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Sample records for phosphorylated creb torc2

  1. A Positive Feedback Loop between Akt and mTORC2 via SIN1 Phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Guang; Murashige, Danielle S; Humphrey, Sean J; James, David E

    2015-08-11

    The mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 2 (mTORC2) regulates cell survival and cytoskeletal organization by phosphorylating its AGC kinase substrates; however, little is known about the regulation of mTORC2 itself. It was previously reported that Akt phosphorylates the mTORC2 subunit SIN1 at T86, activating mTORC2 through a positive feedback loop, though another study reported that S6K phosphorylates SIN1 at the same site, inhibiting mTORC2 activity. We performed extensive analysis of SIN1 phosphorylation upon inhibition of Akt, S6K, and mTOR under diverse cellular contexts, and we found that, in all cell lines and conditions studied, Akt is the major kinase responsible for SIN1 phosphorylation. These findings refine the activation mechanism of the Akt-mTORC2 signaling branch as follows: PDK1 phosphorylates Akt at T308, increasing Akt kinase activity. Akt phosphorylates SIN1 at T86, enhancing mTORC2 kinase activity, which leads to phosphorylation of Akt S473 by mTORC2, thereby catalyzing full activation of Akt.

  2. Inhibition of Rb Phosphorylation Leads to mTORC2-Mediated Activation of Akt.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jinfang; Xu, Kai; Liu, Pengda; Geng, Yan; Wang, Bin; Gan, Wenjian; Guo, Jianping; Wu, Fei; Chin, Y Rebecca; Berrios, Christian; Lien, Evan C; Toker, Alex; DeCaprio, James A; Sicinski, Piotr; Wei, Wenyi

    2016-06-16

    The retinoblastoma (Rb) protein exerts its tumor suppressor function primarily by inhibiting the E2F family of transcription factors that govern cell-cycle progression. However, it remains largely elusive whether the hyper-phosphorylated, non-E2F1-interacting form of Rb has any physiological role. Here we report that hyper-phosphorylated Rb directly binds to and suppresses the function of mTORC2 but not mTORC1. Mechanistically, Rb, but not p107 or p130, interacts with Sin1 and blocks the access of Akt to mTORC2, leading to attenuated Akt activation and increased sensitivity to chemotherapeutic drugs. As such, inhibition of Rb phosphorylation by depleting cyclin D or using CDK4/6 inhibitors releases Rb-mediated mTORC2 suppression. This, in turn, leads to elevated Akt activation to confer resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs in Rb-proficient cells, which can be attenuated with Akt inhibitors. Therefore, our work provides a molecular basis for the synergistic usage of CDK4/6 and Akt inhibitors in treating Rb-proficient cancer.

  3. TORC1 and TORC2 work together to regulate ribosomal protein S6 phosphorylation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Yerlikaya, Seda; Meusburger, Madeleine; Kumari, Romika; Huber, Alexandre; Anrather, Dorothea; Costanzo, Michael; Boone, Charles; Ammerer, Gustav; Baranov, Pavel V.; Loewith, Robbie

    2016-01-01

    Nutrient-sensitive phosphorylation of the S6 protein of the 40S subunit of the eukaryote ribosome is highly conserved. However, despite four decades of research, the functional consequences of this modification remain unknown. Revisiting this enigma in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we found that the regulation of Rps6 phosphorylation on Ser-232 and Ser-233 is mediated by both TOR complex 1 (TORC1) and TORC2. TORC1 regulates phosphorylation of both sites via the poorly characterized AGC-family kinase Ypk3 and the PP1 phosphatase Glc7, whereas TORC2 regulates phosphorylation of only the N-terminal phosphosite via Ypk1. Cells expressing a nonphosphorylatable variant of Rps6 display a reduced growth rate and a 40S biogenesis defect, but these phenotypes are not observed in cells in which Rps6 kinase activity is compromised. Furthermore, using polysome profiling and ribosome profiling, we failed to uncover a role of Rps6 phosphorylation in either global translation or translation of individual mRNAs. Taking the results together, this work depicts the signaling cascades orchestrating Rps6 phosphorylation in budding yeast, challenges the notion that Rps6 phosphorylation plays a role in translation, and demonstrates that observations made with Rps6 knock-ins must be interpreted cautiously. PMID:26582391

  4. Hydrophobic motif site-phosphorylated protein kinase CβII between mTORC2 and Akt regulates high glucose-induced mesangial cell hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Das, Falguni; Ghosh-Choudhury, Nandini; Mariappan, Meenalakshmi M; Kasinath, Balakuntalam S; Choudhury, Goutam Ghosh

    2016-04-01

    PKCβII controls the pathologic features of diabetic nephropathy, including glomerular mesangial cell hypertrophy. PKCβII contains the COOH-terminal hydrophobic motif site Ser-660. Whether this hydrophobic motif phosphorylation contributes to high glucose-induced mesangial cell hypertrophy has not been determined. Here we show that, in mesangial cells, high glucose increased phosphorylation of PKCβII at Ser-660 in a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-kinase)-dependent manner. Using siRNAs to downregulate PKCβII, dominant negative PKCβII, and PKCβII hydrophobic motif phosphorylation-deficient mutant, we found that PKCβII regulates activation of mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) and mesangial cell hypertrophy by high glucose. PKCβII via its phosphorylation at Ser-660 regulated phosphorylation of Akt at both catalytic loop and hydrophobic motif sites, resulting in phosphorylation and inactivation of its substrate PRAS40. Specific inhibition of mTORC2 increased mTORC1 activity and induced mesangial cell hypertrophy. In contrast, inhibition of mTORC2 decreased the phosphorylation of PKCβII and Akt, leading to inhibition of PRAS40 phosphorylation and mTORC1 activity and prevented mesangial cell hypertrophy in response to high glucose; expression of constitutively active Akt or mTORC1 restored mesangial cell hypertrophy. Moreover, constitutively active PKCβII reversed the inhibition of high glucose-stimulated Akt phosphorylation and mesangial cell hypertrophy induced by suppression of mTORC2. Finally, using renal cortexes from type 1 diabetic mice, we found that increased phosphorylation of PKCβII at Ser-660 was associated with enhanced Akt phosphorylation and mTORC1 activation. Collectively, our findings identify a signaling route connecting PI3-kinase to mTORC2 to phosphorylate PKCβII at the hydrophobic motif site necessary for Akt phosphorylation and mTORC1 activation, leading to mesangial cell hypertrophy.

  5. Involvement of Phosphorylated "Apis Mellifera" CREB in Gating a Honeybee's Behavioral Response to an External Stimulus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gehring, Katrin B.; Heufelder, Karin; Feige, Janina; Bauer, Paul; Dyck, Yan; Ehrhardt, Lea; Kühnemund, Johannes; Bergmann, Anja; Göbel, Josefine; Isecke, Marlene; Eisenhardt, Dorothea

    2016-01-01

    The transcription factor cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB) is involved in neuronal plasticity. Phosphorylation activates CREB and an increased level of phosphorylated CREB is regarded as an indicator of CREB-dependent transcriptional activation. In honeybees ("Apis mellifera") we recently demonstrated a particular high…

  6. TORC2 regulates germinal center repression of the TCL1 oncoprotein to promote B cell development and inhibit transformation.

    PubMed

    Kuraishy, Ali I; French, Samuel W; Sherman, Mara; Herling, Marco; Jones, Dan; Wall, Randolph; Teitell, Michael A

    2007-06-12

    Aberrant expression of the TCL1 oncoprotein promotes malignant transformation of germinal center (GC) B cells. Repression of TCL1 in GC B cells facilitates FAS-mediated apoptosis and prevents lymphoma formation. However, the mechanism for this repression is unknown. Here we show that the CREB coactivator TORC2 directly regulates TCL1 expression independent of CREB Ser-133 phosphorylation and CBP/p300 recruitment. GC signaling through CD40 or the BCR, which activates pCREB-dependent genes, caused TORC2 phosphorylation, cytosolic emigration, and TCL1 repression. Signaling via cAMP-inducible pathways inhibited TCL1 repression and reduced apoptosis, consistent with a prosurvival role for TCL1 before GC selection and supporting an initiating role for aberrant TCL1 expression during GC lymphomagenesis. Our data indicate that a novel CREB/TORC2 regulatory mode controls the normal program of GC gene activation and repression that promotes B cell development and circumvents oncogenic progression. Our results also reconcile a paradox in which signals that activate pCREB/CBP/p300 genes concurrently repress TCL1 to initiate its silencing.

  7. mTORC2-PKBα/Akt1 Serine 473 phosphorylation axis is essential for regulation of FOXP3 Stability by chemokine CCL3 in psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ling; Wu, Jinjin; Pier, Eric; Zhao, Yun; Shen, Zhu

    2013-02-01

    The connection between infections and acute guttate psoriasis (AGP) outbreaks/chronic plaque psoriasis (CPP) exacerbation has been known for years. Impaired function of FOXP3+Tregs in psoriasis has been identified. However, the mechanisms behind these two observations have not been fully interpreted. In the present study, we provide evidence to support chemokine CCL3 as one of the vital links between infections and FOXP3 stability in the psoriatic microenvironment. We found that serum CCL3, strongly induced by microorganism infections including streptococcus, was closely correlated with FOXP3 levels in CD4+CD25+T cells of patients with psoriasis. CCL3 manipulated FOXP3 stability in a concentration-dependent bidirectional manner. High-concentration CCL3 decreased FOXP3 stability by promoting FOXP3's degradation through K48-linkage ubiquitination. This degradation was mainly dependent on upregulation of Serine 473 phosphorylation of the PKBα/Akt1 isoform, and almost independent of mTORC1 (mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1) activity. On the other hand, low-concentration CCL3 could enhance FOXP3 stability by the maintenance of the PKC pathway and the restriction of the PKB/Akt pathway. We further demonstrated that enhancing FOXP3 stability by low-concentration CCL3 attributed, at least partly, to the prevention of cytoplasmic Sin1, a vital component of mTORC2, nuclear translocation. Our results suggest vital roles for CCL3-mTORC2-isoform PKB/Akt1 S473 phosphorylation axis in FOXP3+Tregs and the development of psoriasis.

  8. Serine 133 Phosphorylation Is Not Required for Hippocampal CREB-Mediated Transcription and Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brian, Lisa A.; Lee, Bridgin G.; Lelay, John; Kaestner, Klaus H.; Blendy, Julie A.

    2015-01-01

    The cAMP response element (CRE)-binding protein, CREB, is a transcription factor whose activity in the brain is critical for long-term memory formation. Phosphorylation of Ser133 in the kinase-inducible domain (KID), that in turn leads to the recruitment of the transcriptional coactivator CREB-binding protein (CBP), is thought to mediate the…

  9. Proliferation of hepatic stellate cells is inhibited by phosphorylation of CREB on serine 133.

    PubMed Central

    Houglum, K; Lee, K S; Chojkier, M

    1997-01-01

    Proliferating, activated, hepatic stellate cells have a high level of collagen type I expression. Therefore, stellate cell proliferation is a critical step in hepatic fibrosis. Here we show that proliferation of activated primary rat stellate cells was blocked by elevation of cAMP with 8 Br-cAMP or isomethylbutyl xanthine, a phosphodiesterase inhibitor, and by stimulation of Ca2+ fluxes with the Ca2+ ionophore A-23187. Because phosphorylation of CREB on Ser133 is an important mediator of cAMP-protein kinase (PKA) and Ca2+-calmodulin kinase II (CAMK-II) activation, we tested whether CREB-PSer133 was essential for stellate cell quiescence. Nuclear extracts from quiescent, but not from activated, stellate cells contained CREB-PSer133. Moreover, the phosphorylation of CREB on Ser133 was stimulated in activated cells by inducing the activity of PKA or CAMK-II. In addition, coexpression of CREB and either a constitutively active PKA or a constitutively active CAMK-II inhibited the proliferation of activated stellate cells. In contrast, expression of CREB alone, PKA or CAMK-II alone, CREB-Ala 133 (which lacks the Ser133 phosphoacceptor) with PKA or CAMK-II, or CREB with inactive PKA or CAMK-II mutants did not affect stellate cell proliferation, suggesting that CREB-PSer133 is necessary for blocking the stellate cell cycle. Conversely, expression of a trans-dominant negative CREB-Ala 133 mutant (which competes with CREB/CREB-PSer133 for cognate DNA binding sites and presumably for protein interactions) induced a greater than fivefold entry into S-phase of quiescent stellate cells, compared with control cells expressing either beta-galactosidase or wt CREB, indicating that CREB-PSer133 may be indispensable for the quiescent stellate cell phenotype. This study suggests that PKA and CAMK-II play an essential role on stellate cell activation through the induction of CREB phosphorylation on Ser133, and provides potential approaches for the treatment of hepatic fibrogenesis in

  10. Enhanced CREB phosphorylation in immature dentate gyrus granule cells precedes neurotrophin expression and indicates a specific role of CREB in granule cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Bender, R. A.; Lauterborn, J. C.; Gall, C. M.; Cariaga, W.; Baram, T. Z.

    2011-01-01

    Differentiation and maturation of dentate gyrus granule cells requires coordinated interactions of numerous processes. These must be regulated by protein factors capable of integrating signals mediated through diverse signalling pathways. Such integrators of inter and intracellular physiological stimuli include the cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB), a leucine-zipper class transcription factor that is activated through phosphorylation. Neuronal activity and neurotrophic factors, known to be involved in granule cell differentiation, are major physiologic regulators of CREB function. To examine whether CREB may play a role in governing coordinated gene transcription during granule cell differentiation, we determined the spatial and temporal profiles of phosphorylated (activated) CREB throughout postnatal development in immature rat hippocampus. We demonstrate that CREB activation is confined to discrete, early stages of granule cell differentiation. In addition, CREB phosphorylation occurs prior to expression of the neurotrophins BDNF and NT-3. These data indicate that in a signal transduction cascade connecting CREB and neurotrophins in the process of granule cell maturation, CREB is located upstream of neurotrophins. Importantly, CREB may be a critical component of the machinery regulating the coordinated transcription of genes contributing to the differentiation of granule cells and their integration into the dentate gyrus network. PMID:11207803

  11. Impairment of Memory Consolidation by Galanin Correlates with In-Vivo Inhibition of Both LTP and CREB Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Kinney, Jefferson W.; Sanchez-Alavez, Manuel; Barr, Alasdair M.; Criado, Jose R.; Crawley, Jacqueline N.; Behrens, M. Margarita; Henriksen, Steven J.; Bartfai, Tamas

    2009-01-01

    Changes in the state of CREB phosphorylation and in LTP in the hippocampus have been associated with learning and memory. Here we show that galanin, the neuropeptide released in the hippocampal formation from cholinergic and noradrenergic fibers, that has been shown to produce impairments in memory consolidation in the Morris water maze task inhibits both LTP and CREB phosphorylation in the rat hippocampus in-vivo. While there are many transmitters regulating CREB phosphorylation none has been shown to suppress behaviorally-induced hippocampal CREB phosphorylation as potently as galanin. The in-vivo inhibition of dentate gyrus-LTP and of CREB phosphorylation by the agonist occupancy of GalR1 and GALR2-type galanin receptors provides strong in-vivo cellular and molecular correlates to galanin-induced learning deficits and designates galanin as a major regulator of the memory consolidation process. PMID:19531380

  12. Abundance of phosphorylated Apis mellifera CREB in the honeybee's mushroom body inner compact cells varies with age.

    PubMed

    Gehring, Katrin B; Heufelder, Karin; Kersting, Isabella; Eisenhardt, Dorothea

    2016-04-15

    Hymenopteran eusociality has been proposed to be associated with the activity of the transcription factor CREB (cAMP-response element binding protein). The honeybee (Apis mellifera) is a eusocial insect displaying a pronounced age-dependent division of labor. In honeybee brains, CREB-dependent genes are regulated in an age-dependent manner, indicating that there might be a role for neuronal honeybee CREB (Apis mellifera CREB, or AmCREB) in the bee's division of labor. In this study, we further explore this hypothesis by asking where in the honeybee brain AmCREB-dependent processes might take place and whether they vary with age in these brain regions. CREB is activated following phosphorylation at a conserved serine residue. An increase of phosphorylated CREB is therefore regarded as an indicator of CREB-dependent transcriptional activation. Thus, we here examine the localization of phosphorylated AmCREB (pAmCREB) in the brain and its age-dependent variability. We report prominent pAmCREB staining in a subpopulation of intrinsic neurons of the mushroom bodies. In these neurons, the inner compact cells (IC), pAmCREB is located in the nuclei, axons, and dendrites. In the central bee brain, the IC somata and their dendritic region, we observed an age-dependent increase of pAmCREB. Our results demonstrate the IC to be candidate neurons involved in age-dependent division of labor. We hypothesize that the IC display a high level of CREB-dependent transcription that might be related to neuronal and behavioral plasticity underlying a bee's foraging behavior.

  13. Phosphorylation and SCF-mediated degradation regulate CREB-H transcription of metabolic targets

    PubMed Central

    Barbosa, Sónia; Carreira, Suzanne; Bailey, Daniel; Abaitua, Fernando; O'Hare, Peter

    2015-01-01

    CREB‑H, an endoplasmic reticulum–anchored transcription factor, plays a key role in regulating secretion and in metabolic and inflammatory pathways, but how its activity is modulated remains unclear. We examined processing of the nuclear active form and identified a motif around S87–S90 with homology to DSG-type phosphodegrons. We show that this region is subject to multiple phosphorylations, which regulate CREB-H stability by targeting it to the SCFFbw1a E3 ubiquitin ligase. Data from phosphatase treatment, use of phosophospecific antibody, and substitution of serine residues demonstrate phosphorylation of candidate serines in the region, with the core S87/S90 motif representing a critical determinant promoting proteasome-mediated degradation. Candidate kinases CKII and GSK-3b phosphorylate CREB-H in vitro with specificities for different serines. Prior phosphorylation with GSK-3 at one or more of the adjacent serines substantially increases S87/S90-dependent phosphorylation by CKII. In vivo expression of a dominant-negative Cul1 enhances steady-state levels of CREB‑H, an effect augmented by Fbw1a. CREB-H directly interacts with Fbw1a in a phosphorylation-dependent manner. Finally, mutations within the phosphodegron, when incorporated into the full-length protein, result in increased levels of constitutively cleaved nuclear protein and increased transcription and secretion of a key endogenous target gene, apolipoprotein A IV. PMID:26108621

  14. Effect of delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol on phosphorylated CREB in rat cerebellum: an immunohistochemical study.

    PubMed

    Casu, Maria Antonietta; Pisu, Carla; Sanna, Angela; Tambaro, Simone; Spada, Gabriele Pinna; Mongeau, Raymond; Pani, Luca

    2005-06-28

    Several converging lines of evidence indicate that drugs of abuse may exert their long-term effects on the central nervous system by modulating signaling pathways controlling gene expression. Cannabinoids produce, beside locomotor effects, cognitive impairment through central CB1 cannabinoid receptors. Data clearly indicate that the cerebellum, an area enriched with CB1 receptors, has a role not only in motor function but also in cognition. This immunohistochemical study examines the effect of delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta9-THC), the principal psychoactive component of marijuana, on the levels of phosphorylated CREB (p-CREB) in the rat cerebellum. Acute treatments with delta9-THC at doses of 5 or 10 mg/kg induced a significant increase of p-CREB in the granule cell layer of the cerebellum, an effect blocked by the CB1 receptor antagonist SR 141716A. Following chronic delta9-THC administration (10 mg/kg/day for 4 weeks), the density of p-CREB was markedly attenuated compared to controls, and this attenuation persisted 3 weeks after withdrawal from delta9-THC. These data provide evidence for the involvement of cerebellar granule cells in the adaptive changes occurring during acute and chronic delta9-THC exposure. This might be a mechanism by which delta9-THC interferes with motor and cognitive functions.

  15. Protein kinase A-mediated CREB phosphorylation is an oxidant-induced survival pathway in alveolar type II cells

    PubMed Central

    Barlow, Christy A.; Kitiphongspattana, Kajorn; Siddiqui, Nazli; Roe, Michael W.; Mossman, Brooke T.

    2008-01-01

    Oxidant stress plays a role in the pathogenesis of pulmonary diseases, including fibrotic lung disease and cancer. We previously found that hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) initiates an increase in Ca2+/cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB) phosphorylation in C10 alveolar type II cells that requires activation of extracellular regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2). Here, we investigated the role of crosstalk between protein kinase A (PKA) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in oxidant-induced signaling to ERK1/2 and CREB in C10 cells. Application of H2O2 increased nuclear accumulation of PKA, and inhibition of PKA with H89 reduced oxidant-mediated phosphorylation of both CREB and ERK1/2. Single cell measurements of cAMP and redox status, using a FRET-based biosensor and a redox-sensitive GFP, respectively, indicated that H2O2 increases production of cAMP that correlates with redox state. Inhibition of EGFR activity decreased both H2O2-induced CREB phosphorylation and translocation of PKA to the nucleus, suggesting that crosstalk between PKA and EGFR underlies the oxidant-induced CREB response. Furthermore, knockdown of CREB expression using siRNA led to a decrease in bcl-2 and an increase in oxidant-induced apoptosis. Together these data reveal a novel role for crosstalk between PKA, ERK1/2 and CREB that mediates cell survival during oxidant stress. PMID:18392938

  16. Chronic morphine administration induces over-expression of aldolase C with reduction of CREB phosphorylation in the mouse hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hai-Yu; Pu, Xiao-Ping

    2009-05-01

    In recent studies, alterations in the activity and expression of metabolic enzymes, such as those involved in glycolysis, have been detected in morphine-dependent patients and animals. Increasing evidence demonstrates that the hippocampus is an important brain region associated with morphine dependence, but the molecular events occurring in the hippocampus following chronic exposure to morphine are poorly understood. Aldolase C is the brain-specific isoform of fructose-1, 6-bisphosphate aldolase which is a glycolytic enzyme catalyzing reactions in the glycolytic, gluconeogenic, and fructose metabolic pathways. Using Western blot and immunofluorescence assays, we found the expression of aldolase C was markedly increased in the mouse hippocampus following chronic morphine treatment. Naloxone pretreatment before morphine administration suppressed withdrawal jumping, weight loss, and overexpression of aldolase C. CREB is a transcription factor regulated through phosphorylation on Ser133, which is known to play a key role in the mechanism of morphine dependence. When detecting the expression of phosphorylated CREB (p-CREB) in the mouse hippocampus using Western blot and immunohistochemistry, we found CREB phosphorylation was clearly decreased following chronic morphine treatment. Interestingly, laser-confocal microscopy showed that overexpression of aldolase C in mouse hippocampal neurons was concomitant with the decreased immunoreactivity of p-CREB. The results suggest potential links between the morphine-induced alteration of aldolase C and the regulation of CREB phosphorylation, a possible mechanism of morphine dependence.

  17. CREB phosphorylation and melatonin biosynthesis in the rat pineal gland: involvement of cyclic AMP dependent protein kinase type II.

    PubMed

    Maronde, E; Wicht, H; Taskén, K; Genieser, H G; Dehghani, F; Olcese, J; Korf, H W

    1999-10-01

    Phosphorylation of cyclic AMP response element binding protein (CREB) at amino acid serine 133 appears as an important link between the norepinephrine (NE)-induced activation of second messenger systems and the stimulation of melatonin biosynthesis. Here we investigated in the rat pineal gland: 1) the type of protein kinase that mediates CREB phosphorylation: and 2) its impact on melatonin biosynthesis. Immunochemical or immunocytochemical demonstration of serine133-phosphorylated cyclic AMP regulated element binding protein (pCREB) and radioimmunological detection of melatonin revealed that only cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) inhibitors suppressed NE-induced CREB phosphorylation and stimulation of melatonin biosynthesis, whereas inhibitors of cyclic GMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG), mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase, protein kinase C, or calcium-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMK) were ineffective. Investigations with cyclic AMP-agonist pairs that selectively activate either PKA type I or II link NE-induced CREB phosphorylation and stimulation of melatonin biosynthesis to the activation of PKA type II. Our data suggest that PKA type II plays an important role in the transcriptional control of melatonin biosynthesis in the rat pineal organ.

  18. DPPC regulates COX-2 expression in monocytes via phosphorylation of CREB

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, R.H.K. Tonks, A.J.; Jones, K.P.; Ahluwalia, M.K.; Thomas, A.W.; Tonks, A.; Jackson, S.K.

    2008-05-23

    The major phospholipid in pulmonary surfactant dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) has been shown to modulate inflammatory responses. Using human monocytes, this study demonstrates that DPPC significantly increased PGE{sub 2} (P < 0.05) production by 2.5-fold when compared to untreated monocyte controls. Mechanistically, this effect was concomitant with an increase in COX-2 expression which was abrogated in the presence of a COX-2 inhibitor. The regulation of COX-2 expression was independent of NF-{kappa}B activity. Further, DPPC increased the phosphorylation of the cyclic AMP response element binding protein (CREB; an important nuclear transcription factor important in regulating COX-2 expression). In addition, we also show that changing the fatty acid groups of PC (e.g. using L-{alpha}-phosphatidylcholine {beta}-arachidonoyl-{gamma}-palmitoyl (PAPC)) has a profound effect on the regulation of COX-2 expression and CREB activation. This study provides new evidence for the anti-inflammatory activity of DPPC and that this activity is at least in part mediated via CREB activation of COX-2.

  19. Phosphorylation of CREB affects its binding to high and low affinity sites: implications for cAMP induced gene transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, M; Weih, F; Schmid, W; DeVack, C; Kowenz-Leutz, E; Luckow, B; Boshart, M; Schütz, G

    1992-01-01

    Cyclic AMP treatment of hepatoma cells leads to increased protein binding at the cyclic AMP response element (CRE) of the tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT) gene in vivo, as revealed by genomic footprinting, whereas no increase is observed at the CRE of the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) gene. Several criteria establish that the 43 kDa CREB protein is interacting with both of these sites. Two classes of CRE with different affinity for CREB are described. One class, including the TATCRE, is characterized by asymmetric and weak binding sites (CGTCA), whereas the second class containing symmetrical TGACGTCA sites shows a much higher binding affinity for CREB. Both classes show an increase in binding after phosphorylation of CREB by protein kinase A (PKA). An in vivo phosphorylation-dependent change in binding of CREB increases the occupancy of weak binding sites used for transactivation, such as the TATCRE, while high affinity sites may have constitutive binding of transcriptionally active and inactive CREB dimers, as demonstrated by in vivo footprinting at the PEPCK CRE. Thus, lower basal level and higher relative stimulation of transcription by cyclic AMP through low affinity CREs should result, allowing finely tuned control of gene activation. Images PMID:1354612

  20. CYCLIC AMP-DEPENDENT PROTEIN KINASE INDUCTION BY POLYCHLORINATED BIPHENYLS (PCBS) STIMULATES CREB PHOSPHORYLATION VIA A CALCIUM-DEPENDENT, PKC-INDEPENDENT PATHWAY IN CORTICAL NEURONS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have previously demonstrated that the PCB mixture, Aroclor 1254 (A1254), increases the phosphorylated form of CREB (pCREB), the cAMP-responsive element binding protein. This transcription factor is important in nervous system development and plasticity. Phosphorylation
    of C...

  1. CREB Phosphorylation Coincides with Transient Synapse Formation in the Rat Hippocampal Dentate Gyrus Following Avoidance Learning

    PubMed Central

    O'Connell, Cormac; Gallagher, Helen C.; O'Malley, Aoibheinn; Bourke, Mary; Regan, Ciaran M.

    2000-01-01

    Spine density change in the hippocampal dentate gyrus accompanies memory consolidation and coincides with the increased expression of ribosome-rich, hyperchromatic granule cells. Although this suggests increased protein synthesis to be required for synaptic growth in the 5 to 7 h post-training period, little temporal mapping of the associated molecular mechanisms has been done. Here, we demonstrate a similar frequency of hyperchromatic cells in naïve animals and in those sacrificed 6 h post-training, suggesting a transient repression of protein synthesis in the early post-training period. Immunoblot analysis of CREB phosphorylation in the dentate gyrus supported this view, with downregulation from basal levels observed at 2 to 3 h and at 12 h posttraining. Protein synthesis reactivation appears to be specific for de novo spine production as no change in spine frequency accompanies the immediate post-training period of depressed protein synthesis. These findings support the view that CREB-mediated gene transcription is a requirement for long-term memory consolidation and may be directly implicated in the process of synaptic growth. PMID:11486487

  2. A high-fat diet or galanin in the PVN decreases phosphorylation of CREB in the nucleus accumbens

    PubMed Central

    Bocarsly, Miriam E.; Avena, Nicole M.

    2013-01-01

    A high-fat diet (HFD) can increase hypothalamic galanin (GAL). GAL has recently been shown to inhibit opiate reward, which in turn, decreases cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) in the nucleus accumbens (NAc). We hypothesized that injection of GAL into the PVN, or consumption of a HFD, would be associated with a decrease in NAc CREB. In Exp. 1, GAL in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of naïve rats decreased phosphorylated-CREB (pCREB) in the NAc compared to saline injected controls. In Exp. 2, rats fed ad libitum HFD for 4 wks had reduced NAc pCREB levels compared to rats with sporadic tastes of the HFD. Body weight, serum triglyceride and leptin levels were also raised in the chronic HFD-fed rats. These data suggest that PVN GAL or chronic intake of a HFD can decrease NAc pCREB. The implications of these findings may help to explain the lack of opiate-like withdrawal that has been reported in response to overeating a high fat diet, thereby providing a potential mechanism underlying behavioral differences seen with addiction-like overconsumption of different types of palatable foods. PMID:23747305

  3. Selective phosphorylation of nuclear CREB by fluoxetine is linked to activation of CaM kinase IV and MAP kinase cascades.

    PubMed

    Tiraboschi, Ettore; Tardito, Daniela; Kasahara, Jiro; Moraschi, Stefania; Pruneri, Paolo; Gennarelli, Massimo; Racagni, Giorgio; Popoli, Maurizio

    2004-10-01

    Regulation of gene expression is purported as a major component in the long-term action of antidepressants. The transcription factor cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB) is activated by chronic antidepressant treatments, although a number of studies reported different effects on CREB, depending on drug types used and brain areas investigated. Furthermore, little is known as to what signaling cascades are responsible for CREB activation, although cAMP-protein kinase A (PKA) cascade was suggested to be a central player. We investigated how different drugs (fluoxetine (FLX), desipramine (DMI), reboxetine (RBX)) affect CREB expression and phosphorylation of Ser(133) in the hippocampus and prefrontal/frontal cortex (PFCX). Acute treatments did not induce changes in these mechanisms. Chronic FLX increased nuclear phospho-CREB (pCREB) far more markedly than pronoradrenergic drugs, particularly in PFCX. We investigated the function of the main signaling cascades that were shown to phosphorylate and regulate CREB. PKA did not seem to account for the selective increase of pCREB induced by FLX. All drug treatments markedly increased the enzymatic activity of nuclear Ca2+/calmodulin (CaM) kinase IV (CaMKIV), a major neuronal CREB kinase, in PFCX. Activation of this kinase was due to increased phosphorylation of the activatory residue Thr196, with no major changes in the expression levels of alpha- and beta-CaM kinase kinase, enzymes that phosphorylate CaMKIV. Again in PFCX, FLX selectively increased the expression level of MAP kinases Erk1/2, without affecting their phosphorylation. Our results show that FLX exerts a more marked effect on CREB phosphorylation and suggest that CaMKIV and MAP kinase cascades are involved in this effect.

  4. Phosphorylation of CREB and mechanical hyperalgesia is reversed by blockade of the cAMP pathway in a time-dependent manner after repeated intramuscular acid injections.

    PubMed

    Hoeger-Bement, Marie K; Sluka, Kathleen A

    2003-07-02

    Spinal activation of the cAMP pathway produces mechanical hyperalgesia, sensitizes nociceptive spinal neurons, and phosphorylates the transcription factor cAMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB), which initiates gene transcription. This study examined the role of the cAMP pathway in a model of chronic muscle pain by assessing associated behavioral changes and phosphorylation of CREB. Bilateral mechanical hyperalgesia of the paw was induced by administering two injections of acidic saline, 5 d apart, into the gastrocnemius muscle of male Sprague Dawley rats. Interestingly, the increases in immunoreactivity for CREB and phosphorylated CREB (p-CREB) in the spinal dorsal horn occur 24 hr, but not 1 week, after the second injection of acidic saline compared with pH 7.2 intramuscular injections. Spinal blockade of adenylate cyclase prevents the expected increase in p-CREB that occurs after intramuscular acid injection. The reversal of mechanical hyperalgesia by adenylate cyclase or protein kinase A inhibitors spinally follows a similar pattern with reversal at 24 hr, but not 1 week, compared with the vehicle controls. The p-CREB immunoreactivity in the superficial dorsal horn correlates with the mechanical withdrawal threshold such that increases in p-CREB are associated with decreases in threshold. Therefore, activation of the cAMP pathway in the spinal cord phosphorylates CREB and produces mechanical hyperalgesia associated with intramuscular acid injections. The mechanical hyperalgesia and phosphorylation of CREB depend on early activation of the cAMP pathway during the first 24 hr but are independent of the cAMP pathway by 1 week after intramuscular injection of acid.

  5. Nucleotide P2Y13-stimulated phosphorylation of CREB is required for ADP-induced proliferation of late developing retinal glial progenitors in culture.

    PubMed

    Jacques, Flavia Jesus; Silva, Thayane Martins; da Silva, Flavia Emenegilda; Ornelas, Isis Moraes; Ventura, Ana Lucia Marques

    2017-03-24

    Nucleotides stimulate phosphorylation of CREB to induce cell proliferation and survival in diverse cell types. We report here that ADP induces the phosphorylation of CREB in a time- and concentration-dependent manner in chick embryo retinal progenitors in culture. ADP-induced increase in phospho-CREB is mediated by P2 receptors as it is blocked by PPADS but not by the adenosine antagonists DPCPX or ZM241385. Incubation of the cultures with the CREB inhibitor KG-501 prevents ADP-induced incorporation of [(3)H]-thymidine, indicating that CREB is involved in retinal cell proliferation. No effect of this compound is observed on the viability of retinal progenitors. While no significant increase in CREB phosphorylation is observed with the P2Y1 receptor agonist MRS2365, ADP-induced phosphorylation of CREB is blocked by the P2Y13 receptor selective antagonist MRS2211, but not by MRS2179 or PSB0739, two antagonists of the P2Y1 and P2Y12 receptors, respectively, suggesting that ADP-induced CREB phosphorylation is mediated by P2Y13 receptors. ADP-induced increase in phospho-CREB is attenuated by the PI3K inhibitor LY241385 and completely prevented by the MEK inhibitor U0126, suggesting that at least ERK is involved in ADP-induced CREB phosphorylation. A pharmacological profile similar to the activation and inhibition of CREB phosphorylation is observed in the phosphorylation of ERK, suggesting that P2Y13 receptors mediate ADP induced ERK/CREB pathway in the cultures. While no increase in [(3)H]-thymidine incorporation is observed with the P2Y1 receptor agonist MRS2365, both MRS2179 and MRS2211 prevent ADP-mediated increase in [(3)H]-thymidine incorporation, but not progenitor's survival, suggesting that both P2Y1 and P2Y13 receptor subtypes are involved in ADP-induced cell proliferation. P2Y1 receptor-mediated increase in [Ca(2+)]i is observed in glial cells only when cultures maintained for 9days are used. In glia from cultures cultivated for only 2days, no increase in [Ca

  6. EPINEPHRINE AND GLUCOSE MODULATE TRAINING-RELATED CREB PHOSPHORYLATION IN OLD RATS: RELATIONSHIPS TO AGE-RELATED MEMORY IMPAIRMENTS

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Ken A.; Gold, Paul E.

    2012-01-01

    Epinephrine enhances memory in young adult rats, in part, by increasing blood glucose levels needed to modulate memory. In old rats, epinephrine is deficient at raising blood glucose levels and thus is only moderately effective at enhancing memory. In contrast, systemic glucose injections improve memory in old rats, with resulting memory performance equal to that of young rats. The diminished response of glucose to training in old rats may blunt downstream neurochemical and molecular mechanisms needed to upregulate memory processes. In the first experiment, young adult and old rats were trained on an inhibitory avoidance task with immediate post-training injections of aCSF or glucose into the dorsal hippocampus. Old rats had significant memory impairments compared to young rats 7 days after training. Intrahippocampal injections of glucose reversed age-related deficits, improving memory scores in old rats to values seen in young rats. A second experiment examined age-related changes in activation of the transcription factor CREB, which is widely implicated in memory formation and may act downstream of hormonal and metabolic signals. Activation was assessed in response to training with systemic injections of epinephrine and glucose at doses known to enhance memory. Young adult and old rats were trained on inhibitory avoidance with immediate post-training systemic injections of saline, epinephrine, or glucose. After training, old rats had significant impairments in CREB phosphorylation in area CA1 and the dentate gyrus region of the hippocampus, and in the basolateral and lateral amygdala. Epinephrine and glucose attenuated age-related deficits in CREB phosphorylation, but were more effective in the amygdala and hippocampus, respectively. Together, these results support the view that age-related changes in blood glucose responses to epinephrine contribute to memory impairments, which may be related to alterations in regional patterns of CREB phosphorylation. PMID

  7. Epinephrine and glucose modulate training-related CREB phosphorylation in old rats: relationships to age-related memory impairments.

    PubMed

    Morris, Ken A; Gold, Paul E

    2013-02-01

    Epinephrine enhances memory in young adult rats, in part, by increasing blood glucose levels needed to modulate memory. In old rats, epinephrine is deficient at raising blood glucose levels and thus is only moderately effective at enhancing memory. In contrast, systemic glucose injections improve memory in old rats, with resulting memory performance equal to that of young rats. The diminished response of glucose to training in old rats may blunt downstream neurochemical and molecular mechanisms needed to upregulate memory processes. In the first experiment, young adult and old rats were trained on an inhibitory avoidance task with immediate post-training injections of aCSF or glucose into the dorsal hippocampus. Old rats had significant memory impairments compared to young rats 7 days after training. Intrahippocampal injections of glucose reversed age-related deficits, improving memory scores in old rats to values seen in young rats. A second experiment examined age-related changes in activation of the transcription factor CREB, which is widely implicated in memory formation and may act downstream of hormonal and metabolic signals. Activation was assessed in response to training with systemic injections of epinephrine and glucose at doses known to enhance memory. Young adult and old rats were trained on inhibitory avoidance with immediate post-training systemic injections of saline, epinephrine, or glucose. After training, old rats had significant impairments in CREB phosphorylation in area CA1 and the dentate gyrus region of the hippocampus, and in the basolateral and lateral amygdala. Epinephrine and glucose attenuated age-related deficits in CREB phosphorylation, but were more effective in the amygdala and hippocampus, respectively. Together, these results support the view that age-related changes in blood glucose responses to epinephrine contribute to memory impairments, which may be related to alterations in regional patterns of CREB phosphorylation.

  8. CaMKII-Mediated CREB Phosphorylation Is Involved in Ca2+-Induced BDNF mRNA Transcription and Neurite Outgrowth Promoted by Electrical Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Zhengxu; Huang, Jinghui; He, Fei; Xiao, Wei; Hu, Xueyu; Luo, Zhuojing

    2016-01-01

    Electrical stimulation (ES)-triggered up-regulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and neurite outgrowth in cultured rat postnatal dorsal root ganglion neurons (DRGNs) is calcium (Ca2+)-dependent. The effects of increased Ca2+ on BDNF up-regulation and neurite outgrowth remain unclear. We showed here that ES increased phosphorylation of the cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB). Blockade of Ca2+ suppressed CREB phosphorylation and neurite outgrowth. Down-regulation of phosphorylated (p)-CREB reduced BDNF transcription and neurite outgrowth triggered by ES. Furthermore, blockade of calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) using the inhibitors KN93 or KN62 reduced p-CREB, and specific knockdown of the CaMKIIα or CaMKIIβ subunit was sufficient to suppress p-CREB. Recombinant BDNF or hyperforin reversed the effects of Ca2+ blockade and CaMKII knockdown. Taken together, these data establish a potential signaling pathway of Ca2+-CaMKII-CREB in neuronal activation. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the mechanisms of Ca2+-dependent BDNF transcription and neurite outgrowth triggered by ES. These findings might help further investigation of complex molecular signaling networks in ES-triggered nerve regeneration in vivo. PMID:27611779

  9. Cadmium up-regulates transcription of the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) gene through phosphorylated CREB rather than SF-1 in K28 cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Soo-Yun; Gomes, Cynthia; Oh, Sung-Dug; Soh, Jaemog

    2015-04-01

    Cadmium is a widely used heavy metal in industry and affects the male reproductive system of animals, including humans, as a result of occupational and environmental exposures. However, the molecular mechanism underlying its effect on steroidogenesis in gonads remains unclear. In this study, we demonstrated that exposure of K28 mouse testicular Leydig tumor cells to cadmium led to a significant increase in the mRNA level, promoter activity and protein level of the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR), an essential factor for steroid biosynthesis. It has been well documented that StAR gene transcription is regulated by multiple transcription factors, including cAMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB) family members and SF-1. Cadmium treatment caused an increase in CREB phosphorylation but did not alter the CREB protein level in the nucleus. EMSA studies revealed that cadmium-induced phosphorylated CREB formed specific complexes with the proximal region of the StAR gene promoter. Furthermore, co-transfection with a CREB expression plasmid significantly increased cadmium-induced StAR promoter activity. However, the nuclear level and the affinity of SF-1 protein for the StAR proximal promoter were dramatically decreased upon exposure to cadmium. Taken together, these results suggest that cadmium up-regulates StAR gene expression through phosphorylated CREB rather than through SF-1 in mouse testicular Leydig cells.

  10. MFN2 suppresses cancer progression through inhibition of mTORC2/Akt signaling

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ke; Chen, Guo; Li, Xiaobo; Wu, Xiaoqin; Chang, Zhijie; Xu, Jianhua; Zhu, Yu; Yin, Peihao; Liang, Xin; Dong, Lei

    2017-01-01

    The mitochondrial GTPase mitofusin-2 (MFN2) has previously been reported to play a role in regulating cell proliferation, apoptosis and differentiation in a number of cell types. Here, we report that breast cancer patients with low MFN2 expression are associated with poor prognosis as compared to patients with high MFN2 expression. We find that MFN2 knockout from MCF7 and A549 cells via Crispr/Cas9 greatly promotes cell viability, colony formation, and invasion of cancer cells in vitro and in vivo, which were confirmed by colony formation assay, transwell invasion assay, and tumor xenograft model. Signaling analyses suggest the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 2 (mTORC2)/Akt signaling pathway is highly elevated in MFN2 knockout cancer cells. The elevated mTORC2 promotes cancer cell growth and metastasis via AktS437 phosphorylation mediated signaling pathway. Mechanistic studies reveal that MFN2 suppresses mTORC2 through direct interaction by binding its domain HR1. Inhibition of mTORC2 significantly suppresses MFN2 deficient tumor growth. Collectively, this study provides novel insights into the tumor progression associated with MFN2 deficiency and suggests that the importance of mTORC2 inhibitor in the treatment of MFN2 downregulated cancer patients. PMID:28176801

  11. Reduced CREB phosphorylation after chronic lithium treatment is associated with down-regulation of CaM kinase IV in rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Tardito, Daniela; Tiraboschi, Ettore; Kasahara, Jiro; Racagni, Giorgio; Popoli, Maurizio

    2007-08-01

    Lithium is widely used in the treatment of bipolar disorder, although its mechanism of action is not fully clear. This study was undertaken to assess the effects of prolonged lithium administration on cAMP responsive element-binding protein (CREB) phosphorylation and CaM kinase IV (CaMKIV), one of the main kinases phosphorylating CREB in neurons following synaptic activation. CREB total protein expression and phosphorylation (Ser133), as well as CaMKIV enzymatic activity, phosphorylation of Thr196 (the activator residue) and kinase expression level were assessed in total homogenates and nuclei from the hippocampus and prefrontal/frontal cortex following 5 wk lithium treatment. Whereas no significant effects were found in prefrontal/frontal cortex, lithium administration reduced CREB phosphorylation and at the same time down-regulated CaMKIV (enzymatic activity, phospho-Thr196 and protein expression level) in cell nuclei from the hippocampus. These data suggest for the first time the involvement of CaMKIV in the mechanism of action of lithium.

  12. CREB phosphorylation regulates striatal transcriptional responses in the self-administration model of methamphetamine addiction in the rat.

    PubMed

    Krasnova, Irina N; Chiflikyan, Margarit; Justinova, Zuzana; McCoy, Michael T; Ladenheim, Bruce; Jayanthi, Subramaniam; Quintero, Cynthia; Brannock, Christie; Barnes, Chanel; Adair, Jordan E; Lehrmann, Elin; Kobeissy, Firas H; Gold, Mark S; Becker, Kevin G; Goldberg, Steven R; Cadet, Jean Lud

    2013-10-01

    Neuroplastic changes in the dorsal striatum participate in the transition from casual to habitual drug use and might play a critical role in the development of methamphetamine (METH) addiction. We examined the influence of METH self-administration on gene and protein expression that may form substrates for METH-induced neuronal plasticity in the dorsal striatum. Male Sprague-Dawley rats self-administered METH (0.1mg/kg/injection, i.v.) or received yoked saline infusions during eight 15-h sessions and were euthanized 2h, 24h, or 1month after cessation of METH exposure. Changes in gene and protein expression were assessed using microarray analysis, RT-PCR and Western blots. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) followed by PCR was used to examine epigenetic regulation of METH-induced transcription. METH self-administration caused increases in mRNA expression of the transcription factors, c-fos and fosb, the neurotrophic factor, Bdnf, and the synaptic protein, synaptophysin (Syp) in the dorsal striatum. METH also caused changes in ΔFosB, BDNF and TrkB protein levels, with increases after 2 and 24h, but decreases after 1month of drug abstinence. Importantly, ChIP-PCR showed that METH self-administration caused enrichment of phosphorylated CREB (pCREB), but not of histone H3 trimethylated at lysine 4 (H3K4me3), on promoters of c-fos, fosb, Bdnf and Syp at 2h after cessation of drug intake. These findings show that METH-induced changes in gene expression are mediated, in part, by pCREB-dependent epigenetic phenomena. Thus, METH self-administration might trigger epigenetic changes that mediate alterations in expression of genes and proteins serving as substrates for addiction-related synaptic plasticity.

  13. GHRP-6 induces CREB phosphorylation and growth hormone secretion via a protein kinase Csigma-dependent pathway in GH3 cells.

    PubMed

    Tian, Chunlei; Ye, Fei; Xu, Tongjiang; Wang, Sheng; Wang, Xiaodan; Wang, Heping; Wan, Feng; Lei, Ting

    2010-04-01

    This study examined the effect of GHRP-6, a known GHSs receptor agonist, on the phosphorylation of cAMP-responsive element-binding protein (CREB) and the underly mechanism. GH3 cells were cultured and subjected to different treatments as follows: GHRP-6, GHRP-6 plus GHRH, phorbol ester (PMA), an activator of PKC, alone or in combination with GHRP-6, Gö6983, a general inhibitor of PKCs, in the presence or absence of GHRP-6, rottlerin, an inhibitor of PKCs, alone or plus GHRP-6. The cells were transiently transfected with PKCsigma-specific siRNA and then treated with GHRP-6. GH level was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The expression of phosphor-CREB, PKCsigma, PKCtheta and phosphor-PKCsigma was determined by Western blotting. The results showed that GHRP-6 stimulated GH secretion in both time- and dose-dependent manners and enhanced the effect of GHRH on GH secretion. GHRP-6 was also found to induce CREB phosphorylation. Moreover, GH secretion was enhanced by the PKC activator PMA and reduced by the PKC inhibitors (Gö6983, rottlerin) and knockdown of PKCsigma. PKCsigma could be activated by GHRP-6. It is concluded that PKC, especially PKCsigma, mediates CREB phosphorylation and GHRP-6-induced GH secretion.

  14. mTORC2 Is Required for Rit-Mediated Oxidative Stress Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Weikang; Andres, Douglas A.

    2014-01-01

    Rit, a member of the Ras family of GTPases, has been shown to promote cell survival in response to oxidative stress, in part by directing an evolutionarily conserved p38 MAPK-Akt survival cascade. Aberrant Rit signaling has recently been implicated as a driver mutation in human cancer, adding importance to the characterization of critical Rit effector pathways. However, the mechanism by which Rit-p38 signaling regulated Akt activity was unknown. Here, we identify mTORC2 as a critical downstream mediator of Rit-dependent survival signaling in response to reactive oxygen species (ROS) stress. Rit interacts with Sin1 (MAPKAP1), and Rit loss compromises ROS-dependent mTORC2 complex activation, blunting mTORC2-mediated phosphorylation of Akt kinase. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that the p38/mTORC2/Akt signaling cascade mediates Rit-dependent oxidative stress survival. Inhibition of this previously unrecognized cascade should be explored as a potential therapy of Rit-dependent malignancies. PMID:25531880

  15. CP-154,526 Modifies CREB Phosphorylation and Thioredoxin-1 Expression in the Dentate Gyrus following Morphine-Induced Conditioned Place Preference.

    PubMed

    García-Carmona, Juan-Antonio; Camejo, Daymi M; Almela, Pilar; Jiménez, Ana; Milanés, María-Victoria; Sevilla, Francisca; Laorden, María-Luisa

    2015-01-01

    Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) acts as neuro-regulator of the behavioral and emotional integration of environmental and endogenous stimuli associated with drug dependence. Thioredoxin-1 (Trx-1) is a functional protein controlling the redox status of several proteins, which is involved in addictive processes. In the present study, we have evaluated the role of CRF1 receptor (CRF1R) in the rewarding properties of morphine by using the conditioned place preference (CPP) paradigm. We also investigate the effects of the CRF1R antagonist, CP-154,526, on the morphine CPP-induced activation of CRF neurons, CREB phosphorylation and Trx expression in paraventricular nucleus (PVN) and dentate gyrus (DG) of the mice brain. CP-154,526 abolished the acquisition of morphine CPP and the increase of CRF/pCREB positive neurons in PVN. Moreover, this CRF1R antagonist prevented morphine-induced CRF-immunoreactive fibers in DG, as well as the increase in pCREB expression in both the PVN and DG. In addition, morphine exposure induced an increase in Trx-1 expression in DG without any alterations in PVN. We also observed that the majority of pCREB positive neurons in DG co-expressed Trx-1, suggesting that Trx-1 could activate CREB in the DG, a brain region involved in memory consolidation. Altogether, these results support the idea that CRF1R antagonist blocked Trx-1 expression and pCREB/Trx-1 co-localization, indicating a critical role of CRF, through CRF1R, in molecular changes involved in morphine associated behaviors.

  16. GSK-3 mediated phosphorylation couples ER-Golgi transport and nuclear stabilisation of the CREB-H transcription factor to mediate Apolipoprotein secretion.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Sónia; Carreira, Suzanne; O'Hare, Peter

    2017-04-05

    CREB-H, an ER-anchored transcription factor plays a key role in regulating secretion in metabolic pathways, particularly triglyceride homeostasis. It controls the production both of secretory pathway components and cargoes including apolipoproteins ApoA-IV and ApoC-II, contributing to VLDL/HDL distribution and lipolysis. The key mechanism controlling CREB-H activity involves its ER retention and forward transport to the Golgi, where it is cleaved by Golgi-resident proteases releasing the N-terminal product which traffics to the nucleus to effect transcriptional responses. Here we show that a serine-rich motif, termed the P-motif located in the N-terminus between serines 73 to 90, controls release of the precursor transmembrane form from the ER and its forward transport to the Golgi. This motif is subject to GSK-3 phosphorylation promoting ER-retention while mutation of target serines or drug inhibition of GSK-3 activity, co-ordinately induces both forward transport of the precursor and cleavage, resulting in nuclear import. We previously showed that for the nuclear product, the P-motif is subject to multiple phosphorylations which regulate stability by targeting the protein to the SCF(Fbw1a) E3 ubiquitin ligase. Thus phosphorylation at the P-motif provides integrated control of CREB-H function, coupling intercompartmental transport in the cytoplasm with stabilisation of the active form in the nucleus.

  17. Inhibition of p38/CREB phosphorylation and COX-2 expression by olive oil polyphenols underlies their anti-proliferative effects

    SciTech Connect

    Corona, Giulia; Deiana, Monica; Incani, Alessandra; Vauzour, David; Assunta Dessi, M.; Spencer, Jeremy P.E.

    2007-10-26

    We investigated the anti-proliferative effects of an olive oil polyphenolic extract on human colon adenocarcinoma cells. Analysis indicated that the extract contained hydroxytyrosol, tyrosol and the various secoiridoid derivatives, including oleuropein. This extract exerted a strong inhibitory effect on cancer cell proliferation, which was linked to the induction of a G2/M phase cell cycle block. Following treatment with the extract (50 {mu}g/ml) the number of cells in the G2/M phase increased to 51.82 {+-} 2.69% relative to control cells (15.1 {+-} 2.5%). This G2/M block was mediated by the ability of olive oil polyphenols (50 {mu}g/ml) to exert rapid inhibition of p38 (38.7 {+-} 4.7%) and CREB (28.6 {+-} 5.5%) phosphorylation which led to a downstream reduction in COX-2 expression (56.9 {+-} 9.3%). Our data suggest that olive oil polyphenols may exert chemopreventative effects in the large intestine by interacting with signalling pathways responsible for colorectal cancer development.

  18. TORC2 Signaling Is Antagonized by Protein Phosphatase 2A and the Far Complex in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Pracheil, Tammy; Thornton, Janet; Liu, Zhengchang

    2012-01-01

    The target of rapamycin (TOR) kinase, a central regulator of eukaryotic cell growth, exists in two essential, yet distinct, TOR kinase complexes in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae: rapamycin-sensitive TORC1 and rapamycin-insensitive TORC2. Lst8, a component of both TOR complexes, is essential for cell viability. However, it is unclear whether the essential function of Lst8 is linked to TORC1, TORC2, or both. To that end, we carried out a genetic screen to isolate lst8 deletion suppressor mutants. Here we report that mutations in SAC7 and FAR11 suppress lethality of lst8Δ and TORC2-deficient (tor2-21) mutations but not TORC1 inactivation, suggesting that the essential function of Lst8 is linked only to TORC2. More importantly, characterization of lst8Δ bypass mutants reveals a role for protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) in the regulation of TORC2 signaling. We show that Far11, a member of the Far3-7-8-9-10-11 complex involved in pheromone-induced cell cycle arrest, interacts with Tpd3 and Pph21, conserved components of PP2A, and deletions of components of the Far3-7-8-9-10-11 complex and PP2A rescue growth defects in lst8Δ and tor2-21 mutants. In addition, loss of the regulatory B′ subunit of PP2A Rts1 or Far11 restores phosphorylation to the TORC2 substrate Slm1 in a tor2-21 mutant. Mammalian Far11 orthologs FAM40A/B exist in a complex with PP2A known as STRIPAK, suggesting a conserved functional association of PP2A and Far11. Antagonism of TORC2 signaling by PP2A-Far11 represents a novel regulatory mechanism for controlling spatial cell growth of yeast. PMID:22298706

  19. The Insulin-Regulated CREB Coactivator TORC Promotes Stress Resistance in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Biao; Goode, Jason; Best, Jennifer; Meltzer, Jodi; Schilman, Pablo E.; Chen, Jian; Garza, Dan; Thomas, John B.; Montminy, Marc

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY In fasted mammals, glucose homeostasis is maintained through induction of the cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) coactivator transducer of regulated CREB activity 2 (TORC2), which stimulates the gluconeogenic program in concert with the forkhead factor FOXO1. Here we show that starvation also triggers TORC activation in Drosophila, where it maintains energy balance through induction of CREB target genes in the brain. TORC mutant flies have reduced glycogen and lipid stores and are sensitive to starvation and oxidative stress. Neuronal TORC expression rescued stress sensitivity as well as CREB target gene expression in TORC mutants. During refeeding, increases in insulin signaling inhibited TORC activity through the salt-inducible kinase 2 (SIK2)-mediated phosphorylation and subsequent degradation of TORC. Depletion of neuronal SIK2 increased TORC activity and enhanced stress resistance. As disruption of insulin signaling also augmented TORC activity in adult flies, our results illustrate the importance of an insulin-regulated pathway that functions in the brain to maintain energy balance. PMID:18460334

  20. F-actin rearrangement is regulated by mTORC2/Akt/Girdin in mouse fertilized eggs.

    PubMed

    Wu, Didi; Yu, Dahai; Wang, Xiuxia; Yu, Bingzhi

    2016-12-01

    In mouse fertilized eggs, correct assembly and distribution of the actin cytoskeleton are intimately related to cleavage in early-stage embryos. However, in mouse fertilized eggs, mechanisms and involved factors responsible for regulating the actin cytoskeleton are poorly defined. In this study, mTORC2, PKB/Akt and Girdin were found to modulate division of mouse fertilized eggs by regulating distribution of the actin cytoskeleton. RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated depletion of mTORC2, Akt1 or Girdin disrupted F-actin rearrangement and strongly inhibited egg development. PKB/Akt has been proven to be a downstream target of the mTORC2 signalling pathway. Girdin, a newly found actin cross-linker, has been proven to be a downstream target of the Akt signalling pathway. Furthermore, phosphorylation of both Akt1 and girdin was affected by knockdown of mTORC2. Akt1 positively regulated development of the mouse fertilized eggs by girdin-mediated F-actin rearrangement. Thus it seems that girdin could be a downstream target of the Akt1-mediated signalling pathway. Collectively, this study aimed to prove participation of mTORC2/Akt in F-actin assembly in early-stage cleavage of mouse fertilized eggs via the function of girdin.

  1. Differences in the Flexibility of Switching Learning Strategies and CREB Phosphorylation Levels in Prefrontal Cortex, Dorsal Striatum and Hippocampus in Two Inbred Strains of Mice

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Woo-Hyun; Han, Jung-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Flexibility in using different learning strategies was assessed in two different inbred strains of mice, the C57BL/6 and DBA/2 strains. Mice were trained sequentially in two different Morris water maze protocols that tested their ability to switch their learning strategy to complete a new task after first being trained in a different task. Training consisted either of visible platform trials (cued training) followed by subsequent hidden platform trials (place training) or the reverse sequence (place training followed by cued training). Both strains of mice showed equivalent performance in the type of training (cued or place) that they received first. However, C57BL/6 mice showed significantly better performances than DBA/2 mice following the switch in training protocols, irrespective of the order of training. After completion of the switched training session, levels of cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) and phosphorylated CREB (pCREB) were measured in the hippocampus, striatum and prefrontal cortex of the mice. Prefrontal cortical and hippocampal pCREB levels differed by strain, with higher levels found in C57BL/6 mice than in DBA/2 mice. No strain differences were observed in the medial or lateral region of the dorsal striatum. These findings indicate that the engagement (i.e., CREB signaling) of relevant neural structures may vary by the specific demands of the learning strategy, and this is closely tied to differences in the flexibility of C57BL/6 and DBA/2 mice to switch their learning strategies when given a new task. PMID:27695401

  2. Differences in the Flexibility of Switching Learning Strategies and CREB Phosphorylation Levels in Prefrontal Cortex, Dorsal Striatum and Hippocampus in Two Inbred Strains of Mice.

    PubMed

    Cho, Woo-Hyun; Han, Jung-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Flexibility in using different learning strategies was assessed in two different inbred strains of mice, the C57BL/6 and DBA/2 strains. Mice were trained sequentially in two different Morris water maze protocols that tested their ability to switch their learning strategy to complete a new task after first being trained in a different task. Training consisted either of visible platform trials (cued training) followed by subsequent hidden platform trials (place training) or the reverse sequence (place training followed by cued training). Both strains of mice showed equivalent performance in the type of training (cued or place) that they received first. However, C57BL/6 mice showed significantly better performances than DBA/2 mice following the switch in training protocols, irrespective of the order of training. After completion of the switched training session, levels of cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) and phosphorylated CREB (pCREB) were measured in the hippocampus, striatum and prefrontal cortex of the mice. Prefrontal cortical and hippocampal pCREB levels differed by strain, with higher levels found in C57BL/6 mice than in DBA/2 mice. No strain differences were observed in the medial or lateral region of the dorsal striatum. These findings indicate that the engagement (i.e., CREB signaling) of relevant neural structures may vary by the specific demands of the learning strategy, and this is closely tied to differences in the flexibility of C57BL/6 and DBA/2 mice to switch their learning strategies when given a new task.

  3. mTORC2 Puts Its Shoulder to Krebs' Wheel.

    PubMed

    Arriola Apelo, Sebastian I; Lamming, Dudley W

    2016-09-01

    In this issue of Molecular Cell, Moloughney et al. (2016) find that mTORC2 responds to falling levels of glucose and glutamine catabolites, promoting glutaminolysis and preserving the TCA cycle and hexosamine biosynthesis.

  4. Rictor/mTORC2 facilitates central regulation of energy and glucose homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Kocalis, Heidi E.; Hagan, Scott L.; George, Leena; Turney, Maxine K.; Siuta, Michael A.; Laryea, Gloria N.; Morris, Lindsey C.; Muglia, Louis J.; Printz, Richard L.; Stanwood, Gregg D.; Niswender, Kevin D.

    2014-01-01

    Insulin signaling in the central nervous system (CNS) regulates energy balance and peripheral glucose homeostasis. Rictor is a key regulatory/structural subunit of the mTORC2 complex and is required for hydrophobic motif site phosphorylation of Akt at serine 473. To examine the contribution of neuronal Rictor/mTORC2 signaling to CNS regulation of energy and glucose homeostasis, we utilized Cre-LoxP technology to generate mice lacking Rictor in all neurons, or in either POMC or AgRP expressing neurons. Rictor deletion in all neurons led to increased fat mass and adiposity, glucose intolerance and behavioral leptin resistance. Disrupting Rictor in POMC neurons also caused obesity and hyperphagia, fasting hyperglycemia and pronounced glucose intolerance. AgRP neuron specific deletion did not impact energy balance but led to mild glucose intolerance. Collectively, we show that Rictor/mTORC2 signaling, especially in POMC-expressing neurons, is important for central regulation of energy and glucose homeostasis. PMID:24944899

  5. The metabolic waste ammonium regulates mTORC2 and mTORC1 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Merhi, Ahmad; Delrée, Paul; Marini, Anna Maria

    2017-01-01

    Two structurally and functionally distinct mammalian TOR complexes control cell growth and metabolism in physiological and pathological contexts including cancer. Upregulated glutaminolysis is part of the metabolic reprogramming occurring in cancer, providing fuels for growth but also liberating ammonium, a potent neurotoxic waste product. Here, we identify ammonium as a novel dose-dependent signal mediating rapid mTORC2 activation and further regulating mTORC1. We show that ammonium induces rapid RICTOR-dependent phosphorylation of AKT-S473, a process requiring the PI3K pathway and further involving the Src-family kinase YES1, the FAK kinase and the ITGβ1 integrin. Release of calcium from the endoplasmic reticulum store triggers rapid mTORC2 activation, similar to ammonium-induced activation, the latter being conversely prevented by calcium chelation.Moreover, in analogy to growth factors, ammonium triggers the AKT-dependent phosphoinhibition of the TSC complex and of PRAS40, two negative regulators of mTORC1. Consistent with mTORC1 stimulation, ammonium induces the inhibitory phosphorylation of 4EBP1, a negative regulator of protein biogenesis. Ammonium however dually impacts on the phosphorylation of p70S6K1 triggering a transient AKT-independent decrease in the phosphorylation of this second mTORC1 readout. Finally, we reveal ammonium as a dose-dependent stimulator of proliferation. This study underscores an mTORC2 and mTORC1 response to the so-called ammonium waste. PMID:28303961

  6. mTORC1 and mTORC2 play different roles in regulating cardiomyocyte differentiation from embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Bei; Wang, Jiadan; Tang, Leilei; Shi, Jiana; Zhu, Danyan

    2017-01-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a serine/threonine kinase and functions through two distinct complexes, mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) and complex 2 (mTORC2), with their key components Raptor and Rictor, to play crucial roles in cellular survival and growth. However, the roles of mTORC1 and mTORC2 in regulating cardiomyocyte differentiation from mouse embryonic stem (mES) cells are not clear. In this study, we performed Raptor or Rictor knockdown experiments to investigate the roles of mTORC1 and mTORC2 in cardiomyocyte differentiation. Ablation of Raptor markedly increased the number of cardiomyocytes derived from mES cells with well-organized myofilaments. Expression levels of brachyury (mesoderm protein), Nkx2.5 (cardiac progenitor cell protein), and α-Actinin (cardiomyocyte marker) were increased in Raptor knockdown cells. In contrast, loss of Rictor prevented cardiomyocyte differentiation. The dual ablation of Raptor and Rictor also decreased the number of cardiomyocytes. The two complexes exerted a regulatory mechanism in such a manner that knockdown of Raptor/mTORC1 resulted in a decreased phosphorylation of Rictor (Thr1135), which subsequently activated Rictor/mTORC2 in the differentiation of mES cells into cardiomyocytes. In conclusion, mTORC1 and mTORC2 played different roles in cardiomyocyte differentiation from mES cells in vitro. The activation of Rictor/mTORC2 was critical for facilitating cardiomyocyte differentiation from mES cells. Thus, this complex may be a promising target for regulating myocardial differentiation from embryonic stem cells or induced pluripotent stem cells.

  7. mTORC2/Rictor Signaling Disrupts Dopamine-Dependent Behaviors via Defects in Striatal Dopamine Neurotransmission

    PubMed Central

    Dadalko, Olga I.; Siuta, Michael; Poe, Amanda; Erreger, Kevin; Matthies, Heinrich J.G.; Niswender, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    Disrupted neuronal protein kinase B (Akt) signaling has been associated with dopamine (DA)-related neuropsychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia, a devastating mental illness. We hypothesize that proper DA neurotransmission is therefore dependent upon intact neuronal Akt function. Akt is activated by phosphorylation of two key residues: Thr308 and Ser473. Blunted Akt phosphorylation at Ser473 (pAkt-473) has been observed in lymphocytes and postmortem brains of schizophrenia patients, and psychosis-prone normal individuals. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) complex 2 (mTORC2) is a multiprotein complex that is responsible for phosphorylation of Akt at Ser473 (pAkt-473). We demonstrate that mice with disrupted mTORC2 signaling in brain exhibit altered striatal DA-dependent behaviors, such as increased basal locomotion, stereotypic counts, and exaggerated response to the psychomotor effects of amphetamine (AMPH). Combining in vivo and ex vivo pharmacological, electrophysiological, and biochemical techniques, we demonstrate that the changes in striatal DA neurotransmission and associated behaviors are caused, at least in part, by elevated D2 DA receptor (D2R) expression and upregulated ERK1/2 activation. Haloperidol, a typical antipsychotic and D2R blocker, reduced AMPH hypersensitivity and elevated pERK1/2 to the levels of control animals. By viral gene delivery, we downregulated mTORC2 solely in the dorsal striatum of adult wild-type mice, demonstrating that striatal mTORC2 regulates AMPH-stimulated behaviors. Our findings implicate mTORC2 signaling as a novel pathway regulating striatal DA tone and D2R signaling. PMID:26063917

  8. Increased phosphorylation of Ser473-Akt, Ser9-GSK-3beta and Ser133-CREB in the rat frontal cortex after MK-801 intraperitoneal injection.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Yong Min; Seo, Myoung Suk; Kim, Se Hyun; Kim, Yeni; Yoon, Se Chang; Juhnn, Yong-Sung; Kim, Yong Sik

    2005-12-01

    GSK-3beta is regarded as playing an important part in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia and the action of psychotomimetic agents. We observed phosphorylation of molecules associated with the GSK-3beta signalling pathway in the rat brain after MK-801 injection, which induces a schizophrenia-like state in humans. Ser9-GSK-3beta phosphorylation was increased after injection of 1 mg/kg MK-801 in the rat frontal cortex but not in the hippocampus or cerebellum. This increase peaked at 30 min and was maintained until 90 min after injection. The phosphorylation showed a dose-dependent increase up to 1 mg/kg MK-801, followed by a decrease at higher dosage. Furthermore, phosphorylation of Ser473-Akt and Ser133-CREB showed similar temporal, dose-dependent and regionally specific patterns with those of Ser9-GSK-3beta. However, phosphorylation of Dvl and Ser33-beta-catenin was not affected by MK-801. These results suggest that GSK-3beta phosphorylation by MK-801 may be associated with the Akt-GSK-3beta pathway rather than with the Wnt-Dvl-GSK3beta pathway.

  9. The underlying mechanism of proinflammatory NF-κB activation by the mTORC2/Akt/IKKα pathway during skin aging

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yeon Ja; Moon, Kyoung Mi; Chung, Ki Wung; Jeong, Ji Won; Park, Daeui; Kim, Dae Hyun; Yu, Byung Pal; Chung, Hae Young

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin complex 2 (mTORC2), one of two different enzymatic complexes of mTOR, regulates a diverse set of substrates including Akt. mTOR pathway is one of well-known mediators of aging process, however, its role in skin aging has not been determined. Skin aging can be induced by physical age and ultraviolet (UV) irradiation which are intrinsic and extrinsic factors, respectively. Here, we report increased mTORC2 pathway in intrinsic and photo-induced skin aging, which is implicated in the activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB). UVB-irradiated or aged mice skin revealed that mTORC2 activity and its component, rictor were significantly upregulated which in turn increased Akt activation and Akt-dependent IκB kinase α (IKKα) phosphorylation at Thr23 in vivo. We also confirmed that UVB induced the mTORC2/Akt/IKKα signaling pathway with HaCaT human normal keratinocytes. The increased mTORC2 signaling pathway during skin aging were associated to NF-κB activation. Suppression of mTORC2 activity by the treatment of a mTOR small inhibitor or knockdown of RICTOR partially rescued UVB-induced NF-κB activation through the downregulation of Akt/IKKα activity. Our data demonstrated the upregulation of mTORC2 pathway in intrinsic and photo-induced skin aging and its role in IKKα/NF-κB activation. These data not only expanded the functions of mTOR to skin aging but also revealed the therapeutic potential of inhibiting mTORC2 in ameliorating both intrinsic skin aging and photoaging. PMID:27486771

  10. PERK mediates eIF2α phosphorylation responsible for BACE1 elevation, CREB dysfunction and neurodegeneration in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Devi, Latha; Ohno, Masuo

    2014-10-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that aberrant phosphorylation of eukaryotic initiation factor-2α (eIF2α) may induce synaptic failure and neurodegeneration through persistent translational inhibition of global protein synthesis. However, elevated phospho-eIF2α also paradoxically causes translational activation of a subset of messenger RNAs such as the β-secretase enzyme, β-site APP-cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1) and cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) repressor, activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4). Therefore, we tested whether genetic reduction of the eIF2α kinase PERK may prevent these deleterious events and mitigate Alzheimer's disease (AD)-like neuropathology and cognitive impairments in the 5XFAD mouse model. PERK haploinsufficiency blocked overactivation of the PERK-eIF2α pathway, as evidenced by significant reductions in phosphorylation of PERK and eIF2α, in 5XFAD mice. PERK haploinsufficiency was sufficient to rescue memory deficits and cholinergic neurodegeneration in this AD model. Notably, PERK haploinsufficiency also prevented BACE1 elevations, resulting in reduced levels of amyloid-β peptides and plaque burden in 5XFAD mice. Moreover, CREB dysfunction was restored in PERK(+/-)·5XFAD mice concomitant with reversal of ATF4 upregulation. Together, these findings suggest that PERK may be a disease-modifying therapeutic target to prevent multiple memory-disrupting mechanisms associated with AD.

  11. Rictor/mTORC2 Pathway in Oocytes Regulates Folliculogenesis, and Its Inactivation Causes Premature Ovarian Failure*

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhenguo; Kang, Xiangjin; Wang, Liping; Dong, Heling; Wang, Caixia; Xiong, Zhi; Zhao, Wanlu; Jia, Chunhong; Lin, Jun; Zhang, Wen; Yuan, Weiping; Zhong, Mei; Du, Hongzi; Bai, Xiaochun

    2015-01-01

    Molecular basis of ovarian folliculogenesis and etiopathogenesis of premature ovarian failure (POF), a common cause of infertility in women, are not fully understood. Mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 2 (mTORC2) is emerging as a central regulator of cell metabolism, proliferation, and survival. However, its role in folliculogenesis and POF has not been reported. Here, we showed that the signaling activity of mTORC2 is inhibited in a 4-vinylcyclohexene diepoxide (VCD)-induced POF mouse model. Notably, mice with oocyte-specific ablation of Rictor, a key component of mTORC2, demonstrated POF phenotypes, including massive follicular death, excessive loss of functional ovarian follicles, abnormal gonadal hormone secretion, and consequently, secondary subfertility in conditional knock-out (cKO) mice. Furthermore, reduced levels of Ser-473-phosphorylated Akt and Ser-253-phosphorylated Foxo3a and elevated pro-apoptotic proteins, Bad, Bax, and cleaved poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP), were observed in cKO mice, replicating the signaling alterations in 4-VCD-treated ovaries. These results indicate a critical role of the Rictor/mTORC2/Akt/Foxo3a pro-survival signaling axis in folliculogenesis. Interestingly, loss of maternal Rictor did not cause obvious developmental defects in embryos or placentas from cKO mice, suggesting that maternal Rictor is dispensable for preimplantation embryonic development. Our results collectively indicate key roles of Rictor/mTORC2 in folliculogenesis, follicle survival, and female fertility and support the utility of oocyte-specific Rictor knock-out mice as a novel model for POF. PMID:25564616

  12. Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein M associates with mTORC2 and regulates muscle differentiation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Yen; Lin, Chia-Lung; Chuang, Jen-Hua; Chiu, Fu-Yu; Sun, Yun-Ya; Liang, Mei-Chih; Lin, Yenshou

    2017-01-20

    Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) plays a range of crucial roles in cell survival, growth, proliferation, metabolism, and morphology. However, mTOR forms two distinct complexes, mTOR complex 1 and mTOR complex 2 (mTORC1 and mTORC2), via association with a series of different components; this allows the complexes to execute their wide range of functions. This study explores further the composition of the mTORC2 complex. Utilizing Rictor knock-out cells, immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry, a novel Rictor associated protein, heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein M (hnRNP M), was identified. The association between hnRNP M and Rictor was verified using recombinant and endogenous protein and the binding site was found to be within aa 1~532 of hnRNP M. The presence of hnRNP M significantly affects phosphorylation of SGK1 S422, but not of Akt S473, PKCα S657 and PKCζ T560. Furthermore, hnRNP M also plays a critical role in muscle differentiation because knock-down of either hnRNP M or Rictor in C2C12 myoblasts reduced differentiation. This decrease is able to be rescued by overexpression SGK S422D in hnRNP M knockdown C2C12 myoblasts. Taken together, we have identified a novel Rictor/mTOR binding molecule, hnRNP M, that allows mTORC2 signaling to phosphorylate SGK1 thus regulating muscle differentiation.

  13. Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein M associates with mTORC2 and regulates muscle differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei-Yen; Lin, Chia-Lung; Chuang, Jen-Hua; Chiu, Fu-Yu; Sun, Yun-Ya; Liang, Mei-Chih; Lin, Yenshou

    2017-01-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) plays a range of crucial roles in cell survival, growth, proliferation, metabolism, and morphology. However, mTOR forms two distinct complexes, mTOR complex 1 and mTOR complex 2 (mTORC1 and mTORC2), via association with a series of different components; this allows the complexes to execute their wide range of functions. This study explores further the composition of the mTORC2 complex. Utilizing Rictor knock-out cells, immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry, a novel Rictor associated protein, heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein M (hnRNP M), was identified. The association between hnRNP M and Rictor was verified using recombinant and endogenous protein and the binding site was found to be within aa 1~532 of hnRNP M. The presence of hnRNP M significantly affects phosphorylation of SGK1 S422, but not of Akt S473, PKCα S657 and PKCζ T560. Furthermore, hnRNP M also plays a critical role in muscle differentiation because knock-down of either hnRNP M or Rictor in C2C12 myoblasts reduced differentiation. This decrease is able to be rescued by overexpression SGK S422D in hnRNP M knockdown C2C12 myoblasts. Taken together, we have identified a novel Rictor/mTOR binding molecule, hnRNP M, that allows mTORC2 signaling to phosphorylate SGK1 thus regulating muscle differentiation. PMID:28106162

  14. Dorsal hippocampal NMDA receptor blockade impairs extinction of naloxone-precipitated conditioned place aversion in acute morphine-treated rats by suppressing ERK and CREB phosphorylation in the basolateral amygdala

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei-Sheng; Chen, Zhong-Guo; Liu, Wen-Tao; Chi, Zhi-Qiang; He, Ling; Liu, Jing-Gen

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Substantial evidence shows that negative reinforcement resulting from the aversive affective consequences of opiate withdrawal may play a crucial role in drug relapse. Understanding the mechanisms underlying the loss (extinction) of conditioned aversion of drug withdrawal could facilitate the treatment of drug addiction. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Naloxone-induced conditioned place aversion (CPA) of Sprague-Dawley rats was used to measure conditioned aversion. An NMDA receptor antagonist and MAPK kinase inhibitor were applied through intracranial injections. The phosphorylation of ERK and cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) was detected using Western blot. KEY RESULTS The extinction of CPA behaviour increased the phosphorylation of ERK and CREB in the dorsal hippocampus (DH) and basolateral amygdala (BLA), but not in the central amygdala (CeA). Intra-DH injection of AP5 or intra-BLA injection of AP-5 or U0126 before extinction training significantly attenuated ERK and CREB phosphorylation in the BLA and impaired the extinction of CPA behaviour. Although intra-DH injections of AP-5 attenuated extinction training-induced activation of the ERK-CREB pathway in the BLA, intra-BLA injection of AP5 had no effect on extinction training-induced activation of the ERK-CREB pathway in the DH. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS These results suggest that activation of ERK and CREB in the BLA and DH is involved in the extinction of CPA behaviour and that the DH, via a direct or indirect pathway, modulates the activity of ERK and CREB in the BLA through activation of NMDA receptors after extinction training. Understanding the mechanisms underlying the extinction of conditioned aversion could facilitate the treatment of drug addiction. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on Opioids: New Pathways to Functional Selectivity. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2015.172.issue-2 PMID:24597568

  15. Ketamine plus imipramine treatment induces antidepressant-like behavior and increases CREB and BDNF protein levels and PKA and PKC phosphorylation in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Réus, Gislaine Z; Stringari, Roberto B; Ribeiro, Karine F; Ferraro, Ana K; Vitto, Marcelo F; Cesconetto, Patrícia; Souza, Claúdio T; Quevedo, João

    2011-08-01

    A growing body of evidence has pointed to the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonists as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of major depression. The present study investigated the possibility of synergistic interactions between antidepressant imipramine with the uncompetitive NMDA receptor antagonist ketamine. Wistar rats were acutely treated with ketamine (5 and 10mg/kg) and imipramine (10 and 20mg/kg) and then subjected to forced swimming tests. The cAMP response element bindig (CREB) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) protein levels and protein kinase C (PKC) and protein kinase A (PKA) phosphorylation were assessed in the prefrontal cortex, hippocampus and amygdala by imunoblot. Imipramine at the dose of 10mg/kg and ketamine at the dose of 5mg/kg did not have effect on the immobility time; however, the effect of imipramine (10 and 20mg/kg) was enhanced by both doses of ketamine. Ketamine and imipramine alone or in combination at all doses tested did not modify locomotor activity. Combined treatment with ketamine and imipramine produced stronger increases of CREB and BDNF protein levels in the prefrontal cortex, hippocampus and amygdala, and PKA phosphorylation in the hippocampus and amygdala and PKC phosphorylation in prefrontal cortex. The results described indicate that co-administration of antidepressant imipramine with ketamine may induce a more pronounced antidepressant activity than treatment with each antidepressant alone. This finding may be of particular importance in the case of drug-resistant patients and could suggest a method of obtaining significant antidepressant actions whilst limiting side effects.

