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Sample records for photon counting imaging

  1. RULLI/a Photon Counting Imager

    SciTech Connect

    Albright, K.L.; Smith, R.C.; Ho, C.; Wilson, S.K.; Bradley, J.; Bird, A.; Casperson, D.E.; Hindman, M.; Whitaker, R.; Theiler, J.; Scarlett, R.; Priedhorsky, W.C.

    1998-10-19

    The Remote Low Light Imaging (RULLI) system responds to individual photons using a modification to conventional image intensifier technology and fast timing electronics. Each photon received at the detector is resolved in three dimensions (X, Y, and time). The accumulation of photons over time allows the system to image with very low light levels, such as starlight illumination. Using a low power pulsed laser and very fine time discrimination, three dimensional imaging has been accomplished with a vertical resolution of five cm.

  2. The Quanta Image Sensor: Every Photon Counts

    PubMed Central

    Fossum, Eric R.; Ma, Jiaju; Masoodian, Saleh; Anzagira, Leo; Zizza, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    The Quanta Image Sensor (QIS) was conceived when contemplating shrinking pixel sizes and storage capacities, and the steady increase in digital processing power. In the single-bit QIS, the output of each field is a binary bit plane, where each bit represents the presence or absence of at least one photoelectron in a photodetector. A series of bit planes is generated through high-speed readout, and a kernel or “cubicle” of bits (x, y, t) is used to create a single output image pixel. The size of the cubicle can be adjusted post-acquisition to optimize image quality. The specialized sub-diffraction-limit photodetectors in the QIS are referred to as “jots” and a QIS may have a gigajot or more, read out at 1000 fps, for a data rate exceeding 1 Tb/s. Basically, we are trying to count photons as they arrive at the sensor. This paper reviews the QIS concept and its imaging characteristics. Recent progress towards realizing the QIS for commercial and scientific purposes is discussed. This includes implementation of a pump-gate jot device in a 65 nm CIS BSI process yielding read noise as low as 0.22 e− r.m.s. and conversion gain as high as 420 µV/e−, power efficient readout electronics, currently as low as 0.4 pJ/b in the same process, creating high dynamic range images from jot data, and understanding the imaging characteristics of single-bit and multi-bit QIS devices. The QIS represents a possible major paradigm shift in image capture. PMID:27517926

  3. The Quanta Image Sensor: Every Photon Counts.

    PubMed

    Fossum, Eric R; Ma, Jiaju; Masoodian, Saleh; Anzagira, Leo; Zizza, Rachel

    2016-08-10

    The Quanta Image Sensor (QIS) was conceived when contemplating shrinking pixel sizes and storage capacities, and the steady increase in digital processing power. In the single-bit QIS, the output of each field is a binary bit plane, where each bit represents the presence or absence of at least one photoelectron in a photodetector. A series of bit planes is generated through high-speed readout, and a kernel or "cubicle" of bits (x, y, t) is used to create a single output image pixel. The size of the cubicle can be adjusted post-acquisition to optimize image quality. The specialized sub-diffraction-limit photodetectors in the QIS are referred to as "jots" and a QIS may have a gigajot or more, read out at 1000 fps, for a data rate exceeding 1 Tb/s. Basically, we are trying to count photons as they arrive at the sensor. This paper reviews the QIS concept and its imaging characteristics. Recent progress towards realizing the QIS for commercial and scientific purposes is discussed. This includes implementation of a pump-gate jot device in a 65 nm CIS BSI process yielding read noise as low as 0.22 e- r.m.s. and conversion gain as high as 420 µV/e-, power efficient readout electronics, currently as low as 0.4 pJ/b in the same process, creating high dynamic range images from jot data, and understanding the imaging characteristics of single-bit and multi-bit QIS devices. The QIS represents a possible major paradigm shift in image capture.

  4. Single-molecule localization software applied to photon counting imaging.

    PubMed

    Hirvonen, Liisa M; Kilfeather, Tiffany; Suhling, Klaus

    2015-06-01

    Centroiding in photon counting imaging has traditionally been accomplished by a single-step, noniterative algorithm, often implemented in hardware. Single-molecule localization techniques in superresolution fluorescence microscopy are conceptually similar, but use more sophisticated iterative software-based fitting algorithms to localize the fluorophore. Here, we discuss common features and differences between single-molecule localization and photon counting imaging and investigate the suitability of single-molecule localization software for photon event localization. We find that single-molecule localization software packages designed for superresolution microscopy-QuickPALM, rapidSTORM, and ThunderSTORM-can work well when applied to photon counting imaging with a microchannel-plate-based intensified camera system: photon event recognition can be excellent, fixed pattern noise can be low, and the microchannel plate pores can easily be resolved.

  5. Multiple-Event, Single-Photon Counting Imaging Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zheng, Xinyu; Cunningham, Thomas J.; Sun, Chao; Wang, Kang L.

    2011-01-01

    The single-photon counting imaging sensor is typically an array of silicon Geiger-mode avalanche photodiodes that are monolithically integrated with CMOS (complementary metal oxide semiconductor) readout, signal processing, and addressing circuits located in each pixel and the peripheral area of the chip. The major problem is its single-event method for photon count number registration. A single-event single-photon counting imaging array only allows registration of up to one photon count in each of its pixels during a frame time, i.e., the interval between two successive pixel reset operations. Since the frame time can t be too short, this will lead to very low dynamic range and make the sensor merely useful for very low flux environments. The second problem of the prior technique is a limited fill factor resulting from consumption of chip area by the monolithically integrated CMOS readout in pixels. The resulting low photon collection efficiency will substantially ruin any benefit gained from the very sensitive single-photon counting detection. The single-photon counting imaging sensor developed in this work has a novel multiple-event architecture, which allows each of its pixels to register as more than one million (or more) photon-counting events during a frame time. Because of a consequently boosted dynamic range, the imaging array of the invention is capable of performing single-photon counting under ultra-low light through high-flux environments. On the other hand, since the multiple-event architecture is implemented in a hybrid structure, back-illumination and close-to-unity fill factor can be realized, and maximized quantum efficiency can also be achieved in the detector array.

  6. Information content per photon versus image fidelity in three-dimensional photon-counting integral imaging.

    PubMed

    Hayat, Majeed M; Narravula, Srikanth; Pepin, Matthew; Javidi, Bahram

    2012-10-01

    Photon-counting integral imaging has been introduced recently, and its applications in three-dimensional (3D) object sensing, visualization, recognition, and classification under photon-starved conditions have been demonstrated. This paper sheds light on the underlying information-theoretic foundation behind the ability of photon-counting integral imaging in performing complex tasks with far fewer photons than conventional imaging systems. A metric for photon-information content is formulated in the context of 3D photon-counting imaging, and its properties are investigated. It is shown that there is an inherent trade-off between imaging fidelity, measured by the entropy-normalized mutual information associated with a given imaging system, and the amount of information in each photon used in the imaging process, as represented by the photon-number-normalized mutual information. The dependence of this trade-off on photon statistics, correlation in the 3D image, and the signal-to-noise ratio of the photon-detection system is also investigated.

  7. Three-Dimensional Photon Counting Imaging with Axially Distributed Sensing.

    PubMed

    Cho, Myungjin; Javidi, Bahram

    2016-07-28

    In this paper, we review three-dimensional (3D) photon counting imaging with axially distributed sensing. Under severely photon-starved conditions, we have proposed various imaging and algorithmic approaches to reconstruct a scene in 3D, which are not possible by using conventional imaging system due to lack of sufficient number of photons. In this paper, we present an overview of optical sensing and imaging system along with dedicated algorithms for reconstructing 3D scenes by photon counting axially distributed sensing, which may be implemented by moving a single image sensor along its optical axis. To visualize the 3D image, statistical estimation methods and computational reconstruction of axially distributed sensing is applied.

  8. High Time Resolution Photon Counting 3D Imaging Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegmund, O.; Ertley, C.; Vallerga, J.

