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Sample records for photoaging alter fatty

  1. Skin aging and photoaging alter fatty acids composition, including 11,14,17-eicosatrienoic acid, in the epidermis of human skin.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Ju; Kim, Min-Kyoung; Jin, Xing-Ji; Oh, Jang-Hee; Kim, Ji Eun; Chung, Jin Ho

    2010-06-01

    We investigated the alterations of major fatty acid components in epidermis by natural aging and photoaging processes, and by acute ultraviolet (UV) irradiation in human skin. Interestingly, we found that 11,14,17-eicosatrienoic acid (ETA), which is one of the omega-3 polyunsaturated acids, was significantly increased in photoaged human epidermis in vivo and also in the acutely UV-irradiated human skin in vivo, while it was significantly decreased in intrinsically aged human epidermis. The increased ETA content in the epidermis of photoaged human skin and acute UV-irradiated human skin is associated with enhanced expression of human elongase 1 and calcium-independent phosphodiesterase A(2). We demonstrated that ETA inhibited matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1 expression after UV-irradiation, and that inhibition of ETA synthesis using EPTC and NA-TCA, which are elongase inhibitors, increased MMP-1 expression. Therefore, our results suggest that the UV increases the ETA levels, which may have a photoprotective effect in the human skin.

  2. Mechanisms and treatments of photoaging.

    PubMed

    Poon, Flora; Kang, Sewon; Chien, Anna L

    2015-03-01

    Photoaging is frequently encountered in a dermatologic practice. This systematic literature review aims to explore the etiology of photoaging and address the evidence behind its current management. A comprehensive search of MEDLINE, EMBASE, UpToDate, and the Cochrane Library was conducted. Articles were limited to those relating to photoaging. There are two major approaches in the current management of photoaging. This includes strategies to prevent against ultraviolet damage (e.g. sunscreen) and medications that attempt to reverse existing skin damage (topical retinoids and 5-fluorouracil). There has been a large growth in the variety of treatment options in recent years. While it is important for such growth to continue, prevention via sensible photoprotection methods still remains the best current management option.

  3. Mechanisms and treatments of photoaging.

    PubMed

    Poon, Flora; Kang, Sewon; Chien, Anna L

    2015-03-01

    Photoaging is frequently encountered in a dermatologic practice. This systematic literature review aims to explore the etiology of photoaging and address the evidence behind its current management. A comprehensive search of MEDLINE, EMBASE, UpToDate, and the Cochrane Library was conducted. Articles were limited to those relating to photoaging. There are two major approaches in the current management of photoaging. This includes strategies to prevent against ultraviolet damage (e.g. sunscreen) and medications that attempt to reverse existing skin damage (topical retinoids and 5-fluorouracil). There has been a large growth in the variety of treatment options in recent years. While it is important for such growth to continue, prevention via sensible photoprotection methods still remains the best current management option. PMID:25351668

  4. Photoaging of the skin from phenotype to mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Scharffetter-Kochanek, K; Brenneisen, P; Wenk, J; Herrmann, G; Ma, W; Kuhr, L; Meewes, C; Wlaschek, M

    2000-05-01

    The skin is increasingly exposed to ambient UV-irradiation thus increasing its risk for photooxidative damage with longterm detrimental effects like photoaging, which is characterized by wrinkles, loss of skin tone, and resilience. Photoaged skin displays prominent alterations in the cellular component and the extracellular matrix of the connective tissue with an accumulation of disorganized elastin and its microfibrillar component fibrillin in the deep dermis and a severe loss of interstitial collagens, the major structural proteins of the dermal connective tissue. The unifying pathogenic agents for these changes are UV-generated reactive oxygen species (ROS) that deplete and damage non-enzymatic and enzymatic antioxidant defense systems of the skin. As well as causing permanent genetic changes, ROS activate cytoplasmic signal transduction pathways in resident fibroblasts that are related to growth, differentiation, senescence, and connective tissue degradation. This review focuses on the role of UV-induced ROS in the photodamage of the skin resulting in biochemical and clinical characteristics of photoaging. In addition, the relationship of photoaging to intrinsic aging of the skin will be discussed. A decrease in the overall ROS load by efficient sunscreens or other protective agents may represent promising strategies to prevent or at least minimize ROS induced photoaging.

  5. New insights in photoaging, UVA induced damage and skin types.

    PubMed

    Battie, Claire; Jitsukawa, Setsuko; Bernerd, Françoise; Del Bino, Sandra; Marionnet, Claire; Verschoore, Michèle

    2014-10-01

    UVA radiation is the most prevalent component of solar UV radiation; it deeply penetrates into the skin and induces profound alterations of the dermal connective tissue. In recent years, the detrimental effects of UVA radiation were more precisely demonstrated at cellular and molecular levels, using adequate methods to identify biological targets of UVA radiation and the resulting cascade impairment of cell functions and tissue degradation. In particular gene expression studies recently revealed that UVA radiation induces modulation of several genes confirming the high sensitivity of dermal fibroblasts to UVA radiation. The major visible damaging effects of UVA radiation only appear after years of exposure: it has been clearly evidenced that they are responsible for more or less early signs of photoageing and photocarcinogenesis. UVA radiation appears to play a key role in pigmented changes occurring with age, the major sign of skin photoaging in Asians. Skin susceptibility to photoaging alterations also depends on constitutive pigmentation. The skin sensitivity to UV light has been demonstrated to be linked to skin color type. PMID:25234829

  6. URBANIZATION ALTERS FATTY ACID CONCENTRATIONS OF STREAM FOOD WEBS IN THE NARRAGANSETT BAY WATERSHED

    EPA Science Inventory

    Urbanization and associated human activities negatively affect stream algal and invertebrate assemblages, likely altering food webs. Our goal was to determine if urbanization affects food web essential fatty acids (EFAs) and if EFAs could be useful ecological indicators in monito...

  7. Beneficial effects of kinin B1 receptor antagonism on plasma fatty acid alterations and obesity in Zucker diabetic fatty rats.

    PubMed

    Talbot, Sébastien; Dias, Jenny Pena; El Midaoui, Adil; Couture, Réjean

    2016-07-01

    Kinins are the endogenous ligands of the constitutive B2 receptor (B2R) and the inducible B1 receptor (B1R). Whereas B2R prevents insulin resistance, B1R is involved in insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome. However, the contribution of B1R in type 2 diabetes associated with obesity remains uncertain. The aim of the present study was to examine the impact of 1-week treatment with a selective B1R antagonist (SSR240612, 10 mg/kg per day, by gavage) on hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, leptinemia, body mass gain, and abnormal plasma fatty acids in obese Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rats. Treatment with SSR240612 abolished the body mass gain and reduced polyphagia, polydipsia, and plasma fatty acid alterations in ZDF rats without affecting hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, and hyperleptinemia. The present study suggests that the upregulated B1R plays a role in body mass gain and circulating fatty acid alterations in ZDF rats. However, mechanisms other than B1R induction would be implicated in glucose metabolism disorder in ZDF rats, based on the finding that SSR240612 did not reverse hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia. PMID:27172260

  8. TELOMERE AND TELOMERASE MODULATION BY BERGAMOT POLYPHENOLIC FRACTION IN EXPERIMENTAL PHOTOAGEING IN HUMAN KERATINOCYTES.

    PubMed

    Nisticò, S; Ehrlich, J; Gliozzi, M; Maiuolo, J; Del Duca, E; Muscoli, C; Mollace, V

    2015-01-01

    Photoageing represents the addition of extrinsic chronic ultraviolet radiation-induced damage on intrinsic ageing and accounts for most age-associated changes in skin appearance. In this study, we evaluated the effect of 38% BPF, a highly concentrated extract of the bergamot fruit (Citrus bergamia) on UVB-induced photoageing by examining inflammatory cytokine expression, telomere length/telomerase alterations and cellular viability in human immortalized HaCaT keratinocytes. Our results suggest that 38% BPF protects HaCaT cells against UVB-induced oxidative stress and markers of photoageing in a dose-dependent manner and could be a useful supplement in skin care products. Together with antioxidant properties, BPF, a highly concentrated extract of the bergamot fruit, appears to modulate basic cellular signal transduction pathways leading to anti-proliferative, anti-aging and immune modulating responses.

  9. TELOMERE AND TELOMERASE MODULATION BY BERGAMOT POLYPHENOLIC FRACTION IN EXPERIMENTAL PHOTOAGEING IN HUMAN KERATINOCYTES.

    PubMed

    Nisticò, S; Ehrlich, J; Gliozzi, M; Maiuolo, J; Del Duca, E; Muscoli, C; Mollace, V

    2015-01-01

    Photoageing represents the addition of extrinsic chronic ultraviolet radiation-induced damage on intrinsic ageing and accounts for most age-associated changes in skin appearance. In this study, we evaluated the effect of 38% BPF, a highly concentrated extract of the bergamot fruit (Citrus bergamia) on UVB-induced photoageing by examining inflammatory cytokine expression, telomere length/telomerase alterations and cellular viability in human immortalized HaCaT keratinocytes. Our results suggest that 38% BPF protects HaCaT cells against UVB-induced oxidative stress and markers of photoageing in a dose-dependent manner and could be a useful supplement in skin care products. Together with antioxidant properties, BPF, a highly concentrated extract of the bergamot fruit, appears to modulate basic cellular signal transduction pathways leading to anti-proliferative, anti-aging and immune modulating responses. PMID:26403416

  10. Isolation of Arabidopsis mutants with altered seed fatty acid composition

    SciTech Connect

    Lemieux, B.; Browse, J.; Somerville, C. Washington State Univ., Pullman )

    1989-04-01

    By direct screening of Arabidopsis seed fatty acid methyl esters, we have isolated mutants which are deficient in the elongation of 18:1 to 20:1 and the desaturation of 18:2 to 18:3. Both the elongation and the desaturation mutants, designated MB14 and BL1 respectively, have only 10% of the wild-type levels of 20:1 and 18:3 in their seeds. The intermediate levels of 20:1 and 18:3 in F1 seeds of crosses to the wild type indicate that the level of enzyme is regulating the amount of 20:1 and 18:3 in seeds. Consistent with this observation, the mutations were found to segregate 1:2:1 in F2 seeds. We have found that the 18:2 desaturase mutation is clearly expressed in root phosphatidylcholine.

  11. Altered cholesterol and fatty acid metabolism in Huntington disease.

    PubMed

    Block, Robert C; Dorsey, E Ray; Beck, Christopher A; Brenna, J Thomas; Shoulson, Ira

    2010-01-01

    Huntington disease is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder characterized by behavioral abnormalities, cognitive decline, and involuntary movements that lead to a progressive decline in functional capacity, independence, and ultimately death. The pathophysiology of Huntington disease is linked to an expanded trinucleotide repeat of cytosine-adenine-guanine (CAG) in the IT-15 gene on chromosome 4. There is no disease-modifying treatment for Huntington disease, and novel pathophysiological insights and therapeutic strategies are needed. Lipids are vital to the health of the central nervous system, and research in animals and humans has revealed that cholesterol metabolism is disrupted in Huntington disease. This lipid dysregulation has been linked to specific actions of the mutant huntingtin on sterol regulatory element binding proteins. This results in lower cholesterol levels in affected areas of the brain with evidence that this depletion is pathologic. Huntington disease is also associated with a pattern of insulin resistance characterized by a catabolic state resulting in weight loss and a lower body mass index than individuals without Huntington disease. Insulin resistance appears to act as a metabolic stressor attending disease progression. The fish-derived omega-3 fatty acids, eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid, have been examined in clinical trials of Huntington disease patients. Drugs that combat the dysregulated lipid milieu in Huntington disease may help treat this perplexing and catastrophic genetic disease.

  12. RNAi knockdown of fatty acid elongase1 alters fatty acid composition in Brassica napus.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jianghua; Lang, Chunxiu; Wu, Xuelong; Liu, Renhu; Zheng, Tao; Zhang, Dongqing; Chen, Jinqing; Wu, Guanting

    2015-10-23

    The quality and end-use of oil from oilseed crops is determined by its fatty acid composition. In particular, the relative proportions of erucic and oleic acids are key selection traits for breeders. The goal of our research is to genetically improve the nutritional quality of Brassica napus cultivar CY2, the oil of which is high in erucic acid (about 40%) and low in oleic acid (about 20%). Here, we report the use of a seed-specific napin A promoter to drive the knockdown of BnFAE1 in transgenic CY2. Southern blotting results confirmed the presence of the transgene. RT-PCR analysis showed that the levels of BnFAE1 were greatly decreased in BnFAE1-Ri lines compared with the CY2 cultivar. Knockdown of BnFAE1 sharply decreased the levels of erucic acid (less than 3%), largely increased the contents of oleic acid (more than 60%) and slightly increased the polyunsaturated chain fatty acids. Compared with high erucic acid parents, expression of BnFAE1 was dramatically decreased in developing F1 seeds derived from reciprocally crossed BnFAE1-Ri lines and high erucic acid cultivars. In addition, F1 seeds derived from reciprocal crosses between BnFAE1-Ri lines and high erucic acid cultivars showed significantly increased oleic acid (more than 52%) and sharply decreased erucic acid (less than 4%), demonstrating that the RNAi construct of BnFAE1 can effectively interfere with the target gene in F1 seeds. Taken together, our results demonstrate that BnFAE1 is a reliable target for genetic improvement of rapeseed in seed oil quality promotion.

  13. Mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation alterations in heart failure, ischaemic heart disease and diabetic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Fillmore, N; Mori, J; Lopaschuk, G D

    2014-01-01

    Heart disease is a leading cause of death worldwide. In many forms of heart disease, including heart failure, ischaemic heart disease and diabetic cardiomyopathies, changes in cardiac mitochondrial energy metabolism contribute to contractile dysfunction and to a decrease in cardiac efficiency. Specific metabolic changes include a relative increase in cardiac fatty acid oxidation rates and an uncoupling of glycolysis from glucose oxidation. In heart failure, overall mitochondrial oxidative metabolism can be impaired while, in ischaemic heart disease, energy production is impaired due to a limitation of oxygen supply. In both of these conditions, residual mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation dominates over mitochondrial glucose oxidation. In diabetes, the ratio of cardiac fatty acid oxidation to glucose oxidation also increases, although primarily due to an increase in fatty acid oxidation and an inhibition of glucose oxidation. Recent evidence suggests that therapeutically regulating cardiac energy metabolism by reducing fatty acid oxidation and/or increasing glucose oxidation can improve cardiac function of the ischaemic heart, the failing heart and in diabetic cardiomyopathies. In this article, we review the cardiac mitochondrial energy metabolic changes that occur in these forms of heart disease, what role alterations in mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation have in contributing to cardiac dysfunction and the potential for targeting fatty acid oxidation to treat these forms of heart disease. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed issue on Mitochondrial Pharmacology: Energy, Injury & Beyond. To view the other articles in this issue visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-8 PMID:24147975

  14. Altered erythrocyte membrane fatty acid profile in typical Rett syndrome: effects of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid supplementation.

    PubMed

    Signorini, Cinzia; De Felice, Claudio; Leoncini, Silvia; Durand, Thierry; Galano, Jean-Marie; Cortelazzo, Alessio; Zollo, Gloria; Guerranti, Roberto; Gonnelli, Stefano; Caffarelli, Carla; Rossi, Marcello; Pecorelli, Alessandra; Valacchi, Giuseppe; Ciccoli, Lucia; Hayek, Joussef

    2014-11-01

    This study mainly aims at examining the erythrocyte membrane fatty acid (FAs) profile in Rett syndrome (RTT), a genetically determined neurodevelopmental disease. Early reports suggest a beneficial effects of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω-3 PUFAs) on disease severity in RTT. A total of 24 RTT patients were assigned to ω-3 PUFAs-containing fish oil for 12 months in a randomized controlled study (average DHA and EPA doses of 72.9, and 117.1mg/kgb.w./day, respectively). A distinctly altered FAs profile was detectable in RTT, with deficient ω-6 PUFAs, increased saturated FAs and reduced trans 20:4 FAs. FAs changes were found to be related to redox imbalance, subclinical inflammation, and decreased bone density. Supplementation with ω-3 PUFAs led to improved ω-6/ω-3 ratio and serum plasma lipid profile, decreased PUFAs peroxidation end-products, normalization of biochemical markers of inflammation, and reduction of bone hypodensity as compared to the untreated RTT group. Our data indicate that a significant FAs abnormality is detectable in the RTT erythrocyte membranes and is partially rescued by ω-3 PUFAs.

  15. Diets Rich in Saturated and Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids Induce Morphological Alterations in the Rat Ventral Prostate

    PubMed Central

    Furriel, Angélica; Campos-Silva, Pamella; Silva, Paola Cariello Guedes Picarote; Costa, Waldemar Silva; Sampaio, Francisco José Barcellos; Gregório, Bianca Martins

    2014-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the influence of dietary lipid quality on the body mass, carbohydrate metabolism and morphology of the rat ventral prostate. Materials and Methods Wistar rats were divided into four groups: SC (standard chow), HF-S (high-fat diet rich in saturated fatty acids), HF-P (high-fat diet rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids) and HF-SP (high-fat diet rich in saturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids). We analyzed body mass, fat mass deposits, plasma blood, insulin resistance and the ventral prostate structure. Results Groups that received high-fat diets were heavier and presented larger fat deposits than SC group. The HF-S and HF-SP groups had higher glucose, insulin and total cholesterol serum levels and insulin resistance compared with the SC. The acinar area, epithelium height and area density of the lumen were higher in the HF-SP than in the other groups. The epithelium area density and epithelial cell proliferation were greater in the HF-P and HF-SP than in the SC group. All of the groups that received high-fat diets had greater area density of the stroma, area density of smooth muscle cells and stromal cell proliferation compared with the SC group. Conclusion Diets rich in saturated and/or polyunsaturated fatty acids induced overweight. Independently of insulin resistance, polyunsaturated fatty acids increased prostate stromal and epithelial cell proliferation. Saturated fatty acids influenced only stromal cellular proliferation. These structural and morphometric alterations may be considered risk factors for the development of adverse remodeling process in the rat ventral prostate. PMID:25029463

  16. Altering the fatty acids in milk fat by including canola seed in dairy cattle diets.

    PubMed

    Chichlowski, M W; Schroeder, J W; Park, C S; Keller, W L; Schimek, D E

    2005-09-01

    The objective was to evaluate the effects of feeding ground canola seed on the fatty acid profile, yield, and composition of milk from dairy cows. Twenty-four multiparous Holstein cows (548.3 +/- 11.9 kg body weight and 28 +/- 9 d in lactation) were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 treatments: Control (CON) or ground canola seed treatment (GCS) with 14% [of diet dry matter (DM)] of the total ration as ground canola seed containing 34% lipid. Diets contained 20% crude protein, but varied in net energy as a result of fat content differences of 2.5% and 6.4% (DM) for CON and GCS, respectively. Diets were composed of corn, corn silage, alfalfa (50:50 ground hay and haylage, DM basis), soybean and blood meal, and vitamins and minerals. Mechanically extruded canola meal was used in the CON diet to adjust for the protein from canola seed in the GCS diet. Cows were housed in tie-stalls and fed and milked twice daily for 10 wk. The inclusion of ground canola seed did not alter DM intake, weight gain, or body condition score of cows. Milk fat from GCS cows had greater proportions of long-chain fatty acids (> or = 18 carbons) and a lower ratio of n-6 to n-3 fatty acids. Feeding GCS reduced the proportion of short- and medium-chain fatty acids. Milk fat from cows fed GCS had a greater proportion of vaccenic acid and tended to have a higher proportion of cis-9,trans-11 conjugated linoleic acid. Actual and 3.5% fat-corrected milk yields were similar between treatments. The milk fat and protein percentages were lower for GCS cows, but total yield of these components was similar between treatments. Milk urea nitrogen was lower and serum urea nitrogen tended to be lower in cows fed canola seed. Serum glucose, insulin, and nonesterified fatty acids were not altered, but serum triglycerides were higher in GCS cows. Ammonia and total volatile fatty acids tended to be lower in ruminal fluid from GCS cows; rumen pH was unchanged. Feeding canola seed to lactating dairy cows resulted in milk

  17. Royal jelly protects against ultraviolet B-induced photoaging in human skin fibroblasts via enhancing collagen production.

    PubMed

    Park, Hye Min; Hwang, Eunson; Lee, Kwang Gill; Han, Sang-Mi; Cho, Yunhi; Kim, Sun Yeou

    2011-09-01

    Royal jelly (RJ) is a honeybee product containing proteins, carbohydrates, fats, free amino acids, vitamins, and minerals. As its principal unsaturated fatty acid, RJ contains 10-hydroxy-2-decenoic acid (10-HDA), which may have antitumor and antibacterial activity and a capacity to stimulate collagen production. RJ has attracted interest in various parts of the world for its pharmacological properties. However, the effects of RJ on ultraviolet (UV)-induced photoaging of the skin have not been reported. In this study we measured the 10-HDA content of RJ by high-performance liquid chromatography and tested the effects of RJ on UVB-induced skin photoaging in normal human dermal fibroblasts. The effects of RJ and 10-HDA on UVB-induced photoaging were tested by measuring procollagen type I, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1, and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1 after UVB irradiation. The RJ contained about 0.211% 10-HDA. The UVB-irradiated human skin fibroblasts treated with RJ and 10-HDA had increased procollagen type I and TGF-β1 productions, but the level of MMP-1 was not changed. Thus RJ may potentially protect the skin from UVB-induced photoaging by enhancing collagen production.

  18. Alterations of fatty acid β-oxidation capability in the liver of ketotic cows.

    PubMed

    Li, P; Li, X B; Fu, S X; Wu, C C; Wang, X X; Yu, G J; Long, M; Wang, Z; Liu, G W

    2012-04-01

    Dairy cows are highly susceptible to ketosis after parturition. In the present study, we evaluated the expression of fatty acid β-oxidation-related enzymes in the liver of ketotic (n=6) and nonketotic (n=6) cows. Serum levels of nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA), β-hydroxybutyrate (BHBA), and glucose were determined by using standard biochemical techniques. The mRNA abundance and protein content of acyl-CoA synthetase long-chain (ACSL), carnitine palmitoyltransferase I (CPT I), carnitine palmitoyltransferase II (CPT II), acyl-CoA dehydrogenase long chain (ACADL), 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase (HMGCS), and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) were evaluated by real-time PCR and ELISA. We found that serum glucose levels were lower in ketotic cows than in nonketotic cows, but serum BHBA and NEFA concentrations were higher. Messenger RNA and protein levels of ACSL were significantly higher in livers of ketotic cows than those in nonketotic cows. In contrast, mRNA levels of CPT I and mRNA and protein levels of CPT II, ACADL, HMGCS, and ACC were decreased in the liver of ketotic cows. Serum NEFA concentration positively correlated with ACSL protein levels and negatively correlated with protein levels of CPT II, HMGCS, ACADL, and ACC. In addition, serum BHBA concentration negatively correlated with protein levels of CPT II, HMGCS, and ACADL. Overall, fatty acid β-oxidation capability was altered in the liver of ketotic compared with nonketotic cows. Furthermore, high serum NEFA and BHBA concentrations play key roles in affecting pathways of fatty acid metabolism in the liver.

  19. Ultraviolet-A triggers photoaging in model nematode Caenorhabditis elegans in a DAF-16 dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Prasanth, Mani Iyer; Santoshram, Gunasekaran Santhi; Bhaskar, James Prabhanand; Balamurugan, Krishnaswamy

    2016-02-01

    Ultraviolet radiations (UV) are the primary causative agent for skin aging (photoaging) and cancer, especially UV-A. The mode of action and the molecular mechanism behind the damages caused by UV-A is not well studied, in vivo. The current study was employed to investigate the impact of UV-A exposure using the model organism, Caenorhabditis elegans. Analysis of lifespan, healthspan, and other cognitive behaviors were done which was supported by the molecular mechanism. UV-A exposure on collagen damages the synthesis and functioning which has been monitored kinetically using engineered strain, col-19:: GFP. The study results suggested that UV-A accelerated the aging process in an insulin-like signaling pathway dependent manner. Mutant (daf-2)-based analysis concrete the observations of the current study. The UV-A exposure affected the usual behavior of the worms like pharyngeal movements and brood size. Quantitative PCR profile of the candidate genes during UV-A exposure suggested that continuous exposure has damaged the neural network of the worms, but the mitochondrial signaling and dietary restriction pathway remain unaffected. Western blot analysis of HSF-1 evidenced the alteration in protein homeostasis in UV-A exposed worms. Outcome of the current study supports our view that C. elegans can be used as a model to study photoaging, and the mode of action of UV-A-mediated damages can be elucidated which will pave the way for drug developments against photoaging. PMID:26873884

  20. Ultraviolet-A triggers photoaging in model nematode Caenorhabditis elegans in a DAF-16 dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Prasanth, Mani Iyer; Santoshram, Gunasekaran Santhi; Bhaskar, James Prabhanand; Balamurugan, Krishnaswamy

    2016-02-01

    Ultraviolet radiations (UV) are the primary causative agent for skin aging (photoaging) and cancer, especially UV-A. The mode of action and the molecular mechanism behind the damages caused by UV-A is not well studied, in vivo. The current study was employed to investigate the impact of UV-A exposure using the model organism, Caenorhabditis elegans. Analysis of lifespan, healthspan, and other cognitive behaviors were done which was supported by the molecular mechanism. UV-A exposure on collagen damages the synthesis and functioning which has been monitored kinetically using engineered strain, col-19:: GFP. The study results suggested that UV-A accelerated the aging process in an insulin-like signaling pathway dependent manner. Mutant (daf-2)-based analysis concrete the observations of the current study. The UV-A exposure affected the usual behavior of the worms like pharyngeal movements and brood size. Quantitative PCR profile of the candidate genes during UV-A exposure suggested that continuous exposure has damaged the neural network of the worms, but the mitochondrial signaling and dietary restriction pathway remain unaffected. Western blot analysis of HSF-1 evidenced the alteration in protein homeostasis in UV-A exposed worms. Outcome of the current study supports our view that C. elegans can be used as a model to study photoaging, and the mode of action of UV-A-mediated damages can be elucidated which will pave the way for drug developments against photoaging.

  1. A randomized and controlled trial about the use of oral isotretinoin for photoaging.

    PubMed

    Bagatin, Ediléia; Parada, Meire O B; Miot, Hélio A; Hassun, Karime M; Michalany, Nilceo; Talarico, Sergio

    2010-02-01

    Topical retinoids are used to treat photoaging; oral isotretinoin is gold standard for acne; "off label" indications, including photoaging, have been reported with insufficient evidence of efficacy. This is a randomized controlled phase II trial with clinical and histological assessment to evaluate efficacy and safety of oral isotretinoin for photoaging. Study population was comprised of 32 menopausal or sterilized women, aged 40-55, divided in 2 groups: A (21) received 20mg isotretinoin, 3 times per week, nightly moisturizer, and daily sunscreen, for three months; B (11) just moisturizer/sunscreen. Main outcome measures were: overall clinical assessment; profilometry, corneometer and elasticity tests in periocular regions and left forearm; before/after biopsies from left forearm in patients of B and in 10 randomly selected of A. Microscopic blinded evaluation of epidermal thickness, dermal elastosis, new collagen, p53 epidermal expression was performed by quantitative digital image analysis. All data were submitted to statistical analysis. Clinical evaluation showed slight improvement; profilometry, corneometer and skin elasticity tests presented significant difference in pre/post values (P = 0.001 to 0.028), but no differences between A/B. Histological findings and p53 expression were comparable between groups before treatment (P > 0.1); microscopic analysis showed no differences between groups for most variables, after treatment. Slight but significant difference between A/B for p53 with major reduction post isotretinoin [0.66+/-0.31 vs. 0.94+/-0.34 respectively (P = 0.04) was observed. There were minor side effects and no significant laboratory test alterations. We concluded that no significant clinical, microscopic changes but p53 epidermal expression reduction were observed. The role of ultra-violet induced p53 mutation in skin carcinogenesis reinforces retinoids chemoprevention. Oral isotretinoin seemed safe but not effective to treat photoaging. Caution

  2. Effects of sunscreen on skin cancer and photoaging.

    PubMed

    Iannacone, Michelle R; Hughes, Maria Celia B; Green, Adèle C

    2014-01-01

    Application of sunscreen to the skin is widely used as an adjunct strategy, along with wearing protective clothing and seeking shade, to protect against skin cancer and photoaging that result from excessive sun exposure. Many epidemiological studies of case-control and cohort study design have studied the effects of sunscreen use on skin cancer, and more recently photoaging, but their findings have been mostly uninformative. This review of results of randomized controlled trials shows that the evidence, though limited, supports beneficial effects of sunscreen application on the occurrence of skin cancers and skin photoaging.

  3. Decreased hepatotoxic bile acid composition and altered synthesis in progressive human nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    SciTech Connect

    Lake, April D.; Novak, Petr; Shipkova, Petia; Aranibar, Nelly; Robertson, Donald; Reily, Michael D.; Lu, Zhenqiang; Lehman-McKeeman, Lois D.; Cherrington, Nathan J.

    2013-04-15

    Bile acids (BAs) have many physiological roles and exhibit both toxic and protective influences within the liver. Alterations in the BA profile may be the result of disease induced liver injury. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a prevalent form of chronic liver disease characterized by the pathophysiological progression from simple steatosis to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). The hypothesis of this study is that the ‘classical’ (neutral) and ‘alternative’ (acidic) BA synthesis pathways are altered together with hepatic BA composition during progression of human NAFLD. This study employed the use of transcriptomic and metabolomic assays to study the hepatic toxicologic BA profile in progressive human NAFLD. Individual human liver samples diagnosed as normal, steatosis, and NASH were utilized in the assays. The transcriptomic analysis of 70 BA genes revealed an enrichment of downregulated BA metabolism and transcription factor/receptor genes in livers diagnosed as NASH. Increased mRNA expression of BAAT and CYP7B1 was observed in contrast to decreased CYP8B1 expression in NASH samples. The BA metabolomic profile of NASH livers exhibited an increase in taurine together with elevated levels of conjugated BA species, taurocholic acid (TCA) and taurodeoxycholic acid (TDCA). Conversely, cholic acid (CA) and glycodeoxycholic acid (GDCA) were decreased in NASH liver. These findings reveal a potential shift toward the alternative pathway of BA synthesis during NASH, mediated by increased mRNA and protein expression of CYP7B1. Overall, the transcriptomic changes of BA synthesis pathway enzymes together with altered hepatic BA composition signify an attempt by the liver to reduce hepatotoxicity during disease progression to NASH. - Highlights: ► Altered hepatic bile acid composition is observed in progressive NAFLD. ► Bile acid synthesis enzymes are transcriptionally altered in NASH livers. ► Increased levels of taurine and conjugated bile acids

  4. The Methoxyflavonoid Isosakuranetin Suppresses UV-B-Induced Matrix Metalloproteinase-1 Expression and Collagen Degradation Relevant for Skin Photoaging.

    PubMed

    Jung, Hana; Lee, Eunjoo H; Lee, Tae Hoon; Cho, Man-Ho

    2016-09-01

    Solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation is a main extrinsic factor for skin aging. Chronic exposure of the skin to UV radiation causes the induction of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), such as MMP-1, and consequently results in alterations of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and skin photoaging. Flavonoids are considered as potent anti-photoaging agents due to their UV-absorbing and antioxidant properties and inhibitory activity against UV-mediated MMP induction. To identify anti-photoaging agents, in the present study we examined the preventative effect of methoxyflavonoids, such as sakuranetin, isosakuranetin, homoeriodictyol, genkwanin, chrysoeriol and syringetin, on UV-B-induced skin photo-damage. Of the examined methoxyflavonoids, pretreatment with isosakuranetin strongly suppressed the UV-B-mediated induction of MMP-1 in human keratinocytes in a concentration-dependent manner. Isosakuranetin inhibited UV-B-induced phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling components, ERK1/2, JNK1/2 and p38 proteins. This result suggests that the ERK1/2 kinase pathways likely contribute to the inhibitory effects of isosakuranetin on UV-induced MMP-1 production in human keratinocytes. Isosakuranetin also prevented UV-B-induced degradation of type-1 collagen in human dermal fibroblast cells. Taken together, our findings suggest that isosakuranetin has the potential for development as a protective agent for skin photoaging through the inhibition of UV-induced MMP-1 production and collagen degradation.

  5. The Methoxyflavonoid Isosakuranetin Suppresses UV-B-Induced Matrix Metalloproteinase-1 Expression and Collagen Degradation Relevant for Skin Photoaging

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Hana; Lee, Eunjoo H.; Lee, Tae Hoon; Cho, Man-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation is a main extrinsic factor for skin aging. Chronic exposure of the skin to UV radiation causes the induction of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), such as MMP-1, and consequently results in alterations of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and skin photoaging. Flavonoids are considered as potent anti-photoaging agents due to their UV-absorbing and antioxidant properties and inhibitory activity against UV-mediated MMP induction. To identify anti-photoaging agents, in the present study we examined the preventative effect of methoxyflavonoids, such as sakuranetin, isosakuranetin, homoeriodictyol, genkwanin, chrysoeriol and syringetin, on UV-B-induced skin photo-damage. Of the examined methoxyflavonoids, pretreatment with isosakuranetin strongly suppressed the UV-B-mediated induction of MMP-1 in human keratinocytes in a concentration-dependent manner. Isosakuranetin inhibited UV-B-induced phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling components, ERK1/2, JNK1/2 and p38 proteins. This result suggests that the ERK1/2 kinase pathways likely contribute to the inhibitory effects of isosakuranetin on UV-induced MMP-1 production in human keratinocytes. Isosakuranetin also prevented UV-B-induced degradation of type-1 collagen in human dermal fibroblast cells. Taken together, our findings suggest that isosakuranetin has the potential for development as a protective agent for skin photoaging through the inhibition of UV-induced MMP-1 production and collagen degradation. PMID:27598131

  6. The Methoxyflavonoid Isosakuranetin Suppresses UV-B-Induced Matrix Metalloproteinase-1 Expression and Collagen Degradation Relevant for Skin Photoaging.

    PubMed

    Jung, Hana; Lee, Eunjoo H; Lee, Tae Hoon; Cho, Man-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation is a main extrinsic factor for skin aging. Chronic exposure of the skin to UV radiation causes the induction of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), such as MMP-1, and consequently results in alterations of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and skin photoaging. Flavonoids are considered as potent anti-photoaging agents due to their UV-absorbing and antioxidant properties and inhibitory activity against UV-mediated MMP induction. To identify anti-photoaging agents, in the present study we examined the preventative effect of methoxyflavonoids, such as sakuranetin, isosakuranetin, homoeriodictyol, genkwanin, chrysoeriol and syringetin, on UV-B-induced skin photo-damage. Of the examined methoxyflavonoids, pretreatment with isosakuranetin strongly suppressed the UV-B-mediated induction of MMP-1 in human keratinocytes in a concentration-dependent manner. Isosakuranetin inhibited UV-B-induced phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling components, ERK1/2, JNK1/2 and p38 proteins. This result suggests that the ERK1/2 kinase pathways likely contribute to the inhibitory effects of isosakuranetin on UV-induced MMP-1 production in human keratinocytes. Isosakuranetin also prevented UV-B-induced degradation of type-1 collagen in human dermal fibroblast cells. Taken together, our findings suggest that isosakuranetin has the potential for development as a protective agent for skin photoaging through the inhibition of UV-induced MMP-1 production and collagen degradation. PMID:27598131

  7. Effects of altering dietary fatty acid composition on prostaglandin synthesis and fertility.

    PubMed

    Abayasekara, D R; Wathes, D C

    1999-11-01

    Several studies over the past 20 years have demonstrated that subjects on diets composed of substances with high levels of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) (e.g. fish) have a decreased incidence of heart disease. On this basis, a recent report from the Department of Health has advised UK consumers to decrease the proportion of saturated as opposed to unsaturated fats in their diet and to increase the ratio of n-3 to n-6 PUFAs. This could be achieved by altering the amounts of these constituents in milk and meat. n-3 Fatty acids can most easily be added to animal feed as either fish oil or linseed oil and can be increased in the blood and milk of ruminants following protection to avoid hydrogenation in the rumen. In western countries the ratio of consumption of n-6 to n-3 PUFAs is greater than 10 and current evidence tends to suggest that a ratio nearer 5 would be more desirable and compatible with cardiovascular well being. As fertility in the UK dairy herd is already poor, it is important to establish whether alterations in dietary n-3 and n-6 PUFAs affects herd fertility before widespread changes in animal diets are recommended. Therefore, this review considers the role played by PUFAs and eicosanoids in fertility, with particular reference to the implications for farm livestock production. The evidence reviewed shows that alteration of the concentration and ratio of n-6 and n-3 PUFAs in feeds can influence prostaglandin synthesis/metabolism in a number of mammalian systems. The changed patterns of prostaglandin synthesis can as a consequence, affect the diverse functions (e.g. hormone secretion) that are normally mediated via prostaglandins. Similarly, changes in prostaglandin synthesis effected through manipulation of PUFAs has a major bearing on fertility (as PGs affect many reproductive parameters, e.g. ovulation). Several studies in cattle and other mammals, show that feeding or infusing different types of fat with varying PUFA content to females can

  8. Key Regulatory Role of Dermal Fibroblasts in Pigmentation as Demonstrated Using a Reconstructed Skin Model: Impact of Photo-Aging

    PubMed Central

    Duval, Christine; Cohen, Catherine; Chagnoleau, Corinne; Flouret, Virginie; Bourreau, Emilie; Bernerd, Françoise

    2014-01-01

    To study cutaneous pigmentation in a physiological context, we have previously developed a functional pigmented reconstructed skin model composed of a melanocyte-containing epidermis grown on a dermal equivalent comprising living fibroblasts. The present studies, using the same model, aimed to demonstrate that dermal fibroblasts influence skin pigmentation up to the macroscopic level. The proof of principle was performed with pigmented skins differing only in the fibroblast component. First, the in vitro system was reconstructed with or without fibroblasts in order to test the global influence of the presence of this cell type. We then assessed the impact of the origin of the fibroblast strain on the degree of pigmentation using fetal versus adult fibroblasts. In both experiments, impressive variation in skin pigmentation at the macroscopic level was observed and confirmed by quantitative parameters related to skin color, melanin content and melanocyte numbers. These data confirmed the responsiveness of the model and demonstrated that dermal fibroblasts do indeed impact the degree of skin pigmentation. We then hypothesized that a physiological state associated with pigmentary alterations such as photo-aging could be linked to dermal fibroblasts modifications that accumulate over time. Pigmentation of skin reconstructed using young unexposed fibroblasts (n = 3) was compared to that of tissues containing natural photo-aged fibroblasts (n = 3) which express a senescent phenotype. A stimulation of pigmentation in the presence of the natural photo-aged fibroblasts was revealed by a significant increase in the skin color (decrease in Luminance) and an increase in both epidermal melanin content and melanogenic gene expression, thus confirming our hypothesis. Altogether, these data demonstrate that the level of pigmentation of the skin model is influenced by dermal fibroblasts and that natural photo-aged fibroblasts can contribute to the hyperpigmentation that is

  9. Key regulatory role of dermal fibroblasts in pigmentation as demonstrated using a reconstructed skin model: impact of photo-aging.

    PubMed

    Duval, Christine; Cohen, Catherine; Chagnoleau, Corinne; Flouret, Virginie; Bourreau, Emilie; Bernerd, Françoise

    2014-01-01

    To study cutaneous pigmentation in a physiological context, we have previously developed a functional pigmented reconstructed skin model composed of a melanocyte-containing epidermis grown on a dermal equivalent comprising living fibroblasts. The present studies, using the same model, aimed to demonstrate that dermal fibroblasts influence skin pigmentation up to the macroscopic level. The proof of principle was performed with pigmented skins differing only in the fibroblast component. First, the in vitro system was reconstructed with or without fibroblasts in order to test the global influence of the presence of this cell type. We then assessed the impact of the origin of the fibroblast strain on the degree of pigmentation using fetal versus adult fibroblasts. In both experiments, impressive variation in skin pigmentation at the macroscopic level was observed and confirmed by quantitative parameters related to skin color, melanin content and melanocyte numbers. These data confirmed the responsiveness of the model and demonstrated that dermal fibroblasts do indeed impact the degree of skin pigmentation. We then hypothesized that a physiological state associated with pigmentary alterations such as photo-aging could be linked to dermal fibroblasts modifications that accumulate over time. Pigmentation of skin reconstructed using young unexposed fibroblasts (n = 3) was compared to that of tissues containing natural photo-aged fibroblasts (n = 3) which express a senescent phenotype. A stimulation of pigmentation in the presence of the natural photo-aged fibroblasts was revealed by a significant increase in the skin color (decrease in Luminance) and an increase in both epidermal melanin content and melanogenic gene expression, thus confirming our hypothesis. Altogether, these data demonstrate that the level of pigmentation of the skin model is influenced by dermal fibroblasts and that natural photo-aged fibroblasts can contribute to the hyperpigmentation that is

  10. Key regulatory role of dermal fibroblasts in pigmentation as demonstrated using a reconstructed skin model: impact of photo-aging.

    PubMed

    Duval, Christine; Cohen, Catherine; Chagnoleau, Corinne; Flouret, Virginie; Bourreau, Emilie; Bernerd, Françoise

    2014-01-01

    To study cutaneous pigmentation in a physiological context, we have previously developed a functional pigmented reconstructed skin model composed of a melanocyte-containing epidermis grown on a dermal equivalent comprising living fibroblasts. The present studies, using the same model, aimed to demonstrate that dermal fibroblasts influence skin pigmentation up to the macroscopic level. The proof of principle was performed with pigmented skins differing only in the fibroblast component. First, the in vitro system was reconstructed with or without fibroblasts in order to test the global influence of the presence of this cell type. We then assessed the impact of the origin of the fibroblast strain on the degree of pigmentation using fetal versus adult fibroblasts. In both experiments, impressive variation in skin pigmentation at the macroscopic level was observed and confirmed by quantitative parameters related to skin color, melanin content and melanocyte numbers. These data confirmed the responsiveness of the model and demonstrated that dermal fibroblasts do indeed impact the degree of skin pigmentation. We then hypothesized that a physiological state associated with pigmentary alterations such as photo-aging could be linked to dermal fibroblasts modifications that accumulate over time. Pigmentation of skin reconstructed using young unexposed fibroblasts (n = 3) was compared to that of tissues containing natural photo-aged fibroblasts (n = 3) which express a senescent phenotype. A stimulation of pigmentation in the presence of the natural photo-aged fibroblasts was revealed by a significant increase in the skin color (decrease in Luminance) and an increase in both epidermal melanin content and melanogenic gene expression, thus confirming our hypothesis. Altogether, these data demonstrate that the level of pigmentation of the skin model is influenced by dermal fibroblasts and that natural photo-aged fibroblasts can contribute to the hyperpigmentation that is

  11. Polyunsaturated fatty acid supplementation during pregnancy alters neonatal behavior in sheep.

    PubMed

    Capper, Judith L; Wilkinson, Robert G; Mackenzie, Alexander M; Sinclair, Liam A

    2006-02-01

    The objectives of the study were to determine whether supplementation of pregnant ewes with long-chain (n-3) fatty acids present in fish oil, in combination with dietary vitamin E, would alter neonatal behavior in sheep. Twin- (n=36) and triplet- (n=12) bearing ewes were allocated at d 103 of gestation to 1 of 4 dietary treatments containing 1 of 2 fat sources [Megalac, a calcium soap of palm fatty acid distillate or a fish oil mixture, high in 20:5(n-3) and 22:6(n-3)] and 1 of 2 dietary vitamin E concentrations (50 or 500 mg/kg) in a 2 x 2 factorial design. Feeding fish oil increased gestation length by 2 d and increased the proportion of 22:6(n-3) within neonatal plasma by 5.1-fold and brain by 10%, whereas brain 20:5(n-3) was increased 5-fold. Supranutritional dietary vitamin E concentrations decreased the latency of lambs to stand in ewes fed fish oil but not Megalac, whereas latency to suckle was decreased from 43 to 34 min by fish oil supplementation. Supplementation with fish oil also substantially decreased the secretion rate (mL/h) of colostrum and the yield (g/h) of fat and protein. We conclude that supplementation of ewes with fish oil decreases the latency to suckle, increases gestation length and the 22:6(n-3):20:4(n-6) ratio in the neonatal brain, and may improve lamb survival rate. However, further work is required to determine how to mitigate the negative effects of fish oil on colostrum production.

  12. Ingestion of a single serving of saury alters postprandial levels of plasma n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and long-chain monounsaturated fatty acids in healthy human adults

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Saury oil contains considerable amounts of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) and monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) with long aliphatic tails (>18C atoms). Ingestion of saury oil reduces the risk of developing metabolic syndrome concomitant with increases in n-3 PUFA and long-chain MUFA in plasma and organs of mice. We therefore evaluated changes in postprandial plasma fatty acid levels and plasma parameters in healthy human subjects after ingestion of a single meal of saury. Findings Five healthy human adults ingested 150 g of grilled saury. Blood was collected before the meal and at 2, 6, and 24 hr after the meal, and plasma was prepared. Plasma levels of eicosapentaenoic acid, docosahexaenoic acid, and long-chain MUFA (C20:1 and C22:1 isomers combined) increased significantly throughout the postprandial period compared with the pre-meal baseline. Postprandial plasma insulin concentration increased notably, and plasma levels of glucose and free fatty acids decreased significantly and subsequently returned to the pre-meal levels. Conclusions Our study suggests that a single saury meal may alter the postprandial plasma levels of n-3 PUFA and long-chain MUFA in healthy human subjects. PMID:22846384

  13. Anti-photoaging and Photoprotective Compounds Derived from Marine Organisms

    PubMed Central

    Pallela, Ramjee; Na-Young, Yoon; Kim, Se-Kwon

    2010-01-01

    Marine organisms form a prominent component of the oceanic population, which significantly contribute in the production of cosmeceutical and pharmaceutical molecules with biologically efficient moieties. In addition to the molecules of various biological activities like anti-bacterial, anti-cancerous, anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative etc., these organisms also produce potential photoprotective or anti-photoaging agents, which are attracting present day researchers. Continuous exposure to UV irradiation (both UV-A and UV-B) leads to the skin cancer and other photoaging complications, which are typically mediated by the reactive oxygen species (ROS), generated in the oxidative pathways. Many of the anti-oxidative and anti-photoaging compounds have been identified previously, which work efficiently against photodamage of the skin. Recently, marine originated photoprotective or anti-photoaging behavior was observed in the methanol extracts of Corallina pilulifera (CPM). These extracts were found to exert potent antioxidant activity and protective effect on UV-A-induced oxidative stress in human dermal fibroblast (HDF) cells by protecting DNA and also by inhibiting matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), a key component in photoaging of the skin due to exposure to UV-A. The present review depicts various other photoprotective compounds from algae and other marine sources for further elaborative research and their probable use in cosmeceutical and pharmaceutical industries. PMID:20479974

  14. Photoaging and chronological aging profile: Understanding oxidation of the skin.

    PubMed

    Peres, P S; Terra, V A; Guarnier, F A; Cecchini, R; Cecchini, A L

    2011-05-01

    The impact of chronological aging and photoaging on the skin is particularly concerning, especially when oxidative stress is involved. This article provides evidence of quantitative and qualitative differences in the oxidative stress generated by chronological aging and photoaging of the skin in HRS/J hairless mice. Analysis of the results revealed an increase in lipid peroxides as the skin gets older and in photoaged skin (10.086 ± 0.70 η MDA/mg and 14.303 ± 1.81 η MDA/mg protein, respectively), although protein oxidation was only verified in chronological aged skin (15.449 ± 0.99 η protein/mg protein). The difference between both skin types is the decay in the capacity of lipid membrane turnover revealed by the dislocation of older skin to the left in the chemiluminescence curve. Imbalance between antioxidant and oxidation processes was verified by the decrease in total antioxidant capacity of chronological and photoaged skins. Although superoxide dismutase remained unchanged, catalase increased in the 18 and 48-week-old skin groups and decreased in irradiated mice, demonstrating that neither enzyme is a good parameter to determine oxidative stress. The differences observed between chronological and photoaging skin represent a potential new approach to understanding the phenomenon of skin aging and a new target for therapeutic intervention. PMID:21356598

  15. Photoaging and chronological aging profile: Understanding oxidation of the skin.

    PubMed

    Peres, P S; Terra, V A; Guarnier, F A; Cecchini, R; Cecchini, A L

    2011-05-01

    The impact of chronological aging and photoaging on the skin is particularly concerning, especially when oxidative stress is involved. This article provides evidence of quantitative and qualitative differences in the oxidative stress generated by chronological aging and photoaging of the skin in HRS/J hairless mice. Analysis of the results revealed an increase in lipid peroxides as the skin gets older and in photoaged skin (10.086 ± 0.70 η MDA/mg and 14.303 ± 1.81 η MDA/mg protein, respectively), although protein oxidation was only verified in chronological aged skin (15.449 ± 0.99 η protein/mg protein). The difference between both skin types is the decay in the capacity of lipid membrane turnover revealed by the dislocation of older skin to the left in the chemiluminescence curve. Imbalance between antioxidant and oxidation processes was verified by the decrease in total antioxidant capacity of chronological and photoaged skins. Although superoxide dismutase remained unchanged, catalase increased in the 18 and 48-week-old skin groups and decreased in irradiated mice, demonstrating that neither enzyme is a good parameter to determine oxidative stress. The differences observed between chronological and photoaging skin represent a potential new approach to understanding the phenomenon of skin aging and a new target for therapeutic intervention.

  16. Genetic alterations in fatty acid transport and metabolism genes are associated with metastatic progression and poor prognosis of human cancers.

    PubMed

    Nath, Aritro; Chan, Christina

    2016-01-01

    Reprogramming of cellular metabolism is a hallmark feature of cancer cells. While a distinct set of processes drive metastasis when compared to tumorigenesis, it is yet unclear if genetic alterations in metabolic pathways are associated with metastatic progression of human cancers. Here, we analyzed the mutation, copy number variation and gene expression patterns of a literature-derived model of metabolic genes associated with glycolysis (Warburg effect), fatty acid metabolism (lipogenesis, oxidation, lipolysis, esterification) and fatty acid uptake in >9000 primary or metastatic tumor samples from the multi-cancer TCGA datasets. Our association analysis revealed a uniform pattern of Warburg effect mutations influencing prognosis across all tumor types, while copy number alterations in the electron transport chain gene SCO2, fatty acid uptake (CAV1, CD36) and lipogenesis (PPARA, PPARD, MLXIPL) genes were enriched in metastatic tumors. Using gene expression profiles, we established a gene-signature (CAV1, CD36, MLXIPL, CPT1C, CYP2E1) that strongly associated with epithelial-mesenchymal program across multiple cancers. Moreover, stratification of samples based on the copy number or expression profiles of the genes identified in our analysis revealed a significant effect on patient survival rates, thus confirming prominent roles of fatty acid uptake and metabolism in metastatic progression and poor prognosis of human cancers. PMID:26725848

  17. Decreased body weight and hepatic steatosis with altered fatty acid ethanolamide metabolism in aged L-Fabp -/- mice.

    PubMed

    Newberry, Elizabeth P; Kennedy, Susan M; Xie, Yan; Luo, Jianyang; Crooke, Rosanne M; Graham, Mark J; Fu, Jin; Piomelli, Daniele; Davidson, Nicholas O

    2012-04-01

    The tissue-specific sources and regulated production of physiological signals that modulate food intake are incompletely understood. Previous work showed that L-Fabp(-/-) mice are protected against obesity and hepatic steatosis induced by a high-fat diet, findings at odds with an apparent obesity phenotype in a distinct line of aged L-Fabp(-/-) mice. Here we show that the lean phenotype in L-Fabp(-/-) mice is recapitulated in aged, chow-fed mice and correlates with alterations in hepatic, but not intestinal, fatty acid amide metabolism. L-Fabp(-/-) mice exhibited short-term changes in feeding behavior with decreased food intake, which was associated with reduced abundance of key signaling fatty acid ethanolamides, including oleoylethanolamide (OEA, an agonist of PPARα) and anandamide (AEA, an agonist of cannabinoid receptors), in the liver. These reductions were associated with increased expression and activity of hepatic fatty acid amide hydrolase-1, the enzyme that degrades both OEA and AEA. Moreover, L-Fabp(-/-) mice demonstrated attenuated responses to OEA administration, which was completely reversed with an enhanced response after administration of a nonhydrolyzable OEA analog. These findings demonstrate a role for L-Fabp in attenuating obesity and hepatic steatosis, and they suggest that hepatic fatty acid amide metabolism is altered in L-Fabp(-/-) mice.

  18. Assessing the photoaging process at sun exposed and non-exposed skin using fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito Nogueira, Marcelo; Kurachi, Cristina

    2016-03-01

    Photoaging is the skin premature aging due to exposure to ultraviolet light, which damage the collagen, elastin and can induce alterations on the skin cells DNA, and, then, it may evolve to precancerous lesions, which are widely investigated by fluorescence spectroscopy and lifetime. The fluorescence spectra and fluorescence lifetime analysis has been presented as a technique of great potential for biological tissue characterization at optical diagnostics. The main targeted fluorophores are NADH (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide) and FAD (flavin adenine dinucleotide), which have free and bound states, each one with different average lifetimes. The average lifetimes for free and bound NADH and FAD change according to tissue metabolic alterations and may contribute to a non-invasive clinical investigation of injuries such as skin lesions. These lesions and the possible areas where they may develop can be interrogated using fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy taking into account the variability of skin phototypes and the changes related to melanin, collagen and elastin, endogenous fluorophores which have emissions that spectrally overlap to the NADH and FAD emission. The objective of this study is to assess the variation on fluorescence lifetimes of normal skin at sun exposed and non-exposed areas and associate this variation to the photoaging process.

  19. Fatty acid double bond orientation alters interaction with L-cell fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Heyliger, C E; Kheshgi, T J; Murphy, E J; Myers-Payne, S; Schroeder, F

    1996-02-23

    Relatively little is known of fatty acid specificity in cellular fatty acid uptake. In this study L-cells, a fibroblastic cell line with very low levels of endogenous cytosolic fatty acid binding protein, were used to examine the role of cis and trans unsaturation on fatty acid uptake. The fluorescent fatty acids, trans-parinaric acid and cis-parinaric acid, were used as analogs of straight-chain saturated, and kinked-chain unsaturated fatty acids, respectively, in order to evaluate the fatty acid specificity of the uptake system. Parinaric acid is poorly metabolizable; greater than 97% was unesterified while 3H-oleic acid was almost totally metabolized after 30 min uptake. Cis- and trans-parinaric acid uptake was saturable and dependent on the concentration of fatty acid. However, the initial rate and maximal amount of trans-parinaric acid taken up by the L-cells was greater than for cis-parinaric acid under the same conditions. The affinity of L-cell uptake for trans-parinaric acid (Km = 0.12 uM) was 35-fold higher than that for cis-parinaric acid (Km = 4.17 uM). Based on competition studies with oleic and stearic acids, it was concluded that the cis- and trans-parinaric acid were taken up by the same L-cell fatty acid uptake system. The results suggest that the L-cell fatty acid uptake system has selectivity for straight chain rather than kinked chain unsaturated fatty acids.

  20. Fatty acid double bond orientation alters interaction with L-cell fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Heyliger, C E; Kheshgi, T J; Murphy, E J; Myers-Payne, S; Schroeder, F

    1996-02-23

    Relatively little is known of fatty acid specificity in cellular fatty acid uptake. In this study L-cells, a fibroblastic cell line with very low levels of endogenous cytosolic fatty acid binding protein, were used to examine the role of cis and trans unsaturation on fatty acid uptake. The fluorescent fatty acids, trans-parinaric acid and cis-parinaric acid, were used as analogs of straight-chain saturated, and kinked-chain unsaturated fatty acids, respectively, in order to evaluate the fatty acid specificity of the uptake system. Parinaric acid is poorly metabolizable; greater than 97% was unesterified while 3H-oleic acid was almost totally metabolized after 30 min uptake. Cis- and trans-parinaric acid uptake was saturable and dependent on the concentration of fatty acid. However, the initial rate and maximal amount of trans-parinaric acid taken up by the L-cells was greater than for cis-parinaric acid under the same conditions. The affinity of L-cell uptake for trans-parinaric acid (Km = 0.12 uM) was 35-fold higher than that for cis-parinaric acid (Km = 4.17 uM). Based on competition studies with oleic and stearic acids, it was concluded that the cis- and trans-parinaric acid were taken up by the same L-cell fatty acid uptake system. The results suggest that the L-cell fatty acid uptake system has selectivity for straight chain rather than kinked chain unsaturated fatty acids. PMID:8700156

  1. Oral isotretinoin in photoaging: objective histological evidence of efficacy and durability*

    PubMed Central

    Bravo, Bruna Souza Felix; Azulay, David Rubem; Luiz, Ronir Raggio; Mandarim-De-Lacerda, Carlos Alberto; Cuzzi, Tullia; Azulay, Mônica Manela

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The off-label use of oral isotretinoin in photoaging is a therapeutic tool that has been used by dermatologists. There are few studies to corroborate its effectiveness and durability. OBJECTIVES To assess, both clinically and histologically, the changes caused by the use of oral isotretinoin in skin photoaging as well as the duration of the effects. METHODS 20 female patients, aged 45-50 years, with phototypes II-VI, none of whom had experienced menopause, were treated with 20mg oral isotretinoin, 3 days a week, for 12 weeks. They underwent clinical analysis and skin biopsies in the pre-auricular region, while histologic cuts enabled assessment of the solar elastosis level and morphologic analysis. RESULTS Clinically, patients, as well as the researching and the assessor physicians, noticed improvement in skin quality. One patient presented severe solar elastosis, 11 manifested the moderate form, while 8 presented the discreet type. According to histological analysis, 65% of the patients revealed alteration in the distribution and thickness of the elastic fibers, which can be interpreted as a histological improvement, while 60% showed an increase in collagen density. We observed an increase in collagen density, from 51.2% to 57.4%, (p=0.004). At the end of the 12-week follow-up period, this density decreased to 54.7% (p=0.050). There was an increase in the density of elastic fibers, from 26.5% to 31.3%, (p=0.02), which had dropped to 27.5% at the end of the 12-week follow-up period. CONCLUSIONS The study confirmed the role of oral isotretinoin in remodeling the extracellular matrix against photoaging, as well as its durability after 12 weeks, especially when we consider collagen fibers. PMID:26375216

  2. Altering fatty acid availability does not impair prolonged, continuous running to fatigue: evidence for carbohydrate dependence.

    PubMed

    Leckey, Jill J; Burke, Louise M; Morton, James P; Hawley, John A

    2016-01-15

    We determined the effect of suppressing lipolysis via administration of nicotinic acid (NA) on fuel substrate selection and half-marathon running capacity. In a single-blinded, Latin square design, 12 competitive runners completed four trials involving treadmill running until volitional fatigue at a pace based on 95% of personal best half-marathon time. Trials were completed in a fed or overnight fasted state: 1) carbohydrate (CHO) ingestion before (2 g CHO·kg(-1)·body mass(-1)) and during (44 g/h) [CFED]; 2) CFED plus NA ingestion [CFED-NA]; 3) fasted with placebo ingestion during [FAST]; and 4) FAST plus NA ingestion [FAST-NA]. There was no difference in running distance (CFED, 21.53 ± 1.07; CFED-NA, 21.29 ± 1.69; FAST, 20.60 ± 2.09; FAST-NA, 20.11 ± 1.71 km) or time to fatigue between the four trials. Concentrations of plasma free fatty acids (FFA) and glycerol were suppressed following NA ingestion irrespective of preexercise nutritional intake but were higher throughout exercise in FAST compared with all other trials (P < 0.05). Rates of whole-body CHO oxidation were unaffected by NA ingestion in the CFED and FAST trials, but were lower in the FAST trial compared with the CFED-NA trial (P < 0.05). CHO was the primary substrate for exercise in all conditions, contributing 83-91% to total energy expenditure with only a small contribution from fat-based fuels. Blunting the exercise-induced increase in FFA via NA ingestion did not impair intense running capacity lasting ∼85 min, nor did it alter patterns of substrate oxidation in competitive athletes. Although there was a small but obligatory use of fat-based fuels, the oxidation of CHO-based fuels predominates during half-marathon running.

  3. Quantitative biomarkers of human skin photoaging based on intrinsic second harmonic generation signal.

    PubMed

    Zhuo, Shuangmu; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Chen, Jianxin; Xie, Shusen

    2013-01-01

    Collagen change is a major feature in the photoaged human skin. Here, we present the use of intrinsic second harmonic generation (SHG) signal as a novel means to quantify collagen change with photoaging. We obtain the SHG images of the superficial dermis from ex vivo the cheek skin and the abdomen skin of eight patients aged 55-60 years. The results show that SHG signal can quantitatively reveal collagen change between normal and photoaged human skin in three dimensions. By comparing normal with photoaged dermis, there are significant differences in the collagen content and fine structure, providing substantial potential to be applied in vivo for the clinical diagnosis of human skin photoaging.

  4. Omega-3 fatty acids alter behavioral and oxidative stress parameters in animals subjected to fenproporex administration.

    PubMed

    Model, Camila S; Gomes, Lara M; Scaini, Giselli; Ferreira, Gabriela K; Gonçalves, Cinara L; Rezin, Gislaine T; Steckert, Amanda V; Valvassori, Samira S; Varela, Roger B; Quevedo, João; Streck, Emilio L

    2014-03-01

    Studies have consistently reported the participation of oxidative stress in bipolar disorder (BD). Evidences indicate that omega-3 (ω3) fatty acids play several important roles in brain development and functioning. Moreover, preclinical and clinical evidence suggests roles for ω3 fatty acids in BD. Considering these evidences, the present study aimed to investigate the effects of ω3 fatty acids on locomotor behavior and oxidative stress parameters (TBARS and protein carbonyl content) in brain of rats subjected to an animal model of mania induced by fenproporex. The fenproporex treatment increased locomotor behavior in saline-treated rats under reversion and prevention model, and ω3 fatty acids prevented fenproporex-related hyperactivity. Moreover, fenproporex increased protein carbonyls in the prefrontal cortex and cerebral cortex, and the administration of ω3 fatty acids reversed this effect. Lipid peroxidation products also are increased in prefrontal cortex, striatum, hippocampus and cerebral after fenproporex administration, but ω3 fatty acids reversed this damage only in the hippocampus. On the other hand, in the prevention model, fenproporex increased carbonyl content only in the cerebral cortex, and administration of ω3 fatty acids prevented this damage. Additionally, the administration of fenproporex resulted in a marked increased of TBARS in the prefrontal cortex, hippocampus, striatum and cerebral cortex, and prevent this damage in the prefrontal cortex, hippocampus and striatum. In conclusion, we are able to demonstrate that fenproporex-induced hyperlocomotion and damage through oxidative stress were prevented by ω3 fatty acids. Thus, the ω3 fatty acids may be important adjuvant therapy of bipolar disorder. PMID:24385143

  5. Fatty acids profile and alteration of lemon seeds extract (Citrus limon) added to soybean oil under thermoxidation.

    PubMed

    Luzia, Débora Maria Moreno; Jorge, Neuza

    2013-10-01

    This paper aimed at evaluating fatty acids profile and the total alteration of lemon seeds extract added to soybean oil under thermoxidation, verifying the isolated and synergistic effect of these antioxidants. Therefore, Control treatments, LSE (2,400 mg/kg Lemon Seeds Extract), TBHQ (mg/kg), Mixture 1 (LSE + 50 mg/kg TBHQ) and Mixture 2 (LSE + 25 mg/kg TBHQ) were subjected to 180°C for 20 h. Samples were taken at 0, 5, 10, 15 and 20 h intervals and analyzed as for fatty acid profile and total polar compounds. Results were subjected to variance analyses and Tukey tests at a 5% significance level. An increase in the percentage of saturated fatty acids and mono-unsaturated, and decrease in polyunsaturated fatty acids was observed, regardless of the treatments studied. For total polar compounds, it was verified that Mixtures 1 and 2 presented values lower than 25% with 20 h of heating, not surpassing the limits established in many countries for disposal of oils and fats under high temperatures, thus proving the synergistic effect of antioxidants. PMID:24426004

  6. Omega-3 Fatty Acid Enriched Chevon (Goat Meat) Lowers Plasma Cholesterol Levels and Alters Gene Expressions in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Rajion, Mohamed Ali; Meng, Goh Yong; Soleimani Farjam, Abdoreza

    2014-01-01

    In this study, control chevon (goat meat) and omega-3 fatty acid enriched chevon were obtained from goats fed a 50% oil palm frond diet and commercial goat concentrate for 100 days, respectively. Goats fed the 50% oil palm frond diet contained high amounts of α-linolenic acid (ALA) in their meat compared to goats fed the control diet. The chevon was then used to prepare two types of pellets (control or enriched chevon) that were then fed to twenty-male-four-month-old Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 10 in each group) for 12 weeks to evaluate their effects on plasma cholesterol levels, tissue fatty acids, and gene expression. There was a significant increase in ALA and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) in the muscle tissues and liver of the rats fed the enriched chevon compared with the control group. Plasma cholesterol also decreased (P < 0.05) in rats fed the enriched chevon compared to the control group. The rat pellets containing enriched chevon significantly upregulated the key transcription factor PPAR-γ and downregulated SREBP-1c expression relative to the control group. The results showed that the omega-3 fatty acid enriched chevon increased the omega-3 fatty acids in the rat tissues and altered PPAR-γ and SREBP-1c genes expression. PMID:24719886

  7. Omega-3 fatty acid enriched chevon (goat meat) lowers plasma cholesterol levels and alters gene expressions in rats.

    PubMed

    Ebrahimi, Mahdi; Rajion, Mohamed Ali; Meng, Goh Yong; Soleimani Farjam, Abdoreza

    2014-01-01

    In this study, control chevon (goat meat) and omega-3 fatty acid enriched chevon were obtained from goats fed a 50% oil palm frond diet and commercial goat concentrate for 100 days, respectively. Goats fed the 50% oil palm frond diet contained high amounts of α-linolenic acid (ALA) in their meat compared to goats fed the control diet. The chevon was then used to prepare two types of pellets (control or enriched chevon) that were then fed to twenty-male-four-month-old Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 10 in each group) for 12 weeks to evaluate their effects on plasma cholesterol levels, tissue fatty acids, and gene expression. There was a significant increase in ALA and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) in the muscle tissues and liver of the rats fed the enriched chevon compared with the control group. Plasma cholesterol also decreased (P < 0.05) in rats fed the enriched chevon compared to the control group. The rat pellets containing enriched chevon significantly upregulated the key transcription factor PPAR-γ and downregulated SREBP-1c expression relative to the control group. The results showed that the omega-3 fatty acid enriched chevon increased the omega-3 fatty acids in the rat tissues and altered PPAR-γ and SREBP-1c genes expression.

  8. UPR in palmitate-treated pancreatic beta-cells is not affected by altering oxidation of the fatty acid

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Elevated levels of lipids are detrimental for beta-cell function and mass. One of the mechanisms of how fatty acids induce apoptosis is development of the unfolded protein response (UPR). It is still far from understood how fatty acids activate the UPR, however. Methods We examined how palmitate-induced activation of the UPR was affected by altering the metabolism of the fatty acid in insulin-secreting INS-1E and MIN6 cell lines and intact human islets. To increase oxidation, we used low glucose (5.5 mM) or AICAR; and to reduce oxidation, we used high glucose (25 mM) or etomoxir. UPR was measured after 3, 24 and 48 hours of palmitate treatment. Results Modulation of palmitate oxidation by either glucose or the pharmacological agents did not affect palmitate-induced UPR activation. Conclusion Our finding suggests that other factors than oxidation of palmitate play a role in the activation of UPR in fatty acid-treated beta-cells. PMID:21978671

  9. Alteration in the fatty acid composition of liver, kidney and plasma from diethylhexyl phthalate-treated rats

    SciTech Connect

    Okita, J.R.; Okita, R.T. )

    1990-02-26

    Cytochromes P-450 are induced in rat liver microsomes by a number of compounds which cause peroxisome proliferation. One such compound, diethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP), induces P-450 IVA1 which catalyzes {omega}- and ({omega}-1)-hydroxylation of fatty acids. In liver of rats fed DEHP, there is a 10-fold induction of {omega}-hydroxylation of laurate and ({omega}-1)-hydroxylation of palmitate, as compared to control rat liver. There is a 3-fold induction of other hydroxylations, such as W-hydroxylation of palmitate and {omega}- ({omega}-1)-hydroxylation of syristate. Despite these increases in hydroxylase activity, the authors have not been able to demonstrate increases in hydroxy fatty acids or dicarboxylic acids in liver or plasma of rats fed DEHP. However, alterations in the fatty acid composition of lipids in liver, kidney cortex and plasma were observed. They consistently observed increases in oleate (expressed as mol% of total fatty acid) in liver (11% in control increased to 24% in DEHP-treated), kidney cortex (12% to 16%) and plasma (13% to 24%). This increase in oleate was quite striking when expressed as ug/gm tissue or ug/al plasma. DEHP treatment resulted in increased oleate in mitochondrial, microsomal and cytosolic fractions of liver.

  10. Conjugated linoleic acid alters growth performance, tissue lipid deposition, and fatty acid composition of darkbarbel catfish (Pelteobagrus vachelli).

    PubMed

    Dong, Gui-Fang; Liu, Wen-Zuo; Wu, Lin-Zhou; Yu, Deng-Hang; Huang, Feng; Li, Peng-Cheng; Yang, Yan-Ou

    2015-02-01

    Fatty liver syndrome is a prevalent problem of farmed fish. Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) has received increased attention recently as a fat-reducing fatty acid to control fat deposition in mammals. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to determine whether dietary CLA can reduce tissue lipid content of darkbarbel catfish (Pelteobagrus vachelli) and whether decreased lipid content is partially due to alterations in lipid metabolism enzyme activities and fatty acid profiles. A 76-day feeding trial was conducted to investigate the effect of dietary CLA on the growth, tissue lipid deposition, and fatty acid composition of darkbarbel catfish. Five diets containing 0 % (control), 0.5 % (CLA0.5), 1 % (CLA1), 2 % (CLA2), and 3 % (CLA3) CLA levels were evaluated. Results showed that fish fed with 2-3 % CLA diets showed a significantly lower specific growth rate and feed conversion efficiency than those fed with the control diet. Dietary CLA decreased the lipid contents in the liver and intraperitoneal fat with the CLA levels from 1 to 3 %. Fish fed with 2-3 % CLA diets showed significantly higher lipoprotein lipase and hepatic triacylglycerol lipase activities in liver than those of fish fed with the control, and fish fed with 1-3 % CLA diets had significantly higher pancreatic triacylglycerol lipase activities in liver than those of fish fed with the control. Dietary CLA was incorporated into liver, intraperitoneal fat, and muscle lipids, with higher percentages observed in liver compared with other tissues. Liver CLA deposition was at the expense of monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA). In contrast, CLA deposition appeared to be primarily at the expense of MUFA and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) in the intraperitoneal fat, whereas in muscle it was at the expense of n-3 PUFA. Our results suggested that CLA at a 1 % dose can reduce liver lipid content without eliciting any negative effect on growth rate in darkbarbel catfish. This lipid-lowering effect could

  11. Maternal folic acid supplementation to dams on marginal protein level alters brain fatty acid levels of their adult offspring.

    PubMed

    Rao, Shobha; Joshi, Sadhana; Kale, Anvita; Hegde, Mahabaleshwar; Mahadik, Sahebarao

    2006-05-01

    Studies on fetal programming of adult diseases have highlighted the importance of maternal nutrition during pregnancy. Folic acid and long-chain essential polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFAs) have independent effects on fetal growth. However, folic acid effects may also involve alteration of LC-PUFA metabolism. Because marginal deficiency of LC-PUFAs during critical periods of brain growth and development is associated with risks for adult diseases, it is highly relevant to investigate how maternal supplementation of such nutrients can alter brain fatty acid levels. We examined the impact of folic acid supplementation, conventionally used in maternal intervention, on brain essential fatty acid levels and plasma corticosterone concentrations in adult offspring at 11 months of age. Pregnant female rats from 4 groups (6 in each) were fed with casein diets either with 18 g protein/100 g diet (control diet) or treatment diets that were marginal in protein (MP), such as 12 g protein/100 g diet supplemented with 8 mg folic acid (FAS/MP), 12 g protein/100 g diet without folic acid (FAD/MP), or 12 g protein/100 g diet (MP) with 2 mg folic acid. Pups were weaned to a standard laboratory diet with 18 g protein/100 g diet. All male adult offspring in the FAS/MP group showed lower docosahexaenoic acid (P<.05) as compared with control adult offspring (6.04+/-2.28 vs 10.33+/-0.86 g/100 g fatty acids) and higher n-6/n-3 ratio (P<.05). Docosahexaenoic acid levels in FAS/MP adult offspring were also lower (P<.05) when compared with the MP group. Plasma corticosterone concentrations were higher (P<.05) in male adult offspring from the FAS/MP group compared with control as well as the MP adult offspring. Results suggest that maternal folic acid supplementation at MP intake decreased brain docosahexaenoic acid levels probably involving corticosterone increase. PMID:16631439

  12. Maternal folic acid supplementation to dams on marginal protein level alters brain fatty acid levels of their adult offspring.

    PubMed

    Rao, Shobha; Joshi, Sadhana; Kale, Anvita; Hegde, Mahabaleshwar; Mahadik, Sahebarao

    2006-05-01

    Studies on fetal programming of adult diseases have highlighted the importance of maternal nutrition during pregnancy. Folic acid and long-chain essential polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFAs) have independent effects on fetal growth. However, folic acid effects may also involve alteration of LC-PUFA metabolism. Because marginal deficiency of LC-PUFAs during critical periods of brain growth and development is associated with risks for adult diseases, it is highly relevant to investigate how maternal supplementation of such nutrients can alter brain fatty acid levels. We examined the impact of folic acid supplementation, conventionally used in maternal intervention, on brain essential fatty acid levels and plasma corticosterone concentrations in adult offspring at 11 months of age. Pregnant female rats from 4 groups (6 in each) were fed with casein diets either with 18 g protein/100 g diet (control diet) or treatment diets that were marginal in protein (MP), such as 12 g protein/100 g diet supplemented with 8 mg folic acid (FAS/MP), 12 g protein/100 g diet without folic acid (FAD/MP), or 12 g protein/100 g diet (MP) with 2 mg folic acid. Pups were weaned to a standard laboratory diet with 18 g protein/100 g diet. All male adult offspring in the FAS/MP group showed lower docosahexaenoic acid (P<.05) as compared with control adult offspring (6.04+/-2.28 vs 10.33+/-0.86 g/100 g fatty acids) and higher n-6/n-3 ratio (P<.05). Docosahexaenoic acid levels in FAS/MP adult offspring were also lower (P<.05) when compared with the MP group. Plasma corticosterone concentrations were higher (P<.05) in male adult offspring from the FAS/MP group compared with control as well as the MP adult offspring. Results suggest that maternal folic acid supplementation at MP intake decreased brain docosahexaenoic acid levels probably involving corticosterone increase.

  13. Dietary omega-3 fatty acids alter cardiac mitochondrial phospholipid composition and delay Ca2+-induced permeability transition.

    PubMed

    O'Shea, Karen M; Khairallah, Ramzi J; Sparagna, Genevieve C; Xu, Wenhong; Hecker, Peter A; Robillard-Frayne, Isabelle; Des Rosiers, Christine; Kristian, Tibor; Murphy, Robert C; Fiskum, Gary; Stanley, William C

    2009-12-01

    Consumption of omega-3 fatty acids from fish oil, specifically eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), decreases risk for heart failure and attenuates pathologic cardiac remodeling in response to pressure overload. Dietary supplementation with EPA + DHA may also impact cardiac mitochondrial function and energetics through alteration of membrane phospholipids. We assessed the role of EPA + DHA supplementation on left ventricular (LV) function, cardiac mitochondrial membrane phospholipid composition, respiration, and sensitivity to mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP) opening in normal and infarcted myocardium. Rats were subjected to sham surgery or myocardial infarction by coronary artery ligation (n=10-14), and fed a standard diet, or supplemented with EPA + DHA (2.3% of energy intake) for 12 weeks. EPA + DHA altered fatty acid composition of total mitochondrial phospholipids and cardiolipin by reducing arachidonic acid content and increasing DHA incorporation. EPA + DHA significantly increased calcium uptake capacity in both subsarcolemmal and intrafibrillar mitochondria from sham rats. This treatment effect persisted with the addition of cyclosporin A, and was not accompanied by changes in mitochondrial respiration or coupling, or cyclophilin D protein expression. Myocardial infarction resulted in heart failure as evidenced by LV dilation and contractile dysfunction. Infarcted LV myocardium had decreased mitochondrial protein yield and activity of mitochondrial marker enzymes, however respiratory function of isolated mitochondria was normal. EPA + DHA had no effect on LV function, mitochondrial respiration, or MPTP opening in rats with heart failure. In conclusion, dietary supplementation with EPA + DHA altered mitochondrial membrane phospholipid fatty acid composition in normal and infarcted hearts, but delayed MPTP opening only in normal hearts.

  14. The fatty liver dystrophy (fld) mutation: Developmentally related alterations in hepatic triglyceride metabolism and protein expression

    SciTech Connect

    Reue, K.; Rehnmark, S.; Cohen, R.D.; Leete, T.H.; Doolittle, M.H. |; Giometti, C.S.; Mishler, K.; Slavin, B.G.

    1997-07-01

    Fatty liver dystrophy (fld) is an autosomal recessive mutation in mice characterized by hypertriglyceridemia and development of a fatty liver in the early neonatal period. Also associated with the fld phenotype is a tissue-specific deficiency in the expression of lipoprotein lipase and hepatic lipase, as well as elevations in hepatic apolipoprotein A-IV and apolipoprotein C-II mRNA levels. Although these lipid abnormalities resolve at the age of weaning, adult mutant mice exhibit a peripheral neuropathy associated with abnormal myelin formation. The fatty liver in fld/fld neonates is characterized by the accumulation of large triglyceride droplets within the parenchymal cells, and these droplets persist within isolated hepatocytes maintained in culture for several days. To identify the metabolic defect that leads to lipid accumulation, the authors investigated several aspects of cellular triglyceride metabolism. The mutant mice exhibited normal activity of acid triacylglycerol lipase, an enzyme thought to be responsible for hydrolysis of dietary triglycerides in the liver. Metabolic labeling studies performed with oleic acid revealed that free fatty acids accumulate in the liver of 3 day old fld/fld mice, but not in adults. This accumulation in liver was mirrored by elevated free fatty acid levels in plasma of fld/fld neonates, with levels highest in very young mice and returning to normal by the age of one month. Quantitation of fatty acid oxidation in cells isolated from fld/fld neonates revealed that oxidation rate is reduced 60% in hepatocytes and 40% in fibroblasts; hepatocytes from adult fld/fld mice exhibited an oxidation rate similar to those from wild-type mice.

  15. Deletion of genes encoding fatty acid desaturases leads to alterations in stress sensitivity in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Meng; Liu, Zhe; Yu, Qilin; Mao, Jiwei; Zhang, Biao; Xing, Laijun; Li, Mingchun

    2015-06-01

    Unsaturated fatty acids (UFAs) are key compounds which have important roles in maintaining cell membrane physiological functions and the adaption to tough conditions. Defects of fatty acid desaturases will change cellular UFA constitution. Pichia pastoris GS115 has four fatty acid desaturase genes, namely FAD9A, FAD9B, FAD12 and FAD15. Their products catalyze the synthesis of three kinds of UFAs, oleic acid (catalyzed by Fad9A and Fad9B), linoleic acid (catalyzed by Fad12) and α-linolenic acid (catalyzed by Fad15), respectively. In this study, we found that deletion of FAD12 led to increased resistance to oxidative stress. Cellular lipid peroxidation levels declined in the fad12Δ mutant upon H2O2 treatment. Cellular fatty acids compositions were changed with the increased expression of FAD9A. On the other hand, deletion of FAD9A resulted in increased tolerance to the plasma membrane (PM) damage agent SDS, and PM deformation was not detected in the fad9AΔ mutant under this stress. Our results showed that UFAs are related to cell adaption to adverse environmental changes.