  16. Mevastatin ameliorates sphingosine 1‐phosphate‐induced COX‐2/PGE2‐dependent cell migration via FoxO1 and CREB phosphorylation and translocation

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Chih‐Kai; Lin, Chih‐Chung; Hsiao, Li‐Der

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Sphingosine 1‐phosphate (S1P), an important inflammatory mediator, has been shown to regulate COX‐2 production and promote various cellular responses such as cell migration. Mevastatin, an inhibitor of 3‐hydroxy‐3‐methylglutaryl‐CoA reductase (HMG‐CoA), effectively inhibits inflammatory responses. However, the mechanisms underlying S1P‐evoked COX‐2‐dependent cell migration, which is modulated by mevastatin in human tracheal smooth muscle cells (HTSMCs) remain unclear. Experimental Approach The expression of COX‐2 was determined by Western blotting, real time‐PCR and promoter analyses. The signalling molecules were investigated by pretreatment with respective pharmacological inhibitors or transfection with siRNAs. The interaction between COX‐2 promoter and transcription factors was determined by chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. Finally, the effect of mevastatin on HTSMC migration and leukocyte counts in BAL fluid and COX‐2 expression induced by S1P was determined by a cell migration assay, cell counting and Western blot. Key Results S1P stimulated mTOR activation through the Nox2/ROS and PI3K/Akt pathways, which can further stimulate FoxO1 phosphorylation and translocation to the cytosol. We also found that S1P induced CREB activation and translocation via an mTOR‐independent signalling pathway. Finally, we showed that pretreatment with mevastatin markedly reduced S1P‐induced cell migration and COX‐2/PGE2 production via a PPARγ‐dependent signalling pathway. Conclusions and Implications Mevastatin attenuates the S1P‐induced increased expression of COX‐2 and cell migration via the regulation of FoxO1 and CREB phosphorylation and translocation by PPARγ in HTSMCs. Mevastatin could be beneficial for prevention of airway inflammation in the future. PMID:26359950

  17. PTEN negatively regulates mTORC2 formation and signaling in grade IV glioma via Rictor hyperphosphorylation at Thr1135 and direct the mode of action of an mTORC1/2 inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, K; Maiti, S; Mandal, C

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the role of PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homolog) in mammalian target of rapamycin complex 2 (mTORC2) signaling in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), we found higher activation of mTORC2 in PTENmu cells, as evidenced by enhanced phosphorylation of mTOR (Ser2481), AKT (Ser473) and glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta (GSK3β) (Ser9) as compared with PTENwt cells. In addition, PTENwt cells upon PTEN depletion showed mTORC2 activation. The reduced mTORC2 signaling in PTENwt cells was related to higher Rictor phosphorylation at Thr1135 residue. Phosphorylation of Rictor at Thr1135 inhibited its association with mTORC and thus there was a reduction in mTORC2 complex formation. In addition, PTENwt cells expressing mutated Rictor in which Thr1135 was substituted with alanine, showed enhanced mTORC2 formation and signaling. This enhanced mTORC2 signaling promoted inactivation of GSK3β. Thus, we established the reciprocal activation of mTORC2 and GSK3β in GBM. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report describing role of PTEN in mTORC2 formation by promoting Rictor phosphorylation (Thr1135) in GBM. Furthermore, the drug sensitivity of mTORC2 was evaluated. A newly identified carbazole alkaloid, mahanine, showed cytotoxicity in both PTENmu and PTENwt cells. It inhibited both mTORC1/2 and AKT completely in PTENmu cells, whereas it inhibited only mTORC1 in PTENwt cells. Cytotoxity and AKT-inhibitory activity of the mTORC1/2 inhibitor was increased either by depleting PTEN or in combination with phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase inhibitors in PTENwt cells. In contrast, depletion of Rictor decreased the cytotoxicity of the mTORC1/2 inhibitor in PTENmu cells. Thus, PTEN has an important role in mTORC2 formation and also influences the effectiveness of an mTORC1/2 inhibitor in GBM. PMID:27239959

  18. IDENTIFICATION OF CHOLINERGIC AND NONCHOLINERGIC NEURONS IN THE PONS EXPRESSING PHOSPHORYLATED cAMP RESPONSE ELEMENT-BINDING PROTEIN (pCREB) AS A FUNCTION OF RAPID EYE MOVEMENT (REM) SLEEP

    PubMed Central

    DATTA, S.; SIWEK, D. F.; STACK, E. C.

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that in the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus (PPT), increased neuronal activity and kainate receptor-mediated activation of intracellular protein kinase A (PKA) are important physiological and molecular steps for the generation of REM sleep. In the present study performed on rats, phosphorylated cAMP response element-binding protein (pCREB) immunostaining was used as a marker for increased intracellular PKA activation and as a reflection of increased neuronal activity. To identify whether activated cells were either cholinergic or noncholinergic, the PPT and laterodorsal tegmental nucleus (LDT) cells were immunostained for choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) in combination with pCREB or c-Fos. The results demonstrated that during high REM sleep (HR, ~27%), significantly higher numbers of cells expressed pCREB and c-Fos in the PPT, of which 95% of pCREB-expressing cells were ChAT-positive. With high REM sleep, the numbers of pCREB-positive cells were also significantly higher in the medial pontine reticular formation (mPRF), pontine reticular nucleus oral (PnO), and dorsal subcoeruleus nucleus (SubCD) but very few in the locus coeruleus (LC) and dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN). Conversely, with low REM sleep (LR, ~2%), the numbers of pCREB expressing cells were very few in the PPT, mPRF, PnO, and SubCD but significantly higher in the LC and DRN. The results of regression analyses revealed significant positive relationships between the total percentages of REM sleep and numbers of ChAT+/pCREB+ (Rsqr = 0.98) cells in the PPT and pCREB+ cells in the mPRF (Rsqr = 0.88), PnO (Rsqr = 0.87), and SubCD (Rsqr = 0.84); whereas significantly negative relationships were associated with the pCREB+ cells in the LC (Rsqr = 0.70) and DRN (Rsqr = 0.60). These results provide evidence supporting the hypothesis that during REM sleep, the PPT cholinergic neurons are active, whereas the LC and DRN neurons are inactive. More importantly, the regression analysis

  19. Peptide IDR-1002 Inhibits NF-κB Nuclear Translocation by Inhibition of IκBα Degradation and Activates p38/ERK1/2–MSK1-Dependent CREB Phosphorylation in Macrophages Stimulated with Lipopolysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Huante-Mendoza, Alejandro; Silva-García, Octavio; Oviedo-Boyso, Javier; Hancock, Robert E. W.; Baizabal-Aguirre, Víctor M.

    2016-01-01

    The inflammatory response is a critical molecular defense mechanism of the innate immune system that mediates the elimination of disease-causing bacteria. Repair of the damaged tissue, and the reestablishment of homeostasis, must be accomplished after elimination of the pathogen. The innate defense regulators (IDRs) are short cationic peptides that mimic natural host defense peptides and are effective in eliminating pathogens by enhancing the activity of the immune system while controlling the inflammatory response. Although the role of different IDRs as modulators of inflammation has been reported, there have been only limited studies of the signaling molecules regulated by this type of peptide. The present study investigated the effect of IDR-1002 on nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) and cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB) transcription factors that are responsible for triggering and controlling inflammation, respectively, in macrophages. We found that TNF-α and COX-2 expression, IκBα phosphorylation, and NF-κB nuclear translocation were strongly inhibited in macrophages pre-incubated with IDR-1002 and then stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). IDR-1002 also increased CREB phosphorylation at Ser133 via activation of the p38/ERK1/2–MSK1 signaling pathways without detectable expression of the cytokines IL-4, IL-10, and IL-13 involved is suppressing inflammation or alternative activation. Transcriptional activation of NF-κB and CREB is known to require interaction with the transcriptional coactivator CREB-binding protein (CBP). To test for CBP–NF-κB and CBP–CREB complex formation, we performed co-immunoprecipitation assays. These assays showed that IDR-1002 inhibited the interaction between CBP and NF-κB in macrophages stimulated with LPS, which might explain the inhibition of TNF-α and COX-2 expression. Furthermore, the complex between CBP and CREB in macrophages stimulated with IDR-1002 was also inhibited, which might explain why IDR-1002 did

  20. Involvement of Rictor/mTORC2 in cardiomyocyte differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Bei; Wang, Jiadan; Tang, Leilei; Tan, Chao; Zhao, Zhe; Xiao, Yi; Ge, Renshan; Zhu, Danyan

    2017-01-01

    Rictor is a key regulatory/structural subunit of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 2 (mTORC2) and is required for phosphorylation of Akt at serine 473. It plays an important role in cell survival, actin cytoskeleton organization and other processes in embryogenesis. However, the role of Rictor/mTORC2 in the embryonic cardiac differentiation has been uncovered. In the present study, we examined a possible link between Rictor expression and cardiomyocyte differentiation of the mouse embryonic stem (mES) cells. Knockdown of Rictor by shRNA significantly reduced the phosphorylation of Akt at serine 473 followed by a decrease in cardiomyocyte differentiation detected by beating embryoid bodies. The protein levels of brachyury (mesoderm protein), Nkx2.5 (cardiac progenitor cell protein) and α-Actinin (cardiomyocyte biomarker) decreased in Rictor knockdown group during cardiogenesis. Furthermore, knockdown of Rictor specifically inhibited the ventricular-like cells differentiation of mES cells with reduced level of ventricular-specific protein, MLC-2v. Meanwhile, patch-clamp analysis revealed that shRNA-Rictor significantly increased the number of cardiomyocytes with abnormal electrophysiology. In addition, the expressions and distribution patterns of cell-cell junction proteins (Cx43/Desmoplakin/N-cadherin) were also affected in shRNA-Rictor cardiomyocytes. Taken together, the results demonstrated that Rictor/mTORC2 might play an important role in the cardiomyocyte differentiation of mES cells. Knockdown of Rictor resulted in inhibiting ventricular-like myocytes differentiation and induced arrhythmias symptom, which was accompanied by interfering the expression and distribution patterns of cell-cell junction proteins. Rictor/mTORC2 might become a new target for regulating cardiomyocyte differentiation and a useful reference for application of the induced pluripotent stem cells. PMID:28123351

  1. Association of MMP7 -181A→G Promoter Polymorphism with Gastric Cancer Risk: INFLUENCE OF NICOTINE IN DIFFERENTIAL ALLELE-SPECIFIC TRANSCRIPTION VIA INCREASED PHOSPHORYLATION OF cAMP-RESPONSE ELEMENT-BINDING PROTEIN (CREB).

    PubMed

    Kesh, Kousik; Subramanian, Lakshmi; Ghosh, Nillu; Gupta, Vinayak; Gupta, Arnab; Bhattacharya, Samir; Mahapatra, Nitish R; Swarnakar, Snehasikta

    2015-06-05

    Elevated expression of matrix metalloproteinase7 (MMP7) has been demonstrated to play a pivotal role in cancer invasion. The -181A→G (rs11568818) polymorphism in the MMP7 promoter modulates gene expression and possibly affects cancer progression. Here, we evaluated the impact of -181A→G polymorphism on MMP7 promoter activity and its association with gastric cancer risk in eastern Indian case-control cohorts (n = 520). The GG genotype as compared with the AA genotype was predisposed (p = 0.02; odds ratio = 1.9, 95% confidence interval = 1.1-3.3) to gastric cancer risk. Stratification analysis showed that tobacco addiction enhanced gastric cancer risk in GG subjects when compared with AA subjects (p = 0.03, odds ratio = 2.46, and 95% confidence interval = 1.07-5.68). Meta-analysis revealed that tobacco enhanced the risk for cancer more markedly in AG and GG carriers. Activity and expression of MMP7 were significantly higher in GG than in AA carriers. In support, MMP7 promoter-reporter assays showed greater transcriptional activity toward A to G transition under basal/nicotine-induced/cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB) overexpressed conditions in gastric adenocarcinoma cells. Moreover, nicotine (a major component of tobacco) treatment significantly up-regulated MMP7 expression due to enhanced CREB phosphorylation followed by its nuclear translocation in gastric adenocarcinoma cells. Furthermore, chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments revealed higher binding of phosphorylated CREB with the -181G than the -181A allele. Altogether, specific binding of phosphorylated CREB to the G allele-carrying promoter enhances MMP7 gene expression that is further augmented by nicotine due to increased CREB phosphorylation and thereby increases the risk for gastric cancer.

  2. Differential effects of chronic amphetamine and baclofen administration on cAMP levels and phosphorylation of CREB in distinct brain regions of wild type and monoamine oxidase B-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Yin, Hsiang-Shu; Chen, Kevin; Kalpana, Sriram; Shih, Jean C

    2006-12-15

    Roles of GABA(B) transmission were explored in the action of amphetamine (Amph) on the brain. Adult male wild type (WT) and monoamine oxidase B-knocked out (MAOBKO) mice received i.p. injections of saline, d-Amph (5 mg/kg), plus baclofen (GABA(B) receptor agonist, 10 mg/kg), or baclofen and Amph, twice daily for 3 days and single treatments on day 4, followed by immuno-cyclic-AMP (cAMP) and immunoblotting assays on the brain tissue. The WT mice responded with higher levels of behavioral responses than the KO to the daily Amph injection; however, baclofen blocked the Amph-induced behavioral hyperactivity of both WT and KO mice. After the last treatment, levels of cAMP and phosphorylated (p) cyclic-AMP response element binding protein (CREB) were up-regulated in the striatum and somatosensory cortex of Amph-treated WT mice, while similar to the saline-controls in the baclofen+Amph-treated group, indicating the blockade by baclofen to Amph. Baclofen similarly suppressed the Amph-induced increases in pCREB levels of WT hippocampus and amygdala, and decreases of olfactory bulb and thalamus. For MAOBKO mice, baclofen hindered the Amph-generated increases in motor cortical cAMP and pCREB, and amygdaloid pCREB, and the decrease in olfactory bulb pCREB, whereas did not affect the Amph-raised hippocampal pCREB. Furthermore, the levels of CREB were variably modified in distinct regions by the drug exposures. The data reveal that the GABA(B)-mediated intracellular signaling differentially participates in mechanisms underlying Amph perturbation to various regions, and may thereby contribute explanations to the behavioral consequences. Moreover, MAOB is region-dependently involved in responses of the brain to Amph and baclofen, supporting interactions between GABA and monoamines.

  3. Prostaglandin E2 activates and utilizes mTORC2 as a central signaling locus for the regulation of mast cell chemotaxis and mediator release.

    PubMed

    Kuehn, Hye Sun; Jung, Mi-Yeon; Beaven, Michael A; Metcalfe, Dean D; Gilfillan, Alasdair M

    2011-01-07

    Prostaglandin (PG) E(2), a potent mediator produced in inflamed tissues, can substantially influence mast cell responses including adhesion to basement membrane proteins, chemotaxis, and chemokine production. However, the signaling pathways by which PGE(2) induces mast cell chemotaxis and chemokine production remains undefined. In this study, we identified the downstream target of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), as a key regulator of these responses. In mouse bone marrow-derived mast cells, PGE(2) was found to induce activation of mTORC1 (mTOR complexed to raptor) as indicated by increased p70S6K and 4E-BP1 phosphorylation, and activation of mTORC2 (mTOR complexed to rictor), as indicated by increased phosphorylation of AKT at position Ser(473). Selective inhibition of the mTORC1 cascade by rapamycin or by the use of raptor-targeted shRNA failed to decrease PGE(2)-mediated chemotaxis or chemokine generation. However, inhibition of the mTORC2 cascade through the dual mTORC1/mTORC2 inhibitor Torin, or through rictor-targeted shRNA, resulted in a significant attenuation in PGE(2)-mediated chemotaxis, which was associated with a comparable decrease in actin polymerization. Furthermore, mTORC2 down-regulation decreased PGE(2)-induced production of the chemokine monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (CCL2), which was linked to a significant reduction in ROS production. These findings are consistent with the conclusion that activation of mTORC2, downstream of PI3K, represents a critical signaling locus for chemotaxis and chemokine release from PGE(2)-activated mast cells.

  4. Blockade of Cannabinoid CB1 receptor attenuates the acquisition of morphine-induced conditioned place preference along with a downregulation of ERK, CREB phosphorylation, and BDNF expression in the nucleus accumbens and hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianbo; Wang, Na; Chen, Bo; Wang, Yi'nan; He, Jing; Cai, Xintong; Zhang, Hongbo; Wei, Shuguang; Li, Shengbin

    2016-09-06

    Cannabinoid CB1 receptor (CB1R) is highly expressed in the mesocorticolimbic system and associated with drug craving and relapse. Clinical trials suggest that CB1R antagonists may represent new therapies for drug addiction. However, the downstream signaling of CB1R is not fully elucidated. In the present study, we investigated the relationship between CB1R and the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signaling in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and hippocampus in morphine-induced conditioned place preference (CPP), which is used to assess the morphine-induced reward memory. The protein level of CB1R, ERK, CREB, and BDNF were detected by western blotting. Additionally, a CB1R antagonist, AM251, was used to study whether blockade of CB1R altered the CPP and above-mentioned molecules. We found an increase of CB1R expression in the NAc and hippocampus of the mice following morphine CPP, but not those after repeated morphine in home cage without context exposure (NO-CPP). Both morphine CPP and NO-CPP induced an upregulation of ERK, CREB phosphorylation and BDNF expression. Furthermore, pretreatment with AM251 before morphine attenuated the CPP acquisition and CB1R expression as well as the activation of ERK-CREB-BDNF cascade. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that (1) Repeated morphine with context exposures but not merely the pharmacological effects of morphine increased CB1R expression both in the NAc and hippocampus. (2) CB1R antagonist mediated blockade of ERK-CREB-BDNF signaling activation in the NAc and hippocampus may be an important mechanism underlying the attenuation of morphine CPP.

  5. Cross-talks via mTORC2 can explain enhanced activation in response to insulin in diabetic patients

    PubMed Central

    Magnusson, Rasmus; Gustafsson, Mika; Cedersund, Gunnar; Strålfors, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms of insulin resistance in Type 2 diabetes have been extensively studied in primary human adipocytes, and mathematical modelling has clarified the central role of attenuation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) complex 1 (mTORC1) activity in the diabetic state. Attenuation of mTORC1 in diabetes quells insulin-signalling network-wide, except for the mTOR in complex 2 (mTORC2)-catalysed phosphorylation of protein kinase B (PKB) at Ser473 (PKB-S473P), which is increased. This unique increase could potentially be explained by feedback and interbranch cross-talk signals. To examine if such mechanisms operate in adipocytes, we herein analysed data from an unbiased phosphoproteomic screen in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Using a mathematical modelling approach, we showed that a negative signal from mTORC1-p70 S6 kinase (S6K) to rictor–mTORC2 in combination with a positive signal from PKB to SIN1–mTORC2 are compatible with the experimental data. This combined cross-branch signalling predicted an increased PKB-S473P in response to attenuation of mTORC1 – a distinguishing feature of the insulin resistant state in human adipocytes. This aspect of insulin signalling was then verified for our comprehensive model of insulin signalling in human adipocytes. Introduction of the cross-branch signals was compatible with all data for insulin signalling in human adipocytes, and the resulting model can explain all data network-wide, including the increased PKB-S473P in the diabetic state. Our approach was to first identify potential mechanisms in data from a phosphoproteomic screen in a cell line, and then verify such mechanisms in primary human cells, which demonstrates how an unbiased approach can support a direct knowledge-based study. PMID:27986865

  6. Scaffold protein enigma homolog activates CREB whereas a short splice variant prevents CREB activation in cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Ito, Jumpei; Iijima, Masumi; Yoshimoto, Nobuo; Niimi, Tomoaki; Kuroda, Shun'ichi; Maturana, Andrés D

    2015-12-01

    Enigma Homolog (ENH1 or Pdlim5) is a scaffold protein composed of an N-terminal PDZ domain and three LIM domains at the C-terminal end. The enh gene encodes for several splice variants with opposing functions. ENH1 promotes cardiomyocytes hypertrophy whereas ENH splice variants lacking LIM domains prevent it. ENH1 interacts with various Protein Kinase C (PKC) isozymes and Protein Kinase D1 (PKD1). In addition, the binding of ENH1's LIM domains to PKC is sufficient to activate the kinase without stimulation. The downstream events of the ENH1-PKC/PKD1 complex remain unknown. PKC and PKD1 are known to phosphorylate the transcription factor cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB). We tested whether ENH1 could play a role in the activation of CREB. We found that, in neonatal rat ventricular cardiomyocytes, ENH1 interacts with CREB, is necessary for the phosphorylation of CREB at ser133, and the activation of CREB-dependent transcription. On the contrary, the overexpression of ENH3, a LIM-less splice variant, inhibited the phosphorylation of CREB. ENH3 overexpression or shRNA knockdown of ENH1 prevented the CREB-dependent transcription. Our results thus suggest that ENH1 plays an essential role in CREB's activation and dependent transcription in cardiomyocytes. At the opposite, ENH3 prevents the CREB transcriptional activity. In conclusion, these results provide a first molecular explanation to the opposing functions of ENH splice variants.

  7. Rictor/mTORC2Loss in the Myf5-lineage Reprograms Brown Fat Metabolism and Protects Mice against Obesity and Metabolic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Chien-Min; Calejman, Camila Martinez; Sanchez-Gurmaches, Joan; Li, Huawei; Clish, Clary B.; Hettmer, Simone; Wagers, Amy J.; Guertin, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The in vivo functions of mTORC2, and the signaling mechanisms that control brown adipose tissue (BAT) fuel utilization and activity, are not well understood. Here, by conditionally deleting Rictorin the Myf5-lineage, we provide in vivo evidence that mTORC2 is dispensable for skeletal muscle development and regeneration but essential for BAT growth. Furthermore, deleting RictorinMyf5 precursors shifts BAT metabolism to a more oxidative and less lipogenic state and protects mice from obesity and metabolic disease at thermoneutrality. We additionally find that Rictor is required for brown adipocyte differentiation in vitro, that the mechanismspecifically requires AKT1 hydrophobic motif phosphorylation but is independent of pan-AKT signaling, and is rescued with BMP7. Our findings provide new insights into the signaling circuitry that regulates brown adipocytes and could have important implications for developing therapies aimed at increasing energy expenditure as a means to combat human obesity. PMID:25001283

  8. Preclinical characterization of OSI-027, a potent and selective inhibitor of mTORC1 and mTORC2: distinct from rapamycin.

    PubMed

    Bhagwat, Shripad V; Gokhale, Prafulla C; Crew, Andrew P; Cooke, Andy; Yao, Yan; Mantis, Christine; Kahler, Jennifer; Workman, Jennifer; Bittner, Mark; Dudkin, Lorina; Epstein, David M; Gibson, Neil W; Wild, Robert; Arnold, Lee D; Houghton, Peter J; Pachter, Jonathan A

    2011-08-01

    The phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT/mTOR pathway is frequently activated in human cancers, and mTOR is a clinically validated target. mTOR forms two distinct multiprotein complexes, mTORC1 and mTORC2, which regulate cell growth, metabolism, proliferation, and survival. Rapamycin and its analogues partially inhibit mTOR through allosteric binding to mTORC1, but not mTORC2, and have shown clinical utility in certain cancers. Here, we report the preclinical characterization of OSI-027, a selective and potent dual inhibitor of mTORC1 and mTORC2 with biochemical IC(50) values of 22 nmol/L and 65 nmol/L, respectively. OSI-027 shows more than 100-fold selectivity for mTOR relative to PI3Kα, PI3Kβ, PI3Kγ, and DNA-PK. OSI-027 inhibits phosphorylation of the mTORC1 substrates 4E-BP1 and S6K1 as well as the mTORC2 substrate AKT in diverse cancer models in vitro and in vivo. OSI-027 and OXA-01 (close analogue of OSI-027) potently inhibit proliferation of several rapamycin-sensitive and -insensitive nonengineered and engineered cancer cell lines and also, induce cell death in tumor cell lines with activated PI3K-AKT signaling. OSI-027 shows concentration-dependent pharmacodynamic effects on phosphorylation of 4E-BP1 and AKT in tumor tissue with resulting tumor growth inhibition. OSI-027 shows robust antitumor activity in several different human xenograft models representing various histologies. Furthermore, in COLO 205 and GEO colon cancer xenograft models, OSI-027 shows superior efficacy compared with rapamycin. Our results further support the important role of mTOR as a driver of tumor growth and establish OSI-027 as a potent anticancer agent. OSI-027 is currently in phase I clinical trials in cancer patients.

  9. Rictor/mTORC2 signaling mediates TGFβ1-induced fibroblast activation and kidney fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianzhong; Ren, Jiafa; Liu, Xin; Jiang, Lei; He, Weichun; Yuan, Weiping; Yang, Junwei; Dai, Chunsun

    2015-09-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) was recently identified in two structurally distinct multiprotein complexes: mTORC1 and mTORC2. Previously, we found that Rictor/mTORC2 protects against cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury, but the role and mechanisms for Rictor/mTORC2 in TGFβ1-induced fibroblast activation and kidney fibrosis remains unknown. To study this, we initially treated NRK-49F cells with TGFβ1 and found that TGFβ1 could activate Rictor/mTORC2 signaling in cultured cells. Blocking Rictor/mTORC2 signaling with Rictor or Akt1 small interfering RNAs markedly inhibited TGFβ1-induced fibronection and α-smooth muscle actin expression. Ensuing western blotting or immunostaining results showed that Rictor/mTORC2 signaling was activated in kidney interstitial myofibroblasts from mice with unilateral ureteral obstruction. Next, a mouse model with fibroblast-specific deletion of Rictor was generated. These knockout mice were normal at birth and had no obvious kidney dysfunction or kidney morphological abnormality within 2 months of birth. Compared with control littermates, the kidneys of Rictor knockout mice developed less interstitial extracellular matrix deposition and inflammatory cell infiltration at 1 or 2 weeks after ureteral obstruction. Thus our study suggests that Rictor/mTORC2 signaling activation mediates TGFβ1-induced fibroblast activation and contributes to the development of kidney fibrosis. This may provide a therapeutic target for chronic kidney diseases.

  10. The small GTPases Ras and Rap1 bind to and control TORC2 activity

    PubMed Central

    Khanna, Ankita; Lotfi, Pouya; Chavan, Anita J.; Montaño, Nieves M.; Bolourani, Parvin; Weeks, Gerald; Shen, Zhouxin; Briggs, Steven P.; Pots, Henderikus; Van Haastert, Peter J. M.; Kortholt, Arjan; Charest, Pascale G.

    2016-01-01

    Target of Rapamycin Complex 2 (TORC2) has conserved roles in regulating cytoskeleton dynamics and cell migration and has been linked to cancer metastasis. However, little is known about the mechanisms regulating TORC2 activity and function in any system. In Dictyostelium, TORC2 functions at the front of migrating cells downstream of the Ras protein RasC, controlling F-actin dynamics and cAMP production. Here, we report the identification of the small GTPase Rap1 as a conserved binding partner of the TORC2 component RIP3/SIN1, and that Rap1 positively regulates the RasC-mediated activation of TORC2 in Dictyostelium. Moreover, we show that active RasC binds to the catalytic domain of TOR, suggesting a mechanism of TORC2 activation that is similar to Rheb activation of TOR complex 1. Dual Ras/Rap1 regulation of TORC2 may allow for integration of Ras and Rap1 signaling pathways in directed cell migration. PMID:27172998

  11. mTORC2 Signaling Regulates Nox4-Induced Podocyte Depletion in Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Eid, Stéphanie; Boutary, Suzan; Braych, Kawthar; Sabra, Ramzi; Massaad, Charbel; Hamdy, Ahmed; Rashid, Awad; Moodad, Sarah; Block, Karen; Gorin, Yves; Abboud, Hanna E.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Aim: Podocyte apoptosis is a critical mechanism for excessive loss of urinary albumin that eventuates in kidney fibrosis. Oxidative stress plays a critical role in hyperglycemia-induced glomerular injury. We explored the hypothesis that mammalian target of rapamycin complex 2 (mTORC2) mediates podocyte injury in diabetes. Results: High glucose (HG)-induced podocyte injury reflected by alterations in the slit diaphragm protein podocin and podocyte depletion/apoptosis. This was paralleled by activation of the Rictor/mTORC2/Akt pathway. HG also increased the levels of Nox4 and NADPH oxidase activity. Inhibition of mTORC2 using small interfering RNA (siRNA)-targeting Rictor in vitro decreased HG-induced Nox1 and Nox4, NADPH oxidase activity, restored podocin levels, and reduced podocyte depletion/apoptosis. Inhibition of mTORC2 had no effect on mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) activation, described by our group to be increased in diabetes, suggesting that the mTORC2 activation by HG could mediate podocyte injury independently of mTORC1. In isolated glomeruli of OVE26 mice, there was a similar activation of the Rictor/mTORC2/Akt signaling pathway with increase in Nox4 and NADPH oxidase activity. Inhibition of mTORC2 using antisense oligonucleotides targeting Rictor restored podocin levels, reduced podocyte depletion/apoptosis, and attenuated glomerular injury and albuminuria. Innovation: Our data provide evidence for a novel function of mTORC2 in NADPH oxidase-derived reactive oxygen species generation and podocyte apoptosis that contributes to urinary albumin excretion in type 1 diabetes. Conclusion: mTORC2 and/or NADPH oxidase inhibition may represent a therapeutic modality for diabetic kidney disease. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 25, 703–719. PMID:27393154

  12. Leucine facilitates the insulin-stimulated glucose uptake and insulin signaling in skeletal muscle cells: involving mTORC1 and mTORC2.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui; Liu, Rui; Xiong, Yufang; Li, Xiang; Wang, Xiaolei; Ma, Yan; Guo, Huailan; Hao, Liping; Yao, Ping; Liu, Liegang; Wang, Di; Yang, Xuefeng

    2014-08-01

    Leucine, a branched-chain amino acid, has been shown to promote glucose uptake and increase insulin sensitivity in skeletal muscle, but the exact mechanism remains unestablished. We addressed this issue in cultured skeletal muscle cells in this study. Our results showed that leucine alone did not have an effect on glucose uptake or phosphorylation of protein kinase B (AKT), but facilitated the insulin-induced glucose uptake and AKT phosphorylation. The insulin-stimulated glucose uptake and AKT phosphorylation were inhibited by the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitor, wortmannin, but the inhibition was partially reversed by leucine. The inhibitor of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1), rapamycin, had no effect on the insulin-stimulated glucose uptake, but eliminated the facilitating effect of leucine in the insulin-stimulated glucose uptake and AKT phosphorylation. In addition, leucine facilitation of the insulin-induced AKT phosphorylation was neutralized by knocking down the core component of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 2 (mTORC2) with specific siRNA. Together, these findings show that leucine can facilitate the insulin-induced insulin signaling and glucose uptake in skeletal muscle cells through both mTORC1 and mTORC2, implicating the potential importance of this amino acid in glucose homeostasis and providing new mechanistic insights.

  13. Targeted Inhibition of Rictor/mTORC2 in Cancer Treatment: A New Era after Rapamycin.

    PubMed

    Zou, Zhipeng; Chen, Juan; Yang, Jun; Bai, Xiaochun

    2016-01-01

    The evolutionarily conserved mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) forms two functionally distinct complexes, mTORC1 and mTORC2. mTORC1, consisting of mTOR, raptor, and mLST8 (GβL), is sensitive to rapamycin and thought to control autonomous cell growth in response to nutrient availability and growth factors. mTORC2, containing the core components mTOR, mLST8, Rictor, mSIN1, and Protor1/2 is largely insensitive to rapamycin. mTORC2 specifically senses growth factors and regulates cell proliferation, metabolism, actin rearrangement, and survival. Dysregulation of mTOR signaling often occurs in a variety of human malignant diseases, rendering it a crucial and validated target in cancer treatment. However, the effectiveness of rapamycin as single-agent therapy is suppressed, in part, by the numerous strong mTORC1-dependent negative feedback loops. Although preclinical and clinical studies of ATP-competitive mTOR inhibitors that target both mTORC1 and mTORC2 have shown greater effectiveness than rapalogs for cancer treatment, the mTORC1 inhibition-induced negative feedback activation of PI3- K/PDK1 and Akt (Thr308) may be sufficient to promote cell survival. Recent cancer biology studies indicated that mTORC2 is a promising target, since its activity is essential for the development of a number of cancers. These studies provide a rationale for developing inhibitors specifically targeting mTORC2, which do not perturb the mTORC1- dependent negative feedback loops and have a more acceptable therapeutic window. This review summarizes the present understanding of mTORC2 signaling and functions, especially tumorigenic functions, highlighting the current status and future perspectives for targeting mTORC2 in cancer treatment.

  14. RES-529: a PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway inhibitor that dissociates the mTORC1 and mTORC2 complexes

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    RES-529 (previously named Palomid 529, P529) is a phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT/mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway inhibitor that interferes with the pathway through both mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) and mTOR complex 2 (mTORC2) dissociation. This compound is currently being developed in oncology and ophthalmology. The oncology focus is for the treatment of glioblastoma, where it has received orphan designation by the US Food and Drug Administration, and prostate cancer. We present a review of the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway, its role in tumorigenesis, and the potential of RES-529 in cancer treatment. RES-529 inhibits mTORC1/mTORC2 activity in various cancer cell lines, as noted by decreased phosphorylation of substrates including ribosomal protein S6, 4E-BP1, and AKT, leading to cell growth inhibition and death, with activity generally in the range of 5–15 μmol/l. In animal tumor models where the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway is abnormally activated (i.e. glioblastoma, prostate cancer, and breast cancer), RES-529 reduces tumor growth by as much as 78%. RES-529 treatment is synergistic with radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and hormonal therapy in reducing tumor growth, potentially by preventing PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway activation associated with these treatments. Furthermore, this compound has shown antiangiogenic activity in several animal models. mTORC1 and mTORC2 have redundant and distinct activities that contribute toward oncogenesis. Current inhibitors of this pathway have primarily targeted mTORC1, but have shown limited clinical efficacy. Inhibitors of mTORC1 and mTORC2 such as RES-529 may therefore have the potential to overcome the deficiencies found in targeting only mTORC1. PMID:26918392

  15. DNA damage-induced S and G2/M cell cycle arrest requires mTORC2-dependent regulation of Chk1.

    PubMed

    Selvarajah, Jogitha; Elia, Androulla; Carroll, Veronica A; Moumen, Abdeladim

    2015-01-01

    mTOR signalling is commonly dysregulated in cancer. Concordantly, mTOR inhibitors have demonstrated efficacy in a subset of tumors and are in clinical trials as combination therapies. Although mTOR is associated with promoting cell survival after DNA damage, the exact mechanisms are not well understood. Moreover, since mTOR exists as two complexes, mTORC1 and mTORC2, the role of mTORC2 in cancer and in the DNA damage response is less well explored. Here, we report that mTOR protein levels and kinase activity are transiently increased by DNA damage in an ATM and ATR-dependent manner. We show that inactivation of mTOR with siRNA or pharmacological inhibition of mTORC1/2 kinase prevents etoposide-induced S and G2/M cell cycle arrest. Further results show that Chk1, a key regulator of the cell cycle arrest, is important for this since ablation of mTOR prevents DNA damage-induced Chk1 phosphorylation and decreases Chk1 protein production. Furthermore, mTORC2 was essential and mTORC1 dispensable, for this role. Importantly, we show that mTORC1/2 inhibition sensitizes breast cancer cells to chemotherapy. Taken together, these results suggest that breast cancer cells may rely on mTORC2-Chk1 pathway for survival and provide evidence that mTOR kinase inhibitors may overcome resistance to DNA-damage based therapies in breast cancer.

  16. RES-529: a PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway inhibitor that dissociates the mTORC1 and mTORC2 complexes.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, Mark A

    2016-07-01

    RES-529 (previously named Palomid 529, P529) is a phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT/mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway inhibitor that interferes with the pathway through both mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) and mTOR complex 2 (mTORC2) dissociation. This compound is currently being developed in oncology and ophthalmology. The oncology focus is for the treatment of glioblastoma, where it has received orphan designation by the US Food and Drug Administration, and prostate cancer. We present a review of the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway, its role in tumorigenesis, and the potential of RES-529 in cancer treatment. RES-529 inhibits mTORC1/mTORC2 activity in various cancer cell lines, as noted by decreased phosphorylation of substrates including ribosomal protein S6, 4E-BP1, and AKT, leading to cell growth inhibition and death, with activity generally in the range of 5-15 μmol/l. In animal tumor models where the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway is abnormally activated (i.e. glioblastoma, prostate cancer, and breast cancer), RES-529 reduces tumor growth by as much as 78%. RES-529 treatment is synergistic with radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and hormonal therapy in reducing tumor growth, potentially by preventing PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway activation associated with these treatments. Furthermore, this compound has shown antiangiogenic activity in several animal models. mTORC1 and mTORC2 have redundant and distinct activities that contribute toward oncogenesis. Current inhibitors of this pathway have primarily targeted mTORC1, but have shown limited clinical efficacy. Inhibitors of mTORC1 and mTORC2 such as RES-529 may therefore have the potential to overcome the deficiencies found in targeting only mTORC1.

  17. CREB1/ATF1 Activation in Photoreceptor Degeneration and Protection

    PubMed Central

    Beltran, William A.; Allore, Heather G.; Johnson, Elizabeth; Towle, Virginia; Tao, Weng; Acland, Gregory M.; Aguirre, Gustavo D.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose. The cAMP response element binding protein 1 (CREB1) and activating transcription factor 1 (ATF1) are closely related members of the bZIP superfamily of transcription factors. Both are activated in response to a wide array of stimuli, including cellular stress. This study was conducted to assess the CREB1/ATF1 pathway in photoreceptor disease and protection. Methods. The expression levels of p-CREB1, CREB1, and ATF1 were examined by immunoblot and immunohistochemistry in normal canine retina and retinas of several canine models of retinal degeneration (rcd1, rcd2, erd, prcd, XLPRA1, XLPRA2, T4R RHO). Humans retinas affected with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) were also examined. p-CREB1/ATF1 immunolabeling was assessed in normal and rcd1 dogs treated with ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF), to examine the effect of a neuroprotective stimulus on activation of CREB1/ATF1. Results. Native CREB1 and ATF1 as well as phosphorylated CREB1/ATF1 was examined in normal canine retina by immunoblot. The p-CREB1 antibody identified phosphorylated CREB1 and ATF1 and labeled the inner retina only in normal dogs. In degenerate canine and human retinas, strong immunolabeling appeared in rod and cone photoreceptors, indicating increased expression of native CREB1 and ATF1, as well as increased phosphorylation of these proteins. Retinal protection by CNTF in rcd1 dogs was accompanied by a significant increase in the number of p-CREB1/ATF1-labeled photoreceptor nuclei. Conclusions. Positive association of CREB1/ATF1 phosphorylation with photoreceptor protection suggests that it may contribute to an innate protective response. These data identify a signaling mechanism in rods and cones of potential importance for therapies of RP and AMD. PMID:19643965

  18. Dynorphin up-regulation in the dentate granule cell mossy fiber pathway following chronic inhibition of GluN2B-containing NMDAR is associated with increased CREB (Ser 133) phosphorylation, but is independent of BDNF/TrkB signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Rittase, W. Bradley; Dong, Yu; Barksdale, DaRel; Galdzicki, Zygmunt; Bausch, Suzanne B.

    2014-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that neuronal responses to N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDAR) activation/inactivation are influenced by subunit composition. For example, activation of synaptic NMDAR (comprised of GluN2A > GluN2B) phosphorylates cAMP-response-element-binding protein (CREB) at Ser 133, induces BDNF expression and promotes neuronal survival. Activation of extrasynaptic NMDAR (comprised of GluN2B>GluN2), dephosphorylates CREB (Ser 133), reduces BDNF expression and triggers neuronal death. These results led us to hypothesize that chronic inhibition of GluN2B-containing NMDAR would increase CREB (Ser 133) phosphorylation, increase BDNF levels and subsequently alter downstream dynorphin (DYN) and neuropeptide Y (NPY) expression. We focused on DYN and NPY because these neuropeptides can decrease excitatory neurotransmission and seizure occurrence and we reported previously that seizure-like events are reduced following chronic treatment with GluN2B antagonists. Consistent with our hypothesis, chronic treatment (17-21 days) of hippocampal slice cultures with the GluN2B-selective antagonists ifenprodil or Ro25,6981 increased both CREB (Ser 133) phosphorylation and granule cell mossy fiber pathway DYN expression. Similar treatment with the non-subtype-selective NMDAR antagonists D-APV or memantine had no significant effect on either CREB (Ser 133) phosphorylation or DYN expression. In contrast to our hypothesis, BDNF levels were decreased following chronic treatment with Ro25,6981, but not ifenprodil, D-APV or memantine. Blockade of BDNF actions and TrkB activation did not significantly augment hilar DYN expression in vehicle-treated cultures and had no effect in Ro25,6981 treated cultures. These finding suggest that chronic exposure to GluN2B-selective NMDAR antagonists increased DYN expression through a putatively pCREB-dependent, but BDNF/TrkB-independent mechanism. PMID:24769103

  19. Early induction of CREB activation and CREB-regulating signalling by antidepressants.

    PubMed

    Tardito, Daniela; Musazzi, Laura; Tiraboschi, Ettore; Mallei, Alessandra; Racagni, Giorgio; Popoli, Maurizio

    2009-11-01

    Converging evidence points to adaptive changes in neuroplasticity and gene expression as mediators of therapeutic action of antidepressants. Activation of cAMP response-element binding protein (CREB) and CREB-regulating signalling are considered main effectors in these mechanisms. We analysed the temporal profile of intracellular changes induced by antidepressants, by measuring activation of major CREB-regulating signalling cascades and activation (Ser133 phosphorylation) of CREB. The main aims of the study were to investigate how these different variables are modulated with time, whether stronger activation of signalling cascades corresponds to stronger activation of CREB, and whether these changes are different in distinct brain areas. Rat groups were treated for 1, 2 or 3 wk with the antidepressants fluoxetine or reboxetine; in additional groups drug treatment was followed by a washout week (3+1). Activation of CREB and major effectors in signalling cascades were analysed by Western blot analysis with phospho-antibodies, in nuclear and cytosolic fractions from hippocampus and prefrontal/frontal cortex (P/FC). Surprisingly, CREB activation was already maximal after 1-wk treatment. In hippocampus early and stronger CREB activation was consistent with early and stronger activation of signalling. For both drugs, the profile of activation in P/FC was different from that observed in hippocampus. The results also showed that, contrary to the activatory role of MAP-ERKs and CaM kinase IV, nuclear alphaCaM kinase II was inactivated in parallel with activation of CREB.

  20. Calcium channel regulator Mid1 links TORC2-mediated changes in mitochondrial respiration to autophagy.

    PubMed

    Vlahakis, Ariadne; Lopez Muniozguren, Nerea; Powers, Ted

    2016-12-19

    Autophagy is a catabolic process that recycles cytoplasmic contents and is crucial for cell survival during stress. The target of rapamycin (TOR) kinase regulates autophagy as part of two distinct protein complexes, TORC1 and TORC2. TORC1 negatively regulates autophagy according to nitrogen availability. In contrast, TORC2 functions as a positive regulator of autophagy during amino acid starvation, via its target kinase Ypk1, by repressing the activity of the calcium-dependent phosphatase calcineurin and promoting the general amino acid control (GAAC) response. Precisely how TORC2-Ypk1 signaling regulates calcineurin within this pathway remains unknown. Here we demonstrate that activation of calcineurin requires Mid1, an endoplasmic reticulum-localized calcium channel regulatory protein implicated in the oxidative stress response. We find that normal mitochondrial respiration is perturbed in TORC2-Ypk1-deficient cells, which results in the accumulation of mitochondrial-derived reactive oxygen species that signal to Mid1 to activate calcineurin, thereby inhibiting the GAAC response and autophagy. These findings describe a novel pathway involving TORC2, mitochondrial oxidative stress, and calcium homeostasis for autophagy regulation.

  1. mTORC2 Signaling Promotes Skeletal Growth and Bone Formation in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jianquan; Holguin, Nilsson; Shi, Yu; Silva, Matthew J.; Long, Fanxin

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is an evolutionarily conserved serine/threonine kinase controlling many physiological processes in mammals. mTOR functions in two distinct protein complexes, namely mTORC1 and mTORC2. Compared to mTORC1, the specific roles of mTORC2 are less well understood. To investigate the potential contribution of mTORC2 to skeletal development and homeostasis, we have genetically deleted Rictor, an essential component of mTORC2, in the limb skeletogenic mesenchyme of the mouse embryo. Loss of Rictor leads to shorter and narrower skeletal elements in both embryos and postnatal mice. In the embryo, Rictor deletion reduces the width but not the length of the initial cartilage anlage. Subsequently, the embryonic skeletal elements are shortened due to a delay in chondrocyte hypertrophy, with no change in proliferation, apoptosis, cell size, or matrix production. Postnatally, Rictor-deficient mice exhibit impaired bone formation, resulting in thinner cortical bone, but the trabecular bone mass is relatively normal thanks to a concurrent decrease in bone resorption. Moreover, Rictor-deficient bones exhibit a lesser anabolic response to mechanical loading. Thus, mTORC2 signaling is necessary for optimal skeletal growth and bone anabolism. PMID:25196701

  2. Systemic Inhibition of CREB is Well-tolerated in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bingbing X.; Gardner, Ryan; Xue, Changhui; Qian, David Z.; Xie, Fuchun; Thomas, George; Kazmierczak, Steven C.; Habecker, Beth A.; Xiao, Xiangshu

    2016-01-01

    cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB) is a nuclear transcription factor activated by multiple extracellular signals including growth factors and hormones. These extracellular cues activate CREB through phosphorylation at Ser133 by various protein serine/threonine kinases. Once phosphorylated, it promotes its association with transcription coactivators CREB-binding protein (CBP) and its paralog p300 to activate CREB-dependent gene transcription. Tumor tissues of different origins have been shown to present overexpression and/or overactivation of CREB, indicating CREB as a potential cancer drug target. We previously identified 666-15 as a potent inhibitor of CREB with efficacious anti-cancer activity both in vitro and in vivo. Herein, we investigated the specificity of 666-15 and evaluated its potential in vivo toxicity. We found that 666-15 was fairly selective in inhibiting CREB. 666-15 was also found to be readily bioavailable to achieve pharmacologically relevant concentrations for CREB inhibition. Furthermore, the mice treated with 666-15 showed no evidence of changes in body weight, complete blood count, blood chemistry profile, cardiac contractility and tissue histologies from liver, kidney and heart. For the first time, these results demonstrate that pharmacological inhibition of CREB is well-tolerated in vivo and indicate that such inhibitors should be promising cancer therapeutics. PMID:27694829

  3. Distinct signaling mechanisms of mTORC1 and mTORC2 in glioblastoma multiforme: a tale of two complexes.

    PubMed

    Jhanwar-Uniyal, Meena; Gillick, John L; Neil, Jayson; Tobias, Michael; Thwing, Zachary E; Murali, Raj

    2015-01-01

    Mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a serine-threonine kinase that functions via two multiprotein complexes, namely mTORC1 and mTORC2, each characterized by different binding partners that confer separate functions. mTORC1 function is tightly regulated by PI3-K/Akt and is sensitive to rapamycin. mTORC2 is sensitive to growth factors, not nutrients, and is associated with rapamycin-insensitivity. mTORC1 regulates protein synthesis and cell growth through downstream molecules: 4E-BP1 (also called EIF4E-BP1) and S6K. Also, mTORC2 is thought to modulate growth factor signaling by phosphorylating the C-terminal hydrophobic motif of some AGC kinases such as Akt and SGK. Recent evidence has suggested that mTORC2 may play an important role in maintenance of normal as well as cancer cells by virtue of its association with ribosomes, which may be involved in metabolic regulation of the cell. Rapamycin (sirolimus) and its analogs known as rapalogues, such as RAD001 (everolimus) and CCI-779 (temsirolimus), suppress mTOR activity through an allosteric mechanism that acts at a distance from the ATP-catalytic binding site, and are considered incomplete inhibitors. Moreover, these compounds suppress mTORC1-mediated S6K activation, thereby blocking a negative feedback loop, leading to activation of mitogenic pathways promoting cell survival and growth. Consequently, mTOR is a suitable target of therapy in cancer treatments. However, neither of these complexes is fully inhibited by the allosteric inhibitor rapamycin or its analogs. In recent years, new pharmacologic agents have been developed which can inhibit these complexes via ATP-binding mechanism, or dual inhibition of the canonical PI3-K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway. These compounds include WYE-354, KU-003679, PI-103, Torin1, and Torin2, which can target both complexes or serve as a dual inhibitor for PI3-K/mTOR. This investigation describes the mechanism of action of pharmacological agents that effectively target mTORC1

  4. DNMT3b Modulates Melanoma Growth by Controlling Levels of mTORC2 Component RICTOR.

    PubMed

    Micevic, Goran; Muthusamy, Viswanathan; Damsky, William; Theodosakis, Nicholas; Liu, Xiaoni; Meeth, Katrina; Wingrove, Emily; Santhanakrishnan, Manjula; Bosenberg, Marcus

    2016-03-08

    DNA methyltransferase DNMT3B is frequently overexpressed in tumor cells and plays important roles during the formation and progression of several cancer types. However, the specific signaling pathways controlled by DNMT3B in cancers, including melanoma, are poorly understood. Here, we report that DNMT3B plays a pro-tumorigenic role in human melanoma and that DNMT3B loss dramatically suppresses melanoma formation in the Braf/Pten mouse melanoma model. Loss of DNMT3B results in hypomethylation of the miR-196b promoter and increased miR-196b expression, which directly targets the mTORC2 component Rictor. Loss of RICTOR in turn prevents mTORC2 activation, which is critical for melanoma formation and growth. These findings establish Dnmt3b as a regulator of melanoma formation through its effect on mTORC2 signaling. Based on these results, DNMT3B is a potential therapeutic target in melanoma.

  5. Chemical-Genetics of Rapamycin-Insensitive TORC2 in S. cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Kliegman, Joseph I.; Fiedler, Dorothea; Ryan, Colm J.; Xu, Yi-Fan; Su, Xiao-yang; Thomas, David; Caccese, Max C.; Cheng, Ada; Shales, Michael; Rabinowitz, Joshua D.; Krogan, Nevan J.; Shokat, Kevan M.

    2014-01-01

    Current approaches for identifying synergistic targets use cell culture models with combinations of clinically available drugs to see if the combined effect of the combination is better than predicted by their individual efficacy. New techniques are needed to systematically and rationally identify targets and pathways that have a high potential as synergistic targets. In this study, we create a tool to screen and identify molecular targets that may synergize with new inhibitors of TOR (Target of Rapamycin), a conserved protein that is a major integrator of cell proliferation signals in the nutrient-signaling pathway. While clinical results from TORC1 inhibition using rapamycin analogs (that only inhibit TORC1) have been disappointing, trials using inhibitors that also target TORC2 have been promising. To understand the molecular basis for this increased therapeutic efficacy and to discover secondary targets that may have potential in targeted combination therapy, we engineered TOR2 in S. cerevisiae to accept an orthogonal inhibitor in order to create the first chemical tool to selectively inhibit TORC2. We used this tool to create a Chemical Epistasis Mini-Array Profile, or ChE-MAP, by measuring interactions between the chemically inhibited TOR2 kinase and a diverse library of deletion mutants. The ChE-MAP identified known TOR components and distinguished between TORC1 (assessed using rapamycin) and TORC2 dependent functions. Results showed a novel TORC2-specific interaction with the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP). We used global metabolic profiling to show that that TORC2 inhibition led to decreases in metabolites specific to the PPP and confirmed that TOR2 was regulating this process using metabolic flux analysis. Regulation of the PPP is a previously unappreciated role for TORC2 that may suggest a role for the complex in balancing the high energy demand required for ribosome biogenesis. PMID:24360963

  6. mTORC1 is necessary but mTORC2 and GSK3β are inhibitory for AKT3-induced axon regeneration in the central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Linqing; Yang, Liu; Huang, Haoliang; Liang, Feisi; Ling, Chen; Hu, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Injured mature CNS axons do not regenerate in mammals. Deletion of PTEN, the negative regulator of PI3K, induces CNS axon regeneration through the activation of PI3K-mTOR signaling. We have conducted an extensive molecular dissection of the cross-regulating mechanisms in axon regeneration that involve the downstream effectors of PI3K, AKT and the two mTOR complexes (mTORC1 and mTORC2). We found that the predominant AKT isoform in CNS, AKT3, induces much more robust axon regeneration than AKT1 and that activation of mTORC1 and inhibition of GSK3β are two critical parallel pathways for AKT-induced axon regeneration. Surprisingly, phosphorylation of T308 and S473 of AKT play opposite roles in GSK3β phosphorylation and inhibition, by which mTORC2 and pAKT-S473 negatively regulate axon regeneration. Thus, our study revealed a complex neuron-intrinsic balancing mechanism involving AKT as the nodal point of PI3K, mTORC1/2 and GSK3β that coordinates both positive and negative cues to regulate adult CNS axon regeneration. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14908.001 PMID:27026523

  7. Regulation of the epithelial Na+ channel by the mTORC2/SGK1 pathway.

    PubMed

    Lang, Florian; Pearce, David

    2016-02-01

    The epithelial Na(+) channel (ENaC) is decisive for sodium reabsorption by the aldosterone-sensitive distal nephron (ASDN) of the kidney. ENaC is regulated by the serum- and glucocorticoid-inducible kinase 1 (SGK1), a kinase genomically upregulated by several hormones including glucocorticoids and mineralocorticoids. SGK1 is activated by the serine/threonine kinase mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) isoform mTORC2. SGK1 knockout (sgk1(-/-) mice) impairs renal Na(+) retention during salt depletion. The mTOR catalytic site inhibitor, PP242, but not mTORC1 inhibitor rapamycin, inhibits ENaC, decreases Na(+) flux in isolated perfused tubules and induces natriuresis in wild-type mice. PP242 does not lead to further impairment of Na(+) reabsorption in sgk1(-/-) mice. The mTORC2/SGK1 sensitive renal Na(+) retention leads to extracellular volume expansion with increase of blood pressure. A SGK1 gene variant (prevalence ∼ 3-5% in Caucasians, ∼ 10% in Africans) predisposes to hypertension, stroke, obesity and type 2 diabetes. Future studies will be required to define the role of mTORC2 in the regulation of further SGK1 sensitive transport proteins, such as further ion channels, carriers and the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase. Moreover, studies are required disclosing the impact of mTORC2 on SGK1 sensitive disorders, such as hypertension, obesity, diabetes, thrombosis, stroke, inflammation, autoimmune disease, fibrosis and tumour growth.

  8. Rictor/mTORC2 deficiency enhances keratinocyte stress tolerance via mitohormesis.

    PubMed

    Tassone, Beatrice; Saoncella, Stefania; Neri, Francesco; Ala, Ugo; Brusa, Davide; Magnuson, Mark A; Provero, Paolo; Oliviero, Salvatore; Riganti, Chiara; Calautti, Enzo

    2017-04-01

    How metabolic pathways required for epidermal tissue growth and remodeling influence the ability of keratinocytes to survive stressful conditions is still largely unknown. The mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 2 (mTORC2) regulates growth and metabolism of several tissues, but its functions in epidermal cells are poorly defined. Rictor is an adaptor protein essential for mTORC2 activity. To explore the roles of mTORC2 in the epidermis, we have conditionally deleted rictor in mice via K14-Cre-mediated homologous recombination and found that its deficiency causes moderate tissue hypoplasia, reduced keratinocyte proliferation and attenuated hyperplastic response to TPA. Noteworthy, rictor-deficient keratinocytes displayed increased lifespan, protection from senescence, and enhanced tolerance to cellular stressors such as growth factors deprivation, epirubicin and X-ray in vitro and radioresistance in vivo. Rictor-deficient keratinocytes exhibited changes in global gene expression profiles consistent with metabolic alterations and enhanced stress tolerance, a shift in cell catabolic processes from glycids and lipids to glutamine consumption and increased production of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS). Mechanistically, the resiliency of rictor-deficient epidermal cells relies on these ROS increases, indicating stress resistance via mitohormesis. Thus, our findings reveal a new link between metabolic changes and stress adaptation of keratinocytes centered on mTORC2 activity, with potential implications in skin aging and therapeutic resistance of epithelial tumors.

  9. Chemical genetics of rapamycin-insensitive TORC2 in S. cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kliegman, Joseph I; Fiedler, Dorothea; Ryan, Colm J; Xu, Yi-Fan; Su, Xiao-Yang; Thomas, David; Caccese, Max C; Cheng, Ada; Shales, Michael; Rabinowitz, Joshua D; Krogan, Nevan J; Shokat, Kevan M

    2013-12-26

    Current approaches for identifying synergistic targets use cell culture models to see if the combined effect of clinically available drugs is better than predicted by their individual efficacy. New techniques are needed to systematically and rationally identify targets and pathways that may be synergistic targets. Here, we created a tool to screen and identify molecular targets that may synergize with new inhibitors of target of rapamycin (TOR), a conserved protein that is a major integrator of cell proliferation signals in the nutrient-signaling pathway. Although clinical results from TOR complex 1 (TORC1)-specific inhibition using rapamycin analogs have been disappointing, trials using inhibitors that also target TORC2 have been promising. To understand this increased therapeutic efficacy and to discover secondary targets for combination therapy, we engineered Tor2 in S. cerevisiae to accept an orthogonal inhibitor. We used this tool to create a chemical epistasis miniarray profile (ChE-MAP) by measuring interactions between the chemically inhibited Tor2 kinase and a diverse library of deletion mutants. The ChE-MAP identified known TOR components and distinguished between TORC1- and TORC2-dependent functions. The results showed a TORC2-specific interaction with the pentose phosphate pathway, a previously unappreciated TORC2 function that suggests a role for the complex in balancing the high energy demand required for ribosome biogenesis.

  10. Rapamycin antagonizes TNF induction of VCAM-1 on endothelial cells by inhibiting mTORC2

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chen; Qin, Lingfeng; Manes, Thomas D.; Kirkiles-Smith, Nancy C.; Tellides, George

    2014-01-01

    Recruitment of circulating leukocytes into inflamed tissues depends on adhesion molecules expressed by endothelial cells (ECs). Here we report that rapamycin pretreatment reduced the ability of TNF-treated ECs to capture T cells under conditions of venular flow. This functional change was caused by inhibition of TNF-induced expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) and could be mimicked by knockdown of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) or rictor, but not raptor, implicating mTORC2 as the target of rapamycin for this effect. Mechanistically, mTORC2 acts through Akt to repress Raf1-MEK1/2-ERK1/2 signaling, and inhibition of mTORC2 consequently results in hyperactivation of ERK1/2. Increased ERK1/2 activity antagonizes VCAM-1 expression by repressing TNF induction of the transcription factor IRF-1. Preventing activation of ERK1/2 reduced the ability of rapamycin to inhibit TNF-induced VCAM-1 expression. In vivo, rapamycin inhibited mTORC2 activity and potentiated activation of ERK1/2. These changes correlated with reduced endothelial expression of TNF-induced VCAM-1, which was restored via pharmacological inhibition of ERK1/2. Functionally, rapamycin reduced infiltration of leukocytes into renal glomeruli, an effect which was partially reversed by inhibition of ERK1/2. These data demonstrate a novel mechanism by which rapamycin modulates the ability of vascular endothelium to mediate inflammation and identifies endothelial mTORC2 as a potential therapeutic target. PMID:24516119

  11. The Distribution of messenger RNAs Encoding the Three Isoforms of the Transducer Of Regulated CREB Activity (TORC) in The Rat Forebrain

    PubMed Central

    Watts, Alan G.; Sanchez-Watts, Graciela; Liu, Ying; Aguilera, Greti

    2012-01-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that the CREB-dependent transcriptional activation of a number of genes requires the CREB co-activator, transducer of regulated CREB activity (TORC). Because of the central importance of CREB in many brain functions we examined the topographic distribution of TORC1, 2, and 3 mRNAs in specific regions of the rat forebrain. In situ hybridisation (ISH) analysis revealed that TORC1 is the most abundant isoform in most forebrain structures, followed by TORC2 and TORC3. All three TORC isoforms were found in a number of brain nuclei, the ventricular ependyma, and pia mater. While high levels of TORC1 were widely distributed in the forebrain, TORC2 was found in discrete nuclei and TORC3 mostly in the ependyma, and pia mater. The relative expression of TORC isoforms was confirmed by qRT-PCR analysis in the hippocampus and hypothalamus. In the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus, TORC1 and 2 mRNAs were abundant in the parvicellular and magnocellular neuroendocrine compartments, while TORC3 expression was low. All three isoform mRNAs were found elsewhere in the hypothalamus, with the most prominent expression of TORC1 in the ventromedial nucleus, TORC2 in the dorsomedial and arcuate nuclei, TORCs 1 and 2 in the supraoptic, and TORC2 in the suprachiasmatic nuclei. These differential distribution patterns are consistent with complex roles for all three TORC isoforms in diverse brain structures, and provide a foundation for further studies on the mechanisms of CREB/TORC signalling on brain function. PMID:21679259

  12. CREB SUMOylation by the E3 ligase PIAS1 enhances spatial memory.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yan-Chu; Hsu, Wei-Lun; Ma, Yun-Li; Tai, Derek J C; Lee, Eminy H Y

    2014-07-16

    cAMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB) phosphorylation and signaling plays an important role in long-term memory formation, but other posttranslational modifications of CREB are less known. Here, we found that CREB1Δ, the short isoform of CREB, could be sumoylated by the small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) E3 ligase protein inhibitor of activated STAT1 (PIAS1) at Lys271 and Lys290 and PIAS1 SUMOylation of CREB1Δ increased the expression level of CREB1Δ. CREB1Δ could also be sumoylated by other PIAS family proteins, but not by the E3 ligases RanBP2 and Pc2 or by the E2 ligase Ubc9. Furthermore, water maze training increased the level of endogenous CREB SUMOylation in rat CA1 neurons determined by in vitro SUMOylation assay, but this effect was not observed in other brain areas. Moreover, transduction of Lenti-CREBWT to rat CA1 area facilitated, whereas transduction of Lenti-CREB double sumo-mutant (CREBK271RK290R) impaired, spatial learning and memory performance. Transduction of Lenti-CREBWT-SUMO1 fusion vector to rat CA1 area showed a more significant effect in enhancing spatial learning and memory and CREB SUMOylation. Lenti-CREBWT transduction increased, whereas Lenti-CREBK271RK290R transduction decreased, CREB DNA binding to the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (bdnf) promoter and decreased bdnf mRNA expression. Knock-down of PIAS1 expression in CA1 area by PIAS1 siRNA transfection impaired spatial learning and memory and decreased endogenous CREB SUMOylation. In addition, CREB SUMOylation was CREB phosphorylation dependent and lasted longer. Therefore, CREB phosphorylation may be responsible for signal transduction during the early phase of long-term memory formation, whereas CREB SUMOylation sustains long-term memory.

  13. Rictor/mTORC2 loss in the Myf5 lineage reprograms brown fat metabolism and protects mice against obesity and metabolic disease.

    PubMed

    Hung, Chien-Min; Calejman, Camila Martinez; Sanchez-Gurmaches, Joan; Li, Huawei; Clish, Clary B; Hettmer, Simone; Wagers, Amy J; Guertin, David A

    2014-07-10

    The in vivo functions of mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 2 (mTORC2) and the signaling mechanisms that control brown adipose tissue (BAT) fuel utilization and activity are not well understood. Here, by conditionally deleting Rictor in the Myf5 lineage, we provide in vivo evidence that mTORC2 is dispensable for skeletal muscle development and regeneration but essential for BAT growth. Furthermore, deleting Rictor in Myf5 precursors shifts BAT metabolism to a more oxidative and less lipogenic state and protects mice from obesity and metabolic disease at thermoneutrality. We additionally find that Rictor is required for brown adipocyte differentiation in vitro and that the mechanism specifically requires AKT1 hydrophobic motif phosphorylation but is independent of pan-AKT signaling and is rescued with BMP7. Our findings provide insights into the signaling circuitry that regulates brown adipocytes and could have important implications for developing therapies aimed at increasing energy expenditure as a means to combat human obesity.

  14. Expression and regulated nuclear transport of transducers of regulated CREB 1 in retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Deng, J; Zhang, X-L; Wang, J-W; Teng, L-L; Ge, J; Takemori, H; Xiong, Z-Q; Zhou, Y

    2009-03-31

    Calcium- and cAMP-dependent activation of CREB and transcription of cAMP-responsive element (CRE)-target genes play critical roles in various physiological and pathological conditions. TORCs (transducers of regulated CREB) represent a new family of conserved CREB coactivators that function as intracellular calcium- and cAMP-sensitive coincidence detectors, controlling the kinetics of CRE-mediated responses and long-term potentiation of synaptic transmission. Here we examined the expression and activity-dependent translocation of TORCs in adult retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), the primary target of acute retinal ischemic injury as well as chronic retinal degenerative diseases. We found that both mRNAs of TORC1 and TORC2, but not TORC3, were enriched in adult rat retina. Comparing with TORC2, TORC1 protein was highly and selectively expressed in RGCs. At resting condition, TORC1 protein was localized in the cytoplasm but not nucleus of RGCs. Activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors by intravitreous injection of NMDA or increase of cAMP signaling by administration of forskolin triggered nuclear accumulation of TORC1. Furthermore, transient retinal ischemic injury resulted in peri-nuclear and nuclear accumulation of TORC1 as well as transcription of BDNF in RGCs. Our results demonstrate that TORC1 is enriched in RGCs and its subcellular location could be regulated by Ca(2+) and cAMP, suggesting that manipulation of TORC1 activity may promote survival of RGCs in some optic disease conditions.

  15. mTORC1 and mTORC2 regulate skin morphogenesis and epidermal barrier formation

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Xiaolei; Bloch, Wilhelm; Iden, Sandra; Rüegg, Markus A.; Hall, Michael N.; Leptin, Maria; Partridge, Linda; Eming, Sabine A.

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), a regulator of growth in many tissues, mediates its activity through two multiprotein complexes, mTORC1 or mTORC2. The role of mTOR signalling in skin morphogenesis and epidermal development is unknown. Here we identify mTOR as an essential regulator in skin morphogenesis by epidermis-specific deletion of Mtor in mice (mTOREKO). mTOREKO mutants are viable, but die shortly after birth due to deficits primarily during the early epidermal differentiation programme and lack of a protective barrier development. Epidermis-specific loss of Raptor, which encodes an essential component of mTORC1, confers the same skin phenotype as seen in mTOREKO mutants. In contrast, newborns with an epidermal deficiency of Rictor, an essential component of mTORC2, survive despite a hypoplastic epidermis and disruption in late stage terminal differentiation. These findings highlight a fundamental role for mTOR in epidermal morphogenesis that is regulated by distinct functions for mTORC1 and mTORC2. PMID:27807348

  16. Deletion of Rictor in neural progenitor cells reveals contributions of mTORC2 signaling to tuberous sclerosis complex.

    PubMed

    Carson, Robert P; Fu, Cary; Winzenburger, Peggy; Ess, Kevin C

    2013-01-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is a multisystem genetic disorder with severe neurologic manifestations, including epilepsy, autism, anxiety and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. TSC is caused by the loss of either the TSC1 or TSC2 genes that normally regulate the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) kinase. mTOR exists within two distinct complexes, mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) and mTOR complex 2 (mTORC2). Loss of either TSC gene leads to increased mTORC1 but decreased mTORC2 signaling. As the contribution of decreased mTORC2 signaling to neural development and homeostasis has not been well studied, we generated a conditional knockout (CKO) of Rictor, a key component of mTORC2. mTORC2 signaling is impaired in the brain, whereas mTORC1 signaling is unchanged. Rictor CKO mice have small brains and bodies, normal lifespan and are fertile. Cortical layering is normal, but neurons are smaller than those in control brains. Seizures were not observed, although excessive slow activity was seen on electroencephalography. Rictor CKO mice are hyperactive and have reduced anxiety-like behavior. Finally, there is decreased white matter and increased levels of monoamine neurotransmitters in the cerebral cortex. Loss of mTORC2 signaling in the cortex independent of mTORC1 can disrupt normal brain development and function and may contribute to some of the neurologic manifestations seen in TSC.

  17. AGE-RELATED IMPAIRMENTS IN MEMORY AND IN CREB AND pCREB EXPRESSION IN HIPPOCAMPUS AND AMYGDALA FOLLOWING INHIBITORY AVOIDANCE TRAINING

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Ken A.; Gold, Paul E.

    2012-01-01

    This experiment examined whether age-related changes in CREB and pCREB contribute to the rapid forgetting seen in aged animals. Young (3-month-old) and aged (24-month-old) Fischer-344 rats received inhibitory avoidance training with a low (0.2 mA, 0.4 sec) or moderate (0.5 mA, 0.5 sec) footshock; memory was measured 7 days later. Other rats were euthanized 30 minutes after training, and CREB and pCREB expression levels were examined in the hippocampus, amygdala, and piriform cortex using immunohistochemistry. CREB levels decreased with age in the hippocampus and amygdala. After training with either shock level, young rats exhibited good memory and increases in pCREB levels in the hippocampus and amygdala. Aged rats exhibited good memory for the moderate but not the low shock but did not show increases in pCREB levels after either shock intensity. These results suggest that decreases in total CREB and in pCREB activation in the hippocampus and amygdala may contribute to rapid forgetting in aged rats. After moderate footshock, the stable memory in old rats together with absence of CREB activation suggests either that CREB was phosphorylated in a spatiotemporal pattern other than analyzed here or that the stronger training conditions engaged alternate mechanisms that promote long-lasting memory. PMID:22445851

  18. microRNA-153 Targets mTORC2 Component Rictor to Inhibit Glioma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Yan; Zhao, Jizong; Yi, Lei; Jiang, Yugang

    2016-01-01

    Rictor upregulation and mTORC complex 2 (mTORC2) over-activation participate in glioma cell progression, yet the underling mechanisms are not known. We here identified microRNA-153 (miR-153) as a potential anti-Rictor miRNA, which was downregulated in multiple human glioma tissues and glioma cell lines (U87MG, T98G, U373MG and U251MG). miR-153 downregulation was correlated with Rictor (mRNA and protein) upregulation and p-Akt Ser473 (the mTORC2 indicator) over-activation in the glioma tissues and cells. Our in vitro evidences suggested that Rictor could be one primary target of miR-153 in glioma cells. Exogenous overexpression of miR-153 downregulated Rictor (mRNA and protein) and decreased p-Akt Ser473 in U87MG cells, leading to significant growth inhibition and apoptosis activation. Notably, U87MG cells with Rictor shRNA knockdown showed similar phenotypes of cells with miR-153 overexpression. More importantly, in Rictor-silenced U87MG cells, miR-153 expression failed to further affect cell growth nor apoptosis. In vivo, we showed that miR-153 overexpression dramatically inhibited U87MG tumor growth in nude mice. Together, these results suggest that miR-153 downregulation could be one important reason of Rictor upregulation and mTORC2 over-activation in glioma cells. Further, miR-153-induced anti-glioma cell activity is possibly via downregulating Rictor. PMID:27295037

  19. mTOR kinase inhibitors promote antibody class switching via mTORC2 inhibition.

    PubMed

    Limon, Jose J; So, Lomon; Jellbauer, Stefan; Chiu, Honyin; Corado, Juana; Sykes, Stephen M; Raffatellu, Manuela; Fruman, David A

    2014-11-25

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a kinase that functions in two distinct complexes, mTORC1 and mTORC2. In peripheral B cells, complete deletion of mTOR suppresses germinal center B-cell responses, including class switching and somatic hypermutation. The allosteric mTORC1 inhibitor rapamycin blocks proliferation and differentiation, but lower doses can promote protective IgM responses. To elucidate the complexity of mTOR signaling in B cells further, we used ATP-competitive mTOR kinase inhibitors (TOR-KIs), which inhibit both mTORC1 and mTORC2. Although TOR-KIs are in clinical development for cancer, their effects on mature lymphocytes are largely unknown. We show that high concentrations of TOR-KIs suppress B-cell proliferation and differentiation, yet lower concentrations that preserve proliferation increase the fraction of B cells undergoing class switching in vitro. Transient treatment of mice with the TOR-KI compound AZD8055 increased titers of class-switched high-affinity antibodies to a hapten-protein conjugate. Mechanistic investigation identified opposing roles for mTORC1 and mTORC2 in B-cell differentiation and showed that TOR-KIs enhance class switching in a manner dependent on forkhead box, subgroup O (FoxO) transcription factors. These observations emphasize the distinct actions of TOR-KIs compared with rapamycin and suggest that TOR-KIs might be useful to enhance production of class-switched antibodies following vaccination.

  20. Physical interaction of estrogen receptor with MnSOD: implication in mitochondrial O2(.-) upregulation and mTORC2 potentiation in estrogen-responsive breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lone, M-U-D; Baghel, K S; Kanchan, R K; Shrivastava, R; Malik, S A; Tewari, B N; Tripathi, C; Negi, M P S; Garg, V K; Sharma, M; Bhatt, M L B; Bhadauria, S

    2017-03-30

    Augmented reactive oxygen species levels consequential to functional alteration of key mitochondrial attributes contribute to carcinogenesis, either directly via oxidative DNA damage infliction or indirectly via activation of oncogenic signaling cascades. We previously reported activation of a key oncogenic signaling cascade via mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling complex-2 (mTORC2) owing to estrogen receptor (ER-α)-dependent augmentation of O2(.-) within the mitochondria of 17-β-estradiol (E2)-stimulated breast cancer cells. Manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) is the principal mitochondrial attribute governing mitochondrial O2(.-) homeostasis, raising the possibility that its functional alteration could be instrumental in augmenting mitochondrial O2(.-) levels in breast cancer cells. Here we show ER-dependent transient inhibition of MnSOD catalytic function in breast cancer cells. Catalytic function of MnSOD is tightly regulated at the post-translational level. Post-translational modifications such as phosphorylation, nitration and acetylation represent key regulatory means governing the catalytic function of MnSOD. Acetylation at lysine-68 (K68) inhibits MnSOD catalytic activity and thus represents an important post-translational regulatory mechanism in human cells. Using reciprocal immunoprecipitation and proximity ligation assay, we demonstrate the occurrence of direct physical interaction between ER-α and MnSOD in human breast cancer cells, which in turn was associated with potentiated acetylation of MnSOD at K68. In addition, we also observed diminished interaction of MnSOD with sirtuin-3, the key mitochondrial deacetylase that deacetylates MnSOD at critical K68 and thereby activates it for scavenging O2(.-). Consequently, compromised deacetylation of MnSOD at K68 leading to its inhibition and a resultant buildup of O2(.-) within the mitochondria culminated in the activation of mTORC2. In agreement with this, human breast cancer tissue

  1. Enhancement by lithium of cAMP-induced CRE/CREB-directed gene transcription conferred by TORC on the CREB basic leucine zipper domain

    PubMed Central

    Böer, Ulrike; Eglins, Julia; Krause, Doris; Schnell, Susanne; Schöfl, Christof; Knepel, Willhart

    2007-01-01

    The molecular mechanism of the action of lithium salts in the treatment of bipolar disorder is not well understood. As their therapeutic action requires chronic treatment, adaptive neuronal processes are suggested to be involved. The molecular basis of this are changes in gene expression regulated by transcription factors such as CREB (cAMP-response-element-binding protein). CREB contains a transactivation domain, in which Ser119 is phosphorylated upon activation, and a bZip (basic leucine zipper domain). The bZip is involved in CREB dimerization and DNA-binding, but also contributes to CREB transactivation by recruiting the coactivator TORC (transducer of regulated CREB). In the present study, the effect of lithium on CRE (cAMP response element)/CREB-directed gene transcription was investigated. Electrically excitable cells were transfected with CRE/CREB-driven luciferase reporter genes. LiCl (6 mM or higher) induced an up to 4.7-fold increase in 8-bromo-cAMP-stimulated CRE/CREB-directed transcription. This increase was not due to enhanced Ser119 phosphorylation or DNA-binding of CREB. Also, the known targets inositol monophosphatase and GSK3β (glycogen-synthase-kinase 3β) were not involved as specific GSK3β inhibitors and inositol replenishment did not mimic and abolish respectively the effect of lithium. However, lithium no longer enhanced CREB activity when the CREB-bZip was deleted or the TORC-binding site inside the CREB-bZip was specifically mutated (CREB-R300A). Otherwise, TORC overexpression conferred lithium responsiveness on CREB-bZip or the CRE-containing truncated rat somatostatin promoter. This indicates that lithium enhances cAMP-induced CRE/CREB-directed transcription, conferred by TORC on the CREB-bZip. We thus support the hypothesis that lithium salts modulate CRE/CREB-dependent gene transcription and suggest the CREB coactivator TORC as a new molecular target of lithium. PMID:17696880

  2. Oxidative stress-induced CREB upregulation promotes DNA damage repair prior to neuronal cell death protection.

    PubMed

    Pregi, Nicolás; Belluscio, Laura María; Berardino, Bruno Gabriel; Castillo, Daniela Susana; Cánepa, Eduardo Tomás

    2017-01-01

    cAMP response element-binding (CREB) protein is a cellular transcription factor that mediates responses to different physiological and pathological signals. Using a model of human neuronal cells we demonstrate herein, that CREB is phosphorylated after oxidative stress induced by hydrogen peroxide. This phosphorylation is largely independent of PKA and of the canonical phosphoacceptor site at ser-133, and is accompanied by an upregulation of CREB expression at both mRNA and protein levels. In accordance with previous data, we show that CREB upregulation promotes cell survival and that its silencing results in an increment of apoptosis after oxidative stress. Interestingly, we also found that CREB promotes DNA repair after treatment with hydrogen peroxide. Using a cDNA microarray we found that CREB is responsible for the regulation of many genes involved in DNA repair and cell survival after oxidative injury. In summary, the neuroprotective effect mediated by CREB appears to follow three essential steps following oxidative injury. First, the upregulation of CREB expression that allows sufficient level of activated and phosphorylated protein is the primordial event that promotes the induction of genes of the DNA Damage Response. Then and when the DNA repair is effective, CREB induces detoxification and survival genes. This kinetics seems to be important to completely resolve oxidative-induced neuronal damages.

  3. Heat Stress-Induced PI3K/mTORC2-Dependent AKT Signaling Is a Central Mediator of Hepatocellular Carcinoma Survival to Thermal Ablation Induced Heat Stress

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Scott M.; Callstrom, Matthew R.; Jondal, Danielle E.; Butters, Kim A.; Knudsen, Bruce E.; Anderson, Jill L.; Lien, Karen R.; Sutor, Shari L.; Lee, Ju-Seog; Thorgeirsson, Snorri S.; Grande, Joseph P.; Roberts, Lewis R.; Woodrum, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Thermal ablative therapies are important treatment options in the multidisciplinary care of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), but lesions larger than 2–3 cm are plagued with high local recurrence rates and overall survival of these patients remains poor. Currently no adjuvant therapies exist to prevent local HCC recurrence in patients undergoing thermal ablation. The molecular mechanisms mediating HCC resistance to thermal ablation induced heat stress and local recurrence remain unclear. Here we demonstrate that the HCC cells with a poor prognostic hepatic stem cell subtype (Subtype HS) are more resistant to heat stress than HCC cells with a better prognostic hepatocyte subtype (Subtype HC). Moreover, sublethal heat stress rapidly induces phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) dependent-protein kinase B (AKT) survival signaling in HCC cells in vitro and at the tumor ablation margin in vivo. Conversely, inhibition of PI3K/mTOR complex 2 (mTORC2)-dependent AKT phosphorylation or direct inhibition of AKT function both enhance HCC cell killing and decrease HCC cell survival to sublethal heat stress in both poor and better prognostic HCC subtypes while mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1)-inhibition has no impact. Finally, we showed that AKT isoforms 1, 2 and 3 are differentially upregulated in primary human HCCs and that overexpression of AKT correlates with worse tumor biology and pathologic features (AKT3) and prognosis (AKT1). Together these findings define a novel molecular mechanism whereby heat stress induces PI3K/mTORC2-dependent AKT survival signaling in HCC cells and provide a mechanistic rationale for adjuvant AKT inhibition in combination with thermal ablation as a strategy to enhance HCC cell killing and prevent local recurrence, particularly at the ablation margin. PMID:27611696

  4. mTORC2 signalling regulates M2 macrophage differentiation in response to helminth infection and adaptive thermogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hallowell, R. W.; Collins, S. L.; Craig, J. M.; Zhang, Y.; Oh, M.; Illei, P. B.; Chan-Li, Y.; Vigeland, C. L.; Mitzner, W.; Scott, A. L.; Powell, J. D.; Horton, M. R.

