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Sample records for phosphorylation regulates directional

  1. A PP6-type phosphatase holoenzyme directly regulates PIN phosphorylation and auxin efflux in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Dai, Mingqiu; Zhang, Chen; Kania, Urszula; Chen, Fang; Xue, Qin; McCray, Tyra; Li, Gang; Qin, Genji; Wakeley, Michelle; Terzaghi, William; Wan, Jianmin; Zhao, Yunde; Xu, Jian; Friml, Jirí; Deng, Xing Wang; Wang, Haiyang

    2012-06-01

    The directional transport of the phytohormone auxin depends on the phosphorylation status and polar localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) auxin efflux proteins. While PINIOD (PID) kinase is directly involved in the phosphorylation of PIN proteins, the phosphatase holoenzyme complexes that dephosphorylate PIN proteins remain elusive. Here, we demonstrate that mutations simultaneously disrupting the function of Arabidopsis thaliana FyPP1 (for Phytochrome-associated serine/threonine protein phosphatase1) and FyPP3, two homologous genes encoding the catalytic subunits of protein phosphatase6 (PP6), cause elevated accumulation of phosphorylated PIN proteins, correlating with a basal-to-apical shift in subcellular PIN localization. The changes in PIN polarity result in increased root basipetal auxin transport and severe defects, including shorter roots, fewer lateral roots, defective columella cells, root meristem collapse, abnormal cotyledons (small, cup-shaped, or fused cotyledons), and altered leaf venation. Our molecular, biochemical, and genetic data support the notion that FyPP1/3, SAL (for SAPS DOMAIN-LIKE), and PP2AA proteins (RCN1 [for ROOTS CURL IN NAPHTHYLPHTHALAMIC ACID1] or PP2AA1, PP2AA2, and PP2AA3) physically interact to form a novel PP6-type heterotrimeric holoenzyme complex. We also show that FyPP1/3, SAL, and PP2AA interact with a subset of PIN proteins and that for SAL the strength of the interaction depends on the PIN phosphorylation status. Thus, an Arabidopsis PP6-type phosphatase holoenzyme acts antagonistically with PID to direct auxin transport polarity and plant development by directly regulating PIN phosphorylation.

  2. Phosphorylation regulates the Star-PAP-PIPKIα interaction and directs specificity toward mRNA targets.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Nimmy; Sudheesh, A P; Francis, Nimmy; Anderson, Richard; Laishram, Rakesh S

    2015-08-18

    Star-PAP is a nuclear non-canonical poly(A) polymerase (PAP) that shows specificity toward mRNA targets. Star-PAP activity is stimulated by lipid messenger phosphatidyl inositol 4,5 bisphoshate (PI4,5P2) and is regulated by the associated Type I phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate 5-kinase that synthesizes PI4,5P2 as well as protein kinases. These associated kinases act as coactivators of Star-PAP that regulates its activity and specificity toward mRNAs, yet the mechanism of control of these interactions are not defined. We identified a phosphorylated residue (serine 6, S6) on Star-PAP in the zinc finger region, the domain required for PIPKIα interaction. We show that S6 is phosphorylated by CKIα within the nucleus which is required for Star-PAP nuclear retention and interaction with PIPKIα. Unlike the CKIα mediated phosphorylation at the catalytic domain, Star-PAP S6 phosphorylation is insensitive to oxidative stress suggesting a signal mediated regulation of CKIα activity. S6 phosphorylation together with coactivator PIPKIα controlled select subset of Star-PAP target messages by regulating Star-PAP-mRNA association. Our results establish a novel role for phosphorylation in determining Star-PAP target mRNA specificity and regulation of 3'-end processing. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  3. Phosphorylation regulates the Star-PAP-PIPKIα interaction and directs specificity toward mRNA targets

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Nimmy; AP, Sudheesh; Francis, Nimmy; Anderson, Richard; Laishram, Rakesh S.

    2015-01-01

    Star-PAP is a nuclear non-canonical poly(A) polymerase (PAP) that shows specificity toward mRNA targets. Star-PAP activity is stimulated by lipid messenger phosphatidyl inositol 4,5 bisphoshate (PI4,5P2) and is regulated by the associated Type I phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate 5-kinase that synthesizes PI4,5P2 as well as protein kinases. These associated kinases act as coactivators of Star-PAP that regulates its activity and specificity toward mRNAs, yet the mechanism of control of these interactions are not defined. We identified a phosphorylated residue (serine 6, S6) on Star-PAP in the zinc finger region, the domain required for PIPKIα interaction. We show that S6 is phosphorylated by CKIα within the nucleus which is required for Star-PAP nuclear retention and interaction with PIPKIα. Unlike the CKIα mediated phosphorylation at the catalytic domain, Star-PAP S6 phosphorylation is insensitive to oxidative stress suggesting a signal mediated regulation of CKIα activity. S6 phosphorylation together with coactivator PIPKIα controlled select subset of Star-PAP target messages by regulating Star-PAP-mRNA association. Our results establish a novel role for phosphorylation in determining Star-PAP target mRNA specificity and regulation of 3′-end processing. PMID:26138484

  4. Cyclin-dependent Kinase 5 (Cdk5) Regulates the Function of CLOCK Protein by Direct Phosphorylation*

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Yongdo; Jeong, Jaehoon; Lee, Saebom; Park, Young-Un; Lee, Seol-Ae; Han, Dong-Hee; Kim, Joung-Hun; Ohshima, Toshio; Mikoshiba, Katsuhiko; Suh, Yoo-Hun; Cho, Sehyung; Park, Sang Ki

    2013-01-01

    Circadian rhythm is a biological rhythm governing physiology and behavior with a period of ∼24 h. At the molecular level, circadian output is controlled by a molecular clock composed of positive and negative feedback loops in transcriptional and post-translational processes. CLOCK is a transcription factor known as a central component of the molecular clock feedback loops generating circadian oscillation. Although CLOCK is known to undergo multiple post-translational modifications, the knowledge of their entities remains limited. Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) is a proline-directed serine-threonine kinase that is involved in various neuronal processes. Here, we report that Cdk5 is a novel regulator of CLOCK protein. Cdk5 phosphorylates CLOCK at the Thr-451 and Thr-461 residues in association with transcriptional activation of CLOCK. The Cdk5-dependent regulation of CLOCK function is mediated by alterations of its stability and subcellular distribution. These results suggest that Cdk5 is a novel regulatory component of the core molecular clock machinery. PMID:24235147

  5. Water channel activities of Mimosa pudica plasma membrane intrinsic proteins are regulated by direct interaction and phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Temmei, Yusuke; Uchida, Shinichi; Hoshino, Daisuke; Kanzawa, Nobuyuki; Kuwahara, Michio; Sasaki, Sei; Tsuchiya, Takahide

    2005-08-15

    cDNAs encoding aquaporins PIP1;1, PIP2;1, and TIP1;1 were isolated from Mimosa pudica (Mp) cDNA library. MpPIP1;1 exhibited no water channel activity; however, it facilitated the water channel activity of MpPIP2;1 in a phosphorylation-dependent manner. Mutagenesis analysis revealed that Ser-131 of MpPIP1;1 was phosphorylated by PKA and that cooperative regulation of the water channel activity of MpPIP2;1 was regulated by phosphorylation of Ser-131 of MpPIP1;1. Immunoprecipitation analysis revealed that MpPIP1;1 binds directly to MpPIP2;1 in a phosphorylation-independent manner, suggesting that phosphorylation of Ser-131 of MpPIP1;1 is involved in regulation of the structure of the channel complex with MpMIP2;1 and thereby affects water channel activity.

  6. Akt directly regulates focal adhesion kinase through association and serine phosphorylation: implication for pressure-induced colon cancer metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shouye

    2011-01-01

    Although focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is typically considered upstream of Akt, extracellular pressure stimulates cancer cell adhesion via Akt-dependent FAK activation. How Akt regulates FAK is unknown. We studied Akt-FAK interaction in colon cancer cells under 15 mmHg increased extracellular pressure. Pressure enhanced Akt-FAK association, blocked by inhibiting FAK or silencing Akt1 but not Akt2, and stimulated FAK serine phosphorylation in Caco-2 and human colon cancer cells from surgical specimens Akt1-dependently. FAK includes three serine (S517/601/695) and one threonine (T600)-containing consensus sequences for Akt phosphorylation. Studying S–>A nonphosphorylatable point mutants suggests that these sites coordinately upregulate FAK Y397 tyrosine phosphorylation, which conventionally initiates FAK activation, and mediate pressure-induced cancer cell adhesion. FAK(T600A) mutation did not prevent pressure-induced FAK(Y397) phosphorylation or adhesion. Akt1 appeared to directly bind FAK, and this binding did not depend on the FAK autophosphorylation site (Y397). In addition, our results demonstrated that Akt phosphorylated FAK at three novel serine phosphorylation sites, which were also not required for FAK-Akt binding. This novel interaction suggests that FAK and Akt may be dual kinase targets to prevent cancer cell adhesion and metastasis. PMID:21209368

  7. Phosphorylation regulates human OCT4.

    PubMed

    Brumbaugh, Justin; Hou, Zhonggang; Russell, Jason D; Howden, Sara E; Yu, Pengzhi; Ledvina, Aaron R; Coon, Joshua J; Thomson, James A

    2012-05-08

    The transcription factor OCT4 is fundamental to maintaining pluripotency and self-renewal. To better understand protein-level regulation of OCT4, we applied liquid chromatography-MS to identify 14 localized sites of phosphorylation, 11 of which were previously unknown. Functional analysis of two sites, T234 and S235, suggested that phosphorylation within the homeobox region of OCT4 negatively regulates its activity by interrupting sequence-specific DNA binding. Mutating T234 and S235 to mimic constitutive phosphorylation at these sites reduces transcriptional activation from an OCT4-responsive reporter and decreases reprogramming efficiency. We also cataloged 144 unique phosphopeptides on known OCT4 interacting partners, including SOX2 and SALL4, that copurified during immunoprecipitation. These proteins were enriched for phosphorylation at motifs associated with ERK signaling. Likewise, OCT4 harbored several putative ERK phosphorylation sites. Kinase assays confirmed that ERK2 phosphorylated these sites in vitro, providing a direct link between ERK signaling and the transcriptional machinery that governs pluripotency.

  8. Phosphorylation regulates human OCT4

    PubMed Central

    Brumbaugh, Justin; Russell, Jason D.; Howden, Sara E.; Yu, Pengzhi; Ledvina, Aaron R.; Coon, Joshua J.; Thomson, James A.

    2012-01-01

    The transcription factor OCT4 is fundamental to maintaining pluripotency and self-renewal. To better understand protein-level regulation of OCT4, we applied liquid chromatography–MS to identify 14 localized sites of phosphorylation, 11 of which were previously unknown. Functional analysis of two sites, T234 and S235, suggested that phosphorylation within the homeobox region of OCT4 negatively regulates its activity by interrupting sequence-specific DNA binding. Mutating T234 and S235 to mimic constitutive phosphorylation at these sites reduces transcriptional activation from an OCT4-responsive reporter and decreases reprogramming efficiency. We also cataloged 144 unique phosphopeptides on known OCT4 interacting partners, including SOX2 and SALL4, that copurified during immunoprecipitation. These proteins were enriched for phosphorylation at motifs associated with ERK signaling. Likewise, OCT4 harbored several putative ERK phosphorylation sites. Kinase assays confirmed that ERK2 phosphorylated these sites in vitro, providing a direct link between ERK signaling and the transcriptional machinery that governs pluripotency. PMID:22474382

  9. The WNK-regulated SPAK/OSR1 kinases directly phosphorylate and inhibit the K+-Cl- co-transporters.

    PubMed

    de Los Heros, Paola; Alessi, Dario R; Gourlay, Robert; Campbell, David G; Deak, Maria; Macartney, Thomas J; Kahle, Kristopher T; Zhang, Jinwei

    2014-03-15

    Precise homoeostasis of the intracellular concentration of Cl- is achieved via the co-ordinated activities of the Cl- influx and efflux. We demonstrate that the WNK (WNK lysine-deficient protein kinase)-activated SPAK (SPS1-related proline/alanine-rich kinase)/OSR1 (oxidative stress-responsive kinase 1) known to directly phosphorylate and stimulate the N[K]CCs (Na+-K+ ion co-transporters), also promote inhibition of the KCCs (K+-Cl- co-transporters) by directly phosphorylating a recently described C-terminal threonine residue conserved in all KCC isoforms [Site-2 (Thr1048)]. First, we demonstrate that SPAK and OSR1, in the presence of the MO25 regulatory subunit, robustly phosphorylates all KCC isoforms at Site-2 in vitro. Secondly, STOCK1S-50699, a WNK pathway inhibitor, suppresses SPAK/OSR1 activation and KCC3A Site-2 phosphorylation with similar efficiency. Thirdly, in ES (embryonic stem) cells lacking SPAK/OSR1 activity, endogenous phosphorylation of KCC isoforms at Site-2 is abolished and these cells display elevated basal activity of 86Rb+ uptake that was not markedly stimulated further by hypotonic high K+ conditions, consistent with KCC3A activation. Fourthly, a tight correlation exists between SPAK/OSR1 activity and the magnitude of KCC3A Site-2 phosphorylation. Lastly, a Site-2 alanine KCC3A mutant preventing SPAK/OSR1 phosphorylation exhibits increased activity. We also observe that KCCs are directly phosphorylated by SPAK/OSR1, at a novel Site-3 (Thr5 in KCC1/KCC3 and Thr6 in KCC2/KCC4), and a previously recognized KCC3-specific residue, Site-4 (Ser96). These data demonstrate that the WNK-regulated SPAK/OSR1 kinases directly phosphorylate the N[K]CCs and KCCs, promoting their stimulation and inhibition respectively. Given these reciprocal actions with anticipated net effects of increasing Cl- influx, we propose that the targeting of WNK-SPAK/OSR1 with kinase inhibitors might be a novel potent strategy to enhance cellular Cl- extrusion, with potential

  10. Phosphorylation regulates mycobacterial proteasome.

    PubMed

    Anandan, Tripti; Han, Jaeil; Baun, Heather; Nyayapathy, Seeta; Brown, Jacob T; Dial, Rebekah L; Moltalvo, Juan A; Kim, Min-Seon; Yang, Seung Hwan; Ronning, Donald R; Husson, Robert N; Suh, Joowon; Kang, Choong-Min

    2014-09-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis possesses a proteasome system that is required for the microbe to resist elimination by the host immune system. Despite the importance of the proteasome in the pathogenesis of tuberculosis, the molecular mechanisms by which proteasome activity is controlled remain largely unknown. Here, we demonstrate that the α-subunit (PrcA) of the M. tuberculosis proteasome is phosphorylated by the PknB kinase at three threonine residues (T84, T202, and T178) in a sequential manner. Furthermore, the proteasome with phosphorylated PrcA enhances the degradation of Ino1, a known proteasomal substrate, suggesting that PknB regulates the proteolytic activity of the proteasome. Previous studies showed that depletion of the proteasome and the proteasome-associated proteins decreases resistance to reactive nitrogen intermediates (RNIs) but increases resistance to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Here we show that PknA phosphorylation of unprocessed proteasome β-subunit (pre-PrcB) and α-subunit reduces the assembly of the proteasome complex and thereby enhances the mycobacterial resistance to H2O2 and that H2O2 stress diminishes the formation of the proteasome complex in a PknA-dependent manner. These findings indicate that phosphorylation of the M. tuberculosis proteasome not only modulates proteolytic activity of the proteasome, but also affects the proteasome complex formation contributing to the survival of M. tuberculosis under oxidative stress conditions.

  11. A PP6-Type Phosphatase Holoenzyme Directly Regulates PIN Phosphorylation and Auxin Efflux in Arabidopsis[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Mingqiu; Zhang, Chen; Kania, Urszula; Chen, Fang; Xue, Qin; Mccray, Tyra; Li, Gang; Qin, Genji; Wakeley, Michelle; Terzaghi, William; Wan, Jianmin; Zhao, Yunde; Xu, Jian; Friml, Jiří; Deng, Xing Wang; Wang, Haiyang

    2012-01-01

    The directional transport of the phytohormone auxin depends on the phosphorylation status and polar localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN) auxin efflux proteins. While PINIOD (PID) kinase is directly involved in the phosphorylation of PIN proteins, the phosphatase holoenzyme complexes that dephosphorylate PIN proteins remain elusive. Here, we demonstrate that mutations simultaneously disrupting the function of Arabidopsis thaliana FyPP1 (for Phytochrome-associated serine/threonine protein phosphatase1) and FyPP3, two homologous genes encoding the catalytic subunits of protein phosphatase6 (PP6), cause elevated accumulation of phosphorylated PIN proteins, correlating with a basal-to-apical shift in subcellular PIN localization. The changes in PIN polarity result in increased root basipetal auxin transport and severe defects, including shorter roots, fewer lateral roots, defective columella cells, root meristem collapse, abnormal cotyledons (small, cup-shaped, or fused cotyledons), and altered leaf venation. Our molecular, biochemical, and genetic data support the notion that FyPP1/3, SAL (for SAPS DOMAIN-LIKE), and PP2AA proteins (RCN1 [for ROOTS CURL IN NAPHTHYLPHTHALAMIC ACID1] or PP2AA1, PP2AA2, and PP2AA3) physically interact to form a novel PP6-type heterotrimeric holoenzyme complex. We also show that FyPP1/3, SAL, and PP2AA interact with a subset of PIN proteins and that for SAL the strength of the interaction depends on the PIN phosphorylation status. Thus, an Arabidopsis PP6-type phosphatase holoenzyme acts antagonistically with PID to direct auxin transport polarity and plant development by directly regulating PIN phosphorylation. PMID:22715043

  12. The cAMP Signaling Pathway and Direct Protein Kinase A Phosphorylation Regulate Polycystin-2 (TRPP2) Channel Function*

    PubMed Central

    Cantero, María del Rocío; Velázquez, Irina F.; Streets, Andrew J.; Ong, Albert C. M.; Cantiello, Horacio F.

    2015-01-01

    Polycystin-2 (PC2) is a TRP-type, Ca2+-permeable non-selective cation channel that plays an important role in Ca2+ signaling in renal and non-renal cells. The effect(s) of the cAMP pathway and kinase mediated phosphorylation of PC2 seem to be relevant to PC2 trafficking and its interaction with polycystin-1. However, the role of PC2 phosphorylation in channel function is still poorly defined. Here we reconstituted apical membranes of term human syncytiotrophoblast (hST), containing endogenous PC2 (PC2hst), and in vitro translated channel protein (PC2iv). Addition of the catalytic subunit of PKA increased by 566% the spontaneous PC2hst channel activity in the presence of ATP. Interestingly, 8-Br-cAMP also stimulated spontaneous PC2hst channel activity in the absence of the exogenous kinase. Either stimulation was inhibited by addition of alkaline phosphatase, which in turn, was reversed by the phosphatase inhibitor vanadate. Neither maneuver modified the single channel conductance but instead increased channel mean open time. PKA directly phosphorylated PC2, which increased the mean open time but not the single channel conductance of the channel. PKA phosphorylation did not modify either R742X truncated or S829A-mutant PC2iv channel function. The data indicate that the cAMP pathway regulates PC2-mediated cation transport in the hST. The relevant PKA site for PC2 channel regulation centers on a single residue serine 829, in the carboxyl terminus. PMID:26269590

  13. IκB Kinase 2 Regulates TPL-2 Activation of Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinases 1 and 2 by Direct Phosphorylation of TPL-2 Serine 400

    PubMed Central

    Roget, Karine; Ben-Addi, Abduelhakem; Mambole-Dema, Agnes; Gantke, Thorsten; Yang, Huei-Ting; Janzen, Julia; Morrice, Nick; Abbott, Derek

    2012-01-01

    Tumor progression locus 2 (TPL-2) functions as a MEK-1/2 kinase, which is essential for Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK-1/2) mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated macrophages and for inducing the production of the proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor and interleukin-1β. In unstimulated cells, association of TPL-2 with NF-κB1 p105 prevents TPL-2 phosphorylation of MEK-1/2. LPS stimulation of TPL-2 MEK-1/2 kinase activity requires TPL-2 release from p105. This is triggered by IκB kinase 2 (IKK-2) phosphorylation of the p105 PEST region, which promotes p105 ubiquitination and degradation by the proteasome. LPS activation of ERK-1/2 additionally requires transphosphorylation of TPL-2 on serine 400 in its C terminus, which controls TPL-2 signaling to ERK-1/2 independently of p105. However, the identity of the protein kinase responsible for TPL-2 serine 400 phosphorylation remained unknown. In the present study, we show that TPL-2 serine 400 phosphorylation is mediated by IKK2. The IKK complex therefore regulates two of the key regulatory steps required for TPL-2 activation of ERK-1/2, underlining the close linkage of ERK-1/2 MAP kinase activation to upregulation of NF-κB-dependent transcription. PMID:22988300

  14. Phosphorylation of tau is regulated by PKN.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, T; Kawamata, T; Mukai, H; Hasegawa, H; Isagawa, T; Yasuda, M; Hashimoto, T; Terashima, A; Nakai, M; Mori, H; Ono, Y; Tanaka, C

    2001-03-30

    For the phosphorylation state of microtubule-associated protein, tau plays a pivotal role in regulating microtubule networks in neurons. Tau promotes the assembly and stabilization of microtubules. The potential for tau to bind to microtubules is down-regulated after local phosphorylation. When we investigated the effects of PKN activation on tau phosphorylation, we found that PKN triggers disruption of the microtubule array both in vitro and in vivo and predominantly phosphorylates tau in microtubule binding domains (MBDs). PKN has a catalytic domain highly homologous to protein kinase C (PKC), a kinase that phosphorylates Ser-313 (= Ser-324, the number used in this study) in MBDs. Thus, we identified the phosphorylation sites of PKN and PKC subtypes (PKC-alpha, -betaI, -betaII, -gamma, -delta, -epsilon, -zeta, and -lambda) in MBDs. PKN phosphorylates Ser-258, Ser-320, and Ser-352, although all PKC subtypes phosphorylate Ser-258, Ser-293, Ser-324, and Ser-352. There is a PKN-specific phosphorylation site, Ser-320, in MBDs. HIA3, a novel phosphorylation-dependent antibody recognizing phosphorylated tau at Ser-320, showed immunoreactivity in Chinese hamster ovary cells expressing tau and the active form of PKN, but not in Chinese hamster ovary cells expressing tau and the inactive form of PKN. The immunoreactivity for phosphorylated tau at Ser-320 increased in the presence of a phosphatase inhibitor, FK506 treatment, which means that calcineurin (protein phosphatase 2B) may be involved in dephosphorylating tau at Ser-320 site. We also noted that PKN reduces the phosphorylation recognized by the phosphorylation-dependent antibodies AT8, AT180, and AT270 in vivo. Thus PKN serves as a regulator of microtubules by specific phosphorylation of tau, which leads to disruption of tubulin assembly.

  15. PKA regulates calcineurin function through the phosphorylation of RCAN1: Identification of a novel phosphorylation site

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Seon Sook; Lee, Eun Hye; Lee, Kooyeon; Jo, Su-Hyun; Seo, Su Ryeon

    2015-04-17

    Calcineurin is a calcium/calmodulin-dependent phosphatase that has been implicated in T cell activation through the induction of nuclear factors of activated T cells (NFAT). We have previously suggested that endogenous regulator of calcineurin (RCAN1, also known as DSCR1) is targeted by protein kinase A (PKA) for the control of calcineurin activity. In the present study, we characterized the PKA-mediated phosphorylation site in RCAN1 by mass spectrometric analysis and revealed that PKA directly phosphorylated RCAN1 at the Ser 93. PKA-induced phosphorylation and the increase in the half-life of the RCAN1 protein were prevented by the substitution of Ser 93 with Ala (S93A). Furthermore, the PKA-mediated phosphorylation of RCAN1 at Ser 93 potentiated the inhibition of calcineurin-dependent pro-inflammatory cytokine gene expression by RCAN1. Our results suggest the presence of a novel phosphorylation site in RCAN1 and that its phosphorylation influences calcineurin-dependent inflammatory target gene expression. - Highlights: • We identify novel phosphorylation sites in RCAN1 by LC-MS/MS analysis. • PKA-dependent phosphorylation of RCAN1 at Ser 93 inhibits calcineurin-mediated intracellular signaling. • We show the immunosuppressive function of RCAN1 phosphorylation at Ser 93 in suppressing cytokine expression.

  16. The regulation of STIM1 by phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Pozo-Guisado, Eulalia; Martin-Romero, Francisco Javier

    2013-01-01

    Calcium ion (Ca2+) concentration plays a key role in cell signaling in eukaryotic cells. At the cellular level, Ca2+ directly participates in such diverse cellular events as adhesion and migration, differentiation, contraction, secretion, synaptic transmission, fertilization, and cell death. As a consequence of these diverse actions, the cytosolic concentration of free Ca2+ is tightly regulated by the coordinated activity of Ca2+ channels, Ca2+ pumps, and Ca2+-binding proteins. Although many of these regulators have been studied in depth, other proteins have been described recently, and naturally far less is known about their contribution to cell physiology. Within this last group of proteins, STIM1 has emerged as a major contributor to Ca2+ signaling by means of its activity as Ca2+ channel regulator. STIM1 is a protein resident mainly, but not exclusively, in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and activates a set of plasma membrane Ca2+ channels termed store-operated calcium channels (SOCs) when the concentration of free Ca2+ within the ER drops transiently as a result of Ca2+ release from this compartment. Knowledge regarding the molecular architecture of STIM1 has grown considerably during the last years, and several structural domains within STIM1 have been reported to be required for the specific molecular interactions with other important players in Ca2+ signaling, such as Ca2+ channels and microtubules. Within the modulators of STIM1, phosphorylation has been shown to both activate and inactivate STIM1-dependent Ca2+ entry depending on the cell type, cell cycle phase, and the specific residue that becomes modified. Here we shall review current knowledge regarding the modulation of STIM1 by phosphorylation. PMID:24505502

  17. Palmitoylation gates phosphorylation-dependent regulation of BK potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Tian, Lijun; Jeffries, Owen; McClafferty, Heather; Molyvdas, Adam; Rowe, Iain C M; Saleem, Fozia; Chen, Lie; Greaves, Jennifer; Chamberlain, Luke H; Knaus, Hans-Guenther; Ruth, Peter; Shipston, Michael J

    2008-12-30

    Large conductance calcium- and voltage-gated potassium (BK) channels are important regulators of physiological homeostasis and their function is potently modulated by protein kinase A (PKA) phosphorylation. PKA regulates the channel through phosphorylation of residues within the intracellular C terminus of the pore-forming alpha-subunits. However, the molecular mechanism(s) by which phosphorylation of the alpha-subunit effects changes in channel activity are unknown. Inhibition of BK channels by PKA depends on phosphorylation of only a single alpha-subunit in the channel tetramer containing an alternatively spliced insert (STREX) suggesting that phosphorylation results in major conformational rearrangements of the C terminus. Here, we define the mechanism of PKA inhibition of BK channels and demonstrate that this regulation is conditional on the palmitoylation status of the channel. We show that the cytosolic C terminus of the STREX BK channel uniquely interacts with the plasma membrane via palmitoylation of evolutionarily conserved cysteine residues in the STREX insert. PKA phosphorylation of the serine residue immediately upstream of the conserved palmitoylated cysteine residues within STREX dissociates the C terminus from the plasma membrane, inhibiting STREX channel activity. Abolition of STREX palmitoylation by site-directed mutagenesis or pharmacological inhibition of palmitoyl transferases prevents PKA-mediated inhibition of BK channels. Thus, palmitoylation gates BK channel regulation by PKA phosphorylation. Palmitoylation and phosphorylation are both dynamically regulated; thus, cross-talk between these 2 major posttranslational signaling cascades provides a mechanism for conditional regulation of BK channels. Interplay of these distinct signaling cascades has important implications for the dynamic regulation of BK channels and physiological homeostasis.

  18. Regulation of renal fibrosis by Smad3 Thr388 phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Qu, Xinli; Li, Xueling; Zheng, Yaowu; Ren, Yi; Puelles, Victor G; Caruana, Georgina; Nikolic-Paterson, David J; Li, Jinhua

    2014-04-01

    Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) promotes tissue fibrosis via receptor-mediated phosphorylation of the receptor-activated Smad2/3, together with Smad4. Of these, Smad3 plays a major profibrotic role in mouse models of tissue fibrosis. Transcriptional activity of the Smad3 protein is regulated by phosphorylation of residues in the C-terminal domain and the linker region. Herein, we examined the role of a novel phosphorylation site within the MH2 domain (T388) in the regulation of Smad3 activity. Confocal microscopy using an Smad3 phosphorylated T388-specific antibody identified phosphorylation of Smad3 T388 in myofibroblasts and tubular epithelial cells in human focal and segmental glomerulosclerosis and mouse models of unilateral ureteric obstruction and diabetic nephropathy, whereas phosphorylated T388 was largely absent in normal kidney. In vitro, TGF-β1 induced phosphorylation of Smad3 T388 in a biphasic pattern. A point mutation of T388/V in an Smad3 construct demonstrated that phosphorylation of T388 promotes Smad3 binding to Smad4 and CDK8, but was not necessary for nuclear translocation. Furthermore, T388 phosphorylation was required for TGF-β-induced collagen I gene promoter activity and extracellular matrix production in cultured fibroblasts. In conclusion, our study identifies phosphorylation of T388 in the Smad3 MH2 domain as an important mechanism that regulates the profibrotic TGF-β/Smad3 signaling pathway, which has direct relevance to human and experimental fibrotic kidney disease.

  19. Grb2 negatively regulates epidermal growth factor-induced phospholipase C-gamma1 activity through the direct interaction with tyrosine-phosphorylated phospholipase C-gamma1.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jang Hyun; Hong, Won-Pyo; Yun, Sanguk; Kim, Hyeon Soo; Lee, Jong-Ryul; Park, Jong Bae; Bae, Yun Soo; Ryu, Sung Ho; Suh, Pann-Ghill

    2005-10-01

    Phospholipase C-gamma1 (PLC-gamma1) plays pivotal roles in cellular growth and proliferation. Upon the stimulation of growth factors and hormones, PLC-gamma1 is rapidly phosphorylated at three known sites; Tyr771, Tyr783 and Tyr1254 and its enzymatic activity is up-regulated. In this study, we demonstrate for the first time that Grb2, an adaptor protein, specifically interacts with tyrosine-phosphorylated PLC-gamma1 at Tyr783. The association of Grb2 with PLC-gamma1 was induced by the treatment with epidermal growth factor (EGF). Replacement of Tyr783 with Phe completely blocked EGF-induced interaction of PLC-gamma1 with Grb2, indicating that tyrosine phosphorylation of PLC-gamma1 at Tyr783 is essential for the interaction with Grb2. Interestingly, the depletion of Grb2 from HEK-293 cells by RNA interference significantly enhanced increased EGF-induced PLC-gamma1 enzymatic activity and mobilization of the intracellular Ca2+, while it did not affect EGF-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of PLC-gamma1. Furthermore, overexpression of Grb2 inhibited PLC-gamma1 enzymatic activity. Taken together, these results suggest Grb2, in addition to its key function in signaling through Ras, may have a negatively regulatory role on EGF-induced PLC-gamma1 activation.

  20. Phosphorylation mechanisms in dopamine transporter regulation.

    PubMed

    Foster, James D; Vaughan, Roxanne A

    2016-11-09

    The dopamine transporter (DAT) is a plasma membrane phosphoprotein that actively translocates extracellular dopamine (DA) into presynaptic neurons. The transporter is the primary mechanism for control of DA levels and subsequent neurotransmission, and is the target for abused and therapeutic drugs that exert their effects by suppressing reuptake. The transport capacity of DAT is acutely regulated by signaling systems and drug exposure, providing neurons the ability to fine-tune DA clearance in response to specific conditions. Kinase pathways play major roles in these mechanisms, and this review summarizes the current status of DAT phosphorylation characteristics and the evidence linking transporter phosphorylation to control of reuptake and other functions. Greater understanding of these processes may aid in elucidation of their possible contributions to DA disease states and suggest specific phosphorylation sites as targets for therapeutic manipulation of reuptake.

  1. Protein Synthesis Initiation Factors: Phosphorylation and Regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Karen S. Browning

    2009-06-15

    The initiation of the synthesis of proteins is a fundamental process shared by all living organisms. Each organism has both shared and unique mechanisms for regulation of this vital process. Higher plants provide for a major amount of fixation of carbon from the environment and turn this carbon into food and fuel sources for our use. However, we have very little understanding of how plants regulate the synthesis of the proteins necessary for these metabolic processes. The research carried out during the grant period sought to address some of these unknowns in the regulation of protein synthesis initiation. Our first goal was to determine if phosphorylation plays a significant role in plant initiation of protein synthesis. The role of phosphorylation, although well documented in mammalian protein synthesis regulation, is not well studied in plants. We showed that several of the factors necessary for the initiation of protein synthesis were targets of plant casein kinase and showed differential phosphorylation by the plant specific isoforms of this kinase. In addition, we identified and confirmed the phosphorylation sites in five of the plant initiation factors. Further, we showed that phosphorylation of one of these factors, eIF5, affected the ability of the factor to participate in the initiation process. Our second goal was to develop a method to make initiation factor 3 (eIF3) using recombinant methods. To date, we successfully cloned and expressed 13/13 subunits of wheat eIF3 in E. coli using de novo gene construction methods. The final step in this process is to place the subunits into three different plasmid operons for co-expression. Successful completion of expression of eIF3 will be an invaluable tool to the plant translation community.

  2. ZDHHC3 Tyrosine Phosphorylation Regulates Neural Cell Adhesion Molecule Palmitoylation

    PubMed Central

    Lievens, Patricia Marie-Jeanne; Kuznetsova, Tatiana; Kochlamazashvili, Gaga; Cesca, Fabrizia; Gorinski, Natalya; Galil, Dalia Abdel; Cherkas, Volodimir; Ronkina, Natalia; Lafera, Juri; Gaestel, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    The neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) mediates cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesion. It is broadly expressed in the nervous system and regulates neurite outgrowth, synaptogenesis, and synaptic plasticity. Previous in vitro studies revealed that palmitoylation of NCAM is required for fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2)-stimulated neurite outgrowth and identified the zinc finger DHHC (Asp-His-His-Cys)-containing proteins ZDHHC3 and ZDHHC7 as specific NCAM-palmitoylating enzymes. Here, we verified that FGF2 controlled NCAM palmitoylation in vivo and investigated molecular mechanisms regulating NCAM palmitoylation by ZDHHC3. Experiments with overexpression and pharmacological inhibition of FGF receptor (FGFR) and Src revealed that these kinases control tyrosine phosphorylation of ZDHHC3 and that ZDHHC3 is phosphorylated by endogenously expressed FGFR and Src proteins. By site-directed mutagenesis, we found that Tyr18 is an FGFR1-specific ZDHHC3 phosphorylation site, while Tyr295 and Tyr297 are specifically phosphorylated by Src kinase in cell-based and cell-free assays. Abrogation of tyrosine phosphorylation increased ZDHHC3 autopalmitoylation, enhanced interaction with NCAM, and upregulated NCAM palmitoylation. Expression of ZDHHC3 with tyrosine mutated in cultured hippocampal neurons promoted neurite outgrowth. Our findings for the first time highlight that FGFR- and Src-mediated tyrosine phosphorylation of ZDHHC3 modulates ZDHHC3 enzymatic activity and plays a role in neuronal morphogenesis. PMID:27247265

  3. Regulation of protein phosphorylation in oat mitochondria

    SciTech Connect

    Pike, C.; Kopeck, K.; Sceppa, E. )

    1989-04-01

    We sought to identify phosphorylated proteins in isolated oat mitocchondria and to characterize the enzymatic and regulatory properties of the protein kinase(s). Mitochondria from oats (Avena sativa L. cv. Garry) were purified on Percoll gradients. Mitochondria were incubated with {sup 32}P-{gamma}-ATP; proteins were separated by SDS-PAGE. A small number of bands was detected on autoradiograms, most prominently at 70 kD and 42 kD; the latter band has been tentatively identified as a subunit of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, a well-known phosphoprotein. The protein kinase(s) could also phosphorylate casein, but not histone. Spermine enhanced the phosphorylation of casein and inhibited the phosphorylation of the 42 kD band. These studies were carried out on both intact and burst mitochondria. Control by calcium and other ions was investigated. The question of the action of regulators on protein kinase or protein phosphatase was studied by the use of {sup 35}S-adenosine thiotriphosphate.

  4. Regulation of peroxisome dynamics by phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Oeljeklaus, Silke; Schummer, Andreas; Mastalski, Thomas; Platta, Harald W; Warscheid, Bettina

    2016-05-01

    Peroxisomes are highly dynamic organelles that can rapidly change in size, abundance, and protein content in response to alterations in nutritional and other environmental conditions. These dynamic changes in peroxisome features, referred to as peroxisome dynamics, rely on the coordinated action of several processes of peroxisome biogenesis. Revealing the regulatory mechanisms of peroxisome dynamics is an emerging theme in cell biology. These mechanisms are inevitably linked to and synchronized with the biogenesis and degradation of peroxisomes. To date, the key players and basic principles of virtually all steps in the peroxisomal life cycle are known, but regulatory mechanisms remained largely elusive. A number of recent studies put the spotlight on reversible protein phosphorylation for the control of peroxisome dynamics and highlighted peroxisomes as hubs for cellular signal integration and regulation. Here, we will present and discuss the results of several studies performed using yeast and mammalian cells that convey a sense of the impact protein phosphorylation may have on the modulation of peroxisome dynamics by regulating peroxisomal matrix and membrane protein import, proliferation, inheritance, and degradation. We further put forward the idea to make use of current data on phosphorylation sites of peroxisomal and peroxisome-associated proteins reported in advanced large-scale phosphoproteomic studies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. The regulation of AMP-activated protein kinase by phosphorylation.

    PubMed Central

    Stein, S C; Woods, A; Jones, N A; Davison, M D; Carling, D

    2000-01-01

    The AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) cascade is activated by an increase in the AMP/ATP ratio within the cell. AMPK is regulated allosterically by AMP and by reversible phosphorylation. Threonine-172 within the catalytic subunit (alpha) of AMPK (Thr(172)) was identified as the major site phosphorylated by the AMP-activated protein kinase kinase (AMPKK) in vitro. We have used site-directed mutagenesis to study the role of phosphorylation of Thr(172) on AMPK activity. Mutation of Thr(172) to an aspartic acid residue (T172D) in either alpha1 or alpha2 resulted in a kinase complex with approx. 50% the activity of the corresponding wild-type complex. The activity of wild-type AMPK decreased by greater than 90% following treatment with protein phosphatases, whereas the activity of the T172D mutant complex fell by only 10-15%. Mutation of Thr(172) to an alanine residue (T172A) almost completely abolished kinase activity. These results indicate that phosphorylation of Thr(172) accounts for most of the activation by AMPKK, but that other sites are involved. In support of this we have shown that AMPKK phosphorylates at least two other sites on the alpha subunit and one site on the beta subunit. Furthermore, we provide evidence that phosphorylation of Thr(172) may be involved in the sensitivity of the AMPK complex to AMP. PMID:10642499

  6. Phosphorylation of Astrin Regulates Its Kinetochore Function*

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Hee Jin; Park, Ji Eun; Lee, Nam Soo; Kim, Hongtae; Jang, Chang-Young

    2016-01-01

    The error-free segregation of chromosomes, which requires the precisely timed search and capture of chromosomes by spindles during early mitotic and meiotic cell division, is responsible for genomic stability and is achieved by the spindle assembly checkpoint in the metaphase-anaphase transition. Mitotic kinases orchestrate M phase events, such as the reorganization of cell architecture and kinetochore (KT) composition with the exquisite phosphorylation of mitotic regulators, to ensure timely and temporal progression. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the changes of KT composition for stable spindle attachment during mitosis are poorly understood. Here, we show that the sequential action of the kinase Cdk1 and the phosphatase Cdc14A control spindle attachment to KTs. During prophase, the mitotic spindle protein Spag5/Astrin is transported into centrosomes by Kinastrin and phosphorylated at Ser-135 and Ser-249 by Cdk1, which, in prometaphase, is loaded onto the spindle and targeted to KTs. We also demonstrate that Cdc14A dephosphorylates Astrin, and therefore the overexpression of Cdc14A sequesters Astrin in the centrosome and results in aberrant chromosome alignment. Mechanistically, Plk1 acts as an upstream kinase for Astrin phosphorylation by Cdk1 and targeting phospho-Astrin to KTs, leading to the recruitment of outer KT components, such as Cenp-E, and the stable attachment of spindles to KTs. These comprehensive findings reveal a regulatory circuit for protein targeting to KTs that controls the KT composition change of stable spindle attachment and chromosome integrity. PMID:27325694

  7. Regulation of cardiac C-protein phosphorylation

    SciTech Connect

    Titus, F.L.

    1985-01-01

    Molecular mechanisms of cardiac sympathetic and parasympathetic responses were addressed by studying subcellular changes in protein phosphorylation, cAMP-dependent protein kinase activity and protein phosphatase activity in frog hearts. B-adrenergic agonists increased and muscarinic cholinergic agonists decreased (/sup 32/P)phosphate incorporation into C-protein, a thick filament component. Regulation of protein phosphatase activity by Iso and methacholine (MCh) was assayed using extracts of drug treated frog hearts and (/sup 32/P)phospho-C-protein as substrate. Total phosphatase activity decreased 21% in extracts from hearts perfused with 0.1 ..mu..M Iso and 17% in hearts exposed to Iso plus 1 ..mu..M methacholine. This decrease reflected decreased phosphatase-2A activity. No changes in total phosphatase activity were measurable in broken cells treated with Iso or MCh. The results suggest adrenergic stimulation changes contractile activity in frog hearts by activating cAMP-dependent protein kinase associated with particulate cellular elements and inactivating soluble protein phosphatase-2A. This is the first demonstration of coordinated regulation of these enzymes by B-adrenergic agonists favoring phosphorylation of effector proteins. Coordinated regulation by methacholine in the presence of Iso was not observed.

  8. Regulation of divalent metal transporter-1 by serine phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Young Ah; Kumara, Ruvin; Wetli, Herbert; Wessling-Resnick, Marianne

    2016-01-01

    Divalent metal transporter-1 (DMT1) mediates dietary iron uptake across the intestinal mucosa and facilitates peripheral delivery of iron released by transferrin in the endosome. Here, we report that classical cannabinoids (Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol, Δ9-THC), nonclassical cannabinoids (CP 55,940), aminoalkylindoles (WIN 55,212-2) and endocannabinoids (anandamide) reduce 55Fe and 54Mn uptake by HEK293T(DMT1) cells stably expressing the transporter. siRNA knockdown of cannabinoid receptor type 2 (CB2) abrogated inhibition. CB2 is a G-protein (GTP-binding protein)-coupled receptor that negatively regulates signal transduction cascades involving serine/threonine kinases. Immunoprecipitation experiments showed that DMT1 is serine-phosphorylated under basal conditions, but that treatment with Δ9-THC reduced phosphorylation. Site-directed mutation of predicted DMT1 phosphosites further showed that substitution of serine with alanine at N-terminal position 43 (S43A) abolished basal phosphorylation. Concordantly, both the rate and extent of 55Fe uptake in cells expressing DMT1(S43A) was reduced compared with those expressing wild-type DMT1. Among kinase inhibitors that affected DMT1-mediated iron uptake, staurosporine also reduced DMT1 phosphorylation confirming a role for serine phosphorylation in iron transport regulation. These combined data indicate that phosphorylation at serine 43 of DMT1 promotes transport activity, whereas dephosphorylation is associated with loss of iron uptake. Since anti-inflammatory actions mediated through CB2 would be associated with reduced DMT1 phosphorylation, we postulate that this pathway provides a means to reduce oxidative stress by limiting iron uptake. PMID:27681840

  9. In the Staphylococcus aureus two-component system sae, the response regulator SaeR binds to a direct repeat sequence and DNA binding requires phosphorylation by the sensor kinase SaeS.

    PubMed

    Sun, Fei; Li, Chunling; Jeong, Dowon; Sohn, Changmo; He, Chuan; Bae, Taeok

    2010-04-01

    Staphylococcus aureus uses the SaeRS two-component system to control the expression of many virulence factors such as alpha-hemolysin and coagulase; however, the molecular mechanism of this signaling has not yet been elucidated. Here, using the P1 promoter of the sae operon as a model target DNA, we demonstrated that the unphosphorylated response regulator SaeR does not bind to the P1 promoter DNA, while its C-terminal DNA binding domain alone does. The DNA binding activity of full-length SaeR could be restored by sensor kinase SaeS-induced phosphorylation. Phosphorylated SaeR is more resistant to digestion by trypsin, suggesting conformational changes. DNase I footprinting assays revealed that the SaeR protection region in the P1 promoter contains a direct repeat sequence (GTTAAN(6)GTTAA [where N is any nucleotide]). This sequence is critical to the binding of phosphorylated SaeR. Mutational changes in the repeat sequence greatly reduced both the in vitro binding of SaeR and the in vivo function of the P1 promoter. From these results, we concluded that SaeR recognizes the direct repeat sequence as a binding site and that binding requires phosphorylation by SaeS.

  10. The Bacterial Phosphoenolpyruvate:Carbohydrate Phosphotransferase System: Regulation by Protein Phosphorylation and Phosphorylation-Dependent Protein-Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Aké, Francine Moussan Désirée; Derkaoui, Meriem; Zébré, Arthur Constant; Cao, Thanh Nguyen; Bouraoui, Houda; Kentache, Takfarinas; Mokhtari, Abdelhamid; Milohanic, Eliane; Joyet, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The bacterial phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP):carbohydrate phosphotransferase system (PTS) carries out both catalytic and regulatory functions. It catalyzes the transport and phosphorylation of a variety of sugars and sugar derivatives but also carries out numerous regulatory functions related to carbon, nitrogen, and phosphate metabolism, to chemotaxis, to potassium transport, and to the virulence of certain pathogens. For these different regulatory processes, the signal is provided by the phosphorylation state of the PTS components, which varies according to the availability of PTS substrates and the metabolic state of the cell. PEP acts as phosphoryl donor for enzyme I (EI), which, together with HPr and one of several EIIA and EIIB pairs, forms a phosphorylation cascade which allows phosphorylation of the cognate carbohydrate bound to the membrane-spanning EIIC. HPr of firmicutes and numerous proteobacteria is also phosphorylated in an ATP-dependent reaction catalyzed by the bifunctional HPr kinase/phosphorylase. PTS-mediated regulatory mechanisms are based either on direct phosphorylation of the target protein or on phosphorylation-dependent interactions. For regulation by PTS-mediated phosphorylation, the target proteins either acquired a PTS domain by fusing it to their N or C termini or integrated a specific, conserved PTS regulation domain (PRD) or, alternatively, developed their own specific sites for PTS-mediated phosphorylation. Protein-protein interactions can occur with either phosphorylated or unphosphorylated PTS components and can either stimulate or inhibit the function of the target proteins. This large variety of signal transduction mechanisms allows the PTS to regulate numerous proteins and to form a vast regulatory network responding to the phosphorylation state of various PTS components. PMID:24847021

  11. Phosphorylation regulates coilin activity and RNA association

    PubMed Central

    Broome, Hanna J.; Carrero, Zunamys I.; Douglas, Heather E.; Hebert, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    Summary The Cajal body (CB) is a domain of concentrated components found within the nucleus of cells in an array of species that is functionally important for the biogenesis of telomerase and small nuclear ribonucleoproteins. The CB is a dynamic structure whose number and size change during the cell cycle and is associated with other nuclear structures and gene loci. Coilin, also known as the marker protein for the CB, is a phosphoprotein widely accepted for its role in maintaining CB integrity. Recent studies have been done to further elucidate functional activities of coilin apart from its structural role in the CB in an attempt to explore the rationale for coilin expression in cells that have few CBs or lack them altogether. Here we show that the RNA association profile of coilin changes in mitosis with respect to that during interphase. We provide evidence of transcriptional and/or processing dysregulation of several CB-related RNA transcripts as a result of ectopic expression of both wild-type and phosphomutant coilin proteins. We also show apparent changes in transcription and/or processing of these transcripts upon coilin knockdown in both transformed and primary cell lines. Additionally, we provide evidence of specific coilin RNase activity regulation, on both U2 and hTR transcripts, by phosphorylation of a single residue, serine 489. Collectively, these results point to additional functions for coilin that are regulated by phosphorylation. PMID:23616925

  12. A redox-regulated tyrosine phosphorylation cascade in rat spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Lewis, B; Aitken, R J

    2001-01-01

    Rat spermatozoa from both the caput and cauda epididymidis were shown to generate superoxide anion (O2-.) both spontaneously and following stimulation with NAD(P)H. Caput spermatozoa gave a significantly greater O2- response to NADPH stimulation than caudal cells, whereas in both cell types the responses to exogenous NADPH and NADH were approximately equivalent. Analysis of H2O2 production revealed that this oxidant was generated only by caudal epididymal cells and only in these cells did the stimulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production with NADPH lead to an increase in tyrosine phosphorylation. Stimulation of ROS production with NADPH increased intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) levels in both caput and caudal epididymal cells, but only in caudal cells did cAMP stimulate tyrosine phosphorylation, in keeping with the NADPH results. On the basis of these findings we propose that tyrosine phosphorylation in rat spermatozoa is driven by ROS acting via 2 different but complementary mechanisms; O2-. stimulates tyrosine kinase activity indirectly through the elevation of intracellular cAMP while H2O2 acts directly on the kinase/phosphatase system, stimulating the former and inhibiting the latter. Zinc was examined as a potential regulator of this signal transduction cascade and was shown to suppress tyrosine phosphorylation in caput cells but to promote this activity in caudal spermatozoa, possibly through an inhibitory effect on tyrosine phosphatase activity. These results reveal the maturation of a redox-regulated, cAMP-mediated, signal transduction cascade during epididymal transit in the rat that is sensitive to zinc and plays a key role in the control of tyrosine phosphorylation events associated with capacitation.

  13. The Regulation of NF-κB Subunits by Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Christian, Frank; Smith, Emma L.; Carmody, Ruaidhrí J.

    2016-01-01

    The NF-κB transcription factor is the master regulator of the inflammatory response and is essential for the homeostasis of the immune system. NF-κB regulates the transcription of genes that control inflammation, immune cell development, cell cycle, proliferation, and cell death. The fundamental role that NF-κB plays in key physiological processes makes it an important factor in determining health and disease. The importance of NF-κB in tissue homeostasis and immunity has frustrated therapeutic approaches aimed at inhibiting NF-κB activation. However, significant research efforts have revealed the crucial contribution of NF-κB phosphorylation to controlling NF-κB directed transactivation. Importantly, NF-κB phosphorylation controls transcription in a gene-specific manner, offering new opportunities to selectively target NF-κB for therapeutic benefit. This review will focus on the phosphorylation of the NF-κB subunits and the impact on NF-κB function. PMID:26999213

  14. Regulation of Endothelial Adherens Junctions by Tyrosine Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Adam, Alejandro Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial cells form a semipermeable, regulated barrier that limits the passage of fluid, small molecules, and leukocytes between the bloodstream and the surrounding tissues. The adherens junction, a major mechanism of intercellular adhesion, is comprised of transmembrane cadherins forming homotypic interactions between adjacent cells and associated cytoplasmic catenins linking the cadherins to the cytoskeleton. Inflammatory conditions promote the disassembly of the adherens junction and a loss of intercellular adhesion, creating openings or gaps in the endothelium through which small molecules diffuse and leukocytes transmigrate. Tyrosine kinase signaling has emerged as a central regulator of the inflammatory response, partly through direct phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of the adherens junction components. This review discusses the findings that support and those that argue against a direct effect of cadherin and catenin phosphorylation in the disassembly of the adherens junction. Recent findings indicate a complex interaction between kinases, phosphatases, and the adherens junction components that allow a fine regulation of the endothelial permeability to small molecules, leukocyte migration, and barrier resealing. PMID:26556953

  15. Kinases, tails and more: regulation of PTEN function by phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Fragoso, Rita; Barata, João T

    2015-05-01

    Phosphorylation regulates the conformation, stability, homo- and heterotypic protein interactions, localization, and activity of the tumor suppressor PTEN. From a simple picture, at the beginning of this millennium, recognizing that CK2 phosphorylated PTEN at the C-terminus and thereby impacted on PTEN stability and activity, research has led to a significantly more complex scenario today, where for instance GSK3, Plk3, ATM, ROCK or Src-family kinases are also gaining the spotlight in this evolving play. Here, we review the current knowledge on the kinases that phosphorylate PTEN, and on the impact that specific phosphorylation events have on PTEN function. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. A compartmentalized phosphorylation/dephosphorylation system that regulates U snRNA export from the nucleus.

    PubMed

    Kitao, Saori; Segref, Alexandra; Kast, Juergen; Wilm, Matthias; Mattaj, Iain W; Ohno, Mutsuhito

    2008-01-01

    PHAX (phosphorylated adaptor for RNA export) is the key regulator of U snRNA nuclear export in metazoa. Our previous work revealed that PHAX is phosphorylated in the nucleus and is exported as a component of the U snRNA export complex to the cytoplasm, where it is dephosphorylated (M. Ohno, A. Segref, A. Bachi, M. Wilm, and I. W. Mattaj, Cell 101:187-198, 2000). PHAX phosphorylation is essential for export complex assembly, whereas its dephosphorylation causes export complex disassembly. Thus, PHAX is subject to a compartmentalized phosphorylation/dephosphorylation cycle that contributes to transport directionality. However, neither essential PHAX phosphorylation sites nor the modifying enzymes that contribute to the compartmentalized system have been identified. Here, we identify PHAX phosphorylation sites that are necessary and sufficient for U snRNA export. Mutation of the phosphorylation sites inhibited U snRNA export in a dominant-negative way. We also show, by both biochemical and RNA interference knockdown experiments, that the nuclear kinase and the cytoplasmic phosphatase for PHAX are CK2 kinase and protein phosphatase 2A, respectively. Our results reveal the composition of the compartmentalized phosphorylation/dephosphorylation system that regulates U snRNA export. This finding was surprising in that such a specific system for U snRNA export regulation is composed of two such universal regulators, suggesting that this compartmentalized system is used more broadly for gene expression regulation.

  17. Direct binding of the Kex2p cytosolic tail to the VHS domain of yeast Gga2p facilitates TGN to prevacuolar compartment transport and is regulated by phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    De, Mithu; Abazeed, Mohamed E.; Fuller, Robert S.

    2013-01-01

    Human Golgi-localized, γ-ear–containing, ADP-ribosylation factor–binding proteins (Ggas) bind directly to acidic dileucine sorting motifs in the cytosolic tails (C-tails) of intracellular receptors. Despite evidence for a role in recruiting ubiquitinated cargo, it remains unclear whether yeast Ggas also function by binding peptide-sorting signals directly. Two-hybrid analysis shows that the Gga1p and Gga2p Vps27, Hrs, Stam (VHS) domains both bind a site in the Kex2p C-tail and that the Gga2p VHS domain binds a site in the Vps10p C-tail. Binding requires deletion of an apparently autoinhibitory sequence in the Gga2p hinge. Ser780 in the Kex2p C-tail is crucial for binding: an Ala substitution blocks but an Asp substitution permits binding. Biochemical assays using purified Gga2p VHS–GGA and TOM1 (GAT) and glutathione S-transferase–Kex2p C-tail fusions show that Gga2p binds directly to the Kex2p C-tail, with relative affinities Asp780 > Ser780 > Ala780. Affinity-purified antibody against a peptide containing phospho-Ser­780 recognizes wild-type Kex2p but not S780A Kex2p, showing that Ser780 is phosphorylated in vivo; phosphorylation of Ser780 is up-regulated by cell wall–damaging drugs. Finally, mutation of Ser780 alters trafficking of Kex2p both in vivo and in cell-free trans-Golgi network (TGN)–prevacuolar compartment (PVC) transport. Thus yeast Gga adaptors facilitate TGN–PVC transport by direct binding of noncanonical phosphoregulated Gga-binding sites in cargo molecules. PMID:23408788

  18. In vivo phosphorylation of adaptors regulates their interaction with clathrin.

    PubMed

    Wilde, A; Brodsky, F M

    1996-11-01

    The coat proteins of clathrin-coated vesicles (CCV) spontaneously self-assemble in vitro, but, in vivo, their self-assembly must be regulated. To determine whether phosphorylation might influence coat formation in the cell, the in vivo phosphorylation state of CCV coat proteins was analyzed. Individual components of the CCV coat were isolated by immunoprecipitation from Madin-Darby bovine kidney cells, labeled with [32P]orthophosphate under normal culture conditions. The predominant phosphoproteins identified were subunits of the AP1 and AP2 adaptors. These included three of the four 100-kD adaptor subunits, alpha and beta 2 of AP2 and beta 1 of AP1, but not the gamma subunit of AP1. In addition, the mu 1 and mu 2 subunits of AP1 and AP2 were phosphorylated under these conditions. Lower levels of in vivo phosphorylation were detected for the clathrin heavy and light chains. Analysis of phosphorylation sites of the 100-kD adaptor subunits indicated they were phosphorylated on serines in their hinge regions, domains that have been implicated in clathrin binding. In vitro clathrin-binding assays revealed that, upon phosphorylation, adaptors no longer bind to clathrin. In vivo analysis further revealed that adaptors with phosphorylated 100-kD subunits predominated in the cytosol, in comparison with adaptors associated with cellular membranes, and that phosphorylated beta 2 subunits of AP2 were exclusively cytosolic. Kinase activity, which converts adaptors to a phosphorylated state in which they no longer bind clathrin, was found associated with the CCV coat. These results suggest that adaptor phosphorylation influences adaptor-clathrin interactions in vivo and could have a role in controlling coat disassembly and reassembly.

  19. Regulation of Rho proteins by phosphorylation in the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Loirand, Gervaise; Guilluy, Christophe; Pacaud, Pierre

    2006-08-01

    The small G protein Rho signaling pathways are recognized as major regulators of cardiovascular functions, and activation of Rho proteins appears to be a common component for the pathogenesis of hypertension and vascular proliferative disorders. Rho proteins are tightly regulated, and recent evidence suggests that modulation of Rho protein signaling by phosphorylation of Rho proteins provides an additional simple mechanism for coordinating Rho protein functions. This regulation by phosphorylation is particularly important in the arterial wall, where RhoA protein expressed in vascular smooth muscle cells is controlled by the endothelium through the nitric oxide/cGMP-dependent kinase pathway.

  20. Phosphorylation-Dependent Regulation of G-Protein Cycle during Nodule Formation in Soybean[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Signaling pathways mediated by heterotrimeric G-protein complexes comprising Gα, Gβ, and Gγ subunits and their regulatory RGS (Regulator of G-protein Signaling) protein are conserved in all eukaryotes. We have shown that the specific Gβ and Gγ proteins of a soybean (Glycine max) heterotrimeric G-protein complex are involved in regulation of nodulation. We now demonstrate the role of Nod factor receptor 1 (NFR1)-mediated phosphorylation in regulation of the G-protein cycle during nodulation in soybean. We also show that during nodulation, the G-protein cycle is regulated by the activity of RGS proteins. Lower or higher expression of RGS proteins results in fewer or more nodules, respectively. NFR1 interacts with RGS proteins and phosphorylates them. Analysis of phosphorylated RGS protein identifies specific amino acids that, when phosphorylated, result in significantly higher GTPase accelerating activity. These data point to phosphorylation-based regulation of G-protein signaling during nodule development. We propose that active NFR1 receptors phosphorylate and activate RGS proteins, which help maintain the Gα proteins in their inactive, trimeric conformation, resulting in successful nodule development. Alternatively, RGS proteins might also have a direct role in regulating nodulation because overexpression of their phospho-mimic version leads to partial restoration of nodule formation in nod49 mutants. PMID:26498905

  1. Early growth response 1 (Egr-1) regulates phosphorylation of microtubule-associated protein tau in mammalian brain.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yifan; Li, Tong; Qureshi, Hamid Y; Han, Dong; Paudel, Hemant K

    2011-06-10

    In the normal brain, tau protein is phosphorylated at a number of proline- and non-proline directed sites, which reduce tau microtubule binding and thus regulate microtubule dynamics. In Alzheimer disease (AD), tau is abnormally hyperphosphorylated, leading to neurofibrillary tangle formation and microtubule disruption, suggesting a loss of regulatory mechanisms controlling tau phosphorylation. Early growth response 1 (Egr-1) is a transcription factor that is significantly up-regulated in AD brain. The pathological significance of this up-regulation is not known. In this study, we found that lentivirus-mediated overexpression of Egr-1 in rat brain hippocampus and primary neurons in culture activates proline-directed kinase Cdk5, inactivates PP1, promotes tau phosphorylation at both proline-directed Ser(396/404) and non-proline-directed Ser(262) sites, and destabilizes microtubules. Furthermore, in Egr-1(-/-) mouse brain, Cdk5 activity was decreased, PP1 activity was increased, and tau phosphorylation was reduced at both proline-directed and non-proline-directed sites. By using nerve growth factor-exposed PC12 cells, we determined that Egr-1 activates Cdk5 to promote phosphorylation of tau and inactivates PP1 via phosphorylation. When Cdk5 was inhibited, tau phosphorylation at both proline- and non-proline directed sites and PP1 phosphorylation were blocked, indicating that Egr-1 acts through Cdk5. By using an in vitro kinase assay and HEK-293 cells transfected with tau, PP1, and Cdk5, we found that Cdk5 phosphorylates Ser(396/404) directly. In addition, by phosphorylating and inactivating PP1, Cdk5 promotes tau phosphorylation at Ser(262) indirectly. Our results indicate that Egr-1 is an in vivo regulator of tau phosphorylation and suggest that in AD brain increased levels of Egr-1 aberrantly activate an Egr-1/Cdk5/PP1 pathway, leading to accumulation of hyperphosphorylated tau, thus destabilizing the microtubule cytoskeleton.

  2. Calcineurin regulates phosphorylation status of transcription factor osterix.

    PubMed

    Okamura, Hirohiko; Amorim, Bruna Rabelo; Wang, Jie; Yoshida, Kaya; Haneji, Tatsuji

    2009-02-06

    Osterix is an osteoblast-specific transcriptional factor that is essential for osteoblast differentiation and bone formation. Calcineurin regulates bone formation through modulating osteoblast differentiation. However, post-translational modification of osterix such as phosphorylation and interactions between osterix and calcineurin remains unclear. In the present study, we demonstrated that calcineurin interacted with osterix determined by immunoprecipitation assay and Western analysis. Immunocytochemical study also revealed that osterix and calcineurin were co-localized in nucleus. Deletion of calcineurin binding motif on osterix molecule disrupted osterix-calcineurin interaction. Phosphorylation status of osterix was augmented by treatment with phosphatase inhibitors, FK506 and calyculin A. In contrast, treatment of recombinant calcineurin reduced phosphorylation status of osterix. Our present study suggests that calcineurin has an important role in the function of osterix through its modification of phosphorylation.

  3. In vivo phosphorylation dynamics of the Bordetella pertussis virulence-controlling response regulator BvgA

    PubMed Central

    Boulanger, Alice; Chen, Qing; Hinton, Deborah M.; Stibitz, Scott

    2013-01-01

    Summary We have used protein electrophoresis through polyacrylamide gels derivatized with the proprietary ligand Phos-tag™ to separate the response regulator BvgA from its phosphorylated counterpart BvgA~P. This approach has allowed us to readily ascertain the degree of phosphorylation of BvgA in in vitro reactions, or in crude lysates of Bordetella pertussis grown under varying laboratory conditions. We have used this technique to examine the kinetics of BvgA phosphorylation after shift of B. pertussis cultures from non-permissive to permissive conditions, or of its dephosphorylation following a shift from permissive to non-permissive conditions. Our results provide the first direct evidence that levels of BvgA~P in vivo correspond temporally to the expression of early and late BvgA-regulated virulence genes. We have also examined a number of other aspects of BvgA function predicted from previous studies and by analogy with other two component response regulators. These include the site of BvgA phosphorylation, the exclusive role of the cognate BvgS sensor kinase in its phosphorylation in Bordetella pertussis, and the effect of the T194M mutation on phosphorylation. We also detected the phosphorylation of a small but consistent fraction of BvgA purified after expression in Escherichia coli. PMID:23489959

  4. Identification of novel in vivo phosphorylation sites of the human proapoptotic protein BAD: pore-forming activity of BAD is regulated by phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Polzien, Lisa; Baljuls, Angela; Rennefahrt, Ulrike E E; Fischer, Andreas; Schmitz, Werner; Zahedi, Rene P; Sickmann, Albert; Metz, Renate; Albert, Stefan; Benz, Roland; Hekman, Mirko; Rapp, Ulf R

    2009-10-09

    BAD is a proapoptotic member of the Bcl-2 protein family that is regulated by phosphorylation in response to survival factors. Although much attention has been devoted to the identification of phosphorylation sites in murine BAD, little data are available with respect to phosphorylation of human BAD protein. Using mass spectrometry, we identified here besides the established phosphorylation sites at serines 75, 99, and 118 several novel in vivo phosphorylation sites within human BAD (serines 25, 32/34, 97, and 124). Furthermore, we investigated the quantitative contribution of BAD targeting kinases in phosphorylating serine residues 75, 99, and 118. Our results indicate that RAF kinases represent, besides protein kinase A, PAK, and Akt/protein kinase B, in vivo BAD-phosphorylating kinases. RAF-induced phosphorylation of BAD was reduced to control levels using the RAF inhibitor BAY 43-9006. This phosphorylation was not prevented by MEK inhibitors. Consistently, expression of constitutively active RAF suppressed apoptosis induced by BAD and the inhibition of colony formation caused by BAD could be prevented by RAF. In addition, using the surface plasmon resonance technique, we analyzed the direct consequences of BAD phosphorylation by RAF with respect to association with 14-3-3 and Bcl-2/Bcl-X(L) proteins. Phosphorylation of BAD by active RAF promotes 14-3-3 protein association, in which the phosphoserine 99 represented the major binding site. Finally, we show here that BAD forms channels in planar bilayer membranes in vitro. This pore-forming capacity was dependent on phosphorylation status and interaction with 14-3-3 proteins. Collectively, our findings provide new insights into the regulation of BAD function by phosphorylation.

  5. Dynamic phosphorylation of Histone Deacetylase 1 by Aurora kinases during mitosis regulates zebrafish embryos development

    PubMed Central

    Loponte, Sara; Segré, Chiara V.; Senese, Silvia; Miccolo, Claudia; Santaguida, Stefano; Deflorian, Gianluca; Citro, Simona; Mattoscio, Domenico; Pisati, Federica; Moser, Mirjam A.; Visintin, Rosella; Seiser, Christian; Chiocca, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) catalyze the removal of acetyl molecules from histone and non-histone substrates playing important roles in chromatin remodeling and control of gene expression. Class I HDAC1 is a critical regulator of cell cycle progression, cellular proliferation and differentiation during development; it is also regulated by many post-translational modifications (PTMs). Herein we characterize a new mitosis-specific phosphorylation of HDAC1 driven by Aurora kinases A and B. We show that this phosphorylation affects HDAC1 enzymatic activity and it is critical for the maintenance of a proper proliferative and developmental plan in a complex organism. Notably, we find that Aurora-dependent phosphorylation of HDAC1 regulates histone acetylation by modulating the expression of genes directly involved in the developing zebrafish central nervous system. Our data represent a step towards the comprehension of HDAC1 regulation by its PTM code, with important implications in unravelling its roles both in physiology and pathology. PMID:27458029

  6. Phosphorylation regulates TRPV1 association with β-arrestin-2.

    PubMed

    Por, Elaine D; Gomez, Ruben; Akopian, Armen N; Jeske, Nathaniel A

    2013-04-01

    Post-translational modifications in TRPV1 (transient receptor potential vanilloid 1) play a critical role in channel activity. Phosphorylation of serine/threonine residues within the N- and C-termini of TRPV1 are implicated in receptor sensitization and activation. Conversely, TRPV1 desensitization occurs via a calcium-dependent mechanism and leads to receptor de-phosphorylation. Importantly, we recently demonstrated that TRPV1 association with β-arrestin-2 is critical to receptor desensitization via its ability to scaffold the phosphodiesterase PDE4D5 to the receptor, regulating TRPV1 phosphorylation. In the present study, we demonstrate that phosphorylation of TRPV1 and β-arrestin-2 regulates this association at the membrane. Under serum-free media conditions, we observed a significant decrease in TRPV1 and β-arrestin-2 association in transfected CHO (Chinese-hamster ovary) cells. Pharmacological activation of the kinases PKA (protein kinase A) and PKC (protein kinase C) led to a robust increase in TRPV1 and β-arrestin-2 association, whereas inhibition of PKA and PKC decreased association. Previously, we identified potential PKA residues (Ser(116), Thr(370)) in the N-terminus of TRPV1 modulated by β-arrestin-2. In the present study we reveal that the phosphorylation status of Thr(370) dictates the β-arrestin-2 and TRPV1 association. Furthermore, we demonstrate that CK2 (casein kinase 2)-mediated phosphorylation of β-arrestin-2 at Thr(382) is critical for its association with TRPV1. Taken together, the findings of the present study suggest that phosphorylation controls the association of TRPV1 with β-arrestin-2.

  7. Akt phosphorylates and regulates Pdcd4 tumor suppressor protein.

    PubMed

    Palamarchuk, Alexey; Efanov, Alexey; Maximov, Vadim; Aqeilan, Rami I; Croce, Carlo M; Pekarsky, Yuri

    2005-12-15

    Programmed cell death 4 (Pdcd4) is a tumor suppressor protein that interacts with eukaryotic initiation factor 4A and inhibits protein synthesis. Pdcd4 also suppresses the transactivation of activator protein-1 (AP-1)-responsive promoters by c-Jun. The Akt (protein kinase B) serine/threonine kinase is a key mediator of phosphoinositide 3-kinase pathway involved in the regulation of cell proliferation, survival, and growth. Because Pdcd4 has two putative Akt phosphorylation sites at Ser(67) and Ser(457), we investigated whether Akt phosphorylates and regulates Pdcd4. Our results show that Akt specifically phosphorylates Ser(67) and Ser(457) residues of Pdcd4 in vitro and in vivo. We further show that phosphorylation of Pdcd4 by Akt causes nuclear translocation of Pdcd4. Using luciferase assay, we show that phosphorylation of Pdcd4 by Akt also causes a significant decrease of the ability of Pdcd4 to interfere with the transactivation of AP-1-responsive promoter by c-Jun.

  8. Phosphorylation of EBP50 negatively regulates β-PIX-dependent Rac1 activity in anoikis.

    PubMed

    Chen, J-Y; Lin, Y-Y; Jou, T-S

    2012-06-01

    We demonstrated a protein kinase C (PKC)-dependent phosphorylation of canine ezrin/radixin/moesin (ERM)-binding phosphoprotein 50 (EBP50) at serine 347/348 by site-directed mutagenesis and a phospho-specific antibody. Cell fractionation and confocal imaging revealed the relocation of EBP50 from the plasma membrane to cytosol that accompanied this phosphorylation event. Increased phosphorylation at these serine residues led to the dissociation of EBP50 from ezrin and β-PIX, which are two upstream regulators of Rac1 activation. Cells overexpressing an EBP50 mutant, mimicking serine 347/348 phosphorylation, became refractory to hepatocyte growth factor-induced cell spreading and scattering, which is normally mediated by Rac1 activation. Detachment of cells from the substratum also elicited an increase in EBP50 phosphorylation, apparently due to counteracting activities of PKC and protein phosphastase 2A, which resulted in decreased Rac1 activation and induction of anoikis. Cells overexpressing an EBP50 mutant defective in serine 347/348 phosphorylation did not undergo apoptosis in suspension culture. These studies reveal a signaling cascade in which different phosphorylation states and subcellular localization of EBP50 regulate Rac1 function.

  9. Phosphorylation of EBP50 negatively regulates β-PIX-dependent Rac1 activity in anoikis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, J-Y; Lin, Y-Y; Jou, T-S

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrated a protein kinase C (PKC)-dependent phosphorylation of canine ezrin/radixin/moesin (ERM)-binding phosphoprotein 50 (EBP50) at serine 347/348 by site-directed mutagenesis and a phospho-specific antibody. Cell fractionation and confocal imaging revealed the relocation of EBP50 from the plasma membrane to cytosol that accompanied this phosphorylation event. Increased phosphorylation at these serine residues led to the dissociation of EBP50 from ezrin and β-PIX, which are two upstream regulators of Rac1 activation. Cells overexpressing an EBP50 mutant, mimicking serine 347/348 phosphorylation, became refractory to hepatocyte growth factor-induced cell spreading and scattering, which is normally mediated by Rac1 activation. Detachment of cells from the substratum also elicited an increase in EBP50 phosphorylation, apparently due to counteracting activities of PKC and protein phosphastase 2A, which resulted in decreased Rac1 activation and induction of anoikis. Cells overexpressing an EBP50 mutant defective in serine 347/348 phosphorylation did not undergo apoptosis in suspension culture. These studies reveal a signaling cascade in which different phosphorylation states and subcellular localization of EBP50 regulate Rac1 function. PMID:22301917

  10. Serine/Threonine/Tyrosine Protein Kinase Phosphorylates Oleosin, a Regulator of Lipid Metabolic Functions1[OA

    PubMed Central

    Parthibane, Velayoudame; Iyappan, Ramachandiran; Vijayakumar, Anitha; Venkateshwari, Varadarajan; Rajasekharan, Ram

    2012-01-01

    Plant oils are stored in oleosomes or oil bodies, which are surrounded by a monolayer of phospholipids embedded with oleosin proteins that stabilize the structure. Recently, a structural protein, Oleosin3 (OLE3), was shown to exhibit both monoacylglycerol acyltransferase and phospholipase A2 activities. The regulation of these distinct dual activities in a single protein is unclear. Here, we report that a serine/threonine/tyrosine protein kinase phosphorylates oleosin. Using bimolecular fluorescence complementation analysis, we demonstrate that this kinase interacts with OLE3 and that the fluorescence was associated with chloroplasts. Oleosin-green fluorescent protein fusion protein was exclusively associated with the chloroplasts. Phosphorylated OLE3 exhibited reduced monoacylglycerol acyltransferase and increased phospholipase A2 activities. Moreover, phosphatidylcholine and diacylglycerol activated oleosin phosphorylation, whereas lysophosphatidylcholine, oleic acid, and Ca2+ inhibited phosphorylation. In addition, recombinant peanut (Arachis hypogaea) kinase was determined to predominantly phosphorylate serine residues, specifically serine-18 in OLE3. Phosphorylation levels of OLE3 during seed germination were determined to be higher than in developing peanut seeds. These findings provide direct evidence for the in vivo substrate selectivity of the dual-specificity kinase and demonstrate that the bifunctional activities of oleosin are regulated by phosphorylation. PMID:22434039

  11. Phosphorylation Regulates the Bound Structure of an Intrinsically Disordered Protein: The p53-TAZ2 Case.

    PubMed

    Ithuralde, Raúl Esteban; Turjanski, Adrián Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    Disordered regions and Intrinsically Disordered Proteins (IDPs) are involved in critical cellular processes and may acquire a stable three-dimensional structure only upon binding to their partners. IDPs may follow a folding-after-binding process, known as induced folding, or a folding-before-binding process, known as conformational selection. The transcription factor p53 is involved in the regulation of cellular events that arise upon stress or DNA damage. The p53 domain structure is composed of an N-terminal transactivation domain (p53TAD), a DNA Binding Domain and a tetramerization domain. The activity of TAD is tightly regulated by interactions with cofactors, inhibitors and phosphorylation. To initiate transcription, p53TAD binds to the TAZ2 domain of CBP, a co-transcription factor, and undergoes a folding and binding process, as revealed by the recent NMR structure of the complex. The activity of p53 is regulated by phosphorylation at multiple sites on the TAD domain and recent studies have shown that modifications at three residues affect the binding towards TAZ2. However, we still do not know how these phosphorylations affect the structure of the bound state and, therefore, how they regulate the p53 function. In this work, we have used computational simulations to understand how phosphorylation affects the structure of the p53TAD:TAZ2 complex and regulates the recognition mechanism. Phosphorylation has been proposed to enhance binding by direct interaction with the folded protein or by changing the unbound conformation of IDPs, for example by pre-folding the protein favoring the recognition mechanism. Here, we show an interesting turn in the p53 case: phosphorylation mainly affects the bound structure of p53TAD, highlighting the complexity of IDP protein-protein interactions. Our results are in agreement with previous experimental studies, allowing a clear picture of how p53 is regulated by phosphorylation and giving new insights into how post

  12. Protein Phosphorylation in Amyloplasts Regulates Starch Branching Enzyme Activity and Protein–Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Tetlow, Ian J.; Wait, Robin; Lu, Zhenxiao; Akkasaeng, Rut; Bowsher, Caroline G.; Esposito, Sergio; Kosar-Hashemi, Behjat; Morell, Matthew K.; Emes, Michael J.

    2004-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation in amyloplasts and chloroplasts of Triticum aestivum (wheat) was investigated after the incubation of intact plastids with γ-32P-ATP. Among the soluble phosphoproteins detected in plastids, three forms of starch branching enzyme (SBE) were phosphorylated in amyloplasts (SBEI, SBEIIa, and SBEIIb), and both forms of SBE in chloroplasts (SBEI and SBEIIa) were shown to be phosphorylated after sequencing of the immunoprecipitated 32P-labeled phosphoproteins using quadrupole-orthogonal acceleration time of flight mass spectrometry. Phosphoamino acid analysis of the phosphorylated SBE forms indicated that the proteins are all phosphorylated on Ser residues. Analysis of starch granule–associated phosphoproteins after incubation of intact amyloplasts with γ-32P-ATP indicated that the granule-associated forms of SBEII and two granule-associated forms of starch synthase (SS) are phosphorylated, including SSIIa. Measurement of SBE activity in amyloplasts and chloroplasts showed that phosphorylation activated SBEIIa (and SBEIIb in amyloplasts), whereas dephosphorylation using alkaline phosphatase reduced the catalytic activity of both enzymes. Phosphorylation and dephosphorylation had no effect on the measurable activity of SBEI in amyloplasts and chloroplasts, and the activities of both granule-bound forms of SBEII in amyloplasts were unaffected by dephosphorylation. Immunoprecipitation experiments using peptide-specific anti-SBE antibodies showed that SBEIIb and starch phosphorylase each coimmunoprecipitated with SBEI in a phosphorylation-dependent manner, suggesting that these enzymes may form protein complexes within the amyloplast in vivo. Conversely, dephosphorylation of immunoprecipitated protein complex led to its disassembly. This article reports direct evidence that enzymes of starch metabolism (amylopectin synthesis) are regulated by protein phosphorylation and indicate a wider role for protein phosphorylation and protein

  13. Phosphodiesterases Regulate BAY 41-2272-Induced VASP Phosphorylation in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Adderley, Shaquria P.; Joshi, Chintamani N.; Martin, Danielle N.; Tulis, David Anthony

    2012-01-01

    BAY 41-2272 (BAY), a stimulator of soluble guanylyl cyclase, increases cyclic nucleotides and inhibits proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). In this study, we elucidated mechanisms of action of BAY in its regulation of vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) with an emphasis on VSMC phosphodiesterases (PDEs). BAY alone increased phosphorylation of VASPSer239 and VASPSer157, respective indicators of PKG and PKA signaling. IBMX, a non-selective inhibitor of PDEs, had no effect on BAY-induced phosphorylation at VASPSer239 but inhibited phosphorylation at VASPSer157. Selective inhibitors of PDE3 or PDE4 attenuated BAY-mediated increases at VASPSer239 and VASPSer157, whereas PDE5 inhibition potentiated BAY-mediated increases only at VASPSer157. In comparison, 8Br-cGMP increased phosphorylation at VASPSer239 and VASPSer157 which were not affected by selective PDE inhibitors. In the presence of 8Br-cAMP, inhibition of either PDE4 or PDE5 decreased VASPSer239 phosphorylation and inhibition of PDE3 increased phosphorylation at VASPSer239, while inhibition of PDE3 or PDE4 increased and PDE5 inhibition had no effect on VASPSer157 phosphorylation. These findings demonstrate that BAY operates via cAMP and cGMP along with regulation by PDEs to phosphorylate VASP in VSMCs and that the mechanism of action of BAY in VSMCs is different from that of direct cyclic nucleotide analogs with respect to VASP phosphorylation and the involvement of PDEs. Given a role for VASP as a critical cytoskeletal protein, these findings provide evidence for BAY as a regulator of VSMC growth and a potential therapeutic agent against vasculoproliferative disorders. PMID:22347188

  14. Antineoplastic agents. 511. Direct phosphorylation of phenpanstatin and pancratistatin.

    PubMed

    Pettit, George R; Melody, Noeleen; Herald, Delbert L

    2004-03-01

    Selective phosphorylation of phenpanstatin (3a) with tetrabutylammonium dihydrogen phosphate and dicyclohexylcarbodiimide in pyridine followed by cation-exchange chromatographic procedures was found to provide an efficient route to a new series (3b-3d) of promising 3,4-O-cyclic phosphate prodrugs designated phenpanstatin phosphates. Application of analogous reaction conditions to pancratistatin (1a) led to a mixture of monophosphate derivatives where sodium pancratistatin 4-O-phosphate (4a) was isolated and the structure confirmed by X-ray crystallography. Modification of the reaction conditions allowed direct phosphorylation of pancratistatin followed by cation-exchange chromatography to afford sodium pancratistatin 3,4-O-cyclic phosphate (5a), which was selected for preclinical development.