  16. Mechanisms of Photoaging and Cutaneous Photocarcinogenesis, and Photoprotective Strategies with Phytochemicals

    PubMed Central

    Bosch, Ricardo; Philips, Neena; Suárez-Pérez, Jorge A.; Juarranz, Angeles; Devmurari, Avani; Chalensouk-Khaosaat, Jovinna; González, Salvador

    2015-01-01

    Photoaging and photocarcinogenesis are primarily due to solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation, which alters DNA, cellular antioxidant balance, signal transduction pathways, immunology, and the extracellular matrix (ECM). The DNA alterations include UV radiation induced thymine-thymine dimers and loss of tumor suppressor gene p53. UV radiation reduces cellular antioxidant status by generating reactive oxygen species (ROS), and the resultant oxidative stress alters signal transduction pathways such as the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), the nuclear factor-kappa beta (NF-κB)/p65, the janus kinase (JAK), signal transduction and activation of transcription (STAT) and the nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2). UV radiation induces pro-inflammatory genes and causes immunosuppression by depleting the number and activity of the epidermal Langerhans cells. Further, UV radiation remodels the ECM by increasing matrixmetalloproteinases (MMP) and reducing structural collagen and elastin. The photoprotective strategies to prevent/treat photoaging and photocarcinogenesis include oral or topical agents that act as sunscreens or counteract the effects of UV radiation on DNA, cellular antioxidant balance, signal transduction pathways, immunology and the ECM. Many of these agents are phytochemical derivatives and include polyphenols and non-polyphenols. The flavonoids are polyphenols and include catechins, isoflavones, proanthocyanidins, and anthocyanins, whereas the non-flavonoids comprise mono phenolic acids and stilbenes. The natural sources of polyphenols include tea, cocoa, grape/wine, soy, pomegranate, and Polypodium leucotomos. The non-phenolic phytochemicals include carotenoids, caffeine and sulphoraphance (SFN). In addition, there are other phytochemical derivatives or whole extracts such as baicalin, flavangenol, raspberry extract, and Photomorphe umbellata with photoprotective activity against UVB radiation, and thereby carcinogenesis. PMID:26783703

  17. Mechanisms of Photoaging and Cutaneous Photocarcinogenesis, and Photoprotective Strategies with Phytochemicals.

    PubMed

    Bosch, Ricardo; Philips, Neena; Suárez-Pérez, Jorge A; Juarranz, Angeles; Devmurari, Avani; Chalensouk-Khaosaat, Jovinna; González, Salvador

    2015-01-01

    Photoaging and photocarcinogenesis are primarily due to solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation, which alters DNA, cellular antioxidant balance, signal transduction pathways, immunology, and the extracellular matrix (ECM). The DNA alterations include UV radiation induced thymine-thymine dimers and loss of tumor suppressor gene p53. UV radiation reduces cellular antioxidant status by generating reactive oxygen species (ROS), and the resultant oxidative stress alters signal transduction pathways such as the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), the nuclear factor-kappa beta (NF-κB)/p65, the janus kinase (JAK), signal transduction and activation of transcription (STAT) and the nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2). UV radiation induces pro-inflammatory genes and causes immunosuppression by depleting the number and activity of the epidermal Langerhans cells. Further, UV radiation remodels the ECM by increasing matrixmetalloproteinases (MMP) and reducing structural collagen and elastin. The photoprotective strategies to prevent/treat photoaging and photocarcinogenesis include oral or topical agents that act as sunscreens or counteract the effects of UV radiation on DNA, cellular antioxidant balance, signal transduction pathways, immunology and the ECM. Many of these agents are phytochemical derivatives and include polyphenols and non-polyphenols. The flavonoids are polyphenols and include catechins, isoflavones, proanthocyanidins, and anthocyanins, whereas the non-flavonoids comprise mono phenolic acids and stilbenes. The natural sources of polyphenols include tea, cocoa, grape/wine, soy, pomegranate, and Polypodium leucotomos. The non-phenolic phytochemicals include carotenoids, caffeine and sulphoraphance (SFN). In addition, there are other phytochemical derivatives or whole extracts such as baicalin, flavangenol, raspberry extract, and Photomorphe umbellata with photoprotective activity against UVB radiation, and thereby carcinogenesis. PMID:26783703

  18. Autism as a disorder of deficiency of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and altered metabolism of polyunsaturated fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Das, Undurti N

    2013-10-01

    Autism has a strong genetic and environmental basis in which inflammatory markers and factors concerned with synapse formation, nerve transmission, and information processing such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs): arachidonic (AA), eicosapentaenoic (EPA), and docosahexaenoic acids (DHA) and their products and neurotransmitters: dopamine, serotonin, acetylcholine, γ-aminobutyric acid, and catecholamines and cytokines are altered. Antioxidants, vitamins, minerals, and trace elements are needed for the normal metabolism of neurotrophic factors, eicosanoids, and neurotransmitters, supporting reports of their alterations in autism. But, the exact relationship among these factors and their interaction with genes and proteins concerned with brain development and growth is not clear. It is suggested that maternal infections and inflammation and adverse events during intrauterine growth of the fetus could lead to alterations in the gene expression profile and proteomics that results in dysfunction of the neuronal function and neurotransmitters, alteration(s) in the metabolism of PUFAs and their metabolites resulting in excess production of proinflammatory eicosanoids and cytokines and a deficiency of anti-inflammatory cytokines and bioactive lipids that ultimately results in the development of autism. Based on these evidences, it is proposed that selective delivery of BDNF and methods designed to augment the production of anti-inflammatory cytokines and eicosanoids and PUFAs may prevent, arrest, or reverse the autism disease process.

  19. Alterations in Serum Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids and Eicosanoids in Patients with Mild to Moderate Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)

    PubMed Central

    Titz, Bjoern; Luettich, Karsta; Leroy, Patrice; Boue, Stephanie; Vuillaume, Gregory; Vihervaara, Terhi; Ekroos, Kim; Martin, Florian; Peitsch, Manuel C.; Hoeng, Julia

    2016-01-01

    Smoking is a major risk factor for several diseases including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). To better understand the systemic effects of cigarette smoke exposure and mild to moderate COPD—and to support future biomarker development—we profiled the serum lipidomes of healthy smokers, smokers with mild to moderate COPD (GOLD stages 1 and 2), former smokers, and never-smokers (n = 40 per group) (ClinicalTrials.gov registration: NCT01780298). Serum lipidome profiling was conducted with untargeted and targeted mass spectrometry-based lipidomics. Guided by weighted lipid co-expression network analysis, we identified three main trends comparing smokers, especially those with COPD, with non-smokers: a general increase in glycero(phospho)lipids, including triglycerols; changes in fatty acid desaturation (decrease in ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, and an increase in monounsaturated fatty acids); and an imbalance in eicosanoids (increase in 11,12- and 14,15-DHETs (dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acids), and a decrease in 9- and 13-HODEs (hydroxyoctadecadienoic acids)). The lipidome profiles supported classification of study subjects as smokers or non-smokers, but were not sufficient to distinguish between smokers with and without COPD. Overall, our study yielded further insights into the complex interplay between smoke exposure, lung disease, and systemic alterations in serum lipid profiles. PMID:27657052

  20. Mimp/Mtch2, an Obesity Susceptibility Gene, Induces Alteration of Fatty Acid Metabolism in Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Tsarfaty, Galia; Kaufman, Dafna; Horev, Judith; Resau, James H.; Tsarfaty, Ilan

    2016-01-01

    Objective Metabolic dysfunctions, such as fatty liver, obesity and insulin resistance, are among the most common contemporary diseases worldwide, and their prevalence is continuously rising. Mimp/Mtch2 is a mitochondrial carrier protein homologue, which localizes to the mitochondria and induces mitochondrial depolarization. Mimp/Mtch2 single-nucleotide polymorphism is associated with obesity in humans and its loss in mice muscle protects from obesity. Our aim was to study the effects of Mimp/Mtch2 overexpression in vivo. Methods Transgenic mice overexpressing Mimp/Mtch2-GFP were characterized and monitored for lipid accumulation, weight and blood glucose levels. Transgenic mice liver and kidneys were used for gene expression analysis. Results Mimp/Mtch2-GFP transgenic mice express high levels of fatty acid synthase and of β-oxidation genes and develop fatty livers and kidneys. Moreover, high-fat diet–fed Mimp/Mtch2 mice exhibit high blood glucose levels. Our results also show that Mimp/Mtch2 is involved in lipid accumulation and uptake in cells and perhaps in human obesity. Conclusions Mimp/Mtch2 alters lipid metabolism and may play a role in the onset of obesity and development of insulin resistance. PMID:27359329

  1. Altered development and function of the placental regions in preeclampsia and its association with long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Rani, Alka; Wadhwani, Nisha; Chavan-Gautam, Preeti; Joshi, Sadhana

    2016-09-01

    The placenta is an essential organ formed during pregnancy that mainly transfers nutrients from the mother to the fetus. Nutrients taken up by the placenta are required for its own growth and development and to optimize fetal growth. Hence, placental function is an important determinant of pregnancy outcome. Among various nutrients, fatty acids, especially long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFAs), including omega 3 and omega 6 fatty acids, are essential for placental development from the time of implantation. Studies have associated these LCPUFAs with placental development through their roles in regulating oxidative stress, angiogenesis, and inflammation, which may in turn influence their transfer to the fetus. The placenta has a heterogeneous morphology with variable regional vasculature, oxidative stress, and LCPUFA levels in healthy pregnancies depending upon the location within the placenta. However, these regional structural and functional parameters are found to be disturbed in pathological conditions, such as preeclampsia (PE), thereby affecting pregnancy outcome. Hence, the alterations in LCPUFA metabolism and transport in different regions of the PE placenta as compared with normal placenta could potentially be contributing to the pathological features of PE. The regional variations in development and function of the placenta and its possible association with placental LCPUFA metabolism and transport in normal and PE pregnancies are discussed in this review. WIREs Dev Biol 2016, 5:582-597. doi: 10.1002/wdev.238 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:27239793

  2. Altered Preconception Fatty Acid Intake Is Associated with Improved Pregnancy Rates in Overweight and Obese Women Undertaking in Vitro Fertilisation.

    PubMed

    Moran, Lisa J; Tsagareli, Victoria; Noakes, Manny; Norman, Robert

    2016-01-04

    Maternal preconception diet is proposed to affect fertility. Prior research assessing the effect of altering the fatty acid profile on female fertility is conflicting. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of preconception maternal diet, specifically fatty acid profile, on pregnancies and live births following in vitro fertilisation (IVF). Forty-six overweight and obese women undergoing IVF were randomised to a diet and physical activity intervention (intervention) or standard care (control). Outcome measures included pregnancy, live birth and pre-study dietary intake from food frequency questionnaire. Twenty pregnancies (n = 12/18 vs. n = 8/20, p = 0.12) and 12 live births (n = 7/18 vs. n = 5/20, p = 0.48) occurred following the intervention with no differences between the treatment groups. On analysis adjusted for BMI and smoking status, women who became pregnant had higher levels of polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) intake (p = 0.03), specifically omega-6 PUFA and linoleic acid (LA) (p = 0.045) with a trend for an elevated intake of omega-3 PUFA (p = 0.06). There were no dietary differences for women who did or did not have a live birth. Maternal preconception PUFA, and specifically omega-6 and LA intake, are associated with improved pregnancy rates in overweight and obese women undergoing IVF. This has implications for optimising fertility through preconception nutrition.

  3. Targeted alteration of dietary n-3 and n-6 fatty acids for the treatment of chronic headaches: a randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Ramsden, Christopher E; Faurot, Keturah R; Zamora, Daisy; Suchindran, Chirayath M; Macintosh, Beth A; Gaylord, Susan; Ringel, Amit; Hibbeln, Joseph R; Feldstein, Ariel E; Mori, Trevor A; Barden, Anne; Lynch, Chanee; Coble, Rebecca; Mas, Emilie; Palsson, Olafur; Barrow, David A; Mann, J Douglas

    2013-11-01

    Omega-3 and n-6 fatty acids are biosynthetic precursors to lipid mediators with antinociceptive and pronociceptive properties. We conducted a randomized, single-blinded, parallel-group clinical trial to assess clinical and biochemical effects of targeted alteration in dietary n-3 and n-6 fatty acids for treatment of chronic headaches. After a 4-week preintervention phase, ambulatory patients with chronic daily headache undergoing usual care were randomized to 1 of 2 intensive, food-based 12-week dietary interventions: a high n-3 plus low n-6 (H3-L6) intervention, or a low n-6 (L6) intervention. Clinical outcomes included the Headache Impact Test (HIT-6, primary clinical outcome), Headache Days per month, and Headache Hours per day. Biochemical outcomes included the erythrocyte n-6 in highly unsaturated fatty acids (HUFA) score (primary biochemical outcome) and bioactive n-3 and n-6 derivatives. Fifty-six of 67 patients completed the intervention. Both groups achieved targeted intakes of n-3 and n-6 fatty acids. In intention-to-treat analysis, the H3-L6 intervention produced significantly greater improvement in the HIT-6 score (-7.5 vs -2.1; P<0.001) and the number of Headache Days per month (-8.8 vs -4.0; P=0.02), compared to the L6 group. The H3-L6 intervention also produced significantly greater reductions in Headache Hours per day (-4.6 vs -1.2; P=0.01) and the n-6 in HUFA score (-21.0 vs -4.0%; P<0.001), and greater increases in antinociceptive n-3 pathway markers 18-hydroxy-eicosapentaenoic acid (+118.4 vs +61.1%; P<0.001) and 17-hydroxy-docosahexaenoic acid (+170.2 vs +27.2; P<0.001). A dietary intervention increasing n-3 and reducing n-6 fatty acids reduced headache pain, altered antinociceptive lipid mediators, and improved quality-of-life in this population. PMID:23886520

  4. Fatty Acid Esters of Phloridzin Induce Apoptosis of Human Liver Cancer Cells through Altered Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Sandhya V. G.; Ziaullah; Rupasinghe, H. P. Vasantha

    2014-01-01

    Phloridzin (phlorizin or phloretin 2′-O-glucoside) is known for blocking intestinal glucose absorption. We have investigated the anticarcinogenic effect of phloridzin and its novel derivatives using human cancer cell lines. We have synthesised novel acylated derivatives of phloridzin with six different long chain fatty acids by regioselective enzymatic acylation using Candida Antarctica lipase B. The antiproliferative effects of the new compounds were investigated in comparison with the parent compounds, phloridzin, aglycone phloretin, the six free fatty acids and chemotherapeutic drugs (sorafenib, doxorubicin and daunorubicin) using human hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cells, human breast adenocarcinoma MDA-MB-231 cells and acute monocytic leukemia THP-1 cells along with normal human and rat hepatocytes. The fatty acid esters of phloridzin inhibited significantly the growth of the two carcinoma and leukemia cells while similar treatment doses were not toxic to normal human or rat hepatocytes. The antiproliferative potency of fatty esters of phloridzin was comparable to the potency of the chemotherapeutic drugs. The fatty acid esters of phloridzin inhibited DNA topoisomerases IIα activity that might induce G0/G1 phase arrest, induced apoptosis via activation of caspase-3, and decreased ATP level and mitochondrial membrane potential in HepG2 cells. Based on the high selectivity on cancer cells, decosahexaenoic acid (DHA) ester of phloridzin was selected for gene expression analysis using RT2PCR human cancer drug target array. Antiproliferative effect of DHA ester of phloridzin could be related to the down regulation of anti-apoptotic gene (BCL2), growth factor receptors (EBFR family, IGF1R/IGF2, PDGFR) and its downstream signalling partners (PI3k/AKT/mTOR, Ras/Raf/MAPK), cell cycle machinery (CDKs, TERT, TOP2A, TOP2B) as well as epigenetics regulators (HDACs). These results suggest that fatty esters of phloridzin have potential chemotherapeutic effects mediated

  5. Photoaging and the clinical utility of fractional laser.

    PubMed

    Borges, Juliano; Manela-Azulay, Mônica; Cuzzi, Tullia

    2016-01-01

    The description of atomic structure by Niels Bohr set the basis for the emergence of quantum physics. Based on these fundamentals, Einstein published in 1917 a paper on the amplification of energy by Stimulated Emission of Radiation as part of his quantum theories. In 1955, Townes and Gordon turned Einstein's theories into practice, creating a coherent and amplified microwave device using ammonia gas in an optical medium. But it was at the beginning of the 1980s, that Anderson and Parrish published an article about the selective photothermolysis model which revolutionized clinical practice. The use of laser in photoaging began with CO2 (10,600 nm). In 1989, it was first used for resurfacing of a face with prominent photoaging. Ablative lasers have therefore had great popularity in the 1980s and 1990s, but prolonged postoperative time and significant risk of side effects have lowered the acceptance by patients. In 2004, the description of the fractionated radiation for the treatment of photoaging, by Mainstein, represented a great event. The stimulation of collagen occurred through fractional laser beams, which would reach the selected area while saving islands of sound skin. These islands accelerated the process of cicatrization of the treated tissue and shortened the postprocedure time. Furthermore, the fractionated radiation presented a smaller range of side effects, increasing the safety of the procedure. As mentioned earlier, as fractional lasers incise on the skin, they leave islands of healthy skin that accelerate recovery, while generating necrosis columns. Such necrosis columns remove damaged extracellular matrix material, allowing resettlement of fibroblasts. Such resettled fibroblasts, under the influence of a new tensile strength, restart to produce structures for extracellular matrix, such as collagen, elastin, and proteoglycans, in a more physiological way. Fractional lasers are considered by many dermatologists as the best choice in laser therapy for

  6. Photoaging and the clinical utility of fractional laser

    PubMed Central

    Borges, Juliano; Manela-Azulay, Mônica; Cuzzi, Tullia

    2016-01-01

    The description of atomic structure by Niels Bohr set the basis for the emergence of quantum physics. Based on these fundamentals, Einstein published in 1917 a paper on the amplification of energy by Stimulated Emission of Radiation as part of his quantum theories. In 1955, Townes and Gordon turned Einstein’s theories into practice, creating a coherent and amplified microwave device using ammonia gas in an optical medium. But it was at the beginning of the 1980s, that Anderson and Parrish published an article about the selective photothermolysis model which revolutionized clinical practice. The use of laser in photoaging began with CO2 (10,600 nm). In 1989, it was first used for resurfacing of a face with prominent photoaging. Ablative lasers have therefore had great popularity in the 1980s and 1990s, but prolonged postoperative time and significant risk of side effects have lowered the acceptance by patients. In 2004, the description of the fractionated radiation for the treatment of photoaging, by Mainstein, represented a great event. The stimulation of collagen occurred through fractional laser beams, which would reach the selected area while saving islands of sound skin. These islands accelerated the process of cicatrization of the treated tissue and shortened the postprocedure time. Furthermore, the fractionated radiation presented a smaller range of side effects, increasing the safety of the procedure. As mentioned earlier, as fractional lasers incise on the skin, they leave islands of healthy skin that accelerate recovery, while generating necrosis columns. Such necrosis columns remove damaged extracellular matrix material, allowing resettlement of fibroblasts. Such resettled fibroblasts, under the influence of a new tensile strength, restart to produce structures for extracellular matrix, such as collagen, elastin, and proteoglycans, in a more physiological way. Fractional lasers are considered by many dermatologists as the best choice in laser therapy

  7. Photoaging and the clinical utility of fractional laser.

    PubMed

    Borges, Juliano; Manela-Azulay, Mônica; Cuzzi, Tullia

    2016-01-01

    The description of atomic structure by Niels Bohr set the basis for the emergence of quantum physics. Based on these fundamentals, Einstein published in 1917 a paper on the amplification of energy by Stimulated Emission of Radiation as part of his quantum theories. In 1955, Townes and Gordon turned Einstein's theories into practice, creating a coherent and amplified microwave device using ammonia gas in an optical medium. But it was at the beginning of the 1980s, that Anderson and Parrish published an article about the selective photothermolysis model which revolutionized clinical practice. The use of laser in photoaging began with CO2 (10,600 nm). In 1989, it was first used for resurfacing of a face with prominent photoaging. Ablative lasers have therefore had great popularity in the 1980s and 1990s, but prolonged postoperative time and significant risk of side effects have lowered the acceptance by patients. In 2004, the description of the fractionated radiation for the treatment of photoaging, by Mainstein, represented a great event. The stimulation of collagen occurred through fractional laser beams, which would reach the selected area while saving islands of sound skin. These islands accelerated the process of cicatrization of the treated tissue and shortened the postprocedure time. Furthermore, the fractionated radiation presented a smaller range of side effects, increasing the safety of the procedure. As mentioned earlier, as fractional lasers incise on the skin, they leave islands of healthy skin that accelerate recovery, while generating necrosis columns. Such necrosis columns remove damaged extracellular matrix material, allowing resettlement of fibroblasts. Such resettled fibroblasts, under the influence of a new tensile strength, restart to produce structures for extracellular matrix, such as collagen, elastin, and proteoglycans, in a more physiological way. Fractional lasers are considered by many dermatologists as the best choice in laser therapy for

  8. Dietary triacylglycerol structure and saturated fat alter plasma and tissue fatty acids in piglets.

    PubMed

    Innis, S M; Dyer, R; Quinlan, P T; Diersen-Schade, D

    1996-05-01

    Human and pig milk triacylglycerols contain a large proportion of palmitic acid (16:0) which is predominately esterified in the 2-position. Other dietary fats contain variable amounts of 16:0, with unsaturated fatty acids predominantly esterified in the 2-position. These studies determined if the amount or position of 16:0 in dietary fat influences the composition or distribution of liver, adipose tissue, lung, or plasma fatty acids in developing piglets. Piglets were fed to 18 d with sow milk or formula with saturated fat from medium-chain triglyceride (MCT), coconut or palm oil, or synthesized triacylglycerols (synthesized to specifically direct 16:0 to the 2-position) with, in total fatty acids, 30.7, 4.3, 6.5, 27.0, and 29.6% 16:0, and in 2-position fatty acids, 55.3, 0.4, 1.3, 4.4, and 69.9% 16:0, respectively. The percentage of 16:0 in the 2-position of adipose fat from piglets fed sow milk, palm oil, and synthesized triacylglycerols were similar and higher than in piglets fed MCT or coconut oil. Thus, the amount, not the position, of dietary 16:0 determines piglet adipose tissue 16:0 content. The effects of the diets on the plasma and liver triacylglycerols were similar, with significantly lower 16:0 in total and 2-position fatty acids of the MCT and coconut oil groups, and significantly higher 16:0 in the plasma and liver triacylglycerol 2-position of piglets fed the synthesized triacylglycerols rather than sow milk or palm oil. The lung phospholipid total and 2-position 16:0 was significantly lower in the MCT, coconut, and palm oil groups, but similar in the synthesized triacylglycerol group and sow milk group. The lung phospholipid total and 2-position percentage of arachidonic acid (20:4n-6) was significantly lower in all of the formula-fed piglets than in milk-fed piglets. The physiological significance of this is not known. PMID:8727642

  9. UV-induced reactive oxygen species in photocarcinogenesis and photoaging.

    PubMed

    Scharffetter-Kochanek, K; Wlaschek, M; Brenneisen, P; Schauen, M; Blaudschun, R; Wenk, J

    1997-11-01

    The increase in UV irradiation on earth due to the stratospheric ozone depletion represents a major environmental threat to the skin increasing its risk of photooxidative damage by UV-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS). Increased ROS load has been implicated in several pathological states including photoaging and photocarcinogenesis of the skin. Large efforts have been made to better define the involvement of distinct ROS in photocarcinogenesis and photoaging. Both pathological processes share common features; however, they reveal unique molecular characteristics which finally determine the fate of the cell and its host. As well as causing permanent genetic changes involving protooncogenes and tumor suppressor genes, ROS activate cytoplasmic signal transduction pathways that are related to growth differentiation, senescence, transformation and tissue degradation. This review focuses on the role of UV-induced ROS in the photodamage of the skin resulting in biochemical and clinical characteristics of photocarcinogenesis and photoaging. A decrease in the ROS load by efficient sunscreens and/or otherwise protective agents may represent a promising strategy to prevent or at least minimize ROS induced cutaneous pathological states. PMID:9426184

  10. Photoaging versus intrinsic aging: a morphologic assessment of facial skin.

    PubMed

    Bhawan, J; Andersen, W; Lee, J; Labadie, R; Solares, G

    1995-04-01

    Histologic studies have become increasingly important in recognizing morphologic differences in photoaged versus intrinsically aged skin. Earlier histologic studies have attempted to evaluate these changes by examining anatomical sites which are not comparable, such as face and buttocks. As part of a multicenter study, we have quantitatively examined a panel of 16 histologic features in baseline facial skin biopsies from 158 women with moderate to severe photodamage. When compared to the postauricular area (photo protected), biopsies of the crow's feet area (photo exposed) had a twofold increase in melanocytes and a statistically significant increase in melanocytic atypia (p < .0001) and epidermal melanin (p < .0001). Other epidermal changes included reduced epidermal thickness (p < .01), more compact stratum corneum (p < .0001) and increased granular layer thickness (p < .0001) in the crow's feet skin. There was increased solar elastosis (p < .0001), dermal elastic tissue (p < .0001), melanophages (p < .0001), perivascular inflammation (p < .05) and perifollicular fibrosis (p < .01) but no change in the number of mast cells or dermal mucin in the photo exposed skin. Our data document quantitative differences in photoaged versus intrinsically aged facial skin and provides the groundwork for future studies to evaluate the efficacy of new treatments for photoaged skin. PMID:7560349

  11. Photoaging versus intrinsic aging: a morphologic assessment of facial skin.

    PubMed

    Bhawan, J; Andersen, W; Lee, J; Labadie, R; Solares, G

    1995-04-01

    Histologic studies have become increasingly important in recognizing morphologic differences in photoaged versus intrinsically aged skin. Earlier histologic studies have attempted to evaluate these changes by examining anatomical sites which are not comparable, such as face and buttocks. As part of a multicenter study, we have quantitatively examined a panel of 16 histologic features in baseline facial skin biopsies from 158 women with moderate to severe photodamage. When compared to the postauricular area (photo protected), biopsies of the crow's feet area (photo exposed) had a twofold increase in melanocytes and a statistically significant increase in melanocytic atypia (p < .0001) and epidermal melanin (p < .0001). Other epidermal changes included reduced epidermal thickness (p < .01), more compact stratum corneum (p < .0001) and increased granular layer thickness (p < .0001) in the crow's feet skin. There was increased solar elastosis (p < .0001), dermal elastic tissue (p < .0001), melanophages (p < .0001), perivascular inflammation (p < .05) and perifollicular fibrosis (p < .01) but no change in the number of mast cells or dermal mucin in the photo exposed skin. Our data document quantitative differences in photoaged versus intrinsically aged facial skin and provides the groundwork for future studies to evaluate the efficacy of new treatments for photoaged skin.

  12. Evaluation of the Quantitative and Qualitative Alterations in the Fatty Acid Contents of the Sebum of Patients with Inflammatory Acne during Treatment with Systemic Lymecycline and/or Oral Fatty Acid Supplementation

    PubMed Central

    Siqueira Talarico, Aline; Parra Duarte, Carla de Oliveira; Silva Pereira, Caroline; de Souza Weimann, Ellem Tatiani; Sabino de Matos, Lissa; Della Coletta, Livia Carolina; Fidelis, Maria Carolina; Vasconcellos, Cidia

    2013-01-01

    Background. Acne is a dermatosis that involves an altered sebum pattern. Objectives. (1) To evaluate if a treatment based on antibiotics (lymecycline) can alter fatty acids contents of the sebum of patients with acne; (2) to evaluate if oral supplementation of fatty acids can interfere with fatty acids contents of the sebum of patients with acne; (3) to evaluate if there is any interaction in fatty acids contents of the sebum of patients with acne when they use both antibiotics and oral supplementation of fatty acids. Methods. Forty-five male volunteers with inflammatory acne vulgaris were treated with 300 mg of lymecycline per day, with 540 mg of γ-linolenic acid, 1,200 mg of linoleic acid, and 510 mg of oleic acid per day, or with both regimens for 90 days. Every 30 days, a sample of sebum from the forehead was collected for fatty acids' chromatographic analysis. Results. Twelve fatty acids studied exhibited some kind of pattern changes during the study: C12:0, C14:0, C15:0, C16:1, C18:0, C18:1n9c+C18:1n9t, C18:2n6t, C18:3n6, C18:3n3, C20:1, C22:0, and C24:0. Conclusions. The daily administration of lymecycline and/or specific fatty acids may slightly influence some fatty acids levels present in the sebum of patients with inflammatory acne vulgaris. PMID:24191156

  13. Homozygous and heterozygous GH transgenesis alters fatty acid composition and content in the liver of Amago salmon (Oncorhynchus masou ishikawae).

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Manabu; Takenaga, Fumio; Kitani, Yoichiro; Yamamoto, Goshi; Okamoto, Hiroyuki; Masaoka, Tetsuji; Araki, Kazuo; Nagoya, Hiroyuki; Mori, Tsukasa

    2012-10-15

    Growth hormone (GH) transgenic Amago (Oncorhynchus masou ishikawae), containing the sockeye GH1 gene fused with metallothionein-B promoter from the same species, were generated and the physiological condition through lipid metabolism compared among homozygous (Tg/Tg) and heterozygous GH transgenic (Tg/+) Amago and the wild type control (+/+). Previously, we have reported that the adipose tissue was generally smaller in GH transgenic fish compared to the control, and that the Δ-6 fatty acyl desaturase gene was down-regulated in the Tg/+ fish. However, fatty acid (FA) compositions have not been measured previously in these fish. In this study we compared the FAs composition and content in the liver using gas chromatography. Eleven kinds of FA were detected. The composition of saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids (SFA and MUFA) such as myristic acid (14:0), palmitoleic acid (16:1n-7), and cis-vaccenic acid (cis-18:1n-7) was significantly (P<0.05) decreased in GH transgenic Amago. On the other hand, the composition of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) such as linoleic acid (18:2n-6), arachidonic acid (20:4n-6), and docosapentaenoic acid (22:5n-3) was significantly (P<0.05) increased. Levels of serum glucose and triacylglycerol were significantly (P<0.05) decreased in the GH transgenics compared with +/+ fish. Furthermore, 3'-tag digital gene expression profiling was performed using liver tissues from Tg/Tg and +/+ fish, and showed that Mid1 interacting protein 1 (Mid1ip1), which is an important factor to activate Acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), was down-regulated in Tg/Tg fish, while genes involved in FA catabolism were up-regulated, including long-chain-fatty-acid-CoA ligase 1 (ACSL1) and acyl-coenzyme A oxidase 3 (ACOX3). These data suggest that liver tissue from GH transgenic Amago showed starvation by alteration in glucose and lipid metabolism due to GH overexpression. The decrease of serum glucose suppressed Mid1ip1, and caused a decrease of de novo FA

  14. Altered gut microbial energy and metabolism in children with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Michail, Sonia; Lin, Malinda; Frey, Mark R.; Fanter, Rob; Paliy, Oleg; Hilbush, Brian; Reo, Nicholas V.

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is becoming the new pediatric epidemic. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is frequently associated with obesity and has become the most common cause of pediatric liver disease. The gut microbiome is the major metabolic organ and determines how calories are processed, serving as a caloric gate and contributing towards the pathogenesis of NAFLD. The goal of this study is to examine gut microbial profiles in children with NAFLD using phylogenetic, metabolomic, metagenomic and proteomic approaches. Fecal samples were obtained from obese children with or without NAFLD and healthy lean children. Stool specimens were subjected to 16S rRNA gene microarray, shotgun sequencing, mass spectroscopy for proteomics and NMR spectroscopy for metabolite analysis. Children with NAFLD had more abundant Gammaproteobacteria and Prevotella and significantly higher levels of ethanol, with differential effects on short chain fatty acids. This group also had increased genomic and protein abundance for energy production with a reduction in carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism and urea cycle and urea transport systems. The metaproteome and metagenome showed similar findings. The gut microbiome in pediatric NAFLD is distinct from lean healthy children with more alcohol production and pathways allocated to energy metabolism over carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism, which would contribute to development of disease. PMID:25764541

  15. Dietary borage oil alters plasma, hepatic and vascular tissue fatty acid composition in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Engler, M M; Engler, M B

    1998-07-01

    Dietary borage oil rich in gamma-linolenic acid (GLA) has been shown to lower blood pressure in Wistar Kyoto (WKY) and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). A potential mechanism for this effect may be attributed to changes in metabolism of GLA to dihomogamma-linolenic (DGLA) and arachidonic acids (AA). We investigated the effects of dietary borage oil on fatty acid composition in the plasma, liver and vascular tissue in WKY and SHR. The diet significantly increased the levels of omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids. GLA and DGLA levels in the plasma, liver, aorta and renal artery tissues increased in SHR (P < 0.001) and WKY (P < 0.001). AA levels were also increased in both plasma and liver of SHR (P < 0.05) and WKY (P < 0.05) fed the borage oil enriched diet. The results demonstrate that dietary borage oil produces marked changes in the metabolism of GLA which may contribute to its blood pressure lowering effect in WKY and SHR.

  16. Dietary omega 3 fatty acid alters prostaglandin synthesis, glucose transport and protein turnover in skeletal muscle of healthy and diabetic rats.

    PubMed Central

    Sohal, P S; Baracos, V E; Clandinin, M T

    1992-01-01

    The present study was designed to determine if dietary-fat-induced alterations in the fatty acid composition of skeletal-muscle lipid alters insulin-dependent and basal muscle metabolism, including glucose and amino acid transport, prostaglandin (PG) synthesis and protein turnover. Rats were fed on high-fat semi-purified diets providing 19% or 1% omega 3 fatty acids in the form of fish oil, for 6 weeks. After 3 weeks, half of the rats were made diabetic by a single injection of streptozotocin (50 mg/kg body wt.). After a further 3 weeks, contralateral epitrochlearis and extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles from each rat were incubated in vitro. High levels of dietary omega 3 fatty acids decreased PGE2 and PGF2 alpha synthesis in EDL and epitrochlearis muscle (P less than 0.0001). Diabetes and insulin had no effect on PG synthesis. Diet did not alter basal glucose or amino acid transport in EDL muscle from healthy or diabetic rats. Insulin increased glucose and amino acid transport (P less than 0.0001); the increase in glucose transport by insulin was significantly greater in muscles of rats fed on high levels of omega 3 fatty acids (P less than 0.05). Epitrochlearis from rats fed on high levels of omega 3 fatty acids showed decreased net protein degradation in the presence and absence of insulin, owing to decreased rates of protein degradation and synthesis. The data suggest that high levels of dietary omega 3 fatty acids that alter muscle membrane composition also result in alterations in glucose transport and the metabolism of muscle protein. PMID:1530573

  17. Photoaging Mobile Apps in School-Based Tobacco Prevention: The Mirroring Approach

    PubMed Central

    Seeger, Werner; Buslaff, Fabian

    2016-01-01

    Background Most smokers start smoking during their early adolescence, often with the idea that smoking is glamorous. Adolescent smoking can best be prevented through health education at schools. Interventions that take advantage of the broad availability of mobile phones as well as adolescents’ interest in their appearance may be a novel way to improve prevention. Objective In this first pilot study, we aimed to use mobile phone technology in accordance with the theory of planned behavior to improve school-based tobacco prevention. Methods We used a free photoaging mobile phone app (“Smokerface”) in three German secondary schools via a novel method called mirroring. The students’ altered three-dimensional selfies on mobile phones or tablets were “mirrored” via a projector in front of their whole grade. Using an anonymous questionnaire, we then measured on a 5-point Likert scale the perceptions of the intervention among 125 students of both genders (average age 12.75 years). Results A majority of the students perceived the intervention as fun (77/125, 61.6%), claimed that the intervention motivated them not to smoke (79/125, 63.2%), and stated that they learned new benefits of non-smoking (81/125, 64.8%). Only a minority of students disagreed or fully disagreed that they learned new benefits of non-smoking (16/125, 12.8%) or that they were themselves motivated not to smoke (18/125, 14.4%). Conclusions We have presented a novel method to integrate photoaging in school-based tobacco prevention that affects student peer groups and considers the predictors of smoking in accordance with the theory of planned behavior. PMID:27352819

  18. Morphological change of skin fibroblasts induced by UV Irradiation is involved in photoaging.

    PubMed

    Yamaba, Hiroyuki; Haba, Manami; Kunita, Mayumi; Sakaida, Tsutomu; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Yashiro, Youichi; Nakata, Satoru

    2016-08-01

    Human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs) are typically flattened or extensible shaped and play a critical role in the metabolism of extracellular matrix components. As the properties of fibroblasts in the dermis are considered to be influenced by their morphology, we investigated the morphological changes induced in fibroblasts by ultraviolet (UV) irradiation as well as the relationship between these changes and collagen metabolism. In this study, we showed that UVA exposure induced morphological changes and reduced collagen contents in HDFs. These morphological changes were accompanied a reduction in actin filaments and upregulation of the actin filament polymerization inhibitor, capping protein muscle Z-line ɑ1 (CAPZA1). External actin filament growth inhibitors also affected the shape of HDFs and reduced collagen levels. These results suggest that UVA exposure may inhibit the polymerization of actin filaments and induce morphological changes in skin fibroblasts. These morphological changes in fibroblasts may accelerate reductions in collagen synthesis. This mechanism may be one of the processes responsible for collagen reductions observed in photoaged skin. When natural materials that suppress these morphological changes in HDFs were evaluated, we found that an extract of Lilium 'Casa Blanca' (LCB) suppressed UVA-induced alterations in the shape of HDFs, which are typically followed by inhibition of collagen reduction. An analysis of the active compounds in LCB extract led to the identification of regaloside I, which had a structure of phenylpropanoid glycerol glucoside, as the active compound inhibiting the upregulation of CAPZA1. Therefore, inhibition of UVA-induced morphological changes in HDFs is considered to be promising way for the suppression of collagen reduction in photoaging.

  19. Morphological change of skin fibroblasts induced by UV Irradiation is involved in photoaging.

    PubMed

    Yamaba, Hiroyuki; Haba, Manami; Kunita, Mayumi; Sakaida, Tsutomu; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Yashiro, Youichi; Nakata, Satoru

    2016-08-01

    Human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs) are typically flattened or extensible shaped and play a critical role in the metabolism of extracellular matrix components. As the properties of fibroblasts in the dermis are considered to be influenced by their morphology, we investigated the morphological changes induced in fibroblasts by ultraviolet (UV) irradiation as well as the relationship between these changes and collagen metabolism. In this study, we showed that UVA exposure induced morphological changes and reduced collagen contents in HDFs. These morphological changes were accompanied a reduction in actin filaments and upregulation of the actin filament polymerization inhibitor, capping protein muscle Z-line ɑ1 (CAPZA1). External actin filament growth inhibitors also affected the shape of HDFs and reduced collagen levels. These results suggest that UVA exposure may inhibit the polymerization of actin filaments and induce morphological changes in skin fibroblasts. These morphological changes in fibroblasts may accelerate reductions in collagen synthesis. This mechanism may be one of the processes responsible for collagen reductions observed in photoaged skin. When natural materials that suppress these morphological changes in HDFs were evaluated, we found that an extract of Lilium 'Casa Blanca' (LCB) suppressed UVA-induced alterations in the shape of HDFs, which are typically followed by inhibition of collagen reduction. An analysis of the active compounds in LCB extract led to the identification of regaloside I, which had a structure of phenylpropanoid glycerol glucoside, as the active compound inhibiting the upregulation of CAPZA1. Therefore, inhibition of UVA-induced morphological changes in HDFs is considered to be promising way for the suppression of collagen reduction in photoaging. PMID:27539902

  20. A high omega 3 fatty acid diet alters fatty acid composition of heart, liver, kidney, adipose tissue and skeletal muscle in swine.

    PubMed

    Otten, W; Wirth, C; Iaizzo, P A; Eichinger, H M

    1993-01-01

    The fatty acid profiles and total lipid contents of two skeletal muscles, adipose tissue, heart, liver and kidney of swine fed a diet rich in omega 3 (n-3) fatty acids (i.e., 5% fish oil) was investigated. These values were compared to those determined for animals which were fed an equal caloric diet low in n-3 fatty acids (i.e., 5% coconut oil). All supplementations were given over a 13-week period. The lipids were extracted with chloroform-methanol, trans-esterified and the relative fatty acid methyl-esters concentrations were determined using capillary gas chromatography. The fish oil diet significantly enhanced the relative amounts of n-3 fatty acids (i.e., eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid) in all tissues examined. In the heart, liver and kidney, the increases in n-3 fatty acids were compensated by decreases primarily in arachidonic acid, but in the other tissues the contents of lauric and myristic acids were also reduced. In general, the n-3 fatty acid contents were 40-165% higher in the animals fed the fish oil. Supplementation of n-3 fatty acids in swine induced a significant incorporation of these fatty acids throughout the body, however the extent of this incorporation differed between tissues perhaps due to tissue-specific metabolic pathways. PMID:8373137

  1. Time-resolved and steady-state fluorescence spectroscopy for the assessment of skin photoaging process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D´Almeida, Camila de Paula; Campos, Carolina; Saito Nogueira, Marcelo; Pratavieira, Sebastião.; Kurachi, Cristina

    2015-06-01

    pathology. The optical properties of these intrinsic fluorophores respond to the microenvironment and the metabolic status, thus making fluorescence spectroscopy a valuable tool to study the conditions of biological tissues. The purpose of this study is to investigate the hairless mice skin metabolic changes during the photoaging process through lifetime and fluorescence measurements targeting NADH and FAD. Two lasers centered at 378 nm and 445 nm, respectively, perform excitation of NADH and FAD. The fluorescence acquisition is carried out at mice dorsal and ventral regions throughout the photoaging protocol and aging process. Differences in fluorescence and lifetime data between young and photoaged mice measurements were observed. The endogenous fluorescence spectrum of photoaged dorsal skin showed an increase compared to young and aged skin. Lifetime of bound NADH and free FAD presented an increase in the first week that continued until the end of the protocol. Aging process is being investigated to complement the information obtained from fluorescence data and lifetime of photoaging process.

  2. Altered fatty acid profile in the liver and serum of stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats: reduced proportion of cis-vaccenic acid.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Shizuyo; Kojiguchi, Chiho; Yamazaki, Tohru; Mitsumoto, Atsushi; Kobayashi, Daisuke; Kudo, Naomi; Kawashima, Yoichi

    2013-01-01

    Stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRSP) are utilized as models for study of the pathogenesis of not only stroke and cardiovascular disorders but also atherosclerosis and metabolic syndrome. Basic information on the profiles of fatty acids and lipid classes in the liver is indispensable to use SHRSP as a model of disorder of lipid metabolism; nevertheless, detailed information on the metabolism of triacylglycerols (TAGs) and fatty acids in the liver of SHRSP is lacking. This study aimed to characterize profiles of lipid classes and fatty acids and to explore the mechanism underlying the characteristic alterations in metabolism of TAGs and fatty acids in the liver of SHRSP, in comparison with spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). The characteristic changes observed in SHRSP were (1) markedly lower hepatic TAG contents; (2) altered expressions of genes encoding three enzymes responsible for the control of TAG level, namely, adipose triglyceride lipase (for TAG degradation; up-regulated), carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1a (for fatty acid β-oxidation; up-regulated) and long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase 3 (for glycerolipid synthesis; down-regulated); (3) evidently lower contents and proportions of monounsaturated fatty acids, in particular cis-vaccenic acid (18:1n-7), in the liver and serum; and (4) down-regulation of palmitoleoyl-CoA chain elongase, which is necessary for the biosynthesis of 18:1n-7, in the liver. From the above observations, we concluded that there are significant differences in profiles of lipid classes and fatty acids between SHRSP and SHR, and that altered characteristics in SHRSP are likely responsible for increases in TAG hydrolysis and β-oxidation, and decreases in TAG synthesis and 18:1n-7 synthesis.

  3. Myotoxic reactions to lipid-lowering therapy are associated with altered oxidation of fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Paul S; Ciaraldi, Theodore P; Kim, Dong-Lim; Verity, M Anthony; Wolfson, Tanya; Henry, Robert R

    2009-02-01

    Despite exceptional efficacy and safety, fear of muscle toxicity remains a major reason statins are underutilized. Evidence suggests that statin muscle toxicity may be mediated by abnormalities in lipid metabolism. To test the hypothesis that myotubes from patients intolerant of lipid-lowering therapies have abnormal fatty acid oxidation (FAO) responses we compared muscle from 11 subjects with statin intolerance (Intolerant) with muscle from seven statin-naive volunteers undergoing knee arthroplasty (Comparator). Gross muscle pathology was graded and skeletal muscle cell cultures were produced from each subject. FAO was assessed following treatment with increasing statin concentrations. There was no difference in muscle biopsy myopathy scores between the groups. Basal octanoate oxidation was greater in Intolerant than in Comparator subjects (P = 0.03). Lovastatin-stimulated palmitate oxidation tended to be greater for Intolerant compared to Control subjects' myotubes (P = 0.07 for 5 microM and P = 0.06 for 20 microM lovastatin). In conclusion abnormalities in FAO of Intolerant subjects appear to be an intrinsic characteristic of these subjects that can be measured in their cultured myotubes.

  4. Cardiac connexin-43 and PKC signaling in rats with altered thyroid status without and with omega-3 fatty acids intake.

    PubMed

    Szeiffová Bačová, B; Egan Beňová, T; Viczenczová, C; Soukup, T; Rauchová, H; Pavelka, S; Knezl, V; Barančík, M; Tribulová, N

    2016-09-19

    Thyroid hormones are powerful modulators of heart function and susceptibility to arrhythmias via both genomic and non-genomic actions. We aimed to explore expression of electrical coupling protein connexin-43 (Cx43) in the heart of rats with altered thyroid status and impact of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (omega-3) supplementation. Adult male Lewis rats were divided into following six groups: euthyroid controls, hyperthyroid (treated with T(3)) and hypothyroid (treated with methimazol) with or without six-weeks lasting supplementation with omega-3 (20 mg/100 g/day). Left and right ventricles, septum and atria were used for immunoblotting of Cx43 and protein kinase C (PKC). Total expression of Cx43 and its phosphorylated forms were significantly increased in all heart regions of hypothyroid rats compared to euthyroid controls. In contrast, the total levels of Cx43 and its functional phosphorylated forms were decreased in atria and left ventricle of hyperthyroid rats. In parallel, the expression of PKC epsilon that phosphorylates Cx43, at serine 368, was increased in hypothyroid but decreased in hyperthyroid rat hearts. Omega-3 intake did not significantly affect either Cx43 or PKC epsilon alterations. In conclusion, there is an inverse relationship between expression of cardiac Cx43 and the levels of circulating thyroid hormones. It appears that increased propensity of hyperthyroid while decreased of hypothyroid individuals to malignant arrhythmias may be in part attributed to the changes in myocardial Cx43.

  5. Cardiac connexin-43 and PKC signaling in rats with altered thyroid status without and with omega-3 fatty acids intake.

    PubMed

    Szeiffová Bačová, B; Egan Beňová, T; Viczenczová, C; Soukup, T; Rauchová, H; Pavelka, S; Knezl, V; Barančík, M; Tribulová, N

    2016-09-19

    Thyroid hormones are powerful modulators of heart function and susceptibility to arrhythmias via both genomic and non-genomic actions. We aimed to explore expression of electrical coupling protein connexin-43 (Cx43) in the heart of rats with altered thyroid status and impact of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (omega-3) supplementation. Adult male Lewis rats were divided into following six groups: euthyroid controls, hyperthyroid (treated with T(3)) and hypothyroid (treated with methimazol) with or without six-weeks lasting supplementation with omega-3 (20 mg/100 g/day). Left and right ventricles, septum and atria were used for immunoblotting of Cx43 and protein kinase C (PKC). Total expression of Cx43 and its phosphorylated forms were significantly increased in all heart regions of hypothyroid rats compared to euthyroid controls. In contrast, the total levels of Cx43 and its functional phosphorylated forms were decreased in atria and left ventricle of hyperthyroid rats. In parallel, the expression of PKC epsilon that phosphorylates Cx43, at serine 368, was increased in hypothyroid but decreased in hyperthyroid rat hearts. Omega-3 intake did not significantly affect either Cx43 or PKC epsilon alterations. In conclusion, there is an inverse relationship between expression of cardiac Cx43 and the levels of circulating thyroid hormones. It appears that increased propensity of hyperthyroid while decreased of hypothyroid individuals to malignant arrhythmias may be in part attributed to the changes in myocardial Cx43. PMID:27643942

  6. Soybean oligosaccharides alter colon short-chain fatty acid production and microbial population in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhou, X L; Kong, X F; Yang, X J; Yin, Y L

    2012-12-01

    This study was conducted to the determine fermentation characteristics of soybean oligosaccharides (SBOS) in an in vitro system. Digesta collected from the colon of Huanjiang mini-pigs was used as inoculums, and SBOS (0.2 g per 10 mL fermentation broth) was used as substrate during the in vitro fermentation. The inoculum or inoculum + glucose (0.2 g) was used as negative or positive control, respectively. The slurry was fermented in an anaerobic chamber and gas production (GP) recording was taken after 48 h of incubation by referring to the moving scale on the plunger of the glass syringes, and then GP parameters, pH value, NH(3)-N content, short chain fatty acid (SCFA) levels, and microbial community in the fermentation broth were determined. For gas production parameters, pH, and fermentation product determination after 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 14, 16, 18, 20, 22, 24, 28, 32, 36, 42, and 48 h of incubation, SBOS and glucose demonstrated similar responses compared to control including increase maximal gas production, decreased lag time, decreased pH, and accumulation of NH(3) and increased SCFA. The exception was rate of GP, which was higher (P < 0.05) for SBOS compared with glucose. Incubation with SBOS increased (P < 0.05) the microbial diversity and population of Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus but decreased (P < 0.05) Escherichia and Streptococcus when compared with incubation with glucose. These findings suggested that the SBOS can improve the gut microbiota balance in colon and modulate its metabolism. PMID:23365277

  7. Prepartum nutrition alters fatty acid composition in plasma, adipose tissue, and liver lipids of periparturient dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Douglas, G N; Rehage, J; Beaulieu, A D; Bahaa, A O; Drackley, J K

    2007-06-01

    The fatty acyl profile of phospholipids (PL) determines the fluidity of cell membranes and affects cell function. The degree to which long-chain fatty acid (LCFA) composition of PL and triacylglycerols (TG) in liver and total lipids in adipose tissue can be altered by prepartum nutrition in peripartal dairy cows is unclear. Multiparous Holsteins (n = 25) were assigned to 1 of 4 prepartal diets: 1) CA, the control diet fed to meet 120% of energy requirements; 2) CR, a control diet fed to meet 80% of requirements; 3) S, a diet supplemented with mostly saturated free fatty acids (47% 16:0, 36% 18:0, 14% cis-18:1) and fed to meet 120% of requirements; or 4) U, a diet similar to S except that cows were abomasally infused with soybean oil so that the diet plus infused fat would meet 120% of requirements. Diets were fed for 40 d prepartum; all cows received a lactation diet postpartum. Groups CR and U had lower prepartum intakes of dry matter and net energy, but glucose concentrations in plasma were similar among treatments. Cows fed S, U, or CR had greater nonesterified fatty acids in plasma prepartum, but cows fed U had decreased beta-hydroxybutyrate postpartum. Postpartal concentrations of total lipids and glycogen in liver tissue were similar among treatments. Cows in group U had a greater percentage of 18:2 but less 16:0, 18:0, and 20:4 in plasma total lipids than cows fed S. Treatment U increased 18:2 and 18:3 and decreased 18:1 in subcutaneous adipose tissue at 1 d postpartum. Across diets, percentages of 16:0 and trans-18:1 were increased, and 18:0, 20:3, and 20:5 were decreased, in hepatic PL at d 1 postpartum. Significant treatment x time interactions indicated that treatment U increased 18:2 in hepatic PL at the expense of 18:1, 20:3, 20:4, 22:6, and 24:0 on d 1 postpartum, but changes were normalized by d 65 postpartum. The unsaturation index of hepatic PL was lower at d 1 than at d -45 or 65, which implies that hepatic membrane fluidity decreased around

  8. Altered Skeletal Muscle Fatty Acid Handling in Subjects with Impaired Glucose Tolerance as Compared to Impaired Fasting Glucose

    PubMed Central

    Goossens, Gijs H.; Moors, Chantalle C. M.; Jocken, Johan W. E.; van der Zijl, Nynke J.; Jans, Anneke; Konings, Ellen; Diamant, Michaela; Blaak, Ellen E.

    2016-01-01

    Altered skeletal muscle fatty acid (FA) metabolism contributes to insulin resistance. Here, we compared skeletal muscle FA handling between subjects with impaired fasting glucose (IFG; n = 12 (7 males)) and impaired glucose tolerance (IGT; n = 14 (7 males)) by measuring arterio-venous concentration differences across forearm muscle. [2H2]-palmitate was infused intravenously, labeling circulating endogenous triacylglycerol (TAG) and free fatty acids (FFA), whereas [U-13C]-palmitate was incorporated in a high-fat mixed-meal, labeling chylomicron-TAG. Skeletal muscle biopsies were taken to determine muscle TAG, diacylglycerol (DAG), FFA, and phospholipid content, their fractional synthetic rate (FSR) and degree of saturation, and gene expression. Insulin sensitivity was assessed using a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp. Net skeletal muscle glucose uptake was lower (p = 0.018) and peripheral insulin sensitivity tended to be reduced (p = 0.064) in IGT as compared to IFG subjects. Furthermore, IGT showed higher skeletal muscle extraction of VLDL-TAG (p = 0.043), higher muscle TAG content (p = 0.025), higher saturation of FFA (p = 0.004), lower saturation of TAG (p = 0.017) and a tendency towards a lower TAG FSR (p = 0.073) and a lower saturation of DAG (p = 0.059) versus IFG individuals. Muscle oxidative gene expression was lower in IGT subjects. In conclusion, increased liver-derived TAG extraction and reduced lipid turnover of saturated FA, rather than DAG content, in skeletal muscle accompany the more pronounced insulin resistance in IGT versus IFG subjects. PMID:26985905

  9. Adipose Tissue Dysfunction and Altered Systemic Amino Acid Metabolism Are Associated with Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Autio, Reija; Borra, Ronald; Ojanen, Xiaowei; Xu, Leiting; Törmäkangas, Timo; Alen, Markku

    2015-01-01

    Background Fatty liver is a major cause of obesity-related morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to identify early metabolic alterations associated with liver fat accumulation in 50- to 55-year-old men (n = 49) and women (n = 52) with and without NAFLD. Methods Hepatic fat content was measured using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H MRS). Serum samples were analyzed using a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) metabolomics platform. Global gene expression profiles of adipose tissues and skeletal muscle were analyzed using Affymetrix microarrays and quantitative PCR. Muscle protein expression was analyzed by Western blot. Results Increased branched-chain amino acid (BCAA), aromatic amino acid (AAA) and orosomucoid were associated with liver fat accumulation already in its early stage, independent of sex, obesity or insulin resistance (p<0.05 for all). Significant down-regulation of BCAA catabolism and fatty acid and energy metabolism was observed in the adipose tissue of the NAFLD group (p<0.001for all), whereas no aberrant gene expression in the skeletal muscle was found. Reduced BCAA catabolic activity was inversely associated with serum BCAA and liver fat content (p<0.05 for all). Conclusions Liver fat accumulation, already in its early stage, is associated with increased serum branched-chain and aromatic amino acids. The observed associations of decreased BCAA catabolism activity, mitochondrial energy metabolism and serum BCAA concentration with liver fat content suggest that adipose tissue dysfunction may have a key role in the systemic nature of NAFLD pathogenesis. PMID:26439744

  10. Fatty acid intake alters growth and immunity in milk-fed calves.

    PubMed

    Hill, T M; Vandehaar, M J; Sordillo, L M; Catherman, D R; Bateman, H G; Schlotterbeck, R L

    2011-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of supplementing milk replacer (MR) with NeoTec4 (Provimi North America, Brookville, OH), a commercially available blend of butyric acid, coconut oil, and flax oil, on calf growth, efficiency, and indices of immune function. In trial 1a, 48 male Holstein calves were fed either a control MR that contained only animal fat or the same MR with NeoTec4 (treatment) along with free-choice starter. The MR (28.7% crude protein, 15.6% fat) was fed at an average of 1 kg of dry matter (DM)/d. In trial 1b, weaned calves from trial 1a were all fed dry starter for 28 d without NeoTec4 (phase 1), and then half the calves were fed NeoTec4 for 28 d (phase 2). In trial 2, 40 male Holstein calves were fed a control MR with lard, coconut oil, and soy lecithin or the same MR supplemented with NeoTec4 (treatment). The MR (22.8% crude protein, 18.9% fat) was fed at an average of 1 kg of DM/d; no starter was fed. In trial 1a, NeoTec4 improved average daily gain, feed intake, and feed efficiency, reduced the number of days that calves experienced scours, and reduced the medical treatments for clostridium sickness. In trials 1a and 2, NeoTec4 altered the inflammatory response to vaccination with Pasteurella at 5 wk of age and to challenge with Salmonella toxin at less than 2 wk of age (fed NeoTec4 for 6 d), as observed by reduced hyperthermia and hypophagia, and altered the tumor necrosis factor-α response. In addition, NeoTec4 enhanced the response in IL-4 and globular protein estimates postchallenge and enhanced titers for bovine viral diarrhea and respiratory parainfluenza-3. Postchallenge serum concentrations of albumin were lower and urea nitrogen concentrations were greater in control calves than in calves fed NeoTec4. In trial 1b, performance did not differ during the first 28 d when no calves received NeoTec4, but calves receiving NeoTec4 in the second 28 d had greater average daily gain and feed efficiency. We conclude that

  11. Plasma omega 3 polyunsaturated fatty acid status and monounsaturated fatty acids are altered by chronic social stress and predict endocrine responses to acute stress in titi monkeys

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Disturbances in fatty acid (FA) metabolism may link chronic psychological stress, endocrine responsiveness, and psychopathology. Therefore, lipid metabolome-wide responses and their relationships with endocrine (cortisol; insulin; adiponectin) responsiveness to acute stress (AS) were assessed in a ...

  12. Dietary (n-6 : n-3) Fatty Acids Alter Plasma and Tissue Fatty Acid Composition in Pregnant Sprague Dawley Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kassem, Amira Abdulbari; Abu Bakar, Md Zuki; Yong Meng, Goh; Mustapha, Noordin Mohamed

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to study the effects of varying dietary levels of n-6 : n-3 fatty acid ratio on plasma and tissue fatty acid composition in rat. The treatment groups included control rats fed chow diet only, rats fed 50% soybean oil (SBO): 50% cod liver oil (CLO) (1 : 1), 84% SBO: 16% CLO (6 : 1), 96% SBO: 4% CLO (30 : 1). Blood samples were taken at day 15 of pregnancy, and the plasma and tissue were analyzed for fatty acid profile. The n-3 PUFA in plasma of Diet 1 : 1 group was significantly higher than the other diet groups, while the total n-6 PUFA in plasma was significantly higher in Diet 30 : 1 group as compared to the control and Diet 1 : 1 groups. The Diet 1 : 1 group showed significantly greater percentages of total n-3 PUFA and docosahexaenoic acid in adipose and liver tissue, and this clearly reflected the contribution of n-3 fatty acids from CLO. The total n-6 PUFA, linoleic acid, and arachidonic acid were significantly difference in Diet 30 : 1 as compared to Diet 1 : 1 and control group. These results demonstrated that the dietary ratio of n-6 : n-3 fatty acid ratio significantly affected plasma and tissue fatty acids profile in pregnant rat. PMID:22489205

  13. A comparative study of baby immature and adult shoots of Aloe vera on UVB-induced skin photoaging in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Eunson; Kim, Su Hyeon; Lee, Sarah; Lee, Choong Hwan; Do, Seon-Gil; Kim, Jinwan; Kim, Sun Yeou

    2013-12-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) irradiation induces photo-damage of the skin, which in turn causes depletion of the dermal extracellular matrix and chronic alterations in skin structure. Skin wrinkle formations are associated with collagen synthesis and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) expression. The production of type I procollagen is regulated by transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) expression; the activation of MMP is also correlated with an increase of interleukin-6 (IL-6). Aloe barbadensis M. (Aloe vera) is widely used in cosmetic and pharmaceutical products. In this study, we examined whether baby aloe shoot extract (BAE, immature aloe extract), which is from the one-month-old shoots of Aloe vera, and adult aloe shoot extract (AE), which is from the four-month-old shoots of Aloe vera, have a protective effect on UVB-induced skin photoaging in normal human dermal fibroblasts (NHDFs). The effects of BAE and AE on UVB-induced photoaging were tested by measuring the levels of reactive oxygen species, MMP-1, MMP-3, IL-6, type I procollagen, and TGF-β1 after UVB irradiation. We found that NHDF cells treated with BAE after UVB-irradiation suppressed MMP-1, MMP-3, and IL-6 levels compared to the AE-treated cells. Furthermore, BAE treatment elevated type I procollagen and TGF-β1 levels. Our results suggest that BAE may potentially protect the skin from UVB-induced damage more than AE.

  14. Altering the Mitochondrial Fatty Acid Synthesis (mtFASII) Pathway Modulates Cellular Metabolic States and Bioactive Lipid Profiles as Revealed by Metabolomic Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Clay, Hayley B.; Parl, Angelika K.; Mitchell, Sabrina L.; Singh, Larry; Bell, Lauren N.; Murdock, Deborah G.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the presence of a cytosolic fatty acid synthesis pathway, mitochondria have retained their own means of creating fatty acids via the mitochondrial fatty acid synthesis (mtFASII) pathway. The reason for its conservation has not yet been elucidated. Therefore, to better understand the role of mtFASII in the cell, we used thin layer chromatography to characterize the contribution of the mtFASII pathway to the fatty acid composition of selected mitochondrial lipids. Next, we performed metabolomic analysis on HeLa cells in which the mtFASII pathway was either hypofunctional (through knockdown of mitochondrial acyl carrier protein, ACP) or hyperfunctional (through overexpression of mitochondrial enoyl-CoA reductase, MECR). Our results indicate that the mtFASII pathway contributes little to the fatty acid composition of mitochondrial lipid species examined. Additionally, loss of mtFASII function results in changes in biochemical pathways suggesting alterations in glucose utilization and redox state. Interestingly, levels of bioactive lipids, including lysophospholipids and sphingolipids, directly correlate with mtFASII function, indicating that mtFASII may be involved in the regulation of bioactive lipid levels. Regulation of bioactive lipid levels by mtFASII implicates the pathway as a mediator of intracellular signaling. PMID:26963735

  15. Changing the omega-6 to omega-3 fatty acid ratio in sow diets alters serum, colostrum, and milk fatty acid profiles, but has minimal impact on reproductive performance.

    PubMed

    Eastwood, L; Leterme, P; Beaulieu, A D

    2014-12-01

    This experiment tested the hypothesis that reducing the omega-6 (n-6) to omega-3 (n-3) fatty acid (FA) ratio in sow diets will improve performance, characterized by increased litter size, decreased preweaning mortality, and improved growth performance. Second, we determined if the FA profile in sow and piglet blood, colostrum, and milk are altered when sows are fed diets with varied n-6:n-3 ratios and if the dietary FA ratio impacts circulating concentrations of IgG, IgA, eicosapentaenoic (EPA), or docosahexaenoic (DHA) acid. Sows (n=150) were assigned to 1 of 5 treatments (each divided into gestation and lactation diets) on d 80 of gestation. Period 1 (P1) is defined as d 80 of gestation to weaning and Period 2 (P2) refers to the subsequent breeding to weaning. Diets were wheat and barley based (5% crude fat) and treatments consisted of a control (tallow), 3 diets with plant oil-based n-6:n-3 ratios (9:1P, 5:1P, and 1:1P), and a 5:1 fish oil diet (5:1F). Litter size was unaffected by treatment during P1 and P2 (P>0.10). In P1, birth weight was unaffected by diet (P>0.10); however, weaning weight (P=0.019) and ADG from birth to weaning (P=0.011) were greatest for piglets born to 9:1P and 5:1P sows. During P2, 5:1F sows consumed 10% less feed during lactation (P=0.036), tended to have reduced piglet birth weights (P=0.052), and piglet weaning weight was reduced by 0.8 kg (P=0.040) relative to the other diets. Colostrum and piglet serum IgA and IgG concentrations were unaffected by diet (P>0.10). Serum n-3 FA were greatest in sows (P<0.01) consuming 1:1P and 5:1F diets and in their offspring (P=0.014). Serum α-linolenic acid (ALA) was greatest in 1:1P sows and EPA and DHA were greatest in 5:1F sows (P<0.01). In pre-suckle piglet serum, ALA did not differ among treatment groups (P>0.10). Relative to piglets of sows consuming the control diet, EPA was 2.5-fold greater in the 1:1P group and 4-fold greater in 5:1F group (P<0.01) before suckling. In post-suckle samples

  16. N-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids supplementation does not affect changes of lipid metabolism induced in rats by altered thyroid status.

    PubMed

    Rauchová, H; Vokurková, M; Pavelka, S; Behuliak, M; Tribulová, N; Soukup, T

    2013-07-01

    Epidemiological studies have demonstrated that n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) consumption is associated with a reduced risk of atherosclerosis and hyperlipidemia. It is well known that lipid metabolism is also influenced by thyroid hormones. The aim of our study was to test whether n-3 PUFA supplementation (200 mg/kg of body weight/day for 6 weeks given intragastrically) would affect lipid metabolism in Lewis male rats with altered thyroid status. Euthyroid, hypothyroid, and hyperthyroid status of experimental groups was well defined by plasma levels of triiodothyronine, the activity of liver mitochondrial glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, and by relative heart weight. Fasting blood glucose levels were significantly higher in the hyperthyroid compared to the euthyroid and hypothyroid rats (5.0±0.2 vs. 3.7±0.4 and 4.4±0.2 mmol/l, respectively). In hyperthyroid animals, the concentration of plasma postprandial triglycerides was also increased compared to euthyroid and hypothyroid rats (0.9±0.1 vs. 0.5±0.1 and 0.4±0.1 mmol/l, respectively). On the other hand, hypothyroidism compared to euthyroid and hyperthyroid status was associated with elevated plasma levels of total cholesterol (2.6±0.2 vs. 1.5±0.1 and 1.6±0.1 mmol/l, respectively), LDL cholesterol (0.9±0.1 vs. 0.4±0.1 and 0.2±0.1 mmol/l, respectively) as well as HDL cholesterol (1.6±0.1 vs. 1.0±0.1 and 1.3±0.1 mmol/l, respectively). Supplementation of n-3 PUFA in the present study did not significantly modify either relative heart weight or glucose and lipid levels in any thyroid status.

  17. Age and Haplotype Variations within FADS1 Interact and Associate with Alterations in Fatty Acid Composition in Human Male Cortical Brain Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Freemantle, Erika; Lalovic, Aleksandra; Mechawar, Naguib; Turecki, Gustavo

    2012-01-01

    Fatty acids (FA) play an integral role in brain function and alterations have been implicated in a variety of complex neurological disorders. Several recent genomic studies have highlighted genetic variability in the fatty acid desaturase (FADS1/2/3) gene cluster as an important contributor to FA alterations in serum lipids as well as measures of FA desaturase index estimated by ratios of relevant FAs. The contribution to alterations of FAs within the brain by local synthesis is still a matter of debate. Thus, the impact of genetic variants in FADS genes on gene expression and brain FA levels is an important avenue to investigate. Methods Analyses were performed on brain tissue from prefrontal cortex Brodmann area 47 (BA47) of 61 male subjects of French Canadian ancestry ranging in age from young adulthood to middle age (18–58 years old), with the exception of one teenager (15 years old). Haplotype tagging SNPs were selected using the publicly available HapMap genotyping dataset in conjunction with Haploview. DNA sequencing was performed by the Sanger method and gene expression was measured by quantitative real-time PCR. FAs in brain tissue were analysed by gas chromatography. Variants in the FADS1 gene region were sequenced and analyzed for their influence on both FADS gene expression and FAs in brain tissue. Results Our results suggest an association of the minor haplotype with alteration in estimated fatty acid desaturase activity. Analysis of the impact of DNA variants on expression and alternative transcripts of FADS1 and FADS2, however, showed no differences. Furthermore, there was a significant interaction between haplotype and age on certain brain FA levels. Discussion This study suggests that genetic variability in the FADS genes cluster, previously shown to be implicated in alterations in peripheral FA levels, may also affect FA composition in brain tissue, but not likely by local synthesis. PMID:22900039

  18. High-fat diet alters serum fatty acid profiles in obesity prone rats: implications for in-vitro studies

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tzu-Wen; Heden, Timothy D.; Morris, E. Matthew; Fritsche, Kevin L.; Vieira-Potter, Victoria J.; Thyfault, John P.

    2015-01-01

    High-fat diets (HFD) are commonly used in rodents to induce obesity, increase serum fatty acids, and induce lipotoxicity in various organs. In-vitro studies commonly utilize individual free fatty acids (FFA) to study lipid exposure in an effort to model what is occurring in-vivo, however, these approaches are not physiological as tissues are exposed to multiple fatty acids in-vivo. Here we characterize circulating lipids in obese-prone rats fed a HFD in both fasted and fed states with the goal of developing physiologically relevant fatty acid mixtures for subsequent in-vitro studies. Rats were fed a HFD (60% kcal fat) or a control diet (10% kcal fat) for 3 weeks; liver tissue, and both portal and systemic blood was collected. Fatty acid profiles and absolute concentrations of triglycerides (TAG) and FFA in the serum and TAG, diacylglycerol (DAG), and phospholipids (PL) in the liver were measured. Surprisingly, both systemic and portal serum TAG were ~40% lower in HFD-fed compared to controls. Overall, compared to the control diet, HFD feeding consistently induced an increase in the proportion of circulating polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) with a concomitant decline in monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA), and saturated fatty acids (SFA) in both serum TAG and FFA. The elevations of PUFA were mostly attributed to increases in n-6 PUFA, linoleic acid and arachidonic acid. In conclusion, fatty acid mixtures enriched with linoleic and arachidonic acid in addition to SFA and MUFA should be utilized for in-vitro studies attempting to model lipid exposures that occur during in-vivo HFD condition. PMID:26318121

  19. Alteration of organic matter during infaunal polychaete gut passage and links to sediment organic geochemistry. Part II: Fatty acids and aldoses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woulds, Clare; Middelburg, Jack J.; Cowie, Greg L.

    2014-07-01

    The activities of sediment-dwelling fauna are known to influence the rates of and pathways through which organic matter is cycled in marine sediments, and thus to influence eventual organic carbon burial or decay. However, due to methodological constraints, the role of faunal gut passage in determining the subsequent composition and thus degradability of organic matter is relatively little studied. Previous studies of organic matter digestion by benthic fauna have been unable to detect uptake and retention of specific biochemicals in faunal tissues, and have been of durations too short to fit digestion into the context of longer-term sedimentary degradation processes. Therefore this study aimed to investigate the aldose and fatty acid compositional alterations occurring to organic matter during gut passage by the abundant and ubiquitous polychaetes Hediste diversicolor and Arenicola marina, and to link these to longer-term changes typically observed during organic matter decay. This aim was approached through microcosm experiments in which selected polychaetes were fed with 13C-labelled algal detritus, and organisms, sediments, and faecal pellets were sampled at three timepoints over ∼6 weeks. Samples were analysed for their 13C-labelled aldose and fatty acid contents using GC-MS and GC-IRMS. Compound-selective net accumulation of biochemicals in polychaete tissues was observed for both aldoses and fatty acids, and the patterns of this were taxon-specific. The dominant patterns included an overall loss of glucose and polyunsaturated fatty acids; and preferential preservation or production of arabinose, microbial compounds (rhamnose, fucose and microbial fatty acids), and animal-synthesised fatty acids. These patterns may have been driven by fatty acid essentiality, preferential metabolism of glucose, and A. marina grazing on bacteria. Fatty acid suites in sediments from faunated microcosms showed greater proportions of saturated fatty acids and bacterial markers

  20. Plant fatty acid hydroxylases

    DOEpatents

    Somerville, Chris; Broun, Pierre; van de Loo, Frank

    2001-01-01

    This invention relates to plant fatty acyl hydroxylases. Methods to use conserved amino acid or nucleotide sequences to obtain plant fatty acyl hydroxylases are described. Also described is the use of cDNA clones encoding a plant hydroxylase to produce a family of hydroxylated fatty acids in transgenic plants. In addition, the use of genes encoding fatty acid hydroxylases or desaturases to alter the level of lipid fatty acid unsaturation in transgenic plants is described.

  1. Triglyceride accumulation and altered composition of triglyceride-associated fatty acids in the skin of tenascin-X-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Ken-ichi; Sato, Takashige; Oka, Seiko; Orba, Yasuko; Sawa, Hirofumi; Kabayama, Kazuya; Inokuchi, Jin-ichi; Ariga, Hiroyoshi

    2004-08-01

    Tenascin-X (TNX) is a member of the tenascin family of glycoproteins of the extracellular matrix. Here, we observed abnormalities in the skin of TNX-deficient mice in comparison with that of wild-type mice. Histological analysis with Oil Red O staining demonstrated that there was considerable accumulation of lipid in the skin of TNX-deficient (TNX-/-) mice. By thin-layer chromatography of total lipids, it was found that the level of triglyceride was significantly increased in TNX-/- mice. The mRNA levels of most of the lipogenic enzyme genes examined were remarkably increased in TNX-/- mice. By gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of triglyceride-associated fatty acids in the skin, saturated fatty acid palmitoic acid was decreased, whereas unsaturated fatty acids palmitoleic acid and oleic acid were increased in TNX-/- mice compared with those in wild-type mice. Conversely, fibroblast cell lines transfected with TNX showed a significant decrease in the amount of triglyceride. An increase in the saturated fatty acid stearic acid and decreases in the unsaturated fatty acids palmitoleic acid, oleic acid and linoleic acid, compared to those in mock-transfected cells were also caused by over-expression of TNX. These results indicate that TNX is involved in the regulation of triglyceride synthesis and the regulation of composition of triglyceride-associated fatty acids.

  2. Alteration of membrane fatty acid composition and inositol phosphate metabolism in HT-29 human colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Awad, A B; Fink, C S; Horvath, P J

    1993-01-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the role of membrane fatty acid (FA) composition on inositol phosphate (InsP) release by a human colon tumor cell line. Cells were supplemented for five days in culture with 0, 10, 30, or 100 microM sodium stearate (18:0), linoleate [18:2(omega-6)], or linolineate [18:3(omega-3)]. These FAs were supplied as a complex with FA-free bovine serum albumin. InsP release was examined in these cells with or without stimulation with deoxycholic acid (DCA) after they were labeled with [3H]myoinositol. FA enrichment was found to influence inositol incorporation into membrane lipids. Although 18:0 had no effect, 18:2(omega-6) decreased the incorporation. On the other hand, 18:3(omega-3) increased the incorporation of inositol compared with the cells supplemented with the other FAs, but they were not different from control. Basal release of total InsP was elevated only with supplementation of 10 and 30 microM 18:3(omega-3). FA supplementation with 18:0 at 30 microM and 18:2 at 30 and 100 microM resulted in downregulation of bsal release of InsP. Enrichment of HT-29 cell membranes with polyunsaturated FAs resulted in a significant increase in stimulated release of InsP, but this was not seen with saturated FA supplementation. At 10 microM supplementation, 18:2 had the greatest effect on stimulated InsP release. This effect of 18:2 disappeared at 30 microM. However, the increase in the stimulated InsP release caused by 18:3 occurred at 10 and 30 microM. DCA-stimulated release of InsP was not downregulated by any FA supplementation. This study showed that enrichment of the membranes with polyunsaturated FAs increases the response of the phosphatidylinositol cycle to DCA stimulation. In addition, enrichment with 18:3(omega-3) increases the basal turnover of InsP. It is concluded that alteration of membrane FAs has a profound effect on the phosphatidylinositol cycle.

  3. Altered Fatty Acid Metabolism-Related Gene Expression in Liver from Morbidly Obese Women with Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Auguet, Teresa; Berlanga, Alba; Guiu-Jurado, Esther; Martinez, Salomé; Porras, José Antonio; Aragonès, Gemma; Sabench, Fátima; Hernandez, Mercé; Aguilar, Carmen; Sirvent, Joan Josep; Del Castillo, Daniel; Richart, Cristóbal

    2014-01-01

    Lipid accumulation in the human liver seems to be a crucial mechanism in the pathogenesis and the progression of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). We aimed to evaluate gene expression of different fatty acid (FA) metabolism-related genes in morbidly obese (MO) women with NAFLD. Liver expression of key genes related to de novo FA synthesis (LXRα, SREBP1c, ACC1, FAS), FA uptake and transport (PPARγ, CD36, FABP4), FA oxidation (PPARα), and inflammation (IL6, TNFα, CRP, PPARδ) were assessed by RT-qPCR in 127 MO women with normal liver histology (NL, n = 13), simple steatosis (SS, n = 47) and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH, n = 67). Liver FAS mRNA expression was significantly higher in MO NAFLD women with both SS and NASH compared to those with NL (p = 0.003, p = 0.010, respectively). Hepatic IL6 and TNFα mRNA expression was higher in NASH than in SS subjects (p = 0.033, p = 0.050, respectively). Interestingly, LXRα, ACC1 and FAS expression had an inverse relation with the grade of steatosis. These results were confirmed by western blot analysis. In conclusion, our results indicate that lipogenesis seems to be downregulated in advanced stages of SS, suggesting that, in this type of extreme obesity, the deregulation of the lipogenic pathway might be associated with the severity of steatosis. PMID:25474087

  4. Skin Photoaging and the Role of Antioxidants in Its Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Pandel, Ruža; Poljšak, Borut

    2013-01-01

    Photoaging of the skin depends primarily on the degree of ultraviolet radiation (UVR) and on an amount of melanin in the skin (skin phototype). In addition to direct or indirect DNA damage, UVR activates cell surface receptors of keratinocytes and fibroblasts in the skin, which leads to a breakdown of collagen in the extracellular matrix and a shutdown of new collagen synthesis. It is hypothesized that dermal collagen breakdown is followed by imperfect repair that yields a deficit in the structural integrity of the skin, formation of a solar scar, and ultimately clinically visible skin atrophy and wrinkles. Many studies confirmed that acute exposure of human skin to UVR leads to oxidation of cellular biomolecules that could be prevented by prior antioxidant treatment and to depletion of endogenous antioxidants. Skin has a network of all major endogenous enzymatic and nonenzymatic protective antioxidants, but their role in protecting cells against oxidative damage generated by UV radiation has not been elucidated. It seems that skin's antioxidative defence is also influenced by vitamins and nutritive factors and that combination of different antioxidants simultaneously provides synergistic effect. PMID:24159392

  5. Deletions of the SACPD-C locus elevate seed stearic acid levels but also result in fatty acid and morphological alterations in nitrogen fixing nodules

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Soybean (Glycine max) seeds are the primary source of edible oil in the United States. Despite its widespread utility, soybean oil is oxidatively unstable. Until recently, the majority of soybean oil underwent chemical hydrogenation, a process which also generates trans fats. An alternative to chemical hydrogenation is genetic modification of seed oil through identification and introgression of mutant alleles. One target for improvement is the elevation of a saturated fat with no negative cardiovascular impacts, stearic acid, which typically constitutes a minute portion of seed oil (~3%). Results We examined radiation induced soybean mutants with moderately increased stearic acid (10-15% of seed oil, ~3-5 X the levels in wild-type soybean seeds) via comparative whole genome hybridization and genetic analysis. The deletion of one SACPD isoform encoding gene (SACPD-C) was perfectly correlated with moderate elevation of seed stearic acid content. However, SACPD-C deletion lines were also found to have altered nodule fatty acid composition and grossly altered morphology. Despite these defects, overall nodule accumulation and nitrogen fixation were unaffected, at least under laboratory conditions. Conclusions Although no yield penalty has been reported for moderate elevated seed stearic acid content in soybean seeds, our results demonstrate that genetic alteration of seed traits can have unforeseen pleiotropic consequences. We have identified a role for fatty acid biosynthesis, and SACPD activity in particular, in the establishment and maintenance of symbiotic nitrogen fixation. PMID:24886084

  6. Steroidogenesis in MA-10 Mouse Leydig Cells Is Altered via Fatty Acid Import into the Mitochondria1

    PubMed Central

    Rone, Malena B.; Midzak, Andrew S.; Martinez-Arguelles, Daniel B.; Fan, Jinjiang; Ye, Xiaoying; Blonder, Josip; Papadopoulos, Vassilios

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mitochondria are home to many cellular processes, including oxidative phosphorylation and fatty acid metabolism, and in steroid-synthesizing cells, they are involved in cholesterol import and metabolism, which is the initiating step in steroidogenesis. The formation of macromolecular protein complexes aids in the regulation and efficiency of these mitochondrial functions, though because of their dynamic nature, they are hard to identify. To overcome this problem, we used Blue-Native PAGE with whole-gel mass spectrometry on isolated mitochondria from control and hormone-treated MA-10 mouse tumor Leydig cells. The presence of multiple mitochondrial protein complexes was shown. Although these were qualitatively similar under control and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG)-stimulated conditions, quantitative differences in the components of the complexes emerged after hCG treatment. A prominent decrease was observed with proteins involved in fatty acid import into the mitochondria, implying that mitochondrial beta-oxidation is not essential for steroidogenesis. To confirm this observation, we inhibited fatty acid import utilizing the CPT1a inhibitor etomoxir, resulting in increased steroid production. Conversely, stimulation of mitochondrial beta-oxidation with metformin resulted in a dose-dependent reduction in steroidogenesis. These changes were accompanied by changes in mitochondrial respiration and in the lactic acid formed during glycolysis. Taken together, these results suggest that upon hormonal stimulation, mitochondria efficiently import cholesterol for steroid production at the expense of other lipids necessary for energy production, specifically fatty acids required for beta-oxidation. PMID:25210128

  7. Anti-photoaging effect of aaptamine in UVB-irradiated human dermal fibroblasts and epidermal keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-Ji; Woo, Seon Wook; Kim, Myung-Suk; Park, Ji-Eun; Hwang, Jae-Kwan

    2014-12-01

    Chronic exposure to ultraviolet (UV) irradiation causes sunburn, inflammatory responses, skin cancer, and photoaging. Photoaging, in particular, generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) that stimulate mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling and transcription factors. UV irradiation also activates matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) expression and inactivates collagen synthesis. Aaptamine, a marine alkaloid isolated from the marine sponge, has been reported to have antitumor, antimicrobial, antiviral, and antioxidant activities. However, the photo-protective effects of aaptamine have not been elucidated. In this study, our data demonstrated that aaptamine deactivated UVB-induced MAPK and activator protein-1 signaling by suppressing ROS, resulting in attenuating the expression of MMPs in UVB-irradiated human dermal fibroblasts. Aaptamine also decreased proinflammatory cytokines such as cyclooxygenase-2, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, and nuclear factor-kappa B subunits in UVB-irradiated human keratinocytes. In conclusion, we suggest that aaptamine represents a novel and effective strategy for treatment and prevention of photoaging.