    2017-01-01

    Alternatively activated macrophages (M2) have an important function in innate immune responses to parasitic helminths, and emerging evidence also indicates these cells are regulators of systemic metabolism. Here we show a critical role for mTORC2 signalling in the generation of M2 macrophages. Abrogation of mTORC2 signalling in macrophages by selective conditional deletion of the adaptor molecule Rictor inhibits the generation of M2 macrophages while leaving the generation of classically activated macrophages (M1) intact. Selective deletion of Rictor in macrophages prevents M2 differentiation and clearance of a parasitic helminth infection in mice, and also abrogates the ability of mice to regulate brown fat and maintain core body temperature. Our findings define a role for mTORC2 in macrophages in integrating signals from the immune microenvironment to promote innate type 2 immunity, and also to integrate systemic metabolic and thermogenic responses. PMID:28128208

  5. Rapamycin-induced insulin resistance is mediated by mTORC2 loss and uncoupled from longevity

    PubMed Central

    Lamming, Dudley W.; Ye, Lan; Katajisto, Pekka; Goncalves, Marcus D.; Saitoh, Maki; Stevens, Deanna M.; Davis, James G.; Salmon, Adam B.; Richardson, Arlan; Ahima, Rexford S.; Guertin, David A.; Sabatini, David M.; Baur, Joseph A.

    2012-01-01

    Rapamycin, an inhibitor of mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1), extends the lifespans of yeast, flies, and mice. Calorie restriction, which increases lifespan and insulin sensitivity, is proposed to function by inhibition of mTORC1, yet paradoxically, chronic administration of rapamycin substantially impairs glucose tolerance and insulin action. We demonstrate that rapamycin disrupted a second mTOR complex, mTORC2, in vivo and that mTORC2 was required for the insulin-mediated suppression of hepatic gluconeogenesis. Further, decreased mTORC1 signaling was sufficient to extend lifespan independently from changes in glucose homeostasis, as female mice heterozygous for both mTOR and mLST8 exhibited decreased mTORC1 activity and extended lifespan, but had normal glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity. Thus, mTORC2 disruption is an important mediator of the effects of rapamycin in vivo. PMID:22461615

  6. Tunable regulation of CREB DNA binding activity couples genotoxic stress response and metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sang Hwa; Trinh, Anthony T.; Larsen, Michele Campaigne; Mastrocola, Adam S.; Jefcoate, Colin R.; Bushel, Pierre R.; Tibbetts, Randal S.

    2016-01-01

    cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) is a key regulator of glucose metabolism and synaptic plasticity that is canonically regulated through recruitment of transcriptional coactivators. Here we show that phosphorylation of CREB on a conserved cluster of Ser residues (the ATM/CK cluster) by the DNA damage-activated protein kinase ataxia-telangiectasia-mutated (ATM) and casein kinase1 (CK1) and casein kinase2 (CK2) positively and negatively regulates CREB-mediated transcription in a signal dependent manner. In response to genotoxic stress, phosphorylation of the ATM/CK cluster inhibited CREB-mediated gene expression, DNA binding activity and chromatin occupancy proportional to the number of modified Ser residues. Paradoxically, substoichiometric, ATM-independent, phosphorylation of the ATM/CK cluster potentiated bursts in CREB-mediated transcription by promoting recruitment of the CREB coactivator, cAMP-regulated transcriptional coactivators (CRTC2). Livers from mice expressing a non-phosphorylatable CREB allele failed to attenuate gluconeogenic genes in response to DNA damage or fully activate the same genes in response to glucagon. We propose that phosphorylation-dependent regulation of DNA binding activity evolved as a tunable mechanism to control CREB transcriptional output and promote metabolic homeostasis in response to rapidly changing environmental conditions. PMID:27431323

  7. Spatial Memory in the Morris Water Maze and Activation of Cyclic AMP Response Element-Binding (CREB) Protein within the Mouse Hippocampus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porte, Yves; Buhot, Marie Christine; Mons, Nicole E.

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the spatio-temporal dynamics of learning-induced cAMP response element-binding protein activation/phosphorylation (pCREB) in mice trained in a spatial reference memory task in the water maze. Using immunohistochemistry, we examined pCREB immunoreactivity (pCREB-ir) in hippocampal CA1 and CA3 and related brain structures. During the…

  8. PRICKLE1 Contributes to Cancer Cell Dissemination through Its Interaction with mTORC2.

    PubMed

    Daulat, Avais M; Bertucci, François; Audebert, Stéphane; Sergé, Arnauld; Finetti, Pascal; Josselin, Emmanuelle; Castellano, Rémy; Birnbaum, Daniel; Angers, Stéphane; Borg, Jean-Paul

    2016-05-23

    Components of the evolutionarily conserved developmental planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway were recently described to play a prominent role in cancer cell dissemination. However, the molecular mechanisms by which PCP molecules drive the spread of cancer cells remain largely unknown. PRICKLE1 encodes a PCP protein bound to the promigratory serine/threonine kinase MINK1. We identify RICTOR, a member of the mTORC2 complex, as a PRICKLE1-binding partner and show that the integrity of the PRICKLE1-MINK1-RICTOR complex is required for activation of AKT, regulation of focal adhesions, and cancer cell migration. Disruption of the PRICKLE1-RICTOR interaction results in a strong impairment of breast cancer cell dissemination in xenograft assays. Finally, we show that upregulation of PRICKLE1 in basal breast cancers, a subtype characterized by high metastatic potential, is associated with poor metastasis-free survival.

  9. mTORC2 sustains thermogenesis via Akt-induced glucose uptake and glycolysis in brown adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Albert, Verena; Svensson, Kristoffer; Shimobayashi, Mitsugu; Colombi, Marco; Muñoz, Sergio; Jimenez, Veronica; Handschin, Christoph; Bosch, Fatima; Hall, Michael N

    2016-03-01

    Activation of non-shivering thermogenesis (NST) in brown adipose tissue (BAT) has been proposed as an anti-obesity treatment. Moreover, cold-induced glucose uptake could normalize blood glucose levels in insulin-resistant patients. It is therefore important to identify novel regulators of NST and cold-induced glucose uptake. Mammalian target of rapamycin complex 2 (mTORC2) mediates insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in metabolic tissues, but its role in NST is unknown. We show that mTORC2 is activated in brown adipocytes upon β-adrenergic stimulation. Furthermore, mice lacking mTORC2 specifically in adipose tissue (AdRiKO mice) are hypothermic, display increased sensitivity to cold, and show impaired cold-induced glucose uptake and glycolysis. Restoration of glucose uptake in BAT by overexpression of hexokinase II or activated Akt2 was sufficient to increase body temperature and improve cold tolerance in AdRiKO mice. Thus, mTORC2 in BAT mediates temperature homeostasis via regulation of cold-induced glucose uptake. Our findings demonstrate the importance of glucose metabolism in temperature regulation.

  10. Adipose tissue mTORC2 regulates ChREBP-driven de novo lipogenesis and hepatic glucose metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Yuefeng; Wallace, Martina; Sanchez-Gurmaches, Joan; Hsiao, Wen-Yu; Li, Huawei; Lee, Peter L.; Vernia, Santiago; Metallo, Christian M.; Guertin, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Adipose tissue de novo lipogenesis (DNL) positively influences insulin sensitivity, is reduced in obesity, and predicts insulin resistance. Therefore, elucidating mechanisms controlling adipose tissue DNL could lead to therapies for type 2 diabetes. Here, we report that mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 2 (mTORC2) functions in white adipose tissue (WAT) to control expression of the lipogenic transcription factor ChREBPβ. Conditionally deleting the essential mTORC2 subunit Rictor in mature adipocytes decreases ChREBPβ expression, which reduces DNL in WAT, and impairs hepatic insulin sensitivity. Mechanistically, Rictor/mTORC2 promotes ChREBPβ expression in part by controlling glucose uptake, but without impairing pan-AKT signalling. High-fat diet also rapidly decreases adipose tissue ChREBPβ expression and insulin sensitivity in wild-type mice, and does not further exacerbate insulin resistance in adipose tissue Rictor knockout mice, implicating adipose tissue DNL as an early target in diet-induced insulin resistance. These data suggest mTORC2 functions in WAT as part of an extra-hepatic nutrient-sensing mechanism to control glucose homeostasis. PMID:27098609

  11. Essential role of CREB family proteins during Xenopus embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lutz, B; Schmid, W; Niehrs, C; Schütz, G

    1999-10-01

    The leucine zipper transcription factors cAMP response element binding protein (CREB), cAMP response element modulatory protein (CREM) and activating transcription factor 1 (ATF1) bind to the cAMP response element (CRE) with the palindromic consensus sequence TGACGTCA. Their transcriptional activities are dependent on serine phosphorylation induced by various extracellular signals such as hormones, growth factors and neurotransmitters. Here we show that CREB is the predominant CRE-binding protein in Xenopus embryos and that it plays an essential role during early development. The importance of CREB for morphogenetic processes was assessed by injection of RNA encoding a dominant-negative form of CREB that is fused to a truncated progesterone receptor ligand binding domain. In this fusion protein, a dominant-negative function can be induced by application of the synthetic steroid RU486 at given developmental stages. The inhibition of CREB at blastula and early gastrula stages leads to severe posterior defects of the embryos reflected by strong spina bifida, whereas the inhibition of CREB at the beginning of neurulation resulted in stunted embryos with microcephaly. In these embryos, initial induction of neural and mesodermal tissues is not dependent on CREB function, as genes such as Otx2, Krox20, Shh and MyoD are still expressed in injected embryos. But the expression domains of Otx2 and MyoD were found to be distorted reflecting the abnormal development in both neural and somitic derivatives. In summary, our data show that CREB is essential during several developmental stages of Xenopus embryogenesis.

  12. Berberine Suppresses Adipocyte Differentiation via Decreasing CREB Transcriptional Activity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Juan; Tang, Hongju; Deng, Ruyuan; Wang, Ning; Zhang, Yuqing; Wang, Yao; Liu, Yun; Li, Fengying; Wang, Xiao; Zhou, Libin

    2015-01-01

    Berberine, one of the major constituents of Chinese herb Rhizoma coptidis, has been demonstrated to lower blood glucose, blood lipid, and body weight in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The anti-obesity effect of berberine has been attributed to its anti-adipogenic activity. However, the underlying molecular mechanism remains largely unknown. In the present study, we found that berberine significantly suppressed the expressions of CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein (C/EBP)α, peroxisome proliferators-activated receptor γ2 (PPARγ2), and other adipogenic genes in the process of adipogenesis. Berberine decreased cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB) phosphorylation and C/EBPβ expression at the early stage of 3T3-L1 preadipocyte differentiation. In addition, CREB phosphorylation and C/EBPβ expression induced by 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX) and forskolin were also attenuated by berberine. The binding activities of cAMP responsive element (CRE) stimulated by IBMX and forskolin were inhibited by berberine. The binding of phosphorylated CREB to the promoter of C/EBPβ was abrogated by berberine after the induction of preadipocyte differentiation. These results suggest that berberine blocks adipogenesis mainly via suppressing CREB activity, which leads to a decrease in C/EBPβ-triggered transcriptional cascades.

  13. Viral vector induction of CREB expression in the periaqueductal gray induces a predator stress-like pattern of changes in pCREB expression, neuroplasticity, and anxiety in rodents.

    PubMed

    Adamec, Robert; Berton, Olivier; Abdul Razek, Waleed

    2009-01-01

    Predator stress is lastingly anxiogenic. Phosphorylation of CREB to pCREB (phosphorylated cyclic AMP response element binding protein) is increased after predator stress in fear circuitry, including in the right lateral column of the PAG (periaqueductal gray). Predator stress also potentiates right but not left CeA-PAG (central amygdala-PAG) transmission up to 12 days after stress. The present study explored the functional significance of pCREB changes by increasing CREB expression in non-predator stressed rats through viral vectoring, and assessing the behavioral, electrophysiological and pCREB expression changes in comparison with handled and predator stressed controls. Increasing CREB expression in right PAG was anxiogenic in the elevated plus maze, had no effect on risk assessment, and increased acoustic startle response while delaying startle habituation. Potentiation of the right but not left CeA-PAG pathway was also observed. pCREB expression was slightly elevated in the right lateral column of the PAG, while the dorsal and ventral columns were not affected. The findings of this study suggest that by increasing CREB and pCREB in the right lateral PAG, it is possible to produce rats that exhibit behavioral, brain, and molecular changes that closely resemble those seen in predator stressed rats.

  14. Hippocampal cAMP/PKA/CREB is required for neuroprotective effect of acupuncture.

    PubMed

    Li, Qian-Qian; Shi, Guang-Xia; Yang, Jing-Wen; Li, Zhao-Xin; Zhang, Zhen-Hua; He, Tian; Wang, Jing; Liu, Li-Ying; Liu, Cun-Zhi

    2015-02-01

    Acupuncture has beneficial effects in vascular dementia (VaD) patients. The underlying mechanism, however, remains unknown. The present study was designed to investigate whether the cAMP/PKA/CREB cascade is involved in the mechanism of acupuncture in cerebral multi-infarction rats. In this study, cerebral multi-infarction was modeled in adult Wistar rats by homologous blood clot emboli. After a two-week acupuncture treatment at Zusanli (ST36), hippocampal-dependent memory was tested by employing a radial arm maze test. The hippocampus was isolated for analyses of cAMP concentration, phosphodiesterase (PDE) activity and CREB/pCREB and ERK/pERK expressions. The Morris water maze (MWM) task and CREB phosphorylation were evaluated in the presence of PKA-selective peptide inhibitor (H89). The radial arm maze test results demonstrated that acupuncture treatment at ST36 reversed hippocampal-dependent memory in impaired animals. Compared to those of the impaired group, cAMP concentration, PKA activity and pCREB and pERK expressions were increased following acupuncture therapy. Finally, the blockade of PKA reversed the increase in CREB phosphorylation and the improvement in recognitive function induced by acupuncture treatment. These results suggest that acupuncture could improve hippocampus function by modulating the cAMP/PKA/CREB signaling pathway, which represents a molecular mechanism of acupuncture for recognitive function in cerebral multi-infarction rats.

  15. Differential regulation of c-jun and CREB by acrolein and 4-hydroxynonenal.

    PubMed

    Pugazhenthi, Subbiah; Phansalkar, Ketaki; Audesirk, Gerald; West, Anne; Cabell, Leigh

    2006-01-01

    In Alzheimer's disease (AD), oxidative stress-induced lipid peroxidation leads to accumulation of unsaturated aldehydes including acrolein and 4-hydroxynonenal (4HNE) in brain. In this study, we examined the effects of these lipid peroxidation products on apoptotic pathways in cultured neurons. Acrolein and 4HNE increased the levels of active phosphorylated forms of c-jun and CREB, the transcription factors that promote apoptosis and cell survival, respectively. However, they decreased the activity of CREB-dependent BDNF promoter while they increased the activity of promoters responsive to c-jun. We hypothesized that this differential regulation could be due to competition between proapoptotic c-jun and cytoprotective CREB for CBP (CREB-binding protein), a coactivator shared by several transcription factors. In support of this hypothesis, we demonstrate that the decrease of BDNF promoter activity by acrolein and 4HNE could be restored (i) by cotransfection with CBP, (ii) by cotransfection with VP 16-CREB, a constitutively active form of CREB that does not depend on CBP for its activation, or (iii) by inhibiting JNK-mediated c-jun activation. Finally, adenoviral transduction of hippocampal neurons with VP 16-CREB resulted in significant reduction in caspase-3 activation by acrolein and 4HNE. These observations suggest that lipid peroxidation-induced differential regulation of CREB and c-jun might play a role in neurodegeneration in AD.

  16. Reduced phosphoCREB in Müller glia during retinal degeneration in rd10 mice

    PubMed Central

    Bachleda, Amelia; Xiong, Yubin; Osawa, Shoji; Weiss, Ellen R.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The mechanisms that trigger retinal degeneration are not well understood, despite the availability of several animal models with different mutations. In the present report, the rd10 mouse, a model for retinitis pigmentosa (RP) that contains a mutation in the gene for PDE6β (Pde6b), is used to evaluate gliosis, as a marker for retinal stress, and cyclic AMP response element binding protein (CREB) phosphorylation, which may be important early in retinal degeneration. Methods Wild-type C57Bl6J and rd10 mice raised under cyclic light were examined for changes in gliosis and CREB phosphorylation for approximately 3 weeks beginning at P14 to P17 using immunocytochemistry. Mice raised under normal cyclic light and in complete darkness were also compared for changes in CREB phosphorylation. Results Gliosis in rd10 mice raised under cyclic light was apparent at P17, before extensive degeneration of the photoreceptor layer is visible, and increased over time. Phosphorylation of CREB at Ser133 (pCREB) was detected in Müller glia (MG) in the wild-type and rd10 mice. However, at all phases of photoreceptor degeneration, the pCREB levels were lower in the rd10 mice. We also observed extensive migration of MG cell bodies to the outer nuclear layer (ONL) during degeneration. In contrast to the mice raised under cyclic light, the rd10 mice raised in the dark exhibited slower rates of degeneration. When the dark-reared mice were exposed to cyclic light, the photoreceptor layer degenerated within 4 days to approximately one to two rows of nuclei. Interestingly, the pCREB levels in the MG also decreased during this 4-day cyclic light exposure compared to the levels in the rd10 mice raised continuously in the dark. Conclusions The results of these studies suggest that photoreceptors communicate directly or indirectly with MG at early stages, inducing gliosis before extensive retinal degeneration is apparent in rd10 mice. Surprisingly, phosphorylation of CREB is downregulated

  17. Differential dependence of hypoxia-inducible factors 1 alpha and 2 alpha on mTORC1 and mTORC2.

    PubMed

    Toschi, Alfredo; Lee, Evan; Gadir, Noga; Ohh, Michael; Foster, David A

    2008-12-12

    Constitutive expression of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) has been implicated in several proliferative disorders. Constitutive expression of HIF1 alpha and HIF2 alpha has been linked to a number of human cancers, especially renal cell carcinoma (RCC), in which HIF2 alpha expression is the more important contributor. Expression of HIF1 alpha is dependent on the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and is sensitive to rapamycin. In contrast, there have been no reports linking HIF2 alpha expression with mTOR. mTOR exists in two complexes, mTORC1 and mTORC2, which are differentially sensitive to rapamycin. We report here that although there are clear differences in the sensitivity of HIF1 alpha and HIF2 alpha to rapamycin, both HIF1 alpha and HIF2 alpha expression is dependent on mTOR. HIF1 alpha expression was dependent on both Raptor (a constituent of mTORC1) and Rictor (a constitutive of mTORC2). In contrast, HIF2 alpha was dependent only on the mTORC2 constituent Rictor. These data indicate that although HIF1 alpha is dependent on both mTORC1 and mTORC2, HIF2 alpha is dependent only on mTORC2. We also examined the dependence of HIF alpha expression on the mTORC2 substrate Akt, which exists as three different isoforms, Akt1, Akt2, and Akt3. Interestingly, the expression of HIF2 alpha was dependent on Akt2, whereas that of HIF1 alpha was dependent on Akt3. Because HIF2 alpha is apparently more critical in RCC, this study underscores the importance of targeting mTORC2 and perhaps Akt2 signaling in RCC and other proliferative disorders in which HIF2 alpha has been implicated.

  18. Stochasticity and bifurcations in a reduced model with interlinked positive and negative feedback loops of CREB1 and CREB2 stimulated by 5-HT.

    PubMed

    Hao, Lijie; Yang, Zhuoqin; Bi, Yuanhong

    2016-04-01

    The cyclic AMP (cAMP)-response element-binding protein (CREB) family of transcription factors is crucial in regulating gene expression required for long-term memory (LTM) formation. Upon exposure of sensory neurons to the neurotransmitter serotonin (5-HT), CREB1 is activated via activation of the protein kinase A (PKA) intracellular signaling pathways, and CREB2 as a transcriptional repressor is relieved possibly via phosphorylation of CREB2 by mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). Song et al. [18] proposed a minimal model with only interlinked positive and negative feedback loops of transcriptional regulation by the activator CREB1 and the repressor CREB2. Without considering feedbacks between the CREB proteins, Pettigrew et al. [8] developed a computational model characterizing complex dynamics of biochemical pathways downstream of 5-HT receptors. In this work, to describe more simply the biochemical pathways and gene regulation underlying 5-HT-induced LTM, we add the important extracellular sensitizing stimulus 5-HT as well as the product Ap-uch into the Song's minimal model. We also strive to examine dynamical properties of the gene regulatory network under the changing concentration of the stimulus, [5-HT], cooperating with the varying positive feedback strength in inducing a high state of CREB1 for the establishment of long-term memory. Different dynamics including monostability, bistability and multistability due to coexistence of stable steady states and oscillations is investigated by means of codimension-2 bifurcation analysis. At the different positive feedback strengths, comparative analysis of deterministic and stochastic dynamics reveals that codimension-1 bifurcation with respect to [5-HT] as the parameter can predict diverse stochastic behaviors resulted from the finite number of molecules, and the number of CREB1 molecules more and more preferentially resides near the high steady state with increasing [5-HT], which contributes to long

  19. A phase I dose‐escalation study to assess safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, and preliminary efficacy of the dual mTORC1/mTORC2 kinase inhibitor CC‐223 in patients with advanced solid tumors or multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Bendell, Johanna C.; Kelley, Robin K.; Shih, Kent C.; Grabowsky, Jennifer A.; Bergsland, Emily; Jones, Suzanne; Martin, Thomas; Infante, Jeffrey R.; Mischel, Paul S.; Matsutani, Tomoo; Xu, Shuichan; Wong, Lilly; Liu, Yong; Wu, Xiaoling; Mortensen, Deborah S.; Chopra, Rajesh; Hege, Kristen

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway is essential for tumor development, yet mTOR inhibitors have yielded modest results. This phase 1 study investigated the mTORC1/mTORC2 inhibitor CC‐223 in patients with advanced cancer. METHODS Patients with advanced solid tumors or multiple myeloma received an initial dose of 7.5‐60 mg of CC‐223, followed by oral daily dosing in 28‐day cycles until disease progression. The primary objective was to determine the safety, tolerability, nontolerated dosage, maximum tolerated dosage (MTD), and preliminary pharmacokinetic profile. Secondary objectives were to evaluate pharmacodynamic effects and to describe preliminary efficacy. RESULTS Twenty‐eight patients were enrolled and received ≥1 dose of CC‐223. The most common treatment‐related grade 3 adverse events were hyperglycemia, fatigue, and rash. Four patients had dose‐limiting toxicities, including hyperglycemia, rash, fatigue, and mucositis. Therefore, 45 mg/d was determined to be the MTD. The pharmacokinetics of CC‐223 demonstrated a mean terminal half‐life ranging from 4.86 to 5.64 hours and maximum observed plasma concentration ranging from 269 to 480 ng/mL in patients who received CC‐223 ≥45 mg/d. Phosphorylation of mTORC1/mTORC2 pathway biomarkers in blood cells was inhibited by CC‐223 ≥30 mg/d with an exposure‐response relationship. Best responses included 1 partial response (breast cancer; response duration 220 days; 30‐mg/d cohort), stable disease (8 patients across ≥15 mg/d cohorts; response duration range, 36‐168 days), and progressive disease (12 patients). The disease control rate was 32%. CONCLUSIONS CC‐223 was tolerable, with manageable toxicities. Preliminary antitumor activity, including tumor regression, and evidence of mTORC1/mTORC2 pathway inhibition were observed. Cancer 2015;121:3435–43. © 2015 American Cancer Society. PMID:26177599

  20. β-TrCP-mediated ubiquitination and degradation of liver-enriched transcription factor CREB-H

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yun; Gao, Wei-Wei; Tang, Hei-Man Vincent; Deng, Jian-Jun; Wong, Chi-Ming; Chan, Chi-Ping; Jin, Dong-Yan

    2016-01-01

    CREB-H is an endoplasmic reticulum-resident bZIP transcription factor which critically regulates lipid homeostasis and gluconeogenesis in the liver. CREB-H is proteolytically activated by regulated intramembrane proteolysis to generate a C-terminally truncated form known as CREB-H-ΔTC, which translocates to the nucleus to activate target gene expression. CREB-H-ΔTC is a fast turnover protein but the mechanism governing its destruction was not well understood. In this study, we report on β-TrCP-dependent ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation of CREB-H-ΔTC. The degradation of CREB-H-ΔTC was mediated by lysine 48-linked polyubiquitination and could be inhibited by proteasome inhibitor. CREB-H-ΔTC physically interacted with β-TrCP, a substrate recognition subunit of the SCFβ-TrCP E3 ubiquitin ligase. Forced expression of β-TrCP increased the polyubiquitination and decreased the stability of CREB-H-ΔTC, whereas knockdown of β-TrCP had the opposite effect. An evolutionarily conserved sequence, SDSGIS, was identified in CREB-H-ΔTC, which functioned as the β-TrCP-binding motif. CREB-H-ΔTC lacking this motif was stabilized and resistant to β-TrCP-induced polyubiquitination. This motif was a phosphodegron and its phosphorylation was required for β-TrCP recognition. Furthermore, two inhibitory phosphorylation sites close to the phosphodegron were identified. Taken together, our work revealed a new intracellular signaling pathway that controls ubiquitination and degradation of the active form of CREB-H transcription factor. PMID:27029215

  1. Membrane Tension Acts Through PLD2 and mTORC2 to Limit Actin Network Assembly During Neutrophil Migration

    PubMed Central

    Diz-Muñoz, Alba; Thurley, Kevin; Chintamen, Sana; Altschuler, Steven J.; Fletcher, Daniel A.; Weiner, Orion D.

    2016-01-01

    For efficient polarity and migration, cells need to regulate the magnitude and spatial distribution of actin assembly. This process is coordinated by reciprocal interactions between the actin cytoskeleton and mechanical forces. Actin polymerization-based protrusion increases tension in the plasma membrane, which in turn acts as a long-range inhibitor of actin assembly. These interactions form a negative feedback circuit that limits the magnitude of membrane tension in neutrophils and prevents expansion of the existing front and the formation of secondary fronts. It has been suggested that the plasma membrane directly inhibits actin assembly by serving as a physical barrier that opposes protrusion. Here we show that efficient control of actin polymerization-based protrusion requires an additional mechanosensory feedback cascade that indirectly links membrane tension with actin assembly. Specifically, elevated membrane tension acts through phospholipase D2 (PLD2) and the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 2 (mTORC2) to limit actin nucleation. In the absence of this pathway, neutrophils exhibit larger leading edges, higher membrane tension, and profoundly defective chemotaxis. Mathematical modeling suggests roles for both the direct (mechanical) and indirect (biochemical via PLD2 and mTORC2) feedback loops in organizing cell polarity and motility—the indirect loop is better suited to enable competition between fronts, whereas the direct loop helps spatially organize actin nucleation for efficient leading edge formation and cell movement. This circuit is essential for polarity, motility, and the control of membrane tension. PMID:27280401

  2. A novel regulatory circuit in base excision repair involving AP endonuclease 1, Creb1 and DNA polymerase β

    PubMed Central

    Pei, De-Sheng; Yang, Xiao-Jie; Liu, Wei; Guikema, Jeroen E. J.; Schrader, Carol E.; Strauss, Phyllis R.

    2011-01-01

    DNA repair is required to maintain genome stability in stem cells and early embryos. At critical junctures, oxidative damage to DNA requires the base excision repair (BER) pathway. Since early zebrafish embryos lack the major polymerase in BER, DNA polymerase ß, repair proceeds via replicative polymerases, even though there is ample polb mRNA. Here, we report that Polb protein fails to appear at the appropriate time in development when AP endonuclease 1 (Apex), the upstream protein in BER, is knocked down. Because polb contains a Creb1 binding site, we examined whether knockdown of Apex affects creb1. Apex knockdown results in loss of Creb1 and Creb complex members but not Creb1 phosphorylation. This effect is independent of p53. Although both apex and creb1 mRNA rescue Creb1 and Polb after Apex knockdown, Apex is not a co-activator of creb1 transcription. This observation has broad significance, as similar results occur when Apex is inhibited in B cells from apex+/− mice. These results describe a novel regulatory circuit involving Apex, Creb1 and Polb and provide a mechanism for lethality of Apex loss in higher eukaryotes. PMID:21172930

  3. Measuring CREB activation using bioluminescent probes that detect KID-KIX interaction in living cells.

    PubMed

    Ishimoto, Tetsuya; Mano, Hiroki; Ozawa, Takeaki; Mori, Hisashi

    2012-05-16

    The cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element-binding protein (CREB) is a transcription factor that contributes to memory formation. The transcriptional activity of CREB is induced by its phosphorylation at Ser-133 and subsequent interaction with the CREB-binding protein (CBP)/p300. We designed and optimized firefly split luciferase probe proteins that detect the interaction of the kinase-inducible domain (KID) of CREB and the KIX domain of CBP/p300. The increase in the light intensity of the probe proteins results from the phosphorylation of the responsible serine corresponding to Ser-133 of CREB. Because these proteins have a high signal-to-noise ratio and are nontoxic, it has become possible for the first time to carry out long-term measurement of KID-KIX interaction in living cells. Furthermore, we examined the usefulness of the probe proteins for future high-throughput cell-based drug screening and found several herbal extracts that activated CREB.

  4. Liver Clock Protein BMAL1 Promotes de Novo Lipogenesis through Insulin-mTORC2-AKT Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Deqiang; Tong, Xin; Arthurs, Blake; Guha, Anirvan; Rui, Liangyou; Kamath, Avani; Inoki, Ken; Yin, Lei

    2014-01-01

    The clock protein BMAL1 (brain and muscle Arnt-like protein 1) participates in circadian regulation of lipid metabolism, but its contribution to insulin AKT-regulated hepatic lipid synthesis is unclear. Here we used both Bmal1−/− and acute liver-specific Bmal1-depleted mice to study the role of BMAL1 in refeeding-induced de novo lipogenesis in the liver. Both global deficiency and acute hepatic depletion of Bmal1 reduced lipogenic gene expression in the liver upon refeeding. Conversely, Bmal1 overexpression in mouse liver by adenovirus was sufficient to elevate the levels of mRNA of lipogenic enzymes. Bmal1−/− primary mouse hepatocytes displayed decreased levels of de novo lipogenesis and lipogenic enzymes, supporting the notion that BMAL1 regulates lipid synthesis in hepatocytes in a cell-autonomous manner. Both refed mouse liver and insulin-treated primary mouse hepatocytes showed impaired AKT activation in the case of either Bmal1 deficiency or Bmal1 depletion by adenoviral shRNA. Restoring AKT activity by a constitutively active mutant of AKT nearly normalized de novo lipogenesis in Bmal1−/− hepatocytes. Finally, Bmal1 deficiency or knockdown decreased the protein abundance of RICTOR, the key component of the mTORC2 complex, without affecting the gene expression of key factors of insulin signaling. Thus, our study uncovered a novel metabolic function of hepatic BMAL1 that promotes de novo lipogenesis via the insulin-mTORC2-AKT signaling during refeeding. PMID:25063808

  5. The mitochondrial aspartate/glutamate carrier isoform 1 gene expression is regulated by CREB in neuronal cells

    PubMed Central

    Menga, Alessio; Iacobazzi, Vito; Infantino, Vittoria; Avantaggiati, Maria Laura; Palmieri, Ferdinando

    2015-01-01

    The aspartate/glutamate carrier isoform 1 is an essential mitochondrial transporter that exchanges intramitochondrial aspartate and cytosolic glutamate across the inner mitochondrial membrane. It is expressed in brain, heart and muscle and is involved in important biological processes, including myelination. However, the signals that regulate the expression of this transporter are still largely unknown. In this study we first identify a CREB binding site within the aspartate/glutamate carrier gene promoter that acts as a strong enhancer element in neuronal SH-SY5Y cells. This element is regulated by active, phosphorylated CREB protein and by signal pathways that modify the activity of CREB itself and, most noticeably, by intracellular Ca2+ levels. Specifically, aspartate/glutamate carrier gene expression is induced via CREB by forskolin while it is inhibited by the PKA inhibitor, H89. Furthermore, the CREB-induced activation of gene expression is increased by thapsigargin, which enhances cytosolic Ca2+, while it is inhibited by BAPTA-AM that reduces cytosolic Ca2+ or by STO-609, which inhibits CaMK-IV phosphorylation. We further show that CREB-dependent regulation of aspartate/glutamate carrier gene expression occurs in neuronal cells in response to pathological (inflammation) and physiological (differentiation) conditions. Since this carrier is necessary for neuronal functions and is involved in myelinogenesis, our results highlight that targeting of CREB activity and Ca2+ might be therapeutically exploited to increase aspartate/glutamate carrier gene expression in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:25597433

  6. Calcium/calmodulin dependent protein kinase II regulates the phosphorylation of cyclic AMP-responsive element-binding protein of spinal cord in rats following noxious stimulation.

    PubMed

    Fang, Li; Wu, Jing; Zhang, Xuan; Lin, Qing; Willis, William D

    2005-02-01

    We have previously reported that intradermal capsaicin injection causes the phosphorylation of cyclic adenosine monophosphate-responsive element-binding protein (CREB) in the spinal cord of rats. The present study was designed to investigate the role of calcium/camodulin protein dependent protein kinase II (CaM kinase II) in the regulation of phosphorylation of CREB after capsaicin injection. We found that capsaicin injection produces a significant upregulation of phosphorylated CREB in the spinal cord of rat. Intrathecal treatment with a CaM kinase II inhibitor, KN-93, significantly blocked the increased phosphorylation of CREB, but did not affect the CREB protein itself. These results suggest that increased phosphorylation of CREB protein may contribute to central sensitization following acute peripheral noxious stimuli, and the effect may be regulated through the activation of CaM kinase cascades.

  7. Morphoproteomics and biomedical analytics confirm the mTORC2/Akt pathway as a resistance signature and activated ERK and STAT3 as concomitant prosurvival/antiapoptotic pathways in metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) progressing on rapalogs: Pathogenesis and therapeutic options

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Robert E.; Buryanek, Jamie; Tammisetti, Varaha S.; McGuire, Mary F.; Csencsits-Smith, Keri

    2016-01-01

    Background It has been proposed that resistance to rapalog therapies in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is due to adaptive switching from mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) to mTORC2. Objective To combine phosphoprotein staining and applied biomedical analytics to investigate resistance signatures in patients with metastatic RCC progressing on rapalog therapies. Design We applied morphoproteomic analysis to biopsy specimens from nine patients with metastatic RCC who continued to show clinical progression of their tumors while being treated with a rapalog. Results In patients who were on temsirolimus or everolimus at the time of biopsy, a moderate to strong expression of phosphorylated (p)-mTOR (Ser 2448) in the nuclear compartment with concomitant expression of p-Akt (Ser 473) confirmed the mTORC2 pathway. Concomitant moderate to strong nuclear expression of p-ERK 1/2 (Thr202/Tyr204) and p-STAT3 (Tyr705) was confirmed. Histopathologic changes of hypoxic-type coagulative necrosis in 5 cases as well as identification of insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R) expression and histone methyltransferase EZH2 in all tumors studied suggested that hypoxia also contributed to the resistance signature. Biomedical analytics provided insight into therapeutic options that could target such adaptive and pathogenetic mechanisms. Conclusions Morphoproteomics and biomedical analytics confirm mTORC2/Akt as a resistance signature to rapalog therapy in metastatic RCC and demonstrate activation of the prosurvival ERK and STAT3 pathways and involvement of hypoxic pathways that contribute to pathogenesis of such adaptive resistance. These results highlight the need for a novel combinatorial therapeutic approach in metastatic RCC progressing on rapalogs. PMID:27223432

  8. Cyclophilin D deficiency rescues Aβ-impaired PKA/CREB signaling and alleviates synaptic degeneration.

    PubMed

    Du, Heng; Guo, Lan; Wu, Xiaoping; Sosunov, Alexander A; McKhann, Guy M; Chen, John Xi; Yan, Shirley ShiDu

    2014-12-01

    The coexistence of neuronal mitochondrial pathology and synaptic dysfunction is an early pathological feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Cyclophilin D (CypD), an integral part of mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP), is involved in amyloid beta (Aβ)-instigated mitochondrial dysfunction. Blockade of CypD prevents Aβ-induced mitochondrial malfunction and the consequent cognitive impairments. Here, we showed the elimination of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by antioxidants probucol or superoxide dismutase (SOD)/catalase blocks Aβ-mediated inactivation of protein kinase A (PKA)/cAMP regulatory-element-binding (CREB) signal transduction pathway and loss of synapse, suggesting the detrimental effects of oxidative stress on neuronal PKA/CREB activity. Notably, neurons lacking CypD significantly attenuate Aβ-induced ROS. Consequently, CypD-deficient neurons are resistant to Aβ-disrupted PKA/CREB signaling by increased PKA activity, phosphorylation of PKA catalytic subunit (PKA C), and CREB. In parallel, lack of CypD protects neurons from Aβ-induced loss of synapses and synaptic dysfunction. Furthermore, compared to the mAPP mice, CypD-deficient mAPP mice reveal less inactivation of PKA-CREB activity and increased synaptic density, attenuate abnormalities in dendritic spine maturation, and improve spontaneous synaptic activity. These findings provide new insights into a mechanism in the crosstalk between the CypD-dependent mitochondrial oxidative stress and signaling cascade, leading to synaptic injury, functioning through the PKA/CREB signal transduction pathway.

  9. Activation of NR2A receptors induces ischemic tolerance through CREB signaling.

    PubMed

    Terasaki, Yasukazu; Sasaki, Tsutomu; Yagita, Yoshiki; Okazaki, Shuhei; Sugiyama, Yukio; Oyama, Naoki; Omura-Matsuoka, Emi; Sakoda, Saburo; Kitagawa, Kazuo

    2010-08-01

    Previous exposure to a nonlethal ischemic insult protects the brain against subsequent harmful ischemia. N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors are a highly studied target of neuroprotection after ischemia. Recently, NMDA receptor subtypes were implicated in neuronal survival and death. We focused on the contribution of NR2A and cyclic-AMP response element (CRE)-binding protein (CREB) signaling to ischemic tolerance using primary cortical neurons. Ischemia in vitro was modeled by oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD). Ischemic tolerance was induced by applying 45-mins OGD 24 h before 180-mins OGD. Sublethal OGD also induced cross-tolerance against lethal glutamate and hydrogen peroxide. After sublethal OGD, expression of phosphorylated CREB and CRE transcriptional activity were significantly increased. When CRE activity was inhibited by CREB-S133A, a mutant CREB, ischemic tolerance was abolished. Inhibiting NR2A using NVP-AAM077 attenuated preconditioning-induced neuroprotection and correlated with decreased CRE activity levels. Activating NR2A using bicuculline and 4-aminopiridine induced resistance to lethal ischemia accompanied by elevated CRE activity levels, and this effect was abolished by NVP-AAM077. Elevated brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) transcriptional activities were observed after sublethal OGD and administration of bicuculline and 4-aminopiridine. NR2A-containing NMDA receptors and CREB signaling have important functions in the induction of ischemic tolerance. This may provide potential novel therapeutic strategies to treat ischemic stroke.

  10. Song-induced phosphorylation of cAMP response element-binding protein in the songbird brain.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, H; Wada, K; Maekawa, M; Watsuji, T; Hagiwara, M

    1999-05-15

    We have investigated the participation of cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) in the response of the songbird brain to a natural auditory stimulus, a conspecific song. The cells in the two song control nuclei, the higher vocal center (HVC) and area X of zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata), were intensely stained with an anti-CREB monoclonal antibody. Double-labeling studies showed that CREB immunoreactivity was detected only in area X-projecting neurons in the HVC. The cloned CREB cDNA from zebra finches (zCREB) is highly homologous to mammalian delta CREB. Phosphorylation of zCREB at Ser119 in area X-projecting HVC neurons was induced by hearing tape-recorded conspecific songs of zebra finches, but not by birdsongs of another species or white noise. These results raise the possibility that zCREB plays a crucial role in the sensory process of song learning.

  11. Oxytocin is involved in the proconvulsant effects of Sildenafil: Possible role of CREB.

    PubMed

    Khoshneviszadeh, Mahsima; Rahimian, Reza; Fakhfouri, Gohar; Payandemehr, Borna; Khodagholi, Fariba; Ejtemaei Mehr, Shahram; Dehpour, Ahmad Reza

    2016-08-10

    Sildenafil is a phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitor mainly used for male erectile dysfunction. One of rare yet serious adverse effects of Sildenafil is its potential to decrease seizure threshold. Ample evidence suggests that Sildenafil exerts central effects through induction of Oxytocin (OT) secretion and CREB phosphorylation. The aim of the present study is to evaluate potential roles of OT and CREB in the proconvulsant effects of Sildenafil. The Pentylenetetrazole-induced seizure was used as a standard convulsion model in this study. OT release and pCREB expression were evaluated in the hippocampus of mice using ELISA and western blot assays, respectively. Our results showed that Sildenafil at the dose of 10mgkg(-1) or higher, significantly decreased seizure threshold. Pretreatment with a non-effective dose of OT, potentiated while OT receptor antagonist, Atosiban, reversed fully the proconvulsant effects of Sildenafil (5mgkg(-1)). At biochemical inspection, Sildenafil markedly increased CREB which was attenuated by coadministration of Atosiban. The present study shows for the first time that OT release and the subsequent CREB phosphorylation are involved in the proconvulsant effects of acute Sildenafil treatment in an experimental model of seizure.

  12. CREB is activated by UVC through a p38/HOG-1-dependent protein kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Iordanov, M; Bender, K; Ade, T; Schmid, W; Sachsenmaier, C; Engel, K; Gaestel, M; Rahmsdorf, H J; Herrlich, P

    1997-01-01

    Changes in environmental conditions such as the addition of growth factors or irradiation of cells in culture first affect immediate response genes. We have shown previously that short wavelength UV irradiation (UVC) elicits massive activation of several growth factor receptor-dependent pathways. At the level of the immediate response gene c-fos, these pathways activate the transcription factor complex serum response factor (SRF)-p62TCF which mediates part of the UV-induced transcriptional response. These studies have, however, suggested that more that one pathway is required for full UV responsiveness of c-fos. Using appropriate promoter mutations and dominant-negative cAMP response element (CRE)-binding protein (CREB), we now find that UVC-induced transcriptional activation depends also on the CRE at position -60 of the c-fos promoter and on the functionality of a CREB. Upon UV irradiation, CREB and ATF-1 are phosphorylated at serines 133 and 63, respectively, preceded by and dependent on activation of p38/RK/HOG-1 and of a p38/RK/HOG-1-dependent p108 CREB kinase. Although p90RSK1 and MAPKAP kinase 2 are also activated by UV, p90RSK1 does not, at least not decisively, participate in this signalling pathway to CREB and ATF-1 as it is not p38/RK/HOG-1 dependent, and CREB is a poor substrate for MAPKAP kinase 2 in vitro. On the basis of resistance to the growth factor receptor inhibitor suramin and of several types of cross-refractoriness experiments, the UVC-induced CREB/ATF-1 phosphorylation represents an as yet unrecognized route of UVC-induced signal transduction, independent of suramin-inhibitable growth factor receptors and different from the Erk 1,2-p62TCF pathway. PMID:9118940

  13. Hypoxia-mediated alterations and their role in the HER-2/neuregulated CREB status and localization

    PubMed Central

    Steven, André; Leisz, Sandra; Sychra, Katharina; Hiebl, Bernhard; Wickenhauser, Claudia; Mougiakakos, Dimitrios; Kiessling, Rolf; Denkert, Carsten; Seliger, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    The cAMP-responsive element-binding protein (CREB) is involved in the tumorigenicity of HER-2/neu-overexpressing murine and human tumor cells, but a link between the HER-2/neu-mediated CREB activation, its posttranslational modification and localization and changes in the cellular metabolism, due to an altered (tumor) microenvironment remains to be established. The present study demonstrated that shRNA-mediated silencing of CREB in HER-2/neu-transformed cells resulted in decreased tumor formation, which was associated with reduced angiogenesis, but increased necrotic and hypoxic areas in the tumor. Hypoxia induced pCREBSer133, but not pCREBSer121 expression in HER-2/neu-transformed cells. This was accompanied by upregulation of the hypoxia-inducible genes GLUT1 and VEGF, increased cell migration and matrix metalloproteinase-mediated invasion. Treatment of HER-2/neu+ cells with signal transduction inhibitors targeting in particular HER-2/neu was able to revert hypoxia-controlled CREB activation. In addition to changes in the phosphorylation, hypoxic response of HER-2/neu+ cells caused a transient ubiquitination and SUMOylation as well as a co-localization of nuclear CREB to the mitochondrial matrix. A mitochondrial localization of CREB was also demonstrated in hypoxic areas of HER-2/neu+ mammary carcinoma lesions. This was accompanied by an altered gene expression pattern, activity and metabolism of mitochondria leading to an increased respiratory rate, oxidative phosphorylation and mitochondrial membrane potential and consequently to an enhanced apoptosis and reduced cell viability. These data suggest that the HER-2/neu-mediated CREB activation caused by a hypoxic tumor microenvironment contributes to the neoplastic phenotype of HER-2/neu+ cells at various levels. PMID:27409833

  14. CREB-mediated synaptogenesis and neurogenesis is crucial for the role of 5-HT1a receptors in modulating anxiety behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing; Cai, Cheng-Yun; Wu, Hai-Yin; Zhu, Li-Juan; Luo, Chun-Xia; Zhu, Dong-Ya

    2016-01-01

    Serotonin 1a-receptor (5-HT1aR) has been specifically implicated in the pathogenesis of anxiety. However, the mechanism underlying the role of 5-HT1aR in anxiety remains poorly understood. Here we show in mice that the transcription factor cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) in the hippocampus functions as an effector of 5-HT1aR in modulating anxiety-related behaviors. We generated recombinant lentivirus LV-CREB133-GFP expressing a dominant negative CREB which could not be phosphorylated at Ser133 to specifically reduce CREB activity, and LV-VP16-CREB-GFP expressing a constitutively active fusion protein VP16-CREB which could be phosphorylated by itself to specifically enhance CREB activity. LV-CREB133-GFP neutralized 5-HT1aR agonist-induced up-regulation of synapse density, spine density, dendrite complexity, neurogenesis, and the expression of synapsin and spinophilin, two well-characterized synaptic proteins, and abolished the anxiolytic effect of 5-HT1aR agonist; whereas LV-VP16-CREB-GFP rescued the 5-HT1aR antagonist-induced down-regulation of synapse density, spine density, dendrite complexity, neurogenesis and synapsin and spinophilin expression, and reversed the anxiogenic effect of 5-HT1aR antagonist. The deletion of neurogenesis by irradiation or the diminution of synaptogenesis by knockdown of synapsin expression abolished the anxiolytic effects of both CREB and 5-HT1aR activation. These findings suggest that CREB-mediated hippoacampus structural plasticity is crucial for the role of 5-HT1aR in modulating anxiety-related behaviors. PMID:27404655

  15. Region-dependent dynamics of cAMP response element-binding protein phosphorylation in the basal ganglia

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fu-Chin; Graybiel, Ann M.

    1998-01-01

    The cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) is an activity-dependent transcription factor that is involved in neural plasticity. The kinetics of CREB phosphorylation have been suggested to be important for gene activation, with sustained phosphorylation being associated with downstream gene expression. If so, the duration of CREB phosphorylation might serve as an indicator for time-sensitive plastic changes in neurons. To screen for regions potentially involved in dopamine-mediated plasticity in the basal ganglia, we used organotypic slice cultures to study the patterns of dopamine- and calcium-mediated CREB phosphorylation in the major subdivisions of the striatum. Different durations of CREB phosphorylation were evoked in the dorsal and ventral striatum by activation of dopamine D1-class receptors. The same D1 stimulus elicited (i) transient phosphorylation (≤15 min) in the matrix of the dorsal striatum; (ii) sustained phosphorylation (≤2 hr) in limbic-related structures including striosomes, the nucleus accumbens, the fundus striati, and the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis; and (iii) prolonged phosphorylation (up to 4 hr or more) in cellular islands in the olfactory tubercle. Elevation of Ca2+ influx by stimulation of L-type Ca2+ channels, NMDA, or KCl induced strong CREB phosphorylation in the dorsal striatum but not in the olfactory tubercle. These findings differentiate the response of CREB to dopamine and calcium signals in different striatal regions and suggest that dopamine-mediated CREB phosphorylation is persistent in limbic-related regions of the neonatal basal ganglia. The downstream effects activated by persistent CREB phosphorylation may include time-sensitive neuroplasticity modulated by dopamine. PMID:9539803

  16. Interferon γ (IFNγ) Signaling via Mechanistic Target of Rapamycin Complex 2 (mTORC2) and Regulatory Effects in the Generation of Type II Interferon Biological Responses*

    PubMed Central

    Kroczynska, Barbara; Rafidi, Robert L.; Majchrzak-Kita, Beata; Kosciuczuk, Ewa M.; Blyth, Gavin T.; Jemielity, Jacek; Warminska, Zofia; Saleiro, Diana; Mehrotra, Swarna; Arslan, Ahmet Dirim; Fish, Eleanor N.; Platanias, Leonidas C.

    2016-01-01

    We provide evidence for a unique pathway engaged by the type II IFN receptor, involving mTORC2/AKT-mediated downstream regulation of mTORC1 and effectors. These events are required for formation of the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4F complex (eIF4F) and initiation of mRNA translation of type II interferon-stimulated genes. Our studies establish that Rictor is essential for the generation of type II IFN-dependent antiviral and antiproliferative responses and that it controls the generation of type II IFN-suppressive effects on normal and malignant hematopoiesis. Together, our findings establish a central role for mTORC2 in IFNγ signaling and type II IFN responses. PMID:26645692

  17. Interferon γ (IFNγ) Signaling via Mechanistic Target of Rapamycin Complex 2 (mTORC2) and Regulatory Effects in the Generation of Type II Interferon Biological Responses.

    PubMed

    Kroczynska, Barbara; Rafidi, Robert L; Majchrzak-Kita, Beata; Kosciuczuk, Ewa M; Blyth, Gavin T; Jemielity, Jacek; Warminska, Zofia; Saleiro, Diana; Mehrotra, Swarna; Arslan, Ahmet Dirim; Fish, Eleanor N; Platanias, Leonidas C

    2016-01-29

    We provide evidence for a unique pathway engaged by the type II IFN receptor, involving mTORC2/AKT-mediated downstream regulation of mTORC1 and effectors. These events are required for formation of the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4F complex (eIF4F) and initiation of mRNA translation of type II interferon-stimulated genes. Our studies establish that Rictor is essential for the generation of type II IFN-dependent antiviral and antiproliferative responses and that it controls the generation of type II IFN-suppressive effects on normal and malignant hematopoiesis. Together, our findings establish a central role for mTORC2 in IFNγ signaling and type II IFN responses.

  18. Gremlin promotes retinal pigmentation epithelial (RPE) cell proliferation, migration and VEGF production via activating VEGFR2-Akt-mTORC2 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuan; Chen, Zhijun; Cheng, Haixia; Chen, Juan; Qian, Jing

    2017-01-01

    Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) is characterized by late-phase pathologic retinal vasoproliferation. Gremlin is a novel vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGF) receptor 2 (VEGFR2) agonist and promotes angiogenic response. We demonstrated that gremlin expression was significantly increased in retinas of ROP model mice, which was correlated with VEGF upregulation. In retinal pigmentation epithelial (RPE) cells, gremlin activated VEGFR2-Akt-mTORC2 (mammalian target of rapamycin complex 2) signaling, and promoted cell proliferation, migration and VEGF production. VEGFR inhibition (by SU5416) or shRNA knockdown almost abolished gremlin-mediated pleiotropic functions in RPE cells. Further, pharmacological inhibition of Akt-mTOR, or shRNA knockdown of key mTORC2 component (Rictor or Sin1) also attenuated gremlin-exerted activities in RPE cells. We conclude that gremlin promotes RPE cell proliferation, migration and VEGF production possibly via activating VEGFR2-Akt-mTORC2 signaling. Gremlin could be a novel therapeutic target of ROP or other retinal vasoproliferation diseases. PMID:27894090

  19. Activation of CREB by St. John's wort may diminish deletorious effects of aging on spatial memory.

    PubMed

    Trofimiuk, Emil; Holownia, Adam; Braszko, Jan J

    2010-03-01

    St. John's wort (Hypericum perforatum) is one of the leading psychotherapeutic phytomedicines. Beneficial effects of this herb in the treatment of mild to moderate depression are well known. In this study we tested a hypothesis that St. John's wort alleviates age-related memory impairments by increasing the levels of cyclic adenosine 3', 5'-monophosphate response element binding protein (CREB) and phosphorylated CREB (pCREB) in hippocampus. Middleaged rats (18 month-old) displayed a decline in the acquisition of spatial working memory (p < 0.001) in the Morris water maze (MWM). Chronic administration of Hypericum perforatum (HP) (350 mg/kg for 21 days), potently and significantly improved the processing of spatial information in the aged rats (p < 0.001). Also the herb increased the levels of pCREB in the aged rat's hippocampus (p < 0.01) as measured by western immunoblotting. Aging caused significant locomotor impairments as tested in the open field (p < 0.001) but not in the MWM test. However, these were unaffected by treatment with HP. Thus, this study indicates that St. John's wort effectively prevents aging-induced deterioration of spatial memory in 18 month-old rats, possibly by the activation of CREB regulated genes associated with memory formation. It appears that mechanism is probably inactive in young rats.

  20. Defective CFTR-dependent CREB activation results in impaired spermatogenesis and azoospermia.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wen Ming; Chen, Jing; Chen, Hui; Diao, Rui Ying; Fok, Kin Lam; Dong, Jian Da; Sun, Ting Ting; Chen, Wen Ying; Yu, Mei Kuen; Zhang, Xiao Hu; Tsang, Lai Ling; Lau, Ann; Shi, Qi Xian; Shi, Qing Hua; Huang, Ping Bo; Chan, Hsiao Chang

    2011-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is the most common life-limiting recessive genetic disease among Caucasians caused by mutations of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) with over 95% male patients infertile. However, whether CFTR mutations could affect spermatogenesis and result in azoospermia remains an open question. Here we report compromised spermatogenesis, with significantly reduced testicular weight and sperm count, and decreased cAMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB) expression in the testes of CFTR knockout mice. The involvement of CFTR in HCO(3) (-) transport and the expression of the HCO(3) (-) sensor, soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC), are demonstrated for the first time in the primary culture of rat Sertoli cells. Inhibition of CFTR or depletion of HCO(3) (-) could reduce FSH-stimulated, sAC-dependent cAMP production and phosphorylation of CREB, the key transcription factor in spermatogenesis. Decreased CFTR and CREB expression are also observed in human testes with azoospermia. The present study reveals a previously undefined role of CFTR and sAC in regulating the cAMP-CREB signaling pathway in Sertoli cells, defect of which may result in impaired spermatogenesis and azoospermia. Altered CFTR-sAC-cAMP-CREB functional loop may also underline the pathogenesis of various CF-related diseases.

  1. Changes in CREB activation in the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus blunt ethanol-induced behavioral sensitization in adolescent mice

    PubMed Central

    Soares-Simi, Sabrina L.; Pastrello, Daniel M.; Ferreira, Zulma S.; Yonamine, Mauricio; Marcourakis, Tania; Scavone, Cristoforo; Camarini, Rosana

    2013-01-01

    Drug dependence is a major health problem in adults and has been recognized as a significant problem in adolescents. We previously demonstrated that repeated treatment with a behaviorally sensitizing dose of ethanol in adult mice induced tolerance or no sensitization in adolescents and that repeated ethanol-treated adolescents expressed lower Fos and Egr-1 expression than adult mice in the prefrontal cortex (PFC). In the present work, we investigated the effects of acute and repeated ethanol administration on cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) response element-binding protein (CREB) DNA-binding activity using the electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) and the phosphorylated CREB (pCREB)/CREB ratio using immunoblotting in both the PFC and hippocampus in adolescent and adult mice. Adult mice exhibited typical locomotor sensitization after 15 days of daily treatment with 2.0 g/kg ethanol, whereas adolescent mice did not exhibit sensitization. Overall, adolescent mice displayed lower CREB binding activity in the PFC compared with adult mice, whereas opposite effects were observed in the hippocampus. The present results indicate that ethanol exposure induces significant and differential neuroadaptive changes in CREB DNA-binding activity in the PFC and hippocampus in adolescent mice compared with adult mice. These differential molecular changes may contribute to the blunted ethanol-induced behavioral sensitization observed in adolescent mice. PMID:24379765

  2. A first in man, dose-finding study of the mTORC1/mTORC2 inhibitor OSI-027 in patients with advanced solid malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Mateo, Joaquin; Olmos, David; Dumez, Herlinde; Poondru, Srinivasu; Samberg, Nancy L; Barr, Sharon; Van Tornout, Jan M; Jie, Fei; Sandhu, Shahneen; Tan, Daniel S; Moreno, Victor; LoRusso, Patricia M; Kaye, Stan B; Schöffski, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Background: The kinase activity of mTOR involves 2 multiprotein complexes, (mTORC1-mTORC2). Targeting mTORC1 with rapalogues induces compensatory feedback loops resulting in AKT/ERK activation, which may be abrogated by mTORC2 inhibition. A first-in-human trial evaluating tolerability, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of the dual TORC1/TORC2 inhibitor OSI-027 was conducted. Methods: Dose escalation was pursued for three schedules of administration (three consecutive days per week (S1), once a week (S2) and daily dosing (S3)), until dose-limiting toxicities (DLT) were identified. Expansion cohorts with paired tumour biopsies were initiated based on tolerability and pharmacodynamics. Results: One hundred and twenty eight patients with advanced cancer were enrolled. DLT consisted predominantly of fatigue, renal function disturbances and cardiac events. OSI-027 exposure was dose proportional, with Tmax within 4 h and a half-life of ∼14 h. Expansion cohorts were initiated for S1 and S2, as MTD for S3 was overall considered suboptimal. Target modulation in peripheral blood mononuclear cells were observed from 30 mg, but in tumour biopsies 120 mg QD were needed, which was a non-tolerable dose due to renal toxicity. No RECIST responses were recorded, with stable disease >6 months in six (5%) patients. Conclusions: OSI-027 inhibits mTORC1/2 in patients with advanced tumour s in a dose-dependent manner but doses above the tolerable levels in S1 and S3 are required for a sustained biological effect in tumour biopsies. PMID:27002938

  3. Chemical probing of HER2-amplified cancer cells identifies TORC2 as a particularly effective secondary target for combination with lapatinib

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Dhara N.; Ruiz-Saenz, Ana; Gulizia, Nathaniel; Moasser, Mark M.

    2015-01-01

    The clinical impact of HER2 inhibitors in the treatment of HER2-amplified breast cancers has been largely confined to chemotherapy combination regimens, since HER2 inhibitors appear to have very modest efficacies by themselves. This is due to the resilient nature of the functionally relevant HER2-HER3 tumor driver, bidirectionally linked with downstream PI3K/Akt pathway signaling, which can break through the inhibitory effects of most current HER2 or HER3 targeting therapies. A vertical combination approach targeting HER2 and a downstream pathway is a highly rational strategy for much more effective targeted therapy of this disease. However the importance of these downstream pathways in many human tissues and cells significant limits their usefulness as secondary targets by narrowing the therapeutic index of such combination therapies. The secondary target that can afford the highest potential for clinical translation is the one with the highest synergy against tumor cells in combination with HER2-inhibition, allowing the widest therapeutic index for clinical translation. We conducted a comparative analysis of such secondary targets in combination with the HER2 inhibitor lapatinib and find that the inhibition of mTor affords the highest degree of synergy. In further dissecting the individual roles of TORC1 and TORC2 complexes using pharmacologic and genetic tools, we find that it is specifically the inactivation of TORC2 that most synergistically enhances the efficacy of lapatinib. Although inhibitors that selectively target TORC2 are not currently available, these data make a compelling case for their development. PMID:26516700

  4. Effect of mTORC1/mTORC2 inhibition on T cell function: potential role in graft-versus-host disease control.

    PubMed

    Herrero-Sánchez, Ma Carmen; Rodríguez-Serrano, Concepción; Almeida, Julia; San-Segundo, Laura; Inogés, Susana; Santos-Briz, Ángel; García-Briñón, Jesús; SanMiguel, Jesús F; Del Cañizo, Consuelo; Blanco, Belén

    2016-06-01

    The mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway is crucial for the activation and function of T cells, which play an essential role in the development of graft-versus-host disease (GvHD). Despite its partial ability to block mTOR pathway, the mTORC1 inhibitor rapamycin has shown encouraging results in the control of GvHD. Therefore, we considered that simultaneous targeting of both mTORC1 and mTORC2 complexes could exert a more potent inhibition of T cell activation and, thus, could have utility in GvHD control. To assess this assumption, we have used the dual mTORC1/mTORC2 inhibitors CC214-1 and CC214-2. In vitro studies confirmed the superior ability of CC214-1 versus rapamycin to block mTORC1 and mTORC2 activity and to reduce T cell proliferation. Both drugs induced a similar decrease in Th1/Th2 cytokine secretion, but CC214-1 was more efficient in inhibiting naïve T cell activation and the expression of T-cell activation markers. In addition, CC214-1 induced specific tolerance against alloantigens, while preserving anti-cytomegalovirus response. Finally, in a mouse model of GvHD, the administration of CC214-2 significantly improved mice survival and decreased GvHD-induced damages. In conclusion, the current study shows, for the first time, the immunosuppressive ability of CC214-1 on T lymphocytes and illustrates the role of CC214-2 in the allogeneic transplantation setting as a possible GvHD prophylaxis agent.

  5. Antidepressant effects of crocin and its effects on transcript and protein levels of CREB, BDNF, and VGF in rat hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Antidepressants have been shown to affect levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and VGF (non-acronymic) whose transcriptions are dependent on cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) in long term treatment. The aim of this study was to verify the subacute antidepressant effects of crocin, an active constituent of saffron (Crocus sativus L.), and its effects on CREB, BDNF, and VGF proteins, transcript levels and amount of active, phosphorylated CREB (P-CREB) protein in rat hippocampus. Methods Crocin (12.5, 25, and 50 mg/kg), imipramine (10 mg/kg; positive control) and saline (1 mL/kg; neutral control) were administered intraperitoneally (IP) to male Wistar rats for 21 days. The antidepressant effects were studied using the forced swimming test (FST) on day 21 after injection. Protein expression and transcript levels of genes in the rat hippocampus were evaluated using western blot and quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), respectively. Results Crocin significantly reduced the immobility time in the FST. Western blot analysis showed that 25 and 50 mg/kg of crocin increased the levels of CREB and BDNF significantly and dose dependently. All doses of crocin increased the VGF levels in a dose-dependent manner. Levels of p-CREB increased significantly by 50 mg/kg dose of crocin. Only 12.5 mg/kg crocin could significantly increase the transcript levels of BDNF. No changes in CREB and VGF transcript levels were observed in all groups. Conclusions These results suggest that crocin has antidepressant-like action by increasing CREB, BDNF and VGF levels in hippocampus. PMID:24401376

  6. Cranial irradiation regulates CREB-BDNF signaling and variant BDNF transcript levels in the mouse hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Son, Yeonghoon; Yang, Miyoung; Kang, Sohi; Lee, Sueun; Kim, Jinwook; Kim, Juhwan; Park, Seri; Kim, Joong-Sun; Jo, Sung-Kee; Jung, Uhee; Shin, Taekyun; Kim, Sung-Ho; Wang, Hongbing; Moon, Changjong

    2015-05-01

    The brain can be exposed to ionizing radiation in various ways, and such irradiation can trigger adverse effects, particularly on learning and memory. However, the precise mechanisms of cognitive impairments induced by cranial irradiation remain unknown. In the hippocampus, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays roles in neurogenesis, neuronal survival, neuronal differentiation, and synaptic plasticity. The significance of BDNF transcript variants in these contexts is becoming clearer. In the present study, both object recognition memory and contextual fear conditioning task performance in adult C57BL/6 mice were assessed 1 month after a single exposure to cranial irradiation (10 Gy) to evaluate hippocampus-related behavioral dysfunction following such irradiation. Furthermore, changes in the levels of BDNF, the cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB) phosphorylation, and BDNF transcript variants were measured in the hippocampus 1 month after cranial irradiation. On object recognition memory and contextual fear conditioning tasks, mice evaluated 1 month after irradiation exhibited significant memory deficits compared to sham-irradiated controls, but no apparent change was evident in locomotor activity. Both phosphorylated CREB and BDNF protein levels were significantly downregulated after irradiation of the hippocampus. Moreover, the levels of mRNAs encoding common BDNF transcripts, and exons IIC, III, IV, VII, VIII, and IXA, were significantly downregulated after irradiation. The reductions in CREB phosphorylation and BDNF expression induced by differential regulation of BDNF hippocampal exon transcripts may be associated with the memory deficits evident in mice after cranial irradiation.

  7. Activation of cannabinoid CB2 receptor-mediated AMPK/CREB pathway reduces cerebral ischemic injury.

    PubMed

    Choi, In-Young; Ju, Chung; Anthony Jalin, Angela M A; Lee, Da In; Prather, Paul L; Kim, Won-Ki

    2013-03-01

    The type 2 cannabinoid receptor (CB2R) was recently shown to mediate neuroprotection in ischemic injury. However, the role of CB2Rs in the central nervous system, especially neuronal and glial CB2Rs in the cortex, remains unclear. We, therefore, investigated anti-ischemic mechanisms of cortical CB2R activation in various ischemic models. In rat cortical neurons/glia mixed cultures, a CB2R agonist, trans-caryophyllene (TC), decreased neuronal injury and mitochondrial depolarization caused by oxygen-glucose deprivation/re-oxygenation (OGD/R); these effects were reversed by the selective CB2R antagonist, AM630, but not by a type 1 cannabinoid receptor antagonist, AM251. Although it lacked free radical scavenging and antioxidant enzyme induction activities, TC reduced OGD/R-evoked mitochondrial dysfunction and intracellular oxidative stress. Western blot analysis demonstrated that TC enhanced phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and cAMP responsive element-binding protein (CREB), and increased expression of the CREB target gene product, brain-derived neurotrophic factor. However, TC failed to alter the activity of either Akt or extracellular signal-regulated kinase, two major CB2R signaling pathways. Selective AMPK and CREB inhibitors abolished the neuroprotective effects of TC. In rats, post-ischemic treatment with TC decreased cerebral infarct size and edema, and increased phosphorylated CREB and brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression in neurons. All protective effects of TC were reversed by co-administration with AM630. Collectively, these data demonstrate that cortical CB2R activation by TC ameliorates ischemic injury, potentially through modulation of AMPK/CREB signaling, and suggest that cortical CB2Rs might serve as a putative therapeutic target for cerebral ischemia.

  8. Enhanced phosphorylation of cyclic AMP response element binding protein in Brain of mice following repetitive hypoxic exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Gao Yanan; Gao Ge; Long Caixia; Han Song; Zu Pengyu; Fang Li . E-mail: lfang@utmb.edu; Li Junfa . E-mail: junfali@cpums.edu.cn

    2006-02-10

    Cerebral ischemic/hypoxic preconditioning (I/HPC) is a phenomenon of endogenous protection that renders Brain tolerant to sustained ischemia/hypoxia. This profound protection induced by I/HPC makes it an attractive target for developing potential clinical therapeutic approaches. However, the molecular mechanism of I/HPC is unclear. Cyclic AMP (cAMP) response element binding protein (CREB), a selective nuclear transcriptional factor, plays a key role in the neuronal functions. Phosphorylation of CREB on Ser-133 may facilitate its transcriptional activity in response to various stresses. In the current study, we observed the changes in CREB phosphorylation (Ser-133) and protein expression in Brain of auto-hypoxia-induced HPC mice by using Western blot analysis. We found that the levels of phosphorylated CREB (Ser-133), but not protein expression of CREB, increased significantly (p < 0.05) in the hippocampus and the frontal cortex of mice after repetitive hypoxic exposure (H2-H4, n = 6 for each group), when compared to that of the normoxic (H0, n = 6) or hypoxic exposure once group (H1, n = 6). In addition, a significant enhancement (p < 0.05) of CREB phosphorylation (Ser-133) could also be found in the nuclear extracts from the whole hippocampus of hypoxic preconditioned mice (H2-H4, n = 6 for each group). These results suggest that the phosphorylation of CREB might be involved in the development of cerebral hypoxic preconditioning.

  9. Palomid 529, a Novel Small-Molecule Drug, Is a TORC1/TORC2 Inhibitor That Reduces Tumor Growth, Tumor Angiogenesis, and Vascular Permeability

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Qi; Hopkins, Benjamin; Perruzzi, Carole; Udayakumar, Durga; Sherris, David; Benjamin, Laura E.

    2009-01-01

    It has become clear that the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway is central for promoting both tumor and tumor stroma and is therefore a major target for anticancer drug development. First- and second-generation rapalogs (prototypical mTOR inhibitors) have shown promise but, due to the complex nature of mTOR signaling, can result in counterproductive feedback signaling to potentiate upstream Akt signaling. We present a novel PI3K/Akt/mTOR inhibitor, Palomid 529 (P529), which inhibits the TORC1 and TORC2 complexes and shows both inhibition of Akt signaling and mTOR signaling similarly in tumor and vasculature. We show that P529 inhibits tumor growth, angiogenesis, and vascular permeability. It retains the beneficial aspects of tumor vascular normalization that rapamycin boasts. However, P529 has the additional benefit of blocking pAktS473 signaling consistent with blocking TORC2 in all cells and thus bypassing feedback loops that lead to increased Akt signaling in some tumor cells. [Cancer Res 2008;68(22):9551–7] PMID:19010932

  10. Palomid 529, a novel small-molecule drug, is a TORC1/TORC2 inhibitor that reduces tumor growth, tumor angiogenesis, and vascular permeability.

    PubMed

    Xue, Qi; Hopkins, Benjamin; Perruzzi, Carole; Udayakumar, Durga; Sherris, David; Benjamin, Laura E

    2008-11-15

    It has become clear that the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway is central for promoting both tumor and tumor stroma and is therefore a major target for anticancer drug development. First- and second-generation rapalogs (prototypical mTOR inhibitors) have shown promise but, due to the complex nature of mTOR signaling, can result in counterproductive feedback signaling to potentiate upstream Akt signaling. We present a novel PI3K/Akt/mTOR inhibitor, Palomid 529 (P529), which inhibits the TORC1 and TORC2 complexes and shows both inhibition of Akt signaling and mTOR signaling similarly in tumor and vasculature. We show that P529 inhibits tumor growth, angiogenesis, and vascular permeability. It retains the beneficial aspects of tumor vascular normalization that rapamycin boasts. However, P529 has the additional benefit of blocking pAktS473 signaling consistent with blocking TORC2 in all cells and thus bypassing feedback loops that lead to increased Akt signaling in some tumor cells.

  11. A microRNA program in the C. elegans hypodermis couples to intestinal mTORC2/PQM-1 signaling to modulate fat transport

    PubMed Central

    Dowen, Robert H.; Breen, Peter C.; Tullius, Thomas; Conery, Annie L.; Ruvkun, Gary

    2016-01-01

    Animals integrate metabolic, developmental, and environmental information before committing key resources to reproduction. In Caenorhabditis elegans, adult animals transport fat from intestinal cells to the germline to promote reproduction. We identified a microRNA (miRNA)-regulated developmental timing pathway that functions in the hypodermis to nonautonomously coordinate the mobilization of intestinal fat stores to the germline upon initiation of adulthood. This developmental timing pathway, which is controlled by the lin-4 and let-7 miRNAs, engages mTOR signaling in the intestine. The intestinal signaling component is specific to mTORC2 and functions in parallel to the insulin pathway to modulate the activity of the serum/glucocorticoid-regulated kinase (SGK-1). Surprisingly, SGK-1 functions independently of DAF-16/FoxO; instead, SGK-1 promotes the cytoplasmic localization of the PQM-1 transcription factor, which antagonizes intestinal fat mobilization at the transcriptional level when localized to the nucleus. These results revealed that a non-cell-autonomous developmental input regulates intestinal fat metabolism by engaging mTORC2 signaling to promote the intertissue transport of fat reserves from the soma to the germline. PMID:27401555

  12. CREB is a key negative regulator of carbonic anhydrase IX (CA9) in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guanqiao; Cheng, Zhenguo; Liu, Funan; Zhang, Hongyan; Li, Jiabin; Li, Feng

    2015-07-01

    Carbonic anhydrase IX(CA9)is a member of the carbonic anhydrase family that catalyzes the reversible hydration of carbon dioxide, and plays a key role in the regulation of pH. Although a large number of studies have shown that CA9 is strongly up-regulated by HIF1-α, little is known about the negative regulation mechanism of CA9 in cancer cells. Here we find that CREB is a key negative regulator of CA9 in gastric cancer. Over-expression of CREB can significantly repress the expression of CA9. Treating with anisomycin (ANS), an activator of p38, the phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of CREB are both promoted, while the transcription of CA9 is repressed. Besides, our results firstly identify that CREB can recruit SIRT1 (class III HDACS) by adaptor protein p300, then repress the expression of CA9. These findings may contribute to understand the negative regulation mechanisms of CA9 in gastric cancer.

  13. Running exercise-induced up-regulation of hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor is CREB-dependent

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Michael J.; Russo-Neustadt, Amelia A.

    2009-01-01

    The past decade has witnessed burgeoning evidence that antidepressant medications and physical exercise increase the expression of hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). This phenomenon has gained widespread appeal because BDNF is one of the first macromolecules observed to play a central role not only in the treatment of mood disorders, but also in neuronal survival-, growth-, and plasticity-related signaling cascades. Thus, it has become critical to understand how BDNF synthesis is regulated. Much evidence exists that changes in BDNF expression result from the activation/phosphorylation of the transcription factor, cAMP-response-element binding protein (CREB) following the administration of antidepressant medications. Utilizing a mouse model genetically engineered with an inducible CREB repressor, our current study provides evidence that increases in BDNF expression and cellular survival signaling resulting from physical exercise are also dependent upon activation of this central transcription factor. The transcription and expression of hippocampal BDNF, as well as the activation of Akt, a key survival signaling molecule, were measured following acute exercise, and also following short-term treatment with the norepinephrine re-uptake inhibitor, reboxetine. We found that both interventions led to a marked increase in hippocampal BDNF mRNA, BDNF protein and Akt phosphorylation (as well as CREB phosphorylation) in wild-type mice. As expected, activation of the CREB repressor in mutant mice sharply decreased CREB phosphorylation. In addition, all measures noted above remained at baseline levels when mutant mice exercised or received reboxetine. Increases in BDNF and phospho-Akt were also prevented when mutant mice received a combination of exercise and antidepressant treatment. The results are discussed in the context of what is currently known about BDNF signaling. PMID:19294650

  14. Activation of mTORC1/mTORC2 signaling in pediatric low-grade glioma and pilocytic astrocytoma reveals mTOR as a therapeutic target

    PubMed Central

    Hütt-Cabezas, Marianne; Karajannis, Matthias A.; Zagzag, David; Shah, Smit; Horkayne-Szakaly, Iren; Rushing, Elisabeth J.; Cameron, J. Douglas; Jain, Deepali; Eberhart, Charles G.; Raabe, Eric H.; Rodriguez, Fausto J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Previous studies support a role for mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway signaling, and more recently Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), in pediatric low-grade glioma (PLGG), including pilocytic astrocytoma (PA). Here we further evaluate the role of the mTORC1/mTORC2 pathway in order to better direct pharmacologic blockade in these common childhood tumors. Methods We studied 177 PLGGs and PAs using immunohistochemistry and tested the effect of mTOR blockade on 2 PLGG cell lines (Res186 and Res259) in vitro. Results Moderate (2+) to strong (3+) immunostaining was observed for pS6 in 107/177 (59%) PAs and other PLGGs, while p4EBP1 was observed in 35/115 (30%), pElF4G in 66/112 (59%), mTOR (total) in 53/113 (47%), RAPTOR (mTORC1 component) in 64/102 (63%), RICTOR (mTORC2 component) in 48/101 (48%), and pAkt (S473) in 63/103 (61%). Complete phosphatase and tensin homolog protein loss was identified in only 7/101 (7%) of cases. In PA of the optic pathways, compared with other anatomic sites, there was increased immunoreactivity for pS6, pElF4G, mTOR (total), RICTOR, and pAkt (P < .05). We also observed increased pS6 (P = .01), p4EBP1 (P = .029), and RICTOR (P = .05) in neurofibromatosis type 1 compared with sporadic tumors. Treatment of the PLGG cell lines Res186 (PA derived) and Res259 (diffuse astrocytoma derived) with the rapalog MK8669 (ridaforolimus) led to decreased mTOR pathway activation and growth. Conclusions These findings suggest that the mTOR pathway is active in PLGG but varies by clinicopathologic subtype. Additionally, our data suggest that mTORC2 is differentially active in optic pathway and neurofibromatosis type 1–associated gliomas. MTOR represents a potential therapeutic target in PLGG that merits further investigation. PMID:24203892

  15. Proatherogenic Abnormalities Of Lipid Metabolism In SirT1 Transgenic Mice Are Mediated Through Creb Deacetylation

    PubMed Central

    Qiang, Li; Lin, Hua V.; Kim-Muller, Ja Young; Welch, Carrie L.; Gu, Wei; Accili, Domenico

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Dyslipidemia and atherosclerosis are associated with reduced insulin sensitivity and diabetes, but the mechanism is unclear. Gain-of-function of the gene encoding deacetylase SirT1 improves insulin sensitivity, and could be expected to protect against lipid abnormalities. Surprisingly, when transgenic mice overexpressing SirT1 (SirBACO) are placed on atherogenic diet, they maintain better glucose homeostasis, but develop worse lipid profiles and larger atherosclerotic lesions than controls. We show that transcription factor cAMP response element binding protein (Creb) is deacetylated in SirBACO mice. We identify Lys136 is a substrate for SirT1-dependent deacetylation that affects Creb activity by preventing its cAMP-dependent phosphorylation, leading to reduced expression of glucogenic genes, and promoting hepatic lipid accumulation and secretion. Expression of constitutively acetylated Creb (K136Q) in SirBACO mice mimics Creb activation and abolishes the dyslipidemic and insulin-sensitizing effects of SirT1 gain-of-function. We propose that SirT1-dependent Creb deacetylation regulates the balance between glucose and lipid metabolism, integrating fasting signals. PMID:22078933

  16. cAMP-Response Element-Binding 3-Like Protein 1 (CREB3L1) is Required for Decidualization and its Expression is Decreased in Women with Endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Ahn, J I; Yoo, J-Y; Kim, T H; Kim, Y I; Ferguson, S D; Fazleabas, A T; Young, S L; Lessey, B A; Ahn, J Y; Lim, J M; Jeong, J-W

    2016-01-01

    Endometriosis is a major cause of infertility and pelvic pain, affecting more than 10% of reproductive-aged women. Progesterone resistance has been observed in the endometrium of women with this disease, as evidenced by alterations in progesterone-responsive gene and protein expression. cAMPResponse Element-Binding 3-like protein 1 (Creb3l1) has previously been identified as a progesterone receptor (PR) target gene in mouse uterus via high density DNA microarray analysis. However, CREB3L1 function has not been studied in the context of endometriosis and uterine biology. In this study, we validated progesterone (P4) regulation of Creb3l1 in the uteri of wild-type and progesterone receptor knockout (PRKO) mice. Furthermore, we observed that CREB3L1 expression was significantly higher in secretory phase human endometrium compared to proliferative phase and that CREB3L1 expression was significantly decreased in the endometrium of women with endometriosis. Lastly, by transfecting CREB3L1 siRNA into cultured human endometrial stromal cells (hESCs) prior to hormonal induction of in vitro decidualization, we showed that CREB3L1 is required for the decidualization process. Interestingly, phosphorylation of ERK1/2, critical factor for decidualization, was also significantly reduced in CREB3L1-silenced hESCs. It is known that hESCs from patients with endometriosis show impaired decidualization and that dysregulation of the P4-PR signaling axis is linked to a variety of endometrial diseases including infertility and endometriosis. Therefore, these results suggest that CREB3L1 is required for decidualization in mice and humans and may be linked to the pathogenesis of endometriosis in a P4-dependent manner.

  17. Roles of PINK1, mTORC2, and mitochondria in preserving brain tumor-forming stem cells in a noncanonical Notch signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyu-Sun; Wu, Zhihao; Song, Yan; Mitra, Siddhartha S; Feroze, Abdullah H; Cheshier, Samuel H; Lu, Bingwei

    2013-12-15

    The self-renewal versus differentiation choice of Drosophila and mammalian neural stem cells (NSCs) requires Notch (N) signaling. How N regulates NSC behavior is not well understood. Here we show that canonical N signaling cooperates with a noncanonical N signaling pathway to mediate N-directed NSC regulation. In the noncanonical pathway, N interacts with PTEN-induced kinase 1 (PINK1) to influence mitochondrial function, activating mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 2 (mTORC2)/AKT signaling. Importantly, attenuating noncanonical N signaling preferentially impaired the maintenance of Drosophila and human cancer stem cell-like tumor-forming cells. Our results emphasize the importance of mitochondria to N and NSC biology, with important implications for diseases associated with aberrant N signaling.