    2016-09-01

    Novel sealed tube microchannel plate (MCP) detectors using next generation cross strip (XS) anode readouts and high performance electronics have been developed to provide photon counting imaging sensors for Astronomy and high time resolution 3D remote sensing. 18 mm aperture sealed tubes with MCPs and high efficiency Super-GenII or GaAs photocathodes have been implemented to access the visible/NIR regimes for ground based research, astronomical and space sensing applications. The cross strip anode readouts in combination with PXS-II high speed event processing electronics can process high single photon counting event rates at >5 MHz ( 80 ns dead-time per event), and time stamp events to better than 25 ps. Furthermore, we are developing a high speed ASIC version of the electronics for low power/low mass spaceflight applications. For a GaAs tube the peak quantum efficiency has degraded from 30% (at 560 - 850 nm) to 25% over 4 years, but for Super-GenII tubes the peak quantum efficiency of 17% (peak at 550 nm) has remained unchanged for over 7 years. The Super-GenII tubes have a uniform spatial resolution of <30 μm FWHM ( 1 x106 gain) and single event timing resolution of 100 ps (FWHM). The relatively low MCP gain photon counting operation also permits longer overall sensor lifetimes and high local counting rates. Using the high timing resolution, we have demonstrated 3D object imaging with laser pulse (630 nm 45 ps jitter Pilas laser) reflections in single photon counting mode with spatial and depth sensitivity of the order of a few millimeters. A 50 mm Planacon sealed tube was also constructed, using atomic layer deposited microchannel plates which potentially offer better overall sealed tube lifetime, quantum efficiency and gain stability. This tube achieves standard bialkali quantum efficiency levels, is stable, and has been coupled to the PXS-II electronics and used to detect and image fast laser pulse signals.

  9. Photon-Counting Arrays for Time-Resolved Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Antolovic, I. Michel; Burri, Samuel; Hoebe, Ron A.; Maruyama, Yuki; Bruschini, Claudio; Charbon, Edoardo

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents a camera comprising 512 × 128 pixels capable of single-photon detection and gating with a maximum frame rate of 156 kfps. The photon capture is performed through a gated single-photon avalanche diode that generates a digital pulse upon photon detection and through a digital one-bit counter. Gray levels are obtained through multiple counting and accumulation, while time-resolved imaging is achieved through a 4-ns gating window controlled with subnanosecond accuracy by a field-programmable gate array. The sensor, which is equipped with microlenses to enhance its effective fill factor, was electro-optically characterized in terms of sensitivity and uniformity. Several examples of capture of fast events are shown to demonstrate the suitability of the approach. PMID:27367697

  10. Optical encryption using photon-counting polarimetric imaging.

    PubMed

    Maluenda, David; Carnicer, Artur; Martínez-Herrero, Rosario; Juvells, Ignasi; Javidi, Bahram

    2015-01-26

    We present a polarimetric-based optical encoder for image encryption and verification. A system for generating random polarized vector keys based on a Mach-Zehnder configuration combined with translucent liquid crystal displays in each path of the interferometer is developed. Polarization information of the encrypted signal is retrieved by taking advantage of the information provided by the Stokes parameters. Moreover, photon-counting model is used in the encryption process which provides data sparseness and nonlinear transformation to enhance security. An authorized user with access to the polarization keys and the optical design variables can retrieve and validate the photon-counting plain-text. Optical experimental results demonstrate the feasibility of the encryption method.

  11. Photon counting phosphorescence lifetime imaging with TimepixCam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirvonen, Liisa M.; Fisher-Levine, Merlin; Suhling, Klaus; Nomerotski, Andrei

    2017-01-01

    TimepixCam is a novel fast optical imager based on an optimized silicon pixel sensor with a thin entrance window and read out by a Timepix Application Specific Integrated Circuit. The 256 × 256 pixel sensor has a time resolution of 15 ns at a sustained frame rate of 10 Hz. We used this sensor in combination with an image intensifier for wide-field time-correlated single photon counting imaging. We have characterised the photon detection capabilities of this detector system and employed it on a wide-field epifluorescence microscope to map phosphorescence decays of various iridium complexes with lifetimes of about 1 μs in 200 μm diameter polystyrene beads.

  12. Photon counting phosphorescence lifetime imaging with TimepixCam

    DOE PAGES

    Hirvonen, Liisa M.; Fisher-Levine, Merlin; Suhling, Klaus; ...

    2017-01-12

    TimepixCam is a novel fast optical imager based on an optimized silicon pixel sensor with a thin entrance window, and read out by a Timepix ASIC. The 256 x 256 pixel sensor has a time resolution of 15 ns at a sustained frame rate of 10 Hz. We used this sensor in combination with an image intensifier for wide-field time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) imaging. We have characterised the photon detection capabilities of this detector system, and employed it on a wide-field epifluorescence microscope to map phosphorescence decays of various iridium complexes with lifetimes of about 1 μs in 200more » μm diameter polystyrene beads.« less

  13. Single-quantum dot imaging with a photon counting camera

    PubMed Central

    Michalet, X.; Colyer, R. A.; Antelman, J.; Siegmund, O.H.W.; Tremsin, A.; Vallerga, J.V.; Weiss, S.

    2010-01-01

    The expanding spectrum of applications of single-molecule fluorescence imaging ranges from fundamental in vitro studies of biomolecular activity to tracking of receptors in live cells. The success of these assays has relied on progresses in organic and non-organic fluorescent probe developments as well as improvements in the sensitivity of light detectors. We describe a new type of detector developed with the specific goal of ultra-sensitive single-molecule imaging. It is a wide-field, photon-counting detector providing high temporal and high spatial resolution information for each incoming photon. It can be used as a standard low-light level camera, but also allows access to a lot more information, such as fluorescence lifetime and spatio-temporal correlations. We illustrate the single-molecule imaging performance of our current prototype using quantum dots and discuss on-going and future developments of this detector. PMID:19689323

  14. Ghosting phenomena in single photon counting imagers with Vernier anode.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hao; Zhao, Baosheng; Qiurong, Yan; Liu, Yong'an; Hu, Huijun

    2011-02-01

    We provide the ghosting theory of two-dimensional Vernier anode based imagers. The single photon counting detection system based on Vernier anode is constructed. The ghosting, which occurs during the decoding of two-dimensional Vernier anode, and its possible solutions are described in detail. On the basis of the discussion of the decoding algorithm, the ghosting theoretical model is established. Phase conditions on which imaging ghosting can be avoided and the probability distribution function are proposed; the root causes of ghosting of two-dimensional Vernier anode are also discussed.

  15. Photon counting imaging with an electron-bombarded CCD: Towards wide-field time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirvonen, Liisa M.; Jiggins, Stephen; Sergent, Nicolas; Zanda, Gianmarco; Suhling, Klaus

    2015-07-01

    Single photon detecting capabilities of an electron-bombarded CCD (EBCCD), where a photon is converted into a photoelectron that is accelerated through a high voltage before hitting the CCD chip, were characterised. The photon event pulse height distribution was found to be linearly dependent on the gain voltage. Based on these results, we propose that a gain voltage sweep during exposure in an EBCCD or EBCMOS camera would allow photon arrival time determination from the photon event pulse height with sub-frame exposure time resolution. This effectively uses an electron-bombarded sensor as a parallel-processing photoelectronic time-to-amplitude converter (TAC), or a 2-dimensional streak camera. Several applications that require timing of photon arrival, including fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM), may benefit from this approach. Moreover, the EBCCD was used on a fluorescence microscope to image fluorescently labelled cells in single photon counting mode.

  16. Single Photon Counting Detectors for Low Light Level Imaging Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolb, Kimberly

    2015-10-01

    This dissertation presents the current state-of-the-art of semiconductor-based photon counting detector technologies. HgCdTe linear-mode avalanche photodiodes (LM-APDs), silicon Geiger-mode avalanche photodiodes (GM-APDs), and electron-multiplying CCDs (EMCCDs) are compared via their present and future performance in various astronomy applications. LM-APDs are studied in theory, based on work done at the University of Hawaii. EMCCDs are studied in theory and experimentally, with a device at NASA's Jet Propulsion Lab. The emphasis of the research is on GM-APD imaging arrays, developed at MIT Lincoln Laboratory and tested at the RIT Center for Detectors. The GM-APD research includes a theoretical analysis of SNR and various performance metrics, including dark count rate, afterpulsing, photon detection efficiency, and intrapixel sensitivity. The effects of radiation damage on the GM-APD were also characterized by introducing a cumulative dose of 50 krad(Si) via 60 MeV protons. Extensive development of Monte Carlo simulations and practical observation simulations was completed, including simulated astronomical imaging and adaptive optics wavefront sensing. Based on theoretical models and experimental testing, both the current state-of-the-art performance and projected future performance of each detector are compared for various applications. LM-APD performance is currently not competitive with other photon counting technologies, and are left out of the application-based comparisons. In the current state-of-the-art, EMCCDs in photon counting mode out-perform GM-APDs for long exposure scenarios, though GM-APDs are better for short exposure scenarios (fast readout) due to clock-induced-charge (CIC) in EMCCDs. In the long term, small improvements in GM-APD dark current will make them superior in both long and short exposure scenarios for extremely low flux. The efficiency of GM-APDs will likely always be less than EMCCDs, however, which is particularly disadvantageous for

  17. Energy dispersive photon counting detectors for breast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barber, William C.; Wessel, Jan C.; Malakhov, Nail; Wawrzyniak, Gregor; Hartsough, Neal E.; Gandhi, Thulasidharan; Nygard, Einar; Iwanczyk, Jan S.