  8. Spontaneous occurrence of photoageing-like phenotypes in the dorsal skin of old SAMP1 mice, an oxidative stress model.

    PubMed

    Sakura, Masaaki; Chiba, Yoichi; Kamiya, Emi; Furukawa, Ayako; Kawamura, Noriko; Niwa, Masanao; Takeuchi, Minoru; Hosokawa, Masanori

    2013-01-01

    Skin photoageing is a complex, multifactorial process and both intrinsic and extrinsic factors may contribute to its pathogenesis. The ultraviolet-irradiated hairless mouse has been used as an animal model for photoageing, but this model mimics only the 'extrinsic' aspects. Here, we show that skin from old SAMP1 mice, a model for higher oxidative stress and senescence acceleration, exhibited histological and gene expression changes similar to those in human photoaged skin without ultraviolet irradiation. These changes include an increase in elastic fibre and glycosaminoglycan histologically, an upregulation of several proinflammatory cytokines and matrix metalloproteinases, and an increase in lipid peroxide. We propose that SAMP1 mice are a spontaneous animal model for photoageing caused by an exaggerated intrinsic mechanism, namely, higher oxidative status. This mouse model is useful to explore the link between oxidative stress and photoageing, and to evaluate the efficacy of antioxidants.

  9. Beef Fat Enriched with Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Biohydrogenation Products Improves Insulin Sensitivity Without Altering Dyslipidemia in Insulin Resistant JCR:LA-cp Rats.

    PubMed

    Diane, Abdoulaye; Borthwick, Faye; Mapiye, Cletos; Vahmani, Payam; David, Rolland C; Vine, Donna F; Dugan, Michael E R; Proctor, Spencer D

    2016-07-01

    The main dietary sources of trans fatty acids are partially hydrogenated vegetable oils (PHVO), and products derived from polyunsaturated fatty acid biohydrogenation (PUFA-BHP) in ruminants. Trans fatty acid intake has historically been associated with negative effects on health, generating an anti-trans fat campaign to reduce their consumption. The profiles and effects on health of PHVO and PUFA-BHP can, however, be quite different. Dairy products naturally enriched with vaccenic and rumenic acids have many purported health benefits, but the putative benefits of beef fat naturally enriched with PUFA-BHP have not been investigated. The objective of the present experiment was to determine the effects of beef peri-renal fat (PRF) with differing enrichments of PUFA-BHP on lipid and insulin metabolism in a rodent model of dyslipidemia and insulin resistance (JCR:LA-cp rat). The results showed that 6 weeks of diet supplementation with beef PRF naturally enriched due to flaxseed (FS-PRF) or sunflower-seed (SS-PRF) feeding to cattle significantly improved plasma fasting insulin levels and insulin sensitivity, postprandial insulin levels (only in the FS-PRF) without altering dyslipidemia. Moreover, FS-PRF but not SS-PRF attenuated adipose tissue accumulation. Therefore, enhancing levels of PUFA-BHP in beef PRF with FS feeding may be a useful approach to maximize the health-conferring value of beef-derived fats. PMID:27072368

  10. Exposure to bioaccumulative organochlorine compounds alters adipogenesis, fatty acid uptake, and adipokine production in NIH3T3-L1 cells.

    PubMed

    Howell, George; Mangum, Lauren

    2011-02-01

    Exposure to the organochlorine compounds p,p'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE) and oxychlordane have been associated with an increased prevalence of diabetes. Although the exact etiology of diabetes, especially type 2 diabetes, is not known, it is thought that adipose dysfunction plays a vital role in the progression of this disease. Thus, the present study examined whether exposure to these bioaccumulative compounds promotes adipocyte dysfunction including alterations in adipogenesis, fatty acid storage, and adipokine production within the adipocyte. We employed the NIH3T3-L1 cell line as a model for adipogenesis and mature adipocyte function. Exposure to DDE or oxychlordane prior to and throughout differentiation did not affect adipogenesis. In mature NIH3T3-L1 adipocytes, exposure to oxychlordane, DDE, or dieldrin had no effect on insulin-stimulated fatty acid uptake but did increase basal fatty acid uptake over a 24 h period. There was no observed effect of exposure to these compounds on lipolysis. Exposure to DDE significantly increased the release of leptin, resistin, and adiponectin from mature adipocytes with corresponding increases in expression of resistin and adiponectin. Taken together, the current data suggest that exposure to these compounds, especially DDE, may promote some aspects of adipocyte dysfunction that are commonly associated with obesity and type 2 diabetes.

  11. Beef Fat Enriched with Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Biohydrogenation Products Improves Insulin Sensitivity Without Altering Dyslipidemia in Insulin Resistant JCR:LA-cp Rats.

    PubMed

    Diane, Abdoulaye; Borthwick, Faye; Mapiye, Cletos; Vahmani, Payam; David, Rolland C; Vine, Donna F; Dugan, Michael E R; Proctor, Spencer D

    2016-07-01

    The main dietary sources of trans fatty acids are partially hydrogenated vegetable oils (PHVO), and products derived from polyunsaturated fatty acid biohydrogenation (PUFA-BHP) in ruminants. Trans fatty acid intake has historically been associated with negative effects on health, generating an anti-trans fat campaign to reduce their consumption. The profiles and effects on health of PHVO and PUFA-BHP can, however, be quite different. Dairy products naturally enriched with vaccenic and rumenic acids have many purported health benefits, but the putative benefits of beef fat naturally enriched with PUFA-BHP have not been investigated. The objective of the present experiment was to determine the effects of beef peri-renal fat (PRF) with differing enrichments of PUFA-BHP on lipid and insulin metabolism in a rodent model of dyslipidemia and insulin resistance (JCR:LA-cp rat). The results showed that 6 weeks of diet supplementation with beef PRF naturally enriched due to flaxseed (FS-PRF) or sunflower-seed (SS-PRF) feeding to cattle significantly improved plasma fasting insulin levels and insulin sensitivity, postprandial insulin levels (only in the FS-PRF) without altering dyslipidemia. Moreover, FS-PRF but not SS-PRF attenuated adipose tissue accumulation. Therefore, enhancing levels of PUFA-BHP in beef PRF with FS feeding may be a useful approach to maximize the health-conferring value of beef-derived fats.

  12. Management of familial Mediterranean fever by colchicine does not normalize the altered profile of microbial long chain fatty acids in the human metabolome

    PubMed Central

    Ktsoyan, Zhanna A.; Beloborodova, Natalia V.; Sedrakyan, Anahit M.; Osipov, George A.; Khachatryan, Zaruhi A.; Manukyan, Gayane P.; Arakelova, Karine A.; Hovhannisyan, Alvard I.; Arakelyan, Arsen A.; Ghazaryan, Karine A.; Zakaryan, Magdalina K.; Aminov, Rustam I.

    2013-01-01

    In our previous works we established that in an autoinflammatory condition, familial Mediterranean fever (FMF), the gut microbial diversity is specifically restructured, which also results in the altered profiles of microbial long chain fatty acids (LCFAs) present in the systemic metabolome. The mainstream management of the disease is based on oral administration of colchicine to suppress clinical signs and extend remission periods and our aim was to determine whether this therapy normalizes the microbial LCFA profiles in the metabolome as well. Unexpectedly, the treatment does not normalize these profiles. Moreover, it results in the formation of new distinct microbial LCFA clusters, which are well separated from the corresponding values in healthy controls and FMF patients without the therapy. We hypothesize that the therapy alters the proinflammatory network specific for the disease, with the concomitant changes in gut microbiota and the corresponding microbial LCFAs in the metabolome. PMID:23373011

  13. Coriander leaf extract exerts antioxidant activity and protects against UVB-induced photoaging of skin by regulation of procollagen type I and MMP-1 expression.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Eunson; Lee, Do-Gyeong; Park, Sin Hee; Oh, Myung Sook; Kim, Sun Yeou

    2014-09-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation causes photodamage to the skin, which, in turn, leads to depletion of the dermal extracellular matrix and chronic alterations in skin structure. Skin wrinkles are associated with collagen synthesis and matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) activity. Coriandrum sativum L. (coriander leaf, cilantro; CS) has been used as a herbal medicine for the treatment of diabetes, hyperlipidemia, liver disease, and cancer. In this study, we examined whether CS ethanol extract (CSE) has protective effects against UVB-induced skin photoaging in normal human dermal fibroblasts (NHDF) in vitro and in the skin of hairless mice in vivo. The main component of CSE, linolenic acid, was determined by gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy. We measured the cellular levels of procollagen type I and MMP-1 using ELISA in NHDF cells after UVB irradiation. NHDF cells that were treated with CSE after UVB irradiation exhibited higher procollagen type I production and lower levels of MMP-1 than untreated cells. We found that the activity of transcription factor activator protein-1 (AP-1) was also inhibited by CSE treatment. We measured the epidermal thickness, dermal collagen fiber density, and procollagen type I and MMP-1 levels in photo-aged mouse skin in vivo using histological staining and western blot analysis. Our results showed that CSE-treated mice had thinner epidermal layers and denser dermal collagen fibers than untreated mice. On a molecular level, it was further confirmed that CSE-treated mice had lower MMP-1 levels and higher procollagen type I levels than untreated mice. Our results support the potential of C. sativum L. to prevent skin photoaging.

  14. Alteration of fatty acid profile and nucleotide-related substances in post-mortem breast meat of α-lipoic acid-fed broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Hamano, Y

    2016-08-01

    The present study was conducted to determine the effects of α-lipoic acid supplementation on post-mortem changes in the fatty acid profile and concentrations of nucleotide-related substances, especially those of a taste-active compound, inosine 5'-monophosphate, in chicken meat. Mixed-sex broiler chicks aged 14 d were divided into three groups of 16 birds each and were fed on diets supplemented with α-lipoic acid at levels of 0, 100 or 200 mg/kg for 4 weeks. Blood and breast muscle samples were taken at 42 d of age under the fed condition and then after fasting for 18 h. The breast muscle obtained from fasted chickens was subsequently refrigerated at 2°C for one and 3 d. α-Lipoic acid supplementation did not affect any plasma metabolite concentration independently of feeding condition, while a slight increase in plasma glucose concentration was shown with both administration levels of α-lipoic acid. In early post-mortem breast muscle under the fed condition, α-lipoic acid had no effect on concentrations of fatty acids or nucleotides of ATP, ADP, and AMP. In post-mortem breast tissues obtained from fasted chickens, total fatty acid concentrations were markedly increased by α-lipoic acid feeding at 200 mg/kg irrespective of length of refrigeration. This effect was dependent on stearic acid, oleic acid, linoleic acid and linolenic acid. However, among fatty acids, the only predominantly increased unsaturated fatty acid was oleic acid. Dietary supplementation with α-lipoic acid at 200 mg/kg increased the inosine 5'-monophosphate concentration in breast meat and, in contrast, reduced the subsequent catabolites, inosine and xanthine, regardless of the length of refrigeration. Therefore, the present study suggests that α-lipoic acid administration altered the fatty acid profile and improved meat quality by increasing taste-active substances in the post-mortem meat obtained from fasted chickens.

  15. Alterations in the fatty acid profile, antioxidant enzymes and protein pattern of Biomphalaria alexandrina snails exposed to the pesticides diazinon and profenfos.

    PubMed

    Bakry, Fayez A; El-Hommossany, Karem; Abd El-Atti, Mahmoud; Ismail, Somaya M

    2016-04-01

    The use of pesticides is widespread in agricultural activities. These pesticides may contaminate the irrigation and drainage systems during agriculture activities and pests' control and then negatively affect the biotic and a biotic component of the polluted water courses. The present study aimed to evaluate the effect of the pesticides diazinon and profenfos on some biological activities of Biomphalaria alexandrina snails such as fatty acid profile, some antioxidant enzymes (thioredoxin reductase (TrxR), sorbitol dehydrogenase (SDH), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) as well as glutathione reductase (GR) and lipid peroxidation (LP)) and protein patterns in snails' tissues exposed for 4 weeks to LC10 of diazinon and profenfos. The results showed that the two pesticides caused considerable reduction in survival rates and egg production of treated snails. Identification of fatty acid composition in snail tissues treated with diazinon and profenfos pesticides was carried out using gas-liquid chromatography (GLC). The results declared alteration in fatty acid profile, fluctuation in percentage of long chain and short chain fatty acid contributions either saturated or unsaturated ones, and a decrease in total lipid content in tissues of snails treated with these pesticides. The data demonstrate that there was a significant inhibition in the activities of tissues SOD, CAT, glutathione reductase (GR), TrxR, and SDH in tissues of treated snails, while a significant elevation was detected in LP as compared to the normal control. On the other hand, the electrophoretic pattern of total protein showed differences in number and molecular weights of protein bands due to the treatment of snails. It was concluded that the residues of diazinon and profenfos pesticides in aquatic environments have toxic effects onB. alexandrina snails.

  16. Elevated dairy fat intake in lactating women alters milk lipid and fatty acids without detectible changes in expression of genes related to lipid uptake or synthesis.

    PubMed

    Yahvah, Katherine M; Brooker, Sarah L; Williams, Janet E; Settles, Matthew; McGuire, Mark A; McGuire, Michelle K

    2015-03-01

    Previous work has demonstrated that elevated maternal lipid intake (particularly from dairy products) is associated with increased lipids and altered fatty acid profile in milk produced by healthy lactating women. To investigate our primary hypothesis that a maternal diet rich in full-fat dairy products would simultaneously increase milk lipid percent and expression of genes related to the uptake and/or de novo biosynthesis of milk lipids, we provided 15 lactating women with diets enriched in full-fat or nonfat dairy products for 14 days each in a randomized, crossover study with a 2-week washout period. Milk fat (%) was lower when women consumed the low-fat compared with the full-fat dairy diet (2.41% ± 0.31% vs 3.35% ± 0.28%, respectively; P < .05); concentrations of more than 20 fatty acids also differed. However, neither conservatively evaluated microarray data nor quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis uncovered any treatment effects on expression of genes related to lipid synthesis or uptake. These data suggest that alteration in gene expression in the lactating human mammary gland is likely not the primary mechanism by which consumption of a high-fat diet affects milk fat percent in healthy, lactating women.

  17. Cessation of daily exercise dramatically alters precursors of hepatic steatosis in Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) rats.

    PubMed

    Rector, R Scott; Thyfault, John P; Laye, Matthew J; Morris, R Tyler; Borengasser, Sarah J; Uptergrove, Grace M; Chakravarthy, Manu V; Booth, Frank W; Ibdah, Jamal A

    2008-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to delineate potential mechanisms initiating the onset of hepatic steatosis following the cessation of daily physical activity. Four-week-old, hyperphagic/obese Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty rats were given access to voluntary running wheels for 16 weeks to prevent the development of hepatic steatosis. The animals were then suddenly transitioned to a sedentary condition as wheels were locked (wheel lock; WL) for 5 h (WL5), 53 h (WL53) or 173 h (WL173). Importantly after the cessation of daily exercise (5-173 h), no changes occurred in body weight, fat pad mass (omental and retroperitoneal), food intake, serum insulin, hepatic triglycerides or in the exercise-suppressed hepatic stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1 and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma protein content. However, complete hepatic fatty acid oxidation and mitochondrial enzyme activities were highest at WL5 and WL53 and dropped significantly to SED levels by WL173. In addition, cessation of daily exercise quickly increased the hepatic protein contents of fatty acid synthase and acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase (ACC), reduced ACC phosphorylation status, and dramatically increased hepatic malonyl-CoA concentration. This study is the first to show that the sudden cessation of daily exercise in a hyperphagic/obese model activates a subgroup of precursors and processes known to initiate hepatic steatosis, including decreased hepatic mitochondrial oxidative capacity, increased hepatic expression of de novo lipogenesis proteins, and increased hepatic malonyl CoA levels; each probably increasing the susceptibility to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

  18. Supplementation of essential fatty acids to Holstein calves during late uterine life and first month of life alters hepatic fatty acid profile and gene expression.

    PubMed

    Garcia, M; Greco, L F; Lock, A L; Block, E; Santos, J E P; Thatcher, W W; Staples, C R

    2016-09-01

    Linoleic acid is an essential dietary fatty acid (FA). However, how the supplementation of linoleic acid during uterine and early life may modify the FA profile and transcriptome regulation of the liver, and performance of preweaned dairy calves is unknown. Our objective was to evaluate the effect of supplementation of essential FA to Holstein calves during late uterine and early life on their hepatic FA profile and global gene expression at 30 d of age. During the last 8 wk of pregnancy, Holstein cattle (n=96) were fed either no fat supplement (control), a saturated FA supplement enriched with C18:0, or an unsaturated FA supplement enriched with linoleic acid. Male calves (n=40) born from these dams were fed a milk replacer (MR) with either low (LLA) or high linoleic acid (HLA) concentration as the sole feedstuff during the first 30 d. Liver biopsy was performed at 30 d of age, and microarray analysis was performed on 18 liver samples. Total concentration of FA in liver were greater in calves fed LLA compared with those fed HLA MR (8.2 vs. 7.1%), but plasma concentrations of total FA did not differ due to MR diets. The FA profiles of plasma and liver of calves were affected differently by the prepartum diets. Specifically, the FA profile in liver was affected moderately by the feeding of fat prepartum, but the profiles did not differ due to the type of FA fed prepartum. The type of MR fed during the first 30 d of life had major effects on both plasma and liver FA profiles, resembling the type of fat fed. Plasma and liver of calves fed LLA MR had greater percentage of medium-chain FA (C12:0 and C14:0), whereas plasma and liver from calves fed HLA MR had greater percentages of linoleic and α-linolenic acids. Dams fed fat or a specific type of FA modified the expression of some genes in liver of calves, particularly those genes involved in biological functions and pathways related to upregulation of lipid metabolism and downregulation of inflammatory responses

  19. Supplementation of essential fatty acids to Holstein calves during late uterine life and first month of life alters hepatic fatty acid profile and gene expression.

    PubMed

    Garcia, M; Greco, L F; Lock, A L; Block, E; Santos, J E P; Thatcher, W W; Staples, C R

    2016-09-01

    Linoleic acid is an essential dietary fatty acid (FA). However, how the supplementation of linoleic acid during uterine and early life may modify the FA profile and transcriptome regulation of the liver, and performance of preweaned dairy calves is unknown. Our objective was to evaluate the effect of supplementation of essential FA to Holstein calves during late uterine and early life on their hepatic FA profile and global gene expression at 30 d of age. During the last 8 wk of pregnancy, Holstein cattle (n=96) were fed either no fat supplement (control), a saturated FA supplement enriched with C18:0, or an unsaturated FA supplement enriched with linoleic acid. Male calves (n=40) born from these dams were fed a milk replacer (MR) with either low (LLA) or high linoleic acid (HLA) concentration as the sole feedstuff during the first 30 d. Liver biopsy was performed at 30 d of age, and microarray analysis was performed on 18 liver samples. Total concentration of FA in liver were greater in calves fed LLA compared with those fed HLA MR (8.2 vs. 7.1%), but plasma concentrations of total FA did not differ due to MR diets. The FA profiles of plasma and liver of calves were affected differently by the prepartum diets. Specifically, the FA profile in liver was affected moderately by the feeding of fat prepartum, but the profiles did not differ due to the type of FA fed prepartum. The type of MR fed during the first 30 d of life had major effects on both plasma and liver FA profiles, resembling the type of fat fed. Plasma and liver of calves fed LLA MR had greater percentage of medium-chain FA (C12:0 and C14:0), whereas plasma and liver from calves fed HLA MR had greater percentages of linoleic and α-linolenic acids. Dams fed fat or a specific type of FA modified the expression of some genes in liver of calves, particularly those genes involved in biological functions and pathways related to upregulation of lipid metabolism and downregulation of inflammatory responses

  20. Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor–Mediated Induction of Stearoyl-CoA Desaturase 1 Alters Hepatic Fatty Acid Composition in TCDD-Elicited Steatosis

    PubMed Central

    Angrish, Michelle M.; Jones, A.D.; Harkema, Jack R.; Zacharewski, Timothy R.

    2011-01-01

    2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-ρ-dioxin (TCDD) induces hepatic dyslipidemia mediated by the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). Stearoyl-CoA desaturase 1 (Scd1) performs the rate-limiting step in monounsaturated fatty acid (MUFA) synthesis, desaturating 16:0 and 18:0 into 16:1n7 and 18:1n9, respectively. To further examine the role of Scd1 in TCDD-induced hepatotoxicity, comparative studies were performed in Scd1+/+ and Scd1−/− mice treated with 30 μg/kg TCDD. TCDD induced Scd1 activity, protein, and messenger RNA (mRNA) levels approximately twofold. In Scd1+/+ mice, hepatic effects were marked by increased vacuolization and inflammation and a 3.5-fold increase in serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels. Hepatic triglycerides (TRGs) were induced 3.9-fold and lipid profiling by gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy measured a 1.9-fold increase in fatty acid (FA) levels, consistent with the induction of lipid transport genes. Induction of Scd1 altered FA composition by decreasing saturated fatty acid (SFA) molar ratios 8% and increasing MUFA molar ratios 9%. Furthermore, ChIP-chip analysis revealed AhR enrichment (up to 5.7-fold), and computational analysis identified 16 putative functional dioxin response elements (DREs) within Scd1 genomic loci. Band shift assays confirmed AhR binding with select DREs. In Scd1−/− mice, TCDD induced minimal hepatic vacuolization and inflammation, while serum ALT levels remained unchanged. Although Scd1 deficiency attenuated TCDD-induced TRG accumulation, overall FA levels remained unchanged compared with Scd1+/+ mice. In Scd1−/− mice, TCDD induced SFA ratios 8%, reduced MUFA ratios 13%, and induced polyunsaturated fatty acid ratios 5% relative to treated Scd1+/+ mice. Collectively, these results suggest that AhR regulation of Scd1 not only alters lipid composition but also contributes to the hepatotoxicity of TCDD. PMID:21890736

  1. Ethanol extracts of chickpeas alter the total lipid content and expression levels of genes related to fatty acid metabolism in mouse 3T3-L1 adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Shinohara, Shigeo; Gu, Yuanjun; Yang, Ying; Furuta, Yasuo; Tanaka, Masahiko; Yue, Xiaohua; Wang, Weiqing; Kitano, Masaru; Kimura, Hiroshi

    2016-08-01

    Desi-type chickpeas, which have long been used as a natural treatment for diabetes, have been reported to lower visceral adiposity, dyslipidemia and insulin resistance induced by a chronic high-fat diet in rats. In this study, in order to examine the effects of chickpeas of this type in an in vitro system, we used the 3T3-L1 mouse cell line, a subclone of Swiss 3T3 cells, which can differentiate into cells with an adipocyte-like phenotype, and we used ethanol extracts of chickpeas (ECP) instead of chickpeas. Treatment of the 3T3-L1 cells with ECP led to a decrease in the lipid content in the cells. The desaturation index, defined as monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs)/saturated fatty acids (SFAs), was also decreased by ECP due to an increase in the cellular content of SFAs and a decrease in the content of MUFAs. The decrease in this index may reflect a decreased reaction from SFA to MUFA, which is essential for fat storage. To confirm this hypothesis, we conducted a western blot analysis, which revealed a reduction in the amount of stearoyl-CoA desaturase 1 (SCD1), a key enzyme catalyzing the reaction from SFA to MUFA. We observed simultaneous inactivations of enzymes participating in lipogenesis, i.e., liver kinase B1 (LKB1), acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) and AMPK, by phosphorylation, which may lead to the suppression of reactions from acetyl-CoA to SFA via malonyl-CoA in lipogenesis. We also investigated whether lipolysis is affected by ECP. The amount of carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 (CPT1), an enzyme important for the oxidation of fatty acids, was increased by ECP treatment. ECP also led to an increase in uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2), reported as a key protein for the oxidation of fatty acids. All of these results obtained regarding lipogenesis and fatty acid metabolism in our in vitro system are consistent with the results previously shown in rats. We also examined the effects on SCD1 and lipid contents of ethanol extracts of Kabuli

  2. Ethanol extracts of chickpeas alter the total lipid content and expression levels of genes related to fatty acid metabolism in mouse 3T3-L1 adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Shinohara, Shigeo; Gu, Yuanjun; Yang, Ying; Furuta, Yasuo; Tanaka, Masahiko; Yue, Xiaohua; Wang, Weiqing; Kitano, Masaru; Kimura, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Desi-type chickpeas, which have long been used as a natural treatment for diabetes, have been reported to lower visceral adiposity, dyslipidemia and insulin resistance induced by a chronic high-fat diet in rats. In this study, in order to examine the effects of chickpeas of this type in an in vitro system, we used the 3T3-L1 mouse cell line, a subclone of Swiss 3T3 cells, which can differentiate into cells with an adipocyte-like phenotype, and we used ethanol extracts of chickpeas (ECP) instead of chickpeas. Treatment of the 3T3-L1 cells with ECP led to a decrease in the lipid content in the cells. The desaturation index, defined as monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs)/saturated fatty acids (SFAs), was also decreased by ECP due to an increase in the cellular content of SFAs and a decrease in the content of MUFAs. The decrease in this index may reflect a decreased reaction from SFA to MUFA, which is essential for fat storage. To confirm this hypothesis, we conducted a western blot analysis, which revealed a reduction in the amount of stearoyl-CoA desaturase 1 (SCD1), a key enzyme catalyzing the reaction from SFA to MUFA. We observed simultaneous inactivations of enzymes participating in lipogenesis, i.e., liver kinase B1 (LKB1), acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) and AMPK, by phosphorylation, which may lead to the suppression of reactions from acetyl-CoA to SFA via malonyl-CoA in lipogenesis. We also investigated whether lipolysis is affected by ECP. The amount of carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 (CPT1), an enzyme important for the oxidation of fatty acids, was increased by ECP treatment. ECP also led to an increase in uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2), reported as a key protein for the oxidation of fatty acids. All of these results obtained regarding lipogenesis and fatty acid metabolism in our in vitro system are consistent with the results previously shown in rats. We also examined the effects on SCD1 and lipid contents of ethanol extracts of Kabuli-type chickpeas, which are

  3. Ethanol extracts of chickpeas alter the total lipid content and expression levels of genes related to fatty acid metabolism in mouse 3T3-L1 adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Shinohara, Shigeo; Gu, Yuanjun; Yang, Ying; Furuta, Yasuo; Tanaka, Masahiko; Yue, Xiaohua; Wang, Weiqing; Kitano, Masaru; Kimura, Hiroshi

    2016-08-01

    Desi-type chickpeas, which have long been used as a natural treatment for diabetes, have been reported to lower visceral adiposity, dyslipidemia and insulin resistance induced by a chronic high-fat diet in rats. In this study, in order to examine the effects of chickpeas of this type in an in vitro system, we used the 3T3-L1 mouse cell line, a subclone of Swiss 3T3 cells, which can differentiate into cells with an adipocyte-like phenotype, and we used ethanol extracts of chickpeas (ECP) instead of chickpeas. Treatment of the 3T3-L1 cells with ECP led to a decrease in the lipid content in the cells. The desaturation index, defined as monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs)/saturated fatty acids (SFAs), was also decreased by ECP due to an increase in the cellular content of SFAs and a decrease in the content of MUFAs. The decrease in this index may reflect a decreased reaction from SFA to MUFA, which is essential for fat storage. To confirm this hypothesis, we conducted a western blot analysis, which revealed a reduction in the amount of stearoyl-CoA desaturase 1 (SCD1), a key enzyme catalyzing the reaction from SFA to MUFA. We observed simultaneous inactivations of enzymes participating in lipogenesis, i.e., liver kinase B1 (LKB1), acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) and AMPK, by phosphorylation, which may lead to the suppression of reactions from acetyl-CoA to SFA via malonyl-CoA in lipogenesis. We also investigated whether lipolysis is affected by ECP. The amount of carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 (CPT1), an enzyme important for the oxidation of fatty acids, was increased by ECP treatment. ECP also led to an increase in uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2), reported as a key protein for the oxidation of fatty acids. All of these results obtained regarding lipogenesis and fatty acid metabolism in our in vitro system are consistent with the results previously shown in rats. We also examined the effects on SCD1 and lipid contents of ethanol extracts of Kabuli

  4. Protective effect of porphyra-334 on UVA-induced photoaging in human skin fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Jina; Park, Su-Jin; Kim, In-Hye; Choi, Youn Hee; Nam, Taek-Jeong

    2014-09-01

    The significant increase in life expectancy is closely related to the growing interest in the impact of aging on the function and appearance of the skin. Skin aging is influenced by several factors, and solar ultraviolet (UV) irradiation is considered one of the most important causes of skin photoaging. The aim of this study was to examine the anti-photoaging role of porphyra-334 from Porphyra (P.) yezoensis, a mycosporine-like amino acid (MAA), using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and electrospray ionization‑mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). In the present study, extracted UV‑absorbing compounds from P. yezoensis included palythine, asterina-330 and porphyra-334. Porphyra-334 was the most abundant MAA in P. yezoensis, and it was therefore used for conducting antiphotoaging experiments. The effect of porphyra-334 on the prevention of photoaging was investigated by measuring reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) levels, as well as extracellular matrix (ECM) components and protein expression in UVA‑irradiated human skin fibroblasts. Porphyra-334 suppressed ROS production and the expression of MMPs following UVA irradiation, while increasing levels of ECM components, such as procollagen, type I collagen, elastin. These results suggest that porphyra-334 has various applications in cosmetics and toiletries because of its anti‑photoaging activities and may serve as a novel anti-aging agent.

  5. A novel in vivo model for evaluating agents that protect against ultraviolet A-induced photoaging.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, T; Uitto, J; Bernstein, E F

    1998-04-01

    Increasing evidence demonstrates that ultraviolet A radiation (UVA) contributes to photoaging, which results in the accumulation of massive amounts of abnormal elastic material in the dermis of photoaged skin. To study UVA-induced photoaging in an in vivo system, we utilized a line of transgenic mice containing the human elastin promoter linked to a chloramphenicol acetyl transferase reporter gene. Our prior work demonstrates promoter activation in response to ultraviolet B radiation (UVB), UVA, and psoralen plus ultraviolet A radiation in the skin of these mice. The addition of psoralen (8-MOP) prior to administration of UVA results in substantial increases in promoter activation, as compared with UVA alone. To demonstrate the utility of these mice as a model of UVA-induced photodamage, we administered four lotions to the skin of our transgenic mice that included: a sunscreen containing octyl methoxycinnamate and benzophenone-3 with a sun protection factor (SPF) of 15, the UVA filter butyl methoxydibenzoylmethane, the SPF 15 sunscreen and the UVA filter together, and the lotion vehicle alone. Following sunscreen administration, mice received a single psoralen plus ultraviolet A radiation treatment. All sunscreens decreased chloramphenicol acetyl transferase activity with the SPF 15 sunscreen, the UVA filter, and the combination SPF 15 sunscreen and UVA filter, resulting in increasing degrees of protection against psoralen plus ultraviolet A radiation. These results demonstrate that this model functions as a rapid and sensitive model of UVA photodamage for the identification and comparison of compounds that protect against UVA-induced photoaging.

  6. Altered Fecal Microbiota Correlates with Liver Biochemistry in Nonobese Patients with Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Baohong; Jiang, Xiangyang; Cao, Min; Ge, Jianping; Bao, Qiongling; Tang, Lingling; Chen, Yu; Li, Lanjuan

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests a role of intestinal dysbiosis in obesity and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). But it remains unknown in nonobese NAFLD. This prospective, cross-sectional study sought to characterize differences in fecal microbiota between nonobese adult individuals with and without NAFLD and their potential association with metabolic markers of disease progression. A total of 126 nonobese subjects were enrolled: 43 NAFLD and 83 healthy controls (HC). The microbial community was profiled by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and examined by 454 pyrosequencing of the 16S ribosomal RNA V3 region. Lower diversity and a phylum-level change in the fecal microbiome were found in NAFLD. Compared with HC, patients had 20% more phylum Bacteroidetes (p = 0.005) and 24% less Firmicutes (p = 0.002). Within Firmicutes, four families and their 8 genera, which were short-chain fatty acids-producing and 7α-dehydroxylating bacteria, were significantly decreased. Moreover, Gram-negative (G−) bacteria were prevalent in NAFLD (p = 0.008). Furthermore, a significant correlation with metabolic markers was revealed for disturbed microbiota in NAFLD. This novel study indicated that intestinal dysbiosis was associated with nonobese NAFLD and might increase the risk of NAFLD progression. PMID:27550547

  7. Altered Fecal Microbiota Correlates with Liver Biochemistry in Nonobese Patients with Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Baohong; Jiang, Xiangyang; Cao, Min; Ge, Jianping; Bao, Qiongling; Tang, Lingling; Chen, Yu; Li, Lanjuan

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests a role of intestinal dysbiosis in obesity and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). But it remains unknown in nonobese NAFLD. This prospective, cross-sectional study sought to characterize differences in fecal microbiota between nonobese adult individuals with and without NAFLD and their potential association with metabolic markers of disease progression. A total of 126 nonobese subjects were enrolled: 43 NAFLD and 83 healthy controls (HC). The microbial community was profiled by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and examined by 454 pyrosequencing of the 16S ribosomal RNA V3 region. Lower diversity and a phylum-level change in the fecal microbiome were found in NAFLD. Compared with HC, patients had 20% more phylum Bacteroidetes (p = 0.005) and 24% less Firmicutes (p = 0.002). Within Firmicutes, four families and their 8 genera, which were short-chain fatty acids-producing and 7α-dehydroxylating bacteria, were significantly decreased. Moreover, Gram-negative (G-) bacteria were prevalent in NAFLD (p = 0.008). Furthermore, a significant correlation with metabolic markers was revealed for disturbed microbiota in NAFLD. This novel study indicated that intestinal dysbiosis was associated with nonobese NAFLD and might increase the risk of NAFLD progression. PMID:27550547

  8. Comparative effects of curcumin and its analog on alcohol- and polyunsaturated fatty acid-induced alterations in circulatory lipid profiles.

    PubMed

    Rukkumani, Rajagopalan; Aruna, Kode; Varma, Penumathsa Suresh; Rajasekaran, Kallikat Narayanan; Menon, Venugopal P

    2005-01-01

    Excessive alcohol intake induces hyperlipidemia. Studies suggest that natural principles and their analogs are known to possess anti-hyperlipidemic properties. In the present work we tested the effect of curcumin, an active principle of turmeric (Curcuma longa), and a curcumin analog on alcohol- and thermally oxidized polyunsaturated fatty acid (deltaPUFA)- induced hyperlipidemia. Male albino Wistar rats were used for the experimental study. Anti-hyperlipidemic activity of curcumin and curcumin analog was evaluated by analyzing the levels of cholesterol, triglycerides (TGs), phospholipids (PLs), and free fatty acids (FFAs). The results showed that the levels of cholesterol, TGs, PLs, and FFAs were increased significantly in alcohol-, deltaPUFA-, and alcohol + deltaPUFA-treated groups, which were brought down significantly on treatment with either of the curcuminoids. Curcumin analog treatment was found to be more effective than curcumin treatment. From the results obtained, we conclude that both curcumin and its analog effectively protect the system against alcohol- and deltaPUFA-induced hyperlipidemia and are possible candidates for the treatment of hyperlipidemia.

  9. Protection against Myocardial Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury at Onset of Type 2 Diabetes in Zucker Diabetic Fatty Rats Is Associated with Altered Glucose Oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Povlsen, Jonas Agerlund; Løfgren, Bo; Dalgas, Christian; Birkler, Rune Isak Dupont; Johannsen, Mogens; Støttrup, Nicolaj Brejnholt; Bøtker, Hans Erik

    2013-01-01

    Background Inhibition of glucose oxidation during initial reperfusion confers protection against ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury in the heart. Mitochondrial metabolism is altered with progression of type 2 diabetes (T2DM). We hypothesized that the metabolic alterations present at onset of T2DM induce cardioprotection by metabolic shutdown during IR, and that chronic alterations seen in late T2DM cause increased IR injury. Methods Isolated perfused hearts from 6 (prediabetic), 12 (onset of T2DM) and 24 (late T2DM) weeks old male Zucker diabetic fatty rats (ZDF) and their age-matched heterozygote controls were subjected to 40 min ischemia/120 min reperfusion. IR injury was assessed by TTC-staining. Myocardial glucose metabolism was evaluated by glucose tracer kinetics (glucose uptake-, glycolysis- and glucose oxidation rates), myocardial microdialysis (metabolomics) and tissue glycogen measurements. Results T2DM altered the development in sensitivity towards IR injury compared to controls. At late diabetes ZDF hearts suffered increased damage, while injury was decreased at onset of T2DM. Coincident with cardioprotection, oxidation of exogenous glucose was decreased during the initial and normalized after 5 minutes of reperfusion. Metabolomic analysis of citric acid cycle intermediates demonstrated that cardioprotection was associated with a reversible shutdown of mitochondrial glucose metabolism during ischemia and early reperfusion at onset of but not at late type 2 diabetes. Conclusions The metabolic alterations of type 2 diabetes are associated with protection against IR injury at onset but detrimental effects in late diabetes mellitus consistent with progressive dysfunction of glucose oxidation. These findings may explain the variable efficacy of cardioprotective interventions in individuals with type 2 diabetes. PMID:23704975

  10. Intrauterine metabolic programming alteration increased susceptibility to non-alcoholic adult fatty liver disease in prenatal caffeine-exposed rat offspring.

    PubMed

    Wang, Linlong; Shen, Lang; Ping, Jie; Zhang, Li; Liu, Zhongfen; Wu, Yong; Liu, Yansong; Huang, Hegui; Chen, Liaobin; Wang, Hui

    2014-01-30

    An increase in susceptibility to metabolic syndromes (MetS) in rat offspring that experienced prenatal caffeine exposure (PCE) has been previously demonstrated. The present study aimed to clarify this increased susceptibility and elucidate the mechanism of foetal origin that causes or contributes to adult non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) as a result of PCE. Based on the results from both foetal and adult studies of rats that experienced PCE (120 mg/kgd), the foetal weight and serum triglyceride levels decreased significantly and hepatocellular ultrastructure was altered. Foetal livers exhibited inhibited insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), enhanced lipogenesis and reduced lipid output. In adult female offspring of PCE+lab chow, lipid synthesis, oxidation and output were enhanced, whereas lipogenesis was inhibited in their male conterparters. Furthermore, in adult offspring of PCE+ high-fat diet, catch-up growth appeared obvious with enhanced hepatic IGF-1, especially in females. Both males and females showed increased lipid synthesis and reduced output, which were accompanied by elevated serum triglyceride. Severe NAFLD appeared with higher Kleiner scores. Gluconeogenesis was continuously enhanced in females. Therefore, increased susceptibility to diet-induced NAFLD in PCE offspring was confirmed, and it appears to be mediated by intrauterine glucose and alterations in lipid metabolic programming. This altered programming enhanced foetal hepatic lipogenesis and reduced lipid output in utero, which continued into the postnatal phase and reappeared in adulthood with the introduction of a high-fat diet, thereby aggravating hepatic lipid accumulation and causing NAFLD.

  11. The combined action of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and grape proanthocyanidins on a rat model of diet-induced metabolic alterations.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Romero, Sara; Molinar-Toribio, Eunice; Pérez-Jiménez, Jara; Taltavull, Núria; Dasilva, Gabriel; Romeu, Marta; Medina, Isabel; Torres, Josep Lluís

    2016-08-10

    It has been suggested that food components such as ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω-3 PUFAs) and (poly)phenols counteract diet-induced metabolic alterations by common or complementary mechanisms. To examine the effects of a combination of ω-3 PUFAs and (poly)phenols on such alterations, adult Wistar-Kyoto rats were fed an obesogenic high-fat high-sucrose diet supplemented, or not, for 24 weeks with: eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA)/docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) 1 : 1 (16.6 g kg(-1) feed); proanthocyanidin-rich grape seed extract (GSE, 0.8 g kg(-1) feed); or EPA/DHA 1 : 1 + GSE. Body weight, feed intake, and plasma glucose were evaluated every 6 weeks, while adipose tissue weight, insulin, glucagon, ghrelin, leptin, adiponectin, cholesterol, and triglycerides were evaluated at the end of the experiment. ω-3 PUFAs reduced plasma leptin and cholesterol levels, but did not modify diet-induced perigonadal fat or plasma insulin levels; while GSE increased plasma triglyceride levels. The combined action of ω-3 PUFAs and the proanthocyanidins reduced plasma insulin and leptin, as well as partially prevented perigonadal fat accumulation. While separate supplementation with ω-3 PUFAs or grape proanthocyanidins may not counteract all the key metabolic changes induced by a high-energy-dense diet, the combination of both supplements reverts altered insulin, leptin and triglyceride levels to normal. PMID:27418399

  12. Dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids suppress acute hepatitis, alter gene expression and prolong survival of female Long-Evans Cinnamon rats, a model of Wilson disease.

    PubMed

    Du, Chunyan; Fujii, Yoichi; Ito, Masafumi; Harada, Manabu; Moriyama, Emiko; Shimada, Ryo; Ikemoto, Atsushi; Okuyama, Harumi

    2004-05-01

    In the Long-Evans Cinnamon rat, copper accumulates in the liver because of a mutation in the copper-transporting ATPase gene, and peroxidative stresses are supposed to be augmented. We examined the effects of dietary fatty acids on hepatitis, hepatic gene expression, and survival. Rats were fed a conventional, low-fat diet (CE2), a CE2 diet supplemented with 10 wt% of lard (Lar), high-linoleic soybean oil (Soy), or a mixture of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)-rich fish oil and soybean oil (DHA/Soy). Among female rats, the mean survival times of the DHA/Soy and the Soy groups were longer by 17 approximately 20% than in the Lar and the CE2 groups. Among male rats, the survival times were much longer than in the females, but no significant difference in survival was observed among the dietary groups. Serum ceruloplasmin levels in female and male rats of all of the dietary groups were similar. Serum transaminase levels of the DHA/Soy group tended to be lower than in the CE2 group. Histological examinations revealed a marked degeneration in hepatic tissue integrity in the Lar and CE2 groups but not in the DHA/Soy group. Hepatic levels of metal-related genes, transferrin and ceruloplasmin, as well as those related to bile acid synthesis were up-regulated, and an inflammation-related gene (cyclooxygenase [COX]-2) was down-regulated in the DHA/Soy group. Some proliferation-related genes were also affected by the dietary fatty acids. These results indicate that polyunsaturated fatty acids suppress the development of acute hepatitis and prolong survival in females, regardless of whether they are of the n-6 or n-3 type, which are associated with altered gene expressions.

  13. High Fat Diet Administration during Specific Periods of Pregnancy Alters Maternal Fatty Acid Profiles in the Near-Term Rat.

    PubMed

    Cerf, Marlon E; Herrera, Emilio

    2016-01-01

    Excessive fat intake is a global health concern as women of childbearing age increasingly ingest high fat diets (HFDs). We therefore determined the maternal fatty acid (FA) profiles in metabolic organs after HFD administration during specific periods of gestation. Rats were fed a HFD for the first (HF1), second (HF2), or third (HF3) week, or for all three weeks (HFG) of gestation. Total maternal plasma non-esterified fatty acid (NEFA) concentrations were monitored throughout pregnancy. At day 20 of gestation, maternal plasma, liver, adipose tissue, and placenta FA profiles were determined. In HF3 mothers, plasma myristic and stearic acid concentrations were elevated, whereas docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) was reduced in both HF3 and HFG mothers. In HF3 and HFG mothers, hepatic stearic and oleic acid proportions were elevated; conversely, DHA and linoleic acid (LA) proportions were reduced. In adipose tissue, myristic acid was elevated, whereas DHA and LA proportions were reduced in all mothers. Further, adipose tissue stearic acid proportions were elevated in HF2, HF3, and HFG mothers; with oleic acid increased in HF1 and HFG mothers. In HF3 and HFG mothers, placental neutral myristic acid proportions were elevated, whereas DHA was reduced. Further, placental phospholipid DHA proportions were reduced in HF3 and HFG mothers. Maintenance on a diet, high in saturated fat, but low in DHA and LA proportions, during late or throughout gestation, perpetuated reduced DHA across metabolic organs that adapt during pregnancy. Therefore a diet, with normal DHA proportions during gestation, may be important for balancing maternal FA status.

  14. Alteration of the lipid composition of rat testicular plasma membranes by dietary (n-3) fatty acids changes the responsiveness of Leydig cells and testosterone synthesis.

    PubMed

    Sebokova, E; Garg, M L; Wierzbicki, A; Thomson, A B; Clandinin, M T

    1990-06-01

    Experiments were conducted to assess whether changing dietary fat composition altered phospholipid composition of rat testicular plasma membranes in a manner that altered receptor-mediated action of luteinizing hormone (LH)/human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG). Weanling rats were fed diets that provided high or low cholesterol intakes and that were enriched with linseed oil, fish oil or beef tallow for 4 wk. Feeding diets high in (n-3) fatty acids decreased plasma and testicular plasma membrane 20:4(n-6) content. A marked reduction of the 22:5(n-6) content and an increase in the 22:6(n-3) content of testicular plasma membrane was found only in animals fed fish oil. A decrease in binding capacity of the gonadotropin (LH/hCG) receptor in the plasma membrane, with no change in receptor affinity, was observed for animals fed either linseed oil or fish oil diets. Dietary treatments that raised plasma membrane cholesterol content and the cholesterol to phospholipid ratio in the membrane were associated with increased binding capacity of the gonadotropin receptor. Feeding diets high in 18:3(n-3) vs. those high in fish oil altered receptor-mediated adenylate cyclase activity in a manner that depended on the level of dietary cholesterol. Feeding diets high in cholesterol or fish oil increased basal and LH-stimulated testosterone synthesis relative to that in animals fed the low cholesterol diet containing linseed oil. It is concluded that changing the fat composition of the diet alters the phospholipid composition of rat testicular plasma membranes and that this change in composition influences membrane-mediated unmasking of gonadotropin receptor-mediated action in testicular tissue. PMID:2352035

  15. Metabolic programming mediated by an essential fatty acid alters body composition and survival skills of a marine fish.

    PubMed

    Fuiman, Lee A; Perez, Kestrel O

    2015-11-22

    Metabolic programming occurs when variations in nutrition during a specific developmental window result in long-term metabolic effects. It has been studied almost exclusively in humans and other mammals but never in an ecological context. Here, we report metabolic programming and its functional consequences in a marine fish, red drum. We demonstrate that maternal provisioning of eggs with an essential fatty acid, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), varies with DHA content of the maternal diet. When offspring are reared on a DHA-replete diet, whole-body DHA content of offspring depends upon the amount of DHA that was in the egg. We further demonstrate that whole-body DHA content is correlated with traits related to offspring fitness (escape responses, routine swimming, growth, and survival). DHA content of red drum eggs produced in nature is in the range where the effects of metabolic programming are most pronounced. Our findings indicate that during a brief developmental window, DHA plays a role in establishing the metabolic capacity for its own uptake or storage, with protracted and possibly permanent effects on ecologically important survival skills of individuals and important implications for dynamics of populations and food webs.

  16. Metabolic programming mediated by an essential fatty acid alters body composition and survival skills of a marine fish.

    PubMed

    Fuiman, Lee A; Perez, Kestrel O

    2015-11-22

    Metabolic programming occurs when variations in nutrition during a specific developmental window result in long-term metabolic effects. It has been studied almost exclusively in humans and other mammals but never in an ecological context. Here, we report metabolic programming and its functional consequences in a marine fish, red drum. We demonstrate that maternal provisioning of eggs with an essential fatty acid, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), varies with DHA content of the maternal diet. When offspring are reared on a DHA-replete diet, whole-body DHA content of offspring depends upon the amount of DHA that was in the egg. We further demonstrate that whole-body DHA content is correlated with traits related to offspring fitness (escape responses, routine swimming, growth, and survival). DHA content of red drum eggs produced in nature is in the range where the effects of metabolic programming are most pronounced. Our findings indicate that during a brief developmental window, DHA plays a role in establishing the metabolic capacity for its own uptake or storage, with protracted and possibly permanent effects on ecologically important survival skills of individuals and important implications for dynamics of populations and food webs. PMID:26582018

  17. Nitrogen Deprivation Induces Lipid Droplet Accumulation and Alters Fatty Acid Metabolism in Symbiotic Dinoflagellates Isolated from Aiptasia pulchella

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, Li-Chi; Pasaribu, Buntora; -Ping Lin, I.; Tsai, Ching-Hsiu; Chen, Chii-Shiarng; Jiang, Pei-Luen

    2014-07-01

    The stability of cnidarian-dinoflagellate (genus Symbiodinium spp.) endosymbioses depends on the regulation of nutrient transport between Symbiodinium populations and their hosts. Previously, we successfully induced the production of lipid droplets in the free-living cultured Symbiodinium (clade B) under the nitrogen-deprivation condition for 5 days. Therefore, the present study aimed at understanding the disruption of the endosymbiotic relationship between the cnidarians and dinoflagellates by nitrogen deprivation using Aiptasia pulchella as an example. Transmission electron micrographs revealed the formation of lipid droplets induced by nitrogen deprivation, and the lipid analyses further showed that polyunsaturated fatty acids were drastically enriched in Symbiodinium after 30 days of nitrogen deprivation, although these were unaffected after 5 days of nitrogen starvation. The present study also suggested that the host provided nitrogen to the symbiotic cells during short-term environmental stress. However, the relationship started to deteriorate after 30 days. These findings provide a more detailed understanding of the mechanisms of the symbiotic relationship between the symbiotic dinoflagellates in terms of the nitrogen source, which might provide more information for the explanation of the regulatory mechanism underlying endosymbiotic associations.

  18. Metabolomic analysis reveals decreased skeletal muscle amino acid content and altered fatty acid handling in obese humans

    PubMed Central

    Koves, Timothy R.; Ilkayeva, Olga R.; Muoio, Deborah M.; Houmard, Joseph A.; Friedman, Jacob E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Investigate the effects of obesity and high fat diet (HFD) exposure on fatty acid oxidation and TCA cycle intermediates and amino acids in skeletal muscle to better characterize energy metabolism. Design and Methods Plasma and skeletal muscle metabolomic profiles were measured from lean and obese males before and after a 5 day HFD in the 4h post-prandial condition. Results At both time points, plasma short-chain acylcarnitine species (SCAC) were higher in the obese subjects, while the amino acids glycine, histidine, methionine, and citrulline were lower in skeletal muscle of obese subjects. Skeletal muscle medium-chain acylcarnitines (MCAC) C6, C8, C10:2, C10:1, C10, and C12:1 increased in obese subjects, but decreased in lean subjects, from Pre- to Post-HFD. Plasma content of C10:1 was also decreased in lean, but increased in the obese subjects from Pre- to Post-HFD. CD36 increased from Pre- to Post-HFD in obese but not lean subjects. Conclusions Lower skeletal muscle amino acid content and accumulation of plasma SCAC in obese subjects could reflect increased anaplerosis for TCA cycle intermediates, while accumulation of MCAC suggests limitations in β-oxidation. These measures may be important markers of or contributors to dysregulated metabolism observed in skeletal muscle of obese humans. PMID:25864501

  19. Functional MC1R-gene variants are associated with increased risk for severe photoaging of facial skin.

    PubMed

    Elfakir, Anissa; Ezzedine, Khaled; Latreille, Julie; Ambroisine, Laurence; Jdid, Randa; Galan, Pilar; Hercberg, Serge; Gruber, Florian; Malvy, Denis; Tschachler, Erwin; Guinot, Christiane

    2010-04-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the association between melanocortin-1 receptor (MC1R) variants and the severity of facial skin photoaging. The study population comprised 530 middle-aged French women. A trained dermatologist graded the severity of facial skin photoaging from photographs using a global scale. Logistic regressions were performed to assess the influence of MC1R polymorphisms on severe photoaging with adjustment for possible confounders (demographic and phenotypic data and sun exposure intensity). Among the fifteen MC1R variants identified, the nine most common were V60L, V92M, R151C, R160W, R163Q, R142H, D294H, D84E, and I155T. One hundred and eighty-five individuals (35%) were WT homozygotes, 261 (49%) had one common variant, 78 (15%) had two common variants, and six (1%) had at least one rare variant. After adjustment for possible confounders, the presence of two common variants was already a risk factor for severe photoaging (AOR (95% confidence interval): 2.33 (1.17-4.63)). This risk reached 5.61 (1.43-21.96) when two major diminished-function variants were present. Surprisingly, the minor variant, V92M, was associated with increased risk of photoaging (2.57 (1.23-5.35)). Our results suggest that genetic variations of MC1R are important determinants for severe photoaging.

  20. Rat neural stem cell proliferation and differentiation are durably altered by the in utero polyunsaturated fatty acid supply.

    PubMed

    Goustard-Langelier, Bénédicte; Koch, Mélanie; Lavialle, Monique; Heberden, Christine

    2013-01-01

    We isolated neural stem cells/neural progenitors (NSC) from 1-day-old rat pups born to mothers fed diets that were deficient or supplemented with n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and compared their proliferation and differentiation in vitro. The cells isolated from the n-3PUFA-deficient pups consistently proliferated more slowly than cells that were isolated from n-3PUFA-supplemented pups, despite the fact that both were cultured under the same conditions. The differences in the proliferation rates were evaluated up until 40 days of culture and were highly significant. When the cells were allowed to differentiate, the deficient cells exhibited a higher degree of neuronal maturation in response to the addition of PUFAs in the medium, as demonstrated by an increase in neurite length, whereas the neurons derived from the supplemented pups showed no change. This result was consistent, regardless of the age of the culture. The properties of the NSC were durably modified throughout the length of the culture, although the membrane phospholipid compositions were similar. We examined the differential expression of selected mRNAs and micro RNAs. We found significant differences in the gene expression of proliferating and differentiating cells, and a group of genes involved in neurogenesis was specifically modified by n-3 PUFA treatment. We conclude that n-3 PUFA levels in the maternal diet can induce persistent modifications of the proliferation and differentiation of NSCs and of their transcriptome. Therefore, the n-3 supply received in utero may condition on a long-term basis cell renewal in the brain.

  1. Nonesterified Fatty Acid-Induced Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in Cattle Cumulus Oocyte Complexes Alters Cell Metabolism and Developmental Competence.

    PubMed

    Sutton-McDowall, Melanie L; Wu, Linda L Y; Purdey, Malcolm; Abell, Andrew D; Goldys, Ewa M; MacMillan, Keith L; Thompson, Jeremy G; Robker, Rebecca L

    2016-01-01

    Reduced oocyte quality has been associated with poor fertility of high-performance dairy cows during peak lactation, due to negative energy balance. We examined the role of nonesterified fatty acids (NEFAs), known to accumulate within follicular fluid during under- and overnutrition scenarios, in causing endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress of in vitro maturated cattle cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs). NEFA concentrations were: palmitic acid (150 μM), oleic acid (200 μM), and steric acid (75 μM). Abattoir-derived COCs were randomly matured for 24 h in the presence of NEFAs and/or an ER stress inhibitor, salubrinal. Total and hatched blastocyst yields were negatively impacted by NEFA treatment compared with controls, but this was reversed by salubrinal. ER stress markers, activating transcription factor 4 (Atf4) and heat shock protein 5 (Hspa5), but not Atf6, were significantly up-regulated by NEFA treatment within whole COCs but reversed by coincubation with salubrinal. Likewise, glucose uptake and lactate production, measured in spent medium samples, showed a similar pattern, suggesting that cumulus cell metabolism is sensitive to NEFAs via an ER stress-mediated process. In contrast, while mitochondrial DNA copy number was recovered in NEFA-treated oocytes, oocyte autofluorescence of the respiratory chain cofactor, FAD, was lower following NEFA treatment of COCs, and this was not reversed by salubrinal, suggesting the negative impact was via reduced mitochondrial function. These results reveal the significance of NEFA-induced ER stress on bovine COC developmental competence, revealing a potential therapeutic target for improving oocyte quality during peak lactation. PMID:26658709

  2. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids enrichment alters performance and immune response in infectious bursal disease challenged broilers

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Infectious bursal disease (IBD) results in economic loss due to mortality, reduction in production efficiency and increasing the usage of antibiotics. This study was carried out to investigate the modulatory roles of dietary n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) enrichment in immune response and performance of IBD challenged broiler chickens. Methods A total of 300 day old male broiler chicks were assigned to four dietary n-3 PUFA ascending levels as the treatment groups (T1: 0.5; T2: 8.0; T3: 11.5; T4: 16.5) using combinations of tuna oil and sunflower oil. All diets were isocaloric and isonitrogenous. On day 28, all birds were challenged with IBD virus. Antibody titer, cytokine production, bursa lesion pre and post-challenge and lymphoid organ weight were recorded. Results On d 42 the highest body weight was observed in the T2 and T3 and the lowest in T4 chickens. Feed conversion ratio of the T2 broilers was significantly better than the other groups. Although productive parameters were not responded to the dietary n-3 PUFA in a dose-dependent manner, spleen weight, IBD and Newcastle disease antibody titers and IL-2 and IFN-γ concentrations were constantly elevated by n-3 PUFA enrichment. Conclusions Dietary n-3 PUFA enrichment may improve the immune response and IBD resistance, but the optimum performance does not coincide with the optimum immune response. It seems that dietary n-3 PUFA modulates the broiler chicken performance and immune response in a dose-dependent manner. Thus, a moderate level of dietary n-3 PUFA enrichment may help to put together the efficiency of performance and relative immune response enhancement in broiler chickens. PMID:22273277

  3. Intake of a Western diet containing cod instead of pork alters fatty acid composition in tissue phospholipids and attenuates obesity and hepatic lipid accumulation in mice.

    PubMed

    Liisberg, Ulrike; Fauske, Kristin Røen; Kuda, Ondrej; Fjære, Even; Myrmel, Lene Secher; Norberg, Nina; Frøyland, Livar; Graff, Ingvild Eide; Liaset, Bjørn; Kristiansen, Karsten; Kopecky, Jan; Madsen, Lise

    2016-07-01

    The content of the marine n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) is far lower in lean than in fatty seafood. Cod filets contain less than 2g fat per kg, whereof approximately 50% is EPA and DHA. However, a large fraction of these n-3 PUFAs is present in the phospholipid (PL) fraction and may have high bioavailability and capacity to change the endocannabinoid profile. Here we investigated whether exchanging meat from a lean terrestrial animal with cod in a background Western diet would alter the endocannabinoid tone in mice and thereby attenuate obesity development and hepatic lipid accumulation. Accordingly, we prepared iso-caloric diets with 15.1 energy (e) % protein, 39.1 e% fat and 45.8 e% carbohydrates using freeze-dried meat from cod filets or pork sirloins, and using a combination of soybean oil, corn oil, margarine, milk fat, and lard as the fat source. Compared with mice receiving diets containing pork, mice fed cod gained less adipose tissue mass and had a lower content of hepatic lipids. This was accompanied by a lower n-6 to n-3 ratio in liver PLs and in red blood cells (RBCs) in the mice. Furthermore, mice receiving the cod-containing diet had lower circulating levels of the two major endocannabinoids, N-arachidonoylethanolamine and 2-arachidonoylglycerol. Together, our data demonstrate that despite the relatively low content of n-3 PUFAs in cod fillets, the cod-containing diet could exert beneficial metabolic effects.

  4. Dietary n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids alter the expression of genes involved in prostaglandin biosynthesis in the bovine uterus.

    PubMed

    Coyne, G S; Kenny, D A; Childs, S; Sreenan, J M; Waters, S M

    2008-09-15

    Nutrition plays a critical role in the regulation of cow fertility. There is emerging evidence that dietary long chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC n-3 PUFA) may act as specific regulators of some reproductive processes. In vitro studies suggest that the n-3 PUFAs, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) may play pivotal roles by suppressing the synthesis of uterine prostaglandin F(2alpha) (PGF(2alpha)) which is centrally involved in the control of the bovine oestrous cycle and in early embryo survival. The objective of the current study was to determine the effect of dietary inclusion of n-3 PUFA on uterine endometrial mRNA expression of key genes regulating PGF(2alpha) biosynthesis. Beef heifers were fed either a low (CON; n=10) or high (HIGH PUFA; n=10) n-3 PUFA diet for 45 days and endometrial tissues were harvested following slaughter. Following analysis, tissues within each dietary group were ranked on the basis of their PUFA concentrations and the highest (n=7) and lowest (n=7) within each of HIGH PUFA and CON, respectively, were used in gene expression studies. Endometrial n-3 PUFA concentrations were more than two-fold higher (P<0.05) and EPA concentrations alone more than seven-fold higher (P<0.01) in the HIGH PUFA than the CON group. Endometrial concentrations of arachidonic acid, were lower (P<0.001) in the tissues from HIGH PUFA than those from the CON group. Total RNA was isolated from all endometrial tissues and real-time reverse transcription (RT) PCR conducted to compare the relative expression of 11 genes with known involvement in uterine biosynthesis of 2-series prostaglandins. Expression of mRNA for prostaglandin E synthase (PGES) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors, PPAR alpha and delta was increased (P<0.05) while mRNA expression of phospholipase A(2) (PLA(2)) was decreased (P=0.06) in the HIGH PUFA endometrial tissues. Expression of genes coding for the oxytocin receptor (OTR), phospholipase C (PLC

  5. Gallic acid regulates skin photoaging in UVB-exposed fibroblast and hairless mice.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Eunson; Park, Sang-Yong; Lee, Hyun Ji; Lee, Tae Youp; Sun, Zheng-Wang; Yi, Tae Hoo

    2014-12-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation is the primary factor in skin photoaging, which is characterized by wrinkle formation, dryness, and thickening. The mechanisms underlying skin photoaging are closely associated with degradation of collagen via upregulation of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity, which is induced by reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Gallic acid (GA), a phenolic compound, possesses a variety of biological activities including antioxidant and antiinflammatory activities. We investigated the protective effects of GA against photoaging caused by UVB irradiation using normal human dermal fibroblasts (NHDFs) in vitro and hairless mice in vivo. The production levels of ROS, interlukin-6, and MMP-1 were significantly suppressed, and type I procollagen expression was stimulated in UVB-irradiated and GA-treated NHDFs. GA treatment inhibited the activity of transcription factor activation protein 1. The effects of GA following topical application and dietary administration were examined by measuring wrinkle formation, histological modification, protein expression, and physiological changes such as stratum corneum hydration, transepidermal water loss, and erythema index. We found that GA decreased dryness, skin thickness, and wrinkle formation via negative modulation of MMP-1 secretion and positive regulation of elastin, type I procollagen, and transforming growth factor-β1. Our data indicate that GA is a potential candidate for the prevention of UVB-induced premature skin aging.

  6. Relationship between dermal birefringence and the skin surface roughness of photoaged human skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Shingo; Nakagawa, Noriaki; Yamanari, Masahiro; Miyazawa, Arata; Yasuno, Yoshiaki; Matsumoto, Masayuki

    2009-07-01

    The dermal degeneration accompanying photoaging is considered to promote skin roughness features such as wrinkles. Our previous study demonstrated that polarization-sensitive spectral domain optical coherence tomography (PS-SD-OCT) enabled noninvasive three-dimensional evaluation of the dermal degeneration of photoaged skin as a change in dermal birefringence, mainly due to collagenous structures. Our purpose is to examine the relationship between dermal birefringence and elasticity and the skin morphology in the eye corner area using PS-SD-OCT. Nineteen healthy male subjects in their seventees were recruited as subjects. A transverse dermal birefringence map, automatically produced by the algorithm, did not show localized changes in the dermal birefringence in the part of the main horizontal wrinkle. The averaged upper dermal birefringence, however, showed depth-dependent correlation with the parameters of skin roughness significantly, suggesting that solar elastosis is a major factor for the progress of wrinkles. Age-dependent parameters of skin elasticity measured with Cutometer did not correlate with the parameters. These results suggest that the analysis of dermal birefringence using PS-SD-OCT enables the evaluation of photoaging-dependent upper dermal degeneration related to the change of skin roughness.

  7. Altered maternal micronutrients (folic acid, vitamin B(12)) and omega 3 fatty acids through oxidative stress may reduce neurotrophic factors in preterm pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Dhobale, Madhavi; Joshi, Sadhana

    2012-04-01

    Preterm pregnancies account for approximately 10% of the total pregnancies and are associated with low birth weight (LBW) babies. Recent studies have shown that LBW babies are at an increased risk of developing brain disorders such as cognitive dysfunction and psychiatric disorders. Maternal nutrition, particularly, micronutrients involved in one-carbon metabolism (folic acid, vitamin B(12), and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)) have a major role during pregnancy for developing fetus and are important determinants of epigenesis. A series of our studies in pregnancy complications have well established the importance of omega 3 fatty acids especially DHA. DHA regulates levels of neurotrophins like brain-derived neurotrophic factor and nerve growth factor, which are required for normal neurological development. We have recently described that in one carbon metabolic pathway, membrane phospholipids are major methyl group acceptors and reduced DHA levels may result in diversion of methyl groups toward deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) ultimately resulting in DNA methylation. In this review, we propose that altered maternal micronutrients (folic acid, vitamin B(12)), increased homocysteine, and oxidative stress levels that cause epigenetic modifications may be one of the mechanisms that contribute to preterm birth and poor fetal outcome, increasing risk for behavioural disorders in children. PMID:21609203

  8. Altered maternal micronutrients (folic acid, vitamin B(12)) and omega 3 fatty acids through oxidative stress may reduce neurotrophic factors in preterm pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Dhobale, Madhavi; Joshi, Sadhana

    2012-04-01

    Preterm pregnancies account for approximately 10% of the total pregnancies and are associated with low birth weight (LBW) babies. Recent studies have shown that LBW babies are at an increased risk of developing brain disorders such as cognitive dysfunction and psychiatric disorders. Maternal nutrition, particularly, micronutrients involved in one-carbon metabolism (folic acid, vitamin B(12), and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)) have a major role during pregnancy for developing fetus and are important determinants of epigenesis. A series of our studies in pregnancy complications have well established the importance of omega 3 fatty acids especially DHA. DHA regulates levels of neurotrophins like brain-derived neurotrophic factor and nerve growth factor, which are required for normal neurological development. We have recently described that in one carbon metabolic pathway, membrane phospholipids are major methyl group acceptors and reduced DHA levels may result in diversion of methyl groups toward deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) ultimately resulting in DNA methylation. In this review, we propose that altered maternal micronutrients (folic acid, vitamin B(12)), increased homocysteine, and oxidative stress levels that cause epigenetic modifications may be one of the mechanisms that contribute to preterm birth and poor fetal outcome, increasing risk for behavioural disorders in children.

  9. In male rats with concurrent iron and (n-3) fatty acid deficiency, provision of either iron or (n-3) fatty acids alone alters monoamine metabolism and exacerbates the cognitive deficits associated with combined deficiency.

    PubMed

    Baumgartner, Jeannine; Smuts, Cornelius M; Malan, Linda; Arnold, Myrtha; Yee, Benjamin K; Bianco, Laura E; Boekschoten, Mark V; Müller, Michael; Langhans, Wolfgang; Hurrell, Richard F; Zimmermann, Michael B

    2012-08-01

    Concurrent deficiencies of iron (Fe) (ID) and (n-3) fatty acids [(n-3)FAD)] in rats can alter brain monoamine pathways and impair learning and memory. We examined whether repletion with Fe and DHA/EPA, alone and in combination, corrects the deficits in brain monoamine activity (by measuring monoamines and related gene expression) and spatial working and reference memory [by Morris water maze (MWM) testing] associated with deficiency. Using a 2 × 2 design, male rats with concurrent ID and (n-3)FAD [ID+(n-3)FAD] were fed an Fe+DHA/EPA, Fe+(n-3)FAD, ID+DHA/EPA, or ID+(n-3)FAD diet for 5 wk [postnatal d 56-91]. Biochemical measures and MWM performance after repletion were compared to age-matched control rats. The provision of Fe in combination with DHA/EPA synergistically increased Fe concentrations in the olfactory bulb (OB) (Fe x DHA/EPA interaction). Similarly, provision of DHA/EPA in combination with Fe resulted in higher brain DHA concentrations than provision of DHA alone in the frontal cortex (FC) and OB (P < 0.05). Dopamine (DA) receptor D1 was upregulated in the hippocampus of Fe+DHA/EPA rats (fold-change = 1.25; P < 0.05) and there were significant Fe x DHA/EPA interactions on serotonin (5-HT) in the OB and on the DA metabolite dihydroxyphenylacetic acid in the FC and striatum. Working memory performance was impaired in ID+DHA/EPA rats compared with controls (P < 0.05). In the reference memory task, Fe+DHA/EPA improved learning behavior, but Fe or DHA/EPA alone did not. These findings suggest that feeding either Fe or DHA/EPA alone to adult rats with both ID and (n-3)FAD affects the DA and 5-HT pathways differently than combined repletion and exacerbates the cognitive deficits associated with combined deficiency.

  10. Protective effect of gelatin and gelatin hydrolysate from salmon skin on UV irradiation-induced photoaging of mice skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Tiejun; Hou, Hu; Lu, Jiaohan; Zhang, Kai; Li, Bafang

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of gelatin (SG) isolated from salmon skin and its hydrolysate (SGH) on photoaging skin, and the mechanism responsible for anti-photoaging. The average molecular weights of SG and SGH were 65 kDa and 873 Da, respectively. The amino acid compositions of SG and SGH were similar. Both of them were abundant in hydrophobic amino acids. Twenty-five peptides were identified from SGH. SG and SGH could improve UV irradiation-induced pathological changes of macroscopical tissue texture and skin morphology. Hydroxyproline content is an indicator of matrix collagen content, SG and SGH could inhibit the decrease of hydroxyproline content in photoaging skin in a dose dependent manner. In addition, SG and SGH could alleviate UV irradiation-induced oxidative damages to skin by increasing the activities of total superoxide dismutase (T-SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and catalase (CAT), increasing the content of glutathione (GSH) and decreasing the content of malonaldehyde (MDA). Moreover, SG and SGH could enhance immune regulation system by increasing the thymus index. Thus, the anti-photoaging mechanisms of SG and SGH were by inhibiting the depletion of antioxidant defense components, involving in the synthesis of collagen and enhancing the function of immune system. Besides, SGH showed a better result in protecting skin from photoaging than SG.

  11. Increased L-CPT-1 activity and altered gene expression in pancreatic islets of malnourished adult rats: a possible relationship between elevated free fatty acid levels and impaired insulin secretion.

    PubMed

    de Barros Reis, Marise Auxiliadora; Arantes, Vanessa Cristina; Cunha, Daniel Andrade; Latorraca, Márcia Queiroz; Toyama, Marcos Hikari; Carneiro, Everardo Magalhães; Boschero, Antonio Carlos

    2008-02-01

    Intrauterine growth restriction is associated with chronically elevated levels of serum fatty acids and reduced glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Lipid metabolism in pancreatic beta cells is critical for the regulation of insulin secretion, and the chronic exposure to fatty acids results in higher palmitate oxidation rates and an altered insulin response to glucose. Using a rat model of isocaloric protein restriction, we examined whether pre- and postnatal protein malnutrition influences the properties of pancreatic islet carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 (liver isoform, L-CPT-1), a rate-limiting enzyme that regulates fatty acid oxidation in mitochondria. The activity of L-CPT-1 in pancreatic islets increased in the low protein (LP), although the L-CPT-1 mRNA levels were unaffected by malnutrition. The susceptibility of enzyme to inhibition by malonyl-CoA was unaltered and the content of malonyl-CoA was reduced in LP cells. Because the mitochondrial oxidation of fatty acids is related to the altered expression of a number of genes encoding proteins involved in insulin secretion, the levels of expression of insulin and GLUT-2 mRNA were assessed. A reduced expression of both genes was observed in malnourished rats. These results provide further evidence that increased L-CPT-1 activity and changes in gene expression in pancreatic islets may be involved in the reduced insulin secretion seen in malnourished rats. PMID:17531461

  12. Long-chain n-3 fatty acids enhance neonatal insulin-regulated protein metabolism in piglets by differentially altering muscle lipid composition.

    PubMed

    Bergeron, Karen; Julien, Pierre; Davis, Teresa A; Myre, Alexandre; Thivierge, M Carole

    2007-11-01

    This study investigated the role of long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCn-3PUFAs) of muscle phospholipids in the regulation of neonatal metabolism. Twenty-eight piglets were weaned at 2 days of age and raised on one of two milk formulas that consisted of either a control formula supplying 0% or a formula containing 3.5% LCn-3PUFAs until 10 or 28 days of age. There was a developmental decline in the insulin sensitivity of amino acid disposal in control pigs during the first month of life, with a slope of -2.24 micromol.kg(-1).h(-1) (P = 0.01) per unit of insulin increment, as assessed using hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic-euaminoacidemic clamps. LCn-3PUFA feeding blunted this developmental decline, resulting in differing insulin sensitivities (P < 0.001). When protein metabolism was assessed under parenteral feeding-induced hyperinsulinemia, LCn-3PUFAs reduced by 16% whole body oxidative losses of amino acids (from 238 to 231 micromol.kg(-1).h(-1); P = 0.06), allowing 41% more amino acids to accrete into body proteins (from 90 to 127 micromol.kg(-1).h(-1); P = 0.06). The fractional synthetic rate of muscle mixed proteins remained unaltered by the LCn-3PUFA feeding. However, LCn-3PUFAs retarded a developmental increase in the essential-to-nonessential amino acid ratio of the muscle intracellular free pool (P = 0.05). Overall, alterations in metabolism were concomitant with a preferential incorporation of LCn-3PUFAs into muscle total membrane phospholipids (P < 0.001), in contrast to intramuscular triglycerides. These results underscore the potential role of LCn-3PUFAs as regulators of different aspects of protein metabolism in the neonate. PMID:17673528

  13. Long-chain n-3 fatty acids enhance neonatal insulin-regulated protein metabolism in piglets by differentially altering muscle lipid composition

    PubMed Central

    Bergeron, Karen; Julien, Pierre; Davis, Teresa A.; Myre, Alexandre; Thivierge, M. Carole

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the role of long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCn-3PUFAs) of muscle phospholipids in the regulation of neonatal metabolism. Twenty-eight piglets were weaned at 2 days of age and raised on one of two milk formulas that consisted of either a control formula supplying 0% or a formula containing 3.5% LCn-3PUFAs until 10 or 28 days of age. There was a developmental decline in the insulin sensitivity of amino acid disposal in control pigs during the first month of life, with a slope of −2.24 μmol·kg−1·h−1 (P = 0.01) per unit of insulin increment, as assessed using hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic-euaminoacidemic clamps. LCn-3PUFA feeding blunted this developmental decline, resulting in differing insulin sensitivities (P < 0.001). When protein metabolism was assessed under parenteral feeding-induced hyperinsulinemia, LCn-3PUFAs reduced by 16% whole body oxidative losses of amino acids (from 238 to 231 μmol·kg−1·h−1; P = 0.06), allowing 41% more amino acids to accrete into body proteins (from 90 to 127 μmol·kg−1·h−1; P = 0.06). The fractional synthetic rate of muscle mixed proteins remained unaltered by the LCn-3PUFA feeding. However, LCn-3PUFAs retarded a developmental increase in the essential-to-nonessential amino acid ratio of the muscle intracellular free pool (P = 0.05). Overall, alterations in metabolism were concomitant with a preferential incorporation of LCn-3PUFAs into muscle total membrane phospholipids (P < 0.001), in contrast to intramuscular triglycerides. These results underscore the potential role of LCn-3PUFAs as regulators of different aspects of protein metabolism in the neonate. PMID:17673528

  14. Protection against photoaging in the hairless mouse by the isoflavone equol.

    PubMed

    Reeve, Vivienne E; Widyarini, Sitarina; Domanski, Diane; Chew, Elaine; Barnes, Karen

    2005-01-01

    Topical application of the isoflavone equol immediately following solar-simulated UV (SSUV) radiation exposure has previously been demonstrated to have significant photoprotective effects. Equol reduced both the inflammatory edema and the systemic suppression of the contact hypersensitivity reaction in hairless mice. Furthermore, daily topical equol application immediately following irradiation during a 10-week chronic SSUV exposure regime also reduced photocarcinogenesis severity in the mouse. This study examines the potential for topical equol to prevent photoaging in response to chronic SSUV irradiation for up to 30 weeks. We did not find consistent expression of the characteristic markers of photoaging until 30 weeks, although moderate epidermal hyperplasia and a transient increase in dermal mast cell numbers were evident after 1 week. Daily application of 10 muM equol lotion significantly reduced these early changes. However after 30 weeks of SSUV exposure, photoaging was well developed, as shown histologically by markedly increased epidermal hyperplasia, increased dermal mast cell number, pronounced focal elastotic deposits, degraded dermal collagen and deposition of glycosaminoglycans in the lower dermis. Topical equol treatment protected significantly from each of these impairments, as demonstrated histologically and quantitatively. Additionally, equol was found to have strong antioxidant action against acute UVA (320-400 nm)-induced lipid peroxidation of mouse skin, this property accounting for its antiphotoaging mechanism. The evidence for equol's antiphotoaging activity, taken together with its anti-inflammatory, immunoprotective and anticarcinogenic efficacy against SSUV irradiation in the mouse, suggests that equol could be developed as a helpful topical photoprotective agent for daily use by humans.

  15. The effects of continuous application of sunscreen on photoaged skin in Japanese elderly people – the relationship with the usage

    PubMed Central

    Mizuno, Makoto; Kunimoto, Kayo; Naru, Eiji; Kameyama, Koichi; Furukawa, Fukumi; Yamamoto, Yuki

    2016-01-01

    Since photoaging of skin is caused by chronic sun exposure, it is well-recognized that regular sunscreen use can help prevent photoaging of skin in fair-skinned people. Therefore, application of sunscreen is recommended for the prevention of photoaging in many countries. However, the relationship between UV exposure and photoaging has rarely been investigated in clinical studies in Japan. In addition, there have been almost no long-term interventional studies in Japanese people. We have previously conducted a study where Japanese actinic keratosis patients were instructed to continuously apply sunscreen. The results indicated that long-term application of sunscreen is effective in suppressing actinic keratosis progression and generation. In the present study, we investigated the effects of sunscreen on photoaged skin in 14 elderly Japanese people. Skin conditions such as water content, transepidermal water loss, the number of spots, wrinkles, and skin color tone uniformity were measured and compared before and after the study. A statistically significant difference was observed only in skin surface hydration. There were large inter-individual differences in amount of sunscreen used throughout the study. The changes in the number of spots and skin color tone uniformity during the 18 months showed good correlation with amount of sunscreen being used. These results suggest an increase in the number of spots and deterioration in skin color tone uniformity in the 18-month non-sunscreen application period, and that such skin conditions improved with increasing use of sunscreen. In this study, we suggested an inhibitory effect on photoaging symptoms such as spots and skin color tone non-uniformity, by application of the appropriate amount of sunscreen over a long period of time in Japanese people, similar to Caucasians. PMID:27217789

  16. The effects of continuous application of sunscreen on photoaged skin in Japanese elderly people - the relationship with the usage.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Makoto; Kunimoto, Kayo; Naru, Eiji; Kameyama, Koichi; Furukawa, Fukumi; Yamamoto, Yuki

    2016-01-01

    Since photoaging of skin is caused by chronic sun exposure, it is well-recognized that regular sunscreen use can help prevent photoaging of skin in fair-skinned people. Therefore, application of sunscreen is recommended for the prevention of photoaging in many countries. However, the relationship between UV exposure and photoaging has rarely been investigated in clinical studies in Japan. In addition, there have been almost no long-term interventional studies in Japanese people. We have previously conducted a study where Japanese actinic keratosis patients were instructed to continuously apply sunscreen. The results indicated that long-term application of sunscreen is effective in suppressing actinic keratosis progression and generation. In the present study, we investigated the effects of sunscreen on photoaged skin in 14 elderly Japanese people. Skin conditions such as water content, transepidermal water loss, the number of spots, wrinkles, and skin color tone uniformity were measured and compared before and after the study. A statistically significant difference was observed only in skin surface hydration. There were large inter-individual differences in amount of sunscreen used throughout the study. The changes in the number of spots and skin color tone uniformity during the 18 months showed good correlation with amount of sunscreen being used. These results suggest an increase in the number of spots and deterioration in skin color tone uniformity in the 18-month non-sunscreen application period, and that such skin conditions improved with increasing use of sunscreen. In this study, we suggested an inhibitory effect on photoaging symptoms such as spots and skin color tone non-uniformity, by application of the appropriate amount of sunscreen over a long period of time in Japanese people, similar to Caucasians. PMID:27217789

  17. n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids suppress CD4(+) T cell proliferation by altering phosphatidylinositol-(4,5)-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2] organization.