  15. Phosphorylation at the Homotypic Interface Regulates Nucleoprotein Oligomerization and Assembly of the Influenza Virus Replication Machinery

    PubMed Central

    Mondal, Arindam; Potts, Gregory K.; Dawson, Anthony R.; Coon, Joshua J.; Mehle, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Negative-sense RNA viruses assemble large ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complexes that direct replication and transcription of the viral genome. Influenza virus RNPs contain the polymerase, genomic RNA and multiple copies of nucleoprotein (NP). During RNP assembly, monomeric NP oligomerizes along the length of the genomic RNA. Regulated assembly of the RNP is essential for virus replication, but how NP is maintained as a monomer that subsequently oligomerizes to form RNPs is poorly understood. Here we elucidate a mechanism whereby NP phosphorylation regulates oligomerization. We identified new evolutionarily conserved phosphorylation sites on NP and demonstrated that phosphorylation of NP decreased formation of higher-order complexes. Two phosphorylation sites were located on opposite sides of the NP:NP interface. In both influenza A and B virus, mutating or mimicking phosphorylation at these residues blocked homotypic interactions and drove NP towards a monomeric form. Highlighting the central role of this process during infection, these mutations impaired RNP formation, polymerase activity and virus replication. Thus, dynamic phosphorylation of NP regulates RNP assembly and modulates progression through the viral life cycle. PMID:25867750

  16. Protein phosphorylation and regulation of adaptive responses in bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Stock, J B; Ninfa, A J; Stock, A M

    1989-01-01

    Bacteria continuously adapt to changes in their environment. Responses are largely controlled by signal transduction systems that contain two central enzymatic components, a protein kinase that uses adenosine triphosphate to phosphorylate itself at a histidine residue and a response regulator that accepts phosphoryl groups from the kinase. This conserved phosphotransfer chemistry is found in a wide range of bacterial species and operates in diverse systems to provide different regulatory outputs. The histidine kinases are frequently membrane receptor proteins that respond to environmental signals and phosphorylate response regulators that control transcription. Four specific regulatory systems are discussed in detail: chemotaxis in response to attractant and repellent stimuli (Che), regulation of gene expression in response to nitrogen deprivation (Ntr), control of the expression of enzymes and transport systems that assimilate phosphorus (Pho), and regulation of outer membrane porin expression in response to osmolarity and other culture conditions (Omp). Several additional systems are also examined, including systems that control complex developmental processes such as sporulation and fruiting-body formation, systems required for virulent infections of plant or animal host tissues, and systems that regulate transport and metabolism. Finally, an attempt is made to understand how cross-talk between parallel phosphotransfer pathways can provide a global regulatory curcuitry. PMID:2556636

  17. TARP phosphorylation regulates synaptic AMPA receptors through lipid bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Sumioka, Akio; Yan, Dan; Tomita, Susumu

    2010-01-01

    Summary Neurons use neurotransmitters to communicate across synapses, constructing neural circuits in the brain. AMPA-type glutamate receptors are the predominant excitatory neurotransmitter receptors mediating fast synaptic transmission. AMPA receptors localize at synapses by forming protein complexes with transmembrane AMPA receptor regulatory proteins (TARPs) and PSD-95-like MAGUKs. Among the three classes of ionotropic glutamate receptors (AMPA-, NMDA, kainate-type), AMPA receptor activity is most regulatable by neuronal activity to adjust synaptic strength. Here, we mutated the prototypical TARP, stargazin, and found that TARP phosphorylation regulates synaptic AMPA receptor activity in vivo. We also found that stargazin interacts with negatively-charged lipid bilayers in its phosphorylation dependent manner, and that the lipid interaction inhibited stargazin binding to PSD-95. Cationic lipids dissociated stargazin from lipid bilayers and enhanced synaptic AMPA receptor activity in a stargazin phosphorylation-dependent manner. Thus, TARP phosphorylation plays a critical role in regulating AMPA receptor-mediated synaptic transmission via a lipid bilayer interaction. PMID:20547132

  18. Phosphorylation of Chs2p regulates interaction with COPII

    PubMed Central

    Jakobsen, Mia Kyed; Cheng, Zhiliang; Lam, Sheung Kwan; Roth-Johnson, Elizabeth; Barfield, Robyn M.; Schekman, Randy

    2013-01-01

    Summary Trafficking of the chitin synthase Chs2p from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to the bud-neck in late mitosis is tightly regulated by the cell cycle via phosphorylation of serine residues in the N-terminus of the protein. Here, we describe the effects of Chs2p phosphorylation on the interaction with coat protein complex II (COPII). Identification of a cdc5ts mutant, which fails to transport Chs2p–3xGFP to the bud-neck and instead accumulates the protein in intracellular puncta, led us to discover that Chs2p–3xGFP accumulates at ER exit sites in metaphase-arrested wild-type cells. Using an in vitro ER vesicle formation assay we showed that phosphorylation of Chs2p by the cyclin-dependent kinase CDK1 prevents packaging into COPII vesicles, whereas dephosphorylation of Chs2p by the phosphatase Cdc14p stimulates selection into the vesicles. We found that the cytoplasmic N-terminal domain of Chs2p, which contains the CDK1 phosphorylation sites, interacts with the COPII component Sec24p in a yeast two-hybrid assay and that phosphomimetic substitutions of serines at the CDK1 consensus sites reduces the interaction. Our data suggest that dephosphorylation functions as a molecular switch for regulated ER exit of Chs2p. PMID:23525003

  19. TARP phosphorylation regulates synaptic AMPA receptors through lipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Sumioka, Akio; Yan, Dan; Tomita, Susumu

    2010-06-10

    Neurons use neurotransmitters to communicate across synapses, constructing neural circuits in the brain. AMPA-type glutamate receptors are the predominant excitatory neurotransmitter receptors mediating fast synaptic transmission. AMPA receptors localize at synapses by forming protein complexes with transmembrane AMPA receptor regulatory proteins (TARPs) and PSD-95-like membrane-associated guanylate kinases. Among the three classes of ionotropic glutamate receptors (AMPA, NMDA, and kainate type), AMPA receptor activity is most regulatable by neuronal activity to adjust synaptic strength. Here, we mutated the prototypical TARP, stargazin, and found that TARP phosphorylation regulates synaptic AMPA receptor activity in vivo. We also found that stargazin interacts with negatively charged lipid bilayers in a phosphorylation-dependent manner and that the lipid interaction inhibited stargazin binding to PSD-95. Cationic lipids dissociated stargazin from lipid bilayers and enhanced synaptic AMPA receptor activity in a stargazin phosphorylation-dependent manner. Thus, TARP phosphorylation plays a critical role in regulating AMPA receptor-mediated synaptic transmission via a lipid bilayer interaction.

  20. Phosphorylation of K+ channels at single residues regulates memory formation

    PubMed Central

    Vernon, Jeffrey; Irvine, Elaine E.; Peters, Marco; Jeyabalan, Jeshmi

    2016-01-01

    Phosphorylation is a ubiquitous post-translational modification of proteins, and a known physiological regulator of K+ channel function. Phosphorylation of K+ channels by kinases has long been presumed to regulate neuronal processing and behavior. Although circumstantial evidence has accumulated from behavioral studies of vertebrates and invertebrates, the contribution to memory of single phosphorylation sites on K+ channels has never been reported. We have used gene targeting in mice to inactivate protein kinase A substrate residues in the fast-inactivating subunit Kv4.2 (T38A mutants), and in the small-conductance Ca2+-activated subunit SK1 (S105A mutants). Both manipulations perturbed a specific form of memory, leaving others intact. T38A mutants had enhanced spatial memory for at least 4 wk after training, whereas performance in three tests of fear memory was unaffected. S105A mutants were impaired in passive avoidance memory, sparing fear, and spatial memory. Together with recent findings that excitability governs the participation of neurons in a memory circuit, this result suggests that the memory type supported by neurons may depend critically on the phosphorylation of specific K+ channels at single residues. PMID:26980786

  1. Plk phosphorylation regulates the microtubule-stabilizing protein TCTP.

    PubMed

    Yarm, Frederic R

    2002-09-01

    The mitotic polo-like kinases have been implicated in the formation and function of bipolar spindles on the basis of their respective localizations and mutant phenotypes. To date, this putative regulation has been limited to a kinesin-like motor protein, a centrosomal structural protein, and two microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs). In this study, another spindle-regulating protein, the mammalian non-MAP microtubule-binding and -stabilizing protein, the translationally controlled tumor protein (TCTP), was identified as a putative Plk-interacting clone by a two-hybrid screen. Plk phosphorylates TCTP on two serine residues in vitro and cofractionates with the majority of kinase activity toward TCTP in mitotic cell lysates. In addition, these sites were demonstrated to be phosphorylated in vivo. Overexpression of a Plk phosphorylation site-deficient mutant of TCTP induced a dramatic increase in the number of multinucleate cells, rounded cells with condensed ball-like nuclei, and cells undergoing cell death, similar to both the reported anti-Plk antibody microinjection and the low-concentration taxol treatment phenotypes. These results suggest that phosphorylation decreases the microtubule-stabilizing activity of TCTP and promotes the increase in microtubule dynamics that occurs after metaphase.

  2. A unified molecular mechanism for the regulation of acetyl-CoA carboxylase by phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Jia; Zhang, Yixiao; Yu, Tai-Yuan; Sadre-Bazzaz, Kianoush; Rudolph, Michael J; Amodeo, Gabriele A; Symington, Lorraine S; Walz, Thomas; Tong, Liang

    2016-01-01

    Acetyl-CoA carboxylases (ACCs) are crucial metabolic enzymes and attractive targets for drug discovery. Eukaryotic acetyl-CoA carboxylases are 250 kDa single-chain, multi-domain enzymes and function as dimers and higher oligomers. Their catalytic activity is tightly regulated by phosphorylation and other means. Here we show that yeast ACC is directly phosphorylated by the protein kinase SNF1 at residue Ser1157, which potently inhibits the enzyme. Crystal structure of three ACC central domains (AC3–AC5) shows that the phosphorylated Ser1157 is recognized by Arg1173, Arg1260, Tyr1113 and Ser1159. The R1173A/R1260A double mutant is insensitive to SNF1, confirming that this binding site is crucial for regulation. Electron microscopic studies reveal dramatic conformational changes in the holoenzyme upon phosphorylation, likely owing to the dissociation of the biotin carboxylase domain dimer. The observations support a unified molecular mechanism for the regulation of ACC by phosphorylation as well as by the natural product soraphen A, a potent inhibitor of eukaryotic ACC. These molecular insights enhance our understanding of acetyl-CoA carboxylase regulation and provide a basis for drug discovery. PMID:27990296

  3. Phosphorylation by Nek1 regulates opening and closing of voltage dependent anion channel 1

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yumay; Gaczynska, Maria; Osmulski, Pawel; Polci, Rosaria; Riley, Daniel J.

    2010-04-09

    VDAC1 is a key component of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore. To initiate apoptosis and certain other forms of cell death, mitochondria become permeable such that cytochrome c and other pre-apoptotic molecules resident inside the mitochondria enter the cytosol and activate apoptotic cascades. We have shown recently that VDAC1 interacts directly with never-in-mitosis A related kinase 1 (Nek1), and that Nek1 phosphorylates VDAC1 on Ser193 to prevent excessive cell death after injury. How this phosphorylation regulates the activity of VDAC1, however, has not yet been reported. Here, we use atomic force microscopy (AFM) and cytochrome c conductance studies to examine the configuration of VDAC1 before and after phosphorylation by Nek1. Wild-type VDAC1 assumes an open configuration, but closes and prevents cytochrome c efflux when phosphorylated by Nek1. A VDAC1-Ser193Ala mutant, which cannot be phosphorylated by Nek1 under identical conditions, remains open and constitutively allows cytochrome c efflux. Conversely, a VDAC1-Ser193Glu mutant, which mimics constitutive phosphorylation by Nek1, remains closed by AFM and prevents cytochrome c leakage in the same liposome assays. Our data provide a mechanism to explain how Nek1 regulates cell death by affecting the opening and closing of VDAC1.

  4. Phosphorylation and SCF-mediated degradation regulate CREB-H transcription of metabolic targets

    PubMed Central

    Barbosa, Sónia; Carreira, Suzanne; Bailey, Daniel; Abaitua, Fernando; O'Hare, Peter

    2015-01-01

    CREB‑H, an endoplasmic reticulum–anchored transcription factor, plays a key role in regulating secretion and in metabolic and inflammatory pathways, but how its activity is modulated remains unclear. We examined processing of the nuclear active form and identified a motif around S87–S90 with homology to DSG-type phosphodegrons. We show that this region is subject to multiple phosphorylations, which regulate CREB-H stability by targeting it to the SCFFbw1a E3 ubiquitin ligase. Data from phosphatase treatment, use of phosophospecific antibody, and substitution of serine residues demonstrate phosphorylation of candidate serines in the region, with the core S87/S90 motif representing a critical determinant promoting proteasome-mediated degradation. Candidate kinases CKII and GSK-3b phosphorylate CREB-H in vitro with specificities for different serines. Prior phosphorylation with GSK-3 at one or more of the adjacent serines substantially increases S87/S90-dependent phosphorylation by CKII. In vivo expression of a dominant-negative Cul1 enhances steady-state levels of CREB‑H, an effect augmented by Fbw1a. CREB-H directly interacts with Fbw1a in a phosphorylation-dependent manner. Finally, mutations within the phosphodegron, when incorporated into the full-length protein, result in increased levels of constitutively cleaved nuclear protein and increased transcription and secretion of a key endogenous target gene, apolipoprotein A IV. PMID:26108621

  5. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Fate Is Controlled by Hrs Tyrosine Phosphorylation Sites That Regulate Hrs Degradation▿

    PubMed Central

    Stern, Kathryn A.; Visser Smit, Gina D.; Place, Trenton L.; Winistorfer, Stanley; Piper, Robert C.; Lill, Nancy L.

    2007-01-01

    Hepatocyte growth factor-regulated tyrosine kinase substrate (Hrs) is an endosomal protein essential for the efficient sorting of activated growth factor receptors into the lysosomal degradation pathway. Hrs undergoes ligand-induced tyrosine phosphorylation on residues Y329 and Y334 downstream of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activation. It has been difficult to investigate the functional roles of phosphoHrs, as only a small proportion of the cellular Hrs pool is detectably phosphorylated. Using an HEK 293 model system, we found that ectopic expression of the protein Cbl enhances Hrs ubiquitination and increases Hrs phosphorylation following cell stimulation with EGF. We exploited Cbl's expansion of the phosphoHrs pool to determine whether Hrs tyrosine phosphorylation controls EGFR fate. In structure-function studies of Cbl and EGFR mutants, the level of Hrs phosphorylation and rapidity of apparent Hrs dephosphorylation correlated directly with EGFR degradation. Differential expression of wild-type versus Y329,334F mutant Hrs in Hrs-depleted cells revealed that one or both tyrosines regulate ligand-dependent Hrs degradation, as well as EGFR degradation. By modulating Hrs ubiquitination, phosphorylation, and protein levels, Cbl may control the composition of the endosomal sorting machinery and its ability to target EGFR for lysosomal degradation. PMID:17101784

  6. ERK Phosphorylation Regulates Sleep and Plasticity in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Vanderheyden, William M.; Gerstner, Jason R.; Tanenhaus, Anne; Yin, Jerry C.; Shaw, Paul J.

    2013-01-01

    Given the relationship between sleep and plasticity, we examined the role of Extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) in regulating baseline sleep, and modulating the response to waking experience. Both sleep deprivation and social enrichment increase ERK phosphorylation in wild-type flies. The effects of both sleep deprivation and social enrichment on structural plasticity in the LNvs can be recapitulated by expressing an active version of ERK (UAS-ERKSEM) pan-neuronally in the adult fly using GeneSwitch (Gsw) Gsw-elav-GAL4. Conversely, disrupting ERK reduces sleep and prevents both the behavioral and structural plasticity normally induced by social enrichment. Finally, using transgenic flies carrying a cAMP response Element (CRE)-luciferase reporter we show that activating ERK enhances CRE-Luc activity while disrupting ERK reduces it. These data suggest that ERK phosphorylation is an important mediator in transducing waking experience into sleep. PMID:24244744

  7. Coincident regulation of PKCdelta in human platelets by phosphorylation of Tyr311 and Tyr565 and phospholipase C signalling.

    PubMed

    Hall, Kellie J; Jones, Matthew L; Poole, Alastair W

    2007-09-15

    PKC (protein kinase C)d plays a complex role in platelets, having effects on both positive and negative signalling functions. It is phosphorylated on tyrosine residues in response to thrombin and collagen, and it has recently been shown that Tyr311 is phosphorylated in response to PAR (protease-activated receptor) 1 and PAR4 receptor activation. In the present study, we show that Tyr311 and Tyr565 are phosphorylated in response to thrombin, and have examined the interplay between phosphorylation and the classical lipid-mediated activation of PKCd. Phosphorylation of both Tyr311 and Tyr565 is dependent on Src kinase and PLC (phospholipase C) activity in response to thrombin. Importantly, direct allosteric activation of PKCd with PMA also induced phosphorylation of Tyr311 and Tyr565, and this was dependent on the activity of Src kinases, but not PLC. Membrane recruitment of PKCd is essential for phosphorylation of this tyrosine residue, but tyrosine phosphorylation is not required for membrane recruitment of PKCd. Both thrombin and PMA induce recruitment of PKCd to the membrane, and for thrombin, this recruitment is a PLC-dependent process. In order to address the functional role of tyrosine residue phosphorylation of PKCd, we demonstrate that phosphorylation can potentiate the activity of the kinase, although phosphorylation does not play a role in membrane recruitment of the kinase. PKCd is therefore regulated in a coincident fashion, PLC-dependent signals recruiting it to the plasma membrane and by phosphorylation on tyrosine residues, potentiating its activity.

  8. JNK phosphorylates Yes-associated protein (YAP) to regulate apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Tomlinson, V; Gudmundsdottir, K; Luong, P; Leung, K-Y; Knebel, A; Basu, S

    2010-01-01

    Yes-associated protein (YAP) regulates DNA damage and chemosensitivity, as well as functioning as a pro-growth, cell size regulator. For both of its roles, regulation by phosphorylation is crucial. We undertook an in vitro screen to identify novel YAP kinases to discover new signaling pathways to better understand YAP's function. We identified JNK1 and JNK2 as robust YAP kinases, as well as mapped multiple sites of phosphorylation. Using inhibitors and siRNA, we showed that JNK specifically phosphorylates endogenous YAP in a number of cell types. We show that YAP protects keratinocytes from UV irradiation but promotes UV-induced apoptosis in a squamous cell carcinoma. We defined the mechanism for this dual role to be YAP's ability to bind and stabilize the pro-proliferative ΔNp63α isoform in a JNK-dependent manner. Our report indicates that an evaluation of the expression of the different isoforms of p63 and p73 is crucial in determining YAP's function. PMID:21364637

  9. Human Cdc14A regulates Wee1 stability by counteracting CDK-mediated phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Ovejero, Sara; Ayala, Patricia; Bueno, Avelino; Sacristán, María P.

    2012-01-01

    The activity of Cdk1–cyclin B1 mitotic complexes is regulated by the balance between the counteracting activities of Wee1/Myt1 kinases and Cdc25 phosphatases. These kinases and phosphatases must be strictly regulated to ensure proper mitotic timing. One masterpiece of this regulatory network is Cdk1, which promotes Cdc25 activity and suppresses inhibitory Wee1/Myt1 kinases through direct phosphorylation. The Cdk1-dependent phosphorylation of Wee1 primes phosphorylation by additional kinases such as Plk1, triggering Wee1 degradation at the onset of mitosis. Here we report that Cdc14A plays an important role in the regulation of Wee1 stability. Depletion of Cdc14A results in a significant reduction in Wee1 protein levels. Cdc14A binds to Wee1 at its amino-terminal domain and reverses CDK-mediated Wee1 phosphorylation. In particular, we found that Cdc14A inhibits Wee1 degradation through the dephosphorylation of Ser-123 and Ser-139 residues. Thus the lack of phosphorylation of these two residues prevents the interaction with Plk1 and the consequent efficient Wee1 degradation at the onset of mitosis. These data support the hypothesis that Cdc14A counteracts Cdk1–cyclin B1 activity through Wee1 dephosphorylation. PMID:23051732

  10. Hedgehog-regulated atypical PKC promotes phosphorylation and activation of Smoothened and Cubitus interruptus in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Kai; Liu, Yajuan; Fan, Junkai; Epperly, Garretson; Gao, Tianyan; Jiang, Jin; Jia, Jianhang

    2014-01-01

    Smoothened (Smo) is essential for transduction of the Hedgehog (Hh) signal in both insects and vertebrates. Cell surface/cilium accumulation of Smo is thought to play an important role in Hh signaling, but how the localization of Smo is controlled remains poorly understood. In this study, we demonstrate that atypical PKC (aPKC) regulates Smo phosphorylation and basolateral accumulation in Drosophila wings. Inactivation of aPKC by either RNAi or a mutation inhibits Smo basolateral accumulation and attenuates Hh target gene expression. In contrast, expression of constitutively active aPKC elevates basolateral accumulation of Smo and promotes Hh signaling. The aPKC-mediated phosphorylation of Smo at Ser680 promotes Ser683 phosphorylation by casein kinase 1 (CK1), and these phosphorylation events elevate Smo activity in vivo. Moreover, aPKC has an additional positive role in Hh signaling by regulating the activity of Cubitus interruptus (Ci) through phosphorylation of the Zn finger DNA-binding domain. Finally, the expression of aPKC is up-regulated by Hh signaling in a Ci-dependent manner. Our findings indicate a direct involvement of aPKC in Hh signaling beyond its role in cell polarity. PMID:25349414

  11. Phosphorylation Regulates NCC Stability and Transporter Activity In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Sung-Sen; Fang, Yu-Wei; Tseng, Min-Hua; Chu, Pei-Yi; Yu, I-Shing; Wu, Han-Chung; Lin, Shu-Wha; Chau, Tom; Uchida, Shinichi; Sasaki, Sei; Lin, Yuh-Feng; Sytwu, Huey-Kang

    2013-01-01

    A T60M mutation in the thiazide-sensitive sodium chloride cotransporter (NCC) is common in patients with Gitelman’s syndrome (GS). This mutation prevents Ste20-related proline and alanine-rich kinase (SPAK)/oxidative stress responsive kinase-1 (OSR1)–mediated phosphorylation of NCC and alters NCC transporter activity in vitro. Here, we examined the physiologic effects of NCC phosphorylation in vivo using a novel Ncc T58M (human T60M) knock-in mouse model. NccT58M/T58M mice exhibited typical features of GS with a blunted response to thiazide diuretics. Despite expressing normal levels of Ncc mRNA, these mice had lower levels of total Ncc and p-Ncc protein that did not change with a low-salt diet that increased p-Spak. In contrast to wild-type Ncc, which localized to the apical membrane of distal convoluted tubule cells, T58M Ncc localized primarily to the cytosolic region and caused an increase in late distal convoluted tubule volume. In MDCK cells, exogenous expression of phosphorylation-defective NCC mutants reduced total protein expression levels and membrane stability. Furthermore, our analysis found diminished total urine NCC excretion in a cohort of GS patients with homozygous NCC T60M mutations. When Wnk4D561A/+ mice, a model of pseudohypoaldosteronism type II expressing an activated Spak/Osr1-Ncc, were crossed with NccT58M/T58M mice, total Ncc and p-Ncc protein levels decreased and the GS phenotype persisted over the hypertensive phenotype. Overall, these data suggest that SPAK-mediated phosphorylation of NCC at T60 regulates NCC stability and function, and defective phosphorylation at this residue corrects the phenotype of pseudohypoaldosteronism type II. PMID:23833262

  12. Phosphorylation regulates NCC stability and transporter activity in vivo.

    PubMed

    Yang, Sung-Sen; Fang, Yu-Wei; Tseng, Min-Hua; Chu, Pei-Yi; Yu, I-Shing; Wu, Han-Chung; Lin, Shu-Wha; Chau, Tom; Uchida, Shinichi; Sasaki, Sei; Lin, Yuh-Feng; Sytwu, Huey-Kang; Lin, Shih-Hua

    2013-10-01

    A T60M mutation in the thiazide-sensitive sodium chloride cotransporter (NCC) is common in patients with Gitelman's syndrome (GS). This mutation prevents Ste20-related proline and alanine-rich kinase (SPAK)/oxidative stress responsive kinase-1 (OSR1)-mediated phosphorylation of NCC and alters NCC transporter activity in vitro. Here, we examined the physiologic effects of NCC phosphorylation in vivo using a novel Ncc T58M (human T60M) knock-in mouse model. Ncc(T58M/T58M) mice exhibited typical features of GS with a blunted response to thiazide diuretics. Despite expressing normal levels of Ncc mRNA, these mice had lower levels of total Ncc and p-Ncc protein that did not change with a low-salt diet that increased p-Spak. In contrast to wild-type Ncc, which localized to the apical membrane of distal convoluted tubule cells, T58M Ncc localized primarily to the cytosolic region and caused an increase in late distal convoluted tubule volume. In MDCK cells, exogenous expression of phosphorylation-defective NCC mutants reduced total protein expression levels and membrane stability. Furthermore, our analysis found diminished total urine NCC excretion in a cohort of GS patients with homozygous NCC T60M mutations. When Wnk4(D561A/+) mice, a model of pseudohypoaldosteronism type II expressing an activated Spak/Osr1-Ncc, were crossed with Ncc(T58M/T58M) mice, total Ncc and p-Ncc protein levels decreased and the GS phenotype persisted over the hypertensive phenotype. Overall, these data suggest that SPAK-mediated phosphorylation of NCC at T60 regulates NCC stability and function, and defective phosphorylation at this residue corrects the phenotype of pseudohypoaldosteronism type II.

  13. Sec24 phosphorylation regulates autophagosome abundance during nutrient deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Saralin; Wang, Juan; Zhu, Ming; Stahmer, Kyle; Lakshminarayan, Ramya; Ghassemian, Majid; Jiang, Yu; Miller, Elizabeth A; Ferro-Novick, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER)-derived COPII coated vesicles constitutively transport secretory cargo to the Golgi. However, during starvation-induced stress, COPII vesicles have been implicated as a membrane source for autophagosomes, distinct organelles that engulf cellular components for degradation by macroautophagy (hereafter called autophagy). How cells regulate core trafficking machinery to fulfill dramatically different cellular roles in response to environmental cues is unknown. Here we show that phosphorylation of conserved amino acids on the membrane-distal surface of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae COPII cargo adaptor, Sec24, reprograms COPII vesicles for autophagy. We also show casein kinase 1 (Hrr25) is a key kinase that phosphorylates this regulatory surface. During autophagy, Sec24 phosphorylation regulates autophagosome number and its interaction with the C-terminus of Atg9, a component of the autophagy machinery required for autophagosome initiation. We propose that the acute need to produce autophagosomes during starvation drives the interaction of Sec24 with Atg9 to increase autophagosome abundance. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.21167.001 PMID:27855785

  14. Regulation of microtubule dynamic instability in vitro by differentially phosphorylated stathmin.

    PubMed

    Manna, Tapas; Thrower, Douglas A; Honnappa, Srinivas; Steinmetz, Michel O; Wilson, Leslie

    2009-06-05

    Stathmin is an important regulator of microtubule polymerization and dynamics. When unphosphorylated it destabilizes microtubules in two ways, by reducing the microtubule polymer mass through sequestration of soluble tubulin into an assembly-incompetent T2S complex (two alpha:beta tubulin dimers per molecule of stathmin), and by increasing the switching frequency (catastrophe frequency) from growth to shortening at plus and minus ends by binding directly to the microtubules. Phosphorylation of stathmin on one or more of its four serine residues (Ser(16), Ser(25), Ser(38), and Ser(63)) reduces its microtubule-destabilizing activity. However, the effects of phosphorylation of the individual serine residues of stathmin on microtubule dynamic instability have not been investigated systematically. Here we analyzed the effects of stathmin singly phosphorylated at Ser(16) or Ser(63), and doubly phosphorylated at Ser(25) and Ser(38), on its ability to modulate microtubule dynamic instability at steady-state in vitro. Phosphorylation at either Ser(16) or Ser(63) strongly reduced or abolished the ability of stathmin to bind to and sequester soluble tubulin and its ability to act as a catastrophe factor by directly binding to the microtubules. In contrast, double phosphorylation of Ser(25) and Ser(38) did not affect the binding of stathmin to tubulin or microtubules or its catastrophe-promoting activity. Our results indicate that the effects of stathmin on dynamic instability are strongly but differently attenuated by phosphorylation at Ser(16) and Ser(63) and support the hypothesis that selective targeting by Ser(16)-specific or Ser(63)-specific kinases provides complimentary mechanisms for regulating microtubule function.

  15. A Compartmentalized Phosphorylation/Dephosphorylation System That Regulates U snRNA Export from the Nucleus▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Kitao, Saori; Segref, Alexandra; Kast, Juergen; Wilm, Matthias; Mattaj, Iain W.; Ohno, Mutsuhito

    2008-01-01

    PHAX (phosphorylated adaptor for RNA export) is the key regulator of U snRNA nuclear export in metazoa. Our previous work revealed that PHAX is phosphorylated in the nucleus and is exported as a component of the U snRNA export complex to the cytoplasm, where it is dephosphorylated (M. Ohno, A. Segref, A. Bachi, M. Wilm, and I. W. Mattaj, Cell 101:187-198, 2000). PHAX phosphorylation is essential for export complex assembly, whereas its dephosphorylation causes export complex disassembly. Thus, PHAX is subject to a compartmentalized phosphorylation/dephosphorylation cycle that contributes to transport directionality. However, neither essential PHAX phosphorylation sites nor the modifying enzymes that contribute to the compartmentalized system have been identified. Here, we identify PHAX phosphorylation sites that are necessary and sufficient for U snRNA export. Mutation of the phosphorylation sites inhibited U snRNA export in a dominant-negative way. We also show, by both biochemical and RNA interference knockdown experiments, that the nuclear kinase and the cytoplasmic phosphatase for PHAX are CK2 kinase and protein phosphatase 2A, respectively. Our results reveal the composition of the compartmentalized phosphorylation/dephosphorylation system that regulates U snRNA export. This finding was surprising in that such a specific system for U snRNA export regulation is composed of two such universal regulators, suggesting that this compartmentalized system is used more broadly for gene expression regulation. PMID:17967890

  16. Phosphorylation and dephosphorylation regulate APC/CCdh1 substrate degradation

    PubMed Central

    Simpson-Lavy, Kobi J; Zenvirth, Drora; Brandeis, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The Anaphase Promoting Complex/Cyclosome (APC/C) ubiquitin ligase activated by its G1 specific adaptor protein Cdh1 is a major regulator of the cell cycle. The APC/CCdh1 mediates degradation of dozens of proteins, however, the kinetics and requirements for their degradation are largely unknown. We demonstrate that overexpression of the constitutive active CDH1m11 mutant that is not inhibited by phosphorylation results in mitotic exit in the absence of the FEAR and MEN pathways, and DNA re-replication in the absence of Cdc7 activity. This mode of mitotic exit also reveals additional requirements for APC/CCdh1 substrate degradation, which for some substrates such as Pds1 or Clb5 is dephosphorylation, but for others such as Cdc5 is phosphorylation. PMID:26252546

  17. Importance of Phosphorylation for Osteopontin Regulation of Biomineralization

    PubMed Central

    Gericke, A.; Qin, C.; Spevak, L.; Fujimoto, Y.; Butler, W. T.; Sørensen, E. S.; Boskey, A. L.

    2006-01-01

    Previous in vitro and in vivo studies demonstrated that osteopontin (OPN) is an inhibitor of the formation and growth of hydroxyapatite (HA) and other biominerals. The present study tests the hypotheses that the interaction of OPN with HA is determined by the extent of protein phosphorylation and that this interaction regulates the mineralization process. Bone OPN as previously reported inhibited HA formation and HA-seeded growth in a gelatin-gel system. A transglutaminase-linked OPN polymer had similar effects. Recombinant, nonphosphorylated OPN and chemically dephosphorylated OPN, had no effect on HA formation or growth in this system. In contrast, highly phosphorylated milk OPN (mOPN) promoted HA formation. The mOPN stabilized the conversion of amorphous calcium phosphate (a noncrystalline constituent of milk) to HA, whereas bone OPN had a lesser effect on this conversion. Mixtures of OPN and osteocalcin known to form a complex in vitro, unexpectedly promoted HA formation. To test the hypothesis that small alterations in protein conformation caused by phosphorylation account for the differences in the observed ability of OPN to interact with HA, the conformation of bone OPN and mOPN in the presence and absence of crystalline HA was determined by attenuated total reflection (ATR) infrared (IR) spectroscopy. Both proteins exhibited a predominantly random coil structure, which was unaffected by the addition of Ca2+. Binding to HA did not alter the secondary structure of bone OPN, but induced a small increase of β-sheet (few percent) in mOPN. These data taken together suggest that the phosphorylation of OPN is an important factor in regulating the OPN-mediated mineralization process. PMID:16007483

  18. Evidence for direct regulation of myocardial Na+/H+ exchanger isoform 1 phosphorylation and activity by 90-kDa ribosomal S6 kinase (RSK): effects of the novel and specific RSK inhibitor fmk on responses to alpha1-adrenergic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Cuello, Friederike; Snabaitis, Andrew K; Cohen, Michael S; Taunton, Jack; Avkiran, Metin

    2007-03-01

    Multiple stimuli of physiological and pathophysiological significance, including alpha1-adrenoceptor agonists, stimulate the cardiac sarcolemmal Na+/H+ exchanger isoform 1 (NHE1) through activation of the mitogen-activated or extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) kinase (MEK) ERK-90-kDa ribosomal S6 kinase (RSK) signaling cascade. However, the individual contributions of ERK and RSK, which can each phosphorylate the NHE1 regulatory domain, to such stimulation are unknown. In the present study, we have used the novel RSK inhibitor fmk to determine the role of RSK as a direct regulator of NHE1 phosphorylation and activity in response to alpha1-adrenergic stimulation, in ventricular myocytes isolated from the adult rat heart. Initial experiments confirmed that pretreatment of myocytes with fmk before exposure to the alpha1-adrenoceptor agonist phenylephrine inhibited RSK C-terminal kinase activity and thereby RSK N-terminal kinase activation, without affecting MEK or ERK activation. Pretreatment of myocytes with fmk also inhibited phenylephrine-induced increases in NHE1 phosphorylation and the rate of NHE1-mediated H+ efflux under conditions of intracellular acidosis. These findings reveal, for the first time to our knowledge, that RSK is the principal regulator of NHE1 phosphorylation and activity after alpha1-adrenergic stimulation in adult myocardium.

  19. Thr-161 phosphorylation of monomeric Cdc2. Regulation by protein phosphatase 2C in Xenopus oocytes.

    PubMed

    De Smedt, Veronique; Poulhe, Robert; Cayla, Xavier; Dessauge, Frederic; Karaiskou, Anthi; Jessus, Catherine; Ozon, Rene

    2002-08-09

    Fully grown Xenopus oocyte is arrested at prophase I of meiosis. Re-entry into meiosis depends on the activation of MPF (M-phase promoting factor or cyclin B.Cdc2 complex), triggered by progesterone. The prophase-arrested oocyte contains a store of Cdc2. Most of the protein is present as a monomer whereas a minor fraction, called pre-MPF, is found to be associated with cyclin B. Activation of Cdc2 depends on two key events: cyclin binding and an activating phosphorylation on Thr-161 residue located in the T-loop. To get new insights into the regulation of Thr-161 phosphorylation of Cdc2, monomeric Cdc2 was isolated from prophase oocytes. Based on its activation upon cyclin addition and detection by an antibody directed specifically against Cdc2 phosphorylated on Thr-161, we show for the first time that the prophase oocyte contains a significant amount of monomeric Cdc2 phosphorylated on Thr-161. PP2C, a Mg2+-dependent phosphatase, negatively controls Thr-161 phosphorylation of Cdc2. The unexpected presence of a population of free Cdc2 already phosphorylated on Thr-161 could contribute to the generation of the Cdc2 kinase activity threshold required to initiate MPF amplification.

  20. Novel role for p90 ribosomal S6 kinase in the regulation of cardiac myofilament phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Cuello, Friederike; Bardswell, Sonya C; Haworth, Robert S; Ehler, Elisabeth; Sadayappan, Sakthivel; Kentish, Jonathan C; Avkiran, Metin

    2011-02-18

    In myocardium, the 90-kDa ribosomal S6 kinase (RSK) is activated by diverse stimuli and regulates the sarcolemmal Na(+)/H(+) exchanger through direct phosphorylation. Only limited information is available on other cardiac RSK substrates and functions. We evaluated cardiac myosin-binding protein C (cMyBP-C), a sarcomeric regulatory phosphoprotein, as a potential RSK substrate. In rat ventricular myocytes, RSK activation by endothelin 1 (ET1) increased cMyBP-C phosphorylation at Ser(282), which was inhibited by the selective RSK inhibitor D1870. Neither ET1 nor D1870 affected the phosphorylation status of Ser(273) or Ser(302), cMyBP-C residues additionally targeted by cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA). Complementary genetic gain- and loss-of-function experiments, through the adenoviral expression of wild-type or kinase-inactive RSK isoforms, confirmed RSK-mediated phosphorylation of cMyBP-C at Ser(282). Kinase assays utilizing as substrate wild-type or mutated (S273A, S282A, S302A) recombinant cMyBP-C fragments revealed direct and selective Ser(282) phosphorylation by RSK. Immunolabeling with a Ser(P)(282) antibody and confocal fluorescence microscopy showed RSK-mediated phosphorylation of cMyBP-C across the C-zones of sarcomeric A-bands. In chemically permeabilized mouse ventricular muscles, active RSK again induced selective Ser(282) phosphorylation in cMyBP-C, accompanied by significant reduction in Ca(2+) sensitivity of force development and significant acceleration of cross-bridge cycle kinetics, independently of troponin I phosphorylation at Ser(22)/Ser(23). The magnitudes of these RSK-induced changes were comparable with those induced by PKA, which phosphorylated cMyBP-C additionally at Ser(273) and Ser(302). We conclude that Ser(282) in cMyBP-C is a novel cardiac RSK substrate and its selective phosphorylation appears to regulate cardiac myofilament function.

  1. Phosphorylation-dependent and Phosphorylation-independent Regulation of Helicobacter pylori Acid Acclimation by the ArsRS Two-component System.

    PubMed

    Marcus, Elizabeth A; Sachs, George; Wen, Yi; Scott, David R

    2016-02-01

    The pH-sensitive Helicobacter pylori ArsRS two-component system (TCS) aids survival of this neutralophile in the gastric environment by directly sensing and responding to environmental acidity. ArsS is required for acid-induced trafficking of urease and its accessory proteins to the inner membrane, allowing rapid, urea-dependent cytoplasmic and periplasmic buffering. Expression of ArsR, but not its phosphorylation, is essential for bacterial viability. The aim of this study was to characterize the roles of ArsS and ArsR in the response of H. pylori to acid. Wild-type H. pylori and an arsR(D52N) phosphorylation-deficient strain were incubated at acidic or neutral pH. Gene and protein expression, survival, membrane trafficking of urease proteins, urease activity, and internal pH were studied. Phosphorylation of ArsR is not required for acid survival. ArsS-driven trafficking of urease proteins to the membrane in acid, required for recovery of internal pH, is independent of ArsR phosphorylation. ArsR phosphorylation increases expression of the urease gene cluster, and the loss of negative feedback in a phosphorylation-deficient mutant leads to an increase in total urease activity. ArsRS has a dual function in acid acclimation: regulation of urease trafficking to UreI at the cytoplasmic membrane, driven by ArsS, and regulation of urease gene cluster expression, driven by phosphorylation of ArsR. ArsS and ArsR work through phosphorylation-dependent and phosphorylation-independent regulatory mechanisms to impact acid acclimation and allow gastric colonization. Furthering understanding of the intricacies of acid acclimation will impact the future development of targeted, nonantibiotic treatment regimens. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Rictor and integrin-linked kinase interact and regulate Akt phosphorylation and cancer cell survival.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Paul C; Oloumi, Arusha; Mills, Julia; Dobreva, Iveta; Maidan, Mykola; Gray, Virginia; Wederell, Elizabeth D; Bally, Marcel B; Foster, Leonard J; Dedhar, Shoukat

    2008-03-15

    An unbiased proteomic screen to identify integrin-linked kinase (ILK) interactors revealed rictor as an ILK-binding protein. This finding was interesting because rictor, originally identified as a regulator of cytoskeletal dynamics, is also a component of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 2 (mTORC2), a complex implicated in Akt phosphorylation. These functions overlap with known ILK functions. Coimmunoprecipitation analyses confirmed this interaction, and ILK and rictor colocalized in membrane ruffles and leading edges of cancer cells. Yeast two-hybrid assays showed a direct interaction between the NH(2)- and COOH-terminal domains of rictor and the ILK kinase domain. Depletion of ILK and rictor in breast and prostate cancer cell lines resulted in inhibition of Akt Ser(473) phosphorylation and induction of apoptosis, whereas, in several cell lines, depletion of mTOR increased Akt phosphorylation. Akt and Ser(473)P-Akt were detected in ILK immunoprecipitates and small interfering RNA-mediated depletion of rictor, but not mTOR, inhibited the amount of Ser(473)P-Akt in the ILK complex. Expression of the NH(2)-terminal (1-398 amino acids) rictor domain also resulted in the inhibition of ILK-associated Akt Ser(473) phosphorylation. These data show that rictor regulates the ability of ILK to promote Akt phosphorylation and cancer cell survival.

  3. PKM2 phosphorylates MLC2 and regulates cytokinesis of tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yuhui; Wang, Yugang; Wang, Ting; Hawke, David H; Zheng, Yanhua; Li, Xinjian; Zhou, Qin; Majumder, Sadhan; Bi, Erfei; Liu, David X; Huang, Suyun; Lu, Zhimin

    2014-11-21

    Pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2) is expressed at high levels during embryonic development and tumour progression and is important for cell growth. However, it is not known whether it directly controls cell division. Here, we found that Aurora B phosphorylates PKM2, but not PKM1, at T45; this phosphorylation is required for PKM2's localization and interaction with myosin light chain 2 (MLC2) in the contractile ring region of mitotic cells during cytokinesis. PKM2 phosphorylates MLC2 at Y118, which primes the binding of ROCK2 to MLC2 and subsequent ROCK2-dependent MLC2 S15 phosphorylation. PKM2-regulated MLC2 phosphorylation, which is greatly enhanced by EGF stimulation or EGFRvIII, K-Ras G12V and B-Raf V600E mutant expression, plays a pivotal role in cytokinesis, cell proliferation and brain tumour development. These findings underscore the instrumental function of PKM2 in oncogenic EGFR-, K-Ras- and B-Raf-regulated cytokinesis and tumorigenesis.

  4. Interactions and phosphorylation of postsynaptic density 93 (PSD-93) by extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK).

    PubMed

    Guo, Ming-Lei; Xue, Bing; Jin, Dao-Zhong; Mao, Li-Min; Wang, John Q

    2012-07-17

    Postsynaptic density 93 (PSD-93) is a protein enriched at postsynaptic sites. As a key scaffolding protein, PSD-93 forms complexes with the clustering of various synaptic proteins to construct postsynaptic signaling networks and control synaptic transmission. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) is a prototypic member of a serine/threonine protein kinase family known as mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). This kinase, especially ERK2 isoform, noticeably resides in peripheral structures of neurons, such as dendritic spines and postsynaptic density areas, in addition to its distribution in the cytoplasm and nucleus, although little is known about specific substrates of ERK at synaptic sites. In this study, we found that synaptic PSD-93 is a direct target of ERK. This was demonstrated by direct protein-protein interactions between purified ERK2 and PSD-93 in vitro. The accurate ERK2-binding region seems to locate at an N-terminal region of PSD-93. In adult rat striatal neurons in vivo, native ERK from synaptosomal fractions also associated with PSD-93. In phosphorylation assays, active ERK2 phosphorylated PSD-93. An accurate phosphorylation site was identified at a serine site (S323). In striatal neurons, immunoprecipitated PSD-93 showed basal phosphorylation at an ERK-sensitive site. Our data provide evidence supporting PSD-93 as a new substrate of the synaptic species of ERK. ERK2 possesses the ability to interact with PSD-93 and phosphorylate PSD-93 at a specific site. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Neurofilament subunit (NFL) head domain phosphorylation regulates axonal transport of neurofilaments.

    PubMed

    Yates, Darran M; Manser, Catherine; De Vos, Kurt J; Shaw, Christopher E; McLoughlin, Declan M; Miller, Christopher C J

    2009-04-01

    Neurofilaments are the intermediate filaments of neurons and are synthesised in neuronal cell bodies and then transported through axons. Neurofilament light chain (NFL) is a principal component of neurofilaments, and phosphorylation of NFL head domain is believed to regulate the assembly of neurofilaments. However, the role that NFL phosphorylation has on transport of neurofilaments is poorly understood. To address this issue, we monitored axonal transport of phosphorylation mutants of NFL. We mutated four known phosphorylation sites in NFL head domain to either preclude phosphorylation, or mimic permanent phosphorylation. Mutation to preclude phosphorylation had no effect on transport but mutation of three sites to mimic permanent phosphorylation inhibited transport. Mutation of all four sites together to mimic permanent phosphorylation proved especially potent at inhibiting transport and also disrupted neurofilament assembly. Our results suggest that NFL head domain phosphorylation is a regulator of neurofilament axonal transport.

  6. Yersinia effector YopO uses actin as bait to phosphorylate proteins that regulate actin polymerization.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wei Lin; Grimes, Jonathan M; Robinson, Robert C

    2015-03-01

    Pathogenic Yersinia species evade host immune systems through the injection of Yersinia outer proteins (Yops) into phagocytic cells. One Yop, YopO, also known as YpkA, induces actin-filament disruption, impairing phagocytosis. Here we describe the X-ray structure of Yersinia enterocolitica YopO in complex with actin, which reveals that YopO binds to an actin monomer in a manner that blocks polymerization yet allows the bound actin to interact with host actin-regulating proteins. SILAC-MS and biochemical analyses confirm that actin-polymerization regulators such as VASP, EVL, WASP, gelsolin and the formin diaphanous 1 are directly sequestered and phosphorylated by YopO through formation of ternary complexes with actin. This leads to a model in which YopO at the membrane sequesters actin from polymerization while using the bound actin as bait to recruit, phosphorylate and misregulate host actin-regulating proteins to disrupt phagocytosis.

  7. Yersinia effector YopO uses actin as bait to phosphorylate proteins that regulate actin polymerization

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wei Lin; Grimes, Jonathan M; Robinson, Robert C

    2016-01-01

    Pathogenic Yersinia species evade host immune systems through the injection of Yersinia outer proteins (Yops) into phagocytic cells. One Yop, YopO, also known as YpkA, induces actin-filament disruption, impairing phagocytosis. Here we describe the X-ray structure of Yersinia enterocolitica YopO in complex with actin, which reveals that YopO binds to an actin monomer in a manner that blocks polymerization yet allows the bound actin to interact with host actin-regulating proteins. SILAC-MS and biochemical analyses confirm that actin-polymerization regulators such as VASP, EVL, WASP, gelsolin and the formin diaphanous 1 are directly sequestered and phosphorylated by YopO through formation of ternary complexes with actin. This leads to a model in which YopO at the membrane sequesters actin from polymerization while using the bound actin as bait to recruit, phosphorylate and misregulate host actin-regulating proteins to disrupt phagocytosis. PMID:25664724

  8. GSK3-mediated raptor phosphorylation supports amino-acid-dependent mTORC1-directed signalling

    PubMed Central

    Stretton, Clare; Hoffmann, Thorsten M.; Munson, Michael J.; Prescott, Alan; Taylor, Peter M.; Ganley, Ian G.; Hundal, Harinder S.

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian or mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) complex 1 (mTORC1) is a ubiquitously expressed multimeric protein kinase complex that integrates nutrient and growth factor signals for the co-ordinated regulation of cellular metabolism and cell growth. Herein, we demonstrate that suppressing the cellular activity of glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK3), by use of pharmacological inhibitors or shRNA-mediated gene silencing, results in substantial reduction in amino acid (AA)-regulated mTORC1-directed signalling, as assessed by phosphorylation of multiple downstream mTORC1 targets. We show that GSK3 regulates mTORC1 activity through its ability to phosphorylate the mTOR-associated scaffold protein raptor (regulatory-associated protein of mTOR) on Ser859. We further demonstrate that either GSK3 inhibition or expression of a S859A mutated raptor leads to reduced interaction between mTOR and raptor and under these circumstances, irrespective of AA availability, there is a consequential loss in phosphorylation of mTOR substrates, such as p70S6K1 (ribosomal S6 kinase 1) and uncoordinated-51-like kinase (ULK1), which results in increased autophagic flux and reduced cellular proliferation. PMID:26348909

  9. Phosphorylation Regulates the Bound Structure of an Intrinsically Disordered Protein: The p53-TAZ2 Case

    PubMed Central

    Ithuralde, Raúl Esteban; Turjanski, Adrián Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    Disordered regions and Intrinsically Disordered Proteins (IDPs) are involved in critical cellular processes and may acquire a stable three-dimensional structure only upon binding to their partners. IDPs may follow a folding-after-binding process, known as induced folding, or a folding-before-binding process, known as conformational selection. The transcription factor p53 is involved in the regulation of cellular events that arise upon stress or DNA damage. The p53 domain structure is composed of an N-terminal transactivation domain (p53TAD), a DNA Binding Domain and a tetramerization domain. The activity of TAD is tightly regulated by interactions with cofactors, inhibitors and phosphorylation. To initiate transcription, p53TAD binds to the TAZ2 domain of CBP, a co-transcription factor, and undergoes a folding and binding process, as revealed by the recent NMR structure of the complex. The activity of p53 is regulated by phosphorylation at multiple sites on the TAD domain and recent studies have shown that modifications at three residues affect the binding towards TAZ2. However, we still do not know how these phosphorylations affect the structure of the bound state and, therefore, how they regulate the p53 function. In this work, we have used computational simulations to understand how phosphorylation affects the structure of the p53TAD:TAZ2 complex and regulates the recognition mechanism. Phosphorylation has been proposed to enhance binding by direct interaction with the folded protein or by changing the unbound conformation of IDPs, for example by pre-folding the protein favoring the recognition mechanism. Here, we show an interesting turn in the p53 case: phosphorylation mainly affects the bound structure of p53TAD, highlighting the complexity of IDP protein-protein interactions. Our results are in agreement with previous experimental studies, allowing a clear picture of how p53 is regulated by phosphorylation and giving new insights into how post

  10. Subcellular distribution of cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 (CDKL5) is regulated through phosphorylation by dual specificity tyrosine-phosphorylation-regulated kinase 1A (DYRK1A).

    PubMed

    Oi, Ami; Katayama, Syouichi; Hatano, Naoya; Sugiyama, Yasunori; Kameshita, Isamu; Sueyoshi, Noriyuki

    2017-01-08

    Cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 (CDKL5) is a Ser/Thr protein kinase primarily expressed in the central nervous system and is known to cause X-linked neurodevelopmental disorders such as Rett syndrome. However, the mechanisms regulating CDKL5 have not yet been fully clarified. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the protein kinase that directly phosphorylates CDKL5, identifying it as dual specificity tyrosine-phosphorylation-regulated kinase 1A (DYRK1A), an enzyme binding to and phosphorylating CDKL5. We showed that subcellular distribution of CDKL5 was regulated by its phosphorylation by DYRK1A. In mouse neuroblastoma Neuro2a cells, CDKL5 was localized in both the cytosol and nucleus, whereas DYRK1A showed a typical nuclear localization. When CDKL5 and DYRK1A were co-expressed, the cytosolic localization of CDKL5 was significantly increased. Results of site-directed mutagenesis revealed that the phosphorylation site was Ser-308, in the vicinity of the nuclear localization signal. A mutation mimicking the phosphorylated serine residue by aspartate substitution (S308D) changed CDKL5 localization to the cytosol, whereas the corresponding alanine-substituted analog, CDKL5(S308A), was primarily localized to the nucleus. Taken together, these results strongly suggested that DYRK1A bound to CDKL5 and phosphorylated it on Ser-308, thus interfering with its nuclear localization.

  11. Akt phosphorylates and regulates the osteogenic activity of Osterix.

    PubMed

    Choi, You Hee; Jeong, Hyung Min; Jin, Yun-Hye; Li, Hongyan; Yeo, Chang-Yeol; Lee, Kwang-Youl

    2011-08-05

    Osterix (Osx), a zinc-finger transcription factor is required for osteoblast differentiation and new bone formation during embryonic development. Akt is a member of the serine/threonine-specific protein kinase and plays important roles in osteoblast differentiation. The function of Osterix can be also modulated by post-translational modification. But, the precise molecular signaling mechanisms between Osterix and Akt are not known. In this study, we investigated the potential regulation of Osterix function by Akt in osteoblast differentiation. We found that Akt phosphorylates Osterix and that Akt activation increases protein stability, osteogenic activity and transcriptional activity of Osterix. We also found that BMP-2 increases the protein level of Osterix in an Akt activity-dependent manner. These results suggest that Akt activity enhances the osteogenic function of Osterix, at least in part, through protein stabilization and that BMP-2 regulates the osteogenic function of Osterix, at least in part, through Akt.

  12. Regulation of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator anion channel by tyrosine phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Billet, Arnaud; Jia, Yanlin; Jensen, Tim; Riordan, John R.; Hanrahan, John W.

    2015-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) channel is activated by PKA phosphorylation of a regulatory domain that interacts dynamically with multiple CFTR domains and with other proteins. The large number of consensus sequences for phosphorylation by PKA has naturally focused most attention on regulation by this kinase. We report here that human CFTR is also phosphorylated by the tyrosine kinases p60c-Src (proto-oncogene tyrosine-protein kinase) and the proline-rich tyrosine kinase 2 (Pyk2), and they can also cause robust activation of quiescent CFTR channels. In excised patch-clamp experiments, CFTR activity during exposure to Src or Pyk2 reached ∼80% of that stimulated by PKA. Exposure to PKA after Src or Pyk2 caused a further increase to the level induced by PKA alone, implying a common limiting step. Channels became spontaneously active when v-Src or the catalytic domain of Pyk2 was coexpressed with CFTR and were further stimulated by the tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor dephostatin. Exogenous Src also activated 15SA-CFTR, a variant that lacks 15 potential PKA sites and has little response to PKA. PKA-independent activation by tyrosine phosphorylation has implications for the mechanism of regulation by the R domain and for the physiologic functions of CFTR.—Billet, A., Jia, Y., Jensen, T., Riordan, J. R., Hanrahan, J. W. Regulation of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator anion channel by tyrosine phosphorylation. PMID:26062600

  13. Nutrient-regulated Phosphorylation of ATG13 Inhibits Starvation-induced Autophagy*

    PubMed Central

    Puente, Cindy; Hendrickson, Ronald C.; Jiang, Xuejun

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy is a conserved catabolic process that utilizes a defined series of membrane trafficking events to generate a de novo double-membrane vesicle termed the autophagosome, which matures by fusing to the lysosome. Subsequently, the lysosome facilitates the degradation and recycling of the cytoplasmic cargo. In yeast, the upstream signals that regulate the induction of starvation-induced autophagy are clearly defined. The nutrient-sensing kinase Tor inhibits the activation of autophagy by regulating the formation of the Atg1-Atg13-Atg17 complex, through hyperphosphorylation of Atg13. However, in mammals, the ortholog complex ULK1-ATG13-FIP200 is constitutively formed. As such, the molecular mechanism by which mTOR regulates mammalian autophagy is unknown. Here we report the identification and characterization of novel nutrient-regulated phosphorylation sites on ATG13: Ser-224 and Ser-258. mTOR directly phosphorylates ATG13 on Ser-258 while Ser-224 is modulated by the AMPK pathway. In ATG13 knock-out cells reconstituted with an unphosphorylatable mutant of ATG13, ULK1 kinase activity is more potent, and amino acid starvation induced more rapid ATG13 and ULK1 translocation. These events culminated in a more rapid starvation-induced autophagy response. Therefore, ATG13 phosphorylation plays a crucial role in autophagy regulation. PMID:26801615

  14. Nutrient-regulated Phosphorylation of ATG13 Inhibits Starvation-induced Autophagy.

    PubMed

    Puente, Cindy; Hendrickson, Ronald C; Jiang, Xuejun

    2016-03-11

    Autophagy is a conserved catabolic process that utilizes a defined series of membrane trafficking events to generate a de novo double-membrane vesicle termed the autophagosome, which matures by fusing to the lysosome. Subsequently, the lysosome facilitates the degradation and recycling of the cytoplasmic cargo. In yeast, the upstream signals that regulate the induction of starvation-induced autophagy are clearly defined. The nutrient-sensing kinase Tor inhibits the activation of autophagy by regulating the formation of the Atg1-Atg13-Atg17 complex, through hyperphosphorylation of Atg13. However, in mammals, the ortholog complex ULK1-ATG13-FIP200 is constitutively formed. As such, the molecular mechanism by which mTOR regulates mammalian autophagy is unknown. Here we report the identification and characterization of novel nutrient-regulated phosphorylation sites on ATG13: Ser-224 and Ser-258. mTOR directly phosphorylates ATG13 on Ser-258 while Ser-224 is modulated by the AMPK pathway. In ATG13 knock-out cells reconstituted with an unphosphorylatable mutant of ATG13, ULK1 kinase activity is more potent, and amino acid starvation induced more rapid ATG13 and ULK1 translocation. These events culminated in a more rapid starvation-induced autophagy response. Therefore, ATG13 phosphorylation plays a crucial role in autophagy regulation.

  15. Sub1 Globally Regulates RNA Polymerase II C-Terminal Domain Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    García, Alicia; Rosonina, Emanuel; Manley, James L.; Calvo, Olga

    2010-01-01

    The transcriptional coactivator Sub1 has been implicated in several aspects of mRNA metabolism in yeast, such as activation of transcription, termination, and 3′-end formation. Here, we present evidence that Sub1 plays a significant role in controlling phosphorylation of the RNA polymerase II large subunit C-terminal domain (CTD). We show that SUB1 genetically interacts with the genes encoding all four known CTD kinases, SRB10, KIN28, BUR1, and CTK1, suggesting that Sub1 acts to influence CTD phosphorylation at more than one step of the transcription cycle. To address this directly, we first used in vitro kinase assays, and we show that, on the one hand, SUB1 deletion increased CTD phosphorylation by Kin28, Bur1, and Ctk1 but, on the other, it decreased CTD phosphorylation by Srb10. Second, chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed that SUB1 deletion decreased Srb10 chromatin association on the inducible GAL1 gene but increased Kin28 and Ctk1 chromatin association on actively transcribed genes. Taken together, our data point to multiple roles for Sub1 in the regulation of CTD phosphorylation throughout the transcription cycle. PMID:20823273

  16. Sub1 globally regulates RNA polymerase II C-terminal domain phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    García, Alicia; Rosonina, Emanuel; Manley, James L; Calvo, Olga

    2010-11-01

    The transcriptional coactivator Sub1 has been implicated in several aspects of mRNA metabolism in yeast, such as activation of transcription, termination, and 3'-end formation. Here, we present evidence that Sub1 plays a significant role in controlling phosphorylation of the RNA polymerase II large subunit C-terminal domain (CTD). We show that SUB1 genetically interacts with the genes encoding all four known CTD kinases, SRB10, KIN28, BUR1, and CTK1, suggesting that Sub1 acts to influence CTD phosphorylation at more than one step of the transcription cycle. To address this directly, we first used in vitro kinase assays, and we show that, on the one hand, SUB1 deletion increased CTD phosphorylation by Kin28, Bur1, and Ctk1 but, on the other, it decreased CTD phosphorylation by Srb10. Second, chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed that SUB1 deletion decreased Srb10 chromatin association on the inducible GAL1 gene but increased Kin28 and Ctk1 chromatin association on actively transcribed genes. Taken together, our data point to multiple roles for Sub1 in the regulation of CTD phosphorylation throughout the transcription cycle.

  17. Thyroid states regulate subcellular glucose phosphorylation activity in male mice.

    PubMed

    Martins Peçanha, Flavia Letícia; Dos Santos, Reinaldo Sousa; da-Silva, Wagner Seixas

    2017-07-01

    The thyroid hormones (THs), triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4), are very important in organism metabolism and regulate glucose utilization. Hexokinase (HK) is responsible for the first step of glycolysis, catalyzing the conversion of glucose to glucose 6-phosphate. HK has been found in different cellular compartments, and new functions have been attributed to this enzyme. The effects of hyperthyroidism on subcellular glucose phosphorylation in mouse tissues were examined. Tissues were removed, subcellular fractions were isolated from eu- and hyperthyroid (T3, 0.25 µg/g, i.p. during 21 days) mice and HK activity was assayed. Glucose phosphorylation was increased in the particulate fraction in soleus (312.4% ± 67.1, n = 10), gastrocnemius (369.2% ± 112.4, n = 10) and heart (142.2% ± 13.6, n = 10) muscle in the hyperthyroid group compared to the control group. Hexokinase activity was not affected in brain or liver. No relevant changes were observed in HK activity in the soluble fraction for all tissues investigated. Acute T3 administration (single dose of T3, 1.25 µg/g, i.p.) did not modulate HK activity. Interestingly, HK mRNA levels remained unchanged and HK bound to mitochondria was increased by T3 treatment, suggesting a posttranscriptional mechanism. Analysis of the AKT pathway showed a 2.5-fold increase in AKT and GSK3B phosphorylation in the gastrocnemius muscle in the hyperthyroid group compared to the euthyroid group. Taken together, we show for the first time that THs modulate HK activity specifically in particulate fractions and that this action seems to be under the control of the AKT and GSK3B pathways. © 2017 The authors.

  18. Serine 249 phosphorylation by ATM protein kinase regulates hepatocyte nuclear factor-1α transactivation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Long; Chen, Hui; Zhan, Yi-Qun; Li, Chang-Yan; Ge, Chang-Hui; Zhang, Jian-Hong; Wang, Xiao-Hui; Yu, Miao; Yang, Xiao-Ming

    2014-07-01

    Hepatocyte nuclear factor-1 alpha (HNF1α) exerts important effects on gene expression in multiple tissues. Several studies have directly or indirectly supported the role of phosphorylation processes in the activity of HNF1α. However, the molecular mechanism of this phosphorylation remains largely unknown. Using microcapillary liquid chromatography MS/MS and biochemical assays, we identified a novel phosphorylation site in HNF1α at Ser249. We also found that the ATM protein kinase phosphorylated HNF1α at Ser249 in vitro in an ATM-dependent manner and that ATM inhibitor KU55933 treatment inhibited phosphorylation of HNF1α at Ser249 in vivo. Coimmunoprecipitation assays confirmed the association between HNF1α and ATM. Moreover, ATM enhanced HNF1α transcriptional activity in a dose-dependent manner, whereas the ATM kinase-inactive mutant did not. The use of KU55933 confirmed our observation. Compared with wild-type HNF1α, a mutation in Ser249 resulted in a pronounced decrease in HNF1α transactivation, whereas no dominant-negative effect was observed. The HNF1αSer249 mutant also exhibited normal nuclear localization but decreased DNA-binding activity. Accordingly, the functional studies of HNF1αSer249 mutant revealed a defect in glucose metabolism. Our results suggested that ATM regulates the activity of HNF1α by phosphorylation of serine 249, particularly in glucose metabolism, which provides valuable insights into the undiscovered mechanisms of ATM in the regulation of glucose homeostasis.

  19. Regulation of mitochondrial functions by protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Lim, Sangbin; Smith, Kelly R; Lim, Ssang-Taek Steve; Tian, Rong; Lu, Jianrong; Tan, Ming

    2016-01-01

    The mitochondria are double membrane-bound organelles found in most eukaryotic cells. They generate most of the cell's energy supply of adenosine triphosphate (ATP). Protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation are critical mechanisms in the regulation of cell signaling networks and are essential for almost all the cellular functions. For many decades, mitochondria were considered autonomous organelles merely functioning to generate energy for cells to survive and proliferate, and were thought to be independent of the cellular signaling networks. Consequently, phosphorylation and dephosphorylation processes of mitochondrial kinases and phosphatases were largely neglected. However, evidence accumulated in recent years on mitochondria-localized kinases/phosphatases has changed this longstanding view. Mitochondria are increasingly recognized as a hub for cell signaling, and many kinases and phosphatases have been reported to localize in mitochondria and play important functions. However, the strength of the evidence on mitochondrial localization and the activities of the reported kinases and phosphatases vary greatly, and the detailed mechanisms on how these kinases/phosphatases translocate to mitochondria, their subsequent function, and the physiological and pathological implications of their localization are still poorly understood. Here, we provide an updated perspective on the recent advancement in this area, with an emphasis on the implications of mitochondrial kinases/phosphatases in cancer and several other diseases.

  20. FIP5 phosphorylation during mitosis regulates apical trafficking and lumenogenesis.

    PubMed

    Li, Dongying; Mangan, Anthony; Cicchini, Louis; Margolis, Ben; Prekeris, Rytis

    2014-04-01

    Apical lumen formation is a key step during epithelial morphogenesis. The establishment of the apical lumen is a complex process that involves coordinated changes in plasma membrane composition, endocytic transport, and cytoskeleton organization. These changes are accomplished, at least in part, by the targeting and fusion of Rab11/FIP5-containing apical endosomes with the apical membrane initiation site (AMIS). Although AMIS formation and polarized transport of Rab11/FIP5-containing endosomes are crucial for the formation of a single apical lumen, the spatiotemporal regulation of this process remains poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that the formation of the midbody during cytokinesis is a symmetry-breaking event that establishes the location of the AMIS. The interaction of FIP5 with SNX18, which is required for the formation of apical endocytic carriers, is inhibited by GSK-3 phosphorylation at FIP5-T276. Importantly, we show that FIP5-T276 phosphorylation occurs specifically during metaphase and anaphase, to ensure the fidelity and timing of FIP5-endosome targeting to the AMIS during apical lumen formation.

  1. Regulation of Rnd3 Localization and Function By PKCα-Mediated Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Madigan, James P.; Bodemann, Brian O.; Brady, Donita C.; Dewar, Brian J.; Keller, Patricia J.; Leitges, Michael; Philips, Mark R.; Ridley, Anne J.; Der, Channing J.; Cox, Adrienne D.

    2010-01-01

    The Rnd proteins (Rnd1, Rnd2 and Rnd3/RhoE) form a distinct branch of the Rho family of small GTPases. Altered Rnd3 expression causes changes in cytoskeletal organization and cell cycle progression. Rnd3 functions to decrease RhoA activity, but how Rnd3 itself is regulated to cause these changes is still under investigation. Unlike other Rho family proteins, Rnd3 is regulated not by GTP/GDP cycling, but at the level of expression and by posttranslational modifications such as prenylation and phosphorylation. We show here that, upon PKC agonist stimulation, Rnd3 undergoes an electrophoretic mobility shift and its subcellular localization becomes enriched at internal membranes. These changes are blocked by inhibition of conventional PKC isoforms and do not occur in PKCα-null cells or to a nonphosphorylatable mutant of Rnd3. We further show that PKCα directly phosphorylates Rnd3 in an in vitro kinase assay. Additionally, we provide evidence that the phosphorylation status of Rnd3 has a direct effect on its ability to block signaling from the Rho-ROCK pathway. These results identify an additional mechanism of regulation and provide clarification of how Rnd3 modulates Rho signaling to alter cytoskeletal organization. PMID:19723022

  2. PGRMC1 regulation by phosphorylation: potential new insights in controlling biological activity!

    PubMed Central

    Cahill, Michael A.; Jazayeri, Jalal A.; Kovacevic, Zaklina; Richardson, Des R.

    2016-01-01

    Progesterone receptor membrane component 1 (PGRMC1) is a multifunctional protein implicated in multiple pathologies, including cancer and Alzheimer's disease. The recently published structure of PGRMC1 revealed heme-mediated dimerization that directed the PGRMC1-dependent cytochrome P450-mediated detoxification of doxorubicin. We describe here how the PGRMC1 structure also enables important new insights into the possible regulation of PGRMC1 function by phosphorylation. Predicted regulatory interaction sites for SH2- and SH3-domain proteins are in non-structured regions that could be available to cytoplasmic enzymes. Further to the published interpretation, we suggest that phosphorylation of PGRMC1 at position Y113 may promote the attested membrane trafficking function of PGRMC1. To stimulate further experimentation, we also discuss that heme-mediated dimerization of PGRMC1 and membrane trafficking may be mutually exclusive functions. These roles could potentially be reciprocally regulated by phosphorylation/dephosphorylation at Y113. It follows that the phosphorylation status of PGRMC1 should be further explored in order to better understand many of its proposed biological functions. PMID:27448967

  3. Regulation of DNA methylation patterns by CK2-mediated phosphorylation of Dnmt3a.

    PubMed

    Deplus, Rachel; Blanchon, Loïc; Rajavelu, Arumugam; Boukaba, Abdelhalim; Defrance, Matthieu; Luciani, Judith; Rothé, Françoise; Dedeurwaerder, Sarah; Denis, Hélène; Brinkman, Arie B; Simmer, Femke; Müller, Fabian; Bertin, Benjamin; Berdasco, Maria; Putmans, Pascale; Calonne, Emilie; Litchfield, David W; de Launoit, Yvan; Jurkowski, Tomasz P; Stunnenberg, Hendrik G; Bock, Christoph; Sotiriou, Christos; Fraga, Mario F; Esteller, Manel; Jeltsch, Albert; Fuks, François

    2014-08-07

    DNA methylation is a central epigenetic modification that is established by de novo DNA methyltransferases. The mechanisms underlying the generation of genomic methylation patterns are still poorly understood. Using mass spectrometry and a phosphospecific Dnmt3a antibody, we demonstrate that CK2 phosphorylates endogenous Dnmt3a at two key residues located near its PWWP domain, thereby downregulating the ability of Dnmt3a to methylate DNA. Genome-wide DNA methylation analysis shows that CK2 primarily modulates CpG methylation of several repeats, most notably of Alu SINEs. This modulation can be directly attributed to CK2-mediated phosphorylation of Dnmt3a. We also find that CK2-mediated phosphorylation is required for localization of Dnmt3a to heterochromatin. By revealing phosphorylation as a mode of regulation of de novo DNA methyltransferase function and by uncovering a mechanism for the regulation of methylation at repetitive elements, our results shed light on the origin of DNA methylation patterns. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. CK2-dependent phosphorylation positively regulates stress-induced activation of Msn2 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Cho, Bo-Ram; Hahn, Ji-Sook

    2017-06-01

    CK2 is a highly conserved Ser/Thr protein kinase involved in a large number of cellular processes. Here, we demonstrate that CK2-dependent phosphorylation positively regulates Msn2/4, the general stress response transcriptional activators in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, in response to various types of environmental stress conditions. CK2 overexpression elicits hyperactivation of Msn2/4, whereas deletion of one of the CK2 catalytic subunits, especially CKA2, leads to reduced transcriptional activity of Msn2/4 in response to glucose starvation, H2O2, and lactic acid. The CKA2 deletion mutant also shows increased stress sensitivity. CK2 phosphorylates Ser194 and Ser638 in Msn2 and replacement of Ser638 with alanine leads to reduced Msn2 activity upon stress and reduced tolerance to H2O2 and lactic acid. CKA2 deletion mutant shows shorter nuclear retention time of Msn2 upon lactic acid stress, suggesting that CK2 might regulate nuclear localization of Msn2. However, Msn2(S194A, S638A) mutant shows normal nuclear import and export patterns upon stress, suggesting that CK2 might positively regulate the general stress response not only by direct phosphorylation of Msn2/4, but also by regulating cellular translocation machinery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. CaMKII phosphorylation of neuroligin-1 regulates excitatory synapses

    PubMed Central

    Bemben, Michael A; Shipman, Seth L; Hirai, Takaaki; Herring, Bruce E; Li, Yan; Badger, John D; Nicoll, Roger A; Diamond, Jeffrey S; Roche, Katherine W

    2014-01-01

    Neuroligins are postsynaptic cell adhesion molecules that are important for synaptic function through their trans-synaptic interaction with neurexins (NRXNs). The localization and synaptic effects of neuroligin-1 (NL-1, also called NLGN1) are specific to excitatory synapses with the capacity to enhance excitatory synapses dependent on synaptic activity or Ca2+/calmodulin kinase II (CaMKII). Here we report that CaMKII robustly phosphorylates the intracellular domain of NL-1. We show that T739 is the dominant CaMKII site on NL-1 and is phosphorylated in response to synaptic activity in cultured rodent neurons and sensory experience in vivo. Furthermore, a phosphodeficient mutant (NL-1 T739A) reduces the basal and activity-driven surface expression of NL-1, leading to a reduction in neuroligin-mediated excitatory synaptic potentiation. To the best of our knowledge, our results are the first to demonstrate a direct functional interaction between CaMKII and NL-1, two primary components of excitatory synapses. PMID:24336150

  6. Brain phosphorylation of MeCP2 at serine 164 is developmentally regulated and globally alters its chromatin association

    PubMed Central

    Stefanelli, Gilda; Gandaglia, Anna; Costa, Mario; Cheema, Manjinder S.; Di Marino, Daniele; Barbiero, Isabella; Kilstrup-Nielsen, Charlotte; Ausió, Juan; Landsberger, Nicoletta

    2016-01-01

    MeCP2 is a transcriptional regulator whose functional alterations are responsible for several autism spectrum and mental disorders. Post-translational modifications (PTMs), and particularly differential phosphorylation, modulate MeCP2 function in response to diverse stimuli. Understanding the detailed role of MeCP2 phosphorylation is thus instrumental to ascertain how MeCP2 integrates the environmental signals and directs its adaptive transcriptional responses. The evolutionarily conserved serine 164 (S164) was found phosphorylated in rodent brain but its functional role has remained uncharacterized. We show here that phosphorylation of S164 in brain is dynamically regulated during neuronal maturation. S164 phosphorylation highly impairs MeCP2 binding to DNA in vitro and largely affects its nucleosome binding and chromatin affinity in vivo. Strikingly, the chromatin-binding properties of the global MeCP2 appear also extensively altered during the course of brain maturation. Functional assays reveal that proper temporal regulation of S164 phosphorylation controls the ability of MeCP2 to regulate neuronal morphology. Altogether, our results support the hypothesis of a complex PTM-mediated functional regulation of MeCP2 potentially involving a still poorly characterized epigenetic code. Furthermore, they demonstrate the relevance of the Intervening Domain of MeCP2 for binding to DNA. PMID:27323888

  7. FSCB phosphorylation regulates mouse spermatozoa capacitation through suppressing SUMOylation of ROPN1/ROPN1L

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xinqi; Chen, Mingrui; Yu, Renyi; Liu, Benli; Tian, Zhiqiang; Liu, Shunli

    2016-01-01

    Fibrous sheath CABYR binding protein (FSCB) is regulated by protein kinase A (PKA)-mediated tyrosine phosphorylation in the spermatozoa capacitation. Recently, we showed that FSCB phosphorylation activated spermatozoa motility. Nevertheless, the underlying mechanisms have not been completely elucidated. Here, we showed that FSCB phosphorylation inhibited SUMOylation of two crucial proteins ROPN1/ROPN1L that are associated with PKA/A kinase activity and spermatozoa motility. Suppression of SUMOylation of ROPN1/ROPN1L mimicked the effects of FSCB phosphorylation on spermatozoa motility. Immunoprecipitation assay showed that phosphorylated FSCB had a significantly higher affinity to ROPN1/ROPN1L than non-phosphorylated FSCB. Together, our data suggest that FSCB phosphorylation may regulate mouse spermatozoa capacitation through suppressing SUMOylation of ROPN1/ROPN1L, which sheds new light on creating a therapeutic strategy targeting FSCB phosphorylation in the study of infertility. PMID:27398160

  8. Mouse Sphingosine Kinase 1a Is Negatively Regulated through Conventional PKC-Dependent Phosphorylation at S373 Residue

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Yong-Seok; Bae, Sun Sik; Park, Jong Bae; Ha, Sang Hoon; Ryu, Sung Ho; Suh, Pann-Ghill

    2015-01-01

    Sphingosine kinase is a lipid kinase that converts sphingosine into sphingosine-1-phosphate, an important signaling molecule with intracellular and extracellular functions. Although diverse extracellular stimuli influence cellular sphingosine kinase activity, the molecular mechanisms underlying its regulation remain to be clarified. In this study, we investigated the phosphorylation-dependent regulation of mouse sphingosine kinase (mSK) isoforms 1 and 2. mSK1a was robustly phosphorylated in response to extracellular stimuli such as phorbol ester, whereas mSK2 exhibited a high basal level of phosphorylation in quiescent cells regardless of agonist stimulation. Interestingly, phorbol ester-induced phosphorylation of mSK1a correlated with suppression of its activity. Chemical inhibition of conventional PKCs (cPKCs) abolished mSK1a phosphorylation, while overexpression of PKCα, a cPKC isoform, potentiated the phosphorylation, in response to phorbol ester. Furthermore, an in vitro kinase assay showed that PKCα directly phosphorylated mSK1a. In addition, phosphopeptide mapping analysis determined that the S373 residue of mSK1a was the only site phosphorylated by cPKC. Interestingly, alanine substitution of S373 made mSK1a refractory to the inhibitory effect of phorbol esters, whereas glutamate substitution of the same residue resulted in a significant reduction in mSK1a activity, suggesting the significant role of this phosphorylation event. Taken together, we propose that mSK1a is negatively regulated through cPKC-dependent phosphorylation at S373 residue. PMID:26642194

  9. Mouse Sphingosine Kinase 1a Is Negatively Regulated through Conventional PKC-Dependent Phosphorylation at S373 Residue.