    2013-09-01

    We report on our efforts toward the development of silicon (Si) strip detectors for energy-resolved clinical breast imaging. Typically, x-ray integrating detectors based on scintillating cesium iodide CsI(Tl) or amorphous selenium (a- Se) are used in most commercial systems. Recently, mammography instrumentation has been introduced based on photon counting silicon Si strip detectors. Mammography requires high flux from the x-ray generator, therefore, in order to achieve energy resolved single photon counting, a high output count rate (OCR) for the detector must be achieved at the required spatial resolution and across the required dynamic range for the application. The required performance in terms of the OCR, spatial resolution, and dynamic range must be obtained with sufficient field of view (FOV) for the application thus requiring the tiling of pixel arrays and scanning techniques. Room temperature semiconductors, operating as direct conversion x-ray sensors, can provide the required speed when connected to application specific integrated circuits (ASICs) operating at fast peaking times with multiple fixed thresholds per pixel, provided that the sensors are designed for rapid signal formation across the x-ray energy ranges of the application at the required energy and spatial resolutions. We present our methods and results from the optimization of prototype detectors based on Si strip structures. We describe the detector optimization and the development of ASIC readout electronics that provide the required spatial resolution, low noise, high count rate capabilities and minimal power consumption.

  18. Photon-counting image sensors for the ultraviolet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, E. B.

    1985-01-01

    An investigation on specific performance details of photon counting, ultraviolet image sensors having 2-dimensional formats is reviewed. In one study, controlled experiments were performed which compare the quantum efficiencies, in pulse counting mode, of CsI photocathodes deposited on: (1) the front surface of a microchannel plate (MCP), (2) a solid surface in front of an MCP, and (3) an intensified CCD image sensor (ICCD) where a CCD is directly bombarded by accelerated photoelectrons. Tests indicated that the detection efficiency of the CsI-coated MCP at 1026 A is lower by a factor of 2.5 than that of the MCP with a separate, opaque CsI photocathode, and the detection efficiency ratio increases substantially at longer wavelengths (ratio is 5 at 1216 A and 20 at 1608 A).

  19. Imaging by photon counting with 256x256 pixel matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tlustos, Lukas; Campbell, Michael; Heijne, Erik H. M.; Llopart, Xavier

    2004-09-01

    Using 0.25µm standard CMOS we have developed 2-D semiconductor matrix detectors with sophisticated functionality integrated inside each pixel of a hybrid sensor module. One of these sensor modules is a matrix of 256x256 square 55µm pixels intended for X-ray imaging. This device is called 'Medipix2' and features a fast amplifier and two-level discrimination for signals between 1000 and 100000 equivalent electrons, with overall signal noise ~150 e- rms. Signal polarity and comparator thresholds are programmable. A maximum count rate of nearly 1 MHz per pixel can be achieved, which corresponds to an average flux of 3x10exp10 photons per cm2. The selected signals can be accumulated in each pixel in a 13-bit register. The serial readout takes 5-10 ms. A parallel readout of ~300 µs could also be used. Housekeeping functions such as local dark current compensation, test pulse generation, silencing of noisy pixels and threshold tuning in each pixel contribute to the homogeneous response over a large sensor area. The sensor material can be adapted to the energy of the X-rays. Best results have been obtained with high-resistivity silicon detectors, but also CdTe and GaAs detectors have been used. The lowest detectable X-ray energy was about 4 keV. Background measurements have been made, as well as measurements of the uniformity of imaging by photon counting. Very low photon count rates are feasible and noise-free at room temperature. The readout matrix can be used also with visible photons if an energy or charge intensifier structure is interposed such as a gaseous amplification layer or a microchannel plate or acceleration field in vacuum.

  20. Multibeam multifocal multiphoton photon counting imaging in scattering media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoover, Erich E.

    Multiphoton microscopy is an invaluable technique for the neurological community, allowing for deep explorations within highly scattering tissues such as the brain. However, prior to this research multiphoton microscopy was limited in its ability to rapidly construct volumetric images deep within scattering specimens. This work establishes a technique that permits such exploration through the application of multiple beams separated in both space and time, where signal photons corresponding to those beams are demultiplexed through the use of a field programmable gate array. With this system a number of improvements are provided to research in scattering media, including the coveted ability to perform photon-counting imaging with multiple beams. The ability to perform these measurements with multiple beams permits unique quantitative measurements of fluorophores within living specimens, allowing new research into dynamic three-dimensional behavior occurring within the brain. Additionally, the ability to perform multimodal measurements without filtering allows for unique avenues of research where the harmonic generation is indistinguishable from the two-photon excited fluorescence. These improvements provide neuroscience researchers with a large assortment of technological tools that will permit them to perform numerous novel experiments within the brain and other highly-scattering specimens, which should one day lead to significant advances in our understanding of complex neuronal activity.

  1. High Speed Large Format Photon Counting Microchannel Plate Imaging Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegmund, O.; Ertley, C.; Vallerga, J.; Craven, C.; Popecki, M.; O'Mahony, A.; Minot, M.

    The development of a new class of microchannel plate technology, using atomic layer deposition (ALD) techniques applied to a borosilicate microcapillary array is enabling the implementation of larger, more stable detectors for Astronomy and remote sensing. Sealed tubes with MCPs with SuperGenII, bialkali, GaAs and GaN photocathodes have been developed to cover a wide range of optical/UV sensing applications. Formats of 18mm and 25mm circular, and 50mm (Planacon) and 20cm square have been constructed for uses from night time remote reconnaissance and biological single-molecule fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy, to large area focal plane imagers for Astronomy, neutron detection and ring imaging Cherenkov detection. The large focal plane areas were previously unattainable, but the new developments in construction of ALD microchannel plates allow implementation of formats of 20cm or more. Continuing developments in ALD microchannel plates offer improved overall sealed tube lifetime and gain stability, and furthermore show reduced levels of radiation induced background. High time resolution astronomical and remote sensing applications can be addressed with microchannel plate based imaging, photon time tagging detector sealed tube schemes. Photon counting imaging readouts for these devices vary from cross strip (XS), cross delay line (XDL), to stripline anodes, and pad arrays depending on the intended application. The XS and XDL readouts have been implemented in formats from 22mm, and 50mm to 20cm. Both use MCP charge signals detected on two orthogonal layers of conductive fingers to encode event X-Y positions. XDL readout uses signal propagation delay to encode positions while XS readout uses charge cloud centroiding. Spatial resolution readout of XS detectors can be better than 20 microns FWHM, with good image linearity while using low gain (<10^6), allowing high local counting rates and longer overall tube lifetime. XS tubes with electronics can encode event

  2. Phasor imaging with a widefield photon-counting detector

    PubMed Central

    Siegmund, Oswald H. W.; Tremsin, Anton S.; Vallerga, John V.; Weiss, Shimon

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. Fluorescence lifetime can be used as a contrast mechanism to distinguish fluorophores for localization or tracking, for studying molecular interactions, binding, assembly, and aggregation, or for observing conformational changes via Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) between donor and acceptor molecules. Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) is thus a powerful technique but its widespread use has been hampered by demanding hardware and software requirements. FLIM data is often analyzed in terms of multicomponent fluorescence lifetime decays, which requires large signals for a good signal-to-noise ratio. This confines the approach to very low frame rates and limits the number of frames which can be acquired before bleaching the sample. Recently, a computationally efficient and intuitive graphical representation, the phasor approach, has been proposed as an alternative method for FLIM data analysis at the ensemble and single-molecule level. In this article, we illustrate the advantages of combining phasor analysis with a widefield time-resolved single photon-counting detector (the H33D detector) for FLIM applications. In particular we show that phasor analysis allows real-time subsecond identification of species by their lifetimes and rapid representation of their spatial distribution, thanks to the parallel acquisition of FLIM information over a wide field of view by the H33D detector. We also discuss possible improvements of the H33D detector’s performance made possible by the simplicity of phasor analysis and its relaxed timing accuracy requirements compared to standard time-correlated single-photon counting (TCSPC) methods. PMID:22352658