    PubMed

    Hou, Tim Y; Barhoumi, Rola; Fan, Yang-Yi; Rivera, Gonzalo M; Hannoush, Rami N; McMurray, David N; Chapkin, Robert S

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms by which n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFA), abundant in fish oil, exert their anti-inflammatory effects have not been rigorously defined. We have previously demonstrated that n-3 PUFA decrease the amount of phosphatidylinositol-(4,5)-bisphosphate, [PI(4,5)P2], in CD4(+) T cells, leading to suppressed actin remodeling upon activation. Since discrete pools of PI(4,5)P2 exist in the plasma membrane, we determined whether n-3 PUFA modulate spatial organization of PI(4,5)P2 relative to raft and non-raft domains. We used Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) to demonstrate that lipid raft mesodomains in the plasma membrane of CD4(+) T cells enriched in n-3 PUFA display increased co-clustering of Lck(N10) and LAT(ΔCP), markers of lipid rafts. CD4(+) T cells enriched in n-3 PUFA also exhibited a depleted plasma membrane non-raft PI(4,5)P2 pool as detected by decreased co-clustering of Src(N15), a non-raft marker, and PH(PLC-δ), a PI(4,5)P2 reporter. Incubation with exogenous PI(4,5)P2 rescued the effects on the non-raft PI(4,5)P2 pool, and reversed the suppression of T cell proliferation in CD4(+) T cells enriched with n-3 PUFA. Furthermore, CD4(+) T cells isolated from mice fed a 4% docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)-enriched diet exhibited a decrease in the non-raft pool of PI(4,5)P2, and exogenous PI(4,5)P2 reversed the suppression of T cell proliferation. Finally, these effects were not due to changes to post-translational lipidation, since n-3 PUFA did not alter the palmitoylation status of signaling proteins. These data demonstrate that n-3 PUFA suppress T cell proliferation by altering plasma membrane topography and the spatial organization of PI(4,5)P2.

  18. Role of Matrix Metalloproteinases in Photoaging and Photocarcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Pittayapruek, Pavida; Meephansan, Jitlada; Prapapan, Ornicha; Komine, Mayumi; Ohtsuki, Mamitaro

    2016-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are zinc-containing endopeptidases with an extensive range of substrate specificities. Collectively, these enzymes are able to degrade various components of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. Based on their structure and substrate specificity, they can be categorized into five main subgroups, namely (1) collagenases (MMP-1, MMP-8 and MMP-13); (2) gelatinases (MMP-2 and MMP-9); (3) stromelysins (MMP-3, MMP-10 and MMP-11); (4) matrilysins (MMP-7 and MMP-26); and (5) membrane-type (MT) MMPs (MMP-14, MMP-15, and MMP-16). The alterations made to the ECM by MMPs might contribute in skin wrinkling, a characteristic of premature skin aging. In photocarcinogenesis, degradation of ECM is the initial step towards tumor cell invasion, to invade both the basement membrane and the surrounding stroma that mainly comprises fibrillar collagens. Additionally, MMPs are involved in angiogenesis, which promotes cancer cell growth and migration. In this review, we focus on the present knowledge about premature skin aging and skin cancers such as basal cell carcinoma (BCC), squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), and melanoma, with our main focus on members of the MMP family and their functions.

  19. Role of Matrix Metalloproteinases in Photoaging and Photocarcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Pittayapruek, Pavida; Meephansan, Jitlada; Prapapan, Ornicha; Komine, Mayumi; Ohtsuki, Mamitaro

    2016-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are zinc-containing endopeptidases with an extensive range of substrate specificities. Collectively, these enzymes are able to degrade various components of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. Based on their structure and substrate specificity, they can be categorized into five main subgroups, namely (1) collagenases (MMP-1, MMP-8 and MMP-13); (2) gelatinases (MMP-2 and MMP-9); (3) stromelysins (MMP-3, MMP-10 and MMP-11); (4) matrilysins (MMP-7 and MMP-26); and (5) membrane-type (MT) MMPs (MMP-14, MMP-15, and MMP-16). The alterations made to the ECM by MMPs might contribute in skin wrinkling, a characteristic of premature skin aging. In photocarcinogenesis, degradation of ECM is the initial step towards tumor cell invasion, to invade both the basement membrane and the surrounding stroma that mainly comprises fibrillar collagens. Additionally, MMPs are involved in angiogenesis, which promotes cancer cell growth and migration. In this review, we focus on the present knowledge about premature skin aging and skin cancers such as basal cell carcinoma (BCC), squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), and melanoma, with our main focus on members of the MMP family and their functions. PMID:27271600

  20. Role of Matrix Metalloproteinases in Photoaging and Photocarcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Pittayapruek, Pavida; Meephansan, Jitlada; Prapapan, Ornicha; Komine, Mayumi; Ohtsuki, Mamitaro

    2016-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are zinc-containing endopeptidases with an extensive range of substrate specificities. Collectively, these enzymes are able to degrade various components of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. Based on their structure and substrate specificity, they can be categorized into five main subgroups, namely (1) collagenases (MMP-1, MMP-8 and MMP-13); (2) gelatinases (MMP-2 and MMP-9); (3) stromelysins (MMP-3, MMP-10 and MMP-11); (4) matrilysins (MMP-7 and MMP-26); and (5) membrane-type (MT) MMPs (MMP-14, MMP-15, and MMP-16). The alterations made to the ECM by MMPs might contribute in skin wrinkling, a characteristic of premature skin aging. In photocarcinogenesis, degradation of ECM is the initial step towards tumor cell invasion, to invade both the basement membrane and the surrounding stroma that mainly comprises fibrillar collagens. Additionally, MMPs are involved in angiogenesis, which promotes cancer cell growth and migration. In this review, we focus on the present knowledge about premature skin aging and skin cancers such as basal cell carcinoma (BCC), squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), and melanoma, with our main focus on members of the MMP family and their functions. PMID:27271600

  1. A fish protein hydrolysate alters fatty acid composition in liver and adipose tissue and increases plasma carnitine levels in a mouse model of chronic inflammation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background There is growing evidence that fish protein hydrolysate (FPH) diets affect mitochondrial fatty acid metabolism in animals. The aim of the study was to determine if FPH could influence fatty acid metabolism and inflammation in transgene mice expressing human tumor necrosis factor alpha (hTNFα). Methods hTNFα mice (C57BL/6 hTNFα) were given a high-fat (23%, w/w) diet containing 20% casein (control group) or 15% FPH and 5% casein (FPH group) for two weeks. After an overnight fast, blood, adipose tissue, and liver samples were collected. Gene expression and enzyme activity was analysed in liver, fatty acid composition was analyzed in liver and ovarian white adipose tissue, and inflammatory parameters, carnitine, and acylcarnitines were analyzed in plasma. Results The n-3/n-6 fatty acid ratio was higher in mice fed the FPH diet than in mice fed the control diet in both adipose tissue and liver, and the FPH diet affected the gene expression of ∆6 and ∆9 desaturases. Mice fed this diet also demonstrated lower hepatic activity of fatty acid synthase. Concomitantly, a lower plasma INF-γ level was observed. Plasma carnitine and the carnitine precursor γ-butyrobetaine was higher in the FPH-group compared to control, as was plasma short-chained and medium-chained acylcarnitine esters. The higher level of plasma acetylcarnitine may reflect a stimulated mitochondrial and peroxisomal β-oxidation of fatty acids, as the hepatic activities of peroxisomal acyl-CoA oxidase 1 and mitochondrial carnitine palmitoyltransferase-II were higher in the FPH-fed mice. Conclusions The FPH diet was shown to influence hepatic fatty acid metabolism and fatty acid composition. This indicates that effects on fatty acid metabolism are important for the bioactivity of protein hydrolysates of marine origin. PMID:24098955

  2. Construction of Nontoxic Polymeric UV-Absorber with Great Resistance to UV-Photoaging

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Zhong; Ding, Aishun; Guo, Hao; Lu, Guolin; Huang, Xiaoyu

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we developed a series of new nontoxic polymeric UV-absorbers through covalently attaching a benzophenone derivative onto the main chain of poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) via mild and quantitative click chemistry. Azide groups were firstly introduced into the backbone of PVC via a nucleophilic reaction without affecting polymeric skeleton. Copper-catalyzed Husigen-Click cycloaddition reaction was performed between the pendant azide groups of PVC and alkynyl of (2-hydroxy-4-(prop-2-ynyloxy)phenyl)(phenyl)methanone at ambient temperature for affording the desired PVC-based UV-absorbers (PVC-UV) with different amounts of benzophenone moieties, which displayed great resistance to photoaging without degradation while exposed to UV irradiation. These polymeric UV-absorbers also showed good solubilities in common organic solvents and no cytotoxicity vs. HaCat cell. Small amounts of PVC-UV were homogeneously mixed with PVC as additive for stabilizing PVC against UV-photoaging without degradation and releasing small molecule even after 200 h while keeping thermal stability. This route of polymeric additive clearly paved an efficient way for solving the puzzle of separation of small molecule additive. PMID:27138547

  3. Singlet molecular oxygen-quenching activity of carotenoids: relevance to protection of the skin from photoaging

    PubMed Central

    Terao, Junji; Minami, Yuko; Bando, Noriko

    2011-01-01

    Carotenoids are known to be potent quenchers of singlet molecular oxygen [O2 (1Δg)]. Solar light-induced photooxidative stress causes skin photoaging by accelerating the generation of reactive oxygen species via photodynamic actions in which O2 (1Δg) can be generated by energy transfer from excited sensitizers. Thus, dietary carotenoids seem to participate in the prevention of photooxidative stress by accumulating as antioxidants in the skin. An in vivo study using hairless mice clarified that a O2 (1Δg) oxygenation-specific peroxidation product of cholesterol, cholesterol 5α-hydroperoxide, accumulates in skin lipids due to ultraviolet-A exposure. Matrix metalloproteinase-9, a metalloproteinase family enzyme responsible for the formation of wrinkles and sagging, was enhanced in the skin of ultraviolet-A -irradiated hairless mice. The activation of metalloproteinase-9 and the accumulation of 5α-hydroperoxide, as well as formation of wrinkles and sagging, were lowered in mice fed a β-carotene diet. These results strongly suggest that dietary β-carotene prevents the expression of metalloproteinase-9 (at least in part), by inhibiting the photodynamic action involving the formation of 5α-hydroperoxide in the skin. Intake of β-Carotene therefore appears to be helpful in slowing down ultraviolet-A -induced photoaging in human skin by acting as a O2 (1Δg) quencher. PMID:21297913

  4. Long-term ultraviolet A irradiation of the eye induces photoaging of the skin in mice.

    PubMed

    Hiramoto, Keiichi; Yamate, Yurika; Kobayashi, Hiromi; Ishii, Masamitsu

    2012-01-01

    Irradiation by long-term ultraviolet (UV) A initiates the induction of photoaging. However, the mechanisms responsible for the structural changes of skin induced by UVA irradiation of the eye are still unknown. Male hairless mice were used in this study. The eye or dorsal skin was locally exposed to UVA after covering the remaining body surface with aluminum foil at a dose of 110 kJ/m(2) using a FL20SBLB-A lamp for 60 days. The plasma α-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH), nitrogen oxides (NO(2)/NO(3)), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and the prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) content all increased after UVA irradiation. The levels of NO(2)/NO(3), TNF-α, and PGE(2) also increased more after UVA skin irradiation than after UVA eye irradiation. However, the level of α-MSH increased more by eye irradiation than skin irradiation. In addition, UVA irradiation of the eye and dorsal skin increased the number of mast cells and fibroblasts. Furthermore, the expression of the melanocortin-1 receptor (MC1R) was increased on the fibroblast surface by UVA irradiation of the eye. These results indicate that the signal evoked by UVA irradiation of the eye, through the hypothalamo-pituitary proopiomelanocortin system, up-regulated the production of α-MSH. This hormone controls the collagen generation from fibroblasts, thus suggesting that photoaging was induced by UVA irradiation of the eye.

  5. Construction of Nontoxic Polymeric UV-Absorber with Great Resistance to UV-Photoaging.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhong; Ding, Aishun; Guo, Hao; Lu, Guolin; Huang, Xiaoyu

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we developed a series of new nontoxic polymeric UV-absorbers through covalently attaching a benzophenone derivative onto the main chain of poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) via mild and quantitative click chemistry. Azide groups were firstly introduced into the backbone of PVC via a nucleophilic reaction without affecting polymeric skeleton. Copper-catalyzed Husigen-Click cycloaddition reaction was performed between the pendant azide groups of PVC and alkynyl of (2-hydroxy-4-(prop-2-ynyloxy)phenyl)(phenyl)methanone at ambient temperature for affording the desired PVC-based UV-absorbers (PVC-UV) with different amounts of benzophenone moieties, which displayed great resistance to photoaging without degradation while exposed to UV irradiation. These polymeric UV-absorbers also showed good solubilities in common organic solvents and no cytotoxicity vs. HaCat cell. Small amounts of PVC-UV were homogeneously mixed with PVC as additive for stabilizing PVC against UV-photoaging without degradation and releasing small molecule even after 200 h while keeping thermal stability. This route of polymeric additive clearly paved an efficient way for solving the puzzle of separation of small molecule additive. PMID:27138547

  6. Construction of Nontoxic Polymeric UV-Absorber with Great Resistance to UV-Photoaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zhong; Ding, Aishun; Guo, Hao; Lu, Guolin; Huang, Xiaoyu

    2016-05-01

    In this article, we developed a series of new nontoxic polymeric UV-absorbers through covalently attaching a benzophenone derivative onto the main chain of poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) via mild and quantitative click chemistry. Azide groups were firstly introduced into the backbone of PVC via a nucleophilic reaction without affecting polymeric skeleton. Copper-catalyzed Husigen-Click cycloaddition reaction was performed between the pendant azide groups of PVC and alkynyl of (2-hydroxy-4-(prop-2-ynyloxy)phenyl)(phenyl)methanone at ambient temperature for affording the desired PVC-based UV-absorbers (PVC-UV) with different amounts of benzophenone moieties, which displayed great resistance to photoaging without degradation while exposed to UV irradiation. These polymeric UV-absorbers also showed good solubilities in common organic solvents and no cytotoxicity vs. HaCat cell. Small amounts of PVC-UV were homogeneously mixed with PVC as additive for stabilizing PVC against UV-photoaging without degradation and releasing small molecule even after 200 h while keeping thermal stability. This route of polymeric additive clearly paved an efficient way for solving the puzzle of separation of small molecule additive.

  7. Spent coffee ground extract suppresses ultraviolet B-induced photoaging in hairless mice.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyeon-Son; Park, Eu Ddeum; Park, Yooheon; Suh, Hyung Joo

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of spent coffee ground (SCG) ethanol extract on UVB-induced skin aging in hairless mice. An ethanol extract of SCG (ESCG) was prepared using the residue remaining after extraction of oil from roasted SCG. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis showed that the content of caffeine (41.58 ± 0.54 μg/mg) was higher than that of chlorogenic acid isomers (~9.17 μg/mg) in ESCG. ESCG significantly decreased the UVB-induced intracellular reactive oxygen species in HaCaT cells. UVB-induced wrinkle formation in mice dorsal skin was effectively reduced by ESCG administration; high dose of ESCG (5 g/L) caused the reduction of wrinkle area by 30% compared with UVB-treated control (UVBC). This result correlated with the ESCG-mediated decrease in epidermis thickness (25%). In addition, ESCG administration significantly reduced transdermal water loss (20%) and erythema formation (35%) derived from UVB exposure. Collagen type I (COL-1) level in dorsal skin was effectively recovered by ESCG administration. These results were supported by down-regulation of collagen-degrading matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2) and 9 (MMP9) expressions. Our results indicate that ESCG protects mouse skin from UVB-induced photoaging by suppressing the expression of matrix metalloproteinases. Our study suggests that ESCG may be anti-photoaging agent. PMID:26410040

  8. Curcumin targeted signaling pathways: basis for anti-photoaging and anti-carcinogenic therapy.

    PubMed

    Heng, Madalene C Y

    2010-06-01

    Photocarcinogenesis is caused by DNA damage from solar radiation in the ultraviolet range, resulting in the development of both melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancers. Although the ultraviolet B (UVB) spectrum has previously been considered the more carcinogenic of the two, recent evidence suggests that ultraviolet A (UVA) irradiation may have damaging effects that are not generally appreciated. Furthermore, it is becoming apparent that although sunscreens have been in use for many years, they are relatively ineffective in protecting against UVA-induced photoaging and UVA-induced skin cancers. More recently, attention has been directed on certain dietary phytochemicals, in particular curcumin, in the attempt to repair photodamaged skin as a means of preventing degeneration into solar-induced skin cancers. Curcumin has been shown to protect against the deleterious effects of injury by attenuating oxidative stress and suppressing inflammation. In this review, the curcumin-targeted signaling pathways directed against solar-induced injury are reviewed. The ability of curcumin to block multiple targets on these pathways serve as a basis for the potential use of this phytochemical in photoaging skin and photocarcinogenesis.

  9. Stereoselective skin anti-photoaging properties of ginsenoside Rg3 in UV-B-irradiated keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Lim, Chang-Jin; Choi, Woo-Yong; Jung, Hyun-Joo

    2014-01-01

    Ginsenosides are major bioactive constituents that are responsible for the diverse pharmacological activities of ginseng. This work aimed to assess the skin anti-photoaging activities of the two stereoisomeric forms of ginsenoside Rg3, 20(S)-Rg3 and 20(R)-Rg3. When the two Rg3 stereoisomers were added to cultured human keratinocyte HaCaT cells prior to irradiation with 70 mJ/cm(2) UV-B, 20(S)-Rg3, but not 20(R)-Rg3, decreased the UV-B-induced intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels in a concentration-dependent manner, as detected by both fluorometric and confocal microscopic analyses. Likewise, 20(S)-Rg3, but not 20(R)-Rg3, decreased the UV-B-induced ROS levels in human dermal fibroblast cells. Both stereoisomers were unable to modulate the nitric oxide levels in HaCaT cells under UV-B irradiation, and induced no cytotoxicity in cultured keratinocytes and fibroblasts. 20(S)-Rg3 suppressed the UV-B-induced matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 activities in HaCaT cells. Taken together, these results indicate that 20(S)-Rg3 possesses both ROS-scavenging and MMP-2 inhibitory activities, while 20(R)-Rg3 possesses neither activity. These findings imply that ginsenoside Rg3 stereoselectively demonstrates skin anti-photoaging activities. PMID:25056231

  10. Andrographolide Sodium Bisulfate Prevents UV-Induced Skin Photoaging through Inhibiting Oxidative Stress and Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Janis Ya-Xian; Wang, Xiu-Fen; Liu, Yu-Hong; Zhang, Zhen-Biao; Wang, Lan; Chen, Jian-Nan; Huang, Song; Zeng, Hui-Fang; Lai, Xiao-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Andrographolide sodium bisulfate (ASB), a water-soluble form made from andrographolide through sulfonating reaction, is an antioxidant and anti-inflammatory drug; however, the antiphotoaging effect of ASB has still not been revealed. Oxidative stress and inflammation are known to be responsible for ultraviolet (UV) irradiation induced skin damage and consequently premature aging. In this study, we aimed at examining the effect of ASB on UV-induced skin photoaging of mice by physiological and histological analysis of skin and examination of skin antioxidant enzymes and immunity analyses. Results showed that topical administration of ASB suppressed the UV-induced skin thickness, elasticity, wrinkles, and water content, while ASB, especially at dose of 3.6 mg/mouse, increased the skin collagen content by about 53.17%, decreased the epidermal thickness by about 41.38%, and prevented the UV-induced disruption of collagen fibers and elastic fibers. Furthermore, ASB decreased MDA level by about 40.21% and upregulated the activities of SOD and CAT and downregulated the production of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10, and TNF-α in UV-irradiated mice. Our study confirmed the protective effect of ASB against UV-induced photoaging and initially indicated that this effect can be attributed to its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities in vivo, suggesting that ASB may be a potential antiphotoaging agent. PMID:26903706

  11. Spent coffee ground extract suppresses ultraviolet B-induced photoaging in hairless mice.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyeon-Son; Park, Eu Ddeum; Park, Yooheon; Suh, Hyung Joo

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of spent coffee ground (SCG) ethanol extract on UVB-induced skin aging in hairless mice. An ethanol extract of SCG (ESCG) was prepared using the residue remaining after extraction of oil from roasted SCG. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis showed that the content of caffeine (41.58 ± 0.54 μg/mg) was higher than that of chlorogenic acid isomers (~9.17 μg/mg) in ESCG. ESCG significantly decreased the UVB-induced intracellular reactive oxygen species in HaCaT cells. UVB-induced wrinkle formation in mice dorsal skin was effectively reduced by ESCG administration; high dose of ESCG (5 g/L) caused the reduction of wrinkle area by 30% compared with UVB-treated control (UVBC). This result correlated with the ESCG-mediated decrease in epidermis thickness (25%). In addition, ESCG administration significantly reduced transdermal water loss (20%) and erythema formation (35%) derived from UVB exposure. Collagen type I (COL-1) level in dorsal skin was effectively recovered by ESCG administration. These results were supported by down-regulation of collagen-degrading matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2) and 9 (MMP9) expressions. Our results indicate that ESCG protects mouse skin from UVB-induced photoaging by suppressing the expression of matrix metalloproteinases. Our study suggests that ESCG may be anti-photoaging agent.

  12. Thread Embedding Acupuncture Inhibits Ultraviolet B Irradiation-Induced Skin Photoaging in Hairless Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yoon-Jung; Kim, Ha-Neui; Shin, Mi-Sook; Choi, Byung-Tae

    2015-01-01

    Thread embedding acupuncture (TEA) is an acupuncture treatment applied to many diseases in Korean medical clinics because of its therapeutic effects by continuous stimulation to tissues. It has recently been used to enhance facial skin appearance and antiaging, but data from evidence-based medicine are limited. To investigate whether TEA therapy can inhibit skin photoaging by ultraviolet B (UVB) irradiation, we performed analyses for histology, histopathology, in situ zymography and western blot analysis in HR-1 hairless mice. TEA treatment resulted in decreased wrinkle formation and skin thickness (Epidermis; P = 0.001 versus UV) in UVB irradiated mice and also inhibited degradation of collagen fibers (P = 0.010 versus normal) by inhibiting proteolytic activity of gelatinase matrix-metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9). Western blot data showed that activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) induced by UVB (P = 0.002 versus normal group) was significantly inhibited by TEA treatment (P = 0.005 versus UV) with subsequent alleviation of MMP-9 activation (P = 0.048 versus UV). These results suggest that TEA treatment can have anti-photoaging effects on UVB-induced skin damage by maintenance of collagen density through regulation of expression of MMP-9 and related JNK signaling. Therefore, TEA therapy may have potential roles as an alternative treatment for protection against skin damage from aging. PMID:26185518

  13. Manipulation of culture conditions alters lipid content and fatty acid profiles of a wide variety of known and new oleaginous yeast species.

    PubMed

    Sitepu, Irnayuli R; Sestric, Ryan; Ignatia, Laura; Levin, David; German, J Bruce; Gillies, Laura A; Almada, Luis A G; Boundy-Mills, Kyria L

    2013-09-01

    Oleaginous yeasts have been studied for oleochemical production for over 80 years. Only a few species have been studied intensely. To expand the diversity of oleaginous yeasts available for lipid research, we surveyed a broad diversity of yeasts with indicators of oleaginicity including known oleaginous clades, and buoyancy. Sixty-nine strains representing 17 genera and 50 species were screened for lipid production. Yeasts belonged to Ascomycota families, Basidiomycota orders, and the yeast-like algal genus Prototheca. Total intracellular lipids and fatty acid composition were determined under different incubation times and nitrogen availability. Thirteen new oleaginous yeast species were discovered, representing multiple ascomycete and basidiomycete clades. Nitrogen starvation generally increased intracellular lipid content. The fatty acid profiles varied with the growth conditions regardless of taxonomic affiliation. The dominant fatty acids were oleic acid, palmitic acid, linoleic acid, and stearic acid. Yeasts and culture conditions that produced fatty acids appropriate for biodiesel were identified. PMID:23891835

  14. Manipulation of culture conditions alters lipid content and fatty acid profiles of a wide variety of known and new oleaginous yeast species.

    PubMed

    Sitepu, Irnayuli R; Sestric, Ryan; Ignatia, Laura; Levin, David; German, J Bruce; Gillies, Laura A; Almada, Luis A G; Boundy-Mills, Kyria L

    2013-09-01

    Oleaginous yeasts have been studied for oleochemical production for over 80 years. Only a few species have been studied intensely. To expand the diversity of oleaginous yeasts available for lipid research, we surveyed a broad diversity of yeasts with indicators of oleaginicity including known oleaginous clades, and buoyancy. Sixty-nine strains representing 17 genera and 50 species were screened for lipid production. Yeasts belonged to Ascomycota families, Basidiomycota orders, and the yeast-like algal genus Prototheca. Total intracellular lipids and fatty acid composition were determined under different incubation times and nitrogen availability. Thirteen new oleaginous yeast species were discovered, representing multiple ascomycete and basidiomycete clades. Nitrogen starvation generally increased intracellular lipid content. The fatty acid profiles varied with the growth conditions regardless of taxonomic affiliation. The dominant fatty acids were oleic acid, palmitic acid, linoleic acid, and stearic acid. Yeasts and culture conditions that produced fatty acids appropriate for biodiesel were identified.

  15. Manipulation of culture conditions alters lipid content and fatty acid profiles of a wide variety of known and new oleaginous yeasts species

    PubMed Central

    Sitepu, Irnayuli R.; Sestric, Ryan; Ignatia, Laura; Levin, David; German, J. Bruce; Gillies, Laura A.; Almada, Luis A.G.; Boundy-Mills, Kyria L.

    2013-01-01

    Oleaginous yeasts have been studied for oleochemical production for over 80 years. Only a few species have been studied intensely. To expand the diversity of oleaginous yeasts available for lipid research, we surveyed a broad diversity of yeasts with indicators of oleaginicity including known oleaginous clades, and buoyancy. Sixty-nine strains representing 17 genera and 50 species were screened for lipid production. Yeasts belonged to Ascomycota families, Basidiomycota orders, and the yeast-like algal genus Prototheca. Total intracellular lipids and fatty acid composition were determined under different incubation times and nitrogen availability. Thirteen new oleaginous yeast species were discovered, representing multiple ascomycete and basidiomycete clades. Nitrogen starvation generally increased intracellular lipid content. The fatty acid profiles varied with the growth conditions regardless of taxonomic affiliation. The dominant fatty acids were oleic acid, palmitic acid, linoleic acid, and stearic acid. Yeasts and culture conditions that produced fatty acids appropriate for biodiesel were identified. PMID:23891835

  16. Transcriptome Analysis of Skin Photoaging in Chinese Females Reveals the Involvement of Skin Homeostasis and Metabolic Changes

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Li; Zhang, Feng; Yin, Ning-Bei; Lin, Hong-Bin; Huang, Chen-Yu; Wang, Lei; Yu, Jun; Wang, Duen-Mei; Zhao, Zhen-Min

    2013-01-01

    Background Photoaging is cumulative damage to skin, caused by chronic, repeated solar radiation exposure. Its molecular mechanisms are poorly understood at the level of global gene expression. Objective This study set out to uncover genes and functional modules involved in photoaging at the level of transcription, with the use of skin samples from Chinese women. Methods Using the Illumina microarray platform, we compared the genome-wide expression profiles of 21 pairs of sun-exposed pre-auricular and sun-protected post-auricular skin samples from northern Chinese women. Results With microarray analysis, 1,621 significantly regulated genes due to photoaging were identified from skin samples. These genes were subjected to functional enrichment analyses with both the Gene Ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) annotation databases. As revealed by the functional analyses, the up-regulated functional modules in sun-exposed pre-auricular skin were related to various cellular activities in regulation of the skin homeostasis (e.g., the KEGG pathways TGF-beta signaling pathway and ECM-receptor interaction), whereas the down-regulated functional modules were mostly metabolic-related. Additionally, five selected genes (HOXA5, LEPR, CLDN5, LAMC3, and CGA) identified as differentially-expressed were further confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR (Q-RT-PCR). Conclusion Our findings suggest that disruption of skin homeostasis and down-regulation of skin metabolism may play important roles in the process of photoaging. PMID:23637934

  17. Conversion of α-linolenic acid to long-chain omega-3 fatty acid derivatives and alterations of HDL density subfractions and plasma lipids with dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids in Monk parrots (Myiopsitta monachus).

    PubMed

    Petzinger, C; Larner, C; Heatley, J J; Bailey, C A; MacFarlane, R D; Bauer, J E

    2014-04-01

    The effect of α-linolenic acid from a flaxseed (FLX)-enriched diet on plasma lipid and fatty acid metabolism and possible atherosclerosis risk factors was studied in Monk parrots (Myiopsitta monachus). Twenty-four Monk parrots were randomly assigned to diets containing either 10% ground SUNs or 10% ground FLXs. Feed intake was calculated daily. Blood samples, body condition scores and body weights were obtained at -5 weeks, day 0, 7, 14, 28, 42 and 70. Plasma samples were analysed for total cholesterol, free cholesterol, triacylglycerols and lipoproteins. Phospholipid subfraction fatty acid profiles were determined. By day 70, the FLX group had significantly higher plasma phospholipid fatty acids including 18:3n-3 (α-linolenic acid), 20:5n-3 (eicosapentaenoic acid) and 22:6n-3 (docosahexaenoic acid). The sunflower group had significantly higher plasma phospholipid levels of 20:4n-6 (arachidonic acid). By day 70, the high-density lipoprotein (HDL) peak shifted resulting in significantly different HDL peak densities between the two experimental groups (1.097 g/ml FLX group and 1.095 g/ml SUN group, p = 0.028). The plasma fatty acid results indicate that Monk parrots can readily convert α-linolenic acid to the long-chain omega-3 derivatives including docosahexaenoic acid and reduce 20:4n-6 accumulation in plasma phospholipids. The reason for a shift in the HDL peak density is unknown at this time. PMID:23600588

  18. Conversion of α-linolenic acid to long-chain omega-3 fatty acid derivatives and alterations of HDL density subfractions and plasma lipids with dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids in Monk parrots (Myiopsitta monachus).

    PubMed

    Petzinger, C; Larner, C; Heatley, J J; Bailey, C A; MacFarlane, R D; Bauer, J E

    2014-04-01

    The effect of α-linolenic acid from a flaxseed (FLX)-enriched diet on plasma lipid and fatty acid metabolism and possible atherosclerosis risk factors was studied in Monk parrots (Myiopsitta monachus). Twenty-four Monk parrots were randomly assigned to diets containing either 10% ground SUNs or 10% ground FLXs. Feed intake was calculated daily. Blood samples, body condition scores and body weights were obtained at -5 weeks, day 0, 7, 14, 28, 42 and 70. Plasma samples were analysed for total cholesterol, free cholesterol, triacylglycerols and lipoproteins. Phospholipid subfraction fatty acid profiles were determined. By day 70, the FLX group had significantly higher plasma phospholipid fatty acids including 18:3n-3 (α-linolenic acid), 20:5n-3 (eicosapentaenoic acid) and 22:6n-3 (docosahexaenoic acid). The sunflower group had significantly higher plasma phospholipid levels of 20:4n-6 (arachidonic acid). By day 70, the high-density lipoprotein (HDL) peak shifted resulting in significantly different HDL peak densities between the two experimental groups (1.097 g/ml FLX group and 1.095 g/ml SUN group, p = 0.028). The plasma fatty acid results indicate that Monk parrots can readily convert α-linolenic acid to the long-chain omega-3 derivatives including docosahexaenoic acid and reduce 20:4n-6 accumulation in plasma phospholipids. The reason for a shift in the HDL peak density is unknown at this time.

  19. L-FABP T94A decreased fatty acid uptake and altered hepatic triglyceride and cholesterol accumulation in Chang liver cells stably transfected with L-FABP.

    PubMed

    Gao, Na; Qu, Xia; Yan, Jin; Huang, Qi; Yuan, Hao-Yong; Ouyang, Dong-Sheng

    2010-12-01

    Liver fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP, FABP1) is a highly conserved key factor in lipid metabolism. This study was undertaken to verify whether the T94A mutation in the L-FABP gene affects fatty acid uptake and intracellular esterification into specific lipid pools. Candidate SNPs were recreated using site-directed mutagenesis and tested for physical function in stably transfected Chang liver cell lines. We found that the T94A mutant of L-FABP lowered FFA uptake but had no effect on FFA efflux. L-FABP T94A-expressing cells showed decreased triglyceride content and increased cholesterol accumulation compared to the wild-type control for cells incubated with an FFA mixture (oleate: palmitate, 2:1 ratio). In conclusion, our study provided additional indications of the functional relevance of the L-FABP T94A SNP in hepatic fatty acid and lipid metabolism in humans.

  20. Dietary fish oil supplements depress milk fat yield and alter milk fatty acid composition in lactating cows fed grass silage-based diets.

    PubMed

    Kairenius, P; Ärölä, A; Leskinen, H; Toivonen, V; Ahvenjärvi, S; Vanhatalo, A; Huhtanen, P; Hurme, T; Griinari, J M; Shingfield, K J

    2015-08-01

    The potential of dietary fish oil (FO) supplements to increase milk 20:5n-3 and 22:6n-3 concentrations and the associated effects on milk fatty acid (FA) composition, intake, and milk production were examined. Four multiparous lactating cows offered a grass silage-based diet (forage:concentrate ratio 58:42, on a dry matter basis) supplemented with 0, 75, 150, or 300g of FO/d (FO0, FO75, FO150, and FO300, respectively) were used in a 4×4 Latin square with 28-d experimental periods. Milk FA composition was analyzed by complementary silver-ion thin-layer chromatography, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and silver-ion HPLC. Supplements of FO decreased linearly dry matter intake, yields of energy-corrected milk, milk fat and protein, and milk fat content. Compared with FO0, milk fat content and yield were decreased by 30.1 and 40.6%, respectively, on the FO300 treatment. Supplements of FO linearly increased milk 20:5n-3 and 22:6n-3 concentrations from 0.07 to 0.18 and 0.03 to 0.10g/100g of FA, respectively. Enrichment of 20:5n-3 and 22:6n-3 was accompanied by decreases in 4- to 18-carbon saturated FA and increases in total conjugated linoleic acid (CLA), trans FA, and polyunsaturated FA concentrations. Fish oil elevated milk fat cis-9,trans-11 CLA content in a quadratic manner, reaching a maximum on FO150 (from 0.61 to 2.15g/100g of FA), whereas further amounts of FO increased trans-10 18:1 with no change in trans-11 18:1 concentration. Supplements of FO also resulted in a dose-dependent appearance of 37 unique 20- and 22-carbon intermediates in milk fat. Concentrations of 16-, 18-, 20-, and 22-carbon trans FA were all increased by FO, with enrichment of trans 18:1 and trans 18:2 being quantitatively the most important. Decreases in milk fat yield to FO were not related to changes in milk trans-10,cis-12 CLA concentration or estimated milk fat melting point. Partial least square regression analysis indicated that FO-induced milk fat depression was associated with

  1. Dietary fish oil supplements depress milk fat yield and alter milk fatty acid composition in lactating cows fed grass silage-based diets.

    PubMed

    Kairenius, P; Ärölä, A; Leskinen, H; Toivonen, V; Ahvenjärvi, S; Vanhatalo, A; Huhtanen, P; Hurme, T; Griinari, J M; Shingfield, K J

    2015-08-01

    The potential of dietary fish oil (FO) supplements to increase milk 20:5n-3 and 22:6n-3 concentrations and the associated effects on milk fatty acid (FA) composition, intake, and milk production were examined. Four multiparous lactating cows offered a grass silage-based diet (forage:concentrate ratio 58:42, on a dry matter basis) supplemented with 0, 75, 150, or 300g of FO/d (FO0, FO75, FO150, and FO300, respectively) were used in a 4×4 Latin square with 28-d experimental periods. Milk FA composition was analyzed by complementary silver-ion thin-layer chromatography, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and silver-ion HPLC. Supplements of FO decreased linearly dry matter intake, yields of energy-corrected milk, milk fat and protein, and milk fat content. Compared with FO0, milk fat content and yield were decreased by 30.1 and 40.6%, respectively, on the FO300 treatment. Supplements of FO linearly increased milk 20:5n-3 and 22:6n-3 concentrations from 0.07 to 0.18 and 0.03 to 0.10g/100g of FA, respectively. Enrichment of 20:5n-3 and 22:6n-3 was accompanied by decreases in 4- to 18-carbon saturated FA and increases in total conjugated linoleic acid (CLA), trans FA, and polyunsaturated FA concentrations. Fish oil elevated milk fat cis-9,trans-11 CLA content in a quadratic manner, reaching a maximum on FO150 (from 0.61 to 2.15g/100g of FA), whereas further amounts of FO increased trans-10 18:1 with no change in trans-11 18:1 concentration. Supplements of FO also resulted in a dose-dependent appearance of 37 unique 20- and 22-carbon intermediates in milk fat. Concentrations of 16-, 18-, 20-, and 22-carbon trans FA were all increased by FO, with enrichment of trans 18:1 and trans 18:2 being quantitatively the most important. Decreases in milk fat yield to FO were not related to changes in milk trans-10,cis-12 CLA concentration or estimated milk fat melting point. Partial least square regression analysis indicated that FO-induced milk fat depression was associated with

  2. Long-chain n-3 fatty acids enhance neonatal insulin-regulated protein metabolism in piglets by differentially altering muscle lipid composition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study investigated the role of long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCn-3PUFAs) of muscle phospholipids in the regulation of neonatal metabolism. Twenty-eight piglets were weaned at 2 days of age and raised on one of two milk formulas that consisted of either a control formula supplying ...

  3. Monitoring collagen remodeling on opto-thermal response of photoaged skin irradiated by Er:YAG laser with optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaoman; Wu, Shulian; Li, Hui

    2010-11-01

    The Optical Coherence Tomography technology was used to perform noninvasive cross-sectional imaging of internal structures in photoaged mouse skin irradiated by Er:YAG laser. The mice were irradiated chronically with a steady dose of ultraviolet irradiation. Various laser light doses were irradiated on the back skins of the photoaged mouse. An OCT was used to observe the process of the collagen remodeling in dermis. The relationship between optical characteristic parameter such as attenuation coefficient and light dose was discovered. The total attenuation coefficient increased when the light dose increased. Our findings showed that Er:YAG laser could be used for the symptoms of the photoaged skin with some degree of thermal damage in the dermis, and the OCT could image the progress of collagen remodeling in photoaged mouse dermis. The OCT may be a useful tool for the determination of optimal parameters for laser skin treatment.

  4. A Review of Clinical Trials Conducted With Oral, Multicomponent Dietary Supplements for Improving Photoaged Skin.

    PubMed

    Birnbaum, Jay; Le Moigne, Anne; Dispensa, Lisa; Buchner, Larry

    2015-12-01

    Although the FDA does not require documentation of efficacy of dietary supplements, prospective clinical studies, including randomized controlled trials, have been conducted with individual micronutrients alone and in combination with other ingredients for promoting skin health. Proposed mechanisms include antioxidation, anti-inflammation, photoprotection, collagen formation, reductions in matrix metalloproteinases, and other effects on photoaging. Literature searches were conducted to identify clinical trials assessing multicomponent dietary supplement formulations on photoaging outcomes. Sixteen studies of various nutrient and non-nutrient ingredients, including essential micronutrients (vitamins, minerals), plant extracts (polyphenols, carotenoids), and marine- or animal-derived ingredients, were identified. Studies were single center, 2-12 months in duration, primarily enrolled women, and evaluated numerous outcomes, including investigator/subject assessments and instrumental/objective measures. Methods to control for potential confounders were implemented in some studies, including limiting sun exposure, cosmetic procedures, and changes in dietary habits/body weight. Given the range of different products, clinical/methodologic heterogeneity, insufficient detail in reporting, and lack of comparable outcome measures, quantitative analysis of results was not possible. Results of individual studies revealed significant improvements from baseline for the dietary supplement group(s) on ≥ 1 endpoint across all studies; significant differences from placebo were observed in 7 of 12 controlled studies (although only 1 study designated a prospectively defined primary endpoint). Most products had only been tested in 1 study; confirmatory studies were rarely conducted per the publicly available literature. Meaningful assessment of dietary supplements, which typically contain nutrients found in the diet, requires unique methodologic considerations and endpoints

  5. A Review of Clinical Trials Conducted With Oral, Multicomponent Dietary Supplements for Improving Photoaged Skin.

    PubMed

    Birnbaum, Jay; Le Moigne, Anne; Dispensa, Lisa; Buchner, Larry

    2015-12-01

    Although the FDA does not require documentation of efficacy of dietary supplements, prospective clinical studies, including randomized controlled trials, have been conducted with individual micronutrients alone and in combination with other ingredients for promoting skin health. Proposed mechanisms include antioxidation, anti-inflammation, photoprotection, collagen formation, reductions in matrix metalloproteinases, and other effects on photoaging. Literature searches were conducted to identify clinical trials assessing multicomponent dietary supplement formulations on photoaging outcomes. Sixteen studies of various nutrient and non-nutrient ingredients, including essential micronutrients (vitamins, minerals), plant extracts (polyphenols, carotenoids), and marine- or animal-derived ingredients, were identified. Studies were single center, 2-12 months in duration, primarily enrolled women, and evaluated numerous outcomes, including investigator/subject assessments and instrumental/objective measures. Methods to control for potential confounders were implemented in some studies, including limiting sun exposure, cosmetic procedures, and changes in dietary habits/body weight. Given the range of different products, clinical/methodologic heterogeneity, insufficient detail in reporting, and lack of comparable outcome measures, quantitative analysis of results was not possible. Results of individual studies revealed significant improvements from baseline for the dietary supplement group(s) on ≥ 1 endpoint across all studies; significant differences from placebo were observed in 7 of 12 controlled studies (although only 1 study designated a prospectively defined primary endpoint). Most products had only been tested in 1 study; confirmatory studies were rarely conducted per the publicly available literature. Meaningful assessment of dietary supplements, which typically contain nutrients found in the diet, requires unique methodologic considerations and endpoints

  6. Contribution of UVA irradiance to the erythema and photoaging effects in solar and sunbed exposures.

    PubMed

    Sola, Yolanda; Lorente, Jerónimo

    2015-02-01

    Even though UVA irradiance had not been considered detrimental to human skin for years, nowadays it is recognized for its role in photoaging and other biological responses. The ratio UVA/UVB is about 17 at a solar zenith angle (SZA) of 20° and it is almost constant up to 60° when it rapidly increases since the UVB wavelengths (280-320nm) are more attenuated than the UVA waveband (320-400nm). For a constant SZA, the ratio increases with the ozone content. The UVA component of the solar erythemal irradiance ranges from 20% at 20° to 30% at 60°, whereas it varies from 50% to 80% in the two different types of measured sunbeds. Moreover, the different spectral distribution of the lamps used for artificial tanning leads frequently to high UVA doses. The biological responses related to skin photoaging (skin sagging and elastosis) could be around fourfold the equivalent solar irradiance at midday in summer midlatitudes and they can be important in unprotected UVA exposures to sunbeds. The UVA dose accumulated during the time required in reaching 1 minimum erythemal dose (MED) increases with the SZA since the exposure durations are longer. Indeed, seasonal differences in the mean UVA dose are observed due to variations in the ozone content that results in longer exposure times without erythema. Although an artificial tanning session is usually shorter than one hour, the UVA dose from sunbeds during the time for 1 MED for skin type II (250Jm(-2)) can be 2-4 times larger than the solar dose, depending on the lamp spectral emission. PMID:25579807

  7. Evidence that the Essential Response Regulator YycF in Streptococcus pneumoniae Modulates Expression of Fatty Acid Biosynthesis Genes and Alters Membrane Composition†

    PubMed Central

    Mohedano, M. Luz; Overweg, Karin; de la Fuente, Alicia; Reuter, Mark; Altabe, Silvia; Mulholland, Francis; de Mendoza, Diego; López, Paloma; Wells, Jerry M.

    2005-01-01

    The YycFG two-component system, originally identified in Bacillus subtilis, is highly conserved among gram-positive bacteria with low G+C contents. In Streptococcus pneumoniae, the YycF response regulator has been reported to be essential for cell growth, but the signal to which it responds and the gene members of the regulon remain unclear. In order to investigate the role of YycFG in S. pneumoniae, we increased the expression of yycF by using a maltose-inducible vector and analyzed the genome-wide effects on transcription and protein expression during the course of yycF expression. The induction of yycF expression increased histidine kinase yycG transcript levels, suggesting an autoregulation of the yycFG operon. Evidence from both proteomic and microarray transcriptome studies as well as analyses of membrane fatty acid composition indicated that YycFG is involved in the regulation of fatty acid biosynthesis pathways and in determining fatty acid chain lengths in membrane lipids. In agreement with recent transcriptome data on pneumococcal cells depleted of YycFG, we also identified several other potential members of the YycFG regulon that are required for virulence and cell wall biosynthesis and metabolism. PMID:15774879

  8. Regenerative and reparative effects of human chorion-derived stem cell conditioned medium on photo-aged epidermal cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiankun; Chen, Yan; Ma, Kui; Zhao, Along; Zhang, Cuiping; Fu, Xiaobing

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal cells are an important regenerative source for skin wound healing. Aged epidermal cells have a low ability to renew themselves and repair skin injury. Ultraviolet (UV) radiation, particularly UVB, can cause photo-aging of the skin by suppressing the viability of human epidermal cells. A chorion-derived stem cell conditioned medium (CDSC-CNM) is thought to have regenerative properties. This study aimed to determine the regenerative effects of CDSC-CNM on UVB-induced photo-aged epidermal cells. Epidermal cells were passaged four times and irradiated with quantitative UVB, and non-irradiated cells served as a control group. Cells were then treated with different concentrations of CDSC-CNM. Compared to the non-irradiated group, the proliferation rates and migration rates of UVB-induced photo-aged epidermal cells significantly decreased (p < 0.05) with increasing intracellular radical oxygen species (ROS) generation and DNA damage. After treatment with CDSC-CNM, photo-aged epidermal cells significantly improved their viability, and their ROS generation and DNA damage decreased. The secretory factors in CDSC-CNM, including epidermal growth factor (EGF), transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), interleukin (IL)-6, and IL-8 and the related signaling pathway protein levels, increased compared to the control medium (CM). The potential regenerative and reparative effects of CDSC-CNM indicate that it may be a candidate material for the treatment of prematurely aged skin. The functions of the secretory factors and the mechanisms of CDSC-CNM therapy deserve further attention.

  9. Anti-photoaging properties of the phosphodiesterase 3 inhibitor cilostazol in ultraviolet B-irradiated hairless mice

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ha Neui; Gil, Chan Hee; Kim, Yu Ri; Shin, Hwa Kyoung; Choi, Byung Tae

    2016-01-01

    We investigated whether cilostazol, an activator of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent intracellular signaling, could inhibit ultraviolet B (UVB) irradiation-induced photoaging in HR-1 hairless mice. Cilostazol decreased wrinkle formation and skin thickness in UVB-irradiated mice, as well as increased staining of collagen fibers and inhibition of reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation in the skin. Moreover, the proteolytic activities of gelatinase matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 and collagenase MMP-3 were significantly decreased in UVB-irradiated mice treated with cilostazol. Western blotting showed that UVB-induced activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) and nuclear factor (NF)-κB was significantly inhibited by cilostazol, whereas the activation of Akt was significantly enhanced by cilostazol. Confirmation of localized protein expression in the skin revealed marked p38 MAPK and NF-κB activation that was mainly detected in the dermis. Marked Akt activation was mainly detected in the epidermis. Our results suggest that cilostazol may have anti-photoaging effects on UVB-induced wrinkle formation by maintaining the extracellular matrix density in the dermis, which occurs via regulation of ROS and related p38 MAPK and NF-κB signaling, and subsequent down-regulation of MMPs. Therefore, cilostazol may protect against photoaging-induced wrinkle formation. PMID:27484958

  10. Anti-photoaging properties of the phosphodiesterase 3 inhibitor cilostazol in ultraviolet B-irradiated hairless mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ha Neui; Gil, Chan Hee; Kim, Yu Ri; Shin, Hwa Kyoung; Choi, Byung Tae

    2016-01-01

    We investigated whether cilostazol, an activator of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent intracellular signaling, could inhibit ultraviolet B (UVB) irradiation-induced photoaging in HR-1 hairless mice. Cilostazol decreased wrinkle formation and skin thickness in UVB-irradiated mice, as well as increased staining of collagen fibers and inhibition of reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation in the skin. Moreover, the proteolytic activities of gelatinase matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 and collagenase MMP-3 were significantly decreased in UVB-irradiated mice treated with cilostazol. Western blotting showed that UVB-induced activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) and nuclear factor (NF)-κB was significantly inhibited by cilostazol, whereas the activation of Akt was significantly enhanced by cilostazol. Confirmation of localized protein expression in the skin revealed marked p38 MAPK and NF-κB activation that was mainly detected in the dermis. Marked Akt activation was mainly detected in the epidermis. Our results suggest that cilostazol may have anti-photoaging effects on UVB-induced wrinkle formation by maintaining the extracellular matrix density in the dermis, which occurs via regulation of ROS and related p38 MAPK and NF-κB signaling, and subsequent down-regulation of MMPs. Therefore, cilostazol may protect against photoaging-induced wrinkle formation. PMID:27484958

  11. Glycyrrhizic acid (GA), a triterpenoid saponin glycoside alleviates ultraviolet-B irradiation-induced photoaging in human dermal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Afnan, Quadri; Adil, Mushtaq Dar; Nissar-Ul, Ashraf; Rafiq, Ahmad Rather; Amir, Hussian Faridi; Kaiser, Peerzada; Gupta, Vijay Kumar; Vishwakarma, Ram; Tasduq, Sheikh Abdullah

    2012-05-15

    Glycyrrhizic acid (GA), a triterpenoid saponin glycoside from the roots and rhizomes of licorice is used in traditional and modern medicine for the treatment of numerous medical conditions including skin diseases and beauty care product. In the present study, we investigated the effect of GA against ultraviolet B (UVB) irradiation-induced photoaging in human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs) and its possible mechanism of action. HDFs were subjected to photoaging by sub-toxic dose of UVB (10 mj/cm(2)) irradiation. Cell viability, matrix metalloproteinase 1 (MMP1), pro-collagen 1, cellular and nuclear morphology, cell cycle, intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), caspase 3 and hyaluronidase inhibition assays were performed. Western blotting was used to evaluate the expression of NF-kappa B (NF-κB) and cytochrome-C proteins. GA treatment significantly inhibited photoaging. It achieved this by reducing ROS, NF-κB, cytochrome c, caspase 3 levels and inhibiting hyaluronidase enzyme. The main mechanism seems to be, most likely by blocking MMP1 activation by modulating NF-κB signaling. These findings may be useful for development of natural and safe photoprotective agents against UVB irradiation. PMID:22516896

  12. Fatty acids - trans fatty acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The data supporting a negative effect of dietary trans fatty acids on cardiovascular disease risk is consistent. The primary dietary sources of trans fatty acids include partially hydrogenated fat and rudiment fat. The adverse effect of trans fatty acids on plasma lipoprotein profiles is consisten...

  13. A Difference in Fatty Acid Composition of Isocaloric High-Fat Diets Alters Metabolic Flexibility in Male C57BL/6JOlaHsd Mice

    PubMed Central

    Duivenvoorde, Loes P. M.; van Schothorst, Evert M.; Swarts, Hans M.; Kuda, Ondrej; Steenbergh, Esther; Termeulen, Sander; Kopecky, Jan; Keijer, Jaap

    2015-01-01

    Poly-unsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are considered to be healthier than saturated fatty acids (SFAs), but others postulate that especially the ratio of omega-6 to omega-3 PUFAs (n6/n3 ratio) determines health. Health can be determined with biomarkers, but functional health status is likely better reflected by challenge tests that assess metabolic flexibility. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of high-fat diets with different fatty acid compositions, but similar n6/n3 ratio, on metabolic flexibility. Therefore, adult male mice received isocaloric high-fat diets with either predominantly PUFAs (HFpu diet) or predominantly SFAs (HFs diet) but similar n6/n3 ratio for six months, during and after which several biomarkers for health were measured. Metabolic flexibility was assessed by the response to an oral glucose tolerance test, a fasting and re-feeding test and an oxygen restriction test (OxR; normobaric hypoxia). The latter two are non-invasive, indirect calorimetry-based tests that measure the adaptive capacity of the body as a whole. We found that the HFs diet, compared to the HFpu diet, increased mean adipocyte size, liver damage, and ectopic lipid storage in liver and muscle; although, we did not find differences in body weight, total adiposity, adipose tissue health, serum adipokines, whole body energy balance, or circadian rhythm between HFs and HFpu mice. HFs mice were, furthermore, less flexible in their response to both fasting- re-feeding and OxR, while glucose tolerance was indistinguishable. To conclude, the HFs versus the HFpu diet increased ectopic fat storage, liver damage, and mean adipocyte size and reduced metabolic flexibility in male mice. This study underscores the physiological relevance of indirect calorimetry-based challenge tests. PMID:26098756

  14. Adaptive alterations in the fatty acids composition under induced oxidative stress in heavy metal-tolerant filamentous fungus Paecilomyces marquandii cultured in ascorbic acid presence.

    PubMed

    Słaba, Mirosława; Gajewska, Ewa; Bernat, Przemysław; Fornalska, Magdalena; Długoński, Jerzy

    2013-05-01

    The ability of the heavy metal-tolerant fungus Paecilomyces marquandii to modulate whole cells fatty acid composition and saturation in response to IC50 of Cd, Pb, Zn, Ni, and Cu was studied. Cadmium and nickel caused the most significant growth reduction. In the mycelia cultured with all tested metals, with the exception of nickel, a rise in the fatty acid unsaturation was noted. The fungus exposure to Pb, Cu, and Ni led to significantly higher lipid peroxidation. P. marquandii incubated in the presence of the tested metals responded with an increase in the level of linoleic acid and escalation of electrolyte leakage. The highest efflux of electrolytes was caused by lead. In these conditions, the fungus was able to bind up to 100 mg g(-1) of lead, whereas the content of the other metals in the mycelium was significantly lower and reached from 3.18 mg g(-1) (Cu) to 15.21 mg g(-1) (Zn). Additionally, it was shown that ascorbic acid at the concentration of 1 mM protected fungal growth and prevented the changes in the fatty acid composition and saturation but did not alleviate lipid peroxidation or affect the increased permeability of membranes after lead exposure. Pro-oxidant properties of ascorbic acid in the copper-stressed cells manifested strong growth inhibition and enhanced metal accumulation as a result of membrane damage. Toxic metals action caused cellular modulations, which might contributed to P. marquandii tolerance to the studied metals. Moreover, these changes can enhance metal removal from contaminated environment. PMID:23132407

  15. Adaptive alterations in the fatty acids composition under induced oxidative stress in heavy metal-tolerant filamentous fungus Paecilomyces marquandii cultured in ascorbic acid presence.

    PubMed

    Słaba, Mirosława; Gajewska, Ewa; Bernat, Przemysław; Fornalska, Magdalena; Długoński, Jerzy

    2013-05-01

    The ability of the heavy metal-tolerant fungus Paecilomyces marquandii to modulate whole cells fatty acid composition and saturation in response to IC50 of Cd, Pb, Zn, Ni, and Cu was studied. Cadmium and nickel caused the most significant growth reduction. In the mycelia cultured with all tested metals, with the exception of nickel, a rise in the fatty acid unsaturation was noted. The fungus exposure to Pb, Cu, and Ni led to significantly higher lipid peroxidation. P. marquandii incubated in the presence of the tested metals responded with an increase in the level of linoleic acid and escalation of electrolyte leakage. The highest efflux of electrolytes was caused by lead. In these conditions, the fungus was able to bind up to 100 mg g(-1) of lead, whereas the content of the other metals in the mycelium was significantly lower and reached from 3.18 mg g(-1) (Cu) to 15.21 mg g(-1) (Zn). Additionally, it was shown that ascorbic acid at the concentration of 1 mM protected fungal growth and prevented the changes in the fatty acid composition and saturation but did not alleviate lipid peroxidation or affect the increased permeability of membranes after lead exposure. Pro-oxidant properties of ascorbic acid in the copper-stressed cells manifested strong growth inhibition and enhanced metal accumulation as a result of membrane damage. Toxic metals action caused cellular modulations, which might contributed to P. marquandii tolerance to the studied metals. Moreover, these changes can enhance metal removal from contaminated environment.

  16. Omega-3 fatty acid deficiency does not alter the effects of chronic fluoxetine treatment on central serotonin turnover or behavior in the forced swim test in female rats.

    PubMed

    McNamara, Robert K; Able, Jessica A; Liu, Yanhong; Jandacek, Ronald; Rider, Therese; Tso, Patrick; Lipton, Jack W

    2013-12-01

    While translational evidence suggests that long-chain omega-3 fatty acid status is positively associated with the efficacy of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor drugs, the neurochemical mechanisms mediating this interaction are not known. Here, we investigated the effects of dietary omega-3 (n-3) fatty acid insufficiency on the neurochemical and behavioral effects of chronic fluoxetine (FLX) treatment. Female rats were fed diets with (CON, n=56) or without (DEF, n=40) the n-3 fatty acids during peri-adolescent development (P21-P90), and one half of each group was administered FLX (10mg/kg/day) for 30days (P60-P90) prior to testing. In adulthood (P90), regional brain serotonin (5-HT) and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic (5-HIAA) concentrations, presynaptic markers of 5-HT neurotransmission, behavioral responses in the forced swim test (FST), and plasma FLX and norfluoxetine (NFLX) concentrations were investigated. Peri-adolescent n-3 insufficiency led to significant reductions in cortical docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n-3) composition in DEF (-25%, p≤0.0001) and DEF+FLX (-28%, p≤0.0001) rats. Untreated DEF rats exhibited significantly lower regional 5-HIAA/5-HT ratios compared with untreated CON rats, but exhibited similar behavioral responses in the FST. In both CON and DEF rats, chronic FLX treatment similarly and significantly decreased 5-HIAA concentrations and the 5-HIAA/5-HT ratio in the hypothalamus, hippocampus, and nucleus accumbens, brainstem tryptophan hydroxylase-2 mRNA expression, and immobility in the FST. While the FLX-induced reduction in 5-HIAA concentrations in the prefrontal cortex was significantly blunted in DEF rats, the reduction in the 5-HIAA/5-HT ratio was similar to CON rats. Although plasma FLX and NFLX levels were not significantly different in DEF and CON rats, the NFLX/FLX ratio was significantly lower in DEF+FLX rats. These preclinical data demonstrate that n-3 fatty acid deficiency does not significantly reduce the effects of chronic

  17. Omega-3 Fatty Acid Deficiency Does Not Alter the Effects of Chronic Fluoxetine Treatment on Central Serotonin Turnover or Behavior in the Forced Swim Test in Female Rats

    PubMed Central

    McNamara, Robert K.; Able, Jessica A.; Liu, Yanhong; Jandacek, Ronald; Rider, Therese; Tso, Patrick; Lipton, Jack W.

    2013-01-01

    While translational evidence suggests that long-chain omega-3 fatty acid status is positively associated with the efficacy of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor drugs, the neurochemical mechanisms mediating this interaction are not known. Here we investigated the effects of dietary omega-3 (n-3) fatty acid insufficiency on the neurochemical and behavioral effects of chronic fluoxetine (FLX) treatment. Female rats were fed diets with (CON, n=56) or without (DEF, n=40) the n-3 fatty acids during peri-adolescent development (P21-P90), and one half of each group were administered FLX (10 mg/kg/d) for 30 d (P60-P90) prior to testing. In adulthood (P90), regional brain serotonin (5-HT) and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic (5-HIAA) concentrations, presynaptic markers of 5-HT neurotransmission, behavioral responses in the forced swim test (FST), and plasma FLX and norfluoxetine (NFLX) concentrations were investigated. Peri-adolescent n-3 insufficiency led to significant reductions in cortical docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n-3) composition in DEF (−25%, p≤0.0001) and DEF+FLX (−28%, p≤0.0001) rats. Untreated DEF rats exhibited significantly lower regional 5-HIAA/5-HT ratios compared with untreated CON rats, but exhibited similar behavioral responses in the FST. In both CON and DEF rats, chronic FLX treatment similarly and significantly decreased 5-HIAA concentrations and the 5-HIAA/5-HT ratio in the hypothalamus, hippocampus, and nucleus accumbens, brainstem tryptophan hydroxylase-2 mRNA expression, and immobility in the FST. While the FLX-induced reduction in 5-HIAA concentrations in the prefrontal cortex was significantly blunted in DEF rats, the reduction in the 5-HIAA/5-HT ratio was similar to CON rats. Although plasma FLX and NFLX levels were not significantly different in DEF and CON rats, the NFLX/FLX ratio was significantly lower in DEF+FLX rats. These preclinical data demonstrate that n-3 fatty acid deficiency does not significantly reduce the effects of chronic

  18. The maximal cumulative solar UVB dose allowed to maintain healthy and young skin and prevent premature photoaging.

    PubMed

    Ichihashi, Masamitsu; Ando, Hideya

    2014-10-01

    The young facial skin of children with a smooth healthy appearance changes over time to photoaged skin having mottled pigmentation, solar lentigines, wrinkles, dry and rough skin, leathery texture, and benign and malignant tumors after exposure to chronic, repeated solar radiation. The first sign of photoaging in Japanese subjects is usually solar lentigines appearing around 20 years of age on the face. Fine wrinkles can then appear after 30 years of age, and benign skin tumors, seborrhoeic keratoses, can occur after 35 years of age in sun-exposed skin. We theoretically calculated the maximal daily exposure time to solar radiation, which could prevent the development of photoaged skin until 60 and 80 years of age, based on published data of personal solar UVB doses in sun-exposed skin. One MED (minimal erythema dose) was determined to be 20 mJ/cm(2) , and 200 MED was used as the average yearly dose of Japanese children. Further, we hypothesized that the annual dose of Japanese adults is the same as that of the children. The cumulative UVB dose at 20 years of age was thus calculated to be 4000 MED, and 22 MED was used as the maximal daily UVB dose based on data measured in Kobe, located in the central area of Japan. We used the solar UVB dose from 10:00 a.m. to 14:00 p.m. which occupies 60% of the total daily UV dose, to obtain the maximal UVB per hour in a day, and calculated the maximal daily UV exposure time that would delay the onset of solar lentigines until 60 or 80 years of age. The mean daily sun exposure time to maintain healthy skin until 80 years of age in the summer was calculated to be 2.54 min (0.14 MED) for unprotected skin and 127 min with the use of a sunscreen of SPF (sun protection factor) of 50. In this study, we did not evaluate the photoaging effect of UVA radiation, but findings of the adverse effects of UVA radiation on the skin have accumulated in the last decade. Therefore, it will be important to estimate the maximal dose of solar

  19. Alterations in fatty acids of polar lipids in Salmo trutta on long-term exposure to a glyphosate-based herbicide (Roundup).

    PubMed

    Bayir, Mehtap; Sirkecioglu, A Necdet; Bayir, Abdulkadir; Aras, Mevlut

    2013-10-15

    Abstract: In present study, the effects of sublethal doses (10 and 20 mg L(-1)) of Roundup on fatty acid pattern in muscle and liver of brown trout were investigated. For this purpose, fish were held in experiment tanks for 1 month. While total MUFA wasn't influenced, the highest total SFA and total n-6 PUFA were determined in group 10 mg L(-1) and the lowest values were determined in control group and group 20 mg L(-1) in muscle, respectively. The highest and the lowest total n-3 PUFA was found in control group and group of 10 mg L(-1) in muscle, respectively. Total n-3/n-6 PUFA ratio and EPA+DHA level of group 10 mg L(-1) were lower than other groups in muscle. The amount of total n-3/n-6 PUFA, EPA + DHA and total n-3 PUFA of control group were found higher than treatment groups in liver. While the highest total SFA was determined in group 10 mg L(-1), there wasn't difference between control group and group 20 mg L(-1) in liver. Both of doses herbicide had higher value than control for total MUFA in liver. While Roundup didn't inhibit n-3 PUFA synthesis in the muscle, both concentrations, exhibited inhibitory effect on n-3 PUFA synthesis in the liver. This result probably consequence of its indirect effect on the some enzyme activities or gene expressions in fatty acid metabolism of brown trout.

  20. Bisphenol A Alters n-6 Fatty Acid Composition and Decreases Antioxidant Enzyme Levels in Rat Testes: A LC-QTOF-Based Metabolomics Study

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Shanlei; Hu, Nan; Hu, Yanhui; Wu, Wei; Qiu, Lianglin; Zhang, Ruyang; Wang, Yubang; Wang, Shoulin; Zhou, Zuomin; Xia, Yankai; Wang, Xinru

    2012-01-01

    Background Male reproductive toxicity induced by exposure to bisphenol A (BPA) has been widely reported. The testes have proven to be a major target organ of BPA toxicity, so studying testicular metabolite variation holds promise for the discovery of mechanisms linked to the toxic effects of BPA on reproduction. Methodology/Principal Findings Male Sprague-Dawley rats were orally administered doses of BPA at the levels of 0, 50 mg/kg/d for 8 weeks. We used an unbiased liquid chromatography-quadrupole time-of-flight (LC-QTOF)-based metabolomics approach to discover, identify, and analyze the variation of testicular metabolites. Two n-6 fatty acids, linoleic acid (LA) and arachidonic acid (AA) were identified as potential testicular biomarkers. Decreased levels of LA and increased levels of AA as well as AA/LA ratio were observed in the testes of the exposed group. According to these suggestions, testicular antioxidant enzyme levels were detected. Testicular superoxide dismutase (SOD) declined significantly in the exposed group compared with that in the non-exposed group, and the glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) as well as catalase (CAT) also showed a decreasing trend in BPA treated group. Conclusions/Significance BPA caused testicular n-6 fatty acid composition variation and decreased antioxidant enzyme levels. This study emphasizes that metabolomics brings the promise of biomarkers identification for the discovery of mechanisms underlying reproductive toxicity. PMID:23024759

  1. Topical Administration of Manuka Oil Prevents UV-B Irradiation-Induced Cutaneous Photoaging in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Oh Sook; Yang, Beom Seok

    2013-01-01

    Manuka tree is indigenous to New Zealand, and its essential oil has been used as a traditional medicine to treat wounds, fever, and pain. Although there is a growing interest in the use of manuka oil for antiaging skin care products, little is known about its bioactivity. Solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation is the primary environmental factor causing skin damage and consequently premature aging. Therefore, we evaluated manuka oil for its effects against photoaging in UV-B-irradiated hairless mice. Topical application of manuka oil suppressed the UV-B-induced increase in skin thickness and wrinkle grading in a dose-dependent manner. Application of 10% manuka oil reduced the average length, depth, and % area of wrinkles significantly, and this was correlated with inhibition of loss of collagen fiber content and epidermal hyperplasia. Furthermore, we observed that manuka oil could suppress UV-B-induced skin inflammation by inhibiting the production of inflammatory cytokines. Taken together, this study provides evidence that manuka oil indeed possesses antiphotoaging activity, and this is associated with its inhibitory activity against skin inflammation induced by UV irradiation. PMID:23762170

  2. Anti-Photoaging Effects of Soy Isoflavone Extract (Aglycone and Acetylglucoside Form) from Soybean Cake

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chieh-Chen; Hsu, Bo-Yang; Wu, Nan-Lin; Tsui, Wen-Huei; Lin, Tzu-Ju; Su, Ching-Chieh; Hung, Chi-Feng

    2010-01-01

    Soy isoflavones, found in soybean and soybean products, have been reported to possess many physiological activities such as antioxidant activity, inhibition of cancer cell proliferation, reduction of cardiovascular risk, prevention of osteoporosis and alleviation of postmenopausal syndrome. In our previous study, soy isoflavone extract ISO-1 (containing 12 soy isoflavones) from soybean cake was demonstrated to prevent skin damage caused by UVB exposure. In this study, soy isoflavone extract from soybean cake was further purified and evaluated for the protective effects on UVB-induced damage. The results revealed that Fraction 3, which contains the aglycone group (daidzein, genistein and glycitein) and acetylglucoside group (acetyldaidzin, acetylgenistin and acetylglycitin) of soy isoflavones, could inhibit UVB-induced death of human keratinocytes and reduce the level of desquamation, transepidermal water loss (TEWL), erythema and epidermal thickness in mouse skin. Furthermore, topical application of Fraction 3 increased the activity of catalase and suppressed cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) expression in mice exposed to UVB. In addition, in comparison with ISO-1 and genistein, the Fraction 3 possessed much greater protective effects on both UVB-induced oxidative stress and keratinocyte death than other fractions. Therefore, the soy isoflavone extract Fraction 3 from soybean cake is a desirable anti-photoaging agent for skin care. PMID:21614173

  3. Flt3 is a target of coumestrol in protecting against UVB-induced skin photoaging.

    PubMed

    Park, Gaeun; Baek, Sohee; Kim, Jong-Eun; Lim, Tae-gyu; Lee, Charles C; Yang, Hee; Kang, Young-Gyu; Park, Jun Seong; Augustin, Martin; Mrosek, Michael; Lee, Chang Yong; Dong, Zigang; Huber, Robert; Lee, Ki Won

    2015-12-01

    While skin aging is a naturally occurring process by senescence, exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation accelerates wrinkle formation and sagging of skin. UV induces skin aging by degrading collagen via activating matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). In this study, we show that coumestrol, a metabolite of the soybean isoflavone daidzein, has a preventive effect on skin photoaging in three-dimensional human skin equivalent model. Coumestrol inhibited UVB-induced MMP-1 expression and activity. Whole human kinase profiling assay identified FLT3 kinase as a novel target protein of coumestrol in UVB-induced signaling pathway in skin. Coumestrol suppresses FLT3 kinase activity, and subsequently, Ras/MEK/ERK and Akt/p70 ribosomal S6 kinase pathway. This suppresses AP-1 activity and in turn, diminishes MMP-1 gene transcription. Using X-ray crystallography, the binding of coumestrol to FLT3 was defined and implied ATP-competitive inhibition. Residues Lys644 and Phe830 showed local changes to accommodate coumestrol in the ATP-binding pocket. 4-APIA, a pharmacological inhibitor of FLT3, inhibited MMP-1 expression and induced signal transduction changes similar to coumestrol. Taken together, coumestrol inhibits UVB-induced MMP-1 expression by suppressing FLT3 kinase activity. These findings suggest that coumestrol is a novel dietary compound with potential application in preventing and improving UVB-associated skin aging.

  4. Alterations in sheep peripheral blood mononuclear cell proliferation and cytokine release by polyunsaturated fatty acid supplementation in the diet under high ambient temperature.

    PubMed

    Ciliberti, Maria Giovanna; Albenzio, Marzia; Annicchiarico, Giovanni; Sevi, Agostino; Muscio, Antonio; Caroprese, Mariangela

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) supplementation from different sources in the diet of dairy sheep under high ambient temperatures on ex vivo lymphocyte proliferation and inflammatory responses. The experiment was carried out during summer: 32 Comisana ewes were divided into 4 groups of 8. The FS group was supplemented with whole flaxseed, the AG group was supplemented with Ascophyllum nodosum, the FS+AG group was supplemented with a combination of flaxseed and A. nodosum. The fourth group (CON group) was a control and received a diet containing no supplement. The average maximum temperature was around 33°C during wk 2 and 3, whereas the mean temperature never decreased below 26°C. Following 15 d of treatment with respective diets, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from sheep who received a diet supplemented with A. nodosum had impaired cell proliferation responses and IL-6 production after mitogen stimulation compared with PBMC from FS+AG sheep. In addition, PBMC from AG sheep displayed impaired cell proliferation compared with cells from the CON group. The FS+AG cells produced lower levels of IL-10 than CON cells, and higher IL-6 than AG and CON cells. Results demonstrated that the supplementation with PUFA from different sources in a sheep's diet can influence their immunological responses under high ambient temperatures depending on the composition of fatty acid supplementation. In particular, synergistic effects of different PUFA from flaxseed and A. nodosum, simultaneously administrated in the sheep diet, were observed on activation of inflammation response. PMID:25497814

  5. Targeted mutation of Δ12 and Δ15 desaturase genes in hemp produce major alterations in seed fatty acid composition including a high oleic hemp oil.

    PubMed

    Bielecka, Monika; Kaminski, Filip; Adams, Ian; Poulson, Helen; Sloan, Raymond; Li, Yi; Larson, Tony R; Winzer, Thilo; Graham, Ian A

    2014-06-01

    We used expressed sequence tag library and whole genome sequence mining to identify a suite of putative desaturase genes representing the four main activities required for production of polyunsaturated fatty acids in hemp seed oil. Phylogenetic-based classification and developing seed transcriptome analysis informed selection for further analysis of one of seven Δ12 desaturases and one of three Δ15 desaturases that we designate CSFAD2A and CSFAD3A, respectively. Heterologous expression of corresponding cDNAs in Saccharomyces cerevisiae showed CSFAD2A to have Δx+3 activity, while CSFAD3A activity was exclusively at the Δ15 position. TILLING of an ethyl methane sulphonate mutagenized population identified multiple alleles including non-sense mutations in both genes and fatty acid composition of seed oil confirmed these to be the major Δ12 and Δ15 desaturases in developing hemp seed. Following four backcrosses and sibling crosses to achieve homozygosity, csfad2a-1 was grown in the field and found to produce a 70 molar per cent high oleic acid (18:1(Δ9) ) oil at yields similar to wild type. Cold-pressed high oleic oil produced fewer volatiles and had a sevenfold increase in shelf life compared to wild type. Two low abundance octadecadienoic acids, 18:2(Δ6,9) and 18:2(Δ9,15), were identified in the high oleic oil, and their presence suggests remaining endogenous desaturase activities utilize the increased levels of oleic acid as substrate. Consistent with this, CSFAD3A produces 18:2(Δ9,15) from endogenous 18:1(Δ9) when expressed in S. cerevisiae. This work lays the foundation for the development of additional novel oil varieties in this multipurpose low input crop.

  6. Omega-3 fatty acid deficient male rats exhibit abnormal behavioral activation in the forced swim test following chronic fluoxetine treatment: association with altered 5-HT1A and alpha2A adrenergic receptor expression.

    PubMed

    Able, Jessica A; Liu, Yanhong; Jandacek, Ronald; Rider, Therese; Tso, Patrick; McNamara, Robert K

    2014-03-01

    Omega-3 fatty acid deficiency during development leads to enduing alterations in central monoamine neurotransmission in rat brain. Here we investigated the effects of omega-3 fatty acid deficiency on behavioral and neurochemical responses to chronic fluoxetine (FLX) treatment. Male rats were fed diets with (CON, n = 34) or without (DEF, n = 30) the omega-3 fatty acid precursor alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) during peri-adolescent development (P21-P90). A subset of CON (n = 14) and DEF (n = 12) rats were administered FLX (10 mg/kg/d) through their drinking water for 30 d beginning on P60. The forced swimming test (FST) was initiated on P90, and regional brain mRNA markers of serotonin and noradrenaline neurotransmission were determined. Dietary ALA depletion led to significant reductions in frontal cortex docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n-3) composition in DEF (-26%, p = 0.0001) and DEF + FLX (-32%, p = 0.0001) rats. Plasma FLX and norfluoxetine concentrations did not different between FLX-treated DEF and CON rats. During the 15-min FST pretest, DEF + FLX rats exhibited significantly greater climbing behavior compared with CON + FLX rats. During the 5-min test trial, FLX treatment reduced immobility and increased swimming in CON and DEF rats, and only DEF + FLX rats exhibited significant elevations in climbing behavior. DEF + FLX rats exhibited greater midbrain, and lower frontal cortex, 5-HT1A mRNA expression compared with all groups including CON + FLX rats. DEF + FLX rats also exhibited greater midbrain alpha2A adrenergic receptor mRNA expression which was positively correlated with climbing behavior in the FST. These preclinical data demonstrate that low omega-3 fatty acid status leads to abnormal behavioral and neurochemical responses to chronic FLX treatment in male rats.

  7. Altered microRNA-9 Expression Level is Directly Correlated with Pathogenesis of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease by Targeting Onecut2 and SIRT1

    PubMed Central

    Ao, Ran; Wang, Ying; Tong, Jing; Wang, Bai-Fang

    2016-01-01

    Background MicroRNA-9 (miR-9) was detected in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) patients to understand the role of miR-9 in NAFLD development. Material/Methods Between February 2014 and February 2015, 105 cases of NAFLD were recruited and confirmed by liver biopsy pathology, including patients with mild NAFLD (n=58) and moderate-severe NAFLD (n=47); nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) (n=53) and non-NASH (n=52); and 50 healthy participants were regarded as the healthy control group. MiR-9 expression was measured by qRT-PCR. For in vitro experiments, L-02 normal liver cells were divided into normal control group (cultured with original culture medium), dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) group (cultured with DMSO) and oleic acid group (cultured with oleic acid to induce fatty change), and MTT assay was used to measure the effect of different oleic acid concentrations on cell proliferation. Nile red staining was used to detect intracellular accumulation of lipid droplets. Further, synthetic miR-9 mimic and its control and miR-9 inhibitors and its control were independently transfected into L-02 cells. Results MiR-9 levels in the mild NAFLD group and moderate-severe NAFLD group were significantly higher than in the healthy control group (both P<0.05). Mean fluorescence intensity of lipid droplets increased with the duration of induction, and were dramatically higher in oleate-treated L-02 cells; intracellular triglyceride (TG) content was also higher. miR-9 levels significantly increased following oleate induction. Importantly, miR-9 levels were significantly elevated upon miR-9 mimic transfection. Conversely, miR-9 level was lowered with miR-9 inhibitors transfection. Additionally, Onecut2 and SIRT1 were identified as miR-9 targets. Conclusions A positive relationship between miR-9 and steatosis was established with our results that miR-9 mimic transfection decreased intracellular lipid content. Finally, we identified 2 miR-9 targets, Onecut2 and SIRT1, which may be

  8. Hypoxia and fatty liver.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Tomohiro; Shinjo, Satoko; Arai, Takatomo; Kanai, Mai; Goda, Nobuhito

    2014-11-01

    The liver is a central organ that metabolizes excessive nutrients for storage in the form of glycogen and lipids and supplies energy-producing substrates to the peripheral tissues to maintain their function, even under starved conditions. These processes require a considerable amount of oxygen, which causes a steep oxygen gradient throughout the hepatic lobules. Alcohol consumption and/or excessive food intake can alter the hepatic metabolic balance drastically, which can precipitate fatty liver disease, a major cause of chronic liver diseases worldwide, ranging from simple steatosis, through steatohepatitis and hepatic fibrosis, to liver cirrhosis. Altered hepatic metabolism and tissue remodeling in fatty liver disease further disrupt hepatic oxygen homeostasis, resulting in severe liver hypoxia. As master regulators of adaptive responses to hypoxic stress, hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) modulate various cellular and organ functions, including erythropoiesis, angiogenesis, metabolic demand, and cell survival, by activating their target genes during fetal development and also in many disease conditions such as cancer, heart failure, and diabetes. In the past decade, it has become clear that HIFs serve as key factors in the regulation of lipid metabolism and fatty liver formation. This review discusses the molecular mechanisms by which hypoxia and HIFs regulate lipid metabolism in the development and progression of fatty liver disease. PMID:25386057

  9. Suppression of the ELO-2 FA elongation activity results in alterations of the fatty acid composition and multiple physiological defects, including abnormal ultradian rhythms, in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed Central

    Kniazeva, Marina; Sieber, Matt; McCauley, Scott; Zhang, Kang; Watts, Jennifer L; Han, Min

    2003-01-01

    While the general steps of fatty acid (FA) biosynthesis are well understood, the individual enzymes involved in the elongation of long chain saturated and polyunsaturated FA (PUFA) are largely unknown. Recent research indicates that these enzymes might be of considerable physiological importance for human health. We use Caenorhabditis elegans to study FA elongation activities and associated abnormal phenotypes. In this article we report that the predicted C. elegans F11E6.5/ELO-2 is a functional enzyme with the FA elongation activity. It is responsible for the elongation of palmitic acid and is involved in PUFA biosynthesis. RNAi-mediated suppression of ELO-2 causes an accumulation of palmitate and an associated decrease in the PUFA fraction in triacylglycerides and phospholipid classes. This imbalance in the FA composition results in multiple phenotypic defects such as slow growth, small body size, reproductive defects, and changes in rhythmic behavior. ELO-2 cooperates with the previously reported ELO-1 in 20-carbon PUFA production, and at least one of the enzymes must function to provide normal growth and development in C. elegans. The presented data indicate that suppression of a single enzyme of the FA elongation machinery is enough to affect various organs and systems in worms. This effect resembles syndromic disorders in humans. PMID:12586704

  10. Enhanced secretion of glucosyltransferase by changes in potassium ion concentrations is accompanied by an altered pattern of membrane fatty acids in Streptococcus salivarius.