    PubMed

    Oh, Yong-Seok; Bae, Sun Sik; Park, Jong Bae; Ha, Sang Hoon; Ryu, Sung Ho; Suh, Pann-Ghill

    2015-01-01

    Sphingosine kinase is a lipid kinase that converts sphingosine into sphingosine-1-phosphate, an important signaling molecule with intracellular and extracellular functions. Although diverse extracellular stimuli influence cellular sphingosine kinase activity, the molecular mechanisms underlying its regulation remain to be clarified. In this study, we investigated the phosphorylation-dependent regulation of mouse sphingosine kinase (mSK) isoforms 1 and 2. mSK1a was robustly phosphorylated in response to extracellular stimuli such as phorbol ester, whereas mSK2 exhibited a high basal level of phosphorylation in quiescent cells regardless of agonist stimulation. Interestingly, phorbol ester-induced phosphorylation of mSK1a correlated with suppression of its activity. Chemical inhibition of conventional PKCs (cPKCs) abolished mSK1a phosphorylation, while overexpression of PKCα, a cPKC isoform, potentiated the phosphorylation, in response to phorbol ester. Furthermore, an in vitro kinase assay showed that PKCα directly phosphorylated mSK1a. In addition, phosphopeptide mapping analysis determined that the S373 residue of mSK1a was the only site phosphorylated by cPKC. Interestingly, alanine substitution of S373 made mSK1a refractory to the inhibitory effect of phorbol esters, whereas glutamate substitution of the same residue resulted in a significant reduction in mSK1a activity, suggesting the significant role of this phosphorylation event. Taken together, we propose that mSK1a is negatively regulated through cPKC-dependent phosphorylation at S373 residue.

  10. How Phosphorylation and ATPase Activity Regulate Anion Flux though the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR).

    PubMed

    Zwick, Matthias; Esposito, Cinzia; Hellstern, Manuel; Seelig, Anna

    2016-07-08

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR, ABCC7), mutations of which cause cystic fibrosis, belongs to the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter family and works as a channel for small anions, such as chloride and bicarbonate. Anion channel activity is known to depend on phosphorylation by cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) and CFTR-ATPase activity. Whereas anion channel activity has been extensively investigated, phosphorylation and CFTR-ATPase activity are still poorly understood. Here, we show that the two processes can be measured in a label-free and non-invasive manner in real time in live cells, stably transfected with CFTR. This study reveals three key findings. (i) The major contribution (≥90%) to the total CFTR-related ATP hydrolysis rate is due to phosphorylation by PKA and the minor contribution (≤10%) to CFTR-ATPase activity. (ii) The mutant CFTR-E1371S that is still conductive, but defective in ATP hydrolysis, is not phosphorylated, suggesting that phosphorylation requires a functional nucleotide binding domain and occurs in the post-hydrolysis transition state. (iii) CFTR-ATPase activity is inversely related to CFTR anion flux. The present data are consistent with a model in which CFTR is in a closed conformation with two ATPs bound. The open conformation is induced by ATP hydrolysis and corresponds to the post-hydrolysis transition state that is stabilized by phosphorylation and binding of chloride channel potentiators.

  11. Proline-directed phosphorylation of the dopamine transporter N-terminal domain

    PubMed Central

    Gorentla, Balachandra K.; Moritz, Amy E.; Foster, James D.; Vaughan, Roxanne A.

    2009-01-01

    Phosphorylation of the dopamine transporter (DAT) on N-terminal serines and unidentified threonines occurs concomitantly with PKC- and substrate-induced alterations in transporter activity, subcellular distribution, and dopamine efflux, but the residues phosphorylated and identities of protein kinases and phosphatases involved are not known. As one approach to investigating these issues we recombinantly expressed the N-terminal tail of rat DAT (NDAT) and examined its phosphorylation and dephosphorylation properties in vitro. We found that NDAT could be phosphorylated to significant levels by PKCα, PKA, PKG, and CaMKII, which catalyzed serine phosphorylation, and ERK1, JNK, and p38, which catalyzed threonine phosphorylation. We identified Thr53, present in a membrane proximal proline-directed kinase motif as the NDAT site phosphorylated in vitro by ERK1, JNK and p38, and confirmed by peptide mapping and mutagenesis that Thr53 is phosphorylated in vivo. Dephosphorylation studies showed that protein phosphatase 1 catalyzed near-complete in vitro dephosphorylation of PKCα-phosphorylated NDAT, similar to its in vivo and in vitro effects on native DAT. These findings demonstrate the ability of multiple enzymes to directly recognize the DAT N-terminal domain and for kinases to act at multiple distinct sites. The strong correspondence between NDAT and rDAT phosphorylation characteristics suggests the potential for the enzymes that are active on NDAT in vitro to act on DAT in vivo and indicates the usefulness of NDAT for guiding future DAT phosphorylation analyses. PMID:19146407

  12. Auxin-regulated changes in protein phosphorylation in pea epicotyl segments

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, A.S.N.; Chengappa, S.; Raghothama, K.G.; Poovaiah, B.W.

    1987-04-01

    Auxin-regulated changes in protein phosphorylation were studied by labeling pea epicotyl segments with (/sup 32/P) PO/sub 4//sup 3 -/ and analyzing the phosphoproteins by two dimensional (2-D) gel electrophoresis. Analysis of phosphoproteins revealed auxin-regulated changes in the phosphorylation of specific polypeptides. In the presence of auxin, phosphorylation of 23,000, 82,000, 105,000 and 110,000 molecular weight polypeptides was markedly decreased whereas phosphorylation of 19,000, 24,000, 28,000 molecular weight polypeptides was increased. Some of these changes are very rapid and could be observed within minutes. Furthermore, their studies with calmodulin antagonists indicate the possible involvement of calmodulin-dependent protein kinases and/or phosphatases in auxin-regulated changes in protein phosphorylation. In view of these results, they suggest that auxin-regulated protein phosphorylation could be the one of the earliest events in regulating diverse physiological processes by this hormone.

  13. SYNTAXIN 1A REGULATES DOPAMINE TRANSPORTER ACTIVITY, PHOSPHORYLATION AND SURFACE EXPRESSION

    PubMed Central

    Cervinski, Mark A.; Foster, James D.; Vaughan, Roxanne A.

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the functional relationship between the SNARE protein syntaxin 1A (syn 1A) and the dopamine transporter (DAT) by treating rat striatal tissue with Botulinum Neurotoxin C (BoNT/C) and co-transfecting syn 1A with DAT in non-neuronal cells, followed by analysis of DAT activity, phosphorylation, and regulation. Treatment of striatal slices with BoNT/C resulted in elevated dopamine (DA) transport Vmax and reduced DAT phosphorylation, while heterologous co-expression of syn 1A led to reduction in DAT surface expression and transport Vmax. Syn 1A was present in DAT immunoprecipitation complexes, supporting a direct or indirect interaction between the proteins. Phorbol ester regulation of DA transport activity was retained in BoNT/C-treated synaptosomes and syn 1A transfected cells, demonstrating that PKC and syn 1A effects occur through independent processes. These findings reveal a novel mechanism for regulation of DAT activity and phosphorylation, and suggest the potential for syn 1A to impact DA neurotransmission through effects on reuptake. PMID:20643191

  14. LATS1/WARTS phosphorylates MYPT1 to counteract PLK1 and regulate mammalian mitotic progression

    PubMed Central

    Chiyoda, Tatsuyuki; Sugiyama, Naoyuki; Shimizu, Takatsune; Naoe, Hideaki; Kobayashi, Yusuke; Ishizawa, Jo; Arima, Yoshimi; Tsuda, Hiroshi; Ito, Masaaki; Kaibuchi, Kozo; Aoki, Daisuke; Ishihama, Yasushi

    2012-01-01

    In the mitotic exit network of budding yeast, Dbf2 kinase phosphorylates and regulates Cdc14 phosphatase. In contrast, no phosphatase substrates of LATS1/WARTS kinase, the mammalian equivalent of Dbf2, has been reported. To address this discrepancy, we performed phosphoproteomic screening using LATS1 kinase. Screening identified MYPT1 (myosin phosphatase–targeting subunit 1) as a new substrate for LATS1. LATS1 directly and preferentially phosphorylated serine 445 (S445) of MYPT1. An MYPT1 mutant (S445A) failed to dephosphorylate Thr 210 of PLK1 (pololike kinase 1), thereby activating PLK1. This suggests that LATS1 promotes MYPT1 to antagonize PLK1 activity. Consistent with this, LATS1-depleted HeLa cells or fibroblasts from LATS1 knockout mice showed increased PLK1 activity. We also found deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) damage–induced LATS1 activation caused PLK1 suppression via the phosphorylation of MYPT1 S445. Furthermore, LATS1 knockdown cells showed reduced G2 checkpoint arrest after DNA damage. These results indicate that LATS1 phosphorylates a phosphatase as does the yeast Dbf2 and demonstrate a novel role of LATS1 in controlling PLK1 at the G2 DNA damage checkpoint. PMID:22641346

  15. Target gene specificity of USF-1 is directed via p38-mediated phosphorylation-dependent acetylation.

    PubMed

    Corre, Sébastien; Primot, Aline; Baron, Yorann; Le Seyec, Jacques; Goding, Colin; Galibert, Marie-Dominique

    2009-07-10

    How transcription factors interpret the output from signal transduction pathways to drive distinct programs of gene expression is a key issue that underpins development and disease. The ubiquitously expressed basic-helix-loop-helix leucine zipper upstream stimulating factor-1 binds E-box regulatory elements (CANNTG) to regulate a wide number of gene networks. In particular, USF-1 is a key component of the tanning process. Following UV irradiation, USF-1 is phosphorylated by the p38 stress-activated kinase on threonine 153 and directly up-regulates expression of the POMC, MC1R, TYR, TYRP-1 and DCT genes. However, how phosphorylation on Thr-153 might affect the activity of USF-1 is unclear. Here we show that, in response to DNA damage, oxidative stress and cellular infection USF-1 is acetylated in a phospho-Thr-153-dependent fashion. Phospho-acetylated USF-1 is nuclear and interacts with DNA but displays altered gene regulatory properties. Phospho-acetylated USF-1 is thus proposed to be associated with loss of transcriptional activation properties toward several target genes implicated in pigmentation process and cell cycle regulation. The identification of this critical stress-dependent USF-1 modification gives new insights into understanding USF-1 gene expression modulation associated with cancer development.

  16. The intracellular fate of zonula occludens 2 is regulated by the phosphorylation of SR repeats and the phosphorylation/O-GlcNAcylation of S257.

    PubMed

    Quiros, Miguel; Alarcón, Lourdes; Ponce, Arturo; Giannakouros, Thomas; González-Mariscal, Lorenza

    2013-08-01

    Zona occludens 2 (ZO-2) has a dual localization. In confluent epithelia, ZO-2 is present at tight junctions (TJs), whereas in sparse proliferating cells it is also found at the nucleus. Previously we demonstrated that in sparse cultures, newly synthesized ZO-2 travels to the nucleus before reaching the plasma membrane. Now we find that in confluent cultures newly synthesized ZO-2 goes directly to the plasma membrane. Epidermal growth factor induces through AKT activation the phosphorylation of the kinase for SR repeats, serine arginine protein kinase 1, which in turn phosphorylates ZO-2, which contains 16 SR repeats. This phosphorylation induces ZO-2 entry into the nucleus and accumulation in speckles. ZO-2 departure from the nucleus requires intact S257, and stabilizing the β-O-linked N-acetylglucosylation (O-GlcNAc) of S257 with O-(2-acetamido-2-deoxy-d-glucopyranosylidene)amino-N-phenylcarbamate, an inhibitor of O-GlcNAcase, triggers nuclear exportation and proteosomal degradation of ZO-2. At the plasma membrane ZO-2 is not O-GlcNAc, and instead, as TJs mature, it becomes phosphorylated at S257 by protein kinase Cζ. This late phosphorylation of S257 is required for the correct cytoarchitecture to develop, as cells transfected with ZO-2 mutant S257A or S257E form aberrant cysts with multiple lumens. These results reveal novel posttranslational modifications of ZO-2 that regulate the intracellular fate of this protein.

  17. The intracellular fate of zonula occludens 2 is regulated by the phosphorylation of SR repeats and the phosphorylation/O-GlcNAcylation of S257

    PubMed Central

    Quiros, Miguel; Alarcón, Lourdes; Ponce, Arturo; Giannakouros, Thomas; González-Mariscal, Lorenza

    2013-01-01

    Zona occludens 2 (ZO-2) has a dual localization. In confluent epithelia, ZO-2 is present at tight junctions (TJs), whereas in sparse proliferating cells it is also found at the nucleus. Previously we demonstrated that in sparse cultures, newly synthesized ZO-2 travels to the nucleus before reaching the plasma membrane. Now we find that in confluent cultures newly synthesized ZO-2 goes directly to the plasma membrane. Epidermal growth factor induces through AKT activation the phosphorylation of the kinase for SR repeats, serine arginine protein kinase 1, which in turn phosphorylates ZO-2, which contains 16 SR repeats. This phosphorylation induces ZO-2 entry into the nucleus and accumulation in speckles. ZO-2 departure from the nucleus requires intact S257, and stabilizing the β-O-linked N-acetylglucosylation (O-GlcNAc) of S257 with O-(2-acetamido-2-deoxy-d-glucopyranosylidene)amino-N-phenylcarbamate, an inhibitor of O-GlcNAcase, triggers nuclear exportation and proteosomal degradation of ZO-2. At the plasma membrane ZO-2 is not O-GlcNAc, and instead, as TJs mature, it becomes phosphorylated at S257 by protein kinase Cζ. This late phosphorylation of S257 is required for the correct cytoarchitecture to develop, as cells transfected with ZO-2 mutant S257A or S257E form aberrant cysts with multiple lumens. These results reveal novel posttranslational modifications of ZO-2 that regulate the intracellular fate of this protein. PMID:23804652

  18. Site-specific phosphorylation of casein kinase 1 δ (CK1δ) regulates its activity towards the circadian regulator PER2.

    PubMed

    Eng, Gracie Wee Ling; Edison; Virshup, David M

    2017-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are intrinsic ~24 hour cycles that regulate diverse aspects of physiology, and in turn are regulated by interactions with the external environment. Casein kinase 1 delta (CK1δ, CSNK1D) is a key regulator of the clock, phosphorylating both stabilizing and destabilizing sites on the PER2 protein, in a mechanism known as the phosphoswitch. CK1δ can itself be regulated by phosphorylation on its regulatory domain, but the specific sites involved, and the role this plays in control of circadian rhythms as well as other CK1-dependent processes is not well understood. Using a sensitized PER2::LUC reporter assay, we identified a specific phosphorylation site, T347, on CK1δ, that regulates CK1δ activity towards PER2. A mutant CK1δ T347A was more active in promoting PER2 degradation. This CK1δ regulatory site is phosphorylated in cells in trans by dinaciclib- and staurosporine-sensitive kinases, consistent with their potential regulation by cyclin dependent and other proline-directed kinases. The regulation of CK1δ by site-specific phosphorylation via the cell cycle and other signaling pathways provides a mechanism to couple external stimuli to regulation of CK1δ-dependent pathways including the circadian clock.

  19. Phosphorylation-dependent cleavage regulates von Hippel Lindau proteostasis and function

    PubMed Central

    German, Peter; Bai, Shanshan; Liu, Xian-De; Sun, Mianen; Zhou, Lijun; Kalra, Sarathi; Zhang, Xuesong; Minelli, Rosalba; Scott, Kenneth L.; Mills, Gordon B.; Jonasch, Eric; Ding, Zhiyong

    2016-01-01

    Loss of von Hippel Lindau (VHL) protein function is a key driver of VHL diseases, including sporadic and inherited clear cell renal cell carcinoma. Modulation of the proteostasis of VHL, especially missense point-mutated VHL, is a promising approach to augmenting VHL levels and function. VHL proteostasis is regulated by multiple mechanisms including folding, chaperone binding, complex formation, and phosphorylation. Nevertheless, many details underlying the regulations of VHL proteostasis are unknown. VHL is expressed as two variants, VHL30 and VHL19. Furthermore, the long form variant of VHL was often detected as multiple bands by Western blotting. However, how these multiple species of VHL are generated and whether the process regulates VHL proteostasis and function are unknown. We hypothesized that the two major species are generated by VHL protein cleavage, and the cleavage regulates VHL proteostasis and subsequent function. We characterized VHL species using genetic and pharmacologic approaches and showed that VHL was first cleaved at the N-terminus by chymotrypsin C before being directed for proteasomal degradation. Casein kinase 2-mediated phosphorylation at VHL N-terminus was required for the cleavage. Furthermore, inhibition of cleavage stabilized VHL protein, thereby promoting HIF downregulation. Our study reveals a novel mechanism regulating VHL proteostasis and function, which is significant for identifying new drug targets and developing new therapeutic approaches targeting VHL deficiency in VHL diseases. PMID:26973240

  20. Phosphorylation of K[superscript +] Channels at Single Residues Regulates Memory Formation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vernon, Jeffrey; Irvine, Elaine E.; Peters, Marco; Jeyabalan, Jeshmi; Giese, K. Peter

    2016-01-01

    Phosphorylation is a ubiquitous post-translational modification of proteins, and a known physiological regulator of K[superscript +] channel function. Phosphorylation of K[superscript +] channels by kinases has long been presumed to regulate neuronal processing and behavior. Although circumstantial evidence has accumulated from behavioral studies…

  1. Phosphorylation of K[superscript +] Channels at Single Residues Regulates Memory Formation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vernon, Jeffrey; Irvine, Elaine E.; Peters, Marco; Jeyabalan, Jeshmi; Giese, K. Peter

    2016-01-01

    Phosphorylation is a ubiquitous post-translational modification of proteins, and a known physiological regulator of K[superscript +] channel function. Phosphorylation of K[superscript +] channels by kinases has long been presumed to regulate neuronal processing and behavior. Although circumstantial evidence has accumulated from behavioral studies…

  2. Regulation of ceramide synthase by casein kinase 2-dependent phosphorylation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Fresques, Tara; Niles, Brad; Aronova, Sofia; Mogri, Huzefa; Rakhshandehroo, Taha; Powers, Ted

    2015-01-16

    Complex sphingolipids are important components of eukaryotic cell membranes and, together with their biosynthetic precursors, including sphingoid long chain bases and ceramides, have important signaling functions crucial for cell growth and survival. Ceramides are produced at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane by a multicomponent enzyme complex termed ceramide synthase (CerS). In budding yeast, this complex is composed of two catalytic subunits, Lac1 and Lag1, as well as an essential regulatory subunit, Lip1. Proper formation of ceramides by CerS has been shown previously to require the Cka2 subunit of casein kinase 2 (CK2), a ubiquitous enzyme with multiple cellular functions, but the precise mechanism involved has remained unidentified. Here we present evidence that Lac1 and Lag1 are direct targets for CK2 and that phosphorylation at conserved positions within the C-terminal cytoplasmic domain of each protein is required for optimal CerS activity. Our data suggest that phosphorylation of Lac1 and Lag1 is important for proper localization and distribution of CerS within the ER membrane and that phosphorylation of these sites is functionally linked to the COP I-dependent C-terminal dilysine ER retrieval pathway. Together, our data identify CK2 as an important regulator of sphingolipid metabolism, and additionally, because both ceramides and CK2 have been implicated in the regulation of cancer, our findings may lead to an enhanced understanding of their relationship in health and disease.

  3. Regulation of Ceramide Synthase by Casein Kinase 2-dependent Phosphorylation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae*

    PubMed Central

    Fresques, Tara; Niles, Brad; Aronova, Sofia; Mogri, Huzefa; Rakhshandehroo, Taha; Powers, Ted

    2015-01-01

    Complex sphingolipids are important components of eukaryotic cell membranes and, together with their biosynthetic precursors, including sphingoid long chain bases and ceramides, have important signaling functions crucial for cell growth and survival. Ceramides are produced at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane by a multicomponent enzyme complex termed ceramide synthase (CerS). In budding yeast, this complex is composed of two catalytic subunits, Lac1 and Lag1, as well as an essential regulatory subunit, Lip1. Proper formation of ceramides by CerS has been shown previously to require the Cka2 subunit of casein kinase 2 (CK2), a ubiquitous enzyme with multiple cellular functions, but the precise mechanism involved has remained unidentified. Here we present evidence that Lac1 and Lag1 are direct targets for CK2 and that phosphorylation at conserved positions within the C-terminal cytoplasmic domain of each protein is required for optimal CerS activity. Our data suggest that phosphorylation of Lac1 and Lag1 is important for proper localization and distribution of CerS within the ER membrane and that phosphorylation of these sites is functionally linked to the COP I-dependent C-terminal dilysine ER retrieval pathway. Together, our data identify CK2 as an important regulator of sphingolipid metabolism, and additionally, because both ceramides and CK2 have been implicated in the regulation of cancer, our findings may lead to an enhanced understanding of their relationship in health and disease. PMID:25429105

  4. Phosphorylated filamin A regulates actin-linked caveolae dynamics.

    PubMed

    Muriel, Olivia; Echarri, Asier; Hellriegel, Christian; Pavón, Dácil M; Beccari, Leonardo; Del Pozo, Miguel A

    2011-08-15

    Caveolae are relatively stable membrane invaginations that compartmentalize signaling, regulate lipid metabolism and mediate viral entry. Caveolae are closely associated with actin fibers and internalize in response to diverse stimuli. Loss of cell adhesion is known to induce rapid and robust caveolae internalization and trafficking toward a Rab11-positive recycling endosome; however, pathways governing this process are poorly understood. Here, we report that filamin A is required to maintain the F-actin-dependent linear distribution of caveolin-1. High spatiotemporal resolution particle tracking of caveolin-1-GFP vesicles by total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy revealed that FLNa is required for the F-actin-dependent arrest of caveolin-1 vesicles in a confined area and their stable anchorage to the plasma membrane. The linear distribution and anchorage of caveolin-1 vesicles are both required for proper caveolin-1 inwards trafficking. De-adhesion-triggered caveolae inward trafficking towards a recycling endosome is impaired in FLNa-depleted HeLa and FLNa-deficient M2-melanoma cells. Inwards trafficking of caveolin-1 requires both the ability of FLNa to bind actin and cycling PKCα-dependent phosphorylation of FLNa on Ser2152 after cell detachment. © 2011. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd

  5. Regulation of SR protein phosphorylation and alternative splicing by modulating kinetic interactions of SRPK1 with molecular chaperones

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Xiang-Yang; Ding, Jian-Hua; Adams, Joseph A.; Ghosh, Gourisankar; Fu, Xiang-Dong

    2009-01-01

    Phosphorylation is essential for the SR family of splicing factors/regulators to function in constitutive and regulated pre-mRNA splicing; yet both hypo- and hyperphosphorylation of SR proteins are known to inhibit splicing, indicating that SR protein phosphorylation must be tightly regulated in the cell. However, little is known how SR protein phosphorylation might be regulated during development or in response to specific signaling events. Here, we report that SRPK1, a ubiquitously expressed SR protein-specific kinase, directly binds to the cochaperones Hsp40/DNAjc8 and Aha1, which mediate dynamic interactions of the kinase with the major molecular chaperones Hsp70 and Hsp90 in mammalian cells. Inhibition of the Hsp90 ATPase activity induces dissociation of SRPK1 from the chaperone complexes, which can also be triggered by a stress signal (osmotic shock), resulting in translocation of the kinase from the cytoplasm to the nucleus, differential phosphorylation of SR proteins, and alteration of splice site selection. These findings connect the SRPK to the molecular chaperone system that has been implicated in numerous signal transduction pathways and provide mechanistic insights into complex regulation of SR protein phosphorylation and alternative splicing in response to developmental cues and cellular signaling. PMID:19240134

  6. Motile properties of the bi-directional kinesin-5 Cin8 are affected by phosphorylation in its motor domain

    PubMed Central

    Shapira, Ofer; Gheber, Larisa

    2016-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae kinesin-5 Cin8 performs essential mitotic functions in spindle assembly and anaphase B spindle elongation. Recent work has shown that Cin8 is a bi-directional motor which moves towards the minus-end of microtubules (MTs) under high ionic strength (IS) conditions and changes directionality in low IS conditions and when bound between anti-parallel microtubules. Previous work from our laboratory has also indicated that Cin8 is differentially phosphorylated during late anaphase at cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (Cdk1)-specific sites located in its motor domain. In vivo, such phosphorylation causes Cin8 detachment from spindles and reduces the spindle elongation rate, while maintaining proper spindle morphology. To study the effect of phosphorylation on Cin8 motor function, we examined in vitro motile properties of wild type Cin8, as well as its phosphorylation using phospho-deficient and phospho-mimic variants, in a single molecule fluorescence motility assay. Analysis was performed on whole cell extracts and on purified Cin8 samples. We found that addition of negative charges in the phospho-mimic mutant weakened the MT-motor interaction, increased motor velocity and promoted minus-end-directed motility. These results indicate that phosphorylation in the catalytic domain of Cin8 regulates its motor function. PMID:27216310

  7. Phosphorylated Rad18 directs DNA Polymerase η to sites of stalled replication

    PubMed Central

    Day, Tovah A.; Palle, Komariah; Barkley, Laura R.; Kakusho, Naoko; Zou, Ying; Tateishi, Satoshi; Verreault, Alain; Masai, Hisao

    2010-01-01

    The E3 ubiquitin ligase Rad18 guides DNA Polymerase eta (Polη) to sites of replication fork stalling and mono-ubiquitinates proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) to facilitate binding of Y family trans-lesion synthesis (TLS) DNA polymerases during TLS. However, it is unclear exactly how Rad18 is regulated in response to DNA damage and how Rad18 activity is coordinated with progression through different phases of the cell cycle. Here we identify Rad18 as a novel substrate of the essential protein kinase Cdc7 (also termed Dbf4/Drf1-dependent Cdc7 kinase [DDK]). A serine cluster in the Polη-binding motif of Rad18 is phosphorylated by DDK. Efficient association of Rad18 with Polη is dependent on DDK and is necessary for redistribution of Polη to sites of replication fork stalling. This is the first demonstration of Rad18 regulation by direct phosphorylation and provides a novel mechanism for integration of S phase progression with postreplication DNA repair to maintain genome stability. PMID:21098111

  8. Phosphorylation-Dependent Regulation of the DNA Damage Response of Adaptor Protein KIBRA in Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mavuluri, Jayadev; Beesetti, Swarnalatha; Surabhi, Rohan; Kremerskothen, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Multifunctional adaptor proteins encompassing various protein-protein interaction domains play a central role in the DNA damage response pathway. In this report, we show that KIBRA is a physiologically interacting reversible substrate of ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) kinase. We identified the site of phosphorylation in KIBRA as threonine 1006, which is embedded within the serine/threonine (S/T) Q consensus motif, by site-directed mutagenesis, and we further confirmed the same with a phospho-(S/T) Q motif-specific antibody. Results from DNA repair functional assays such as the γ-H2AX assay, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), Comet assay, terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay, and clonogenic cell survival assay using stable overexpression clones of wild-type (wt.) KIBRA and active (T1006E) and inactive (T1006A) KIBRA phosphorylation mutants showed that T1006 phosphorylation on KIBRA is essential for optimal DNA double-strand break repair in cancer cells. Further, results from stable retroviral short hairpin RNA-mediated knockdown (KD) clones of KIBRA and KIBRA knockout (KO) model cells generated by a clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)-Cas9 system showed that depleting KIBRA levels compromised the DNA repair functions in cancer cells upon inducing DNA damage. All these phenotypic events were reversed upon reconstitution of KIBRA into cells lacking KIBRA knock-in (KI) model cells. All these results point to the fact that phosphorylated KIBRA might be functioning as a scaffolding protein/adaptor protein facilitating the platform for further recruitment of other DNA damage response factors. In summary, these data demonstrate the imperative functional role of KIBRA per se (KIBRA phosphorylation at T1006 site as a molecular switch that regulates the DNA damage response, possibly via the nonhomologous end joining [NHEJ] pathway), suggesting that KIBRA could be a potential

  9. Mek1 Down Regulates Rad51 Activity during Yeast Meiosis by Phosphorylation of Hed1

    PubMed Central

    Callender, Tracy L.; Laljee, Saif; Zhou, Sai; Suhandynata, Ray T.; Gaines, William A.; Kwon, YoungHo; Börner, G. Valentin; Nicolas, Alain; Neiman, Aaron M.

    2016-01-01

    During meiosis, programmed double strand breaks (DSBs) are repaired preferentially between homologs to generate crossovers that promote proper chromosome segregation at Meiosis I. In many organisms, there are two strand exchange proteins, Rad51 and the meiosis-specific Dmc1, required for interhomolog (IH) bias. This bias requires the presence, but not the strand exchange activity of Rad51, while Dmc1 is responsible for the bulk of meiotic recombination. How these activities are regulated is less well established. In dmc1Δ mutants, Rad51 is actively inhibited, thereby resulting in prophase arrest due to unrepaired DSBs triggering the meiotic recombination checkpoint. This inhibition is dependent upon the meiosis-specific kinase Mek1 and occurs through two different mechanisms that prevent complex formation with the Rad51 accessory factor Rad54: (i) phosphorylation of Rad54 by Mek1 and (ii) binding of Rad51 by the meiosis-specific protein Hed1. An open question has been why inhibition of Mek1 affects Hed1 repression of Rad51. This work shows that Hed1 is a direct substrate of Mek1. Phosphorylation of Hed1 at threonine 40 helps suppress Rad51 activity in dmc1Δ mutants by promoting Hed1 protein stability. Rad51-mediated recombination occurring in the absence of Hed1 phosphorylation results in a significant increase in non-exchange chromosomes despite wild-type levels of crossovers, confirming previous results indicating a defect in crossover assurance. We propose that Rad51 function in meiosis is regulated in part by the coordinated phosphorylation of Rad54 and Hed1 by Mek1. PMID:27483004

  10. Mek1 Down Regulates Rad51 Activity during Yeast Meiosis by Phosphorylation of Hed1.

    PubMed

    Callender, Tracy L; Laureau, Raphaelle; Wan, Lihong; Chen, Xiangyu; Sandhu, Rima; Laljee, Saif; Zhou, Sai; Suhandynata, Ray T; Prugar, Evelyn; Gaines, William A; Kwon, YoungHo; Börner, G Valentin; Nicolas, Alain; Neiman, Aaron M; Hollingsworth, Nancy M

    2016-08-01

    During meiosis, programmed double strand breaks (DSBs) are repaired preferentially between homologs to generate crossovers that promote proper chromosome segregation at Meiosis I. In many organisms, there are two strand exchange proteins, Rad51 and the meiosis-specific Dmc1, required for interhomolog (IH) bias. This bias requires the presence, but not the strand exchange activity of Rad51, while Dmc1 is responsible for the bulk of meiotic recombination. How these activities are regulated is less well established. In dmc1Δ mutants, Rad51 is actively inhibited, thereby resulting in prophase arrest due to unrepaired DSBs triggering the meiotic recombination checkpoint. This inhibition is dependent upon the meiosis-specific kinase Mek1 and occurs through two different mechanisms that prevent complex formation with the Rad51 accessory factor Rad54: (i) phosphorylation of Rad54 by Mek1 and (ii) binding of Rad51 by the meiosis-specific protein Hed1. An open question has been why inhibition of Mek1 affects Hed1 repression of Rad51. This work shows that Hed1 is a direct substrate of Mek1. Phosphorylation of Hed1 at threonine 40 helps suppress Rad51 activity in dmc1Δ mutants by promoting Hed1 protein stability. Rad51-mediated recombination occurring in the absence of Hed1 phosphorylation results in a significant increase in non-exchange chromosomes despite wild-type levels of crossovers, confirming previous results indicating a defect in crossover assurance. We propose that Rad51 function in meiosis is regulated in part by the coordinated phosphorylation of Rad54 and Hed1 by Mek1.

  11. Serine 649 phosphorylation within the protein kinase C-regulated domain down-regulates CARMA1 activity in lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Moreno-García, Miguel E; Sommer, Karen; Haftmann, Claudia; Sontheimer, Clayton; Andrews, Sarah F; Rawlings, David J

    2009-12-01

    Phosphorylation of CARMA1 is a crucial event initiating the assembly of IkappaB kinase and JNK signaling complexes downstream of activated Ag receptors. We previously mapped three protein kinase C (PKC) target sites in murine CARMA1 in vitro, and demonstrated that mutation of two of these serines (S564 and S657) resulted in reduced NF-kappaB activation, whereas mutation of the third serine (S649) had no clear effect. In this study, we report that when low concentrations of Ag receptor activators are used, loss of S649 (by mutation to alanine) promotes enhanced IkappaB kinase and JNK activation in both B and T cell lines. Reconstitution of CARMA1(-/-) DT40 B cells with CARMA1 S649A leads to increased cell death and reduced cell growth in comparison to wild-type CARMA1, likely a result of enhanced JNK activation. To directly determine whether S649 is modified in vivo, we generated phospho-specific Abs recognizing phospho-S649, and phospho-S657 as a positive control. Although phospho-S657 peaked and declined rapidly after Ag receptor stimulation, phospho-S649 occurred later and was maintained for a significantly longer period poststimulation in both B and T cells. Interestingly, phospho-S657 was completely abolished in PKCbeta-deficient B cells, whereas delayed phosphorylation at S649 was partially intact and depended, in part, upon novel PKC activity. Thus, distinct PKC-mediated CARMA1 phosphorylation events exert opposing effects on the activation status of CARMA1. We propose that early phosphorylation events at S657 and S564 promote the initial assembly of the CARMA1 signalosome, whereas later phosphorylation at S649 triggers CARMA1 down-regulation.

  12. Rif1 controls DNA replication by directing Protein Phosphatase 1 to reverse Cdc7-mediated phosphorylation of the MCM complex.

    PubMed

    Hiraga, Shin-Ichiro; Alvino, Gina M; Chang, Fujung; Lian, Hui-Yong; Sridhar, Akila; Kubota, Takashi; Brewer, Bonita J; Weinreich, Michael; Raghuraman, M K; Donaldson, Anne D

    2014-02-15

    Initiation of eukaryotic DNA replication requires phosphorylation of the MCM complex by Dbf4-dependent kinase (DDK), composed of Cdc7 kinase and its activator, Dbf4. We report here that budding yeast Rif1 (Rap1-interacting factor 1) controls DNA replication genome-wide and describe how Rif1 opposes DDK function by directing Protein Phosphatase 1 (PP1)-mediated dephosphorylation of the MCM complex. Deleting RIF1 partially compensates for the limited DDK activity in a cdc7-1 mutant strain by allowing increased, premature phosphorylation of Mcm4. PP1 interaction motifs within the Rif1 N-terminal domain are critical for its repressive effect on replication. We confirm that Rif1 interacts with PP1 and that PP1 prevents premature Mcm4 phosphorylation. Remarkably, our results suggest that replication repression by Rif1 is itself also DDK-regulated through phosphorylation near the PP1-interacting motifs. Based on our findings, we propose that Rif1 is a novel PP1 substrate targeting subunit that counteracts DDK-mediated phosphorylation during replication. Fission yeast and mammalian Rif1 proteins have also been implicated in regulating DNA replication. Since PP1 interaction sites are evolutionarily conserved within the Rif1 sequence, it is likely that replication control by Rif1 through PP1 is a conserved mechanism.

  13. Protein phosphorylation and prevention of cytochrome oxidase inhibition by ATP: coupled mechanisms of energy metabolism regulation

    PubMed Central

    Acin-Perez, Rebeca; Gatti, Domenico L.; Bai, Yidong; Manfredi, Giovanni

    2011-01-01

    Summary Rapid regulation of oxidative phosphorylation is crucial for mitochondrial adaptation to swift changes in fuels availability and energy demands. An intra-mitochondrial signaling pathway regulates cytochrome oxidase (COX), the terminal enzyme of the respiratory chain, through reversible phosphorylation. We find that PKA-mediated phosphorylation of a COX subunit dictates mammalian mitochondrial energy fluxes, and identify the specific residue (S58) of COX subunit IV-1 (COXIV-1) that is involved in this mechanism of metabolic regulation. Using protein mutagenesis, molecular dynamics simulations, and induced fit docking, we show that mitochondrial energy metabolism regulation by phosphorylation of COXIV-1 is coupled with prevention of COX allosteric inhibition by ATP. This regulatory mechanism is essential for efficient oxidative metabolism and cell survival. We propose that S58 COXIV-1 phosphorylation has evolved as a metabolic switch that allows mammalian mitochondria to rapidly toggle between energy utilization and energy storage. PMID:21641552

  14. Regulation of ataxin-1 phosphorylation and its impact on biology.

    PubMed

    Lagalwar, Sarita; Orr, Harry T

    2013-01-01

    Ataxin-1 protein expression is found in the cytoplasm and nucleus of Purkinje cells, the primary site of spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1). Phosphorylation at S776 occurs in the cytoplasm and stabilizes the protein through interaction with 14-3-3, allowing it to translocate into the nucleus where disease is initiated. Phosphorylation and stabilization are enhanced when the polyglutamine expansion is present. In this chapter, we present a model of neurodegeneration in SCA1 initiated through phosphorylation at S776 by cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) and enhanced by the presence of the polyglutamine expansion. The biological methods used to uncover SCA1 pathogenesis and phosphorylation at S776 are described.

  15. HIF and reactive oxygen species regulate oxidative phosphorylation in cancer.

    PubMed

    Hervouet, Eric; Cízková, Alena; Demont, Jocelyne; Vojtísková, Alena; Pecina, Petr; Franssen-van Hal, Nicole L W; Keijer, Jaap; Simonnet, Hélène; Ivánek, Robert; Kmoch, Stanislav; Godinot, Catherine; Houstek, Josef

    2008-08-01

    A decrease in oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) is characteristic of many cancer types and, in particular, of clear cell renal carcinoma (CCRC) deficient in von Hippel-Lindau (vhl) gene. In the absence of functional pVHL, hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) 1-alpha and HIF2-alpha subunits are stabilized, which induces the transcription of many genes including those involved in glycolysis and reactive oxygen species (ROS) metabolism. Transfection of these cells with vhl is known to restore HIF-alpha subunit degradation and to reduce glycolytic genes transcription. We show that such transfection with vhl of 786-0 CCRC (which are devoid of HIF1-alpha) also increased the content of respiratory chain subunits. However, the levels of most transcripts encoding OXPHOS subunits were not modified. Inhibition of HIF2-alpha synthesis by RNA interference in pVHL-deficient 786-0 CCRC also restored respiratory chain subunit content and clearly demonstrated a key role of HIF in OXPHOS regulation. In agreement with these observations, stabilization of HIF-alpha subunit by CoCl(2) decreased respiratory chain subunit levels in CCRC cells expressing pVHL. In addition, HIF stimulated ROS production and mitochondrial manganese superoxide dismutase content. OXPHOS subunit content was also decreased by added H(2)O(2.) Interestingly, desferrioxamine (DFO) that also stabilized HIF did not decrease respiratory chain subunit level. While CoCl(2) significantly stimulates ROS production, DFO is known to prevent hydroxyl radical production by inhibiting Fenton reactions. This indicates that the HIF-induced decrease in OXPHOS is at least in part mediated by hydroxyl radical production.

  16. NHE3 phosphorylation via PKCη marks the polarity and orientation of directionally migrating cells

    PubMed Central

    Bola, Sharanya; Zhang, Lei; Reid, Brian; Fu, Guo; Funk, Richard H. W.; Zhao, Min

    2015-01-01

    Endogenous electric fields (EF) may provide an overriding cue for directional cell migration during wound closure. Perceiving a constant direction requires active sodium-hydrogen exchanger (pNHE3) at the leading edge of HEK 293 cells but its activation mechanism is not yet fully understood. Because protein kinase C (PKC) is required in electrotaxis, we asked whether NHE3 is activated by PKC during wound healing. Using pharmacological (pseudosubstrate and edelfosine) inhibition, we showed that inhibition of PKCη isoform impairs directional cell migration in HEK 293 cells in the presence of a persistent directional cue (0.25–0.3 V/mm of EF for 2 h). Further, we found that pNHE3 forms complexes with both PKCη and ɣ-tubulin, suggesting that these molecules may regulate the microtubule-organizing center. In addition, cellular pNHE3 content was reduced significantly when PKCη was inhibited during directional cell migration. Taken together, these data suggest that PKCη-dependent phosphorylation of NHE3 and the formation of pNHE3/PKCη/ɣ-tubulin complexes at the leading edge of the cell are required for directional cell migration in an EF. PMID:24788043

  17. Regulation of carbon metabolism in gram-positive bacteria by protein phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Deutscher, J; Fischer, C; Charrier, V; Galinier, A; Lindner, C; Darbon, E; Dossonnet, V

    1997-01-01

    The main function of the bacterial phosphotransferase system is to transport and to phosphorylate mono- and disaccharides as well as sugar alcohols. However, the phosphotransferase system is also involved in regulation of carbon metabolism. In Gram-positive bacteria, it is implicated in carbon catabolite repression and regulation of expression of catabolic genes by controlling either catabolic enzyme activities, transcriptional activators or antiterminators. All these different regulations follow a protein phosphorylation mechanism.

  18. p38 regulates expression of osteoblast-specific genes by phosphorylation of osterix.

    PubMed

    Ortuño, María José; Ruiz-Gaspà, Silvia; Rodríguez-Carballo, Edgardo; Susperregui, Antonio R G; Bartrons, Ramon; Rosa, José Luis; Ventura, Francesc

    2010-10-15

    Osterix, a zinc finger transcription factor, is specifically expressed in osteoblasts and osteocytes of all developing bones. Because no bone formation occurs in Osx-null mice, Osterix is thought to be an essential regulator of osteoblast differentiation. We report that, in several mesenchymal and osteoblastic cell types, BMP-2 induces an increase in expression of the two isoforms of Osterix arising from two alternative promoters. We identified a consensus Sp1 sequence (GGGCGG) as Osterix binding regions in the fibromodulin and the bone sialoprotein promoters in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, we show that Osterix is a novel substrate for p38 MAPK in vitro and in vivo and that Ser-73 and Ser-77 are the regulatory sites phosphorylated by p38. Our data also demonstrate that Osterix is able to increase recruitment of p300 and Brg1 to the promoters of its target genes fibromodulin and bone sialoprotein in vivo and that it directly associates with these cofactors through protein-protein interactions. Phosphorylation of Osterix at Ser-73/77 increased its ability to recruit p300 and SWI/SNF to either fibromodulin or bone sialoprotein promoters. We therefore propose that Osterix binds to Sp1 sequences on target gene promoters and that its phosphorylation by p38 enhances recruitment of coactivators to form transcriptionally active complexes.

  19. Abundant protein phosphorylation potentially regulates Arabidopsis anther development

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Juanying; Zhang, Zaibao; You, Chenjiang; Zhang, Xumin; Lu, Jianan; Ma, Hong

    2016-01-01

    As the male reproductive organ of flowering plants, the stamen consists of the anther and filament. Previous studies on stamen development mainly focused on single gene functions by genetic methods or gene expression changes using comparative transcriptomic approaches, especially in model plants such as Arabidopsis thaliana. However, studies on Arabidopsis anther protein expression and post-translational modifications are still lacking. Here we report proteomic and phosphoproteomic studies on developing Arabidopsis anthers at stages 4–7 and 8–12. We identified 3908 high-confidence phosphorylation sites corresponding to 1637 phosphoproteins. Among the 1637 phosphoproteins, 493 were newly identified, with 952 phosphorylation sites. Phosphopeptide enrichment prior to LC-MS analysis facilitated the identification of low-abundance proteins and regulatory proteins, thereby increasing the coverage of proteomic analysis, and facilitated the analysis of more regulatory proteins. Thirty-nine serine and six threonine phosphorylation motifs were uncovered from the anther phosphoproteome and further analysis supports that phosphorylation of casein kinase II, mitogen-activated protein kinases, and 14-3-3 proteins is a key regulatory mechanism in anther development. Phosphorylated residues were preferentially located in variable protein regions among family members, but they were they were conserved across angiosperms in general. Moreover, phosphorylation might reduce activity of reactive oxygen species scavenging enzymes and hamper brassinosteroid signaling in early anther development. Most of the novel phosphoproteins showed tissue-specific expression in the anther according to previous microarray data. This study provides a community resource with information on the abundance and phosphorylation status of thousands of proteins in developing anthers, contributing to understanding post-translational regulatory mechanisms during anther development. PMID:27531888

  20. Regulation of photoreceptor gap junction phosphorylation by adenosine in zebrafish retina

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hongyan; Chuang, Alice Z.; O’Brien, John

    2014-01-01

    Electrical coupling of photoreceptors through gap junctions suppresses voltage noise, routes rod signals into cone pathways, expands the dynamic range of rod photoreceptors in high scotopic and mesopic illumination, and improves detection of contrast and small stimuli. In essentially all vertebrates, connexin 35/36 (gene homologues Cx36 in mammals, Cx35 in other vertebrates) is the major gap junction protein observed in photoreceptors, mediating rod-cone, cone-cone, and possibly rod-rod communication. Photoreceptor coupling is dynamically controlled by the day/night cycle and light/dark adaptation, and is directly correlated with phosphorylation of Cx35/36 at two sites, serine110 and serine 276/293 (homologous sites in teleost fish and mammals respectively). Activity of protein kinase A (PKA) plays a key role during this process. Previous studies have shown that activation of dopamine D4 receptors on photoreceptors inhibits adenylyl cyclase, down-regulates cAMP and PKA activity, and leads to photoreceptor uncoupling, imposing the daytime/light condition. In this study we explored the role of adenosine, a nighttime signal with a high extracellular concentration at night and a low concentration in the day, in regulating photoreceptor coupling by examining photoreceptor Cx35 phosphorylation in zebrafish retina. Adenosine enhanced photoreceptor Cx35 phosphorylation in daytime, but with a complex dose-response curve. Selective pharmacological manipulations revealed that adenosine A2a receptors provide a potent positive drive to phosphorylate photoreceptor Cx35 under the influence of endogenous adenosine at night. A2a receptors can be activated in the daytime as well by micromolar exogenous adenosine. However, the higher affinity adenosine A1 receptors are also present and have an antagonistic though less potent effect. Thus the nighttime/darkness signal adenosine provides a net positive drive on Cx35 phosphorylation at night, working in opposition to dopamine to

  1. Intracellular APP Sorting and Aβ Secretion are Regulated by Src-mediated Phosphorylation of Mint2

    PubMed Central

    Chaufty, Jeremy; Sullivan, Sarah E.; Ho, Angela

    2012-01-01

    Mint adaptor proteins bind to the membrane-bound amyloid precursor protein (APP) and affect the production of pathogenic amyloid-beta (Aβ) peptides related to Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Previous studies have shown that loss of each of the three Mint proteins delays the age-dependent production of amyloid plaques in transgenic mouse models of AD. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying Mints effect on amyloid production are unclear. Because Aβ generation involves the internalization of membrane-bound APP via endosomes and Mints bind directly to the endocytic motif of APP, we proposed that Mints are involved in APP intracellular trafficking, which in turn, affects Aβ generation. Here, we show that APP endocytosis was attenuated in Mint knockout neurons, revealing a role for Mints in APP trafficking. We also show that the endocytic APP sorting processes are regulated by Src-mediated phosphorylation of Mint2 and that internalized APP is differentially sorted between autophagic and recycling trafficking pathways. A Mint2 phospho-mimetic mutant favored endocytosis of APP along the autophagic sorting pathway leading to increased intracellular Aβ accumulation. Conversely, the Mint2 phospho-resistant mutant increased APP localization to the recycling pathway and back to the cell surface thereby enhancing Aβ42 secretion. These results demonstrate that Src-mediated phosphorylation of Mint2 regulates the APP endocytic sorting pathway, providing a mechanism for regulating Aβ secretion. PMID:22787047

  2. A phosphorylation-deubiquitination cascade regulates the BRCA2-RAD51 axis in homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Luo, Kuntian; Li, Lei; Li, Yunhui; Wu, Chenming; Yin, Yujiao; Chen, Yuping; Deng, Min; Nowsheen, Somaira; Yuan, Jian; Lou, Zhenkun

    2016-12-01

    Homologous recombination (HR) is one of the major DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair pathways in mammalian cells. Defects in HR trigger genomic instability and result in cancer predisposition. The defining step of HR is homologous strand exchange directed by the protein RAD51, which is recruited to DSBs by BRCA2. However, the regulation of the BRCA2-RAD51 axis remains unclear. Here we report that ubiquitination of RAD51 hinders RAD51-BRCA2 interaction, while deubiquitination of RAD51 facilitates RAD51-BRCA2 binding and RAD51 recruitment and thus is critical for proper HR. Mechanistically, in response to DNA damage, the deubiquitinase UCHL3 is phosphorylated and activated by ATM. UCHL3, in turn, deubiquitinates RAD51 and promotes the binding between RAD51 and BRCA2. Overexpression of UCHL3 renders breast cancer cells resistant to radiation and chemotherapy, while depletion of UCHL3 sensitizes cells to these treatments, suggesting a determinant role of UCHL3 in cancer therapy. Overall, we identify UCHL3 as a novel regulator of DNA repair and reveal a model in which a phosphorylation-deubiquitination cascade dynamically regulates the BRCA2-RAD51 pathway. © 2016 Luo et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  3. Kin of IRRE-like Protein 2 Is a Phosphorylated Glycoprotein That Regulates Basal Insulin Secretion*

    PubMed Central

    Yesildag, Burcak; Bock, Thomas; Herrmanns, Karolin; Wollscheid, Bernd; Stoffel, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Direct interactions among pancreatic β-cells via cell surface proteins inhibit basal and enhance stimulated insulin secretion. Here, we functionally and biochemically characterized Kirrel2, an immunoglobulin superfamily protein with β-cell-specific expression in the pancreas. Our results show that Kirrel2 is a phosphorylated glycoprotein that co-localizes and interacts with the adherens junction proteins E-cadherin and β-catenin in MIN6 cells. We further demonstrate that the phosphosites Tyr595–596 are functionally relevant for the regulation of Kirrel2 stability and localization. Analysis of the extracellular and intracellular domains of Kirrel2 revealed that it is cleaved and shed from MIN6 cells and that the remaining membrane spanning cytoplasmic domain is processed by γ-secretase complex. Kirrel2 knockdown with RNA interference in MIN6 cells and ablation of Kirrel2 from mice with genetic deletion resulted in increased basal insulin secretion from β-cells, with no immediate influence on stimulated insulin secretion, total insulin content, or whole body glucose metabolism. Our results show that in pancreatic β-cells Kirrel2 localizes to adherens junctions, is regulated by multiple post-translational events, including glycosylation, extracellular cleavage, and phosphorylation, and engages in the regulation of basal insulin secretion. PMID:26324709

  4. Regulation of Arrestin Binding by Rhodopsin Phosphorylation Level

    PubMed Central

    Vishnivetskiy, Sergey A.; Raman, Dayanidhi; Wei, Junhua; Kennedy, Matthew J.; Hurley, James B.; Gurevich, Vsevolod V.

    2008-01-01

    Arrestins ensure the timely termination of receptor signaling. The role of rhodopsin phosphorylation in visual arrestin binding was established more than 20 years ago, but the effects of the number of receptor-attached phosphates on this interaction remain controversial. Here we use purified rhodopsin fractions with carefully quantified content of individual phosphorylated rhodopsin species to elucidate the impact of phosphorylation level on arrestin interaction with three biologically relevant functional forms of rhodopsin: light-activated and dark phosphorhodopsin and phospho-opsin. We found that a single receptor-attached phosphate does not facilitate arrestin binding, two are necessary to induce high affinity interaction, and three phosphates fully activate arrestin. Higher phosphorylation levels do not increase the stability of arrestin complex with light-activated rhodopsin but enhance its binding to the dark phosphorhodopsin and phospho-opsin. The complex of arrestin with hyperphosphorylated light-activated rhodopsin is less sensitive to high salt and appears to release retinal faster. These data suggest that arrestin likely quenches rhodopsin signaling after the third phosphate is added by rhodopsin kinase. The complex of arrestin with heavily phosphorylated rhodopsin, which appears to form in certain disease states, has distinct characteristics that may contribute to the phenotype of these visual disorders. PMID:17848565

  5. Oligomerization of the Response Regulator ComE from Streptococcus mutans Is Affected by Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Hung, David C. I.; Downey, Jennifer S.; Kreth, Jens; Qi, Fengxia; Shi, Wenyuan; Cvitkovitch, Dennis G.

    2012-01-01

    We have previously characterized the interactions of the response regulator ComE from Streptococcus mutans and DNA binding sites through DNase I footprinting and electrophoretic mobility shift assay analysis. Since response regulator functions are often affected by their phosphorylation state, we investigated how phosphorylation affects the biochemical function of ComE. Unlike many response regulators, we found that the phosphorylation state of ComE does not likely play a role in DNA binding affinity but rather seems to induce the formation of an oligomeric form of the protein. The role of this oligomerization state for ComE function is discussed. PMID:22210762

  6. How Phosphotransferase System-Related Protein Phosphorylation Regulates Carbohydrate Metabolism in Bacteria†

    PubMed Central

    Deutscher, Josef; Francke, Christof; Postma, Pieter W.

    2006-01-01

    The phosphoenolpyruvate(PEP):carbohydrate phosphotransferase system (PTS) is found only in bacteria, where it catalyzes the transport and phosphorylation of numerous monosaccharides, disaccharides, amino sugars, polyols, and other sugar derivatives. To carry out its catalytic function in sugar transport and phosphorylation, the PTS uses PEP as an energy source and phosphoryl donor. The phosphoryl group of PEP is usually transferred via four distinct proteins (domains) to the transported sugar bound to the respective membrane component(s) (EIIC and EIID) of the PTS. The organization of the PTS as a four-step phosphoryl transfer system, in which all P derivatives exhibit similar energy (phosphorylation occurs at histidyl or cysteyl residues), is surprising, as a single protein (or domain) coupling energy transfer and sugar phosphorylation would be sufficient for PTS function. A possible explanation for the complexity of the PTS was provided by the discovery that the PTS also carries out numerous regulatory functions. Depending on their phosphorylation state, the four proteins (domains) forming the PTS phosphorylation cascade (EI, HPr, EIIA, and EIIB) can phosphorylate or interact with numerous non-PTS proteins and thereby regulate their activity. In addition, in certain bacteria, one of the PTS components (HPr) is phosphorylated by ATP at a seryl residue, which increases the complexity of PTS-mediated regulation. In this review, we try to summarize the known protein phosphorylation-related regulatory functions of the PTS. As we shall see, the PTS regulation network not only controls carbohydrate uptake and metabolism but also interferes with the utilization of nitrogen and phosphorus and the virulence of certain pathogens. PMID:17158705

  7. Phosphorylation dependent and independent regulation of Helicobacter pylori acid acclimation by the ArsRS two-component system

    PubMed Central

    Marcus, Elizabeth A.; Sachs, George; Wen, Yi; Scott, David R.

    2015-01-01

    Background The pH sensitive Helicobacter pylori ArsRS two-component system (TCS) aids survival of this neutralophile in the gastric environment by directly sensing and responding to environmental acidity. ArsS is required for acid-induced trafficking of urease and its accessory proteins to the inner membrane, allowing rapid, urea-dependent cytoplasmic and periplasmic buffering. Expression of ArsR, but not its phosphorylation, is essential for bacterial viability. The aim of this study is to characterize the roles of ArsS and ArsR in the response of H. pylori to acid. Materials and Methods Wildtype H. pylori and an arsR(D52N) phosphorylation deficient strain were incubated at acidic or neutral pH. Gene and protein expression, survival, membrane trafficking of urease proteins, urease activity, and internal pH were studied. Results Phosphorylation of ArsR is not required for acid survival. ArsS-driven trafficking of urease proteins to the membrane in acid, required for recovery of internal pH, is independent of ArsR phosphorylation. ArsR phosphorylation increases expression of the urease gene cluster, and the loss of negative feedback in a phosphorylation deficient mutant leads to an increase in total urease activity. Conclusions ArsRS has a dual function in acid acclimation: regulation of urease trafficking to UreI at the cytoplasmic membrane, driven by ArsS, and regulation of urease gene cluster expression, driven by phosphorylation of ArsR. ArsS and ArsR work through phosphorylation dependent and independent regulatory mechanisms to impact acid acclimation and allow gastric colonization. Furthering understanding of the intricacies of acid acclimation will impact the future development of targeted, non-antibiotic treatment regimens. PMID:25997502

  8. HEY1 functions are regulated by its phosphorylation at Ser-68

    PubMed Central

    López-Mateo, Irene; Arruabarrena-Aristorena, Amaia; Artaza-Irigaray, Cristina; López, Juan A.; Calvo, Enrique; Belandia, Borja

    2016-01-01

    HEY1 (hairy/enhancer-of-split related with YRPW motif 1) is a member of the basic helix–loop–helix-orange (bHLH-O) family of transcription repressors that mediate Notch signalling. HEY1 acts as a positive regulator of the tumour suppressor p53 via still unknown mechanisms. A MALDI-TOF/TOF MS analysis has uncovered a novel HEY1 regulatory phosphorylation event at Ser-68. Strikingly, this single phosphorylation event controls HEY1 stability and function: simulation of HEY1 Ser-68 phosphorylation increases HEY1 protein stability but inhibits its ability to enhance p53 transcriptional activity. Unlike wild-type HEY1, expression of the phosphomimetic mutant HEY1-S68D failed to induce p53-dependent cell cycle arrest and it did not sensitize U2OS cells to p53-activating chemotherapeutic drugs. We have identified two related kinases, STK38 (serine/threonine kinase 38) and STK38L (serine/threonine kinase 38 like), which interact with and phosphorylate HEY1 at Ser-68. HEY1 is phosphorylated at Ser-68 during mitosis and it accumulates in the centrosomes of mitotic cells, suggesting a possible integration of HEY1-dependent signalling in centrosome function. Moreover, HEY1 interacts with a subset of p53-activating ribosomal proteins. Ribosomal stress causes HEY1 relocalization from the nucleoplasm to perinucleolar structures termed nucleolar caps. HEY1 interacts physically with at least one of the ribosomal proteins, RPL11, and both proteins cooperate in the inhibition of MDM2-mediated p53 degradation resulting in a synergistic positive effect on p53 transcriptional activity. HEY1 itself also interacts directly with MDM2 and it is subjected to MDM2-mediated degradation. Simulation of HEY1 Ser-68 phosphorylation prevents its interaction with p53, RPL11 and MDM2 and abolishes HEY1 migration to nucleolar caps upon ribosomal stress. Our findings uncover a novel mechanism for cross-talk between Notch signalling and nucleolar stress. PMID:27129302

  9. Phosphorylation Events in the Multiple Gene Regulator of Group A Streptococcus Significantly Influence Global Gene Expression and Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Sanson, Misu; Makthal, Nishanth; Gavagan, Maire; Cantu, Concepcion; Olsen, Randall J.; Musser, James M.

    2015-01-01

    Whole-genome sequencing analysis of ∼800 strains of group A Streptococcus (GAS) found that the gene encoding the multiple virulence gene regulator of GAS (mga) is highly polymorphic in serotype M59 strains but not in strains of other serotypes. To help understand the molecular mechanism of gene regulation by Mga and its contribution to GAS pathogenesis in serotype M59 GAS, we constructed an isogenic mga mutant strain. Transcriptome studies indicated a significant regulatory influence of Mga and altered metabolic capabilities conferred by Mga-regulated genes. We assessed the phosphorylation status of Mga in GAS cell lysates with Phos-tag gels. The results revealed that Mga is phosphorylated at histidines in vivo. Using phosphomimetic and nonphosphomimetic substitutions at conserved phosphoenolpyruvate:carbohydrate phosphotransferase regulation domain (PRD) histidines of Mga, we demonstrated that phosphorylation-mimicking aspartate replacements at H207 and H273 of PRD-1 and at H327 of PRD-2 are inhibitory to Mga-dependent gene expression. Conversely, non-phosphorylation-mimicking alanine substitutions at H273 and H327 relieved inhibition, and the mutant strains exhibited a wild-type phenotype. The opposing regulatory profiles observed for phosphorylation- and non-phosphorylation-mimicking substitutions at H273 extended to global gene regulation by Mga. Consistent with these observations, the H273D mutant strain attenuated GAS virulence, whereas the H273A strain exhibited a wild-type virulence phenotype in a mouse model of necrotizing fasciitis. Together, our results demonstrate phosphoregulation of Mga and its direct link to virulence in M59 GAS strains. These data also lay a foundation toward understanding how naturally occurring gain-of-function variations in mga, such as H201R, may confer an advantage to the pathogen and contribute to M59 GAS pathogenesis. PMID:25824840

  10. TCR-induced Akt serine 473 phosphorylation is regulated by protein kinase C-alpha

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Lifen; Qiao, Guilin; Ying, Haiyan; Zhang, Jian; Yin, Fei

    2010-09-10

    Research highlights: {yields} Conventional PKC positively regulates TCR-induced phosphorylation of Akt. {yields} PKC-alpha is the PDK-2 responsible for phosphorylating Akt at Ser{sup 473} upon TCR stimulation. {yields} Knockdown of PKC-alpha decreases TCR-induced Akt phosphorylation. -- Abstract: Akt signaling plays a central role in T cell functions, such as proliferation, apoptosis, and regulatory T cell development. Phosphorylation at Ser{sup 473} in the hydrophobic motif, along with Thr{sup 308} in its activation loop, is considered necessary for Akt function. It is widely accepted that phosphoinositide-dependent kinase 1 (PDK-1) phosphorylates Akt at Thr{sup 308}, but the kinase(s) responsible for phosphorylating Akt at Ser{sup 473} (PDK-2) remains elusive. The existence of PDK-2 is considered to be specific to cell type and stimulus. PDK-2 in T cells in response to TCR stimulation has not been clearly defined. In this study, we found that conventional PKC positively regulated TCR-induced Akt Ser{sup 473} phosphorylation. PKC-alpha purified from T cells can phosphorylate Akt at Ser{sup 473} in vitro upon TCR stimulation. Knockdown of PKC-alpha in T-cell-line Jurkat cells reduced TCR-induced phosphorylation of Akt as well as its downstream targets. Thus our results suggest that PKC-alpha is a candidate for PDK-2 in T cells upon TCR stimulation.

  11. BRAF, KIT and NRAS mutations and expression of c-KIT, phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase and phosphorylated AKT in Japanese melanoma patients.

    PubMed

    Oyama, Satomi; Funasaka, Yoko; Watanabe, Atsushi; Takizawa, Toshihiro; Kawana, Seiji; Saeki, Hidehisa

    2015-05-01

    To clarify the status of gene mutation and activation of growth signal in melanoma of Japanese patients in vivo, we analyzed the mutation of BRAF exon 15, NRAS exon 2, and KIT exons 9, 11, 13, 17 and 18 in melanoma cells obtained by laser capture microdissection, and performed direct sequencing in 20 cases of acral lentiginous melanoma (ALM) and 17 cases of superficial spreading melanoma (SSM). In the study of the mutation of BRAF, pyrosequencing was also done. To examine the cell proliferation signaling, immunohistochemistry for phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (pERK), phosphorylated AKT (phosphorylated AKT) and c-KIT was done. The mutation of BRAF p.V600E was detected in 13 cases of ALM (65.0%) and 12 cases of SSM (70.6%). No NRAS mutation was found in all cases. The mutation in exons 9, 11, and 18 of KIT was detected in nine cases. The mutation of BRAF and KIT showed no correlation with clinical stage, lymph node metastasis, tumor thickness, ulceration and histology. pERK and pAKT was observed in small population of melanoma cells and there was no correlation with gene mutation. Our results indicate that the mutations of BRAF and KIT exist in Japanese melanoma patients, however, the cell growth signaling may be regulated by not only these mutated genes, but by other unknown regulatory factors, which may affect the prognosis of melanoma.

  12. Regulation of Hepatitis C Virion Production via Phosphorylation of the NS5A Protein

    PubMed Central

    Tellinghuisen, Timothy L.; Foss, Katie L.; Treadaway, Jason

    2008-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a significant pathogen, infecting some 170 million people worldwide. Persistent virus infection often leads to cirrhosis and liver cancer. In the infected cell many RNA directed processes must occur to maintain and spread infection. Viral genomic RNA is constantly replicating, serving as template for translation, and being packaged into new virus particles; processes that cannot occur simultaneously. Little is known about the regulation of these events. The viral NS5A phosphoprotein has been proposed as a regulator of events in the HCV life cycle for years, but the details have remained enigmatic. NS5A is a three-domain protein and the requirement of domains I and II for RNA replication is well documented. NS5A domain III is not required for RNA replication, and the function of this region in the HCV lifecycle is unknown. We have identified a small deletion in domain III that disrupts the production of infectious virus particles without altering the efficiency of HCV RNA replication. This deletion disrupts virus production at an early stage of assembly, as no intracellular virus is generated and no viral RNA and nucleocapsid protein are released from cells. Genetic mapping has indicated a single serine residue within the deletion is responsible for the observed phenotype. This serine residue lies within a casein kinase II consensus motif, and mutations that mimic phosphorylation suggest that phosphorylation at this position regulates the production of infectious virus. We have shown by genetic silencing and chemical inhibition experiments that NS5A requires casein kinase II phosphorylation at this position for virion production. A mutation that mimics phosphorylation at this position is insensitive to these manipulations of casein kinase II activity. These data provide the first evidence for a function of the domain III of NS5A and implicate NS5A as an important regulator of the RNA replication and virion assembly of HCV. The ability to

  13. The phosphatase calcineurin regulates pathological TDP-43 phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Liachko, Nicole F; Saxton, Aleen D; McMillan, Pamela J; Strovas, Timothy J; Currey, Heather N; Taylor, Laura M; Wheeler, Jeanna M; Oblak, Adrian L; Ghetti, Bernardino; Montine, Thomas J; Keene, C Dirk; Raskind, Murray A; Bird, Thomas D; Kraemer, Brian C

    2016-10-01

    Detergent insoluble inclusions of TDP-43 protein are hallmarks of the neuropathology in over 90 % of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) cases and approximately half of frontotemporal dementia (FTLD-TDP) cases. In TDP-43 proteinopathy disorders, lesions containing aggregated TDP-43 protein are extensively post-translationally modified, with phosphorylated TDP-43 (pTDP) being the most consistent and robust marker of pathological TDP-43 deposition. Abnormally phosphorylated TDP-43 has been hypothesized to mediate TDP-43 toxicity in many neurodegenerative disease models. To date, several different kinases have been implicated in the genesis of pTDP, but no phosphatases have been shown to reverse pathological TDP-43 phosphorylation. We have identified the phosphatase calcineurin as an enzyme binding to and catalyzing the removal of pathological C-terminal phosphorylation of TDP-43 in vitro. In C. elegans models of TDP-43 proteinopathy, genetic elimination of calcineurin results in accumulation of excess pTDP, exacerbated motor dysfunction, and accelerated neurodegenerative changes. In cultured human cells, treatment with FK506 (tacrolimus), a calcineurin inhibitor, results in accumulation of pTDP species. Lastly, calcineurin co-localizes with pTDP in degenerating areas of the central nervous system in subjects with FTLD-TDP and ALS. Taken together, these findings suggest calcineurin acts on pTDP as a phosphatase in neurons. Furthermore, patient treatment with calcineurin inhibitors may have unappreciated adverse neuropathological consequences.

  14. Mechanism of Ribonuclease III Catalytic Regulation by Serine Phosphorylation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gone, Swapna; Alfonso-Prieto, Mercedes; Paudyal, Samridhdi; Nicholson, Allen W.

    2016-05-01

    Ribonuclease III (RNase III) is a conserved, gene-regulatory bacterial endonuclease that cleaves double-helical structures in diverse coding and noncoding RNAs. RNase III is subject to multiple levels of control, reflective of its global regulatory functions. Escherichia coli (Ec) RNase III catalytic activity is known to increase during bacteriophage T7 infection, reflecting the expression of the phage-encoded protein kinase, T7PK. However, the mechanism of catalytic enhancement is unknown. This study shows that Ec-RNase III is phosphorylated on serine in vitro by purified T7PK, and identifies the targets as Ser33 and Ser34 in the N-terminal catalytic domain. Kinetic experiments reveal a 5-fold increase in kcat and a 1.4-fold decrease in Km following phosphorylation, providing a 7.4–fold increase in catalytic efficiency. Phosphorylation does not change the rate of substrate cleavage under single-turnover conditions, indicating that phosphorylation enhances product release, which also is the rate-limiting step in the steady-state. Molecular dynamics simulations provide a mechanism for facilitated product release, in which the Ser33 phosphomonoester forms a salt bridge with the Arg95 guanidinium group, thereby weakening RNase III engagement of product. The simulations also show why glutamic acid substitution at either serine does not confer enhancement, thus underscoring the specific requirement for a phosphomonoester.

  15. Phosphorylation acts positively and negatively to regulate MRTF-A subcellular localisation and activity

    PubMed Central

    Panayiotou, Richard; Miralles, Francesc; Pawlowski, Rafal; Diring, Jessica; Flynn, Helen R; Skehel, Mark; Treisman, Richard

    2016-01-01

    The myocardin-related transcription factors (MRTF-A and MRTF-B) regulate cytoskeletal genes through their partner transcription factor SRF. The MRTFs bind G-actin, and signal-regulated changes in cellular G-actin concentration control their nuclear accumulation. The MRTFs also undergo Rho- and ERK-dependent phosphorylation, but the function of MRTF phosphorylation, and the elements and signals involved in MRTF-A nuclear export are largely unexplored. We show that Rho-dependent MRTF-A phosphorylation reflects relief from an inhibitory function of nuclear actin. We map multiple sites of serum-induced phosphorylation, most of which are S/T-P motifs and show that S/T-P phosphorylation is required for transcriptional activation. ERK-mediated S98 phosphorylation inhibits assembly of G-actin complexes on the MRTF-A regulatory RPEL domain, promoting nuclear import. In contrast, S33 phosphorylation potentiates the activity of an autonomous Crm1-dependent N-terminal NES, which cooperates with five other NES elements to exclude MRTF-A from the nucleus. Phosphorylation thus plays positive and negative roles in the regulation of MRTF-A. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15460.001 PMID:27304076

  16. Regulation of VASP serine 157 phosphorylation in human neutrophils after stimulation by a chemoattractant.

    PubMed

    Eckert, Rachael E; Jones, Samuel L

    2007-11-01

    Vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) is a cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) substrate, which links cellular signaling to cytoskeletal organization and cellular movement. VASP is phosphorylated by PKA on serine 157 (Ser 157), which is required for VASP function in platelet adhesion and fibroblast motility. Our hypothesis is that PKA regulates neutrophil migration through VASP Ser 157 phosphorylation. The objective of this study was to characterize VASP Ser 157 phosphorylation in chemoattractant-stimulated neutrophils. fMLF, IL-8, leukotriene B(4), or platelet-activating factor stimulation resulted in an initial increase in VASP Ser 157 phosphorylation, which was maximal by 30 s and was followed by a return to baseline Ser 157 phosphorylation by 10 min. In contrast, stimulation with the nonchemoattractant, proinflammatory cytokine TNF-alpha did not affect Ser 157 phosphorylation. The kinetics of fMLF-induced VASP Ser 157 phosphorylation levels closely matched the kinetics of the fold-change in F-actin levels in fMLF-stimulated neutrophils. fMLF-induced Ser 157 phosphorylation was abolished by pretreatment with the PKA inhibitor H89 and the adenylyl cyclase inhibitor SQ22536. In contrast, fMLF-induced Ser 157 phosphorylation was unaffected by the PKC inhibitors calphostin and staurosporine, the PKG inhibitors Rp-8-pCPT-cGMP and KT5823, and the calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II inhibitor KN-62. Inhibition of adhesion with EDTA or the anti-beta2-integrin antibody IB4 did not alter fMLF-induced VASP phosphorylation or dephosphorylation. These data show that chemoattractant stimulation of human neutrophils induces a rapid and transient PKA-dependent VASP Ser 157 phosphorylation. Adhesion does not appear to be an important regulator of the state of VASP Ser 157 phosphorylation in chemoattractant-stimulated neutrophils.

  17. Phosphorylation Affects DNA-Binding of the Senescence-Regulating bZIP Transcription Factor GBF1

    PubMed Central

    Smykowski, Anja; Fischer, Stefan M.; Zentgraf, Ulrike

    2015-01-01

    Massive changes in the transcriptome of Arabidopsis thaliana during onset and progression of leaf senescence imply a central role for transcription factors. While many transcription factors are themselves up- or down-regulated during senescence, the bZIP transcription factor G-box-binding factor 1 (GBF1/bZIP41) is constitutively expressed in Arabidopsis leaf tissue but at the same time triggers the onset of leaf senescence, suggesting posttranscriptional mechanisms for senescence-specific GBF1 activation. Here we show that GBF1 is phosphorylated by the threonine/serine CASEIN KINASE II (CKII) in vitro and that CKII phosphorylation had a negative effect on GBF1 DNA-binding to G-boxes of two direct target genes, CATALASE2 and RBSCS1a. Phosphorylation mimicry at three serine positions in the basic region of GBF1 also had a negative effect on DNA-binding. Kinase assays revealed that CKII phosphorylates at least one serine in the basic domain but has additional phosphorylation sites outside this domain. Two different ckII α subunit1 and one α subunit2 T-DNA insertion lines showed no visible senescence phenotype, but in all lines the expression of the senescence marker gene SAG12 was remarkably diminished. A model is presented suggesting that senescence-specific GBF1 activation might be achieved by lowering the phosphorylation of GBF1 by CKII. PMID:27135347

  18. Regulation of myosin phosphorylation and myofilament Ca2+ sensitivity in vascular smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Katsuya; Hirano, Mayumi; Kanaide, Hideo

    2004-12-01

    The Ca2+-dependent, reversible phosphorylation of the 20 kDa regulatory myosin light chain (MLC) plays a primary role in regulating the contraction of smooth muscle. However, it is well known that the Ca2+ signal is not the only factor which regulates such contraction, however, the alteration of the Ca2+ sensitivity in the contractile apparatus is also known to play an important role. The degree of MLC phosphorylation is determined by the balance of the activity between phosphorylation and dephosphorylation. Either the Ca2+-independent activation of MLC phosphorylation or the inhibition of MLC dephosphorylation causes a greater MLC phosphorylation for a given level of Ca2+ signal and thereby potentiates the myofilament Ca2+ sensitivity. The smooth muscle myosin light chain phosphatase (MLCP) consisting of three subunits was first isolated and cloned in the early '90s. The intensive investigation thereafter has uncovered the biochemical basis for regulating the activity of MLCP. The regulation of the MLCP activity is now considered to play a critical role in regulating the myofilament Ca2+ sensitivity. There are three major mechanisms in the regulation of MLCP; (1) the phosphorylation of a 110 kDa regulatory subunit of MLCP (2) the conformational change of the trimeric structure, and (3) the inhibition by a smooth muscle specific inhibitor protein, CPI-17. Furthermore, some kinases have been found to phosphorylate the MLC and activate the contraction of smooth muscle in a Ca2+-independent manner. Numerous protein kinases have been found to be involved in the regulation of MLC phosphorylation, and rho-kinase is one of the most frequently investigated kinases. The smooth muscle physiology is now asked to integrate the current understanding of the biochemical mechanisms and to clarify which kinases and/or proteins in the contractile apparatus play a physiological role in regulating the myofilament Ca2+ sensitivity and how such extracellular contractile stimulation

  19. CK2 phosphorylation of SAG at Thr10 regulates SAG stability, but not its E3 ligase activity.

    PubMed

    He, Hongbin; Tan, Mingjia; Pamarthy, Deepika; Wang, Guixia; Ahmed, Khalil; Sun, Yi

    2007-01-01

    Sensitive to Apoptosis Gene (SAG), a RING component of SCF E3 ubiquitin ligase, was shown to be phosphorylated by protein kinase CK2 at the Thr10 residue. It is, however, unknown whether this phosphorylation is stress-responsive or whether the phosphorylation changes its E3 ubiquitin ligase activity. To address these, we made a specific antibody against the phosphor-SAG(Thr10). Transient transfection experiment showed that SAG was phosphorylated at Thr10 which can be significantly inhibited by TBB, a relatively specific inhibitor of protein kinase CK2. To determine whether this SAG phosphorylation is stress-responsive, we defined a chemical-hypoxia condition in which SAG and CK2 were both induced. Under this condition, we failed to detect SAG phosphorylation at Thr10, which was readily detected, however, in the presence of MG132, a proteasome inhibitor, suggesting that the phosphorylated SAG has undergone a rapid degradation. To further define this, we made two SAG mutants, SAG-T10A which abolishes the SAG phosphorylation and SAG-T10E, which mimics the constitutive SAG phosphorylation. The half-life study revealed that indeed, SAG-T10E has a much shorter protein half-life (2 h), as compared to wild-type SAG (10 h). Again, rapid degradation of SAG-T10E in cells can be blocked by MG132. Thus, it appears that CK2-induced SAG phosphorylation at Thr10 regulates its stability through a proteasome-dependent pathway. Immunocytochemistry study showed that SAG as well as its phosphorylation mutants, was mainly localized in nucleus and lightly in cytoplasm. Hypoxia condition did not change their sub-cellular localization. Finally, an in vitro ubiqutination assay showed that SAG mutation at Thr10 did not change its E3 ligase activity when complexed with cullin-1. These studies suggested that CK2 might regulate SAG-SCF E3 ligase activity through modulating SAG's stability, rather than its enzymatic activity directly.

  20. Deoxycholic acid differentially regulates focal adhesion kinase phosphorylation: role of tyrosine phosphatase ShP2.

    PubMed

    Khare, Sharad; Holgren, Cory; Samarel, Allen M

    2006-12-01

    Environmental factors, including dietary fats, are implicated in colonic carcinogenesis. Dietary fats modulate secondary bile acids including deoxycholic acid (DCA) concentrations in the colon, which are thought to contribute to the nutritional-related component of colon cancer risk. Here we demonstrate, for the first time, that DCA differentially regulated the site-specific phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK). DCA decreased adhesion of HCA-7 cells to the substratum and induced dephosphorylation of FAK at tyrosine-576/577 (Tyr-576/577) and Tyr-925. Tyrosine phosphorylation of FAK at Tyr-397 remained unaffected by DCA stimulation. Interestingly, we found that c-Src was constitutively associated with FAK and DCA actually activated Src, despite no change in FAK-397 and an inhibition of FAK-576 phosphorylation. DCA concomitantly and significantly increased association of tyrosine phosphatase ShP2 with FAK. Incubation of immunoprecipitated FAK, in vitro, with glutathione-S-transferase-ShP2 fusion protein resulted in tyrosine dephosphorylation of FAK in a concentration-dependent manner. Antisense oligodeoxynucleotides directed against ShP2 decreased ShP2 protein levels and attenuated DCA-induced FAK dephosphorylation. Inhibition of FAK by adenoviral-mediated overexpression of FAK-related nonkinase and gene silencing of Shp2 both abolished DCA's effect on cell adhesion, thus providing a possible mechanism for inside-out signaling by DCA in colon cancer cells. Our results suggest that DCA differentially regulates focal adhesion complexes and that tyrosine phosphatase ShP2 has a role in DCA signaling.