  3. Multispectral photon counting integral imaging system for color visualization of photon limited 3D scenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Inkyu

    2014-06-01

    This paper provides an overview of a colorful photon-counting integral imaging system using Bayer elemental images for 3D visualization of photon limited scenes. The color image sensor with a format of Bayer color filter array, i.e., a red, a green, or a blue filter in a repeating pattern, captures elemental image set of a photon limited three-dimensional (3D) scene. It is assumed that the observed photon count in each channel (red, green or blue) follows Poisson statistics. The reconstruction of 3D scene with a format of Bayer is obtained by applying computational geometrical ray back propagation algorithm and parametric maximum likelihood estimator to the photon-limited Bayer elemental images. Finally, several standard demosaicing algorithms are applied in order to convert the 3D reconstruction with a Bayer format into a RGB per pixel format. Experimental results demonstrate that the gradient corrected linear interpolation technique achieves better performance in regard with acceptable PSNR and less computational complexity.

  4. Spectroscopic and imaging capabilities of a pixellated photon counting system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amendolia, S. R.; Bisogni, M. G.; Bottigli, U.; Delogu, P.; Dipasquale, G.; Fantacci, M. E.; Marchi, A.; Marzulli, V. M.; Oliva, P.; Palmiero, R.; Rosso, V.; Stefanini, A.; Stumbo, S.; Zucca, S.

    2001-06-01

    We are studying the performance of various thickness GaAs pixel detectors bump-bonded to a dedicated photon counting chip (PCC) for medical imaging applications in different energy ranges. In this work we present the experimental results obtained with a 600 μm thick pixel matrix (64×64 square pixels, 170 μm side) in the 60-140 keV energy range to evaluate the possible use of such a system in the nuclear medicine field. In particular, we have measured the spectroscopic properties of the detector (charge collection efficiency, energy resolution and detection efficiency) and evaluated the discrimination capability of the electronics. Then we have measured the imaging properties of the whole system in terms of Point Spread Function and using a home made thyroid phantom. We present also a comparison with a traditional gamma camera and an evaluation, made by both experimental measurements and software simulations, of the imaging characteristics related to the use of a collimation system.

  5. Single Photon Counting Performance and Noise Analysis of CMOS SPAD-Based Image Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Dutton, Neale A. W.; Gyongy, Istvan; Parmesan, Luca; Henderson, Robert K.

    2016-01-01

    SPAD-based solid state CMOS image sensors utilising analogue integrators have attained deep sub-electron read noise (DSERN) permitting single photon counting (SPC) imaging. A new method is proposed to determine the read noise in DSERN image sensors by evaluating the peak separation and width (PSW) of single photon peaks in a photon counting histogram (PCH). The technique is used to identify and analyse cumulative noise in analogue integrating SPC SPAD-based pixels. The DSERN of our SPAD image sensor is exploited to confirm recent multi-photon threshold quanta image sensor (QIS) theory. Finally, various single and multiple photon spatio-temporal oversampling techniques are reviewed. PMID:27447643

  6. Single Photon Counting Performance and Noise Analysis of CMOS SPAD-Based Image Sensors.

    PubMed

    Dutton, Neale A W; Gyongy, Istvan; Parmesan, Luca; Henderson, Robert K

    2016-07-20

    SPAD-based solid state CMOS image sensors utilising analogue integrators have attained deep sub-electron read noise (DSERN) permitting single photon counting (SPC) imaging. A new method is proposed to determine the read noise in DSERN image sensors by evaluating the peak separation and width (PSW) of single photon peaks in a photon counting histogram (PCH). The technique is used to identify and analyse cumulative noise in analogue integrating SPC SPAD-based pixels. The DSERN of our SPAD image sensor is exploited to confirm recent multi-photon threshold quanta image sensor (QIS) theory. Finally, various single and multiple photon spatio-temporal oversampling techniques are reviewed.

  7. Color image authentication scheme via multispectral photon-counting double random phase encoding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Inkyu

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, we present an overview of a color image authentication scheme via multispectral photon-counting (MPCI) double random phase encoding (DRPE). The MPCI makes image sparse distributed and DRPE lets image be stationary white noise which make intruder attacks difficult. In this method, the original RGB image is down-sampled into Bayer image and then be encrypted with DRPE. The encrypted image is photon-counted and transmitted on internet channel. For image authentication, the decrypted Bayer image is interpolated into RBC image with demosaicing algorithm. Experimental results show that the decrypted image is not visually recognized under low light level but can be verified with nonlinear correlation algorithm.

  8. Estimating ROI activity concentration with photon-processing and photon-counting SPECT imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jha, Abhinav K.; Frey, Eric C.

    2015-03-01

    Recently a new class of imaging systems, referred to as photon-processing (PP) systems, are being developed that uses real-time maximum-likelihood (ML) methods to estimate multiple attributes per detected photon and store these attributes in a list format. PP systems could have a number of potential advantages compared to systems that bin photons based on attributes such as energy, projection angle, and position, referred to as photon-counting (PC) systems. For example, PP systems do not suffer from binning-related information loss and provide the potential to extract information from attributes such as energy deposited by the detected photon. To quantify the effects of this advantage on task performance, objective evaluation studies are required. We performed this study in the context of quantitative 2-dimensional single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging with the end task of estimating the mean activity concentration within a region of interest (ROI). We first theoretically outline the effect of null space on estimating the mean activity concentration, and argue that due to this effect, PP systems could have better estimation performance compared to PC systems with noise-free data. To evaluate the performance of PP and PC systems with noisy data, we developed a singular value decomposition (SVD)-based analytic method to estimate the activity concentration from PP systems. Using simulations, we studied the accuracy and precision of this technique in estimating the activity concentration. We used this framework to objectively compare PP and PC systems on the activity concentration estimation task. We investigated the effects of varying the size of the ROI and varying the number of bins for the attribute corresponding to the angular orientation of the detector in a continuously rotating SPECT system. The results indicate that in several cases, PP systems offer improved estimation performance compared to PC systems.

  9. A Photon Counting Imaging Detector for NASA Exoplanet Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figer, Donald

    The key objective of the proposed project is to advance the maturity of a 256x256 pixel single-photon optical imaging detector. The detector has zero read noise and is resilient against the harsh effects of radiation in space. We expect that the device will have state-of-the-art performance in other parameters, e.g., high quantum efficiency from UV to 1 #m, low dark current, etc.

  10. Photon Counting Imaging with an Electron-Bombarded Pixel Image Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Hirvonen, Liisa M.; Suhling, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Electron-bombarded pixel image sensors, where a single photoelectron is accelerated directly into a CCD or CMOS sensor, allow wide-field imaging at extremely low light levels as they are sensitive enough to detect single photons. This technology allows the detection of up to hundreds or thousands of photon events per frame, depending on the sensor size, and photon event centroiding can be employed to recover resolution lost in the detection process. Unlike photon events from electron-multiplying sensors, the photon events from electron-bombarded sensors have a narrow, acceleration-voltage-dependent pulse height distribution. Thus a gain voltage sweep during exposure in an electron-bombarded sensor could allow photon arrival time determination from the pulse height with sub-frame exposure time resolution. We give a brief overview of our work with electron-bombarded pixel image sensor technology and recent developments in this field for single photon counting imaging, and examples of some applications. PMID:27136556

  11. Photon counting imaging and centroiding with an electron-bombarded CCD using single molecule localisation software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirvonen, Liisa M.; Barber, Matthew J.; Suhling, Klaus

    2016-06-01

    Photon event centroiding in photon counting imaging and single-molecule localisation in super-resolution fluorescence microscopy share many traits. Although photon event centroiding has traditionally been performed with simple single-iteration algorithms, we recently reported that iterative fitting algorithms originally developed for single-molecule localisation fluorescence microscopy work very well when applied to centroiding photon events imaged with an MCP-intensified CMOS camera. Here, we have applied these algorithms for centroiding of photon events from an electron-bombarded CCD (EBCCD). We find that centroiding algorithms based on iterative fitting of the photon events yield excellent results and allow fitting of overlapping photon events, a feature not reported before and an important aspect to facilitate an increased count rate and shorter acquisition times.

