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Sample records for photometer measured precipitable

  1. Analysis of the Performance Characteristics of the Five-Channel Microtops II Sun Photometer for Measuring Aerosol Optical Thickness and Precipitable Water Vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ichoku, Charles; Levy, Robert; Kaufman, Yoram; Remer, Lorraine A.; Li, Rong-Rong; Martins, Vanderlei J.; Holben, Brent N.; Abuhassan, Nader; Slutsker, Ilya; Eck, Thomas F.; Pietras, Christophe; Lau, William K. M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Five Microtops II sun photometers were studied in detail at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) to determine their performance in measuring aerosol optical thickness (AOT or Tau(sub alphalambda) and precipitable column water vapor (W). Each derives Tau(sub alphalambda) from measured signals at four wavelengths lambda (340, 440, 675, and 870 nm), and W from the 936 nm signal measurements. Accuracy of Tau(sub alphalambda) and W determination depends on the reliability of the relevant channel calibration coefficient (V(sub 0)). Relative calibration by transfer of parameters from a more accurate sun photometer (such as the Mauna-Loa-calibrated AERONET master sun photometer at GSFC) is more reliable than Langley calibration performed at GSFC. It was found that the factory-determined value of the instrument constant for the 936 nm filter (k= 0.7847) used in the Microtops' internal algorithm is unrealistic, causing large errors in V(sub 0(936)), Tau(sub alpha936), and W. Thus, when applied for transfer calibration at GSFC, whereas the random variation of V(aub 0) at 340 to 870 nm is quite small, with coefficients of variation (CV) in the range of 0 to 2.4%, at 936 nm the CV goes up to 19%. Also, the systematic temporal variation of V(sub 0) at 340 to 870 nm is very slow, while at 936 nm it is large and exhibits a very high dependence on W. The algorithm also computes Tau(sub alpha936) as 0.91Tau(sub alpha870), which is highly simplistic. Therefore, it is recommended to determine Tau(sub alpha936) by logarithmic extrapolation from Tau(sub alpha675) and Tau(sub alpha 870. From the operational standpoint of the Microtops, apart from errors that may result from unperceived cloud contamination, the main sources of error include inaccurate pointing to the Sun, neglecting to clean the front quartz window, and neglecting to calibrate correctly. If these three issues are adequately taken care of, the Microtops can be quite accurate and stable, with root mean square (rms

  2. Analysis of the Performance Characteristics of the Five-Channel Microtops II Sun Photometer for Measuring Aerosol Optical Thickness and Precipitable Water Vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ichoku, Charles; Levy, Robert; Kaufman, Yoram; Remer, Lorraine A.; Li, Rong-Rong; Martins, Vanderlei J.; Holben, Brent N.; Abuhassan, Nader; Slutsker, Ilya; Eck, Thomas F.; hide

    2001-01-01

    Five Microtops II sun photometers were studied in detail at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) to determine their performance in measuring aerosol optical thickness (AOT or Tau(sub alphalambda) and precipitable column water vapor (W). Each derives Tau(sub alphalambda) from measured signals at four wavelengths lambda (340, 440, 675, and 870 nm), and W from the 936 nm signal measurements. Accuracy of Tau(sub alphalambda) and W determination depends on the reliability of the relevant channel calibration coefficient (V(sub 0)). Relative calibration by transfer of parameters from a more accurate sun photometer (such as the Mauna-Loa-calibrated AERONET master sun photometer at GSFC) is more reliable than Langley calibration performed at GSFC. It was found that the factory-determined value of the instrument constant for the 936 nm filter (k= 0.7847) used in the Microtops' internal algorithm is unrealistic, causing large errors in V(sub 0(936)), Tau(sub alpha936), and W. Thus, when applied for transfer calibration at GSFC, whereas the random variation of V(aub 0) at 340 to 870 nm is quite small, with coefficients of variation (CV) in the range of 0 to 2.4%, at 936 nm the CV goes up to 19%. Also, the systematic temporal variation of V(sub 0) at 340 to 870 nm is very slow, while at 936 nm it is large and exhibits a very high dependence on W. The algorithm also computes Tau(sub alpha936) as 0.91Tau(sub alpha870), which is highly simplistic. Therefore, it is recommended to determine Tau(sub alpha936) by logarithmic extrapolation from Tau(sub alpha675) and Tau(sub alpha 870. From the operational standpoint of the Microtops, apart from errors that may result from unperceived cloud contamination, the main sources of error include inaccurate pointing to the Sun, neglecting to clean the front quartz window, and neglecting to calibrate correctly. If these three issues are adequately taken care of, the Microtops can be quite accurate and stable, with root mean square (rms

  3. Search for lightning-induced electron precipitation with rocket-borne photometers

    SciTech Connect

    Massey, R.D.; McCarthy, M.P.; Parks, G.K.

    1990-11-01

    Photometers at 3,914{angstrom} and 5,577{angstrom} and an optical imager were part of an experimental package launched on a sounding rocket in the 1987 Wave Induced Particle Precipitation (WIPP) campaign at Wallops Island, Virginia. The objective was to measure lightning-induced electron precipitation (LEP) by means of its optical signature. This was the first attempt to measure LEP using rocket-borne optical instrumentation. Launch criteria included nearby thunderstorm activity and ground-based observations of Trimpi events. Lightning flashes are clearly discernible in the data. The photometer data was also characterized by large spin and precession modulations in the photon count rate, consistent with elevated steady particle fluxes in the northern portion of the instrument field of view. No evidence of LEP was observed by the photometers or onboard particle detectors (Arnoldy and Kinter, 1989). Analysis of the data has enabled the authors to place an upper limit of 8 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} ergs-cm{sup {minus}2}-sec{sup {minus}1} on any burst precipitation energy flux that many have occurred during the rocket flight in the regions explored by the photometers.

  4. Error analysis of integrated water vapor measured by CIMEL photometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezin, I. A.; Timofeyev, Yu. M.; Virolainen, Ya. A.; Frantsuzova, I. S.; Volkova, K. A.; Poberovsky, A. V.; Holben, B. N.; Smirnov, A.; Slutsker, I.

    2017-01-01

    Water vapor plays a key role in weather and climate forming, which leads to the need for continuous monitoring of its content in different parts of the Earth. Intercomparison and validation of different methods for integrated water vapor (IWV) measurements are essential for determining the real accuracies of these methods. CIMEL photometers measure IWV at hundreds of ground-based stations of the AERONET network. We analyze simultaneous IWV measurements performed by a CIMEL photometer, an RPG-HATPRO MW radiometer, and a FTIR Bruker 125-HR spectrometer at the Peterhof station of St. Petersburg State University. We show that the CIMEL photometer calibrated by the manufacturer significantly underestimates the IWV obtained by other devices. We may conclude from this intercomparison that it is necessary to perform an additional calibration of the CIMEL photometer, as well as a possible correction of the interpretation technique for CIMEL measurements at the Peterhof site.

  5. A Photometer for Measuring Population Growth in Yeast.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tatina, Robert; Hartley, Tamela; Thomas, Danita

    1999-01-01

    Describes the construction and use of an inexpensive, portable photometer designed specifically for estimating population sizes in yeast cultures. Suggests activities for use with the photometer. (WRM)

  6. A Photometer for Measuring Population Growth in Yeast.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tatina, Robert; Hartley, Tamela; Thomas, Danita

    1999-01-01

    Describes the construction and use of an inexpensive, portable photometer designed specifically for estimating population sizes in yeast cultures. Suggests activities for use with the photometer. (WRM)

  7. Transmissometer versus sun photometer measurements of the aerosol optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusmierczyk-Michulec, Jolanta; Van Eijk, Alexander M. J.; Moerman, M. M.; Cohen, L. H.; de Jong, A.; Fritz, P.

    2008-08-01

    Atmospheric aerosol particles affect the Earth's radiative balance both in the cloud-free and the cloudy atmosphere. The direct effect of aerosols is related with scattering and absorption of solar radiation, and as a consequence, reduction of the amount of radiation reaching the surface. The best parameter that quantifies this effect is the aerosol extinction, which can be derived from vertical, as well as, horizontal measurements. The purpose of this paper is to compare the aerosol optical properties registered by two types of instruments. The first is a standard 5-wavelength hand-held sun photometer yielding the vertical column extinction, the second a 7-wavelength transmissometer developed at TNO. This multi-band transmissometer provides horizontal, path-integrated transmission data at 7 wavelengths within the visible/infra red spectral range. The data used in the comparison were collected during an experiment near Scripps Pier in La Jolla near San Diego, in November 2006.

  8. Direct solar radiation - Spectrum and irradiance derived from sun-photometer measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wobrock, Wolfram; Eiden, Reiner

    1988-06-01

    The continuous spectrum of the direct solar radiation from wavelength = 330 to 2690 nm, penetrating a cloudless atmosphere and arriving on the earth surface, is determined by measuring the solar irradiance in ten selected discrete spectral ranges defined by interference filters. Heretofore knowledge of the extraterrestrial solar spectrum has been required as well as of the transmittance functions to describe the spectral optical properties of the atmosphere. A set of appropriate and simple functions is given and discussed, which allows calculation of the molecular, aerosol, oxygen, and ozone optical thicknesses. The influence of atmospheric water vapor is considered through line by line calculations. The dominant and most fluctuating extinction parameters are the aerosol optical thickness and the content of precipitable water vapor. These are obtained by measurements with two sun photometers, developed according to the World Meteorological Organization recommendation. To test the derived solar spectrum at ground level the photometers are also run with nine broadband filters. The values observed differ little from those obtained by integration of the deduced spectral irradiance. Furthermore, the integral value of the resulting entire spectrum agrees reasonably well with the total direct irradiance gained from actinometer measurements.

  9. Direct solar radiation: spectrum and irradiance derived from sun-photometer measurements.

    PubMed

    Wobrock, W; Eiden, R

    1988-06-01

    The continuous spectrum of the direct solar radiation from lambda= 330 to 2690 nm, penetrating a cloudless atmosphere and arriving on the earth surface, is determined by measuring the solar irradiance in ten selected discrete spectral ranges defined by interference filters. Heretofore knowledge of the extraterrestrial solar spectrum has been required as well as of the transmittance functions to describe the spectral optical properties of the atmosphere. A set of appropriate and simple functions is given and discussed, which allows calculation of the molecular, aerosol, oxygen, and ozone optical thicknesses. The influence of atmospheric water vapor is considered through line by line calculations. The dominant and most fluctuating extinction parameters are the aerosol optical thickness and the content of precipitable water vapor. These are obtained by measurements with two sun photometers, developed according to the WMO recommendation. To test the derived solar spectrum at ground level the photometers are also run with nine broadband filters. The values observed differ little from those obtained by integration of the deduced spectral irradiance. Furthermore, the integral value of the resulting entire spectrum agrees reasonably well with the total direct irradiance gained from actinometer measurements.

  10. Comparison of independent integrated water vapour estimates from GPS and sun photometer measurements and a meteorological model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pugnaghi, S.; Boccolari, M.; Fazlagić, S.; Pacione, R.; Santangelo, R.; Vedel, H.; Vespe, F.

    Measurements using the Global Positioning System (GPS) are affected by the so-called tropospheric delay. Of this, the so-called wet delay is related mainly to the amount of water vapour along the path of the GPS signal through the troposphere. Precise knowledge of the abundance of water vapour, in space and time, is important for meteorology, both in forecasting and now-casting as well as in climate studies. Both because water vapour is the predecessor of precipitation, which is a forecast product, and because a very significant fraction of the energy released to the atmosphere comes from latent heat via water vapour. Despite the high variability of water vapour compared to other meteorological fields, like pressure and wind, water vapour observations are scarce; wherefore additional measurements of water vapour are expected to benefit meteorology. Water vapour is crucial for the development of the small scale, but sometimes very severe,precipitation events which are often seen at mid latitudes, and which are very hard to predict. In this work a comparison between radiometric (sun photometer) and GPS integrated water vapour (IWV) is presented. A sun photometer has been installed at the ENEA (Ente per le Nuove tecnologie, l'Energia e l'Ambiente) base of Lampedusa Island. The sun photometer is quite close (less then 4 km) to an ASI (Agenzia Spaziale Italiana) GPS permanent receiver. In Venezia an ASI GPS permanent receiver is collocated with another sun photometer. Both sun photometers are installed as part of the AERONET (AErosol and RObotic NETwork) program. A long record of sun photometric measurements, GPS data, and meteorological data is available for the Venezia site. A shorter record (summer period of the year 2000) is available for the station at Lampedusa. The comparison among the three different methods for water vapour delay estimation is presented. We find that the GPS and sun photometric data are better correlated (S.D. about 10 mm for the wet delay

  11. An inexpensive and stable LED Sun photometer for measuring the water vapor column over South Texas from 1990 to 2001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mims, Forrest M.

    2002-07-01

    A Sun photometer that uses near-infrared light-emitting diodes (LEDs) as spectrally-selective photodetectors has measured total column water vapor in South Texas since February 1990. The 12 years of solar noon observations to date are correlated with upper air soundings at Del Rio, Texas (r2 = 0.75), and highly correlated with measurements by a Microtops II filter Sun photometer (r2 = 0.94). LEDs are inexpensive and have far better long term stability than the interference filters in conventional Sun photometers. The LED Sun photometer therefore provides an inexpensive, stable and portable means for measuring column water vapor.

  12. Development of Ultraviolet Absorption Photometer for Atmospheric Ozone Measurements and Results from Mid - Investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, Bhaswar

    This presentation consists of two parts. First we describe the design and construction of a dual-beam ultraviolet-absorption photometer, as a balloon payload, for ozone measurements. We then describe the construction of a rocket-borne version of the instrument and results of tests performed in the laboratory. Results of balloon flights using this instrument and a NASA-JSC/UH ultraviolet photometer are finally presented. Measurement of ozone in the atmosphere can be made using the strong photometric absorption feature of the gas at 253.7 nanometers. An ultraviolet lamp produces identical optical paths through two absorption columns. Two photodetectors measure the intensity of light through the two columns and a third detector just adjacent to the lamp provides a monitor of integrated light intensity, thus allowing detection of (and on board corrections to) changes in lamp output. A four-port valve in series with an ozone scrubber periodically reverses the two columns between ozone measurement and reference cycles. In this way, instrumental drifts and differences in the two optical paths can be monitored, and corrections, both scientific and engineering, can be deduced. Fast ozone measurements can be made along with other meteorological parameters, allowing good determination of the vertical profile of ozone. Ozone profiles computed from standard photochemical models are usually lower than those determined from satellite measurements; the discrepancies are typically forty percent of measured values at 50 km, and fifty percent at 80 km. Ozone column density measurements with ground based instruments and rocket-borne detectors agree with satellite data, but with a wide variation in accuracy and precision. In situ measurement of ozone with high accuracy, precision, and good spatial resolution would allow testing of (i) current and future photochemical models and (ii) predicted diurnal and seasonal variation in the mesosphere. Details are presented of our ultraviolet

  13. Global Precipitation Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hou, Arthur Y.; Skofronick-Jackson, Gail; Kummerow, Christian D.; Shepherd, James Marshall

    2008-01-01

    This chapter begins with a brief history and background of microwave precipitation sensors, with a discussion of the sensitivity of both passive and active instruments, to trace the evolution of satellite-based rainfall techniques from an era of inference to an era of physical measurement. Next, the highly successful Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission will be described, followed by the goals and plans for the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission and the status of precipitation retrieval algorithm development. The chapter concludes with a summary of the need for space-based precipitation measurement, current technological capabilities, near-term algorithm advancements and anticipated new sciences and societal benefits in the GPM era.

  14. Using a Homemade Flame Photometer to Measure Sodium Concentration in a Sports Drink

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaFratta, Christopher N.; Jain, Swapan; Pelse, Ian; Simoska, Olja; Elvy, Karina

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this experiment was to create a simple and inexpensive flame photometer to measure the concentration of sodium in beverages, such as Gatorade. We created a nebulizer using small tubing and sprayed the sample into the base of a Bunsen burner. Adjacent to the flame was a photodiode with a filter specific for the emission of the sodium…

  15. Using a Homemade Flame Photometer to Measure Sodium Concentration in a Sports Drink

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaFratta, Christopher N.; Jain, Swapan; Pelse, Ian; Simoska, Olja; Elvy, Karina

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this experiment was to create a simple and inexpensive flame photometer to measure the concentration of sodium in beverages, such as Gatorade. We created a nebulizer using small tubing and sprayed the sample into the base of a Bunsen burner. Adjacent to the flame was a photodiode with a filter specific for the emission of the sodium…

  16. Evaluation of the Accuracy of the CAU Multiple-Wavelength Sun Photometer for Spectral Measurements of Total Atmospheric Extinction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, D.; Mandock, R. L.; Grams, G. W.; Blyler, M. L.; Tucker, D.

    2005-05-01

    Researchers at Clark Atlanta University have developed a second-generation LED sun photometer with significant improvements over the LED haze sensor distributed to high schools by NASA. We compared sun photometer results obtained in the Atlanta area with simultaneous observations that used a more expensive, handheld, 5-filter Microtops II Sunphotometer, manufactured by Solar Light Company, Inc. This device measures precipitable water (using a 940 nm filter with 10 nm bandwidth) and aerosol optical depth (using a 1020 nm filter with 10 nm bandwidth). It also measures ozone column depth using 3 filters for wavelengths in the Huggins ozone absorption band. Our most recent sun photometer results agreed within expected errors when comparing LED results at the 3 longest wavelengths (660, 860, and 940 nm) with the Microtops aerosol optical thicknesses. However, some problems were encountered with data obtained at the shortest wavelength (400 nm), and that issue needs to be resolved. We are evaluating the performance of our instrument using a series of computer calculations that address the finite bandwidth of the LED detectors. The Bouguer-Beer law assumes the light source is monochromatic. However, the LED bandwidth varies from 30-50 nm (widest at the longest wavelengths). We must determine whether this bandwidth is narrow enough to justify the use of a standard Langley plot. MODTRAN4 is used to obtain the transmissivity of light at relative high resolution through a variety of atmospheric conditions. By assuming realistic concentrations of water vapor, ozone and aerosol content, the wavelength-dependent overlap between radiation reaching the surface and the spectral response of the LEDs is computed to determine the magnitude of any deviations from Beer's law.

  17. Aging and removal of Black Carbon measured using a Single Particle Soot Photometer in East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanaya, Y.; Miyakawa, T.; Taketani, F.; Oshima, N.; PAN, X.; Komazaki, Y.; Kondo, Y.; Takami, A.; Yoshino, A.

    2015-12-01

    Black carbon (BC) aerosol is one of the most important aerosols, affecting the Earth's radiative budget both directly through light absorption and indirectly by acting as cloud condensation and ice nuclei. Microphysical parameters of soot aerosols are important to assess their roles in atmosphere. A single particle soot photometer (SP2, Droplet Measurement Technologies Inc.) can be used to detect and quantify the mass of refractory BC (rBC) in a soot-containing particle. We conducted ground-measurements of rBC-containing particles using the SP2 at Yokosuka (near industrial sources, early summer of 2014, Fig1) and at Fukue island (outflow from Asian continent, spring of 2015, Fig1). During Fukue observation, we measured carbon monoxide (CO) mixing ratio (by 48C, Themo Scientific, Inc.) which is useful for investigating polluted air masses. Air mass histories were analyzed with backward trajectories from the sampling point and precipitation along the trajectory calculated using the NOAA Hybrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory model with the meteorological data sets from NCEP's GDAS. We analysed number-/mass-size distributions and mixing states of rBC-containing particles considering the differences in air mass characteristics and history. The observed rBC mass concentrations (at STP) were ranging from ~50 ng m-3 at Fukue island to ~2000 ng m-3 near industrial sources. The size distributions of rBC-containing particles were systematically changed depending on the sites and air mass histories. Modal mass-equivalent diameters of the observed mass-size distributions showed minima (~0.16 μm) near source area and maxima (~0.21 μm) at Fukue island for Asian outflow period without wet removal. In the presentation, we synthetically discuss the relationship between rBC microphysics and air mass characteristics and histories.

  18. A dedicated H-beta meridian scanning photometer for proton aurora measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unick, Craig W.; Donovan, Eric; Connors, Martin; Jackel, Brian

    2017-01-01

    An instrument designed to measure the location and brightness of auroral emissions from energetic proton precipitation is described. This photometer scans from the north to south horizon with a stepper motor and mirror. The scans are configured in software for a 30 s cadence with equally spaced samples along a meridian at constant altitude. Broadband light is separated into two channels with a novel optical splitter. This splitter uses a filter that has high transmission for the signal channel and high reflection on both the long- and short-wavelength sides to reflect the combined background passbands, directing each channel to its respective detector. The half-cone angle and angle of incidence of this splitter filter allow for an overall compact optical design that also provides superior sensitivity in both signal and background channels. The signal channel is 3 nm wide full width at half maximum (FWHM) at 486.1 nm, and the background channel comprises two 3 nm wide FWHM passbands at 480 nm and 495 nm created by a single filter. Both of these channels are measured with photomultiplier tubes in photon-counting mode. Calibrations indicate a response of around 1000 c/s per rayleigh. Data are currently acquired in 5 ms bins with a Nyquist frequency of 100 Hz. The first system (Forty-Eight Sixty-One (FESO)-1) has been operating at Athabasca University since February 2014, and the second system (FESO-2) was deployed at Lucky Lake, Saskatchewan, in October 2015. The improved sensitivity over legacy instruments and the simultaneous measurement of signal and background enable operation during intervals with dynamic electron aurora and scattered moonlight.

  19. Cloud Screening and Quality Control Algorithm for Star Photometer Data: Assessment with Lidar Measurements and with All-sky Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramirez, Daniel Perez; Lyamani, H.; Olmo, F. J.; Whiteman, D. N.; Navas-Guzman, F.; Alados-Arboledas, L.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the development and set up of a cloud screening and data quality control algorithm for a star photometer based on CCD camera as detector. These algorithms are necessary for passive remote sensing techniques to retrieve the columnar aerosol optical depth, delta Ae(lambda), and precipitable water vapor content, W, at nighttime. This cloud screening procedure consists of calculating moving averages of delta Ae() and W under different time-windows combined with a procedure for detecting outliers. Additionally, to avoid undesirable Ae(lambda) and W fluctuations caused by the atmospheric turbulence, the data are averaged on 30 min. The algorithm is applied to the star photometer deployed in the city of Granada (37.16 N, 3.60 W, 680 ma.s.l.; South-East of Spain) for the measurements acquired between March 2007 and September 2009. The algorithm is evaluated with correlative measurements registered by a lidar system and also with all-sky images obtained at the sunset and sunrise of the previous and following days. Promising results are obtained detecting cloud-affected data. Additionally, the cloud screening algorithm has been evaluated under different aerosol conditions including Saharan dust intrusion, biomass burning and pollution events.

  20. Ultraviolet-absorption photometer for measurement of ozone on a rocket-boosted payload

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, B.; Sheldon, W. R.; Benbrook, J. R.

    1996-10-01

    We developed a rocket payload to perform in situ measurements of atmospheric ozone at the University of Houston. The ozone detector is a dual-beam UV-absorption photometer that uses the 253.7-nm radiation from a low-pressure mercury-vapor lamp to illuminate two identical absorption chambers. We describe the design features and the operation of the instrument. The fundamental resolution of the photometer is shown to be 2.7 10 15 molecules m 3 . We present the ozone profile measured during parachute descent following boosted ascent to 60 km by a Nike Orion rocket. The uncertainty in the measurement of this ozone profile is estimated to be 8.2 .

  1. Balloon in-situ measurements of ozone with the NASA-JSC UV photometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robbins, D. E.

    1985-01-01

    Details of the design and performance of a UV absorption photometer used to measure ozone in the stratosphere from large balloons are given. Mechanisms which might cause a loss of ozone in the instrument are shown to be negligible. An analysis of errors obtains an instrumental precision that is better than 3 percent and an accuracy less than 5 percent. Improvements are being made that will increase the precision to about 1 percent and the accuracy to 3 percent. The NASA-JSC photometer has been intercompared with other techniques during several balloon campaigns. Agreement with other in-situ techniques was usually within 1 to 5 percent, while agreement with remote techniques was typically in the range 10 to 15 percent.

  2. Precipitable Water Vapor Characterization In The Gulf Of Cadiz Region (Southwestern Spain) Based On Sun Photometer, GPS And Radiosonde Data

    SciTech Connect

    Torres, B.; Cachorro, V. E.; Toledano, C.; Ortiz de Galisteo, J. P.; Berjon, A.; de Frutos, A. M.; Bennouna, Yasmine; Laulainen, Nels S.

    2010-09-16

    Column integrated water vapor (IWV) data in the Gulf of Cádiz area (Southwestern Spain) are analyzed during the period 2001 to 2005 with two aims: 1) to establish the climatology over this area using three different techniques, such as Sun-Photometer (SP), Global Position System (GPS) and Radiosondes, and 2) to take advantage of this comparative process to assess the quality of radiometric IWV data collected at the RIMA-AERONET station. The 5 years of climatological series gives a mean value of about 2 cm (STD=0.72) and a clear seasonal behavior as a general feature, with the highest values in summer and the lowest in winter. In the multi-annual monthly means basis, the highest values are reached in August-September, with a mean value of 2.5-2.6 cm, whereas the lowest are obtained in January-February, with an average of 1.4-24 1.5. However the most relevant results for this area is the observed local minimum in July, occurring during the maximum of desert dust intrusions in the southern Iberian Peninsula. A comparison process allows us to evaluate the agreement of IWV data sets between these three different techniques at different temporal scales because of different time sampling. On a daily basis and taking GPS as the reference value we have a bias or difference between Radiosonde and GPS measurements for the entire data base of 0.07 cm (relative bias of 3%) and RMSE of 0.33. For SP-GPS we have a bias of 0.14 cm (about 7%) and RMSE of 0.37. On a monthly basis the differences between Radiosonde and GPS values varies from summer with 2% to winter with -8% and between SP and GPS values from 3% in summer to -14% in winter. The observed bias between GPS and SP varies during each SP operational period, with lower values at the beginning of the measurements and increasing until the end of its measurement term and with the bias values being quite dependent on each individual SP. The observed differences highlight the importance of drift in each Sun-Photometer, because

  3. Global precipitation measurement (GPM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neeck, Steven P.; Flaming, Gilbert M.; Adams, W. James; Smith, Eric A.

    2001-12-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is studying options for future space-based missions for the EOS Follow-on Era (post 2003), building upon the measurements made by Pre-EOS and EOS First Series Missions. One mission under consideration is the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM), a cooperative venture of NASA, Japan, and other international partners. GPM will capitalize on the experience of the highly successful Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM). Its goal is to extend the measurement of rainfall to high latitudes with high temporal frequency, providing a global data set every three hours. A reference concept has been developed consisting of an improved TRMM-like primary satellite with precipitation radar and microwave radiometer to make detailed and accurate estimates of the precipitation structure and a constellation of small satellites flying compact microwave radiometers to provide the required temporal sampling of highly variable precipitation systems. Considering that DMSP spacecraft equipped with SSMIS microwave radiometers, successor NPOESS spacecraft equipped with CMIS microwave radiometers, and other relevant international systems are expected to be in operation during the timeframe of the reference concept, the total number of small satellites required to complete the constellation will be reduced. A nominal plan is to begin implementation in FY'03 with launches in 2007. NASA is presently engaged in advanced mission studies and advanced instrument technology development related to the mission.

  4. Measurement of Global Precipitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flaming, Gilbert Mark

    2004-01-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Program is an international cooperative effort whose objectives are to (a) obtain increased understanding of rainfall processes, and (b) make frequent rainfall measurements on a global basis. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) of the United States and the Japanese Aviation and Exploration Agency (JAXA) have entered into a cooperative agreement for the formulation and development of GPM. This agreement is a continuation of the partnership that developed the highly successful Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) that was launched in November 1997; this mission continues to provide valuable scientific and meteorological information on rainfall and the associated processes. International collaboration on GPM from other space agencies has been solicited, and discussions regarding their participation are currently in progress. NASA has taken lead responsibility for the planning and formulation of GPM, Key elements of the Program to be provided by NASA include a Core satellite bus instrumented with a multi-channel microwave radiometer, a Ground Validation System and a ground-based Precipitation Processing System (PPS). JAXA will provide a Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar for installation on the Core satellite and launch services. Other United States agencies and international partners may participate in a number of ways, such as providing rainfall measurements obtained from their own national space-borne platforms, providing local rainfall measurements to support the ground validation activities, or providing hardware or launch services for GPM constellation spacecraft. This paper will present an overview of the current planning for the GPM Program, and discuss in more detail the status of the lead author's primary responsibility, development and acquisition of the GPM Microwave Imager.

  5. Near infrared emission photometer for measuring the oxidative stability of edible oils.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Francisco Senna; Pasquini, Celio

    2013-09-24

    Near infrared emission spectroscopy (NIRES) allows the determination of the induction time (IT) of edible oils in accelerated oxidation experiments by monitoring the emissivity of a band at 2900 nm, which corresponds to the formation of hydroperoxides. In this work, a new near infrared emission photometer dedicated to the determination of oxidative stability is described. The photometer presents several advantages compared to the previously reported NIRES instrument, such as lower cost and extreme simplicity of design and maintenance. The results obtained in the evaluation of the proposed instrument were compared with the official Rancimat method and instrument. The significant advantages include: faster analysis, lower sample consumption and operational simplicity. It is demonstrated that the procedure for determination of oxidative stability of oils can be significantly simplified and performed by measuring the sample emission at only one spectral region centered at 2900 nm. Also, the proposed instrument and method present precision equivalent to the Rancimat method (coefficient of variation=5.0%). A significant correlation between the methods has been found (R(2)=0.81).

  6. Nighttime Aerosol Optical Depth Measurements Using a Ground-based Lunar Photometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berkoff, Tim; Omar, Ali; Haggard, Charles; Pippin, Margaret; Tasaddaq, Aasam; Stone, Tom; Rodriguez, Jon; Slutsker, Ilya; Eck, Tom; Holben, Brent; Welton, Judd; da Silva, Arlindo; Colarco, Pete; Trepte, Charles; Winker, David

    2015-01-01

    In recent years it was proposed to combine AERONET network photometer capabilities with a high precision lunar model used for satellite calibration to retrieve columnar nighttime AODs. The USGS lunar model can continuously provide pre-atmosphere high precision lunar irradiance determinations for multiple wavelengths at ground sensor locations. When combined with measured irradiances from a ground-based AERONET photometer, atmospheric column transmissions can determined yielding nighttime column aerosol AOD and Angstrom coefficients. Additional demonstrations have utilized this approach to further develop calibration methods and to obtain data in polar regions where extended periods of darkness occur. This new capability enables more complete studies of the diurnal behavior of aerosols, and feedback for models and satellite retrievals for the nighttime behavior of aerosols. It is anticipated that the nighttime capability of these sensors will be useful for comparisons with satellite lidars such as CALIOP and CATS in additional to ground-based lidars in MPLNET at night, when the signal-to-noise ratio is higher than daytime and more precise AOD comparisons can be made.

  7. Productino of KSR-III Airglow Photometers to Measure MUV Airglows of the Upper Atmosphere Above the Korean Peninsular

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, T.-H.; Park, K.-C.; Kim, Y.-H.; Yi, Y.; Kim, J.

    2002-12-01

    We have constructed two flight models of airglow photometer system (AGP) to be onboard Korea Sounding Rocket-III (KSR-III) for detection of MUV dayglow above the Korean peninsular. The AGP system is designed to detect dayglow emissions of OI 2972 Å, N_2 VK (0,6) 2780Å, N_2 2PG 3150Å and background 3070Å toward the horizon at altitudes between 100 km and 300 km. The AGP system consists of a photometer body, a baffle, an electronic control unit and a battery unit. The MUV dayglow emissions enter through a narrow band interference filter and focusing lens of the photometer, which contains an ultraviolet sensitive photomultiplier tube. The photometer is equipped with an in-flight calibration light source on a circular plane that will rotate at the rocket's apogee. A baffle tube is installed at the entry of the photometer in order to block strong scattering lights from the lower atmosphere. We have carried out laboratory measurements of sensitivity and in-flight calibration light source for the AGP flight models. Although absolute sensitivities of the AGP flight models could not be determined in the country, relative sensitivities among channels are well measured so that observation data during rocket flight in the future can be analyzed with confidence.

  8. Development of KRISS standard reference photometer (SRP) for ambient ozone measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S.; Lee, J.

    2014-12-01

    Surface ozone has adverse impacts on human health and ecosystem. Accurate measurement of ambient ozone concentration is essential for developing effective mitigation strategies and understanding atmospheric chemistry. Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science (KRISS) has developed new ozone standard reference photometers (SRPs) for the calibration of ambient ozone instruments. The basic principle of the KRISS ozone SRPs is to determine the absorption of ultraviolet radiation at a specific wavelength, 253.7 nm, by ozone in the atmosphere. Ozone concentration is calculated by converting UV transmittance through the Beer-Lambert Law. This study introduces the newly developed ozone SRPs and characterizes their performance through uncertainty analysis and comparison with BIPM (International Bureau of Weights and Measures) SRP.

  9. Properties of coastal Antarctic aerosol from combined FTIR spectrometer and sun photometer measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rathke, Carsten; Notholt, Justus; Fischer, Jürgen; Herber, Andreas

    2002-12-01

    Remotely sensing the physical and chemical properties of summertime aerosol at the Antarctic coastal station Neumayer has been accomplished for the first time by a combined analysis of atmospheric thermal emission spectra, measured by an FTIR spectrometer, and atmospheric visible-near infrared extinction spectra, measured by a sun photometer. From the synergy of both spectral ranges, we find that the aerosol is composed of 1.1-1.6 mg m-2 of sulfates, with the water component in the solid phase, having a bimodal size distribution with radii peaking at 0.04 and 0.64 μm. We also provide the first estimate of the direct thermal radiative forcing of this aerosol: +1.68 W m-2 at the surface, and +0.006 W m-2 at the top of the atmosphere.

  10. A Single Particle Soot Photometer for the Measurement of Aerosol Black Carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kok, G. L.; Baumgardner, D.; Spuler, S.

    2002-12-01

    A Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2) has been developed for the measurement of black carbon mass in single particles. The analytical technique is the incandescence of light absorbing particles. An aerosol stream is directed intra-cavity across the beam of a Nd:YAG laser where the laser intensity is in excess of 1 MW/cm2. Non-light absorbing particles only scatter light but particles containing black carbon absorb sufficient energy to heat and incandesce as they vaporize. Four optical detectors are used to measure the scattered and incandescence radiation from the particles. One measures the scattered, 1064 nm radiation while the other three detectors measure the light of incandescence over different wavelength regions. The ratio of intensities at the different wavelengths yields the temperature at which the particle incandesced whereas the absolute intensity is proportional to the carbon mass. The minimum size of non-incandescing particles that can be measured is approximately 100 nm and for incandescing particles it is 80 nm. Data will be presented on the operation of the instrumentation and examples of ambient measurements of black carbon.

  11. A combined Settling Tube-Photometer for rapid measurement of effective sediment particle size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhn, Nikolaus J.; Kuhn, Brigitte; Rüegg, Hans-Rudolf; Zimmermann, Lukas

    2017-04-01

    Sediment and its movement in water is commonly described based on the size distribution of the mineral particles forming the sediment. While this approach works for coarse sand, pebbles and gravel, smaller particles often form aggregates, creating material of larger diameters than the mineral grain size distribution indicates, but lower densities than often assumed 2.65 g cm-3 of quartz. The measurement of the actual size and density of such aggregated sediment is difficult. For the assessment of sediment movement an effective particle size for the use in mathematical can be derived based on the settling velocity of sediment. Settling velocity of commonly measured in settling tubes which fractionate the sample in settling velocity classes by sampling material at the base in selected time intervals. This process takes up to several hours, requires a laboratory setting and carries the risk of either destruction of aggregates during transport or coagulation while sitting in rather still water. Measuring the velocity of settling particles in situ, or at least a rapidly after collection, could avoids these problems. In this study, a settling tube equipped with four photometers used to measure the darkening of a settling particle cloud is presented and the potential to improve the measurement of settling velocities are discussed.

  12. Measurement of different types of optical loss using high-precision laser photometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Zhen; Hu, Guohang; He, Hongbo; Zhao, Yuanan; Wang, Yueliang; Peng, Xiaocong

    2017-06-01

    The development of high-power laser systems requires optical components that function at peak performance. Here, a high-precision, double beam, 1064 nm laser photometer setup was developed to measure the following different forms of optical loss from Nd-glass samples: total loss, volume loss, and the residual reflection and surface loss. The double beam design and a lock-in technique were utilized to decrease the impact of light-source instabilities and signal noise, respectively. The stability of the signal was further improved by decreasing the amount of optical absorption along the light path and by increasing the detection responsivity. Paired samples were symmetrically placed to eliminate beam displacement, and a laser scattering imaging technique was used to determine the influence of surface defects on the optical performance. Using the above techniques, multiple measurements of the transmittance and reflection values of the sample were taken, which showed our transmittance measurement to be highly precise, exhibiting a relative standard deviation of less than 0.06%. Different types of optical loss were distinguished and obtained from the transmittance and reflection measurements of samples with different thicknesses. A comparison of the optical performance from test points with and without surface defects allowed us to determine the influence of surface defects on the optical performance.

  13. Monitoring of Sahelian aerosol and Atmospheric water vapor content characteristics from sun photometer measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faizoun, C. A.; Podaire, A.; Dedieu, G.

    1994-11-01

    Atmospheric measurements in two Sahelian sites in West Africa are presented and analyzed. The measurements were performed using a sun photometer with five bands in the visible and near-infrared range of the solar spectrum. This instrument measures spectral values of the solar irradiances that are used to derive the aerosol optical thickness in three bands; the two other bands are used to derive the integrated atmospheric water vapor content using a differential absorption method. The Angstroem exponent, which is an estimate of the aerosol particle size, is derived from the spectral dependence of the optical thickness. Although the sites were located far from Sahara Desert aerosol sources, the observed aerosol optical thicknesses were high, with a mean annual value of 0.5 at 550 nm. The spectral dependence of aerosol optical thickness is generally low, with a mean annual value of Angstroem exponent of 0.4. The aerosol optical thickness and the atmosphereic water vapor content are both characterized by high temporal variability and exhibit seasonal cycles. From these measurements, climatological values and associated probability distribution laws are proposed.

  14. Comparison of the aerosol optical properties and size distribution retrieved by sun photometer with in situ measurements at midlatitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauvigné, Aurélien; Sellegri, Karine; Hervo, Maxime; Montoux, Nadège; Freville, Patrick; Goloub, Philippe

    2016-09-01

    Aerosols influence the Earth radiative budget through scattering and absorption of solar radiation. Several methods are used to investigate aerosol properties and thus quantify their direct and indirect impacts on climate. At the Puy de Dôme station, continuous high-altitude near-surface in situ measurements and low-altitude ground-based remote sensing atmospheric column measurements give the opportunity to compare the aerosol extinction measured with both methods over a 1-year period. To our knowledge, it is the first time that such a comparison is realised with continuous measurements of a high-altitude site during a long-term period. This comparison addresses to which extent near-surface in situ measurements are representative of the whole atmospheric column, the aerosol mixing layer (ML) or the free troposphere (FT). In particular, the impact of multi-aerosol layers events detected using lidar backscatter profiles is analysed. A good correlation between in situ aerosol extinction coefficient and aerosol optical depth (AOD) measured by the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) sun photometer is observed with a correlation coefficient around 0.80, indicating that the in situ measurements station is representative of the overall atmospheric column. After filtering for multilayer cases and correcting for each layer optical contribution (ML and FT), the atmospheric structure seems to be the main factor influencing the comparison between the two measurement techniques. When the site lies in the ML, the in situ extinction represents 45 % of the sun photometer ML extinction while when the site lies within the FT, the in situ extinction is more than 2 times higher than the FT sun photometer extinction. Moreover, the assumption of a decreasing linear vertical aerosol profile in the whole atmosphere has been tested, significantly improving the instrumental agreement. Remote sensing retrievals of the aerosol particle size distributions (PSDs) from the sun photometer

  15. Handheld sun photometer measurements in Southwestern Africa: results from Benin and Ivory Coast.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leon, Jean-François; Akpo, Aristide; Bedou, Mohamadou; Bodjrenou, Marleine; Djossou, Julien; Konaté, Ismael; Yoboué, Véronique; Liousse, Cathy

    2017-04-01

    The atmosphere of the Gulf of Guinea and adjacent countries is influenced by a large amount of aerosol particles advected from the African continent. This place is one of the hot-spot of aerosol optical depth (AOD) in the world. However AOD in situ observations remains scarce in this area. We present in this paper new measurements of the AOD at 4 sites in southwestern Africa: Cotonou (6.37°N, 2.43°W) and Savè (8.1°N, 2.4°E) cities in Benin, and Abidjan (5.34°N, 3.99°W) city and Lamto (6.22°N, 5.03°W) observatory in Côte d'Ivoire. We use a lightweight handheld sun photometer measuring the solar irradiance at 465, 540 and 619 nm operated manually once per day. Measurements are performed without cloud cover in the field of view. Possible remaining cloud contamination is removed by checking the AOD variability during the measurement sequence. A total of 708 daily observations have been acquired in 2015. The AOD time series in Benin and Ivory Coast highlight a seasonal cycle with a maximum during the dry season (December-Mars) and a minimum during the wet season (May-September). The Angström exponent derived from the spectral AOD measurements enables to attribute the maximum AOD to the presence of large desert dust particles advected by the Harmattan wind during the dry season. We have found an excellent agreement (overall correlation coefficient R=0.85) between our data set and the MODIS (Moderate Imaging Spectroradiometer) aerosol products.

  16. Overview of sun photometer measurements of aerosol properties in Scandinavia and Svalbard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toledano, C.; Cachorro, V. E.; Gausa, M.; Stebel, K.; Aaltonen, V.; Berjón, A.; Ortiz de Galisteo, J. P.; de Frutos, A. M.; Bennouna, Y.; Blindheim, S.; Myhre, C. L.; Zibordi, G.; Wehrli, C.; Kratzer, S.; Hakansson, B.; Carlund, T.; de Leeuw, G.; Herber, A.; Torres, B.

    2012-06-01

    An overview on the data of columnar aerosol properties measured in Northern Europe is provided. Apart from the necessary data gathered in the Arctic, the knowledge of the aerosol loading in nearby areas (e.g. sub-Arctic) is of maximum interest to achieve a correct analysis of the Arctic aerosols and transport patterns. This work evaluates data from operational sites with sun photometer measurements belonging either to national or international networks (AERONET, GAW-PFR) and programs conducted in Scandinavia and Svalbard. We enumerate a list of sites, measurement type and periods together with observed aerosol properties. An evaluation and analysis of aerosol data was carried out with a review of previous results as well. Aerosol optical depth (AOD) and Ångström exponent (AE) are the current parameters with sufficient long-term records for a first evaluation of aerosol properties. AOD (500 nm) ranges from 0.08 to 0.10 in Arctic and sub-Arctic sites (Ny-Ålesund: 0.09; Andenes: 0.10; Sodankylä: 0.08), and it is somewhat higher in more populated areas in Southern Scandinavia (AOD about 0.10-0.12 at 500 nm). On the Norwegian coast, aerosols show larger mean size (AE = 1.2 at Andenes) than in Finland, with continental climate (AE = 1.5 at Sodankylä). Columnar particle size distributions and related parameters derived from inversion of sun/sky radiances were also investigated. This work makes special emphasis in the joint and collaborative effort of the various groups from different countries involved in this study. Part of the measurements presented here were involved in the IPY projects Polar-AOD and POLARCAT.

  17. Sensitive Small Area Photometer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levenson, M. D.

    1970-01-01

    Describes a simple photometer capable of measuring small light intensities over small areas. The inexpensive, easy-to- construct instrument is intended for use in a student laboratory to measure the light intensities in a diffraction experiment from single or multiple slits. Typical experimental results are presented along with the theoretical…

  18. Precipitation Measurements from Space: The Global Precipitation Measurement Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hou, Arthur Y.

    2007-01-01

    Water is fundamental to the life on Earth and its phase transition between the gaseous, liquid, and solid states dominates the behavior of the weather/climate/ecological system. Precipitation, which converts atmospheric water vapor into rain and snow, is central to the global water cycle. It regulates the global energy balance through interactions with clouds and water vapor (the primary greenhouse gas), and also shapes global winds and dynamic transport through latent heat release. Surface precipitation affects soil moisture, ocean salinity, and land hydrology, thus linking fast atmospheric processes to the slower components of the climate system. Precipitation is also the primary source of freshwater in the world, which is facing an emerging freshwater crisis in many regions. Accurate and timely knowledge of global precipitation is essential for understanding the behavior of the global water cycle, improving freshwater management, and advancing predictive capabilities of high-impact weather events such as hurricanes, floods, droughts, and landslides. With limited rainfall networks on land and the impracticality of making extensive rainfall measurements over oceans, a comprehensive description of the space and time variability of global precipitation can only be achieved from the vantage point of space. This presentation will examine current capabilities in space-borne rainfall measurements, highlight scientific and practical benefits derived from these observations to date, and provide an overview of the multi-national Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission scheduled to bc launched in the early next decade.

  19. Precipitation Measurements from Space: The Global Precipitation Measurement Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hou, Arthur Y.

    2007-01-01

    Water is fundamental to the life on Earth and its phase transition between the gaseous, liquid, and solid states dominates the behavior of the weather/climate/ecological system. Precipitation, which converts atmospheric water vapor into rain and snow, is central to the global water cycle. It regulates the global energy balance through interactions with clouds and water vapor (the primary greenhouse gas), and also shapes global winds and dynamic transport through latent heat release. Surface precipitation affects soil moisture, ocean salinity, and land hydrology, thus linking fast atmospheric processes to the slower components of the climate system. Precipitation is also the primary source of freshwater in the world, which is facing an emerging freshwater crisis in many regions. Accurate and timely knowledge of global precipitation is essential for understanding the behavior of the global water cycle, improving freshwater management, and advancing predictive capabilities of high-impact weather events such as hurricanes, floods, droughts, and landslides. With limited rainfall networks on land and the impracticality of making extensive rainfall measurements over oceans, a comprehensive description of the space and time variability of global precipitation can only be achieved from the vantage point of space. This presentation will examine current capabilities in space-borne rainfall measurements, highlight scientific and practical benefits derived from these observations to date, and provide an overview of the multi-national Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission scheduled to bc launched in the early next decade.

  20. Ozone measurements of the NASA-JSC U.V. photometer during the MAP/GLOBUS campaign of 1983

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robbins, Donald E.

    1987-01-01

    Results of the NASA-JSC UV photometer from flights on large balloons during the MAP/GLOBUS campaing of September 1983 are reported. Profiles obtained on September 14 and 24 agree within uncertainties above a height of 36 mb (about 22.5 km) indicating a degree of stability in the upper stratosphere. Measurements were made during ascent and descent of the first flight, and ascent of the second flight. Because the vertical descent rate of the first flight was five times lower than the ascent rate, more structure was obtained. Float altitudes of 32 km (8.1 mb) for the first flight and 39 km (3.1 mb) for the second flight were attained. Results from the photometer are compared with Nimbus 7 SBUV observations made at the same time. The profiles agree within 10 percent above the partial pressure peak. Above the ozone mixing ratio peak, the UV photometry values are about 1 ppmV lower for the second flight. The SBUV profile peak is 1-2 km higher in altitude than that of the UV photometer. Peak values agree within about 4 percent.

  1. Aerosol optical depth measurements by means of a Sun photometer network in Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingold, T.; MäTzler, C.; KäMpfer, N.; Heimo, A.

    2001-11-01

    Within the Swiss Atmospheric Radiation Monitoring program (CHARM) the Swiss Meteorological Institute - MeteoSwiss operates a network of presently six Sun photometer stations. Aerosol optical depths (AOD) at 368, 500, and 778 nm were determined from measurements of the relative direct solar irradiance, primarily to provide climatological information relevant in particular to climate change studies. The six instruments are located at various sites representative of high and low altitudes at the north and south part of the Alps in areas free from urban pollution in Switzerland. AOD time series of recordings back to 1991 are discussed, when data were first collected at Davos. An important aerosol layer is often present over stations at lower sites, showing seasonal variability and regional differences for the observed tropospheric aerosols. A classification scheme for synoptic weather types was applied to separate the AOD data into groups corresponding to different atmospheric transport conditions. On average, lower AODs are measured within advective weather situations than within convective ones. However, at the high Alpine sites such a classification is incomplete for AOD characterization due to orographically induced vertical motion. Monthly averaged values of AOD at 500 nm ranged from 0.05 during winter up to 0.3 in summer. The scale height of the aerosol optical depth is found to be 1-2 km depending on season. The high mountain sites are more suitable to the study stratospheric aerosols, for example, the change of the aerosol content and of its size distribution due to Mount Pinatubo eruption was clearly identified at Davos. In 1996 the aerosol optical depth returned to pre-Pinatubo values. Minimum AODs of ≈0.004-0.007 measured at 500 nm in 1997 are in good agreement with widely reported aerosol optical depth measurements of the stratospheric background aerosols. Besides the Pinatubo-affected period aerosol characterization by means of the Angström power law

  2. Results of SPM sun photometer measurements at Mirny Antarctic station (58-60th RAE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabanov, Dmitry M.; Prakhov, Aleksander N.; Radionov, Vladimir F.; Sakerin, Sergey M.

    2015-11-01

    The SPM portable sun photometer observations in the wavelength range of 0.34-2.14 μm are performed at Mirny Antarctic station since fall 2013. The data obtained are used to calculate the aerosol optical depth (AOD) and water vapor content of the atmosphere. The sun photometer intercalibration results and statistical characteristics of interdiurnal and seasonal variations in spectral AOD of the atmosphere are discussed. Estimates of interannual variations in the atmospheric AOD in the region of Mirny station and in the coastal zone of Antarctica are presented. The global background level of AOD of the Antarctic atmosphere is noted to be still about 0.02 at the wavelength of 0.5 μm.

  3. Oceanic Precipitation Measurement - Surface Validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klepp, Christian

    2013-04-01

    State-of-the-art satellite derived and reanalysis based precipitation climatologies still show remarkably large differences in frequency, amount, intensity, variability and temporal behavior of precipitation over the oceans. Additionally so far appropriate in-situ validation instruments were not available for shipboard use. The uncertainties are largest for light precipitation within the ITCZ and subtropics and for cold season high-latitude precipitation including mix-phase and snowfall. Hence, a long-term issue on which IPWG and GPM-GV is urging more attention is the provision of high quality surface validation data in oceanic areas using innovative ship-based instruments. Precipitation studies would greatly benefit from systematic dataset collection and analysis as such data could also be used to constrain precipitation retrievals. To achieve this goal, the KlimaCampus and Max Planck Institute for Meteorology in Hamburg, Germany funded this project that uses automated shipboard optical disdrometers, called Eigenbrodt ODM470, that are capable of measuring liquid and solid precipitation using drop size distributions in minute intervals on moving ships with high accuracy even under high wind speeds and rough sea states. Since the project start in 2009 the statistical basis for a conclusive validation has significantly improved with comprehensive data collection of more than 3 million minutes of precipitation measurements onboard six ships. Currently, six ODM470 instrument systems are available of which three are long-term mounted onboard the German research icebreaker R/V Polarstern (Alfred Wegner Institut) since June 2010, on R/V Akademik Ioffe (P.P.Shirshov Institute of Oceanology, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, Russia) since September 2010 and on R/V Maria S. Merian (Brise Research, University of Hamburg) since December 2011. Three instruments are used for additional short-term shipboard campaigns and intercomparison projects. The core regions for these

  4. Measurement of precipitation using lysimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fank, Johann; Klammler, Gernot

    2013-04-01

    Austria's alpine foothill aquifers contain important drinking water resources, but are also used intensively for agricultural production. These groundwater bodies are generally recharged by infiltrating precipitation. A sustainable water resources management of these aquifers requires quantifying real evapotranspiration (ET), groundwater recharge (GR), precipitation (P) and soil water storage change (ΔS). While GR and ΔS can be directly measured by weighable lysimeters and P by separate precipitation gauges, ET is determined by solving the climatic water balance ET = P GR ± ΔS. According to WMO (2008) measurement of rainfall is strongly influenced by precipitation gauge errors. Most significant errors result from wind loss, wetting loss, evaporation loss, and due to in- and out-splashing of water. Measuring errors can be reduced by a larger area of the measuring gaugés surface and positioning the collecting vessel at ground level. Modern weighable lysimeters commonly have a surface of 1 m², are integrated into their typical surroundings of vegetation cover (to avoid oasis effects) and allow scaling the mass change of monolithic soil columns in high measuring accuracy (0.01 mm water equivalent) and high temporal resolution. Thus, also precipitation can be quantified by measuring the positive mass changes of the lysimeter. According to Meissner et al. (2007) also dew, fog and rime can be determined by means of highly precise weighable lysimeters. Furthermore, measuring precipitation using lysimeters avoid common measuring errors (WMO 2008) at point scale. Though, this method implicates external effects (background noise, influence of vegetation and wind) which affect the mass time series. While the background noise of the weighing is rather well known and can be filtered out of the mass time series, the influence of wind, which blows through the vegetation and affects measured lysimeter mass, cannot be corrected easily since there is no clear relation between

  5. Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-02-23

    A NASA Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission shirt is seen drying in the mid-day sun outside the Sun Pearl Hotel where many of the NASA GPM team are staying, Sunday, Feb. 23, 2014, Tanegashima Island, Japan. A Japanese H-IIA rocket carrying the NASA-Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory is planned for launch from the space center on Feb. 28, 2014. Once launched, the GPM spacecraft will collect information that unifies data from an international network of existing and future satellites to map global rainfall and snowfall every three hours. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  6. The Global Precipitation Measurement Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Gail

    2014-05-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission's Core satellite, scheduled for launch at the end of February 2014, is well designed estimate precipitation from 0.2 to 110 mm/hr and to detect falling snow. Knowing where and how much rain and snow falls globally is vital to understanding how weather and climate impact both our environment and Earth's water and energy cycles, including effects on agriculture, fresh water availability, and responses to natural disasters. The design of the GPM Core Observatory is an advancement of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM)'s highly successful rain-sensing package [3]. The cornerstone of the GPM mission is the deployment of a Core Observatory in a unique 65o non-Sun-synchronous orbit to serve as a physics observatory and a calibration reference to improve precipitation measurements by a constellation of 8 or more dedicated and operational, U.S. and international passive microwave sensors. The Core Observatory will carry a Ku/Ka-band Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) and a multi-channel (10-183 GHz) GPM Microwave Radiometer (GMI). The DPR will provide measurements of 3-D precipitation structures and microphysical properties, which are key to achieving a better understanding of precipitation processes and improving retrieval algorithms for passive microwave radiometers. The combined use of DPR and GMI measurements will place greater constraints on possible solutions to radiometer retrievals to improve the accuracy and consistency of precipitation retrievals from all constellation radiometers. Furthermore, since light rain and falling snow account for a significant fraction of precipitation occurrence in middle and high latitudes, the GPM instruments extend the capabilities of the TRMM sensors to detect falling snow, measure light rain, and provide, for the first time, quantitative estimates of microphysical properties of precipitation particles. The GPM Core Observatory was developed and tested at NASA

  7. Nocturnal aerosol optical depth measurements with a small-aperture automated photometer using the moon as a light source

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Berkoff, T.A.; Sorokin, M.; Stone, T.; Eck, T.F.; Hoff, R.; Welton, E.; Holben, B.

    2011-01-01

    A method is described that enables the use of lunar irradiance to obtain nighttime aerosol optical depth (AOD) measurements using a small-aperture photometer. In this approach, the U.S. Geological Survey lunar calibration system was utilized to provide high-precision lunar exoatmospheric spectral irradiance predictions for a ground-based sensor location, and when combined with ground measurement viewing geometry, provided the column optical transmittance for retrievals of AOD. Automated multiwavelength lunar measurements were obtained using an unmodified Cimel-318 sunphotometer sensor to assess existing capabilities and enhancements needed for day/night operation in NASA's Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET). Results show that even existing photometers can provide the ability for retrievals of aerosol optical depths at night near full moon. With an additional photodetector signal-to-noise improvement of 10-100, routine use over the bright half of the lunar phase and a much wider range of wavelengths and conditions can be achieved. Although the lunar cycle is expected to limit the frequency of observations to 30%-40% compared to solar measurements, nevertheless this is an attractive extension of AERONET capabilities. ?? 2011 American Meteorological Society.

  8. Nocturnal Aerosol Optical Depth Measurements with a Small-Aperture Automated Photometer Using the Moon as a Light Source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berkoff, Timothy A.; Sorokin, Mikail; Stone, Tom; Eck, Thomas F.; Hoff, Raymond; Welton, Ellsworth; Holben, Brent

    2011-01-01

    A method is described that enables the use of lunar irradiance to obtain nighttime aerosol optical depth (AOD) measurements using a small-aperture photometer. In this approach, the U.S. Geological Survey lunar calibration system was utilized to provide high-precision lunar exoatmospheric spectral irradiance predictions for a ground-based sensor location, and when combined with ground measurement viewing geometry, provided the column optical transmittance for retrievals of AOD. Automated multiwavelength lunar measurements were obtained using an unmodified Cimel-318 sunphotometer sensor to assess existing capabilities and enhancements needed for day/night operation in NASA s Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET). Results show that even existing photometers can provide the ability for retrievals of aerosol optical depths at night near full moon. With an additional photodetector signal-to-noise improvement of 10-100, routine use over the bright half of the lunar phase and a much wider range of wavelengths and conditions can be achieved. Although the lunar cycle is expected to limit the frequency of observations to 30%-40% compared to solar measurements, nevertheless this is an attractive extension of AERONET capabilities.

  9. Nocturnal Aerosol Optical Depth Measurements with a Small-Aperture Automated Photometer Using the Moon as a Light Source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berkoff, Timothy A.; Sorokin, Mikail; Stone, Tom; Eck, Thomas F.; Hoff, Raymond; Welton, Ellsworth; Holben, Brent

    2011-01-01

    A method is described that enables the use of lunar irradiance to obtain nighttime aerosol optical depth (AOD) measurements using a small-aperture photometer. In this approach, the U.S. Geological Survey lunar calibration system was utilized to provide high-precision lunar exoatmospheric spectral irradiance predictions for a ground-based sensor location, and when combined with ground measurement viewing geometry, provided the column optical transmittance for retrievals of AOD. Automated multiwavelength lunar measurements were obtained using an unmodified Cimel-318 sunphotometer sensor to assess existing capabilities and enhancements needed for day/night operation in NASA s Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET). Results show that even existing photometers can provide the ability for retrievals of aerosol optical depths at night near full moon. With an additional photodetector signal-to-noise improvement of 10-100, routine use over the bright half of the lunar phase and a much wider range of wavelengths and conditions can be achieved. Although the lunar cycle is expected to limit the frequency of observations to 30%-40% compared to solar measurements, nevertheless this is an attractive extension of AERONET capabilities.

  10. Mediterranean aerosol typing by integrating three-wavelength lidar and sun photometer measurements.

    PubMed

    Perrone, M R; Burlizzi, P

    2016-07-01

    Backscatter lidar measurements at 355, 532, and 1064 nm combined with aerosol optical thicknesses (AOTs) from sun photometer measurements collocated in space and time were used to retrieve the vertical profiles of intensive and extensive aerosol parameters. Then, the vertical profiles of the Ångström coefficients for different wavelength pairs (Å(λ1, λ2, z)), the color ratio (CR(z)), the fine mode fraction (η(z)) at 532 nm, and the fine modal radius (R f (z)), which represent aerosol characteristic properties independent from the aerosol load, were used for typing the aerosol over the Central Mediterranean. The ability of the Ångström coefficients to identify the main aerosol types affecting the Central Mediterranean with the support of the backward trajectory analysis was first demonstrated. Three main aerosol types, which were designed as continental-polluted (CP), marine-polluted (MP), and desert-polluted (DP), were identified. We found that both the variability range and the vertical profile structure of the tested aerosol intensive parameters varied with the aerosol type. The variability range and the altitude dependence of the aerosol extinction coefficients at 355, 532, and 1064 nm, respectively, also varied with the identified aerosol types even if they are extensive aerosol parameters. DP, MP, and CP aerosols were characterized by the Å(532, 1064 nm) mean values ± 1 standard deviation equal to 0.5 ± 0.2, 1.1 ± 0.2, 1.6 ± 0.2, respectively. η(%) mean values ± 1SD were equal to 50 ± 10, 73 ± 7, and 86 ± 6 for DP, MP, and CP aerosols, respectively. The R f and CR mean values ± 1SD were equal to 0.16 ± 0.05 μm and 1.3 ± 0.3, respectively, for DP aerosols; to 0.12 ± 0.03 μm and 1.8 ± 0.4, respectively, for MP aerosols; and to 0.11 ± 0.02 μm and 1.7 ± 0.4, respectively, for CP aerosols. CP and DP aerosols were on average responsible for greater AOT and LR values, but

  11. Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-02-27

    A Japanese H-IIA rocket with the NASA-Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory onboard is seen on launch pad 1 of the Tanegashima Space Center, Thursday, Feb. 27, 2014, Tanegashima, Japan. Once launched, the GPM spacecraft will collect information that unifies data from an international network of existing and future satellites to map global rainfall and snowfall every three hours. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  12. Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-02-27

    A Japanese H-IIA rocket carrying the NASA-Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory is seen in this 10 second exposure as it rolls out to launch pad 1 of the Tanegashima Space Center, Thursday, Feb. 27, 2014, Tanegashima, Japan. Once launched, the GPM spacecraft will collect information that unifies data from an international network of existing and future satellites to map global rainfall and snowfall every three hours. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  13. Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-02-28

    A Japanese H-IIA rocket with the NASA-Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory onboard, is seen on launch pad 1 of the Tanegashima Space Center, Friday, Feb. 28, 2014, Tanegashima, Japan. Once launched, the GPM spacecraft will collect information that unifies data from an international network of existing and future satellites to map global rainfall and snowfall every three hours. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  14. Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-02-27

    A Japanese H-IIA rocket carrying the NASA-Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory is seen as it rolls out to launch pad 1 of the Tanegashima Space Center, Thursday, Feb. 27, 2014, Tanegashima, Japan. Once launched, the GPM spacecraft will collect information that unifies data from an international network of existing and future satellites to map global rainfall and snowfall every three hours. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  15. Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-02-21

    The Takesaki Observation Center is seen at the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency’s (JAXA) Tanegashima Space Center (TNSC) a week ahead of the planned launch of an H-IIA rocket carrying the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory, Friday, Feb. 21, 2014, Tanegashima Island, Japan. The NASA-JAXA GPM spacecraft will collect information that unifies data from an international network of existing and future satellites to map global rainfall and snowfall every three hours. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  16. Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-02-21

    The launch pads at the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency’s (JAXA) Tanegashima Space Center are seen a week ahead of the planned launch of an H-IIA rocket carrying the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory, Friday, Feb. 21, 2014, Tanegashima Island, Japan. The NASA-JAXA GPM spacecraft will collect information that unifies data from an international network of existing and future satellites to map global rainfall and snowfall every three hours. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  17. Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-02-28

    Flames and smoke from a Japanese H-IIA rocket with the NASA-Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory onboard, are seen during the launch from the Tanegashima Space Center, Friday, Feb. 28, 2014, Tanegashima, Japan. The GPM spacecraft will collect information that unifies data from an international network of existing and future satellites to map global rainfall and snowfall every three hours. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  18. Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-02-28

    A Japanese H-IIA rocket with the NASA-Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory onboard, fades into the dark as it launches from the Tanegashima Space Center, Friday, Feb. 28, 2014, Tanegashima, Japan. The GPM spacecraft will collect information that unifies data from an international network of existing and future satellites to map global rainfall and snowfall every three hours. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  19. Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-02-21

    The entrance sign to the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency’s (JAXA) Tanegashima Space Center (TNSC) is seen a week ahead of the planned launch of an H-IIA rocket carrying the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory, Friday, Feb. 21, 2014, Tanegashima Island, Japan. The NASA-JAXA GPM spacecraft will collect information that unifies data from an international network of existing and future satellites to map global rainfall and snowfall every three hours. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  20. Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-02-21

    The sun sets just outside the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency’s (JAXA) Tanegashima Space Center (TNSC) a week ahead of the planned launch of an H-IIA rocket carrying the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory, Friday, Feb. 21, 2014, Tanegashima Island, Japan. The NASA-JAXA GPM spacecraft will collect information that unifies data from an international network of existing and future satellites to map global rainfall and snowfall every three hours. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  1. Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-02-28

    A Japanese H-IIA rocket with the NASA-Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory onboard, is seen launching from the Tanegashima Space Center, Friday, Feb. 28, 2014, Tanegashima, Japan. The GPM spacecraft will collect information that unifies data from an international network of existing and future satellites to map global rainfall and snowfall every three hours. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  2. Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-02-25

    Masahiro Kojima, GPM Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar project manager, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), Tsukuba, bows at the Ebisu Shrine, the first shrine in a traditional San-ja Mairi, or Three Shrine Pilgrimage, in which members of the JAXA team pray for a successful launch, Tuesday, Feb. 25, 2014, Tanegashima Island, Japan. A Japanese H-IIA rocket carrying the NASA-JAXA, Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory is planned for launch from the Tanegashima Space Center (TNSC) on Feb. 28, 2014. Once launched, the GPM spacecraft will collect information that unifies data from an international network of existing and future satellites to map global rainfall and snowfall every three hours. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  3. Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-02-26

    Masahiro Kojima, GPM Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar project manager, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), left, and, Art Azarbarzin, NASA Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) project manager, talk after the GPM Launch Readiness Review (LRR), Wednesday, Feb. 26, 2014 at Tanegashima Space Center, Japan. The GPM spacecraft is scheduled to launch aboard an H-IIA rocket early on the morning of Feb. 28 Japan time. At the meeting in the space center's Range Control Center, all preparations to date were reviewed and approval was given to proceed with launch on schedule. Once launched, the GPM spacecraft will collect information that unifies data from an international network of existing and future satellites to map global rainfall and snowfall every three hours. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  4. Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-02-26

    A daruma doll is seen on the desk of Masahiro Kojima, GPM Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar project manager, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), at the Tanegashima Space Cener's Range Control Center (RCC), Wednesday, Feb. 26, 2014, Tanegashima, Japan. One eye of the daruma doll is colored in when a goal is set and the second eye is colored in at the completion of the goal. JAXA plans to launch an H-IIA rocket carrying the NASA-JAXA, Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory from the space center on Feb. 28, 2014. Once launched, the GPM spacecraft will collect information that unifies data from an international network of existing and future satellites to map global rainfall and snowfall every three hours. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  5. A procedure for determining the optical characteristics of a device for measuring illumination in the atmosphere of Venus. [broad band photometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golovin, Y. M.; Moshkin, B. Y.

