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Sample records for photometric titration procedure

  1. Instrumentation and Automated Photometric Titration Procedure for Total Acidity Determination in Red Wine Employing a Multicommuted Flow System

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Ausberta Jesus Cabezas; Reis, Boaventura F.

    2006-01-01

    An automated procedure for photometric titration of red wine and associated instrumentation is described. The procedure was based on the flow-batch approach implemented employing multicommutation. The photometric detection was carried out using a homemade LED-based photometer. The mixing device, LED, and photodetector were attached to the titration chamber in order to form a compact and small-sized unit. The flow system comprised an automatic injector and three-way solenoid valves, which were controlled by a microcomputer through an electronic interface card. The software, written in Quick BASIC 4.5, was designed with abilities to accomplish all steps of the titration procedure including data acquisition and real-time processing to decide about the course of titration in the following step and so forth, until the titration endpoint was reached. The usefulness of the proposed titration system was demonstrated by analyzing red wine samples. When results were compared with those obtained using the AOAC reference method, no significant difference was observed at the 95% confidence level. A relative standard deviation of ca  2% (n=9 ) was obtained when processing a typical red wine sample containing 7.3 gl -1 total acidity expressed as tartaric acid. PMID:17671625

  2. A Full Automatic Device for Sampling Small Solution Volumes in Photometric Titration Procedure Based on Multicommuted Flow System

    PubMed Central

    Borges, Sivanildo S.; Vieira, Gláucia P.; Reis, Boaventura F.

    2007-01-01

    In this work, an automatic device to deliver titrant solution into a titration chamber with the ability to determine the dispensed volume of solution, with good precision independent of both elapsed time and flow rate, is proposed. A glass tube maintained at the vertical position was employed as a container for the titrant solution. Electronic devices were coupled to the glass tube in order to control its filling with titrant solution, as well as the stepwise solution delivering into the titration chamber. The detection of the titration end point was performed employing a photometer designed using a green LED (λ=545 nm) and a phototransistor. The titration flow system comprised three-way solenoid valves, which were assembled to allow that the steps comprising the solution container loading and the titration run were carried out automatically. The device for the solution volume determination was designed employing an infrared LED (λ=930 nm) and a photodiode. When solution volume delivered from proposed device was within the range of 5 to 105 μl, a linear relationship (R = 0.999) between the delivered volumes and the generated potential difference was achieved. The usefulness of the proposed device was proved performing photometric titration of hydrochloric acid solution with a standardized sodium hydroxide solution and using phenolphthalein as an external indicator. The achieved results presented relative standard deviation of 1.5%. PMID:18317510

  3. A Low-Cost Device for Automatic Photometric Titrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocha, Fábio R. P.; Reis, Boaventura F.

    2000-02-01

    Electronics is an important topic in chemistry courses. However, the introduction of basic concepts is often difficult and the lab instruments are frequently seen as "black boxes". To address this problem, we propose the construction of a simple, low-cost (about $150 U.S.) automatic photometric titrator employing a light-emitting diode (LED) and a phototransistor. The electronic circuit can be assembled by the students themselves. The device was employed to implement a common procedure in chemical labs, making feasible the introduction of concepts related to electronics in undergraduate chemistry courses. The titrator is able to work automatically, since a feedback system permits stopping the addition of titrant solution when the end-point is achieved. With this demonstration, it can be stressed that automatic procedures can be implemented without expensive instruments. Additionally, a classical procedure becomes more attractive to the students and its importance to chemical analysis can be emphasized. The feasibility of the titrator was demonstrated by acid-base titrations of HCl solutions with NaOH in the presence of phenolphthalein and by iodimetric determination of ascorbic acid in vitamin C tablets and lemon juice. Precise results (0.7% relative standard deviation, n = 10) in agreement at the 95% confidence level with those attained by a conventional procedure were obtained.

  4. Theoretical curves in indicator photometric titration of monodentate polyatomic ligands by metal ions

    SciTech Connect

    Kuznetsov, V.V.; Shamanskii, V.A.

    1986-03-20

    On the basis of the law of mass action and material balance conditions, theoretical equations have been derived for the curves obtained in indicator photometric titration of anionic ligands by metal ions for the cases of formation of complexes ML, M/sub 2/L, and ML/sub 2/. Correspondence between theoretical and experimental titration curves has been demonstrated, thus making it possible to explain the factual material and to use reactions of low-stability complex formation in photometric titrations.

  5. Automatic photometric titrations of calcium and magnesium in carbonate rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shapiro, L.; Brannock, W.W.

    1955-01-01

    Rapid nonsubjective methods have been developed for the determination of calcium and magnesium in carbonate rocks. From a single solution of the sample, calcium is titrated directly, and magnesium is titrated after a rapid removal of R2O3 and precipitation of calcium as the tungstate. A concentrated and a dilute solution of disodium ethylenediamine tetraacetate are used as titrants. The concentrated solution is added almost to the end point, then the weak solution is added in an automatic titrator to determine the end point precisely.

  6. Photometric titration of small quantities of metals with ethylenediaminetetra-acetic acid.

    PubMed

    Belcher, R; Crossland, B; Fennell, T R

    1969-09-01

    A commercially available photometric titration apparatus has been used for the determination ofAl, Ba, Bi, Ca, Cd, Co, Mg, Mn, Ni and Zn in the 4-20 mug range and of Hg in the 16-32 mug range. Pooled standard deviations (32 determinations) of between 0.09 and 0.15 mug were found for all the metals except Ba (0.20 mug) and Hg (0.44 mug, 24 determinations).

  7. [Photometric micro-titration model of DPPH radicals scavenging activity and its application].

    PubMed

    Gao, Yun-tao; Wei, Wei; Ye, Li-qing; Li, Xiao-fen; Liu, Ping; Zhang, Hong-jiao; Yang, Lu; Yu, Jiao-jiao; Cha, Jia-wei

    2015-02-01

    In the present paper, the stoichiometric ratio (R) for the interreaction of DPPH radicals with the antoxidant was employed as a evaluation index for DPPH radicals scavenging activity of antioxidants. This evaluation index was related only with the stoichiometric relationship between DPPH radicals and the antioxidant, not the relationship with the initial DPPH amount and the volume of sample, which could offer a solution for the problem of poor comparability of EC50 under different conditions. A novel photometric micro-titration method was proposed for the determination of the stoichiometric ratio (R) for the interreaction of DPPH radicals with the antoxidant. The titration equation was established based on the absorbance difference (deltaA) of DPPH radicals in the titration process and the added amount of antoxidant. The stoichiometric ratio (R) for the reaction of DPPH radicals with the addition amount of antoxidant was determined by the titration equation obtained, while, the DPPH median elimination concentration (EC50) of antoxidant can be calculated by the stoichiometric ratio (R). The above photometric micro-titration model was verified using rutin as DPPH radicals scavenger. As experiment results, the stoichiometric ratio (R) of DPPH radicals to rutin was determined to be in the range of 1.817-1.846. The calculated value of EC50 was 1.196 x 10(-3), 2.392 x 10(-3), 4.819 x 10(-3) and 7.292 x 10(-3) mg x mL(-1) for 1.12 x 10(-7), 2.24 x 10(-7), 4.48 x 10(-7) and 6.72 x 10(-7) mol of the additon amount of DPPH radicals, respectively. The proposed method has better precision and reliability with smaller amount of sample than conventional method. While, the obtained stoichiometric ratio value (R) of rutin was employed to calculate the rutin median elimination concentration for DPPH EC50) according to the conditions as reported in the literatures, and the calculated results were consistent with that reported in the literatures.

  8. Scopolamine Effects Under a Titrating-Delayed-Nonmatching-to-Position Procedure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porritt, M.; Poling, A.

    2008-01-01

    In a study of working memory, the performance of rats under titrating-delayed-nonmatching- to-position (TDNMTP) procedures was examined. Overall accuracy and the number of trials completed were inversely related to titration value, whereas the highest delay attained was directly related to titration value. When given intraperitoneally,…

  9. Comparison of VFA titration procedures used for monitoring the biogas process.

    PubMed

    Lützhøft, Hans-Christian Holten; Boe, Kanokwan; Fang, Cheng; Angelidaki, Irini

    2014-05-01

    Titrimetric determination of volatile fatty acids (VFAs) contents is a common way to monitor a biogas process. However, digested manure from co-digestion biogas plants has a complex matrix with high concentrations of interfering components, resulting in varying results when using different titration procedures. Currently, no standardized procedure is used and it is therefore difficult to compare the performance among plants. The aim of this study was to evaluate four titration procedures (for determination of VFA-levels of digested manure samples) and compare results with gas chromatographic (GC) analysis. Two of the procedures are commonly used in biogas plants and two are discussed in literature. The results showed that the optimal titration results were obtained when 40 mL of four times diluted digested manure was gently stirred (200 rpm). Results from samples with different VFA concentrations (1-11 g/L) showed linear correlation between titration results and GC measurements. However, determination of VFA by titration generally overestimated the VFA contents compared with GC measurements when samples had low VFA concentrations, i.e. around 1 g/L. The accuracy of titration increased when samples had high VFA concentrations, i.e. around 5 g/L. It was further found that the studied ionisable interfering components had lowest effect on titration when the sample had high VFA concentration. In contrast, bicarbonate, phosphate and lactate had significant effect on titration accuracy at low VFA concentration. An extended 5-point titration procedure with pH correction was best to handle interferences from bicarbonate, phosphate and lactate at low VFA concentrations. Contrary, the simplest titration procedure with only two pH end-points showed the highest accuracy among all titration procedures at high VFA concentrations. All in all, if the composition of the digested manure sample is not known, the procedure with only two pH end-points should be the procedure of

  10. A new oxidimetric reagent: potassium dichromate in a strong phosphoric acid medium--VII. Photometric titration of vanadium(IV) and of cerium(III) alone and in mixtures with iroN(II).

    PubMed

    Rao, G G; Rao, P K

    1967-01-01

    Vanadium(IV) can be accurately titrated with potassium dichromate in media containing phosphoric acid of 3-12M concentration: the change in absorption of vanadium(IV) is followed in the region 660 mmicro using a red filter. It is more convenient to carry out the titration in 3M phosphoric acid because at higher concentrations chloride, nitrate, cerium(III) and manganese(II) may interfere. Photoelcetric titration is more convenient than potentiometric because the former can be made in a 3M phosphoric acid medium, whereas the latter is possible only in 12M phosphoric acid. The simultaneous differential photometric titration of iron(II) and vanadium(IV) is also possible. Conditions have been found for the photometric titration of cerium(III) and of cerium(III) plus iron(II). The titration is carried out (at 450 mmicro or with a blue filter) in about 10.5M phosphoric acid. Application of the method to a cerium mineral is considered.

  11. Acid-base properties of the alumina surface: influence of the titration procedures on the microcalorimetric results.

    PubMed

    Morel, Jean-Pierre; Marmier, Nicolas; Hurel, Charlotte; Morel-Desrosiers, Nicole

    2009-10-01

    The enthalpy changes associated with the protonation and deprotonation of an alumina surface have been determined on the basis of microcalorimetry experiments and acid-base potentiometric titrations at 25 degrees C. It has been shown that the results may vary significantly according to the experimental procedure. In order to do so, the potentiometric and microcalorimetric titrations have been carried out first from an acidic pH to basic pH and second from a pH near the pH(zpc) of alumina to acidic or basic pH. It has been demonstrated that the pK(a) values deduced from the potentiometric titrations are the same whatever the experimental protocol whereas the only way to obtain meaningful enthalpies of proton exchange is to carry out microcalorimetric titrations by starting around the point of zero charge.

  12. A Highly Sensitive Multicommuted Flow Analysis Procedure for Photometric Determination of Molybdenum in Plant Materials without a Solvent Extraction Step

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Felisberto G.

    2017-01-01

    A highly sensitive analytical procedure for photometric determination of molybdenum in plant materials was developed and validated. This procedure is based on the reaction of Mo(V) with thiocyanate ions (SCN−) in acidic medium to form a compound that can be monitored at 474 nm and was implemented employing a multicommuted flow analysis setup. Photometric detection was performed using an LED-based photometer coupled to a flow cell with a long optical path length (200 mm) to achieve high sensitivity, allowing Mo(V) determination at a level of μg L−1 without the use of an organic solvent extraction step. After optimization of operational conditions, samples of digested plant materials were analyzed employing the proposed procedure. The accuracy was assessed by comparing the obtained results with those of a reference method, with an agreement observed at 95% confidence level. In addition, a detection limit of 9.1 μg L−1, a linear response (r = 0.9969) over the concentration range of 50–500 μg L−1, generation of only 3.75 mL of waste per determination, and a sampling rate of 51 determinations per hour were achieved. PMID:28357152

  13. A Highly Sensitive Multicommuted Flow Analysis Procedure for Photometric Determination of Molybdenum in Plant Materials without a Solvent Extraction Step.

    PubMed

    Santos, Felisberto G; Reis, Boaventura F

    2017-01-01

    A highly sensitive analytical procedure for photometric determination of molybdenum in plant materials was developed and validated. This procedure is based on the reaction of Mo(V) with thiocyanate ions (SCN(-)) in acidic medium to form a compound that can be monitored at 474 nm and was implemented employing a multicommuted flow analysis setup. Photometric detection was performed using an LED-based photometer coupled to a flow cell with a long optical path length (200 mm) to achieve high sensitivity, allowing Mo(V) determination at a level of μg L(-1) without the use of an organic solvent extraction step. After optimization of operational conditions, samples of digested plant materials were analyzed employing the proposed procedure. The accuracy was assessed by comparing the obtained results with those of a reference method, with an agreement observed at 95% confidence level. In addition, a detection limit of 9.1 μg L(-1), a linear response (r = 0.9969) over the concentration range of 50-500 μg L(-1), generation of only 3.75 mL of waste per determination, and a sampling rate of 51 determinations per hour were achieved.

  14. An Environmental Friendly Procedure for Photometric Determination of Hypochlorite in Tap Water Employing a Miniaturized Multicommuted Flow Analysis Setup

    PubMed Central

    Borges, Sivanildo S.; Reis, Boaventura F.

    2011-01-01

    A photometric procedure for the determination of ClO− in tap water employing a miniaturized multicommuted flow analysis setup and an LED-based photometer is described. The analytical procedure was implemented using leucocrystal violet (LCV; 4,4′,4′′-methylidynetris (N,N-dimethylaniline), C25H31N3) as a chromogenic reagent. Solenoid micropumps employed for solutions propelling were assembled together with the photometer in order to compose a compact unit of small dimensions. After control variables optimization, the system was applied for the determination of ClO− in samples of tap water, and aiming accuracy assessment samples were also analyzed using an independent method. Applying the paired t-test between results obtained using both methods, no significant difference at the 95% confidence level was observed. Other useful features include low reagent consumption, 2.4 μg of LCV per determination, a linear response ranging from 0.02 up to 2.0 mg L−1  ClO−, a relative standard deviation of 1.0% (n = 11) for samples containing 0.2 mg L−1  ClO−, a detection limit of 6.0 μg L−1  ClO−, a sampling throughput of 84 determinations per hour, and a waste generation of 432 μL per determination. PMID:21747732

  15. Microscale Titration in Schools Titration Competition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Michael J.

    1998-01-01

    Reviews the requirements of the National Titration Competition and describes how a team in a local competition used the technique. Compares microscale titration to conventional titration. Outlines the benefits of employing microscale techniques. (DDR)

  16. Coulometric titration of bases in acetic acid and acetonitrile media.

    PubMed

    Vajgand, V J; Mihajlović, R

    1969-09-01

    The working conditions and the results for coulometric titration of milligram amounts of some bases in 0.1M sodium perchlorate in a mixture of acetic acid and acetic anhydride (1:6), are given. Determinations were made both by coulometric back-titration or direct titration at the platinum anode. Back-titration was done in the catholyte, by coulometric titration of the excess of added perchloric acid. The titration end-point was detected photometrically with Crystal Violet as indicator. The direct titration of bases was done at the platinum anode, in the same electrolyte, to which hydroquinone was added as anode depolarizer and as the source of hydrogen ions, Malachite Green being used as indicator. Similarly, bases can be determined in acetonitrile if sodium perchlorate, hydroquinone and Malachite Green are added to the solvent. Errors are below 1 %, and the precision is satisfactory.

  17. Photometric microdetermination of malathion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kallman, B.J.

    1962-01-01

    Carboxylic esters and lactones react with alkaline hydroxylamine to yield hydroxamates; these in acidic solution form colored iron(III) complexes. A photometric determination of such esters and lactones is thus permitted and has been extensively applied ( I-6). Hestrin ( 3) utilized this method for the microdetermination of acetylcholine and his procedure is much used for the in vitro study of cholinesterase activity and inhibition (4-6).

  18. Postoperative intravenous morphine titration.

    PubMed

    Aubrun, F; Mazoit, J-X; Riou, B

    2012-02-01

    Relief of acute pain during the immediate postoperative period is an important task for anaesthetists. Morphine is widely used to control moderate-to-severe postoperative pain and the use of small i.v. boluses of morphine in the post-anaesthesia care unit allows a rapid titration of the dose needed for adequate pain relief. The essential principle of a titration regimen must be to adapt the morphine dose to the pain level. Although morphine would not appear to be the most appropriate choice for achieving rapid pain relief, this is the sole opioid assessed in many studies of immediate postoperative pain management using titration. More than 90% of the patients have pain relief using a protocol of morphine titration and the mean dose required to obtain pain relief is 12 (7) mg, after a median of four boluses. Sedation is frequent during i.v. morphine titration and should be considered as a morphine-related adverse event and not evidence of pain relief. The incidence of ventilatory depression is very low when the criteria to limit the dose of i.v. morphine are enforced. Morphine titration can be used with caution in elderly patients, in children, or in obese patients. In practice, i.v. morphine titration allows the physician to meet the needs of individual patients rapidly and limits the risk of overdose making this method the first step in postoperative pain management.

  19. Colloid Titration--A Rapid Method for the Determination of Charged Colloid.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ueno, Keihei; Kina, Ken'yu

    1985-01-01

    "Colloid titration" is a volumetric method for determining charged polyelectrolytes in aqueous solutions. The principle of colloid titration, reagents used in the procedure, methods of endpoint detection, preparation of reagent solutions, general procedure used, results obtained, and pH profile of colloid titration are considered. (JN)

  20. Linear titration plots for polyfunctional weak acids and bases.

    PubMed

    Midgley, D; McCallum, C

    1976-04-01

    Procedures are derived for obtaining the equivalence volumes in the potentiometric titrations of polyfunctional weak acids and weak bases by a linear titration plot method. The effect of errors in the equilibrium constants on the accuracy is considered. A Fortran program is available to do the calculations.

  1. Spectrophotometric Titration of a Mixture of Calcium and Magnesium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fulton, Robert; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Describes a spectrophotometric titration experiment which uses a manual titration spectrophotometer and manually operated buret, rather than special instrumentation. Identifies the equipment, materials, and procedures needed for the completion of the experiment. Recommends the use of this experiment in introductory quantitative analysis…

  2. pH Static Titration: A Quasistatic Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michalowski, Tadeusz; Toporek, Marcin; Rymanowski, Maciej

    2007-01-01

    The pH-static titration is applicable to those systems where at least two types of reactions occur in comparable intensities. The commonalities in titrimetric procedure realized according to pH-static titration, irrespective of the kind of chemical processes occurring are discussed.

  3. Filtrates & Residues: Olfactory Titration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, John T.; Eddy, Roberta M.

    1996-01-01

    Presents an experiment that uses a unique acid-base indicator--the odor of raw onion--to indicate the end point of the titration of sodium hydroxide with hydrochloric acid. Allows the student to detect the completion of the neutralization reaction by olfaction rather than sight. (JRH)

  4. Titrimetric and photometric methods for determination of hypochlorite in commercial bleaches.

    PubMed

    Jonnalagadda, Sreekanth B; Gengan, Prabhashini

    2010-01-01

    Two methods, simple titration and photometric methods for determination of hypochlorite are developed, based its reaction with hydrogen peroxide and titration of the residual peroxide by acidic permanganate. In the titration method, the residual hydrogen peroxide is estimated by titration with standard permanganate solution to estimate the hypochlorite concentration. The photometric method is devised to measure the concentration of remaining permanganate, after the reaction with residual hydrogen peroxide. It employs 4 ranges of calibration curves to enable the determination of hypochlorite accurately. The new photometric method measures hypochlorite in the range 1.90 x 10(-3) to 1.90 x 10(-2) M, with high accuracy and with low variance. The concentrations of hypochlorite in diverse commercial bleach samples and in seawater which is enriched with hypochlorite were estimated using the proposed method and compared with the arsenite method. The statistical analysis validates the superiority of the proposed method.

  5. Titration Curves: Fact and Fiction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chamberlain, John

    1997-01-01

    Discusses ways in which datalogging equipment can enable titration curves to be measured accurately and how computing power can be used to predict the shape of curves. Highlights include sources of error, use of spreadsheets to generate titration curves, titration of a weak acid with a strong alkali, dibasic acids, weak acid and weak base, and…

  6. Neutron absorptiometric titration.

    PubMed

    Tölgyessy, J; Varga, S; Dillinger, P

    1967-03-01

    A method is outlined for detection of two-phase titration end-points by means of an abrupt change in the neutron-absorption characteristics of one of the phases. One of the components of the precipitate must have a large neutron absorption cross-section, and the disappearance or appearance of neutron absorption by the supernatant liquid from the precipitation reaction then marks the completion of precipitation.

  7. Ion-selective electrodes in potentiometric titrations; a new method for processing and evaluating titration data.

    PubMed

    Granholm, Kim; Sokalski, Tomasz; Lewenstam, Andrzej; Ivaska, Ari

    2015-08-12

    A new method to convert the potential of an ion-selective electrode to concentration or activity in potentiometric titration is proposed. The advantage of this method is that the electrode standard potential and the slope of the calibration curve do not have to be known. Instead two activities on the titration curve have to be estimated e.g. the starting activity before the titration begins and the activity at the end of the titration in the presence of large excess of titrant. This new method is beneficial when the analyte is in a complexed matrix or in a harsh environment which affects the properties of the electrode and the traditional calibration procedure with standard solutions cannot be used. The new method was implemented both in a method of linearization based on the Grans's plot and in determination of the stability constant of a complex and the concentration of the complexing ligand in the sample. The new method gave accurate results when using titrations data from experiments with samples of known composition and with real industrial harsh black liquor sample. A complexometric titration model was also developed.

  8. Potentiometric/turbidometric titration of antiperspirant actives.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Clifford T; Hem, Stanley L; Guenin, Eric; Mattai, Jairajh; Afflito, John

    2003-01-01

    A titration procedure that simultaneously monitors the pH and turbidity of an antiperspirant solution during neutralization with sodium hydroxide was developed to characterize antiperspirant actives. Aluminum chloride, aluminum chlorohydrate (ACH), and aluminum zirconium glycine complex (AZG) gave distinctive pH/turbidity profiles. The activated forms of aluminum chlorohydrate (ACH') and aluminum zirconium glycine complex (AZG') produced more turbidity than the non-activated forms. On an equimolar basis, AZG' produced more turbidity than any of the antiperspirant actives tested.

  9. Coulometric titration of urea with electrogenerated hypobromite.

    PubMed

    Kato, Jun; Koseki, Takuma; Aoki, Yukie; Yamada, Ayako; Tanaka, Tatsuhiko

    2013-01-01

    A definitive method is described for the indirect assay of several tens of milligrams of urea by coulometric titration. Urea was decomposed in concentrated sulfuric acid using a Kjeldahl flask. Subsequently, the formed ammonium ion was titrated with electrogenerated hypobromite ion in a sodium bromide-sodium tetraborate medium of pH 8.6, with amperometric end-point detection. Parameters affecting the pretreatment procedure were evaluated. The optimized conditions included the heating of 2 g of urea at around 300°C for 2 h with 10 cm(3) of sulfuric acid. Under the proposed conditions, the assay value with expanded uncertainty (k = 2), 99.870 ± 0.026%, agreed well with the certified value of NIST SRM 912a urea, 99.9 ± 0.1%.

  10. Effects of Acute and Chronic Cocaine Administration on Titrating-Delay Matching-to-Sample Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kangas, Brian D.; Branch, Marc N.

    2012-01-01

    The effects of cocaine were examined under a titrating-delay matching-to-sample procedure. In this procedure, the delay between sample stimulus offset and comparison stimuli onset adjusts as a function of the subject's performance. Specifically, matches increase the delay and mismatches decrease the delay. Titrated delay values served as the…

  11. THE ALHAMBRA PHOTOMETRIC SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Villegas, T. Aparicio; Alfaro, E. J.; Cabrera-Cano, J. E-mail: emilio@iaa.es

    2010-03-15

    This paper presents the characterization of the optical range of the ALHAMBRA photometric system, a 20 contiguous, equal-width, medium-band CCD system with wavelength coverage from 3500 A to 9700 A. The photometric description of the system is done by presenting the full response curve as a product of the filters, CCD, and atmospheric transmission curves, and using some first- and second-order moments of this response function. We also introduce the set of standard stars that defines the system, formed by 31 classic spectrophotometric standard stars which have been used in the calibration of other known photometric systems, and 288 stars, flux calibrated homogeneously, from the Next Generation Spectral Library (NGSL). Based on the NGSL, we determine the transformation equations between Sloan Digital Sky Survey ugriz photometry and the ALHAMBRA photometric system, in order to establish some relations between both systems. Finally, we develop and discuss a strategy to calculate the photometric zero points of the different pointings in the ALHAMBRA project.

  12. Amperometric, Bipotentiometric, and Coulometric Titration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stock, John T.

    1980-01-01

    Discusses recent review articles in various kinds of titration. Also discusses new research in apparatus and methodology, acid-base reactions, precipitation and complexing reactions, oxidation-reduction reactions, and nomenclature. Cites 338 references. (CS)

  13. Quantitative determination of wine highly volatile sulfur compounds by using automated headspace solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography-pulsed flame photometric detection. Critical study and optimization of a new procedure.

    PubMed

    López, Ricardo; Lapeña, Ana Cristina; Cacho, Juan; Ferreira, Vicente

    2007-03-02

    The quantitative determination of wine volatile sulfur compounds by automated headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) with a carboxen-polydimethylsiloxane (CAR-PDMS) fiber and subsequent gas chromatography-pulsed flame photometric detection (GC-PFPD) has been evaluated. The direct extraction of the sulfur compounds in 5 ml of wine has been found to suffer from matrix effects and short linear ranges, problems which could not be solved by the use of different internal standards or by multiple headspace SPME. These problems were attributed to saturation of the fiber and to competitive effects between analytes, internal standards and other wine volatiles. Another problem was the oxidation of analytes during the procedure. The reduction in sample volume by a factor 50 (0.1 ml diluted with water or brine) brought about a reduction in the amount of sulfur compounds taken in the fiber by a factor just 3.3. Consequently, a new procedure has been proposed. In a sealed vial containing 4.9 ml of saturated NaCl brine, the air is thoroughly displaced with nitrogen, and the wine (0.1 ml) and the internal standards (0.02 ml) are further introduced with a syringe through the vial septum. This sample is extracted at 35 degrees C for 20 min. This procedure makes a satisfactory determination possible of hydrogen sulfide, methanethiol, ethanethiol, dimethyl sulfide, diethyl sulfide and dimethyl disulfide. The linear dynamic ranges cover the normal ranges of occurrence of these analytes in wine with typical r2 between 0.9823 and 0.9980. Reproducibility in real samples ranges from 10 to 20% and repeatability is better than 10% in most cases. The method accuracy is satisfactory, with errors below 20% for hydrogen sulfide and mostly below 10% for the other compounds. The proposed method has been applied to the analysis of 34 Spanish wines.

  14. Photometric Lunar Surface Reconstruction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nefian, Ara V.; Alexandrov, Oleg; Morattlo, Zachary; Kim, Taemin; Beyer, Ross A.

    2013-01-01

    Accurate photometric reconstruction of the Lunar surface is important in the context of upcoming NASA robotic missions to the Moon and in giving a more accurate understanding of the Lunar soil composition. This paper describes a novel approach for joint estimation of Lunar albedo, camera exposure time, and photometric parameters that utilizes an accurate Lunar-Lambertian reflectance model and previously derived Lunar topography of the area visualized during the Apollo missions. The method introduced here is used in creating the largest Lunar albedo map (16% of the Lunar surface) at the resolution of 10 meters/pixel.

  15. Asphalt compatibility testing using the automated Heithaus titration test

    SciTech Connect

    Pauli, A.T.

    1996-12-31

    The Heithaus titration test or variations of the test have been used for over 35 years to predict compatibilities of blends of asphalts from different crude sources. Asphalt compatibility is determined from three calculated parameters that measure the state of peptization of an asphalt or asphalt blend. The parameter p{sub a} is a measure of the peptizability of the asphaltenes. The parameter p{sub a} is a measure of the peptizing power of the maltenes, and the parameter P, derived from p{sub a} and p{sub o} values, is a measure of the overall state of peptization of the asphalt or asphalt blend. In Heithaus original procedure, samples of asphalt were dissolved in toluene and titrated with n-heptane in order to initiate flocculation. The onset of flocculation was detected either by photography or by spotting a filter paper with a small amount of the titrated solution. Recently, an {open_quotes}automated{close_quotes} procedure, after Hotier and Robin, has been developed for use with asphalt. In the automated method UV-visible spectrophotometric detection measures the onset of flocculation as a peak with the percent transmittance plotted as a function of the volume of titrating solvent added to a solution of asphalt. The automated procedure has proven to be less operator dependent and much faster than the original Heithaus procedure. Results from the automated procedure show the data to be consistent with results from the original, {open_quotes}classical{close_quotes} Heithaus procedure.

  16. Luminescence Titrations of Polyelectrolytes.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-05-01

    aluentered JA Week N it ditiu’I ken A60010 IL. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES IS. Kay WORDS (CaaIAhu. an revrn ide "I .. eesese md =0uI1Y 6F we"A amA .) Polyele...Polyelectrolytes are also seeing increasing use as agents for the preparation of chemically modified electrodes (3,4). The equivalent weight (EW) of the...sufficiently large, Imax will be reached after a small excess of polyelectrolyte solution has been added. Standard (28) extrapolation procedures may then be used

  17. Standard Asteroid Photometric Catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piironen, J.; Lagerkvist, C.-I.; Torppa, J.; Kaasalainen, M.; Warner, B.

    2001-12-01

    The Asteroid Photometric Catalogue (APC) is now in its fifth update with over 8600 lightcurves of more than 1000 asteroids in the database. The APC also has references of over one thousand lightcurves not in digital format. The catalogue has been published by Uppsala University Observatory and is distributed by request (contact: classe@astro.uu.se). The new update also includes a list of known asteroid rotational periods and a CD-ROM containing all the existing digital data in the APC. The total number of observed lightcurves is growing rapidly, not the least because of the new state-of-the-art equipment and growing interest among amateur astronomers. The photometric database is now so large that the present format must be altered to facilitate a user-friendly on-line service for the down- and uploading of data. We are proposing (and have started to construct) a new Internet-based Standard Asteroid Photometric Catalogue (SAPC). The website is planned to open during the first half of the year 2002. In addition to the data files, the site would contain the index and guide to the catalogue, a web-form for reporting observations, and some general observing guidelines (e.g., on filters, timing, etc.). There would also be a list of asteroids for which more observations are needed, together with recommended observing periods. This would be accompanied by an up-to-date collection of physical asteroid models based on photometric data, as well as links to observer network pages and other sites that work in collaboration with the catalogue project. Our aim is to develop this site into a global standard service used by everyone involved in asteroid photometry.

  18. Determination of Acidity Constants by Gradient Flow-Injection Titration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conceicao, Antonio C. L.; Minas da Piedade, Manuel E.

    2006-01-01

    A three-hour laboratory experiment, designed for an advanced undergraduate course in instrumental analysis that illustrates the application of the gradient chamber flow-injection titration (GCFIT) method with spectrophotometric detection to determine acidity constants is presented. The procedure involves the use of an acid-base indicator to obtain…

  19. Amperometric, Bipotentiometric, and Coulometric Titration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stock, John T.

    1984-01-01

    Reviews literature on amperometric, bipotentiometric, and coulometric titration methods examining: apparatus and methodology; acid-base reactions; precipitation and complexing reactions (considering methods involving silver, mercury, EDTA or analogous reagents, and other organic compounds); and oxidation-reduction reactions (considering methods…

  20. Assembling and Using an LED-Based Detector to Monitor Absorbance Changes during Acid-Base Titrations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santos, Willy G.; Cavalheiro, E´der T. G.

    2015-01-01

    A simple photometric assembly based in an LED as a light source and a photodiode as a detector is proposed in order to follow the absorbance changes as a function of the titrant volume added during the course of acid-base titrations in the presence of a suitable visual indicator. The simplicity and low cost of the electronic device allow the…

  1. Photometric properties of Mars soils analogs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pommerol, A.; Thomas, N.; Jost, B.; Beck, P.; Okubo, C.; McEwen, A.S.

    2013-01-01

    We have measured the bidirectional reflectance of analogs of dry, wet, and frozen Martian soils over a wide range of phase angles in the visible spectral range. All samples were produced from two geologic samples: the standard JSC Mars-1 soil simulant and Hawaiian basaltic sand. In a first step, experiments were conducted with the dry samples to investigate the effects of surface texture. Comparisons with results independently obtained by different teams with similar samples showed a satisfying reproducibility of the photometric measurements as well as a noticeable influence of surface textures resulting from different sample preparation procedures. In a second step, water was introduced to produce wet and frozen samples and their photometry investigated. Optical microscope images of the samples provided information about their microtexture. Liquid water, even in relatively low amount, resulted in the disappearance of the backscattering peak and the appearance of a forward-scattering peak whose intensity increases with the amount of water. Specular reflections only appeared when water was present in an amount large enough to allow water to form a film at the surface of the sample. Icy samples showed a wide variability of photometric properties depending on the physical properties of the water ice. We discuss the implications of these measurements in terms of the expected photometric behavior of the Martian surface, from equatorial to circum-polar regions. In particular, we propose some simple photometric criteria to improve the identification of wet and/or icy soils from multiple observations under different geometries.

  2. Titration of chaos with added noise

    PubMed Central

    Poon, Chi-Sang; Barahona, Mauricio

    2001-01-01

    Deterministic chaos has been implicated in numerous natural and man-made complex phenomena ranging from quantum to astronomical scales and in disciplines as diverse as meteorology, physiology, ecology, and economics. However, the lack of a definitive test of chaos vs. random noise in experimental time series has led to considerable controversy in many fields. Here we propose a numerical titration procedure as a simple “litmus test” for highly sensitive, specific, and robust detection of chaos in short noisy data without the need for intensive surrogate data testing. We show that the controlled addition of white or colored noise to a signal with a preexisting noise floor results in a titration index that: (i) faithfully tracks the onset of deterministic chaos in all standard bifurcation routes to chaos; and (ii) gives a relative measure of chaos intensity. Such reliable detection and quantification of chaos under severe conditions of relatively low signal-to-noise ratio is of great interest, as it may open potential practical ways of identifying, forecasting, and controlling complex behaviors in a wide variety of physical, biomedical, and socioeconomic systems. PMID:11416195

  3. Colorblindness and Titrations with Visual Indicators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diehl, Harvey; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Discusses various issues related to colorblind students performing titrations with visual indicators. Includes tables showing precisions in the titration of a weak acid by colorblind students using phenolphthalein and thymolphthalein and in the titration of a weak base by colorblind persons using methyl red and bromcresol green. (JN)

  4. Evaluation of the 5 and 8 pH point titration methods for monitoring anaerobic digesters treating solid waste.

    PubMed

    Vannecke, T P W; Lampens, D R A; Ekama, G A; Volcke, E I P

    2015-01-01

    Simple titration methods certainly deserve consideration for on-site routine monitoring of volatile fatty acid (VFA) concentration and alkalinity during anaerobic digestion (AD), because of their simplicity, speed and cost-effectiveness. In this study, the 5 and 8 pH point titration methods for measuring the VFA concentration and carbonate system alkalinity (H2CO3*-alkalinity) were assessed and compared. For this purpose, synthetic solutions with known H2CO3*-alkalinity and VFA concentration as well as samples from anaerobic digesters treating three different kind of solid wastes were analysed. The results of these two related titration methods were verified with photometric and high-pressure liquid chromatography measurements. It was shown that photometric measurements lead to overestimations of the VFA concentration in the case of coloured samples. In contrast, the 5 pH point titration method provides an accurate estimation of the VFA concentration, clearly corresponding with the true value. Concerning the H2CO3*-alkalinity, the most accurate and precise estimations, showing very similar results for repeated measurements, were obtained using the 8 pH point titration. Overall, it was concluded that the 5 pH point titration method is the preferred method for the practical monitoring of AD of solid wastes due to its robustness, cost efficiency and user-friendliness.

  5. An elevated temperature titration calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.R.; Zanonato, P.L.; Choppin, G.R. . Dept. of Chemistry)

    1991-06-01

    A variable-temperature (313 K to 353 K) titration calorimeter of high sensitivity has been constructed. The purpose of the calorimeter is to study temperature effects on the enthalpies of complex formation and of other reactions of metal cations such as hydrolysis and precipitation. Operation of the calorimetric system, including that final calculation of the heat released during titration, is automatic via computer control. Calibration tests of the calorimeter using 2-amino-2-hydroxymethyl-1,3-propanediol gave -(46.0 {plus minus} 0.3) kJ mol{sup {minus}1} and -(46.2 {plus minus} 0.2) kJ mol{sup {minus}1} for the enthalpy of protonation, at 318 K and at 343 K, respectively. For titrations of 2-bis(2-hydroxyethyl) amino-2-hydroxymethyl-1,3-propanediol, enthalpy of protonation values of -(28.4 {plus minus} 0.3) kJ mol{sup {minus}1} and -(29.3 {plus minus} 0.2) kJ mol{sup {minus}1} were obtained at 318 K and at 343 K, respectively. 6 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Supernova Photometric Lightcurve Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaidi, Tayeb; Narayan, Gautham

    2016-01-01

    This is a preliminary report on photometric supernova classification. We first explore the properties of supernova light curves, and attempt to restructure the unevenly sampled and sparse data from assorted datasets to allow for processing and classification. The data was primarily drawn from the Dark Energy Survey (DES) simulated data, created for the Supernova Photometric Classification Challenge. This poster shows a method for producing a non-parametric representation of the light curve data, and applying a Random Forest classifier algorithm to distinguish between supernovae types. We examine the impact of Principal Component Analysis to reduce the dimensionality of the dataset, for future classification work. The classification code will be used in a stage of the ANTARES pipeline, created for use on the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope alert data and other wide-field surveys. The final figure-of-merit for the DES data in the r band was 60% for binary classification (Type I vs II).Zaidi was supported by the NOAO/KPNO Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) Program which is funded by the National Science Foundation Research Experiences for Undergraduates Program (AST-1262829).

  7. Going Beyond, Going Further: The Preparation of Acid-Base Titration Curves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClendon, Michael

    1984-01-01

    Background information, list of materials needed, and procedures used are provided for a simple technique for generating mechanically plotted acid-base titration curves. The method is suitable for second-year high school chemistry students. (JN)

  8. Photometric Redshifts of Galaxies in COSMOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mobasher, B.; Capak, P.; Scoville, N. Z.; Dahlen, T.; Salvato, M.; Aussel, H.; Thompson, D. J.; Feldmann, R.; Tasca, L.; Le Fevre, O.; Lilly, S.; Carollo, C. M.; Kartaltepe, J. S.; McCracken, H.; Mould, J.; Renzini, A.; Sanders, D. B.; Shopbell, P. L.; Taniguchi, Y.; Ajiki, M.; Shioya, Y.; Contini, T.; Giavalisco, M.; Ilbert, O.; Iovino, A.; Le Brun, V.; Mainieri, V.; Mignoli, M.; Scodeggio, M.

    2007-09-01

    We present photometric redshifts for the COSMOS survey derived from a new code, optimized to yield accurate and reliable redshifts and spectral types of galaxies down to faint magnitudes and redshifts out to z~1.2. The technique uses χ2 template fitting, combined with luminosity function priors and with the option to estimate the internal extinction [or E(B-V)]. The median most probable redshift, best-fit spectral type and reddening, absolute magnitude, and stellar mass are derived in addition to the full redshift probability distributions. Using simulations with sampling and noise similar to those in COSMOS, the accuracy and reliability is estimated for the photometric redshifts as a function of the magnitude limits of the sample, S/N ratios, and the number of bands used. We find from the simulations that the ratio of derived 95% confidence interval in the χ2 probability distribution to the estimated photometric redshift (D95) can be used to identify and exclude the catastrophic failures in the photometric redshift estimates. To evaluate the reliability of the photometric redshifts, we compare the derived redshifts with high-reliability spectroscopic redshifts for a sample of 868 normal galaxies with z<1.2 from zCOSMOS. Considering different scenarios, depending on using prior, no prior, and/or extinction, we compare the photometric and spectroscopic redshifts for this sample. The rms scatter between the estimated photometric redshifts and known spectroscopic redshifts is σ(Δ(z))=0.031, where Δ(z)=(zphot-zspec)/(1+zspec) with a small fraction of outliers (<2.5%) [outliers are defined as objects with Δ(z)>3σ(Δ(z)), where σ(Δ(z)) is the rms scatter in Δ(z)]. We also find good agreement [σ(Δ(z))=0.10] between photometric and spectroscopic redshifts for type II AGNs. We compare results from our photometric redshift procedure with three other independent codes and find them in excellent agreement. We show preliminary results, based on photometric redshifts

  9. Simultaneous determination of equivalence volumes and acid dissociation constants from potentiometric titration data.

    PubMed

    Papanastasiou, G; Ziogas, I

    1995-06-01

    New iterative methods for analysis of potentiometric titration data of (a) mixtures of weak monoprotic acids with their conjugate bases, (b) solutions of polyprotic (di- and triprotic) acids, and (c) mixtures of two diprotic acids are presented. These methods, using data exclusively resulting from the acidic region of the titration curve permits the accurate determination of the analytical concentration of one or more acids even if the titration is stopped well before the end point of the titration. For the titration of a solution containing a conjugate acid/base pair, the proposed procedure enables the extraction of the initial composition of the mixture, as well as the dissociation constant of the concerned acid. Thus, it is possible by this type of analysis to distinguish whether a weak acid has been contaminated by a strong base and define the extent of the contamination. On the other hand, for the titration of polyprotic acids, the proposed approach enables the extraction of the accurate values of the equivalence volume and the dissociation constants K(i) even when the ionization stages overlap. Finally, for the titration of a mixture of two diprotic acids the proposed procedure enables the determination of the composition of the mixture even if the sum of the concentrations of the acids is not known. This method can be used in the analysis of solutions containing two diastereoisomeric forms of a weak diprotic acid. The test of the proposed procedures by means of ideal and Monte Carlo simulated data revealed that these methods are fairly applicable even when the titration data are considerably obscured by 'noise' or contain an important systematic error. The proposed procedures were also successfully applied to experimental titration data.

  10. GTC Photometric Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Cesare, M. A.; Hammersley, P. L.; Rodriguez Espinosa, J. M.

    2006-06-01

    We are currently developing the calibration programme for GTC using techniques similar to the ones use for the space telescope calibration (Hammersley et al. 1998, A&AS, 128, 207; Cohen et al. 1999, AJ, 117, 1864). We are planning to produce a catalogue with calibration stars which are suitable for a 10-m telescope. These sources will be not variable, non binary and do not have infrared excesses if they are to be used in the infrared. The GTC science instruments require photometric calibration between 0.35 and 2.5 microns. The instruments are: OSIRIS (Optical System for Imaging low Resolution Integrated Spectroscopy), ELMER and EMIR (Espectrógrafo Multiobjeto Infrarrojo) and the Acquisition and Guiding boxes (Di Césare, Hammersley, & Rodriguez Espinosa 2005, RevMexAA Ser. Conf., 24, 231). The catalogue will consist of 30 star fields distributed in all of North Hemisphere. We will use fields containing sources over the range 12 to 22 magnitude, and spanning a wide range of spectral types (A to M) for the visible and near infrared. In the poster we will show the method used for selecting these fields and we will present the analysis of the data on the first calibration fields observed.

  11. Photometric Passive Range Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argueta-Diaz, Victor; García-Valenzuela, Augusto

    2008-04-01

    In this paper we present a passive optical ranging method that consists of taking several photometric measurements from the light radiated by an object and deriving the range from these measurements. This passive ranging device uses an iris of radius a, a lens of radius larger than a, and a photodetector of radius p

  12. Risks and Benefits of Rapid Clozapine Titration

    PubMed Central

    Lochhead, Jeannie D.; Nelson, Michele A.; Schneider, Alan L.

    2016-01-01

    Clozapine is often considered the gold standard for the treatment of schizophrenia. Clinical guidelines suggest a gradual titration over 2 weeks to reduce the risks of adverse events such as seizures, hypotension, agranulocytosis, and myocarditis. The slow titration often delays time to therapeutic response. This raises the question of whether, in some patients, it may be safe to use a more rapid clozapine titration. The following case illustrates the potential risks associated with the use of multiple antipsychotics and rapid clozapine titration. We present the case of a young man with schizophrenia who developed life threatening neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS) during rapid clozapine titration and treatment with multiple antipsychotics. We were unable to find another case in the literature of NMS associated with rapid clozapine titration. This case is meant to urge clinicians to carefully evaluate the risks and benefits of rapid clozapine titration, and to encourage researchers to further evaluate the safety of rapid clozapine titration. Rapid clozapine titration has implications for decreasing health care costs associated with prolonged hospitalizations, and decreasing the emotional suffering associated with uncontrolled symptoms of psychosis. Clozapine is considered the most effective antipsychotic available thus efforts should focus on developing strategies that would allow for safest and most efficient use of clozapine to encourage its utilization for treatment resistance schizophrenia. PMID:27403276

  13. Risks and Benefits of Rapid Clozapine Titration.

    PubMed

    Lochhead, Jeannie D; Nelson, Michele A; Schneider, Alan L

    2016-05-18

    Clozapine is often considered the gold standard for the treatment of schizophrenia. Clinical guidelines suggest a gradual titration over 2 weeks to reduce the risks of adverse events such as seizures, hypotension, agranulocytosis, and myocarditis. The slow titration often delays time to therapeutic response. This raises the question of whether, in some patients, it may be safe to use a more rapid clozapine titration. The following case illustrates the potential risks associated with the use of multiple antipsychotics and rapid clozapine titration. We present the case of a young man with schizophrenia who developed life threatening neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS) during rapid clozapine titration and treatment with multiple antipsychotics. We were unable to find another case in the literature of NMS associated with rapid clozapine titration. This case is meant to urge clinicians to carefully evaluate the risks and benefits of rapid clozapine titration, and to encourage researchers to further evaluate the safety of rapid clozapine titration. Rapid clozapine titration has implications for decreasing health care costs associated with prolonged hospitalizations, and decreasing the emotional suffering associated with uncontrolled symptoms of psychosis. Clozapine is considered the most effective antipsychotic available thus efforts should focus on developing strategies that would allow for safest and most efficient use of clozapine to encourage its utilization for treatment resistance schizophrenia.

  14. Alternative methods of titrating continuous positive airway pressure: a large multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Masa, Juan F; Jiménez, Antonio; Durán, Joaquín; Capote, Francisco; Monasterio, Carmen; Mayos, Mercedes; Terán, Joaquín; Hernández, Lourdes; Barbé, Ferrán; Maimó, Andrés; Rubio, Manuela; Montserrat, José M

    2004-12-01

    Standard practice for continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment in sleep apnea and hypopnea syndrome (SAHS) requires pressure titration during attended laboratory polysomnography. However, polysomnographic titration is expensive and time-consuming. The aim of this study was to ascertain, in a large sample of CPAP-naive patients, whether CPAP titration performed by an unattended domiciliary autoadjusted CPAP device or with a predicted formula was as effective as CPAP titration performed by full polysomnography. The main outcomes were the apnea-hypopnea index and the subjective daytime sleepiness. We included 360 patients with SAHS requiring CPAP treatment. Patients were randomly allocated into three groups: standard, autoadjusted, and predicted formula titration with domiciliary adjustment. The follow-up period was 12 weeks. With CPAP treatment, the improvement in subjective sleepiness and apnea-hypopnea index was very similar in the three groups. There were no differences in the objective compliance of CPAP treatment and in the dropout rate of the three groups at the end of the follow-up. Autoadjusted titration at home and predicted formula titration with domiciliary adjustment can replace standard titration. These procedures could lead to considerable savings in cost and to significant reductions in the waiting list.

  15. Aquaporin-4 antibody titration in NMO patients treated with rituximab

    PubMed Central

    Marnetto, Fabiana; Granieri, Letizia; Capobianco, Marco; Bertolotto, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Objective: We undertook an observational retrospective study to investigate the usefulness of aquaporin-4 (AQP4) antibodies (Ab) titration in the management of patients with neuromyelitis optica (NMO) treated with rituximab (RTX) by studying (1) the correlation between AQP4-Ab titer and disease activity, (2) the influence of RTX on antibody levels, and (3) the association between AQP4-Ab levels and responsiveness to RTX. Methods: A cell-based assay was used for AQP4-Ab titration in 322 serum samples from 7 patients with NMO treated with RTX (median follow-up 65 months), according to a treatment-to-target approach. Serum samples were collected every month following standardized procedures. Results: (1) In group analysis, AQP4-Ab titers correlated with the disease activity, showing higher titers during and preceding relapses than during remission. However, in individual analysis, an increase in AQP4-Ab titers and CD19+ B cells did not always precede a relapse. (2) A reduction of AQP4-Ab titers in the short-term and long-term period was observed during RTX treatment. (3) Reduction of AQP4-Ab titers was observed in responder patients both 3 months after RTX infusion and in the long-term follow-up. In one nonresponder patient, AQP4-Ab levels never decreased during the treatment period. Conclusions: Titration of AQP4-Abs could be useful in the clinical management of patients with NMO treated with RTX: titration before each reinfusion and 3 months after each reinfusion may provide information about responsiveness to RTX. Although a relationship among AQP4-Ab levels, disease activity, and response to RTX was observed, the usefulness of AQP4-Ab titration to predict relapses is limited. PMID:28054001

  16. A Tabular Approach to Titration Calculations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lim, Kieran F.

    2012-01-01

    Titrations are common laboratory exercises in high school and university chemistry courses, because they are easy, relatively inexpensive, and they illustrate a number of fundamental chemical principles. While students have little difficulty with calculations involving a single titration step, there is a significant leap in conceptual difficulty…

  17. Calibrationless determination of creatinine and ammonia by coulometric flow titration.

    PubMed

    He, Z K; Fuhrmann, B; Spohn, U

    2000-08-01

    A precise and sensitive working microflow titration procedure was developed to determine creatinine and ammonia in urine samples. This procedure is based on enzymatic conversion of creatinine, gas diffusional membrane separation of the released ammonia into an acid acceptor stream, and coulometric titration of ammonia with hypobromite. The hypobromite is formed after the electrogeneration of bromine in an electrolyte containing 1.0 M NaBr and 0.1 M sodium borate adjusted to pH 8.5. The electrolysis current follows a triangle-programmed current-time course. An amperometric flow detector records the resulting mirror symmetrical titration curves, which show two equivalence points. The analyte concentration is calculated from the time difference between the equivalence points. For quantitative conversion of creatinine and quantitative separation of present and released ammonia no calibration is necessary to get accurate results. Both ammonia/ammonium and creatinine were determined in the range between 2 microM and 2 mM with relative standard deviations between 3.0 and 1.0% (n = 5). High recoveries were obtained for the analysis of diluted urine samples for both creatinine and ammonia.

  18. Photometric redshifts for the NGVS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raichoor, A.; Mei, S.; Erben, T.; Hildebrandt, H.; Huertas-Company, M.; Ilbert, O.; Licitra, R.; Ball, N. M.; Boissier, S.; Boselli, A.; Chen, Y.-T.; Côté, P.; Cuillandre, J.-C.; Duc, P. A.; Durrell, P. R.; Ferrarese, L.; Guhathakurta, P.; Gwyn, S. D. J.; Kavelaars, J. J.; Lancon, A.; Liu, C.; MacArthur, L. A.; Muller, M.; Muñoz, R. P.; Peng, E. W.; Puzia, T. H.; Sawicki, M.; Toloba, E.; Van Waerbeke, L.; Woods, D.; Zhang, H.

    2014-12-01

    We present the photometric redshift catalog for the Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey (NGVS), a 104 deg^2 optical imaging survey centered on the Virgo cluster in the u^*, g, r ,i, z bandpasses at point source depth of 25-26 ABmag. It already is the new optical reference survey for the study of the Virgo cluster, and will be also used for multiple ancillary programs. To obtain photometric redshifts, we perform accurate photometry, through the PSF-homogenization of our data. We then estimate the photometric redshifts using Le Phare and BPZ codes, adding a new prior extended down to i_{AB}=12.5 mag. We assess the accuracy of our photometric redshifts as a function of magnitude and redshift using ˜80,000 spectroscopic redshifts from public surveys. For i_{AB} < 23 mag or z_{phot} < 1 galaxies, we obtain photometric redshifts with |bias| < 0.02, a scatter increasing with magnitude (from 0.02 to 0.05), and less than 5% outliers.

  19. Linear Titration Curves of Acids and Bases.

    PubMed

    Joseph, N R

    1959-05-29

    The Henderson-Hasselbalch equation, by a simple transformation, becomes pH - pK = pA - pB, where pA and pB are the negative logarithms of acid and base concentrations. Sigmoid titration curves then reduce to straight lines; titration curves of polyelectrolytes, to families of straight lines. The method is applied to the titration of the dipeptide glycyl aminotricarballylic acid, with four titrable groups. Results are expressed as Cartesian and d'Ocagne nomograms. The latter is of a general form applicable to polyelectrolytes of any degree of complexity.

  20. Improving Photometric Calibration of Meteor Video Camera Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ehlert, Steven; Kingery, Aaron; Cooke, William

    2016-01-01

    Current optical observations of meteors are commonly limited by systematic uncertainties in photometric calibration at the level of approximately 0.5 mag or higher. Future improvements to meteor ablation models, luminous efficiency models, or emission spectra will hinge on new camera systems and techniques that significantly reduce calibration uncertainties and can reliably perform absolute photometric measurements of meteors. In this talk we discuss the algorithms and tests that NASA's Meteoroid Environment Office (MEO) has developed to better calibrate photometric measurements for the existing All-Sky and Wide-Field video camera networks as well as for a newly deployed four-camera system for measuring meteor colors in Johnson-Cousins BV RI filters. In particular we will emphasize how the MEO has been able to address two long-standing concerns with the traditional procedure, discussed in more detail below.

  1. Micro coulometric titration in a liquid drop.

    PubMed

    Kanyanee, Tinakorn; Fuekhad, Pongwasin; Grudpan, Kate

    2013-10-15

    Miniaturized coulometric titration in a liquid drop has been investigated. Assays of ascorbic acid and thiosulfate with iodine titration were chosen as models. Constant volumes of falling liquid drops containing sample or reagent are manipulated via gravimetrical force to move along a slope hydrophobic path and directed to stop or to move out from an electrode. Such manipulation is useful for delivery of sample and reagents, in a way of flow without tubing. Electrochemical generation of titrant, in this case, iodine, is started at the electrode and micro coulometric titration can be performed in a drop by applying constant current. Timing in the titration can be made via naked eye with a stopwatch or via recording with a webcam camera connecting to a computer to detect the change due to the blue color complex of the excess iodine and starch.

  2. Precise coulometric titration of sodium thiosulfate and development of potassium iodate as a redox standard.

    PubMed

    Asakai, Toshiaki; Murayama, Mariko; Tanaka, Tatsuhiko

    2007-09-15

    In this paper, we determine the effective purity of potassium iodate as a redox standard with a certified value linked to the international system of units (SI units). Concentration measurement of sodium thiosulfate solution was performed by precise coulometric titration with electrogenerated iodine, and an assay of potassium iodate was carried out by gravimetric titration based on the reductometric factor of sodium thiosulfate assigned by coulometry. The accuracy of the coulometric titration method was evaluated by examining the current efficiency of iodine electrogeneration, stability of sodium thiosulfate solutions and dependence on the amount of sodium thiosulfate solution used. The measurement procedure for gravimetric titration of potassium iodate with sodium thiosulfate was validated based on determination of a reference material of known purity (potassium dichromate determined by coulometry with electrogenerated ferrous ions) using the same gravimetric method. Solutions of 0.2 and 0.5mol/L sodium thiosulfate were stable over 17 days without stabilizer. Investigation of the dependency of titration results on the amount of sodium thiosulfate solution used showed no significant effects, no evidence of diffusion of the sample, and no effect of contamination appearing during the experiment. Precise coulometric titration of sodium thiosulfate achieved a relative standard deviation of less than 0.005% under repeating conditions (six measurements). For gravimetric titration, the results obtained for the effective purity of potassium dichromate were sufficiently close to its certified value to allow confirmation of the validity of the gravimetric titration was confirmed. The relative standard deviation of gravimetric titration for potassium iodate was less than 0.011% (nine measurements), and a redox standard with a certified value linked to SI units was developed.

  3. Acid-base titrations by stepwise addition of equal volumes of titrant with special reference to automatic titrations-II Theory of titration of mixtures of acids, polyprotic acids, acids in mixture with weak bases, and ampholytes.

    PubMed

    Pehrsson, L; Ingman, F; Johansson, S

    A general method for evaluating titration data for mixtures of acids and for acids in mixture with weak bases is presented. Procedures are given that do not require absolute [H]-data, i.e., relative [H]-data may be used. In most cases a very rough calibration of the electrode system is enough. Further, for simple systems, very approximate values of the stability constants are sufficient. As examples, the titration of the following are treated in some detail: a mixture of two acids, a diprotic acid, an acid in presence of its conjugate base, and an ampholyte.

  4. Nanopore Back Titration Analysis of Dipicolinic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Han, Yujing; Zhou, Shuo; Wang, Liang; Guan, Xiyun

    2015-01-01

    Here we report a novel label-free nanopore back titration method for the detection of dipicolinic acid, a marker molecule for bacterial spores. By competitive binding of the target analyte and a large ligand probe to metal ions, dipicolinic acid could be sensitively and selectively detected. This nanopore back titration approach should find useful applications in the detection of other species of medical, biological, or environmental importance if their direct detection is difficult to achieve. PMID:25074707

  5. Photometric Redshifts: 50 Years After

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budavári, Tamás

    2012-03-01

    Almost half a century has passed since Baum [1] first applied a novel method to a handful of galaxies. Using the mean spectral energy distribution (SED) of six bright ellipticals in the Virgo cluster, he could accurately estimate the redshifts of other clusters in a comparison that we today call SED fitting or, more generally, photometric redshifts. Owing to the expansion of the Universe, galaxies farther away appear to be redder. Their observed colors are a combination of this redshift and their intrinsic properties. Thanks to the latest detector technology, today we can undertake deep, multicolor surveys to probe statistically meaningful volumes. The yield of photometry in terms of the number of sources is over two orders of magnitude higher than what is achievable by (the more accurate) spectroscopic follow-ups. To exploit the information in the photometric data themselves, several new methods have been developed over the years. One particular successful example is the estimation of photometric redshifts. Baum's motivation for using photometric measurements instead of spectroscopy was the same back then as ours is now: to push the analyses to uncharted territories. His original idea has grown into a research area of its own, which is more important now than ever before. In this chapter, we look at some of the recent advancements of the field. In Section 15.2 we briefly highlight some of the original ideas and the current state of the art in estimating the photometric redshifts. Section 15.3 introduces a Bayesian framework for discussing the traditional methods within a unified context; it explicitly enumerates and identifies their (missing) ingredients. Section 15.4 aims to plant seeds for new ideas for future directions, and Section 15.5 offers some concluding remarks.

  6. PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFTS OF SUBMILLIMETER GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Chakrabarti, Sukanya; Magnelli, Benjamin; Lutz, Dieter; Berta, Stefano; Popesso, Paola; McKee, Christopher F.; Pozzi, Francesca

    2013-08-20

    We use the photometric redshift method of Chakrabarti and McKee to infer photometric redshifts of submillimeter galaxies with far-IR (FIR) Herschel data obtained as part of the PACS Evolutionary Probe program. For the sample with spectroscopic redshifts, we demonstrate the validity of this method over a large range of redshifts (4 {approx}> z {approx}> 0.3) and luminosities, finding an average accuracy in (1 + z{sub phot})/(1 + z{sub spec}) of 10%. Thus, this method is more accurate than other FIR photometric redshift methods. This method is different from typical FIR photometric methods in deriving redshifts from the light-to-gas mass (L/M) ratio of infrared-bright galaxies inferred from the FIR spectral energy distribution, rather than dust temperatures. To assess the dependence of our photometric redshift method on the data in this sample, we contrast the average accuracy of our method when we use PACS data, versus SPIRE data, versus both PACS and SPIRE data. We also discuss potential selection effects that may affect the Herschel sample. Once the redshift is derived, we can determine physical properties of infrared-bright galaxies, including the temperature variation within the dust envelope, luminosity, mass, and surface density. We use data from the GOODS-S field to calculate the star formation rate density (SFRD) of submillimeter bright sources detected by AzTEC and PACS. The AzTEC-PACS sources, which have a threshold 850 {mu}m flux {approx}> 5 mJy, contribute 15% of the SFRD from all ultraluminous infrared galaxies (L{sub IR} {approx}> 10{sup 12} L{sub Sun }), and 3% of the total SFRD at z {approx} 2.

  7. Photometric Redshifts of Submillimeter Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrabarti, Sukanya; Magnelli, Benjamin; McKee, Christopher F.; Lutz, Dieter; Berta, Stefano; Popesso, Paola; Pozzi, Francesca

    2013-08-01

    We use the photometric redshift method of Chakrabarti & McKee to infer photometric redshifts of submillimeter galaxies with far-IR (FIR) Herschel data obtained as part of the PACS Evolutionary Probe program. For the sample with spectroscopic redshifts, we demonstrate the validity of this method over a large range of redshifts (4 >~ z >~ 0.3) and luminosities, finding an average accuracy in (1 + z phot)/(1 + z spec) of 10%. Thus, this method is more accurate than other FIR photometric redshift methods. This method is different from typical FIR photometric methods in deriving redshifts from the light-to-gas mass (L/M) ratio of infrared-bright galaxies inferred from the FIR spectral energy distribution, rather than dust temperatures. To assess the dependence of our photometric redshift method on the data in this sample, we contrast the average accuracy of our method when we use PACS data, versus SPIRE data, versus both PACS and SPIRE data. We also discuss potential selection effects that may affect the Herschel sample. Once the redshift is derived, we can determine physical properties of infrared-bright galaxies, including the temperature variation within the dust envelope, luminosity, mass, and surface density. We use data from the GOODS-S field to calculate the star formation rate density (SFRD) of submillimeter bright sources detected by AzTEC and PACS. The AzTEC-PACS sources, which have a threshold 850 μm flux >~ 5 mJy, contribute 15% of the SFRD from all ultraluminous infrared galaxies (L IR >~ 1012 L ⊙), and 3% of the total SFRD at z ~ 2.

  8. Photometric Variability of Y Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trucks, Jesica; Cushing, M.; Hardegree-Ullman, K.; Gelino, C. R.; Kirkpatrick, J. D.; Mace, G. N.; Gizis, J.; Marley, M. S.; Morley, C.; Fortney, J. J.

    2014-01-01

    Condensate clouds are present in brown dwarf atmospheres due to their low surface temperatures. As the coolest (Teff < 600 K) class of brown dwarfs currently known, Y dwarfs allow us to study the unique atmospheric physics that occur at these temperatures including the formation of sulfide, chloride, and water clouds. Dynamic inhomogeneities in cloud cover should manifest as photometric variabilities in the observed light curves of brown dwarfs. This phenomenon was originally documented in two brown-dwarfs by Morales-Calderón et al. (2006) at 4.5 microns, and in one brown dwarf by Heinze et al. (2013) at 3.6 microns. We describe our ongoing program to monitor fourteen Y dwarfs for photometric variability at 3.6 and 4.5 microns with the Spitzer Space Telescope and present initial results including the first detection of Y dwarf variability.

  9. Photometric variability in earthshine observations.

    PubMed

    Langford, Sally V; Wyithe, J Stuart B; Turner, Edwin L

    2009-04-01

    The identification of an extrasolar planet as Earth-like will depend on the detection of atmospheric signatures or surface non-uniformities. In this paper we present spatially unresolved flux light curves of Earth for the purpose of studying a prototype extrasolar terrestrial planet. Our monitoring of the photometric variability of earthshine revealed changes of up to 23% per hour in the brightness of Earth's scattered light at around 600 nm, due to the removal of specular reflection from the view of the Moon. This variability is accompanied by reddening of the spectrum and results from a change in surface properties across the continental boundary between the Indian Ocean and Africa's east coast. Our results based on earthshine monitoring indicate that specular reflection should provide a useful tool in determining the presence of liquid water on extrasolar planets via photometric observations.

  10. Photometrics at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    McWilliams, J.Y.; Hill, R.A.; Hughes, R.L.

    1990-07-01

    This report highlights Sandia National Laboratories' work in the following areas: photometrics and optical development; still and time-lapse photography; real-time motion photography; high-speed photography; image-motion photography; schlieren photography; ultra-high-speed photography; electronic imaging; shuttered video and high-speed video; infrared imaging radiometry; exoatmospheric photography and videography; microdensitometry and image analysis; and optical system design and development.