  12. Photon counting imaging and centroiding with an electron-bombarded CCD using single molecule localisation software

    PubMed Central

    Hirvonen, Liisa M.; Barber, Matthew J.; Suhling, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Photon event centroiding in photon counting imaging and single-molecule localisation in super-resolution fluorescence microscopy share many traits. Although photon event centroiding has traditionally been performed with simple single-iteration algorithms, we recently reported that iterative fitting algorithms originally developed for single-molecule localisation fluorescence microscopy work very well when applied to centroiding photon events imaged with an MCP-intensified CMOS camera. Here, we have applied these algorithms for centroiding of photon events from an electron-bombarded CCD (EBCCD). We find that centroiding algorithms based on iterative fitting of the photon events yield excellent results and allow fitting of overlapping photon events, a feature not reported before and an important aspect to facilitate an increased count rate and shorter acquisition times. PMID:27274604

  13. Reduction of CMOS Image Sensor Read Noise to Enable Photon Counting

    PubMed Central

    Guidash, Michael; Ma, Jiaju; Vogelsang, Thomas; Endsley, Jay

    2016-01-01

    Recent activity in photon counting CMOS image sensors (CIS) has been directed to reduction of read noise. Many approaches and methods have been reported. This work is focused on providing sub 1 e− read noise by design and operation of the binary and small signal readout of photon counting CIS. Compensation of transfer gate feed-through was used to provide substantially reduced CDS time and source follower (SF) bandwidth. SF read noise was reduced by a factor of 3 with this method. This method can be applied broadly to CIS devices to reduce the read noise for small signals to enable use as a photon counting sensor. PMID:27070625

  14. Reduction of CMOS Image Sensor Read Noise to Enable Photon Counting.

    PubMed

    Guidash, Michael; Ma, Jiaju; Vogelsang, Thomas; Endsley, Jay

    2016-04-09

    Recent activity in photon counting CMOS image sensors (CIS) has been directed to reduction of read noise. Many approaches and methods have been reported. This work is focused on providing sub 1 e(-) read noise by design and operation of the binary and small signal readout of photon counting CIS. Compensation of transfer gate feed-through was used to provide substantially reduced CDS time and source follower (SF) bandwidth. SF read noise was reduced by a factor of 3 with this method. This method can be applied broadly to CIS devices to reduce the read noise for small signals to enable use as a photon counting sensor.

  15. Photon counting passive 3D image sensing for automatic target recognition.

    PubMed

    Yeom, Seokwon; Javidi, Bahram; Watson, Edward

    2005-11-14

    In this paper, we propose photon counting three-dimensional (3D) passive sensing and object recognition using integral imaging. The application of this approach to 3D automatic target recognition (ATR) is investigated using both linear and nonlinear matched filters. We find there is significant potential of the proposed system for 3D sensing and recognition with a low number of photons. The discrimination capability of the proposed system is quantified in terms of discrimination ratio, Fisher ratio, and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on photon counting 3D passive sensing and ATR with integral imaging.

  16. Simultaneous x-ray fluorescence and K-edge CT imaging with photon-counting detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Liang; Li, Ruizhe; Zhang, Siyuan; Chen, Zhiqiang

    2016-10-01

    Rapid development of the X-ray phonon-counting detection technology brings tremendous research and application opportunities. In addition to improvements in conventional X-ray imaging performance such as radiation dose utilization and beam hardening correction, photon-counting detectors allows significantly more efficient X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and K-edge imaging, and promises a great potential of X-ray functional, cellular and molecular imaging. XRF is the characteristic emission of secondary X-ray photons from a material excited by initial X-rays. The phenomenon is widely used for chemical and elemental analysis. K-edge imaging identifies a material based on its chemically-specific absorption discontinuity over X-ray photon energy. In this paper, we try to combine XRF and K-edge signals from the contrast agents (e.g., iodine, gadolinium, gold nanoparticles) to simultaneously realize XFCT and K-edge CT imaging for superior image performance. As a prerequisite for this dual-modality imaging, the accurate energy calibration of multi-energy-bin photon-counting detectors is critically important. With the measured XRF data of different materials, we characterize the energy response function of a CZT detector for energy calibration and spectrum reconstruction, which can effectively improve the energy resolution and decrease the inconsistence of the photon counting detectors. Then, a simultaneous K-edge and X-ray fluorescence CT imaging (SKYFI) experimental setup is designed which includes a cone-beam X-ray tube, two separate photon counting detector arrays, a pin-hole collimator and a rotation stage. With a phantom containing gold nanoparticles the two types of XFCT and K-edge CT datasets are collected simultaneously. Then, XFCT and K-edge CT images are synergistically reconstructed in a same framework. Simulation results are presented and quantitative analyzed and compared with the separate XFCT and K-edge CT results.

  17. Tilted angle CZT detector for photon counting/energy weighting x-ray and CT imaging.

    PubMed

    Shikhaliev, Polad M

    2006-09-07

    X-ray imaging with a photon counting/energy weighting detector can provide the highest signal to noise ratio (SNR). Scanning slit/multi-slit x-ray image acquisition can provide a dose-efficient scatter rejection, which increases SNR. Use of a photon counting/energy weighting detector in a scanning slit/multi-slit acquisition geometry could provide highest possible dose efficiency in x-ray and CT imaging. Currently, the most advanced photon counting detector is the cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detector, which, however, is suboptimal for energy resolved x-ray imaging. A tilted angle CZT detector is proposed in this work for applications in photon counting/energy weighting x-ray and CT imaging. In tilted angle configuration, the x-ray beam hits the surface of the linear array of CZT crystals at a small angle. This allows the use of CZT crystals of a small thickness while maintaining the high photon absorption. Small thickness CZT detectors allow for a significant decrease in the polarization effect in the CZT volume and an increase in count rate. The tilted angle CZT with a small thickness also provides higher spatial and energy resolution, and shorter charge collection time, which potentially enables fast energy resolving x-ray image acquisition. In this work, the major performance parameters of the tilted angle CZT detector, including its count rate, spatial resolution and energy resolution, were evaluated. It was shown that for a CZT detector with a 0.7 mm thickness and 13 degrees tilting angle, the maximum count rate can be increased by 10.7 times, while photon absorption remains >90% at photon energies up to 120 keV. Photon counting/energy weighting x-ray imaging using a tilted angle CZT detector was simulated. SNR improvement due to optimal photon energy weighting was 23% and 14% when adipose contrast element, inserted in soft tissue with 10 cm and 20 cm thickness, respectively, was imaged using 5 energy bins and weighting factors optimized for the adipose. SNR

  18. Double-random-phase encryption with photon counting for image authentication using only the amplitude of the encrypted image.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong; Markman, Adam; Quan, Chenggen; Javidi, Bahram

    2016-11-01

    We present a photon-counting double-random-phase encryption technique that only requires the photon-limited amplitude of the encrypted image for decryption. The double-random-phase encryption is used to encrypt an image, generating a complex image. Photon counting is applied to the amplitude of the encrypted image, generating a sparse noise-like image; however, the phase information is not retained. By not using the phase information, the encryption process is simplified, allowing for intensity detection and also less information to be recorded. Using a phase numerically generated from the correct encryption keys together with the photon-limited amplitude of the encrypted image, we are able to decrypt the image. Moreover, nonlinear correlation algorithms can be used to authenticate the decrypted image. Both amplitude-based and full-phase encryption using the proposed method are investigated. Preliminary computational results and performance evaluation are presented.