  18. Endogenous prostaglandin E2 potentiates anti-inflammatory phenotype of macrophage through the CREB-C/EBP-β cascade.

    PubMed

    Na, Yi Rang; Jung, Daun; Yoon, Bo Ruem; Lee, Won Woo; Seok, Seung Hyeok

    2015-09-01

    Macrophages have important functions in tissue homeostasis, but the exact mechanisms regarding wide spectrum of macrophage phenotype remain unresolved. In this study, we report that mouse bone marrow derived naïve macrophages produce prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 ) endogenously, resulting in anti-inflammatory gene expression upon differentiation induced by macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF). Cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibition by indomethacin reduced endogenous PGE2 production of macrophages and subsequently reduced arg1, IL10 and Mrc1, YmI and FizzI gene expressions. Of note, PGE2 phosphorylates CREB via EP2 and EP4 receptor ligation, thereby transcriptionally increasing C/EBP-β expression in BALB/c bone marrow derived macrophages. Activated CREB directly binds to the CREB-responsive element of the C/EBP-β promoter, such that PGE2 ultimately reinforces arg1, IL10 and Mrc1 gene expression. Cyclic AMP activator forskolin also phosphorylated CREB and induced the C/EBP-β cascade, but this was completely blocked by the PKA inhibitor, H89. Consequently, M-CSF grown macrophages inhibited T-cell proliferation but the inhibition ability was reduced when the COX is inhibited by indomethacin or macrophage C/EBP-β expression was decreased by siRNA transduction. Our results collectively describe the molecular basis for homeostatic macrophage differentiation by endogenous PGE2 .

  19. The dual mTORC1 and mTORC2 inhibitor AZD8055 inhibits head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cell growth in vivo and in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Qiang; Song, Xin-mao; Ji, Yang-yang; Jiang, Hui; Xu, Lin-gen

    2013-11-01

    Highlights: •AZD8055 induces significant cytotoxic effects in cultured HNSCC cells. •AZD8055 blocks mTORC1 and mTORC2 activation in cultured HNSCC cells. •JNK activation is required for AZD8055-induced HNSCC cell death. •AZD8055 inhibits Hep-2 cell growth in vivo, and was more efficient than rapamycin. -- Abstract: The serine/threonine kinase mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) promotes cell survival and proliferation, and is constitutively activated in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Thus mTOR is an important target for drug development in this disease. Here we tested the anti-tumor ability of AZD8055, the novel mTOR inhibitor, in HNSCC cells. AZD8055 induced dramatic cell death of HNSCC lines (Hep-2 and SCC-9) through autophagy. AZD8055 blocked both mTOR complex (mTORC) 1 and mTORC2 activation without affecting Erk in cultured HNSCC cells. Meanwhile, AZD8055 induced significant c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activation, which was also required for cancer cell death. JNK inhibition by its inhibitors (SP 600125 and JNK-IN-8), or by RNA interference (RNAi) alleviated AZD8055-induced cell death. Finally, AZD8055 markedly increased the survival of Hep-2 transplanted mice through a significant reduction of tumor growth, without apparent toxicity, and its anti-tumor ability was more potent than rapamycin. Meanwhile, AZD8055 administration activated JNK while blocking mTORC1/2 in Hep-2 tumor engrafts. Our current results strongly suggest that AZD8055 may be further investigated for HNSCC treatment in clinical trials.

  20. DA-9801 promotes neurite outgrowth via ERK1/2-CREB pathway in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Won, Jong Hoon; Ahn, Kyong Hoon; Back, Moon Jung; Ha, Hae Chan; Jang, Ji Min; Kim, Ha Hyung; Choi, Sang-Zin; Son, Miwon; Kim, Dae Kyong

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we examined the mechanisms underlying the effect of DA-9801 on neurite outgrowth. We found that DA-9801 elicits its effects via the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MEK) extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2-cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) pathway. DA-9801, an extract from a mixture of Dioscorea japonica and Dioscorea nipponica, was reported to promote neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells. The effects of DA-9801 on cell viability and expression of neuronal markers were evaluated in PC12 cells. To investigate DA-9801 action, specific inhibitors targeting the ERK signaling cascade were used. No cytotoxicity was observed in PC12 cells at DA-9801 concentrations of less than 30 µg/mL. In the presence of nerve growth factor (NGF, 2 ng/mL), DA-9801 promoted neurite outgrowth and increased the relative mRNA levels of neurofilament-L (NF-L), a marker of neuronal differentiation. The Raf-1 inhibitor GW5074 and MEK inhibitor PD98059 significantly attenuated DA-9801-induced neurite outgrowth. Additionally, the MEK1 and MEK2 inhibitor SL327 significantly attenuated the increase in the percentage of neurite-bearing PC12 cells induced by DA-9801 treatment. Conversely, the selective p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase inhibitor SB203580 did not attenuate the DA-9801 treatment-induced increase in the percentage of neurite-bearing PC12 cells. DA-9801 enhanced the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and CREB in PC12 cells incubated with and without NGF. Pretreatment with PD98059 blocked the DA-9801-induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and CREB. In conclusion, DA-9801 induces neurite outgrowth by affecting the ERK1/2-CREB signaling pathway. Insights into the mechanism underlying this effect of DA-9801 may suggest novel potential strategies for the treatment of peripheral neuropathy.

  1. Rictor regulates phosphorylation of the novel protein kinase C Apl II in Aplysia sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Labban, Margaret; Dyer, John R; Sossin, Wayne S

    2012-09-01

    Rapamycin-insensitive companion of TOR (Rictor) is a conserved component of target of rapamycin complex 2 (TORC2), a complex implicated in phosphorylation of a number of signal transduction-related kinases, including protein kinase Cs (PKCs) at their 'hydrophobic' site in the carboxy-terminal extension domain. In the marine mollusk, Aplysia californica, an increase in phosphorylation of the novel PKC, Apl II, at the hydrophobic site is associated with a protein synthesis-dependent increase in synaptic strength seen after continuous application of serotonin. To determine if Rictor plays a role in this increase, we cloned the Aplysia ortholog of Rictor (ApRictor). An siRNA-mediated decrease in ApRictor levels in Aplysia sensory neurons led to a decrease in the phosphorylation of PKC Apl II at the hydrophobic site suggesting a role for ApRictor in hydrophobic site phosphorylation. However, over-expression of ApRictor was not sufficient to increase phosphorylation of PKC Apl II. Continuous application of serotonin increased phosphorylation of PKC Apl II at the hydrophobic site in cultured sensory neurons, and this was blocked by Torin, which inhibits both TORC1 and TORC2. Over-expression of ApRictor did not lead to change in the magnitude of serotonin-mediated phosphorylation, but did lead to a small increase in the membrane localization of phosphorylated PKC Apl II. In conclusion, these studies implicate Rictor in phosphorylation of a novel PKC during synaptic plasticity and suggest an additional role for Rictor in regulating the localization of PKCs.

  2. Neuregulin1 signaling targets SRF and CREB and activates the muscle spindle-specific gene Egr3 through a composite SRF-CREB-binding site.

    PubMed

    Herndon, Carter A; Ankenbruck, Nick; Lester, Bridget; Bailey, Julie; Fromm, Larry

    2013-03-10

    Muscle spindles are sensory receptors embedded within muscle that detect changes in muscle length. Each spindle is composed of specialized muscle fibers, known as intrafusal muscle fibers, along with the endings of axons from sensory neurons that innervate these muscle fibers. Formation of muscle spindles requires neuregulin1 (NRG1), which is released by sensory axons, activating ErbB receptors in muscle cells that are contacted. In muscle cells, the transcription factor Egr3 is transcriptionally induced by NRG1, which in turn activates various target genes involved in forming the intrafusal fibers of muscle spindles. The signaling relay within the NRG1-ErbB pathway that acts to induce Egr3 is presumably critical for muscle spindle formation but for the most part has not been determined. In the current studies, we examined, using cultured muscle cells, transcriptional regulatory mechanisms by which Egr3 responds to NRG1. We identified a composite regulatory element for the Egr3 gene, consisting adjacent sites that bind cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) and serum response factor (SRF), with a role in NRG1 responsiveness. The SRF element also influences Egr3 basal expression in unstimulated myotubes, and in the absence of the SRF element, the CREB element influences basal expression. We show that NRG1 signaling, to target SRF, acts on the SRF coactivators myocardian-related transcription factor (MRTF)-A and MRTF-B, which are known to activate SRF-mediated transcription, by stimulating their translocation from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. CREB is phosphorylated, which is known to contribute to its activation, in response to NRG1. These results suggest that NRG1 induces expression of the muscle spindle-specific gene Egr3 by stimulating the transcriptional activity of CREB and SRF.

  3. Hippocampal Overexpression of Mutant CREB Blocks Long-Term, but Not Short-Term Memory for a Socially Transmitted Food Preference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brightwell, Jennifer J.; Countryman, Renee A.; Neve, Rachael L.; Colombo, Paul J.; Smith, Clayton A.

    2005-01-01

    Phosphorylation of the transcription factor CREB on Ser133 is implicated in the establishment of long-term memory for hippocampus-dependent tasks, including spatial learning and contextual fear conditioning. We reported previously that training on a hippocampus-dependent social transmission of food preference (STFP) task increases CREB…

  4. Novel mechanisms and signaling pathways of esophageal ulcer healing: the role of prostaglandin EP2 receptors, cAMP, and pCREB.

    PubMed

    Ahluwalia, Amrita; Baatar, Dolgor; Jones, Michael K; Tarnawski, Andrzej S

    2014-09-15

    Clinical studies indicate that prostaglandins of E class (PGEs) may promote healing of tissue injury e.g., gastroduodenal and dermal ulcers. However, the precise roles of PGEs, their E-prostanoid (EP) receptors, signaling pathways including cAMP and cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB), and their relation to VEGF and angiogenesis in the tissue injury healing process remain unknown, forming the rationale for this study. Using an esophageal ulcer model in rats, we demonstrated that esophageal mucosa expresses predominantly EP2 receptors and that esophageal ulceration triggers an increase in expression of the EP2 receptor, activation of CREB (the downstream target of the cAMP signaling), and enhanced VEGF gene expression. Treatment of rats with misoprostol, a PGE1 analog capable of activating EP receptors, enhanced phosphorylation of CREB, stimulated VEGF expression and angiogenesis, and accelerated esophageal ulcer healing. In cultured human esophageal epithelial (HET-1A) cells, misoprostol increased intracellular cAMP levels (by 163-fold), induced phosphorylation of CREB, and stimulated VEGF expression. A cAMP analog (Sp-cAMP) mimicked, whereas an inhibitor of cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (Rp-cAMP) blocked, these effects of misoprostol. These results indicate that the EP2/cAMP/protein kinase A pathway mediates the stimulatory effect of PGEs on angiogenesis essential for tissue injury healing via the induction of CREB activity and VEGF expression.

  5. Antiproliferative effect of panaxynol on RASMCs via inhibition of ERK1/2 and CREB.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Li-Ping; Lu, Yang; Nie, Bao-Ming; Chen, Hong-Zhuan

    2008-02-15

    Panaxynol (PNN) occurs in many foods such as carrot, celery, and several reports have shown that it has neuritogenic and neuroprotective properties. In this study, we have investigated the antiproliferative effect and the mechanism of PNN on platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB-induced proliferation of rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (RASMCs). PNN significantly inhibited PDGF-BB-induced proliferation and DNA synthesis of RASMCs in a concentration-dependent manner. Flow cytometry analysis showed that PNN blocked the cell cycle progression at the G(1)/S phase. Preincubation of RASMCs with 9 microM PNN resulted in a significant inhibition of PDGF-BB-induced extracellular signal-regulated kinase1/2 (ERK1/2) phosphorylation expression and PDGF-BB-induced CREB phosphorylation expression. The results indicated that the inhibitory effect of PNN on the PDGF-BB-induced proliferation of RASMCs might be mediated by blocking phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and that of CREB.

  6. Small molecule kaempferol modulates PDX-1 protein expression and subsequently promotes pancreatic β-cell survival and function via CREB.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanling; Zhen, Wei; Maechler, Pierre; Liu, Dongmin

    2013-04-01

    Chronic hyperlipidemia causes β-cell apoptosis and dysfunction, thereby contributing to the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes (T2D). Thus, searching for agents to promote pancreatic β-cell survival and improve its function could be a promising strategy to prevent and treat T2D. We investigated the effects of kaempferol, a small molecule isolated from ginkgo biloba, on apoptosis and function of β-cells and further determined the mechanism underlying its actions. Kaempferol treatment promoted viability, inhibited apoptosis and reduced caspase-3 activity in INS-1E cells and human islets chronically exposed to palmitate. In addition, kaempferol prevented the lipotoxicity-induced down-regulation of antiapoptotic proteins Akt and Bcl-2. The cytoprotective effects of kaempferol were associated with improved insulin secretion, synthesis, and pancreatic and duodenal homeobox-1 (PDX-1) expression. Chronic hyperlipidemia significantly diminished cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) production, protein kinase A (PKA) activation, cAMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB) phosphorylation and its regulated transcriptional activity in β-cells, all of which were restored by kaempferol treatment. Disruption of CREB expression by transfection of CREB siRNA in INS-1E cells or adenoviral transfer of dominant-negative forms of CREB in human islets ablated kaempferol protection of β-cell apoptosis and dysfunction caused by palmitate. Incubation of INS-1E cells or human islets with kaempferol for 48h induced PDX-1 expression. This effect of kaempferol on PDX-1 expression was not shared by a host of structurally related flavonoid compounds. PDX-1 gene knockdown reduced kaempferol-stimulated cAMP generation and CREB activation in INS-1E cells. These findings demonstrate that kaempferol is a novel survivor factor for pancreatic β-cells via up-regulating the PDX-1/cAMP/PKA/CREB signaling cascade.

  7. YC-1 potentiates cAMP-induced CREB activation and nitric oxide production in alveolar macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Tsong-Long; Tang, Ming-Chi; Kuo, Liang-Mou; Chang, Wen-De; Chung, Pei-Jen; Chang, Ya-Wen; Fang, Yao-Ching

    2012-04-15

    Alveolar macrophages play significant roles in the pathogenesis of several inflammatory lung diseases. Increases in exhaled nitric oxide (NO) are well documented to reflect disease severity in the airway. In this study, we investigated the effect of 3-(5′-hydroxymethyl-2′-furyl)-1-benzyl indazole (YC-1), a known activator of soluble guanylyl cyclase, on prostaglandin (PG)E{sub 1} (a stable PGE{sub 2} analogue) and forskolin (a adenylate cyclase activator) induced NO production and inducible NO synthase (iNOS) expression in rat alveolar macrophages (NR8383). YC-1 did not directly cause NO production or iNOS expression, but drastically potentiated PGE{sub 1}- or forskolin-induced NO production and iNOS expression in NR8383 alveolar macrophages. Combination treatment with YC-1 and PGE{sub 1} significantly increased phosphorylation of the cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB), but not nuclear factor (NF)-κB activation. The combined effect on NO production, iNOS expression, and CREB phosphorylation was reversed by a protein kinase (PK)A inhibitor (H89), suggesting that the potentiating functions were mediated through a cAMP/PKA signaling pathway. Consistent with this, cAMP analogues, but not the cGMP analogue, caused NO release, iNOS expression, and CREB activation. YC-1 treatment induced an increase in PGE{sub 1}-induced cAMP formation, which occurred through the inhibition of cAMP-specific phosphodiesterase (PDE) activity. Furthermore, the combination of rolipram (an inhibitor of PDE4), but not milronone (an inhibitor of PDE3), and PGE{sub 1} also triggered NO production and iNOS expression. In summary, YC-1 potentiates PGE{sub 1}-induced NO production and iNOS expression in alveolar macrophages through inhibition of cAMP PDE activity and activation of the cAMP/PKA/CREB signaling pathway. Highlights: ► YC-1 potentiated PGE1-induced iNOS expression in alveolar macrophages. ► The combination of YC-1 and PGE1 increased CREB but not NFκB activation.

  8. Exercise Prevents Memory Impairment Induced by Arsenic Exposure in Mice: Implication of Hippocampal BDNF and CREB.

    PubMed

    Sun, Bao-Fei; Wang, Qing-Qing; Yu, Zi-Jiang; Yu, Yan; Xiao, Chao-Lun; Kang, Chao-Sheng; Ge, Guo; Linghu, Yan; Zhu, Jun-De; Li, Yu-Mei; Li, Qiang-Ming; Luo, Shi-Peng; Yang, Dang; Li, Lin; Zhang, Wen-Yan; Tian, Guang

    2015-01-01

    High concentrations of arsenic, which can be occasionally found in drinking water, have been recognized as a global health problem. Exposure to arsenic can disrupt spatial memory; however, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. In the present study, we tested whether exercise could interfere with the effect of arsenic exposure on the long-term memory (LTM) of object recognition in mice. Arsenic (0, 1, 3, and 10 mg/ kg, i.g.) was administered daily for 12 weeks. We found that arsenic at dosages of 1, 3, and 10 mg/kg decreased body weight and increased the arsenic content in the brain. The object recognition LTM (tested 24 h after training) was disrupted by 3 mg/ kg and 10 mg/ kg, but not 1 mg/ kg arsenic exposure. Swimming exercise also prevented LTM impairment induced by 3 mg/ kg, but not with 10 mg/ kg, of arsenic exposure. The expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and phosphorylated cAMP-response element binding protein (pCREB) in the CA1 and dentate gyrus areas (DG) of the dorsal hippocampus were decreased by 3 mg/ kg and 10 mg/ kg, but not by 1 mg/ kg, of arsenic exposure. The decrease in BDNF and pCREB in the CA1 and DG induced by 3 mg/ kg, but not 10 mg/ kg, of arsenic exposure were prevented by swimming exercise. Arsenic exposure did not affect the total CREB expression in the CA1 or DG. Taken together, these results indicated that swimming exercise prevented the impairment of object recognition LTM induced by arsenic exposure, which may be mediated by BDNF and CREB in the dorsal hippocampus.

  9. Synergistic Neuroprotective Effects of Two Herbal Ingredients via CREB-Dependent Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xu; Wang, Dongxiao; Zhao, Runqing; Dong, Xianzhe; Hu, Yuan; Liu, Ping

    2016-01-01

    As two natural oligosaccharide esters, 3,6’-Disinapoyl sucrose (DISS) and tenuifolisideA (TFSA) are originating from the root of Polygala tenuifolia Willd, a traditional Chinese medicine used in treatment of mental disorders. Previous reports have shown that both of them possess in vitro neuroprotective effects by stimulating different upstream pathways related with cyclic AMP-responsive element-binding protein (CREB). In the present study, we investigated the additive neuroprotective effects of DISS and TFSA on Glu-induced damage of SY5Y cells and purposed the possible underlying mechanism. The interaction between DISS and TFSA showed a clear-cut synergistic effect as evidenced by combination index (CI). Additional evidence from biochemical (NOS activity) assays confirmed their additive inhibition on the Glu-induced NOS hyperactivation. Moreover, we showed that co-treatment of DISS and TFSA resulted in an additively up-regulated phosphorylation of CREB as well as increased expressions of CRTC1 and BDNF. Neuroprotective effects of DISS and TFSA on Glu-induced decrease in cell viability were blocked by MAPK/ERK1/2 inhibitor (U0126) and PI3-K inhibitor (LY290042). Nevertheless, the CRTC1 or BDNF expression induced by these two compounds was significantly reduced in the presence of either ERK or PI3-K inhibitor, indicating that the two oligosaccharide esters shared some common pathways in the regulation of CREB-BDNF pathway. Taken together, we, for the first time, showed that DISS and TFSA exerted the additive neuroprotective effects on CREB-BDNF signaling pathway through complementary mechanisms. PMID:27729863

  10. Exercise Prevents Memory Impairment Induced by Arsenic Exposure in Mice: Implication of Hippocampal BDNF and CREB

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Zi-Jiang; Yu, Yan; Xiao, Chao-Lun; Kang, Chao-Sheng; Ge, Guo; Linghu, Yan; Zhu, Jun-De; Li, Yu-Mei; Li, Qiang-Ming; Luo, Shi-Peng; Yang, Dang; Li, Lin; Zhang, Wen-Yan; Tian, Guang

    2015-01-01

    High concentrations of arsenic, which can be occasionally found in drinking water, have been recognized as a global health problem. Exposure to arsenic can disrupt spatial memory; however, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. In the present study, we tested whether exercise could interfere with the effect of arsenic exposure on the long-term memory (LTM) of object recognition in mice. Arsenic (0, 1, 3, and 10 mg/ kg, i.g.) was administered daily for 12 weeks. We found that arsenic at dosages of 1, 3, and 10 mg/kg decreased body weight and increased the arsenic content in the brain. The object recognition LTM (tested 24 h after training) was disrupted by 3 mg/ kg and 10 mg/ kg, but not 1 mg/ kg arsenic exposure. Swimming exercise also prevented LTM impairment induced by 3 mg/ kg, but not with 10 mg/ kg, of arsenic exposure. The expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and phosphorylated cAMP-response element binding protein (pCREB) in the CA1 and dentate gyrus areas (DG) of the dorsal hippocampus were decreased by 3 mg/ kg and 10 mg/ kg, but not by 1 mg/ kg, of arsenic exposure. The decrease in BDNF and pCREB in the CA1 and DG induced by 3 mg/ kg, but not 10 mg/ kg, of arsenic exposure were prevented by swimming exercise. Arsenic exposure did not affect the total CREB expression in the CA1 or DG. Taken together, these results indicated that swimming exercise prevented the impairment of object recognition LTM induced by arsenic exposure, which may be mediated by BDNF and CREB in the dorsal hippocampus. PMID:26368803

  11. The molecular biology of memory: cAMP, PKA, CRE, CREB-1, CREB-2, and CPEB.

    PubMed

    Kandel, Eric R

    2012-05-14

    The analysis of the contributions to synaptic plasticity and memory of cAMP, PKA, CRE, CREB-1, CREB-2, and CPEB has recruited the efforts of many laboratories all over the world. These are six key steps in the molecular biological delineation of short-term memory and its conversion to long-term memory for both implicit (procedural) and explicit (declarative) memory. I here first trace the background for the clinical and behavioral studies of implicit memory that made a molecular biology of memory storage possible, and then detail the discovery and early history of these six molecular steps and their roles in explicit memory.

  12. Concurrent inhibition of mTORC1 and mTORC2 by WYE-687 inhibits renal cell carcinoma cell growth in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Hua; Chen, Xinfeng; Zheng, Bing; Shan, Yuxi

    2017-01-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) represents a valuable oncotarget for treatment. We here tested the potential anti-RCC activity by a novel mTOR kinase inhibitor WYE-687in vitro and in vivo.WYE-687 was cytotoxic and anti-proliferative to established RCC cell lines (786-O and A498) and primary human RCC cells. Yet, it was non-cytotoxic toHK-2 tubular epithelial cells.WYE-687 provoked caspase-dependent apoptosis in the RCC cells. At the molecular level, WYE-687 almost completely blocked mTORC1 (p-S6K1 and p-S6) and mTORC2 (p-Akt Ser 473) activation in both 786-Ocells and primary human RCC cells, where it downregulated both hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α and HIF-2α expression. Significantly, oral administration of WYE-687 potently suppressed786-O tumor xenograft growth in nude mice. mTORC1/2 activation and HIF-1α/2α expression were also remarkably downregulated in WYE-687-treated tumor tissues. Thus, our preclinical results imply that WYE-687 may have important translational value for the treatment of RCC. PMID:28257457

  13. The Antipancreatic Cancer Activity of OSI-027, a Potent and Selective Inhibitor of mTORC1 and mTORC2

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bo; Xu, Ming; Zhang, Hui; Xu, Ming-zheng; Wang, Xu-jing; Tang, Qing-he

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the potential activity of OSI-027, a potent and selective mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) complex 1/2 (mTORC1/2) dual inhibitor, against pancreatic cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo. We demonstrated that OSI-027 inhibited survival and growth of both primary and transformed (PANC-1 and MIA PaCa-2 lines) human pancreatic cancer cells. Meanwhile, OSI-027 induced caspase-dependent apoptotic death of the pancreatic cancer cells. On the other hand, caspase inhibitors alleviated cytotoxicity by OSI-027. At the molecular level, OSI-027 treatment blocked mTORC1 and mTORC2 activation simultaneously, without affecting ERK–mitogen-activated protein kinase activation. Importantly, OSI-027 activated cytoprotective autophagy in the above cancer cells. Whereas pharmacological blockage of autophagy or siRNA knockdown of Beclin-1 significantly enhanced the OSI-027-induced activity against pancreatic cancer cells. Specifically, a relatively low dose of OSI-027 sensitized gemcitabine-induced pancreatic cancer cell death in vitro. Further, administration of OSI-027 or together with gemcitabine dramatically inhibited PANC-1 xenograft growth in severe combined immunodeficiency mice, leading to significant mice survival improvement. In summary, the preclinical results of this study suggest that targeting mTORC1/2 synchronously by OSI-027 could be further investigated as a valuable treatment for pancreatic cancer. PMID:26284306

  14. The Antipancreatic Cancer Activity of OSI-027, a Potent and Selective Inhibitor of mTORC1 and mTORC2.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bo; Xu, Ming; Zhang, Hui; Xu, Ming-zheng; Wang, Xu-jing; Tang, Qing-he; Tang, Jian-ying

    2015-10-01

    In the present study, we investigated the potential activity of OSI-027, a potent and selective mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) complex 1/2 (mTORC1/2) dual inhibitor, against pancreatic cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo. We demonstrated that OSI-027 inhibited survival and growth of both primary and transformed (PANC-1 and MIA PaCa-2 lines) human pancreatic cancer cells. Meanwhile, OSI-027 induced caspase-dependent apoptotic death of the pancreatic cancer cells. On the other hand, caspase inhibitors alleviated cytotoxicity by OSI-027. At the molecular level, OSI-027 treatment blocked mTORC1 and mTORC2 activation simultaneously, without affecting ERK-mitogen-activated protein kinase activation. Importantly, OSI-027 activated cytoprotective autophagy in the above cancer cells. Whereas pharmacological blockage of autophagy or siRNA knockdown of Beclin-1 significantly enhanced the OSI-027-induced activity against pancreatic cancer cells. Specifically, a relatively low dose of OSI-027 sensitized gemcitabine-induced pancreatic cancer cell death in vitro. Further, administration of OSI-027 or together with gemcitabine dramatically inhibited PANC-1 xenograft growth in severe combined immunodeficiency mice, leading to significant mice survival improvement. In summary, the preclinical results of this study suggest that targeting mTORC1/2 synchronously by OSI-027 could be further investigated as a valuable treatment for pancreatic cancer.

  15. T Cells Encountering Myeloid Cells Programmed for Amino Acid-dependent Immunosuppression Use Rictor/mTORC2 Protein for Proliferative Checkpoint Decisions.

    PubMed

    Van de Velde, Lee-Ann; Subramanian, Chitra; Smith, Amber M; Barron, Luke; Qualls, Joseph E; Neale, Geoffrey; Alfonso-Pecchio, Adolfo; Jackowski, Suzanne; Rock, Charles O; Wynn, Thomas A; Murray, Peter J

    2017-01-06

    Modulation of T cell proliferation and function by immunoregulatory myeloid cells are an essential means of preventing self-reactivity and restoring tissue homeostasis. Consumption of amino acids such as arginine and tryptophan by immunoregulatory macrophages is one pathway that suppresses local T cell proliferation. Using a reduced complexity in vitro macrophage-T cell co-culture system, we show that macrophage arginase-1 is the only factor required by M2 macrophages to block T cells in G1, and this effect is mediated by l-arginine elimination rather than metabolite generation. Tracking how T cells adjust their metabolism when deprived of arginine revealed the significance of macrophage-mediated arginine deprivation to T cells. We found mTORC1 activity was unaffected in the initial G1 block. After 2 days of arginine deprivation, mTORC1 activity declined paralleling a selective down-regulation of SREBP target gene expression, whereas mRNAs involved in glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, and T cell activation were unaffected. Cell cycle arrest was reversible at any point by exogenous arginine, suggesting starved T cells remain poised awaiting nutrients. Arginine deprivation-induced cell cycle arrest was mediated in part by Rictor/mTORC2, providing evidence that this nutrient recognition pathway is a central component of how T cells measure environmental arginine.

  16. PI3K-mTORC2 but not PI3K-mTORC1 regulates transcription of HIF2A/EPAS1 and vascularization in neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Mohlin, Sofie; Hamidian, Arash; von Stedingk, Kristoffer; Bridges, Esther; Wigerup, Caroline; Bexell, Daniel; Påhlman, Sven

    2015-11-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) is a master regulator of cellular responses to oxygen deprival with a critical role in mediating the angiogenic switch in solid tumors. Differential expression of the HIF subunits HIF1α and HIF2α occurs in many human tumor types, suggesting selective implications to biologic context. For example, high expression of HIF2α that occurs in neuroblastoma is associated with stem cell-like features, disseminated disease, and poor clinical outcomes, suggesting pivotal significance for HIF2 control in neuroblastoma biology. In this study, we provide novel insights into how HIF2α expression is transcriptionally controlled by hypoxia and how this control is abrogated by inhibition of insulin-like growth factor-1R/INSR-driven phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) signaling. Reducing PI3K activity was sufficient to decrease HIF2α mRNA and protein expression in a manner with smaller and less vascularized tumors in vivo. PI3K-regulated HIF2A mRNA expression was independent of Akt or mTORC1 signaling but relied upon mTORC2 signaling. HIF2A mRNA was induced by hypoxia in neuroblastoma cells isolated from metastatic patient-derived tumor xenografts, where HIF2A levels could be reduced by treatment with PI3K and mTORC2 inhibitors. Our results suggest that targeting PI3K and mTORC2 in aggressive neuroblastomas with an immature phenotype may improve therapeutic efficacy.

  17. The cAMP Response Element Binding protein (CREB) is activated by Insulin-like Growth Factor-1 (IGF-1) and regulates myostatin gene expression in skeletal myoblast

    SciTech Connect

    Zuloaga, R.; Fuentes, E.N.; Molina, A.; Valdés, J.A.

    2013-10-18

    Highlights: •IGF-1 induces the activation of CREB via IGF-1R/PI3K/PLC signaling pathway. •Calcium dependent signaling pathways regulate myostatin gene expression. •IGF-1 regulates myostatin gene expression via CREB transcription in skeletal myoblast. -- Abstract: Myostatin, a member of the Transforming Growth Factor beta (TGF-β) superfamily, plays an important role as a negative regulator of skeletal muscle growth and differentiation. We have previously reported that IGF-1 induces a transient myostatin mRNA expression, through the activation of the Nuclear Factor of Activated T cells (NFAT) in an IP{sub 3}/calcium-dependent manner. Here we examined the activation of CREB transcription factor as downstream targets of IGF-1 during myoblast differentiation and its role as a regulator of myostatin gene expression. In cultured skeletal myoblast, IGF-1 induced the phosphorylation and transcriptional activation of CREB via IGF-1 Receptor/Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase (PI3K)/Phospholipase C gamma (PLC γ), signaling pathways. Also, IGF-1 induced calcium-dependent molecules such as Calmodulin Kinase II (CaMK II), Extracellular signal-regulated Kinases (ERK), Protein Kinase C (PKC). Additionally, we examined myostatin mRNA levels and myostatin promoter activity in differentiated myoblasts stimulated with IGF-1. We found a significant increase in mRNA contents of myostatin and its reporter activity after treatment with IGF-1. The expression of myostatin in differentiated myoblast was downregulated by the transfection of siRNA–CREB and by pharmacological inhibitors of the signaling pathways involved in CREB activation. By using pharmacological and genetic approaches together these data demonstrate that IGF-1 regulates the myostatin gene expression via CREB transcription factor during muscle cell differentiation.

  18. 5-Aminolaevulinate synthase gene promoter contains two cAMP-response element (CRE)-like sites that confer positive and negative responsiveness to CRE-binding protein (CREB).

    PubMed Central

    Giono, L E; Varone, C L; Cánepa, E T

    2001-01-01

    The first and rate-controlling step of the haem biosynthetic pathway in mammals and fungi is catalysed by the mitochondrial-matrix enzyme 5-aminolaevulinate synthase (ALAS). The purpose of this work was to explore the molecular mechanisms involved in the cAMP regulation of rat housekeeping ALAS gene expression. Thus we have examined the ALAS promoter for putative transcription-factor-binding sites that may regulate transcription in a cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA)-induced context. Applying both transient transfection assays with a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter gene driven by progressive ALAS promoter deletions in HepG2, and electrophoresis mobility-shift assays we have identified two putative cAMP-response elements (CREs) at positions -38 and -142. Functional analysis showed that both CRE-like sites were necessary for complete PKA induction, but only one for basal expression. Co-transfection with a CRE-binding protein (CREB) expression vector increased PKA-mediated induction of ALAS promoter transcriptional activity. However, in the absence of co-transfected PKA, CREB worked as a specific repressor for ALAS promoter activity. A CREB mutant deficient in a PKA phosphorylation site was unable to induce expression of the ALAS gene but could inhibit non-stimulated promoter activity. Furthermore, a DNA-binding mutant of CREB did not interfere with ALAS promoter basal activity. Site-directed-mutagenesis studies showed that only the nearest element to the transcription start site was able to inhibit the activity of the promoter. Therefore, we conclude that CREB, through its binding to CRE-like sites, mediates the effect of cAMP on ALAS gene expression. Moreover, we propose that CREB could also act as a repressor of ALAS transcription, but is able to reverse its role after PKA activation. Dephosphorylated CREB would interfere in a spatial-disposition-dependent manner with the transcriptional machinery driving inhibition of gene expression. PMID:11139395

  19. cAMP/PKA/CREB/GLT1 signaling involved in the antidepressant-like effects of phosphodiesterase 4D inhibitor (GEBR-7b) in rats

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xu; Guo, Haibiao; Sayed, Mohammad Daud SOM; Lu, Yang; Yang, Ting; Zhou, Dongsheng; Chen, Zhongming; Wang, Haitao; Wang, Chuang; Xu, Jiangping

    2016-01-01

    Objectives GEBR-7b, a potential phosphodiesterase 4D inhibitor, has been shown to have memory-enhancing effects in rodents. However, it is still unknown whether GEBR-7b also has the antidepressant-like effects in rats. Herein, we examined the potential of GEBR-7b to attenuate depression-like behaviors in the rat model of depression induced by chronic unpredictable stress (CUS). Next, we also investigated the alterations of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), protein kinase A (PKA) catalytic subunit (PKAca), cAMP response element-binding (CREB), and glutamate transporter 1 (GLT1) levels produced by GEBR-7b in the rats model of depression. Methods Effects of GEBR-7b on CUS (35 days)-induced depression-like behaviors were examined by measuring immobility time in the forced swimming test (FST). Hippocampal cAMP levels were examined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, whereas PKAca, phosphorylation of CREB (pCREB), CREB, and GLT1 in the hippocampus of rats were subjected to Western blot analysis. Results CUS exposure caused a depression-like behavior evidenced by the increased immobility time in FST. Depression-like behavior induced by CUS was accompanied by a significant increased GLT, decreased cAMP, PKAca, pCREB activities in hippocampus. However, repeated GEBR-7b administration significantly reversed CUS-induced depression-like behavior and changes of cAMP/PKA/CREB/GLT1 signaling. No alteration was observed in locomotor activity in open field test. Conclusion These findings indicate that GEBR-7b reversed the depression-like behaviors induced by CUS in rats, which is at least in part mediated by modulating cAMP, PKAca, pCREB, and GLT1 levels in the hippocampus of rats, supporting its neuroprotective potential against behavioral and biochemical dysfunctions induced by CUS. PMID:26855578

  20. Molecular regulation of apoptotic machinery and lipid metabolism by mTORC1/mTORC2 dual inhibitors in preclinical models of HER2+/PIK3CAmut breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Jianchang; Chen, Yaqing; Meng, Tao; Ma, Lanping; Meng, Lanfang; Wang, Xin; Yu, Ting; Zask, Arie; Shen, Jingkang; Yu, Ker

    2016-01-01

    The mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a rational target for cancer treatment. While the mTORC1-selective rapalogs have shown significant benefits in the clinic, antitumor response may be further improved by inhibiting both mTORC1 and mTORC2. Herein, we established target profile of a novel mTOR kinase inhibitor (mTOR-KI) MTI-31 and employed it to study new therapeutic mechanism in breast cancer. MTI-31 demonstrated a potent mTOR binding affinity with >5000 fold selectivity over the related PI3K family isoforms. MTI-31 inhibited mTORC1- and mTORC2 function at ≤120 nM in cellular assays or 5 mg/kg orally in tumor-bearing mice. In a panel of breast cancer lines, the antitumor efficacy of MTI-31 was dependent on HER2+ and/or PIK3CAmut (HER2+/PIK3CAmut) status of the tumors and required mTORC2-specific modulation of Bim, MCL-1 and GSK3. Inactivation of Bim or GSK3 each attenuated apoptotic death resulting in mTOR-KI resistance. The antitumor response also required a suppression of lipid metabolism in therapy-sensitive tumors. Treatment with MTI-31 or AZD8055 substantially reduced lipogenesis and acetyl-CoA homeostasis, which was mechanistically linked to a blockade of mTORC2-dependent glucose-to-lipid conversion rate. We also found that the basal levels of carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1A and lipid catabolism were elevated in HER2+/PIK3CAmut breast cells and were inhibited upon mTOR-KI treatment. A CPT1A inhibitor etomoxir mimicked MTI-31 action in selective downregulation of cellular lipid catabolism. Co-treatments with MTI-31 and etomoxir enhanced the suppression of cyclin D1, c-Myc and cell growth in HER2+/PIK3CAmut tumors. These new mechanistic findings provide a rationale for targeting mTORC1 and mTORC2 in HER2+/PIK3CAmut breast cancer. PMID:27563814

  1. Storage of passive motion pattern in hippocampal CA1 region depends on CaMKII/CREB signaling pathway in a motion sickness rodent model

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Junqin; Liu, Jiluo; Pan, Leilei; Qi, Ruirui; Liu, Peng; Zhou, Wei; Cai, Yiling

    2017-01-01

    Sensory mismatch between actual motion information and anticipated sensory patterns (internal model) is the etiology of motion sickness (MS). Some evidence supports that hippocampus might involve the neural storage of the “internal model”. This study established an “internal model” acquisition-retention behavioral model using a repeated habituation rotation training protocol. We tried to identify the hippocampal subregion involved in “internal model” retention using chemical lesion methods. Hippocampal kinases (CaMK, CaMKIV, CREB and ERK1/2) phosphorylation in the target subregion was assayed and the effects of kinase inhibitors (KN93 or U0126) on “internal model” retention were investigated. The activities of potential kinases (CaMKII and CREB) were also examined in otoliths deficit het/het mice. In habituated rats, CA1 lesion reproduced MS-related behavioral responses on “internal model” retention day. Habituation training increased CaMKII and CREB activity but had no effect on CaMKIV and ERK1/2 activity in the CA1, while inhibition of CaMKII but not ERK1/2 impaired “internal model” retention. In het/het mice, CaMKII and CREB were not activated in the CA1 on the retention day. These results suggested that CaMKII/CREB pathway might potentially contribute to the storage of the “internal model” in the hippocampal CA1 after motion sickness induced by vestibular stimulation. PMID:28230177

  2. Leptin Induces Hippocampal Synaptogenesis via CREB-Regulated MicroRNA-132 Suppression of p250GAP

    PubMed Central

    Dhar, Matasha; Zhu, Mingyan; Impey, Soren; Lambert, Talley J.; Bland, Tyler; Karatsoreos, Ilia N.; Nakazawa, Takanobu

    2014-01-01

    Leptin acts in the hippocampus to enhance cognition and reduce depression and anxiety. Cognitive and emotional disorders are associated with abnormal hippocampal dendritic spine formation and synaptogenesis. Although leptin has been shown to induce synaptogenesis in the hypothalamus, its effects on hippocampal synaptogenesis and the mechanism(s) involved are not well understood. Here we show that leptin receptors (LepRs) are critical for hippocampal dendritic spine formation in vivo because db/db mice lacking the long form of the leptin receptor (LepRb) have reduced spine density on CA1 and CA3 neurons. Leptin promotes the formation of mature spines and functional glutamate synapses on hippocampal pyramidal neurons in both dissociated and slice cultures. These effects are blocked by short hairpin RNAs specifically targeting the LepRb and are absent in cultures from db/db mice. Activation of the LepR leads to cAMP response element–binding protein (CREB) phosphorylation and initiation of CREB-dependent transcription via the MAPK kinase/Erk pathway. Furthermore, both Mek/Erk and CREB activation are required for leptin-induced synaptogenesis. Leptin also increases expression of microRNA-132 (miR132), a well-known CREB target, which is also required for leptin-induced synaptogenesis. Last, leptin suppresses the expression of p250GAP, a miR132 target, and this suppression is obligatory for leptin's effects as is the downstream target of p250GAP, Rac1. LepRs appear to be critical in vivo as db/db mice have lowered hippocampal miR132 levels and elevated p250GAP expression. In conclusion, we identify a novel signaling pathway by which leptin increases synaptogenesis through inducing CREB transcription and increasing microRNA-mediated suppression of p250GAP activity, thus removing a known inhibitor of Rac1-stimulated synaptogenesis. PMID:24877561

  3. The TORC1/TORC2 inhibitor, Palomid 529, reduces tumor growth and sensitizes to docetaxel and cisplatin in aggressive and hormone-refractory prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Gravina, Giovanni Luca; Marampon, Francesco; Petini, Foteini; Biordi, Leda; Sherris, David; Jannini, Emmanuele A; Tombolini, Vincenzo; Festuccia, Claudio

    2011-08-01

    One of the major obstacles in the treatment of hormone-refractory prostate cancer (HRPC) is the development of chemo-resistant tumors. The aim of this study is to evaluate the role of Palomid 529 (P529), a novel TORC1/TORC2 inhibitor, in association with docetaxel (DTX) and cisplatin (CP). This work utilizes a wide panel of prostatic cancer cell lines with or without basal activation of Akt as well as two in vivo models of aggressive HRPC. The blockade of Akt/mTOR activity was associated to reduced cell proliferation and induction of apoptosis. Comparison of IC50 values calculated for PTEN-positive and PTEN-negative cell lines as well as the PTEN transfection in PC3 cells or PTEN silencing in DU145 cells revealed that absence of PTEN was indicative for a better activity of the drug. In addition, P529 synergized with DTX and CP. The strongest synergism was achieved when prostate cancer (PCa) cells were sequentially exposed to CP or DTX followed by treatment with P529. Treatment with P529 before the exposure to chemotherapeutic drugs resulted in a moderate synergism, whereas intermediated values of combination index were found when drugs were administered simultaneously. In vivo treatment of a combination of P529 with DTX or CP increased the percentage of complete responses and reduced the number of mice with tumor progression. Our results provide a rationale for combinatorial treatment using conventional chemotherapy and a Akt/mTOR inhibitor as promising therapeutic approach for the treatment of HRPC, a disease largely resistant to conventional therapies.

  4. Mdivi-1 Protects Against Ischemic Brain Injury via Elevating Extracellular Adenosine in a cAMP/CREB-CD39-Dependent Manner.

    PubMed

    Cui, Mei; Ding, Hongyan; Chen, Fangzhe; Zhao, Yanxin; Yang, Qi; Dong, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to examine whether the neuroprotective effects of Mdivi-1 are attributable to extracellular ATP and adenosine. Mdivi-1 was administered prior to or post middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). The extracellular adenosine was measured by in vivo microdialysis and high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) in MCAO mouse model. Western blot was done to determine the influence of Mdivi-1 on the expression of CD39 and CREB phosphorylation both in vivo and in the cultured astrocytes. Intracellular cAMP and protein kinase A (PKA) activity were detected in primary astrocytes. Results showed that Mdivi-1 significantly reduced infarct volume and neurological scores when administered either prior to or post MCAO. Interestingly, pretreatment with Mdivi-1 resulted in marked increase of extracellular adenosine and concomitant decrease in ATP. The expression of CD39, but not CD73, was upregulated by Mdivi-1, which was associated with the elevated phosphorylated cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB), a transcription factor potentially regulating CD39 expression. In primary astrocytes, Mdivi-1 treatment induced increases in intracellular cAMP, PKA activity and CREB phosphorylation, and PKA-specific inhibitor completely reversed Mdivi-1-induced CD39 expression. Our results demonstrate that Mdivi-1 protects against ischemic brain injury through increasing extracellular adenosine, a process involving elevated CD39 expression that is likely modulated by cAMP/PKA/CREB cascade. Figure Potential mechanisms by which Mdivi-1 mediates the neuroprotection on cerebral ischemic stroke. Results from the present study indicate that Mdivi-1 protects against ischemic brain injury through increasing extracellular adenosine, a process involving elevated CD39 expression that is likely modulated by the cAMP/PKA/CREB cascades.

  5. CREB influences timing and entrainment of the SCN circadian clock.

    PubMed

    Lee, Boyoung; Li, Aiqing; Hansen, Katelin F; Cao, Ruifeng; Yoon, Jae Hwa; Obrietan, Karl

    2010-12-01

    The transcriptional feedback circuit, which is at the core of the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) circadian (i.e., 24 h) clock, is tightly coupled to both external entrainment cues, such as light, as well as rhythmic cues that arise on a system-wide level within the SCN. One potential signaling pathway by which these cues are conveyed to the molecular clock is the CREB/CRE transcriptional cascade. In this study, we employed a tetracycline-inducible CREB repressor mouse strain, in which approximately 60% of the SCN neurons express the transgene, to test CREB functionality in the clock and its effects on overt rhythmicity. We show that attenuated CREB signaling in the SCN led to a significant reduction in light-evoked clock entrainment. An examination of circadian timing revealed that CREB repressor mice exhibited normal free-running rhythms in the absence of external lighting cues. However, under conditions of constant light, which typically leads to a lengthening of the circadian period, CREB repressor mice exhibited a dramatic arrhythmic phenotype, which could be reversed with doxycycline. At a cellular level, the repression of CREB led to a significant reduction in both the expression of the circadian clock proteins PERIOD1 and PERIOD2 and the clock output hormones AVP and VIP. Together, these data support the idea that the CRE transcriptional pathway orchestrates transcriptional events that are essential for both the maintenance of SCN timing and light entrainment of the circadian clock.

  6. CREB-Induced Inflammation Is Important for Malignant Mesothelioma Growth

    PubMed Central

    Westbom, Catherine M.; Shukla, Anurag; MacPherson, Maximilian B.; Yasewicz, Elizabeth C.; Miller, Jill M.; Beuschel, Stacie L.; Steele, Chad; Pass, Harvey I.; Vacek, Pamela M.; Shukla, Arti

    2015-01-01

    Malignant mesothelioma (MM) is an aggressive tumor with no treatment regimen. Previously we have demonstrated that cyclic AMP response element binding protein (CREB) is constitutively activated in MM tumor cells and tissues and plays an important role in MM pathogenesis. To understand the role of CREB in MM tumor growth, we generated CREB-inhibited MM cell lines and performed in vitro and in vivo experiments. In vitro experiments demonstrated that CREB inhibition results in significant attenuation of proliferation and drug resistance of MM cells. CREB-silenced MM cells were then injected into severe combined immunodeficiency mice, and tumor growth in s.c. and i.p. models of MM was followed. We observed significant inhibition in MM tumor growth in both s.c. and i.p. models and the presence of a chemotherapeutic drug, doxorubicin, further inhibited MM tumor growth in the i.p. model. Peritoneal lavage fluids from CREB-inhibited tumor-bearing mice showed a significantly reduced total cell number, differential cell counts, and pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines (IL-6, IL-8, regulated on activation normal T cell expressed and secreted, monocyte chemotactic protein-1, and vascular endothelial growth factor). In vitro studies showed that asbestos-induced inflammasome/inflammation activation in mesothelial cells was CREB dependent, further supporting the role of CREB in inflammation-induced MM pathogenesis. In conclusion, our data demonstrate the involvement of CREB in the regulation of MM pathogenesis by regulation of inflammation. PMID:25111229

  7. Phosphorylated testis-specific serine/threonine kinase 4 may phosphorylate Crem at Ser-117.

    PubMed

    Fu, Guolong; Wei, Youheng; Wang, Xiaoli; Yu, Long

    2016-06-01

    We aimed to investigate the internal existence status of testis-specific serine/threonine kinase 4 (Tssk4) and the interaction of Tssk4 and Cre-responsive element modulator (Crem). The internal existence status of Tssk4 in testis of mice was detected using western blotting and dephosphorylation method. The interaction of Tssk4 and Crem was analyzed by western blotting, immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence, in vitro co-immunoprecipitation assays, and in vitro kinase assay. The results revealed that Tssk4 existed in testis both in phosphorylation and unphosphorylation status by a temporal manner with the development of testis. Immunofluorescence results showed that Tssk4 had identical distribution pattern with Crem in testis, which was utterly different to the localization of Cre-responsive element binding (Creb). In conclusion, our study demonstrated that phosphorylated Tssk4 might participate in testis genes expressions by phosphorylating Crem at Ser-117.

  8. Rit-mediated Stress Resistance Involves a p38-Mitogen- and Stress-activated Protein Kinase 1 (MSK1)-dependent cAMP Response Element-binding Protein (CREB) Activation Cascade*

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Geng-Xian; Cai, Weikang; Andres, Douglas A.

    2012-01-01

    The cAMP response element (CRE)-binding protein (CREB) is a key regulatory factor of gene transcription, and plays an essential role in development of the central nervous system and for neuroprotection. Multiple signaling pathways have been shown to contribute to the regulation of CREB-dependent transcription, including both ERK and p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases cascades. Recent studies have identified the Ras-related small G-protein, Rit, as a central regulator of a p38-MK2-HSP27 signaling cascade that functions as a critical survival mechanism for cells adapting to stress. Here, we examine the contribution of Rit-p38 signaling to the control of stress-dependent gene transcription. Using a pheochromocytoma cell model, we find that a novel Rit-p38-MSK1/2 pathway plays a critical role in stress-mediated CREB activation. RNAi-mediated Rit silencing, or inhibition of p38 or MSK1/2 kinases, was found to disrupt stress-mediated CREB-dependent transcription, resulting in increased cell death. Furthermore, ectopic expression of active Rit stimulates CREB-Ser133 phosphorylation, induces expression of the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 and BclXL proteins, and promotes cell survival. These data indicate that the Rit-p38-MSK1/2 signaling pathway may have an important role in the stress-dependent regulation of CREB-dependent gene expression. PMID:23038261

  9. Angiotensin II-induced protein kinase D activates the ATF/CREB family of transcription factors and promotes StAR mRNA expression.

    PubMed

    Olala, Lawrence O; Choudhary, Vivek; Johnson, Maribeth H; Bollag, Wendy B

    2014-07-01

    Aldosterone synthesis is initiated upon the transport of cholesterol from the outer to the inner mitochondrial membrane, where the cholesterol is hydrolyzed to pregnenolone. This process is the rate-limiting step in acute aldosterone production and is mediated by the steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR) protein. We have previously shown that angiotensin II (AngII) activation of the serine/threonine protein kinase D (PKD) promotes acute aldosterone production in bovine adrenal glomerulosa cells, but the mechanism remains unclear. Thus, the purpose of this study was to determine the downstream signaling effectors of AngII-stimulated PKD activity. Our results demonstrate that overexpression of the constitutively active serine-to-glutamate PKD mutant enhances, whereas the dominant-negative serine-to-alanine PKD mutant inhibits, AngII-induced StAR mRNA expression relative to the vector control. PKD has been shown to phosphorylate members of the activating transcription factor (ATF)/cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) family of leucine zipper transcription factors, which have been shown previously to bind the StAR proximal promoter and induce StAR mRNA expression. In primary glomerulosa cells, AngII induces ATF-2 and CREB phosphorylation in a time-dependent manner. Furthermore, overexpression of the constitutively active PKD mutant enhances the AngII-elicited phosphorylation of ATF-2 and CREB, and the dominant-negative mutant inhibits this response. Furthermore, the constitutively active PKD mutant increases the binding of phosphorylated CREB to the StAR promoter. Thus, these data provide insight into the previously reported role of PKD in AngII-induced acute aldosterone production, providing a mechanism by which PKD may be mediating steroidogenesis in primary bovine adrenal glomerulosa cells.

  10. Dual inhibition of the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway suppresses the growth of leiomyosarcomas but leads to ERK activation through mTORC2: biological and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Fourneaux, Benjamin; Chaire, Vanessa; Lucchesi, Carlo; Karanian, Marie; Pineau, Raphael; Laroche-Clary, Audrey; Italiano, Antoine

    2017-01-31

    The PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway plays a crucial role in the development of leiomyosarcomas (LMSs). In this study, we tested the efficacy of dual PI3K/mTOR (BEZ235), PI3K (BKM120) and mTOR (everolimus) inhibitors in three human LMS cell lines. In vitro and in vivo studies using LMS cell lines showed that BEZ235 has a significantly higher anti-tumor effect than either BKM120 or everolimus, resulting in a greater reduction in tumor growth and more pronounced inhibitory effects on mitotic activity and PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling. Strikingly, BEZ235 but neither BKM120 nor everolimus markedly enhanced the ERK pathway. This effect was reproduced by the combination of BKM120 and everolimus, suggesting the involvement of mTORC2 via a PI3K-independent mechanism. Silencing of RICTOR in LMS cells confirmed the role of mTORC2 in the regulation of ERK activity. Combined treatment with BEZ235 and GSK1120212, a potent MEK inhibitor, resulted in synergistic growth inhibition and apoptosis induction in vitro and in vivo. These findings document for the first time that dual PI3K/mTOR inhibition in leiomyosarcomas suppress a negative feedback loop mediated by mTORC2, leading to enhanced ERK pathway activity. Thus, combining a dual PI3K/mTOR inhibitor with MEK inhibitors may be a relevant approach to increase anti-tumor activity and prevent drug resistance in patients with LMS.

  11. Hypoxic adaptation engages the CBP/CREST-induced coactivator complex of Creb-HIF-1α in transactivating murine neuroblastic glucose transporter

    PubMed Central

    Thamotharan, Shanthie; Raychaudhuri, Nupur; Tomi, Masatoshi; Shin, Bo-Chul

    2013-01-01

    We have shown in vitro a hypoxia-induced time-dependent increase in facilitative glucose transporter isoform 3 (GLUT3) expression in N2A murine neuroblasts. This increase in GLUT3 expression is partially reliant on a transcriptional increase noted in actinomycin D and cycloheximide pretreatment experiments. Transient transfection assays in N2A neuroblasts using murine glut3-luciferase reporter constructs mapped the hypoxia-induced enhancer activities to −857- to −573-bp and −203- to −177-bp regions. Hypoxia-exposed N2A nuclear extracts demonstrated an increase in HIF-1α and p-Creb binding to HRE (−828 to −824 bp) and AP-1 (−187 to −180 bp) cis-elements, respectively, in electromobility shift and supershift assays, which was confirmed by chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. In addition, the interaction of CBP with Creb and HIF-1α and CREST with CBP in hypoxia was detected by coimmunoprecipitation. Furthermore, small interference (si)RNA targeting Creb in these cells decreased endogenous Creb concentrations that reduced by twofold hypoxia-induced glut3 gene transcription. Thus, in N2A neuroblasts, phosphorylated HIF-1α and Creb mediated the hypoxia-induced increase in glut3 transcription. Coactivation by the Ca++-dependent CREST and CBP proteins may enhance cross-talk between p-Creb-AP-1 and HIF-1α/HRE of the glut3 gene. Collectively, these processes can facilitate an adaptive response to hypoxic energy depletion targeted at enhancing glucose transport and minimizing injury while fueling the proliferative potential of neuroblasts. PMID:23321477

  12. Prevention of vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation and injury-induced neointimal hyperplasia by CREB-mediated p21 induction: An insight from a plant polyphenol.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lan; Zhao, Rui; Zhang, Li; Zhang, Weiku; He, GuoRong; Yang, Shengqian; Song, Junke; Du, Guanhua

    2016-03-01

    Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)/protein kinase A (PKA)/cAMP response element (CRE)-binding protein (CREB) signaling cascade negatively regulates platelet-derived growth factor BB (PDGF-BB)-induced smooth muscle cell (SMC) proliferation, which is a critical event in the initiation and development of restenosis and atherosclerotic lesions. Salvianolic acid A (SAA) is one of the most abundant polyphenols extracted from salvia. The aim of this study is to investigate whether SAA exerts an action on PDGF-BB-induced proliferation via cAMP/PKA/CREB mechanism. SAA blunts PDGF-BB-induced human umbilical artery smooth muscle cell (hUASMC) proliferation via p21 induction, as evidenced by its increased mRNA and protein expression levels. The SAA-induced upregulation of p21 involves the cAMP/PKA signaling pathway; a cAMP analog mimicked the effects of SAA and a specific cAMP/PKA inhibitor opposed these effects. SAA also activated CREB, including phosphorylation at Ser133, and induced its nuclear translocation. Deletion and mutational analysis of p21 promoters, co-immunoprecipitation, and western blot analysis showed that CRE is essential for SAA-induced p21 protein expression. Transfection of dominant-negative CREB (mutated Ser133) plasmids into hUASMCs attenuated SAA-stimulated p21 expression. SAA upregulated p21 expression and activated CREB in the neointima of balloon-injured arteries in vivo. Our results indicate that SAA promotes p21 expression in SMCs through the cAMP/PKA/CREB signaling cascade in vitro and prevents injury-induced neointimal hyperplasia.

  13. Transcriptional regulation of autophagy by an FXR/CREB axis

    PubMed Central

    Seok, Sunmi; Fu, Ting; Choi, Sung-E; Li, Yang; Zhu, Rong; Kumar, Subodh; Sun, Xiaoxiao; Yoon, Gyesoon; Kang, Yup; Zhong, Wenxuan; Ma, Jian; Kemper, Byron; Kemper, Jongsook Kim

    2014-01-01

    Lysosomal degradation of cytoplasmic components by autophagy is essential for cellular survival and homeostasis under nutrient-deprived conditions1–4. Acute regulation of autophagy by nutrient-sensing kinases is well defined3, 5–7, but longer-term transcriptional regulation is relatively unknown. Here we show that the fed-state sensing nuclear receptor FXR8, 9 and the fasting transcriptional activator CREB10, 11 coordinately regulate the hepatic autophagy gene network. Pharmacological activation of FXR repressed many autophagy genes and inhibited autophagy even in fasted mice and feeding-mediated inhibition of macroautophagy was attenuated in FXR-knockout mice. From mouse liver ChIP-seq data12–15, FXR and CREB binding peaks were detected at 178 and 112, respectively, of 230 autophagy-related genes, and 78 genes showed shared binding, mostly in their promoter regions. CREB promoted lipophagy, autophagic degradation of lipids16, under nutrient-deprived conditions, and FXR inhibited this response. Mechanistically, CREB upregulated autophagy genes, including Atg7, Ulk1, and Tfeb, by recruiting the coactivator CRTC2. After feeding or pharmacological activation, FXR trans-repressed these genes by disrupting the functional CREB/CRTC2 complex. This study identifies the novel FXR/CREB axis as a key physiological switch regulating autophagy, resulting in sustained nutrient regulation of autophagy during feeding/fasting cycles. PMID:25383523

  14. The neuroprotective effects of α-iso-cubebene on dopaminergic cell death: involvement of CREB/Nrf2 signaling.

    PubMed

    Park, Sun Young; Son, Beung Gu; Park, Young Hoon; Kim, Cheol-Min; Park, Geuntae; Choi, Young-Whan

    2014-09-01

    As a part of ongoing studies to elucidate pharmacologically active components of Schisandra chinensis, we isolated and studied α-iso-cubebene. The neuroprotective mechanisms of α-iso-cubebene in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells were investigated. α-Iso-cubebene significantly inhibited cytotoxicity and apoptosis due to 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced neurotoxicity in dopaminergic SH-SY5Y cells. Pretreatment of cells with α-iso-cubebene reduced intracellular accumulation of ROS and calcium in response to 6-OHDA. The neuroprotective effects of α-iso-cubebene were found to result from protecting the mitochondrial membrane potential. Notably, α-iso-cubebene inhibited the release of apoptosis-inducing factor from the mitochondria into the cytosol and nucleus after 6-OHDA treatment. α-Iso-cubebene also induced the activation of PKA/PKB/CREB/Nrf2 and suppressed 6-OHDA-induced neurotoxicity. α-Iso-cubebene was found to induce phosphorylation of PKA and PKB and activate Nrf2 and CREB signaling pathways in a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, α-iso-cubebene stimulated the expression of the antioxidant response genes NQO1 and HO-1. Finally, α-iso-cubebene-mediated neuroprotective effects were found to be reversible after transfection with CREB and Nrf2 small interfering RNAs.

  15. Effects of estrogen treatment on expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and cAMP response element-binding protein expression and phosphorylation in rat amygdaloid and hippocampal structures.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jin; Zhang, Huaibo; Cohen, Rochelle S; Pandey, Subhash C

    2005-01-01

    Clinical studies indicate an effect of estrogen (E2) on affect and cognition, which may be mediated by the cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) pathway and CREB-related gene target brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). We investigated the effect of E2 on CREB expression and phosphorylation and BDNF expression in the amygdala and hippocampus, areas involved in emotional processing. Ovariectomized rats were given 10 microg 17beta-estradiol or vehicle for 14 days and expression of components of the CREB signaling pathway, i.e., CREB, phosphorylated CREB (pCREB), and BDNF in amygdala and hippocampus were investigated using immunogold labeling. Levels of BDNF mRNA were determined by in situ reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. We also examined the effect of E2 on calcium/calmodulin kinase (CaMK IV) immunolabeling in the hippocampus. E2 increased immunolabeling and mRNA levels of BDNF in the medial and basomedial amygdala and CA1 and CA3 regions of the hippocampus, but not in any other amygdaloid or hippocampal regions examined. E2 increased immunolabeling of CREB and pCREB in the medial and basomedial, but not central or basolateral amygdala. E2 also increased CaMK IV and pCREB immunolabeling in the CA1 and CA3 regions, but not CA2 region or dentate gyrus, of the hippocampus. There was no change in immunolabeling of CREB in any hippocampal region. These data identify a signaling pathway through which E2 increases BDNF expression that may underlie some actions of E2 on affective behavior and indicate neuroanatomical heterogeneity in the E2 effect within the amygdala and hippocampus.

  16. Heat induces interleukin-6 in skeletal muscle cells via TRPV1/PKC/CREB pathways.

    PubMed

    Obi, Syotaro; Nakajima, Toshiaki; Hasegawa, Takaaki; Kikuchi, Hironobu; Oguri, Gaku; Takahashi, Masao; Nakamura, Fumitaka; Yamasoba, Tatsuya; Sakuma, Masashi; Toyoda, Shigeru; Tei, Chuwa; Inoue, Teruo

    2017-03-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is released from skeletal muscle cells and induced by exercise, heat, catecholamine, glucose, lipopolysaccharide, reactive oxygen species, and inflammation. However, the mechanism that induces release of IL-6 from skeletal muscle cells remains unknown. Thermosensitive transient receptor potential (TRP) proteins such as TRPV1-4 play vital roles in cellular functions. In this study we hypothesized that TRPV1 senses heat, transmits a signal into the nucleus, and produces IL-6. The purpose of the present study is to investigate the underlying mechanisms whereby skeletal muscle cells sense and respond to heat. When mouse myoblast cells were exposed to 37-42°C for 2 h, mRNA expression of IL-6 increased in a temperature-dependent manner. Heat also increased IL-6 secretion in myoblast cells. A fura 2 fluorescence dual-wavelength excitation method showed that heat increased intracellular calcium flux in a temperature-dependent manner. Intracellular calcium flux and IL-6 mRNA expression were increased by the TRPV1 agonists capsaicin and N-arachidonoyldopamine and decreased by the TRPV1 antagonists AMG9810 and SB366791 and siRNA-mediated knockdown of TRPV1. TRPV2, 3, and 4 agonists did not change intracellular calcium flux. Western blotting with inhibitors demonstrated that heat increased phosphorylation levels of TRPV1, followed by PKC and cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB). PKC inhibitors, Gö6983 and staurosporine, CREB inhibitors, curcumin and naphthol AS-E, and knockdown of CREB suppressed the heat-induced increases in IL-6. These results indicate that heat increases IL-6 in skeletal muscle cells through the TRPV1, PKC, and CREB signal transduction pathway.NEW & NOTEWORTHY Heat increases the release of interleukin-6 (IL-6) from skeletal muscle cells. IL-6 has been shown to serve immune responses and metabolic functions in muscle. It can be anti-inflammatory as well as proinflammatory. However, the mechanism that induces release of IL-6

  17. The selective glucocorticoid receptor antagonist ORG 34116 decreases immobility time in the forced swim test and affects cAMP-responsive element-binding protein phosphorylation in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Bachmann, Cornelius G; Bilang-Bleuel, Alicia; De Carli, Sonja; Linthorst, Astrid C E; Reul, Johannes M H M

    2005-01-01

    Glucocorticoid receptor (GR) antagonists can block the retention of the immobility response in the forced swimming test. Recently, we showed that forced swimming evokes a distinct spatiotemporal pattern of cAMP-responsive element-binding protein (CREB) phosphorylation in the dentate gyrus (DG) and neocortex. In the present study, we found that chronic treatment of rats with the selective GR antagonist ORG 34116 decreased the immobility time in the forced swim test, increased baseline levels of phosphorylated CREB (P-CREB) in the DG and neocortex and affected the forced swimming-induced changes in P-CREB levels in a time- and site-specific manner. Overall, we observed that, in control rats, forced swimming evoked increases in P-CREB levels in the DG and neocortex, whereas in ORG 34116-treated animals a major dephosphorylation of P-CREB was observed. These observations underscore an important role of GRs in the control of the phosphorylation state of CREB which seems to be of significance for the immobility response in the forced swim test and extend the molecular mechanism of action of GRs in the brain.

  18. NALP1 is a transcriptional target for cAMP-response-element-binding protein (CREB) in myeloid leukaemia cells

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    NALP1 (also called DEFCAP, NAC, CARD7) has been shown to play a central role in the activation of inflammatory caspases and processing of pro-IL1β (pro-interleukin-1β). Previous studies showed that NALP1 is highly expressed in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. In the present study, we report that expression of NALP1 is absent from CD34+ haematopoietic blast cells, and its levels are upregulated upon differentiation of CD34+ cells into granulocytes and to a lesser extent into monocytes. In peripheral blood cells, the highest levels of NALP1 were observed in CD3+ (T-lymphocytes), CD15+ (granulocytes) and CD14+ (monocytes) cell populations. Notably, the expression of NALP1 was significantly increased in the bone marrow blast cell population of some patients with acute leukaemia, but not among tissue samples from thyroid and renal cancer. A search for consensus sites within the NALP1 promoter revealed a sequence for CREB (cAMP-response-element-binding protein) that was required for transcriptional activity. Moreover, treatment of TF1 myeloid leukaemia cells with protein kinase C and protein kinase A activators induced CREB phosphorylation and upregulated the mRNA and protein levels of NALP1. Conversely, ectopic expression of a dominant negative form of CREB in TF1 cells blocked the transcriptional activity of the NALP1 promoter and significantly reduced the expression of NALP1. Thus NALP1 is transcriptionally regulated by CREB in myeloid cells, a mechanism that may contribute to modulate the response of these cells to pro-inflammatory stimuli. PMID:15285719

  19. Chronic nicotine treatment reverses hypothyroidism-induced impairment of L-LTP induction phase: critical role of CREB.

    PubMed

    Alzoubi, K H; Alkadhi, K A

    2014-06-01

    We have previously shown that adult onset hypothyroidism impairs late-phase long-term potentiation (L-LTP) and reduces basal protein levels of cyclic-AMP response element binding protein (CREB), mutagen-activated protein kinase (MAPKp42/44), and calcium calmodulin kinase IV (CaMKIV) in area Cornu Ammonis 1 (CA1) of the hippocampus. These changes were reversed by chronic nicotine treatment. In the present study, levels of signaling molecules important for L-LTP were determined in CA1 area of the hippocampus during the induction phase. Standard multiple high-frequency stimulation (MHFS) was used to evoke L-LTP in the CA1 area of the hippocampus of hypothyroid, nicotine-treated hypothyroid, nicotine, and sham control anaesthetized adult rats. Chronic nicotine treatment reversed hypothyroidism-induced impairment of L-LTP at the induction phase. Five minutes after MHFS, Western blotting showed an increase in the levels of P-CREB, and P-MAPKp42/44 in sham-operated control, nicotine, and nicotine-treated hypothyroid animals, but not in hypothyroid animals. The protein levels of total CREB, total MAPK p42/44, BDNF, and CaMKIV were not altered in all groups 5 min after MHFS. Therefore, normalized phosphorylation of essential kinases such as P-CREB and P-MAPK p42/44 in the CA1 area of nicotine-treated hypothyroid animals plays a crucial role in nicotine-induced rescue of L-LTP induction during hypothyroidism.

  20. Electroacupuncture improves cognitive ability following cerebral ischemia reperfusion injury via CaM-CaMKIV-CREB signaling in the rat hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yun; Lin, Ruhui; Tao, Jing; Wu, Yunan; Chen, Bin; Yu, Kunqiang; Chen, Jixiang; Li, Xiaojie; Chen, Li-Dian

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of electroacupuncture (EA) on cognitive deficits, and the underlying mechanism following cerebral ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) via the calmodulin (CaM)-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase type IV (CaMKIV)-cyclic adenosine monophosphate response elements binding protein (CREB) intracellular signaling pathway in the hippocampus. In total, 45 adult female Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into three groups, namely the sham group, the middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) group and the MCAO + EA group. Rats in the MCAO and MCAO + EA groups were modeled for post-stroke cognitive impairment. EA was performed at the Baihui and Shenting acupuncture points for 30 min/day for one week in the MCAO + EA group. Behavioral testing was analyzed using a step-down apparatus, while 2,3,5-triphenyl tetrazolium chloride was used to detect the infarct volume and lesion size. In addition, CaM activity was assessed by cyclic nucleotide-dependent phosphodiesterase analysis, and the protein expression levels of CaM, CaMKIV, phosphorylated (p)-CaMKIV, CREB and p-CREB were analyzed by western blot analysis. The cerebral I/R injured rat model in the MCAO group was established successfully with regard to the infarct volume and neuronal lesion size, as compared with the sham group. EA was demonstrated to effectively improve the cognitive ability, as measured by the step-down apparatus test, and decrease the infarct volume when compared with the MCAO group (P<0.05). The step-down apparatus test for the EA-treated rats revealed improved learning and reduced memory impairment when compared with the MCAO group. Furthermore, CaM activity and CaM protein expression levels in the MCAO + EA group were lower compared with those in the MCAO group (P<0.05). By contrast, the protein expression levels of CaMKIV, p-CaMKIV, CREB and p-CREB were significantly reduced in the MCAO group when compared with the sham group (P<0.05), although the

  1. Methylmercury, an environmental electrophile capable of activation and disruption of the Akt/CREB/Bcl-2 signal transduction pathway in SH-SY5Y cells

    PubMed Central

    Unoki, Takamitsu; Abiko, Yumi; Toyama, Takashi; Uehara, Takashi; Tsuboi, Koji; Nishida, Motohiro; Kaji, Toshiyuki; Kumagai, Yoshito

    2016-01-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) modifies cellular proteins via their thiol groups in a process referred to as “S-mercuration”, potentially resulting in modulation of the cellular signal transduction pathway. We examined whether low-dose MeHg could affect Akt signaling involved in cell survival. Exposure of human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells of up to 2 μM MeHg phosphorylated Akt and its downstream signal molecule CREB, presumably due to inactivation of PTEN through S-mercuration. As a result, the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 was up-regulated by MeHg. The activation of Akt/CREB/Bcl-2 signaling mediated by MeHg was, at least in part, linked to cellular defence because either pretreatment with wortmannin to block PI3K/Akt signaling or knockdown of Bcl-2 enhanced MeHg-mediated cytotoxicity. In contrast, increasing concentrations of MeHg disrupted Akt/CREB/Bcl-2 signaling. This phenomenon was attributed to S-mercuration of CREB through Cys286 rather than Akt. These results suggest that although MeHg is an apoptosis-inducing toxicant, this environmental electrophile is able to activate the cell survival signal transduction pathway at lower concentrations prior to apoptotic cell death. PMID:27357941

  2. RACK1 promotes maintenance of morphine-associated memory via activation of an ERK-CREB dependent pathway in hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Liu, Litao; Zhu, Jiejun; Zhou, Liming; Wan, Lihong

    2016-02-02

    Existence of long-term drug-associated memories may be a crucial factor in drug cravings and relapse. RACK1 plays a critical role in morphine-induced reward. In the present study, we used conditioned place preference (CPP) to assess the acquisition and maintenance of morphine conditioned place preference memory. The hippocampal protein level of RACK1 and synaptic quantitation were evaluated by Western blotting, immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy, respectively. Additionally, shRACK1 (shGnb2l1) was used to silence RACK1 in vivo to evaluate the role and the underlying mechanism of RACK1 in maintenance of morphine CPP memory. We found that morphine induced CPP was maintained for at least 7 days after the last morphine treatment, which indicated a positive correlation with hippocampal RACK1 level, and was accompanied simultaneously by increases in the synapse density and hippocampal expression of synaptophysin (SYP), phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase1/2 (pERK1/2) and the phosphorylation of cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element-binding (pCREB). ShGnb2l1 icv injection significantly suppressed the expression of all above proteins, decreased the synapse density in the hippocampus and attenuated the acquisition and maintenance of morphine CPP. Our present study highlights that RACK1 plays an important role in the maintenance of morphine CPP, likely via activation of ERK-CREB pathway in hippocampus.

  3. 2-Ethoxybenzamide stimulates melanin synthesis in B16F1 melanoma cells via the CREB signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Sato, Kazuomi; Ando, Ryosuke; Kobayashi, Honoka; Nishio, Takashi

    2016-12-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are frequently used for the treatment of inflammation, pain, and fever. In this study, we found that 2-ethoxybenzamide (ETZ) significantly enhanced melanin synthesis in B16F1 melanoma cells, and also induced melanosome formation. Therefore, we investigated the mechanism by which ETZ up-regulated melanin synthesis. Western blot analysis demonstrated that ETZ increased melanogenic protein levels, except that for TRP-2. Moreover, semi-quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and real-time RT-PCR analyses showed that ETZ enhanced the mRNA levels of melanogenic genes, including microphthalmia-associated transcription factor and melanocortin 1 receptor. We also observed phosphorylation of cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) following ETZ treatment. However, ETZ did not affect intracellular cAMP levels. ERK was also activated by ETZ treatment, and melanin content was enhanced upon treatment with the specific ERK inhibitor PD98059. Together, our results indicate that ETZ induces melanin synthesis via CREB phosphorylation.

  4. Akt Phosphorylation and Regulation of Transketolase Is a Nodal Point for Amino Acid Control of Purine Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Arindam; Connelly, Stephen; Jiang, Jingjing; Zhuang, Shunhui; Amador, Deron T.; Phan, Tony; Pilz, Renate B.; Boss, Gerry R.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathway integrates environmental clues to regulate cell growth and survival. We showed previously that depriving cells of a single essential amino acid rapidly and reversibly arrests purine synthesis. Here we demonstrate that amino acids via mTORC2 and IκB kinase regulate Akt activity, and Akt association and phosphorylation of transketolase (TKT), a key enzyme of the non-oxidative pentose phosphate pathway (PPP). Akt phosphorylates TKT on Thr382, markedly enhancing enzyme activity and increasing carbon flow through the non-oxidative PPP, thereby increasing purine synthesis. Mice fed a lysine-deficient diet for two days show decreased Akt activity, TKT activity, and purine synthesis in multiple organs. These results provide a new mechanism whereby Akt coordinates amino acid availability with glucose utilization, purine synthesis, and RNA and DNA synthesis. PMID:24981175

  5. Crif1 Promotes Adipogenic Differentiation of Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells After Irradiation by Modulating the PKA/CREB Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xi; Xiang, Lixin; Ran, Qian; Liu, Yao; Xiang, Yang; Xiao, Yanni; Chen, Li; Li, Fengjie; Zhong, Jiang F; Li, Zhongjun

    2015-06-01

    Dysfunction of the hematopoietic microenvironment is the main obstacle encountered during hematopoiesis reconstruction in patients with acute hematopoietic radiation syndrome. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) play a crucial supporting role in hematopoiesis by maintaining the balance between adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation. In this study, we found that irradiation decreased the colony-forming efficiency of BM-MSCs and impaired the balance between adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation. Following irradiation, BM-MCSs became strongly predisposed to adipogenesis, as evidenced by increased oil red O staining and elevated mRNA and protein levels of the adipogenic markers and transcription factors PPARγ and AP2. Overexpression of the essential adipogenesis regulator Crif1 in BM-MSCs promoted adipogenesis after irradiation exposure by upregulating adipogenesis-related genes, including C/EBPβ, PPARγ, and AP2. We found that Crif1 promoted the phosphorylation of cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) through direct interaction with protein kinase A (PKA)-α. Phosphorylation of CREB was inhibited in Crif1-knockdown BM-MSCs even in the presence of a PKA agonist (db-cAMP) and could be suppressed in Crif1-overexpressing BM-MSCs by a PKAα inhibitor (H-89). These results suggest that Crif1 is an indispensable regulator of PKAα cat that modulates the PKA/CREB signaling pathway to promote adipogenic differentiation of BM-MSCs after irradiation.

  6. SCM-198 Ameliorates Cognitive Deficits, Promotes Neuronal Survival and Enhances CREB/BDNF/TrkB Signaling without Affecting Aβ Burden in AβPP/PS1 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Zhen-Yi; Yu, Shuang-Shuang; Wang, Zhi-Jun; Zhu, Yi-Zhun

    2015-01-01

    SCM-198 is an alkaloid found only in Herba leonuri and it has been reported to possess considerable neuroprotective effects in animal models of ischemic stroke, Parkinson’s disease and Alzheimer’s disease (AD). In this study, we demonstrated for the first time that 3-month oral SCM-198 treatment could significantly improve both recognition and spatial memory, inhibit microgliosis and promote neuronal survival in amyloid-β protein precursor and presenilin-1(AβPP/PS1) double-transgenic mice without affecting amyloid-β (Aβ) burden. In addition, decreases in cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB) phosphorylation, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB) phosphorylation were attenuated by SCM-198 both in vivo and in primary cortical neurons, which could be blocked by protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitors, suggesting the involvement of upstream PKA in enhancing the BDNF/TrkB/CREB signaling by SCM-198. Our results indicate that SCM-198, a drug that could promote neuronal survival and enhance BDNF/TrkB/CREB signaling, has beneficial effects on behavioral and biochemical alterations without affecting Aβ burden in AβPP/PS1 mice and might become a potential drug candidate for AD treatment in the future. PMID:26262618

  7. SCM-198 Ameliorates Cognitive Deficits, Promotes Neuronal Survival and Enhances CREB/BDNF/TrkB Signaling without Affecting Aβ Burden in AβPP/PS1 Mice.

    PubMed

    Hong, Zhen-Yi; Yu, Shuang-Shuang; Wang, Zhi-Jun; Zhu, Yi-Zhun

    2015-08-07

    SCM-198 is an alkaloid found only in Herba leonuri and it has been reported to possess considerable neuroprotective effects in animal models of ischemic stroke, Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease (AD). In this study, we demonstrated for the first time that 3-month oral SCM-198 treatment could significantly improve both recognition and spatial memory, inhibit microgliosis and promote neuronal survival in amyloid-β protein precursor and presenilin-1(AβPP/PS1) double-transgenic mice without affecting amyloid-β (Aβ) burden. In addition, decreases in cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB) phosphorylation, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB) phosphorylation were attenuated by SCM-198 both in vivo and in primary cortical neurons, which could be blocked by protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitors, suggesting the involvement of upstream PKA in enhancing the BDNF/TrkB/CREB signaling by SCM-198. Our results indicate that SCM-198, a drug that could promote neuronal survival and enhance BDNF/TrkB/CREB signaling, has beneficial effects on behavioral and biochemical alterations without affecting Aβ burden in AβPP/PS1 mice and might become a potential drug candidate for AD treatment in the future.

  8. Distinctive Roles for Amygdalar CREB in Reconsolidation and Extinction of Fear Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tronson, Natalie C.; Wiseman, Shari L.; Neve, Rachael L.; Nestler, Eric J.; Olausson, Peter; Taylor, Jane R.