  11. Cosmology with photometric redshift surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blake, Chris; Bridle, Sarah

    2005-11-01

    We explore the utility of future photometric redshift imaging surveys for delineating the large-scale structure of the Universe, and assess the resulting constraints on the cosmological model. We perform the following two complementary types of analysis. (i) We quantify the statistical confidence and the accuracy with which such surveys will be able to detect and measure characteristic features in the clustering power spectrum such as the acoustic oscillations and the turnover, in a `model-independent' fashion. We show for example that a 10000-deg2 imaging survey with depth r= 22.5 and photometric redshift accuracy δz/(1 +z) = 0.03 will detect the acoustic oscillations with 99.9 per cent confidence, measuring the associated preferred cosmological scale with 2 per cent precision. Such a survey will also detect the turnover with 95 per cent confidence, determining the corresponding scale with 20 per cent accuracy. (ii) By assuming a Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) model power spectrum we calculate the confidence with which a non-zero baryon fraction can be deduced from such future galaxy surveys. We quantify `wiggle detection' by calculating the number of standard deviations by which the baryon fraction is measured, after marginalizing over the shape parameter. This is typically a factor of 4 more significant (in terms of number of standard deviations) than the above `model-independent' result. For both analyses, we quantify the variation of the results with magnitude depth and photometric redshift precision, and discuss the prospects for obtaining the required performance with realistic future surveys. We conclude that the precision with which the clustering pattern may be inferred from future photometric redshift surveys will be competitive with contemporaneous spectroscopic redshift surveys, assuming that systematic effects can be controlled. We find that for equivalent wiggle detection power, a photometric redshift survey requires an area approximately 12[δz/(1 +z

  12. [Sources of error in the European Pharmacopoeia assay of halide salts of organic bases by titration with alkali].

    PubMed

    Kószeginé, S H; Ráfliné, R Z; Paál, T; Török, I

    2000-01-01

    A short overview has been given by the authors on the titrimetric assay methods of halide salts of organic bases in the pharmacopoeias of greatest importance. The alternative procedures introduced by the European Pharmacopoeia Commission some years ago to replace the non-aqueous titration with perchloric acid in the presence of mercuric acetate have also been presented and evaluated. The authors investigated the limits of applicability and the sources of systematic errors (bias) of the strongly preferred titration with sodium hydroxide in an alcoholic medium. To assess the bias due to the differences between the results calculated from the two inflexion points of the titration curves and the two real endpoints corresponding to the strong and weak acids, respectively, the mathematical analysis of the titration curve function was carried out. This bias, generally negligible when the pH change near the endpoint of the titration is more than 1 unit, is the function of the concentration, the apparent pK of the analyte and the ionic product of water (ethanol) in the alcohol-water mixtures. Using the validation data gained for the method with the titration of ephedrine hydrochloride the authors analysed the impact of carbon dioxide in the titration medium on the additive and proportional systematic errors of the method. The newly introduced standardisation procedure of the European Pharmacopoeia for the sodium hydroxide titrant to decrease the systematic errors caused by carbon dioxide has also been evaluated.

  13. Determination of quaternary ammonium compounds by potentiometric titration with an ionic surfactant electrode: single-laboratory validation.

    PubMed

    Price, Randi; Wan, Ping

    2010-01-01

    A potentiometric titration for determining the quaternary ammonium compounds (QAC) commonly found in antimicrobial products was validated by a single laboratory. Traditionally, QACs were determined by using a biphasic (chloroform and water) manual titration procedure. Because of safety considerations regarding chloroform, as well as the subjectivity of color indicator-based manual titration determinations, an automatic potentiometric titration procedure was tested with quaternary nitrogen product formulations. By using the Metrohm Titrando system coupled with an ionic surfactant electrode and an Ag/AgCl reference electrode, titrations were performed with various QAC-containing formulation products/matrixes; a standard sodium lauryl sulfate solution was used as the titrant. Results for the products tested are sufficiently reproducible and accurate for the purpose of regulatory product enforcement. The robustness of the method was measured by varying pH levels, as well as by comparing buffered versus unbuffered titration systems. A quantitation range of 1-1000 ppm quaternary nitrogen was established. Eight commercially available antimicrobial products covering a variety of matrixes were assayed; the results obtained were comparable to those obtained by the manual titration method. Recoveries of 94 to 104% were obtained for spiked samples.

  14. Titration of the bacteriorhodopsin Schiff base involves titration of an additional protein residue.

    PubMed

    Zadok, Uri; Asato, Alfred E; Sheves, Mordechai

    2005-06-14

    The retinal protein protonated Schiff base linkage plays a key role in the function of bacteriorhodopsin (bR) as a light-driven proton pump. In the unphotolyzed pigment, the Schiff base (SB) is titrated with a pK(a) of approximately 13, but following light absorption, it experiences a decrease in the pK(a) and undergoes several alterations, including a deprotonation process. We have studied the SB titration using retinal analogues which have intrinsically lower pK(a)'s which allow for SB titrations over a much lower pH range. We found that above pH 9 the channel for the SB titration is perturbed, and the titration rate is considerably reduced. On the basis of studies with several mutants, it is suggested that the protonation state of residue Glu204 is responsible for the channel perturbation. We suggest that above pH 12 a channel for the SB titration is restored probably due to titration of an additional protein residue. The observations may imply that during the bR photocycle and M photointermediate formation the rate of Schiff base protonation from the bulk is decreased. This rate decrease may be due to the deprotonation process of the "proton-releasing complex" which includes Glu204. In contrast, during the lifetime of the O intermediate, the protonated SB is exposed to the bulk. Possible implications for the switch mechanism, and the directionality of the proton movement, are discussed.

  15. A new end-point for ELISA titrations.

    PubMed

    Vidal, José

    2004-01-01

    This report describes a new ELISA procedure based on end-point titrations. This end-point ELISA takes advantage of the change of color intensity that occurs when peroxidase-containing wells of an ELISA plate are revealed with diaminobenzidine-nickel and further intensification with silver: as antibody concentration and, therefore, peroxidase concentration, decreased, the color became stronger in some wells and, afterwards (i.e., at lower antibody and peroxidase concentrations), the color faded toward clear background. It is proposed that the reciprocal of the sample dilution at which the color intensifies can be used as a measure of the sample antibody content. This report verifies the validity and precision of that procedure.

  16. Coulometric Titration of Ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA) with Spectrophotometric Endpoint Detection: An Experiment for the Instrumental Analysis Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Kathryn R.; Young, Vaneica Y.; Killian, Benjamin J.

    2011-01-01

    Ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA) is commonly used as an anticoagulant in blood-collection procedures. In this experiment for the instrumental analysis laboratory, students determine the quantity of EDTA in commercial collection tubes by coulometric titration with electrolytically generated Cu[superscript 2+]. The endpoint is detected…

  17. Novel approaches to analysis by flow injection gradient titration.

    PubMed

    Wójtowicz, Marzena; Kozak, Joanna; Kościelniak, Paweł

    2007-09-26

    Two novel procedures for flow injection gradient titration with the use of a single stock standard solution are proposed. In the multi-point single-line (MP-SL) method the calibration graph is constructed on the basis of a set of standard solutions, which are generated in a standard reservoir and subsequently injected into the titrant. According to the single-point multi-line (SP-ML) procedure the standard solution and a sample are injected into the titrant stream from four loops of different capacities, hence four calibration graphs are able to be constructed and the analytical result is calculated on the basis of a generalized slope of these graphs. Both approaches have been tested on the example of spectrophotometric acid-base titration of hydrochloric and acetic acids with using bromothymol blue and phenolphthalein as indicators, respectively, and sodium hydroxide as a titrant. Under optimized experimental conditions the analytical results of precision less than 1.8 and 2.5% (RSD) and of accuracy less than 3.0 and 5.4% (relative error (RE)) were obtained for MP-SL and SP-ML procedures, respectively, in ranges of 0.0031-0.0631 mol L(-1) for samples of hydrochloric acid and of 0.1680-1.7600 mol L(-1) for samples of acetic acid. The feasibility of both methods was illustrated by applying them to the total acidity determination in vinegar samples with precision lower than 0.5 and 2.9% (RSD) for MP-SL and SP-ML procedures, respectively.

  18. Virtual Titrator: A Student-Oriented Instrument.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritter, David; Johnson, Michael

    1997-01-01

    Describes a titrator system, constructed from a computer-interfaced pH-meter, that was designed to increase student involvement in the process. Combines automatic data collection with real-time graphical display and interactive controls to focus attention on the process rather than on bits of data. Improves understanding of concepts and…

  19. Titration Calculations with Computer Algebra Software

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lachance, Russ; Biaglow, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    This article examines the symbolic algebraic solution of the titration equations for a diprotic acid, as obtained using "Mathematica," "Maple," and "Mathcad." The equilibrium and conservation equations are solved symbolically by the programs to eliminate the approximations that normally would be performed by the student. Of the three programs,…

  20. Isothermal Titration Calorimetry in the Student Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wadso, Lars; Li, Yujing; Li, Xi

    2011-01-01

    Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) is the measurement of the heat produced by the stepwise addition of one substance to another. It is a common experimental technique, for example, in pharmaceutical science, to measure equilibrium constants and reaction enthalpies. We describe a stirring device and an injection pump that can be used with a…

  1. Photometric Characteristics of Lunar Terrains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Hiroyuki; Hapke, Bruce W.; Denevi, Brett W.; Robinson, Mark

    2016-10-01

    The photometric properties of the lunar depend on albedo, surface roughness, porosity, and the internal/external structure of particles. Hapke parameter maps derived using a bidirectional reflectance model [Hapke, 2012] from Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC) Wide Angle Camera (WAC) images demonstrated the spatial and spectral variation of the photometric properties of the Moon [Sato et al., 2014]. Using the same methodology, here we present the photometric characteristics of typical lunar terrains, which were not systematically analyzed in the previous study.We selected five representative terrain types: mare, highland, swirls, and two Copernican (fresh) crater ejecta (one mare and one highlands example). As for the datasets, we used ~39 months of WAC repeated observations, and for each image pixel, we computed latitude, longitude, incidence, emission, and phase angles using the WAC GLD100 stereo DTM [Scholten et al., 2012]. To obtain similar phase and incidence angle ranges, all sampling sites are near the equator and in the vicinity of Reiner Gamma. Three free Hapke parameters (single scattering albedo: w, HG2 phase function parameter: c, and angular width of SHOE: hs) were then calculated for the seven bands (321-689 nm). The remaining parameters were fixed by simplifying the model [Sato et al., 2014].The highlands, highland ejecta, and swirl (Reiner Gamma) showed clearly higher w than the mare and mare ejecta. The derived c values were lower (less backscattering) for the swirl and higher (more backscattering) for the highlands (and ejecta) relative to the other sites. Forward scattering materials such as unconsolidated transparent crystalline materials might be relatively enriched in the swirl. In the highlands, anorthositic agglutinates with dense internal scattering could be responsible for the strong backscattering. The mare and mare ejecta showed continuously decreasing c from UV to visible wavelengths. This might be caused by the FeO-rich pyroxene

  2. Photometric commissioning results from MINERVA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eastman, Jason D.; Swift, Jonathan; Beatty, Thomas G.; Bottom, Michael; Johnson, John; Wright, Jason; McCrady, Nate; Wittenmyer, Robert A.; Riddle, Reed L.; Plavchan, Peter; Muirhead, Philip Steven; Blake, Cullen; Zhao, Ming

    2015-01-01

    MINERVA is a robotic observatory with four 0.7 meter telescopes at Mt. Hopkins, Arizona, dedicated to precise photometry and radial velocity observations of bright, nearby stars for the discovery and characterization of small exoplanets. Here we present the first photometric results from MINERVA during commissioning at our test facility in Pasadena, California, demonstrating sub-millimag precision on 3-5 minute timescales over several hours. These results show that MINERVA is well-equipped to address its secondary science goal of searching for transits of known and newly discovered super-Earth exoplanets detected by radial velocity, including potential detections from the MINERVA spectrograph.

  3. Failure in distinguishing colored noise from chaos using the ``noise titration'' technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freitas, Ubiratan S.; Letellier, Christophe; Aguirre, Luis A.

    2009-03-01

    Identifying chaos in experimental data—noisy data—remains a challenging problem for which conclusive arguments are still very difficult to provide. In order to avoid problems usually encountered with techniques based on geometrical invariants (dimensions, Lyapunov exponent, etc.), Poon and Barahona introduced a numerical titration procedure which compares one-step-ahead predictions of linear and nonlinear models [Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 98, 7107 (2001)]. We investigate the aformentioned technique in the context of colored noise or other types of nonchaotic behaviors. The main conclusion is that in several examples noise titration fails to distinguish such nonchaotic signals from low-dimensional deterministic chaos.

  4. Sloan Digital Sky Survey Photometric Calibration Revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Marriner, John; /Fermilab

    2012-06-29

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey calibration is revisited to obtain the most accurate photometric calibration. A small but significant error is found in the flat-fielding of the Photometric telescope used for calibration. Two SDSS star catalogs are compared and the average difference in magnitude as a function of right ascension and declination exhibits small systematic errors in relative calibration. The photometric transformation from the SDSS Photometric Telescope to the 2.5 m telescope is recomputed and compared to synthetic magnitudes computed from measured filter bandpasses.

  5. Photometric Determination of Quasar Candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, S.; Philip, N. S.

    2010-12-01

    We describe an efficient and fast method for the detection and classification of quasars using a machine learning tool, making use of photometric information from SDSS DR7 data release. The photometric information used are the ten independent colours that can be derived from the 5 filters available with SDSS and the machine learning algorithm used is a difference boosting neural network (DBNN) that uses Bayesian classification rule. An adaptive learning algorithm was used to prepare the training sample for each region. Cross validations were done with SDSS spectroscopy and it was found that the method could detect quasars with above 96.96% confidence regarding their true classification. The completeness at this stage was 99.01%. Contaminants were mainly stars and the incorrectly classified quasars belonged to a few specific patches of redshifts. Color plots indicated that the colors of some stars and quasars in those redshits were indistinguishable from each other and was the major cause of their incorrect classification. A confidence value (computed posterior Bayesian belief of the network) was assigned to every object that was classified. Most of the incorrect classifications had a low confidence value. This information may be used to filter out contaminants and improve the classification accuracy at the cost of reduced completeness.

  6. An Olfactory Indicator for Acid-Base Titrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flair, Mark N.; Setzer, William N.

    1990-01-01

    The use of an olfactory acid-base indicator in titrations for visually impaired students is discussed. Potential olfactory indicators include eugenol, thymol, vanillin, and thiophenol. Titrations performed with each indicator with eugenol proved to be successful. (KR)

  7. Characterization of protein-protein interactions by isothermal titration calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Velazquez-Campoy, Adrian; Leavitt, Stephanie A; Freire, Ernesto

    2015-01-01

    The analysis of protein-protein interactions has attracted the attention of many researchers from both a fundamental point of view and a practical point of view. From a fundamental point of view, the development of an understanding of the signaling events triggered by the interaction of two or more proteins provides key information to elucidate the functioning of many cell processes. From a practical point of view, understanding protein-protein interactions at a quantitative level provides the foundation for the development of antagonists or agonists of those interactions. Isothermal Titration Calorimetry (ITC) is the only technique with the capability of measuring not only binding affinity but the enthalpic and entropic components that define affinity. Over the years, isothermal titration calorimeters have evolved in sensitivity and accuracy. Today, TA Instruments and MicroCal market instruments with the performance required to evaluate protein-protein interactions. In this methods paper, we describe general procedures to analyze heterodimeric (porcine pancreatic trypsin binding to soybean trypsin inhibitor) and homodimeric (bovine pancreatic α-chymotrypsin) protein associations by ITC.

  8. Simple and Automated Coulometric Titration of Acid Using Nonisolated Electrodes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuntzleman, Thomas S.; Kenney, Joshua B.; Hasbrouck, Scott; Collins, Michael J.; Amend, John R.

    2011-01-01

    Coulometric titrations involve the quantification of analyte by measurements of current and time. In most coulometric titrations, the anode and cathode are placed in isolated cells that are connected by a salt bridge. By contrast, the experiments described here involve coulometric titrations (of acidic protons in solution) using a silver anode and…

  9. Determination of carbonate carbon in geological materials by coulometric titration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Engleman, E.E.; Jackson, L.L.; Norton, D.R.

    1985-01-01

    A coulometric titration is used for the determination of carbonate carbon in geological materials. Carbon dioxide is evolved from the sample by the addition of 2 M perchloric acid, with heating, and is determined by automated coulometric titration. The coulometric titration showed improved speed and precision with comparable accuracy to gravimetric and gasometric techniques. ?? 1985.

  10. Precision Photometric Redshifts for Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capak, Peter

    The growth of structure as measured by weak lensing has been identified as one of the most sensitive probes of dark energy and dark matter, and is one of the three key dark energy experiments proposed for WFIRST. However, the weak lensing measurement depends strongly on robust photometric redshifts, and is highly sensitive to systematic biases in these redshift estimates. Several methods have been proposed to remove systematic biases based on spectroscopic samples and spatial clustering, but none has been demonstrated to perform at the level required for WFIRST. Making the problem more challenging, at least two independent methods must be developed: one to correct the systematic errors, and another to verify the correction and quantify residual error. Here we propose to develop an informed calibration of the color-redshift relation that will minimize the number of spectroscopic redshifts needed for machine learning algorithms and produce accurate Bayesian priors for template fitting algorithms. The proposed method uses our current knowledge of galaxies and galaxy evolution from existing deep surveys to parameterize where in the WFIRST color space the photometric redshifts are well understood, and where they are not. First, we will develop a method to map from the WFIRST N-dimensional color space to redshift. This will determine which regions of color space map to redshift in a well-behaved way, and which have a more complex behavior. We will make use of the fact that higher-dimensional data (narrower band passes, more sensitive data, and larger spectral coverage) are available in select areas of the sky to determine how much uncertainty exists in WFIRST color regions. Finally, we will develop a statistical method to determine how many spectroscopic redshifts are needed in each cell of WFIRST color space to accurately map from color to redshift, and which color space cells should be excised from the weak lensing analysis due to redshift degeneracy. In addition to

  11. Kinetic titration series with biolayer interferometry.

    PubMed

    Frenzel, Daniel; Willbold, Dieter

    2014-01-01

    Biolayer interferometry is a method to analyze protein interactions in real-time. In this study, we illustrate the usefulness to quantitatively analyze high affinity protein ligand interactions employing a kinetic titration series for characterizing the interactions between two pairs of interaction patterns, in particular immunoglobulin G and protein G B1 as well as scFv IC16 and amyloid beta (1-42). Kinetic titration series are commonly used in surface plasmon resonance and involve sequential injections of analyte over a desired concentration range on a single ligand coated sensor chip without waiting for complete dissociation between the injections. We show that applying this method to biolayer interferometry is straightforward and i) circumvents problems in data evaluation caused by unavoidable sensor differences, ii) saves resources and iii) increases throughput if screening a multitude of different analyte/ligand combinations.

  12. APIRP: The Automated Photometric Data Reduction Package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hebert, Ian; Ziffer, J.; Walker, M.

    2009-09-01

    For decades the Image Reduction and Analysis Facility (IRAF) has been the standard for processing CCD-based image datasets. During that time, technology has advanced and the astronomical record greatly expanded. However, the discovery process is often bogged down by the time consuming procedures of image reduction. To keep up with demand and shorten reduction steps programmers have developed a series of command languages (CL) for IRAF and most recently, within only the past five years, the Python-based language, Pyraf. Python is a robust and powerful language that combines syntactical simplicity with versatile and dynamic file management, database access and software development capabilities, to name just a few features. Pyraf, by extension, incorporates all of the qualities of IRAF CL, with all of the power and flexibility provided by Python. Pyraf scripts may be written to automate file processing at the same time that reduction tasks are called from IRAF. Thus, the potential to write fully automated reduction procedures is here; tightening the gaps of scientific advancement. We have created such a tool for CCD Photometry. Our Automated Photometric Image Reduction Package (APIRP) uses a range of graphical user interfaces (GUI's) to form an interactive yet non-overbearing user environment. A combination of built-in file management and procedural variability makes APIRP a perfect choice for both amateur and professional astronomers. Due to the programs design, it can be run from anywhere on your computer and users can specify exactly what steps of reduction they wish to execute. Thus, setup is easy with no need for cumbersome documentation and tasks may be preformed piecewise or in blocks, depending on the users needs.

  13. Digital movie-based on automatic titrations.

    PubMed

    Lima, Ricardo Alexandre C; Almeida, Luciano F; Lyra, Wellington S; Siqueira, Lucas A; Gaião, Edvaldo N; Paiva Junior, Sérgio S L; Lima, Rafaela L F C

    2016-01-15

    This study proposes the use of digital movies (DMs) in a flow-batch analyzer (FBA) to perform automatic, fast and accurate titrations. The term used for this process is "Digital movie-based on automatic titrations" (DMB-AT). A webcam records the DM during the addition of the titrant to the mixing chamber (MC). While the DM is recorded, it is decompiled into frames ordered sequentially at a constant rate of 26 frames per second (FPS). The first frame is used as a reference to define the region of interest (ROI) of 28×13pixels and the R, G and B values, which are used to calculate the Hue (H) values for each frame. The Pearson's correlation coefficient (r) is calculated between the H values of the initial frame and each subsequent frame. The titration curves are plotted in real time using the r values and the opening time of the titrant valve. The end point is estimated by the second derivative method. A software written in C language manages all analytical steps and data treatment in real time. The feasibility of the method was attested by application in acid/base test samples and edible oils. Results were compared with classical titration and did not present statistically significant differences when the paired t-test at the 95% confidence level was applied. The proposed method is able to process about 117-128 samples per hour for the test and edible oil samples, respectively, and its precision was confirmed by overall relative standard deviation (RSD) values, always less than 1.0%.

  14. Thermometric titration of acids in pyridine.

    PubMed

    Vidal, R; Mukherjee, L M

    1974-04-01

    Thermometric titration of HClO(4), HI, HNO(3), HBr, picric acid o-nitrobenzoic acid, 2,4- and 2,5-dinitrophenol, acetic acid and benzoic acid have been attempted in pyridine as solvent, using 1,3-diphenylguanidine as the base. Except in the case of 2,5-dinitrophenol, acetic acid and benzoic acid, the results are, in general, reasonably satisfactory. The approximate molar heats of neutralization have been calculated.

  15. Photometric invariant stereo matching method.

    PubMed

    Gu, Feifei; Zhao, Hong; Zhou, Xiang; Li, Jinjun; Bu, Penghui; Zhao, Zixin

    2015-12-14

    A robust stereo matching method based on a comprehensive mathematical model for color formation process is proposed to estimate the disparity map of stereo images with noise and photometric variations. The band-pass filter with DoP kernel is firstly used to filter out noise component of the stereo images. Then the log-chromaticity normalization process is applied to eliminate the influence of lightning geometry. All the other factors that may influence the color formation process are removed through the disparity estimation process with a specific matching cost. Performance of the developed method is evaluated by comparing with some up-to-date algorithms. Experimental results are presented to demonstrate the robustness and accuracy of the method.

  16. Perspective photometric stereo beyond Lambert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khanian, Maryam; Sharifi Boroujerdi, Ali; Breuß, Michael

    2015-04-01

    Photometric stereo is a technique for estimating the 3-D depth of a surface using multiple images taken under different illuminations from the same viewing angle. Most existing models make use of Lambertian reflection and an orthographic camera as underlying assumptions. However, real-world materials often exhibit non-Lambertian effects such as specular highlights and for many applications it is of interest to consider objects close to the camera. In our work, we aim at addressing these issues. Together with a perspective camera we employ a non-Lambertian reflectance model, namely the Blinn-Phong model which is capable to deal with specular reflection. Focusing on the effects of specular highlights, we perform a detailed study of one-dimensional test cases showing important aspects of our method.

  17. CuBANz: Photometric redshift estimator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samui, Saumyadip; Pal, Shanoli Samui

    2016-09-01

    CuBANz is a photometric redshift estimator code for high redshift galaxies that uses the back propagation neural network along with clustering of the training set, making it very efficient. The training set is divided into several self learning clusters with galaxies having similar photometric properties and spectroscopic redshifts within a given span. The clustering algorithm uses the color information (i.e. u-g, g-r etc.) rather than the apparent magnitudes at various photometric bands, as the photometric redshift is more sensitive to the flux differences between different bands rather than the actual values. The clustering method enables accurate determination of the redshifts. CuBANz considers uncertainty in the photometric measurements as well as uncertainty in the neural network training. The code is written in C.

  18. Photometric Redshift Techniques in Big-data Era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yan-Xia; Zhao, Yong-Heng

    Photometric data increase with large survey projects running. The huge volume of data influences the means and methods to deal with them. As such, the techniques of photometric redshift estimation based on photometric data must be developed and improved.

  19. Standardized Photometric Calibrations for Panchromatic SSA Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, P.; Payne, T.; Battle, A.; Cole, Z.; Moody, J.; Gregory, S.; Dao, P.

    2016-09-01

    Panchromatic sensors used for Space Situational Awareness (SSA) have no standardized method for transforming the net flux detected by a CCD without a spectral filter into an exo-atmospheric magnitude in a standard magnitude system. Each SSA data provider appears to have their own method for computing the visual magnitude based on panchromatic brightness making cross-comparisons impossible. We provide a procedure in order to standardize the calibration of panchromatic sensors for the purposes of SSA. A technique based on theoretical modeling is presented that derives standard panchromatic magnitudes from the Johnson-Cousins photometric system defined by Arlo Landolt. We verify this technique using observations of Landolt standard stars and a Vega-like star to determine empirical panchromatic magnitudes and compare these to synthetically derived panchromatic magnitudes. We also investigate color terms caused by differences in the quantum efficiency (QE) between the Landolt standard system and panchromatic systems. We evaluate calibrated panchromatic satellite photometry by observing several GEO satellites and standard stars using three different sensors. We explore the effect of satellite color terms by comparing the satellite signatures. In order to remove other variables affecting the satellite photometry, two of the sensors are at the same site using different CCDs. The third sensor is geographically separate from the first two allowing for a definitive test of calibrated panchromatic satellite photometry.

  20. Photometric Studies of GEO Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seitzer, Patrick; Cowardin, Heather M.; Barker, Edwin; Abercromby, Kira J.; Foreman, Gary; Horstman, Matt

    2009-01-01

    The photometric signature of a debris object can be useful in determining what the physical characteristics of a piece of debris are. We report on optical observations in multiple filters of debris at geosynchronous Earth orbit (GEO). Our sample is taken from GEO objects discovered in a survey with the University of Michigan's 0.6-m aperture Schmidt telescope MODEST (for Michigan Orbital DEbris Survey Telescope), and then followed up in real-time with the SMARTS (Small and Medium Aperture Research Telescope System) 0.9-m at CTIO for orbits and photometry. Our goal is to determine 6 parameter orbits and measure colors for all objects fainter than R = 15 th magnitude that are discovered in the MODEST survey. At this magnitude the distribution of observed angular rates changes significantly from that of brighter objects. There are two objectives: 1. Estimate the orbital distribution of objects selected on the basis of two observational criteria: brightness (magnitude) and angular rates. 2. Obtain magnitudes and colors in standard astronomical filters (BVRI) for comparison with reflectance spectra of likely spacecraft materials. What is the faint debris likely to be? In this paper we report on the photometric results. For a sample of 50 objects, more than 90 calibrated sequences of R-B-V-I-R magnitudes have been obtained with the CTIO 0.9-m. For objects that do not show large brightness variations, the colors are largely redder than solar in both B-R and R-I. The width of the color distribution may be intrinsic to the nature of the surfaces, but also could be that we are seeing irregularly shaped objects and measuring the colors at different times with just one telescope. For a smaller sample of objects we have observed with synchronized CCD cameras on the two telescopes. The CTIO 0.9-m observes in B, and MODEST in R. The CCD cameras are electronically linked together so that the start time and duration of observations are the same to better than 50 milliseconds. Thus

  1. Sloan Digital Sky Survey photometric telescope automation and observing software

    SciTech Connect

    Eric H. Neilsen, Jr. et al.

    2002-10-16

    The photometric telescope (PT) provides observations necessary for the photometric calibration of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Because the attention of the observing staff is occupied by the operation of the 2.5 meter telescope which takes the survey data proper, the PT must reliably take data with little supervision. In this paper we describe the PT's observing program, MOP, which automates most tasks necessary for observing. MOP's automated target selection is closely modeled on the actions a human observer might take, and is built upon a user interface that can be (and has been) used for manual operation. This results in an interface that makes it easy for an observer to track the activities of the automating procedures and intervene with minimum disturbance when necessary. MOP selects targets from the same list of standard star and calibration fields presented to the user, and chooses standard star fields covering ranges of airmass, color, and time necessary to monitor atmospheric extinction and produce a photometric solution. The software determines when additional standard star fields are unnecessary, and selects survey calibration fields according to availability and priority. Other automated features of MOP, such as maintaining the focus and keeping a night log, are also built around still functional manual interfaces, allowing the observer to be as active in observing as desired; MOP's automated features may be used as tools for manual observing, ignored entirely, or allowed to run the telescope with minimal supervision when taking routine data.

  2. Gaia Data Release 1. The photometric data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Leeuwen, F.; Evans, D. W.; De Angeli, F.; Jordi, C.; Busso, G.; Cacciari, C.; Riello, M.; Pancino, E.; Altavilla, G.; Brown, A. G. A.; Burgess, P.; Carrasco, J. M.; Cocozza, G.; Cowell, S.; Davidson, M.; De Luise, F.; Fabricius, C.; Galleti, S.; Gilmore, G.; Giuffrida, G.; Hambly, N. C.; Harrison, D. L.; Hodgkin, S. T.; Holland, G.; MacDonald, I.; Marinoni, S.; Montegriffo, P.; Osborne, P.; Ragaini, S.; Richards, P. J.; Rowell, N.; Voss, H.; Walton, N. A.; Weiler, M.; Castellani, M.; Delgado, A.; Høg, E.; van Leeuwen, M.; Millar, N. R.; Pagani, C.; Piersimoni, A. M.; Pulone, L.; Rixon, G.; Suess, F. F.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Yoldas, A.; Alecu, A.; Allan, P. M.; Balaguer-Núñez, L.; Barstow, M. A.; Bellazzini, M.; Belokurov, V.; Blagorodnova, N.; Bonfigli, M.; Bragaglia, A.; Brown, S.; Bunclark, P.; Buonanno, R.; Burgon, R.; Campbell, H.; Collins, R. S.; Cross, N. J. G.; Ducourant, C.; van Elteren, A.; Evans, N. W.; Federici, L.; Fernández-Hernández, J.; Figueras, F.; Fraser, M.; Fyfe, D.; Gebran, M.; Heyrovsky, A.; Holl, B.; Holland, A. D.; Iannicola, G.; Irwin, M.; Koposov, S. E.; Krone-Martins, A.; Mann, R. G.; Marrese, P. M.; Masana, E.; Munari, U.; Ortiz, P.; Ouzounis, A.; Peltzer, C.; Portell, J.; Read, A.; Terrett, D.; Torra, J.; Trager, S. C.; Troisi, L.; Valentini, G.; Vallenari, A.; Wevers, T.

    2017-02-01

    Context. This paper presents an overview of the photometric data that are part of the first Gaia data release. Aims: The principles of the processing and the main characteristics of the Gaia photometric data are presented. Methods: The calibration strategy is outlined briefly and the main properties of the resulting photometry are presented. Results: Relations with other broadband photometric systems are provided. The overall precision for the Gaia photometry is shown to be at the milli-magnitude level and has a clear potential to improve further in future releases.

  3. Determining enzyme kinetics via isothermal titration calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Demarse, Neil A; Killian, Marie C; Hansen, Lee D; Quinn, Colette F

    2013-01-01

    Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) has emerged as a powerful tool for determining the thermodynamic properties of chemical or physical equilibria such as protein-protein, ligand-receptor, and protein-DNA binding interactions. The utility of ITC for determining kinetic information, however, has not been fully recognized. Methods for collecting and analyzing data on enzyme kinetics are discussed here. The step-by-step process of converting the raw heat output rate into the kinetic parameters of the Michaelis-Menten equation is explicitly stated. The hydrolysis of sucrose by invertase is used to demonstrate the capability of the instrument and method.

  4. Photometric properties of Triton hazes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hillier, J.; Veverka, J.

    1994-01-01

    Voyager imaging observations of Triton have been used to investigate the characteristics of the atmospheric hazes on Triton at three wavelengths: violet (0.41 micrometers), blue (0.48 micrometers), and green (0.56 micrometers). The globally averaged optical depth is wavelength dependent, varying from 0.034 in green to 0.063 in violet. These photometric results are dominated by the properties of localized discrete clouds rather than by those of the thinner, more widespread haze known to occur on Triton. The cloud particles are bright, with single-scattering albedos near unity at all three wavelengths, suggestive of a transparent icy condensate. The asymmetry parameter (+0.6) and the wavelength dependence of the optical depth both indicate cloud particles 0.2-0.4 micrometers in radius. The clouds are concentrated at 50-60 deg S latitude, where opacities up to three times the global average are observed. This is the same latitude region where most of the evidence for current surface activity is found, suggesting that the clouds may be related to the plumes or at least to some process connected with the sublimation of the south polar cap. The effects of possible temporal variations in the haze opacity are examined. Increases in the haze opacity tend to redden Triton. However, the degree of reddening is not sufficient to explain the full range of observed changed in Triton over the past decade; variations in the surface properties appear to be necessary.

  5. Photometric Study of Uranian Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kesten, Philip R.

    1998-10-01

    The best summary of my work at NASA is expressed in the following abstract, submitted the Division for Planetary Science of the American Astronomical Society and to be presented at the annual meeting in Madison in October. We report photometric measurements of Uranian satellites Miranda, Ariel, Umbriel and Titania (10.4 Aug. 1995), and Neptune's satellite Triton (21.2 Sept. 1995) with the infrared camera (IRCAM) and standard J (1.13 - 1.42 microns), H (1.53 - 1.81 microns), and K (2.00 - 2.41 microns) filters at the 3.8-m UKIRT telescope on Mauna Kea. The individual images frames are 256 x 256 pixels with a platescale of .286 arcsec/pixel, resulting in a 1.22 arc min field of view. This summer brought the IR photometry measurements nearly to a close. As indicated by the abstract above, I will present this work at the annual DPS meeting in October. In anticipation of the opening of the new Carl Sagan Laboratory for Cosmochemisty, of which I will be a participating member, I also devoted a considerable fraction of the summer to learning the biochemistry which underlies the experiments to be conducted. To put the end of the summary close to the beginning, it was a most productive summer.

  6. Photometric Study of Uranian Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kesten, Philip R.

    1998-01-01

    The best summary of my work at NASA is expressed in the following abstract, submitted the Division for Planetary Science of the American Astronomical Society and to be presented at the annual meeting in Madison in October. We report photometric measurements of Uranian satellites Miranda, Ariel, Umbriel and Titania (10.4 Aug. 1995), and Neptune's satellite Triton (21.2 Sept. 1995) with the infrared camera (IRCAM) and standard J (1.13 - 1.42 microns), H (1.53 - 1.81 microns), and K (2.00 - 2.41 microns) filters at the 3.8-m UKIRT telescope on Mauna Kea. The individual images frames are 256 x 256 pixels with a platescale of .286 arcsec/pixel, resulting in a 1.22 arc min field of view. This summer brought the IR photometry measurements nearly to a close. As indicated by the abstract above, I will present this work at the annual DPS meeting in October. In anticipation of the opening of the new Carl Sagan Laboratory for Cosmochemisty, of which I will be a participating member, I also devoted a considerable fraction of the summer to learning the biochemistry which underlies the experiments to be conducted. To put the end of the summary close to the beginning, it was a most productive summer.

  7. Titration of individual strains in trivalent live-attenuated influenza vaccine without neutralization.

    PubMed

    Sirinonthanawech, Naraporn; Surichan, Somchaiya; Namsai, Aphinya; Puthavathana, Pilaipan; Auewarakul, Prasert; Kongchanagul, Alita

    2016-11-01

    Formulation and quality control of trivalent live-attenuated influenza vaccine requires titration of infectivity of individual strains in the trivalent mix. This is usually performed by selective neutralization of two of the three strains and titration of the un-neutralized strain in cell culture or embryonated eggs. This procedure requires standard sera with high neutralizing titer against each of the three strains. Obtaining standard sera, which can specifically neutralize only the corresponding strain of influenza viruses and is able to completely neutralize high concentration of virus in the vaccine samples, can be a problem for many vaccine manufacturers as vaccine stocks usually have very high viral titers and complete neutralization may not be obtained. Here an alternative approach for titration of individual strain in trivalent vaccine without the selective neutralization is presented. This was done by detecting individual strains with specific antibodies in an end-point titration of a trivalent vaccine in cell culture. Similar titers were observed in monovalent and trivalent vaccines for influenza A H3N2 and influenza B strains, whereas the influenza A H1N1 strain did not grow well in cell culture. Viral interference among the vaccine strains was not observed. Therefore, providing that vaccine strains grow well in cell culture, this assay can reliably determine the potency of individual strains in trivalent live-attenuated influenza vaccines.

  8. Developing a multipoint titration method with a variable dose implementation for anaerobic digestion monitoring.

    PubMed

    Salonen, K; Leisola, M; Eerikäinen, T

    2009-01-01

    Determination of metabolites from an anaerobic digester with an acid base titration is considered as superior method for many reasons. This paper describes a practical at line compatible multipoint titration method. The titration procedure was improved by speed and data quality. A simple and novel control algorithm for estimating a variable titrant dose was derived for this purpose. This non-linear PI-controller like algorithm does not require any preliminary information from sample. Performance of this controller is superior compared to traditional linear PI-controllers. In addition, simplification for presenting polyprotic acids as a sum of multiple monoprotic acids is introduced along with a mathematical error examination. A method for inclusion of the ionic strength effect with stepwise iteration is shown. The titration model is presented with matrix notations enabling simple computation of all concentration estimates. All methods and algorithms are illustrated in the experimental part. A linear correlation better than 0.999 was obtained for both acetate and phosphate used as model compounds with slopes of 0.98 and 1.00 and average standard deviations of 0.6% and 0.8%, respectively. Furthermore, insensitivity of the presented method for overlapping buffer capacity curves was shown.

  9. A simple method for the titration of multicomponent acid-base mixtures.

    PubMed

    Moisio, T; Heikonen, M

    1996-01-01

    A titration method has been developed to analyze acid mixtures, in which the pK values differed by 0.5 to 1 pH units. Instead of the use of equivalence points a buffer capacity curve is numerically derived from the titration curve resulting in a presentation similar to chromatograms and spectra. The consumption of the NaOH titrant is determined within pH intervals of 0.2-0.6 units around the pK values of the components. The buffer capacity measured is expressed as the consumption of NaOH over the pH interval. The amounts of compounds are found from these results using simple models of chemometrics. The method has been applied to a mixture of formic and acetic acids with concentrations of 0-3 mmol/20 ml with an error of 0-0.05 mmol. Furthermore a curve-fitting method based on a theoretical equation of buffer capacity can be applied with an error slightly larger than with the previous method. In this case, the pK values were also computed. For titrations beyond the pH range 4-10, the buffer capacity of water has to be subtracted from the titration results. The whole procedure requires including the computations about 3-6 min.

  10. A computer-controlled potentiometric/spectrophotometric titrator

    PubMed Central

    Stong, John D.

    1988-01-01

    A laboratory computer controlled potentiometric titrator interfaced to a diode array spectrophotometer is described. The titrator consists of widely used, commercially available components; therefore, major attention is given to modes of interconnection and software implementation in data format and system control. Replicate potentiometric titrations of glycines gave a relative standard deviation in titre of 1.035% and a relative standard deviation in pH of 0.745%. Replicate spectrophotometric titrations of bromophenol blue were analysed at three wavelengths to yield pKa= 3.898 ± 0.075 (1.9% rsd). Methods of data presentation and manipulation are presented. PMID:18925194

  11. Rapid Clozapine Titration in Patients with Treatment Refractory Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Poyraz, Cana Aksoy; Özdemir, Armağan; Sağlam, Nazife Gamze Usta; Turan, Şenol; Poyraz, Burç Çağrı; Tomruk, Nesrin; Duran, Alaattin

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of rapid clozapine titration in patients with schizophrenia in hospital settings. We conducted a retrospective two-center cohort study to compare the safety and effectiveness of clozapine with different titration rates in treatment-refractory patients with schizophrenia. In the first center, clozapine was started at 25-50 mg followed by 50-100 mg as needed every 6 h on day 1, followed by increases of 50-100 mg/day. In the second center, titration was slower; clozapine initiated with 12.5-50 mg on day 1 followed by increases of 25-50 mg/day. The number of days between starting of clozapine until discharge was shorter in the rapid titration group (22.4 ± 8.72 vs 27.0 ± 10.5, p = 0.1). Number of days of total hospital stay were significantly shorter in the rapid titration group (29.6 ± 10.6 vs 41.2 ± 14.8, p = 0.002). Hypotension was more common in the rapid titration group and one patient had suspected myocarditis. Rapid clozapine titration appeared safe and effective. The length of stay following initiation of clozapine was shorter in the rapid-titration group, although this was not statistically significant. However starting clozapine earlier together with rapid titration has significantly shortened the length of hospital stay in patients with treatment refractory schizophrenia.

  12. Automated titration method for use on blended asphalts

    DOEpatents

    Pauli, Adam T [Cheyenne, WY; Robertson, Raymond E [Laramie, WY; Branthaver, Jan F [Chatham, IL; Schabron, John F [Laramie, WY

    2012-08-07

    A system for determining parameters and compatibility of a substance such as an asphalt or other petroleum substance uses titration to highly accurately determine one or more flocculation occurrences and is especially applicable to the determination or use of Heithaus parameters and optimal mixing of various asphalt stocks. In a preferred embodiment, automated titration in an oxygen gas exclusive system and further using spectrophotometric analysis (2-8) of solution turbidity is presented. A reversible titration technique enabling in-situ titration measurement of various solution concentrations is also presented.

  13. The acid-base titration of montmorillonite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourg, I. C.; Sposito, G.; Bourg, A. C.

    2003-12-01

    Proton binding to clay minerals plays an important role in the chemical reactivity of soils (e.g., acidification, retention of nutrients or pollutants). If should also affect the performance of clay barriers for waste disposal. The surface acidity of clay minerals is commonly modelled empirically by assuming generic amphoteric surface sites (>SOH) on a flat surface, with fitted site densities and acidity constant. Current advances in experimental methods (notably spectroscopy) are rapidly improving our understanding of the structure and reactivity of the surface of clay minerals (arrangement of the particles, nature of the reactive surface sites, adsorption mechanisms). These developments are motivated by the difficulty of modelling the surface chemistry of mineral surfaces at the macro-scale (e.g., adsorption or titration) without a detailed (molecular-scale) picture of the mechanisms, and should be progressively incorporated into surface complexation models. In this view, we have combined recent estimates of montmorillonite surface properties (surface site density and structure, edge surface area, surface electrostatic potential) with surface site acidities obtained from the titration of alpha-Al2O3 and SiO2, and a novel method of accounting for the unknown initial net proton surface charge of the solid. The model predictions were compared to experimental titrations of SWy-1 montmorillonite and purified MX-80 bentonite in 0.1-0.5 mol/L NaClO4 and 0.005-0.5 mol/L NaNO3 background electrolytes, respectively. Most of the experimental data were appropriately described by the model after we adjusted a single parameter (silanol sites on the surface of montmorillonite were made to be slightly more acidic than those of silica). At low ionic strength and acidic pH the model underestimated the buffering capacity of the montmorillonite, perhaps due to clay swelling or to the interlayer adsorption of dissolved aluminum. The agreement between our model and the experimental

  14. Isothermal Titration Calorimetry of Chiral Polymeric Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Werber, Liora; Preiss, Laura C; Landfester, Katharina; Muñoz-Espí, Rafael; Mastai, Yitzhak

    2015-09-01

    Chiral polymeric nanoparticles are of prime importance, mainly due to their enantioselective potential, for many applications such as catalysis and chiral separation in chromatography. In this article we report on the preparation of chiral polymeric nanoparticles by miniemulsion polymerization. In addition, we describe the use of isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) to measure the chiral interactions and the energetics of the adsorption of enantiomers from aqueous solutions onto chiral polymeric nanoparticles. The characterization of chirality in nano-systems is a very challenging task; here, we demonstrate that ITC can be used to accurately determine the thermodynamic parameters associated with the chiral interactions of nanoparticles. The use of ITC to measure the energetics of chiral interactions and recognition at the surfaces of chiral nanoparticles can be applied to other nanoscale chiral systems and can provide further insight into the chiral discrimination processes of nanomaterials.

  15. Isothermal Titration Calorimetry to Characterize Enzymatic Reactions.

    PubMed

    Mazzei, Luca; Ciurli, Stefano; Zambelli, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) is a technique that measures the heat released or absorbed during a chemical reaction as an intrinsic probe to characterize any chemical process that involves heat changes spontaneously occurring during the reaction. The general features of this method to determine the kinetic and thermodynamic parameters of enzymatic reactions (kcat, KM, ΔH) are described and discussed here together with some detailed applications to specific cases. ITC does not require any modification or labeling of the system under analysis, can be performed in solution, and needs only small amounts of enzyme. These properties make ITC an invaluable, powerful, and unique tool to extend the knowledge of enzyme kinetics to drug discovery.

  16. Three-dimensional stereo by photometric ratios

    SciTech Connect

    Wolff, L.B.; Angelopoulou, E.

    1994-11-01

    We present a methodology for corresponding a dense set of points on an object surface from photometric values for three-dimensional stereo computation of depth. The methodology utilizes multiple stereo pairs of images, with each stereo pair being taken of the identical scene but under different illumination. With just two stereo pairs of images taken under two different illumination conditions, a stereo pair of ratio images can be produced, one for the ratio of left-hand images and one for the ratio of right-hand images. We demonstrate how the photometric ratios composing these images can be used for accurate correspondence of object points. Object points having the same photometric ratio with respect to two different illumination conditions constitute a well-defined equivalence class of physical constraints defined by local surface orientation relative to illumination conditions. We formally show that for diffuse reflection the photometric ratio is invariant to varying camera characteristics, surface albedo, and viewpoint and that therefore the same photometric ratio in both images of a stereo pair implies the same equivalence class of physical constraints. The correspondence of photometric ratios along epipolar lines in a stereo pair of images under different illumination conditions is a correspondence of equivalent physical constraints, and the determination of depth from stereo can be performed. Whereas illumination planning is required, our photometric-based stereo methodology does not require knowledge of illumination conditions in the actual computation of three-dimensional depth and is applicable to perspective views. This technique extends the stereo determination of three-dimensional depth to smooth featureless surfaces without the use of precisely calibrated lighting. We demonstrate experimental depth maps from a dense set of points on smooth objects of known ground-truth shape, determined to within 1% depth accuracy.

  17. PHOTOMETRIC ORBITS OF EXTRASOLAR PLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Robert A.

    2009-09-10

    We define and analyze the photometric orbit (PhO) of an extrasolar planet observed in reflected light. In our definition, the PhO is a Keplerian entity with six parameters: semimajor axis, eccentricity, mean anomaly at some particular time, argument of periastron, inclination angle, and effective radius, which is the square root of the geometric albedo times the planetary radius. Preliminarily, we assume a Lambertian phase function. We study in detail the case of short-period giant planets (SPGPs) and observational parameters relevant to the Kepler mission: 20 ppm photometry with normal errors, 6.5 hr cadence, and three-year duration. We define a relevant 'planetary population of interest' in terms of probability distributions of the PhO parameters. We perform Monte Carlo experiments to estimate the ability to detect planets and to recover PhO parameters from light curves. We calibrate the completeness of a periodogram search technique, and find structure caused by degeneracy. We recover full orbital solutions from synthetic Kepler data sets and estimate the median errors in recovered PhO parameters. We treat in depth a case of a Jupiter body-double. For the stated assumptions, we find that Kepler should obtain orbital solutions for many of the 100-760 SPGP that Jenkins and Doyle estimate Kepler will discover. Because most or all of these discoveries will be followed up by ground-based radial velocity observations, the estimates of inclination angle from the PhO may enable the calculation of true companion masses: Kepler photometry may break the 'msin i' degeneracy. PhO observations may be difficult. There is uncertainty about how low the albedos of SPGPs actually are, about their phase functions, and about a possible noise floor due to systematic errors from instrumental and stellar sources. Nevertheless, simple detection of SPGPs in reflected light should be robust in the regime of Kepler photometry, and estimates of all six orbital parameters may be feasible in

  18. 3-D Surface Visualization of pH Titration "Topos": Equivalence Point Cliffs, Dilution Ramps, and Buffer Plateaus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Garon C.; Hossain, Md Mainul; MacCarthy, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    3-D topographic surfaces ("topos") can be generated to visualize how pH behaves during titration and dilution procedures. The surfaces are constructed by plotting computed pH values above a composition grid with volume of base added in one direction and overall system dilution on the other. What emerge are surface features that…

  19. Quantitative Analysis of Sulfate in Water by Indirect EDTA Titration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belle-Oudry, Deirdre

    2008-01-01

    The determination of sulfate concentration in water by indirect EDTA titration is an instructive experiment that is easily implemented in an analytical chemistry laboratory course. A water sample is treated with excess barium chloride to precipitate sulfate ions as BaSO[subscript 4](s). The unprecipitated barium ions are then titrated with EDTA.…

  20. Students' integration of multiple representations in a titration experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunze, Nicole M.

    A complete understanding of a chemical concept is dependent upon a student's ability to understand the microscopic or particulate nature of the phenomenon and integrate the microscopic, symbolic, and macroscopic representations of the phenomenon. Acid-base chemistry is a general chemistry topic requiring students to understand the topics of chemical reactions, solutions, and equilibrium presented earlier in the course. In this study, twenty-five student volunteers from a second semester general chemistry course completed two interviews. The first interview was completed prior to any classroom instruction on acids and bases. The second interview took place after classroom instruction, a prelab activity consisting of a titration calculation worksheet, a titration computer simulation, or a microscopic level animation of a titration, and two microcomputer-based laboratory (MBL) titration experiments. During the interviews, participants were asked to define and describe acid-base concepts and in the second interview they also drew the microscopic representations of four stages in an acid-base titration. An analysis of the data showed that participants had integrated the three representations of an acid-base titration to varying degrees. While some participants showed complete understanding of acids, bases, titrations, and solution chemistry, other participants showed several alternative conceptions concerning strong acid and base dissociation, the formation of titration products, and the dissociation of soluble salts. Before instruction, participants' definitions of acid, base, and pH were brief and consisted of descriptive terms. After instruction, the definitions were more scientific and reflected the definitions presented during classroom instruction.

  1. A Closer Look at Acid-Base Olfactory Titrations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neppel, Kerry; Oliver-Hoyo, Maria T.; Queen, Connie; Reed, Nicole

    2005-01-01

    Olfactory titrations using raw onions and eugenol as acid-base indicators are reported. An in-depth investigation on olfactory titrations is presented to include requirements for potential olfactory indicators and protocols for using garlic, onions, and vanillin as acid-base olfactory indicators are tested.

  2. Differential Binding Models for Direct and Reverse Isothermal Titration Calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Isaac; Winnik, Mitchell A

    2016-03-10

    Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) is a technique to measure the stoichiometry and thermodynamics from binding experiments. Identifying an appropriate mathematical model to evaluate titration curves of receptors with multiple sites is challenging, particularly when the stoichiometry or binding mechanism is not available. In a recent theoretical study, we presented a differential binding model (DBM) to study calorimetry titrations independently of the interaction among the binding sites (Herrera, I.; Winnik, M. A. J. Phys. Chem. B 2013, 117, 8659-8672). Here, we build upon our DBM and show its practical application to evaluate calorimetry titrations of receptors with multiple sites independently of the titration direction. Specifically, we present a set of ordinary differential equations (ODEs) with the general form d[S]/dV that can be integrated numerically to calculate the equilibrium concentrations of free and bound species S at every injection step and, subsequently, to evaluate the volume-normalized heat signal (δQ(V) = δq/dV) of direct and reverse calorimetry titrations. Additionally, we identify factors that influence the shape of the titration curve and can be used to optimize the initial concentrations of titrant and analyte. We demonstrate the flexibility of our updated DBM by applying these differentials and a global regression analysis to direct and reverse calorimetric titrations of gadolinium ions with multidentate ligands of increasing denticity, namely, diglycolic acid (DGA), citric acid (CIT), and nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA), and use statistical tests to validate the stoichiometries for the metal-ligand pairs studied.

  3. A Dating Analogy for Acid-Base Titration Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delorenzo, Ronald

    1995-11-01

    Although many students can easily and quickly calculate the answers to titration problems using formulas, they frequently have trouble understanding the consequences of concentrating or diluting unknowns before titrating them. I use a combination of dimensional analysis and dating analogies to alleviate this confusion.

  4. Hydrogen-ion titration studies on erythrocyte membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Hallam, C; Wrigglesworth, J M

    1976-01-01

    1. H+ titration was used to detect the presence of ionizable groups on human erythrocyte plasma membranes. Between pH2.9 and 11.3, two significant peaks of H+ association/dissociation occur in the differential from of the titration curve, one at pH3. 1. And the other at pH10.3. 2. After disruption of membrane structure by exposure to high pH or by the addition of sodium dodecyl sulphate, maxima of H+ association/dissociation were seen at pH3.1,4.3,6.5,10.3 and 10.7. 3. Spectrophotometric assay and selective chemical treatments were used to identify several of the titratable residues. 4. The degree of eleectrostatic interaction between titratable charged groups was investigated by comparing the titration characteristics of the membranes before and after modification of membrane structure. PMID:8038

  5. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Photometric Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunn, J. E.; Carr, M.; Rockosi, C.; Sekiguchi, M.; Berry, K.; Elms, B.; de Haas, E.; Ivezić, Ž .; Knapp, G.; Lupton, R.; Pauls, G.; Simcoe, R.; Hirsch, R.; Sanford, D.; Wang, S.; York, D.; Harris, F.; Annis, J.; Bartozek, L.; Boroski, W.; Bakken, J.; Haldeman, M.; Kent, S.; Holm, S.; Holmgren, D.; Petravick, D.; Prosapio, A.; Rechenmacher, R.; Doi, M.; Fukugita, M.; Shimasaku, K.; Okada, N.; Hull, C.; Siegmund, W.; Mannery, E.; Blouke, M.; Heidtman, D.; Schneider, D.; Lucinio, R.; Brinkman, J.

    1998-12-01

    We have constructed a large-format mosaic CCD camera for the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. The camera consists of two arrays, a photometric array that uses 30 2048 x 2048 SITe/Tektronix CCDs (24 μm pixels) with an effective imaging area of 720 cm^2 and an astrometric array that uses 24 400 x 2048 CCDs with the same pixel size, which will allow us to tie bright astrometric standard stars to the objects imaged in the photometric camera. The instrument will be used to carry out photometry essentially simultaneously in five color bands spanning the range accessible to silicon detectors on the ground in the time-delay-and-integrate (TDI) scanning mode. The photometric detectors are arrayed in the focal plane in six columns of five chips each such that two scans cover a filled stripe 2.5d wide. This paper presents engineering and technical details of the camera.

  6. The Candela and Photometric and Radiometric Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Parr, Albert C.

    2001-01-01

    The national measurement system for photometric and radiometric quantities is presently based upon techniques that make these quantities traceable to a high-accuracy cryogenic radiometer. The redefinition of the candela in 1979 provided the opportunity for national measurement laboratories to base their photometric measurements on optical detector technology rather than on the emission from high-temperature blackbody optical sources. The ensuing technical developments of the past 20 years, including the significant improvements in cryogenic radiometer performance, have provided the opportunity to place the fundamental maintenance of photometric quantities upon absolute detector based technology as was allowed by the 1979 redefinition. Additionally, the development of improved photodetectors has had a significant impact on the methodology in most of the radiometric measurement areas. This paper will review the status of the NIST implementation of the technical changes mandated by the 1979 redefinition of the candela and its effect upon the maintenance and dissemination of optical radiation measurements. PMID:27500020

  7. Defining photometric peculiar type Ia supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    González-Gaitán, S.; Pignata, G.; Förster, F.; Gutiérrez, C. P.; Bufano, F.; Galbany, L.; Hamuy, M.; De Jaeger, T.; Hsiao, E. Y.; Phillips, M. M.; Folatelli, G.; Anderson, J. P.

    2014-11-10

    We present a new photometric identification technique for SN 1991bg-like type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia), i.e., objects with light curve characteristics such as later primary maxima and the absence of a secondary peak in redder filters. This method is capable of selecting this sub-group from the normal type Ia population. Furthermore, we find that recently identified peculiar sub-types such as SNe Iax and super-Chandrasekhar SNe Ia have photometric characteristics similar to 91bg-like SNe Ia, namely, the absence of secondary maxima and shoulders at longer wavelengths, and can also be classified with our technique. The similarity of these different SN Ia sub-groups perhaps suggests common physical conditions. This typing methodology permits the photometric identification of peculiar SNe Ia in large upcoming wide-field surveys either to study them further or to obtain a pure sample of normal SNe Ia for cosmological studies.

  8. Accurate photometric redshifts for the CFHT legacy survey calibrated using the VIMOS VLT deep survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilbert, O.; Arnouts, S.; McCracken, H. J.; Bolzonella, M.; Bertin, E.; Le Fèvre, O.; Mellier, Y.; Zamorani, G.; Pellò, R.; Iovino, A.; Tresse, L.; Le Brun, V.; Bottini, D.; Garilli, B.; Maccagni, D.; Picat, J. P.; Scaramella, R.; Scodeggio, M.; Vettolani, G.; Zanichelli, A.; Adami, C.; Bardelli, S.; Cappi, A.; Charlot, S.; Ciliegi, P.; Contini, T.; Cucciati, O.; Foucaud, S.; Franzetti, P.; Gavignaud, I.; Guzzo, L.; Marano, B.; Marinoni, C.; Mazure, A.; Meneux, B.; Merighi, R.; Paltani, S.; Pollo, A.; Pozzetti, L.; Radovich, M.; Zucca, E.; Bondi, M.; Bongiorno, A.; Busarello, G.; de La Torre, S.; Gregorini, L.; Lamareille, F.; Mathez, G.; Merluzzi, P.; Ripepi, V.; Rizzo, D.; Vergani, D.

    2006-10-01

    Aims. We present and release photometric redshifts for a uniquely large and deep sample of 522286 objects with i'_AB≤ 25 in the Canada-France Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey (CFHTLS) "Deep Survey" fields D1, D2, D3, and D4, which cover a total effective area of 3.2 °^2. Methods: . We use 3241 spectroscopic redshifts with 0 ≤ z ≤ 5 from the VIMOS VLT Deep Survey (VVDS) as a calibration and training set to derive these photometric redshifts. Using the "Le Phare" photometric redshift code, we developed a robust calibration method based on an iterative zero-point refinement combined with a template optimisation procedure and the application of a Bayesian approach. This method removes systematic trends in the photometric redshifts and significantly reduces the fraction of catastrophic errors (by a factor of 2), a significant improvement over traditional methods. We use our unique spectroscopic sample to present a detailed assessment of the robustness of the photometric redshift sample. Results: . For a sample selected at i'_AB≤ 24, we reach a redshift accuracy of σΔ z/(1+z)=0.029 with η=3.8% of catastrophic errors (η is defined strictly as those objects with |Δ z|/(1+z) > 0.15). The reliability of our photometric redshifts decreases for faint objects: we find σΔ z/(1+z)=0.025, 0.034 and η=1.9%, 5.5% for samples selected at i'_AB=17.5-22.5 and 22.5-24 respectively. We find that the photometric redshifts of starburst galaxies are less reliable: although these galaxies represent only 22% of the spectroscopic sample, they are responsible for 50% of the catastrophic errors. An analysis as a function of redshift demonstrates that our photometric redshifts work best in the redshift range 0.2≤ z ≤ 1.5. We find an excellent agreement between the photometric and the VVDS spectroscopic redshift distributions at i'_AB≤ 24. Finally, we compare the redshift distributions of i' selected galaxies on the four CFHTLS deep fields, showing that cosmic variance is

  9. Photometric diversity of terrains on Triton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hillier, J.; Veverka, J.; Helfenstein, P.; Lee, P.

    1994-01-01

    Voyager disk-resolved images of Triton in the violet (0.41 micrometers) and green (0.56 micrometer wavelengths have been analyzed to derive the photometric characteristics of terrains on Triton. Similar conclusions are found using two distinct but related definitions of photometric units, one based on color ratio and albedo properties (A. S. McEwen, 1990), the other on albedo and brightness ratios at different phase angles (P. Lee et al., 1992). A significant diversity of photometric behavior, much broader than that discovered so far on any other icy satellite, occurs among Triton's terrains. Remarkably, differences in photometric behavior do not correlate well with geologic terrain boundaries defined on the basis of surface morphology. This suggests that in most cases photometric properties on Triton are controlled by thin deposits superposed on underlying geologic units. Single scattering albedos are 0.98 or higher and asymmetry factors range from -0.35 to -0.45 for most units. The most distinct scattering behavior is exhibited by the reddish northern units already identified as the Anomalously Scattering Region (ASR), which scatters light almost isotropically with g = -0.04. In part due to the effects of Triton's clouds and haze, it is difficult to constrain the value of bar-theta, Hapke's macroscopic roughness parameter, precisely for Triton or to map differences in bar-theta among the different photometric terrains. However, our study shows that Triton must be relatively smooth, with bar-theta less than 15-20 degs and suggests that a value of 14 degs is appropriate. The differences in photometric characteristics lead to significantly different phase angle behavior for the various terrains. For example, a terrain (e.g., the ASR) that appears dark relative to another at low phase angles will reverse its contrast (become relatively brighter) at larger phase angles. The photometric parameters have been used to calculate hemispherical albedos for the units and to

  10. Effect of photometric detector spectral response quality on white LED spectral mismatch correction factors.

    PubMed

    Rosas, E; Estrada-Hernández, A

    2016-07-01

    Light-emitting-diode (LED)-based solid-state lighting has become a real option for private and public lighting after achieving high total luminous flux (TLF) and luminous efficacy levels, thus promoting the development of energy efficient use regulation to be fulfilled by LED lamps and LED luminaires. Here, we propose a photometer-quality-based fast-checking criterion. This allows photometric technicians to perform a quick evaluation of the photometric head spectral response quality effect on the LED source spectral mismatch correction factor-when determining the TLF and luminous efficacy minimum approved levels-performance parameters subject to mandatory verification by the conformity assessment procedures technically supporting the corresponding regulation. The proposed criterion applies for a wide range of photometric detector heads' qualities (2.6%≤f1'≤36.4%).

  11. Titration of gold nanoparticles in phase extraction.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Han-Wen; Schadt, Mark J; Zhong, Chuan-Jian

    2015-12-07

    In the organic-aqueous phase transfer process of gold nanoparticles, there are two types of distinctive interfaces involving hydrophilic and hydrophobic ligands, the understanding of which is important for the design of functional nanomaterials for analytical/bioanalytical applications and the control over the nanoparticles' nanoactivity and nanotoxicity in different phases. This report describes new findings of an investigation of the quantitative aspect of ligand ion pairing at the capping monolayer structure that drives the phase extraction of gold nanoparticles. Alkanethiolate-capped gold nanoparticles of 8 nm diameter with high size monodispersity (RSD ∼ 5%) were first derivatized by a ligand place exchange reaction with 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid to form a mixed monolayer shell consisting of both hydrophobic (-CH3) and hydrophilic (-COOH) groups. It was followed by quantitative titration of the resulting nanoparticles with a cationic species (-NR4(+)) in a toluene phase, yielding ion pairing of -NR4(+) and -COO(-) on part of the capping monolayer. Analysis of the phase extraction allowed a quantitative determination of the percentage of ion pairing and structural changes in the capping monolayer on the nanoparticles. The results, along with morphological characterization, are discussed in terms of the interfacial structural changes and their implications on the rational design of surface-functionalized nanoparticles and fine tuning of the interfacial reactivity.

  12. Titration and hysteresis in epigenetic chromatin silencing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dayarian, Adel; Sengupta, Anirvan M.

    2013-06-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms of silencing via heritable chromatin modifications play a major role in gene regulation and cell fate specification. We consider a model of epigenetic chromatin silencing in budding yeast and study the bifurcation diagram and characterize the bistable and the monostable regimes. The main focus of this paper is to examine how the perturbations altering the activity of histone modifying enzymes affect the epigenetic states. We analyze the implications of having the total number of silencing proteins, given by the sum of proteins bound to the nucleosomes and the ones available in the ambient, to be constant. This constraint couples different regions of chromatin through the shared reservoir of ambient silencing proteins. We show that the response of the system to perturbations depends dramatically on the titration effect caused by the above constraint. In particular, for a certain range of overall abundance of silencing proteins, the hysteresis loop changes qualitatively with certain jump replaced by continuous merger of different states. In addition, we find a nonmonotonic dependence of gene expression on the rate of histone deacetylation activity of Sir2. We discuss how these qualitative predictions of our model could be compared with experimental studies of the yeast system under anti-silencing drugs.

  13. Dynamical and photometric investigation of comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sekanina, Z.

    1980-01-01

    The findings of dynamic and photometric investigations of comets are summarized, and include discussions of the comets Bennett 1970 II, Kohoutek 1973f, West 1976 VI, and periodic comets d'Arrest, Encke, and Swift Tuttle. The phenomena examined include striated and anomalous tails, tail composition and the dynamics of vaporizing dust particles, the evolution of dust jets, and split and dissipating comets.