  1. Heat Shock Proteins Regulate Activation-induced Proteasomal Degradation of the Mature Phosphorylated Form of Protein Kinase C*

    PubMed Central

    Lum, Michelle A.; Balaburski, Gregor M.; Murphy, Maureen E.; Black, Adrian R.; Black, Jennifer D.

    2013-01-01

    Although alterations in stimulus-induced degradation of PKC have been implicated in disease, mechanistic understanding of this process remains limited. Evidence supports the existence of both proteasomal and lysosomal mechanisms of PKC processing. An established pathway involves rate-limiting priming site dephosphorylation of the activated enzyme and proteasomal clearance of the dephosphorylated protein. However, here we show that agonists promote down-regulation of endogenous PKCα with minimal accumulation of a nonphosphorylated species in multiple cell types. Furthermore, proteasome and lysosome inhibitors predominantly protect fully phosphorylated PKCα, pointing to this form as a substrate for degradation. Failure to detect substantive dephosphorylation of activated PKCα was not due to rephosphorylation because inhibition of Hsp70/Hsc70, which is required for re-priming, had only a minor effect on agonist-induced accumulation of nonphosphorylated protein. Thus, PKC degradation can occur in the absence of dephosphorylation. Further analysis revealed novel functions for Hsp70/Hsc70 and Hsp90 in the control of agonist-induced PKCα processing. These chaperones help to maintain phosphorylation of activated PKCα but have opposing effects on degradation of the phosphorylated protein; Hsp90 is protective, whereas Hsp70/Hsc70 activity is required for proteasomal processing of this species. Notably, down-regulation of nonphosphorylated PKCα shows little Hsp70/Hsc70 dependence, arguing that phosphorylated and nonphosphorylated species are differentially targeted for proteasomal degradation. Finally, lysosomal processing of activated PKCα is not regulated by phosphorylation or Hsps. Collectively, these data demonstrate that phosphorylated PKCα is a direct target for agonist-induced proteasomal degradation via an Hsp-regulated mechanism, and highlight the existence of a novel pathway of PKC desensitization in cells. PMID:23900841

  2. Regulation of the transcription factor YY1 in mitosis through phosphorylation of its DNA-binding domain.

    PubMed

    Rizkallah, Raed; Hurt, Myra M

    2009-11-01

    Yin-Yang 1 (YY1) is a ubiquitously expressed zinc finger transcription factor. It regulates a vast array of genes playing critical roles in development, differentiation, and cell cycle. Very little is known about the mechanisms that regulate the functions of YY1. It has long been proposed that YY1 is a phosphoprotein; however, a direct link between phosphorylation and the function of YY1 has never been proven. Investigation of the localization of YY1 during mitosis shows that it is distributed to the cytoplasm during prophase and remains excluded from DNA until early telophase. Immunostaining studies show that YY1 is distributed equally between daughter cells and rapidly associates with decondensing chromosomes in telophase, suggesting a role for YY1 in early marking of active and repressed genes. The exclusion of YY1 from DNA in prometaphase HeLa cells correlated with an increase in the phosphorylation of YY1 and loss of DNA-binding activity that can be reversed by dephosphorylation. We have mapped three phosphorylation sites on YY1 during mitosis and show that phosphorylation of two of these sites can abolish the DNA-binding activity of YY1. These results demonstrate a novel mechanism for the inactivation of YY1 through phosphorylation of its DNA-binding domain.

  3. Regulation of the Transcription Factor YY1 in Mitosis through Phosphorylation of Its DNA-binding Domain

    PubMed Central

    Rizkallah, Raed

    2009-01-01

    Yin-Yang 1 (YY1) is a ubiquitously expressed zinc finger transcription factor. It regulates a vast array of genes playing critical roles in development, differentiation, and cell cycle. Very little is known about the mechanisms that regulate the functions of YY1. It has long been proposed that YY1 is a phosphoprotein; however, a direct link between phosphorylation and the function of YY1 has never been proven. Investigation of the localization of YY1 during mitosis shows that it is distributed to the cytoplasm during prophase and remains excluded from DNA until early telophase. Immunostaining studies show that YY1 is distributed equally between daughter cells and rapidly associates with decondensing chromosomes in telophase, suggesting a role for YY1 in early marking of active and repressed genes. The exclusion of YY1 from DNA in prometaphase HeLa cells correlated with an increase in the phosphorylation of YY1 and loss of DNA-binding activity that can be reversed by dephosphorylation. We have mapped three phosphorylation sites on YY1 during mitosis and show that phosphorylation of two of these sites can abolish the DNA-binding activity of YY1. These results demonstrate a novel mechanism for the inactivation of YY1 through phosphorylation of its DNA-binding domain. PMID:19793915

  4. Regulation of casein kinase 2 by phosphorylation/dephosphorylation.

    PubMed Central

    Agostinis, P; Goris, J; Pinna, L A; Merlevede, W

    1987-01-01

    The effects of various polycation-stimulated (PCS) phosphatases and of the active catalytic subunit of the ATPMg-dependent (AMDc) protein phosphatase on the activity of casein kinase 2 (CK-2) were investigated by using the synthetic peptide substrate Ser-Glu-Glu-Glu-Glu-Glu, whose phosphorylated derivative is entirely insensitive to these protein phosphatases. Previous dephosphorylation of native CK-2 enhances its specific activity 2-3-fold. Such an effect, accounted for by an increase in Vmax, is more readily promoted by the PCS phosphatases than by the AMDc phosphatase. The phosphate incorporated by autophosphorylation could not be removed by the protein phosphatases, suggesting the involvement of phosphorylation site(s) other than the one(s) affected by intramolecular autophosphorylation. The activation of CK-2 by the phosphatase pretreatment is neutralized during the kinase assay; the mechanism of this phenomenon, which is highly dependent on the kinase concentration, is discussed. Images Fig. 4. PMID:2829841

  5. Regulation of casein kinase 2 by phosphorylation/dephosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Agostinis, P; Goris, J; Pinna, L A; Merlevede, W

    1987-12-15

    The effects of various polycation-stimulated (PCS) phosphatases and of the active catalytic subunit of the ATPMg-dependent (AMDc) protein phosphatase on the activity of casein kinase 2 (CK-2) were investigated by using the synthetic peptide substrate Ser-Glu-Glu-Glu-Glu-Glu, whose phosphorylated derivative is entirely insensitive to these protein phosphatases. Previous dephosphorylation of native CK-2 enhances its specific activity 2-3-fold. Such an effect, accounted for by an increase in Vmax, is more readily promoted by the PCS phosphatases than by the AMDc phosphatase. The phosphate incorporated by autophosphorylation could not be removed by the protein phosphatases, suggesting the involvement of phosphorylation site(s) other than the one(s) affected by intramolecular autophosphorylation. The activation of CK-2 by the phosphatase pretreatment is neutralized during the kinase assay; the mechanism of this phenomenon, which is highly dependent on the kinase concentration, is discussed.

  6. A tyrosine-phosphorylated 55-kilodalton motility-associated bovine sperm protein is regulated by cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphates and calcium.

    PubMed

    Vijayaraghavan, S; Trautman, K D; Goueli, S A; Carr, D W

    1997-06-01

    Sperm motility is regulated by protein phosphorylation. We have recently shown that a serine/threonine phosphatase system is involved in motility regulation. Two of the components of the phosphatase system, GSK-3 and PP1gamma2, are regulated by tyrosine phosphorylation. During our investigation of sperm tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins we discovered a 55-kDa protein whose tyrosine phosphorylation correlates closely to the motility state of sperm. This protein is tyrosine phosphorylated to a much higher degree in motile caudal than in immotile caput epididymal sperm. Motility inhibition of caudal epididymal sperm by protein kinase A (PKA) anchoring inhibition or by ionomycin-induced calcium overload led to the virtual disappearance of tyrosine phosphorylation of the 55-kDa protein. Conversely, treatment of sperm with motility activators, isobutylmethylxanthine or 8-bromo-cAMP, resulted in increased tyrosine phosphorylation of the protein. The protein was present in the soluble 100 000 x g supernatants of sperm extracts and was heat labile. Chromatography through diethylaminoethyl-cellulose and Western blot analysis showed that this 55-kDa protein is not a regulatory subunit of PKA or alpha-tubulin. Our results represent the identification of a soluble protein whose tyrosine phosphorylation varies directly with motility and suggest that motility regulation may involve cross talk between PKA, calcium, and tyrosine kinase pathways.

  7. Role of Protein Phosphorylation in the Regulation of Neuronal Sensitivity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-03-29

    substrate of a GTP- preferring protein kinase, ana the substrates of ectokinase acti- vity . These antibodies will be used in experiments designed to provide...adding y - SP - TP (2uM; lOuCi/well). Intact NG cells utilized extracellu- lar AT 3 2 p to phosphorylate endogenous proteins, as well as exo- genous...began in the preparation of mono- clonal antibodies to the 54KDa protein substrate of a GTP-prefer- ring kinase in neuronal membranes. Specific

  8. Shear stress regulates HUVEC hydraulic conductivity by occludin phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Pang, Zhengyu; Antonetti, David A; Tarbell, John M

    2005-11-01

    Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) display hydraulic conductivity (L(P)) responses to shear stress that differ markedly from the responses of bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAECs). In HUVECs, 5, 10, and 20 dyn cm(-2) steady shear stress transiently increased L(P) with a return to preshear baseline after a 2-h exposure to shear stress. Pure oscillatory shear stress of 0 +/- 20 dyn cm(-2) (mean+/-amplitude) had no effect on L(P), whereas superposition of oscillatory shear stress on steady shear stress suppressed the effect induced by steady shear stress alone. Shear reversal (amplitude greater than mean) was not necessary for the inhibitory influence of oscillatory shear stress. The transient increase of L(P) by steady shear stress was not affected by incubation with BAPTA-AM (10 microM), suggesting calcium independence of the shear response. Decreasing nitric oxide (NO) concentration with L-NMMA (100 microM), a nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor, did not inhibit the HUVEC L(P) response to shear stress. At the protein level, 10 dyn cm(-2) shear stress did not affect the total content of occludin, but it did elevate the phosphorylation level transiently. The positive correlation between occludin phosphorylation and hydraulic conductivity parallels observations in BAECs and suggests that occludin phosphorylation may be a general mediator of shear-L(P) responses in diverse endothelial cell types.

  9. Phosphorylation of Yeast Pah1 Phosphatidate Phosphatase by Casein Kinase II Regulates Its Function in Lipid Metabolism*

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Lu-Sheng; Su, Wen-Min; Han, Gil-Soo; Carman, George M.

    2016-01-01

    Pah1 phosphatidate phosphatase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae catalyzes the penultimate step in the synthesis of triacylglycerol (i.e. the production of diacylglycerol by dephosphorylation of phosphatidate). The enzyme playing a major role in lipid metabolism is subject to phosphorylation (e.g. by Pho85-Pho80, Cdc28-cyclin B, and protein kinases A and C) and dephosphorylation (e.g. by Nem1-Spo7) that regulate its cellular location, catalytic activity, and stability/degradation. In this work, we show that Pah1 is a substrate for casein kinase II (CKII); its phosphorylation was time- and dose-dependent and was dependent on the concentrations of Pah1 (Km = 0.23 μm) and ATP (Km = 5.5 μm). By mass spectrometry, truncation analysis, site-directed mutagenesis, phosphopeptide mapping, and phosphoamino acid analysis, we identified that >90% of its phosphorylation occurs on Thr-170, Ser-250, Ser-313, Ser-705, Ser-814, and Ser-818. The CKII-phosphorylated Pah1 was a substrate for the Nem1-Spo7 protein phosphatase and was degraded by the 20S proteasome. The prephosphorylation of Pah1 by protein kinase A or protein kinase C reduced its subsequent phosphorylation by CKII. The prephosphorylation of Pah1 by CKII reduced its subsequent phosphorylation by protein kinase A but not by protein kinase C. The expression of Pah1 with combined mutations of S705D and 7A, which mimic its phosphorylation by CKII and lack of phosphorylation by Pho85-Pho80, caused an increase in triacylglycerol content and lipid droplet number in cells expressing the Nem1-Spo7 phosphatase complex. PMID:27044741

  10. Phosphorylation of Yeast Pah1 Phosphatidate Phosphatase by Casein Kinase II Regulates Its Function in Lipid Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Lu-Sheng; Su, Wen-Min; Han, Gil-Soo; Carman, George M

    2016-05-06

    Pah1 phosphatidate phosphatase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae catalyzes the penultimate step in the synthesis of triacylglycerol (i.e. the production of diacylglycerol by dephosphorylation of phosphatidate). The enzyme playing a major role in lipid metabolism is subject to phosphorylation (e.g. by Pho85-Pho80, Cdc28-cyclin B, and protein kinases A and C) and dephosphorylation (e.g. by Nem1-Spo7) that regulate its cellular location, catalytic activity, and stability/degradation. In this work, we show that Pah1 is a substrate for casein kinase II (CKII); its phosphorylation was time- and dose-dependent and was dependent on the concentrations of Pah1 (Km = 0.23 μm) and ATP (Km = 5.5 μm). By mass spectrometry, truncation analysis, site-directed mutagenesis, phosphopeptide mapping, and phosphoamino acid analysis, we identified that >90% of its phosphorylation occurs on Thr-170, Ser-250, Ser-313, Ser-705, Ser-814, and Ser-818. The CKII-phosphorylated Pah1 was a substrate for the Nem1-Spo7 protein phosphatase and was degraded by the 20S proteasome. The prephosphorylation of Pah1 by protein kinase A or protein kinase C reduced its subsequent phosphorylation by CKII. The prephosphorylation of Pah1 by CKII reduced its subsequent phosphorylation by protein kinase A but not by protein kinase C. The expression of Pah1 with combined mutations of S705D and 7A, which mimic its phosphorylation by CKII and lack of phosphorylation by Pho85-Pho80, caused an increase in triacylglycerol content and lipid droplet number in cells expressing the Nem1-Spo7 phosphatase complex. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  11. Actin Polymerization: An Event Regulated by Tyrosine Phosphorylation During Buffalo Sperm Capacitation.

    PubMed

    Naresh, S; Atreja, S K

    2015-12-01

    In the female reproductive tract, the spermatozoa undergo a series of physiological and biochemical changes, prior to gaining the ability to fertilize, that result to capacitation. However, the actin polymerization and protein tyrosine phosphorylation are the two necessary steps for capacitation. In this study, we have demonstrated the actin polymerization and established the correlation between protein tyrosine phosphorylation and actin reorganization during in vitro capacitation in buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) spermatozoa. Indirect immunofluorescence and Western blot techniques were used to detect actin polymerization and tyrosine phosphorylation. The time-dependent fluorimetric studies revealed that the actin polymerization starts from the tail region and progressed towards the head region of spermatozoa during capacitation. The lysophosphatidyl choline (LPC)-induced acrosome reaction (AR) stimulated quick actin depolymerization. The inhibitor cytochalasin D (CD) blocked the in vitro capacitation by inhibiting the actin polymerization. In addition, we also performed different inhibitor (Genistein, H-89, PD9809 and GF-109) and enhancer (dbcAMP, H(2)O(2) and vanadate) studies on actin tyrosine phosphorylation and actin polymerization. The inhibitors of tyrosine phosphorylation inhibit actin tyrosine phosphorylation and polymerization, whereas enhancers of tyrosine phosphorylation stimulate F-actin formation and tyrosine phosphorylation. These observations suggest that the tyrosine phosphorylation regulates the actin polymerization, and both are coupled processes during capacitation of buffalo spermatozoa.

  12. Regulation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor phosphorylation in rat myotubes by forskolin and cAMP

    SciTech Connect

    Miles, K.; Anthony, D.T.; Rubin, L.L.; Greengard, P.; Huganir, R.L.

    1987-09-01

    The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (Ac-ChoR) from rat myotubes prelabeled in culture with (/sup 32/P)orthophosphate was isolated by acetylcholine affinity chromatography followed by immunoaffinity chromatography. Under basal conditions, the nicotinic AcChoR was shown to be phosphorylated in situ on the ..beta.. and delta subunits. Regulation of AcChoR phosphorylation by cAMP-dependent protein kinase was explored by the addition of forskolin or cAMP analogues to prelabeled cell cultures. Forskolin, an activator of adenylate cyclase, stimulated the phosphorylation of the delta subunit 20-fold over basal phosphorylation and induced phosphorylation of the ..cap alpha.. subunit. The effect of forskolin was dose dependent with a half-maximal response at 8 ..mu..M in the presence of 35 ..mu..M Ro 20-1724, a phosphodiesterase inhibitor. Stimulation of delta subunit phosphorylation was almost maximal within 5 min, whereas stimulation of ..cap alpha.. subunit phosphorylation was not maximal until 45 min after forskolin treatment. Stimulation of AcChoR phosphorylation by 8-benzylthioadenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate was identical to that obtained by forskolin. Two-dimensional thermolytic phosphopeptide maps of the delta subunit revealed a single major phosphopeptide. These results correlate closely with the observed effects of forskolin on AcChoR desensitization in muscle and suggest that cAMP-dependent phosphorylation of the delta subunit increases the rate of AcChoR desensitization in rat myotubes.

  13. Cell Cycle Regulated Phosphorylation of the Telomere-Associated Protein TIN2

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shuqun; Counter, Christopher M.

    2013-01-01

    The protein TIN2 is a member of telomere-binding protein complex that serves to cap and protect mammalian chromosome ends. As a number of proteins in this complex are phosphorylated in a cell cycle-dependent manner, we investigated whether TIN2 is modified by phosphorylation as well. We performed phospho-proteomic analysis of human TIN2, and identified two phosphorylated residues, serines 295 and 330. We demonstrated that both these sites were phosphorylated during mitosis in human cells, as detected by Phos-tag reagent and phosphorylation-specific antibodies. Phosphorylation of serines 295 and 330 appeared to be mediated, at least in part, by the mitotic kinase RSK2. Specifically, phosphorylation of TIN2 at both these residues was increased upon expression of RSK2 and reduced by an inhibitor of the RSK family of kinases. Moreover, RSK2 phosphorylated TIN2 in vitro. The identification of these specifically timed post-translational events during the cell cycle suggests a potential mitotic regulation of TIN2 by phosphorylation. PMID:23977114

  14. Leptin down-regulates insulin action through phosphorylation of serine-318 in insulin receptor substrate 1.

    PubMed

    Hennige, Anita M; Stefan, Norbert; Kapp, Katja; Lehmann, Rainer; Weigert, Cora; Beck, Alexander; Moeschel, Klaus; Mushack, Joanne; Schleicher, Erwin; Häring, Hans-Ulrich

    2006-06-01

    Insulin resistance in skeletal muscle is found in obesity and type 2 diabetes. A mechanism for impaired insulin signaling in peripheral tissues is the inhibition of insulin action through serine phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate (Irs) proteins that abolish the coupling of Irs proteins to the activated insulin receptor. Recently, we described serine-318 as a protein kinase C (PKC)-dependent phosphorylation site in Irs1 (Ser-318) activated by hyperinsulinemia. Here we show in various cell models that the adipose hormone leptin, a putative mediator in obesity-related insulin resistance, promotes phosphorylation of Ser-318 in Irs1 by a janus kinase 2, Irs2, and PKC-dependent pathway. Mutation of Ser-318 to alanine abrogates the inhibitory effect of leptin on insulin-induced Irs1 tyrosine phosphorylation and glucose uptake in L6 myoblasts. In C57Bl/6 mice, Ser-318 phosphorylation levels in muscle tissue were enhanced by leptin and insulin administration in lean animals while in diet-induced obesity Ser-318 phosphorylation levels were already up-regulated in the basal state, and further stimulation was diminished. In analogy, in lymphocytes of obese hyperleptinemic human subjects basal Ser-318 phosphorylation levels were increased compared to lean individuals. During a hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp, the increment in Ser-318 phosphorylation observed in lean individuals was absent in obese. In summary, these data suggest that phosphorylation of Ser-318 in Irs1 mediates the inhibitory signal of leptin on the insulin-signaling cascade in obese subjects.

  15. Topographic regulation of cytoskeletal protein phosphorylation by multimeric complexes in the squid giant fiber system.

    PubMed

    Grant, P; Diggins, M; Pant, H C

    1999-07-01

    In mammalian and squid nervous systems, the phosphorylation of neurofilament proteins (NFs) seems to be topographically regulated. Although NFs and relevant kinases are synthesized in cell bodies, phosphorylation of NFs, particularly in the lys-ser-pro (KSP) repeats in NF-M and NF-H tail domains, seem to be restricted to axons. To explore the factors regulating the cellular compartmentalization of NF phosphorylation, we separated cell bodies (GFL) from axons in the squid stellate ganglion and compared the kinase activity in the respective lysates. Although total kinase activity was similar in each lysate, the profile of endogenous phosphorylated substrates was strikingly different. Neurofilament protein 220 (NF220), high-molecular-weight NF protein (HMW), and tubulin were the principal phosphorylated substrates in axoplasm, while tubulin was the principal GFL phosphorylated substrate, in addition to highly phosphorylated low-molecular-weight proteins. Western blot analysis showed that whereas both lysates contained similar kinases and cytoskeletal proteins, phosphorylated NF220 and HMW were completely absent from the GFL lysate. These differences were highlighted by P13(suc1) affinity chromatography, which revealed in axoplasm an active multimeric phosphorylation complex(es), enriched in cytoskeletal proteins and kinases; the equivalent P13 GFL complex exhibited six to 20 times less endogenous and exogenous phosphorylation activity, respectively, contained fewer cytoskeletal proteins and kinases, and expressed a qualitatively different cdc2-like kinase epitope, 34 kDa rather than 49 kDa. Cell bodies and axons share a similar repertoire of molecular consitutents; however, the data suggest that the cytoskeletal/kinase phosphorylation complexes extracted from each cellular compartment by P13 are fundamentally different. Copyright 1999 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  16. ERK5 pathway regulates the phosphorylation of tumour suppressor hDlg during mitosis

    SciTech Connect

    Inesta-Vaquera, Francisco A.; Campbell, David G.; Arthur, J. Simon C.; Cuenda, Ana

    2010-08-13

    Research highlights: {yields} hDlg is phosphorylated during mitosis in multiple residues. {yields} Prospho-hDlg is excluded from the midbody during mitosis. {yields} hDlg is not phosphorylated by p38{gamma} or JNK1/2 during mitosis. {yields} ERK5 pathway mediates hDlg phosphorylation in mitosis. -- Abstract: Human disc-large (hDlg) is a scaffold protein critical for the maintenance of cell polarity and adhesion. hDlg is thought to be a tumour suppressor that regulates the cell cycle and proliferation. However, the mechanism and pathways involved in hDlg regulation during these processes is still unclear. Here we report that hDlg is phosphorylated during mitosis, and we establish the identity of at least three residues phosphorylated in hDlg; some are previously unreported. Phosphorylation affects hDlg localisation excluding it from the contact point between the two daughter cells. Our results reveal a previously unreported pathway for hDlg phosphorylation in mitosis and show that ERK5 pathway mediates hDlg cell cycle dependent phosphorylation. This is likely to have important implications in the correct timely mitotic entry and mitosis progression.

  17. Focal Adhesion Targeting: The Critical Determinant of FAK Regulation and Substrate Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yu; Schaller, Michael D.

    1999-01-01

    The focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is discretely localized to focal adhesions via its C-terminal focal adhesion–targeting (FAT) sequence. FAK is regulated by integrin-dependent cell adhesion and can regulate tyrosine phosphorylation of downstream substrates, like paxillin. By the use of a mutational strategy, the regions of FAK that are required for cell adhesion–dependent regulation and for inducing tyrosine phosphorylation of paxillin were determined. The results show that the FAT sequence was the single region of FAK that was required for each function. Furthermore, the FAT sequence of FAK was replaced with a focal adhesion–targeting sequence from vinculin, and the resulting chimera exhibited cell adhesion–dependent tyrosine phosphorylation and could induce paxillin phosphorylation like wild-type FAK. These results suggest that subcellular localization is the major determinant of FAK function. PMID:10436008

  18. Cdk5/p35 phosphorylates lemur tyrosine kinase-2 to regulate protein phosphatase-1C phosphorylation and activity.

    PubMed

    Manser, Catherine; Vagnoni, Alessio; Guillot, Florence; Davies, Jennifer; Miller, Christopher C J

    2012-05-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase-5 (cdk5)/p35 and protein phosphatase-1 (PP1) are two major enzymes that control a variety of physiological processes within the nervous system including neuronal differentiation, synaptic plasticity and axonal transport. Defective cdk5/p35 and PP1 function are also implicated in several major human neurodegenerative diseases. Cdk5/p35 and the catalytic subunit of PP1 (PP1C) both bind to the brain-enriched, serine-threonine kinase lemur tyrosine kinase-2 (LMTK2). Moreover, LMTK2 phosphorylates PP1C on threonine-320 (PP1Cthr³²⁰) to inhibit its activity. Here, we demonstrate that LMTK2 is phosphorylated on serine-1418 (LMTK2ser¹⁴¹⁸) by cdk5/p35 and present evidence that this regulates its ability to phosphorylate PP1Cthr³²⁰. We thus describe a new signalling pathway within the nervous system that links cdk5/p35 with PP1C and which has implications for a number of neuronal functions and neuronal dysfunction.

  19. Evidence for regulation of mitotic progression through temporal phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of CK2alpha.

    PubMed

    St-Denis, Nicole A; Derksen, D Richard; Litchfield, David W

    2009-04-01

    Proper mitotic progression is crucial for maintenance of genomic integrity in proliferating cells and is regulated through an intricate series of events, including protein phosphorylation governed by a complex network of protein kinases. One kinase family implicated in the regulation of mitotic progression is protein kinase CK2, a small family of enzymes that is overexpressed in cancer and induces transformation in mice and cultured fibroblasts. CK2alpha, one isoform of the catalytic subunits of CK2, is maximally phosphorylated at four sites in nocodazole-treated cells. To investigate the effects of CK2alpha phosphorylation on mitotic progression, we generated phosphospecific antibodies against its mitotic phosphorylation sites. In U2OS cells released from S-phase arrest, these antibodies reveal that CK2alpha is most highly phosphorylated in prophase and metaphase. Phosphorylation gradually decreases during anaphase and becomes undetectable during telophase and cytokinesis. Stable expression of phosphomimetic CK2alpha (CK2alpha-4D, CK2alpha-4E) results in aberrant centrosome amplification and chromosomal segregation defects and loss of mitotic cells through mitotic catastrophe. Conversely, cells expressing nonphosphorylatable CK2alpha (CK2alpha-4A) show a decreased ability to arrest in mitosis following nocodazole treatment, suggesting involvement in the spindle assembly checkpoint. Collectively, these studies indicate that reversible phosphorylation of CK2alpha requires precise regulation to allow proper mitotic progression.

  20. Phosphorylation-Dependent Regulation of the DNA Damage Response of Adaptor Protein KIBRA in Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Mavuluri, Jayadev; Beesetti, Swarnalatha; Surabhi, Rohan; Kremerskothen, Joachim; Venkatraman, Ganesh; Rayala, Suresh K

    2016-05-01

    Multifunctional adaptor proteins encompassing various protein-protein interaction domains play a central role in the DNA damage response pathway. In this report, we show that KIBRA is a physiologically interacting reversible substrate of ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) kinase. We identified the site of phosphorylation in KIBRA as threonine 1006, which is embedded within the serine/threonine (S/T) Q consensus motif, by site-directed mutagenesis, and we further confirmed the same with a phospho-(S/T) Q motif-specific antibody. Results from DNA repair functional assays such as the γ-H2AX assay, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), Comet assay, terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay, and clonogenic cell survival assay using stable overexpression clones of wild-type (wt.) KIBRA and active (T1006E) and inactive (T1006A) KIBRA phosphorylation mutants showed that T1006 phosphorylation on KIBRA is essential for optimal DNA double-strand break repair in cancer cells. Further, results from stable retroviral short hairpin RNA-mediated knockdown (KD) clones of KIBRA and KIBRA knockout (KO) model cells generated by a clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)-Cas9 system showed that depleting KIBRA levels compromised the DNA repair functions in cancer cells upon inducing DNA damage. All these phenotypic events were reversed upon reconstitution of KIBRA into cells lacking KIBRA knock-in (KI) model cells. All these results point to the fact that phosphorylated KIBRA might be functioning as a scaffolding protein/adaptor protein facilitating the platform for further recruitment of other DNA damage response factors. In summary, these data demonstrate the imperative functional role of KIBRAper se(KIBRA phosphorylation at T1006 site as a molecular switch that regulates the DNA damage response, possibly via the nonhomologous end joining [NHEJ] pathway), suggesting that KIBRA could be a potential

  1. A novel mode of regulation of the Staphylococcus aureus Vancomycin-resistance-associated response regulator VraR mediated by Stk1 protein phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Canova, Marc J; Baronian, Grégory; Brelle, Solène; Cohen-Gonsaud, Martin; Bischoff, Markus; Molle, Virginie

    2014-04-25

    The Staphylococcus aureus Vancomycin-resistance-associated response regulator VraR is known as an important response regulator, member of the VraTSR three-component signal transduction system that modulates the expression of the cell wall stress stimulon in response to a number of different cell wall active antibiotics. Given its crucial role in regulating gene expression in response to antibiotic challenges, VraR must be tightly regulated. We report here for the first time in S. aureus convergence of two major signal transduction systems, serine/threonine protein kinase and two (three)-component systems. We demonstrate that VraR can be phosphorylated by the staphylococcal Ser/Thr protein kinase Stk1 and that phosphorylation negatively affects its DNA-binding properties. Mass spectrometric analyses and site-directed mutagenesis identified Thr106, Thr119, Thr175 and Thr178 as phosphoacceptors. A S. aureus ΔvraR mutant expressing a VraR derivative that mimics constitutive phosphorylation, VraR_Asp, still exhibited markedly decreased antibiotic resistance against different cell wall active antibiotics, when compared to the wild-type, suggesting that VraR phosphorylation may represent a novel and presumably more general mechanism of regulation of the two (three)-component systems in staphylococci.

  2. Localized α4 Integrin Phosphorylation Directs Shear Stress-Induced Endothelial Cell Alignment

    PubMed Central

    Goldfinger, Lawrence E.; Tzima, Eleni; Stockton, Rebecca; Kiosses, William B.; Kinbara, Kayoko; Tkachenko, Eugene; Gutierrez, Edgar; Groisman, Alex; Nguyen, Phu; Chien, Shu; Ginsberg1, Mark H.

    2009-01-01

    Vascular endothelial cells respond to laminar shear stress by aligning in the direction of flow, a process which may contribute to athero-protection. Here we report that localized α4 integrin phosphorylation is a mechanism for establishing the directionality of shear stress-induced alignment in microvascular endothelial cells. Within 5 minutes of exposure to a physiological level of shear stress, endothelial α4 integrins became phosphorylated on Ser988. In wounded monolayers, phosphorylation was enhanced at the downstream edges of cells relative to the source of flow. The shear-induced α4 integrin phosphorylation was blocked by inhibitors of cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA), an enzyme involved in the alignment of endothelial cells under prolonged shear. Moreover, shear-induced localized activation of the small GTPase Rac1, which specifies the directionality of endothelial alignment, was similarly blocked by PKA inhibitors. Furthermore, endothelial cells bearing a non-phosphorylatable α4(S988A) mutation failed to align in response to shear stress, thus establishing α4 as a relevant PKA substrate. We thereby show that shear-induced PKA-dependent α4 integrin phosphorylation at the downstream edge of endothelial cells promotes localized Rac1 activation, which in turn directs cytoskeletal alignment in response to shear stress. PMID:18583710

  3. Cortactin phosphorylation regulates cell invasion through a pH-dependent pathway

    PubMed Central

    Magalhaes, Marco A. O.; Larson, Daniel R.; Mader, Christopher C.; Bravo-Cordero, Jose Javier; Gil-Henn, Hava; Oser, Matthew; Chen, Xiaoming; Koleske, Anthony J.

    2011-01-01

    Invadopodia are invasive protrusions with proteolytic activity uniquely found in tumor cells. Cortactin phosphorylation is a key step during invadopodia maturation, regulating Nck1 binding and cofilin activity. The precise mechanism of cortactin-dependent cofilin regulation and the roles of this pathway in invadopodia maturation and cell invasion are not fully understood. We provide evidence that cortactin–cofilin binding is regulated by local pH changes at invadopodia that are mediated by the sodium–hydrogen exchanger NHE1. Furthermore, cortactin tyrosine phosphorylation mediates the recruitment of NHE1 to the invadopodium compartment, where it locally increases the pH to cause the release of cofilin from cortactin. We show that this mechanism involving cortactin phosphorylation, local pH increase, and cofilin activation regulates the dynamic cycles of invadopodium protrusion and retraction and is essential for cell invasion in 3D. Together, these findings identify a novel pH-dependent regulation of cell invasion. PMID:22105349

  4. H3S10 phosphorylation-mediated transcriptional regulation by Aurora kinase A.

    PubMed

    Kim, Se-Ryeon; Kim, Kee-Beom; Chae, Yun-Cheol; Park, Jin Woo; Seo, Sang-Beom

    2016-01-01

    Histone H3S10 phosphorylation has been known as a cell cycle-specific marker and has a role in transcriptional activation. Various kinases phosphorylate H3S10 in different species, however, the role of the mitotic serine/threonine protein kinase Aurora A (AURKA) is largely unknown. Here we present evidence that AURKA phosphorylates H3S10 and activates target gene transcription. We show that down-regulation of AURKA level during leukemia cell differentiation results in decreased H3S10 phosphorylation level. We further show that AURKA is recruited to target gene promoters and activates transcription via H3S10 phosphorylation. Furthermore, this recruitment can be disrupted by the AURKA inhibitor Alisertib and results in H3K9-me2 recruitment by G9a.

  5. Synthesis and biochemical characterization of a phosphorylated analogue of the response regulator CheB.

    PubMed

    Saxl, R L; Anand, G S; Stock, A M

    2001-10-30

    CheB is a response regulator protein in the bacterial chemotaxis two-component signal transduction pathway. Methylesterase CheB functions together with methyltransferase CheR to modulate the level of glutamate methylation in transmembrane chemoreceptors in response to environmental stimuli. The level of glutamate methylation in turn indirectly controls the direction of flagellar rotation. Like most two-component response regulators, CheB is activated in vivo by phosphorylation of a single aspartate, Asp 56, in its regulatory domain. Extensive biochemical and crystallographic studies have been completed on the inactive, unphosphorylated form of CheB. Because of the inherent lability of aspartyl phosphate bonds and the intrinsic phosphatase activity of CheB, the activated, phosphorylated form of CheB cannot be isolated for further characterization. We present a synthetic scheme to prepare an analogue of phosphorylated CheB using site-specific mutagenesis and chemical modification strategies. Initially, the two native cysteines found in CheB were substituted by serines and a cysteine was substituted for Asp 56 to yield D56C/C207S/C309S CheB. The unique cysteine in the substituted form of CheB was modified by sodium thiophosphate, Na(3)SPO(3), using two sequential disulfide bond exchange reactions. The analogue, D56C/C207S/C309S CheB-SPO(3), contained a thiophosphate group covalently bonded to the protein through a disulfide linkage at residue 56. Mass spectrometry showed that the protein was singly modified. Reverse phase chromatography showed that greater than 95% of the protein was modified under optimized conditions and that the analogue had a half-life of 28 days. In in vitro methylesterase assays in the presence of Mg(2+), the analogue exhibited activity equivalent to that of fully phosphorylated C207S/C309S CheB. Thus, D56C/C207S/C309S CheB-SPO(3) is a stable analogue that may be useful for characterization of the active form of CheB.

  6. Lens fiber connexin turnover and caspase-3-mediated cleavage are regulated alternately by phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xinye; Liu, Jialu; Jiang, Jean X

    2008-05-01

    Lens connexins are phosphorylated in vivo; however, the function and regulation of the phosphorylation remain largely unknown. We have previously identified an in vivo phosphorylation site, Ser(364), at the COOH terminus of lens connexin (Cx) Cx45.6 and phosphorylation appears to regulate connexin protein turnover. To assess the specific mechanism of Ser(364) phosphorylation in Cx45.6, exogenous wild type and Ser(364) mutant Cx45.6 were expressed in primary lens cultures through retroviral infection. Cx45.6 turnover was attenuated primarily by proteasomal inhibitors and to a lesser extent by lysosomal inhibitors. Furthermore, the level of Cx45.6 protein in ubiquitin co-expressed cells was significantly reduced as compared to the cells expressing Cx45.6 alone. Moreover, overexpression of ubiquitin led to a more significant decrease in wild type Cx45.6 than Cx45.6(S364A), a mutant deficient of phosphorylation site at Ser(364), although we did not detect any difference in the levels of ubiquitination between wild type and mutant Cx45.6. Interestingly, the mutant mimicking constitutive phosphorylation, Cx45.6(S364D), partially prevented the cleavage of Cx45.6 by caspase-3. Together, our data suggest that phosphorylation of Cx45.6 at Ser(364) appears to stimulate Cx45.6 turnover primarily through proteasome pathway and this phosphorylation inhibits the cleavage of Cx45.6 by caspase-3. These findings provide further insights into regulatory mechanism of the specific phosphorylation of connexins in the lens.

  7. Lens Fiber Connexin Turnover and Caspase-3-Mediated Cleavage Are Regulated Alternately by Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Xinye; Liu, Jialu; Jiang, Jean X.

    2009-01-01

    Lens connexins are phosphorylated in vivo; however, the function and regulation of the phosphorylation remain largely unknown. We have previously identified an in vivo phosphorylation site, Ser364, at the COOH terminus of lens connexin (Cx) Cx45.6 and phosphorylation appears to regulate connexin protein turnover. To assess the specific mechanism of Ser364 phosphorylation in Cx45.6, exogenous wild type and Ser364 mutant Cx45.6 were expressed in primary lens cultures through retroviral infection. Cx45.6 turnover was attenuated primarily by proteasomal inhibitors and to a lesser extent by lysosomal inhibitors. Furthermore, the level of Cx45.6 protein in ubiquitin co-expressed cells was significantly reduced as compared to the cells expressing Cx45.6 alone. Moreover, overexpression of ubiquitin led to a more significant decrease in wild type Cx45.6 than Cx45.6(S364A), a mutant deficient of phosphorylation site at Ser364, although we did not detect any difference in the levels of ubiquitination between wild type and mutant Cx45.6. Interestingly, the mutant mimicking constitutive phosphorylation, Cx45.6(S364D), partially prevented the cleavage of Cx45.6 by caspase-3. Together, our data suggest that phosphorylation of Cx45.6 at Ser364appears to stimulate Cx45.6 turnover primarily through proteasome pathway and this phosphorylation inhibits the cleavage of Cx45.6 by caspase-3. These findings provide further insights into regulatory mechanism of the specific phosphorylation of connexins in the lens. PMID:18649174

  8. Phosphorylation of filamin A regulates chemokine receptor CCR2 recycling.

    PubMed

    Pons, Mònica; Izquierdo, Ismael; Andreu-Carbó, Mireia; Garrido, Georgina; Planagumà, Jesús; Muriel, Olivia; Del Pozo, Miguel A; Geli, M Isabel; Aragay, Anna M

    2017-01-15

    Proper endosomal trafficking of ligand-activated G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) is essential to spatiotemporally tune their physiological responses. For the monocyte chemoattractant receptor 2 (CCR2B; one of two isoforms encoded by CCR2), endocytic recycling is important to sustain monocyte migration, whereas filamin A (FLNa) is essential for CCL2-induced monocyte migration. Here, we analyze the role of FLNa in the trafficking of CCR2B along the endocytic pathway. In FLNa-knockdown cells, activated CCR2B accumulated in enlarged EEA-1-positive endosomes, which exhibited slow movement and fast fluorescence recovery, suggesting an imbalance between receptor entry and exit rates. Utilizing super-resolution microscopy, we observed that FLNa-GFP, CCR2B and β2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR) were present in actin-enriched endosomal microdomains. Depletion of FLNa decreased CCR2B association with these microdomains and concomitantly delayed CCR2B endosomal traffic, without apparently affecting the number of microdomains. Interestingly, CCR2B and β2AR signaling induced phosphorylation of FLNa at residue S2152, and this phosphorylation event was contributes to sustain receptor recycling. Thus, our data strongly suggest that CCR2B and β2AR signals to FLNa to stimulate its endocytosis and recycling to the plasma membrane. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  9. B-Cyclin/CDKs Regulate Mitotic Spindle Assembly by Phosphorylating Kinesins-5 in Budding Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Chee, Mark K.; Haase, Steven B.

    2010-01-01

    Although it has been known for many years that B-cyclin/CDK complexes regulate the assembly of the mitotic spindle and entry into mitosis, the full complement of relevant CDK targets has not been identified. It has previously been shown in a variety of model systems that B-type cyclin/CDK complexes, kinesin-5 motors, and the SCFCdc4 ubiquitin ligase are required for the separation of spindle poles and assembly of a bipolar spindle. It has been suggested that, in budding yeast, B-type cyclin/CDK (Clb/Cdc28) complexes promote spindle pole separation by inhibiting the degradation of the kinesins-5 Kip1 and Cin8 by the anaphase-promoting complex (APCCdh1). We have determined, however, that the Kip1 and Cin8 proteins are present at wild-type levels in the absence of Clb/Cdc28 kinase activity. Here, we show that Kip1 and Cin8 are in vitro targets of Clb2/Cdc28 and that the mutation of conserved CDK phosphorylation sites on Kip1 inhibits spindle pole separation without affecting the protein's in vivo localization or abundance. Mass spectrometry analysis confirms that two CDK sites in the tail domain of Kip1 are phosphorylated in vivo. In addition, we have determined that Sic1, a Clb/Cdc28-specific inhibitor, is the SCFCdc4 target that inhibits spindle pole separation in cells lacking functional Cdc4. Based on these findings, we propose that Clb/Cdc28 drives spindle pole separation by direct phosphorylation of kinesin-5 motors. PMID:20463882

  10. Regulation of gap junction conductance by calcineurin through Cx43 phosphorylation: implications for action potential conduction.

    PubMed

    Jabr, Rita I; Hatch, Fiona S; Salvage, Samantha C; Orlowski, Alejandro; Lampe, Paul D; Fry, Christopher H

    2016-11-01

    Cardiac arrhythmias are associated with raised intracellular [Ca(2+)] and slowed action potential conduction caused by reduced gap junction (GJ) electrical conductance (Gj). Ventricular GJs are composed of connexin proteins (Cx43), with Gj determined by Cx43 phosphorylation status. Connexin phosphorylation is an interplay between protein kinases and phosphatases but the precise pathways are unknown. We aimed to identify key Ca(2+)-dependent phosphorylation sites on Cx43 that regulate cardiac gap junction conductance and action potential conduction velocity. We investigated the role of the Ca(2+)-dependent phosphatase, calcineurin. Intracellular [Ca(2+)] was raised in guinea-pig myocardium by a low-Na solution or increased stimulation. Conduction velocity and Gj were measured in multicellular strips. Phosphorylation of Cx43 serine residues (S365 and S368) and of the intermediary regulator I1 at threonine35 was measured by Western blot. Measurements were made in the presence and absence of inhibitors to calcineurin, I1 or protein phosphatase-1 and phosphatase-2.Raised [Ca(2)(+)]i decreased Gj, reduced Cx43 phosphorylation at S365 and increased it at S368; these changes were reversed by calcineurin inhibitors. Cx43-S368 phosphorylation was reversed by the protein kinase C inhibitor chelerythrine. Raised [Ca(2+)]i also decreased I1 phosphorylation, also prevented by calcineurin inhibitors, to increase activity of the Ca(2+)-independent phosphatase, PPI. The PP1 inhibitor, tautomycin, prevented Cx43-365 dephosphorylation, Cx43-S368 phosphorylation and Gj reduction in raised [Ca(2+)]i. PP2A had no role. Conduction velocity was reduced by raised [Ca(2+)]i and reversed by calcineurin inhibitors. Reduced action potential conduction and Gj in raised [Ca(2+)] are regulated by calcineurin-dependent Cx43-S365 phosphorylation, leading to Cx43-S368 dephosphorylation. The calcineurin action is indirect, via I1 dephosphorylation and subsequent activation of PP1.

  11. Phosphorylation of Pex11p does not regulate peroxisomal fission in the yeast Hansenula polymorpha.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Ann S; Krikken, Arjen M; van der Klei, Ida J; Williams, Chris P

    2015-06-23

    Pex11p plays a crucial role in peroxisomal fission. Studies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Pichia pastoris indicated that Pex11p is activated by phosphorylation, which results in enhanced peroxisome proliferation. In S. cerevisiae but not in P. pastoris, Pex11p phosphorylation was shown to regulate the protein's trafficking to peroxisomes. However, phosphorylation of PpPex11p was proposed to influence its interaction with Fis1p, another component of the organellar fission machinery. Here, we have examined the role of Pex11p phosphorylation in the yeast Hansenula polymorpha. Employing mass spectrometry, we demonstrate that HpPex11p is also phosphorylated on a Serine residue present at a similar position to that of ScPex11p and PpPex11p. Furthermore, through the use of mutants designed to mimic both phosphorylated and unphosphorylated forms of HpPex11p, we have investigated the role of this post-translational modification. Our data demonstrate that mutations to the phosphorylation site do not disturb the function of Pex11p in peroxisomal fission, nor do they alter the localization of Pex11p. Also, no effect on peroxisome inheritance was observed. Taken together, these data lead us to conclude that peroxisomal fission in H. polymorpha is not modulated by phosphorylation of Pex11p.

  12. Phosphorylation sites in BubR1 that regulate kinetochore attachment, tension, and mitotic exit

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Haomin; Hittle, James; Zappacosta, Francesca; Annan, Roland S.; Hershko, Avram; Yen, Timothy J.

    2008-01-01

    BubR1 kinase is essential for the mitotic checkpoint and also for kinetochores to establish microtubule attachments. In this study, we report that BubR1 is phosphorylated in mitosis on four residues that differ from sites recently reported to be phosphorylated by Plk1 (Elowe, S., S. Hummer, A. Uldschmid, X. Li, and E.A. Nigg. 2007. Genes Dev. 21:2205–2219; Matsumura, S., F. Toyoshima, and E. Nishida. 2007. J. Biol. Chem. 282:15217–15227). S670, the most conserved residue, is phosphorylated at kinetochores at the onset of mitosis and dephosphorylated before anaphase onset. Unlike the Plk1-dependent S676 phosphorylation, S670 phosphorylation is sensitive to microtubule attachments but not to kinetochore tension. Functionally, phosphorylation of S670 is essential for error correction and for kinetochores with end-on attachments to establish tension. Furthermore, in vitro data suggest that the phosphorylation status of BubR1 is important for checkpoint inhibition of the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome. Finally, RNA interference experiments show that Mps1 is a major but not the exclusive kinase that specifies BubR1 phosphorylation in vivo. The combined data suggest that BubR1 may be an effector of multiple kinases that are involved in discrete aspects of kinetochore attachments and checkpoint regulation. PMID:19015317

  13. Nuclear import of the Drosophila Rel protein Dorsal is regulated by phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Drier, E A; Huang, L H; Steward, R

    1999-03-01

    In Drosophila, dorsal-ventral polarity is determined by a maternally encoded signal transduction pathway that culminates in the graded nuclear localization of the Rel protein, Dorsal. Dorsal is retained in the cytoplasm by the IkappaB protein, Cactus. Signal-dependent phosphorylation of Cactus results in the degradation of Cactus and the nuclear targeting of Dorsal. We present an in-depth study of the functional importance of Dorsal phosphorylation. We find that Dorsal is phosphorylated by the ventral signal while associated with Cactus, and that Dorsal phosphorylation is essential for its nuclear import. In vivo phospholabeling of Dorsal is limited to serine residues in both ovaries and early embryos. A protein bearing mutations in six conserved serines abolishes Dorsal activity, is constitutively cytoplasmic, and appears to eliminate Dorsal phosphorylation, but still interacts with Cactus. Two individual serine-to-alanine mutations produce unexpected results. In a wild-type signaling background, a mutation in the highly conserved PKA site (S312) produces only a weak loss-of-function; however, it completely destabilizes the protein in a cactus mutant background. Significantly, the phosphorylation of another completely conserved serine (S317) regulates the high level of nuclear import found in ventral cells. We conclude that the formation of a wild-type Dorsal nuclear gradient requires the phosphorylation of both Cactus and Dorsal. The strong conservation of the serines suggests that phosphorylation of other Rel proteins is essential for their proper nuclear targeting.

  14. Protein kinase D regulates positive selection of CD4+ thymocytes through phosphorylation of SHP-1

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Eri; Kosako, Hidetaka; Yasuda, Tomoharu; Ohmuraya, Masaki; Araki, Kimi; Kurosaki, Tomohiro; Saito, Takashi; Yamasaki, Sho

    2016-01-01

    Thymic selection shapes an appropriate T cell antigen receptor (TCR) repertoire during T cell development. Here, we show that a serine/threonine kinase, protein kinase D (PKD), is crucial for thymocyte positive selection. In T cell-specific PKD-deficient (PKD2/PKD3 double-deficient) mice, the generation of CD4 single positive thymocytes is abrogated. This defect is likely caused by attenuated TCR signalling during positive selection and incomplete CD4 lineage specification in PKD-deficient thymocytes; however, TCR-proximal tyrosine phosphorylation is not affected. PKD is activated in CD4+CD8+ double positive (DP) thymocytes on stimulation with positively selecting peptides. By phosphoproteomic analysis, we identify SH2-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase-1 (SHP-1) as a direct substrate of PKD. Substitution of wild-type SHP-1 by phosphorylation-defective mutant (SHP-1S557A) impairs generation of CD4+ thymocytes. These results suggest that the PKD–SHP-1 axis positively regulates TCR signalling to promote CD4+ T cell development. PMID:27670070

  15. Abl regulates planar polarized junctional dynamics through β-catenin tyrosine phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Tamada, Masako; Farrell, Dene L.; Zallen, Jennifer A.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Interactions between epithelial cells are mediated by adherens junctions that are dynamically regulated during development. Here we show that the turnover of β-catenin is increased at cell interfaces that are targeted for disassembly during Drosophila axis elongation. The Abl tyrosine kinase is concentrated at specific planar junctions and is necessary for polarized β-catenin localization and dynamics. abl mutant embryos have decreased β-catenin turnover at shrinking edges, and these defects are accompanied a reduction in multicellular rosette formation and axis elongation. Abl promotes β-catenin phosphorylation on the conserved tyrosine 667 and expression of an unphosphorylatable β-catenin mutant recapitulates the defects of abl mutants. Notably, a phosphomimetic β-cateninY667E mutation is sufficient to increase β-catenin turnover and rescues axis elongation in abl deficient embryos. These results demonstrate that the asymmetrically localized Abl tyrosine kinase directs planar polarized junctional remodeling during Drosophila axis elongation through the tyrosine phosphorylation of β-catenin. PMID:22340496

  16. Cell cycle regulated phosphorylation of RPA-32 occurs within the replication initiation complex.

    PubMed Central

    Fotedar, R; Roberts, J M

    1992-01-01

    The transition from G1 to S phase of the cell cycle may be regulated by modification of proteins which are essential for initiating DNA replication. One of the first events during initiation is to unwind the origin DNA and this requires a single-stranded DNA binding protein. RPA, a highly conserved multi-subunit single-stranded DNA binding protein, was first identified as a cellular protein necessary for the initiation of SV40 DNA replication. The 32 kDa subunit of RPA has been shown to be phosphorylated at the start of S phase. Using SV40 replication as a model, we have reproduced in vitro the S phase-dependent phosphorylation of RPA-32 and show that it occurs specifically within the replication initiation complex. Phosphorylated RPA-32 is predominantly associated with DNA. Phosphorylation is not a pre-requisite for association with DNA, but occurs after RPA binds to single-stranded DNA formed at the origin during the initiation phase. The protein kinase(s) which phosphorylates RPA-32 is present at all stages of the cell cycle but RPA-32 does not bind to the SV40 origin or become phosphorylated in extracts from G1 cells. Therefore, the cell cycle-dependent phosphorylation of RPA-32 may be regulated by its binding to single-stranded origin DNA during replication initiation. Images PMID:1318194

  17. Regulation of RNA polymerase II activity by CTD phosphorylation and cell cycle control.

    PubMed

    Oelgeschläger, Thomas

    2002-02-01

    The carboxyl-terminal domain (CTD) of the largest subunit of mammalian RNA polymerase II (RNAP II) consists of 52 repeats of a consensus heptapeptide and is subject to phosphorylation and dephosphorylation events during each round of transcription. RNAP II activity is regulated during the cell cycle and cell cycle-dependend changes in RNAP II activity correlate well with CTD phosphorylation. In addition, global changes in the CTD phosphorylation status are observed in response to mitogenic or cytostatic signals such as growth factors, mitogens and DNA-damaging agents. Several CTD kinases are members of the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) superfamily and associate with transcription initiation complexes. Other CTD kinases implicated in cell cycle regulation include the mitogen-activated protein kinases ERK-1/2 and the c-Abl tyrosine kinase. These observations suggest that reversible RNAP II CTD phosphorylation may play a key role in linking cell cycle regulatory events to coordinated changes in transcription.

  18. Ribosomal Protein S6 Phosphorylation in the Nervous System: From Regulation to Function

    PubMed Central

    Biever, Anne; Valjent, Emmanuel; Puighermanal, Emma

    2015-01-01

    Since the discovery of the phosphorylation of the 40S ribosomal protein S6 (rpS6) about four decades ago, much effort has been made to uncover the molecular mechanisms underlying the regulation of this post-translational modification. In the field of neuroscience, rpS6 phosphorylation is commonly used as a readout of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 signaling activation or as a marker for neuronal activity. Nevertheless, its biological role in neurons still remains puzzling. Here we review the pharmacological and physiological stimuli regulating this modification in the nervous system as well as the pathways that transduce these signals into rpS6 phosphorylation. Altered rpS6 phosphorylation observed in various genetic and pathophysiological mouse models is also discussed. Finally, we examine the current state of knowledge on the physiological role of this post-translational modification and highlight the questions that remain to be addressed. PMID:26733799

  19. P-TEFb Kinase Complex Phosphorylates Histone H1 to Regulate Expression of Cellular and HIV-1 Genes*

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, Siobhan K.; Cao, Hong; Nathans, Robin; Ali, Akbar; Rana, Tariq M.

    2010-01-01

    Transcription of HIV-1 genes depends on the RNA polymerase II kinase and elongation factor positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb), the complex of cyclin T1 and CDK9. Recent evidence suggests that regulation of transcription by P-TEFb involves chromatin binding and modifying factors. To determine how P-TEFb may connect chromatin remodeling to transcription, we investigated the relationship between P-TEFb and histone H1. We identify histone H1 as a substrate for P-TEFb involved in cellular and HIV-1 transcription. We show that P-TEFb interacts with H1 and that P-TEFb inhibition by RNAi, flavopiridol, or dominant negative CDK9 expression correlates with loss of phosphorylation and mobility of H1 in vivo. Importantly, P-TEFb directs H1 phosphorylation in response to wild-type HIV-1 infection, but not Tat-mutant HIV-1 infection. Our results show that P-TEFb phosphorylates histone H1 at a specific C-terminal phosphorylation site. Expression of a mutant H1.1 that cannot be phosphorylated by P-TEFb also disrupts Tat transactivation in an HIV reporter cell line as well as transcription of the c-fos and hsp70 genes in HeLa cells. We identify histone H1 as a novel P-TEFb substrate, and our results suggest new roles for P-TEFb in both cellular and HIV-1 transcription. PMID:20551309

  20. Negative regulation of RelA phosphorylation: emerging players and their roles in cancer.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xinyuan; Yarbrough, Wendell G

    2015-02-01

    NF-κB signaling contributes to human disease processes, notably inflammatory diseases and cancer. Many advances have been made in understanding mechanisms responsible for abnormal NF-κB activation with RelA post-translational modification, particularly phosphorylation, proven to be critical for RelA function. While the majority of studies have focused on identifying kinases responsible for NF-κB phosphorylation and pathway activation, recently progress has also been made in understanding the negative regulators important for restraining RelA activity. Here we summarize negative regulators of RelA phosphorylation, their targeting sites in RelA and biological functions through negative regulation of RelA activation. Finally, we emphasize the tumor suppressor-like roles that these negative regulators can assume in human cancers.

  1. Dynein ATPase pathway: ATP analogs and regulation by phosphorylation

    SciTech Connect

    Chilcote, T.J.

    1988-01-01

    Three biochemical aspects of 22S dynein from Tetrahymena cilia have been investigated: its ATP binding polypeptides and the manner in which they bind ATP, its AMPPNP-induced dissociation from microtubules, and its phosphorylation. We have attempted to identify the polypeptides of dynein that bind ATP, i.e., the active site polypeptides, with the photoaffinity ATP analog 8-N{sub 3}ATP. The 8-N{sub 3}ATP has been shown to bind to dyneins active sites and in a manner similar to that of ATP. Upon irradiation, (2-{sup 3}H)8-N{sub 3}ATP covalently labels the three heavy chains, i.e., heads, which is detected by autoradiography of SDS PAG's. Thus, the three heads are considered to be the three active sites of dynein. AMPPNP is a nonhydrolyzable ATP analog which we have assayed for the ability to induce dynein dissociation from microtubules.

  2. Regulation of Auxin Transport by Phosphorylation and Flavonoids during Gravitropism in Arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muday, Gloria K.

    2005-01-01

    The focus of this research includes: 1) Regulation of Axin transport by flavonoids during gravitropism; 2) Phosphorylation control of auxin transport during gravity response; 3) Ethylene regulation of gravitropic curvature; 4) IBA transport and gravitropic response; and 5) Other collaborative projects.

  3. ERK/MAPK Regulates Hippocampal Histone Phosphorylation Following Contextual Fear Conditioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levenson, Jonathan M.; Sweatt, J. David; Chwang, Wilson B.; O'Riordan, Kenneth J.

    2006-01-01

    Long-term memory formation is regulated by many distinct molecular mechanisms that control gene expression. An emerging model for effecting a stable, coordinated pattern of gene transcription involves epigenetic tagging through modifications of histones or DNA. In this study, we investigated the regulation of histone phosphorylation in the…

  4. ERK/MAPK Regulates Hippocampal Histone Phosphorylation Following Contextual Fear Conditioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levenson, Jonathan M.; Sweatt, J. David; Chwang, Wilson B.; O'Riordan, Kenneth J.

    2006-01-01

    Long-term memory formation is regulated by many distinct molecular mechanisms that control gene expression. An emerging model for effecting a stable, coordinated pattern of gene transcription involves epigenetic tagging through modifications of histones or DNA. In this study, we investigated the regulation of histone phosphorylation in the…

  5. Regulation of Auxin Transport by Phosphorylation and Flavonoids during Gravitropism in Arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muday, Gloria K.

    2005-01-01

    The focus of this research includes: 1) Regulation of Axin transport by flavonoids during gravitropism; 2) Phosphorylation control of auxin transport during gravity response; 3) Ethylene regulation of gravitropic curvature; 4) IBA transport and gravitropic response; and 5) Other collaborative projects.

  6. Tyrosine phosphorylation of type Igamma phosphatidylinositol phosphate kinase by Src regulates an integrin-talin switch.

    PubMed

    Ling, Kun; Doughman, Renee L; Iyer, Vidhya V; Firestone, Ari J; Bairstow, Shawn F; Mosher, Deane F; Schaller, Michael D; Anderson, Richard A

    2003-12-22

    Engagement of integrin receptors with the extracellular matrix induces the formation of focal adhesions (FAs). Dynamic regulation of FAs is necessary for cells to polarize and migrate. Key interactions between FA scaffolding and signaling proteins are dependent on tyrosine phosphorylation. However, the precise role of tyrosine phosphorylation in FA development and maturation is poorly defined. Here, we show that phosphorylation of type Igamma phosphatidylinositol phosphate kinase (PIPKIgamma661) on tyrosine 644 (Y644) is critical for its interaction with talin, and consequently, localization to FAs. PIPKIgamma661 is specifically phosphorylated on Y644 by Src. Phosphorylation is regulated by focal adhesion kinase, which enhances the association between PIPKIgamma661 and Src. The phosphorylation of Y644 results in an approximately 15-fold increase in binding affinity to the talin head domain and blocks beta-integrin binding to talin. This defines a novel phosphotyrosine-binding site on the talin F3 domain and a "molecular switch" for talin binding between PIPKIgamma661 and beta-integrin that may regulate dynamic FA turnover.

  7. Negative Regulation of the Yeast ABC Transporter Ycf1p by Phosphorylation within Its N-terminal Extension*

    PubMed Central

    Paumi, Christian M.; Chuk, Matthew; Chevelev, Igor; Stagljar, Igor; Michaelis, Susan

    2008-01-01

    The yeast vacuolar membrane protein Ycf1p and its mammalian counterpart, MRP1, belong to the ABCC subfamily of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters that rid cells of toxic endogenous and xenobiotic compounds. Like most members of the ABCC subfamily, Ycf1p contains an N-terminal extension in addition to its ABC “core” domain and transports substrates in the form of glutathione conjugates. Ycf1p is subject to complex regulation to ensure its optimal function. Previous studies showed that Ycf1p activity is stimulated by a guanine nucleotide exchange factor, Tus1p, and is positively regulated by phosphorylation in its ABC core domain at residues Ser-908 and Thr-911. Here we provide evidence that phosphorylation of Ser-251 in the Ycf1p N-terminal extension negatively regulates activity. Mutant Ycf1p-S251A exhibits increased resistance to cadmium in vivo and increased Ycf1p-dependent transport of [3H]estradiol-β-17-glucuronide in vitro as compared with wild-type Ycf1p. Activity is restored to the wild-type level for Ycf1-S251E. To identify kinase(s) that negatively regulate Ycf1p function, we conducted an integrated membrane yeast two-hybrid (iMYTH) screen and identified two kinase genes, CKA1 and HAL5, deletion of which increases Ycf1p function. Genetic evidence suggests that Cka1p may regulate Ycf1p function through phosphorylation of Ser-251 either directly or indirectly. Overall, this study provides compelling evidence that negative, as well as positive, regulation of Ycf1p is mediated by phosphorylation. PMID:18667437

  8. Regulation of myosin light chain phosphorylation in the trabecular meshwork: role in aqueous humour outflow facility.

    PubMed

    Rao, P Vasantha; Deng, Peifeng; Sasaki, Yasuharu; Epstein, David L

    2005-02-01

    Cellular contraction and relaxation and integrity of the actin cytoskeleton in trabecular meshwork (TM) tissue have been thought to influence aqueous humour outflow. However, the cellular pathways that regulate these events in TM cells are not well understood. In this study, we investigated physiological agonist-mediated regulation of myosin light chain (MLC) phosphorylation in the TM, and correlated such effects with alterations in aqueous outflow facility, since MLC phosphorylation is a critical biochemical determinant of cellular contraction in TM cells. Treatment of serum starved human TM cells with endothelin-1 (0.1 microM), thromboxane A2 mimetic U-46619 (1.0 microM), or angiotensin II (1 microM), all of which are agonists of G-protein coupled receptors, triggered activation of MLC phosphorylation, as determined by urea/glycerol-based Western blot analysis. Agonist-stimulated increase in MLC phosphorylation was associated with activation of Rho GTPase in TM cells, as determined in pull-down assays. In contrast, treatment of human TM cells with a novel Rho-kinase inhibitor H-1152 (0.1-2 microM), in the presence of serum reduced basal MLC phosphorylation. H-1152 also increased aqueous outflow facility significantly in a dose-dependent fashion, in perfusion studies with cadaver porcine eyes. This effect of H-1152 on outflow facility was associated with decreased MLC phosphorylation in TM tissue of drug-perfused eyes. Collectively, this study identifies potential physiological regulators of MLC phosphorylation in human TM cells and demonstrates the significance of Rho/Rho-kinase pathway-mediated MLC phosphorylation in modulation of aqueous outflow facility through TM.

  9. A role for the p34cdc2 kinase and phosphatases in the regulation of phosphorylation and disassembly of lamin B2 during the cell cycle.

    PubMed Central

    Lüscher, B; Brizuela, L; Beach, D; Eisenman, R N

    1991-01-01

    While the p34cdc2 kinase is considered to be a critical regulator of mitosis, its function has not yet been directly linked to one of the key events during the onset of mitosis: nuclear envelope breakdown. Here we show that a major structural protein of the nuclear envelope, lamin B2, is phosphorylated by p34cdc2. Results from two-dimensional phosphopeptide mapping experiments demonstrate that the p34cdc2-specific phosphopeptides represent both mitotic and interphase specific phosphorylations of lamin B2 and include the major interphase phosphorylation site. In mitotic cells we detected two distinct forms of lamin B2 which differ in electrophoretic mobility and in degree of phosphorylation. The phosphorylation pattern of lamin B2 generated in vitro by p34cdc2 was more closely related to the less phosphorylated mitotic lamin B2, suggesting that another kinase(s) in addition to p34cdc2 is involved in generating the mitotic phosphorylation pattern. In addition, we show that treatment of interphase cells with okadaic acid, a potent phosphatase inhibitor, leads to the acquisition of mitosis-specific phosphopeptides and can reversibly increase the detergent-solubility of lamin B2. However, the M-phase-like phosphorylation of lamin B2 in itself is not sufficient to induce its disassembly from the nuclear lamina suggesting that an additional event(s) besides phosphorylation is required. Images PMID:1849074

  10. 50 years of biological research--from oxidative phosphorylation to energy requiring transport regulation.

    PubMed

    Kalckar, H M

    1991-01-01

    In 1930 adenosine triphosphate appeared in the literature from W. A. Engelhardt's work on avian erythrocytes. This was an early example of oxidative phosphorylation in intact cells, and it required methylene blue and oxygen. Both Belitser and I realized that the use of Warburg manometers for aeration was critical in order to generate oxidative phosphorylation of glucose in tissue preparations. Test tube techniques did not work. In 1956 we were able to describe a human type of diabetes called "galactose diabetes," in which consumption of human or cows' milk provokes mental retardation. Replacement of human or cows' milk products with "vegetable milk" formula in early infancy can prevent retardation. We determined that the disease results from a defect of galactose-one-phosphate uridylyl-transferase, a hereditary enzyme. This type of enzyme defect, if discovered and treated in early infancy, is a benign molecular disease. Regulation of transport systems in mammalian cell cultures are frequently complex energized systems. Perhaps my greatest surprise in this regard was the mere fact that an all-cis "odd" hexose-D-allose turned out to be a highly intense down-regulator of the hexose transport system. Additions of inhibitors of oxidative phosphorylation (such as oligomycin or di-nitrophenol) arrested the allose-mediated down-regulation. We have reason to suspect that the strong down-regulator is a phosphorylated form of D-allose. Thus ends my story about oxidative energized biological phosphorylation systems.

  11. Chk1 phosphorylates the tumour suppressor Mig-6, regulating the activation of EGF signalling

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ning; Matsumoto, Masaki; Kitagawa, Kyoko; Kotake, Yojiro; Suzuki, Sayuri; Shirasawa, Senji; Nakayama, Keiichi I; Nakanishi, Makoto; Niida, Hiroyuki; Kitagawa, Masatoshi

    2012-01-01

    The tumour suppressor gene product Mig-6 acts as an inhibitor of epidermal growth factor (EGF) signalling. However, its posttranslational modifications and regulatory mechanisms have not been elucidated. Here, we investigated the phosphorylation of human Mig-6 and found that Chk1 phosphorylated Mig-6 in vivo as well as in vitro. Moreover, EGF stimulation promoted phosphorylation of Mig-6 without DNA damage and the phosphorylation was inhibited by depletion of Chk1. EGF also increased Ser280-phosphorylated Chk1, a cytoplasmic-tethering form, via PI3K pathway. Mass spectrometric analyses suggested that Ser 251 of Mig-6 was a major phosphorylation site by Chk1 in vitro and in vivo. Substitution of Ser 251 to alanine increased inhibitory activity of Mig-6 against EGF receptor (EGFR) activation. Moreover, EGF-dependent activation of EGFR and cell growth were inhibited by Chk1 depletion, and were rescued by co-depletion of Mig-6. Our results suggest that Chk1 phosphorylates Mig-6 on Ser 251, resulting in the inhibition of Mig-6, and that Chk1 acts as a positive regulator of EGF signalling. This is a novel function of Chk1. PMID:22505024

  12. Chk1 phosphorylates the tumour suppressor Mig-6, regulating the activation of EGF signalling.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ning; Matsumoto, Masaki; Kitagawa, Kyoko; Kotake, Yojiro; Suzuki, Sayuri; Shirasawa, Senji; Nakayama, Keiichi I; Nakanishi, Makoto; Niida, Hiroyuki; Kitagawa, Masatoshi

    2012-05-16

    The tumour suppressor gene product Mig-6 acts as an inhibitor of epidermal growth factor (EGF) signalling. However, its posttranslational modifications and regulatory mechanisms have not been elucidated. Here, we investigated the phosphorylation of human Mig-6 and found that Chk1 phosphorylated Mig-6 in vivo as well as in vitro. Moreover, EGF stimulation promoted phosphorylation of Mig-6 without DNA damage and the phosphorylation was inhibited by depletion of Chk1. EGF also increased Ser280-phosphorylated Chk1, a cytoplasmic-tethering form, via PI3K pathway. Mass spectrometric analyses suggested that Ser 251 of Mig-6 was a major phosphorylation site by Chk1 in vitro and in vivo. Substitution of Ser 251 to alanine increased inhibitory activity of Mig-6 against EGF receptor (EGFR) activation. Moreover, EGF-dependent activation of EGFR and cell growth were inhibited by Chk1 depletion, and were rescued by co-depletion of Mig-6. Our results suggest that Chk1 phosphorylates Mig-6 on Ser 251, resulting in the inhibition of Mig-6, and that Chk1 acts as a positive regulator of EGF signalling. This is a novel function of Chk1.

  13. Akt-dependent Girdin phosphorylation regulates repair processes after acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Hayano, Shinji; Takefuji, Mikito; Maeda, Kengo; Noda, Tomonori; Ichimiya, Hitoshi; Kobayashi, Koichi; Enomoto, Atsushi; Asai, Naoya; Takahashi, Masahide; Murohara, Toyoaki

    2015-11-01

    Myocardial infarction is a leading cause of death, and cardiac rupture following myocardial infarction leads to extremely poor prognostic feature. A large body of evidence suggests that Akt is involved in several cardiac diseases. We previously reported that Akt-mediated Girdin phosphorylation is essential for angiogenesis and neointima formation. The role of Girdin expression and phosphorylation in myocardial infarction, however, is not understood. Therefore, we employed Girdin-deficient mice and Girdin S1416A knock-in (Girdin(SA/SA)) mice, replacing the Akt phosphorylation site with alanine, to address this question. We found that Girdin was expressed and phosphorylated in cardiac fibroblasts in vitro and that its phosphorylation was crucial for the proliferation and migration of cardiac fibroblasts. In vivo, Girdin was localized in non-cardiomyocyte interstitial cells and phosphorylated in α-smooth muscle actin-positive cells, which are likely to be cardiac myofibroblasts. In an acute myocardial infarction model, Girdin(SA/SA) suppressed the accumulation and proliferation of cardiac myofibroblasts in the infarcted area. Furthermore, lower collagen deposition in Girdin(SA/SA) mice impaired cardiac repair and resulted in increased mortality attributed to cardiac rupture. These findings suggest an important role of Girdin phosphorylation at serine 1416 in cardiac repair after acute myocardial infarction and provide insights into the complex mechanism of cardiac rupture through the Akt/Girdin-mediated regulation of cardiac myofibroblasts.

  14. Transcriptional regulation by post-transcriptional modification--role of phosphorylation in Sp1 transcriptional activity.

    PubMed

    Chu, Shijian

    2012-10-15

    Sp1 is a ubiquitously expressed transcription factor involved in the regulation of a large number of genes including housekeeping genes as well as actively regulated genes. Although Sp1 was discovered nearly three decades ago, its functional diversity is still not completely understood. One of the ways that make Sp1 versatile in transcriptional regulation is its post-transcriptional modification, which alters Sp1 structure in different cells and at different times. Compared to other types of modifications of the Sp1 protein, phosphorylation has been studied far more extensively. This review focuses on the inducers, pathways, enzymes, and biological effects of Sp1 phosphorylation. Recent data are beginning to reveal the biological significance and universal presence of Sp1 phosphorylation-related cell/molecular responses. Studies in this field provide a quick glance at how a simple chemical modification of a transcription factor could produce significant functional diversity of the protein.

  15. Early Steps in Autophagy Depend on Direct Phosphorylation of Atg9 by the Atg1 Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Papinski, Daniel; Schuschnig, Martina; Reiter, Wolfgang; Wilhelm, Larissa; Barnes, Christopher A.; Maiolica, Alessio; Hansmann, Isabella; Pfaffenwimmer, Thaddaeus; Kijanska, Monika; Stoffel, Ingrid; Lee, Sung Sik; Brezovich, Andrea; Lou, Jane Hua; Turk, Benjamin E.; Aebersold, Ruedi; Ammerer, Gustav; Peter, Matthias; Kraft, Claudine

    2014-01-01

    Summary Bulk degradation of cytoplasmic material is mediated by a highly conserved intracellular trafficking pathway termed autophagy. This pathway is characterized by the formation of double-membrane vesicles termed autophagosomes engulfing the substrate and transporting it to the vacuole/lysosome for breakdown and recycling. The Atg1/ULK1 kinase is essential for this process; however, little is known about its targets and the means by which it controls autophagy. Here we have screened for Atg1 kinase substrates using consensus peptide arrays and identified three components of the autophagy machinery. The multimembrane-spanning protein Atg9 is a direct target of this kinase essential for autophagy. Phosphorylated Atg9 is then required for the efficient recruitment of Atg8 and Atg18 to the site of autophagosome formation and subsequent expansion of the isolation membrane, a prerequisite for a functioning autophagy pathway. These findings show that the Atg1 kinase acts early in autophagy by regulating the outgrowth of autophagosomal membranes. PMID:24440502

  16. Phosphorylation-dependent regulation of phospholipase D2 by protein kinase C delta in rat Pheochromocytoma PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Han, Jung Min; Kim, Jae Ho; Lee, Byoung Dae; Lee, Sang Do; Kim, Yong; Jung, Yon Woo; Lee, Sukmook; Cho, Wonhwa; Ohba, Motoi; Kuroki, Toshio; Suh, Pann-Ghill; Ryu, Sung Ho

    2002-03-08

    Many studies have shown that protein kinase C (PKC) is an important physiological regulator of phospholipase D (PLD). However, the role of PKC in agonist-induced PLD activation has been mainly investigated with a focus on the PLD1, which is one of the two PLD isoenzymes (PLD1 and PLD2) cloned to date. Since the expression of PLD2 significantly enhanced phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)- or bradykinin-induced PLD activity in rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cells, we investigated the regulatory mechanism of PLD2 in PC12 cells. Two different PKC inhibitors, GF109203X and Ro-31-8220, completely blocked PMA-induced PLD2 activation. In addition, specific inhibition of PKC delta by rottlerin prevented PLD2 activation in PMA-stimulated PC12 cells. Concomitant with PLD2 activation, PLD2 became phosphorylated upon PMA or bradykinin treatment of PC12 cells. Moreover, rottlerin blocked PMA- or bradykinin-induced PLD2 phosphorylation in PC12 cells. Expression of a kinase-deficient mutant of PKC delta using adenovirus-mediated gene transfer inhibited the phosphorylation and activation of PLD2 induced by PMA in PC12 cells, suggesting the phosphorylation-dependent regulation of PLD2 mediated by PKC delta kinase activity in PC12 cells. PKC delta co-immunoprecipitated with PLD2 from PC12 cell extracts, and associated with PLD2 in vitro in a PMA-dependent manner. Phospho-PLD2 immunoprecipitated from PMA-treated PC12 cells and PLD2 phosphorylated in vitro by PKC delta were resolved by two-dimensional phosphopeptide mapping and compared. At least seven phosphopeptides co-migrated, indicating the direct phosphorylation of PLD2 by PKC delta inside the cells. Immunocytochemical studies of PC12 cells revealed that after treatment with PMA, PKC delta was translocated from the cytosol to the plasma membrane where PLD2 is mainly localized. These results suggest that PKC delta-dependent direct phosphorylation plays an important role in the regulation of PLD2 activity in PC12 cells.

  17. Phosphorylation-Independent Activity of Atypical Response Regulators of Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Schär, Jennifer; Sickmann, Albert; Beier, Dagmar

    2005-01-01

    The genome of the gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori harbors a remarkably low number of regulatory genes, including three and five open reading frames encoding two-component histidine kinases and response regulators, respectively, which are putatively involved in transcriptional regulation. Two of the response regulator genes, hp1043 and hp166, proved to be essential for cell growth, and inactivation of the response regulator gene hp1021 resulted in a severe growth defect, as indicated by a small-colony phenotype. The sequences of the receiver domains of response regulators HP1043 and HP1021 differ from the consensus sequence of the acidic pocket of the receiver domain which is involved in the phosphotransfer reaction from the histidine kinase to the response regulator. Using a genetic complementation system, we demonstrated that the function of response regulator HP166, which is essential for cell growth, can be provided by a mutated derivative carrying a D52N substitution at the site of phosphorylation. We found that the atypical receiver sequences of HP1043 and HP1021 are not crucial for the function of these response regulators. Phosphorylation of the receiver domains of HP1043 and HP1021 is not needed for response regulator function and may not occur at all. Thus, the phosphorylation-independent action of these regulators differs from the well-established two-component paradigm. PMID:15838037

  18. Phosphorylation-independent activity of atypical response regulators of Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Schär, Jennifer; Sickmann, Albert; Beier, Dagmar

    2005-05-01

    The genome of the gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori harbors a remarkably low number of regulatory genes, including three and five open reading frames encoding two-component histidine kinases and response regulators, respectively, which are putatively involved in transcriptional regulation. Two of the response regulator genes, hp1043 and hp166, proved to be essential for cell growth, and inactivation of the response regulator gene hp1021 resulted in a severe growth defect, as indicated by a small-colony phenotype. The sequences of the receiver domains of response regulators HP1043 and HP1021 differ from the consensus sequence of the acidic pocket of the receiver domain which is involved in the phosphotransfer reaction from the histidine kinase to the response regulator. Using a genetic complementation system, we demonstrated that the function of response regulator HP166, which is essential for cell growth, can be provided by a mutated derivative carrying a D52N substitution at the site of phosphorylation. We found that the atypical receiver sequences of HP1043 and HP1021 are not crucial for the function of these response regulators. Phosphorylation of the receiver domains of HP1043 and HP1021 is not needed for response regulator function and may not occur at all. Thus, the phosphorylation-independent action of these regulators differs from the well-established two-component paradigm.

  19. Nik-related kinase regulates trophoblast proliferation and placental development by modulating AKT phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Morioka, Yuka; Nam, Jin-Min; Ohashi, Takashi

    2017-01-01

    Nik-related kinase (Nrk) is a Ser/Thr kinase and was initially discovered as a molecule that was predominantly detected in skeletal muscles during development. A recent study using Nrk-null mice suggested the importance of Nrk in proper placental development; however, the molecular mechanism remains unknown. In this study, we demonstrated that differentiated trophoblasts from murine embryonic stem cells (ESCs) endogenously expressed Nrk and that Nrk disruption led to the enhanced proliferation of differentiated trophoblasts. This phenomenon may reflect the overproliferation of trophoblasts that has been reported in enlarged placentas of Nrk-null mice. Furthermore, we demonstrated that AKT phosphorylation at Ser473 was upregulated in Nrk-null trophoblasts and that inhibition of AKT phosphorylation cancelled the enhanced proliferation observed in differentiated Nrk-null trophoblasts. These results indicated that the upregulation of AKT phosphorylation was the possible cause of enhanced proliferation observed in Nrk-null trophoblasts. The upregulation of AKT phosphorylation was also confirmed in enlarged Nrk-null placentas in vivo, suggesting that proper regulation of AKT by Nrk was important for normal placental development. In addition, our detailed analysis on phosphorylation status of AKT isoforms in newly established trophoblast stem cells (TSCs) revealed that different levels of upregulation of AKT phosphorylation were occurred in Nrk-null TSCs depending on AKT isoforms. These results further support the importance of Nrk in proper development of trophoblast lineage cells and indicate the possible application of TSCs for the analysis of differently regulated activation mechanisms of AKT isoforms.