  19. Reflectivity and depth images based on time-correlated single photon counting technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Xuejie; Ma, Lin; Kang, Yan; Zhang, Tongyi

    2016-10-01

    We presented three-dimensional image including reflectivity and depth image of a target with two traditional optical imaging systems based on time-correlated single photon counting technique (TCSPC), when it was illuminated by a MHz repetition rate pulsed laser source. The first one is bi-static system of which transmitted and received beams path are separated. Another one called mono-static system of which transmit and receive channels are coaxial, so it was also named by transceiver system. Experimental results produced by both systems showed that the mono-static system had more advantages of less noise from ambient light and no limitation about field area of view. While in practical applications, the target was far away leading to there were few photons return which was prejudicial to build 3D images with traditional imaging system. Thus an advanced one named first photon system was presented. This one was also a mono-static system on hardware system structure, but the control system structure was different with traditional transceiver system described in this paper. The difference was that the first return photon per pixel was recorded across system with first photon system, instead of overall return photons per pixel. That's to say only one detected return photon is needed for per pixel of this system to rebuild 3D images of target with less energy and time.

  20. X-ray Photon Counting and Two-Color X-ray Imaging Using Indirect Detection

    PubMed Central

    Dierickx, Bart; Yao, Qiang; Witvrouwen, Nick; Uwaerts, Dirk; Vandewiele, Stijn; Gao, Peng

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we report on the design and performance of a 1 cm2, 90 × 92-pixel image sensor. It is made X-ray sensitive by the use of a scintillator. Its pixels have a charge packet counting circuit topology with two channels, each realizing a different charge packet size threshold and analog domain event counting. Here, the sensor’s performance was measured in setups representative of a medical X-ray environment. Further, two-energy-level photon counting performance is demonstrated, and its capabilities and limitations are documented. We then provide an outlook on future improvements. PMID:27240362

  1. The effects of photon flux on energy spectra and imaging characteristics in a photon-counting x-ray detector.

    PubMed

    Cho, H-M; Kim, H-J; Choi, Y-N; Lee, S-W; Ryu, H-J; Lee, Y-J

    2013-07-21

    The purpose of this paper was to investigate the effect of photon flux on the recorded energy spectrum and images produced with a photon-counting detector. We used a photon-counting cadmium telluride (CdTe) x-ray detector (model PID350, Oy Ajat, Finland). The CdTe array was composed of 16 384 pixels, each 0.35 × 0.35 × 0.75 mm(3) in dimension. The photon flux is controlled by an additional aluminum filter (1, 10, 20, 30 and 40 mm). Images were acquired at three different tube voltages (50, 70 and 90 kVp) with various thicknesses of photon flux control (PFC) filters. The data acquisition time was changed to acquire an approximately equal number of counts within the selected energy window between different thicknesses of PFC filters at the same tube voltage. A phantom was manufactured to evaluate the photon flux effect on the image. The phantom was made from polymethyl methacrylate and four concentrations of iodine. The photon flux effect on the image was evaluated by the signal-difference-to-noise ratio (SDNR) between iodine and the background material. The changes of photon flux affected the recorded energy spectra and image. The thickness of the PFC filter that showed the maximum SDNR differed according to the tube voltage. The 10 mm PFC filter showed the highest SDNR at 50 and 70 kVp, while the 30 mm PFC filter exhibited the highest SDNR at 90 kVp. The SDNR was improved up to, on average, 30-fold in optimal photon flux conditions which acquired a spectrum including the lowest electronic noise with no pulse pile-up effect. The results of this study showed that the photon flux affected not only the acquired energy spectrum but also the image. Based on these results, the spectral distortion correction should be considered in connection with the image that is the ultimate purpose of medical imaging.

  2. The effects of photon flux on energy spectra and imaging characteristics in a photon-counting x-ray detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, H.-M.; Kim, H.-J.; Choi, Y.-N.; Lee, S.-W.; Ryu, H.-J.; Lee, Y.-J.

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this paper was to investigate the effect of photon flux on the recorded energy spectrum and images produced with a photon-counting detector. We used a photon-counting cadmium telluride (CdTe) x-ray detector (model PID350, Oy Ajat, Finland). The CdTe array was composed of 16 384 pixels, each 0.35 × 0.35 × 0.75 mm3 in dimension. The photon flux is controlled by an additional aluminum filter (1, 10, 20, 30 and 40 mm). Images were acquired at three different tube voltages (50, 70 and 90 kVp) with various thicknesses of photon flux control (PFC) filters. The data acquisition time was changed to acquire an approximately equal number of counts within the selected energy window between different thicknesses of PFC filters at the same tube voltage. A phantom was manufactured to evaluate the photon flux effect on the image. The phantom was made from polymethyl methacrylate and four concentrations of iodine. The photon flux effect on the image was evaluated by the signal-difference-to-noise ratio (SDNR) between iodine and the background material. The changes of photon flux affected the recorded energy spectra and image. The thickness of the PFC filter that showed the maximum SDNR differed according to the tube voltage. The 10 mm PFC filter showed the highest SDNR at 50 and 70 kVp, while the 30 mm PFC filter exhibited the highest SDNR at 90 kVp. The SDNR was improved up to, on average, 30-fold in optimal photon flux conditions which acquired a spectrum including the lowest electronic noise with no pulse pile-up effect. The results of this study showed that the photon flux affected not only the acquired energy spectrum but also the image. Based on these results, the spectral distortion correction should be considered in connection with the image that is the ultimate purpose of medical imaging.

  3. Edge-on illumination photon-counting for medical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doni, M.; Visser, J.; Koffeman, E.; Herrmann, C.

    2015-08-01

    In medical X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) a silicon based sensor (300-1000 μm) in face-on configuration does not collect the incoming X-rays effectively because of their high energy (40-140 keV). For example, only 2% of the incoming photons at 100 keV are stopped by a 500 μm thick silicon layer. To increase the efficiency, one possibility is to use materials with higher Z (e.g. GaAs, CZT), which have some drawbacks compared to silicon, such as short carrier lifetime or low mobility. Therefore, we investigate whether illuminating silicon edge-on instead of face-on is a solution. Aim of the project is to find and take advantage of the benefits of this new geometry when used for a pixel detector. In particular, we employ a silicon hybrid pixel detector, which is read out by a chip from the Medipix family. Its capabilities to be energy selective will be a notable advantage in energy resolved (spectral) X-ray CT.

  4. Readout techniques for photon-counting microchannel image systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lampton, Michael

    1988-01-01

    A comparative evaluation is made of such readout methods for the microchannel plates that are commonly used in EUV, FUV, and X-ray low light level image systems as the (1) phosphor-video, (2) phosphor and binary-mask encoder, (3) direct discrete-position encoder, (4) direct analog amplitude position-encoder systems, and (5) delay-line encoders. Relative advantages and limitations are discussed in the context of low light level space-based astronomy applications. The delay-line technique offers great promise for high-resolution applications where oversampling is mandatory, as in spectroscopy.

  5. A dynamic attenuator improves spectral imaging with energy-discriminating, photon counting detectors.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Scott S; Pelc, Norbert J

    2015-03-01

    Energy-discriminating, photon counting (EDPC) detectors have high potential in spectral imaging applications but exhibit degraded performance when the incident count rate approaches or exceeds the characteristic count rate of the detector. In order to reduce the requirements on the detector, we explore the strategy of modulating the X-ray flux field using a recently proposed dynamic, piecewise-linear attenuator. A previous paper studied this modulation for photon counting detectors but did not explore the impact on spectral applications. In this work, we modeled detection with a bipolar triangular pulse shape (Taguchi et al., 2011) and estimated the Cramer-Rao lower bound (CRLB) of the variance of material selective and equivalent monoenergetic images, assuming deterministic errors at high flux could be corrected. We compared different materials for the dynamic attenuator and found that rare earth elements, such as erbium, outperformed previously proposed materials such as iron in spectral imaging. The redistribution of flux reduces the variance or dose, consistent with previous studies on benefits with conventional detectors. Numerical simulations based on DICOM datasets were used to assess the impact of the dynamic attenuator for detectors with several different characteristic count rates. The dynamic attenuator reduced the peak incident count rate by a factor of 4 in the thorax and 44 in the pelvis, and a 10 Mcps/mm (2) EDPC detector with dynamic attenuator provided generally superior image quality to a 100 Mcps/mm (2) detector with reference bowtie filter for the same dose. The improvement is more pronounced in the material images.