    2012-01-01

    Cyclic AMP response element binding protein (CREB) plays a critical role in fear memory formation. Here we determined the role of CREB selectively within the amygdala in reconsolidation and extinction of auditory fear. Viral overexpression of the inducible cAMP early repressor (ICER) or the dominant-negative mCREB, specifically within the lateral…

  9. DFP initiated early alterations of PKA/p-CREB pathway and differential persistence of {beta}-tubulin subtypes in the CNS of hens contributes to OPIDN

    SciTech Connect

    Damodaran, Tirupapuliyur V.; Gupta, Ram P.; Attia, Moustafa K.; Abou-Donia, Mohamed B.

    2009-10-15

    Organophosphorus ester-induced delayed neurotoxicity (OPIDN) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by ataxia progressing to paralysis with a concomitant central and peripheral distal axonapathy. Diisopropylphosphorofluoridate (DFP) produces OPIDN in the chicken, which results in mild ataxia in 7-14 days and severe paralysis as the disease progresses with a single dose. White leghorn layer hens were treated with DFP (1.7 mg/kg, sc) after prophylactic treatment with atropine (1 mg/kg, sc) in normal saline and eserine (1 mg/kg, sc) in dimethyl sulfoxide. Control groups were treated with vehicle propylene glycol (0.1 mL/kg, sc), atropine in normal saline and eserine in dimethyl sulfoxide. The hens were sacrificed at different time points such as 2, 4, and 8 h, as well as 1, 2, 5, 10 and 20 days, and the tissues from cerebrum, midbrain, cerebellum brainstem and spinal cord were quickly dissected and frozen for protein (western) and mRNA (northern) studies. Subcellular fractionation, SDS-PAGE and immunoblotting of the nuclear and supernatant fractions using standard protocols from spinal cord and cerebrum showed differential expression of protein levels of PKA, CREB and phosphorylated CREB (p-CREB). There was an increase in PKA level in spinal cord nuclear fraction after 4 h (130 {+-} 5%) and 8 h (133 {+-} 6 %), while cerebrum nuclear fraction showed decrease (77 {+-} 5%) at 4 h and remained at the same level at 8 h. No change was seen in either spinal cord or cerebrum soluble fraction at any time points. There was an increase in CREB level in the spinal cord supernatant (133 {+-} 3%) after 5 days, while nuclear and supernatant fraction of the cerebrum did not show any alterations at any time point. p-CREB was induced in the spinal cord nuclear fraction at 1 day (150 {+-} 3%) and 5 days (173{+-}{+-}7%) of treatment, in contrast to the decreased levels p-CREB (72 {+-} 4%) at 10 days in cerebrum nuclear fraction. Supernatant fraction of spinal cord and cerebrum did

  10. Ferulic acid prevents LPS-induced up-regulation of PDE4B and stimulates the cAMP/CREB signaling pathway in PC12 cells

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hao; Hong, Qian; Tan, Hong-ling; Xiao, Cheng-rong; Gao, Yue

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Phosphodiesterase 4 (PDE4) isozymes are involved in different functions, depending on their patterns of distribution in the brain. The PDE4 subtypes are distributed in different inflammatory cells, and appear to be important regulators of inflammatory processes. In this study we examined the effects of ferulic acid (FA), a plant component with strong anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory activities, on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced up-regulation of phosphodiesterase 4B (PDE4B) in PC12 cells, which in turn regulated cellular cAMP levels and the cAMP/cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) pathway in the cells. Methods: PC12 cells were treated with LPS (1 μg/mL) for 8 h, and the changes of F-actin were detected using laser scanning confocal microscopy. The levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines were measured suing ELISA kits, and PDE4B-specific enzymatic activity was assessed with a PDE4B assay kit. The mRNA levels of PDE4B were analyzed with Q-PCR, and the protein levels of CREB and phosphorylated CREB (pCREB) were determined using immunoblotting. Furthermore, molecular docking was used to identify the interaction between PDE4B2 and FA. Results: Treatment of PC12 cells with LPS induced thick bundles of actin filaments appearing in the F-actin cytoskeleton, which were ameliorated by pretreatment with FA (10–40 μmol/L) or with a PDE4B inhibitor rolipram (30 μmol/L). Pretreatment with FA dose-dependently inhibited the LPS-induced production of TNF-α and IL-1β in PC12 cells. Furthermore, pretreatment with FA dose-dependently attenuated the LPS-induced up-regulation of PDE4 activity in PC12 cells. Moreover, pretreatment with FA decreased LPS-induced up-regulation of the PDE4B mRNA, and reversed LPS-induced down-regulation of CREB and pCREB in PC12 cells. The molecular docking results revealed electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions between FA and PDE4B2. Conclusion: The beneficial effects of FA in PC12 cells might be conferred through inhibition of LPS

  11. CREB Selectively Controls Learning-Induced Structural Remodeling of Neurons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Middei, Silvia; Spalloni, Alida; Longone, Patrizia; Pittenger, Christopher; O'Mara, Shane M.; Marie, Helene; Ammassari-Teule, Martine

    2012-01-01

    The modulation of synaptic strength associated with learning is post-synaptically regulated by changes in density and shape of dendritic spines. The transcription factor CREB (cAMP response element binding protein) is required for memory formation and in vitro dendritic spine rearrangements, but its role in learning-induced remodeling of neurons…

  12. dCREB2-Mediated Enhancement of Memory Formation

    PubMed Central

    Tubon, Thomas C.; Zhang, Jiabin; Friedman, Eugenia L.; Jin, Haining; Gonzales, Erin D.; Zhou, Hong; Drier, Diana; Gerstner, Jason R.; Paulson, Emily A.; Fropf, Robin; Yin, Jerry C. P.

    2013-01-01

    CREB-responsive transcription has an important role in adaptive responses in all cells and tissue. In the nervous system, it has an essential and well established role in long-term memory formation throughout a diverse set of organisms. Activation of this transcription factor correlates with long-term memory formation and disruption of its activity interferes with this process. Most convincingly, aug-menting CREB activity in a number of different systems enhances memory formation. In Drosophila, a sequence rearrangement in the original transgene used to enhance memory formation has been a source of confusion. This rearrangement prematurely terminates translation of the full-length protein, leaving the identity of the “enhancing molecule” unclear. In this report, we show that a naturally occurring, downstream, in-frame initiation codon is used to make a dCREB2 protein off of both transgenic and chromosomal substrates. This protein is a transcriptional activator and is responsible for memory enhancement. A number of parameters can affect enhancement, including the short-lived activity of the activator protein, and the time-of-day when induction and behavioral training occur. Our results reaffirm that overexpression of a dCREB2 activator can enhance memory formation and illustrate the complexity of this behavioral enhancement. PMID:23616553

  13. Chronic enhancement of CREB activity in the hippocampus interferes with the retrieval of spatial information.

    PubMed

    Viosca, Jose; Malleret, Gaël; Bourtchouladze, Rusiko; Benito, Eva; Vronskava, Svetlana; Kandel, Eric R; Barco, Angel

    2009-03-01

    The activation of cAMP-responsive element-binding protein (CREB)-dependent gene expression is thought to be critical for the formation of different types of long-term memory. To explore the consequences of chronic enhancement of CREB function on spatial memory in mammals, we examined spatial navigation in bitransgenic mice that express in a regulated and restricted manner a constitutively active form of CREB, VP16-CREB, in forebrain neurons. We found that chronic enhancement of CREB activity delayed the acquisition of an allocentric strategy to solve the hidden platform task. The ability to turn on and off transgene expression allowed us to dissect the role of CREB in dissociable memory processes. In mice in which transgene expression was turned on during memory acquisition, turning off the transgene re-established the access to the memory trace, whereas in mice in which transgene expression was turned off during acquisition, turning on the transgene impaired memory expression in a reversible manner, indicating that CREB enhancement specifically interfered with the retrieval of spatial information. The defects on spatial navigation in mice with chronic enhancement of CREB function were not corrected by conditions that increased further CREB-dependent activation of hippocampal memory systems, such as housing in an enriched environment. These results along with previous findings in CREB-deficient mutants indicate that the relationship of CREB-mediated plasticity to spatial memory is an inverted-U function, and that optimal learning in the water maze requires accurate regulation of this pathway.

  14. Topiramate Confers Neuroprotection Against Methylphenidate-Induced Neurodegeneration in Dentate Gyrus and CA1 Regions of Hippocampus via CREB/BDNF Pathway in Rats.

    PubMed

    Motaghinejad, Majid; Motevalian, Manijeh; Abdollahi, Mohammad; Heidari, Mansour; Madjd, Zahra

    2017-04-01

    Methylphenidate (MPH) abuse can cause serious neurological damages. The neuroprotective effects of topiramate (TPM) have been reported already, but its mechanism of action still remains unclear. The current study evaluates in vivo role of CREB/BDNF in TPM protection of the rat hippocampal cells from methylphenidate-induced apoptosis, oxidative stress, and inflammation. A total of 60 adult male rats were divided into six groups. Groups 1 and 2 received normal saline (0.7 ml/rat) and MPH (10 mg/kg) respectively for 14 days. Groups 3 and 4 were concurrently treated with MPH (10 mg/kg) and TPM 50 and 100 mg/kg respectively for 14 days. Groups 5 and 6 were treated with 50 and 100 mg/kg TPM only respectively. After drug administration, open field test (OFT) was used to investigate motor activity. The hippocampus was then isolated and the apoptotic, antiapoptotic, oxidative, antioxidant, and inflammatory factors were measured. Expression of the total and phosphorylated CREB and BDNF in gene and protein levels, and gene expression of Ak1, CaMK4, MAPK3, PKA, and c-Fos levels were also measured. MPH significantly decreased motor activity in OFT. TPM (50 and 100 mg/kg) decreased MPH-induced motor activity disturbance. Additionally, MPH significantly increased Bax protein level, CaMK4 gene expression, lipid peroxidation, catalase activity, mitochondrial GSH, IL-1β, and TNF-α levels in isolated hippocampal cells. Also CREB, in total and phosphorylated forms, BDNF and Bcl-2 protein levels, Ak1, MAPK3, PKA and c-Fos gene expression, superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione reductase activities decreased significantly by MPH. TPM (50 and 100 mg/kg), both in the presence and absence of MPH, attenuated the effects of MPH. Immunohistochemistry data showed that TPM increased localization of the total and phosphorylated forms of CREB in dentate gyrus (DG) and CA1 areas of the hippocampus. It seems that TPM can be used as a neuroprotective agent against

  15. Ginger improves cognitive function via NGF-induced ERK/CREB activation in the hippocampus of the mouse.

    PubMed

    Lim, Soonmin; Moon, Minho; Oh, Hyein; Kim, Hyo Geun; Kim, Sun Yeou; Oh, Myung Sook

    2014-10-01

    Ginger (the rhizome of Zingiber officinale Roscoe) has been used worldwide for many centuries in cooking and for treatment of several diseases. The main pharmacological properties of ginger include anti-inflammatory, antihyperglycemic, antiarthritic, antiemetic and neuroprotective actions. Recent studies demonstrated that ginger significantly enhances cognitive function in various cognitive disorders as well as in healthy brain. However, the biochemical mechanisms underlying the ginger-mediated enhancement of cognition have not yet been studied in normal or diseased brain. In the present study, we assessed the memory-enhancing effects of dried ginger extract (GE) in a model of scopolamine-induced memory deficits and in normal animals by performing a novel object recognition test. We found that GE administration significantly improved the ability of mice to recognize novel objects, indicating improvements in learning and memory. Furthermore, to elucidate the mechanisms of GE-mediated cognitive enhancement, we focused on nerve growth factor (NGF)-induced signaling pathways. NGF enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay analysis revealed that GE administration led to elevated NGF levels in both the mouse hippocampus and rat glioma C6 cells. GE administration also resulted in phosphorylation of extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and cyclic AMP response element-binding protein (CREB), as revealed by Western blotting analysis. Neutralization of NGF with a specific NGF antibody inhibited GE-triggered activation of ERK and CREB in the hippocampus. Also, GE treatment significantly increased pre- and postsynaptic markers, synaptophysin and PSD-95, which are related to synapse formation in the brain. These data suggest that GE has a synaptogenic effect via NGF-induced ERK/CREB activation, resulting in memory enhancement.

  16. Dioscin Derived from Solanum melongena L. "Usukawamarunasu" Attenuates α-MSH-Induced Melanogenesis in B16 Murine Melanoma Cells via Downregulation of Phospho-CREB and MITF.

    PubMed

    Nishina, Atsuyoshi; Ebina, Kodai; Ukiya, Motohiko; Fukatsu, Makoto; Koketsu, Mamoru; Ninomiya, Masayuki; Sato, Daisuke; Kimura, Hirokazu

    2015-10-01

    This study aimed to chemically isolate and explore an antimelanogenesis inducer in extracts of Solanum melongena L. "Usukawamarunasu" eggplant. We successfully identified dioscin ([25R]-Spirost-5-en-3β-yl) 2-O-(6-deoxy-α-L-mannopyranosyl) - 4-O-(6-deoxy-α-L-mannopyranosyl)-β-D-glucopyranoside] in the plant, and examined the effects of α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (MSH)-induced melanogenesis in B16 murine melanoma cells by this plant-derived dioscin. Immunoblot analysis suggested that dioscin reduced the expression of tyrosinase, tyrosinase-related protein-1 (TRP-1), and TRP-2, resulting in inhibition of intracellular production of melanin. In addition, dioscin caused reduction of phosphorylated cAMP-responsive element binding protein 1 transcription factors (CREB), which led to a reduction of microphthalmia-related transcription factor (MITF) in α-MSH-stimulated cells, but did not affect phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase. Furthermore, dioscin significantly downregulated the expression of tyrosinase, TRP-1, and TRP-2, which led to the reduction of α-MSH-induced melanogenesis in B16 cells. These results suggest that dioscin may decrease the level of MITF via inhibition of phosphorylation of CREB in α-MSH-induced melanogenesis in B16 cells.

  17. Downregulation of CREB expression in Alzheimer's brain and in Aβ-treated rat hippocampal neurons

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Oxidative stress plays an important role in neuronal dysfunction and neuron loss in Alzheimer's brain. Previous studies have reported downregulation of CREB-mediated transcription by oxidative stress and Aβ. The promoter for CREB itself contains cyclic AMP response elements. Therefore, we examined the expression of CREB in the hippocampal neurons of Tg2576 mice, AD post-mortem brain and in cultured rat hippocampal neurons exposed to Aβ aggregates. Results Laser Capture Microdissection of hippocampal neurons from Tg2576 mouse brain revealed decreases in the mRNA levels of CREB and its target, BDNF. Immunohistochemical analysis of Tg2576 mouse brain showed decreases in CREB levels in hippocampus and cortex. Markers of oxidative stress were detected in transgenic mouse brain and decreased CREB staining was observed in regions showing abundance of astrocytes. There was also an inverse correlation between SDS-extracted Aβ and CREB protein levels in Alzheimer's post-mortem hippocampal samples. The levels of CREB-regulated BDNF and BIRC3, a caspase inhibitor, decreased and the active cleaved form of caspase-9, a marker for the intrinsic pathway of apoptosis, was elevated in these samples. Exposure of rat primary hippocampal neurons to Aβ fibrils decreased CREB promoter activity. Decrease in CREB mRNA levels in Aβ-treated neurons was reversed by the antioxidant, N-acetyl cysteine. Overexpression of CREB by adenoviral transduction led to significant protection against Aβ-induced neuronal apoptosis. Conclusions Our findings suggest that chronic downregulation of CREB-mediated transcription results in decrease of CREB content in the hippocampal neurons of AD brain which may contribute to exacerbation of disease progression. PMID:21854604

  18. The Myb-p300-CREB axis modulates intestine homeostasis, radiosensitivity and tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Sampurno, S; Bijenhof, A; Cheasley, D; Xu, H; Robine, S; Hilton, D; Alexander, W S; Pereira, L; Mantamadiotis, T; Malaterre, J; Ramsay, R G

    2013-01-01

    The gastrointestinal (GI) epithelium is constantly renewing, depending upon the intestinal stem cells (ISC) regulated by a spectrum of transcription factors (TFs), including Myb. We noted previously in mice with a p300 mutation (plt6) within the Myb-interaction-domain phenocopied Myb hypomorphic mutant mice with regard to thrombopoiesis, and here, changes in GI homeostasis. p300 is a transcriptional coactivator for many TFs, most prominently cyclic-AMP response element-binding protein (CREB), and also Myb. Studies have highlighted the importance of CREB in proliferation and radiosensitivity, but not in the GI. This prompted us to directly investigate the p300–Myb–CREB axis in the GI. Here, the role of CREB has been defined by generating GI-specific inducible creb knockout (KO) mice. KO mice show efficient and specific deletion of CREB, with no evident compensation by CREM and ATF1. Despite complete KO, only modest effects on proliferation, radiosensitivity and differentiation in the GI under homeostatic or stress conditions were evident, even though CREB target gene pcna (proliferating cell nuclear antigen) was downregulated. creb and p300 mutant lines show increased goblet cells, whereas a reduction in enteroendocrine cells was apparent only in the p300 line, further resembling the Myb hypomorphs. When propagated in vitro, crebKO ISC were defective in organoid formation, suggesting that the GI stroma compensates for CREB loss in vivo, unlike in MybKO studies. Thus, it appears that p300 regulates GI differentiation primarily through Myb, rather than CREB. Finally, active pCREB is elevated in colorectal cancer (CRC) cells and adenomas, and is required for the expression of drug transporter, MRP2, associated with resistance to Oxaliplatin as well as several chromatin cohesion protein that are relevant to CRC therapy. These data raise the prospect that CREB may have a role in GI malignancy as it does in other cancer types, but unlike Myb, is not critical for GI

  19. Dipeptidyl Peptidase IV Inhibition Activates CREB and Improves Islet Vascularization through VEGF-A/VEGFR-2 Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Samikannu, Balaji; Chen, Chunguang; Lingwal, Neelam; Padmasekar, Manju; Engel, Felix B.; Linn, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Substitution of pancreatic islets is a potential therapy to treat diabetes and it depends on reconstitution of islet’s capillary network. In this study, we addressed the question whether stabilization of Glucagon-Like-Peptide-1 (GLP-1) by inhibiting Dipeptidyl Peptidase-IV (DPP-IV) increases β-cell mass by modulating vascularization. Mouse or porcine donor islets were implanted under kidney capsule of diabetic mice treated with DPP-IV inhibitor sitagliptin. Grafts were analyzed for insulin production, β-cell proliferation and vascularization. In addition, the effect of sitagliptin on sprouting and Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF)-A expression was examined ex vivo. The cAMP response element-binding (CREB) and VEGF-A/ Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor (VEGFR)-2 signaling pathway leading to islet vascularization was explored. Sitagliptin increased mean insulin content of islet grafts and area of insulin-positive tissue as well as β-cell proliferation. Interestingly, sitagliptin treatment also markedly increased endothelial cell proliferation, microvessel density and blood flow. Finally, GLP-1 (7-36) stimulated sprouting and VEGF expression, which was significantly enhanced by sitagliptin- mediated inhibition of DPP-IV. Our in vivo data demonstrate that sitagliptin treatment phosphorylated CREB and induced islet vascularization through VEGF-A/VEGFR-2 signaling pathway. This study paves a new pathway for improvement of islet transplantation in treating diabetes mellitus. PMID:24349326

  20. Resveratrol abrogates lipopolysaccharide-induced depressive-like behavior, neuroinflammatory response, and CREB/BDNF signaling in mice.

    PubMed

    Ge, Li; Liu, Liwei; Liu, Hansen; Liu, Song; Xue, Hao; Wang, Xueer; Yuan, Lin; Wang, Zhen; Liu, Dexiang

    2015-12-05

    Current evidence supports that depression is accompanied by the activation of the inflammatory-response system, and overproduction of pro-inflammatory cytokines may play a role in the pathophysiology of depressive disorders. Resveratrol has anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and anti-depressant-like properties. Using an animal model of depression induced by a single administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), the present study investigated the effects of resveratrol on LPS-induced depressive-like behavior and inflammatory-response in adult mice. Our results showed that pretreatment with resveratrol (80mg/kg, i.p.) for 7 consecutive days reversed LPS-increased the immobility time in the forced swimming test and tail suspension test, and LPS-reduced sucrose preference test. Moreover, the antidepressant action of resveratrol was paralleled by significantly reducing the expression levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and up-regulating phosphorylated cAMP response-element-binding protein (pCREB)/brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression in prefrontal cortex (PFC) and hippocampus. In addition, resveratrol ameliorated LPS-induced NF-κB activation in the PFC and hippocampus. The results demonstrate that resveratrol may be an effective therapeutic agent for LPS-induced depressive-like behavior, partially due to its anti-inflammatory aptitude and by modulating pCREB and BDNF expression in the brain region of mice.

  1. Herpes simplex virus type 1 infection activates the Epstein-Barr virus replicative cycle via a CREB-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hongling; Li, Ting; Zeng, Musheng; Peng, Tao

    2012-04-01

    The reactivation of latent Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) to lytic replication is important in pathogenesis and requires virus-host cellular interactions. However, the mechanism underlying the reactivation of EBV is not yet fully understood. In the present study, herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) was shown to induce the reactivation of latent EBV by triggering BZLF1 expression. The BZLF1 promoter (Zp) was not activated by HSV-1 essential glycoprotein-induced membrane fusion. Nevertheless, Zp was activated within 6 h post HSV-1 infection in virus entry-dependent and replication-independent manners. Using a panel of Zp deletion mutants, HSV-1 was shown to promote Zp through a cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) response element (CRE) located in ZII. The phosphorylated cAMP response element-binding (phos-CREB) protein, the cellular transactivator that binds to CRE, also increased after HSV-1 infection. By transient transfection, cAMP-dependent protein kinase A and HSV-1 US3 protein were found to be capable of activating Zp in CREB- and CRE-dependent manners. The relationship between EBV activation and HSV-1 infection revealed a possible common mechanism that stimulated latent EBV into lytic cycles in vivo.

  2. Neuroprotective effect of arctigenin via upregulation of P-CREB in mouse primary neurons and human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Nan; Wen, Qingping; Ren, Lu; Liang, Wenbo; Xia, Yang; Zhang, Xiaodan; Zhao, Dan; Sun, Dong; Hu, Yv; Hao, Haiguang; Yan, Yaping; Zhang, Guangxian; Yang, Jingxian; Kang, Tingguo

    2013-09-10

    Arctigenin (Arc) has been shown to act on scopolamine-induced memory deficit mice and to provide a neuroprotective effect on cultured cortical neurons from glutamate-induced neurodegeneration through mechanisms not completely defined. Here, we investigated the neuroprotective effect of Arc on H89-induced cell damage and its potential mechanisms in mouse cortical neurons and human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. We found that Arc prevented cell viability loss induced by H89 in human SH-SY5Y cells. Moreover, Arc reduced intracellular beta amyloid (Aβ) production induced by H89 in neurons and human SH-SY5Y cells, and Arc also inhibited the presenilin 1(PS1) protein level in neurons. In addition, neural apoptosis in both types of cells, inhibition of neurite outgrowth in human SH-SY5Y cells and reduction of synaptic marker synaptophysin (SYN) expression in neurons were also observed after H89 exposure. All these effects induced by H89 were markedly reversed by Arc treatment. Arc also significantly attenuated downregulation of the phosphorylation of CREB (p-CREB) induced by H89, which may contribute to the neuroprotective effects of Arc. These results demonstrated that Arc exerted the ability to protect neurons and SH-SY5Y cells against H89-induced cell injury via upregulation of p-CREB.

  3. Short-Chain Fatty Acids Inhibit Growth Hormone and Prolactin Gene Transcription via cAMP/PKA/CREB Signaling Pathway in Dairy Cow Anterior Pituitary Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jian-Fa; Fu, Shou-Peng; Li, Su-Nan; Hu, Zhong-Ming; Xue, Wen-Jing; Li, Zhi-Qiang; Huang, Bing-Xu; Lv, Qing-Kang; Liu, Ju-Xiong; Wang, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) play a key role in altering carbohydrate and lipid metabolism, influence endocrine pancreas activity, and as a precursor of ruminant milk fat. However, the effect and detailed mechanisms by which SCFAs mediate bovine growth hormone (GH) and prolactin (PRL) gene transcription remain unclear. In this study, we detected the effects of SCFAs (acetate, propionate, and butyrate) on the activity of the cAMP/PKA/CREB signaling pathway, GH, PRL, and Pit-1 gene transcription in dairy cow anterior pituitary cells (DCAPCs). The results showed that SCFAs decreased intracellular cAMP levels and a subsequent reduction in PKA activity. Inhibition of PKA activity decreased CREB phosphorylation, thereby inhibiting GH and PRL gene transcription. Furthermore, PTX blocked SCFAs- inhibited cAMP/PKA/CREB signaling pathway. These data showed that the inhibition of GH and PRL gene transcription induced by SCFAs is mediated by Gi activation and that propionate is more potent than acetate and butyrate in inhibiting GH and PRL gene transcription. In conclusion, this study identifies a biochemical mechanism for the regulation of SCFAs on bovine GH and PRL gene transcription in DCAPCs, which may serve as one of the factors that regulate pituitary function in accordance with dietary intake. PMID:24177567

  4. Mixture of Peanut Skin Extract and Fish Oil Improves Memory in Mice via Modulation of Anti-Oxidative Stress and Regulation of BDNF/ERK/CREB Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Lan; Cao, Xue-Li; Xing, Tian-Yan; Mori, Daisuke; Tang, Rui-Qi; Li, Jing; Gao, Li-Juan; Qi, Jian-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Long-term use of fish oil (FO) is known to induce oxidative stress and increase the risk of Alzheimer’s disease in humans. In the present study, peanut skin extract (PSE), which has strong antioxidant capacity, was mixed with FO to reduce its side effects while maintaining its beneficial properties. Twelve-week Institute of Cancer Research (ICR) mice were used to conduct animal behavior tests in order to evaluate the memory-enhancing ability of the mixture of peanut skin extract and fish oil (MPF). MPF significantly increased alternations in the Y-maze and cognitive index in the novel object recognition test. MPF also improved performance in the water maze test. We further sought to understand the mechanisms underlying these effects. A significant decrease in superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and an increase in malonyldialdehyde (MDA) in plasma were observed in the FO group. The MPF group showed reduced MDA level and increased SOD activity in the plasma, cortex and hippocampus. Furthermore, the gene expression levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and cAMP responsive element-binding protein (CREB) in the hippocampus were increased in the MPF group, while phosphorylation of protein kinase B (AKT), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and CREB in the hippocampus were enhanced. MPF improves memory in mice via modulation of anti-oxidative stress and activation of BDNF/ERK/CREB signaling pathways. PMID:27136583

  5. TLR4 induces CREB-mediated IL-6 production via upregulation of F-spondin to promote vascular smooth muscle cell migration.

    PubMed

    Lee, Guan-Lin; Wu, Jing-Yiing; Yeh, Chang-Ching; Kuo, Cheng-Chin

    2016-05-13

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) is important in promoting inflammation and vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) migration, both of which contribute to atherosclerosis development and progression. But the mechanism underlying the regulation of TLR4 in VSMC migration remains unclear. Stimulation of VSMCs with LPS increased the cellular level of F-spondin which is associated with the regulation of proinflammatory cytokine production. The LPS-induced F-spondin expression depended on TLR4-mediated PI3K/Akt pathway. Suppression of F-spondin level by siRNA inhibited not only F-spondin expression but also LPS-induced phosphorylation of cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) and IL-6 expression, VSMC migration and proliferation as well as MMP9 expression. Moreover, suppression of CREB level by siRNA inhibited TLR4-induced IL-6 production and VSMC migration. Inhibition of F-spondin siRNA on LPS-induced migration was restored by addition of exogenous recombinant mouse IL-6. We conclude that upon ligand binding, TLR4 activates PI3K/Akt signaling to induce F-spondin expression, subsequently control CREB-mediated IL-6 production to promote VSMC migration. These findings provide vital insights into the essential role of F-spondin in VSMC function and will be valuable for developing new therapeutic strategies against atherosclerosis.

  6. Regulation of Energy Stores and Feeding by Neuronal and Peripheral CREB Activity in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Iijima, Koichi; Zhao, LiJuan; Shenton, Christopher; Iijima-Ando, Kanae

    2009-01-01

    The cAMP-responsive transcription factor CREB functions in adipose tissue and liver to regulate glycogen and lipid metabolism in mammals. While Drosophila has a homolog of mammalian CREB, dCREB2, its role in energy metabolism is not fully understood. Using tissue-specific expression of a dominant-negative form of CREB (DN-CREB), we have examined the effect of blocking CREB activity in neurons and in the fat body, the primary energy storage depot with functions of adipose tissue and the liver in flies, on energy balance, stress resistance and feeding behavior. We found that disruption of CREB function in neurons reduced glycogen and lipid stores and increased sensitivity to starvation. Expression of DN-CREB in the fat body also reduced glycogen levels, while it did not affect starvation sensitivity, presumably due to increased lipid levels in these flies. Interestingly, blocking CREB activity in the fat body increased food intake. These flies did not show a significant change in overall body size, suggesting that disruption of CREB activity in the fat body caused an obese-like phenotype. Using a transgenic CRE-luciferase reporter, we further demonstrated that disruption of the adipokinetic hormone receptor, which is functionally related to mammalian glucagon and β-adrenergic signaling, in the fat body reduced CRE-mediated transcription in flies. This study demonstrates that CREB activity in either neuronal or peripheral tissues regulates energy balance in Drosophila, and that the key signaling pathway regulating CREB activity in peripheral tissue is evolutionarily conserved. PMID:20041126

  7. Overexpression of CREB in the nucleus accumbens shell increases cocaine reinforcement in self-administering rats.

    PubMed

    Larson, Erin B; Graham, Danielle L; Arzaga, Rose R; Buzin, Nicole; Webb, Joseph; Green, Thomas A; Bass, Caroline E; Neve, Rachael L; Terwilliger, Ernest F; Nestler, Eric J; Self, David W

    2011-11-09

    Chronic exposure to addictive drugs enhances cAMP response element binding protein (CREB)-regulated gene expression in nucleus accumbens (NAc), and these effects are thought to reduce the positive hedonic effects of passive cocaine administration. Here, we used viral-mediated gene transfer to produce short- and long-term regulation of CREB activity in NAc shell of rats engaging in volitional cocaine self-administration. Increasing CREB expression in NAc shell markedly enhanced cocaine reinforcement of self-administration behavior, as indicated by leftward (long-term) and upward (short-term) shifts in fixed ratio dose-response curves. CREB also increased the effort exerted by rats to obtain cocaine on more demanding progressive ratio schedules, an effect highly correlated with viral-induced modulation of BDNF protein in the NAc shell. CREB enhanced cocaine reinforcement when expressed either throughout acquisition of self-administration or when expression was limited to postacquisition tests, indicating a direct effect of CREB independent of reinforcement-related learning. Downregulating endogenous CREB in NAc shell by expressing a short hairpin RNA reduced cocaine reinforcement in similar tests, while overexpression of a dominant-negative CREB(S133A) mutant had no significant effect on cocaine self-administration. Finally, increasing CREB expression after withdrawal from self-administration enhanced cocaine-primed relapse, while reducing CREB levels facilitated extinction of cocaine seeking, but neither altered relapse induced by cocaine cues or footshock stress. Together, these findings indicate that CREB activity in NAc shell increases the motivation for cocaine during active self-administration or after withdrawal from cocaine. Our results also highlight that volitional and passive drug administration can lead to substantially different behavioral outcomes.

  8. Distinct effect of CacyBP/SIP on the ERK1/2-CREB-BDNF pathway in undifferentiated and differentiated neuroblastoma NB2a cells.

    PubMed

    Rosińska, Sara; Leśniak, Wiesława; Filipek, Anna

    2016-07-01

    CacyBP/SIP, a protein expressed to high extent in the brain, has been shown to act as ERK1/2 phosphatase in vitro and in cultured cells. It has been demonstrated recently that CacyBP/SIP can modulate the activity of some transcription factors in neurons and glioma cells. In the present work we have examined the effect of CacyBP/SIP overexpression and silencing on the phosphorylation/activity of ERK1/2 (pERK1/2) and CREB (pCREB) and on the level of BDNF mRNA in differentiated and undifferentiated neuroblastoma NB2a cells. We have shown that in undifferentiated cells the amount of pERK1/2 decreased upon CacyBP/SIP overexpression. Further studies have shown that the activity of CREB and the level of BDNF mRNA, downstream effectors of the ERK1/2 signaling pathway, also depended on the CacyBP/SIP level and strictly matched the level of pERK1/2. Interestingly, in differentiated NB2a cells, overexpression of CacyBP/SIP appeared to have a distinct effect on the pERK1/2 level from that observed in undifferentiated cells. Subsequent studies have revealed that distinct function of CacyBP/SIP in undifferentiated and differentiated NB2a cells might be due to changes in its posttranslational modifications and protein ligands. Altogether, our studies suggest that CacyBP/SIP is involved in the ERK1/2-CREB-BDNF pathway and that it might regulate this pathway depending on the stage of NB2a cell differentiation.

  9. Hepatic CREB3L3 controls whole-body energy homeostasis and improves obesity and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Yoshimi; Satoh, Aoi; Yabe, Sachiko; Furusawa, Mika; Tokushige, Naoko; Tezuka, Hitomi; Mikami, Motoki; Iwata, Wakiko; Shingyouchi, Akiko; Matsuzaka, Takashi; Kiwata, Shiori; Fujimoto, Yuri; Shimizu, Hidehisa; Danno, Hirosuke; Yamamoto, Takashi; Ishii, Kiyoaki; Karasawa, Tadayoshi; Takeuchi, Yoshinori; Iwasaki, Hitoshi; Shimada, Masako; Kawakami, Yasushi; Urayama, Osamu; Sone, Hirohito; Takekoshi, Kazuhiro; Kobayashi, Kazuto; Yatoh, Shigeru; Takahashi, Akimitsu; Yahagi, Naoya; Suzuki, Hiroaki; Yamada, Nobuhiro; Shimano, Hitoshi

    2014-12-01

    Transcriptional regulation of metabolic genes in the liver is the key to maintaining systemic energy homeostasis during starvation. The membrane-bound transcription factor cAMP-responsive element-binding protein 3-like 3 (CREB3L3) has been reported to be activated during fasting and to regulate triglyceride metabolism. Here, we show that CREB3L3 confers a wide spectrum of metabolic responses to starvation in vivo. Adenoviral and transgenic overexpression of nuclear CREB3L3 induced systemic lipolysis, hepatic ketogenesis, and insulin sensitivity with increased energy expenditure, leading to marked reduction in body weight, plasma lipid levels, and glucose levels. CREB3L3 overexpression activated gene expression levels and plasma levels of antidiabetic hormones, including fibroblast growth factor 21 and IGF-binding protein 2. Amelioration of diabetes by hepatic activation of CREB3L3 was also observed in several types of diabetic obese mice. Nuclear CREB3L3 mutually activates the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) α promoter in an autoloop fashion and is crucial for the ligand transactivation of PPARα by interacting with its transcriptional regulator, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1α. CREB3L3 directly and indirectly controls fibroblast growth factor 21 expression and its plasma level, which contributes at least partially to the catabolic effects of CREB3L3 on systemic energy homeostasis in the entire body. Therefore, CREB3L3 is a therapeutic target for obesity and diabetes.

  10. Microdomain organization and frequency-dependence of CREB-dependent transcriptional signaling in heart cells

    PubMed Central

    Kobrinsky, Evgeny; Duong, Son Q.; Sheydina, Anna; Soldatov, Nikolai M.

    2011-01-01

    Voltage-gated Cav1.2 calcium channels couple membrane depolarization to cAMP response-element-binding protein (CREB)-dependent transcriptional activation. To investigate the spatial and temporal organization of CREB-dependent transcriptional nuclear microdomains, we combined perforated patch-clamp technique and FRET microscopy for monitoring CREB and CREB-binding protein interaction in the nuclei of live cells. The experimental approach to the quantitative assessment of CREB-dependent transcriptional signaling evoked by cAMP- and Cav1.2-dependent mechanisms was devised in COS1 cells expressing recombinant Cav1.2 calcium channels. Using continuous 2-dimensional wavelet transform and time series analyses, we found that nuclear CREB-dependent transcriptional signaling is organized differentially in spatially and temporally separated microdomains of 4 distinct types. In rat neonatal cardiomyocytes, CREB-dependent transcription is mediated by the cAMP-initiated CaMKII-sensitive and Cav1.2-initiated CaMKII-insensitive mechanisms. The latter microdomains show a tendency to exhibit periodic behavior correlated with spontaneous contraction of myocytes suggestive of frequency-dependent CREB-dependent transcriptional regulation in the heart.—Kobrinsky, E., Duong, S.Q., Sheydina, A., Soldatov, N. M. Microdomain organization and frequency-dependence of CREB-dependent transcriptional signaling in heart cells. PMID:21248242

  11. Olprinone and colforsin daropate alleviate septic lung inflammation and apoptosis through CREB-independent activation of the Akt pathway.

    PubMed

    Oishi, Hirofumi; Takano, Ken-ichi; Tomita, Kengo; Takebe, Mariko; Yokoo, Hiroki; Yamazaki, Mitsuaki; Hattori, Yuichi

    2012-07-01

    Olprinone, a specific phosphodiesterase III inhibitor, and corforsin daropate, a direct adenylate cyclase activator, are now being used in critical conditions. We investigated whether their therapeutic use provides protection against septic acute lung injury (ALI) and mortality. Polymicrobial sepsis was induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) in BALB/c mice. Olprinone or colforsin daropate was continuously given through an osmotic pump that was implanted into the peritoneal cavity immediately following CLP. These treatments prevented the ALI development in CLP mice, as indicated by the findings that severe hypoxemia, increased pulmonary vascular permeability, and histological lung damage were strikingly remedied. Furthermore, continued administration of olprinone or colforsin daropate suppressed apoptosis induction in septic lungs and improved the survival of CLP mice. Olprinone and corforsin daropate enhanced Akt phosphorylation in septic lungs. Wortmannin, which inhibits the Akt upstream regulator phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, abrogated the protective effects of olprinone and corforsin daropate on sepsis-associated lung inflammation and apoptosis. In vivo transfection of cyclic AMP response element binding protein (CREB) decoy oligodeoxynucleotide failed to negate the abilities of these agents to increase Akt phosphorylation and to inhibit IκBα degradation in septic lungs. These results demonstrate for the first time that CREB-independent Akt-mediated signaling is a critical mechanism contributing to the therapeutic effects of olprinone and corforsin daropate on septic ALI. Moreover, our data also suggest that these cyclic AMP-related agents, by blocking both nuclear factor-κB activation and apoptosis induction, may represent an effective therapeutic approach to the treatment of the septic syndrome.

  12. Sodium phenylbutyrate enhances astrocytic neurotrophin synthesis via protein kinase C (PKC)-mediated activation of cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB): implications for Alzheimer disease therapy.

    PubMed

    Corbett, Grant T; Roy, Avik; Pahan, Kalipada

    2013-03-22

    Neurotrophins, such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3), are believed to be genuine molecular mediators of neuronal growth and homeostatic synapse activity. However, levels of these neurotrophic factors decrease in different brain regions of patients with Alzheimer disease (AD). Induction of astrocytic neurotrophin synthesis is a poorly understood phenomenon but represents a plausible therapeutic target because neuronal neurotrophin production is aberrant in AD and other neurodegenerative diseases. Here, we delineate that sodium phenylbutyrate (NaPB), a Food and Drug Administration-approved oral medication for hyperammonemia, induces astrocytic BDNF and NT-3 expression via the protein kinase C (PKC)-cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB) pathway. NaPB treatment increased the direct association between PKC and CREB followed by phosphorylation of CREB (Ser(133)) and induction of DNA binding and transcriptional activation of CREB. Up-regulation of markers for synaptic function and plasticity in cultured hippocampal neurons by NaPB-treated astroglial supernatants and its abrogation by anti-TrkB blocking antibody suggest that NaPB-induced astroglial neurotrophins are functionally active. Moreover, oral administration of NaPB increased the levels of BDNF and NT-3 in the CNS and improved spatial learning and memory in a mouse model of AD. Our results highlight a novel neurotrophic property of NaPB that may be used to augment neurotrophins in the CNS and improve synaptic function in disease states such as AD.

  13. The CREB coactivator CRTC2 controls hepatic lipid metabolism by regulating SREBP1.

    PubMed

    Han, Jinbo; Li, Erwei; Chen, Liqun; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Wei, Fangchao; Liu, Jieyuan; Deng, Haiteng; Wang, Yiguo

    2015-08-13

    Abnormal accumulation of triglycerides in the liver, caused in part by increased de novo lipogenesis, results in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and insulin resistance. Sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1 (SREBP1), an important transcriptional regulator of lipogenesis, is synthesized as an inactive precursor that binds to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). In response to insulin signalling, SREBP1 is transported from the ER to the Golgi in a COPII-dependent manner, processed by proteases in the Golgi, and then shuttled to the nucleus to induce lipogenic gene expression; however, the mechanisms underlying enhanced SREBP1 activity in insulin-resistant obesity and diabetes remain unclear. Here we show in mice that CREB regulated transcription coactivator 2 (CRTC2) functions as a mediator of mTOR signalling to modulate COPII-dependent SREBP1 processing. CRTC2 competes with Sec23A, a subunit of the COPII complex, to interact with Sec31A, another COPII subunit, thus disrupting SREBP1 transport. During feeding, mTOR phosphorylates CRTC2 and attenuates its inhibitory effect on COPII-dependent SREBP1 maturation. As hepatic overexpression of an mTOR-defective CRTC2 mutant in obese mice improved the lipogenic program and insulin sensitivity, these results demonstrate how the transcriptional coactivator CRTC2 regulates mTOR-mediated lipid homeostasis in the fed state and in obesity.

  14. Chronic enhancement of CREB activity in the hippocampus interferes with the retrieval of spatial information

    PubMed Central

    Viosca, Jose; Malleret, Gaël; Bourtchouladze, Rusiko; Benito, Eva; Vronskava, Svetlana; Kandel, Eric R.; Barco, Angel

    2009-01-01

    The activation of cAMP-responsive element-binding protein (CREB)-dependent gene expression is thought to be critical for the formation of different types of long-term memory. To explore the consequences of chronic enhancement of CREB function on spatial memory in mammals, we examined spatial navigation in bitransgenic mice that express in a regulated and restricted manner a constitutively active form of CREB, VP16-CREB, in forebrain neurons. We found that chronic enhancement of CREB activity delayed the acquisition of an allocentric strategy to solve the hidden platform task. The ability to turn on and off transgene expression allowed us to dissect the role of CREB in dissociable memory processes. In mice in which transgene expression was turned on during memory acquisition, turning off the transgene re-established the access to the memory trace, whereas in mice in which transgene expression was turned off during acquisition, turning on the transgene impaired memory expression in a reversible manner, indicating that CREB enhancement specifically interfered with the retrieval of spatial information. The defects on spatial navigation in mice with chronic enhancement of CREB function were not corrected by conditions that increased further CREB-dependent activation of hippocampal memory systems, such as housing in an enriched environment. These results along with previous findings in CREB-deficient mutants indicate that the relationship of CREB-mediated plasticity to spatial memory is an inverted-U function, and that optimal learning in the water maze requires accurate regulation of this pathway. PMID:19237642

  15. Puerarin protects mouse liver against nickel-induced oxidative stress and inflammation associated with the TLR4/p38/CREB pathway.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chan-Min; Ma, Jie-Qiong; Liu, Si-Si; Feng, Zhao-Jun; Wang, Ai-Min

    2016-01-05

    Nickel (Ni), one of hazardous environmental chemicals, is known to cause liver injury. Accumulating evidence showed that puerarin (PU) possessed comprehensive biological effects. The purpose of the current study was to test the hypothesis that the puerarin protects against enhanced liver injury caused by Ni in mice. ICR mice received intraperitoneally nickel sulfate (20 mg/kg/body weight, daily) for 20 days, and puerarin (200 and 400 mg/kg/body weight) was applied before Ni exposure. The results indicated that puerarin markedly inhibited Ni-induced liver injury, which was characterized by decreased aminotransferase activities and inflammation. Puerarin also inhibited the oxidative stress and decreased the metallothionein (MT) levels. Puerarin decreased the level of pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-6 in livers. Puerarin significantly inhibited the TLR4 activation and p38 MAPK phosphorylation, which in turn inhibited NF-κB activity. Likewise, Ni-induced inflammatory responses were diminished by puerarin as observed by a remarkable reduction in the levels of phosphorylated CREB. Furthermore, puerarin also reduced inflammatory mediators such as cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) levels in livers. Data from this study suggested that the inhibition of Ni-induced oxidative stress and inflammatory responses by puerarin is due to its ability to modulate the TLR4/p38/CREB signaling pathway.

  16. The Kinase Function of MSK1 Regulates BDNF Signaling to CREB and Basal Synaptic Transmission, But Is Not Required for Hippocampal Long-Term Potentiation or Spatial Memory

    PubMed Central

    Daumas, Stephanie; Hunter, Christopher J.; Mistry, Rajen B.; Cooper, Daniel D.; Reyskens, Kathleen M.; Flynn, Harry T.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The later stages of long-term potentiation (LTP) in vitro and spatial memory in vivo are believed to depend upon gene transcription. Accordingly, considerable attempts have been made to identify both the mechanisms by which transcription is regulated and indeed the gene products themselves. Previous studies have shown that deletion of one regulator of transcription, the mitogen- and stress-activated kinase 1 (MSK1), causes an impairment of spatial memory. Given the ability of MSK1 to regulate gene expression via the phosphorylation of cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) at serine 133 (S133), MSK1 is a plausible candidate as a prime regulator of transcription underpinning synaptic plasticity and learning and memory. Indeed, prior work has revealed the necessity for MSK1 in homeostatic and experience-dependent synaptic plasticity. However, using a knock-in kinase-dead mouse mutant of MSK1, the current study demonstrates that, while the kinase function of MSK1 is important in regulating the phosphorylation of CREB at S133 and basal synaptic transmission in hippocampal area CA1, it is not required for metabotropic glutamate receptor-dependent long-term depression (mGluR-LTD), two forms of LTP or several forms of spatial learning in the watermaze. These data indicate that other functions of MSK1, such as a structural role for the whole enzyme, may explain previous observations of a role for MSK1 in learning and memory. PMID:28275711

  17. Regulation of proliferation and histone acetylation in embryonic neural precursors by CREB/CREM signaling

    PubMed Central

    Parlato, Rosanna; Mandl, Claudia; Hölzl-Wenig, Gabriele; Liss, Birgit; Tucker, Kerry L; Ciccolini, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    The transcription factor CREB (cAMP-response element binding protein) regulates differentiation, migration, survival and activity-dependent gene expression in the developing and mature nervous system. However, its specific role in the proliferation of embryonic neural progenitors is still not completely understood. Here we investigated how CREB regulates proliferation of mouse embryonic neural progenitors by a conditional mutant lacking Creb gene in neural progenitors. In parallel, we explored possible compensatory effects by the genetic ablation of another member of the same gene family, the cAMP-responsive element modulator (Crem). We show that CREB loss differentially impaired the proliferation, clonogenic potential and self-renewal of precursors derived from the ganglionic eminence (GE), in comparison to those derived from the cortex. This phenotype was associated with a specific reduction of histone acetylation in the GE of CREB mutant mice, and this reduction was rescued in vivo by inhibition of histone deacetylation. These observations indicate that the impaired proliferation could be caused by a reduced acetyltransferase activity in Creb conditional knock-out mice. These findings support a crucial role of CREB in controlling embryonic neurogenesis and propose a novel mechanism by which CREB regulates embryonic neural development. PMID:27504469

  18. Control of CREB expression in tumors: from molecular mechanisms and signal transduction pathways to therapeutic target

    PubMed Central

    Steven, André; Seliger, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    The cyclic AMP response element binding (CREB) protein has pleiotropic activities in physiologic processes. Due to its central position downstream of many growth signaling pathways CREB has the ability to influence cell survival, growth and differentiation of normal, but also of tumor cells suggesting an oncogenic potential of CREB. Indeed, increased CREB expression and activation is associated with tumor progression, chemotherapy resistance and reduced patients' survival. We summarize here the different cellular functions of CREB in tumors of distinct histology as well as its use as potential prognostic marker. In addition, the underlying molecular mechanisms to achieve constitutive activation of CREB including structural alterations, such as gene amplification and chromosomal translocation, and deregulation, which could occur at the transcriptional, post-transcriptional and post-translational level, will be described. Since downregulation of CREB by different strategies resulted in inhibition of cell proliferation, invasion and induction of apoptosis, the role of CREB as a promising target for cancer therapy will be also discussed. PMID:26934558

  19. CREB3L3 controls fatty acid oxidation and ketogenesis in synergy with PPARα

    PubMed Central

    Nakagawa, Yoshimi; Satoh, Aoi; Tezuka, Hitomi; Han, Song-iee; Takei, Kenta; Iwasaki, Hitoshi; Yatoh, Shigeru; Yahagi, Naoya; Suzuki, Hiroaki; Iwasaki, Yasumasa; Sone, Hirohito; Matsuzaka, Takashi; Yamada, Nobuhiro; Shimano, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    CREB3L3 is involved in fatty acid oxidation and ketogenesis in a mutual manner with PPARα. To evaluate relative contribution, a combination of knockout and transgenic mice was investigated. On a ketogenic-diet (KD) that highlights capability of hepatic ketogenesis, Creb3l3−/− mice exhibited reduction of expression of genes for fatty oxidation and ketogenesis comparable to Ppara−/− mice. Most of the genes were further suppressed in double knockout mice indicating independent contribution of hepatic CREB3L3. During fasting, dependency of ketogenesis on CREB3L3 is lesser extents than Ppara−/− mice suggesting importance of adipose PPARα for supply of FFA and hyperlipidemia in Creb3l3−/− mice. In conclusion CREB3L3 plays a crucial role in hepatic adaptation to energy starvation via two pathways: direct related gene regulation and an auto-loop activation of PPARα. Furthermore, as KD-fed Creb3l3−/− mice exhibited severe fatty liver, activating inflammation, CREB3L3 could be a therapeutic target for NAFLD. PMID:27982131

  20. Dorsal Hippocampal CREB Is Both Necessary and Sufficient for Spatial Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sekeres, Melanie J.; Neve, Rachael L.; Frankland, Paul W.; Josselyn, Sheena A.

    2010-01-01

    Although the transcription factor CREB has been widely implicated in memory, whether it is sufficient to produce spatial memory under conditions that do not normally support memory formation in mammals is unknown. We found that locally and acutely increasing CREB levels in the dorsal hippocampus using viral vectors is sufficient to induce robust…

  1. Chronic Enhancement of CREB Activity in the Hippocampus Interferes with the Retrieval of Spatial Information

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Viosca, Jose; Malleret, Gael; Bourtchouladze, Rusiko; Benito, Eva; Vronskava, Svetlana; Kandel, Eric R.; Barco, Angel

    2009-01-01

    The activation of cAMP-responsive element-binding protein (CREB)-dependent gene expression is thought to be critical for the formation of different types of long-term memory. To explore the consequences of chronic enhancement of CREB function on spatial memory in mammals, we examined spatial navigation in bitransgenic mice that express in a…

  2. Targeted activation of CREB in reactive astrocytes is neuroprotective in focal acute cortical injury.

    PubMed

    Pardo, Luis; Schlüter, Agatha; Valor, Luis M; Barco, Angel; Giralt, Mercedes; Golbano, Arantxa; Hidalgo, Juan; Jia, Peilin; Zhao, Zhongming; Jové, Mariona; Portero-Otin, Manuel; Ruiz, Montserrat; Giménez-Llort, Lydia; Masgrau, Roser; Pujol, Aurora; Galea, Elena

    2016-05-01

    The clinical challenge in acute injury as in traumatic brain injury (TBI) is to halt the delayed neuronal loss that occurs hours and days after the insult. Here we report that the activation of CREB-dependent transcription in reactive astrocytes prevents secondary injury in cerebral cortex after experimental TBI. The study was performed in a novel bitransgenic mouse in which a constitutively active CREB, VP16-CREB, was targeted to astrocytes with the Tet-Off system. Using histochemistry, qPCR, and gene profiling we found less neuronal death and damage, reduced macrophage infiltration, preserved mitochondria, and rescued expression of genes related to mitochondrial metabolism in bitransgenic mice as compared to wild type littermates. Finally, with meta-analyses using publicly available databases we identified a core set of VP16-CREB candidate target genes that may account for the neuroprotective effect. Enhancing CREB activity in astrocytes thus emerges as a novel avenue in acute brain post-injury therapeutics.

  3. Identification of compounds that potentiate CREB signaling as possible enhancers of long-term memory

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Menghang; Huang, Ruili; Guo, Vicky; Southall, Noel; Cho, Ming-Hsuang; Inglese, James; Austin, Christopher P.; Nirenberg, Marshall

    2009-01-01

    Many studies have implicated the cAMP Response Element Binding (CREB) protein signaling pathway in long-term memory. To identify small molecule enhancers of CREB activation of gene expression, we screened ≈73,000 compounds, each at 7–15 concentrations in a quantitative high-throughput screening (qHTS) format, for activity in cells by assaying CREB mediated β-lactamase reporter gene expression. We identified 1,800 compounds that potentiated CREB mediated gene expression, with potencies as low as 16 nM, comprising 96 structural series. Mechanisms of action were systematically determined, and compounds that affect phosphodiesterase 4, protein kinase A, and cAMP production were identified, as well as compounds that affect CREB signaling via apparently unidentified mechanisms. qHTS folowed by interrogation of pathway targets is an efficient paradigm for lead generation for chemical genomics and drug development. PMID:19196967

  4. NR2B overexpression leads to the enhancement of specific protein phosphorylation in the brain.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunxia; Zhang, Ning; Hu, Yinghe; Wang, Huimin

    2014-11-07

    n-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) are highly expressed in the central nervous system (CNS) including the cerebral cortex, and it has been found that they contribute significantly to the processes of learning and memory. Dysfunctions of NMDARs are implicated in many neurological disorders. To further investigate the specific role of the NR2B subunit of NMDARs in brain functions, we have examined differences in gene expression in the cerebral cortex between NR2B transgenic mice and their wild-type littermates using the DNA microarray. Total of 179 differentially expressed genes were identified, including genes involved in ion channel activity and/or neurotransmission, signal transduction, structure/cytoskeleton, transcription, and hormone/growth factor activity. Signal pathway analysis has indicated that multiple pathways were involved in this process, especially the Mitogen-activated protein kinases/Extracellular signal-regulated kinases (MAPK/ERK) pathway. The phosphorylation levels of ERK and cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB), and the mRNA levels of CREB target genes (C-Fos and Nr4a1) were significantly upregulated in the cerebral cortices of NR2B transgenic mice compared to their wild-type littermates. Our study suggested that a chronic increase of NMDARs activation by NR2B overexpression in the forebrain may enhance the protein serine/threonine phosphorylation levels of MAPK/ERK-CREB and thereby regulated their signaling pathway.

  5. Diet and energy-sensing inputs affect TorC1-mediated axon misrouting but not TorC2-directed synapse growth in a Drosophila model of tuberous sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Dimitroff, Brian; Howe, Katie; Watson, Adrienne; Campion, Bridget; Lee, Hyun-Gwan; Zhao, Na; O'Connor, Michael B; Neufeld, Thomas P; Selleck, Scott B

    2012-01-01

    The Target of Rapamycin (TOR) growth regulatory system is influenced by a number of different inputs, including growth factor signaling, nutrient availability, and cellular energy levels. While the effects of TOR on cell and organismal growth have been well characterized, this pathway also has profound effects on neural development and behavior. Hyperactivation of the TOR pathway by mutations in the upstream TOR inhibitors TSC1 (tuberous sclerosis complex 1) or TSC2 promotes benign tumors and neurological and behavioral deficits, a syndrome known as tuberous sclerosis (TS). In Drosophila, neuron-specific overexpression of Rheb, the direct downstream target inhibited by Tsc1/Tsc2, produced significant synapse overgrowth, axon misrouting, and phototaxis deficits. To understand how misregulation of Tor signaling affects neural and behavioral development, we examined the influence of growth factor, nutrient, and energy sensing inputs on these neurodevelopmental phenotypes. Neural expression of Pi3K, a principal mediator of growth factor inputs to Tor, caused synapse overgrowth similar to Rheb, but did not disrupt axon guidance or phototaxis. Dietary restriction rescued Rheb-mediated behavioral and axon guidance deficits, as did overexpression of AMPK, a component of the cellular energy sensing pathway, but neither was able to rescue synapse overgrowth. While axon guidance and behavioral phenotypes were affected by altering the function of a Tor complex 1 (TorC1) component, Raptor, or a TORC1 downstream element (S6k), synapse overgrowth was only suppressed by reducing the function of Tor complex 2 (TorC2) components (Rictor, Sin1). These findings demonstrate that different inputs to Tor signaling have distinct activities in nervous system development, and that Tor provides an important connection between nutrient-energy sensing systems and patterning of the nervous system.

  6. Involvement of PI3K/Akt/FoxO3a and PKA/CREB Signaling Pathways in the Protective Effect of Fluoxetine Against Corticosterone-Induced Cytotoxicity in PC12 Cells.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Bingqing; Li, Yiwen; Niu, Bo; Wang, Xinyi; Cheng, Yufang; Zhou, Zhongzhen; You, Tingting; Liu, Yonggang; Wang, Haitao; Xu, Jiangping

    2016-08-01

    The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine is neuroprotective in several brain injury models. It is commonly used to treat major depressive disorder and related conditions, but its mechanism of action remains incompletely understood. Activation of the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase/protein kinase B/forkhead box O3a (PI3K/Akt/FoxO3a) and protein kinase A/cAMP-response element binding protein (PKA/CREB) signaling pathways has been strongly implicated in the pathogenesis of depression and might be the downstream target of fluoxetine. Here, we used PC12 cells exposed to corticosterone (CORT) to study the neuroprotective effects of fluoxetine and the involvement of the PI3K/Akt/FoxO3a and PKA/CREB signaling pathways. Our results show that CORT reduced PC12 cells viability by 70 %, and that fluoxetine showed a concentration-dependent neuroprotective effect. Neuroprotective effects of fluoxetine were abolished by inhibition of PI3K, Akt, and PKA using LY294002, KRX-0401, and H89, respectively. Treatment of PC12 cells with fluoxetine resulted in increased phosphorylation of Akt, FoxO3a, and CREB. Fluoxetine also dose-dependently rescued the phosphorylation levels of Akt, FoxO3a, and CREB, following administration of CORT (from 99 to 110, 56 to 170, 80 to 170 %, respectively). In addition, inhibition of PKA and PI3K/Akt resulted in decreased levels of p-CREB, p-Akt, and p-FoxO3a in the presence of fluoxetine. Furthermore, fluoxetine reversed CORT-induced upregulation of p53-upregulated modulator of apoptosis (Puma) and Bcl-2-interacting mediator of cell death (Bim) via the PI3K/Akt/FoxO3a signaling pathway. H89 treatment reversed the effect of fluoxetine on the mRNA level of brain-derived neurotrophic factor, which was decreased in the presence of CORT. Our data indicate that fluoxetine elicited neuroprotection toward CORT-induced cell death that involves dual regulation from PI3K/Akt/FoxO3a and PKA/CREB pathways.

  7. NMDA Receptor Subunit Composition Controls Dendritogenesis of Hippocampal Neurons through CAMKII, CREB-P and H3K27ac.

    PubMed

    Bustos, Fernando J; Jury, Nur; Martinez, Pablo; Ampuero, Estibaliz; Campos, Matias; Abarzúa, Sebastian; Jaramillo, Karen; Ibing, Susanne; Mardones, Muriel D; Haensgen, Henny; Kzhyshkowska, Julia; Tevy, Maria Florencia; Neve, Rachael; Sanhueza, Magdalena; Varela-Nallar, Lorena; Montecino, Martín; van Zundert, Brigitte

    2017-02-04

    Dendrite arbor growth, or dendritogenesis, is choreographed by a diverse set of cues, including the NMDA receptor (NMDAR) subunits NR2A and NR2B. While NR1NR2B receptors are predominantly expressed in immature neurons and promote plasticity, NR1NR2A receptors are mainly expressed in mature neurons and induce circuit stability. How the different subunits regulate these processes is unclear, but this is likely related to the presence of their distinct C-terminal sequences that couple different signaling proteins. Calcium-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) is an interesting candidate as this protein can be activated by calcium influx through NMDARs. CaMKII triggers a series of biochemical signaling cascades, involving the phosphorylation of diverse targets. Among them, the activation of cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB-P) pathway triggers a plasticity-specific transcriptional program through unknown epigenetic mechanisms. Here we found that dendritogenesis in hippocampal neurons is impaired by several well-characterized constructs (i.e. NR2B-RS/QD) and peptides (i.e. tatCN21) that specifically interfere with the recruitment and interaction of CaMKII with the NR2B C-terminal domain. Interestingly, we found that transduction of NR2AΔIN, a mutant NR2A construct with increased interaction to CaMKII, reactivates dendritogenesis in mature hippocampal neurons in vitro and in vivo. To gain insights into the signaling and epigenetic mechanisms underlying NMDAR-mediated dendritogenesis, we used immunofluorescence staining to detect CREB-P and acetylated lysine 27 of histone H3 (H3K27ac), an activation-associated histone tail mark. In contrast to control mature neurons, our data shows that activation of the NMDAR/CaMKII/ERK-P/CREB-P signaling axis in neurons expressing NR2AΔIN is not correlated with increased nuclear H3K27ac levels. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  8. Molecular Mechanisms of Environmental Enrichment: Impairments in Akt/GSK3β, Neurotrophin-3 and CREB Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yuan-Shih; Long, Nancy; Pigino, Gustavo; Brady, Scott T.; Lazarov, Orly

    2013-01-01

    Experience of mice in a complex environment enhances neurogenesis and synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus of wild type and transgenic mice harboring familial Alzheimer's disease (FAD)-linked APPswe/PS1ΔE9. In FAD mice, this experience also reduces levels of tau hyperphosphorylation and oligomeric β-amyloid. Although environmental enrichment has significant effects on brain plasticity and neuropathology, the molecular mechanisms underlying these effects are unknown. Here we show that environmental enrichment upregulates the Akt pathway, leading to the downregulation of glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β), in wild type but not FAD mice. Several neurotrophic signaling pathways are activated in the hippocampus of both wild type and FAD mice, including brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and nerve growth factor (NGF), and this increase is accompanied by the upregulation of the BDNF receptor, tyrosine kinase B (TrkB). Interestingly, neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) is upregulated in the brains of wild type mice but not FAD mice, while insulin growth factor-1 (IGF-1) is upregulated exclusively in the brains of FAD mice. Upregulation of neurotrophins is accompanied by the increase of N-Methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptors in the hippocampus following environmental enrichment. Most importantly, we observed a significant increase in levels of cAMP response element- binding (CREB) transcripts in the hippocampus of wild type and FAD mice following environmental enrichment. However, CREB phosphorylation, a critical step for the initiation of learning and memory-required gene transcription, takes place in the hippocampus of wild type but not of FAD mice. These results suggest that experience of wild type mice in a complex environmental upregulates critical signaling that play a major role in learning and memory in the hippocampus. However, in FAD mice, some of these pathways are impaired and cannot be rescued by environmental enrichment. PMID:23700479

  9. Naloxone's pentapeptide binding site on filamin A blocks Mu opioid receptor-Gs coupling and CREB activation of acute morphine.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hoau-Yan; Burns, Lindsay H

    2009-01-01

    Chronic morphine causes the mu opioid receptor (MOR) to switch its coupling from Gi/o to Gs, resulting in excitatory signaling via both Galphas and its Gbetagamma dimer. Ultra-low-dose naloxone (NLX) prevents this switch and attenuates opioid tolerance and dependence. This protective effect is mediated via a high-affinity interaction of NLX to a pentapeptide region in c-terminal filamin A (FLNA), a scaffolding protein interacting with MOR. In organotypic striatal slice cultures, we now show that acute morphine induces a dose-dependent Go-to-Gs coupling switch at 5 and 15 min that resolves by 1 hr. The acute Gs coupling induced by 100 microM morphine was completely prevented by co-treatment with 100 pM NLX, (+)NLX, or naltrexone (NTX), or their pentapeptide binding site (FLNA(2561-2565)), which we show can act as a decoy for MOR or bind to FLNA itself. All of these co-treatments presumably prevent the MOR-FLNA interaction. Since ultra-low-dose NTX also attenuates the addictive properties of opioids, we assessed striatal cAMP production and CREB phosphorylation at S(133). Correlating with the Gs coupling, acute morphine induced elevated cAMP levels and a several-fold increase in pS(133)CREB that were also completely blocked by NLX, NTX or the FLNA pentapeptide. We propose that acute, robust stimulation of MOR causes an interaction with FLNA that allows an initially transient MOR-Gs coupling, which recovers with receptor recycling but persists when MOR stimulation is repeated or prolonged. The complete prevention of this acute, morphine-induced MOR-Gs coupling by 100 pM NLX/NTX or 10 microM pentapeptide segment of FLNA further elucidates both MOR signaling and the mechanism of action of ultra-low-dose NLX or NTX in attenuating opioid tolerance, dependence and addictive potential.

  10. Interleukin-18 directly protects cortical neurons by activating PI3K/AKT/NF-κB/CREB pathways.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jia; Ping, Feng-feng; Lv, Wen-ting; Feng, Jun-yi; Shang, Jing

    2014-09-01

    Interleukin-18 (IL-18), a member of the IL-1 family of cytokines, was initially identified as an interferon (IFN)-γ-inducing factor. IL-18 is expressed in both immune and non-immune cells and participates in the adjustment of multitude cellular functions. Nonetheless, the effects of IL-18 on cortical neurons have not been explored. The present study was conducted to investigate the influence of IL-18 on rat primary cortical neurons and elucidate the underlying mechanisms. We proved that rrIL-18 increased the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression in a time-dependent manner. Treatment with rrIL-18 (50 ng/ml) deactivated phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) by facilitating its phosphorylation, enhanced the expression of Phosphoinositide 3-OH kinase (PI3K) and p-Akt, standing for the activation of the PI3K/Akt pathway. As its pivotal downstream pathways, nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB), cAMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB)/Bcl-2 and glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) were examined in further steps. Our data revealed that rrIL-18 stimulated NF-κB activation, improved p-CREB and anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 expression levels. But rrIL-18 had little or no effect on GSK-3β pathway. Besides, rrIL-18 increased levels of BDNF and Bcl-2/Bax ratio and decreased cleaved caspase-3 expression to protect cortical neurons from damage induced by oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD). These results in vitro showed the protection of IL-18 on cortical neurons. And this direct neuroprotective effect of IL-18 is crippled by PI3K inhibitor wortmannin.

  11. CREB modulates calcium signaling in cAMP-induced bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Linxia; Liu, Li; Thompson, Ryan; Chan, Christina

    2014-10-01

    Calcium signaling has a versatile role in many important cellular functions. Despite its importance, regulation of calcium signaling in bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs, also known as bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells) has not been explored extensively. Our previous study revealed that cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) enabled BMSCs to generate calcium signal upon stimulation by dopamine, KCl and glutamate. Concurrently, cAMP transiently activated the transcription factor cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) in BMSCs. Activity of CREB can be modulated by the calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase signaling pathway, however, whether the calcium signaling observed in cAMP-induced BMSCs requires CREB has not been investigated. In an effort to uncover the role of CREB in the generation of calcium signaling in response to modulators such as dopamine and KCl, we knocked down CREB activity in BMSCs. Our study indicated that BMSCs, but not its close relative fibroblasts, are responsive to dopamine and KCl after cAMP treatment. Calcium signal elicited by dopamine depends, in part, on calcium influx whereas that elicited by KCl depends completely on calcium influx. Knock-down of CREB activity significantly reduced or abolished the cAMP-induced calcium response, and reintroducing a constitutively active CREB partially restored the calcium response.

  12. CREB overexpression in dorsal CA1 ameliorates long-term memory deficits in aged rats

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiao-Wen; Curlik, Daniel M; Oh, M Matthew; Yin, Jerry CP; Disterhoft, John F

    2017-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms underlying age-related cognitive deficits are not yet fully elucidated. In aged animals, a decrease in the intrinsic excitability of CA1 pyramidal neurons is believed to contribute to age-related cognitive impairments. Increasing activity of the transcription factor cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) in young adult rodents facilitates cognition, and increases intrinsic excitability. However, it has yet to be tested if increasing CREB expression also ameliorates age-related behavioral and biophysical deficits. To test this hypothesis, we virally overexpressed CREB in CA1 of dorsal hippocampus. Rats received CREB or control virus, before undergoing water maze training. CREB overexpression in aged animals ameliorated the long-term memory deficits observed in control animals. Concurrently, cells overexpressing CREB in aged animals had reduced post-burst afterhyperpolarizations, indicative of increased intrinsic excitability. These results identify CREB modulation as a potential therapy to treat age-related cognitive decline. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19358.001 PMID:28051768

  13. CREB Regulates Experience-Dependent Spine Formation and Enlargement in Mouse Barrel Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Pignataro, Annabella; Borreca, Antonella; Ammassari-Teule, Martine; Middei, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Experience modifies synaptic connectivity through processes that involve dendritic spine rearrangements in neuronal circuits. Although cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) has a key function in spines changes, its role in activity-dependent rearrangements in brain regions of rodents interacting with the surrounding environment has received little attention so far. Here we studied the effects of vibrissae trimming, a widely used model of sensory deprivation-induced cortical plasticity, on processes associated with dendritic spine rearrangements in the barrel cortex of a transgenic mouse model of CREB downregulation (mCREB mice). We found that sensory deprivation through prolonged whisker trimming leads to an increased number of thin spines in the layer V of related barrel cortex (Contra) in wild type but not mCREB mice. In the barrel field controlling spared whiskers (Ipsi), the same trimming protocol results in a CREB-dependent enlargement of dendritic spines. Last, we demonstrated that CREB regulates structural rearrangements of synapses that associate with dynamic changes of dendritic spines. Our findings suggest that CREB plays a key role in dendritic spine dynamics and synaptic circuits rearrangements that account for new brain connectivity in response to changes in the environment. PMID:26075101

  14. CREB decreases astrocytic excitability by modifying subcellular calcium fluxes via the sigma-1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Eraso-Pichot, A; Larramona-Arcas, R; Vicario-Orri, E; Villalonga, R; Pardo, L; Galea, E; Masgrau, R

    2017-03-01

    Astrocytic excitability relies on cytosolic calcium increases as a key mechanism, whereby astrocytes contribute to synaptic transmission and hence learning and memory. While it is a cornerstone of neurosciences that experiences are remembered, because transmitters activate gene expression in neurons, long-term adaptive astrocyte plasticity has not been described. Here, we investigated whether the transcription factor CREB mediates adaptive plasticity-like phenomena in astrocytes. We found that activation of CREB-dependent transcription reduced the calcium responses induced by ATP, noradrenaline, or endothelin-1. As to the mechanism, expression of VP16-CREB, a constitutively active CREB mutant, had no effect on basal cytosolic calcium levels, extracellular calcium entry, or calcium mobilization from lysosomal-related acidic stores. Rather, VP16-CREB upregulated sigma-1 receptor expression thereby increasing the release of calcium from the endoplasmic reticulum and its uptake by mitochondria. Sigma-1 receptor was also upregulated in vivo upon VP16-CREB expression in astrocytes. We conclude that CREB decreases astrocyte responsiveness by increasing calcium signalling at the endoplasmic reticulum-mitochondria interface, which might be an astrocyte-based form of long-term depression.

  15. Interactions between CBP, NF-kappaB, and CREB in the lungs after hemorrhage and endotoxemia.

    PubMed

    Shenkar, R; Yum, H K; Arcaroli, J; Kupfner, J; Abraham, E

    2001-08-01

    The transcriptional regulatory factor nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB has a central role in modulating expression of proinflammatory mediators that are important in acute lung injury. In vitro studies have shown that competition between NF-kappaB and cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) for binding to the coactivator CREB-binding protein (CBP) is important in regulating transcriptional activity of these factors. In the present study, we examined in vivo interactions between CBP, CREB, and NF-kappaB in hemorrhage- or endotoxemia-induced acute lung injury. Association of CBP with CREB or the p65 subunit of NF-kappaB increased in the lungs after hemorrhage or endotoxemia. Inhibition of xanthine oxidase before hemorrhage, but not before endotoxemia, decreased p65-CBP interactions while increasing those between CREB and CBP. These alterations in CREB-CBP and p65-CBP interactions were functionally significant because xanthine oxidase inhibition before hemorrhage resulted in increased expression of the CREB-dependent gene c-Fos and decreased expression of macrophage inflammatory protein-2, a NF-kappaB-dependent gene. The present results show that the coactivator CBP has an important role in modulating transcription in vivo under clinically relevant pathophysiological conditions.

  16. The role of CREB3L4 in the proliferation of prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae-Hyun; Park, Joo-Man; Kim, Mi-Young; Ahn, Yong-Ho

    2017-01-01

    The incidence of prostate cancer (PC) is growing rapidly throughout the world, in probable association with the adoption of western style diets. Thus, understanding the molecular pathways triggering the development of PC is crucial for both its prevention and treatment. Here, we investigated the role of the metabolism-associated protein, CREB3L4, in the proliferation of PC cells. CREB3L4 was upregulated by the synthetic androgen, R1881, in LNCaP PC cells (an androgen-dependent cell line). Knockdown of CREB3L4 resulted in decreased androgen-dependent PC cell growth. LNCaP cells transfected with siCREB3L4 underwent G2/M arrest, with upregulation of the proteins cyclin B1, phospho-CDK1, p21Waf1/Cip1, and INCA1, and downregulation of cyclin D1. Moreover, depletion of CREB3L4 resulted in significantly decreased expression of a subset of androgen-receptor (AR) target genes, including PSA, FKBP5, HPGD, KLK2, and KLK4. We also demonstrated that CREB3L4 directly interacts with the AR, and increases the binding of AR to androgen response elements (AREs). We also identified a role for the unfolded protein response (and its surrogate, IRE1α), in activating CREB3L4. Cumulatively, we postulate that CREB3L4 expression is mediated by an AR-IRE1α axis, but is also directly regulated by AR-to-ARE binding. Thus, our study demonstrates that CREB3L4 plays a key role in PC cell proliferation, which is promoted by both AR and IRE1α. PMID:28338058

  17. MTOR inhibition attenuates DNA damage and apoptosis through autophagy-mediated suppression of CREB1.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Hu, Zhongdong; Liu, Zhibo; Chen, Rongrong; Peng, Haiyong; Guo, Jing; Chen, Xinxin; Zhang, Hongbing

    2013-12-01

    Hyperactivation of mechanistic target of rapamycin (MTOR) is a common feature of human cancers, and MTOR inhibitors, such as rapamycin, are thus becoming therapeutics in targeting certain cancers. However, rapamycin has also been found to compromise the efficacy of chemotherapeutics to cells with hyperactive MTOR. Here, we show that loss of TSC2 or PTEN enhanced etoposide-induced DNA damage and apoptosis, which was blunted by suppression of MTOR with either rapamycin or RNA interference. cAMP response element-binding protein 1 (CREB1), a nuclear transcription factor that regulates genes involved in survival and death, was positively regulated by MTOR in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) and cancer cell lines. Silencing Creb1 expression with siRNA protected MTOR-hyperactive cells from DNA damage-induced apoptosis. Furthermore, loss of TSC2 or PTEN impaired either etoposide or nutrient starvation-induced autophagy, which in turn, leads to CREB1 hyperactivation. We further elucidated an inverse correlation between autophagy activity and CREB1 activity in the kidney tumor tissue obtained from a TSC patient and the mouse livers with hepatocyte-specific knockout of PTEN. CREB1 induced DNA damage and subsequent apoptosis in response to etoposide in autophagy-defective cells. Reactivation of CREB1 or inhibition of autophagy not only improved the efficacy of rapamycin but also alleviated MTOR inhibition-mediated chemoresistance. Therefore, autophagy suppression of CREB1 may underlie the MTOR inhibition-mediated chemoresistance. We suggest that inhibition of MTOR in combination with CREB1 activation may be used in the treatment of cancer caused by an abnormal PI3K-PTEN-AKT-TSC1/2-MTOR signaling pathway. CREB1 activators should potentiate the efficacy of chemotherapeutics in treatment of these cancers.

  18. MicroRNA-34b promoter hypermethylation induces CREB overexpression and contributes to myeloid transformation

    PubMed Central

    Pigazzi, Martina; Manara, Elena; Bresolin, Silvia; Tregnago, Claudia; Beghin, Alessandra; Baron, Emma; Giarin, Emanuela; Cho, Er-Chieh; Masetti, Riccardo; Rao, Dinesh S.; Sakamoto, Kathleen M.; Basso, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNA-34b down-regulation in acute myeloid leukemia was previously shown to induce CREB overexpression, thereby causing leukemia proliferation in vitro and in vivo. The role of microRNA-34b and CREB in patients with myeloid malignancies has never been evaluated. We examined microRNA-34b expression and the methylation status of its promoter in cells from patients diagnosed with myeloid malignancies. We used gene expression profiling to identify signatures of myeloid transformation. We established that microRNA-34b has suppressor ability and that CREB has oncogenic potential in primary bone marrow cell cultures and in vivo. MicroRNA-34b was found to be up-regulated in pediatric patients with juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia (n=17) and myelodysplastic syndromes (n=28), but was down-regulated in acute myeloid leukemia patients at diagnosis (n=112). Our results showed that hypermethylation of the microRNA-34b promoter occurred in 66% of cases of acute myeloid leukemia explaining the low microRNA-34b levels and CREB overexpression, whereas preleukemic myelodysplastic syndromes and juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia were not associated with hypermethylation or CREB overexpression. In paired samples taken from the same patients when they had myelodysplastic syndrome and again during the subsequent acute myeloid leukemia, we confirmed microRNA-34b promoter hypermethylation at leukemia onset, with 103 CREB target genes differentially expressed between the two disease stages. This subset of CREB targets was confirmed to associate with high-risk myelodysplastic syndromes in a separate cohort of patients (n=20). Seventy-eight of these 103 CREB targets were also differentially expressed between healthy samples (n=11) and de novo acute myeloid leukemia (n=72). Further, low microRNA-34b and high CREB expression levels induced aberrant myelopoiesis through CREB-dependent pathways in vitro and in vivo. In conclusion, we suggest that microRNA-34b controls CREB expression and

  19. [Phosphorylation of tau protein].

    PubMed

    Uchida, T; Ishiguro, K

    1990-05-01

    In aged human brain and particularly in Alzheimer's disease brain, paired helical filaments (PHFs) accumulate in the neuronal cell. Recently, it has been found that the highly phosphorylated tau protein, one of the microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs), is a component of PHF. The authors attempted to clarify the mechanism underlying the accumulation of PHF from the following two aspects; 1) What is the mechanism of phosphorylation of tau protein? 2) Is the highly phosphorylated tau protein capable of forming PHFs? From rat or bovine microtubule proteins we partially purified and characterized a novel protein kinase that specifically phosphorylated tau and MAP2 among many proteins in the brain extract, and which formed a PHF epitope on the phosphorylated human tau. This enzyme was one of the protein serine/threonine kinases and was independent of known second messengers. The phosphorylation of tau by this enzyme was stimulated by tubulin under the condition of microtubule formation, suggesting that the phosphorylation of tau could occur concomitantly with microtubule formation in the brain. Since this kinase was usually bound to tau but not directly to tubulin, the enzyme was associated with microtubules through tau. From these properties related to tau, this kinase is designated as tau protein kinase. The tau that been phosphorylated with this kinase using [gamma-32P]ATP as a phosphate donor, was digested by endoprotinase Lys-C to produce three labeled fragments, K1, K2 and K3. These three fragments were sequenced and the phosphorylation sites on tau by this kinase were identified. The K2 fragment overlapped with the tau-1 site known to be one of the phosphorylation site in PHF. This result strengthens the possibility that tau protein phosphorylated by tau protein kinase is incorporated into PHF. Tubulin binding sites on tau were located between K1 and K3 fragments, while K2 fragment was located in the neighboring to N-terminus of K1. No phosphorylated sites were

  20. Detection of novelty, but not memory of spatial habituation, is associated with an increase in phosphorylated cAMP response element-binding protein levels in the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Winograd, Milena; Viola, Haydée

    2004-01-01

    There is a growing body of evidence showing that the formation of associative memories is associated with an increase in phosphorylated cAMP response element-binding protein (pCREB) levels. We recently reported increased pCREB levels in the rat hippocampus after an exploration to a novel environment. In the present work, we studied whether this increment in CREB activation is associated with the formation of memory of habituation to a novel environment or with the detection of novelty. Rats were submitted to consecutive open field sessions at 3-h intervals. Measurement of the hippocampal pCREB level, carried out 1 h after each training session, showed that (1) it did not increase when rats explored a familiar environment; (2) it did not increase after a reexposure that improves the memory of habituation; (3) it increased after a brief novel exploration unable to form memory of habituation; and (4) it increased in amnesic rats for spatial habituation. Taken as a whole, our results suggest that the elevated pCREB level after a single open field exploration is not associated with the memory formation of habituation. It is indeed associated with the detection of a novel environment.