  20. Positive and negative regulation of insulin signaling through IRS-1 phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Gual, Philippe; Le Marchand-Brustel, Yannick; Tanti, Jean-François

    2005-01-01

    This review will provide insight on the current understanding of the regulation of insulin signaling in both physiological and pathological conditions through modulations that occur with regards to the functions of the insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1). While the phosphorylation of IRS1 on tyrosine residue is required for insulin-stimulated responses, the phosphorylation of IRS1 on serine residues has a dual role, either to enhance or to terminate the insulin effects. The activation of PKB in response to insulin propagates insulin signaling and promotes the phosphorylation of IRS1 on serine residue in turn generating a positive-feedback loop for insulin action. Insulin also activates several kinases and these kinases act to induce the phosphorylation of IRS1 on specific sites and inhibit its functions. This is part of the negative-feedback control mechanism induced by insulin that leads to termination of its action. Agents such as free fatty acids, cytokines, angiotensin II, endothelin-1, amino acids, cellular stress and hyperinsulinemia, which induce insulin resistance, lead to both activation of several serine/threonine kinases and phosphorylation of IRS1. These agents negatively regulate the IRS1 functions by phosphorylation but also via others molecular mechanisms (SOCS expression, IRS degradation, O-linked glycosylation) as summarized in this review. Understanding how these agents inhibit IRS1 functions as well as identification of kinases involved in these inhibitory effects may provide novel targets for development of strategies to prevent insulin resistance.

  1. Phosphorylation-dependent regulation of nuclear localization and functions of integrin-linked kinase

    PubMed Central

    Acconcia, Filippo; Barnes, Christopher J.; Singh, Rajesh R.; Talukder, Amjad H.; Kumar, Rakesh

    2007-01-01

    Integrin-linked kinase (ILK) is a phosphorylated protein that regulates physiological processes that overlap with those regulated by p21-activated kinase 1 (PAK1). Here we report the possible role of ILK phosphorylation by PAK1 in ILK-mediated signaling and intracellular translocation. We found that PAK1 phosphorylates ILK at threonine-173 and serine-246 in vitro and in vivo. Depletion of PAK1 decreased the levels of endogenous ILK phosphorylation in vivo. Mutation of PAK1 phosphorylation sites on ILK to alanine reduced cell motility and cell proliferation. Biochemical fractionation, confocal microscopy, and chromatin-interaction analyses of human cells revealed that ILK localizes predominantly in the cytoplasm but also resides in the nucleus. Transfection of MCF-7 cells with point mutants ILK-T173A, ILK-S246A, or ILK-T173A; S246A (ILK-DM) altered ILK localization. Selective depletion of PAK1 dramatically increased the nuclear and focal point accumulation of ILK, further demonstrating a role for PAK1 in ILK translocation. We also identified functional nuclear localization sequence and nuclear export sequence motifs in ILK, delineated an apparently integral role for ILK in maintaining normal nuclear integrity, and established that ILK interacts with the regulatory region of the CNKSR3 gene chromatin to negatively modulate its expression. Together, these results suggest that ILK is a PAK1 substrate, undergoes phosphorylation-dependent shuttling between the cell nucleus and cytoplasm, and interacts with gene-regulatory chromatin. PMID:17420447

  2. Adenosine and dopamine receptors co-regulate photoreceptor coupling via gap junction phosphorylation in mouse retina

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hongyan; Zhang, Zhijing; Blackburn, Michael R.; Wang, Steven W.; Ribelayga, Christophe P.; O’Brien, John

    2013-01-01

    Gap junctions in retinal photoreceptors suppress voltage noise and facilitate input of rod signals into the cone pathway during mesopic vision. These synapses are highly plastic and regulated by light and circadian clocks. Recent studies have revealed an important role for connexin36 (Cx36) phosphorylation by protein kinase A (PKA) in regulating cell-cell coupling. Dopamine is a light-adaptive signal in the retina, causing uncoupling of photoreceptors via D4 receptors (D4R), which inhibits adenylyl cyclase (AC) and reduces PKA activity. We hypothesized that adenosine, with its extracellular levels increasing in darkness, may serve as a dark signal to co-regulate photoreceptor coupling through modulation of gap junction phosphorylation. Both D4R and A2a receptor (A2aR) mRNAs were present in photoreceptors, inner nuclear layer neurons, and ganglion cells in C57BL/6 mouse retina, and showed cyclic expression with partially overlapping rhythms. Pharmacologically activating A2aR or inhibiting D4R in light-adapted daytime retina increased photoreceptor coupling. Cx36 among photoreceptor terminals, representing predominantly rod-cone gap junctions but possibly including some rod-rod and cone-cone gap junctions, was phosphorylated in a PKA-dependent manner by the same treatments. Conversely, inhibiting A2aR or activating D4R in daytime dark-adapted retina decreased Cx36 phosphorylation with similar PKA dependence. A2a-deficient mouse retina showed defective regulation of photoreceptor gap junction phosphorylation, fairly regular dopamine release, and moderately down-regulated expression of D4R and AC type I mRNA. We conclude that adenosine and dopamine co-regulate photoreceptor coupling through opposite action on the PKA pathway and Cx36 phosphorylation. In addition, loss of the A2aR hampered D4R gene expression and function. PMID:23407968

  3. Binding of AP-2 adaptor complex to brain membrane is regulated by phosphorylation of proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Alberdi, A. . E-mail: aalberdi@fcm.uncu.edu.ar; Sartor, T.; Sosa, M.A.

    2005-05-13

    Phosphorylation of proteins appears as a key process in early steps of clathrin coated vesicle formation. Here, we report that treatment of post-nuclear fraction with alkaline phosphatase induced redistribution of {alpha} subunits of AP-2 adaptor complex to cytosol and this effect was higher in the {alpha}2 subunit. A high serine phosphorylation status of {alpha} subunits correlated with the higher affinity of AP-2 to membranes. Using a simple binding assay, where membranes were incubated with either purified adaptors or cytosols, we observed an inhibitory effect of tyrphostin, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, on the binding of AP-2 to membranes, but also an unexpected decrease induced by the phosphatase inhibitor cyclosporine. We also show an inhibitory effect of ATP mediated by cytosolic proteins, although it could not be related to the phosphorylation of AP-2, suggesting an action upstream a cascade of phosphorylations that participate in the regulation of the assembly of AP-2 to membranes.

  4. Regulation of NHE3 by lysophosphatidic acid is mediated by phosphorylation of NHE3 by RSK2.

    PubMed

    No, Yi Ran; He, Peijian; Yoo, Byong Kwon; Yun, C Chris

    2015-07-01

    Na(+)/H(+) exchange by Na(+)/H(+) exchanger 3 (NHE3) is a major route of sodium absorption in the intestine and kidney. We have shown previously that lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), a small phospholipid produced ubiquitously by all types of cells, stimulates NHE3 via LPA5 receptor. Stimulation of NHE3 activity by LPA involves LPA5 transactivating EGF receptor (EGFR) in the apical membrane. EGFR activates proline-rich tyrosine kinase 2 (Pyk2) and ERK, both of which are necessary for NHE3 regulation. However, Pyk2 and ERK are regulated by EGFR via independent pathways and appear to converge on an unidentified intermediate that ultimately targets NHE3. The p90 ribosomal S6 kinase (RSK) family of Ser/Thr protein kinases is a known effector of EGFR and ERK. Hence, we hypothesized that RSK may be the convergent effector of Pyk2 and ERK although it is not known whether Pyk2 regulates RSK. In this study, we show that Pyk2 is necessary for the maintenance of phosphoinositide-dependent kinase 1 (PDK1) autophosphorylation, and knockdown of Pyk2 or PDK1 mitigated LPA-induced phosphorylation of RSK and stimulation of NHE3 activity. Additionally, we show that RSK2, but not RSK1, is responsible for NHE3 regulation. RSK2 interacts with NHE3 at the apical membrane domain, where it phosphorylates NHE3. Alteration of S663 of NHE3 ablated LPA-induced phosphorylation of NHE3 and stimulation of the transport activity. Our study identifies RSK2 as a new kinase that regulates NHE3 activity by direct phosphorylation. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  5. Regulation of NHE3 by lysophosphatidic acid is mediated by phosphorylation of NHE3 by RSK2

    PubMed Central

    No, Yi Ran; He, Peijian; Yoo, Byong Kwon

    2015-01-01

    Na+/H+ exchange by Na+/H+ exchanger 3 (NHE3) is a major route of sodium absorption in the intestine and kidney. We have shown previously that lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), a small phospholipid produced ubiquitously by all types of cells, stimulates NHE3 via LPA5 receptor. Stimulation of NHE3 activity by LPA involves LPA5 transactivating EGF receptor (EGFR) in the apical membrane. EGFR activates proline-rich tyrosine kinase 2 (Pyk2) and ERK, both of which are necessary for NHE3 regulation. However, Pyk2 and ERK are regulated by EGFR via independent pathways and appear to converge on an unidentified intermediate that ultimately targets NHE3. The p90 ribosomal S6 kinase (RSK) family of Ser/Thr protein kinases is a known effector of EGFR and ERK. Hence, we hypothesized that RSK may be the convergent effector of Pyk2 and ERK although it is not known whether Pyk2 regulates RSK. In this study, we show that Pyk2 is necessary for the maintenance of phosphoinositide-dependent kinase 1 (PDK1) autophosphorylation, and knockdown of Pyk2 or PDK1 mitigated LPA-induced phosphorylation of RSK and stimulation of NHE3 activity. Additionally, we show that RSK2, but not RSK1, is responsible for NHE3 regulation. RSK2 interacts with NHE3 at the apical membrane domain, where it phosphorylates NHE3. Alteration of S663 of NHE3 ablated LPA-induced phosphorylation of NHE3 and stimulation of the transport activity. Our study identifies RSK2 as a new kinase that regulates NHE3 activity by direct phosphorylation. PMID:25855080

  6. Site-Specific Phosphorylation of PSD-95 PDZ Domains Reveals Fine-Tuned Regulation of Protein-Protein Interactions.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Søren W; Albertsen, Louise; Moran, Griffin E; Levesque, Brié; Pedersen, Stine B; Bartels, Lina; Wapenaar, Hannah; Ye, Fei; Zhang, Mingjie; Bowen, Mark E; Strømgaard, Kristian

    2017-09-15

    The postsynaptic density protein of 95 kDa (PSD-95) is a key scaffolding protein that controls signaling at synapses in the brain through interactions of its PDZ domains with the C-termini of receptors, ion channels, and enzymes. PSD-95 is highly regulated by phosphorylation. To explore the effect of phosphorylation on PSD-95, we used semisynthetic strategies to introduce phosphorylated amino acids at four positions within the PDZ domains and examined the effects on interactions with a large set of binding partners. We observed complex effects on affinity. Most notably, phosphorylation at Y397 induced a significant increase in affinity for stargazin, as confirmed by NMR and single molecule FRET. Additionally, we compared the effects of phosphorylation to phosphomimetic mutations, which revealed that phosphomimetics are ineffective substitutes for tyrosine phosphorylation. Our strategy to generate site-specifically phosphorylated PDZ domains provides a detailed understanding of the role of phosphorylation in the regulation of PSD-95 interactions.

  7. Rictor regulates phosphorylation of the novel protein kinase C Apl II in Aplysia sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Labban, Margaret; Dyer, John R; Sossin, Wayne S

    2012-09-01

    Rapamycin-insensitive companion of TOR (Rictor) is a conserved component of target of rapamycin complex 2 (TORC2), a complex implicated in phosphorylation of a number of signal transduction-related kinases, including protein kinase Cs (PKCs) at their 'hydrophobic' site in the carboxy-terminal extension domain. In the marine mollusk, Aplysia californica, an increase in phosphorylation of the novel PKC, Apl II, at the hydrophobic site is associated with a protein synthesis-dependent increase in synaptic strength seen after continuous application of serotonin. To determine if Rictor plays a role in this increase, we cloned the Aplysia ortholog of Rictor (ApRictor). An siRNA-mediated decrease in ApRictor levels in Aplysia sensory neurons led to a decrease in the phosphorylation of PKC Apl II at the hydrophobic site suggesting a role for ApRictor in hydrophobic site phosphorylation. However, over-expression of ApRictor was not sufficient to increase phosphorylation of PKC Apl II. Continuous application of serotonin increased phosphorylation of PKC Apl II at the hydrophobic site in cultured sensory neurons, and this was blocked by Torin, which inhibits both TORC1 and TORC2. Over-expression of ApRictor did not lead to change in the magnitude of serotonin-mediated phosphorylation, but did lead to a small increase in the membrane localization of phosphorylated PKC Apl II. In conclusion, these studies implicate Rictor in phosphorylation of a novel PKC during synaptic plasticity and suggest an additional role for Rictor in regulating the localization of PKCs.

  8. Histone H3 phosphorylation in the rat pineal gland: adrenergic regulation and diurnal variation.

    PubMed

    Chik, C L; Arnason, T G; Dukewich, W G; Price, D M; Ranger, A; Ho, A K

    2007-04-01

    In this study, we investigated phosphorylation of Ser10 in histone H3 by norepinephrine (NE) in the rat pineal gland. In whole-animal studies, we demonstrated a marked increase in histone H3 phosphorylation in the rat pineal gland during the first half of the dark period. Exposure to light during this period caused a rapid decline in histone H3 phosphorylation with an estimated t1/2 of less than 15 min, indicating a high level of dephosphorylation activity. Corresponding studies in cultured pineal cells revealed that treatment with NE produced an increase in histone H3 phosphorylation that peaked between 2 and 3 h and declined rapidly by 4 h. The NE-induced histone H3 phosphorylation was blocked by cotreatment with propranolol or KT5720, a protein kinase A inhibitor, but not by prazosin or other kinase inhibitors. Moreover, only treatment with dibutyryl cAMP but not other kinase activators mimicked the effect of NE on histone H3 phosphorylation. The NE-stimulated H3 phosphorylation was markedly increased by cotreatment with a serine/threonine phosphatase inhibitor, tautomycin or okadaic acid, supporting a high level of ongoing histone H3 dephosphorylation activity. Together, our results indicate that histone H3 phosphorylation is a naturally occurring event at night in the rat pineal gland that is driven almost exclusively by a NE-->beta-adrenergic-->cAMP/protein kinase A signaling mechanism. This transient histone H3 phosphorylation probably reflects the nocturnal activation of multiple adrenergic-regulated genes in the rat pineal gland.

  9. Characterization of four plasma membrane aquaporins in tulip petals: a putative homolog is regulated by phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Azad, Abul Kalam; Katsuhara, Maki; Sawa, Yoshihiro; Ishikawa, Takahiro; Shibata, Hitoshi

    2008-08-01

    We suggested previously that temperature-dependent tulip (Tulipa gesneriana) petal movement that is concomitant with water transport is regulated by reversible phosphorylation of an unidentified plasma membrane intrinsic protein (PIP). In this study, four full-length cDNAs of PIPs from tulip petals were identified and cloned. Two PIPs, namely TgPIP1;1 and TgPIP1;2, are members of the PIP1 subfamily, and the remaining two PIPs, namely TgPIP2;1 and TgPIP2;2, belong to the PIP2 subfamily of aquaporins and were named according to the nomenclature of PIP genes in plants. Of these four homologs, only TgPIP2;2 displayed significant water channel activity in the heterologous expression assay using Xenopus laevis oocytes. The water channel activity of this functional isoform was abolished by mercury and was affected by inhibitors of protein kinase and protein phosphatase. Using a site-directed mutagenesis approach to substitute several serine residues with alanine, and assessing water channel activity using the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris expression assay, we showed that Ser35, Ser116 and Ser274 are the putative phosphorylation sites of TgPIP2;2. Real-time reverse transcription-PCR analysis revealed that the transcript levels of TgPIP1;1 and TgPIP1;2 in tulip petals, stems, leaves, bulbs and roots are very low when compared with those of TgPIP2;1 and TgPIP2;2. The transcript level of TgPIP2;1 is negligible in roots, and TgPIP2;2 is ubiquitously expressed in all organs with significant transcript levels. From the data reported herein, we suggest that TgPIP2;2 might be modulated by phosphorylation and dephosphorylation for regulating water channel activity, and may play a role in transcellular water transport in all tulip organs.

  10. Cross-talk phosphorylations by protein kinase C and Pho85p-Pho80p protein kinase regulate Pah1p phosphatidate phosphatase abundance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Su, Wen-Min; Han, Gil-Soo; Carman, George M

    2014-07-04

    Yeast Pah1p is the phosphatidate phosphatase that catalyzes the penultimate step in triacylglycerol synthesis and plays a role in the transcriptional regulation of phospholipid synthesis genes. The enzyme is multiply phosphorylated, some of which is mediated by Pho85p-Pho80p, Cdc28p-cyclin B, and protein kinase A. Here, we showed that Pah1p is a bona fide substrate of protein kinase C; the phosphorylation reaction was time- and dose-dependent and dependent on the concentrations of ATP (Km = 4.5 μm) and Pah1p (Km = 0.75 μm). The stoichiometry of the reaction was 0.8 mol of phosphate/mol of Pah1p. By combining mass spectrometry, truncation analysis, site-directed mutagenesis, and phosphopeptide mapping, we identified Ser-677, Ser-769, Ser-773, and Ser-788 as major sites of phosphorylation. Analysis of Pah1p phosphorylations by different protein kinases showed that prephosphorylation with protein kinase C reduces its subsequent phosphorylation with protein kinase A and vice versa. Prephosphorylation with Pho85p-Pho80p had an inhibitory effect on its subsequent phosphorylation with protein kinase C; however, prephosphorylation with protein kinase C had no effect on the subsequent phosphorylation with Pho85p-Pho80p. Unlike its phosphorylations by Pho85p-Pho80p and protein kinase A, which cause a significant reduction in phosphatidate phosphatase activity, the phosphorylation of Pah1p by protein kinase C had a small stimulatory effect on the enzyme activity. Analysis of phosphorylation-deficient forms of Pah1p indicated that protein kinase C does not have a major effect on its location or its function in triacylglycerol synthesis, but instead, the phosphorylation favors loss of Pah1p abundance when it is not phosphorylated with Pho85p-Pho80p. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  11. CaMKII-γ mediates phosphorylation of BAD at Ser170 to regulate cytokine-dependent survival and proliferation.

    PubMed

    Hojabrpour, Payman; Waissbluth, Ivan; Ghaffari, Mazyar; Cox, Michael E; Duronio, Vincent

    2012-02-15

    Phosphorylation of the BH3 (Bcl-2 homology domain 3)-only protein BAD (Bcl-2/Bcl-X(L)-antagonist, causing cell death) can either directly disrupt its association with the pro-survival proteins Bcl-X(L) and/or Bcl-2, or cause association of BAD with 14-3-3 proteins. In the present study, we further characterize phosphorylation of BAD at Ser170, a unique site with unclear function. We provide further evidence that mutation of Ser170 to a phospho-mimetic aspartic acid residue (S170D) can have a profound inhibitory effect on the pro-apoptosis function of BAD. Furthermore, mutated BAD with an alanine substitution inhibited cell proliferation, slowing progression specifically through S-phase. We identify the kinase responsible for phosphorylation at this site as CaMKII-γ (γ isoform of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase II), but not the other three isoforms of CaMKII, revealing an extraordinary specificity among these closely related kinases. Furthermore, cytokine treatment increased BAD-Ser170-directed CaMKII-γ activity and phosphorylation of CaMKII-γ at an activating site, and CaMKII activity directed to the BAD-Ser170 site was elevated during S-phase. Treating cells with a selective inhibitor of CaMKII caused apoptosis in cells expressing BAD, but not in cells expressing the BAD-S170D mutant. The present study provides support for BAD-Ser170 phosphorylation playing a key role not only in regulating BAD's pro-apoptotic activity, but also in cell proliferation.

  12. Subgroup II PAK-mediated phosphorylation regulates Ran activity during mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Bompard, Guillaume; Rabeharivelo, Gabriel; Frank, Marie; Cau, Julien; Delsert, Claude

    2010-01-01

    Ran is an essential GTPase that controls nucleocytoplasmic transport, mitosis, and nuclear envelope formation. These functions are regulated by interaction of Ran with different partners, and by formation of a Ran-GTP gradient emanating from chromatin. Here, we identify a novel level of Ran regulation. We show that Ran is a substrate for p21-activated kinase 4 (PAK4) and that its phosphorylation on serine-135 increases during mitosis. The endogenous phosphorylated Ran and active PAK4 dynamically associate with different components of the microtubule spindle during mitotic progression. A GDP-bound Ran phosphomimetic mutant cannot undergo RCC1-mediated GDP/GTP exchange and cannot induce microtubule asters in mitotic Xenopus egg extracts. Conversely, phosphorylation of GTP-bound Ran facilitates aster nucleation. Finally, phosphorylation of Ran on serine-135 impedes its binding to RCC1 and RanGAP1. Our study suggests that PAK4-mediated phosphorylation of GDP- or GTP-bound Ran regulates the assembly of Ran-dependent complexes on the mitotic spindle. PMID:20805321

  13. Phosphorylation-dependent Pex11p and Fis1p interaction regulates peroxisome division

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Saurabh; Agrawal, Gaurav; Subramani, Suresh

    2012-01-01

    Peroxisome division is regulated by the conserved peroxin Pex11p. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Sc), induction of the phosphoprotein ScPex11p coincides with peroxisome biogenesis. We show that the ScPex11p homologue in Pichia pastoris (PpPex11p) is phosphorylated at serine 173. PpPex11p expression and phosphorylation are induced in oleate and coordinated with peroxisome biogenesis. PpPex11p transits to peroxisomes via the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). PpPex11p is unstable and ER restricted gin pex3Δ and pex19Δ cells, which are impaired in peroxisomal membrane protein biogenesis. In oleate medium, the P. pastoris mutants pex11A (constitutively unphosphorylated; S173A) and pex11D (constitutively phosphorylated; S173D) exhibit juxtaposed elongated peroxisomes (JEPs) and hyperdivided forms, respectively, although protein levels remain unchanged. In contrast with ScPex11p, the ER-to-peroxisome translocation in P. pastoris is phosphorylation independent, and the phosphorylation occurs at the peroxisome. We show that PpPex11p interacts with the peroxisome fission machinery via PpFis1p and is regulated by phosphorylation because PpPex11p and PpPex11Dp interact more strongly with PpFis1p than PpPex11Ap. Neither PpPex11p nor PpFis1p is necessary for peroxisome division in methanol medium. We propose a model for the role of PpPex11p in the regulation of peroxisome division through a phosphorylation-dependent interaction with the fission machinery, providing novel insights into peroxisome morphogenesis. PMID:22337771

  14. Phosphorylation of the AMPA receptor GluA1 subunit regulates memory load capacity.

    PubMed

    Olivito, Laura; Saccone, Paola; Perri, Valentina; Bachman, Julia L; Fragapane, Paola; Mele, Andrea; Huganir, Richard L; De Leonibus, Elvira

    2016-01-01

    Memory capacity (MC) refers to the number of elements one can maintain for a short retention interval. The molecular mechanisms underlying MC are unexplored. We have recently reported that mice as well as humans have a limited MC, which is reduced by hippocampal lesions. Here, we addressed the molecular mechanisms supporting MC. GluA1 AMPA-receptors (AMPA-R) mediate the majority of fast excitatory synaptic transmission in the brain and are critically involved in memory. Phosphorylation of GluA1 at serine residues S831 and S845 is promoted by CaMKII and PKA, respectively, and regulates AMPA-R function in memory duration. We hypothesized that AMPA-R phosphorylation may also be a key plastic process for supporting MC because it occurs in a few minutes, and potentiates AMPA-R ion channel function. Here, we show that knock-in mutant mice that specifically lack both of S845 and S831 phosphorylation sites on the GluA1 subunit had reduced MC in two different behavioral tasks specifically designed to assess MC in mice. This demonstrated a causal link between AMPA-R phosphorylation and MC. We then showed that information load regulates AMPA-R phosphorylation within the hippocampus, and that an overload condition associated with impaired memory is paralleled by a lack of AMPA-R phosphorylation. Accordingly, we showed that in conditions of high load, but not of low load, the pharmacological inhibition of the NMDA-CaMKII-PKA pathways within the hippocampus prevents memory as well as associated AMPA-R phosphorylation. These data provide the first identified molecular mechanism that regulates MC.

  15. PPM1D controls nucleolar formation by up-regulating phosphorylation of nucleophosmin

    PubMed Central

    Kozakai, Yuuki; Kamada, Rui; Furuta, Junya; Kiyota, Yuhei; Chuman, Yoshiro; Sakaguchi, Kazuyasu

    2016-01-01

    An increase of nucleolar number and size has made nucleoli essential markers for cytology and tumour development. However, the underlying basis for their structural integrity and abundance remains unclear. Protein phosphatase PPM1D was found to be up-regulated in different carcinomas including breast cancers. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that PPM1D regulates nucleolar formation via inducing an increased phosphorylation of the nucleolar protein NPM. We show that PPM1D overexpression induces an increase in the nucleolar number regardless of p53 status. We also demonstrated that specific sequential phosphorylation of NPM is important for nucleolar formation and that PPM1D is a novel upstream regulator of this phosphorylation pathway. These results enhance our understanding of the molecular mechanisms that govern nucleoli formation by demonstrating that PPM1D regulates nucleolar formation by regulating NPM phosphorylation status through a novel signalling pathway, PPM1D-CDC25C-CDK1-PLK1. PMID:27619510

  16. Glucose Sensor O-GlcNAcylation Coordinates with Phosphorylation to Regulate Circadian Clock

    PubMed Central

    Kaasik, Krista; Kivimäe, Saul; Allen, Jasmina J.; Chalkley, Robert J.; Huang, Yong; Baer, Kristin; Kissel, Holger; Burlingame, Alma. L.; Shokat, Kevan M.; Ptáček, Louis J.; Fu, Ying-Hui

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Post-translational modifications play central roles in myriad biological pathways including circadian regulation. We employed a circadian proteomic approach to demonstrate that circadian timing of phosphorylation is a critical factor in regulating complex GSK3β dependent pathways and identified O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT) as a substrate of GSK3β. Interestingly, OGT activity is regulated by GSK3β, hence OGT and GSK3β exhibit reciprocal regulation. Modulating OGlcNAcylation levels alter circadian period length in both mice and Drosophila, and conversely protein O-GlcNAcylation is circadianly regulated. Central clock proteins, Clock and Period, are reversibly modified by O-GlcNAcylation to regulate their transcriptional activities. In addition, O-GlcNAcylation of a region in PER2 known to regulate human sleep phase (S662–S674) competes with phosphorylation of this region, and this interplay is at least partly mediated by glucose levels. Together, these results indicate that O-GlcNAcylation serves as a metabolic sensor for clock regulation and works coordinately with phosphorylation to fine tune circadian clock. PMID:23395175

  17. Phosphorylated STAT5 regulates p53 expression via BRCA1/BARD1-NPM1 and MDM2

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Zhuo; Aerts, Joeri L; Vandenplas, Hugo; Wang, Jiance A; Gorbenko, Olena; Chen, Jack P; Giron, Philippe; Heirman, Carlo; Goyvaerts, Cleo; Zacksenhaus, Eldad; Minden, Mark D; Stambolic, Vuk; Breckpot, Karine; De Grève, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5) and nucleophosmin (NPM1) are critical regulators of multiple biological and pathological processes. Although a reciprocal regulatory relationship was established between STAT5A and a NPM–ALK fusion protein in T-cell lymphoma, no direct connection between STAT5 and wild-type NPM1 has been documented. Here we demonstrate a mutually regulatory relationship between STAT5 and NPM1. Induction of STAT5 phosphorylation at Y694 (P-STAT5) diminished NPM1 expression, whereas inhibition of STAT5 phosphorylation enhanced NPM1 expression. Conversely, NPM1 not only negatively regulated STAT5 phosphorylation but also preserved unphosphorylated STAT5 level. Mechanistically, we show that NPM1 downregulation by P-STAT5 is mediated by impairing the BRCA1-BARD1 ubiquitin ligase, which controls the stability of NPM1. In turn, decreased NPM1 levels led to suppression of p53 expression, resulting in enhanced cell survival. This study reveals a new STAT5 signaling pathway regulating p53 expression via NPM1 and uncovers new therapeutic targets for anticancer treatment in tumors driven by STAT5 signaling. PMID:28005077

  18. Phosphorylated STAT5 regulates p53 expression via BRCA1/BARD1-NPM1 and MDM2.

    PubMed

    Ren, Zhuo; Aerts, Joeri L; Vandenplas, Hugo; Wang, Jiance A; Gorbenko, Olena; Chen, Jack P; Giron, Philippe; Heirman, Carlo; Goyvaerts, Cleo; Zacksenhaus, Eldad; Minden, Mark D; Stambolic, Vuk; Breckpot, Karine; De Grève, Jacques

    2016-12-22

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5) and nucleophosmin (NPM1) are critical regulators of multiple biological and pathological processes. Although a reciprocal regulatory relationship was established between STAT5A and a NPM-ALK fusion protein in T-cell lymphoma, no direct connection between STAT5 and wild-type NPM1 has been documented. Here we demonstrate a mutually regulatory relationship between STAT5 and NPM1. Induction of STAT5 phosphorylation at Y694 (P-STAT5) diminished NPM1 expression, whereas inhibition of STAT5 phosphorylation enhanced NPM1 expression. Conversely, NPM1 not only negatively regulated STAT5 phosphorylation but also preserved unphosphorylated STAT5 level. Mechanistically, we show that NPM1 downregulation by P-STAT5 is mediated by impairing the BRCA1-BARD1 ubiquitin ligase, which controls the stability of NPM1. In turn, decreased NPM1 levels led to suppression of p53 expression, resulting in enhanced cell survival. This study reveals a new STAT5 signaling pathway regulating p53 expression via NPM1 and uncovers new therapeutic targets for anticancer treatment in tumors driven by STAT5 signaling.

  19. Phosphorylation-dependent regulation of Notch1 signaling: the fulcrum of Notch1 signaling.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hye-Jin; Kim, Mi-Yeon; Park, Hee-Sae

    2015-08-01

    Notch signaling plays a pivotal role in cell fate determination, cellular development, cellular self-renewal, tumor progression, and has been linked to developmental disorders and carcinogenesis. Notch1 is activated through interactions with the ligands of neighboring cells, and acts as a transcriptional activator in the nucleus. The Notch1 intracellular domain (Notch1-IC) regulates the expression of target genes related to tumor development and progression. The Notch1 protein undergoes modification after translation by posttranslational modification enzymes. Phosphorylation modification is critical for enzymatic activation, complex formation, degradation, and subcellular localization. According to the nuclear cycle, Notch1-IC is degraded by E3 ligase, FBW7 in the nucleus via phosphorylation-dependent degradation. Here, we summarize the Notch signaling pathway, and resolve to understand the role of phosphorylation in the regulation of Notch signaling as well as to understand its relation to cancer.

  20. Regulation of lamin properties and functions: does phosphorylation do it all?

    PubMed Central

    Machowska, Magdalena; Piekarowicz, Katarzyna; Rzepecki, Ryszard

    2015-01-01

    The main functions of lamins are their mechanical and structural roles as major building blocks of the karyoskeleton. They are also involved in chromatin structure regulation, gene expression, intracellular signalling pathway modulation and development. All essential lamin functions seem to depend on their capacity for assembly or disassembly after the receipt of specific signals, and after specific, selective and precisely regulated interactions through their various domains. Reversible phosphorylation of lamins is crucial for their functions, so it is important to understand how lamin polymerization and interactions are modulated, and which sequences may undergo such modifications. This review combines experimental data with results of our in silico analyses focused on lamin phosphorylation in model organisms to show the presence of evolutionarily conserved sequences and to indicate specific in vivo phosphorylations that affect particular functions. PMID:26581574

  1. Src regulates sequence-dependent beta-2 adrenergic receptor recycling via cortactin phosphorylation*

    PubMed Central

    Vistein, Rachel; Puthenveedu, Manojkumar A.

    2014-01-01

    The recycling of internalized signaling receptors, which has direct functional consequences, is subject to multiple sequence and biochemical requirements. Why signaling receptors recycle via a specialized pathway, unlike many other proteins that recycle by bulk, is a fundamental unanswered question. Here we show that these specialized pathways allow selective control of signaling receptor recycling by heterologous signaling. Using assays to visualize receptor recycling in living cells, we show that the recycling of the beta-2 adrenergic receptor (B2AR), a prototypic signaling receptor, is regulated by Src family kinases. The target of Src is cortactin, an essential factor for B2AR sorting into specialized recycling microdomains on the endosome. Phosphorylation of a single cortactin residue, Y466, regulates the rate of fission of B2AR recycling vesicles from these microdomains, and, therefore, the rate of delivery of B2AR to the cell surface. Together, our results indicate that actin-stabilized microdomains that mediate signaling receptor recycling can serve as a functional point of convergence for crosstalk between signaling pathways. PMID:25077552

  2. Src regulates sequence-dependent beta-2 adrenergic receptor recycling via cortactin phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Vistein, Rachel; Puthenveedu, Manojkumar A

    2014-11-01

    The recycling of internalized signaling receptors, which has direct functional consequences, is subject to multiple sequence and biochemical requirements. Why signaling receptors recycle via a specialized pathway, unlike many other proteins that recycle by bulk, is a fundamental unanswered question. Here, we show that these specialized pathways allow selective control of signaling receptor recycling by heterologous signaling. Using assays to visualize receptor recycling in living cells, we show that the recycling of the beta-2 adrenergic receptor (B2AR), a prototypic signaling receptor, is regulated by Src family kinases. The target of Src is cortactin, an essential factor for B2AR sorting into specialized recycling microdomains on the endosome. Phosphorylation of a single cortactin residue, Y466, regulates the rate of fission of B2AR recycling vesicles from these microdomains and, therefore, the rate of delivery of B2AR to the cell surface. Together, our results indicate that actin-stabilized microdomains that mediate signaling receptor recycling can serve as a functional point of convergence for crosstalk between signaling pathways.

  3. Regulation of GABA-modulin phosphorylation and GABA receptor binding by excitatory amino acids

    SciTech Connect

    Vaccarino, F.; Guidotti, A.

    1987-05-01

    Primary cultures of cerebellar granule cells phosphorylate numerous proteins including GABA-modulin (GM), which is a putative allosteric modulator of GABA receptors. Cell depolarization and treatment with dicarboxylic excitatory amino acids, which activate PI turnover, Ca/sup 2 +/ influx and guanylate cyclase in granule cells increase the phosphorylation of specific proteins. To determine GM phosphorylation by endogenous protein kinases in living granule cell cultures, GM was isolated by immunoprecipitation and reverse-phase HPLC. High K/sup +/, veratridine, glutamate and NMDA treatment stimulated GM phosphorylation over 2-fold. This increase was abolished by the absence of extracellular Ca/sup 2 +/ and was antagonized by Mg/sup 2 +/ ions and by AVP. The excitatory amino acid action was mimicked by phorbol esters but not by forskolin or by cGMP, and thus may be mediated by an activation of protein kinase C (PKC). Moreover, excitatory amino acids increase /sup 3/H-labelled phorbol ester binding sites in granule cell membrane. The same cultures, treated with glutamate or kainate, showed a 50-fold greater efficacy of muscimol for the stimulation of benzodiazepine (BZ) binding. These data-suggest that excitatory amino acid stimulation of neurons triggers PKC translocation and the activated enzyme phosphorylates GM. The extent of GM phosphorylation may regulate the coupling between GABA and BZ binding sites.

  4. Regulation of 90-kilodalton ribosomal S6 kinase phosphorylation in the rat pineal gland.

    PubMed

    Ho, A K; Mackova, M; Cho, C; Chik, C L

    2003-08-01

    In this study we investigated diurnal changes in the activation state of the 90-kDa ribosomal S6 kinase (p90RSK) in the rat pineal gland. In animals housed under a lighting regimen with 12 h of light, we found an increase in phosphorylated p90RSK during the dark phase, and this increase was abolished by treatment with propranolol or continuous exposure to light. To determine the intracellular mechanism involved, rat pinealocytes were treated with norepinephrine. Norepinephrine caused a parallel increase in phosphorylated p42/44 MAPK (p42/44(MAPK)) and p90RSK that was reduced by prazosin or propranolol, indicating involvement of both alpha(1)- and beta-adrenergic receptors. Treatment with dibutyryl cGMP, 4beta-phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, or ionomycin mimicked norepinephrine-stimulated p90RSK phosphorylation, whereas dibutyryl cAMP caused a decrease in p90RSK phosphorylation. Inhibition of p42/44(MAPK) activation by UO126 was effective in reducing norepinephrine-stimulated p90RSK phosphorylation. Moreover, UO126 had an inhibitory effect on norepinephrine-stimulated arylalkyl-N-acetyltransferase activity. These results indicate that the adrenergically regulated nocturnal increase in p90RSK phosphorylation is mainly mediated through a cGMP-->p42/44(MAPK)-dependent mechanism.

  5. O-GlcNAcylation stabilizes β-catenin through direct competition with phosphorylation at threonine 41

    PubMed Central

    Olivier-Van Stichelen, Stéphanie; Dehennaut, Vanessa; Buzy, Armelle; Zachayus, Jean-Luc; Guinez, Céline; Mir, Anne-Marie; El Yazidi-Belkoura, Ikram; Copin, Marie-Christine; Boureme, Didier; Loyaux, Denis; Ferrara, Pascual; Lefebvre, Tony

    2014-01-01

    Dysfunctions in Wnt signaling increase β-catenin stability and are associated with cancers, including colorectal cancer. In addition, β-catenin degradation is decreased by nutrient-dependent O-GlcNAcylation. Human colon tumors and colons from mice fed high-carbohydrate diets exhibited higher amounts of β-catenin and O-GlcNAc relative to healthy tissues and mice fed a standard diet, respectively. Administration of the O-GlcNAcase inhibitor thiamet G to mice also increased colonic expression of β-catenin. By ETD-MS/MS, we identified 4 O-GlcNAcylation sites at the N terminus of β-catenin (S23/T40/T41/T112). Furthermore, mutation of serine and threonine residues within the D box of β-catenin reduced O-GlcNAcylation by 75%. Interestingly, elevating O-GlcNAcylation in human colon cell lines drastically reduced phosphorylation at T41, a key residue of the D box responsible for β-catenin stability. Analyses of β-catenin O-GlcNAcylation mutants reinforced T41 as the most crucial residue that controls the β-catenin degradation rate. Finally, inhibiting O-GlcNAcylation decreased the β-catenin/α-catenin interaction necessary for mucosa integrity, whereas O-GlcNAcase silencing improved this interaction. These results suggest that O-GlcNAcylation regulates not only the stability of β-catenin, but also affects its localization at the level of adherens junctions. Accordingly, we propose that O-GlcNAcylation of β-catenin is a missing link between the glucose metabolism deregulation observed in metabolic disorders and the development of cancer.—Olivier-Van Stichelen, S., Dehennaut, V., Buzy, A., Zachayus, J.-L., Guinez, C., Mir, A.-M., El Yazidi-Belkoura, I., Copin, M.-C., Boureme, D., Loyaux, D., Ferrara, P., Lefebvre, T. O-GlcNAcylation stabilizes β-catenin through direct competition with phosphorylation at threonine 41. PMID:24744147

  6. Phosphorylation of AIB1 at Mitosis Is Regulated by CDK1/CYCLIN B

    PubMed Central

    Ferrero, Macarena; Ferragud, Juan; Orlando, Leonardo; Valero, Luz; Sánchez del Pino, Manuel; Farràs, Rosa; Font de Mora, Jaime

    2011-01-01

    Background Although the AIB1 oncogene has an important role during the early phase of the cell cycle as a coactivator of E2F1, little is known about its function during mitosis. Methodology/Principal Findings Mitotic cells isolated by nocodazole treatment as well as by shake-off revealed a post-translational modification occurring in AIB1 specifically during mitosis. This modification was sensitive to the treatment with phosphatase, suggesting its modification by phosphorylation. Using specific inhibitors and in vitro kinase assays we demonstrate that AIB1 is phosphorylated on Ser728 and Ser867 by Cdk1/cyclin B at the onset of mitosis and remains phosphorylated until exit from M phase. Differences in the sensitivity to phosphatase inhibitors suggest that PP1 mediates dephosphorylation of AIB1 at the end of mitosis. The phosphorylation of AIB1 during mitosis was not associated with ubiquitylation or degradation, as confirmed by western blotting and flow cytometry analysis. In addition, luciferase reporter assays showed that this phosphorylation did not alter the transcriptional properties of AIB1. Importantly, fluorescence microscopy and sub-cellular fractionation showed that AIB1 phosphorylation correlated with the exclusion from the condensed chromatin, thus preventing access to the promoters of AIB1-dependent genes. Phospho-specific antibodies developed against Ser728 further demonstrated the presence of phosphorylated AIB1 only in mitotic cells where it was localized preferentially in the periphery of the cell. Conclusions Collectively, our results describe a new mechanism for the regulation of AIB1 during mitosis, whereby phosphorylation of AIB1 by Cdk1 correlates with the subcellular redistribution of AIB1 from a chromatin-associated state in interphase to a more peripheral localization during mitosis. At the exit of mitosis, AIB1 is dephosphorylated, presumably by PP1. This exclusion from chromatin during mitosis may represent a mechanism for governing the

  7. Dishevelled stability is positively regulated by PKCζ-mediated phosphorylation induced by Wnt agonists.

    PubMed

    Velázquez, Dora M; Castañeda-Patlán, M Cristina; Robles-Flores, Martha

    2017-07-01

    Dishevelled (Dvl) proteins are central mediators of both canonical and non-canonical Wnt signaling. It is well known that, upon Wnt stimulation, Dvl becomes phosphorylated. However, how Wnt-induced phosphorylation of Dvl is regulated and its consequences are poorly understood. Here we found that Dvl proteins are overexpressed in colon cancer cells. In addition, we found that Wnt3a treatment rapidly induces hyperphosphorylation and stabilization of Dvl2 and Dvl3. The latter can be blocked by inhibition of Protein Kinase C (PKC)α, PKCδ, and PKCζ isoforms. We also found that Wnt3a-induced phosphorylation of Dvl3 by PKCζ is required to avoid Dvl3 degradation via proteasome. This demonstrated, to our knowledge for the first time, that hyperphosphorylation of Dvl by PKCζ results in Dvl stabilization. This is clear contrast with the consequences reported to date of CK1δ/ε-mediated Dvl phosphorylation upon Wnt treatment. Mapping the interaction domain between PKCζ and Dvl3 indicated that, although the Dvl-DIX domain is required to stabilize PKCζ-phosphorylated Dvl, it is not the region phosphorylated by this kinase. Our data show that the Dvl-DEP domain, required for specific interaction with PKCζ, is the site phosphorylated by this kinase, and also probably the Dvl-C terminus. Our findings suggest a model of positive regulation of PKCζ-mediated Dvl signaling activity, to produce a strong and sustained response to Wnt3a treatment by stabilizing Dvl protein levels. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Ubiquitination of p27 is regulated by Cdk-dependent phosphorylation and trimeric complex formation

    PubMed Central

    Montagnoli, Alessia; Fiore, Francesca; Eytan, Esther; Carrano, Andrea C.; Draetta, Giulio F.; Hershko, Avram; Pagano, Michele

    1999-01-01

    The cellular abundance of the cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) inhibitor p27 is regulated by the ubiquitin–proteasome system. Activation of p27 degradation is seen in proliferating cells and in many types of aggressive human carcinomas. p27 can be phosphorylated on threonine 187 by Cdks, and cyclin E/Cdk2 overexpression can stimulate the degradation of wild-type p27, but not of a threonine 187-to-alanine p27 mutant [p27(T187A)]. However, whether threonine 187 phosphorylation stimulates p27 degradation through the ubiquitin–proteasome system or an alternative pathway is still not known. Here, we demonstrate that p27 ubiquitination (as assayed in vivo and in an in vitro reconstituted system) is cell-cycle regulated and that Cdk activity is required for the in vitro ubiquitination of p27. Furthermore, ubiquitination of wild-type p27, but not of p27(T187A), can occur in G1-enriched extracts only upon addition of cyclin E/Cdk2 or cyclin A/Cdk2. Using a phosphothreonine 187 site-specific antibody for p27, we show that threonine 187 phosphorylation of p27 is also cell-cycle dependent, being present in proliferating cells but undetectable in G1 cells. Finally, we show that in addition to threonine 187 phosphorylation, efficient p27 ubiquitination requires formation of a trimeric complex with the cyclin and Cdk subunits. In fact, cyclin B/Cdk1 which can phosphorylate p27 efficiently, but cannot form a stable complex with it, is unable to stimulate p27 ubiquitination by G1 extracts. Furthermore, another p27 mutant [p27(CK−)] that can be phosphorylated by cyclin E/Cdk2 but cannot bind this kinase complex, is refractory to ubiquitination. Thus throughout the cell cycle, both phosphorylation and trimeric complex formation act as signals for the ubiquitination of a Cdk inhibitor. PMID:10323868

  9. Polo-like Kinase 1 Regulates Vimentin Phosphorylation at Ser-56 and Contraction in Smooth Muscle.

    PubMed

    Li, Jia; Wang, Ruping; Gannon, Olivia J; Rezey, Alyssa C; Jiang, Sixin; Gerlach, Brennan D; Liao, Guoning; Tang, Dale D

    2016-11-04

    Polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1) is a serine/threonine-protein kinase that has been implicated in mitosis, cytokinesis, and smooth muscle cell proliferation. The role of Plk1 in smooth muscle contraction has not been investigated. Here, stimulation with acetylcholine induced Plk1 phosphorylation at Thr-210 (an indication of Plk1 activation) in smooth muscle. Contractile stimulation also activated Plk1 in live smooth muscle cells as evidenced by changes in fluorescence resonance energy transfer signal of a Plk1 sensor. Moreover, knockdown of Plk1 in smooth muscle attenuated force development. Smooth muscle conditional knock-out of Plk1 also diminished contraction of mouse tracheal rings. Plk1 knockdown inhibited acetylcholine-induced vimentin phosphorylation at Ser-56 without affecting myosin light chain phosphorylation. Expression of T210A Plk1 inhibited the agonist-induced vimentin phosphorylation at Ser-56 and contraction in smooth muscle. However, myosin light chain phosphorylation was not affected by T210A Plk1. Ste20-like kinase (SLK) is a serine/threonine-protein kinase that has been implicated in spindle orientation and microtubule organization during mitosis. In this study knockdown of SLK inhibited Plk1 phosphorylation at Thr-210 and activation. Finally, asthma is characterized by airway hyperresponsiveness, which largely stems from airway smooth muscle hyperreactivity. Here, smooth muscle conditional knock-out of Plk1 attenuated airway resistance and airway smooth muscle hyperreactivity in a murine model of asthma. Taken together, these findings suggest that Plk1 regulates smooth muscle contraction by modulating vimentin phosphorylation at Ser-56. Plk1 activation is regulated by SLK during contractile activation. Plk1 contributes to the pathogenesis of asthma. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  10. VANADL SULFATE INHIBITS NO PRODUCTION BY DIFFERENTIALLY REGULATING SERINE/THREONINE PHOSPHORYLATION OF ENOS

    EPA Science Inventory

    VANADYL SULFATE INHIBITS NO PRODUCTION BY DIFFERENTIALLY REGULATING SERINE/THREONINE PHOSPHORYLATION OF eNOS. Zhuowei Li, Jacqueline D. Carter, Lisa A. Dailey, Joleen Soukup, Yuh-Chin T. Huang. CEMALB, University of North Carolina and ORD, US EPA, Chapel Hill, North Carolina
    V...

  11. VANADYL SULFATE INHIBITS NO PRODUCTION BY DIFFERENTIALLY REGULATING SERINE/THREONINE PHOSPHORYLATION OF ENOS

    EPA Science Inventory

    VANADYL SULFATE INHIBITS NO PRODUCTION BY DIFFERENTIALLY REGULATING SERINE/THREONINE PHOSPHORYLATION OF eNOS.

    Zhuowei Li, Jacqueline D. Carter, Lisa A. Dailey, Joleen Soukup, Yuh-Chin T. Huang. CEMALB, University of North Carolina and NHEERL, US EPA, Chapel Hill, North Ca...

  12. VANADYL SULFATE INHIBITS NO PRODUCTION BY DIFFERENTIALLY REGULATING SERINE/THREONINE PHOSPHORYLATION OF ENOS

    EPA Science Inventory

    VANADYL SULFATE INHIBITS NO PRODUCTION BY DIFFERENTIALLY REGULATING SERINE/THREONINE PHOSPHORYLATION OF eNOS.

    Zhuowei Li, Jacqueline D. Carter, Lisa A. Dailey, Joleen Soukup, Yuh-Chin T. Huang. CEMALB, University of North Carolina and NHEERL, US EPA, Chapel Hill, North Ca...

  13. VANADL SULFATE INHIBITS NO PRODUCTION BY DIFFERENTIALLY REGULATING SERINE/THREONINE PHOSPHORYLATION OF ENOS

    EPA Science Inventory

    VANADYL SULFATE INHIBITS NO PRODUCTION BY DIFFERENTIALLY REGULATING SERINE/THREONINE PHOSPHORYLATION OF eNOS. Zhuowei Li, Jacqueline D. Carter, Lisa A. Dailey, Joleen Soukup, Yuh-Chin T. Huang. CEMALB, University of North Carolina and ORD, US EPA, Chapel Hill, North Carolina
    V...

  14. Spatial and temporal regulation of mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphorylation in the mouse suprachiasmatic nucleus.

    PubMed

    Nakaya, Michio; Sanada, Kamon; Fukada, Yoshitaka

    2003-06-06

    Circadian and photic regulation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) has been shown to associate closely with the function of the circadian clock in vertebrate clock tissues such as the mouse suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). Here we show that, in the central region of the mouse SCN, MAPK exhibited circadian and daily rhythms in phosphorylation with a peak at (subjective) night, and this activation was sustained for at least 8 h. In contrast, in the dorsomedial region of the SCN, MAPK showed an overt rhythm in phosphorylation with a transient peak at early subjective day, which was antiphase to that in the central region. Noticeably, the phospho-MAPK-immunoreactive cells observed in the dorsomedial region were distributed from the rostral to the caudal end of the SCN, whereas those observed in the central region were localized within the middle SCN along the rostral-caudal axis. Furthermore, a 15-min light pulse given at subjective night transiently evoked MAPK phosphorylation throughout the ventrolateral region of the SCN peaking within 15 min after the light onset, whereas nighttime-phosphorylated MAPK signals in the central-middle SCN become undetectable within 60 min after the light onset. Thus, the mode of circadian and photic regulation of MAPK phosphorylation varies remarkably among the three subregions within the SCN, suggesting divergent and cell type-specific roles of MAPK in the clock system of the mouse SCN.

  15. Cdk9 T-loop Phosphorylation is Regulated by the Calcium Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ramakrishnan, Rajesh; Rice, Andrew P.

    2011-01-01

    Eukaryotic RNA polymerase II transcriptional elongation is a tightly regulated process and is dependent upon positive transcription elongation factor-b (P-TEFb). The core P-TEFb complex is composed of Cdk9 and Cyclin T and is essential for the expression of most protein coding genes. Cdk9 kinase function is dependent upon phosphorylation of Thr186 in its T-loop. In this study, we examined kinases and signaling pathways that influence Cdk9 T-loop phosphorylation. Using an RNAi screen in HeLa cells, we found that Cdk9 T-loop phosphorylation is regulated by Calcium/Calmodulin- dependent kinase 1D (CaMK1D). Using small molecules inhibitors in HeLa cells and primary CD4+ T lymphocytes, we found that the Ca2+ signaling pathway is required for Cdk9 T-loop phosphorylation. Inhibition of Ca2+ signaling led to dephosphorylation of Thr186 on Cdk9. In reporter plasmid assays, inhibition of the Ca2+ signaling pathway repressed the PCNA promoter and HIV-1 Tat transactivation of the HIV-1 LTR, but not HTLV-1 Tax transactivation of the HTLV-1 LTR, suggesting that perturbation of the Ca2+ pathway and reduction of Cdk9 T-loop phosphorylation inhibits transcription units that have a rigorous requirement for P-TEFb function. PMID:21448926

  16. Cdk9 T-loop phosphorylation is regulated by the calcium signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, Rajesh; Rice, Andrew P

    2012-02-01

    Eukaryotic RNA polymerase II transcriptional elongation is a tightly regulated process and is dependent upon positive transcription elongation factor-b (P-TEFb). The core P-TEFb complex is composed of Cdk9 and Cyclin T and is essential for the expression of most protein coding genes. Cdk9 kinase function is dependent upon phosphorylation of Thr186 in its T-loop. In this study, we examined kinases and signaling pathways that influence Cdk9 T-loop phosphorylation. Using an RNAi screen in HeLa cells, we found that Cdk9 T-loop phosphorylation is regulated by Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent kinase 1D (CaMK1D). Using small molecules inhibitors in HeLa cells and primary CD4(+) T lymphocytes, we found that the Ca(2+) signaling pathway is required for Cdk9 T-loop phosphorylation. Inhibition of Ca(2+) signaling led to dephosphorylation of Thr186 on Cdk9. In reporter plasmid assays, inhibition of the Ca(2+) signaling pathway repressed the PCNA promoter and HIV-1 Tat transactivation of the HIV-1 LTR, but not HTLV-1 Tax transactivation of the HTLV-1 LTR, suggesting that perturbation of the Ca(2+) pathway and reduction of Cdk9 T-loop phosphorylation inhibits transcription units that have a rigorous requirement for P-TEFb function.

  17. Regulation of heterogenous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1 transport by phosphorylation in cells stressed by osmotic shock

    PubMed Central

    Allemand, Eric; Guil, Sònia; Myers, Michael; Moscat, Jorge; Cáceres, Javier F.; Krainer, Adrian R.

    2005-01-01

    Heterogenous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) A1 is an alternative splicing factor that is mainly nuclear, although it shuttles rapidly between nuclear and cytoplasmic compartments. Cells stressed by osmotic shock (OSM) activate the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase3/6-p38 signaling pathway, which in turn results in accumulation of hnRNP A1 in the cytoplasm. This effect modulates alternative splicing regulation in vivo and correlates with increased hnRNP A1 phosphorylation. We have characterized the molecular mechanism involved in the cytoplasmic accumulation of hnRNP A1 in NIH 3T3 cells subjected to OSM. This treatment results in serine-specific phosphorylation within a C-terminal peptide, dubbed the “F-peptide,” which is adjacent to the M9 motif that mediates bidirectional transport of hnRNP A1. Analysis of mutants in which the F-peptide serines were replaced by aspartic acids or alanines showed that F-peptide phosphorylation is required for the subcellular redistribution of hnRNP A1 in cells subjected to OSM. Furthermore, F-peptide phosphorylation modulates the interaction of hnRNP A1 with transportin Trn1. Our findings suggest that the phosphorylation of F-peptide by cell-signaling pathways regulates the rate of hnRNP A1 nuclear import. PMID:15738418

  18. CDK2 Regulates HIV-1 Transcription by Phosphorylation of CDK9 on Serine 90

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background HIV-1 transcription is activated by the viral Tat protein that recruits host positive transcription elongation factor-b (P-TEFb) containing CDK9/cyclin T1 to the HIV-1 promoter. P-TEFb in the cells exists as a lower molecular weight CDK9/cyclin T1 dimer and a high molecular weight complex of 7SK RNA, CDK9/cyclin T1, HEXIM1 dimer and several additional proteins. Our previous studies implicated CDK2 in HIV-1 transcription regulation. We also found that inhibition of CDK2 by iron chelators leads to the inhibition of CDK9 activity, suggesting a functional link between CDK2 and CDK9. Here, we investigate whether CDK2 phosphorylates CDK9 and regulates its activity. Results The siRNA-mediated knockdown of CDK2 inhibited CDK9 kinase activity and reduced CDK9 phosphorylation. Stable shRNA-mediated CDK2 knockdown inhibited HIV-1 transcription, but also increased the overall level of 7SK RNA. CDK9 contains a motif (90SPYNR94) that is consensus CDK2 phosphorylation site. CDK9 was phosphorylated on Ser90 by CDK2 in vitro. In cultured cells, CDK9 phosphorylation was reduced when Ser90 was mutated to an Ala. Phosphorylation of CDK9 on Ser90 was also detected with phospho-specific antibodies and it was reduced after the knockdown of CDK2. CDK9 expression decreased in the large complex for the CDK9-S90A mutant and was correlated with a reduced activity and an inhibition of HIV-1 transcription. In contrast, the CDK9-S90D mutant showed a slight decrease in CDK9 expression in both the large and small complexes but induced Tat-dependent HIV-1 transcription. Molecular modeling showed that Ser 90 of CDK9 is located on a flexible loop exposed to solvent, suggesting its availability for phosphorylation. Conclusion Our data indicate that CDK2 phosphorylates CDK9 on Ser 90 and thereby contributes to HIV-1 transcription. The phosphorylation of Ser90 by CDK2 represents a novel mechanism of HIV-1 regulated transcription and provides a new strategy for activation of latent HIV-1

  19. Casein kinase 2α regulates multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 function via phosphorylation of Thr249.

    PubMed

    Stolarczyk, Elzbieta I; Reiling, Cassandra J; Pickin, Kerry A; Coppage, Ryan; Knecht, Marc R; Paumi, Christian M

    2012-09-01

    We have shown previously that the function of Ycf1p, yeast ortholog of multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1), is regulated by yeast casein kinase 2α (Cka1p) via phosphorylation at Ser251. In this study, we explored whether casein kinase 2α (CK2α), the human homolog of Cka1p, regulates MRP1 by phosphorylation at the semiconserved site Thr249. Knockdown of CK2α in MCF7-derived cells expressing MRP1 [MRP1 CK2α(-)] resulted in increased doxorubicin sensitivity. MRP1-dependent transport of leukotriene C(4) and estradiol-17β-d-glucuronide into vesicles derived from MRP1 CK2α(-) cells was decreased compared with MRP1 vesicles. Moreover, mutation of Thr249 to alanine (MRP1-T249A) also resulted in decreased MRP1-dependent transport, whereas a phosphomimicking mutation (MRP1-T249E) led to dramatic increase in MRP1-dependent transport. Studies in tissue culture confirmed these findings, showing increased intracellular doxorubicin accumulation in MRP1 CK2α(-) and MRP1-T249A cells compared with MRP1 cells. Inhibition of CK2 kinase by 2-dimethylamino-4,5,6,7-tetrabromo-1H-benzimidazole resulted in increased doxorubicin accumulation in MRP1 cells, but not in MRP1 CK2α(-), MRP1-T249A, or MRP1-T249E cells, suggesting that CK2α regulates MRP1 function via phosphorylation of Thr249. Indeed, CK2α and MRP1 interact physically, and recombinant CK2 phosphorylates MRP1-derived peptide in vitro in a Thr249-dependent manner, whereas knockdown of CK2α results in decreased phosphorylation at MRP1-Thr249. The role of CK2 in regulating MRP1 was confirmed in other cancer cell lines where CK2 inhibition decreased MRP1-mediated efflux of doxorubicin and increased doxorubicin cytotoxicity. This study supports a model in which CK2α potentiates MRP1 function via direct phosphorylation of Thr249.

  20. Phosphorylation of FEZ1 by Microtubule Affinity Regulating Kinases regulates its function in presynaptic protein trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Butkevich, Eugenia; Härtig, Wolfgang; Nikolov, Miroslav; Erck, Christian; Grosche, Jens; Urlaub, Henning; Schmidt, Christoph F.; Klopfenstein, Dieter R.; Chua, John Jia En

    2016-01-01

    Adapters bind motor proteins to cargoes and therefore play essential roles in Kinesin-1 mediated intracellular transport. The regulatory mechanisms governing adapter functions and the spectrum of cargoes recognized by individual adapters remain poorly defined. Here, we show that cargoes transported by the Kinesin-1 adapter FEZ1 are enriched for presynaptic components and identify that specific phosphorylation of FEZ1 at its serine 58 regulatory site is mediated by microtubule affinity-regulating kinases (MARK/PAR-1). Loss of MARK/PAR-1 impairs axonal transport, with adapter and cargo abnormally co-aggregating in neuronal cell bodies and axons. Presynaptic specializations are markedly reduced and distorted in FEZ1 and MARK/PAR-1 mutants. Strikingly, abnormal co-aggregates of unphosphorylated FEZ1, Kinesin-1 and its putative cargoes are present in brains of transgenic mice modelling aspects of Alzheimer’s disease, a neurodegenerative disorder exhibiting impaired axonal transport and altered MARK activity. Our findings suggest that perturbed FEZ1-mediated synaptic delivery of proteins arising from abnormal signalling potentially contributes to the process of neurodegeneration. PMID:27247180

  1. Direct inhibition of Retinoblastoma phosphorylation by Nimbolide causes cell cycle arrest and suppresses glioblastoma growth

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Jane; Liu, Xiaona; Henry, Heather; Gasilina, Anjelika; Nassar, Nicholas; Ghosh, Jayeeta; Clark, Jason P; Kumar, Ashish; Pauletti, Giovanni M.; Ghosh, Pradip K; Dasgupta, Biplab

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Classical pharmacology allows the use and development of conventional phytomedicine faster and more economically than conventional drugs. This approach should be tested for their efficacy in terms of complementarity and disease control. The purpose of this study was to determine the molecular mechanisms by which nimbolide, a triterpenoid found in the well-known medicinal plant Azadirachta indica controls glioblastoma (GBM) growth. Experimental Design Using in vitro signaling, anchorage-independent growth, kinase assays, and xenograft models, we investigated the mechanisms of its growth inhibition in glioblastoma. Results We show that nimbolide or an ethanol soluble fraction of A. indica leaves (Azt) that contains nimbolide as the principal cytotoxic agent is highly cytotoxic against GBM in vitro and in vivo. Azt caused cell cycle arrest, most prominently at the G1-S stage in GBM cells expressing EGFRvIII, an oncogene present in about 20-25% of GBMs. Azt/nimbolide directly inhibited CDK4/CDK6 kinase activity leading to hypophosphorylation of the retinoblastoma (RB) protein, cell cycle arrest at G1-S and cell death. Independent of RB hypophosphorylation, Azt also significantly reduced proliferative and survival advantage of GBM cells in vitro and in tumor xenografts by downregulating Bcl2 and blocking growth factor induced phosphorylation of Akt, Erk1/2 and STAT3. These effects were specific since Azt did not affect mTOR or other cell cycle regulators. In vivo, Azt completely prevented initiation and inhibited progression of GBM growth. Conclusions Our preclinical findings demonstrate Nimbolide as a potent anti-glioma agent that blocks cell cycle and inhibits glioma growth in vitro and in vivo. PMID:24170547

  2. AMP-activated protein kinase phosphorylates CtBP1 and down-regulates its activity

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jae-Hwan; Choi, Soo-Youn; Kang, Byung-Hee; Lee, Soon-Min; Cho, Eun-Jung; Youn, Hong-Duk

    2013-02-01

    Highlights: ► AMPK phosphorylates CtBP1 on serine 158. ► AMPK-mediated phosphorylation of CtBP1 causes the ubiquitination and nuclear export of CtBP1. ► AMPK downregulates the CtBP1-mediated repression of Bax transcription. -- Abstract: CtBP is a transcriptional repressor which plays a significant role in the regulation of cell proliferation and tumor progression. It was reported that glucose withdrawal causes induction of Bax due to the dissociation of CtBP from the Bax promoter. However, the precise mechanism involved in the regulation of CtBP still remains unclear. In this study, we found that an activated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) phosphorylates CtBP1 on Ser-158 upon metabolic stresses. Moreover, AMPK-mediated phosphorylation of CtBP1 (S158) attenuates the repressive function of CtBP1. We also confirmed that triggering activation of AMPK by various factors resulted in an increase of Bax gene expression. These findings provide connections of AMPK with CtBP1-mediated regulation of Bax expression for cell death under metabolic stresses.

  3. RIC-3 phosphorylation enables dual regulation of excitation and inhibition of Caenorhabditis elegans muscle

    PubMed Central

    Safdie, Gracia; Liewald, Jana F.; Kagan, Sarah; Battat, Emil; Gottschalk, Alexander; Treinin, Millet

    2016-01-01

    Brain function depends on a delicate balance between excitation and inhibition. Similarly, Caenorhabditis elegans motor system function depends on a precise balance between excitation and inhibition, as C. elegans muscles receive both inhibitory, GABAergic and excitatory, cholinergic inputs from motor neurons. Here we show that phosphorylation of the ER-resident chaperone of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, RIC-3, leads to increased muscle excitability. RIC-3 phosphorylation at Ser-164 depends on opposing functions of the phosphatase calcineurin (TAX-6), and of the casein kinase II homologue KIN-10. Effects of calcineurin down-regulation and of phosphorylated RIC-3 on muscle excitability are mediated by GABAA receptor inhibition. Thus RIC-3 phosphorylation enables effects of this chaperone on GABAA receptors in addition to nAChRs. This dual effect provides coordinated regulation of excitation and inhibition and enables fine-tuning of the excitation–inhibition balance. Moreover, regulation of inhibitory GABAA signaling by calcineurin, a calcium- and calmodulin-dependent phosphatase, enables homeostatic balancing of excitation and inhibition. PMID:27489343

  4. Iron-independent phosphorylation of iron regulatory protein 2 regulates ferritin during the cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Wallander, Michelle L; Zumbrennen, Kimberly B; Rodansky, Eva S; Romney, S Joshua; Leibold, Elizabeth A

    2008-08-29

    Iron regulatory protein 2 (IRP2) is a key iron sensor that post-transcriptionally regulates mammalian iron homeostasis by binding to iron-responsive elements (IREs) in mRNAs that encode proteins involved in iron metabolism (e.g. ferritin and transferrin receptor 1). During iron deficiency, IRP2 binds IREs to regulate mRNA translation or stability, whereas during iron sufficiency IRP2 is degraded by the proteasome. Here, we identify an iron-independent IRP2 phosphorylation site that is regulated by the cell cycle. IRP2 Ser-157 is phosphorylated by Cdk1/cyclin B1 during G(2)/M and is dephosphorylated during mitotic exit by the phosphatase Cdc14A. Ser-157 phosphorylation during G(2)/M reduces IRP2 RNA-binding activity and increases ferritin synthesis, whereas Ser-157 dephosphorylation during mitotic exit restores IRP2 RNA-binding activity and represses ferritin synthesis. These data show that reversible phosphorylation of IRP2 during G(2)/M has a role in modulating the iron-independent expression of ferritin and other IRE-containing mRNAs during the cell cycle.

  5. Phosphorylation of human Jak3 at tyrosines 904 and 939 positively regulates its activity.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Hanyin; Ross, Jeremy A; Frost, Jeffrey A; Kirken, Robert A

    2008-04-01

    Janus tyrosine kinase 3 (Jak3) is essential for signaling by interleukin-2 (IL-2) family cytokines and proper immune function. Dysfunctional regulation of Jak3 may result in certain disease states. However, the molecular mechanisms governing Jak3 activation are not fully understood. In this study, we used a functional-proteomics approach to identify two novel tyrosine phosphorylation sites within Jak3, Y904 and Y939, which are conserved among Jak family proteins. By using phosphospecific antibodies, both residues were observed to be rapidly induced by stimulation of cells with IL-2 or other gammac cytokines. Mechanistic studies indicated that Y904 and Y939 regulate Jak3 activities. A phenylalanine substitution at either site greatly reduced Jak3 kinase activity in vitro and its ability to phosphorylate signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (Stat5) in vivo, suggesting that phosphorylation of these previously unrecognized residues positively regulates Jak3 activity. Y904 and Y939 were required for optimal ATP usage by Jak3, while phosphorylation of Y939 preferentially promoted Stat5 activity in intact cells. Together, these findings demonstrate positive functional roles for two novel Jak3 phosphoregulatory sites which may be similarly important for other Jak family members. Identification of these sites also provides new therapeutic opportunities to modulate Jak3 function.

  6. PAR3 and aPKC regulate Golgi organization through CLASP2 phosphorylation to generate cell polarity

    PubMed Central

    Matsui, Toshinori; Watanabe, Takashi; Matsuzawa, Kenji; Kakeno, Mai; Okumura, Nobumasa; Sugiyama, Ikuko; Itoh, Norimichi; Kaibuchi, Kozo

    2015-01-01

    The organization of the Golgi apparatus is essential for cell polarization and its maintenance. The polarity regulator PAR complex (PAR3, PAR6, and aPKC) plays critical roles in several processes of cell polarization. However, how the PAR complex participates in regulating the organization of the Golgi remains largely unknown. Here we demonstrate the functional cross-talk of the PAR complex with CLASP2, which is a microtubule plus-end–tracking protein and is involved in organizing the Golgi ribbon. CLASP2 directly interacted with PAR3 and was phosphorylated by aPKC. In epithelial cells, knockdown of either PAR3 or aPKC induced the aberrant accumulation of CLASP2 at the trans-Golgi network (TGN) concomitantly with disruption of the Golgi ribbon organization. The expression of a CLASP2 mutant that inhibited the PAR3-CLASP2 interaction disrupted the organization of the Golgi ribbon. CLASP2 is known to localize to the TGN through its interaction with the TGN protein GCC185. This interaction was inhibited by the aPKC-mediated phosphorylation of CLASP2. Furthermore, the nonphosphorylatable mutant enhanced the colocalization of CLASP2 with GCC185, thereby perturbing the Golgi organization. On the basis of these observations, we propose that PAR3 and aPKC control the organization of the Golgi through CLASP2 phosphorylation. PMID:25518939

  7. Activation of NF-kappa B in vivo is regulated by multiple phosphorylations.

    PubMed Central

    Naumann, M; Scheidereit, C

    1994-01-01

    The activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappa B) in intact cells is mechanistically not well understood. Therefore we investigated the modifications imposed on NF-kappa B/I kappa B components following stimulation and show that the final step of NF-kappa B induction in vivo involves phosphorylation of several members of the NF-kappa B/I kappa B protein families. In HeLa cells as well as in B cells, TNF-alpha rapidly induced nuclear translocation primarily of p50-p65, but not of c-rel. Both NF-kappa B precursors and I kappa B alpha became strongly phosphorylated with the same kinetics. In addition to the inducible phosphorylation after stimulation, B lymphocytes containing constitutive nuclear NF-kappa B revealed constitutively phosphorylated p65 and I kappa B alpha. Phosphorylation was accompanied by induced processing of the precursors p100 and p105 and by degradation of I kappa B alpha. As an in vitro model we show that phosphorylation of p105 impedes its ability to interact with NF-kappa B, as has been shown before for I kappa B alpha. Surprisingly, even p65, but not c-rel, was phosphorylated after induction in vivo, suggesting that TNF-alpha selectively activates only specific NF-kappa B heteromers and that modifications regulate not only I kappa B molecules but also NF-kappa B molecules. In fact, cellular NF-kappa B activity was phosphorylation-dependent and the DNA binding activity of p65-containing NF-kappa B was enhanced by phosphorylation in vitro. Furthermore, we found that the induction by hydrogen peroxide of NF-kappa B translocation to the nucleus, which is assumed to be triggered by reactive oxygen intermediates, also coincided with incorporation of phosphate into the same subunits that were modified after stimulation by TNF-alpha. Thus, phosphorylation appears to be a general mechanism for activation of NF-kappa B in vivo. Images PMID:7925300

  8. Phosphorylation Provides a Negative Mode of Regulation for the Yeast Rab GTPase Sec4p

    PubMed Central

    Heger, Christopher D.; Wrann, Christiane D.; Collins, Ruth N.

    2011-01-01

    The Rab family of Ras-related GTPases are part of a complex signaling circuitry in eukaryotic cells, yet we understand little about the mechanisms that underlie Rab protein participation in such signal transduction networks, or how these networks are integrated at the physiological level. Reversible protein phosphorylation is widely used by cells as a signaling mechanism. Several phospho-Rabs have been identified, however the functional consequences of the modification appear to be diverse and need to be evaluated on an individual basis. In this study we demonstrate a role for phosphorylation as a negative regulatory event for the action of the yeast Rab GTPase Sec4p in regulating polarized growth. Our data suggest that the phosphorylation of the Rab Sec4p prevents interactions with its effector, the exocyst component Sec15p, and that the inhibition may be relieved by a PP2A phosphatase complex containing the regulatory subunit Cdc55p. PMID:21931684

  9. Synaptic Clustering of PSD-95 Is Regulated by c-Abl through Tyrosine Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    de Arce, Karen Perez; Varela-Nallar, Lorena; Farias, Olivia; Cifuentes, Alejandra; Bull, Paulina; Couch, Brian A.; Koleske, Anthony J.; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C.; Alvarez, Alejandra R.

    2010-01-01

    The c-Abl tyrosine kinase is present in mouse brain synapses, but its precise synaptic function is unknown. We found that c-Abl levels in the rat hippocampus increase postnatally, with expression peaking at the first postnatal week. In 14 d in vitro hippocampal neuron cultures, c-Abl localizes primarily to the postsynaptic compartment, in which it colocalizes with the postsynaptic scaffold protein postsynaptic density protein-95 (PSD-95) in apposition to presynaptic markers. c-Abl associates with PSD-95, and chemical or genetic inhibition of c-Abl kinase activity reduces PSD-95 tyrosine phosphorylation, leading to reduced PSD-95 clustering and reduced synapses in treated neurons. c-Abl can phosphorylate PSD-95 on tyrosine 533, and mutation of this residue reduces the ability of PSD-95 to cluster at postsynaptic sites. Our results indicate that c-Abl regulates synapse formation by mediating tyrosine phosphorylation and clustering of PSD-95. PMID:20220006

  10. Fimbrin phosphorylation by metaphase Cdk1 regulates actin cable dynamics in budding yeast

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Yansong; Han, Xuemei; Zheng, Liangzhen; Xie, Ying; Mu, Yuguang; Yates, John R.; Drubin, David G.

    2016-01-01

    Actin cables, composed of actin filament bundles nucleated by formins, mediate intracellular transport for cell polarity establishment and maintenance. We previously observed that metaphase cells preferentially promote actin cable assembly through cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (Cdk1) activity. However, the relevant metaphase Cdk1 targets were not known. Here we show that the highly conserved actin filament crosslinking protein fimbrin is a critical Cdk1 target for actin cable assembly regulation in budding yeast. Fimbrin is specifically phosphorylated on threonine 103 by the metaphase cyclin–Cdk1 complex, in vivo and in vitro. On the basis of conformational simulations, we suggest that this phosphorylation stabilizes fimbrin's N-terminal domain, and modulates actin filament binding to regulate actin cable assembly and stability in cells. Overall, this work identifies fimbrin as a key target for cell cycle regulation of actin cable assembly in budding yeast, and suggests an underlying mechanism. PMID:27068241

  11. The Circadian Protein BMAL1 Regulates Translation in Response to S6K1-Mediated Phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Lipton, Jonathan O; Yuan, Elizabeth D; Boyle, Lara M; Ebrahimi-Fakhari, Darius; Kwiatkowski, Erica; Nathan, Ashwin; Güttler, Thomas; Davis, Fred; Asara, John M; Sahin, Mustafa

    2015-05-21

    The circadian timing system synchronizes cellular function by coordinating rhythmic transcription via a transcription-translational feedback loop. How the circadian system regulates gene expression at the translational level remains a mystery. Here, we show that the key circadian transcription factor BMAL1 associates with the translational machinery in the cytosol and promotes protein synthesis. The mTOR-effector kinase, ribosomal S6 protein kinase 1 (S6K1), an important regulator of translation, rhythmically phosphorylates BMAL1 at an evolutionarily conserved site. S6K1-mediated phosphorylation is critical for BMAL1 to both associate with the translational machinery and stimulate protein synthesis. Protein synthesis rates demonstrate circadian oscillations dependent on BMAL1. Thus, in addition to its critical role in circadian transcription, BMAL1 is a translation factor that links circadian timing and the mTOR signaling pathway. More broadly, these results expand the role of the circadian clock to the regulation of protein synthesis.

  12. Fimbrin phosphorylation by metaphase Cdk1 regulates actin cable dynamics in budding yeast.

    PubMed

    Miao, Yansong; Han, Xuemei; Zheng, Liangzhen; Xie, Ying; Mu, Yuguang; Yates, John R; Drubin, David G

    2016-04-12

    Actin cables, composed of actin filament bundles nucleated by formins, mediate intracellular transport for cell polarity establishment and maintenance. We previously observed that metaphase cells preferentially promote actin cable assembly through cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (Cdk1) activity. However, the relevant metaphase Cdk1 targets were not known. Here we show that the highly conserved actin filament crosslinking protein fimbrin is a critical Cdk1 target for actin cable assembly regulation in budding yeast. Fimbrin is specifically phosphorylated on threonine 103 by the metaphase cyclin-Cdk1 complex, in vivo and in vitro. On the basis of conformational simulations, we suggest that this phosphorylation stabilizes fimbrin's N-terminal domain, and modulates actin filament binding to regulate actin cable assembly and stability in cells. Overall, this work identifies fimbrin as a key target for cell cycle regulation of actin cable assembly in budding yeast, and suggests an underlying mechanism.

  13. Regulated phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of tau protein: effects on microtubule interaction, intracellular trafficking and neurodegeneration.