  14. Magnification with wide-field photometric surveys.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Fernandez, M.; Sánchez, E.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.

    2017-03-01

    A methodology to detect and measure magnification using the galaxy number count technique designed to be used at present and future photometric galaxy surveys is described. The method is tested with the N-body simulation MICE-GC showing that it allows to clearly detect magnification and showing agreement with the theory for sky areas of at least 110°^2.

  15. System for clinical photometric stereo endoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durr, Nicholas J.; González, Germán.; Lim, Daryl; Traverso, Giovanni; Nishioka, Norman S.; Vakoc, Benjamin J.; Parot, Vicente

    2014-02-01

    Photometric stereo endoscopy is a technique that captures information about the high-spatial-frequency topography of the field of view simultaneously with a conventional color image. Here we describe a system that will enable photometric stereo endoscopy to be clinically evaluated in the large intestine of human patients. The clinical photometric stereo endoscopy system consists of a commercial gastroscope, a commercial video processor, an image capturing and processing unit, custom synchronization electronics, white light LEDs, a set of four fibers with diffusing tips, and an alignment cap. The custom pieces that come into contact with the patient are composed of biocompatible materials that can be sterilized before use. The components can then be assembled in the endoscopy suite before use. The resulting endoscope has the same outer diameter as a conventional colonoscope (14 mm), plugs into a commercial video processor, captures topography and color images at 15 Hz, and displays the conventional color image to the gastroenterologist in real-time. We show that this system can capture a color and topographical video in a tubular colon phantom, demonstrating robustness to complex geometries and motion. The reported system is suitable for in vivo evaluation of photometric stereo endoscopy in the human large intestine.

  16. THE Pan-STARRS1 PHOTOMETRIC SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Tonry, J. L.; Burgett, W. S.; Chambers, K. C.; Hodapp, K. W.; Kaiser, N.; Kudritzki, R.-P.; Magnier, E. A.; Morgan, J. S.; Wainscoat, R. J.; Stubbs, C. W.; Shivvers, I. S.; Lykke, K. R.; Doherty, P.; Price, P. A.

    2012-05-10

    The Pan-STARRS1 survey is collecting multi-epoch, multi-color observations of the sky north of declination -30 Degree-Sign to unprecedented depths. These data are being photometrically and astrometrically calibrated and will serve as a reference for many other purposes. In this paper, we present our determination of the Pan-STARRS1 photometric system: g{sub P1}, r{sub P1}, i{sub P1}, z{sub P1}, y{sub P1}, and w{sub P1}. The Pan-STARRS1 photometric system is fundamentally based on the Hubble Space Telescope Calspec spectrophotometric observations, which in turn are fundamentally based on models of white dwarf atmospheres. We define the Pan-STARRS1 magnitude system and describe in detail our measurement of the system passbands, including both the instrumental sensitivity and atmospheric transmission functions. By-products, including transformations to other photometric systems, Galactic extinction, and stellar locus, are also provided. We close with a discussion of remaining systematic errors.

  17. Kohoutek, photometric photography experiment (S233)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundquist, C. A.; Craven, P. D.

    1981-01-01

    The final results of the Skylab 4 experiment S233, Kohoutek photometric photography experiment, which undertook a series of visible light photographs suitable for photometry and for a photographic history of Comet Kohoutek are described. The experiment concept, the data reduction method, and the results obtained are discussed.

  18. Asteroids (21) Lutetia: global and spatially resolved photometric properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faury, G.; Lamy, P.; Vernazza, P.; Jorda, L.; Toth, I.

    2011-10-01

    Asteroids (21) Lutetia has recently been visited by the Rosetta spacecraft of the European Space Agency and imaged by its Rosetta narrow (NAC) and wide (WAC) angle cameras. The accurate photometric analysis of the images requires utmost care due to several instrumental problems, the most severe and complex to handle being the presence of optical ghosts which result from multiple reflections on the two filters inserted in the optical beam and on the thick window which protects the CCD detector from cosmic ray impacts. These ghosts prominently appears as either slighlty defocused images offset from the primary images or large round or elliptical halos. The appearance, the location and the radiance of each individual ghost depends upon the optical configuration (selected filters) and on the image itself so that no general model can be proposed. Consequently, a case-by-case approach must be adopted which requires a long and tedious work where each ghost is individually parametrized according to its specific geometry (defocused offset image or halo) and iteratively fitted to the original image. The procedure has been successfully applied to all NAC and WAC images and works extremely well with residuals and sometime artifacts at insignificant levels. Both NAC and WAC have further been recalibrated using the most recent observations of stellar calibrators VEGA and the solar analog 16 Cyg B allowing to correct the quantum efficiency response of the two CCD and the throughput for all channels (i.e., filters). We will present results on the global photometric properties of (21) Lutetia, albedo, phase function and spectral reflectivity as well as spatially resolved properties based on a novel method developed in the space of the facets representing the three-dimensional shape of the body. This method successfully implemented in the cases of the nucleus of comet 9P/Tempel 2 and of asteroid (2867) Steins (Spjuth et al. 2011) has the advantage of automatically tracking the same

  19. Philosophy and updating of the asteroid photometric catalogue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Magnusson, Per; Barucci, M. Antonietta; Capria, M. T.; Dahlgren, Mats; Fulchignoni, Marcello; Lagerkvist, C. I.

    1992-01-01

    The Asteroid Photometric Catalogue now contains photometric lightcurves for 584 asteroids. We discuss some of the guiding principles behind it. This concerns both observers who offer input to it and users of the product.

  20. Photometric method for determination of acidity constants through integral spectra analysis.

    PubMed

    Zevatskiy, Yuriy Eduardovich; Ruzanov, Daniil Olegovich; Samoylov, Denis Vladimirovich

    2015-04-15

    An express method for determination of acidity constants of organic acids, based on the analysis of the integral transmittance vs. pH dependence is developed. The integral value is registered as a photocurrent of photometric device simultaneously with potentiometric titration. The proposed method allows to obtain pKa using only simple and low-cost instrumentation. The optical part of the experimental setup has been optimized through the exclusion of the monochromator device. Thus it only takes 10-15 min to obtain one pKa value with the absolute error of less than 0.15 pH units. Application limitations and reliability of the method have been tested for a series of organic acids of various nature.

  1. Photometric method for determination of acidity constants through integral spectra analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zevatskiy, Yuriy Eduardovich; Ruzanov, Daniil Olegovich; Samoylov, Denis Vladimirovich

    2015-04-01

    An express method for determination of acidity constants of organic acids, based on the analysis of the integral transmittance vs. pH dependence is developed. The integral value is registered as a photocurrent of photometric device simultaneously with potentiometric titration. The proposed method allows to obtain pKa using only simple and low-cost instrumentation. The optical part of the experimental setup has been optimized through the exclusion of the monochromator device. Thus it only takes 10-15 min to obtain one pKa value with the absolute error of less than 0.15 pH units. Application limitations and reliability of the method have been tested for a series of organic acids of various nature.

  2. A Titration Technique for Demonstrating a Magma Replenishment Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodder, A. P. W.

    1983-01-01

    Conductiometric titrations can be used to simulate subduction-setting volcanism. Suggestions are made as to the use of this technique in teaching volcanic mechanisms and geochemical indications of tectonic settings. (JN)

  3. Microscope Titration and Extraction of DNA from Liver.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayo, Lois T.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Describes a simple and inexpensive, one-period activity to extract DNA to make the study of DNA less abstract. A microscope titration is used to determine when cells are ready for DNA extraction. (PR)

  4. Concentration-related response potentiometric titrations to study the interaction of small molecules with large biomolecules.

    PubMed

    Hamidi-Asl, Ezat; Daems, Devin; De Wael, Karolien; Van Camp, Guy; Nagels, Luc J

    2014-12-16

    In the present paper, the utility of a special potentiometric titration approach for recognition and calculation of biomolecule/small-molecule interactions is reported. This approach is fast, sensitive, reproducible, and inexpensive in comparison to the other methods for the determination of the association constant values (Ka) and the interaction energies (ΔG). The potentiometric titration measurement is based on the use of a classical polymeric membrane indicator electrode in a solution of the small-molecule ligand. The biomolecule is used as a titrant. The potential is measured versus a reference electrode and transformed into a concentration-related signal over the entire concentration interval, also at low concentrations, where the millivolt (y-axis) versus log canalyte (x-axis) potentiometric calibration curve is not linear. In the procedure, Ka is calculated for the interaction of cocaine with a cocaine binding aptamer and with an anticocaine antibody. To study the selectivity and cross-reactivity, other oligonucleotides and aptamers are tested, as well as other small ligand molecules such as tetrakis(4-chlorophenyl)borate, metergoline, lidocaine, and bromhexine. The calculated Ka compared favorably to the value reported in the literature using surface plasmon resonance. The potentiometric titration approach called "concentration-related response potentiometry" is used to study molecular interaction for seven macromolecular target molecules and four small-molecule ligands.

  5. Ionization behavior of polyphosphoinositides determined via the preparation of pH titration curves using solid-state 31P NMR.

    PubMed

    Graber, Zachary T; Kooijman, Edgar E

    2013-01-01

    Detailed knowledge of the degree of ionization of lipid titratable groups is important for the evaluation of protein-lipid and lipid-lipid interactions. The degree of ionization is commonly evaluated by acid-base titration, but for lipids localized in a multicomponent membrane interface this is not a suitable technique. For phosphomonoester-containing lipids such as the polyphosphoinositides, phosphatidic acid, and ceramide-1-phosphate, this is more conveniently accomplished by (31)P NMR. Here, we describe a solid-state (31)P NMR procedure to construct pH titration curves to determine the degree of ionization of phosphomonoester groups in polyphosphoinositides. This procedure can also be used, with suitable sample preparation conditions, for other important signaling lipids. Access to a solid-state, i.e., magic angle spinning, capable NMR spectrometer is assumed. The procedures described here are valid for a Bruker instrument, but can be adapted for other spectrometers as needed.

  6. Multispectral photometric stereo for acquiring high-fidelity surface normals.

    PubMed

    Nam, Giljoo; Kim, Min H

    2014-01-01

    Multispectral imaging and photometric stereo are common in 3D imaging but rarely have been combined. Reconstructing a 3D object's shape using photometric stereo is challenging owing to indirect illumination, specular reflection, and self-shadows, and removing interreflection in photometric stereo is problematic. A new multispectral photometric-stereo method removes interreflection on diffuse materials using multispectral-reflectance information and reconstructs 3D shapes with high accuracy. You can integrate this method into photometric-stereo systems by simply substituting the original camera with a multispectral camera.

  7. Astrophysical science with a spaceborne photometric telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Granados, Arno F. (Editor); Borucki, William J. (Editor)

    1994-01-01

    The FRESIP Project (FRequency of Earth-Sized Inner Planets) is currently under study at NASA Ames Research Center. The goal of FRESIP is the measurement of the frequency of Earth-sized extra-solar planets in inner orbits via the photometric signature of a transit event. This will be accomplished with a spaceborne telescope/photometer capable of photometric precision of two parts in 100,000 at a magnitude of m(sub v) = 12.5. To achieve the maximum scientific value from the FRESIP mission, an astrophysical science workshop was held at the SETI Institute in Mountain View, California, November 11-12, 1993. Workshop participants were invited as experts in their field of astrophysical research and discussed the astrophysical science that can be achieved within the context of the FRESIP mission.

  8. A Photometric Search for Extrasolar Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, S. B.; Everett, M.; Davis, D. R.; Weidenschilling, S. J.; McGruder, C. H., III; Gelderman, R.

    2000-10-01

    We describe a new program for the photometric detection of extrasolar planets using the 1.3 m telescope on Kitt Peak, which will be operated by a consortium of universities headed by Western Kentucky Univ. and including South Carolina State Univ., Planetary Science Institute, Boston Univ., and UC-Berkeley (SSL). This approach will complement the existing, highly successful, spectroscopic searches. The theory of photometric transit detection has been discussed by a number of authors (e.g. Borucki & Summers 1984; Howell & Merline 1995; Howell et al. 1996) and shown to be well within the capabilities of both photomultiplier and CCD observations. The first photometric transit detection was recently accomplished for the spectroscopically discovered planet orbiting HD209458 (Henry et al. 2000). The detection of extrasolar planet transits requires high photometric precision rather than accuracy. The necessary photometric precision to detect Jupiter-, Neptune-, and Earth-sized planets in orbit around F-M dwarfs is 1%, 0.1% and 0.00001%, respectively. The required precision to observe transits by Jupiter-sized extrasolar planets is easily obtained with modern CCD detectors and the differential ensemble photometric techniques pioneered by Howell et al. (1988). The use of such a technique for ultra-high precision photometry has been described in numerous papers (Charbonneau et al. 2000, Howell 2000, plus many others). Everett and Howell recently used the Kitt Peak NOAO 0.9 m telescope with the wide-field MOSAIC camera to search for extrasolar planet transits. During this run, they achieved a photometric precision of 0.024% for this dataset. With the 1.3 m telescope, we expect to reach a photometric precision of ~ 0.01% (10-4 mag). Our consortium has recently begun to refurbish and automate the 1.3 m telescope, which will be known as the Remote-Controlled Telescope (RCT). The primary instrument will be a CCD camera with a SITe 2048 x 2048 CCD having pixel well depths of 363

  9. A test of the Hapke photometric model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepard, Michael K.; Helfenstein, Paul

    2007-03-01

    We conducted a test of the Hapke (1981, 1984, 1986, 2002) photometric model to determine what physical parameters could be confidently linked to a surface's photometric behavior. The first author selected and measured the bidirectional reflectance distribution functions of 14 different samples in up to three different wavelengths using the Bloomsburg University Goniometer Laboratory. A total of 29 data files were obtained, each file containing more than 700 measurements from different viewing geometries; phase angles varied from 3° to 130°. The 29 files were initially sent ``in-the-blind'' to the second author, who was charged with inverting the data files and extracting best fit model parameters. Our baseline model used the most recent Hapke (2002) formulation with a two-term Henyey-Greenstein particle phase function and shadow-hiding backscatter opposition effect (SHOE) model. We also inverted the data with three other variations that included three-term Henyey-Greenstein phase functions and both SHOE and the coherent backscatter opposition effect (CBOE) models. Our results were compared with the known physical properties of our samples. We found no compelling evidence that individual photometric parameters could be uniquely interpreted to reveal the physical state of our samples, either in an absolute or relative sense. Rather, combinations of physical properties such as albedo, roughness, and porosity were convolved within each retrieved photometric parameter. On the basis of our empirical evidence, we speculate that the fault lies with the inability of radiative transfer models to adequately account for discrete media and the effects of porosity, and its deficient assumption that individual particles are the primary scattering units.

  10. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Photometric Camera

    SciTech Connect

    Gunn, J.E.; Carr, M.; Rockosi, C.; Sekiguchi, M.; Berry, K.; Elms, B.; de Haas, E.; Ivezic, Z.; Knapp, G.; Lupton, R.; Pauls, G.; Simcoe, R.; Hirsch, R.; Sanford, D.; Wang, S.; York, D.; Harris, F.; Annis, J.; Bartozek, L.; Boroski, W.; Bakken, J.; Haldeman, M.; Kent, S.; Holm, S.; Holmgren, D.; Petravick, D.; Prosapio, A.; Rechenmacher, R.; Doi, M.; Fukugita, M.; Shimasaku, K.; Okada, N.; Hull, C.; Siegmund, W.; Mannery, E.; Blouke, M.; Heidtman, D.; Schneider, D.; Lucinio, R.; and others

    1998-12-01

    We have constructed a large-format mosaic CCD camera for the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. The camera consists of two arrays, a photometric array that uses 30 2048 {times} 2048 SITe/Tektronix CCDs (24 {mu}m pixels) with an effective imaging area of 720 cm{sup 2} and an astrometric array that uses 24 400 {times} 2048 CCDs with the same pixel size, which will allow us to tie bright astrometric standard stars to the objects imaged in the photometric camera. The instrument will be used to carry out photometry essentially simultaneously in five color bands spanning the range accessible to silicon detectors on the ground in the time-delay{endash}and{endash}integrate (TDI) scanning mode. The photometric detectors are arrayed in the focal plane in six columns of five chips each such that two scans cover a filled stripe 2&arcdeg;5 wide. This paper presents engineering and technical details of the camera. {copyright} {ital {copyright} 1998.} {ital The American Astronomical Society}

  11. Photometric assessment of energy efficient torchieres

    SciTech Connect

    Page, Erik; Siminovitch, Michael

    1997-06-01

    Extensive development of designs and prototyping of energy efficient torchiere systems using compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) has led directly to the production of CFL torchieres by a major US manufacturer. This paper compares the electrical and photometric characteristics of one of the new CFL torchieres to standard tungsten halogen torchieres (halogen uplighters). Power assessments and gonio-photometric data indicate that the new CFL torchiere provides significant energy savings over the standard tungsten halogen torchiere while producing more luminous flux. The energy savings is jointly due to the high source efficacy of the CFLs and the poor performance . of the imported halogen lamps. The paper also presents results from a test site in the student dormitories at Stanford University where a torchiere "lamp swap" program was initiated in which students voluntarily traded their halogen torchieres for CFL torchieres. Out of the 500 torchieres involved in the lamp swap, a random sample of nearly 100 halogen lamps (seasoned in the field and considered to represent a typical population) were collected and photometrically and electrically characterized in the laboratory. These laboratory results indicate that the CFL torchieres use 65 watts to produce 25 percent more light than the 300 W tungsten halogen torchieres they are designed to replace. Additionally, the CFL torchieres have the benefit of a cooler lamp operating temperature, making them safer luminaires.

  12. Can Selforganizing Maps Accurately Predict Photometric Redshifts?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Way, Michael J.; Klose, Christian

    2012-01-01

    We present an unsupervised machine-learning approach that can be employed for estimating photometric redshifts. The proposed method is based on a vector quantization called the self-organizing-map (SOM) approach. A variety of photometrically derived input values were utilized from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey's main galaxy sample, luminous red galaxy, and quasar samples, along with the PHAT0 data set from the Photo-z Accuracy Testing project. Regression results obtained with this new approach were evaluated in terms of root-mean-square error (RMSE) to estimate the accuracy of the photometric redshift estimates. The results demonstrate competitive RMSE and outlier percentages when compared with several other popular approaches, such as artificial neural networks and Gaussian process regression. SOM RMSE results (using delta(z) = z(sub phot) - z(sub spec)) are 0.023 for the main galaxy sample, 0.027 for the luminous red galaxy sample, 0.418 for quasars, and 0.022 for PHAT0 synthetic data. The results demonstrate that there are nonunique solutions for estimating SOM RMSEs. Further research is needed in order to find more robust estimation techniques using SOMs, but the results herein are a positive indication of their capabilities when compared with other well-known methods

  13. Photometric Parallaxes for Red Dwarf Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humphrey, Nick; Robertson, T.

    2008-05-01

    The luminosity function of low luminosity red stars is import due to the high frequency of such stars and their substantial contribution to the mass of baryonic matter as determined by analysis of the numbers of such stars within a few parsecs of the Sun. Many such stars relatively close to the Sun have not been detected due to their low luminosity and to an inability to distinguish between red giant and dwarf stars. A sample of one hundred potential red dwarf stars was selected from 2MASS photometric data, and USNO-B photometric and astrometric data. Sample stars were observed using the SARA (Southeastern Association for Research in Astronomy) telescope using Kron-Cousins RI photometry and intermediate-band CaH photometry. All thirty two sample stars observed have luminosity classes consistent with red dwarfs. The photometric parallaxes range from 40 to 230 pc. A comparison of USNO-B R magnitudes and the observed CCD R magnitudes (observed - USNO) indicated no systematic difference (-0.03 with and standard error of the mean of 0.05). A comparison of the R-I color index showed a mean difference of -0.21 and standard error of the mean of 0.03. The selection criterion used seems to be quite efficient in identifying red dwarf stars. This study used data collected with the SARA Telescope and was funded by grants from the Indiana Space Grant Consortium and Ball State University.

  14. Improving HST/WFC3 photometric calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deustua, Susana E.; WFC3 Team

    2017-01-01

    I will discuss improvements in the photometric calibration of the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) imaging channels based on the analisys of 6 years of standard star observations acquired between 2009 and 2015. Observations of the three white dwarf standard stars, GD 153, GD 71, and G191B2B and of the G-type star P330E were obtained at multiple dither positions . Departing from previous practice, chip-dependent inverse sensitivities for the WFC3/UVIS channel are computed at r=10 pixels for the 42 full frame filters (excluding the 20 quad filters); and these data also provide encircled energy fractions as a function of filter. Chip-dependent inverse sensitivities differ on average by 3% from previous computations, primarily due to drizzling effects. I describe the UVIS 2.0 (chip-dependent) philosophy and discuss the esults in the context of prior photometric calculations. Further, I will also discuss the status of the WFC3/IR photometric calibration, in view of updated linearity corrections and updated dark reference files.

  15. Characterization of Titratable Amphiphiles in Lipid Membranes by Fluorescence Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pierrat, Philippe; Lebeau, Luc

    2015-11-17

    Understanding the ionization behavior of lipid membranes is a key parameter for successful development of lipid-based drug delivery systems. Accurate determination of the ionization state of a titratable species incorporated in a lipid bilayer however requires special care. Herein we investigated the behavior of titratable lipids in liposomes by fluorescence spectroscopy and determined which extrinsic parameters-i.e., besides those directly related to their molecular structure-determine their ionization state. Two fluorescent dyes, TNS and R18, have been used to investigate basic and acidic titratable lipids, respectively. Our results suggest that the titration behavior of the ionizable lipid in the membrane is more sensitive to the composition of the membrane and to its physical state than to the presence of solutes in the aqueous phase. Essentially overlooked in earlier studies on ionizable lipid assemblies, the concentration of the titratable lipid in the membrane was found to have a major effect on the ionization state of the lipid polar head. This may result in a shift in the apparent pKa value which may be as large as two pKa units and cannot be satisfactorily predicted.

  16. Potentiometric titration and equivalent weight of humic acid

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pommer, A.M.; Breger, I.A.

    1960-01-01

    The "acid nature" of humic acid has been controversial for many years. Some investigators claim that humic acid is a true weak acid, while others feel that its behaviour during potentiometric titration can be accounted for by colloidal adsorption of hydrogen ions. The acid character of humic acid has been reinvestigated using newly-derived relationships for the titration of weak acids with strong base. Re-interpreting the potentiometric titration data published by Thiele and Kettner in 1953, it was found that Merck humic acid behaves as a weak polyelectrolytic acid having an equivalent weight of 150, a pKa of 6.8 to 7.0, and a titration exponent of about 4.8. Interdretation of similar data pertaining to the titration of phenol-formaldehyde and pyrogallol-formaldehyde resins, considered to be analogs for humic acid by Thiele and Kettner, leads to the conclusion that it is not possible to differentiate between adsorption and acid-base reaction for these substances. ?? 1960.

  17. [Titration comparative study of TOPINA Tablets in patients with localization related epilepsy: double-blind comparative study by rapid and slow titration methods].

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Sunao; Inoue, Yushi; Sasagawa, Mutsuo; Kato, Masaaki

    2012-04-01

    To compare the tolerability and efficacy of two titration methods (rapid and slow titration) for TOPINA Tablets with different dosages and periods of escalation, a double-blind comparative study was conducted in patients with localization-related epilepsy. A total of 183 patients were randomized to either rapid titration (initial dosage 100 mg/day increased by 100-200 mg at weekly intervals) or to slow titration (initial dosage 50 mg/day increased in 50 mg/day increments at weekly intervals). TOPINA Tablets were administered for 12 weeks to the maximum dosage of 400 mg/day. The incident of adverse events leading to treatment interruptions or withdrawals was 18.9% in rapid titration and 14.8% in slow titration, with no statistical significance (p = 0.554). The incident of adverse events and adverse reactions of slow titration was slightly lower than that of rapid titration. The common adverse events and adverse reactions reported in the two titration methods were comparable and were well tolerated. On the other hand, the efficacy of slow titration, percent reduction in seizure rate and responder rate, was comparable with that of rapid titration. In conclusion, there were no significant differences of therapeutic response to TOPINA Tablets between the two titration methods.

  18. Differential titration of bases in glacial acetic acid.

    PubMed

    Castellano, T; Medwick, T; Shinkai, J H; Bailey, L

    1981-01-01

    A study of bases in acetic acid and their differential titration was carried out. The overall basicity constants for 20 bases were measured in acetic acid, and the differential titration of five binary mixtures of variable delta pKb values in acetic acid was followed using a glass electrode-modified calomel electrode system. Agreement with literature values was good. A leveling diagram was constructed that indicated that bases stronger than aqueous pKb 10 are leveled to an acetous pKb 5.69, whereas weaker bases are not leveled but instead exhibit their own intrinsic basicity, with the acetous pKb to aqueous pKb values being linearly related (slope 1.18, correlation coefficient 0.962). A minimum acetous delta pKb of four units is required for the satisfactory differential titration of two bases in acetic acid.

  19. The Definitive Johnson Kron-Cousins UBVRI Photometric System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landolt, Arlo U.; Clem, James L.

    2015-08-01

    The defining characteristics and a brief history of the Johnson Kron-Cousins UBVRI photometric system will be reviewed, and recent observational efforts to extend the UBVRI standard star network, both in magnitude and sky coverage, presented. The current incarnation of this network now comprises more than 50,000 photometric standards distributed around the sky in three declination zones centered on -50 degrees, the celestial equator, and +50 degrees. The majority of these standards encompass the magnitude range of ~9 < V <~ 22, and the color index range of ~ -0.3 < B-V <~ +2. The standard error of the mean in the photometry is less than 0.005 magnitudes in BVRI and 0.015 magn. in U. Relations have been developed to permit conversion between the UBVRI and SDSS ugriz photometric systems, thereby enhancing the versatility of both photometric systems. Several uses of the UBVRI photometric system, and its synergy with other photometric systems, will be noted.

  20. Hyperspectral photometric stereo for a single capture.

    PubMed

    Ozawa, Keisuke; Sato, Imari; Yamaguchi, Masahiro

    2017-03-01

    We present a single-capture photometric stereo method using a hyperspectral camera. A spectrally and spatially designed illumination enables a point-wise estimation of reflectance spectra and surface normals from a single hyperspectral image. The illumination works as a reflectance probe in wide spectral regions where reflectance spectra are measured, and the full spectra are estimated by interpolation. It also works as the resource for shadings in other spectral regions. The accuracy of estimation is evaluated in a simulation. Also, we prepare an experimental setup and demonstrate a surface reconstruction against a real scene.

  1. Photometric monitoring of Luminous Blue Variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buemi, Carla; Distefano, Elisa; Leto, Paolo; Schillirò, Francesco; Trigilio, Corrado; Umana, Grazia; Bernabei, Stefano; Cutispoto, Giuseppe; Messina, Sergio

    2011-01-01

    We present some preliminary results from our program of intensive near-infrared photometric monitoring of a sample of confirmed and candidate Luminous Blue Variables (LBVs) conducted from 2008 to 2010. Clear long-term variability has been observed for Wray 17-96 and V481 Sct, with overall brightness variation greater than 1 mag in the J band. Other sources, such as LBV 1806-20 showed detectable variability with amplitudes of few tenths of a magnitude with a time-scale of about 60 days.

  2. Difficult cases in photometric studies of asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marciniak, Anna; Pilcher, Frederick; Oszkiewicz, Dagmara; Bartczak, Przemysław; Santana-Ros, Toni; Kamiński, Krzysztof; Urakawa, Seitaro; Ogłoza, Waldemar; Fauvaud, Stéphane; Kankiewicz, Paweł; Kudak, Viktor; Żejmo, Michał; Nishiyama, Kota; Okumura, Shin-ichiro; Nimura, Tokuhiro; Hirsch, Roman; Konstanciak, Izabella; Tychoniec, Łukasz; Figas, Michał

    2016-06-01

    We present a photometric campaign targeted at asteroids that display both long periods of rotation and small amplitudes of brightness variations. Our aim is to debias available sample of spin and shape modelled asteroids and to correct previous wrong period determinations. Our newest findings are corrected period determinations for asteroids (279) Thule (P=23.896h ± 0.005 h), (673) Edda (P=22.340h ± 0.004 h), and (737) Arequipa (P=7.0259h ± 0.0003 h). Supporting lightcurves are presented in this paper.

  3. Anion-exchange nanospheres as titration reagents for anionic analytes.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Jingying; Xie, Xiaojiang; Bakker, Eric

    2015-08-18

    We present here anion-exchange nanospheres as novel titration reagents for anions. The nanospheres contain a lipophilic cation for which the counterion is initially Cl(-). Ion exchange takes place between Cl(-) in the nanospheres and a more lipophilic anion in the sample, such as ClO4(-) and NO3(-). Consecutive titration in the same sample solution for ClO4(-) and NO3(-) were demonstrated. As an application, the concentration of NO3(-) in spinach was successfully determined using this method.

  4. Fast coarse-grained model for RNA titration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barroso da Silva, Fernando Luís; Derreumaux, Philippe; Pasquali, Samuela

    2017-01-01

    A new numerical scheme for RNA (ribonucleic acid) titration based on the Debye-Hückel framework for the salt description is proposed in an effort to reduce the computational costs for further applications to study protein-RNA systems. By means of different sets of Monte Carlo simulations, we demonstrated that this new scheme is able to correctly reproduce the experimental titration behavior and salt pKa shifts. In comparison with other theoretical approaches, similar or even better outcomes are achieved at much lower computational costs. The model was tested on the lead-dependent ribozyme, the branch-point helix, and the domain 5 from Azotobacter vinelandii Intron 5.

  5. A fully automatic system for acid-base coulometric titrations

    PubMed Central

    Cladera, A.; Caro, A.; Estela, J. M.; Cerdà, V.

    1990-01-01

    An automatic system for acid-base titrations by electrogeneration of H+ and OH- ions, with potentiometric end-point detection, was developed. The system includes a PC-compatible computer for instrumental control, data acquisition and processing, which allows up to 13 samples to be analysed sequentially with no human intervention. The system performance was tested on the titration of standard solutions, which it carried out with low errors and RSD. It was subsequently applied to the analysis of various samples of environmental and nutritional interest, specifically waters, soft drinks and wines. PMID:18925283

  6. Photometric Evidence for Volatile Transport on Triton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbert, B. D.; Buratti, B.; Schmidt, B.; Bauer, J.

    2003-12-01

    Past observations of Neptune's moon Triton reveal that its surface is exhibiting both long and short term variability in color relative to baseline data gathered in the 1989 Voyager 2 flyby. These changes are likely due to the seasonal sublimation and deposition of Nitrogen frost and other volatiles (Buratti et al. 1994). Photometric light curves provide an additional verification that volatile transport is occurring on Triton. Steady state models, based on Voyager data and the assumption that Triton's surface is not changing, suggest a visual light curve amplitude of less than 0.05 magnitudes (Hillier et al.1991). Measurements taken in July 2000, however, indicated an amplitude of nearly 0.20 magnitudes (Cobb et al. 2001). Follow-up photometric observations in B,V,R,I broadband filters and an 890nm narrow band filter, covering a broader range in sub-Earth longitudes, were taken in June, July, and August 2003. They indicate a visual amplitude of 0.17 +/- 0.05 magnitudes, in close agreement with the 2001 data. These amplitudes are far larger than expected and may imply substantial volatile transport on Triton's surface. In addition, we observed a larger than expected opposition surge that demands further investigation.

  7. Photometric stellar catalogue for TV meteor astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonov, V. A.; Bagrov, A. V.

    2016-01-01

    Photometry for ordinary astrophysics was carefully developed for its own purposes. As stars radiation is very similar to the blackbody radiation, astronomers measure star illumination in wide or narrow calibrated spectral bands. This is enough for star photometry with precise accuracy and for measuring their light flux in these bands in energetic units. Meteors are moving objects and do not allow collection of more photons then they emit. So meteor observers use the whole spectral band that can be covered by sensitivity of their light sensors. This is why measurements of stellar magnitudes of background stars by these sensors are not the same as catalogued star brightness in standard photometric spectral bands. Here we present a special photometric catalogue of 93 bright non-variable stars of the northern hemisphere, that can be used by meteor observers of standard background whose brightness are calculated in energetic units as well as in non-systematic stellar magnitudes in spectral wavelength of the WATEC 902 sensitivity.

  8. Photometric Redshifts in the IRAC Shallow Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Brodwin, M; Brown, M; Ashby, M; Bian, C; Brand, K; Dey, A; Eisenhardt, P; Eisenstein, D; Gonzalez, A; Huang, J; Kochanek, C; McKenzie, E; Pahre, M; Smith, H; Soifer, B; Stanford, S; Stern, D; Elston, R

    2006-06-13

    Accurate photometric redshifts are calculated for nearly 200,000 galaxies to a 4.5 micron flux limit of {approx} 13 {micro}Jy in the 8.5 deg{sup 2} Spitzer/IRAC Shallow survey. Using a hybrid photometric redshift algorithm incorporating both neural-net and template-fitting techniques, calibrated with over 15,000 spectroscopic redshifts, a redshift accuracy of {sigma} = 0.06 (1+z) is achieved for 95% of galaxies at 0 < z < 1.5. The accuracy is {sigma} = 0.12 (1 + z) for 95% of AGN at 0 < z < 3. Redshift probability functions, central to several ongoing studies of the galaxy population, are computed for the full sample. We demonstrate that these functions accurately represent the true redshift probability density, allowing the calculation of valid confidence intervals for all objects. These probability functions have already been used to successfully identify a population of Spitzer-selected high redshift (z > 1) galaxy clusters. We present one such spectroscopically confirmed cluster at = 1.24, ISCS J1434.2+3426. Finally, we present a measurement of the 4.5 {micro}m-selected galaxy redshift distribution.

  9. Photometric Redshift Biases from Galaxy Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, C. Jonathan; Bernstein, Gary

    2010-04-01

    Proposed cosmological surveys will make use of photometric redshifts of galaxies that are significantly fainter than any complete spectroscopic redshift surveys that exist to train the photo-z methods. We investigate the photo-z biases that result from known differences between the faint and bright populations: a rise in active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity toward higher redshift, and a metallicity difference between intrinsically luminous and faint early-type galaxies. We find that even very small mismatches between the mean photometric target and the training set can induce photo-z biases large enough to corrupt derived cosmological parameters significantly. Our results suggest that a metallicity shift of ∼0.003 dex in an old population, or contamination of any galaxy spectrum with ∼0.2% AGN flux, is sufficient to induce a 10-3 bias in photo-z. These results highlight the danger in extrapolating the behavior of bright galaxies to a fainter population, and the desirability of a spectroscopic training set that spans all of the characteristics of the photo-z targets, i.e., extending to the 25th mag or fainter galaxies that will be used in future surveys.

  10. Improved End Point Detection in the Redox Titration of Vitamin C in Green Peppers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deal, S. Todd; Pope, Sandi R.

    1996-06-01

    We have used E. R. Johnson's "infamous pepper lab" (titrimetric determination of vitamin C content in raw and cooked green peppers) in our introductory biochemistry course for years with varying success. In the original paper, Johnson states that after seeing the change from a bright green to a muddy green or gray a couple of times during the titration procedure that students can easily determine the endpoint. Because of the large variation in the colors of the solutions obtained from the cooking and extraction procedures, we did not find this to be the case. In fact, we found that the endpoint color was very different from sample to sample. Our solution to this problem is discussed in this article. It has proven to be remarkably simple, yet has produced dramatically improved results.

  11. Titration of Isolated Cell Walls of Lemna minor L 1

    PubMed Central

    Morvan, Claudine; Demarty, Maurice; Thellier, Michel

    1979-01-01

    A theoretical model has been built to bypass the equation of titration of the cell wall. This equation, which is an extension of the Henderson-Hasselbach equation, underlines the importance of the exchange constant, the ionic strength as well as the rate of neutralization. The model is restricted to the case when the ionization degree is equal to the neutralization degree. The shape of the titration curve is shown to be strongly dependent on the valency of the base used. Experimental results have shown that isolated cell walls bear at least two kinds of sites. The first sites which are titrated after a short time of equilibration are attributed to polyuronic acids (capacity: 0.3 milliequivalents per gram fresh cell walls). The second sites, are obtained after a long time of equilibration (capacity: 1.2 to 1.3 milliequivalents per gram, fresh cell walls). Titrations have been performed with different bases [KOH, NaOH, and Ca(OH)2] and under different ionic strengths. The results obtained with NaOH and KOH do not exhibit any difference of selectivity. Conversely, the sites have a much bigger affinity for the Ca2+ ions than for the monovalent ones. The apparent pKa of the uronic acids was estimated to lie between 3.0 and 3.4; this is consistent with the values obtained with polyuronic acid solutions. PMID:16660868

  12. Coulometric titration of ruthenium and iridium by the generated hydroquinone

    SciTech Connect

    Organeysan, L.S.; Butakova, N.A.

    1986-05-10

    This paper studies the electrogeneration of hydroquinone from solutions of quinone on platinum and glass-carbon electrodes in HC1 and H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ media of different concentrations, to select the optimal conditions for the coulometric titration of Ru(IV) and Ir(IV).

  13. Successive determination of praseodymium and ytterbium by coulometric complexometric titration

    SciTech Connect

    Chun-Nian, S.; Jing-Ci, L.; Qi-Dao, N.; Mou-Sen, C.

    1982-06-01

    A method is described for the successive coulometric complexometric titration of microgram levels of light and heavy rare earth elements. The total amount of light and heavy rare earth elements is titrated by electrogenerating titrant EDTA on the mercury pool as a cathode. Then, the mercury pool is switched as an anode, electrogenerating Hg/sup 2 +/, and is used to titrate EDTA which is displaced from its light rare earth elements complex by malic acid that has been added prior to the electrogenerating Hg/sup 2 +/. The heavy rare earth elements can be determined from the total rare earth elements minus the result of displacement titration of EDTA which is equivalent to the light rare earth elements. A 10-30 ..mu..g sample of light and heavy rare earth elements (Pr and Yb, La and Lu, Nd and Tm) can be determined successively. Errors and standard deviation are not more than 2.5% and 0.20, respectively. 2 tables, 5 figures.

  14. Using Spreadsheets to Produce Acid-Base Titration Curves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cawley, Martin James; Parkinson, John

    1995-01-01

    Describes two spreadsheets for producing acid-base titration curves, one uses relatively simple cell formulae that can be written into the spreadsheet by inexperienced students and the second uses more complex formulae that are best written by the teacher. (JRH)

  15. Isothermal Titration Calorimetry Can Provide Critical Thinking Opportunities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Dale E.; Goode, David R.; Seney, Caryn S.; Boatwright, Jennifer M.

    2016-01-01

    College chemistry faculties might not have considered including isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) in their majors' curriculum because experimental data from this instrumental method are often analyzed via automation (software). However, the software-based data analysis can be replaced with a spreadsheet-based analysis that is readily…

  16. Production of first generation adenoviral vectors for preclinical protocols: amplification, purification and functional titration.

    PubMed

    Armendáriz-Borunda, Juan; Bastidas-Ramírez, Blanca Estela; Sandoval-Rodríguez, Ana; González-Cuevas, Jaime; Gómez-Meda, Belinda; García-Bañuelos, Jesús

    2011-11-01

    Gene therapy represents a promising approach in the treatment of several diseases. Currently, the ideal vector has yet to be designed; though, adenoviral vectors (Ad-v) have provided the most utilized tool for gene transfer due principally to their simple production, among other specific characteristics. Ad-v viability represents a critical variable that may be affected by storage or shipping conditions and therefore it is advisable to be assessed previously to protocol performance. The present work is unique in this matter, as the complete detailed process to obtain Ad-v of preclinical grade is explained. Amplification in permissive HEK-293 cells, purification in CsCl gradients in a period of 10 h, spectrophotometric titration of viral particles (VP) and titration of infectious units (IU), yielding batches of AdβGal, AdGFP, AdHuPA and AdMMP8, of approximately 10¹³-10¹⁴ VP and 10¹²-10¹³ IU were carried out. In vivo functionality of therapeutic AdHuPA and AdMMP8 was evidenced in rats presenting CCl₄-induced fibrosis, as more than 60% of fibrosis was eliminated in livers after systemic delivery through iliac vein in comparison with irrelevant AdβGal. Time required to accomplish the whole Ad-v production steps, including IU titration was 20 to 30 days. We conclude that production of Ad-v following standard operating procedures assuring vector functionality and the possibility to effectively evaluate experimental gene therapy results, leaving aside the use of high-cost commercial kits or sophisticated instrumentation, can be performed in a conventional laboratory of cell culture.

  17. The Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment. OGLE-III Photometric Maps of the Galactic Bulge Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szymański, M. K.; Udalski, A.; Soszyński, I.; Kubiak, M.; Pietrzyński, G.; Poleski, R.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Ulaczyk, K.

    2011-06-01

    We present OGLE-III Photometric Maps of the Galactic bulge fields observed during the third phase of the OGLE project. This paper describes the last, concluding set of maps based on OGLE-III data. The maps contain precise, calibrated VI photometry of about 340 million stars from 267 fields in the Galactic bulge observed during entire OGLE-III phase (2002-2009), covering about 92 square degrees in the sky. Precise astrometry of these objects is also provided. We briefly discuss the photometry procedures and the quality of the data. We also present sample data and color-magnitude diagrams of the observed fields. All photometric data are available to the astronomical community from the OGLE Internet archive.

  18. Photometric Stellar Variability in the Galactic Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafelski, M.; Ghez, A. M.; Hornstein, S. D.; Lu, J. R.; Morris, M.

    2006-12-01

    We report the results of a diffraction-limited, photometric variability study of the central 5'' × 5'' of the Galaxy conducted over the past 10 years using speckle imaging techniques on the W.M. Keck I 10 m telescope. Within our limiting magnitude of mK < 16 for maps made from a single night of data, we find a minimum of 25 variable stars out of 131 monitored stars. Among 46 stars brighter than mK < 14 which have roughly uniform photometric uncertainties, there are 16 variable stars. This suggests a minimum variable star frequency of 34%. We see no evidence of fares or dimming of the 7 stars that have known 3-dimensional orbits in our study, which greatly limits the possibility of a cold, geometrically-thin, inactive accretion disk around the supermassive black hole, Sgr A*. While large populations of binaries have been posited to exist in this region both to explain the presence of young stars in the vicinity of a black hole and because of the high stellar densities, only one eclipsing binary is identiffed. The only periodic source in our sample is the previously identiffed variable IRS 16SW (P = 19.448 ± 0.002 days). In contrast to recent results, our data show an asymmetric phased light curve with a much steeper fall-time than rise-time. IRS 29N shows variability on time scales of approx 5 years and has a known spectral type of WC9. This variation is likely due to episodic dust production, which may suggest that this source is a binary star system. Only 2 of the LBV candidates in our sample (16NW, 16SW) show variability and none of the 4 show the characteristic large increase or decrease in luminosity. However, our time baseline is too short to rule them out as LBVs. Our study has shown that photometric variability provides a useful handle on the unusual massive star population surrounding our Galaxy's supermassive black hole and its local environment.

  19. Asteroid models from the Lowell photometric database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ďurech, J.; Hanuš, J.; Oszkiewicz, D.; Vančo, R.

    2016-03-01

    Context. Information about shapes and spin states of individual asteroids is important for the study of the whole asteroid population. For asteroids from the main belt, most of the shape models available now have been reconstructed from disk-integrated photometry by the lightcurve inversion method. Aims: We want to significantly enlarge the current sample (~350) of available asteroid models. Methods: We use the lightcurve inversion method to derive new shape models and spin states of asteroids from the sparse-in-time photometry compiled in the Lowell Photometric Database. To speed up the time-consuming process of scanning the period parameter space through the use of convex shape models, we use the distributed computing project Asteroids@home, running on the Berkeley Open Infrastructure for Network Computing (BOINC) platform. This way, the period-search interval is divided into hundreds of smaller intervals. These intervals are scanned separately by different volunteers and then joined together. We also use an alternative, faster, approach when searching the best-fit period by using a model of triaxial ellipsoid. By this, we can independently confirm periods found with convex models and also find rotation periods for some of those asteroids for which the convex-model approach gives too many solutions. Results: From the analysis of Lowell photometric data of the first 100 000 numbered asteroids, we derived 328 new models. This almost doubles the number of available models. We tested the reliability of our results by comparing models that were derived from purely Lowell data with those based on dense lightcurves, and we found that the rate of false-positive solutions is very low. We also present updated plots of the distribution of spin obliquities and pole ecliptic longitudes that confirm previous findings about a non-uniform distribution of spin axes. However, the models reconstructed from noisy sparse data are heavily biased towards more elongated bodies with high

  20. Development of an isothermal titration microcalorimetric system with digital control and dynamic power peltier compensation. II. Characterization and operation mode. Myoglobin adsorption onto polymeric latex particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velázquez-Campoy, A.; López-Mayorga, O.; Cabrerizo-Vílchez, M. A.

    2000-04-01

    In a previous article a comprehensive description of an isothermal titration microcalorimeter with Peltier compensation was reported. This work deals with the characterization procedure and the operation mode. The transfer function parameters (time constants, calibration constants, and thermal properties of the system components) have been determined using a rigorous physical model for the microcalorimeter. To check the good performance of the instrument, titration experiments of cytidine and adenosine protonation have been carried out. Finally, as an example of the instrument applicability, differential heat measurements of myoglobin adsorption onto polymeric (polystyrene) latex particles are presented.

  1. Development of a photometric system for continuous flow analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bansod, Baban K. S.; Singh, Anirudh K.; Chand, G.; Ganju, A. K.

    2003-01-01

    Most chemical analyses carried out in a clinical laboratory are colorimetric. An improved photometric system is described where a tungsten lamp is the light source, a photo-diode is the detector and a microcontroller 8051 is used for processing and displaying absorbances. The performance characteristics of the instrument are reported. The parameters investigated are photometric linearity, precision and instrumental drift. PMID:18924716

  2. Robust photometric stereo using structural light sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Tian-Qi; Cheng, Yue; Shen, Hui-Liang; Du, Xin

    2014-05-01

    We propose a robust photometric stereo method by using structural arrangement of light sources. In the arrangement, light sources are positioned on a planar grid and form a set of collinear combinations. The shadow pixels are detected by adaptive thresholding. The specular highlight and diffuse pixels are distinguished according to their intensity deviations of the collinear combinations, thanks to the special arrangement of light sources. The highlight detection problem is cast as a pattern classification problem and is solved using support vector machine classifiers. Considering the possible misclassification of highlight pixels, the ℓ1 regularization is further employed in normal map estimation. Experimental results on both synthetic and real-world scenes verify that the proposed method can robustly recover the surface normal maps in the case of heavy specular reflection and outperforms the state-of-the-art techniques.

  3. Photometric Supernova Classification with Machine Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lochner, Michelle; McEwen, Jason D.; Peiris, Hiranya V.; Lahav, Ofer; Winter, Max K.

    2016-08-01

    Automated photometric supernova classification has become an active area of research in recent years in light of current and upcoming imaging surveys such as the Dark Energy Survey (DES) and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope, given that spectroscopic confirmation of type for all supernovae discovered will be impossible. Here, we develop a multi-faceted classification pipeline, combining existing and new approaches. Our pipeline consists of two stages: extracting descriptive features from the light curves and classification using a machine learning algorithm. Our feature extraction methods vary from model-dependent techniques, namely SALT2 fits, to more independent techniques that fit parametric models to curves, to a completely model-independent wavelet approach. We cover a range of representative machine learning algorithms, including naive Bayes, k-nearest neighbors, support vector machines, artificial neural networks, and boosted decision trees (BDTs). We test the pipeline on simulated multi-band DES light curves from the Supernova Photometric Classification Challenge. Using the commonly used area under the curve (AUC) of the Receiver Operating Characteristic as a metric, we find that the SALT2 fits and the wavelet approach, with the BDTs algorithm, each achieve an AUC of 0.98, where 1 represents perfect classification. We find that a representative training set is essential for good classification, whatever the feature set or algorithm, with implications for spectroscopic follow-up. Importantly, we find that by using either the SALT2 or the wavelet feature sets with a BDT algorithm, accurate classification is possible purely from light curve data, without the need for any redshift information.

  4. ASTEP South: a first photometric analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crouzet, N.; Guillot, T.; Mékarnia, D.; Szulágyi, J.; Abe, L.; Agabi, A.; Fanteï-Caujolle, Y.; Gonçalves, I.; Barbieri, M.; Schmider, F.-X.; Rivet, J.-P.; Bondoux, E.; Challita, Z.; Pouzenc, C.; Fressin, F.; Valbousquet, F.; Blazit, A.; Bonhomme, S.; Daban, J.-B.; Gouvret, C.; Bayliss, D.; Zhou, G.

    2013-01-01

    The ASTEP project aims at detecting and characterizing transiting planets from Dome C, Antarctica, and qualifying this site for photometry in the visible. The first phase of the project, ASTEP South, is a fixed 10 cm diameter instrument pointing continuously towards the celestial South Pole. Observations were made almost continuously during 4 winters, from 2008 to 2011. The point-to-point RMS of 1-day photometric lightcurves can be explained by a combination of expected statistical noises, dominated by the photon noise up to magnitude 14. This RMS is large, from 2.5 mmag at R = 8 to 6% at R = 14, because of the small size of ASTEP South and the short exposure time (30 s). Statistical noises should be considerably reduced using the large amount of collected data. A 9.9-day period eclipsing binary is detected, with a magnitude R = 9.85. The 2-season lightcurve folded in phase and binned into 1,000 points has a RMS of 1.09 mmag, for an expected photon noise of 0.29 mmag. The use of the 4 seasons of data with a better detrending algorithm should yield a sub-millimagnitude precision for this folded lightcurve. Radial velocity follow-up observations reveal a F-M binary system. The detection of this 9.9-day period system with a small instrument such as ASTEP South and the precision of the folded lightcurve show the quality of Dome C for continuous photometric observations, and its potential for the detection of planets with orbital periods longer than those usually detected from the ground.

  5. Combination of Continuous Dexmedetomidine Infusion with Titrated Ultra-Low-Dose Propofol-Fentanyl for an Awake Craniotomy.

    PubMed

    Das, Samaresh; Al-Mashani, Ali; Suri, Neelam; Salhotra, Neeraj; Chatterjee, Nilay

    2016-08-01

    An awake craniotomy is a continuously evolving technique used for the resection of brain tumours from the eloquent cortex. We report a 29-year-old male patient who presented to the Khoula Hospital, Muscat, Oman, in 2016 with a two month history of headaches and convulsions due to a space-occupying brain lesion in close proximity with the left motor cortex. An awake craniotomy was conducted using a scalp block, continuous dexmedetomidine infusion and a titrated ultra-low-dose of propofolfentanyl. The patient remained comfortable throughout the procedure and the intraoperative neuropsychological tests, brain mapping and tumour resection were successful. This case report suggests that dexmedetomidine in combination with titrated ultra-low-dose propofolfentanyl are effective options during an awake craniotomy, ensuring optimum sedation, minimal disinhibition and a rapid recovery. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first awake craniotomy conducted successfully in Oman.

  6. Electrophoretic separation of alginic sodium diester and sodium hexametaphosphate in chondroitin sulfate that interfere with the cetylpyridinium chloride titration assay.

    PubMed

    Weiguo, Zhang; Giancaspro, Gabriel; Adams, Kristie M; Neal-Kababick, James; Hildreth, Jana; Li, Aishan; Roman, Mark C; Betz, Joseph M

    2014-01-01

    adulterants in CS and procedures to isolate ASD from CS matrixes containing these adulterants. The authors describe in this paper utilization of an orthogonal approach to establish the identity of Z1 as sodium hexametaphosphate and to confirm the identity of ASD, including ethanol fractionation, FTIR spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, and NMR spectroscopy. The authors suggest that CAME is a cost-effective and easy to use methodfor detecting certain impurities in CS raw ingredients and recommend that CPC and CAME be used in combination by QC laboratories as a means of effectively deterring the practice of adulterating CS raw materials with the known adulterants ASD and Z1 and/or other non-chondroitin substances that can be separated from CSby CAME and that exhibit CPC titration behavior similar to CS.

  7. Solution Equilibrium Titration for High-Throughput Affinity Estimation of Unpurified Antibodies and Antibody Fragments.

    PubMed

    Della Ducata, Daniela; Jaehrling, Jan; Hänel, Cornelia; Satzger, Marion; Wolber, Meike; Ostendorp, Ralf; Pabst, Stefan; Brocks, Bodo

    2015-12-01

    The generation of therapeutic antibodies with extremely high affinities down to the low picomolar range is today feasible with state-of-the art recombinant technologies. However, reliable and efficient identification of lead candidates with the desired affinity from a pool of thousands of antibody clones remains a challenge. Here, we describe a high-throughput procedure that allows reliable affinity screening of unpurified immunoglobulin G or antibody fragments. The method is based on the principle of solution equilibrium titration (SET) using highly sensitive electrochemiluminescence as a readout system. Because the binding partners are not labeled, the resulting KD represents a sound approximation of the real affinity. For screening, diluted bacterial lysates or cell culture supernatants are equilibrated with four different concentrations of a soluble target molecule, and unbound antibodies are subsequently quantified on 384-well Meso Scale Discovery (MSD) plates coated with the respective antigen. For determination of KD values from the resulting titration curves, fit models deduced from the law of mass action for 1:1 and 2:1 binding modes are applied to assess hundreds of interactions simultaneously. The accuracy of the method is demonstrated by comparing results from different screening campaigns from affinity optimization projects with results from detailed affinity characterization.

  8. Automated potentiometric titrations in KCl/water-saturated octanol: method for quantifying factors influencing ion-pair partitioning.

    PubMed

    Scherrer, Robert A; Donovan, Stephen F

    2009-04-01

    The knowledge base of factors influencing ion pair partitioning is very sparse, primarily because of the difficulty in determining accurate log P(I) values of desirable low molecular weight (MW) reference compounds. We have developed a potentiometric titration procedure in KCl/water-saturated octanol that provides a link to log P(I) through the thermodynamic cycle of ionization and partitioning. These titrations have the advantage of being independent of the magnitude of log P, while maintaining a reproducibility of a few hundredths of a log P in the calculated difference between log P neutral and log P ion pair (diff (log P(N - I))). Simple model compounds can be used. The titration procedure is described in detail, along with a program for calculating pK(a)'' values incorporating the ionization of water in octanol. Hydrogen bonding and steric factors have a greater influence on ion pairs than they do on neutral species, yet these factors are missing from current programs used to calculate log P(I) and log D. In contrast to the common assumption that diff (log P(N - I)) is the same for all amines, they can actually vary more than 3 log units, as in our examples. A major factor affecting log P(I) is the ability of water and the counterion to approach the charge center. Bulky substituents near the charge center have a negative influence on log P(I). On the other hand, hydrogen bonding groups near the charge center have the opposite effect by lowering the free energy of the ion pair. The use of this titration method to determine substituent ion pair stabilization values (IPS) should bring about more accurate log D calculations and encourage species-specific QSAR involving log D(N) and log D(I). This work also brings attention to the fascinating world of nature's highly stabilized ion pairs.

  9. 40 CFR Appendix A to Part 425 - Potassium Ferricyanide Titration Method

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Potassium Ferricyanide Titration..., App. A Appendix A to Part 425—Potassium Ferricyanide Titration Method Source The potassium ferricyanide titration method is based on method SLM 4/2 described in “Official Method of Analysis,” Society...

  10. The Acid-Base Titration of a Very Weak Acid: Boric Acid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Celeste, M.; Azevedo, C.; Cavaleiro, Ana M. V.

    2012-01-01

    A laboratory experiment based on the titration of boric acid with strong base in the presence of d-mannitol is described. Boric acid is a very weak acid and direct titration with NaOH is not possible. An auxiliary reagent that contributes to the release of protons in a known stoichiometry facilitates the acid-base titration. Students obtain the…

  11. Titration of vaccinia virus by intravenous injection of chick embryos

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, C.

    1960-01-01

    The final test of a smallpox vaccine is its capacity to prevent the disease from developing in inoculated individuals. This capacity, however, cannot be measured directly, so that other methods of assessing the efficacy of vaccine have had to be developed. A laboratory method—pock counting on the chorio-allantoic membrane of chick embryos—has recently been shown to provide a reasonably reliable estimate of the number of infective units in a given vaccine. In this paper, the author compares this pock-counting method with another method—titration by intravenous injection of chick embryos. He concludes that, although the reproducibility of titrations by intravenous injection compares very favourably with that obtained by chorio-allantoic inoculation, the former method would not be advantageous for the assay of vaccines, since it is very time-consuming and since differences in virulence might obscure comparisons between the efficacy of vaccines. PMID:14404376

  12. Applications of isothermal titration calorimetry in protein science.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yi

    2008-07-01

    During the past decade, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) has developed from a specialist method for understanding molecular interactions and other biological processes within cells to a more robust, widely used method. Nowadays, ITC is used to investigate all types of protein interactions, including protein-protein interactions, protein-DNA/RNA interactions, protein-small molecule interactions and enzyme kinetics; it provides a direct route to the complete thermodynamic characterization of protein interactions. This review concentrates on the new applications of ITC in protein folding and misfolding, its traditional application in protein interactions, and an overview of what can be achieved in the field of protein science using this method and what developments are likely to occur in the near future. Also, this review discusses some new developments of ITC method in protein science, such as the reverse titration of ITC and the displacement method of ITC.

  13. Monitoring RNA-ligand interactions using isothermal titration calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Sunny D; Batey, Robert T

    2009-01-01

    Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) is a biophysical technique that measures the heat evolved or absorbed during a reaction to report the enthalpy, entropy, stoichiometry of binding, and equilibrium association constant. A significant advantage of ITC over other methods is that it can be readily applied to almost any RNA-ligand complex without having to label either molecule and can be performed under a broad range of pH, temperature, and ionic concentrations. During our application of ITC to investigate the thermodynamic details of the interaction of a variety of compounds with the purine riboswitch, we have explored and optimized experimental parameters that yield the most useful and reproducible results for RNAs. In this chapter, we detail this method using the titration of an adenine-binding RNA with 2,6-diaminopurine (DAP) as a practical example. Our insights should be generally applicable to observing the interactions of a broad range of molecules with structured RNAs.

  14. Kids in a Candy Store: An Analogy for Back Titration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Last, Arthur M.

    1998-09-01

    A simple analogy for back titration is presented. A child is sent into a candy store with a known amount of money in order to purchase a candy bar and the cost of the bar is subsequently determined by counting the amount of change the child brings back. This is analogous to adding excess acid to a base and determining how much base was present by titrating the unreacted acid. The analogy is extended to illustrate what happens when an acidic or basic impurity is present in the system and is further developed to cover a situation in which the acid and unknown base react in a 2:1 ratio rather than a 1:1 ratio.

  15. Derivative analysis of potentiometric titration data to obtain protonation constants

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.F.; Xia, Y.X.; Choppin, G.R.

    1996-11-15

    A methodology is described to calibrate glass electrodes and to analyze potentiometric titration data to calculate protonation constants. The analysis uses the variation of dV/dpH with titrant addition in terms of two physical parameters which involve the concentrations of H{sup +}, OH{sup -}, and H{sub m}A. The data for titration of acetic acid and 8-hydroxyquinoline in 0.10-5.0 m NaCl media are analyzed by this method to obtain the stoichiometric protonation constants of the acids, the ionization constants of water, and the parameters s and b in the pH electrode calibration equation, pcH = spH{sub m} + b, where pcH = -log[H{sup +}], pH{sub m} is the pH meter reading. 31 refs., 3 figs., 6 tabs.

  16. Solubility of dicalcium phosphate dihydrate by solid titration.

    PubMed

    Pan, H-B; Darvell, B W

    2009-01-01

    Solid-titration results for hydroxyapatite (HAp), octacalcium phosphate, beta-tricalcium phosphate and tetracalcium phosphate have shown that the only stable phase in 100 mmol x l(-1) KCl at 37 degrees C is HAp. In particular, dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD) did not form at pH <4.2 (where it is otherwise believed to be stable) except as a metastable phase under conditions of slight supersaturation. The behaviour of DCPD itself under the same conditions requires checking. Solid titration was used to determine the apparent solubility of DCPD in a 100-mmol x l(-1) KCl solution at 37.0 +/- 0.1 degrees C over the pH range 3.2-11.6. The constitution of the precipitate was determined by X-ray diffraction, particle morphology was observed by scanning and transmission electron microscopy, and the precipitate Ca/P ratio was calculated by energy-dispersive X-ray analysis. The titration curve for DCPD was substantially lower than the position reported elsewhere. DCPD was the only identified phase at equilibrium at pH 3.60 and 4.50, but HAp was formed after seeding with 1 mg HAp at DCPD equilibrium at pH 4.47, 3.60 and 3.30. It is concluded that the titration curve observed for DCPD corresponds to the solubility isotherm for the phase, but that this represents a metastable equilibrium. HAp is more stable than DCPD, particularly below pH 4.2. The implications for calcium phosphate studies are profound as the reverse is generally believed to be true. Thus, solubility results and the nature of the carious lesion need reconsideration.

  17. Ozone Cross-Section Measurement by Gas Phase Titration.

    PubMed

    Viallon, Joële; Moussay, Philippe; Flores, Edgar; Wielgosz, Robert I

    2016-11-01

    Elevated values of ground-level ozone damage health, vegetation, and building materials and are the subject of air quality regulations. Levels are monitored by networks using mostly ultraviolet (UV) absorption instruments, with traceability to standard reference photometers, relying on the UV absorption of ozone at the 253.65 nm line of mercury. We have redetermined the ozone cross-section at this wavelength based on gas phase titration (GPT) measurements. This is a well-known chemical method using the reaction of ozone (O3) with nitrogen monoxide (NO) resulting in nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and oxygen (O2). The BIPM GPT facility uses state-of-the-art flow measurement, chemiluminescence for NO concentration measurements, a cavity phase shift analyzer (CAPS) for NO2 measurements, and a UV ozone analyzer. The titration experiment is performed over the concentration range 100-500 nmol/mol, with NO and NO2 reactants/calibrants diluted down from standards with nominal mole fractions of 50 μmol/mol. Accurate measurements of NO, NO2, and O3 mole fractions allow the calculation of ozone absorption cross section values at 253.65 nm, and we report a value of 11.24 × 10(-18) cm(2) molecule(-1) with a relative expanded uncertainty of 1.8% (coverage factor k = 2) based on nitrogen monoxide titration values and a value of 11.22 × 10(-18) cm(2) molecule(-1) with a relative expanded uncertainty of 1.4% (coverage factor k = 2) based on nitrogen dioxide titration values. The excellent agreement between these values and recently published absorption cross-section measurements directly on pure ozone provide strong evidence for revising the conventionally accepted value of ozone cross section at 253.65 nm.

  18. Photometric normalization of LROC WAC images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, H.; Denevi, B.; Robinson, M. S.; Hapke, B. W.; McEwen, A. S.; LROC Science Team

    2010-12-01

    The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC) Wide Angle Camera (WAC) acquires near global coverage on a monthly basis. The WAC is a push frame sensor with a 90° field of view (FOV) in BW mode and 60° FOV in 7-color mode (320 nm to 689 nm). WAC images are acquired during each orbit in 10° latitude segments with cross track coverage of ~50 km. Before mosaicking, WAC images are radiometrically calibrated to remove instrumental artifacts and to convert at sensor radiance to I/F. Images are also photometrically normalized to common viewing and illumination angles (30° phase), a challenge due to the wide angle nature of the WAC where large differences in phase angle are observed in a single image line (±30°). During a single month the equatorial incidence angle drifts about 28° and over the course of ~1 year the lighting completes a 360° cycle. The light scattering properties of the lunar surface depend on incidence(i), emission(e), and phase(p) angles as well as soil properties such as single-scattering albedo and roughness that vary with terrain type and state of maturity [1]. We first tested a Lommel-Seeliger Correction (LSC) [cos(i)/(cos(i) + cos(e))] [2] with a phase function defined by an exponential decay plus 4th order polynomial term [3] which did not provide an adequate solution. Next we employed a LSC with an exponential 2nd order decay phase correction that was an improvement, but still exhibited unacceptable frame-to-frame residuals. In both cases we fitted the LSC I/F vs. phase angle to derive the phase corrections. To date, the best results are with a lunar-lambert function [4] with exponential 2nd order decay phase correction (LLEXP2) [(A1exp(B1p)+A2exp(B2p)+A3) * cos(i)/(cos(e) + cos(i)) + B3cos(i)]. We derived the parameters for the LLEXP2 from repeat imaging of a small region and then corrected that region with excellent results. When this correction was applied to the whole Moon the results were less than optimal - no surprise given the

  19. Titration of hydrophobic polyelectrolytes using Monte Carlo simulations.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, Serge; Laguecir, Abohachem; Stoll, Serge

    2005-03-01

    The conformation and titration curves of weak (or annealed) hydrophobic polyelectrolytes have been examined using Monte Carlo simulations with screened Coulomb potentials in the grand canonical ensemble. The influence of the ionic concentration pH and presence of hydrophobic interactions has been systematically investigated. A large number of conformations such as extended, pearl-necklace, cigar-shape, and collapsed structures resulting from the subtle balance of short-range hydrophobic attractive interactions and long-range electrostatic repulsive interactions between the monomers have been observed. Titration curves were calculated by adjusting the pH-pK(0) values (pK(0) represents the intrinsic dissociation constant of an isolated monomer) and then calculating the ionization degree alpha of the polyelectrolyte. Important transitions related to cascades of conformational changes were observed in the titration curves, mainly at low ionic concentration and with the presence of strong hydrophobic interactions. We demonstrated that the presence of hydrophobic interactions plays an important role in the acid-base properties of a polyelectrolyte in promoting the formation of compact conformations and hence decreasing the polyelectrolyte degree of ionization for a given pH-pK(0) value.