    1979-01-01

    A procedure is described for obtaining the calibration, angular and spectral characteristics of a broad band photometer used on Venera 9 and 10 spacecraft to measure the illuminance regime in five spectral intervals with respect to three directions. The photometer has three identical groups of photoreceivers on which light falls through fiber light guides. Each group contains three cadmium sulfide photoresistors with light filters, a cadmium selenide photoresistor and a silicon photodiode. The temperature of the photoreceivers is measured by thermistors installed in series with the receivers.

  6. The multichannel astrometric photometer and atmospheric limitations in the measurement of relative positions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatewood, George D.

    1987-01-01

    The operational Multichannel Astrometric Photometer (MAP) now in use in the Allegheny Observatory astrometric program is the culmination of a decade of design and development effort. A detailed description of the system and its related software is followed by analysis of data acquired in four stellar regions. The study indicates an accuracy (in the sense of conformity to the best model), per night, for stars of the eighth magnitude or brighter, of 0.003 arcsec or better. These data points each have approximately twice the precision of the annual normal points obtained in our photographic program. Accuracy is shown to depend on: (1) the photon-count rate of the target star (it follows that the number of photons from the reference frame is also in important factor), (2) the duration of the observation, (3) the angular size of the reference frame, and (4) the quality of the astronomical seeing. Since (4) and, to a lesser extent, (1) involve the atmospheric characteristics at the time of observation, the probable performance at more favorable sites is discussed briefly.

  7. The multichannel astrometric photometer and atmospheric limitations in the measurement of relative positions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatewood, George D.

    1987-01-01

    The operational Multichannel Astrometric Photometer (MAP) now in use in the Allegheny Observatory astrometric program is the culmination of a decade of design and development effort. A detailed description of the system and its related software is followed by analysis of data acquired in four stellar regions. The study indicates an accuracy (in the sense of conformity to the best model), per night, for stars of the eighth magnitude or brighter, of 0.003 arcsec or better. These data points each have approximately twice the precision of the annual normal points obtained in our photographic program. Accuracy is shown to depend on: (1) the photon-count rate of the target star (it follows that the number of photons from the reference frame is also in important factor), (2) the duration of the observation, (3) the angular size of the reference frame, and (4) the quality of the astronomical seeing. Since (4) and, to a lesser extent, (1) involve the atmospheric characteristics at the time of observation, the probable performance at more favorable sites is discussed briefly.

  8. Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-02-22

    NASA GPM Radio Frequency Engineer David Lassiter monitors the progress of an all-day launch simulation for the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory at the Spacecraft Test and Assembly Building 2 (STA2), Saturday, Feb. 22, 2014, Tanegashima Space Center (TNSC), Tanegashima Island, Japan. Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) plans to launch an H-IIA rocket carrying the GPM Core Observatory on Feb. 28, 2014. The NASA-JAXA GPM spacecraft will collect information that unifies data from an international network of existing and future satellites to map global rainfall and snowfall every three hours. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  9. Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-02-22

    NASA GPM Safety Quality and Assurance, Shirley Dion, and, NASA GPM Quality and Assurance, Larry Morgan, monitor the all-day launch simulation for the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory at the Spacecraft Test and Assembly Building 2 (STA2), Saturday, Feb. 22, 2014, Tanegashima Space Center (TNSC), Tanegashima Island, Japan. Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) plans to launch an H-IIA rocket carrying the GPM Core Observatory on Feb. 28, 2014. The NASA-JAXA GPM spacecraft will collect information that unifies data from an international network of existing and future satellites to map global rainfall and snowfall every three hours. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  10. Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-02-22

    A live television view of the H-IIA rocket, with the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory onboard, is seen inside the Spacecraft Test and Assembly Building 2 (STA2) during an all-day launch simulation, Saturday, Feb. 22, 2014, Tanegashima Space Center (TNSC), Tanegashima Island, Japan. Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) plans to launch an H-IIA rocket carrying the GPM Core Observatory on Feb. 28, 2014. The NASA-JAXA GPM spacecraft will collect information that unifies data from an international network of existing and future satellites to map global rainfall and snowfall every three hours. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  11. Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-02-22

    A sign guides travelers to the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency’s (JAXA) Tanegashima Space Center (TNSC), Saturday, Feb. 22, 2014, Tanegashima Island, Japan. A launch of an H-IIA rocket carrying the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory is planned for Feb. 28, 2014 from the space center. The NASA-JAXA GPM spacecraft will collect information that unifies data from an international network of existing and future satellites to map global rainfall and snowfall every three hours. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  12. Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-02-22

    A roadside sign shows visitors of Minamitane Town various locations for activities, including the viewing of rocket launches from the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency’s (JAXA) Tanegashima Space Center (TNSC), where the launch of an H-IIA rocket carrying the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory is scheduled to take place in the next week, Saturday, Feb. 22, 2014, Minamitane Town, Tanegashima Island, Japan. The NASA-JAXA GPM spacecraft will collect information that unifies data from an international network of existing and future satellites to map global rainfall and snowfall every three hours. Launch is planned for Feb. 28, 2014. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  13. Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-02-23

    Tourist photograph themselves in astronaut space suites next to a cardboard cutout of Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) Astronaut Akihiko Hoshide at the visitor's center of the Tanegashima Space Center (TNSC), Sunday, Feb. 23, 2014, Tanegashima Island, Japan. A Japanese H-IIA rocket carrying the NASA-Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory is planned for launch from the space center on Feb. 28, 2014. Once launched, the GPM spacecraft will collect information that unifies data from an international network of existing and future satellites to map global rainfall and snowfall every three hours. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  14. Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-02-22

    A sign with a model of the Japanese H-IIB rocket welcomes visitors to Minamitane Town, one of only a few small towns located outside of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency’s (JAXA) Tanegashima Space Center (TNSC), where the launch of an H-IIA rocket carrying the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory will take place in the next week, Saturday, Feb. 22, 2014, Tanegashima Island, Japan. The NASA-Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) GPM spacecraft will collect information that unifies data from an international network of existing and future satellites to map global rainfall and snowfall every three hours. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  15. Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-02-22

    Space themed signs are seen along the roads to and from the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency’s (JAXA) Tanegashima Space Center (TNSC), Saturday, Feb. 22, 2014, Tanegashima Island, Japan. A launch of an H-IIA rocket carrying the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory is planned for Feb. 28, 2014 from the space center. The NASA-JAXA GPM spacecraft will collect information that unifies data from an international network of existing and future satellites to map global rainfall and snowfall every three hours. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  16. Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-02-21

    A light house and weather station is seen at the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency’s (JAXA) Tanegashima Space Center (TNSC) a week ahead of the planned launch of an H-IIA rocket carrying the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory, Friday, Feb. 21, 2014, Tanegashima Island, Japan. The NASA-JAXA GPM spacecraft will collect information that unifies data from an international network of existing and future satellites to map global rainfall and snowfall every three hours. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  17. Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-02-22

    Roadside flags welcome the NASA team and visitors to Minamitame Town, one of only a few small towns located outside of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency’s (JAXA) Tanegashima Space Center (TNSC), where the launch of an H-IIA rocket carrying the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory will take place in the next week, Saturday, Feb. 22, 2014, Tanegashima Island, Japan. The NASA-Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) GPM spacecraft will collect information that unifies data from an international network of existing and future satellites to map global rainfall and snowfall every three hours. The launch is planned for Feb. 28, 2014. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  18. Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-02-23

    The Tanegashima Space Center (TNSC) lighthouse is seen on Sunday, Feb. 23, 2014, Tanegashima Island, Japan. A Japanese H-IIA rocket carrying the NASA-Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory is planned for launch from the space center on Feb. 28, 2014. Once launched, the GPM spacecraft will collect information that unifies data from an international network of existing and future satellites to map global rainfall and snowfall every three hours. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  19. Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-02-22

    Andy Aylward, GPM EGSE, monitors the progress of an all-day launch simulation for the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory at the Spacecraft Test and Assembly Building 2 (STA2), Saturday, Feb. 22, 2014, Tanegashima Space Center (TNSC), Tanegashima Island, Japan. Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) plans to launch an H-IIA rocket carrying the GPM Core Observatory on Feb. 28, 2014. The NASA-JAXA GPM spacecraft will collect information that unifies data from an international network of existing and future satellites to map global rainfall and snowfall every three hours. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  20. Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-02-21

    Topiary shaped into the logo of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) is seen at the Tanegashima Space Center (TNSC) a week ahead of the planned launch of an H-IIA rocket carrying the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory, Friday, Feb. 21, 2014, Tanegashima Island, Japan. The NASA-JAXA GPM spacecraft will collect information that unifies data from an international network of existing and future satellites to map global rainfall and snowfall every three hours. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  1. Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-02-25

    Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) team members stand before at the Kawachi Shrine, the second shrine in a traditional San-ja Mairi, or Three Shrine Pilgrimage, where the team prays for a successful launch, Tuesday, Feb. 25, 2014, Tanegashima Island, Japan. A Japanese H-IIA rocket carrying the NASA-JAXA, Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory is planned for launch from the Tanegashima Space Center (TNSC) on Feb. 28, 2014. Once launched, the GPM spacecraft will collect information that unifies data from an international network of existing and future satellites to map global rainfall and snowfall every three hours. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  2. Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-02-24

    Launch pad 1 is seen at the Tanegashima Space Center (TNSC) on Monday, Feb. 24, 2014 in Tanegashima, Japan. A Japanese H-IIA rocket carrying the NASA-Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory is planned for launch from pad 1 on Feb. 28, 2014. Once launched, the GPM spacecraft will collect information that unifies data from an international network of existing and future satellites to map global rainfall and snowfall every three hours. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  3. Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-02-23

    A rocket is seen at the entrance to the visitor's center of the Tanegashima Space Center (TNSC), Sunday, Feb. 23, 2014, Tanegashima Island, Japan. A Japanese H-IIA rocket carrying the NASA-Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory is planned for launch from the space center on Feb. 28, 2014. Once launched, the GPM spacecraft will collect information that unifies data from an international network of existing and future satellites to map global rainfall and snowfall every three hours. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  4. Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-02-22

    The NASA Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory team is seen during an all-day launch simulation for GPM at the Spacecraft Test and Assembly Building 2 (STA2), Saturday, Feb. 22, 2014, Tanegashima Space Center (TNSC), Tanegashima Island, Japan. Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) plans to launch an H-IIA rocket carrying the GPM Core Observatory on Feb. 28, 2014. The NASA-JAXA GPM spacecraft will collect information that unifies data from an international network of existing and future satellites to map global rainfall and snowfall every three hours. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  5. Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-02-22

    A small roadside park honoring spaceflight is seen in Minamitane Town, Saturday Feb. 22, 2014, Tanegashima Island, Japan. Minamitane Town is located not far from the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency’s (JAXA) Tanegashima Space Center (TNSC), where the launch of an H-IIA rocket carrying the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory is planned for Feb. 28, 2014. The NASA-JAXA GPM spacecraft will collect information that unifies data from an international network of existing and future satellites to map global rainfall and snowfall every three hours. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  6. Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-02-25

    Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) are seen as they depart the Houman Shrine, the third, and final, shrine in a traditional San-ja Mairi, or Three Shrine Pilgrimage, where the team prays for a successful launch, Tuesday, Feb. 25, 2014, Tanegashima Island, Japan. A Japanese H-IIA rocket carrying the NASA-JAXA, Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory is planned for launch from the Tanegashima Space Center (TNSC) on Feb. 28, 2014. Once launched, the GPM spacecraft will collect information that unifies data from an international network of existing and future satellites to map global rainfall and snowfall every three hours. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  7. Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-02-26

    Chief officers from Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) and NASA met on Wednesday, Feb. 26, 2014 in the Range Control Center (RCC) of the Tanegashima Space Center, Japan, to review the readiness of the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory for launch. The spacecraft is scheduled to launch aboard an H-IIA rocket early on the morning of Feb. 28 Japan time. Once launched, the GPM spacecraft will collect information that unifies data from an international network of existing and future satellites to map global rainfall and snowfall every three hours. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  8. Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-02-21

    A full size model of an H-II rocket is seen at the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency’s (JAXA) Tanegashima Space Center (TNSC) visitors center a week ahead of the planned launch of an H-IIA rocket carrying the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory, Friday, Feb. 21, 2014, Tanegashima Island, Japan. The NASA-JAXA GPM spacecraft will collect information that unifies data from an international network of existing and future satellites to map global rainfall and snowfall every three hours. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  9. Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-02-21

    A sign at an overlook, named Rocket Hill, helps viewers identify the various facilities of the Tanegashima Space Center (TNSC), including launch pad 1 that will be used Feb. 28, 2014 for the launch of an H-IIA rocket carrying the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory, Friday, Feb. 21, 2014, Tanegashima Island, Japan. The NASA-Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) GPM spacecraft will collect information that unifies data from an international network of existing and future satellites to map global rainfall and snowfall every three hours. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  10. Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-02-23

    A jogger runs past a sign welcoming NASA and other visitors to Minamitane Town on Sunday, Feb. 23, 2014, Tanegashima Island, Japan. A Japanese H-IIA rocket carrying the NASA-Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory is planned for launch from the space center on Feb. 28, 2014. Once launched, the GPM spacecraft will collect information that unifies data from an international network of existing and future satellites to map global rainfall and snowfall every three hours. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  11. Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-02-25

    Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) team members bow at the Ebisu Shrine, the first shrine in a traditional San-ja Mairi, or Three Shrine Pilgrimage, where the team prays for a successful launch, Tuesday, Feb. 25, 2014, Tanegashima Island, Japan. A Japanese H-IIA rocket carrying the NASA-JAXA, Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory is planned for launch from the Tanegashima Space Center (TNSC) on Feb. 28, 2014. Once launched, the GPM spacecraft will collect information that unifies data from an international network of existing and future satellites to map global rainfall and snowfall every three hours. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  12. Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-02-27

    Caroline Kennedy, U.S. Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary to Japan, right, is welcomed by Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), President, Naoki Okumura, at the Tanegashima Space Center Visitors Center on Thursday, Feb. 27, 2014, Tanegashima, Japan. The Ambassador is visiting the space center and hopes to witness the planned launch of a Japanese H-IIA rocket carrying the NASA-JAXA, Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory. Once launched, the GPM spacecraft will collect information that unifies data from an international network of existing and future satellites to map global rainfall and snowfall every three hours. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  13. Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-02-23

    A surfer navigates the waters in front of the Tanegashima Space Center (TNSC) launch pads on Sunday, Feb. 23, 2014, Tanegashima Island, Japan. A Japanese H-IIA rocket carrying the NASA-Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory is planned for launch from the space center on Feb. 28, 2014. Once launched, the GPM spacecraft will collect information that unifies data from an international network of existing and future satellites to map global rainfall and snowfall every three hours. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  14. Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-02-28

    Caroline Kennedy, U.S. Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary to Japan, congratulated both NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory teams and noted it was an example of over 40 years of strong U.S. and Japan relations, Friday Feb. 28, 2014, Tanegashima Space Center (TNSC) Tanegashima, Japan. The Ambassador witnessed the launch of a Japanese H-IIA rocket carrying the NASA-JAXA, GPM Core Observatory. The GPM spacecraft will collect information that unifies data from an international network of existing and future satellites to map global rainfall and snowfall every three hours. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  15. Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-02-23

    Shrubs and flowers in the shape of a space shuttle, star and planet are seen just outside the visitor's center of the Tanegashima Space Center (TNSC), Sunday, Feb. 23, 2014, Tanegashima Island, Japan. A Japanese H-IIA rocket carrying the NASA-Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory is planned for launch from the space center on Feb. 28, 2014. Once launched, the GPM spacecraft will collect information that unifies data from an international network of existing and future satellites to map global rainfall and snowfall every three hours. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  16. Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-02-25

    The Ebisu Shrine, the first shrine in a traditional San-ja Mairi, or Three Shrine Pilgrimage, is seen just after members of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) team prayed for a successful launch, Tuesday, Feb. 25, 2014, Tanegashima Island, Japan. A Japanese H-IIA rocket carrying the NASA-JAXA, Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory is planned for launch from the Tanegashima Space Center (TNSC) on Feb. 28, 2014. Once launched, the GPM spacecraft will collect information that unifies data from an international network of existing and future satellites to map global rainfall and snowfall every three hours. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  17. Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-02-23

    A building designed to look like a space shuttle is seen a few kilometers outside of the Tanegashima Space Center (TNSC), Sunday, Feb. 23, 2014, Tanegashima Island, Japan. A Japanese H-IIA rocket carrying the NASA-Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory is planned for launch from the space center on Feb. 28, 2014. Once launched, the GPM spacecraft will collect information that unifies data from an international network of existing and future satellites to map global rainfall and snowfall every three hours. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  18. Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-02-25

    Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) team members pray at the Houman Shrine, the third, and final, shrine in a traditional San-ja Mairi, or Three Shrine Pilgrimage, where the team prays for a successful launch, Tuesday, Feb. 25, 2014, Tanegashima Island, Japan. A Japanese H-IIA rocket carrying the NASA-JAXA, Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory is planned for launch from the Tanegashima Space Center (TNSC) on Feb. 28, 2014. Once launched, the GPM spacecraft will collect information that unifies data from an international network of existing and future satellites to map global rainfall and snowfall every three hours. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  19. Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-02-23

    Envelopes with stamps depicting various space missions are shown at the visitor's center of the Tanegashima Space Center (TNSC), Sunday, Feb. 23, 2014, Tanegashima Island, Japan. A Japanese H-IIA rocket carrying the NASA-Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory is planned for launch from the space center on Feb. 28, 2014. Once launched, the GPM spacecraft will collect information that unifies data from an international network of existing and future satellites to map global rainfall and snowfall every three hours. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  20. Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-02-23

    A visitor looks over a Tanegashima Space Center (TNSC) Facility Map, Sunday, Feb. 23, 2014, Tanegashima Island, Japan. A Japanese H-IIA rocket carrying the NASA-Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's (JAXA), Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory is planned for launch from the space center on Feb. 28, 2014. Once launched, the GPM spacecraft will collect information that unifies data from an international network of existing and future satellites to map global rainfall and snowfall every three hours. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  1. Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-02-23

    A car drives on the twisty roads that hug the coast line of the Tanegashima Space Center (TNSC) on Sunday, Feb. 23, 2014, Tanegashima Island, Japan. A Japanese H-IIA rocket carrying the NASA-Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory is planned for launch from the space center on Feb. 28, 2014. Once launched, the GPM spacecraft will collect information that unifies data from an international network of existing and future satellites to map global rainfall and snowfall every three hours. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  2. Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-02-27

    Caroline Bouvier Kennedy, U.S. Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary to Japan, center, tours the Tanegashima Space Center, Visitors Center with Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), President, Naoki Okumura, right, on Thursday, Feb. 27, 2014, Tanegashima, Japan. The Ambassador visiting the space center and hopes to witness the planned launch of a Japanese H-IIA rocket carrying the NASA-JAXA, Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory. Once launched, the GPM spacecraft will collect information that unifies data from an international network of existing and future satellites to map global rainfall and snowfall every three hours. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  3. Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-02-22

    A roadside sign announces the upcoming launch of an H-IIA rocket carrying the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory, Saturday, Feb. 22, 2014, Minamitane Town, Tanegashima Island, Japan. Once launched from the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency’s (JAXA) Tanegashima Space Center (TNSC) the NASA-JAXA GPM spacecraft will collect information that unifies data from an international network of existing and future satellites to map global rainfall and snowfall every three hours. The launch is planned for Feb. 28, 2014. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  4. Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-02-22

    George Dakermanji, NASA GPM Power, monitors the progress of an all-day launch simulation for the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory at the Spacecraft Test and Assembly Building 2 (STA2), Saturday, Feb. 22, 2014, Tanegashima Space Center (TNSC), Tanegashima Island, Japan. Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) plans to launch an H-IIA rocket carrying the GPM Core Observatory on Feb. 28, 2014. The NASA-JAXA GPM spacecraft will collect information that unifies data from an international network of existing and future satellites to map global rainfall and snowfall every three hours. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  5. Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-02-22

    Clyde Woodall, NASA GPM launch services, is seen during the all-day launch simulation for the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory at the Spacecraft Test and Assembly Building 2 (STA2), Saturday, Feb. 22, 2014, Tanegashima Space Center (TNSC), Tanegashima Island, Japan. Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) plans to launch an H-IIA rocket carrying the GPM Core Observatory on Feb. 28, 2014. The NASA-JAXA GPM spacecraft will collect information that unifies data from an international network of existing and future satellites to map global rainfall and snowfall every three hours. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  6. Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-02-22

    NASA GPM Test Conductors, Michelle Lacombe, left, and Bill Dehaven participate in an all-day launch simulation for the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory at the Spacecraft Test and Assembly Building 2 (STA2), Saturday, Feb. 22, 2014, Tanegashima Space Center (TNSC), Tanegashima Island, Japan. Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) plans to launch an H-IIA rocket carrying the GPM Core Observatory on Feb. 28, 2014. The NASA-JAXA GPM spacecraft will collect information that unifies data from an international network of existing and future satellites to map global rainfall and snowfall every three hours. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  7. Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-02-22

    NASA GPM Systems team member Tim Grunner, left, and NASA GPM Test Conductor John Pope talk during an all-day launch simulation for the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory at the Spacecraft Test and Assembly Building 2 (STA2), Saturday, Feb. 22, 2014, Tanegashima Space Center (TNSC), Tanegashima Island, Japan. Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) plans to launch an H-IIA rocket carrying the GPM Core Observatory on Feb. 28, 2014. The NASA-JAXA GPM spacecraft will collect information that unifies data from an international network of existing and future satellites to map global rainfall and snowfall every three hours. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  8. Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-02-22

    NASA GPM Test Conductors, Bill Dehaven, left, and John Pope, standing, and other GPM team members, participate in an all-day launch simulation for the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory at the Spacecraft Test and Assembly Building 2 (STA2), Saturday, Feb. 22, 2014, Tanegashima Space Center (TNSC), Tanegashima Island, Japan. Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) plans to launch an H-IIA rocket carrying the GPM Core Observatory on Feb. 28, 2014. The NASA-JAXA GPM spacecraft will collect information that unifies data from an international network of existing and future satellites to map global rainfall and snowfall every three hours. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  9. Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-02-22

    NASA GPM Test Conductors John Pope, and, Michelle Lacombe talk during the all-day launch simulation for the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory at the Spacecraft Test and Assembly Building 2 (STA2), Saturday, Feb. 22, 2014, Tanegashima Space Center (TNSC), Tanegashima Island, Japan. Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) plans to launch an H-IIA rocket carrying the GPM Core Observatory on Feb. 28, 2014. The NASA-JAXA GPM spacecraft will collect information that unifies data from an international network of existing and future satellites to map global rainfall and snowfall every three hours. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  10. Measurement and modeling of asphaltene precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, N.E.; Hobbs, R.E.; Kashou, S.F. )

    1990-11-01

    This paper reports on experimental asphaltene precipitation data on several live-oil/solvent mixtures at reservoir conditions measured to study the effects of temperature, pressure, and composition on precipitate formation and the relationships between critical properties, PVT phase behavior, and precipitate formation. Data generated by the model can be used to identify operating conditions conducive to precipitate formation.

  11. Skylab experiment performance evaluation manual. Appendix T: Experiment T027/S073 contamination measurement, photometer and Gegenschein/zodiacal light (MSFC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyers, J. E.

    1973-01-01

    A series of analyses for Experiment T027/S073, contamination measurement, photometer and gegenschein/zodiacal light (MSFC), to be used for evaluating the performance of the Skylab corollary experiments under preflight, inflight, and post-flight conditons is presented. Experiment contingency plan workaround procedure and malfunction analyses are presented in order to assist in making the experiment operationally successful.

  12. A Simple Photometer to Study Skylight

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIntosh Gordon

    2006-01-01

    A simple photometer constructed from an LED and an op amp can be used to measure light in a number of physical situations. A variety of LEDs exist to investigate different wavelength ranges. Combined with an inexpensive transit, the LED photometer can be used to carry out skylight studies and atmospheric optical depth measurements. The activities…

  13. A Simple Photometer to Study Skylight

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIntosh Gordon

    2006-01-01

    A simple photometer constructed from an LED and an op amp can be used to measure light in a number of physical situations. A variety of LEDs exist to investigate different wavelength ranges. Combined with an inexpensive transit, the LED photometer can be used to carry out skylight studies and atmospheric optical depth measurements. The activities…

  14. Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-02-23

    Minamitane elementary school girls pose for a photo in front of a sign featuring the town's mascot "Chuta-kun", Sunday, Feb. 23, 2014, Tanegashima Island, Japan. The Chuta-kun mascot rides a rocket and has guns on the side of his helmet to show the areas history as the site of the first known contact of Europe and the Japanese, in 1543 and the introduction of the gun. A Japanese H-IIA rocket carrying the NASA-Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory is planned for launch from the space center on Feb. 28, 2014. Once launched, the GPM spacecraft will collect information that unifies data from an international network of existing and future satellites to map global rainfall and snowfall every three hours. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  15. Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-02-25

    Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) team members walk with their offering of sake to the Houman Shrine, the third, and final, shrine in a traditional San-ja Mairi, or Three Shrine Pilgrimage, where the team prays for a successful launch, Tuesday, Feb. 25, 2014, Tanegashima Island, Japan. A Japanese H-IIA rocket carrying the NASA-JAXA, Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory is planned for launch from the Tanegashima Space Center (TNSC) on Feb. 28, 2014. Once launched, the GPM spacecraft will collect information that unifies data from an international network of existing and future satellites to map global rainfall and snowfall every three hours. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  16. Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-02-25

    An offering of sake can be seen at the Ebisu Shrine, the first shrine in a traditional San-ja Mairi, or Three Shrine Pilgrimage, in which members of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) team pray for a successful launch, Tuesday, Feb. 25, 2014, Tanegashima Island, Japan. A Japanese H-IIA rocket carrying the NASA-JAXA, Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory is planned for launch from the Tanegashima Space Center (TNSC) on Feb. 28, 2014. Once launched, the GPM spacecraft will collect information that unifies data from an international network of existing and future satellites to map global rainfall and snowfall every three hours. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  17. Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-02-26

    Art Azarbarzin, NASA Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) project manager, left, participates in the GPM Launch Readiness Review (LRR) along with Chief officers from Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) on Wednesday, Feb. 26, 2014 at Tanegashima Space Center, Japan. The spacecraft is scheduled to launch aboard an H-IIA rocket early on the morning of Feb. 28 Japan time. At the meeting in the space center's Range Control Center, all preparations to date were reviewed and approval was given to proceed with launch on schedule. Once launched, the GPM spacecraft will collect information that unifies data from an international network of existing and future satellites to map global rainfall and snowfall every three hours. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  18. Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-02-26

    Members of the weather team prepare reports for the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory Launch Readiness Review (LRR) with Chief officers from Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), and NASA, on Wednesday, Feb. 26, 2014 at Tanegashima Space Center, Japan. The GPM spacecraft is scheduled to launch aboard an H-IIA rocket early on the morning of Feb. 28 Japan time. At the meeting in the space center's Range Control Center, all preparations to date were reviewed and approval was given to proceed with launch on schedule. Once launched, the GPM spacecraft will collect information that unifies data from an international network of existing and future satellites to map global rainfall and snowfall every three hours. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  19. Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-02-22

    NASA GPM Systems team members, Tim Grunner, left, Harry Culver, 2nd from left, and, Liza Bartusek, right, talk, along with with GPM Testing team member Beth Weinsteen, during an all-day launch simulation for the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory at the Spacecraft Test and Assembly Building 2 (STA2), Saturday, Feb. 22, 2014, Tanegashima Space Center (TNSC), Tanegashima Island, Japan. Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) plans to launch an H-IIA rocket carrying the GPM Core Observatory on Feb. 28, 2014. The NASA-JAXA GPM spacecraft will collect information that unifies data from an international network of existing and future satellites to map global rainfall and snowfall every three hours. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  20. Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-02-22

    A daruma doll is seen amongst the NASA GPM Mission launch team in the Spacecraft Test and Assembly Building 2 (STA2) during the all-day launch simulation for the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory, Saturday, Feb. 22, 2014, Tanegashima Space Center (TNSC), Tanegashima Island, Japan. One eye of the daruma doll is colored in when a goal is set, in this case a successful launch of GPM, and the second eye is colored in at the completion of the goal. Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) plans to launch an H-IIA rocket carrying the GPM Core Observatory on Feb. 28, 2014. The NASA-JAXA GPM spacecraft will collect information that unifies data from an international network of existing and future satellites to map global rainfall and snowfall every three hours. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  1. Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-02-22

    Andy Aylward, NASA GPM EGSE, left, Beth Weinsteen, NASA GPM Integration and Testing Team, center, and another GPM team member, talk during the all-day launch simulation for the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory at the Spacecraft Test and Assembly Building 2 (STA2), Saturday, Feb. 22, 2014, Tanegashima Space Center (TNSC), Tanegashima Island, Japan. Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) plans to launch an H-IIA rocket carrying the GPM Core Observatory on Feb. 28, 2014. The NASA-JAXA GPM spacecraft will collect information that unifies data from an international network of existing and future satellites to map global rainfall and snowfall every three hours. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  2. NitroMAC: An instrument for the measurement of HONO and intercomparison with a long-path absorption photometer.

    PubMed

    Afif, Charbel; Jambert, Corinne; Michoud, Vincent; Colomb, Aurélie; Eyglunent, Gregory; Borbon, Agnès; Daële, Véronique; Doussin, Jean-François; Perros, Pascal

    2016-02-01

    NitroMAC (French acronym for continuous atmospheric measurements of nitrogenous compounds) is an instrument which has been developed for the semi-continuous measurement of atmospheric nitrous acid (HONO). This instrument relies on wet chemical sampling and detection using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-visible absorption at 540 nm. Sampling proceeds by dissolution of gaseous HONO in a phosphate buffer solution followed by derivatization with sulfanilamide/N-(1-naphthyl)-ethylenediamine. The performance of this instrument was found to be as follows: a detection limit of around 3 ppt with measurement uncertainty of 10% over an analysis time of 10 min. Intercomparison was made between the instrument and a long-path absorption photometer (LOPAP) during two experiments in different environments. First, air was sampled in a smog chamber with concentrations up to 18 ppb of nitrous acid. NitroMAC and LOPAP measurements showed very good agreement. Then, in a second experiment, ambient air with HONO concentrations below 250 ppt was sampled. While NitroMAC showed its capability of measuring HONO in moderate and highly polluted environments, the intercomparison results in ambient air highlighted that corrections must be made for minor interferences when low concentrations are measured.

  3. Nocturnal aerosol optical thickness measured with a sun/moon photometer developed by improving the Prede Sky-radiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiobara, Masataka; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Hishida, Kosuke; Uchiyama, Akihiro

    2017-04-01

    Sun photometry to obtain the aerosol optical thickness (AOT) needs the sun. Since the moon must be another source of light instead of the sun during night-time, a moon photometer was developed by improving the Prede POM-02 Sky-radiometer to measure the spectral lunar irradiance. The original POM-02 model has an electric dynamic range of 109 to measure both of direct- and circum-solar radiation. The electronics of POM-02 was upgraded to include a 1011 dynamic range for better performance to measure the direct lunar irradiance at the visible range as well as the sun and sky measurements with a single instrument. A CCD-based position sensor was newly developed to track the moon as well as the sun continuously. The position of the moon/sun is determined with accuracy of better than 0.01° by a real-time processing system using the CCD imager. Test measurements with the improved POM-02 instrument were performed for the half to full moon conditions, and showed a good performance for lunar photometry to obtain the nocturnal AOTs.

  4. The Design and Fabrication of Fiber Optic Sensors and Photometers and Their Application in Measuring Aqueous Ammonia.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, James Calvin

    1995-01-01

    Three low-cost, solid-state fiber optic instrument designs for the analysis of aqueous ammonia in natural and process waters are presented. Two separate fiber optic chemical sensor (FOCS) designs were developed and tested. One was constructed by placing the chemical phase at the distal end of the fiber (optode FOCS), and the other was constructed by placing the chemical phase in a gap between two fibers (in-line FOCS). The dynamic responses of the two designs were evaluated relative to the chemical phase chemistry, the chemical phase volume, and the chemical phase depth (cell depth). Sensor sensitivity and response time were determined to be a function of the three chemical phase parameters. Improvements in sensitivity that increased either volume or cell depth were found to result in an increase in response time. The optode FOCS had a typical sensor response range between 0.1 mg/L and 5.0mg/L ammonia -nitrogen, and the in-line sensor had a sensor response range between 0.02 mg/L and 0.20 mg/L ammonia-nitrogen. The response rate increased with increased aqueous ammonia concentration; however, the time for the sensor to reach an equilibrium condition (response time) also increased with increased concentration. The response time was typically between 5 and 20 minutes. The third instrument design, the fiber optic photometer (FOP), evolved from the in-line FOCS and, was shown to be an important finding of this research. The FOP was developed to have performance characteristics comparable to field spectrometers and filter colorimeters. This included a detection range between 0.01 mg/L and 1.0 mg/L ammonia -nitrogen. Additionally, the FOP was demonstrated to be capable of measuring orthophosphate in surface water with a detection range between 0.01 mg/L and 1.0 mg/L as phosphate. The FOP had the advantage of reduced size, weight and system cost relative to commercially available field spectrometers and colorimeters. The results of this study illustrated the potential

  5. Mixing States of Light-absorbing Particles Measured Using a Transmission Electron Microscope and a Single-particle Soot Photometer in Tokyo, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adachi, K.; Moteki, N.; Kondo, Y.; Igarashi, Y.

    2016-12-01

    Light-absorbing atmospheric aerosols such as carbonaceous particles and iron-oxide influence the climate through absorbing sunlight. The abundances and mixing states of these aerosol particles affect their optical properties. This study examines the changes in the mixing states and abundance of strongly light-absorbing carbonaceous particles and iron-oxide particles by using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and single-particle soot photometer (SP2) in Tokyo, Japan during August, 2012. TEM and SP2 use fundamentally different detection techniques for the same light-absorbing particles. TEM allows characterization of the morphological, chemical, and structural features of individual particles, whereas SP2 optically measures the number, size, and mixing states of black carbon (BC) and the abundances of iron-oxide particles. A comparison of the results obtained using these two techniques indicates that 1) the peaks of high soot (nanosphere soot (ns-soot)) concentration periods agree with those of the BC concentrations determined by SP2 and 2) the high Fe-bearing particle fraction periods measured by TEM agree with that of high number concentrations of iron-oxide particles measured using SP2 during the first half of the observation campaign. The results also show that the changes in the ns-soot/BC mixing states primarily correlate with the air mass sources, wind speed, precipitation, and photochemical processes. Nano-sized, aggregated, iron-oxide particles mixed with other particles were commonly observed by using TEM during the high-iron-oxide particle periods. We conclude that the morphologically and optically defined ns-soot and BC, respectively, are essentially the same substance and that their mixing states are generally consistent across the techniques. Our results will improve the understanding of the atmospheric light-absorbing aerosols and will help to reduce uncertainty in aerosol effect on climate.

  6. Mixing states of light-absorbing particles measured using a transmission electron microscope and a single-particle soot photometer in Tokyo, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adachi, Kouji; Moteki, Nobuhiro; Kondo, Yutaka; Igarashi, Yasuhito

    2016-08-01

    Light-absorbing atmospheric aerosols such as carbonaceous particles influence the climate through absorbing sunlight. The mixing states of these aerosol particles affect their optical properties. This study examines the changes in the mixing states and abundance of strongly light absorbing carbonaceous particles by using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and single-particle soot photometer (SP2), as well as of iron oxide particles, in Tokyo, Japan. TEM and SP2 use fundamentally different detection techniques for the same light-absorbing particles. TEM allows characterization of the morphological, chemical, and structural features of individual particles, whereas SP2 optically measures the number, size, and mixing states of black carbon (BC). A comparison of the results obtained using these two techniques indicates that the peaks of high soot (nanosphere soot (ns-soot)) concentration periods agree with those of the BC concentrations determined by SP2 and that the high Fe-bearing particle fraction periods measured by TEM agree with that of high number concentrations of iron oxide particles measured using SP2 during the first half of the observation campaign. The results also show that the changes in the ns-soot/BC mixing states primarily correlate with the air mass sources, wind speed, precipitation, and photochemical processes. Nano-sized, aggregated, iron oxide particles mixed with other particles were commonly observed by using TEM during the high iron oxide particle periods. We conclude that although further quantitative comparison between TEM and SP2 data will be needed, the morphologically and optically defined ns-soot and BC, respectively, are essentially the same substance and that their mixing states are generally consistent across the techniques.

  7. Evaluation of ground-based black carbon measurements by filter-based photometers at two Arctic sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, P. R.; Kondo, Y.; Koike, M.; Ogren, J. A.; Jefferson, A.; Barrett, T. E.; Sheesley, R. J.; Ohata, S.; Moteki, N.; Coe, H.; Liu, D.; Irwin, M.; Tunved, P.; Quinn, P. K.; Zhao, Y.

    2017-03-01

    Long-term measurements of the light absorption coefficient (babs) obtained with a particle soot absorption photometer (PSAP), babs (PSAP), have been previously reported for Barrow, Alaska, and Ny-Ålesund, Spitsbergen, in the Arctic. However, the effects on babs of other aerosol chemical species coexisting with black carbon (BC) have not been critically evaluated. Furthermore, different mass absorption cross section (MAC) values have been used to convert babs to BC mass concentration (MBC = babs/MAC). We used a continuous soot monitoring system (COSMOS), which uses a heated inlet to remove volatile aerosol compounds, to measure babs (babs (COSMOS)) at these sites during 2012-2015. Field measurements and laboratory experiments have suggested that babs (COSMOS) is affected by about 9% on average by sea-salt aerosols. MBC values derived by COSMOS (MBC (COSMOS)) using a MAC value obtained by our previous studies agreed to within 9% with elemental carbon concentrations at Barrow measured over 11 months. babs (PSAP) was higher than babs (COSMOS), by 22% at Barrow (PM1) and by 43% at Ny-Ålesund (PM10), presumably due to the contribution of volatile aerosol species to babs (PSAP). Using babs (COSMOS) as a reference, we derived MBC (PSAP) from babs (PSAP) measured since 1998. We also established the seasonal variations of MBC at these sites. Seasonally averaged MBC (PSAP) decreased at a rate of about 0.55 ± 0.30 ng m-3 yr-1. We also compared MBC (COSMOS) and scaled MBC (PSAP) values with previously reported data and evaluated the degree of inconsistency in the previous data.

  8. Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission Development Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Azarbarzin, Ardeshir Art

    2011-01-01

    Mission Objective: (1) Improve scientific understanding of the global water cycle and fresh water availability (2) Improve the accuracy of precipitation forecasts (3) Provide frequent and complete sampling of the Earth s precipitation Mission Description (Class B, Category I): (1) Constellation of spacecraft provide global precipitation measurement coverage (2) NASA/JAXA Core spacecraft: Provides a microwave radiometer (GMI) and dual-frequency precipitation radar (DPR) to cross-calibrate entire constellation (3) 65 deg inclination, 400 km altitude (4) Launch July 2013 on HII-A (5) 3 year mission (5 year propellant) (6) Partner constellation spacecraft.

  9. Correction for a measurement artifact of the Multi-Angle Absorption Photometer (MAAP) at high black carbon mass concentration levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyvärinen, A.-P.; Vakkari, V.; Laakso, L.; Hooda, R. K.; Sharma, V. P.; Panwar, T. S.; Beukes, J. P.; van Zyl, P. G.; Josipovic, M.; Garland, R. M.; Andreae, M. O.; Pöschl, U.; Petzold, A.

    2013-01-01

    The Multi-Angle Absorption Photometer (MAAP) is a widely-used instrument for aerosol black carbon (BC) measurements. In this paper, we show correction methods for an artifact found to affect the instrument accuracy in environments characterized by high black carbon concentrations. The artifact occurs after a filter spot change - as BC mass is accumulated on a fresh filter spot, the attenuation of the light (raw signal) is weaker than anticipated. This causes a sudden decrease, followed by a gradual increase in measured BC concentration. The artifact is present in the data when the BC concentration exceeds ~3 μg m-3 at the typical MAAP flow rate of 16.7 L min-1 or 1 m3 h-1. The artifact is caused by erroneous dark counts in the photodetector measuring the transmitted light, in combination with an instrument internal averaging procedure of the photodetector raw signals. It was found that, in addition to the erroneous temporal response of the data, concentrations higher than 9 μg m-3 (at the flow rate of 16.7 L min-1) are underestimated by the MAAP. The underestimation increases with increasing BC accumulation rate. At a flow rate of 16.7 L min-1 and concentration of about 24 μg m-3 (BC accumulation rate ~0.4 μg min-1), the underestimation is about 30%. There are two ways of overcoming the MAAP artifact. One method is by logging the raw signal of the 165° photomultiplier measuring the reflected light from the filter spot. As this signal is not affected by the artifact, it can be converted to approximately correct absorption and BC values. However, as the typical print formats of the MAAP do not give the reflected signal as an output, a semi-empirical correction method was developed based on laboratory experiments to correct for the results in the post-processing phase. The correction function was applied to three MAAP datasets from Gual Pahari (India), Beijing (China), and Welgegund (South Africa). In Beijing, the results could also be compared against a

  10. Correction for a measurement artifact of the Multi-Angle Absorption Photometer (MAAP) at high black carbon mass concentration levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyvärinen, A.-P.; Vakkari, V.; Laakso, L.; Hooda, R. K.; Sharma, V. P.; Panwar, T. S.; Beukes, J. P.; van Zyl, P. G.; Josipovic, M.; Garland, R. M.; Andreae, M. O.; Pöschl, U.; Petzold, A.

    2012-09-01

    The Multi-Angle Absorption Photometer (MAAP) is a widely-used instrument for aerosol black carbon observations. In this paper, we show correction methods for an artifact found to affect the instrument accuracy in environments with high black carbon concentrations. The artifact occurs after a filter spot change - as BC mass is accumulated on a fresh filter spot, the attenuation of the light (raw signal) is weaker than anticipated. This causes a sudden decrease, followed by a gradual increase in measured BC concentration. The artifact is present in the data when the BC concentration exceeds ∼3 μg m-3 at the typical MAAP flow rate of 16.7 l min-1 or 1 m3 h-1. The artifact is caused by erroneous dark counts in the photo detector measuring the transmitted light, in combination with an instrument internal averaging procedure of the photo detector raw signals. It was found that in addition to the erroneous temporal response of the data, concentrations higher than 9 μg m-3 (at the flow rate of 16.7 l min-1) are underestimated by the MAAP. The underestimation increases with increasing BC accumulation rate. At a flow rate of 16.7 l min-1 and concentration of about 24 μg m-3 (BC accumulation rate ∼0.4 μg min-1), the underestimation is about 30%. There are two ways of overcoming the MAAP artifact. One method is by logging the raw signal of the 165° photomultiplier measuring the reflected light from the filter spot. As this signal is not affected by the artifact, it can be converted to approximately correct absorption and BC values. However, as the typical print formats of the MAAP do not give the reflected signal as an output, a semi-empirical correction method was developed based on laboratory experiments to correct for the results in the post-processing phase. The correction function was applied to three MAAP datasets from Gual Pahari (India), Beijing (China), and Welgegund (South Africa). In Beijing, the results could also be compared against a Photo

  11. Global Precipitation Measurement: Methods, Datasets and Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tapiador, Francisco; Turk, Francis J.; Petersen, Walt; Hou, Arthur Y.; Garcia-Ortega, Eduardo; Machado, Luiz, A. T.; Angelis, Carlos F.; Salio, Paola; Kidd, Chris; Huffman, George J.; hide

    2011-01-01

    This paper reviews the many aspects of precipitation measurement that are relevant to providing an accurate global assessment of this important environmental parameter. Methods discussed include ground data, satellite estimates and numerical models. First, the methods for measuring, estimating, and modeling precipitation are discussed. Then, the most relevant datasets gathering precipitation information from those three sources are presented. The third part of the paper illustrates a number of the many applications of those measurements and databases. The aim of the paper is to organize the many links and feedbacks between precipitation measurement, estimation and modeling, indicating the uncertainties and limitations of each technique in order to identify areas requiring further attention, and to show the limits within which datasets can be used.

  12. Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) L-6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neeck, Steven P.; Kakar, Ramesh K.; Azarbarzin, Ardeshir A.; Hou, Arthur Y.

    2013-10-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission will advance the measurement of global precipitation, making possible high spatial resolution precipitation measurements. GPM will provide the first opportunity to calibrate measurements of global precipitation across tropical, mid-latitude, and polar regions. The GPM mission has the following scientific objectives: (1) Advance precipitation measurement capability from space through combined use of active and passive remote-sensing techniques; (2) Advance understanding of global water/energy cycle variability and fresh water availability; (3) Improve climate prediction by providing the foundation for better understanding of surface water fluxes, soil moisture storage, cloud/precipitation microphysics and latent heat release in the Earth's atmosphere; (4) Advance Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) skills through more accurate and frequent measurements of instantaneous rain rates; and (5) Improve high impact natural hazard (flood/drought, landslide, and hurricane hazard) prediction capabilities. The GPM mission centers on the deployment of a Core Observatory carrying an advanced radar / radiometer system to measure precipitation from space and serve as a reference standard to unify precipitation measurements from a constellation of research and operational satellites. GPM, jointly led with the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), involves a partnership with other international space agencies including the French Centre National d'Études Spatiales (CNES), the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO), the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the European Organisation for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites (EUMETSAT), and others. The GPM Core Observatory is currently being prepared for shipment to Japan for launch. Launch is scheduled for February 2014 from JAXA's Tanegashima Space Center on an H-IIA 202 launch vehicle.

  13. The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Azarbarzin, Ardeshir; Carlisle, Candace

    2010-01-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GP!v1) mission is an international cooperative effort to advance the understanding of the physics of the Earth's water and energy cycle. Accurate and timely knowledge of global precipitation is essential for understanding the weather/climate/ecological system, for improving our ability to manage freshwater resources, and for predicting high-impact natural hazard events including floods, droughts, extreme weather events, and landslides. The GPM Core Observatory will be a reference standard to uniformly calibrate data from a constellation of spacecraft with passive microwave sensors. GPM is being developed under a partnership between the United States (US) National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the Japanese Aerospace and Exploration Agency (JAXA). NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), in Greenbelt, MD is developing the Core Observatory, two GPM Microwave Imager (GMI) instruments, Ground Validation System and Precipitation Processing System for the GPM mission. JAXA will provide a Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) for installation on the Core satellite and launch services for the Core Observatory. The second GMI instrument will be flown on a partner-provided spacecraft. Other US agencies and international partners contribute to the GPM mission by providing precipitation measurements obtained from their own spacecraft and/or providing ground-based precipitation measurements to support ground validation activities. The Precipitation Processing System will provide standard data products for the mission.

  14. Global precipitation measurement (GPM) preliminary design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neeck, Steven P.; Kakar, Ramesh K.; Azarbarzin, Ardeshir A.; Hou, Arthur Y.

    2008-10-01

    The overarching Earth science mission objective of the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission is to develop a scientific understanding of the Earth system and its response to natural and human-induced changes. This will enable improved prediction of climate, weather, and natural hazards for present and future generations. The specific scientific objectives of GPM are advancing: Precipitation Measurement through combined use of active and passive remote-sensing techniques, Water/Energy Cycle Variability through improved knowledge of the global water/energy cycle and fresh water availability, Climate Prediction through better understanding of surface water fluxes, soil moisture storage, cloud/precipitation microphysics and latent heat release, Weather Prediction through improved numerical weather prediction (NWP) skills from more accurate and frequent measurements of instantaneous rain rates with better error characterizations and improved assimilation methods, Hydrometeorological Prediction through better temporal sampling and spatial coverage of highresolution precipitation measurements and innovative hydro-meteorological modeling. GPM is a joint initiative with the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) and other international partners and is the backbone of the Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS) Precipitation Constellation. It will unify and improve global precipitation measurements from a constellation of dedicated and operational active/passive microwave sensors. GPM is completing the Preliminary Design Phase and is advancing towards launch in 2013 and 2014.

  15. Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission: NASA Precipitation Processing System (PPS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stocker, Erich Franz

    2008-01-01

    NASA is contributing the precipitation measurement data system PPS to support the GPM mission. PPS will distribute all GPM data products including NASA s GMI data products freely and quickly. PPS is implementing no system mechanisms for restricting access to GPM data. PPS is implementing no system mechanisms for charging for GPM data products. PPS will provide a number of geographical and parameter subsetting features available to its users. The first implementation of PPS (called PPS--) will assume processing of TRMM data effective 1 June 2008. TRMM realtime data will be available via PPS- to all users requesting access

  16. SeaWIFS Postlaunch Technical Report Series. Volume 13; The SeaWiFS Photometer Revision for Incident Surface Measurement (SeaPRISM) Field Commissioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hooker, Stanford B. (Editor); Zibordi, Giuseppe; Berthon, Jean-Francois; Bailey, Sean W.; Pietras, Christophe M.; Firestone, Elaine R. (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    This report documents the scientific activities that took place at the Acqua Alta Oceanographic Tower (AAOT) in the northern Adriatic Sea off the coast of Italy from 2-6 August 1999. The ultimate objective of the field campaign was to evaluate the capabilities of a new instrument called the SeaWiFS Photometer Revision for Incident Surface Measurements (SeaPRISM). SeaPRISM is based on a CE-318 sun photometer made by CIMEL Electronique (Paris, France). The CE-318 is an automated, robotic system which measures the direct sun irradiance plus the sky radiance in the sun plane and in the almucantar plane. The data are transmitted over a satellite link, and this remote operation capability has made the device very useful for atmospheric measurements. The revision to the CE-318 that makes the instrument potentially useful for SeaWiFS calibration and validation activities is to include a capability for measuring the radiance leaving the sea surface in wavelengths suitable for the determination of chlorophyll a concentration. The initial evaluation of this new capability involved above- and in-water measurement protocols. An intercomparison of the water-leaving radiances derived from SeaPRISM and an in-water system showed the overall spectral agreement was approximately 8.6%, but the blue-green channels intercompared at the 5% level. A blue-green band ratio comparison was at the 4% level.

  17. The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Azarbarazin, Ardeshir Art; Carlisle, Candace C.

    2008-01-01

    The GIobd Precipitation hleasurement (GPM) mission is an international cooperatiee ffort to advance weather, climate, and hydrological predictions through space-based precipitation measurements. The Core Observatory will be a reference standard to uniform11 calibrate data from a constellatism of spacecraft with passive microuave sensors. GP3l mission data will be used for scientific research as well as societal applications. GPM is being developed under a partnership between the United States (US) National .Aeronautics and Space Administration (XASA) and the Japanese Aerospace and Exploration Agency (JAYA). NASA is developing the Core Observatory, a Low-Inclination Constellation Observatory, two GPM Rlicrowave Imager (GXII) instruments. Ground Validation System and Precipitation Processing System for the GPRl mission. JAXA will provide a Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) for installation on the Core satellite and launch services for the Core Observatory. Other US agencies and international partners contribute to the GPkf mission by providing precipitation measurements obtained from their own spacecraft and,'or providing ground-based precipitation measurements to support ground validation activities. The GPM Core Observatory will be placed in a low earth orbit (-400 krn) with 65-degree inclination, in order to calibrate partner instruments in a variety of orbits. The Core Observatory accommodates 3 instruments. The GkfI instrument provides measurements of precipitation intensity and distribution. The DPR consists of Ka and Ku band instruments, and provides threedimensional measurements of cloud structure, precipitation particle size distribution and precipitation intensitj and distribution. The instruments are key drivers for GPM Core Observatory overall size (1 1.6m x 6.5m x 5.0m) and mass (3500kg), as well as the significant (-1 950U.3 power requirement. The Core Spacecraft is being built in-house at Goddard Space Flight Center. The spacecraft structure

  18. Sun photometer and lidar measurements of the plume from the Hawaii Kilauea Volcano Pu'u O'o vent: Aerosol flux and SO2 lifetime

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Porter, J.N.; Horton, K.A.; Mouginis-Mark, P. J.; Lienert, B.; Sharma, S.K.; Lau, E.; Sutton, A.J.; Elias, T.; Oppenheimer, C.

    2002-01-01

    Aerosol optical depths and lidar measurements were obtained under the plume of Hawaii Kilauea Volcano on August 17, 2001, ???9 km downwind from the erupting Pu'u O'o vent. Measured aerosol optical depths (at 500 nm) were between 0.2-0.4. Aerosol size distributions inverted from the spectral sun photometer measurements suggest the volcanic aerosol is present in the accumulation mode (0.1-0.5 micron diameter), which is consistent with past in situ optical counter measurements. The aerosol dry mass flux rate was calculated to be 53 Mg d-1. The estimated SO2 emission rate during the aerosol measurements was ???1450 Mg d-1. Assuming the sulfur emissions at Pu'u O'o vent are mainly SO2 (not aerosol), this corresponds to a SO2 half-life of 6.0 hours in the atmosphere.

  19. Global Precipitation Measurement Cold Season Precipitation Experiment (GCPEx): For Measurement Sake Let it Snow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skofronick-Jackson, Gail; Hudak, David; Petersen, Walter; Nesbitt, Stephen W.; Chandrasekar, V.; Durden, Stephen; Gleicher, Kirstin J.; Huang, Gwo-Jong; Joe, Paul; Kollias, Pavlos; Reed, Kimberly A.; Schwaller, Mathew R.; Stewart, Ronald; Tanelli, Simone; Tokay, Ali; Wang, James R.; Wolde, Mengistu

    2014-01-01

    As a component of the Earth's hydrologic cycle, and especially at higher latitudes,falling snow creates snow pack accumulation that in turn provides a large proportion of the fresh water resources required by many communities throughout the world. To assess the relationships between remotely sensed snow measurements with in situ measurements, a winter field project, termed the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission Cold Season Precipitation Experiment (GCPEx), was carried out in the winter of 2011-2012 in Ontario, Canada. Its goal was to provide information on the precipitation microphysics and processes associated with cold season precipitation to support GPM snowfall retrieval algorithms that make use of a dual-frequency precipitation radar and a passive microwave imager on board the GPM core satellite,and radiometers on constellation member satellites. Multi-parameter methods are required to be able to relate changes in the microphysical character of the snow to measureable parameters from which precipitation detection and estimation can be based. The data collection strategy was coordinated, stacked, high-altitude and in-situ cloud aircraft missions with three research aircraft sampling within a broader surface network of five ground sites taking in-situ and volumetric observations. During the field campaign 25 events were identified and classified according to their varied precipitation type, synoptic context, and precipitation amount. Herein, the GCPEx fieldcampaign is described and three illustrative cases detailed.

  20. Airborne Sun Photometer Measurements of Aerosol Optical Depth during SOLVE II: Comparison with SAGE III and POAM III Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, P.; Livingston, J.; Schmid, B.; Eilers, J.; Kolyer, R.; Redemann, J.; Yee, J.-H.; Trepte, C.; Thomason, L.; Zawodny, J.

    2003-01-01

    The 14-channel NASA Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-14) was operated aboard the NASA DC-8 during the Second SAGE III Ozone Loss and Validation Experiment (SOLVE II) and obtained successful measurements during the sunlit segments of eight science flights. These included six flights out of Kiruna, Sweden, one flight out of NASA Dryden Flight Research Center (DFRC), and the Kiruna-DFRC return transit flight. Values of spectral aerosol optical depth (AOD), columnar ozone and columnar water vapor have been derived from the AATS-14 measurements. In this paper, we focus on AATS-14 AOD data. In particular, we compare AATS-14 AOD spectra with temporally and spatially near-coincident measurements by the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment III (SAGE III) and the Polar Ozone and Aerosol Measurement III (POAM III) satellite sensors. We examine the effect on retrieved AOD of uncertainties in relative optical airmass (the ratio of AOD along the instrument-to-sun slant path to that along the vertical path) at large solar zenith angles. Airmass uncertainties result fiom uncertainties in requisite assumed vertical profiles of aerosol extinction due to inhomogeneity along the viewing path or simply to lack of available data. We also compare AATS-14 slant path solar transmission measurements with coincident measurements acquired from the DC-8 by the NASA Langley Research Center Gas and Aerosol Measurement Sensor (GAMS).

  1. Two-Matrix Photometer Control System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhantayev, Zh. Sh.; Kuratov, K. S.; Seytimbetov, A. M.; Mailybayev, A. G.; Alimgazinova, N. Sh.; Manapbayeva, A. B.; Kuratova, A. K.; Iztleuov, N. T.

    In this paper astronomical two-matrix photometer is described. It differs from common one CCD camera photometers by using the second CCD camera. It enables simultaneously to carry out the studied star and standard star light inputs measurements. The second camera application enables significantly to increase measurements accuracy and at least twice time decrease of one star observation. The significant increase of measurements accuracy is reached by carrying out simultaneous observations, and errors caused by the Earth atmosphere fluctuation are the same as for studied star so for standard star. Time decrease is reached by carrying out both stars simultaneous observations. In the paper photometer's optical mechanics scheme is given. The motion mechanism of receiving and recording block with micrometer screw rotated by stepping motor is described. It is demonstrated that exact coordinates of matrix position attached to clutch on micrometer screw are shoot by absolute magnetic encoder. The applied two-matrix photometer control system electronic equipment is described. The photometer operation control algorithm installed on Tien-Shan astronomical observatory 1-meter telescope is presented.

  2. Retrieval of ozone column content from airborne Sun photometer measurements during SOLVE II: comparison with coincident satellite and aircraft measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livingston, J. M.; Schmid, B.; Russell, P. B.; Eilers, J. A.; Kolyer, R. W.; Redemann, J.; Ramirez, S. R.; Yee, J.-H.; Swartz, W. H.; Trepte, C. R.; Thomason, L. W.; Pitts, M. C.; Avery, M. A.; Randall, C. E.; Lumpe, J. D.; Bevilacqua, R. M.; Bittner, M.; Erbertseder, T.; McPeters, R. D.; Shetter, R. E.; Browell, E. V.; Kerr, J. B.; Lamb, K.

    2005-08-01

    During the 2003 SAGE (Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment) III Ozone Loss and Validation Experiment (SOLVE) II, the fourteen-channel NASA Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-14) was mounted on the NASA DC-8 aircraft and measured spectra of total and aerosol optical depth (TOD and AOD) during the sunlit portions of eight science flights. Values of ozone column content above the aircraft have been derived from the AATS-14 measurements by using a linear least squares method that exploits the differential ozone absorption in the seven AATS-14 channels located within the Chappuis band. We compare AATS-14 columnar ozone retrievals with temporally and spatially near-coincident measurements acquired by the SAGE III and the Polar Ozone and Aerosol Measurement (POAM) III satellite sensors during four solar occultation events observed by each satellite. RMS differences are 19 DU (7% of the AATS value) for AATS-SAGE and 10 DU (3% of the AATS value) for AATS-POAM. In these checks of consistency between AATS-14 and SAGE III or POAM III ozone results, the AATS-14 analyses use airmass factors derived from the relative vertical profiles of ozone and aerosol extinction obtained by SAGE III or POAM III.

    We also compare AATS-14 ozone retrievals for measurements obtained during three DC-8 flights that included extended horizontal transects with total column ozone data acquired by the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) and the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME) satellite sensors. To enable these comparisons, the amount of ozone in the column below the aircraft is estimated either by assuming a climatological model or by combining SAGE and/or POAM data with high resolution in-situ ozone measurements acquired by the NASA Langley Research Center chemiluminescent ozone sensor, FASTOZ, during the aircraft vertical profile at the start or end of each flight. Resultant total column ozone values agree with corresponding TOMS and GOME

  3. Design and Engineering Aspects of a Compact Lyman Alpha Photometer (LAP) for In-situ Measurements of D/H Ratio in Martian Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sridhar Raja, V. L. N.; Kalyani, K.; Mohan, Aparna; Chandran, Anand; Durga Pushpavalli, J. T.; Laxmiprasad, S. A.; Kamalakar, A. J.; Viswanathan, M.; Rao, M. V. H.

    2012-07-01

    One of the most challenging multidisciplinary problems in geophysics and atmospheric science is the study of the evolution and escape of planetary atmospheres. Owing to no or little intrinsic magnetic field, the upper atmosphere of the planet Mars is always exposed to the solar wind that triggers the photo-dissociation of water by producing H and D, which are subsequently lost to space over time. Measurements of the atmospheric deuterium to hydrogen abundance ratio (D/H ratio) are significantly vital not only to examine the escape process of the current atmosphere but also to infer the loss process of water in the evolutionary history of Martian atmosphere. Till date, observations of D/H ratio measurements of Mars revealed only local values at certain time or average values over the planetary atmosphere. The exact value of the pristine Martian D/H ratio is still considered to be an open question. This paper primarily focuses on the development of a compact ultraviolet photometer capable of providing present D/H ratio of Mars from spacecraft observations. An ultraviolet photometer named `Lyman Alpha Photometer-LAP' that is currently under development at our laboratory is compact, light weight with low-power consumption and supports the spacecraft operational altitude range of 200 km to 20000 km. LAP operates on the principle of resonant scattering and absorption at Lyman-a wavelengths of H and D i.e., 121.56 nm, 121.53 nm respectively and comprises of 25 mm (Φ) x 60 mm (l) cylindrical metal/glass based gas cells filled with pure H2 and D2 gases at 3 mbar pressure. Thermally dissociated H2 and D2 molecules (due to the heating of a filament inserted in the cell) in the cells absorb the incoming H2/D2 Lyman-a incident on the cell. A 15 nm bandwidth Lyman-a filter cuts-off the undesirable radiation and a solar-blind side-on type photo multiplier tube (PMT) is selected for photon detection. Proto-LAP that is currently under development is a compact instrument that

  4. Radar/radiometer facilities for precipitation measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodge, D. B.; Taylor, R. C.

    1973-01-01

    The OSU ElectroScience Laboratory Radar/Radiometer Facilities are described. This instrumentation includes a high-resolution radar/radiometer system, a fully automated low-resolution radar system, and a small surveillance radar system. The high-resolution radar/radiometer system operates at 3, 9, and 15 GHz using two 9.1 m and one 4.6 m parabolic antennas, respectively. The low-resolution and surveillance radars operate at 9 and 15 GHz, respectively. Both the high- and low-resolution systems are interfaced to real-time digital processing and recording systems. This capability was developed for the measurement of the temporal and spatial characteristics of precipitation in conjunction with millimeter wavelength propagation studies utilizing the Advanced Technology Satellites. Precipitation characteristics derived from these measurements could also be of direct benefit in such diverse areas as: the atmospheric sciences, meteorology, water resources, flood control and warning, severe storm warning, agricultural crop studies, and urban and regional planning.

  5. Temperature-Dependent Refractive Index Measurements of Caf2, Suprasil 3001, and S-FTM16 for the Euclid Near Infrared Spectrometer and Photometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leviton, Douglas B.; Miller, Kevin H.; Quijada, Manuel A.; Grupp, Frank D.

    2015-01-01

    Using the Cryogenic High Accuracy Refraction Measuring System (CHARMS) at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, we measured absolute refractive indices at temperatures from 100 to 310 K at wavelengths from 0.42 to 3.6 microns for CaF2, Suprasil 3001 fused silica, and S-FTM16 glass in support of lens designs for the Near Infrared Spectrometer and Photometer (NISP) for ESA's Euclid dark energy mission. We report absolute refractive index, dispersion (dn/d?), and thermo-optic coefficient (dn/dT) for these materials. In this study, materials from different melts were procured to understand index variability in each material. We provide temperature-dependent Sellmeier coefficients based on our data to allow accurate interpolation of index to other wavelengths and temperatures. For calcium fluoride (CaF2) and S-FTM16, we compare our current measurements with CHARMS measurements of these materials made in the recent past for other programs. We also compare Suprasil 3001's indices to those of other forms of fused silica we have measured in CHARMS.

  6. Global Precipitation Measurement Mission Launch and Commissioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Nikesha; Deweese, Keith; Vess, Missie; Welter, Gary; O'Donnell, James R., Jr.

    2015-01-01

    During launch and early operation of the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission, the Guidance, Navigation and Control (GNC) analysis team encountered four main on orbit anomalies. These include: (1) unexpected shock from Solar Array deployment, (2) momentum buildup from the Magnetic Torquer Bars (MTBs) phasing errors, (3) transition into Safehold due to albedo-induced Course Sun Sensor (CSS) anomaly, and (4) a flight software error that could cause a Safehold transition due to a Star Tracker occultation. This paper will discuss ways GNC engineers identified and tracked down the root causes. Flight data and GNC on board models will be shown to illustrate how each of these anomalies were investigated and mitigated before causing any harm to the spacecraft. On May 29, 2014, GPM was handed over to the Mission Flight Operations Team after a successful commissioning period. Currently, GPM is operating nominally on orbit, collecting meaningful scientific data that will significantly improve our understanding of the Earth's climate and water cycle.