    PubMed Central

    Billingsley, M L; Kincaid, R L

    1997-01-01

    This review attempts to summarize what is known about tau phosphorylation in the context of both normal cellular function and dysfunction. However, conceptions of tau function continue to evolve, and it is likely that the regulation of tau distribution and metabolism is complex. The roles of microtubule-associated kinases and phosphatases have yet to be fully described, but may afford insight into how tau phosphorylation at the distal end of the axon regulates cytoskeletal-membrane interactions. Finally, lipid and glycosaminoglycan modification of tau structure affords yet more complexity for regulation and aggregation. Continued work will help to determine what is causal and what is coincidental in Alzheimer's disease, and may lead to identification of therapeutic targets for halting the progression of paired helical filament formation. PMID:9169588

  14. PPM1A Regulates Antiviral Signaling by Antagonizing TBK1-Mediated STING Phosphorylation and Aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zexing; Liu, Ge; Sun, Liwei; Teng, Yan; Guo, Xuejiang; Jia, Jianhang; Sha, Jiahao; Yang, Xiao; Chen, Dahua; Sun, Qinmiao

    2015-01-01

    Stimulator of interferon genes (STING, also known as MITA and ERIS) is critical in protecting the host against DNA pathogen invasion. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the regulation of STING remains unclear. Here, we show that PPM1A negatively regulates antiviral signaling by targeting STING in its phosphatase activity-dependent manner, and in a line with this, PPM1A catalytically dephosphorylates STING and TBK1 in vitro. Importantly, we provide evidence that whereas TBK1 promotes STING aggregation in a phosphorylation-dependent manner, PPM1A antagonizes STING aggregation by dephosphorylating both STING and TBK1, emphasizing that phosphorylation is crucial for the efficient activation of STING. Our findings demonstrate a novel regulatory circuit in which STING and TBK1 reciprocally regulate each other to enable efficient antiviral signaling activation, and PPM1A dephosphorylates STING and TBK1, thereby balancing this antiviral signal transduction. PMID:25815785

  15. Nik-related kinase regulates trophoblast proliferation and placental development by modulating AKT phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Morioka, Yuka; Nam, Jin-Min; Ohashi, Takashi

    2017-01-01

    Nik-related kinase (Nrk) is a Ser/Thr kinase and was initially discovered as a molecule that was predominantly detected in skeletal muscles during development. A recent study using Nrk-null mice suggested the importance of Nrk in proper placental development; however, the molecular mechanism remains unknown. In this study, we demonstrated that differentiated trophoblasts from murine embryonic stem cells (ESCs) endogenously expressed Nrk and that Nrk disruption led to the enhanced proliferation of differentiated trophoblasts. This phenomenon may reflect the overproliferation of trophoblasts that has been reported in enlarged placentas of Nrk-null mice. Furthermore, we demonstrated that AKT phosphorylation at Ser473 was upregulated in Nrk-null trophoblasts and that inhibition of AKT phosphorylation cancelled the enhanced proliferation observed in differentiated Nrk-null trophoblasts. These results indicated that the upregulation of AKT phosphorylation was the possible cause of enhanced proliferation observed in Nrk-null trophoblasts. The upregulation of AKT phosphorylation was also confirmed in enlarged Nrk-null placentas in vivo, suggesting that proper regulation of AKT by Nrk was important for normal placental development. In addition, our detailed analysis on phosphorylation status of AKT isoforms in newly established trophoblast stem cells (TSCs) revealed that different levels of upregulation of AKT phosphorylation were occurred in Nrk-null TSCs depending on AKT isoforms. These results further support the importance of Nrk in proper development of trophoblast lineage cells and indicate the possible application of TSCs for the analysis of differently regulated activation mechanisms of AKT isoforms. PMID:28152035

  16. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation in forebrain neurones contributes to osmoregulatory mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Dine, Julien; Ducourneau, Vincent R R; Fénelon, Valérie S; Fossat, Pascal; Amadio, Aurélie; Eder, Matthias; Israel, Jean-Marc; Oliet, Stéphane H R; Voisin, Daniel L

    2014-04-01

    Vasopressin secretion from the magnocellular neurosecretory cells (MNCs) is crucial for body fluid homeostasis. Osmotic regulation of MNC activity involves the concerted modulation of intrinsic mechanosensitive ion channels, taurine release from local astrocytes as well as excitatory inputs derived from osmosensitive forebrain regions. Extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases (ERK) are mitogen-activated protein kinases that transduce extracellular stimuli into intracellular post-translational and transcriptional responses, leading to changes in intrinsic neuronal properties and synaptic function. Here, we investigated whether ERK activation (i.e. phosphorylation) plays a role in the functioning of forebrain osmoregulatory networks. We found that within 10 min after intraperitoneal injections of hypertonic saline (3 m, 6 m) in rats, many phosphoERK-immunopositive neurones were observed in osmosensitive forebrain regions, including the MNC containing supraoptic nuclei. The intensity of ERK labelling was dose-dependent. Reciprocally, slow intragastric infusions of water that lower osmolality reduced basal ERK phosphorylation. In the supraoptic nucleus, ERK phosphorylation predominated in vasopressin neurones vs. oxytocin neurones and was absent from astrocytes. Western blot experiments confirmed that phosphoERK expression in the supraoptic nucleus was dose dependent. Intracerebroventricular administration of the ERK phosphorylation inhibitor U 0126 before a hyperosmotic challenge reduced the number of both phosphoERK-immunopositive neurones and Fos expressing neurones in osmosensitive forebrain regions. Blockade of ERK phosphorylation also reduced hypertonically induced depolarization and an increase in firing of the supraoptic MNCs recorded in vitro. It finally reduced hypertonically induced vasopressin release in the bloodstream. Altogether, these findings identify ERK phosphorylation as a new element contributing to the osmoregulatory mechanisms of

  17. Negative regulation of NF-κB p65 activity by serine 536 phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Pradère, Jean-Philippe; Hernandez, Céline; Koppe, Christiane; Friedman, Richard A; Luedde, Tom; Schwabe, Robert F.

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) is a master regulator of inflammation and cell death. Whereas most of the activity of NF-κB is regulated through the inhibitor of kB (IκB) kinase (IKK)–dependent degradation of IκB, IKK also phosphorylates subunits of NF-κB. Here, we investigated the contribution of the phosphorylation of the NF-κ B subunit p65 at the IKK phosphorylation site serine 536 (Ser536) in humans, which is thought to be required for the activation and nuclear translocation of NF-κB. Through experiments with knock-in mice (S534A mice) expressing a mutant p65 with an alanine-to-serine substitution at position 534 (the murine homolog of human Ser536), we observed increased expression of NF-κ B–dependent genes after injection of mice with the inflammatory stimulus lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or exposure to gamma irradiation, and the enhanced gene expression was most pronounced at late time points. Compared to wild-type mice, S534A mice displayed increased mortality after injection with LPS. Increased NF-κ B signaling in the S534A mice was at least in part explained by the increased stability of the S534A p65 protein compared to that of the Ser534-phosphorylated wild-type protein. Together, our results suggest that Ser534 phosphorylation of p65 in mice (and, by extension, Ser536 phosphorylation of human p65) is not required for its nuclear translocation, but instead inhibits NF-κ B signaling to prevent deleterious inflammation. PMID:27555662

  18. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation in forebrain neurones contributes to osmoregulatory mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Dine, Julien; Ducourneau, Vincent R R; Fénelon, Valérie S; Fossat, Pascal; Amadio, Aurélie; Eder, Matthias; Israel, Jean-Marc; Oliet, Stéphane H R; Voisin, Daniel L

    2014-01-01

    Vasopressin secretion from the magnocellular neurosecretory cells (MNCs) is crucial for body fluid homeostasis. Osmotic regulation of MNC activity involves the concerted modulation of intrinsic mechanosensitive ion channels, taurine release from local astrocytes as well as excitatory inputs derived from osmosensitive forebrain regions. Extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases (ERK) are mitogen-activated protein kinases that transduce extracellular stimuli into intracellular post-translational and transcriptional responses, leading to changes in intrinsic neuronal properties and synaptic function. Here, we investigated whether ERK activation (i.e. phosphorylation) plays a role in the functioning of forebrain osmoregulatory networks. We found that within 10 min after intraperitoneal injections of hypertonic saline (3 m, 6 m) in rats, many phosphoERK-immunopositive neurones were observed in osmosensitive forebrain regions, including the MNC containing supraoptic nuclei. The intensity of ERK labelling was dose-dependent. Reciprocally, slow intragastric infusions of water that lower osmolality reduced basal ERK phosphorylation. In the supraoptic nucleus, ERK phosphorylation predominated in vasopressin neurones vs. oxytocin neurones and was absent from astrocytes. Western blot experiments confirmed that phosphoERK expression in the supraoptic nucleus was dose dependent. Intracerebroventricular administration of the ERK phosphorylation inhibitor U 0126 before a hyperosmotic challenge reduced the number of both phosphoERK-immunopositive neurones and Fos expressing neurones in osmosensitive forebrain regions. Blockade of ERK phosphorylation also reduced hypertonically induced depolarization and an increase in firing of the supraoptic MNCs recorded in vitro. It finally reduced hypertonically induced vasopressin release in the bloodstream. Altogether, these findings identify ERK phosphorylation as a new element contributing to the osmoregulatory mechanisms of

  19. Tyrosine phosphorylation within the SH3 domain regulates CAS subcellular localization, cell migration, and invasiveness.

    PubMed

    Janoštiak, Radoslav; Tolde, Ondřej; Brůhová, Zuzana; Novotný, Marian; Hanks, Steven K; Rösel, Daniel; Brábek, Jan

    2011-11-01

    Crk-associated substrate (CAS) is a major tyrosine-phosphorylated protein in cells transformed by v-crk and v-src oncogenes and plays an important role in invasiveness of Src-transformed cells. A novel phosphorylation site on CAS, Tyr-12 (Y12) within the ligand-binding hydrophobic pocket of the CAS SH3 domain, was identified and found to be enriched in Src-transformed cells and invasive human carcinoma cells. To study the biological significance of CAS Y12 phosphorylation, phosphomimicking Y12E and nonphosphorylatable Y12F mutants of CAS were studied. The phosphomimicking mutation decreased interaction of the CAS SH3 domain with focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and PTP-PEST and reduced tyrosine phosphorylation of FAK. Live-cell imaging showed that green fluorescent protein-tagged CAS Y12E mutant is, in contrast to wild-type or Y12F CAS, excluded from focal adhesions but retains its localization to podosome-type adhesions. Expression of CAS-Y12F in cas-/- mouse embryonic fibroblasts resulted in hyperphosphorylation of the CAS substrate domain, and this was associated with slower turnover of focal adhesions and decreased cell migration. Moreover, expression of CAS Y12F in Src-transformed cells greatly decreased invasiveness when compared to wild-type CAS expression. These findings reveal an important role of CAS Y12 phosphorylation in the regulation of focal adhesion assembly, cell migration, and invasiveness of Src-transformed cells.

  20. Phosphorylation of the TAL1 oncoprotein by the extracellular-signal-regulated protein kinase ERK1.

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, J T; Cobb, M H; Baer, R

    1993-01-01

    Alteration of the TAL1 gene is the most common genetic lesion found in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. TAL1 encodes phosphoproteins, pp42TAL1 and pp22TAL1, that represent phosphorylated versions of the full-length (residues 1 to 331) and truncated (residues 176 to 331) TAL1 gene products, respectively. Both proteins contain the basic helix-loop-helix motif, a DNA-binding and protein dimerization motif common to several known transcriptional regulatory factors. We now report that serine residue 122 (S122) is a major phosphorylation site of pp42TAL1 in leukemic cell lines and transfected COS1 cells. In vivo phosphorylation of S122 is induced by epidermal growth factor with a rapid time course that parallels activation of the ERK/MAP2 protein kinases. Moreover, S122 is readily phosphorylated in vitro by the extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase ERK1. These data suggest that TAL1 residue S122 serves as an in vivo substrate for ERK/MAP2 kinases such as ERK1. Therefore, S122 phosphorylation may provide a mechanism whereby the properties of TAL1 polypeptides can be modulated by extracellular stimuli. Images PMID:8423803

  1. ELYS regulates the localization of LBR by modulating its phosphorylation state

    PubMed Central

    Mimura, Yasuhiro; Takagi, Masatoshi; Clever, Michaela

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Lamin B receptor (LBR), an inner nuclear membrane (INM) protein, contributes to the functional integrity of the nucleus by tethering heterochromatin to the nuclear envelope. We have previously reported that the depletion of embryonic large molecule derived from yolk sac (ELYS; also known as AHCTF1), a component of the nuclear pore complex, from cells perturbs the localization of LBR to the INM, but little is known about the underlying molecular mechanism. In this study, we found that the depletion of ELYS promoted LBR phosphorylation at the residues known to be phosphorylated by cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) and serine/arginine protein kinases 1 and 2 (SRPK1 and SRPK2, respectively). These phosphorylation events were most likely to be counter-balanced by protein phosphatase 1 (PP1), and the depletion of PP1 from cells consistently caused the mislocalization of LBR. These observations point to a new mechanism regulating the localization of LBR, which is governed by an ELYS-mediated phosphorylation network. This phosphorylation-dependent coordination between INM proteins and the nuclear pore complex might be important for the integrity of the nucleus. PMID:27802161

  2. Angiotensin II regulates phosphorylation of actin-associated proteins in human podocytes.

    PubMed

    Schenk, Laura K; Möller-Kerutt, Annika; Klosowski, Rafael; Wolters, Dirk; Schaffner-Reckinger, Elisabeth; Weide, Thomas; Pavenstädt, Hermann; Vollenbröker, Beate

    2017-08-02

    Within the kidney, angiotensin II (AngII) targets different cell types in the vasculature, tubuli, and glomeruli. An important part of the renal filtration barrier is composed of podocytes with their actin-rich foot processes. In this study, we used stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture coupled to mass spectrometry to characterize relative changes in the phosphoproteome of human podocytes in response to short-term treatment with AngII. In 4 replicates, we identified a total of 17,956 peptides that were traceable to 2081 distinct proteins. Bioinformatic analyses revealed that among the increasingly phosphorylated peptides are predominantly peptides that are related to actin filaments, cytoskeleton, lamellipodia, mammalian target of rapamycin, and MAPK signaling. Among others, this screening approach highlighted the increased phosphorylation of actin-bundling protein, l-plastin (LCP1). AngII-dependent phosphorylation of LCP1 in cultured podocytes was mediated by the kinases ERK, p90 ribosomal S6 kinase, PKA, or PKC. LCP1 phosphorylation increased filopodia formation. In addition, treatment with AngII led to LCP1 redistribution to the cell margins, membrane ruffling, and formation of lamellipodia. Our data highlight the importance of AngII-triggered actin cytoskeleton-associated signal transduction in podocytes.-Schenk, L. K., Möller-Kerutt, A., Klosowski, R., Wolters, D., Schaffner-Reckinger, E., Weide, T., Pavenstädt, H., Vollenbröker, B. Angiotensin II regulates phosphorylation of actin-associated proteins in human podocytes. © FASEB.

  3. Site-specific radical directed dissociation of peptides at phosphorylated residues.

    PubMed

    Diedrich, Jolene K; Julian, Ryan R

    2008-09-17

    Site-specific fragmentation of peptides at phosphorylated serine or threonine residues is demonstrated. This radical directed cleavage is accomplished by a two-step procedure. First the phosphate is replaced with naphthalenethiol using well established Michael Addition chemistry. Second, the modified peptide is electrosprayed and subjected to irradiation at 266 nm. Absorption at naphthalene causes homolytic cleavage of the connecting carbon-sulfur bond yielding a radical in the beta-position. Subsequent rearrangement cleaves the peptide backbone yielding a d-type fragment. This chemistry is generally applicable as demonstrated by experiments with several different peptides. Assignment of phosphorylation sites is greatly facilitated by this approach, particularly for peptides containing multiple serine or threonine residues.

  4. Biphasic regulation of myosin light chain phosphorylation by p21-activated kinase modulates intestinal smooth muscle contractility.

    PubMed

    Chu, Ji; Pham, Ngoc T; Olate, Nicole; Kislitsyna, Karina; Day, Mary-Clare; LeTourneau, Phillip A; Kots, Alexander; Stewart, Randolph H; Laine, Glen A; Cox, Charles S; Uray, Karen

    2013-01-11

    Supraphysiological mechanical stretching in smooth muscle results in decreased contractile activity. However, the mechanism is unclear. Previous studies indicated that intestinal motility dysfunction after edema development is associated with increased smooth muscle stress and decreased myosin light chain (MLC) phosphorylation in vivo, providing an ideal model for studying mechanical stress-mediated decrease in smooth muscle contraction. Primary human intestinal smooth muscle cells (hISMCs) were subjected to either control cyclical stretch (CCS) or edema (increasing) cyclical stretch (ECS), mimicking the biophysical forces in non-edematous and edematous intestinal smooth muscle in vivo. ECS induced significant decreases in phosphorylation of MLC and MLC phosphatase targeting subunit (MYPT1) and a significant increase in p21-activated kinase (PAK) activity compared with CCS. PAK regulated MLC phosphorylation in an activity-dependent biphasic manner. PAK activation increased MLC and MYPT1 phosphorylation in CCS but decreased MLC and MYPT1 phosphorylation in hISMCs subjected to ECS. PAK inhibition had the opposite results. siRNA studies showed that PAK1 plays a critical role in regulating MLC phosphorylation in hISMCs. PAK1 enhanced MLC phosphorylation via phosphorylating MYPT1 on Thr-696, whereas PAK1 inhibited MLC phosphorylation via decreasing MYPT1 on both Thr-696 and Thr-853. Importantly, in vivo data indicated that PAK activity increased in edematous tissue, and inhibition of PAK in edematous intestine improved intestinal motility. We conclude that PAK1 positively regulates MLC phosphorylation in intestinal smooth muscle through increasing inhibitory phosphorylation of MYPT1 under physiologic conditions, whereas PAK1 negatively regulates MLC phosphorylation via inhibiting MYPT1 phosphorylation when PAK activity is increased under pathologic conditions.

  5. M phase phosphorylation of the epigenetic regulator UHRF1 regulates its physical association with the deubiquitylase USP7 and stability

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Honghui; Chen, Hao; Guo, Xue; Wang, Zhentian; Sowa, Mathew E.; Zheng, Lijuan; Hu, Shibin; Zeng, Pingyao; Guo, Rui; Diao, Jianbo; Lan, Fei; Harper, J. Wade; Shi, Yujiang Geno; Xu, Yanhui; Shi, Yang

    2012-01-01

    UHRF1 (Ubiquitin-like, with PHD and RING finger domains 1) plays an important role in DNA CpG methylation, heterochromatin function and gene expression. Overexpression of UHRF1 has been suggested to contribute to tumorigenesis. However, regulation of UHRF1 is largely unknown. Here we show that the deubiquitylase USP7 interacts with UHRF1. Using interaction-defective and catalytic mutants of USP7 for complementation experiments, we demonstrate that both physical interaction and catalytic activity of USP7 are necessary for UHRF1 ubiquitylation and stability regulation. Mass spectrometry analysis identified phosphorylation of serine (S) 652 within the USP7-interacting domain of UHRF1, which was further confirmed by a UHRF1 S652 phosphor (S652ph)-specific antibody. Importantly, the S652ph antibody identifies phosphorylated UHRF1 in mitotic cells and consistently S652 can be phosphorylated by the M phase-specific kinase CDK1-cyclin B in vitro. UHRF1 S652 phosphorylation significantly reduces UHRF1 interaction with USP7 in vitro and in vivo, which is correlated with a decreased UHRF1 stability in the M phase of the cell cycle. In contrast, UHRF1 carrying the S652A mutation, which renders UHRF1 resistant to phosphorylation at S652, is more stable. Importantly, cells carrying the S652A mutant grow more slowly suggesting that maintaining an appropriate level of UHRF1 is important for cell proliferation regulation. Taken together, our findings uncovered a cell cycle-specific signaling event that relieves UHRF1 from its interaction with USP7, thus exposing UHRF1 to proteasome-mediated degradation. These findings identify a molecular mechanism by which cellular UHRF1 level is regulated, which may impact cell proliferation. PMID:22411829

  6. M phase phosphorylation of the epigenetic regulator UHRF1 regulates its physical association with the deubiquitylase USP7 and stability.

    PubMed

    Ma, Honghui; Chen, Hao; Guo, Xue; Wang, Zhentian; Sowa, Mathew E; Zheng, Lijuan; Hu, Shibin; Zeng, Pingyao; Guo, Rui; Diao, Jianbo; Lan, Fei; Harper, J Wade; Shi, Yujiang Geno; Xu, Yanhui; Shi, Yang

    2012-03-27

    UHRF1 (Ubiquitin-like, with PHD and RING finger domains 1) plays an important role in DNA CpG methylation, heterochromatin function and gene expression. Overexpression of UHRF1 has been suggested to contribute to tumorigenesis. However, regulation of UHRF1 is largely unknown. Here we show that the deubiquitylase USP7 interacts with UHRF1. Using interaction-defective and catalytic mutants of USP7 for complementation experiments, we demonstrate that both physical interaction and catalytic activity of USP7 are necessary for UHRF1 ubiquitylation and stability regulation. Mass spectrometry analysis identified phosphorylation of serine (S) 652 within the USP7-interacting domain of UHRF1, which was further confirmed by a UHRF1 S652 phosphor (S652ph)-specific antibody. Importantly, the S652ph antibody identifies phosphorylated UHRF1 in mitotic cells and consistently S652 can be phosphorylated by the M phase-specific kinase CDK1-cyclin B in vitro. UHRF1 S652 phosphorylation significantly reduces UHRF1 interaction with USP7 in vitro and in vivo, which is correlated with a decreased UHRF1 stability in the M phase of the cell cycle. In contrast, UHRF1 carrying the S652A mutation, which renders UHRF1 resistant to phosphorylation at S652, is more stable. Importantly, cells carrying the S652A mutant grow more slowly suggesting that maintaining an appropriate level of UHRF1 is important for cell proliferation regulation. Taken together, our findings uncovered a cell cycle-specific signaling event that relieves UHRF1 from its interaction with USP7, thus exposing UHRF1 to proteasome-mediated degradation. These findings identify a molecular mechanism by which cellular UHRF1 level is regulated, which may impact cell proliferation.

  7. Pho85p-Pho80p Phosphorylation of Yeast Pah1p Phosphatidate Phosphatase Regulates Its Activity, Location, Abundance, and Function in Lipid Metabolism*♦

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hyeon-Son; Su, Wen-Min; Han, Gil-Soo; Plote, Devin; Xu, Zhi; Carman, George M.

    2012-01-01

    The yeast Pah1p phosphatidate phosphatase, which catalyzes the penultimate step in the synthesis of triacylglycerol and plays a role in the transcriptional regulation of phospholipid synthesis genes, is a cytosolic enzyme that associates with the nuclear/endoplasmic reticulum membrane to catalyze the dephosphorylation of phosphatidate to yield diacylglycerol. Pah1p is phosphorylated on seven (Ser-110, Ser-114, Ser-168, Ser-602, Thr-723, Ser-744, and Ser-748) sites that are targets for proline-directed protein kinases. In this work, we showed that the seven sites are phosphorylated by Pho85p-Pho80p, a protein kinase-cyclin complex known to regulate a variety of cellular processes. The phosphorylation of recombinant Pah1p was time- and dose-dependent and dependent on the concentrations of ATP (3.7 μm) and Pah1p (0.25 μm). Phosphorylation reduced (6-fold) the catalytic efficiency (Vmax/Km) of Pah1p and reduced (3-fold) its interaction (Kd) with liposomes. Alanine mutations of the seven sites ablated the inhibitory effect that Pho85p-Pho80p had on Pah1p activity and on the interaction with liposomes. Analysis of pho85Δ mutant cells, phosphate-starved wild type cells, and cells expressing phosphorylation-deficient forms of Pah1p indicated that loss of Pho85p-Pho80p phosphorylation reduced Pah1p abundance. In contrast, lack of Nem1p-Spo7p, the phosphatase complex that dephosphorylates Pah1p at the nuclear/endoplasmic reticulum membrane, stabilized Pah1p abundance. Although loss of phosphorylation caused a decrease in abundance, a greater amount of Pah1p was associated with membranes when compared with phosphorylated enzyme, and the loss of phosphorylation allowed bypass of the Nem1p-Spo7p requirement for Pah1p function in the synthesis of triacylglycerol. PMID:22334681

  8. Keratin 8 phosphorylation regulates keratin reorganization and migration of epithelial tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Busch, Tobias; Armacki, Milena; Eiseler, Tim; Joodi, Golsa; Temme, Claudia; Jansen, Julia; von Wichert, Götz; Omary, M. Bishr; Spatz, Joachim; Seufferlein, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Cell migration and invasion are largely dependent on the complex organization of the various cytoskeletal components. Whereas the role of actin filaments and microtubules in cell motility is well established, the role of intermediate filaments in this process is incompletely understood. Organization and structure of the keratin cytoskeleton, which consists of heteropolymers of at least one type 1 and one type 2 intermediate filament, are in part regulated by post-translational modifications. In particular, phosphorylation events influence the properties of the keratin network. Sphingosylphosphorylcholine (SPC) is a bioactive lipid with the exceptional ability to change the organization of the keratin cytoskeleton, leading to reorganization of keratin filaments, increased elasticity, and subsequently increased migration of epithelial tumor cells. Here we investigate the signaling pathways that mediate SPC-induced keratin reorganization and the role of keratin phosphorylation in this process. We establish that the MEK–ERK signaling cascade regulates both SPC-induced keratin phosphorylation and reorganization in human pancreatic and gastric cancer cells and identify Ser431 in keratin 8 as the crucial residue whose phosphorylation is required and sufficient to induce keratin reorganization and consequently enhanced migration of human epithelial tumor cells. PMID:22344252

  9. PER2 Differentially Regulates Clock Phosphorylation versus Transcription by Reciprocal Switching of CK1ε Activity

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Ximing; Mori, Tetsuya; Zhang, Yunfei; Johnson, Carl Hirschie

    2015-01-01

    Casein kinase 1ε (CK1ε) performs key phosphorylation reactions in the circadian clock mechanism that determine period. We show that the central clock protein PERIOD2 (PER2) not only acts as a transcriptional repressor but also inhibits the autoinactivation of CK1ε, thereby promoting CK1ε activity. Moreover, PER2 reciprocally regulates CK1ε’s ability to phosphorylate other substrates. On output pathway substrates (e.g., P53), PER2 inhibits the activity of CK1ε. However, in the case of central clock proteins (e.g., CRYPTOCHROME2), PER2 stimulates the CK1ε-mediated phosphorylation of CRY2. CK1ε activity is temperature compensated on the core clock substrate CRY2 but not on output substrates, for example, the physiological output protein substrate P53 and its nonphysiological correlate, bovine serum albumin (BSA). These results indicate heretofore unrecognized pivotal roles of PER2; it not only regulates the central transcription/translation feedback loop but also differentially controls kinase activity CK1ε in its phosphorylation of central clock (e.g., CRY2) versus output (e.g., P53) substrates. PMID:25994100

  10. Mitotic Phosphorylation of TREX1 C Terminus Disrupts TREX1 Regulation of the Oligosaccharyltransferase Complex.

    PubMed

    Kucej, Martin; Fermaintt, Charles S; Yang, Kun; Irizarry-Caro, Ricardo A; Yan, Nan

    2017-03-14

    TREX1 mutations are associated with several autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. The N-terminal DNase domain of TREX1 is important for preventing self-DNA from activating the interferon response. The C terminus of TREX1 is required for ER localization and regulation of oligosacchariyltransferase (OST) activity. Here, we show that during mitosis TREX1 is predominately phosphorylated at the C-terminal Serine-261 by Cyclin B/CDK1. TREX1 is dephosphorylated quickly at mitotic exit, likely by PP1/PP2-type serine/threonine phosphatase. Mitotic phosphorylation does not affect TREX1 DNase activity. Phosphomimetic mutations of mitotic phosphorylation sites in TREX1 disrupted the interaction with the OST subunit RPN1. RNA-seq analysis of Trex1(-/-) mouse embryonic fibroblasts expressing TREX1 wild-type or phosphor-mutants revealed a glycol-gene signature that is elevated when TREX1 mitotic phosphorylation sites are disrupted. Thus, the cell-cycle-dependent post-translation modification of TREX1 regulates its interaction with OST, which may have important implications for immune disease associated with the DNase-independent function of TREX1.

  11. Allosteric regulation of SERCA by phosphorylation-mediated conformational shift of phospholamban

    PubMed Central

    Gustavsson, Martin; Verardi, Raffaello; Mullen, Daniel G.; Mote, Kaustubh R.; Traaseth, Nathaniel J.; Gopinath, T.; Veglia, Gianluigi

    2013-01-01

    The membrane protein complex between the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA) and phospholamban (PLN) controls Ca2+ transport in cardiomyocytes, thereby modulating cardiac contractility. β-Adrenergic-stimulated phosphorylation of PLN at Ser-16 enhances SERCA activity via an unknown mechanism. Using solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, we mapped the physical interactions between SERCA and both unphosphorylated and phosphorylated PLN in membrane bilayers. We found that the allosteric regulation of SERCA depends on the conformational equilibrium of PLN, whose cytoplasmic regulatory domain interconverts between three different states: a ground T state (helical and membrane associated), an excited R state (unfolded and membrane detached), and a B state (extended and enzyme-bound), which is noninhibitory. Phosphorylation at Ser-16 of PLN shifts the populations toward the B state, increasing SERCA activity. We conclude that PLN’s conformational equilibrium is central to maintain SERCA’s apparent Ca2+ affinity within a physiological window. This model represents a paradigm shift in our understanding of SERCA regulation by posttranslational phosphorylation and suggests strategies for designing innovative therapeutic approaches to enhance cardiac muscle contractility. PMID:24101520

  12. Phosphorylation sites of Epstein–Barr virus EBNA1 regulate its function

    PubMed Central

    Duellman, Sarah J.; Thompson, Katie L.; Coon, Joshua J.; Burgess, Richard R.

    2009-01-01

    Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) is the causative agent of infectious mononucleosis and a risk factor for developing a variety of lymphomas and carcinomas. EBV nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA1) is the only viral protein found in all EBV-related malignancies. It plays a key role in establishing and maintaining the altered state of cells transformed with EBV. EBNA1 is required for a variety of functions, including gene regulation, replication and maintenance of the viral genome, but the regulation of EBNA1's functions is poorly understood. We demonstrate that phosphorylation affects the functions of EBNA1. By using electron-transfer dissociation tandem mass spectrometry, ten specific phosphorylated EBNA1 residues were identified. A mutant derivative preventing the phosphorylation of all ten phosphosites retained the unusually long half-life and the ability to translocate into the nucleus of wild-type EBNA1. This phosphorylation-deficient mutant, however, had a significantly reduced ability to activate transcription and to maintain EBV's plasmids in cells. PMID:19439552

  13. Polo-mediated phosphorylation of Maelstrom regulates oocyte determination during oogenesis in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Pek, Jun Wei; Ng, Bing Fu; Kai, Toshie

    2012-12-01

    In Drosophila, Maelstrom is a conserved component of the perinuclear nuage, a germline-unique structure that appears to serve as a site for Piwi-interacting RNA (piRNA) production to repress deleterious transposons. Maelstrom also functions in the nucleus as a transcriptional regulator to repress the expression of microRNA-7, a process that is essential for the proper differentiation of germline stem cells. In this paper, we report another function of Maelstrom in regulating oocyte determination independently of its transposon silencing and germline stem cell differentiation activities. In Drosophila, the conserved serine 138 residue in Maelstrom is required for its phosphorylation, an event that promotes oocyte determination. Phosphorylation of Maelstrom is required for the repression of the pachytene checkpoint protein Sir2, but not for transposon silencing or for germline stem cell differentiation. We identify Polo as a kinase that mediates the phosphorylation of Maelstrom. Our results suggest that the Polo-mediated phosphorylation of Maelstrom may be a mechanism that controls oocyte determination by inactivating the pachytene checkpoint via the repression of Sir2 in Drosophila ovaries.

  14. Phosphorylation sites of Epstein-Barr virus EBNA1 regulate its function.

    PubMed

    Duellman, Sarah J; Thompson, Katie L; Coon, Joshua J; Burgess, Richard R

    2009-09-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is the causative agent of infectious mononucleosis and a risk factor for developing a variety of lymphomas and carcinomas. EBV nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA1) is the only viral protein found in all EBV-related malignancies. It plays a key role in establishing and maintaining the altered state of cells transformed with EBV. EBNA1 is required for a variety of functions, including gene regulation, replication and maintenance of the viral genome, but the regulation of EBNA1's functions is poorly understood. We demonstrate that phosphorylation affects the functions of EBNA1. By using electron-transfer dissociation tandem mass spectrometry, ten specific phosphorylated EBNA1 residues were identified. A mutant derivative preventing the phosphorylation of all ten phosphosites retained the unusually long half-life and the ability to translocate into the nucleus of wild-type EBNA1. This phosphorylation-deficient mutant, however, had a significantly reduced ability to activate transcription and to maintain EBV's plasmids in cells.

  15. Regulation of CK2 by Phosphorylation and O-GlcNAcylation Revealed by Semisynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Tarrant, Mary Katherine; Rho, Hee-Sool; Xie, Zhi; Jiang, Yu Lin; Gross, Christopher; Culhane, Jeffrey C.; Yan, Gai; Qian, Jiang; Ichikawa, Yoshitaka; Matsuoka, Tatsuji; Zachara, Natasha; Etzkorn, Felicia A.; Hart, Gerald W.; Jeong, Jun Seop; Blackshaw, Seth; Zhu, Heng; Cole, Philip A.

    2011-01-01

    Protein Ser/Thr kinase CK2 (casein kinase II) is involved in a myriad of cellular processes including cell growth and proliferation by phosphorylating hundreds of substrates, yet the regulation process of CK2 function is poorly understood. Here we report that the CK2 catalytic subunit CK2α is modified by O-GlcNAc on Ser347, proximal to a cyclin-dependent kinase phosphorylation site (Thr344) on the same protein. We use protein semisynthesis to show that Thr344 phosphorylation increases CK2α cellular stability via Pin1 interaction whereas Ser347 glycosylation appears to be antagonistic to Thr344 phosphorylation and permissive to proteasomal degradation. By performing kinase assays with the site-specifically modified phospho- and glyco-modified CK2α in combination with CK2β and Pin1 binding partners on human protein microarrays, we show that CK2 kinase substrate selectivity is modulated by these specific posttranslational modifications. This study suggests how a promiscuous protein kinase can be regulated at multiple levels to achieve particular biological outputs. PMID:22267120

  16. Novel phosphorylation target in the serum response factor MADS box regulates alpha-actin transcription.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Dinakar; Belaguli, Narasimhaswamy; Flück, Martin; Rowan, Brian G; Wei, Lei; Weigel, Nancy L; Booth, Frank W; Epstein, Henry F; Schwartz, Robert J; Balasubramanyam, Ashok

    2003-06-24

    Serum response factor (SRF) is a phosphoprotein that regulates skeletal and cardiac alpha-actin gene transcription. Myotonic dystrophy protein kinase (DMPK), a muscle- and neuron-restricted kinase, enhanced SRF-mediated promoter activity of the skeletal and cardiac alpha-actin genes in C2C12 myoblasts as well as in nonmyogenic cells. DMPK phosphorylated SRF in vitro in the alphaI coil of the DNA-binding domain in the MADS box, a highly conserved region required for DNA binding, dimerization, and co-activator interaction in COS and CV1 cells. Threonine 159 in the MADS box alphaI coil was a specific phosphorylation target in vitro as well as in vivo of both DMPK and protein kinase C-alpha. Substitution of threonine 159 with the nonphosphorylatable residue alanine markedly diminished activation of the cardiac alpha-actin promoter in the presence of kinase, while its substitution with aspartic acid, to introduce a negative charge and mimic phosphorylation, restored activation completely. Phosphorylation of the MADS box may constitute a novel mechanism for regulation of SRF-dependent actin gene transcription.

  17. The interaction between acetylation and serine-574 phosphorylation regulates the apoptotic function of FOXO3.

    PubMed

    Li, Z; Bridges, B; Olson, J; Weinman, S A

    2017-03-30

    The multispecific transcription factor and tumor suppressor FOXO3 is an important mediator of apoptosis, but the mechanisms that control its proapoptotic function are poorly understood. There has long been evidence that acetylation promotes FOXO3-driven apoptosis and recently a specific JNK (c-Jun N-terminal kinase)-dependent S574 phosphorylated form (p-FOXO3) has been shown to be specifically apoptotic. This study examined whether acetylation and S574 phosphorylation act independently or in concert to regulate the apoptotic function of FOXO3. We observed that both sirtuins 1 and 7 (SIRT1 and SIRT7) are able to deacetylate FOXO3 in vitro and in vivo, and that lipopolysaccharide (LPS) treatment of THP-1 monocytes induced a rapid increase of FOXO3 acetylation, partly by suppression of SIRT1 and SIRT7. Acetylation was required for S574 phosphorylation and cellular apoptosis. Deacetylation of FOXO3 by SIRT activation or SIRT1 or SIRT7 overexpression prevented its S574 phosphorylation and blocked apoptosis in response to LPS. We also found that acetylated FOXO3 preferentially bound JNK1, and a mutant FOXO3 lacking four known acetylation sites (K242, 259, 290 and 569R) abolished JNK1 binding and failed to induce apoptosis. This interplay of acetylation and phosphorylation also regulated cell death in primary human peripheral blood monocytes (PBMs). PBMs isolated from alcoholic hepatitis patients had high expression of SIRT1 and SIRT7 and failed to induce p-FOXO3 and apoptosis in response to LPS. PBMs from healthy controls had lower SIRT1 and SIRT7 and readily formed p-FOXO3 and underwent apoptosis when similarly treated. These results reveal that acetylation is permissive for generation of the apoptotic form of FOXO3 and the activity of SIRT1 and particularly SIRT7 regulate this process in vivo, allowing control of monocyte apoptosis in response to LPS.

  18. Phosphorylation sites required for regulation of cardiac calcium channels in the fight-or-flight response.

    PubMed

    Fu, Ying; Westenbroek, Ruth E; Scheuer, Todd; Catterall, William A

    2013-11-26

    L-type Ca(2+) currents conducted by CaV1.2 channels initiate excitation-contraction coupling in the heart. Their activity is increased by β-adrenergic/cAMP signaling via phosphorylation by PKA in the fight-or-flight response, but the sites of regulation are unknown. We describe the functional role of phosphorylation of Ser1700 and Thr1704-sites of phosphorylation by PKA and casein kinase II at the interface between the proximal and distal C-terminal regulatory domains. Mutation of both residues to Ala in STAA mice reduced basal L-type Ca(2+) currents, due to a small decrease in expression and a substantial decrease in functional activity. The increase in L-type Ca(2+) current caused by isoproterenol was markedly reduced at physiological levels of stimulation (3-10 nM). Maximal increases in calcium current at nearly saturating concentrations of isoproterenol (100 nM) were also significantly reduced, but the mutation effects were smaller, suggesting that alternative regulatory mechanisms are engaged at maximal levels of stimulation. The β-adrenergic increase in cell contraction was also diminished. STAA ventricular myocytes exhibited arrhythmic contractions in response to isoproterenol, and up to 20% of STAA cells failed to sustain contractions when stimulated at 1 Hz. STAA mice have reduced exercise capacity, and cardiac hypertrophy is evident at 3 mo. We conclude that phosphorylation of Ser1700 and Thr1704 is essential for regulation of basal activity of CaV1.2 channels and for up-regulation by β-adrenergic signaling at physiological levels of stimulation. Disruption of phosphorylation at those sites leads to impaired cardiac function in vivo, as indicated by reduced exercise capacity and cardiac hypertrophy.

  19. APP is phosphorylated by TrkA and regulates NGF/TrkA signaling.

    PubMed

    Matrone, Carmela; Barbagallo, Alessia P M; La Rosa, Luca R; Florenzano, Fulvio; Ciotti, Maria T; Mercanti, Delio; Chao, Moses V; Calissano, Pietro; D'Adamio, Luciano

    2011-08-17

    The pathogenic model of Alzheimer's disease (AD) posits that aggregates of amyloid β, a product of amyloid precursor protein (APP) processing, cause dementia. However, alterations of normal APP functions could contribute to AD pathogenesis, and it is therefore important to understand the role of APP. APP is a member of a gene family that shows functional redundancy as documented by the evidence that single knock-out mice are viable, whereas mice with combined deletions of APP family genes die shortly after birth. A residue in the APP intracellular region, Y(682), is indispensable for these essential functions of APP. It is therefore important to identify pathways that regulate phosphorylation of Y(682) as well as the role of Y(682) in vivo. TrkA is associated with both phosphorylation of APP-Y(682) and alteration of APP processing, suggesting that tyrosine phosphorylation of APP links APP processing and neurotrophic signaling to intracellular pathways associated with cellular differentiation and survival. Here we have tested whether the NGF/TrkA signaling pathway is a physiological regulator of APP phosphorylation. We find that NGF induces tyrosine phosphorylation of APP, and that APP interacts with TrkA and this interaction requires Y(682). Unpredictably, we also uncover that APP, and specifically Y(682), regulates activation of the NGF/TrkA signaling pathway in vivo, the subcellular distribution of TrkA and the sensitivity of neurons to the trophic action of NGF. This evidence suggests that these two membrane protein's functions are strictly interconnected and that the NGF/TrkA signaling pathway is involved in AD pathogenesis and can be used as a therapeutic target.

  20. The interaction between acetylation and serine-574 phosphorylation regulates the apoptotic function of FOXO3

    PubMed Central

    Li, Z; Bridges, B; Olson, J; Weinman, SA

    2017-01-01

    The multispecific transcription factor and tumor suppressor FOXO3 is an important mediator of apoptosis, but the mechanisms that control its proapoptotic function are poorly understood. There has long been evidence that acetylation promotes FOXO3-driven apoptosis and recently a specific JNK (c-Jun N-terminal kinase)-dependent S574 phosphorylated form (p-FOXO3) has been shown to be specifically apoptotic. This study examined whether acetylation and S574 phosphorylation act independently or in concert to regulate the apoptotic function of FOXO3. We observed that both sirtuins 1 and 7 (SIRT1 and SIRT7) are able to deacetylate FOXO3 in vitro and in vivo, and that lipopolysaccharide (LPS) treatment of THP-1 monocytes induced a rapid increase of FOXO3 acetylation, partly by suppression of SIRT1 and SIRT7. Acetylation was required for S574 phosphorylation and cellular apoptosis. Deacetylation of FOXO3 by SIRT activation or SIRT1 or SIRT7 overexpression prevented its S574 phosphorylation and blocked apoptosis in response to LPS. We also found that acetylated FOXO3 preferentially bound JNK1, and a mutant FOXO3 lacking four known acetylation sites (K242, 259, 290 and 569R) abolished JNK1 binding and failed to induce apoptosis. This interplay of acetylation and phosphorylation also regulated cell death in primary human peripheral blood monocytes (PBMs). PBMs isolated from alcoholic hepatitis patients had high expression of SIRT1 and SIRT7 and failed to induce p-FOXO3 and apoptosis in response to LPS. PBMs from healthy controls had lower SIRT1 and SIRT7 and readily formed p-FOXO3 and underwent apoptosis when similarly treated. These results reveal that acetylation is permissive for generation of the apoptotic form of FOXO3 and the activity of SIRT1 and particularly SIRT7 regulate this process in vivo, allowing control of monocyte apoptosis in response to LPS. PMID:27669435

  1. Regulation of membrane-cytoskeletal interactions by tyrosine phosphorylation of erythrocyte band 3

    PubMed Central

    Ferru, Emanuela; Giger, Katie; Pantaleo, Antonella; Campanella, Estela; Grey, Jesse; Ritchie, Ken; Vono, Rosa; Low, Philip S.

    2011-01-01

    The cytoplasmic domain of band 3 serves as a center of erythrocyte membrane organization and constitutes the major substrate of erythrocyte tyrosine kinases. Tyrosine phosphorylation of band 3 is induced by several physiologic stimuli, including malaria parasite invasion, cell shrinkage, normal cell aging, and oxidant stress (thalassemias, sickle cell disease, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency, etc). In an effort to characterize the biologic sequelae of band 3 tyrosine phosphorylation, we looked for changes in the polypeptide's function that accompany its phosphorylation. We report that tyrosine phosphorylation promotes dissociation of band 3 from the spectrin-actin skeleton as evidenced by: (1) a decrease in ankyrin affinity in direct binding studies, (2) an increase in detergent extractability of band 3 from ghosts, (3) a rise in band 3 cross-linkability by bis-sulfosuccinimidyl-suberate, (4) significant changes in erythrocyte morphology, and (5) elevation of the rate of band 3 diffusion in intact cells. Because release of band 3 from its ankyrin and adducin linkages to the cytoskeleton can facilitate changes in multiple membrane properties, tyrosine phosphorylation of band 3 is argued to enable adaptive changes in erythrocyte biology that permit the cell to respond to the above stresses. PMID:21474668

  2. TPX2 phosphorylation maintains metaphase spindle length by regulating microtubule flux

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Jingyan; Bian, Minglei; Xin, Guangwei; Deng, Zhaoxuan; Luo, Jia; Guo, Xiao; Chen, Hao; Wang, Yao; Jiang, Qing

    2015-01-01

    A steady-state metaphase spindle maintains constant length, although the microtubules undergo intensive dynamics. Tubulin dimers are incorporated at plus ends of spindle microtubules while they are removed from the minus ends, resulting in poleward movement. Such microtubule flux is regulated by the microtubule rescue factors CLASPs at kinetochores and depolymerizing protein Kif2a at the poles, along with other regulators of microtubule dynamics. How microtubule polymerization and depolymerization are coordinated remains unclear. Here we show that TPX2, a microtubule-bundling protein and activator of Aurora A, plays an important role. TPX2 was phosphorylated by Aurora A during mitosis. Its phospho-null mutant caused short metaphase spindles coupled with low microtubule flux rate. Interestingly, phosphorylation of TPX2 regulated its interaction with CLASP1 but not Kif2a. The effect of its mutant in shortening the spindle could be rescued by codepletion of CLASP1 and Kif2a that abolished microtubule flux. Together we propose that Aurora A–dependent TPX2 phosphorylation controls mitotic spindle length through regulating microtubule flux. PMID:26240182

  3. Coordinated ubiquitination and phosphorylation of RIP1 regulates necroptotic cell death

    PubMed Central

    de Almagro, M Cristina; Goncharov, Tatiana; Izrael-Tomasevic, Anita; Duttler, Stefanie; Kist, Matthias; Varfolomeev, Eugene; Wu, Xiumin; Lee, Wyne P; Murray, Jeremy; Webster, Joshua D; Yu, Kebing; Kirkpatrick, Donald S; Newton, Kim; Vucic, Domagoj

    2017-01-01

    Proper regulation of cell death signaling is crucial for the maintenance of homeostasis and prevention of disease. A caspase-independent regulated form of cell death called necroptosis is rapidly emerging as an important mediator of a number of human pathologies including inflammatory bowel disease and ischemia–reperfusion organ injury. Activation of necroptotic signaling through TNF signaling or organ injury leads to the activation of kinases receptor-interacting protein kinases 1 and 3 (RIP1 and RIP3) and culminates in inflammatory cell death. We found that, in addition to phosphorylation, necroptotic cell death is regulated by ubiquitination of RIP1 in the necrosome. Necroptotic RIP1 ubiquitination requires RIP1 kinase activity, but not necroptotic mediators RIP3 and MLKL (mixed lineage kinase-like). Using immunoaffinity enrichment and mass spectrometry, we profiled numerous ubiquitination events on RIP1 that are triggered during necroptotic signaling. Mutation of a necroptosis-related ubiquitination site on RIP1 reduced necroptotic cell death and RIP1 ubiquitination and phosphorylation, and disrupted the assembly of RIP1 and RIP3 in the necrosome, suggesting that necroptotic RIP1 ubiquitination is important for maintaining RIP1 kinase activity in the necrosome complex. We also observed RIP1 ubiquitination in injured kidneys consistent with a physiological role of RIP1 ubiquitination in ischemia–reperfusion disease. Taken together, these data reveal that coordinated and interdependent RIP1 phosphorylation and ubiquitination within the necroptotic complex regulate necroptotic signaling and cell death. PMID:27518435

  4. Phosphorylation of PP1 Regulator Sds22 by PLK1 Ensures Accurate Chromosome Segregation.

    PubMed

    Duan, Hequan; Wang, Chunli; Wang, Ming; Gao, Xinjiao; Yan, Maomao; Akram, Saima; Peng, Wei; Zou, Hanfa; Wang, Dong; Zhou, Jiajia; Chu, Youjun; Dou, Zhen; Barrett, Gregory; Green, Hadiyah-Nichole; Wang, Fangjun; Tian, Ruijun; He, Ping; Wang, Wenwen; Liu, Xing; Yao, Xuebiao

    2016-09-30

    During cell division, accurate chromosome segregation is tightly regulated by Polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) and opposing activities of Aurora B kinase and protein phosphatase 1 (PP1). However, the regulatory mechanisms underlying the aforementioned hierarchical signaling cascade during mitotic chromosome segregation have remained elusive. Sds22 is a conserved regulator of PP1 activity, but how it regulates PP1 activity in space and time during mitosis remains elusive. Here we show that Sds22 is a novel and cognate substrate of PLK1 in mitosis, and the phosphorylation of Sds22 by PLK1 elicited an inhibition of PP1-mediated dephosphorylation of Aurora B at threonine 232 (Thr(232)) in a dose-dependent manner. Overexpression of a phosphomimetic mutant of Sds22 causes a dramatic increase in mitotic delay, whereas overexpression of a non-phosphorylatable mutant of Sds22 results in mitotic arrest. Mechanistically, the phosphorylation of Sds22 by PLK1 strengthens the binding of Sds22 to PP1 and inhibits the dephosphorylation of Thr(232) of Aurora B to ensure a robust, error-free metaphase-anaphase transition. These findings delineate a conserved signaling hierarchy that orchestrates dynamic protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of critical mitotic regulators during chromosome segregation to guard chromosome stability.

  5. Phosphorylation is the major mechanism regulating isocitrate lyase activity in Paracoccidioides brasiliensis yeast cells.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Aline H da Silva; Brock, Matthias; Zambuzzi-Carvalho, Patrícia F; Santos-Silva, Ludier K; Troian, Rogério F; Góes, Alfredo M; Soares, Célia M de Almeida; Pereira, Maristela

    2011-07-01

    The glyoxylate cycle plays an essential role for anaplerosis of oxaloacetate during growth of microorganisms on carbon sources such as acetate or fatty acids and has been shown to contribute to virulence of several pathogens. Here, we investigated the transcriptional and post-translational regulation of the glyoxylate cycle key enzyme isocitrate lyase (PbICL) in the human pathogenic fungus Paracoccidioides brasiliensis. Although sequence analyses on fungal isocitrate lyases revealed a high phylogenetic conservation, their regulation seems to differ significantly. Closely related Aspergillus species regulate the glyoxylate cycle at the transcriptional level, whereas Pbicl was constitutively expressed in yeast cells. However, only low PbICL activity was detected when cells were grown in the presence of glucose. Two-dimensional gel analyses with subsequent antibody hybridization revealed constitutive production of PbICL, but low PbICL activity on glucose coincided with extensive protein phosphorylation. Since an in vitro dephosphorylation of PbICL from glucose grown cells strongly increased ICL activity and resembled the phosphorylation pattern of highly active acetate grown cells, post-translational modification seems the main mechanism regulating PbICL activity in yeast cells. In agreement, a transfer of yeast cells from glucose to acetate medium increased PbICL activity without requirement of de novo protein synthesis. Thus, inactivation of PbICL by phosphorylation is reversible, denoting a new strategy for the rapid adaptation to changing environmental conditions.

  6. c-Jun N-terminal kinase-3 (JNK3)/stress-activated protein kinase-beta (SAPKbeta) binds and phosphorylates the neuronal microtubule regulator SCG10.

    PubMed

    Neidhart, S; Antonsson, B; Gilliéron, C; Vilbois, F; Grenningloh, G; Arkinstall, S

    2001-11-16

    The neuronal growth-associated protein SCG10 is enriched in the growth cones of neurons where it destabilizes microtubules and thus contributes to the dynamic assembly and disassembly of microtubules. Since its microtubule-destabilizing activity is regulated by phosphorylation, SCG10 may link extracellular signals to rearrangements of the neuronal cytoskeleton. To identify signal transduction pathways that may lead to SCG10 phosphorylation, we tested a series of serine-threonine-directed protein kinases that phosphorylate SCG10 in vitro. We demonstrate that purified SCG10 can be phosphorylated by two subclasses of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases, c-Jun N-terminal/stress-activated protein kinase (JNK/SAPK) and p38 MAP kinase. Moreover, SCG10 was found to bind tightly and specifically to JNK3/SAPKbeta. JNK3/SAPKbeta phosphorylation occurs at Ser-62 and Ser-73, residues that result in reduced microtubule-destabilizing activity for SCG10. Endogenous SCG10 also undergoes increased phosphorylation in sympathetic neurons at times of JNK3/SAPKbeta activation following deprivation from nerve growth factor. Together these observations indicate that activation of JNK/SAPKs provides a pathway for phosphorylation of SCG10 and control of growth cone microtubule formation following neuronal exposure to cellular stresses.

  7. Site-directed spectroscopy of cardiac myosin-binding protein C reveals effects of phosphorylation on protein structural dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Colson, Brett A.; Thompson, Andrew R.; Espinoza-Fonseca, L. Michel; Thomas, David D.

    2016-01-01

    We have used the site-directed spectroscopies of time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer (TR-FRET) and double electron–electron resonance (DEER), combined with complementary molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, to resolve the structure and dynamics of cardiac myosin-binding protein C (cMyBP-C), focusing on the N-terminal region. The results have implications for the role of this protein in myocardial contraction, with particular relevance to β-adrenergic signaling, heart failure, and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. N-terminal cMyBP-C domains C0–C2 (C0C2) contain binding regions for potential interactions with both thick and thin filaments. Phosphorylation by PKA in the MyBP-C motif regulates these binding interactions. Our spectroscopic assays detect distances between pairs of site-directed probes on cMyBP-C. We engineered intramolecular pairs of labeling sites within cMyBP-C to measure, with high resolution, the distance and disorder in the protein’s flexible regions using TR-FRET and DEER. Phosphorylation reduced the level of molecular disorder and the distribution of C0C2 intramolecular distances became more compact, with probes flanking either the motif between C1 and C2 or the Pro/Ala-rich linker (PAL) between C0 and C1. Further insight was obtained from microsecond MD simulations, which revealed a large structural change in the disordered motif region in which phosphorylation unmasks the surface of a series of residues on a stable α-helix within the motif with high potential as a protein–protein interaction site. These experimental and computational findings elucidate structural transitions in the flexible and dynamic portions of cMyBP-C, providing previously unidentified molecular insight into the modulatory role of this protein in cardiac muscle contractility. PMID:26908877

  8. Site-directed spectroscopy of cardiac myosin-binding protein C reveals effects of phosphorylation on protein structural dynamics.

    PubMed

    Colson, Brett A; Thompson, Andrew R; Espinoza-Fonseca, L Michel; Thomas, David D

    2016-03-22

    We have used the site-directed spectroscopies of time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer (TR-FRET) and double electron-electron resonance (DEER), combined with complementary molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, to resolve the structure and dynamics of cardiac myosin-binding protein C (cMyBP-C), focusing on the N-terminal region. The results have implications for the role of this protein in myocardial contraction, with particular relevance to β-adrenergic signaling, heart failure, and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. N-terminal cMyBP-C domains C0-C2 (C0C2) contain binding regions for potential interactions with both thick and thin filaments. Phosphorylation by PKA in the MyBP-C motif regulates these binding interactions. Our spectroscopic assays detect distances between pairs of site-directed probes on cMyBP-C. We engineered intramolecular pairs of labeling sites within cMyBP-C to measure, with high resolution, the distance and disorder in the protein's flexible regions using TR-FRET and DEER. Phosphorylation reduced the level of molecular disorder and the distribution of C0C2 intramolecular distances became more compact, with probes flanking either the motif between C1 and C2 or the Pro/Ala-rich linker (PAL) between C0 and C1. Further insight was obtained from microsecond MD simulations, which revealed a large structural change in the disordered motif region in which phosphorylation unmasks the surface of a series of residues on a stable α-helix within the motif with high potential as a protein-protein interaction site. These experimental and computational findings elucidate structural transitions in the flexible and dynamic portions of cMyBP-C, providing previously unidentified molecular insight into the modulatory role of this protein in cardiac muscle contractility.

  9. EGFR Signaling Regulates Maspin/SerpinB5 Phosphorylation and Nuclear Localization in Mammary Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Reina, Jeffrey; Morais Freitas, Vanessa

    2016-01-01

    Maspin (SerpinB5) is a non-inhibitory serpin (serine protease inhibitor) with very diverse biological activities including regulation of cell adhesion, migration, death, control of gene expression and oxidative stress response. Initially described as a tumor and metastasis suppressor, clinical data brought controversies to the field, as some studies reported no correlation between SerpinB5 expression and prognosis value. These data underscore the importance of understanding SerpinB5 function in a normal physiological context and the molecular mechanism involved. Several SerpinB5 phosphoforms have been detected in different cell lines, but the signaling pathways involved and the biological significance of this post-translational modification in vivo remains to be explored. In this study we investigated SerpinB5 expression, subcellular localization and phosphorylation in different stages of the mouse mammary gland development and the signaling pathway involved. Here we show that SerpinB5 is first detected in late pregnancy, reaches its highest levels in lactation and remains at constant levels during post-lactational regression (involution). Using high resolution isoelectric focusing followed but immunoblot, we found at least 8 different phosphoforms of SerpinB5 during lactation, which decreases steadily at the onset of involution. In order to investigate the signaling pathway involved in SerpinB5 phosphorylation, we took advantage of the non-transformed MCF-10A model system, as we have previously observed SerpinB5 phosphorylation in these cells. We detected basal levels of SerpinB5 phosphorylation in serum- and growth factor-starved cells, which is due to amphiregulin autocrine activity on MCF-10A cells. EGF and TGF alpha, two other EGFR ligands, promote important SerpinB5 phosphorylation. Interestingly, EGF treatment is followed by SerpinB5 nuclear accumulation. Altogether, these data indicate that SerpinB5 expression and phosphorylation are developmentally

  10. Tyrosine Phosphorylation Based Homo-dimerization of Arabidopsis RACK1A Proteins Regulates Oxidative Stress Signaling Pathways in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Sabila, Mercy; Kundu, Nabanita; Smalls, Deana; Ullah, Hemayet

    2016-01-01

    Scaffold proteins are known as important cellular regulators that can interact with multiple proteins to modulate diverse signal transduction pathways. RACK1 (Receptor for Activated C Kinase 1) is a WD-40 type scaffold protein, conserved in eukaryotes, from Chlamydymonas to plants and humans, plays regulatory roles in diverse signal transduction and stress response pathways. RACK1 in humans has been implicated in myriads of neuropathological diseases including Alzheimer and alcohol addictions. Model plant Arabidopsis thaliana genome maintains three different RACK1 genes termed RACK1A, RACK1B, and RACK1C with a very high (85–93%) sequence identity among them. Loss of function mutation in Arabidopsis indicates that RACK1 proteins regulate diverse environmental stress signaling pathways including drought and salt stress resistance pathway. Recently deduced crystal structure of Arabidopsis RACK1A- very first among all of the RACK1 proteins, indicates that it can potentially be regulated by post-translational modifications, like tyrosine phosphorylations and sumoylation at key residues. Here we show evidence that RACK1A proteins, depending on diverse environmental stresses, are tyrosine phosphorylated. Utilizing site-directed mutagenesis of key tyrosine residues, it is found that tyrosine phosphorylation can potentially dictate the homo-dimerization of RACK1A proteins. The homo-dimerized RACK1A proteins play a role in providing UV-B induced oxidative stress resistance. It is proposed that RACK1A proteins ability to function as scaffold protein may potentially be regulated by the homo-dimerized RACK1A proteins to mediate diverse stress signaling pathways. PMID:26941753

  11. Tyrosine Phosphorylation Based Homo-dimerization of Arabidopsis RACK1A Proteins Regulates Oxidative Stress Signaling Pathways in Yeast.

    PubMed

    Sabila, Mercy; Kundu, Nabanita; Smalls, Deana; Ullah, Hemayet

    2016-01-01

    Scaffold proteins are known as important cellular regulators that can interact with multiple proteins to modulate diverse signal transduction pathways. RACK1 (Receptor for Activated C Kinase 1) is a WD-40 type scaffold protein, conserved in eukaryotes, from Chlamydymonas to plants and humans, plays regulatory roles in diverse signal transduction and stress response pathways. RACK1 in humans has been implicated in myriads of neuropathological diseases including Alzheimer and alcohol addictions. Model plant Arabidopsis thaliana genome maintains three different RACK1 genes termed RACK1A, RACK1B, and RACK1C with a very high (85-93%) sequence identity among them. Loss of function mutation in Arabidopsis indicates that RACK1 proteins regulate diverse environmental stress signaling pathways including drought and salt stress resistance pathway. Recently deduced crystal structure of Arabidopsis RACK1A- very first among all of the RACK1 proteins, indicates that it can potentially be regulated by post-translational modifications, like tyrosine phosphorylations and sumoylation at key residues. Here we show evidence that RACK1A proteins, depending on diverse environmental stresses, are tyrosine phosphorylated. Utilizing site-directed mutagenesis of key tyrosine residues, it is found that tyrosine phosphorylation can potentially dictate the homo-dimerization of RACK1A proteins. The homo-dimerized RACK1A proteins play a role in providing UV-B induced oxidative stress resistance. It is proposed that RACK1A proteins ability to function as scaffold protein may potentially be regulated by the homo-dimerized RACK1A proteins to mediate diverse stress signaling pathways.

  12. ATP-dependent phosphorylation of serine-46 in the phosphocarrier protein HPr regulates lactose/H+ symport in Lactobacillus brevis.

    PubMed Central

    Ye, J J; Reizer, J; Cui, X; Saier, M H

    1994-01-01

    Lactobacillus brevis takes up lactose and the nonmetabolizable lactose analogue thiomethyl beta-galactoside (TMG) by a permease-catalyzed lactose/H+ symport mechanism. Earlier studies have shown that TMG, previously accumulated in L. brevis cells, rapidly effluxes from the cells upon addition of glucose, and that glucose inhibits further uptake of TMG. We have developed a vesicular system to analyze this regulatory mechanism and have used electroporation to shock proteins and membrane-impermeant metabolites into the vesicles. Uptake of TMG was dependent on an energy source, effectively provided by intravesicular ATP or extravesicular arginine. TMG uptake into these vesicles was not inhibited, and preaccumulated TMG did not efflux from them upon addition of glucose. Intravesicular but not extravesicular wild-type phosphocarrier protein HPr of Bacillus subtilis restored regulation. Glucose could be replaced by intravesicular (but not extravesicular) fructose 1,6-bisphosphate, gluconate 6-phosphate, or 2-phosphoglycerate, but not by other phosphorylated metabolites, in agreement with the allosteric activating effects of these compounds on HPr(Ser) kinase measured in vitro. Intravesicular serine-46-->alanine mutant HPr cold not promote regulation of lactose permease activity when electroporated into the vesicles with or without glucose or the various phosphorylated metabolites, but the serine-46-->aspartate mutant HPr promoted regulation, even in the absence of glucose or a metabolite. HPr(Ser-P) appears to convert the lactose/H+ symporter into a sugar uniporter. These results establish that HPr serine phosphorylation by the ATP-dependent metabolite-activated HPr kinase regulates lactose permease activity in L. brevis. A direct allosteric mechanism is proposed. Images PMID:8159711

  13. Regulation of the renal Na+-Cl− cotransporter by phosphorylation and ubiquitylation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The activity of the renal thiazide-sensitive NaCl cotransporter (NCC) in the distal convoluted tubule plays a key role in defining arterial blood pressure levels. Increased or decreased activity of the NCC is associated with arterial hypertension or hypotension, respectively. Thus it is of major interest to understand the activity of NCC using in vivo models. Phosphorylation of certain residues of the amino-terminal domain of NCC has been shown to be associated with its activation. The development of phospho-specific antibodies against these sites provides a powerful tool that is helping to increase our understanding of the molecular physiology of NCC. Additionally, NCC expression in the plasma membrane is modulated by ubiquitylation, which represents another major mechanism for regulating protein activity. This work presents a review of our current knowledge of the regulation of NCC activity by phosphorylation and ubiquitylation. PMID:23034942

  14. Phosphorylation of Complexin by PKA Regulates Activity-dependent Spontaneous Neurotransmitter Release and Structural Synaptic Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Richard W.; Buhl, Lauren K.; Volfson, Dina; Tran, Adrienne; Li, Feng; Akbergenova, Yulia; Littleton, J. Troy

    2016-01-01

    Summary Synaptic plasticity is a fundamental feature of the nervous system that allows adaptation to changing behavioral environments. Most studies of synaptic plasticity have examined the regulated trafficking of postsynaptic glutamate receptors that generates alterations in synaptic transmission. Whether and how changes in the presynaptic release machinery contribute to neuronal plasticity is less clear. The SNARE complex mediates neurotransmitter release in response to presynaptic Ca++ entry. Here we show that the SNARE fusion clamp Complexin undergoes activity-dependent phosphorylation that alters the basic properties of neurotransmission in Drosophila. Retrograde signaling following stimulation activates PKA-dependent phosphorylation of the Complexin C-terminus that selectively and transiently enhances spontaneous release. Enhanced spontaneous release is required for activity-dependent synaptic growth. These data indicate that SNARE-dependent fusion mechanisms can be regulated in an activity-dependent manner and highlight the key role of spontaneous neurotransmitter release as a mediator of functional and structural plasticity. PMID:26590346

  15. APP is phosphorylated by TrkA and regulates NGF/TrkA signaling APP regulates TrkA

    PubMed Central

    Matrone, C; Barbagallo, APM; La Rosa, LR; Florenzano, F; Ciotti, MT; Mercanti, D; Chao, MV; Calissano, P; D’Adamio, L

    2012-01-01

    The pathogenic model of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) posits that aggregates of Aβ, a product of Aβ-precursor protein (APP) processing, cause dementia. However, alterations of normal APP functions could contribute to AD pathogenesis and it is therefore important to understand the role of APP. APP is a member of a gene family that shows functional redundancy as documented by the evidence that single knock-out mice are viable,whereas mice with combined deletions of APP-family genes die shortly after birth. A residue in the APP intracellular region, Y682, is indispensable for these essential functions of APP. It is therefore important to identify pathways that regulate phosphorylation of Y682 as well as the role of Y682 in vivo. TrkA is associated with both phosphorylation of APP-Y682 and alteration of APP processing, suggesting that tyrosine phosphorylation of APP links APP processing and neurotrophic signaling to intracellular pathways associated with cellular differentiation and survival. Here we have tested whether the NGF/TrkA signaling pathway is a physiological regulator of APP phosphorylation. We find that NGF induces tyrosine phosphorylation of APP, and that APP interacts with TrkA and this interaction requires Y682. Unpredictably, we also uncover that APP, and specifically Y682, regulates activation of the NGF/TrkA signaling pathway in vivo, the sub-cellular distribution of TrkA and the sensitivity of neurons to the trophic action of NGF. This evidence suggests that these two membrane protein’s functions are strictly interconnected and that the NGF/TrkA signaling pathway is involved in AD pathogenesis and can be used as a therapeutic target. PMID:21849536

  16. Tyrosine phosphorylation on spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) is differentially regulated in human and murine platelets by protein kinase C isoforms.

    PubMed

    Buitrago, Lorena; Bhavanasi, Dheeraj; Dangelmaier, Carol; Manne, Bhanu Kanth; Badolia, Rachit; Borgognone, Alessandra; Tsygankov, Alexander Y; McKenzie, Steven E; Kunapuli, Satya P

    2013-10-04

    Protein kinase C (PKC) isoforms differentially regulate platelet functional responses downstream of glycoprotein VI (GPVI) signaling, but the role of PKCs regulating upstream effectors such as Syk is not known. We investigated the role of PKC on Syk tyrosine phosphorylation using the pan-PKC inhibitor GF109203X (GFX). GPVI-mediated phosphorylation on Syk Tyr-323, Tyr-352, and Tyr-525/526 was rapidly dephosphorylated, but GFX treatment inhibited this dephosphorylation on Tyr-525/526 in human platelets but not in wild type murine platelets. GFX treatment did not affect tyrosine phosphorylation on FcRγ chain or Src family kinases. Phosphorylation of Lat Tyr-191 and PLCγ2 Tyr-759 was also increased upon treatment with GFX. We evaluated whether secreted ADP is required for such dephosphorylation. Exogenous addition of ADP to GFX-treated platelets did not affect tyrosine phosphorylation on Syk. FcγRIIA- or CLEC-2-mediated Syk tyrosine phosphorylation was also potentiated with GFX in human platelets. Because potentiation of Syk phosphorylation is not observed in murine platelets, PKC-deficient mice cannot be used to identify the PKC isoform regulating Syk phosphorylation. We therefore used selective inhibitors of PKC isoforms. Only PKCβ inhibition resulted in Syk hyperphosphorylation similar to that in platelets treated with GFX. This result indicates that PKCβ is the isoform responsible for Syk negative regulation in human platelets. In conclusion, we have elucidated a novel pathway of Syk regulation by PKCβ in human platelets.

  17. Chronic fluoxetine treatment directs energy metabolism towards the citric acid cycle and oxidative phosphorylation in rat hippocampal nonsynaptic mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Filipović, Dragana; Costina, Victor; Perić, Ivana; Stanisavljević, Andrijana; Findeisen, Peter

    2017-03-15

    Fluoxetine (Flx) is the principal treatment for depression; however, the precise mechanisms of its actions remain elusive. Our aim was to identify protein expression changes within rat hippocampus regulated by chronic Flx treatment versus vehicle-controls using proteomics. Fluoxetine-hydrohloride (15mg/kg) was administered daily to adult male Wistar rats for 3weeks, and cytosolic and nonsynaptic mitochondrial hippocampal proteomes were analyzed. All differentially expressed proteins were functionally annotated according to biological process and molecular function using Uniprot and Blast2GO. Our comparative study revealed that in cytosolic and nonsynaptic mitochondrial fractions, 60 and 3 proteins respectively, were down-regulated, and 23 and 60 proteins, respectively, were up-regulated. Proteins differentially regulated in cytosolic and nonsynaptic mitochondrial fractions were primarily related to cellular and metabolic processes. Of the identified proteins, the expressions of calretinin and parvalbumine were confirmed. The predominant molecular functions of differentially expressed proteins in both cell hippocampal fractions were binding and catalytic activity. Most differentially expressed proteins in nonsynaptic mitochondria were catalytic enzymes involved in the pyruvate metabolism, citric acid cycle, oxidative phosphorylation, ATP synthesis, ATP transduction and glutamate metabolism. Results indicate that chronic Flx treatment may influence proteins involved in calcium signaling, cytoskeletal structure, chaperone system and stimulates energy metabolism via the upregulation of GAPDH expression in cytoplasm, as well as directing energy metabolism toward the citric acid cycle and oxidative phosphorylation in nonsynaptic mitochondria. This approach provides new insight into the chronic effects of Flx treatment on protein expression in a key brain region associated with stress response and memory. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. MARCKS Protein Is Phosphorylated and Regulates Calcium Mobilization during Human Acrosomal Exocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez Peña, Marcelo J.; Castillo Bennett, Jimena V.; Soler, Osvaldo M.; Mayorga, Luis S.; Michaut, Marcela A.

    2013-01-01

    Acrosomal exocytosis is a calcium-regulated exocytosis that can be triggered by PKC activators. The involvement of PKC in acrosomal exocytosis has not been fully elucidated, and it is unknown if MARCKS, the major substrate for PKC, participates in this exocytosis. Here, we report that MARCKS is expressed in human spermatozoa and localizes to the sperm head and the tail. Calcium- and phorbol ester-triggered acrosomal exocytosis in permeabilized sperm was abrogated by different anti-MARCKS antibodies raised against two different domains, indicating that the protein participates in acrosomal exocytosis. Interestingly, an anti-phosphorylated MARCKS antibody was not able to inhibit secretion. Similar results were obtained using recombinant proteins and phospho-mutants of MARCKS effector domain (ED), indicating that phosphorylation regulates MARCKS function in acrosomal exocytosis. It is known that unphosphorylated MARCKS sequesters PIP2. This phospholipid is the precursor for IP3, which in turn triggers release of calcium from the acrosome during acrosomal exocytosis. We found that PIP2 and adenophostin, a potent IP3-receptor agonist, rescued MARCKS inhibition in permeabilized sperm, suggesting that MARCKS inhibits acrosomal exocytosis by sequestering PIP2 and, indirectly, MARCKS regulates the intracellular calcium mobilization. In non-permeabilized sperm, a permeable peptide of MARCKS ED also inhibited acrosomal exocytosis when stimulated by a natural agonist such as progesterone, and pharmacological inducers such as calcium ionophore and phorbol ester. The preincubation of human sperm with the permeable MARCKS ED abolished the increase in calcium levels caused by progesterone, demonstrating that MARCKS regulates calcium mobilization. In addition, the phosphorylation of MARCKS increased during acrosomal exocytosis stimulated by the same activators. Altogether, these results show that MARCKS is a negative modulator of the acrosomal exocytosis, probably by sequestering

  19. Cardiac myosin binding protein-C Ser302 phosphorylation regulates cardiac β-adrenergic reserve

    PubMed Central

    Mamidi, Ranganath; Gresham, Kenneth S.; Li, Jiayang; Stelzer, Julian E.

    2017-01-01

    Phosphorylation of cardiac myosin binding protein-C (MyBP-C) modulates cardiac contractile function; however, the specific roles of individual serines (Ser) within the M-domain that are targets for β-adrenergic signaling are not known. Recently, we demonstrated that significant accelerations in in vivo pressure development following β-agonist infusion can occur in transgenic (TG) mouse hearts expressing phospho-ablated Ser282 (that is, TGS282A) but not in hearts expressing phospho-ablation of all three serines [that is, Ser273, Ser282, and Ser302 (TG3SA)], suggesting an important modulatory role for other Ser residues. In this regard, there is evidence that Ser302 phosphorylation may be a key contributor to the β-agonist–induced positive inotropic responses in the myocardium, but its precise functional role has not been established. Thus, to determine the in vivo and in vitro functional roles of Ser302 phosphorylation, we generated TG mice expressing nonphosphorylatable Ser302 (that is, TGS302A). Left ventricular pressure-volume measurements revealed that TGS302A mice displayed no accelerations in the rate of systolic pressure rise and an inability to maintain systolic pressure following dobutamine infusion similar to TG3SA mice, implicating Ser302 phosphorylation as a critical regulator of enhanced systolic performance during β-adrenergic stress. Dynamic strain–induced cross-bridge (XB) measurements in skinned myocardium isolated from TGS302A hearts showed that the molecular basis for impaired β-adrenergic–mediated enhancements in systolic function is due to the absence of protein kinase A–mediated accelerations in the rate of cooperative XB recruitment. These results demonstrate that Ser302 phosphorylation regulates cardiac contractile reserve by enhancing contractile responses during β-adrenergic stress. PMID:28345052

  20. Mitotic protein kinase CDK1 phosphorylation of mRNA translation regulator 4E-BP1 Ser83 may contribute to cell transformation

    SciTech Connect

    Velásquez, Celestino; Cheng, Erdong; Shuda, Masahiro; Lee-Oesterreich, Paula J.; Pogge von Strandmann, Lisa; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Moore, Patrick S.; Chang, Yuan

    2016-07-11

    mTOR-directed 4E-BP1 phosphorylation promotes cap-dependent translation and tumorigen-esis. During mitosis, CDK1 substitutes for mTOR and fully phosphorylates 4E-BP1 at canoni-cal as well a non-canonical S83 site resulting in a mitosis-specific hyperphosphorylated δ isoform. Colocalization studies with a phospho-S83 specific antibody indicate that 4E-BP1 S83 phosphorylation accumulates at centrosomes during prophase, peaks at metaphase, and decreases through telophase. While S83 phosphorylation of 4E-BP1 does not affect in vitro cap-dependent translation, nor eIF4G/4E-BP1 cap-binding, expression of an alanine substitution mutant 4E-BP1.S83A partially reverses rodent cell transformation induced by Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCV) small T (sT) antigen viral oncoprotein. In contrast to inhibitory mTOR 4E-BP1 phosphorylation, these findings suggest that mitotic CDK1-directed phosphorylation of δ-4E-BP1 may yield a gain-of-function, distinct from translation regulation, that may be important in tumorigenesis and mitotic centrosome function.

  1. Mitotic protein kinase CDK1 phosphorylation of mRNA translation regulator 4E-BP1 Ser83 may contribute to cell transformation

    PubMed Central

    Velásquez, Celestino; Cheng, Erdong; Shuda, Masahiro; Lee-Oesterreich, Paula J.; Pogge von Strandmann, Lisa; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Moore, Patrick S.; Chang, Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)-directed eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E-binding protein 1 (4E-BP1) phosphorylation promotes cap-dependent translation and tumorigenesis. During mitosis, cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1) substitutes for mTOR and fully phosphorylates 4E-BP1 at canonical sites (T37, T46, S65, and T70) and the noncanonical S83 site, resulting in a mitosis-specific hyperphosphorylated δ isoform. Colocalization studies with a phospho-S83 specific antibody indicate that 4E-BP1 S83 phosphorylation accumulates at centrosomes during prophase, peaks at metaphase, and decreases through telophase. Although S83 phosphorylation of 4E-BP1 does not affect general cap-dependent translation, expression of an alanine substitution mutant 4E-BP1.S83A partially reverses rodent cell transformation induced by Merkel cell polyomavirus small T antigen viral oncoprotein. In contrast to inhibitory mTOR 4E-BP1 phosphorylation, these findings suggest that mitotic CDK1-directed phosphorylation of δ-4E-BP1 may yield a gain of function, distinct from translation regulation, that may be important in tumorigenesis and mitotic centrosome function. PMID:27402756

  2. NLK-mediated phosphorylation of HDAC1 negatively regulates Wnt signaling

    PubMed Central

    Masoumi, Katarzyna Chmielarska; Daams, Renée; Sime, Wondossen; Siino, Valentina; Ke, Hengning; Levander, Fredrik; Massoumi, Ramin

    2017-01-01

    The Wnt signaling pathway is essential in regulating various cellular processes. Different mechanisms of inhibition for Wnt signaling have been proposed. Besides β-catenin degradation through the proteasome, nemo-like kinase (NLK) is another molecule that is known to negatively regulate Wnt signaling. However, the mechanism by which NLK mediates the inhibition of Wnt signaling was not known. In the present study, we used primary embryonic fibroblast cells isolated from NLK-deficient mice and showed that these cells proliferate faster and have a shorter cell cycle than wild-type cells. In NLK-knockout cells, we observed sustained interaction between Lef1 and β-catenin, leading to elevated luciferase reporter of β-catenin/Lef1–mediated transcriptional activation. The mechanism for the reduced β-catenin/Lef1 promoter activation was explained by phosphorylation of HDAC1 at serine 421 via NLK. The phosphorylation of HDAC1 was achieved only in the presence of wild-type NLK because a catalytically inactive mutant of NLK was unable to phosphorylate HDAC1 and reduced the luciferase reporter of β-catenin/Lef1–mediated transcriptional activation. This result suggests that NLK and HDAC1 together negatively regulate Wnt signaling, which is vital in preventing aberrant proliferation of nontransformed primary fibroblast cells. PMID:27903773

  3. Learning from each other: ABC transporter regulation by protein phosphorylation in plant and mammalian systems.

    PubMed

    Aryal, Bibek; Laurent, Christophe; Geisler, Markus

    2015-10-01

    The ABC (ATP-binding cassette) transporter family in higher plants is highly expanded compared with those of mammalians. Moreover, some members of the plant ABC subfamily B (ABCB) display very high substrate specificity compared with their mammalian counterparts that are often associated with multi-drug resistance phenomena. In this review, we highlight prominent functions of plant and mammalian ABC transporters and summarize our knowledge on their post-transcriptional regulation with a focus on protein phosphorylation. A deeper comparison of regulatory events of human cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) and ABCB1 from the model plant Arabidopsis reveals a surprisingly high degree of similarity. Both physically interact with orthologues of the FK506-binding proteins that chaperon both transporters to the plasma membrane in an action that seems to involve heat shock protein (Hsp)90. Further, both transporters are phosphorylated at regulatory domains that connect both nt-binding folds. Taken together, it appears that ABC transporters exhibit an evolutionary conserved but complex regulation by protein phosphorylation, which apparently is, at least in some cases, tightly connected with protein-protein interactions (PPI). © 2015 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited.

  4. Correction: Learning from each other: ABC transporter regulation by protein phosphorylation in plant and mammalian systems.