  20. A cooperative approach among methods for photometric redshifts estimation: an application to KiDS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavuoti, S.; Tortora, C.; Brescia, M.; Longo, G.; Radovich, M.; Napolitano, N. R.; Amaro, V.; Vellucci, C.; La Barbera, F.; Getman, F.; Grado, A.

    2017-04-01

    Photometric redshifts (photo-z) are fundamental in galaxy surveys to address different topics, from gravitational lensing and dark matter distribution to galaxy evolution. The Kilo Degree Survey (KiDS), i.e. the European Southern Observatory (ESO) public survey on the VLT Survey Telescope (VST), provides the unprecedented opportunity to exploit a large galaxy data set with an exceptional image quality and depth in the optical wavebands. Using a KiDS subset of about 25000 galaxies with measured spectroscopic redshifts, we have derived photo-z using (i) three different empirical methods based on supervised machine learning; (ii) the Bayesian photometric redshift model (or BPZ); and (iii) a classical spectral energy distribution (SED) template fitting procedure (LE PHARE). We confirm that, in the regions of the photometric parameter space properly sampled by the spectroscopic templates, machine learning methods provide better redshift estimates, with a lower scatter and a smaller fraction of outliers. SED fitting techniques, however, provide useful information on the galaxy spectral type, which can be effectively used to constrain systematic errors and to better characterize potential catastrophic outliers. Such classification is then used to specialize the training of regression machine learning models, by demonstrating that a hybrid approach, involving SED fitting and machine learning in a single collaborative framework, can be effectively used to improve the accuracy of photo-z estimates.

  1. Voyager photometry of Triton - Haze and surface photometric properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hillier, J.; Helfenstein, P.; Verbiscer, A.; Veverka, J.

    1991-01-01

    The Voyager whole-disk observations of Triton at 0.41, 0.48, and 0.56 micron filter wavelengths are analyzed using a model which combines an improved version of Hapke's photometric equation with a thin atmospheric haze layer in the appropriate spherical geometry. The model is shown to describe accurately the phase curves over a range of phase angles and to agree with disk-resolved brightness scans along the photometric equator and mirror meridian. According to the model, the photometric parameters of Triton's regolith are reasonably typical of icy satellites, except for the extremely high (close to unity) single-scattering albedo.

  2. Photometric Imaging of the Moon from the Robotic Lunar Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, J. M.; Kieffer, H. H.

    1999-01-01

    As part of the calibration program for the NASA Earth Observing System (part of NASA's Earth Science Enterprise), the U.S. Geological Survey operates the Robotic Lunar Observatory (ROLO). The ROLO project is designed to produce a photometric model of the nearside lunar surface for all phase and libration angles visible from Flagstaff [2]. Goals for this photometric model are 2.5 % absolute and 1.0% relative uncertainty. Although the model is principally intended to produce radiance images of the Moon for use in calibration of Earth-orbiting spacecraft, the ROLO data and model will also provide important information for studies of the lunar soil. Instrumentation: An astronomical observatory dedicated to the radiometry of the Moon has been constructed on the campus of the U.S. Geological Survey Flagstaff Field Station in Arizona. Two separate camera systems are attached to a single telescope mount and boresighted to the same pointing direction. The visible/near infrared (VNIR) camera uses a 512 x 512 pixel CCD and 23 intermediate width interference filters for wavelength selection. The shortwave infrared (SWIR) camera uses a 256 x 256 pixel cooled-HgCdTe infrared array and nine intermediate-width interference filters. Table I and Fig. I provide information on the instrumental passbands. Separate 20-cm-diameter Ritchey-Cretien telescopes are provided for the two cameras. The optics are designed to image the entire Moon within each camera's field of view, resulting in instrument pixel scales of 4 and 8 arcsec /pixel (about 7.4 and 15 km/pixel for the sub-Earth point on the Moon) for VNIR and SWIR respectively. Detailed information on the instrumentation can be found in Anderson et al. Observations: Routine imaging has been in progress since late 1995 for VNIR and late 1997 for SWIR, and is expected to continue through at least 2002. ROLO observes the Moon every clear night between the first and last quarter phases of the moon. On such nights, the Moon is imaged through

  3. SIMULTANEOUS ESTIMATION OF PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFTS AND SED PARAMETERS: IMPROVED TECHNIQUES AND A REALISTIC ERROR BUDGET

    SciTech Connect

    Acquaviva, Viviana; Raichoor, Anand

    2015-05-01

    We seek to improve the accuracy of joint galaxy photometric redshift estimation and spectral energy distribution (SED) fitting. By simulating different sources of uncorrected systematic errors, we demonstrate that if the uncertainties in the photometric redshifts are estimated correctly, so are those on the other SED fitting parameters, such as stellar mass, stellar age, and dust reddening. Furthermore, we find that if the redshift uncertainties are over(under)-estimated, the uncertainties in SED parameters tend to be over(under)-estimated by similar amounts. These results hold even in the presence of severe systematics and provide, for the first time, a mechanism to validate the uncertainties on these parameters via comparison with spectroscopic redshifts. We propose a new technique (annealing) to re-calibrate the joint uncertainties in the photo-z and SED fitting parameters without compromising the performance of the SED fitting + photo-z estimation. This procedure provides a consistent estimation of the multi-dimensional probability distribution function in SED fitting + z parameter space, including all correlations. While the performance of joint SED fitting and photo-z estimation might be hindered by template incompleteness, we demonstrate that the latter is “flagged” by a large fraction of outliers in redshift, and that significant improvements can be achieved by using flexible stellar populations synthesis models and more realistic star formation histories. In all cases, we find that the median stellar age is better recovered than the time elapsed from the onset of star formation. Finally, we show that using a photometric redshift code such as EAZY to obtain redshift probability distributions that are then used as priors for SED fitting codes leads to only a modest bias in the SED fitting parameters and is thus a viable alternative to the simultaneous estimation of SED parameters and photometric redshifts.

  4. Photometric stability of the lunar surface

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kieffer, H.H.

    1997-01-01

    The rate at which cratering events currently occur on the Moon is considered in light of their influence on the use of the Moon as a radiometric standard. The radiometric effect of small impact events is determined empirically from the study of Clementine images. Events that would change the integral brightness of the moon by 1% are expected once per 1.4 Gyr. Events that cause a 1% shift in one pixel for low Earth-orbiting instruments with a 1-km nadir field of view are expected approximately once each 43 Myr. Events discernible at 1% radiometric resolution with a 5 arc-sec telescope resolution correspond to crater diameters of approximately 210 m and are expected once every 200 years. These rates are uncertain by a factor of two. For a fixed illumination and observation geometry, the Moon can be considered photometrically stable to 1 ?? 10-8per annum for irradiance, and 1 ?? 10-7per annum for radiance at a resolution common for spacecraft imaging instruments, exceeding reasonable instrument goals by six orders of magnitude. ?? 1997 Academic Press.

  5. Photometric functions for photoclinometry and other applications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McEwen, A.S.

    1991-01-01

    Least-squared fits to the brightness profiles across a disk or "limb darkening" described by Hapke's photometric function are found for the simpler Minnaert and lunar-Lambert functions. The simpler functions are needed to reduce the number of unknown parameters in photoclinometry, especially to distinguish the brightness variations of the surface materials from that due to the resolved topography. The limb darkening varies with the Hapke parameters for macroscopic roughness (??), the single-scattering albedo (w), and the asymmetry factor of the particle phase function (g). Both of the simpler functions generally provide good matches to the limb darkening described by Hapke's function, but the lunar-Lambert function is superior when viewing angles are high and when (??) is less than 30??. Although a nonunique solution for the Minnaert function at high phase angles has been described for smooth surfaces, the discrepancy decreases with increasing (??) and virtually disappears when (??) reaches 30?? to 40??. The variation in limb darkening with w and g, pronounced for smooth surfaces, is reduced or eliminated when the Hapke parameters are in the range typical of most planetary surfaces; this result simplifies the problem of photoclinometry across terrains with variable surface materials. The Minnaert or lunar-Lambert fits to published Hapke models will give photoclinometric solutions that are very similar (>1?? slope discrepancy) to the Hapke-function solutions for nearly all of the bodies and terrains thus far modeled by Hapke's function. ?? 1991.

  6. Orbital and photometric properties of SZ Lyncis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moffett, Thomas J.; Barnes, Thomas G., III; Fekel, Francis C., Jr.; Jefferys, William H.; Achtermann, Jeffrey M.

    1988-01-01

    New photometric results based on 3760 observations made on the Johnson BVRI system and 69 new radial-velocity measurements of the large-amplitude Delta Scuti binary SZ Lyncis are reported. Using these data and previous observations from the literature, improved values for the pulsation and orbital parameters are derived. The pulsation period is found to be 0.12052115 days, which is shorter than earlier determinations. The pulsation period is undergoing a secular period change of 3 X 10 to the -12th days/cycle. The orbital period of the binary is found to be 1181.1 days, with an orbital eccentricity of 0.188. A new ephemeris is given, which accurately predicts the times of light maximum and is consistent with the spectroscopic orbit. The mass function is 0.101 solar, which, together with other known properties of SZ Lyn, indicates that the unseen companion is most likely on the main sequence with a spectral type between F2 and K3.

  7. IMPROVED PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFTS WITH SURFACE LUMINOSITY PRIORS

    SciTech Connect

    Xia Lifang; Cohen, Seth; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Rhoads, James; Grogin, Norman; Windhorst, Rogier A.; Hathi, Nimish P.; Pirzkal, Nor; Xu Chun

    2009-07-15

    We apply Bayesian statistics with prior probabilities of galaxy surface luminosity (SL) to improve photometric redshifts. We apply the method to a sample of 1266 galaxies with spectroscopic redshifts in the GOODS North and South fields at 0.1 {approx}< z {approx}< 2.0. We start with spectrophotometric redshifts (SPZs) based on Probing Evolution and Reionization Spectroscopically grism spectra, which cover a wavelength range of 6000-9000 A, combined with (U)BViz(JHK) broadband photometry in the GOODS fields. The accuracy of SPZ redshifts is estimated to be {sigma}({delta}(z)) = 0.035 with an systematic offset of -0.026, where {delta}(z) = {delta}z/(1 + z), for galaxies in redshift range of 0.5 {approx}< z {approx}< 1.25. The addition of the SL prior probability helps break the degeneracy of SPZ redshifts between low redshift 4000 A break galaxies and high-redshift Lyman break galaxies which are mostly catastrophic outliers. For the 1138 galaxies at z {approx}< 1.6, the fraction of galaxies with redshift deviation {delta}(z)>0.2 is reduced from 15.0% to 10.4%, while the rms scatter of the fractional redshift error does not change much.

  8. BROADBAND PHOTOMETRIC REVERBERATION MAPPING OF NGC 4395

    SciTech Connect

    Edri, Haim; Rafter, Stephen E.; Kaspi, Shai; Behar, Ehud; Chelouche, Doron E-mail: shai@physics.technion.ac.il E-mail: doron@sci.haifa.ac.il

    2012-09-01

    We present results of broadband photometric reverberation mapping (RM) to measure the radius of the broad-line region, and subsequently the black hole mass (M{sub BH}), in the nearby, low-luminosity active galactic nuclei NGC 4395. Using the Wise Observatory's 1 m telescope equipped with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey g', r', and i' broadband filters, we monitored NGC 4395 for nine consecutive nights and obtained three light curves each with over 250 data points. The g' and r' bands include time variable contributions from H{beta} and H{alpha}, respectively, plus continuum. The i' band is free of broad lines and covers exclusively continuum. We show that by looking for a peak in the difference between the cross-correlation and the auto-correlation functions for all combinations of filters, we can get a reliable estimate of the time lag necessary to compute M{sub BH}. We measure the time lag for H{alpha} to be 3.6 {+-} 0.8 hr, comparable to previous studies using the line-resolved spectroscopic RM method. We argue that this lag implies a black hole mass of M{sub BH} = (4.9 {+-} 2.6) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} M{sub Sun }.

  9. Photometric orbits of seven detached eclipsing binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popper, D. M.; Etzel, P. B.

    1981-01-01

    Photoelectric light curves of the detached eclipsing binaries V805 Aql, TV Cet, MY Cyg, V478 Cyg, V1143 Cyg, BS Dra, and BK Peg are analyzed. The systems are among those with good spectrographic orbits of both components that are in need of good photometric solutions in order to obtain the absolute properties of the components. The analyses are carried out with a computer program valid for detached systems of spherical or slightly oblate stars in orbits of arbitrary eccentricity. A range of solutions much greater than implied by the internal mean errors of the parameters, is found to give satisfactory fits to the observations. Some of the fits are displayed for a variety of solutions for each system. For the three systems with measurable light variation between eclipses - V478 Cyg, V805 Aql, and MY Cyg - the effect of reflection appears to be substantially less than predicted. Very small, but nonzero, orbital eccentricities are found for four of the systems. The variations of limb darkening with wavelength and with spectral type are found to be in reasonable agreement with predictions from atmospheric theory.

  10. Probabilistic Photometric Redshifts in the Era of Petascale Astronomy

    SciTech Connect

    Carrasco Kind, Matias

    2014-01-01

    With the growth of large photometric surveys, accurately estimating photometric redshifts, preferably as a probability density function (PDF), and fully understanding the implicit systematic uncertainties in this process has become increasingly important. These surveys are expected to obtain images of billions of distinct galaxies. As a result, storing and analyzing all of these photometric redshift PDFs will be non-trivial, and this challenge becomes even more severe if a survey plans to compute and store multiple different PDFs. In this thesis, we have developed an end-to-end framework that will compute accurate and robust photometric redshift PDFs for massive data sets by using two new, state-of-the-art machine learning techniques that are based on a random forest and a random atlas, respectively. By using data from several photometric surveys, we demonstrate the applicability of these new techniques, and we demonstrate that our new approach is among the best techniques currently available. We also show how different techniques can be combined by using novel Bayesian techniques to improve the photometric redshift precision to unprecedented levels while also presenting new approaches to better identify outliers. In addition, our framework provides supplementary information regarding the data being analyzed, including unbiased estimates of the accuracy of the technique without resorting to a validation data set, identification of poor photometric redshift areas within the parameter space occupied by the spectroscopic training data, and a quantification of the relative importance of the variables used during the estimation process. Furthermore, we present a new approach to represent and store photometric redshift PDFs by using a sparse representation with outstanding compression and reconstruction capabilities. We also demonstrate how this framework can also be directly incorporated into cosmological analyses. The new techniques presented in this thesis are crucial

  11. Inferring solar structure variations from photometric and helioseismic observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhn, J. R.

    1991-01-01

    Present large scale photometric and helioseismic data may be related to spatial and temporal deviations from an otherwise static, spherical solar convection zone (SCZ). New space experiments combine precise photometric, helioseismic, and magnetic observational capabilities (like SOHO and MDI) and will provide data needed to understand the interaction of magnetic fields and global scale circulation in the SCZ. Even simple physical arguments make it clear that the anticipated accuracy of these new experiments virtually guarantees new constraints on models of the SCZ.

  12. Photometric study of a marginal contact binary SY Hor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yıldırım, Muhammed Faruk; Soydugan, Faruk

    2017-02-01

    In this study, we present light curve analysis of a southern contact binary SY Hor. Photometric parameters of the system and its components are derived using the Wilson and Devinney code based on the data taken from the SuperWASP public data archive. Photometric solutions indicate that SY Hor is a marginal contact binary system with a mass ratio of q = 1.59 and a contact degree of f = 6%.

  13. Photometric followup investigations on LAMOST survey target Ly And

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Hong-peng; Zhang, Li-yun; Han, Xianming L.; Pi, Qing-feng; Wang, Dai-mei

    2017-02-01

    We present a low-dispersion spectrum and two sets of CCD photometric light curves of the eclipsing binary LY And for the first time. The spectrum of LY And was classified as G2. We derived an updated ephemeris based on all previously available and our newly acquired minimum light times. Our analyses of LY And light curve minimum times reveals that the differences between calculated and observed minimum times for LY And can be represented by an upward parabolic curve, which means its orbital period is increasing with a rate of 1.88 (± 0.13) × 10-7 days/year. This increase in orbital period may be interpreted as mass transfer from the primary component to the secondary component, with a rate of dM1/dt = -4.54 × 10-8M⊙/year. By analyzing our CCD photometric light curves obtained in 2015, we obtained its photometric solution with the Wilson-Devinney program. This photometric solution also fits very well our light curves obtained in 2014. Our photometric solution shows that LY And is a contact eclipsing binary and its contact factor is f = (17.8 ± 1.9)%. Furthermore, both our spectroscopic and photometric data show no obvious chromospheric activity of LY And.

  14. Photometric reverberation mapping of 3C 120

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pozo Nuñez, F.; Ramolla, M.; Westhues, C.; Bruckmann, C.; Haas, M.; Chini, R.; Steenbrugge, K.; Murphy, M.

    2012-09-01

    We present the results of a five month monitoring campaign of the local active galactic nuclei (AGN) 3C 120. Observations with a median sampling of two days were conducted with the robotic 15 cm telescope VYSOS-6 located near Cerro Armazones in Chile. Broad band (B, V) and narrow band (NB) filters were used in order to measure fluxes of the AGN and the Hβ broad line region (BLR) emission line. The NB flux is constituted by about 50% continuum and 50% Hβ emission line. To disentangle line and continuum flux, a synthetic Hβ light curve was created by subtracting a scaled V-band light curve from the NB light curve. Here we show that the Hβ emission line responds to continuum variations with a rest frame lag of 23.6 ± 1.69 days. We estimate a virial mass of the central black hole MBH = 57 ± 27 × 106 M⊙, by combining the obtained lag with the velocity dispersion of a single contemporaneous spectrum. Using the flux variation gradient method, we determined the host galaxy subtracted rest frame 5100 Å luminosity at the time of our monitoring campaign with an uncertainty of 10% (LAGN = (6.94 ± 0.71) × 1043 erg s-1). Compared with recent spectroscopic reverberation results, 3C 120 shifts in the RBLR - LAGN diagram remarkably close to the theoretically expected relation of R ∝ L0.5. Our results demonstrate the performance of photometric AGN reverberation mapping, in particular for efficiently determining the BLR size and the AGN luminosity. Table 5 is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  15. Characterization of Sea Lettuce Surface Functional Groups by Potentiometric Titrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebling, A. M.; Schijf, J.

    2008-12-01

    In pursuit of our ultimate goal to better understand the prodigious capacity of the marine macroalga Ulva lactuca (sea lettuce) for adsorbing a broad range of dissolved trace metals from seawater, we performed an initial characterization of its surface functional groups. Specifically, the number of distinct functional groups as well as their individual bulk concentrations and acid dissociation constants (pKas) were determined by potentiometric titrations in NaCl solutions of various ionic strengths (I = 0.01-5.0 M), under inert nitrogen atmosphere at 25°C. Depending on the ionic strength, Ulva samples were manually titrated down to pH 2 or 3 with 1 N HCl and then up to pH 10 with 1 N NaOH in steps of 0.1-0.2 units, continuously monitoring pH with a glass combination electrode. Titrations of a dehydrated Ulva standard reference material (BCR-279) were compared with fresh Ulva tissue cultured in our laboratory. A titration in filtered natural seawater was also compared with one in an NaCl solution of equal ionic strength. Equilibrium constants for the ionization of water in NaCl solutions as a function of ionic strength were obtained from the literature. Fits to the titration data ([H]T vs. pH) were performed with the FITEQL4.0 computer code using non-electrostatic 3-, 4-, and 5-site models, either by fixing ionic strength at its experimental value or by allowing it to be extrapolated to zero, while considering all functional group pKas and bulk concentrations as adjustable parameters. Since pKas and bulk concentrations were found to be strongly correlated, the latter were also fixed in some cases to further constrain the pKas. Whereas these calculations are currently ongoing, preliminary results point to three, possibly four, functional groups with pKas of about 4.1, 6.3, and 9.5 at I = 0. Bulk concentrations of the three groups are very similar, about 5-6×10-4 mol/g based on dry weight, which suggests that all are homogeneously distributed over the surface and

  16. Charge characteristics of humic and fulvic acids: comparative analysis by colloid titration and potentiometric titration with continuous pK-distribution function model.

    PubMed

    Bratskaya, S; Golikov, A; Lutsenko, T; Nesterova, O; Dudarchik, V

    2008-09-01

    Charge characteristics of humic and fulvic acids of a different origin (inshore soils, peat, marine sediments, and soil (lysimetric) waters) were evaluated by means of two alternative methods - colloid titration and potentiometric titration. In order to elucidate possible limitations of the colloid titration as an express method of analysis of low content of humic substances we monitored changes in acid-base properties and charge densities of humic substances with soil depth, fractionation, and origin. We have shown that both factors - strength of acidic groups and molecular weight distribution in humic and fulvic acids - can affect the reliability of colloid titration. Due to deviations from 1:1 stoichiometry in interactions of humic substances with polymeric cationic titrant, the colloid titration can underestimate total acidity (charge density) of humic substances with domination of weak acidic functional groups (pK>6) and high content of the fractions with molecular weight below 1kDa.

  17. Interaction between bisphenol A and tannic Acid: Spectroscopic titration approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omoike, Anselm; Brandt, Benjamin

    2011-06-01

    The interaction between tannic acid (TA) and bisphenol A (BPA), an endocrine disruptor, was studied by absorption and fluorescence titration techniques. The binding constants and corresponding thermodynamic parameters at different temperatures (294, 296, 298, 300 and 303 K) were determined. The intrinsic fluorescence of BPA was strongly quenched by TA and the quenching mechanism is attributed to static quenching. The thermodynamic data revealed that the formation of TA-BPA complex was exothermic, entropic-driven, and spontaneous. Furthermore, hydrogen and van der Waals interactions seem to be the major driving forces for the formation of the nonfluorescent TA-BPA complex.

  18. Acid Base Titrations in Nonaqueous Solvents and Solvent Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barcza, Lajos; Buvári-Barcza, Ágnes

    2003-07-01

    The acid base determination of different substances by nonaqueous titrations is highly preferred in pharmaceutical analyses since the method is quantitative, exact, and reproducible. The modern interpretation of the reactions in nonaqueous solvents started in the last century, but several inconsistencies and unsolved problems can be found in the literature. The acid base theories of Brønsted Lowry and Lewis as well as the so-called solvent theory are outlined first, then the promoting (and leveling) and the differentiating effects are discussed on the basis of the hydrogen-bond concept. Emphasis is put on the properties of formic acid and acetic anhydride since their importance is increasing.

  19. Interaction between bisphenol A and tannic acid: spectroscopic titration approach.

    PubMed

    Omoike, Anselm; Brandt, Benjamin

    2011-06-01

    The interaction between tannic acid (TA) and bisphenol A (BPA), an endocrine disruptor, was studied by absorption and fluorescence titration techniques. The binding constants and corresponding thermodynamic parameters at different temperatures (294, 296, 298, 300 and 303 K) were determined. The intrinsic fluorescence of BPA was strongly quenched by TA and the quenching mechanism is attributed to static quenching. The thermodynamic data revealed that the formation of TA-BPA complex was exothermic, entropic-driven, and spontaneous. Furthermore, hydrogen and van der Waals interactions seem to be the major driving forces for the formation of the nonfluorescent TA-BPA complex.

  20. Isothermal Titration Calorimetry: Assisted Crystallization of RNA-Ligand Complexes.

    PubMed

    Da Veiga, Cyrielle; Mezher, Joelle; Dumas, Philippe; Ennifar, Eric

    2016-01-01

    The success rate of nucleic acids/ligands co-crystallization can be significantly improved by performing preliminary biophysical analyses. Among suitable biophysical approaches, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) is certainly a method of choice. ITC can be used in a wide range of experimental conditions to monitor in real time the formation of the RNA- or DNA-ligand complex, with the advantage of providing in addition the complete binding profile of the interaction. Following the ITC experiment, the complex is ready to be concentrated for crystallization trials. This chapter describes a detailed experimental protocol for using ITC as a tool for monitoring RNA/small molecule binding, followed by co-crystallization.

  1. Choice of chemical conditions in order to obtain linear titration curves in potentiometry.

    PubMed

    Johansson, A

    1975-12-01

    In the titration of an acid HA with a strong base, [HA] diminishes, on the whole, in proportion to the addition of titrant. However, [HA] = K(HA)[H] [A], and if [A] is kept constant [HA] will be proportional to [H]. Therefore if [H] instead of [HA] is plotted against ml of titrant added, one obtains a linear titration curve. [A] is kept constant by addition of NaA before titration in such high concentration that the formation of A can be neglected during the titration. When an acid stronger than acetic acid is titrated, sodium acetate can be used as the added salt. Even mixtures of adds, mono- or polybasic, then yield'straight titration curves since one is in fact titrating acetic acid in the presence of excess of acetate. For weaker acids sodium sulphite is used. In the oxidation-reduction titration of, for example, ferrous iron with permanganate, the potential measured is dependent on the ratio [Fe(2+)]/[Fe(3+)]. If [Fe(3+)] is kept constant by the addition of ferric chloride before the titration, the potential win be dependent only on [Fe(2+)]. Since this diminishes in proportion to the added volume of titrant, straight titration curves can be obtained in this case also. No correction for dilution should be made.

  2. Determination of berkelium by the method of spectrophotometric titration

    SciTech Connect

    Frolova, L.M.; Vityutnev, V.M.; Vasil'ev, V.M.

    1987-01-01

    The method that the authors propose consists of the following: berkelium is oxidized electrochemically, spectrophotometric titration of berkelium(IV) by a solution of the reducing agent is performed, and the amount of berkelium(IV) is determined according to the volume of the titrant, and considering the degree of oxidation of berkelium(III) to berkelium(IV), the total berkelium content in the sample is also determined. In this case the necessity for preliminary determination of the molar extinction coefficient of berkelium(IV) under the experimental conditions falls away. Moreover, the radiometric method of determining the berkelium content is not used. Successful titration requires selection of a reagent which, on the one hand, would rapidly reduce berkelium(VI), but on the other hand, neither itself nor the reaction products would interfere with the measurement of the optical density of berkelium(IV). As is well known, berkelium(IV) is quantitatively and rapidly reduced by hydrogen peroxide (10, 11), hydroxylamine (11), and nitrous acid (9). After preliminary experiments, they selected hydrogen peroxide and sodium nitrite as the titrants.

  3. Outpatient titration of carbidopa/levodopa enteral suspension (Duopa).

    PubMed

    Pahwa, Rajesh; Lyons, Kelly E

    2017-05-01

    Carbidopa/levodopa enteral suspension (CLES; Duopa) is a suspension or gel formulation of carbidopa/levodopa that is approved by the USA Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of advanced Parkinson's disease patients with motor fluctuations. CLES is delivered at a constant rate continuously throughout the day into the jejunum through an infusion pump via a PEG-J tube implanted surgically. The efficacy of CLES was established in the USA based on a randomized, double-blind, double-dummy, active controlled, parallel group and 12-week study, in which mean daily OFF time was reduced by 4.0 h, compared to 1.9 h with oral immediate release carbidopa/levodopa. The CLES hardware consists of a cassette containing the drug, a pump to deliver the drug and tubing to connect the PEG-J to the pump. It is critical to understand the appropriate conversion of the carbidopa/levodopa daily dosages to the CLES dosage and how to program the pump and titrate CLES to achieve the most effective dose. We describe one methodology for patient selection, outpatient titration and pump programming.

  4. [Alkalimetric titrations of salts of organic bases in the Pharmacopoeia].

    PubMed

    Bezáková, Zelmíra; Stankovičová, Mária

    2013-12-01

    Modified methods - alkalimetry in ethanol 70% with a defined small volume of hydrochloric acid 0.01 mol/l added to the solution of the sample before the titration and alkalimetry in ethanol 70% or ethanol 96% alone with potentiometric end-point detection for the assay of halide salts of 11 organic N-bases has been investigated. The results were compared to those obtained by the method of the European Pharmacopoeia 7th Ed. (Ph. Eur. 7th Ed.). The Ph. Eur. 7th Ed. use for 8 investigated substances alkalimetry in alcohol 96 % with a defined small volume of hydrochloric acid 0.01 mol/l (5 ml) with potentiometric end-point detection: Cinchocaine hydrochloride, Codeine hydrochloride dihydrate, Ethylmorphine hydrochloride, Lidocaine hydrochloride, Papaverine hydrochloride, Pilocarpine hydrochloride, Quinine hydrochloride, Tetracaine hydrochloride. Our results revealed that the Ph. Eur. 7th Ed. method did not work for 5 drugs from this group: Cinchocaine hydrochloride, Ethylmorphine hydrochloride, Papaverine hydrochloride, Pilocarpine hydrochloride and Tetracaine hydrochloride. In the group of investigated substances we included also drugs with the character of weak organic bases for which Ph. Eur. 7th Ed. prescribed different methods for their assay: Thiamine hydrochloride and Pyridoxine hydrochloride - acidimetric titration in non-aqueous solvents with perchloric acid and Procaine hydrochloride - determination of primary aromatic amino-nitrogen (Ph. Eur. 7th Ed., chapter 2.5.8).

  5. Isothermal titration calorimetry: general formalism using binding polynomials.

    PubMed

    Freire, Ernesto; Schön, Arne; Velazquez-Campoy, Adrian

    2009-01-01

    The theory of the binding polynomial constitutes a very powerful formalism by which many experimental biological systems involving ligand binding can be analyzed under a unified framework. The analysis of isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) data for systems possessing more than one binding site has been cumbersome because it required the user to develop a binding model to fit the data. Furthermore, in many instances, different binding models give rise to identical binding isotherms, making it impossible to discriminate binding mechanisms using binding data alone. One of the main advantages of the binding polynomials is that experimental data can be analyzed by employing a general model-free methodology that provides essential information about the system behavior (e.g., whether there exists binding cooperativity, whether the cooperativity is positive or negative, and the magnitude of the cooperative energy). Data analysis utilizing binding polynomials yields a set of binding association constants and enthalpy values that conserve their validity after the correct model has been determined. In fact, once the correct model is validated, the binding polynomial parameters can be immediately translated into the model specific constants. In this chapter, we describe the general binding polynomial formalism and provide specific theoretical and experimental examples of its application to isothermal titration calorimetry.

  6. Measuring Multivalent Binding Interactions by Isothermal Titration Calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Dam, Tarun K; Talaga, Melanie L; Fan, Ni; Brewer, Curtis F

    2016-01-01

    Multivalent glycoconjugate-protein interactions are central to many important biological processes. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) can potentially reveal the molecular and thermodynamic basis of such interactions. However, calorimetric investigation of multivalency is challenging. Binding of multivalent glycoconjugates to proteins (lectins) often leads to a stoichiometry-dependent precipitation process due to noncovalent cross-linking between the reactants. Precipitation during ITC titration severely affects the quality of the baseline as well as the signals. Hence, the resulting thermodynamic data are not dependable. We have made some modifications to address this problem and successfully studied multivalent glycoconjugate binding to lectins. We have also modified the Hill plot equation to analyze high quality ITC raw data obtained from multivalent binding. As described in this chapter, ITC-driven thermodynamic parameters and Hill plot analysis of ITC raw data can provide valuable information about the molecular mechanism of multivalent lectin-glycoconjugate interactions. The methods described herein revealed (i) the importance of functional valence of multivalent glycoconjugates, (ii) that favorable entropic effects contribute to the enhanced affinities associated with multivalent binding, (iii) that with the progression of lectin binding, the microscopic affinities of the glycan epitopes of a multivalent glycoconjugate decrease (negative cooperativity), (iv) that lectin binding to multivalent glycoconjugates, especially to mucins, involves internal diffusion jumps, (bind and jump) and (v) that scaffolds of glycoconjugates influence their entropy of binding.

  7. Measuring the Kinetics of Molecular Association by Isothermal Titration Calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Vander Meulen, Kirk A; Horowitz, Scott; Trievel, Raymond C; Butcher, Samuel E

    2016-01-01

    The real-time power response inherent in an isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) experiment provides an opportunity to directly analyze association kinetics, which, together with the conventional measurement of thermodynamic quantities, can provide an incredibly rich description of molecular binding in a single experiment. Here, we detail our application of this method, in which interactions occurring with relaxation times ranging from slightly below the instrument response time constant (12.5 s in this case) to as large as 600 s can be fully detailed in terms of both the thermodynamics and kinetics. In a binding titration scenario, in the most general case an injection can reveal an association rate constant (kon). Under more restrictive conditions, the instrument time constant-corrected power decay following each injection is simply an exponential decay described by a composite rate constant (kobs), from which both kon and the dissociation rate constant (koff) can be extracted. The data also support the viability of this exponential approach, for kon only, for a slightly larger set of conditions. Using a bimolecular RNA folding model and a protein-ligand interaction, we demonstrate and have internally validated this approach to experiment design, data processing, and error analysis. An updated guide to thermodynamic and kinetic regimes accessible by ITC is provided.

  8. A microfabrication-based approach to quantitative isothermal titration calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bin; Jia, Yuan; Lin, Qiao

    2016-04-15

    Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) directly measures heat evolved in a chemical reaction to determine equilibrium binding properties of biomolecular systems. Conventional ITC instruments are expensive, use complicated design and construction, and require long analysis times. Microfabricated calorimetric devices are promising, although they have yet to allow accurate, quantitative ITC measurements of biochemical reactions. This paper presents a microfabrication-based approach to integrated, quantitative ITC characterization of biomolecular interactions. The approach integrates microfabricated differential calorimetric sensors with microfluidic titration. Biomolecules and reagents are introduced at each of a series of molar ratios, mixed, and allowed to react. The reaction thermal power is differentially measured, and used to determine the thermodynamic profile of the biomolecular interactions. Implemented in a microdevice featuring thermally isolated, well-defined reaction volumes with minimized fluid evaporation as well as highly sensitive thermoelectric sensing, the approach enables accurate and quantitative ITC measurements of protein-ligand interactions under different isothermal conditions. Using the approach, we demonstrate ITC characterization of the binding of 18-Crown-6 with barium chloride, and the binding of ribonuclease A with cytidine 2'-monophosphate within reaction volumes of approximately 0.7 µL and at concentrations down to 2mM. For each binding system, the ITC measurements were completed with considerably reduced analysis times and material consumption, and yielded a complete thermodynamic profile of the molecular interaction in agreement with published data. This demonstrates the potential usefulness of our approach for biomolecular characterization in biomedical applications.

  9. Acetoclastic methanogenic activity measurement by a titration bioassay.

    PubMed

    Rozzi, Alberto; Castellazzi, Luca; Speece, Richard E

    2002-01-05

    A titration bioassay, designed to accurately determine the activity of acetoclastic methanogens, is described that also allows evaluation of inhibition due to potential toxicants on the active biomass. The instrument is made of a pH-stat connected to an anaerobic batch reactor. Acetate is blended and mixed with anaerobic sludge in the reactor where a 1:1 N2 and CO2 mixture is sparged at the beginning of each test. As the acetoclastic methanogens consume acetate, the pH increase, and the titration unit adds acetic acid and keeps the pH constant. The rate of titrant addition is directly proportional to the methanogenic activity. A very useful feature of the system is its potential to operate for long periods (days) at constant pH and substrate (acetate) concentration. The theoretical background and principle of operation are described as well as some of the practical problems encountered with the use of the instrument. Estimation of kinetic constants for an anaerobic culture according to the Michaelis-Menten model is presented. Examples of inhibition by inorganics (NaCl) and chlorinated solvents (chloroform) are also given.

  10. A photometric model for asteroid (21) Lutetia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasselmann, P.; Leyrat, C.; Fornasier, S.; Barucci, M.; Lazzaro, D.

    2014-07-01

    (21) Lutetia has been successfully observed (July 10, 2010) by the ESA Rosetta spacecraft during its journey toward the comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko (Sierks et al. 2011, Coradini et al. 2011). All the available data show intriguing characteristics with a complex surface composition interpretation (Barucci et al. 2012). The quite high mean density estimation (3.4±0.3, Pätzold et al. 2011) together with the unmatching density derived from the most probable surface compositions raise a hypothesis of (21) Lutetia having a metal core (Weiss et al 2012). The surface geology of (21) Lutetia is also highly complex with significant interactions between ancient and more recent structures (Thomas et al; 2012). The large craters and lineaments show that the object was heavily battered in the past, probably losing almost all of its crust in the process (Massironi et al 2012). If (21) Lutetia is a partially differentiated asteroid with an impact-stripped crust, a complete study of variegations might help in elucidating this event. Regions or strips of different albedo might indicate heavier- or lighter-battered surface histories. Albedo variations have been detected by Leyrat et al. (2012) in the visible wavelengths. In this work, we present a deeper analysis of the Lutetia photometric properties. For such analysis, a full set of pipelines was developed in the Python 2.7.6 language. Images obtained by the OSIRIS cameras, NAC and WAC, were used alongside the shape model provided by L. Jorda to derive for each facet the luminance angles and the correct I/F. The pipeline takes image pixels and matches with facets on different observational conditions. Facets are iteratively fitted by a phase function and a disk function. Several phase functions were tested as Akimov (1976), Kaasalainen (Kaasalainen et al. 2003), Schroder (Schroder et al; 2013) and polynomial and were implemented; for disk function, McEwen (1991), Akimov and Minnaert (1941) were used. The method can be also

  11. Optical Photometric Observations of GEO Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seitzer, Patrick; Rodriquez-Cowardin, Heather M.; Barker, Edwin S.; Abercromby, Kira J.; Kelecy, Thomas M.; Horstman, Matt

    2010-01-01

    We report on a continuing program of optical photometric measurements of faint orbital debris at geosynchronous Earth orbit (GEO). These observations can be compared with laboratory studies of actual spacecraft materials in an effort to determine what the faint debris at GEO may be. We have optical observations from Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO) in Chile of two samples of debris: 1. GEO objects discovered in a survey with the University of Michigan's 0.6-m aperture Curtis-Schmidt telescope MODEST (for Michigan Orbital DEbris Survey Telescope), and then followed up in real-time with the CTIO/SMARTS 0.9-m for orbits and photometry. Our goal is to determine 6 parameter orbits and measure colors for all objects fainter than R = 15 t11 magnitude that are discovered in the MODEST survey. 2. A smaller sample of high area to mass ratio (AMR) objects discovered independently, and acquired using predictions from orbits derived from independent tracking data collected days prior to the observations. Our optical observations in standard astronomical BVRI filters are done with either telescope, and with the telescope tracking the debris object at the object's angular rate. Observations in different filters are obtained sequentially. We have obtained 71 calibrated sequences of R-B-V-I-R magnitudes. A total of 66 of these sequences have 3 or more good measurements in all filters (not contaminated by star streaks or in Earth's shadow). Most of these sequences show brightness variations, but a small subset has observed brightness variations consistent with that expected from observational errors alone. The majority of these stable objects are redder than a solar color in both B-R and R-I. There is no dependence on color with brightness. For a smaller sample of objects we have observed with synchronized CCD cameras on the two telescopes. The CTIO 0.9-m observes in B, and MODEST in R. The CCD cameras are electronically linked together so that the start time and

  12. Photometric constraints on binary asteroid dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheirich, Peter

    2015-08-01

    To date, about 50 binary NEAs, 20 Mars-crossing and 80 small MB asteroids are known. We observe also a population of about 200 unbound asteroid systems (asteroid pairs). I will review the photometric observational data we have for the best observed cases and compare them with theories of binary and paired asteroids evolution.The observed characteristics of asteroid systems suggest their formation by rotational fission of parent rubble-pile asteroids after being spun up by the YORP effect. The angular momentum content of binary asteroids is close to critical. The orientations of satellite orbits of observed binary systems are non-random; the orbital poles concentrate near the obliquities of 0 and 180 degrees, i.e., near the YORP asymptotic states.Recently, a significant excess of retrograde satellite orbits was detected, which is not yet explained characteristic.An evolution of binary system depend heavily on the BYORP effect. If BYORP is contractive, the primary and secondary could end in a tidal-BYORP equilibrium. Observations of mutual events between binary components in at least four apparitions are needed for BYORP to be revealed by detecting a quadratic drift in mean anomaly of the satellite. I will show the observational evidence of single-synchronous binary asteroid with tidally locked satellite (175706 1996 FG3), i.e, with the quadratic drift equal to zero, and binary asteroid with contracting orbit (88710 2001 SL9), with positive value of the quadratic drift (the solution for the quadratic drift is ambiguous so far, with possible values of 5 and 8 deg/yr2).The spin configuration of the satellite play a crucial role in the evolution of the system under the influence of the BYORP effect. I will show that the rotational lightcurves of the satellites show that most of them have small libration amplitudes (up to 20 deg.), with a few interesting exceptions.Acknowledgements: This work has been supported by the Grant Agency of the Czech Republic, Grant P209

  13. Photometric calibrations for 21st century science

    SciTech Connect

    Kent, Stephen; Kaiser, Mary Elizabeth; Deustua, Susana E.; Smith, J.Allyn; Adelman, Saul; Allam, Sahar S.; Baptista, Brian; Bohlin, Ralph C.; Clem, James L.; Conley, Alex; Edelstein, Jerry; /UC, Berkeley, Space Sci. Dept. /NOAO, Tucson

    2009-02-01

    The answers to fundamental science questions in astrophysics, ranging from the history of the expansion of the universe to the sizes of nearby stars, hinge on our ability to make precise measurements of diverse astronomical objects. As our knowledge of the underlying physics of objects improves along with advances in detectors and instrumentation, the limits on our capability to extract science from measurements is set, not by our lack of understanding of the nature of these objects, but rather by the most mundane of all issues: the precision with which we can calibrate observations in physical units. In principle, photometric calibration is a solved problem - laboratory reference standards such as blackbody furnaces achieve precisions well in excess of those needed for astrophysics. In practice, however, transferring the calibration from these laboratory standards to astronomical objects of interest is far from trivial - the transfer must reach outside the atmosphere, extend over 4{pi} steradians of sky, cover a wide range of wavelengths, and span an enormous dynamic range in intensity. Virtually all spectrophotometric observations today are calibrated against one or more stellar reference sources, such as Vega, which are themselves tied back to laboratory standards in a variety of ways. This system's accuracy is not uniform. Selected regions of the electromagnetic spectrum are calibrated extremely well, but discontinuities of a few percent still exist, e.g., between the optical and infrared. Independently, model stellar atmospheres are used to calibrate the spectra of selected white dwarf stars, e.g. the HST system, but the ultimate accuracy of this system should be verified against laboratory sources. Our traditional standard star systems, while sufficient until now, need to be improved and extended in order to serve future astrophysics experiments. This white paper calls for a program to improve upon and expand the current networks of spectrophotometrically

  14. Systemic errors in quantitative polymerase chain reaction titration of self-complementary adeno-associated viral vectors and improved alternative methods.

    PubMed

    Fagone, Paolo; Wright, J Fraser; Nathwani, Amit C; Nienhuis, Arthur W; Davidoff, Andrew M; Gray, John T

    2012-02-01

    Self-complementary AAV (scAAV) vector genomes contain a covalently closed hairpin derived from a mutated inverted terminal repeat that connects the two monomer single-stranded genomes into a head-to-head or tail-to-tail dimer. We found that during quantitative PCR (qPCR) this structure inhibits the amplification of proximal amplicons and causes the systemic underreporting of copy number by as much as 10-fold. We show that cleavage of scAAV vector genomes with restriction endonuclease to liberate amplicons from the covalently closed terminal hairpin restores quantitative amplification, and we implement this procedure in a simple, modified qPCR titration method for scAAV vectors. In addition, we developed and present an AAV genome titration procedure based on gel electrophoresis that requires minimal sample processing and has low interassay variability, and as such is well suited for the rigorous quality control demands of clinical vector production facilities.

  15. Computer controlled titration with piston burette or peristaltic pump - a comparison.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, W

    1996-09-01

    The advantages and problems of the use of piston burettes and peristaltic pumps for dosage of titrant solutions in automatic titrations are shown. For comparison, only the dosing devices were exchanged and all other components and conditions remained unchanged. The results of continuous acid base titration show good agreement and comparable reproducibility. Potentiometric sensors (glass electrodes) with different equilibration behaviour influence the results. The capability of such electrodes was tested. Conductometric measurements allow a much faster detection because there is no equilibration of electrodes. Piston burettes should be used for titration with very high precision, titration with organic solvents and slow titrations. Peristaltic pumps seem to be more suitable for continuous titrations and long time operation without service.

  16. Signal processing with a summing operational amplifier in multicomponent potentiometric titrations.

    PubMed

    Parczewski, A

    1987-06-01

    It has been proved that application of two indicator electrodes connected to the ordinary titration apparatus through an auxiliary electronic device (a summing operational amplifier) significantly extends the scope of multicomponent potentiometric titrations in which the analytes are determined simultaneously from a single titration curve. For each analyte there is a corresponding potential jump on the titration curve. By application of the proposed auxiliary device, the sum of the electrode potentials is measured. The device also enables the relative sizes of the potential jumps at the end-points on the titration curve to be varied. The advantages of the proposed signal processing are exemplified by complexometric potentiometric titrations of Fe(III) and Cu(II) in mixtures, with a platinum electrode and a copper ion-selective electrode as the indicator electrodes.

  17. Photometric Parallaxes and Subdwarf Identification for M Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Dayna L.; Robertson, T. H.; Thompson, S. K.

    2013-06-01

    Advances have been made in the detection of M dwarf stars over the last two decades giving more complete CMDs and therefore more accurate photometric parallaxes. Distance estimations that are obtained using these photometric parallaxes are essential when modeling the spatial distribution of stars in our Galaxy. This is especially important for M-type stars, as they make up more than half of the mass of the Milky Way. Photometric data on the Kron-Cousins photometric system have been obtained for new late K to middle M-type stars with known distances. These data have been used to obtain absolute red magnitudes, to construct a CMD, and to compute a polynomial function for disk dwarf stars in the color range 1.5 ≤ R-I < 2.0, which can be used to compute absolute red magnitudes to be used for photometric parallaxes. Subdwarf stars that lie close to the disk dwarf sequence have higher systematic velocities and proper motions than disk dwarf stars. This makes them key targets for the proper-motion surveys, and although approximately 99.7% of stars in the Milky Way make up the disk main sequence, statistically there will be more subdwarfs in the sample. Therefore, intermediate-band CaH observations have been obtained to distinguish subdwarf stars from disk dwarfs for 0.9 < R-I < 1.4.

  18. Photometric redshifts for the SDSS Data Release 12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Róbert; Dobos, László; Budavári, Tamás; Szalay, Alexander S.; Csabai, István

    2016-08-01

    We present the methodology and data behind the photometric redshift data base of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 12. We adopt a hybrid technique, empirically estimating the redshift via local regression on a spectroscopic training set, then fitting a spectrum template to obtain K-corrections and absolute magnitudes. The SDSS spectroscopic catalogue was augmented with data from other, publicly available spectroscopic surveys to mitigate target selection effects. The training set is comprised of 1976 978 galaxies, and extends up to redshift z ≈ 0.8, with a useful coverage of up to z ≈ 0.6. We provide photometric redshifts and realistic error estimates for the 208 474 076 galaxies of the SDSS primary photometric catalogue. We achieve an average bias of overline{Δ z_{norm}} = {5.84 × 10^{-5}}, a standard deviation of σ(Δznorm) = 0.0205, and a 3σ outlier rate of Po = 4.11 per cent when cross-validating on our training set. The published redshift error estimates and photometric error classes enable the selection of galaxies with high-quality photometric redshifts. We also provide a supplementary error map that allows additional, sophisticated filtering of the data.

  19. Photometric Calibration of Consumer Video Cameras

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suggs, Robert; Swift, Wesley, Jr.

    2007-01-01

    Equipment and techniques have been developed to implement a method of photometric calibration of consumer video cameras for imaging of objects that are sufficiently narrow or sufficiently distant to be optically equivalent to point or line sources. Heretofore, it has been difficult to calibrate consumer video cameras, especially in cases of image saturation, because they exhibit nonlinear responses with dynamic ranges much smaller than those of scientific-grade video cameras. The present method not only takes this difficulty in stride but also makes it possible to extend effective dynamic ranges to several powers of ten beyond saturation levels. The method will likely be primarily useful in astronomical photometry. There are also potential commercial applications in medical and industrial imaging of point or line sources in the presence of saturation.This development was prompted by the need to measure brightnesses of debris in amateur video images of the breakup of the Space Shuttle Columbia. The purpose of these measurements is to use the brightness values to estimate relative masses of debris objects. In most of the images, the brightness of the main body of Columbia was found to exceed the dynamic ranges of the cameras. A similar problem arose a few years ago in the analysis of video images of Leonid meteors. The present method is a refined version of the calibration method developed to solve the Leonid calibration problem. In this method, one performs an endto- end calibration of the entire imaging system, including not only the imaging optics and imaging photodetector array but also analog tape recording and playback equipment (if used) and any frame grabber or other analog-to-digital converter (if used). To automatically incorporate the effects of nonlinearity and any other distortions into the calibration, the calibration images are processed in precisely the same manner as are the images of meteors, space-shuttle debris, or other objects that one seeks to

  20. Photometric analysis in the Kepler Science Operations Center pipeline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Twicken, Joseph D.; Clarke, Bruce D.; Bryson, Stephen T.; Tenenbaum, Peter; Wu, Hayley; Jenkins, Jon M.; Girouard, Forrest; Klaus, Todd C.

    2010-07-01

    We describe the Photometric Analysis (PA) software component and its context in the Kepler Science Operations Center (SOC) Science Processing Pipeline. The primary tasks of this module are to compute the photometric flux and photocenters (centroids) for over 160,000 long cadence (~thirty minute) and 512 short cadence (~one minute) stellar targets from the calibrated pixels in their respective apertures. We discuss science algorithms for long and short cadence PA: cosmic ray cleaning; background estimation and removal; aperture photometry; and flux-weighted centroiding. We discuss the end-to-end propagation of uncertainties for the science algorithms. Finally, we present examples of photometric apertures, raw flux light curves, and centroid time series from Kepler flight data. PA light curves, centroid time series, and barycentric timestamp corrections are exported to the Multi-mission Archive at Space Telescope [Science Institute] (MAST) and are made available to the general public in accordance with the NASA/Kepler data release policy.

  1. Spectral reflectance and photometric properties of selected rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Watson, Robert D.

    1971-01-01

    Studies of the spectral reflectance and photometric properties of selected rocks at the USGS Mill Creek, Oklahoma, remote sensing test site demonstrate that discrimination of rock types is possible through reflection measurements, but that the discrimination is complicated by surface conditions, such as weathering and lichen growth. Comparisons between fresh-broken, weathered, and lichen-covered granite show that whereas both degree of weathering and amount of lichen cover change the reflectance quality of the granite, lichen cover also considerably changes the photometric properties of the granite. Measurements of the spectral reflectance normal to the surface of both limestone and dolomite show limestone to be more reflective than dolomite in the wavelength range from 380 to 1550 nanometers. The reflectance difference decreases at view angles greater than 40° owing to the difference in the photometric properties of dolomite and limestone.

  2. Photometric redshift techniques of quasars in big-data era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yanxia

    2015-08-01

    With the availability of the huge amounts of data from ground- and space-based large multiband photometric surveys, photometric redshifts provide an estimate for the distance of an astronomical object and have become a crucial tool for extragalactic astronomy and cosmology. Various phtometric redshift approaches are in bloom. Their performance and efficiency not only depend on completeness and quality of data, but also on the volume of data. The increase of data volume lead to different choice of techniques. We present various data mining methods used for photometric redshift estimation of quasars and compare their advantages and disadvantages. In the big-data era, the methods fit for large-scale data are in great requirement.

  3. Photometric Analysis in the Kepler Science Operations Center Pipeline

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Twicken, Joseph D.; Clarke, Bruce D.; Bryson, Stephen T.; Tenenbaum, Peter; Wu, Hayley; Jenkins, Jon M.; Girouard, Forrest; Klaus, Todd C.

    2010-01-01

    We describe the Photometric Analysis (PA) software component and its context in the Kepler Science Operations Center (SOC) pipeline. The primary tasks of this module are to compute the photometric flux and photocenters (centroids) for over 160,000 long cadence (thirty minute) and 512 short cadence (one minute) stellar targets from the calibrated pixels in their respective apertures. We discuss the science algorithms for long and short cadence PA: cosmic ray cleaning; background estimation and removal; aperture photometry; and flux-weighted centroiding. We discuss the end-to-end propagation of uncertainties for the science algorithms. Finally, we present examples of photometric apertures, raw flux light curves, and centroid time series from Kepler flight data. PA light curves, centroid time series, and barycentric timestamp corrections are exported to the Multi-mission Archive at Space Telescope [Science Institute] (MAST) and are made available to the general public in accordance with the NASA/Kepler data release policy.

  4. Photometric Variability and Rotation in Magnetic White Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrie, K. A.; Burleigh, M. R.; Brinkworth, C. S.; Marsh, T. R.

    2010-11-01

    We present a search for long term (months-years) photometric variability in a sample of ten isolated magnetic white dwarfs using observations taken with the Liverpool Robotic Telescope between March 2005 and January 2007. These stars had previously been found to be photometrically stable on short (hours-one week) timescales [1]. We construct differential light curves for each target and then use CLEAN and Lomb-Scargle periodograms to determine any periodicity that may be present. Photometric variability is detected in two of the targets during the observed timescale-G 240-72 and G 227-28. We find no variability in the remaining eight targets above the 1% level. Finally, we search for any correlations between the spin periods and intrinsic physical properties of magnetic white dwarfs, such as the magnetic field strength, temperature, mass and age.

  5. CHARACTERIZING AND PROPAGATING MODELING UNCERTAINTIES IN PHOTOMETRICALLY DERIVED REDSHIFT DISTRIBUTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Abrahamse, Augusta; Knox, Lloyd; Schmidt, Samuel; Thorman, Paul; Anthony Tyson, J.; Zhan Hu

    2011-06-10

    The uncertainty in the redshift distributions of galaxies has a significant potential impact on the cosmological parameter values inferred from multi-band imaging surveys. The accuracy of the photometric redshifts measured in these surveys depends not only on the quality of the flux data, but also on a number of modeling assumptions that enter into both the training set and spectral energy distribution (SED) fitting methods of photometric redshift estimation. In this work we focus on the latter, considering two types of modeling uncertainties: uncertainties in the SED template set and uncertainties in the magnitude and type priors used in a Bayesian photometric redshift estimation method. We find that SED template selection effects dominate over magnitude prior errors. We introduce a method for parameterizing the resulting ignorance of the redshift distributions, and for propagating these uncertainties to uncertainties in cosmological parameters.

  6. Effects of photometric geometry on spectral reflectance measurements. [celestial bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veverka, J.; Gradie, J. C.

    1981-01-01

    Progress is reported in obtaining valuable results needed for the full interpretation of the spectral reflectance curves of solar system objects. The degree to which photometric geometry affects spectral reflectance curves was demonstrated. Various forms of photometric functions were compared and a function adequate for describing the scattering properties of low and moderately reflecting materials was developed and applied in a study of the phase coefficients of various materials, as well as in a study of how the shape of a body affects the spectral reflectance properties. The adequacy of the photometric function for Mars-like analogs was studied. The goniometer system is being converted to a computer driven mode. As soon as computer controls are integrated in the goniometer, the phase dependence 0.95 micron feature in meteorite spectra is scheduled to begin.

  7. Sailing on the "C": A Vitamin Titration with a Twist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sowa, S.; Kondo, A. E.

    2003-05-01

    The experiment takes the traditional redox titration of vitamin C using iodine with starch as an indicator, and presents it to the student as a challenge in guided-inquiry format. Two versions, with different levels of difficulty, are provided, to accommodate students with varying levels of problem-solving skills. The "challenge" is both quantitative and qualitative: if you were an eighteenth-century sea captain packing for a voyage to the New World, would you take oranges, lemons, limes, or grapefruits to prevent your crew from getting scurvy? The challenge ties in history, nutrition, and health with chemistry, and provides students an opportunity to work with familiar food products in the laboratory.

  8. Ultrasensitivity by Molecular Titration in Spatially Propagating Enzymatic Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Semenov, Sergey N.; Markvoort, Albert J.; Gevers, Wouter B.L.; Piruska, Aigars; de Greef, Tom F.A.; Huck, Wilhelm T.S.

    2013-01-01

    Delineating design principles of biological systems by reconstitution of purified components offers a platform to gauge the influence of critical physicochemical parameters on minimal biological systems of reduced complexity. Here we unravel the effect of strong reversible inhibitors on the spatiotemporal propagation of enzymatic reactions in a confined environment in vitro. We use micropatterned, enzyme-laden agarose gels which are stamped on polyacrylamide films containing immobilized substrates and reversible inhibitors. Quantitative fluorescence imaging combined with detailed numerical simulations of the reaction-diffusion process reveal that a shallow gradient of enzyme is converted into a steep product gradient by addition of strong inhibitors, consistent with a mathematical model of molecular titration. The results confirm that ultrasensitive and threshold effects at the molecular level can convert a graded input signal to a steep spatial response at macroscopic length scales. PMID:23972857

  9. Analysis of an Oxygen Bleach: A Redox Titration Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Copper, Christine L.; Koubek, Edward

    2001-05-01

    An experiment is presented which allows students to balance an oxidation-reduction reaction equation and use the reaction to analyze a consumer product. The experiment calls for students to balance the reaction of H2O2 and MnO4- two different ways (one assuming that H2O2 is the oxygen source and a second assuming that MnO4- is the oxygen source). They then determine which of these balanced equations has the correct stoichiometry by titrating a standard H2O2 solution with KMnO4. Finally, they use the correct balanced equation to determine the mass percent of H2O2 in a commercially available, "environmentally friendly" oxygen bleach solution.

  10. Ultrasonic and densimetric titration applied for acid-base reactions.

    PubMed

    Burakowski, Andrzej; Gliński, Jacek

    2014-01-01

    Classical acoustic acid-base titration was monitored using sound speed and density measurements. Plots of these parameters, as well as of the adiabatic compressibility coefficient calculated from them, exhibit changes with the volume of added titrant. Compressibility changes can be explained and quantitatively predicted theoretically in terms of Pasynski theory of non-compressible hydrates combined with that of the additivity of the hydration numbers with the amount and type of ions and molecules present in solution. It also seems that this development could be applied in chemical engineering for monitoring the course of chemical processes, since the applied experimental methods can be carried out almost independently on the medium under test (harmful, aggressive, etc.).

  11. Isothermal titration calorimetry of ion-coupled membrane transporters.

    PubMed

    Boudker, Olga; Oh, SeCheol

    2015-04-01

    Binding of ligands, ranging from proteins to ions, to membrane proteins is associated with absorption or release of heat that can be detected by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). Such measurements not only provide binding affinities but also afford direct access to thermodynamic parameters of binding--enthalpy, entropy and heat capacity. These parameters can be interpreted in a structural context, allow discrimination between different binding mechanisms and guide drug design. In this review, we introduce advantages and limitations of ITC as a methodology to study molecular interactions of membrane proteins. We further describe case studies where ITC was used to analyze thermodynamic linkage between ions and substrates in ion-coupled transporters. Similar type of linkage analysis will likely be applicable to a wide range of transporters, channels, and receptors.

  12. Isothermal titration calorimetry of membrane proteins - progress and challenges.

    PubMed

    Rajarathnam, Krishna; Rösgen, Jörg

    2014-01-01

    Integral membrane proteins, including G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) and ion channels, mediate diverse biological functions that are crucial to all aspects of life. The knowledge of the molecular mechanisms, and in particular, the thermodynamic basis of the binding interactions of the extracellular ligands and intracellular effector proteins is essential to understand the workings of these remarkable nanomachines. In this review, we describe how isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) can be effectively used to gain valuable insights into the thermodynamic signatures (enthalpy, entropy, affinity, and stoichiometry), which would be most useful for drug discovery studies, considering that more than 30% of the current drugs target membrane proteins. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Structural and biophysical characterisation of membrane protein-ligand binding.

  13. Photometric measurements of solar irradiance variations due to sunspots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, G. A.; Herzog, A. D.; Laico, D. E.; Lawrence, J. K.; Templer, M. S.

    1989-01-01

    A photometric telescope constructed to obtain photometric sunspot areas and deficits on a daily basis is described. Data from this Cartesian full disk telescope (CFDT) are analyzed with attention given to the period between June 4 and June 17, 1985 because of the availability of overlapping sunspot area and irradiance deficit data from high-resolution digital spectroheliograms made with the San Fernando Observatory 28 cm vacuum solar telescope and spectroheliograph. The CFDT sunspot deficits suggest a substantial irradiance contribution from faculae and active region plage.

  14. Macromolecular competition titration method accessing thermodynamics of the unmodified macromolecule-ligand interactions through spectroscopic titrations of fluorescent analogs.

    PubMed

    Bujalowski, Wlodzimierz; Jezewska, Maria J

    2011-01-01

    Analysis of thermodynamically rigorous binding isotherms provides fundamental information about the energetics of the ligand-macromolecule interactions and often an invaluable insight about the structure of the formed complexes. The Macromolecular Competition Titration (MCT) method enables one to quantitatively obtain interaction parameters of protein-nucleic acid interactions, which may not be available by other methods, particularly for the unmodified long polymer lattices and specific nucleic acid substrates, if the binding is not accompanied by adequate spectroscopic signal changes. The method can be applied using different fluorescent nucleic acids or fluorophores, although the etheno-derivatives of nucleic acid are especially suitable as they are relatively easy to prepare, have significant blue fluorescence, their excitation band lies far from the protein absorption spectrum, and the modification eliminates the possibility of base pairing with other nucleic acids. The MCT method is not limited to the specific size of the reference nucleic acid. Particularly, a simple analysis of the competition titration experiments is described in which the fluorescent, short fragment of nucleic acid, spanning the exact site-size of the protein-nucleic acid complex, and binding with only a 1:1 stoichiometry to the protein, is used as a reference macromolecule. Although the MCT method is predominantly discussed as applied to studying protein-nucleic acid interactions, it can generally be applied to any ligand-macromolecule system by monitoring the association reaction using the spectroscopic signal originating from the reference macromolecule in the presence of the competing macromolecule, whose interaction parameters with the ligand are to be determined.

  15. 40 CFR Appendix A to Part 425 - Potassium Ferricyanide Titration Method

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Method A Appendix A to Part 425 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED..., App. A Appendix A to Part 425—Potassium Ferricyanide Titration Method Source The potassium... buffered sulfide solution is titrated with standard potassium ferricyanide solution in the presence of...

  16. A Laser-Pointer-Based Spectrometer for Endpoint Detection of EDTA Titrations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dahm, Christopher E.; Hall, James W.; Mattioni, Brian E.

    2004-01-01

    A laser spectrometer for the ethylenediaminetetra-acetic acid (EDTA) titration of magnesium or calcium ions that is designed around a handheld laser pointer as the source and a photoresistor as the detector is developed. Findings show that the use of the spectrometer reduces the degree of uncertainty and error in one part of the EDTA titrations,…

  17. SHARDS: AN OPTICAL SPECTRO-PHOTOMETRIC SURVEY OF DISTANT GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Perez-Gonzalez, Pablo G.; Cava, Antonio; Barro, Guillermo; Villar, Victor; Cardiel, Nicolas; Espino, Nestor; Gallego, Jesus; Ferreras, Ignacio; Rodriguez-Espinosa, Jose Miguel; Balcells, Marc; Cepa, Jordi; Alonso-Herrero, Almudena; Cenarro, Javier; Charlot, Stephane; Cimatti, Andrea; Conselice, Christopher J.; Daddi, Emmanuele; Elbaz, David; Gobat, R. [Laboratoire AIM-Paris-Saclay, CEA and others

    2013-01-01

    We present the Survey for High-z Absorption Red and Dead Sources (SHARDS), an ESO/GTC Large Program carried out using the OSIRIS instrument on the 10.4 m Gran Telescopio Canarias (GTC). SHARDS is an ultra-deep optical spectro-photometric survey of the GOODS-N field covering 130 arcmin{sup 2} at wavelengths between 500 and 950 nm with 24 contiguous medium-band filters (providing a spectral resolution R {approx} 50). The data reach an AB magnitude of 26.5 (at least at a 3{sigma} level) with sub-arcsec seeing in all bands. SHARDS' main goal is to obtain accurate physical properties of intermediate- and high-z galaxies using well-sampled optical spectral energy distributions (SEDs) with sufficient spectral resolution to measure absorption and emission features, whose analysis will provide reliable stellar population and active galactic nucleus (AGN) parameters. Among the different populations of high-z galaxies, SHARDS' principal targets are massive quiescent galaxies at z > 1, whose existence is one of the major challenges facing current hierarchical models of galaxy formation. In this paper, we outline the observational strategy and include a detailed discussion of the special reduction and calibration procedures which should be applied to the GTC/OSIRIS data. An assessment of the SHARDS data quality is also performed. We present science demonstration results on the detection and study of emission-line galaxies (star-forming objects and AGNs) at z = 0-5. We also analyze the SEDs for a sample of 27 quiescent massive galaxies with spectroscopic redshifts in the range 1.0 < z {approx}< 1.4. We discuss the improvements introduced by the SHARDS data set in the analysis of their star formation history and stellar properties. We discuss the systematics arising from the use of different stellar population libraries, typical in this kind of study. Averaging the results from the different libraries, we find that the UV-to-MIR SEDs of the massive quiescent galaxies at z = 1

  18. Stepwise a.c. amperometric titration of cadmium and zinc with EGTA.

    PubMed

    Asplund, J

    1974-03-01

    The theory of d.c. and a.c. amperometric titrations based on complexometric reactions is presented. It is shown that when E(1 2 )(M(I)) > E(1 2 )(M(II)) and log K(M(I)L) < log K(M(II)L), M(I) and M(II) can be sequentially determined by d.c. as well as a.c. amperometric titration. If, on the other hand E(1 2 )(M(I)) > E(1 2 )(M(II)) and log K(M(II)L), a stepwise titration can be performed only by a.c. amperometry. The effect of oxygen on an a.c. amperometric titration is also discussed. The stepwise a.c. amperometric titration of cadmium and zinc with EGTA at pH 6 in the presence of oxygen and an excess of 0.05 M acetate illustrates the theory.