    PubMed Central

    Markevics, L J; Jacques, N A

    1985-01-01

    Growth of Streptococcus salivarius ATCC 25975 in a Na+-based medium containing 1 to 50 mM K+ enhanced extracellular glucosyltransferase production by 3.7-fold over the level of enzyme found in a K+-based medium containing 184 mM K+. Enzyme synthesis and secretion were further enhanced in a nonlinear manner with respect to the concentration of K+ in the medium when cells were cultured from an inoculum grown in the presence of 1 mM K+. This concentration of K+ was the minimum required to maintain a near-maximum growth rate for S. salivarius in medium where K+ was limited. A maximum sevenfold stimulation of glucosyltransferase production occurred at 18 mM K+ under these conditions. Analysis of the total membrane lipids showed that the composition of octadecanoic acid increased with decreasing K+ concentration essentially at the expense of the octadecenoic acid moiety. Extracellular glucosyltransferase production was found to be directly related to the ratio of these two fatty acids. Similar confirmatory results over a greater range of enzyme production were obtained with nonproliferating cell suspensions. PMID:3156125

  11. Overexpression of the olive acyl carrier protein gene (OeACP1) produces alterations in fatty acid composition of tobacco leaves.

    PubMed

    De Marchis, Francesca; Valeri, Maria Cristina; Pompa, Andrea; Bouveret, Emmanuelle; Alagna, Fiammetta; Grisan, Simone; Stanzione, Vitale; Mariotti, Roberto; Cultrera, Nicolò; Baldoni, Luciana; Bellucci, Michele

    2016-02-01

    Taking into account that fatty acid (FA) biosynthesis plays a crucial role in lipid accumulation in olive (Olea europaea L.) mesocarp, we investigated the effect of olive acyl carrier protein (ACP) on FA composition by overexpressing an olive ACP cDNA in tobacco plants. The OeACP1.1A cDNA was inserted in the nucleus or in the chloroplast DNA of different tobacco plants, resulting in extensive transcription of the transgenes. The transplastomic plants accumulated lower olive ACP levels in comparison to nuclear-transformed plants. Moreover, the phenotype of the former plants was characterized by pale green/white cotyledons with abnormal chloroplasts, delayed germination and reduced growth. We suggest that the transplastomic phenotype was likely caused by inefficient olive ACP mRNA translation in chloroplast stroma. Conversely, total lipids from leaves of nuclear transformants expressing high olive ACP levels showed a significant increase in oleic acid (18:1) and linolenic acid (18:3), and a concomitant significant reduction of hexadecadienoic acid (16:2) and hexadecatrienoic acid (16:3). This implies that in leaves of tobacco transformants, as likely in the mesocarp of olive fruit, olive ACP not only plays a general role in FA synthesis, but seems to be specifically involved in chain length regulation forwarding the elongation to C18 FAs and the subsequent desaturation to 18:1 and 18:3. PMID:26560313

  12. Characterization and mechanisms of photoageing-related changes in skin. Damages of basement membrane and dermal structures.

    PubMed

    Amano, Satoshi

    2016-08-01

    Sun-exposed skin is characterized by superficial changes such as wrinkles, sagging and pigmentary changes, and also many internal changes in the structure and function of epidermis, basement membrane (BM) and dermis. These changes (so-called photoageing) are predominantly induced by the ultraviolet (UV) component of sunlight. Epidermis of UV-irradiated skin produced several enzymes such as matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), urinary plasminogen activator (uPA)/plasmin and heparanase, which degrade dermal collagen fibres and elastic fibres in the dermis, and components of epidermal BM. The BM at the dermal-epidermal junction (DEJ) controls dermal-epidermal signalling and plays an important role in the maintenance of a healthy epidermis and dermis. BM is repetitively damaged in sun-exposed skin compared with unexposed skin, leading to epidermal and dermal deterioration and accelerated skin ageing. UV exposure also induces an increase in vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), an angiogenic factor, while thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1), an anti-angiogenic factor, is decreased; these changes induce angiogenesis in papillary dermis with increased migration of elastase-positive leucocytes, leading to dermal elastic fibre damage. Elastic fibres, such as oxytalan fibres in papillary dermis, are associated with not only skin resilience, but also skin surface texture, and elastic fibre formation by fibroblasts is facilitated by increased expression of fibulin-5. Thus, induction of fibulin-5 expression is a damage-repair mechanism, and fibulin-5 is an early marker of photoaged skin. UV-induced skin damage is cumulative and leads to premature ageing of skin. However, appropriate daily skincare may ameliorate photoageing by inhibiting processes causing damage and enhancing repair processes. PMID:27539897

  13. Ability of sodium copper chlorophyllin complex to repair photoaged skin by stimulation of biomarkers in human extracellular matrix

    PubMed Central

    McCook, John P; Stephens, Thomas J; Jiang, Lily I; Law, Robert M; Gotz, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To examine the effect of sodium copper chlorophyllin complex on the expression of biomarkers of photoaged dermal extracellular matrix indicative of skin repair. Patients and methods Following a previously published 12-day clinical assessment model, skin biopsy samples from the forearms of four healthy females with signs of photoaged skin were obtained and samples were analyzed by immunohistochemistry for key biomarkers of aging skin after each subject was treated with a test material consisting of a gel containing a liposomal dispersion of sodium copper chlorophyllin complex 0.05%, a positive control of tretinoin cream 0.025%, and an untreated negative control. Results There was a statistically significantly greater amount of fibrillin/amyloid P and epidermal mucins found for skin treated with the test material containing 0.05% sodium copper chlorophyllin complex and the reference control tretinoin 0.025% cream compared to the negative control (untreated site). Expression of procollagen 1 and dermal mucin also showed a greater presence in the samples treated with the test material and the reference control compared to the negative control, though the differences were not statistically significant. No adverse events were observed or reported by the subjects during the course of the study. Conclusion The results of this human biopsy study suggest that both retinoids and sodium copper chlorophyllin complex have beneficial effects on biomarkers of photoaged skin. Products containing both sodium copper chlorophyllin complex and retinols may provide a dual approach to reversing age-related decreases in hyaluronic acid (HA) in the skin: inhibition of the breakdown of HA via sodium copper chlorophyllin complex by inhibition of hyaluronidase, and stimulation of HA synthases by retinol. PMID:27524916

  14. Garlic Supplementation Ameliorates UV-Induced Photoaging in Hairless Mice by Regulating Antioxidative Activity and MMPs Expression.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hye Kyung

    2016-01-08

    UV exposure is associated with oxidative stress and is the primary factor in skin photoaging. UV-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) cause the up-regulation of metalloproteinase (MMPs) and the degradation of dermal collagen and elastic fibers. Garlic and its components have been reported to exert antioxidative effects. The present study investigated the protective effect of garlic on UV-induced photoaging and MMPs regulation in hairless mice. Garlic was supplemented in the diet, and Skh-1 hairless mice were exposed to UV irradiation five days/week for eight weeks. Mice were divided into four groups; Non-UV, UV-irradiated control, UV+1% garlic powder diet group, and UV+2% garlic powder diet group. Chronic UV irradiation induced rough wrinkling of the skin with hyperkeratosis, and administration of garlic diminished the coarse wrinkle formation. UV-induced dorsal skin and epidermal thickness were also ameliorated by garlic supplementation. ROS generation, skin and serum malondialdehyde levels were significantly increased by UV exposure and were ameliorated by garlic administration although the effects were not dose-dependent. Antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase and catalase activities in skin tissues were markedly reduced by UV irradiation and garlic treatment increased these enzyme activities. UV-induced MMP-1 and MMP-2 protein levels were suppressed by garlic administration. Furthermore, garlic supplementation prevented the UV-induced increase of MMP-1 mRNA expression and the UV-induced decrease of procollagen mRNA expression. These results suggest that garlic may be effective for preventing skin photoaging accelerated by UV irradiation through the antioxidative system and MMP regulation.

  15. Pretreatment of photoaged forearm skin with topical tretinoin accelerates healing of full-thickness wounds.

    PubMed

    Popp, C; Kligman, A M; Stoudemayer, T J

    1995-01-01

    Pretreatment of skin with all-trans retinoic acid (tretinoin) has been shown to enhance wound healing. Previous studies have mainly used animal models to demonstrate this effect. We wanted to determine whether pretreatment could promote wound healing in severely photoaged dorsal forearm skin. Four elderly men with severely actinically damaged forearms were treated daily for 16 weeks. One arm was treated with 0.05-0.1% tretinoin cream (Retin A, Ortho), and the other with Purpose cream (Ortho) as a vehicle control. Four-millimetre punch biopsies were taken from both dorsal forearms prior to treatment. After 16 weeks, full-thickness 2-mm punch biopsies were taken from both sides. Serial photographs were taken, and healing of the wounds quantitatively assessed by image analysis. On the 11th day, the wounds were excised using a 4-mm biopsy punch. Biopsies were processed for light microscopy. After 16 weeks, the tretinoin-treated forearms showed moderate erythema and scaling. Polarized light photographs revealed multiple, red, vascularized foci and/or a diffuse network of small vessels. The histological effects were typical for tretinoin, i.e. compaction of the stratum corneum, epidermal acanthosis with correction of atypia, an increase in small vessels, and increased cellularity in the upper dermis. Purpose cream had no effect, either clinically or histologically. On the tretinoin-treated side, the wound areas were 35-37% smaller on days 1 and 4, and 47-50% smaller on days 6, 8, 11, compared with the controls. Clinically and histologically, reepithelialization occurred more rapidly. Thus tretinoin dramatically accelerated wound healing in photodamaged skin.

  16. Production of hydroxylated fatty acids in genetically modified plants

    DOEpatents

    Somerville, Chris; Broun, Pierre; van de Loo, Frank; Boddupalli, Sekhar S.

    2011-08-23

    This invention relates to plant fatty acyl hydroxylases. Methods to use conserved amino acid or nucleotide sequences to obtain plant fatty acyl hydroxylases are described. Also described is the use of cDNA clones encoding a plant hydroxylase to produce a family of hydroxylated fatty acids in transgenic plants. In addition, the use of genes encoding fatty acid hydroxylases or desaturases to alter the level of lipid fatty acid unsaturation in transgenic plants is described.

  17. Production of hydroxylated fatty acids in genetically modified plants

    DOEpatents

    Somerville, Chris; Broun, Pierre; van de Loo, Frank; Boddupalli, Sekhar S.

    2005-08-30

    This invention relates to plant fatty acyl hydroxylases. Methods to use conserved amino acid or nucleotide sequences to obtain plant fatty acyl hydroxylases are described. Also described is the use of cDNA clones encoding a plant hydroxylase to produce a family of hydroxylated fatty acids in transgenic plants. In addition, the use of genes encoding fatty acid hydroxylases or desaturases to alter the level of lipid fatty acid unsaturation in transgenic plants is described.

  18. Pharmacological blockade of the fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) alters neural proliferation, apoptosis and gliosis in the rat hippocampus, hypothalamus and striatum in a negative energy context

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, Patricia; Bindila, Laura; Pastor, Antoni; Pérez-Martín, Margarita; Pavón, Francisco J.; Serrano, Antonia; de la Torre, Rafael; Lutz, Beat; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando; Suárez, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Endocannabinoids participate in the control of neurogenesis, neural cell death and gliosis. The pharmacological effect of the fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) inhibitor URB597, which limits the endocannabinoid degradation, was investigated in the present study. Cell proliferation (phospho-H3+ or BrdU+ cells) of the main adult neurogenic zones as well as apoptosis (cleaved caspase-3+), astroglia (GFAP+), and microglia (Iba1+ cells) were analyzed in the hippocampus, hypothalamus and striatum of rats intraperitoneally treated with URB597 (0.3 mg/kg/day) at one dose/4-days resting or 5 doses (1 dose/day). Repeated URB597 treatment increased the plasma levels of the N-acylethanolamines oleoylethanolamide, palmitoylethanolamide and arachidonoylethanolamine, reduced the plasma levels of glucose, triglycerides and cholesterol, and induced a transitory body weight decrease. The hippocampi of repeated URB597-treated rats showed a reduced number of phospho-H3+ and BrdU+ subgranular cells as well as GFAP+, Iba1+ and cleaved caspase-3+ cells, which was accompanied with decreased hippocampal expression of the cannabinoid CB1 receptor gene Cnr1 and Faah. In the hypothalami of these rats, the number of phospho-H3+, GFAP+ and 3-weeks-old BrdU+ cells was specifically decreased. The reduced striatal expression of CB1 receptor in repeated URB597-treated rats was only associated with a reduced apoptosis. In contrast, the striatum of acute URB597-treated rats showed an increased number of subventricular proliferative, astroglial and apoptotic cells, which was accompanied with increased Faah expression. Main results indicated that FAAH inhibitor URB597 decreased neural proliferation, glia and apoptosis in a brain region-dependent manner, which were coupled to local changes in Faah and/or Cnr1 expression and a negative energy context. PMID:25870539

  19. Fractional Erbium laser in the treatment of photoaging: randomized comparative, clinical and histopathological study of ablative (2940nm) vs. non-ablative (1540nm) methods after 3 months*

    PubMed Central

    Borges, Juliano; Cuzzi, Tullia; Mandarim-de-Lacerda, Carlos Alberto; Manela-Azulay, Mônica

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Fractional non-ablative lasers keep the epidermis intact, while fractional ablative lasers remove it, making them theoretically more effective. OBJECTIVES To evaluate the clinical and histological alterations induced by fractional photothermolysis for treating photoaging, comparing the possible equivalence of multiple sessions of 1540nm Erbium, to one session of 2940nm Erbium. METHODS Eighteen patients (mean age 55.9) completed the treatment with three sessions of 1540nm fractional Erbium laser on one side of the face (50 mJ/mB, 15ms, 2 passes), and one session of 2940nm on the other side (5mJ/mB, 0.25ms, 2 passes). Biopsies were performed before and 3 months after treatment. Clinical, histological and morphometric evaluations were carried out. RESULTS All patients presented clinical improvement with no statistically significant difference (p> 0.05) between the treated sides. Histopathology revealed a new organization of collagen and elastic fibers, accompanied by edema, which was more evident with the 2940nm laser. This finding was confirmed by morphometry, which showed a decrease in collagen density for both treatments, with a statistical significance for the 2940nm laser (p > 0.001). CONCLUSIONS Three 1540nm sessions were clinically equivalent to one 2940nm session. The edema probably contributed to the positive results after three months, togheter with the new collagen and elastic fibers organization. The greater edema after the 2940nm session indicates that dermal remodeling takes longer than with 1540nm. It is possible that this histological superiority relates to a more prolonged effect, but a cohort longer than three months is needed to confirm that supposition. PMID:24770501

  20. Safety and lipid-altering efficacy of a new omega-3 fatty acid and antioxidant-containing medical food in men and women with elevated triacylglycerols.

    PubMed

    Maki, K C; Geohas, J G; Dicklin, M R; Huebner, M; Udani, J K

    2015-08-01

    This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled multi-center trial investigated the lipid-altering effects of a medical food (PDL-0101) providing 1.8 g/d eicosapentaenoic acid; 12 mg/d astaxanthin, a marine algae-derived carotenoid; and 100 mg/d tocopherol-free gamma/delta tocotrienols enriched with geranylgeraniol, extracted from annatto, on triacylglycerols (TAG), other lipoprotein lipids, and oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LDL) in 102 subjects with TAG 150-499 mg/dL (1.69-5.63 mmol/L) and LDL cholesterol (LDL-C) ≥70 mg/dL (1.81 mmol/L). Compared to placebo, after eight weeks of treatment, PDL-0101 significantly reduced median TAG (-9.5% vs. 10.6%, p<0.001), while not significantly altering mean LDL-C (-3.0% vs. -8.0% for PDL-0101 and placebo, respectively, p=0.071), mean high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (~3% decrease in both groups, p=0.732), or median oxidized LDL concentrations (5% vs. -5% for PDL-0101 and placebo, respectively, p=0.112). These results demonstrate that PDL-0101 is an effective medical food for the management of elevated TAG. PMID:26076828

  1. Oral administration of cobalt acetate alters milk fatty acid composition, consistent with an inhibition of stearoyl-coenzyme A desaturase in lactating ewes.

    PubMed

    Frutos, P; Toral, P G; Ramos-Morales, E; Shingfield, K J; Belenguer, A; Hervás, G

    2014-02-01

    Previous investigations have shown that cobalt (Co) modifies milk fat composition in cattle, consistent with an inhibition of stearoyl-coenzyme A desaturase (SCD) activity, but it remains unclear whether other ruminant species are also affected. The present study examined the effects of oral administration of Co acetate on intake, rumen function, and milk production and fatty acid (FA) composition in sheep. Twenty lactating Assaf ewes were allocated into 1 of 4 groups and used in a continuous randomized block design that involved a 15-d adaptation, a 6-d treatment, and a 10-d posttreatment period. During the treatment period, animals received an oral drench supplying 0 (control), 3 (Co3), 6 (Co6), and 9 (Co9) mg of Co/kg of BW per day, administered in 3 equal doses at 8-h intervals. Cobalt acetate had no influence on intake or milk fat and protein concentrations, whereas treatments Co6 and Co9 tended to lower milk yield. Results on rumen parameters showed no effects on rumen fermentation, FA composition, or bacterial community structure. Administration of Co acetate decreased milk concentrations of FA containing a cis-9 double bond and SCD product:substrate ratios, consistent with an inhibition of SCD activity in the ovine mammary gland. Temporal changes in milk fat composition indicated that the effects of treatments were evident within 3d of dosing, with further changes being apparent after 6d and reverting to pretreatment values by d 6 after administration. Effect on milk FA composition did not differ substantially in response to incremental doses of Co acetate. On average, Co decreased milk cis-9 10:1/10:0, cis-9 12:1/12:0, cis-9 14:1/14:0, cis-9 16:1/16:0, cis-9 17:1/17:0, cis-9 18:1/18:0, and cis-9,trans-11 18:2/trans-11 18:1 concentration ratios by 30, 32, 38, 33, 21, 24, and 25%, respectively. Changes in milk fat cis-9 10:1, cis-9 12:1, and cis-9 14:1 concentrations to Co treatment indicated that 51% of cis-9 18:1 and cis-9,trans-11 18:2 secreted in milk

  2. Cynaropicrin from Cynara scolymus L. suppresses photoaging of skin by inhibiting the transcription activity of nuclear factor-kappa B.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yuka Tsuda; Tanaka, Kiyotaka; Kojima, Hiroyuki; Hamada, Tomoji; Masutani, Teruaki; Tsuboi, Makoto; Akao, Yukihiro

    2013-01-15

    Aging of skin is characterized by skin wrinkling, laxity, and pigmentation induced by several environmental stress factors. Histological changes during the photoaging of skin include hyperproliferation of keratinocytes and melanocytes causing skin wrinkles and pigmentation. Nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) is one of the representative transcription factors active in conjunction with inflammation. NF-κB is activated by stimulation such as ultraviolet rays and inflammatory cytokines and induces the expression of various genes such as those of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) and matrix metalloprotease-1 (MMP-1). We screened several plant extracts for their possible inhibitory effect on the transcriptional activity of NF-κB. One of them, an extract from Cynara scolymus L., showed a greatest effect on the suppression of NF-κB transactivation. As a result, we found that cynaropicrin, which is a sesquiterpene lactone, inhibited the NF-κB-mediated transactivation of bFGF and MMP-1. Furthermore, it was confirmed that in an in vivo mouse model cynaropicrin prevented skin photoaging processes leading to the hyperproliferation of keratinocytes and melanocytes. These findings taken together indicate that cynaropicrin is an effective antiphotoaging agent that acts by inhibiting NF-κB-mediated transactivation. PMID:23232059

  3. Cynaropicrin from Cynara scolymus L. suppresses photoaging of skin by inhibiting the transcription activity of nuclear factor-kappa B.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yuka Tsuda; Tanaka, Kiyotaka; Kojima, Hiroyuki; Hamada, Tomoji; Masutani, Teruaki; Tsuboi, Makoto; Akao, Yukihiro

    2013-01-15

    Aging of skin is characterized by skin wrinkling, laxity, and pigmentation induced by several environmental stress factors. Histological changes during the photoaging of skin include hyperproliferation of keratinocytes and melanocytes causing skin wrinkles and pigmentation. Nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) is one of the representative transcription factors active in conjunction with inflammation. NF-κB is activated by stimulation such as ultraviolet rays and inflammatory cytokines and induces the expression of various genes such as those of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) and matrix metalloprotease-1 (MMP-1). We screened several plant extracts for their possible inhibitory effect on the transcriptional activity of NF-κB. One of them, an extract from Cynara scolymus L., showed a greatest effect on the suppression of NF-κB transactivation. As a result, we found that cynaropicrin, which is a sesquiterpene lactone, inhibited the NF-κB-mediated transactivation of bFGF and MMP-1. Furthermore, it was confirmed that in an in vivo mouse model cynaropicrin prevented skin photoaging processes leading to the hyperproliferation of keratinocytes and melanocytes. These findings taken together indicate that cynaropicrin is an effective antiphotoaging agent that acts by inhibiting NF-κB-mediated transactivation.

  4. Skin anti-photoaging properties of ginsenoside Rh2 epimers in UV-B-irradiated human keratinocyte cells.

    PubMed

    Oh, Sun-Joo; Lee, Sihyeong; Choi, Woo-Yong; Lim, Chang-Jin

    2014-09-01

    Ginseng, one of the most widely used herbal medicines, has a wide range of therapeutic and pharmacological applications. Ginsenosides are the major bioactive ingredients of ginseng, which are responsible for various pharmacological activities of ginseng. Ginsenoside Rh2, known as an antitumour ginsenoside, exists as two different stereoisomeric forms, 20(S)-ginsenoside Rh2 [20(S)-Rh2] and 20(R)-ginsenoside Rh2 [20(R)-Rh2]. This work aimed to assess and compare skin anti-photoaging activities of 20(S)-Rh2 and 20(R)-Rh2 in UV-B-irradiated HaCat cells. 20(S)-Rh2, but not 20(R)-Rh2, was able to suppress UV-B-induced ROS production in HaCat cells. Both stereoisomeric forms could not modulate cellular survival and NO level in UV-B-irradiated HaCat cells. Both 20(S)-Rh2 and 20(R)-Rh2 exhibited suppressive effects on UV-B-induced MMP-2 activity and expression in HaCat cells. In brief, the two stereoisomers of ginsenoside Rh2, 20(S)-Rh2 and 20(R)-Rh2, possess skin anti-photoaging effects but possibly in different fashions. PMID:25116621

  5. Anti-photoaging activity and inhibition of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) by marine red alga, Corallina pilulifera methanol extract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, BoMi; Qian, Zhong-Ji; Kim, Moon-Moo; Nam, Ki Wan; Kim, Se-Kwon

    2009-02-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), a key component in photoaging of the skin due to exposure to ultraviolet A, appear to be increased by UV-irradiation-associated generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In this study, the alga Corallina pilulifera methanol (CPM) extract has been shown to exert a potent antioxidant activity and protective effect on UVA-induced oxidative stress of human dermal fibroblast (HDF) cell. Antioxidant evaluated by various antioxidant assays. These include reducing power, total antioxidant, DPPH radical scavenging, hydroxyl radical scavenging and protective effect on DNA damage caused by hydroxyl radicals generated. Further, the ROS level was detected using a fluorescence probe, 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA), which could be converted to highly fluorescent dichlorofluorescein (DCF) with the presence of intracellular ROS on HT-1080 cells. Those various antioxidant activities were compared to standard antioxidants such as α-tocopherol. In addition, the in vitro activities of MMP-2 and MMP-9 in HDF cell were inhibited by C. pilulifera methanol extract dose dependently by using gelatin zymography method. The results obtained in the present study suggested that the C. pilulifera methanol extract may be a potential source of natural anti-photoaging.

  6. Fernblock, a Nutriceutical with Photoprotective Properties and Potential Preventive Agent for Skin Photoaging and Photoinduced Skin Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Salvador; Gilaberte, Yolanda; Philips, Neena; Juarranz, Angeles

    2011-01-01

    Many phytochemicals are endowed with photoprotective properties, i.e., the capability to prevent the harmful effects of excessive exposure to ultraviolet (UV) light. These effects include photoaging and skin cancer, and immunosuppression. Photoprotection is endowed through two major modes of action: UV absorption or reflection/scattering; and tissue repair post-exposure. We and others have uncovered the photoprotective properties of an extract of the fern Polypodium leucotomos (commercial name Fernblock). Fernblock is an all-natural antioxidant extract, administered both topically (on the skin) or orally. It inhibits generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production induced by UV including superoxide anion. It also prevents damage to the DNA, inhibits UV-induced AP1 and NF-κB, and protects endogenous skin natural antioxidant systems, i.e., CAT, GSH, and GSSR. Its photoprotective effects at a cellular level include a marked decrease of UV-mediated cellular apoptosis and necrosis and a profound inhibition of extracellular matrix remodeling. These molecular and cellular effects translate into long-term inhibition of photoaging and carcinogenesis that, together with its lack of toxicity, postulate its use as a novel-generation photoprotective nutriceutical of phytochemical origin. PMID:22272084

  7. Brain phospholipid arachidonic acid half-lives are not altered following 15 weeks of N-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid adequate or deprived diet

    PubMed Central

    Green, Joshua T.; Liu, Zhen; Bazinet, Richard P.

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies have infused radiolabeled arachidonic acid (AA) into rat brains and followed AA esterification into phospholipids for up to 24 h; however, the half-life of AA in rat brain phospholipids is unknown. Eighteen day old rats were fed either an n-3 PUFA adequate or deprived diet for 15 weeks. Following the 15 weeks, 40 µCi of [3H] AA was injected intracerebroventricularly into the right lateral ventricle using stereotaxic surgery and returned to their dietary treatment. From 4–120 days after [3H] AA administration, brains were collected for chemical analyses. The half-life of AA in rat brain phospholipids was 44 ± 4 days for the n-3 PUFA adequate group and 46 ± 4 days for the n-3 PUFA deprived group, which closely approximates the predicted half-life previously reported, based on the rate of entry from the plasma unesterified pool, suggesting the plasma unesterified pool is a major contributor to brain uptake of AA. Furthermore, unlike a previous report in which the half-life of brain phospholipid docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) was increased in n-3 PUFA deprived rats, n-3 PUFA deprivation did not significantly alter the AA half-life, suggesting different mechanisms exist to maintain brain concentrations of AA and DHA. PMID:19661256

  8. Fatty acid induced metabolic memory involves alterations in renal histone H3K36me2 and H3K27me3.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sandeep; Pamulapati, Himani; Tikoo, Kulbhushan

    2016-02-15

    Accumulating evidence suggest that diabetic complications persist even after the maintenance of normal glucose levels. However, the molecular mechanisms involved are still unclear. In the present study, we have investigated the molecular mechanism behind the presence of insulin resistance (IR) condition even after normalization of circulating lipids levels both in vivo and in vitro. Persistent inhibition of insulin signalling in absence of elevated circulating lipids level confirms the presence of metabolic memory in our model of IR. IR in human urine derived podocyte-like epithelial cells (HUPECs) was developed by incubating cells with palmitate (750 μM) for 24 h and in SD rats by feeding high fat diet for 16 weeks. Inhibition of insulin induced FOXO1 (regulator of gluconeogenic genes) degradation persisted even after 48 h of palmitate removal from the culture media. Metabolic memory by palmitate was found to be associated with increased FOXO1 activity as evident from increased expression of FOXO1 target genes such as PDK4, p21, G6Pc and IGFBP1. To understand the reason for prolonged activation of FOXO1 and its target genes, chromatin immuno-precipitation (ChIP) was performed with histone H3K36me2 and H3K27me3 antibodies. ChIP assay shows persistent increase in abundance of histone H3K36me2 on promoter region of FOXO1. We also show decreased abundance of histone H3K27me3 on promoter region of FOXO1, in the kidneys of HFD fed rats, which persisted even after 8 weeks of diet reversal. Taken together, we provide first evidence that circulating lipids generate metabolic memory possibly by altering the abundance of histone H3K36me2 and H3K27me3 on FOXO1 promoter.

  9. Rosuvastatin Decreases Intestinal Fatty Acid Binding Protein (I-FABP), but Does Not Alter Zonulin or Lipopolysaccharide Binding Protein (LBP) Levels, in HIV-Infected Subjects on Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Funderburg, Nicholas T.; Boucher, Morgan; Sattar, Abdus; Kulkarni, Manjusha; Labbato, Danielle; Kinley, Bruce I.; McComsey, Grace A.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Altered gastrointestinal (GI) barrier integrity and subsequent microbial translocation may contribute to immune activation in HIV infection. We have reported that rosuvastatin improved several markers of immune activation in HIV+ participants, but the effect of statin treatment on markers of GI barrier dysfunction is unknown. Methods SATURN-HIV is a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial assessing the effect of rosuvastatin (10mg/daily) on markers of cardiovascular disease, inflammation, and immune activation in ART-treated patients. Gut-barrier integrity was assessed by the surrogate markers intestinal fatty acid binding protein (I-FABP), a marker of enterocyte death, and zonulin-1, a marker of gut epithelial cell function. Levels of lipopolysaccharide binding protein (LBP) were measured as a marker of microbial translocation. Results Rosuvastatin significantly reduced levels of I-FABP during the treatment period compared to the placebo. There was no effect of rosuvastatin treatment on levels of zonulin or LBP. Baseline levels of LBP were directly related to several markers of immune activation in samples from all participants, including soluble CD163, IP-10, VCAM-1, TNFR-II, and the proportion of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells expressing CD38 and HLA-DR. Many of these relationships, however, were not seen in the statin arm alone at baseline or over time, as inflammatory markers often decreased and LBP levels were unchanged. Conclusions Forty-eight weeks of rosuvastatin treatment reduced levels of I-FABP, but did not affect levels of zonulin or LBP. The reduction in levels of inflammatory markers that we have reported with rosuvastatin treatment is likely mediated through other mechanisms not related to gut integrity or microbial translocation. PMID:27500282

  10. Deregulation of mitochondrial functions provoked by long-chain fatty acid accumulating in long-chain 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase and mitochondrial permeability transition deficiencies in rat heart--mitochondrial permeability transition pore opening as a potential contributing pathomechanism of cardiac alterations in these disorders.

    PubMed

    Cecatto, Cristiane; Hickmann, Fernanda H; Rodrigues, Marília D N; Amaral, Alexandre U; Wajner, Moacir

    2015-12-01

    Mitochondrial trifunctional protein and long-chain 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiencies are fatty acid oxidation disorders biochemically characterized by tissue accumulation of long-chain fatty acids and derivatives, including the monocarboxylic long-chain 3-hydroxy fatty acids (LCHFAs) 3-hydroxytetradecanoic acid (3HTA) and 3-hydroxypalmitic acid (3HPA). Patients commonly present severe cardiomyopathy for which the pathogenesis is still poorly established. We investigated the effects of 3HTA and 3HPA, the major metabolites accumulating in these disorders, on important parameters of mitochondrial homeostasis in Ca(2+) -loaded heart mitochondria. 3HTA and 3HPA significantly decreased mitochondrial membrane potential, the matrix NAD(P)H pool and Ca(2+) retention capacity, and also induced mitochondrial swelling. These fatty acids also provoked a marked decrease of ATP production reflecting severe energy dysfunction. Furthermore, 3HTA-induced mitochondrial alterations were completely prevented by the classical mitochondrial permeability transition (mPT) inhibitors cyclosporin A and ADP, as well as by ruthenium red, a Ca(2+) uptake blocker, indicating that LCHFAs induced Ca(2+)-dependent mPT pore opening. Milder effects only achieved at higher doses of LCHFAs were observed in brain mitochondria, implying a higher vulnerability of heart to these fatty acids. By contrast, 3HTA and docosanoic acids did not change mitochondrial homeostasis, indicating selective effects for monocarboxylic LCHFAs. The present data indicate that the major LCHFAs accumulating in mitochondrial trifunctional protein and long-chain 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiencies induce mPT pore opening, compromising Ca(2+) homeostasis and oxidative phosphorylation more intensely in the heart. It is proposed that these pathomechanisms may contribute at least in part to the severe cardiac alterations characteristic of patients affected by these diseases.

  11. Facial primer provides immediate and long-term improvements in mild-to-moderate facial hyperpigmentation and fine lines associated with photoaging

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Wendy E; Jiang, Lily I; Herndon, James H

    2015-01-01

    Background Photoaged skin results from various environmental factors, most importantly chronic sun exposure. Dyschromia and fine lines/wrinkles are common clinical manifestations of photodamaged skin. Purpose This single-center clinical trial was conducted to assess the efficacy and tolerability of a new multifunctional facial primer (camouflage, broad-spectrum SPF 50, and a treatment for hyperpigmentation) when used by females with mild-to-moderate facial hyperpigmentation and fine lines due to photoaging over a course of 12 weeks. Patients and methods Subjects were provided test material (Even Up-Clinical Pigment Perfector) and supporting products to use on their face and neck. Products were used according to specific application instructions. Clinical grading for efficacy and tolerability assessments were performed by an expert grader at baseline, baseline (post-application primer), week 4, week 8, week 12, and week 12 (post-application primer). Standardized digital photographs were taken, and self-assessment questionnaires were conducted. Results Twenty-eight female subjects completed the 12-week trial. The facial primer improved scores for the appearance of hyperpigmentation and other photoaging parameters immediately after the first application. The treatment also showed a progressive improvement in the clinical assessment of hyperpigmentation and other photoaging parameters over the 12-week trial. These long-term benefits can be attributed to an improvement in the underlying skin condition. The facial primer was well tolerated. Subject questionnaires showed that the product was highly rated at all visits. Conclusion The facial primer was shown to be effective and well tolerated for immediate and long-term improvement in the appearance of mild-to-moderate hyperpigmentation and fine lines associated with photodamage when used over a 12-week period. PMID:26366102

  12. Alteration of the phospho- or neutral lipid content and fatty acid composition in Listeria monocytogenes due to acid adaptation mechanisms for hydrochloric, acetic and lactic acids at pH 5.5 or benzoic acid at neutral pH.

    PubMed

    Mastronicolis, Sofia K; Berberi, Anita; Diakogiannis, Ioannis; Petrova, Evanthia; Kiaki, Irene; Baltzi, Triantafillia; Xenikakis, Polydoros

    2010-10-01

    This study provides a first approach to observe the effects on Listeria monocytogenes of cellular exposure to acid stress at low or neutral pH, notably how phospho- or neutral lipids are involved in this mechanism, besides the fatty acid profile alteration. A thorough investigation of the composition of polar and neutral lipids from L. monocytogenes grown at pH 5.5 in presence of hydrochloric, acetic and lactic acids, or at neutral pH 7.3 in presence of benzoic acid, is described relative to cells grown in acid-free medium. The results showed that only low pH values enhance the antimicrobial activity of an acid. We suggest that, irrespective of pH, the acid adaptation response will lead to a similar alteration in fatty acid composition [decreasing the ratio of branched chain/saturated straight fatty acids of total lipids], mainly originating from the neutral lipid class of adapted cultures. Acid adaptation in L. monocytogenes was correlated with a decrease in total lipid phosphorus and, with the exception of cells adapted to benzoic acid, this change in the amount of phosphorus reflected a higher content of the neutral lipid class. Upon acetic or benzoic acid stress the lipid phosphorus proportion was analysed in the main phospholipids present: cardiolipin, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphoaminolipid and phosphatidylinositol. Interestingly only benzoic acid had a dramatic effect on the relative quantities of these four phospholipids.

  13. Probing fatty acid metabolism in bacteria, cyanobacteria, green microalgae and diatoms with natural and unnatural fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Beld, Joris; Abbriano, Raffaela; Finzel, Kara; Hildebrand, Mark; Burkart, Michael D

    2016-04-01

    In both eukaryotes and prokaryotes, fatty acid synthases are responsible for the biosynthesis of fatty acids in an iterative process, extending the fatty acid by two carbon units every cycle. Thus, odd numbered fatty acids are rarely found in nature. We tested whether representatives of diverse microbial phyla have the ability to incorporate odd-chain fatty acids as substrates for their fatty acid synthases and their downstream enzymes. We fed various odd and short chain fatty acids to the bacterium Escherichia coli, cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, green microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana. Major differences were observed, specifically in the ability among species to incorporate and elongate short chain fatty acids. We demonstrate that E. coli, C. reinhardtii, and T. pseudonana can produce longer fatty acid products from short chain precursors (C3 and C5), while Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 lacks this ability. However, Synechocystis can incorporate and elongate longer chain fatty acids due to acyl-acyl carrier protein synthetase (AasS) activity, and knockout of this protein eliminates the ability to incorporate these fatty acids. In addition, expression of a characterized AasS from Vibrio harveyii confers a similar capability to E. coli. The ability to desaturate exogenously added fatty acids was only observed in Synechocystis and C. reinhardtii. We further probed fatty acid metabolism of these organisms by feeding desaturase inhibitors to test the specificity of long-chain fatty acid desaturases. In particular, supplementation with thia fatty acids can alter fatty acid profiles based on the location of the sulfur in the chain. We show that coupling sensitive gas chromatography mass spectrometry to supplementation of unnatural fatty acids can reveal major differences between fatty acid metabolism in various organisms. Often unnatural fatty acids have antibacterial or even therapeutic properties. Feeding of short

  14. Probing fatty acid metabolism in bacteria, cyanobacteria, green microalgae and diatoms with natural and unnatural fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Beld, Joris; Abbriano, Raffaela; Finzel, Kara; Hildebrand, Mark; Burkart, Michael D

    2016-04-01

    In both eukaryotes and prokaryotes, fatty acid synthases are responsible for the biosynthesis of fatty acids in an iterative process, extending the fatty acid by two carbon units every cycle. Thus, odd numbered fatty acids are rarely found in nature. We tested whether representatives of diverse microbial phyla have the ability to incorporate odd-chain fatty acids as substrates for their fatty acid synthases and their downstream enzymes. We fed various odd and short chain fatty acids to the bacterium Escherichia coli, cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, green microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana. Major differences were observed, specifically in the ability among species to incorporate and elongate short chain fatty acids. We demonstrate that E. coli, C. reinhardtii, and T. pseudonana can produce longer fatty acid products from short chain precursors (C3 and C5), while Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 lacks this ability. However, Synechocystis can incorporate and elongate longer chain fatty acids due to acyl-acyl carrier protein synthetase (AasS) activity, and knockout of this protein eliminates the ability to incorporate these fatty acids. In addition, expression of a characterized AasS from Vibrio harveyii confers a similar capability to E. coli. The ability to desaturate exogenously added fatty acids was only observed in Synechocystis and C. reinhardtii. We further probed fatty acid metabolism of these organisms by feeding desaturase inhibitors to test the specificity of long-chain fatty acid desaturases. In particular, supplementation with thia fatty acids can alter fatty acid profiles based on the location of the sulfur in the chain. We show that coupling sensitive gas chromatography mass spectrometry to supplementation of unnatural fatty acids can reveal major differences between fatty acid metabolism in various organisms. Often unnatural fatty acids have antibacterial or even therapeutic properties. Feeding of short

  15. High levels of vegetable oils in plant protein-rich diets fed to gilthead sea bream ( Sparus aurata L.): growth performance, muscle fatty acid profiles and histological alterations of target tissues.

    PubMed

    Benedito-Palos, Laura; Navarro, Juan C; Sitjà-Bobadilla, Ariadna; Bell, J Gordon; Kaushik, Sadasivam; Pérez-Sánchez, Jaume

    2008-11-01

    The feasibility of fish oil (FO) replacement by vegetable oils (VO) was investigated in gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata L.) in a growth trial conducted for the duration of 8 months. Four isolipidic and isoproteic diets rich in plant proteins were supplemented with L-lysine (0.55 %) and soya lecithin (1 %). Added oil was either FO (control) or a blend of VO, replacing 33 % (33VO diet), 66 % (66VO diet) and 100 % (VO diet) of FO. No detrimental effects on growth performance were found with the partial FO replacement, but feed intake and growth rates were reduced by about 10 % in fish fed the VO diet. The replacement strategy did not damage the intestinal epithelium, and massive accumulation of lipid droplets was not found within enterocytes. All fish showed fatty livers, but signs of lipoid liver disease were only found in fish fed the VO diet. Muscle fatty acid profiles of total lipids reflected the diet composition with a selective incorporation of unsaturated fatty acids in polar lipids. The robustness of the phospholipid fatty acid profile when essential fatty acid requirements were theoretically covered by the diet was evidenced by multivariate principal components analysis in fish fed control, 33VO and 66VO diets.

  16. Photoaging of retinal pigment epithelial melanosomes: The effect of photobleaching on morphology and reactivity of the pigment granules.

    PubMed

    Zadlo, Andrzej; Szewczyk, Grzegorz; Sarna, Michal; Kozinska, Anna; Pilat, Anna; Kaczara, Patrycja; Sarna, Tadeusz

    2016-08-01

    To elucidate the mechanism of age-related changes in antioxidant and photoprotective properties of human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) melanosomes, the effect of in vitro photoaging of bovine RPE melanosomes was examined employing an array of complementary spectroscopic and analytical methods. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy, saturation recovery EPR, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) were used to determine melanin content of control and photobleached melanosomes, and to monitor changes in their morphology. Methylene blue (MB), TEMPO choline, dysprosium(III) ions and singlet oxygen were employed as molecular probes to characterize the efficiency of control and photobleached melanosomes to interact with different reagents. EPR oximetry, UV-vis absorption spectroscopy, iodometric assay of lipid hydroperoxides and time-resolved singlet oxygen phosphorescence were used to analyze the efficiency of photobleached and untreated melanosomes to inhibit MB-photosensitized oxidation of liposomal lipids. The obtained results revealed that, compared to untreated melanosomes, moderately photobleached melanosomes protected unsaturated lipids less efficiently against photosensitized peroxidiation, while weakly photobleached melanosomes were actually better antioxidant and photoprotective agents. The observed changes could be attributed to two effects - modification of the melanosome morphology and oxidative degradation of the melanin functional groups induced by different degree of photobleaching. While the former increases the accessibility of melanin nanoaggregates to reagents, the latter reduces the efficiency of melanin to interact with chemical and physical agents. PMID:27338854

  17. Synthesis and utilization of fatty acids by wild-type and fatty acid auxotrophs of Caulobacter crescentus.

    PubMed Central

    Letts, V; Shaw, P; Shapiro, L; Henry, S

    1982-01-01

    The fatty acid composition of the dimorphic bacterium Caulobacter crescentus was found to consist primarily of 16- and 18-carbon fatty acids, both saturated and monounsaturated, in agreement with the findings of Chow and Schmidt (J. Gen. Microbiol. 83:359-373, 1974). In addition, two minor but as yet unidentified fatty acids were detected. Chromatographic mobilities suggested that these fatty acids may be a cyclopropane and a branched-chain fatty acid. In addition, we demonstrated that the fatty acid composition of wild-type C. crescentus can be altered by growing the cells in medium supplemented with any one of a variety of unsaturated fatty acids. Linoleic acid, a diunsaturated fatty acid which is not synthesized by C. crescentus, was incorporated into phospholipids without apparent modification. In addition, we found that C. crescentus, like Escherichia coli, synthesizes vaccenic acid (18:1 delta 11,cis) rather than oleic acid (18:1 delta 9,cis). This result allowed us to deduce that the mechanism of fatty acid desaturation in C. crescentus is anaerobic, as it is in E. coli. Finally, we examined the fatty acid biosynthesis and composition of two unsaturated fatty acid auxotrophs of C. crescentus. Neither of these mutants resembled the E. coli unsaturated fatty acid auxotrophs, which have defined enzymatic lesions in fatty acid biosynthesis. Rather, the mutants appeared to have defects relating to the complex coordination of membrane biogenesis and cell cycle events in C. crescentus. Images PMID:7107555

  18. Solar ultraviolet irradiation reduces collagen in photoaged human skin by blocking transforming growth factor-beta type II receptor/Smad signaling.

    PubMed

    Quan, Taihao; He, Tianyuan; Kang, Sewon; Voorhees, John J; Fisher, Gary J

    2004-09-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) irradiation from the sun reduces production of type I procollagen (COLI), the major structural protein in human skin. This reduction is a key feature of the pathophysiology of premature skin aging (photoaging). Photoaging is the most common form of skin damage and is associated with skin carcinoma. TGF-beta/Smad pathway is the major regulator of type I procollagen synthesis in human skin. We have previously reported that UV irradiation impairs transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta)/Smad signaling in mink lung epithelial cells. We have investigated the mechanism of UV irradiation impairment of the TGF-beta/Smad pathway and the impact of this impairment on type I procollagen production in human skin fibroblasts, the major collagen-producing cells in skin. We report here that UV irradiation impairs TGF-beta/Smad pathway in human skin by down-regulation of TGF-beta type II receptor (TbetaRII). This loss of TbetaRII occurs within 8 hours after UV irradiation and precedes down-regulation of type I procollagen expression in human skin in vivo. In human skin fibroblasts, UV-induced TbetaRII down-regulation is mediated by transcriptional repression and results in 90% reduction of specific, cell-surface binding of TGF-beta. This loss of TbetaRII prevents downstream activation of Smad2/3 by TGF-beta, thereby reducing expression of type I procollagen. Preventing loss of TbetaRII by overexpression protects against UV inhibition of type I procollagen gene expression in human skin fibroblasts. UV-induced down-regulation of TbetaRII, with attendant reduction of type I procollagen production, is a critical molecular mechanism in the pathophysiology of photoaging.

  19. Multi-center clinical study and review of fractional ablative CO2 laser resurfacing for the treatment of rhytides, photoaging, scars and striae.

    PubMed

    Alexiades-Armenakas, Macrene; Sarnoff, Deborah; Gotkin, Robert; Sadick, Neil

    2011-04-01

    Laser skin resurfacing has shifted over the past two decades from standard ablative resurfacing to non-ablative resurfacing and most recently, to fractional laser resurfacing. In this most recent category, fractional non-ablative lasers were first introduced followed by fractional ablative lasers, which offer an improved balance between safety and efficacy. In the current article, a review of fractional ablative resurfacing is presented alongside the results from a multi-center clinical study employing the fractional carbon dioxide (CO2) laser (SmartXide DOT, DEKA) for the treatment of rhytides, photoaging, scars and striae distensae.

  20. Dietary fatty acids modulate antigen presentation to hepatic NKT cells in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease[S

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Jing; Ma, Xiong; Webb, Tonya; Potter, James J.; Oelke, Mathias; Li, Zhiping

    2010-01-01

    Dietary fatty acids are major contributors to the development and progression of insulin resistance and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Dietary fatty acids also alter hepatic NKT cells that are activated by antigens presented by CD1d. In the current study, we examine the mechanism of dietary fatty acid induced hepatic NKT cell deficiency and its causal relationship to insulin resistance and NAFLD. We discover that dietary saturated fatty acids (SFA) or monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA), but not polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), cause hepatic NKT cell depletion with increased apoptosis. Dietary SFA or MUFA also impair hepatocyte presentation of endogenous, but not exogenous, antigen to NKT cells, indicating alterations of the endogenous antigen processing or presenting pathway. In vitro treatment of normal hepatocytes with fatty acids also demonstrates impaired ability of CD1d to present endogenous antigen by dietary fatty acids. Furthermore, dietary SFA and MUFA activate the NFκB signaling pathway and lead to insulin resistance and hepatic steatosis. In conclusion, both dietary SFA and MUFA alter endogenous antigen presentation to hepatic NKT cells and contribute to NKT cell depletion, leading to further activation of inflammatory signaling, insulin resistance, and hepatic steatosis. PMID:20185414

  1. The effect of systemic cyclosporin A on a hairless mouse model of photoaging.

    PubMed

    Moloney, S J; Learn, D B

    1992-10-01

    The mechanisms that cause skin wrinkling in response to chronic exposure to sunlight are unknown. We investigated the possibility that wrinkling of Skh-1 hairless mice is associated with an ultraviolet (UV) radiation-induced immunologic alteration. Exposing Skh-1 hairless mice to a regimen of nonerythemal UV-B (290-320 nm) radiation induced skin wrinkles after 6-7 weeks. Concomitant treatment with cyclosporin A decreased the time to the onset of wrinkles to approximately 4 weeks. Exposing HRS/J hairless mice or athymic nude mice to a similar nonerythemal UV-B radiation regimen for 10 weeks failed to induce skin wrinkles. Concomitant administration of cyclosporin A and UV-B radiation for 7 weeks to HRS/J hairless mice induced no skin wrinkles. Ultraviolet-B or UV-B plus cyclosporin A exposure caused increased immunohistochemical staining for Ia and F4/80 antigens in the upper dermis of tissue from Skh-1 mice, as compared to controls. Treating Skh-1 mice with UV-B radiation plus cyclosporin A was also associated with a large increase in the number of CD3+ cells in the dermis. These staining patterns were absent in similarly treated HRS/J hairless mice. Dermal mast cell numbers in Skh-1 mice were 2-3-fold higher than in HRS/J, athymic nude or NSA mice. Treatment with cyclosporin A increased Skh-1 dermal mast cell numbers approximately 2-fold but had no effect on the dermal mast cell numbers in HRS/J or NSA mice. Based on these findings we postulate that UV-B light and cyclosporin A exacerbate an immunological condition in Skh-1 mice, one consequence of which is manifested as skin wrinkles. Thus, the induction of skin wrinkles in this mouse strain may have no relevance to the wrinkles observed in human skin after chronic exposure to sunlight. PMID:1454879

  2. Omega-6 Fatty Acids

    MedlinePlus

    ... types of fats. Some types are found in vegetable oils, including corn, evening primrose seed, safflower, and soybean ... from studying specific omega-6 fatty acids or plant oils containing omega-6 fatty acids. See the separate ...

  3. Fatty acid analogs

    DOEpatents

    Elmaleh, David R.; Livni, Eli

    1985-01-01

    In one aspect, a radioactively labeled analog of a fatty acid which is capable of being taken up by mammalian tissue and which exhibits an in vivo beta-oxidation rate below that with a corresponding radioactively labeled fatty acid.

  4. Fernblock (Polypodium leucotomos Extract): Molecular Mechanisms and Pleiotropic Effects in Light-Related Skin Conditions, Photoaging and Skin Cancers, a Review

    PubMed Central

    Parrado, Concepcion; Mascaraque, Marta; Gilaberte, Yolanda; Juarranz, Angeles; Gonzalez, Salvador

    2016-01-01

    Healthier life styles include increased outdoors time practicing sports and walking. This means increased exposure to the sun, leading to higher risk of sunburn, photoaging and skin cancer. In addition to topical barrier products, oral supplementations of various botanicals endowed with antioxidant activity are emerging as novel method of photoprotection. Polypodium leucotomos extract (PL, commercial name Fernblock®, IFC Group, Spain) is a powerful antioxidant due to its high content of phenolic compounds. PL is administered orally, with proven safety, and it can also be used topically. Its mechanisms include inhibition of the generation and release of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by ultraviolet (UV) light. It also prevents UV- and ROS-induced DNA damage with inhibition of AP1 and NF-κB and protection of natural antioxidant enzyme systems. At the cellular level, PL decreases cellular apoptosis and necrosis mediated UV and inhibits abnormal extracellular matrix remodeling. PL reduces inflammation, prevents immunosuppression, activates tumor suppressor p53 and inhibits UV-induced cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) enzyme expression. In agreement with increased p53 activity, PL decreased UV radiation-induced cell proliferation. PL also prevents common deletions mitochondrial DNA damage induced by UVA, and MMP-1 expression induced Visible Light and Infrared Radiation. These cellular and molecular effects are reflected in inhibitions of carcinogenesis and photoaging. PMID:27367679

  5. Fernblock (Polypodium leucotomos Extract): Molecular Mechanisms and Pleiotropic Effects in Light-Related Skin Conditions, Photoaging and Skin Cancers, a Review.

    PubMed

    Parrado, Concepcion; Mascaraque, Marta; Gilaberte, Yolanda; Juarranz, Angeles; Gonzalez, Salvador

    2016-01-01

    Healthier life styles include increased outdoors time practicing sports and walking. This means increased exposure to the sun, leading to higher risk of sunburn, photoaging and skin cancer. In addition to topical barrier products, oral supplementations of various botanicals endowed with antioxidant activity are emerging as novel method of photoprotection. Polypodium leucotomos extract (PL, commercial name Fernblock(®), IFC Group, Spain) is a powerful antioxidant due to its high content of phenolic compounds. PL is administered orally, with proven safety, and it can also be used topically. Its mechanisms include inhibition of the generation and release of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by ultraviolet (UV) light. It also prevents UV- and ROS-induced DNA damage with inhibition of AP1 and NF-κB and protection of natural antioxidant enzyme systems. At the cellular level, PL decreases cellular apoptosis and necrosis mediated UV and inhibits abnormal extracellular matrix remodeling. PL reduces inflammation, prevents immunosuppression, activates tumor suppressor p53 and inhibits UV-induced cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) enzyme expression. In agreement with increased p53 activity, PL decreased UV radiation-induced cell proliferation. PL also prevents common deletions mitochondrial DNA damage induced by UVA, and MMP-1 expression induced Visible Light and Infrared Radiation. These cellular and molecular effects are reflected in inhibitions of carcinogenesis and photoaging. PMID:27367679

  6. Valencene from the Rhizomes of Cyperus rotundus Inhibits Skin Photoaging-Related Ion Channels and UV-Induced Melanogenesis in B16F10 Melanoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Nam, Joo Hyun; Nam, Da-Yeong; Lee, Dong-Ung

    2016-04-22

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation deeply penetrates skin and causes inflammation and pigmentary changes and triggers immune responses. Furthermore, accumulating evidence suggests that calcium ion channels, such as TRPV1 and ORAI1, mediate diverse dermatological processes including melanogenesis, skin wrinkling, and inflammation. The rhizomes of Cyperus rotundus have been used to treat inflammatory diseases including dermatitis. However, their effects on UV-induced photoaging-related ion channels remain unknown. Therefore, this study was undertaken to evaluate the antagonistic effects of C. rotundus extract and their constituents on TRPV1 and ORAI1 channels. Electrophysiological analysis revealed that valencene (1) isolated from the hexane fraction potently inhibited capsaicin-induced TRPV1 and ORAI1 currents at 90 μM (69 ± 15% and 97 ± 2% at -60 and -120 mV, respectively). The inhibitory effect of 1 on cytoplasmic Ca(2+) concentrations in response to ORAI1 activation (85 ± 2% at 50 μM) was also confirmed. Furthermore, 1 concentration-dependently decreased the melanin content after UVB irradiation in murine B16F10 melanoma cells by 82.66 ± 2.14% at 15 μg/mL. These results suggest that C. rotundus rhizomes have potential therapeutic effects on UV-induced photoaging and indicate that the therapeutic and cosmetic applications of 1 are worth further investigation. PMID:26967731

  7. Improvement of photoaged facial skin in middle-aged Japanese females by topical retinol (vitamin A alcohol): a vehicle-controlled, double-blind study.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Katsuko; Suetake, Takaki; Kumasaka, Naka; Tagami, Hachiro

    2009-01-01

    Topical tretinoin formulation is still unavailable in Japan. Because topical retinol, which is less potent but may cause less irritation, is available here, we have performed a randomized, blinded, vehicle-controlled study on the face using a once-nightly regimen for the treatment of mild photoaging in middle-aged Japanese females. First, a 26-week study was conducted in 57 subjects with a 0.075% retinol cream and its vehicle on each half side of the face. Three of the 57 subjects withdrew from the study due to irritation, although this rate was much smaller than that noted in our previous study with topical tretinoin. After 26 weeks, the rates of photoaging improvement were significantly higher on the retinol side: 27 out of 54 (50%) versus 13 (24%) for the fine wrinkling and 15 out of 54 (28%) versus 1 (2%) for deep wrinkling. A similar trial with a 0.04% retinol cream for 13 weeks revealed less prominent improvements in fine wrinkling but minimal irritation. From these data, we think that retinol creams, especially 0.04% cream, are suitable for daily use in the general population because of the low irritancy, even for those with sensitive skin.

  8. Modulation of infant formula fat profile alters the low-density lipoprotein/high-density lipoprotein ratio and plasma fatty acid distribution relative to those with breast-feeding.

    PubMed

    Hayes, K C; Pronczuk, A; Wood, R A; Guy, D G

    1992-04-01

    The effect of breast-feeding was compared with that of two fat-modified milk formulas in 45 infants (15 per group) studied by assessing body weight gain for 4 months and plasma lipids, lipoprotein profiles, fatty acid profiles of plasma and red blood cells, and plasma tocopherol status 3 months after birth. A saturated fat formula with coconut oil/soybean oil (COCO/SOY) had a fatty acid content and polyunsaturated/saturated ratio (P/S, 0.55) comparable with that of human milk fat (P/S, 0.39) and had the same fat energy content (50% kcal). The second formula, with corn oil/soybean oil (CORN/SOY), was highly unsaturated (P/S, 4.6), with only 35% kcal from fat. Energy intake and body weight gain were similar for all groups. Plasma total cholesterol, triglyceride, and phospholipid levels were significantly lower (greater than 20% on average) in infants fed the CORN/SOY formula than in infants fed either the COCO/SOY formula or human milk. Infants fed the CORN/SOY formula also had lower (25% to 35%) plasma low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and apolipoprotein B levels and low-density lipoprotein/high-density lipoprotein and apolipoprotein B/apolipoprotein A-I ratios. Plasma, red blood cell, and cholesteryl ester fatty acids from infants fed COCO/SOY contained less 18:1 and more 18:2; cholesterol esters in plasma from breast-fed infants had the highest 20:4n-6 levels. Plasma tocopherol levels were higher in infants consuming formulas. The presence of cholesterol in human milk appeared to expand the low-density lipoprotein pool and exert an "unfavorable" increase in the low-density lipoprotein/high-density lipoprotein ratio. Thus modulation of infant lipoproteins by changing dietary fat and cholesterol is feasible and in keeping with the known response in adults. PMID:1560323

  9. Targeted alterations in dietary n-3 and n-6 fatty acids improve life functioning and reduce psychological distress among patients with chronic headache: a secondary analysis of a randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Ramsden, Christopher E; Faurot, Keturah R; Zamora, Daisy; Palsson, Olafur S; MacIntosh, Beth A; Gaylord, Susan; Taha, Ameer Y; Rapoport, Stanley I; Hibbeln, Joseph R; Davis, John M; Mann, J Douglas

    2015-04-01

    Omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids are precursors of bioactive lipid mediators posited to modulate both physical pain and psychological distress. In a randomized trial of 67 subjects with severe headaches, we recently demonstrated that targeted dietary manipulation-increasing omega-3 fatty acids with concurrent reduction in omega-6 linoleic acid (the H3-L6 intervention)-produced major reductions in headache compared with an omega-6 lowering (L6) intervention. Because chronic pain is often accompanied by psychological distress and impaired health-related quality of life (HRQOL), we used data from this trial to examine whether the H3-L6 intervention favorably impacted these domains. Additionally, we examined the effect of the interventions on the number of cases with substantial physical or mental impairments as defined by cutoff values in the Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI-18), Medical Outcomes Study Short Forms 12 (SF-12), Headache Impact Test (HIT-6), and the number of headache days per month. In the intention-to-treat analysis, participants in the H3-L6 group experienced statistically significant reductions in psychological distress (BSI-18 mean difference: -6.56; 95% confidence interval [CI]: -11.43 to -1.69) and improvements in SF-12 mental (mean difference: 6.01; 95% CI: 0.57 to 11.45) and physical (mean difference: 6.65; 95% CI: 2.14 to 11.16) health summary scores. At 12 weeks, the proportion of subjects experiencing substantial impairment according to cutoff values in the BSI-18, SF-12 physical, HIT-6, and headache days per month was significantly lower in the H3-L6 group. Dietary manipulation of n-3 and n-6 fatty acids, previously shown to produce major improvements in headache, was found to also reduce psychological distress and improve HRQOL and function.

  10. Targeted alterations in dietary n-3 and n-6 fatty acids improve life functioning and reduce psychological distress among patients with chronic headache: a secondary analysis of a randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Ramsden, Christopher E; Faurot, Keturah R; Zamora, Daisy; Palsson, Olafur S; MacIntosh, Beth A; Gaylord, Susan; Taha, Ameer Y; Rapoport, Stanley I; Hibbeln, Joseph R; Davis, John M; Mann, J Douglas

    2015-04-01

    Omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids are precursors of bioactive lipid mediators posited to modulate both physical pain and psychological distress. In a randomized trial of 67 subjects with severe headaches, we recently demonstrated that targeted dietary manipulation-increasing omega-3 fatty acids with concurrent reduction in omega-6 linoleic acid (the H3-L6 intervention)-produced major reductions in headache compared with an omega-6 lowering (L6) intervention. Because chronic pain is often accompanied by psychological distress and impaired health-related quality of life (HRQOL), we used data from this trial to examine whether the H3-L6 intervention favorably impacted these domains. Additionally, we examined the effect of the interventions on the number of cases with substantial physical or mental impairments as defined by cutoff values in the Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI-18), Medical Outcomes Study Short Forms 12 (SF-12), Headache Impact Test (HIT-6), and the number of headache days per month. In the intention-to-treat analysis, participants in the H3-L6 group experienced statistically significant reductions in psychological distress (BSI-18 mean difference: -6.56; 95% confidence interval [CI]: -11.43 to -1.69) and improvements in SF-12 mental (mean difference: 6.01; 95% CI: 0.57 to 11.45) and physical (mean difference: 6.65; 95% CI: 2.14 to 11.16) health summary scores. At 12 weeks, the proportion of subjects experiencing substantial impairment according to cutoff values in the BSI-18, SF-12 physical, HIT-6, and headache days per month was significantly lower in the H3-L6 group. Dietary manipulation of n-3 and n-6 fatty acids, previously shown to produce major improvements in headache, was found to also reduce psychological distress and improve HRQOL and function. PMID:25790451

  11. [Serumconcentrations of non esterified fatty acids during operative stress and blockade of betaadrenergic receptors (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Knitza, R; Clasen, R; Kunz, C

    1978-11-01

    Every stress reaction leads to an increased, hormonelly induced mobilisation of fatty acids, the extent of which may be considered as a parameter of the aggression mechanism. In 15 patients with idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia, who were operated under neurolepthypalgesia, the problem of quantitative alterations of the concentration pattern of fatty acids was investigated during the operation. In contrast to some reports of the literature, the increase of the concentration of total fatty acids was due to corresponding increases of all individual fatty acids. By preoperative administration of the beta-adrenergic blocking agent Pindolol the increase of fatty acids was reduced without a qualitative shifting of individual fatty acids. PMID:30855

  12. Fatty acid profiles in relation to triglyceride level in the liver of dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Sato, Hiroshi; Mohamed, Tharwat; Goto, Akiko; Oikawa, Shin; Kurosawa, Takashi

    2004-01-01

    To elucidate possible relationships between triglyceride (TG) levels and fatty acid composition in bovine liver, hepatic TG and seven individual fatty acids were measured in 23 Holstein dairy cows, of them 6 are healthy. Liver TG level was greater than 3 % in 12 cows which were ruled fatty liver. Palmitic and oleic acid proportions were significantly higher in fatty liver cows than in the healthy cows, while stearic acid was lower in fatty liver cows. With increased liver TG, stearic acid proportions decreased dramatically. Results indicate that hepatic lipidosis markedly alters the proportions of the various fatty acids in the liver of dairy cows.

  13. THP-1 macrophage lipid accumulation unaffected by fatty acid double bond geometric or positional configuration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dietary fatty acid type alters atherosclerotic lesion progression and macrophage lipid accumulation. Incompletely elucidated are the mechanisms by which fatty acids differing in double-bond geometric or positional configuration alter arterial lipid accumulation. The objective of this study was to ev...

  14. Radioiodinated fatty acid analogs for myocardial imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Ruyan, M.K.

    1993-01-01

    Fatty acids are the preferred substrate for the normoxic heart. About sixty percent of the energy required by the myocardium is provided by fatty acid [beta]-oxidation. Many scientists have focused on the alterations in fatty acid metabolism in the ischemic heart for the development of radiolabelled fatty acids for functional imaging of the heart. Three main categories of compounds were synthesized: tetrazoles (1 and 2), glycidic and [alpha]-methylene acids (3-5), and analogs of oleic acid (6,7 and 7A). The tetrazole group has a similar pKa and size to that of a carboxyl group; however, such fatty acid analogs cannot undergo normal fatty acid metabolism. Glycidic and [alpha]-methylene analogs are potential irreversible inhibitors of fatty acid metabolism. Oleic acid analogs were investigated to assess the affect of stereochemical consequences on biodistribution. The key intermediates in the synthesis of the target compounds were [omega]-nitrophenyl alkylcarboxylic acids and alcohols, which were made using a variety of cross-coupling reactions. The Wittig reaction, which was used in the synthesis of tetrazole 1 and glycidic acid 3, gave low yields of the cross-coupled products. The remaining target compounds were synthesized by condensation of appropriate RCu (CN) ZnI and substituted benzyl bromides or by Pd[sup II] catalyzed cross-coupling of substituted arylhalides with suitable alkynes. The latter two reactions produced much higher yields of the desired products. All of the target compounds were radiolabeled with [sup 125]I by various Cu(I) catalyzed radioiodine exchange procedures and were then subjected to tissue biodistribution (TD) studies in rats. Except for the 15-(4-iodophenyl)-2-methylene-pentadecanoic acid (5), all of the fatty acid analogs failed to surpass clinically-used 15-(4-iodophenyl)pentadecanoic acid (IPPA) in their ability to be taken up and retained by the rat myocardium.

  15. Metabolite profiling of enzymatically hydrolyzed and fermented forms of Opuntia ficus-indica and their effect on UVB-induced skin photoaging.

    PubMed

    Cho, Dong-Woon; Kim, Dae-Eung; Lee, Dae-Hee; Jung, Kyung-Hoon; Hurh, Byung-Serk; Kwon, Oh Wook; Kim, Sun Yeou

    2014-01-01

    Fermentation of natural products is emerging as an important processing method and is attracting a lot of attention because it may have the advantage of having a new biological function. In this study, fruits of Opuntia ficus-indica were enzymatically hydrolyzed and then fermented with two species of yeast. We identified novel prominent markers in enzymatically hydrolyzed O. ficus-indica (EO) and fermented O. ficus-indica (FO) samples by using an ultra-performance liquid chromatography/quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry. We also evaluated the effect of EO and FO on photoaging of skin cells exposed to ultraviolet radiation. We identified the major fermented metabolite in the FO as ferulic acid. Our in vitro study indicated that FO significantly enhanced the concentration of pro-collagen type 1 than the EO, by increasing the TGF-β1 production. PMID:24446110

  16. Metabolite profiling of enzymatically hydrolyzed and fermented forms of Opuntia ficus-indica and their effect on UVB-induced skin photoaging.

    PubMed

    Cho, Dong-Woon; Kim, Dae-Eung; Lee, Dae-Hee; Jung, Kyung-Hoon; Hurh, Byung-Serk; Kwon, Oh Wook; Kim, Sun Yeou

    2014-01-01

    Fermentation of natural products is emerging as an important processing method and is attracting a lot of attention because it may have the advantage of having a new biological function. In this study, fruits of Opuntia ficus-indica were enzymatically hydrolyzed and then fermented with two species of yeast. We identified novel prominent markers in enzymatically hydrolyzed O. ficus-indica (EO) and fermented O. ficus-indica (FO) samples by using an ultra-performance liquid chromatography/quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry. We also evaluated the effect of EO and FO on photoaging of skin cells exposed to ultraviolet radiation. We identified the major fermented metabolite in the FO as ferulic acid. Our in vitro study indicated that FO significantly enhanced the concentration of pro-collagen type 1 than the EO, by increasing the TGF-β1 production.

  17. Attenuating properties of Agastache rugosa leaf extract against ultraviolet-B-induced photoaging via up-regulating glutathione and superoxide dismutase in a human keratinocyte cell line.

    PubMed

    Oh, Yuri; Lim, Hye-Won; Huang, Yu-Hua; Kwon, Hee-Souk; Jin, Chang Duck; Kim, Kyunghoon; Lim, Chang-Jin

    2016-10-01

    Agastache rugosa Kuntze, known as a Korean mint, is an herbal medicine that has been used for the treatment of diverse kinds of symptoms in traditional medicine. This work was undertaken to assess the protective properties of A. rugosa leaves against UV-B-induced photoaging in HaCaT keratinocytes. They were evaluated via analyzing reactive oxygen species (ROS), promatrix metalloproteinase-2 (proMMP-2) and -9 (proMMP-9), total glutathione (GSH), total superoxide dismutase (SOD), cellular viability, flavonoid content and in vitro radical scavenging activity. Total flavonoid content of ARE, a hot water extract of A. rugosa leaves, was 22.8±7.6mg of naringin equivalent/g ARE. ARE exhibited ABTS(+) radical scavenging activity with an SC50 of 836.9μg/mL. ARE attenuated the UV-B-induced ROS generation. It diminished the UV-B-induced elevation of proMMP-2 and -9 at both activity and protein levels. On the contrary, ARE was able to enhance the UV-B-reduced total GSH and total SOD activity levels. ARE, at the used concentrations, was unable to interfere with the cellular viabilities of HaCaT keratinocytes under UV-B irradiation. Taken together, ARE possesses a protective potential against UV-B-induced photoaging in HaCaT keratinocytes, possibly based upon up-regulating antioxidant components, including total GSH and SOD. These findings reasonably suggest the use of A. rugosa leaves as a photoprotective resource in manufacturing functional cosmetics. PMID:27579986

  18. Attenuating properties of Agastache rugosa leaf extract against ultraviolet-B-induced photoaging via up-regulating glutathione and superoxide dismutase in a human keratinocyte cell line.

    PubMed

    Oh, Yuri; Lim, Hye-Won; Huang, Yu-Hua; Kwon, Hee-Souk; Jin, Chang Duck; Kim, Kyunghoon; Lim, Chang-Jin

    2016-10-01

    Agastache rugosa Kuntze, known as a Korean mint, is an herbal medicine that has been used for the treatment of diverse kinds of symptoms in traditional medicine. This work was undertaken to assess the protective properties of A. rugosa leaves against UV-B-induced photoaging in HaCaT keratinocytes. They were evaluated via analyzing reactive oxygen species (ROS), promatrix metalloproteinase-2 (proMMP-2) and -9 (proMMP-9), total glutathione (GSH), total superoxide dismutase (SOD), cellular viability, flavonoid content and in vitro radical scavenging activity. Total flavonoid content of ARE, a hot water extract of A. rugosa leaves, was 22.8±7.6mg of naringin equivalent/g ARE. ARE exhibited ABTS(+) radical scavenging activity with an SC50 of 836.9μg/mL. ARE attenuated the UV-B-induced ROS generation. It diminished the UV-B-induced elevation of proMMP-2 and -9 at both activity and protein levels. On the contrary, ARE was able to enhance the UV-B-reduced total GSH and total SOD activity levels. ARE, at the used concentrations, was unable to interfere with the cellular viabilities of HaCaT keratinocytes under UV-B irradiation. Taken together, ARE possesses a protective potential against UV-B-induced photoaging in HaCaT keratinocytes, possibly based upon up-regulating antioxidant components, including total GSH and SOD. These findings reasonably suggest the use of A. rugosa leaves as a photoprotective resource in manufacturing functional cosmetics.

  19. Anti-photoaging potential of Botulinum Toxin Type A in UVB-induced premature senescence of human dermal fibroblasts in vitro through decreasing senescence-related proteins.

    PubMed

    Permatasari, Felicia; Hu, Yan-yan; Zhang, Jia-an; Zhou, Bing-rong; Luo, Dan

    2014-04-01

    This study was aimed to evaluate the anti-photoaging effects of Botulinum Toxin Type A (BoNTA) in Ultraviolet B-induced premature senescence (UVB-SIPS) of human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs) in vitro and the underlying mechanism. We established a stress-induced premature senescence model by repeated subcytotoxic exposures to Ultraviolet B (UVB) irradiation. The aging condition was determined by cytochemical staining of senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA-β-gal). The tumor suppressor and senescence-associated protein levels of p16(INK-4a), p21(WAF-1), and p53 were estimated by Western blotting. The G1 phase cell growth arrest was analyzed by flow cytometry. The mRNA expressions of p16, p21, p53, COL1a1, COL3a1, MMP1, and MMP3 were determined by real-time PCR. The level of Col-1, Col-3, MMP-1, and MMP-3 were determined by ELISA. Compared with the UVB-irradiated group, we found that the irradiated fibroblasts additionally treated with BoNTA demonstrated a decrease in the expression of SA-β-gal, a decrease in the level of tumor suppressor and senescence-associated proteins, a decrease in the G1 phase cell proportion, an increase in the production of Col-1 and Col-3, and a decrease in the secretion of MMP-1 and MMP-3, in a dose-dependent manner. Taken together, these results indicate that BoNTA significantly antagonizes premature senescence induced by UVB in HDFs in vitro, therefore potential of intradermal BoNTA injection as anti-photoaging treatment still remains a question. PMID:24727404

  20. Transcriptomics profiling study of breast cancer from Kingdom of Saudi Arabia revealed altered expression of Adiponectin and Fatty Acid Binding Protein4: Is lipid metabolism associated with breast cancer?

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Breast cancer incidence rates are increasing at an alarming rate among Saudi Arabian females. Most molecular genetic discoveries on breast cancer and other cancers have arisen from studies examining European and American patients. However, possibility of specific changes in molecular signature among cancer patients of diverse ethnic groups remains largely unexplored. We performed transcriptomic profiling of surgically-resected breast tumors from 45 patients based in the Western region of Saudi Arabia using Affymetrix Gene 1.0 ST chip. Pathway and biological function-based clustering was apparent across the tissue samples. Results Pathway analysis revealed canonical pathways that had not been previously implicated in breast cancer. Biological network analysis of differentially regulated genes revealed that Fatty acid binding protein 4, adipocyte (FABP4), adiponectin (ADIPOQ), and retinol binding protein 4 (RBP4) were most down regulated genes, sharing strong connection with the other molecules of lipid metabolism pathway. The marked biological difference in the signatures uncovered between the USA and Saudi samples underpins the importance of this study. Connectivity Map identified compounds that could reverse an observed gene expression signature Conclusions This study describes, to our knowledge, the first genome-wide profiling of breast cancer from Saudi ethnic females. We demonstrate the involvement of the lipid metabolism pathway in the pathogenesis of breast cancer from this region. This finding also highlights the need for strategies to curb the increasing rates of incidence of this disease by educating the public about life-style risk factors such as unhealthy diet and obesity. PMID:25923423

  1. A Rosemary Extract Rich in Carnosic Acid Selectively Modulates Caecum Microbiota and Inhibits β-Glucosidase Activity, Altering Fiber and Short Chain Fatty Acids Fecal Excretion in Lean and Obese Female Rats

    PubMed Central

    Larrosa, Mar; Obiol, María; García-Villalba, Rocío; González-Barrio, Rocío; Issaly, Nicolas; Flanagan, John; Roller, Marc; Tomás-Barberán, Francisco A.; García-Conesa, María-Teresa

    2014-01-01

    Background Carnosic acid (CA) and rosemary extracts (RE) show body-weight, energy metabolism and inflammation regulatory properties in animal models but the mechanisms are not yet understood. Gut microbiota plays an important role in the host metabolism and inflammatory status and is modulated by the diet. The aim of this research was to investigate whether a RE enriched in CA affected caecum microbiota composition and activity in a rat model of genetic obesity. Methods and Principal Findings A RE (40% CA) was administered with the diet (0.5% w/w) to lean (fa/+) and obese (fa/fa) female Zucker rats for 64 days. Changes in the microbiota composition and β-glucosidase activity in the caecum and in the levels of macronutrients and short chain fatty acids (SCFA) in feces were examined. The RE increased the Blautia coccoides and Bacteroides/Prevotella groups and reduced the Lactobacillus/Leuconostoc/Pediococccus group in both types of animals. Clostridium leptum was significantly decreased and Bifidobacterium increased only in the lean rats. β-Glucosidase activity was significantly reduced and fecal fiber excretion increased in the two genotypes. The RE also increased the main SCFA excreted in the feces of the obese rats but decreased them in the lean rats reflecting important differences in the uptake and metabolism of these molecules between the two genotypes. Conclusions Our results indicate that the consumption of a RE enriched in CA modifies microbiota composition and decreases β-glucosidase activity in the caecum of female Zucker rats while it increases fiber fecal elimination. These results may contribute to explain the body weight gain reducing effects of the RE. The mutated leptin receptor of the obese animals significantly affects the microbiota composition, the SCFA fecal excretion and the host response to the RE intake. PMID:24733124

  2. Margarines fortified with α-linolenic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid, or docosahexaenoic acid alter the fatty acid composition of erythrocytes but do not affect the antioxidant status of healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Egert, Sarah; Lindenmeier, Michael; Harnack, Kerstin; Krome, Katharina; Erbersdobler, Helmut F; Wahrburg, Ursel; Somoza, Veronika

    2012-09-01

    We aimed to investigate the effects of increased intake of α-linolenic acid (ALA), EPA, or DHA incorporated into a food matrix on the fatty acid composition of erythrocytes and on biomarkers of oxidant/antioxidant status. To this end, a controlled dietary study was conducted in 74 healthy men and women. The participants were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 interventions in which margarines fortified with either 10 weight percent ALA, EPA, or DHA ethyl esters replaced their normal spread for 6 wk. The total intakes of ALA, EPA, and DHA were 4.4, 2.2, and 2.3 g/d, respectively. Consuming EPA increased the erythrocyte proportion of EPA (394%) and the omega-3 index (sum of EPA and DHA, 38%). Consumption of DHA increased erythrocyte DHA (91%), the omega-3 index (98%), and EPA (137%). The omega-3 index increased to a significantly greater extent in the DHA group than in the EPA group. ALA did not increase erythrocyte EPA or the omega-3 index. We found no change in plasma uric acid or antioxidant capacity in any of the groups. Plasma malondialdehyde (MDA) increased with the EPA and DHA interventions. All 3 interventions decreased erythrocyte linoleic acid hydroperoxides but did not affect their MDA concentrations. In conclusion, the intake of both isolated EPA and DHA incorporated into margarine resulted in an enhanced incorporation of EPA and DHA into erythrocytes. Our findings indicate that DHA is quantitatively superior to EPA in view of the EPA+DHA tissue incorporation and also that 4 g/d ALA is not sufficient to increase the omega-3 index over a 6-wk period.

  3. Omega-3 Fatty Acids

    MedlinePlus

    Omega-3 fatty acids are used together with lifestyle changes (diet, weight-loss, exercise) to reduce the amount of triglycerides (a fat-like ... people with very high triglycerides. Omega-3 fatty acids are in a class of medications called antilipemic ...