  7. Quality assurance in acid precipitation measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, S.; Scott, H.

    1985-06-01

    The growing interest in acid deposition has led to a proliferation of laboratories engaged in such studies. High-level quality assurance (QA) procedures are required for each program to standardize the diverse measurement methods in use and to determine the validity of differences in measurements widely separated in space and time. Both in-laboratory (quality control) and external (quality assurance) procedures are required. A complete QA program for acid precipitation measurements must address program objectives; site selection and operation; operator selection and training; sample collection, handling, and analyses; and data checking, storage, retrieval, and transmission. Objective criteria must be developed for detecting adulterated samples and invalid data. Appropriate laboratory and field blanks must be collected and analyzed. Standard techniques (sample spiking, replicate analysis of standards and samples) should ensure the reliability of analytical results. Relevant quality assurance data, including analytical detection limits, blank values, and the variability of replicate determinations, must be supplied with each data transmittal. Experimental information should be available upon request. The measurement of the pH of dilute solutions such as rain is particularly difficult; differences as large as 0.3 pH unit may be observed in replicate analyses of the same sample using different electrode types. Laboratory results are presented demonstrating typical variability to be expected in the collection, storage, and analysis of rainwater for major ions, including hydrogen ion. 15 references, 4 tables.

  8. Precipitation measurements by using of a disdrometer at Syowa station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirasawa, Naohiko; Yamanouchi, Takashi; Konishi, Hiroyuki

    2016-04-01

    The Laser Precipitation Monitor (LPM, manufactured by Thies) has been installed as a disdrometer at Syowa station, East Antarctica, since February 2015. We firstly explore the character of the data because, basically, our experiences in precipitation measurement in the Antarctic region have been very few and also because disdrometer is in a test phase toward the operational use in the world. Indeed, SPICE (Solid Precipitation InterComparison Experiment) project conducted by WMO at various sites around the world (including two sites in Japan) has tested several disdrometers, including LPM. LPM measures precipitation particle size and fall velocity for an individual particle, and compiles the precipitation microphysical parameters together with estimated precipitation intensity per minute. From our domestic experiences related to SPICE, we have confirmed that LPM measurements are affected by wind such as the higher intensity of precipitation under the higher wind speed. At the poster, we will discuss the precipitation intensity obtained at Syowa station, being compared with other meteorological parameters.

  9. Measurement of acid precipitation in Norway

    Treesearch

    Arne Semb

    1976-01-01

    Since January 1972, chemical analysis of daily precipitation samples from about 20 background stations in Norway has been carried out on a routine basis. Air monitoring is carried out at six stations. The chemical analysis programme is: sulphate, pH and acidity in precipitation, sulphates and sulphur dioxide in air. In addition, more detailed chemical analysis of...

  10. Global Precipitation Measurement. Report 7; Bridging from TRMM to GPM to 3-Hourly Precipitation Estimates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepherd, J. Marshall; Smith, Eric A.; Adams, W. James (Editor)

    2002-01-01

    Historically, multi-decadal measurements of precipitation from surface-based rain gauges have been available over continents. However oceans remained largely unobserved prior to the beginning of the satellite era. Only after the launch of the first Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) satellite in 1987 carrying a well-calibrated and multi-frequency passive microwave radiometer called Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) have systematic and accurate precipitation measurements over oceans become available on a regular basis; see Smith et al. (1994, 1998). Recognizing that satellite-based data are a foremost tool for measuring precipitation, NASA initiated a new research program to measure precipitation from space under its Mission to Planet Earth program in the 1990s. As a result, the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM), a collaborative mission between NASA and NASDA, was launched in 1997 to measure tropical and subtropical rain. See Simpson et al. (1996) and Kummerow et al. (2000). Motivated by the success of TRMM, and recognizing the need for more comprehensive global precipitation measurements, NASA and NASDA have now planned a new mission, i.e., the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission. The primary goal of GPM is to extend TRMM's rainfall time series while making substantial improvements in precipitation observations, specifically in terms of measurement accuracy, sampling frequency, Earth coverage, and spatial resolution. This report addresses four fundamental questions related to the transition from current to future global precipitation observations as denoted by the TRMM and GPM eras, respectively.

  11. Global Precipitation Measurement Mission Launch and Commissioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Nikesha; DeWeese, Keith; Vess, Melissa; O'Donnell, James R., Jr.; Welter, Gary

    2015-01-01

    During launch and early operation of the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission, the Guidance, Navigation, and Control (GN&C) analysis team encountered four main on-orbit anomalies. These include: (1) unexpected shock from Solar Array deployment, (2) momentum buildup from the Magnetic Torquer Bars (MTBs) phasing errors, (3) transition into Safehold due to albedo induced Course Sun Sensor (CSS) anomaly, and (4) a flight software error that could cause a Safehold transition due to a Star Tracker occultation. This paper will discuss ways GN&C engineers identified the anomalies and tracked down the root causes. Flight data and GN&C on-board models will be shown to illustrate how each of these anomalies were investigated and mitigated before causing any harm to the spacecraft. On May 29, 2014, GPM was handed over to the Mission Flight Operations Team after a successful commissioning period. Currently, GPM is operating nominally on orbit, collecting meaningful scientific data that will significantly improve our understanding of the Earth's climate and water cycle.

  12. A comparison of total precipitable water measurements from radiosonde and sunphotometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campmany, Elies; Bech, Joan; Rodríguez-Marcos, Javier; Sola, Yolanda; Lorente, Jerónimo

    2010-08-01

    Atmospheric water vapour is an essential component of the terrestrial atmosphere and must be known precisely in a wide range of applications such as radiative transfer modelling or weather forecasting to mention just a few examples. Vertically integrated measurements, or total precipitable water (TPW) equivalent amounts traditionally derived from radiosonde measurements, are needed in many of these applications and can also be obtained from other methodologies such as sunphotometers or GPS-based techniques. This paper presents a study comparing different measurements of TPW from radiosonde and sunphotometer data recorded from 2001 to 2004 in Barcelona, Spain. Three collocated instruments were employed in this study: RS-80A Vaisala sondes and two types of commonly used sunphotometers (Cimel 318N-VBS7 and Microtops II). A cloud screening filter was applied to photometer data based on the quality control procedure of the AERONET database. A systematic comparison among the measurements indicates that bivariate correlations between different instruments were high, with correlation factors ( r2) above 0.8 in all cases. Measurements covered all seasons allowing examining intra-annual variability, which generally did not exhibit statistically significant differences. Examination of 57 concurrent measurements of the three instruments indicated that radiosonde TPW measurements were the highest (15 mm on average) and Cimel and Microtops presented similar values (12 mm and 11 mm respectively).

  13. TIMED Imaging Photometer Experiment (TIPE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mende, Stephen B.; Fritts, D. C.; Hecht, James H.; Killeen, T. L.; Llewellyn, Edward J.; Lowe, Robert P.; Mcdade, Ian C.; Ross, Martin N.; Swenson, Gary R.; Turnbull, David N.

    1994-01-01

    This document contains a summary of the TIMED Imaging Photometer Experiment (TIPE) instrument study at the time of the termination of project due to TIPE being de-selected from the Thermosphere, Ionosphere and Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics (TIMED) mission.

  14. TIMED Imaging Photometer Experiment (TIPE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mende, Stephen B.; Fritts, D. C.; Hecht, James H.; Killeen, T. L.; Llewellyn, Edward J.; Lowe, Robert P.; McDade, Ian C.; Ross, Martin N.; Swenson, Gary R.; Turnbull, David N.

    1994-12-01

    This document contains a summary of the TIMED Imaging Photometer Experiment (TIPE) instrument study at the time of the termination of project due to TIPE being de-selected from the Thermosphere, Ionosphere and Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics (TIMED) mission.

  15. Uncertainty Estimation of Global Precipitation Measurement through Objective Validation Strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    KIM, H.; Utsumi, N.; Seto, S.; Oki, T.

    2014-12-01

    Since Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) has been launched in 1997 as the first satellite mission dedicated to measuring precipitation, the spatiotemporal gaps of precipitation observation have been filled significantly. On February 27th, 2014, Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) satellite has been launched as a core observatory of Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM), an international multi-satellite mission aiming to provide the global three hourly map of rainfall and snowfall. In addition to Ku-band, Ka-band radar is newly equipped, and their combination is expected to introduce higher precision than the precipitation measurement of TRMM/PR. In this study, the GPM level-2 orbit products are evaluated comparing to various precipitation observations which include TRMM/PR, in-situ data, and ground radar. In the preliminary validation over intercross orbits of DPR and TRMM, Ku-band measurements in both satellites shows very close spatial pattern and intensity, and the DPR is capable to capture broader range of precipitation intensity than of the TRMM. Furthermore, we suggest a validation strategy based on 'objective classification' of background atmospheric mechanisms. The Japanese 55-year Reanalysis (JRA-55) and auxiliary datasets (e.g., tropical cyclone best track) is used to objectively determine the types of precipitation. Uncertainty of abovementioned precipitation products is quantified as their relative differences and characterized for different precipitation mechanism. Also, it is discussed how the uncertainty affects the synthesis of TRMM and GPM for a long-term satellite precipitation observation records which is internally consistent.

  16. NASA Measures Extreme Precipitation From Space

    NASA Image and Video Library

    From Jan. 25 through Feb. 3, IMERG data estimated that the most extreme precipitation over the United States during this period was over 200mm (7.9 inches) in an area where stormy weather frequentl...

  17. Precipitation measurements on wind-swept slopes

    Treesearch

    Austin E. Helmers

    1954-01-01

    Precipitation catch for three calendar years is compared for four types of gage installation on a wind-swept south-facing slope with a 22° gradient at elevation 5500 ft. The 1950 precipitation catch by (1) weighing-recording gage with the orifice and an Alter type wind shield sloped parallel to the ground surface, (2) unshielded nonrecording gage with orifice sloped...

  18. Intercomparison between a single particle soot photometer and evolved gas analysis in an industrial area in Japan: Implications for the consistency of soot aerosol mass concentration measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyakawa, T.; Kanaya, Y.; Komazaki, Y.; Taketani, F.; Pan, X.; Irwin, M.; Symonds, J.

    2016-02-01

    Mass concentrations of soot (typically comprising black and elemental carbon; BC and EC, respectively) aerosols, were measured at Yokosuka city, an industrial region in Japan in the early summer of 2014. The results of laser-induced incandescence (LII) and evolved gas analysis (EGA) techniques were compared using a single particle soot photometer (SP2) and semi-continuous elemental/organic carbon analyzer (EC/OC analyzer), respectively. We revisited the procedure of SP2 calibration with a focus on investigating the relationship between LII intensity (SLII) and refractory BC (rBC) mass per particle (mPP) for some BC-proxies in the laboratory, as well as for ambient rBC particles in order to discuss the uncertainty of the SP2. It was found that the mPP-SLII for the fullerene soot and carbon black particles agreed well within 3% and 10%, respectively, with that for ambient rBC particles. This is the first time to suggest the use of carbon black as a reference material. We also found that the mPP-SLII for the aqueous deflocculated Acheson graphite particles with the correction factor given by Baumgardner et al. (2012) was still biased by around +20% to that for ambient rBC particles. EC quantified by the semi-continuous EC/OC analyzer using a thermal-protocol similar to that of Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environments (IMPROVE-like), systematically showed higher concentrations than rBC measured by the SP2. The uncertainties related to SP2 cannot fully account for this difference. This result was likely caused by the contribution of charred organic materials to EC, which can be affected significantly by thermal-protocols for the EGA. The consistency and differences between rBC and EC are discussed with regard to comparing their respective mass concentrations.

  19. Black carbon aerosol properties measured by a single particle soot photometer in emissions from biomass burning in the laboratory and field

    Treesearch

    G. R. McMeeking; J. W. Taylor; A. P. Sullivan; M. J. Flynn; S. K. Akagi; C. M. Carrico; J. L. Collett; E. Fortner; T. B. Onasch; S. M. Kreidenweis; R. J. Yokelson; C. Hennigan; A. L. Robinson; H. Coe

    2010-01-01

    We present SP2 observations of BC mass, size distributions and mixing state in emissions from laboratory and field biomass fires in California, USA. Biomass burning is the primary global black carbon (BC) source, but understanding of the amount emitted and its physical properties at and following emission are limited. The single particle soot photometer (SP2) uses a...

  20. Performance of an automated six-wavelength photometer (Radiometer OSM3) for routine measurement of hemoglobin derivatives.

    PubMed

    Zijlstra, W G; Buursma, A; Zwart, A

    1988-01-01

    A new instrument for spectrophotometric determination of oxygen saturation (SO2) and the fractions of carboxyhemoglobin (FHbCO) and methemoglobin (FHi), the Hemoximeter OSM3 (Radiometer), was tested by comparative measurements with a multiwavelength method. We found that it gave reliable results for freshly drawn samples from patients. When samples with artificially induced high proportions of HbCO or Hi, or both, were introduced, results were still sufficiently accurate. The presence of sulfhemoglobin (SHb) seriously interfered with the measurement of SO2, FHbCO, and FHi, but the instrument reliably indicated its presence. Because SHb is rarely encountered, a reliable warning for its presence is adequate for clinical practice. Using the instrument in its fetal mode, we obtained accurate results for blood samples from newborns.

  1. Development of Filter Photometers Onboard the TARANIS Satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Mitsuteru; Yoshita, Kengo; Takahashi, Yukihiro; Suzuki, Makoto; Ushio, Tomoo; Yoshida, Kazuya; Sakamoto, Yuji; Farges, Thomas; Grosjean, Olivier; Blanc, Elisabeth

    In order to study the generation region and mechanism of terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) and to identify the relationship between TGFs and transient luminous events (TLEs), the TARANIS (Tool for the Analysis of RAdiations from lightNIngs and Sprites) satellite will be launched in 2013. The scientific payload consists of two cameras, four photometers, one hard X-ray/gamma-ray detector, one energetic electron detector, and electric/magnetic field sensors. The orbit of the satellite will be polar sun-synchronous with an altitude of 700 km, and the local time of ascending node is required to be 22 LT with a slow drift of the order of 2 LT/year. Our group has joined the mission and is in charge of the development of the filter photometers. The photometers consist of four channels: PH1 is a wide-FOV (42.7 deg.) photometer with wide-band filter (150-280 nm) to detect N2 LBH emission, PH2 is a wide-FOV (42.7 deg.) photometer with narrowband filter (337+/-5 nm) to detect N2 2PG, PH3 is a wide-FOV (42.7 deg.) photometer with narrowband filter (762.5+/-5 nm) to detect N2 1PG, and PH4 is a wide-FOV (86.8 deg.) photometer with wideband filter (600-800 nm) to detect N2 1PG. As the optical detector of these photometers, metal-package photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) will be used. As the optics of the photometers, telecentric dioptrics system is adopted. The dimension (X, Y, Z) and mass of the photometers is (140, 129, 205) and 1.6 kg, respectively. We have developed breadboard model in 2007 and have carried out various performance check tests, such as sensitivity and SNR measurements and sun exposure tests. Based on these results, we have almost fixed the specification and design of the engineering model (EM) of the photometers. At the presentation, we will present the EM design of the photometers and expected performances more in detail.

  2. Development of filter photometers onboard the TARANIS satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Mitsuteru; Suzuki, Makoto; Farges, Thomas; Grosjean, Olivier; Yoshita, Kengo; Blanc, Elisabeth; Ushio, Tomoo; Takahashi, Yukihiro

    In order to study the generation region and mechanism of terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) and to identify the relationship between TGFs and transient luminous events (TLEs), the TARANIS (Tool for the Analysis of RAdiations from lightNIngs and Sprites) satellite will be launched in 2011. The scientific payload consists of two cameras, four photometers, one hard X-ray/gamma-ray detector, one energetic electron detector, and electric/magnetic field sensors. The orbit of the satellite will be polar sun-synchronous with an altitude of 700 km, and the local time of ascending node is required to be 22 LT with a slow drift of the order of 2 LT/year. Our group has joined the mission and is in charge of the development of the filter photometers. The photometers consist of four channels: a wide-FOV (42.7° ) photometer with wideband filter (150-280 nm) named PH1, a wide-FOV (42.7° ) photometer with narrowband filter (337+/-5 nm) named PH2, a wide-FOV (42.7° ) photometer with narrowband filter (762.5+/-5 nm) named PH3, and a wide-FOV (86.8° ) photometer with wideband filter (600-800 nm) named PH4. As the optical detector of these photometers, metal-package photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) will be used. As the optics of the photometers, telecentric dioptrics system is adopted. The dimension (LxDxH) and mass of the photometers is 120×190×140 mm3 and 1 kg, respectively. We have developed breadboard model in 2007 and have carried out various performance check tests, such as sensitivity and SNR measurements and sun exposure tests. Based on these results, we have started designing of the engineering model (EM) of the photometers. At the presentation, we will discuss the results derived from the performance check tests and will present the EM design of the photometers more in detail.

  3. Biomass burning layers measured with an airborne Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2) during the Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry (DC3) experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heimerl, K.; Weinzierl, B.; Minikin, A.; Sauer, D. N.; Fütterer, D.; Lichtenstern, M.; Schlager, H.; Schwarz, J. P.; Markovic, M. Z.; Perring, A. E.; Fahey, D. W.; Huntrieser, H.

    2013-12-01

    The 2012 wildfire season in the U.S. was one of the worst in the past decade. Coinciding with the period of intense wildfires in the western U.S., the Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry (DC3) experiment took place in the central U.S. in May and June of 2012. Although the main goal of this experiment was to characterize chemical processes in and around thunderstorms, biomass burning plumes from wildfires were also measured during almost every flight. Measurements were performed with three different research aircraft (NCAR GV, NASA DC8 and DLR Falcon 20E), accompanied by ground based measurements with radars and radiosondes, and measurements of meteorological parameters and lightning. The instrumentation aboard the DLR Falcon included measurements of the trace gases NO, CO, O3, CO2, CH4, SO2, volatile organic compounds, and a variety of aerosol microphysical parameters. To cover a wide range of aerosol particle sizes, the DLR Falcon payload included optical particle counters (UHSAS-A, FSSP-300, FSSP-100, PCASP-100X/SPP-200 and Sky-OPC 1.129), a multi-channel CPC system for measuring total and non-volatile particle concentrations and, for absorbing particles, a three-wavelength PSAP and a Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2). We will focus on the latter in this presentation. The SP2 measures both the mass of refractory black carbon (rBC) particles as well as their optical size, providing information about the mixing state of particles in the biomass burning layers. Most biomass burning layers were found between 3 and 8 km altitude. We will discuss measurements of plumes originating from New Mexico wildfires (Little Bear wildfire on June 11th of 2012 and Whitewater-Baldy wildfire on May 29th and 30th of 2012). Peaks of the rBC mass concentration in the plumes were as high as 2μg/m3, the fraction of rBC particles with thick coatings was higher than what is usually found in the boundary layer. During the Falcon transfer flights from Germany to the U.S. and back

  4. The effect of precipitation collector design on the measured acid content of precipitation

    Treesearch

    H. A. Weibe

    1976-01-01

    In order to evaluate the effect of different types of collectors on the measured chemical constituents of monthly precipitation collections, an array of fourteen precipitation samplers of five different designs has been in operation at Woodbridge, Ontario since March 1974. The collectors are located in an open field near the city of Toronto in an area of approximately...

  5. A unified approach to asphaltene precipitation: Laboratory measurement and modeling

    SciTech Connect

    MacMillan, D.J.; Tackett, J.E. Jr.; Jessee, M.A.; Monger-McClure, T.G.

    1995-11-01

    A unified approach to evaluating asphaltene precipitation based on laboratory measurement and modeling is presented. This approach used an organic deposition cell for measuring asphaltene drop out onset conditions. Asphaltene precipitation was detected by changes in optical fluorescence, electrical conductance, and visual observation. A series of experiments measured the effects of changing pressure, temperature and composition on asphaltene precipitation. A fully-compositional V-L-S mathematical model completed the analysis by matching the experimental results. The model was then used to forecast asphaltene precipitation under a variety of production scenarios including response to gas-lift operations, and to evaluate the possible location of a tar-mat.

  6. Measurement of solid precipitation with an optical disdrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lempio, G. E.; Bumke, K.; Macke, A.

    2007-04-01

    A study about measurements of solid precipitation using an optical disdrometer is presented. The optical disdrometer is an improved version of the ODM 470 disdrometer. It allows to measure hydrometeors within a size range of 0.4 to 22 mm in diameter. The main advantage of this instrument is its ability to estimate accurately precipitation even under strong wind conditions (Großklaus, 1996). To measure solid precipitation a geometrical model was developed to determine the mean cross-sectional area of snow crystals for different predefined shapes and sizes. It serves to develop an algorithm, which relates the mean cross sectional area of snow crystals to their maximum dimension, liquid water content, and terminal velocity. The algorithm was applied to disdrometer measurements during winter 1999/2000 in Uppsala/Sweden. Resulting precipitation was compared to independent measurements of a Geonor gauge and to manual measurements. In terms of daily precipitation the disdrometer shows a reliable performance.

  7. Measuring Black Carbon Concentrations in Liquid Samples Using the Single Particle Soot Photometer: Addressing Black Carbon Losses During Sample Storage and Nebulization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menking, J. A.; Kaspari, S.; Jenkins, M.

    2011-12-01

    Black Carbon (BC), an aerosol created from the incomplete combustion of fossil and bio-fuels, is the second largest contributor to global warming next to CO2. BC deposited on snow and ice reduces the surface albedo, accelerating seasonal snowmelt and glacier retreat and influencing the regional water cycle and climate (Hansen and Nazarenko, 2004). BC emissions and its post-depositional spatial distribution in snow and ice are a large uncertainty in climate change analyses, thus measurements of global BC concentrations in liquid samples of snow and ice are desirable. The Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2) is a relatively new method for measuring BC concentrations in liquid samples with promising advantages over other commonly used methods, namely that measurements require smaller sample volumes and are not affected by the presence of other absorbing particles. Despite potential advantages over traditional methods, total BC in liquid samples cannot be quantified because of methodological uncertainties. Preliminary tests show BC losses related to (1) nebulization and (2) changes to the sample during storage. BC in storage may adhere to the vial walls, resulting in BC losses. Particles containing BC may also agglomerate to form large particles with sizes outside of the SP2 detection range (80-650nm). Further losses are indicated in a comparison of polydisperse Aquadag (BC standard) particle size distributions between the ultrasonic nebulizer and a collision-type atomizer, which shows a loss of particles > ~500nm associated with the Cetac U-5000AT+ ultrasonic nebulizer. Larger particles may not be nebulized because of inefficiencies related to the ultrasonic transducer plate, and/or highly charged particles may adhere to the glass within the nebulizer, also resulting in BC losses. The purpose of this study was to determine the methods of storage and nebulization that maximize the amount of BC delivered to the SP2 inlet. Storage and sample parameters tested include

  8. Comparison of Water Vapor Measurements by Airborne Sun Photometer and Near-Coincident in Situ and Satellite Sensors during INTEX/ITCT 2004

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Livingston, J.; Schmid, B.; Redemann, J.; Russell, P. B.; Ramirez, S. A.; Eilers, J.; Gore, W.; Howard, S.; Pommier, J.; Fetzer, E. J.; hide

    2007-01-01

    We have retrieved columnar water vapor (CWV) from measurements acquired by the 14-channel NASA Ames Airborne Tracking Sun photometer (AATS-14) during 19 Jetstream 31 (J31) flights over the Gulf of Maine in summer 2004 in support of the Intercontinental Chemical Transport Experiment (INTEX)/Intercontinental Transport and Chemical Transformation (ITCT) experiments. In this paper we compare AATS-14 water vapor retrievals during aircraft vertical profiles with measurements by an onboard Vaisala HMP243 humidity sensor and by ship radiosondes and with water vapor profiles retrieved from AIRS measurements during eight Aqua overpasses. We also compare AATS CWV and MODIS infrared CWV retrievals during five Aqua and five Terra overpasses. For 35 J31 vertical profiles, mean (bias) and RMS AATS-minus-Vaisala layer-integrated water vapor (LWV) differences are -7.1 percent and 8.8 percent, respectively. For 22 aircraft profiles within 1 hour and 130 km of radiosonde soundings, AATS-minus-sonde bias and RMS LWV differences are -5.4 percent and 10.7 percent, respectively, and corresponding J31 Vaisala-minus-sonde differences are 2.3 percent and 8.4 percent, respectively. AIRS LWV retrievals within 80 lan of J31 profiles yield lower bias and RMS differences compared to AATS or Vaisala retrievals than do AIRS retrievals within 150 km of the J31. In particular, for AIRS-minus-AATS LWV differences, the bias decreases from 8.8 percent to 5.8 percent, and the RMS difference decreases from 2 1.5 percent to 16.4 percent. Comparison of vertically resolved AIRS water vapor retrievals (LWVA) to AATS values in fixed pressure layers yields biases of -2 percent to +6 percent and RMS differences of -20 percent below 700 hPa. Variability and magnitude of these differences increase significantly above 700 hPa. MODIS IR retrievals of CWV in 205 grid cells (5 x 5 km at nadir) are biased wet by 10.4 percent compared to AATS over-ocean near-surface retrievals. The MODIS-Aqua subset (79 grid cells

  9. The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission: An Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hou, Arthur Y.

    2006-01-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission is an international satellite mission that uses advanced precipitation radar with a constellation of passive microwave radiometers to improve the accuracy, sampling, and coverage of global precipitation measurements. It is a science mission with integrated applications goals focusing on (1) advancing the knowledge of the global watedenergy cycle variability and freshwater availability and (2) improving weather, climate, and hydrological prediction capabilities through more accurate and frequent measurements of global precipitation. The GPM Mission is currently a partnership between NASA and the Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), with opportunities for additional domestic and international partners in satellite constellation buildup and ground validation activities. The GPM Core satellite, which carries a JAXA-provided dual-frequency precipitation radar and a NASAprovided microwave radiometers with high-frequency capabilities for light rain and frozen precipitation measurements, is expected to be launched in the 2010 timeframe. The GPM Core will serve as a precipitation physics laboratory and a calibration system for improved precipitation measurements by a heterogeneous constellation of dedicated and operational microwave radiometers. NASA also plans to provide a "wild card" constellation member with a copy of the radiometer carried on the GPM Core to be placed in an orbit that maximizes the coverage and sampling of the constellation. An overview of the GPM mission concept, instrument capabilities, ground validation plans, and the expected scientific and societal benefits will be presented.

  10. The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission: An Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hou, Arthur Y.

    2006-01-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission is an international satellite mission that uses advanced precipitation radar with a constellation of passive microwave radiometers to improve the accuracy, sampling, and coverage of global precipitation measurements. It is a science mission with integrated applications goals focusing on (1) advancing the knowledge of the global watedenergy cycle variability and freshwater availability and (2) improving weather, climate, and hydrological prediction capabilities through more accurate and frequent measurements of global precipitation. The GPM Mission is currently a partnership between NASA and the Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), with opportunities for additional domestic and international partners in satellite constellation buildup and ground validation activities. The GPM Core satellite, which carries a JAXA-provided dual-frequency precipitation radar and a NASAprovided microwave radiometers with high-frequency capabilities for light rain and frozen precipitation measurements, is expected to be launched in the 2010 timeframe. The GPM Core will serve as a precipitation physics laboratory and a calibration system for improved precipitation measurements by a heterogeneous constellation of dedicated and operational microwave radiometers. NASA also plans to provide a "wild card" constellation member with a copy of the radiometer carried on the GPM Core to be placed in an orbit that maximizes the coverage and sampling of the constellation. An overview of the GPM mission concept, instrument capabilities, ground validation plans, and the expected scientific and societal benefits will be presented.

  11. A New Approach to Measuring Precipitation over Snow Cover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Y.; Liu, Y.; Arsenault, K. R.; Behrangi, A.

    2013-12-01

    One of the great challenges for truly global precipitation measurement is the remote sensing of precipitation over snow cover. Due to the physical limitation in the current retrieval methodology, satellite-based measurements of precipitation over snow-covered areas are unreliable and largely unavailable. In this presentation, a new satellite-based approach to the estimation of precipitation over snow cover is proposed and tested. The method is based on the principle that precipitation can be inferred by the changes in the water content of the snowpack. During the EOS era operational remote sensing of snow water equivalent is available, with similar spatial and temporal resolutions of the precipitation-sensing passive microwave sensors. With these satellite-based snow water equivalent measurements, daily precipitation amounts can be derived. We tested the method for the Northern Hemisphere for three snow-accumulation seasons, with AMSR-E snow water equivalent data, and compared with existing datasets, including CPC gauge analysis and GPCP. The new precipitation estimates captured natural- and realistic-looking storm events over largely under-instrumented regions. The spatial distribution appeared more reasonable than existing global datasets over many boreal inland areas. The results indicate this approach is feasible and promising. Besides the capability to estimate precipitation over snow cover, this new approach has the following additional advantages over the conventional methods: 1. The relationship between precipitation and the observed variable (i.e., SWE) is more direct than the conventional methods, which have to rely on scattering signals from hydrometeors (passive microwave) or cloud top brightness temperatures (infrared) to infer precipitation; 2. Temporal sampling error is small. The method will not miss any precipitation amount even if there are no instantaneous satellite overpasses during the precipitation event. The memory of the snowpack stores the

  12. Inconsistency in precipitation measurements across the Alaska-Yukon border

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scaff, L.; Yang, D.; Li, Y.; Mekis, E.

    2015-12-01

    This study quantifies the inconsistency in gauge precipitation observations across the border of Alaska and Yukon. It analyses the precipitation measurements by the national standard gauges (National Weather Service (NWS) 8 in. gauge and Nipher gauge) and the bias-corrected data to account for wind effect on the gauge catch, wetting loss and trace events. The bias corrections show a significant amount of errors in the gauge records due to the windy and cold environment in the northern areas of Alaska and Yukon. Monthly corrections increase solid precipitation by 136 % in January and 20 % for July at the Barter Island in Alaska, and about 31 % for January and 4 % for July at the Yukon stations. Regression analyses of the monthly precipitation data show a stronger correlation for the warm months (mainly rainfall) than for cold month (mainly snowfall) between the station pairs, and small changes in the precipitation relationship due to the bias corrections. Double mass curves also indicate changes in the cumulative precipitation over the study periods. This change leads to a smaller and inverted precipitation gradient across the border, representing a significant modification in the precipitation pattern over the northern region. Overall, this study discovers significant inconsistency in the precipitation measurements across the USA-Canada border. This discontinuity is greater for snowfall than for rainfall, as gauge snowfall observations have large errors in windy and cold conditions. This result will certainly impact regional, particularly cross-border, climate and hydrology investigations.

  13. Global Precipitation Measurement: GPM Microwave Imager (GMI) Algorithm Development Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stocker, Erich Franz

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the approach to the development of the Global Precipitation Measurement algorithm. This presentation includes information about the responsibilities for the development of the algorithm, and the calibration. Also included is information about the orbit, and the sun angle. The test of the algorithm code will be done with synthetic data generated from the Precipitation Processing System (PPS).

  14. The Global Precipitation Measurement Mission: NASA Status and Early Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skofronick-Jackson, Gail; Huffman, G.; Petersen, W.; Kidd, Chris

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission’s Core satellite, launched 27 February 2014, is well-designed to estimate precipitation from 0.2 to 110 mm/hr and to detect falling snow. Knowing where and how much rain and snow falls globally is vital to understanding how weather and climate impact both our environment and Earth’s water and energy cycles, including effects on agriculture, fresh water availability, and responses to natural disasters. GPM is a joint NASA-JAXA mission. The design of the GPM Core Observatory is an advancement of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM)’s highly successful rain-sensing package. The cornerstone of the GPM mission is the deployment of a Core Observatory in a unique 65 (°) non-Sun-synchronous orbit serving as a physics observatory and a calibration reference to improve precipitation measurements by a constellation of 8 or more dedicated and operational, U.S. and international passive microwave sensors. The Core Observatory carries a Ku/Ka-band Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) and a multi-channel (10-183 GHz) GPM Microwave Radiometer (GMI). The DPR provides measurements of 3-D precipitation structures and microphysical properties, which are key to achieving a better understanding of precipitation processes and improving retrieval algorithms for passive microwave radiometers. The combined use of DPR and GMI measurements places greater constraints on possible solutions to radiometer retrievals to improve the accuracy and consistency of precipitation retrievals from all constellation radiometers. Furthermore, since light rain and falling snow account for a significant fraction of precipitation occurrence in middle and high latitudes, the GPM instruments extend the capabilities of the TRMM sensors to detect falling snow, measure light rain, and provide, for the first time, quantitative estimates of microphysical properties of precipitation particles. The GPM mission science objectives and instrument

  15. NASA's Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission for Science and Society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Gail

    2016-04-01

    Water is fundamental to life on Earth. Knowing where and how much rain and snow falls globally is vital to understanding how weather and climate impact both our environment and Earth's water and energy cycles, including effects on agriculture, fresh water availability, and responses to natural disasters. The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission, launched February 27, 2014, is an international satellite mission to unify and advance precipitation measurements from a constellation of research and operational sensors to provide "next-generation" precipitation products. The joint NASA-JAXA GPM Core Observatory serves as the cornerstone and anchor to unite the constellation radiometers. The GPM Core Observatory carries a Ku/Ka-band Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) and a multi-channel (10-183 GHz) GPM Microwave Radiometer (GMI). Furthermore, since light rain and falling snow account for a significant fraction of precipitation occurrence in middle and high latitudes, the GPM instruments extend the capabilities of the TRMM sensors to detect falling snow, measure light rain, and provide, for the first time, quantitative estimates of microphysical properties of precipitation particles. As a science mission with integrated application goals, GPM is designed to (1) advance precipitation measurement capability from space through combined use of active and passive microwave sensors, (2) advance the knowledge of the global water/energy cycle and freshwater availability through better description of the space-time variability of global precipitation, and (3) improve weather, climate, and hydrological prediction capabilities through more accurate and frequent measurements of instantaneous precipitation rates and time-integrated rainfall accumulation. Since launch, the instruments have been collecting outstanding precipitation data. New scientific insights resulting from GPM data, an overview of the GPM mission concept and science activities in the United States

  16. Successes with the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skofronick-Jackson, Gail; Huffman, George; Stocker, Erich; Petersen, Walter

    2016-01-01

    Water is essential to our planet Earth. Knowing when, where and how precipitation falls is crucial for understanding the linkages between the Earth's water and energy cycles and is extraordinarily important for sustaining life on our planet during climate change. The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory spacecraft launched February 27, 2014, is the anchor to the GPM international satellite mission to unify and advance precipitation measurements from a constellation of research and operational sensors to provide "next-generation" precipitation products. GPM is currently a partnership between NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA). Status and successes in terms of spacecraft, instruments, retrieval products, validation, and impacts for science and society will be presented. Precipitation, microwave, satellite

  17. Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission: Precipitation Processing System (PPS) GPM Mission Gridded Text Products Provide Surface Precipitation Retrievals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stocker, Erich Franz; Kelley, O.; Kummerow, C.; Huffman, G.; Olson, W.; Kwiatkowski, J.

    2015-01-01

    In February 2015, the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission core satellite will complete its first year in space. The core satellite carries a conically scanning microwave imager called the GPM Microwave Imager (GMI), which also has 166 GHz and 183 GHz frequency channels. The GPM core satellite also carries a dual frequency radar (DPR) which operates at Ku frequency, similar to the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Precipitation Radar, and a new Ka frequency. The precipitation processing system (PPS) is producing swath-based instantaneous precipitation retrievals from GMI, both radars including a dual-frequency product, and a combined GMIDPR precipitation retrieval. These level 2 products are written in the HDF5 format and have many additional parameters beyond surface precipitation that are organized into appropriate groups. While these retrieval algorithms were developed prior to launch and are not optimal, these algorithms are producing very creditable retrievals. It is appropriate for a wide group of users to have access to the GPM retrievals. However, for researchers requiring only surface precipitation, these L2 swath products can appear to be very intimidating and they certainly do contain many more variables than the average researcher needs. Some researchers desire only surface retrievals stored in a simple easily accessible format. In response, PPS has begun to produce gridded text based products that contain just the most widely used variables for each instrument (surface rainfall rate, fraction liquid, fraction convective) in a single line for each grid box that contains one or more observations.This paper will describe the gridded data products that are being produced and provide an overview of their content. Currently two types of gridded products are being produced: (1) surface precipitation retrievals from the core satellite instruments GMI, DPR, and combined GMIDPR (2) surface precipitation retrievals for the partner constellation

  18. Global Precipitation Measurement Program and the Development of Dual-Frequency Precipitation Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iguchi, Toshio; Oki, Riko; Smith, Eric A.; Furuhama, Yoji

    2002-01-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) program is a mission to measure precipitation from space, and is a similar but much expanded mission of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission. Its scope is not limited to scientific research, but includes practical and operational applications such as weather forecasting and water resource management. To meet the requirements of operational use, the GPM uses multiple low-orbiting satellites to increase the sampling frequency and to create three-hourly global rain maps that will be delivered to the world in quasi-real time. A dual-frequency radar (DPR) will be installed on the primary satellite that plays an important role in the whole mission. The DPR will realize measurement of precipitation with high sensitivity, high precision and high resolutions. This paper describes an outline of the GPM program, its issues and the roles and development of the DPR.

  19. Comparison of Aerosol Optical Properties and Water Vapor Among Ground and Airborne Lidars and Sun Photometers During TARFOX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrare, R.; Ismail, S.; Browell, E.; Brackett, V.; Clayton, M.; Kooi, S.; Melfi, S. H.; Whiteman, D.; Schwemmer, G.; Evans, K.

    2000-01-01

    We compare aerosol optical thickness (AOT) and precipitable water vapor (PWV) measurements derived from ground and airborne lidars and sun photometers during the Tropospheric Aerosol Radiative Forcing Observational Experiment. Such comparisons are important to verify the consistency between various remote sensing measurements before employing them in any assessment of the impact of aerosols on the global radiation balance. Total scattering ratio and extinction profiles measured by the ground-based NASA Goddard Space Flight Center scanning Raman lidar system, which operated from Wallops Island, Virginia (37.86 deg N, 75.51 deg W); are compared with those measured by the Lidar Atmospheric Sensing Experiment (LASE) airborne lidar system aboard the NASA ER-2 aircraft. Bias and root-mean-square differences indicate that these measurements generally agreed within about 10%. Aerosol extinction profiles and estimates of AOT are derived from both lidar measurements using a value for the aerosol extinction/backscattering ratio S(sub a) = 60 sr for the aerosol extinction/backscattering ratio, which was determined from the Raman lidar measurements. The lidar measurements of AOT are found to be generally within 25% of the AOT measured by the NASA Ames Airborne Tracking Sun Photometer (AATS-6). However, during certain periods the lidar and Sun photometer measurements of AOT differed significantly, possibly because of variations in the aerosol physical characteristics (e.g., size, composition) which affect S(sub a). Estimates of PWV, derived from water vapor mixing ratio profiles measured by LASE, are within 5-10% of PWV derived from the airborne Sun photometer. Aerosol extinction profiles measured by both lidars show that aerosols were generally concentrated in the lowest 2-3 km.

  20. Comparison of Aerosol Optical Properties and Water Vapor Among Ground and Airborne Lidars and Sun Photometers During TARFOX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrare, R.; Ismail, S.; Browell, E.; Brackett, V.; Clayton, M.; Kooi, S.; Melfi, S. H.; Whiteman, D.; Schwemmer, G.; Evans, K.

    2000-01-01

    We compare aerosol optical thickness (AOT) and precipitable water vapor (PWV) measurements derived from ground and airborne lidars and sun photometers during the Tropospheric Aerosol Radiative Forcing Observational Experiment. Such comparisons are important to verify the consistency between various remote sensing measurements before employing them in any assessment of the impact of aerosols on the global radiation balance. Total scattering ratio and extinction profiles measured by the ground-based NASA Goddard Space Flight Center scanning Raman lidar system, which operated from Wallops Island, Virginia (37.86 deg N, 75.51 deg W); are compared with those measured by the Lidar Atmospheric Sensing Experiment (LASE) airborne lidar system aboard the NASA ER-2 aircraft. Bias and root-mean-square differences indicate that these measurements generally agreed within about 10%. Aerosol extinction profiles and estimates of AOT are derived from both lidar measurements using a value for the aerosol extinction/backscattering ratio S(sub a) = 60 sr for the aerosol extinction/backscattering ratio, which was determined from the Raman lidar measurements. The lidar measurements of AOT are found to be generally within 25% of the AOT measured by the NASA Ames Airborne Tracking Sun Photometer (AATS-6). However, during certain periods the lidar and Sun photometer measurements of AOT differed significantly, possibly because of variations in the aerosol physical characteristics (e.g., size, composition) which affect S(sub a). Estimates of PWV, derived from water vapor mixing ratio profiles measured by LASE, are within 5-10% of PWV derived from the airborne Sun photometer. Aerosol extinction profiles measured by both lidars show that aerosols were generally concentrated in the lowest 2-3 km.

  1. Satellite-based Precipitation Measurements For Science and Society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skofronick Jackson, G.; Huffman, G. J.

    2016-12-01

    Water is essential to Earth. Thus, knowing when, where, and how precipitation falls is of paramount importance for science and society. Some areas of the world have dense ground-based rain observations, but the vast oceans, less populated regions, and parts of developing countries lack adequate surface precipitation data. Satellites provide an optimal platform to measure precipitation globally. In the 1970's satellites started measuring precipitation and, over time, satellite precipitation sensors improved considerably. A major breakthrough was the 1998 launch of the joint NASA-Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM). The TRMM spacecraft had both a multi-frequency passive microwave imaging radiometer for measuring wide-swath rainfall surface intensity and horizontal structures, and a single-frequency radar channel capable of generating 3D views of rain in clouds. In 2014, NASA and JAXA launched the Global Precipitation Measurement Core Observatory (GPM-CO) spacecraft carrying the most advanced precipitation sensors currently in space, including a dual-frequency precipitation radar and a well-calibrated, multi-frequency passive microwave radiometer. The GPM-CO was designed to measure precipitation rates from 0.2-110 mm hr-1, to provide 3D particle size distributions, and to detect moderate to intense snow events, considerably improving over TRMM's capabilities. The GPM-CO serves as a reference for unifying data from a constellation of partner satellites to provide next-generation, merged estimates globally and with high temporal (30 min) and spatial (0.1ox0.1o) resolutions. GPM data have been used for observing hurricanes from the tropics to mid-latitudes; developing susceptibility maps for floods, landslides, and droughts; providing inputs into weather and climate models; and offering new insights into agricultural productivity and world health. The current status of GPM, its ongoing science, and the future plans will be

  2. Current status of the dual-frequency precipitation radar on the global precipitation measurement core spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furukawa, K.; Nio, T.; Konishi, T.; Oki, R.; Masaki, T.; Kubota, T.; Iguchi, T.; Hanado, H.

    2015-10-01

    The Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) on the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) core satellite was developed by Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) and National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT). The GPM is a follow-on mission of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM). The objectives of the GPM mission are to observe global precipitation more frequently and accurately than TRMM. The frequent precipitation measurement about every three hours will be achieved by some constellation satellites with microwave radiometers (MWRs) or microwave sounders (MWSs), which will be developed by various countries. The accurate measurement of precipitation in mid-high latitudes will be achieved by the DPR. The GPM core satellite is a joint product of National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), JAXA and NICT. NASA developed the satellite bus and the GPM Microwave Imager (GMI), and JAXA and NICT developed the DPR. JAXA and NICT developed the DPR through procurement. The configuration of precipitation measurement using active radar and a passive radiometer is similar to TRMM. The major difference is that DPR is used in GPM instead of the precipitation radar (PR) in TRMM. The inclination of the core satellite is 65 degrees, and the nominal flight altitude is 407 km. The non-sun-synchronous circular orbit is necessary for measuring the diurnal change of rainfall similarly to TRMM. The DPR consists of two radars, which are Ku-band (13.6 GHz) precipitation radar (KuPR) and Ka-band (35.5 GHz) precipitation radar (KaPR). Both KuPR and KaPR have almost the same design as TRMM PR. The DPR system design and performance were verified through the ground test. GPM core observatory was launched at 18:37:00 (UT) on February 27, 2014 successfully. DPR orbital check out was completed in May 2014. The results of orbital checkout show that DPR meets its specification on orbit. After completion of initial checkout, DPR started Normal

  3. A unified approach to asphaltene precipitation: Laboratory measurement and modeling

    SciTech Connect

    MacMillan, D.J.; Tackett, J.E. Jr.; Jessee, M.A.; Monger-McClure, T.G.

    1995-09-01

    A unified approach to evaluation of asphaltene precipitation based on laboratory measurement and modeling is presented. This approach uses an organic deposition cell (ODC) for measuring asphaltene-dropout onset conditions. Asphaltene precipitation was detected by changes in optical fluorescence, electrical conductance, and visual observation. A series of experiments measured the effects of changing pressure,m temperature, and composition on asphaltene precipitation. A fully compositional vapor/liquid/solid (V/L/S) mathematical model completed by analysis by matching the experimental results. The authors then used the model to forecast asphaltene precipitation under a variety of production scenarios, including response to gas-lift operations,and to evaluate the possible location of a tar mat.

  4. An Enhanced Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Validation Network Prototype

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwaller, Matthew R.; Morris, K. Robert

    2009-01-01

    A Validation Network (VN) prototype is currently underway that compares data from the Precipitation Radar (PR) instrument on NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite to similar measurements from the U.S. national network of operational weather radars. This prototype is being conducted as part of the ground validation activities of NASA's Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission. GPM will carry a Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar instrument (DPR) with similar characteristics to the TRMM PR. The purpose of the VN is to identify and resolve significant discrepancies between the U.S. national network of ground radar (GR) observations and satellite observations. The ultimate goal of such comparisons is to understand and resolve the first order variability and bias of precipitation retrievals in different meteorological/hydrological regimes at large scales. This paper presents a description of, and results from, an improved algorithm for volume matching and comparison of PR and ground radar observations.

  5. A bilateral comparison on illuminance using a photometer between IPT and LABELO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira Junior, A. F. G.; Bindé Junior, C. J. R.

    2016-07-01

    This work presents the result of bilateral illuminance comparison obtained from a photometer calibration. The bilateral comparison was performed comparing the calibration results from the same photometer at LABELO and IPT laboratories, which take part of Brazilian calibration network. Occasionally LABELO was chosen as a pilot laboratory and was responsible to calibrate the photometer at the beginning and end of comparison and define the reference illuminance value of photometer calibration. The illuminance calibration points ranged from 20 to 2000 lx and the comparison evaluation criterion was the normalized error (En numbers). The laboratory measurements are in agreement according to the evaluation criterion.

  6. Photometer calibration error using extended standard sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torr, M. R.; Hays, P. B.; Kennedy, B. C.; Torr, D. G.

    1976-01-01

    As part of a project to compare measurements of the night airglow made by the visible airglow experiment on the Atmospheric Explorer-C satellite, the standard light sources of several airglow observatories were compared with the standard source used in the absolute calibration of the satellite photometer. In the course of the comparison, it has been found that serious calibration errors (up to a factor of two) can arise when a calibration source with a reflecting surface is placed close to an interference filter. For reliable absolute calibration, the source should be located at a distance of at least five filter radii from the interference filter.

  7. Automated estimation of urinary calcium using the Eppendorf flame photometer.

    PubMed

    Bold, A M

    1966-11-01

    A method is described for estimating urine calcium on a mechanized Eppendorf flame photometer with twin channels at a rate of 60 per hour. Sodium is estimated simultaneously so that a correction can be made for the small sodium error. Errors due to potassium and phosphate are minimized by adding these ions to the standards and to the diluting fluid. Results agree well with those obtained by Trinder's naphthal-hydroxamic acid precipitation method.

  8. Automated estimation of urinary calcium using the Eppendorf flame photometer

    PubMed Central

    Bold, A. M.

    1966-01-01

    A method is described for estimating urine calcium on a mechanized Eppendorf flame photometer with twin channels at a rate of 60 per hour. Sodium is estimated simultaneously so that a correction can be made for the small sodium error. Errors due to potassium and phosphate are minimized by adding these ions to the standards and to the diluting fluid. Results agree well with those obtained by Trinder's naphthal-hydroxamic acid precipitation method. Images PMID:5928614

  9. The flame photometer as engine of nephrology: a biography.

    PubMed

    Peitzman, Steven J

    2010-08-01

    In the 1940s, the flame photometer made possible for the first time relatively simple and quick measurements of sodium and potassium in serum and urine. During World War II, it unexpectedly fell into the hands of John P. Peters of Yale University, who sought to understand water and electrolyte physiology and apply such knowledge to patient problems. Pupils and young associates of Peters would seed the early nephrology divisions and training programs in the United States; the flame photometer was essential to their work and that of their trainees, both Americans and international visitors. Hyponatremia and the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion became the "attribute" disorders of nephrologists. Invention of a microflame photometer fostered the revival of micropuncture and transport studies. In the 1960s, the flame photometer was linked to Leonard Skeggs' sequential automated analysis system, leading to enormous numbers of routine measurements of electrolytes. The growing number of nephrologists, then based mostly at teaching hospitals, thus found plentiful instances of sodium and potassium abnormalities to address. The autoanalyzer also catalyzed use of the anion gap, another emblem of nephrology in its early decades. Not only ideas and theories, but also the usually invisible machinery, enable the growth of a knowledge base and formation of a scientific discipline or medical specialty. Of course, the flame photometer did not itself shape the agenda of nephrology, but it allowed the most influential group of progenitors and their progeny to explore normal function and bring a strongly physiologic imperative to their daily work with patients.

  10. Precipitation Measurements from Space: Why Do We Need Them?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hou, Arthur Y.

    2006-01-01

    Water is fundamental to the life on Earth and its phase transition between the gaseous, liquid, and solid states dominates the behavior of the weather/climate/ecological system. Precipitation, which converts atmospheric water vapor into rain and snow, is central to the global water cycle. It regulates the global energy balance through interactions with clouds and water vapor (the primary greenhouse gas), and also shapes global winds and dynamic transport through latent heat release. Surface precipitation affects soil moisture, ocean salinity, and land hydrology, thus linking fast atmospheric processes to the slower components of the climate system. Precipitation is also the primary source of freshwater in the world, which is facing an emerging freshwater crisis in many regions. Accurate and timely knowledge of global precipitation is essential for understanding the behavior of the global water cycle, improving freshwater management, and advancing predictive capabilities of high-impact weather events such as hurricanes, floods, droughts, and landslides. With limited rainfall networks on land and the impracticality of making extensive rainfall measurements over oceans, a comprehensive description of the space and time variability of global precipitation can only be achieved from the vantage point of space. This presentation will examine current capabilities in space-borne rainfall measurements, highlight scientific and practical benefits derived from these observations to date, and provide an overview of the multi-national Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission scheduled to be launched in the early next decade.

  11. Precipitation Measurements from Space: Why Do We Need Them?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hou, Arthur Y.

    2006-01-01

    Water is fundamental to the life on Earth and its phase transition between the gaseous, liquid, and solid states dominates the behavior of the weather/climate/ecological system. Precipitation, which converts atmospheric water vapor into rain and snow, is central to the global water cycle. It regulates the global energy balance through interactions with clouds and water vapor (the primary greenhouse gas), and also shapes global winds and dynamic transport through latent heat release. Surface precipitation affects soil moisture, ocean salinity, and land hydrology, thus linking fast atmospheric processes to the slower components of the climate system. Precipitation is also the primary source of freshwater in the world, which is facing an emerging freshwater crisis in many regions. Accurate and timely knowledge of global precipitation is essential for understanding the behavior of the global water cycle, improving freshwater management, and advancing predictive capabilities of high-impact weather events such as hurricanes, floods, droughts, and landslides. With limited rainfall networks on land and the impracticality of making extensive rainfall measurements over oceans, a comprehensive description of the space and time variability of global precipitation can only be achieved from the vantage point of space. This presentation will examine current capabilities in space-borne rainfall measurements, highlight scientific and practical benefits derived from these observations to date, and provide an overview of the multi-national Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission scheduled to be launched in the early next decade.

  12. Inter-comparison of precipitation retrievals from the Global Precipitation Measurement mission constellation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kidd, Chris; Matsui, Toshihisa; Randel, Dave; Stocker, Erich; Kummerow, Chris

    2015-04-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement mission (GPM) is an international satellite mission that brings together a number of different component satellites and sensors, each contributing observations capable of providing information on precipitation. The joint US-Japan core observatory, launched on 27 February 2014, carries the GPM Microwave Imager (GMI) and the Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR). The core observatory serves as a standard against which other sensors in the constellation are calibrated, providing a consistent observational dataset to ensure the highest quality precipitation retrievals to be made. Precipitation retrievals from the constellation of partner satellites are generated through the common framework of the Goddard-PROFiling (GPROF) scheme, and is applied to both the conically-scanning sensors and the cross-track sensors; the provision of precipitation estimates from all the constellation sensors contributing to the better-than 3-hour average temporal sampling. This study focuses upon the inter-comparison of the products from the different sensors during the first year of GPM operations; March 2014-February 2015. The two regions chosen for the inter-comparison, are the United States and Western Europe, and utilize the extensive radar networks of these regions. Statistical results were generated for instantaneous precipitation retrievals for each of the constellation sensors. Results show that overall the retrievals from the cross-track observations produce higher correlations with the surface radar data sets than the retrievals from the conically-scanning observations, although they tend to have higher root-mean squared errors. Some variation in performance between the individual types of sensors is also noted, which may be attributed to assumptions within the retrieval scheme (e.g. resolution, background fields, etc); other differences require further investigation.

  13. A Prototype Bioluminescence Photometer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-02-01

    Seliger et al., 1962) provided maximum mechanical stimulation to dino - flagellates , and incorporated light baffles to permit continuous measurement...was deployed in a shallow coastal area relatively free of any mixing. The principle bioluminescent plankton were the dino - flagellates , as evidenced

  14. Uncertainty Quantification for GPM-era Precipitation Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Yudong

    2014-05-01

    Uncertainty quantification will remain a challenge for GPM-era precipitation measurements. Our studies with TRMM-era products can provide useful guidance and improved procedures. For satellite-borne precipitation measurements, uncertainty originates from many error sources, including sampling errors, systematic errors and random errors. This presentation summarizes our efforts to quantify these errors in six different TRMM-era precipitation products (3B42, 3B42RT, CMORPH, PERSIANN, NRL and GSMaP), and proposes improved error modeling and validation procedures for GPM-era products. For systematic errors, we devised an error decomposition scheme to separate errors in precipitation estimates into three independent components, hit biases, missed precipitation and false precipitation (Tian et al., 2009). This decomposition scheme reveals more error features and provides a better link to the error sources than conventional analysis, because in the latter these error components tend to cancel one another when aggregated or averaged in space or time. To evaluate the random errors, we calculated the measurement spread from the ensemble of these six quasi-independent products, and produced a global map of measurement uncertainties (Tian and Peters-Lidard, 2010). The map yields a global view of the error characteristics and their regional and seasonal variations. More recently, we have established the fitness of a multiplicative error model to predict the uncertainties when ground validation data are not available (Tian et al., 2013), and have shown that this model is superior to the commonly-used additive error model in describing and predicting the uncertainty in precipitation measurements. Thus we propose an improved procedure based on error decomposition and the multiplicative error model for GPM-era uncertainty quantification.

  15. New Approaches For Validating Satellite Global Precipitation Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Eric A.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The scientific successes of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) and additional recent satellite-focused precipitation retrieval projects, particularly those based on use of passive microwave radiometer measurements, have paved the way for a more advanced mission currently under development as the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission. This new mission is motivated by a number of scientific questions that TRMM research has posed over a range of space-time scales and within a variety of scientific disciplines that are becoming more integrated into earth system science modeling.

  16. Using NDVI to measure precipitation in semi-arid landscapes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Birtwhistle, Amy N.; Laituri, Melinda; Bledsoe, Brian; Friedman, Jonathan M.

    2016-01-01

    Measuring precipitation in semi-arid landscapes is important for understanding the processes related to rainfall and run-off; however, measuring precipitation accurately can often be challenging especially within remote regions where precipitation instruments are scarce. Typically, rain-gauges are sparsely distributed and research comparing rain-gauge and RADAR precipitation estimates reveal that RADAR data are often misleading, especially for monsoon season convective storms. This study investigates an alternative way to map the spatial and temporal variation of precipitation inputs along ephemeral stream channels using Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) derived from Landsat Thematic Mapper imagery. NDVI values from 26 years of pre- and post-monsoon season Landsat imagery were derived across Yuma Proving Ground (YPG), a region covering 3,367 km2 of semiarid landscapes in southwestern Arizona, USA. The change in NDVI from a pre-to post-monsoon season image along ephemeral stream channels explained 73% of the variance in annual monsoonal precipitation totals from a nearby rain-gauge. In addition, large seasonal changes in NDVI along channels were useful in determining when and where flow events have occurred.

  17. Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission: Overview and Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hou, Arthur Y.

    2012-01-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission is an international satellite mission specifically designed to unify and advance precipitation measurements from a constellation of research and operational microwave sensors. NASA and JAXA will deploy a Core Observatory in 2014 to serve as a reference satellite to unify precipitation measurements from the constellation of sensors. The GPM Core Observatory will carry a Ku/Ka-band Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) and a conical-scanning multi-channel (10-183 GHz) GPM Microwave Radiometer (GMI). The DPR will be the first dual-frequency radar in space to provide not only measurements of 3-D precipitation structures but also quantitative information on microphysical properties of precipitating particles. The DPR and GMI measurements will together provide a database that relates vertical hydrometeor profiles to multi-frequency microwave radiances over a variety of environmental conditions across the globe. This combined database will be used as a common transfer standard for improving the accuracy and consistency of precipitation retrievals from all constellation radiometers. For global coverage, GPM relies on existing satellite programs and new mission opportunities from a consortium of partners through bilateral agreements with either NASA or JAXA. Each constellation member may have its unique scientific or operational objectives but contributes microwave observations to GPM for the generation and dissemination of unified global precipitation data products. In addition to the DPR and GMI on the Core Observatory, the baseline GPM constellation consists of the following sensors: (1) Special Sensor Microwave Imager/Sounder (SSMIS) instruments on the U.S. Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) satellites, (2) the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer-2 (AMSR-2) on the GCOM-W1 satellite of JAXA, (3) the Multi-Frequency Microwave Scanning Radiometer (MADRAS) and the multi-channel microwave humidity sounder

  18. Hyperspectral Sun Photometer for Atmospheric Characterization and Vicarious Calibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagnutti, Mary; Ryan, Robert; Holekamp, Kara

    2008-01-01

    A hyperspectral sun photometer and associated methods have been developed and demonstrated. Accurate sun photometer calibration is critical to properly measure the solar irradiance and characterize the atmosphere. Traditional sun photometer calibration requires solar observations over several hours. In contrast, the procedures for operating this photometer entail less data acquisition time and embody a more direct approach to calibration. The scientific value of the measurement data produced by this instrument is not adversely affected by atmospheric instability. In addition, this instrument yields hyperspectral data covering a large spectral range (350-2,500 nm) not available from most traditional sun photometers. The hyperspectral sun photometer components include (1) a commercially available spectroradiometer that has been laboratory-calibrated and (2) a commercially available reflectance standard panel that exhibits nearly Lambertian 99% reflectance. The spectroradiometer is positioned above, and aimed downward at, the panel. The procedure for operating this instrument calls for a series of measurements: one in which the panel is fully illuminated by the sun, one in which a shade is positioned between the panel and the sun, and two in which the shade is positioned to cast a shadow to either side of the panel. The total sequence of measurements can be performed in less than a minute. From these measurements, the total radiance, the diffuse radiance, and the direct solar radiance are calculated. The direct solar irradiance is calculated from the direct solar radiance and the known reflectance factor of the panel as a function of the solar zenith angle. Atmospheric characteristics are estimated from the optical depth at various wavelengths calculated from (1) the direct solar irradiance obtained as described above, (2) the air mass along a column from the measurement position to the Sun, and (3) the top-of-atmosphere solar irradiance. The instrumentation used to

  19. Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission Applications: Activities, Challenges, and Vision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirschbaum, Dalia; Hou, Arthur

    2012-01-01

    Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) is an international satellite mission to provide nextgeneration observations of rain and snow worldwide every three hours. NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) will launch a "Core" satellite carrying advanced instruments that will set a new standard for precipitation measurements from space. The data they provide will be used to unify precipitation measurements made by an international network of partner satellites to quantify when, where, and how much it rains or snows around the world. The GPM mission will help advance our understanding of Earth's water and energy cycles, improve the forecasting of extreme events that cause natural disasters, and extend current capabilities of using satellite precipitation information to directly benefit society. Building upon the successful legacy of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM), GPM's next-generation global precipitation data will lead to scientific advances and societal benefits within a range of hydrologic fields including natural hazards, ecology, public health and water resources. This talk will highlight some examples from TRMM's IS-year history within these applications areas as well as discuss some existing challenges and present a look forward for GPM's contribution to applications in hydrology.

  20. Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission after Three Years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huffman, George; Skofronick-Jackson, Gail

    2017-04-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission is a partnership between NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) to advance scientific understanding and practical application of satellite-based global precipitation estimates. The GPM Core Observatory spacecraft, launched February 27, 2014, provides high-quality passive microwave (PMW) and radar observations. These data are subjects of study and application in their own right, and they are also used to unify and advance precipitation measurements from a constellation of research and operational satellite PMW sensors to provide "next-generation" precipitation products. Both uses are facilitated by the the GPM Core Observatory's 65° non-Sun-synchronous orbit at an altitude of 407 km, which precesses across all times of day and covers the tropics and mid-latitudes, where a majority of the Earth's population lives. GPM provides products ranging from raw instrument data to Core and partner swath precipitation estimates, to gridded and accumulated products, and finally to multi-satellite merged products. The U.S. GPM Science Team is developing such a merged product, the Integrated Multi-satellitE Retrievals for GPM (IMERG), which is available with a 5-hour latency with temporal resolution of 30 minutes and spatial resolution of 0.1° x 0.1° ( 10km x 10km). Some products have a 1-hour latency for societal applications, such as floods, landslides, hurricanes, blizzards, and typhoons, and all of these products have long-latency high-quality science products. After three years in orbit, GPM has fulfilled its initial mission requirements, which are to measure rain rates from 0.2 to 110 mm/hr and to detect and estimate falling snow. The GPM mission is well on its way to providing essential data on precipitation (rain and snow) from micro to local to global scales, providing precipitation particle size distributions in the clouds, 5-15 km estimates of regional precipitation, and merged global precipitation

  1. Study of accuracy of precipitation measurements using simulation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagy, Zoltán; Lajos, Tamás; Morvai, Krisztián

    2013-04-01

    Hungarian Meteorological Service1 Budapest University of Technology and Economics2 Precipitation is one of the the most important meteorological parameters describing the state of the climate and to get correct information from trends, accurate measurements of precipitation is very important. The problem is that the precipitation measurements are affected by systematic errors leading to an underestimation of actual precipitation which errors vary by type of precipitaion and gauge type. It is well known that the wind speed is the most important enviromental factor that contributes to the underestimation of actual precipitation, especially for solid precipitation. To study and correct the errors of precipitation measurements there are two basic possibilities: · Use of results and conclusion of International Precipitation Measurements Intercomparisons; · To build standard reference gauges (DFIR, pit gauge) and make own investigation; In 1999 at the HMS we tried to achieve own investigation and built standard reference gauges But the cost-benefit ratio in case of snow (use of DFIR) was very bad (we had several winters without significant amount of snow, while the state of DFIR was continously falling) Due to the problem mentioned above there was need for new approximation that was the modelling made by Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Department of Fluid Mechanics using the FLUENT 6.2 model. The ANSYS Fluent package is featured fluid dynamics solution for modelling flow and other related physical phenomena. It provides the tools needed to describe atmospheric processes, design and optimize new equipment. The CFD package includes solvers that accurately simulate behaviour of the broad range of flows that from single-phase to multi-phase. The questions we wanted to get answer to are as follows: · How do the different types of gauges deform the airflow around themselves? · Try to give quantitative estimation of wind induced error. · How does the use

  2. Global Precipitation Measurement Mission: Architecture and Mission Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bundas, David

    2005-01-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission is a collaboration between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), and other partners, with the goal of monitoring the diurnal and seasonal variations in precipitation over the surface of the earth. These measurements will be used to improve current climate models and weather forecasting, and enable improved storm and flood warnings. This paper gives an overview of the mission architecture and addresses some of the key trades that have been completed, including the selection of the Core Observatory s orbit, orbit maintenance trades, and design issues related to meeting orbital debris requirements.

  3. Global precipitation measurement (GPM) mission core spacecraft systems engineering challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bundas, David J.; O'Neill, Deborah; Rhee, Michael; Feild, Thomas; Meadows, Gary; Patterson, Peter

    2006-09-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission is a collaboration between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), and other US and international partners, with the goal of monitoring the diurnal and seasonal variations in precipitation over the surface of the earth. These measurements will be used to improve current climate models and weather forecasting, and enable improved storm and flood warnings. This paper gives an overview of the mission architecture and addresses the status of some key trade studies, including the geolocation budgeting, design considerations for spacecraft charging, and design issues related to the mitigation of orbital debris.

  4. First Results from the Photometer Experiment on TOMEX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hecht, J. H.; Clemmons, J. H.; Larsen, M. F.; Liu, A. Z.; Roble, R. G.

    2001-12-01

    The Turbulent Oxygen Mixing Experiment (TOMEX) combined Na lidar measurements, from Starfire Optical Range in Albuquerque, New Mexico, with a launch of a payload from White Sands Missile Range (WSMR), located a little over 100 km from Starfire. The payload included a TMA release to measure winds and diffusion, a five channel ionization gauge to measure neutral densities, and a three channel photometer experiment to measure atomic oxygen related airglow. The payload was launched at 0957 UT on 26 October 2000 and successfully obtained data from all the experiments. This paper discusses results from the photometer experiment. This experiment consisted of three liquid nitrogen cooled filter photometers which measured the emission from the the O2 Atmospheric Band (0,0) emission, the OH Meinel (9,4) band, and the OI(557.7 nm) green line. Measurements were made as the rocket went from 80 to 110 km on the upleg. The pointing of the photometers was within a few degrees of zenith. Differentiating these data allowed volume emission rates to be derived which can be inverted to form atomic oxygen density profiles. The interpretation of the data will make use of simultaneous atmospheric temperature data from the Na lidar. The results of this analysis will be compared to previous rocket measurements during Coqui Dos and model calculations of airglow emission.