    PubMed

    Aryal, Bibek; Laurent, Christophe; Geisler, Markus

    2016-04-15

    The ABC (ATP-binding cassette) transporter family in higher plants is highly expanded compared with those of mammalians. Moreover, some members of the plant ABCB subfamily display very high substrate specificity compared with their mammalian counterparts that are often associated with multidrug resistance (MDR) phenomena. In this review we highlight prominent functions of plant and mammalian ABC transporters and summarize our knowledge on their post-transcriptional regulation with a focus on protein phosphorylation. A deeper comparison of regulatory events of human cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) and ABCB1 from the model plantArabidopsisreveals a surprisingly high degree of similarity. Both physically interact with orthologues of the FK506-binding proteins (FKBPs) that chaperon both transporters to the plasma membrane in an action that seems to involve Hsp90. Further both transporters are phosphorylated at regulatory domains that connect both nucleotide-binding folds. Taken together it appears that ABC transporters exhibit an evolutionary conserved but complex regulation by protein phosphorylation, which apparently is, at least in some cases, tightly connected with protein-protein interactions (PPI). © 2016 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited.

  5. AMPK Regulates Mitotic Spindle Orientation through Phosphorylation of Myosin Regulatory Light Chain

    PubMed Central

    Thaiparambil, Jose T.; Eggers, Carrie M.

    2012-01-01

    The proper orientation of the mitotic spindle is essential for mitosis; however, how these events unfold at the molecular level is not well understood. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) regulates energy homeostasis in eukaryotes, and AMPK-null Drosophila mutants have spindle defects. We show that threonine172 phosphorylated AMPK localizes to the mitotic spindle poles and increases when cells enter mitosis. AMPK depletion causes a mitotic delay with misoriented spindles relative to the normal division plane and a reduced number and length of astral microtubules. AMPK-depleted cells contain mitotic actin bundles, which prevent astral microtubule-actin cortex attachments. Since myosin regulatory light chain (MRLC) is an AMPK downstream target and mediates actin function, we investigated whether AMPK signals through MRLC to control spindle orientation. Mitotic levels of serine19 phosphorylated MRLC (pMRLCser19) and spindle pole-associated pMRLCser19 are abolished when AMPK function is compromised, indicating that AMPK is essential for pMRLCser19 spindle pole activity. Phosphorylation of AMPK and MRLC in the mitotic spindle is dependent upon calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase (CamKK) activity in LKB1-deficient cells, suggesting that CamKK regulates this pathway when LKB1 function is compromised. Taken together, these data indicate that AMPK mediates spindle pole-associated pMRLCser19 to control spindle orientation via regulation of actin cortex-astral microtubule attachments. PMID:22688514

  6. The function of the inner nuclear envelope protein SUN1 in mRNA export is regulated by phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Li, Ping; Stumpf, Maria; Müller, Rolf; Eichinger, Ludwig; Glöckner, Gernot; Noegel, Angelika A

    2017-08-22

    SUN1, a component of the LINC (Linker of Nucleoskeleton and Cytoskeleton) complex, functions in mammalian mRNA export through the NXF1-dependent pathway. It associates with mRNP complexes by direct interaction with NXF1. It also binds to the NPC through association with the nuclear pore component Nup153, which is involved in mRNA export. The SUN1-NXF1 association is at least partly regulated by a protein kinase C (PKC) which phosphorylates serine 113 (S113) in the N-terminal domain leading to reduced interaction. The phosphorylation appears to be important for the SUN1 function in nuclear mRNA export since GFP-SUN1 carrying a S113A mutation was less efficient in restoring mRNA export after SUN1 knockdown as compared to the wild type protein. By contrast, GFP-SUN1-S113D resembling the phosphorylated state allowed very efficient export of poly(A)+RNA. Furthermore, probing a possible role of the LINC complex component Nesprin-2 in this process we observed impaired mRNA export in Nesprin-2 knockdown cells. This effect might be independent of SUN1 as expression of a GFP tagged SUN-domain deficient SUN1, which no longer can interact with Nesprin-2, did not affect mRNA export.

  7. The heterocyst differentiation transcriptional regulator HetR of the filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena forms tetramers and can be regulated by phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Valladares, Ana; Flores, Enrique; Herrero, Antonia

    2016-02-01

    Many filamentous cyanobacteria respond to the external cue of nitrogen scarcity by the differentiation of heterocysts, cells specialized in the fixation of atmospheric nitrogen in oxic environments. Heterocysts follow a spatial pattern along the filament of two heterocysts separated by ca. 10-15 vegetative cells performing oxygenic photosynthesis. HetR is a transcriptional regulator that directs heterocyst differentiation. In the model strain Anabaena sp. PCC 7120, the HetR protein was observed in various oligomeric forms in vivo, including a tetramer that peaked with maximal hetR expression during differentiation. Tetramers were not detected in a hetR point mutant incapable of differentiation, but were conspicuous in an over-differentiating strain lacking the PatS inhibitor. In differentiated filaments the HetR tetramer was restricted to heterocysts, being undetectable in vegetative cells. HetR co-purified with RNA polymerase from Anabaena mainly as a tetramer. In vitro, purified recombinant HetR was distributed between monomers, dimers, trimers and tetramers, and it was phosphorylated when incubated with (γ-(32)P)ATP. Phosphorylation and PatS hampered the accumulation of HetR tetramers and impaired HetR binding to DNA. In summary, tetrameric HetR appears to represent a functionally relevant form of HetR, whose abundance in the Anabaena filament could be negatively regulated by phosphorylation and by PatS.

  8. Inhibition of CRMP2 phosphorylation repairs CNS by regulating neurotrophic and inhibitory responses.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Jun; Owada, Kazuki; Kitamura, Yoshiteru; Goshima, Yoshio; Ohshima, Toshio

    2016-03-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) regeneration is restricted by both the lack of neurotrophic responses and the presence of inhibitory factors. As of yet, a common mediator of these two pathways has not been identified. Microtubule dynamics is responsible for several key processes after CNS injuries: intracellular trafficking of receptors for neurotrophic factors, axonal retraction by inhibitory factors, and secondary tissue damages by inflammation and scarring. Kinases regulating microtubule organization, such as Cdk5 or GSK3β, may play pivotal roles during CNS recovery, but the molecular mechanisms remain to be elucidated. Collapsin response mediator protein 2 (CRMP2) stabilizes cytoskeletal polymerization, while CRMP2 phosphorylation by Cdk5 and GSK3β loses its affinity for cytoskeleton proteins, leading to the inhibition of axonal growth. Here, we characterized CRMP2 phosphorylation as the first crucial factor regulating neurotrophic and inhibitory responses after spinal cord injury (SCI). We found that pharmacological inhibition of GSK3β enhanced brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)-induced axonal growth response in cultured dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. DRG neurons from CRMP2 knock-in (Crmp2KI/KI) mice, where CRMP2 phosphorylation was eliminated, showed elevated sensitivity to BDNF as well. Additionally, cultured Crmp2KI/KI neurons exhibited suppressed axonal growth inhibition by chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (CSPG). These data suggest a couple of new molecular insights: the BDNF/GSK3β/CRMP2 and CSPG/GSK3β/CRMP2 pathways. Next, we tested the significance of CRMP2 phosphorylation after CNS injury in vivo. The phosphorylation level of CRMP2 was enhanced in the injured spinal cord. Crmp2KI/KI mice exhibited prominent recovery of locomotive and nociceptive functions after SCI, which correlated with the enhanced axonal growth of the motor and sensory neurons. Neuroprotective effects against SCI, such as microtubule stabilization, reduced inflammation

  9. Phosphorylation of Synaptojanin Differentially Regulates Endocytosis of Functionally Distinct Synaptic Vesicle Pools

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Junhua; Wang, Liping; Lee, Joo Yeun; Chen, Chun-Kan

    2016-01-01

    The rapid replenishment of synaptic vesicles through endocytosis is crucial for sustaining synaptic transmission during intense neuronal activity. Synaptojanin (Synj), a phosphoinositide phosphatase, is known to play an important role in vesicle recycling by promoting the uncoating of clathrin following synaptic vesicle uptake. Synj has been shown to be a substrate of the minibrain (Mnb) kinase, a fly homolog of the dual-specificity tyrosine phosphorylation-regulated kinase 1A (DYRK1A); however, the functional impacts of Synj phosphorylation by Mnb are not well understood. Here we identify that Mnb phosphorylates Synj at S1029 in Drosophila. We find that phosphorylation of Synj at S1029 enhances Synj phosphatase activity, alters interaction between Synj and endophilin, and promotes efficient endocytosis of the active cycling vesicle pool (also referred to as exo-endo cycling pool) at the expense of reserve pool vesicle endocytosis. Dephosphorylated Synj, on the other hand, is deficient in the endocytosis of the active recycling pool vesicles but maintains reserve pool vesicle endocytosis to restore total vesicle pool size and sustain synaptic transmission. Together, our findings reveal a novel role for Synj in modulating reserve pool vesicle endocytosis and further indicate that dynamic phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of Synj differentially maintain endocytosis of distinct functional synaptic vesicle pools. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Synaptic vesicle endocytosis sustains communication between neurons during a wide range of neuronal activities by recycling used vesicle membrane and protein components. Here we identify that Synaptojanin, a protein with a known role in synaptic vesicle endocytosis, is phosphorylated at S1029 in vivo by the Minibrain kinase. We further demonstrate that the phosphorylation status of Synaptojanin at S1029 differentially regulates its participation in the recycling of distinct synaptic vesicle pools. Our results reveal a new role for

  10. Serine 1179 Phosphorylation of Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase Increases Superoxide Generation and Alters Cofactor Regulation.

    PubMed

    Peng, Hu; Zhuang, Yugang; Harbeck, Mark C; He, Donghong; Xie, Lishi; Chen, Weiguo

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) is responsible for maintaining systemic blood pressure, vascular remodeling and angiogenesis. In addition to producing NO, eNOS can also generate superoxide (O2-.) in the absence of the cofactor tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4). Previous studies have shown that bovine eNOS serine 1179 (Serine 1177/human) phosphorylation critically modulates NO synthesis. However, the effect of serine 1179 phosphorylation on eNOS superoxide generation is unknown. Here, we used the phosphomimetic form of eNOS (S1179D) to determine the effect of S1179 phosphorylation on superoxide generating activity, and its sensitivity to regulation by BH4, Ca2+, and calmodulin (CAM). S1179D eNOS exhibited significantly increased superoxide generating activity and NADPH consumption compared to wild-type eNOS (WT eNOS). The superoxide generating activities of S1179D eNOS and WT eNOS did not differ significantly in their sensitivity to regulation by either Ca2+ or CaM. The sensitivity of the superoxide generating activity of S1179D eNOS to inhibition by BH4 was significantly reduced compared to WT eNOS. In eNOS-overexpressing 293 cells, BH4 depletion with 10mM DAHP for 48 hours followed by 50ng/ml VEGF for 30 min to phosphorylate eNOS S1179 increased ROS accumulation compared to DAHP-only treated cells. Meanwhile, MTT assay indicated that overexpression of eNOS in HEK293 cells decreased cellular viability compared to control cells at BH4 depletion condition (P<0.01). VEGF-mediated Serine 1179 phosphorylation further decreased the cellular viability in eNOS-overexpressing 293 cells (P<0.01). Our data demonstrate that eNOS serine 1179 phosphorylation, in addition to enhancing NO production, also profoundly affects superoxide generation: S1179 phosphorylation increases superoxide production while decreasing sensitivity to the inhibitory effect of BH4 on this activity.

  11. SUMOylation of DNA topoisomerase IIα regulates histone H3 kinase Haspin and H3 phosphorylation in mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Makoto M.; Ting, Lily; Gygi, Steven P.

    2016-01-01

    DNA topoisomerase II (TOP2) plays a pivotal role in faithful chromosome separation through its strand-passaging activity that resolves tangled genomic DNA during mitosis. Additionally, TOP2 controls progression of mitosis by activating cell cycle checkpoints. Recent work showed that the enzymatically inert C-terminal domain (CTD) of TOP2 and its posttranslational modification are critical to this checkpoint regulation. However, the molecular mechanism has not yet been determined. By using Xenopus laevis egg extract, we found that SUMOylation of DNA topoisomerase IIα (TOP2A) CTD regulates the localization of the histone H3 kinase Haspin and phosphorylation of histone H3 at threonine 3 at the centromere, two steps known to be involved in the recruitment of the chromosomal passenger complex (CPC) to kinetochores in mitosis. Robust centromeric Haspin localization requires SUMOylated TOP2A CTD binding activity through SUMO-interaction motifs and the phosphorylation of Haspin. We propose a novel mechanism through which the TOP2 CTD regulates the CPC via direct interaction with Haspin at mitotic centromeres. PMID:27325792

  12. Regulation of Arabidopsis Leaf Hydraulics Involves Light-Dependent Phosphorylation of Aquaporins in Veins[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Prado, Karine; Boursiac, Yann; Tournaire-Roux, Colette; Monneuse, Jean-Marc; Postaire, Olivier; Da Ines, Olivier; Schäffner, Anton R.; Hem, Sonia; Santoni, Véronique; Maurel, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    The water status of plant leaves depends on the efficiency of the water supply, from the vasculature to inner tissues. This process is under hormonal and environmental regulation and involves aquaporin water channels. In Arabidopsis thaliana, the rosette hydraulic conductivity (Kros) is higher in darkness than it is during the day. Knockout plants showed that three plasma membrane intrinsic proteins (PIPs) sharing expression in veins (PIP1;2, PIP2;1, and PIP2;6) contribute to rosette water transport, and PIP2;1 can fully account for Kros responsiveness to darkness. Directed expression of PIP2;1 in veins of a pip2;1 mutant was sufficient to restore Kros. In addition, a positive correlation, in both wild-type and PIP2;1-overexpressing plants, was found between Kros and the osmotic water permeability of protoplasts from the veins but not from the mesophyll. Thus, living cells in veins form a major hydraulic resistance in leaves. Quantitative proteomic analyses showed that light-dependent regulation of Kros is linked to diphosphorylation of PIP2;1 at Ser-280 and Ser-283. Expression in pip2;1 of phosphomimetic and phosphorylation-deficient forms of PIP2;1 demonstrated that phosphorylation at these two sites is necessary for Kros enhancement under darkness. These findings establish how regulation of a single aquaporin isoform in leaf veins critically determines leaf hydraulics. PMID:23532070

  13. The fission yeast meiotic checkpoint kinase Mek1 regulates nuclear localization of Cdc25 by phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Hidalgo, Livia; Moreno, Sergio; San-Segundo, Pedro A

    2008-12-01

    In eukaryotic cells, fidelity in transmission of genetic information during cell division is ensured by the action of cell cycle checkpoints. Checkpoints are surveillance mechanisms that arrest or delay cell cycle progression when critical cellular processes are defective or when the genome is damaged. During meiosis, the so-called meiotic recombination checkpoint blocks entry into meiosis I until recombination has been completed, thus avoiding aberrant chromosome segregation and the formation of aneuploid gametes. One of the key components of the meiotic recombination checkpoint is the meiosis-specific Mek1 kinase, which belongs to the family of Rad53/Cds1/Chk2 checkpoint kinases containing forkhead-associated domains. In fission yeast, several lines of evidence suggest that Mek1 targets the critical cell cycle regulator Cdc25 to delay meiotic cell cycle progression. Here, we investigate in more detail the molecular mechanism of action of the fission yeast Mek1 protein. We demonstrate that Mek1 acts independently of Cds1 to phosphorylate Cdc25, and this phosphorylation is required to trigger cell cycle arrest. Using ectopic overexpression of mek1(+) as a tool to induce in vivo activation of Mek1, we find that Mek1 promotes cytoplasmic accumulation of Cdc25 and results in prolonged phosphorylation of Cdc2 at tyrosine 15. We propose that at least one of the mechanisms contributing to the cell cycle delay when the meiotic recombination checkpoint is activated in fission yeast is the nuclear exclusion of the Cdc25 phosphatase by Mek1-dependent phosphorylation.

  14. Non-Canonical Role of IKKα in the Regulation of STAT1 Phosphorylation in Antiviral Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Fei; Matsumiya, Tomoh; Shiba, Yuko; Hayakari, Ryo; Yoshida, Hidemi; Imaizumi, Tadaatsu

    2016-01-01

    Non-self RNA is recognized by retinoic acid-inducible gene-I (RIG-I)-like receptors (RLRs), inducing type I interferons (IFNs). Type I IFN promotes the expression of IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs), which requires the activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription-1 (STAT1). We previously reported that dsRNA induced STAT1 phosphorylation via a type I IFN-independent pathway in addition to the well-known type I IFN-dependent pathway. IκB kinase α (IKKα) is involved in antiviral signaling induced by dsRNA; however, its role is incompletely understood. Here, we explored the function of IKKα in RLR-mediated STAT1 phosphorylation. Silencing of IKKα markedly decreased the level of IFN-β and STAT1 phosphorylation inHeH response to dsRNA. However, the inhibition of IKKα did not alter the RLR signaling-mediated dimerization of interferon responsive factor 3 (IRF3) or the nuclear translocation of nuclear factor-κB (NFκB). These results suggest a non-canonical role of IKKα in RLR signaling. Furthermore, phosphorylation of STAT1 was suppressed by IKKα knockdown in cells treated with a specific neutralizing antibody for the type I IFN receptor (IFNAR) and in IFNAR-deficient cells. Collectively, the dual regulation of STAT1 by IKKα in antiviral signaling suggests a role for IKKα in the fine-tuning of antiviral signaling in response to non-self RNA. PMID:27992555

  15. Embryonic Stem Cell Growth Factors Regulate eIF2α Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Friend, Kyle; Brooks, Hunter A.; Propson, Nicholas E.; Thomson, James A.; Kimble, Judith

    2015-01-01

    Growth factors and transcription factors are well known to regulate pluripotent stem cells, but less is known about translational control in stem cells. Here, we use embryonic stem cells (ESCs) to investigate a connection between ESC growth factors and eIF2α-mediated translational control (eIF2α phosphorylation promotes protein expression from mRNAs with upstream open-reading frames, or uORFs). We find abundant phosphorylated P-eIF2α (P-eIF2α) in both pluripotent mouse and human ESCs, but little P-eIF2α in ESCs triggered to differentiate. We show that the growth factors LIF (leukemia inhibitory factor) and BMP4 (bone morphogenic protein 4) both maintain P-eIF2α in mESCs, but use distinct mechanisms: LIF inhibits an eIF2α phosphatase whereas BMP4 activates an eIF2α kinase. The mRNAs encoding the pluripotency factors Nanog and c-Myc possess uORFs while Oct4 mRNA does not. We find that salubrinal, a chemical that increases eIF2α phosphorylation, promotes Nanog and c-Myc expression, but not Oct4 expression. These experiments connect ESC growth factors to eIF2α phosphorylation and suggest a chemical substitute for LIF to enhance Nanog and c-Myc expression. PMID:26406898

  16. Regulation of the EBNA1 Epstein-Barr virus protein by serine phosphorylation and arginine methylation.

    PubMed

    Shire, Kathy; Kapoor, Priya; Jiang, Ke; Hing, Margaret Ng Thow; Sivachandran, Nirojini; Nguyen, Tin; Frappier, Lori

    2006-06-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) EBNA1 protein is important for the replication and mitotic segregation of EBV genomes in latently infected cells and also activates the transcription of some of the viral latency genes. A Gly-Arg-rich region between amino acids 325 and 376 is required for both the segregation and transcriptional activation functions of EBNA1. Here we show that this region is modified by both arginine methylation and serine phosphorylation. Mutagenesis of the four potentially phosphorylated serines in this region indicated that phosphorylation of multiple serines contributes to the efficient segregation of EBV-based plasmids by EBNA1, at least in part by increasing EBNA1 binding to hEBP2. EBNA1 was also found to bind the arginine methyltransferases PRMT1 and PRMT5. Multiple arginines in the 325-376 region were methylated in vitro by PRMT1 and PRMT5, as was an N-terminal Gly-Arg-rich region between amino acids 41 and 50. EBNA1 was also shown to be methylated in vivo, predominantly in the 325-376 region. Treatment of cells with a methylation inhibitor or down-regulation of PRMT1 altered EBNA1 localization, resulting in the formation of EBNA1 rings around the nucleoli. The results indicate that EBNA1 function is influenced by both serine phosphorylation and arginine methylation.

  17. Three-dimensional Reconstruction of Tarantula Myosin Filaments Suggests How Phosphorylation May Regulate Myosin Activity

    PubMed Central

    Alamo, Lorenzo; Wriggers, Willy; Pinto, Antonio; Bártoli, Fulvia; Salazar, Leiría; Zhao, Fa-Qing; Craig, Roger; Padrón, Raúl

    2008-01-01

    Summary Muscle contraction involves the interaction of the myosin heads of the thick filaments with actin subunits of the thin filaments. Relaxation occurs when this interaction is blocked by molecular switches on these filaments. In many muscles, myosin-linked regulation involves phosphorylation of the myosin regulatory light chains (RLC). Electron microscopy of vertebrate smooth muscle myosin molecules (regulated by phosphorylation) has provided insight into the relaxed structure, revealing that myosin is switched off by intramolecular interactions between its two heads, the free-head and the blocked head. Three-dimensional reconstruction of frozen-hydrated specimens reveals that this asymmetric head interaction is also present in native thick filaments of tarantula striated muscle. Our goal here has been to elucidate the structural features of the tarantula filament involved in phosphorylation-based regulation. A new reconstruction reveals intra- and intermolecular myosin interactions in addition to those seen previously. To help interpret the interactions, we sequenced the tarantula RLC, and fitted to the reconstruction an atomic model of the myosin head that included the predicted RLC atomic structure and an S2 crystal structure. The fitting suggests an intramolecular interaction between the cardiomyopathy loop of the free-head and its own S2 and two intermolecular interactions—between the cardio-loop of the free head and the ELC of the blocked head, and between the Leu-305 - Gln-327 “interaction loop” (loop I) of the free-head and the N-terminal fragment of the RLC of the blocked-head. These interactions, added to those previously described, would help to switch off the thick filament. Molecular dynamics simulations suggest how phosphorylation could increase the helical content of the RLC N-terminus, weakening these interactions, thus releasing both heads and activating the thick filament. PMID:18951904

  18. Three-dimensional reconstruction of tarantula myosin filaments suggests how phosphorylation may regulate myosin activity.

    PubMed

    Alamo, Lorenzo; Wriggers, Willy; Pinto, Antonio; Bártoli, Fulvia; Salazar, Leiria; Zhao, Fa-Qing; Craig, Roger; Padrón, Raúl

    2008-12-26

    Muscle contraction involves the interaction of the myosin heads of the thick filaments with actin subunits of the thin filaments. Relaxation occurs when this interaction is blocked by molecular switches on these filaments. In many muscles, myosin-linked regulation involves phosphorylation of the myosin regulatory light chains (RLCs). Electron microscopy of vertebrate smooth muscle myosin molecules (regulated by phosphorylation) has provided insight into the relaxed structure, revealing that myosin is switched off by intramolecular interactions between its two heads, the free head and the blocked head. Three-dimensional reconstruction of frozen-hydrated specimens revealed that this asymmetric head interaction is also present in native thick filaments of tarantula striated muscle. Our goal in this study was to elucidate the structural features of the tarantula filament involved in phosphorylation-based regulation. A new reconstruction revealed intra- and intermolecular myosin interactions in addition to those seen previously. To help interpret the interactions, we sequenced the tarantula RLC and fitted an atomic model of the myosin head that included the predicted RLC atomic structure and an S2 (subfragment 2) crystal structure to the reconstruction. The fitting suggests one intramolecular interaction, between the cardiomyopathy loop of the free head and its own S2, and two intermolecular interactions, between the cardiac loop of the free head and the essential light chain of the blocked head and between the Leu305-Gln327 interaction loop of the free head and the N-terminal fragment of the RLC of the blocked head. These interactions, added to those previously described, would help switch off the thick filament. Molecular dynamics simulations suggest how phosphorylation could increase the helical content of the RLC N-terminus, weakening these interactions, thus releasing both heads and activating the thick filament.

  19. Phosphorylation of Rab11-FIP2 regulates polarity in MDCK cells

    PubMed Central

    Lapierre, Lynne A.; Avant, Kenya M.; Caldwell, Cathy M.; Oztan, Asli; Apodaca, Gerard; Knowles, Byron C.; Roland, Joseph T.; Ducharme, Nicole A.; Goldenring, James R.

    2012-01-01

    The Rab11 effector Rab11-family interacting protein 2 (Rab11-FIP2) regulates transcytosis through its interactions with Rab11a and myosin Vb. Previous studies implicated Rab11-FIP2 in the establishment of polarity in Madin–Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells through phosphorylation of Ser-227 by MARK2. Here we examine the dynamic role of Rab11-FIP2 phosphorylation on MDCK cell polarity. Endogenous Rab11-FIP2 phosphorylated on Ser-227 coalesces on vesicular plaques during the reestablishment of polarity after either monolayer wounding or calcium switch. Whereas expression of the nonphosphorylatable Rab11-FIP2(S227A) elicits a loss in lumen formation in MDCK cell cysts grown in Matrigel, the putative pseudophosphorylated Rab11-FIP2(S227E) mutant induces the formation of cysts with multiple lumens. On permeable filters, Rab11-FIP2(S227E)–expressing cells exhibit alterations in the composition of both the adherens and tight junctions. At the adherens junction, p120 catenin and K-cadherin are retained, whereas the majority of the E-cadherin is lost. Although ZO-1 is retained at the tight junction, occludin is lost and the claudin composition is altered. Of interest, the effects of Rab11-FIP2 on cellular polarity did not involve myosin Vb or Rab11a. These results indicate that Ser-227 phosphorylation of Rab11-FIP2 regulates the composition of both adherens and tight junctions and is intimately involved in the regulation of polarity in epithelial cells. PMID:22553350

  20. Regulation of TRPP3 Channel Function by N-terminal Domain Palmitoylation and Phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Wang; Yang, JungWoo; Beauchamp, Erwan; Cai, Ruiqi; Hussein, Shaimaa; Hofmann, Laura; Li, Qiang; Flockerzi, Veit; Berthiaume, Luc G; Tang, Jingfeng; Chen, Xing-Zhen

    2016-12-02

    Transient receptor potential polycystin-3 (TRPP3) is a cation channel activated by calcium and proton and is involved in hedgehog signaling, intestinal development, and sour tasting. How TRPP3 channel function is regulated remains poorly understood. By N-terminal truncation mutations, electrophysiology, and Xenopus oocyte expression, we first identified fragment Asp-21-Ser-42 to be functionally important. We then found that deletion mutant Δ1-36 (TRPP3 missing fragment Met-1-Arg-36) has a similar function as wild-type TRPP3, whereas Δ1-38 is functionally dead, suggesting the importance of Val-37 or Cys-38. Further studies found that Cys-38, but not Val-37, is functionally critical. Cys-38 is a predicted site of palmitoylation, and indeed TRPP3 channel activity was inhibited by palmitoylation inhibitor 2-bromopalmitate and rescued by palmitoylation substrate palmitic acid. The TRPP3 N terminus (TRPP3NT, Met-1-Leu-95) localized along the plasma membrane of HEK293 cells but stayed in the cytoplasm with 2-bromopalmitate treatment or C38A mutation, indicating that TRPP3NT anchors to the surface membrane through palmitoylation at Cys-38. By acyl-biotin exchange assays, we showed that TRPP3, but not mutant C38A, is indeed palmitoylated. When putative phosphorylation sites near Cys-38 were mutated to Asp or Glu to mimic phosphorylation, only T39D and T39E reduced TRPP3 function. Furthermore, TRPP3NT displayed double bands in which the upper band was abolished by λ phosphatase treatment or T39A mutation. However, palmitoylation at Cys-38 and phosphorylation at Thr-39 independently regulated TRPP3 channel function, in contrast to previous reports about correlated palmitoylation with a proximate phosphorylation. Palmitoylation at Cys-38 represents a novel mechanism of functional regulation for TRPP3. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  1. Role of CBS and Bateman Domains in Phosphorylation-Dependent Regulation of a CLC Anion Channel.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Toshiki; Krzeminski, Mickael; Bozoky, Zoltan; Forman-Kay, Julie D; Strange, Kevin

    2016-11-01

    Eukaryotic CLC anion channels and transporters are homodimeric proteins composed of multiple α-helical membrane domains and large cytoplasmic C-termini containing two cystathionine-β-synthase domains (CBS1 and CBS2) that dimerize to form a Bateman domain. The Bateman domains of adjacent CLC subunits interact to form a Bateman domain dimer. The functions of CLC CBS and Bateman domains are poorly understood. We utilized the Caenorhabditis elegans CLC-1/2/Ka/Kb anion channel homolog CLH-3b to characterize the regulatory roles of CLC cytoplasmic domains. CLH-3b activity is reduced by phosphorylation or deletion of a 14-amino-acid activation domain (AD) located on the linker connecting CBS1 and CBS2. We demonstrate here that phosphorylation-dependent reductions in channel activity require an intact Bateman domain dimer and concomitant phosphorylation or deletion of both ADs. Regulation of a CLH-3b AD deletion mutant is reconstituted by intracellular perfusion with recombinant 14-amino-acid AD peptides. The sulfhydryl reactive reagent 2-(trimethylammonium)ethyl methanethiosulfonate bromide (MTSET) alters in a phosphorylation-dependent manner the activity of channels containing single cysteine residues that are engineered into the short intracellular loop connecting membrane α-helices H and I (H-I loop), the AD, CBS1, and CBS2. In contrast, MTSET has no effect on channels in which cysteine residues are engineered into intracellular regions that are dispensable for regulation. These studies together with our previous work suggest that binding and unbinding of the AD to the Bateman domain dimer induces conformational changes that are transduced to channel membrane domains via the H-I loop. Our findings provide new, to our knowledge, insights into the roles of CLC Bateman domains and the structure-function relationships that govern the regulation of CLC protein activity by diverse ligands and signaling pathways.

  2. The Plastid Casein Kinase 2 Phosphorylates Rubisco Activase at the Thr-78 Site but Is Not Essential for Regulation of Rubisco Activation State

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sang Y.; Bender, Kyle W.; Walker, Berkley J.; Zielinski, Raymond E.; Spalding, Martin H.; Ort, Donald R.; Huber, Steven C.

    2016-01-01

    Rubisco activase (RCA) is essential for the activation of Rubisco, the carboxylating enzyme of photosynthesis. In Arabidopsis, RCA is composed of a large RCAα and small RCAβ isoform that are formed by alternative splicing of a single gene (At2g39730). The activity of Rubisco is controlled in response to changes in irradiance by regulation of RCA activity, which is known to involve a redox-sensitive disulfide bond located in the carboxy-terminal extension of the RCAα subunit. Additionally, phosphorylation of RCA threonine-78 (Thr-78) has been reported to occur in the dark suggesting that phosphorylation may also be associated with dark-inactivation of RCA and deactivation of Rubisco. In the present study, we developed site-specific antibodies to monitor phosphorylation of RCA at the Thr-78 site and used non-reducing SDS-PAGE to monitor the redox status of the RCAα subunit. By immunoblotting, phosphorylation of both RCA isoforms occurred at low light and in the dark and feeding peroxide or DTT to leaf segments indicated that redox status of the chloroplast stroma was a critical factor controlling RCA phosphorylation. Use of a knockout mutant identified the plastid-targeted casein kinase 2 (cpCK2α) as the major protein kinase involved in RCA phosphorylation. Studies with recombinant cpCK2α and synthetic peptide substrates identified acidic residues at the –1, +2, and +3 positions surrounding Thr-78 as strong positive recognition elements. The cpck2 knockout mutant had strongly reduced phosphorylation at the Thr-78 site but was similar to wild type plants in terms of induction kinetics of photosynthesis following transfer from darkness or low light to high light, suggesting that if phosphorylation of RCA Thr-78 plays a direct role it would be redundant to redox regulation for control of Rubisco activation state under normal conditions. PMID:27064346

  3. G Protein-coupled Receptor Kinase-mediated Phosphorylation Regulates Post-endocytic Trafficking of the D2 Dopamine Receptor*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Namkung, Yoon; Dipace, Concetta; Javitch, Jonathan A.; Sibley, David R.

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the role of G protein-coupled receptor kinase (GRK)-mediated phosphorylation in agonist-induced desensitization, arrestin association, endocytosis, and intracellular trafficking of the D2 dopamine receptor (DAR). Agonist activation of D2 DARs results in rapid and sustained receptor phosphorylation that is solely mediated by GRKs. A survey of GRKs revealed that only GRK2 or GRK3 promotes D2 DAR phosphorylation. Mutational analyses resulted in the identification of eight serine/threonine residues within the third cytoplasmic loop of the receptor that are phosphorylated by GRK2/3. Simultaneous mutation of these eight residues results in a receptor construct, GRK(-), that is completely devoid of agonist-promoted GRK-mediated receptor phosphorylation. We found that both wild-type (WT) and GRK(-) receptors underwent a similar degree of agonist-induced desensitization as assessed using [35S]GTPγS binding assays. Similarly, both receptor constructs internalized to the same extent in response to agonist treatment. Furthermore, using bioluminescence resonance energy transfer assays to directly assess receptor association with arrestin3, we found no differences between the WT and GRK(-) receptors. Thus, phosphorylation is not required for arrestin-receptor association or agonist-induced desensitization or internalization. In contrast, when we examined recycling of the D2 DARs to the cell surface, subsequent to agonist-induced endocytosis, the GRK(-) construct exhibited less recycling in comparison with the WT receptor. This impairment appears to be due to a greater propensity of the GRK(-) receptors to down-regulate once internalized. In contrast, if the receptor is highly phosphorylated, then receptor recycling is promoted. These results reveal a novel role for GRK-mediated phosphorylation in regulating the post-endocytic trafficking of a G protein-coupled receptor. PMID:19332542

  4. Regulation of phenylalanine hydroxylase: conformational changes upon phosphorylation detected by H/D exchange and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; Fitzpatrick, Paul F

    2013-07-15

    The enzyme phenylalanine hydroxylase catalyzes the hydroxylation of excess phenylalanine in the liver to tyrosine. The enzyme is regulated allosterically by phenylalanine and by phosphorylation of Ser16. Hydrogen/deuterium exchange monitored by mass spectrometry has been used to gain insight into any structural change upon phosphorylation. Peptides in both the catalytic and regulatory domains show increased deuterium incorporation into the phosphorylated protein. Deuterium is incorporated into fewer peptides than when the enzyme is activated by phenylalanine, and the incorporation is slower. This establishes that the conformational change upon phosphorylation of phenylalanine hydroxylase is different from and less extensive than that upon phenylalanine activation.

  5. Direct binding of MEK1 and MEK2 to AKT induces Foxo1 phosphorylation, cellular migration and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Procaccia, Shiri; Ordan, Merav; Cohen, Izel; Bendetz-Nezer, Sarit; Seger, Rony

    2017-01-01

    Crosstalk between the ERK cascade and other signaling pathways is one of the means by which it acquires its signaling specificity. Here we identified a direct interaction of both MEK1 and MEK2 with AKT. The interaction is mediated by the proline rich domain of MEK1/2 and regulated by phosphorylation of Ser298 in MEK1, or Ser306 in MEK2, which we identified here as a novel regulatory site. We further developed a blocking peptide, which inhibits the interaction between MEK and AKT, and when applied to cells, affects migration and adhesion, but not proliferation. The specific mechanism of action of the MEK-AKT complex involves phosphorylation of the migration-related transcription factor FoxO1. Importantly, prevention of the interaction results in a decreased metastasis formation in a breast cancer mouse model. Thus, the identified interaction both sheds light on how signaling specificity is determined, and represents a possible new therapeutic target for metastatic cancer. PMID:28225038

  6. KIF5C S176 Phosphorylation Regulates Microtubule Binding and Transport Efficiency in Mammalian Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Padzik, Artur; Deshpande, Prasannakumar; Hollos, Patrik; Franker, Mariella; Rannikko, Emmy H.; Cai, Dawen; Prus, Piotr; Mågård, Mats; Westerlund, Nina; Verhey, Kristen J.; James, Peter; Hoogenraad, Casper C.; Coffey, Eleanor T.

    2016-01-01

    Increased phosphorylation of the KIF5 anterograde motor is associated with impaired axonal transport and neurodegeneration, but paradoxically also with normal transport, though the details are not fully defined. JNK phosphorylates KIF5C on S176 in the motor domain; a site that we show is phosphorylated in brain. Microtubule pelleting assays demonstrate that phosphomimetic KIF5C(1-560)S176D associates weakly with microtubules compared to KIF5C(1-560)WT. Consistent with this, 50% of KIF5C(1-560)S176D shows diffuse movement in neurons. However, the remaining 50% remains microtubule bound and displays decreased pausing and increased bidirectional movement. The same directionality switching is observed with KIF5C(1-560)WT in the presence of an active JNK chimera, MKK7-JNK. Yet, in cargo trafficking assays where peroxisome cargo is bound, KIF5C(1-560)S176D-GFP-FRB transports normally to microtubule plus ends. We also find that JNK increases the ATP hydrolysis of KIF5C in vitro. These data suggest that phosphorylation of KIF5C-S176 primes the motor to either disengage entirely from microtubule tracks as previously observed in response to stress, or to display improved efficiency. The final outcome may depend on cargo load and motor ensembles. PMID:27013971

  7. A Variable Active Site Residue Influences the Kinetics of Response Regulator Phosphorylation and Dephosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Immormino, Robert M; Silversmith, Ruth E; Bourret, Robert B

    2016-10-04

    Two-component regulatory systems, minimally composed of a sensor kinase and a response regulator protein, are common mediators of signal transduction in microorganisms. All response regulators contain a receiver domain with conserved active site residues that catalyze the signal activating and deactivating phosphorylation and dephosphorylation reactions. We explored the impact of variable active site position T+1 (one residue C-terminal to the conserved Thr/Ser) on reaction kinetics and signaling fidelity, using wild type and mutant Escherichia coli CheY, CheB, and NarL to represent the three major sequence classes observed across response regulators: Ala/Gly, Ser/Thr, and Val/Ile/Met, respectively, at T+1. Biochemical and structural data together suggested that different amino acids at T+1 impacted reaction kinetics by altering access to the active site while not perturbing overall protein structure. A given amino acid at position T+1 had similar effects on autodephosphorylation in each protein background tested, likely by modulating access of the attacking water molecule to the active site. Similarly, rate constants for CheY autophosphorylation with three different small molecule phosphodonors were consistent with the steric constraints on access to the phosphorylation site arising from combination of specific phosphodonors with particular amino acids at T+1. Because other variable active site residues also influence response regulator phosphorylation biochemistry, we began to explore how context (here, the amino acid at T+2) affected the influence of position T+1 on CheY autocatalytic reactions. Finally, position T+1 affected the fidelity and kinetics of phosphotransfer between sensor kinases and response regulators but was not a primary determinant of their interaction.

  8. Regulation of Xenopus laevis DNA topoisomerase I activity by phosphorylation in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Kaiserman, H.B.; Ingebritsen, T.S.; Benbow, R.M.

    1988-05-03

    DNA topoisomerase I has been purified to electrophoretic homogeneity from ovaries of the frog Xenopus laevis. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the most purified fraction revealed a single major band at 110 kDa and less abundant minor bands centered at 62 kDa. Incubation of the most purified fraction with immobilized calf intestinal alkaline phosphatase abolished all DNA topoisomerase enzymatic activity in a time-dependent reaction. Treatment of the dephosphorylated X. laevis DNA topoisomerase I with a X. laevis casein kinase type II activity and ATP restored DNA topoisomerase activity to a level higher than that observed in the most purified fraction. In vitro labeling experiments which employed the most purified DNA topoisomerase I fraction, (..gamma..-/sup 32/P)ATP, and the casein kinase type II enzyme showed that both the 110- and 62-kDa bands became phosphorylated in approximately molar proportions. Phosphoamino acid analysis showed that only serine residues became phosphorylated. Phosphorylation was accompanied by an increase in DNA topoisomerase activity in vitro. Dephosphorylation of DNA topoisomerase I appears to block formation of the initial enzyme-substrate complex on the basis of the failure of the dephosphorylated enzyme to nick DNA in the presence of camptothecin. The authors conclude that X. laevis DNA topoisomerase I is partially phosphorylated as isolated and that this phosphorylation is essential for expression of enzymatic activity in vitro. On the basis of the ability of the casein kinase type II activity to reactivate dephosphorylated DNA topoisomerase I, they speculate that this kinase may contribute to the physiological regulation of DNA topoisomerase I activity.

  9. A mutation of the fission yeast EB1 overcomes negative regulation by phosphorylation and stabilizes microtubules

    SciTech Connect

    Iimori, Makoto; Ozaki, Kanako; Chikashige, Yuji; Habu, Toshiyuki; Hiraoka, Yasushi; Maki, Takahisa; Hayashi, Ikuko; Obuse, Chikashi; Matsumoto, Tomohiro

    2012-02-01

    Mal3 is a fission yeast homolog of EB1, a plus-end tracking protein (+ TIP). We have generated a mutation (89R) replacing glutamine with arginine in the calponin homology (CH) domain of Mal3. Analysis of the 89R mutant in vitro has revealed that the mutation confers a higher affinity to microtubules and enhances the intrinsic activity to promote the microtubule-assembly. The mutant Mal3 is no longer a + TIP, but binds strongly the microtubule lattice. Live cell imaging has revealed that while the wild type Mal3 proteins dissociate from the tip of the growing microtubules before the onset of shrinkage, the mutant Mal3 proteins persist on microtubules and reduces a rate of shrinkage after a longer pausing period. Consequently, the mutant Mal3 proteins cause abnormal elongation of microtubules composing the spindle and aster. Mal3 is phosphorylated at a cluster of serine/threonine residues in the linker connecting the CH and EB1-like C-terminal motif domains. The phosphorylation occurs in a microtubule-dependent manner and reduces the affinity of Mal3 to microtubules. We propose that because the 89R mutation is resistant to the effect of phosphorylation, it can associate persistently with microtubules and confers a stronger stability of microtubules likely by reinforcing the cylindrical structure. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We characterize a mutation (mal3-89R) in fission yeast homolog of EB1. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The mutation enhances the activity to assemble microtubules. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mal3 is phosphorylated in a microtubule-dependent manner. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The phosphorylation negatively regulates the Mal3 activity.

  10. Casein kinase 1 α phosphorylates the Wnt regulator Jade-1 and modulates its activity.

    PubMed

    Borgal, Lori; Rinschen, Markus M; Dafinger, Claudia; Hoff, Sylvia; Reinert, Matthäus J; Lamkemeyer, Tobias; Lienkamp, Soeren S; Benzing, Thomas; Schermer, Bernhard

    2014-09-19

    Tight regulation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling is critical for vertebrate development and tissue maintenance, and deregulation can lead to a host of disease phenotypes, including developmental disorders and cancer. Proteins associated with primary cilia and centrosomes have been demonstrated to negatively regulate canonical Wnt signaling in interphase cells. The plant homeodomain zinc finger protein Jade-1 can act as an E3 ubiquitin ligase-targeting β-catenin for proteasomal degradation and concentrates at the centrosome and ciliary basal body in addition to the nucleus in interphase cells. We demonstrate that the destruction complex component casein kinase 1α (CK1α) phosphorylates Jade-1 at a conserved SLS motif and reduces the ability of Jade-1 to inhibit β-catenin signaling. Consistently, Jade-1 lacking the SLS motif is more effective than wild-type Jade-1 in reducing β-catenin-induced secondary axis formation in Xenopus laevis embryos in vivo. Interestingly, CK1α also phosphorylates β-catenin and the destruction complex component adenomatous polyposis coli at a similar SLS motif to the effect that β-catenin is targeted for degradation. The opposing effect of Jade-1 phosphorylation by CK1α suggests a novel example of the dual functions of CK1α activity to either oppose or promote canonical Wnt signaling in a context-dependent manner.

  11. Girdin and its phosphorylation dynamically regulate neonatal vascular development and pathological neovascularization in the retina.

    PubMed

    Ito, Takanori; Komeima, Keiichi; Yasuma, Tetsuhiro; Enomoto, Atsushi; Asai, Naoya; Asai, Masato; Iwase, Sayoko; Takahashi, Masahide; Terasaki, Hiroko

    2013-02-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is recognized as a principal mediator of vessel growth. VEGF regulates various endothelial cellular processes, including cell migration, proliferation, and survival, through the serine threonine protein kinase Akt. The Akt substrate girdin, an actin-binding protein, is known to regulate VEGF-mediated postnatal angiogenesis. However, the role of girdin and its phosphorylation in neonatal retinal vascular development and ocular pathological neovascularization in vivo has not been elucidated. In the present study, therefore, we investigated these processes using Girdin(+/-) mice lacking one copy of the girdin gene and girdin S1416A knockin (Girdin-KI(SA/SA)) mice in which the phosphorylation site of girdin is completely disrupted. We used three mouse models of pathological ocular neovascularization: oxygen-induced retinopathy (a mouse model of ischemic retinopathies), laser-induced choroidal neovascularization, and a human VEGF transgenic mouse that overexpresses human VEGF specifically in photoreceptor cells and generates pathological neovascularization in the retina. Neonatal vascular development was delayed and pathological neovascularization was decreased in both Girdin(+/-) mice and Girdin-KI(SA/SA) mice. These results demonstrate that girdin and its phosphorylation play an important role in neonatal vascular development and in pathological neovascularization in the retina. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Abl2 kinase phosphorylates Bi-organellar regulator MNRR1 in mitochondria, stimulating respiration.

    PubMed

    Aras, Siddhesh; Arrabi, Hassan; Purandare, Neeraja; Hüttemann, Maik; Kamholz, John; Züchner, Stephan; Grossman, Lawrence I

    2017-02-01

    We previously showed that MNRR1 (Mitochondrial Nuclear Retrograde Regulator 1, also CHCHD2) functions in two subcellular compartments, displaying a different function in each. In the mitochondria it is a stress regulator of respiration that binds to cytochrome c oxidase (COX) whereas in the nucleus it is a transactivator of COX4I2 and other hypoxia-stimulated genes. We now show that binding of MNRR1 to COX is promoted by phosphorylation at tyrosine-99 and that this interaction stimulates respiration. We show that phosphorylation of MNRR1 takes place in mitochondria and is mediated by Abl2 kinase (ARG). A family with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A with an exaggerated phenotype harbors a Q112H mutation in MNRR1, located in a domain that is necessary for transcriptional activation by MNRR1. Furthermore, the mutation causes the protein to function suboptimally in the mitochondria in response to cellular stress. The Q112H mutation hinders the ability of the protein to interact with Abl kinase, leading to defective tyrosine phosphorylation and a resultant defect in respiration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Extracellular regulated kinase phosphorylates mitofusin 1 to control mitochondrial morphology and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Pyakurel, Aswin; Savoia, Claudia; Hess, Daniel; Scorrano, Luca

    2015-04-16

    Controlled changes in mitochondrial morphology participate in cellular signaling cascades. However, the molecular mechanisms modifying mitochondrial shape are largely unknown. Here we show that the mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase cascade member extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylates the pro-fusion protein mitofusin (MFN) 1, modulating its participation in apoptosis and mitochondrial fusion. Phosphoproteomic and biochemical analyses revealed that MFN1 is phosphorylated at an atypical ERK site in its heptad repeat (HR) 1 domain. This site proved essential to mediate MFN1-dependent mitochondrial elongation and apoptosis regulation by the MEK/ERK cascade. A mutant mimicking constitutive MFN1 phosphorylation was less efficient in oligomerizing and mitochondria tethering but bound more avidly to the proapoptotic BCL-2 family member BAK, facilitating its activation and cell death. Moreover, neuronal apoptosis following oxygen glucose deprivation and MEK/ERK activation required an intact MFN1(T562). Our data identify MFN1 as an ERK target to modulate mitochondrial shape and apoptosis.

  14. PKA-regulated VASP phosphorylation promotes extrusion of transformed cells from the epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Anton, Katarzyna A.; Sinclair, John; Ohoka, Atsuko; Kajita, Mihoko; Ishikawa, Susumu; Benz, Peter M.; Renne, Thomas; Balda, Maria; Matter, Karl; Fujita, Yasuyuki

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT At the early stages of carcinogenesis, transformation occurs in single cells within tissues. In an epithelial monolayer, such mutated cells are recognized by their normal neighbors and are often apically extruded. The apical extrusion requires cytoskeletal reorganization and changes in cell shape, but the molecular switches involved in the regulation of these processes are poorly understood. Here, using stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC)-based quantitative mass spectrometry, we have identified proteins that are modulated in transformed cells upon their interaction with normal cells. Phosphorylation of VASP at serine 239 is specifically upregulated in RasV12-transformed cells when they are surrounded by normal cells. VASP phosphorylation is required for the cell shape changes and apical extrusion of Ras-transformed cells. Furthermore, PKA is activated in Ras-transformed cells that are surrounded by normal cells, leading to VASP phosphorylation. These results indicate that the PKA–VASP pathway is a crucial regulator of tumor cell extrusion from the epithelium, and they shed light on the events occurring at the early stage of carcinogenesis. PMID:24963131

  15. mTORC1 phosphorylates UVRAG to negatively regulate autophagosome and endosome maturation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Mi; Jung, Chang Hwa; Seo, Minchul; Kim, Eun Kyoung; Park, Ji-Man; Bae, Sun Sik; Kim, Do-Hyung

    2015-01-22

    mTORC1 plays a key role in autophagy as a negative regulator. The currently known targets of mTORC1 in the autophagy pathway mainly function at early stages of autophagosome formation. Here, we identify that mTORC1 inhibits later stages of autophagy by phosphorylating UVRAG. Under nutrient-enriched conditions, mTORC1 binds and phosphorylates UVRAG. The phosphorylation positively regulates the association of UVRAG with RUBICON, thereby enhancing the antagonizing effect of RUBICON on UVRAG-mediated autophagosome maturation. Upon dephosphorylation, UVRAG is released from RUBICON to interact with the HOPS complex, a component for the late endosome and lysosome fusion machinery, and enhances autophagosome and endosome maturation. Consequently, the dephosphorylation of UVRAG facilitates the lysosomal degradation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), reduces EGFR signaling, and suppresses cancer cell proliferation and tumor growth. These results demonstrate that mTORC1 engages in late stages of autophagy and endosome maturation, defining a broader range of mTORC1 functions in the membrane-associated processes.

  16. Phosphorylation on TRPV4 Serine 824 Regulates Interaction with STIM1.

    PubMed

    Shin, Sung H; Lee, Eun J; Chun, Jaesun; Hyun, Sunghee; Kang, Sang S

    2015-01-01

    The TRPV4 cation channel, a member of the TRP vanilloid subfamily, is expressed in a broad range of tissues where it participates in the generation of a Ca2+ signal and/or depolarization of membrane potential. Here, we identified stromal interaction molecule 1 precursor (STIM1) as an auxiliary protein of this epithelial Ca2+channel using confocal microscopy analysis and GST pull-down assay. The STIM1 protein associates specifically with the C-terminal tail of TRPV4 to form a complex. In previous reports, we demonstrated that the serine824 residue of TRPV4 is one of the target phosphorylation sites of serum/glucocorticoid regulated kinase 1 (SGK1). In this report we further identified the role of serine 824 phosphorylation. The TRPV4 mutant S824D (not S824A) exhibited a diminished capacity to bind STIM1. Using GST pull-down and co-immunoprecipitation assays, we demonstrated that STIM1 is part of the TRPV4 protein complex. Our observations clearly suggest that the formation of a complex between TRPV4 and STIM1 and its plasma membrane localization are regulated through phosphorylation of serine824 of TRPV4, and that the STIM1-TRPV4 complex plays crucial roles in routing TRPV4 to the plasma membrane from the endoplasmic reticulum and in maintaining its function.

  17. Phosphorylation on TRPV4 Serine 824 Regulates Interaction with STIM1

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Sung H; Lee, Eun J; Chun, Jaesun; Hyun, Sunghee; Kang, Sang S

    2015-01-01

    The TRPV4 cation channel, a member of the TRP vanilloid subfamily, is expressed in a broad range of tissues where it participates in the generation of a Ca2+ signal and/or depolarization of membrane potential. Here, we identified stromal interaction molecule 1 precursor (STIM1) as an auxiliary protein of this epithelial Ca2+channel using confocal microscopy analysis and GST pull-down assay. The STIM1 protein associates specifically with the C-terminal tail of TRPV4 to form a complex. In previous reports, we demonstrated that the serine824 residue of TRPV4 is one of the target phosphorylation sites of serum/glucocorticoid regulated kinase 1 (SGK1). In this report we further identified the role of serine 824 phosphorylation. The TRPV4 mutant S824D (not S824A) exhibited a diminished capacity to bind STIM1. Using GST pull-down and co-immunoprecipitation assays, we demonstrated that STIM1 is part of the TRPV4 protein complex. Our observations clearly suggest that the formation of a complex between TRPV4 and STIM1 and its plasma membrane localization are regulated through phosphorylation of serine824 of TRPV4, and that the STIM1-TRPV4 complex plays crucial roles in routing TRPV4 to the plasma membrane from the endoplasmic reticulum and in maintaining its function. PMID:25972993

  18. Dp71 is regulated by phosphorylation and ubiquitin-proteasome system in neuronal cells.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Takahiro; Yaoi, Takeshi; Fushiki, Shinji; Itoh, Kyoko

    2017-10-21

    The Dystrophin (Dp) gene is responsible for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), which is characterized by progressive muscular degeneration and variable degrees of cognitive impairment. Although Dp71 is the most abundant among the Dp isoforms in the brain, the regulatory mechanisms of the related expression levels have not been elucidated. In this study, we found that the constitutive expression levels of Dp71 in PC12 cells were sensitive to proteasomal inhibition. The ectopic expression of FLAG-tagged ubiquitin revealed that Dp71 was ubiquitinated intracellularly. Interestingly, proteasomal inhibition was accompanied by a posttranslational accumulation of modified Dp71, which was restored by protein phosphatase treatment in vitro, indicating that phosphorylation is responsible for the modification and affects the proteasome-dependent degradation of Dp71. Proteasomal activity-sensitive phosphorylated Dp71 is closely associated with syntrophin, a well-known binding partner of Dp71, and syntrophin is also regulated by proteasomal activity in a similar way to Dp71, suggesting that the posttranslational regulatory machinery for Dp71 level is coupled with Dp71-syntrophin molecular complex. Taken together, our results indicated that the expression levels of Dp71 are posttranslationally regulated by the phosphorylation-ubiquitin-proteasomal pathway, which may indicate the presence of regulatory mechanisms underlying the proteostasis of both Dp and its molecular complex, which may lead to better therapeutic approaches for the treatment of Dp-related diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. [Inhibition of NHE1 down-regulates IL-8 expression and enhances p38 phosphorylation].

    PubMed

    Gao, Wei; Zhang, Yu-Juan; Zhang, Hai-Rui; Jin, Wei-Na; Chang, Guo-Qiang; Zhang, Hong-Ju; Ma, Li; Lin, Ya-Ni; Li, Qing-Hua; Ru, Rong-Xin; Pang, Tian-Xiang

    2013-02-01

    This study was purposed to explore the changes of possible angiogenetic factors other than VEGF after inhibition of NHE1 and their related mechanisms. The K562 cells were treated by NHE1 specific inhibitor cariporide, the angiogenesis factors after inhibition of NHE1 were screened by using protein chip, the IL-8 expression level after cariporide treatment was detected by real-time quantitative PCR; the K562 cells with stable interference of NHE1 were constructed, the IL-8 expression level after interference of NHE1 was detected by real-time quantitative PCR; the p38 phosphorylation level in K562 cells treated with cariporide was detected by Western blot. After treatment of K562 cells with p38 inhibitor SB203580, the IL-8 expression level was decreased by real-time quantitative PCR. The results of protein chip showed that IL-8 expression decreased after cariporide treatment. Real-time quantitative PCR confirmed this inhibitory effect. The p38 phosphorylation level increased after cariporide treatment. The down-regulation of IL-8 expression induced by cariporide treatment was partially restored after K562 cells were treated with p38 inhibitor SB203580. It is concluded that the inhibition of NHE1 can inhibit IL-8 expression through up-regulation of p38 phosphorylation.

  20. Casein Kinase 1 α Phosphorylates the Wnt Regulator Jade-1 and Modulates Its Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Borgal, Lori; Rinschen, Markus M.; Dafinger, Claudia; Hoff, Sylvia; Reinert, Matthäus J.; Lamkemeyer, Tobias; Lienkamp, Soeren S.; Benzing, Thomas; Schermer, Bernhard

    2014-01-01

    Tight regulation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling is critical for vertebrate development and tissue maintenance, and deregulation can lead to a host of disease phenotypes, including developmental disorders and cancer. Proteins associated with primary cilia and centrosomes have been demonstrated to negatively regulate canonical Wnt signaling in interphase cells. The plant homeodomain zinc finger protein Jade-1 can act as an E3 ubiquitin ligase-targeting β-catenin for proteasomal degradation and concentrates at the centrosome and ciliary basal body in addition to the nucleus in interphase cells. We demonstrate that the destruction complex component casein kinase 1α (CK1α) phosphorylates Jade-1 at a conserved SLS motif and reduces the ability of Jade-1 to inhibit β-catenin signaling. Consistently, Jade-1 lacking the SLS motif is more effective than wild-type Jade-1 in reducing β-catenin-induced secondary axis formation in Xenopus laevis embryos in vivo. Interestingly, CK1α also phosphorylates β-catenin and the destruction complex component adenomatous polyposis coli at a similar SLS motif to the effect that β-catenin is targeted for degradation. The opposing effect of Jade-1 phosphorylation by CK1α suggests a novel example of the dual functions of CK1α activity to either oppose or promote canonical Wnt signaling in a context-dependent manner. PMID:25100726

  1. Regulation of GABAergic synapse formation and plasticity by GSK3β-dependent phosphorylation of gephyrin

    PubMed Central

    Tyagarajan, Shiva K.; Ghosh, Himanish; Yévenes, Gonzalo E.; Nikonenko, Irina; Ebeling, Claire; Schwerdel, Cornelia; Sidler, Corinne; Zeilhofer, Hanns Ulrich; Gerrits, Bertran; Muller, Dominique; Fritschy, Jean-Marc

    2011-01-01

    Postsynaptic scaffolding proteins ensure efficient neurotransmission by anchoring receptors and signaling molecules in synapse-specific subcellular domains. In turn, posttranslational modifications of scaffolding proteins contribute to synaptic plasticity by remodeling the postsynaptic apparatus. Though these mechanisms are operant in glutamatergic synapses, little is known about regulation of GABAergic synapses, which mediate inhibitory transmission in the CNS. Here, we focused on gephyrin, the main scaffolding protein of GABAergic synapses. We identify a unique phosphorylation site in gephyrin, Ser270, targeted by glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) to modulate GABAergic transmission. Abolishing Ser270 phosphorylation increased the density of gephyrin clusters and the frequency of miniature GABAergic postsynaptic currents in cultured hippocampal neurons. Enhanced, phosphorylation-dependent gephyrin clustering was also induced in vitro and in vivo with lithium chloride. Lithium is a GSK3β inhibitor used therapeutically as mood-stabilizing drug, which underscores the relevance of this posttranslational modification for synaptic plasticity. Conversely, we show that gephyrin availability for postsynaptic clustering is limited by Ca2+-dependent gephyrin cleavage by the cysteine protease calpain-1. Together, these findings identify gephyrin as synaptogenic molecule regulating GABAergic synaptic plasticity, likely contributing to the therapeutic action of lithium. PMID:21173228

  2. Mad2 phosphorylation regulates its association with Mad1 and the APC/C

    PubMed Central

    Wassmann, Katja; Liberal, Vasco; Benezra, Robert

    2003-01-01

    Improper attachment of the mitotic spindle to the kinetochores of paired sister chromatids in mitosis is monitored by a checkpoint that leads to an arrest in early metaphase. This arrest requires the inhibitory association of Mad2 with the anaphase promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C). It is not known how the association of Mad2 with the kinetochore and the APC/C is regulated in mitosis. Here, we demonstrate that human Mad2 is modified through phosphorylation on multiple serine residues in vivo in a cell cycle dependent manner and that only unphosphorylated Mad2 interacts with Mad1 or the APC/C in vivo. A Mad2 mutant containing serine to aspartic acid mutations mimicking the C-terminal phosphorylation events fails to interact with Mad1 or the APC/C and acts as a dominant-negative antagonist of wild-type Mad2. These data suggest that the phosphorylation state of Mad2 regulates its checkpoint activity by modulating its association with Mad1 and the APC/C. PMID:12574116

  3. Specific on-plate enrichment of phosphorylated peptides for direct MALDI-TOF MS analysis.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Liang; Roussel, Christophe; Wan, Jingjing; Yang, Pengyuan; Girault, Hubert H; Liu, Baohong

    2007-12-01

    An on-plate specific enrichment method is presented for the direct analysis of peptides phosphorylation. An array of sintered TiO 2 nanoparticle spots was prepared on a stainless steel plate to provide porous substrate with a very large specific surface and durable functions. These spots were used to selectively capture phosphorylated peptides from peptide mixtures, and the immobilized phosphopeptides could then be analyzed directly by MALDI MS after washing away the nonphosphorylated peptides. beta-Casein and protein mixtures were employed as model samples to investigate the selection efficiency. In this strategy, the steps of phosphopeptide capture, purification, and subsequent mass spectrometry analysis are all successfully accomplished on a single target plate, which greatly reduces sample loss and simplifies analytical procedures. The low detection limit, small sample size, and rapid selective entrapment show that this on-plate strategy is promising for online enrichment of phosphopeptides, which is essential for the analysis of minute amount of samples in high-throughput proteome research.

  4. Phosphorylation of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis β-Ketoacyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Reductase MabA Regulates Mycolic Acid Biosynthesis*

    PubMed Central

    Veyron-Churlet, Romain; Zanella-Cléon, Isabelle; Cohen-Gonsaud, Martin; Molle, Virginie; Kremer, Laurent

    2010-01-01

    Mycolic acids are key cell wall components for the survival, pathogenicity, and antibiotic resistance of the human tubercle bacillus. Although it was thought that Mycobacterium tuberculosis tightly regulates their production to adapt to prevailing environmental conditions, the molecular mechanisms governing mycolic acid biosynthesis remained extremely obscure. Meromycolic acids, the direct precursors of mycolic acids, are synthesized by a type II fatty acid synthase from acyl carrier protein-bound substrates that are extended iteratively, with a reductive cycle in each round of extension, the second step of which is catalyzed by the essential β-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein reductase, MabA. In this study, we investigated whether post-translational modifications of MabA might represent a strategy employed by M. tuberculosis to regulate mycolic acid biosynthesis. Indeed, we show here that MabA was efficiently phosphorylated in vitro by several M. tuberculosis Ser/Thr protein kinases, including PknB, as well as in vivo in mycobacteria. Mass spectrometric analyses using LC-ESI/MS/MS and site-directed mutagenesis identified three phosphothreonines, with Thr191 being the primary phosphor-acceptor. A MabA_T191D mutant, designed to mimic constitutive phosphorylation, exhibited markedly decreased ketoacyl reductase activity compared with the wild-type protein, as well as impaired binding of the NADPH cofactor, as demonstrated by fluorescence spectroscopy. The hypothesis that phosphorylation of Thr191 alters the enzymatic activity of MabA, and subsequently mycolic acid biosynthesis, was further supported by the fact that constitutive overexpression of the mabA_T191D allele in Mycobacterium bovis BCG strongly impaired mycobacterial growth. Importantly, conditional expression of the phosphomimetic MabA_T191D led to a significant inhibition of de novo biosynthesis of mycolic acids. This study provides the first information on the molecular mechanism(s) involved in mycolic acid

  5. Phosphorylation of the Brome Mosaic Virus Capsid Regulates the Timing of Viral Infection

    PubMed Central

    Hoover, Haley S.; Wang, Joseph Che-Yen; Middleton, Stefani; Ni, Peng; Zlotnick, Adam

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The four brome mosaic virus (BMV) RNAs (RNA1 to RNA4) are encapsidated in three distinct virions that have different disassembly rates in infection. The mechanism for the differential release of BMV RNAs from virions is unknown, since 180 copies of the same coat protein (CP) encapsidate each of the BMV genomic RNAs. Using mass spectrometry, we found that the BMV CP contains a complex pattern of posttranslational modifications. Treatment with phosphatase was found to not significantly affect the stability of the virions containing RNA1 but significantly impacted the stability of the virions that encapsidated BMV RNA2 and RNA3/4. Cryo-electron microscopy reconstruction revealed dramatic structural changes in the capsid and the encapsidated RNA. A phosphomimetic mutation in the flexible N-terminal arm of the CP increased BMV RNA replication and virion production. The degree of phosphorylation modulated the interaction of CP with the encapsidated RNA and the release of three of the BMV RNAs. UV cross-linking and immunoprecipitation methods coupled to high-throughput sequencing experiments showed that phosphorylation of the BMV CP can impact binding to RNAs in the virions, including sequences that contain regulatory motifs for BMV RNA gene expression and replication. Phosphatase-treated virions affected the timing of CP expression and viral RNA replication in plants. The degree of phosphorylation decreased when the plant hosts were grown at an elevated temperature. These results show that phosphorylation of the capsid modulates BMV infection. IMPORTANCE How icosahedral viruses regulate the release of viral RNA into the host is not well understood. The selective release of viral RNA can regulate the timing of replication and gene expression. Brome mosaic virus (BMV) is an RNA virus, and its three genomic RNAs are encapsidated in separate virions. Through proteomic, structural, and biochemical analyses, this work shows that posttranslational modifications

  6. Mitosis-specific phosphorylation of PML at T409 regulates spindle checkpoint.

    PubMed

    Jin, J; Liu, J

    2016-08-31

    During mitosis, Promyelocytic leukemia nuclear bodies (PML NBs) change dramatically in morphology and composition, but little is known about function of PML in mitosis. Here, we show that PML is phosphorylated at T409 (PML p409) in a mitosis-specific manner. More importantly, PML p409 contributes to maintain the duration of pro-metaphase and regulates spindle checkpoint. Deficient PML p409 caused a shortening of pro-metaphase and challenged the nocodazole-triggered mitotic arrest. T409A mutation led to a higher frequency of misaligned chromosomes on metaphase plate, and subsequently death in late mitosis. In addition, inhibition of PML p409 repressed growth of tumor cells, suggesting that PML p409 is a potential target for cancer therapy. Collectively, our study demonstrated an important phosphorylated site of PML, which contributed to explore the role of PML in mitosis.

  7. Silica nanoparticles inhibit brown adipocyte differentiation via regulation of p38 phosphorylation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, Min Jeong; Kim, Won Kon; Kwak, Minjeong; Oh, Kyoung-Jin; Chang, Won Seok; Min, Jeong-Ki; Lee, Sang Chul; Song, Nam Woong; Bae, Kwang-Hee

    2015-10-01

    Nanoparticles are of great interest due to their wide variety of biomedical and bioengineering applications. However, they affect cellular differentiation and/or intracellular signaling when applied and exposed to target organisms or cells. The brown adipocyte is a cell type important in energy homeostasis and thus closely related to obesity. In this study, we assessed the effects of silica nanoparticles (SNPs) on brown adipocyte differentiation. The results clearly showed that brown adipocyte differentiation was significantly repressed by exposure to SNPs. The brown adipocyte-specific genes as well as mitochondrial content were also markedly reduced. Additionally, SNPs led to suppressed p38 phosphorylation during brown adipocyte differentiation. These effects depend on the size of SNPs. Taken together, these results lead us to suggest that SNP has anti-brown adipogenic effect in a size-dependent manner via regulation of p38 phosphorylation.

  8. ULK3 regulates cytokinetic abscission by phosphorylating ESCRT-III proteins.

    PubMed

    Caballe, Anna; Wenzel, Dawn M; Agromayor, Monica; Alam, Steven L; Skalicky, Jack J; Kloc, Magdalena; Carlton, Jeremy G; Labrador, Leticia; Sundquist, Wesley I; Martin-Serrano, Juan

    2015-05-26

    The endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRT) machinery mediates the physical separation between daughter cells during cytokinetic abscission. This process is regulated by the abscission checkpoint, a genome protection mechanism that relies on Aurora B and the ESCRT-III subunit CHMP4C to delay abscission in response to chromosome missegregation. In this study, we show that Unc-51-like kinase 3 (ULK3) phosphorylates and binds ESCRT-III subunits via tandem MIT domains, and thereby, delays abscission in response to lagging chromosomes, nuclear pore defects, and tension forces at the midbody. Our structural and biochemical studies reveal an unusually tight interaction between ULK3 and IST1, an ESCRT-III subunit required for abscission. We also demonstrate that IST1 phosphorylation by ULK3 is an essential signal required to sustain the abscission checkpoint and that ULK3 and CHMP4C are functionally linked components of the timer that controls abscission in multiple physiological situations.

  9. ULK1 translocates to mitochondria and phosphorylates FUNDC1 to regulate mitophagy

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Wenxian; Tian, Weili; Hu, Zhe; Chen, Guo; Huang, Lei; Li, Wen; Zhang, Xingli; Xue, Peng; Zhou, Changqian; Liu, Lei; Zhu, Yushan; Zhang, Xingliang; Li, Longxuan; Zhang, Liangqing; Sui, Senfang; Zhao, Bin; Feng, Du

    2014-01-01

    Autophagy eliminates dysfunctional mitochondria in an intricate process known as mitophagy. ULK1 is critical for the induction of autophagy, but its substrate(s) and mechanism of action in mitophagy remain unclear. Here, we show that ULK1 is upregulated and translocates to fragmented mitochondria upon mitophagy induction by either hypoxia or mitochondrial uncouplers. At mitochondria, ULK1 interacts with FUNDC1, phosphorylating it at serine 17, which enhances FUNDC1 binding to LC3. A ULK1-binding-deficient mutant of FUNDC1 prevents ULK1 translocation to mitochondria and inhibits mitophagy. Finally, kinase-active ULK1 and a phospho-mimicking mutant of FUNDC1 rescue mitophagy in ULK1-null cells. Thus, we conclude that FUNDC1 regulates ULK1 recruitment to damaged mitochondria, where FUNDC1 phosphorylation by ULK1 is crucial for mitophagy. PMID:24671035

  10. Phosphorylation and dephosphorylation regulate APC/C(Cdh1) substrate degradation.

    PubMed

    Simpson-Lavy, Kobi J; Zenvirth, Drora; Brandeis, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The Anaphase Promoting Complex/Cyclosome (APC/C) ubiquitin ligase activated by its G1 specific adaptor protein Cdh1 is a major regulator of the cell cycle. The APC/C(Cdh1) mediates degradation of dozens of proteins, however, the kinetics and requirements for their degradation are largely unknown. We demonstrate that overexpression of the constitutive active CDH1(m11) mutant that is not inhibited by phosphorylation results in mitotic exit in the absence of the FEAR and MEN pathways, and DNA re-replication in the absence of Cdc7 activity. This mode of mitotic exit also reveals additional requirements for APC/C(Cdh1) substrate degradation, which for some substrates such as Pds1 or Clb5 is dephosphorylation, but for others such as Cdc5 is phosphorylation.

  11. Protein phosphorylation as a mechanism for regulation of spinach leaf sucrose-phosphate synthase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, J.L.A.; Huber, S.C. )

    1989-04-01

    Protein phosphorylation has been identified as a mechanism for the light-dark regulation of spinach sucrose-phosphate synthase (SPS) activity, previously shown to involve some type of covalent modification of the enzyme. The 120 kD subunit of SPS in extracts of light-treated leaves was labeled with {sup 32}P in the presence of ({gamma}-{sup 32}P) ATP. In this in vitro system, {sup 32}P incorporation into light-activated SPS was dependent upon ATP and magnesium concentrations as well as time, and was closely paralleled by inactivation of the enzyme. The soluble protein kinase involved in the interconversion of SPS between activated and deactivated forms may be specific for SPS as it co-purifies with SPS during partial purification of the enzyme. The kinase appears not to be calcium activated and no evidence has been obtained for metabolite control of SPS phosphorylation/inactivation.

  12. Juvenile Hormone Prevents 20-Hydroxyecdysone-induced Metamorphosis by Regulating the Phosphorylation of a Newly Identified Broad Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Mei-Juan; Liu, Wen; Pei, Xu-Yang; Li, Xiang-Ru; He, Hong-Juan; Wang, Jin-Xing; Zhao, Xiao-Fan

    2014-01-01

    The steroid hormone 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) initiates insect molting and metamorphosis. By contrast, juvenile hormone (JH) prevents metamorphosis. However, the mechanism by which JH inhibits metamorphosis remains unclear. In this study, we propose that JH induces the phosphorylation of Broad isoform Z7 (BrZ7), a newly identified protein, to inhibit 20E-mediated metamorphosis in the lepidopteran insect Helicoverpa armigera. The knockdown of BrZ7 in larvae inhibited metamorphosis by repressing the expression of the 20E response gene. BrZ7 was weakly expressed and phosphorylated during larval growth but highly expressed and non-phosphorylated during metamorphosis. JH regulated the rapid phosphorylation of BrZ7 via a G-protein-coupled receptor-, phospholipase C-, and protein kinase C-triggered pathway. The phosphorylated BrZ7 bound to the 5′-regulatory region of calponin to regulate its expression in the JH pathway. Exogenous JH induced BrZ7 phosphorylation to prevent metamorphosis by suppressing 20E-related gene transcription. JH promoted non-phosphorylated calponin interacting with ultraspiracle protein to activate the JH pathway and antagonize the 20E pathway. This study reveals one of the possible mechanisms by which JH counteracts 20E-regulated metamorphosis by inducing the phosphorylation of BrZ7. PMID:25096576

  13. Juvenile hormone prevents 20-hydroxyecdysone-induced metamorphosis by regulating the phosphorylation of a newly identified broad protein.

    PubMed

    Cai, Mei-Juan; Liu, Wen; Pei, Xu-Yang; Li, Xiang-Ru; He, Hong-Juan; Wang, Jin-Xing; Zhao, Xiao-Fan

    2014-09-19

    The steroid hormone 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) initiates insect molting and metamorphosis. By contrast, juvenile hormone (JH) prevents metamorphosis. However, the mechanism by which JH inhibits metamorphosis remains unclear. In this study, we propose that JH induces the phosphorylation of Broad isoform Z7 (BrZ7), a newly identified protein, to inhibit 20E-mediated metamorphosis in the lepidopteran insect Helicoverpa armigera. The knockdown of BrZ7 in larvae inhibited metamorphosis by repressing the expression of the 20E response gene. BrZ7 was weakly expressed and phosphorylated during larval growth but highly expressed and non-phosphorylated during metamorphosis. JH regulated the rapid phosphorylation of BrZ7 via a G-protein-coupled receptor-, phospholipase C-, and protein kinase C-triggered pathway. The phosphorylated BrZ7 bound to the 5'-regulatory region of calponin to regulate its expression in the JH pathway. Exogenous JH induced BrZ7 phosphorylation to prevent metamorphosis by suppressing 20E-related gene transcription. JH promoted non-phosphorylated calponin interacting with ultraspiracle protein to activate the JH pathway and antagonize the 20E pathway. This study reveals one of the possible mechanisms by which JH counteracts 20E-regulated metamorphosis by inducing the phosphorylation of BrZ7. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  14. Negative regulation of Jak2 by its auto-phosphorylation at tyrosine 913 via the Epo signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Funakoshi-Tago, Megumi; Tago, Kenji; Kasahara, Tadashi; Parganas, Evan; Ihle, James N

    2008-11-01

    Janus kinase 2 (Jak2) has a pivotal role in erythropoietin (Epo) signaling pathway, including erythrocyte differentiation and Stat5 activation. In the course of screening for critical phosphorylation of tyrosine residues in Jak2, we identified tyrosine 913 (Y(913)) as a novel and functional phosphorylation site, which negatively regulates Jak2. Phosphorylation at Y(913) rapidly occurred and was sustained for at least 120 min after Epo stimulation, in contrast to the transient phosphorylation of Y(1007/1008) in the activation loop of Jak2. Interestingly, phosphorylation defective mutation of Y(913) (Y(913)F) results in a significant enhancement of Epo-induced Jak2 activation, whereas phosphorylation mimic mutation of Y(913) (Y(913)E) completely abrogated its activation. Furthermore, Jak2 deficient fetal liver cells expressing Y(913)F mutant generated many mature erythroid BFU-E and CFU-E colonies, while Y(913)E mutant failed to reconstitute Jak2 deficiency. We also demonstrate, in Jak1, phosphorylation of Y(939), a corresponding tyrosine residue with Y(913), negatively regulated Jak1 signaling pathway. Accordingly, our results suggest that this tyrosine phosphorylation in JH1 domain may be involved in common negative regulation mechanism for Jak family.

  15. Regulation of pituitary tumor transforming gene (PTTG) expression and phosphorylation in thyroid cells.

    PubMed

    Lewy, Gregory D; Ryan, Gavin A; Read, Martin L; Fong, Jim C W; Poole, Vikki; Seed, Robert I; Sharma, Neil; Smith, Vicki E; Kwan, Perkin P K; Stewart, Sarah L; Bacon, Andrea; Warfield, Adrian; Franklyn, Jayne A; McCabe, Christopher J; Boelaert, Kristien

    2013-11-01

    Human pituitary tumor transforming gene (hPTTG) is a multifunctional proto-oncogene implicated in the initiation and progression of several tumors. Phosphorylation of hPTTG is mediated by cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDC2), whereas cellular expression is regulated by specificity protein 1 (SP1). The mechanisms underlying hPTTG propagation of aberrant thyroid cell growth have not been fully defined. We set out to investigate the interplay between hPTTG and growth factors, as well as the effects of phosphorylation and SP1 regulation on hPTTG expression and function. In our study, epidermal growth factor (EGF), TGFα, and IGF-1 induced hPTTG expression and phosphorylation in thyroid cells, which was associated with activation of MAPK and phosphoinositide 3-kinase. Growth factors induced hPTTG independently of CDC2 and SP1 in thyroid carcinoma cells. Strikingly, CDC2 depletion in TPC-1 cells resulted in enhanced expression and phosphorylation of hPTTG and reduced cellular proliferation. In reciprocal experiments, hPTTG overexpression induced EGF, IGF-1, and TGFα mRNAs in primary human thyrocytes. Treatment of primary human thyrocytes with conditioned media derived from hPTTG-transfected cells resulted in autocrine upregulation of hPTTG protein, which was ameliorated by growth factor depletion or growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors. A transgenic murine model of thyroid targeted hPTTG overexpression (hPTTG-Tg) (FVB/N strain, both sexes) demonstrated smaller thyroids with reduced cellular proliferation and enhanced secretion of Egf. In contrast, Pttg(-/-) knockout mice (c57BL6 strain, both sexes) showed reduced thyroidal Egf mRNA expression. These results define hPTTG as having a central role in thyroid autocrine signaling mechanisms via growth factors, with profound implications for promotion of transformed cell growth.

  16. Bidirectional regulation of eEF2 phosphorylation controls synaptic plasticity by decoding neuronal activity patterns.