  19. Simple Modification of Karl-Fischer Titration Method for Determination of Water Content in Colored Samples

    PubMed Central

    Tavčar, Eva; Turk, Erika; Kreft, Samo

    2012-01-01

    The most commonly used technique for water content determination is Karl-Fischer titration with electrometric detection, requiring specialized equipment. When appropriate equipment is not available, the method can be performed through visual detection of a titration endpoint, which does not enable an analysis of colored samples. Here, we developed a method with spectrophotometric detection of a titration endpoint, appropriate for moisture determination of colored samples. The reaction takes place in a sealed 4 ml cuvette. Detection is performed at 520 nm. Titration endpoint is determined from the graph of absorbance plotted against titration volume. The method has appropriate reproducibility (RSD = 4.3%), accuracy, and linearity (R2 = 0.997). PMID:22567558

  20. Molecular Titration Promotes Oscillations and Bistability in Minimal Network Models with Monomeric Regulators.

    PubMed

    Cuba Samaniego, Christian; Giordano, Giulia; Kim, Jongmin; Blanchini, Franco; Franco, Elisa

    2016-04-15

    Molecular titration is emerging as an important biochemical interaction mechanism within synthetic devices built with nucleic acids and the CRISPR/Cas system. We show that molecular titration in the context of feedback circuits is a suitable mechanism to enhance the emergence of oscillations and bistable behaviors. We consider biomolecular modules that can be inhibited or activated by input monomeric regulators; the regulators compete with constitutive titrating species to determine the activity of their target. By tuning the titration rate and the concentration of titrating species, it is possible to modulate the delay and convergence speed of the transient response, and the steepness and dead zone of the stationary response of the modules. These phenomena favor the occurrence of oscillations when modules are interconnected to create a negative feedback loop; bistability is favored in a positive feedback interconnection. Numerical simulations are supported by mathematical analysis showing that the capacity of the closed loop systems to exhibit oscillations or bistability is structural.

  1. Integration and global analysis of isothermal titration calorimetry data for studying macromolecular interactions.

    PubMed

    Brautigam, Chad A; Zhao, Huaying; Vargas, Carolyn; Keller, Sandro; Schuck, Peter

    2016-05-01

    Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) is a powerful and widely used method to measure the energetics of macromolecular interactions by recording a thermogram of differential heating power during a titration. However, traditional ITC analysis is limited by stochastic thermogram noise and by the limited information content of a single titration experiment. Here we present a protocol for bias-free thermogram integration based on automated shape analysis of the injection peaks, followed by combination of isotherms from different calorimetric titration experiments into a global analysis, statistical analysis of binding parameters and graphical presentation of the results. This is performed using the integrated public-domain software packages NITPIC, SEDPHAT and GUSSI. The recently developed low-noise thermogram integration approach and global analysis allow for more precise parameter estimates and more reliable quantification of multisite and multicomponent cooperative and competitive interactions. Titration experiments typically take 1-2.5 h each, and global analysis usually takes 10-20 min.

  2. Spectroscopic and photometric monitoring of southern post-AGB stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pooley, D. J.; Cottrell, P. L.; Pollard, K. R.; Albrow, M. D.

    2004-05-01

    We present the results of contemporaneous photometric and spectroscopic monitoring of 20 post-AGB stars from Mt John University Observatory. Photometric measures were carried our suing Johnson BV and Cousins RI filters, and the radial velocity measurements were acquired using spectra from an echelle spectrograph. Our program spanned five years and the stars covered a range of spectral types from B to K in order to investigate the behavior of post-AGB stars as they evolve away from the AGB. A number of stars proved to be variable inways incompatible with post-AGB models and are reclassified. Periodicities are presented for a number of stars. Photometrically, HD 70379 was found to be pulsating in two modes with periods of 85 and 97 d. The radial velocities also varied, with the peak amplitude occurring when the photometry was also changing most. AI CMi presented three different types of spectra associated with photometric brightness, with varying strengths of narrow emission lines and molecular bandheads. The Hα profiles in almost all of the stars show evidence of emission which varies on time scales of days to months. The Na D line profiles are generally complex showing between 4 and 7 components due to both circumstellar and interstellar material.

  3. Photometric CCD observations of four Pre-cataclysmic binary candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinojosa, R.; Vogt, N.; Colque, Juan Pablo

    We present preliminary results of differential photometric observations of Abell 65, HZ 9, GD 1401 and BPM 46460, obtained between September and December 2006 with the 42 cm telescope of the Cerro Armazones Observatory which belongs to the Universidad Catolica del Norte, Antofagasta. All four stars are close red dwarf/white dwarf binaries which could have formed be recent common envelope events. In two of the four cases we detected (or confirmed) significant variability. In one of them, the central star of a planetary nebula Abell 65, we confirmed the rather strong photometric variability with a period very near to 24 hours (Bond and Livio, 1990). In the white dwarf binary HZ9 we detected, for the first time, photometric variations with a period near 0.58 days which corresponds to the known orbital period (Lanning and Pesch, 1981; Stauffer, 1987). The amplitude of this variation is 0.08 mag, it probably refers to reflection of the white dwarf radiation on the surface of the red companion. - These observations are part of a larger on-going project which pretends to identify and to study pre-cataclysmic binaries by means of photometric and spectroscopic methods and to improve, this way, the hitherto poor statistics on the properties of these interesting stars.

  4. Classical variables in the era of space photometric missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molnár, L.; Plachy, E.; Szabó, R.; Benkő, J. M.

    2015-09-01

    The space photometric missions like CoRoT and Kepler transformed our view of pulsating stars, including the well-known RR Lyrae and Cepheid classes. The K2, TESS and PLATO missions will expand these investigations to larger sample sizes and to specific stellar populations.

  5. Photometric NO/sub x/ analyzer helps surpass EPA standards

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, L.H.

    1983-10-01

    A photometric analyzer helped Monsanto Company of Pensacola, Florida reduce stack emissions to a point where an observer could not tell the difference between a shutdown and normal plant operation. Oxides of nitrogen output levels have been kept within 200 ppm at typical production rates, well within EPA limits.

  6. A photometric mode identification method, including an improved non-adiabatic treatment of the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupret, M.-A.; De Ridder, J.; De Cat, P.; Aerts, C.; Scuflaire, R.; Noels, A.; Thoul, A.

    2003-02-01

    We present an improved version of the method of photometric mode identification of Heynderickx et al. (\\cite{hey}). Our new version is based on the inclusion of precise non-adiabatic eigenfunctions determined in the outer stellar atmosphere according to the formalism recently proposed by Dupret et al. (\\cite{dup}). Our improved photometric mode identification technique is therefore no longer dependent on ad hoc parameters for the non-adiabatic effects. It contains the complete physical conditions of the outer atmosphere of the star, provided that rotation does not play a key role. We apply our method to the two slowly pulsating B stars HD 74560 and HD 138764 and to the beta Cephei star EN (16) Lac. Besides identifying the degree l of the pulsating stars, our method is also a tool for improving the knowledge of stellar interiors and atmospheres, by imposing constraints on parameters such as the metallicity and the mixing-length parameter alpha (a procedure we label non-adiabatic asteroseismology). The non-adiabatic eigenfunctions needed for the mode identification are available upon request from the authors.

  7. Catalogue of Large Magellanic Cloud star clusters observed in the Washington photometric system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palma, T.; Gramajo, L. V.; Clariá, J. J.; Lares, M.; Geisler, D.; Ahumada, A. V.

    2016-02-01

    Aims: The main goal of this study is to compile a catalogue of the fundamental parameters of a complete sample of 277 star clusters (SCs) of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) observed in the Washington photometric system. A set of 82 clusters was recently studied by our team. Methods: All the clusters' parameters such as radii, deprojected distances, reddenings, ages, and metallicities were obtained by applying essentially the same procedures, which are briefly described here. We used empirical cumulative distribution functions to examine age, metallicity and deprojected distance distributions for different cluster subsamples of the catalogue. Results: Our new sample of 82 additional clusters represents about a 40% increase in the total number of LMC SCs observed to date in the Washington photometric system. In particular, we report here the fundamental parameters obtained for the first time for 42 of these clusters. We found that single LMC SCs are typically older than multiple SCs. Both single and multiple SCs exhibit asymmetrical distributions in log (age). We compared cluster ages derived through isochrone fittings obtained using different models of the Padova group. Although ages obtained using recent isochrones are consistent in general terms, we found that there is some disagreement in the obtained values and their uncertainties.

  8. Rapid Inpatient Titration of Intravenous Treprostinil for Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension: Safe and Tolerable.

    PubMed

    El-Kersh, Karim; Ruf, Kathryn M; Smith, J Shaun

    2016-03-18

    There is no standard protocol for intravenous treprostinil dose escalation. In most cases, slow up-titration is performed in the outpatient setting. However, rapid up-titration in an inpatient setting is an alternative that provides opportunity for aggressive treatment of common side effects experienced during dose escalation. In this study, we describe our experience with inpatient rapid up-titration of intravenous treprostinil. This was a single-center, retrospective study in which we reviewed the data of subjects with pulmonary arterial hypertension treated at our center who underwent inpatient rapid up-titration of intravenous treprostinil. Our treprostinil dose escalation protocol included initiation at 2 ng·kg·min with subsequent up-titration by 1 ng·kg·min every 6 to 8 hours as tolerated by side effects. A total of 16 subjects were identified. Thirteen subjects were treprostinil naive (naive group), and 3 subjects were receiving subcutaneous treprostinil but were hospitalized for further intravenous up-titration of treprostinil dose (nonnaive group). In the naive group, the median maximum dose achieved was 20 ng·kg·min with an interquartile range (IQR) of 20-23 ng·kg·min. The median up-titration interval was 6 days (IQR: 4-9). In the nonnaive group, the median maximum dose achieved was 20 ng·kg·min (range: 17-30). The median up-titration interval was 8.5 days (range: 1.5-11). Overall, the median maximum dose achieved was 20 ng·kg·min (IQR: 20-23.5), and the median up-titration interval was 6 days (IQR: 4.6-9.25), with no reported significant adverse hemodynamic events. In patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension, rapid inpatient titration of intravenous treprostinil is safe and tolerable.

  9. Photometric Supernova Cosmology with BEAMS and SDSS-II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hlozek, Renée; Kunz, Martin; Bassett, Bruce; Smith, Mat; Newling, James; Varughese, Melvin; Kessler, Rick; Bernstein, Joseph P.; Campbell, Heather; Dilday, Ben; Falck, Bridget; Frieman, Joshua; Kuhlmann, Steve; Lampeitl, Hubert; Marriner, John; Nichol, Robert C.; Riess, Adam G.; Sako, Masao; Schneider, Donald P.

    2012-06-01

    Supernova (SN) cosmology without spectroscopic confirmation is an exciting new frontier, which we address here with the Bayesian Estimation Applied to Multiple Species (BEAMS) algorithm and the full three years of data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey II Supernova Survey (SDSS-II SN). BEAMS is a Bayesian framework for using data from multiple species in statistical inference when one has the probability that each data point belongs to a given species, corresponding in this context to different types of SNe with their probabilities derived from their multi-band light curves. We run the BEAMS algorithm on both Gaussian and more realistic SNANA simulations with of order 104 SNe, testing the algorithm against various pitfalls one might expect in the new and somewhat uncharted territory of photometric SN cosmology. We compare the performance of BEAMS to that of both mock spectroscopic surveys and photometric samples that have been cut using typical selection criteria. The latter typically either are biased due to contamination or have significantly larger contours in the cosmological parameters due to small data sets. We then apply BEAMS to the 792 SDSS-II photometric SNe with host spectroscopic redshifts. In this case, BEAMS reduces the area of the Ω m , ΩΛ contours by a factor of three relative to the case where only spectroscopically confirmed data are used (297 SNe). In the case of flatness, the constraints obtained on the matter density applying BEAMS to the photometric SDSS-II data are ΩBEAMS m = 0.194 ± 0.07. This illustrates the potential power of BEAMS for future large photometric SN surveys such as Large Synoptic Survey Telescope.

  10. Photometric Reverberation Mapping using a Meter-class Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, Carla June; Joner, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    For the past several decades, mass estimates for supermassive black holes hosted by active galactic nuclei (AGNs) have been made using the reverberation mapping (RM) technique. This methodology has produced consistent results and has been used to establish several relations that link the characteristics of the host galaxy to the mass of the central black hole. Despite this success, there are less than 50 AGNs with black hole masses derived from RM. This low number is generally attributed to the difficulties in coordinating large blocks of telescope time for making the simultaneous photometric and spectroscopic observations. In addition, the spectroscopic observations generally require several months of nightly observations with moderate to large size telescopes.We have made photometric observations of several AGNs in selected filters in order to evaluate a photometric methodology for determining the lag time between the variations observed in the continuum and the response signal that is seen coming from the broad-line region (BLR) gas. This time delay represents the mean light travel time to the BLR, and is therefore a measurement of the mean BLR radius. In traditional RM campaigns, this time lag is combined with a measure of the width of the broad line to determine the velocity of the gas and then make a virial estimate of the black hole mass. We investigate results obtained using photometric time lags and a single epoch spectroscopic measurement of the line width in order to estimate the mass of the central black hole.We present results from our photometric observations of several target AGNs made with the West Mountain Observatory 0.9 m reflector during the spring and summer of 2014.This research was supported by the College of Physical and Mathematical Sciences at Brigham Young University as well as through a fellowship from the NASA Rocky Mountain Space Grant Consortium.

  11. PHOTOMETRIC SUPERNOVA COSMOLOGY WITH BEAMS AND SDSS-II

    SciTech Connect

    Hlozek, Renee; Kunz, Martin; Bassett, Bruce; Smith, Mat; Newling, James; Varughese, Melvin; Kessler, Rick; Frieman, Joshua; Bernstein, Joseph P.; Kuhlmann, Steve; Marriner, John; Campbell, Heather; Lampeitl, Hubert; Nichol, Robert C.; Dilday, Ben; Falck, Bridget; Riess, Adam G.; Sako, Masao; Schneider, Donald P.

    2012-06-20

    Supernova (SN) cosmology without spectroscopic confirmation is an exciting new frontier, which we address here with the Bayesian Estimation Applied to Multiple Species (BEAMS) algorithm and the full three years of data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey II Supernova Survey (SDSS-II SN). BEAMS is a Bayesian framework for using data from multiple species in statistical inference when one has the probability that each data point belongs to a given species, corresponding in this context to different types of SNe with their probabilities derived from their multi-band light curves. We run the BEAMS algorithm on both Gaussian and more realistic SNANA simulations with of order 10{sup 4} SNe, testing the algorithm against various pitfalls one might expect in the new and somewhat uncharted territory of photometric SN cosmology. We compare the performance of BEAMS to that of both mock spectroscopic surveys and photometric samples that have been cut using typical selection criteria. The latter typically either are biased due to contamination or have significantly larger contours in the cosmological parameters due to small data sets. We then apply BEAMS to the 792 SDSS-II photometric SNe with host spectroscopic redshifts. In this case, BEAMS reduces the area of the {Omega}{sub m}, {Omega}{sub {Lambda}} contours by a factor of three relative to the case where only spectroscopically confirmed data are used (297 SNe). In the case of flatness, the constraints obtained on the matter density applying BEAMS to the photometric SDSS-II data are {Omega}{sup BEAMS}{sub m} = 0.194 {+-} 0.07. This illustrates the potential power of BEAMS for future large photometric SN surveys such as Large Synoptic Survey Telescope.

  12. Planck 2013 results. VIII. HFI photometric calibration and mapmaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Armitage-Caplan, C.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bertincourt, B.; Bielewicz, P.; Bobin, J.; Bock, J. J.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bridges, M.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Catalano, A.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chary, R.-R.; Chen, X.; Chiang, H. C.; Chiang, L.-Y.; Christensen, P. R.; Church, S.; Clements, D. L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J.-M.; Désert, F.-X.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Filliard, C.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Franceschi, E.; Galeotta, S.; Ganga, K.; Giard, M.; Giardino, G.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Hansen, F. K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D.; Helou, G.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Knox, L.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Laureijs, R. J.; Lawrence, C. R.; Le Jeune, M.; Lellouch, E.; Leonardi, R.; Leroy, C.; Lesgourgues, J.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maffei, B.; Mandolesi, N.; Maris, M.; Marshall, D. J.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Massardi, M.; Matarrese, S.; Matthai, F.; Maurin, L.; Mazzotta, P.; McGehee, P.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Moreno, R.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Osborne, S.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paladini, R.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Pearson, T. J.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Popa, L.; Poutanen, T.; Pratt, G. W.; Prézeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Ricciardi, S.; Riller, T.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Roudier, G.; Rusholme, B.; Santos, D.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Shellard, E. P. S.; Spencer, L. D.; Starck, J.-L.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sureau, F.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Techene, S.; Terenzi, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2014-11-01

    This paper describes the methods used to produce photometrically calibrated maps from the Planck High Frequency Instrument (HFI) cleaned, time-ordered information. HFI observes the sky over a broad range of frequencies, from 100 to 857 GHz. To obtain the best calibration accuracy over such a large range, two different photometric calibration schemes have to be used. The 545 and 857 GHz data are calibrated by comparing flux-density measurements of Uranus and Neptune with models of their atmospheric emission. The lower frequencies (below 353 GHz) are calibrated using the solar dipole. A component of this anisotropy is time-variable, owing to the orbital motion of the satellite in the solar system. Photometric calibration is thus tightly linked to mapmaking, which also addresses low-frequency noise removal. By comparing observations taken more than one year apart in the same configuration, we have identified apparent gain variations with time. These variations are induced by non-linearities in the read-out electronics chain. We have developed an effective correction to limit their effect on calibration. We present several methods to estimate the precision of the photometric calibration. We distinguish relative uncertainties (between detectors, or between frequencies) and absolute uncertainties. Absolute uncertainties lie in the range from 0.54% to 10% from 100 to 857 GHz. We describe the pipeline used to produce the maps from the HFI timelines, based on the photometric calibration parameters, and the scheme used to set the zero level of the maps a posteriori. We also discuss the cross-calibration between HFI and the SPIRE instrument on board Herschel. Finally we summarize the basic characteristics of the set of HFI maps included in the 2013 Planck data release.

  13. Precision Cosmology with a New Probabilistic Photometric Redshifts Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrasco Kind, Matias; Brunner, R. J.

    2013-06-01

    A complete understanding of both dark energy and dark matter remains one of most important challenges in astrophysics today. Recent theoretical and numerical computations have made important progress in quantifying the role of these dark components on the formation and evolution of galaxies through cosmic time, but observational verification of these predictions and the development of new, more stringent constraints has not kept pace. It is in this context that, photometric redshifts have become more important with the growth of large imaging surveys, such as DES and LSST, that have been designed to address this issue. But their basic implementation has not changed significantly from their original development, as most techniques provide a single photometric redshift estimate and an associated error for the an extragalactic source. In this work, we present a unique and powerful solution that leverages the full information contained in the photometric data to address this cosmological challenge with a new approach that provides accurate photometric redshift probability density functions (PDF) for galaxies. This new approach, which scales efficiently to massive data, efficiently combines standard template fitting techniques with powerful machine learning methods. Included in this framework is our recently developed technique entitled Trees for PhotoZ (TPZ); a new, robust, parallel photometric redshift code that uses prediction trees and random forests to generate photo-z PDFs in a reliable and fast manner. In addition, our approach also provides ancillary information about the internal structure of the data, including the relative importance of variables used during the redshift estimation, an identification of areas in the training sample that provide poor predictions, and an accurate outlier rejection method. We will also present current results of this approach on a variety of datasets and discuss, by using specific examples, how the full photo-z PDF can be

  14. Exploring the SDSS photometric galaxies with clustering redshifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Mubdi; Mendez, Alexander J.; Ménard, Brice; Scranton, Ryan; Schmidt, Samuel J.; Morrison, Christopher B.; Budavári, Tamás

    2016-07-01

    We apply clustering-based redshift inference to all extended sources from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey photometric catalogue, down to magnitude r = 22. We map the relationships between colours and redshift, without assumption of the sources' spectral energy distributions (SEDs). We identify and locate star-forming quiescent galaxies, and active galactic nuclei, as well as colour changes due to spectral features, such as the 4000 Å break, redshifting through specific filters. Our mapping is globally in good agreement with colour-redshift tracks computed with SED templates, but reveals informative differences, such as the need for a lower fraction of M-type stars in certain templates. We compare our clustering-redshift estimates to photometric redshifts and find these two independent estimators to be in good agreement at each limiting magnitude considered. Finally, we present the global clustering-redshift distribution of all Sloan extended sources, showing objects up to z ˜ 0.8. While the overall shape agrees with that inferred from photometric redshifts, the clustering-redshift technique results in a smoother distribution, with no indication of structure in redshift space suggested by the photometric-redshift estimates (likely artefacts imprinted by their spectroscopic training set). We also infer a higher fraction of high-redshift objects. The mapping between the four observed colours and redshift can be used to estimate the redshift probability distribution function of individual galaxies. This work is an initial step towards producing a general mapping between redshift and all available observables in the photometric space, including brightness, size, concentration, and ellipticity.

  15. Pan-STARRS1 variability of XMM-COSMOS AGN. I. Impact on photometric redshifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simm, T.; Saglia, R.; Salvato, M.; Bender, R.; Burgett, W. S.; Chambers, K. C.; Draper, P. W.; Flewelling, H.; Kaiser, N.; Kudritzki, R.-P.; Magnier, E. A.; Metcalfe, N.; Tonry, J. L.; Wainscoat, R. J.; Waters, C.

    2015-12-01

    Aims: Upcoming large area sky surveys like Euclid and eROSITA, which are dedicated to studying the role of dark energy in the expansion history of the Universe and the three-dimensional mass distribution of matter, crucially depend on accurate photometric redshifts. The identification of variable sources, such as active galactic nuclei (AGNs), and the achievable redshift accuracy for varying objects are important in view of the science goals of the Euclid and eROSITA missions. Methods: We probe AGN optical variability for a large sample of X-ray-selected AGNs in the XMM-COSMOS field, using the multi-epoch light curves provided by the Pan-STARRS1 (PS1) 3π and Medium Deep Field surveys. To quantify variability we employed a simple statistic to estimate the probability of variability and the normalized excess variance to measure the variability amplitude. Utilizing these two variability parameters, we defined a sample of varying AGNs for every PS1 band. We investigated the influence of variability on the calculation of photometric redshifts by applying three different input photometry sets for our fitting procedure. For each of the five PS1 bands gP1, rP1, iP1, zP1, and yP1, we chose either the epochs minimizing the interval in observing time, the median magnitude values, or randomly drawn light curve points to compute the redshift. In addition, we derived photometric redshifts using PS1 photometry extended by GALEX/IRAC bands. Results: We find that the photometry produced by the 3π survey is sufficient to reliably detect variable sources provided that the fractional variability amplitude is at least ~3%. Considering the photometric redshifts of variable AGNs, we observe that minimizing the time spacing of the chosen points yields superior photometric redshifts in terms of the percentage of outliers (33%) and accuracy (0.07), outperforming the other two approaches. Drawing random points from the light curve gives rise to typically 57% of outliers and an accuracy of

  16. Determination of vanadium(V) by direct automatic potentiometric titration with EDTA using a chemically modified electrode as a potentiometric sensor.

    PubMed

    Quintar, S E; Santagata, J P; Cortinez, V A

    2005-10-15

    A chemically modified electrode (CME) was prepared and studied as a potentiometric sensor for the end-point detection in the automatic titration of vanadium(V) with EDTA. The CME was constructed with a paste prepared by mixing spectral-grade graphite powder, Nujol oil and N-2-naphthoyl-N-p-tolylhydroxamic acid (NTHA). Buffer systems, pH effects and the concentration range were studied. Interference ions were separated by applying a liquid-liquid extraction procedure. The CME did not require any special conditioning before using. The electrode was constructed with very inexpensive materials and was easily made. It could be continuously used, at least two months without removing the paste. Automatic potentiometric titration curves were obtained for V(V) within 5 x 10(-5) to 2 x 10(-3)M with acceptable accuracy and precision. The developed method was applied to V(V) determination in alloys for hip prosthesis.

  17. Determination of Carbonyl Functional Groups in Bio-oils by Potentiometric Titration: The Faix Method

    SciTech Connect

    Black, Stuart; Ferrell, Jack R.

    2017-01-01

    Carbonyl compounds present in bio-oils are known to be responsible for bio-oil property changes upon storage and during upgrading. Specifically, carbonyls cause an increase in viscosity (often referred to as 'aging') during storage of bio-oils. As such, carbonyl content has previously been used as a method of tracking bio-oil aging and condensation reactions with less variability than viscosity measurements. Additionally, carbonyls are also responsible for coke formation in bio-oil upgrading processes. Given the importance of carbonyls in bio-oils, accurate analytical methods for their quantification are very important for the bio-oil community. Potentiometric titration methods based on carbonyl oximation have long been used for the determination of carbonyl content in pyrolysis bio-oils. Here, we present a modification of the traditional carbonyl oximation procedures that results in less reaction time, smaller sample size, higher precision, and more accurate carbonyl determinations. While traditional carbonyl oximation methods occur at room temperature, the Faix method presented here occurs at an elevated temperature of 80 degrees C.

  18. Determination of Carbonyl Functional Groups in Bio-oils by Potentiometric Titration: The Faix Method.

    PubMed

    Black, Stuart; Ferrell, Jack R

    2017-02-07

    Carbonyl compounds present in bio-oils are known to be responsible for bio-oil property changes upon storage and during upgrading. Specifically, carbonyls cause an increase in viscosity (often referred to as 'aging') during storage of bio-oils. As such, carbonyl content has previously been used as a method of tracking bio-oil aging and condensation reactions with less variability than viscosity measurements. Additionally, carbonyls are also responsible for coke formation in bio-oil upgrading processes. Given the importance of carbonyls in bio-oils, accurate analytical methods for their quantification are very important for the bio-oil community. Potentiometric titration methods based on carbonyl oximation have long been used for the determination of carbonyl content in pyrolysis bio-oils. Here, we present a modification of the traditional carbonyl oximation procedures that results in less reaction time, smaller sample size, higher precision, and more accurate carbonyl determinations. While traditional carbonyl oximation methods occur at room temperature, the Faix method presented here occurs at an elevated temperature of 80 °C.

  19. Misuse of thermodynamics in the interpretation of isothermal titration calorimetry data for ligand binding to proteins.

    PubMed

    Pethica, Brian A

    2015-03-01

    Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) has given a mass of data on the binding of small molecules to proteins and other biopolymers, with particular interest in drug binding to proteins chosen as therapeutic indicators. Interpretation of the enthalpy data usually follows an unsound protocol that uses thermodynamic relations in circumstances where they do not apply. Errors of interpretation include incomplete definitions of ligand binding and equilibrium constants and neglect of the non-ideality of the solutions under study, leading to unreliable estimates of standard free energies and entropies of binding. The mass of reported thermodynamic functions for ligand binding to proteins estimated from ITC enthalpies alone is consequently of uncertain thermodynamic significance and utility. ITC and related experiments to test the protocol assumptions are indicated. A thermodynamic procedure avoiding equilibrium constants or other reaction models and not requiring protein activities is given. The discussion draws attention to the fundamental but neglected relation between the thermodynamic activity and bioactivity of drugs and to the generally unknown thermodynamic status of ligand solutions, which for drugs relates directly to effective therapeutic dosimetry.

  20. [Determination of total protein content in soya-bean milk via visual moving reaction boundary titration].

    PubMed

    Guo, Chengye; Wang, Houyu; Zhang, Lei; Fan, Liuyin; Cao, Chengxi

    2013-11-01

    A visual, rapid and accurate moving reaction boundary titration (MRBT) method was used for the determination of the total protein in soya-bean milk. During the process, moving reaction boundary (MRB) was formed by hydroxyl ions in the catholyte and soya-bean milk proteins immobilized in polyacrylamide gel (PAG), and an acid-base indicator was used to denote the boundary motion. The velocity of MRB has a relationship with protein concentration, which was used to obtain a standard curve. By paired t-test, there was no significant difference of the protein content between MRBT and Kjeldahl method at 95% confidence interval. The procedure of MRBT method required about 10 min, and it had linearity in the range of 2.0-14.0 g/L, low limit of detection (0.05 g/L), good precision (RSD of intra-day < 1.90% and inter-day < 4.39%), and high recoveries (97.41%-99.91%). In addition, non-protein nitrogen (NPN) such as melamine added into the soya-bean milk had weak influence on MRBT results.

  1. Determination of Carbonyl Groups in Pyrolysis Bio-oils Using Potentiometric Titration: Review and Comparison of Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Black, Stuart; Ferrell, Jack R.

    2016-01-06

    Carbonyl compounds present in bio-oils are known to be responsible for bio-oil property changes upon storage and during upgrading. As such, carbonyl content has previously been used as a method of tracking bio-oil aging and condensation reactions with less variability than viscosity measurements. Given the importance of carbonyls in bio-oils, accurate analytical methods for their quantification are very important for the bio-oil community. Potentiometric titration methods based on carbonyl oximation have long been used for the determination of carbonyl content in pyrolysis bio-oils. Here in this study, we present a modification of the traditional carbonyl oximation procedures that results in less reaction time, smaller sample size, higher precision, and more accurate carbonyl determinations. Some compounds such as carbohydrates are not measured by the traditional method (modified Nicolaides method), resulting in low estimations of the carbonyl content. Furthermore, we have shown that reaction completion for the traditional method can take up to 300 hours. The new method presented here (the modified Faix method) reduces the reaction time to 2 hours, uses triethanolamine (TEA) in the place of pyridine, and requires a smaller sample size for the analysis. Carbonyl contents determined using this new method are consistently higher than when using the traditional titration methods.

  2. Determination of Carbonyl Groups in Pyrolysis Bio-oils Using Potentiometric Titration: Review and Comparison of Methods

    DOE PAGES

    Black, Stuart; Ferrell, Jack R.

    2016-01-06

    Carbonyl compounds present in bio-oils are known to be responsible for bio-oil property changes upon storage and during upgrading. As such, carbonyl content has previously been used as a method of tracking bio-oil aging and condensation reactions with less variability than viscosity measurements. Given the importance of carbonyls in bio-oils, accurate analytical methods for their quantification are very important for the bio-oil community. Potentiometric titration methods based on carbonyl oximation have long been used for the determination of carbonyl content in pyrolysis bio-oils. Here in this study, we present a modification of the traditional carbonyl oximation procedures that results inmore » less reaction time, smaller sample size, higher precision, and more accurate carbonyl determinations. Some compounds such as carbohydrates are not measured by the traditional method (modified Nicolaides method), resulting in low estimations of the carbonyl content. Furthermore, we have shown that reaction completion for the traditional method can take up to 300 hours. The new method presented here (the modified Faix method) reduces the reaction time to 2 hours, uses triethanolamine (TEA) in the place of pyridine, and requires a smaller sample size for the analysis. Carbonyl contents determined using this new method are consistently higher than when using the traditional titration methods.« less

  3. Mapping glycoside hydrolase substrate subsites by isothermal titration calorimetry

    PubMed Central

    Zolotnitsky, Gennady; Cogan, Uri; Adir, Noam; Solomon, Vered; Shoham, Gil; Shoham, Yuval

    2004-01-01

    Relating thermodynamic parameters to structural and biochemical data allows a better understanding of substrate binding and its contribution to catalysis. The analysis of the binding of carbohydrates to proteins or enzymes is a special challenge because of the multiple interactions and forces involved. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) provides a direct measure of binding enthalpy (ΔHa) and allows the determination of the binding constant (free energy), entropy, and stoichiometry. In this study, we used ITC to elucidate the binding thermodynamics of xylosaccharides for two xylanases of family 10 isolated from Geobacillus stearothermophilus T-6. The change in the heat capacity of binding (ΔCp = ΔH/ΔT) for xylosaccharides differing in one sugar unit was determined by using ITC measurements at different temperatures. Because hydrophobic stacking interactions are associated with negative ΔCp, the data allow us to predict the substrate binding preference in the binding subsites based on the crystal structure of the enzyme. The proposed positional binding preference was consistent with mutants lacking aromatic binding residues at different subsites and was also supported by tryptophan fluorescence analysis. PMID:15277671

  4. Application of isothermal titration calorimetry in bioinorganic chemistry.

    PubMed

    Grossoehme, Nicholas E; Spuches, Anne M; Wilcox, Dean E

    2010-11-01

    The thermodynamics of metals ions binding to proteins and other biological molecules can be measured with isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), which quantifies the binding enthalpy (ΔH°) and generates a binding isotherm. A fit of the isotherm provides the binding constant (K), thereby allowing the free energy (ΔG°) and ultimately the entropy (ΔS°) of binding to be determined. The temperature dependence of ΔH° can then provide the change in heat capacity (ΔC (p)°) upon binding. However, ITC measurements of metal binding can be compromised by undesired reactions (e.g., precipitation, hydrolysis, and redox), and generally involve competing equilibria with the buffer and protons, which contribute to the experimental values (K (ITC), ΔH (ITC)). Guidelines and factors that need to be considered for ITC measurements involving metal ions are outlined. A general analysis of the experimental ITC values that accounts for the contributions of metal-buffer speciation and proton competition and provides condition-independent thermodynamic values (K, ΔH°) for metal binding is developed and validated.

  5. Predicting proton titration in cationic micelle and bilayer environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrow, Brian H.; Eike, David M.; Murch, Bruce P.; Koenig, Peter H.; Shen, Jana K.

    2014-08-01

    Knowledge of the protonation behavior of pH-sensitive molecules in micelles and bilayers has significant implications in consumer product development and biomedical applications. However, the calculation of pKa's in such environments proves challenging using traditional structure-based calculations. Here we apply all-atom constant pH molecular dynamics with explicit ions and titratable water to calculate the pKa of a fatty acid molecule in a micelle of dodecyl trimethylammonium chloride and liquid as well as gel-phase bilayers of diethyl ester dimethylammonium chloride. Interestingly, the pKa of the fatty acid in the gel bilayer is 5.4, 0.4 units lower than that in the analogous liquid bilayer or micelle, despite the fact that the protonated carboxylic group is significantly more desolvated in the gel bilayer. This work illustrates the capability of all-atom constant pH molecular dynamics in capturing the delicate balance in the free energies of desolvation and Coulombic interactions. It also shows the importance of the explicit treatment of ions in sampling the protonation states. The ability to model dynamics of pH-responsive substrates in a bilayer environment is useful for improving fabric care products as well as our understanding of the side effects of anti-inflammatory drugs.

  6. Predicting proton titration in cationic micelle and bilayer environments

    SciTech Connect

    Morrow, Brian H.; Shen, Jana K.; Eike, David M.; Murch, Bruce P.; Koenig, Peter H.

    2014-08-28

    Knowledge of the protonation behavior of pH-sensitive molecules in micelles and bilayers has significant implications in consumer product development and biomedical applications. However, the calculation of pK{sub a}’s in such environments proves challenging using traditional structure-based calculations. Here we apply all-atom constant pH molecular dynamics with explicit ions and titratable water to calculate the pK{sub a} of a fatty acid molecule in a micelle of dodecyl trimethylammonium chloride and liquid as well as gel-phase bilayers of diethyl ester dimethylammonium chloride. Interestingly, the pK{sub a} of the fatty acid in the gel bilayer is 5.4, 0.4 units lower than that in the analogous liquid bilayer or micelle, despite the fact that the protonated carboxylic group is significantly more desolvated in the gel bilayer. This work illustrates the capability of all-atom constant pH molecular dynamics in capturing the delicate balance in the free energies of desolvation and Coulombic interactions. It also shows the importance of the explicit treatment of ions in sampling the protonation states. The ability to model dynamics of pH-responsive substrates in a bilayer environment is useful for improving fabric care products as well as our understanding of the side effects of anti-inflammatory drugs.

  7. Hot biological catalysis: isothermal titration calorimetry to characterize enzymatic reactions.

    PubMed

    Mazzei, Luca; Ciurli, Stefano; Zambelli, Barbara

    2014-04-04

    Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) is a well-described technique that measures the heat released or absorbed during a chemical reaction, using it as an intrinsic probe to characterize virtually every chemical process. Nowadays, this technique is extensively applied to determine thermodynamic parameters of biomolecular binding equilibria. In addition, ITC has been demonstrated to be able of directly measuring kinetics and thermodynamic parameters (kcat, KM, ΔH) of enzymatic reactions, even though this application is still underexploited. As heat changes spontaneously occur during enzymatic catalysis, ITC does not require any modification or labeling of the system under analysis and can be performed in solution. Moreover, the method needs little amount of material. These properties make ITC an invaluable, powerful and unique tool to study enzyme kinetics in several applications, such as, for example, drug discovery. In this work an experimental ITC-based method to quantify kinetics and thermodynamics of enzymatic reactions is thoroughly described. This method is applied to determine kcat and KM of the enzymatic hydrolysis of urea by Canavalia ensiformis (jack bean) urease. Calculation of intrinsic molar enthalpy (ΔHint) of the reaction is performed. The values thus obtained are consistent with previous data reported in literature, demonstrating the reliability of the methodology.

  8. Enzyme kinetics determined by single-injection isothermal titration calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Transtrum, Mark K; Hansen, Lee D; Quinn, Colette

    2015-04-01

    The purposes of this paper are (a) to examine the effect of calorimeter time constant (τ) on heat rate data from a single enzyme injection into substrate in an isothermal titration calorimeter (ITC), (b) to provide information that can be used to predict the optimum experimental conditions for determining the rate constant (k2), Michaelis constant (KM), and enthalpy change of the reaction (ΔRH), and (c) to describe methods for evaluating these parameters. We find that KM, k2 and ΔRH can be accurately estimated without correcting for the calorimeter time constant, τ, if (k2E/KM), where E is the total active enzyme concentration, is between 0.1/τ and 1/τ and the reaction goes to at least 99% completion. If experimental conditions are outside this domain and no correction is made for τ, errors in the inferred parameters quickly become unreasonable. A method for fitting single-injection data to the Michaelis-Menten or Briggs-Haldane model to simultaneously evaluate KM, k2, ΔRH, and τ is described and validated with experimental data. All four of these parameters can be accurately inferred provided the reaction time constant (k2E/KM) is larger than 1/τ and the data include enzyme saturated conditions.

  9. Characterization of membrane protein interactions by isothermal titration calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Situ, Alan J; Schmidt, Thomas; Mazumder, Parichita; Ulmer, Tobias S

    2014-10-23

    Understanding the structure, folding, and interaction of membrane proteins requires experimental tools to quantify the association of transmembrane (TM) helices. Here, we introduce isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) to measure integrin αIIbβ3 TM complex affinity, to study the consequences of helix-helix preorientation in lipid bilayers, and to examine protein-induced lipid reorganization. Phospholipid bicelles served as membrane mimics. The association of αIIbβ3 proceeded with a free energy change of -4.61±0.04kcal/mol at bicelle conditions where the sampling of random helix-helix orientations leads to complex formation. At bicelle conditions that approach a true bilayer structure in effect, an entropy saving of >1kcal/mol was obtained from helix-helix preorientation. The magnitudes of enthalpy and entropy changes increased distinctly with bicelle dimensions, indicating long-range changes in bicelle lipid properties upon αIIbβ3 TM association. NMR spectroscopy confirmed ITC affinity measurements and revealed αIIbβ3 association and dissociation rates of 4500±100s(-1) and 2.1±0.1s(-1), respectively. Thus, ITC is able to provide comprehensive insight into the interaction of membrane proteins.

  10. Radial velocity variations of photometrically quiet, chromospherically inactive Kepler stars: A link between RV jitter and photometric flicker

    SciTech Connect

    Bastien, Fabienne A.; Stassun, Keivan G.; Pepper, Joshua; Wright, Jason T.; Aigrain, Suzanne; Basri, Gibor; Johnson, John A.; Howard, Andrew W.; Walkowicz, Lucianne M.

    2014-02-01

    We compare stellar photometric variability, as measured from Kepler light curves by Basri et al., with measurements of radial velocity (RV) rms variations of all California Planet Search overlap stars. We newly derive rotation periods from the Kepler light curves for all of the stars in our study sample. The RV variations reported herein range from less than 4 to 135 m s{sup –1}, yet the stars all have amplitudes of photometric variability less than 3 mmag, reflecting the preference of the RV program for chromospherically 'quiet' stars. Despite the small size of our sample, we find with high statistical significance that the RV rms manifests strongly in the Fourier power spectrum of the light curve: stars that are noisier in RV have a greater number of frequency components in the light curve. We also find that spot models of the observed light curves systematically underpredict the observed RV variations by factors of ∼2-1000, likely because the low-level photometric variations in our sample are driven by processes not included in simple spot models. The stars best fit by these models tend to have simpler light curves, dominated by a single relatively high-amplitude component of variability. Finally, we demonstrate that the RV rms behavior of our sample can be explained in the context of the photometric variability evolutionary diagram introduced by Bastien et al. We use this diagram to derive the surface gravities of the stars in our sample, revealing many of them to have moved off the main sequence. More generally, we find that the stars with the largest RV rms are those that have evolved onto the 'flicker floor' sequence in that diagram, characterized by relatively low amplitude but highly complex photometric variations which grow as the stars evolve to become subgiants.

  11. THE PHOTOMETRIC CLASSIFICATION SERVER FOR Pan-STARRS1

    SciTech Connect

    Saglia, R. P.; Bender, R.; Seitz, S.; Senger, R.; Snigula, J.; Phleps, S.; Wilman, D.; Tonry, J. L.; Burgett, W. S.; Chambers, K. C.; Heasley, J. N.; Kaiser, N.; Magnier, E. A.; Morgan, J. S.; Greisel, N.; Bailer-Jones, C. A. L.; Klement, R. J.; Rix, H.-W.; Smith, K.; Green, P. J.; and others

    2012-02-20

    The Pan-STARRS1 survey is obtaining multi-epoch imaging in five bands (g{sub P1} r{sub P1} i{sub P1} z{sub P1} y{sub P1}) over the entire sky north of declination -30 deg. We describe here the implementation of the Photometric Classification Server (PCS) for Pan-STARRS1. PCS will allow the automatic classification of objects into star/galaxy/quasar classes based on colors and the measurement of photometric redshifts for extragalactic objects, and will constrain stellar parameters for stellar objects, working at the catalog level. We present tests of the system based on high signal-to-noise photometry derived from the Medium-Deep Fields of Pan-STARRS1, using available spectroscopic surveys as training and/or verification sets. We show that the Pan-STARRS1 photometry delivers classifications and photometric redshifts as good as the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) photometry to the same magnitude limits. In particular, our preliminary results, based on this relatively limited data set down to the SDSS spectroscopic limits, and therefore potentially improvable, show that stars are correctly classified as such in 85% of cases, galaxies in 97%, and QSOs in 84%. False positives are less than 1% for galaxies, Almost-Equal-To 19% for stars, and Almost-Equal-To 28% for QSOs. Moreover, photometric redshifts for 1000 luminous red galaxies up to redshift 0.5 are determined to 2.4% precision (defined as 1.48 Multiplication-Sign Median|z{sub phot} - z{sub spec}|/(1 + z)) with just 0.4% catastrophic outliers and small (-0.5%) residual bias. For bluer galaxies up to the same redshift, the residual bias (on average -0.5%) trend, percentage of catastrophic failures (1.2%), and precision (4.2%) are higher, but still interestingly small for many science applications. Good photometric redshifts (to 5%) can be obtained for at most 60% of the QSOs of the sample. PCS will create a value-added catalog with classifications and photometric redshifts for eventually many millions of sources.

  12. Gas chromatography with flame photometric detection of 31 organophosphorus pesticide residues in Alpinia oxyphylla dried fruits.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiangsheng; Kong, Weijun; Wei, Jianhe; Yang, Meihua

    2014-11-01

    A simple, rapid and effective gas chromatography-flame photometric detection method was established for simultaneous multi-component determination of 31 organophosphorus pesticides (OPPs) residues in Alpinia oxyphylla, which is widely consumed as a traditional medicine and food in China. Sample preparation was completed in a single step without any clean-up procedure. All pesticides expressed good linear relationships between 0.004 and 1.0 μg/mL with correlation coefficients higher than 0.9973. The method gave satisfactory recoveries for most pesticides. The limits of detection varied from 1 to 10 ng/mL, and the limits of quantification (LOQs) were between 4 and 30 ng/mL. The proposed method was successfully applied to 55 commercial samples purchased from five different areas. Five pesticide residues were detected in four (7.27%) samples. The positive samples were confirmed by gas chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS).

  13. A photometric method for the estimation of the oil yield of oil shale

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cuttitta, Frank

    1951-01-01

    A method is presented for the distillation and photometric estimation of the oil yield of oil-bearing shales. The oil shale is distilled in a closed test tube and the oil extracted with toluene. The optical density of the toluene extract is used in the estimation of oil content and is converted to percentage of oil by reference to a standard curve. This curve is obtained by relating the oil yields determined by the Fischer assay method to the optical density of the toluene extract of the oil evolved by the new procedure. The new method gives results similar to those obtained by the Fischer assay method in a much shorter time. The applicability of the new method to oil-bearing shale and phosphatic shale has been tested.

  14. Derivation of sky quality indicators from photometrically calibrated all-sky image mosaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duriscoe, Dan M.; Moore, Chadwick A.; Luginbuhl, Christian B.

    2015-08-01

    A large database of high resolution all-sky measurements of V-band night sky brightness at sites in U.S. National Parks and astronomical observatories is utilized to describe sky quality over a wide geographic area. Mosaics of photometrically calibrated V-band imagery are processed with a semi-automated procedure to reveal the effects of artificial sky glow through graphical presentation and numeric indicators of artificial sky brightness. Comparison with simpler methods such as the use of the Unihedron SQM and naked eye limiting magnitude reveal that areas near the horizon, which are not typically captured with single-channel measurements, contribute significantly to the indicators maximum vertical illuminance, maximum sky luminance, and average all-sky luminance. Distant sources of sky glow may represent future threats to areas of the sky nearer the zenith. Timely identification and quantification of these threats may allow mitigating strategies to be implemented.

  15. Multigrid solution of the nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann equation and calculation of titration curves.

    PubMed Central

    Oberoi, H; Allewell, N M

    1993-01-01

    Although knowledge of the pKa values and charge states of individual residues is critical to understanding the role of electrostatic effects in protein structure and function, calculating these quantities is challenging because of the sensitivity of these parameters to the position and distribution of charges. Values for many different proteins which agree well with experimental results have been obtained with modified Tanford-Kirkwood theory in which the protein is modeled as a sphere (reviewed in Ref. 1); however, convergence is more difficult to achieve with finite difference methods, in which the protein is mapped onto a grid and derivatives of the potential function are calculated as differences between the values of the function at grid points (reviewed in Ref. 6). Multigrid methods, in which the size of the grid is varied from fine to coarse in several cycles, decrease computational time, increase rates of convergence, and improve agreement with experiment. Both the accuracy and computational advantage of the multigrid approach increase with grid size, because the time required to achieve a solution increases slowly with grid size. We have implemented a multigrid procedure for solving the nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann equation, and, using lysozyme as a test case, compared calculations for several crystal forms, different refinement procedures, and different charge assignment schemes. The root mean square difference between calculated and experimental pKa values for the crystal structure which yields best agreement with experiment (1LZT) is 1.1 pH units, with the differences in calculated and experimental pK values being less than 0.6 pH units for 16 out of 21 residues. The calculated titration curves of several residues are biphasic. Images FIGURE 8 PMID:8369451

  16. Assessing Coupled Protein Folding and Binding Through Temperature-Dependent Isothermal Titration Calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Debashish; Bastidas, Monique; Lawrence, Chad W; Noid, William G; Showalter, Scott A

    2016-01-01

    Broad interest in the thermodynamic driving forces of coupled macromolecular folding and binding is motivated by the prevalence of disorder-to-order transitions observed when intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) bind to their partners. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) is one of the few methods available for completely evaluating the thermodynamic parameters describing a protein-ligand binding event. Significantly, when the effective ΔH° for the coupled folding and binding process is determined by ITC in a temperature series, the constant-pressure heat capacity change (ΔCp) associated with these coupled equilibria is experimentally accessible, offering a unique opportunity to investigate the driving forces behind them. Notably, each of these molecular-scale events is often accompanied by strongly temperature-dependent enthalpy changes, even over the narrow temperature range experimentally accessible for biomolecules, making single temperature determinations of ΔH° less informative than typically assumed. Here, we will document the procedures we have adopted in our laboratory for designing, executing, and globally analyzing temperature-dependent ITC studies of coupled folding and binding in IDP interactions. As a biologically significant example, our recent evaluation of temperature-dependent interactions between the disordered tail of FCP1 and the winged-helix domain from Rap74 will be presented. Emphasis will be placed on the use of publically available analysis programs written in MATLAB that facilitate quantification of the thermodynamic forces governing IDP interactions. Although motivated from the perspective of IDPs, the experimental design principles and data fitting procedures presented here are general to the study of most noncooperative ligand binding equilibria.

  17. On the physical meaning of the isothermal titration calorimetry measurements in calorimeters with full cells.

    PubMed

    Grolier, Jean-Pierre E; del Río, Jose Manuel

    2009-12-09

    We have performed a detailed study of the thermodynamics of the titration process in an isothermal titration calorimeter with full cells. We show that the relationship between the enthalpy and the heat measured is better described in terms of the equation Delta H = W(inj) + Q (where W(inj) is the work necessary to carry out the titration) than in terms of DeltaH = Q. Moreover, we show that the heat of interaction between two components is related to the partial enthalpy of interaction at infinite dilution of the titrant component, as well as to its partial volume of interaction at infinite dilution.

  18. On the Physical Meaning of the Isothermal Titration Calorimetry Measurements in Calorimeters with Full Cells

    PubMed Central

    Grolier, Jean-Pierre E.; del Río, Jose Manuel

    2009-01-01

    We have performed a detailed study of the thermodynamics of the titration process in an isothermal titration calorimeter with full cells. We show that the relationship between the enthalpy and the heat measured is better described in terms of the equation Δ H = Winj + Q (where Winj is the work necessary to carry out the titration) than in terms of ΔH = Q. Moreover, we show that the heat of interaction between two components is related to the partial enthalpy of interaction at infinite dilution of the titrant component, as well as to its partial volume of interaction at infinite dilution. PMID:20054472

  19. Determination of organic bases in non-aqueous solvents by catalytic thermometric titration.

    PubMed

    Vajgand, V J; Kiss, T A; Gaál, F F; Zsigrai, I J

    1968-07-01

    Catalytic thermometric titrations have been developed for bases (brucine, diethylaniline, potassium acetate and triethylamine) in acetic acid by continuous and discontinuous addition of the standard solution and automatic temperature recording. The determination of weak bases, e.g., antipyrine, unsuccessful in acetic acid by catalytic thermometric titration, has been achieved by using nitromethane or acetic anhydride as solvent. Catalytic thermometric titrations were also performed by coulometric generation of hydrogen ions for the determination of micro amounts of weak bases in a mixture of acetic anhyride and acetic acid.

  20. Ionic equilibria in neutral amphiprotic solvents of low dielectric constant: Titration curves.

    PubMed

    Bosch, E; Rosés, M

    1989-06-01

    Titration curves have been simulated for the titration of acids, bases and salts in neutral amphiprotic solvents such as isopropyl and tert-butyl alcohols. Ranges of pK values and acid concentrations have been examined. The incomplete dissociation of salts, which increases the acid or basic strength, has been found to be the major factor modifying the shape of the curve and the pH break. The theoretical predictions have been checked by titrating several series of acids and good agreement has been obtained between computed and experimental results.

  1. Titration of intravenous synthetic oxytocin post vaginal birth following induction or augmentation.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Lucy; Hauck, Yvonne L; Pemberton, Alissa; Crichton, Caroline; Conwell, Marion

    2016-10-01

    Evidence exists for titration of intravenous oxytocin during induction and augmentation, whereas no evidence was identified for titration of intravenous oxytocin following vaginal birth, where management excluded oxytocin for postpartum haemorrhage (PPH). This retrospective cohort study explored this issue through patient case notes and computerised perinatal data. Analysis included 335 women comparing induction (n = 226, 67%) to augmentation (n = 109, 33%). The two groups differed in terms of: parity; oxytocin dosage; length of time on intravenous oxytocin; and the length of first and second stage labour. They had similar rates of PPH and titration of intravenous oxytocin following birth was rarely recorded.

  2. A High-speed Photometric Survey of AP Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurtanidze, O. M.; Nikolashvili, M. G.

    We have undertook a long-term programme of high-speed photometric observations about two hundred Normal and Peculiar A-type stars with 125cm RC telescope equipped by Two-Star Photometer. It enables to chop as frequently as need between objects, sky and dark due to effects of sky transparency and background variations are removed and scintillation noise spectra are obtained. An attempt was made to include representative number of each spectral subtypes. The selected objects lie in the range of 8-10 magnitudes in the Jonhson wide-band B filter. At first stage it is planned to carry out a pilot survey with duration of 6-8 hours divided between two or three observing sessions. The objects with noticable oscillations will be studied photometrically as well as spectroscopically in detail. During the preliminary observations one rapidly-oscillating Ap star HD231427 was revealed which should be considered as tentative.

  3. A high-speed photometric survey of AP stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolashvili, M. G.; Kurtanidze, O. M.

    We have undertook a long-term programme of high-speed photometric observations about two hundred Normal and Peculiar A-type stars with 125cm RC telescope equipped by Two-Star Photometer. It enables to chop as frequently as need between objects, sky and dark due to effects of sky transparency and background variations are removed and scintillation noise spectra are obtained. An attempt was made to include representative number of each spectral subtypes. The selected objects lie in the range of 8-10 magnitudes in the Jonhson wide-band B filter. At first stage it is planned to carry out a pilot survey with duration of 6-8 hours divided between two or three observing sessions. The objects with noticable oscillations will be studied photometrically as well as spectroscopically in detail. During the preliminary observations one rapidly-oscillating Ap star HD231427 was revealed which should be considered as tentative.

  4. Galaxy clustering with photometric surveys using PDF redshift information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asorey, J.; Carrasco Kind, M.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Brunner, R. J.; Thaler, J.

    2016-06-01

    Photometric surveys produce large-area maps of the galaxy distribution, but with less accurate redshift information than is obtained from spectroscopic methods. Modern photometric redshift (photo-z) algorithms use galaxy magnitudes, or colours, that are obtained through multiband imaging to produce a probability density function (PDF) for each galaxy in the map. We used simulated data to study the effect of using different photo-z estimators to assign galaxies to redshift bins in order to compare their effects on angular clustering and galaxy bias measurements. We found that if we use the entire PDF, rather than a single-point (mean or mode) estimate, the deviations are less biased, especially when using narrow redshift bins. When the redshift bin widths are Δz = 0.1, the use of the entire PDF reduces the typical measurement bias from 5 per cent, when using single point estimates, to 3 per cent.

  5. Galaxy clustering with photometric surveys using PDF redshift information

    DOE PAGES

    Asorey, J.; Carrasco Kind, M.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; ...

    2016-03-28

    Here, photometric surveys produce large-area maps of the galaxy distribution, but with less accurate redshift information than is obtained from spectroscopic methods. Modern photometric redshift (photo-z) algorithms use galaxy magnitudes, or colors, that are obtained through multi-band imaging to produce a probability density function (PDF) for each galaxy in the map. We used simulated data to study the effect of using different photo-z estimators to assign galaxies to redshift bins in order to compare their effects on angular clustering and galaxy bias measurements. We found that if we use the entire PDF, rather than a single-point (mean or mode) estimate, the deviations are less biased, especially when using narrow redshift bins. When the redshift bin widths aremore » $$\\Delta z=0.1$$, the use of the entire PDF reduces the typical measurement bias from 5%, when using single point estimates, to 3%.« less

  6. KEPLER MISSION DESIGN, REALIZED PHOTOMETRIC PERFORMANCE, AND EARLY SCIENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, David G.; Borucki, William J.; Lissauer, Jack J.; Basri, Gibor; Marcy, Geoffrey; Batalha, Natalie M.; Brown, Timothy M.; Caldwell, Douglas; DeVore, Edna; Jenkins, Jon; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Joergen; Cochran, William D.; Dunham, Edward W.; Gautier, Thomas N.; Gilliland, Ronald L.; Gould, Alan; Kondo, Yoji; Monet, David

    2010-04-20

    The Kepler Mission, launched on 2009 March 6, was designed with the explicit capability to detect Earth-size planets in the habitable zone of solar-like stars using the transit photometry method. Results from just 43 days of data along with ground-based follow-up observations have identified five new transiting planets with measurements of their masses, radii, and orbital periods. Many aspects of stellar astrophysics also benefit from the unique, precise, extended, and nearly continuous data set for a large number and variety of stars. Early results for classical variables and eclipsing stars show great promise. To fully understand the methodology, processes, and eventually the results from the mission, we present the underlying rationale that ultimately led to the flight and ground system designs used to achieve the exquisite photometric performance. As an example of the initial photometric results, we present variability measurements that can be used to distinguish dwarf stars from red giants.

  7. The Future of Photometric, Spectrophotometric and Polarimetric Standardization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterken, C.

    2007-04-01

    Several dozens standard setters and active standardizers came together to reflect on the status and on the future of standardization and calibration in photometry, spectrophotometry and polarimetry. This Proceedings book contains papers about calibration and standardization, including the production of standards. The Volume covers plenty of advice on the construction and use of calibration apparatus, and on the setting up of standard systems. The organisation of the book, though not a faithful record of the talks, closely reflects the structure of the Workshop, with topics grouped by discipline. The book opens with concepts of standardization, followed by construction, calibration and maintenance of photometric systems. This leads to discussions of sky surveys, followed by standardization of spectrophotometry, and spectrophotometric and photometric absolute flux calibrations.

  8. Photometric study of the pulsating, eclipsing binary OO DRA

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, X. B.; Deng, L. C.; Tian, J. F.; Wang, K.; Yan, Z. Z.; Luo, C. Q.; Sun, J. J.; Liu, Q. L.; Xin, H. Q.; Zhou, Q.; Luo, Z. Q.

    2014-12-01

    We present a comprehensive photometric study of the pulsating, eclipsing binary OO Dra. Simultaneous B- and V-band photometry of the star was carried out on 14 nights. A revised orbital period and a new ephemeris were derived from the data. The first photometric solution of the binary system and the physical parameters of the component stars are determined. They reveal that OO Dra could be a detached system with a less-massive secondary component nearly filling its Roche lobe. By subtracting the eclipsing light changes from the data, we obtained the intrinsic pulsating light curves of the hotter, massive primary component. A frequency analysis of the residual light yields two confident pulsation modes in both B- and V-band data with the dominant frequency detected at 41.865 c/d. A brief discussion concerning the evolutionary status and the pulsation nature of the binary system is finally given.

  9. Galaxy clustering with photometric surveys using PDF redshift information

    SciTech Connect

    Asorey, J.; Carrasco Kind, M.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Brunner, R. J.; Thaler, J.

    2016-03-28

    Here, photometric surveys produce large-area maps of the galaxy distribution, but with less accurate redshift information than is obtained from spectroscopic methods. Modern photometric redshift (photo-z) algorithms use galaxy magnitudes, or colors, that are obtained through multi-band imaging to produce a probability density function (PDF) for each galaxy in the map. We used simulated data to study the effect of using different photo-z estimators to assign galaxies to redshift bins in order to compare their effects on angular clustering and galaxy bias measurements. We found that if we use the entire PDF, rather than a single-point (mean or mode) estimate, the deviations are less biased, especially when using narrow redshift bins. When the redshift bin widths are $\\Delta z=0.1$, the use of the entire PDF reduces the typical measurement bias from 5%, when using single point estimates, to 3%.

  10. Assessing the Photometric Calibration of the ASAS Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berdnikov, L. N.; Dambis, A. K.

    2016-05-01

    We compare bona fide calibrated mean VIC magnitudes of several hundred stars found in the CCD frames taken in 2012 during our photometric observations of 109 Cepheids and RR Lyrae type stars made at the South African Astronomical Observatory to the corresponding mean VIC magnitudes measured in the course of the ASAS survey to assess the quality of ASAS photometry and derive the appropriate transformation equations. We conclude that as far as the only serious caveat due to photometric errors, which range from ˜ 0.05m for relatively bright stars to about ˜ 0.15m for ˜ 14m stars and translates into extra fractional distance error of 0.025-0.07.

  11. Determination of rotation periods of M stars with photometric techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díez Alonso, E.; Montes, D.; de Cos Juez, F. J.; Naves, R.; García de La Cuesta, F.; Herrero, E.; Béjar, V. J. S.; Caballero, J. A.; Quirrenbach, A.; Amado, P. J.; Ribas, I.; Reiners, A.; Mundt, R.; Seifert, W.; CARMENES Consortium

    2017-03-01

    This work is part of the project CARMENES (Calar Alto search for high-Resolution M dwarfs With Exoearths With Near-infrared and optical Echelle spectrographs) searching for Earthlike exoplanets in M dwarf stars (Quirrenbach et al. 2014SPIE.9147E..1FQ). Our goal is to characterize the rotation periods of the M-type dwarf stars of CARMENES input catalog in order to distinguish variations in radial velocity produced by magnetic activity of those produced by possible exoplanets. These data will also allow us to study in detail the dependence of chromospheric activity with rotation in this type of stars. We are analyzing photometric series of our input stars obtained by surveys as MEarth, ASAS or K2 and doing our own observations at various telescopes in collaboration with amateur observatories. We are also developing and testing new photometric techniques based on intelligent modeling of atmospheric turbulence to improve rotation curves

  12. The Photometric Classification Server of PanSTARRS1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saglia, R. P.

    2008-12-01

    The Panoramic Survey Telescope and Rapid Response System 1 (PanSTARRS1) project is on his way to start science operations early 2009. In the next 3.5 years it will produce a grizy survey of 3/4 of the sky, 2 mag deeper than Sloan. The Photometric Classification Server is responsibile for the object classification as star, galaxy or quasar, based on multiband photometry. Accordingly, it t should also deliver accurate and timely stellar parameters or photometric redshifts. Several science projects rely on the output of the server, from transit planet search, to transient detections, the structure of the Milky Way, high redshift Quasars, galaxy evolution, cosmological shear, baryonic oscillations and galaxy cluster searches.

  13. Measuring photometric redshifts using galaxy images and Deep Neural Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyle, B.

    2016-07-01

    We propose a new method to estimate the photometric redshift of galaxies by using the full galaxy image in each measured band. This method draws from the latest techniques and advances in machine learning, in particular Deep Neural Networks. We pass the entire multi-band galaxy image into the machine learning architecture to obtain a redshift estimate that is competitive, in terms of the measured point prediction metrics, with the best existing standard machine learning techniques. The standard techniques estimate redshifts using post-processed features, such as magnitudes and colours, which are extracted from the galaxy images and are deemed to be salient by the user. This new method removes the user from the photometric redshift estimation pipeline. However we do note that Deep Neural Networks require many orders of magnitude more computing resources than standard machine learning architectures, and as such are only tractable for making predictions on datasets of size ≤50k before implementing parallelisation techniques.

  14. Microdensitometer errors: Their effect on photometric data reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozyan, E. P.; Opal, C. B.

    1984-01-01

    The performance of densitometers used for photometric data reduction of high dynamic range electrographic plate material is analyzed. Densitometer repeatability is tested by comparing two scans of one plate. Internal densitometer errors are examined by constructing histograms of digitized densities and finding inoperative bits and differential nonlinearity in the analog to digital converter. Such problems appear common to the four densitometers used in this investigation and introduce systematic algorithm dependent errors in the results. Strategies to improve densitometer performance are suggested.

  15. Calibration of photometric systems from homogeneous spectrophotometric data.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labhardt, L.; Buser, R.

    The atlas of stellar spectrophotometric data published by Gunn and Stryker (1983) constitutes an extremely valuable tool for the evaluation and calibration of photometric systems. Since RGU photometry is tightly linked to UBV data the Gunn-Stryker atlas has been used in the present paper to evaluate these two systems and subsequently investigate the resulting calibration of the RGU colors in terms of MK spectral classification.

  16. A sparse Gaussian process framework for photometric redshift estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almosallam, Ibrahim A.; Lindsay, Sam N.; Jarvis, Matt J.; Roberts, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    Accurate photometric redshifts are a lynchpin for many future experiments to pin down the cosmological model and for studies of galaxy evolution. In this study, a novel sparse regression framework for photometric redshift estimation is presented. Synthetic data set simulating the Euclid survey and real data from SDSS DR12 are used to train and test the proposed models. We show that approaches which include careful data preparation and model design offer a significant improvement in comparison with several competing machine learning algorithms. Standard implementations of most regression algorithms use the minimization of the sum of squared errors as the objective function. For redshift inference, this induces a bias in the posterior mean of the output distribution, which can be problematic. In this paper, we directly minimize the target metric Δz = (zs - zp)/(1 + zs) and address the bias problem via a distribution-based weighting scheme, incorporated as part of the optimization objective. The results are compared with other machine learning algorithms in the field such as artificial neural networks (ANN), Gaussian processes (GPs) and sparse GPs. The proposed framework reaches a mean absolute Δz = 0.0026(1 + zs), over the redshift range of 0 ≤ zs ≤ 2 on the simulated data, and Δz = 0.0178(1 + zs) over the entire redshift range on the SDSS DR12 survey, outperforming the standard ANNz used in the literature. We also investigate how the relative size of the training sample affects the photometric redshift accuracy. We find that a training sample of >30 per cent of total sample size, provides little additional constraint on the photometric redshifts, and note that our GP formalism strongly outperforms ANNz in the sparse data regime for the simulated data set.