  5. Cross-track sensor precipitation retrievals for the Global Precipitation Measurement mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kidd, Chris; Randel, David; Stocker, Erich; Kummerow, Christian

    2014-05-01

    The utilization of observations from passive microwave cross-track, or sounders, for global precipitation estimation provides a number of distinct advantages including the potential to retrieve precipitation over cold surface backgrounds and improvements in temporal sampling. As part of the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission, observations from these cross-track instruments are being incorporated into the overall retrieval framework to enable better temporal and spatial sampling, particularly over regions where surface conditions provide a challenging background against which to observe precipitation. GPM is an international satellite mission and brings together a number of different component satellites and sensors, each contributing observations capable of providing information on precipitation. The joint US-Japan core observatory was launched in early 2014 and carries the GPM Microwave Imager (GMI) and the Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR). The core observatory serves as a standard against which other sensors in the constellation are calibrated, providing a consistent observational dataset to ensure the highest quality precipitation retrievals to be made. The conically-scanning GMI provides observations from 10.65 GHz through to 166 GHz with dual polarization capabilities, and two 183 GHz channels (+-1 and +-3 GHz) with vertical polarization. The highest frequencies provide resolutions in the order of 4.4x7.3 km. 885 km swath width. The DPR operates at 35.5 GHz and 13.6 GHz with swath widths 120 and 245 km respectively, and a vertical resolution of 250 m. The higher frequency radar will provide a sensitivity down to 12 dBZ, or about 0.2 mmh-1 equivalent rainrate, particularly useful for higher latitudes where light precipitation dominates. Integration of the cross-track sensors into the overall retrieval scheme of the GPM mission is achieved through the GPROF retrieval scheme, utilizing databases based upon observational and modelled data sets

  6. Photometer for tracking a moving light source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strawa, Anthony W. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A photometer that tracks a path of a moving light source with little or no motion of the photometer components. The system includes a non-moving, truncated paraboloid of revolution, having a paraboloid axis, a paraboloid axis, a small entrance aperture, a larger exit aperture and a light-reflecting inner surface, that receives and reflects light in a direction substantially parallel to the paraboloid axis. The system also includes a light processing filter to receive and process the redirected light, and to issue the processed, redirected light as processed light, and an array of light receiving elements, at least one of which receives and measures an associated intensity of a portion of the processed light. The system tracks a light source moving along a path and produces a corresponding curvilinear image of the light source path on the array of light receiving elements. Undesired light wavelengths from the light source may be removed by coating a selected portion of the reflecting inner surface or another light receiving surface with a coating that absorbs incident light in the undesired wavelength range.

  7. Sun photometer aerosol retrievals during SALTRACE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toledano, Carlos; Torres, Benjamin; Althausen, Dietrich; Groß, Silke; Freudenthaler, Volker; Weinzierl, Bernadett; Gasteiger, Josef; Ansmann, Albert; Wiegner, Matthias; González, Ramiro; Cachorro, Victoria

    2015-04-01

    The Saharan Aerosol Long-range Transport and Aerosol-Cloud-Interaction Experiment (SALTRACE), aims at investigating the long-range transport of Saharan dust across the Atlantic Ocean. A large set of ground-based and airborne aerosol and meteorological instrumentation was used for this purpose during a 5-week campaign that took place during June-July 2013. Several Sun photometers were deployed at Barbados Island during this campaign. Two Cimels included in AERONET and the Sun and Sky Automatic Radiometer (SSARA) were co-located with the ground-based lidars BERTHA and POLIS. A set of optical and microphysical aerosol properties derived from Sun and Sky spectral observations (principal plane and almucantar configurations) in the range 340-1640nm are analyzed, including aerosol optical depth (AOD), volume size distribution, complex refractive index, sphericity and single scattering albedo. The Sun photometers include polarization capabilities, therefore apart from the inversion of sky radiances as it is routinely done in AERONET, polarized radiances are also inverted. Several dust events are clearly identified in the measurement period, with moderated AOD (500nm) in the range 0.3 to 0.6. The clean marine background was also observed during short periods. The retrieved aerosol properties are compared with the lidar and in-situ observations carried out within SALTRACE, as well as with data collected during the SAMUM campaigns in Morocco and Cape Verde, in order to investigate possible changes in the dust plume during the transport.

  8. A rocket-borne airglow photometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paarmann, L. D.; Smith, L. G.

    1977-01-01

    The design of a rocket-borne photometer to measure the airglow emission of ionized molecular nitrogen in the 391.4 nm band is presented. This airglow is a well known and often observed phenomenon of auroras, where the principal source of ionization is energetic electrons. It is believed that at some midlatitude locations energetic electrons are also a source of nighttime ionization in the E region of the ionosphere. If this is so, then significant levels of 391.4 nm airglow should be present. The intensity of this airglow will be measured in a rocket payload which also contains instrumentation to measured in a rocket payload which also contains instrumentation to measure energetic electron differential flux and the ambient electron density. An intercomparison of the 3 experiments in a nightime launch will allow a test of the importance of energetic electrons as a nighttime source of ionization in the upper E region.

  9. Precipitation Measurements From Space: Workshop report. An element of the climate observing system study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atlas, D. (Editor); Thiele, O. W. (Editor)

    1981-01-01

    Global climate, agricultural uses for precipitation information, hydrological uses for precipitation, severe thunderstorms and local weather, global weather are addressed. Ground truth measurement, visible and infrared techniques, microwave radiometry and hybrid precipitation measurements, and spaceborne radar are discussed.

  10. The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission: Overview and Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hou, Arthur

    2008-01-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission is an international satellite mission to unify and advance global precipitation measurements from a constellation of dedicated and operational microwave sensors. The GPM concept centers on the deployment of a Core Spacecraft in a non-Sun-synchronous orbit at 65' inclination carrying a dual-frequency precipitation radar (DPR) and a multi-frequency passive microwave radiometer (GMI) with high-frequency capabilities to serve as a precipitation physics observatory and calibration standard for the constellation radiometers. The baseline GPM constellation is envisioned to comprise conical-scanning microwave imagers (e.g., GMI, SSMIS, AMSR, MIS, MADRAS, GPM-Brazil) augmented with cross-track microwave temperaturelhumidity sounders (e.g., MHS, ATMS) over land. In addition to the Core Satellite, the GPM Mission will contribute a second GMI to be flown in a low-inclination (approx.40deg) non-Sun-synchronous orbit to improve near real-time monitoring of hurricanes. GPM is a science mission with integrated applications goals aimed at (1) advancing the knowledge of the global waterlenergy cycle variability and freshwater availability and (2) improving weather, climate, and hydrological prediction capabilities through more accurate and frequent measurements of global precipitation. The GPM Mission is currently a partnership between NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), with opportunities for additional partners in satellite constellation and ground validation activities. Within the framework of the inter-governmental Group ob Earth Observations (GEO) and Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS), GPM has been identified as a cornerstone for the Precipitation Constellation (PC) being developed under the auspices of Committee of Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS). The GPM Core Observatory is scheduled for launch in 201 3, followed by the launch of the GPM Low- Inclination Observatory in 2014. An

  11. The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission: Overview and Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hou, Arthur

    2008-01-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission is an international satellite mission to unify and advance global precipitation measurements from a constellation of dedicated and operational microwave sensors. The GPM concept centers on the deployment of a Core Spacecraft in a non-Sun-synchronous orbit at 65 degrees inclination carrying a dual-frequency precipitation radar (DPR) and a multi-frequency passive microwave radiometer (GMI) with high-frequency capabilities to serve as a precipitation physics observatory and calibration standard for the constellation radiometers. The baseline GPM constellation is envisioned to comprise conical-scanning microwave imagers (e.g., GMI, SSMIS, AMSR, MIS, MADRAS, GPM-Brazil) augmented with cross-track microwave temperature/humidity sounders (e.g., MHS, ATMS) over land. In addition to the Core Satellite, the GPM Mission will contribute a second GMI to be flown in a low-inclination (approximately 40 deg.) non-Sun-synchronous orbit to improve near real-time monitoring of hurricanes. GPM is a science mission with integrated applications goals aimed at (1) advancing the knowledge of the global water/energy cycle variability and freshwater availability and (2) improving weather, climate, and hydrological prediction capabilities through more accurate and frequent measurements of global precipitation. The GPM Mission is currently a partnership between NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), with opportunities for additional partners in satellite constellation and ground validation activities. Within the framework of the inter-governmental Group ob Earth Observations (GEO) and Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS), GPM has been identified as a cornerstone for the Precipitation Constellation (PC) being developed under the auspices of Committee of Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS). The GPM Core Observatory is scheduled for launch in 2013, followed by the launch of the GPM Low-Inclination Observatory in

  12. The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission: Overview and Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hou, Arthur Y.; Azarbarzin, Ardeshir A.; Kakar, Ramesh K.; Neeck, Steven

    2008-01-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission is an international satellite mission to unify and advance global precipitation measurements from a constellation of dedicated and operational microwave sensors. The GPM concept centers on the deployment of a Core SpacecraR in a non-Sun-synchronous orbit at 65 deg. inclination carrying a dual-frequency precipitation radar (DPR) and a multi-frequency passive microwave radiometer (GMI) with high-frequency capabilities to serve as a precipitation physics observatory and calibration standard for the constellation radiometers. The baseline GPM constellation is envisioned to comprise conical-scanning microwave imagers (e.g., GMI, SSMIS, AMSR, MIS, MADRAS, GPM-Brazil) augmented with cross-track microwave temperaturethumidity sounders (e.g., MHS, ATMS) over land. In addition to the Core Satellite, the GPM Mission will contribute a second GMI to be flown in a low-inclination (approximately 40 deg.) non-Sun-synchronous orbit to improve near-realtime monitoring of hurricanes. GPM is a science mission with integrated applications goals aimed at (1) advancing the knowledge of the global watertenergy cycle variability and freshwater availability and (2) improving weather, climate, and hydrological prediction capabilities through more accurate and frequent measurements of global precipitation. The GPM Mission is currently a partnership between NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), with opportunities for additional partners in satellite constellation and ground validation activities. Within the framework of the inter-governmental Group ob Earth Observations (GEO) and Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS), GPM has been identified as a cornerstone for the Precipitation Constellation (PC) being developed under the auspices of Committee of Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS). The GPM Core Observatory is scheduled for launch in 2013, followed by the launch of the GPM Low-Inclination Observatory in 2014

  13. Some observations on precipitation measurement on forested experimental watersheds

    Treesearch

    Raymond E. Leonard; Kenneth G. Reinhart

    1963-01-01

    Measurement of precipitation on forested experimental watersheds presents difficulties other than those associated with access to and from the gages in all kinds of weather. For instance, the tree canopy must be cleared above the gage. The accepted practice of keeping an unobstructed sky view of 45" around the gage involves considerable tree cutting. On a level...

  14. Modeling Errors in Daily Precipitation Measurements: Additive or Multiplicative?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tian, Yudong; Huffman, George J.; Adler, Robert F.; Tang, Ling; Sapiano, Matthew; Maggioni, Viviana; Wu, Huan

    2013-01-01

    The definition and quantification of uncertainty depend on the error model used. For uncertainties in precipitation measurements, two types of error models have been widely adopted: the additive error model and the multiplicative error model. This leads to incompatible specifications of uncertainties and impedes intercomparison and application.In this letter, we assess the suitability of both models for satellite-based daily precipitation measurements in an effort to clarify the uncertainty representation. Three criteria were employed to evaluate the applicability of either model: (1) better separation of the systematic and random errors; (2) applicability to the large range of variability in daily precipitation; and (3) better predictive skills. It is found that the multiplicative error model is a much better choice under all three criteria. It extracted the systematic errors more cleanly, was more consistent with the large variability of precipitation measurements, and produced superior predictions of the error characteristics. The additive error model had several weaknesses, such as non constant variance resulting from systematic errors leaking into random errors, and the lack of prediction capability. Therefore, the multiplicative error model is a better choice.

  15. Aerosol Optical Depth Measurements by Airborne Sun Photometer in SOLVE II: Comparisons to SAGE III, POAM III and Airborne Spectrometer Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, P.; Livingston, J.; Schmid, B.; Eilers, J.; Kolyer, R.; Redemann, J.; Ramirez, S.; Yee, J-H.; Swartz, W.; Shetter, R.

    2004-01-01

    The 14-channel NASA Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-14) measured solar-beam transmission on the NASA DC-8 during the Second SAGE III Ozone Loss and Validation Experiment (SOLVE II). This paper presents AATS-14 results for multiwavelength aerosol optical depth (AOD), including its spatial structure and comparisons to results from two satellite sensors and another DC-8 instrument. These are the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment III (SAGE III), the Polar Ozone and Aerosol Measurement III (POAM III) and the Direct beam Irradiance Airborne Spectrometer (DIAS).

  16. Aerosol Optical Depth Measurements by Airborne Sun Photometer in SOLVE II: Comparisons to SAGE III, POAM III and Airborne Spectrometer Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, P.; Livingston, J.; Schmid, B.; Eilers, J.; Kolyer, R.; Redemann, J.; Ramirez, S.; Yee, J-H.; Swartz, W.; Shetter, R.

    2004-01-01

    The 14-channel NASA Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-14) measured solar-beam transmission on the NASA DC-8 during the Second SAGE III Ozone Loss and Validation Experiment (SOLVE II). This paper presents AATS-14 results for multiwavelength aerosol optical depth (AOD), including its spatial structure and comparisons to results from two satellite sensors and another DC-8 instrument. These are the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment III (SAGE III), the Polar Ozone and Aerosol Measurement III (POAM III) and the Direct beam Irradiance Airborne Spectrometer (DIAS).

  17. Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) launch, commissioning, and early operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neeck, Steven P.; Kakar, Ramesh K.; Azarbarzin, Ardeshir A.; Hou, Arthur Y.

    2014-10-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission is an international partnership co-led by NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA). The mission centers on the GPM Core Observatory and consists of an international network, or constellation, of additional satellites that together will provide next-generation global observations of precipitation from space. The GPM constellation will provide measurements of the intensity and variability of precipitation, three-dimensional structure of cloud and storm systems, the microphysics of ice and liquid particles within clouds, and the amount of water falling to Earth's surface. Observations from the GPM constellation, combined with land surface data, will improve weather forecast models; climate models; integrated hydrologic models of watersheds; and forecasts of hurricanes/typhoons/cylcones, landslides, floods and droughts. The GPM Core Observatory carries an advanced radar/radiometer system and serves as a reference standard to unify precipitation measurements from all satellites that fly within the constellation. The GPM Core Observatory improves upon the capabilities of its predecessor, the NASA-JAXA Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM), with advanced science instruments and expanded coverage of Earth's surface. The GPM Core Observatory carries two instruments, the NASA-supplied GPM Microwave Imager (GMI) and the JAXA-supplied Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR). The GMI measures the amount, size, intensity and type of precipitation, from heavy-tomoderate rain to light rain and snowfall. The DPR provides three-dimensional profiles and intensities of liquid and solid precipitation. The French Centre National d'Études Spatiales (CNES), the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO), the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the European Organisation for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites (EUMETSAT), and the U.S. Department of Defense are partners with NASA and

  18. Multipurpose computer-controlled scanning photometer

    SciTech Connect

    Kleckner, E.W.; Michalsky, J.J.; Smith, L.L.; Schmelzer, J.R.; Severtsen, R.H.; Berndt, J.L.

    1981-11-01

    This paper presents a design for a multipurpose computer-controlled scanning photometer capable of measuring optical radiation ranging in intensity from the subvisual light levels associated with night sky airglow emissions to the intense flux levels of direct sunlight. The instrument has twelve interference filters for wavelength selection, a 2.5/sup 0/ field of view for nighttime observations, and a 1.5/sup 0/ field of view for daytime observations. A photomultiplier tube is used as the low light-level detector, and a silicon-PIN photodiode serves as the insolation detector. A particular measurement sequence is programmed into the instrument and can be modified by reading a cassette tape in the field. Normal operation is fully automatic.

  19. Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Ground Validation: Plans and Preparations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwaller, M.; Bidwell, S.; Durning, F. J.; Smith, E.

    2004-01-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) program is an international partnership led by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA). GPM will improve climate, weather, and hydro-meteorological forecasts through more frequent and more accurate measurement of precipitation across the globe. This paper describes the concept, the planning, and the preparations for Ground Validation within the GPM program. Ground Validation (GV) plays an important role in the program by investigating and quantitatively assessing the errors within the satellite retrievals. These quantitative estimates of retrieval errors will assist the scientific community by bounding the errors within their research products. The two fundamental requirements of the GPM Ground Validation program are: (1) error characterization of the precipitation retrievals and (2) continual improvement of the satellite retrieval algorithms. These two driving requirements determine the measurements, instrumentation, and location for ground observations. This paper outlines GV plans for estimating the systematic and random components of retrieval error and for characterizing the spatial p d temporal structure of the error and plans for algorithm improvement in which error models are developed and experimentally explored to uncover the physical causes of errors within the retrievals. This paper discusses NASA locations for GV measurements as well as anticipated locations from international GPM partners. NASA's primary locations for validation measurements are an oceanic site at Kwajalein Atoll in the Republic of the Marshall Islands and a continental site in north-central Oklahoma at the U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program site.

  20. Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Ground Validation: Plans and Preparations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwaller, M.; Bidwell, S.; Durning, F. J.; Smith, E.

    2004-01-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) program is an international partnership led by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA). GPM will improve climate, weather, and hydro-meteorological forecasts through more frequent and more accurate measurement of precipitation across the globe. This paper describes the concept, the planning, and the preparations for Ground Validation within the GPM program. Ground Validation (GV) plays an important role in the program by investigating and quantitatively assessing the errors within the satellite retrievals. These quantitative estimates of retrieval errors will assist the scientific community by bounding the errors within their research products. The two fundamental requirements of the GPM Ground Validation program are: (1) error characterization of the precipitation retrievals and (2) continual improvement of the satellite retrieval algorithms. These two driving requirements determine the measurements, instrumentation, and location for ground observations. This paper outlines GV plans for estimating the systematic and random components of retrieval error and for characterizing the spatial p d temporal structure of the error and plans for algorithm improvement in which error models are developed and experimentally explored to uncover the physical causes of errors within the retrievals. This paper discusses NASA locations for GV measurements as well as anticipated locations from international GPM partners. NASA's primary locations for validation measurements are an oceanic site at Kwajalein Atoll in the Republic of the Marshall Islands and a continental site in north-central Oklahoma at the U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program site.

  1. Simple photometer circuits using modular electronic components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wampler, J. E.

    1975-01-01

    Operational and peak holding amplifiers are discussed as useful circuits for bioluminescence assays. Circuit diagrams are provided. While analog methods can give a good integration on short time scales, digital methods were found best for long term integration in bioluminescence assays. Power supplies, a general photometer circuit with ratio capability, and variations in the basic photometer design are also considered.

  2. A Tracking Sun Photometer Without Moving Parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strawa, Anthony W.

    2012-01-01

    This innovation is small, lightweight, and consumes very little electricity as it measures the solar energy attenuated by gases and aerosol particles in the atmosphere. A Sun photometer is commonly used on the Earth's surface, as well as on aircraft, to determine the solar energy attenuated by aerosol particles in the atmosphere and their distribution of sizes. This information is used to determine the spatial and temporal distribution of gases and aerosols in the atmosphere, as well as their distribution sizes. The design for this Sun photometer uses a combination of unique optics and a charge coupled device (CCD) array to eliminate moving parts and make the instrument more reliable. It could be selfcalibrating throughout the year. Data products would be down-welling flux, the direct-diffuse flux ratio, column abundance of gas phase constituents, aerosol optical depth at multiple-wavelengths, phase functions, cloud statistics, and an estimate of the representative size of atmospheric particles. These measurements can be used to obtain an estimate of aerosol size distribution, refractive index, and particle shape. Incident light is received at a light-reflecting (inner) surface, which is a truncated paraboloid. Light arriving from a hemispheric field of view (solid angle 2 steradians) enters the reflecting optic at an entrance aperture at, or adjacent to, the focus of the paraboloid, and is captured by the optic. Most of this light is reflected from an inner surface. The light proceeds substantially parallel to the paraboloid axis, and is detected by an array detector located near an exit aperture. Each of the entrance and exit apertures is formed by the intersection of the paraboloid with a plane substantially perpendicular to the paraboloid axis. Incident (non-reflected) light from a source of limited extent (the Sun) illuminates a limited area on the detector array. Both direct and diffuse illumination may be reflected, or not reflected, before being received on

  3. Measurement of Global Precipitation: Introduction to International GPM Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, P.

    2004-01-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Program is an international cooperative effort whose objectives are to (a) obtain better understanding of rainfall processes, and (b) make frequent rainfall measurements on a global basis. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) of the United States and the Japanese Aviation and Exploration Agency (JAXA) have entered into a cooperative agreement for the formulation and development of GPM. This agreement is a continuation of the partnership that developed the highly successful Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) that was launched in November 1997; this mission continues to provide valuable scientific and meteorological information on rainfall and the associated processes. International collaboration on GPM from other space agencies has been solicited, and discussions regarding their participation are currently in progress. NASA has taken lead responsibility for the planning and formulation of GPM. Key elements of the Program to be provided by NASA include a Core satellite instrumented with a multi-channel microwave radiometer, a Ground Validation System and a ground-based Precipitation Processing System (PPS). JAXA will provide a Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar for installation on the Core satellite and launch services. Other United States agencies and international partners may participate in a number of ways, such as providing rainfall measurements obtained from their own national space-borne platforms, providing local rainfall measurements to support the ground validation activities, or providing hardware or launch services for GPM constellation spacecraft.

  4. Measurement of Global Precipitation: Introduction to International GPM Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, P.

    2004-01-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Program is an international cooperative effort whose objectives are to (a) obtain better understanding of rainfall processes, and (b) make frequent rainfall measurements on a global basis. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) of the United States and the Japanese Aviation and Exploration Agency (JAXA) have entered into a cooperative agreement for the formulation and development of GPM. This agreement is a continuation of the partnership that developed the highly successful Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) that was launched in November 1997; this mission continues to provide valuable scientific and meteorological information on rainfall and the associated processes. International collaboration on GPM from other space agencies has been solicited, and discussions regarding their participation are currently in progress. NASA has taken lead responsibility for the planning and formulation of GPM. Key elements of the Program to be provided by NASA include a Core satellite instrumented with a multi-channel microwave radiometer, a Ground Validation System and a ground-based Precipitation Processing System (PPS). JAXA will provide a Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar for installation on the Core satellite and launch services. Other United States agencies and international partners may participate in a number of ways, such as providing rainfall measurements obtained from their own national space-borne platforms, providing local rainfall measurements to support the ground validation activities, or providing hardware or launch services for GPM constellation spacecraft.

  5. Preparations for Global Precipitation Measurement(GPM)Ground Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bidwell, S. W.; Bibyk, I. K.; Duming, J. F.; Everett, D. F.; Smith, E. A.; Wolff, D. B.

    2004-01-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) program is an international partnership led by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA). GPM will improve climate, weather, and hydro-meterorological forecasts through more frequent and more accurate measurement of precipitation across the globe. This paper describes the concept and the preparations for Ground Validation within the GPM program. Ground Validation (GV) plays a critical role in the program by investigating and quantitatively assessing the errors within the satellite retrievals. These quantitative estimates of retrieval errors will assist the scientific community by bounding the errors within their research products. The two fundamental requirements of the GPM Ground Validation program are: (1) error characterization of the precipitation retrievals and (2) continual improvement of the satellite retrieval algorithms. These two driving requirements determine the measurements, instrumentation, and location for ground observations. This paper describes GV plans for estimating the systematic and random components of retrieval error and for characterizing the spatial and temporal structure of the error. This paper describes the GPM program for algorithm improvement in which error models are developed and experimentally explored to uncover the physical causes of errors within the retrievals. GPM will ensure that information gained through Ground Validation is applied to future improvements in the spaceborne retrieval algorithms. This paper discusses the potential locations for validation measurement and research, the anticipated contributions of GPM's international partners, and the interaction of Ground Validation with other GPM program elements.

  6. Photographic photometry with Iris diaphragm photometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, B. E.

    1981-01-01

    A general method is presented for solving problems encountered in the analysis of Iris diaphragm photometer (IDP) data. The method is used to derive the general shape of the calibration curve, allowing both a more accurate fit to the IDP data for comparison stars and extrapolation to magnitude ranges for which no comparison stars are measured. The profile of starlight incident and the characteristic curve of the plate are both assumed and then used to derive the profile of the star image. An IDP reading is then determined for each star image. A procedure for correcting the effects of a nonconstant background fog level on the plate is also demonstrated. Additional applications of the method are made in the appendix to determine the relation between the radius of a photographic star image and the star's magnitude, and to predict the IDP reading of the 'point of optimum density'.

  7. Assimilating the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Estimates in the Canadian Precipitation Analysis (CaPA) Over North America.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boluwade, A.; Rasmussen, P. F.; Stadnyk, T. A.; Fortin, V.; Guy, R.

    2015-12-01

    The importance of precipitation measurement using estimates from satellite products cannot be over emphasized. Observations from space using sensors mounted on satellites cover wider areas and provide high spatial and temporal resolution. The estimates derived from this process are very useful in integrated hydrologic modeling, weather forecasting and monitoring landslides, droughts and floods, etc. Example of a satellite precipitation product is the Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM) and Global Precipitation Mission (GPM). TRMM was primarily designed to measure heavy-to-moderate rainfall over tropical and subtropical regions. GPM was designed to extend, enhance, and improve TRMM precipitation data. The primary objective of this study is the assimilation GPM satellite based precipitation estimates into the Canadian Precipitation Analysis (CaPA). CaPA combines the Global Environmental Multi-Scale model (GEM) dataset and observed precipitation from monitoring stations to provide precipitation estimates at 6hr and 24hr time steps and spatial resolution of 10km covering North America. In the result, we used the Equitable Threat Score (ETS) as performance evaluation. GPM assimilation provides higher skill (ETS) at precipitation values below 3mm while being used as additional data source. GPM has better skill as background field at precipitation value above 3mm.

  8. Focused beam reflectance measurement to monitor nimodipine precipitation process.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaoming; Siddiqui, Akhtar; Khan, Mansoor A

    2013-11-18

    Crystallization of nimodipine in liquid-filled soft gelatin capsule during storage was reported for some commercial products, resulting in product recalls due to product quality and more importantly safety concerns. In this study, a real time particle monitoring tool, focused beam reflectance measurement, was used to evaluate the precipitation conditions of nimodipine in co-solvents. Upon water addition, two particle populations were discovered, appearing at different percentage of water content. Two transitions (i.e. sudden increase in particle counts) were observed, possibility related to nucleation and crystal growth of nimodipine. Furthermore, lowering storage temperature increased the tendency of nimodipine precipitation. Most critically, it was determined that with certain excipient, the drug precipitation occurred at approximately 7% (w/w) water content. Considering that all the orally administered liquid filled soft gelatin capsule shells contain residue water content as plasticizer, moisture transfer from the shell to the formulation may occur during long term storage, resulting in drug precipitation, particularly under cold temperature conditions.

  9. Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Ground Validation (GV) Science Implementation Plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petersen, Walter A.; Hou, Arthur Y.

    2008-01-01

    For pre-launch algorithm development and post-launch product evaluation Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Ground Validation (GV) goes beyond direct comparisons of surface rain rates between ground and satellite measurements to provide the means for improving retrieval algorithms and model applications.Three approaches to GPM GV include direct statistical validation (at the surface), precipitation physics validation (in a vertical columns), and integrated science validation (4-dimensional). These three approaches support five themes: core satellite error characterization; constellation satellites validation; development of physical models of snow, cloud water, and mixed phase; development of cloud-resolving model (CRM) and land-surface models to bridge observations and algorithms; and, development of coupled CRM-land surface modeling for basin-scale water budget studies and natural hazard prediction. This presentation describes the implementation of these approaches.

  10. Global Precipitation Measurement, Validation, and Applications Integrated Hydrologic Validation to Improve Physical Precipitation Retrievals for GPM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters-Lidar, Christa D.; Tian, Yudong; Kenneth, Tian; Harrison, Kenneth; Kumar, Sujay

    2011-01-01

    Land surface modeling and data assimilation can provide dynamic land surface state variables necessary to support physical precipitation retrieval algorithms over land. It is well-known that surface emission, particularly over the range of frequencies to be included in the Global Precipitation Measurement Mission (GPM), is sensitive to land surface states, including soil properties, vegetation type and greenness, soil moisture, surface temperature, and snow cover, density, and grain size. In order to investigate the robustness of both the land surface model states and the microwave emissivity and forward radiative transfer models, we have undertaken a multi-site investigation as part of the NASA Precipitation Measurement Missions (PMM) Land Surface Characterization Working Group. Specifically, we will demonstrate the performance of the Land Information System (LIS; http://lis.gsfc.nasa.gov; Peters-Lidard et aI., 2007; Kumar et al., 2006) coupled to the Joint Center for Satellite Data Assimilation (JCSDA's) Community Radiative Transfer Model (CRTM; Weng, 2007; van Deist, 2009). The land surface is characterized by complex physical/chemical constituents and creates temporally and spatially heterogeneous surface properties in response to microwave radiation scattering. The uncertainties in surface microwave emission (both surface radiative temperature and emissivity) and very low polarization ratio are linked to difficulties in rainfall detection using low-frequency passive microwave sensors (e.g.,Kummerow et al. 2001). Therefore, addressing these issues is of utmost importance for the GPM mission. There are many approaches to parameterizing land surface emission and radiative transfer, some of which have been customized for snow (e.g., the Helsinki University of Technology or HUT radiative transfer model;) and soil moisture (e.g., the Land Surface Microwave Emission Model or LSMEM).

  11. Current Status of Japanese Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Research Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kachi, Misako; Oki, Riko; Kubota, Takuji; Masaki, Takeshi; Kida, Satoshi; Iguchi, Toshio; Nakamura, Kenji; Takayabu, Yukari N.

    2013-04-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission is a mission led by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) under collaboration with many international partners, who will provide constellation of satellites carrying microwave radiometer instruments. The GPM Core Observatory, which carries the Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) developed by JAXA and the National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT), and the GPM Microwave Imager (GMI) developed by NASA. The GPM Core Observatory is scheduled to be launched in early 2014. JAXA also provides the Global Change Observation Mission (GCOM) 1st - Water (GCOM-W1) named "SHIZUKU," as one of constellation satellites. The SHIZUKU satellite was launched in 18 May, 2012 from JAXA's Tanegashima Space Center, and public data release of the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer 2 (AMSR2) on board the SHIZUKU satellite was planned that Level 1 products in January 2013, and Level 2 products including precipitation in May 2013. The Japanese GPM research project conducts scientific activities on algorithm development, ground validation, application research including production of research products. In addition, we promote collaboration studies in Japan and Asian countries, and public relations activities to extend potential users of satellite precipitation products. In pre-launch phase, most of our activities are focused on the algorithm development and the ground validation related to the algorithm development. As the GPM standard products, JAXA develops the DPR Level 1 algorithm, and the NASA-JAXA Joint Algorithm Team develops the DPR Level 2 and the DPR-GMI combined Level2 algorithms. JAXA also develops the Global Rainfall Map product as national product to distribute hourly and 0.1-degree horizontal resolution rainfall map. All standard algorithms including Japan-US joint algorithm will be reviewed by the Japan-US Joint

  12. Calibration Plans for the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bidwell, S. W.; Flaming, G. M.; Adams, W. J.; Everett, D. F.; Mendelsohn, C. R.; Smith, E. A.; Turk, J.

    2002-01-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) is an international effort led by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) of the U.S.A. and the National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA) for the purpose of improving research into the global water and energy cycle. GPM will improve climate, weather, and hydrological forecasts through more frequent and more accurate measurement of precipitation world-wide. Comprised of U.S. domestic and international partners, GPM will incorporate and assimilate data streams from many spacecraft with varied orbital characteristics and instrument capabilities. Two of the satellites will be provided directly by GPM, the core satellite and a constellation member. The core satellite, at the heart of GPM, is scheduled for launch in November 2007. The core will carry a conical scanning microwave radiometer, the GPM Microwave Imager (GMI), and a two-frequency cross-track-scanning radar, the Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR). The passive microwave channels and the two radar frequencies of the core are carefully chosen for investigating the varying character of precipitation over ocean and land, and from the tropics to the high-latitudes. The DPR will enable microphysical characterization and three-dimensional profiling of precipitation. The GPM-provided constellation spacecraft will carry a GMI radiometer identical to that on the core spacecraft. This paper presents calibration plans for the GPM, including on-board instrument calibration, external calibration methods, and the role of ground validation. Particular emphasis is on plans for inter-satellite calibration of the GPM constellation. With its Unique instrument capabilities, the core spacecraft will serve as a calibration transfer standard to the GPM constellation. In particular the Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar aboard the core will check the accuracy of retrievals from the GMI radiometer and will enable improvement of the radiometer retrievals

  13. New Features of the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Validation Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwaller, M.; Morris, K. R.

    2014-12-01

    Various enhancements have been added to the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Validation Network (VN) to evaluate the GPM satellite's instrument and data product performance. The GPM VN acquires data from the Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) on GPM, the Precipitation Radar (PR) on the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite, from microwave imagers on GPM, TRMM, and GPM constellation satellites, and from ground radar (GR) networks in the continental U.S. and participating international sites. The VN characterizes the variability and bias of precipitation retrievals between the satellite products and the GR in various precipitation regimes, with the goal of improving precipitation retrieval algorithms for the GPM instruments. The core VN dataset consists of WSR-88D GR data and matching satellite orbit subset data, primarily covering the eastern US. TRMM data range from August, 2006 to the present, and GPM and constellation data range from March, 2014 to the present. New features of the VN include the extension of the observation network from 21 weather service ground radars in the southeast US to 66 radars covering most of the eastern half of the US, and a radar in Alaska was also added to the network. Additional comparison parameters have also been added to the VN. These include ground radar polarimetric variables (Zdr, Kdp, RHOhv), microphysical variables (Dzero, Nw), and hydrometeor type classifications. New visualization tools and statistical methods are now also available to help compare ground radar and GPM DPR measurements for validation purposes. The VN also now includes an experimental GPM Microwave Imager (GMI)-to-ground radar geometry matching technique. For this product, the GMI near-surface rain rate field from the GPM GPROF algorithm is matched to the GR reflectivity and dual-polarization fields a) along the GMI line- of-sight, and b) as a vertical column above the GMI surface. The full VN software suite to produce the

  14. Calibration Plans for the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bidwell, S. W.; Flaming, G. M.; Adams, W. J.; Everett, D. F.; Mendelsohn, C. R.; Smith, E. A.; Turk, J.

    2002-01-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) is an international effort led by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) of the U.S.A. and the National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA) for the purpose of improving research into the global water and energy cycle. GPM will improve climate, weather, and hydrological forecasts through more frequent and more accurate measurement of precipitation world-wide. Comprised of U.S. domestic and international partners, GPM will incorporate and assimilate data streams from many spacecraft with varied orbital characteristics and instrument capabilities. Two of the satellites will be provided directly by GPM, the core satellite and a constellation member. The core satellite, at the heart of GPM, is scheduled for launch in November 2007. The core will carry a conical scanning microwave radiometer, the GPM Microwave Imager (GMI), and a two-frequency cross-track-scanning radar, the Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR). The passive microwave channels and the two radar frequencies of the core are carefully chosen for investigating the varying character of precipitation over ocean and land, and from the tropics to the high-latitudes. The DPR will enable microphysical characterization and three-dimensional profiling of precipitation. The GPM-provided constellation spacecraft will carry a GMI radiometer identical to that on the core spacecraft. This paper presents calibration plans for the GPM, including on-board instrument calibration, external calibration methods, and the role of ground validation. Particular emphasis is on plans for inter-satellite calibration of the GPM constellation. With its Unique instrument capabilities, the core spacecraft will serve as a calibration transfer standard to the GPM constellation. In particular the Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar aboard the core will check the accuracy of retrievals from the GMI radiometer and will enable improvement of the radiometer retrievals

  15. Measuring Snow Precipitation in New Zealand- Challenges and Opportunities.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renwick, J. A.; Zammit, C.

    2015-12-01

    Monitoring plays a pivotal role in determining sustainable strategy for efficient overall management of the water resource. Though periodic monitoring provides some information, only long-term monitoring can provide data sufficient in quantity and quality to determine trends and develop predictive models. These can support informed decisions about sustainable and efficient use of water resources in New Zealand. However the development of such strategies is underpinned by our understanding and our ability to measure all inputs in headwaters catchments, where most of the precipitation is falling. Historically due to the harsh environment New Zealand has had little to no formal high elevation monitoring stations for all climate and snow related parameters outside of ski field climate and snow stations. This leads to sparse and incomplete archived datasets. Due to the importance of these catchments to the New Zealand economy (eg irrigation, hydro-electricity generation, tourism) NIWA has developed a climate-snow and ice monitoring network (SIN) since 2006. This network extends existing monitoring by electricity generator and ski stations and it is used by a number of stakeholders. In 2014 the network comprises 13 stations located at elevation above 700masl. As part of the WMO Solid Precipitation Intercomparison Experiment (SPICE), NIWA is carrying out an intercomparison of precipitation data over the period 2013-2015 at Mueller Hut. The site was commissioned on 11 July 2013, set up on the 17th September 2013 and comprises two Geonor weighing bucket raingauges, one shielded and the other un-shielded, in association with a conventional tipping bucket raingauge and conventional climate and snow measurements (temperature, wind, solar radiation, relative humidity, snow depth and snow pillow). The presentation aims to outline the state of the current monitoring network in New Zealand, as well as the challenge and opportunities for measurement of precipitation in alpine

  16. A Plan for Measuring Climatic Scale Global Precipitation Variability: The Global Precipitation Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Eric A.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The outstanding success of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) stemmed from a near flawless launch and deployment, a highly successful measurement campaign, achievement of all original scientific objectives before the mission life had ended, and the accomplishment of a number of unanticipated but important additional scientific advances. This success and the realization that satellite rainfall datasets are now a foremost tool in the understanding of decadal climate variability has helped motivate a comprehensive global rainfall measuring mission, called 'The Global Precipitation Mission' (GPM). The intent of this mission is to address looming scientific questions arising in the context of global climate-water cycle interactions, hydrometeorology, weather prediction, the global carbon budget, and atmosphere-biosphere-cryosphere chemistry. This paper addresses the status of that mission currently planed for launch in the early 2007 time frame. The GPM design involves a nine-member satellite constellation, one of which will be an advanced TRMM-like 'core' satellite carrying a dual-frequency Ku-Ka band radar (df-PR) and a TMI-like radiometer. The other eight members of the constellation can be considered drones to the core satellite, each carrying some type of passive microwave radiometer measuring across the 10.7-85 GHz frequency range, likely based on both real and synthetic aperture antenna technology and to include a combination of new lightweight dedicated GPM drones and both co-existing operational and experimental satellites carrying passive microwave radiometers (i.e., SSM/l, AMSR, etc.). The constellation is designed to provide a minimum of three-hour sampling at any spot on the globe using sun-synchronous orbit architecture, with the core satellite providing relevant measurements on internal cloud precipitation microphysical processes. The core satellite also enables 'training' and 'calibration' of the drone retrieval process. Additional

  17. A Plan for Measuring Climatic Scale Global Precipitation Variability: The Global Precipitation Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Eric A.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The outstanding success of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) stemmed from a near flawless launch and deployment, a highly successful measurement campaign, achievement of all original scientific objectives before the mission life had ended, and the accomplishment of a number of unanticipated but important additional scientific advances. This success and the realization that satellite rainfall datasets are now a foremost tool in the understanding of decadal climate variability has helped motivate a comprehensive global rainfall measuring mission, called 'The Global Precipitation Mission' (GPM). The intent of this mission is to address looming scientific questions arising in the context of global climate-water cycle interactions, hydrometeorology, weather prediction, the global carbon budget, and atmosphere-biosphere-cryosphere chemistry. This paper addresses the status of that mission currently planed for launch in the early 2007 time frame. The GPM design involves a nine-member satellite constellation, one of which will be an advanced TRMM-like 'core' satellite carrying a dual-frequency Ku-Ka band radar (df-PR) and a TMI-like radiometer. The other eight members of the constellation can be considered drones to the core satellite, each carrying some type of passive microwave radiometer measuring across the 10.7-85 GHz frequency range, likely based on both real and synthetic aperture antenna technology and to include a combination of new lightweight dedicated GPM drones and both co-existing operational and experimental satellites carrying passive microwave radiometers (i.e., SSM/l, AMSR, etc.). The constellation is designed to provide a minimum of three-hour sampling at any spot on the globe using sun-synchronous orbit architecture, with the core satellite providing relevant measurements on internal cloud precipitation microphysical processes. The core satellite also enables 'training' and 'calibration' of the drone retrieval process. Additional

  18. Continuous Light Absorption Photometer (CLAP) Final Campaign Report

    SciTech Connect

    Jefferson, Anne

    2014-05-01

    The Continuous Light Absorption Photometer (CLAP) measures the aerosol absorption of radiation at three visible wavelengths; 461, 522, and 653 nanometers (nm). Data from this measurement is used in radiative forcing calculations, atmospheric heating rates, and as a prediction of the amount of equivalent black carbon in atmospheric aerosol and in models of aerosol semi-direct forcing. Aerosol absorption measurements are essential to modeling the energy balance of the atmosphere.

  19. The Hubble Space Telescope high speed photometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vancitters, G. W., Jr.; Bless, R. C.; Dolan, J. F.; Elliot, J. L.; Robinson, E. L.; White, R. L.

    1988-01-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope will provide the opportunity to perform precise astronomical photometry above the disturbing effects of the atmosphere. The High Speed Photometer is designed to provide the observatory with a stable, precise photometer with wide dynamic range, broad wavelenth coverage, time resolution in the microsecond region, and polarimetric capability. Here, the scientific requirements for the instrument are examined, the unique design features of the photometer are explored, and the improvements to be expected over the performance of ground-based instruments are projected.

  20. The Pierce-Blitzstein Photometer - The PBPHOT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambruster, Carol; Hull, A. B.; Koch, R. H.; Mitchell, R. J.; Smith, R. E.

    2009-01-01

    This report describes the inception, development and extensive use (over 50 years) of the simultaneous 2-source, pulse-counting photometer named after the two astronomers in this paper's title. These men are not, however, the only personalities associated with the lifetime of the photometer from 1952 to 2007 and the contributions of other people are explicitly recognized. The embellishments and upgrades over time of the original conceptions are detailed for both the optical/mechanical/electrical hardware and the software. The opportunities and limitations of the three observing stations where this photometer and its prototypes were tested and functioned and the telescopes upon which they were mounted are also discussed and compared.

  1. Impacts of Light Precipitation Detection with Dual Frequency Radar on Global Precipitation Measurement Core Observatory (GPM/DPR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takayabu, Y. N.; Hamada, A.; Oki, R.; Kachi, M.; Kubota, T.; Iguchi, T.; Shige, S.; Nakamura, K.

    2014-12-01

    The Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) on board the GPM Core Observatory consists of Ku-band (13.6 GHz) and Ka-band (35.5 GHz) radars, with an improved minimum detection sensitivity of precipitation compared to the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission Precipitation Radar (TRMM PR). We have studied impacts of improved detection sensitivity with the GPM DPR compared with the TRMM PR. One example of light precipitation is, a scattered rainfall around a trough over the subtropical South Pacific Ocean, which consists of weak but erect precipitation reaching over the melting level of ~2.5 km and trailing precipitation above, which reaches as high as 5km. Another example is a light anvil precipitation spreading from convective cores of a storm in the upper troposphere, overcasting shallow convective precipitation below. The ability of globally detecting such light precipitation will improve our knowledge of precipitation processes. Utilizing an early version of the DPR product, a quick evaluation on statistical impacts of increasing the detection sensitivity from 17dBZ to 12dBZ has been performed. Here, 17dBZ is the value which is mostly accepted as the performed detection sensitivity of the TRMM PR, and 12dBZ is the guaranteed sensitivity for GPM Ka-band radar. For the near surface precipitation, impacts are significant in terms of numbers, but limited to several regions in terms of the rainfall volume. Volume impacts are much larger at the upper troposphere, which is indicated by the detection of the anvil precipitation, for example. The upper level improvements are mostly found where the deep precipitation systems exist. Quantitative discussions utilizing the latest version of the DPR data, which is scheduled to be released to the public in September, will be presented at the session.

  2. Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Safety Inhibit Timeline Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dion, Shirley

    2012-01-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Observatory is a joint mission under the partnership by National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), Japan. The NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) has the lead management responsibility for NASA on GPM. The GPM program will measure precipitation on a global basis with sufficient quality, Earth coverage, and sampling to improve prediction of the Earth's climate, weather, and specific components of the global water cycle. As part of the development process, NASA built the spacecraft (built in-house at GSFC) and provided one instrument (GPM Microwave Imager (GMI) developed by Ball Aerospace) JAXA provided the launch vehicle (H2-A by MHI) and provided one instrument (Dual-Frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) developed by NTSpace). Each instrument developer provided a safety assessment which was incorporated into the NASA GPM Safety Hazard Assessment. Inhibit design was reviewed for hazardous subsystems which included the High Gain Antenna System (HGAS) deployment, solar array deployment, transmitter turn on, propulsion system release, GMI deployment, and DPR radar turn on. The safety inhibits for these listed hazards are controlled by software. GPM developed a "pathfinder" approach for reviewing software that controls the electrical inhibits. This is one of the first GSFC in-house programs that extensively used software controls. The GPM safety team developed a methodology to document software safety as part of the standard hazard report. As part of this process a new tool "safety inhibit time line" was created for management of inhibits and their controls during spacecraft buildup and testing during 1& Tat GSFC and at the Range in Japan. In addition to understanding inhibits and controls during 1& T the tool allows the safety analyst to better communicate with others the changes in inhibit states with each phase of hardware and software testing. The tool was very

  3. High precision laser photometer for laser optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yuan'an; Hu, Guohang; Cao, Zhen; Liu, Shijie; Zhu, Meiping; Shao, Jianda

    2017-06-01

    Development of laser systems requires optical components with high performance, and a high-precision double-beam laser photometer was designed and established to measure the optical performance at 1064nm. Double beam design and lock-in technique was applied to decrease the impact of light energy instability and electric noise. Pairs of samples were placed symmetrically to eliminate beam displacement, and laser scattering imaging technique was applied to determine the influence of surface defect on the optical performance. Based on the above techniques, transmittance and reflection of pairs of optics were obtained, and the measurement precision was improved to 0.06%. Different types of optical loss, such as total loss, volume loss, residual reflection and surface scattering loss, were obtained from the transmittance and reflection measurement of samples with different thickness. Comparison of optical performance of the test points with and without surface defects, the influence of surface defects on optical performance was determined. The optical performance of Nd-glass at 1064nm were measured as an example. Different types of optical loss and the influence of surface defects on the optical loss was determined.

  4. Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Orbit Design and Autonomous Maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Folta, David; Mendelsohn, Chad

    2003-01-01

    The NASA Goddard Space Flight Center's Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission will meet a challenge of measuring worldwide precipitation every three hours. The GPM spacecraft, part of a constellation, will be required to maintain a circular orbit in a high drag environment to accomplish this challenge. Analysis by the Flight Dynamics Analysis Branch has shown that the prime orbit altitude of 40% is necessary to prevent ground track repeating. Combined with goals to minimize maneuver impacts to science data collection and enabling reasonable long-term orbit predictions, the GPM project has decided to fly an autonomous maneuver system. This system is a derivative of the successful New Millennium Program technology flown onboard the Earth Observing-1 mission. This paper presents the driving science requirements and goals of the mission and shows how they will be met. Analysis of the orbit optimization and the AV requirements for several ballistic properties are presented. The architecture of the autonomous maneuvering system to meet the goals and requirements is presented along with simulations using a GPM prototype. Additionally, the use of the GPM autonomous system to mitigate possible collision avoidance and to aid other spacecraft systems during navigation outages is explored.

  5. Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Orbit Design and Autonomous Maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Folta, David; Mendelsohn, Chad; Mailhe, Laurie

    2003-01-01

    The NASA Goddard Space Flight Center's Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission must meet the challenge of measuring worldwide precipitation every three hours. The GPM core spacecraft, part of a constellation, will be required to maintain a circular orbit in a high drag environment at a near-critical inclination. Analysis shows that a mean orbit altitude of 407 km is necessary to prevent ground track repeating. Combined with goals to minimize maneuver operation impacts to science data collection and to enable reasonable long-term orbit predictions, the GPM project has decided to fly the GSFC autonomous maneuver system, AutoCon(TM). This system is a follow-up version of the highly successful New Millennium Program technology flown onboard the Earth Observing-1 formation flying mission. This paper presents the driving science requirements and goals of the GPM mission and shows how they will be met. Selection of the mean semi-major axis, eccentricity, and the AV budget for several ballistic properties are presented. The architecture of the autonomous maneuvering system to meet the goals and requirements is presented along with simulations using GPM parameters. Additionally, the use of the GPM autonomous system to mitigate possible collision avoidance and to aid other spacecraft systems during navigation outages is explored.

  6. Optical alignment of the Global Precipitation Measurements (GPM) star trackers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hetherington, Samuel; Osgood, Dean; McMann, Joe; Roberts, Viki; Gill, James; McLean, Kyle

    2013-09-01

    The optical alignment of the star trackers on the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) core spacecraft at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) was challenging due to the layout and structural design of the GPM Lower Bus Structure (LBS) in which the star trackers are mounted as well as the presence of the star tracker shades that blocked line-of-sight to the primary star tracker optical references. The initial solution was to negotiate minor changes in the original LBS design to allow for the installation of a removable item of ground support equipment (GSE) that could be installed whenever measurements of the star tracker optical references were needed. However, this GSE could only be used to measure secondary optical reference cube faces not used by the star tracker vendor to obtain the relationship information and matrix transformations necessary to determine star tracker alignment. Unfortunately, due to unexpectedly large orthogonality errors between the measured secondary adjacent cube faces and the lack of cube calibration data, we required a method that could be used to measure the same reference cube faces as originally measured by the vendor. We describe an alternative technique to theodolite autocollimation for measurement of an optical reference mirror pointing direction when normal incidence measurements are not possible. This technique was used to successfully align the GPM star trackers and has been used on a number of other NASA flight projects. We also discuss alignment theory as well as a GSFC-developed theodolite data analysis package used to analyze angular metrology data.

  7. Evaluation of a Portable Photometer for Estimating Diesel Particulate Matter Concentrations in an Underground Limestone Mine

    PubMed Central

    Watts, Winthrop F.; Gladis, David D.; Schumacher, Matthew F.; Ragatz, Adam C.; Kittelson, David B.

    2010-01-01

    A low cost, battery-operated, portable, real-time aerosol analyzer is not available for monitoring diesel particulate matter (DPM) concentrations in underground mines. This study summarizes a field evaluation conducted at an underground limestone mine to evaluate the potential of the TSI AM 510 portable photometer (equipped with a Dorr-Oliver cyclone and 1.0-μm impactor) to qualitatively track time-weighted average mass and elemental, organic, and total carbon (TC) measurements associated with diesel emissions. The calibration factor corrected correlation coefficient (R2) between the underground TC and photometer measurements was 0.93. The main issues holding back the use of a photometer for real-time estimation of DPM in an underground mine are the removal of non-DPM-associated particulate matter from the aerosol stream using devices, such as a cyclone and/or impactor and calibration of the photometer to mine-specific aerosol. PMID:20410071

  8. Validation and Error Characterization for the Global Precipitation Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bidwell, Steven W.; Adams, W. J.; Everett, D. F.; Smith, E. A.; Yuter, S. E.

    2003-01-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) is an international effort to increase scientific knowledge on the global water cycle with specific goals of improving the understanding and the predictions of climate, weather, and hydrology. These goals will be achieved through several satellites specifically dedicated to GPM along with the integration of numerous meteorological satellite data streams from international and domestic partners. The GPM effort is led by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) of the United States and the National Space Development Agency (NASDA) of Japan. In addition to the spaceborne assets, international and domestic partners will provide ground-based resources for validating the satellite observations and retrievals. This paper describes the validation effort of Global Precipitation Measurement to provide quantitative estimates on the errors of the GPM satellite retrievals. The GPM validation approach will build upon the research experience of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) retrieval comparisons and its validation program. The GPM ground validation program will employ instrumentation, physical infrastructure, and research capabilities at Supersites located in important meteorological regimes of the globe. NASA will provide two Supersites, one in a tropical oceanic and the other in a mid-latitude continental regime. GPM international partners will provide Supersites for other important regimes. Those objectives or regimes not addressed by Supersites will be covered through focused field experiments. This paper describes the specific errors that GPM ground validation will address, quantify, and relate to the GPM satellite physical retrievals. GPM will attempt to identify the source of errors within retrievals including those of instrument calibration, retrieval physical assumptions, and algorithm applicability. With the identification of error sources, improvements will be made to the respective calibration

  9. Validation and Error Characterization for the Global Precipitation Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bidwell, Steven W.; Adams, W. J.; Everett, D. F.; Smith, E. A.; Yuter, S. E.

    2003-01-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) is an international effort to increase scientific knowledge on the global water cycle with specific goals of improving the understanding and the predictions of climate, weather, and hydrology. These goals will be achieved through several satellites specifically dedicated to GPM along with the integration of numerous meteorological satellite data streams from international and domestic partners. The GPM effort is led by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) of the United States and the National Space Development Agency (NASDA) of Japan. In addition to the spaceborne assets, international and domestic partners will provide ground-based resources for validating the satellite observations and retrievals. This paper describes the validation effort of Global Precipitation Measurement to provide quantitative estimates on the errors of the GPM satellite retrievals. The GPM validation approach will build upon the research experience of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) retrieval comparisons and its validation program. The GPM ground validation program will employ instrumentation, physical infrastructure, and research capabilities at Supersites located in important meteorological regimes of the globe. NASA will provide two Supersites, one in a tropical oceanic and the other in a mid-latitude continental regime. GPM international partners will provide Supersites for other important regimes. Those objectives or regimes not addressed by Supersites will be covered through focused field experiments. This paper describes the specific errors that GPM ground validation will address, quantify, and relate to the GPM satellite physical retrievals. GPM will attempt to identify the source of errors within retrievals including those of instrument calibration, retrieval physical assumptions, and algorithm applicability. With the identification of error sources, improvements will be made to the respective calibration

  10. Portable fluorescence photometer for monitoring free calcium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Struckmeier, Jens; Klopp, Erk; Born, Matthias; Hofmann, Martin; Tenbosch, Jochen; Jones, David B.

    2000-12-01

    We introduce a compact and portable photometric system for measurements of the calcium dynamics in cells. The photometer is designed for applications in centrifuges or in zero gravity environment and thus extremely compact and reliable. It operates with the calcium-sensitive dye Indo-1. The excitation wavelength of 345 nm is generated by frequency doubling of a laser diode. Two compact photomultiplier tubes detect the fluorescent emission. The electronics provide the sensitivity of photon counting combined with simultaneous measurement of the temperature, of air pressure, and of gravitational force. Internal data storage during the experiment is possible. A newly developed cell chamber stabilizes the cell temperature to 37.0±0.1 °C and includes a perfusion system to supply the cells with medium. The system has a modular setup providing the possibility of changing the light source and detectors for investigation of ions other than calcium. Measurements of the intracellular calcium concentration are based on a comprehensive calibration of our system. First experiments show that the calcium dynamics of osteosarcoma cells stimulated by parathyroid hormone is observable.

  11. Climatological characteristics of summer precipitation over East Asia measured by TRMM PR: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Yunfei; Pan, Xiao; Yang, Yuanjian; Chen, Fengjiao; Liu, Peng

    2017-02-01

    Precipitation is an important indicator of climate change and a critical process in the hydrological cycle, on both the global and regional scales. Methods of precipitation observation and associated analyses are of strategic importance in global climate change research. As the first space-based radar, the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Precipitation Radar (PR) has been in operation for almost 17 years and has acquired a huge amount of cloud and precipitation data that provide a distinctive view to help expose the nature of cloud and precipitation in the tropics and subtropics. In this paper we review recent advances in summer East Asian precipitation climatology studies based on long-term TRMM PR measurements in the following three aspects: (1) the three-dimensional structure of precipitation, (2) the diurnal variation of precipitation, and (3) the recent precipitation trend. Additionally, some important prospects regarding satellite remote sensing of precipitation and its application in the near future are discussed.

  12. Precipitation measurement using SIR-C: A feasibility study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahamad, Atiq; Moore, Richard K.

    1993-01-01

    A precipitation detection and measurement experiment is planned for the SIR-C/X-SAR mission. This study was conducted to determine under what conditions an off-nadir experiment is feasible. The signal-to-clutter ratio, the signal-to-noise ratio, and the minimum detectable rain rate were investigated. Available models, used in previous studies, were used for the surface clutter and the rain echo. The study also considers the attenuation of the returns at X band. It was concluded that an off-nadir rain-measurement experiment is feasible only for rain rates greater than 10 mm/hr for look angles greater than 60 deg. For the range of look angles 5 less than theta(sub 1) less than 50, the rain rate required is very high for adequate signal-to-clutter ratio, and hence the feasibility of the experiment.

  13. On-orbit calibration of the tiny ionospheric photometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    jiang, fang

    2016-04-01

    The Tiny Ionospheric Photometer(TIP) instrument is a compact, high sensitivity far ultraviolet photometer that observes the nighttime ionosphere of the Earth at 135.6 nm. The sensor will be on board the FY-3 meteorological satellite of China. As an optical instrument, it is necessary to have on-orbit calibration. But because of limited resources, calibration equipment could not be carried together. On order to determine and monitor the on-orbit sensitivity of the TIP instrument, an on-orbit calibration method based on the model calculation was studied. For a calculation, The peak electron density and the electron density profile were obtained from the ground-based digisonde and the neutral molecule density profile was obtained from MSIS-90 model. These parameters were the input values in the OI 135.6 nm nighttime airglow radiative transfer model which was developed and introduced in another paper. the OI 135.6 nm airglow intensity was obtained from the model. The OI 135.6 nm intensity calculated was used to revise the measured value of intensity at 135.6 nm from the tiny ions ionospheric photometer when measuring time and space conditions of both the TIP and the ground-based digisonde were consistent. The method was tested using some measured data from the TIP on COSMIC/FORMOSAT-3 satellite and the results showed the method of on-orbit were feasible.

  14. Precipitable water vapor and its relationship with the Standardized Precipitation Index: ground-based GPS measurements and reanalysis data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordi, Isabella; Zhu, Xiuhua; Fraedrich, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Monthly means of ground-based GPS measurements of precipitable water vapor (PWV) from six stations in the USA covering the period January 2007-December 2012 are analyzed to investigate their usefulness for monitoring meteorological wet/dry spells. For this purpose, the relationship between PWV and the Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI) on 1-month timescale is investigated. The SPI time series at grid points close to the stations are computed using gridded precipitation records from the NOAA Climate Prediction Center (CPC) unified precipitation dataset (January 1948-April 2012). GPS measurements are first verified against PWV data taken from the latest ECMWF reanalysis ERA-Interim; these PWV reanalysis data, which extend back to 1979, are then used jointly with CPC precipitation to compute precipitation efficiency (PE), defined as the percentage of total water vapor content that falls onto the surface as measurable precipitation in a given time period. The overall results suggest that (i) PWV time series are dominated by the seasonal cycle with maximum values during summer months, (ii) the comparison between GPS and ERA-Interim PWV monthly data shows good agreement with differences less than 4 mm, (iii) at all stations and for almost all months, PWV is only poorly correlated with recorded precipitation and the SPI, while PE correlates highly with the SPI, providing an estimate of the water availability at a given location and useful information on wet/dry spell occurrence, and (iv) long data records would allow, for each month of the year, the identification of PE thresholds associated with different SPI classes that, in turn, have potential for forecasting meteorological wet/dry spells. Thus, it is through PE that ground-based GPS measurements appear of relevance for assessing wet/dry spells, although there is not a direct relationship between PWV and SPI.

  15. Determination of precipitation profiles from airborne passive microwave radiometric measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kummerow, Christian; Hakkarinen, Ida M.; Pierce, Harold F.; Weinman, James A.

    1991-01-01

    This study presents the first quantitative retrievals of vertical profiles of precipitation derived from multispectral passive microwave radiometry. Measurements of microwave brightness temperature (Tb) obtained by a NASA high-altitude research aircraft are related to profiles of rainfall rate through a multichannel piecewise-linear statistical regression procedure. Statistics for Tb are obtained from a set of cloud radiative models representing a wide variety of convective, stratiform, and anvil structures. The retrieval scheme itself determines which cloud model best fits the observed meteorological conditions. Retrieved rainfall rate profiles are converted to equivalent radar reflectivity for comparison with observed reflectivities from a ground-based research radar. Results for two case studies, a stratiform rain situation and an intense convective thunderstorm, show that the radiometrically derived profiles capture the major features of the observed vertical structure of hydrometer density.

  16. Structure of the polar oval from simultaneous observations of the optical emissions and particle precipitations during the period of high solar activity 1981-1982

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogoshev, M. M.; Maglova, P. V.; Guineva, V. Kh.; Dachev, Ts. P.; Shepherd, G. G.

    The observations on board the IC-Bulgaria-1300 satellite, obtained during the period 1981 - 1982, have been analysed. The optical emissions have been measured by the optical photometer EMO-5. The simultaneous precipitating electron and proton fluxes have been measured by the ANEPE spectrometer. The structure of the oval is studied as a function of the magnetic local time and the geomagnetic activity.

  17. Optical Alignment of the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Star Trackers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hetherington, Samuel; Osgood, Dean; McMann, Joe; Roberts, Viki; Gill, James; Mclean, Kyle

    2013-01-01

    The optical alignment of the star trackers on the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) core spacecraft at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) was challenging due to the layout and structural design of the GPM Lower Bus Structure (LBS) in which the star trackers are mounted as well as the presence of the star tracker shades that blocked line-of-sight to the primary star tracker optical references. The initial solution was to negotiate minor changes in the original LBS design to allow for the installation of a removable item of ground support equipment (GSE) that could be installed whenever measurements of the star tracker optical references were needed. However, this GSE could only be used to measure secondary optical reference cube faces not used by the star tracker vendor to obtain the relationship information and matrix transformations necessary to determine star tracker alignment. Unfortunately, due to unexpectedly large orthogonality errors between the measured secondary adjacent cube faces and the lack of cube calibration data, we required a method that could be used to measure the same reference cube faces as originally measured by the vendor. We describe an alternative technique to theodolite auto-collimation for measurement of an optical reference mirror pointing direction when normal incidence measurements are not possible. This technique was used to successfully align the GPM star trackers and has been used on a number of other NASA flight projects. We also discuss alignment theory as well as a GSFC-developed theodolite data analysis package used to analyze angular metrology data.

  18. Inference of precipitation through thermal infrared measurements of soil moisture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wetzel, P. J.; Atlas, D.

    1981-01-01

    The physics of microwave radiative transfer is well understood so that causal models can be assembled which relate the observed brightness temperatures to assumed distributions of hydrometeors (both liquid and ice), non-precipitating clouds, water vapor oxygen, and surface conditions. Present models assume a Marshall Palmer size distribution of liquid hydrometers from the surface to the freezing level (near the 0 C isotherm) and a variable thickness of frozen hydrometeors above that with various reasonable distribution of the other relevant constituents. The validity of such models is discussed. All uncertainties in the rain rate retrieval algorithms can be expressed in terms of specific model uncertainties which can be addressed through appropriate measurements. Those factors which must be known to achieve umambiguous results can be identified so that rainfall measuring algorithms can be developed and improved. The emissivity of the underlying surface significantly affects the contrast that may be measured between areas covered by rain and those which are dry. Sensing strategies for measuring rain over the ocean and rain over land are reviewed.

  19. MicroCameras and Photometers (MCP) on board TARANIS satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farges, Thomas; Blanc, Elisabeth; Hébert, Philippe; Le Mer-Dachard, Fanny; Ravel, Karen; Gaillac, Stéphanie

    2017-04-01

    TARANIS (Tool for the Analysis of Radiations from lightNings and Sprites) is a CNES micro satellite. Its main objective is to study impulsive transfers of energy between the Earth atmosphere and the space environment. It will be sun-synchronous at an altitude of 700 km. It will be launched from end-2018 for at least 2 years. Its payload is composed of several electromagnetic instruments in different wavelengths (from gamma-rays to radio waves including optical). TARANIS instruments are currently in calibration and qualification phase. The purpose of this poster is to present the MicroCameras and Photometers (MCP) scientific objectives and the sensor design, to show the performances of this instrument using the recent characterization, and at last to promote its products. The MicroCameras, developed by Sodern, are dedicated to the spatial description of TLEs and their parent lightning. They are able to differentiate sprite and lightning thanks to two narrow bands ([757-767 nm] and [772-782 nm]) that provide simultaneous pairs of images of an Event. Simulation results of the differentiation method will be shown. After calibration and tests, the MicroCameras are now delivered to CNES for integration on the payload. The Photometers, developed by Bertin Technologies, will provide temporal measurements and spectral characteristics of TLEs and lightning. There are key instrument because of their capability to detect on-board TLEs and then switch all the instruments of the scientific payload in their high resolution acquisition mode. Photometers use four spectral bands in the [170-260 nm], [332-342 nm], [757-767 nm] and [600-900 nm] and have the same field of view as cameras. The on-board TLE detection algorithm remote-controlled parameters have been tuned before launch using the electronic board and simulated or real events waveforms. The Photometers are now in the calibration and test phase. They will be delivered for integration in mid-2017.

  20. Aerosol measurements during the central Chilean orographic precipitation experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fults, Sara Lynn

    The Central Chilean Orographic Precipitation Experiment (CCOPE) was a three-month field campaign (June, July and August 2015) that investigated winter rain events. Reported here are analyses of aerosol measurements made at a coastal site (Arauco, Chile) during CCOPE. Data was obtained using a condensation particle counter (CPC) and an aerosol spectrometer (UHSAS). Arauco CPC concentrations are compared to those measured at the NOAA station at coastal Trinidad Head, California (THD). The marine-sector averaged CPC concentration at Arauco is 3457 cm-3 +/- 2284 cm-3; at THD the average is 1171 cm-3 +/- 772 cm-3. Surprisingly, the Arauco concentrations are larger (p < 0.01). In addition, UHSAS measurements were analyzed to determine processes that shaped the ASD at Arauco. Variables analyzed included the fraction of particles smaller than 0.055 mum and moments of the UHSAS-derived aerosol size distributions. There is evidence for both primary particle sources and for new particle formation adding to the aerosol burden in oceanic air as it approaches the coast and advects onshore.