  1. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor, phosphorylated cyclic AMP response element binding protein and neuropeptide Y decline as early as middle age in the dentate gyrus and CA1 and CA3 subfields of the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Hattiangady, Bharathi; Rao, Muddanna S; Shetty, Geetha A; Shetty, Ashok K

    2005-10-01

    The hippocampus is very susceptible to aging. Severely diminished dentate neurogenesis at middle age is one of the most conspicuous early changes in the aging hippocampus, which is likely linked to an early decline in the concentration of neurotrophic factors and signaling proteins that influence neurogenesis. We analyzed three proteins that are well-known to promote dentate neurogenesis and learning and memory function in the dentate gyrus and the hippocampal CA1 and CA3 subfields of young, middle-aged and aged F344 rats. These include the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), the transcription factor phosphorylated cyclic AMP response element binding protein (p-CREB) and the neuropeptide neuropeptide Y (NPY). The BDNF was analyzed via ELISA and BDNF immunohistochemistry, the p-CREB through densitometric analysis of p-CREB immunopositive cells, and the NPY via stereological counting of NPY-immunopositive interneurons. We provide new evidence that the BDNF concentration, the p-CREB immunoreactivity and the number of NPY immunopositive interneurons decline considerably by middle age in both dentate gyrus and CA1 and CA3 subfields of the hippocampus. However, both BDNF concentration and NPY immunopositive interneuron numbers exhibit no significant decrease between middle age and old age. In contrast, the p-CREB immunoreactivity diminishes further during this period, which is also associated with reduced BDNF immunoreaction within the soma of dentate granule cells and hippocampal pyramidal neurons. Collectively, these results suggest that severely dampened dentate neurogenesis observed at middle age is linked at least partially to reduced concentrations of BDNF, p-CREB and NPY, as each of these proteins is a positive regulator of dentate neurogenesis. Dramatically diminished CREB phosphorylation (and persistently reduced levels of BDNF and NPY) at old age may underlie the learning and memory impairments observed during senescence.

  2. N-palmitoyl serotonin alleviates scopolamine-induced memory impairment via regulation of cholinergic and antioxidant systems, and expression of BDNF and p-CREB in mice.

    PubMed

    Min, A Young; Doo, Choon Nan; Son, Eun Jung; Sung, Nak Yun; Lee, Kun Jong; Sok, Dai-Eun; Kim, Mee Ree

    2015-12-05

    N-Palmitoyl-5-hydroxytryptamines (Pal-5HT), a cannabinoid, has recently been reported to express anti-allergic and anti-inflammatory actions in RBL-2H3 cells, and ameliorate glutamate-induced cytotoxicity in HT-22 cells. In this study, we examined the effect of Pal-5HT on deficits of learning and memory induced by scopolamine in mice. Memory performance was evaluated using Morris water maze test and passive avoidance test. Activities of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), level of oxidative stress markers, and expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), phosphorylation of cAMP response element-binding protein (p-CREB) were determined. Loss of neuronal cells in hippocampus was evaluated by histological examinations. Pal-5HT significantly improved the amnesia in the behavioral assessment. Pal-5HT regulated cholinergic function by inhibiting scopolamine-induced elevation of AChE activity and decline of ChAT activity. Pal-5HT suppressed oxidative stress by increasing activities of glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione reductase (GR) or NAD(P)H quinine oxidoreductase-1 (NQO-1) and lowering MDA level. Additionally, it prevented against scopolamine-induced expression of iNOS and COX-2. Moreover, Pal-5HT suppressed the death of neuronal cells in CA1 and CA3 regions, while it restored expression of p-CREB and BDNF in hippocampus. Taken together, Pal-5HT is suggested to ameliorate deficits of memory and learning through regulation of cholinergic function, activation of antioxidant systems as well as restoration of BDNF and p-CREB expression. From these, Pal-5HT may be a potential candidate to prevent against neurodegeneration related to the memory deficit.

  3. Mitogen- and stress-activated protein kinase-1 (MSK1) is directly activated by MAPK and SAPK2/p38, and may mediate activation of CREB.

    PubMed Central

    Deak, M; Clifton, A D; Lucocq, L M; Alessi, D R

    1998-01-01

    We have identified a novel mitogen- and stress-activated protein kinase (MSK1) that contains two protein kinase domains in a single polypeptide. MSK1 is activated in vitro by MAPK2/ERK2 or SAPK2/p38. Endogenous MSK1 is activated in 293 cells by either growth factor/phorbol ester stimulation, or by exposure to UV radiation, and oxidative and chemical stress. The activation of MSK1 by growth factors/phorbol esters is prevented by PD 98059, which suppresses activation of the MAPK cascade, while the activation of MSK1 by stress stimuli is prevented by SB 203580, a specific inhibitor of SAPK2/p38. In HeLa, PC12 and SK-N-MC cells, PD 98059 and SB 203580 are both required to suppress the activation of MSK1 by TNF, NGF and FGF, respectively, because these agonists activate both the MAPK/ERK and SAPK2/p38 cascades. MSK1 is localized in the nucleus of unstimulated or stimulated cells, and phosphorylates CREB at Ser133 with a Km value far lower than PKA, MAPKAP-K1(p90Rsk) and MAPKAP-K2. The effects of SB 203580, PD 98059 and Ro 318220 on agonist-induced activation of CREB and ATF1 in four cell-lines mirror the effects of these inhibitors on MSK1 activation, and exclude a role for MAPKAP-K1 and MAPKAP-K2/3 in this process. These findings, together with other observations, suggest that MSK1 may mediate the growth-factor and stress-induced activation of CREB. PMID:9687510

  4. Dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate mediates activation of transcription factors CREB and ATF-1 via a Gα11-coupled receptor in the spermatogenic cell line GC-2.

    PubMed

    Shihan, Mazen; Kirch, Ulrike; Scheiner-Bobis, Georgios

    2013-12-01

    Dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS) is a circulating steroid produced in the adrenal cortex, brain, and gonads. Whereas a series of investigations attest to neuroprotective effects of the steroid in the brain, surprisingly little is known about the physiological effects of DHEAS on cells of the reproductive system. Here we demonstrate that DHEAS acting on the spermatogenic cell line GC-2 induces a time- and concentration-dependent phosphorylation of c-Src and Erk1/2 and activates the transcription factors activating transforming factor-1 (ATF-1) and cyclic AMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB). These actions are consistent with the non-classical signaling pathway of testosterone and suggest that DHEAS is a pro-androgen that is converted into testosterone in order to exert its biological activity. The fact, however, that steroid sulfatase mRNA was not detected in the GC-2 cells and the clear demonstration of DHEAS-induced activation of Erk1/2, ATF-1 and CREB after silencing the androgen receptor by small interfering RNA (siRNA) clearly contradict this assumption and make it appear unlikely that DHEAS has to be converted in the cytosol into a different steroid in order to activate the kinases and transcription factors mentioned. Instead, it is likely that the DHEAS-induced signaling is mediated through the interaction of the steroid with a membrane-bound G-protein-coupled receptor, since silencing of Guanine nucleotide-binding protein subunit alpha-11 (Gnα11) leads to the abolition of the DHEAS-induced stimulation of Erk1/2, ATF-1, and CREB. The investigation presented here shows a hormone-like activity of DHEAS on a spermatogenic cell line. Since DHEAS is produced in male and female reproductive organs, these findings could help to define new roles for DHEAS in the physiology of reproduction.

  5. UVB Stimulates the Expression of Endothelin B Receptor in Human Melanocytes via a Sequential Activation of the p38/MSK1/CREB/MITF Pathway Which Can Be Interrupted by a French Maritime Pine Bark Extract through a Direct Inactivation of MSK1

    PubMed Central

    Tagashira, Hideki; Miyamoto, Aki; Kitamura, Sei-ichi; Tsubata, Masahito; Yamaguchi, Kazuya; Takagaki, Kinya; Imokawa, Genji

    2015-01-01

    Melanogenesis is the physiological process by which melanin is synthesized to protect the skin from UV damage. While paracrine interactions between keratinocytes and melanocytes are crucial for regulating epidermal pigmentation, the endothelin (EDN)-endothelin B-receptor (EDNRB) interaction is one of the key linkages. In this study, we found that a single exposure of normal human melanocytes (NHMs) with UVB stimulates the expression of EDNRB and its upstream transcription factor microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) at the transcriptional and translational levels. That stimulation can be abrogated by post-irradiation treatment with a French maritime pine bark extract (PBE). UVB stimulated the phosphorylation of p38 and c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), but not ERK, followed by the increased phosphorylation of MSK1 and CREB. The post-irradiation treatment with PBE did not affect the increased phosphorylation of p38 and JNK, but distinctly abrogated the phosphorylation of MSK1 and CREB. Post-irradiation treatment with the MSK1 inhibitor H89 significantly down-regulated the increased gene expression of MITF and EDNRB in UVB-exposed NHMs. Our findings indicate for the first time that the increased expression of MITF that leads to the up-regulation of melanocyte-specific proteins in UVB-exposed NHMs is mediated via activation of the p38/MSK1/CREB pathway but not the ERK/RSK/CREB pathway. The mode of action by PBE demonstrates that interrupting MSK1 activation is a new target for antioxidants including PBE which can serve as anti-pigmenting agents in a reactive oxygen species-depletion-independent manner. PMID:26030901

  6. Transgenic songbirds with suppressed or enhanced activity of CREB transcription factor

    PubMed Central

    Abe, Kentaro; Matsui, Sumiko; Watanabe, Dai

    2015-01-01

    Songbirds postnatally develop their skill to utter and to perceive a vocal signal for communication. How genetic and environmental influences act in concert to regulate the development of such skill is not fully understood. Here, we report the phenotype of transgenic songbirds with altered intrinsic activity of cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) transcription factor. By viral vector-mediated modification of genomic DNA, we established germ line-transmitted lines of zebra finches, which exhibited enhanced or suppressed activity of CREB. Although intrinsically acquired vocalizations or their hearing ability were not affected, the transgenic birds showed reduced vocal learning quality of their own songs and impaired audio-memory formation against conspecific songs. These results thus demonstrate that appropriate activity of CREB is necessary for the postnatal acquisition of learned behavior in songbirds, and the CREB transgenic birds offer a unique opportunity to separately manipulate both genetic and environmental factors that impinge on the postnatal song learning. PMID:26048905

  7. Selective CREB-dependent cyclin expression mediated by the PI3K and MAPK pathways supports glioma cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Daniel, P; Filiz, G; Brown, D V; Hollande, F; Gonzales, M; D'Abaco, G; Papalexis, N; Phillips, W A; Malaterre, J; Ramsay, R G; Mantamadiotis, T

    2014-01-01

    The cyclic-AMP response element binding (CREB) protein has been shown to have a pivotal role in cell survival and cell proliferation. Transgenic rodent models have revealed a role for CREB in higher-order brain functions, such as memory and drug addiction behaviors. CREB overexpression in transgenic animals imparts oncogenic properties on cells in various tissues, and aberrant CREB expression is associated with tumours. It is the central position of CREB, downstream from key developmental and growth signalling pathways, which gives CREB this ability to influence a spectrum of cellular activities, such as cell survival, growth and differentiation, in both normal and cancer cells. We show that CREB is highly expressed and constitutively activated in patient glioma tissue and that this activation closely correlates with tumour grade. The mechanism by which CREB regulates glioblastoma (GBM) tumour cell proliferation involves activities downstream from both the mitogen-activated protein kinase and phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) pathways that then modulate the expression of three key cell cycle factors, cyclin B, D and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). Cyclin D1 is highly CREB-dependent, whereas cyclin B1 and PCNA are co-regulated by both CREB-dependent and -independent mechanisms. The precise regulatory network involved appears to differ depending on the tumour-suppressor phosphatase and tensin homolog status of the GBM cells, which in turn allows CREB to regulate the activity of the PI3K itself. Given that CREB sits at the hub of key cancer cell signalling pathways, understanding the role of glioma-specific CREB function may lead to improved novel combinatorial anti-tumour therapies, which can complement existing PI3K-specific drugs undergoing early phase clinical trials. PMID:24979279

  8. Nuclear TRAF3 is a negative regulator of CREB in B cells.

    PubMed

    Mambetsariev, Nurbek; Lin, Wai W; Stunz, Laura L; Hanson, Brett M; Hildebrand, Joanne M; Bishop, Gail A

    2016-01-26

    The adaptor protein TNF receptor-associated factor 3 (TRAF3) regulates signaling through B-lymphocyte receptors, including CD40, BAFF receptor, and Toll-like receptors, and also plays a critical role inhibiting B-cell homoeostatic survival. Consistent with these findings, loss-of-function human TRAF3 mutations are common in B-cell cancers, particularly multiple myeloma and B-cell lymphoma. B cells of B-cell-specific TRAF3(-/-) mice (B-Traf3(-/-)) display remarkably enhanced survival compared with littermate control (WT) B cells. The mechanism for this abnormal homeostatic survival is poorly understood, a key knowledge gap in selecting optimal treatments for human B-cell cancers with TRAF3 deficiency. We show here for the first time to our knowledge that TRAF3 is a resident nuclear protein that associates with the transcriptional regulator cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) in both mouse and human B cells. The TRAF-C domain of TRAF3 was necessary and sufficient to localize TRAF3 to the nucleus via a functional nuclear localization signal. CREB protein was elevated in TRAF3(-/-) B cells, without change in mRNA, but with a decrease in CREB ubiquitination. CREB-mediated transcriptional activity was increased in TRAF3-deficient B cells. Consistent with these findings, Mcl-1, an antiapoptotic target of CREB-mediated transcription, was increased in the absence of TRAF3 and enhanced Mcl-1 was suppressed with CREB inhibition. TRAF3-deficient B cells were also preferentially sensitive to survival inhibition with pharmacologic CREB inhibitor. Our results identify a new mechanism by which nuclear TRAF3 regulates B-cell survival via inhibition of CREB stability, information highly relevant to the role of TRAF3 in B-cell malignancies.

  9. RGS17, an Overexpressed Gene in Human Lung and Prostate Cancer, Induces Tumor Cell Proliferation Through the Cyclic AMP-PKA-CREB Pathway

    PubMed Central

    James, Michael A.; Lu, Yan; Liu, Yan; Vikis, Haris G.; You, Ming

    2009-01-01

    We have identified RGS17 as a commonly induced gene in lung and prostate tumors. Through microarray and gene expression analysis, we show that expression of RGS17 is up-regulated in 80% of lung tumors, and also up-regulated in prostate tumors. Through knockdown and overexpression of RGS17 in tumor cells, we show that RGS17 confers a proliferative phenotype and is required for the maintenance of the proliferative potential of tumor cells. We show through exon microarray, transcript analysis, and functional assays that RGS17 promotes cyclic AMP (cAMP)-responsive element binding protein (CREB)-responsive gene expression, increases cAMP levels, and enhances forskolin-mediated cAMP production. Furthermore, inhibition of cAMP-dependent kinase prevents tumor cell proliferation, and proliferation is partially rescued by RGS17 overexpression. In the present study, we show a role for RGS17 in the maintenance of tumor cell proliferation through induction of cAMP signaling and CREB phosphorylation. The prevalence of the induction of RGS17 in tumor tissues of various types further implicates its importance in the maintenance of tumor growth. PMID:19244110

  10. Effects of acute cocaine on ERK and DARPP-32 phosphorylation pathways in the caudate-putamen of Fischer rats

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Wei-Lun; Zhou, Luyi; Hazim, Ruhal; Quinones-Jenab, Vanya; Jenab, Shirzad

    2010-01-01

    Activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and dopamine- and cAMP-regulated phosphoprotein (DARPP-32) pathways has been implicated in biochemical and behavioral effects induced by various drugs of abuse. In this study, we investigated the phosphorylation pathways of these two proteins in response to acute cocaine administration. A single cocaine administration (30 mg/kg) increased ERK-mediated signaling proteins, phosphoryation of cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) kinase, pp90 ribosomal S6 kinase (RSK), and c-Fos protein levels in the caudate/putamen of Fischer rats. Acute cocaine administration also induced phosphorylation of the striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase (STEP) and decreased the phosphorylation of DARPP-32 protein at the Thr-75 site. The phosphorylation states of these inhibitors of ERK and DARPP-32 proteins may thus contribute to the effects of cocaine on ERK- and DARPP-32-mediated cascades, on gene expression and on behaviors. PMID:17920048

  11. Identification of cholinergic and non-cholinergic neurons in the pons expressing phosphorylated cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element-binding protein as a function of rapid eye movement sleep.

    PubMed

    Datta, S; Siwek, D F; Stack, E C

    2009-09-29

    Recent studies have shown that in the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus (PPT), increased neuronal activity and kainate receptor-mediated activation of intracellular protein kinase A (PKA) are important physiological and molecular steps for the generation of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. In the present study performed on rats, phosphorylated cyclic AMP response element-binding protein (pCREB) immunostaining was used as a marker for increased intracellular PKA activation and as a reflection of increased neuronal activity. To identify whether activated cells were either cholinergic or noncholinergic, the PPT and laterodorsal tegmental nucleus (LDT) cells were immunostained for choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) in combination with pCREB or c-Fos. The results demonstrated that during high rapid eye movement sleep (HR, approximately 27%), significantly higher numbers of cells expressed pCREB and c-Fos in the PPT, of which 95% of pCREB-expressing cells were ChAT-positive. With HR, the numbers of pCREB-positive cells were also significantly higher in the medial pontine reticular formation (mPRF), pontine reticular nucleus oral (PnO), and dorsal subcoeruleus nucleus (SubCD) but very few in the locus coeruleus (LC) and dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN). Conversely, with low rapid eye movement sleep (LR, approximately 2%), the numbers of pCREB expressing cells were very few in the PPT, mPRF, PnO, and SubCD but significantly higher in the LC and DRN. The results of regression analyses revealed significant positive relationships between the total percentages of REM sleep and numbers of ChAT+/pCREB+ (Rsqr=0.98) cells in the PPT and pCREB+ cells in the mPRF (Rsqr=0.88), PnO (Rsqr=0.87), and SubCD (Rsqr=0.84); whereas significantly negative relationships were associated with the pCREB+ cells in the LC (Rsqr=0.70) and DRN (Rsqr=0.60). These results provide evidence supporting the hypothesis that during REM sleep, the PPT cholinergic neurons are active, whereas the LC and DRN neurons are

  12. Activation of cAMP-response-element-binding protein (CREB) after focal cerebral ischemia stimulates neurogenesis in the adult dentate gyrus

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Dong Ya; Lau, Lorraine; Liu, Shu Hong; Wei, Jian She; Lu, You Ming

    2004-01-01

    New neurons are generated in adult mammalians and may contribute to repairing the brain after injury. Here, we show that the number of new neurons in the dentate gyrus of adult rats increased in cerebral ischemic stroke and correlated with activation of the cAMP-response-element-binding protein (CREB). Inhibition of endogenous CREB by expression of a dominant-negative mutant of CREB (CREB-S133A or CREB-R287L) blocked ischemia-induced neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus of adult rats, whereas expression of constitutively active CREB, VP16-CREB, increased the number of new neurons. Thus, our findings provide roles and regulatory mechanisms for CREB in adult neurogenesis and possibly suggest a practical strategy for replacing dead neurons in brain injury. PMID:15197280

  13. Involvement of Transducer of Regulated cAMP Response Element-Binding Protein Activity on Corticotropin Releasing Hormone Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ying; Coello, Ana G.; Grinevich, Valery; Aguilera, Greti

    2010-01-01

    We have recently shown that phospho-cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) is essential but not sufficient for activation of CRH transcription, suggesting the requirement of a coactivator. Here, we test the hypothesis that the CREB coactivator, transducer of regulated CREB activity (TORC), is required for activation of CRH transcription, using the cell line 4B and primary cultures of hypothalamic neurons. Immunohistochemistry and Western blot experiments in 4B cells revealed time-dependent nuclear translocation of TORC1,TORC 2, and TORC3 by forskolin [but not by the phorbol ester, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)] in a concentration-dependent manner. In reporter gene assays, cotransfection of TORC1 or TORC2 potentiated the stimulatory effect of forskolin on CRH promoter activity but had no effect in cells treated with PMA. Knockout of endogenous TORC using silencing RNA markedly inhibited forskolin-activated CRH promoter activity in 4B cells, as well as the induction of endogenous CRH primary transcript by forskolin in primary neuronal cultures. Coimmunoprecipitation and chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments in 4B cells revealed association of CREB and TORC in the nucleus, and recruitment of TORC2 by the CRH promoter, after 20-min incubation with forskolin. These studies demonstrate a correlation between nuclear translocation of TORC with association to the CRH promoter and activation of CRH transcription. The data suggest that TORC is required for transcriptional activation of the CRH promoter by acting as a CREB coactivator. In addition, cytoplasmic retention of TORC during PMA treatment is likely to explain the failure of phorbolesters to activate CRH transcription in spite of efficiently phosphorylating CREB. PMID:20080871

  14. cAMP Response Element-binding Protein (CREB) and Nuclear Factor κB Mediate the Tamoxifen-induced Up-regulation of Glutamate Transporter 1 (GLT-1) in Rat Astrocytes*

    PubMed Central

    Karki, Pratap; Webb, Anton; Smith, Keisha; Lee, Kyuwon; Son, Deok-Soo; Aschner, Michael; Lee, Eunsook

    2013-01-01

    Tamoxifen (TX), a selective estrogen receptor modulator, exerts antagonistic effects on breast tissue and is used to treat breast cancer. Recent evidence also suggests that it may act as an agonist in brain tissue. We reported previously that TX enhanced the expression and function of glutamate transporter 1 (GLT-1) in rat astrocytes, an effect that was mediated by TGF-α. To gain further insight into the mechanisms that mediate TX-induced up-regulation of GLT-1 (EAAT2 in humans), we investigated its effect on GLT-1 at the transcriptional level. TX phosphorylated the cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) and recruited CREB to the GLT-1 promoter consensus site. The effect of TX on astrocytic GLT-1 was attenuated by the inhibition of PKA, the upstream activator of the CREB pathway. In addition, the effect of TX on GLT-1 promoter activity was abolished by the inhibition of the NF-κB pathway. Furthermore, TX recruited the NF-κB subunits p65 and p50 to the NF-κB binding domain of the GLT-1 promoter. Mutation of NF-κB (triple, −583/-282/-251) or CRE (-308) sites on the GLT-1 promoter led to significant repression of the promoter activity, but neither mutant completely abolished the TX-induced GLT-1 promoter activity. Mutation of both the NF-κB (-583/-282/-251) and CRE (-308) sites led to a complete abrogation of the effect of TX on GLT-1 promoter activity. Taken together, our findings establish that TX regulates GLT-1 via the CREB and NF-κB pathways. PMID:23955341

  15. 2-(4-Methoxyphenyl)ethyl-2-acetamido-2-deoxy-β-D-pyranoside confers neuroprotection in cell and animal models of ischemic stroke through calpain1/PKA/CREB-mediated induction of neuronal glucose transporter 3

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Shu; Cheng, Qiong; Li, Lu; Liu, Mei; Yang, Yumin; Ding, Fei

    2014-06-15

    Salidroside is proven to be a neuroprotective agent of natural origin, and its analog, 2-(4-Methoxyphenyl)ethyl-2-acetamido-2-deoxy-β-D-pyranoside (named SalA-4 g), has been synthesized in our lab. In this study, we showed that SalA-4 g promoted neuronal survival and inhibited neuronal apoptosis in primary hippocampal neurons exposed to oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD) and in rats subjected to ischemia by transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO), respectively, and that SalA-4 g was more neuroprotective than salidroside. We further found that SalA-4 g elevated glucose uptake in OGD-injured primary hippocampal neurons and increased the expression and recruitment of glucose transporter 3 (GLUT3) in ischemic brain. Signaling analysis revealed that SalA-4 g triggered the phosphorylation of CREB, and increased the expression of PKA RII in primary hippocampal neurons exposed to OGD injury, while inhibition of PKA/CREB by H-89 alleviated the elevation in glucose uptake and GLUT3 expression, and blocked the protective effects of SalA-4 g. Moreover, SalA-4 g was noted to inhibit intracellular Ca{sup 2+} influx and calpain1 activation in OGD-injured primary hippocampal neurons. Our results suggest that SalA-4 g neuroprotection might be mediated by increased glucose uptake and elevated GLUT3 expression through calpain1/PKA/CREB pathway. - Highlights: • A salidroside (Sal) analog (SalA-4 g) is prepared to be more neuroprotective than Sal. • SalA-4 g protected hippocampal neurons from oxygen and glucose deprivation insult. • SalA-4 g reduced ischemic injury after transient middle cerebral artery occlusion in rats. • Neuroprotection of SalA-4 g was mediated by GLUT3 level via calpain/PKA/CREB pathway.

  16. Suppression of type I interferon production by porcine epidemic diarrhea virus and degradation of CREB-binding protein by nsp1

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Qingzhan; Shi, Kaichuang; Yoo, Dongwan

    2016-02-15

    Type I interferons (IFN-α/β) are the major components of the innate immune response of hosts, and in turn many viruses have evolved to modulate the host response during infection. We found that the IFN-β production was significantly suppressed during PEDV infection in cells. To identify viral IFN antagonists and to study their suppressive function, viral coding sequences for the entire structural and nonstructural proteins were cloned and expressed. Of 16 PEDV nonstructural proteins (nsps), nsp1, nsp3, nsp7, nsp14, nsp15 and nsp16 were found to inhibit the IFN-β and IRF3 promoter activities. The sole accessory protein ORF3, structure protein envelope (E), membrane (M), and nucleocapsid (N) protein were also shown to inhibit such activities. PEDV nsp1 did not interfere the IRF3 phosphorylation and nuclear translocation but interrupted the enhanceosome assembly of IRF3 and CREB-binding protein (CBP) by degrading CBP. A further study showed that the CBP degradation by nsp1 was proteasome-dependent. Our data demonstrate that PEDV modulates the host innate immune responses by degrading CBP and suppressing ISGs expression. - Highlights: • PEDV modulates the host innate immune system by suppressing the type I interferon production and ISGs expression. • Ten viral proteins were identified as IFN antagonists, and nsp1 was the most potent viral IFN antagonist. • PEDV nsp1 did not interfere the IRF3 phosphorylation and nuclear translocation but interrupted the enhanceosome assembly of IRF3 and CREB-binding protein (CBP). • PEDV nsp1 caused the CBP degradation in the nucleus, which may be the key mechanism for PEDV-mediated IFN downregulation.

  17. Phosphorylation: Implications in Cancer.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vishakha; Ram, Mahendra; Kumar, Rajesh; Prasad, Raju; Roy, Birendra Kumar; Singh, Kaushal Kumar

    2017-02-01

    Post translational modifications (PTMs) are involved in variety of cellular activities and phosphorylation is one of the most extensively studied PTM, which regulates a number of cellular functions like cell growth, differentiation, apoptosis and cell signaling in healthy condition. However, alterations in phosphorylation pathways result in serious outcomes in the form of diseases, especially cancer. Many signalling pathways including Tyrosine kinase, MAP kinase, Cadherin-catenin complex, Cyclin-dependent kinase etc. are major players of the cell cycle and deregulation in their phosphorylation-dephosphorylation cascade has been shown to be manifested in the form of various types of cancers. Tyrosine kinase family encompasses the greatest number of oncoproteins. MAPK cascade has an importance role in cancer growth and progression. Bcl-2 family proteins serve either proapoptotic or antiapoptotic function. Cadherin-catenin complex regulates cell adhesion properties and cyclins are the key regulators of cell cycle. Altered phosphorylations in any of the above pathways are strongly associated with cancer, at the same time they serve as the potential tergets for drug development against cancer. Drugs targeting tyrosine kinase are potent anticancer drugs. Inhibitors of MEK, PI3K and ERK signalling pathways are undergoing clinical trials. Thus, drugs targeting phosphorylation pathways represent a promising area for cancer therapy.

  18. Determinants of CREB degradation and KChIP2 gene transcription in cardiac memory

    PubMed Central

    Özgen, Nazira; Lau, David H.; Shlapakova, Iryna N.; Sherman, Warren; Feinmark, Steven J.; Danilo, Peter; Rosen, Michael R.

    2010-01-01

    Background Left ventricular pacing (LVP) to induce cardiac memory (CM) in dogs results in a decreased transient outward K current (Ito) and reduced mRNA and protein of the Ito channel accessory subunit, KChIP2. The KChIP2 decrease is attributed to a decrease in its transcription factor CREB (cAMP response element binding protein). Objective To determine the mechanisms responsible for the CREB decrease that is initiated by LVP. Methods CM was quantified as T wave vector displacement in 18 LVP dogs. In 5 dogs, Ang II receptor blocker, saralasin, was infused before and during pacing. In 3 dogs, proteasomal inhibitor, lactacystin, was injected into the left anterior descending artery before LVP. Epicardial biopsies were taken before and after LVP. Neonatal rat cardiomyocytes (NRCM) were incubated with H2O2 (50 μmol/L) for 1h with or without lactacystin. Results LVP significantly displaced the T wave vector and was associated with increased lipid peroxidation and increased tissue Ang II levels. Saralasin prevented T vector displacement and lipid peroxidation. CREB was significantly decreased after 2h of LVP and was comparably decreased in H2O2–treated NRM. Lactacystin inhibited the CREB decrease in LVP dogs and H2O2 -treated NRM. LVP and H2O2 both induced CREB ubiquitination and the H2O2-induced CREB decrease was prevented by knocking down ubiquitin. Conclusion LVP initiates myocardial Ang II production and ROS synthesis leading to CREB ubiquitination and its proteasomal degradation. This sequence of events would explain the pacing-induced reduction in KChIP2, and contribute to altered repolarization and the T wave changes of cardiac memory. PMID:20346417

  19. Neuronal activity controls Bdnf expression via Polycomb de-repression and CREB/CBP/JMJD3 activation in mature neurons

    PubMed Central

    Palomer, Ernest; Carretero, Javier; Benvegnù, Stefano; Dotti, Carlos G.; Martin, Mauricio G.

    2016-01-01

    It has been recently described that in embryonic stem cells, the expression of some important developmentally regulated genes is repressed, but poised for fast activation under the appropriate stimuli. In this work we show that Bdnf promoters are repressed by Polycomb Complex 2 in mature hippocampal neurons, and basal expression is guaranteed by the coexistence with activating histone marks. Neuronal stimulation triggered by N-methyl-D-aspartate application induces the transcription of these promoters by H3K27Me3 demethylation and H3K27Me3 phosphorylation at Serine 28 leading to displacement of EZH2, the catalytic subunit of Polycomb Repressor Complex 2. Our data show that the fast transient expression of Bdnf promoters II and VI after neuronal stimulation is dependent on acetylation of histone H3K27 by CREB-p/CBP. Thus, regulatory mechanisms established during development seem to remain after differentiation controlling genes induced by different stimuli, as would be the case of early memory genes in mature neurons. PMID:27010597

  20. CREB1 gene polymorphisms combined with environmental risk factors increase susceptibility to major depressive disorder (MDD).

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Yang, Yanjie; Yang, Xiuxian; Qiu, Xiaohui; Qiao, Zhengxue; Wang, Lin; Zhu, Xiongzhao; Sui, Hong; Ma, Jingsong

    2015-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is one of the most severe psychiatric disorders. The objective of this study was to explore the effects of CREB1 gene polymorphisms on risk of developing MDD and the joint effects of gene-environment interactions. Genotyping was performed by Taqman allelic discrimination assay among 586 patients and 586 healthy controls. A significant impact on rs6740584 genotype distribution was found for childhood trauma (P = 0.015). We did not find an association of CREB1 polymorphisms with MDD susceptibility. However, we found a significantly increased risk associated with the interactions of CREB1 polymorphisms and drinking (OR = 11.67, 95% CI = 2.52-54.18; OR = 11.52, 95% CI = 2.55-51.95 for rs11904814; OR = 4.18, 95% CI = 1.87-9.38; OR = 5.02, 95% CI = 2.27-11.14 for rs6740584; OR = 7.58, 95% CI = 2.05-27.98; OR = 7.59, 95% CI = 2.12-27.14 for rs2553206; OR = 8.37, 95% CI = 3.02-23.23; OR = 7.84, 95% CI = 2.93-20.98 for rs2551941). We also noted that CREB polymorphisms combined with family harmony and childhood trauma conferred increased susceptibility for MDD. In conclusion, polymorphisms in the CREB gene may not be independently associated with MDD risk, but they are likely to confer increased susceptibility by interacting with environmental risk factors in the Chinese population.

  1. Genetic approaches to investigate the role of CREB in neuronal plasticity and memory.

    PubMed

    Barco, Angel; Marie, Hélène

    2011-12-01

    In neurons, the convergence of multiple intracellular signaling cascades leading to cAMP-responsive element-binding protein (CREB) activation suggests that this transcription factor plays a critical role in integrating different inputs and mediating appropriate neuronal responses. The nature of this transcriptional response depends on both the type and strength of the stimulus and the cellular context. CREB-dependent gene expression has been involved in many different aspects of nervous system function, from embryonic development to neuronal survival, and synaptic, structural, and intrinsic plasticity. Here, we first review the different methodological approaches used to genetically manipulate CREB activity and levels in neurons in vivo in the adult brain, including recombinant viral vectors, mouse transgenesis, and gene-targeting techniques. We then discuss the impact of these approaches on our understanding of CREB's roles in neuronal plasticity and memory in rodents. Studies combining these genetic approaches with electrophysiology and behavior provide strong evidence that CREB is critically involved in the regulation of synaptic plasticity, intrinsic excitability, and long-term memory formation. These findings pave the way for the development of novel therapeutic strategies to treat memory disorders.

  2. CREB controls hepatic lipid metabolism through nuclear hormone receptor PPAR-gamma.

    PubMed

    Herzig, Stephan; Hedrick, Susan; Morantte, Ianessa; Koo, Seung-Hoi; Galimi, Francesco; Montminy, Marc

    2003-11-13

    Fasting triggers a series of hormonal cues that promote energy balance by inducing glucose output and lipid breakdown in the liver. In response to pancreatic glucagon and adrenal cortisol, the cAMP-responsive transcription factor CREB activates gluconeogenic and fatty acid oxidation programmes by stimulating expression of the nuclear hormone receptor coactivator PGC-1 (refs 2-5). In parallel, fasting also suppresses lipid storage and synthesis (lipogenic) pathways, but the underlying mechanism is unknown. Here we show that mice deficient in CREB activity have a fatty liver phenotype and display elevated expression of the nuclear hormone receptor PPAR-gamma, a key regulator of lipogenic genes. CREB inhibits hepatic PPAR-gamma expression in the fasted state by stimulating the expression of the Hairy Enhancer of Split (HES-1) gene, a transcriptional repressor that is shown here to be a mediator of fasting lipid metabolism in vivo. The coordinate induction of PGC-1 and repression of PPAR-gamma by CREB during fasting provides a molecular rationale for the antagonism between insulin and counter-regulatory hormones, and indicates a potential role for CREB antagonists as therapeutic agents in enhancing insulin sensitivity in the liver.

  3. CREB1 gene polymorphisms combined with environmental risk factors increase susceptibility to major depressive disorder (MDD)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Peng; Yang, Yanjie; Yang, Xiuxian; Qiu, Xiaohui; Qiao, Zhengxue; Wang, Lin; Zhu, Xiongzhao; Sui, Hong; Ma, Jingsong

    2015-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is one of the most severe psychiatric disorders. The objective of this study was to explore the effects of CREB1 gene polymorphisms on risk of developing MDD and the joint effects of gene-environment interactions. Genotyping was performed by Taqman allelic discrimination assay among 586 patients and 586 healthy controls. A significant impact on rs6740584 genotype distribution was found for childhood trauma (P = 0.015). We did not find an association of CREB1 polymorphisms with MDD susceptibility. However, we found a significantly increased risk associated with the interactions of CREB1 polymorphisms and drinking (OR = 11.67, 95% CI = 2.52-54.18; OR = 11.52, 95% CI = 2.55-51.95 for rs11904814; OR = 4.18, 95% CI = 1.87-9.38; OR = 5.02, 95% CI = 2.27-11.14 for rs6740584; OR = 7.58, 95% CI = 2.05-27.98; OR = 7.59, 95% CI = 2.12-27.14 for rs2553206; OR = 8.37, 95% CI = 3.02-23.23; OR = 7.84, 95% CI = 2.93-20.98 for rs2551941). We also noted that CREB polymorphisms combined with family harmony and childhood trauma conferred increased susceptibility for MDD. In conclusion, polymorphisms in the CREB gene may not be independently associated with MDD risk, but they are likely to confer increased susceptibility by interacting with environmental risk factors in the Chinese population. PMID:25755794

  4. PKA/CREB regulates the constitutive promoter activity of the USP22 gene.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Jianjun; Zhou, Xiaoou; Gong, Zhen; Wang, Ting; Zhang, Chao; Xu, Xiaoyuan; Liu, Jianyun; Li, Weidong

    2015-03-01

    The human ubiquitin-specific processing enzyme 22 (USP22) plays a crucial role in regulating cell cycle processes and its overexpression has been linked to tumor progression. However, the mechanisms leading to USP22 transcriptional activation in human cancer cells are still unclear. Previously, we characterized the 5'-flanking sequence of the human USP22 gene and found a potential CREB/ATF binding site within the basic promoter region. The present study found that this site was required for constitutive USP22 transcriptional activity in HeLa and HepG2 cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay confirmed that CREB interacted with this site. siRNA knockdown of CREB decreased USP22 transcriptional activation and endogenous expression, whereas CREB overexpression did not affect transcriptional levels. Furthermore, USP22 promoter activity and expression were decreased by inhibiting PKA with H-89, but were not responsive to forskolin induction. All of these results demonstrate that PKA/CREB is involved in the regulation of constitutive promoter activity of the USP22 gene.

  5. Involvement of AMPA receptor phosphorylation in antidepressant actions with special reference to tianeptine.

    PubMed

    Svenningsson, Per; Bateup, Helen; Qi, Hongshi; Takamiya, Kogo; Huganir, Richard L; Spedding, Michael; Roth, Bryan L; McEwen, Bruce S; Greengard, Paul

    2007-12-01

    Depression is associated with abnormal neuronal plasticity. AMPA receptors mediate transmission and plasticity at excitatory synapses in a manner which is positively regulated by phosphorylation at Ser831-GluR1, a CaMKII/PKC site, and Ser845-GluR1, a PKA site. Treatment with the selective serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine increases P-Ser845-GluR1 but not P-Ser831-GluR1. Here, it was found that treatment with another antidepressant, tianeptine, increased P-Ser831-GluR1 in the frontal cortex and the CA3 region of hippocampus and P-Ser845-GluR1 in the CA3 region of hippocampus. A receptorome profile detected no affinity for tianeptine at any monaminergic receptors or transporters, confirming an atypical profile for this compound. Behavioural analyses showed that mice bearing point mutations at both Ser831- and Ser845-GluR1, treated with saline, exhibited increased latency to enter the centre of an open field and increased immobility in the tail-suspension test compared to their wild-type counterparts. Chronic tianeptine treatment increased open-field locomotion and reduced immobility in wild-type mice but not in phosphomutant GluR1 mice. P-Ser133-CREB was reduced in the CA3 region of hippocampus in phosphomutant mice, and tianeptine decreased P-Ser133-CREB in this region in wild-type, but not in phosphomutant, mice. Tianeptine increased P-Ser133-CREB in the CA1 region in wild-type mice but not in phosphomutant GluR1 mice. There were higher basal P-Ser133-CREB and c-fos levels in frontal and cingulate cortex in phosphomutant GluR1 mice; these changes in level were counteracted by tianeptine in a GluR1-independent manner. Using phosphorylation assays and phosphomutant GluR1 mice, this study provides evidence that AMPA receptor phosphorylation mediates certain explorative and antidepressant-like actions under basal conditions and following tianeptine treatment.

  6. Phosphorylation regulates mycobacterial proteasome.

    PubMed

    Anandan, Tripti; Han, Jaeil; Baun, Heather; Nyayapathy, Seeta; Brown, Jacob T; Dial, Rebekah L; Moltalvo, Juan A; Kim, Min-Seon; Yang, Seung Hwan; Ronning, Donald R; Husson, Robert N; Suh, Joowon; Kang, Choong-Min

    2014-09-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis possesses a proteasome system that is required for the microbe to resist elimination by the host immune system. Despite the importance of the proteasome in the pathogenesis of tuberculosis, the molecular mechanisms by which proteasome activity is controlled remain largely unknown. Here, we demonstrate that the α-subunit (PrcA) of the M. tuberculosis proteasome is phosphorylated by the PknB kinase at three threonine residues (T84, T202, and T178) in a sequential manner. Furthermore, the proteasome with phosphorylated PrcA enhances the degradation of Ino1, a known proteasomal substrate, suggesting that PknB regulates the proteolytic activity of the proteasome. Previous studies showed that depletion of the proteasome and the proteasome-associated proteins decreases resistance to reactive nitrogen intermediates (RNIs) but increases resistance to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Here we show that PknA phosphorylation of unprocessed proteasome β-subunit (pre-PrcB) and α-subunit reduces the assembly of the proteasome complex and thereby enhances the mycobacterial resistance to H2O2 and that H2O2 stress diminishes the formation of the proteasome complex in a PknA-dependent manner. These findings indicate that phosphorylation of the M. tuberculosis proteasome not only modulates proteolytic activity of the proteasome, but also affects the proteasome complex formation contributing to the survival of M. tuberculosis under oxidative stress conditions.

  7. Struvite and prebiotic phosphorylation.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Handschuh, G. J.; Orgel, L. E.

    1973-01-01

    Struvite rather than apatite or amorphous calcium phosphate is precipitated when phosphate is added to seawater containing more than 0.01M NH4+ ions. Struvite may have precipitated from evaporating seawater on the primitive earth, and may have been important for prebiotic phosphorylation.

  8. Protein phosphorylation and photorespiration.

    PubMed

    Hodges, M; Jossier, M; Boex-Fontvieille, E; Tcherkez, G

    2013-07-01

    Photorespiration allows the recycling of carbon atoms of 2-phosphoglycolate produced by ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) oxygenase activity, as well as the removal of potentially toxic metabolites. The photorespiratory pathway takes place in the light, encompasses four cellular compartments and interacts with several other metabolic pathways and functions. Therefore, the regulation of this cycle is probably of paramount importance to plant metabolism, however, our current knowledge is poor. To rapidly respond to changing conditions, proteins undergo a number of different post-translational modifications that include acetylation, methylation and ubiquitylation, but protein phosphorylation is probably the most common. The reversible covalent addition of a phosphate group to a specific amino acid residue allows the modulation of protein function, such as activity, subcellular localisation, capacity to interact with other proteins and stability. Recent data indicate that many photorespiratory enzymes can be phosphorylated, and thus it seems that the photorespiratory cycle is, in part, regulated by protein phosphorylation. In this review, the known phosphorylation sites of each Arabidopsis thaliana photorespiratory enzyme and several photorespiratory-associated proteins are described and discussed. A brief account of phosphoproteomic protocols is also given since the published data compiled in this review are the fruit of this approach.

  9. Learning Strategy Selection in the Water Maze and Hippocampal CREB Phosphorylation Differ in Two Inbred Strains of Mice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sung, Jin-Young; Goo, June-Seo; Lee, Dong-Eun; Jin, Da-Qing; Bizon, Jennifer L.; Gallagher, Michela; Han, Jung-Soo

    2008-01-01

    Learning strategy selection was assessed in two different inbred strains of mice, C57BL/6 and DBA/2, which are used for developing genetically modified mouse models. Male mice received a training protocol in a water maze using alternating blocks of visible and hidden platform trials, during which mice escaped to a single location. After training,…

  10. A role for neuronal cAMP responsive-element binding (CREB)-1 in brain responses to calorie restriction.

    PubMed

    Fusco, Salvatore; Ripoli, Cristian; Podda, Maria Vittoria; Ranieri, Sofia Chiatamone; Leone, Lucia; Toietta, Gabriele; McBurney, Michael W; Schütz, Günther; Riccio, Antonella; Grassi, Claudio; Galeotti, Tommaso; Pani, Giovambattista

    2012-01-10

    Calorie restriction delays brain senescence and prevents neurodegeneration, but critical regulators of these beneficial responses other than the NAD(+)-dependent histone deacetylase Sirtuin-1 (Sirt-1) are unknown. We report that effects of calorie restriction on neuronal plasticity, memory and social behavior are abolished in mice lacking cAMP responsive-element binding (CREB)-1 in the forebrain. Moreover, CREB deficiency drastically reduces the expression of Sirt-1 and the induction of genes relevant to neuronal metabolism and survival in the cortex and hippocampus of dietary-restricted animals. Biochemical studies reveal a complex interplay between CREB and Sirt-1: CREB directly regulates the transcription of the sirtuin in neuronal cells by binding to Sirt-1 chromatin; Sirt-1, in turn, is recruited by CREB to DNA and promotes CREB-dependent expression of target gene peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α and neuronal NO Synthase. Accordingly, expression of these CREB targets is markedly reduced in the brain of Sirt KO mice that are, like CREB-deficient mice, poorly responsive to calorie restriction. Thus, the above circuitry, modulated by nutrient availability, links energy metabolism with neurotrophin signaling, participates in brain adaptation to nutrient restriction, and is potentially relevant to accelerated brain aging by overnutrition and diabetes.

  11. Time of day influences memory formation and dCREB2 proteins in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Fropf, Robin; Zhang, Jiabin; Tanenhaus, Anne K.; Fropf, Whitney J.; Siefkes, Ellen; Yin, Jerry C. P.

    2014-01-01

    Many biological phenomena oscillate under the control of the circadian system, exhibiting peaks and troughs of activity across the day/night cycle. In most animal models, memory formation also exhibits this property, but the underlying neuronal and molecular mechanisms remain unclear. The dCREB2 transcription factor shows circadian regulated oscillations in its activity, and has been shown to be important for both circadian biology and memory formation. We show that the time-of-day (TOD) of behavioral training affects Drosophila memory formation. dCREB2 exhibits complex changes in protein levels across the daytime and nighttime, and these changes in protein abundance are likely to contribute to oscillations in dCREB2 activity and TOD effects on memory formation. PMID:24744705

  12. Hunting increases phosphorylation of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase type II in adult barn owls.

    PubMed

    Nichols, Grant S; DeBello, William M

    2015-01-01

    Juvenile barn owls readily adapt to prismatic spectacles, whereas adult owls living under standard aviary conditions do not. We previously demonstrated that phosphorylation of the cyclic-AMP response element-binding protein (CREB) provides a readout of the instructive signals that guide plasticity in juveniles. Here we investigated phosphorylation of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (pCaMKII) in both juveniles and adults. In contrast to CREB, we found no differences in pCaMKII expression between prism-wearing and control juveniles within the external nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICX), the major site of plasticity. For prism-wearing adults that hunted live mice and are capable of adaptation, expression of pCaMKII was increased relative to prism-wearing adults that fed passively on dead mice and are not capable of adaptation. This effect did not bear the hallmarks of instructive information: it was not localized to rostral ICX and did not exhibit a patchy distribution reflecting discrete bimodal stimuli. These data are consistent with a role for CaMKII as a permissive rather than an instructive factor. In addition, the paucity of pCaMKII expression in passively fed adults suggests that the permissive default setting is "off" in adults.

  13. Expression of Iron Regulatory Protein 1 Is Regulated not only by HIF-1 but also pCREB under Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Qian-Qian; Qian, Zhong-Ming; Zhou, Yu-Fu; Zhang, Meng-Wan; Wang, Dang; Zhu, Li; Ke, Ya

    2016-01-01

    The inconsistent of responses of IRP1 and HIF-1 alpha to hypoxia and the similar tendencies in the changes of IRP1 and pCREB contents led us to hypothesize that pCREB might be involved in the regulation of IRP1 under hypoxia. Here, we investigated the role of pCREB in IRP1 expression in HepG2 cells under hypoxia using quantitative PCR, western blot, immunofluorescence, electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP). We demonstrated that 1) Hypoxia increased pCREB levels inside of the nucleus; 2) Putative CREs were found in the IRP1 gene; 3) Nuclear extracts of HepG2 cells treated with hypoxia could bind to CRE1 and CRE3, and 100-fold competitor of putative CREs could abolish the binding activity to varying degrees; 4) pCREB was found in the CRE1 and CRE3 DNA-protein complexes of EMSA; 5) CRE1 and CRE3 binding activity of IRP1 depended on CREB activation but not on HIF-1; 6) Increased IRP1 expression under hypoxia could be prevented by LY294002; 7) ChIP assays demonstrated that pCREB binds to IRP1 promoter; and 8) HIF-1 and/or HIF-2 siRNA had no effect on the expression of pCREB and IRP1 proteins in cells treated with hypoxia for 8 hours. Our findings evidenced for the involvement of pCREB in IRP1 expression and revealed a dominant role of PI3K/Akt pathway in CREB activation under hypoxia and also suggested that dual-regulation of IRP1 expression by HIF-1 and pCERB or other transcription factor(s) under hypoxia might be a common mechanism in most if not all of hypoxia-inducible genes. PMID:27766034

  14. Renal Proximal Tubule Na,K-ATPase is Controlled by CREB Regulated Transcriptional CoActivators as well as Salt Inducible Kinase 1

    PubMed Central

    Taub, Mary; Garamella, Sudha; Kim, Dongwook; Rajkhowa, Trivikram; Cutuli, Facundo

    2015-01-01

    Sodium reabsorption by the kidney is regulated by locally produced natriuretic and anti-natriuretic factors, including dopamine and norepinephrine, respectively. Previous studies indicated that signaling events initiated by these natriuretic and anti-natriuretic factors achieve their effects by altering the phosphorylation of Na,K-ATPase in the renal proximal tubule, and that Protein Kinase A (PKA) and Calcium mediated signaling pathways are involved. The same signaling pathways also control the transcription of the Na,K-ATPase β subunit gene atp1b1 in renal proximal tubule cells. In this report, evidence is presented that 1) both the recently discovered cAMP-Regulated Transcriptional Coactivators (CRTCs), and Salt Inducible Kinase 1 (SIK1) contribute to the transcriptional regulation of atp1b1 in renal proximal tubule (RPT) cells, and 2) that renal effectors including norepinephrine, dopamine, prostaglandins and sodium play a role. Exogenously expressed CRTCs stimulate atp1b1 transcription. Evidence for a role of endogenous CRTCs includes the loss of transcriptional regulation of atp1b1 by a dominant negative CRTC, as well as by a CREB mutant, with an altered CRTC binding site. In a number of experimental systems, SIK phosphorylates CRTCs, which are then sequestered in the cytoplasm, preventing their nuclear effects. Consistent with such a role of SIK in primary RPT cells, atp1b1 transcription increased in the presence of a dominant negative SIK1, and in addition, regulation by dopamine, norepinephrine and monensin was disrupted by a dominant negative SIK1. These latter observations can be explained, if SIK1 is phosphorylated and inactivated in the presence of these renal effectors. Our results support the hypothesis that Na,K-ATPase in the renal proximal tubule is regulated at the transcriptional level via SIK1 and CRTCs by renal effectors, in addition to the previously reported control of the phosphorylation of Na,K-ATPase. PMID:26432356

  15. Analysis of a cAMP regulated coactivator family reveals an alternative phosphorylation motif for AMPK family members

    PubMed Central

    Moresco, James J.; Vaughan, Joan M.; Matsumura, Shigenobu; Yates, John R.; Montminy, Marc

    2017-01-01

    The second messenger cAMP stimulates cellular gene expression via the PKA-mediated phosphorylation of the transcription factor CREB and through dephosphorylation of the cAMP-responsive transcriptional coactivators (CRTCs). Under basal conditions, CRTCs are phosphorylated by members of the AMPK family of Ser/Thr kinases and sequestered in the cytoplasm via a phosphorylation-dependent association with 14-3-3 proteins. Increases in cAMP promote the dephosphorylation and nuclear translocation of CRTCs, where they bind to CREB and stimulate relevant target genes. Although they share considerable sequence homology, members of the CRTC family exert non-overlapping effects on cellular gene expression through as yet unidentified mechanisms. Here we show that the three CRTCs exhibit distinct patterns of 14-3-3 binding at three conserved sites corresponding to S70, S171, and S275 (in CRTC2). S171 functions as the gatekeeper site for 14-3-3 binding; it acts cooperatively with S275 in stabilizing this interaction following its phosphorylation by the cAMP-responsive SIK and the cAMP-nonresponsive MARK kinases. Although S171 contains a consensus recognition site for phosphorylation by AMPK family members, S70 and S275 carry variant motifs (MNTGGS275LPDL), lacking basic residues that are otherwise critical for SIK/MARK recognition as well as 14-3-3 binding. Correspondingly, the activity of these motifs differs between CRTC family members. As the variant (SLPDL) motif is present and apparently phosphorylated in other mammalian proteins, our studies suggest that the regulation of cellular targets by AMPK family members is more extensive than previously appreciated. PMID:28235073

  16. Mogrol Derived from Siraitia grosvenorii Mogrosides Suppresses 3T3-L1 Adipocyte Differentiation by Reducing cAMP-Response Element-Binding Protein Phosphorylation and Increasing AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Harada, Naoki; Ishihara, Mikako; Horiuchi, Hiroko; Ito, Yuta; Tabata, Hiromitsu; Suzuki, Yasushi A.; Nakano, Yoshihisa; Yamaji, Ryoichi; Inui, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of mogrol, an aglycone of mogrosides from Siraitia grosvenorii, on adipogenesis in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. Mogrol, but not mogrosides, suppressed triglyceride accumulation by affecting early (days 0–2) and late (days 4–8), but not middle (days 2–4), differentiation stages. At the late stage, mogrol increased AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) phosphorylation and reduced glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase activity. At the early stage, mogrol promoted AMPK phosphorylation, inhibited the induction of CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein β (C/EBPβ; a master regulator of adipogenesis), and reduced 3T3-L1 cell contents (e.g., clonal expansion). In addition, mogrol, but not the AMPK activator AICAR, suppressed the phosphorylation and activity of the cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB), which regulates C/EBPβ expression. These results indicated that mogrol suppressed adipogenesis by reducing CREB activation in the initial stage of cell differentiation and by activating AMPK signaling in both the early and late stages of this process. PMID:27583359

  17. Rapid Forgetting of Social Transmission of Food Preferences in Aged Rats: Relationship to Hippocampal CREB Activation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Countryman, Renee A.; Gold, Paul E.

    2007-01-01

    A major characteristic of age-related changes in memory in rodents is an increase in the rate of forgetting of new information, even when tests given soon after training reveal intact memory. Interference with CREB functions similarly results in rapid decay of memory. Using quantitative immunocytochemistry, the present experiment examined the…

  18. Intra-Amygdala Injections of CREB Antisense Impair Inhibitory Avoidance Memory: Role of Norepinephrine and Acetylcholine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canal, Clinton E.; Chang, Qing; Gold, Paul E.

    2008-01-01

    Infusions of CREB antisense into the amygdala prior to training impair memory for aversive tasks, suggesting that the antisense may interfere with CRE-mediated gene transcription and protein synthesis important for the formation of new memories within the amygdala. However, the amygdala also appears to modulate memory formation in distributed…

  19. Short term memory of Caenorhabditis elegans against bacterial pathogens involves CREB transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Prithika, Udayakumar; Vikneswari, Ramaraj; Balamurugan, Krishnaswamy

    2017-04-01

    One of the key issues pertaining to the control of memory is to respond to a consistently changing environment or microbial niche present in it. Human cyclic AMP response element binding protein (CREB) transcription factor which plays a crucial role in memory has a homolog in C. elegans, crh-1. crh-1 appears to influence memory processes to certain extent by habituation of the host to a particular environment. The discrimination between the pathogen and a non-pathogen is essential for C. elegans in a microbial niche which determines its survival. Training the nematodes in the presence of a virulent pathogen (S. aureus) and an opportunistic pathogen (P. mirabilis) separately exhibits a different behavioural paradigm. This appears to be dependent on the CREB transcription factor. Here we show that C. elegans homolog crh-1 helps in memory response for a short term against the interacting pathogens. Following conditioning of the nematodes to S. aureus and P. mirabilis, the wild type nematodes exhibited a positive response towards the respective pathogens which diminished slowly after 2h. By contrast, the crh-1 deficient nematodes had a defective memory post conditioning. The molecular data reinforces the importance of crh-1 gene in retaining the memory of nematode. Our results also suggest that involvement of neurotransmitters play a crucial role in modulating the memory of the nematode with the assistance of CREB. Therefore, we elucidate that CREB is responsible for the short term memory response in C. elegans against bacterial pathogens.

  20. Lifespan extension induced by AMPK and calcineurin is mediated by CRTC-1 and CREB

    PubMed Central

    Mair, William; Morantte, Ianessa; Rodrigues, Ana P. C.; Manning, Gerard; Montminy, Marc; Shaw, Reuben J.; Dillin, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    Activating AMPK or inactivating calcineurin slows ageing in Caenorhabditis elegans1,2 and both have been implicated as therapeutic targets for age-related pathology in mammals3–5. However, the direct targets that mediate their effects on longevity remain unclear. In mammals, CREB-regulated transcriptional coactivators (CRTCs)6 are a family of cofactors involved in diverse physiological processes including energy homeostasis7–9, cancer10 and endoplasmic reticulum stress11. Here we show that both AMPK and calcineurin modulate longevity exclusively through post-translational modification of CRTC-1, the sole C. elegans CRTC. We demonstrate that CRTC-1 is a direct AMPK target, and interacts with the CREB homologue-1 (CRH-1) transcription factor in vivo. The pro-longevity effects of activating AMPK or deactivating calcineurin decrease CRTC-1 and CRH-1 activity and induce transcriptional responses similar to those of CRH-1 null worms. Downregulation of crtc-1 increases lifespan in a crh-1-dependent manner and directly reducing crh-1 expression increases longevity, substantiating a role for CRTCs and CREB in ageing. Together, these findings indicate a novel role for CRTCs and CREB in determining lifespan downstream of AMPK and calcineurin, and illustrate the molecular mechanisms by which an evolutionarily conserved pathway responds to low energy to increase longevity. PMID:21331044

  1. Combination of early and delayed ischemic postconditioning enhances brain-derived neurotrophic factor production by upregulating the ERK-CREB pathway in rats with focal ischemia.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hui; Yang, Shao-Feng; Dai, Jiong; Qiu, Yong-Ming; Miao, Yi-Feng; Zhang, Xiao-Hua

    2015-11-01

    Ischemic postconditioning, including early and delayed ischemic postconditioning, has been recognized as a simple and promising strategy in the treatment of stroke. However, the effects of the combination of early and delayed ischemic postconditioning, and the mechanisms underlying these effects, remain unclear. The aim of the present study was to determine whether the combination of early and delayed ischemic postconditioning offers greater protection against stroke, and enhances the production of brain‑derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). A combination of early and delayed ischemic postconditioning was established by repeated, transient occlusion and reperfusion of the ipsilateral common carotid artery in a rat model of middle cerebral artery occlusion. Infarct size, motor function, cerebral blood flow and brain edema were then evaluated, in order to confirm the effects of combinative ischemic postconditioning. TUNEL staining was used to analyze the rate of apoptosis of cells in the penumbral area. BDNF, extracellular signal‑regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2) and cAMP response element‑binding protein (CREB) expression was detected using immunofluorescence staining and western blot analysis. The results of the present study indicated that the combination of early and delayed ischemic postconditioning further reduced the infarct volume, stabilized cerebral blood disturbance and attenuated neuronal apoptosis, compared with either alone. However, combinative postconditioning exerted the same effect on neurological function and brain edema, compared with early or delayed ischemic postconditioning alone. Further investigation indicated that combinative ischemic postconditioning increased the expression of BDNF, and a significantly higher number of BDNF‑positive cells was observed in neurons and astrocytes from the combined group than in the early or delayed groups. Combinative ischemic postconditioning also induced the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and CREB in the

  2. Impairment of object recognition memory by maternal bisphenol A exposure is associated with inhibition of Akt and ERK/CREB/BDNF pathway in the male offspring hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chong; Li, Zhihui; Han, Haijun; Luo, Guangying; Zhou, Bingrui; Wang, Shaolin; Wang, Jundong

    2016-02-03

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a commonly used endocrine-disrupting chemical used as a component of polycarbonates plastics that has potential adverse effects on human health. Exposure to BPA during development has been implicated in memory deficits, but the mechanism of action underlying the effect is not fully understood. In this study, we investigated the effect of maternal exposure to BPA on object recognition memory and the expressions of proteins important for memory, especially focusing on the ERK/CREB/BDNF pathway. Pregnant Sprague-Dawley female rats were orally treated with either vehicle or BPA (0.05, 0.5, 5 or 50 mg/kg BW/day) during days 9-20 of gestation. Male offspring were tested on postnatal day 21 with the object recognition task. Recognition memory was assessed using the object recognition index (index=the time spent exploring the novel object/(the time spent exploring the novel object+the time spent exploring the familiar object)). In the test session performed 90 min after the training session, BPA-exposed male offspring not only spent more time in exploring the familiar object at the highest dose than the control, but also displayed a significantly decreased the object recognition index at the doses of 0.5, 5 and 50 mg/kg BW/day. During the test session performed 24h after the training session, BPA-treated males did not change the time spent exploring the familiar object, but had a decreased object recognition index at 5 and 50 mg/kg BW/day, when compared to control group. These findings indicate that object recognition memory was susceptible to maternal BPA exposure. Western blot analysis of hippocampi from BPA-treated male offspring revealed a decrease in Akt, phospho-Akt, p44/42 MAPK and phospho-p44/42 MAPK protein levels, compared to controls. In addition, BPA significantly inhibited the levels of phosphorylation of CREB and BDNF in the hippocampus. Our results show that maternal BPA exposure may full impair object recognition memory, and that

  3. InFlo: a novel systems biology framework identifies cAMP-CREB1 axis as a key modulator of platinum resistance in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Dimitrova, N; Nagaraj, A B; Razi, A; Singh, S; Kamalakaran, S; Banerjee, N; Joseph, P; Mankovich, A; Mittal, P; DiFeo, A; Varadan, V

    2016-11-07

    Characterizing the complex interplay of cellular processes in cancer would enable the discovery of key mechanisms underlying its development and progression. Published approaches to decipher driver mechanisms do not explicitly model tissue-specific changes in pathway networks and the regulatory disruptions related to genomic aberrations in cancers. We therefore developed InFlo, a novel systems biology approach for characterizing complex biological processes using a unique multidimensional framework integrating transcriptomic, genomic and/or epigenomic profiles for any given cancer sample. We show that InFlo robustly characterizes tissue-specific differences in activities of signalling networks on a genome scale using unique probabilistic models of molecular interactions on a per-sample basis. Using large-scale multi-omics cancer datasets, we show that InFlo exhibits higher sensitivity and specificity in detecting pathway networks associated with specific disease states when compared to published pathway network modelling approaches. Furthermore, InFlo's ability to infer the activity of unmeasured signalling network components was also validated using orthogonal gene expression signatures. We then evaluated multi-omics profiles of primary high-grade serous ovarian cancer tumours (N=357) to delineate mechanisms underlying resistance to frontline platinum-based chemotherapy. InFlo was the only algorithm to identify hyperactivation of the cAMP-CREB1 axis as a key mechanism associated with resistance to platinum-based therapy, a finding that we subsequently experimentally validated. We confirmed that inhibition of CREB1 phosphorylation potently sensitized resistant cells to platinum therapy and was effective in killing ovarian cancer stem cells that contribute to both platinum-resistance and tumour recurrence. Thus, we propose InFlo to be a scalable and widely applicable and robust integrative network modelling framework for the discovery of evidence-based biomarkers

  4. PSM Peptides of Staphylococcus aureus Activate the p38-CREB Pathway in Dendritic Cells, Thereby Modulating Cytokine Production and T Cell Priming.

    PubMed

    Armbruster, Nicole S; Richardson, Jennifer R; Schreiner, Jens; Klenk, Juliane; Günter, Manina; Kretschmer, Dorothee; Pöschel, Simone; Schenke-Layland, Katja; Kalbacher, Hubert; Clark, Kristopher; Autenrieth, Stella E

    2016-02-01

    The challenging human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus has highly efficient immune evasion strategies for causing a wide range of diseases, from skin and soft tissue to life-threatening infections. Phenol-soluble modulin (PSM) peptides are major pathogenicity factors of community-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus strains. In previous work, we demonstrated that PSMs in combination with TLR2 ligand from S. aureus induce tolerogenic dendritic cells (DCs) characterized by the production of high amounts of IL-10, but no proinflammatory cytokines. This in turn promotes the activation of regulatory T cells while impairing Th1 response; however, the signaling pathways modulated by PSMs remain elusive. In this study, we analyzed the effects of PSMs on signaling pathway modulation downstream of TLR2. TLR2 stimulation in combination with PSMα3 led to increased and prolonged phosphorylation of NF-κB, ERK, p38, and CREB in mouse bone marrow-derived DCs compared with single TLR2 activation. Furthermore, inhibition of p38 and downstream MSK1 prevented IL-10 production, which in turn reduced the capacity of DCs to activate regulatory T cells. Interestingly, the modulation of the signaling pathways by PSMs was independent of the known receptor for PSMs, as shown by experiments with DCs lacking the formyl peptide receptor 2. Instead, PSMs penetrate the cell membrane most likely by transient pore formation. Moreover, colocalization of PSMs and p38 was observed near the plasma membrane in the cytosol, indicating a direct interaction. Thus, PSMs from S. aureus directly modulate the signaling pathway p38-CREB in DCs, thereby impairing cytokine production and in consequence T cell priming to increase the tolerance toward the pathogen.

  5. Prevention of hepatic steatosis and hepatic insulin resistance by knockdown of cAMP Response Element Binding Protein (CREB)

    PubMed Central

    Erion, Derek M.; Ignatova, Irena D.; Yonemitsu, Shin; Nagai, Yoshio; Chatterjee, Paula; Weismann, Dirk; Hsiao, Jennifer J.; Zhang, Dongyan; Iwasaki, Takanori; Stark, Romana; Flannery, Clare; Kahn, Mario; Carmean, Christopher M.; Yu, Xing Xian; Murray, Susan F.; Bhanot, Sanjay; Monia, Brett P.; Cline, Gary W.; Samuel, Varman T.; Shulman, Gerald I.

    2009-01-01

    Summary In patients with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), hepatic insulin resistance and increased gluconeogenesis contributes to fasting and postprandial hyperglycemia. Since CREB is a key regulator of gluconeogenic gene expression, we hypothesized that decreasing hepatic CREB expression would reduce fasting hyperglycemia in rodent models of T2DM. In order to test this hypothesis, we used a CREB-specific antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) to knock down CREB expression in liver. CREB ASO treatment dramatically reduced fasting plasma glucose concentrations in ZDF rats, ob/ob mice and a STZ-treated high-fat fed rat model of T2DM. Surprisingly, CREB ASO treatment also decreased plasma cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations, as well as hepatic triglyceride content due to decreases in hepatic lipogenesis. These results suggest that CREB is an attractive therapeutic target for correcting both hepatic insulin resistance and dyslipidemia associated with NAFLD and T2DM by down regulation of both lipogenic and gluconeogenic gene expression. PMID:19945407

  6. Genome-wide functional analysis of CREB/long-term memory-dependent transcription reveals distinct basal and memory gene expression programs.

    PubMed

    Lakhina, Vanisha; Arey, Rachel N; Kaletsky, Rachel; Kauffman, Amanda; Stein, Geneva; Keyes, William; Xu, Daniel; Murphy, Coleen T

    2015-01-21

    Induced CREB activity is a hallmark of long-term memory, but the full repertoire of CREB transcriptional targets required specifically for memory is not known in any system. To obtain a more complete picture of the mechanisms involved in memory, we combined memory training with genome-wide transcriptional analysis of C. elegans CREB mutants. This approach identified 757 significant CREB/memory-induced targets and confirmed the involvement of known memory genes from other organisms, but also suggested new mechanisms and novel components that may be conserved through mammals. CREB mediates distinct basal and memory transcriptional programs at least partially through spatial restriction of CREB activity: basal targets are regulated primarily in nonneuronal tissues, while memory targets are enriched for neuronal expression, emanating from CREB activity in AIM neurons. This suite of novel memory-associated genes will provide a platform for the discovery of orthologous mammalian long-term memory components.

  7. Determinants of half-site spacing preferences that distinguish AP-1 and ATF/CREB bZIP domains.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, J; Struhl, K

    1995-01-01

    The AP-1 and ATF/CREB families of eukaryotic transcription factors are dimeric DNA-binding proteins that contain the bZIP structural motif. The AP-1 and ATF/CREB proteins are structurally related and recognize identical half-sites (TGAC), but they differ in their requirements for half-site spacing. AP-1 proteins such as yeast GCN4 preferentially bind to sequences with overlapping half-sites, whereas ATF/CREB proteins bind exclusively to sequences with adjacent half-sites. Here we investigate the distinctions between AP-1 and ATF/CREB proteins by determining the DNA-binding properties of mutant and hybrid proteins. First, analysis of GCN4-ATF1 hybrid proteins indicates that a short surface spanning the basic and fork regions of the bZIP domain is the major determinant of half-site spacing. Replacement of two GCN4 residues on this surface (Ala244 and Leu247) by their ATF1 counterparts largely converts GCN4 into a protein with ATF/CREB specificity. Secondly, analysis of a Fos derivative containing the GCN4 leucine zipper indicates that Fos represents a novel intermediate between AP-1 and ATF/CREB proteins. Thirdly, we examine the effects of mutations in the invariant arginine residue of GCN4 (Arg243) that contacts the central base pair(s) of the target sites. While most mutations abolish DNA binding, substitution of a histidine residue results in a GCN4 derivative with ATF/CREB binding specificity. These results suggest that the AP-1 and ATF/CREB proteins differ in positioning a short surface that includes the invariant arginine and that AP-1 proteins may represent a subclass (and perhaps evolutionary offshoot) of ATF/CREB proteins that can tolerate overlapping half-sites. Images PMID:7630732

  8. Lithium Response and Genetic Variation in the CREB Family of Genes

    PubMed Central

    Mamdani, Firoza; Alda, Martin; Grof, Paul; Young, L. Trevor; Rouleau, Guy; Turecki, Gustavo

    2013-01-01

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is a severe psychiatric disorder that affects 1% of the population. Recently, there have been many attempts to identify specific genes that are involved in BD; however, the task of finding susceptibility genes is not easy due to the complexity of the disorder. Since lithium (Li) has been used for over 40 years now as an effective prophylactic agent and response to Li treatment seems to be, at least in part, genetically determined, classification according to Li response is a manner through which more homogeneous populations can be obtained for investigation. It has previously been suggested that Li exerts an effect on signal transduction pathways, such as the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) pathway. We carried out an association study of BD with CREB1, CREB2 and CREB3 genes, located at ch 2q32.3-q34, 22q13.1 and 9pter-p22.1, respectively. A total of three promoter single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP), 14 SNPs in the UTR, 6 exonic and 15 intronic SNPs were investigated for their frequency and haplotype distribution in a BD sample of 180 lithium responders and 69 nonresponders and 127 controls using a SNaPshot multiplex reaction from Applied Biosystems, a modified fluorescent single base pair extension procedure. Following correction for multiple testing, our results suggest that the CREB1-1H SNP (G/A change, p < 0.002) and the CREB1-7H SNP (T/C change, p < 0.002) may be associated with BD and/or lithium response. PMID:18189280

  9. CREB activity in dopamine D1 receptor expressing neurons regulates cocaine-induced behavioral effects

    PubMed Central

    Bilbao, Ainhoa; Rieker, Claus; Cannella, Nazzareno; Parlato, Rosanna; Golda, Slawomir; Piechota, Marcin; Korostynski, Michal; Engblom, David; Przewlocki, Ryszard; Schütz, Günther; Spanagel, Rainer; Parkitna, Jan R.

    2014-01-01

    It is suggested that striatal cAMP responsive element binding protein (CREB) regulates sensitivity to psychostimulants. To test the cell-specificity of this hypothesis we examined the effects of a dominant-negative CREB protein variant expressed in dopamine receptor D1 (D1R) neurons on cocaine-induced behaviors. A transgenic mouse strain was generated by pronuclear injection of a BAC-derived transgene harboring the A-CREB sequence under the control of the D1R gene promoter. Compared to wild-type, drug-naïve mutants showed moderate alterations in gene expression, especially a reduction in basal levels of activity-regulated transcripts such as Arc and Egr2. The behavioral responses to cocaine were elevated in mutant mice. Locomotor activity after acute treatment, psychomotor sensitization after intermittent drug injections and the conditioned locomotion after saline treatment were increased compared to wild-type littermates. Transgenic mice had significantly higher cocaine conditioned place preference, displayed normal extinction of the conditioned preference, but showed an augmented cocaine-seeking response following priming-induced reinstatement. This enhanced cocaine-seeking response was associated with increased levels of activity-regulated transcripts and prodynorphin. The primary reinforcing effects of cocaine were not altered in the mutant mice as they did not differ from wild-type in cocaine self-administration under a fixed ratio schedule at the training dose. Collectively, our data indicate that expression of a dominant-negative CREB variant exclusively in neurons expressing D1R is sufficient to recapitulate the previously reported behavioral phenotypes associated with virally expressed dominant-negative CREB. PMID:24966820

  10. CREB- and NF-κB-Regulated CXC Chemokine Gene Expression in Lung Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Hongxia; Chung, Wen-Cheng; Ryu, Seung-Hee; Ju, Zhenlin; Tran, Hai T.; Kim, Edward; Kurie, Jonathan M.; Koo, Ja Seok

    2009-01-01

    The recognition of the importance of angiogenesis in tumor progression has led to the development of antiangiogenesis as a new strategy for cancer treatment and prevention. By modulating tumor microenvironment and inducing angiogenesis, the proinflammatory cytokine interleukine (IL)-1 β has been reported to promote tumor development. However, the factors mediating IL-1β-induced angiogenesis in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and the regulation of these angiogenic factors by IL-1β are less clear. Here, we report that IL-1β upregulated an array of proangiogenic CXC chemokine genes in NSCLC cell line A549 and in normal human tracheobronchial epithelium (NHTBE) cells, as determined by microarray analysis. Further analysis revealed that IL-1β induced much higher protein levels of CXC chemokines in NSCLC cells than in NHTBE cells. Conditioned medium from IL-1β treated A549 cells markedly increased endothelial cell migration, which was suppressed by neutralizing antibodies against CXCL5 and CXCR2. We also found that IL-1β-induced CXC chemokine gene overexpression in NSCLC cells was abrogated with the knockdown of CREB or NF-κB. Moreover, the expression of the CXC chemokine genes as well as CREB and NF-κB activities were greatly increased in tumorigenic NSCLC cell line compared with normal, premalignant immortalized or non-tumorigenic cell lines. A disruptor of the interaction between CREB-binding protein (CBP) and transcription factors such as CREB and NF-κB, 2-naphthol-AS-E-phosphate (KG-501), inhibited IL-1β-induced CXC chemokine gene expression and angiogenic activity in NSCLC. We propose that targeting CREB or NF-κB using small molecule inhibitors, such as KG-501, holds promise as a preventive and/or therapeutic approach for NSCLC. PMID:19138976

  11. Determination of GPCR Phosphorylation Status: Establishing a Phosphorylation Barcode.

    PubMed

    Prihandoko, Rudi; Bradley, Sophie J; Tobin, Andrew B; Butcher, Adrian J

    2015-06-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are rapidly phosphorylated following agonist occupation in a process that mediates receptor uncoupling from its cognate G protein, a process referred to as desensitization. In addition, this process provides a mechanism by which receptors can engage with arrestin adaptor molecules and couple to downstream signaling pathways. The importance of this regulatory process has been highlighted recently by the understanding that ligands can direct receptor signaling along one pathway in preference to another, the phenomenon of signaling bias that is partly mediated by the phosphorylation status or phosphorylation barcode of the receptor. Methods to determine the phosphorylation status of a GPCR in vitro and in vivo are necessary to understand not only the physiological mechanisms involved in GPCR signaling, but also to fully examine the signaling properties of GPCR ligands. This unit describes detailed methods for determining the overall phosphorylation pattern on a receptor (the phosphorylation barcode), as well as mass spectrometry approaches that can define the precise sites that become phosphorylated. These techniques, coupled with the generation and characterization of receptor phosphorylation-specific antibodies, provide a full palate of techniques necessary to determine the phosphorylation status of any given GPCR subtype.

  12. Role of cAMP-response element-binding protein phosphorylation in hepatic apoptosis under protein kinase C alpha suppression during sepsis.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Ya-Ching; Chen, Yen-Hsu; Jao, Hsiao-Ching; Hsu, Hseng-Kuang; Huang, Li-Ju; Hsu, Chin

    2005-10-01

    Previous studies have shown that a decrease in protein kinase C (PKC) alpha levels contributes to hepatic failure and/or apoptosis during sepsis, and suppression of PKCalpha plays a critical role in triggering caspase-dependent apoptosis, which can modulate expression of Bcl-xL. However, the underlying molecular mechanism remains uncertain. In the present study, we examined whether a decrease in the nuclear PKCalpha levels causes hepatic apoptosis via modulation of cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB) or nuclear factor-kappaB (NFkappaB), the crucial factors regulating the expression of prosurvival Bcl-xL. For polymicrobial sepsis induction, a cecal ligation and puncture model was used; at 9 or 18 h after CLP, experiments were terminated, referring as early or late sepsis, respectively. Additionally, PKCalpha was suppressed by stable transfection of antisense PKCalpha plasmid into a Clone-9 rat hepatic epithelial cell. The results showed that the nuclear PKCalpha was significantly decreased in the liver during sepsis, which was accompanied by decreases in phospho-CREB content, DNA-binding activity of CREB, and Bcl-xL expression. Likewise, the binding activity of NFkappaB increased significantly, which was associated with a decrease in cytosolic inhibitory-kappaBalpha content. The in vitro suppression of PKCalpha also resulted in decreases in the phospho-CREB content and DNA-binding activity, which were accompanied by down-regulation of Bcl-xL and apoptosis, but no significant alteration in NFkappaB-binding activity. The in vivo and in vitro results suggest that the suppression of PKCalpha results in a decreased CREB phosphorylation and subsequent down-regulation of Bcl-xL, which may contribute to the hepatic apoptosis during sepsis.

  13. 4'-Demethylnobiletin, a bioactive metabolite of nobiletin enhancing PKA/ERK/CREB signaling, rescues learning impairment associated with NMDA receptor antagonism via stimulation of the ERK cascade.

    PubMed

    Al Rahim, Md; Nakajima, Akira; Saigusa, Daisuke; Tetsu, Naomi; Maruyama, Yuji; Shibuya, Masatoshi; Yamakoshi, Hiroyuki; Tomioka, Yoshihisa; Iwabuchi, Yoshiharu; Ohizumi, Yasushi; Yamakuni, Tohru

    2009-08-18

    The biochemical and pharmacological activities of nobiletin, including neurotrophic and memory-enhancing action, in both in vitro and in vivo systems are well established. However, whether its metabolites do have such beneficial effects like nobiletin remains to be examined. Here we, for the first time, report that 2-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-5,6,7,8-tetramethoxychromen-4-one (4'-demethylnobiletin), a major metabolite of nobiletin identified in the urine of rats and mice, stimulates the phosphorylation of ERK and CREB and enhances CRE-mediated transcription by activating a PKA/MEK/ERK pathway, like nobiletin, in cultured hippocampal neurons. Since NMDA receptor-mediated ERK signaling is involved in memory processing, including associative memories, we also examined whether 4'-demethylnobiletin, by activating ERK signaling, could restore learning impairment. Chronic intraperitoneal (ip) treatment of the mice with 10 or 50 mg of 4'-demethylnobiletin/kg rescued the NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801-induced learning impairment, accompanied by improvement of the MK-801-induced decrease in the level of ERK phosphorylation in the hippocampus of the animals. Consistently, 4'-demethylnobiletin also restored MK-801-induced inhibition of NMDA-stimulated phosphorylation of not only ERK but also PKA substrates in cultured rat hippocampal neurons. Moreover, we actually detected 4'-demethylnobiletin in the brain of mice following acute ip administration, demonstrating that the metabolite can cross the blood-brain barrier to reach the brain and thereby exert its effects to reverse learning impairment. Therefore, these results suggest that 4'-demethylnobiletin, a bioactive metabolite of nobiletin, may serve as a potential therapeutic agent, at least, for memory disorders associated with a dysregulated NMDA receptor ERK signaling, like nobiletin.