    PubMed

    McCamphill, Patrick K; Farah, Carole A; Anadolu, Mina N; Hoque, Sanjida; Sossin, Wayne S

    2015-03-11

    At the sensory-motor neuron synapse of Aplysia, either spaced or continuous (massed) exposure to serotonin (5-HT) induces a form of intermediate-term facilitation (ITF) that requires new protein synthesis but not gene transcription. However, spaced and massed ITF use distinct molecular mechanisms to maintain increased synaptic strength. Synapses activated by spaced applications of 5-HT generate an ITF that depends on persistent protein kinase A (PKA) activity, whereas an ITF produced by massed 5-HT depends on persistent protein kinase C (PKC) activity. In this study, we demonstrate that eukaryotic elongation factor 2 (eEF2), which catalyzes the GTP-dependent translocation of the ribosome during protein synthesis, acts as a biochemical sensor that is tuned to the pattern of neuronal stimulation. Specifically, we find that massed training leads to a PKC-dependent increase in phosphorylation of eEF2, whereas spaced training results in a PKA-dependent decrease in phosphorylation of eEF2. Importantly, by using either pharmacological or dominant-negative strategies to inhibit eEF2 kinase (eEF2K), we were able to block massed 5-HT-dependent increases in eEF2 phosphorylation and subsequent PKC-dependent ITF. In contrast, pharmacological inhibition of eEF2K during the longer period of time required for spaced training was sufficient to reduce eEF2 phosphorylation and induce ITF. Finally, we find that the massed 5-HT-dependent increase in synaptic strength requires translation elongation, but not translation initiation, whereas the spaced 5-HT-dependent increase in synaptic strength is partially dependent on translation initiation. Thus, bidirectional regulation of eEF2 is critical for decoding distinct activity patterns at synapses by activating distinct modes of translation regulation. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/354403-15$15.00/0.

  17. Critical role of parathyroid hormone (PTH) receptor-1 phosphorylation in regulating acute responses to PTH

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Akira; Okazaki, Makoto; Baron, David M.; Dean, Thomas; Khatri, Ashok; Mahon, Mathew; Segawa, Hiroko; Abou-Samra, Abdul B.; Jüppner, Harald; Bloch, Kenneth D.; Potts, John T.; Gardella, Thomas J.

    2013-01-01

    Agonist-induced phosphorylation of the parathyroid hormone (PTH) receptor 1 (PTHR1) regulates receptor signaling in vitro, but the role of this phosphorylation in vivo is uncertain. We investigated this role by injecting “knock-in” mice expressing a phosphorylation-deficient (PD) PTHR1 with PTH ligands and assessing acute biologic responses. Following injection with PTH (1–34), or with a unique, long-acting PTH analog, PD mice, compared with WT mice, exhibited enhanced increases in cAMP levels in the blood, as well as enhanced cAMP production and gene expression responses in bone and kidney tissue. Surprisingly, however, the hallmark hypercalcemic and hypophosphatemic responses were markedly absent in the PD mice, such that paradoxical hypocalcemic and hyperphosphatemic responses were observed, quite strikingly with the long-acting PTH analog. Spot urine analyses revealed a marked defect in the capacity of the PD mice to excrete phosphate, as well as cAMP, into the urine in response to PTH injection. This defect in renal excretion was associated with a severe, PTH-induced impairment in glomerular filtration, as assessed by the rate of FITC-inulin clearance from the blood, which, in turn, was explainable by an overly exuberant systemic hypotensive response. The overall findings demonstrate the importance in vivo of PTH-induced phosphorylation of the PTHR1 in regulating acute ligand responses, and they serve to focus attention on mechanisms that underlie the acute calcemic response to PTH and factors, such as blood phosphate levels, that influence it. PMID:23533279

  18. Tgf-beta induced Erk phosphorylation of smad linker region regulates smad signaling.

    PubMed

    Hough, Chris; Radu, Maria; Doré, Jules J E

    2012-01-01

    The Transforming Growth Factor-Beta (TGF-β) family is involved in regulating a variety of cellular processes such as apoptosis, differentiation, and proliferation. TGF-β binding to a Serine/Threonine kinase receptor complex causes the recruitment and subsequent activation of transcription factors known as smad2 and smad3. These proteins subsequently translocate into the nucleus to negatively or positively regulate gene expression. In this study, we define a second signaling pathway leading to TGF-β receptor activation of Extracellular Signal Regulated Kinase (Erk) in a cell-type dependent manner. TGF-β induced Erk activation was found in phenotypically normal mesenchymal cells, but not normal epithelial cells. By activating phosphotidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), TGF-β stimulates p21-activated kinase2 (Pak2) to phosphorylate c-Raf, ultimately resulting in Erk activation. Activation of Erk was necessary for TGF-β induced fibroblast replication. In addition, Erk phosphorylated the linker region of nuclear localized smads, resulting in increased half-life of C-terminal phospho-smad 2 and 3 and increased duration of smad target gene transcription. Together, these data show that in mesenchymal cell types the TGF-β/PI3K/Pak2/Raf/MEK/Erk pathway regulates smad signaling, is critical for TGF-β-induced growth and is part of an integrated signaling web containing multiple interacting pathways rather than discrete smad/non-smad pathways.

  19. Diacylglycerol kinase-zeta localization in skeletal muscle is regulated by phosphorylation and interaction with syntrophins.

    PubMed

    Abramovici, Hanan; Hogan, Angela B; Obagi, Christopher; Topham, Matthew K; Gee, Stephen H

    2003-11-01

    Syntrophins are scaffolding proteins that link signaling molecules to dystrophin and the cytoskeleton. We previously reported that syntrophins interact with diacylglycerol kinase-zeta (DGK-zeta), which phosphorylates diacylglycerol to yield phosphatidic acid. Here, we show syntrophins and DGK-zeta form a complex in skeletal muscle whose translocation from the cytosol to the plasma membrane is regulated by protein kinase C-dependent phosphorylation of the DGK-zeta MARCKS domain. DGK-zeta mutants that do not bind syntrophins were mislocalized, and an activated mutant of this sort induced atypical changes in the actin cytoskeleton, indicating syntrophins are important for localizing DGK-zeta and regulating its activity. Consistent with a role in actin organization, DGK-zeta and syntrophins were colocalized with filamentous (F)-actin and Rac in lamellipodia and ruffles. Moreover, extracellular signal-related kinase-dependent phosphorylation of DGK-zeta regulated its association with the cytoskeleton. In adult muscle, DGK-zeta was colocalized with syntrophins on the sarcolemma and was concentrated at neuromuscular junctions (NMJs), whereas in type IIB fibers it was found exclusively at NMJs. DGK-zeta was reduced at the sarcolemma of dystrophin-deficient mdx mouse myofibers but was specifically retained at NMJs, indicating that dystrophin is important for the sarcolemmal but not synaptic localization of DGK-zeta. Together, our findings suggest syntrophins localize DGK-zeta signaling complexes at specialized domains of muscle cells, which may be critical for the proper control of lipid-signaling pathways regulating actin organization. In dystrophic muscle, mislocalized DGK-zeta may cause abnormal cytoskeletal changes that contribute to disease pathogenesis.

  20. The UL12 Protein of Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Is Regulated by Tyrosine Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, Hikaru; Kato, Akihisa; Mugitani, Michio; Kashima, Yukie; Oyama, Masaaki; Kozuka-Hata, Hiroko; Arii, Jun

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) UL12 protein (pUL12) is a nuclease that is critical for viral replication in vitro and neurovirulence in vivo. In this study, mass spectrometric analysis of pUL12 and phosphate-affinity SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis identified tyrosine at pUL12 residue 371 (Tyr-371) as a pUL12 phosphorylation site: Tyr-371 is conserved in pUL12 homologs in herpesviruses in all Herpesviridae subfamilies. Replacement of Tyr-371 with phenylalanine (Y371F) in pUL12 (i) abolished its exonuclease activity in HSV-1-infected Vero, HEL, and A549 cells, (ii) reduced viral replication, cell-cell spread, and pUL12 expression in infected cells in a cell type-dependent manner, (iii) led to aberrant subcellular localization of pUL12 in infected cells in a cell type-dependent manner, and (iv) reduced HSV-1 neurovirulence in mice. The effects of the pUL12 Y371F mutation in cell cultures and mice were similar to those of a nuclease-dead double mutation in pUL12, although the Y371F mutation reduced viral replication severalfold more than the nuclease-dead double mutation in a cell type- and multiplicity-of-infection-dependent manner. Replacement of Tyr-371 with glutamic acid, which mimics constitutive phosphorylation, restored the wild-type phenotype in cell cultures and mice. These results suggested that phosphorylation of pUL12 Tyr-371 was essential for pUL12 to express its nuclease activity in HSV-1-infected cells and that this phosphorylation promoted viral replication and cell-cell spread in cell cultures and neurovirulence in mice mainly by upregulating pUL12 nuclease activity and, in part, by regulating the subcellular localization and expression of pUL12 in HSV-1-infected cells. IMPORTANCE Herpesviruses encode a considerable number of enzymes for their replication. Like cellular enzymes, the viral enzymes need to be properly regulated in infected cells. Although the functional aspects of herpesvirus enzymes have gradually been

  1. Phosphorylation of Def Regulates Nucleolar p53 Turnover and Cell Cycle Progression through Def Recruitment of Calpain3

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Ting; Shi, Hui; Lo, Li Jan; Wang, Yingchun; Chen, Jun; Peng, Jinrong

    2016-01-01

    Digestive organ expansion factor (Def) is a nucleolar protein that plays dual functions: it serves as a component of the ribosomal small subunit processome for the biogenesis of ribosomes and also mediates p53 degradation through the cysteine proteinase calpain-3 (CAPN3). However, nothing is known about the exact relationship between Def and CAPN3 or the regulation of the Def function. In this report, we show that CAPN3 degrades p53 and its mutant proteins p53A138V, p53M237I, p53R248W, and p53R273P but not the p53R175H mutant protein. Importantly, we show that Def directly interacts with CAPN3 in the nucleoli and determines the nucleolar localisation of CAPN3, which is a prerequisite for the degradation of p53 in the nucleolus. Furthermore, we find that Def is modified by phosphorylation at five serine residues: S50, S58, S62, S87, and S92. We further show that simultaneous phosphorylations at S87 and S92 facilitate the nucleolar localisation of Capn3 that is not only essential for the degradation of p53 but is also important for regulating cell cycle progression. Hence, we propose that the Def-CAPN3 pathway serves as a nucleolar checkpoint for cell proliferation by selective inactivation of cell cycle-related substrates during organogenesis. PMID:27657329

  2. PLD1 regulates adipogenic differentiation through mTOR - IRS-1 phosphorylation at serine 636/639

    PubMed Central

    Song, Hae-In; Yoon, Mee-Sup

    2016-01-01

    Phospholipase D1 (PLD1) plays a known role in several differentiation processes, but its role in adipogenic differentiation remains unknown. In the present study, we identified PLD1 as a negative regulator of adipogenic differentiation. We showed that PLD activity was downregulated by both 3-Isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX) and insulin upon induction of differentiation in 3T3-L1 adipogenic cells. In line with this observation, PLD activity decreased in both high fat diet (HFD)-fed mice and ob/ob mice. We also found that differentiation of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes was enhanced by the depletion of PLD1 levels or inhibition of PLD1 activity by VU0155069, a PLD1-specific inhibitor. Conversely, treatment with phosphatidic acid (PA), a PLD product, and overexpression of PLD1 both caused a decrease in adipogenic differentiation. Moreover, the elevated differentiation in PLD1-knockdown 3T3-L1 cells was reduced by either PA treatment or PLD1 expression, confirming negative roles of PLD1 and PA in adipogenic differentiation. Further investigation revealed that PA displaces DEP domain-containing mTOR-interacting protein (DEPTOR) from mTORC1, which subsequently phosphorylates insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) at serine 636/639 in 3T3-L1 cells. Taken together, our findings provide convincing evidence for a direct role of PLD1 in adipogenic differentiation by regulating IRS-1 phosphorylation at serine 636/639 through DEPTOR displacement and mTOR activation. PMID:27872488

  3. Phosphorylation-regulated Binding of RNA Polymerase II to Fibrous Polymers of Low Complexity Domains

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Siheng; Wu, Leeju; Theodoropoulos, Pano; Mirzaei, Hamid; Han, Tina; Xie, Shanhai; Corden, Jeffry L.; McKnight, Steven L.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The low complexity (LC) domains of the products of the fused in sarcoma (FUS), Ewings sarcoma (EWS) and TAF15 genes are translocated onto a variety of different DNA-binding domains and thereby assist in driving the formation of cancerous cells. In the context of the translocated fusion proteins, these LC sequences function as transcriptional activation domains. Here we show that polymeric fibers formed from these LC domains directly bind the C-terminal domain (CTD) of RNA polymerase II in a manner reversible by phosphorylation of the iterated, heptad repeats of the CTD. Mutational analysis indicates that the degree of binding between the CTD and the LC domain polymers correlates with the strength of transcriptional activation. These studies offer a simple means of conceptualizing how RNA polymerase II is recruited to active genes in its unphosphorylated state, and released for elongation following phosphorylation of the CTD. PMID:24267890

  4. NF-κB-repressing factor phosphorylation regulates transcription elongation via its interactions with 5'→3' exoribonuclease 2 and negative elongation factor.

    PubMed

    Rother, Sascha; Bartels, Myriam; Schweda, Aike Torben; Resch, Klaus; Pallua, Norbert; Nourbakhsh, Mahtab

    2016-01-01

    NF-κB-repressing factor (NKRF) inhibits transcription elongation by binding to specific sequences in target promoters. Stimuli such as IL-1 have been shown to overcome this inhibitory action and enable the resumption of transcription elongation machinery by an unknown mechanism. Using mass spectrometry and in vitro phosphorylation analyses, we demonstrate that NKRF is phosphorylated within 3 different domains in unstimulated HeLa cells. Phosphoamino acid mapping and mutation analysis of NKRF further suggest that only Ser phosphorylation within aa 421-429 is regulated by IL-1 stimulation. In copurification studies, aa 421-429 is required for interactions between NKRF, 5'→3' exoribonuclease 2 (XRN2) and the negative elongation factor (NELF)-E in HeLa cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments further show that IL-1 stimulation leads to decrease in NKRF aa 421-429 phosphorylation and dissociation of NELF-E and XRN2 by concomitant resumption of transcription elongation of a synthetic reporter or the endogenous NKRF target gene, IL-8. Together, NKRF phosphorylation modulates promoter-proximal transcription elongation of NF-κB/NKRF-regulated genes via direct interactions with elongation complex in response to specific stimuli.

  5. Phosphorylation regulates the dynamic interaction of RCC1 with chromosomes during mitosis.

    PubMed

    Hutchins, James R A; Moore, William J; Hood, Fiona E; Wilson, Jamie S J; Andrews, Paul D; Swedlow, Jason R; Clarke, Paul R

    2004-06-22

    The small GTPase Ran has multiple roles during the cell division cycle, including nuclear transport, mitotic spindle assembly, and nuclear envelope formation. However, regulation of Ran during cell division is poorly understood. Ran-GTP is generated by the guanine nucleotide exchange factor RCC1, the localization of which to chromosomes is necessary for the fidelity of mitosis in human cells. Using photobleaching techniques, we show that the chromosomal interaction of human RCC1 fused to green fluorescent protein (GFP) changes during progression through mitosis by being highly dynamic during metaphase and more stable toward the end of mitosis. The interaction of RCC1 with chromosomes involves the interface of RCC1 with Ran and requires an N-terminal region containing a nuclear localization signal. We show that this region contains sites phosphorylated by mitotic protein kinases. One site, serine 11, is targeted by CDK1/cyclin B and is phosphorylated in mitotic human cells. Phosphorylation of the N-terminal region of RCC1 inhibits its binding to importin alpha/beta and maintains the mobility of RCC1 during metaphase. This mechanism may be important for the localized generation of Ran-GTP on chromatin after nuclear envelope breakdown and may play a role in the coordination of progression through mitosis.

  6. Novel RNA chaperone domain of RNA-binding protein La is regulated by AKT phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Kuehnert, Julia; Sommer, Gunhild; Zierk, Avery W.; Fedarovich, Alena; Brock, Alexander; Fedarovich, Dzmitry; Heise, Tilman

    2015-01-01

    The cellular function of the cancer-associated RNA-binding protein La has been linked to translation of viral and cellular mRNAs. Recently, we have shown that the human La protein stimulates IRES-mediated translation of the cooperative oncogene CCND1 in cervical cancer cells. However, there is little known about the underlying molecular mechanism by which La stimulates CCND1 IRES-mediated translation, and we propose that its RNA chaperone activity is required. Herein, we show that La binds close to the CCND1 start codon and demonstrate that La's RNA chaperone activity can change the folding of its binding site. We map the RNA chaperone domain (RCD) within the C-terminal region of La in close proximity to a novel AKT phosphorylation site (T389). Phosphorylation at T389 by AKT-1 strongly impairs its RNA chaperone activity. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the RCD as well as T389 is required to stimulate CCND1 IRES-mediated translation in cells. In summary, we provide a model whereby a novel interplay between RNA-binding, RNA chaperoning and AKT phosphorylation of La protein regulates CCND1 IRES-mediated translation. PMID:25520193

  7. Phosphorylation regulates activity of 7-dehydrocholesterol reductase (DHCR7), a terminal enzyme of cholesterol synthesis.

    PubMed

    Prabhu, Anika V; Luu, Winnie; Sharpe, Laura J; Brown, Andrew J

    2017-01-01

    Cholesterol is essential for survival, but too much or too little can cause disease. Thus, cholesterol levels must be kept within close margins. 7-dehydrocholesterol reductase (DHCR7) is a terminal enzyme of cholesterol synthesis, and is essential for embryonic development. Largely, DHCR7 research is associated with the developmental disease Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome, which is caused by mutations in the DHCR7 gene. However, little is known about what regulates DHCR7 activity. Here we provide evidence that phosphorylation plays a role in controlling DHCR7 activity, which may provide a means to divert flux from cholesterol synthesis to vitamin D production. DHCR7 activity was significantly decreased when we used pharmacological inhibitors against two important kinases, AMP-activated protein kinase and protein kinase A. Moreover, mutating a known phosphorylated residue, S14, also decreased DHCR7 activity. Thus, we demonstrate that phosphorylation modulates DHCR7 activity in cells, and contributes to the overall synthesis of cholesterol, and probably vitamin D. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Phosphorylation of the Yeast γ-Tubulin Tub4 Regulates Microtubule Function

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Tien-chen; Gombos, Linda; Neuner, Annett; Sebastian, Dominik; Olsen, Jesper V.; Hrle, Ajla; Benda, Christian; Schiebel, Elmar

    2011-01-01

    The yeast γ-tubulin Tub4 is assembled with Spc97 and Spc98 into the small Tub4 complex. The Tub4 complex binds via the receptor proteins Spc72 and Spc110 to the spindle pole body (SPB), the functional equivalent of the mammalian centrosome, where the Tub4 complex organizes cytoplasmic and nuclear microtubules. Little is known about the regulation of the Tub4 complex. Here, we isolated the Tub4 complex with the bound receptors from yeast cells. Analysis of the purified Tub4 complex by mass spectrometry identified more than 50 phosphorylation sites in Spc72, Spc97, Spc98, Spc110 and Tub4. To examine the functional relevance of the phosphorylation sites, phospho-mimicking and non-phosphorylatable mutations in Tub4, Spc97 and Spc98 were analyzed. Three phosphorylation sites in Tub4 were found to be critical for Tub4 stability and microtubule organization. One of the sites is highly conserved in γ-tubulins from yeast to human. PMID:21573187

  9. Regulated phosphorylation of secretory granule membrane proteins of the rat parotid gland

    SciTech Connect

    Marino, C.R.; Castle, J.D.; Gorelick, F.S. )

    1990-07-01

    An antiserum raised against purified rat parotid secretory granule membrane proteins has been used to identify organelle-specific protein phosphorylation events following stimulation of intact cells from the rat parotid gland. After lobules were prelabeled with ({sup 32}P)orthophosphate and exposed to secretagogues, phosphoproteins were immunoprecipitated with the granule membrane protein antiserum, separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and visualized by autoradiography. Parallel studies of stimulated amylase release were performed. Isoproterenol treatment of parotid lobules resulted in an increase in the phosphate content of immunoprecipitable 60- and 72-kDa proteins that correlated with amylase release in a time-dependent manner. Forskolin addition mimicked these effects, but only the isoproterenol effects were reversed by propranolol treatment. To confirm the specificity of the antiserum to the secretory granule membrane fraction, subcellular isolation techniques were employed following in situ phosphorylation. The 60- and 72-kDa phosphoproteins were immunoprecipitated from both a particulate fraction and a purified secretory granule fraction. Furthermore, the extraction properties of both species suggest that they are integral membrane proteins. These findings support the possibility that stimulus-regulated secretion may involve phosphorylation of integral membrane proteins of the exocrine secretory granule.

  10. Protein Kinase D Regulates RhoA Activity via Rhotekin Phosphorylation*

    PubMed Central

    Pusapati, Ganesh V.; Eiseler, Tim; Rykx, An; Vandoninck, Sandy; Derua, Rita; Waelkens, Etienne; Van Lint, Johan; von Wichert, Götz; Seufferlein, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    The members of the protein kinase D (PKD) family of serine/threonine kinases are major targets for tumor-promoting phorbol esters, G protein-coupled receptors, and activated protein kinase C isoforms (PKCs). The expanding list of cellular processes in which PKDs exert their function via phosphorylation of various substrates include proliferation, apoptosis, migration, angiogenesis, and vesicle trafficking. Therefore, identification of novel PKD substrates is necessary to understand the profound role of this kinase family in signal transduction. Here, we show that rhotekin, an effector of RhoA GTPase, is a novel substrate of PKD. We identified Ser-435 in rhotekin as the potential site targeted by PKD in vivo. Expression of a phosphomimetic S435E rhotekin mutant resulted in an increase of endogenous active RhoA GTPase levels. Phosphorylation of rhotekin by PKD2 modulates the anchoring of the RhoA in the plasma membrane. Consequently, the S435E rhotekin mutant displayed enhanced stress fiber formation when expressed in serum-starved fibroblasts. Our data thus identify a novel role of PKD as a regulator of RhoA activity and actin stress fiber formation through phosphorylation of rhotekin. PMID:22228765

  11. Cannabinoid WIN 55,212-2 regulates TRPV1 phosphorylation in sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Jeske, Nathaniel A; Patwardhan, Amol M; Gamper, Nikita; Price, Theodore J; Akopian, Armen N; Hargreaves, Kenneth M

    2006-10-27

    Cannabinoids are known to have multiple sites of action in the nociceptive system, leading to reduced pain sensation. However, the peripheral mechanism(s) by which this phenomenon occurs remains an issue that has yet to be resolved. Because phosphorylation of TRPV1 (transient receptor potential subtype V1) plays a key role in the induction of thermal hyperalgesia in inflammatory pain models, we evaluated whether the cannabinoid agonist WIN 55,212-2 (WIN) regulates the phosphorylation state of TRPV1. Here, we show that treatment of primary rat trigeminal ganglion cultures with WIN led to dephosphorylation of TRPV1, specifically at threonine residues. Utilizing Chinese hamster ovary cell lines, we demonstrate that Thr(144) and Thr(370) were dephosphorylated, leading to desensitization of the TRPV1 receptor. This post-translational modification occurred through activation of the phosphatase calcineurin (protein phosphatase 2B) following WIN treatment. Furthermore, knockdown of TRPA1 (transient receptor potential subtype A1) expression in sensory neurons by specific small interfering RNA abolished the WIN effect on TRPV1 dephosphorylation, suggesting that WIN acts through TRPA1. We also confirm the importance of TRPA1 in WIN-induced dephosphorylation of TRPV1 in Chinese hamster ovary cells through targeted expression of one or both receptor channels. These results imply that the cannabinoid WIN modulates the sensitivity of sensory neurons to TRPV1 activation by altering receptor phosphorylation. In addition, our data could serve as a useful strategy in determining the potential use of certain cannabinoids as peripheral analgesics.

  12. Aurora A phosphorylation of WD40-repeat protein 62 in mitotic spindle regulation

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Nicholas R.; Yeap, Yvonne Y. C.; Ang, Ching-Seng; Williamson, Nicholas A.; Bogoyevitch, Marie A.; Quinn, Leonie M.; Ng, Dominic C. H.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mitotic spindle organization is regulated by centrosomal kinases that potentiate recruitment of spindle-associated proteins required for normal mitotic progress including the microcephaly protein WD40-repeat protein 62 (WDR62). WDR62 functions underlie normal brain development as autosomal recessive mutations and wdr62 loss cause microcephaly. Here we investigate the signaling interactions between WDR62 and the mitotic kinase Aurora A (AURKA) that has been recently shown to cooperate to control brain size in mice. The spindle recruitment of WDR62 is closely correlated with increased levels of AURKA following mitotic entry. We showed that depletion of TPX2 attenuated WDR62 localization at spindle poles indicating that TPX2 co-activation of AURKA is required to recruit WDR62 to the spindle. We demonstrated that AURKA activity contributed to the mitotic phosphorylation of WDR62 residues Ser49 and Thr50 and phosphorylation of WDR62 N-terminal residues was required for spindle organization and metaphase chromosome alignment. Our analysis of several MCPH-associated WDR62 mutants (V65M, R438H and V1314RfsX18) that are mislocalized in mitosis revealed that their interactions and phosphorylation by AURKA was substantially reduced consistent with the notion that AURKA is a key determinant of WDR62 spindle recruitment. Thus, our study highlights the role of AURKA signaling in the spatiotemporal control of WDR62 at spindle poles where it maintains spindle organization. PMID:26713495

  13. LINGO-1 negatively regulates TrkB phosphorylation after ocular hypertension.

    PubMed

    Fu, Qing-Ling; Hu, Bing; Li, Xin; Shao, Zhaohui; Shi, Jian-Bo; Wu, Wutian; So, Kwok-Fai; Mi, Sha

    2010-03-01

    The antagonism of LINGO-1, a CNS-specific negative regulator of neuronal survival, was shown to promote short-term survival of retinal ganglion cell (RGC) in an ocular hypertension model. LINGO-1 antagonists, combined with brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), can increase the length of neuron survival through an unclear molecular mechanism. To determine the relationship between LINGO-1 and BDNF/TrkB receptor in neuronal protection, we show here that LINGO-1 forms a receptor complex with TrkB and negatively regulates its activation in the retina after ocular hypertension injury. LINGO-1 antagonist antibody 1A7 or soluble LINGO-1 (LINGO-1-Fc) treatment upregulates phospho-TrkB phosphorylation and leads to RGC survival after high intraocular pressure injury. This neuronal protective effect was blocked by anti-BDNF antibody. LINGO-1 antagonism therefore promotes RGC survival by regulating the BDNF and TrkB signaling pathway after ocular hypertension.

  14. Phosphorylation-dependent 14-3-3 protein interactions regulate CFTR biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Xiubin; Da Paula, Ana Carina; Bozóky, Zoltán; Zhang, Hui; Bertrand, Carol A.; Peters, Kathryn W.; Forman-Kay, Julie D.; Frizzell, Raymond A.

    2012-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a cAMP/protein kinase A (PKA)–regulated chloride channel whose phosphorylation controls anion secretion across epithelial cell apical membranes. We examined the hypothesis that cAMP/PKA stimulation regulates CFTR biogenesis posttranslationally, based on predicted 14-3-3 binding motifs within CFTR and forskolin-induced CFTR expression. The 14-3-3β, γ, and ε isoforms were expressed in airway cells and interacted with CFTR in coimmunoprecipitation assays. Forskolin stimulation (15 min) increased 14-3-3β and ε binding to immature and mature CFTR (bands B and C), and 14-3-3 overexpression increased CFTR bands B and C and cell surface band C. In pulse-chase experiments, 14-3-3β increased the synthesis of immature CFTR, reduced its degradation rate, and increased conversion of immature to mature CFTR. Conversely, 14-3-3β knockdown decreased CFTR B and C bands (70 and 55%) and elicited parallel reductions in cell surface CFTR and forskolin-stimulated anion efflux. In vitro, 14-3-3β interacted with the CFTR regulatory region, and by nuclear magnetic resonance analysis, this interaction occurred at known PKA phosphorylated sites. In coimmunoprecipitation assays, forskolin stimulated the CFTR/14-3-3β interaction while reducing CFTR's interaction with coat protein complex 1 (COP1). Thus 14-3-3 binding to phosphorylated CFTR augments its biogenesis by reducing retrograde retrieval of CFTR to the endoplasmic reticulum. This mechanism permits cAMP/PKA stimulation to make more CFTR available for anion secretion. PMID:22278744

  15. Multisite phosphorylation of Arabidopsis HFR1 by casein kinase II and a plausible role in regulating its degradation rate.

    PubMed

    Park, Hee-Jin; Ding, Lei; Dai, Mingqiu; Lin, Rongcheng; Wang, Haiyang

    2008-08-22

    Arabidopsis Long Hypocotyl in Far-Red Light 1 (HFR1), a bHLH transcription factor, plays a critical role in promoting seedling photomorphogenesis and in balancing the shade-avoidance response under canopy shade conditions. Previous studies have established that HFR1 protein is degraded in darkness and is stabilized under light conditions to promote light signaling. How light regulates HFR1 stability is not well understood. In this study, we show that Arabidopsis HFR1 can be phosphorylated by recombinant casein kinase II (CKII) and plant extract in vitro and that phosphorylation of HFR1 can be effectively reduced by treatments with two CKII-specific inhibitors, 5,6-dichloro-1-beta-d-ribofuranosyl-benzimidazole (DRB) and heparin. We demonstrate that HFR1 physically interacts with the CKB1 and CKB2 regulatory subunits of CKII. Mutagenesis studies indicate that HFR1 is phosphorylated at multiple serine (Ser) residues in the N-terminal regulatory domain of HFR1. We also show that phosphorylation of HFR1 is promoted by light and that a predicted CKII site, Ser(122), represents a major phosphorylation site of HFR1 under both dark and light conditions. Comparison of wild-type, phosphorylation-deficient, and phosphorylation-mimic mutant proteins suggests that phosphorylation acts to reduce the degradation rate of HFR1. Together, our results suggest that CKII-mediated phosphorylation represents an important post-translational modification influencing the stability and signaling activity of Arabidopsis HFR1.

  16. Phosphorylation-dependent down-regulation of apolipoprotein A5 by insulin

    SciTech Connect

    Nowak, Maxine; Helleboid-Chapman, Audrey; Jakel, Heidelinde; Rommens, Corinne; Martin, Genevieve; Duran-Sandoval, Daniel; Staels, Bart; Rubin, Edward M.; Pennacchio, Len A.; Taskinen, Marja-Riitta; Fruchart-Najib, Jamila; Fruchart, Jean-Charles

    2004-02-15

    The apolipoprotein A5 (APOA5) gene has been shown to be important in lowering plasma triglyceride levels. Since several studies have shown that hyperinsulinemia is associated with hypertriglyceridemia, we sought to determine whether APOA5 gene is regulated by insulin. We show here that cell and mouse treatments with insulin down-regulated APOA5 expression in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, we determined that insulin decreases APOA5 promoter activity and subsequent deletion analyses revealed an E-box-containing fragment. We showed that Upstream Stimulatory Factors, USF1/USF2, bind to the identified E-box in the APOA5 promoter. Moreover, in cotransfection studies, USF1 stimulates APOA5 promoter activity. The treatment with insulin reduces the binding of USF1/USF2 to APOA5 promoter. The inhibition of PI3K pathway with wortmannin abolished the insulin s effect on APOA5 gene transcription. Using oligoprecipitation method of USF from nuclear extracts, we demonstrated that phosphorylated USF1 failed to bind to APOA5 promoter. This indicates that the APOA5 gene transrepression by insulin involves a phosphorylation of USF through PI3K, that modulate their binding to APOA5 promoter and results in APOA5 down-regulation. The effect of exogenous hyperinsulinemia in healthy men shows a decrease of the plasma ApoAV level. These data suggest a potential mechanism involving APOA5 gene in hypertriglyceridemia associated with hyperinsulinemia.

  17. Protein kinase C phosphorylation disrupts Na+/H+ exchanger regulatory factor 1 autoinhibition and promotes cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator macromolecular assembly.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianquan; Poulikakos, Poulikos I; Dai, Zhongping; Testa, Joseph R; Callaway, David J E; Bu, Zimei

    2007-09-14

    An emerging theme in cell signaling is that membrane-bound channels and receptors are organized into supramolecular signaling complexes for optimum function and cross-talk. In this study, we determined how protein kinase C (PKC) phosphorylation influences the scaffolding protein Na(+)/H(+) exchanger regulatory factor 1 (NHERF) to assemble protein complexes of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a chloride ion channel that controls fluid and electrolyte transport across cell membranes. NHERF directs polarized expression of receptors and ion transport proteins in epithelial cells, as well as organizes the homo- and hetero-association of these cell surface proteins. NHERF contains two modular PDZ domains that are modular protein-protein interaction motifs, and a C-terminal domain. Previous studies have shown that NHERF is a phosphoprotein, but how phosphorylation affects NHERF to assemble macromolecular complexes is unknown. We show that PKC phosphorylates two amino acid residues Ser-339 and Ser-340 in the C-terminal domain of NHERF, but a serine 162 of PDZ2 is specifically protected from being phosphorylated by the intact C-terminal domain. PKC phosphorylation-mimicking mutant S339D/S340D of NHERF has increased affinity and stoichiometry when binding to C-CFTR. Moreover, solution small angle x-ray scattering indicates that the PDZ2 and C-terminal domains contact each other in NHERF, but such intramolecular domain-domain interactions are released in the PKC phosphorylation-mimicking mutant indicating that PKC phosphorylation disrupts the autoinhibition interactions in NHERF. The results demonstrate that the C-terminal domain of NHERF functions as an intramolecular switch that regulates the binding capability of PDZ2, and thus controls the stoichiometry of NHERF to assemble protein complexes.

  18. DYRK2 and GSK-3 phosphorylate and promote the timely degradation of OMA-1, a key regulator of the oocyte-to-embryo transition in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Nishi, Yuichi; Lin, Rueyling

    2005-12-01

    Oocyte maturation and fertilization initiates a dynamic and tightly regulated process in which a non-dividing oocyte is transformed into a rapidly dividing embryo. We have shown previously that two C. elegans CCCH zinc finger proteins, OMA-1 and OMA-2, have an essential and redundant function in oocyte maturation. Both OMA-1 and OMA-2 are expressed only in oocytes and 1-cell embryos, and need to be degraded rapidly after the first mitotic division for embryogenesis to proceed normally. We report here a distinct redundant function for OMA-1 and OMA-2 in the 1-cell embryo. Depletion of both oma-1 and oma-2 in embryos leads to embryonic lethality. We also show that OMA-1 protein is directly phosphorylated at T239 by the DYRK kinase MBK-2, and that phosphorylation at T239 is required both for OMA-1 function in the 1-cell embryo and its degradation after the first mitosis. OMA-1 phosphorylated at T239 is only detected within a short developmental window of 1-cell embryos, beginning soon after the proposed activation of MBK-2. Phosphorylation at T239 facilitates subsequent phosphorylation of OMA-1 by another kinase, GSK-3, at T339 in vitro. Phosphorylation at both T239 and T339 are essential for correctly-timed OMA-1 degradation in vivo. We propose that a series of precisely-timed phosphorylation events regulates both the activity and the timing of degradation for OMA proteins, thereby allowing restricted and distinct functions of OMA-1 and OMA-2 in the maturing oocyte and 1-cell embryo, ensuring a normal oocyte-to-embryo transition in C. elegans.

  19. DNA-Dependent Protein Kinase Phosphorylation of IκBα and IκBβ Regulates NF-κB DNA Binding Properties

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Li; Kwak, Youn-Tae; Bex, Françoise; García-Martínez, León F.; Li, Xiao-Hua; Meek, Katheryn; Lane, William S.; Gaynor, Richard B.

    1998-01-01

    Regulation of the IκBα and IκBβ proteins is critical for modulating NF-κB-directed gene expression. Both IκBα and IκBβ are substrates for cellular kinases that phosphorylate the amino and carboxy termini of these proteins and regulate their function. In this study, we utilized a biochemical fractionation scheme to purify a kinase activity which phosphorylates residues in the amino and carboxy termini of both IκBα and IκBβ. Peptide microsequence analysis by capillary high-performance liquid chromatography ion trap mass spectroscopy revealed that this kinase was the DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs). DNA-PK phosphorylates serine residue 36 but not serine residue 32 in the amino terminus of IκBα and also phosphorylates threonine residue 273 in the carboxy terminus of this protein. To determine the biological relevance of DNA-PK phosphorylation of IκBα, murine severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) cell lines which lack the DNA-PKcs gene were analyzed. Gel retardation analysis using extract prepared from these cells demonstrated constitutive nuclear NF-κB DNA binding activity, which was not detected in extracts prepared from SCID cells complemented with the human DNA-PKcs gene. Furthermore, IκBα that was phosphorylated by DNA-PK was a more potent inhibitor of NF-κB binding than nonphosphorylated IκBα. These results suggest that DNA-PK phosphorylation of IκBα increases its interaction with NF-κB to reduce NF-κB DNA binding properties. PMID:9632806

  20. Involvement of histone methylation and phosphorylation in regulation of transcription by thyroid hormone receptor.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiwen; Lin, Qiushi; Yoon, Ho-Geun; Huang, Zhi-Qing; Strahl, Brian D; Allis, C David; Wong, Jiemin

    2002-08-01

    Previous studies have established an important role of histone acetylation in transcriptional control by nuclear hormone receptors. With chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, we have now investigated whether histone methylation and phosphorylation are also involved in transcriptional regulation by thyroid hormone receptor (TR). We found that repression by unliganded TR is associated with a substantial increase in methylation of H3 lysine 9 (H3-K9) and a decrease in methylation of H3 lysine 4 (H3-K4), methylation of H3 arginine 17 (H3-R17), and a dual modification of phosphorylation of H3 serine 10 and acetylation of lysine 14 (pS10/acK14). On the other hand, transcriptional activation by liganded TR is coupled with a substantial decrease in both H3-K4 and H3-K9 methylation and a robust increase in H3-R17 methylation and the dual modification of pS10/acK14. Trichostatin A treatment results in not only histone hyperacetylation but also an increase in methylation of H3-K4, increase in dual modification of pS10/acK14, and reduction in methylation of H3-K9, revealing an extensive interplay between histone acetylation, methylation, and phosphorylation. In an effort to understand the underlying mechanism for an increase in H3-K9 methylation during repression by unliganded TR, we demonstrated that TR interacts in vitro with an H3-K9-specific histone methyltransferase (HMT), SUV39H1. Functional analysis indicates that SUV39H1 can facilitate repression by unliganded TR and in so doing requires its HMT activity. Together, our data uncover a novel role of H3-K9 methylation in repression by unliganded TR and provide strong evidence for the involvement of multiple distinct histone covalent modifications (acetylation, methylation, and phosphorylation) in transcriptional control by nuclear hormone receptors.

  1. Truncation and Activation of Dual Specificity Tyrosine Phosphorylation-regulated Kinase 1A by Calpain I

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Nana; Yin, Xiaomin; Gu, Jianlan; Zhang, Xinhua; Shi, Jianhua; Qian, Wei; Ji, Yuhua; Cao, Maohong; Gu, Xiaosong; Ding, Fei; Iqbal, Khalid; Gong, Cheng-Xin; Liu, Fei

    2015-01-01

    Hyperphosphorylation and dysregulation of exon 10 splicing of Tau are pivotally involved in pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease (AD) and/or other tauopathies. Alternative splicing of Tau exon 10, which encodes the second microtubule-binding repeat, generates Tau isoforms containing three and four microtubule-binding repeats, termed 3R-Taus and 4R-Taus, respectively. Dual specificity tyrosine-phosphorylation-regulated kinase 1A (Dyrk1A) lies at the Down syndrome critical region of chromosome 21. Overexpression of this kinase may contribute to the early Tau pathology in Down syndrome via phosphorylation of Tau and dysregulation of Tau exon 10. Here, we report that Dyrk1A was truncated at the C terminus and was associated with overactivation of calpain I in AD brain. Calpain I proteolyzed Dyrk1A in vitro first at the C terminus and further at the N terminus and enhanced its kinase activity toward Tau via increased Vmax but not Km. C-terminal truncation of Dyrk1A resulted in stronger activity than its full-length protein in promotion of exon 10 exclusion and phosphorylation of Tau. Dyrk1A was truncated in kainic acid-induced excitotoxic mouse brains and coincided with an increase in 3R-Tau expression and phosphorylation of Tau via calpain activation. Moreover, truncation of Dyrk1A was correlated with an increase in the ratio of 3R-Tau/4R-Tau and Tau hyperphosphorylation in AD brain. Collectively, these findings suggest that truncation/activation of Dyrk1A by Ca2+/calpain I might contribute to Tau pathology via promotion of exon 10 exclusion and hyperphosphorylation of Tau in AD brain. PMID:25918155

  2. Regulation between O-GlcNAcylation and phosphorylation of neurofilament-M and their dysregulation in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yanqiu; Li, Bin; Liu, Fei; Iqbal, Khalid; Grundke-Iqbal, Inge; Brandt, Roland; Gong, Cheng-Xin

    2008-01-01

    The medium subunit of neurofilament (NF-M) is extensively modified by phosphate and O-linked beta-N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc). Phosphorylation of NF-M plays a critical role in regulating its translocation, filament formation, and function. However, the regulation of NF-M phosphorylation and the role of NF-M O-GlcNAcylation (a modification by which GlcNAc is attached to the serine/threonine residues of a protein via an O-linked glycosidic bond) are largely unknown. Here, we demonstrate that O-GlcNAcylation and phosphorylation of NF-M regulate each other reciprocally in cultured neuroblastoma cells and in metabolically active rat brain slices. In animal models of fasting rats, which mimicked the decreased glucose uptake/metabolism observed in brains of individuals with Alzheimer disease (AD), we found a decrease in O-GlcNAcylation and increase in phosphorylation of NF-M. We also observed decreased O-GlcNAcylation and an increased phosphorylation of NF-M in AD brain. These results suggest that O-GlcNAcylation and phosphorylation of NF-M are regulated reciprocally and that the hyperphosphorylation and accumulation of NF-M in AD brain might be caused by impaired brain glucose uptake/metabolism via down-regulation of NF-M O-GlcNAcylation.

  3. Differential regulation of androgen receptor by PIM-1 kinases via phosphorylation-dependent recruitment of distinct ubiquitin E3 ligases.

    PubMed

    Linn, Douglas E; Yang, Xi; Xie, Yingqiu; Alfano, Alan; Deshmukh, Dhanraj; Wang, Xin; Shimelis, Hermela; Chen, Hegang; Li, Wei; Xu, Kexin; Chen, Mingyuan; Qiu, Yun

    2012-06-29

    Androgen receptor (AR) plays a pivotal role in prostate cancer. Regulation of AR transcriptional activity by post-translational modifications, such as phosphorylation by multiple kinases, is well documented. Here, we report that two PIM-1 kinase isoforms which are up-regulated during prostate cancer progression, namely PIM-1S and PIM-1L, modulate AR stability and transcriptional activity through differentially phosphorylating AR at serine 213 (Ser-213) and threonine 850 (Thr-850). Although both kinases are capable of interacting with and phosphorylating AR at Ser-213, only PIM-1L could phosphorylate Thr-850. We also showed that PIM-1S induced Ser-213 phosphorylation destabilizes AR by recruiting the ubiquitin E3 ligase Mdm2 and promotes AR degradation in a cell cycle-dependent manner, while PIM-1L-induced Thr-850 phosphorylation stabilizes AR by recruiting the ubiquitin E3 ligase RNF6 and promotes AR-mediated transcription under low-androgen conditions. Furthermore, both PIM-1 isoforms could promote prostate cancer cell growth under low-androgen conditions. Our data suggest that these kinases regulate AR stability and transcriptional activity through recruitment of different functional partners in a phosphorylation-dependent manner. As AR turnover has been previously shown to be critical for cell cycle progression in prostate cancer cells, PIM-1 kinase isoforms may promote prostate cancer cell growth, at least in part, through modulating AR activity via distinct mechanisms.

  4. TORC1 and TORC2 work together to regulate ribosomal protein S6 phosphorylation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Yerlikaya, Seda; Meusburger, Madeleine; Kumari, Romika; Huber, Alexandre; Anrather, Dorothea; Costanzo, Michael; Boone, Charles; Ammerer, Gustav; Baranov, Pavel V.; Loewith, Robbie

    2016-01-01

    Nutrient-sensitive phosphorylation of the S6 protein of the 40S subunit of the eukaryote ribosome is highly conserved. However, despite four decades of research, the functional consequences of this modification remain unknown. Revisiting this enigma in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we found that the regulation of Rps6 phosphorylation on Ser-232 and Ser-233 is mediated by both TOR complex 1 (TORC1) and TORC2. TORC1 regulates phosphorylation of both sites via the poorly characterized AGC-family kinase Ypk3 and the PP1 phosphatase Glc7, whereas TORC2 regulates phosphorylation of only the N-terminal phosphosite via Ypk1. Cells expressing a nonphosphorylatable variant of Rps6 display a reduced growth rate and a 40S biogenesis defect, but these phenotypes are not observed in cells in which Rps6 kinase activity is compromised. Furthermore, using polysome profiling and ribosome profiling, we failed to uncover a role of Rps6 phosphorylation in either global translation or translation of individual mRNAs. Taking the results together, this work depicts the signaling cascades orchestrating Rps6 phosphorylation in budding yeast, challenges the notion that Rps6 phosphorylation plays a role in translation, and demonstrates that observations made with Rps6 knock-ins must be interpreted cautiously. PMID:26582391

  5. Evidence for Regulation of Mitotic Progression through Temporal Phosphorylation and Dephosphorylation of CK2α▿ †

    PubMed Central

    St-Denis, Nicole A.; Derksen, D. Richard; Litchfield, David W.

    2009-01-01

    Proper mitotic progression is crucial for maintenance of genomic integrity in proliferating cells and is regulated through an intricate series of events, including protein phosphorylation governed by a complex network of protein kinases. One kinase family implicated in the regulation of mitotic progression is protein kinase CK2, a small family of enzymes that is overexpressed in cancer and induces transformation in mice and cultured fibroblasts. CK2α, one isoform of the catalytic subunits of CK2, is maximally phosphorylated at four sites in nocodazole-treated cells. To investigate the effects of CK2α phosphorylation on mitotic progression, we generated phosphospecific antibodies against its mitotic phosphorylation sites. In U2OS cells released from S-phase arrest, these antibodies reveal that CK2α is most highly phosphorylated in prophase and metaphase. Phosphorylation gradually decreases during anaphase and becomes undetectable during telophase and cytokinesis. Stable expression of phosphomimetic CK2α (CK2α-4D, CK2α-4E) results in aberrant centrosome amplification and chromosomal segregation defects and loss of mitotic cells through mitotic catastrophe. Conversely, cells expressing nonphosphorylatable CK2α (CK2α-4A) show a decreased ability to arrest in mitosis following nocodazole treatment, suggesting involvement in the spindle assembly checkpoint. Collectively, these studies indicate that reversible phosphorylation of CK2α requires precise regulation to allow proper mitotic progression. PMID:19188443

  6. New insights into the regulation of myosin light chain phosphorylation in retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Loredo, Ariadna Yolanda; López-Colomé, Ana María

    2012-01-01

    The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) plays an essential role in the function of the neural retina and the maintenance of vision. Most of the functions displayed by RPE require a dynamic organization of the acto-myosin cytoskeleton. Myosin II, a main cytoskeletal component in muscle and non-muscle cells, is directly involved in force generation required for organelle movement, selective molecule transport within cell compartments, exocytosis, endocytosis, phagocytosis, and cell division, among others. Contractile processes are triggered by the phosphorylation of myosin II light chains (MLCs), which promotes actin-myosin interaction and the assembly of contractile fibers. Considerable evidence indicates that non-muscle myosin II activation is critically involved in various pathological states, increasing the interest in studying the signaling pathways controlling MLC phosphorylation. Particularly, recent findings suggest a role for non-muscle myosin II-induced contraction in RPE cell transformation involved in the establishment of numerous retinal diseases. This review summarizes the current knowledge regarding myosin function in RPE cells, as well as the signaling networks leading to MLC phosphorylation under pathological conditions. Understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying RPE dysfunction would improve the development of new therapies for the treatment or prevention of different ocular disorders leading to blindness.

  7. Regulation of Ci-SCFSlimb binding, Ci proteolysis and Hedgehog pathway activity by Ci phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Smelkinson, Margery G.; Zhou, Qianhe; Kalderon, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    SUMMARY Hedgehog (Hh) proteins signal by inhibiting the proteolytic processing of Ci/Gli family transcription factors and by increasing Ci/Gli specific activity. In the absence of Hh, phosphorylation of Ci/Gli triggers binding to SCF ubiquitin ligase complexes and consequent proteolysis. Here we define the principal SCFSlimb binding site in Ci as an extended variant of a canonical Slimb/β-TRCP binding motif that can be created by PKA-priming of five successive CK1 sites. GSK3 enhances binding primarily through a nearby region of Ci, which may contact an SCF component other than Slimb. Studies of Ci variants with altered CK1 and GSK3 sites suggest that the large number of phosphorylation sites that direct SCFSlimb binding confers a Hh response that is both sensitive and graded, and that in the Drosophila wing disc, morphogenetic responses involve changes in both the level and specific activity of Ci. We also show that when Ci proteolysis is compromised, its specific activity is limited principally by Su(fu) and not by Cos2 cytoplasmic tethering or PKA phosphorylation. PMID:17925225

  8. Regulation of cytochrome c oxidase by adenylic nucleotides. Is oxidative phosphorylation feedback regulated by its end-products?

    PubMed

    Beauvoit, B; Rigoulet, M

    2001-01-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase, which catalyzes an irreversible step of the respiratory chain, is one of the rate-controlling steps of oxidative phosphorylation on isolated mitochondria. The rate of electron transfer through the complex is primarily controlled by the associated thermodynamic forces, i.e., the span in redox potential between oxygen and cytochrome c and the protonmotive force. However, the electron flux also depends on the various kinetic effectors, including adenylic nucleotides. Although the number of binding sites for ATP and ADP on cytochrome oxidase is still a matter of debate, experiments performed on the solubilized and reconstituted enzyme provide strong functional evidence that the mammalian cytochrome c oxidase binds adenylic nucleotides on both sides of the inner membrane. These effects include modification in cytochrome c affinity, allosteric inhibition and changes in proton pumping efficiency. Immunological studies have pointed out the role of subunit IV and that of an ATP-binding protein, subunit VIa, in these kinetic regulations. In yeast, the role of the nuclear-encoded subunits in assembly and regulation of the cytochrome c oxidase has been further substantiated by using gene-disruption analysis. Using a subunit VIa-null mutant, the consequences of the ATP regulation on oxidative phosphorylation have been further investigated on isolated mitochondria. Taken together, the data demonstrate that there are multiple regulating sites for ATP on the yeast cytochrome oxidase with respect to the location (matrix versus cytosolic side), kinetic effect (activation versus inhibition) and consequence on the flow-force relationships. The question is therefore raised as to the physiological meaning of such feedback regulation of the respiratory chain by ATP in the control and regulation of cellular energy metabolism.

  9. Down-regulation of NOX2 activity in phagocytes mediated by ATM-kinase dependent phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Beaumel, Sylvain; Picciocchi, Antoine; Debeurme, Franck; Vivès, Corinne; Hesse, Anne-Marie; Ferro, Myriam; Grunwald, Didier; Stieglitz, Heather; Thepchatri, Pahk; Smith, Susan M E; Fieschi, Franck; José Stasia, Marie

    2017-09-13

    NADPH oxidases (NOX) have many biological roles, but their regulation to control production of potentially toxic ROS molecules remains unclear. A previously identified insertion sequence of 21 residues (called NIS) influences NOX activity, and its predicted flexibility makes it a good candidate for providing a dynamic switch controlling the NOX active site. We constructed NOX2 chimeras in which NIS had been deleted or exchanged with those from other NOXs (NIS1, 3 and 4). All contained functional heme and were expressed normally at the plasma membrane of differentiated PLB-985 cells. However, NOX2-ΔNIS and NOX2-NIS1 had neither NADPH-oxidase nor reductase activity and exhibited abnormal translocation of p47(phox) and p67(phox) to the phagosomal membrane. This suggested a functional role of NIS. Interestingly after activation, NOX2-NIS3 cells exhibited superoxide overproduction compared with wild-type cells. Paradoxically, the Vmax of purified unstimulated NOX2-NIS3 was only one-third of that of WT-NOX2. We therefore hypothesized that post-translational events regulate NOX2 activity and differ between NOX2-NIS3 and WT-NOX2. We demonstrated that Ser486, a phosphorylation target of ataxia telangiectasia mutated kinase (ATM kinase) located in the NIS of NOX2 (NOX2-NIS), was phosphorylated in purified cytochrome b558 after stimulation with phorbol 12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA). Moreover, ATM kinase inhibition and a NOX2 Ser486Ala mutation enhanced NOX activity whereas a Ser486Glu mutation inhibited it. Thus, the absence of Ser486 in NIS3 could explain the superoxide overproduction in the NOX2-NIS3 mutant. These results suggest that PMA-stimulated NOX2-NIS phosphorylation by ATM kinase causes a dynamic switch that deactivates NOX2 activity. We hypothesize that this downregulation is defective in NOX2-NIS3 mutant because of the absence of Ser486. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Site-directed spin labeling reveals a conformational switch in the phosphorylation domain of smooth muscle myosin.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Wendy D; Blakely, Sarah E; Nesmelov, Yuri E; Thomas, David D

    2005-03-15

    We have used site-directed spin labeling and EPR spectroscopy to detect structural changes within the regulatory light chain (RLC) of smooth muscle myosin upon phosphorylation. Smooth muscle contraction is activated by phosphorylation of S19 on RLC, but the structural basis of this process is unknown. There is no crystal structure containing a phosphorylated RLC, and there is no crystal structure for the N-terminal region of any RLC. Therefore, we have prepared single-Cys mutations throughout RLC, exchanged each mutant onto smooth muscle heavy meromyosin, verified normal regulatory function, and used EPR to determine dynamics and solvent accessibility at each site. A survey of spin-label sites throughout the RLC revealed that only the N-terminal region (first 24 aa) shows a significant change in dynamics upon phosphorylation, with most of the first 17 residues showing an increase in rotational amplitude. Therefore, we focused on this N-terminal region. Additional structural information was obtained from the pattern of oxygen accessibility along the sequence. In the absence of phosphorylation, little or no periodicity was observed, suggesting a lack of secondary structural order in this region. However, phosphorylation induced a strong helical pattern (3.6-residue periodicity) in the first 17 residues, while increasing accessibility throughout the first 24 residues. We have identified a domain within RLC, the N-terminal phosphorylation domain, in which phosphorylation increases helical order, internal dynamics, and accessibility. These results support a model in which this disorder-to-order transition within the phosphorylation domain results in decreased head-head interactions, activating myosin in smooth muscle.

  11. Plant dual-specificity tyrosine phosphorylation-regulated kinase optimizes light-regulated growth and development in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wen-Yu; Wu, Yi-Chen; Pu, Hsin-Yi; Wang, Ying; Jang, Geng-Jen; Wu, Shu-Hsing

    2017-09-01

    Light controls vegetative and reproductive development of plants. For a plant, sensing the light input properly ensures coordination with the ever-changing environment. Previously, we found that LIGHT-REGULATED WD1 (LWD1) and LWD2 regulate the circadian clock and photoperiodic flowering. Here, we identified Arabidopsis YET ANOTHER KINASE1 (AtYAK1), an evolutionarily conserved protein and a member of dual-specificity tyrosine phosphorylation-regulated kinases (DYRKs), as an interacting protein of LWDs. Our study revealed that AtYAK1 is an important regulator for various light responses, including the circadian clock, photomorphogenesis and reproductive development. AtYAK1 could antagonize the function of LWDs in regulating the circadian clock and photoperiodic flowering. By examining phenotypes of atyak1, we found that AtYAK1 regulated light-induced period-length shortening and photomorphogenic development. Moreover, AtYAK1 mediated plant fertility especially under inferior light conditions including low light and short-day length. This study discloses a new regulator connecting environmental light to plant growth. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. 14-3-3 Proteins regulate Akt Thr308 phosphorylation in intestinal epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Suárez, M; Gutiérrez-Martínez, I Z; Hernández-Trejo, J A; Hernández-Ruiz, M; Suárez-Pérez, D; Candelario, A; Kamekura, R; Medina-Contreras, O; Schnoor, M; Ortiz-Navarrete, V; Villegas-Sepúlveda, N; Parkos, C; Nusrat, A; Nava, P

    2016-01-01

    Akt activation has been associated with proliferation, differentiation, survival and death of epithelial cells. Phosphorylation of Thr308 of Akt by phosphoinositide-dependent kinase 1 (PDK1) is critical for optimal stimulation of its kinase activity. However, the mechanism(s) regulating this process remain elusive. Here, we report that 14-3-3 proteins control Akt Thr308 phosphorylation during intestinal inflammation. Mechanistically, we found that IFNγ and TNFα treatment induce degradation of the PDK1 inhibitor, 14-3-3η, in intestinal epithelial cells. This mechanism requires association of 14-3-3ζ with raptor in a process that triggers autophagy and leads to 14-3-3η degradation. Notably, inhibition of 14-3-3 function by the chemical inhibitor BV02 induces uncontrolled Akt activation, nuclear Akt accumulation and ultimately intestinal epithelial cell death. Our results suggest that 14-3-3 proteins control Akt activation and regulate its biological functions, thereby providing a new mechanistic link between cell survival and apoptosis of intestinal epithelial cells during inflammation. PMID:26846144

  13. Light-regulated translational control of circadian behavior by eIF4E phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Cao, Ruifeng; Gkogkas, Christos G; de Zavalia, Nuria; Blum, Ian D; Yanagiya, Akiko; Tsukumo, Yoshinori; Xu, Haiyan; Lee, Choogon; Storch, Kai-Florian; Liu, Andrew C; Amir, Shimon; Sonenberg, Nahum

    2015-06-01

    The circadian (∼24 h) clock is continuously entrained (reset) by ambient light so that endogenous rhythms are synchronized with daily changes in the environment. Light-induced gene expression is thought to be the molecular mechanism underlying clock entrainment. mRNA translation is a key step of gene expression, but the manner in which clock entrainment is controlled at the level of mRNA translation is not well understood. We found that a light- and circadian clock-regulated MAPK/MNK pathway led to phosphorylation of the cap-binding protein eIF4E in the mouse suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus, the locus of the master circadian clock in mammals. Phosphorylation of eIF4E specifically promoted translation of Period 1 (Per1) and Period 2 (Per2) mRNAs and increased the abundance of basal and inducible PER proteins, which facilitated circadian clock resetting and precise timekeeping. Together, these results highlight a critical role for light-regulated translational control in the physiology of the circadian clock.

  14. Regulation of the DNA Damage Response by DNA-PKcs Inhibitory Phosphorylation of ATM.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yi; Lee, Ji-Hoon; Jiang, Wenxia; Crowe, Jennie L; Zha, Shan; Paull, Tanya T

    2017-01-05

    Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) regulates the DNA damage response as well as DNA double-strand break repair through homologous recombination. Here we show that ATM is hyperactive when the catalytic subunit of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PKcs) is chemically inhibited or when the DNA-PKcs gene is deleted in human cells. Pre-incubation of ATM protein with active DNA-PKcs also significantly reduces ATM activity in vitro. We characterize several phosphorylation sites in ATM that are targets of DNA-PKcs and show that phospho-mimetic mutations at these residues significantly inhibit ATM activity and impair ATM signaling upon DNA damage. In contrast, phospho-blocking mutations at one cluster of sites increase the frequency of apoptosis during normal cell growth. DNA-PKcs, which is integral to the non-homologous end joining pathway, thus negatively regulates ATM activity through phosphorylation of ATM. These observations illuminate an important regulatory mechanism for ATM that also controls DNA repair pathway choice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Phosphorylation regulates binding of the human papillomavirus type 8 E2 protein to host chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Sekhar, Vandana; McBride, Alison A

    2012-09-01

    The papillomavirus E2 proteins are indispensable for the viral life cycle, and their functions are subject to tight regulation. The E2 proteins undergo posttranslational modifications that regulate their properties and roles in viral transcription, replication, and genome maintenance. During persistent infection, the E2 proteins from many papillomaviruses act as molecular bridges that tether the viral genomes to host chromosomes to retain them within the host nucleus and to partition them to daughter cells. The betapapillomavirus E2 proteins bind to pericentromeric regions of host mitotic chromosomes, including the ribosomal DNA loci. We recently reported that two residues (arginine 250 and serine 253) within the chromosome binding region of the human papillomavirus type 8 (HPV8) E2 protein are required for this binding. In this study, we show that serine 253 is phosphorylated, most likely by protein kinase A, and this modulates the interaction of the E2 protein with cellular chromatin. Furthermore, we show that this phosphorylation occurs in S phase, increases the half-life of the E2 protein, and promotes chromatin binding from S phase through mitosis.

  16. Protein tyrosine phosphatase PTPRB regulates Src phosphorylation and tumour progression in NSCLC.

    PubMed

    Qi, Yinliang; Dai, Yuanchang; Gui, Shuyu

    2016-10-01

    Protein tyrosine-phosphatases (PTPs) play important roles in various biological processes. Deregulation in PTP function has been implicated in carcinogenesis and tumour progression in many cancer types. However, the role of protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor type B (PTPRB) in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) tumorigenesis has not been investigated. Lentiviral vector expressing PTPRB cDNA or shRNA was infected into A549 and H1299 cell lines, followed by cell proliferation, colony formation, soft agar and invasion assays. A549 xenograft mouse model was used to evaluate in vivo function of PTPRB. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to measure PTPRB expression in NSCLC patient samples. Kaplan Meier analysis was performed to assess association between PTPRB expression and patient overall survival (OS). Multivariate analysis was performed to evaluate prognostic significance of PTPRB. Overexpression of PTPRB reduced cell proliferation rate, colony formation efficiency, soft agar growth and cell invasion in A549 and H1299 cells, as well as tumour growth rate in A549 xenograft. Knockdown of PTPRB increased Src phosphorylation and cell invasion, which was reversed by Src inhibitor PP2. Additionally, PTPRB was down-regulated in NSCLC patient and was associated with patient OS. PTPRB regulates Src phosphorylation and tumorigenesis in NSCLC. PTPRB may serve as an independent prognostic biomarker for NSCLC patients.

  17. Glycogen synthase kinase 3 phosphorylates kinesin light chains and negatively regulates kinesin-based motility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morfini, Gerardo; Szebenyi, Gyorgyi; Elluru, Ravindhra; Ratner, Nancy; Brady, Scott T.

    2002-01-01

    Membrane-bounded organelles (MBOs) are delivered to different domains in neurons by fast axonal transport. The importance of kinesin for fast antero grade transport is well established, but mechanisms for regulating kinesin-based motility are largely unknown. In this report, we provide biochemical and in vivo evidence that kinesin light chains (KLCs) interact with and are in vivo substrates for glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3). Active GSK3 inhibited anterograde, but not retrograde, transport in squid axoplasm and reduced the amount of kinesin bound to MBOs. Kinesin microtubule binding and microtubule-stimulated ATPase activities were unaffected by GSK3 phosphorylation of KLCs. Active GSK3 was also localized preferentially to regions known to be sites of membrane delivery. These data suggest that GSK3 can regulate fast anterograde axonal transport and targeting of cargos to specific subcellular domains in neurons.

  18. Glycogen synthase kinase 3 phosphorylates kinesin light chains and negatively regulates kinesin-based motility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morfini, Gerardo; Szebenyi, Gyorgyi; Elluru, Ravindhra; Ratner, Nancy; Brady, Scott T.

    2002-01-01

    Membrane-bounded organelles (MBOs) are delivered to different domains in neurons by fast axonal transport. The importance of kinesin for fast antero grade transport is well established, but mechanisms for regulating kinesin-based motility are largely unknown. In this report, we provide biochemical and in vivo evidence that kinesin light chains (KLCs) interact with and are in vivo substrates for glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3). Active GSK3 inhibited anterograde, but not retrograde, transport in squid axoplasm and reduced the amount of kinesin bound to MBOs. Kinesin microtubule binding and microtubule-stimulated ATPase activities were unaffected by GSK3 phosphorylation of KLCs. Active GSK3 was also localized preferentially to regions known to be sites of membrane delivery. These data suggest that GSK3 can regulate fast anterograde axonal transport and targeting of cargos to specific subcellular domains in neurons.

  19. G protein-coupled receptor kinase GRK5 phosphorylates moesin and regulates metastasis in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Prabir Kumar; Zhang, Yushan; Coomes, Alexandra S; Kim, Wan-Ju; Stupay, Rachel; Lynch, Lauren D; Atkinson, Tamieka; Kim, Jae I; Nie, Zhongzhen; Daaka, Yehia

    2014-07-01

    G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRK) regulate diverse cellular functions ranging from metabolism to growth and locomotion. Here, we report an important contributory role for GRK5 in human prostate cancer. Inhibition of GRK5 kinase activity attenuated the migration and invasion of prostate cancer cells and, concordantly, increased cell attachment and focal adhesion formation. Mass spectrometric analysis of the phosphoproteome revealed the cytoskeletal-membrane attachment protein moesin as a putative GRK5 substrate. GRK5 regulated the subcellular distribution of moesin and colocalized with moesin at the cell periphery. We identified amino acid T66 of moesin as a principal GRK5 phosphorylation site and showed that enforcing the expression of a T66-mutated moesin reduced cell spreading. In a xenograft model of human prostate cancer, GRK5 silencing reduced tumor growth, invasion, and metastasis. Taken together, our results established GRK5 as a key contributor to the growth and metastasis of prostate cancer.

  20. C-terminal phosphorylation regulates the kinetics of a subset of melanopsin-mediated behaviors in mice.

    PubMed

    Somasundaram, Preethi; Wyrick, Glenn R; Fernandez, Diego Carlos; Ghahari, Alireza; Pinhal, Cindy M; Simmonds Richardson, Melissa; Rupp, Alan C; Cui, Lihong; Wu, Zhijian; Brown, R Lane; Badea, Tudor Constantin; Hattar, Samer; Robinson, Phyllis R

    2017-03-07

    Intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs) express the photopigment melanopsin and mediate several non-image-forming visual functions, including circadian photoentrainment and the pupillary light reflex (PLR). ipRGCs act as autonomous photoreceptors via the intrinsic melanopsin-based phototransduction pathway and as a relay for rod/cone input via synaptically driven responses. Under low light intensities, where only synaptically driven rod/cone input activates ipRGCs, the duration of the ipRGC response will be determined by the termination kinetics of the rod/cone circuits. Little is known, however, about the termination kinetics of the intrinsic melanopsin-based phototransduction pathway and its contribution to several melanopsin-mediated behaviors. Here, we show that C-terminal phosphorylation of melanopsin determines the recovery kinetics of the intrinsic melanopsin-based photoresponse in ipRGCs, the duration of the PLR, and the speed of reentrainment. In contrast, circadian phase alignment and direct effects of light on activity (masking) are not influenced by C-terminal phosphorylation of melanopsin. Electrophysiological measurements demonstrate that expression of a virally encoded melanopsin lacking all C-terminal phosphorylation sites (C terminus phosphonull) leads to a prolonged intrinsic light response. In addition, mice expressing the C terminus phosphonull in ipRGCs reentrain faster to a delayed light/dark cycle compared with mice expressing virally encoded WT melanopsin; however, the phase angle of entrainment and masking were indistinguishable. Importantly, a sustained PLR in the phosphonull animals is only observed at brighter light intensities that activate melanopsin phototransduction, but not at dimmer light intensities that activate only the rod/cone pathway. Taken together, our results highlight how the kinetics of the melanopsin photoresponse differentially regulate distinct light-mediated behaviors.

  1. Extracellular Signal-regulated Kinases (ERKs) Phosphorylate Lin28a Protein to Modulate P19 Cell Proliferation and Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiangyuan; Chen, Min; Li, Long; Gong, Liyan; Zhou, Hu; Gao, Daming

    2017-03-10

    Lin28a, originally discovered in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans and highly conserved across species, is a well characterized regulator of let-7 microRNA (miRNA) and is implicated in cell proliferation and pluripotency control. However, little is known about how Lin28a function is modulated at the post-translational level and thereby responds to major signaling pathways. Here we show that Lin28a is directly phosphorylated by ERK1/2 kinases at Ser-200. By editing lin28a gene with the CRISPR/Cas9-based method, we generated P19 mouse embryonic carcinoma stem cells expressing Lin28a-S200A (phospho-deficient) and Lin28a-S200D (phospho-mimetic) mutants, respectively, to study the functional impact of Ser-200 phosphorylation. Lin28a-S200D-expressing cells, but not Lin28a-S200A-expressing or control P19 embryonic carcinoma cells, displayed impaired inhibition of let-7 miRNA and resulted in decreased cyclin D1, whereas Lin28a-S200A knock-in cells expressed less let-7 miRNA, proliferated faster, and exhibited differentiation defect upon retinoic acid induction. Therefore our results support that ERK kinase-mediated Lin28a phosphorylation may be an important mechanism for pluripotent cells to facilitate the escape from the self-renewal cycle and start the differentiation process. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  2. Gravity loading induces adenosine triphosphate release and phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases in human periodontal ligament cells.

    PubMed

    Ito, Mai; Arakawa, Toshiya; Okayama, Miki; Shitara, Akiko; Mizoguchi, Itaru; Takuma, Taishin

    2014-11-01

    The periodontal ligament (PDL) receives mechanical stress (MS) from dental occlusion or orthodontic tooth movement. Mechanical stress is thought to be a trigger for remodeling of the PDL and alveolar bone, although its signaling mechanism is still unclear. So we investigated the effect of MS on adenosine triphosphate (ATP) release and extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) phosphorylation in PDL cells. Mechanical stress was applied to human PDL cells as centrifugation-mediated gravity loading. Apyrase, Ca(2+)-free medium and purinergic receptor agonists and antagonists were utilized to analyze the contribution of purinergic receptors to ERK phosphorylation. Gravity loading and ATP increased ERK phosphorylation by 5 and 2.5 times, respectively. Gravity loading induced ATP release from PDL cells by tenfold. Apyrase and suramin diminished ERK phosphorylation induced by both gravity loading and ATP. Under Ca(2+)-free conditions the phosphorylation by gravity loading was partially decreased, whereas ATP-induced phosphorylation was unaffected. Receptors P2Y4 and P2Y6 were prominently expressed in the PDL cells. Gravity loading induced ATP release and ERK phosphorylation in PDL fibroblasts, and ATP signaling via P2Y receptors was partially involved in this phosphorylation, which in turn would enhance gene expression for the remodeling of PDL tissue during orthodontic tooth movement. © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  3. Protein phosphorylation changes reveal new candidates in the regulation of egg activation and early embryogenesis in D. melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Krauchunas, Amber R.; Horner, Vanessa L.; Wolfner, Mariana F.

    2012-01-01

    Egg activation is the series of events that must occur for a mature oocyte to become capable of supporting embryogenesis. These events include changes to the egg’s outer coverings, the resumption and completion of meiosis, the translation of new proteins, and the degradation of specific maternal mRNAs. While we know some of the molecules that direct the initial events of egg activation, it remains unclear how multiple pathways are coordinated to change the cellular state from mature oocyte to activated egg. Using a proteomic approach we have identified new candidates for the regulation and progression of egg activation. Reasoning that phosphorylation can simultaneously and rapidly modulate the activity of many proteins, we identified proteins that are post-translationally modified during the transition from oocyte to activated egg in Drosophila melanogaster. We find that at least 311 proteins change in phosphorylation state between mature oocytes and activated eggs. These proteins fall into various functional classes related to the events of egg activation including calcium binding, proteolysis, and protein translation. Our set of candidates includes genes already associated with egg activation, as well as many genes not previously studied during this developmental period. RNAi knockdown of a subset of these genes revealed a new gene, mrityu, necessary for embryonic development past the first mitosis. Thus, by identifying phospho-modulated proteins we have produced a focused candidate set for future genetic studies to test their roles in egg activation and the initiation of embryogenesis. PMID:22884528

  4. CASEIN KINASE1-LIKE PROTEIN2 Regulates Actin Filament Stability and Stomatal Closure via Phosphorylation of Actin Depolymerizing Factor

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Shuangshuang; Jiang, Yuxiang; Zhao, Yang; Huang, Shanjin; Yuan, Ming; Zhao, Yanxiu; Guo, Yan

    2016-01-01

    The opening and closing of stomata are crucial for plant photosynthesis and transpiration. Actin filaments undergo dynamic reorganization during stomatal closure, but the underlying mechanism for this cytoskeletal reorganization remains largely unclear. In this study, we identified and characterized Arabidopsis thaliana casein kinase 1-like protein 2 (CKL2), which responds to abscisic acid (ABA) treatment and participates in ABA- and drought-induced stomatal closure. Although CKL2 does not bind to actin filaments directly and has no effect on actin assembly in vitro, it colocalizes with and stabilizes actin filaments in guard cells. Further investigation revealed that CKL2 physically interacts with and phosphorylates actin depolymerizing factor 4 (ADF4) and inhibits its activity in actin filament disassembly. During ABA-induced stomatal closure, deletion of CKL2 in Arabidopsis alters actin reorganization in stomata and renders stomatal closure less sensitive to ABA, whereas deletion of ADF4 impairs the disassembly of actin filaments and causes stomatal closure to be more sensitive to ABA. Deletion of ADF4 in the ckl2 mutant partially recues its ABA-insensitive stomatal closure phenotype. Moreover, Arabidopsis ADFs from subclass I are targets of CKL2 in vitro. Thus, our results suggest that CKL2 regulates actin filament reorganization and stomatal closure mainly through phosphorylation of ADF. PMID:27268429

  5. Regulation of the mRNA-binding protein HuR by posttranslational modification: spotlight on phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Eberhardt, Wolfgang; Doller, Anke; Pfeilschifter, Josef

    2012-06-01

    The ubiquitous mRNA-binding protein human antigen R (HuR) and its neuronal relatives (HuB, HuC, HuD) participate in the post-transcriptional regulation of many AU-rich element-bearing mRNAs. In addition to its originally described role in controlling mRNA decay, the binding of HuR to target mRNAs can affect many aspects of mRNA processing including splicing, polyadenylation, intracellular trafficking, translation and modulation of mRNA repression by miRNAs. In accordance to the growing list of signalling events which are involved in regulating these different HuR functions, recent data implicate that posttranslational modification, namely protein kinase-triggered phosphorylation of HuR plays a crucial role in connecting extracellular signal inputs to a specific post-transcriptional program by HuR. Notably, in addition to directly targeting HuR functions, posttranslational modifications of HuR have a major impact on the sequestration and binding to various HuR ligand proteins as has been demonstrated e.g. for the 14-3-3 chaperones. However, the detailed mechanisms of how a specific modification of HuR coordinates different aspects in HuR regulation are currently poorly understood. Due to the fact that most of the described HuR activities are closely related to its subcellular localization and the binding to cargo mRNA, this review will focus on these aspects of HuR functions and their control by posttranslational modification, particularly by HuR phosphorylations by different protein kinases.

  6. Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3β Is Positively Regulated by Protein Kinase Cζ-Mediated Phosphorylation Induced by Wnt Agonists

    PubMed Central

    Tejeda-Muñoz, Nydia; González-Aguilar, Héctor; Santoyo-Ramos, Paula; Castañeda-Patlán, M. Cristina

    2015-01-01

    The molecular events that drive Wnt-induced regulation of glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK-3β) activity are poorly defined. In this study, we found that protein kinase Cζ (PKCζ) and GSK-3β interact mainly in colon cancer cells. Wnt stimulation induced a rapid GSK-3β redistribution from the cytoplasm to the nuclei in malignant cells and a transient PKC-mediated phosphorylation of GSK-3β at a different site from serine 9. In addition, while Wnt treatment induced a decrease in PKC-mediated phosphorylation of GSK-3β in nonmalignant cells, in malignant cells, this phosphorylation was increased. Pharmacological inhibition and small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated silencing of PKCζ abolished all of these effects, but unexpectedly, it also abolished the constitutive basal activity of GSK-3β. In vitro activity assays demonstrated that GSK-3β phosphorylation mediated by PKCζ enhanced GSK-3β activity. We mapped Ser147 of GSK-3β as the site phosphorylated by PKCζ, i.e., its mutation into alanine abolished GSK-3β activity, resulting in β-catenin stabilization and increased transcriptional activity, whereas phosphomimetic replacement of Ser147 by glutamic acid maintained GSK-3β basal activity. Thus, we found that PKCζ phosphorylates GSK-3β at Ser147 to maintain its constitutive activity in resting cells and that Wnt stimulation modifies the phosphorylation of Ser147 to regulate GSK-3β activity in opposite manners in normal and malignant colon cells. PMID:26711256

  7. Arabidopsis Casein Kinase1 Proteins CK1.3 and CK1.4 Phosphorylate Cryptochrome2 to Regulate Blue Light Signaling[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Shu-Tang; Dai, Cheng; Liu, Hong-Tao; Xue, Hong-Wei

    2013-01-01

    Casein kinase1 (CK1) plays crucial roles in regulating growth and development via phosphorylating various substrates throughout the eukaryote kingdom. Blue light is crucial for normal growth of both plants and animals, and blue light receptor cryptochrome2 (CRY2) undergoes blue light–dependent phosphorylation and degradation in planta. To study the function of plant CK1s, systematic genetic analysis showed that deficiency of two paralogous Arabidopsis thaliana CK1s, CK1.3 and CK1.4, caused shortened hypocotyls, especially under blue light, while overexpression of either CK1.3 or CK1.4 resulted in the insensitive response to blue light and delayed flowering under long-day conditions. CK1.3 or CK1.4 act dependently on CRY2, and overexpression of CK1.3 or CK1.4 significantly suppresses the hypersensitive response to blue light by CRY2 overexpression. Biochemical studies showed that CK1.3 and CK1.4 directly phosphorylate CRY2 at Ser-587 and Thr-603 in vitro and negatively regulate CRY2 stability in planta, which are stimulated by blue light, further confirming the crucial roles of CK1.3 and CK1.4 in blue light responses through phosphorylating CRY2. Interestingly, expression of CK1.3 and CK1.4 is stimulated by blue light and feedback regulated by CRY2-mediated signaling. These results provide direct evidence for CRY2 phosphorylation and informative clues on the mechanisms of CRY2-mediated light responses. PMID:23897926

  8. Arabidopsis casein kinase1 proteins CK1.3 and CK1.4 phosphorylate cryptochrome2 to regulate blue light signaling.

    PubMed

    Tan, Shu-Tang; Dai, Cheng; Liu, Hong-Tao; Xue, Hong-Wei

    2013-07-01

    Casein kinase1 (CK1) plays crucial roles in regulating growth and development via phosphorylating various substrates throughout the eukaryote kingdom. Blue light is crucial for normal growth of both plants and animals, and blue light receptor cryptochrome2 (CRY2) undergoes blue light-dependent phosphorylation and degradation in planta. To study the function of plant CK1s, systematic genetic analysis showed that deficiency of two paralogous Arabidopsis thaliana CK1s, CK1.3 and CK1.4, caused shortened hypocotyls, especially under blue light, while overexpression of either CK1.3 or CK1.4 resulted in the insensitive response to blue light and delayed flowering under long-day conditions. CK1.3 or CK1.4 act dependently on CRY2, and overexpression of CK1.3 or CK1.4 significantly suppresses the hypersensitive response to blue light by CRY2 overexpression. Biochemical studies showed that CK1.3 and CK1.4 directly phosphorylate CRY2 at Ser-587 and Thr-603 in vitro and negatively regulate CRY2 stability in planta, which are stimulated by blue light, further confirming the crucial roles of CK1.3 and CK1.4 in blue light responses through phosphorylating CRY2. Interestingly, expression o