  1. InterComparison of precipitation measured between automatic and manual precipitation gauges in nepal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talchabhadel, R.; Karki, R.; Parajuli, B.

    2016-12-01

    An inter-comparison of precipitation data of manual and automatic precipitation gauge was carried out for four stations of Nepal for the period of 2011-2014. Manual recorded (MR) precipitation is used as reference to calculate deviation for automatic recording (AR). This study has attempted to quantify and understand the differences in precipitation amounts between MR and AR. In addition, the possible causes behind the disparity of automatic and manual observational data are also discussed. In case of selected stations, the data quality is fairly satisfactory. The daily deviation between MR and 24 hrs aggregated AR precipitation data are calculated for only those days when both gauges are functional. Monthly deviation, monthly absolute deviation and monthly root mean square deviation (MRMSD) are calculated from daily deviations. Months which have higher value of MRMSD (greater than 100mm) are selected for further analysis to identify the potential causes behind disparity. The authors have suspected some of key reasons behind disparity of AR and MR precipitation data. They are untimely observation of MR, lack of monitoring of AR data and lack of site level maintenance. On analyzing the records that are quite matching or has minor difference (±10% difference), it is found that AR has negatively deviated 77% of time and positively deviated 23% of time. When the difference is more than 10%, it is found that AR has negatively deviated 79% of time and positively deviated 21% of time. In normal operation the AR precipitation is underestimated on an average of 10% compared to MR precipitation. Selected stations are some of the easily accessible stations of Nepal by road or air transportation. These stations should be some of the efficiently operated meteorological stations in country. But they are not well representing the realism. The main causes are lack of monitoring and timely maintenance during malfunctioning of stations. In addition to this, the technological

  2. Orbital checkout result of the dual-frequency precipitation radar on the global precipitation measurement core spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furukawa, K.; Kojima, M.; Miura, T.; Hyakusoku, Y.; Kai, H.; Ishikiri, T.; Iguchi, T.; Hanado, H.; Nakagawa, K.; Okumura, M.

    2014-10-01

    The Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) on the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) core satellite was developed by Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) and National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT). The GPM is a follow-on mission of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM). The objectives of the GPM mission are to observe global precipitation more frequently and accurately than TRMM. The frequent precipitation measurement about every three hours will be achieved by some constellation satellites with microwave radiometers (MWRs) or microwave sounders (MWSs), which will be developed by various countries. The accurate measurement of precipitation in mid-high latitudes will be achieved by the DPR. The GPM core satellite is a joint product of National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), JAXA and NICT. NASA developed the satellite bus and the GPM Microwave Imager (GMI), and JAXA and NICT developed the DPR. JAXA and NICT developed the DPR through procurement. The contract for DPR was awarded to NEC TOSHIBA Space Systems, Ltd. The configuration of precipitation measurement using active radar and a passive radiometer is similar to TRMM. The major difference is that DPR is used in GPM instead of the precipitation radar (PR) in TRMM. The inclination of the core satellite is 65 degrees, and the flight altitude is about 407 km. The non-sun-synchronous circular orbit is necessary for measuring the diurnal change of rainfall similarly to TRMM. The DPR consists of two radars, which are Ku-band (13.6 GHz) precipitation radar (KuPR) and Ka-band (35.5 GHz) precipitation radar (KaPR). Both KuPR and KaPR have almost the same design as TRMM PR. The DPR system design and performance were verified through the development test and the proto flight test. DPR had handed over to NASA and integration of the DPR to the GPM core spacecraft had completed in May 2012. GPM core spacecraft satellite system test had completed in November 2013

  3. Validation and understanding of Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer aerosol products (C5) using ground-based measurements from the handheld Sun photometer network in China

    Treesearch

    Zhanqing Li; Feng Niu; Kwon-Ho Lee; Jinyuan Xin; Wei Min Hao; Bryce L. Nordgren; Yuesi Wang; Pucai Wang

    2007-01-01

    The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) currently provides the most extensive aerosol retrievals on a global basis, but validation is limited to a small number of ground stations. This study presents a comprehensive evaluation of Collection 4 and 5 MODIS aerosol products using ground measurements from the Chinese Sun Hazemeter Network (CSHNET). The...

  4. Comparison of Water Vapor Measurements by Airborne Sun photometer and Near-Coincident In Situ and Satellite Sensors during INTEX-ITCT 2004

    SciTech Connect

    Livingston, J.; Schmid, Beat; Redemann, Jens; Russell, P. B.; Ramirez, Samuel; Eilers, J.; Gore, W.; Howard, Samuel; Pommier, J.; Fetzer, E. J.; Seemann, S. W.; Borbas, E.; Wolfe, Daniel; Thompson, Anne M.

    2007-06-06

    We have retrieved columnar water vapor (CWV) from measurements acquired by the 14-channel NASA Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-14) during 19 Jetstream 31 (J31) flights over the Gulf of Maine in summer 2004. In this paper we compare AATS-14 water vapor retrievals during aircraft vertical profiles with measurements by an onboard Vaisala HMP243 humidity sensor and by ship radiosondes, and with water vapor profiles retrieved from AIRS measurements during 8 Aqua overpasses. We also compare AATS CWV and MODIS infrared CWV retrievals during 5 Aqua and 5 Terra overpasses. For 35 J31 vertical profiles mean (bias) and rms AATS-minus-Vaisala layer-integrated water vapor (LWV) differences are -7.1% and 8.8%, respectively. For 22 aircraft profiles within 1 h and 130 km of radiosonde soundings, AATS-minus-sonde bias and rms LWV differences are -5.4% and 8.8%, respectively, and corresponding J31 Vaisala-minus-sonde differences are 2.3% and 8.4%, respectively. AIRS LWV retrievals within 80 km of J31 profiles yield lower bias and rms differences compared to AATS or Vaisala retrievals than do AIRS retrievals within 150 km of the J31. In particular, for AIRS-minus-AATS LWV differences, the bias decreases from 8.8% to 5.8%, and the rms difference decreases from 21.5% to 16.4%. Comparison of vertically resolved AIRS water vapor retrievals (LWVA) to AATS values in fixed pressure layers yields biases of -2% to +6% and rms differences of ~20% below 700 hPa. Variability and magnitude of these differences increase significantly above 700 hPa. MODIS IR retrievals of CWV in 205 grid cells (5 x 5-km at nadir) are biased wet by 10.4% compared to AATS over-ocean near surface retrievals. The MODIS Aqua subset (79 grid cells) exhibits a wet bias of 5.1%, and the MODIS-Terra subset (126 grid cells) yields a wet bias of 13.2%.

  5. Propulsion Options for the Global Precipitation Measurement Core Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardiff, Eric H.; Davis, Gary T.; Folta, David C.

    2003-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate several propulsion system options for the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) core satellite. Orbital simulations showed clear benefits for the scientific data to be obtained at a constant orbital altitude rather than with a decay/reboost approach. An orbital analysis estimated the drag force on the satellite will be 1 to 12 mN during the five-year mission. Four electric propulsion systems were identified that are able to compensate for these drag forces and maintain a circular orbit. The four systems were the UK-10/TS and the NASA 8 cm ion engines, and the ESA RMT and RITl0 EVO radio-frequency ion engines. The mass, cost, and power requirements were examined for these four systems. The systems were also evaluated for the transfer time from the initial orbit of 400 x 650 km altitude orbit to a circular 400 km orbit. The transfer times were excessive, and as a consequence a dual system concept (with a hydrazine monopropellant system for the orbit transfer and electric propulsion for drag compensation) was examined. Clear mass benefits were obtained with the dual system, but cost remains an issue because of the larger power system required for the electric propulsion system. An electrodynamic tether was also evaluated in this trade study.

  6. Filter type rotor for multistation photometer

    DOEpatents

    Shumate, II, Starling E.

    1977-07-12

    A filter type rotor for a multistation photometer is provided. The rotor design combines the principle of cross-flow filtration with centrifugal sedimentation so that these occur simultaneously as a first stage of processing for suspension type fluids in an analytical type instrument. The rotor is particularly useful in whole-blood analysis.

  7. OAO 2/Wisconsin Experiment Package (WEP) photometer users guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wende, C. D.

    1974-01-01

    The user's guide is intended to enable astronomers to reduce the filter photometry data obtained by the WEP carried on the OAO 2 spacecraft. Only information related to the stellar photometer contained within the experiment package is presented, since the nebular photometer failed after 2-1/2 months of operation, while the stellar photometers provided roughly 49 months worth of data.

  8. Characterization of Precipitation Behavior in Nimonic 263 BY Ultrasonic Velocity Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murthy, G. V. S.; Anish, Kumar; Sridhar, G.; Jayakumar, T.; Ghosh, R. N.

    2009-03-01

    The precipitation behavior in Nimonic-263 has been studied using ultrasonic velocity and hardness measurements. The study clearly revealed that ultrasonic velocity measurements are more sensitive to the initiation of the precipitation, whereas the influence of precipitation on hardness can be felt only after the precipitates attain a minimum size to influence the movement of dislocations. These observations are corroborated with the electron microscopy studies. Further, ultrasonic shear wave velocity is found to be more sensitive than longitudinal wave velocity in assessment of precipitation of intermetallic phases. Ultrasonic velocity measurements could also reveal faster kinetics and lesser amount of precipitation at 1073 K as compared to 923 K due to higher solubility of precipitate forming elements at 1073 K.

  9. Advanced Precipitation Radar Antenna to Measure Rainfall From Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rahmat-Samii, Yahya; Lin, John; Huang, John; Im, Eastwood; Lou, Michael; Lopez, Bernardo; Durden, Stephen

    2008-01-01

    To support NASA s planned 20-year mission to provide sustained global precipitation measurement (EOS-9 Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM)), a deployable antenna has been explored with an inflatable thin-membrane structure. This design uses a 5.3 5.3-m inflatable parabolic reflector with the electronically scanned, dual-frequency phased array feeds to provide improved rainfall measurements at 2.0-km horizontal resolution over a cross-track scan range of up to 37 , necessary for resolving intense, isolated storm cells and for reducing the beam-filling and spatial sampling errors. The two matched radar beams at the two frequencies (Ku and Ka bands) will allow unambiguous retrieval of the parameters in raindrop size distribution. The antenna is inflatable, using rigidizable booms, deployable chain-link supports with prescribed curvatures, a smooth, thin-membrane reflecting surface, and an offset feed technique to achieve the precision surface tolerance (0.2 mm RMS) for meeting the low-sidelobe requirement. The cylindrical parabolic offset-feed reflector augmented with two linear phased array feeds achieves dual-frequency shared-aperture with wide-angle beam scanning and very low sidelobe level of -30 dB. Very long Ku and Ka band microstrip feed arrays incorporating a combination of parallel and series power divider lines with cosine-over-pedestal distribution also augment the sidelobe level and beam scan. This design reduces antenna mass and launch vehicle stowage volume. The Ku and Ka band feed arrays are needed to achieve the required cross-track beam scanning. To demonstrate the inflatable cylindrical reflector with two linear polarizations (V and H), and two beam directions (0deg and 30deg), each frequency band has four individual microstrip array designs. The Ku-band array has a total of 166x2 elements and the Ka-band has 166x4 elements with both bands having element spacing about 0.65 lambda(sub 0). The cylindrical reflector with offset linear array feeds

  10. Calibration of of Sun Photometers and Sky Radiance Sensors. Chapter 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pietras, Christophe; Miller, Mark; Frouin, Robert; Eck, Tom; Holben, Brent; Marketon, John

    2001-01-01

    The main source of error in retrieving aerosol optical thicknesses using sun photometry comes from the determination of the TOA voltages. The degradation of interference filters is the most important source of the long-term changes in the cross-calibrations. Although major improvements have been made in the design of the filters (interference filters fabricated using ion-assisted deposition), the filters remain the principal factor limiting performance of the sun photometers. Degradation of filters necessitates frequent calibration of sun photometers and frequent measurements of the filter transmission or the relative system response. The degradation of the filters mounted on the CIMEL sun photometers have been monitored since 1993 by the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) project. The decay reported by Holben et al. for the first two years of a CIMEL#s operation is between 1 and 5%. Nevertheless, the filters mounted on CIMEL instruments are regularly replaced after two years of use. The cross-calibration technique consists of taking measurements concurrently with the uncalibrated and the reference sun photometers. While analyzing measurements, the quality of the calibration has to be checked, using the following considerations: (1) any cirrus clouds suspected to be masking the sun, during the calibration period, need to be reported and the corresponding data set removed; and (2) the stability of the day needs to be checked. This chapter will describe calibration techniques, facilities, and protocols used for calibrating sun photometers and sky radiometers.

  11. On the microwave measurement of precipitation in tropics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weng, Fuzhong; Vonder Haar, Thomas H.

    1992-01-01

    The difference between the brightness temperature structure over a typical tropical rain system and that of the midlatitude thunderstorms is examined. It is also determined how the brightness temperature and the rain rate relationship at the microwave frequencies deviates from that in the thunderstorms. It is shown, in particular, that the theoretical brightness temperature and rain rate relationship at 19.35 GHz provides good estimates of the surface rain rates for either convective or stratiform precipitation, but the relationship at 37 and 85.5 GHz may result in a significant overestimation of surface rain rate, especially for stratiform precipitation.

  12. Evaluation of a method to derive ionospheric conductivities using two auroral emissions (428 and 630 nm) measured with a photometer at Tromsø (69.6°N)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adachi, Kazuhiro; Nozawa, Satonori; Ogawa, Yasunobu; Brekke, Asgeir; Hall, Chris; Fujii, Ryoichi

    2017-07-01

    This paper mainly aims at evaluating capabilities of derivation of ionospheric conductivities using two principal auroral emissions (427.8 and 630 nm). We have evaluated a photometric method of derivation of ionospheric conductivities based on simultaneous observations of a photometer (field of view = 1.2°), a digital camera, and the EISCAT UHF radar (field of view = 0.7°) operated at Tromsø, Norway (69.6°N, 19.2°E), for two nights on October 10 and 11, 2002. We have compared height-integrated Pedersen and Hall conductivities with a post-integration time of 10 s derived from EISCAT UHF radar observations and photometer observations with wavelengths of 427.8 and 630.0 nm. Sky images taken with the digital camera are utilized for distinguishing types of auroras in the views of the EISCAT UHF radar and the photometer. In general, a good agreement of temporal variations of the height-integrated Pedersen and Hall conductivities was found between EISCAT and photometer values. In cases of auroral arcs passing by in the field of view, however, differences in derived values between the two methods were found. Possible causes of the differences are discussed. We conclude that (1) the photometric method using 427.8 and 630 nm can capture temporal variations of the conductivities well, but unavoidable underestimations of the Pedersen (about 30-40%) and the Hall (about 50-60%) conductivities are involved, and (2) care is necessary for using photometric observational data when auroral arcs appear in the field of view.[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  13. Measurements of Asian dust optical properties over the Yellow Sea of China by shipboard and ground-based photometers, along with satellite remote sensing: A case study of the passage of a frontal system during April 2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yi; Yang, Dongxu; Chen, Wenzhong; Zhang, Hua

    2010-04-01

    Aerosol optical properties were measured by a POM-01 MarkII Sun and sky photometer onboard the Dongfanghong Number 2 Research Ship on the Yellow Sea of China during the passage of a cold front surrounded by airborne dust that originated in Mongolia between 21 and 24 April 2006. The aerosol size distributions in clean marine environment were dominated by an accumulate mode with radius of 0.15 μm and a coarse mode with radius of 4.5 μm. The mean aerosol optical depth (AOD) and Ångström exponent were 0.26 and 1.26, respectively. In the frontal zone the aerosol size distribution was dominated by an accumulate mode with radius of 0.25 μm and two coarse modes with radii of 1.69 and 7.73 μm, and the AOD and Ångström exponent were 2.46 and 0.84, respectively. In the nonfrontal dust conditions, the concentration of coarse modes with radii of 2.5 μm increased to a maximum of 0.3 μm3/μm2, and the mean AOD and Ångström exponent were 0.70 and 0.30, respectively. Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) observations combined with shipboard measurements reveal the decreasing concentration of dust aerosol during its transport from continent to Japan. The spatial distribution of dust aerosol was studied using the Aqua/Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and Aura/Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) products. On 22 April, for frontal dust, their AOD and UV aerosol index (UVAI) increased with decreasing distance to the frontal line, peaked with values of 4.36 and 5.21 in the frontal zone, and decreased rapidly with increasing distance off the frontal line. On 23 April, nonfrontal dust showed the lower AOD and UVAI with peak values of 2.0 and 2.7, respectively.

  14. Correction of electronic record for weighing bucket precipitation gauge measurements

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Electronic sensors generate valuable streams of forcing and validation data for hydrologic models, but are often subject to noise, which must be removed as part of model input and testing database development. We developed Automated Precipitation Correction Program (APCP) for weighting bucket preci...

  15. Characteristics of Duskside Relativistic Electron Precipitation measured with SAMPEX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, D. M.; Comess, M.; Liang, X.; Casavant, E.; Selesnick, R. S.; Sample, J. G.; Millan, R. M.

    2011-12-01

    We will present spectral data from the Proton/Electron Telescope (PET) on SAMPEX that show relativistic electron precipitation with the hardest spectra concentrated in the dusk sector, as observed with a much smaller data set from balloons (Duskside Relativistic Electron Precipitation, or DREP). This is roughly consistent with the favored model of scattering by electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves as the precipitation mechanism. To further test the EMIC wave hypothesis, we compare the local-time distribution of the SAMPEX DREPs with the distribution of EMIC waves studied with GOES at geosynchronous orbit and find a significant shift between the two local time peaks. This statistical comparison is complementary to case studies that show, e.g., DREP occurring simultaneously with proton precipitation, in support of the EMIC hypothesis. We will also show IMAGE EUV data giving the plasmaspheric density at the times and locations of SAMPEX DREP events, testing the expectation that the DREP correspond to enhanced densities (strong plumes) relative to randomly-selected times. Finally, we will show the distribution of the timing of DREP relative to geomagnetic storms and the dependence of the probability of DREP on Kp and the phase of the solar cycle.

  16. Snow in the desert - measuring and modeling precipitation in an extreme environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlosser, Elisabeth; Stenni, Barbara; Valt, Mauro; Caganti, Anselmo; Powers, Jordan G.; Manning, Kevin W.; Duda, Michael G.

    2013-04-01

    Measuring precipitation in Antarctica remains a challenge that has been accepted only in a few cases. In coastal areas, precipitation events are usually accompanied by high wind speeds, which makes it very difficult to distinguish between blowing/drifting snow and falling precipitation. In the interior of the continent, wind speeds are lower, but the extreme small amounts of precipitation considerably complicate the measurements. A further uncertainty is the amount of precipitation due to the local cycle of sublimation and deposition. However, at the French-Italian wintering base Dome C, daily precipitation measurements have been carried out since 2006, representing the only multi-year precipitation series of continental Antarctica. Even though error possibilities are large, it is possible to clearly distinguish between diamond dust and synoptic precipitation, the latter yielding amounts approximately one order of magnitude higher than the first. The measured data are compared to AMPS (Antarctic Mesoscale Prediction System) archive data. AMPS employs the Polar WRF (Weather Research and Forecasting Model), a mesoscale model especially adapted for polar regions. The model generally overestimates precipitation amounts, partly due to a warm bias in air temperature. However, in most cases it clearly represents precipitation events that are also marked by an increase in air temperature and wind speed, sometimes also by a decrease in surface pressure. Using observed precipitation and model fields, the synoptic situations of the precipitation events are investigated. A better understanding of precipitation processes in Antarctica is necessary for both mass balance studies and a correct paleoclimatic interpretation of ice core data.

  17. A fibre optic, four channel comparative photometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, E. N.

    1988-01-01

    Development of a four channel comparative photometer is described. Tests have shown that it is stable from night to night and is capable of working in very poor sky conditions. Even when the sky conditions are so poor that stars are barely visible, light curves can still be obtained with an r.m.s. value of 0.0016 mag., provided that integration times that are long compared with the transparancy changes are possible.

  18. ISIS-II Scanning Auroral Photometer.

    PubMed

    Anger, C D; Fancott, T; McNally, J; Kerr, H S

    1973-08-01

    The ISIS-II dual wavelength scanning auroral photometer is designed to map the distribution of auroral emissions at 5577 A and 3914 A over the portion of the dark earth visible to the spacecraft. A combination of internal electronic scanning and the natural orbital and rotational motions of the spacecraft causes a dual wavelength photometer to be scanned systematically across the earth. The data will be reproduced directly in the form of separate pictures representing emissions at each wavelength, which will be used to study the large-scale distribution and morphology of auroras, to study the ratio of 3914-A and 5577-A emissions thought to depend upon the energies of exciting particles), and to compare with results from other instruments on board the spacecraft and on the ground. The Red Line Photometer experiment on the same spacecraft is described in an accompanying paper by Shepherd et al. [Appl. Opt. 12, 1767 (1973)]. The instrument can be thought of as the photometric equivalent of an all-sky color camera which will view the aurora from above instead of below and with a much wider vantage point unobstructed by cloud and haze. In one satellite pass, the instrument will be capable of surveying (in one hemisphere) the entire polar region in which auroras normally occur.

  19. A facile electron microscopy method for measuring precipitate volume fractions in AlCuMg alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, X.Q.; Shi, M.J.; Chen, J.H. Wang, S.B.; Liu, C.H.; Wu, C.L.

    2012-07-15

    Precipitate volume fraction is an important parameter to estimate the strength of precipitation-hardened metals. In this study, a facile method was applied to measure the precipitate volume fractions in an age-hardened AlCuMg alloy. In this method, the precipitate volume fraction values can be obtained by multiplying the volume precipitate number densities with the averaged precipitate volumes, which can be easily measured in scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy, respectively. Compared with the conventional method, in which the specimen thickness has to be measured in transmission electron microscopy, the method proposed in this study is more facile to perform. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We have proposed a facile method to measure precipitate volume fractions for precipitation-hardened metals. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This technique works well for the square-shaped {theta} Prime -phase nano-precipitates in 2xxx aluminum alloys. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Interesting is that the proposed method is easy for materials scientists and engineers to perform.

  20. Influence of sea ice cover on high latitude precipitation: Inferences from precipitation isotope measurements and a 2D model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posmentier, E. S.; Faiia, A.; Feng, X.; Michel, F. A.

    2009-12-01

    The most widely cited climate feedback in the Arctic region is ice cover. Warming climate reduces the sea ice extent, which causes a lower surface albedo, resulting in more absorbed insolation and further warming - a positive feedback. Conversely, warming is also likely to result in increased Arctic evaporation and precipitation, leading to increased snow cover and a higher Arctic terrestrial albedo, which would cause cooling - a negative feedback. The balance between these feedbacks must be understood and quantified in order to predict climate response to influences such as increased greenhouse gases. Here, we use measurements of high latitude precipitation isotopes and a 2D model to investigate interannual variability in the contributions of subtropical and Arctic vapor sources to Arctic precipitation. In a previous study, we used isotopic ratios alone to investigate the sources of moisture to the Arctic. We found significant positive relationships between ice area and the d-excess of precipitation on both interannual and seasonal timescales, an expected result under the assumption that sea ice prevents evaporation from the sea surface and consequently reduces the contribution of Arctic moisture with low d-excess values to Arctic precipitation. In this work, we go a step further with an attempt to estimate the influence of sea ice cover on Arctic evaporation using a 2D model and constraining it with high latitude isotopic measurements. The 2D model is a vertical-meridional mass conservation model for H2O, HDO, and H218O with prescribed atmospheric circulation and temperatures. For each isotope, the rates of surface evaporation, sublimation, precipitation, and reevaporation of falling hydrometeors are calculated, and values of the humidity and isotopic concentrations of both vapor and hydrometeors are computed interdependently with the four process rates.. The model fractionation associated with the four processes is based primarily on the work of Jouzel and

  1. Characterization and intercomparison of aerosol absorption photometers: result of two intercomparison workshops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, T.; Henzing, J. S.; de Leeuw, G.; Wiedensohler, A.; Alastuey, A.; Angelov, H.; Bizjak, M.; Collaud Coen, M.; Engström, J. E.; Gruening, C.; Hillamo, R.; Hoffer, A.; Imre, K.; Ivanow, P.; Jennings, G.; Sun, J. Y.; Kalivitis, N.; Karlsson, H.; Komppula, M.; Laj, P.; Li, S.-M.; Lunder, C.; Marinoni, A.; Martins Dos Santos, S.; Moerman, M.; Nowak, A.; Ogren, J. A.; Petzold, A.; Pichon, J. M.; Rodriquez, S.; Sharma, S.; Sheridan, P. J.; Teinilä, K.; Tuch, T.; Viana, M.; Virkkula, A.; Weingartner, E.; Wilhelm, R.; Wang, Y. Q.

    2011-02-01

    Absorption photometers for real time application have been available since the 1980s, but the use of filter-based instruments to derive information on aerosol properties (absorption coefficient and black carbon, BC) is still a matter of debate. Several workshops have been conducted to investigate the performance of individual instruments over the intervening years. Two workshops with large sets of aerosol absorption photometers were conducted in 2005 and 2007. The data from these instruments were corrected using existing methods before further analysis. The inter-comparison shows a large variation between the responses to absorbing aerosol particles for different types of instruments. The unit to unit variability between instruments can be up to 30% for Particle Soot Absorption Photometers (PSAPs) and Aethalometers. Multi Angle Absorption Photometers (MAAPs) showed a variability of less than 5%. Reasons for the high variability were identified to be variations in sample flow and spot size. It was observed that different flow rates influence system performance with respect to response to absorption and instrumental noise. Measurements with non absorbing particles showed that the current corrections of a cross sensitivity to particle scattering are not sufficient. Remaining cross sensitivities were found to be a function of the total particle load on the filter. The large variation between the response to absorbing aerosol particles for different types of instruments indicates that current correction functions for absorption photometers are not adequate.

  2. Characterization and intercomparison of aerosol absorption photometers: result of two intercomparison workshops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, T.; Henzing, J. S.; de Leeuw, G.; Wiedensohler, A.; Alastuey, A.; Angelov, H.; Bizjak, M.; Collaud Coen, M.; Engström, J. E.; Gruening, C.; Hillamo, R.; Hoffer, A.; Imre, K.; Ivanow, P.; Jennings, G.; Sun, J. Y.; Kalivitis, N.; Karlsson, H.; Komppula, M.; Laj, P.; Li, S.-M.; Lunder, C.; Marinoni, A.; Martins Dos Santos, S.; Moerman, M.; Nowak, A.; Ogren, J. A.; Petzold, A.; Pichon, J. M.; Rodriquez, S.; Sharma, S.; Sheridan, P. J.; Teinilä, K.; Tuch, T.; Viana, M.; Virkkula, A.; Weingartner, E.; Wilhelm, R.; Wang, Y. Q.

    2010-04-01

    Absorption photometers for real time application have been available since the 1980s, but the use of filter-based instruments to derive information on aerosol properties (absorption coefficient and black carbon, BC) is still a matter of debate. Several workshops have been conducted to investigate the performance of individual instruments over the intervening years. Two workshops with large sets of aerosol absorption photometers were conducted in 2005 and 2007. The data from these instruments were corrected using existing methods before further analysis. The inter-comparison shows a large variation between the responses to absorbing aerosol particles for different types of instruments. The unit to unit variability between instruments can be up to 30% for Particle Soot Absorption Photometers (PSAPs) and Aethalometers. Multi Angle Absorption Photometers (MAAPs) showed a variability of less than 5%. Reasons for the high variability were identified to be variations in sample flow and spot size. It was observed that different flow rates influence system performance with respect to response to absorption and instrumental noise. Measurements with non absorbing particles showed that the current corrections of a cross sensitivity to particle scattering are not sufficient. Remaining cross sensitivities were found to be a function of the total particle load on the filter. The large variation between the response to absorbing aerosol particles for different types of instruments indicates that current correction functions for absorption photometers are not adequate.

  3. Low-cost photometers and open source software for Light Pollution research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamorano, Jaime; Nievas, Miguel; Sánchez de Miguel, Alejandro; Tapia, Carlos; García, Cristóbal; Pascual, Sergio; Ocaña, Francisco; Gallego, Jesús

    2015-08-01

    Astronomical observatories have been measuring the brightness of the sky (NSB) using the methods of astronomical photometry with telescopes, photoelectric photometers and CCD cameras. The observations are disperse and sporadic. This is why some dedicated devices (including all-sky cameras) have been designed to automatically monitor the sky brightness at the observatories.These sophisticated and expensive instruments are restricted to research groups since they are out of reach for the interested citizens who wish to make a contribution to light pollution research. Most of them are using sky photometers (sky quality meter, SQM) a commercial photometer, designed to measure NSB in a photometric band that mimics the human eye response, that provide reliable data at an affordable budget.We are designing and building low cost devices to measure night sky brightness that could be widely distributed. The final designs will be calibrated and distributed to the community as open hardware. The researchers and also the interested people could acquire the parts and replicate the photometers from the instructions provided. Among the new features for these photometers we plan to add the capability to automatically send data to a repository located in a server, the autonomous operation with solar panels and batteries in remote places and the ability to measure in different spectral bands.We also present open source software for NSB research. PySQM, designed for SQM photometers, records the NSB data in the IDA-IAU standard data format and also builds the plots along the night. PyASB analyses all-sky images to determine photometric parameters and to build all-sky NSB maps

  4. PACS photometer calibration block analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moór, A.; Müller, T. G.; Kiss, C.; Balog, Z.; Billot, N.; Marton, G.

    2014-07-01

    The absolute stability of the PACS bolometer response over the entire mission lifetime without applying any corrections is about 0.5 % (standard deviation) or about 8 % peak-to-peak. This fantastic stability allows us to calibrate all scientific measurements by a fixed and time-independent response file, without using any information from the PACS internal calibration sources. However, the analysis of calibration block observations revealed clear correlations of the internal source signals with the evaporator temperature and a signal drift during the first half hour after the cooler recycling. These effects are small, but can be seen in repeated measurements of standard stars. From our analysis we established corrections for both effects which push the stability of the PACS bolometer response to about 0.2 % (stdev) or 2 % in the blue, 3 % in the green and 5 % in the red channel (peak-to-peak). After both corrections we still see a correlation of the signals with PACS FPU temperatures, possibly caused by parasitic heat influences via the Kevlar wires which connect the bolometers with the PACS Focal Plane Unit. No aging effect or degradation of the photometric system during the mission lifetime has been found.

  5. A white super-stable source for the metrology of astronomical photometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wildi, F. P.; Deline, A.; Chazelas, B.

    2015-09-01

    The testing of photometers and in particular the testing of high precision photometers for the detection of planetary transits requires a light source which photometric stability is to par or better than the goal stability of the photometer to be tested. In the frame of the CHEOPS mission, a comprehensive calibration bench has been developed. Aside from measuring the sensibility of the CHEOPS payload to the different environmental conditions, this bench will also be used to test the relative accuracy of the payload. A key element of this bench is an extremely stable light source that is used to create an artificial star which is then projected into the payload's telescope. We present here the development of this payload and the performance achieved.

  6. Evaporation from weighing precipitation gauges: impacts on automated gauge measurements and quality assurance methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leeper, R. D.; Kochendorfer, J.

    2015-06-01

    Evaporation from a precipitation gauge can cause errors in the amount of measured precipitation. For automated weighing-bucket gauges, the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) suggests the use of evaporative suppressants and frequent observations to limit these biases. However, the use of evaporation suppressants is not always feasible due to environmental hazards and the added cost of maintenance, transport, and disposal of the gauge additive. In addition, research has suggested that evaporation prior to precipitation may affect precipitation measurements from auto-recording gauges operating at sub-hourly frequencies. For further evaluation, a field campaign was conducted to monitor evaporation and its impacts on the quality of precipitation measurements from gauges used at U.S. Climate Reference Network (USCRN) stations. Two Geonor gauges were collocated, with one gauge using an evaporative suppressant (referred to as Geonor-NonEvap) and the other with no suppressant (referred to as Geonor-Evap) to evaluate evaporative losses and evaporation biases on precipitation measurements. From June to August, evaporative losses from the Geonor-Evap gauge exceeded accumulated precipitation, with an average loss of 0.12 mm h-1. The impact of evaporation on precipitation measurements was sensitive to the choice of calculation method. In general, the pairwise method that utilized a longer time series to smooth out sensor noise was more sensitive to gauge evaporation (-4.6% bias with respect to control) than the weighted-average method that calculated depth change over a smaller window (<+1% bias). These results indicate that while climate and gauge design affect gauge evaporation rates, computational methods also influence the magnitude of evaporation biases on precipitation measurements. This study can be used to advance quality insurance (QA) techniques used in other automated networks to mitigate the impact of evaporation biases on precipitation measurements.

  7. Evaporation from weighing precipitation gauges: impacts on automated gauge measurements and quality assurance methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leeper, R. D.; Kochendorfer, J.

    2014-12-01

    The effects of evaporation on precipitation measurements have been understood to bias total precipitation lower. For automated weighing-bucket gauges, the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) suggests the use of evaporative suppressants with frequent observations. However, the use of evaporation suppressants is not always feasible due to environmental hazards and the added cost of maintenance, transport, and disposal of the gauge additive. In addition, research has suggested that evaporation prior to precipitation may affect precipitation measurements from auto-recording gauges operating at sub-hourly frequencies. For further evaluation, a field campaign was conducted to monitor evaporation and its impacts on the quality of precipitation measurements from gauges used at US Climate Reference Network (USCRN) stations. Collocated Geonor gauges with (nonEvap) and without (evap) an evaporative suppressant were compared to evaluate evaporative losses and evaporation biases on precipitation measurements. From June to August, evaporative losses from the evap gauge exceeded accumulated precipitation, with an average loss of 0.12 mm h-1. However, the impact of evaporation on precipitation measurements was sensitive to calculation methods. In general, methods that utilized a longer time series to smooth out sensor noise were more sensitive to gauge (-4.6% bias with respect to control) evaporation than methods computing depth change without smoothing (< +1% bias). These results indicate that while climate and gauge design affect gauge evaporation rates computational methods can influence the magnitude of evaporation bias on precipitation measurements. It is hoped this study will advance QA techniques that mitigate the impact of evaporation biases on precipitation measurements from other automated networks.

  8. The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission contributions to terrestrial hydrology and societal applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirschbaum, D.; Skofronick Jackson, G.; Huffman, G. J.

    2015-12-01

    Too much or too little rain can serve as a tipping point for triggering catastrophic flooding and landslides or widespread drought. Knowing when, where and how much rain is falling globally is vital to understanding how vulnerable areas may be more or less impacted by these disasters. The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission is an international constellation of satellites coordinated through a partnership with NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) to provide next-generation global observations of rain and snow. The GPM mission centers on the deployment of a Core Observatory satellite that serves as a reference standard to unify precipitation measurements from a constellation of research and operational satellites. This satellite launched from Tanegashima Space Complex in Japan on January 28th, 2014 and carries advanced instruments setting a new standard for precipitation measurements from space. The GPM Core Observatory satellite measures rain and snow using two science instruments: the GPM Microwave Imager (GMI) and the Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR). The GMI captures precipitation intensities and horizontal patterns, while the DPR provides insights into the three dimensional structure of precipitating particles. Together these two instruments provide a database of measurements against which other partner satellites' microwave observations can be meaningfully compared and combined to make a global precipitation dataset. GPM has already provided unprecedented views of typhoons, extratropical systems, light rain, snow storms and extreme precipitation. Through improved measurements of precipitation globally, the GPM mission provides new insights into measuring the fluxes of Earth's water cycle. This presentation will outline new findings and advancements of GPM in understanding and modeling of Earth's water and energy cycles, improving forecasting of extreme events that cause natural hazards and disasters, and extending current

  9. Characterization of intermetallic precipitates in a Nimonic alloy by ultrasonic velocity measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Murthy, G.V.S. Sridhar, G.; Kumar, Anish; Jayakumar, T.

    2009-03-15

    Ultrasonic velocity measurements have been carried out in Nimonic 263 specimens thermally aged at 923 and 1073 K for durations up to 75 h and correlated with the results of hardness measurements and electron microscopy studies. The ultrasonic velocities and hardness results obtained in the specimens thermally aged at both temperatures clearly indicated that ultrasonic velocity is more sensitive to the initiation of the precipitation, whereas the influence of precipitation on hardness can be observed only after the precipitates attain a minimum size to influence the movement of dislocations. Further, ultrasonic velocity measurements also revealed faster kinetics and a lesser amount of precipitation at 1073 K compared to 923 K due to higher solubility of precipitate-forming elements.

  10. Recent Advances in Spaceborne Precipitation Radar Measurement Techniques and Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Im, Eastwood; Durden, Stephen L.; Tanelli, Simone

    2006-01-01

    NASA is currently developing advanced instrument concepts and technologies for future spaceborne atmospheric radars, with an over-arching objective of making such instruments more capable in supporting future science needs and more cost effective. Two such examples are the Second-Generation Precipitation Radar (PR-2) and the Nexrad-In-Space (NIS). PR-2 is a 14/35-GHz dual-frequency rain radar with a deployable 5-meter, wide-swath scanned membrane antenna, a dual-polarized/dual-frequency receiver, and a realtime digital signal processor. It is intended for Low Earth Orbit (LEO) operations to provide greatly enhanced rainfall profile retrieval accuracy while consuming only a fraction of the mass of the current TRMM Precipitation Radar (PR). NIS is designed to be a 35-GHz Geostationary Earth Orbiting (GEO) radar for providing hourly monitoring of the life cycle of hurricanes and tropical storms. It uses a 35-m, spherical, lightweight membrane antenna and Doppler processing to acquire 3-dimensional information on the intensity and vertical motion of hurricane rainfall.

  11. Use of Dual Polarization Radar in Validation of Satellite Precipitation Measurements: Rationale and Opportunities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandrasekar, V.; Hou, Arthur; Smith, Eric; Bringi, V. N.; Rutledge, S. A.; Gorgucci, E.; Petersen, W. A.; SkofronickJackson, Gail

    2008-01-01

    Dual-polarization weather radars have evolved significantly in the last three decades culminating in the operational deployment by the National Weather Service. In addition to operational applications in the weather service, dual-polarization radars have shown significant potential in contributing to the research fields of ground based remote sensing of rainfall microphysics, study of precipitation evolution and hydrometeor classification. Furthermore the dual-polarization radars have also raised the awareness of radar system aspects such as calibration. Microphysical characterization of precipitation and quantitative precipitation estimation are important applications that are critical in the validation of satellite borne precipitation measurements and also serves as a valuable tool in algorithm development. This paper presents the important role played by dual-polarization radar in validating space borne precipitation measurements. Starting from a historical evolution, the various configurations of dual-polarization radar are presented. Examples of raindrop size distribution retrievals and hydrometeor type classification are discussed. The quantitative precipitation estimation is a product of direct relevance to space borne observations. During the TRMM program substantial advancement was made with ground based polarization radars specially collecting unique observations in the tropics which are noted. The scientific accomplishments of relevance to space borne measurements of precipitation are summarized. The potential of dual-polarization radars and opportunities in the era of global precipitation measurement mission is also discussed.

  12. Basic Requirements for Collecting, Documenting, and Reporting Precipitation and Stormwater-Flow Measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Church, Peter E.; Granato, Gregory E.; Owens, David W.

    1999-01-01

    Accurate and representative precipitation and stormwater-flow data are crucial for use of highway- or urban-runoff study results, either individually or in a regional or national synthesis of stormwater-runoff data. Equally important is information on the level of accuracy and representativeness of this precipitation and stormwaterflow data. Accurate and representative measurements of precipitation and stormwater flow, however, are difficult to obtain because of the rapidly changing spatial and temporal distribution of precipitation and flows during a storm. Many hydrologic and hydraulic factors must be considered in performing the following: selecting sites for measuring precipitation and stormwater flow that will provide data that adequately meet the objectives and goals of the study, determining frequencies and durations of data collection to fully characterize the storm and the rapidly changing stormwater flows, and selecting methods that will yield accurate data over the full range of both rainfall intensities and stormwater flows. To ensure that the accuracy and representativeness of precipitation and stormwater-flow data can be evaluated, decisions as to (1) where in the drainage system precipitation and stormwater flows are measured, (2) how frequently precipitation and stormwater flows are measured, (3) what methods are used to measure precipitation and stormwater flows, and (4) on what basis are these decisions made, must all be documented and communicated in an accessible format, such as a project description report, a data report or an appendix to a technical report, and (or) archived in a State or national records center. A quality assurance/quality control program must be established to ensure that this information is documented and reported, and that decisions made in the design phase of a study are continually reviewed, internally and externally, throughout the study. Without the supporting data needed to evaluate the accuracy and representativeness

  13. Automated Sky-Compensating Photometer with a Silicon Photodiode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riggs, J. D.; Alexander, D. R.

    1983-12-01

    This article describes the automated, sky-compensating filter photometer, currently being built and tested for the Lake Afton Public Observatory (LAPO) at Wichita State University, for use on the 16-inch Ritchey-Chretien telescope. Design emphasis is directed toward minimal user intervention due to varying user backgrounds. The instrumentation consists of a sky-compensating photometer, a Hamamatsu S1133-01 silicon photodiode detector, a programmable DC amplifier, and a computer dedicated to data collection and photometer control.

  14. Drop Size Distribution Measurements Supporting the NASA Global Precipitation Measurement Mission: Infrastructure and Preliminary Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petersen, Walter A.; Carey, Lawerence D.; Gatlin, Patrick N.; Wingo, Matthew; Tokay, Ali; Wolff, David B.; Bringi, V. N.

    2011-01-01

    Global Precipitation Measurement Mission (GPM) retrieval algorithm validation requires datasets that characterize the 4-D structure, variability, and correlation properties of hydrometeor particle size distributions (PSD) and accumulations over satellite fields of view (5 -- 50 km). Key to this process is the combined use of disdrometer and polarimetric radar platforms. Here the disdrometer measurements serve as a reference for up-scaling dual-polarimetric radar observations of the PSD to the much larger volumetric sampling domain of the radar. The PSD observations thus derived provide a much larger data set for assessing DSD variability, and satellite-based precipitation retrieval algorithm assumptions, in all three spatial dimensions for a range of storm types and seasons. As one component of this effort, the GPM Ground Validation program recently acquired five 3rd generation 2D Video disdrometers as part of its Disdrometer and Radar Observations of Precipitation Facility (DROP), currently hosted in northern Alabama by the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center and the University of Alabama in Huntsville. These next-generation 2DVDs were operated and evaluated in different phases of data collection under the scanning domain of the UAH ARMOR C-band dual-polarimetric radar. During this period approximately 7500 minutes of PSD data were collected and processed to create gamma size distribution parameters using a truncated method of moments approach. After creating the gamma parameter datasets the DSDs were then used as input to T-matrix code for computation of polarimetric radar moments at C-band. The combined dataset was then analyzed with two basic objectives in mind: 1) the investigation of seasonal variability in the rain PSD parameters as observed by the 2DVDs; 2) the use of combined polarimetric moments and observed gamma distribution parameters in a functional form to retrieve PSD parameters in 4-D using the ARMOR radar for precipitation occurring in different

  15. MIPS - The Multiband Imaging Photometer for SIRTF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rieke, G. H.; Lada, C.; Lebofsky, M.; Low, F.; Strittmatter, P.; Young, E.; Beichman, C.; Gautier, T. N.; Mould, J.; Werner, M.

    1986-01-01

    The Multiband Imaging Photometer System (MIPS) for SIRTF is to be designed to reach as closely as possible the fundamental sensitivity and angular resolution limits for SIRTF over the 3 to 700 microns spectral region. It will use high performance photoconductive detectors from 3 to 200 microns with integrating JFET amplifiers. From 200 to 700 microns, the MIPS will use a bolometer cooled by an adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator. Over much of its operating range, the MIPS will make possible observations at and beyond the conventional Rayleigh diffraction limit of angular resolution.

  16. The Orbital Checkout Status of the Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) on the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) core observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Takeshi; Kojima, Masahiro; Furukawa, Kinji; Hyakusoku, Yasutoshi; Ishikiri, Takayuki; Kai, Hiroki; Iguchi, Toshio; Hanado, Hiroshi; Nakagawa, Katsuhiro

    2014-05-01

    The Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) on the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) core observatory is developed by Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) with National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT). GPM objective is to observe global precipitation more frequently and accurately. GPM contributes to climate and water cycle change studies, flood prediction and numerical weather forecast. GPM consists of the GPM core observatory and constellation satellites carrying microwave radiometers (MWRs) and/or sounders (MWSs). The frequent measurement will be achieved by constellation satellites, and the accurate measurement will be achieved by the DPR with high sensitivity and dual frequency capability. The GPM core observatory is jointly developed by National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and JAXA. NASA is developing the satellite bus and GPM microwave radiometer (GMI), and JAXA is developing the DPR. The DPR consists of Ku-band (13.6 GHz) radar suitable for heavy rainfall in the tropical region, and Ka-band (35.55 GHz) radar suitable for light rainfall in higher latitude region. Drop size distribution information will be derived which contributes to the improvement of rainfall estimate accuracy. DPR will also play a key role to improve rainfall estimation accuracy of constellation satellites. DPR proto-flight test at JAXA Tsukuba space center has been completed in February 2012. The DPR has handed over to NASA and integrated to the core observatory in May 2012. The system test of the core observatory has completed in November 2013 and DPR test results satisfied its system requirements. The core observatory was shipped to launch site of JAXA Tanegashima space center in Japan. Launch site activities have started on November 2013 and GPM core observatory will be launched in early 2014. DPR orbital check out will be started in March 2014 and it will be completed in April 2014. In this presentation, the orbital check out

  17. Measurement of atmospheric precipitable water using a solar radiometer. [water vapor absorption effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pitts, D. E.; Dillinger, A. E.; Mcallum, W. E.

    1974-01-01

    A technique is described and tested that allows the determination of atmospheric precipitable water from two measurements of solar intensity: one in a water-vapor absorption band and another in a nearby spectral region unaffected by water vapor.

  18. Retrieval of Ozone Column Content from Airborne Sun Photometer Measurements During SOLVE II: Comparison with SAGE III, POAM III,THOMAS and GOME Measurements. Comparison with SAGE 111, POAM 111, TOMS and GOME Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Livingston, J.; Schmid, B.; Russell, P.; Eilers, J.; Kolyer, R.; Redemann, J.; Yee, J.-H.; Trepte, C.; Thomason, L.; Pitts, M.

    2003-01-01

    During the Second SAGE 111 Ozone Loss and Validation Experiment (SOLVE II), the 14- channel NASA Ames Airborne Trackmg Sunphotometer (AATS-14) was mounted on the NASA DC-8 and successfully measured spectra of total and aerosol optical depth (TOD and AOD) during the sunlit portions of eight science flights. Values of ozone column content above the aircraft have been derived from the AATS-14 data by using a linear least squares method. For each AATS-14 measured TOD spectrum, this method iteratively finds the ozone column content that yields the best match between measured and calculated TOD. The calculations assume the known Chappuis ozone band shape and a three-parameter AOD shape (quadratic in log-log space). Seven of the AATS-14 channels (each employing an interference filter with a nominal full-width at half maximum bandpass of -5 nm) are within the Chappuis band, with center wavelengths between 452.9 nm and 864.5 nm. One channel (604.4 nm) is near the peak, and three channels (499.4, 519.4 and 675.1 nm) have ozone absorption within 30-40% of that at the peak. For the typical DC-8 SOLVE II cruising altitudes of approx. 8-12 km and the background stratospheric aerosol conditions that prevailed during SOLVE 11, absorption of incoming solar radiation by ozone comprised a significant fraction of the aerosol-plus-ozone optical depth measured in the four AATS-14 channels centered between 499.4 and 675.1 nm. Typical AODs above the DC-8 ranged from 0.003-0.008 in these channels. For comparison, an ozone overburden of 0.3 atm-cm (300 DU) translates to ozone optical depths of 0.009,0.014, 0.041, and 0.012, respectively, at these same wavelengths. In this paper, we compare AATS-14 values of ozone column content with temporally and spatially near-coincident values derived from measurements acquired by the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment III (SAGE III) and the Polar Ozone and Aerosol Measurement 111 (POAM III) satellite sensors. We also compare AATS-14 ozone

  19. Retrieval of Ozone Column Content from Airborne Sun Photometer Measurements During SOLVE II: Comparison with SAGE III, POAM III,THOMAS and GOME Measurements. Comparison with SAGE 111, POAM 111, TOMS and GOME Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Livingston, J.; Schmid, B.; Russell, P.; Eilers, J.; Kolyer, R.; Redemann, J.; Yee, J.-H.; Trepte, C.; Thomason, L.; Pitts, M.

    2003-01-01

    During the Second SAGE 111 Ozone Loss and Validation Experiment (SOLVE II), the 14- channel NASA Ames Airborne Trackmg Sunphotometer (AATS-14) was mounted on the NASA DC-8 and successfully measured spectra of total and aerosol optical depth (TOD and AOD) during the sunlit portions of eight science flights. Values of ozone column content above the aircraft have been derived from the AATS-14 data by using a linear least squares method. For each AATS-14 measured TOD spectrum, this method iteratively finds the ozone column content that yields the best match between measured and calculated TOD. The calculations assume the known Chappuis ozone band shape and a three-parameter AOD shape (quadratic in log-log space). Seven of the AATS-14 channels (each employing an interference filter with a nominal full-width at half maximum bandpass of -5 nm) are within the Chappuis band, with center wavelengths between 452.9 nm and 864.5 nm. One channel (604.4 nm) is near the peak, and three channels (499.4, 519.4 and 675.1 nm) have ozone absorption within 30-40% of that at the peak. For the typical DC-8 SOLVE II cruising altitudes of approx. 8-12 km and the background stratospheric aerosol conditions that prevailed during SOLVE 11, absorption of incoming solar radiation by ozone comprised a significant fraction of the aerosol-plus-ozone optical depth measured in the four AATS-14 channels centered between 499.4 and 675.1 nm. Typical AODs above the DC-8 ranged from 0.003-0.008 in these channels. For comparison, an ozone overburden of 0.3 atm-cm (300 DU) translates to ozone optical depths of 0.009,0.014, 0.041, and 0.012, respectively, at these same wavelengths. In this paper, we compare AATS-14 values of ozone column content with temporally and spatially near-coincident values derived from measurements acquired by the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment III (SAGE III) and the Polar Ozone and Aerosol Measurement 111 (POAM III) satellite sensors. We also compare AATS-14 ozone

  20. Quantification of precipitation measurement discontinuity induced by wind shields on national gauges

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yang, D.; Goodison, B.E.; Metcalfe, J.R.; Louie, P.; Leavesley, G.; Emerson, D.; Hanson, C.L.; Golubev, V.S.; Elomaa, E.; Gunther, T.; Pangburn, T.; Kang, E.; Milkovic, J.

    1999-01-01

    Various combinations of wind shields and national precipitation gauges commonly used in countries of the northern hemisphere have been studied in this paper, using the combined intercomparison data collected at 14 sites during the World Meteorological Organization's (WMO) Solid Precipitation Measurement Intercomparison Project. The results show that wind shields improve gauge catch of precipitation, particularly for snow. Shielded gauges, on average, measure 20-70% more snow than unshielded gauges. Without a doubt, the use of wind shields on precipitation gauges has introduced a significant discontinuity into precipitation records, particularly in cold and windy regions. This discontinuity is not constant and it varies with wind speed; temperature, and precipitation type. Adjustment for this discontinuity is necessary to obtain homogenous precipitation data for climate change and hydrological studies. The relation of the relative catch ratio (RCR, ratio of measurements of shielded gauge to unshielded gauge) versus wind speed and temperature has been developed for Alter and Tretyakov wind shields. Strong linear relations between measurements of shielded gauge and unshielded gauge have also been found for different precipitation types. The linear relation does not fully take into account the varying effect of wind and temperature on gauge catch. Overadjustment by the linear relation may occur at those sites with lower wind speeds, and underadjustment may occur at those stations with higher wind speeds. The RCR technique is anticipated to be more applicable in a wide range of climate conditions. The RCR technique and the linear relation have been tested at selected WMO intercomparison stations, and reasonable agreement between the adjusted amounts and the shielded gauge measurement was obtained at most of the sites. Test application of the developed methodologies to a regional or national network is therefore recommended to further evaluate their applicability in

  1. A New Fast Silicon Photomultiplier Photometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meddi, F.; Ambrosino, F.; Nesci, R.; Rossi, C.; Sclavi, S.; Bruni, I.; Ruggieri, A.; Sestito, S.

    2012-05-01

    The realization of low-cost instruments with high technical performance is a goal that deserves some efforts in an epoch of fast technological developments; indeed, such instruments can be easily reproduced and therefore allow new research programs to be opened in several observatories. We realized a fast optical photometer based on the SiPM technology, using commercially available modules. Using low-cost components, we have developed a custom electronic chain to extract the signal produced by a commercial MPPC module produced by Hamamatsu Photonics, in order to obtain submillisecond sampling of the light curve of astronomical sources (typically, pulsars). In the early 2011 February, we observed the Crab pulsar with the Cassini telescope with our prototype photometer, deriving its period and power spectrum and the shape of its light curve, in very good agreement with the results obtained in the past with other instruments. Based on observations made with the 152 cm Cassini telescope at the Loiano station of the Bologna Observatory and with the 50 cm telescope of the Università di Roma “La Sapienza” at Vallinfreda (Rome).

  2. GOES Satellite Data Validation Via Hand-held 4 LED Sun Photometer at Norfolk State University

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, Arthur, Jr.; Jackson, Tyrone; Reynolds, Kevin; Davidson, Cassy; Coope-Pabis, Barbara

    2005-01-01

    Sun photometry is a passive means of measuring a quantity of light radiation. The GIFTS- IOMI/GLOBE Water Vapor/Haze Sun photometer contains four light emitting diodes (LEDs), which are used to convert photocurrent to voltage. The intensity of the incoming and outgoing radiation as detected on the Earth s surface can be affected by aerosols and gases in the atmosphere. The focus of this research is primarily on aerosol and water vapor particles that absorb and reemit energy. Two LEDs in the photometer correspond to light scattered at 530 nm (green spectrum) and 620 nm (red spectrum). They collect data pertaining to aerosols that scatter light. The other two LEDs detect the light scattered by water vapor at wavelengths of 820 nm and 920 nm. The water vapor measurements will be compared to data collected by the Geostationary Observation Environmental Satellite (GOES). Before a comparison can be made, the extraterrestrial constant (ET), which is intrinsic to each sun photometer, must be measured. This paper will present determination of the ET constant, from which the aerosol optical thickness (AOT) can be computed for comparison to the GOES satellite to ascertain the reliability of the sun photometer.

  3. GOES Satellite Data Validation Via Hand-held 4 LED Sun Photometer at Norfolk State University

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, Arthur, Jr.; Jackson, Tyrone; Reynolds, Kevin; Davidson, Cassy; Coope-Pabis, Barbara

    2005-01-01

    Sun photometry is a passive means of measuring a quantity of light radiation. The GIFTS- IOMI/GLOBE Water Vapor/Haze Sun photometer contains four light emitting diodes (LEDs), which are used to convert photocurrent to voltage. The intensity of the incoming and outgoing radiation as detected on the Earth s surface can be affected by aerosols and gases in the atmosphere. The focus of this research is primarily on aerosol and water vapor particles that absorb and reemit energy. Two LEDs in the photometer correspond to light scattered at 530 nm (green spectrum) and 620 nm (red spectrum). They collect data pertaining to aerosols that scatter light. The other two LEDs detect the light scattered by water vapor at wavelengths of 820 nm and 920 nm. The water vapor measurements will be compared to data collected by the Geostationary Observation Environmental Satellite (GOES). Before a comparison can be made, the extraterrestrial constant (ET), which is intrinsic to each sun photometer, must be measured. This paper will present determination of the ET constant, from which the aerosol optical thickness (AOT) can be computed for comparison to the GOES satellite to ascertain the reliability of the sun photometer.

  4. The assessment and characterization of the built-in internal photometer of primary diagnostic monitors.

    PubMed

    Ruuge, Andres E; Mahmood, Usman A; Erdi, Yusuf E

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this work was to perform the initial evaluation of primary diagnostic monitor (PDM) characteristics following the implementation of New York City quality assurance (NYC QA) regulations on January 1, 2016, and compare the results of the QA measurements performed by an external photometer and the PDM manufacturer's built-in photometer. TG-18 and Society of Motion Picture and Television Engineers test patterns were used to evaluate monitor performance. Overall, 79 PDMs were included in the analysis. The verification of grayscale standard display function (GSDF) calibration, using a built-in photometer, showed that only 2 out of 79 PDMs failed calibration. However, the same measurements performed by the external luminance meter showed that 15 out of 79 monitors had failed GSDF calibration. Measurements of the PDMs maximum luminance (Lmax ), using an external photometer showed that 10 out of 53 PDMs calibrated for Lmax = 400 cd/m(2) and 17 out of 26 PDMs calibrated for Lmax = 500 cd/m(2) do not meet the manufacturer's recommended 10% tolerance limit for the target Lmax calibration. Two PDMs did not pass the Lmax ≥ 350 cd/m(2) NYC QA regulations with Lmax = 331 cd/m(2) and Lmax = 340 cd/m(2) . All tested PDMs exceeded the minimum luminance ratio (LR) of 250:1 as required by NYC QA regulations. Measurements taken of Lmax and LR performed by a built-in photometer showed that none of the PDMs had failed the NYC QA regulations. All PDMs passed the luminance uniformity test with a maximum nonuniformity of 17% (according to NYC regulations it must be less than 30%). The luminance uniformity test could only be performed using an external photometer. The evaluation of 79 PDMs of various ages and models demonstrated up to 18% disagreement between luminance measurements performed by the manufacturer's built-in photometer when compared with those performed by an externally calibrated luminance meter. These disagreements were larger for older PDMs. © 2017 The

  5. Classification of Tropical Oceanic Precipitation Using High Altitude Aircraft Microwave and Electric Field Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cecil, Daniel J.; LaFontaine, Frank J.; Hood, Robbie E.; Blakeslee, Richard; Mach, Douglas; Heymsfield, Gerald

    2004-01-01

    A physically intuitive and computationally simple precipitation mapping algorithm has been developed for use with the airborne Advanced Microwave Precipitation Radiometer (AMPR). The algorithm is based on microwave emission and scattering properties of precipitation. Specifically, emission by liquid water allows increasing brightness temperatures at low frequencies to be interpreted as increasing rain rates. Scattering by large hydrometeors (particularly graupel and hail) causes relative minima in the brightness temperatures, with progressively larger hydrometeors scattering progressively longer wavelengths. The vigor of convection is therefore ascertained according to which wavelengths are being significantly scattered. The combination of emission and scattering information from four microwave channels is used to assign a precipitation category, which is related to the liquid rain rate, the vertical extent of precipitation, and the vigor of convection. The qualitative precipitation categories output by the passive microwave algorithm have been verified using coincident radar (ER-2 Doppler Radar - EDOP) and electric field measurements (Lightning Instrument Package - LIP). These coincident measurements can subsequently be used to quantify rain rates, hydrometeor contents, and vertical profiles that are typical for each precipitation category. This algorithm has been developed using an airborne platform. Comparisons are being made with other airborne, satellite, and ground-based radar and radiometer data. This technique shows promise both as a research tool and potentially as a real-time analysis tool, which could be applied to either traditional or uninhabited aerial vehicles.

  6. Global Precipitation Measurement mission data released on This Week @NASA - September 5, 2014

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-09-05

    Precipitation information from the first six months of the Global Precipitation Measurement Core Observatory mission now is fully available to the public. Launched from Japan in February, the joint NASA and Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency mission works with international partner satellites to produce precise and standardized data sets on worldwide rainfall, snowfall and other precipitation. The data can be used to improve forecasts of extreme weather events like floods and help decision makers worldwide better manage water resources. Also, Earthquake data from the air, Next ISS crew trains, Talking STEM with students and OSIRIS-REx time capsule!

  7. The Status of NASA's Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission 26 Months After Launch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Gail; Huffman, George

    2016-04-01

    Water is essential to our planet Earth. Knowing when, where and how precipitation falls is crucial for understanding the linkages between the Earth's water and energy cycles and is extraordinarily important for sustaining life on our planet during climate change. The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory spacecraft launched February 27, 2014, is the anchor to the GPM international satellite mission to unify and advance precipitation measurements from a constellation of research and operational sensors to provide "next-generation" precipitation products [1-2]. GPM is currently a partnership between NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA). The unique 65o non-Sun-synchronous orbit at an altitude of 407 km for the GPM Core Observatory allows for highly sophisticated observations of precipitation in the mid-latitudes where a majority of the population lives. Indeed, the GOM Core Observatory serves as the cornerstone, as a physics observatory and a calibration reference to improve precipitation measurements by a constellation of 8 or more dedicated and operational, U.S. and international passive microwave sensors. GPM's requirements are to measure rain rates from 0.2 to 110 mm/hr and to detect and estimate falling snow. GPM has several retrieval product levels ranging from raw instrument data to Core and partner swath precipitation estimates to gridded and accumulated products and finally to multi-satellite merged products. The latter merged product, called IMERG, is available with a 5-hour latency with temporal resolution of 30 minutes and spatial resolution of 0.1o x 0.1o (~10km x 10km) grid box. Some products have a 1-hour latency for societal applications such as floods, landslides, hurricanes, blizzards, and typhoons and all have late-latency high-quality science products. The GPM mission is well on its way to providing essential data on precipitation (rain and snow) from micro to local to global scales via providing precipitation

  8. Monitoring bacterially induced calcite precipitation in porous media using magnetic resonance imaging and flow measurements.

    PubMed

    Sham, E; Mantle, M D; Mitchell, J; Tobler, D J; Phoenix, V R; Johns, M L

    2013-09-01

    A range of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques are employed to provide novel, non-invasive measurements of both the structure and transport properties of porous media following a biologically mediated calcite precipitation reaction. Both a model glass bead pack and a sandstone rock core were considered. Structure was probed using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) via a combination of quantitative one-dimensional profiles and three-dimensional images, applied before and after the formation of calcite in order to characterise the spatial distribution of the precipitate. It was shown through modification and variations of the calcite precipitation treatment that differences in the calcite fill would occur but all methods were successful in partially blocking the different porous media. Precipitation was seen to occur predominantly at the inlet of the bead pack, whereas precipitation occurred almost uniformly along the sandstone core. Transport properties are quantified using pulse field gradient (PFG) NMR measurements which provide probability distributions of molecular displacement over a set observation time (propagators), supplementing conventional permeability measurements. Propagators quantify the local effect of calcite formation on system hydrodynamics and the extent of stagnant region formation. Collectively, the combination of NMR measurements utilised here provides a toolkit for determining the efficacy of a biological-precipitation reaction for partially blocking porous materials. © 2013.

  9. OPTIMA: A Photon Counting High-Speed Photometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straubmeier, C.; Kanbach, G.; Schrey, F.

    OPTIMA is a small, versatile high-speed photometer which is primarily intended for time resolved observations of young high energy pulsars at optical wavelengths. The detector system consists of eight fiber fed photon counters based on avalanche photodiodes, a GPS timing receiver, an integrating CCD camera to ensure the correct pointing of the telescope and a computerized control unit. Since January 1999 OPTIMA proves its scientific potential by measuring a very detailed lightcurve of the Crab Pulsar as well as by observing cataclysmic variable stars on very short timescales. In this article we describe the design of the detector system focussing on the photon counting units and the software control which correlates the detected photons with the GPS timing signal.

  10. SIMBIOS Sun Photometer Program. Chapter 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McClain, Charles; Fargion, Giulietta S.

    2001-01-01

    Aerosol optical thickness (AOT) values determined from the satellite ocean color data provide useful information on the spatial and temporal distributions of aerosols and are by-products of the atmospheric corrections required to estimation of water-leaving radiances. The Sensor Intercomparison and Merger for Biological and Interdisciplinary Oceanic Studies (SIMBIOS) project is using in situ atmospheric data, primarily from sun photometers, for several purposes including: (1) validation the SeaWiFS and other ocean color mission aerosol optical products, e.g., AOT and Angstrom exponent; (2) evaluation of the aerosol models currently used for atmospheric corrections; and (3) development of vicarious sensor calibration methodologies, especially for the near-infrared bands where in situ water-leaving radiance data in the visible from sites like the Marine Optical Buoy cannot be used. The principal source of in situ aerosol observations was the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET).

  11. Photometer calibration problem for extended astronomical sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muscari, J. A.

    1975-01-01

    Analysis of calibration tests for the Skylab experimental T027 photometer is used to show that if an instrument is focused at infinity, the uniform extended calibration source should be positioned at distances at least equal to the hyperfocal distance and should be large enough to fill the field of view. It is noted that the field depth can be increased by focusing the optical system at the hyperfocal distance and that this method of focusing reduces the needed diameter of the calibration source to half that of a system focused at infinity. Other calibration methods discussed includes determining the radiance responsivity distance and extrapolating the curve to larger distances as well as extensive mapping of the spatial response combined with the irradiance responsivity to obtain the radiance responsivity.

  12. Auroral meridian scanning photometer calibration using Jupiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackel, Brian J.; Unick, Craig; Creutzberg, Fokke; Baker, Greg; Davis, Eric; Donovan, Eric F.; Connors, Martin; Wilson, Cody; Little, Jarrett; Greffen, M.; McGuffin, Neil

    2016-10-01

    Observations of astronomical sources provide information that can significantly enhance the utility of auroral data for scientific studies. This report presents results obtained by using Jupiter for field cross calibration of four multispectral auroral meridian scanning photometers during the 2011-2015 Northern Hemisphere winters. Seasonal average optical field-of-view and local orientation estimates are obtained with uncertainties of 0.01 and 0.1°, respectively. Estimates of absolute sensitivity are repeatable to roughly 5 % from one month to the next, while the relative response between different wavelength channels is stable to better than 1 %. Astronomical field calibrations and darkroom calibration differences are on the order of 10 %. Atmospheric variability is the primary source of uncertainty; this may be reduced with complementary data from co-located instruments.