  14. Protein phosphorylation in stomatal movement

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tong; Chen, Sixue; Harmon, Alice C

    2014-01-01

    As research progresses on how guard cells perceive and transduce environmental cues to regulate stomatal movement, plant biologists are discovering key roles of protein phosphorylation. Early research efforts focused on characterization of ion channels and transporters in guard cell hormonal signaling. Subsequent genetic studies identified mutants of kinases and phosphatases that are defective in regulating guard cell ion channel activities, and recently proteins regulated by phosphorylation have been identified. Here we review the essential role of protein phosphorylation in ABA-induced stomatal closure and in blue light-induced stomatal opening. We also highlight evidence for the cross-talk between different pathways, which is mediated by protein phosphorylation. PMID:25482764

  15. Phosphorylation site prediction in plants.

    PubMed

    Yao, Qiuming; Schulze, Waltraud X; Xu, Dong

    2015-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation events on serine, threonine, and tyrosine residues are the most pervasive protein covalent bond modifications in plant signaling. Both low and high throughput studies reveal the importance of phosphorylation in plant molecular biology. Although becoming more and more common, the proteome-wide screening on phosphorylation by experiments remains time consuming and costly. Therefore, in silico prediction methods are proposed as a complementary analysis tool to enhance the phosphorylation site identification, develop biological hypothesis, or help experimental design. These methods build statistical models based on the experimental data, and they do not have some of the technical-specific bias, which may have advantage in proteome-wide analysis. More importantly computational methods are very fast and cheap to run, which makes large-scale phosphorylation identifications very practical for any types of biological study. Thus, the phosphorylation prediction tools become more and more popular. In this chapter, we will focus on plant specific phosphorylation site prediction tools, with essential illustration of technical details and application guidelines. We will use Musite, PhosPhAt and PlantPhos as the representative tools. We will present the results on the prediction of the Arabidopsis protein phosphorylation events to give users a general idea of the performance range of the three tools, together with their strengths and limitations. We believe these prediction tools will contribute more and more to the plant phosphorylation research community.

  16. Protein tyrosine phosphorylation in streptomycetes.

    PubMed

    Waters, B; Vujaklija, D; Gold, M R; Davies, J

    1994-07-01

    Using phosphotyrosine-specific antibodies, we demonstrate that in several Streptomyces spp. a variety of proteins are phosphorylated on tyrosine residues. Tyrosine phosphorylation was found in a number of Streptomyces species including Streptomyces lividans, Streptomyces hygroscopicus and Streptomyces lavendulae. Each species exhibited a unique pattern of protein tyrosine phosphorylation. Moreover, the patterns of tyrosine phosphorylation varied during the growth phase and were also influenced by culture conditions. We suggest that metabolic shifts during the complex growth cycle of these filamentous bacteria, and possibly secondary metabolic pathways, may be controlled by the action of protein tyrosine kinases and phosphatases, as has been demonstrated in signal transduction pathways in eukaryotic organisms.

  17. Increased Hippocampal Neurogenesis and Accelerated Response to Antidepressants in Mice with Specific Deletion of CREB in the Hippocampus: Role of cAMP Response-Element Modulator τ

    PubMed Central

    Gundersen, Brigitta B.; Briand, Lisa A.; Onksen, Jennifer L.; LeLay, John; Kaestner, Klaus H.

    2013-01-01

    The transcription factor cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) has been implicated in the pathophysiology of depression as well as in the efficacy of antidepressant treatment. However, altering CREB levels appears to have differing effects on anxiety- and depression-related behaviors, depending on which brain region is examined. Furthermore, many manipulations of CREB lead to corresponding changes in other CREB family proteins, and the impact of these changes has been largely ignored. To further investigate the region-specific importance of CREB in depression-related behavior and antidepressant response, we used CrebloxP/loxP mice to localize CREB deletion to the hippocampus. In an assay sensitive to chronic antidepressant response, the novelty-induced hypophagia procedure, hippocampal CREB deletion, did not alter the response to chronic antidepressant treatment. In contrast, mice with hippocampal CREB deletion responded to acute antidepressant treatment in this task, and this accelerated response was accompanied by an increase in hippocampal neurogenesis. Upregulation of the CREB-family protein cAMP response-element modulator (CREM) was observed after CREB deletion. Viral overexpression of the activator isoform of CREM, CREMτ, in the hippocampus also resulted in an accelerated response to antidepressants as well as increased hippocampal neurogenesis. This is the first demonstration of CREMτ within the brain playing a role in behavior and specifically in behavioral outcomes following antidepressant treatment. The current results suggest that activation of CREMτ may provide a means to accelerate the therapeutic efficacy of current antidepressant treatment. PMID:23966689

  18. Chronic antidepressant administration increases the expression of cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) in rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Nibuya, M; Nestler, E J; Duman, R S

    1996-04-01

    The present study demonstrates that chronic, but not acute, adminstration of several different classes of antidepressants, including serotonin- and norepinephrine-selective reuptake inhibitors, increases the expression of cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) mRNA in rat hippocampus. In contrast, chronic administration of several nonantidepressant psychotropic drugs did not influence expression of CREB mRNA, demonstrating the pharmacological specificity of this effect. In situ hybridization analysis demonstrates that antidepressant administration increases expression of CREB mRNA in CA1 and CA3 pyramidal and dentate gyrus granule cell layers of the hippocampus. In addition, levels of CRE immunoreactivity and of CRE binding activity were increased by chronic antidepressant administration, which indicates that expression and function of CREB protein are increased along with its mRNA. Chronic administration of the phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibitors rolipram or papaverine also increased expression of CREB mRNA in hippocampus, demonstrating a role for the cAMP cascade. Moreover, coadministration of rolipram with imipramine resulted in a more rapid induction of CREB than with either treatment alone. Increased expression and function of CREB suggest that specific target genes may be regulated by these treatments. We have found that levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and trkB mRNA are also increased by administration of antidepressants or PDE inhibitors. These findings indicate that upregulation of CREB is a common action of chronic antidepressant treatments that may lead to regulation of specific target genes, such as BDNF and trkB, and to the long-term effects of these treatments on brain function.

  19. Effects of curcumin (Curcuma longa) on learning and spatial memory as well as cell proliferation and neuroblast differentiation in adult and aged mice by upregulating brain-derived neurotrophic factor and CREB signaling.

    PubMed

    Nam, Sung Min; Choi, Jung Hoon; Yoo, Dae Young; Kim, Woosuk; Jung, Hyo Young; Kim, Jong Whi; Yoo, Miyoung; Lee, Sanghee; Kim, Chul Jung; Yoon, Yeo Sung; Hwang, In Koo

    2014-06-01

    Aging is a progressive process, and it may lead to the initiation of neurological diseases. In this study, we investigated the effects of wild Indian Curcuma longa using a Morris water maze paradigm on learning and spatial memory in adult and D-galactose-induced aged mice. In addition, the effects on cell proliferation and neuroblast differentiation were assessed by immunohistochemistry for Ki67 and doublecortin (DCX) respectively. The aging model in mice was induced through the subcutaneous administration of D-galactose (100 mg/kg) for 10 weeks. C. longa (300 mg/kg) or its vehicle (physiological saline) was administered orally to adult and D-galactose-treated mice for the last three weeks before sacrifice. The administration of C. longa significantly shortened the escape latency in both adult and D-galactose-induced aged mice and significantly ameliorated D-galactose-induced reduction of cell proliferation and neuroblast differentiation in the subgranular zone of hippocampal dentate gyrus. In addition, the administration of C. longa significantly increased the levels of phosphorylated CREB and brain-derived neurotrophic factor in the subgranular zone of dentate gyrus. These results indicate that C. longa mitigates D-galactose-induced cognitive impairment, associated with decreased cell proliferation and neuroblast differentiation, by activating CREB signaling in the hippocampal dentate gyrus.

  20. Quercetin-3-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1 → 6)-β-d-glucopyranoside suppresses melanin synthesis by augmenting p38 MAPK and CREB signaling pathways and subsequent cAMP down-regulation in murine melanoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Hyun Gug; Kim, Han Hyuk; Paul, Souren; Jang, Jae Yoon; Cho, Yong Hun; Kim, Hyeon Jeong; Yu, Jae Myo; Lee, Eun Su; An, Bong Jeun; Kang, Sun Chul; Bang, Byung Ho

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the effect of purified quercetin-3-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-(1 → 6)-β-d-glucopyranosid (QCGG) on melanogenesis was investigated. QCGG was isolated from the calyx of a traditional Korean medicinal herb, Persimmon (Diospyros kaki). The hypopigmentation effects of QCGG were determined by examination of cellular melanin contents, tyrosinase activity assay, cAMP assay, and Western blotting of α-MSH-stimulated B16F10 mouse melanoma cells. Our results showed that QCGG inhibited both melanin synthesis and tyrosinase activity in a concentration-dependent manner as well as significantly reduced the expression of melanogenic proteins such as microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF), tyrosinase-related protein-1, tyrosinase-related protein-2, and tyrosinase. Moreover, QCGG inhibited intracellular cAMP levels, cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB), and p38 MAPK expression in α-MSH-stimulated B16F10 cells. Taken together, the suppressive effects of QCGG on melanogenesis may involve down-regulation of MITF and its downstream signaling pathway via phosphorylation of p38 MAPK and CREB along with reduced cAMP levels. These results indicate that QCGG reduced melanin synthesis by reducing expression of tyrosine and tyrosine-related proteins via extracellular signal-related protein kinase (ERK) activation, followed by down-regulation of CREB, p38, and MITF. PMID:26586997

  1. Differential regulation of phosphorylation of the cAMP response element-binding protein after activation of EP2 and EP4 prostanoid receptors by prostaglandin E2.

    PubMed

    Fujino, Hiromichi; Salvi, Sambhitab; Regan, John W

    2005-07-01

    The EP2 and EP4 prostanoid receptors are G-protein-coupled receptors whose activation by their endogenous ligand, prostaglandin (PG) E2, stimulates the formation of intracellular cAMP. We have previously reported that the stimulation of cAMP formation in EP4-expressing cells is significantly less than in EP2-expressing cells, despite nearly identical levels of receptor expression (J Biol Chem 277:2614-2619, 2002). In addition, a component of EP4 receptor signaling, but not of EP2 receptor signaling, was found to involve the activation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K). In this study, we report that PGE2 stimulation of cells expressing either the EP2 or EP4 receptor results in the phosphorylation of the cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) at serine-133. Pretreatment of cells with N-[2-(4-bromocinnamylamino)ethyl]-5-isoquinoline (H-89), an inhibitor of protein kinase A (PKA), attenuated the PGE2-mediated phosphorylation of CREB in EP2-expressing cells, but not in EP4-expressing cells. Pretreatment of cells with wortmannin, an inhibitor of PI3K, had no effects on the PGE2-mediated phosphorylation of CREB in either EP2- or EP4-expressing cells, although it significantly increased the PGE2-mediated activation of PKA in EP4-expressing cells. However, combined pretreatment with H-89 and wortmannin blocked PGE2-mediated phosphorylation in EP2-expressing cells as well as in EP2-expressing cells. PGE2-mediated intracellular cAMP formation was not affected by pretreatment with wortmannin, or combined treatment with wortmannin and H-89, in either the EP2- or EP4-expressing cells. These findings suggest that PGE2 stimulation of EP4 receptors, but not EP2 receptors, results in the activation of a PI3K signaling pathway that inhibits the activity of PKA and that the PGE2-mediated phosphorylation of CREB by these receptors occurs through different signaling pathways

  2. Hydrocortisone-induced parkin prevents dopaminergic cell death via CREB pathway in Parkinson's disease model.

    PubMed

    Ham, Sangwoo; Lee, Yun-Il; Jo, Minkyung; Kim, Hyojung; Kang, Hojin; Jo, Areum; Lee, Gum Hwa; Mo, Yun Jeong; Park, Sang Chul; Lee, Yun Song; Shin, Joo-Ho; Lee, Yunjong

    2017-04-03

    Dysfunctional parkin due to mutations or post-translational modifications contributes to dopaminergic neurodegeneration in Parkinson's disease (PD). Overexpression of parkin provides protection against cellular stresses and prevents dopamine cell loss in several PD animal models. Here we performed an unbiased high-throughput luciferase screening to identify chemicals that can increase parkin expression. Among promising parkin inducers, hydrocortisone possessed the most favorable profiles including parkin induction ability, cell protection ability, and physicochemical property of absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (ADME) without inducing endoplasmic reticulum stress. We found that hydrocortisone-induced parkin expression was accountable for cell protection against oxidative stress. Hydrocortisone-activated parkin expression was mediated by CREB pathway since gRNA to CREB abolished hydrocortisone's ability to induce parkin. Finally, hydrocortisone treatment in mice increased brain parkin levels and prevented 6-hydroxy dopamine induced dopamine cell loss when assessed at 4 days after the toxin's injection. Our results showed that hydrocortisone could stimulate parkin expression via CREB pathway and the induced parkin expression was accountable for its neuroprotective effect. Since glucocorticoid is a physiological hormone, maintaining optimal levels of glucocorticoid might be a potential therapeutic or preventive strategy for Parkinson's disease.

  3. Scopolamine induced amnesia is reversed by Bacopa monniera through participation of kinase-CREB pathway.

    PubMed

    Saraf, Manish Kumar; Anand, Akshay; Prabhakar, Sudesh

    2010-02-01

    Scopolamine, an anticholinergic drug, is reported to produce amnesia by interference of long term potentiation and has been used for discerning the efficacy of various antiamnesic drugs. The intoxication with anticholinergics and benzodiazepines tend to produce neurodegeneration which cause memory deficits. Our earlier reports have shown the antiamnesic drug, B. monniera to be capable of alleviating diazepam induced memory deficits. We have now tested how scopolamine affects downstream signaling molecules of long term potentiation and if B. monniera can also modulate the scopolamine induced amnesia. We used Morris water maze scale to test the amnesic effect of scopolamine and its reversal by B. monniera. Rota-rod test was used to screen muscle coordination activity of mice before water maze investigations were carried out. The results showed that scopolamine downregulated protein kinase C and iNOS without affecting cAMP, protein kinase A, calmodulin, MAP kinase, nitrite, CREB and pCREB. B. monniera reversed the scopolamine induced amnesia by significantly improving calmodulin and by partially attenuating protein kinase C and pCREB. These observations suggest involvement of calmodulin in evoking antiamnesic effects of B. monniera.

  4. Antidepressant Effect of Crocus sativus Aqueous Extract and its Effect on CREB, BDNF, and VGF Transcript and Protein Levels in Rat Hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Ghasemi, T; Abnous, K; Vahdati, F; Mehri, S; Razavi, B M; Hosseinzadeh, H

    2015-07-01

    Crocus sativus L., commonly known as saffron, is a perennial stemless herb in Iridaceae family. It has been used in traditional medicine as well as in modern pharmacological studies for variety of conditions including depression. Recent studies have suggested brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), VGF Neuropeptide, Cyclic-AMP Response Element Binding Protein (CREB) and phospho-CREB (p-CREB) may play roles in depression. In this research the molecular mechanism of antidepressant effect of aqueous extract of saffron and its effect on the levels of BDNF, VGF, CREB and p-CREB in rat hippocampus, were investigated. The aqueous extract of saffron (40, 80 and 160 mg/kg/day) and imipramine 10 mg/kg/day were injected intraperitoneally (i.p.) for 21 days to rats. The FST (forced swimming test) was performed on the days 1(st) and 21(st). The protein expression and transcript levels of BDNF, VGF CREB and phospho-CREB in rat hippocampus, were evaluated using western blot and quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). The results of FST showed that saffron reduced the immobility time. The protein levels of BDNF, CREB and p-CREB were significantly increased in saffron treated rats. VGF protein expression was also increased, but not significantly. The transcript levels of BDNF significantly increased. No significant changes in CREB and VGF transcript levels were observed. It was concluded that aqueous extract of saffron has antidepressant effects and the mechanism of its antidepressant effect may be due to increasing the levels of BDNF, VGF, CREB and P-CREB in rat hippocampus.

  5. N-->S phosphoryl migration in phosphoryl glutathion.

    PubMed

    Yang, H J; Liu, J; Zhao, Y F

    1993-07-01

    It was found that in the case of N-(diisopropylphosphoryl) glutathion (reduced form), 2, N-->S phosphoryl migration took place, but not for N,N-bis(diisopropylphosphoryl) glutathion (oxidized form) or N-diisopropylphosphoryl cysteine. These results were deduced by 31P-NMR tracing experiments. It was shown that phosphoryl migration was catalyzed by an intramolecular carboxyl group, and a mechanism involving a mixed carboxyl-phosphoric anhydride was proposed. A competitive reaction between the amino and thiol group toward diisopropyl phosphite indicated that the phospho-thiol derived from N-(diisopropylphosphoryl) glutathion (reduced form), 2, did not result from direct phosphorylation of the thiol group. N,S-Bis(diisopropylphosphoryl) glutathion provides an authentic sample to confirm the migrated phosphoryl thiol product.

  6. The adrenergic-regulated CRTC1 and CRTC2 phosphorylation and cellular distribution is independent of endogenous SIK1 in the male rat pinealocyte.

    PubMed

    McTague, J; Ferguson, M; Chik, C L; Ho, A K

    2015-10-15

    Salt inducible kinase 1 (SIK1) has been reported to repress cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB)-mediated gene transcription by causing the nuclear export of CREB-regulated transcription coactivators (CRTCs) through phosphorylation. Although the repressor role of SIK1 in suppressing the expression of arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase, the enzyme that controls the daily rhythm in melatonin production in the rat pineal gland, has been established, whether SIK1 regulates the phosphorylation and localization of CRTC1 and CRTC2 in this tissue remains unclear. The present study found that overexpressing SIK1 in NE-stimulated rat pinealocytes could increase the phosphorylation of CRTC1 and CRTC2, reduced selectively the nuclear level of CRTC2 (but not that of CRTC1), and elevated the cytosolic levels of both CRTC1 and CRTC2. In contrast, transient knockdown of endogenous SIK1 had no effect on the phosphorylation or distribution of CRTC1 and CRTC2 in norepinephrine (NE)-stimulated pinealocytes. Our results also showed that adrenergic blockade during NE stimulation led to a rapid rephosphorylation and decline in the nucleus levels of CRTC1 and CRTC2; however SIK1 knockdown had no effect on this rapid rephosphorylation. Moreover, studies with kinase inhibitors revealed that kinase(s) sensitive to KT5823 appeared to be involved in this rapid rephosphorylation. Together, these results indicate that although overexpressing SIK1 can phosphorylate CRTC1 and CRTC2 in the NE-stimulated pinealocyte, the endogenous SIK1, in spite of its induction by NE, does not appear to be the main regulator of the phosphorylation and intracellular localization of these two coactivators.

  7. CREB1 directly activates the transcription of ribonucleotide reductase small subunit M2 and promotes the aggressiveness of human colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Zejun; Lin, Aifen; Chen, Jiaoe; Zhang, Xiaomin; Liu, Hong; Li, Hongzhang; Hu, Yanyan; Zhang, Xia; Zhang, Jiangang; Qiu, Lanlan; Mei, Lingming; Shao, Jimin; Chen, Xiang

    2016-01-01

    As the small subunit of Ribonucleotide reductase (RR), RRM2 displays a very important role in various critical cellular processes such as cell proliferation, DNA repair, and senescence, etc. Importantly, RRM2 functions like a tumor driver in most types of cancer but little is known about the regulatory mechanism of RRM2 in cancer development. In this study, we found that the cAMP responsive element binding protein 1 (CREB1) acted as a transcription factor of RRM2 gene in human colorectal cancer (CRC). CREB1 directly bound to the promoter of RRM2 gene and induced its transcriptional activation. Knockdown of CREB1 decreased the expression of RRM2 at both mRNA and protein levels. Moreover, knockdown of RRM2 attenuated CREB1-induced aggressive phenotypes of CRC cells in vitro and in vivo. Analysis of the data from TCGA database and clinical CRC specimens with immunohistochemical staining also demonstrated a strong correlation between the co-expression of CREB1 and RRM2. Decreased disease survivals were observed in CRC patients with high expression levels of CREB1 or RRM2. Our results indicate CREB1 as a critical transcription factor of RRM2 which promotes tumor aggressiveness, and imply a significant correlation between CREB1 and RRM2 in CRC specimens. These may provide the possibility that CREB1 and RRM2 could be used as biomarkers or targets for CRC diagnosis and treatment. PMID:27801665

  8. CREB trans-activation of disruptor of telomeric silencing-1 mediates forskolin inhibition of CTGF transcription in mesangial cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhiyuan; Kong, Qun; Kone, Bruce C

    2010-03-01

    Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) participates in diverse fibrotic processes including glomerulosclerosis. The adenylyl cyclase agonist forskolin inhibits CTGF expression in mesangial cells by unclear mechanisms. We recently reported that the histone H3K79 methyltransferase disruptor of telomeric silencing-1 (Dot1) suppresses CTGF gene expression in collecting duct cells (J Clin Invest 117: 773-783, 2007) and HEK 293 cells (J Biol Chem In press). In the present study, we characterized the involvement of Dot1 in mediating the inhibitory effect of forskolin on CTGF transcription in mouse mesangial cells. Overexpression of Dot1 or treatment with forskolin dramatically suppressed basal CTGF mRNA levels and CTGF promoter-luciferase activity, while hypermethylating H3K79 in chromatin associated with the CTGF promoter. siRNA knockdown of Dot1 abrogated the inhibitory effect of forskolin on CTGF mRNA expression. Analysis of the Dot1 promoter sequence identified a CREB response element (CRE) at -384/-380. Overexpression of CREB enhanced forskolin-stimulated Dot1 promoter activity. A constitutively active CREB mutant (CREB-VP16) strongly induced Dot1 promoter-luciferase activity, whereas overexpression of CREBdLZ-VP16, which lacks the CREB DNA-binding domain, abolished this activation. Mutation of the -384/-380 CRE resulted in 70% lower levels of Dot1 promoter activity. ChIP assays confirmed CREB binding to the Dot1 promoter in chromatin. We conclude that forskolin stimulates CREB-mediated trans-activation of the Dot1 gene, which leads to hypermethylation of histone H3K79 at the CTGF promoter, and inhibition of CTGF transcription. These data are the first to describe regulation of the Dot1 gene, and disclose a complex network of genetic and epigenetic controls on CTGF transcription.

  9. Participation of microRNA 124-CREB pathway: a parallel memory enhancing mechanism of standardised extract of Bacopa monniera (BESEB CDRI-08).

    PubMed

    Preethi, Jayakumar; Singh, Hemant K; Charles, Prisila Dulcy; Rajan, Koilmani Emmanuvel

    2012-10-01

    Bacosides, the effective component of standardised leaf extract of Bacopa monniera (BESEB CDRI-08) has been reported to have memory enhancing effect. Our previous reports suggested that BESEB CDRI-08 (BME) improves memory in postnatal rats by enhancing serotonin [5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)] metabolism, its transportation and subsequently activates 5-HT(3A) receptor during hippocampus-dependent learning. In this study, we examine whether the up-regulated 5-HT(3A) receptor activity by BME modulate microRNA 124-CREB pathway to enhance synaptic plasticity. Wistar rat pups received single dose of vehicle solution (0.5 % gum acacia + 0.9 % saline)/BME (80 mg/kg)/mCPBG (10 mg/kg)/BME + mCPBG during the postnatal days (PND) 15-29. On PND 30, individuals were trained at brightness discrimination task and 24 h later, they were tested on the task. The BME treated group exhibited significantly lower percentage of errors during retention than acquisition. In addition, pre-miR-124 expression in hippocampus was significantly down-regulated in the BME and mCPBG + BME treated groups combined with a significant increase in the plasticity related genes, cAMP response element-binding protein, its phosphorylation and postsynaptic density protein 95. Our results suggest that this may be one of the mechanisms of bacosides present in BME for the memory enhancement.

  10. Oxidative and Photosynthetic Phosphorylation Mechanisms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Jui H.

    1970-01-01

    Proposes a molecular mechanism for the coupling of phosphorylation to electron transport in both mitochondria and chloroplasts. Justifies the proposed reaction schemes in terms of thermodynamics and biochemical data. Suggests how areobic respiration could have evolved. (EB)

  11. NAc Shell Arc/Arg3.1 Protein Mediates Reconsolidation of Morphine CPP by Increased GluR1 Cell Surface Expression: Activation of ERK-Coupled CREB is Required

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Xiu-Fang; Sun, Lin-Lin; Han, Ji-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Background: Relapse into drug abuse evoked by reexposure to the drug-associated context has been a primary problem in the treatment of drug addiction. Disrupting the reconsolidation of drug-related context memory would therefore limit the relapse susceptibility. Methods: Morphine conditioned place preference (CPP) was used to assess activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein (Arc/Arg3.1) and correlative molecule expression in the Nucleus accumbens (NAc) shell during the reconsolidation of morphine CPP. U0126 and Arc/Arg3.1 antisense oligodeoxynucleotide were adapted to evaluate the role and the underlying mechanism of Arc/Arg3.1 during the reconsolidation. Results: The retrieval of morphine CPP in rats specifically increased the Arc/Arg3.1 protein level in the NAc shell, accompanied simultaneously by increases in the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase1/2 (pERK1/2), the phosphorylation of Cyclic Adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) response element-binding (pCREB), and the up-regulation of the membrane α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionate (AMPA) receptors GluR1 subunit level. Intra-NAc shell infusion U0126, an inhibitor of the Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK), prevented the retrieval-induced up-regulation of pERK1/2, pCREB, Arc/Arg3.1, and membrane GluR1 immediately after retrieval of morphine CPP. The effect of disrupting the reconsolidation of morphine CPP by U0126 could last for at least 14 days, and could not be evoked by a priming injection of morphine. Furthermore, the specific knockdown of Arc/Arg3.1 in the NAc shell decreased the membrane GluR1 level, and impaired both the reconsolidation and the reinstatement of morphine CPP. Conclusions: Arc/Arg3.1 in the NAc shell mediates the reconsolidation of morphine-associated context memory via up-regulating the level of membrane of GluR1, for which the local activation of the ERK-CREB signal pathway, as an upstream mechanism of Arc/Arg3.1, is required. PMID

  12. Enriched environment prevents hypobaric hypoxia induced memory impairment and neurodegeneration: role of BDNF/PI3K/GSK3β pathway coupled with CREB activation.

    PubMed

    Jain, Vishal; Baitharu, Iswar; Prasad, Dipti; Ilavazhagan, Govindasamy

    2013-01-01

    Adverse environmental conditions such as hypobaric hypoxia (HH) cause memory impairment by affecting cellular machinery leading to neurodegeneration. Providing enriched environment (EE) is found to be beneficial for curing several neurodegenerative disorders. The protective role of EE in preventing HH induced neuronal death has been reported previously but the involved mechanism is still not clearly understood. The present study is an attempt to verify the impact of EE on spatial memory during HH and also to explore the possible role of neurotrophin in EE mediated neuroprotection. Signaling mechanism involved in neuroprotection was also explored. Male Sprague Dawley rats were simulated to HH condition in an Animal Decompression Chamber at an altitude of 25000 feet in standard and enriched cages for 7 days. Spatial memory was assessed through Morris Water Maze. Role of different neurotrophins was explored by gene silencing and inhibitors for their respective receptors. Further, using different blockers signaling pathway was also explored. Finding of the present study suggested that EE prevents HH mediated memory impairment and neurodegeneration. Also brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays a major role in EE mediated neuroprotection and it effectively prevented neurodegeneration by activating PI3K/AKT pathway resulting in GSK3β inactivation which further inhibits apoptosis. Moreover GSK3β phosphorylation and hence its inactivation upregulates CREB phosphorylation which may also accounts for activation of survival machinery in cells and provides neuroprotection. From these observations it can be postulated that EE has a therapeutic potential in amelioration of HH induced memory impairment and neurodegeneration. Hence it may be used as a non invasive and non pharmacological intervention against various neurological disorders.

  13. Phosphorylation regulates human OCT4.

    PubMed

    Brumbaugh, Justin; Hou, Zhonggang; Russell, Jason D; Howden, Sara E; Yu, Pengzhi; Ledvina, Aaron R; Coon, Joshua J; Thomson, James A

    2012-05-08

    The transcription factor OCT4 is fundamental to maintaining pluripotency and self-renewal. To better understand protein-level regulation of OCT4, we applied liquid chromatography-MS to identify 14 localized sites of phosphorylation, 11 of which were previously unknown. Functional analysis of two sites, T234 and S235, suggested that phosphorylation within the homeobox region of OCT4 negatively regulates its activity by interrupting sequence-specific DNA binding. Mutating T234 and S235 to mimic constitutive phosphorylation at these sites reduces transcriptional activation from an OCT4-responsive reporter and decreases reprogramming efficiency. We also cataloged 144 unique phosphopeptides on known OCT4 interacting partners, including SOX2 and SALL4, that copurified during immunoprecipitation. These proteins were enriched for phosphorylation at motifs associated with ERK signaling. Likewise, OCT4 harbored several putative ERK phosphorylation sites. Kinase assays confirmed that ERK2 phosphorylated these sites in vitro, providing a direct link between ERK signaling and the transcriptional machinery that governs pluripotency.

  14. Phosphorylation regulates human OCT4

    PubMed Central

    Brumbaugh, Justin; Russell, Jason D.; Howden, Sara E.; Yu, Pengzhi; Ledvina, Aaron R.; Coon, Joshua J.; Thomson, James A.

    2012-01-01

    The transcription factor OCT4 is fundamental to maintaining pluripotency and self-renewal. To better understand protein-level regulation of OCT4, we applied liquid chromatography–MS to identify 14 localized sites of phosphorylation, 11 of which were previously unknown. Functional analysis of two sites, T234 and S235, suggested that phosphorylation within the homeobox region of OCT4 negatively regulates its activity by interrupting sequence-specific DNA binding. Mutating T234 and S235 to mimic constitutive phosphorylation at these sites reduces transcriptional activation from an OCT4-responsive reporter and decreases reprogramming efficiency. We also cataloged 144 unique phosphopeptides on known OCT4 interacting partners, including SOX2 and SALL4, that copurified during immunoprecipitation. These proteins were enriched for phosphorylation at motifs associated with ERK signaling. Likewise, OCT4 harbored several putative ERK phosphorylation sites. Kinase assays confirmed that ERK2 phosphorylated these sites in vitro, providing a direct link between ERK signaling and the transcriptional machinery that governs pluripotency. PMID:22474382

  15. Sustained Induction of Collagen Synthesis by TGF-β Requires Regulated Intramembrane Proteolysis of CREB3L1

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qiuyue; Lee, Ching-En; Denard, Bray; Ye, Jin

    2014-01-01

    CREB3L1 (cAMP response element binding protein 3-like 1), a transcription factor synthesized as a membrane-bound precursor and activated through Regulated Intramembrane Proteolysis (RIP), is essential for collagen production by osteoblasts during bone development. Here, we show that TGF-β (transforming growth factor-β), a cytokine known to stimulate production of collagen during wound healing and fibrotic diseases, induces proteolytic activation of CREB3L1 in human A549 cells. This activation results from inhibition of expression of TM4SF20 (transmembrane 4 L6 family member 20), which normally inhibits RIP of CREB3L1. Cleavage of CREB3L1 releases its NH2-terminal domain from membranes, allowing it to enter the nucleus where it binds to Smad4 to activate transcription of genes encoding proteins required for assembly of collagen-containing extracellular matrix. Our findings raise the possibility that inhibition of RIP of CREB3L1 could prevent excess deposition of collagen in certain fibrotic diseases. PMID:25310401

  16. Cell-specific occupancy of an extended repertoire of CREM and CREB binding loci in male germ cells

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background CREB and CREM are closely related factors that regulate transcription in response to various stress, metabolic and developmental signals. The CREMτ activator isoform is selectively expressed in haploid spermatids and plays an essential role in murine spermiogenesis. Results We have used chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled to sequencing (ChIP-seq) to map CREM and CREB target loci in round spermatids from adult mouse testis and spermatogonia derived GC1-spg cells respectively. We identify more than 9000 genomic loci most of which are cell-specifically occupied. Despite the fact that round spermatids correspond to a highly specialised differentiated state, our results show that they have a remarkably accessible chromatin environment as CREM occupies more than 6700 target loci corresponding not only to the promoters of genes selectively expressed in spermiogenesis, but also of genes involved in functions specific to other cell types. The expression of only a small subset of these target genes are affected in the round spermatids of CREM knockout animals. We also identify a set of intergenic binding loci some of which are associated with H3K4 trimethylation and elongating RNA polymerase II suggesting the existence of novel CREB and CREM regulated transcripts. Conclusions We demonstrate that CREM and CREB occupy a large number of promoters in highly cell specific manner. This is the first study of CREM target promoters directly in a physiologically relevant tissue in vivo and represents the most comprehensive experimental analysis of CREB/CREM regulatory potential to date. PMID:20920259

  17. A new perspective on the role of the CREB family of transcription factors in memory consolidation via adult hippocampal neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ortega-Martínez, Sylvia

    2015-01-01

    Adult neurogenesis is the process by which new neurons are generated in the brains of adults. Since its discovery 50 years ago, adult neurogenesis has been widely studied in the mammalian brain and has provided a new perspective on the pathophysiology of many psychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders, some of which affect memory. In this regard, adult hippocampal neurogenesis (AHN), which occurs in the subgranular zone (SGZ) of the dentate gyrus (DG), has been suggested to play a role in the formation and consolidation of new memories. This process involves many transcription factors, of which cyclic AMP (cAMP)-responsive element-binding protein (CREB) is a well-documented one. In the developing brain, CREB regulates crucial cell stages (e.g., proliferation, differentiation, and survival), and in the adult brain, it participates in neuronal plasticity, learning, and memory. In addition, new evidence supports the hypothesis that CREB may also participate in learning and memory through its involvement in AHN. This review examines the CREB family of transcription factors, including the different members and known signaling pathways. It highlights the role of CREB as a modulator of AHN, which could underlie its function in memory consolidation mechanisms. PMID:26379491

  18. Reciprocal Regulation of Reactive Oxygen Species and Phospho-CREB Regulates Voltage Gated Calcium Channel Expression during Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Selvakumar, Arti; Antony, Cecil; Singhal, Jhalak; Tiwari, Brijendra K.; Singh, Yogendra; Natarajan, Krishnamurthy

    2014-01-01

    Our previous work has demonstrated the roles played by L-type Voltage Gated Calcium Channels (VGCC) in regulating Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb) survival and pathogenesis. Here we decipher mechanisms and pathways engaged by the pathogen to regulate VGCC expression in macrophages. We show that M. tb and its antigen Rv3416 use phospho-CREB (pCREB), Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS), Protein Kinase C (PKC) and Mitogen Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) to modulate VGCC expression in macrophages. siRNA mediated knockdown of MyD88, IRAK1, IRAK2 or TRAF6 significantly inhibited antigen mediated VGCC expression. Inhibiting Protein Kinase C (PKC) or MEK-ERK1/2 further increased VGCC expression. Interestingly, inhibiting intracellular calcium release upregulated antigen mediated VGCC expression, while inhibiting extracellular calcium influx had no significant effect. siRNA mediated knockdown of transcription factors c-Jun, SOX5 and CREB significantly inhibited Rv3416 mediated VGCC expression. A dynamic reciprocal cross-regulation between ROS and pCREB was observed that in turn governed VGCC expression with ROS playing a limiting role in the process. Further dissection of the mechanisms such as the interplay between ROS and pCREB would improve our understanding of the regulation of VGCC expression during M. tb infection. PMID:24797940

  19. MiR-582-5p/miR-590-5p targeted CREB1/CREB5–NF-κB signaling and caused opioid-induced immunosuppression in human monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Long, X; Li, Y; Qiu, S; Liu, J; He, L; Peng, Y

    2016-01-01

    Chronic opioid abusers are more susceptible to bacterial and viral infections, but the molecular mechanism underlying opioid-induced immunosuppression is unknown. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are emerging as key players in the control of biological processes, and may participate in immune regulation. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms in opioid-induced and miRNA-mediated immunosuppression, in the context of miRNA dysregulation in opioid abusers. Blood samples of heroin abusers were collected and analyzed using miRNA microarray analysis and quantitative PCR validation. The purified primary human monocytes were cultured in vitro to explore the underlying mechanism. We found that morphine and its derivative heroin significantly decreased the expression levels of miR-582-5p and miR-590-5p in monocytes. cAMP response element-binding protein 1 (CREB1) and CREB5 were detected as direct target genes of miR-582-5p and miR-590-5p, respectively, by using dual-luciferase assay and western bolt. Functional studies showed that knockdown of CREB1/CREB5 increased tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) level and enhanced expression of phospho–NF-κB p65 and NF-κB p65. Our results demonstrated that miR-582-5p and miR-590-5p play important roles in opioid-induced immunosuppression in monocytes by targeting CREB1/CREB5–NF-κB signaling pathway. PMID:26978739

  20. MicroRNA-122 inhibits proliferation and invasion in gastric cancer by targeting CREB1

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Min; Zhu, Yonggang; Zhou, Yinan; Cong, Xiaoxia; Feng, Li

    2017-01-01

    MicroRNA-122 (miR-122) has been implicated in tumor development and progression in various types of cancers. However, the biological function and regulatory mechanisms of miR-122 in gastric cancer (GC) remain largely unknown. We aimed to determine the biological role and underlying mechanism of miR-122 in GC. Real time quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) was performed to detect the expression of miR-122 in GC tissues and cell lines. CCK8, wound healing, and transwell assays were conducted to determine the effect of miR-122 on cell proliferation, migration, and invasion, respectively. Target molecules were identified by luciferase activity, quantitative RT-PCR, and western blotting. We found that miR-122 expression was significantly decreased in both GC tissues and cell lines and that reduced expression was significantly associated with aggressive clinicopathological features in patients. We also found that overexpression of miR-122 markedly inhibited proliferation, migration, and invasion in GC cell lines. In addition, cAMP responsive element binding protein 1 (CREB1) was identified as a direct target of miR-122, and its expression was negatively correlated with miR-122 expression in GC tissues (r = -0.711, P < 0.001). CREB1overexpression rescued the suppressive effect of miR-122 on GC cell proliferation, migration, and invasion. Moreover, we demonstrated that miR-122 inhibited GC tumorigenesis in vivo by repressing CREB1 expression. These findings suggest that miR-122 might function as a tumor suppressor in GC and could serve as a promising candidate for therapeutic applications regarding GC treatment.

  1. Overlapping ETS and CRE Motifs ((G/C)CGGAAGTGACGTCA) preferentially bound by GABPα and CREB proteins.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Raghunath; Zhao, Jianfei; He, Ximiao; Shlyakhtenko, Andrey; Mann, Ishminder; Waterfall, Joshua J; Meltzer, Paul; Sathyanarayana, B K; FitzGerald, Peter C; Vinson, Charles

    2012-10-01

    Previously, we identified 8-bps long DNA sequences (8-mers) that localize in human proximal promoters and grouped them into known transcription factor binding sites (TFBS). We now examine split 8-mers consisting of two 4-mers separated by 1-bp to 30-bps (X(4)-N(1-30)-X(4)) to identify pairs of TFBS that localize in proximal promoters at a precise distance. These include two overlapping TFBS: the ETS⇔ETS motif ((C/G)CCGGAAGCGGAA) and the ETS⇔CRE motif ((C/G)CGGAAGTGACGTCAC). The nucleotides in bold are part of both TFBS. Molecular modeling shows that the ETS⇔CRE motif can be bound simultaneously by both the ETS and the B-ZIP domains without protein-protein clashes. The electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) shows that the ETS protein GABPα and the B-ZIP protein CREB preferentially bind to the ETS⇔CRE motif only when the two TFBS overlap precisely. In contrast, the ETS domain of ETV5 and CREB interfere with each other for binding the ETS⇔CRE. The 11-mer (CGGAAGTGACG), the conserved part of the ETS⇔CRE motif, occurs 226 times in the human genome and 83% are in known regulatory regions. In vivo GABPα and CREB ChIP-seq peaks identified the ETS⇔CRE as the most enriched motif occurring in promoters of genes involved in mRNA processing, cellular catabolic processes, and stress response, suggesting that a specific class of genes is regulated by this composite motif.

  2. miR-134 regulates ischemia/reperfusion injury-induced neuronal cell death by regulating CREB signaling.

    PubMed

    Huang, Weidong; Liu, Xiaobin; Cao, Jie; Meng, Facai; Li, Min; Chen, Bo; Zhang, Jie

    2015-04-01

    microRNA-134 (miR-134) has been reported to be a brain-specific miRNA and is differently expressed in brain tissues subjected to ischemic injury. However, the underlying mechanism of miR-134 in regulating cerebral ischemic injury remains poorly understood. The current study was designed to delineate the molecular basis of miR-134 in regulating cerebral ischemic injury. Using the oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) model of hippocampal neuron ischemia in vitro, we found that the overexpression of miR-134 mediated by recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector infection significantly promoted neuron death induced by OGD/reoxygenation, whereas the inhibition of miR-134 provided protective effects against OGD/reoxygenation-induced cell death. Moreover, cyclic AMP (cAMP) response element-binding protein (CREB) as a putative target of miR-134 was downregulated and upregulated by miR-134 overexpression or inhibition, respectively. The direct interaction between miR-134 and the 3'-untranslated region (UTR) of CREB mRNA was further confirmed by dual-luciferase reporter assay. Overexpression of miR-134 also inhibited the expression of the downstream gene of CREB, including brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and the anti-apoptotic gene Bcl-2, whereas the inhibition of miR-134 upregulated the expression of BDNF and Bcl-2 in neurons after OGD/reoxygenation. Notably, the knockdown of CREB by CREB siRNA apparently abrogated the protective effect of anti-miR-134 on OGD/reoxygenation-induced cell death. Taken together, our study suggests that downregulation of miR-134 alleviates ischemic injury through enhancing CREB expression and downstream genes, providing a promising and potential therapeutic target for cerebral ischemic injury.

  3. Aripiprazole Increases the PKA Signalling and Expression of the GABAA Receptor and CREB1 in the Nucleus Accumbens of Rats.

    PubMed

    Pan, Bo; Lian, Jiamei; Huang, Xu-Feng; Deng, Chao

    2016-05-01

    The GABAA receptor is implicated in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia and regulated by PKA signalling. Current antipsychotics bind with D2-like receptors, but not the GABAA receptor. The cAMP-responsive element-binding protein 1 (CREB1) is also associated with PKA signalling and may be related to the positive symptoms of schizophrenia. This study investigated the effects of antipsychotics in modulating D2-mediated PKA signalling and its downstream GABAA receptors and CREB1. Rats were treated orally with aripiprazole (0.75 mg/kg, ter in die (t.i.d.)), bifeprunox (0.8 mg/kg, t.i.d.), haloperidol (0.1 mg/kg, t.i.d.) or vehicle for 1 week. The levels of PKA-Cα and p-PKA in the prefrontal cortex (PFC), nucleus accumbens (NAc) and caudate putamen (CPu) were detected by Western blots. The mRNA levels of Gabrb1, Gabrb2, Gabrb3 and Creb1, and their protein expression were measured by qRT-PCR and Western blots, respectively. Aripiprazole elevated the levels of p-PKA and the ratio of p-PKA/PKA in the NAc, but not the PFC and CPu. Correlated with this elevated PKA signalling, aripiprazole elevated the mRNA and protein expression of the GABAA (β-1) receptor and CREB1 in the NAc. While haloperidol elevated the levels of p-PKA and the ratio of p-PKA/PKA in both NAc and CPu, it only tended to increase the expression of the GABAA (β-1) receptor and CREB1 in the NAc, but not the CPu. Bifeprunox had no effects on PKA signalling in these brain regions. These results suggest that aripiprazole has selective effects on upregulating the GABAA (β-1) receptor and CREB1 in the NAc, probably via activating PKA signalling.

  4. Interplay of CREB and ATF2 in Ionizing Radiation-Induced Neuroendocrine Differentiation of Prostate Cancer Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    and NSE expression was barely detectable by immunoblotting even for wild-type LNCaP cells. Cell viability and growth inhibition assay. Wild-type or...by IR treatment (Fig. 2C). Interestingly, pCREB was also detected in the cytoplasm in proliferating LNCaP cells, and IR treatment did not seem to...cell lysates were prepared 3 d after the induction, and Flag-nATF2 and HA-CREB-S133A were detected with anti-ATF2 and anti-HA antibodies, respectively

  5. Fluoride and arsenic exposure affects spatial memory and activates the ERK/CREB signaling pathway in offspring rats.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yu-Peng; Xi, Shu-Hua; Li, Ming-Yan; Ding, Ting-Ting; Liu, Nan; Cao, Fu-Yuan; Zeng, Yang; Liu, Xiao-Jing; Tong, Jun-Wang; Jiang, Shou-Fang

    2017-03-01

    Fluoride and arsenic are inorganic contaminants that occur in the natural environment. Chronic fluoride and/or arsenic exposure can induce developmental neurotoxicity and negatively influence intelligence in children, although the underlying molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. This study explored the effects of fluoride and arsenic exposure in drinking water on spatial learning, memory and key protein expression in the ERK/CREB signaling pathway in hippocampal and cerebral cortex tissue in rat offspring. Pregnant rats were divided into four groups. Control rats drank tap water, while rats in the three exposure groups drank water with sodium fluoride (100mg/L), sodium arsenite (75mg/L), and a sodium fluoride (100mg/L) and sodium arsenite (75mg/L) combination during gestation and lactation. After weaning, rat pups drank the same solution as their mothers. Spatial learning and memory ability of pups at postnatal day 21 (PND21) and postnatal day 42 (PND42) were measured using a Morris water maze. ERK, phospho-ERK (p-ERK), CREB and phospho-CREB (p-CREB) protein expression in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex was detected using Western blot. Compared with the control pups, escape latencies increased in PND42 pups exposed to arsenic and co-exposed to fluoride and arsenic, and the short-term and long-term spatial memory ability declined in pups exposed to fluoride and arsenic, both alone and in combination. Compared with controls, ERK and p-ERK levels decreased in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex in pups exposed to combined fluoride and arsenic. CREB protein expression in the cerebral cortex decreased in pups exposed to fluoride, arsenic, and the fluoride and arsenic combination. p-CREB protein expression in both the hippocampus and cerebral cortex was decreased in pups exposed to fluoride and arsenic in combination compared to the control group. There were negative correlation between the proteins expression and escape latency periods in pups. These data

  6. Transcription Factor CREB3L1 Regulates Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Response Genes in the Osmotically Challenged Rat Hypothalamus

    PubMed Central

    Greenwood, Mingkwan; Greenwood, Michael Paul; Paton, Julian F. R.; Murphy, David

    2015-01-01

    Arginine vasopressin (AVP) is synthesised in magnocellular neurons (MCNs) of supraoptic nucleus (SON) and paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of the hypothalamus. In response to the hyperosmotic stressors of dehydration (complete fluid deprivation, DH) or salt loading (drinking 2% salt solution, SL), AVP synthesis increases in MCNs, which over-burdens the protein folding machinery in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). ER stress and the unfolded protein response (UPR) are signaling pathways that improve ER function in response to the accumulation of misfold/unfold protein. We asked whether an ER stress response was activated in the SON and PVN of DH and SL rats. We observed increased mRNA expression for the immunoglobulin heavy chain binding protein (BiP), activating transcription factor 4 (Atf4), C/EBP-homologous protein (Chop), and cAMP responsive element binding protein 3 like 1 (Creb3l1) in both SON and PVN of DH and SL rats. Although we found no changes in the splicing pattern of X box-binding protein 1 (Xbp1), an increase in the level of the unspliced form of Xbp1 (Xbp1U) was observed in DH and SL rats. CREB3L1, a novel ER stress inducer, has been shown to be activated by ER stress to regulate the expression of target genes. We have previously shown that CREB3L1 is a transcriptional regulator of the AVP gene; however, a role for CREB3L1 in the response to ER stress has yet to be investigated in MCNs. Here, we used lentiviral vectors to introduce a dominant negative form of CREB3L1 (CREB3L1DN) in the rat SON. Expression of CREB3L1DN in the SON decreased Chop and Xbp1U mRNA levels, but not BiP and Atf4 transcript expression. CREB3L1 is thus implicated as a transcriptional mediator of the ER stress response in the osmotically stimulated SON. PMID:25915053

  7. Broad-Scale Phosphoprotein Profiling of Beta Adrenergic Receptor (β-AR) Signaling Reveals Novel Phosphorylation and Dephosphorylation Events

    PubMed Central

    Chruscinski, Andrzej J.; Singh, Harvir; Chan, Steven M.; Utz, Paul J.

    2013-01-01

    β-adrenergic receptors (β-ARs) are model G-protein coupled receptors that mediate signal transduction in the sympathetic nervous system. Despite the widespread clinical use of agents that target β-ARs, the signaling pathways that operate downstream of β-AR stimulation have not yet been completely elucidated. Here, we utilized a lysate microarray approach to obtain a broad-scale perspective of phosphoprotein signaling downstream of β-AR. We monitored the time course of phosphorylation states of 54 proteins after β-AR activation mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) cells. In response to stimulation with the non-selective β-AR agonist isoproterenol, we observed previously described phosphorylation events such as ERK1/2(T202/Y204) and CREB(S133), but also novel phosphorylation events such as Cdc2(Y15) and Pyk2(Y402). All of these events were mediated through cAMP and PKA as they were reproduced by stimulation with the adenylyl cyclase activator forskolin and were blocked by treatment with H89, a PKA inhibitor. In addition, we also observed a number of novel isoproterenol-induced protein dephosphorylation events in target substrates of the PI3K/AKT pathway: GSK3β(S9), 4E-BP1(S65), and p70s6k(T389). These dephosphorylations were dependent on cAMP, but were independent of PKA and correlated with reduced PI3K/AKT activity. Isoproterenol stimulation also led to a cAMP-dependent dephosphorylation of PP1α(T320), a modification known to correlate with enhanced activity of this phosphatase. Dephosphorylation of PP1α coincided with the secondary decline in phosphorylation of some PKA-phosphorylated substrates, suggesting that PP1α may act in a feedback loop to return these phosphorylations to baseline. In summary, lysate microarrays are a powerful tool to profile phosphoprotein signaling and have provided a broad-scale perspective of how β-AR signaling can regulate key pathways involved in cell growth and metabolism. PMID:24340001

  8. cAMP-dependent protein kinase and c-Jun N-terminal kinase mediate stathmin phosphorylation for the maintenance of interphase microtubules during osmotic stress.

    PubMed

    Yip, Yan Y; Yeap, Yvonne Y C; Bogoyevitch, Marie A; Ng, Dominic C H

    2014-01-24

    Dynamic microtubule changes after a cell stress challenge are required for cell survival and adaptation. Stathmin (STMN), a cytoplasmic microtubule-destabilizing phosphoprotein, regulates interphase microtubules during cell stress, but the signaling mechanisms involved are poorly defined. In this study ectopic expression of single alanine-substituted phospho-resistant mutants demonstrated that STMN Ser-38 and Ser-63 phosphorylation were specifically required to maintain interphase microtubules during hyperosmotic stress. STMN was phosphorylated on Ser-38 and Ser-63 in response to hyperosmolarity, heat shock, and arsenite treatment but rapidly dephosphorylated after oxidative stress treatment. Two-dimensional PAGE and Phos-tag gel analysis of stress-stimulated STMN phospho-isoforms revealed rapid STMN Ser-38 phosphorylation followed by subsequent Ser-25 and Ser-63 phosphorylation. Previously, we delineated stress-stimulated JNK targeting of STMN. Here, we identified cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) signaling as responsible for stress-induced STMN Ser-63 phosphorylation. Increased cAMP levels induced by cholera toxin triggered potent STMN Ser-63 phosphorylation. Osmotic stress stimulated an increase in PKA activity and elevated STMN Ser-63 and CREB (cAMP-response element-binding protein) Ser-133 phosphorylation that was substantially attenuated by pretreatment with H-89, a PKA inhibitor. Interestingly, PKA activity and subsequent phosphorylation of STMN were augmented in the absence of JNK activation, indicating JNK and PKA pathway cross-talk during stress regulation of STMN. Taken together our study indicates that JNK- and PKA-mediated STMN Ser-38 and Ser-63 phosphorylation are required to preserve interphase microtubules in response to hyperosmotic stress.

  9. Human ZCCHC12 activates AP-1 and CREB signaling as a transcriptional co-activator.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong; Liu, Qian; Hu, Xiang; Feng, Du; Xiang, Shuanglin; He, Zhicheng; Hu, Xingwang; Zhou, Jianlin; Ding, Xiaofeng; Zhou, Chang; Zhang, Jian

    2009-07-01

    Mouse zinc finger CCHC domain containing 12 gene (ZCCHC12) has been identified as a transcriptional co-activator of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling, and human ZCCHC12 was reported to be related to non-syndromic X-linked mental retardation (NS-XLMR). However, the details of how human ZCCHC12 involve in the NS-XLMR still remain unclear. In this study, we identified a novel nuclear localization signal (NLS) in the middle of human ZCCHC12 protein which is responsible for the nuclear localization. Multiple-tissue northern blot analysis indicated that ZCCHC12 is highly expressed in human brain. Furthermore, in situ hybridization showed that ZCCHC12 is specifically expressed in neuroepithelium of forebrain, midbrain, and diencephalon regions of mouse E10.5 embryos. Luciferase reporter assays demonstrated that ZCCHC12 enhanced the transcriptional activities of activator protein 1 (AP-1) and cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) as a coactivator. In conclusion, we identified a new NLS in ZCCHC12 and figured out that ZCCHC12 functions as a transcriptional co-activator of AP-1 and CREB.

  10. Creb coactivators direct anabolic responses and enhance performance of skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Bruno, Nelson E; Kelly, Kimberly A; Hawkins, Richard; Bramah-Lawani, Mariam; Amelio, Antonio L; Nwachukwu, Jerome C; Nettles, Kendall W; Conkright, Michael D

    2014-01-01

    During the stress response to intense exercise, the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) induces rapid catabolism of energy reserves through the release of catecholamines and subsequent activation of protein kinase A (PKA). Paradoxically, chronic administration of sympathomimetic drugs (β-agonists) leads to anabolic adaptations in skeletal muscle, suggesting that sympathetic outflow also regulates myofiber remodeling. Here, we show that β-agonists or catecholamines released during intense exercise induce Creb-mediated transcriptional programs through activation of its obligate coactivators Crtc2 and Crtc3. In contrast to the catabolic activity normally associated with SNS function, activation of the Crtc/Creb transcriptional complex by conditional overexpression of Crtc2 in the skeletal muscle of transgenic mice fostered an anabolic state of energy and protein balance. Crtc2-overexpressing mice have increased myofiber cross-sectional area, greater intramuscular triglycerides and glycogen content. Moreover, maximal exercise capacity was enhanced after induction of Crtc2 expression in transgenic mice. Collectively these findings demonstrate that the SNS-adrenergic signaling cascade coordinates a transient catabolic stress response during high-intensity exercise, which is followed by transcriptional reprogramming that directs anabolic changes for recovery and that augments subsequent exercise performance. PMID:24674967

  11. CREB-Dependent Regulation of GAD65 Transcription by BDNF/TrkB in Cortical Interneurons.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Huertas, Carlos; Rico, Beatriz

    2011-04-01

    In the cerebral cortex, the functional output of projection neurons is fine-tuned by inhibitory neurons present in the network, which use γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) as their main neurotransmitter. Previous studies have suggested that the expression levels of the rate-limiting GABA synthetic enzyme, GAD65, depend on brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)/TrkB activation. However, the molecular mechanisms by which this neurotrophic factor and its receptor controls GABA synthesis are still unknown. Here, we show a direct regulation of the GAD65 gene by BDNF-TrkB signaling via CREB in cortical interneurons. Conditional ablation of TrkB in cortical interneurons causes a cell-autonomous decrease in the synaptically enriched GAD65 protein and its transcripts levels, suggesting that transcriptional regulation of the GAD65 gene is altered. Dissection of the intracellular pathway that underlies this process revealed that BDNF/TrkB signaling controls the transcription of GAD65 in a Ras-ERK-CREB-dependent manner. Our study reveals a novel molecular mechanism through which BDNF/TrkB signaling may modulate the maturation and function of cortical inhibitory circuits.

  12. The CREB/CRTC2 Pathway Modulates Autoimmune Disease by Promoting Th17 Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Jeniffer B.; Chang, Christina; LeBlanc, Mathias; Grimm, David; Le Lay, John; Kaestner, Klaus H.; Zheng, Ye; Montminy, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Following their activation in response to inflammatory signals, innate immune cells secrete T cell polarizing cytokines that promote the differentiation of naïve CD4 T cells into T helper (Th) cell subsets. Amongst these, Th17 cells play a prominent role in the development of a number of autoimmune diseases. Although regarded primarily as an immunosuppressant signal, cAMP has been found to mediate pro-inflammatory effects of macrophage-derived prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) on Th17 cells. Here we show that PGE2 enhances Th17 cell differentiation via the activation of the CREB co-activator CRTC2. Following its dephosphorylation, CRTC2 stimulates the expression of the cytokines IL-17A and IL-17F by binding to CREB over both promoters. CRTC2 mutant mice have decreased Th17 cell numbers, and they are protected from experimental autoimmune encephalitis, a model for multiple sclerosis. Our results suggest that small molecule inhibitors of CRTC2 may provide therapeutic benefit to individuals with autoimmune disease. PMID:26031354

  13. SYMPOSIUM ON PLANT PROTEIN PHOSPHORYLATION

    SciTech Connect

    JOHN C WALKER

    2011-11-01

    Protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation play key roles in many aspects of plant biology, including control of cell division, pathways of carbon and nitrogen metabolism, pattern formation, hormonal responses, and abiotic and biotic responses to environmental signals. A Symposium on Plant Protein Phosphorylation was hosted on the Columbia campus of the University of Missouri from May 26-28, 2010. The symposium provided an interdisciplinary venue at which scholars studying protein modification, as it relates to a broad range of biological questions and using a variety of plant species, presented their research. It also provided a forum where current international challenges in studies related to protein phosphorylation could be examined. The symposium also stimulated research collaborations through interactions and networking among those in the research community and engaged students and early career investigators in studying issues in plant biology from an interdisciplinary perspective. The proposed symposium, which drew 165 researchers from 13 countries and 21 States, facilitated a rapid dissemination of acquired knowledge and technical expertise regarding protein phosphorylation in plants to a broad range of plant biologists worldwide.

  14. Phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of spectrin.

    PubMed

    Fairbanks, G; Avruch, J; Dino, J E; Patel, V P

    1978-01-01

    The phosphorylation of spectrin polypeptide 2 is thought to be involved in the metabolically dependent regulation of red cell shape and deformability. Spectrin phosphorylation is not affected by cAMP. The reaction in isolated membranes resembles the cAMP-independent, salt-stimulated phosphorylation of an exogenous substrate, casein, by enzyme(s) present both in isolated membranes and cytoplasmic extracts. Spectrin kinase is selectively eluted from membranes by 0.5 M NaCl and co-fractionates with eluted casein kinase. Phosphorylation of band 3 in the membrane is inhibited by salt, but the band 3 kinase is otherwise indistinguishable operationally from spectrin kinase. The membrane-bound casein (spectrin) kinase is not eluted efficiently with spectrin at low ionic strength; about 80% of the activity is apparently bound at sites (perhaps on or near band 3) other than spectrin. Partitioning of casein kinase between cytoplasm and membrane is metabolically dependent; the proportion of casein kinase on the membrane can range from 25% to 75%, but for fresh cells is normally about 40%. Dephosphorylation of phosphorylated spectrin has not been studied intensively. Slow release of 32Pi from [32P] spectrin on the membrane can be demonstrated, but phosphatase activity measured against solubilized [32P] spectrin is concentrated in the cytoplasm. The crude cytoplasmic phosphospectrin phosphatase is inhibited by various anions--notably, ATP and 2,3-DPG at physiological concentrations. Regulation of spectrin phosphorylation in intact cells has not been studied. We speculate that spectrin phosphorylation state may be regulated 1) by metabolic intermediates and other internal chemical signals that modulate kinase and phosphatase activities per se or determine their intracellular localization and 2) by membrane deformation that alters enzyme-spectrin interaction locally. Progress in the isolation and characterization of spectrin kinase and phosphospectrin phosphatase should lead to

  15. Fibrotic lung fibroblasts show blunted inhibition by cAMP due to deficient cAMP response element-binding protein phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoqiu; Sun, Shu Qiang; Ostrom, Rennolds S

    2005-11-01

    Pulmonary fibroblasts regulate extracellular matrix production and degradation; thus, they are critical for maintenance of lung structure, function, and repair. In pulmonary fibrosis, fibroblasts produce excess collagen and form fibrotic foci that eventually impair lung function, but the mechanisms responsible for these alterations are not known. Receptors coupled to the stimulation of cAMP production can inhibit activation of fibroblasts and thereby are antifibrotic. To test whether this signaling pathway is altered in pulmonary fibrosis, we compared the ability of normal adult human pulmonary fibroblasts to generate and respond to cAMP with that of cells isolated from lungs with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Serum- and transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta-stimulated cell proliferation was inhibited approximately 50% by forskolin and approximately 100% by prostaglandin (PG) E(2) in the normal cells but substantially less in the diseased cells. Collagen synthesis was also inhibited >50% by the same drugs in the normal cells but significantly less so in the diseased cells, despite responding with similar increases in cAMP production. Although expression of protein kinase A (PKA) and cAMP-stimulated PKA activity were similar in both the normal and diseased cell types, forskolin- and PGE(2)-stimulated cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) phosphorylation was decreased in the diseased cell lines compared with the normal cells. cAMP-mediated activation and TGF-beta-mediated inhibition of CREB DNA binding was also diminished in the diseased cells. Thus, pulmonary fibroblasts derived from patients with pulmonary fibrosis are refractory to the inhibition by cAMP due to altered activity of components distal to the activity of PKA, in particular the phosphorylation of CREB.

  16. Phosphorylation in halobacterial signal transduction.

    PubMed Central

    Rudolph, J; Tolliday, N; Schmitt, C; Schuster, S C; Oesterhelt, D

    1995-01-01

    Regulated phosphorylation of proteins has been shown to be a hallmark of signal transduction mechanisms in both Eubacteria and Eukarya. Here we demonstrate that phosphorylation and dephosphorylation are also the underlying mechanism of chemo- and phototactic signal transduction in Archaea, the third branch of the living world. Cloning and sequencing of the region upstream of the cheA gene, known to be required for chemo- and phototaxis in Halobacterium salinarium, has identified cheY and cheB analogs which appear to form part of an operon which also includes cheA and the following open reading frame of 585 nucleotides. The CheY and CheB proteins have 31.3 and 37.5% sequence identity compared with the known signal transduction proteins CheY and CheB from Escherichia coli, respectively. The biochemical activities of both CheA and CheY were investigated following their expression in E.coli, isolation and renaturation. Wild-type CheA could be phosphorylated in a time-dependent manner in the presence of [gamma-32P]ATP and Mg2+, whereas the mutant CheA(H44Q) remained unlabeled. Phosphorylated CheA was dephosphorylated rapidly by the addition of wild-type CheY. The mutant CheY(D53A) had no effect on phosphorylated CheA. The mechanism of chemo- and phototactic signal transduction in the Archaeon H.salinarium, therefore, is similar to the two-component signaling system known from chemotaxis in the eubacterium E.coli. Images PMID:7556066

  17. Constitutive activation of CREB in mice enhances temporal association learning and increases hippocampal CA1 neuronal spine density and complexity

    PubMed Central

    Serita, Tatsurou; Fukushima, Hotaka; Kida, Satoshi

    2017-01-01

    Transcription factor CREB is believed to play essential roles in the formation of long-term memory (LTM), but not in learning and short-term memory (STM). Surprisingly, we previously showed that transgenic mice expressing a dominant active mutant of CREB (DIEDML) in the forebrain (DIEDML mice) demonstrated enhanced STM and LTM in hippocampal-dependent, rapid, one-trial learning tasks. Here we show that constitutive activation of CREB enhances hippocampal-dependent learning of temporal association in trace fear conditioning and delayed matching-to-place tasks. We then show that in DIEDML mice the apical tuft dendrites of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons, required for temporal association learning, display increased spine density, especially of thin spines and of Homer1-negative spines. In contrast, the basal and apical oblique dendrites of CA1 neurons, required for rapid one-trial learning, show increased density of thin, stubby, and mushroom spines and of Homer1-positive spines. Furthermore, DIEDML mice showed increased dendritic complexity in the proximal portion of apical CA1 dendrites to the soma. In contrast, forebrain overexpression of CaMKIV, leading to enhanced LTM but not STM, show normal learning and CA1 neuron morphology. These findings suggest that dendritic region-specific morphological changes in CA1 neurons by constitutive activation of CREB may contribute to improved learning and STM. PMID:28195219

  18. GABPα Binding to Overlapping ETS and CRE DNA Motifs Is Enhanced by CREB1: Custom DNA Microarrays.

    PubMed

    He, Ximiao; Syed, Khund Sayeed; Tillo, Desiree; Mann, Ishminder; Weirauch, Matthew T; Vinson, Charles

    2015-07-16

    To achieve proper spatiotemporal control of gene expression, transcription factors cooperatively assemble onto specific DNA sequences. The ETS domain protein monomer of GABPα and the B-ZIP domain protein dimer of CREB1 cooperatively bind DNA only when the ETS ((C)/GCGGAA GT: ) and CRE ( GT: GACGTCAC) motifs overlap precisely, producing the ETS↔CRE motif ((C)/GCGGAA GT: GACGTCAC). We designed a Protein Binding Microarray (PBM) with 60-bp DNAs containing four identical sectors, each with 177,440 features that explore the cooperative interactions between GABPα and CREB1 upon binding the ETS↔CRE motif. The DNA sequences include all 15-mers of the form (C)/GCGGA--CG-, the ETS↔CRE motif, and all single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), and occurrences in the human and mouse genomes. CREB1 enhanced GABPα binding to the canonical ETS↔CRE motif CCGGAAGT two-fold, and up to 23-fold for several SNPs at the beginning and end of the ETS motif, which is suggestive of two separate and distinct allosteric mechanisms of cooperative binding. We show that the ETS-CRE array data can be used to identify regions likely cooperatively bound by GABPα and CREB1 in vivo, and demonstrate their ability to identify human genetic variants that might inhibit cooperative binding.

  19. The Expression of Porcine Prdx6 Gene Is Up-Regulated by C/EBPβ and CREB.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xinyu; Ji, Panlong; Zhang, Liang; Bu, Guowei; Gu, Hao; Wang, Xiaojing; Xiong, Yuanzhu; Zuo, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Peroxiredoxin6 (Prdx6) is one of the peroxiredoxin (Prdxs) family members that play an important role in maintaining cell homeostasis. Our previous studies demonstrated that Prdx6 was significantly associated with pig meat quality, especially meat tenderness. However, the transcriptional regulation of porcine Prdx6 remains unclear. In this study, we determined the transcription start site (TSS) of porcine Prdx6 gene by 5' rapid-amplification of cDNA ends (5' RACE). Several regulatory elements including CCAAT/enhancer-binding proteinβ (C/EBPβ), Myogenic Differentiation (MyoD), cAMP response element binding protein (CREB), stimulating protein1 (Sp1) and heat shock factor (HSF) binding sites were found by computational analyses together with luciferase reporter system. Overexpression and RNA interference experiments showed that C/EBPβ or CREB could up-regulate the expression of porcine Prdx6 gene at both mRNA and protein level. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA) and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays (ChIP) confirmed that C/EBPβ and CREB could interact with Prdx6 promoter. Immuoprecipitation results also showed that C/EBPβ could interact with Prdx6 in vivo. Taken together, our findings identified C/EBPβ and CREB as the important regulators of porcine Prdx6 gene expression, and offered clues for further investigation of Prdx6 gene function.

  20. Rescue of Impaired Long-Term Facilitation at Sensorimotor Synapses of Aplysia following siRNA Knockdown of CREB1

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Lian; Zhang, Yili; Liu, Rong-Yu; Smolen, Paul; Cleary, Leonard J.

    2015-01-01

    Memory impairment is often associated with disrupted regulation of gene induction. For example, deficits in cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) binding protein (CBP; an essential cofactor for activation of transcription by CREB) impair long-term synaptic plasticity and memory. Previously, we showed that small interfering RNA (siRNA)-induced knockdown of CBP in individual sensory neurons significantly reduced levels of CBP and impaired 5-HT-induced long-term facilitation (LTF) in sensorimotor cocultures from Aplysia. Moreover, computational simulations of the biochemical cascades underlying LTF successfully predicted training protocols that restored LTF following CBP knockdown. We examined whether simulations could also predict a training protocol that restores LTF impaired by siRNA-induced knockdown of the transcription factor CREB1. Simulations based on a previously described model predicted rescue protocols that were specific to CREB1 knockdown. Empirical studies demonstrated that one of these rescue protocols partially restored impaired LTF. In addition, the effectiveness of the rescue protocol was enhanced by pretreatment with rolipram, a selective cAMP phosphodiesterase inhibitor. These results provide further evidence that computational methods can help rescue disruptions in signaling cascades underlying memory formation. Moreover, the study demonstrates that the effectiveness of computationally designed training protocols can be enhanced with complementary pharmacological approaches. PMID:25632137

  1. GRK3 is a direct target of CREB activation and regulates neuroendocrine differentiation of prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Song, Haiping; Zheng, Dayong; Zhang, Yan; Li, Min; Xu, Jianming; Zhang, Songlin; Ittmann, Michael; Li, Wenliang

    2016-01-01

    Neuroendocrine prostate cancer (NEPC) is an aggressive subtype of prostate cancer that commonly arises through neuroendocrine differentiation (NED) of prostate adenocarcinoma (PAC) after therapy, such as radiation therapy and androgen deprivation treatment (ADT). No effective therapeutic is available for NEPC and its molecular mechanisms remain poorly understood. We have reported that G protein-coupled receptor kinase 3 (GRK3, also called ADRBK2) promotes prostate cancer progression. In this study, we demonstrate that the ADT-activated cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) directly targets and induces GRK3. We show GRK3 expression is higher in NEPC than in PAC cells and mouse models, and it positively correlates with the expression and activity of CREB in human prostate cancers. Notably, overexpression of GRK3 in PAC cells increased the expression of NE markers in a kinase activity dependent manner. Conversely, silencing GRK3 blocked CREB-induced NED in PAC cells, reversed NE phenotypes and inhibited proliferation of NEPC cells. Taken together, these results indicate that GRK3 is a new critical activator of NE phenotypes and mediator of CREB activation in promoting NED of prostate cancer cells. PMID:27191986

  2. Reversion of BDNF, Akt and CREB in Hippocampus of Chronic Unpredictable Stress Induced Rats: Effects of Phytochemical, Bacopa Monnieri

    PubMed Central

    Hazra, Somoday; Kumar, Sourav; Saha, Goutam Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Objective The aims of the present study were to explore the behavioural effects and to understand the possible mode of action of Bacopa monnieri extract (BME) on chronic unpredictable stress (CUS) induced depressive model and the biochemical alterations such as brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), Akt, cyclic-AMP response element binding (CREB) protein level in the hippocampus of rats. Methods We examined the effects of chronic administration of BME on CUS exposed rats for 28 days. Behavioural changes were assessed by sucrose consumption and open field test to assess the effect of BME on CUS-induced depression. The mechanisms underlying antidepressant like action of BME was further evaluated by measuring levels of BDNF, Akt, and CREB in the hippocampus of rat brain and compared with the standard tricyclic antidepressant drug imipramine (20 mg/kg body weight). Results Exposure to CUS for 28 days produced depression-like behavior in rats, as indicated by significant decreases in sucrose consumption, locomotor activity including decreased BDNF, Akt and CREB levels in the hippocampus. Daily administration of BME at a dose of (80 mg/kg body weight) significantly reverses the behavioral alteration and restored the normal level of BDNF, total and phospho-Akt, total and phospho CREB in the hippocampus of CUS induced rats as compared to vehicle treated control rats. Conclusion These findings suggest that BME ameliorates CUS induced behavioural depression in rats and that can be used as a potent therapeutic agent in treating depressive like behavior. PMID:28096878

  3. Rescue of impaired long-term facilitation at sensorimotor synapses of Aplysia following siRNA knockdown of CREB1.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lian; Zhang, Yili; Liu, Rong-Yu; Smolen, Paul; Cleary, Leonard J; Byrne, John H

    2015-01-28

    Memory impairment is often associated with disrupted regulation of gene induction. For example, deficits in cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) binding protein (CBP; an essential cofactor for activation of transcription by CREB) impair long-term synaptic plasticity and memory. Previously, we showed that small interfering RNA (siRNA)-induced knockdown of CBP in individual sensory neurons significantly reduced levels of CBP and impaired 5-HT-induced long-term facilitation (LTF) in sensorimotor cocultures from Aplysia. Moreover, computational simulations of the biochemical cascades underlying LTF successfully predicted training protocols that restored LTF following CBP knockdown. We examined whether simulations could also predict a training protocol that restores LTF impaired by siRNA-induced knockdown of the transcription factor CREB1. Simulations based on a previously described model predicted rescue protocols that were specific to CREB1 knockdown. Empirical studies demonstrated that one of these rescue protocols partially restored impaired LTF. In addition, the effectiveness of the rescue protocol was enhanced by pretreatment with rolipram, a selective cAMP phosphodiesterase inhibitor. These results provide further evidence that computational methods can help rescue disruptions in signaling cascades underlying memory formation. Moreover, the study demonstrates that the effectiveness of computationally designed training protocols can be enhanced with complementary pharmacological approaches.

  4. Combined ampakine and BDNF treatments enhance poststroke functional recovery in aged mice via AKT-CREB signaling

    PubMed Central

    Clarkson, Andrew N; Parker, Kim; Nilsson, Michael; Walker, F Rohan; Gowing, Emma K

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral ischemia results in damage to neuronal circuits and lasting impairment in function. We have previously reported that stimulation of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptors with the ampakine, CX1837, increases brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels and affords significant motor recovery after stroke in young mice. Here, we investigated whether administration of CX1837 in aged (24 months old) mice was equally effective. In a model of focal ischemia, administration of CX1837 from 5 days after stroke resulted in a small gain of motor function by week 6 after stroke. Mice that received a local delivery of BDNF via hydrogel implanted into the stroke cavity also showed a small gain of function from 4 to 6 weeks after stroke. Combining both treatments, however, resulted in a marked improvement in motor function from 2 weeks after insult. Assessment of peri-infarct tissue 2 weeks after stroke revealed a significant increase in p-AKT and p-CREB after the combined drug treatment. Using the pan-AKT inhibitor, GSK-690693, or deletion of CREB from forebrain neurons using the CREB-flox/CAMKii-cre mice, we were able to block the recovery of motor function. These data suggest that combined CX1837 and local delivery of BDNF are required to achieve maximal functional recovery after stroke in aged mice, and is occurring via the AKT-GSK3-CREB signaling pathway. PMID:25757752

  5. Constitutive activation of CREB in mice enhances temporal association learning and increases hippocampal CA1 neuronal spine density and complexity.

    PubMed

    Serita, Tatsurou; Fukushima, Hotaka; Kida, Satoshi

    2017-02-14

    Transcription factor CREB is believed to play essential roles in the formation of long-term memory (LTM), but not in learning and short-term memory (STM). Surprisingly, we previously showed that transgenic mice expressing a dominant active mutant of CREB (DIEDML) in the forebrain (DIEDML mice) demonstrated enhanced STM and LTM in hippocampal-dependent, rapid, one-trial learning tasks. Here we show that constitutive activation of CREB enhances hippocampal-dependent learning of temporal association in trace fear conditioning and delayed matching-to-place tasks. We then show that in DIEDML mice the apical tuft dendrites of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons, required for temporal association learning, display increased spine density, especially of thin spines and of Homer1-negative spines. In contrast, the basal and apical oblique dendrites of CA1 neurons, required for rapid one-trial learning, show increased density of thin, stubby, and mushroom spines and of Homer1-positive spines. Furthermore, DIEDML mice showed increased dendritic complexity in the proximal portion of apical CA1 dendrites to the soma. In contrast, forebrain overexpression of CaMKIV, leading to enhanced LTM but not STM, show normal learning and CA1 neuron morphology. These findings suggest that dendritic region-specific morphological changes in CA1 neurons by constitutive activation of CREB may contribute to improved learning and STM.

  6. Neuroprotective action of N-acetyl serotonin in oxidative stress-induced apoptosis through the activation of both TrkB/CREB/BDNF pathway and Akt/Nrf2/Antioxidant enzyme in neuronal cells.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Jae-Myung; Lee, Bo Dam; Sok, Dai-Eun; Ma, Jin Yuel; Kim, Mee Ree

    2017-04-01

    N-acetyl serotonin (NAS) as a melatonin precursor has neuroprotective actions. Nonetheless, it is not clarified how NAS protects neuronal cells against oxidative stress. Recently, we have reported that N-palmitoyl serotonins possessed properties of antioxidants and neuroprotection. Based on those, we hypothesized that NAS, a N-acyl serotonin, may have similar actions in oxidative stress-induced neuronal cells, and examined the effects of NAS based on in vitro and in vivo tests. NAS dose-dependently inhibited oxidative stress-induced cell death in HT-22 cells. Moreover, NAS suppressed glutamate-induced apoptosis by suppressing expression of AIF, Bax, calpain, cytochrome c and cleaved caspase-3, whereas it enhanced expression of Bcl-2. Additionally, NAS improved phosphorylation of tropomyosin-related kinase receptor B (TrkB) and cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) as well as expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), whereas the inclusion of each inhibitor of JNK, p38 or Akt neutralized the neuroprotective effect of NAS, but not that of ERK. Meanwhile, NAS dose-dependently reduced the level of reactive oxygen species, and enhanced the level of glutathione in glutamate-treated HT-22 cells. Moreover, NAS significantly increased expression of heme oxygenase-1, NAD(P)H quinine oxidoreductase-1 and glutamate-cysteine ligase catalytic subunit as well as nuclear translocation of NF-E2-related factor-2. Separately, NAS at 30mg/kg suppressed scopolamine-induced memory impairment and cell death in CA1 and CA3 regions in mice. In conclusion, NAS shows actions of antioxidant and anti-apoptosis by activating TrkB/CREB/BDNF pathway and expression of antioxidant enzymes in oxidative stress-induced neurotoxicity. Therefore, such effects of NAS may provide the information for the application of NAS against neurodegenerative diseases.

  7. Effects of lentivirus-mediated CREB expression in the dorsolateral striatum: memory enhancement and evidence for competitive and cooperative interactions with the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Kathirvelu, Balachandar; Colombo, Paul J

    2013-11-01

    Neural systems specialized for memory may interact during memory formation or recall, and the results of interactions are important determinants of how systems control behavioral output. In two experiments, we used lentivirus-mediated expression of the transcription factor CREB (LV-CREB) to test if localized manipulations of cellular plasticity influence interactions between the hippocampus and dorsolateral striatum. In Experiment 1, we tested the hypothesis that infusion of LV-CREB in the dorsolateral striatum facilitates memory for response learning, and impairs memory for place learning. LV-CREB in the dorsolateral striatum had no effect on response learning, but impaired place memory; a finding consistent with competition between the striatum and hippocampus. In Experiment 2, we tested the hypothesis that infusion of LV-CREB in the dorsolateral striatum facilitates memory for cue learning, and impairs memory for contextual fear conditioning. LV-CREB in the dorsolateral striatum enhanced memory for cue learning and, in contrast to our prediction, also enhanced memory for contextual fear conditioning, consistent with a cooperative interaction between the striatum and hippocampus. Overall, the current experiments demonstrate that infusion of LV-CREB in the dorsolateral striatum (1) increases levels of CREB protein locally, (2) does not alter acquisition of place, response, cue, or contextual fear conditioning, (3) facilitates memory for cue learning and contextual fear conditioning, and (4) impairs memory for place learning. Taken together, the present results provide evidence that LV-CREB in the dorsolateral striatum can enhance memory formation and cause both competitive and cooperative interactions with the hippocampus.