  17. MYRaf: A new Approach with IRAF for Astronomical Photometric Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilic, Y.; Shameoni Niaei, M.; Özeren, F. F.; Yesilyaprak, C.

    2016-12-01

    In this study, the design and some developments of MYRaf software for astronomical photometric reduction are presented. MYRaf software is an easy to use, reliable, and has a fast IRAF aperture photometry GUI tools. MYRaf software is an important step for the automated software process of robotic telescopes, and uses IRAF, PyRAF, matplotlib, ginga, alipy, and Sextractor with the general-purpose and high-level programming language Python and uses the QT framework.

  18. The photometric method of extrasolar planet detection revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hale, Alan; Doyle, Laurance R.

    1994-01-01

    We investigate the geometry concerning the photometric method of extrasolar planet detection, i.e., the detection of dimunition of a parent star's brightness during a planetary transit. Under the assumption that planetary orbital inclinations can be defined by a Gaussian with a sigma of 10 deg centered on the parent star's equatorial plane, Monte Carlo simulations suggest that for a given star observed at an inclination of exactly 90 deg, the probability of at least one Earth-sized or larger planet being suitably placed for transits is approximately 4%. This probability drops to 3% for a star observed at an inclination of 80 deg, and is still approximately 0.5% for a star observed at an inclination of 60 deg. If one can select 100 stars with a pre-determined inclination equal or greater than 80 deg, the probability of at least one planet being suitably configured for transits is 95%. The majority of transit events are due to planets in small-a orbits similar to the Earth and Venus; thus, the photometric method in principle is the method best suited for the detection of Earthlike planets. The photometric method also allows for testing whether or not planets can exist within binary systems. This can ge done by selecting binary systems observed at high orbital inclinations, both eclipsing binaries and wider visual binaries. For a 'real-world' example, we look at the alpha Centauri system (i = 79.2 deg). If we assume that the equatorial planes of both components coincide with the system's orbital plane, Monte Carlo simulations suggest that the probability of at least one planet (of either component) being suitably configured for transits is approximately 8%. In conclusion, we present a non-exhaustive list of solar-type stars, both single and within binary systems, which exhibit a high equatorial inclination. These objects may be considered as preliminary candidates for planetary searches via the photometric method.

  19. Photometric recording of transmembrane potential in outer hair cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagawa, Takashi; Oghalai, John S.; Saggau, Peter; Rabbitt, Richard D.; Brownell, William E.

    2006-06-01

    Cochlear outer hair cells (OHCs) are polarized epithelial cells that have mechanoelectrical transduction channels within their apical stereocilia and produce electromotile force along their lateral wall. Phase shifts, or time delays, in the transmembrane voltage occurring at different axial locations along the cell may contribute to our understanding of how these cells operate at auditory frequencies. We developed a method to optically measure the phase of the OHC transmembrane potential using the voltage-sensitive dye (VSD) di-8-ANEPPS. The exit aperture of a fibre-optic light source was driven in two dimensions so that a 24 µm spot of excitation light could be positioned along the length of the OHC. We used the whole-cell patch-clamp technique in the current-clamp mode to stimulate the OHC at the base. The photometric response and the voltage response were monitored with a photodetector and patch-clamp amplifier, respectively. The photometric response was used to measure the regional changes in the membrane potential in response to maintained (dc) and sinusoidal (ac) current stimuli applied at the base of the cell. We used a neutral density filter to lower the excitation light intensity and reduce phototoxicity. A sensitive detector and lock-in amplifier were used to measure the small ac VSD signal. This permitted measurements of the ac photometric response below the noise floor of the static fluorescence. The amplitude and phase components of the photometric response were recorded for stimuli up to 800 Hz. VSD data at 400-800 Hz show the presence of a small phase delay between the stimulus voltage at the base of the cell and the local membrane potential measured along the lateral wall. Results are consistent with the hypothesis that OHCs exhibit inhomogeneous membrane potentials that vary with position in analogy with the voltage in nerve axons.

  20. PhotoRApToR: PHOTOmetric Research APplication TO Redshifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brescia, Massimo; Cavuoti, Stefano

    2014-08-01

    PhotoRApToR (PHOTOmetric Research APplication TO Redshifts) solves regression and classification problems and is specialized for photo-z estimation. PhotoRApToR offers data table manipulation capabilities and 2D and 3D graphics tools for data visualization; it also provides a statistical report for both classification and regression experiments. The code is written in Java; the machine learning model is in C++ to increase the core execution speed.

  1. Some photometric techniques for atmosphereless solar system bodies.

    PubMed

    Lumme, K; Peltoniemi, J; Irvine, W M

    1990-01-01

    We discuss various photometric techniques and their absolute scales in relation to the information that can be derived from the relevant data. We also outline a new scattering model for atmosphereless bodies in the solar system and show how it fits Mariner 10 surface photometry of the planet Mercury. It is shown how important the correct scattering law is while deriving the topography by photoclinometry.

  2. Some Tungsten Oxidation-Reduction Chemistry: A Paint Pot Titration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pickering, Miles; Monts, David L.

    1982-01-01

    Reports an oxidation-reduction experiment using tungsten, somewhat analogous to the classical student experiment involving oxidation-reduction of vanadium. Includes experimental procedures, results, and toxicity/cost of tungsten compounds. (Author/JN)

  3. The wavelength dependence and an interpretation of the photometric parameters of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weaver, W. R.; Meador, W. E.

    1976-01-01

    The photometric function developed by Meador and Weaver has been used with photometric data from the bright desert areas of Mars to determine the wavelength dependence of the three photometric parameters of that function and to provide some predictions about the physical properties of the surface. Knowledge of the parameters permits the brightness of these areas of Mars to be determined for scattering geometry over the wavelength range of 0.45 to 0.70 micrometer. The changes in the photometric parameters with wavelength are shown to be consistent with qualitative theoretical predictions, and the predictions of surface properties are shown to be consistent with conditions that might exist in these regions of Mars. The photometric function is shown to have good potential as a diagnostic tool for the determination of surface properties, and the consistency of the behavior of the photometric parameters is shown to be good support for the validity of the photometric function.

  4. The Photometric Performance and Calibration of WFPC2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holtzman, Jon A.; Burrows, Christopher J.; Casertano, Stefano; Hester, J. Jeff; Trauger, John T.; Watson, Alan M.; Worthey, Guy

    1995-11-01

    We discuss the photometric performance and calibration of the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) on the Hubble Space Telesopce (HST). The stability and accuracy of WFPC2 photometric measurements is discussed, with particular attention given to charge transfer efficiency (CTE) effects, contamination effects in the ultraviolet (UV), and flat field accuracy and normalization. Observational data are presented from both WFPC2 observations and ground observations using a system similar to that flown. WFPC2 photometric systems are defined both for the ground and flight systems. Transformations between these systems and the Landolt UBVRI system are presented. These transformations are sensitive to details in the spectra being transformed, and these sensitivities are quantified and discussed. On-orbit observations are used to revise the prelaunch estimates of response curves to best match synthetic photometry results with observations, and the accuracy of the resulting synthetic photometry is discussed. Synthetic photometry is used to determine zeropoints and transformations for all of the fight filters, and also to derive interstellar extinction values for the WFPC2 system. Using stellar interior and atmosphere models, isochrones in the WFPC2 system are calculated and compared with several observations. (SECTION: Astronomical Instrumentation)

  5. Photometric and polarimetric observations and model simulations of (216) Kleopatra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, S.; Shinokawa, K.; Yoshida, F.; Mukai, T.; Ip, W. H.; Kawabata, K.

    2004-10-01

    We performed photometric and polarimetric observations, on November 8 and 9, 1999, of an M-type main belt asteroid, (216) Kleopatra by using the HBS spectropolarimeter installed at Dodaira observatory, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (NAOJ). Photometric amplitude of lightcurve in the V band was 0.12 mag, and the averaged degree of polarization was -1.01±0.1%. It seems that the polarimetric data might also show a slight change in the degree of polarization ( ~0.2%) at the second minimum of the photometric lightcurve, but we could not confirm that the feature was real because of the large errors of data. With the assumption that the surface is uniform, we have carried out lightcurve simulations based on shape models by Ostro et al. (2000), Tanga et al. (2001) and Roche binary (Cellino et al., 1985). The results of simulations were compared to the configurations of lightcurves which had been obtained at different 4 geometric positions (1980, 1982, 1987 and 1999). The model by Cellino et al. (1985) reproduced almost all the data points without the 1987 observations within ~0.05 mag., which is the best result among the 3 models. The model by Tanga et al. (2001) well reproduced the lightcurves, but failed in reproducing the 1982 amplitude (difference Δdiff ~ 0 2 mag.). We also confirmed that the model by Ostro et al. (2000) could not explain the observed lightcurves.

  6. Can Self-Organizing Maps Accurately Predict Photometric Redshifts?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Way, M. J.; Klose, C. D.

    2012-03-01

    We present an unsupervised machine-learning approach that can be employed for estimating photometric redshifts. The proposed method is based on a vector quantization called the self-organizing-map (SOM) approach. A variety of photometrically derived input values were utilized from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey’s main galaxy sample, luminous red galaxy, and quasar samples, along with the PHAT0 data set from the Photo- z Accuracy Testing project. Regression results obtained with this new approach were evaluated in terms of root-mean-square error (RMSE) to estimate the accuracy of the photometric redshift estimates. The results demonstrate competitive RMSE and outlier percentages when compared with several other popular approaches, such as artificial neural networks and Gaussian process regression. SOM RMSE results (using Δz = zphot - zspec) are 0.023 for the main galaxy sample, 0.027 for the luminous red galaxy sample, 0.418 for quasars, and 0.022 for PHAT0 synthetic data. The results demonstrate that there are nonunique solutions for estimating SOM RMSEs. Further research is needed in order to find more robust estimation techniques using SOMs, but the results herein are a positive indication of their capabilities when compared with other well-known methods.

  7. Photometric period and rotational brightness modulation of V833 Tau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondar', N. I.

    2017-02-01

    Photometric data covering 1994-2009, obtained at the Crimean Astrophysical Observatory or retrieved from the ASAS and SuperWASP catalogs, were used to analyze the brightness variations of the rapidly rotating star V833 Tau, whose activity level is close to saturation. Combined with previously published results, these data represent for the first time all stages in the development of the star's 19- year activity cycle. The photometric period and rotational-modulation amplitude for different epochs are determined, and the qualitative pattern of the spots is considered. The photometric period is close to the orbital period, but always exceeds it, indicating that surface inhomogeneities are located far from the equatorial plane. With the high spottedness of the star, reaching 28% at the cycle maximum, the rotationalmodulation amplitude is 0.05-0.1 m , and increases during the growth and decline phases of the 19-year cycle. The rotational modulation is due to spots with higher latitudes than in the case of the Sun, and concentrating on active longitudes.

  8. Photometric and polarimetric mapping of water turbidity and water depth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halajian, J.; Hallock, H.

    1973-01-01

    A Digital Photometric Mapper (DPM) was used in the Fall of 1971 in an airborne survey of New York and Boston area waters to acquire photometric, spectral and polarimetric data. The object of this study is to analyze these data with quantitative computer processing techniques to assess the potential of the DPM in the measurement and regional mapping of water turbidity and depth. These techniques have been developed and an operational potential has been demonstrated. More emphasis is placed at this time on the methodology of data acquisition, analysis and display than on the quantity of data. The results illustrate the type, quantity and format of information that could be generated operationally with the DPM-type sensor characterized by high photometric stability and fast, accurate digital output. The prototype, single-channel DPM is suggested as a unique research tool for a number of new applications. For the operational mapping of water turbidity and depth, the merits of a multichannel DPM coupled with a laser system are stressed.

  9. Calibration of LSST Instrumental and Atmospheric Photometric Passbands

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, David L.; Axelrod, T.; Barrau, Aurelien; Baumont, Sylvain; Blondin, Stephane; Claver, Chuck; Gorecki, Alexia; Ivezic, Zeljko; Jones, Lynne; Krabbendam, Victor; Liang, Ming; Saha, Abhijit; Smith, Allyn; Smith, R.Chris; Stubbs, Christopher W.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.

    2011-07-06

    The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) will continuously image the entire sky visible from Cerro Pachon in northern Chile every 3-4 nights throughout the year. The LSST will provide data for a broad range of science investigations that require better than 1% photometric precision across the sky (repeatability and uniformity) and a similar accuracy of measured broadband color. The fast and persistent cadence of the LSST survey will significantly improve the temporal sampling rate with which celestial events and motions are tracked. To achieve these goals, and to optimally utilize the observing calendar, it will be necessary to obtain excellent photometric calibration of data taken over a wide range of observing conditions - even those not normally considered 'photometric'. To achieve this it will be necessary to routinely and accurately measure the full optical passband that includes the atmosphere as well as the instrumental telescope and camera system. The LSST mountain facility will include a new monochromatic dome illumination projector system to measure the detailed wavelength dependence of the instrumental passband for each channel in the system. The facility will also include an auxiliary spectroscopic telescope dedicated to measurement of atmospheric transparency at all locations in the sky during LSST observing. In this paper, we describe these systems and present laboratory and observational data that illustrate their performance.

  10. Satellite Type Estination from Ground-based Photometric Observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endo, T.; Ono, H.; Suzuki, J.; Ando, T.; Takanezawa, T.

    2016-09-01

    The optical photometric observation is potentially a powerful tool for understanding of the Geostationary Earth Orbit (GEO) objects. At first, we measured in laboratory the surface reflectance of common satellite materials, for example, Multi-layer Insulation (MLI), mono-crystalline silicon cells, and Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastic (CFRP). Next, we calculated visual magnitude of a satellite by simplified shape and albedo. In this calculation model, solar panels have dimensions of 2 by 8 meters, and the bus area is 2 meters squared with measured optical properties described above. Under these conditions, it clarified the brightness can change the range between 3 and 4 magnitudes in one night, but color index changes only from 1 to 2 magnitudes. Finally, we observed the color photometric data of several GEO satellites visible from Japan multiple times in August and September 2014. We obtained that light curves of GEO satellites recorded in the B and V bands (using Johnson filters) by a ground-base optical telescope. As a result, color index changed approximately from 0.5 to 1 magnitude in one night, and the order of magnitude was not changed in all cases. In this paper, we briefly discuss about satellite type estimation using the relation between brightness and color index obtained from the photometric observation.

  11. Photometric monitoring of the young star Par 1724 in Orion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuhäuser, R.; Koeltzsch, A.; Raetz, St.; Schmidt, T. O. B.; Mugrauer, M.; Young, N.; Bertoldi, F.; Roell, T.; Eisenbeiss, T.; Hohle, M. M.; Vaňko, M.; Ginski, C.; Rammo, W.; Moualla, M.; Broeg, C.

    2009-05-01

    We report new photometric observations of the ˜ 200 000 year old naked weak-line run-away T Tauri star Par 1724, located north of the Trapezium cluster in Orion. We observed in the broad band filters B, V, R, and I using the 90 cm Dutch telescope on La Silla, the 80 cm Wendelstein telescope, and a 25 cm telescope of the University Observatory Jena in Großschwabhausen near Jena. The photometric data in V and R are consistent with a ˜ 5.7 day rotation period due to spots, as observed before between 1960ies and 2000. Also, for the first time, we present evidence for a long-term 9 or 17.5 year cycle in photometric data (V band) of such a young star, a cycle similar to that to of the Sun and other active stars. Based on observations obtained with telescopes of the University Observatory Jena, which is operated by the Astrophysical Institute of the Friedrich-Schiller-University; a telescope of the University Observatory Munich on Mount Wendelstein, the 0.9m ESO-Dutch telescope on La Silla, Chile, and with the All Sky Automated Survey (ASAS) project (www.astrouw.edu.pl/asas).

  12. Detector driver systems and photometric estimates for RIMAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toy, Vicki L.; Kutyrev, Alexander S.; Lyness, Eric I.; Muench, Marius; Robinson, Frederick D.; Lotkin, Gennadiy N.; Capone, John I.; Veilleux, Sylvain; Moseley, Samuel H.; Gehrels, Neil A.; Vogel, Stuart N.

    2014-07-01

    The Rapid infrared IMAger-Spectrometer (RIMAS) is a rapid gamma-ray burst afterglow instrument that will provide photometric and spectroscopic coverage of the Y, J, H, and K bands. RIMAS separates light into two optical arms, YJ and HK, which allows for simultaneous coverage in two photometric bands. RIMAS utilizes two 2048 x 2048 pixel Teledyne HgCdTe (HAWAII-2RG) detectors along with a Spitzer Legacy Indium- Antimonide (InSb) guiding detector in spectroscopic mode to position and keep the source on the slit. We describe the software and hardware development for the detector driver and acquisition systems. The HAWAII- 2RG detectors simultaneously acquire images using Astronomical Research Cameras, Inc. driver, timing, and processing boards with two C++ wrappers running assembly code. The InSb detector clocking and acquisition system runs on a National Instruments cRIO-9074 with a Labview user interface and clocks written in an easily alterable ASCII file. We report the read noise, linearity, and dynamic range of our guide detector. Finally, we present RIMAS's estimated instrument efficiency in photometric imaging mode (for all three detectors) and expected limiting magnitudes. Our efficiency calculations include atmospheric transmission models, filter models, telescope components, and optics components for each optical arm.

  13. Titration of Alanine Monitored by NMR Spectroscopy: A Biochemistry Laboratory Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waller, Francis J.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    The experiment described here involves simultaneous monitoring of pH and NMR chemical shifts during an aqueous titration of alpha- and beta-alanine. This experiment is designed for use in an undergraduate biochemistry course. (MR)

  14. Simple home-made sensors for potentiometric titrations. [Nitroform CH(NO/sub 2/)/sub 3/

    SciTech Connect

    Selig, W.

    1982-04-01

    A sensor for potentiometric titrations was prepared by coating a spectroscopic graphite rod with a solution of poly(vinyl chloride) and dioctyphthalate in tetrahydrofuran. The reference electrode was an Ag/AgCl single-junction electrode. The sensor was used in precipitation, acid-base, compleximetric, and redox titrations. Preparation of the coated-graphite sensor is simple and rapid. Moreover, it is quite inexpensive. A limitation is its applicability in aqueous media only, because organic solvents will dissolve the membrane. Various uncoated types of graphite have also been investigated as sensors, particularly in two applications of interest in the analysis of propellants: the titration of nitroform and perchlorate. Obviously, these sensors can be used also in nonaqueous, or partially nonaqueous media. These sensors may also find use in the potentiometric titration of fluoride vs La(III) or Th(IV).

  15. A Computer-Based Simulation of an Acid-Base Titration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boblick, John M.

    1971-01-01

    Reviews the advantages of computer simulated environments for experiments, referring in particular to acid-base titrations. Includes pre-lab instructions and a sample computer printout of a student's use of an acid-base simulation. Ten references. (PR)

  16. Determination of two metals from a single potentiometric titration curve The application of two indicator electrodes.

    PubMed

    Parczewski, A

    1988-06-01

    The advantages of applying two indicator electrodes in complexometric potentiometric multicomponent titration are shown by means of simulated titration curves. Two measurement arrangements have been considered, one in which the indicator electrodes are directly connected to a voltmeter and the other in which the electrodes are connected to the voltmeter through a summing operational amplifier. They have been compared with the conventional arrangement of a single indicator electrode and a reference electrode. The influence of the stability constants of the complexes in solution and of the electrode parameters on the shape of titration curves has been examined. It is shown that the use of two indicator electrodes may significantly increase the applicability of multicomponent potentiometric titrations.

  17. New approach in the treatment of data from an acid-base potentiometric titrationI. Monocomponent systems of monofunctional acids and bases.

    PubMed

    Maslarska, Vania; Tencheva, Jasmina; Budevsky, Omortag

    2003-01-01

    Based on precise analysis of the acid-base equilibrium, a new approach in the treatment of experimental data from a potentiometric titration is proposed. A new general formula giving explicitly the relation V=f([H(+)]) is derived, valid for every acid-base titration, which includes mono- and polyfunctional protolytes and their mixtures. The present study is the first practical application of this formula for the simplest case, the analysis of one monofunctional protolyte. The collected mV data during the titration are converted into pH-values by means of an auto pH-calibration procedure, thus avoiding preliminary preparation of the measuring system. The mentioned pH-calibration method is applicable also in water-organic mixtures and allows the quantitative determination of sparingly soluble substances (particularly pharmaceuticals). The treatment of the data is performed by means of ready-to-use software products, which makes the proposed approach accessible for a wide range of applications.

  18. An automatic falling drop system based on multicommutation process for photometric chlorine determination in bleach.

    PubMed

    da Silva Borges, Sivanildo; Reis, Boaventura F

    2007-09-26

    In this work an automatic photometric procedure for the determination of chlorine in bleach samples employing N,N'-diethyl-p-phenylenediamine (DPD) as chromogenic reagent is described. The procedure was based on a falling drop system where the analyte (Cl(2)) was collected by a DPD solution drop (50 microL) after its delivery from the sample bulk that was previously acidified. The flow system was designed based on the multicommutation process assembling a set of three-way solenoid valves, which under microcomputer control afforded facilities to handle sample and reagent solution in order to control analyte delivering and solution drop generation. The analyte volatilization was improved by coupling online a little heating device. The detection system comprised a green LED (515 nm) and a phototransistor. Aiming to prove the usefulness of the proposed procedure a set of bleach samples was analyzed. Comparing the results with those obtained with reference method no significant difference at 95% confidence level was observed. Other profitable features such as a linear response ranging from 15 up to 100 mgL(-1) Cl(2) (R=0.999); a detection limit of 4.5 mgL(-1) Cl(2) estimated based on the 3 sigma criterion; a relative standard deviation of 2.5% (n=10) using a typical bleach sample containing 25.0 mgL(-1) Cl(2); a consumption of 55 microg of DPD per determination; and a analytical frequency of 20 determinations per hour were also achieved.

  19. CALIBRATION OF THE MEARTH PHOTOMETRIC SYSTEM: OPTICAL MAGNITUDES AND PHOTOMETRIC METALLICITY ESTIMATES FOR 1802 NEARBY M-DWARFS

    SciTech Connect

    Dittmann, Jason A.; Irwin, Jonathan M.; Charbonneau, David; Newton, Elisabeth R.

    2016-02-20

    The MEarth Project is a photometric survey systematically searching the smallest stars near the Sun for transiting rocky planets. Since 2008, MEarth has taken approximately two million images of 1844 stars suspected to be mid-to-late M dwarfs. We have augmented this survey by taking nightly exposures of photometric standard stars and have utilized this data to photometrically calibrate the MEarth system, identify photometric nights, and obtain an optical magnitude with 1.5% precision for each M dwarf system. Each optical magnitude is an average over many years of data, and therefore should be largely immune to stellar variability and flaring. We combine this with trigonometric distance measurements, spectroscopic metallicity measurements, and 2MASS infrared magnitude measurements in order to derive a color–magnitude–metallicity relation across the mid-to-late M dwarf spectral sequence that can reproduce spectroscopic metallicity determinations to a precision of 0.1 dex. We release optical magnitudes and metallicity estimates for 1567 M dwarfs, many of which did not have an accurate determination of either prior to this work. For an additional 277 stars without a trigonometric parallax, we provide an estimate of the distance, assuming solar neighborhood metallicity. We find that the median metallicity for a volume-limited sample of stars within 20 pc of the Sun is [Fe/H] = −0.03 ± 0.008, and that 29/565 of these stars have a metallicity of [Fe/H] = −0.5 or lower, similar to the low-metallicity distribution of nearby G dwarfs. When combined with the results of ongoing and future planet surveys targeting these objects, the metallicity estimates presented here will be important for assessing the significance of any putative planet–metallicity correlation.

  20. A model for oxygen conservation associated with titration during pediatric oxygen therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Grace; Wollen, Alec; Himley, Stephen; Austin, Glenn; Delarosa, Jaclyn; Izadnegahdar, Rasa; Ginsburg, Amy Sarah; Zehrung, Darin

    2017-01-01

    Background Continuous oxygen treatment is essential for managing children with hypoxemia, but access to oxygen in low-resource countries remains problematic. Given the high burden of pneumonia in these countries and the fact that flow can be gradually reduced as therapy progresses, oxygen conservation through routine titration warrants exploration. Aim To determine the amount of oxygen saved via titration during oxygen therapy for children with hypoxemic pneumonia. Methods Based on published clinical data, we developed a model of oxygen flow rates needed to manage hypoxemia, assuming recommended flow rate at start of therapy, and comparing total oxygen used with routine titration every 3 minutes or once every 24 hours versus no titration. Results Titration every 3 minutes or every 24 hours provided oxygen savings estimated at 11.7% ± 5.1% and 8.1% ± 5.1% (average ± standard error of the mean, n = 3), respectively. For every 100 patients, 44 or 30 kiloliters would be saved—equivalent to 733 or 500 hours at 1 liter per minute. Conclusions Ongoing titration can conserve oxygen, even performed once-daily. While clinical validation is necessary, these findings could provide incentive for the routine use of pulse oximeters for patient management, as well as further development of automated systems. PMID:28234903

  1. Process monitored spectrophotometric titration coupled with chemometrics for simultaneous determination of mixtures of weak acids.

    PubMed

    Liao, Lifu; Yang, Jing; Yuan, Jintao

    2007-05-15

    A new spectrophotometric titration method coupled with chemometrics for the simultaneous determination of mixtures of weak acids has been developed. In this method, the titrant is a mixture of sodium hydroxide and an acid-base indicator, and the indicator is used to monitor the titration process. In a process of titration, both the added volume of titrant and the solution acidity at each titration point can be obtained simultaneously from an absorption spectrum by least square algorithm, and then the concentration of each component in the mixture can be obtained from the titration curves by principal component regression. The method only needs the information of absorbance spectra to obtain the analytical results, and is free of volumetric measurements. The analyses are independent of titration end point and do not need the accurate values of dissociation constants of the indicator and the acids. The method has been applied to the simultaneous determination of the mixtures of benzoic acid and salicylic acid, and the mixtures of phenol, o-chlorophenol and p-chlorophenol with satisfactory results.

  2. Titration of fatty acids solubilized in cationic and anionic micelles. Calorimetry and thermodynamic modeling.

    PubMed

    Söderman, Olle; Jönsson, Bengt; Olofsson, Gerd

    2006-02-23

    The electrostatic properties of charged surfactant micelles are investigated through titrations of fatty acid probes solubilized in the micelles. The titration process is followed by means of calorimetric measurements and by determining the pH values as a function of added base. This approach yields a complete thermodynamic description of the titration process. In particular, we find that the process is endothermic at 298 K. This is contrary to the titration of carboxylic acids in water, where DeltaH is approximately 0. To identify the main effect underlying the difference in DeltaH between titration in a micelle and water, a thermodynamic model has been developed which focuses on the transfer properties of charged and uncharged species from bulk water to the surface of a micelle and which incorporates a dielectric discontinuity at the micellar surface. The model relies on the use of the Poisson-Boltzmann equation which is solved using a finite element method. Experimental results and the model calculations imply that the dielectric discontinuity at (or near) the micellar surface plays a major role and hence must be included when analyzing the titration behavior of an acid functionality at the surface of a charged micelle.

  3. Titration of strong and weak acids by sequential injection analysis technique.

    PubMed

    Maskula, S; Nyman, J; Ivaska, A

    2000-05-31

    A sequential injection analysis (SIA) titration method has been developed for acid-base titrations. Strong and weak acids in different concentration ranges have been titrated with a strong base. The method is based on sequential aspiration of an acidic sample zone and only one zone of the base into a carrier stream of distilled water. On their way to the detector, the sample and the reagent zones are partially mixed due to the dispersion and thereby the base is partially neutralised by the acid. The base zone contains the indicator. An LED-spectrophotometer is used as detector. It senses the colour of the unneutralised base and the signal is recorded as a typical SIA peak. The peak area of the unreacted base was found to be proportional to the logarithm of the acid concentration. Calibration curves with good linearity were obtained for a strong acid in the concentration ranges of 10(-4)-10(-2) and 0.1-3 M. Automatic sample dilution was implemented when sulphuric acid at concentration of 6-13 M was titrated. For a weak acid, i.e. acetic acid, a linear calibration curve was obtained in the range of 3x10(-4)-8x10(-2) M. By changing the volumes of the injected sample and the reagent, different acids as well as different concentration ranges of the acids can be titrated without any other adjustments in the SIA manifold or the titration protocol.

  4. Sulfur in graphite by combustion-iodometric titration method

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    The method covers the determination of sulfur in graphite in the concentration range of 1 to 200 ..mu..g/g in a l-g sample or 5 to 1000 ..mu..g/g in a 0.2-g sample. The method includes a discussion of interferences, apparatus, reagents and materials, procedure, calculations, and precision. (JMT)

  5. Entire-Dataset Analysis of NMR Fast-Exchange Titration Spectra: A Mg(2+) Titration Analysis for HIV-1 Ribonuclease H Domain.

    PubMed

    Karki, Ichhuk; Christen, Martin T; Spiriti, Justin; Slack, Ryan L; Oda, Masayuki; Kanaori, Kenji; Zuckerman, Daniel M; Ishima, Rieko

    2016-12-15

    This article communicates our study to elucidate the molecular determinants of weak Mg(2+) interaction with the ribonuclease H (RNH) domain of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase in solution. As the interaction is weak (a ligand-dissociation constant >1 mM), nonspecific Mg(2+) interaction with the protein or interaction of the protein with other solutes that are present in the buffer solution can confound the observed Mg(2+)-titration data. To investigate these indirect effects, we monitored changes in the chemical shifts of backbone amides of RNH by recording NMR (1)H-(15)N heteronuclear single-quantum coherence spectra upon titration of Mg(2+) into an RNH solution. We performed the titration under three different conditions: (1) in the absence of NaCl, (2) in the presence of 50 mM NaCl, and (3) at a constant 160 mM Cl(-) concentration. Careful analysis of these three sets of titration data, along with molecular dynamics simulation data of RNH with Na(+) and Cl(-) ions, demonstrates two characteristic phenomena distinct from the specific Mg(2+) interaction with the active site: (1) weak interaction of Mg(2+), as a salt, with the substrate-handle region of the protein and (2) overall apparent lower Mg(2+) affinity in the absence of NaCl compared to that in the presence of 50 mM NaCl. A possible explanation may be that the titrated MgCl2 is consumed as a salt and interacts with RNH in the absence of NaCl. In addition, our data suggest that Na(+) increases the kinetic rate of the specific Mg(2+) interaction at the active site of RNH. Taken together, our study provides biophysical insight into the mechanism of weak metal interaction on a protein.

  6. Photometric Properties of Ceres and Comparisons with Previous HST Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.-Y.; Nathues, A.; Le Corre, L.; Reddy, V.; Sykes, M. V.; Hoffmann, M.; Mottola, S.; Schröder, S. E.; Longobardo, A.; Ciarniello, M.; McFadden, L. A.; Raymond, C. A.; Russell, C. T.

    2015-10-01

    NASA's Dawn spacecraft entered the first science orbit around its second target, dwarf planet Ceres, in April 2015. The photometric properties of Ceres not only reveal clues about the physical state of the regolith, surface composition, and geological history, but also are important for correcting the data collected under various observing and illumination geometries to a common geometry to facilitate the interpretations of all photometric and spectral data. The Dawn data collected during its approach to Ceres cover phase angles from a few degrees to ~155º, and almost cover the full range of incidence angles and emission angles from 0º to 90º, making an excellent dataset for studying the spectrophotometric properties of Ceres. We report the analysis of the photometric properties of Ceres in the visible wavelengths using the Framing Camera (FC) [1] data through all seven color filters and one clear filter, acquired during the approach and the Survey orbit of the mission. Although previous studies [2-4] suggested a remarkably uniform surface of Ceres, the images collected by Dawn during its approach to the target at a scale of a few km/pixel revealed some small but extremely bright spots and regions, with albedos up to >4 times the average albedo of Ceres, representing the highest contrast so far observed in all asteroids imaged from close distances by spacecraft missions. These bright spots should be geologically young, and might be related to the episodic water sublimation activity of Ceres [5-7]. We performed detailed comparisons of the albedos of these bright spots between previous Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations and the Dawn observations that span about 10 years to search for any possible changes. By the time of preparing this abstract, the Dawn FChas collected images at pixel scale down to 2.1 km/pixel. By June 2015, the data with a scale of 0.4 km/pixel will have been collected during the Survey Orbit phase.

  7. Improving Photometric Redshifts for Hyper Suprime-Cam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speagle, Josh S.; Leauthaud, Alexie; Eisenstein, Daniel; Bundy, Kevin; Capak, Peter L.; Leistedt, Boris; Masters, Daniel C.; Mortlock, Daniel; Peiris, Hiranya; HSC Photo-z Team; HSC Weak Lensing Team

    2017-01-01

    Deriving accurate photometric redshift (photo-z) probability distribution functions (PDFs) are crucial science components for current and upcoming large-scale surveys. We outline how rigorous Bayesian inference and machine learning can be combined to quickly derive joint photo-z PDFs to individual galaxies and their parent populations. Using the first 170 deg^2 of data from the ongoing Hyper Suprime-Cam survey, we demonstrate our method is able to generate accurate predictions and reliable credible intervals over ~370k high-quality redshifts. We then use galaxy-galaxy lensing to empirically validate our predicted photo-z's over ~14M objects, finding a robust signal.

  8. PHOTOMETRICALLY TRIGGERED KECK SPECTROSCOPY OF FERMI BL LACERTAE OBJECTS

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, Michael S.; Romani, Roger W.

    2013-11-01

    We report on Keck spectra of 10 Fermi blazars. J0622+3326, previously unobserved, is shown to be a flat-spectrum radio quasar at redshift z = 1.062. The others are known BL Lac type objects that have resisted previous attempts to secure redshifts. Using a photometric monitoring campaign with the 0.76 m Katzman Automatic Imaging Telescope at Lick Observatory, we identified epochs when the relativistic jet emission was fainter than usual, thus triggering the Keck spectroscopy. This strategy gives improved sensitivity to stars and ionized gas in the host galaxy, thereby providing improved redshift constraints for seven of these sources.

  9. Femtosecond broadband fluorescence upconversion spectroscopy: Improved setup and photometric correction

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, X.-X.; Wuerth, C.; Resch-Genger, U.; Zhao, L.; Ernsting, N. P.; Sajadi, M.

    2011-06-15

    A setup for fluorescence upconversion spectroscopy (FLUPS) is described which has 80 fs temporal response (fwhm) for emission in the spectral range 425-750 nm. Broadband phase matching is achieved with tilted gate pulses at 1340 nm. Background from harmonics of the gate pulse is removed and sensitivity increased compared to previous designs. Photometric calibration of the upconversion process is performed with a set of fluorescent dyes. For Coumarin 153 in methanol the peak position, bandwidth, and asymmetry depending on delay time are reported.

  10. KINEMATIC AND PHOTOMETRIC EVIDENCE FOR A BAR IN NGC 2683

    SciTech Connect

    Kuzio de Naray, Rachel; Zagursky, Matthew J.; McGaugh, Stacy S. E-mail: mzagursk@umd.edu

    2009-10-15

    We present optical long-slit and SparsePak Integral Field Unit emission line spectroscopy along with optical broadband and near-IR images of the edge-on spiral galaxy NGC 2683. We find a multi-valued, figure-of-eight velocity structure in the inner 45'' of the long-slit spectrum and twisted isovelocity contours in the velocity field. We also find, regardless of wavelength, that the galaxy isophotes are boxy. We argue that taken together, these kinematic and photometric features are evidence for the presence of a bar in NGC 2683. We use our data to constrain the orientation and strength of the bar.

  11. Using Gamma Regression for Photometric Redshifts of Survey Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, J.; de Souza, R. S.; Krone-Martins, A.; Cameron, E.; Ishida, E. E. O.; Hilbe, J.

    Machine learning techniques offer a plethora of opportunities in tackling big data within the astronomical community. We present the set of Generalized Linear Models as a fast alternative for determining photometric redshifts of galaxies, a set of tools not commonly applied within astronomy, despite being widely used in other professions. With this technique, we achieve catastrophic outlier rates of the order of ˜ 1%, that can be achieved in a matter of seconds on large datasets of size ˜ 1,000,000. To make these techniques easily accessible to the astronomical community, we developed a set of libraries and tools that are publicly available.

  12. A Calibration Method for Wide-Field Multicolor Photometric Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xu; Chen, Jiansheng; Xu, Wen; Zhang, Mei; Jiang, Zhaoji; Zheng, Zhongyuan; Zhu, Jin

    1999-07-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a method to self-calibrate the spectral energy distribution (SED) of objects in a survey based on the fitting of a SED library to observed multicolor photometry. We adopt, for illustrative purposes, the Vilnius and Gunn & Stryker SED libraries. The self-calibration technique can improve the quality of observations which are not taken under perfectly photometric conditions. The more passbands used for the photometry, the better the results. This technique has been applied to the BATC 15 passband CCD survey.

  13. A photometric function for diffuse reflection by particulate materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, W. E.; Weaver, W. R.

    1975-01-01

    A photometric function is proposed to describe the diffuse reflection of radiation by particulate materials. Both multiple scattering and the dominant effects of particle shadowing are included and the function is verified by comparisons with the photometries of laboratory surfaces. Brightness measurements of planetary and other diffusely scattering surfaces can be used to calculate the brightness for geometries other than those used in the measurements and for which the Minnaert function does not apply. The measurements also can be directly related to such surface characteristics as particle size, single-particle albedo, and compactness.

  14. Infrared Imaging, Spectroscopic, and Photometric Studies of Comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrz, Robert D.

    1997-01-01

    We have continued our program of infrared (IR) photometric, imaging, spectroscopic, and polarimetric temporal observations of comets to study the properties of comet dust and comet nuclei. During the first two years we digitized our IR data base on P/Halley and other recent comets to facilitate further analysis and comparison with other data bases, and found compelling evidence for the emission of a burst of small grains from P/Halley's nucleus at perihelion. We reported imaging and photometric observations of Comets Austin 1990 V and Swift-Tuttle 1992. The Swift-Tuttle 1992t observations included IR photometry, several 7-14 micron long-slit spectra of the coma and a time-sequence of more than 150 10 micron broadband images of the coma. An analysis of near-IR images of the inner coma of P/Halley obtained on three consecutive nights in 1986 March showed sunwardjets. We completed our analysis of IR imaging spectrosco-photometric data on comets. We also obtained observations of Comets Hyakutake 1996 B2 and Hale/Bopp 1995 01. We obtained infrared imaging, photometric, spectroscopic and polarimetric temporal observations of bright comets using a network of five telescopes, with emphasis on simultaneous observations of comets at many wavelengths with different instruments. Our program offers several unique advantages: 1) rapid observational response to new comets with dedicated infrared telescopes; 2) observations within a few degrees of the sun when comets are near perihelion and 3) access to advanced infrared array imagers and spectrometers. In particular, reduction, analysis, publication and archiving of our Jupiter/sl-9 and Comet Hyakutake infrared data received special emphasis. Instrumentation development included installation of the latest version of the innovative FORTH telescope control and a data acquisition system that enables us to control three telescopes remotely by telephone from anywhere in the world for comet observations in broad daylight. We have

  15. Photometric Surveys of the Galactic Bulge and Long Bar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerhard, O.; Wegg, C.; Portail, M.

    The Galactic bar and box/peanut bulge can be studied in an unrivaled manner, star-by-star, with detailed chemical information and full 3D kinematics. Because of intervening dust this is greatly facilitated by the availability of wide field deep NIR photometric surveys. Here we summarize recent results on the three-dimensional structure of the bulge and the long bar region, based on 2MASS, UKIDSS, and particularly the ongoing VVV survey. We also summarize results from dynamical models for the Galactic bulge constructed with the Made-to-Measure method.

  16. Probing dark energy with lensing magnification in photometric surveys.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Michael D

    2014-02-14

    I present an estimator for the angular cross correlation of two tracers of the cosmological large-scale structure that utilizes redshift information to isolate separate physical contributions. The estimator is derived by solving the Limber equation for a reweighting of the foreground tracer that nulls either clustering or lensing contributions to the cross correlation function. Applied to future photometric surveys, the estimator can enhance the measurement of gravitational lensing magnification effects to provide a competitive independent constraint on the dark energy equation of state.

  17. Real time swallowing measurement system by using photometric stereo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujino, Masahiro; Kato, Kunihito; Mura, Emi; Nagai, Hajime

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, we propose a measurement system to evaluate the swallowing by estimating the movement of the thyroid cartilage. We developed a measurement system based on the vision sensor in order to achieve the noncontact and non-invasive sensor. The movement of the subject's thyroid cartilage is tracked by the three dimensional information of the surface of the skin measured by the photometric stereo. We constructed a camera system that uses near-IR light sources and three camera sensors. We conformed the effectiveness of the proposed system by experiments.

  18. Photometric correction of VIR high space resolution data of Ceres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longobardo, Andrea; Palomba, Ernesto; De Sanctis, Maria Cristina; Ciarniello, Mauro; Tosi, Federico; Giacomo Carrozzo, Filippo; Capria, Maria Teresa; Zambon, Francesca; Raponi, Andrea; Ammannito, Eleonora; Zinzi, Angelo; Raymond, Carol; Russell, Christopher T.; VIR-Dawn Team

    2016-10-01

    NASA's Dawn spacecraft [1] has been orbiting Ceres since early 2015. The mission is divided into five stages, characterized by different spacecraft altitudes corresponding to different space resolutions, i.e. Approach (CSA), Rotational Characterization (CSR), Survey (CSS), High Altitude Mapping Orbit (HAMO), and Low Altitude Mapping Orbit (LAMO).Ceres is a dark body (i.e. average albedo at 1.2 um is 0.08 [2]), hence photometric correction is much more important than for brighter asteroids (e.g. S-type and achondritric). Indeed, the negligible role of multiple scattering increases the reflectance dependence on phase angle.A photometric correction of VIR data at low spatial resolution (i.e. CSA, CSR, CSS) has already been applied with different methodologies (e.g. [2], [3]), These techniques highlight a reflectance and band depths dependency on the phase angle which is homogeneous on the entire surface in agreement with C-type taxonomy.However, with increasing spatial resolution (i.e. HAMO and LAMO data), the retrieval of a unique set of parameters for the photometric correction is no longer sufficient to obtain reliable albedo/band depth maps. In this work, a new photometric correction is obtained and applied to all the high resolution VIR data of Ceres, taking into account the reflectance variations observed at small scales. The developed algorithm will be implemented on the MATISSE tool [4] in order to be visualized on the Ceres shape model.Finally, an interpretation of the obtained phase functions is given in terms of optical and physical properties of the Ceres regolith.AcknowledgementsVIR was funded and coordinated by the Italian Space Agency, and built by SELEX ES, with the scientific leadership of IAPS-INAF, Rome, Italy, and is operated by IAPS-INAF, Rome, Italy. Support of the Dawn Science, Instrument, and Operation Teams is gratefully acknowledged.References[1] Russell, C. T. et al., 2012, Science 336, 686[2] Longobardo A., et al., 2016, LPSC, 2239

  19. Documentation for the machine-readable version of photometric data for nearby stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warren, W. H., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    A computer list of all photometric systems (of those considered), in which each star was measured is provided. The file is a subset of a much larger and more comprehensive compilation, which lists all measured photoelectric photometric systems for any star that has been measured in at least one photoelectric system. In addition to the photometric system identifications, cross identifications to the Henry Draper and Durchmusterung catalogs and apparent visual magnitudes are included.

  20. A stable and convenient protein electrophoresis titration device with bubble removing system.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiang; Fan, Liu-Yin; Li, Wen-Lin; Cong, Feng-Song; Zhong, Ran; Chen, Jing-Jing; He, Yu-Chen; Xiao, Hua; Cao, Cheng-Xi

    2017-03-17

    Moving reaction boundary titration (MRBT) has a potential application to immunoassay and protein content analysis with high selectivity. However, air bubbles often impair the accuracy of MRBT, and the leakage of electrolyte greatly decreases the safety and convenience of electrophoretic titration. Addressing these two issues a reliable MRBT device with modified electrolyte chamber of protein titration was designed. Multiphysics computer simulation was conducted for optimization according to two-phase flow. The single chamber was made of two perpendicular cylinders with different diameters. After placing electrophoretic tube, the resident air in the junction next to the gel could be eliminated by a simple fast electrolyte flow. Removing the electrophoretic tube automatically prevented electrolyte leakage at the junction due to the gravity-induced negative pressure within the chamber. Moreover, the numerical simulation and experiments showed that the improved MRBT device has following advantages: (i) easy and rapid setup of electrophoretic tube within 20 s; (ii) simple and quick bubble dissipates from the chamber of titration within 2 s; (iii) no electrolyte leakage from the two chambers: and (iv) accurate protein titration and safe instrumental operation. The developed technique and apparatus greatly improves the performance of the previous MRBT device, and providing a new route toward practical application.

  1. A Photometric Survey of Peculiar A-type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurtanidze, O. M.; Ogadze, G.

    The rapidly-oscillating Ap stars represent the only main-sequence stars, despite the Sun, which pulsate in high-overtone low degree p-moges with their axis aligned with oblique ones. We have undertook a long-term programme of high-speed photometric observations about two hundred Normal and Peculiar A-type stars with 125cm RC telescope equipped by Two-Star Photometer. It enable us to chop as frequently as need between objects, sky and dark due to effects of sky transparency and background variations are remouved and scintillation noise spectra are obtained. An attempt was made to include representative number of each spectral subtypes. The selected objects lie in the range of 8-10 magnitudes in the Jonhson wide-band B filter. At first stage it is planned to carry out a pilot survey with duration of 6-8 hours divided between two observing sessions. The objects with noticable oscillations will be studied photometrically as well as spectroscopically in detail. During the pleliminary observations one rapidly-oscillating Ap star HD231427 was revealed which should be considered as tentative.

  2. A PHOTOMETRIC METALLICITY ESTIMATE OF THE VIRGO STELLAR OVERDENSITY

    SciTech Connect

    An, Deokkeun; Johnson, Jennifer A.; Pinsonneault, Marc H.; Terndrup, Donald M.; Masseron, Thomas; Beers, Timothy C.; Lee, Young Sun; Delahaye, Franck

    2009-12-10

    We determine photometric metal abundance estimates for individual main-sequence stars in the Virgo Overdensity (VOD), which covers almost 1000 deg{sup 2} on the sky, based on a calibration of the metallicity sensitivity of stellar isochrones in the gri filter passbands using field stars with well-determined spectroscopic metal abundances. Despite the low precision of the method for individual stars, we derive [Fe/H] = -2.0 +- 0.1(internal) +- 0.5(systematic) for the metal abundance of the VOD from photometric measurements of 0.7 million stars in the northern Galactic hemisphere with heliocentric distances from approx10 kpc to approx20 kpc. The metallicity of the VOD is indistinguishable, within DELTA[Fe/H] <= 0.2, from that of field halo stars covering the same distance range. This initial application suggests that the Sloan Digital Sky Survey gri passbands can be used to probe the properties of main-sequence stars beyond approx10 kpc, complementing studies of nearby stars from more metallicity-sensitive color indices that involve the u passband.

  3. A PHOTOMETRICALLY AND MORPHOLOGICALLY VARIABLE INFRARED NEBULA IN L483

    SciTech Connect

    Connelley, Michael S.; Hodapp, Klaus W.; Fuller, Gary A.

    2009-03-15

    We present narrow and broad K-band observations of the Class 0/I source IRAS 18148-0440 that span 17 years. The infrared nebula associated with this protostar in the L483 dark cloud is both morphologically and photometrically variable on a timescale of only a few months. This nebula appears to be an infrared analog to other well known optically visible variable nebulae associated with young stars, such as Hubble's Variable Nebula. Along with Cepheus A, this is one of the first large variable nebulae to be found that is only visible in the infrared. The variability of this nebula is most likely due to changing illumination of the cloud rather than any motion of the structure in the nebula. Both morphological and photometric changes are observed on a timescale only a few times longer than the light crossing time of the nebula, suggesting very rapid intrinsic changes in the illumination of the nebula. Our narrowband observations also found that H{sub 2} knots are found nearly twice as far to the east of the source as to its west, and that H{sub 2} emission extends farther east of the source than the previously known CO outflow.

  4. Photometric analysis of the overcontact binary CW Cas

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J. J.; Qian, S. B.; He, J. J.; Li, L. J.; Zhao, E. G.

    2014-11-01

    New CCD photometric observations of overcontact binary CW Cas were carried out in 2004 and 2011. In particular, the light curve obtained in 2004 shows a remarkable O'Connell effect. Compared with light curves in different observing seasons, variations were found. These variations can be explained by dark spot activities on the surface of at least one component. Using the Wilson-Devinney code with a spot model, we find that the photometric solutions confirm CW Cas is a shallow W-subtype overcontact binary with a spotted massive component. Our new determined times of minimum light together with the others published in the literature were analyzed to find a change of orbital period. From the O – C curves, the period of the system shows a cyclic period change (P {sub 3} = 69.9 yr, A {sub 3} = 0.03196 days) superposed on the linear increase. The cyclic variation, if explained as the light-travel time effect, reveals the presence of a tertiary companion.

  5. DETECTION OF KOI-13.01 USING THE PHOTOMETRIC ORBIT

    SciTech Connect

    Shporer, Avi; Jenkins, Jon M.; Seader, Shawn E.; Smith, Jeffrey C.; Thompson, Susan E.; Twicken, Joseph D.; Still, Martin D.

    2011-12-15

    We use the KOI-13 transiting star-planet system as a test case for the recently developed BEER algorithm, aimed at identifying non-transiting low-mass companions by detecting the photometric variability induced by the companion along its orbit. Such photometric variability is generated by three mechanisms: the beaming effect, tidal ellipsoidal distortion, and reflection/heating. We use data from three Kepler quarters, from the first year of the mission, while ignoring measurements within the transit and occultation, and show that the planet's ephemeris is clearly detected. We fit for the amplitude of each of the three effects and use the beaming effect amplitude to estimate the planet's minimum mass, which results in M{sub p} sin i = 9.2 {+-} 1.1 M{sub J} (assuming the host star parameters derived by Szabo et al.). Our results show that non-transiting star-planet systems similar to KOI-13.01 can be detected in Kepler data, including a measurement of the orbital ephemeris and the planet's minimum mass. Moreover, we derive a realistic estimate of the amplitudes uncertainties, and use it to show that data obtained during the entire lifetime of the Kepler mission of 3.5 years will allow detecting non-transiting close-in low-mass companions orbiting bright stars, down to the few Jupiter mass level. Data from the Kepler Extended Mission, if funded by NASA, will further improve the detection capabilities.

  6. The photometric properties of galaxies in the early Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkins, Stephen M.; Feng, Yu; Di-Matteo, Tiziana; Croft, Rupert; Stanway, Elizabeth R.; Bunker, Andrew; Waters, Dacen; Lovell, Christopher

    2016-08-01

    We use the large cosmological hydro-dynamic simulation BLUETIDES to predict the photometric properties of galaxies during the epoch of reionization (z = 8-15). These properties include the rest-frame UV to near-IR broad-band spectral energy distributions, the Lyman continuum (LyC) photon production, the UV star formation rate calibration, and intrinsic UV continuum slope. In particular we focus on exploring the effect of various modelling assumptions, including the assumed choice of stellar population synthesis (SPS) model, initial mass function, and the escape fraction of LyC photons, upon these quantities. We find that these modelling assumptions can have a dramatic effect on photometric properties leading to consequences for the accurate determination of physical properties from observations. For example, at z = 8 we predict that nebular emission can account for up to 50 per cent of the rest-frame R-band luminosity, while the choice of SPS model can change the LyC production rate up to a factor of ×2.

  7. A Photometric Metallicity Estimate of the Virgo Stellar Overdensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Deokkeun; Johnson, Jennifer A.; Beers, Timothy C.; Pinsonneault, Marc H.; Terndrup, Donald M.; Delahaye, Franck; Lee, Young Sun; Masseron, Thomas; Yanny, Brian

    2009-12-01

    We determine photometric metal abundance estimates for individual main-sequence stars in the Virgo Overdensity (VOD), which covers almost 1000 °^2 on the sky, based on a calibration of the metallicity sensitivity of stellar isochrones in the gri filter passbands using field stars with well-determined spectroscopic metal abundances. Despite the low precision of the method for individual stars, we derive [Fe/H] = -2.0 ± 0.1(internal) ± 0.5(systematic) for the metal abundance of the VOD from photometric measurements of 0.7 million stars in the northern Galactic hemisphere with heliocentric distances from ~10 kpc to ~20 kpc. The metallicity of the VOD is indistinguishable, within Δ[Fe/H] <= 0.2, from that of field halo stars covering the same distance range. This initial application suggests that the Sloan Digital Sky Survey gri passbands can be used to probe the properties of main-sequence stars beyond ~10 kpc, complementing studies of nearby stars from more metallicity-sensitive color indices that involve the u passband.

  8. How Accurate Are Infrared Luminosities from Monochromatic Photometric Extrapolation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Zesen; Fang, Guanwen; Kong, Xu

    2016-12-01

    Template-based extrapolations from only one photometric band can be a cost-effective method to estimate the total infrared (IR) luminosities ({L}{IR}) of galaxies. By utilizing multi-wavelength data that covers across 0.35-500 μm in GOODS-North and GOODS-South fields, we investigate the accuracy of this monochromatic extrapolated {L}{IR} based on three IR spectral energy distribution (SED) templates out to z˜ 3.5. We find that the Chary & Elbaz template provides the best estimate of {L}{IR} in Herschel/Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer (PACS) bands, while the Dale & Helou template performs best in Herschel/Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver (SPIRE) bands. To estimate {L}{IR}, we suggest that extrapolations from the available longest wavelength PACS band based on the Chary & Elbaz template can be a good estimator. Moreover, if the PACS measurement is unavailable, extrapolations from SPIRE observations but based on the Dale & Helou template can also provide a statistically unbiased estimate for galaxies at z≲ 2. The emission with a rest-frame 10-100 μm range of IR SED can be well described by all three templates, but only the Dale & Helou template shows a nearly unbiased estimate of the emission of the rest-frame submillimeter part.

  9. Photometric Calibration of the Gemini South Adaptive Optics Imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevenson, Sarah Anne; Rodrigo Carrasco Damele, Eleazar; Thomas-Osip, Joanna

    2017-01-01

    The Gemini South Adaptive Optics Imager (GSAOI) is an instrument available on the Gemini South telescope at Cerro Pachon, Chile, utilizing the Gemini Multi-Conjugate Adaptive Optics System (GeMS). In order to allow users to easily perform photometry with this instrument and to monitor any changes in the instrument in the future, we seek to set up a process for performing photometric calibration with standard star observations taken across the time of the instrument’s operation. We construct a Python-based pipeline that includes IRAF wrappers for reduction and combines the AstroPy photutils package and original Python scripts with the IRAF apphot and photcal packages to carry out photometry and linear regression fitting. Using the pipeline, we examine standard star observations made with GSAOI on 68 nights between 2013 and 2015 in order to determine the nightly photometric zero points in the J, H, Kshort, and K bands. This work is based on observations obtained at the Gemini Observatory, processed using the Gemini IRAF and gemini_python packages, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under a cooperative agreement with the NSF on behalf of the Gemini partnership: the National Science Foundation (United States), the National Research Council (Canada), CONICYT (Chile), Ministerio de Ciencia, Tecnología e Innovación Productiva (Argentina), and Ministério da Ciência, Tecnologia e Inovação (Brazil).

  10. Photometric Mapping of Asteroid (4) Vesta from HST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jianyang; McFadden, L. A.; Thomas, P. C.; Mutchler, M.; Parker, J. W.; Young, E. F.; Russell, C. T.; Sykes, M. V.; Schmidt, B.

    2007-10-01

    We obtained 96 disk-resolved images of the target of NASA's Dawn mission, asteroid (4) Vesta, from HST's WFPC2 PC camera. The observation was planned such that complete rotational coverage over the 5.34 hr rotational period was acquired through 4 filters centered at 0.439, 0.673, 0.953, and 1.042 microns. The sub-Earth latitude at Vesta of 18-19 deg S during the observation and Earth- Vesta distance of 1.17-1.18 AU, enable mapping of the southern hemisphere at a pixel scale of 38 km/pixel. These maps will complement the previous HST mapping in 1994 (Binzel et al. 1997) that mapped more northern latitudes. The rotational lightcurve shows a single peak, consistent with the albedo dominated origin. Color variations over the four observed wavelengths are suggested by the slightly different shapes of lightcuves. Preliminary disk-resolved photometric modeling and mapping have been performed using the shape model of Vesta (Thomas et al. 1997). The albedo variation is about 10% at all filters, consistent with the light curve amplitude. The distribution of albedo is slightly bi-modal, with two peaks at about +3% and -5% of the average. We report preliminary results of the photometric analysis and mapping as well as some mineralogical interpretations from the maps.

  11. H-alpha Photometric Survey of M33

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaha, Cindy; Massey, P.; Hodge, P.; Martin, R.; Gavilan, L.; Adhikari, A.

    2006-12-01

    We present the results of a photometric survey of optical emission line regions in M33. Using data from the Local Group Galaxy Survey (LGGS see Massey et al, 2006)), we created continuum-subtracted H-alpha, [OIII] and [SII] emission line images and used flux contours on the H-alpha images to define emission line regions. To date, we have obtained photometric measurements for over 2850 H -alpha emission regions, with a faint flux limit of 10 -15 ergs-sec-1-cm-2 in the outer regions of the galaxy. Our global H Ι region luminosity function displays a broad peak centered at a luminosity of 6 x 10 35 ergs-sec-1 and extends to fainter luminosities than previously published surveys. We used the H-alpha-defined emission regions to determine fluxes for the [OIII] and [SII] images and created RGB images combining the calibrated emission images from all three filters. These RGB emission line images are being used with our [OIII]/ H-alpha and [SII]/ H-alpha line ratios and published catalogs to develop visual diagnostic tools to identify H II regions, planetary nebulae and supernova remnants in M33. Additional results from the LGGS data are being presented elsewhere at this meeting; see Massey et al and McNeill et al.

  12. Photometric Properties of the Variable Star LZ Herculis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seung-Lee; Lee, Jae Woo; Kim, Chulhee; Lee, Chung-Uk; Kang, Yong Beom; Koo, Jae-Rim

    2005-12-01

    We present BV photometric results of the variable star LZ Her. Frolov & Irkaev classified it as a field SX Phe-type pulsating star, but our observations clearly show that LZ Her is not an SX Phe star, but rather a W UMa-type eclipsing binary, as reported by Garrido et al. The orbital period is derived to be 0.33173646 days by combining our data with that in the literature. The eclipsing light-curve solution from the Wilson-Devinney code shows that LZ Her belongs to the W subgroup of W UMa stars; the primary component is less massive and hotter, with a spectral type of F9-G0, and the secondary is more massive and cooler, with a spectral type G5-G6. The spectral types were estimated from the photometric light-curve solution. Asymmetric light curves could be explained by assuming a cool spot on the secondary star. In the observing field of LZ Her, we found a new eclipsing binary, 2MASS 17500367+2928020, with an orbital period of 0.3056 days.

  13. Chemically peculiar stars identified in large photometric surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paunzen, Ernst; Netopil, Martin; Bernhard, Klaus; Hümmerich, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    The chemically peculiar (CP) stars of the upper main sequence are mainly characterized by strong overabundances of heavy elements. Two subgroups (CP2 and CP4) have strong local magnetic fields which make them interesting targets for astrophysical studies. This star group, in general, is often used for the analysis of stellar formation and evolution in the context of diffusion as well as meridional circulation. The overabundant elements in CP2/4 star atmospheres are concentrated into large spot regions that persist for decades to centuries. Periodic variations of the brightness, spectrum, and magnetic field are observed. The stars are slow rotators and it is believed that the slow rotation is owed to the strong magnetic field. Recent and future surveys that aim to obtain photometric time series are ideally suited to provide a detailed view of the stars' rotational behaviour. We present our efforts to analyze the rotational periods of CP stars and to identify new candidates in the Kepler, SuperWASP, and ASAS-3 surveys, but also in the photometric data that were extracted as valuable by-product of the STEREO satellite mission.

  14. Linear titration plots for the analysis of mixtures of three weak acids or bases.

    PubMed

    Midgley, D; McCallum, C

    1984-06-01

    Linearly related functions have been derived which enable mixtures of three weak acids or bases in solution to be analysed by means of pH-titration data. This theory has been tested with data from the titration of a variety of mixtures of acids. The data required for the functions are pH, volume of titrant, the equilibrium constants relevant to the mixture, and an independently determined equivalence volume. This may be the equivalence volume for one of the components of the mixture or the sum of the equivalence volumes for any two or all three of the components. It is immaterial how this equivalence volume is obtained, but it is usually possible to obtain the total equivalence volume from data in another part of the same titration curve (when a large excess of titrant has been added).

  15. Acid-Base Titration of (S)-Aspartic Acid: A Circular Dichroism Spectrophotometry Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavaleiro, Ana M. V.; Pedrosa de Jesus, Júlio D.

    2000-09-01

    The magnitude of the circular dichroism of (S)-aspartic acid in aqueous solutions at a fixed wavelength varies with the addition of strong base. This laboratory experiment consists of the circular dichroism spectrophotometric acid-base titration of (S)-aspartic acid in dilute aqueous solutions, and the use of the resulting data to determine the ionization constant of the protonated amino group. The work familiarizes students with circular dichroism and illustrates the possibility of performing titrations using a less usual instrumental method of following the course of a reaction. It shows the use of a chiroptical property in the determination of the concentration in solution of an optically active molecule, and exemplifies the use of a spectrophotometric titration in the determination of an ionization constant.

  16. An on-line potentiometric sequential injection titration process analyser for the determination of acetic acid.

    PubMed

    van Staden, J F; Mashamba, Mulalo G; Stefan, Raluca I

    2002-09-01

    An on-line potentiometric sequential injection titration process analyser for the determination of acetic acid is proposed. A solution of 0.1 mol L(-1) sodium chloride is used as carrier. Titration is achieved by aspirating acetic acid samples between two strong base-zone volumes into a holding coil and by channelling the stack of well-defined zones with flow reversal through a reaction coil to a potentiometric sensor where the peak widths were measured. A linear relationship between peak width and logarithm of the acid concentration was obtained in the range 1-9 g/100 mL. Vinegar samples were analysed without any sample pre-treatment. The method has a relative standard deviation of 0.4% with a sample frequency of 28 samples per hour. The results revealed good agreement between the proposed sequential injection and an automated batch titration method.

  17. Acid-base titration curves for acids with very small ratios of successive dissociation constants.

    PubMed

    Campbell, B H; Meites, L

    1974-02-01

    The shapes of the potentiometric acid-base titration curves obtained in the neutralizations of polyfunctional acids or bases for which each successive dissociation constant is smaller than the following one are examined. In the region 0 < < 1 (where is the fraction of the equivalent volume of reagent that has been added) the slope of the titration curve decreases as the number j of acidic or basic sites increases. The difference between the pH-values at = 0.75 and = 0.25 has (1 j)log 9 as the lower limit of its maximum value.

  18. Using isothermal titration calorimetry to determine thermodynamic parameters of protein-glycosaminoglycan interactions.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Amit K; Rösgen, Jörg; Rajarathnam, Krishna

    2015-01-01

    It has now become increasingly clear that a complete atomic description of how biomacromolecules recognize each other requires knowledge not only of the structures of the complexes but also of how kinetics and thermodynamics drive the binding process. In particular, such knowledge is lacking for protein-glycosaminoglycan (GAG) complexes. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) is the only technique that can provide various thermodynamic parameters-enthalpy, entropy, free energy (binding constant), and stoichiometry-from a single experiment. Here we describe different factors that must be taken into consideration in carrying out ITC titrations to obtain meaningful thermodynamic data of protein-GAG interactions.

  19. Determination of sulfur compounds in hydrotreated transformer base oil by potentiometric titration.

    PubMed

    Chao, Qiu; Sheng, Han; Cheng, Xingguo; Ren, Tianhui

    2005-06-01

    A method was developed to analyze the distribution of sulfur compounds in model sulfur compounds by potentiometric titration, and applied to analyze hydrotreated transformer base oil. Model thioethers were oxidized to corresponding sulfoxides by tetrabutylammonium periodate and sodium metaperiodate, respectively, and the sulfoxides were titrated by perchloric acid titrant in acetic anhydride. The contents of aliphatic thioethers and total thioethers were then determined from that of sulfoxides in solution. The method was applied to determine the organic sulfur compounds in hydrotreated transformer base oil.

  20. Photometric metallicities in Boötes I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, J.; Wallerstein, G.; Dotter, A.; Geisler, D.