  13. Millimeter wave radiative transfer studies for precipitation measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vivekanandan, J.; Evans, Frank

    1989-01-01

    Scattering calculations using the discrete dipole approximation and vector radiative transfer calculations were performed to model multiparameter radar return and passive microwave emission for a simple model of a winter storm. The issue of dendrite riming was addressed by computing scattering properties of thin ice disks with varying bulk density. It was shown that C-band multiparameter radar contains information about particle density and the number concentration of the ice particles. The radiative transfer modeling indicated that polarized multifrequency passive microwave emission may be used to infer some properties of ice hydrometers. Detailed radar modeling and vector radiative transfer modeling is in progress to enhance the understanding of simultaneous radar and radiometer measurements, as in the case of the proposed TRMM field program. A one-dimensional cloud model will be used to simulate the storm structure in detail and study the microphysics, such as size and density. Multifrequency polarized radiometer measurements from the SSMI satellite instrument will be analyzed in relation to dual-frequency and dual-polarization radar measurements.

  14. A global ETCCDI based precipitation climatology from satellite and rain gauge measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietzsch, Felix; Andersson, Axel; Schröder, Marc; Ziese, Markus; Becker, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    The project framework MiKlip ("Mittelfristige Klimaprognosen") is focused onto the development of an operational forecast system for decadal climate predictions. The objective of the "Daily Precipitation Analysis for the validation of Global medium-range Climate predictions Operationalized" (DAPAGLOCO) project, is the development and operationalization of a global precipitation dataset for forecast validation of the MPI-ESM experiments used in MiKlip. The dataset is a combination of rain gauge measurement data over land and satellite-based precipitation retrievals over ocean. Over land, gauge data from the Global Precipitation Climatology Centre (GPCC) at Deutscher Wetterdienst (DWD) are used. Over ocean, retrievals from the Hamburg Ocean Atmosphere Parameters and Fluxes from Satellite Data (HOAPS) dataset are used as data source. The currently available dataset consists of 21 years of data (1988-2008) and has a spatial resolution of 1°. So far, the MiKlip forecast validation is based upon the Expert Team on Climate Change and Detection Indices (ETCCDI). These indices focus on precipitation extrema in terms of spell durations, percentiles, averaged precipitation amounts and further more. The application of these indices on the DAPAGLOCO dataset in its current state delivers insight into the global distribution of precipitation characteristics and extreme events. The resulting global patterns of these characteristics and extrema are the main objective of the presentation.

  15. Comparison of Aerosol Optical Properties and Water Vapor Among Ground and Airborne Lidars and Sun Photometers During TARFOX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrare, R.; Ismail, S.; Browell, E.; Brackett, V.; Clayton, M.; Kooi, S.; Melfi, S. H.; Whiteman, D.; Schwemmer, G.; Evans, K.; Russell, P.; Livingston, J.; Schmid, B.; Holben, B.; Remer, L.; Smirnov, A.; Hobbs, P. V.

    2000-01-01

    We compare aerosol optical thickness (AOT) and precipitable water vapor (PWV) measurements derived from ground and airborne lidars and Sun photometers during TARFOX (Tropospheric Aerosol Radiative Forcing Observational Experiment). Such comparisons are important to verify the consistency between various remote sensing measurements before employing them in any assessment of the impact of aerosols on the global radiation balance. Total scattering ratio and extinction profiles measured by the ground-based NASA/GSFC Scanning Raman Lidar (SRL) system, which operated from Wallops Island, Virginia (37.86 deg N, 75.51 deg W), are compared with those measured by the Lidar Atmospheric Sensing Experiment (LASE) airborne lidar system aboard the NASA ER-2 aircraft. Bias and rms differences indicate that these measurements generally agreed within about 10%. Aerosol extinction profiles and estimates of AOT are derived from both lidar measurements using a value for the aerosol extinction/backscattering ratio S(sub a)=60 sr for the aerosol extinction/backscattering ratio, which was determined from the Raman lidar measurements.

  16. Comparison of Aerosol Optical Properties and Water Vapor Among Ground and Airborne Lidars and Sun Photometers During TARFOX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrare, R.; Ismail, S.; Browell, E.; Brackett, V.; Clayton, M.; Kooi, S.; Melfi, S. H.; Whiteman, D.; Schwemmer, G.; Evans, K.; hide

    2000-01-01

    We compare aerosol optical thickness (AOT) and precipitable water vapor (PWV) measurements derived from ground and airborne lidars and Sun photometers during TARFOX (Tropospheric Aerosol Radiative Forcing Observational Experiment). Such comparisons are important to verify the consistency between various remote sensing measurements before employing them in any assessment of the impact of aerosols on the global radiation balance. Total scattering ratio and extinction profiles measured by the ground-based NASA/GSFC Scanning Raman Lidar (SRL) system, which operated from Wallops Island, Virginia (37.86 deg N, 75.51 deg W), are compared with those measured by the Lidar Atmospheric Sensing Experiment (LASE) airborne lidar system aboard the NASA ER-2 aircraft. Bias and rms differences indicate that these measurements generally agreed within about 10%. Aerosol extinction profiles and estimates of AOT are derived from both lidar measurements using a value for the aerosol extinction/backscattering ratio S(sub a)=60 sr for the aerosol extinction/backscattering ratio, which was determined from the Raman lidar measurements.

  17. Photometer for monitoring the thickness of inkjet printed films for organic electronic and sensor applications.

    PubMed

    Im, Jisun; Sengupta, Sandip K; Whitten, James E

    2010-03-01

    Inkjet printed organic thin films are being used for a variety of electronic and sensor applications with advantages that include ease of fabrication and reproducibility. Construction and use of a low-cost photometer based on a light-emitting diode (LED) light source and a photodiode detector are described. The photometer attaches to the exit of the printer with the transparent substrate onto which the film is printed passing between the LED and photodiode. By measuring the output voltage of the detector, the transmittance and absorbance of the inkjet printed film can be calculated in real-time. Since absorbance is linearly proportional to thickness in the Beer-Lambert regime, the thickness of the film may be monitored and controlled by varying the number of passes through the printer. Use of the photometer is demonstrated for inkjet printed films of monolayer-protected colloidal gold nanoparticles that function as chemical vapor sensors. The photometer may find applications in both research and quality control related to the manufacture of organic electronic devices and sensors and enables "feedback-controlled" inkjet printing.

  18. Central Andean temperature and precipitation measurements and its homogenization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunziker, Stefan; Gubler, Stefanie

    2015-04-01

    Observation of climatological parameters and the homogenization of these time series have a well-established history in western countries. This is not the case for many other countries, such as Bolivia and Peru. In Bolivia and Peru, the organization of measurements, quality of measurement equipment, equipment maintenance, training of staff and data management are fundamentally different compared to the western standard. The data needs special attention, because many problems are not detected by standard quality control procedures. Information about the weather stations, best achieved by station visits, is very beneficial. If the cause of the problem is known, some of the data may be corrected. In this study, cases of typical problems and measurement errors will be demonstrated. Much of research on homogenization techniques (up to subdaily scale) has been completed in recent years. However, data sets of the quality of western station networks have been used, and little is known about the performance of homogenization methods on data sets from countries such as Bolivia and Peru. HOMER (HOMogenizaton softwarE in R) is one of the most recent and widely used homogenization softwares. Its performance is tested on Peruvian-like data that has been sourced from Swiss stations (similar station density and metadata availability). The Swiss station network is a suitable test bed, because climate gradients are strong and the terrain is complex, as is also found in the Central Andes. On the other hand, the Swiss station network is dense, and long time series and extensive metadata are available. By subsampling the station network and omitting the metadata, the conditions of a Peruvian test region are mimicked. Results are compared to a dataset homogenized by THOMAS (Tool for Homogenization of Monthly Data Series), the homogenization tool used by MeteoSwiss.

  19. The quantification and correction of wind-induced precipitation measurement errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochendorfer, John; Rasmussen, Roy; Wolff, Mareile; Baker, Bruce; Hall, Mark E.; Meyers, Tilden; Landolt, Scott; Jachcik, Al; Isaksen, Ketil; Brækkan, Ragnar; Leeper, Ronald

    2017-04-01

    Hydrologic measurements are important for both the short- and long-term management of water resources. Of the terms in the hydrologic budget, precipitation is typically the most important input; however, measurements of precipitation are subject to large errors and biases. For example, an all-weather unshielded weighing precipitation gauge can collect less than 50 % of the actual amount of solid precipitation when wind speeds exceed 5 m s-1. Using results from two different precipitation test beds, such errors have been assessed for unshielded weighing gauges and for weighing gauges employing four of the most common windshields currently in use. Functions to correct wind-induced undercatch were developed and tested. In addition, corrections for the single-Alter weighing gauge were developed using the combined results of two separate sites in Norway and the USA. In general, the results indicate that the functions effectively correct the undercatch bias that affects such precipitation measurements. In addition, a single function developed for the single-Alter gauges effectively decreased the bias at both sites, with the bias at the US site improving from -12 to 0 %, and the bias at the Norwegian site improving from -27 to -4 %. These correction functions require only wind speed and air temperature as inputs, and were developed for use in national and local precipitation networks, hydrological monitoring, roadway and airport safety work, and climate change research. The techniques used to develop and test these transfer functions at more than one site can also be used for other more comprehensive studies, such as the World Meteorological Organization Solid Precipitation Intercomparison Experiment (WMO-SPICE).

  20. Data Visualization and Analysis Tools for the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Validation Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Kenneth R.; Schwaller, Mathew

    2010-01-01

    The Validation Network (VN) prototype for the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission compares data from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite Precipitation Radar (PR) to similar measurements from U.S. and international operational weather radars. This prototype is a major component of the GPM Ground Validation System (GVS). The VN provides a means for the precipitation measurement community to identify and resolve significant discrepancies between the ground radar (GR) observations and similar satellite observations. The VN prototype is based on research results and computer code described by Anagnostou et al. (2001), Bolen and Chandrasekar (2000), and Liao et al. (2001), and has previously been described by Morris, et al. (2007). Morris and Schwaller (2009) describe the PR-GR volume-matching algorithm used to create the VN match-up data set used for the comparisons. This paper describes software tools that have been developed for visualization and statistical analysis of the original and volume matched PR and GR data.

  1. Measurements of precipitation in Dumont d'Urville, Adélie Land, East Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grazioli, Jacopo; Genthon, Christophe; Boudevillain, Brice; Duran-Alarcon, Claudio; Del Guasta, Massimo; Madeleine, Jean-Baptiste; Berne, Alexis

    2017-08-01

    The first results of a campaign of intensive observation of precipitation in Dumont d'Urville, Antarctica, are presented. Several instruments collected data from November 2015 to February 2016 or longer, including a polarimetric radar (MXPol), a Micro Rain Radar (MRR), a weighing gauge (Pluvio2), and a Multi-Angle Snowflake Camera (MASC). These instruments collected the first ground-based measurements of precipitation in the region of Adélie Land (Terre Adélie), including precipitation microphysics. Microphysical observations during the austral summer 2015/2016 showed that, close to the ground level, aggregates are the dominant hydrometeor type, together with small ice particles (mostly originating from blowing snow), and that riming is a recurring process. Eleven percent of the measured particles were fully developed graupel, and aggregates had a mean riming degree of about 30 %. Spurious precipitation in the Pluvio2 measurements in windy conditions, leading to phantom accumulations, is observed and partly removed through synergistic use of MRR data. The yearly accumulated precipitation of snow (300 m above ground), obtained by means of a local conversion relation of MRR data, trained on the Pluvio2 measurement of the summer period, is estimated to be 815 mm of water equivalent, with a confidence interval ranging between 739.5 and 989 mm. Data obtained in previous research from satellite-borne radars, and the ERA-Interim reanalysis of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) provide lower yearly totals: 655 mm for ERA-Interim and 679 mm for the climatological data over DDU. ERA-Interim overestimates the occurrence of low-intensity precipitation events especially in summer, but it compensates for them by underestimating the snowfall amounts carried by the most intense events. Overall, this paper provides insightful examples of the added values of precipitation monitoring in Antarctica with a synergistic use of in situ and remote sensing

  2. Effects of precipitation on sonic anemometer measurements of turbulent fluxes in the atmospheric surface layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rongwang; Huang, Jian; Wang, Xin; Zhang, Jun A.; Huang, Fei

    2016-06-01

    Effects caused by precipitation on the measurements of three-dimensional sonic anemometer are analyzed based on a field observational experiment conducted in Maoming, Guangdong Province, China. Obvious fluctuations induced by precipitation are observed for the outputs of sonic anemometer-derived temperature and wind velocity components. A technique of turbulence spectra and cospectra normalized in the framework of similarity theory is utilized to validate the measured variables and calculated fluxes. It is found that the sensitivity of sonic anemometer-derived temperature to precipitation is significant, compared with that of the wind velocity components. The spectra of wind velocity and cospectra of momentum flux resemble the standard universal shape with the slopes of the spectra and cospectra at the inertial subrange, following the -2/3 and -4/3 power law, respectively, even under the condition of heavy rain. Contaminated by precipitation, however, the spectra of temperature and cospectra of sensible heat flux do not exhibit a universal shape and have obvious frequency loss at the inertial subrange. From the physical structure and working principle of sonic anemometer, a possible explanation is proposed to describe this difference, which is found to be related to the variations of precipitation particles. Corrections for errors of sonic anemometer-derived temperature under precipitation is needed, which is still under exploration.

  3. A Data System Architecture for Measurement Based Systems: Precipitation Processing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stocker, Erich Franz

    2003-01-01

    NASA s Earth Science Enterprise (ESE) is changing focus from single satellite missions to measurement oriented programs. An example of this paradigm shift is the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) project. GPM is conceptualized as a rolling-wave of measurement possibilities all focused on the key precipitation parameter. In response to this shift to measurement programs and also integral to the ESE s new strategy for processing and management its data, a measurement based approach is also critical for data processing system that support measurement programs like GPM. This paper provides an overview of the paradigm shift from mission to measurement. It also presents a summary of the ESE s new strategy for its data systems. Building on this background the paper details the architectural, design and implementation aspects of the Precipitation Processing System (PPS). The PPS is an evolution of a single point system developed for the Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission to a generic precipitation data system. The paper provides the context within which PPS will support the GPM program.

  4. Precipitation measurement intercomparison in the Qilian Mountains, north-eastern Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, R.; Liu, J.; Kang, E.; Yang, Y.; Han, C.; Liu, Z.; Song, Y.; Qing, W.; Zhu, P.

    2015-10-01

    An experimental field study of wind-induced bias in precipitation measurements was conducted from September 2010 to April 2015 at a grassland site (99°52.9´ E, 38°16.1´ N; 2980 m) in the Hulu watershed in the Qilian Mountains, on the north-eastern Tibetan Plateau, in China. The experiment included (1) an unshielded Chinese standard precipitation gauge (CSPGUN; orifice diameter = 20 cm, height = 70 cm), (2) a single Alter shield around a CSPG (CSPGSA), (3) a CSPG in a pit (CSPGPIT) and (4) a Double-Fence International Reference (DFIR) with a Tretyakov-shielded CSPG (CSPGDFIR). The catch ratio (CR) used the CSPGDFIR as a reference (CR = CSPGX/CSPGDFIR, %; X denotes UN, SA or PIT). The results show that the CSPGSA, CSPGPIT and CSPGDIFR caught 0.9, 4.5 and 3.4 % more rainfall; 7.7, 15.6 and 14.2 % more mixed precipitation (snow with rain, rain with snow); 11.1, 16.0 and 20.6 % more snowfall and 2.0, 6.0 and 5.3 % more precipitation (of all types), respectively, than the CSPGUN from September 2012 to April 2015. The CSPGPIT and CSPGDFIR caught 3.6 and 2.5 % more rainfall; 7.3 and 6.0 % more mixed precipitation; 4.4 and 8.5 % more snowfall; and 3.9 and 3.2 % more total precipitation, respectively, than the CSPGSA. However, the CSPGDFIR caught 1.0 % less rainfall; 1.2 % less mixed precipitation; 3.9 % more snowfall and 0.6 % less total precipitation than the CSPGPIT. From most to least precipitation measured, the instruments ranked as follows: for rain and mixed precipitation, CSPGPIT > CSPGDFIR > CSPGSA > CSPGUN; for snowfall, CSPGDFIR > CSPGPIT > CSPGSA > CSPGUN. The CR vs. 10 m wind speed for the period of precipitation indicated that with increasing wind speed from 0 to 8.0 m s-1, the CRUN/DFIR and CRSA/DFIR for rainfall decreased slightly. For mixed precipitation, the wind speed showed no significant effect on CRUN/DFIR and CRSA/DFIR below 3.5 m s-1. For snowfall, the CRUN/DFIR and CRSA/DFIR vs. wind speed showed that CR decreased with increasing wind speed. The

  5. Actual evapotranspiration and precipitation measured by lysimeters: a comparison with eddy covariance and tipping bucket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebler, S.; Hendricks Franssen, H.-J.; Pütz, T.; Post, H.; Schmidt, M.; Vereecken, H.

    2015-05-01

    This study compares actual evapotranspiration (ETa) measurements by a set of six weighable lysimeters, ETa estimates obtained with the eddy covariance (EC) method, and evapotranspiration calculated with the full-form Penman-Monteith equation (ETPM) for the Rollesbroich site in the Eifel (western Germany). The comparison of ETa measured by EC (including correction of the energy balance deficit) and by lysimeters is rarely reported in the literature and allows more insight into the performance of both methods. An evaluation of ETa for the two methods for the year 2012 shows a good agreement with a total difference of 3.8% (19 mm) between the ETa estimates. The highest agreement and smallest relative differences (< 8%) on a monthly basis between both methods are found in summer. ETa was close to ETPM, indicating that ET was energy limited and not limited by water availability. ETa differences between lysimeter and EC were mainly related to differences in grass height caused by harvest and the EC footprint. The lysimeter data were also used to estimate precipitation amounts in combination with a filter algorithm for the high-precision lysimeters recently introduced by Peters et al. (2014). The estimated precipitation amounts from the lysimeter data differ significantly from precipitation amounts recorded with a standard rain gauge at the Rollesbroich test site. For the complete year 2012 the lysimeter records show a 16 % higher precipitation amount than the tipping bucket. After a correction of the tipping bucket measurements by the method of Richter (1995) this amount was reduced to 3%. With the help of an on-site camera the precipitation measurements of the lysimeters were analyzed in more detail. It was found that the lysimeters record more precipitation than the tipping bucket, in part related to the detection of rime and dew, which contribute 17% to the yearly difference between both methods. In addition, fog and drizzle explain an additional 5.5% of the total

  6. The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission: Overview and U.S. Science Status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Arthur Y.; Skofronick-Jackson, Gail; Stocker, Erich F.

    2013-04-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission is a satellite mission specifically designed to unify and advance precipitation measurements from a constellation of research and operational microwave sensors provided by a consortium of international partners. NASA and JAXA will deploy a Core Observatory in 2014 to serve as a reference satellite for precipitation measurements by the constellation sensors. The GPM Core Observatory will carry a Ku/Ka-band Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) and a conical-scanning multi-channel (10-183 GHz) GPM Microwave Radiometer (GMI). The DPR, the first dual-frequency radar in space, will provide not only measurements of 3-D precipitation structures but also quantitative information on microphysical properties of precipitating particles. The DPR and GMI measurements will together provide a database that relates vertical hydrometeor profiles to multi-frequency microwave radiances over a variety of environmental conditions across the globe. This combined database will serve as a common transfer standard for improving the accuracy and consistency of precipitation retrievals from all constellation radiometers. In addition to the Core Observatory, the GPM constellation consists of (1) Special Sensor Microwave Imager/Sounder (SSMIS) instruments on the U.S. Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) satellites, (2) the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer-2 (AMSR-2) on the GCOM-W1 satellite of JAXA, (3) the Multi-Frequency Microwave Scanning Radiometer (MADRAS) and the multi-channel microwave humidity sounder (SAPHIR) on the French-Indian Megha-Tropiques satellite, (4) the Microwave Humidity Sounder (MHS) on the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Polar Orbiting Environmental Satellites (POES), (5) MHS instruments on MetOp satellites launched by the European Organisation for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites (EUMETSAT), (6) the Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS) on the National Polar

  7. Microphysical properties of frozen particles inferred from Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Microwave Imager (GMI) polarimetric measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Jie; Wu, Dong L.

    2017-02-01

    Scattering differences induced by frozen particle microphysical properties are investigated, using the vertically (V) and horizontally (H) polarized radiances from the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Microwave Imager (GMI) 89 and 166 GHz channels. It is the first study on frozen particle microphysical properties on a global scale that uses the dual-frequency microwave polarimetric signals.From the ice cloud scenes identified by the 183.3 ± 3 GHz channel brightness temperature (Tb), we find that the scattering by frozen particles is highly polarized, with V-H polarimetric differences (PDs) being positive throughout the tropics and the winter hemisphere mid-latitude jet regions, including PDs from the GMI 89 and 166 GHz TBs, as well as the PD at 640 GHz from the ER-2 Compact Scanning Submillimeter-wave Imaging Radiometer (CoSSIR) during the TC4 campaign. Large polarization dominantly occurs mostly near convective outflow regions (i.e., anvils or stratiform precipitation), while the polarization signal is small inside deep convective cores as well as at the remote cirrus region. Neglecting the polarimetric signal would easily result in as large as 30 % error in ice water path retrievals. There is a universal bell curve in the PD-TBV relationship, where the PD amplitude peaks at ˜ 10 K for all three channels in the tropics and increases slightly with latitude (2-4 K). Moreover, the 166 GHz PD tends to increase in the case where a melting layer is beneath the frozen particles aloft in the atmosphere, while 89 GHz PD is less sensitive than 166 GHz to the melting layer. This property creates a unique PD feature for the identification of the melting layer and stratiform rain with passive sensors.Horizontally oriented non-spherical frozen particles are thought to produce the observed PD because of different ice scattering properties in the V and H polarizations. On the other hand, turbulent mixing within deep convective cores inevitably promotes the random

  8. Towards the Development of a Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepherd, Marshall; Starr, David OC. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The scientific success of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) and additional satellite-focused precipitation retrieval projects have paved the way for a more advanced global precipitation mission. A comprehensive global measuring strategy is currently under study - Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM). The GPM study could ultimately lead to the development of the Global Precipitation Mission. The intent of GPM is to address looming scientific questions arising in the context of global climate-water cycle interactions, hydrometeorology, weather prediction and prediction of freshwater resources, the global carbon cycle, and biogeochemical cycles. This talk overviews the status and scientific agenda of this proposed mission currently planned for launch in the 2007-2008 time frame. GPM is planning to expand the scope of precipitation measurement through the use of a constellation of 6-10 satellites, one of which will be an advanced TRMM-like "core" satellite carry dual-frequency Ku-Ka band radar and a microwave radiometer (e.g. TMI-like). The other constellation members will likely include new lightweight satellites and co-existing operational/research satellites carrying passive microwave radiometers. The goal behind the constellation is to achieve no worse than 3-hour sampling at any spot on the globe. The constellation's orbit architecture will consist of a mix of sun-synchronous and non-su n -synchronous satellites with the "core" satellite providing measurement of cloud-precipitation microphysical processes plus "training calibrating" information to be used with the retrieval algorithms for the constellation satellite measurements. The GPM is organized internationally, currently involving a partnership between NASA in the US, NASDA in Japan, and ESA in Europe (representing the European community). The program is expected to involve additional international partners, other federal agencies, and a diverse collection of scientists from academia

  9. Precipitation water stable isotope measurements and analyses in Middle and Polar Ural

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stukova, Olga; Gribanov, Konstantin; Zakharov, Vyacheslav; Cattani, Olivier; Jouzel, Jean

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, we present results of precipitation (rain, snow) water stable isotope measurements, which were collected on two places. Measuring was made on laser spectroscopy analyzer PICARRO L2130-i equipped with liquid auto sampler. We describe method of sample collecting, preparing, measuring and continuing analysis of experimental data. Stored data include results of 177 samples measuring from Kourovka collected from November 2012 to March 2014 and 73 samples from Labytnangi collected from March 2013 to December 2013.

  10. Actual evapotranspiration and precipitation measured by lysimeters: a comparison with eddy covariance and tipping bucket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebler, S.; Hendricks Franssen, H.-J.; Pütz, T.; Post, H.; Schmidt, M.; Vereecken, H.

    2014-12-01

    This study compares actual evapotranspiration (ETa) measurements by a set of six weighable lysimeters, ETa estimates obtained with the eddy covariance (EC) method, and potential crop evapotranspiration according to FAO (ETc-FAO) for the Rollesbroich site in the Eifel (Western Germany). The comparison of ETa measured by EC (including correction of the energy balance deficit) and by lysimeters is rarely reported in literature and allows more insight into the performance of both methods. An evaluation of ETa for the two methods for the year 2012 shows a good agreement with a total difference of 3.8% (19 mm) between the ETa estimates. The highest agreement and smallest relative differences (<8%) on monthly basis between both methods are found in summer. ETa was close to ETc-FAO, indicating that ET was energy limited and not limited by water availability. ETa differences between lysimeter, ETc-FAO, and EC were mainly related to differences in grass height caused by harvesting management and the EC footprint. The lysimeter data were also used to estimate precipitation amounts in combination with a filter algorithm for high precision lysimeters recently introduced by Peters et al. (2014). The estimated precipitation amounts from the lysimeter data show significant differences compared to the precipitation amounts recorded with a standard rain gauge at the Rollesbroich test site. For the complete year 2012 the lysimeter records show a 16% higher precipitation amount than the tipping bucket. With the help of an on-site camera the precipitation measurements of the lysimeters were analyzed in more detail. It was found that the lysimeters record more precipitation than the tipping bucket in part related to the detection of rime and dew, which contributes 17% to the yearly difference between both methods. In addition, fog and drizzle explain an additional 5.5% of the total difference. Larger differences are also recorded for snow and sleet situations. During snowfall, the

  11. Bias corrections of precipitation measurements across experimental sites in different ecoclimatic regions of western Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Xicai; Yang, Daqing; Li, Yanping; Barr, Alan; Helgason, Warren; Hayashi, Masaki; Marsh, Philip; Pomeroy, John; Janowicz, Richard J.

    2016-10-01

    This study assesses a filtering procedure on accumulating precipitation gauge measurements and quantifies the effects of bias corrections for wind-induced undercatch across four ecoclimatic regions in western Canada, including the permafrost regions of the subarctic, the Western Cordillera, the boreal forest, and the prairies. The bias corrections increased monthly precipitation by up to 163 % at windy sites with short vegetation and sometimes modified the seasonal precipitation regime, whereas the increases were less than 13 % at sites shielded by forest. On a yearly basis, the increase of total precipitation ranged from 8 to 20 mm (3-4 %) at sites shielded by vegetation and 60 to 384 mm (about 15-34 %) at open sites. In addition, the bias corrections altered the seasonal precipitation patterns at some windy sites with high snow percentage ( > 50 %). This study highlights the need for and importance of precipitation bias corrections at both research sites and operational networks for water balance assessment and the validation of global/regional climate-hydrology models.

  12. HOAPS precipitation validation with ship-borne rain and snow measurements over the Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bumke, Karl; Schröder, Marc; Fennig, Karsten

    2013-04-01

    Measuring precipitation over the oceans is still a challenging task. The main reason for a lack of such data can be attributed to the difficulty of measuring precipitation on moving platforms under high wind speeds. The progress in satellite technology has provided the possibility to retrieve global data sets from space, including precipitation. Levizzani et al. (2007) showed that precipitation over the oceans can be derived with sufficient accuracy from passive microwave radiometry. On the other hand, Andersson et al. (2011) pointed out that even state-of-the-art satellite retrievals and reanalysis data sets still disagree on global precipitation with respect to amounts, patterns, variability and temporal behaviour. This creates the need for ship-based precipitation validation data using instruments capable of accurately measuring rain rates even under high wind speed conditions. In the present study we use ship rain gauges (Hasse et al., 1998) and optical disdrometers (Großklaus et al., 1998), the latter is also capable to measure snow (Lempio et al., 2007). Measurements are point-to-area collocated against Hamburg Ocean Atmosphere Parameters and fluxes from Satellite (HOAPS) data (Andersson et al., 2011). The used HOAPS-S data subset contains all retrieved physical parameters at the native SSM/I (Special Sensor Microwave Imager) pixel-level resolution of approximately 50 km for each individual satellite. The algorithm does not discriminate between rain and snowfall. The satellite data is compared to the in situ measurement by the nearest neighbour approach. Therefore, it must be ensured that both observations are related to each other, which can be determined by the decorrelation length. At least a number of 660 precipitation events are at our disposal including 127 snow events. The statistical analysis follows the recommendations given by the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) for dichotomous or binary forecasts (WWRP/WGNE: http://www

  13. The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission: U.S. Program and Science Status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Arthur; Azarbarzin, Ardeshir; Kakar, Ramesh; Neeck, Steven

    2010-05-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission is an international satellite mission designed to unify and advance precipitation measurements from a constellation of research and operational microwave sensors. NASA and JAXA will deploy the GPM Core Observatory carrying an advanced radar-radiometer system to serve as a physics observatory and a transfer standard for inter-calibration of constellation radiometers. The GPM Core Observatory is scheduled for launch in July 2013. In addition, NASA will provide a second radiometer to be flown on a partner-provided GPM Low-Inclination Observatory to enhance the near real-time monitoring of hurricanes and mid-latitude storms. JAXA will also contribute data from the Global Change Observation Mission-Water (GCOM-W) satellite. Additional partnerships are under development to include conical-scanning microwave imagers on the French-Indian Megha-Tropiques satellite and U.S. Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) satellites, as well as cross-track scanning humidity sounders on operational satellites such as the National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System (NPOESS) Preparatory Project (NPP), POES, NPOESS, and European MetOp satellites, which are used to improve the precipitation sampling over land. Currently, Brazil has in its national space plan for a GPM low-inclination radiometer, and data from Chinese and Russian microwave radiometers could potentially become available through international collaboration under the auspices of the Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS) and Group on Earth Observations (GEO). The current generation of global rainfall products combines observations from a network of uncoordinated satellite missions using a variety of merging techniques. GPM will provide "next-generation" precipitation data products characterized by: (1) more accurate instantaneous precipitation measurement (especially for light rain and cold-season solid precipitation), (2) more

  14. The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission: Overview and U.S. Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hou, Arthur Y.

    2010-01-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission is an international satellite mission designed to unify and advance precipitation measurements from a constellation of research and operational microwave sensors. NASA and JAXA will deploy the GPM Core Observatory carrying an advanced radar-radiometer system to serve as a physics observatory and a transfer standard for inter-calibration of constellation radiometers. The GPM Core Observatory is scheduled for launch in July 2013. NASA will provide a second radiometer to be flown on a partner-provided GPM Low-Inclination Observatory to enhance the near real-time monitoring of hurricanes and mid-latitude storms. JAXA will also contribute data from the Global Change Observation Mission-Water (GCOM-W) satellite. Additional partnerships are under development to include microwave radiometers on the French-Indian Megha-Tropiques satellite and U.S. Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) satellites, as well as cross-track scanning humidity sounders on operational satellites such as the NPP, POES, JPSS, and MetOp satellites, which are used to improve the precipitation sampling over land. Brazil has in its national space plan for a GPM low-inclination radiometer, and data from Chinese and Russian microwave radiometers could potentially become available through international collaboration under the auspices of the Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS) and Group on Earth Observations (GEO). The current generation of global rainfall products combines observations from a network of uncoordinated satellite missions using a variety of merging techniques. GPM will provide "next-generation" precipitation data products characterized by: (1) more accurate instantaneous precipitation measurement (especially for light rain and cold-season solid precipitation), (2) more frequent sampling by an expanded constellation of microwave radiometers including operational humidity sounders over land, (3) intercalibrated microwave

  15. The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission: Overview and U.S. Science Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hou, Arthur

    2007-01-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission, an international satellite mission to unify and advance space-based precipitation measurements around the globe, is a science mission with integrated application goals. The mission is designed to (1) advance the knowledge of the global water cycle and freshwater availability, and (2) improve weather, climate, and hydrological prediction capabilities through more accurate and frequent measurements of global precipitation. The cornerstone of GPM is the deployment of a Core Spacecraft in a unique 65 deg-inclined orbit to serve as a physics observatory and a calibration reference to improve the accuracy of precipitation measurements by a heterogeneous constellation of dedicated and operational passive microwave sensors. The Core Spacecraft will carry a dual-frequency (Ku-Ka band) radar and a multi-channel microwave radiometer with high-frequency capabilities to provide measurements of 3-D precipitation structures and microphysical properties, which are key to achieving a better understanding of precipitation processes and improved retrieval algorithms for passive microwave radiometers. The GPM constellation is envisioned to comprise 5 or more conical-scanning microwave radiometers provided by partners, augmented by cross-track microwave sounders on operational satellites such as the National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System (NPOESS) Preparatory Project (NPP), POES, NPOESS, and MetOp satellites for improved sampling over land. The GPM Mission is currently a partnership between NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), with opportunities for additional international partners in constellation satellites and ground validation. An overview of the GPM mission concept and science activities in the United States will be presented.

  16. Scaling precipitation input to distributed hydrological models by measured snow distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voegeli, Christian; Lehning, Michael; Wever, Nander; Bavay, Mathias; Bühler, Yves; Marty, Mauro; Molnar, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Precise knowledge about the snow distribution in alpine terrain is crucial for various applications such as flood risk assessment, avalanche warning or water supply and hydropower. To simulate the seasonal snow cover development in alpine terrain, the spatially distributed, physics-based model Alpine3D is suitable. The model is often driven by spatial interpolations from automatic weather stations (AWS). As AWS are sparsely spread, the data needs to be interpolated, leading to errors in the spatial distribution of the snow cover - especially on subcatchment scale. With the recent advances in remote sensing techniques, maps of snow depth can be acquired with high spatial resolution and vertical accuracy. Here we use maps of the snow depth distribution, calculated from summer and winter digital surface models acquired with the airborne opto-electronic scanner ADS to preprocess and redistribute precipitation input data for Alpine3D to improve the accuracy of spatial distribution of snow depth simulations. A differentiation between liquid and solid precipitation is made, to account for different precipitation patterns that can be expected from rain and snowfall. For liquid precipitation, only large scale distribution patterns are applied to distribute precipitation in the simulation domain. For solid precipitation, an additional small scale distribution, based on the ADS data, is applied. The large scale patterns are generated using AWS measurements interpolated over the domain. The small scale patterns are generated by redistributing the large scale precipitation according to the relative snow depth in the ADS dataset. The determination of the precipitation phase is done using an air temperature threshold. Using this simple approach to redistribute precipitation, the accuracy of spatial snow distribution could be improved significantly. The standard deviation of absolute snow depth error could be reduced by a factor of 2 to less than 20 cm for the season 2011/12. The

  17. Supporting Hydrometeorological Research and Applications with Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Products and Services

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Zhong; Ostrenga, D.; Vollmer, B.; Deshong, B.; MacRitchie, K.; Greene, M.; Kempler, S.

    2016-01-01

    Precipitation is an important dataset in hydrometeorological research and applications such as flood modeling, drought monitoring, etc. On February 27, 2014, the NASA Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission was launched to provide the next-generation global observations of rain and snow (http:pmm.nasa.govGPM). The GPM mission consists of an international network of satellites in which a GPM Core Observatory satellite carries both active and passive microwave instruments to measure precipitation and serve as a reference standard, to unify precipitation measurements from a constellation of other research and operational satellites. The NASA Goddard Earth Sciences (GES) Data and Information Services Center (DISC) hosts and distributes GPM data. The GES DISC is home to the data archive for the GPM predecessor, the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM). GPM products currently available include the following:1. Level-1 GPM Microwave Imager (GMI) and partner radiometer products2. Goddard Profiling Algorithm (GPROF) GMI and partner products (Level-2 and Level-3)3. GPM dual-frequency precipitation radar and their combined products (Level-2 and Level-3)4. Integrated Multi-satellitE Retrievals for GPM (IMERG) products (early, late, and final run)GPM data can be accessed through a number of data services (e.g., Simple Subset Wizard, OPeNDAP, WMS, WCS, ftp, etc.). A newly released Unified User Interface or UUI is a single interface to provide users seamless access to data, information and services. For example, a search for precipitation products will not only return TRMM and GPM products, but also other global precipitation products such as MERRA (Modern Era Retrospective-Analysis for Research and Applications), GLDAS (Global Land Data Assimilation Systems), etc.New features and capabilities have been recently added in GIOVANNI to allow exploring and inter-comparing GPM IMERG (Integrated Multi-satelliE Retrievals for GPM) half-hourly and monthly precipitation

  18. A method for measuring precipitation parameters and raindrop size distributions using radar reflectivity and optical extinction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulbrich, C. W.; Atlas, D.

    1977-01-01

    A method of determining precipitation parameters from two remotely measurable quantities, the radar reflectivity factor and the optical extinction, is described. The raindrop size spectrum is approximated by a two-parameter exponential form; when these parameters are evaluated in terms of the radar reflectivity factor and the optical extinction, an exponential spectrum is obtained that is generally in very good agreement with the observed size spectrum. Other calculated precipitation parameters, such as rainfall rate and liquid water content, which are derived from the exponential approximation, also agree with experimental data. It is indicated that other combinations of two remote measurables can also be used to obtain more accurate estimates of precipitation parameters than can be obtained by the use of an empirical relationship.

  19. How Well do we Measure Precipitation? 'Wind-Induced Undercatch' Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollock, M.; Colli, M.; Dutton, M.; O'Donnell, G. M.; Wilkinson, M.; Black, A.; Kilsby, C. G.; Quinn, P. F.; Lanza, L. G.; Stagnaro, M.; O'Connell, P. E.

    2016-12-01

    Data from precipitation gauges are critical for flood forecasting and flood risk management; radar calibration and numerical weather prediction models; and water resource management and hydrological modelling. They are often considered to provide the most accurate practicable measure of precipitation at a point in space and time, but remain subject to considerable errors. Inaccuracies in measurements are compounded in modelling applications by producing potentially misleading or incorrect results; it is therefore of utmost importance to understand uncertainty in observations. All precipitation gauges mounted above the ground surface present an obstruction to the prevailing wind. This causes an acceleration of wind above the orifice of a gauge resulting in what is commonly referred to as `wind-induced undercatch'. This is where precipitation is deflected away from the orifice and lands 'downstream' of the area represented by the gauge measurement, which reduces its collection efficiency (CE). The physical shape of a gauge bears a significant impact on its CE. Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) simulations are used to investigate how different shapes of precipitation gauge are affected by the wind. The CFD modelling is supported by high-resolution field measurements at several exposed `Hydro-Met' research stations in the UK. These sites are occupied by a range of precipitation gauges, scrutinised in the CFD analysis, which have different shapes and are mounted at varying heights. The wind-induced undercatch present within a number of large UK storms, which is not captured by operational gauge networks in the UK, is quantified and presented in this study. The combination of results from CFD modelling and the field studies show that gauge shape and mounting height significantly affect the extent of the `undercatching'. `Aerodynamic' gauges following a `champagne flute' or a `funnel' profile were demonstrated by both to have significant advantages over conventional gauge

  20. The High Speed Photometer for the Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bless, R. C.

    1982-01-01

    An overview of the high speed photometer (HSP), its optics and detectors, its electronics, its mechanical structure, and some observational considerations are presented. The capabilities and limitations of the HSP are outlined.

  1. MIPS - The Multiband Imaging Photometer for SIRTF. [Multiband Imaging Photometer for SIRTF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rieke, G. H.; Lada, C.; Lebofsky, M.; Low, F.; Strittmatter, P.; Young, E.; Arens, J.; Beichman, C.; Gautier, T. N.; Werner, M.

    1986-01-01

    The Multiband Imaging Photometer for SIRTF (MIPS) is to be designed to reach as closely as possible the fundamental sensitivity and angular resolution limits for SIRTF over the 3 to 700 micron spectral region. It will use high performance photoconductive detectors from 3 to 200 micron with integrating JFET amplifiers. From 200 to 700 microns, the MIPS will use a bolometer cooled by an adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator. Over much of its operating range, the MIPS will make possible observations at and beyond the conventional Rayleigh diffraction limit of angular resolution.

  2. Developments and applications of the Global Satellite Mapping of Precipitation (GSMaP) for the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kachi, Misako; Aonashi, Kazumasa; Kubota, Takuji; Shige, Shoichi; Ushio, Tomoo; Mega, Tomoaki; Yamamoto, Munehisa; Hamada, Atsushi; Seto, Shinta; Takayabu, Yukari N.; Oki, Riko

    2016-04-01

    The Global Satellite Mapping of Precipitation (GSMaP) is a global rainfall map based on a blended Microwave-Infrared product and has been developed in Japan for the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission. To fulfill gaps of passive microwave observations, we developed a method to interpolate observations between each microwave imager by utilizing information from the Infrared imagers on board the geostationary satellites, and achieved production of an hourly global rainfall map in 0.1-degree latitude/longitude grid. The latest GSMaP version 6 product was released in September 2014 to the public as one of Japanese GPM products after the launch of the GPM Core Observatory, which is Japan and U.S. joint mission and carrying both the Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) and GPM Microwave Imager (GMI), in February 2014. In the next version (version 7), which is scheduled to be released in the summer 2016, we plan to apply databases produced from DPR instead of those from PR, and to introduce snow retrieval algorithm for the passive microwave instruments that have higher frequency channels. The GSMaP near-real-time version (GSMaP_NRT) product is available 4-hour after observation through the "JAXA Global Rainfall Watch" web site (http://sharaku.eorc.jaxa.jp/GSMaP) since 2008. To assure near-real-time data availability, the GSMaP_NRT system simplified part of the algorithm and its processing procedure. Therefore, the GSMaP_NRT product gives higher priority to data latency than accuracy. Since its data release, GSMaP_NRT data has been used by various users for various purposes, such as rainfall monitoring, flood alert and warning, drought monitoring, crop yield forecast, and agricultural insurance. There are, however, several requirements from users for GSMaP improvements not only for accuracy but also specification. Among those requests for data specification, the most popular ones are shortening of data latency time and higher horizontal resolution. To reduce

  3. Developing a Stand Alone Sun Photometer for Ships and Buoys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, John N.

    1997-01-01

    During November and December 1995 the first Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE 1) was carried to characterize the aerosol physical and optical properties in the clean marine atmosphere near Tasmania in the South Pacific. As part of this effort, and with funding from this proposal, we installed a sun photometer on the R/V Discoverer and a spectro-photometer on the NOAA C-130 aircraft.

  4. A multichannel fiber optic photometer present performance and future developments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barwig, H.; Schoembs, R.; Huber, G.

    1988-01-01

    A three channel photometer for simultaneous multicolor observations was designed with the aim of making possible highly efficient photometry of fast variable objects like cataclysmic variables. Experiences with this instrument over a period of three years are presented. Aspects of the special techniques applied are discussed with respect to high precision photometry. In particular, the use of fiber optics is critically analyzed. Finally, the development of a new photometer concept is discussed.

  5. The Replication of an original Zoellner-Photometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staubermann, K.; Berger, L.; Boettcher, H.; Borchardt-Ott, W.; Buzzoni, B.; Franza, F.; Frercks, J.; Griffin, R.; Herrmann, D. B.; Heyer, H.; Nair, A.; Pettersson, B.; Ruland, H.; Sterken, C.; Wolfschmidt, G.

    In 1858 the German physicist Karl Friedrich Zoellner designed a photometer which became one of the most popular astrophysical instruments in the 19th century. To understand the instrument a replica of it has been built which is based on descriptions, pictures and remaining parts of the original instrument. In this paper we describe the investigation of this material and the reconstruction of the photometer.

  6. Current Scientific Progress and Future Scientific Prospects Enabled by Spaceborne Precipitation Radar Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Eric A.; Im, Eastwood; Tripoli, Gregory J.; Yang, Song

    2008-01-01

    First, we examine current scientific progress and understanding that have been possible through use of spaceborne precipitation radar measurements being provided by the TRMM and CloudSat satellites. Second, we look across a future 20-year time frame to assess how and why anticipated improvements in space radar systems will further advance scientific progress into topic areas once considered beyond the realm of space-based remote sensing. JAXA's 13.8 GHz Ku-band cross-track scanning Precipitation Radar (PR) developed for flight on NASA's non-sun-synchronous, diurnally-precessing TRMM satellite, was the first Earth radar flown in space that was designed specifically for precipitation measurement. Its proven accuracy in measuring global rainfall in the tropics and sub-tropics and its unanticipated longevity in continuing these measurements beyond a full decade have established the standards against which all follow-up and future space radars will be evaluated. In regards to the current PR measurement time series, we will discuss a selection of major scientific discoveries and impacts which have set the stage for future radar measuring systems. In fact, the 2nd contemporary space radar applicable for terrestrial precipitation measurement, i.e., JPL-CSA's 94 GHz nadir-staring Cloud Profiling Radar (CPR) flown on NASA's sun-synchronous CloudSat satellite, although designed primarily for measurement of non-precipitating cloud hydrometeors and aerosols, has also unquestionably advanced precipitation measurement because CPR's higher frequency and greatly increased sensitivity (approximately 30 dBZ) has enabled global observations of light rain rate spectrum processes (i.e., rain rates below 0.05 mm per hourand of precipitation processes in the high troposphere (particularly ice phase processes). These processes are beyond reach of the TRMM radar because the PR sensitivity limit is approximately 17 dBZ which means its lower rain rate cutoff is around 0.3 mm per hour and its

  7. The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission: U.S. Program and Science Status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, A.; Azarbarzin, A.; Kakar, R.; Neeck, S.

    2009-04-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission is an international satellite mission designed to unify and advance precipitation measurements from a constellation of research and operational microwave sensors to provide next-generation precipitation data products for scientific research and societal applications. NASA and JAXA will deploy the GPM Core Observatory carrying an advanced radar-radiometer system to serve as a physics observatory and calibration reference for constellation radiometers. NASA will deploy the GPM Low-Inclination Observatory to enhance the near real-time monitoring of hurricanes and mid-latitude storms, and JAXA will contribute data from the Global Change Observation Mission-Water (GCOM-W) satellite. Partnerships are under development to include additional conical-scanning microwave imagers on the French-Indian Megha-Tropiques satellite and U.S. Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) satellites, as well as cross-track scanning humidity sounders on operational satellites such as the National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System (NPOESS) Preparatory Project (NPP), POES, NPOESS, and European MetOp satellites, which are used to improve the precipitation sampling over land. In addition, Brazil has in its national space plan for a GPM low-inclination radiometer, and data from Chinese and Russian microwave radiometers could potentially become available through international collaboration under the auspices of the Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS) and Group on Earth Observations (GEO). As a science mission with integrated application goals, GPM is expected to (1) provide new measurement standards for precipitation estimation from space, (2) improve understanding of precipitation physics, the global water cycle variability, and freshwater availability, and (3) advance weather/climate/hydrological prediction capabilities to directly benefit the society. An overview of the GPM mission concept, program

  8. Simultaneous measurements of waves and precipitating electrons near the equator in the outer radiation belt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imhof, W. L.; Robinson, R. M.; Collin, H. L.; Wygant, J. R.; Anderson, R. R.

    1994-01-01

    An investigation of wave-particle interactions is made using several simultaneous electron and wave measurements performed at near-equatorial positions from the Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite (CRRES) satellite. Bursts of electron precipitation were observed, most frequently at local times near dawn. Examples of bursts are presented in which the fluxes of the precipitating electrons and the wave intensities are correlated with coefficients as high as 0.7. During bursts the frequencies of the enhanced waves spanned a wide range from 311 Hz to 3.11 kHz, and the energies of the enhanced electrons were in the range 1.7 keV to 288 keV. The changes of the precipitating fluxes were generally less pronounced at the lowest energies. On the basis of electron-cyclotron resonant calculations using the cold plasma densities and ambient magnetic fields taken from the CRRES measurements it was found that the wave frequencies and precipitating electron energies were generally consistent with those expected from electron resonance with parallel propagating whistler waves. The electron data of principal concern here were acquired in and about the loss cone with narrow angular resolution spectrometers covering the energy range 340 eV to 5 MeV. The wave data included electric field measurements spanning frequencies from 5 Hz to 400 kHz and magnetic field measurements from 5 Hz to 10 kHz.

  9. Precipitation Estimation Using Combined Radar/Radiometer Measurements Within the GPM Framework

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hou, Arthur

    2012-01-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission is an international satellite mission specifically designed to unify and advance precipitation measurements from a constellation of research and operational microwave sensors. The GPM mission centers upon the deployment of a Core Observatory in a 65o non-Sun-synchronous orbit to serve as a physics observatory and a transfer standard for intersatellite calibration of constellation radiometers. The GPM Core Observatory will carry a Ku/Ka-band Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) and a conical-scanning multi-channel (10-183 GHz) GPM Microwave Radiometer (GMI). The DPR will be the first dual-frequency radar in space to provide not only measurements of 3-D precipitation structures but also quantitative information on microphysical properties of precipitating particles needed for improving precipitation retrievals from microwave sensors. The DPR and GMI measurements will together provide a database that relates vertical hydrometeor profiles to multi-frequency microwave radiances over a variety of environmental conditions across the globe. This combined database will be used as a common transfer standard for improving the accuracy and consistency of precipitation retrievals from all constellation radiometers. For global coverage, GPM relies on existing satellite programs and new mission opportunities from a consortium of partners through bilateral agreements with either NASA or JAXA. Each constellation member may have its unique scientific or operational objectives but contributes microwave observations to GPM for the generation and dissemination of unified global precipitation data products. In addition to the DPR and GMI on the Core Observatory, the baseline GPM constellation consists of the following sensors: (1) Special Sensor Microwave Imager/Sounder (SSMIS) instruments on the U.S. Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) satellites, (2) the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer-2 (AMSR-2) on the GCOM-W1

  10. Solid Precipitation Measurement Intercomparison in Bismarck, North Dakota, from 1988 through 1997

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ryberg, Karen R.; Emerson, Douglas G.; Macek-Rowland, Kathleen M.

    2009-01-01

    A solid precipitation measurement intercomparison was recommended by the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) and was initiated after approval by the ninth session of the Commission for Instruments and Methods of Observation. The goal of the intercomparison was to assess national methods of measuring solid precipitation against methods whose accuracy and reliability were known. A field study was started in Bismarck, N. Dak., during the 1988-89 winter as part of the intercomparison. The last official field season of the WMO intercomparison was 1992-93; however, the Bismarck site continued to operate through the winter of 1996-97. Precipitation events at Bismarck were categorized as snow, mixed, or rain on the basis of descriptive notes recorded as part of the solid precipitation intercomparison. The rain events were not further analyzed in this study. Catch ratios (CRs) - the ratio of the precipitation catch at each gage to the true precipitation measurement (the corrected double fence intercomparison reference) - were calculated. Then, regression analysis was used to develop equations that model the snow and mixed precipitation CRs at each gage as functions of wind speed and temperature. Wind speed at the gages, functions of temperature, and upper air conditions (wind speed and air temperature at 700 millibars pressure) were used as possible explanatory variables in the multiple regression analysis done for this study. The CRs were modeled by using multiple regression analysis for the Tretyakov gage, national shielded gage, national unshielded gage, AeroChem gage, national gage with double fence, and national gage with Wyoming windshield. As in earlier studies by the WMO, wind speed and air temperature were found to influence the CR of the Tretyakov gage. However, in this study, the temperature variable represented the average upper air temperature over the duration of the event. The WMO did not use upper air conditions in its analysis. The national shielded and

  11. Measurement of visible and UV emission from Energetic Neutral Atom Precipitation (ENAP), on Spacelab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tinsley, B. A.

    1980-01-01

    The charge exchange of plasmaspheric ions and exospheric H and O and of solar wind ions with exospheric and interplanetary H are sources of precipitating neutrals whose faint emission may be observed by the imaging spectrometric observatory during dark periods of the SL-1 orbit. Measurements of the interactions of these precipitating atoms with the thermosphere are needed to evaluate the heating and ionization effects on the atmosphere as well as the selective loss of i energetic ions from the sources (predominantly the ring current).

  12. Two-channel rocket photometer for tracing weak optical emissions at night

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogoshev, M. M.; Petkov, N. P.; Stavrakov, T. L.; Kunev, K. D.; Kostadinov, I. N.

    The photometer was developed to determine the vertical profiles of optical emissions in the F-region and to juxtapose them with optical measurements made on board the Intercosmos-Bulgaria-1300 satellite by means of the EMO-5 spectral and spatial scanning photometric system. The photometer contains two optical channels comprising the input blinds, the lenses, and the interference filters. The light signal, measured in intensity, is converted into an electrical signal by means of photoconvertors based on a photomultiplier. The protective blind contains 10 diaphragms, so fabricated and positioned as to lower to the maximum extent the level of the side hum signal entering the apparatus of the optical channel, whose complete visual angle is 15 deg.

  13. Precipitable water estimation from high-resolution split window radiance measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jedlovec, Gary J.

    1990-01-01

    A technique that uses the spatial variance of image brightness temperature to derive total column precipitable water is applied to high-resolution multispectral aircraft scanner data for the June 19, 1986 COHMEX day. The technique has several advantages over other approaches in that it requires only relative calibration accuracy, is less susceptible to instrument error, and does not directly use a priori information. Results indicate significant horizontal variability of precipitable water at the mesoscale. Precipitable water gradients of 6 mm per 10 km are not uncommon. The results verify well against special rawinsonde measurements and the ensuing cloud field development. While only applied to this specialized aircraft data, the applicability of the technique to operational AVHRR and VAS data is discussed.

  14. Precipitable water estimation from high-resolution split window radiance measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jedlovec, Gary J.

    1990-01-01

    A technique that uses the spatial variance of image brightness temperature to derive total column precipitable water is applied to high-resolution multispectral aircraft scanner data for the June 19, 1986 COHMEX day. The technique has several advantages over other approaches in that it requires only relative calibration accuracy, is less susceptible to instrument error, and does not directly use a priori information. Results indicate significant horizontal variability of precipitable water at the mesoscale. Precipitable water gradients of 6 mm per 10 km are not uncommon. The results verify well against special rawinsonde measurements and the ensuing cloud field development. While only applied to this specialized aircraft data, the applicability of the technique to operational AVHRR and VAS data is discussed.

  15. Mars heavy ion precipitating flux as measured by Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leblanc, F.; Modolo, R.; Curry, S.; Luhmann, J.; Lillis, R.; Chaufray, J. Y.; Hara, T.; McFadden, J.; Halekas, J.; Eparvier, F.; Larson, D.; Connerney, J.; Jakosky, B.

    2015-11-01

    In the absence of an intrinsic dipole magnetic field, Mars' O+ planetary ions are accelerated by the solar wind. Because of their large gyroradius, a population of these planetary ions can precipitate back into Mars' upper atmosphere with enough energy to eject neutrals into space via collision. This process, referred to as sputtering, may have been a dominant atmospheric loss process during earlier stages of our Sun. Yet until now, a limited number of observations have been possible; Analyzer of Space Plasmas and Energetic Atoms-3/Mars Express observed such a precipitation only during extreme conditions, suggesting that sputtering might be not as intense as theoretically predicted. Here we describe one example of precipitation of heavy ions during quiet solar conditions. Between November 2014 and April 2015, the average precipitating flux is significant and in agreement with predictions. From these measured precipitating fluxes, we estimate that a maximum of 1.0 × 1024 O/s could have been lost due to sputtering.

  16. Remote sensing of precipitable water over the oceans from Nimbus-7 microwave measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prabhakara, C.; Change, H. D.; Chang, A. T. C.

    1981-01-01

    Global maps of precipitable water over derived from scanning multichannel microwave radiometer (SMMR) data reveal salient features associated with ocean currents and the large scale general circulation in the atmosphere. Nimbus-7 SMMR brightness temperature measurements in the 21 and 18 GHz channels are used to sense the precipitable water in the atmospheric over oceans. The difference in the brightness temperature (T sub 21 -T sub 18), both in the horizontal and vertical polarization, is found to be essentially a function of the precipitable water in the atmosphere. An equation, based on the physical consideration of the radiative transfer in the microwave region, is developed to relate the precipitable water to (T sub 21 - T sub 18). It shows that the signal (T sub 21- T sub 18) does not suffer severely from the noise introduced by variations in the sea surface temperature, surface winds, and liquid water content in non rain clouds. The rms deviation between the estimated precipitable water from SMMR data and that given by the closely coincident ship radiosondes is about 0.25 g/ sq cm

  17. CCD Photometer Installed on the Telescope - 600 OF the Shamakhy Astrophysical Observatory: I. Adjustment of CCD Photometer with Optics - 600

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyuty, V. M.; Abdullayev, B. I.; Alekberov, I. A.; Gulmaliyev, N. I.; Mikayilov, Kh. M.; Rustamov, B. N.

    2009-12-01

    Short description of optical and electric scheme of CCD photometer with camera U-47 installed on the Cassegrain focus of ZEISS-600 telescope of the ShAO NAS Azerbaijan is provided. The reducer of focus with factor of reduction 1.7 is applied. It is calculated equivalent focal distances of a telescope with a focus reducer. General calculations of optimum distance from focal plane and t sizes of optical filters of photometer are presented.

  18. Methods and Results for a Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Validation Network Prototype

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Kenneth R.; Schwaller, Mathew R.

    2010-01-01

    As one component of a ground validation system to meet requirements for the upcoming Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission, a quasi-operational prototype a system to compare satellite- and ground-based radar measurements has been developed. This prototype, the GPM Validation Network (VN), acquires data from the Precipitation Radar (PR) on the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite and from ground radar (GR) networks in the continental U.S. and participating international sites. PR data serve as a surrogate for similar observations from the Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) to be present on GPM. Primary goals of the VN prototype are to understand and characterize the variability and bias of precipitation retrievals between the PR and GR in various precipitation regimes at large scales, and to improve precipitation retrieval algorithms for the GPM instruments. The current VN capabilities concentrate on comparisons of the base reflectivity observations between the PR and GR, and include support for rain rate comparisons. The VN algorithm resamples PR and GR reflectivity and other 2-D and 3-D data fields to irregular common volumes defined by the geometric intersection of the instrument observations, and performs statistical comparisons of PR and GR reflectivity and estimated rain rates. Algorithmic biases and uncertainties introduced by traditional data analysis techniques are minimized by not performing interpolation or extrapolation of data to a fixed grid. The core VN dataset consists of WSR-88D GR data and matching PR orbit subset data covering 21 sites in the southeastern U. S., from August, 2006 to the present. On average, about 3.5 overpass events per month for these WSR-88D sites meet VN criteria for significant precipitation, and have matching PR and GR data available. This large statistical sample has allowed the relative calibration accuracy and stability of the individual ground radars, and the quality of the PR reflectivity

  19. Methods and Results for a Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Validation Network Prototype

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Kenneth R.; Schwaller, Mathew R.

    2010-01-01

    As one component of a ground validation system to meet requirements for the upcoming Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission, a quasi-operational prototype a system to compare satellite- and ground-based radar measurements has been developed. This prototype, the GPM Validation Network (VN), acquires data from the Precipitation Radar (PR) on the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite and from ground radar (GR) networks in the continental U.S. and participating international sites. PR data serve as a surrogate for similar observations from the Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) to be present on GPM. Primary goals of the VN prototype are to understand and characterize the variability and bias of precipitation retrievals between the PR and GR in various precipitation regimes at large scales, and to improve precipitation retrieval algorithms for the GPM instruments. The current VN capabilities concentrate on comparisons of the base reflectivity observations between the PR and GR, and include support for rain rate comparisons. The VN algorithm resamples PR and GR reflectivity and other 2-D and 3-D data fields to irregular common volumes defined by the geometric intersection of the instrument observations, and performs statistical comparisons of PR and GR reflectivity and estimated rain rates. Algorithmic biases and uncertainties introduced by traditional data analysis techniques are minimized by not performing interpolation or extrapolation of data to a fixed grid. The core VN dataset consists of WSR-88D GR data and matching PR orbit subset data covering 21 sites in the southeastern U. S., from August, 2006 to the present. On average, about 3.5 overpass events per month for these WSR-88D sites meet VN criteria for significant precipitation, and have matching PR and GR data available. This large statistical sample has allowed the relative calibration accuracy and stability of the individual ground radars, and the quality of the PR reflectivity

  20. Probabilistic correction of precipitation measurement errors using a Bayesian Model Average Approach applied for the estimation of glacier accumulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moya Quiroga, Vladimir; Mano, Akira; Asaoka, Yoshihiro; Udo, Keiko; Kure, Shuichi; Mendoza, Javier

    2013-04-01

    Precipitation is a major component of the water cycle that returns atmospheric water to the ground. Without precipitation there would be no water cycle, all the water would run down the rivers and into the seas, then the rivers would dry up with no fresh water from precipitation. Although precipitation measurement seems an easy and simple procedure, it is affected by several systematic errors which lead to underestimation of the actual precipitation. Hence, precipitation measurements should be corrected before their use. Different correction approaches were already suggested in order to correct precipitation measurements. Nevertheless, focusing on the outcome of a single model is prone to statistical bias and underestimation of uncertainty. In this presentation we propose a Bayesian model average (BMA) approach for correcting rain gauge measurement errors. In the present study we used meteorological data recorded every 10 minutes at the Condoriri station in the Bolivian Andes. Comparing rain gauge measurements with totalisators rain measurements it was possible to estimate the rain underestimation. First, different deterministic models were optimized for the correction of precipitation considering wind effect and precipitation intensities. Then, probabilistic BMA correction was performed. The corrected precipitation was then separated into rainfall and snowfall considering typical Andean temperature thresholds of -1°C and 3°C. Hence, precipitation was separated into rainfall, snowfall and mixed precipitation. Then, relating the total snowfall with the glacier ice density, it was possible to estimate the glacier accumulation. Results show a yearly glacier accumulation of 1200 mm/year. Besides, results confirm that in tropical glaciers winter is not accumulation period, but a low ablation one. Results show that neglecting such correction may induce an underestimation higher than 35 % of total precipitation. Besides, the uncertainty range may induce differences up

  1. Analysis of single-Alter-shielded and unshielded measurements of mixed and solid precipitation from WMO-SPICE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochendorfer, John; Nitu, Rodica; Wolff, Mareile; Mekis, Eva; Rasmussen, Roy; Baker, Bruce; Earle, Michael E.; Reverdin, Audrey; Wong, Kai; Smith, Craig D.; Yang, Daqing; Roulet, Yves-Alain; Buisan, Samuel; Laine, Timo; Lee, Gyuwon; Aceituno, Jose Luis C.; Alastrué, Javier; Isaksen, Ketil; Meyers, Tilden; Brækkan, Ragnar; Landolt, Scott; Jachcik, Al; Poikonen, Antti

    2017-07-01

    Although precipitation has been measured for many centuries, precipitation measurements are still beset with significant inaccuracies. Solid precipitation is particularly difficult to measure accurately, and wintertime precipitation measurement biases between different observing networks or different regions can exceed 100 %. Using precipitation gauge results from the World Meteorological Organization Solid Precipitation Intercomparison Experiment (WMO-SPICE), errors in precipitation measurement caused by gauge uncertainty, spatial variability in precipitation, hydrometeor type, crystal habit, and wind were quantified. The methods used to calculate gauge catch efficiency and correct known biases are described. Adjustments, in the form of transfer functions that describe catch efficiency as a function of air temperature and wind speed, were derived using measurements from eight separate WMO-SPICE sites for both unshielded and single-Alter-shielded precipitation-weighing gauges. For the unshielded gauges, the average undercatch for all eight sites was 0.50 mm h-1 (34 %), and for the single-Alter-shielded gauges it was 0.35 mm h-1 (24 %). After adjustment, the mean bias for both the unshielded and single-Alter measurements was within 0.03 mm h-1 (2 %) of zero. The use of multiple sites to derive such adjustments makes these results unique and more broadly applicable to other sites with various climatic conditions. In addition, errors associated with the use of a single transfer function to correct gauge undercatch at multiple sites were estimated.

  2. Measurements of charged precipitation in a New Mexico thunderstorm: Lower positive charge centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Thomas C.; Winn, William P.

    1982-08-01

    We designed an instrument to measure the charge and vertical velocity of individual precipitation particles inside thunderclouds. A balloon carried the particle charge instrument, an electric field meter, and a standard meteorological radiosonde upward into thunderclouds over Langmuir Laboratory in central New Mexico. During one balloon flight the instruments encountered two regions of positive charge below the main negative charge center. We identify these positive regions with the lower positive charge centers that have been described in the literature for many years. We find the following points: (1) One region had an estimated total charge of 0.4 C. The other had 2 C. (2) The charge resided on precipitation particles. The particles' charges typically ranged between 10 and 200 pC, but a few particles had charges up to 400 pC. Their diameters lay between an estimated 1-3 mm. The charges were too large to be explained by the polarization induction mechanism. We favor the hypothesis that lightning provided the positive charge in the lower positive charge centers. (3) The motion of the lower positive charge centers enhanced the electrical energy of the storm, but their contribution to the overall electrical budget was small. (4) The field excursions (at the ground) associated with precipitation (FEAWPs) described by C. B. Moore and B. Vonnegut are probably caused by lower positive charge centers descending on precipitation. The larger (2 C) lower positive charge center caused a FEAWP. Negatively charged precipitation particles passed through our instrument near the top of its trajectory just before the balloon was struck by lightning. The charge density on precipitation particles was substantial, but we do not have enough information to comment on the role the particles may have had in generating the main region of negative charge.

  3. Retrieving moisture profiles from precipitable water measurements using a variational data assimilation approach

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Y.R.; Zou, X.; Kuo, Y.H.