  4. Dietary omega-3 fatty acids for women.

    PubMed

    Bourre, Jean-Marie

    2007-01-01

    This review details the specific needs of women for omega-3 fatty acids, including alpha linoleic acid (ALA) and the very long chain fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). Omega-3 fatty acid (dietary or in capsules) ensures that a woman's adipose tissue contains a reserve of these fatty acids for the developing fetus and the breast-fed newborn infant. This ensures the optimal cerebral and cognitive development of the infant. The presence of large quantities of EPA and DHA in the diet slightly lengthens pregnancy, and improves its quality. Human milk contains both ALA and DHA, unlike that of other mammals. Conditions such as diabetes can alter the fatty acid profile of mother's milk, while certain diets, like those of vegetarians, vegans, or even macrobiotic diets, can have the same effect, if they do not include seafood. ALA, DHA and EPA, are important for preventing ischemic cardiovascular disease in women of all ages. Omega-3 fatty acids can help to prevent the development of certain cancers, particularly those of the breast and colon, and possibly of the uterus and the skin, and are likely to reduce the risk of postpartum depression, manic-depressive psychosis, dementias (Alzheimer's disease and others), hypertension, toxemia, diabetes and, to a certain extend, age-related macular degeneration. Omega-3 fatty acids could play a positive role in the prevention of menstrual syndrome and postmenopausal hot flushes. The normal western diet contains little ALA (less than 50% of the RDA). The only adequate sources are rapeseed oil (canola), walnuts and so-called "omega-3" eggs (similar to wild-type or Cretan eggs). The amounts of EPA and DHA in the diet vary greatly from person to person. The only good sources are fish and seafood, together with "omega-3" eggs. PMID:17254747

  5. Nutritional and management strategies for the prevention of fatty liver in dairy cattle.

    PubMed

    Grummer, Ric R

    2008-04-01

    Fatty liver occurs in dairy cattle during periods of elevated blood non-esterified fatty acids (NEFAs). Elevated blood NEFAs are associated with hormonal changes at parturition and negative energy balance. Approaches for preventing fatty liver include inhibition of fatty acid mobilization from adipose tissues and altering hepatic metabolism to enhance fatty acid oxidation or export as a constituent of very low-density lipoproteins (VLDL). Nutritional and management strategies to implement these approaches have been examined. Increasing energy density of diet, either by increasing non-fiber carbohydrate or fat, has failed to prevent fatty liver. Two nutritional supplements, ruminally-protected choline and propylene glycol, have proven effective at preventing fatty liver. Choline probably enhances hepatic VLDL secretion. Propylene glycol most likely reduces fatty acid mobilization from adipose tissue. Shortening or eliminating the dry period is a management strategy that reduces the magnitude of negative energy balance after calving and triglyceride accumulation in the liver.

  6. Dietary α-linolenic acid from flaxseed oil or eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids from fish oil differentially alter fatty acid composition and characteristics of fresh and frozen-thawed bull semen.

    PubMed

    Moallem, Uzi; Neta, Noam; Zeron, Yoel; Zachut, Maya; Roth, Zvi

    2015-04-15

    Incorporation rates of dietary omega-3 (n-3) fatty acids (FAs) from different sources into bull plasma and sperm and the effects on physiological characteristics of fresh and frozen-thawed semen were determined. Fifteen fertile bulls were assigned to three treatment groups and supplemented for 13 weeks with encapsulated fat: (1) SFA-360 g/d per bull saturated FA; (2) FLX-450 g/d per bull providing 84.2 g/d C18:3n-3 (α-linolenic acid) from flaxseed oil; and (3) FO-450 g/d per bull providing 8.7 g/d C20:5n-3 (eicosapentaenoic acid) and 6.5 g/d C22:6n-3 (docosahexaenoic acid, DHA) from fish oil. Blood samples were taken every 2 weeks and semen was collected weekly. With respect to the FA supplements, the proportion of α-linolenic acid in plasma increased in the FLX bulls, whereas that of DHA was increased in the FO bulls, within 2 weeks. However, changes in the sperm FA fraction were first expressed in the sixth week of supplementation: in the FO and FLX bulls the DHA proportion increased (P < 0.001), whereas that of C22:5n-6 FAs (docosapentaenoic acid [DPA] n-6) decreased (P < 0.001). Sperm motility and progressive motility in fresh semen were higher (P < 0.05), and the fading rate tended to be lower in the FLX than in FO bulls (P < 0.06). Furthermore, sperm motility, progressive motility, and velocity in frozen-thawed semen were higher in FLX than in the other groups (P < 0.008). These findings indicate that the proportion of DHA in sperm can be increased at the expense of DPAn-6 by either FO or FLX supplementation, indicating de novo elongation and desaturation of short- into longer-chain n-3 FAs in testes. Furthermore, the moderate exchange of DHA and DPAn-6 in the FLX group's sperm was associated with changes in the characteristics of both fresh and frozen-thawed semen, suggesting the importance of the ratio between these two FAs for sperm structure and function. PMID:25617988

  7. Dietary α-linolenic acid from flaxseed oil or eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids from fish oil differentially alter fatty acid composition and characteristics of fresh and frozen-thawed bull semen.

    PubMed

    Moallem, Uzi; Neta, Noam; Zeron, Yoel; Zachut, Maya; Roth, Zvi

    2015-04-15

    Incorporation rates of dietary omega-3 (n-3) fatty acids (FAs) from different sources into bull plasma and sperm and the effects on physiological characteristics of fresh and frozen-thawed semen were determined. Fifteen fertile bulls were assigned to three treatment groups and supplemented for 13 weeks with encapsulated fat: (1) SFA-360 g/d per bull saturated FA; (2) FLX-450 g/d per bull providing 84.2 g/d C18:3n-3 (α-linolenic acid) from flaxseed oil; and (3) FO-450 g/d per bull providing 8.7 g/d C20:5n-3 (eicosapentaenoic acid) and 6.5 g/d C22:6n-3 (docosahexaenoic acid, DHA) from fish oil. Blood samples were taken every 2 weeks and semen was collected weekly. With respect to the FA supplements, the proportion of α-linolenic acid in plasma increased in the FLX bulls, whereas that of DHA was increased in the FO bulls, within 2 weeks. However, changes in the sperm FA fraction were first expressed in the sixth week of supplementation: in the FO and FLX bulls the DHA proportion increased (P < 0.001), whereas that of C22:5n-6 FAs (docosapentaenoic acid [DPA] n-6) decreased (P < 0.001). Sperm motility and progressive motility in fresh semen were higher (P < 0.05), and the fading rate tended to be lower in the FLX than in FO bulls (P < 0.06). Furthermore, sperm motility, progressive motility, and velocity in frozen-thawed semen were higher in FLX than in the other groups (P < 0.008). These findings indicate that the proportion of DHA in sperm can be increased at the expense of DPAn-6 by either FO or FLX supplementation, indicating de novo elongation and desaturation of short- into longer-chain n-3 FAs in testes. Furthermore, the moderate exchange of DHA and DPAn-6 in the FLX group's sperm was associated with changes in the characteristics of both fresh and frozen-thawed semen, suggesting the importance of the ratio between these two FAs for sperm structure and function.

  8. Mutant fatty acid desaturase

    DOEpatents

    Shanklin, John; Cahoon, Edgar B.

    2004-02-03

    The present invention relates to a method for producing mutants of a fatty acid desaturase having a substantially increased activity towards fatty acid substrates with chains containing fewer than 18 carbons relative to an unmutagenized precursor desaturase having an 18 carbon atom chain length substrate specificity. The method involves inducing one or more mutations in the nucleic acid sequence encoding the precursor desaturase, transforming the mutated sequence into an unsaturated fatty acid auxotroph cell such as MH13 E. coli, culturing the cells in the absence of supplemental unsaturated fatty acids, thereby selecting for recipient cells which have received and which express a mutant fatty acid desaturase with an elevated specificity for fatty acid substrates having chain lengths of less than 18 carbon atoms. A variety of mutants having 16 or fewer carbon atom chain length substrate specificities are produced by this method. Mutant desaturases produced by this method can be introduced via expression vectors into prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells and can also be used in the production of transgenic plants which may be used to produce specific fatty acid products.

  9. Trans Fatty Acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle, Ellin

    1997-09-01

    Fats and their various fatty acid components seem to be a perennial concern of nutritionists and persons concerned with healthful diets. Advice on the consumption of saturated, polyunsaturated, monounsaturated, and total fat bombards us from magazines and newspapers. One of the newer players in this field is the group of trans fatty acids found predominantly in partially hydrogenated fats such as margarines and cooking fats. The controversy concerning dietary trans fatty acids was recently addressed in an American Heart Association (AHA) science advisory (1) and in a position paper from the American Society of Clinical Nutrition/American Institute of Nutrition (ASCN/AIN) (2). Both reports emphasize that the best preventive strategy for reducing risk for cardiovascular disease and some types of cancer is a reduction in total and saturated fats in the diet, but a reduction in the intake of trans fatty acids was also recommended. Although the actual health effects of trans fatty acids remain uncertain, experimental evidence indicates that consumption of trans fatty acids adversely affects serum lipid levels. Since elevated levels of serum cholesterol and triacylglycerols are associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease, it follows that intake of trans fatty acids should be minimized.

  10. Ghrelin reduces hepatic mitochondrial fatty acid beta oxidation.

    PubMed

    Rigault, C; Le Borgne, F; Georges, B; Demarquoy, J

    2007-04-01

    Ghrelin is a 28-amino-acid peptide secreted during starvation by gastric cells. Ghrelin physiologically induces food intake and seems to alter lipid and glucid metabolism in several tissues such as adipose tissue and liver. Liver has a key position in lipid metabolism as it allows the metabolic orientation of fatty acids between oxidation and esterification. We investigated the effects of peripheral ghrelin administration on 2 crucial parameters of fatty acid oxidation: the levocarnitine (L-carnitine)-dependent entry of the fatty acids in the mitochondria and the mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation. Ghrelin was either given to rats prior to the hepatocyte preparation and culture or used to treat hepatocytes prepared from control animals. Direct incubation of ghrelin to raw hepatocytes did not induce any change in the studied parameters. In hepatocytes prepared from 3 nmol ghrelin-treated rats, a 44% reduction of the mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation while no alteration of the L-carnitine-related parameters were observed. These results suggested (a) that ghrelin has no direct effect on liver, and (b) that when administrated to a whole organism, ghrelin may alter the lipid metabolism and the energy balance through a marked decrease in liver fatty acid oxidation. PMID:17556859

  11. Zilpaterol hydrochloride alters abundance of β-adrenergic receptors in bovine muscle cells but has little effect on de novo fatty acid biosynthesis in bovine subcutaneous adipose tissue explants.

    PubMed

    Miller, E K; Chung, K Y; Hutcheson, J P; Yates, D A; Smith, S B; Johnson, B J

    2012-04-01

    We predicted that zilpaterol hydrochloride (ZH), a β-adrenergic receptor (AR) agonist, would depress mRNA and protein abundance of β-AR in bovine satellite cells. We also predicted that ZH would decrease total lipid synthesis in bovine adipose tissue. Bovine satellite cells isolated from the semimembranosus muscle were plated on tissue culture plates coated with reduced growth factor matrigel or collagen. Real-time quantitative PCR was used to measure specific gene expression after 48 h of ZH exposure in proliferating satellite cells and fused myoblasts. There was no effect of ZH dose on [(3)H]thymidine incorporation into DNA in proliferating myoblasts. Zilpaterol hydrochloride at 1 µM decreased (P < 0.05) β1-AR mRNA, and 0.01 and 1 µM ZH decreased (P < 0.05) β2-AR and β3-AR mRNA in myoblasts. The expression of IGF-I mRNA tended to increase (P = 0.07) with 1 µM ZH. There was no effect (P > 0.10) of ZH on the β-AR or IGF-I gene expression in fused myotube cultures at 192 h or on fusion percentage. The β2-AR antagonist ICI-118, 551 at 0.1 µM attenuated (P < 0.05) the effect of 0.1 µM ZH to reduce expression of β1- and β2-AR mRNA. The combination of 0.01 µM ZH and 0.1 µM ICI-118, 551 caused an increase (P < 0.05) in β1-AR gene expression. There was no effect (P > 0.10) of ICI-118, 551 or ZH on β3-AR or IGF-I. Western blot analysis revealed that the protein content of β2-AR in ZH-treated myotube cultures decreased (P < 0.05) relative to control. Total lipid synthesis from acetate was increased by ZH in bovine subcutaneous adipose tissue explants in the absence of theophylline but was decreased by ZH when theophylline was included in the incubation medium. These data indicate that ZH alters mRNA and protein concentrations of β-AR in satellite cell cultures, which in turn could affect responsiveness of cells to prolonged ZH exposure in vivo. Similar to other β-adrenergic agonists, ZH had only modest effects on lipid metabolism in adipose tissue

  12. Efficacy of Photodynamic Therapy in the Short and Medium Term in the Treatment of Actinic Keratosis, Basal Cell Carcinoma, Acne Vulgaris and Photoaging: Results from Four Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Carpio, PA; Alcolea-López, JM; Vélez, M

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To determine the clinical efficacy of methyl-aminolevulinate (MAL)-Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) in the treatment of actinic keratosis (AK), basal cell carcinoma (BCC), acne vulgaris (AV) and photoaging (PA), in the short and medium term. Subjects and methods: Four separate prospective studies were designed on patients with AK (n=25), BCC (n=20), AV (n=20) and PA (n=25). Two PDT protocols were applied, and different clinical efficacy criteria were established, including lesion count and size. Two semi-quantitative and four analogue visual scales were completed for the evaluation of results according to the therapist, the patient and two independent experts. Results: In the AK and BCC studies, full clinical remission was observed in 84.7% and 75.7% of lesions, respectively. In the AV study, the number of inflammatory and non-inflammatory lesions fell significantly (p<0.001, p<0.05). In the PA study a reduction in Dover scale scores (3.19 vs. 2.14, p<0.001) was proven. The percentages of satisfied or very satisfied patients were: AK=88%, BCC=90%, AV=89% and PA=80%. A year later, none of the AK or BCC lesions had reappeared, and the cases of AV and PA remained stable, with a tendency towards improvement. Conclusion: the MAL-PDT procedures used produced efficacious, safe and satisfactory results in KA, BCC, AV and PA in the short and medium term. PMID:24511190

  13. Changes in the redox state and endogenous fluorescence of in vivo human skin due to intrinsic and photo-aging, measured by multiphoton tomography with fluorescence lifetime imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, Washington Y.; Obispo, Clara; Ryan, Elizabeth; Grice, Jeffrey E.; Roberts, Michael S.

    2013-06-01

    Ultraviolet radiation from solar exposure is a key extrinsic factor responsible for premature skin aging (i.e., photo-aging). Recent advances using in vivo multiphoton tomography (MPT) demonstrate the efficacy of this approach to assess intrinsic and extrinsic skin aging as an alternative to existing invasive techniques. In this study, we measured changes in epidermal autofluorescence, dermal collagen second harmonic generation (SHG), and the redox state of solar-exposed and solar-protected human skin by MPT with fluorescence lifetime imaging (MPT-FLIM). Twenty-four volunteers across four age categories (20 to 29, 30 to 39, 40 to 49, and 50 to 59 years old; six volunteers each) were recruited for MPT-FLIM imaging of the dorsal (solar-exposed; photo-damaged) and volar (solar-protected) forearm. We demonstrate a higher intensity of dermal collagen SHG within the volar forearm compared to dorsal solar-exposed skin. Redox imaging of each epidermal skin stratum by FLIM demonstrates an increase in fluorescence lifetime in the solar-exposed dorsal forearm that is more apparent in aged skin. The results of this study suggest the redox state of the viable epidermis is a key marker in assessing intrinsic and photo-damage skin aging, in combination with changes in autofluorescence and SHG.

  14. Lipoproteini lipase-derived fatty acids: physiology and dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jee; Goldberg, Ira J

    2007-12-01

    Under normal circumstances, most energy substrate used for heart contraction derives from fatty acids in the form of nonesterified fatty acids bound to albumin or fatty acids derived from lipolysis of lipoprotein-bound triglyceride by lipoprotein lipase (LpL). By creating LpL knockout mice (hLpL0), we learned that loss of cardiac LpL leads to myocardial dysfunction; therefore, neither nonesterified fatty acids nor increased glucose metabolism can replace LpL actions. hLpL0 mice do not survive abdominal aortic constriction and they develop more heart failure with hypertension. Conversely, we created a mouse overexpressing cardiomyocyte-anchored LpL. This transgene produced cardiac lipotoxicity and dilated cardiomyopathy. Methods to alter this phenotype and the causes of other models of lipotoxicity are currently being studied and will provide further insight into the physiology of lipid metabolism in the heart. PMID:18367009

  15. Structural and functional interaction of fatty acids with human liver fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP) T94A variant.

    PubMed

    Huang, Huan; McIntosh, Avery L; Martin, Gregory G; Landrock, Kerstin K; Landrock, Danilo; Gupta, Shipra; Atshaves, Barbara P; Kier, Ann B; Schroeder, Friedhelm

    2014-05-01

    The human liver fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP) T94A variant, the most common in the FABP family, has been associated with elevated liver triglyceride levels. How this amino acid substitution elicits these effects is not known. This issue was addressed using human recombinant wild-type (WT) and T94A variant L-FABP proteins as well as cultured primary human hepatocytes expressing the respective proteins (genotyped as TT, TC and CC). The T94A substitution did not alter or only slightly altered L-FABP binding affinities for saturated, monounsaturated or polyunsaturated long chain fatty acids, nor did it change the affinity for intermediates of triglyceride synthesis. Nevertheless, the T94A substitution markedly altered the secondary structural response of L-FABP induced by binding long chain fatty acids or intermediates of triglyceride synthesis. Finally, the T94A substitution markedly decreased the levels of induction of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α-regulated proteins such as L-FABP, fatty acid transport protein 5 and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α itself meditated by the polyunsaturated fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid in cultured primary human hepatocytes. Thus, although the T94A substitution did not alter the affinity of human L-FABP for long chain fatty acids, it significantly altered human L-FABP structure and stability, as well as the conformational and functional response to these ligands.

  16. Long chain fatty acids and dietary fats in fetal nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Cetin, Irene; Alvino, Gioia; Cardellicchio, Manuela

    2009-01-01

    Long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids are essential nutrients for a healthy diet. The different kinds consumed by the mother during gestation and lactation may influence pregnancy, fetal and also neonatal outcome. The amount of fatty acids transferred from mother to fetus depends not only on maternal metabolism but also on placental function, i.e. by the uptake, metabolism and then transfer of fatty acids to the fetus. The third trimester of gestation is characterized by an increase of long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids in the fetal circulation, in particular docosahexaenoic acid, especially to support brain growth and visual development. These mechanisms may be altered in pathological conditions, such as intrauterine growth restriction and diabetes, when maternal and fetal plasma levels of long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids undergo significant changes. The aim of this review is to describe the maternal and placental factors involved in determining fetal fatty acid availability and metabolism, focusing on the specific role of long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids in normal and pathological pregnancies. PMID:19528253

  17. Discovery of essential fatty acids

    PubMed Central

    Spector, Arthur A.; Kim, Hee-Yong

    2015-01-01

    Dietary fat was recognized as a good source of energy and fat-soluble vitamins by the first part of the 20th century, but fatty acids were not considered to be essential nutrients because they could be synthesized from dietary carbohydrate. This well-established view was challenged in 1929 by George and Mildred Burr who reported that dietary fatty acid was required to prevent a deficiency disease that occurred in rats fed a fat-free diet. They concluded that fatty acids were essential nutrients and showed that linoleic acid prevented the disease and is an essential fatty acid. The Burrs surmised that other unsaturated fatty acids were essential and subsequently demonstrated that linolenic acid, the omega-3 fatty acid analog of linoleic acid, is also an essential fatty acid. The discovery of essential fatty acids was a paradigm-changing finding, and it is now considered to be one of the landmark discoveries in lipid research. PMID:25339684

  18. Omega-3 fatty acids (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Omega-3 fatty acids are a form of polyunsaturated fat that the body derives from food. Omega-3s (and omega-6s) are known as essential fatty acids (EFAs) because they are important for good health. ...

  19. The effect of pH on the toxicity of fatty acids and fatty acid amides to rainbow trout gill cells.

    PubMed

    Bertin, Matthew J; Voronca, Delia C; Chapman, Robert W; Moeller, Peter D R

    2014-01-01

    Harmful algal blooms (HABs) expose aquatic organisms to multiple physical and chemical stressors during an acute time period. Algal toxins themselves may be altered by water chemistry parameters affecting their bioavailability and resultant toxicity. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of two abiotic parameters (pH, inorganic metal salts) on the toxicity of fatty acid amides and fatty acids, two classes of lipids produced by harmful algae, including the golden alga, Prymnesium parvum, that are toxic to aquatic organisms. Rainbow trout gill cells were used as a model of the fish gill and exposed to single compounds and mixtures of compounds along with variations in pH level and concentration of inorganic metal salts. We employed artificial neural networks (ANNs) and standard ANOVA statistical analysis to examine and predict the effects of these abiotic parameters on the toxicity of fatty acid amides and fatty acids. Our results demonstrate that increasing pH levels increases the toxicity of fatty acid amides and inhibits the toxicity of fatty acids. This phenomenon is reversed at lower pH levels. Exposing gill cells to complex mixtures of chemical factors resulted in dramatic increases in toxicity compared to tests of single compounds for both the fatty acid amides and fatty acids. These findings highlight the potential of physicochemical factors to affect the toxicity of chemicals released during algal blooms and demonstrate drastic differences in the effect of pH on fatty acid amides and fatty acids. PMID:24240104

  20. Fatty acids of Thiobacillus thiooxidans.

    PubMed

    Levin, R A

    1971-12-01

    Fatty acid spectra were made on Thiobacillus thiooxidans cultures both in the presence and absence of organic compounds. Small additions of glucose or acetate had no significant effect either on growth or fatty acid content. The addition of biotin had no stimulatory effect but did result in slight quantitative changes in the fatty acid spectrum. The predominant fatty acid was a C(19) cyclopropane acid.

  1. Fatty Acids of Thiobacillus thiooxidans

    PubMed Central

    Levin, Richard A.

    1971-01-01

    Fatty acid spectra were made on Thiobacillus thiooxidans cultures both in the presence and absence of organic compounds. Small additions of glucose or acetate had no significant effect either on growth or fatty acid content. The addition of biotin had no stimulatory effect but did result in slight quantitative changes in the fatty acid spectrum. The predominant fatty acid was a C19 cyclopropane acid. PMID:4945206

  2. Acute effects of dietary fatty acids on the fatty acids of human milk.

    PubMed

    Francois, C A; Connor, S L; Wander, R C; Connor, W E

    1998-02-01

    Although it is known that the fatty acid profile of human milk is altered by diet, the rapidity with which this occurs has not been addressed. We hypothesized that after absorption the fatty acids of a given meal would be transferred rapidly from the chylomicrons of the blood into human milk. Fourteen lactating women drank six test formulas, each containing a different fat: menhaden oil, herring oil, safflower oil, canola oil, coconut oil, or cocoa butter. The subjects collected a midfeeding milk sample before consuming the breakfast test formula and additional samples at 6, 10, 14, and 24 h and then once daily for 4-7 d. Fatty acids of special interest included eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids from menhaden oil, cetoleic acid from herring oil, linoleic acid from safflower oil, linolenic acid from canola oil, lauric acid from coconut oil, and palmitic and stearic acids from cocoa butter. Each of these fatty acids increased significantly in human milk within 6 h of consumption of the test formulas (P < 0.001). Maximum increases occurred 10 h after safflower oil; 14 h after cocoa utter, coconut oil, canola oil, and menhaden oil (eicosapentaenoic acid); and 24 h after herring oil and menhaden oil (docosahexaenoic acid). All of these fatty acids remained significantly elevated in milk (P < 0.05) for 10-24 h, except for docosahexaenoic acid, which remained significantly elevated for 2 d, and eicosapentaenoic acid, which remained elevated for 3 d. These data support the hypothesis that there is a rapid transfer of dietary fatty acids from chylomicrons into human milk. PMID:9459379

  3. Rosiglitazone increases fatty acid oxidation and fatty acid translocase (FAT/CD36) but not carnitine palmitoyltransferase I in rat muscle mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Benton, Carley R; Holloway, Graham P; Campbell, S E; Yoshida, Yuko; Tandon, Narendra N; Glatz, Jan F C; Luiken, Joost J J F P; Spriet, Lawrence L; Bonen, Arend

    2008-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) alter the expression of genes involved in regulating lipid metabolism. Rosiglitazone, a PPARγ agonist, induces tissue-specific effects on lipid metabolism; however, its mode of action in skeletal muscle remains unclear. Since fatty acid translocase (FAT/CD36) was recently identified as a possible regulator of skeletal muscle fatty acid transport and mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation, we examined in this tissue the effects of rosiglitazone infusion (7 days, 1 mg day−1) on FAT/CD36 mRNA and protein, its plasmalemmal content and fatty acid transport. In addition, in isolated subsarcolemmal (SS) and intermyofibrillar (IMF) mitochondria we examined rates of fatty acid oxidation, FAT/CD36 and carnitine palmitoyltransferase I (CPTI) protein, and CPTI and β-hydroxyacyl CoA dehydrogenase (β-HAD) activities. Rosiglitazone did not alter FAT/CD36 mRNA or protein expression, FAT/CD36 plasmalemmal content, or the rate of fatty acid transport into muscle (P > 0.05). In contrast, rosiglitazone increased the rates of fatty acid oxidation in both SS (+21%) and IMF mitochondria (+36%). This was accompanied by concomitant increases in FAT/CD36 in subsarcolemmal (SS) (+43%) and intermyofibrillar (IMF) mitochondria (+46%), while SS and IMF CPTI protein content, and CPTI submaximal and maximal activities (P > 0.05) were not altered. Similarly, citrate synthase (CS) and β-HAD activities were also not altered by rosiglitazone in SS and IMF mitochondria (P > 0.05). These studies provide another example whereby changes in mitochondrial fatty oxidation are associated with concomitant changes in mitochondrial FAT/CD36 independent of any changes in CPTI. Moreover, these studies identify for the first time a mechanism by which rosiglitazone stimulates fatty acid oxidation in skeletal muscle, namely the chronic, subcellular relocation of FAT/CD36 to mitochondria. PMID:18238811

  4. [A catalogue of fatty acids].

    PubMed

    Canalejo, E; Martín Peña, G; Gómez Molero, L; Ruiz Galiana, J

    1996-01-01

    Fatty acids structure and function is an area of renewed interest because of its effects on plasma lipids, biosynthesis of prostaglandins, leucotrienes and thromboxanes, and the obligatory demands of some fatty acids, especially for the newborn. Fatty acids are identified in three different ways: by the classical nomenclature, by its trivial name, and by the new methods also known as the omega system. These three different methods have created some confusion. The aim of this article is to revise fatty acids chemical structure and to compile a list of nutritional important fatty acids with the three different terminologies.

  5. Steatocholecystitis and fatty gallbladder disease.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chung-Jyi

    2009-09-01

    Obesity has become an epidemic worldwide. It is accompanied by a multitude of medical complications including metabolic syndrome. Obesity may lead to fatty infiltration of multiple internal organs including liver, heart, kidney, and pancreas, causing organ dysfunctions. Fatty infiltration leads to chronic inflammation and tissue damage. Fatty infiltration in the liver results in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, which is increasingly common nowadays. Recent studies in animals and humans indicate that obesity also is associated with fatty infiltration of gallbladder, resulting in cholecystosteatosis. The increased gallbladder lipids include free fatty acids, phospholipids, and triglycerides. Enhanced inflammation with an increased amount of fat in the gallbladder results in an abnormal wall structure and decreased contractility. In support of this notion, a recent experiment on the effect of Ezetimibe, which is a novel drug that inhibits intestinal fat absorption, on fatty gallbladder disease reveals that Ezetimibe can ameliorate cholecystosteatosis and restore in vivo gallbladder contractility. The proportion of cholecystectomies performed for chronic acalculous cholecystitis has increased significantly over the past two decades. An increase in gallbladder fat, which leads to poor gallbladder emptying and biliary symptoms, may partly explain this phenomenon. Although dietary carbohydrates have been demonstrated to be associated with fatty gallbladder disease, other potential modifiable environmental factors are not clear. The pathogenesis and prognosis of fatty gallbladder disease, including steatocholecystitis, and the relations of fatty gallbladder disease to nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, including steatohepatitis, and other components of metabolic syndrome are largely unknown. More research is needed to answer these questions.

  6. Microbial production of fatty alcohols.

    PubMed

    Fillet, Sandy; Adrio, José L

    2016-09-01

    Fatty alcohols have numerous commercial applications, including their use as lubricants, surfactants, solvents, emulsifiers, plasticizers, emollients, thickeners, and even fuels. Fatty alcohols are currently produced by catalytic hydrogenation of fatty acids from plant oils or animal fats. Microbial production of fatty alcohols may be a more direct and environmentally-friendly strategy since production is carried out by heterologous enzymes, called fatty acyl-CoA reductases, able to reduce different acyl-CoA molecules to their corresponding primary alcohols. Successful examples of metabolic engineering have been reported in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Escherichia coli in which the production of fatty alcohols ranged from 1.2 to 1.9 g/L, respectively. Due to their metabolic advantages, oleaginous yeasts are considered the best hosts for production of fatty acid-derived chemicals. Some of these species can naturally produce, under specific growth conditions, lipids at high titers (>50 g/L) and therefore provide large amounts of fatty acyl-CoAs or fatty acids as precursors. Very recently, taking advantage of such features, over 8 g/L of C16-C18 fatty alcohols have been produced in Rhodosporidium toruloides. In this review we summarize the different metabolic engineering strategies, hosts and cultivation conditions used to date. We also point out some future trends and challenges for the microbial production of fatty alcohols. PMID:27465852

  7. Steatocholecystitis and fatty gallbladder disease.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chung-Jyi

    2009-09-01

    Obesity has become an epidemic worldwide. It is accompanied by a multitude of medical complications including metabolic syndrome. Obesity may lead to fatty infiltration of multiple internal organs including liver, heart, kidney, and pancreas, causing organ dysfunctions. Fatty infiltration leads to chronic inflammation and tissue damage. Fatty infiltration in the liver results in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, which is increasingly common nowadays. Recent studies in animals and humans indicate that obesity also is associated with fatty infiltration of gallbladder, resulting in cholecystosteatosis. The increased gallbladder lipids include free fatty acids, phospholipids, and triglycerides. Enhanced inflammation with an increased amount of fat in the gallbladder results in an abnormal wall structure and decreased contractility. In support of this notion, a recent experiment on the effect of Ezetimibe, which is a novel drug that inhibits intestinal fat absorption, on fatty gallbladder disease reveals that Ezetimibe can ameliorate cholecystosteatosis and restore in vivo gallbladder contractility. The proportion of cholecystectomies performed for chronic acalculous cholecystitis has increased significantly over the past two decades. An increase in gallbladder fat, which leads to poor gallbladder emptying and biliary symptoms, may partly explain this phenomenon. Although dietary carbohydrates have been demonstrated to be associated with fatty gallbladder disease, other potential modifiable environmental factors are not clear. The pathogenesis and prognosis of fatty gallbladder disease, including steatocholecystitis, and the relations of fatty gallbladder disease to nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, including steatohepatitis, and other components of metabolic syndrome are largely unknown. More research is needed to answer these questions. PMID:19093209

  8. Microbial production of fatty alcohols.

    PubMed

    Fillet, Sandy; Adrio, José L

    2016-09-01

    Fatty alcohols have numerous commercial applications, including their use as lubricants, surfactants, solvents, emulsifiers, plasticizers, emollients, thickeners, and even fuels. Fatty alcohols are currently produced by catalytic hydrogenation of fatty acids from plant oils or animal fats. Microbial production of fatty alcohols may be a more direct and environmentally-friendly strategy since production is carried out by heterologous enzymes, called fatty acyl-CoA reductases, able to reduce different acyl-CoA molecules to their corresponding primary alcohols. Successful examples of metabolic engineering have been reported in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Escherichia coli in which the production of fatty alcohols ranged from 1.2 to 1.9 g/L, respectively. Due to their metabolic advantages, oleaginous yeasts are considered the best hosts for production of fatty acid-derived chemicals. Some of these species can naturally produce, under specific growth conditions, lipids at high titers (>50 g/L) and therefore provide large amounts of fatty acyl-CoAs or fatty acids as precursors. Very recently, taking advantage of such features, over 8 g/L of C16-C18 fatty alcohols have been produced in Rhodosporidium toruloides. In this review we summarize the different metabolic engineering strategies, hosts and cultivation conditions used to date. We also point out some future trends and challenges for the microbial production of fatty alcohols.

  9. Mutant fatty acid desaturase and methods for directed mutagenesis

    DOEpatents

    Shanklin, John; Whittle, Edward J.

    2008-01-29

    The present invention relates to methods for producing fatty acid desaturase mutants having a substantially increased activity towards substrates with fewer than 18 carbon atom chains relative to an unmutagenized precursor desaturase having an 18 carbon chain length specificity, the sequences encoding the desaturases and to the desaturases that are produced by the methods. The present invention further relates to a method for altering a function of a protein, including a fatty acid desaturase, through directed mutagenesis involving identifying candidate amino acid residues, producing a library of mutants of the protein by simultaneously randomizing all amino acid candidates, and selecting for mutants which exhibit the desired alteration of function. Candidate amino acids are identified by a combination of methods. Enzymatic, binding, structural and other functions of proteins can be altered by the method.

  10. (Radioiodinated free fatty acids)

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, Jr., F. F.

    1987-12-11

    The traveler participated in the Second International Workshop on Radioiodinated Free Fatty Acids in Amsterdam, The Netherlands where he presented an invited paper describing the pioneering work at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) involving the design, development and testing of new radioiodinated methyl-branched fatty acids for evaluation of heart disease. He also chaired a technical session on the testing of new agents in various in vitro and in vivo systems. He also visited the Institute for Clinical and Experimental Nuclear Medicine in Bonn, West Germany, to review, discuss, plan and coordinate collaborative investigations with that institution. In addition, he visited the Cyclotron Research Center in Liege, Belgium, to discuss continuing collaborative studies with the Osmium-191/Iridium-191m radionuclide generator system, and to complete manuscripts and plan future studies.

  11. Using Caenorhabditis elegans to Uncover Conserved Functions of Omega-3 and Omega-6 Fatty Acids

    PubMed Central

    Watts, Jennifer L.

    2016-01-01

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is a powerful model organism to study functions of polyunsaturated fatty acids. The ability to alter fatty acid composition with genetic manipulation and dietary supplementation permits the dissection of the roles of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids in many biological process including reproduction, aging and neurobiology. Studies in C. elegans to date have mostly identified overlapping functions of 20-carbon omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids in reproduction and in neurons, however, specific roles for either omega-3 or omega-6 fatty acids are beginning to emerge. Recent findings with importance to human health include the identification of a conserved Cox-independent prostaglandin synthesis pathway, critical functions for cytochrome P450 derivatives of polyunsaturated fatty acids, the requirements for omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids in sensory neurons, and the importance of fatty acid desaturation for long lifespan. Furthermore, the ability of C. elegans to interconvert omega-6 to omega-3 fatty acids using the FAT-1 omega-3 desaturase has been exploited in mammalian studies and biotechnology approaches to generate mammals capable of exogenous generation of omega-3 fatty acids. PMID:26848697

  12. Plasma and brain fatty acid profiles in mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Cunnane, Stephen C; Schneider, Julie A; Tangney, Christine; Tremblay-Mercier, Jennifer; Fortier, Mélanie; Bennett, David A; Morris, Martha Clare

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is generally associated with lower omega-3 fatty acid intake from fish but despite numerous studies, it is still unclear whether there are differences in omega-3 fatty acids in plasma or brain. In matched plasma and brain samples provided by the Memory and Aging Project, fatty acid profiles were quantified in several plasma lipid classes and in three brain cortical regions. Fatty acid data were expressed as % composition and as concentrations (mg/dL for plasma or mg/g for brain). Differences in plasma fatty acid profiles between AD, mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and those with no cognitive impairment (NCI) were most apparent in the plasma free fatty acids (lower oleic acid isomers and omega-6 fatty acids in AD) and phospholipids (lower omega-3 fatty acids in AD). In brain, % DHA was lower only in phosphatidylserine of mid-frontal cortex and superior temporal cortex in AD compared to NCI (-14% and -12%, respectively; both p < 0.05). The only significant correlation between plasma and brain fatty acids was between % DHA in plasma total lipids and % DHA in phosphatidylethanolamine of the angular gyrus, but only in the NCI group (+0.77, p < 0.05). We conclude that AD is associated with altered plasma status of both DHA and other fatty acids unrelated to DHA, and that the lipid class-dependent nature of these differences reflects a combination of differences in intake and metabolism. PMID:22466064

  13. Using Caenorhabditis elegans to Uncover Conserved Functions of Omega-3 and Omega-6 Fatty Acids.

    PubMed

    Watts, Jennifer L

    2016-02-02

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is a powerful model organism to study functions of polyunsaturated fatty acids. The ability to alter fatty acid composition with genetic manipulation and dietary supplementation permits the dissection of the roles of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids in many biological process including reproduction, aging and neurobiology. Studies in C. elegans to date have mostly identified overlapping functions of 20-carbon omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids in reproduction and in neurons, however, specific roles for either omega-3 or omega-6 fatty acids are beginning to emerge. Recent findings with importance to human health include the identification of a conserved Cox-independent prostaglandin synthesis pathway, critical functions for cytochrome P450 derivatives of polyunsaturated fatty acids, the requirements for omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids in sensory neurons, and the importance of fatty acid desaturation for long lifespan. Furthermore, the ability of C. elegans to interconvert omega-6 to omega-3 fatty acids using the FAT-1 omega-3 desaturase has been exploited in mammalian studies and biotechnology approaches to generate mammals capable of exogenous generation of omega-3 fatty acids.

  14. Reduced Maternal Erythrocyte Long Chain Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids Exist in Early Pregnancy in Preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Wadhwani, Nisha S; Narang, Ankita S; Mehendale, Savita S; Wagh, Girija N; Gupte, Sanjay A; Joshi, Sadhana R

    2016-01-01

    The present prospective study examines proportions of maternal erythrocyte fatty acids across gestation and their association with cord erythrocyte fatty acids in normotensive control (NC) and preeclamptic pregnancies. We hypothesize that maternal fatty acid status in early pregnancy influences fetal fatty acid stores in preeclampsia. 137 NC women and 58 women with preeclampsia were included in this study. Maternal blood was collected at 3 time points during pregnancy (16-20th weeks, 26-30th weeks and at delivery). Cord blood was collected at delivery. Fatty acids were analyzed using gas chromatography. The proportions of maternal erythrocyte α-linolenic acid, docosahexaenoic acid, nervonic acid, and monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) (p < 0.05 for all) were lower while total n-6 fatty acids were higher (p < 0.05) at 16-20th weeks of gestation in preeclampsia as compared with NC. Cord 18:3n-3, 22:6n-3, 24:1n-9, MUFA, and total n-3 fatty acids (p < 0.05 for all) were also lower in preeclampsia as compared with NC. A positive association was observed between maternal erythrocyte 22:6n-3 and 24:1n-9 at 16-20th weeks with the same fatty acids in cord erythrocytes (p < 0.05 for both) in preeclampsia. Our study for the first time indicates alteration in maternal erythrocyte fatty acids at 16th weeks of gestation which is further reflected in cord erythrocytes at delivery in preeclampsia.

  15. Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease and the Gut Microbiome.

    PubMed

    Boursier, Jerome; Diehl, Anna Mae

    2016-05-01

    Recent progress has allowed a more comprehensive study of the gut microbiota. Gut microbiota helps in health maintenance and gut dysbiosis associates with chronic metabolic diseases. Modulation of short-chain fatty acids and choline bioavailability, lipoprotein lipase induction, alteration of bile acid profile, endogenous alcohol production, or liver inflammation secondary to endotoxemia result from gut dysbiosis. Modulation of the gut microbiota by pre/probiotics gives promising results in animal, but needs to be evaluated in human before use in clinical practice. Gut microbiota adds complexity to the pathophysiology of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease but represents an opportunity to discover new therapeutic targets.

  16. Long-chain fatty acid perturbations in Mycoplasma pneumoniae.

    PubMed Central

    Leon, O; Panos, C

    1981-01-01

    The fatty acid content of Mycoplasma pneumoniae increased 2.5- to 9.6-fold when the growth medium was supplemented with a saturated, unsaturated, or beta-hydroxy fatty acid, the greatest increase occurring with palmitic acid. The amount of each supplemented fatty acid found within this organism was 2.8 to 5.5% of the total fatty acid content; the exception was palmitic acid. Up to 57% of the palmitic acid was utilized from the supplemented medium, whereas only 0.2 to 10% of the other fatty acids was utilized. Chromatographic and isotopic analyses revealed that 22% of the labeled palmitic acid incorporated from the palmitic acid-supplemented medium remained free in this organism. Also, even though complex lipid synthesis increased a minimum of 3.8-fold under these conditions, this mycoplasma continued to incorporate intact complex lipids from the growth medium. Bacteriostatic and bactericidal studies which used high concentrations of various long-chain fatty acids showed that only palmitic, myristic, and beta-hydroxydecanoic acids were not bactericidal. The addition of palmitic acid to the growth medium resulted in the formation of exceedingly long, filamentous cells in approximately 25% of the population. Osmotic fragility and electron spin resonance spectroscopy studies showed a correlation among this increased fatty acid content, decreased membrane fluidity, and the increased osmotic fragility of palmitic acid-grown cells. In addition, these cells had a lowered cholesterol content. The effect of such compositional changes on osmotic fragility is discussed in this paper. Finally, the profound increase in the total fatty acid content of palmitic acid-grown cells altered neither sensitivity to tetracycline or erythromycin nor the amount of hydrogen peroxide secreted. Images PMID:6787014

  17. Brain and Liver Headspace Aldehyde Concentration Following Dietary Supplementation with n-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids.

    PubMed

    Ross, Brian M; Babay, Slim; Malik, Imran

    2015-11-01

    Reactive oxygen species react with unsaturated fatty acids to form a variety of metabolites including aldehydes. Many aldehydes are volatile enough to be detected in headspace gases of blood or cultured cells and in exhaled breath, in particular propanal and hexanal which are derived from omega-3 and omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids, respectively. Aldehydes are therefore potential non-invasive biomarkers of oxidative stress and of various diseases in which oxidative stress is thought to play a role including cancer, cardiovascular disease and diabetes. It is unclear, however, how changes in the abundance of the fatty acid precursors, for example by altered dietary intake, affect aldehyde concentrations. We therefore fed male Wistar rats diets supplemented with either palm oil or a combination of palm oil plus an n-3 fatty acid (alpha-linolenic, eicosapentaenoic, or docosahexaenoic acids) for 4 weeks. Fatty acid analysis revealed large changes in the abundance of both n-3 and n-6 fatty acids in the liver with smaller changes observed in the brain. Despite the altered fatty acid abundance, headspace concentrations of C1-C8 aldehydes, and tissue concentrations of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, did not differ between the 4 dietary groups. Our data suggest that tissue aldehyde concentrations are independent of fatty acid abundance, and further support their use as volatile biomarkers of oxidative stress.

  18. Greater Transport Efficiencies of the Membrane Fatty Acid Transporters FAT/CD36 and FATP4 Compared with FABPpm and FATP1 and Differential Effects on Fatty Acid Esterification and Oxidation in Rat Skeletal Muscle*

    PubMed Central

    Nickerson, James G.; Alkhateeb, Hakam; Benton, Carley R.; Lally, James; Nickerson, Jennifer; Han, Xiao-Xia; Wilson, Meredith H.; Jain, Swati S.; Snook, Laelie A.; Glatz, Jan F. C.; Chabowski, Adrian; Luiken, Joost J. F. P.; Bonen, Arend

    2009-01-01

    In selected mammalian tissues, long chain fatty acid transporters (FABPpm, FAT/CD36, FATP1, and FATP4) are co-expressed. There is controversy as to whether they all function as membrane-bound transporters and whether they channel fatty acids to oxidation and/or esterification. Among skeletal muscles, the protein expression of FABPpm, FAT/CD36, and FATP4, but not FATP1, correlated highly with the capacities for oxidative metabolism (r ≥ 0.94), fatty acid oxidation (r ≥ 0.88), and triacylglycerol esterification (r ≥ 0.87). We overexpressed independently FABPpm, FAT/CD36, FATP1, and FATP4, within a normal physiologic range, in rat skeletal muscle, to determine the effects on fatty acid transport and metabolism. Independent overexpression of each fatty acid transporter occurred without altering either the expression or plasmalemmal content of other fatty acid transporters. All transporters increased fatty acid transport, but FAT/CD36 and FATP4 were 2.3- and 1.7-fold more effective than FABPpm and FATP1, respectively. Fatty acid transporters failed to alter the rates of fatty acid esterification into triacylglycerols. In contrast, all transporters increased the rates of long chain fatty acid oxidation, but the effects of FABPpm and FAT/CD36 were 3-fold greater than for FATP1 and FATP4. Thus, fatty acid transporters exhibit different capacities for fatty acid transport and metabolism. In vivo, FAT/CD36 and FATP4 are the most effective fatty acid transporters, whereas FABPpm and FAT/CD36 are key for stimulating fatty acid oxidation. PMID:19380575

  19. Total dietary fat and omega-3 fatty acids have modest effects on urinary sex hormones in postmenopausal women

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Total fat and omega-3 fatty acids in the diet may affect breast cancer risk by altering estrogen metabolism. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the effects of differing total fat and omega-3 fatty acid content of diets on a panel of urinary estrogens and metabolites. A controlled, cross-ove...

  20. Acute fatty liver of pregnancy: an update on mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Natarajan, Sathish Kumar; Thangaraj, Kavitha R; Goel, Ashish; Eapen, C E; Balasubramanian, K A; Ramachandran, Anup

    2011-01-01

    Acute fatty liver of pregnancy (AFLP), characterized by hepatic microvesicular steatosis, is a sudden catastrophic illness occurring almost exclusively in the third trimester of pregnancy. Defective fatty acid oxidation in the fetus has been shown to be associated with this disease. Since the placenta has the same genetic makeup as the fetus and as AFLP patients generally recover following delivery, we hypothesized that the placenta might be involved in pathogenesis of this disease. In an animal model of hepatic microvesicular steatosis (using sodium valproate), we found that microvesicular steatosis results in mitochondrial structural alterations and oxidative stress in subcellular organelles of the liver. In placentas from patients with AFLP, we observed placental mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress in subcellular organelles. In addition, defective placental fatty acid oxidation results in accumulation of toxic mediators such as arachidonic acid. Escape of these mediators into the maternal circulation might affect the maternal liver resulting in microvesicular steatosis.

  1. Carotenoids and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, Bahiddin; Sahin, Kazim; Bilen, Hande; Bahcecioglu, Ibrahim H.; Bilir, Birdal; Ashraf, Sara; Halazun, Karim J.

    2015-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a growing health problem around the world, especially in developed countries. NAFLD includes all cases of fatty liver disease from simple steatosis to cirrhosis, without excessive alcohol intake, use of steatogenic medication or hereditary disorders. Pathogenesis is associated with dietary high fat intake, decreased free fatty acid (FFA) oxidation, increased hepatic lipogenesis and lipolysis from the adipose tissue. These metabolic alterations contribute to the hepatic fat accumulation. Consequently, stimulated oxidative stress and inflammation play a major role in hepatocellular damage. Therefore, antioxidant and anti-inflammatory agents may have a role in the prevention of this disease. Carotenoids are potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory micronutrients, which have been investigated in the prevention and treatment of NAFLD. The main sources of the carotenoids are fruits and vegetables. In this article we review the potential role and possible molecular mechanism of carotenoids in NAFLD. PMID:26151056

  2. Unsaturated fatty acids in alkane solution: adsorption to steel surfaces.

    PubMed

    Lundgren, Sarah M; Persson, Karin; Mueller, Gregor; Kronberg, Bengt; Clarke, Jim; Chtaib, Mohammed; Claesson, Per M

    2007-10-01

    The adsorption of the unsaturated fatty acids oleic, linoleic, and linolenic acid on steel surfaces has been investigated by means of a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM). Two different solvents were used, n-hexadecane and its highly branched isomer, viz., 2,2,4,4,6,8,8-heptamethylnonane. The area occupied per molecule of oleic acid at 1 wt % corresponds to what is needed for adsorption parallel to the surface. At the same concentration, the adsorbed amount of linoleic acid and linolenic acid indicates that they adsorb in multilayers. The chemisorbed amount estimated from static secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) measurements was found to be similar for the three unsaturated fatty acids. In the case of linolenic acid, it was found that the presence of water significantly alters the adsorption, most likely because of the precipitation of fatty acid/water aggregates. Furthermore, static SIMS results indicate that the amount of water used here inhibits the chemisorption of linolenic acid.

  3. Treatment of Fatty Acid Oxidation Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... of fatty acid oxidation disorders Treatment of fatty acid oxidation disorders E-mail to a friend Please ... page It's been added to your dashboard . Fatty acid oxidation disorders are rare health conditions that affect ...

  4. Dietary n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids modify fatty acid composition in hepatic and abdominal adipose tissue of sucrose-induced obese rats.

    PubMed

    Alexander-Aguilera, Alfonso; Berruezo, Silvia; Hernández-Diaz, Guillermo; Angulo, Ofelia; Oliart-Ros, Rosamaria

    2011-12-01

    The fatty acid profile of hepatocytes and adipocytes is determined by the composition of the dietary lipids. It remains unclear which fatty acid components contribute to the development or reduction of insulin resistance. The present work examined the fatty acid composition of both tissues in sucrose-induced obese rats receiving fish oil to determine whether the effect of dietary (n-3) polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) on the reversion of metabolic syndrome in these rats is associated to changes in the fatty acid composition of hepatocyte and adipocyte membrane lipids. Animals with metabolic syndrome were divided into a corn-canola oil diet group and a fish oil diet group, and tissues fatty acids composition were analyzed after 6 weeks of dietary treatment. Fatty acid profiles of the total membrane lipids were modified by the fatty acid composition of the diets fed to rats. N-3 PUFAs levels in animals receiving the fish oil diet plus sucrose in drinking water were significantly higher than in animals under corn-canola oil diets. It is concluded that in sucrose-induced obese rats, consumption of dietary fish oil had beneficial effects on the metabolic syndrome and that such effects would be conditioned by the changes in the n-3 PUFAs composition in hepatic and adipose tissues because they alter membrane properties and modify the type of substrates available for the production of active lipid metabolites acting on insulin resistance and obesity. PMID:21695545

  5. Effect of dietary intake of n-6 and n-3 fatty acids on the fatty acid composition of human milk in North America.

    PubMed

    Jensen, R G; Lammi-Keefe, C J; Henderson, R A; Bush, V J; Ferris, A M

    1992-04-01

    To determine the effect of maternal dietary n-6 and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) on the amounts of these fatty acids in human milk, two criteria must be met. These are assessment of the maternal diet and accurate analysis of the milk fatty acids. This type of analysis requires gas-liquid chromatography with capillary columns to resolve important n-6 and n-3 C20 and C22 fatty acid. This type of analytic equipment has only recently become available; thus the amount of complete data on human milk fatty acids is limited. To assess actual fatty acid intakes by the infant, the fat content and volume of milk received by the infant must be known. Alterations in maternal dietary intake of PUFA cause similar changes in milk PUFA. Several investigators have shown that maternal supplementation with fish oils increases the amounts of 20:5n-3 and 22:6n-3 in milk and maternal and infant erythrocyte lipids. A new mathematic index for assessment of essential fatty acid status, the mean melting point of plasma phospholipid fatty acids, has been proposed. We found in some mother-infant pairs that maternal supplementation with fish oil lowered the mean melting points of erythrocyte lipids to levels seen in nonpregnant women.

  6. Effect of n-3 fatty acids on serum lipid levels and hepatic fatty acid metabolism in BALB/c.KOR-Apoeshl mice deficient in apolipoprotein E expression.

    PubMed

    Ide, Takashi; Takahashi, Yoko; Kushiro, Masayo; Tachibana, Masayoshi; Matsushima, Yoshibumi

    2004-03-01

    N-3 fatty acids exert a potent serum lipid-lowering effect in rodents mainly by affecting hepatic fatty acid oxidation and synthesis. However, it has been observed that fish oil and docosahexaenoic acid ethyl ester do not lower serum lipid levels in apolipoprotein E (apoE)-knockout (Apoetm1Unc) mice generated by gene targeting. To test the hypothesis that apoE expression is required for n-3 fatty acid-dependent regulation of serum lipid levels and hepatic fatty acid metabolism, we examined the effect of fish oil and n-3 fatty acid ethyl esters on the activity and gene expression of hepatic enzymes involved in fatty acid oxidation and synthesis using an alternative apoE-deficient mouse model with the BALB/c genetic background (BALB/c.KOR-Apoeshl). ApoE-deficient mice were fed diets containing 9.4% palm oil, fish oil, or 5.4% palm oil and 1% EPA plus 3% DHA ethyl esters for 15 days. In contrast to the reported data on apoE-knockout mice, fish oil and n-3 fatty acid ethyl esters greatly decreased serum triacylglycerol, cholesterol, and phospholipid levels in the Apoeshl mice. The decreases were greater with fish oil than with ethyl esters. The alterations by dietary n-3 fatty acids of serum lipid levels were accompanied by parallel changes in the activity and mRNA levels of enzymes involved in hepatic fatty acid oxidation and synthesis. The reason for the discrepancy between the results of the current study and previous studies is unknown. However, our study at least indicates that a lack of apoE expression does not necessarily accompany deficits in the n-3 fatty acid-dependent regulation of serum lipid levels and hepatic fatty acid metabolism.

  7. Fatty acid-induced mitochondrial uncoupling in adipocytes is not a promising target for treatment of insulin resistance unless adipocyte oxidative capacity is increased.

    PubMed

    Frayn, K N; Langin, D; Karpe, F

    2008-03-01

    The release of fatty acids from white adipose tissue is regulated at several levels. We have examined the suggestion that fatty acid release might be diminished by upregulation of mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation in the adipocyte, through increasing mitochondrial uncoupling. The intrinsic oxidative capacity of white adipose tissue is low, and older studies suggest that there is little fatty acid oxidation in white adipocytes, human or rodent. We have examined data on fatty acid metabolism and O(2) consumption in human white adipose tissue in vivo, and conclude that increasing fatty acid oxidation within the oxidative capacity of the tissue would produce only small changes (a few percent) in fatty acid release. The major locus of control of fatty acid release beyond the stimulation of lipolysis is the pathway of fatty acid esterification, already probably targeted by the thiazolidinedione insulin-sensitising agents. An alternative approach would be to upregulate the mitochondrial capacity of the adipocyte. We review proof-of-concept studies in which the phenotype of the white adipocyte has been changed to resemble that of the brown adipocyte by expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor coactivator-1alpha. This increases oxidative capacity and also leads to fatty acid retention through upregulation of glycerol-3-phosphate production, and hence increased fatty acid re-esterification. We conclude that prevention or treatment of insulin resistance through alteration of adipocyte fatty acid handling will require more than a simple alteration of the activity of mitochondrial beta-oxidation within normal limits.

  8. Potential adverse effects of omega-3 Fatty acids in dogs and cats.

    PubMed

    Lenox, C E; Bauer, J E

    2013-01-01

    Fish oil omega-3 fatty acids, mainly eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid, are used in the management of several diseases in companion animal medicine, many of which are inflammatory in nature. This review describes metabolic differences among omega-3 fatty acids and outlines potential adverse effects that may occur with their supplementation in dogs and cats with a special focus on omega-3 fatty acids from fish oil. Important potential adverse effects of omega-3 fatty acid supplementation include altered platelet function, gastrointestinal adverse effects, detrimental effects on wound healing, lipid peroxidation, potential for nutrient excess and toxin exposure, weight gain, altered immune function, effects on glycemic control and insulin sensitivity, and nutrient-drug interactions.

  9. Omega-3 Fatty Acids and Skeletal Muscle Health

    PubMed Central

    Jeromson, Stewart; Gallagher, Iain J.; Galloway, Stuart D. R.; Hamilton, D. Lee

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle is a plastic tissue capable of adapting and mal-adapting to physical activity and diet. The response of skeletal muscle to adaptive stimuli, such as exercise, can be modified by the prior nutritional status of the muscle. The influence of nutrition on skeletal muscle has the potential to substantially impact physical function and whole body metabolism. Animal and cell based models show that omega-3 fatty acids, in particular those of marine origin, can influence skeletal muscle metabolism. Furthermore, recent human studies demonstrate that omega-3 fatty acids of marine origin can influence the exercise and nutritional response of skeletal muscle. These studies show that the prior omega-3 status influences not only the metabolic response of muscle to nutrition, but also the functional response to a period of exercise training. Omega-3 fatty acids of marine origin therefore have the potential to alter the trajectory of a number of human diseases including the physical decline associated with aging. We explore the potential molecular mechanisms by which omega-3 fatty acids may act in skeletal muscle, considering the n-3/n-6 ratio, inflammation and lipidomic remodelling as possible mechanisms of action. Finally, we suggest some avenues for further research to clarify how omega-3 fatty acids may be exerting their biological action in skeletal muscle. PMID:26610527

  10. Omega-3 Fatty Acids and Skeletal Muscle Health.

    PubMed

    Jeromson, Stewart; Gallagher, Iain J; Galloway, Stuart D R; Hamilton, D Lee

    2015-11-01

    Skeletal muscle is a plastic tissue capable of adapting and mal-adapting to physical activity and diet. The response of skeletal muscle to adaptive stimuli, such as exercise, can be modified by the prior nutritional status of the muscle. The influence of nutrition on skeletal muscle has the potential to substantially impact physical function and whole body metabolism. Animal and cell based models show that omega-3 fatty acids, in particular those of marine origin, can influence skeletal muscle metabolism. Furthermore, recent human studies demonstrate that omega-3 fatty acids of marine origin can influence the exercise and nutritional response of skeletal muscle. These studies show that the prior omega-3 status influences not only the metabolic response of muscle to nutrition, but also the functional response to a period of exercise training. Omega-3 fatty acids of marine origin therefore have the potential to alter the trajectory of a number of human diseases including the physical decline associated with aging. We explore the potential molecular mechanisms by which omega-3 fatty acids may act in skeletal muscle, considering the n-3/n-6 ratio, inflammation and lipidomic remodelling as possible mechanisms of action. Finally, we suggest some avenues for further research to clarify how omega-3 fatty acids may be exerting their biological action in skeletal muscle. PMID:26610527

  11. Omega-3 Fatty Acids and Skeletal Muscle Health.

    PubMed

    Jeromson, Stewart; Gallagher, Iain J; Galloway, Stuart D R; Hamilton, D Lee

    2015-11-19

    Skeletal muscle is a plastic tissue capable of adapting and mal-adapting to physical activity and diet. The response of skeletal muscle to adaptive stimuli, such as exercise, can be modified by the prior nutritional status of the muscle. The influence of nutrition on skeletal muscle has the potential to substantially impact physical function and whole body metabolism. Animal and cell based models show that omega-3 fatty acids, in particular those of marine origin, can influence skeletal muscle metabolism. Furthermore, recent human studies demonstrate that omega-3 fatty acids of marine origin can influence the exercise and nutritional response of skeletal muscle. These studies show that the prior omega-3 status influences not only the metabolic response of muscle to nutrition, but also the functional response to a period of exercise training. Omega-3 fatty acids of marine origin therefore have the potential to alter the trajectory of a number of human diseases including the physical decline associated with aging. We explore the potential molecular mechanisms by which omega-3 fatty acids may act in skeletal muscle, considering the n-3/n-6 ratio, inflammation and lipidomic remodelling as possible mechanisms of action. Finally, we suggest some avenues for further research to clarify how omega-3 fatty acids may be exerting their biological action in skeletal muscle.

  12. Requirement for the heart-type fatty acid binding protein in cardiac fatty acid utilization.

    PubMed

    Binas, B; Danneberg, H; McWhir, J; Mullins, L; Clark, A J

    1999-05-01

    Nonenzymatic cytosolic fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs) are abundantly expressed in many animal tissues with high rates of fatty acid metabolism. No physiological role has been demonstrated for any FABP, although these proteins have been implicated in transport of free long-chain fatty acids (LCFAs) and protection against LCFA toxicity. We report here that mice lacking heart-type FABP (H-FABP) exhibit a severe defect of peripheral (nonhepatic, non-fat) LCFA utilization. In these mice, the heart is unable to efficiently take up plasma LCFAs, which are normally its main fuel, and switches to glucose usage. Altered plasma levels of LCFAs, glucose, lactate and beta-hydroxybutyrate are consistent with depressed peripheral LCFA utilization, intensified carbohydrate usage, and increased hepatic LCFA oxidation; these changes are most pronounced under conditions favoring LCFA oxidation. H-FABP deficiency is only incompletely compensated, however, causing acute exercise intolerance and, at old age, a localized cardiac hypertrophy. These data establish a requirement for H-FABP in cardiac intracellular lipid transport and fuel selection and a major role in metabolic homeostasis. This new animal model should be particularly useful for investigating the significance of peripheral LCFA utilization for heart function, insulin sensitivity, and blood pressure.

  13. Plant fatty acid hydroxylase

    DOEpatents

    Somerville, Chris; van de Loo, Frank

    2000-01-01

    The present invention relates to the identification of nucleic acid sequences and constructs, and methods related thereto, and the use of these sequences and constructs to produce genetically modified plants for the purpose of altering the composition of plant oils, waxes and related compounds.

  14. Obesity and cancer progression: is there a role of fatty acid metabolism?

    PubMed

    Balaban, Seher; Lee, Lisa S; Schreuder, Mark; Hoy, Andrew J

    2015-01-01

    Currently, there is renewed interest in elucidating the metabolic characteristics of cancer and how these characteristics may be exploited as therapeutic targets. Much attention has centered on glucose, glutamine and de novo lipogenesis, yet the metabolism of fatty acids that arise from extracellular, as well as intracellular, stores as triacylglycerol has received much less attention. This review focuses on the key pathways of fatty acid metabolism, including uptake, esterification, lipolysis, and mitochondrial oxidation, and how the regulators of these pathways are altered in cancer. Additionally, we discuss the potential link that fatty acid metabolism may serve between obesity and changes in cancer progression. PMID:25866768

  15. Fatty acid-producing hosts

    DOEpatents

    Pfleger, Brian F; Lennen, Rebecca M

    2013-12-31

    Described are hosts for overproducing a fatty acid product such as a fatty acid. The hosts include an exogenous nucleic acid encoding a thioesterase and, optionally, an exogenous nucleic acid encoding an acetyl-CoA carboxylase, wherein an acyl-CoA synthetase in the hosts are functionally delected. The hosts prefereably include the nucleic acid encoding the thioesterase at an intermediate copy number. The hosts are preferably recominantly stable and growth-competent at 37.degree. C. Methods of producing a fatty acid product comprising culturing such hosts at 37.degree. C. are also described.

  16. Fatty Acid Desaturases, Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Regulation, and Biotechnological Advances

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Je Min; Lee, Hyungjae; Kang, SeokBeom; Park, Woo Jung

    2016-01-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are considered to be critical nutrients to regulate human health and development, and numerous fatty acid desaturases play key roles in synthesizing PUFAs. Given the lack of delta-12 and -15 desaturases and the low levels of conversion to PUFAs, humans must consume some omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids in their diet. Many studies on fatty acid desaturases as well as PUFAs have shown that fatty acid desaturase genes are closely related to different human physiological conditions. Since the first front-end desaturases from cyanobacteria were cloned, numerous desaturase genes have been identified and animals and plants have been genetically engineered to produce PUFAs such as eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid. Recently, a biotechnological approach has been used to develop clinical treatments for human physiological conditions, including cancers and neurogenetic disorders. Thus, understanding the functions and regulation of PUFAs associated with human health and development by using biotechnology may facilitate the engineering of more advanced PUFA production and provide new insights into the complexity of fatty acid metabolism. PMID:26742061

  17. Nitrogen dioxide induced changes in level of free fatty acids, triglyceride, esterified fatty acid, ganglioside and lipase activity in the guinea pig brain

    SciTech Connect

    Farahani, H.; Hasan, M. )

    1992-02-01

    The biochemical response to controlled inhalation of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) was studied in 18 male guinea pigs. Animals were exposed to 2.5, 5.0, and 10 ppm NO2 for 2h daily for 35 consecutive days, and the results compared with six control animals exposed to filtered air for 2h daily for same period. Five biochemical parameters, including triglyceride, free fatty acids, esterified fatty acid, ganglioside and lipase activity were measured immediately after the last day of exposure. At 2.5 ppm NO2 inhalation no significant changes occurred in any region of the central nervous system (CNS). While as the dose concentration was increased to 5 and 10 ppm nitrogen dioxide, significant dose-related alteration were observed in the levels of triglyceride, free fatty acid, esterified fatty acid, ganglioside and lipase activity in the different regions of the guinea pig CNS.

  18. Effect of dietary Fatty acids on human lipoprotein metabolism: a comprehensive update.

    PubMed

    Ooi, Esther M M; Watts, Gerald F; Ng, Theodore W K; Barrett, P Hugh R

    2015-06-01

    Dyslipidemia is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Dietary fatty-acid composition regulates lipids and lipoprotein metabolism and may confer CVD benefit. This review updates understanding of the effect of dietary fatty-acids on human lipoprotein metabolism. In elderly participants with hyperlipidemia, high n-3 polyunsaturated fatty-acids (PUFA) consumption diminished hepatic triglyceride-rich lipoprotein (TRL) secretion and enhanced TRL to low-density lipoprotein (LDL) conversion. n-3 PUFA also decreased TRL-apoB-48 concentration by decreasing TRL-apoB-48 secretion. High n-6 PUFA intake decreased very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations by up-regulating VLDL lipolysis and uptake. In a study of healthy subjects, the intake of saturated fatty-acids with increased palmitic acid at the sn-2 position was associated with decreased postprandial lipemia. Low medium-chain triglyceride may not appreciably alter TRL metabolism. Replacing carbohydrate with monounsaturated fatty-acids increased TRL catabolism. Trans-fatty-acid decreased LDL and enhanced high-density lipoprotein catabolism. Interactions between APOE genotype and n-3 PUFA in regulating lipid responses were also described. The major advances in understanding the effect of dietary fatty-acids on lipoprotein metabolism has centered on n-3 PUFA. This knowledge emphasizes the importance of regulating lipoprotein metabolism as a mode to improve plasma lipids and potentially CVD risk. Additional studies are required to better characterize the cardiometabolic effects of other dietary fatty-acids. PMID:26043038

  19. Abiotic synthesis of fatty acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leach, W. W.; Nooner, D. W.; Oro, J.

    1978-01-01

    The formation of fatty acids by Fischer-Tropsch-type synthesis was investigated with ferric oxide, ammonium carbonate, potassium carbonate, powdered Pueblito de Allende carbonaceous chondrite, and filings from the Canyon Diablo meteorite used as catalysts. Products were separated and identified by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. Iron oxide, Pueblito de Allende chondrite, and Canyon Diablo filings in an oxidized catalyst form yielded no fatty acids. Canyon Diablo filings heated overnight at 500 C while undergoing slow purging by deuterium produced fatty acids only when potassium carbonate was admixed; potassium carbonate alone also produced these compounds. The active catalytic combinations gave relatively high yields of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons; substantial amounts of n-alkenes were almost invariably observed when fatty acids were produced; the latter were in the range C6 to C18, with maximum yield in C9 or 10.

  20. Inhibitors of Fatty Acid Synthesis Induce PPAR α -Regulated Fatty Acid β -Oxidative Genes: Synergistic Roles of L-FABP and Glucose.

    PubMed

    Huang, Huan; McIntosh, Avery L; Martin, Gregory G; Petrescu, Anca D; Landrock, Kerstin K; Landrock, Danilo; Kier, Ann B; Schroeder, Friedhelm

    2013-01-01

    While TOFA (acetyl CoA carboxylase inhibitor) and C75 (fatty acid synthase inhibitor) prevent lipid accumulation by inhibiting fatty acid synthesis, the mechanism of action is not simply accounted for by inhibition of the enzymes alone. Liver fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP), a mediator of long chain fatty acid signaling to peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor- α (PPAR α ) in the nucleus, was found to bind TOFA and its activated CoA thioester, TOFyl-CoA, with high affinity while binding C75 and C75-CoA with lower affinity. Binding of TOFA and C75-CoA significantly altered L-FABP secondary structure. High (20 mM) but not physiological (6 mM) glucose conferred on both TOFA and C75 the ability to induce PPAR α transcription of the fatty acid β -oxidative enzymes CPT1A, CPT2, and ACOX1 in cultured primary hepatocytes from wild-type (WT) mice. However, L-FABP gene ablation abolished the effects of TOFA and C75 in the context of high glucose. These effects were not associated with an increased cellular level of unesterified fatty acids but rather by increased intracellular glucose. These findings suggested that L-FABP may function as an intracellular fatty acid synthesis inhibitor binding protein facilitating TOFA and C75-mediated induction of PPAR α in the context of high glucose at levels similar to those in uncontrolled diabetes.

  1. Hyperinsulinemia and skeletal muscle fatty acid trafficking.

    PubMed

    Kanaley, Jill A; Shadid, Samyah; Sheehan, Michael T; Guo, ZengKui; Jensen, Michael D

    2013-08-15

    We hypothesized that insulin alters plasma free fatty acid (FFA) trafficking into intramyocellular (im) long-chain acylcarnitines (imLCAC) and triglycerides (imTG). Overnight-fasted adults (n = 41) received intravenous infusions of [U-¹³C]palmitate (0400-0900 h) and [U-¹³C]oleate (0800-1400 h) to label imTG and imLCAC. A euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic (1.0 mU·kg fat-free mass⁻¹·min⁻¹) clamp (0800-1400 h) and two muscle biopsies (0900 h, 1400 h) were performed. The patterns of [U-¹³C]palmitate incorporation into imTG-palmitate and palmitoylcarnitine were similar to those we reported in overnight postabsorptive adults (saline control); the intramyocellular palmitoylcarnitine enrichment was not different from and correlated with imTG-palmitate enrichment for both the morning (r = 0.38, P = 0.02) and afternoon (r = 0.44, P = 0.006) biopsy samples. Plasma FFA concentrations, flux, and the incorporation of plasma oleate into imTG-oleate during hyperinsulinemia were ~1/10th of that observed in the previous saline control studies (P < 0.001). At the time of the second biopsy, the enrichment in oleoylcarnitine was <25% of that in imTG-oleate and was not correlated with imTG-oleate enrichment. The intramyocellular nonesterified fatty acid-palmitate-to-imTG-palmitate enrichment ratio was greater (P < 0.05) in women than men, suggesting that sex differences in intramyocellular palmitate trafficking may occur under hyperinsulinemic conditions. We conclude that plasma FFA trafficking into imTG during hyperinsulinemia is markedly suppressed, and these newly incorporated FFA fatty acids do not readily enter the LCAC preoxidative pools. Hyperinsulinemia does not seem to inhibit the entry of fatty acids from imTG pools that were labeled under fasting conditions, possibly reflecting the presence of two distinct imTG pools that are differentially regulated by insulin. PMID:23820622

  2. Cardiac fatty acid oxidation in heart failure associated with obesity and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Arata; Lopaschuk, Gary D

    2016-10-01

    Obesity and diabetes are major public health problems, and are linked to the development of heart failure. Emerging data highlight the importance of alterations in cardiac energy metabolism as a major contributor to cardiac dysfunction related to obesity and diabetes. Increased rates of fatty acid oxidation and decreased rates of glucose utilization are two prominent changes in cardiac energy metabolism that occur in obesity and diabetes. This metabolic profile is probably both a cause and consequence of a prominent cardiac insulin resistance, which is accompanied by a decrease in both cardiac function and efficiency, and by the accumulation of potentially toxic lipid metabolites in the heart that can further exaggerate insulin resistance and cardiac dysfunction. The high cardiac fatty acid oxidation rates seen in obesity and diabetes are attributable to several factors, including: 1) increased fatty acid supply and uptake into the cardiomyocyte, 2) increased transcription of fatty acid metabolic enzymes, 3) decreased allosteric control of mitochondrial fatty acid uptake and fatty acid oxidation, and 4) increased post-translational acetylation control of various fatty acid oxidative enzymes. Emerging evidence suggests that therapeutic approaches aimed at switching the balance of cardiac energy substrate preference from fatty acid oxidation to glucose use can prevent cardiac dysfunction associated with obesity and diabetes. Modulating acetylation control of fatty acid oxidative enzymes is also a potentially attractive strategy, although presently this is limited to precursors of nicotinamide adenine or nonspecific activators of deacetylation such as resveratrol. This review will focus on the metabolic alterations in the heart that occur in obesity and diabetes, as well as on the molecular mechanisms controlling these metabolic changes. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Heart Lipid Metabolism edited by G.D. Lopaschuk. PMID:26996746

  3. Cardiac fatty acid oxidation in heart failure associated with obesity and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Arata; Lopaschuk, Gary D

    2016-10-01

    Obesity and diabetes are major public health problems, and are linked to the development of heart failure. Emerging data highlight the importance of alterations in cardiac energy metabolism as a major contributor to cardiac dysfunction related to obesity and diabetes. Increased rates of fatty acid oxidation and decreased rates of glucose utilization are two prominent changes in cardiac energy metabolism that occur in obesity and diabetes. This metabolic profile is probably both a cause and consequence of a prominent cardiac insulin resistance, which is accompanied by a decrease in both cardiac function and efficiency, and by the accumulation of potentially toxic lipid metabolites in the heart that can further exaggerate insulin resistance and cardiac dysfunction. The high cardiac fatty acid oxidation rates seen in obesity and diabetes are attributable to several factors, including: 1) increased fatty acid supply and uptake into the cardiomyocyte, 2) increased transcription of fatty acid metabolic enzymes, 3) decreased allosteric control of mitochondrial fatty acid uptake and fatty acid oxidation, and 4) increased post-translational acetylation control of various fatty acid oxidative enzymes. Emerging evidence suggests that therapeutic approaches aimed at switching the balance of cardiac energy substrate preference from fatty acid oxidation to glucose use can prevent cardiac dysfunction associated with obesity and diabetes. Modulating acetylation control of fatty acid oxidative enzymes is also a potentially attractive strategy, although presently this is limited to precursors of nicotinamide adenine or nonspecific activators of deacetylation such as resveratrol. This review will focus on the metabolic alterations in the heart that occur in obesity and diabetes, as well as on the molecular mechanisms controlling these metabolic changes. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Heart Lipid Metabolism edited by G.D. Lopaschuk.

  4. Omega 3 fatty acids and inborn errors of metabolism.

    PubMed

    Gil-Campos, Mercedes; Sanjurjo Crespo, Pablo

    2012-06-01

    A number of studies are investigating the role of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in children with metabolic inborn errors, while the effects on visual and brain development in premature infants and neonates are well known. However, their function incertain chronic neurological, inflammatory and metabolic disorders is still under study. Standards should be established to help identify the need of docosahexaenoic acid supplementation in conditions requiring a restricted diet resulting in an altered metabolism system, and find scientific evidence on the effects of such supplementation. This study reviews relevant published literature to propose adequate n-3 intake or supplementation doses for different ages and pathologies. The aim of this review is to examine the effects of long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids supplementation in preventing cognitive impairment or in retarding its progress, and to identify nutritional deficiencies, in children with inborn errors of metabolism. Trials were identified from a search of the Cochrane and MEDLINE databases in 2011. These databases include all major completed and ongoing double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized trials, as well as all studies in which omega-3 supplementation was administered to children with inborn errors, and studies assessing omega-3 fatty acids status in plasma in these pathologies. Although few randomized controlled trials met the inclusion criteria of this review, some evidenced that most of children with inborn errors are deficient in omega-3 fatty acids, and demonstrated that supplementation might improve their neural function, or prevent the progression of neurological impairment. Nontheless, further investigations are needed on this issue.

  5. Omega-3 Fatty Acid Supplementation for the Treatment of Children with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder Symptomatology: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloch, Michael H.; Qawasmi, Ahmad

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Several studies have demonstrated differences in omega-3 fatty acid composition in plasma and in erythrocyte membranes in patients with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) compared with unaffected controls. Omega-3 fatty acids have anti-inflammatory properties and can alter central nervous system cell membrane fluidity and…

  6. Endocrine causes of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Marino, Laura; Jornayvaz, François R

    2015-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common cause of chronic liver disease in the industrialized world. The prevalence of NAFLD is increasing, becoming a substantial public health burden. NAFLD includes a broad spectrum of disorders, from simple conditions such as steatosis to severe manifestations such as fibrosis and cirrhosis. The relationship of NAFLD with metabolic alterations such as type 2 diabetes is well described and related to insulin resistance, with NAFLD being recognized as the hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome. However, NAFLD may also coincide with endocrine diseases such as polycystic ovary syndrome, hypothyroidism, growth hormone deficiency or hypercortisolism. It is therefore essential to remember, when discovering altered liver enzymes or hepatic steatosis on radiological exams, that endocrine diseases can cause NAFLD. Indeed, the overall prognosis of NAFLD may be modified by treatment of the underlying endocrine pathology. In this review, we will discuss endocrine diseases that can cause NALFD. Underlying pathophysiological mechanisms will be presented and specific treatments will be reviewed. PMID:26494962

  7. Endocrine causes of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Marino, Laura; Jornayvaz, François R

    2015-10-21

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common cause of chronic liver disease in the industrialized world. The prevalence of NAFLD is increasing, becoming a substantial public health burden. NAFLD includes a broad spectrum of disorders, from simple conditions such as steatosis to severe manifestations such as fibrosis and cirrhosis. The relationship of NAFLD with metabolic alterations such as type 2 diabetes is well described and related to insulin resistance, with NAFLD being recognized as the hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome. However, NAFLD may also coincide with endocrine diseases such as polycystic ovary syndrome, hypothyroidism, growth hormone deficiency or hypercortisolism. It is therefore essential to remember, when discovering altered liver enzymes or hepatic steatosis on radiological exams, that endocrine diseases can cause NAFLD. Indeed, the overall prognosis of NAFLD may be modified by treatment of the underlying endocrine pathology. In this review, we will discuss endocrine diseases that can cause NALFD. Underlying pathophysiological mechanisms will be presented and specific treatments will be reviewed.

  8. Prenatal hyperandrogenism induces alterations that affect liver lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Abruzzese, Giselle Adriana; Heber, Maria Florencia; Ferreira, Silvana Rocio; Velez, Leandro Martin; Reynoso, Roxana; Pignataro, Omar Pedro; Motta, Alicia Beatriz

    2016-07-01

    Prenatal hyperandrogenism is hypothesized as one of the main factors contributing to the development of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). PCOS patients have high risk of developing fatty liver and steatosis. This study aimed to evaluate the role of prenatal hyperandrogenism in liver lipid metabolism and fatty liver development. Pregnant rats were hyperandrogenized with testosterone. At pubertal age, the prenatally hyperandrogenized (PH) female offspring displayed both ovulatory (PHov) and anovulatory (PHanov) phenotypes that mimic human PCOS features. We evaluated hepatic transferases, liver lipid content, the balance between lipogenesis and fatty acid oxidation pathway, oxidant/antioxidant balance and proinflammatory status. We also evaluated the general metabolic status through growth rate curve, basal glucose and insulin levels, glucose tolerance test, HOMA-IR index and serum lipid profile. Although neither PH group showed signs of liver lipid content, the lipogenesis and fatty oxidation pathways were altered. The PH groups also showed impaired oxidant/antioxidant balance, a decrease in the proinflammatory pathway (measured by prostaglandin E2 and cyclooxygenase-2 levels), decreased glucose tolerance, imbalance of circulating lipids and increased risk of metabolic syndrome. We conclude that prenatal hyperandrogenism generates both PHov and PHanov phenotypes with signs of liver alterations, imbalance in lipid metabolism and increased risk of developing metabolic syndrome. The anovulatory phenotype showed more alterations in liver lipogenesis and a more impaired balance of insulin and glucose metabolism, being more susceptible to the development of steatosis.

  9. The relationship between dietary fatty acids and inflammatory genes on the obese phenotype and serum lipids.

    PubMed

    Joffe, Yael T; Collins, Malcolm; Goedecke, Julia H

    2013-05-21

    Obesity, a chronic low-grade inflammatory condition is associated with the development of many comorbidities including dyslipidemia. This review examines interactions between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in the inflammatory genes tumor necrosis alpha (TNFA) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) and dietary fatty acids, and their relationship with obesity and serum lipid levels. In summary, dietary fatty acids, in particular saturated fatty acids and the omega-3 and omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids, impact the expression of the cytokine genes TNFA and IL-6, and alter TNFα and IL-6 production. In addition, sequence variants in these genes have also been shown to alter their gene expression and plasma levels, and are associated with obesity, measures of adiposity and serum lipid concentrations. When interactions between dietary fatty acids and TNFA and IL-6 SNPs on obesity and serum lipid were analyzed, both the quantity and quality of dietary fatty acids modulated the relationship between TNFA and IL-6 SNPs on obesity and serum lipid profiles, thereby impacting the association between phenotype and genotype. Researching these diet-gene interactions more extensively, and understanding the role of ethnicity as a confounder in these relationships, may contribute to a better understanding of the inter-individual variability in the obese phenotype.