    2014-03-01

    We present new Strömgren and Washington data sets for the Boötes I dwarf galaxy, and combine them with the available Sloan Digital Sky Survey photometry. The goal of this project is to refine a ground-based, practical, accurate method to determine age and metallicity for individual stars in Boötes I that can be selected in an unbiased imaging survey, without having to take spectra. With few bright upper red giant branch stars and distances of about 35-250 kpc, the ultra-faint dwarf galaxies (UDFs) present observational challenges in characterizing their stellar population. Other recent studies have produced spectra and proper motions, making Boötes I an ideal test case for our photometric methods. We produce photometric metallicities from Strömgren and Washington photometry, for stellar systems with a range of -1.0 > [Fe/H] > -3.5. Needing to avoid the collapse of the metallicity sensitivity of the Strömgren m1-index on the lower red giant branch, we replace the Strömgren v filter with the broader Washington C filter to minimize observing time. We construct two indices: m* = (C - T1)0 - (T1 - T2)0 and m** = (C - b)0 - (b - y)0. We find that CT1by is the most successful filter combination, for individual stars with [Fe/H] < -2.0, to maintain ˜0.2 dex [Fe/H]-resolution over the whole red giant branch. The m**-index would be the best choice for space-based observations because the (C - y) colour is not sufficient to fix metallicity alone in an understudied system. Our photometric metallicites of stars in the central regions of Boötes I confirm that there is a metallicity spread of at least -1.9 > [Fe/H] > -3.7. The best-fitting Dartmouth isochrones give a mean age, for all the Boötes I stars in our data set, of 11.5 ± 0.4 Gyr. From ground-based telescopes, we show that the optimal filter combination is CT1by, avoiding the v filter entirely. We demonstrate that we can break the isochrones' age-metallicity degeneracy with the CT1by filters, using stars with

  1. Comet C/2002 T7 (LINEAR): Polarimetric and photometric studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenbush, V. K.; Velichko, F. P.; Kiselev, N. N.; Velichko, S. F.; Shakhovskoy, N. M.; Efimov, Yu. S.; Antonyuk, K. A.; Kolesnikov, S. V.; Shakhovskoy, D. N.

    2006-05-01

    We present the results of polarimetric and photometric observations of dynamically new comet C/2002 T7 (LINEAR) at phase angles from 6° to 26°. During the observations, the comet was at a distance of 2.7 1.3 AU from the Sun and 1.7 2.0 AU from the Earth. The aperture polarimetry was made with the 2.6-m Shain telescope and the 1.25-m AZT-11 telescope of the Crimean Astrophysical Observatory and with the 0.7-m telescope of the Astronomical Institute of the Kharkiv National University during the period from November 21, 2003, to February 21, 2004. The wideband UBVRI and WRC (λ7228/1142 Å) filters and the narrowband GC (λ5260/56 Å) filter were used. The photometric observations of the comet were carried out on February 21, 2004, with narrowband filters isolated the BC (λ4845/65 Å) and RC (λ6840/90 Å) continuum and the C2 emission (λ5140/90 Å). The phase-angle dependence of linear polarization of the comet has been obtained, and its parameters, such as the minimal polarization P min = -1.63%, the phase angle of the minimal polarization αmin = 10.6°, the inversion angle αinv = 22.7°, and the slope of the phase curve at the inversion angle h = 0.24% per degree, were found. From the photometric observations, the following quantities have been obtained: the column density of molecules C2 in the line of sight logN (C2) = -9.15 mol/cm2 and their production rate log Q (C2) = 27.11 mol/s, the spectral gradient of reflectivity for the dust S‧(BC, RC) ≈ 3%/1000 Å, and the dust production parameter Afρ equal to 371 and 273 cm for the blue and red continuum ranges, respectively. According to these results, the physical parameters of comet C/2002 T7 are close to the average characteristics of typical dusty comets.

  2. Photometric Properties of the Most Massive High-Redshift Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Brant; Li, Yuexing; Cox, Thomas J.; Hernquist, Lars; Hopkins, Philip F.

    2007-09-01

    We calculate the observable properties of the most massive high-redshift galaxies in the hierarchical formation scenario where stellar spheroid and supermassive black hole growth are fueled by gas-rich mergers. Combining high-resolution hydrodynamical simulations of the hierarchical formation of a z~6 quasar, stellar population synthesis models, template active galactic nucleus (AGN) spectra, prescriptions for interstellar and intergalactic absorption, and the response of modern telescopes, the photometric evolution of galaxies destined to host z~6 quasars is modeled at redshifts z~4-14. These massive galaxies, with enormous stellar masses of M*~1011.5-1012 Msolar and star formation rates of SFR~103-104 Msolar yr-1 at z>~7, satisfy a variety of photometric selection criteria based on Lyman break techniques, including V-band dropouts at z>~5, i-band dropouts at z>~6, and z-band dropouts at z>~7. The observability of the most massive high-redshift galaxies is assessed and compared with a wide range of existing and proposed photometric surveys, including the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey (GOODS)/Hubble Ultra Deep Field (HUDF), National Optical Astronomy Observatory Deep Wide-Field Survey (NDWFS), UKIRT Infared Deep Sky Survey (UKIDSS), Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) Shallow Survey, Ultradeep Visible and Infrared Survey Telescope for Astronomy (VISTA), Dark Universe Explorer (DUNE), Panoramic Survey Telescope and Rapid Response System (Pan-STARRS), Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST), and Supernova/Acceleration Probe (SNAP). Massive stellar spheroids descended from z~6 quasars will likely be detected at z~4 by existing surveys, but owing to their low number densities the discovery of quasar progenitor galaxies at z>7 will likely require future surveys of large portions of the sky (>~0.5%) at wavelengths λ>~1 μm. The detection of rare, starbursting, massive galaxies at redshifts z>~6 would provide support for the

  3. Photometric classification of quasars from RCS-2 using Random Forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrasco, D.; Barrientos, L. F.; Pichara, K.; Anguita, T.; Murphy, D. N. A.; Gilbank, D. G.; Gladders, M. D.; Yee, H. K. C.; Hsieh, B. C.; López, S.

    2015-12-01

    The classification and identification of quasars is fundamental to many astronomical research areas. Given the large volume of photometric survey data available in the near future, automated methods for doing so are required. In this article, we present a new quasar candidate catalog from the Red-Sequence Cluster Survey 2 (RCS-2), identified solely from photometric information using an automated algorithm suitable for large surveys. The algorithm performance is tested using a well-defined SDSS spectroscopic sample of quasars and stars. The Random Forest algorithm constructs the catalog from RCS-2 point sources using SDSS spectroscopically-confirmed stars and quasars. The algorithm identifies putative quasars from broadband magnitudes (g, r, i, z) and colors. Exploiting NUV GALEX measurements for a subset of the objects, we refine the classifier by adding new information. An additional subset of the data with WISE W1 and W2 bands is also studied. Upon analyzing 542 897 RCS-2 point sources, the algorithm identified 21 501 quasar candidates with a training-set-derived precision (the fraction of true positives within the group assigned quasar status) of 89.5% and recall (the fraction of true positives relative to all sources that actually are quasars) of 88.4%. These performance metrics improve for the GALEX subset: 6529 quasar candidates are identified from 16 898 sources, with a precision and recall of 97.0% and 97.5%, respectively. Algorithm performance is further improved when WISE data are included, with precision and recall increasing to 99.3% and 99.1%, respectively, for 21 834 quasar candidates from 242 902 sources. We compiled our final catalog (38 257) by merging these samples and removing duplicates. An observational follow up of 17 bright (r < 19) candidates with long-slit spectroscopy at DuPont telescope (LCO) yields 14 confirmed quasars. The results signal encouraging progress in the classification of point sources with Random Forest algorithms to search

  4. Measuring titratable alkalinity by single versus double endpoint titration: An evaluation in two cyprinodont species and implications for characterizing net H+ flux in aquatic organisms.

    PubMed

    Brix, Kevin V; Wood, Chris M; Grosell, Martin

    2013-01-01

    In this study, Na(+) uptake and acid-base balance in the euryhaline pupfish Cyprinodon variegatus variegatus were characterized when fish were exposed to pH 4.5 freshwater (7mM Na(+)). Similar to the related cyprinodont, Fundulus heteroclitus, Na(+) uptake was significantly inhibited when exposed to low pH water. However, it initially appeared that C. v. variegatus increased apparent net acid excretion at low pH relative to circumneutral pH. This result is opposite to previous observations for F. heteroclitus under similar conditions where fish were observed to switch from apparent net H(+) excretion at circumneutral pH to apparent net H(+) uptake at low pH. Further investigation revealed disparate observations between these studies were the result of using double endpoint titrations to measure titratable alkalinity fluxes in the current study, while the earlier study utilized single endpoint titrations to measure these fluxes (i.e.,. Cyprinodon acid-base transport is qualitatively similar to Fundulus when characterized using single endpoint titrations). This led to a comparative investigation of these two methods. We hypothesized that either the single endpoint methodology was being influenced by a change in the buffer capacity of the water (e.g., mucus being released by the fish) at low pH, or the double endpoint methodology was not properly accounting for ammonia flux by the fish. A series of follow-up experiments indicated that buffer capacity of the water did not change significantly, that excretion of protein (a surrogate for mucus) was actually reduced at low pH, and that the double endpoint methodology does not properly account for NH(3) excretion by fish under low pH conditions. As a result, it overestimates net H(+) excretion during low pH exposure. After applying the maximum possible correction for this error (i.e., assuming that all ammonia is excreted as NH(3)), the double endpoint methodology indicates that net H(+) transport was reduced to

  5. 21 CFR 862.2160 - Discrete photometric chemistry analyzer for clinical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Discrete photometric chemistry analyzer for... AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Laboratory Instruments § 862.2160 Discrete photometric chemistry analyzer for clinical use....

  6. 21 CFR 862.2160 - Discrete photometric chemistry analyzer for clinical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Discrete photometric chemistry analyzer for... AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Laboratory Instruments § 862.2160 Discrete photometric chemistry analyzer for clinical use....

  7. 21 CFR 862.2160 - Discrete photometric chemistry analyzer for clinical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Discrete photometric chemistry analyzer for... AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Laboratory Instruments § 862.2160 Discrete photometric chemistry analyzer for clinical use....

  8. 21 CFR 862.2160 - Discrete photometric chemistry analyzer for clinical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Discrete photometric chemistry analyzer for... AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Laboratory Instruments § 862.2160 Discrete photometric chemistry analyzer for clinical use....

  9. 21 CFR 862.2160 - Discrete photometric chemistry analyzer for clinical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Discrete photometric chemistry analyzer for... AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Laboratory Instruments § 862.2160 Discrete photometric chemistry analyzer for clinical use....

  10. Topography Dependent Photometric Correction of SELENE Multispectral Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steutel, D.; Ohtake, M.

    2003-12-01

    The SELENE mission to the Moon in 2005 includes the Multiband Imager (MI) [1], a visible/near-infrared imaging spectrometer, and the Terrain Camera (TC), a 10m panchromatic stereoimager for global topography. The ˜1TB of TC data will take years to reduce; initial photometric correction of MI data will not include the effect of topography. We present a method for prioritizing analysis of TC data so topography can be included in photometric correction of MI data at the earliest time to regions of the lunar surface where the effects of topography are most significant. We have calculated the general quantified dependence of photometric correction on incidence angle, emission angle, phase angle, and local topographic slopes. To calculate photometric correction we use the method used for Clementine [2,3] with the following corrections: The factor of 2 is included in the XL function (see [3]), P(α ,g) = (1-g2)/(1+g2+2gcos(α ))1.5, and g1 = D*R30 + E. In order to predict the topography of the Moon to determine the regional distribution of local slopes at the resolution of MI (20m and 62m), we performed a fractal analysis on existing topographic data derived from Clementine LIDAR [4], Earth-based radar of Tycho crater [5], and Apollo surface-based stereoimagery [6]. The fractal parameter H, which describes the relationship between scale and roughness, is 0.65+/-0.02, 0.64+/-0.01, and 0.69+/-0.06 [6] at the 20-75km, 150m-1.5km, and 0.1-10mm scales, respectively. Based on the consistency of H at these disparate scales, we interpolate H=0.65+/-0.03 (a weighted average) at the 20m and 62m scales of the MI cameras. The second fractal parameter, σ (L0), is calculated from Clementine LIDAR data for overlapping 3x3 degree segments over the lunar surface. From this, we predict local topographic slopes for all regions on the Moon -60° to +60° at the 20m and 62m scales based on H=0.65 and σ (L0) as determined for each pixel. These results allow us to prioritize TC data analysis

  11. The photometric variability of ζ Ori Aa observed by BRITE* **

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buysschaert, B.; Neiner, C.

    2016-12-01

    Using BRITE photometry, we investigated the photometric variability of the magnetic O-type supergiant ζOri Aa. We found two independent frequencies, leading to several higher harmonics and simple linear combinations. One frequency is related to the rotation period, f_{rot} = 0.15±0.02 d^{-1}. The derived rotation period from this frequency and its higher harmonics, P_{rot} = 6.65±0.28 d, is compatible with the literature value (P_{rot} = 6.83±0.08 d). Thanks to simultaneous CHIRON spectroscopy, we locate the origin of the second frequency, f_{env} = 0.10±0.02 d^{-1}, at the circumstellar environment. We propose mass-loss events as the underlying origin.

  12. Photometric Properties of Pluto and Charon: Comparison to Other Bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buratti, B. J.; Stern, A.; Weaver, H. A., Jr.; Young, L. A.; Ennico Smith, K.; Momary, T.; Zangari, A. M.; Binzel, R. P.

    2015-12-01

    The New Horizons spacecraft provided the first detailed views of the photometric properties of Pluto and Charon, and how these properties relate to geophysical processes. Among the first results are the distribution of albedo on the surfaces of both bodies, and the surface phase function for both high- and low-albedo regions of Pluto, which yields information on macroscopic roughness and particle properties. The highest albedos on Pluto are similar to those of the bright icy moons of Saturn and Jupiter. The range of albedos on Pluto is surprisingly large, surpassed only by Saturn's moon Iapetus. Charon has a more limited range, with a bifurcated distribution. The disk-integrated phase function of Pluto is similar to those of the icy moons of Saturn. The geologic implications of these results will be discussed. Funded by NASA

  13. Fifth image and photometric variability in 2237 + 0305 ('Einstein Cross')

    SciTech Connect

    Racine, R. Montreal, Universite, Montreal Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Corp., Kamuela, HI )

    1991-08-01

    The paper describes the morphological and photometric characteristics of the gravitational mirage 2237 + 0305, obtained by combining CCD frames in R and I taken with HRCam at the CFHT in a 0.4 arcsec (FWHM) observation on August 23, 1990. High S/N images of the 2237 + 0305 provided precise positions and relative magnitudes for the four brighter components and for the galaxy core, and new information on the light distribution in the lensing galaxy core was obtained. Compared with Yee's (1988) photometry, the present data show components B brighter by 0.25 mag and C fainter by 0.15 mag, while the brightness of A and D and the colors of all four images are unchanged. Possible reason for the variability trends of the four components are discussed. 19 refs.

  14. Simultaneous Hα and photometric observations of P Cygni

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markova, N.; Scuderi, S.; de Groot, M.; Markov, H.; Panagia, N.

    2001-02-01

    For the first time an extensive set of (quasi-) simultaneous photometric (UBV) and spectroscopic (Hα line profiles) observations of P Cygni, covering a period from May, 1990 to June, 1994 was analyzed in terms of time variability. It is found that the Hα equivalent width (EW) exhibits two different patterns of variability: a slower one, called Long-Term (LT) variability, with an amplitude of about 30 Åand a characteristic duration of about 600 days and a faster one, called Short-Term (ST) variability, with an amplitude up to 10 Åand duration of 40 to 60 days. Suggestive evidence for EW variation on a longer time scale (about few years) also exists. The variations in the Hα luminosity are not solely due to changes in the underlying continuum but also reflect variations in the physical properties of the wind. We find, in terms of a simplified spherically-symmetric wind model, that the LT variation of the line can be successfully explained in terms of a 26% alteration of the mass-loss rate, possibly accompanied by variations in the velocity field. From the analysis of the photometric behaviour of the star we find evidence for a very slow variation in the stellar brightness with an amplitude of about 0.13 mag and a duration of about 2600 days, i.e. about 7 years. During this variation, i.e. when the star brightens, the effective temperature decreases (by about 10%) and the radius increases (by about 7%). The properties of this Very Long Term (VLT) variation suggest that P Cygni has probably experienced a normal S Dor-type variation with a minimum phase around 1988 and a maximum phase in 1992. Some hints for a positive correlation between mass loss variations and changes in the stellar radius, due to the normal SD variability, do exist implying that the behaviour of P Cygni is more likely similar to that of R71 and S Dor but different from e.g. AG Car, R127 and HD 160529. Superimposed on the VLT component in the photometric variability of P Cygni, we observe ST

  15. Photometric and polarimetric properties of the Bruderheim chondritic meteorite.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egan, W. G.; Hilgeman, T.; Veverka, J.; Noland, M.

    1973-01-01

    Study of the spectral, photometric, and polarimetric properties of the Bruderheim olivine-hypersthene chondritic meteorite. This meteorite is representative of the most common meteoritic material recovered on earth, and, hence, could also be the most common in interplanetary space. Yet, comparison with astronomical data indicates that none of the asteroids in the main belt for which adequate observations exist can be matched with Bruderheim properties. Only the surface of the Apollo asteroid Icarus does, in light of polarization and photometry data, appear to be consistent with an ordinary chondrite composition. This suggests the possibility that this material, although common in earth-crossing orbits, is rare as a surface constituent in the main asteroid belt.

  16. Photometric observations of the energetics of small solar active regions

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence, J.K.; Chapman, G.A. )

    1990-10-01

    The energetics of small solar active regions was investigated using for the analysis the photometric solar images taken from July 29 to September 6, 1984 with the San Fernando Observatory's 28-cm vacuum telescope, vacuum spectroheliograph, and dual 512 element Reticon linear diode arrays. Ten small newly formed regions were observed, whose entire sunspot evolution apparently occurred within the observed disk crossing. Seven of these showed a net energy excess of a few times 10 to the 33th ergs during this time. These results are discussed in connection with the 0.1 percent decline in solar irradiance observed by the SMM/ACRIM and Nimbus 7/ERB radiometers between 1980 and 1986. 35 refs.

  17. NIF ReShock/Shear Photometrics Design Considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Flippo, Kirk Adler

    2015-03-12

    The design of the photometrics for the NIF Shock/Shear campaign was driven by three linked considerations: the backlighter (BL) material had to be chosen such that it’s He-α emission line gave high enough contrast to measure mix width and see the shock propagation in the target wall, the BL beam geometry had to give sufficient BL spot dimensions and intensity to produce a uniform He-α radiograph of the target, and the BL/pinhole system had to have a high enough resolution and signal to be able to measure the quantities of interest. The design considerations are linked such that the required contrast determines the BL material, the BL material determines what laser intensity range is need for He-α emission, and the resulting He-α emission intensity helps determine whether or not there will be sufficient signal for analysis.

  18. First CCD UBVI photometric analysis of six open cluster candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piatti, A. E.; Clariá, J. J.; Ahumada, A. V.

    2011-04-01

    We have obtained CCD UBVIKC photometry down to V ˜ 22 for the open cluster candidates Haffner 3, Haffner 5, NGC 2368, Haffner 25, Hogg 3 and Hogg 4 and their surrounding fields. None of these objects have been photometrically studied so far. Our analysis shows that these stellar groups are not genuine open clusters since no clear main sequences or other meaningful features can be seen in their colour-magnitude and colour-colour diagrams. We checked for possible differential reddening across the studied fields that could be hiding the characteristics of real open clusters. However, the dust in the directions to these objects appears to be uniformly distributed. Moreover, star counts carried out within and outside the open cluster candidate fields do not support the hypothesis that these objects are real open clusters or even open cluster remnants.

  19. A photometric study of early-type stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza, E. E.; Gomez, T.; Ortega, R.; Quintero, A.

    1983-01-01

    Observation data in the alpha(16), Lambda(9) photometric system are presented for 228 early-type O4-B8 stars of all luminosity classes. Also included are data for Be stars, B-type stars with a shell, and Beta Canis Majoris stars. The comparison with R-alpha and beta indices suggests that the alpha(16) photometry is of good quality. The photometry can be used in separating different kinds of stars; when combined with the 13-color photometry, it makes possible a finer classification. The alpha(16) index also provides an indication of stellar mass-loss rates, especially for supergiant stars. Preliminary He I (5876 A) measurements suggest that this line is well correlated with MK types. Be stars observed over several years also exhibit H-alpha line-strength variability. It is found that the Lambda(9) index separates supergiant stars later than B2.

  20. Miniature photometric stereo system for textile surface structure reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorpas, Dimitris; Kampouris, Christos; Malassiotis, Sotiris

    2013-04-01

    In this work a miniature photometric stereo system is presented, targeting the three-dimensional structural reconstruction of various fabric types. This is a supportive module to a robot system, attempting to solve the well known "laundry problem". The miniature device has been designed for mounting onto the robot gripper. It is composed of a low-cost off-the-shelf camera, operating in macro mode, and eight light emitting diodes. The synchronization between image acquisition and lighting direction is controlled by an Arduino Nano board and software triggering. The ambient light has been addressed by a cylindrical enclosure. The direction of illumination is recovered by locating the reflection or the brightest point on a mirror sphere, while a flatfielding process compensates for the non-uniform illumination. For the evaluation of this prototype, the classical photometric stereo methodology has been used. The preliminary results on a large number of textiles are very promising for the successful integration of the miniature module to the robot system. The required interaction with the robot is implemented through the estimation of the Brenner's focus measure. This metric successfully assesses the focus quality with reduced time requirements in comparison to other well accepted focus metrics. Besides the targeting application, the small size of the developed system makes it a very promising candidate for applications with space restrictions, like the quality control in industrial production lines or object recognition based on structural information and in applications where easiness in operation and light-weight are required, like those in the Biomedical field, and especially in dermatology.

  1. Photometric Imaging of the Moon from Flagstaff: A Progress Report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, J. M.

    1997-05-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey and the Northern Arizona University operate a highly automated observatory atop McMillan Mesa on the grounds of the U.S. Geological Survey's Flagstaff Field Center. The primary purpose of the observatory is to provide accurate radiance information of the Moon for calibration of Earth-orbiting instruments, particularly Earth Observing System instruments. Current instrumentation includes a 20 cm diameter Ritchey-Cretien telescope on a computer controlled mount designed for a 41 cm telescope. The imaging device is a 512x512 CCD with a resolution of 4.0 arcsec/pixel. Interference filters within 350--950 nm are used to correspond to standard stellar bandpasses, wavelengths of high lunar contrast, and approximate bandpasses of planned Earth-orbiting instruments. A full aperture radiance calibration source ties observations to an absolute radiance system. A second instrument operating from 0.95--2.4 {microns } is under construction and will be added to the same mount as the present instrument. Since March 1996 observations have been made every clear night during the bright half of each month. Both stars and the Moon are observed by the same equipment; photometric standard stars are observed each night to provide long-term stability in the radiance calibration of lunar images and to determine atmospheric extinction. Real-time software determines object targeting, calculates optimal exposure times, commands telescope pointing, and controls data acquisition. Semi-automated routines backup data to remote disks and archive data onto CD-ROMs. Over 100000 images were generated by this system during 1996, necessitating the development of automated software to reduce lunar images to exoatmospheric radiance projected in a fixed selenographic grid system. These radiance images will be further reduced to photometric models for individual grid points, from which radiance models can be produced for the precise geometry of spacecraft observations.

  2. Photometric Separation of Stellar Properties Using SDSS Filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenz, Dawn D.; Newberg, Jo; Rosner, Robert; Richards, Gordon T.; Stoughton, Chris

    1998-12-01

    Using synthetic photometry of Kurucz model spectra, we explore the colors of stars as a function of temperature, metallicity, and surface gravity with Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) filters, u'g'r'i'z'. The synthetic colors show qualitative agreement with the few published observations in these filters. We find that the locus of synthetic stars is basically two-dimensional for 4500 < T < 8000 K, which precludes simultaneous color separation of the three basic stellar characteristics we consider. Colors including u' contain the most information about normal stellar properties; measurements in this filter are also important for selecting white dwarfs. We identify two different subsets of the locus in which the loci separate by either metallicity or surface gravity. For 0.5 < g' - r' < 0.8 (corresponding roughly to G stars), the locus separates by metallicity; for photometric error of a few percent, we estimate metallicity to within ~0.5 dex in this range. In the range -0.15 < g' - r' < 0.00 (corresponding roughly to A stars), the locus shows separation by surface gravity. In both cases, we show that it is advantageous to use more than two colors when determining stellar properties by color. Strategic observations in SDSS filters are required to resolve the source of a ~5% discrepancy between synthetic colors of Gunn-Stryker stars, Kurucz models, and external determinations of the metallicities and surface gravities. The synthetic star colors can be used to investigate the properties of any normal star and to construct analytic expressions for the photometric prediction of stellar properties in special cases.

  3. Photometric Separation of Stellar Properties Using SDSS Filters

    SciTech Connect

    Lenz, D.D.; Newberg, H.J.; Rosner, R.; Richards, G.T.; Stoughton, C.

    1998-12-01

    Using synthetic photometry of Kurucz model spectra, we explore the colors of stars as a function of temperature, metallicity, and surface gravity with Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) filters, {ital u}{prime}{ital g}{prime}{ital r}{prime}{ital i}{prime}{ital z}{prime}. The synthetic colors show qualitative agreement with the few published observations in these filters. We find that the locus of synthetic stars is basically two-dimensional for 4500 {lt} {ital T} {lt} 8000 K, which precludes simultaneous color separation of the three basic stellar characteristics we consider. Colors including {ital u}{prime} contain the most information about normal stellar properties; measurements in this filter are also important for selecting white dwarfs. We identify two different subsets of the locus in which the loci separate by either metallicity or surface gravity. For 0.5 {lt} {ital g}{prime} {minus} {ital r}{prime} {lt} 0.8 (corresponding roughly to G stars), the locus separates by metallicity; for photometric error of a few percent, we estimate metallicity to within {approximately}0.5 dex in this range. In the range {minus}0.15 {lt} {ital g}{prime} {minus} {ital r}{prime} {lt} 0.00 (corresponding roughly to A stars), the locus shows separation by surface gravity. In both cases, we show that it is advantageous to use more than two colors when determining stellar properties by color. Strategic observations in SDSS filters are required to resolve the source of a {approximately}5{percent} discrepancy between synthetic colors of Gunn-Stryker stars, Kurucz models, and external determinations of the metallicities and surface gravities. The synthetic star colors can be used to investigate the properties of any normal star and to construct analytic expressions for the photometric prediction of stellar properties in special cases. {copyright} {ital {copyright} 1998.} {ital The American Astronomical Society}

  4. Carbon Stars In Andromeda. II. Demographics and Photometric Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guhathakurta, Puragra; Hamren, K.; Dorman, C.; Toloba, E.; Seth, A.; Dalcanton, J.; Nayak, A.; PHAT Collaboration; SPLASH Collaboration

    2014-01-01

    This is the second of two talks about a sample of newly-discovered carbon stars in the Andromeda galaxy (M31). As explained in the first talk, these stars were identified on the basis of their spectroscopic characteristics using Keck/DEIMOS spectra obtained as part of the Spectroscopic and Photometric Landscape of Andromeda's Stellar Halo (SPLASH) survey. We explore the physical properties of strong and weak carbon stars using photometric data from a Hubble Space Telescope Multi-Cycle Treasury program: Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury (PHAT). The PHAT data set includes deep photometry in six filters: two in the ultraviolet, two in the optical, and two in the near infrared. The carbon stars appear to be in the asymptotic giant branch stage of their evolution as evidenced by the fact that they lie above the tip of the red giant branch and are cleanly separated from normal (i.e., oxygen-rich) giants in color-magnitude diagrams. We study the spatial distribution of carbon stars in M31 and use kinematics to determine whether they belong to M31's thin disk, thick disk, or spheroid. These carbon stars serve as highly visible tracers of the intermediate-mass, intermediate-age stellar population in M31; they are important markers in the study of the star-formation history of the galaxy. This research was part of the SPLASH and PHAT collaboration. We are grateful to the National Science Foundation and NASA for funding support. AN's participation was under the auspices of UCSC's Science Internship Program.

  5. Photometric study of the major satellites of Uranus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avramchuk, V. V.; Rosenbush, V. K.; Bul'Ba, T. P.

    2007-06-01

    In this paper, we analyze the results of ground-based and space-born photometric observations of the major satellites of Uranus—Miranda, Ariel, Umbriel, Titania, and Oberon. All sets of photometric observations of the satellites available in the literature were examined for uniformity and systematic differences and summarized to a unified set by wavelength ranging from 0.25 to 2.4 μm. This set covers the interval of phase angles from 0.034° to 35°. The compound phase curves of brightness of the satellites in the spectral bands at 0.25, 0.41, 0.48, 0.56, 0.75, 0.91, 1.4, and 1.8 μm, which include a pronounced opposition surge and linear part, were constructed. For each satellite, the geometric albedo was found in different spectral bands taking into account the brightness opposition effect, and its spectral dependence was studied. It has been shown that the reflectance of the satellites linearly depends on the wavelength at different phase angles, but has different spectral gradients. The parameters of the phase functions of brightness, including the amplitude and the angular width of the brightness opposition surge, the phase coefficient, and the phase angle at which the nonlinear increase in brightness starts, were determined and their dependences on wavelength and geometric albedo were analyzed. Our investigations show that, in their optical properties, the satellites Miranda and Ariel, Titania and Oberon, and Umbriel present three types of surfaces. The observed parameters of the brightness opposition effect for the Uranian satellites, some ice satellites of Jupiter and Saturn, and the E-and S-type asteroids are analyzed and compared within the framework of the coherent backscattering and mutual shadowing mechanisms.

  6. Photometric and kinematic studies of extragalactic globular cluster systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowell, Jessica

    Globular clusters (GCs) are old, luminous, compact collections of stars found in galaxy halos that formed during the early stages of galaxy formation. Because of this, GCs serve as excellent tracers of the formation, structure, and merger history of their host galaxies. My dissertation will examine both the photometric and kinematic properties of GC systems and their relationship to their host galaxies. In the first section, I will present the analysis of the GC systems of two spiral galaxies, NGC 891 and NGC 1055. I will discuss the photometric methods used to detect GCs using wide-field BVR imaging and to quantify the global properties of the system such as the total number of GCs and their radial distribution. My results for these two GC systems were compared to those of other galaxies. I will also present the results of spectroscopic follow-up for two giant galaxies: the S0 galaxy NGC 4594 (M104), and the elliptical galaxy NGC 3379 (M105). I measured the radial velocities of GCs in these two galaxies, and combined them with published results to determine the mass distribution and mass-to-light (M/L) ratio profile for each galaxy out to large effective radius (7-9 Re). For both galaxies, I found that the M/L profiles increase with radius and do not flatten, which suggests that the dark matter halos in these galaxies extend to the edge of my data. I also looked for evidence of rotation in the GC systems, and found that neither system exhibits significant rotation around the host galaxy. I examined the velocity dispersion profile of each GC system and found kinematic differences between the red and blue GC subpopulations. Finally, I compared my results to mass estimates for these galaxies from other kinematic tracers and considered them in the context of galaxy formation models.

  7. Robust surface reconstruction by design-guided SEM photometric stereo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyamoto, Atsushi; Matsuse, Hiroki; Koutaki, Gou

    2017-04-01

    We present a novel approach that addresses the blind reconstruction problem in scanning electron microscope (SEM) photometric stereo for complicated semiconductor patterns to be measured. In our previous work, we developed a bootstrapping de-shadowing and self-calibration (BDS) method, which automatically calibrates the parameter of the gradient measurement formulas and resolves shadowing errors for estimating an accurate three-dimensional (3D) shape and underlying shadowless images. Experimental results on 3D surface reconstruction demonstrated the significance of the BDS method for simple shapes, such as an isolated line pattern. However, we found that complicated shapes, such as line-and-space (L&S) and multilayered patterns, produce deformed and inaccurate measurement results. This problem is due to brightness fluctuations in the SEM images, which are mainly caused by the energy fluctuations of the primary electron beam, variations in the electronic expanse inside a specimen, and electrical charging of specimens. Despite these being essential difficulties encountered in SEM photometric stereo, it is difficult to model accurately all the complicated physical phenomena of electronic behavior. We improved the robustness of the surface reconstruction in order to deal with these practical difficulties with complicated shapes. Here, design data are useful clues as to the pattern layout and layer information of integrated semiconductors. We used the design data as a guide of the measured shape and incorporated a geometrical constraint term to evaluate the difference between the measured and designed shapes into the objective function of the BDS method. Because the true shape does not necessarily correspond to the designed one, we use an iterative scheme to develop proper guide patterns and a 3D surface that provides both a less distorted and more accurate 3D shape after convergence. Extensive experiments on real image data demonstrate the robustness and effectiveness

  8. Photometric Variability and Spectroscopic Characterisation of White Dwarfs in Kepler 2 Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braker, I. P.; Burleigh, M. R.; Goad, M. R.; Casewell, S. L.; Buckley, D.; Holberg, J. B.; Lawrie, K. A.; Barstow, M. A.

    2017-03-01

    It had long been thought that the majority of white dwarfs (WDs) are photometrically stable at the level of a least a few mmags with the exception of those WDs in the instability strip and some magnetic WDs. However long term (≍ tens of days), high photometric precision, observations of such stars had not previously been undertaken. The Kepler and Kepler 2 (K2) missions have provided an opportunity to photometrically monitor a large sample (≍1000 –1500) of WDs. Our analysis of isolated WDs in campaigns 1 to 7 shows that up to ≍25% of the sample is photometrically variable, with some WDs with peak to peak amplitudes of >5%. Many of these targets had only been previously classified photometrically. Our spectroscopic follow up indicates that up to 20% may not be bona fide WDs.

  9. Calcium-buffering effects of gluconate and nucleotides, as determined by a novel fluorimetric titration method

    PubMed Central

    Woehler, Andrew; Lin, Kun-Han; Neher, Erwin

    2014-01-01

    Significantly more Ca2+ influx is required for eliciting release of neurotransmitter during whole cell patch clamp recording in the Calyx of Held, when gluconate with 3 mm free ATP is used as pipette filling solution, as compared to a methanesulfonate-based solution with excess Mg2+. This reduction in efficiency of Ca2+ in eliciting release is due to low-affinity Ca2+ binding of both gluconate and ATP2− anions. To study these effects we developed a simple fluorimeteric titration procedure, which reports the dissociation constant, KD, of a given Ca2+ indicator dye, multiplied by 1 plus the sum of Ca2+ binding ratios of any anions, which act as low-affinity Ca2+ ligands. For solutions without Ca2+ binding anions we find KD values for Fura2FF ranging from 11.5 ± 1.7 to 15.6 ± 7.47 μm depending on the dominant anion used. For Fura6F and KCl-based solutions we find KD = 17.8 ± 1.3 μm. For solutions with gluconate as the main anion and for solutions that contain nucleotides, such as ATP and GTP, we find much higher values for the product. Assuming that the KD of the indicator dye is equal to that of KCl-based solutions we calculate the summed Ca2+ binding ratios and find a value of 3.55 for a solution containing 100 mm potassium gluconate and 4 mm ATP. Gluconate contributes a value of 1.75 to this number, while the contribution of ATP depends strongly on the presence of Mg2+ and varies from 0.8 (with excess Mg2+) to 13.8 (in the presence of 3 mm free ATP). Methanesulfonate has negligible Ca2+ binding capacity. These results explain the reduced efficiency of Ca2+ influx in the presence of gluconate or nucleotides, as these anions are expected to intercept Ca2+ ions at short distance. PMID:25194050

  10. Selective coulometric release of ions from ion selective polymeric membranes for calibration-free titrations.

    PubMed

    Bhakthavatsalam, Vishnupriya; Shvarev, Alexey; Bakker, Eric

    2006-08-01

    Coulometry belongs to one of the few known calibration-free techniques and is therefore highly attractive for chemical analysis. Titrations performed by the coulometric generation of reactants is a well-known approach in electrochemistry, but suffers from limited selectivity and is therefore not generally suited for samples of varying or unknown composition. Here, the selective coulometric release of ionic reagents from ion-selective polymeric membrane materials ordinarily used for the fabrication of ion-selective electrodes is described. The selectivity of such membranes can be tuned to a significant extent by the type and concentration of ionophore and lipophilic ion-exchanger and is today well understood. An anodic current of fixed magnitude and duration may be imposed across such a membrane to release a defined quantity of ions with high selectivity and precision. Since the applied current relates to a defined ion flux, a variety of non-redox active ions may be accurately released with this technique. In this work, the released titrant's activity was measured with a second ionophore-based ion-selective electrode and corresponded well with expected dosage levels on the basis of Faraday's law of electrolysis. Initial examples of coulometric titrations explored here include the release of calcium ions for complexometric titrations, including back titrations, and the release of barium ions to determine sulfate.

  11. Performing Titration Analyses for Water Quality. Module 17. Vocational Education Training in Environmental Health Sciences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Consumer Dynamics Inc., Rockville, MD.

    This module, one of 25 on vocational education training for careers in environmental health occupations, contains self-instructional materials on performing titration analysis for water quality. Following guidelines for students and instructors and an introduction that explains what the student will learn are three lessons: (1) naming each part of…

  12. Thermodynamic analysis of Bacillus subtilis endospore protonation using isothermal titration calorimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrold, Zoë R.; Gorman-Lewis, Drew

    2013-05-01

    Bacterial proton and metal adsorption reactions have the capacity to affect metal speciation and transport in aqueous environments. We coupled potentiometric titration and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) analyses to study Bacillus subtilis spore-proton adsorption. We modeled the potentiometric data using a four and five-site non-electrostatic surface complexation model (NE-SCM). Heats of spore surface protonation from coupled ITC analyses were used to determine site specific enthalpies of protonation based on NE-SCMs. The five-site model resulted in a substantially better model fit for the heats of protonation but did not significantly improve the potentiometric titration model fit. The improvement observed in the five-site protonation heat model suggests the presence of a highly exothermic protonation reaction circa pH 7 that cannot be resolved in the less sensitive potentiometric data. From the log Ks and enthalpies we calculated corresponding site specific entropies. Log Ks and site concentrations describing spore surface protonation are statistically equivalent to B. subtilis cell surface protonation constants. Spore surface protonation enthalpies, however, are more exothermic relative to cell based adsorption suggesting a different bonding environment. The thermodynamic parameters defined in this study provide insight on molecular scale spore-surface protonation reactions. Coupled ITC and potentiometric titrations can reveal highly exothermic, and possibly endothermic, adsorption reactions that are overshadowed in potentiometric models alone. Spore-proton adsorption NE-SCMs derived in this study provide a framework for future metal adsorption studies.

  13. Thermodynamics of cationic lipid-DNA complex formation as studied by isothermal titration calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Pozharski, Edwin; MacDonald, Robert C

    2002-07-01

    The detailed analysis of the cationic lipid-DNA complex formation by means of isothermal titration calorimetry is presented. Most experiments were done using 1,2-dioleyl-sn-glycero-3-ethylphosphocholine (EDOPC), but basic titrations were also done using DOTAP, DOTAP:DOPC, and DOTAP:DOPE mixtures. Complex formation was endothermic with less than 1 kcal absorbed per mole of lipid or DNA charge. This enthalpy change was attributed to DNA-DNA mutual repulsion within the lamellar complex. The exception was DOTAP:DOPE-containing lipoplex for which the enthalpy of formation was exothermic, presumably because of DOPE amine group protonation. Experimental conditions, namely, direction and titration increment as well as concentration of titrant, which dictate the structure of resulting lipoplex (whether lamellar complex or DNA-coated vesicle), were found to affect the apparent thermodynamics of complex formation. The structure, in turn, influences the biological properties of the lipoplex. If the titration of lipid into DNA was carried out in large increments, the DeltaH was larger than when the injection increments were smaller, a finding that is consistent with increased vesicle disruption under large increments and which is expected theoretically. Cationic lipid-DNA binding was weak in high ionic strength solutions, however, the effective binding constant is within micromolar range because of macromolecular nature of the interaction.

  14. 40 CFR Appendix A to Part 425 - Potassium Ferricyanide Titration Method

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... MDL. Spike recovery must be 40 to 120 percent for the analysis of a particular matrix type to be... swirl gently. Let stand for two minutes, add 10 ml. of a 30 percent zinc sulfate solution, and titrate.... Preparation of ferrous dimethylglyoxime indicator solution: Mix 10 ml. 0.6 percent ferrous sulfate, 50 ml....

  15. 40 CFR Appendix A to Part 425 - Potassium Ferricyanide Titration Method

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... MDL. Spike recovery must be 40 to 120 percent for the analysis of a particular matrix type to be... swirl gently. Let stand for two minutes, add 10 ml. of a 30 percent zinc sulfate solution, and titrate.... Preparation of ferrous dimethylglyoxime indicator solution: Mix 10 ml. 0.6 percent ferrous sulfate, 50 ml....

  16. Thermodynamics of cationic lipid-DNA complex formation as studied by isothermal titration calorimetry.

    PubMed Central

    Pozharski, Edwin; MacDonald, Robert C

    2002-01-01

    The detailed analysis of the cationic lipid-DNA complex formation by means of isothermal titration calorimetry is presented. Most experiments were done using 1,2-dioleyl-sn-glycero-3-ethylphosphocholine (EDOPC), but basic titrations were also done using DOTAP, DOTAP:DOPC, and DOTAP:DOPE mixtures. Complex formation was endothermic with less than 1 kcal absorbed per mole of lipid or DNA charge. This enthalpy change was attributed to DNA-DNA mutual repulsion within the lamellar complex. The exception was DOTAP:DOPE-containing lipoplex for which the enthalpy of formation was exothermic, presumably because of DOPE amine group protonation. Experimental conditions, namely, direction and titration increment as well as concentration of titrant, which dictate the structure of resulting lipoplex (whether lamellar complex or DNA-coated vesicle), were found to affect the apparent thermodynamics of complex formation. The structure, in turn, influences the biological properties of the lipoplex. If the titration of lipid into DNA was carried out in large increments, the DeltaH was larger than when the injection increments were smaller, a finding that is consistent with increased vesicle disruption under large increments and which is expected theoretically. Cationic lipid-DNA binding was weak in high ionic strength solutions, however, the effective binding constant is within micromolar range because of macromolecular nature of the interaction. PMID:12080142

  17. Tested Demonstrations: Comparison of Strong Acid and Weak Acid Titration Curves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1979-01-01

    A lecture demonstration is presented for comparing titration curves. A plot of pH vs volume of strong base is produced by connecting the external output of a pH meter to a strip recorder. Thus, pH is recorded as a function of time. (BB)

  18. Potentiometric titration of heterocyclic nitrogen bases in non-aqueous media.

    PubMed

    Rao, K C; Naidu, P R

    1972-11-01

    Pyridine, quinoline, isoquinoline, acridine, alpha-picoline, beta-picoline, gamma-picoline and 2,6-lutidine have been titrated potentio-metrically (calomel and glass electrodes), with chlorosulphonic acid in methyl ethyl ketone-acetic acid (1:1) medium, with an error of less than 1%.

  19. Trace analysis of acids and bases by conductometric titration with multiparametric non-linear regression.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Lúcia H G; Gutz, Ivano G R

    2006-03-15

    A chemometric method for analysis of conductometric titration data was introduced to extend its applicability to lower concentrations and more complex acid-base systems. Auxiliary pH measurements were made during the titration to assist the calculation of the distribution of protonable species on base of known or guessed equilibrium constants. Conductivity values of each ionized or ionizable species possibly present in the sample were introduced in a general equation where the only unknown parameters were the total concentrations of (conjugated) bases and of strong electrolytes not involved in acid-base equilibria. All these concentrations were adjusted by a multiparametric nonlinear regression (NLR) method, based on the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm. This first conductometric titration method with NLR analysis (CT-NLR) was successfully applied to simulated conductometric titration data and to synthetic samples with multiple components at concentrations as low as those found in rainwater (approximately 10 micromol L(-1)). It was possible to resolve and quantify mixtures containing a strong acid, formic acid, acetic acid, ammonium ion, bicarbonate and inert electrolyte with accuracy of 5% or better.

  20. Solvatochromic Dyes as pH-Independent Indicators for Ionophore Nanosphere-Based Complexometric Titrations.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Jingying; Xie, Xiaojiang; Bakker, Eric

    2015-12-15

    For half a century, complexometric titrations of metal ions have been performed with water-soluble chelators and indicators that typically require careful pH control. Very recently, ion-selective nanosphere emulsions were introduced that exhibit ion-exchange properties and are doped with lipophilic ionophores originally developed for chemical ion sensors. They may serve as novel, highly selective and pH independent complexometric reagents. While ion optode emulsions have been demonstrated as useful indicators for such titrations, they exhibit a pH cross-response that unfortunately complicates the identification of the end point. Here, we present pH-independent optode nanospheres as indicators for complexometric titrations, with calcium as an initial example. The nanospheres incorporate an ionic solvatochromic dye (SD), ion exchanger and ionophore. The solvatochromic dye will be only expelled from the core of the nanosphere into the aqueous solution at the end point at which point it results in an optical signal change. The titration curves are demonstrated to be pH-independent and with sharper end points than with previously reported chromoionophore-based optical nanospheres as indicator. The calcium concentration in mineral water was successfully determined using this method.

  1. Charge Density Quantification of Polyelectrolyte Polysaccharides by Conductometric Titration: An Analytical Chemistry Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farris, Stefano; Mora, Luigi; Capretti, Giorgio; Piergiovanni, Luciano

    2012-01-01

    An easy analytical method for determination of the charge density of polyelectrolytes, including polysaccharides and other biopolymers, is presented. The basic principles of conductometric titration, which is used in the pulp and paper industry as well as in colloid and interface science, were adapted to quantify the charge densities of a…

  2. Subsite binding energies of an exo-polygalacturonase using isothermal titration calorimetry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Thermodynamic parameters for binding of a series of galacturonic acid oligomers to an exo-polygalacturonase, RPG16 from Rhizopus oryzae, were determined by isothermal titration calorimetry. Binding of oligomers varying in chain length from two to five galacturonic acid residues is an exothermic proc...

  3. Avian influenza virus isolation, propagation and titration in embryonated chicken eggs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Avian influenza (AI) virus is usually isolated, propagated, and titrated in embryonated chickens eggs (ECE). Most any sample type can be accommodated for culture with appropriate processing. Isolation may also be accomplished in cell culture particularly if mammalian lineage isolates are suspected, ...

  4. Titration of a Solid Acid Monitored by X-Ray Diffraction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dungey, Keenan E.; Epstein, Paul

    2007-01-01

    An experiment is described to introduce students to an important class of solid-state reactions while reinforcing concepts of titration by using a pH meter and a powder X-ray diffractometer. The experiment was successful in teaching students the abstract concepts of solid-state structure and diffraction by applying the diffraction concepts learned…

  5. The Simulation of an Oxidation-Reduction Titration Curve with Computer Algebra

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whiteley, Richard V., Jr.

    2015-01-01

    Although the simulation of an oxidation/reduction titration curve is an important exercise in an undergraduate course in quantitative analysis, that exercise is frequently simplified to accommodate computational limitations. With the use of readily available computer algebra systems, however, such curves for complicated systems can be generated…

  6. Development of a Platform to Enable Fully Automated Cross-Titration Experiments.

    PubMed

    Cassaday, Jason; Finley, Michael; Squadroni, Brian; Jezequel-Sur, Sylvie; Rauch, Albert; Gajera, Bharti; Uebele, Victor; Hermes, Jeffrey; Zuck, Paul

    2017-04-01

    In the triage of hits from a high-throughput screening campaign or during the optimization of a lead compound, it is relatively routine to test compounds at multiple concentrations to determine potency and maximal effect. Additional follow-up experiments, such as agonist shift, can be quite valuable in ascertaining compound mechanism of action (MOA). However, these experiments require cross-titration of a test compound with the activating ligand of the receptor requiring 100-200 data points, severely limiting the number tested in MOA assays in a screening triage. We describe a process to enhance the throughput of such cross-titration experiments through the integration of Hewlett Packard's D300 digital dispenser onto one of our robotics platforms to enable on-the-fly cross-titration of compounds in a 1536-well plate format. The process handles all the compound management and data tracking, as well as the biological assay. The process relies heavily on in-house-built software and hardware, and uses our proprietary control software for the platform. Using this system, we were able to automate the cross-titration of compounds for both positive and negative allosteric modulators of two different G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) using two distinct assay detection formats, IP1 and Ca(2+) detection, on nearly 100 compounds for each target.

  7. Isothermal Titration Calorimetry and Macromolecular Visualization for the Interaction of Lysozyme and Its Inhibitors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wei, Chin-Chuan; Jensen, Drake; Boyle, Tiffany; O'Brien, Leah C.; De Meo, Cristina; Shabestary, Nahid; Eder, Douglas J.

    2015-01-01

    To provide a research-like experience to upper-division undergraduate students in a biochemistry teaching laboratory, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) is employed to determine the binding constants of lysozyme and its inhibitors, N-acetyl glucosamine trimer (NAG[subscript 3]) and monomer (NAG). The extremely weak binding of lysozyme/NAG is…

  8. Potentiometric titration of bisarenechromium compounds with an ion-selective electrode

    SciTech Connect

    Gur'ev, I.A.; Gur'eva, Z.M.; Sankova, E.V.; Sirotkin, N.I.

    1986-06-10

    A liquid-membrane ion-selective electrode was developed for determining bisbenzene-chromium and its electrochemical and analytical characteristics studied. Methods have also been developed for determining bisarenechromium compounds in the industrial product and its waste waters by potentiometric titration with sodium tetraphenylborate solution.

  9. Evaluation of the number of ionogenic groups of inulinase by acid-base titration.

    PubMed

    Kovaleva, T A; Holyavka, M G; Rezvan, S G; Kozhedub, S V

    2008-06-01

    Acid base titration showed that Aspergillus awamori inulinase includes 178 asparaginic and glutamic acid residues, 20 histidine, 10 serine, and 34 lysine and tyrosine residues. Denaturation temperature for this enzyme was calculated using analysis of the proportion of stabilizing and destabilizing amino acids in the molecule.

  10. Determination of the phenolic-group capacities of humic substances by non-aqueous titration technique.

    PubMed

    Kirishima, Akira; Ohnishi, Takashi; Sato, Nobuaki; Tochiyama, Osamu

    2009-07-15

    The phenolic-group capacities of five humic substances, such as, the Aldrich humic acid, the humic and fulvic acids extracted from a soil, the humic and fulvic acids extracted from a peat have been precisely determined by the non-aqueous potentiometric titration technique. The titration by KOH in the mixed solvent of DMSO:2-propanol:water=80:19.3:0.7 at [K(+)]=0.02 M enabled to measure the potential change in a wide range of pOH (=-log[OH(-)]), and thus to determine the capacities of phenolic groups which could not be precisely determined in the aqueous titration. The results of the titration revealed that the mean protonation constants of the phenolic groups were nearly the same for all humic substances and close to that of phenol in the same medium, indicating that each phenolic-group in the humic substances is rather isolated and is not electronically affected by other affecting groups in the humic macromolecule.

  11. Single-experiment displacement assay for quantifying high-affinity binding by isothermal titration calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Krainer, Georg; Keller, Sandro

    2015-04-01

    Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) is the gold standard for dissecting the thermodynamics of a biomolecular binding process within a single experiment. However, reliable determination of the dissociation constant (KD) from a single titration is typically limited to the range 100 μM>KD>1 nM. Interactions characterized by a lower KD can be assessed indirectly by so-called competition or displacement assays, provided that a suitable competitive ligand is available whose KD falls within the directly accessible window. However, this protocol is limited by the fact that it necessitates at least two titrations to characterize one high-affinity inhibitor, resulting in considerable consumption of both sample material and time. Here, we introduce a fast and efficient ITC displacement assay that allows for the simultaneous characterization of both a high-affinity ligand and a moderate-affinity ligand competing for the same binding site on a receptor within a single experiment. The protocol is based on a titration of the high-affinity ligand into a solution containing the moderate-affinity ligand bound to the receptor present in excess. The resulting biphasic binding isotherm enables accurate and precise determination of KD values and binding enthalpies (ΔH) of both ligands. We discuss the theoretical background underlying the approach, demonstrate its practical application to metal ion chelation, explore its potential and limitations with the aid of simulations and statistical analyses, and elaborate on potential applications to protein-inhibitor interactions.

  12. Acid-base titrations for polyacids: Significance of the pK sub a and parameters in the Kern equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meites, L.

    1978-01-01

    A new method is suggested for calculating the dissociation constants of polyvalent acids, especially polymeric acids. In qualitative form the most significant characteristics of the titration curves are demonstrated and identified which are obtained when titrating the solutions of such acids with a standard base potentiometrically.

  13. The Quantitative Resolution of a Mixture of Group II Metal Ions by Thermometric Titration with EDTA. An Analytical Chemistry Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Robert L.; Popham, Ronald E.

    1983-01-01

    Presents an experiment in thermometric titration used in an analytic chemistry-chemical instrumentation course, consisting of two titrations, one a mixture of calcium and magnesium, the other of calcium, magnesium, and barium ions. Provides equipment and solutions list/specifications, graphs, and discussion of results. (JM)

  14. Spectroscopic versus photometric metallicities: Milky Way dwarf spheroidal companions as a test case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lianou, S.; Grebel, E. K.; Koch, A.

    2011-07-01

    Aims: The method of deriving photometric metallicities using red giant branch stars is applied to resolved stellar populations under the common assumption that they mainly consist of single-age old stellar populations. We explore the effect of the presence of mixed-age stellar populations on deriving photometric metallicities. Methods: We use photometric data sets for the five Galactic dwarf spheroidals Sculptor, Sextans, Carina, Fornax, and Leo II in order to derive their photometric metallicity distribution functions from their resolved red giant branches using isochrones of the Dartmouth Stellar Evolutionary Database. We compare the photometric metallicities with published spectroscopic metallicities based on the analysis of the near-infrared Ca triplet (Ca T), both on the metallicity scale of Carretta & Gratton and on the scale defined by the Dartmouth isochrones. In addition, we compare the photometric metallicities with published spectroscopic metallicities based on spectral synthesis and medium-resolution spectroscopy, and on high resolution spectra where available. Results: The mean properties of the spectroscopic and photometric metallicity samples are comparable within the intrinsic scatter of each method although the mean metallicities of dSphs with pronounced intermediate-age population fractions may be underestimated by the photometric method by up to a few tenths of dex in [Fe/H]. The star-by-star differences of the spectroscopic minus the photometric metallicities show a wide range of values along the fiducial spectroscopic metallicity range, with the tendency to have systematically lower photometric metallicities for those dwarf spheroidals with a higher fraction of intermediate-age populations. Such discrepancies persist even in the case of the purely old Sculptor dSph, where one would naïvely expect a very good match when comparing with medium or low resolution metallicity measurements. Overall, the agreement between Ca T metallicities and

  15. Direct sensing of total acidity by chronopotentiometric flash titrations at polymer membrane ion-selective electrodes.

    PubMed

    Gemene, Kebede L; Bakker, Eric

    2008-05-15

    Polymer membrane ion-selective electrodes containing lipophilic ionophores are traditionally interrogated by zero current potentiometry, which, ideally, gives information on the sample activity of ionic species. It is shown here that a discrete cathodic current pulse across an H (+)-selective polymeric membrane doped with the ionophore ETH 5294 may be used for the chronopotentiometric detection of pH in well-buffered samples. However, a reduction in the buffer capacity leads to large deviations from the expected Nernstian response slope. This is explained by the local depletion of hydrogen ions at the sample-membrane interface as a result of the galvanostatically imposed ion flux in direction of the membrane. This depletion is found to be a function of the total acidity of the sample and can be directly monitored chronopotentiometrically in a flash titration experiment. The subsequent application of a baseline potential pulse reverses the extraction process of the current pulse, allowing one to interrogate the sample with minimal perturbation. In one protocol, total acidity is found to be proportional to the magnitude of applied current at the flash titration end point. More conveniently, the square root of the flash titration end point time observed at a fixed applied current is a linear function of the total acid concentration. This suggests that it is possible to perform rapid localized pH titrations at ion-selective electrodes without the need for volumetric titrimetry. The technique is explored here for acetic acid, MES and citric acid with promising results. Polymeric membrane electrodes based on poly(vinyl chloride) plasticized with o-nitrophenyl octyl ether in a 1:2 mass ratio may be used for the detection of acids of up to ca. 1 mM concentration, with flash titration times on the order of a few seconds. Possible limitations of the technique are discussed, including variations of the acid diffusion coefficients and influence of electrical migration.

  16. A disposable voltammetric cell for determining the titratable acidity in vinegar.

    PubMed

    Kotani, Akira; Miyaguchi, Yuji; Harada, Dai; Kusu, Fumiyo

    2003-11-01

    A disposable voltammetric cell using three pencil leads as working, reference, and counter electrodes was developed for determining the titratable acidity, i.e. the acid content in vinegar. The materials of the pencil leads were graphite-reinforcement carbons (GRCs). A voltammetric determination of acid was made by measuring the reduction prepeak current of 3,5-di-t-butyl-1,2-benzoquinone (DBBQ) due to the presence of acids in unbuffered solution. The potential stability of the pseudo-reference electrode of GRC was examined. The prepeak current was found to be proportional to the acetic acid concentration from 0.05 to 2.7 mM with a correlation coefficient of 0.999. The cell-to-cell reproducibility for 1 mM acetic acid was evaluated with ten individual disposable cells. The RSD of the prepeak current and the SD of the prepeak potential were 2.56% and 0.008, respectively. The titratable acidity in five vinegar samples was determined by voltammetry using disposable cells and compared with that of the titratable acidity determined by the conventional potentiometric titration method. We then observed the results by both methods, and found a correlation coefficient of 0.972. As such, the voltammetry using disposable-cell required only one thousandth the volume of a vinegar sample for the titration method. The disposable cell was superior to the conventional electrochemical cell, in terms of facility, environment-friendly, and economy, and thus a sensor using the present cell would be useful for routine work in the quality control of vinegar.

  17. Safety and tolerability of different titration rates of retigabine (ezogabine) in patients with partial-onset seizures.

    PubMed

    Biton, Victor; Gil-Nagel, Antonio; Brodie, Martin J; Derossett, Sarah E; Nohria, Virinder

    2013-11-01

    Retigabine (RTG; international nonproprietary name)/ezogabine (EZG; US adopted name) is an antiepileptic drug (AED) that prolongs neuronal voltage-gated potassium-channel KCNQ2-5 (Kv 7.2-7.5) opening. This double-blind study evaluated different RTG/EZG dose-titration rates. Patients (N=73) with partial-onset seizures receiving concomitant AEDs were randomized to one of three titration groups, all of which were initiated at RTG/EZG 300mg/day divided into three equal doses. Fast-, medium-, and slow-titration groups received dose increments of 150mg/day every 2, 4, and 7 days, respectively, achieving the target dose of 1200mg/day after 13, 25, and 43 days, respectively. Safety assessments were performed throughout. Discontinuation rates due to treatment-emergent adverse events (TEAEs) were numerically higher in the fast- (10/23) and medium- (7/22) titration groups than in the slow-titration group (3/23) but statistical significance was achieved only for the high-titration group compared with the low-titration group (p=0.024). Stratified analysis, with concomitant AEDs divided into enzyme inducers (carbamazepine, phenytoin, oxcarbazepine) or noninducers, showed that the risk of discontinuation due primarily to TEAEs was significantly higher in the fast- (p=0.010) but not in the medium-titration group (p=0.078) when compared with the slow-titration group. Overall, the slow-titration rate appeared to be best tolerated and was used in further efficacy and safety studies with RTG/EZG.

  18. A Photometric redshift galaxy catalog from the Red-Sequence Cluster Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, Bau-Ching; Yee, H.K.C.; Lin, H.; Gladders, M.D.; /Carnegie Inst. Observ.

    2005-02-01

    The Red-Sequence Cluster Survey (RCS) provides a large and deep photometric catalog of galaxies in the z' and R{sub c} bands for 90 square degrees of sky, and supplemental V and B data have been obtained for 33.6 deg{sup 2}. They compile a photometric redshift catalog from these 4-band data by utilizing the empirical quadratic polynomial photometric redshift fitting technique in combination with CNOC2 and GOODS/HDF-N redshift data. The training set includes 4924 spectral redshifts. The resulting catalog contains more than one million galaxies with photometric redshifts < 1.5 and R{sub c} < 24, giving an rms scatter {delta}({Delta}z) < 0.06 within the redshift range 0.2 < z < 0.5 and {sigma}({Delta}z) < 0.11 for galaxies at 0.0 < z < 1.5. They describe the empirical quadratic polynomial photometric redshift fitting technique which they use to determine the relation between red-shift and photometry. A kd-tree algorithm is used to divide up the sample to improve the accuracy of the catalog. They also present a method for estimating the photometric redshift error for individual galaxies. They show that the redshift distribution of the sample is in excellent agreement with smaller and much deeper photometric and spectroscopic redshift surveys.

  19. Gaia Data Release 1. Principles of the photometric calibration of the G band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrasco, J. M.; Evans, D. W.; Montegriffo, P.; Jordi, C.; van Leeuwen, F.; Riello, M.; Voss, H.; De Angeli, F.; Busso, G.; Fabricius, C.; Cacciari, C.; Weiler, M.; Pancino, E.; Brown, A. G. A.; Holland, G.; Burgess, P.; Osborne, P.; Altavilla, G.; Gebran, M.; Ragaini, S.; Galleti, S.; Cocozza, G.; Marinoni, S.; Bellazzini, M.; Bragaglia, A.; Federici, L.; Balaguer-Núñez, L.

    2016-11-01

    Context. Gaia is an ESA cornerstone mission launched on 19 December 2013 aiming to obtain the most complete and precise 3D map of our Galaxy by observing more than one billion sources. This paper is part of a series of documents explaining the data processing and its results for Gaia Data Release 1, focussing on the G band photometry. Aims: This paper describes the calibration model of the Gaia photometric passband for Gaia Data Release 1. Methods: The overall principle of splitting the process into internal and external calibrations is outlined. In the internal calibration, a self-consistent photometric system is generated. Then, the external calibration provides the link to the absolute photometric flux scales. Results: The Gaia photometric calibration pipeline explained here was applied to the first data release with good results. Details are given of the various calibration elements including the mathematical formulation of the models used and of the extraction and preparation of the required input parameters (e.g. colour terms). The external calibration in this first release provides the absolute zero point and photometric transformations from the Gaia G passband to other common photometric systems. Conclusions: This paper describes the photometric calibration implemented for the first Gaia data release and the instrumental effects taken into account. For this first release no aperture losses, radiation damage, and other second-order effects have not yet been implemented in the calibration.

  20. SNIa detection in the SNLS photometric analysis using Morphological Component Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Möller, A.; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V.; Neveu, J.; Palanque-Delabrouille, N.; Lanusse, F.; Starck, J.-L. E-mail: vanina.ruhlmann-kleider@cea.fr E-mail: jeremy.neveu@cea.fr E-mail: jstarck@cea.fr

    2015-04-01

    Detection of supernovae (SNe) and, more generally, of transient events in large surveys can provide numerous false detections. In the case of a deferred processing of survey images, this implies reconstructing complete light curves for all detections, requiring sizable processing time and resources. Optimizing the detection of transient events is thus an important issue for both present and future surveys. We present here the optimization done in the SuperNova Legacy Survey (SNLS) for the 5-year data deferred photometric analysis. In this analysis, detections are derived from stacks of subtracted images with one stack per lunation. The 3-year analysis provided 300,000 detections dominated by signals of bright objects that were not perfectly subtracted. Allowing these artifacts to be detected leads not only to a waste of resources but also to possible signal coordinate contamination. We developed a subtracted image stack treatment to reduce the number of non SN-like events using morphological component analysis. This technique exploits the morphological diversity of objects to be detected to extract the signal of interest. At the level of our subtraction stacks, SN-like events are rather circular objects while most spurious detections exhibit different shapes. A two-step procedure was necessary to have a proper evaluation of the noise in the subtracted image stacks and thus a reliable signal extraction. We also set up a new detection strategy to obtain coordinates with good resolution for the extracted signal. SNIa Monte-Carlo (MC) generated images were used to study detection efficiency and coordinate resolution. When tested on SNLS 3-year data this procedure decreases the number of detections by a factor of two, while losing only 10% of SN-like events, almost all faint ones. MC results show that SNIa detection efficiency is equivalent to that of the original method for bright events, while the coordinate resolution is improved.

  1. Data-driven, Interpretable Photometric Redshifts Trained on Heterogeneous and Unrepresentative Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leistedt, Boris; Hogg, David W.

    2017-03-01

    We present a new method for inferring photometric redshifts in deep galaxy and quasar surveys, based on a data-driven model of latent spectral energy distributions (SEDs) and a physical model of photometric fluxes as a function of redshift. This conceptually novel approach combines the advantages of both machine learning methods and template fitting methods by building template SEDs directly from the spectroscopic training data. This is made computationally tractable with Gaussian processes operating in flux–redshift space, encoding the physics of redshifts and the projection of galaxy SEDs onto photometric bandpasses. This method alleviates the need to acquire representative training data or to construct detailed galaxy SED models; it requires only that the photometric bandpasses and calibrations be known or have parameterized unknowns. The training data can consist of a combination of spectroscopic and deep many-band photometric data with reliable redshifts, which do not need to entirely spatially overlap with the target survey of interest or even involve the same photometric bands. We showcase the method on the i-magnitude-selected, spectroscopically confirmed galaxies in the COSMOS field. The model is trained on the deepest bands (from SUBARU and HST) and photometric redshifts are derived using the shallower SDSS optical bands only. We demonstrate that we obtain accurate redshift point estimates and probability distributions despite the training and target sets having very different redshift distributions, noise properties, and even photometric bands. Our model can also be used to predict missing photometric fluxes or to simulate populations of galaxies with realistic fluxes and redshifts, for example.