  8. Oral Administration of Sitagliptin Activates CREB and Is Neuroprotective in Murine Model of Brain Trauma

    PubMed Central

    DellaValle, Brian; Brix, Gitte S.; Brock, Birgitte; Gejl, Michael; Rungby, Jørgen; Larsen, Agnete

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Traumatic brain injury is a major cause of mortality and morbidity. We have previously shown that the injectable glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) analog, liraglutide, significantly improved the outcome in mice after severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). In this study we are interested in the effects of oral treatment of a different class of GLP-1 based therapy, dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-IV) inhibition on mice after TBI. DPP-IV inhibitors reduce the degradation of endogenous GLP-1 and extend circulation of this protective peptide in the bloodstream. This class has yet to be investigated as a potential therapy for TBI. Methods: Mice were administrated once-daily 50 mg/kg of sitagliptin in a Nutella® ball or Nutella® alone throughout the study, beginning 2 days before severe trauma was induced with a stereotactic cryo-lesion. At 2 days post trauma, lesion size was determined. Brains were isolated for immunoblotting for assessment of selected biomarkers for pathology and protection. Results: Sitagliptin treatment reduced lesion size at day 2 post-injury by ~28% (p < 0.05). Calpain-driven necrotic tone was reduced ~2-fold in sitagliptin-treated brains (p < 0.001) and activation of the protective cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB) system was significantly more pronounced (~1.5-fold, p < 0.05). The CREB-regulated, mitochondrial antioxidant protein manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) was increased in sitagliptin-treated mice (p < 0.05). Conversely, apoptotic tone (alpha-spectrin fragmentation, Bcl-2 levels) and the neuroinflammatory markers IL-6, and Iba-1 were not affected by treatment. Conclusions: This study shows, for the first time, that DPP-IV inhibition ameliorates both anatomical and biochemical consequences of TBI and activates CREB in the brain. Moreover, this work supports previous studies suggesting that the effect of GLP-1 analogs in models of brain damage relates to GLP-1 receptor stimulation in a dose-dependent manner. PMID

  9. Oral Administration of Sitagliptin Activates CREB and Is Neuroprotective in Murine Model of Brain Trauma.

    PubMed

    DellaValle, Brian; Brix, Gitte S; Brock, Birgitte; Gejl, Michael; Rungby, Jørgen; Larsen, Agnete

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Traumatic brain injury is a major cause of mortality and morbidity. We have previously shown that the injectable glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) analog, liraglutide, significantly improved the outcome in mice after severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). In this study we are interested in the effects of oral treatment of a different class of GLP-1 based therapy, dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-IV) inhibition on mice after TBI. DPP-IV inhibitors reduce the degradation of endogenous GLP-1 and extend circulation of this protective peptide in the bloodstream. This class has yet to be investigated as a potential therapy for TBI. Methods: Mice were administrated once-daily 50 mg/kg of sitagliptin in a Nutella® ball or Nutella® alone throughout the study, beginning 2 days before severe trauma was induced with a stereotactic cryo-lesion. At 2 days post trauma, lesion size was determined. Brains were isolated for immunoblotting for assessment of selected biomarkers for pathology and protection. Results: Sitagliptin treatment reduced lesion size at day 2 post-injury by ~28% (p < 0.05). Calpain-driven necrotic tone was reduced ~2-fold in sitagliptin-treated brains (p < 0.001) and activation of the protective cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB) system was significantly more pronounced (~1.5-fold, p < 0.05). The CREB-regulated, mitochondrial antioxidant protein manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) was increased in sitagliptin-treated mice (p < 0.05). Conversely, apoptotic tone (alpha-spectrin fragmentation, Bcl-2 levels) and the neuroinflammatory markers IL-6, and Iba-1 were not affected by treatment. Conclusions: This study shows, for the first time, that DPP-IV inhibition ameliorates both anatomical and biochemical consequences of TBI and activates CREB in the brain. Moreover, this work supports previous studies suggesting that the effect of GLP-1 analogs in models of brain damage relates to GLP-1 receptor stimulation in a dose-dependent manner.

  10. Preliminary investigation of the influence of CREB1 gene polymorphisms on cognitive dysfunction in Chinese patients with major depression.

    PubMed

    Guo, Junhui; Liu, Zhongchun; Dai, Hong; Zhu, Zhixian; Wang, Huiling; Yang, Can; Xiao, Ling; Huang, Yonglan; Wang, Gaohua

    2014-01-01

    Research has increasingly focused on the role of the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) response element binding (CREB) protein in learning and memory, particularly its role in cognitive disorders and neurodegeneration, such as Huntington's disease, Alzheimer's disease, Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome, and Coffin-Lowry syndrome. The cognitive dysfunction of patients with major depressive disorder (MDD), which is widely recognized, is not completely in accordance with depressive severity, and the dysfunction persists upon clinical remission in some patients. However, few studies have focused on the role of CREB on cognitive function in patients with MDD. This study aimed to investigate the influence of CREB1 polymorphism on cognitive function in patients with MDD. The current study comprised 113 patients with MDD. The severity of depression was measured using the 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, and cognitive function was assessed using the Stroop Neuropsychological Screening Test, verbal fluency test, and tests of immediate logical memory and visual reproduction. All subjects were genotyped with regard to CREB1 polymorphisms (rs10932201, rs2551645, rs2254137, rs6740584, and rs2551640). For the verbal fluency test, the results showed significant differences for all single-nucleotide polymorphism genotypic groups. For the Stroop color-word task, a significant difference was found only for rs6740584. No significant differences were found for the Stroop color task, the immediate logical memory test or the visual reproduction test. In conclusion, there was an effect of CREB1 polymorphism on selective attention and retrieval of long-term memory, but not on immediate memory.

  11. Function of Estrogen Receptor Tryosine Phosphorylation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-07-01

    6219 TITLE: Function of Estrogen Receptor Tryosine Phosphorylation PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Matthew R. Yudt CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: University of...Estrogen Receptor Tryosine Phosphorylation ~DAMD17-96-1-6219 6. AUTHOR(S) Matthew R. Yudt 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME11S) AND AODRESS(ES...this model, tyrosine 537 (Y537) phosphorylation of one monomer interacts with another tyrosine phosphorylated monomer to constitute an hER dimer

  12. Tyrosine phosphorylation of WW proteins

    PubMed Central

    Reuven, Nina; Shanzer, Matan

    2015-01-01

    A number of key regulatory proteins contain one or two copies of the WW domain known to mediate protein–protein interaction via proline-rich motifs, such as PPxY. The Hippo pathway components take advantage of this module to transduce tumor suppressor signaling. It is becoming evident that tyrosine phosphorylation is a critical regulator of the WW proteins. Here, we review the current knowledge on the involved tyrosine kinases and their roles in regulating the WW proteins. PMID:25627656

  13. The CREB-binding protein affects the circadian regulation of behaviour.

    PubMed

    Maurer, Christian; Winter, Tobias; Chen, Siwei; Hung, Hsiu-Cheng; Weber, Frank

    2016-09-01

    Rhythmic changes in light and temperature conditions form the primary environmental cues that synchronize the molecular circadian clock of most species with the external cycles of day and night. Previous studies established a role for the CREB-binding protein (CBP) in molecular clock function by coactivation of circadian transcription. Here, we report that moderately increased levels of CBP strongly dampen circadian behavioural rhythms without affecting molecular oscillations of circadian transcription. Interestingly, light-dark cycles as well as high temperature facilitated a circadian control of behavioural activity. Based on these observations we propose that in addition to its coactivator function for circadian transcription, CBP is involved in the regulation of circadian behaviour down-stream of the circadian clock.

  14. Notch1 Regulates Hippocampal Plasticity Through Interaction with the Reelin Pathway, Glutamatergic Transmission and CREB Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Brai, Emanuele; Marathe, Swananda; Astori, Simone; Fredj, Naila Ben; Perry, Elisabeth; Lamy, Christophe; Scotti, Alessandra; Alberi, Lavinia

    2015-01-01

    Notch signaling plays a crucial role in adult brain function such as synaptic plasticity, memory and olfaction. Several reports suggest an involvement of this pathway in neurodegenerative dementia. Yet, to date, the mechanism underlying Notch activity in mature neurons remains unresolved. In this work, we investigate how Notch regulates synaptic potentiation and contributes to the establishment of memory in mice. We observe that Notch1 is a postsynaptic receptor with functional interactions with the Reelin receptor, apolipoprotein E receptor 2 (ApoER2) and the ionotropic receptor, N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR). Targeted loss of Notch1 in the hippocampal CA fields affects Reelin signaling by influencing Dab1 expression and impairs the synaptic potentiation achieved through Reelin stimulation. Further analysis indicates that loss of Notch1 affects the expression and composition of the NMDAR but not AMPAR. Glutamatergic signaling is further compromised through downregulation of CamKII and its secondary and tertiary messengers resulting in reduced cAMP response element-binding (CREB) signaling. Our results identify Notch1 as an important regulator of mechanisms involved in synaptic plasticity and memory formation. These findings emphasize the possible involvement of this signaling receptor in dementia. Highlights In this paper, we propose a mechanism for Notch1-dependent plasticity that likely underlies the function of Notch1 in memory formation: Notch1 interacts with another important developmental pathway, the Reelin cascade. Notch1 regulates both NMDAR expression and composition. Notch1 influences a cascade of cellular events culminating in CREB activation. PMID:26635527

  15. Phosphorylation of tau is regulated by PKN.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, T; Kawamata, T; Mukai, H; Hasegawa, H; Isagawa, T; Yasuda, M; Hashimoto, T; Terashima, A; Nakai, M; Mori, H; Ono, Y; Tanaka, C

    2001-03-30

    For the phosphorylation state of microtubule-associated protein, tau plays a pivotal role in regulating microtubule networks in neurons. Tau promotes the assembly and stabilization of microtubules. The potential for tau to bind to microtubules is down-regulated after local phosphorylation. When we investigated the effects of PKN activation on tau phosphorylation, we found that PKN triggers disruption of the microtubule array both in vitro and in vivo and predominantly phosphorylates tau in microtubule binding domains (MBDs). PKN has a catalytic domain highly homologous to protein kinase C (PKC), a kinase that phosphorylates Ser-313 (= Ser-324, the number used in this study) in MBDs. Thus, we identified the phosphorylation sites of PKN and PKC subtypes (PKC-alpha, -betaI, -betaII, -gamma, -delta, -epsilon, -zeta, and -lambda) in MBDs. PKN phosphorylates Ser-258, Ser-320, and Ser-352, although all PKC subtypes phosphorylate Ser-258, Ser-293, Ser-324, and Ser-352. There is a PKN-specific phosphorylation site, Ser-320, in MBDs. HIA3, a novel phosphorylation-dependent antibody recognizing phosphorylated tau at Ser-320, showed immunoreactivity in Chinese hamster ovary cells expressing tau and the active form of PKN, but not in Chinese hamster ovary cells expressing tau and the inactive form of PKN. The immunoreactivity for phosphorylated tau at Ser-320 increased in the presence of a phosphatase inhibitor, FK506 treatment, which means that calcineurin (protein phosphatase 2B) may be involved in dephosphorylating tau at Ser-320 site. We also noted that PKN reduces the phosphorylation recognized by the phosphorylation-dependent antibodies AT8, AT180, and AT270 in vivo. Thus PKN serves as a regulator of microtubules by specific phosphorylation of tau, which leads to disruption of tubulin assembly.

  16. Phosphorylation of STAT3 mediates the induction of cyclooxygenase-2 by cortisol in the human amnion at parturition.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wangsheng; Guo, Chunming; Zhu, Ping; Lu, Jiangwen; Li, Wenjiao; Liu, Chao; Xie, Huiliang; Myatt, Leslie; Chen, Zi-Jiang; Sun, Kang

    2015-10-27

    The induction of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and subsequent production of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) by cortisol in the amnion contrast with the effect of cortisol on most other tissues, but this proinflammatory effect of cortisol may be a key event in human parturition (labor). We evaluated the underlying mechanism activated by cortisol in primary human amnion fibroblasts. Exposure of the amnion fibroblasts to cortisol led to the activation of the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-protein kinase A (PKA) pathway, which induced the phosphorylation of the kinase SRC and STAT3 (signal transducer and activator of transcription 3). STAT3 interacted with the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and the transcription factor CREB-1 (cAMP response element-binding protein 1) at the promoter of the gene encoding COX-2, which promoted the production of the secreted prostaglandin PGE2. PGE2 activates the prostaglandin receptors EP2 and EP4, which stimulate cAMP-PKA signaling. Thus, cortisol reinforced the activation of cAMP-PKA signaling through an SRC-STAT3-COX-2-PGE2-mediated feedback loop. Inhibiting STAT3, SRC, or the cAMP-PKA pathway attenuated the cortisol-stimulated induction of COX-2 and PGE2 production in amnion fibroblasts. In human amnion tissue, the amount of phosphorylated STAT3 correlated positively with that of cortisol, COX-2, and PGE2, and all were more abundant in tissue obtained after active labor than in tissue obtained from cesarean surgeries in the absence of labor. These results indicated that the coordinated recruitment of STAT3, CREB-1, and GR to the promoter of the gene encoding COX-2 contributes to the feed-forward induction of COX-2 activity and prostaglandin synthesis in the amnion during parturition.

  17. Gene Network Inference and Biochemical Assessment Delineates GPCR Pathways and CREB Targets in Small Intestinal Neuroendocrine Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Drozdov, Ignat; Svejda, Bernhard; Gustafsson, Bjorn I.; Mane, Shrikant; Pfragner, Roswitha; Kidd, Mark; Modlin, Irvin M.

    2011-01-01

    Small intestinal (SI) neuroendocrine tumors (NET) are increasing in incidence, however little is known about their biology. High throughput techniques such as inference of gene regulatory networks from microarray experiments can objectively define signaling machinery in this disease. Genome-wide co-expression analysis was used to infer gene relevance network in SI-NETs. The network was confirmed to be non-random, scale-free, and highly modular. Functional analysis of gene co-expression modules revealed processes including ‘Nervous system development’, ‘Immune response’, and ‘Cell-cycle’. Importantly, gene network topology and differential expression analysis identified over-expression of the GPCR signaling regulators, the cAMP synthetase, ADCY2, and the protein kinase A, PRKAR1A. Seven CREB response element (CRE) transcripts associated with proliferation and secretion: BEX1, BICD1, CHGB, CPE, GABRB3, SCG2 and SCG3 as well as ADCY2 and PRKAR1A were measured in an independent SI dataset (n = 10 NETs; n = 8 normal preparations). All were up-regulated (p<0.035) with the exception of SCG3 which was not differently expressed. Forskolin (a direct cAMP activator, 10−5 M) significantly stimulated transcription of pCREB and 3/7 CREB targets, isoproterenol (a selective ß-adrenergic receptor agonist and cAMP activator, 10−5 M) stimulated pCREB and 4/7 targets while BIM-53061 (a dopamine D2 and Serotonin [5-HT2] receptor agonist, 10−6 M) stimulated 100% of targets as well as pCREB; CRE transcription correlated with the levels of cAMP accumulation and PKA activity; BIM-53061 stimulated the highest levels of cAMP and PKA (2.8-fold and 2.5-fold vs. 1.8–2-fold for isoproterenol and forskolin). Gene network inference and graph topology analysis in SI NETs suggests that SI NETs express neural GPCRs that activate different CRE targets associated with proliferation and secretion. In vitro studies, in a model NET cell system, confirmed that transcriptional

  18. Appetitive Cue-Evoked ERK Signaling in the Nucleus Accumbens Requires NMDA and D1 Dopamine Receptor Activation and Regulates CREB Phosphorylation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirschmann, Erin K. Z.; Mauna, Jocelyn C.; Willis, Cory M.; Foster, Rebecca L.; Chipman, Amanda M.; Thiels, Edda

    2014-01-01

    Conditioned stimuli (CS) can modulate reward-seeking behavior. This modulatory effect can be maladaptive and has been implicated in excessive reward seeking and relapse to drug addiction. We previously demonstrated that exposure to an appetitive CS causes an increase in the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and cyclic-AMP…

  19. Hyperlipidemia and hepatitis in liver-specific CREB3L3 knockout mice generated using a one-step CRISPR/Cas9 system

    PubMed Central

    Nakagawa, Yoshimi; Oikawa, Fusaka; Mizuno, Seiya; Ohno, Hiroshi; Yagishita, Yuka; Satoh, Aoi; Osaki, Yoshinori; Takei, Kenta; Kikuchi, Takuya; Han, Song-iee; Matsuzaka, Takashi; Iwasaki, Hitoshi; Kobayashi, Kazuto; Yatoh, Shigeru; Yahagi, Naoya; Isaka, Masaaki; Suzuki, Hiroaki; Sone, Hirohito; Takahashi, Satoru; Yamada, Nobuhiro; Shimano, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    cAMP responsive element binding protein 3-like 3 (CREB3L3), a transcription factor expressed in the liver and small intestine, governs fasting-response energy homeostasis. Tissue-specific CREB3L3 knockout mice have not been generated till date. To our knowledge, this is the first study using the one-step CRISPR/Cas9 system to generate CREB3L3 floxed mice and subsequently obtain liver- and small intestine-specific Creb3l3 knockout (LKO and IKO, respectively) mice. While LKO mice as well as global KO mice developed hypertriglyceridemia, LKO mice exhibited hypercholesterolemia in contrast to hypocholesterolemia in global KO mice. LKO mice demonstrated up-regulation of hepatic Srebf2 and its corresponding target genes. No phenotypic differences were observed between IKO and floxed mice. Severe liver injury was observed in LKO mice fed a methionine-choline deficient diet, a model for non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. These results provide new evidence regarding the hepatic CREB3L3 role in plasma triglyceride metabolism and hepatic and intestinal CREB3L3 contributions to cholesterol metabolism. PMID:27291420

  20. Starch phosphorylation: insights and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Mahlow, Sebastian; Orzechowski, Sławomir; Fettke, Joerg

    2016-07-01

    During starch metabolism, the phosphorylation of glucosyl residues of starch, to be more precise of amylopectin, is a repeatedly observed process. This phosphorylation is mediated by dikinases, the glucan, water dikinase (GWD) and the phosphoglucan, water dikinase (PWD). The starch-related dikinases utilize ATP as dual phosphate donor transferring the terminal γ-phosphate group to water and the β-phosphate group selectively to either C6 position or C3 position of a glucosyl residue within amylopectin. By the collaborative action of both enzymes, the initiation of a transition of α-glucans from highly ordered, water-insoluble state to a less order state is realized and thus the initial process of starch degradation. Consequently, mutants lacking either GWD or PWD reveal a starch excess phenotype as well as growth retardation. In this review, we focus on the increased knowledge collected over the last years related to enzymatic properties, the precise definition of the substrates, the physiological implications, and discuss ongoing questions.

  1. Early-onset sleep defects in Drosophila models of Huntington's disease reflect alterations of PKA/CREB signaling

    PubMed Central

    Gonzales, Erin D.; Tanenhaus, Anne K.; Zhang, Jiabin; Chaffee, Ryan P.; Yin, Jerry C.P.

    2016-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a progressive neurological disorder whose non-motor symptoms include sleep disturbances. Whether sleep and activity abnormalities are primary molecular disruptions of mutant Huntingtin (mutHtt) expression or result from neurodegeneration is unclear. Here, we report Drosophila models of HD exhibit sleep and activity disruptions very early in adulthood, as soon as sleep patterns have developed. Pan-neuronal expression of full-length or N-terminally truncated mutHtt recapitulates sleep phenotypes of HD patients: impaired sleep initiation, fragmented and diminished sleep, and nighttime hyperactivity. Sleep deprivation of HD model flies results in exacerbated sleep deficits, indicating that homeostatic regulation of sleep is impaired. Elevated PKA/CREB activity in healthy flies produces patterns of sleep and activity similar to those in our HD models. We were curious whether aberrations in PKA/CREB signaling were responsible for our early-onset sleep/activity phenotypes. Decreasing signaling through the cAMP/PKA pathway suppresses mutHtt-induced developmental lethality. Genetically reducing PKA abolishes sleep/activity deficits in HD model flies, restores the homeostatic response and extends median lifespan. In vivo reporters, however, show dCREB2 activity is unchanged, or decreased when sleep/activity patterns are abnormal, suggesting dissociation of PKA and dCREB2 occurs early in pathogenesis. Collectively, our data suggest that sleep defects may reflect a primary pathological process in HD, and that measurements of sleep and cAMP/PKA could be prodromal indicators of disease, and serve as therapeutic targets for intervention. PMID:26604145

  2. A cAMP and CREB-mediated feed-forward mechanism regulates GSK3β in polycystic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Kakade, Vijayakumar R.; Tao, Shixin; Rajagopal, Madhumitha; Zhou, Xia; Li, Xiaogang; Yu, Alan S.L.; Calvet, James P.; Pandey, Pankaj; Rao, Reena

    2016-01-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β), a serine/threonine protein kinase, is commonly known to be regulated at the level of its activity. However, in some diseases including polycystic kidney disease (PKD), GSK3β expression is increased and plays a pathophysiological role. The current studies aimed to determine the mechanism for the increased GSK3β expression in PKD and its significance to disease progression. In mouse models of PKD, increases in renal GSK3β corresponded with increases in renal cAMP levels and disease progression. In vivo and in vitro studies revealed that GSK3β is a cAMP-responsive gene, and elevated cAMP levels, as seen in PKD, can increase GSK3β expression. In normal mice, vasopressin signaling induced by water deprivation increased GSK3β expression, which decreased following rehydration. Examination of the GSK3β promoter revealed five potential binding sites for the transcription factor, cAMP response element binding protein (CREB). CREB was found to bind to GSK3β promoter and essential for cAMP-mediated regulation of GSK3β. Importantly, this regulation was demonstrated to be part of a feed-forward loop in which cAMP through CREB regulates GSK3β expression, and GSK3β in turn positively regulates cAMP generation. GSK3β or CREB inhibition reduced transepithelial fluid secretion and cyst expansion in vitro. Thus, disruption at any point of this destructive cycle may be therapeutically useful to reduce cyst expansion and preserve renal function in PKD. PMID:27190311

  3. CRTC2 Is a Coactivator of GR and Couples GR and CREB in the Regulation of Hepatic Gluconeogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hill, Micah J; Suzuki, Shigeru; Segars, James H; Kino, Tomoshige

    2016-01-01

    Glucocorticoid hormones play essential roles in the regulation of gluconeogenesis in the liver, an adaptive response that is required for the maintenance of circulating glucose levels during fasting. Glucocorticoids do this by cooperating with glucagon, which is secreted from pancreatic islets to activate the cAMP-signaling pathway in hepatocytes. The cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB)-regulated transcription coactivator 2 (CRTC2) is a coactivator known to be specific to CREB and plays a central role in the glucagon-mediated activation of gluconeogenesis in the early phase of fasting. We show here that CRTC2 also functions as a coactivator for the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). CRTC2 strongly enhances GR-induced transcriptional activity of glucocorticoid-responsive genes. CRTC2 physically interacts with the ligand-binding domain of the GR through a region spanning amino acids 561-693. Further, CRTC2 is required for the glucocorticoid-associated cooperative mRNA expression of the glucose-6-phosphatase, a rate-limiting enzyme for hepatic gluconeogenesis, by facilitating the attraction of GR and itself to its promoter region already occupied by CREB. CRTC2 is required for the maintenance of blood glucose levels during fasting in mice by enhancing the GR transcriptional activity on both the G6p and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (Pepck) genes. Finally, CRTC2 modulates the transcriptional activity of the progesterone receptor, indicating that it may influence the transcriptional activity of other steroid/nuclear receptors. Taken together, these results reveal that CRTC2 plays an essential role in the regulation of hepatic gluconeogenesis through coordinated regulation of the glucocorticoid/GR- and glucagon/CREB-signaling pathways on the key genes G6P and PEPCK.

  4. Tetramethylpyrazine protects against scopolamine-induced memory impairments in rats by reversing the cAMP/PKA/CREB pathway.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wei; Yu, Xiao; Luo, Xiao-Ping; Yang, Shu-Hua; Zheng, Dong

    2013-09-15

    Tetramethylpyrazine is used in the treatment of many neurological diseases because of its neuroprotective effect. Here, we demonstrate that administration of tetramethylpyrazine effectively reverses memory deficits induced by scopolamine. Moreover, tetramethylpyrazine preserves postsynaptic protein synthesis and restores cAMP/PKA/CREB pathway signaling deficits. Our study not only explores the actions of tetramethylpyrazine on synapses, but also provides novel evidence for the possible therapeutic use of tetramethylpyrazine in dementia.

  5. Hemorrhage induces rapid in vivo activation of CREB and NF-kappaB in murine intraparenchymal lung mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Shenkar, R; Abraham, E

    1997-02-01

    Increased expression of proinflammatory cytokines appears to be an important factor contributing to the development of acute lung injury. In murine models, mRNA levels of proinflammatory and immunoregulatory cytokines, including IL-1alpha, IL-1beta, TGF-beta1, and TNF-alpha, are increased in intraparenchymal lung mononuclear cells 1 h after hemorrhage. Binding elements for the nuclear transcriptional regulatory factors, nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB), CCAAT/enhancer binding protein beta (C/EBPbeta), serum protein 1 (Sp1), activator protein 1 (AP-1), and the cyclic AMP response-element binding protein (CREB) are present in the promoter regions of numerous cytokine genes, including those whose expression is increased after blood loss. To investigate early transcriptional mechanisms which may be involved in regulating pulmonary cytokine expression after hemorrhage, we examined in vivo activation of these five nuclear transcriptional factors among intraparenchymal lung mononuclear cells obtained in the immediate post-hemorrhage period. Activation of NF-kappaB and CREB, but not C/EBPbeta, Sp1, or AP-1, was present in lung mononuclear cells isolated from mice 15 min after hemorrhage. Inhibition of xanthine oxidase by prior feeding with either an allopurinol-supplemented or a tungsten-enriched diet prevented hemorrhage-induced activation of CREB, but not NF-kappaB. These results demonstrate that hemorrhage leads to rapid in vivo activation in the lung of CREB through a xanthine oxidase-dependent mechanism and of NF-kappaB through other pathways, and suggest that the activation of these transcriptional factors may have an important role in regulating pulmonary cytokine expression and the development of acute lung injury after blood loss.

  6. Loss of dopamine D1 receptors and diminished D1/5 receptor-mediated ERK phosphorylation in the periaqueductal gray after spinal cord lesion

    PubMed Central

    Voulalas, Pamela J.; Ji, Yadong; Jiang, Li; Asgar, Jamila; Ro, Jin Y.; Masri, Radi

    2016-01-01

    Neuropathic pain resulting from spinal cord injury is often accompanied by maladaptive plasticity of the central nervous system, including the opioid receptor-rich periaqueductal gray (PAG). Evidence suggests that sensory signaling via the PAG is robustly modulated by dopamine D1- and D2-like receptors, but the effect of damage to the spinal cord on D1 and D2 receptor protein expression and function in the PAG has not been examined. Here we show that 21 days after a T10 or C6 spinothalamic tract lesion, both mice and rats display a remarkable decline in the expression of D1 receptors in the PAG, revealed by western blot analysis. These changes were associated with a significant reduction in hindpaw withdrawal thresholds in lesioned animals compared to sham-operated controls. We investigated the consequences of diminished D1 receptor levels by quantifying D1-like receptor-mediated phosphorylation of ERK1,2 and CREB, events that have been observed in numerous brain structures. In naïve animals, western blot analysis revealed that ERK1,2, but not CREB phosphorylation was significantly increased in the PAG by the D1-like agonist SKF 81297. Using immunohistochemistry, we found that SKF 81297 increased ERK1,2 phosphorylation in the PAG of sham animals. However, in lesioned animals, basal pERK1,2 levels were elevated and did not significantly increase after exposure to SKF 81297. Our findings provide support for the hypothesis that molecular adaptions resulting in a decrease in D1 receptor expression and signaling in the PAG are a consequence of SCL. PMID:27932310

  7. Autocrine activation of neuronal NMDA receptors by aspartate mediates dopamine- and cAMP-induced CREB-dependent gene transcription

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Luis E. F.; Murray, Peter D.; Zielke, H. Ronald; Roby, Clinton D.; Kingsbury, Tami J.; Krueger, Bruce K.

    2009-01-01

    Cyclic AMP can stimulate the transcription of many activity-dependent genes via activation of the transcription factor, CREB. However, in mouse cortical neuron cultures, prior to synaptogenesis, neither cAMP nor dopamine, which acts via cAMP, stimulated CREB-dependent gene transcription when NR2B-containing NMDA receptors (NMDARs) were blocked. Stimulation of transcription by cAMP was potentiated by inhibitors of excitatory amino acid uptake, suggesting a role for extracellular glutamate or aspartate in cAMP-induced transcription. Aspartate was identified as the extracellular messenger: enzymatic scavenging of L-aspartate, but not glutamate, blocked stimulation of CREB-dependent gene transcription by cAMP; moreover, cAMP induced aspartate but not glutamate release. Taken together, these results suggest that cAMP acts via an autocrine or paracrine pathway to release aspartate, which activates NR2B-containing NMDARs, leading to Ca2+ entry and activation of transcription. This cAMP/aspartate/NMDAR signaling pathway may mediate the effects of transmitters such as dopamine on axon growth and synaptogenesis in developing neurons or on synaptic plasticity in mature neural networks. PMID:19812345

  8. Laser Acupuncture Exerts Neuroprotective Effects via Regulation of Creb, Bdnf, Bcl-2, and Bax Gene Expressions in the Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Yeong-Chan; Yoon, Sun-Bee; Kim, Dohyeong; Choi, Dong-Hee; Lee, Yu-Mi

    2017-01-01

    Acupuncture has a positive effect on cognitive deficits. However, the effects of laser acupuncture (LA) on cognitive function and its mechanisms of action are unclear. The present study aimed to evaluate the effects of LA on middle cerebral artery occlusion- (MCAO-) induced cognitive impairment and its mechanisms of action. Transient focal cerebral ischemia was modeled in adult Sprague-Dawley rats by MCAO. After LA or manual-acupuncture (MA) treatment at the GV20 and HT7 for 2 weeks, hippocampal-dependent memory was evaluated using the Morris water maze (MWM) test. The hippocampus was dissected to analyze choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) immunoreactivity and Creb, Bdnf, Bcl-2, and Bax gene expressions. MWM test demonstrated a significant improvement in hippocampal-dependent memory in the MCAO rats after LA treatment. LA treatment significantly reversed the postischemic decrease in ChAT immunoreactivity in the hippocampal CA1 region. LA treatment significantly normalized gene expression in the hippocampus which had been altered by MCAO, especially upregulating gene expression of Creb, Bdnf, and Bcl-2 and downregulating gene expression of Bax. This study suggests that LA treatment could improve cognitive impairment in MCAO rats to enhance the cholinergic system in the hippocampal CA1 region and to exert a neuroprotective effect by regulating Creb, Bdnf, Bcl-2, and Bax gene expressions.

  9. cAMP/CREB-regulated LINC00473 marks LKB1-inactivated lung cancer and mediates tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zirong; Lin, Shuibin; Cao, Chunxia; Gimbrone, Nicholas T.; Yang, Rongqiang; Fu, Dongtao A.; Carper, Miranda B.; Haura, Eric B.; Schabath, Matthew B.; Cress, W. Douglas; Kaye, Frederic J.

    2016-01-01

    The LKB1 tumor suppressor gene is frequently mutated and inactivated in non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Loss of LKB1 promotes cancer progression and influences therapeutic responses in preclinical studies; however, specific targeted therapies for lung cancer with LKB1 inactivation are currently unavailable. Here, we have identified a long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) signature that is associated with the loss of LKB1 function. We discovered that LINC00473 is consistently the most highly induced gene in LKB1-inactivated human primary NSCLC samples and derived cell lines. Elevated LINC00473 expression correlated with poor prognosis, and sustained LINC00473 expression was required for the growth and survival of LKB1-inactivated NSCLC cells. Mechanistically, LINC00473 was induced by LKB1 inactivation and subsequent cyclic AMP–responsive element–binding protein (CREB)/CREB-regulated transcription coactivator (CRTC) activation. We determined that LINC00473 is a nuclear lncRNA and interacts with NONO, a component of the cAMP signaling pathway, thereby facilitating CRTC/CREB-mediated transcription. Collectively, our study demonstrates that LINC00473 expression potentially serves as a robust biomarker for tumor LKB1 functional status that can be integrated into clinical trials for patient selection and treatment evaluation, and implicates LINC00473 as a therapeutic target for LKB1-inactivated NSCLC. PMID:27140397

  10. FT-IR analysis of phosphorylated protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, Katsunori; Yoshihashi, Sachiko S.; Chihara, Kunihiro; Awazu, Kunio

    2004-09-01

    Phosphorylation and dephosphorylation, which are the most remarkable posttranslational modifications, are considered to be important chemical reactions that control the activation of proteins. We examine the phosphorylation analysis method by measuring the infrared absorption peak of phosphate group that observed at about 1070cm-1 (9.4μm) with Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometer (FT-IR). This study indicates that it is possible to identify a phosphorylation by measuring the infrared absorption peak of phosphate group observed at about 1070 cm-1 with FT-IR method. As long as target peptides have the same amino acid sequence, it is possible to identify the phosphorylated sites (threonine, serine and tyrosine).

  11. Creb1-Mecp2-mCpG Complex Transactivates Postnatal Murine Neuronal Glucose Transporter Isoform 3 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yongjun; Shin, Bo-Chul; Thamotharan, Shanthie

    2013-01-01

    The murine neuronal facilitative glucose transporter isoform 3 (Glut3) is developmentally regulated, peaking in expression at postnatal day (PN)14. In the present study, we characterized a canonical CpG island spanning the 5′-flanking region of the glut3 gene. Methylation-specific PCR and bisulfite sequencing identified methylation of this CpG (mCpG) island of the glut3 gene, frequency of methylation increasing 2.5-fold with a 1.6-fold increase in DNA methyl transferase 3a concentrations noted with advancing postnatal age (PN14 vs PN3). 5′-flanking region of glut3-luciferase reporter transient transfection in HT22 hippocampal neurons demonstrated that mCpGs inhibit glut3 transcription. Contrary to this biological function, glut3 expression rises synchronously with mCpGs in PN14 vs PN3 neurons. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (IP) revealed that methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (Mecp2) bound the glut3-mCpGs. Depending on association with specific coregulators, Mecp2, a dual regulator of gene transcription, may repress or activate a downstream gene. Sequential chromatin IP uncovered the glut3-mCpGs to bind Mecp2 exponentially upon recruitment of Creb1 rather than histone deacetylase 1. Co-IP and coimmunolocalization confirmed that Creb1 associated with Mecp2 and cotransfection with glut3-mCpG in HT22 cells enhanced glut3 transcription. Separate 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine pretreatment or in combination with trichostatin A reduced mCpG and specific small interference RNAs targeting Mecp2 and Creb1 separately or together depleting Mecp2 and/or Creb1 binding of glut3-mCpGs reduced glut3 expression in HT22 cells. We conclude that Glut3 is a methylation-sensitive neuronal gene that recruits Mecp2. Recruitment of Creb1-Mecp2 by glut3-mCpG contributes towards transactivation, formulating an escape from mCpG-induced gene suppression, and thereby promoting developmental neuronal glut3 gene transcription and expression. PMID:23493374

  12. Role of Hypothalamic Creb-Binding Protein in Obesity and Molecular Reprogramming of Metabolic Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Cesar L.; Yang, Linda; Dacks, Penny A.; Isoda, Fumiko; van Deursen, Jan M. A.; Mobbs, Charles V.

    2016-01-01

    We have reported a correlation between hypothalamic expression of Creb-binding protein (Cbp) and lifespan, and that inhibition of Cbp prevents protective effects of dietary restriction during aging, suggesting that hypothalamic Cbp plays a role in responses to nutritional status and energy balance. Recent GWAS and network analyses have also implicated Cbp as the most connected gene in protein-protein interactions in human Type 2 diabetes. The present studies address mechanisms mediating the role of Cbp in diabetes by inhibiting hypothalamic Cbp using a Cre-lox strategy. Inhibition of hypothalamic Cbp results in profound obesity and impaired glucose homeostasis, increased food intake, and decreased body temperature. In addition, these changes are accompanied by molecular evidence in the hypothalamus for impaired leptin and insulin signaling, a shift from glucose to lipid metabolism, and decreased Pomc mRNA, with no effect on locomotion. Further assessment of the significance of the metabolic switch demonstrated that enhanced expression of hypothalamic Cpt1a, which promotes lipid metabolism, similarly resulted in increased body weight and reduced Pomc mRNA. PMID:27832201

  13. Modulation of type I interferon induction by porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus and degradation of CREB-binding protein by non-structural protein 1 in MARC-145 and HeLa cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Oekyung; Sun Yan; Lai, Frances W.; Song Cheng; Yoo, Dongwan

    2010-07-05

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) is an emerged disease of swine characterized by negligible response of type I IFNs and viral persistence. We show that the PRRSV non-structural protein 1 (Nsp1) is the viral component responsible for modulation of IFN response. Nsp1 blocked dsRNA-induced IRF3 and IFN promoter activities. Nsp1 did not block phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of IRF3 but inhibited IRF3 association with CREB-binding protein (CBP) in the nucleus. While IRF3 was stable, CBP was degraded, and CBP degradation was proteasome-dependent, suggesting that CBP degradation is not due to the protease activity of Nsp1 but an intermediary is involved. Our data suggest that the Nsp1-mediated CBP degradation inhibits the recruitment of CBP for enhanceosome assembly, leading to the block of IFN response. CBP degradation is a novel strategy for viral evasion from the host response, and Nsp1 may form a new class of viral antagonists for IFN modulation.

  14. β-Hydroxybutyric sodium salt inhibition of growth hormone and prolactin secretion via the cAMP/PKA/CREB and AMPK signaling pathways in dairy cow anterior pituitary cells.

    PubMed

    Fu, Shou-Peng; Wang, Wei; Liu, Bing-Run; Yang, Huan-Min; Ji, Hong; Yang, Zhan-Qing; Guo, Bin; Liu, Ju-Xiong; Wang, Jian-Fa

    2015-02-16

    β-hydroxybutyric acid (BHBA) regulates the synthesis and secretion of growth hormone (GH) and prolactin (PRL), but its mechanism is unknown. In this study, we detected the effects of BHBA on the activities of G protein signaling pathways, AMPK-α activity, GH, and PRL gene transcription, and GH and PRL secretion in dairy cow anterior pituitary cells (DCAPCs). The results showed that BHBA decreased intracellular cAMP levels and a subsequent reduction in protein kinase A (PKA) activity. Inhibition of PKA activity reduced cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) phosphorylation, thereby inhibiting GH and PRL transcription and secretion. The effects of BHBA were attenuated by a specific Gαi inhibitor, pertussis toxin (PTX). In addition, intracellular BHBA uptake mediated by monocarboxylate transporter 1 (MCT1) could trigger AMPK signaling and result in the decrease in GH and PRL mRNA translation in DCAPCs cultured under low-glucose and non-glucose condition when compared with the high-glucose group. This study identifies a biochemical mechanism for the regulatory action of BHBA on GH and PRL gene transcription, translation, and secretion in DCAPCs, which may be one of the factors that regulate pituitary function during the transition period in dairy cows.

  15. Identification of kinases, phosphatases, and phosphorylation sites in human and porcine spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Lackey, Brett R; Gray, Sandra L

    2015-01-01

    Multiple inter-connected signaling pathways, involving kinases and phosphatases, form a framework that controls sperm motility, function, and fertilizing ability. Methods that give a broad view of the proteomic landscape may prove valuable in uncovering new crosstalk connections, as well as in discovering new proteins within this regulatory framework. A multi-immunoblotting strategy was utilized to evaluate this concept on human and porcine spermatozoa samples. In human and porcine spermatozoa, a diversity of kinases were identified including protein kinase A (PKA), protein kinase B (PKB), isoforms of protein kinase C (PKC), calmodulin-dependent kinases (CAMK), casein kinase (CK), and isoforms of glycogen synthase kinase (GSK3). Several phosphatases, such as protein phosphatase (PP)-1, PP2A, PP2C, and mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphatase (MKP-1), were identified in human spermatozoa. The phosphorylation epitopes recognized belonged to members of the MAPK family, in addition to α and β isoforms of GSK3 and cAMP response element binding protein (CREB). Proteomic approaches that allow a broad view may aid in understanding the crosstalk between signaling systems in spermatozoal physiology.

  16. The abnormal phosphorylation of tau protein at Ser-202 in Alzheimer disease recapitulates phosphorylation during development.

    PubMed

    Goedert, M; Jakes, R; Crowther, R A; Six, J; Lübke, U; Vandermeeren, M; Cras, P; Trojanowski, J Q; Lee, V M

    1993-06-01

    Tau is a neuronal phosphoprotein whose expression is developmentally regulated. A single tau isoform is expressed in fetal human brain but six isoforms are expressed in adult brain, with the fetal isoform corresponding to the shortest of the adult isoforms. Phosphorylation of tau is also developmentally regulated, as fetal tau is phosphorylated at more sites than adult tau. In Alzheimer disease, the six adult tau isoforms become abnormally phosphorylated and form the paired helical filament, the major fibrous component of the characteristic neurofibrillary lesions. We show here that Ser-202 (in the numbering of the longest human brain tau isoform) is a phosphorylation site that distinguishes fetal from adult tau and we identify it as one of the abnormal phosphorylation sites in Alzheimer disease. The abnormal phosphorylation of tau at Ser-202 in Alzheimer disease thus recapitulates normal phosphorylation during development.

  17. Electroacupuncture Ameliorates Learning and Memory and Improves Synaptic Plasticity via Activation of the PKA/CREB Signaling Pathway in Cerebral Hypoperfusion

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Min; Guo, Ya-Bi; Zhang, Feng-Xia; Liu, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Electroacupuncture (EA) has shown protective effects on cognitive decline. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms are ill-understood. The present study was undertaken to determine whether the cognitive function was ameliorated in cerebral hypoperfusion rats following EA and to investigate the role of PKA/CREB pathway. We used a rat 2-vessel occlusion (2VO) model and delivered EA at Baihui (GV20) and Dazhui (GV14) acupoints. Morris water maze (MWM) task, electrophysiological recording, Golgi silver stain, Nissl stain, Western blot, and real-time PCR were employed. EA significantly (1) ameliorated the spatial learning and memory deficits, (2) alleviated long-term potentiation (LTP) impairment and the reduction of dendritic spine density, (3) suppressed the decline of phospho-CREB (pCREB) protein, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) protein, and microRNA132 (miR132), and (4) reduced the increase of p250GAP protein of 2VO rats. These changes were partially blocked by a selective protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor, N-[2-(p-bromocinnamylamino)ethyl]-5-isoquinoline-sulfonamide (H89), suggesting that the PKA/CREB pathway is potentially involved in the effects of EA. Moreover, any significant damage to the pyramidal cell layer of CA1 subregion was absent. These results demonstrated that EA could ameliorate learning and memory deficits and alleviate hippocampal synaptic plasticity impairment of cerebral hypoperfusion rats, potentially mediated by PKA/CREB signaling pathway. PMID:27829866

  18. Single nucleotide polymorphism near CREB1, rs7591784, is associated with pretreatment methamphetamine use frequency and outcome of outpatient treatment for methamphetamine use disorder.

    PubMed

    Heinzerling, Keith G; Demirdjian, Levon; Wu, Yingnian; Shoptaw, Steven

    2016-03-01

    Although stimulant dependence is highly heritable, few studies have examined genetic influences on methamphetamine dependence. We performed a candidate gene study of 52 SNPs and pretreatment methamphetamine use frequency among 263 methamphetamine dependent Hispanic and Non-Hispanic White participants of several methamphetamine outpatient clinical trials in Los Angeles. One SNP, rs7591784 was significantly associated with pretreatment methamphetamine use frequency following Bonferroni correction (p < 0.001) in males but not females. We then examined rs7591784 and methamphetamine urine drug screen results during 12 weeks of outpatient treatment among males with treatment outcome data available (N = 94) and found rs7591784 was significantly associated with methamphetamine use during treatment controlling for pretreatment methamphetamine use. rs7591784 is near CREB1 and in a linkage disequilibrium block with rs2952768, previously shown to influence CREB1 expression. The CREB signaling pathway is involved in gene expression changes related to chronic use of multiple drugs of abuse including methamphetamine and these results suggest that variability in CREB signaling may influence pretreatment frequency of methamphetamine use as well as outcomes of outpatient treatment. Medications targeting the CREB pathway, including phosphodiesterase inhibitors, warrant investigation as pharmacotherapies for methamphetamine use disorders.

  19. Inhibition of the cAMP/PKA/CREB Pathway Contributes to the Analgesic Effects of Electroacupuncture in the Anterior Cingulate Cortex in a Rat Pain Memory Model

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jing; Liu, Bo-Yi; Shen, Zui; Fang, Fang; Wang, Jia-Ling

    2016-01-01

    Pain memory is considered as endopathic factor underlying stubborn chronic pain. Our previous study demonstrated that electroacupuncture (EA) can alleviate retrieval of pain memory. This study was designed to observe the different effects between EA and indomethacin (a kind of nonsteroid anti-inflammatory drugs, NSAIDs) in a rat pain memory model. To explore the critical role of protein kinase A (PKA) in pain memory, a PKA inhibitor was microinjected into anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) in model rats. We further investigated the roles of the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), PKA, cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB), and cAMP/PKA/CREB pathway in pain memory to explore the potential molecular mechanism. The results showed that EA alleviates the retrieval of pain memory while indomethacin failed. Intra-ACC microinjection of a PKA inhibitor blocked the occurrence of pain memory. EA reduced the activation of cAMP, PKA, and CREB and the coexpression levels of cAMP/PKA and PKA/CREB in the ACC of pain memory model rats, but indomethacin failed. The present findings identified a critical role of PKA in ACC in retrieval of pain memory. We propose that the proper mechanism of EA on pain memory is possibly due to the partial inhibition of cAMP/PKA/CREB signaling pathway by EA. PMID:28090359

  20. Single nucleotide polymorphism near CREB1, rs7591784, is associated with pretreatment methamphetamine use frequency and outcome of outpatient treatment for methamphetamine use disorder

    PubMed Central

    Heinzerling, Keith G.; Demirdjian, Levon; Wu, Yingnian; Shoptaw, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Although stimulant dependence is highly heritable, few studies have examined genetic influences on methamphetamine dependence. We performed a candidate gene study of 52 SNPs and pretreatment methamphetamine use frequency among 263 methamphetamine dependent Hispanic and Non-Hispanic White participants of several methamphetamine outpatient clinical trials in Los Angeles. One SNP, rs7591784 was significantly associated with pretreatment methamphetamine use frequency following Bonferroni correction (p < 0.001) in males but not females. We then examined rs7591784 and methamphetamine urine drug screen results during 12 weeks of outpatient treatment among males with treatment outcome data available (N = 94) and found rs7591784 was significantly associated with methamphetamine use during treatment controlling for pretreatment methamphetamine use. rs7591784 is near CREB1 and in a linkage disequilibrium block with rs2952768, previously shown to influence CREB1 expression. The CREB signaling pathway is involved in gene expression changes related to chronic use of multiple drugs of abuse including methamphetamine and these results suggest that variability in CREB signaling may influence pretreatment frequency of methamphetamine use as well as outcomes of outpatient treatment. Medications targeting the CREB pathway, including phosphodiesterase inhibitors, warrant investigation as pharmacotherapies for methamphetamine use disorders. PMID:26736037

  1. Wnt/β-catenin pathway transactivates microRNA-150 that promotes EMT of colorectal cancer cells by suppressing CREB signaling.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yan-Hua; Wang, Lu-Qin; Li, Bin; Xu, Hui; Yang, Jian-Hua; Zheng, Li-Si; Yu, Peng; Zhou, Ai-Dong; Zhang, Yin; Xie, Shu-Juan; Liang, Zi-Rui; Zhang, Chen-Min; Zhou, Hui; Qu, Liang-Hu

    2016-07-05

    A hallmark of aberrant activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway has been observed in most colorectal cancers (CRC), but little is known about the role of non-coding RNAs regulated by this pathway. Here, we found that miR-150 was the most significantly upregulated microRNA responsive to elevated of Wnt/β-catenin signaling activity in both HCT116 and HEK293T cells. Mechanistically, the β-catenin/LEF1 complex binds to the conserved TCF/LEF1-binding element in the miR-150 promoter and thereby transactivates its expression. Enforced expression of miR-150 in HCT116 cell line transformed cells into a spindle shape with higher migration and invasion activity. miR-150 markedly suppressed the CREB signaling pathway by targeting its core transcription factors CREB1 and EP300. Knockdown of CREB1 or EP300 and knockout of CREB1 by CRISPR/Cas9 phenocopied the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) observed in HCT116 cells in response to miR-150 overexpression. In summary, our data indicate that miR-150 is a novel Wnt effector that may significantly enhance EMT of CRC cells by targeting the CREB signaling pathway.

  2. Distinct roles of methamphetamine in modulating spatial memory consolidation, retrieval, reconsolidation and the accompanying changes of ERK and CREB activation in hippocampus and prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Cao, Guofen; Zhu, Jie; Zhong, Qing; Shi, Chaofeng; Dang, Yonghui; Han, Wei; Liu, Xinshe; Xu, Ming; Chen, Teng

    2013-04-01

    Drugs of abuse modulated learning and memory in humans yet the underlying mechanism remained unclear. The extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and the transcription factor cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) were involved in neuroplastic changes associated with learning and memory. In the current study, we used a Morris water maze to examine the effect of methamphetamine (METH) on different processes of spatial memory in mice. We then investigated the status of ERK and CREB in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex (PFC). We found that 1.0 mg/kg dose of METH facilitated spatial memory consolidation when it was injected immediately after the last learning trial. In contrast, the same dose of METH had no effect on spatial memory retrieval when it was injected 30 min before the test. Furthermore, 1.0 mg/kg dose of METH injected immediately after retrieval had no effect on spatial memory reconsolidation. Activation of both ERK and CREB in the hippocampus was found following memory consolidation but not after retrieval or reconsolidation in METH-treated mouse groups. In contrast, activation of both ERK and CREB in the PFC was found following memory retrieval but not other processes in METH-treated mouse groups. These results suggested that METH facilitated spatial memory consolidation but not retrieval or reconsolidation. Moreover, activation of the ERK and CREB signaling pathway in the hippocampus might be involved in METH-induced spatial memory changes.

  3. Functional Impact of Corticotropin-Releasing Factor Exposure on Tau Phosphorylation and Axon Transport.

    PubMed

    Le, Michelle H; Weissmiller, April M; Monte, Louise; Lin, Po Han; Hexom, Tia C; Natera, Orlangie; Wu, Chengbiao; Rissman, Robert A

    2016-01-01

    Stress exposure or increased levels of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) induce hippocampal tau phosphorylation (tau-P) in rodent models, a process that is dependent on the type-1 CRF receptor (CRFR1). Although these preclinical studies on stress-induced tau-P provide mechanistic insight for epidemiological work that identifies stress as a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD), the actual impact of stress-induced tau-P on neuronal function remains unclear. To determine the functional consequences of stress-induced tau-P, we developed a novel mouse neuronal cell culture system to explore the impact of acute (0.5hr) and chronic (2hr) CRF treatment on tau-P and integral cell processes such as axon transport. Consistent with in vivo reports, we found that chronic CRF treatment increased tau-P levels and caused globular accumulations of phosphorylated tau in dendritic and axonal processes. Furthermore, while both acute and chronic CRF treatment led to significant reduction in CREB activation and axon transport of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), this was not the case with mitochondrial transport. Acute CRF treatment caused increased mitochondrial velocity and distance traveled in neurons, while chronic CRF treatment modestly decreased mitochondrial velocity and greatly increased distance traveled. These results suggest that transport of cellular energetics may take priority over growth factors during stress. Tau-P was required for these changes, as co-treatment of CRF with a GSK kinase inhibitor prevented CRF-induced tau-P and all axon transport changes. Collectively, our results provide mechanistic insight into the consequences of stress peptide-induced tau-P and provide an explanation for how chronic stress via CRF may lead to neuronal vulnerability in AD.

  4. The CREB binding protein inhibitor ICG-001 suppresses pancreatic cancer growth

    PubMed Central

    Arensman, Michael D.; Telesca, Donatello; Lay, Anna R.; Kershaw, Kathleen M.; Wu, Nanping; Donahue, Timothy R.; Dawson, David W.

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a highly lethal cancer due in part to a lack of highly robust cytotoxic or molecular-based therapies. Recent studies investigating ligand-mediated Wnt/β-catenin signaling have highlighted its importance in pancreatic cancer initiation and progression, as well as its potential as a therapeutic target in PDAC. The small molecule ICG-001 binds CREB-binding protein (CBP) to disrupt its interaction with β-catenin and inhibit CBP function as a co-activator of Wnt/β-catenin-mediated transcription. Given its ability to inhibit Wnt/β-catenin-mediated transcription in vitro and in vivo, as well as its efficacy in preclinical models of colorectal cancer and other Wnt-driven diseases, we examined ICG-001 and its potential role as a therapeutic in PDAC. ICG-001 alone significantly inhibited anchorage-dependent and -independent growth of multiple PDAC lines, and augmented in vitro growth inhibition when used in combination with gemcitabine. ICG-001 had only variable modest effects on PDAC apoptosis and instead mediated PDAC growth inhibition primarily through robust induction of G1 cell cycle arrest. These effects, however, appeared decoupled from its inhibition of Wnt/β-catenin-mediated transcription. DNA microarrays performed on PDAC cells in the context of ICG-001 treatment revealed ICG-001 altered the expression of several genes with well-established roles in DNA replication and cell cycle progression, including direct actions on SKP2 and CDKN1A. ICG-001 also significantly prolonged survival in an in vivo orthotopic xenograft model of PDAC, indicating ICG-001 or derived compounds that disrupt CBP activity are potentially useful small molecule therapeutics for pancreatic cancer. PMID:25082960

  5. CREB-binding protein, p300, butyrate, and Wnt signaling in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bordonaro, Michael; Lazarova, Darina L

    2015-01-01

    This paper reviews the distinctive roles played by the transcriptional coactivators CREB-binding protein (CBP) and p300 in Wnt/β-catenin signaling and cell physiology in colorectal cancer (CRC). Specifically, we focus on the effects of CBP- and p300-mediated Wnt activity on (1) neoplastic progression; (2) the activities of butyrate, a breakdown product of dietary fiber, on cell signaling and colonic cell physiology; (3) the development of resistance to histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACis), including butyrate and synthetic HDACis, in colonic cells; and (4) the physiology and number of cancer stem cells. Mutations of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway initiate the majority of CRC cases, and we have shown that hyperactivation of this pathway by butyrate and other HDACis promotes CRC cell apoptosis. This activity by butyrate may in part explain the preventive action of fiber against CRC. However, individuals with a high-fiber diet may still develop neoplasia; therefore, resistance to the chemopreventive action of butyrate likely contributes to CRC. CBP or p300 may modify the ability of butyrate to influence colonic cell physiology since the two transcriptional coactivators affect Wnt signaling, and likely, its hyperactivation by butyrate. Also, CBP and p300 likely affect colonic tumorigenesis, as well as stem cell pluripotency. Improvement of CRC prevention and therapy requires a better understanding of the alterations in Wnt signaling and gene expression that underlie neoplastic progression, stem cell fate, and the development of resistance to butyrate and clinically relevant HDACis. Detailed knowledge of how CBP- and p300 modulate colonic cell physiology may lead to new approaches for anti-CRC prevention and therapeutics, particularly with respect to combinatorial therapy of CBP/p300 inhibitors with HDACis. PMID:26217075

  6. Insulin stimulates the tyrosine phosphorylation of caveolin

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    The specialized plasma membrane structures termed caveolae and the caveolar-coat protein caveolin are highly expressed in insulin- sensitive cells such as adipocytes and muscle. Stimulation of 3T3-L1 adipocytes with insulin significantly increased the tyrosine phosphorylation of caveolin and a 29-kD caveolin-associated protein in caveolin-enriched Triton-insoluble complexes. Maximal phosphorylation occurred within 5 min, and the levels of phosphorylation remained elevated for at least 30 min. The insulin-dose responses for the tyrosine phosphorylation of caveolin and the 29-kD caveolin-associated protein paralleled those for the phosphorylation of the insulin receptor. The stimulation of caveolin tyrosine phosphorylation was specific for insulin and was not observed with PDGF or EGF, although PDGF stimulated the tyrosine phosphorylation of the 29-kD caveolin- associated protein. Increased tyrosine phosphorylation of caveolin, its associated 29-kD protein, and a 60-kD protein was observed in an in vitro kinase assay after incubation of the caveolin-enriched Triton- insoluble complexes with Mg-ATP, suggesting the presence of an intrinsic tyrosine kinase in these complexes. These fractions contain only trace amounts of the activated insulin receptor. In addition, these complexes contain a 60-kD kinase detected in an in situ gel kinase assay and an approximately 60 kD protein that cross-reacts with an antibody against the Src-family kinase p59Fyn. Thus, the insulin- dependent tyrosine phosphorylation of caveolin represents a novel, insulin-specific signal transduction pathway that may involve activation of a tyrosine kinase downstream of the insulin receptor. PMID:7540611

  7. Heme Oxygenase-1 Regulates Dendritic Cell Function through Modulation of p38 MAPK-CREB/ATF1 Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    Al-Huseini, Laith M. A.; Aw Yeang, Han Xian; Hamdam, Junnat M.; Sethu, Swaminathan; Alhumeed, Naif; Wong, Wai; Sathish, Jean G.

    2014-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are critical for the initiation of immune responses including activation of CD8 T cells. Intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels influence DC maturation and function. Intracellular heme, a product of catabolism of heme-containing metalloproteins, is a key inducer of ROS. Intracellular heme levels are regulated by heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), which catalyzes the degradation of heme. Heme oxygenase-1 has been implicated in regulating DC maturation; however, its role in other DC functions is unclear. Furthermore, the signaling pathways modulated by HO-1 in DCs are unknown. In this study, we demonstrate that inhibition of HO-1 activity in murine bone marrow-derived immature DCs (iDCs) resulted in DCs with raised intracellular ROS levels, a mature phenotype, impaired phagocytic and endocytic function, and increased capacity to stimulate antigen-specific CD8 T cells. Interestingly, our results reveal that the increased ROS levels following HO-1 inhibition did not underlie the changes in phenotype and functions observed in these iDCs. Importantly, we show that the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK), cAMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB), and activating transcription factor 1 (ATF1) pathway is involved in the mediation of the phenotypic and functional changes arising from HO-1 inhibition. Furthermore, up-regulation of HO-1 activity rendered iDCs refractory to lipopolysaccharide-induced activation of p38 MAPK-CREB/ATF1 pathway and DC maturation. Finally, we demonstrate that treatment of iDC with the HO-1 substrate, heme, recapitulates the effects that result from HO-1 inhibition. Based on these results, we conclude that HO-1 regulates DC maturation and function by modulating the p38 MAPK-CREB/ATF1 signaling axis. PMID:24719331

  8. Morphine-induced conditioned place preference and the alterations of p-ERK, p-CREB and c-fos levels in hypothalamus and hippocampus: the effects of physical stress.

    PubMed

    Pahlevani, P; Fatahi, Z; Moradi, M; Haghparast, A

    2014-12-08

    The hypothalamus and hippocampus are important areas involved in stress responses and reward processing. In addition, ERK/CREB pathway plays a critical role in the control of cellular responses to stress and reward. In the current study, effects of acute and subchronic stress on the alteration of p-ERK, p-CREB and c-fos levels in the hypothalamus and hippocampus of saline- or morphine-treated animals during morphine-induced conditioned place preference (CPP) procedure were investigated. Male Wistar rats were divided into two saline- and morphine-treated supergroups. Each supergroup includes of control, acute stress and subchronic stress groups. In all of groups, the CPP procedure was done, afterward the alternation of p-ERK/ERK ratio, p-CREB/CREB ratio and c-fos level in the hypothalamus and hippocampus were estimated by Western blot analysis. The results indicated that in saline- or morphine-treated animals, p-ERK/ERK ratio, p-CREB/CREB ratio and c-fos level increased after application of acute and subchronic stress (except for p-ERK/ERK ratio in morphine-control group). Our findings revealed that in saline- or morphine-treated animals, acute and subcronic stress increased the p-ERK/ERK ratio, p-CREB/CREB ratio and c-fos level in the hypothalamus and hippocampus and this enhancement in morphine-treated animals, was more considerable than that in saline-treated animals.

  9. Chronic CXCL10 alters the level of activated ERK1/2 and transcriptional factors CREB and NF-kB in hippocampal neuronal cell culture

    PubMed Central

    Bajova, Hilda; Nelson, Thomas E.; Gruol, Donna L.

    2008-01-01

    Signal transduction pathways may be important targets of chemokines during neuroinflammation. In the current study, Western blot analyses show that in rat hippocampal neuronal/glial cell cultures chronic CXCL10 increases the level of protein for ERK1/2 as well as for the transcriptional factors CREB and NF-κB. Bcl-2, an anti-apoptotic protein whose expression can be regulated by a pathway involving ERK1/2, CREB and NF-κB, was also increased in the CXCL10 treated cultures. These results implicate a role for ERK1/2, CREB and NF-κB in effects of CXCL10 on hippocampal cells and suggest that chronic CXCL10 may have a protective role during certain neuroinflammatory conditions. PMID:18329727

  10. Upregulation of AKT1 protein expression in forskolin-stimulated macrophage: evidence from ChIP analysis that CREB binds to and activates the AKT1 promoter.

    PubMed

    Misra, Uma Kant; Pizzo, Salvatore Vincent

    2007-03-01

    Recently, we reported that silencing CREB gene expression by RNAi significantly attenuates forskolin-induced activation of Akt1. We now provide evidence that forskolin-treatment causes transcriptional and translational upregulation of Akt1 in macrophages. Akt synthesis was demonstrated by [(14)C]leucine or [(35)S] incorporation into newly synthesized Akt1 protein. Akt protein levels increased by approximately 1.5-fold after only a 5 min exposure of macrophages to forskolin. Akt1 levels thereafter rapidly returned to basal values (t(1/2) approximately 15 min). Maximal upregulation of Akt1 occurred in cells treated with 10 microM forskolin. Forskolin-dependent Akt1 synthesis was abolished by pretreating the cells with CREB-directed dsRNA as demonstrated at both the message and protein level, as well as by determining the synthesis of [(35)S]-labeled Akt1 protein. The PKA inhibitor H-89, greatly attenuated forskolin-induced Akt1 synthesis. Transcriptional and translational inhibitors also greatly reduced Akt1 synthesis in forskolin-stimulated [(14)C]leucine-labeled macrophages. Using a chromatin immunoprecipitation assay, we demonstrate that CREB binds to a CRE binding domain of the Akt1 gene promoter. In conclusion, we show here for the first time transcriptional upregulation of Akt1 by CREB, based upon Akt1 protein synthesis and its modulation by transitional and translational inhibitors in forskolin-stimulated cells, Akt1 protein. and mRNA levels upon silencing CREB gene expression, and binding of CREB to the Akt1 gene promoter.

  11. A negative feedback control of transforming growth factor-beta signaling by glycogen synthase kinase 3-mediated Smad3 linker phosphorylation at Ser-204.

    PubMed

    Millet, Caroline; Yamashita, Motozo; Heller, Mary; Yu, Li-Rong; Veenstra, Timothy D; Zhang, Ying E

    2009-07-24

    Through the action of its membrane-bound type I receptor, transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) elicits a wide range of cellular responses that regulate cell proliferation, differentiation, and apo ptosis. Many of these signaling responses are mediated by Smad proteins. As such, controlling Smad activity is crucial for proper signaling by TGF-beta and its related factors. Here, we show that TGF-beta induces phosphorylation at three sites in the Smad3 linker region in addition to the two C-terminal residues, and glycogen synthase kinase 3 is responsible for phosphorylation at one of these sites, namely Ser-204. Alanine substitution at Ser-204 and/or the neighboring Ser-208, the priming site for glycogen synthase kinase 3 in vivo activity, strengthened the affinity of Smad3 to CREB-binding protein, suggesting that linker phosphorylation may be part of a negative feedback loop that modulates Smad3 transcriptional activity. Thus, our findings reveal a novel aspect of the Smad3 signaling mechanism that controls the final amplitude of cellular responses to TGF-beta.

  12. Examining site-specific GPCR phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Butcher, Adrian J; Tobin, Andrew B; Kong, Kok Choi

    2011-01-01

    Phosphorylation of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) is one of the most prominent post-translation modifications mediated by agonist stimulation. This process has been shown to result not only in receptor desensitisation but also, via the recruitment of arrestin adaptor proteins, to promote receptor coupling to numerous signalling pathways. Furthermore, there is now a growing body of evidence suggesting that GPCRs may employ phosphorylation as a mechanism to regulate their cell-type-specific signalling, hence generating tissue-specific functions. These advances have resulted partly from improved methods used in the determination of phospho-acceptor sites on GPCRs and improved analysis of the consequences of phosphorylation. This chapter aims to describe the methods used in our laboratory for the investigation of site-specific phosphorylation of the M₃-muscarinic receptor. These methods could easily be applied in the study of other receptors.

  13. Protein phosphorylation in neurodegeneration: friend or foe?

    PubMed Central

    Tenreiro, Sandra; Eckermann, Katrin; Outeiro, Tiago F.

    2014-01-01

    Protein misfolding and aggregation is a common hallmark in neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), and fronto-temporal dementia (FTD). In these disorders, the misfolding and aggregation of specific proteins occurs alongside neuronal degeneration in somewhat specific brain areas, depending on the disorder and the stage of the disease. However, we still do not fully understand the mechanisms governing protein aggregation, and whether this constitutes a protective or detrimental process. In PD, alpha-synuclein (aSyn) forms protein aggregates, known as Lewy bodies, and is phosphorylated at serine 129. Other residues have also been shown to be phosphorylated, but the significance of phosphorylation in the biology and pathophysiology of the protein is still controversial. In AD and in FTD, hyperphosphorylation of tau protein causes its misfolding and aggregation. Again, our understanding of the precise consequences of tau phosphorylation in the biology and pathophysiology of the protein is still limited. Through the use of a variety of model organisms and technical approaches, we are now gaining stronger insight into the effects of phosphorylation in the behavior of these proteins. In this review, we cover recent findings in the field and discuss how targeting phosphorylation events might be used for therapeutic intervention in these devastating diseases of the nervous system. PMID:24860424

  14. Long-term dynamics of multisite phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Rubinstein, Boris Y.; Mattingly, Henry H.; Berezhkovskii, Alexander M.; Shvartsman, Stanislav Y.

    2016-01-01

    Multisite phosphorylation cycles are ubiquitous in cell regulation systems and are studied at multiple levels of complexity, from molecules to organisms, with the ultimate goal of establishing predictive understanding of the effects of genetic and pharmacological perturbations of protein phosphorylation in vivo. Achieving this goal is essentially impossible without mathematical models, which provide a systematic framework for exploring dynamic interactions of multiple network components. Most of the models studied to date do not discriminate between the distinct partially phosphorylated forms and focus on two limiting reaction regimes, distributive and processive, which differ in the number of enzyme–substrate binding events needed for complete phosphorylation or dephosphorylation. Here we use a minimal model of extracellular signal-related kinase regulation to explore the dynamics of a reaction network that includes all essential phosphorylation forms and arbitrary levels of reaction processivity. In addition to bistability, which has been studied extensively in distributive mechanisms, this network can generate periodic oscillations. Both bistability and oscillations can be realized at high levels of reaction processivity. Our work provides a general framework for systematic analysis of dynamics in multisite phosphorylation systems. PMID:27226482

  15. Compartment-Specific Phosphorylation of Squid Neurofilaments.

    PubMed

    Grant, Philip; Pant, Harish C

    2016-01-01

    Studies of the giant axon and synapse of third-order neurons in the squid stellate ganglion have provided a vast literature on neuronal physiology and axon transport. Large neuronal size also lends itself to comparative biochemical studies of cell body versus axon. These have focused on the regulation of synthesis, assembly, posttranslational modification and function of neuronal cytoskeletal proteins (microtubules (MTs) and neurofilaments (NFs)), the predominant proteins in axoplasm. These contribute to axonal organization, stability, transport, and impulse transmission responsible for rapid contractions of mantle muscles underlying jet propulsion. Studies of vertebrate NFs have established an extensive literature on NF structure, organization, and function; studies of squid NFs, however, have made it possible to compare compartment-specific regulation of NF synthesis, assembly, and function in soma versus axoplasm. Since NFs contain over 100 eligible sites for phosphorylation by protein kinases, the compartment-specific patterns of phosphorylation have been a primary focus of biochemical studies. We have learned that NF phosphorylation is tightly compartmentalized; extensive phosphorylation occurs only in the axonal compartment in squid and in vertebrate neurons. This extensive phosphorylation plays a key role in organizing NFs, in association with microtubules (MTs), into a stable, dynamic functional lattice that supports axon growth, diameter, impulse transmission, and synaptic activity. To understand how cytoskeletal phosphorylation is topographically regulated, the kinases and phosphatases, bound to NFs isolated from cell bodies and axoplasm, have also been studied.

  16. Phosphorylation of human skeletal muscle myosin

    SciTech Connect

    Houston, M.E.; Lingley, M.D.; Stuart, D.S.; Hoffman-Goetz, L.

    1986-03-01

    Phosphorylation of the P-light chains (phosphorylatable light chains) in human skeletal muscle myosin was studied in vitro and in vivo under resting an d contracted conditions. biopsy samples from rested vastus lateralis muscle of male and female subjects were incubated in oxygenated physiological solution at 30/sup 0/C. Samples frozen following a quiescent period showed the presence of only unphosphorylated P-light chains designated LC2f (light chain two of fast myosin) CL2s and LC2s'(light chains two of slow myosin). Treatment with caffeine (10 mM) or direct electrical stimulation resulted in the appearance of three additional bands which were identified as the phosphorylated forms of the P-light chains i.e. LC2f-P, LC2s-P and LC2s'-P. The presence of phosphate was confirmed by prior incubation with (/sup 30/P) orthophosphate. Muscle samples rapidly frozen from resting vastus lateralis muscle revealed the presence of unphosphorylated and phosphorylated P-light chains in approximately equal ratios. Muscle samples rapidly frozen following a maximal 10 second isometric contraction showed virtually only phosphorylated fast and slow P-light chains. These results reveal that the P-light chains in human fast and slow myosin may be rapidly phosphorylated, but the basal level of phosphorylation in rested human muscle considerably exceeds that observed in animal muscles studied in vitro or in situ.

  17. Protein phosphorylation: Localization in regenerating optic axons

    SciTech Connect

    Larrivee, D. )

    1990-09-01

    A number of axonal proteins display changes in phosphorylation during goldfish optic nerve regeneration. (1) To determine whether the phosphorylation of these proteins was closely linked to their synthesis in the retinal ganglion cell body, cycloheximide was injected intraocularly into goldfish whose optic nerves had been regenerating for 3 weeks. Cycloheximide reduced the incorporation of (3H)proline and 32P orthophosphate into total nerve protein by 84% and 46%, respectively. Of the 20 individual proteins examined, 17 contained less than 15% of the (3H)proline label measured in corresponding controls, whereas 18 proteins contained 50% or more of the 32P label, suggesting that phosphorylation was largely independent of synthesis. (2) To determine whether the proteins were phosphorylated in the ganglion cell axons, axonal transport of proteins was blocked by intraocular injection of vincristine. Vincristine reduced (3H)proline labeling of total protein by 88% and 32P labeling by 49%. Among the individual proteins (3H)proline labeling was reduced by 90% or more in 18 cases but 32P labeling was reduced only by 50% or less. (3) When 32P was injected into the cranial cavity near the ends of the optic axons, all of the phosphoproteins were labeled more intensely in the optic tract than in the optic nerve. These results suggest that most of the major phosphoproteins that undergo changes in phosphorylation in the course of regeneration are phosphorylated in the optic axons.

  18. CREB is a regulatory target for the protein kinase Akt/PKB in the differentiation of pancreatic ductal cells into islet {beta}-cells mediated by hepatocyte growth factor

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xin-Yu; Zhan, Xiao-Rong; Liu, Xiao-Min; Wang, Xiao-Chen

    2011-01-14

    Research highlights: {yields} CREB is a regulatory target for the protein kinase Akt/PKB in pancreatic duct cells. {yields} Activation of the PI3K/AKT/CREB pathway plays a critical role in the HGF-mediated differentiation of pancreatic duct cells in vivo. {yields} CREB was causally linked to the expression of transcription factors during PDEC differentiation induced by HGF. -- Abstract: We have previously reported that the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway is involved in hepatocyte growth factor (HGF)-induced differentiation of adult rat pancreatic ductal epithelial cells (PDECs) into islet {beta}-cells in vitro. The transcription factor CREB is one of the downstream key effectors of the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. Recent studies showing that CREB is required for the survival of certain cell types prompted us to examine whether CREB is a nuclear target for activation via the HGF-dependent Ser/Thr kinase Akt/PKB in the differentiation of pancreatic duct cell into islet {beta}-cells. In this study, we first attempted to examine whether HGF modulates the Akt-dependent activation of target gene CREB and then investigated whether CREB activity affects the differentiation of HGF-induced PDECs. Finally, we studied the role of CREB in modulating the expression of transcription factors in PDECs during the differentiation of HGF-induced PDECs. Our results demonstrated that CREB is a regulatory target for the protein kinase Akt/PKB in the differentiation of pancreatic ductal cells into islet {beta}-cells mediated by HGF.

  19. PKA regulates calcineurin function through the phosphorylation of RCAN1: Identification of a novel phosphorylation site

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Seon Sook; Lee, Eun Hye; Lee, Kooyeon; Jo, Su-Hyun; Seo, Su Ryeon

    2015-04-17

    Calcineurin is a calcium/calmodulin-dependent phosphatase that has been implicated in T cell activation through the induction of nuclear factors of activated T cells (NFAT). We have previously suggested that endogenous regulator of calcineurin (RCAN1, also known as DSCR1) is targeted by protein kinase A (PKA) for the control of calcineurin activity. In the present study, we characterized the PKA-mediated phosphorylation site in RCAN1 by mass spectrometric analysis and revealed that PKA directly phosphorylated RCAN1 at the Ser 93. PKA-induced phosphorylation and the increase in the half-life of the RCAN1 protein were prevented by the substitution of Ser 93 with Ala (S93A). Furthermore, the PKA-mediated phosphorylation of RCAN1 at Ser 93 potentiated the inhibition of calcineurin-dependent pro-inflammatory cytokine gene expression by RCAN1. Our results suggest the presence of a novel phosphorylation site in RCAN1 and that its phosphorylation influences calcineurin-dependent inflammatory target gene expression. - Highlights: • We identify novel phosphorylation sites in RCAN1 by LC-MS/MS analysis. • PKA-dependent phosphorylation of RCAN1 at Ser 93 inhibits calcineurin-mediated intracellular signaling. • We show the immunosuppressive function of RCAN1 phosphorylation at Ser 93 in suppressing cytokine expression.

  20. The HTLV-1 HBZ protein inhibits cyclin D1 expression through interacting with the cellular transcription factor CREB.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yunyun; Zheng, Shangen; Wang, Yuanyuan; Zang, Wenqiao; Li, Min; Wang, Na; Li, Ping; Jin, Jing; Dong, Ziming; Zhao, Guoqiang

    2013-10-01

    Human T cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is an oncogenic retrovirus that can cause adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) and other diseases. The HTLV-1 bZIP factor (HBZ), which is encoded by an mRNA of the opposite polarity of the viral genomic RNA, interacts with several transcription factors and is involved in T cell proliferation, viral gene transcription and cellular transformation. Cyclin D1 is a pivotal regulatory protein involved in cell cycle progression, and its depressed expression correlates with cell cycle prolongation or arrested at the G1/S transition. In our present study, we observed that HBZ expression suppressed cyclin D1 level. To investigate the role of HBZ on cyclin D1 depression, we transduced HBZ with lentivirus vector into 293T cells, CEM cells and Jurkat cells. The results of Western blot, RT-PCR and luciferase assays showed that transcriptional activity of the cyclin D1 promoter was suppressed by the bZIP domain of HBZ (HBZ-bZIP) through cyclic AMP response element (CRE) site. Immunoprecipitation and GST pull-down assays showed the binding of HBZ-bZIP to CRE-binding protein (CREB), which confirmed that the cyclin D1 promoter activity inhibition via the CRE-site was mediated by HBZ-bZIP. The results suggested that HBZ suppressed cyclin D1 transcription through interactions with CREB and along with other viral protein, HBZ may play a causal role for leukemogenesis.

  1. Fission yeast Ryh1 GTPase activates TOR Complex 2 in response to glucose.

    PubMed

    Hatano, Tomoyuki; Morigasaki, Susumu; Tatebe, Hisashi; Ikeda, Kyoko; Shiozaki, Kazuhiro

    2015-01-01

    The Target Of Rapamycin (TOR) is an evolutionarily conserved protein kinase that forms 2 distinct protein complexes referred to as TOR complex 1 (TORC1) and 2 (TORC2). Recent extensive studies have demonstrated that TORC1 is under the control of the small GTPases Rheb and Rag that funnel multiple input signals including those derived from nutritional sources; however, information is scarce as to the regulation of TORC2. A previous study using the model system provided by the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe identified Ryh1, a Rab-family GTPase, as an activator of TORC2. Here, we show that the nucleotide-binding state of Ryh1 is regulated in response to glucose, mediating this major nutrient signal to TORC2. In glucose-rich growth media, the GTP-bound form of Ryh1 induces TORC2-dependent phosphorylation of Gad8, a downstream target of TORC2 in fission yeast. Upon glucose deprivation, Ryh1 becomes inactive, which turns off the TORC2-Gad8 pathway. During glucose starvation, however, Gad8 phosphorylation by TORC2 gradually recovers independently of Ryh1, implying an additional TORC2 activator that is regulated negatively by glucose. The paired positive and negative regulatory mechanisms may allow fine-tuning of the TORC2-Gad8 pathway, which is essential for growth under glucose-limited environment.

  2. Phosphorylation of Recombinant Tristetraprolin in Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Heping; Lin, Rui

    2009-01-01

    Tristetraprolin/zinc finger protein 36 (TTP/ZFP36) binds and destabilizes some proinflammatory cytokine mRNAs. TTP-deficient mice develop a profound inflammatory syndrome due to excessive production of proinflammatory cytokines. TTP gene expression is induced by various factors including insulin, cinnamon, and green tea extracts. Previous studies have shown that TTP is highly phosphorylated in vivo and multiple phosphorylation sites are identified in human TTP. This study evaluated the potential protein kinases that could phosphorylate recombinant TTP in vitro. Motif scanning suggested that TTP was a potential substrate for various kinases. SDS-PAGE showed that in vitro phosphorylation of TTP with p42 and p38 MAP kinases resulted in visible electrophoretic mobility shift of TTP to higher molecular masses. Autoradiography showed that TTP was phosphorylated in vitro by GSK3b, PKA, PKB, PKC, but not Cdc2, in addition to p42, p38, and JNK. These results demonstrate that TTP is a substrate for a number of protein kinases in vitro. PMID:18071886

  3. CREB Antisense Oligodeoxynucleotide Administration into the Dorsal Hippocampal CA3 Region Impairs Long- but Not Short-Term Spatial Memory in Mice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florian, Cedrick; Mons, Nicole; Roullet, Pascal

    2006-01-01

    The transcription factor cAMP response-element binding protein (CREB) has a pivotal role in hippocampal synaptic plasticity and hippocampus-dependent long-term memory. We recently demonstrated that the dorsal hippocampal CA3 region is involved in memory consolidation of spatial information tested on a Morris water maze in mice. To test whether…

  4. Transgenic Mice Expressing a Truncated Form of CREB-Binding Protein (CBP) Exhibit Deficits in Hippocampal Synaptic Plasticity and Memory Storage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Marcelo A.; Kaplan, Michael P.; Park, Alice; Blanchard, Edward J.; Oliveira, Ana M. M.; Lombardi, Thomas L.; Abel, Ted

    2005-01-01

    Deletions, translocations, or point mutations in the CREB-binding protein (CBP) gene have been associated with Rubinstein-Taybi Syndrome; a human developmental disorder characterized by retarded growth and reduced mental function. To examine the role of CBP in memory, transgenic mice were generated in which the CaMKII[alpha] promoter drives…

  5. Intrathecal baclofen, a GABAB receptor agonist, inhibits the expression of p-CREB and NR2B in the spinal dorsal horn in rats with diabetic neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Liu, Peng; Guo, Wen-Ya; Zhao, Xiao-Nan; Bai, Hui-Pin