  6. Near UV imager with an MCP-based photon counting detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambily, S.; Mathew, Joice; Sarpotdar, Mayuresh; Sreejith, A. G.; Nirmal, K.; Prakash, Ajin; Safonova, Margarita; Murthy, Jayant

    2016-07-01

    We are developing a compact UV Imager using light weight components, that can be own on a small CubeSat or a balloon platform. The system has a lens-based optics that can provide an aberration-free image over a wide field of view. The backend instrument is a photon counting detector with off-the-shelf MCP, CMOS sensor and electronics. We are using a Z-stack MCP with a compact high voltage power supply and a phosphor screen anode, which is read out by a CMOS sensor and the associated electronics. The instrument can be used to observe solar system objects and detect bright transients from the upper atmosphere with the help of CubeSats or high altitude balloons. We have designed the imager to be capable of working in direct frame transfer mode as well in the photon-counting mode for single photon event detection. The identification and centroiding of each photon event are done using an FPGA-based data acquisition and real-time processing system.

  7. Photon Counting Energy Dispersive Detector Arrays for X-ray Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Iwanczyk, Jan S.; Nygård, Einar; Meirav, Oded; Arenson, Jerry; Barber, William C.; Hartsough, Neal E.; Malakhov, Nail; Wessel, Jan C.

    2009-01-01

    The development of an innovative detector technology for photon-counting in X-ray imaging is reported. This new generation of detectors, based on pixellated cadmium telluride (CdTe) and cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detector arrays electrically connected to application specific integrated circuits (ASICs) for readout, will produce fast and highly efficient photon-counting and energy-dispersive X-ray imaging. There are a number of applications that can greatly benefit from these novel imagers including mammography, planar radiography, and computed tomography (CT). Systems based on this new detector technology can provide compositional analysis of tissue through spectroscopic X-ray imaging, significantly improve overall image quality, and may significantly reduce X-ray dose to the patient. A very high X-ray flux is utilized in many of these applications. For example, CT scanners can produce ~100 Mphotons/mm2/s in the unattenuated beam. High flux is required in order to collect sufficient photon statistics in the measurement of the transmitted flux (attenuated beam) during the very short time frame of a CT scan. This high count rate combined with a need for high detection efficiency requires the development of detector structures that can provide a response signal much faster than the transit time of carriers over the whole detector thickness. We have developed CdTe and CZT detector array structures which are 3 mm thick with 16×16 pixels and a 1 mm pixel pitch. These structures, in the two different implementations presented here, utilize either a small pixel effect or a drift phenomenon. An energy resolution of 4.75% at 122 keV has been obtained with a 30 ns peaking time using discrete electronics and a 57Co source. An output rate of 6×106 counts per second per individual pixel has been obtained with our ASIC readout electronics and a clinical CT X-ray tube. Additionally, the first clinical CT images, taken with several of our prototype photon-counting and energy

  8. Photon Counting Energy Dispersive Detector Arrays for X-ray Imaging.

    PubMed

    Iwanczyk, Jan S; Nygård, Einar; Meirav, Oded; Arenson, Jerry; Barber, William C; Hartsough, Neal E; Malakhov, Nail; Wessel, Jan C

    2009-01-01

    The development of an innovative detector technology for photon-counting in X-ray imaging is reported. This new generation of detectors, based on pixellated cadmium telluride (CdTe) and cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detector arrays electrically connected to application specific integrated circuits (ASICs) for readout, will produce fast and highly efficient photon-counting and energy-dispersive X-ray imaging. There are a number of applications that can greatly benefit from these novel imagers including mammography, planar radiography, and computed tomography (CT). Systems based on this new detector technology can provide compositional analysis of tissue through spectroscopic X-ray imaging, significantly improve overall image quality, and may significantly reduce X-ray dose to the patient. A very high X-ray flux is utilized in many of these applications. For example, CT scanners can produce ~100 Mphotons/mm(2)/s in the unattenuated beam. High flux is required in order to collect sufficient photon statistics in the measurement of the transmitted flux (attenuated beam) during the very short time frame of a CT scan. This high count rate combined with a need for high detection efficiency requires the development of detector structures that can provide a response signal much faster than the transit time of carriers over the whole detector thickness. We have developed CdTe and CZT detector array structures which are 3 mm thick with 16×16 pixels and a 1 mm pixel pitch. These structures, in the two different implementations presented here, utilize either a small pixel effect or a drift phenomenon. An energy resolution of 4.75% at 122 keV has been obtained with a 30 ns peaking time using discrete electronics and a (57)Co source. An output rate of 6×10(6) counts per second per individual pixel has been obtained with our ASIC readout electronics and a clinical CT X-ray tube. Additionally, the first clinical CT images, taken with several of our prototype photon-counting and

  9. Polychromatic Iterative Statistical Material Image Reconstruction for Photon-Counting Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Weidinger, Thomas; Buzug, Thorsten M.; Flohr, Thomas; Kappler, Steffen; Stierstorfer, Karl

    2016-01-01

    This work proposes a dedicated statistical algorithm to perform a direct reconstruction of material-decomposed images from data acquired with photon-counting detectors (PCDs) in computed tomography. It is based on local approximations (surrogates) of the negative logarithmic Poisson probability function. Exploiting the convexity of this function allows for parallel updates of all image pixels. Parallel updates can compensate for the rather slow convergence that is intrinsic to statistical algorithms. We investigate the accuracy of the algorithm for ideal photon-counting detectors. Complementarily, we apply the algorithm to simulation data of a realistic PCD with its spectral resolution limited by K-escape, charge sharing, and pulse-pileup. For data from both an ideal and realistic PCD, the proposed algorithm is able to correct beam-hardening artifacts and quantitatively determine the material fractions of the chosen basis materials. Via regularization we were able to achieve a reduction of image noise for the realistic PCD that is up to 90% lower compared to material images form a linear, image-based material decomposition using FBP images. Additionally, we find a dependence of the algorithms convergence speed on the threshold selection within the PCD. PMID:27195003

  10. The Slope Imaging Multi-Polarization Photon-Counting Lidar: Development and Performance Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dabney, Phillip

    2010-01-01

    The Slope Imaging Multi-polarization Photon-counting Lidar is an airborne instrument developed to demonstrate laser altimetry measurement methods that will enable more efficient observations of topography and surface properties from space. The instrument was developed through the NASA Earth Science Technology Office Instrument Incubator Program with a focus on cryosphere remote sensing. The SIMPL transmitter is an 11 KHz, 1064 nm, plane-polarized micropulse laser transmitter that is frequency doubled to 532 nm and split into four push-broom beams. The receiver employs single-photon, polarimetric ranging at 532 and 1064 nm using Single Photon Counting Modules in order to achieve simultaneous sampling of surface elevation, slope, roughness and depolarizing scattering properties, the latter used to differentiate surface types. Data acquired over ice-covered Lake Erie in February, 2009 are documenting SIMPL s measurement performance and capabilities, demonstrating differentiation of open water and several ice cover types. ICESat-2 will employ several of the technologies advanced by SIMPL, including micropulse, single photon ranging in a multi-beam, push-broom configuration operating at 532 nm.

  11. Vision 20/20: Single photon counting x-ray detectors in medical imaging.

    PubMed

    Taguchi, Katsuyuki; Iwanczyk, Jan S

    2013-10-01

    Photon counting detectors (PCDs) with energy discrimination capabilities have been developed for medical x-ray computed tomography (CT) and x-ray (XR) imaging. Using detection mechanisms that are completely different from the current energy integrating detectors and measuring the material information of the object to be imaged, these PCDs have the potential not only to improve the current CT and XR images, such as dose reduction, but also to open revolutionary novel applications such as molecular CT and XR imaging. The performance of PCDs is not flawless, however, and it seems extremely challenging to develop PCDs with close to ideal characteristics. In this paper, the authors offer our vision for the future of PCD-CT and PCD-XR with the review of the current status and the prediction of (1) detector technologies, (2) imaging technologies, (3) system technologies, and (4) potential clinical benefits with PCDs.

  12. Vision 20/20: Single photon counting x-ray detectors in medical imaging

    PubMed Central

    Taguchi, Katsuyuki; Iwanczyk, Jan S.