  10. A high-performance direct transmethylation method for total fatty acids assessment in biological and foodstuff samples.

    PubMed

    Castro-Gómez, Pilar; Fontecha, Javier; Rodríguez-Alcalá, Luis M

    2014-10-01

    Isolation is the main bottleneck in the analysis of fatty acids in biological samples and foods. In the last few decades some methods described direct derivatization procedures bypassing these steps. They involve the utilization of methanolic HCL or BF3 as catalysts, but several evidences from previous works suggest these reagents are unstable, lead to the formation of artifacts and alter the distribution of specific compounds as hydroxy fatty acids or CLA. However, the main issue is that they are excellent esterification reagents but poor in transterification, being not suitable for the analysis of all lipid classes and leading to erroneous composition quantitations. The present research work is a comprehensive comparison of six general methylation protocols using base, acid or base/acid catalysts plus a proposed method in the analysis of total fatty acids in lipid standards mixtures, foodstuff and biological samples. The addition of aprotic solvents to the reaction mixture to avoid alterations was also tested. Results confirmed that procedures solely involving acid catalyst resulted in incomplete derivatizations and alteration of the fatty acid profile, partially corrected by addition of the aprotic solvent. The proposed method combining sodium methoxyde and sulfuric acid showed absence of alteration of the FAME profile and the best values for response factors (short chain fatty acids to PUFA), accuracy in the determination of total cholesterol and derivatization performance, thus showing a high reliability in the determination of the total fatty acid composition in biological samples and foods.

  11. A high-performance direct transmethylation method for total fatty acids assessment in biological and foodstuff samples.

    PubMed

    Castro-Gómez, Pilar; Fontecha, Javier; Rodríguez-Alcalá, Luis M

    2014-10-01

    Isolation is the main bottleneck in the analysis of fatty acids in biological samples and foods. In the last few decades some methods described direct derivatization procedures bypassing these steps. They involve the utilization of methanolic HCL or BF3 as catalysts, but several evidences from previous works suggest these reagents are unstable, lead to the formation of artifacts and alter the distribution of specific compounds as hydroxy fatty acids or CLA. However, the main issue is that they are excellent esterification reagents but poor in transterification, being not suitable for the analysis of all lipid classes and leading to erroneous composition quantitations. The present research work is a comprehensive comparison of six general methylation protocols using base, acid or base/acid catalysts plus a proposed method in the analysis of total fatty acids in lipid standards mixtures, foodstuff and biological samples. The addition of aprotic solvents to the reaction mixture to avoid alterations was also tested. Results confirmed that procedures solely involving acid catalyst resulted in incomplete derivatizations and alteration of the fatty acid profile, partially corrected by addition of the aprotic solvent. The proposed method combining sodium methoxyde and sulfuric acid showed absence of alteration of the FAME profile and the best values for response factors (short chain fatty acids to PUFA), accuracy in the determination of total cholesterol and derivatization performance, thus showing a high reliability in the determination of the total fatty acid composition in biological samples and foods. PMID:25059195

  12. Fatty acid biosynthesis in actinomycetes

    PubMed Central

    Gago, Gabriela; Diacovich, Lautaro; Arabolaza, Ana; Tsai, Shiou-Chuan; Gramajo, Hugo

    2011-01-01

    All organisms that produce fatty acids do so via a repeated cycle of reactions. In mammals and other animals, these reactions are catalyzed by a type I fatty acid synthase (FAS), a large multifunctional protein to which the growing chain is covalently attached. In contrast, most bacteria (and plants) contain a type II system in which each reaction is catalyzed by a discrete protein. The pathway of fatty acid biosynthesis in Escherichia coli is well established and has provided a foundation for elucidating the type II FAS pathways in other bacteria (White et al., 2005). However, fatty acid biosynthesis is more diverse in the phylum Actinobacteria: Mycobacterium, possess both FAS systems while Streptomyces species have only the multi-enzyme FAS II system and Corynebacterium species exclusively FAS I. In this review we present an overview of the genome organization, biochemical properties and physiological relevance of the two FAS systems in the three genera of actinomycetes mentioned above. We also address in detail the biochemical and structural properties of the acyl-CoA carboxylases (ACCases) that catalyzes the first committed step of fatty acid synthesis in actinomycetes, and discuss the molecular bases of their substrate specificity and the structure-based identification of new ACCase inhibitors with anti-mycobacterial properties. PMID:21204864

  13. Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids in Children

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are the major components of brain and retina, and are the essential fatty acids with important physiologically active functions. Thus, PUFAs should be provided to children, and are very important in the brain growth and development for fetuses, newborn infants, and children. Omega-3 fatty acids decrease coronary artery disease and improve blood flow. PUFAs have been known to have anti-inflammatory action and improved the chronic inflammation such as auto-immune diseases or degenerative neurologic diseases. PUFAs are used for metabolic syndrome related with obesity or diabetes. However, there are several considerations related with intake of PUFAs. Obsession with the intake of unsaturated fatty acids could bring about the shortage of essential fatty acids that are crucial for our body, weaken the immune system, and increase the risk of heart disease, arrhythmia, and stroke. In this review, we discuss types, physiologic mechanism of action of PUFAs, intake of PUFAs for children, recommended intake of PUFAs, and considerations for the intake of PUFAs. PMID:24224148

  14. Fatty alcohols production by oleaginous yeast.

    PubMed

    Fillet, Sandy; Gibert, Jordi; Suárez, Beatriz; Lara, Armando; Ronchel, Carmen; Adrio, José L

    2015-11-01

    We have engineered Rhodosporidium toruloides to produce fatty alcohols by expressing a fatty acyl-CoA reductase from Marinobacter aquaeolei VT8. Production of fatty alcohols in flasks was achieved in different fermentation media at titers ranging from 0.2 to 2 g/L. In many of the conditions tested, more than 80 % of fatty alcohols were secreted into the cultivation broth. Through fed-batch fermentation in 7 L bioreactors, over 8 g/L of C(16)-C(18) fatty alcohols were produced using sucrose as the substrate. This is the highest titer ever reported on microbial production of fatty alcohols to date.

  15. Stability of fatty acid composition after thermal, high pressure, and microwave processing of cow milk as affected by polyunsaturated fatty acid concentration.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Alcalá, L M; Alonso, L; Fontecha, J

    2014-12-01

    Interest has been increasing to enhance the contents of healthy polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) in milk. However, trans fatty acids and conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) can be altered after thermal processing and high pressures disrupt the milk fat globule membrane, exposing the lipid core and helping its oxidation. The objective of the present research was to study whether processing can alter the fatty acid composition of milk and if these changes are affected by PUFA concentration as previous studies suggest. Two cow milk batches (500 L each), one naturally enriched in PUFA, were processed to obtain pasteurized; high temperature, short time; UHT; high pressure; and microwave pasteurized samples. The detailed fatty acid composition was analyzed with special attention to trans fatty acids and CLA isomers. Results showed that after high temperature, short time processing, total CLA content increased in both milk batches, whereas sterilization resulted in a sigmatropic rearrangement of C18:2 cis-9,trans-11 to C18:2 trans-9,trans-11. The extent of these effects was greater in milks naturally enriched in PUFA.

  16. [Association of fatty acid metabolism with systemic inflammatory response in chronic respiratory diseases].

    PubMed

    Denisenko, Y K; Novgorodtseva, T P; Zhukova, N V; Antonuk, M V; Lobanova, E G; Kalinina, E P

    2016-03-01

    We examined composition of plasma non-esterified fatty acids (NFAs), erythrocyte fatty acids, levels of eicosanoids in patients with asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) with different type of the inflammatory response. The results of our study show that asthma and COPD in remission are associated with changes in the composition NFAs of plasma, FA of erythrocytes, level eicosanoid despite the difference in the regulation of immunological mechanisms of systemic inflammation. These changes are characterized by excessive production of arachidonic acid (20:4n-6) and cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase metabolites (thromboxane B2, leukotriene B4) and deficiency of their functional antagonist, eicosapentaenoic acid (20:5n-3). The recognized association between altered fatty acid composition and disorders of the immune mechanisms of regulation of systemic inflammation in COPD and asthma demonstrated the important role of fatty acids and their metabolites in persistence of inflammatory processes in diseases of the respiratory system in the condition of remission. PMID:27420629

  17. Neutrophil fatty acid composition: effect of a single session of exercise and glutamine supplementation.

    PubMed

    Lagranha, C J; Alba-Loureiro, T C; Martins, E F; Pithon-Curi, T C; Curi, R

    2008-06-01

    The fatty acid composition of immune cells appears to contribute to variations of cell function. The independent and combined effects of a single session of exercise (SSE) and glutamine supplementation (GS) on neutrophil fatty acid composition were investigated. Compared to control (no treatment given--i.e. neither SSE or GS), single session of exercise decreased myristic, palmitic and eicosapentaenoic (EPA) acids, and increased lauric, oleic, linoleic, arachidonic (AA) and docosahexaenoic (DHA) acids whereas glutamine supplementation combined with SSE (GS+SSE) increased oleic acid. Polyunsaturated/saturated fatty acid ratio and Unsaturation index were higher in neutrophils from the SSE and GS groups as compared with control. These findings support the proposition that SSE and GS may modulate neutrophil function through alterations in fatty acid composition. PMID:17721676

  18. [Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma - 2016].

    PubMed

    Pár, Alajos; Pár, Gabriella

    2016-06-19

    In the past decade non-alcoholic liver disease became the most frequently diagnosed liver disease in developed countries. At the same time, the dramatic rise in the incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma is attributed to this common metabolic disorder, and mainly to its severe form, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. The risk factors of these associated diseases are genetic predisposition, obesity and diabetes as well as chronic low grade necro-infammation, which often leads to liver fibrosis. Free fatty acids, cytokines, lipotoxicity, insulin resistance, microRNS dysregulation and alteration in intestinal microbiota play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis. Treatment of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease - weight reduction and physical exercise in obesity, metformin in diabetes, statins in dyslipidemia and, as a new option, obeticholic acid - may diminish the risk of the hepatocellular carcinoma related to this metabolic disease. PMID:27287838

  19. [Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma - 2016].

    PubMed

    Pár, Alajos; Pár, Gabriella

    2016-06-19

    In the past decade non-alcoholic liver disease became the most frequently diagnosed liver disease in developed countries. At the same time, the dramatic rise in the incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma is attributed to this common metabolic disorder, and mainly to its severe form, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. The risk factors of these associated diseases are genetic predisposition, obesity and diabetes as well as chronic low grade necro-infammation, which often leads to liver fibrosis. Free fatty acids, cytokines, lipotoxicity, insulin resistance, microRNS dysregulation and alteration in intestinal microbiota play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis. Treatment of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease - weight reduction and physical exercise in obesity, metformin in diabetes, statins in dyslipidemia and, as a new option, obeticholic acid - may diminish the risk of the hepatocellular carcinoma related to this metabolic disease.

  20. Unsaturated fatty acids induce calcium influx into keratinocytes and cause abnormal differentiation of epidermis.

    PubMed

    Katsuta, Yuji; Iida, Toshii; Inomata, Shinji; Denda, Mitsuhiro

    2005-05-01

    Abnormal follicular keratinization is involved in comedogenesis in acne vulgaris. We recently demonstrated that calcium influx into epidermal keratinocytes is associated with impaired skin barrier function and epidermal proliferation. Based on these results, we hypothesized that sebum components affect calcium dynamics in the keratinocyte and consequently induce abnormal keratinization. To test this idea, we first observed the effects of topical application of sebum components, triglycerides (triolein), saturated fatty acids (palmitic acid and stearic acid), and unsaturated fatty acids (oleic acid and palmitoleic acid) on hairless mouse skin. Neither triglyceride nor saturated fatty acids affected the skin surface morphology or epidermal proliferation. On the other hand, application of unsaturated fatty acids, oleic acid, and palmitoleic acid induced scaly skin, abnormal keratinization, and epidermal hyperplasia. Application of triglycerides and saturated fatty acids on cultured human keratinocytes did not affect the intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)), whereas unsaturated fatty acids increased the [Ca(2+)](i) of the keratinocytes. Moreover, application of oleic acid on hairless mouse skin induced an abnormal calcium distribution in the epidermis. These results suggest that unsaturated fatty acids in sebum alter the calcium dynamics in epidermal keratinocytes and induce abnormal follicular keratinization.

  1. Inhibition of Long Chain Acyl Coenzyme A Synthetases during Fatty Acid Loading Induces Lipotoxicity in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Saraswathi, Viswanathan; Hasty, Alyssa H.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Obesity is often associated with hypertriglyceridemia and elevated free fatty acids (FFAs) which are independent risk factors for cardiovascular disease and diabetes. While impairment of cholesterol homeostasis is known to induce toxicity in macrophages, the consequence of altered fatty acid homeostasis is not clear. METHODS AND RESULTS Long chain acyl CoA synthetases (ACSLs) play a critical role in fatty acid homeostasis by channeling fatty acids to diverse metabolic pools. We treated mouse peritoneal macrophages (MPMs) with VLDL or FFAs in the presence of triacsin C, an inhibitor of the three ACSL isoforms present in macrophages. Treatment of macrophages with VLDL and triacsin C resulted in reduced TG accumulation but increased intracellular FFA levels which induced lipotoxicity characterized by induction of apoptosis. Treatment of MPMs with the saturated fatty acid stearic acid in the presence of triacsin C increased intracellular stearic acid and induced apoptosis. Stromal vascular cells collected from high fat diet-fed mice displayed foam cell morphology and exhibited increased mRNA levels of macrophage markers and ACSL1. Importantly, all of these changes were associated with increased FFA level in AT. CONCLUSIONS Inhibition of ACSLs during fatty acid loading results in apoptosis via accumulation of FFAs. Our data have implications in understanding the consequences of dysregulated fatty acid metabolism in macrophages. PMID:19679826

  2. Serum Fatty Acids Are Correlated with Inflammatory Cytokines in Ulcerative Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Wiese, Dawn M.; Horst, Sara N.; Brown, Caroline T.; Allaman, Margaret M.; Hodges, Mallary E.; Slaughter, James C.; Druce, Jennifer P.; Beaulieu, Dawn B.; Schwartz, David A.; Wilson, Keith T.; Coburn, Lori A.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims Ulcerative colitis (UC) is associated with increased dietary intake of fat and n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA). Modification of fat metabolism may alter inflammation and disease severity. Our aim was to assess differences in dietary and serum fatty acid levels between control and UC subjects and associations with disease activity and inflammatory cytokines. Methods Dietary histories, serum, and colonic tissue samples were prospectively collected from 137 UC subjects and 38 controls. Both histologic injury and the Mayo Disease Activity Index were assessed. Serum and tissue cytokines were measured by Luminex assay. Serum fatty acids were obtained by gas chromatography. Results UC subjects had increased total fat and oleic acid (OA) intake, but decreased arachidonic acid (AA) intake vs controls. In serum, there was less percent saturated fatty acid (SFA) and AA, with higher monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA), linoleic acid, OA, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), and docosapentaenoic acid (DPA) in UC. Tissue cytokine levels were directly correlated with SFA and inversely correlated with PUFA, EPA, and DPA in UC subjects, but not controls. 5-aminosalicylic acid therapy blunted these associations. Conclusions In summary, we found differences in serum fatty acids in UC subjects that correlated with pro-inflammatory tissue cytokines. We propose that fatty acids may affect cytokine production and thus be immunomodulatory in UC. PMID:27227540

  3. Diets containing traditional and novel green leafy vegetables improve liver fatty acid profiles of spontaneously hypertensive rats

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The consumption of green leafy vegetables (GLVs) has been demonstrated to reduce the risks associated with cardiovascular and other diseases. However, no literature exists that examines the influence of traditional and novel GLVs on the liver fatty acid profile of an animal model genetically predisposed to developing hypertension. The aim of the present study was to examine the effects of diets containing 4% collard greens, purslane or sweet potato greens on the liver fatty acid profiles of four-week old male spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs, N = 44). Following four weeks consumption of the diets, liver fatty acid profiles were determined by gas–liquid chromatography of transesterified fatty acid methyl esters. Results SHRs consuming the control diet had greater percentages of liver saturated fatty acid and less omega-3 fatty acid percentages. SHRs consuming the diets containing vegetables had significantly greater liver concentrations of γ- linolenic, docosahexaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids, as well as lower levels of lauric, palmitic and arachidonic acids. SHRs consuming the control diet had significantly greater percentages (p < 0.05) of oleic; significantly less γ-linolenic and docosahexaenoic acids. Conclusions This study demonstrates the ability of GLVs to modulate liver fatty acid composition, thus providing protection against elevations in atherogenic fatty acids, which may be involved in CVD pathogenesis. Consequently, dietary recommendations for the prevention of CVD should consider the possible cardioprotective benefits and the subsequent alterations in fatty acid profiles afforded by diets containing collard greens, purslane and sweet potato greens. PMID:24192144

  4. Effect of maternal micronutrients (folic acid, vitamin B12) and omega 3 fatty acids on liver fatty acid desaturases and transport proteins in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Wadhwani, Nisha S; Manglekar, Rupali R; Dangat, Kamini D; Kulkarni, Asmita V; Joshi, Sadhana R

    2012-01-01

    A disturbed fatty acid metabolism increases the risk of adult non-communicable diseases. This study examines the effect of maternal micronutrients on the fatty acid composition, desaturase activity, mRNA levels of fatty acid desaturases and transport proteins in the liver. Pregnant female rats were divided into 6 groups at 2 levels of folic acid both in the presence and absence of vitamin B(12). The vitamin B(12) deficient groups were supplemented with omega 3 fatty acid. An imbalance of maternal micronutrients reduces liver docosahexaenoic acid, increases Δ5 desaturase activity but decreases mRNA levels, decreases Δ6 desaturase activity but not mRNA levels as compared to control. mRNA level of Δ5 desaturase reverts back to the levels of the control group as a result of omega 3 fatty acid supplementation. Our data for the first time indicates that maternal micronutrients differentially alter the activity and expression of fatty acid desaturases in the liver.

  5. Tailored fatty acid synthesis via dynamic control of fatty acid elongation

    SciTech Connect

    Torella, JP; Ford, TJ; Kim, SN; Chen, AM; Way, JC; Silver, PA

    2013-07-09

    Medium-chain fatty acids (MCFAs, 4-12 carbons) are valuable as precursors to industrial chemicals and biofuels, but are not canonical products of microbial fatty acid synthesis. We engineered microbial production of the full range of even-and odd-chain-length MCFAs and found that MCFA production is limited by rapid, irreversible elongation of their acyl-ACP precursors. To address this limitation, we programmed an essential ketoacyl synthase to degrade in response to a chemical inducer, thereby slowing acyl-ACP elongation and redirecting flux from phospholipid synthesis to MCFA production. Our results show that induced protein degradation can be used to dynamically alter metabolic flux, and thereby increase the yield of a desired compound. The strategy reported herein should be widely useful in a range of metabolic engineering applications in which essential enzymes divert flux away from a desired product, as well as in the production of polyketides, bioplastics, and other recursively synthesized hydrocarbons for which chain-length control is desired.

  6. Tailored fatty acid synthesis via dynamic control of fatty acid elongation.

    PubMed

    Torella, Joseph P; Ford, Tyler J; Kim, Scott N; Chen, Amanda M; Way, Jeffrey C; Silver, Pamela A

    2013-07-01

    Medium-chain fatty acids (MCFAs, 4-12 carbons) are valuable as precursors to industrial chemicals and biofuels, but are not canonical products of microbial fatty acid synthesis. We engineered microbial production of the full range of even- and odd-chain-length MCFAs and found that MCFA production is limited by rapid, irreversible elongation of their acyl-ACP precursors. To address this limitation, we programmed an essential ketoacyl synthase to degrade in response to a chemical inducer, thereby slowing acyl-ACP elongation and redirecting flux from phospholipid synthesis to MCFA production. Our results show that induced protein degradation can be used to dynamically alter metabolic flux, and thereby increase the yield of a desired compound. The strategy reported herein should be widely useful in a range of metabolic engineering applications in which essential enzymes divert flux away from a desired product, as well as in the production of polyketides, bioplastics, and other recursively synthesized hydrocarbons for which chain-length control is desired. PMID:23798438

  7. [Altered states of consciousness].

    PubMed

    Gora, E P

    2005-01-01

    The review of modern ideas concerning the altered states of consciousness is presented in this article. Various methods of entry into the altered states of consciousness are looked over. It is shown that the altered states of consciousness are insufficiently known, but important aspects of human being existence. The role of investigation of the altered states of consciousness for the creation of integrative scientific conception base is discussed.

  8. [Altered states of consciousness].

    PubMed

    Gora, E P

    2005-01-01

    The review of modern ideas concerning the altered states of consciousness is presented in this article. Various methods of entry into the altered states of consciousness are looked over. It is shown that the altered states of consciousness are insufficiently known, but important aspects of human being existence. The role of investigation of the altered states of consciousness for the creation of integrative scientific conception base is discussed. PMID:15810684

  9. Women and omega-3 Fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Saldeen, Pia; Saldeen, Tom

    2004-10-01

    Omega-3 fatty acids (omega-3 FA) are constituents of the membranes of all cells in the body and are precursors of locally produced hormones, eicosanoids, which are important in the prevention and treatment of various diseases, especially in women. Omega-3 FA are of interest in some of the most common conditions affecting women. One mechanism underlying dysmenorrhea is a disturbed balance between antiinflammatory, vasodilator eicosanoids derived from omega-3 FA and proinflammatory, vasoconstrictor eicosanoids derived from omega-6 FA. Increased intake of omega-3 FA can reverse the symptoms in this condition by decreasing the amount of omega-6 FA in cell membranes. An increased prostacyclin/thromboxane ratio induced by omega-3 FA can facilitate pregnancy in women with infertility problems by increasing uterine blood flow. Supplementation with omega-3 FA during pregnancy lowers the risk of premature birth and can increase the length of pregnancy and birth weight by altering the balance of eicosanoids involved in labor and promote fetal growth by improving placental blood flow. Intake of omega-3 FA during pregnancy and breast feeding may facilitate the child's brain development. There is also some evidence that supplementation with omega-3 FA might help to prevent preeclampsia, postpartum depression, menopausal problems, postmenopausal osteoporosis, and breast cancer. Furthermore, because elevated triglyceride levels are associated with cardiovascular disease, especially in women; and because omega-3 FA have powerful effects on triglycerides, women in particular gain from an increased intake of these fatty acids. This is especially important in women receiving hormone therapy, which can increase triglyceride levels. The quality of the omega-3 FA preparation is important. It should have an appropriate antioxidant content not to induce lipid peroxidation, and its content of dioxin and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) should be well below the established safe limit.

  10. Expression of fatty acid synthase in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Dorn, Christoph; Riener, Marc-Oliver; Kirovski, Georgi; Saugspier, Michael; Steib, Kathrin; Weiss, Thomas S; Gäbele, Erwin; Kristiansen, Glen; Hartmann, Arndt; Hellerbrand, Claus

    2010-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is characterized by hepatic lipid accumulation which starts with simple hepatic steatosis and may progress toward inflammation (nonalcoholic steatohepatitis [NASH]). Fatty acid synthase (FASN) catalyzes the last step in fatty acid biosynthesis, and thus, it is believed to be a major determinant of the maximal hepatic capacity to generate fatty acids by de novo lipogenesis. The aim of this study was to analyze the correlation between hepatic steatosis and inflammation with FASN expression. In vitro incubation of primary human hepatocytes with fatty acids dose-dependently induced cellular lipid-accumulation and FASN expression, while stimulation with TNF did not affect FASN levels. Further, hepatic FASN expression was significantly increased in vivo in a murine model of hepatic steatosis without significant inflammation but not in a murine NASH model as compared to control mice. Also, FASN expression was not increased in mice subjected to bile duct ligation, an experimental model characterized by severe hepatocellular damage and inflammation. Furthermore, FASN expression was analyzed in 102 human control or NAFLD livers applying tissue micro array technology and immunohistochemistry, and correlated significantly with the degree of hepatic steatosis, but not with inflammation or ballooning of hepatocytes. Quantification of FASN mRNA expression in human liver samples confirmed significantly higher FASN levels in hepatic steatosis but not in NASH, and expression of SREBP1, which is the main transcriptional regulator of FASN, paralleled FASN expression levels in human and experimental NAFLD. In conclusion, the transcriptional induction of FASN expression in hepatic steatosis is impaired in NASH, while hepatic inflammation in the absence of steatosis does not affect FASN expression, suggesting that FASN may serve as a new diagnostic marker or therapeutic target for the progression of NAFLD. PMID:20606731

  11. Bioactive dietary long chain fatty acids: Emerging mechanisms of action

    PubMed Central

    Chapkin, Robert S.; McMurray, David N.; Davidson, Laurie A.; Patil, Bhimanagouda S.; Fan, Yang-Yi; Lupton, Joanne R.

    2009-01-01

    The plasma membrane of all eukaryotic cells contain heterogeneous self organizing intrinsically unstable liquid ordered domains or lipid assemblies in which key signal transduction proteins are localized. These assemblies are classified as “lipid rafts” (10–200 nm), which are composed mostly of cholesterol and sphingolipid microdomains and therefore do not integrate well into the fluid phospholipid bilayers. In addition, caveolae represent a subtype of lipid raft macrodomain that form flask-shaped membrane invaginations containing structural proteins, i.e., caveolins. With respect to the diverse biological effects of long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), increasing evidence suggests that n-3 PUFA and perhaps conjugated fatty acids uniquely alter the basic properties of cell membranes. Because of its polyunsaturation, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and possibly conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) are sterically incompatible with sphingolipid and cholesterol and, therefore, appear to alter lipid raft behavior and protein function. This review examines the evidence indicating that dietary sources of n-3 PUFA can profoundly alter the biochemical make up of lipid rafts/caveolae microdomains, thereby influencing cell signaling, protein trafficking, and cell cytokinetics. PMID:18492298

  12. Oxidative stress promotes pathologic polyploidization in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Gentric, Géraldine; Maillet, Vanessa; Paradis, Valérie; Couton, Dominique; L’Hermitte, Antoine; Panasyuk, Ganna; Fromenty, Bernard; Celton-Morizur, Séverine; Desdouets, Chantal

    2015-01-01

    Polyploidization is one of the most dramatic changes that can occur in the genome. In the liver, physiological polyploidization events occur during both liver development and throughout adult life. Here, we determined that a pathological polyploidization takes place in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), a widespread hepatic metabolic disorder that is believed to be a risk factor for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In murine models of NAFLD, the parenchyma of fatty livers displayed alterations of the polyploidization process, including the presence of a large proportion of highly polyploid mononuclear cells, which are rarely observed in normal hepatic parenchyma. Biopsies from patients with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) revealed the presence of alterations in hepatocyte ploidy compared with tissue from control individuals. Hepatocytes from NAFLD mice revealed that progression through the S/G2 phases of the cell cycle was inefficient. This alteration was associated with activation of a G2/M DNA damage checkpoint, which prevented activation of the cyclin B1/CDK1 complex. Furthermore, we determined that oxidative stress promotes the appearance of highly polyploid cells, and antioxidant-treated NAFLD hepatocytes resumed normal cell division and returned to a physiological state of polyploidy. Collectively, these findings indicate that oxidative stress promotes pathological polyploidization and suggest that this is an early event in NAFLD that may contribute to HCC development. PMID:25621497

  13. Membrane lipid alterations in hemoglobinopathies.

    PubMed

    Kuypers, Frans A

    2007-01-01

    The red blood cell (RBC) membrane is a complex mixture of lipids and proteins. Hundreds of phospholipid molecular species spontaneously arrange themselves in a lipid bilayer and move rapidly in the plane as well as across the bilayer in a dynamic but highly organized fashion. Areas enriched in certain lipids determine proper protein function. Phospholipids are asymmetrically distributed across the lipid bilayer with phosphatidylserine (PS) exclusively on the inside. Both the composition and organization of the RBC membrane is well maintained. Alterations lead to apoptosis during erythropoiesis or early demise of the cell in the circulation. The mechanisms that govern the maintenance of the lipid bilayer are only recently being unraveled at the individual protein level. Oxidized lipids are rapidly repaired using fatty acids taken up from plasma to maintain membrane integrity. Several isoforms of a RBC acyl-Coenzyme A (CoA) synthase have been reported, as well as the first member of a family of lysophospholipid acylCoA acyltransferases. Phospholipid asymmetry is maintained by the recently identified RBC amino-phospholipid translocase. These enzymes, essential in maintaining membrane lipid organization, are affected by oxidant stress or an increase in cytosolic calcium. Normal lipid composition and organization is lost in subpopulations of RBC in hemoglobinopathies such as sickle cell disease and thalassemia. Despite elaborate antioxidant systems, lipids and membrane proteins, including those that maintain lipid organization, are damaged in these cells. This in turn leads to improper repair of damaged RBC membranes and altered interactions of RBCs with other blood cells and plasma components that play a role in the pathology that defines these disorders. The altered lipid bilayer in RBCs in hemoglobinopathies leads to premature removal (anemia) and imbalance in hemostasis, and plays a role in vaso-occlusive crisis in sickle cell disease. Lipid breakdown products of PS

  14. 21 CFR 172.860 - Fatty acids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Fatty acids. 172.860 Section 172.860 Food and Drugs... Multipurpose Additives § 172.860 Fatty acids. The food additive fatty acids may be safely used in food and in... food additive consists of one or any mixture of the following straight-chain monobasic carboxylic...

  15. 21 CFR 172.860 - Fatty acids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Fatty acids. 172.860 Section 172.860 Food and... Multipurpose Additives § 172.860 Fatty acids. The food additive fatty acids may be safely used in food and in... food additive consists of one or any mixture of the following straight-chain monobasic carboxylic...

  16. Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD)

    MedlinePlus

    Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease What is Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD)? FAT N AFLD is a name that is given to a ... and under “Liver Health Information view ‘Nonalcoholic fatty liver Disease (NAFLD/NASH)’ IMPORTANT REMINDER: This information from the ...

  17. Fatty Acids Composition and Biofilm Production of Attenuated Salmonella typhimurium dam and seqA Mutants After Exposure to UV-C.

    PubMed

    Abdelwaheb, Chatti; Lobna, Maalej; Bouchra, BelHadj Abdallah; Selma, Kloula; Ahmed, Landoulsi

    2015-10-01

    The goal of this work was the investigation of correlation between some peculiarities of membrane fatty acids composition, biofilm formation, and motility of dam and/or seqA mutants in Salmonella typhimurium bacterial cells and UV-C radiations. The exposure changed the fatty acids composition of dam and seqA/dam strains. Significant increase of unsaturated fatty acids was observed. Swarming and swimming were enhanced only in dam mutant and biofilm formation increased significantly in all tested strains after UV-C exposure. These results suggest that increased sensitivity toward UV-C rays in dam strains might be due to fatty acid alteration.

  18. Oxidative stability of fatty acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The use of polyunsaturated fatty acids in poultry feeds follows the recent trend in the food industry to fortify processed foods with health promoting supplements. The chemical structure of these compounds presents a challenge to the feed formulator and producer that must contend with such unstable ...

  19. Oxidation of nonplasma fatty acids during exercise is increased in women with abdominal obesity.

    PubMed

    Horowitz, J F; Klein, S

    2000-12-01

    We evaluated plasma fatty acid availability and plasma and whole body fatty acid oxidation during exercise in five lean and five abdominally obese women (body mass index = 21 +/- 1 vs. 38 +/- 1 kg/m(2)), who were matched on aerobic fitness, to test the hypothesis that obesity alters the relative contribution of plasma and nonplasma fatty acids to total energy production during exercise. Subjects exercised on a recumbent cycle ergometer for 90 min at 54% of their peak oxygen consumption. Stable isotope tracer methods ([(13)C]palmitate) were used to measure fatty acid rate of appearance in plasma and the rate of plasma fatty acid oxidation, and indirect calorimetry was used to measure whole body substrate oxidation. During exercise, palmitate rate of appearance increased progressively and was similar in obese and lean groups between 60 and 90 min of exercise [3.9 +/- 0.4 vs. 4.0 +/- 0.3 micromol. kg fat free mass (FFM)(-1). min(-1)]. The rate of plasma fatty acid oxidation was also similar in obese and lean subjects (12.8 +/- 1.7 vs. 14.5 +/- 1.8 micromol. kg FFM(-1). min(-1); P = not significant). However, whole body fatty acid oxidation during exercise was 25% greater in obese than in lean subjects (21.9 +/- 1.2 vs. 17.5 +/- 1.6 micromol. kg FFM(-1). min(-1); P < 0.05). These results demonstrate that, although plasma fatty acid availability and oxidation are similar during exercise in lean and obese women, women with abdominal obesity use more fat as a fuel by oxidizing more nonplasma fatty acids.

  20. Role of CoA and acetyl-CoA in regulating cardiac fatty acid and glucose oxidation.

    PubMed

    Abo Alrob, Osama; Lopaschuk, Gary D

    2014-08-01

    CoA (coenzyme A) and its derivatives have a critical role in regulating cardiac energy metabolism. This includes a key role as a substrate and product in the energy metabolic pathways, as well as serving as an allosteric regulator of cardiac energy metabolism. In addition, the CoA ester malonyl-CoA has an important role in regulating fatty acid oxidation, secondary to inhibiting CPT (carnitine palmitoyltransferase) 1, a key enzyme involved in mitochondrial fatty acid uptake. Alterations in malonyl-CoA synthesis by ACC (acetyl-CoA carboxylase) and degradation by MCD (malonyl-CoA decarboxylase) are important contributors to the high cardiac fatty acid oxidation rates seen in ischaemic heart disease, heart failure, obesity and diabetes. Additional control of fatty acid oxidation may also occur at the level of acetyl-CoA involvement in acetylation of mitochondrial fatty acid β-oxidative enzymes. We find that acetylation of the fatty acid β-oxidative enzymes, LCAD (long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase) and β-HAD (β-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase) is associated with an increase in activity and fatty acid oxidation in heart from obese mice with heart failure. This is associated with decreased SIRT3 (sirtuin 3) activity, an important mitochondrial deacetylase. In support of this, cardiac SIRT3 deletion increases acetylation of LCAD and β-HAD, and increases cardiac fatty acid oxidation. Acetylation of MCD is also associated with increased activity, decreases malonyl-CoA levels and an increase in fatty acid oxidation. Combined, these data suggest that malonyl-CoA and acetyl-CoA have an important role in mediating the alterations in fatty acid oxidation seen in heart failure. PMID:25110000

  1. Alterations of gene expression in skin and lung of mice exposed to light and cigarette smoke.

    PubMed

    Izzotti, Alberto; Cartiglia, Cristina; Longobardi, Mariagrazia; Balansky, Roumen M; D'Agostini, Francesco; Lubet, Ronald A; De Flora, Silvio

    2004-10-01

    We previously showed that sunlight-mimicking light induces genotoxic damage not only in skin but also even in lung, bone marrow, and peripheral blood of hairless mice. Moreover, light and smoke acted synergically in the respiratory tract. To clarify the mechanisms involved, we investigated by cDNA-arrays the expression of 746 toxicologically relevant genes in skin and lungs of mice exposed for 28 days to light and/or environmental cigarette smoke. Glutathione-S-transferase-Pi and catalase were overexpressed in the lungs of mice exposed to light only. Moreover, the light induced in skin the expression of genes involved in carcinogenesis, photoaging, and production of genotoxic and oxidizing derivatives traveling at a distance. Smoke induced the expression of multiple genes in both skin and lung, which reflect adaptive responses and mechanisms related to cancer and, possibly, to emphysema and stroke. As shown in mice exposed to both light and smoke, the light tended to increase smoke-induced gene expression in lungs, while smoke tended to attenuate light-induced gene expression in skin. The oral administration of the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug sulindac inhibited the light-induced overexpression of cyclooxygenase-2 and oxidative stress-related genes in skin, and down-regulated smoke-induced genes involved in oxidative stress, removal of damaged proteins, inflammation, and immune response in lung. These results provide a mechanistic insight explaining the systemic alterations induced by both light and smoke in mouse skin and lungs.

  2. Protective Effect of Super-Critical Carbon Dioxide Fluid Extract from Flowers and Buds of Chrysanthemum indicum Linnén Against Ultraviolet-Induced Photo-Aging in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xie; Xie, You-Liang; Yu, Xiu-Ting; Su, Zu-Qing; Yuan, Jie; Li, Yu-Cui; Su, Zi-Ren

    2015-01-01

    Abstract It is known that solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation to human skin causes photo-aging, including increases in skin thickness and wrinkle formation and reduction in skin elasticity. UV radiation induces damage to skin mainly by superfluous reactive oxygen species and chronic low-grade inflammation, which eventually up-regulate the expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). In this study, the super-critical carbon dioxide extract from flowers and buds of Chrysanthemum indicum Linnén (CISCFE), which has been reported to possess free radical scavenging and anti-inflammatory properties, was investigated for its photo-protective effect by topical application on the skin of mice. Moreover, CISCFE effectively suppressed the UV-induced increase in skin thickness and wrinkle grading in a dose-dependent manner, which was correlated with the inhibition of loss of collagen fiber content and epidermal thickening. Furthermore, we observed that CISCFE could obviously decrease UV-induced skin inflammation by inhibiting the production of inflammatory cytokines (interleukin-1β [IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10, tumor necrosis factor-α), alleviate the abnormal changes of anti-oxidative indicators (superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase), and down-regulate the levels of MMP-1 and MMP-3. The results indicated that CISCFE was a novel photo-protective agent from natural resources against UV irradiation. PMID:25849065

  3. Protective Effect of Super-Critical Carbon Dioxide Fluid Extract from Flowers and Buds of Chrysanthemum indicum Linnén Against Ultraviolet-Induced Photo-Aging in Mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xie; Xie, You-Liang; Yu, Xiu-Ting; Su, Zu-Qing; Yuan, Jie; Li, Yu-Cui; Su, Zi-Ren; Zhan, Janis Ya-Xian; Lai, Xiao-Ping

    2015-10-01

    It is known that solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation to human skin causes photo-aging, including increases in skin thickness and wrinkle formation and reduction in skin elasticity. UV radiation induces damage to skin mainly by superfluous reactive oxygen species and chronic low-grade inflammation, which eventually up-regulate the expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). In this study, the super-critical carbon dioxide extract from flowers and buds of Chrysanthemum indicum Linnén (CISCFE), which has been reported to possess free radical scavenging and anti-inflammatory properties, was investigated for its photo-protective effect by topical application on the skin of mice. Moreover, CISCFE effectively suppressed the UV-induced increase in skin thickness and wrinkle grading in a dose-dependent manner, which was correlated with the inhibition of loss of collagen fiber content and epidermal thickening. Furthermore, we observed that CISCFE could obviously decrease UV-induced skin inflammation by inhibiting the production of inflammatory cytokines (interleukin-1β [IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10, tumor necrosis factor-α), alleviate the abnormal changes of anti-oxidative indicators (superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase), and down-regulate the levels of MMP-1 and MMP-3. The results indicated that CISCFE was a novel photo-protective agent from natural resources against UV irradiation.

  4. NF-E2-related factor 2 deletion facilitates hepatic fatty acids metabolism disorder induced by high-fat diet via regulating related genes in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xinghe; Li, Chunyan; Xu, Shang; Ishfaq, Muhammad; Zhang, Xiuying

    2016-08-01

    There is increasing evidence that Nrf2 participates in hepatic fatty acid metabolism in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease; however, the mechanism remains unclear. We investigated the role of Nrf2 in hepatic fatty acid metabolism disorder induced by high-fat diet (HFD). Mice fed HFD developed hepatic steatosis and exhibited Nrf2 deficiency. Change of fatty acid composition mediated by Nrf2 deletion was observed predominantly in the liver and not the serum. HFD-induced variations in hepatic 18-carbon and 22-carbon fatty acids were enhanced by Nrf2 deficiency. In the HFD group, Nrf2 deficiency led to increases in the mRNA expression of PPARα, FXR, FAS, LXR and ACC-1, while levels of PGC-1α and Srebp-1c mRNA were decreased. Nrf2 mRNA expression was enhanced in the liver of HFD-induced wild type mice, whereas it was undetectable in Nrf2-null mice. These results suggest that Nrf2 deficiency induced by HFD promoted hepatic fatty acid metabolism disorder by altering 18-carbon and 22-carbon fatty acid composition. Changes in fatty acid content were also associated with alteration of the transcription of genes involved in hepatic fatty acid metabolism. PMID:27311796

  5. Omega-3 Fatty Acids and Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Coletta, Jaclyn M; Bell, Stacey J; Roman, Ashley S

    2010-01-01

    Omega-3 fatty acids are essential fatty acids that must be consumed in the diet. Adequate consumption of omega-3 fatty acids is vitally important during pregnancy as they are critical building blocks of fetal brain and retina. Omega-3 fatty acids may also play a role in determining the length of gestation and in preventing perinatal depression. The most biologically active forms of omega-3 fatty acids are docosahexaenoic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid, which are primarily derived from marine sources such as seafood and algae. Recent surveys, however, indicate that pregnant women in the United States and in other countries eat little fish and therefore do not consume enough omega-3 fatty acids, primarily due to concern about the adverse effects of mercury and other contaminants on the developing fetus. This review discusses the benefits of omega-3 fatty acid consumption during pregnancy and provides guidelines for obstetricians advising patients. PMID:21364848

  6. Branched chain amino acid metabolism profiles in progressive human nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Lake, April D; Novak, Petr; Shipkova, Petia; Aranibar, Nelly; Robertson, Donald G; Reily, Michael D; Lehman-McKeeman, Lois D; Vaillancourt, Richard R; Cherrington, Nathan J

    2015-03-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a globally widespread disease of increasing clinical significance. The pathological progression of the disease from simple steatosis to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) has been well defined, however, the contribution of altered branched chain amino acid metabolomic profiles to the progression of NAFLD is not known. The three BCAAs: leucine, isoleucine and valine are known to mediate activation of several important hepatic metabolic signaling pathways ranging from insulin signaling to glucose regulation. The purpose of this study is to profile changes in hepatic BCAA metabolite levels with transcriptomic changes in the progression of human NAFLD to discover novel mechanisms of disease progression. Metabolomic and transcriptomic data sets representing the spectrum of human NAFLD (normal, steatosis, NASH fatty, and NASH not fatty livers) were utilized for this study. During the transition from steatosis to NASH, increases in the levels of leucine (127% of normal), isoleucine (139%), and valine (147%) were observed. Carnitine metabolites also exhibited significantly elevated profiles in NASH fatty and NASH not fatty samples and included propionyl, hexanoyl, lauryl, acetyl and butyryl carnitine. Amino acid and BCAA metabolism gene sets were significantly enriched among downregulated genes during NASH. These cumulative alterations in BCAA metabolite and amino acid metabolism gene profiles represent adaptive physiological responses to disease-induced hepatic stress in NASH patients.

  7. Fatty acid uptake in normal human myocardium

    SciTech Connect

    Vyska, K.; Meyer, W.; Stremmel, W.; Notohamiprodjo, G.; Minami, K.; Machulla, H.J.; Gleichmann, U.; Meyer, H.; Koerfer, R. )

    1991-09-01

    Fatty acid binding protein has been found in rat aortic endothelial cell membrane. It has been identified to be a 40-kDa protein that corresponds to a 40-kDa fatty acid binding protein with high affinity for a variety of long chain fatty acids isolated from rat heart myocytes. It is proposed that this endothelial membrane fatty acid binding protein might mediate the myocardial uptake of fatty acids. For evaluation of this hypothesis in vivo, influx kinetics of tracer-labeled fatty acids was examined in 15 normal subjects by scintigraphic techniques. Variation of the plasma fatty acid concentration and plasma perfusion rate has been achieved by modulation of nutrition state and exercise conditions. The clinical results suggest that the myocardial fatty acid influx rate is saturable by increasing fatty acid plasma concentration as well as by increasing plasma flow. For analysis of these data, functional relations describing fatty acid transport from plasma into myocardial tissue in the presence and absence of an unstirred layer were developed. The fitting of these relations to experimental data indicate that the free fatty acid influx into myocardial tissue reveals the criteria of a reaction on a capillary surface in the vicinity of flowing plasma but not of a reaction in extravascular space or in an unstirred layer and that the fatty acid influx into normal myocardium is a saturable process that is characterized by the quantity corresponding to the Michaelis-Menten constant, Km, and the maximal velocity, Vmax, 0.24 {plus minus} 0.024 mumol/g and 0.37 {plus minus} 0.013 mumol/g(g.min), respectively. These data are compatible with a nondiffusional uptake process mediated by the initial interaction of fatty acids with the 40-kDa membrane fatty acid binding protein of cardiac endothelial cells.

  8. [Prevalence of no alcohol fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in a population of obese children in Valencia, Venezuela].

    PubMed

    Pontiles de Sánchez, Milagros; Morón de Salim, Alba; Rodríguez de Perdomo, Henny; Perdomo Oramas, Germán

    2014-06-01

    No Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD) is characterized by an abnormal accumulation of fat in hepatocytes, without alcohol, where overweight and obesity are determinants. Ecosonografia evaluated the prevalence of fatty liver in obese pediatric patients and its relation to nutritional assessment. The sample consisted of 85 children (51 females, 34 males), age 3-17. The abdominal ecosonography, BMI, waist circumference were performed; Godard Test for physical activity, history of diabetes, dyslipidemia, obesity and cardiovascular disease were questioned. Lipid profile, glucose and insulin resistance were determined. Data analyzed from descriptive and comparative tables. We obtained: mean age 9.8 ± 2.7 females and males 9.6 ± 2.7 years. The ecosonography indicated 50% and 50% fatty liver-pancreas fatty liver in children aged 3-6 years; 7-11 years 39.7% fatty liver-pancreas; 12-17yrs 31.6% fatty liver-pancreas (p > 0.05); BMI > 26 kg/m2 42.9% fatty liver-pancreas; 21 to 25 kg/m2 44.7% fatty liver; 15 to 20 kg/m2 60%fatty liver-pancreas (p> 0.05). 97.6% with high CC; 68.2% with inadequate physical activity; high frequency of history of chronic non-communicable diseases. We concluded that this population had predominantly fatty liver fatty replacement of the pancreas (HG-RGP) in the groups with higher BMI, CC and high male unrelated insulin resistance, altered lipid profile and diagnosis HG. We inferred that the anthropometric assessment of waist circumference and abdominal ecosonography indicate the presence of visceral obesity, a condition that predisposes to hepatic steatosis, pancreas and/or liver-pancreas.

  9. Slaughterhouse fatty waste saponification to increase biogas yield.

    PubMed

    Battimelli, A; Torrijos, M; Moletta, R; Delgenès, J P

    2010-05-01

    A thermochemical pretreatment, i.e. saponification, was optimised in order to improve anaerobic biodegradation of slaughterhouse wastes such as aeroflotation grease and flesh fats from cattle carcass. Anaerobic digestion of raw wastes, as well as of wastes saponified at different temperatures (60 degrees C, 120 degrees C and 150 degrees C) was conducted in fed-batch reactors under mesophilic condition and the effect of different saponification temperatures on anaerobic biodegradation and on the long-chain fatty acids (LCFAs) relative composition was assessed. Even after increasing loads over a long period of time, raw fatty wastes were biodegraded slowly and the biogas potentials were lower than those of theoretical estimations. In contrast, pretreated wastes exhibited improved batch biodegradation, indicating a better initial bio-availability, particularly obvious for carcass wastes. However, LCFA relative composition was not significantly altered by the pretreatment. Consequently, the enhanced biodegradation should be attributed to an increased initial bio-availability of fatty wastes without any modification of their long chain structure which remained slowly biodegradable. Finally, saponification at 120 degrees C achieved best performances during anaerobic digestion of slaughterhouse wastes.

  10. Omega-3 fatty acids for breast cancer prevention and survivorship.

    PubMed

    Fabian, Carol J; Kimler, Bruce F; Hursting, Stephen D

    2015-05-04

    Women with evidence of high intake ratios of the marine omega-3 fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) relative to the omega-6 arachidonic acid have been found to have a reduced risk of breast cancer compared with those with low ratios in some but not all case-control and cohort studies. If increasing EPA and DHA relative to arachidonic acid is effective in reducing breast cancer risk, likely mechanisms include reduction in proinflammatory lipid derivatives, inhibition of nuclear factor-κB-induced cytokine production, and decreased growth factor receptor signaling as a result of alteration in membrane lipid rafts. Primary prevention trials with either risk biomarkers or cancer incidence as endpoints are underway but final results of these trials are currently unavailable. EPA and DHA supplementation is also being explored in an effort to help prevent or alleviate common problems after a breast cancer diagnosis, including cardiac and cognitive dysfunction and chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy. The insulin-sensitizing and anabolic properties of EPA and DHA also suggest supplementation studies to determine whether these omega-3 fatty acids might reduce chemotherapy-associated loss of muscle mass and weight gain. We will briefly review relevant omega-3 fatty acid metabolism, and early investigations in breast cancer prevention and survivorship.

  11. Omega-3 fatty acids: role in metabolism and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Gerber, Philipp A; Gouni-Berthold, Ioanna; Berneis, Kaspar

    2013-01-01

    The inverse association of cardiovascular risk with intake of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids was suspected early in populations that are known to have a high consumption of fish and fish oil. Subsequent cohort studies confirmed such associations in other populations. Further evidence of possible beneficial effects on metabolism and cardiovascular health was provided by many studies that were able to show specific mechanisms that may underlie these observations. These include improvement of the function of tissues involved in the alterations occurring during the development of obesity and the metabolic syndrome, as adipose tissue, the liver and skeletal muscle. Direct action on the cardiovascular system was not only shown regarding vascular function and the formation of atherosclerotic plaques, but also by providing antiarrhythmic effects on the heart. Data on these effects come from in vitro as well as in vivo studies that were conducted in animal models of disease, in healthy humans and in humans suffering from cardiovascular disease. To define prophylactic as well as treatment options in primary and secondary prevention, large clinical trial assessed the effect of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids on end points as cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. However, so far these trials provided ambiguous data that do allow recommendations regarding the use of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in higher dosages and beyond the dietary advice of regular fish intake only in few clinical situations, such as severe hypertriglyceridemia.

  12. Obesity, fatty liver disease and intestinal microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Arslan, Nur

    2014-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a chronic liver disorder that is increasing in prevalence with the worldwide epidemic of obesity. NAFLD is the hepatic manifestation of the metabolic syndrome. The term NAFLD describes a spectrum of liver pathology ranges from simple steatosis to steatosis with inflammation nonalcoholic steatohepatitis and even cirrhosis. Metabolic syndrome and NAFLD also predict hepatocellular carcinoma. Many genetic and environmental factors have been suggested to contribute to the development of obesity and NAFLD, but the exact mechanisms are not known. Intestinal ecosystem contains trillions of microorganisms including bacteria, Archaea, yeasts and viruses. Several studies support the relationship between the intestinal microbial changes and obesity and also its complications, including insulin resistance and NAFLD. Given that the gut and liver are connected by the portal venous system, it makes the liver more vulnerable to translocation of bacteria, bacterial products, endotoxins or secreted cytokines. Altered intestinal microbiota (dysbiosis) may stimulate hepatic fat deposition through several mechanisms: regulation of gut permeability, increasing low-grade inflammation, modulation of dietary choline metabolism, regulation of bile acid metabolism and producing endogenous ethanol. Regulation of intestinal microbial ecosystem by diet modifications or by using probiotics and prebiotics as a treatment for obesity and its complications might be the issue of further investigations. PMID:25469013

  13. Obesity, fatty liver disease and intestinal microbiota.

    PubMed

    Arslan, Nur

    2014-11-28

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a chronic liver disorder that is increasing in prevalence with the worldwide epidemic of obesity. NAFLD is the hepatic manifestation of the metabolic syndrome. The term NAFLD describes a spectrum of liver pathology ranges from simple steatosis to steatosis with inflammation nonalcoholic steatohepatitis and even cirrhosis. Metabolic syndrome and NAFLD also predict hepatocellular carcinoma. Many genetic and environmental factors have been suggested to contribute to the development of obesity and NAFLD, but the exact mechanisms are not known. Intestinal ecosystem contains trillions of microorganisms including bacteria, Archaea, yeasts and viruses. Several studies support the relationship between the intestinal microbial changes and obesity and also its complications, including insulin resistance and NAFLD. Given that the gut and liver are connected by the portal venous system, it makes the liver more vulnerable to translocation of bacteria, bacterial products, endotoxins or secreted cytokines. Altered intestinal microbiota (dysbiosis) may stimulate hepatic fat deposition through several mechanisms: regulation of gut permeability, increasing low-grade inflammation, modulation of dietary choline metabolism, regulation of bile acid metabolism and producing endogenous ethanol. Regulation of intestinal microbial ecosystem by diet modifications or by using probiotics and prebiotics as a treatment for obesity and its complications might be the issue of further investigations.

  14. Nonalcoholic fatty pancreas disease1

    PubMed Central

    Mathur, Abhishek; Marine, Megan; Lu, Debao; Swartz-Basile, Deborah A.; Saxena, Romil; Zyromski, Nicholas J.

    2007-01-01

    Background. Obesity leads to fat infiltration of multiple organs including the heart, kidneys, and liver. Under conditions of oxidative stress, fat-derived cytokines are released locally and result in an inflammatory process and organ dysfunction. In the liver, fat infiltration has been termed nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, which may lead to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. No data are available, however, on the influence of obesity on pancreatic fat and cytokines, and nonalcoholic fatty pancreas disease (NAFPD) has not been described. Therefore, we designed a study to determine whether obesity is associated with increased pancreatic fat and cytokines. Materials and methods. Thirty C57BL/6J lean control and 30 leptin-deficient obese female mice were fed a 15% fat diet for 4 weeks. At 12 weeks of age all animals underwent total pancreatectomy. Pancreata from each strain were pooled for measurement of a) wet and dry weight, b) histologic presence of fat, c) triglycerides, free fatty acids (FFAs), cholesterol, phospholipids, and total fat, and d) interleukin (IL)-1β and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α). Data were analyzed by Student's t test and Fisher's exact test. Results. Pancreata from obese mice were heavier (p<0.05) and had more fat histologically (p<0.05). Pancreata from obese mice had more triglycerides, FFAs, cholesterol, and total fat (p<0.05). Triglycerides represented 11% of pancreatic fat in lean mice compared with 67% of pancreatic fat in obese mice (p<0.01). Cytokines IL-1β and TNF-α also were elevated in the pancreata of obese mice (p<0.05). Conclusions. These data suggest that obese mice have 1) heavier pancreata, 2) more pancreatic fat, especially triglycerides and FFAs, and 3) increased cytokines. We conclude that obesity leads to nonalcoholic fatty pancreatic disease. PMID:18345311

  15. Dehydration of multilamellar fatty acid membranes: Towards a computational model of the stratum corneum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDermaid, Christopher M.; DeVane, Russell H.; Klein, Michael L.; Fiorin, Giacomo

    2014-12-01

    The level of hydration controls the cohesion between apposed lamellae of saturated free fatty acids found in the lipid matrix of stratum corneum, the outermost layer of mammalian skin. This multilamellar lipid matrix is highly impermeable to water and ions, so that the local hydration shell of its fatty acids may not always be in equilibrium with the acidity and relative humidity, which significantly change over a course of days during skin growth. The homeostasis of the stratum corneum at each moment of its growth likely requires a balance between two factors, which affect in opposite ways the diffusion of hydrophilic species through the stratum corneum: (i) an increase in water order as the lipid lamellae come in closer contact, and (ii) a decrease in water order as the fraction of charged fatty acids is lowered by pH. Herein molecular dynamics simulations are employed to estimate the impact of both effects on water molecules confined between lamellae of fatty acids. Under conditions where membrane undulations are energetically favorable, the charged fatty acids are able to sequester cations around points of contact between lamellae that are fully dehydrated, while essentially maintaining a multilamellar structure for the entire system. This observation suggests that the undulations of the fatty acid lamellae control the diffusion of hydrophilic species through the water phase by altering the positional and rotational order of water molecules in the embedded/occluded "droplets."

  16. The development of iodine-123-methyl-branched fatty acids and their applications in nuclear cardiology

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, F.F. Jr.; Ambrose, K.R. ); Kropp, J.; Biersack, H.J. . Inst. fuer Klinische und Experimentelle Nuklearmedizin); Goodman, M.M. . Dept. of Radiology); Franken, P. . Nuclear Medicine Dept.); Reske, S.N. (Ulm Univ. (Germany

    1993-01-01

    Continued Interest in the use of iodine-1 23-labeled fatty acids for myocardial Imaging results from observations from a variety of studies that in many types of cardiac disease, regional fatty acid myocardial uptake patterns are often different than regional distribution of flow tracers. These differences may reflect alterations in important parameters of metabolism which can be useful for patient management or therapeutic strategy decision making. In addition, use of iodine-I 23-labeled fatty acid distribution may represent a unique metabolic probe to relate some aspects of the metabolism of these substrates with the regional viability of cardiac tissue. The use of such viability markers could provide important prognostic information on myocardial salvage, helping to identify patients for revascularization or angioplasty. Clinical studies are currently in progress with the iodine-123-labeled 1 5-(p-iodophenyl)-3-R,S-methylpentadecanoic acid (BMIPP) fatty acid analogue at several institutions. The goals of this paper are to discuss development of the concept of metabolic trapping of fatty acids, to briefly review development and evaluation of various radioiodinated methyl-branched fatty acids and to discuss recent patient studies with iodine-123 (BMIPP) using single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT).

  17. The development of iodine-123-methyl-branched fatty acids and their applications in nuclear cardiology

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, F.F. Jr.; Ambrose, K.R.; Kropp, J.; Biersack, H.J.; Goodman, M.M.; Franken, P.; Reske, S.N.; Som, P.; Sloof, G.W.; Visser, F.C.

    1993-06-01

    Continued Interest in the use of iodine-1 23-labeled fatty acids for myocardial Imaging results from observations from a variety of studies that in many types of cardiac disease, regional fatty acid myocardial uptake patterns are often different than regional distribution of flow tracers. These differences may reflect alterations in important parameters of metabolism which can be useful for patient management or therapeutic strategy decision making. In addition, use of iodine-I 23-labeled fatty acid distribution may represent a unique metabolic probe to relate some aspects of the metabolism of these substrates with the regional viability of cardiac tissue. The use of such viability markers could provide important prognostic information on myocardial salvage, helping to identify patients for revascularization or angioplasty. Clinical studies are currently in progress with the iodine-123-labeled 1 5-(p-iodophenyl)-3-R,S-methylpentadecanoic acid (BMIPP) fatty acid analogue at several institutions. The goals of this paper are to discuss development of the concept of metabolic trapping of fatty acids, to briefly review development and evaluation of various radioiodinated methyl-branched fatty acids and to discuss recent patient studies with iodine-123 (BMIPP) using single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT).

  18. Abnormalities in the Metabolism of Fatty Acids and Triacylglycerols in the Liver of the Goto-Kakizaki Rat: A Model for Non-Obese Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Karahashi, Minako; Hirata-Hanta, Yuko; Kawabata, Kohei; Tsutsumi, Daisuke; Kametani, Misaki; Takamatsu, Nanako; Sakamoto, Takeshi; Yamazaki, Tohru; Asano, Satoshi; Mitsumoto, Atsushi; Kawashima, Yoichi; Kudo, Naomi

    2016-08-01

    The Goto-Kakizaki (GK) rat is widely used as an animal model for spontaneous-onset type 2 diabetes without obesity; nevertheless, little information is available on the metabolism of fatty acids and triacylglycerols (TAG) in their livers. We investigated the mechanisms underlying the alterations in the metabolism of fatty acids and TAG in their livers, in comparison with Zucker (fa/fa) rats, which are obese and insulin resistant. Lipid profiles, the expression of genes for enzymes and proteins related to the metabolism of fatty acid and TAG, de novo synthesis of fatty acids and TAG in vivo, fatty acid synthase activity in vitro, fatty acid oxidation in liver slices, and very-low-density-lipoprotein (VLDL)-TAG secretion in vivo were estimated. Our results revealed that (1) the TAG accumulation was moderate, (2) the de novo fatty acid synthesis was increased by upregulation of fatty acid synthase in a post-transcriptional manner, (3) fatty acid oxidation was also augmented through the induction of carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1a, and (4) the secretion rate of VLDL-TAG remained unchanged in the livers of GK rats. These results suggest that, despite the fact that GK rats exhibit non-obese type 2 diabetes, the upregulation of de novo lipogenesis is largely compensated by the upregulation of fatty acid oxidation, resulting in only moderate increase in TAG accumulation in the liver. PMID:27372943

  19. Vibrational structure of the polyunsaturated fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid and arachidonic acid studied by infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiefer, Johannes; Noack, Kristina; Bartelmess, Juergen; Walter, Christian; Dörnenburg, Heike; Leipertz, Alfred

    2010-02-01

    The spectroscopic discrimination of the two structurally similar polyunsaturated C 20 fatty acids (PUFAs) 5,8,11,14,17-eicosapentaenoic acid and 5,8,11,14-eicosatetraenoic acid (arachidonic acid) is shown. For this purpose their vibrational structures are studied by means of attenuated total reflection (ATR) Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. The fingerprint regions of the recorded spectra are found to be almost identical, while the C-H stretching mode regions around 3000 cm -1 show such significant differences as results of electronic and molecular structure alterations based on the different degree of saturation that both fatty acids can be clearly distinguished from each other.

  20. The Multifaceted Effects of Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids on the Hallmarks of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Stephenson, J. A.; Al-Taan, O.; Arshad, A.; Morgan, B.; Metcalfe, M. S.; Dennison, A. R.

    2013-01-01

    Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, in particular eicosapentaenoic acid, and docosahexaenoic acid have been shown to have multiple beneficial antitumour actions that affect the essential alterations that dictate malignant growth. In this review we explore the putative mechanisms of action of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid in cancer protection in relation to self-sufficiency in growth signals, insensitivity to growth-inhibitory signals, apoptosis, limitless replicative potential, sustained angiogenesis, and tissue invasion, and how these will hopefully translate from bench to bedside. PMID:23762563

  1. Amazing Altered Books

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kieling, Linda W.

    2006-01-01

    Linda Kieling, an art teacher at Rosemont Ridge Middle school in West Linn, Oregon, describes an altered book art project she introduced to her students. Alteration of books is a form of recycling that started in the eleventh century when Italian monks recycled old manuscripts written on vellum by scraping off the ink and adding new text and…

  2. Liquid chromatography – high resolution mass spectrometry analysis of fatty acid metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Kamphorst, Jurre J.; Fan, Jing; Lu, Wenyun; White, Eileen; Rabinowitz, Joshua D.

    2011-01-01

    We present a liquid chromatography – mass spectrometry (LC-MS) method for long-chain and very-long-chain fatty acid analysis, and its application to 13C-tracer studies of fatty acid metabolism. Fatty acids containing 14 to 36 carbon atoms are separated by C8 reversed-phase chromatography using a water-methanol gradient with tributylamine as ion pairing agent, ionized by electrospray, and analyzed by a stand-alone orbitrap mass spectrometer. The median limit of detection is 5 ng/ml with a linear dynamic range of 100-fold. Ratios of unlabeled to 13C-labeled species are quantitated precisely and accurately (average relative standard deviation 3.2% and deviation from expectation 2.3%). In samples consisting of fatty acids saponified from cultured mammalian cells, 45 species are quantified, with average intraday relative standard deviations for independent biological replicates of 11%. The method enables quantitation of molecular ion peaks for all labeled forms of each fatty acid. Different degrees of 13C-labeling from glucose and glutamine correspond to fatty acid uptake from media, de novo synthesis, and elongation. To exemplify the utility of the method, we examined isogenic cell lines with and without activated Ras oncogene expression. Ras increases the abundance and alters the labeling patterns of saturated and monounsaturated very-long-chain fatty acids, with the observed pattern consistent with Ras leading to enhanced activity of ELOVL4 or an enzyme with similar catalytic activity. This LC-MS method and associated isotope tracer techniques should be broadly applicable to investigating fatty acid metabolism. PMID:22004349

  3. Aldehydes from n-6 fatty acid peroxidation. Effects on aminophospholipids.

    PubMed

    Guichardant, M; Bernoud-Hubac, N; Chantegrel, B; Deshayes, C; Lagarde, M

    2002-01-01

    4-Hydroxy-nonenal (4-HNE) is a major by-product of n-6 fatty acid peroxidation. It has been described to covalently bind biomolecules expressing primary amine, especially the Lys residues in proteins. Low-density lipoproteins (LDL) are well-described macromolecules to be modified by 4-HNE, making them available to scavenger receptors on macrophages. Those macrophages then become foam cells and play an active role in atherogenesis. This paper reports on the covalent binding of 4-HNE to phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), a major aminophospholipid in biological membranes. In contrast, phosphatidylserine (PS) is virtually not modified by 4-HNE. One stable adduct, the Michael adduct PE/4-HNE is a poor substrate of secreted phospholipase A(2) and is not cleaved by phospholipase D. Plasmalogen PE, an important subclass of PE, is covalently modified by 4-HNE as well, but appears to be further degraded on its sn-1 position, the alkenyl chain, which might alter the antioxidant potential of the molecule. An aldehyde homologous to 4-HNE has been characterized as a breakdown product of 12-hydroperoxyeicosatetraenoic acid (12-HpETE) and named 4-hydroxy-2E,6Z-dodecadienal (4-HDDE). This compound as well as 4-HNE was detected in human plasma. Finally, 4-HDDE appears almost 3-fold more active than 4-HNE to make covalent adducts with PE. We conclude that 4-HNE and 4-HDDE are two biologically relevant markers of n-6 fatty acid peroxidation that may alter the phospholipid-dependent cell signaling.

  4. Acetaminophen Pharmacokinetics in Children with Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Barshop, Nicole J.; Capparelli, Edmund V.; Sirlin, Claude B.; Schwimmer, Jeffrey B.; Lavine, Joel E

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate UDP-glucuronyltransferase (UGT) activity and the pharmacokinetics of a single oral dose of acetaminophen (APAP) in children with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Methods Twelve boys 10–17 years old with biopsy-proven NAFLD and 12 age and gender-matched controls without NAFLD were recruited. Following administration of a single oral dose of APAP (5mg/kg, maximum 325mg), APAP and its glucuronide metabolite (APAP-G) were measured in plasma, urine, and sputum at various intervals up to 24 hours. The activity of UGT was estimated by the plasma ratio of APAP-G to APAP at 4 hours. Results Following administration of APAP, children with NAFLD had significantly higher concentrations of APAP-G in serum (p=.0071) and urine (p=.0210) compared to controls. No significant differences in APAP pharmacokinetics parameters were observed between the two groups. Conclusions APAP glucuronidation is altered in children with fatty liver disease. Despite the altered disposition of this metabolite, the pharmacokinetics of a single 5 mg/kg dose of APAP is the same in children with NAFLD as in children with normal liver function. PMID:21240014

  5. Electrogenicity of hepatocellular fatty acid uptake.

    PubMed

    Elsing, C; Kassner, A; Gajdzik, L; Graf, J; Stremmel, W

    1998-08-18

    Sensitivity of cellular fatty acids uptake to the membrane potential difference is still a matter of controversy. For direct evaluation of potential sensitivity the effect of changing membrane potential on uptake of a fluorescent long chain fatty acid derivative, 12-NBD-stearate, in isolated rat hepatocytes, was examined. Changes in membrane potential were achieved by patch clamp procedures. Fatty acid influx was simultaneously determined by recording of cell fluorescence. Hyperpolarization from -30 to -70 mV accelerated fatty acid influx whereas depolarization to +50 mV reduced uptake. After obtaining equilibrium hyperpolarization increased cell fluorescence, whereas depolarization pushed NBD-stearate out of cells. Potential sensitivity of uptake was dependent on the fatty acid concentrations in the medium with most prominent effects at low unbound concentrations. These data show that, at low fatty acid concentrations, uptake is, in part, driven by an intracellular negative electric membrane potential.

  6. OMEGA-3 FATTY ACIDS IN CRITICAL ILLNESS

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Julie M.; Stapleton, Renee D.

    2015-01-01

    Supplementation of enteral nutritional formulas and parenteral nutrition lipid emulsions with omega-3 fatty acids is a recent area of research in patients with critical illness. It is hypothesized that omega-3 fatty acids may help reduce inflammation in critically ill patients, particularly those with sepsis and acute lung injury. The objective of this article is to review the data on supplementing omega-3 fatty acids during critical illness; enteral and parenteral supplementation are reviewed separately. The results of the research available to date are contradictory for both enteral and parenteral omega-3 fatty acid administration. Supplementation with omega-3 fatty acids may influence the acute inflammatory response in critically ill patients, but more research is needed before definitive recommendations about the routine use of omega-3 fatty acids in caring for critically ill patients can be made. PMID:20796218

  7. Plasma phospholipids and fatty acid composition differ between liver biopsy-proven nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and healthy subjects

    PubMed Central

    Ma, D W L; Arendt, B M; Hillyer, L M; Fung, S K; McGilvray, I; Guindi, M; Allard, J P

    2016-01-01

    Background: There is growing evidence that nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is associated with perturbations in liver lipid metabolism. Liver phospholipid and fatty acid composition have been shown to be altered in NAFLD. However, detailed profiles of circulating lipids in the pathogenesis of NAFLD are lacking. Objective: Therefore, the objective of the present study was to examine circulating lipids and potential mechanisms related to hepatic gene expression between liver biopsy-proven simple steatosis (SS), nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and healthy subjects. Subjects: Plasma phospholipid and fatty acid composition were determined in 31 healthy living liver donors as healthy controls (HC), 26 patients with simple hepatic steatosis (SS) and 20 with progressive NASH. Hepatic gene expression was analyzed by Illumina microarray in a subset of 22 HC, 16 SS and 14 NASH. Results: Concentrations of phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) increased relative to disease progression, HCFatty acid composition of phospholipids was also remodeled. In particular, docosahexaenoic and arachidonic acid were higher (P<0.05) in SS and NASH relative to HC in PS. Differentially expressed hepatic genes included ETNK1 and PLSCR1 that are involved in PE synthesis and PS transport, respectively. Conclusions: The present study demonstrates that there is a disruption in phospholipid metabolism that is present in SS, but more pronounced in NASH. Intervention studies targeted at lipid metabolism could benefit SS and NASH. PMID:27428872

  8. Fatty acid content of selected seed oils.

    PubMed

    Orhan, Ilkay; Sener, Bilge

    2002-01-01

    Fatty acid content of selected seed oils from world-wide edible fruits, Ceratonia ciliqua (carob) from Caesalpiniaceae family, Diospyros kaki (persimmon) from Ebenaceae family, Zizyphus jujuba (jujube) from Rhamnaceae family, and Persea gratissima (avocado pear) from Lauraceae family, were determined by capillary gas chromatography- mass spectrometry (GC-MS) to find new natural sources for essential fatty acids. Among the seed oils analyzed, Ceratonia ciliqua has been found to have the highest essential fatty acid content.

  9. Fatty acids of Pinus elliottii tissues.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laseter, J. L.; Lawler, G. C.; Walkinshaw, C. H.; Weete, J. D.

    1973-01-01

    The total fatty constituents of slash pine (Pinus elliottii) tissue cultures, seeds, and seedlings were examined by GLC and MS. Qualitatively, the fatty acid composition of these tissues was found to be very similar to that reported for other pine species. The fatty acid contents of the tissue cultures resembled that of the seedling tissues. The branched-chain C(sub 17) acid reported for several other Pinus species was confirmed as the anteiso isomer.

  10. 21 CFR 862.1290 - Fatty acids test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Fatty acids test system. 862.1290 Section 862.1290....1290 Fatty acids test system. (a) Identification. A fatty acids test system is a device intended to measure fatty acids in plasma and serum. Measurements of fatty acids are used in the diagnosis...

  11. Genome-wide association and prediction of direct genomic breeding values for composition of fatty acids in Angus beef cattlea

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background As consumers continue to request food products that have health advantages, it will be important for the livestock industry to supply a product that meet these demands. One such nutrient is fatty acids, which have been implicated as playing a role in cardiovascular disease. Therefore, the objective of this study was to determine the extent to which molecular markers could account for variation in fatty acid composition of skeletal muscle and identify genomic regions that harbor genetic variation. Results Subsets of markers on the Illumina 54K bovine SNPchip were able to account for up to 57% of the variance observed in fatty acid composition. In addition, these markers could be used to calculate a direct genomic breeding values (DGV) for a given fatty acids with an accuracy (measured as simple correlations between DGV and phenotype) ranging from -0.06 to 0.57. Furthermore, 57 1-Mb regions were identified that were associated with at least one fatty acid with a posterior probability of inclusion greater than 0.90. 1-Mb regions on BTA19, BTA26 and BTA29, which harbored fatty acid synthase, Sterol-CoA desaturase and thyroid hormone responsive candidate genes, respectively, explained a high percentage of genetic variance in more than one fatty acid. It was also observed that the correlation between DGV for different fatty acids at a given 1-Mb window ranged from almost 1 to -1. Conclusions Further investigations are needed to identify the causal variants harbored within the identified 1-Mb windows. For the first time, Angus breeders have a tool whereby they could select for altered fatty acid composition. Furthermore, these reported results could improve our understanding of the biology of fatty acid metabolism and deposition. PMID:24156620

  12. 40 CFR 721.10629 - Fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction products with modified fatty acids and polyalkanolamines (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction... Fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction products with modified fatty acids and polyalkanolamines (generic). (a... generically as fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction products with modified fatty acids and polyalkanolamines (PMN...

  13. 40 CFR 721.10629 - Fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction products with modified fatty acids and polyalkanolamines (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction... Fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction products with modified fatty acids and polyalkanolamines (generic). (a... generically as fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction products with modified fatty acids and polyalkanolamines (PMN...

  14. Ontogenic development of the fatty acyl chain composition of the turkey (Meleagris gallopavo) pectoralis superficialis muscle membranes: an allometric approach.

    PubMed

    Szabó, A; Fébel, Hedvig; Horn, P; Andrássy-Baka, G; Bázár, Gy; Romvári, R

    2006-06-01

    The growth-associated development of the m. pectoralis superficialis (MPS) phospholipid (PL) and triacylglycerol (TAG) fatty acyl (FA) chain composition was determined in BUT8 meat-type turkeys. Samples (3 d, 8, 12, 16 and 20 wk) of each 6 males were analysed by lipid fractionation and subsequent gas chromatography. Results were interpreted on an allometric basis. The MPS mass increased linearly (MPS weight = 0.2787 BW- 123.67; R2 = 0.9935, P<0.001, n = 30). In the total phospholipids 62-63% unsaturated fatty acids were found irrespective of the diet. A negative allometric alteration was found for the total saturated acyl chains (B = -0.012), while a positive value for the calculated unsaturation index (B = 0.026) was obtained. Within the PUFA chains, the n3- n6 balance was markedly changed, on the favour of the n3 fatty acyl chains, namely competitive allometric trends were found for the total n3 (B = 0.087) and n6 (B = 0.032) fatty acid groups. The alterations of the TAG FA chain composition were diet-dependent. The serum creatine kinase activity increased by over one class of magnitude during the trial. The allometric approach was found to be powerful in the characterization of the basic, non diet-dependent ontogenic alterations of the phospholipid fatty acyl chain composition.

  15. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in children: focus on nutritional interventions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Min; Gong, Sitang; Ye, Shui Qing; Lyman, Beth; Geng, Lanlan; Chen, Peiyu; Li, Ding-You

    2014-10-28

    With increasing prevalence of childhood obesity, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has emerged as the most common cause of liver disease among children and adolescents in industrialized countries. It is generally recognized that both genetic and environmental risk factors contribute to the pathogenesis of NAFLD. Recently, there has been a growing body of evidence to implicate altered gut microbiota in the development of NAFLD through the gut-liver axis. The first line of prevention and treatment of NAFLD in children should be intensive lifestyle interventions such as changes in diet and physical activity. Recent advances have been focused on limitation of dietary fructose and supplementation of antioxidants, omega-3 fatty acids, and prebiotics/probiotics. Convincing evidences from both animal models and human studies have shown that reduction of dietary fructose and supplement of vitamin E, omega-3 fatty acids, and prebiotics/probiotics improve NAFLD.

  16. Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in Children: Focus on Nutritional Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Min; Gong, Sitang; Ye, Shui Qing; Lyman, Beth; Geng, Lanlan; Chen, Peiyu; Li, Ding-You

    2014-01-01

    With increasing prevalence of childhood obesity, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has emerged as the most common cause of liver disease among children and adolescents in industrialized countries. It is generally recognized that both genetic and environmental risk factors contribute to the pathogenesis of NAFLD. Recently, there has been a growing body of evidence to implicate altered gut microbiota in the development of NAFLD through the gut-liver axis. The first line of prevention and treatment of NAFLD in children should be intensive lifestyle interventions such as changes in diet and physical activity. Recent advances have been focused on limitation of dietary fructose and supplementation of antioxidants, omega-3 fatty acids, and prebiotics/probiotics. Convincing evidences from both animal models and human studies have shown that reduction of dietary fructose and supplement of vitamin E, omega-3 fatty acids, and prebiotics/probiotics improve NAFLD. PMID:25353664

  17. Suppression of interleukin 2-dependent human T cell growth in vitro by prostaglandin E (PGE) and their precursor fatty acids. Evidence for a PGE-independent mechanism of inhibition by the fatty acids.

    PubMed Central

    Santoli, D; Phillips, P D; Colt, T L; Zurier, R B

    1990-01-01

    PGE represent oxygenation products of polyunsaturated essential fatty acids and are important regulators of cell-mediated immune responses. Because oils enriched in such fatty acids reduce inflammation and tissue injury in vivo, we examined the effects of these PGE precursors on IL-2-driven growth of human T lymphocytes. Dihomogamma linoleic acid (DGLA), AA, and their metabolites (PGE1 and PGE2, respectively) strongly inhibited short- and long-term growth of IL-2-dependent T cell cultures; EPA was much less inhibitory and its product, PGE3, failed to suppress IL-2 responses. Short-term pretreatment of the cells with DGLA or AA and removal of the fatty acids before the proliferation assay resulted in a smaller reduction in [3H]TdR incorporation. PGE and fatty acids did not alter the number of high affinity IL-2 binding sites on the T cell cultures but reduced the percentage of cells expressing CD25 and HLA class II molecules. No PGE was detected in supernatants from the fatty acid-treated cultures. Moreover, indomethacin, a cyclooxygenase inhibitor, did not reverse the antiproliferative effects of the fatty acids. Together, these findings indicate that fatty acids can inhibit IL-2-driven T cell growth via a PGE-independent mechanism and might be relevant to inflammatory diseases associated with persistent T cell activation. Images PMID:2298918

  18. Dietary intake of ain-93 standard diet induces Fatty liver with altered hepatic fatty acid profile in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Farias Santos, Juliana; Suruagy Amaral, Monique; Lima Oliveira, Suzana; Porto Barbosa, Júnia; Rego Cabral-Jr, Cyro; Sofia Melo, Ingrid; Bezerra Bueno, Nassib; Duarte Freitas, Johnatan; Goulart Sant'ana, Antônio; Rocha Ataíde, Terezinha

    2015-05-01

    Introducción: En la investigación científica, hay varias dietas estándar para los animales, generalmente concebidas por instituciones científicas. La dieta AIN-93 es ampliamente utilizada, pero hay algunos informes de esteatosis hepática en ratones Wistar alimentadas con esta dieta. Objetivo: Evaluar las repercusiones hepáticas de la ingesta de la dieta estándar AIN-93 en ratones Wistar. Métodos: Cuarenta recién destetados, ratones Wistar machos, con 21 días de edad fueron alimentados con la dieta AIN-93 o una dieta comercial, durante 1 mes o 4 meses. El aumento de peso, la bioquímica sérica, la histología hepática y el perfil de ácidos grasos hepáticos fueron analizados. Resultados: Se observó esteatosis hepática, especialmente en el grupo alimentado con la dieta AIN-93. Glucosa en suero, peso absoluto y relativo del hígado y los niveles hepáticos de ácidos grasos oleico, palmitoleico, esteárico y palmítico se relacionaron con la esteatosis observada, mientras el lipidograma y los marcadores sanguíneos de la función hepática, no se relacionaron. Conclusión: La dieta estándar AIN-93 causó esteatosis hepática aguda en ratones Wistar, que puede comprometer su uso como una dieta estándar para los estudios experimentales con roedores. El perfil de ácidos grasos hepáticos se asoció con la esteatosis, con posibles implicaciones para el pronóstico de la enfermedad.

  19. Transformation with Oncogenic Ras and the Simian Virus 40 T Antigens Induces Caspase-Dependent Sensitivity to Fatty Acid Biosynthetic Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Shihao; Spencer, Cody M.