    1996-04-01

    Atmospheric moisture distribution is directly related to the formation of clouds and precipitation and affects the atmospheric radiation and climate. Currently, several remote sensing systems can measure precipitable water (PW) with fairly high accuracy. As part of the development of an Integrated Data Assimilation and Sounding System in support of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program, retrieving the 3-D water vapor fields from PW measurements is an important problem. A new four dimensional variational (4DVAR) data assimilation system based on the Penn State/National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) mesoscale model (MM5) has been developed by Zou et al. (1995) with the adjoint technique. In this study, we used this 4DVAR system to retrieve the moisture profiles. Because we do not have a set of real observed PW measurements now, the special soundings collected during the Severe Environmental Storm and Mesoscale Experiment (SESAME) in 1979 were used to simulate a set of PW measurements, which were then assimilated into the 4DVAR system. The accuracy of the derived water vapor fields was assessed by direct comparison with the detailed specific humidity soundings. The impact of PW assimilation on precipitation forecast was examined by conducting a series of model forecast experiments started from the different initial conditions with or without data assimilation.

  4. NIP: the near infrared imaging photometer for Euclid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweitzer, Mario; Bender, Ralf; Katterloher, Reinhard; Eisenhauer, Frank; Hofmann, Reiner; Saglia, Roberto; Holmes, Rory; Krause, Oliver; Rix, Hans-Walter; Booth, Jeff; Fagrelius, Parker; Rhodes, Jason; Seshadri, Suresh; Refregier, Alexandre; Amiaux, Jerome; Augueres, Jean-Louis; Boulade, Olivier; Cara, Christophe; Amara, Adam; Lilly, Simon; Atad-Ettedgui, Eli; di Giorgio, Anna-Maria; Duvet, Ludovic; Kuehl, Christopher; Syed, Mohsin

    2010-07-01

    The NIP is a near infrared imaging photometer that is currently under investigation for the Euclid space mission in context of ESA's 2015 Cosmic Vision program. Together with the visible camera (VIS) it will form the basis of the weak lensing measurements for Euclid. The NIP channel will perform photometric imaging in 3 near infrared bands (Y, J, H) covering a wavelength range from ~ 0.9 to 2 μm over a field of view (FoV) of ~ 0.5 deg2. With the required limiting point source magnitude of 24 mAB (5 sigma) the NIP channel will be used to determine the photometric redshifts of over 2 billion galaxies collected over a wide survey area of 20 000 deg2. In addition to the photometric measurements, the NIP channel will deliver unique near infrared (NIR) imaging data over the entire extragalactic sky, enabling a wide variety of ancillary astrophysical and cosmological studies. In this paper we will present the results of the study carried out by the Euclid Imaging Consortium (EIC) during the Euclid assessment phase.

  5. A new, low-cost sun photometer for student use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espinoza, A.; Pérez-Álvarez, H.; Parra-Vilchis, J. I.; Fauchey-López, E.; Fernando-González, L.; Faus-Landeros, G. E.; Celarier, E. A.; Robinson, D. Q.; Zepeda-Galbez, R.

    2011-12-01

    We have designed a sun photometer for the measurement of aerosol optical thickness (AOT) at 505 nm and 620 nm, using custom-made glass filters (9.5 nm bandpass, FWHM) and photodiodes. The recommended price-point (US150 - US200) allowed us to incorporate technologies such as microcontrollers, a sun target, a USB port for data uploading, nonvolatile memory to contain tables of up to 127 geolocation profiles, extensive calibration data, and a log of up to 2,000 measurements. The instrument is designed to be easy to use, and to provide instant display of AOT estimates. A diffuser in the fore-optics limits the sensitivity to pointing error. We have developed postprocessing software to refine the AOT estimates, format a spreadsheet file, and upload the data to the GLOBE website. We are currently finalizing hardware and firmware, and conducting extensive calibration/validation experiments. These instruments will soon be in production and available to the K-12 education community, including and especially the GLOBE program.

  6. Influence of particle charging on TEOM measurements in the presence of an electrostatic precipitator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, N. K.; Lauber, A.; Nussbaumer, T.; Burtscher, H.

    2008-12-01

    The efficiency of an electrostatic precipitator (ESP) for reducing wood combustion emissions was investigated. Real-time measurements were conducted by directly reading the change in frequency of the tapered element in a Thermo Scientific 1400a TEOM. The measurements have been shown to be influenced by the charge on the aerosols reaching the tapered element such that the TEOM overestimates mass concentration. This electrostatic effect was cross-checked with particle number concentration measurements where no influence was observed. Placing a radioactive neutraliser prior to the TEOM leads to agreement between observed ESP efficiencies as measured by both the TEOM and a CPC.

  7. Influence of particle charging on TEOM measurements in the presence of an electrostatic precipitator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, N. K.; Lauber, A.; Nussbaumer, T.; Burtscher, H.

    2009-03-01

    The efficiency of an electrostatic precipitator (ESP) for reducing wood combustion emissions was investigated. Real-time measurements were conducted by directly reading the change in frequency of the tapered element in a Thermo Scientific 1400a TEOM. These measurements have been shown to be influenced by the charge on the aerosols reaching the tapered element such that the TEOM overestimates mass concentration. This electrostatic effect was crosschecked with particle mass concentration and particle number concentration measurements where no influence was observed. Placing a radioactive neutraliser prior to the TEOM leads to agreement between observed ESP efficiencies as measured by both the TEOM, mass filters and a CPC.

  8. Comparative analysis of precipitation data from the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM, NASA) mission and a national rain gauge network: three case studies in Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vecere, Annibale; Marsigli, Chiara; Martina, Mario; Paccagnella, Tiziana; Monteiro, Ricardo

    2017-04-01

    The study presented here, is focused on a comparative analysis of the precipitation estimates produced by the new NASA mission, Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission, and precipitation data from the Italian rain gauge network (managed by the Italian Civil Protection and provided by ARPA Emilia-Romagna) for three floods occurred in Italy between September and October 2015. In particular, among the different types of available GPM's products, the so called Integrated Multi-satellitE Retrievals for GPM (IMERG) data, which provides rainfall estimates combining data from all passive-microwave instruments in the GPM constellation, has been used. The satellite data is provided into half-hourly 0.1° x 0.1° fields, and, for the present study, an 18 hours latency (so called Near Real Time, Late Run) has been considered. The final goal of the study is to assess the reliability and the accuracy of GPM's precipitation estimates in order to use them as a hazard input for a Rapid Flood Loss Estimation methodology in countries were no precipitation data from a national (or local) rain gauge network is available. The analysis is aimed at comparing both the spatial distribution and statistical properties of the two above mentioned precipitation datasets.

  9. Temperature and precipitation fluctuations in the Czech Republic during the period of instrumental measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brázdil, R.; Zahradníček, P.; Pišoft, P.; Štěpánek, P.; Bělínová, M.; Dobrovolný, P.

    2012-04-01

    The history of early meteorological observations using instruments in the Czech Lands is described (the longest temperature series for Prague-Klementinum starts in 1775, precipitation series for Brno in 1803). Using the PRODIGE method, long-term monthly temperature and precipitation series from selected secular stations were homogenized (for 10 and 12 stations, respectively). All the seasonal and annual temperature series for the common period 1882-2010 show a significant positive linear trend with accelerated warming from the 1970s onwards. No significant linear trends were disclosed in the series of seasonal and annual precipitation totals. Correlation coefficients between the Czech series analysed decrease as distances between measuring stations increase. A sharper decrease of correlations for precipitation totals displays much weaker spatial relationships than those for mean temperatures. The highest correlations between all stations appeared in 1921-1950, the lowest in 1891-1920 (temperature) and 1981-2010 (precipitation). Wavelet analysis reveals that very distinct annual cycles, as well as the slightly weaker semi-annual ones, are better expressed for temperature series than for precipitation. Statistically significant cycles longer than one year are temporally unstable and sporadic for precipitation while in the temperature series cycles of 7.4-7.7a (a = year) and 17.9-18.4a were recorded as significant by all stations in 1882-2010 (quasi-biennial cycle of 2.1-2.2a for half the stations). Czech homogenous temperature series correlate best with those of the Northern Hemisphere for annual, spring and summer values (with significant correlation coefficients between 0.60 and 0.70), but this relation is temporally unstable. Circulation indices, such as the North Atlantic Oscillation Index (NAOI) and the Central European Zonal Index (CEZI) may explain the greater part of Czech temperature variability, especially from December to March and for the winter; however

  10. Temperature and precipitation fluctuations in the Czech Republic during the period of instrumental measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brázdil, Rudolf; Zahradníček, Pavel; Pišoft, Petr; Štěpánek, Petr; Bělínová, Monika; Dobrovolný, Petr

    2012-10-01

    The history of early meteorological observations using instruments in the Czech Lands is described (the longest temperature series for Prague-Klementinum starts in 1775, precipitation series for Brno in 1803). Using the PRODIGE method, long-term monthly temperature and precipitation series from selected secular stations were homogenised (for 10 and 12 stations, respectively). All the seasonal and annual temperature series for the common period 1882-2010 show a significant positive linear trend with accelerated warming from the 1970s onwards. No significant linear trends were disclosed in the series of seasonal and annual precipitation totals. Correlation coefficients between the Czech series analysed decrease as distances between measuring stations increase. A sharper decrease of correlations for precipitation totals displays much weaker spatial relationships than those for mean temperatures. The highest correlations between all stations appeared in 1921-1950, the lowest in 1891-1920 (temperature) and 1981-2010 (precipitation). Wavelet analysis reveals that very distinct annual cycles as well as the slightly weaker semi-annual ones are better expressed for temperature series than for precipitation. Statistically significant cycles longer than 1 year are temporally unstable and sporadic for precipitation, while in the temperature series cycles of 7.4-7.7 and 17.9-18.4 years were recorded as significant by all stations in 1882-2010 (quasi-biennial cycle of 2.1-2.2 years for half the stations). Czech homogenous temperature series correlate best with those of the Northern Hemisphere for annual, spring and summer values (with significant correlation coefficients between 0.60 and 0.70), but this relation is temporally unstable. Circulation indices, such as the North Atlantic Oscillation Index (NAOI) and the Central European Zonal Index (CEZI), may explain the greater part of Czech temperature variability, especially from December to March and for the winter; however

  11. The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission: Overview and U.S. Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hou, Arthur Y.; Azarbarzin, Ardeshir A.; Kakar, Ramesh K.; Neeck, Steven

    2011-01-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission is an international satellite mission specifically designed to unify and advance precipitation measurements from a constellation of research and operational microwave sensors. Building upon the success of the U.S.-Japan Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) of the United States and the Japan Aerospace and Exploration Agency (JAXA) will deploy in 2013 a GPM "Core" satellite carrying a KulKa-band Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) and a conical-scanning multi-channel (10-183 GHz) GPM Microwave Imager (GMI) to establish a new reference standard for precipitation measurements from space. The combined active/passive sensor measurements will also be used to provide common database for precipitation retrievals from constellation sensors. For global coverage, GPM relies on existing satellite programs and new mission opportunities from a consortium of partners through bilateral agreements with either NASA or JAXA. Each constellation member may have its unique scientific or operational objectives but contributes microwave observations to GPM for the generation and dissemination of unified global precipitation data products. In addition to the DPR and GMI on the Core Observatory, the baseline GPM constellation consists of the following sensors: (1) Special Sensor Microwave Imager/Sounder (SSMIS) instruments on the U.S. Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) satellites, (2) the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer- 2 (AMSR-2) on the GCOM-Wl satellite of JAXA, (3) the Multi-Frequency Microwave Scanning Radiometer (MADRAS) and the multi-channel microwave humidity sounder (SAPHIR) on the French-Indian Megha-Tropiques satellite, (4) the Microwave Humidity Sounder (MHS) on the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)-19, (5) MHS instruments on MetOp satellites launched by the European Organisation for the Exploitation of Meteorological

  12. Direct measurement of precipitate induced strain in an Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloy with aberration corrected transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ying, X R; Du, Y X; Song, M; Lu, N; Ye, H Q

    2016-11-01

    Precipitates and their associated strain fields significantly influence mechanical properties and, consequently, the industrial performance of aluminum alloys. In this work, we present a direct measurement of strains induced by η' and η precipitates in an Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloy using aberration-corrected high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and quantitative strain analysis. The results demonstrate that the strain induced by precipitates in the Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloy shows significant tensile strains perpendicular to the longitudinal direction of the precipitate discs on the side of the discs and along the longitudinal direction at both ends of the η' and η precipitates. This strain field can be described by an equivalent dislocation model, in which the lattice mismatch between the precipitate and the matrix is equivalent to a series of dislocation pairs along the precipitate/matrix interfaces.

  13. Modification of mesospheric OH and O3 during a measured highly relativistic electron precipitation event

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, R. A.; Jackman, C. H.; Backer, D. N.; Herrero, F. A.

    1994-01-01

    Highly relativistic electron precipitation events (HRE's) can provide a major source of energy affecting mesospheric constituents and ionization. Based on satellite data, these events are most pronounced near the minimum of the solar sunspot cycle, increasing in intensity, spectral hardness, and frequency of occurrence as the solar cycle declines. Since such events can be sustained up to several days, their integrated effect in the mesosphere can dominate over those of other energy sources such as relativistic electron precipitation events (REP's) and auroral precipitation. The energy deposition data to be discussed and analyzed were obtained by rocket at Poker Flat, Alaska, in May 1990 during a modest HRE observed at midday near the peak of the sunspot cycle. Using a NASA two dimensional model, significant enhancement of OH and depletion of O3 at 75 +/- 10 km altitude from the measured radiation are found. Estimates of enhanced effects were made for more intense HRE events, as might be expected during solar minimum. By causing O3 depletion, the electron precipitation can also regulate the penetration of solar UV radiation, which could affect the thermal properties of the mesosphere.

  14. Tropical intercontinental optical measurement network of aerosol, precipitable water and total column ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holben, B. N.; Tanre, D.; Reagan, J. A.; Eck, T. F.; Setzer, A.; Kaufman, Y. A.; Vermote, E.; Vassiliou, G. D.; Lavenu, F.

    1992-01-01

    A new generation of automatic sunphotometers is used to systematically monitor clear sky total column aerosol concentration and optical properties, precipitable water and total column ozone diurnally and annually in West Africa and South America. The instruments are designed to measure direct beam sun, solar aureole and sky radiances in nine narrow spectral bands from the UV to the near infrared on an hourly basis. The instrumentation and the algorithms required to reduce the data for subsequent analysis are described.

  15. Tropical intercontinental optical measurement network of aerosol, precipitable water and total column ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holben, B. N.; Tanre, D.; Reagan, J. A.; Eck, T. F.; Setzer, A.; Kaufman, Y. A.; Vermote, E.; Vassiliou, G. D.; Lavenu, F.

    1992-01-01

    A new generation of automatic sunphotometers is used to systematically monitor clear sky total column aerosol concentration and optical properties, precipitable water and total column ozone diurnally and annually in West Africa and South America. The instruments are designed to measure direct beam sun, solar aureole and sky radiances in nine narrow spectral bands from the UV to the near infrared on an hourly basis. The instrumentation and the algorithms required to reduce the data for subsequent analysis are described.

  16. Japanese Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission status and application of satellite-based global rainfall map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kachi, Misako; Shimizu, Shuji; Kubota, Takuji; Yoshida, Naofumi; Oki, Riko; Kojima, Masahiro; Iguchi, Toshio; Nakamura, Kenji

    2010-05-01

    As accuracy of satellite precipitation estimates improves and observation frequency increases, application of those data to societal benefit areas, such as weather forecasts and flood predictions, is expected, in addition to research of precipitation climatology to analyze precipitation systems. There is, however, limitation on single satellite observation in coverage and frequency. Currently, the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission is scheduled under international collaboration to fulfill various user requirements that cannot be achieved by the single satellite, like the Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM). The GPM mission is an international mission to achieve high-accurate and high-frequent rainfall observation over a global area. GPM is composed of a TRMM-like non-sun-synchronous orbit satellite (GPM core satellite) and constellation of satellites carrying microwave radiometer instruments. The GPM core satellite carries the Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR), which is being developed by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) and the National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT), and microwave radiometer provided by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). Development of DPR instrument is in good progress for scheduled launch in 2013, and DPR Critical Design Review has completed in July - September 2009. Constellation satellites, which carry a microwave imager and/or sounder, are planned to be launched around 2013 by each partner agency for its own purpose, and will contribute to extending coverage and increasing frequency. JAXA's future mission, the Global Change Observation Mission (GCOM) - Water (GCOM-W) satellite will be one of constellation satellites. The first generation of GCOM-W satellite is scheduled to be launched in 2011, and it carries the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer 2 (AMSR2), which is being developed based on the experience of the AMSR-E on EOS Aqua satellite

  17. The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Microwave Imager (GMI): Instrument Overview and Early On-Orbit Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Draper, David W.; Newell, David A.; Wentz, Frank J.; Krimchansky, Sergey; Jackson, Gail

    2015-01-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission is an international satellite mission that uses measurements from an advanced radar/radiometer system on a core observatory as reference standards to unify and advance precipitation estimates made by a constellation of research and operational microwave sensors. The GPM core observatory was launched on February 27, 2014 at 18:37 UT in a 65? inclination nonsun-synchronous orbit. GPM focuses on precipitation as a key component of the Earth's water and energy cycle, and has the capability to provide near-real-time observations for tracking severe weather events, monitoring freshwater resources, and other societal applications. The GPM microwave imager (GMI) on the core observatory provides the direct link to the constellation radiometer sensors, which fly mainly in polar orbits. The GMI sensitivity, accuracy, and stability play a crucial role in unifying the measurements from the GPM constellation of satellites. The instrument has exhibited highly stable operations through the duration of the calibration/validation period. This paper provides an overview of the GMI instrument and a report of early on-orbit commissioning activities. It discusses the on-orbit radiometric sensitivity, absolute calibration accuracy, and stability for each radiometric channel. Index Terms-Calibration accuracy, passive microwave remote sensing, radiometric sensitivity.

  18. The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Microwave Imager (GMI): Instrument Overview and Early On-Orbit Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Draper, David W.; Newell, David A.; Wentz, Frank J.; Krimchansky, Sergey; Jackson, Gail

    2015-01-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission is an international satellite mission that uses measurements from an advanced radar/radiometer system on a core observatory as reference standards to unify and advance precipitation estimates made by a constellation of research and operational microwave sensors. The GPM core observatory was launched on February 27, 2014 at 18:37 UT in a 65? inclination nonsun-synchronous orbit. GPM focuses on precipitation as a key component of the Earth's water and energy cycle, and has the capability to provide near-real-time observations for tracking severe weather events, monitoring freshwater resources, and other societal applications. The GPM microwave imager (GMI) on the core observatory provides the direct link to the constellation radiometer sensors, which fly mainly in polar orbits. The GMI sensitivity, accuracy, and stability play a crucial role in unifying the measurements from the GPM constellation of satellites. The instrument has exhibited highly stable operations through the duration of the calibration/validation period. This paper provides an overview of the GMI instrument and a report of early on-orbit commissioning activities. It discusses the on-orbit radiometric sensitivity, absolute calibration accuracy, and stability for each radiometric channel. Index Terms-Calibration accuracy, passive microwave remote sensing, radiometric sensitivity.

  19. On improving rainfall and solid precipitation weighing-gauge measurements using laboratory experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colli, Matteo; Landolt, Scott; Rasmussen, Roy; Govanni Lanza, Luca; La Barbera, Paolo

    2013-04-01

    Short interval snowfall, drizzle and light rainfall events can be hard to measure with precipitation gauges due to sampling limitations, wind effects, and noise. The noise observed in the data sampling can often be greater than the detectable signal from a real precipitation event. In addition wind effects can induce differential air pressure on the measurement devices inside the gauges increasing the signal noise. Various algorithms have been devised to help reduce noise and other unwanted effects in precipitation gauge measurements. Most of these algorithms have focused on the removal of wind effects, while others have focused on reducing temperature dependencies. Recent laboratory testing has demonstrated the ability to reproduce some of these anomalies observed in precipitation measurements during field trial campaigns. Assessing the factors contributing to these anomalies is required to accurately simulate these conditions in the laboratory. It is also important to understand these factors to support the selection of the appropriate natural conditions to be simulated in the laboratory environment. This work details the wind-free laboratory testing of some of the above-mentioned effects in order to develop a measurement interpretation algorithm capable of improving the accuracy of the Geonor T-200B vibrating wire gauge and the OTT Pluvio2 weighing gauge. Specifically, these experiments will examine the effects of temperature oscillations on the various gauge components, as well as snow capping and the potential heat-plume problem associated with heating the gauge orifices. These experiments use an artificial snow-generation machine: a snowflake simulation system in which snowflake sizes and snowfall rates can be controlled in a wind-free environment. The positive outcome of this preliminary phase would result in the transfer of the tested methodologies to the on-going WMO Solid Precipitation InterComparison Experiment (SPICE) campaign. The laboratory

  20. A Data Acquisition Program for an Astronomical Photometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergey, N. A.; Hawkins, R. L.; Ellsworth, C. C.; Caton, D. B.

    2005-12-01

    Recently an astronomical photometer was built for use on the 32-inch telescope Appalachian State University's Dark Sky Observatory (DSO). We have written a first version of the software needed to interpret and display the photometer's output in real time. Primary uses for the photometer are standard star photometry, and continuation of our eclipsing binary research when the nearest comparison star is out of the field of view of our CCD cameras. Eventually high-speed photometry will be added the functionality for transient events such as asteroidal occultations. The program is intended to have the ability to be used with all of our other research telescopes at DSO. Goals for this program include gathering and logging photometry data, real time graphing, filter wheel control, and an easy user interface. The code is being developed with the Microsoft(c) Visual Basic .NET framework with C# as the source code.

  1. Regional extreme rainfalls observed globally with 17 years of the Tropical Precipitation Measurement Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takayabu, Yukari; Hamada, Atsushi; Mori, Yuki; Murayama, Yuki; Liu, Chuntao; Zipser, Edward

    2015-04-01

    While extreme rainfall has a huge impact upon human society, the characteristics of the extreme precipitation vary from region to region. Seventeen years of three dimensional precipitation measurements from the space-borne precipitation radar equipped with the Tropical Precipitation Measurement Mission satellite enabled us to describe the characteristics of regional extreme precipitation globally. Extreme rainfall statistics are based on rainfall events defined as a set of contiguous PR rainy pixels. Regional extreme rainfall events are defined as those in which maximum near-surface rainfall rates are higher than the corresponding 99.9th percentile in each 2.5degree x2.5degree horizontal resolution grid. First, regional extreme rainfall is characterized in terms of its intensity and event size. Regions of ''intense and extensive'' extreme rainfall are found mainly over oceans near coastal areas and are likely associated with tropical cyclones and convective systems associated with the establishment of monsoons. Regions of ''intense but less extensive'' extreme rainfall are distributed widely over land and maritime continents, probably related to afternoon showers and mesoscale convective systems. Regions of ''extensive but less intense'' extreme rainfall are found almost exclusively over oceans, likely associated with well-organized mesoscale convective systems and extratropical cyclones. Secondly, regional extremes in terms of surface rainfall intensity and those in terms of convection height are compared. Conventionally, extremely tall convection is considered to contribute the largest to the intense rainfall. Comparing probability density functions (PDFs) of 99th percentiles in terms of the near surface rainfall intensity in each regional grid and those in terms of the 40dBZ echo top heights, it is found that heaviest precipitation in the region is not associated with tallest systems, but rather with systems with moderate heights. Interestingly, this separation

  2. Performance of the Falling Snow Retrieval Algorithms for the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skofronick-Jackson, Gail; Munchak, Stephen J.; Ringerud, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Retrievals of falling snow from space represent an important data set for understanding the Earth's atmospheric, hydrological, and energy cycles, especially during climate change. Estimates of falling snow must be captured to obtain the true global precipitation water cycle, snowfall accumulations are required for hydrological studies, and without knowledge of the frozen particles in clouds one cannot adequately understand the energy and radiation budgets. While satellite-based remote sensing provides global coverage of falling snow events, the science is relatively new and retrievals are still undergoing development with challenges remaining). This work reports on the development and testing of retrieval algorithms for the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission Core Satellite, launched February 2014.

  3. Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Spacecraft Lithium Ion Battery Micro-Cycling Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dakermanji, George; Lee, Leonine; Spitzer, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) spacecraft was jointly developed by NASA and JAXA. It is a Low Earth Orbit (LEO) spacecraft launched on February 27, 2014. The power system is a Direct Energy Transfer (DET) system designed to support 1950 watts orbit average power. The batteries use SONY 18650HC cells and consist of three 8s by 84p batteries operated in parallel as a single battery. During instrument integration with the spacecraft, large current transients were observed in the battery. Investigation into the matter traced the cause to the Dual-Frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) phased array radar which generates cyclical high rate current transients on the spacecraft power bus. The power system electronics interaction with these transients resulted in the current transients in the battery. An accelerated test program was developed to bound the effect, and to assess the impact to the mission.

  4. Precipitation susceptibility in marine stratocumulus and shallow cumulus from airborne measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Eunsil; Albrecht, Bruce A.; Sorooshian, Armin; Zuidema, Paquita; Jonsson, Haflidi H.

    2016-09-01

    Precipitation tends to decrease as aerosol concentration increases in warm marine boundary layer clouds at fixed liquid water path (LWP). The quantitative nature of this relationship is captured using the precipitation susceptibility (So) metric. Previously published works disagree on the qualitative behavior of So in marine low clouds: So decreases monotonically with increasing LWP or cloud depth (H) in stratocumulus clouds (Sc), while it increases and then decreases in shallow cumulus clouds (Cu). This study uses airborne measurements from four field campaigns on Cu and Sc with similar instrument packages and flight maneuvers to examine if and why So behavior varies as a function of cloud type. The findings show that So increases with H and then decreases in both Sc and Cu. Possible reasons for why these results differ from those in previous studies of Sc are discussed.

  5. Photometer Performance Assessment in Kepler Science Data Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jie; Allen, Christopher; Bryson, Stephen T.; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Chandrasekaran, Hema; Clarke, Bruce D.; Gunter, Jay P.; Jenkins, Jon M.; Klaus, Todd C.; Quintana, Elisa V.; Tenenbaum, Peter; Twicken, Joseph D.; Wohler, Bill; Wu, Hayley

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the algorithms of the Photometer Performance Assessment (PPA) software component in the science data processing pipeline of the Kepler mission. The PPA performs two tasks: One is to analyze the health and performance of the Kepler photometer based on the long cadence science data down-linked via Ka band approximately every 30 days. The second is to determine the attitude of the Kepler spacecraft with high precision at each long cadence. The PPA component is demonstrated to work effectively with the Kepler flight data.

  6. Evaluating the Global Precipitation Measurement mission with NOAA/NSSL Multi-Radar Multisensor: current status and future directions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirstetter, P. E.; Petersen, W. A.; Gourley, J. J.; Kummerow, C. D.; Huffman, G. J.; Turk, J.; Tanelli, S.; Maggioni, V.; Anagnostou, E. N.; Hong, Y.; Schwaller, M.

    2016-12-01

    Accurate characterization of uncertainties in precipitation estimates derived from space-borne measurements is critical for many applications including water budget studies or prediction of natural hazards caused by extreme rainfall events. The GPM precipitation Level II (active and passive) and Level III (IMERG) estimates are compared to the high quality and high resolution NEXRAD-based precipitation estimates derived from the NOAA/NSSL's Multi-Radar, Multi-Sensor (MRMS) platform. The MRMS products, after having been adjusted by rain gauges and passing several quality controls and filtering procedures, are 1) accurate with known uncertainty bounds and 2) measured at a resolution below the pixel sizes any GPM estimates, providing great flexibility in matching MRMS samples to grid scales or "footprints". Collectively, these MRMS products provide an independent and consistent reference research framework for directly evaluating post-launch GPM precipitation products across a large number of meteorological regimes as a function of resolution, accuracy and sample size. A comparison framework was developed to examine the consistency of the ground and space-based sensors in term of precipitation detection, typology and quantification. Several aspects of satellite precipitation retrieval are evaluated such as precipitation distributions, separation of systematic biases and random errors, influence of precipitation sub-pixel variability and comparison between satellite products. At the Level II precipitation features are introduced to analyze satellite estimates under various precipitation processes. Prognostic analysis directly provides feedback to algorithm developers on how to improve the satellite estimates. Comparison with TRMM products serves as a benchmark to evaluate GPM precipitation estimates. A the Level III the contribution of Level II is explicitly characterized and a rigorous characterization is performed to migrate across scales fully understanding the

  7. On the consistency of 2-D video disdrometers in measuring microphysical parameters of solid precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernauer, F.; Hürkamp, K.; Rühm, W.; Tschiersch, J.

    2015-08-01

    Detailed characterization and classification of precipitation is an important task in atmospheric research. Line scanning 2-D video disdrometer devices are well established for rain observations. The two orthogonal views taken of each hydrometeor passing the sensitive area of the instrument qualify these devices especially for detailed characterization of nonsymmetric solid hydrometeors. However, in case of solid precipitation, problems related to the matching algorithm have to be considered and the user must be aware of the limited spatial resolution when size and shape descriptors are analyzed. Clarifying the potential of 2-D video disdrometers in deriving size, velocity and shape parameters from single recorded pictures is the aim of this work. The need of implementing a matching algorithm suitable for mixed- and solid-phase precipitation is highlighted as an essential step in data evaluation. For this purpose simple reproducible experiments with solid steel spheres and irregularly shaped Styrofoam particles are conducted. Self-consistency of shape parameter measurements is tested in 38 cases of real snowfall. As a result, it was found that reliable size and shape characterization with a relative standard deviation of less than 5 % is only possible for particles larger than 1 mm. For particles between 0.5 and 1.0 mm the relative standard deviation can grow up to 22 % for the volume, 17 % for size parameters and 14 % for shape descriptors. Testing the adapted matching algorithm with a reproducible experiment with Styrofoam particles, a mismatch probability of less than 3 % was found. For shape parameter measurements in case of real solid-phase precipitation, the 2-DVD shows self-consistent behavior.

  8. The Southern-Appalachians Precipitation Measurement and Hydrology Project - A Prototype for Middle Mountains Everywhere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barros, A. P.; Wilson, A. M.; Tao, J.; Miller, D.

    2012-12-01

    -mountains of the Himalayas and the cloud forests of the American Cordillera. The TRMM (Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission) prompted a great leap forward in our understanding of the water cycle in mountainous regions. However, estimates of rainfall errors indicate that near 90% of the instances when raingauges record rainfall and the PR misses detection correspond to LR events. The upcoming Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission will bring much improved temporal sampling frequency and higher accuracy. Nevertheless, to capture the spatial (and temporal) variability of precipitation in mountainous regions at the resolution required by science and applications, there is a critical need to downscale satellite-based precipitation products to the space-time scales at which hydrological processes work. One approach is the integration of satellite- and ground-based observations and models. This implies that a set of observations can be interpreted and placed in the correct environmental context to provide physically-meaningful constraints to the models. An overview of findings of the Southern-Appalachians Precipitation Measurement (PMM) project including headwater hydrology and ongoing downscaling efforts will be presented.

  9. Using laboratory experiments to improve reliability in rainfall and solid precipitation weighing-gauge measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landolt, S.; Colli, M.; La Barbera, P.; Lanza, L. G.; Rasmussen, R.

    2012-12-01

    Snowfall, drizzle and light rainfall events (defined as events with intensities < 12 mm/h) can often be hard to detect over a short-time resolution due to sampling limitations, wind effects, and noise influencing the weighing-gauge measurements. In many instances, the noise observed in the data sampling can often be greater than the detectable signal from a real precipitation event. Wind can be one of the largest contributors to gauge undercatch, and can also increase noise due to wind pumping on the measurement devices inside the gauges. Various algorithms have been devised to help reduce noise and other unwanted effects in precipitation gauge measurements. Most of these algorithms have focused on the removal of wind effects, while others have focused on reducing temperature dependencies and snow capping. Recent laboratory testing has demonstrated the ability to reproduce some of these anomalies observed in precipitation measurements during field trial campaigns. Assessing the factors contributing to these anomalies is required to accurately simulate these conditions in the laboratory. It is also important to understand these factors to support the selection of the appropriate natural conditions to be simulated in the laboratory environment. Significant research has already been undertaken to measure the influence of wind affecting the gauges. This work details the wind-free laboratory testing of some of the above-mentioned algorithms developed to improve measurement accuracy from the Geonor T-200b vibrating wire gauge and the OTT Pluvio2 weighing gauges. Specifically, these experiments will examine the effects of temperature oscillations and their subsequent effects on the various gauge components, as well as snow capping and the potential heat-plume problem associated with heating the gauges. These experiments employ an artificial snow-generation machine; a snowflake simulation system in which snowflake sizes and snowfall rates can be controlled in a wind

  10. The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission contributions to hydrology and societal applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirschbaum, D.; Huffman, G. J.; Skofronick Jackson, G.

    2016-12-01

    Too much or too little rain can serve as a tipping point for triggering catastrophic flooding and landslides or widespread drought. Knowing when, where and how much rain is falling globally is vital to understanding how vulnerable areas may be more or less impacted by these disasters. The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission provides near real-time precipitation data worldwide that is used by a broad range of end users, from tropical cyclone forecasters to agricultural modelers to researchers evaluating the spread of diseases. The GPM constellation provides merged, multi-satellite data products at three latencies that are critical for research and societal applications around the world. This presentation will outline current capabilities in using accurate and timely information of precipitation to directly benefit society, including examples of end user applications within the tropical cyclone forecasting, disasters response, agricultural forecasting, and disease tracking communities, among others. The presentation will also introduce some of the new visualization and access tools developed by the GPM team.

  11. Evidence of Urban Precipitation Anomalies from Satellite and Ground-Based Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepherd, J. Marshall; Manyin, M.; Negri, Andrew

    2004-01-01

    Urbanization is one of the extreme cases of land use change. Most of world's population has moved to urban areas. Although currently only 1.2% of the land is considered urban, the spatial coverage and density of cities are expected to rapidly increase in the near future. It is estimated that by the year 2025, 60% of the world's population will live in cities. Human activity in urban environments also alters weather and climate processes. However, our understanding of urbanization on the total Earth-weather-climate system is incomplete. Recent literature continues to provide evidence that anomalies in precipitation exist over and downwind of major cities. Current and future research efforts are actively seeking to verify these literature findings and understand potential cause-effect relationships. The novelty of this study is that it utilizes rainfall data from multiple satellite data sources (e.g. TRMM precipitation radar, TRMM-geosynchronous-rain gauge merged product, and SSM/I) and ground-based measurements to identify spatial anomalies and temporal trends in precipitation for cities around the world. Early results will be presented and placed within the context of weather prediction, climate assessment, and societal applications.

  12. Evidence of Urban Precipitation Anomalies from Satellite and Ground-Based Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepherd, J. M.; Manyin, M.; Negri, A.

    2004-01-01

    Urbanization is one of the extreme cases of land use change. Most of world s population has moved to urban areas. Although currently only 1.2% of the land is considered urban, the spatial coverage and density of cities are expected to rapidly increase in the near future. It is estimated that by the year 2025,60% of the world s population will live in cities. Human activity in urban environments also alters weather and climate processes. However, our understanding of urbanization on the total Earth-weather-climate system is incomplete. Recent literature continues to provide evidence that anomalies in precipitation exist over and downwind of major cities. Current and future research efforts are actively seeking to verify these literature findings and understand potential cause- effect relationships. The novelty of this study is that it utilizes rainfall data from multiple satellite data sources (e.g. TRMM precipitation radar, TRMM-geosynchronous-rain gauge merged product, and SSM/I) and ground-based measurements to identify spatial anomalies and temporal trends in precipitation for cities around the world. Early results will be presented and placed within the context of weather prediction, climate assessment, and societal applications.

  13. Three-station measurements of upward vertical wind associated with auroral precipitation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hampton, D. L.; Meriwether, J. W.; Conde, M.

    2014-12-01

    Sustained F-region thermospheric upward vertical winds associated with auroral precipitation were observed by a dedicated Fabry-Perot interferometer observing the OI emission at 630.0 nm at Poker Flat Research Range from 2009 to 2011. The winds are typically 20 to 40 m/s and lasted for the duration of low-energy electron precipitation. Based on these observations we have initiated a three-station campaign to further investigate the relative local time and latitudinal extent of these winds. The three stations are located at Poker Flat Research Range (65.1 N, -147.4 E), Eagle, AK (64.8 N, -141.2 E) and Fort Yukon, AK (66.6 N, -145.2 E). All three stations operated simultaneously from Feb to April of 2014 . We will present initial results from the season especially the correlation between the observed vertical motion and the location and intensity of auroral precipitation as measured by co-located cameras and spectrographs.

  14. Improving the precipitation accumulation analysis using lightning measurements and different integration periods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregow, Erik; Pessi, Antti; Mäkelä, Antti; Saltikoff, Elena

    2017-01-01

    The focus of this article is to improve the precipitation accumulation analysis, with special focus on the intense precipitation events. Two main objectives are addressed: (i) the assimilation of lightning observations together with radar and gauge measurements, and (ii) the analysis of the impact of different integration periods in the radar-gauge correction method. The article is a continuation of previous work by Gregow et al. (2013) in the same research field. A new lightning data assimilation method has been implemented and validated within the Finnish Meteorological Institute - Local Analysis and Prediction System. Lightning data do improve the analysis when no radars are available, and even with radar data, lightning data have a positive impact on the results. The radar-gauge assimilation method is highly dependent on statistical relationships between radar and gauges, when performing the correction to the precipitation accumulation field. Here, we investigate the usage of different time integration intervals: 1, 6, 12, 24 h and 7 days. This will change the amount of data used and affect the statistical calculation of the radar-gauge relations. Verification shows that the real-time analysis using the 1 h integration time length gives the best results.

  15. Measurement of the equilibrium relative humidity for common precipitant concentrations: facilitating controlled dehydration experiments

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, Matthew J.; Russi, Silvia; Bowler, Michael G.; Bowler, Matthew W.

    2012-01-01

    The dehydration of crystals of macromolecules has long been known to have the potential to increase their diffraction quality. A number of methods exist to change the relative humidity that surrounds crystals, but for reproducible results, with complete characterization of the changes induced, a precise humidity-control device coupled with an X-ray source is required. The first step in these experiments is to define the relative humidity in equilibrium with the mother liquor of the system under study; this can often be quite time-consuming. In order to reduce the time spent on this stage of the experiment, the equilibrium relative humidity for a range of concentrations of the most commonly used precipitants has been measured. The relationship between the precipitant solution and equilibrium relative humidity is explained by Raoult’s law for the equilibrium vapour pressure of water above a solution. The results also have implications for the choice of cryoprotectant and solutions used to dehydrate crystals. For the most commonly used precipitants (10–30% PEG 2000–8000), the starting point will be a relative humidity of 99.5%. PMID:22232186

  16. Evidence of Urban Precipitation Anomalies from Satellite and Ground-Based Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepherd, J. Marshall; Manyin, M.; Negri, Andrew

    2004-01-01

    Urbanization is one of the extreme cases of land use change. Most of world's population has moved to urban areas. Although currently only 1.2% of the land is considered urban, the spatial coverage and density of cities are expected to rapidly increase in the near future. It is estimated that by the year 2025, 60% of the world's population will live in cities. Human activity in urban environments also alters weather and climate processes. However, our understanding of urbanization on the total Earth-weather-climate system is incomplete. Recent literature continues to provide evidence that anomalies in precipitation exist over and downwind of major cities. Current and future research efforts are actively seeking to verify these literature findings and understand potential cause-effect relationships. The novelty of this study is that it utilizes rainfall data from multiple satellite data sources (e.g. TRMM precipitation radar, TRMM-geosynchronous-rain gauge merged product, and SSM/I) and ground-based measurements to identify spatial anomalies and temporal trends in precipitation for cities around the world. Early results will be presented and placed within the context of weather prediction, climate assessment, and societal applications.

  17. Relationship of Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission to Global Change Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Eric A.; Starr, David OC. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    In late 2001, the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission was approved as a new start by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). This new mission is motivated by a number of scientific questions that are posed over a range of space and time scales that generally fall within the discipline of the global water and energy cycle (GWEC). Recognizing that satellite rainfall datasets are now a foremost tool for understanding global climate variability out to decadal scales and beyond, for improving weather forecasting, and for producing better predictions of hydrometeorological processes including short-term hazardous flooding and seasonal fresh water resources assessment, a comprehensive and internationally sanctioned global measuring strategy has led to the GPM mission. The GPM mission plans to expand the scope of rainfall measurement through use of a multi-member satellite constellation that will be contributed by a number of world nations. This talk overviews the GPM scientific research program that has been fostered within NASA, then focuses on scientific progress that is being made in various research areas in the course of the mission formulation phase that are of interest to the global change scientific community. This latter part of the talk addresses research issues that have become central to the GPM science implementation plan concerning: (1) the rate of global water cycling through the atmosphere and surface and the relationship of precipitation variability to the sustained rate of the water cycle; (2) the relationship between climate change and cloud macrophysical- microphysical processes; and (3) the general improvement in measuring precipitation at the fundamental microphysical level that will take place during the GPM era and an explanation of how these improvements are expected to come about.

  18. Relationship of Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission to Global Change Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Eric A.; Starr, David OC. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    In late 2001, the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission was approved as a new start by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). This new mission is motivated by a number of scientific questions that are posed over a range of space and time scales that generally fall within the discipline of the global water and energy cycle (GWEC). Recognizing that satellite rainfall datasets are now a foremost tool for understanding global climate variability out to decadal scales and beyond, for improving weather forecasting, and for producing better predictions of hydrometeorological processes including short-term hazardous flooding and seasonal fresh water resources assessment, a comprehensive and internationally sanctioned global measuring strategy has led to the GPM mission. The GPM mission plans to expand the scope of rainfall measurement through use of a multi-member satellite constellation that will be contributed by a number of world nations. This talk overviews the GPM scientific research program that has been fostered within NASA, then focuses on scientific progress that is being made in various research areas in the course of the mission formulation phase that are of interest to the global change scientific community. This latter part of the talk addresses research issues that have become central to the GPM science implementation plan concerning: (1) the rate of global water cycling through the atmosphere and surface and the relationship of precipitation variability to the sustained rate of the water cycle; (2) the relationship between climate change and cloud macrophysical- microphysical processes; and (3) the general improvement in measuring precipitation at the fundamental microphysical level that will take place during the GPM era and an explanation of how these improvements are expected to come about.

  19. MARG - A Low Cost Solid State Microwave Areal Precipitation Measurement System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulitsch, Helmut; Dombai, Ferenc; Cremonini, Roberto; Bechini, Renzo

    2014-05-01

    Water is an essential resource for us so the measurements of its movement throughout the whole cycle is very important. The rainfall is discontinuous in space and in time having large natural variability unlike many other meteorological parameters. The widely used method for getting relatively accurate precipitation data over land is the combination of radar rainfall estimations and rain gauge data. The typically used radar data is coming from long-range weather radars operating in C or S band, or from mini radars operating in X band which is attenuating heavily in strong precipitation. Using such radar data we are facing several constraints: operating costs and limitations of long range radars, X band radars can be blocked totally in heavy thunderstorms even in short range, dual polarization solutions are expensive, etc. Recognizing that an important gap exists in instrumental precipitation measurements over land a consortium has been organized and a project has been established to develop a new measurement device, the so called Microwave Areal Rain Gauge (MARG). MARG is based on FMCW radar principle using solid state transmitter and digital signal processing and operating in C band. The MARG project aims to provide an innovative, real-time, low-cost, user friendly and accurate sensor technology to monitor and to measure continuously the rainfall intensity distribution over an area around some thousand square km. The MARG project proposal has been granted by the EU in FP7-SME-2012 funding scheme. The developed instrument is able to monitor in real-time intensity and spatial distribution of rainfall in rural and urban environments and can be operated by commercial weather data and value-added forecast product suppliers. To achieve sufficient isolation between the transmitter and receiver modules, and to avoid using complex and expensive microwave components, two parabolic antennae are used to transmit and receive the FMCW signal. The radar frontend operates in the

  20. Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Precipitation Data and Services for Research and Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Zhong; Ostrenga, Dana; Teng, William; Kempler, Steven

    2012-01-01

    Precipitation is a critical component of the Earth's hydrological cycle. Launched on 27 November 1997, TRMM is a joint U.S.-Japan satellite mission to provide the first detailed and comprehensive data set of the four-dimensional distribution of rainfall and latent heating over vastly under-sampled tropical and subtropical oceans and continents (40 S - 40 N). Over the past 14 years, TRMM has been a major data source for meteorological, hydrological and other research and application activities around the world. The purpose of this short article is to inform that the NASA Goddard Earth Sciences Data and Information Services Center (GES DISC) provides TRMM archive and near-real-time precipitation data sets and services for research and applications. TRMM data consist of orbital data from TRMM instruments at the sensor s resolution, gridded data at a range of spatial and temporal resolutions, subsets, ground-based instrument data, and ancillary data. Data analysis, display, and delivery are facilitated by the following services: (1) Mirador (data search and access); (2) TOVAS (TRMM Online Visualization and Analysis System); (3) OPeNDAP (Open-source Project for a Network Data Access Protocol); (4) GrADS Data Server (GDS); and (5) Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) Web Map Service (WMS) for the GIS community. Precipitation data application services are available to support a wide variety of applications around the world. Future plans include enhanced and new services to address data related issues from the user community. Meanwhile, the GES DISC is preparing for the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission which is scheduled for launch in 2014.

  1. Comparison of global precipitation climatology products derived from ground- and satellite-based measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhong

    2014-11-01

    Satellite-based products increasingly take an important role in filling data gaps in data sparse regions around the world. In recent years, precipitation products that utilize multi-satellite and multi-sensor datasets have been gaining more popularity than products from a single sensor or satellite. Adjusted with gauge and ground radar data, satellitebased products have been significantly improved. However the history of satellite-based precipitation products is relatively short compared to the length of 30 years in the definition for climatology from the World Meteorological Organization (WMO). For example, the NASA/JAXA Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) has been in operation for over 16 years since 1997. The length of TRMM is far shorter than those from ground observations, raising a question whether TRMM climatology products are good enough for research and applications. In this study, three climatologies derived from ground observations (Global Precipitation Climatology Centre (GPCC) and Willmott and Matsuura (WM)) and a blended product (the TRMM Multi-Satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA) monthly product or 3B43) are compared on a global scale to assess the performance and weaknesses of the TMPAderived climatology. Results show that the 3B43 climatology matches well with the two gauge-based climatologies in all seasons in terms of spatial distribution, zonal means as well as seasonal variations. However, high variations in rain rates are found in light rain regions such as the Sahara Desert. Large negative biases (3B43

  2. Evaluation of TRMM multi-satellite precipitation analysis (TMPA) against terrestrial measurement over a humid sub-tropical basin, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Dheeraj; Gautam, Amar Kant; Palmate, Santosh S.; Pandey, Ashish; Suryavanshi, Shakti; Rathore, Neha; Sharma, Nayan

    2017-08-01

    To support the GPM mission which is homologous to its predecessor, the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM), this study has been undertaken to evaluate the accuracy of Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission multi-satellite precipitation analysis (TMPA) daily-accumulated precipitation products for 5 years (2008-2012) using the statistical methods and contingency table method. The analysis was performed on daily, monthly, seasonal and yearly basis. The TMPA precipitation estimates were also evaluated for each grid point i.e. 0.25° × 0.25° and for 18 rain gauge stations of the Betwa River basin, India. Results indicated that TMPA precipitation overestimates the daily and monthly precipitation in general, particularly for the middle sub-basin in the non-monsoon season. Furthermore, precision of TMPA precipitation estimates declines with the decrease of altitude at both grid and sub-basin scale. The study also revealed that TMPA precipitation estimates provide better accuracy in the upstream of the basin compared to downstream basin. Nevertheless, the detection capability of daily TMPA precipitation improves with increase in altitude for drizzle rain events. However, the detection capability decreases during non-monsoon and monsoon seasons when capturing moderate and heavy rain events, respectively. The veracity of TMPA precipitation estimates was improved during the rainy season than during the dry season at all scenarios investigated. The analyses suggest that there is a need for better precipitation estimation algorithm and extensive accuracy verification against terrestrial precipitation measurement to capture the different types of rain events more reliably over the sub-humid tropical regions of India.

  3. Early Results from the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kachi, Misako; Kubota, Takuji; Masaki, Takeshi; Kaneko, Yuki; Kanemaru, Kaya; Oki, Riko; Iguchi, Toshio; Nakamura, Kenji; Takayabu, Yukari N.

    2015-04-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission is an international collaboration to achieve highly accurate and highly frequent global precipitation observations. The GPM mission consists of the GPM Core Observatory jointly developed by U.S. and Japan and Constellation Satellites that carry microwave radiometers and provided by the GPM partner agencies. The Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) was developed by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) and the National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT), and installed on the GPM Core Observatory. The GPM Core Observatory chooses a non-sun-synchronous orbit to carry on diurnal cycle observations of rainfall from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite and was successfully launched at 3:37 a.m. on February 28, 2014 (JST), while the Constellation Satellites, including JAXA's Global Change Observation Mission (GCOM) - Water (GCOM-W1) or "SHIZUKU," are launched by each partner agency sometime around 2014 and contribute to expand observation coverage and increase observation frequency JAXA develops the DPR Level 1 algorithm, and the NASA-JAXA Joint Algorithm Team develops the DPR Level 2 and DPR-GMI combined Level2 algorithms. JAXA also develops the Global Rainfall Map (GPM-GSMaP) algorithm, which is a latest version of the Global Satellite Mapping of Precipitation (GSMaP), as national product to distribute hourly and 0.1-degree horizontal resolution rainfall map. Major improvements in the GPM-GSMaP algorithm is; 1) improvements in microwave imager algorithm based on AMSR2 precipitation standard algorithm, including new land algorithm, new coast detection scheme; 2) Development of orographic rainfall correction method for warm rainfall in coastal area (Taniguchi et al., 2012); 3) Update of database, including rainfall detection over land and land surface emission database; 4) Development of microwave sounder algorithm over land (Kida et al., 2012); and 5) Development

  4. Rapid and precise determination of ATP using a modified photometer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shultz, David J.; Stephens, Doyle W.

    1980-01-01

    An inexpensive delay timer was designed to modify a commercially available ATP photometer which allows a disposable tip pipette to be used for injecting either enzyme or sample into the reaction cuvette. The disposable tip pipette is as precise and accurate as a fixed-needle syringe but eliminates the problem of sample contamination and decreases analytical time. (USGS)

  5. Testing of a photoelectric photometer. 1: Determination of operational parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawson, D. W.; Tedesco, E. F.

    1976-01-01

    Observations over four months are used to evaluate magnitude and color transformations, extinction coefficients, and a gain table for the photoelectric photometer of the 41 cm. reflector at the Tortugas Mountain site. Ways of increasing the efficiency and accuracy of this system are discussed.

  6. A Performance Comparison for Two Versions of the Vulcan Photometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borucki, W. J.; Caldwell, D. A.; Koch, D. G.; Jenkins, J. M.; Showen, R. L.

    2001-01-01

    Analysis of the images produced by the first version (V1) of the Vulcan photometer indicated that two major sources of noise were sky brightness and image motion. To reduce the effect of the sky brightness, a second version (V2) with a longer focal length and a larger format detector was developed and tested. The first version consisted of 15-centimeter (cm) focal length, F/1.5 Aerojet Delft reconnaissance lens, and a 2048 x 2048 format front-illuminated charged coupled device (CCD) with 9 microns micropixels (Mpixels). The second version used a 30-cm focal length, F/2.5 Kodak AeroEktar lens, and a 4096 x 4096 format CCD with 9 micro pixels. Both have a 49-square-degree field of view (FOV) but the area of the sky subtended by each pixel in the V2 version is one-fourth that of the V1 version. This modification substantially reduces the shot noise due to the sky background and allows fainter stars to be monitored for planetary transits. To remove the data gap and consequent signal-level change caused by flipping the photometer around the declination axis and to reduce image movement on the detector, several other modifications were incorporated. These include modifying the mount and stiffening the photometer and autoguider structures to reduce flexure. This paper compares the performance characteristics of each photometer and discusses tests to identify sources of systematic noise.

  7. A Performance Comparison for Two Versions of the Vulcan Photometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borucki, W. J.; Caldwell, D. A.; Koch, D. G.; Jenkins, J. M.; Showen, R. L.

    2001-01-01

    Analysis of the images produced by the first version (V1) of the Vulcan photometer indicated that two major sources of noise were sky brightness and image motion. To reduce the effect of the sky brightness, a second version (V2) with a longer focal length and a larger format detector was developed and tested. The first version consisted of 15-centimeter (cm) focal length, F/1.5 Aerojet Delft reconnaissance lens, and a 2048 x 2048 format front-illuminated charged coupled device (CCD) with 9 microns micropixels (Mpixels). The second version used a 30-cm focal length, F/2.5 Kodak AeroEktar lens, and a 4096 x 4096 format CCD with 9 micro pixels. Both have a 49-square-degree field of view (FOV) but the area of the sky subtended by each pixel in the V2 version is one-fourth that of the V1 version. This modification substantially reduces the shot noise due to the sky background and allows fainter stars to be monitored for planetary transits. To remove the data gap and consequent signal-level change caused by flipping the photometer around the declination axis and to reduce image movement on the detector, several other modifications were incorporated. These include modifying the mount and stiffening the photometer and autoguider structures to reduce flexure. This paper compares the performance characteristics of each photometer and discusses tests to identify sources of systematic noise.

  8. Functional characteristics of the OGO main body airglow photometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, E. I.; Fowler, W. B.; Blamont, J. E.

    1972-01-01

    The OGO-4 main body airglow photometer used a trialkali cathode photomultiplier to sense light at selected wavelengths between 2500 and 6300A corresponding to important emissions in the aurora and night airglow at emission rates ranging from a few rayleighs to about 200 kilorayleighs. The optical, electronic, and mechanical systems are described in terms of their functional characteristics.

  9. The pioneer study of fog detection and horizontal precipitation measurement at subtropical highland of Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, P. H.; Lai, K. L.

    2010-07-01

    Heavy rainfall in highland caused by the interaction of tropical storms and sharp terrain is one of the major natural disasters in Taiwan. But there is no quantitative measurement on the fog and its horizontal precipitation (HP) to estimate the storage of water by plants in the highland region of Taiwan. In this pioneer study, we studied the fog detection and its horizontal precipitation amount, existence length and monthly variation at Kuan-Wu recreation area in Shei-Pa National Park of Taiwan. The 20-year (1988~2007) record length of meteorological data at Kuan-Wu was analyzed first to build up the background information of the local weather. The FDID (fog detection and interception device) including two fog detectors, two fog collectors and auto-shooting digital camera was delivered in this field program. The parallel experiment indoor with a fog tunnel also confirms the performance of polypropylene net used in FDID. FDID has collected data in the field over one year, and the preliminary results show that some components of FDID present the capability of fog event detection and give quantitative data of fog interception. The digital images in 5-min interval via fog collector data detected over 90% happening of fog event in the data available days. Through the RGB diagnosis in different pixel domains (different distances to the camera) on the digital images, the fog events are distinguished into light, medium and heavy fog events. The characteristics of daily and monthly variations of fog events could be explained through the terrain and local climate effects well. We also found the horizontal precipitation from fog provides ~11% extra water amount in the no-rain days. The happened possibility of fog & stratus cloud with The MTSAT geostationary IR channels by Central Weather Bureau is also validated by the FDID in-situ measurement. It shows that the remote sensing product of fog detection in nighttime has good correlation with FDID ground measurement.

  10. Wind induced errors on solid precipitation measurements: an evaluation using time-dependent turbulence simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colli, Matteo; Lanza, Luca Giovanni; Rasmussen, Roy; Mireille Thériault, Julie

    2014-05-01

    Among the different environmental sources of error for ground based solid precipitation measurements, wind is the main responsible for a large reduction of the catching performance. This is due to the aero-dynamic response of the gauge that affects the originally undisturbed airflow causing the deformation of the snowflakes trajectories. The application of composite gauge/wind shield measuring configurations allows the improvements of the collection efficiency (CE) at low wind speeds (Uw) but the performance achievable under severe airflow velocities and the role of turbulence still have to be explained. This work is aimed to assess the wind induced errors of a Geonor T200B vibrating wires gauge equipped with a single Alter shield. This is a common measuring system for solid precipitation, which constitutes of the R3 reference system in the ongoing WMO Solid Precipitation InterComparison Experiment (SPICE). The analysis is carried out by adopting advanced Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) tools for the numerical simulation of the turbulent airflow realized in the proximity of the catching section of the gauge. The airflow patterns were computed by running both time-dependent (Large Eddies Simulation) and time-independent (Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes) simulations. on the Yellowstone high performance computing system of the National Center for Atmospheric Research. The evaluation of CE under different Uw conditions was obtained by running a Lagrangian model for the calculation of the snowflakes trajectories building on the simulated airflow patterns. Particular attention has been paid to the sensitivity of the trajectories to different snow particles sizes and water content (corresponding to dry and wet snow). The results will be illustrated in comparative form between the different methodologies adopted and the existing infield CE evaluations based on double shield reference gauges.

  11. The Vertical Characteristics of Temperature inside Summer Monsoon Precipitating Clouds as Measured by TRMM PR and IGRA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Yun-Fei

    2017-04-01

    To reveal the nature of the vertical structure of temperature and humidity inside precipitating clouds, a quasi-spatiotemporal synchronization dataset of temperature and humidity profiles, collocated with precipitation profiles, is generated in this study by merging Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Precipitation Radar (PR) and the Integrated Global Radiosonde Archive (IGRA) from 1998 to 2012. Based on this dataset, the characteristics of precipitation, temperature, humidity and convective available potential energy (CAPE) in the East Asian Summer Monsoon (EASM) region and Indian Summer Monsoon (ISM) region are investigated. Case studies indicate wet air in the atmospheric column inside deep convective precipitating clouds, together with weak wind in the upper atmosphere; while for stratiform precipitating clouds, wet air occurs below the layer of 850 hPa, accompanied by decreasing humidity and strengthening wind with height. Statistics illustrate a heavier precipitation intensity in the EASM region than in the ISM region, and the heights of storm tops can reach 17 km and 12 km for convective and stratiform precipitation, respectively, in the EASM region. Usually, the height of storm tops in the ISM is 1 km lower than that in the EASM region. Moreover, results also indicate that convective precipitation in the ISM is greatly impacted by the propagation of the monsoon. The significant difference of temperature for the precipitation scenario between the EASM region and ISM region also appears near the surface, i.e. about 4°C higher in the ISM than in the EASM region. Generally, relative dryer air occurs inside convective precipitating clouds in the ISM region, as compared to in the EASM region, and there is a larger CAPE precipitation scenario in the ISM region than in the EASM region.

  12. High resolution hydrological modeling with measured precipitation data for the city of Amsterdam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Vossen, Jojanneke; Schuurmans, Hanneke; Siemerink, Martijn; van Leeuwen, Elgard; Oudhuis, Richard

    2014-05-01

    Assessing measures to reduce flooding in densely populated urban areas require a high level of detail to properly analyse the hydrological response to precipitation events. This means detailed data (for example elevation and landuse) and fast models that can cope with this level of detail. This also indicates the value of having a similar level of detail in precipitation data. We present an approach in which Dutch National Rainfall Radar data are combined with a new approach to hydrological modeling called 3di. This is illustrated for a case in the city of Amsterdam to assess the effects of precipitation events and the possibilities for suitable measures in the public space to reduce the effects of flooding. Dutch National Rainfall Radar is a consortium of water authorities and the industry and scientific experts/universities/research centers to improve the available radar data in the Netherlands. This is achieved by making a composite of the radar stations in The Netherlands together with German and Belgian radar stations. In addition, the composite image is calibrated with local rainfall stations. 3Di is a novel approach to calculate the hydrological response of catchments as a function of properties, such as surface elevation and land use. Because of the ability of the model to take the detail of the elevation and land-use (both 0,5x0m5 meter) into the calculations, this model allows for a very detailed modeling of the hydrological response of urban areas to precipitation events. In addition, the model is extremely fast and allows for real-time and interactive changes in the geometry, making it a very powerful tool to assess the effects of measures in the public space for reducing flooding. We illustrate this approach for a case for the city of Amsterdam, a densely populated, low-lying city in The Netherlands. The obtained level of detail allows to study which houses are flooded, which roads remain available for emergency services etc. The model is used to show

  13. 21 CFR 862.2300 - Colorimeter, photometer, or spectrophotometer for clinical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Colorimeter, photometer, or spectrophotometer for... Clinical Laboratory Instruments § 862.2300 Colorimeter, photometer, or spectrophotometer for clinical use. (a) Identification. A colorimeter, a photometer, or a spectrophotometer for clinical use is an...

  14. 21 CFR 862.2300 - Colorimeter, photometer, or spectrophotometer for clinical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Colorimeter, photometer, or spectrophotometer for... Clinical Laboratory Instruments § 862.2300 Colorimeter, photometer, or spectrophotometer for clinical use. (a) Identification. A colorimeter, a photometer, or a spectrophotometer for clinical use is an...

  15. 21 CFR 862.2300 - Colorimeter, photometer, or spectrophotometer for clinical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Colorimeter, photometer, or spectrophotometer for... Clinical Laboratory Instruments § 862.2300 Colorimeter, photometer, or spectrophotometer for clinical use. (a) Identification. A colorimeter, a photometer, or a spectrophotometer for clinical use is an...

  16. 21 CFR 862.2300 - Colorimeter, photometer, or spectrophotometer for clinical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Colorimeter, photometer, or spectrophotometer for... Clinical Laboratory Instruments § 862.2300 Colorimeter, photometer, or spectrophotometer for clinical use. (a) Identification. A colorimeter, a photometer, or a spectrophotometer for clinical use is an...

  17. 21 CFR 862.2300 - Colorimeter, photometer, or spectrophotometer for clinical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Colorimeter, photometer, or spectrophotometer for... Clinical Laboratory Instruments § 862.2300 Colorimeter, photometer, or spectrophotometer for clinical use. (a) Identification. A colorimeter, a photometer, or a spectrophotometer for clinical use is an...

  18. Current status of the dual-frequency precipitation radar on the global precipitation measurement core spacecraft and the new version of GPM standard products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furukawa, K.; Nio, T.; Konishi, T.; Masaki, T.; Kubota, T.; Oki, R.; Iguchi, T.

    2016-10-01

    The Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) on the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) core satellite was developed by Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) and National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT). The objective of the GPM mission is to observe global precipitation more frequently and accurately. The GPM core satellite is a joint product of National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), JAXA and NICT. NASA developed the satellite bus and the GPM Microwave Imager (GMI), and JAXA and NICT developed the DPR. The inclination of the GPM core satellite is 65 degrees, and the nominal flight altitude is 407 km. The non-sunsynchronous circular orbit is necessary for measuring the diurnal change of rainfall. The DPR consists of two radars, which are Ku-band precipitation radar (KuPR) and Ka-band precipitation radar (KaPR). GPM core observatory was successfully launched by H2A launch vehicle on Feb. 28, 2014. DPR keeps its performances on orbit after launch. DPR products were released to the public on Sep. 2, 2014. JAXA is continuing DPR trend monitoring, calibration and validation operations to confirm that DPR keeps its function and performance on orbit. JAXA have started to provide new version (Version 4) of GPM standard products on March 3, 2016. Various improvements of the DPR algorithm were implemented in the Version 4 product. Moreover, the latent heat product based on the Spectral Latent Heating (SLH) algorithm is available since Version 4 product. Current orbital operation status of the GPM/DPR and highlights of the Version 4 product are reported.

  19. Surge Pressure Mitigation in the Global Precipitation Measurement Mission Core Propulsion System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scroggins, Ashley R.; Fiebig, Mark D.

    2014-01-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission is an international partnership between NASA and JAXA whose Core spacecraft performs cutting-edge measurements of rainfall and snowfall worldwide and unifies data gathered by a network of precipitation measurement satellites. The Core spacecraft's propulsion system is a blowdown monopropellant system with an initial hydrazine load of 545 kg in a single composite overwrapped propellant tank. At launch, the propulsion system contained propellant in the tank and manifold tubes upstream of the latch valves, with low-pressure helium gas in the manifold tubes downstream of the latch valves. The system had a relatively high beginning-of- life pressure and long downstream manifold lines; these factors created conditions that were conducive to high surge pressures. This paper discusses the GPM project's approach to surge mitigation in the propulsion system design. The paper describes the surge testing program and results, with discussions of specific difficulties encountered. Based on the results of surge testing and pressure drop analyses, a unique configuration of cavitating venturis was chosen to mitigate surge while minimizing pressure losses during thruster maneuvers. This paper concludes with a discussion of overall lessons learned with surge pressure testing for NASA Goddard spacecraft programs.

  20. Variability of precipitation in complex terrain and the investigation of representativeness of measurements for the Matre catchment area, Western Norway.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skjerdal, M.; Reuder, J.; Villanger, F.

    2009-04-01

    Orography is strongly affecting precipitation. Especially over complex terrain, the precipitation fields can show high spatial variability even over very small scales. Along the Western coast of Norway with its large precipitation amounts of up to above 3000 mm per year, an improved understanding of the spatial precipitation patterns is of large socio-economic impact, as it can improve both the prediction of floods and landslides and the water management for hydro power plants. The producers of hydroelectric power continuously want the water resources to be utilized in the best suited way. Control and supervision of the water resources are therefore of the utmost economic importance. To get an overview over the water resource situation, it is essential to know about the spatial and temporal distribution of precipitation. In cooperation with the Norwegian power company BKK, 20 HOBO rain gauges and two Aanderaa weather stations have been deployed between 22 and 898 meters above sea level in the catchment area for the Matre water system in Western Norway in the period May - October 2009. The main purpose of the project is to investigate the horizontal variability and the altitude dependence of precipitation in complex terrain under different synoptic conditions in this catchment area. Moreover, the representativeness of a few single point measurements on the total precipitation amount of the whole catchment area has been addressed. The total amount of precipitation recorded by the 20 rain gauges during the deployment period ranges between 535 mm and 1190 mm, which indicate the large variability within the catchment area. Analysis of the data with respect to wind direction shows that 75 % of the total precipitation amount during the measurement period arrives when the wind direction is S - SW. During a high precipitation event, which will be investigated in more detail, amounts of precipitation between 58 mm - 121 mm within a 24-hour period have been observed during a

  1. Dual-channel filter photometer system for biocomponent content determination in diesel oil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gołębiowski, Jacek; Prohuń, Tomasz

    2008-07-01

    Currently, infrared spectrometry is the most often used method of determination of the biocomponent content in diesel oil, but this is also an expensive and time-consuming process. In this study, a portable, low-cost dual-channel filter photometer system is presented which meets the requirements of the European standard for biocomponent concentration measurements in diesel fuel. The results obtained using this novel system are reported and compared to the measurements made using a standard infrared spectrometer for biodiesel concentration between 0% and 20% by weight. The advantages of the new system, such as its adaptability to the different environmental conditions of analysis, are also discussed.