  2. Predicting Fundamental Stellar Parameters From Photometric Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Adam; Richards, J.; Bloom, J. S.; a larger Team

    2014-01-01

    We present a new machine-learning-based framework for the prediction of the fundamental stellar parameters, Teff, log g, and [Fe/H], based on the photometric light curves of variable stellar sources. The method was developed following a systematic spectroscopic survey of stellar variability. Variable sources were selected from repeated Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) observations of Stripe 82, and spectroscopic observations were obtained with Hectospec on the 6.5-m Multi-Mirror Telescope. In sum, spectra were obtained for ~9000 stellar variables (including ~3000 from the SDSS archive), for which we measured Teff, log g, and [Fe/H] using the Segue Stellar Parameters Pipeline (SSPP). Examining the full sample of ~67k variables in Stripe 82, we show that the vast majority of photometric variables are consistent with main-sequence stars, even after restricting the search to high galactic latitudes. From the spectroscopic sample we confirm that most of these stellar variables are G and K dwarfs, though there is a bias in the output of the SSPP that prevents the identification of M type variables. We are unable to identify the dominant source of variability for these stars, but eclipsing systems and/or star spots are the most likely explanation. We develop a machine-learning model that can determine Teff, log g, and [Fe/H] without obtaining a spectrum. Instead, the random-forest-regression model uses SDSS color information and light-curve features to infer stellar properties. We detail how the feature set is pruned and the model is optimized to produce final predictions of Teff, log g, and [Fe/H] with a typical scatter of 165 K, 0.42 dex, and 0.33 dex, respectively. We further show that for the subset of variables with at least 50 observations in the g band the typical scatter reduces to 75 K, 0.19 dex, and 0.16 dex, respectively. We consider these results an important step on the path to the efficient and optimal extraction of information from future time

  3. Predicting Fundamental Stellar Parameters from Photometric Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, A.

    We present a new machine learning based framework for the prediction of the fun- damental stellar parameters, Teff, logg, and [Fe/H], based on the photometric light curves of variable stellar sources. The method was developed following a systematic spectroscopic survey of stellar variability. Variable sources were selected from re- peated Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) observations of Stripe 82, and spectroscopic observations were obtained with Hectospec on the 6.5-m Multi-Mirror Telescope. In sum, spectra were obtained for ˜9,000 stellar variables (including ˜3,000 from the SDSS archive), for which we measured Teff, log g, and [Fe/H] using the Segue Stellar Parameters Pipeline (SSPP). Examining the full sample of ˜67,000 variables in Stripe 82, we show that the vast majority of photometric variables are consistent with main-sequence stars, even after restricting the search to high galactic latitudes. From the spectroscopic sample we confirm that most of these stellar variables are G and K dwarfs, though there is a bias in the output of the SSPP that prevents the identification of M type variables. We are unable to identify the dominant source of variability for these stars, but eclipsing systems and/or star spots are the most likely explanation. We develop a machine learning model that can determine Teff , log g, and [Fe/H] without obtaining a spectrum. Instead, the random forest regression model uses SDSS color information and light curve features to infer stellar properties. We detail how the feature set is pruned and the model is optimized to produce final predictions of Teff, log g, and [Fe/H] with a typical scatter of 165 K, 0.42 dex, and 0.33 dex, respectively. We further show that for the subset of variables with at least 50 observations in the g band the typical scatter reduces to 75 K, 0.19 dex, and 0.16 dex, respectively. We consider these results an important step on the path to the efficient and optimal extraction of information from future time

  4. KEPLER INPUT CATALOG: PHOTOMETRIC CALIBRATION AND STELLAR CLASSIFICATION

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Timothy M.; Latham, David W.; Esquerdo, Gilbert A.; Everett, Mark E. E-mail: latham@cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: everett@noao.edu

    2011-10-15

    We describe the photometric calibration and stellar classification methods used by the Stellar Classification Project to produce the Kepler Input Catalog (KIC). The KIC is a catalog containing photometric and physical data for sources in the Kepler mission field of view; it is used by the mission to select optimal targets. Four of the visible-light (g, r, i, z) magnitudes used in the KIC are tied to Sloan Digital Sky Survey magnitudes; the fifth (D51) is an AB magnitude calibrated to be consistent with Castelli and Kurucz (CK) model atmosphere fluxes. We derived atmospheric extinction corrections from hourly observations of secondary standard fields within the Kepler field of view. For these filters and extinction estimates, repeatability of absolute photometry for stars brighter than magnitude 15 is typically 2%. We estimated stellar parameters {l_brace}T{sub eff}, log (g), log (Z), E{sub B-V}{r_brace} using Bayesian posterior probability maximization to match observed colors to CK stellar atmosphere models. We applied Bayesian priors describing the distribution of solar-neighborhood stars in the color-magnitude diagram, in log (Z), and in height above the galactic plane. Several comparisons with samples of stars classified by other means indicate that for 4500 K {<=}T{sub eff} {<=} 6500 K, our classifications are reliable within about {+-}200 K and 0.4 dex in log (g) for dwarfs, with somewhat larger log (g) uncertainties for giants. It is difficult to assess the reliability of our log (Z) estimates, but there is reason to suspect that it is poor, particularly at extreme T{sub eff}. Comparisons between the CK models and observed colors are generally satisfactory with some exceptions, notably for stars cooler than 4500 K. Of great importance for the Kepler mission, for T{sub eff} {<=} 5400 K, comparison with asteroseismic results shows that the distinction between main-sequence stars and giants is reliable with about 98% confidence. Larger errors in log (g) occur

  5. Unraveling the thermodynamics and kinetics of RNA assembly: surface plasmon resonance, isothermal titration calorimetry, and circular dichroism.

    PubMed

    Hoogstraten, Charles G; Sumita, Minako; White, Neil A

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms and driving forces of the assembly of RNA tertiary structure are a topic of much current interest. In several systems, including our own work in the docking transition of the hairpin ribozyme, intramolecular RNA tertiary folding has been converted into an intermolecular binding event, allowing the full power of contemporary biophysical techniques to be brought to bear on the analysis. We review the use of three such methods: circular dichroism to isolate the binding of multivalent cations coupled to tertiary assembly, surface plasmon resonance to determine the rates of association and dissociation, and isothermal titration calorimetry to dissect the thermodynamic contributions to RNA assembly events. We pay particular attention to practical aspects of these studies, such as careful preparation of samples with fixed free concentrations of cations in order to avoid errors due to ion depletion effects that are common in RNA systems. Examples of applications from our own work with the hairpin ribozyme are shown. Distinctions among the data handling procedures for the various techniques used and solution conditions encountered are also discussed.

  6. Photometric studies of δ Scuti stars. I. IP Virginis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Joner, Michael D.; Hintz, Eric G.; Collier, Matthew W.

    1998-01-01

    We report 15 new times of maximum light for the δ Scuti star IP Virginis (formerly known as SA 106‐1024). An analysis of all times of maximum light indicates that IP Vir has been decreasing in period at a constant rate of − days day−1. Evidence is also presented that IP Vir is a double‐mode variable with a period ratio of . This period ratio predicts a [Fe/H] value of −0.3. From photometric (uvbyβ) observations, we find a foreground reddening of .008 mag and a metallicity of [Fe/H] = +0.05. It is shown that [Fe/H] = −0.3 is most likely the correct value. Intrinsic ‐ and c1‐values, plotted in a model atmosphere grid, indicate a mean effective temperature, K, and a mean surface gravity, . All of these physical parameters support Landolt's initial conclusion that IP Vir is an ordinary δ Sct star.

  7. A photometric and orbital analysis of GT MUSCAE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdoch, K. A.; Hearnshaw, J. B.; Kilmartin, P. M.; Gilmore, A. C.

    1995-10-01

    GT Mus is a quadruple system comprising a long-period RS CVn-type binary (HD 101379) and a pair of eclipsing A dwarfs (HD 101380). Six and a half years of UBV (RI)_C photometry obtained at the Mt John University Observatory has enabled identification of four distinct types of photometric variability in this system. These are (1) a slowly changing mean magnitude, which probably arises from an activity-cycle-like effect in the active component of HD 101379, (2) a periodic variation (P_rot~64d), which is attributed to rotational modulation due to spots on the active star, (3) a periodic variation (P_eclipse=2.7546d) due to the eclipses of HD 101380, and (4) an excess in the I band, which occurs on a short time-scale (<1d) and is probably associated with HD 101379 activity. The evolution of the light curve of HD 101379 is fast with respect to the rotational period, suggesting rapid spot evolution for which we anticipate a possible model. The colours of HD 101379, even at maximum brightness, are excessively red for its spectral type, unless there is significant reddening by dust. Radial velocity measurements of HD 101379 are also presented, along with an improved determination of the orbit of this somewhat long-period (P_orb=61.448d) system.

  8. Photometric observations of facular contrasts near the solar limb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrence, J. K.; Chapman, G. A.

    1988-12-01

    Digital, photometric images of several active regions near the solar limb made with 1.5 A effective bandpass at 6264 A are analyzed. From three to ten images were made per day on several days during 1983, 1984, and 1987 with the San Fernando Observatory 28 cm vacuum solar telescope and spectroheliograph and 512 element Reticon linear diode arrays. Pixel spacing is 0.94 arcsec. Pixels in each image were sorted into quiet sun and facular intensity distributions by mu value, where mu = cos theta and theta is the heliocentric angle between the pixel and the direction of earth. These distributions were converted to overall average values of facular pixel contrast relative to the quiet sun background by mu value, and a center-limb variation of contrast per facular element was derived. If one is careful to distinguish between contrasts per unit projected area (pixel contrasts) and contrasts per facular element or individual flux tube, the results are in reasonable agreement with those of other workers. The center-limb contrast variation resembles a 'hot wall' model of facular emission, with indications of an additional emitting component which protrudes above the photospheric level.

  9. An improved multiple flame photometric detector for gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Clark, Adrian G; Thurbide, Kevin B

    2015-11-20

    An improved multiple flame photometric detector (mFPD) is introduced, based upon interconnecting fluidic channels within a planar stainless steel (SS) plate. Relative to the previous quartz tube mFPD prototype, the SS mFPD provides a 50% reduction in background emission levels, an orthogonal analytical flame, and easier more sensitive operation. As a result, sulfur response in the SS mFPD spans 4 orders of magnitude, yields a minimum detectable limit near 9×10(-12)gS/s, and has a selectivity approaching 10(4) over carbon. The device also exhibits exceptionally large resistance to hydrocarbon response quenching. Additionally, the SS mFPD uniquely allows analyte emission monitoring in the multiple worker flames for the first time. The findings suggest that this mode can potentially further improve upon the analytical flame response of sulfur (both linear HSO, and quadratic S2) and also phosphorus. Of note, the latter is nearly 20-fold stronger in S/N in the collective worker flames response and provides 6 orders of linearity with a detection limit of about 2.0×10(-13)gP/s. Overall, the results indicate that this new SS design notably improves the analytical performance of the mFPD and can provide a versatile and beneficial monitoring tool for gas chromatography.

  10. Infrared photometric behavior and opposition effect of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erard, S.; Bibring, J-P.; Drossart, P.

    1992-01-01

    Although the instrument wasn't designed for this purpose, data from the imaging spectrometer ISM may be used for studying photometric variations of Mars reflectance, that are related to the surface materials and aerosols physical properties. ISM flew aboard the Phobos-2 spacecraft which orbited Mars from January to March, 1989. About 40,000 spectra were acquired in 128 channels ranging from 0.76 to 3.16 micro-m, with a spatial resolution of 25 km and a signal-to-noise ratio ranging up to 1000. Analysis of the results leads to the following conclusions: width variations of the opposition surge can be related to differences in porosity or grain size distribution on the various domains, with little or no effect from suspended dust. As the biggest effects are observed on dark and bright materials, intermediate behaviors on average-bright regions cannot result from a mixing process, but are more likely to come from either cementation processes or modification of the grain size distribution under the influence of wind, which under Martian conditions preferentially removes the biggest particles. Thus, a surface dust consisting in big bright and small dark grains could explain the observations.

  11. Photometric Modelling of Close Binary Star CN And

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jassur, D. M. Z.; Khodadadi, A.

    2006-03-01

    The results of two color photometry of active close binary CN And are presented and analyzed. The light curves of the system are obviously asymmetric, with the primary maximum brighter than the sec-ondary maximum, which is known as the O'Conell effect. The most plau-sible explanation of the asymmetry is expected to be due to spot activity of the primary component. For the determination of physical and geometrical parameters, the most new version of W--D code was used, but the presence of asymmetry prevented the convergence of the method when the whole light curves were used. The solutions were obtained by applying mode 3 of W--D code to the first half of the light curves, assuming synchronous rota-tion and zero eccentricity. Absolute parameters of the system were obtained from combining the photometric solution with spectroscopic data obtained from radial velocity curve analysis. The results indicate the poor thermal contact of the components and transit primary minimum. Finally the O--C diagram was analyzed. It was found that the orbital period of the system is changing with a rate of dP/dt =-2 2 6-10??? 10 which corresponds to mass transfer from more massive component to less massive with the rate of dM/dt ?4 82-10??? 8 M sun year.

  12. Characterization of extrasolar terrestrial planets from diurnal photometric variability.

    PubMed

    Ford, E B; Seager, S; Turner, E L

    2001-08-30

    The detection of massive planets orbiting nearby stars has become almost routine, but current techniques are as yet unable to detect terrestrial planets with masses comparable to the Earth's. Future space-based observatories to detect Earth-like planets are being planned. Terrestrial planets orbiting in the habitable zones of stars-where planetary surface conditions are compatible with the presence of liquid water-are of enormous interest because they might have global environments similar to Earth's and even harbour life. The light scattered by such a planet will vary in intensity and colour as the planet rotates; the resulting light curve will contain information about the planet's surface and atmospheric properties. Here we report a model that predicts features that should be discernible in the light curve obtained by low-precision photometry. For extrasolar planets similar to Earth, we expect daily flux variations of up to hundreds of per cent, depending sensitively on ice and cloud cover as well as seasonal variations. This suggests that the meteorological variability, composition of the surface (for example, ocean versus land fraction) and rotation period of an Earth-like planet could be derived from photometric observations. Even signatures of Earth-like plant life could be constrained or possibly, with further study, even uniquely determined.

  13. Photometric and polarimetric properties of the Bruderheim chondritic meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egan, W. G.; Veverka, J.; Noland, M.; Hilgeman, T.

    1973-01-01

    Photometric and polarimetric laboratory measurements were made as a function of phase angle in the U(0.36 microns), G(0.54 microns) and R(0.67 microns) bands for 0, 30 and 60 deg incident illumination on four particle size ranges of Bruderheim, an L6 olivine-hypersthene chondritic meteorite. The four particle size ranges were: 0.25-4.76 mm coated with less than 74 microns powder, 74-250 microns, and less than 37 microns. In addition, normal reflectance measurements were made in the spectral range from 0.31 to 1.1 microns. Comparison with astronomical data reveals that none of the asteroids in the main belt for which adequate observations exist can be matched with Bruderheim, which is representative of the most common meteoritic material encountered by the Earth. However, it appears from the polarization and photometry data that the surface of the Apollo asteroid Icarus is consistent with an ordinary chondrite composition. This suggests the possibility that this material, although common in Earth-crossing orbits, is rare as a surface constituent in the main asteroid belt.

  14. Photometric Asymmetry Between Clockwise and Counterclockwise Spiral Galaxies in SDSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamir, Lior

    2017-02-01

    While galaxies with clockwise and counterclockwise handedness are visually different, they are expected to be symmetric in all of their other characteristics. Previous experiments using both manual analysis and machine vision have shown that the handedness of Sloan Digital Sky Survey galaxies can be predicted with accuracy significantly higher than mere chance using its photometric data alone. However, some of these previous experiments were based on manually classified galaxies, and the results may therefore be subjected to bias originated from the human perception. This paper describes an experiment based on a set of 162,514 galaxies classified automatically to clockwise and counterclockwise spiral galaxies, showing that the source of the asymmetry in Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) database is not the human perception bias. The results are compared to two smaller datasets, and confirm the observation that the handedness of SDSS galaxies can be predicted by their photometry. The experiment also shows statistically significant differences in the measured magnitude of SDSS galaxies, according which galaxies with clockwise patterns are brighter than galaxies with counterclockwise patterns. The magnitude of that difference changes across RA ranges, and exhibits a strong correlation with the cosine of the right ascension.

  15. ANALYTICAL GALAXY PROFILES FOR PHOTOMETRIC AND LENSING ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Spergel, David N.

    2010-11-15

    This article introduces a family of analytical functions of the form x {sup {nu}} K {sub {nu}}(x), where K {sub {nu}} is the incomplete Bessel function of the third kind. This family of functions can describe the density profile, projected and integrated light profiles, and the gravitational potentials of galaxies. For the proper choice of parameters, these functions accurately approximate Sersic functions over a range of indices and are good fits to galaxy light profiles. With an additional parameter corresponding to a galaxy core radius, these functions can fit galaxy like M87 over a factor of 10{sup 5} in radius. Unlike Sersic profiles, these functions have simple analytical two-dimensional and three-dimensional Fourier transforms, so they are easily convolved with spatially varying point-spread function (PSF) and are well suited for photometric and lensing analysis. We use these functions to estimate the effects of seeing on lensing measurements and show that high S/N measurements, even when the PSF is larger than the galaxy effective radius, should be able to recover accurate estimates of lensing distortions by weighting light in the outer isophotes that are less affected by seeing.

  16. Atmospheric Emissions Photometric Imaging Experiment For Spacelab 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandie, William G.; Mende, Stephen B.; Swenson, Gary R.; Polites, Michael E.

    1983-12-01

    The atmospheric emissions photometric imaging (AEPI) experiment to be flown on Spacelab 1 is designed to study faint natural and artificial atmospheric emission phenomena. Atmospheric emissions in the spectral region 2000 A to 7500 A from two optical channels, wide angle and telephoto, are detected by an image-enhanced low-light-level TV system. A third, telephoto, optical channel images onto the photocathode of a microchannel plate photomultiplier tube having 100 discrete anodes. Photons are counted for each discrete anode, providing a direct measure of the luminosity of an object viewed by the TV telephoto lens, albeit with low spatial resolution. Detector pointing in the range +/-40°x+/-80°exclusive of restrictions due to the proximity of other experiments is provided by a two-axis gimbal made from a surplus Apollo telescope mount (MAST). The pointing stability is 1 arc min with respect to the spacecraft coordinate system for an exposure of one s, and the tracking capability is 3.5 deg - s-1 with a stability of 1 arc min. The detector and pointing system are located on the Spacelab pallet and are controlled by stored programs resident in the dedicated experiment processor located in the Spacelab module.

  17. Atmospheric emissions photometric imaging experiment /AEPT/ for Spacelab 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandie, W. G.; Mende, S. B.; Swenson, G. R.; Polites, M. E.

    1981-04-01

    The atmospheric emissions photometric imaging experiment (AEPI) to be flown on Spacelab 1 is designed to study faint natural and artificial atmospheric emission phenomena. Optical emissions are imaged in the region 2150 A to 7320 A using a television system consisting of two optical channels, one wide-angle and one telephoto. The detection system is an image-enhanced SEC vidicon. A third optical channel images onto the photocathode of a microchannel plate photomultiplier tube that has 100 discrete anodes. Photons are counted for each discrete anode, providing a direct measure of the luminosity of an object viewed by the TV telephoto lens, albeit with low spatial resolution. The AEPI detector is mounted on a two-axis gimbal comprised of a Modified Apollo Telescope Mount Star Tracker (MAST), which provides experiment pointing over a 40-deg x 80-deg range, exclusive of restrictions due to the proximity of other experiments. The pointing stability is 1 arcmin with respect to the spacecraft coordinate system for an exposure of 1 second. The tracking capability is 3.5 deg/s with a stability of 1 arcmin. The detector and pointing system are located on the Spacelab pallet. The experiment is controlled by stored programs resident in the Dedicated Experiment Processor located in the Spacelab module.

  18. Improving Photometric Calibration of Meteor Video Camera Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ehlert, Steven; Kingery, Aaron; Suggs, Robert

    2016-01-01

    We present the results of new calibration tests performed by the NASA Meteoroid Environment Oce (MEO) designed to help quantify and minimize systematic uncertainties in meteor photometry from video camera observations. These systematic uncertainties can be categorized by two main sources: an imperfect understanding of the linearity correction for the MEO's Watec 902H2 Ultimate video cameras and uncertainties in meteor magnitudes arising from transformations between the Watec camera's Sony EX-View HAD bandpass and the bandpasses used to determine reference star magnitudes. To address the rst point, we have measured the linearity response of the MEO's standard meteor video cameras using two independent laboratory tests on eight cameras. Our empirically determined linearity correction is critical for performing accurate photometry at low camera intensity levels. With regards to the second point, we have calculated synthetic magnitudes in the EX bandpass for reference stars. These synthetic magnitudes enable direct calculations of the meteor's photometric ux within the camera band-pass without requiring any assumptions of its spectral energy distribution. Systematic uncertainties in the synthetic magnitudes of individual reference stars are estimated at 0:20 mag, and are limited by the available spectral information in the reference catalogs. These two improvements allow for zero-points accurate to 0:05 ?? 0:10 mag in both ltered and un ltered camera observations with no evidence for lingering systematics.

  19. Photometric and Spectral Study of the Saturnian Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Sarah F.

    2005-01-01

    Photometric and spectra analysis of data from the Cassini Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) has yielded intriguing findings regarding the surface properties of several of the icy Saturnian satellites. Spectral cubes were obtained of these satellites with a wavelength distribution in the IR far more extensive than from any previous observations. Disk-integrated solar phase curves were constructed in several key IR wavelengths that are indicative of key properties of the surface of the body, such as macroscopic roughness, fluffiness (or the porosity of the surface), global albedo and scattering properties of surface particles. Polynomial fits to these phase curves indicate a linear albedo trend of the curvature of the phase functions. Rotational phase functions from Enceladus were found to exhibit a double-peaked sinusoidal curve, which shows larger amplitudes for bands corresponding to water ice and a linear amplitude-albedo trend. These functions indicate regions on the surface of the satellite of more recent geologic activity. In addition, recent images of Enceladus show tectonic features and an absence of impact craters on Southern latitudes which could be indicative of a younger surface. Investigations into the properties of these features using VIMS are underway.

  20. Explaining Multi-wavelength Photometric Variability in Young Stellar Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kesseli, Aurora; Whitney, B.; Wood, K.; Plavchan, P.; Terebey, S.; Stauffer, J. R.; Morales-Calderon, M.; YSOVAR

    2013-01-01

    We explore a variety of radiation transfer models to explain multi-wavelength photometric variability of young stellar objects in the Orion Nebula Cluster (Morales-Calderon et al. (2011). Our models include hotspots, warps in the accretion disk, and spiral arms. Variability comes in different types, which have been categorized as periodic or quasi-periodic, narrow or broad dips in the light curves, and rapid flux variations or “wild type” stars. Our models can successfully reproduce these. The optical and near-infrared light curves are sensitive to the stellar variations and obscurations from the circumstellar material. The mid-infrared provides an additional diagnostic because it is sensitive to emission from the inner disk and the inner wall height. Our models make specific predictions as to the shapes and phasing of optical through mid-infrared photometry that can be tested with multi-wavelength time-series data. This work is based in part on observations made with the Spitzer Space Telescope, which is operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology under a contract with NASA. Support for this work was provided by NASA through an award issued by JPL/Caltech and was partially supported by the National Science Foundation's REU program through NSF Award AST-1004881.

  1. Photometric Stereo for General BRDFs via Reflection Sparsity Modeling.

    PubMed

    Han, Tian-Qi; Shen, Hui-Liang

    2015-12-01

    This paper proposes a pixelwise photometric stereo method for object surfaces with general bidirectional reflectance distribution functions (BRDFs) via appropriate reflection modeling. The modeling is based on three general characteristics of reflection components, i.e., the smooth variation of diffuse reflection, the concentration of specular reflection, and the low-intensity nature of shadow. A graph, whose nodes are light directions, is introduced to model these characteristics. In the graph, the neighborhood of nodes is determined by finding the light sources with close directions. The smoothness of the diffuse component is termed as the summation of local variations under all light sources. The specular reflection is modeled by group sparsity, and the shadow is determined via weighted l1 -norm modeling. The optimization problem, which incorporates these three modeling terms, is cast as a second-order cone programming problem. The proposed method is evaluated on both synthetic and real-world scenes with both isotropic and anisotropic materials. The experimental results show that the method is effective for object surfaces with general BRDFs and outperforms the state-of-the-arts.

  2. Getting leverage on inflation with a large photometric redshift survey

    SciTech Connect

    Basse, Tobias; Hannestad, Steen; Hamann, Jan; Wong, Yvonne Y.Y. E-mail: jan.hamann@cern.ch E-mail: yvonne.y.wong@unsw.edu.au

    2015-06-01

    We assess the potential of a future large-volume photometric redshift survey to constrain observational inflationary parameters using three large-scale structure observables: the angular shear and galaxy power spectra, and the cluster mass function measured through weak lensing. When used in combination with Planck-like CMB measurements, we find that the spectral index n{sub s} can be constrained to a 1 σ precision of up to 0.0025. The sensitivity to the running of the spectral index can potentially improve to 0.0017, roughly a factor of five better than the present 1σ constraint from Planck and auxiliary CMB data, allowing us to test the assumptions of the slow-roll scenario with unprecedented accuracy. Interestingly, neither CMB+shear nor CMB+galaxy nor CMB+clusters alone can achieve this level of sensitivity; it is the combined power of all three probes that conspires to break the different parameter degeneracies inherent in each type of observations. We make our forecast software publicly available via download or upon request from the authors.

  3. Catastrophic photometric redshift errors: Weak-lensing survey requirements

    DOE PAGES

    Bernstein, Gary; Huterer, Dragan

    2010-01-11

    We study the sensitivity of weak lensing surveys to the effects of catastrophic redshift errors - cases where the true redshift is misestimated by a significant amount. To compute the biases in cosmological parameters, we adopt an efficient linearized analysis where the redshift errors are directly related to shifts in the weak lensing convergence power spectra. We estimate the number Nspec of unbiased spectroscopic redshifts needed to determine the catastrophic error rate well enough that biases in cosmological parameters are below statistical errors of weak lensing tomography. While the straightforward estimate of Nspec is ~106 we find that using onlymore » the photometric redshifts with z ≤ 2.5 leads to a drastic reduction in Nspec to ~ 30,000 while negligibly increasing statistical errors in dark energy parameters. Therefore, the size of spectroscopic survey needed to control catastrophic errors is similar to that previously deemed necessary to constrain the core of the zs – zp distribution. We also study the efficacy of the recent proposal to measure redshift errors by cross-correlation between the photo-z and spectroscopic samples. We find that this method requires ~ 10% a priori knowledge of the bias and stochasticity of the outlier population, and is also easily confounded by lensing magnification bias. In conclusion, the cross-correlation method is therefore unlikely to supplant the need for a complete spectroscopic redshift survey of the source population.« less

  4. Simultaneous photometric correction and defect detection in semiconductor manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yijiang; Lam, Edmund Y.

    2006-02-01

    This paper reports on an image processing algorithm for simultaneous photometric correction and defect detection in semiconductor manufacturing. We note that this problem has some resemblance to change detection in real time image analysis. In particular, the changes between the two images are analogous to the defects in our machine vision system. We therefore applied several detection methods and examined their applicability to defect detection. We first performed a sub-pixel image registration, using a phase correlation method together with a singular value decomposition factorization of the correlation matrix to compute the necessary alignment. We then tested a few change detection methods, including the shading model, derivative model, statistical change detection, linear dependence change detector and Wronskian change detection model. We subjected this system to our collection of raw data acquired from an industrial system, and we evaluated the different methods with respect to the detection accuracy, robustness, and speed of the system. We have promising results at this stage, especially in detecting the blob and line defects that are most commonly found, and when the lighting variation is within a certain threshold.

  5. MULTIBAND PHOTOMETRIC AND SPECTROSCOPIC ANALYSIS OF HV Cnc

    SciTech Connect

    Gökay, G.; Gürol, B.; Derman, E.

    2013-11-01

    In this paper, radial velocity and VI- and JHK{sub S} - (Two Micron All Sky Survey) band photometric data of the detached system HV Cnc have been analyzed. The primary component of HV Cnc, which is a member of the M67 cluster, is suspected to be either a blue straggler or turn-off star. The system is a single-lined spectroscopic binary and its light curve shows a total eclipse. Spectroscopic observations of the system revealed the third component, which shows contribution to the total light of the system. Light curve and radial velocity data have been analyzed using the Wilson-Devinney (W-D) code and JHK{sub S} filter definitions computed for the W-D code in this work. Our analysis shows that the mass and radius of the primary and secondary components are 1.31 M {sub ☉}, 0.52 M {sub ☉}, 1.87 R {sub ☉}, and 0.48 R {sub ☉}, respectively. All results are compared with previously published literature values and discussed.

  6. The SDSS Coadd: A Galaxy Photometric Redshift Catalog

    SciTech Connect

    Reis, Ribamar R.R.; Soares-Santos, Marcelle; Annis, James; Dodelson, Scott; Hao, Jiangang; Johnston, David; Kubo, Jeffrey; Lin, Huan; Seo, Hee-Jong; Simet, Melanie; /Chicago U.

    2011-11-01

    We present and describe a catalog of galaxy photometric redshifts (photo-z's) for the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Coadd Data. We use the Artificial Neural Network (ANN) technique to calculate photo-z's and the Nearest Neighbor Error (NNE) method to estimate photo-z errors for {approx} 13 million objects classified as galaxies in the coadd with r < 24.5. The photo-z and photo-z error estimators are trained and validated on a sample of {approx} 89, 000 galaxies that have SDSS photometry and spectroscopic redshifts measured by the SDSS Data Release 7 (DR7), the Canadian Network for Observational Cosmology Field Galaxy Survey (CNOC2), the Deep Extragalactic Evolutionary Probe Data Release 3(DEEP2 DR3), the SDSS-III's Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS), the Visible imaging Multi-Object Spectrograph - Very Large Telescope Deep Survey (VVDS) and the WiggleZ Dark Energy Survey. For the best ANN methods we have tried, we find that 68% of the galaxies in the validation set have a photo-z error smaller than {sigma}{sub 68} = 0.036. After presenting our results and quality tests, we provide a short guide for users accessing the public data.

  7. Photometric Properties of Face-on Isolated Spiral Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahr, Alexander; Epstein, P.; Durbala, A.

    2011-05-01

    We want to quantify the relative role of nature versus nurture in defining the observed properties of galaxies. In simpler terms we would like to disentangle the ``genetic'’ and the environmental influences in shaping the morphology of galaxies. In order to do that one needs to firstly define a zero-order baseline, i.e., a sample of galaxies that have been minimally perturbed by neighbors in the last few billion years of their existence. Such a sample has been produced and refined in different stages in the context of the AMIGA international project (www.iaa.es/AMIGA.html). The recent catalogue ``The All-Sky Catalog of Isolated Galaxies Selected from 2MASS'’ (Karachentseva, V. E. et al. 2010) allows us to complete and enrich the initial sample constructed within AMIGA with new objects, thus enhancing the statistical relevance of our study. Our focus is to define a subset of isolated disk spiral galaxies. We constrain the sample selection by: 1) orientation, restricting to almost face-on galaxies and 2) availability of good photometric images in SDSS. The goal is to ``dissect'’ (decompose) these galaxies in major components (disk, bulge, bars, etc.) and to study the properties of the components in a statistical context. Having a reasonable representation of all morphological types, we aim to test the bimodality of bulges and bars. We present a progress report of our work.

  8. Evaluation of a Multicommuted Flow System for Photometric Environmental Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Ródenas-Torralba, Eva; Rocha, Fábio R. P.; Reis, Boaventura F.; de la Guardia, Miguel

    2006-01-01

    A portable flow analysis instrument is described for in situ photometric measurements. This system is based on light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and a photodiode detector, coupled to a multipumping flow system. The whole equipment presents dimensions of 25  cm × 22  cm × 10  cm, weighs circa 3 kg, and costs 650 €. System performance was evaluated for different chemistries without changing hardware configuration for determinations of (i) Fe3+ with SCN-, (ii) iodometric nitrite determination, (iii) phenol with sodium nitroprusside, and (iv) 1-naphthol-N-methylcarbamate (carbaryl) with p-aminophenol. The detection limits were estimated as 22, 60, 25, and 60 ng mL -1 for iron, nitrite, phenol, and carbaryl at the 99.7% confidence level with RSD of 2.3, 1.0, 1.8, and 0.8%, respectively. Reagent and waste volumes were lower than those obtained by flow systems with continuous reagent addition. Sampling rates of 100, 110, 65, and 72 determinations per hour were achieved for iron, nitrite, phenol, and carbaryl determinations PMID:17671614

  9. The Aquarius Superclusters. II. Spectroscopic and Photometric Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caretta, César A.; Maia, Marcio A. G.; Willmer, Christopher N. A.

    2004-12-01

    We present spectroscopic and photometric data for 920 galaxies selected in 68 fields of the Aquarius Cluster Catalog. Typically, the 15 brightest candidate members with magnitudes in the range 16

  10. An absolute photometric system at 10 and 20 microns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rieke, G. H.; Lebofsky, M. J.; Low, F. J.

    1985-01-01

    Two new direct calibrations at 10 and 20 microns are presented in which terrestrial flux standards are referred to infrared standard stars. These measurements give both good agreement and higher accuracy when compared with previous direct calibrations. As a result, the absolute calibrations at 10 and 20 microns have now been determined with accuracies of 3 and 8 percent, respectively. A variety of absolute calibrations based on extrapolation of stellar spectra from the visible to 10 microns are reviewed. Current atmospheric models of A-type stars underestimate their fluxes by about 10 percent at 10 microns, whereas models of solar-type stars agree well with the direct calibrations. The calibration at 20 microns can probably be determined to about 5 percent by extrapolation from the more accurate result at 10 microns. The photometric system at 10 and 20 microns is updated to reflect the new absolute calibration, to base its zero point directly on the colors of A0 stars, and to improve the accuracy in the comparison of the standard stars.

  11. Spectroscopic and photometric observations of M supergiants in Carina.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphreys, R. M.; Strecker, D. W.; Ney, E. P.

    1972-01-01

    Spectroscopic study of 30 Southern-Hemisphere M supergiants mostly in Carina in the blue and near-infrared, and photometrical study of these stars from 0.4 to 18 microns. The uncertainties in the determinations of interstellar extinction are discussed, and the spatial distribution of the M supergiants in the Carina arm is shown. The presence of the 11-micron excess attributed to silicate dust is a common feature. Stars of the same spectral type and luminosity class are remarkably homogeneous in their long-wave behavior. The silicate feature becomes more prominent in the more luminous stars and in stars of later spectral type. Four composite systems show little long-wave excess. The two VV Cephei objects have excesses probably produced by gas emission, and the other two have little or no excess - supporting the suggestion that the presence of the early star prohibits the formation of a dust envelope. Three stars - VY CMa, VX Sgr, and HD 9767 - appear to be extreme examples of stars with large excesses over the entire long-wave region. It is suggested that these objects are surrounded by large amounts of particulate material over a great range of distances from the stars.

  12. A Photometric and Energy Assessment of a Novel Lighting System

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, Doug; Gould, Carl; Packer, Michael; Rubinstein, Francis; Siminovitch, Michael

    1995-06-01

    This paper describes the results of a photometric and energy analysis that was conducted on a new light guide and sulfur lamp system recently installed at both the US Department of Energy's Forrestal building and the Smithsonian Institution's National Air and Space Museum. This system couples high lumen output, high efficiency sulfur lamps to hollow light guides lined with a reflective prismatic film. At the Forrestal building the system lights a large roadway and plaza area that lies beneath a section of the building. It has been designed to completely replace the grid of 280 mercury vapor lamps formerly used to illuminate the space. At the National Air and Space Museum a similar system illuminates Gallery 114, which houses the large rocket displays from the US Space program. This paper outlines the unique operational and design characteristics of this highly efficient distribution system and details the results of field studies that characterize the significant energy savings and increased illumination levels that have been achieved. The projected savings in maintenance costs, due to longer lamp life and a reduction of the total number of lamps, is also presented.

  13. A Photometric Study of Five Open Clusters in the SDSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Jinhyuk; Lee, Myung Gyoon

    2011-10-01

    We present a photometric study of five open clusters (Czernik 5, Alessi 53, Berkeley 49, Berkeley 84, and Pfleiderer 3) in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. The position and size of these clusters are determined using the radial number density profiles of the stars, and the member stars of the clusters are selected using the proper motion data in the literature. We estimate the reddening, distance and age of the clusters based on the isochrone fitting in the color-magnitude diagram. The foreground reddenings for these clusters are estimated to be E(B-V)=0.71-1.55 mag. The distances to these clusters are derived to be 2.0-4.4 kpc, and their distances from the Galactic center range from 7.57 kpc to 12.35 kpc. Their ages are in the range from 250 Myr to 1 Gyr. Berkeley 49 and Berkeley 84 are located in the Orion spur, Czernik 5 is in the Perseus arm, and Pfleiderer 3 and Alessi 53 are located beyond the Perseus arm.

  14. A Photometric Survey of Ori OB1b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merritt, Allison T.; Sherry, W.

    2011-01-01

    Several mechanisms have been suggested to describe the formation of sub-stellar mass objects (SSMOs), specifically brown dwarfs. Each proposed mechanism predicts a unique spatial distribution of the brown dwarfs relative to the O and B stars of the association. We have 9 square degrees of optical (VRI) data and 7 square degrees of NIR (JHK) data of Orion OB1b. The purpose of the survey is to obtain the photometric data that will allow us to determine the spatial distribution of brown dwarfs in this region and constrain the various formation theories. We present an overview of the survey, with an emphasis on the NIR data, as well as color-magnitude diagrams. This research was supported by the NOAO/KPNO Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) Program which is funded by the National Science Foundation Research Experiences for Undergraduates Program and the Department of Defense ASSURE program through Scientific Program Order No. 13 (AST-0754223) of the Cooperative Agreement No. AST-0132798 between the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy (AURA) and the NSF.

  15. Probing the thermodynamics of protein-lipid interactions by isothermal titration calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Swamy, Musti J; Sankhala, Rajeshwer S

    2013-01-01

    Isothermal titration calorimetry is a highly sensitive technique for the study of molecular interactions. This method has been applied quite extensively to investigate the interaction of proteins with small ligands, other proteins, and nucleic acids as well as with drugs and metal ions. In this chapter, we describe the application of ITC for the investigation of thermodynamics of protein-lipid interaction. A number of parameters such as enthalpy of binding (ΔH), entropy of binding (ΔS), association constant (K (a)), binding stoichiometry (n), and free energy of binding (ΔG) can be obtained from a single calorimetric titration, providing a complete thermodynamic characterization of the interaction. The method is described in detail taking the major protein of the bovine seminal plasma, PDC-109, which exhibits a high preference for interaction with choline-containing lipids, as an example. The method can be applied to investigate the thermodynamics of the interaction of other soluble proteins with lipid membranes.

  16. Titratable macroions in multivalent electrolyte solutions: Strong coupling dressed ion approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adžić, Nataša; Podgornik, Rudolf

    2016-06-01

    We present a theoretical description of the effect of polyvalent ions on the interaction between titratable macroions. The model system consists of two point-like macroions with dissociable sites, immersed in an asymmetric ionic mixture of monovalent and polyvalent salts. We formulate a dressed ion strong coupling theory, based on the decomposition of the asymmetric ionic mixture into a weakly electrostatically coupled monovalent salt and into polyvalent ions that are strongly electrostatically coupled to the titratable macro-ions. The charge of the macroions is not considered as fixed, but is allowed to respond to local bathing solution parameters (electrostatic potential, pH of the solution, and salt concentration) through a simple charge regulation model. The approach presented, yielding an effective polyvalent-ion mediated interaction between charge-regulated macroions at various solution conditions, describes the strong coupling equivalent of the Kirkwood-Schumaker interaction.

  17. Exact analysis of competition ligand binding by displacement isothermal titration calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Sigurskjold, B W

    2000-01-15

    A rigorous method for the least-squares nonlinear regression analysis of displacement isothermal titration calorimetric data is presented. The method can fit the binding isotherm of a ligand which is competitively inhibited in its binding by another bound ligand to a molecule with n identical and independent binding sites. There are no other assumptions for the method and no approximations. Analysis of previously published data of the strong binding of acarbose to glucoamylase is presented as an example. The regression equations have been programmed for the Origin software supplied with the widely used titration calorimeters from Microcal, Inc., and an Origin Function Definition File with instructions is freely available from the author upon e-mail request.

  18. Investigation of the formation of peroxide in. gamma. -irradiated polyethylene by the method of iodometric titration

    SciTech Connect

    Savost'yanov, V.S.; Kritskaya, D.A.; Ponomarev, A.N.

    1986-09-01

    The concentrations of hydroperoxides (HP) and dialkyl peroxides (DAP) in polyethylene (PE) powder, ..gamma.. irradiated in air at 295 K at a dose of 0.22-2.8 J/(kg x sec) up to doses of 16-300 kJ/kg, were determined by various methods of iodometric titration. Under the indicated conditions, the HP concentration reached 0.18 mole/kg, DPA 0.07 mole/kg, G /SUB HP/ was 8.3 1/100 eV; G /SUB GP/ ..integral..I /SUP -0.5/ . On the basis of the total absence of grafting of acrylamide onto ..gamma..-irradiated PE after reduction during titration of HP in it, it was concluded that grafted polymerization is initiated by the radicals of thermal decomposition of HP in PE.

  19. Rapid air titration method for determining SO/sub 2/ concentration in inhalation chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, E.A.; Palmes, E.D.

    1985-06-01

    A rapid air titration method for determining SO/sub 2/ concentration in inhalation chambers has been validated using the pararosaniline-formaldehyde (PRA) method of West and Gaeke. This air-titration (iodate) method is an adaptation of iodometric methods using a starch indicator. Potassium iodate and an excess of potassium iodide are used in the reaction. Sampling is completed in ten minutes or less and concentration is calculated by use of a simple formula. Linear equations were derived over the range of concentrations from 0.5 to 100 ppm SO/sub 2/ for uncorrected iodate bubbler results, data corrected for tandem bubbler concentrations and data corrected for mean iodate bubbler efficiency. Linear correlation with the PRA method over this range was 0.999 for all three sets of data.

  20. Volumetric determination of uranium titanous sulfate as reductant before oxidimetric titration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wahlberg, J.S.; Skinner, D.L.; Rader, L.F.

    1957-01-01

    Need for a more rapid volumetric method for the routine determination of uranium in uranium-rich materials has led to the development of a method that uses titanous sulfate as a reductant before oxidimetric titration. Separation of the hydrogen sulfide group is not necessary. Interfering elements precipitated by cupferron are removed by automatic filtrations made simultaneously rather than by the longer chloroform extraction method. Uranium is reduced from VI to IV by addition of an excess of titanous sulfate solution, cupric ion serving as an indicator by forming red metallic copper when reduction is complete. The copper is reoxidized by addition of mercuric perchlorate. The reduced uranium is then determined by addition of excess ferric sulfate and titration with ceric sulfate. The method has proved to be rapid, accurate, and economical.

  1. Determination of the catalytic activity of binuclear metallohydrolases using isothermal titration calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Pedroso, Marcelo M; Ely, Fernanda; Lonhienne, Thierry; Gahan, Lawrence R; Ollis, David L; Guddat, Luke W; Schenk, Gerhard

    2014-03-01

    Binuclear metallohydrolases are a large and diverse family of enzymes that are involved in numerous metabolic functions. An increasing number of members find applications as drug targets or in processes such as bioremediation. It is thus essential to have an assay available that allows the rapid and reliable determination of relevant catalytic parameters (k cat, K m, and k cat/K m). Continuous spectroscopic assays are frequently only possible by using synthetic (i.e., nonbiological) substrates that possess a suitable chromophoric marker (e.g., nitrophenol). Isothermal titration calorimetry, in contrast, affords a rapid assay independent of the chromophoric properties of the substrate-the heat associated with the hydrolytic reaction can be directly related to catalytic properties. Here, we demonstrate the efficiency of the method on several selected examples of this family of enzymes and show that, in general, the catalytic parameters obtained by isothermal titration calorimetry are in good agreement with those obtained from spectroscopic assays.

  2. An automatic system for acidity determination based on sequential injection titration and the monosegmented flow approach.

    PubMed

    Kozak, Joanna; Wójtowicz, Marzena; Gawenda, Nadzieja; Kościelniak, Paweł

    2011-06-15

    An automatic sequential injection system, combining monosegmented flow analysis, sequential injection analysis and sequential injection titration is proposed for acidity determination. The system enables controllable sample dilution and generation of standards of required concentration in a monosegmented sequential injection manner, sequential injection titration of the prepared solutions, data collecting, and handling. It has been tested on spectrophotometric determination of acetic, citric and phosphoric acids with sodium hydroxide used as a titrant and phenolphthalein or thymolphthalein (in the case of phosphoric acid determination) as indicators. Accuracy better than |4.4|% (RE) and repeatability better than 2.9% (RSD) have been obtained. It has been applied to the determination of total acidity in vinegars and various soft drinks. The system provides low sample (less than 0.3 mL) consumption. On average, analysis of a sample takes several minutes.

  3. Search for and study of photometric variability in magnetic white dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valeev, A. F.; Antonyuk, K. A.; Pit, N. V.; Moskvitin, A. S.; Grauzhanina, A. O.; Gadelshin, D. R.; Kolesnikov, S. V.; Zhuzhulina, E. A.; Burlakova, T. E.; Galazutdinov, G. A.; Gutaev, A. G.; Zhuchkov, R. Ya.; Ikhsanova, A. I.; Zhukov, D. G.; Joshi, Arti; Pandey, J. C.; Kholtygin, A. F.; Valyavin, G. G.

    2017-01-01

    We report the results of photometric observations of a number of magnetic white dwarfs in order to search for photometric variability in these stars. These V-band observations revealed significant variability in the classical highly magnetized white dwarf GRW+70°8247 with a likely period from several days to several dozen days and a half-amplitude of about 0. m 04. Our observations also revealed the variability of the well-known white dwarf GD229. The half amplitude of its photometric variability is equal to about 0. m 005, and the likely period of this degenerate star lies in the 10-20 day interval. This variability is most likely due to the rotation of the stars considered.We also discuss the peculiarities of the photometric variability in a number of other white dwarfs. We present the updated "magnetic field-rotation period" diagram for the white dwarfs.

  4. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Trumpler 5 photometric BV catalog (Donati+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donati, P.; Cocozza, G.; Bragaglia, A.; Pancino, E.; Cantat-Gaudin, T.; Carrera, R.; Tosi, M.

    2014-11-01

    We combined high-quality photometric observations obtained with WFI and high-resolution spectra obtained with FLAMES to determine accurate cluster parameters, namely age, distance, reddening, and metallicity. (2 data files).

  5. Creation of a Unified Set of Core-Collapse Supernovae for Training of Photometric Classifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Arcy Kenworthy, William; Scolnic, Daniel; Kessler, Richard

    2017-01-01

    One of the key tasks for future supernova cosmology analyses is to photometrically distinguish type Ia supernovae (SNe) from their core collapse (CC) counterparts. In order to train programs for this purpose, it is necessary to train on a large number of core-collapse SNe. However, there are only a handful used for current programs. We plan to use the large amount of CC lightcurves available on the Open Supernova Catalog (OSC). Since this data is scraped from many different surveys, it is given in a number of photometric systems with different calibration and filters. We therefore created a program to fit smooth lightcurves (as a function of time) to photometric observations of arbitrary SNe. The Supercal method is then used to translate the smoothed lightcurves to a single photometric system. We can thus compile a training set of 782 supernovae, of which 127 are not type Ia. These smoothed lightcurves are also being contributed upstream to the OSC as derived data.

  6. Electroanalytical measurements without electrolytes: conducting polymers as probes for redox titration in non-conductive organic media.

    PubMed

    Lange, Ulrich; Mirsky, Vladimir M

    2012-09-26

    Electroanalytical methods have been applied only in conducting media. An application of conducting polymers allows to overcome this limitation. If such material is in electrochemical equilibrium with dissolved redox active species, its electrical conductivity depends on the redox potential of these species. Therefore, conductometric measurements with conducting polymers can provide about the same information as classical redox electrodes. The approach was applied for redox titration. Equivalent points obtained by this titration in aqueous and organic electrolytes were identical. Then the approach was applied for determination of bromine number by redox titration in non-conducting organic phase.

  7. Influence of kinetics on the determination of the surface reactivity of oxide suspensions by acid-base titration.

    PubMed

    Duc, M; Adekola, F; Lefèvre, G; Fédoroff, M

    2006-11-01

    The effect of acid-base titration protocol and speed on pH measurement and surface charge calculation was studied on suspensions of gamma-alumina, hematite, goethite, and silica, whose size and porosity have been well characterized. The titration protocol has an important effect on surface charge calculation as well as on acid-base constants obtained by fitting of the titration curves. Variations of pH versus time after addition of acid or base to the suspension were interpreted as diffusion processes. Resulting apparent diffusion coefficients depend on the nature of the oxide and on its porosity.

  8. Acute bilateral parotitis occurring during venlafaxine titration in an adolescent female with major depression.

    PubMed

    Bonnet, U; Khalil-Boutros, Y

    2014-01-01

    Parotitis is a fairly uncommon adverse drug reaction of psychopharmacological treatment. Here, we report on an acute bilateral parotitis, which was associated with titration of venlafaxine in a 20-year-old female suffering from a severe depressive episode. The parotitis recovered quickly with oral penicillin and was most likely caused by bacteria assumed to spread from oral flora into Stensen's duct as a complication of pronounced venlafaxine-induced xerostomia.

  9. Conformation and hydrogen ion titration of proteins: a continuum electrostatic model with conformational flexibility.

    PubMed

    You, T J; Bashford, D

    1995-11-01

    A new method for including local conformational flexibility in calculations of the hydrogen ion titration of proteins using macroscopic electrostatic models is presented. Intrinsic pKa values and electrostatic interactions between titrating sites are calculated from an ensemble of conformers in which the positions of titrating side chains are systematically varied. The method is applied to the Asp, Glu, and Tyr residues of hen lysozyme. The effects of different minimization and/or sampling protocols for both single-conformer and multi-conformer calculations are studied. For single-conformer calculations it is found that the results are sensitive to the choice of all-hydrogen versus polar-hydrogen-only atomic models and to the minimization protocol chosen. The best overall agreement of single-conformer calculations with experiment is obtained with an all-hydrogen model and either a two-step minimization process or minimization using a high dielectric constant. Multi-conformational calculations give significantly improved agreement with experiment, slightly smaller shifts between model compound pKa values and calculated intrinsic pKa values, and reduced sensitivity of the intrinsic pKa calculations to the initial details of the structure compared to single-conformer calculations. The extent of these improvements depends on the type of minimization used during the generation of conformers, with more extensive minimization giving greater improvements. The ordering of the titrations of the active-site residues, Glu-35 and Asp-52, is particularly sensitive to the minimization and sampling protocols used. The balance of strong site-site interactions in the active site suggests a need for including site-site conformational correlations.

  10. Flow cytometry as an improved method for the titration of Chlamydiaceae and other intracellular bacteria.

    PubMed

    Käser, T; Pasternak, J A; Hamonic, G; Rieder, M; Lai, K; Delgado-Ortega, M; Gerdts, V; Meurens, F

    2016-05-01

    Chlamydiaceae is a family of intracellular bacteria causing a range of diverse pathological outcomes. The most devastating human diseases are ocular infections with C. trachomatis leading to blindness and genital infections causing pelvic inflammatory disease with long-term sequelae including infertility and chronic pelvic pain. In order to enable the comparison of experiments between laboratories investigating host-chlamydia interactions, the infectious titer has to be determined. Titer determination of chlamydia is most commonly performed via microscopy of host cells infected with a serial dilution of chlamydia. However, other methods including fluorescent ELISpot (Fluorospot) and DNA Chip Scanning Technology have also been proposed to enumerate chlamydia-infected cells. For viruses, flow cytometry has been suggested as a superior alternative to standard titration methods. In this study we compared the use of flow cytometry with microscopy and Fluorospot for the titration of C. suis as a representative of other intracellular bacteria. Titer determination via Fluorospot was unreliable, while titration via microscopy led to a linear read-out range of 16 - 64 dilutions and moderate reproducibility with acceptable standard deviations within and between investigators. In contrast, flow cytometry had a vast linear read-out range of 1,024 dilutions and the lowest standard deviations given a basic training in these methods. In addition, flow cytometry was faster and material costs were lower compared to microscopy. Flow cytometry offers a fast, cheap, precise, and reproducible alternative for the titration of intracellular bacteria like C. suis. © 2016 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  11. Quantitative RT-PCR for titration of replication-defective recombinant Semliki Forest virus.

    PubMed

    Puglia, Ana L P; Rezende, Alexandre G; Jorge, Soraia A C; Wagner, Renaud; Pereira, Carlos A; Astray, Renato M

    2013-11-01

    Virus titration may constitute a drawback in the development and use of replication-defective viral vectors like Semliki Forest virus (SFV). The standardization and validation of a reverse transcription quantitative PCR (qRT-PCR) method for SFV titration is presented here. The qRT-PCR target is located within the nsp1 gene of the non-structural polyprotein SFV region (SFV RNA), which allows the strategy to be used for several different recombinant SFV constructs. Titer determinations were carried out by performing virus titration and infection assays with SFVs containing an RNA coding region for the rabies virus glycoprotein (RVGP) or green fluorescent protein (GFP). Results showed that the standardized qRT-PCR is applicable for different SFV constructs, and showed good reproducibility. To evaluate the correlation between the amount of functional SFV RNA in a virus lot and its infectivity in BHK-21 cell cultures, a temperature mediated titer decrease was performed and successfully quantitated by qRT-PCR. When used for cell infection at the same multiplicity of infection (MOI), the temperature treated SFV-RVGP samples induced the same levels of RVGP expression. Similarly, when different SFV-GFP lots with different virus titers, as accessed by qRT-PCR, were used for cell infection at the same MOI, the cultures showed comparable amounts of fluorescent cells. The data demonstrate a good correlation between the amount of virus used for infection, as measured by its SFV RNA, and the protein synthesis in the cells. In conclusion, the qRT-PCR method developed here is accurate and enables the titration of replication-defective SFV vectors, an essential aid for viral vector development as well as for establishment of production bioprocesses.

  12. Implementation of coulometric titration system at constant current for developing of certified materials as primary standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suarez, H.; Cristancho, R.; Peralta, F.; Torres, H.

    2017-01-01

    Coulometry is a primary method for measuring high purity substances. This is used to certify the primary reference materials required in a chemical analysis process. This paper describes the coulometric titration system developed by the National Metrology Institute (NMI) of Colombia for the certification of hydrochloric acid 0.1mol/kg reference materials. In addition, it also shows preliminary studies for future development of potassium chloride (KCl) and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid disodium salt (EDTA-Na2) certification.

  13. Comparison of ozone determinations by ultraviolet photometry and gas-phase titration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demore, W. B.; Patapoff, M.

    1976-01-01

    A comparison of ozone determinations based on ultraviolet absorption photometry and gas-phase titration (GPT) shows good agreement between the two methods. Together with other results, these findings indicate that three candidate reference methods for ozone, UV photometry, IR photometry, and GPT are in substantial agreement. However, the GPT method is not recommended for routine use by air pollution agencies for calibration of ozone monitors because of susceptibility to experimental error.

  14. Manufacturing of a Secretoneurin Drug Delivery System with Self-Assembled Protamine Nanoparticles by Titration

    PubMed Central

    Scheicher, Bernhard; Lorenzer, Cornelia; Gegenbauer, Katrin; Partlic, Julia; Andreae, Fritz; Kirsch, Alexander H.; Rosenkranz, Alexander R.; Werzer, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Since therapeutic peptides and oligonucleotides are gathering interests as active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs), nanoparticulate drug delivery systems are becoming of great importance. Thereby, the possibility to design drug delivery systems according to the therapeutic needs of APIs enhances clinical implementation. Over the last years, the focus of our group was laid on protamine-oligonucleotide-nanoparticles (so called proticles), however, the possibility to modify the size, zeta potential or loading efficiencies was limited. Therefore, at the present study we integrated a stepwise addition of protamine (titration) into the formation process of proticles loaded with the angiogenic neuropeptide secretoneurin (SN). A particle size around 130 nm was determined when proticles were assembled by the commonly used protamine addition at once. Through application of the protamine titration process it was possible to modify and adjust the particle size between approx. 120 and 1200 nm (dependent on mass ratio) without influencing the SN loading capacity. Dynamic light scattering pointed out that the difference in particle size was most probably the result of a secondary aggregation. Initially-formed particles of early stages in the titration process aggregated towards bigger assemblies. Atomic-force-microscopy images also revealed differences in morphology along with different particle size. In contrast, the SN loading was only influenced by the applied mass ratio, where a slight saturation effect was observable. Up to 65% of deployed SN could be imbedded into the proticle matrix. An in-vivo biodistribution study (i.m.) showed a retarded distribution of SN from the site of injection after the application of a SN-proticle formulation. Further, it was demonstrated that SN loaded proticles can be successfully freeze-dried and resuspended afterwards. To conclude, the integration of the protamine titration process offers new possibilities for the formulation of proticles in

  15. Manufacturing of a Secretoneurin Drug Delivery System with Self-Assembled Protamine Nanoparticles by Titration.

    PubMed

    Scheicher, Bernhard; Lorenzer, Cornelia; Gegenbauer, Katrin; Partlic, Julia; Andreae, Fritz; Kirsch, Alexander H; Rosenkranz, Alexander R; Werzer, Oliver; Zimmer, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Since therapeutic peptides and oligonucleotides are gathering interests as active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs), nanoparticulate drug delivery systems are becoming of great importance. Thereby, the possibility to design drug delivery systems according to the therapeutic needs of APIs enhances clinical implementation. Over the last years, the focus of our group was laid on protamine-oligonucleotide-nanoparticles (so called proticles), however, the possibility to modify the size, zeta potential or loading efficiencies was limited. Therefore, at the present study we integrated a stepwise addition of protamine (titration) into the formation process of proticles loaded with the angiogenic neuropeptide secretoneurin (SN). A particle size around 130 nm was determined when proticles were assembled by the commonly used protamine addition at once. Through application of the protamine titration process it was possible to modify and adjust the particle size between approx. 120 and 1200 nm (dependent on mass ratio) without influencing the SN loading capacity. Dynamic light scattering pointed out that the difference in particle size was most probably the result of a secondary aggregation. Initially-formed particles of early stages in the titration process aggregated towards bigger assemblies. Atomic-force-microscopy images also revealed differences in morphology along with different particle size. In contrast, the SN loading was only influenced by the applied mass ratio, where a slight saturation effect was observable. Up to 65% of deployed SN could be imbedded into the proticle matrix. An in-vivo biodistribution study (i.m.) showed a retarded distribution of SN from the site of injection after the application of a SN-proticle formulation. Further, it was demonstrated that SN loaded proticles can be successfully freeze-dried and resuspended afterwards. To conclude, the integration of the protamine titration process offers new possibilities for the formulation of proticles in

  16. Equivalence-point electromigration acid-base titration via moving neutralization boundary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qing; Fan, Liu-Yin; Huang, Shan-Sheng; Zhang, Wei; Cao, Cheng-Xi

    2011-04-01

    In this paper, we developed a novel method of acid-base titration, viz. the electromigration acid-base titration (EABT), via a moving neutralization boundary (MNR). With HCl and NaOH as the model strong acid and base, respectively, we conducted the experiments on the EABT via the method of moving neutralization boundary for the first time. The experiments revealed that (i) the concentration of agarose gel, the voltage used and the content of background electrolyte (KCl) had evident influence on the boundary movement; (ii) the movement length was a function of the running time under the constant acid and base concentrations; and (iii) there was a good linearity between the length and natural logarithmic concentration of HCl under the optimized conditions, and the linearity could be used to detect the concentration of acid. The experiments further manifested that (i) the RSD values of intra-day and inter-day runs were less than 1.59 and 3.76%, respectively, indicating similar precision and stability in capillary electrophoresis or HPLC; (ii) the indicators with different pK(a) values had no obvious effect on EABT, distinguishing strong influence on the judgment of equivalence-point titration in the classic one; and (iii) the constant equivalence-point titration always existed in the EABT, rather than the classic volumetric analysis. Additionally, the EABT could be put to good use for the determination of actual acid concentrations. The experimental results achieved herein showed a new general guidance for the development of classic volumetric analysis and element (e.g. nitrogen) content analysis in protein chemistry.

  17. Revisiting the streptavidin-biotin binding by using an aptamer and displacement isothermal calorimetry titration.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Tai-Chih; Tsai, Ching-Wei; Lee, Peng-Chen; Chen, Wen-Yih

    2015-03-01

    The association constant of a well-known streptavidin-biotin binding has only been inferred from separately measured kinetic parameters. In a single experiment, we obtained Ka 1 × 10(12)  M(-1) by using a streptavidin-binding aptamer and ligand-displacement isothermal titration calorimetry. This study explores the challenges of determining thermodynamic parameters and the derived equilibrium binding affinity of tight ligand-receptor binding.

  18. Acid-base titrations using microfluidic paper-based analytical devices.

    PubMed

    Karita, Shingo; Kaneta, Takashi

    2014-12-16

    Rapid and simple acid-base titration was accomplished using a novel microfluidic paper-based analytical device (μPAD). The μPAD was fabricated by wax printing and consisted of ten reservoirs for reaction and detection. The reaction reservoirs contained various amounts of a primary standard substance, potassium hydrogen phthalate (KHPth), whereas a constant amount of phenolphthalein was added to all the detection reservoirs. A sample solution containing NaOH was dropped onto the center of the μPAD and was allowed to spread to the reaction reservoirs where the KHPth neutralized it. When the amount of NaOH exceeded that of the KHPth in the reaction reservoirs, unneutralized hydroxide ion penetrated the detection reservoirs, resulting in a color reaction from the phenolphthalein. Therefore, the number of the detection reservoirs with no color change determined the concentration of the NaOH in the sample solution. The titration was completed within 1 min by visually determining the end point, which required neither instrumentation nor software. The volumes of the KHPth and phenolphthalein solutions added to the corresponding reservoirs were optimized to obtain reproducible and accurate results for the concentration of NaOH. The μPADs determined the concentration of NaOH at orders of magnitude ranging from 0.01 to 1 M. An acid sample, HCl, was also determined using Na2CO3 as a primary standard substance instead of KHPth. Furthermore, the μPAD was applicable to the titrations of nitric acid, sulfuric acid, acetic acid, and ammonia solutions. The μPADs were stable for more than 1 month when stored in darkness at room temperature, although this was reduced to only 5 days under daylight conditions. The analysis of acidic hot spring water was also demonstrated in the field using the μPAD, and the results agreed well with those obtained by classic acid-base titration.

  19. Reconstructing the galaxy density field with photometric redshifts. I. Methodology and validation on stellar mass functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malavasi, N.; Pozzetti, L.; Cucciati, O.; Bardelli, S.; Cimatti, A.

    2016-01-01

    Context. Measuring environment for large numbers of galaxies in the distant Universe is an open problem in astrophysics, as environment is important in determining many properties of galaxies during their formation and evolution. In order to measure galaxy environments, we need galaxy positions and redshifts. Photometric redshifts are more easily available for large numbers of galaxies, but at the price of larger uncertainties than spectroscopic redshifts. Aims: We study how photometric redshifts affect the measurement of galaxy environment and how the reconstruction of the density field may limit an analysis of the galaxy stellar mass function (GSMF) in different environments. Methods: Through the use of mock galaxy catalogues, we measured galaxy environment with a fixed aperture method, using each galaxy's true and photometric redshifts. We varied the parameters defining the fixed aperture volume and explored different configurations. We also used photometric redshifts with different uncertainties to simulate the case of various surveys. We then computed GSMF of the mock galaxy catalogues as a function of redshift and environment to see how the environmental estimate based on photometric redshifts affects their analysis. Results: We found that the most extreme environments can be reconstructed in a fairly accurate way only when using high-precision photometric redshifts with σΔz/ (1 + z) ≲ 0.01, with a fraction ≥ 60 ÷ 80% of galaxies placed in the correct density quartile and a contamination of ≤10% by opposite quartile interlopers. A length of the volume in the radial direction comparable to the ±1.5σ error of photometric redshifts and a fixed aperture radius of a size similar to the physical scale of the studied environment grant a better reconstruction than other volume configurations. When using this kind of an estimate of the density field, we found that any difference between the starting GSMF (divided accordingly to the true galaxy environment

  20. Dental Procedures.

    PubMed

    Ramponi, Denise R

    2016-01-01

    Dental problems are a common complaint in emergency departments in the United States. There are a wide variety of dental issues addressed in emergency department visits such as dental caries, loose teeth, dental trauma, gingival infections, and dry socket syndrome. Review of the most common dental blocks and dental procedures will allow the practitioner the opportunity to make the patient more comfortable and reduce the amount of analgesia the patient will need upon discharge. Familiarity with the dental equipment, tooth, and mouth anatomy will help prepare the practitioner for to perform these dental procedures.