    2015-01-01

    drive the transformation of normal cells to the cancerous state. These oncogenic alterations induce metabolic changes and dependencies that can be targeted to kill cancerous cells. Here, we find that the cellular transformation resulting from combined expression of the SV40 early region with an oncogenic Ras allele is sufficient to induce cellular susceptibility to fatty acid biosynthetic inhibition. Inhibition of fatty acid biosynthesis in these cells resulted in programmed cell death, which could be rescued by supplementing the medium with nonsaturated fatty acids. Similar results were observed with the expression of oncogenic Ras in nontransformed breast epithelial cells. Combined, our results suggest that specific oncogenic alleles induce metabolic dependencies that can be exploited to selectively kill cancerous cells. PMID:25855740

  20. Biochemical studies on cell fusion. II. Control of fusion response by lipid alteration

    PubMed Central

    1985-01-01

    The preceding communication (Roos, D.S. and P.W. Choppin, 1985, J. Cell Biol. 101:1578-1590) described the lipid composition of a series of mouse fibroblast cell lines which vary in susceptibility to the fusogenic effects of polyethylene glycol (PEG). Two alterations in lipid content were found to be directly correlated with resistance to PEG-induced cell fusion: increases in fatty acyl chain saturation, and the elevation of neutral glycerides, including an unusual ether-linked compound. In this study, we have probed the association between lipid composition and cell fusion through the use of fatty acid supplements to the cellular growth medium, and show that the fusibility of cells can be controlled by altering their acyl chain composition. The parental Clone 1D cells contain moderately unsaturated fatty acids with a ratio of saturates to polyunsaturates (S/P) approximately 1 and fuse virtually to completion following a standard PEG treatment. By contrast, the lipids of a highly fusion-resistant mutant cell line, F40, are highly saturated (S/P approximately 4). When the S/P ratio of Clone 1D cells was increased to approximate that normally found in F40 cells by growth in the presence of high concentrations of saturated fatty acids, they became highly resistant to PEG. Reduction of the S/P ratio of F40 cells by growth in cis-polyunsaturated fatty acids rendered them susceptible to fusion. Cell lines F8, F16, etc., which are normally intermediate between Clone 1D and F40 in both lipid composition and fusion response, can be altered in either direction (towards either increased or decreased susceptibility to fusion) by the addition of appropriate fatty acids to the growth medium. Although trans-unsaturated fatty acids have phase-transition temperatures roughly similar to saturated compounds, and might therefore be expected to affect membrane fluidity in a similar manner, trans-unsaturated fatty acids exerted the same effect as cis-unsaturates on the control of PEG

  1. Plasma fatty acids profile and estimated elongase and desaturases activities in Tunisian patients with the metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sethom, M M; Fares, S; Feki, M; Hadj-Taieb, S; Elasmi, M; Omar, S; Sanhaji, H; Jemaa, R; Kaabachi, N

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to determine plasma fatty acids pattern and to estimate desaturases activities in Tunisian subjects with metabolic syndrome (MetS). A total of 1975 adults were randomly selected from the Great Tunis region (Tunisia). MetS was defined according to the International Diabetes Federation criteria. Saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids levels and delta 9 desaturase activity were increased, but polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) levels and delta 5 desaturase activity were decreased in patients with MetS. Using multivariate analysis, MetS was found inversely associated with PUFA; compared to first quartile, multi-adjusted odd ratios (95% confidence interval) of MetS were 0.80 (0.54-1.17), 0.47 (0.27-0.81) and 0.32 (0.15-0.68) for second, third and fourth quartiles of PUFA, respectively. Altered fatty acids pattern in MetS is likely related to both dietary and metabolic changes. PMID:21782403

  2. Mental retardation is associated with plasma omega-3 fatty acid levels and the omega-3/omega-6 ratio in children.

    PubMed

    Neggers, Yasmin H; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Song, Ju-Mi; Chung, Eun-Jung; Um, Young-Sook; Park, Taesun

    2009-01-01

    There is evidence that alteration in plasma fatty acid composition may play a role in certain neurological disorders. This case control study was conducted to evaluate the association between plasma fatty acid levels and mental retardation in Korean children. Plasma phospholipid fatty acids, plasma lipids, dietary fatty acids and selected nutrients were measured in 31 mentally retarded boys (mean age 9.93 +/-1.5 yrs) and matched controls. Total plasma omega-3 fatty acids (Sigmaw3), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and high density lipoprotein (HDL) concentrations were significantly lower and the Sigmaomega-6/Sigmaomega-3 ratio was significantly higher in cases than in controls. The odds in favor of mental retardation increased by 69 % for each unit increase in the Sigmaomega-6/ Sigmaomega-3 ratio (adjusted odds ratio = 1.69, 95% CI = 1.25-2.29). Significant variation in plasma Sigmaomega-3 and the Sigmaomega-6/ Sigmaomega-3 ratio was explained by mental retardation and plasma HDL concentrations (45% and 37 % respectively). There was a significant inverse association between plasma DHA and mental retardation. For each unit increase in plasma DHA, odds of mental retardation decreased by 74 %. There was no significant difference in either total dietary fat or fatty acids intakes between cases and controls. The energy intake of cases was significantly higher than the controls. These results suggest that proportion of plasma Sigmaomega-3 fatty acids, particularly, DHA, and the Sigmaomega-6/ Sigmaomega-3 ratio are associated with mental retardation in children in this study. PMID:19329391

  3. Fatty acid profile of cheese from dairy goats fed a diet enriched with castor, sesame and faveleira vegetable oils.

    PubMed

    Medeiros, Ertha; Queiroga, Rita; Oliveira, Maria; Medeiros, Ariosvaldo; Sabedot, Mayara; Bomfim, Marco; Madruga, Marta

    2014-01-15

    The addition of vegetable oils to the diets of dairy goats is an alternative to supplemental feeding during the dry period and improves the lipid profile of milk and by-products. Cheeses were produced using milk from cross bred goats (Saanen×Alpina) fed diets enriched with 4% vegetable oil (faveleira, sesame or castor), the fatty acid profile of cheeses was studied. Supplementation with vegetable oils did not increase the total fat percentage of the cheese (p≥0.05) but did increase the percentage of CLA isomers, long-chain fatty acids (LCFA) and polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA); in addition, the index of desirable fatty acids (DFA--expressed as the sum of unsaturated fatty acids plus stearic acid) was increased for cheese made from milk from goats fed sesame or faveleira oil. Cheeses may have had increased percentages of cis-9,trans-11-CLA due to the supplementation of animal diets with vegetable oils rich in C18:2, such as faveleira and sesame oils. The fatty acid profile of goat cheese did not change significantly in response to the use of castor oil. Thus, the addition of sesame and faveleira oils to goat diets positively altered the fatty acid profile, which improved the nutritional characteristics of the fat present in goat cheese.

  4. Mental retardation is associated with plasma omega-3 fatty acid levels and the omega-3/omega-6 ratio in children.

    PubMed

    Neggers, Yasmin H; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Song, Ju-Mi; Chung, Eun-Jung; Um, Young-Sook; Park, Taesun

    2009-01-01

    There is evidence that alteration in plasma fatty acid composition may play a role in certain neurological disorders. This case control study was conducted to evaluate the association between plasma fatty acid levels and mental retardation in Korean children. Plasma phospholipid fatty acids, plasma lipids, dietary fatty acids and selected nutrients were measured in 31 mentally retarded boys (mean age 9.93 +/-1.5 yrs) and matched controls. Total plasma omega-3 fatty acids (Sigmaw3), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and high density lipoprotein (HDL) concentrations were significantly lower and the Sigmaomega-6/Sigmaomega-3 ratio was significantly higher in cases than in controls. The odds in favor of mental retardation increased by 69 % for each unit increase in the Sigmaomega-6/ Sigmaomega-3 ratio (adjusted odds ratio = 1.69, 95% CI = 1.25-2.29). Significant variation in plasma Sigmaomega-3 and the Sigmaomega-6/ Sigmaomega-3 ratio was explained by mental retardation and plasma HDL concentrations (45% and 37 % respectively). There was a significant inverse association between plasma DHA and mental retardation. For each unit increase in plasma DHA, odds of mental retardation decreased by 74 %. There was no significant difference in either total dietary fat or fatty acids intakes between cases and controls. The energy intake of cases was significantly higher than the controls. These results suggest that proportion of plasma Sigmaomega-3 fatty acids, particularly, DHA, and the Sigmaomega-6/ Sigmaomega-3 ratio are associated with mental retardation in children in this study.

  5. Molecular Mechanisms of Alcoholic Fatty Liver

    PubMed Central

    Purohit, Vishnudutt; Gao, Bin; Song, Byoung-Joon

    2009-01-01

    Alcoholic fatty liver is a potentially pathologic condition which can progress to steatohepatitis, fibrosis, and cirrhosis if alcohol consumption is continued. Alcohol exposure may induce fatty liver by increasing NADH/NAD+ ratio, increasing sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1 (SREBP-1) activity, decreasing peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α (PPAR-α) activity, and increasing complement C3 hepatic levels. Alcohol may increase SREBP-1 activity by decreasing the activities of AMP-activated protein kinase and sirtuin-1. Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) produced in response to alcohol exposure may cause fatty liver by up-regulating SREBP-1 activity, whereas betaine and pioglitazone may attenuate fatty liver by down-regulating SREBP-1 activity. PPAR-α agonists have potentials to attenuate alcoholic fatty liver. Adiponectin and interleukin-6 may attenuate alcoholic fatty liver by up-regulating PPAR-α and insulin signaling pathways while down-regulating SREBP-1 activity, and suppressing TNF-α production. Recent studies show that paracrine activation of hepatic cannabinoid receptor 1 by hepatic stellate cell-derived endocannabinoids also contributes to the development of alcoholic fatty liver. Furthermore, oxidative modifications and inactivation of the enzymes involved in the mitochondrial and/or peroxisomal β-oxidation of fatty acids could contribute to fat accumulation in the liver. PMID:19032584

  6. Physiological activities of hydroxyl fatty acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the search of value-added products from surplus soybean oil, we produced many new hydroxy fatty acids through microbial bioconversion. Hydroxy fatty acids are used in a wide range of industrial products, such as resins, waxes, nylons plastics, lubricants, cosmetics, and additives in coatings and...

  7. Nickel inhibits mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation.

    PubMed

    Uppala, Radha; McKinney, Richard W; Brant, Kelly A; Fabisiak, James P; Goetzman, Eric S

    2015-08-01

    Nickel exposure is associated with changes in cellular energy metabolism which may contribute to its carcinogenic properties. Here, we demonstrate that nickel strongly represses mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation-the pathway by which fatty acids are catabolized for energy-in both primary human lung fibroblasts and mouse embryonic fibroblasts. At the concentrations used, nickel suppresses fatty acid oxidation without globally suppressing mitochondrial function as evidenced by increased glucose oxidation to CO2. Pre-treatment with l-carnitine, previously shown to prevent nickel-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in neuroblastoma cells, did not prevent the inhibition of fatty acid oxidation. The effect of nickel on fatty acid oxidation occurred only with prolonged exposure (>5 h), suggesting that direct inhibition of the active sites of metabolic enzymes is not the mechanism of action. Nickel is a known hypoxia-mimetic that activates hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF1α). Nickel-induced inhibition of fatty acid oxidation was blunted in HIF1α knockout fibroblasts, implicating HIF1α as one contributor to the mechanism. Additionally, nickel down-regulated the protein levels of the key fatty acid oxidation enzyme very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (VLCAD) in a dose-dependent fashion. In conclusion, inhibition of fatty acid oxidation by nickel, concurrent with increased glucose metabolism, represents a form of metabolic reprogramming that may contribute to nickel-induced carcinogenesis.

  8. Phylogenomic reconstruction of archaeal fatty acid metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Dibrova, Daria V.; Galperin, Michael Y.; Mulkidjanian, Armen Y.

    2014-01-01

    While certain archaea appear to synthesize and/or metabolize fatty acids, the respective pathways still remain obscure. By analyzing the genomic distribution of the key lipid-related enzymes, we were able to identify the likely components of the archaeal pathway of fatty acid metabolism, namely, a combination of the enzymes of bacterial-type β-oxidation of fatty acids (acyl-CoA-dehydrogenase, enoyl-CoA hydratase, and 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase) with paralogs of the archaeal acetyl-CoA C-acetyltransferase, an enzyme of the mevalonate biosynthesis pathway. These three β-oxidation enzymes working in the reverse direction could potentially catalyze biosynthesis of fatty acids, with paralogs of acetyl-CoA C-acetyltransferase performing addition of C2 fragments. The presence in archaea of the genes for energy-transducing membrane enzyme complexes, such as cytochrome bc complex, cytochrome c oxidase, and diverse rhodopsins, was found to correlate with the presence of the proposed system of fatty acid biosynthesis. We speculate that because these membrane complexes functionally depend on fatty acid chains, their genes could have been acquired via lateral gene transfer from bacteria only by those archaea that already possessed a system of fatty acid biosynthesis. The proposed pathway of archaeal fatty acid metabolism operates in extreme conditions and therefore might be of interest in the context of biofuel production and other industrial applications. PMID:24818264

  9. Nickel Inhibits Mitochondrial Fatty Acid Oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Uppala, Radha; McKinney, Richard W.; Brant, Kelly A.; Fabisiak, James P.; Goetzman, Eric S.

    2015-01-01

    Nickel exposure is associated with changes in cellular energy metabolism which may contribute to its carcinogenic properties. Here, we demonstrate that nickel strongly represses mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation—the pathway by which fatty acids are catabolized for energy—in both primary human lung fibroblasts and mouse embryonic fibroblasts. At the concentrations used, nickel suppresses fatty acid oxidation without globally suppressing mitochondrial function as evidenced by increased glucose oxidation to CO2. Pre-treatment with L-carnitine, previously shown to prevent nickel-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in neuroblastoma cells, did not prevent the inhibition of fatty acid oxidation. The effect of nickel on fatty acid oxidation occurred only with prolonged exposure (>5 hr), suggesting that direct inhibition of the active sites of metabolic enzymes is not the mechanism of action. Nickel is a known hypoxia-mimetic that activates hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF1α). Nickel-induced inhibition of fatty acid oxidation was blunted in HIF1α knockout fibroblasts, implicating HIF1α as one contributor to the mechanism. Additionally, nickel down-regulated the protein levels of the key fatty acid oxidation enzyme very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (VLCAD) in a dose-dependent fashion. In conclusion, inhibition of fatty acid oxidation by nickel, concurrent with increased glucose metabolism, represents a form of metabolic reprogramming that may contribute to nickel-induced carcinogenesis. PMID:26051273

  10. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Lynne

    2016-08-24

    Essential facts Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is an excess of fat in the liver that is not the result of excessive alcohol consumption or other secondary causes, such as hepatitis C. According to the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence, fatty liver - steatosis - affects between 20% and 30% of the population and its prevalence is increasing. PMID:27641564

  11. 21 CFR 172.860 - Fatty acids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Fatty acids. 172.860 Section 172.860 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Multipurpose Additives § 172.860 Fatty...

  12. Historical perspectives on fatty acid chemistry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fatty acids are basic renewable chemical building blocks that can be used as intermediates for a multitude of products. Today the global value of fatty acids exceeds 18 billion dollars and is expected to increase to nearly 26 billion over the period from 2014-2019. From it auspicious beginnings, the...

  13. Fatty Aldehyde and Fatty Alcohol Metabolism: Review and Importance for Epidermal Structure and Function

    PubMed Central

    Rizzo, William B.

    2014-01-01

    Normal fatty aldehyde and alcohol metabolism is essential for epidermal differentiation and function. Long-chain aldehydes are produced by catabolism of several lipids including fatty alcohols, sphingolipids, ether glycerolipids, isoprenoid alcohols and certain aliphatic lipids that undergo α- or ω-oxidation. The fatty aldehyde generated by these pathways is chiefly metabolized to fatty acid by fatty aldehyde dehydrogenase (FALDH, alternately known as ALDH3A2), which also functions to oxidize fatty alcohols as a component of the fatty alcohol:NAD oxidoreductase (FAO) enzyme complex. Genetic deficiency of FALDH/FAO in patients with Sjögren-Larsson syndrome (SLS) results in accumulation of fatty aldehydes, fatty alcohols and related lipids (ether glycerolipids, wax esters) in cultured keratinocytes. These biochemical changes are associated with abnormalities in formation of lamellar bodies in the stratum granulosum and impaired delivery of their precursor membranes to the stratum corneum (SC). The defective extracellular SC membranes are responsible for a leaky epidermal water barrier and ichthyosis. Although lamellar bodies appear to be the pathogenic target for abnormal fatty aldehyde/alcohol metabolism in SLS, the precise biochemical mechanisms are yet to be elucidated. Nevertheless, studies in SLS highlight the critical importance of FALDH and normal fatty aldehyde/alcohol metabolism for epidermal function. PMID:24036493

  14. Bactericidal activity of the human skin fatty acid cis-6-hexadecanoic acid on Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Cartron, Michaël L; England, Simon R; Chiriac, Alina Iulia; Josten, Michaele; Turner, Robert; Rauter, Yvonne; Hurd, Alexander; Sahl, Hans-Georg; Jones, Simon; Foster, Simon J

    2014-07-01

    Human skin fatty acids are a potent aspect of our innate defenses, giving surface protection against potentially invasive organisms. They provide an important parameter in determining the ecology of the skin microflora, and alterations can lead to increased colonization by pathogens such as Staphylococcus aureus. Harnessing skin fatty acids may also give a new avenue of exploration in the generation of control measures against drug-resistant organisms. Despite their importance, the mechanism(s) whereby skin fatty acids kill bacteria has remained largely elusive. Here, we describe an analysis of the bactericidal effects of the major human skin fatty acid cis-6-hexadecenoic acid (C6H) on the human commensal and pathogen S. aureus. Several C6H concentration-dependent mechanisms were found. At high concentrations, C6H swiftly kills cells associated with a general loss of membrane integrity. However, C6H still kills at lower concentrations, acting through disruption of the proton motive force, an increase in membrane fluidity, and its effects on electron transfer. The design of analogues with altered bactericidal effects has begun to determine the structural constraints on activity and paves the way for the rational design of new antistaphylococcal agents.

  15. Autistic Children Exhibit Decreased Levels of Essential Fatty Acids in Red Blood Cells

    PubMed Central

    Brigandi, Sarah A.; Shao, Hong; Qian, Steven Y.; Shen, Yiping; Wu, Bai-Lin; Kang, Jing X.

    2015-01-01

    Omega-6 (n-6) and omega-3 (n-3) polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) are essential nutrients for brain development and function. However, whether or not the levels of these fatty acids are altered in individuals with autism remains debatable. In this study, we compared the fatty acid contents between 121 autistic patients and 110 non-autistic, non-developmentally delayed controls, aged 3–17. Analysis of the fatty acid composition of red blood cell (RBC) membrane phospholipids showed that the percentage of total PUFA was lower in autistic patients than in controls; levels of n-6 arachidonic acid (AA) and n-3 docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) were particularly decreased (p < 0.001). In addition, plasma levels of the pro-inflammatory AA metabolite prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) were higher in a subset of the autistic participants (n = 20) compared to controls. Our study demonstrates an alteration in the PUFA profile and increased production of a PUFA-derived metabolite in autistic patients, supporting the hypothesis that abnormal lipid metabolism is implicated in autism. PMID:25946342

  16. Polyunsaturated fatty acids affect the localization and signaling of PIP3/AKT in prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Gu, Zhennan; Wu, Jiansheng; Wang, Shihua; Suburu, Janel; Chen, Haiqin; Thomas, Michael J; Shi, Lihong; Edwards, Iris J; Berquin, Isabelle M; Chen, Yong Q

    2013-09-01

    AKT is a serine-threonine protein kinase that plays important roles in cell growth, proliferation and apoptosis. It is activated after binding to phosphatidylinositol phosphates (PIPs) with phosphate groups at positions 3,4 and 3,4,5 on the inositol ring. In spite of extensive research on AKT, one aspect has been largely overlooked, namely the role of the fatty acid chains on PIPs. PIPs are phospholipids composed of a glycerol backbone with fatty acids at the sn-1 and sn-2 position and inositol at the sn-3 position. Here, we show that polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) modify phospholipid content. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), an ω3 PUFA, can replace the fatty acid at the sn-2 position of the glycerol backbone, thereby changing the species of phospholipids. DHA also inhibits AKT(T308) but not AKT(S473) phosphorylation, alters PI(3,4,5)P3 (PIP3) and phospho-AKT(S473) protein localization, decreases pPDPK1(S241)-AKT and AKT-BAD interaction and suppresses prostate tumor growth. Our study highlights a potential novel mechanism of cancer inhibition by ω3 PUFA through alteration of PIP3 and AKT localization and affecting the AKT signaling pathway.

  17. Bactericidal Activity of the Human Skin Fatty Acid cis-6-Hexadecanoic Acid on Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Cartron, Michaël L.; England, Simon R.; Chiriac, Alina Iulia; Josten, Michaele; Turner, Robert; Rauter, Yvonne; Hurd, Alexander; Sahl, Hans-Georg; Jones, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Human skin fatty acids are a potent aspect of our innate defenses, giving surface protection against potentially invasive organisms. They provide an important parameter in determining the ecology of the skin microflora, and alterations can lead to increased colonization by pathogens such as Staphylococcus aureus. Harnessing skin fatty acids may also give a new avenue of exploration in the generation of control measures against drug-resistant organisms. Despite their importance, the mechanism(s) whereby skin fatty acids kill bacteria has remained largely elusive. Here, we describe an analysis of the bactericidal effects of the major human skin fatty acid cis-6-hexadecenoic acid (C6H) on the human commensal and pathogen S. aureus. Several C6H concentration-dependent mechanisms were found. At high concentrations, C6H swiftly kills cells associated with a general loss of membrane integrity. However, C6H still kills at lower concentrations, acting through disruption of the proton motive force, an increase in membrane fluidity, and its effects on electron transfer. The design of analogues with altered bactericidal effects has begun to determine the structural constraints on activity and paves the way for the rational design of new antistaphylococcal agents. PMID:24709265

  18. [Role of the endocrine system in the pathogenesis of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease].

    PubMed

    Hagymási, Krisztina; Reismann, Péter; Rácz, Károly; Tulassay, Zsolt

    2009-11-29

    The most frequent liver disorder in metabolic syndrome is the nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Its pathogenesis is a complex, multifactorial process, characterized by insulin resistance and involvement of the endocrine system. Hypothyroidism may lead to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis via hyperlipidemia and obesity. Adult patients with growth hormone deficiency have a metabolic syndrome-like phenotype with obesity and many characteristic metabolic alterations. The chronic activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis results in metabolic syndrome as well. Cushing's syndrome has also features of metabolic syndrome. Mild elevation of transaminase activities is commonly seen in patients with adrenal failure. Non-alcoholic steatosis is twice as common in postmenopusal as in premenopausal women and hormonal replacement therapy decreases the risk of steatosis. Insulin resistance, diabetes mellitus type 2, sleeping apnoe syndrome, cardiovascular disorders and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease are more frequent in polycystic ovary syndrome. Hypoandrogenism in males and hyperandrogenism in females may lead to fatty liver via obesity and insulin resistance. Adipokines (leptin, acylation stimulating protein, adiponectin) have a potential role in the pathogenesis of nonalcoholic fatty liver. The alterations of endocrine system must be considered in the background of cryptogenic liver diseases. The endocrine perspective may help the therapeutic approaches in the future. PMID:19923096

  19. [Role of the endocrine system in the pathogenesis of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease].

    PubMed

    Hagymási, Krisztina; Reismann, Péter; Rácz, Károly; Tulassay, Zsolt

    2009-11-29

    The most frequent liver disorder in metabolic syndrome is the nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Its pathogenesis is a complex, multifactorial process, characterized by insulin resistance and involvement of the endocrine system. Hypothyroidism may lead to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis via hyperlipidemia and obesity. Adult patients with growth hormone deficiency have a metabolic syndrome-like phenotype with obesity and many characteristic metabolic alterations. The chronic activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis results in metabolic syndrome as well. Cushing's syndrome has also features of metabolic syndrome. Mild elevation of transaminase activities is commonly seen in patients with adrenal failure. Non-alcoholic steatosis is twice as common in postmenopusal as in premenopausal women and hormonal replacement therapy decreases the risk of steatosis. Insulin resistance, diabetes mellitus type 2, sleeping apnoe syndrome, cardiovascular disorders and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease are more frequent in polycystic ovary syndrome. Hypoandrogenism in males and hyperandrogenism in females may lead to fatty liver via obesity and insulin resistance. Adipokines (leptin, acylation stimulating protein, adiponectin) have a potential role in the pathogenesis of nonalcoholic fatty liver. The alterations of endocrine system must be considered in the background of cryptogenic liver diseases. The endocrine perspective may help the therapeutic approaches in the future.

  20. Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid-Derived Lipid Mediators and T Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Nicolaou, Anna; Mauro, Claudio; Urquhart, Paula; Marelli-Berg, Federica

    2014-01-01

    Fatty acids are involved in T cell biology both as nutrients important for energy production as well as signaling molecules. In particular, polyunsaturated fatty acids are known to exhibit a range of immunomodulatory properties that progress through T cell mediated events, although the molecular mechanisms of these actions have not yet been fully elucidated. Some of these immune activities are linked to polyunsaturated fatty acid-induced alteration of the composition of cellular membranes and the consequent changes in signaling pathways linked to membrane raft-associated proteins. However, significant aspects of the polyunsaturated fatty acid bioactivities are mediated through their transformation to specific lipid mediators, products of cyclooxygenase, lipoxygenase, or cytochrome P450 enzymatic reactions. Resulting bioactive metabolites including prostaglandins, leukotrienes, and endocannabinoids are produced by and/or act upon T leukocytes through cell surface receptors and have been shown to alter T cell activation and differentiation, proliferation, cytokine production, motility, and homing events. Detailed appreciation of the mode of action of these lipids presents opportunities for the design and development of therapeutic strategies aimed at regulating T cell function. PMID:24611066

  1. Fatty acids, calcium soaps of fatty acids, and cottonseeds fed to high yielding cows.

    PubMed

    Sklan, D; Ashkenazi, R; Braun, A; Devorin, A; Tabori, K

    1992-09-01

    We examined the effects of dietary fat as cottonseed, fatty acids, or calcium soaps of fatty acids in the rations of high yielding lactating cows receiving low forage. Experiments were with isoenergetic, isonitrogenous diets containing equal amounts of forage. Inclusion of up to 510 g/d of fatty acids in the ration enhanced FCM yield. With cottonseed, increased FCM was mainly due to increased fat yield. Dietary fatty acids tended to increase milk in mid and late lactation and to decrease fat percentage. Calcium soaps of fatty acids enhanced FCM, particularly in early lactation. Feeding cottonseed and fatty acids together did not enhance yield. Effects described may be attributed in part to changes in ruminal fermentation in which cottonseed increased acetate concentrations and fatty acids decreased the ratio of acetate and butyrate to propionate and in part to enhanced efficiency of milk yield when fat was included in the ration.

  2. Fatty acids in bovine milk fat

    PubMed Central

    Månsson, Helena Lindmark

    2008-01-01

    Milk fat contains approximately 400 different fatty acid, which make it the most complex of all natural fats. The milk fatty acids are derived almost equally from two sources, the feed and the microbial activity in the rumen of the cow and the lipids in bovine milk are mainly present in globules as an oil-in-water emulsion. Almost 70% of the fat in Swedish milk is saturated of which around 11% comprises short-chain fatty acids, almost half of which is butyric acid. Approximately 25% of the fatty acids in milk are mono-unsaturated and 2.3% are poly-unsaturated with omega-6/omega-3 ratio around 2.3. Approximately 2.7% are trans fatty acids. PMID:19109654

  3. Trans fatty acid intake and emotion regulation.

    PubMed

    Holt, Megan E; Lee, Jerry W; Morton, Kelly R; Tonstad, Serena

    2015-06-01

    We examined whether there is a relationship between trans fatty acid intakes and emotion regulation, mediated by positive or negative affect. Archival data on 1699 men and 3293 women were used to measure trans fatty acid intake at baseline, positive, and negative affects and emotion regulation at follow-up. Higher trans fatty acid intake related to subsequent difficulties with emotional awareness (p = 0.045), clarity (p = 0.012), and regulation strategies (p = 0.009). Affect mediated these relationships. Lower trans fatty acid intake associated with increased positive and decreased negative affects which, in turn, associated with improved emotion regulation. Trans fatty acid intakes may be associated with subsequent ability to regulate emotions.

  4. Circulating concentrations of non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA) as mediators of the innate immune response in cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We previously reported that temperamental cattle have greater non-esterified fatty acid (NEFA) concentrations and an altered innate immune response compared to calm cattle. Therefore, this trial was designed to determine if increasing energy availability via a lipid infusion or bolus dextrose inject...

  5. Directed evolution increases desaturation of a cyanobacterial fatty acid desaturase in eukaryotic expression systems.

    PubMed

    Bai, Shuangyi; Wallis, James G; Denolf, Peter; Browse, John

    2016-07-01

    Directed evolution of a cyanobacterial Δ9 fatty acid desaturase (DSG) from Synechococcus elongatus, PCC6301 created new, more productive desaturases and revealed the importance of certain amino acid residues to increased desaturation. A codon-optimized DSG open reading frame with an endoplasmic-reticulum retention/retrieval signal appended was used as template for random mutagenesis. Increased desaturation was detected using a novel screen based on complementation of the unsaturated fatty acid auxotrophy of Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant ole1Δ. Amino acid residues whose importance was discovered by the random processes were further examined by saturation mutation to determine the best amino acid at each identified location in the peptide chain and by combinatorial analysis. One frequently-detected single amino acid change, Q240R, yielded a nearly 25-fold increase in total desaturation in S. cerevisiae. Several other variants of the protein sequence with multiple amino acid changes increased total desaturation more than 60-fold. Many changes leading to increased desaturation were in the vicinity of the canonical histidine-rich regions known to be critical for electron transfer mediated by these di-iron proteins. Expression of these evolved proteins in the seed of Arabidopsis thaliana altered the fatty acid composition, increasing monounsaturated fatty acids and decreasing the level of saturated fatty acid, suggesting a potential application of these desaturases in oilseed crops. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 1522-1530. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26724425

  6. Mechanisms of hepatic triglyceride accumulation in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Kawano, Yuki; Cohen, David E

    2013-04-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is characterized by hepatic lipid accumulation in the absence of excess alcohol intake. NAFLD is the most common chronic liver disease, and ongoing research efforts are focused on understanding the underlying pathobiology of hepatic steatosis with the anticipation that these efforts will identify novel therapeutic targets. Under physiological conditions, the low steady-state triglyceride concentrations in the liver are attributable to a precise balance between acquisition by uptake of non-esterified fatty acids from the plasma and by de novo lipogenesis, versus triglyceride disposal by fatty acid oxidation and by the secretion of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins. In NAFLD patients, insulin resistance leads to hepatic steatosis by multiple mechanisms. Greater uptake rates of plasma non-esterified fatty acids are attributable to increased release from an expanded mass of adipose tissue as a consequence of diminished insulin responsiveness. Hyperinsulinemia promotes the transcriptional upregulation of genes that promote de novo lipogenesis in the liver. Increased hepatic lipid accumulation is not offset by fatty acid oxidation or by increased secretion rates of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins. This review discusses the molecular mechanisms by which hepatic triglyceride homeostasis is achieved under normal conditions, as well as the metabolic alterations that occur in the setting of insulin resistance and contribute to the pathogenesis of NAFLD. PMID:23397118

  7. Fatty acid esters produced by Lasiodiplodia theobromae function as growth regulators in tobacco seedlings.

    PubMed

    Uranga, Carla C; Beld, Joris; Mrse, Anthony; Córdova-Guerrero, Iván; Burkart, Michael D; Hernández-Martínez, Rufina

    2016-04-01

    The Botryosphaeriaceae are a family of trunk disease fungi that cause dieback and death of various plant hosts. This work sought to characterize fatty acid derivatives in a highly virulent member of this family, Lasiodiplodia theobromae. Nuclear magnetic resonance and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry of an isolated compound revealed (Z, Z)-9,12-ethyl octadecadienoate, (trivial name ethyl linoleate), as one of the most abundant fatty acid esters produced by L. theobromae. A variety of naturally produced esters of fatty acids were identified in Botryosphaeriaceae. In comparison, the production of fatty acid esters in the soil-borne tomato pathogen Fusarium oxysporum, and the non-phytopathogenic fungus Trichoderma asperellum was found to be limited. Ethyl linoleate, ethyl hexadecanoate (trivial name ethyl palmitate), and ethyl octadecanoate, (trivial name ethyl stearate), significantly inhibited tobacco seed germination and altered seedling leaf growth patterns and morphology at the highest concentration (0.2 mg/mL) tested, while ethyl linoleate and ethyl stearate significantly enhanced growth at low concentrations, with both still inducing growth at 98 ng/mL. This work provides new insights into the role of naturally esterified fatty acids from L. theobromae as plant growth regulators with similar activity to the well-known plant growth regulator gibberellic acid.

  8. Changes in fatty acid composition in plant tissues expressing a mammalian delta9 desaturase.

    PubMed

    Moon, H; Hazebroek, J; Hildebrand, D F

    2000-05-01

    Plant tissues expressing a mammalian stearoyl-CoA delta9 desaturase were reported to accumulate delta9 hexadecenoic acid (16:1), normally very minor in most plant tissues. The transgenic plants were thoroughly analyzed for alterations of individual lipids in different subcellular sites. Western blot analysis indicated that the animal desaturase was targeted to the microsomes. The delta9 16:1 was incorporated into both the sn-1 and sn-2 positions of all the major membrane lipids tested, indicating that the endoplasmic reticulum acyltransferases do not exclude unsaturated C16 fatty acids from the sn-2 position. In addition to increases in monounsaturated and decreases in saturated fatty acids, accumulation of 16:1 was accompanied by a reduction in 18:3 in all the lipids tested except phosphatidylglycerol, and increases in 18:2 in phospholipids. Total C16 fatty acid content in the galactolipids of the transgenics was significantly higher than that in the control, but those in the phospholipids were unchanged. In transgenics, delta11 18:1 was detected in the sn-1 position of the lipids tested except phosphatidylinositol and phosphatidylserine. Introduction of the animal desaturase, controlled by a seed-specific phaseolin promoter, into soybean somatic embryo resulted in a significant reduction in saturated fatty acids. Such effects were greater in cotyledons than hypocotyl-radicles. This study demonstrated that the animal desaturase can be used to decrease the levels of saturated fatty acids in a crop plant. PMID:10907781

  9. A systemic review of the roles of n-3 fatty acids in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Riediger, Natalie D; Othman, Rgia A; Suh, Miyoung; Moghadasian, Mohammed H

    2009-04-01

    Attention to the role of n-3 long-chain fatty acids in human health and disease has been continuously increased during recent decades. Many clinical and epidemiologic studies have shown positive roles for n-3 fatty acids in infant development; cancer; cardiovascular diseases; and more recently, in various mental illnesses, including depression, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, and dementia. These fatty acids are known to have pleiotropic effects, including effects against inflammation, platelet aggregation, hypertension, and hyperlipidemia. These beneficial effects may be mediated through several distinct mechanisms, including alterations in cell membrane composition and function, gene expression, or eicosanoid production. A number of authorities have recently recommended increases in intakes of n-3 fatty acids by the general population. To comply with this recommendation a variety of food products, most notably eggs, yogurt, milk, and spreads have been enriched with these fatty acids. Ongoing research will further determine the tissue distribution, biological effects, cost-effectiveness, and consumer acceptability of such enriched products. Furthermore, additional controlled clinical trials are needed to document whether long-term consumption or supplementation with eicosapentaenoic acid/docosahexaenoic acid or the plant-derived counterpart (alpha-linolenic acid) results in better quality of life.

  10. Deficiency of intestinal mucin-2 protects mice from diet-induced fatty liver disease and obesity.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Phillipp; Seebauer, Caroline T; Mazagova, Magdalena; Horvath, Angela; Wang, Lirui; Llorente, Cristina; Varki, Nissi M; Brandl, Katharina; Ho, Samuel B; Schnabl, Bernd

    2016-03-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and obesity are characterized by altered gut microbiota, inflammation, and gut barrier dysfunction. Here, we investigated the role of mucin-2 (Muc2) as the major component of the intestinal mucus layer in the development of fatty liver disease and obesity. We studied experimental fatty liver disease and obesity induced by feeding wild-type and Muc2-knockout mice a high-fat diet (HFD) for 16 wk. Muc2 deficiency protected mice from HFD-induced fatty liver disease and obesity. Compared with wild-type mice, after a 16-wk HFD, Muc2-knockout mice exhibited better glucose homeostasis, reduced inflammation, and upregulated expression of genes involved in lipolysis and fatty acid β-oxidation in white adipose tissue. Compared with wild-type mice that were fed the HFD as well, Muc2-knockout mice also displayed higher intestinal and plasma levels of IL-22 and higher intestinal levels of the IL-22 target genes Reg3b and Reg3g. Our findings indicate that absence of the intestinal mucus layer activates the mucosal immune system. Higher IL-22 levels protect mice from diet-induced features of the metabolic syndrome.

  11. Prevention of fatty liver in transition dairy cows by subcutaneous injections of glucagon.

    PubMed

    Nafikov, R A; Ametaj, B N; Bobe, G; Koehler, K J; Young, J W; Beitz, D C

    2006-05-01

    The main objective of this study was to test the extent to which injecting glucagon subcutaneously for 14 d beginning at d 2 postpartum would prevent fatty liver development in transition dairy cows. Twenty-four multiparous Holstein cows were fed 6 kg of cracked corn in addition to their standard diet during the last 30 d of a dry period to induce postpartum development of fatty liver. Glucagon at either 7.5 or 15 mg/d or saline (control) was injected subcutaneously 3 times daily for 14 d beginning at d 2 postpartum. Glucagon at 15 mg/ d prevented liver triacylglycerol accumulation in postpartum dairy cows. Glucagon at 7.5 mg/d showed potential for fatty liver prevention. Glucagon increased concentration of plasma glucose and insulin and decreased plasma nonesterified fatty acid concentrations. No effects of glucagon were detected on plasma beta-hydroxybutyrate concentrations. Glucagon affected neither feed intake nor milk production. Moreover, milk composition was not altered by glucagon. Milk urea N concentrations decreased, and plasma urea N concentrations tended to decrease during glucagon administration, indicating that glucagon may improve protein use. Liver glycogen concentrations were not affected by glucagon. No significant differences in body condition scores were detected among treatments throughout the study. These results indicate that subcutaneous glucagon injections can prevent fatty liver in transition dairy cows without causing major production and metabolite disturbances.

  12. Fatty acid esters produced by Lasiodiplodia theobromae function as growth regulators in tobacco seedlings.

    PubMed

    Uranga, Carla C; Beld, Joris; Mrse, Anthony; Córdova-Guerrero, Iván; Burkart, Michael D; Hernández-Martínez, Rufina

    2016-04-01

    The Botryosphaeriaceae are a family of trunk disease fungi that cause dieback and death of various plant hosts. This work sought to characterize fatty acid derivatives in a highly virulent member of this family, Lasiodiplodia theobromae. Nuclear magnetic resonance and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry of an isolated compound revealed (Z, Z)-9,12-ethyl octadecadienoate, (trivial name ethyl linoleate), as one of the most abundant fatty acid esters produced by L. theobromae. A variety of naturally produced esters of fatty acids were identified in Botryosphaeriaceae. In comparison, the production of fatty acid esters in the soil-borne tomato pathogen Fusarium oxysporum, and the non-phytopathogenic fungus Trichoderma asperellum was found to be limited. Ethyl linoleate, ethyl hexadecanoate (trivial name ethyl palmitate), and ethyl octadecanoate, (trivial name ethyl stearate), significantly inhibited tobacco seed germination and altered seedling leaf growth patterns and morphology at the highest concentration (0.2 mg/mL) tested, while ethyl linoleate and ethyl stearate significantly enhanced growth at low concentrations, with both still inducing growth at 98 ng/mL. This work provides new insights into the role of naturally esterified fatty acids from L. theobromae as plant growth regulators with similar activity to the well-known plant growth regulator gibberellic acid. PMID:26926564

  13. Alterations in carbohydrate metabolism and its regulation in PPARalpha null mouse hearts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although a shift from fatty acids (FAs) to carbohydrates (CHOs) is considered beneficial for the diseased heart, it is unclear why subjects with FA beta-oxidation defects are prone to cardiac decompensation under stress conditions. The present study investigated potential alterations in the myocardi...

  14. Histopathological alterations in the liver of freshwater teleost Tilapia mossambica in response to cadmium toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Usha Rani, A.; Ramamurthi, R.

    1989-04-01

    The effects of lethal (50 ppm) and sublethal (5 ppm) concentrations of CdCl/sub 2/ on the liver of the freshwater teleost Tilapia mossambica were studied by routine histological techniques. Engorged blood vessels, congestion, vacuolar degeneration of hepatocytes, necrosis of pancreatic cells, and fatty changes in the peripancreatic hepatocytes were the pathological alterations observed in liver.

  15. Lipid Raft Alterations in Aged-Associated Neuropathologies.

    PubMed

    Marin, Raquel; Fabelo, Noemí; Fernández-Echevarría, Cecilia; Canerina-Amaro, Ana; Rodríguez-Barreto, Deiene; Quinto-Alemany, David; Mesa-Herrera, Fátima; Díaz, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Lipid rafts are membrane microdomains particularly enriched in cholesterol, sphingolipids and saturated fatty acids. These microstructures play a key role in a plethora of mechanisms involved in cell signaling, synapsis, cell-cell communication and cell survival. In the last years, increasing evidence indicate that lipid rafts may be altered in age-related neuropathologies, such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson disease even at asymptomatic stages. In particular, important changes in raft lipid composition are observed with the progression of these diseases, then inducing alterations in their physicochemical properties. Furthermore, these phenomena contribute to neuropathological events related to amyloidogenesis, aberrant protein aggregation and toxic cell signalling. In this review, we discuss some relevant data on the age-related molecular changes occurring in lipid rafts since the first stages of these neurodegenerative diseases. Further characterization of specific parameters associated with alterations of these microdomains may provide potential tools of diagnosis and prediction of these neuropathologies.

  16. Attention Alters Perceived Attractiveness.

    PubMed

    Störmer, Viola S; Alvarez, George A

    2016-04-01

    Can attention alter the impression of a face? Previous studies showed that attention modulates the appearance of lower-level visual features. For instance, attention can make a simple stimulus appear to have higher contrast than it actually does. We tested whether attention can also alter the perception of a higher-order property-namely, facial attractiveness. We asked participants to judge the relative attractiveness of two faces after summoning their attention to one of the faces using a briefly presented visual cue. Across trials, participants judged the attended face to be more attractive than the same face when it was unattended. This effect was not due to decision or response biases, but rather was due to changes in perceptual processing of the faces. These results show that attention alters perceived facial attractiveness, and broadly demonstrate that attention can influence higher-level perception and may affect people's initial impressions of one another. PMID:26966228

  17. De novo fatty acid biosynthesis and elongation in very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase-deficient mice supplemented with odd or even medium-chain fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Tucci, Sara; Behringer, Sidney; Spiekerkoetter, Ute

    2015-11-01

    An even medium-chain triglyceride (MCT)-based diet is the mainstay of treatment in very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (VLCAD) deficiency (VLCADD). Previous studies with magnetic resonance spectroscopy have shown an impact of MCT on the average fatty acid chain length in abdominal fat. We therefore assume that medium-chain fatty acids (MCFAs) are elongated and accumulate in tissue as long-chain fatty acids. In this study, we explored the hepatic effects of long-term supplementation with MCT or triheptanoin, an odd-chain C7-based triglyceride, in wild-type and VLCAD-deficient (VLCAD(-/-) ) mice after 1 year of supplementation as compared with a control diet. The de novo biosynthesis and elongation of fatty acids, and peroxisomal β-oxidation, were quantified by RT-PCR. This was followed by a comprehensive analysis of hepatic and cardiac fatty acid profiles by GC-MS. Long-term application of even and odd MCFAs strongly induced de novo biosynthesis and elongation of fatty acids in both wild-type and VLCAD(-/-) mice, leading to an alteration of the hepatic fatty acid profiles. We detected de novo-synthesized and elongated fatty acids, such as heptadecenoic acid (C17:1n9), eicosanoic acid (C20:1n9), erucic acid (C22:1n9), and mead acid (C20:3n9), that were otherwise completely absent in mice under control conditions. In parallel, the content of monounsaturated fatty acids was massively increased. Furthermore, we observed strong upregulation of peroxisomal β-oxidation in VLCAD(-/-) mice, especially when they were fed an MCT diet. Our data raise the question of whether long-term MCFA supplementation represents the most efficient treatment in the long term. Studies on the hepatic toxicity of triheptanoin are still ongoing.

  18. De novo fatty acid biosynthesis and elongation in very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase-deficient mice supplemented with odd or even medium-chain fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Tucci, Sara; Behringer, Sidney; Spiekerkoetter, Ute

    2015-11-01

    An even medium-chain triglyceride (MCT)-based diet is the mainstay of treatment in very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (VLCAD) deficiency (VLCADD). Previous studies with magnetic resonance spectroscopy have shown an impact of MCT on the average fatty acid chain length in abdominal fat. We therefore assume that medium-chain fatty acids (MCFAs) are elongated and accumulate in tissue as long-chain fatty acids. In this study, we explored the hepatic effects of long-term supplementation with MCT or triheptanoin, an odd-chain C7-based triglyceride, in wild-type and VLCAD-deficient (VLCAD(-/-) ) mice after 1 year of supplementation as compared with a control diet. The de novo biosynthesis and elongation of fatty acids, and peroxisomal β-oxidation, were quantified by RT-PCR. This was followed by a comprehensive analysis of hepatic and cardiac fatty acid profiles by GC-MS. Long-term application of even and odd MCFAs strongly induced de novo biosynthesis and elongation of fatty acids in both wild-type and VLCAD(-/-) mice, leading to an alteration of the hepatic fatty acid profiles. We detected de novo-synthesized and elongated fatty acids, such as heptadecenoic acid (C17:1n9), eicosanoic acid (C20:1n9), erucic acid (C22:1n9), and mead acid (C20:3n9), that were otherwise completely absent in mice under control conditions. In parallel, the content of monounsaturated fatty acids was massively increased. Furthermore, we observed strong upregulation of peroxisomal β-oxidation in VLCAD(-/-) mice, especially when they were fed an MCT diet. Our data raise the question of whether long-term MCFA supplementation represents the most efficient treatment in the long term. Studies on the hepatic toxicity of triheptanoin are still ongoing. PMID:26284828

  19. Potency of pre–post treatment of coenzyme Q10 and melatonin supplement in ameliorating the impaired fatty acid profile in rodent model of autism

    PubMed Central

    El-Ansary, Afaf; Al-Ghamdi, Mashael; Bhat, Ramesa Shafi; Al-daihan, Sooad; Al-Ayadhi, Laila

    2016-01-01

    Background Abnormalities in fatty acid metabolism and membrane fatty acid composition play a part in a wide range of neurodevelopmental and psychiatric disorders. Altered fatty acid homeostasis as a result of insufficient dietary supplementation, genetic defects, the function of enzymes involved in their metabolism, or mitochondrial dysfunction contributes to the development of autism. Objective This study evaluates the association of altered brain lipid composition and neurotoxicity related to autism spectrum disorders in propionic acid (PA)–treated rats. Design Forty-eight young male western albino rats were used in this study. They were grouped into six equal groups with eight rats in each. The first group received only phosphate buffered saline (control group). The second group received a neurotoxic dose of buffered PA (250 mg/kg body weight/day for 3 consecutive days). The third and fourth groups were intoxicated with PA as described above followed by treatment with either coenzyme Q (4.5 mg/kg body weight) or melatonin (10 mg/kg body weight) for 1 week (therapeutically treated groups). The fifth and sixth groups were administered both compounds for 1 week prior to PA (protected groups). Methyl esters of fatty acid were extracted with hexane, and the fatty acid composition of the extract was analyzed on a gas chromatography. Results The obtained data proved that fatty acids are altered in brain tissue of PA-treated rats. All saturated fatty acids were increased while all unsaturated fatty acids were significantly decreased in the PA-treated group and relatively ameliorated in the pre–post melatonin and coenzyme Q groups. Conclusions Melatonin and coenzyme Q were effective in restoring normal level of most of the impaired fatty acids in PA-intoxicated rats which could help suggest both as supplements to ameliorate the autistic features induced in rat pups. PMID:26945230

  20. Consequences of Essential Fatty Acids

    PubMed Central

    Lands, Bill

    2012-01-01

    Essential fatty acids (EFA) are nutrients that form an amazingly large array of bioactive mediators that act on a large family of selective receptors. Nearly every cell and tissue in the human body expresses at least one of these receptors, allowing EFA-based signaling to influence nearly every aspect of human physiology. In this way, the health consequences of specific gene-environment interactions with these nutrients are more extensive than often recognized. The metabolic transformations have similar competitive dynamics for the n-3 and n-6 homologs when converting dietary EFA from the external environment of foods into the highly unsaturated fatty acid (HUFA) esters that accumulate in the internal environment of cells and tissues. In contrast, the formation and action of bioactive mediators during tissue responses to stimuli tend to selectively create more intense consequences for n-6 than n-3 homologs. Both n-3 and n-6 nutrients have beneficial actions, but many common health disorders are undesired consequences of excessive actions of tissue n-6 HUFA which are preventable. This review considers the possibility of preventing imbalances in dietary n-3 and n-6 nutrients with informed voluntary food choices. That action may prevent the unintended consequences that come from eating imbalanced diets which support excessive chronic actions of n-6 mediators that harm human health. The consequences from preventing n-3 and n-6 nutrient imbalances on a nationwide scale may be very large, and they need careful evaluation and implementation to avoid further harmful consequences for the national economy. PMID:23112921

  1. Molten fatty acid based microemulsions.

    PubMed

    Noirjean, Cecile; Testard, Fabienne; Dejugnat, Christophe; Jestin, Jacques; Carriere, David

    2016-06-21

    We show that ternary mixtures of water (polar phase), myristic acid (MA, apolar phase) and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB, cationic surfactant) studied above the melting point of myristic acid allow the preparation of microemulsions without adding a salt or a co-surfactant. The combination of SANS, SAXS/WAXS, DSC, and phase diagram determination allows a complete characterization of the structures and interactions between components in the molten fatty acid based microemulsions. For the different structures characterized (microemulsion, lamellar or hexagonal phases), a similar thermal behaviour is observed for all ternary MA/CTAB/water monophasic samples and for binary MA/CTAB mixtures without water: crystalline myristic acid melts at 52 °C, and a thermal transition at 70 °C is assigned to the breaking of hydrogen bounds inside the mixed myristic acid/CTAB complex (being the surfactant film in the ternary system). Water determines the film curvature, hence the structures observed at high temperature, but does not influence the thermal behaviour of the ternary system. Myristic acid is partitioned in two "species" that behave independently: pure myristic acid and myristic acid associated with CTAB to form an equimolar complex that plays the role of the surfactant film. We therefore show that myristic acid plays the role of a solvent (oil) and a co-surfactant allowing the fine tuning of the structure of oil and water mixtures. This solvosurfactant behaviour of long chain fatty acid opens the way for new formulations with a complex structure without the addition of any extra compound. PMID:27241163

  2. [Non-alcoholic fatty liver].

    PubMed

    Tagle Arrospide, Martín

    2003-01-01

    Non alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and its more agressive form, non alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) are entities that are becoming subject of interest of the medical community in general, especially because of the increased prevalence of diabetes and obesity in the world population. There is solid evidence linking NAFLD with the so called metabolic syndrome or syndrome X, to the point of accepting hepatic steatosis and its spectrum as one more element of the latter, along with diabetes, hipertension, hypertriglyceridemia and obesity. Insulin resistance seems to be the common link between these entities. Clinical evaluation of every patient with abnormal aminotransferase levels should take into account non alcoholic fatty liver and its spectrum, especially if the subject is obese or diabetic. Despite the important developments in the field of imaging, currenty the only way to differentiate NASH from simple NAFLD is by performing a liver biopsy, which should be discussed extensively with the patient. The prognosis of simple NAFLD is generally benign, but if there is fibrosis, ballooning of the hepatocytes, inflammation and Mallory bodies there is risk to progression to cirrhosis. Liver histology in NAFLD is indistinguishable from alcoholic hepatitis, although the clinical course is generally more benign. Despite this long and protracted clinical course, an important number of subjects have complications of cirrhosis including hepatocellular carcinoma, and many patients require a liver transplantation. There is no specific treatment for this condition, although every therapeutic regimen should include a gradual and supervised weight reduction, a balanced diet and exercise, as well as correction of precipitant factors. There is currently no specific pharmacologic treatment for NASH or NAFLD. Current body of evidence and some pilot studies suggest that the future might be concentrated in agents improving insulin resistance. Meanwhile, we should do our best to

  3. Effect of a diet enriched with omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids on the pig liver transcriptome.

    PubMed

    Szostak, Agnieszka; Ogłuszka, Magdalena; Te Pas, Marinus F W; Poławska, Ewa; Urbański, Paweł; Juszczuk-Kubiak, Edyta; Blicharski, Tadeusz; Pareek, Chandra Shekhar; Dunkelberger, Jenelle R; Horbańczuk, Jarosław O; Pierzchała, Mariusz

    2016-01-01

    The optimal ratio of omega-6 to omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) is important for keeping the homeostasis of biological processes and metabolism, yet the underlying biological mechanism is poorly understood. The objective of this study was to identify changes in the pig liver transcriptome induced by a diet enriched with omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids and to characterize the biological mechanisms related to PUFA metabolism. Polish Landrace pigs (n = 12) were fed diet enriched with linoleic acid (LA, omega-6) and α-linolenic acid (ALA, omega-3) or standard diet as a control. The fatty acid profiling was assayed in order to verify how feeding influenced the fatty acid content in the liver, and subsequently next-generation sequencing (NGS) was used to identify differentially expressed genes (DEG) between transcriptomes between dietary groups. The biological mechanisms and pathway interaction networks were identified using DAVID and Cytoscape tools. Fatty acid profile analysis indicated a higher contribution of PUFAs in the liver for LA- and ALA-enriched diet group, particularly for the omega-3 fatty acid family, but not omega-6. Next-generation sequencing identified 3565 DEG, 1484 of which were induced and 2081 were suppressed by PUFA supplementation. A low ratio of omega-6/omega-3 fatty acids resulted in the modulation of fatty acid metabolism pathways and over-representation of genes involved in energy metabolism, signal transduction, and immune response pathways. In conclusion, a diet enriched with omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids altered the transcriptomic profile of the pig liver and would influence animal health status.

  4. Influence of DGAT1 K232A polymorphism on milk fat percentage and fatty acid profiles in Romanian holstein cattle.

    PubMed

    Tăbăran, A; Balteanu, V A; Gal, E; Pusta, D; Mihaiu, R; Dan, S D; Tăbăran, A F; Mihaiu, M

    2015-01-01

    Milk and dairy products are considered the main sources of saturated fatty acids, which are a valuable source of nutrients in the human diet. Fat composition can be adjusted through guided nutrition of dairy animals but also through selective breeding. Recently, a dinucleotide substitution located in the exon 8 of the gene coding for acyl CoA: diacylglycerol acyltransferase 1 (DGAT1), that alters the amino acid sequence from a lysine to an alanine (p.Lys232Ala) in the mature protein, was shown to have a strong effect on milk fat content in some cattle breeds. Therefore, the objectives of this work were to study the occurrence of the DGAT1 p.Lys232Ala polymorphism in Romanian Holstein cattle and Romanian Buffalo breeds and to further investigate its possible influence on fat percentage and fatty acid profiles. The results obtained in this study show that in Romanian Holstein cattle the K allele is associated with increased fat percentage and higher levels of C16:0 and C18:0 fatty acids. The ratio of saturated fatty acids versus unsaturated fatty acids (SFA/UFA) was also higher in KK homozygous individuals, whereas the fractions of C14:0, unsaturated C18 decreased. The DGAT1 p.Lys232Ala polymorphism revealed a high genetic variance for fat percentage, unsaturated C18, C16:0, and SFA/UFA. Although the effect of this polymorphism was not so evident for short chain fatty acids such as C4:0-C8:0, it was significant for C14:0 fatty acids. We concluded that selective breeding of carriers of the A allele in Romanian Holsteins can contribute to improvement in unsaturated fatty acids content of milk. However, in buffalo, the lack of the A allele makes selection inapplicable because only the K allele, associated with higher saturated fatty acids contents in milk, was identified.

  5. Effect of a diet enriched with omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids on the pig liver transcriptome.

    PubMed

    Szostak, Agnieszka; Ogłuszka, Magdalena; Te Pas, Marinus F W; Poławska, Ewa; Urbański, Paweł; Juszczuk-Kubiak, Edyta; Blicharski, Tadeusz; Pareek, Chandra Shekhar; Dunkelberger, Jenelle R; Horbańczuk, Jarosław O; Pierzchała, Mariusz

    2016-01-01

    The optimal ratio of omega-6 to omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) is important for keeping the homeostasis of biological processes and metabolism, yet the underlying biological mechanism is poorly understood. The objective of this study was to identify changes in the pig liver transcriptome induced by a diet enriched with omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids and to characterize the biological mechanisms related to PUFA metabolism. Polish Landrace pigs (n = 12) were fed diet enriched with linoleic acid (LA, omega-6) and α-linolenic acid (ALA, omega-3) or standard diet as a control. The fatty acid profiling was assayed in order to verify how feeding influenced the fatty acid content in the liver, and subsequently next-generation sequencing (NGS) was used to identify differentially expressed genes (DEG) between transcriptomes between dietary groups. The biological mechanisms and pathway interaction networks were identified using DAVID and Cytoscape tools. Fatty acid profile analysis indicated a higher contribution of PUFAs in the liver for LA- and ALA-enriched diet group, particularly for the omega-3 fatty acid family, but not omega-6. Next-generation sequencing identified 3565 DEG, 1484 of which were induced and 2081 were suppressed by PUFA supplementation. A low ratio of omega-6/omega-3 fatty acids resulted in the modulation of fatty acid metabolism pathways and over-representation of genes involved in energy metabolism, signal transduction, and immune response pathways. In conclusion, a diet enriched with omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids altered the transcriptomic profile of the pig liver and would influence animal health status. PMID:27482299

  6. Fatty acid mobilization and comparison to milk fatty acid content in northern elephant seals.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Melinda A; Debier, Cathy; Mignolet, Eric; Linard, Clementine; Crocker, Daniel E; Costa, Daniel P

    2014-01-01

    A fundamental feature of the life history of true seals, bears and baleen whales is lactation while fasting. This study examined the mobilization of fatty acids from blubber and their subsequent partitioning into maternal metabolism and milk production in northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris). The fatty acid composition of blubber and milk was measured in both early and late lactation. Proportions of fatty acids in milk and blubber were found to display a high degree of similarity both early and late in lactation. Seals mobilized an enormous amount of lipid (~66 kg in 17 days), but thermoregulatory fatty acids, those that remain fluid at low temperatures, were relatively conserved in the outer blubber layer. Despite the stratification, the pattern of mobilization of specific fatty acids conforms to biochemical predictions. Long chain (>20C) monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs) were the least mobilized from blubber and the only class of fatty acids that showed a proportional increase in milk in late lactation. Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and saturated fatty acids (SFAs) were more mobilized from the blubber, but neither proportion increased in milk at late lactation. These data suggest that of the long chain MUFA mobilized, the majority is directed to milk synthesis. The mother may preferentially use PUFA and SFA for her own metabolism, decreasing the availability for deposition into milk. The potential impacts of milk fatty acid delivery on pup diving development and thermoregulation are exciting avenues for exploration.

  7. Fatty acid mobilization and comparison to milk fatty acid content in northern elephant seals.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Melinda A; Debier, Cathy; Mignolet, Eric; Linard, Clementine; Crocker, Daniel E; Costa, Daniel P

    2014-01-01

    A fundamental feature of the life history of true seals, bears and baleen whales is lactation while fasting. This study examined the mobilization of fatty acids from blubber and their subsequent partitioning into maternal metabolism and milk production in northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris). The fatty acid composition of blubber and milk was measured in both early and late lactation. Proportions of fatty acids in milk and blubber were found to display a high degree of similarity both early and late in lactation. Seals mobilized an enormous amount of lipid (~66 kg in 17 days), but thermoregulatory fatty acids, those that remain fluid at low temperatures, were relatively conserved in the outer blubber layer. Despite the stratification, the pattern of mobilization of specific fatty acids conforms to biochemical predictions. Long chain (>20C) monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs) were the least mobilized from blubber and the only class of fatty acids that showed a proportional increase in milk in late lactation. Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and saturated fatty acids (SFAs) were more mobilized from the blubber, but neither proportion increased in milk at late lactation. These data suggest that of the long chain MUFA mobilized, the majority is directed to milk synthesis. The mother may preferentially use PUFA and SFA for her own metabolism, decreasing the availability for deposition into milk. The potential impacts of milk fatty acid delivery on pup diving development and thermoregulation are exciting avenues for exploration. PMID:24126964

  8. Orthogonal Fatty Acid Biosynthetic Pathway Improves Fatty Acid Ethyl Ester Production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Eriksen, Dawn T; HamediRad, Mohammad; Yuan, Yongbo; Zhao, Huimin

    2015-07-17

    Fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEEs) are a form of biodiesel that can be microbially produced via a transesterification reaction of fatty acids with ethanol. The titer of microbially produced FAEEs can be greatly reduced by unbalanced metabolism and an insufficient supply of fatty acids, resulting in a commercially inviable process. Here, we report on a pathway engineering strategy in Saccharomyces cerevisiae for enhancing the titer of microbially produced FAEEs by providing the cells with an orthogonal route for fatty acid synthesis. The fatty acids generated from this heterologous pathway would supply the FAEE production, safeguarding endogenous fatty acids for cellular metabolism and growth. We investigated the heterologous expression of a Type-I fatty acid synthase (FAS) from Brevibacterium ammoniagenes coupled with WS/DGAT, the wax ester synthase/acyl-coenzyme that catalyzes the transesterification reaction with ethanol. Strains harboring the orthologous fatty acid synthesis yielded a 6.3-fold increase in FAEE titer compared to strains without the heterologous FAS. Variations in fatty acid chain length and degree of saturation can affect the quality of the biodiesel; therefore, we also investigated the diversity of the fatty acid production profile of FAS enzymes from other Actinomyces organisms. PMID:25594225

  9. Fatty acid synthesis is inhibited by inefficient utilization of unusual fatty acids for glycerolipid assembly.

    PubMed

    Bates, Philip D; Johnson, Sean R; Cao, Xia; Li, Jia; Nam, Jeong-Won; Jaworski, Jan G; Ohlrogge, John B; Browse, John

    2014-01-21

    Degradation of unusual fatty acids through β-oxidation within transgenic plants has long been hypothesized as a major factor limiting the production of industrially useful unusual fatty acids in seed oils. Arabidopsis seeds expressing the castor fatty acid hydroxylase accumulate hydroxylated fatty acids up to 17% of total fatty acids in seed triacylglycerols; however, total seed oil is also reduced up to 50%. Investigations into the cause of the reduced oil phenotype through in vivo [(14)C]acetate and [(3)H]2O metabolic labeling of developing seeds surprisingly revealed that the rate of de novo fatty acid synthesis within the transgenic seeds was approximately half that of control seeds. RNAseq analysis indicated no changes in expression of fatty acid synthesis genes in hydroxylase-expressing plants. However, differential [(14)C]acetate and [(14)C]malonate metabolic labeling of hydroxylase-expressing seeds indicated the in vivo acetyl-CoA carboxylase activity was reduced to approximately half that of control seeds. Therefore, the reduction of oil content in the transgenic seeds is consistent with reduced de novo fatty acid synthesis in the plastid rather than fatty acid degradation. Intriguingly, the coexpression of triacylglycerol synthesis isozymes from castor along with the fatty acid hydroxylase alleviated the reduced acetyl-CoA carboxylase activity, restored the rate of fatty acid synthesis, and the accumulation of seed oil was substantially recovered. Together these results suggest a previously unidentified mechanism that detects inefficient utilization of unusual fatty acids within the endoplasmic reticulum and activates an endogenous pathway for posttranslational reduction of fatty acid synthesis within the plastid.

  10. Role of fatty acid transporters in epidermis

    PubMed Central

    Miner, Jeffrey H; Jahnsen, Frode

    2011-01-01

    Skin epidermis is an active site of lipid synthesis. The intercellular lipids of human stratum corneum (SC) are unique in composition and quite different from the lipids found in most biological membranes. The three major lipids in the SC are free fatty acids, cholesterol and ceramides. Fatty acids can be synthesized by keratinocytes de novo and, in addition, need to be taken up from the circulation. The latter process has been shown to be protein mediated, and several fatty acid transporters are expressed in skin. Recent studies of transgenic and knockout animal models for fatty acid transporters and the identification of fatty acid transport protein 4 (FATP4 or SLC27A4) mutations as causative for Ichthyosis Prematurity Syndrome highlight the vital roles of fatty acid transport and metabolism in skin homeostasis. This review provides an overview of our current understanding of the role of fatty acids and their transporters in cutaneous biology, including their involvement in epidermal barrier generation and skin inflammation. PMID:21695012

  11. Immunization alters body odor.

    PubMed

    Kimball, Bruce A; Opiekun, Maryanne; Yamazaki, Kunio; Beauchamp, Gary K

    2014-04-10

    Infections have been shown to alter body odor. Because immune activation accompanies both infection and immunization, we tested the hypothesis that classical immunization might similarly result in the alteration of body odors detectable by trained biosensor mice. Using a Y-maze, we trained biosensor mice to distinguish between urine odors from rabies-vaccinated (RV) and unvaccinated control mice. RV-trained mice generalized this training to mice immunized with the equine West Nile virus (WNV) vaccine compared with urine of corresponding controls. These results suggest that there are similarities between body odors of mice immunized with these two vaccines. This conclusion was reinforced when mice could not be trained to directly discriminate between urine odors of RV- versus WNV-treated mice. Next, we trained biosensor mice to discriminate the urine odors of mice treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS; a general elicitor of innate immunological responses) from the urine of control mice. These LPS-trained biosensors could distinguish between the odors of LPS-treated mouse urine and RV-treated mouse urine. Finally, biosensor mice trained to distinguish between the odors of RV-treated mouse urine and control mouse urine did not generalize this training to discriminate between the odors of LPS-treated mouse urine and control mouse urine. From these experiments, we conclude that: (1) immunization alters urine odor in similar ways for RV and WNV immunizations; and (2) immune activation with LPS also alters urine odor but in ways different from those of RV and WNV. PMID:24524972

  12. How Misinformation Alters Memories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Daniel B.; Loftus, Elizabeth F.

    1998-01-01

    Notes that a multitude of studies have demonstrated that misleading postevent information affects people's memories. Contents that the fuzzy-trace theory is a positive step toward understanding the malleability of memory. Discusses fuzzy-trace theory in terms of three primary areas of study: altered response format, maximized misinformation…

  13. Desaturation of fatty acids in Trypanosoma cruzi

    SciTech Connect

    de Lema, M.G.; Aeberhard, E.E.

    1986-11-01

    Uptake and metabolism of saturated (16:0, 18:0) and unsaturated (18:1(n-9), 18:2(n-6), 18:3(n-3)) fatty acids by cultured epimastigotes of Trypanosoma cruzi were studied. Between 17.5 and 33.5% of the total radioactivity of (1-/sup 14/C)labeled fatty acids initially added to the culture medium was incorporated into the lipids of T. cruzi and mostly choline and ethanolamine phospholipids. As demonstrated by argentation thin layer chromatography, gas liquid chromatography and ozonolysis of the fatty acids synthesized, exogenous palmitic acid was elongated to stearic acid, and the latter was desaturated to oleic acid and 18:2 fatty acid. The 18:2 fatty acid was tentatively identified as linoleic acid with the first bond in the delta 9 position and the second bond toward the terminal methyl end. Exogenous stearic acid was also desaturated to oleic and 18:2 fatty acid, while oleic acid was only converted into 18:2. All of the saturated and unsaturated fatty acids investigated were also converted to a small extent (2-4%) into polyunsaturated fatty acids. No radioactive aldehyde methyl ester fragments of less than nine carbon atoms were detected after ozonolysis of any of the fatty acids studied. These results demonstrate the existence of delta 9 and either delta 12 or delta 15 desaturases, or both, in T. cruzi and suggest that delta 6 desaturase or other desaturases of the animal type are likely absent in cultured forms of this organism.

  14. Challenges with fats and fatty acid methods.

    PubMed

    Palmquist, D L; Jenkins, T C

    2003-12-01

    The content and chemical nature of lipids in feedstuffs is heterogeneous. It has long been known that ether extraction by the Weende procedure inadequately characterizes the fat content of feedstuffs, yet it remains the official method. Diethyl ether (or hexanes that are often used) extracts significant amounts of nonnutritive, nonsaponifiable lipids from forages, and often incompletely extracts lipids of nutritional value, especially fatty acids present as salts of divalent cations. Preextraction hydrolysis of insoluble fatty acid salts with acid releases these fatty acids, and this step is included in the official procedure for certain feedstuffs in the United Kingdom; however, acid hydrolysis increases analysis time and decreases precision. Acid hydrolysis also causes confusion as to the proper definition of the fat content of feedstuffs. A preferred method of fat analysis determines the total fatty acid concentration in feed samples by converting fatty acid salts, as well as the acyl components in all lipid classes, such as triacylglycerols, phospholipids, and sphingolipids, to methyl esters using a simple, direct one-step esterification procedure. Fatty acid methyl esters are then quantified by GLC, which provides information on both fatty acid quantity and profile in a single analysis. Adjustments in conditions and reagents may be necessary to overcome difficulty in quantitatively preparing esters from certain types of fatty acids and their derivatives in commercial fat supplements. After correction for glycerol content, analysis of oils by this procedure provides information on the content of nonsaponifiable material, such as chlorophyll, waxes, and indigestible polymers formed from heat- or oxidatively damaged fats. The correct description of feedstuffs for energy value of fats is the content of total fatty acids. PMID:14677882

  15. Fatty acids on continental sulfate aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tervahattu, H.; Juhanoja, J.; Vaida, V.; Tuck, A. F.; Niemi, J. V.; Kupiainen, K.; Kulmala, M.; VehkamäKi, H.

    2005-03-01

    Surface analyses of atmospheric aerosols from different continental sources, such as forest fires and coal and straw burning, show that organic surfactants are found on such aerosols. The predominant organic species detected by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry on the sulfate aerosols are fatty acids of different carbon chain length up to the C32 acid. These observations are consistent with literature accounts of functional group analysis of bulk samples, but this is the first direct evidence of fatty acid films on the surface of sulfate aerosols. Surface analysis leads to the conclusion that fatty acid films on continental aerosols may be more common than has been previously suggested.

  16. Hepatic Fatty Acid Trafficking: Multiple Forks in the Road123

    PubMed Central

    Mashek, Douglas G.

    2013-01-01

    The liver plays a unique, central role in regulating lipid metabolism. In addition to influencing hepatic function and disease, changes in specific pathways of fatty acid (FA) metabolism have wide-ranging effects on the metabolism of other nutrients, extra-hepatic physiology, and the development of metabolic diseases. The high prevalence of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has led to increased efforts to characterize the underlying biology of hepatic energy metabolism and FA trafficking that leads to disease development. Recent advances have uncovered novel roles of metabolic pathways and specific enzymes in generating lipids important for cellular processes such as signal transduction and transcriptional activation. These studies have also advanced our understanding of key branch points involving FA partitioning between metabolic pathways and have identified new roles for lipid droplets in these events. This review covers recent advances in our understanding of FA trafficking and its regulation. An emphasis will be placed on branch points in these pathways and how alterations in FA trafficking contribute to NAFLD and related comorbidities. PMID:24228201

  17. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: a challenge for pediatricians.

    PubMed

    Nobili, Valerio; Alkhouri, Naim; Alisi, Anna; Della Corte, Claudia; Fitzpatrick, Emer; Raponi, Massimiliano; Dhawan, Anil

    2015-02-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the hepatic manifestation of the metabolic syndrome and is considered the most common form of chronic liver disease in children. Several factors contribute to NAFLD development, including race/ethnicity, genetic factors, environmental exposures, and alterations in the gut microbiome. The histologic spectrum of NAFLD ranges from simple steatosis to the more aggressive nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Fibrosis and eventually cirrhosis can develop from NAFLD during childhood. Diagnosing advanced disease is challenging and may require a liver biopsy, highlighting the urgent need for reliable, noninvasive markers of disease severity. The mainstay of treatment for NAFLD remains lifestyle modifications and weight loss. Probiotics and ω-3 fatty acids may ameliorate disease progression. Recent data have suggested that vitamin E may be considered as a NASH-specific therapy in children, and there are several ongoing human studies evaluating different therapeutic targets for NAFLD. We provide an up-to-date review of the risk factors, diagnosis, and treatment to manage this common disease in children.

  18. Fatty acid-gene interactions, adipokines and obesity.

    PubMed

    Stryjecki, C; Mutch, D M

    2011-03-01

    It is now recognized that the low-grade inflammation observed with obesity is associated with the development of a wide range of downstream complications. As such, there is considerable interest in elucidating the regulatory mechanisms underlying the production of inflammatory molecules to improve the prevention and treatment of obesity and its co-morbidities. White adipose tissue is no longer considered a passive reservoir for storing lipids, but rather an important organ influencing energy metabolism, insulin sensitivity and inflammation by the secretion of proteins, commonly referred to as adipokines. Dysregulation of several adipokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and adiponectin, contributes to the low-grade inflammation that is a hallmark of obesity. Evidence now suggests that fatty acids represent a class of molecules that can modulate adipokine production, thereby influencing inflammatory status. Although the precise molecular mechanisms by which dietary fats regulate adipokine production remain unclear, recent findings indicate that diet-gene interactions may have an important role in the transcriptional and secretory regulation of adipokines. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the genes encoding TNF-α, IL-6 and adiponectin can modify circulating levels of these adipokines and, subsequently, obesity-related phenotypes. This genetic variation can also alter the influence of dietary fatty acids on adipokine production. Therefore, the current review will show that it is paramount to consider both genetic information and dietary fat intake to unravel the inter-individual variability in inflammatory response observed in intervention protocols targeting obesity.

  19. The role of essential fatty acids in development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fatty acids are aliphatic monocarboxylic acids. They are classified as saturated, monounsaturated, or polyunsaturated fatty acids depending upon the number of double bonds in the carbon chain. Saturated fatty acids have no double bonds, monounsaturated fatty acids have 1 double bond, and polyunsat...

  20. 21 CFR 172.854 - Polyglycerol esters of fatty acids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Polyglycerol esters of fatty acids. 172.854... § 172.854 Polyglycerol esters of fatty acids. Polyglycerol esters of fatty acids, up to and including..., safflower oil, sesame oil, soybean oil, and tallow and the fatty acids derived from these...

  1. 21 CFR 172.848 - Lactylic esters of fatty acids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Lactylic esters of fatty acids. 172.848 Section... § 172.848 Lactylic esters of fatty acids. Lactylic esters of fatty acids may be safely used in food in accordance with the following prescribed conditions: (a) They are prepared from lactic acid and fatty...

  2. 21 CFR 172.864 - Synthetic fatty alcohols.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Synthetic fatty alcohols. 172.864 Section 172.864... CONSUMPTION Multipurpose Additives § 172.864 Synthetic fatty alcohols. Synthetic fatty alcohols may be safely... conditions: (a) The food additive consists of any one of the following fatty alcohols: (1) Hexyl,...

  3. 21 CFR 172.864 - Synthetic fatty alcohols.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Synthetic fatty alcohols. 172.864 Section 172.864... CONSUMPTION Multipurpose Additives § 172.864 Synthetic fatty alcohols. Synthetic fatty alcohols may be safely... conditions: (a) The food additive consists of any one of the following fatty alcohols: (1) Hexyl,...

  4. 21 CFR 172.864 - Synthetic fatty alcohols.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Synthetic fatty alcohols. 172.864 Section 172.864... Synthetic fatty alcohols. Synthetic fatty alcohols may be safely used in food and in the synthesis of food... of the following fatty alcohols: (1) Hexyl, octyl, decyl, lauryl, myristyl, cetyl, and...

  5. 21 CFR 172.864 - Synthetic fatty alcohols.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Synthetic fatty alcohols. 172.864 Section 172.864... CONSUMPTION Multipurpose Additives § 172.864 Synthetic fatty alcohols. Synthetic fatty alcohols may be safely... conditions: (a) The food additive consists of any one of the following fatty alcohols: (1) Hexyl,...

  6. 21 CFR 172.864 - Synthetic fatty alcohols.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Synthetic fatty alcohols. 172.864 Section 172.864... CONSUMPTION Multipurpose Additives § 172.864 Synthetic fatty alcohols. Synthetic fatty alcohols may be safely... conditions: (a) The food additive consists of any one of the following fatty alcohols: (1) Hexyl,...

  7. 21 CFR 178.3480 - Fatty alcohols, synthetic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Fatty alcohols, synthetic. 178.3480 Section 178... § 178.3480 Fatty alcohols, synthetic. Synthetic fatty alcohols may be safely used as components of... following prescribed conditions: (a) The food additive consists of fatty alcohols meeting the...

  8. Technological Aspects of Chemoenzymatic Epoxidation of Fatty Acids, Fatty Acid Esters and Vegetable Oils: A Review.

    PubMed

    Milchert, Eugeniusz; Malarczyk, Kornelia; Kłos, Marlena

    2015-12-02

    The general subject of the review is analysis of the effect of technological parameters on the chemoenzymatic epoxidation processes of vegetable oils, fatty acids and alkyl esters of fatty acids. The technological parameters considered include temperature, concentration, amount of hydrogen peroxide relative to the number of unsaturated bonds, the amounts of enzyme catalysts, presence of solvent and amount of free fatty acids. Also chemical reactions accompanying the technological processes are discussed together with different technological options and significance of the products obtained.

  9. Sunflower oil supplementation alters meat quality but not performance of growing partridges (Alectoris chukar).

    PubMed

    Gülşen, N; Umucalilar, H D; Kirikçi, K; Hayirli, A; Aktümsek, A; Alaşahan, S

    2010-04-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of sunflower oil supplementation (0%, 3%, 6% and 9%) to partridge chicks (Alectoris chukar) on growth performance, nutrient digestibility and carcass characteristics. Feed consumption and live weight gain were responsive to dietary sunflower oil inclusion during the starter period, but not during the grower period. Increasing sunflower oil level linearly increased crude protein and fat digestibilities. Except for abdominal fat, weights of inedible parts and edible organs remained unchanged by the diets. The treatments linearly decreased weight and efficiency of carcass and weights of wings and breast and did not alter weights of thighs and neck. Breast meat saturated fatty acids decreased linearly by 17.9% and unsaturated fatty acids increased linearly by 10.6%, as sunflower oil level increased in the diets. Monounsaturated fatty acids decreased linearly by 27.3%, whereas polyunsaturated fatty acids increased linearly by 51%. Overall, n-3 (0.78% vs. 0.59%) and n-6 (42.6% vs. 29.8%) were greater in breast meat in treatment groups than in control group. In conclusion, sunflower addition into diets has minimal effects on performance of growing partridges, but significantly alters meat fatty acid composition.

  10. Omega-3 Fatty Acids during Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... omega-3s. They are mostly found in fatty fish like salmon, sardines, and trout. Some eggs are ... and yogurt. Should I Worry About Eating Certain Fish? Because of mercury contamination of our oceans, rivers, ...

  11. Omega-3 Fatty Acid Supplementation During Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Greenberg, James A; Bell, Stacey J; Ausdal, Wendy Van

    2008-01-01

    Omega-3 fatty acids are essential and can only be obtained from the diet. The requirements during pregnancy have not been established, but likely exceed that of a nonpregnant state. Omega-3 fatty acids are critical for fetal neurodevelopment and may be important for the timing of gestation and birth weight as well. Most pregnant women likely do not get enough omega-3 fatty acids because the major dietary source, seafood, is restricted to 2 servings a week. For pregnant women to obtain adequate omega-3 fatty acids, a variety of sources should be consumed: vegetable oils, 2 low-mercury fish servings a week, and supplements (fish oil or algae-based docosahexaenoic acid). PMID:19173020

  12. [Omega-3 fatty acids and cognition].

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Michio

    2014-04-01

    Docosahexaenoic acid, the most abundant omega3 fatty acid in the brain, plays a role in cognitive development, learning ability, neuronal membrane plasticity, synaptogenesis, and neurogenesis, all of which are involved in synaptic transmission and the well-being of normal brain functions, and search on the functionality is still in progress. Establishment of prevention and treatment of neuropsychiatric illnesses, such as dementia is n