  2. Extracting gridded probability density functions for precipitation intensity from point measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haerter, Jan; Eggert, Bastian; Moseley, Christopher; Piani, Claudio; Berg, Peter

    2016-04-01

    A common complication arising in comparisons of modeled data, e.g. from regional climate models or re-analysis, to measurements, e.g. rain gauge data collected at a single position, is that the resolutions do not match. Thereby, a direct comparison of the probability density functions of precipitation rates is not possible, since the gridded data represent an average over an area and a time interval while the point data represent only a temporal average. The spatial resolution of the point data can be considered "infinitely high". This especially constitutes an obstacle in statistical downscaling approaches such as statistical bias correction, or the proper assessment of extremes as computed by climate models. It is well known from the Taylor hypothesis that considerable spatio-temporal information about a dynamical process, such as the eddies of the atmospheric flow, is already contained in a point measurement. Applying the Taylor hypothesis to the statistical distribution functions of precipitation intensity, we show that a gridded spatio-temporal process can be approximated very well by the zero-dimensional analog, i.e. the statistics at a single point. All that needs to be done is to use a coarser temporal resolution for the point timeseries, when comparing to the gridded data, i.e. much better results can be achieved when coarsening the resolution of the point data. The remaining question is, how to extract the proper "scale-adapted" temporal resolution in practice, when only an observed point timeseries and some gridded model data sets are available. We show that this is indeed possible by use of the model alone. Indeed, we find that models which misrepresent precipitation intensity, still serve well in producing proper scale-adaptation, i.e. the model is sufficient in representing larger-scale atmospheric dynamics even though precipitation formation is misrepresented. Our results may have relevance to improved statistical downscaling as well as the

  3. In situ measurements and radar observations of a severe storm - Electricity, kinematics, and precipitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byrne, G. J.; Few, A. A.; Stewart, M. F.; Conrad, A. C.; Torczon, R. L.

    1987-01-01

    Electric field measurements made inside a multicell severe storm in Oklahoma in 1983 with a balloon-borne instrument are presented. The properties of the electric charge regions, such as altitude, thickness, and charge concentrations, are studied. These measurements are analzyed with meteorological measurements of temperature and humidity, and balloon tracking and radar observations. The relation between the electric charge structure and the precipitation and kinematic features of the storm is examined. The data reveal that the cell exhibits a bipolar charge structure with negative charge below positive charge. The average charge concentrations of the two regions are estimated as -1.2 and 0.15 nC/cu m, respectively; the upper positive charge is about 6 km in vertical extent, and the lower negative charge is less than 1 km in vertical extent.

  4. In situ measurements and radar observations of a severe storm - Electricity, kinematics, and precipitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byrne, G. J.; Few, A. A.; Stewart, M. F.; Conrad, A. C.; Torczon, R. L.

    1987-01-01

    Electric field measurements made inside a multicell severe storm in Oklahoma in 1983 with a balloon-borne instrument are presented. The properties of the electric charge regions, such as altitude, thickness, and charge concentrations, are studied. These measurements are analzyed with meteorological measurements of temperature and humidity, and balloon tracking and radar observations. The relation between the electric charge structure and the precipitation and kinematic features of the storm is examined. The data reveal that the cell exhibits a bipolar charge structure with negative charge below positive charge. The average charge concentrations of the two regions are estimated as -1.2 and 0.15 nC/cu m, respectively; the upper positive charge is about 6 km in vertical extent, and the lower negative charge is less than 1 km in vertical extent.

  5. Simultaneous equatorial measurements of waves and precipitating electrons in the outer radiation belt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imhof, W. L.; Robinson, R. M.; Collin, H. L.; Wygant, J. R.; Anderson, R. R.

    1992-01-01

    Simultaneous wave and precipitating electron measurements near the equator in the outer radiation belt have been made from the CRRES satellite. The electron data of principal concern here were acquired in and about the loss cone with narrow angular resolution spectrometers covering the energy range 340 eV to 5 MeV. The wave data included electric field measurements spanning frequencies from 5 Hz to 400 kHz and magnetic field measurements from 5 Hz to 10 kHz. This paper presents examples in which the variations in electron fluxes in the loss cone and the wave intensities were correlated. These variations in electron flux were confined to pitch angles less than about 30 deg. The association between the flux enhancements and the waves is consistent with wave-induced pitch angle diffusion processes.

  6. Advances in Understanding Global Water Cycle with Advent of Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Eric A.; Starr, David (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Within this decade the internationally organized Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission will take an important step in creating a global precipitation observing system from space. One perspective for understanding the nature of GPM is that it will be a hierarchical system of datastreams beginning with very high caliber combined dual frequency radar/passive microwave (PMW) rain-radiometer retrievals, to high caliber PMW rain-radiometer only retrievals, and then on to blends of the former datastreams with additional lower-caliber PMW-based and IR-based rain retrievals. Within the context of the now emerging global water & energy cycle (GWEC) programs of a number of research agencies throughout the world, GPM serves as a centerpiece space mission for improving our understanding of the global water cycle from a global measurement perspective. One of the salient problems within our current understanding of the global water and energy cycle is determining whether a change in the rate of the water cycle is accompanying changes in climate, e.g., climate warming. As there are a number of ways in which to define a rate-change of the global water cycle, it is not entirely clear as to what constitutes such a determination. This paper presents an overview of the GPM Mission and how its observations can be used within the framework of the oceanic and continental water budget equations to determine whether a given perturbation in precipitation is indicative of an actual rate change in the global water cycle, consistent with required responses in water storage and/or water flux transport processes, or whether it is the natural variability of a fixed rate cycle.

  7. Advances in Understanding Global Water Cycle with Advent of Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Eric A.; Starr, David (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Within this decade the internationally organized Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission will take an important step in creating a global precipitation observing system from space. One perspective for understanding the nature of GPM is that it will be a hierarchical system of datastreams beginning with very high caliber combined dual frequency radar/passive microwave (PMW) rain-radiometer retrievals, to high caliber PMW rain-radiometer only retrievals, and then on to blends of the former datastreams with additional lower-caliber PMW-based and IR-based rain retrievals. Within the context of the now emerging global water & energy cycle (GWEC) programs of a number of research agencies throughout the world, GPM serves as a centerpiece space mission for improving our understanding of the global water cycle from a global measurement perspective. One of the salient problems within our current understanding of the global water and energy cycle is determining whether a change in the rate of the water cycle is accompanying changes in climate, e.g., climate warming. As there are a number of ways in which to define a rate-change of the global water cycle, it is not entirely clear as to what constitutes such a determination. This paper presents an overview of the GPM Mission and how its observations can be used within the framework of the oceanic and continental water budget equations to determine whether a given perturbation in precipitation is indicative of an actual rate change in the global water cycle, consistent with required responses in water storage and/or water flux transport processes, or whether it is the natural variability of a fixed rate cycle.

  8. Spectral type of auroral precipitating electrons estimated from optical and cosmic noise absorption measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Y.-M.; Kubota, M.; Ishii, M.; Monzen, Y.; Murayama, Y.; Mori, H.; Lummerzheim, D.

    2006-11-01

    We estimate the energy spectra of precipitating electrons from optical emissions and cosmic noise absorption (CNA) that were observed with the all-sky imager (ASI) and the 16 × 16-element imaging riometer at Poker Flat Research Range (PFRR) (65.11° N, 147.42° W), Alaska. Maxwellian energy parameters (peak energy and total energy flux) are derived from the auroral spectroscopic emissions according to the conventional photometric method. We theoretically estimate CNA from the derived Maxwellian spectra and compare it with the observed CNA. The difference between the estimated CNA and the observed (δCNA) is used as an indicator of the difference in high-energy electron flux (E > ˜20 keV) between the actual energy distribution and Maxwellian. This analysis is carried out for two substorm events in the evening sector to show the temporal and spatial variations of the energy spectra. Event 1 exhibits two arcs of CNA during the growth phase of the substorm. The results for this event suggest that the energy spectra of the two CNA arcs have different shapes, and this difference is revealed in the precipitating electron flux quasi-simultaneously measured by NOAA-17. Event 2 is a typical substorm that consists of growth, expansion, and recovery phases. The δCNA changes throughout the course of the substorm, which can be consistently explained by the energy spectrum variation of the precipitating electrons measured in previous studies. Furthermore, the energy spectra consistent for both optical and CNA data are estimated by assuming a kappa or a Gaussian distribution. This estimation method based on ground observations of the energy spectra has the potential to provide significant information on substorms.

  9. Electro-Optics of an Experimental Quantum-Optical Photometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomos, N. H.

    2010-07-01

    The first working version of a new ultrafast three-beam photon counting photometer (QOP) has been materialized and demonstrated by the Applied Physics / Electro-optics Laboratory of the Hellenic Naval Academy in Piraeus. The QOP has been installed on the new 0.51m TVD telescope. The instrument is currently being used for quantum-optical study of atmospheric transmission in green monochromatic light over slant paths, at the RFK/Eudoxos Observatories. Actively quenched Single Photon Avalanche Diode detectors can be interchangeably deployed in addition to PMTs and LLL-CCDs. It is also intended for the testing of various approaches for solving the difficult problem of coupling light efficiently to the very small sensitive areas of SPADS, either using fiber couplers, or novel technologies like dedicated fiber tapers. Some particulars of the instrument design philosophy and its optomechanical construction are very briefly mentioned further below. However, it is appropriate to comment, firstly, on its purpose/rationale: The successful formalism of Glauber that led to the quantum-optical framework pertinent to the study of light in the terrestrial laboratories could, perhaps, be proven equally fruitful if applied to celestial light as well. Adopting the new idea of describing an arbitrary light state in terms of coherence functions, it is easily concluded that conventional astronomical instrumentation measures only spatial (imaging) or temporal (spectroscopy) coherence properties of the incoming photon stream. However, higher order spatiotemporal coherence (manifested as correlations among separated photon detection events) convey blueprints of the emission mechanism itself or even of the photon scattering history written in the course of the long path from the emitter to the telescope. To extract this information, high photon fluxes and unprecedented timing resolutions are needed. Our gradual entrance to the era of Extremely Large Telescopes combined with certain new

  10. Global Precipitation Measurement. Report 1; Summary of the First GPM Partners Planning Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepherd, J. Marshall; Mehta, Amita; Smith, Eric A. (Editor); Adams, W. James (Editor)

    2002-01-01

    This report provides a synopsis of the proceedings of the First Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Partners Planning Workshop held at the University of Maryland, College Park, from May 16 to 18, 2001. GPM consists of a multi-member global satellite constellation (i.e., an international set of satellite missions) and the accompanying scientific research program, with the main goal of providing frequent, accurate, and globally distributed precipitation measurements essential in understanding several fundamental issues associated with the global water and energy cycle (GWEC). The exchange of scientific and technical information at this and subsequent GPM workshops between representatives from around the world represents a key step in the formulation phase of GPM mission development. The U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Agency (NASA), the National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA), and other interested agencies from nations around the world seek to observe, understand, and model the Earth system to learn how it is changing and what consequences these changes have on life, particularly as they pertain to hydrological processes and the availability of fresh water resources. GWEN processes are central to a broader understanding of the Earth system.

  11. Analysis of a vortex precipitation event over Southwest China using AIRS and in situ measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Chengcheng; Li, Guoping; Xiong, Xiaozhen

    2017-04-01

    A strong precipitation event caused by the southwest vortex (SWV), which affected Sichuan Province and Chongqing municipality in Southwest China on 10-14 July 2012, is investigated. The SWV is examined using satellite observations from AIRS (Atmospheric Infrared Sounder), in situ measurements from the SWV intensive observation campaign, and MICAPS (Marine Interactive Computer-Aided Provisioning System) data. Analysis of this precipitation process revealed that: (1) heavy rain occurred during the development phase, and cloud water content increased significantly after the dissipation of the SWV; (2) the area with low outgoing longwave radiation values from AIRS correlated well with the SWV; (3) variation of the temperature of brightness blackbody (TBB) from AIRS reflected the evolution of the SWV, and the values of TBB reduced significantly during the SWV's development; and (4) strong temperature and water vapor inversions were noted during the development of the SWV. The moisture profile displayed large vertical variation during the SWV's puissant phase, with the moisture inversion occurring at low levels. The moisture content during the receding phase was significantly reduced compared with that during the developing and puissant phases. The vertical flux of vapor divergence explained the variation of the moisture profile. These results also indicate the potential for using AIRS products in studying severe weather over the Tibetan Plateau and its surroundings, where in situ measurements are sparse.

  12. Global variability of precipitation according to the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haddad, Ziad S.; Meagher, Jonathan P.; Adler, Robert F.; Smith, Eric A.; Im, Eastwood; Durden, Stephen L.

    2004-01-01

    Numerous studies have documented the effect of El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) on rainfall in many regions of the globe. The question of whether ENSO is the single most important factor in interannual rainfall variability has received less attention, mostly because the kind of data that would be required to make such an assessment were simply not available. Until 1979 the evidence linking El Nino with changes in rainfall around the world came from rain gauges measuring precipitation over land masses and a handful of islands. From 1980 until the launch of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) in November 1997 the remote sensing evidence was confined to ocean rainfall because of the very poor sensitivity of the instruments over land. In this paper we summarize the results of a principal component analysis of TRMM's 60-month (January 1998 to December 2002) global land and ocean remote-sensing record of monthly rainfall accumulations. Contrary to the first principal component of the rainfall itself, the first three indices of the anomaly are most sensitive to precipitation over the ocean rather than over the land. With the help of archived surface station data the first TRMM rain anomaly index is extended back several decades. Comparison of the extended index with the Southern Oscillation Index confirms that the first principal component of the rainfall anomaly is strongly correlated with the ENSO indices.

  13. Global variability of precipitation according to the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haddad, Ziad S.; Meagher, Jonathan P.; Adler, Robert F.; Smith, Eric A.; Im, Eastwood; Durden, Stephen L.

    2004-01-01

    Numerous studies have documented the effect of El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) on rainfall in many regions of the globe. The question of whether ENSO is the single most important factor in interannual rainfall variability has received less attention, mostly because the kind of data that would be required to make such an assessment were simply not available. Until 1979 the evidence linking El Nino with changes in rainfall around the world came from rain gauges measuring precipitation over land masses and a handful of islands. From 1980 until the launch of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) in November 1997 the remote sensing evidence was confined to ocean rainfall because of the very poor sensitivity of the instruments over land. In this paper we summarize the results of a principal component analysis of TRMM's 60-month (January 1998 to December 2002) global land and ocean remote-sensing record of monthly rainfall accumulations. Contrary to the first principal component of the rainfall itself, the first three indices of the anomaly are most sensitive to precipitation over the ocean rather than over the land. With the help of archived surface station data the first TRMM rain anomaly index is extended back several decades. Comparison of the extended index with the Southern Oscillation Index confirms that the first principal component of the rainfall anomaly is strongly correlated with the ENSO indices.

  14. The comparison of IR and MW ground-based measurements of total precipitable water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezin, I. A.; Virolainen, Ya. A.; Timofeyev, Yu. M.; Poberovskii, A. V.

    2016-05-01

    Water vapor is one of the basic climate gases playing a key role in various processes at different altitudes of the Earth's atmosphere. An intercomparison and validation of different total precipitable water (TPW) measurement methods are important for determining the true accuracy of these methods, the shared use of data from multiple sources, the creation of data archives of different measurements, etc. In this paper, the TPW values obtained from measurements of solar IR spectral radiation (~8-9 μm absorption band) and thermal MW radiation of the atmosphere (1.35 cm absorption line) for 138 days of observation are compared. Measurements have been carried out from March 2013 to June 2014 at Peterhof station of the St. Petersburg State University in (59.88° N, 29.82° E). It is shown that MW measurements usually give higher TPW values than IR measurements. The bias between the two methods varies from 1 to 8% for small and large TPW values, respectively. With increasing TPW values, the bias reduces and for TPW > 1 cm it is ~1%. Standard deviation (SD) between the two methods reaches 7% for TPW < 0.4 cm and 3-5% for TPW > 1 cm. These data show the high quality of both remote sensing methods. Moreover, the IR measurements have a higher accuracy than MW measurements for small TPW values.

  15. Comparison of precipitation chemistry measurements obtained by the Canadian Air and Precipitation Monitoring Network and National Atmospheric Deposition Program for the period 1995-2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wetherbee, Gregory A.; Shaw, Michael J.; Latysh, Natalie E.; Lehmann, Christopher M.B.; Rothert, Jane E.

    2010-01-01

    Precipitation chemistry and depth measurements obtained by the Canadian Air and Precipitation Monitoring Network (CAPMoN) and the US National Atmospheric Deposition Program/National Trends Network (NADP/NTN) were compared for the 10-year period 1995–2004. Colocated sets of CAPMoN and NADP instrumentation, consisting of precipitation collectors and rain gages, were operated simultaneously per standard protocols for each network at Sutton, Ontario and Frelighsburg, Ontario, Canada and at State College, PA, USA. CAPMoN samples were collected daily, and NADP samples were collected weekly, and samples were analyzed exclusively by each network’s laboratory for pH, H + , Ca2+  , Mg2+  , Na + , K + , NH+4 , Cl − , NO−3 , and SO2−4 . Weekly and annual precipitation-weighted mean concentrations for each network were compared. This study is a follow-up to an earlier internetwork comparison for the period 1986–1993, published by Alain Sirois, Robert Vet, and Dennis Lamb in 2000. Median weekly internetwork differences for 1995–2004 data were the same to slightly lower than for data for the previous study period (1986–1993) for all analytes except NO−3 , SO2−4 , and sample depth. A 1994 NADP sampling protocol change and a 1998 change in the types of filters used to process NADP samples reversed the previously identified negative bias in NADP data for hydrogen-ion and sodium concentrations. Statistically significant biases (α = 0.10) for sodium and hydrogen-ion concentrations observed in the 1986–1993 data were not significant for 1995–2004. Weekly CAPMoN measurements generally are higher than weekly NADP measurements due to differences in sample filtration and field instrumentation, not sample evaporation, contamination, or analytical laboratory differences.

  16. Simultaneous measurements of stable water isotopes in near-surface vapor and precipitation to constrain below-cloud processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graf, Pascal; Sodemann, Harald; Pfahl, Stephan; Schneebeli, Marc; Ventura, Jordi Figueras i.; Leuenberger, Andreas; Grazioli, Jacopo; Raupach, Tim; Berne, Alexis; Wernli, Heini

    2016-04-01

    Present-day observations of stable water isotopes (SWI) in precipitation on monthly time scales are abundant and the processes governing the variation of SWI on these time scales have been investigated by many studies. However, also on much shorter time scales of hours mesoscale meteorological processes lead to significant variations of SWIs, which are important to understand. There are only few studies investigating the variations of SWI on this short time scale, for which, e.g., frontal dynamics, convection and cloud microphysics play an essential role. In particular, the isotopic composition of both near-surface vapor and precipitation is significantly influenced by below-cloud processes that include precipitation evaporation and isotopic exchange between falling precipitation and surrounding vapor. In this study, simultaneous measurements of SWI in near-surface vapor and precipitation with high (sub-hourly) temporal resolution in combination with observational data from radars, disdrometers, radiosondes and standard meteorological instruments are used for a detailed analysis of the relative importance of below-cloud and in-cloud (i.e., precipitation formation) processes during the course of three rain events in Switzerland in spring 2014. Periods are identified when the isotopic composition of near-surface vapor and equilibrium vapor above liquid rain drops agree and when they differ due to either evaporation of precipitation or incomplete equilibration of precipitation with surrounding vapor. These findings are verified by the supporting observational data. In addition, calculations with a simple rain-shaft model fed with observational data are compared to the actual isotopic composition of precipitation. This combination of isotope measurements and model calculations allows us to test the sensitivity of the precipitation isotope signal to rain intensity, drop-size distribution and temperature and humidity profiles.

  17. Field significance of performance measures in the context of regional climate model evaluation. Part 2: precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Martin; Warrach-Sagi, Kirsten; Wulfmeyer, Volker

    2017-02-01

    A new approach for rigorous spatial analysis of the downscaling performance of regional climate model (RCM) simulations is introduced. It is based on a multiple comparison of the local tests at the grid cells and is also known as `field' or `global' significance. The block length for the local resampling tests is precisely determined to adequately account for the time series structure. New performance measures for estimating the added value of downscaled data relative to the large-scale forcing fields are developed. The methodology is exemplarily applied to a standard EURO-CORDEX hindcast simulation with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model coupled with the land surface model NOAH at 0.11 ∘ grid resolution. Daily precipitation climatology for the 1990-2009 period is analysed for Germany for winter and summer in comparison with high-resolution gridded observations from the German Weather Service. The field significance test controls the proportion of falsely rejected local tests in a meaningful way and is robust to spatial dependence. Hence, the spatial patterns of the statistically significant local tests are also meaningful. We interpret them from a process-oriented perspective. While the downscaled precipitation distributions are statistically indistinguishable from the observed ones in most regions in summer, the biases of some distribution characteristics are significant over large areas in winter. WRF-NOAH generates appropriate stationary fine-scale climate features in the daily precipitation field over regions of complex topography in both seasons and appropriate transient fine-scale features almost everywhere in summer. As the added value of global climate model (GCM)-driven simulations cannot be smaller than this perfect-boundary estimate, this work demonstrates in a rigorous manner the clear additional value of dynamical downscaling over global climate simulations. The evaluation methodology has a broad spectrum of applicability as it is

  18. Measurement of precipitation induced FUV emission and Geocoronal Lyman Alpha from the IMI mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mende, Stephen B.; Fuselier, S. A.; Rairden, R. L.

    1995-01-01

    This final report describes the activities of the Lockheed Martin Palo Alto Research Laboratory in studying the measurement of ion and electron precipitation induced Far Ultra-Violet (FUV) emissions and Geocoronal Lyman Alpha for the NASA Inner Magnetospheric Imager (IMI) mission. this study examined promising techniques that may allow combining several FUV instruments that would separately measure proton aurora, electron aurora, and geocoronal Lyman alpha into a single instrument operated on a spinning spacecraft. The study consisted of two parts. First, the geocoronal Lyman alpha, proton aurora, and electron aurora emissions were modeled to determine instrument requirements. Second, several promising techniques were investigated to determine if they were suitable for use in an IMI-type mission. Among the techniques investigated were the Hydrogen gas cell for eliminating cold geocoronal Lyman alpha emissions, and a coded aperture spectrometer with sufficient resolution to separate Doppler shifted Lyman alpha components.

  19. Assimilation of Precipitation Measurement Missions Microwave Radiance Observations With GEOS-5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jin, Jianjun; Kim, Min-Jeong; McCarty, Will; Akella, Santha; Gu, Wei

    2015-01-01

    The Global Precipitation Mission (GPM) Core Observatory satellite was launched in February, 2014. The GPM Microwave Imager (GMI) is a conically scanning radiometer measuring 13 channels ranging from 10 to 183 GHz and sampling between 65 S 65 N. This instrument is a successor to the Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM) Microwave Imager (TMI), which has observed 9 channels at frequencies ranging 10 to 85 GHz between 40 S 40 N since 1997. This presentation outlines the base procedures developed to assimilate GMI and TMI radiances in clear-sky conditions, including quality control methods, thinning decisions, and the estimation of, observation errors. This presentation also shows the impact of these observations when they are incorporated into the GEOS-5 atmospheric data assimilation system.

  20. Lessons Learned during Thermal Hardware Integration on the Global Precipitation Measurement Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cottingham, Christine; Dwivedi, Vivek H.; Peters, Carlton; Powers, Daniel; Yang, Kan

    2012-01-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement mission is a joint NASA/JAXA mission scheduled for launch in late 2013. The integration of thermal hardware onto the satellite began in the Fall of 2010 and will continue through the Summer of 2012. The thermal hardware on the mission included several constant conductance heat pipes, heaters, thermostats, thermocouples radiator coatings and blankets. During integration several problems arose and insights were gained that would help future satellite integrations. Also lessons learned from previous missions were implemented with varying degrees of success. These insights can be arranged into three categories. 1) the specification of flight hardware using analysis results and the available mechanical resources. 2) The integration of thermal flight hardware onto the spacecraft, 3) The preparation and implementation of testing the thermal flight via touch tests, resistance measurements and thermal vacuum testing.

  1. At-line benzene monitor for measuring benzene in precipitate hydrolysis aqueous

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, W.J.

    1992-10-14

    A highly accurate and repeatable at-line benzene monitor (ALBM) has been developed to measure the benzene concentration in precipitate hydrolysis aqueous (PHA) in the DWPF. This analyzer was conceived and jointly developed within SRTC by the Analytical Development and the Defense Waste Process Technology Sections with extensive support from the Applied Statistics Group and the TNX Operations Section. It is recommended that an ALBM specifically adapted to DWPF analytical requirements be used to measure benzene in PHA; calibrations be performed using a 10% methanol solution matrix (for standard stability); and based on experience gained in development at TNX, the services of ADS and ASG be employed to both adapt the ALBM to DWPF requirements and develop statistical control procedures.

  2. AMPS definition study on Optical Band Imager and Photometer System (OBIPS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, T. N.; Deehr, C. S.; Hallinan, T. J.; Wescott, E. M.

    1975-01-01

    A study was conducted to define the characteristics of a modular optical diagnostic system (OBIPS) for AMPS, to provide input to Phase B studies, and to give information useful for experiment planning and design of other instrumentation. The system described consists of visual and UV-band imagers and visual and UV-band photometers; of these the imagers are most important because of their ability to measure intensity as a function of two spatial dimensions and time with high resolution. The various subsystems of OBIPS are in themselves modular with modules having a high degree of interchangeability for versatility, economy, and redundancy.

  3. Stellar spectral flux calibration of auroral H-beta photometer signal and background channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackel, Brian J.; Unick, Craig

    2017-01-01

    Observations of optical aurora typically require the operation of sensitive instruments at remote field sites. Absolute radiometric calibration of these devices is essential for quantitative comparison over time and with other measurements. In this study we present absolute calibration of a proton auroral photometer using star transits observed during regular data collection. This requires absolute flux spectra with sufficient resolution to account for structure in stellar Hβ absorption line profiles. Several flux spectral catalogs are combined and corrected for systematic differences. The resulting estimates of instrumental sensitivity are consistent with darkroom calibration to roughly 15%.

  4. Recent results of the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubota, Takuji; Oki, Riko; Furukawa, Kinji; Kaneko, Yuki; Yamaji, Moeka; Iguchi, Toshio; Takayabu, Yukari

    2017-04-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission is an international collaboration to achieve highly accurate and highly frequent global precipitation observations. The GPM mission consists of the GPM Core Observatory jointly developed by U.S. and Japan and Constellation Satellites that carry microwave radiometers and provided by the GPM partner agencies. The GPM Core Observatory, launched on February 2014, carries the Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) and the National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT). JAXA develops the DPR Level 1 algorithm, and the NASA-JAXA Joint Algorithm Team develops the DPR Level 2 and DPR-GMI combined Level2 algorithms. The Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) started the DPR assimilation in the meso-scale Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) system on March 24 2016. This was regarded as the world's first "operational" assimilation of spaceborne radar data in the NWP system of meteorological agencies. JAXA also develops the Global Satellite Mapping of Precipitation (GSMaP), as national product to distribute hourly and 0.1-degree horizontal resolution rainfall map. The GSMaP near-real-time version (GSMaP_NRT) product is available 4-hour after observation through the "JAXA Global Rainfall Watch" web site (http://sharaku.eorc.jaxa.jp/GSMaP) since 2008. The GSMaP_NRT product gives higher priority to data latency than accuracy, and has been used by various users for various purposes, such as rainfall monitoring, flood alert and warning, drought monitoring, crop yield forecast, and agricultural insurance. There is, however, a requirement for shortening of data latency time from GSMaP users. To reduce data latency, JAXA has developed the GSMaP realtime version (GSMaP_NOW) product for observation area of the geostationary satellite Himawari-8 operated by the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA). GSMaP_NOW product was released to public in November 2, 2015 through the

  5. Evaluating the Global Precipitation Measurement mission with NOAA/NSSL Multi-Radar Multisensor: current status and future directions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirstetter, P. E.; Hong, Y.; Gourley, J. J.; Carr, N.; Petersen, W. A.; Schwaller, M.; Anagnostou, E. N.; Kummerow, C. D.; Ferraro, R. R.; Wang, N. Y.; Tanelli, S.; Turk, J.; Huffman, G. J.

    2015-12-01

    Accurate characterization of uncertainties in precipitation estimates derived from space-borne measurements is critical for many applications including water budget studies or prediction of natural hazards caused by extreme rainfall events. The GPM precipitation Level II (active and passive) and Level III (IMERG) estimates are compared to the NEXRAD-based precipitation estimates derived from NOAA/NSSL's Multi-Radar, Multi-Sensor (MRMS) platform. The NEXRAD network has undergone an upgrade in technology with dual-polarization capabilities and the MRMS products, after having been adjusted by rain gauges and passing several quality controls and filtering procedures, are 1) accurate with known uncertainty bounds and 2) measured at a resolution below the pixel sizes any GPM estimates. They are used by a number of NASA investigators to evaluate Level II and Level III satellite precipitation algorithms. A comparison framework was developed to examine the consistency of the ground and space-based sensors in term of precipitation detection, typology (e.g. convective, stratiform) and quantification. At the Level II precipitation features are introduced to analyze satellite estimates under various precipitation processes. Specific factors for passive (e.g. surface conditions for GMI) and active (e.g. attenuation of the radar signal, non uniform beam filling for DPR) sensors are investigated. Prognostic analysis directly provides feedback to algorithm developers on how to improve the satellite estimates. Comparison with TRMM products serves as a benchmark to evaluate GPM precipitation estimates. A the Level III the contribution of Level II is explicitly characterized and a rigorous characterization is performed to migrate across scales fully understanding the propagation of errors. This cross products characterization acts as a bridge to intercalibrate microwave measurements from the GPM constellation satellites and propagate to the combined and global precipitation estimates

  6. Measurement of Low Amounts of Precipitable Water Vapor Using Ground-Based Millimeterwave Radiometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Racette, Paul E.; Westwater, Ed R.; Han, Yong; Gasiewski, Albin J.; Klein, Marian; Cimini, Domenico; Jones, David C.; Manning, WIll; Kim, Edward J.; Wang, James R.

    2003-01-01

    Extremely dry conditions characterized by amounts of precipitable water vapor (PWV) as as 1-2 mm commonly occur in high-latitude regions during the winter months. While such atmospheres carry only a few percent of the latent heat energy compared to tropical atmospheres, the effects of low vapor amounts on the polar radiation budget - both directly through modulation of longwave radiation and indirectly through the formation of clouds - are considerable. Accurate measurements of precipitable water vapor (PWV) during such dry conditions are needed to improve polar radiation models for use in understanding and predicting change in the climatically sensitive polar regions. To this end, the strong water vapor absorption at 183.310 GHz provides a unique means of measuring low amounts of PWV. Weighting function analysis, forward model calculations based upon a 7-year radiosonde dataset, and retrieval simulations consistently predict that radiometric measurements made using several millimeter-wavelength (MMW) channels near the 183 GHz line, together with established microwave (MW) measurements at the 22.235 GHz water vapor line and -3 1 GHz atmospheric absorption window can be used to determine within 5% uncertainty the full range of PWV expected in the Arctic. This unique collective capability stands in spite of accuracy limitations stemming from uncertainties due to the sensitivity of the vertical distribution of temperature and water vapor at MMW channels. In this study the potential of MMW radiometry using the 183 GHz line for measuring low amounts of PWV is demonstrated both theoretically and experimentally. The study uses data obtained during March 1999 as part of an experiment conducted at the Department of Energy s Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) near Barrow, Alaska. Several radiometers from both NOAA and NASA were deployed during the experiment to provide the first combined MMW and MW ground-based data set during dry arctic conditions. Single-channel retrievals

  7. Integrated Precipitable Water from GPS Observations and CIMEL Sunphotometer Measurements at CGO Belsk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruczyk, Michał; Liwosz, Tomasz; Pietruczuk, Aleksander

    2017-06-01

    This paper describes results of integrated precipitable water co-located measurements from two techniques: GPS solution and CIMEL-318 sunphotometer. Integrated Precipitable Water (IPW) is an important meteorological parameter and is derived from GPS tropospheric solutions for GPS station at Central Geophysical Observatory (CGO), Polish Academy of Sciences (PAS), Belsk and compared with sunphotometer (CIMEL-318 device by Cimel Electronique) data provided by Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET). Two dedicated and independent GPS solutions: network solution in the sub-network of European Permanent Network (EPN) and precise point positioning solution have been made to obtain tropospheric delays. The quality of dedicated tropospheric solutions has been verified by comparison with EPN tropospheric combined product. Several IPW comparisons and analyses revealed systematic difference between techniques (difference RMS is over 1 mm). IPW bias changes with season: annual close to 1 mm IPW (and semi-annual term also present). IPW bias is a function of atmospheric temperature. Probable cause of this systematic deficiency in solar photometry as IPW retrieval technique is a change of optical filter characteristics in CIMEL.

  8. Correlating Global Precipitation Measurement satellite data with karst spring hydrographs for rapid catchment delineation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longenecker, Jake; Bechtel, Timothy; Chen, Zhao; Goldscheider, Nico; Liesch, Tanja; Walter, Robert

    2017-05-01

    To protect karst spring water resources, catchments must be known. We have developed a method for correlating spring hydrographs with newly available, high-resolution, satellite-based Global Precipitation Measurement data to rapidly and remotely locate recharge areas. We verify the method using a synthetic comparison of ground-based rain gage data with the satellite precipitation data set. Application to karst springs is proven by correlating satellite data with hydrographs from well-known springs with published catchments in Europe and North America. Application to an unknown-catchment spring in Pennsylvania suggests distant recharge, requiring a flow path that crosses topographic divides, as well as multiple lithologies, physiographic provinces, and tectonic boundaries. Although surprising, this latter result is consistent with published geologic/geophysical, monitoring well, and stream gage data. We conclude that the method has considerable potential to improve the speed and accuracy of catchment identification and hydrodynamic characterization, with applications to water resource protection and groundwater exploration, among others.

  9. Soil Moisture Estimation Using Surface Backscattering Coefficients Observed by the Tropical Rain Measurement Mission Precipitation Radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seto, S.; Robock, A.; Luo, L.; Oki, T.; Iguchi, T.; Musiake, K.

    2003-12-01

    Soil moisture affects many important hydrological and meteorological processes on various scales and it is important to know the global distribution of soil moisture. Microwave remote sensing is an indispensable method of obtaining this information. We used the first space-borne precipitation radar, on the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission satellite, for this purpose by examining backscattering not from rainfall but from the land surface under no precipitation conditions. The spatial pattern of the land surface backscattering coefficient (σ ° ) is determined mainly by the incident angle and vegetation. The seasonal pattern of σ ° in general does not depend on different incident angles, except in the Sahel region, where there is a large impact of from the temporal change of vegetation. We propose a soil moisture estimation algorithm that considers a mosaic of different vegetation types in each scene. The vegetation fraction is determined by the σ ° observed at an incident angle of 3° and then the temporal change of σ ° for bare soil is calculated with observation at an angle of 12° . Because σ ° observed at 12° is not strongly affected by change of vegetation, the algorithm can simulate the seasonal pattern well even in the Sahel where vegetation changes drastically. This algorithm generally works well in regions without heavy vegetation. The algorithm works well when tested for estimating daily soil moisture in Oklahoma at a latitude of about 35° N.

  10. Hail detection algorithm for the Global Precipitation Measuring mission core satellite sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mroz, Kamil; Battaglia, Alessandro; Lang, Timothy J.; Tanelli, Simone; Cecil, Daniel J.; Tridon, Frederic

    2017-04-01

    By exploiting an abundant number of extreme storms observed simultaneously by the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission core satellite's suite of sensors and by the ground-based S-band Next-Generation Radar (NEXRAD) network over continental US, proxies for the identification of hail are developed based on the GPM core satellite observables. The full capabilities of the GPM observatory are tested by analyzing more than twenty observables and adopting the hydrometeor classification based on ground-based polarimetric measurements as truth. The proxies have been tested using the Critical Success Index (CSI) as a verification measure. The hail detection algorithm based on the mean Ku reflectivity in the mixed-phase layer performs the best, out of all considered proxies (CSI of 45%). Outside the Dual frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) swath, the Polarization Corrected Temperature at 18.7 GHz shows the greatest potential for hail detection among all GMI channels (CSI of 26% at a threshold value of 261 K). When dual variable proxies are considered, the combination involving the mixed-phase reflectivity values at both Ku and Ka-bands outperforms all the other proxies, with a CSI of 49%. The best-performing radar-radiometer algorithm is based on the mixed-phase reflectivity at Ku-band and on the brightness temperature (TB) at 10.7 GHz (CSI of 46%). When only radiometric data are available, the algorithm based on the TBs at 36.6 and 166 GHz is the most efficient, with a CSI of 27.5%.

  11. Quantitative precipitation climatology over the Himalayas by using Precipitation Radar on Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) and a dense network of rain-gauges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yatagai, A.

    2010-09-01

    Quantified grid observation data at a reasonable resolution are indispensable for environmental monitoring as well as for predicting future change of mountain environment. However quantified datasets have not been available for the Himalayan region. Hence we evaluate climatological precipitation data around the Himalayas by using Precipitation Radar (PR) data acquired by the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) over 10 years of observation. To validate and adjust these patterns, we used a dense network of rain gauges collected by the Asian Precipitation—Highly Resolved Observational Data Integration Towards Evaluation of Water Resources (APHRODITE Water Resources) project (http://www.chikyu.ac.jp/precip/). We used more than 2600 stations which have more than 10-year monthly precipitation over the Himalayan region (75E-105E, 20-36N) including country data of Nepal, Bangladesh, Bhutan, Pakistan, India, Myanmar, and China. The region we studied is so topographically complicated that horizontal patterns are not uniform. Therefore, every path data of PR2A25 (near-surface rain) was averaged in a 0.05-degree grid and a 10-year monthly average was computed (hereafter we call PR). On the other hand, for rain-gauge, we first computed cell averages if each 0.05-degree grid cell has 10 years observation or more. Here we refer to the 0.05-degree rain-gauge climatology data as RG data. On the basis of comparisons between the RG and PR composite values, we defined the parameters of the regressions to correct the monthly climatology value based on the rain gauge observations. Compared with the RG, the PR systematically underestimated precipitation by 28-38% in summer (July-September). Significant correlation between TRMM/PR and rain-gauge data was found for all months, but the correlation is relatively low in winter. The relationship is investigated for different elevation zones, and the PR was found to underestimate RG data in most zones, except for certain zones in

  12. A far infrared photometer for characterization of stratospheric perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Andreta, Gerardo; D'Addio, Lorenzo; Melchiorri, Bianca

    1995-10-01

    The sensitivity of the new generation of He-3 bolometers is such that it is possible to detect tiny atmospheric perturbations occurring at high altitude by means of a submillimetric photometer: an excess of 1% along one km of the stratosphere for H2O vapour is detectable up to 10 km of altitude, while the same excess for O2 is detectable up to 20 km and up to 35 km in the case of Ozone. In the present paper we describe a multi-band photometer operating at the focal plane of MITO (Millimeter and Infrared Testagrigia Observatory), capable of discriminating atmospheric perturbations in altitude and in chemical composition. The instrument is devoted to the study of the dynamics of the upper atmosphere in a long range program of far infrared observations.

  13. Estimating drizzle drop size and precipitation rate using two-colour lidar measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westbrook, C. D.; Hogan, R. J.; O'Connor, E. J.; Illingworth, A. J.

    2010-03-01

    A method to estimate the size and liquid water content of drizzle drops using lidar measurements at two wavelengths is described. The method exploits the differential absorption of infrared light by liquid water at 905 nm and 1.5 µm, which leads to a different backscatter cross section for water drops larger than ≍50 µm. The ratio of backscatter measured from drizzle samples below cloud base at these two wavelengths (the colour ratio) provides a measure of the median volume drop diameter D0. This is a strong effect: for D0=200 µm, a colour ratio of ≍6 dB is predicted. Once D0 is known, the measured backscatter at 905 nm can be used to calculate the liquid water content (LWC) and other moments of the drizzle drop distribution. The method is applied to observations of drizzle falling from stratocumulus and stratus clouds. High resolution (32 s, 36 m) profiles of D0, LWC and precipitation rate R are derived. The main sources of error in the technique are the need to assume a value for the dispersion parameter μ in the drop size spectrum (leading to at most a 35% error in R) and the influence of aerosol returns on the retrieval (≍10% error in R for the cases considered here). Radar reflectivities are also computed from the lidar data, and compared to independent measurements from a colocated cloud radar, offering independent validation of the derived drop size distributions.

  14. Estimating drizzle drop size and precipitation rate using two-colour lidar measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westbrook, C. D.; Hogan, R. J.; O'Connor, E. J.; Illingworth, A. J.

    2010-06-01

    A method to estimate the size and liquid water content of drizzle drops using lidar measurements at two wavelengths is described. The method exploits the differential absorption of infrared light by liquid water at 905 nm and 1.5 μm, which leads to a different backscatter cross section for water drops larger than ≈50 μm. The ratio of backscatter measured from drizzle samples below cloud base at these two wavelengths (the colour ratio) provides a measure of the median volume drop diameter D0. This is a strong effect: for D0=200 μm, a colour ratio of ≈6 dB is predicted. Once D0 is known, the measured backscatter at 905 nm can be used to calculate the liquid water content (LWC) and other moments of the drizzle drop distribution. The method is applied to observations of drizzle falling from stratocumulus and stratus clouds. High resolution (32 s, 36 m) profiles of D0, LWC and precipitation rate R are derived. The main sources of error in the technique are the need to assume a value for the dispersion parameter μ in the drop size spectrum (leading to at most a 35% error in R) and the influence of aerosol returns on the retrieval (≈10% error in R for the cases considered here). Radar reflectivities are also computed from the lidar data, and compared to independent measurements from a colocated cloud radar, offering independent validation of the derived drop size distributions.

  15. Solutions Network Formulation Report. The Potential Contributions of the Global Precipitation Measurement Mission to Estuary Management in Acadia National Park

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Daniel; Hilbert, Kent; Lewis, David

    2007-01-01

    This candidate solution suggests the use of GPM precipitation observations to enhance the Acadia National Park NLERDSS. Simulated GPM data should provide measurements that would enable analysis of how precipitation affects runoff and nutrient load in the park?s wetlands. This solution benefits society by aiding park and resource managers in making predictions based on hypothetical changes and in identifying effective mitigation scenarios. This solution supports the Coastal Management, Water Management, and Ecological Forecasting National Applications.

  16. Performance analysis of the multichannel astrometric photometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Chunsheng; Lawrence, George N.; Levy, Eugene H.; Mcmillan, Robert S.

    1987-01-01

    It has been proposed that extrasolar planetary systems may be observed if perturbations in star position due to the orbit of Jupiter-type planets could be detected. To see this motion, high accuracy measurements of 0.01 milliarcsecond are required over a relatively large field of view. Techniques using a moving Ronchi grating have been proposed for this application and have been successful in ground-based lower resolution tests. The method may have application to other precision angular measurement problems. This paper explores the theoretical description of the method, considers certain of the error sources, and presents a preliminary calculation of the performance which may be achieved.

  17. Updates in SDO/EVE/EUV SpectroPhotometer (ESP) Data Processing and Inter-comparison of Calibrated ESP Irradiances with Measurements from Other On-orbit EUV Instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wieman, S. R.; Didkovsky, L. V.; Woodraska, D.

    2014-12-01

    Prior to the May 2014 anomaly which indefinitely suspended SDO/EVE Multiple EUV Spectrographs-A (MEGS-A) science operations, MEGS-A spectral distributions were used in the data processing algorithm for determining absolute EUV irradiance values from the SDO/EVE EUV Spectrophotometer (ESP) raw data. We discuss a revised ESP data processing algorithm which, in lieu of concurrently measured MEGS-A spectra, adopts reference spectra selected (based on solar activity at the time of the ESP observation) from a discrete set of spectra derived from MEGS-A spectra for various levels of activity observed prior to the anomaly. We present evaluations of the revised algorithm and adopted reference spectra based on comparisons of the resultant ESP irradiance values with EUV measurements from other on-orbit instrumentation including the SOHO/Solar EUV Monitor (SEM). The results of comparisons between ESP irradiances determined using the revised algorithm and those based on the pre-anomaly algorithm which uses concurrent MEGS-A spectra are also presented

  18. Assessment of spill flow emissions on the basis of measured precipitation and waste water data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hochedlinger, Martin; Gruber, Günter; Kainz, Harald

    2005-09-01

    Combined sewer overflows (CSOs) are substantial contributors to the total emissions into surface water bodies. The emitted pollution results from dry-weather waste water loads, surface runoff pollution and from the remobilisation of sewer deposits and sewer slime during storm events. One possibility to estimate overflow loads is a calculation with load quantification models. Input data for these models are pollution concentrations, e.g. Total Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD tot), Total Suspended Solids (TSS) or Soluble Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD sol), rainfall series and flow measurements for model calibration and validation. It is important for the result of overflow loads to model with reliable input data, otherwise this inevitably leads to bad results. In this paper the correction of precipitation measurements and the sewer online-measurements are presented to satisfy the load quantification model requirements already described. The main focus is on tipping bucket gauge measurements and their corrections. The results evidence the importance of their corrections due the effects on load quantification modelling and show the difference between corrected and not corrected data of storm events with high rain intensities.

  19. Characterizing a high resolution color display performance using a Prichard photometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Balvinder; Olson, Jeff T.; Hixson, Jonathan G.; Richardson, Philip I.; Flug, Eric A.

    2015-05-01

    Measuring the performance of a cathode ray tube (CRT) or liquid crystal display (LCD) is necessary to enable end-to-end system modeling and characterization of currently used high performance analog imaging systems, such as 2nd Generation FLIR systems. If the display is color, the performance measurements are made more difficult because of the underlying structure of the color pixel as compared to a monochrome pixel. Out of the various characteristics of interest, we focus on determining the gamma value of a display. Gamma quantifies the non-linear response between the input gray scale and the displayed luminance. If the displayed image can be corrected for the display's gamma, an accurate scene can be presented or characterized for laboratory measurements such as MRT (Minimum Resolvable Temperature) and CTF (Contrast Threshold Function). In this paper, we present a method to determine the gamma to characterize a color display using the Prichard 1980A photometer. Gamma corrections were applied to the test images for validating the accuracy of the computed gamma value. The method presented here is a simple one easily implemented employing a Prichard photometer.

  20. Comparison of column water vapor retrieved from GOES and ground based LED Sun Photometer developed for GIFTS Education and Public Ourtreach Program and GLOBE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limaye, S. S.; Sromovsky, L. A.; Menzel, W. P.; Valkanas, K.; Pertzborn, R. A.

    2003-04-01

    Measurement of atmospheric water vapor using a hand-held sun photometer as a Special Protocol of the Global Learning and Observations to Benefit the Environ-ment (GLOBE) Program was proposed as a key component of the Education and Public Outreach program designed for Geossynchronous Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (GIFTS), the EO-3 mission selected under NASA's New Millennium program. The GIFTS-GLOBE photometer design is based on the work of Forrest Mims III (1992, Applied Optics, Vol. 31, 6965-7), who pioneered the use of LEDs as narrow-band radiation detectors, and on the GLOBE haze photometer (Mims, 1999, BAMS 80, 1421--31). A reference unit was calibrated by comparison against the Microwave Radiometer (MWR) at the ARM site, and the calibration has been transferred to other units that are now being used in participating schools. The data collected from the ground based photometers correlates well with the GOES derived atmospheric water vapor amounts at approximately the same time over the ground site. The data collected to date indicates that the photometer is capable of meeting its dual purpose of science observations for validation of space based data, and the use of inquiry based ap-proach to science education in schools.

  1. Quantitative evaluation of dynamic precipitation kinetics in a complex Nb-Ti-V microalloyed steel using electrical resistivity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Jae-Gil; Bae, Jin-Ho; Lee, Young-Kook

    2013-09-01

    The kinetics of dynamic precipitation in austenite of a complex Nb-Ti-V microalloyed steel during hot compression at 900 °C with a strain rate of 6.7 s-1 was quantitatively investigated through electrical resistivity measurements. The dynamic precipitation in the Nb-Ti-V microalloyed steel started at a strain of 0.15. The amount of tiny Nb-rich (Nb,Ti,V)C carbides, which were precipitated at crystal defects gradually increased up to 0.02 wt% at a maximum strain of 0.67. The electrical resistivity was successfully applied to the quantitative evaluation of dynamic precipitation kinetics in microalloyed steel by excluding the effects of crystal defects and interstitial atoms on the electrical resistivity.

  2. Evaluation of candidate rain gages for upgrading precipitation measurement tools for the National Atmospheric Deposition Program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gordon, John D.

    2003-01-01

    The National Atmospheric Deposition Program (NADP) was established in 1977 to investigate atmospheric deposition and its effects on the environment. Since its establishment, precipitation records have been obtained at all NADP sites using a gage developed approximately 50 years ago-the Belfort 5-780 mechanical rain gage. In 1998 and 1999, a study was done by the U.S. Geological Survey to evaluate four recently developed, technologically advanced rain gages as possible replacement candidates for the mechanical gage currently (2002) in use by the NADP. The gage types evaluated were the Belfort 3200, Geonor T-200, ETI Noah II, and the OTT PLUVIO. The Belfort 5-780 was included in the study to compare the performance of the rain gage currently (2002) used by NADP to the performance of the more recently developed gages. As a reference gage, the NovaLynx Model 260-2510 National Weather Service type stick gage also was included in the study. Two individual gages of each type were included in the study to evaluate precision between gages of the same type. A two-phase evaluation was completed. Phase I consisted of indoor bench tests with known amounts of simulated rainfall applied in 20 individual tests. Phase II consisted of outdoor testing by collecting precipitation during a 26-week period near Bay St. Louis, Mississippi. The ETI Noah II, OTT PLUVIO, and NovaLynx stick gages consistently recorded depths more commensurate with the amounts of applied simulated rainfall in Phase I testing than the Geonor T-200, Belfort 5-780, and Belfort 3200 gages. Gages where both the median difference between the measured and applied simulated rainfall and the interquartile range of all of their measured minus applied simulated rainfall differences were small (less than or equal to 0.01 inch) were judged to have performed very well in Phase I testing. The median and interquartile-range values were 0.01 inch or less for each of the ETI Noah II gages, OTT PLUVIO gages, and NovaLynx stick

  3. Towards an unbiased filter routine to determine precipitation and evapotranspiration from high precision lysimeter measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Andre; Groh, Jannis; Schrader, Frederik; Durner, Wolfgang; Vereecken, Harry; Pütz, Thomas

    2017-06-01

    Weighing lysimeters are considered to be the best means for a precise measurement of water fluxes at the interface between the soil-plant system and the atmosphere. Any decrease of the net mass of the lysimeter can be interpreted as evapotranspiration (ET), any increase as precipitation (P). However, the measured raw data need to be filtered to separate real mass changes from noise. Such filter routines typically apply two steps: (i) a low pass filter, like moving average, which smooths noisy data, and (ii) a threshold filter that separates significant from insignificant mass changes. Recent developments of these filters have identified and solved some problems regarding bias in the data processing. A remaining problem is that each change in flow direction is accompanied with a systematic flow underestimation due to the threshold scheme. In this contribution, we analyze this systematic effect and show that the absolute underestimation is independent of the magnitude of a flux event. Thus, for small events, like dew or rime formation, the relative error is high and can reach the same magnitude as the flux itself. We develop a heuristic solution to the problem by introducing a so-called ;snap routine;. The routine is calibrated and tested with synthetic flux data and applied to real measurements obtained with a precision lysimeter for a 10-month period. The heuristic snap routine effectively overcomes these problems and yields an almost unbiased representation of the real signal.

  4. Analysis of aerosol properties derived from sun photometer and lidar over Dunhuang radiometric calibration site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lin; Jing, Yingying; Zhang, Peng; Hu, Xiuqing

    2016-05-01

    Duhuang site has been selected as China Radiation Calibration Site (CRCS) for Remote Sensing Satellite Sensors since 1996. With the economic development of Dunhuang city, the ambient of the radiation calibration field has changed in recent years. Taking into account the key role of aerosol in radiometric calibration, it is essential to investigate the aerosol optical properties over Dunhuang radiometric calibration site. In this paper, the CIMEL sun photometer (CE-318) and Mie-scattering Lidar are simultaneously used to measure aerosol optical properties in Dunhuang site. Data from aerosol-bands of sun photometer are used in a Langley method to determine spectral optical depths of aerosol. And Lidar is utilized to obtain information of vertical profile and integrated aerosol optical depths at different heights. The results showed that the aerosol optical depth at 500 nm wavelength during the in-situ measurement campaigns varied from 0.1 to 0.3 in Dunhuang site. And the observation results also indicated that high aerosol concentration layer mostly located at the height of about 2~4 km. These results implies that the aerosol concentration of atmosphere in Dunhuang was relatively small and suitable for in-flight calibration for remote sensing satellite sensors.

  5. Calibration and first light of the Diabolo photometer at the Millimetre and Infrared Testa Grigia Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benoit, A.; Zagury, F.; Coron, N.; De Petris, M.; Désert, F.-X.; Giard, M.; Bernard, J.-P.; Crussaire, J.-P.; Dambier, G.; de Bernardis, P.; Delabrouille, J.; De Luca, A.; de Marcillac, P.; Jegoudez, G.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Leblanc, J.; Lepeltier, J.-P.; Leriche, B.; Mainella, G.; Narbonne, J.; Pajot, F.; Pons, R.; Puget, J.-L.; Pujol, S.; Recouvreur, G.; Serra, G.; Soglasnova, V.; Torre, J.-P.; Vozzi, B.

    2000-02-01

    We have designed and built a large-throughput dual channel photometer, Diabolo. This photometer is dedicated to the observation of millimetre continuum diffuse sources, and in particular, of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect and of anisotropies of the 3 K background. We describe the optical layout and filtering system of the instrument, which uses two bolometric detectors for simultaneous observations in two frequency channels at 1.2 and 2.1 mm. The bolometers are cooled to a working temperature of 0.1 K provided by a compact dilution cryostat. The photometric and angular responses of the instrument are measured in the laboratory. First astronomical light was detected in March 1995 at the focus of the new Millimetre and Infrared Testa Grigia Observatory (MITO) Telescope. The established sensitivity of the system is of 7 mKRJ\\ s1/2. For a typical map of at least 10 beams, with one hour of integration per beam, one can achieve the rms values of y_SZ =~ 7\\ 10-5 and the 3 K background anisotropy {Delta T/ T} =~ 7\\ 10-5, in winter conditions. We also report on a novel bolometer AC readout circuit which allows for the first time total power measurements on the sky. This technique alleviates (but does not forbid) the use of chopping with a secondary mirror. This technique and the dilution fridge concept will be used in future scan-modulated space instrument like the ESA Planck mission project.

  6. Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Microwave Imager Falling Snow Retrieval Algorithm Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skofronick Jackson, Gail; Munchak, Stephen J.; Johnson, Benjamin T.

    2015-04-01

    Retrievals of falling snow from space represent an important data set for understanding the Earth's atmospheric, hydrological, and energy cycles. While satellite-based remote sensing provides global coverage of falling snow events, the science is relatively new and retrievals are still undergoing development with challenges and uncertainties remaining. This work reports on the development and post-launch testing of retrieval algorithms for the NASA Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission Core Observatory satellite launched in February 2014. In particular, we will report on GPM Microwave Imager (GMI) radiometer instrument algorithm performance with respect to falling snow detection and estimation. Since GPM's launch, the at-launch GMI precipitation algorithms, based on a Bayesian framework, have been used with the new GPM data. The at-launch database is generated using proxy satellite data merged with surface measurements (instead of models). One year after launch, the Bayesian database will begin to be replaced with the more realistic observational data from the GPM spacecraft radar retrievals and GMI data. It is expected that the observational database will be much more accurate for falling snow retrievals because that database will take full advantage of the 166 and 183 GHz snow-sensitive channels. Furthermore, much retrieval algorithm work has been done to improve GPM retrievals over land. The Bayesian framework for GMI retrievals is dependent on the a priori database used in the algorithm and how profiles are selected from that database. Thus, a land classification sorts land surfaces into ~15 different categories for surface-specific databases (radiometer brightness temperatures are quite dependent on surface characteristics). In addition, our work has shown that knowing if the land surface is snow-covered, or not, can improve the performance of the algorithm. Improvements were made to the algorithm that allow for daily inputs of ancillary snow cover

  7. Measurement of Low Amounts of Precipitable Water Vapor Using Ground-Based Millimeterwave Radiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Racette, Paul E.; Westwater, Ed R.; Han, Yong; Gasiewski, Albin J.; Klein, Marian; Cimini, Domenico; Jones, David C.; Manning, Will; Kim, Edward J.; Wang, James R.; Leuski, Vladimir; Kiedron, Peter

    2005-04-01

    Extremely dry conditions characterized by amounts of precipitable water vapor (PWV) as low as 1-2 mm commonly occur in high-latitude regions during the winter months. While such dry atmospheres carry only a few percent of the latent heat energy compared to tropical atmospheres, the effects of low vapor amounts on the polar radiation budget - both directly through modulation of longwave radiation and indirectly through the formation of clouds - are considerable. Accurate measurements of PWV during such dry conditions are needed to improve polar radiation models for use in understanding and predicting change in the climatically sensitive polar regions. To this end, the strong water-vapor absorption line at 183.310 GHz provides a unique means of measuring low amounts of PWV. Weighting function analysis, forward model calculations based upon a 7-yr radiosonde dataset, and retrieval simulations consistently predict that radiometric measurements made using several millimeter-wavelength (MMW) channels near the 183-GHz line, together with established microwave (MW) measurements near the 22.235-GHz water-vapor line and ∼31-GHz atmospheric absorption window can be used to determine within 5% uncertainty the full range of PWV expected in the Arctic. This combined capability stands in spite of accuracy limitations stemming from uncertainties due to the sensitivity of the vertical distribution of temperature and water vapor at MMW channels. In this study the potential of MMW radiometry using the 183-GHz line for measuring low amounts of PWV is demonstrated both theoretically and experimentally. The study uses data obtained during March 1999 as part of an experiment conducted at the Department of Energy's Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site near Barrow, Alaska. Several radiometers from both NOAA and NASA were deployed during the experiment to provide the first combined MMW and MW ground-based dataset during dry Arctic conditions. Single-channel retrievals of PWV were

  8. Instrumenting Wildlife Water Developments to Measure Precipitation and Estimate Runoff in Remote Catchments

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In Nevada, available data on precipitation and runoff in remote catchments are extremely limited. The National Weather Service’s Cooperative Observer Network (COOP) includes 178 weather stations, most of which collect precipitation data and qualitative weather observations. Most of these stations ar...

  9. Using Wildlife Water Developments to Measure Precipitation and Estimate Runoff in Remote Catchments

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In Nevada, available data on precipitation and runoff in remote catchments is extremely limited. The National Weather Service’s Cooperative Observer Network (COOP) includes 178 weather stations, most of which collect precipitation data and qualitative weather observations. Most of these stations a...

  10. Lead precipitation fluxes at tropical oceanic sites determined from /sup 210/Pb measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Settle, D.M.; Patterson, C.C.; Turekian, K.K.; Cochran, J.K.

    1982-02-20

    Concentrations of lead, /sup 210/Pb, and /sup 210/Po were measured in rain selected for least influence by local sources of contamination at several tropical and subtropical islands (Enewetak; Pigeon Key, Florida; and American Samoa) and shipboard stations (near Bermuda and Tahiti). Ratios expressed as ng Pb/dpm /sup 210/Pb in rain were 250--900 for Pigeon Key (assuming 12% adsorption for /sup 210/Pb and no adsorption for lead), depending on whether the air masses containing the analyzed rain came from the Caribbean or from the continent, respectively; about 390 for the northern Sargasso Sea downwind from emissions of industrial lead in North America; 65 for Enewetak, remote from continental emissions of industrial lead in the northern hemisphere; and 14 near Tahiti, a remote location in the southern hemisphere where industrial lead emissions to the atmosphere are much less than in the northern hemisphere. (The American Samoa sample yielded a higher ratio than Tahiti; the reason for this is not clear but may be due to local Pb sources). The corresponding fluxes of lead to the oceans, based on measured or modeled /sup 210/Pb precipitation fluxes, are about 4 ng Pb/cm/sup 2/y for Tahiti, 10 for Enewetak, and 270 for the Sargasso Sea site, and between 110 to 390 at Pigeon Key.

  11. MM-Wave Radiometric Measurements of Low Amounts of Precipitable Water Vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Racette, P.; Westwater, Ed; Han, Yong; Manning, Will; Jones, David; Gasiewski, Al

    2000-01-01

    An experiment was conducted during March, 1999 to study ways in which to improve techniques for measuring low amounts of total-column precipitable water vapor (PWV). The experiment was conducted at the DOE's ARM program's North Slope of Alaska/Adjacent Arctic Ocean Cloud and Radiation Testbed site (DoE ARM NSA/AAO CaRT) located just outside Barrow, Alaska. NASA and NOAA deployed a suite of radiometers covering 25 channels in the frequency range of 20 GHz up to 340 GHz including 8 channels around the 183 GHz water vapor absorption line. In addition to the usual CaRT site instrumentation the NOAA Depolarization and Backscatter Unattended Lidar (DABUL), the SUNY Rotating Shadowband Spectroradiometer (RSS) and other surface based meteorological instrumentation were deployed during the intensive observation period. Vaisala RS80 radiosondes were launched daily as well as nearby National Weather Service VIZ sondes. Atmospheric conditions ranged from clear calm skies to blowing snow and heavy multi-layer cloud coverage. Measurements made by the radiosondes indicate the PWV varied from approx. 1 to approx. 5 mm during the experiment. The near-surface temperature varied between about -40 C to - 15 C. In this presentation, an overview of the experiment with examples of data collected will be presented. Application of the data for assessing the potential and limitations of millimeter-wave radiometry for retrieving very low amounts of PWV will be discussed.

  12. Measurement of irradiation effects in precipitate hardened aluminum using nonlinear ultrasonic principles (in-situ)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinhardt, B. T.; Parks, D. A.; Tittmann, B. R.

    2012-05-01

    Currently nuclear power plants are reaching the end of their initial design life. Yet, in order to meet the energy demands, twenty year extensions have been granted to many nuclear reactor facilities. These extensions will be ending by the year 2035, leaving a large gap in the available energy supply. In order to extend the life of these facilities it will imperative to develop techniques capable detecting damage in the aging nuclear facilities. However, the high temperature and high neutron flux environment limits the materials available for use in the nuclear reactor. Because of this limitation little NDE based inspection has been implemented in high radiation environments. Yet recent developments in the understanding of Aluminum Nitride (AlN) piezoelectric sensors high temperature and radiation dependent behavior have opened the door for in-situ experimentation. An experiment was designed to monitor the propagation of an ultrasonic wave in a precipitate hardened aluminum specimen while being subjected to radiation at the Pennsylvania State Universities Breazeale Reactor. Measurements of harmonic generation were made up to 1.85×1018 fluence with significant spectral difference between the pre-irradiated state and the post irradiated state. The connection between micro-structural material changes and harmonic measurements are addressed.

  13. Measurement of irradiation effects in precipitate hardened aluminum using nonlinear ultrasonic principles (in-situ)

    SciTech Connect

    Reinhardt, B. T.; Parks, D. A.; Tittmann, B. R.

    2012-05-17

    Currently nuclear power plants are reaching the end of their initial design life. Yet, in order to meet the energy demands, twenty year extensions have been granted to many nuclear reactor facilities. These extensions will be ending by the year 2035, leaving a large gap in the available energy supply. In order to extend the life of these facilities it will imperative to develop techniques capable detecting damage in the aging nuclear facilities. However, the high temperature and high neutron flux environment limits the materials available for use in the nuclear reactor. Because of this limitation little NDE based inspection has been implemented in high radiation environments. Yet recent developments in the understanding of Aluminum Nitride (AlN) piezoelectric sensors high temperature and radiation dependent behavior have opened the door for in-situ experimentation. An experiment was designed to monitor the propagation of an ultrasonic wave in a precipitate hardened aluminum specimen while being subjected to radiation at the Pennsylvania State Universities Breazeale Reactor. Measurements of harmonic generation were made up to 1.85x10{sup 18} fluence with significant spectral difference between the pre-irradiated state and the post irradiated state. The connection between micro-structural material changes and harmonic measurements are addressed.

  14. Reconstruction of Winter and July Precipitation in the US Southwest using minimum blue intensity measurements from Pseudotsuga menziesii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, R.; Woodhouse, C. A.; Griffin, D.; Meko, D. M.; Touchan, R.; Leavitt, S. W.; Castro, C. L.

    2012-12-01

    Tree ring research has demonstrated that the latewood measurements of conifers contain information on the variability of the North American Monsoon while the earlywood measurements reflect cool season moisture variability in the US Southwest. Here we use minimum blue intensity a reflected light image technique to investigate the potential for additional seasonal climatic information. This paper presents the first reconstruction of January through April and July (JFMA_J) precipitation (AD 1680-2010) from Rhyolite Canyon, Chiricahua Mountains, Arizona, based on minimum blue intensity measurements of the annual latewood of Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco). Winter and July precipitation variation (JFMA_J) were reconstructed, suggesting these months may be a critical composite for the moisture important for growth in this region. The wettest years occurred in the early AD 1980s and the driest years occurred around AD 1810. In the Southwest, where annual pr