    2013-01-01

    Photon counting detectors (PCDs) with energy discrimination capabilities have been developed for medical x-ray computed tomography (CT) and x-ray (XR) imaging. Using detection mechanisms that are completely different from the current energy integrating detectors and measuring the material information of the object to be imaged, these PCDs have the potential not only to improve the current CT and XR images, such as dose reduction, but also to open revolutionary novel applications such as molecular CT and XR imaging. The performance of PCDs is not flawless, however, and it seems extremely challenging to develop PCDs with close to ideal characteristics. In this paper, the authors offer our vision for the future of PCD-CT and PCD-XR with the review of the current status and the prediction of (1) detector technologies, (2) imaging technologies, (3) system technologies, and (4) potential clinical benefits with PCDs. PMID:24089889

  13. High energy X-ray photon counting imaging using linear accelerator and silicon strip detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Y.; Shimazoe, K.; Yan, X.; Ueda, O.; Ishikura, T.; Fujiwara, T.; Uesaka, M.; Ohno, M.; Tomita, H.; Yoshihara, Y.; Takahashi, H.

    2016-09-01

    A photon counting imaging detector system for high energy X-rays is developed for on-site non-destructive testing of thick objects. One-dimensional silicon strip (1 mm pitch) detectors are stacked to form a two-dimensional edge-on module. Each detector is connected to a 48-channel application specific integrated circuit (ASIC). The threshold-triggered events are recorded by a field programmable gate array based counter in each channel. The detector prototype is tested using 950 kV linear accelerator X-rays. The fast CR shaper (300 ns pulse width) of the ASIC makes it possible to deal with the high instant count rate during the 2 μs beam pulse. The preliminary imaging results of several metal and concrete samples are demonstrated.

  14. Material decomposition and virtual non-contrast imaging in photon counting computed tomography: an animal study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutjahr, R.; Polster, C.; Kappler, S.; Pietsch, H.; Jost, G.; Hahn, K.; Schöck, F.; Sedlmair, M.; Allmendinger, T.; Schmidt, B.; Krauss, B.; Flohr, T. G.

    2016-03-01

    The energy resolving capabilities of Photon Counting Detectors (PCD) in Computed Tomography (CT) facilitate energy-sensitive measurements. The provided image-information can be processed with Dual Energy and Multi Energy algorithms. A research PCD-CT firstly allows acquiring images with a close to clinical configuration of both the X-ray tube and the CT-detector. In this study, two algorithms (Material Decomposition and Virtual Non-Contrast-imaging (VNC)) are applied on a data set acquired from an anesthetized rabbit scanned using the PCD-CT system. Two contrast agents (CA) are applied: A gadolinium (Gd) based CA used to enhance contrasts for vascular imaging, and xenon (Xe) and air as a CA used to evaluate local ventilation of the animal's lung. Four different images are generated: a) A VNC image, suppressing any traces of the injected Gd imitating a native scan, b) a VNC image with a Gd-image as an overlay, where contrast enhancements in the vascular system are highlighted using colored labels, c) another VNC image with a Xe-image as an overlay, and d) a 3D rendered image of the animal's lung, filled with Xe, indicating local ventilation characteristics. All images are generated from two images based on energy bin information. It is shown that a modified version of a commercially available dual energy software framework is capable of providing images with diagnostic value obtained from the research PCD-CT system.

  15. Solid-state Image Sensor with Focal-plane Digital Photon-counting Pixel Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fossum, Eric R.; Pain, Bedabrata

    1997-01-01

    A solid-state focal-plane imaging system comprises an NxN array of high gain. low-noise unit cells. each unit cell being connected to a different one of photovoltaic detector diodes, one for each unit cell, interspersed in the array for ultra low level image detection and a plurality of digital counters coupled to the outputs of the unit cell by a multiplexer(either a separate counter for each unit cell or a row of N of counters time shared with N rows of digital counters). Each unit cell includes two self-biasing cascode amplifiers in cascade for a high charge-to-voltage conversion gain (greater than 1mV/e(-)) and an electronic switch to reset input capacitance to a reference potential in order to be able to discriminate detection of an incident photon by the photoelectron (e(-))generated in the detector diode at the input of the first cascode amplifier in order to count incident photons individually in a digital counter connected to the output of the second cascade amplifier. Reseting the input capacitance and initiating self-biasing of the amplifiers occurs every clock cycle of an integratng period to enable ultralow light level image detection by the may of photovoltaic detector diodes under such ultralow light level conditions that the photon flux will statistically provide only a single photon at a time incident on anyone detector diode during any clock cycle.

  16. Spectral prior image constrained compressed sensing (spectral PICCS) for photon-counting computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zhicong; Leng, Shuai; Li, Zhoubo; McCollough, Cynthia H.

    2016-09-01

    Photon-counting computed tomography (PCCT) is an emerging imaging technique that enables multi-energy imaging with only a single scan acquisition. To enable multi-energy imaging, the detected photons corresponding to the full x-ray spectrum are divided into several subgroups of bin data that correspond to narrower energy windows. Consequently, noise in each energy bin increases compared to the full-spectrum data. This work proposes an iterative reconstruction algorithm for noise suppression in the narrower energy bins used in PCCT imaging. The algorithm is based on the framework of prior image constrained compressed sensing (PICCS) and is called spectral PICCS; it uses the full-spectrum image reconstructed using conventional filtered back-projection as the prior image. The spectral PICCS algorithm is implemented using a constrained optimization scheme with adaptive iterative step sizes such that only two tuning parameters are required in most cases. The algorithm was first evaluated using computer simulations, and then validated by both physical phantoms and in vivo swine studies using a research PCCT system. Results from both computer-simulation and experimental studies showed substantial image noise reduction in narrow energy bins (43-73%) without sacrificing CT number accuracy or spatial resolution.

  17. Imaging of small children with a prototype for photon counting tomosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    del Risco Norrlid, Lilián; Fredenberg, Erik; Hemmendorff, Magnus; Jackowski, Christian; Danielsson, Mats

    2009-02-01

    We present data on a first prototype for photon counting tomosynthesis imaging of small children, which we call photoncounting tomosynthesis (PCT). A photon counting detector can completely eliminate electronic noise, which makes it ideal for tomosynthesis because of the low dose in each projection. Another advantage is that the detector allows for energy sensitivity in later versions, which will further lower the radiation dose. In-plane resolution is high and has been measured to be 5 lp/mm, at least 4 times better than in CT, while the depth resolution was significantly lower than typical CT resolution. The image SNR decreased from 30 to 10 for a detail of 10 mm depth in increasing thickness of PMMA from 10 to 80 mm. The air kerma measured for PCT was 5.2 mGy, which leads to an organ dose to the brain of approximately 0.7 mGy. This dose is 96 % lower than a typical CT dose. PCT can be appealing for pediatric imaging since young children have an increased sensitivity to radiation induced cancers. We have acquired post mortem images of a newborn with the new device and with a state-of-the-art CT and compared the diagnostic information and dose levels of the two modalities. The results are promising but more work is needed to provide input to a next generation prototype that would be suitable for clinical trials.

  18. Energy-resolved CT imaging with a photon-counting silicon-strip detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persson, Mats; Huber, Ben; Karlsson, Staffan; Liu, Xuejin; Chen, Han; Xu, Cheng; Yveborg, Moa; Bornefalk, Hans; Danielsson, Mats

    2014-11-01

    Photon-counting detectors are promising candidates for use in the next generation of x-ray computed tomography (CT) scanners. Among the foreseen benefits are higher spatial resolution, better trade-off between noise and dose and energy discriminating capabilities. Silicon is an attractive detector material because of its low cost, mature manufacturing process and high hole mobility. However, it is sometimes overlooked for CT applications because of its low absorption efficiency and high fraction of Compton scatter. The purpose of this work is to demonstrate that silicon is a feasible material for CT detectors by showing energy-resolved CT images acquired with an 80 kVp x-ray tube spectrum using a photon-counting silicon-strip detector with eight energy thresholds developed in our group. We use a single detector module, consisting of a linear array of 50 0.5 × 0.4 mm detector elements, to image a phantom in a table-top lab setup. The phantom consists of a plastic cylinder with circular inserts containing water, fat and aqueous solutions of calcium, iodine and gadolinium, in different concentrations. By using basis material decomposition we obtain water, calcium, iodine and gadolinium basis images and demonstrate that these basis images can be used to separate the different materials in the inserts. We also show results showing that the detector has potential for quantitative measurements of substance concentrations.

  19. Image-based spectral distortion correction for photon-counting x-ray detectors

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Huanjun; Molloi, Sabee

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of using an image-based method to correct for distortions induced by various artifacts in the x-ray spectrum recorded with photon-counting detectors for their application in breast computed tomography (CT). Methods: The polyenergetic incident spectrum was simulated with the tungsten anode spectral model using the interpolating polynomials (TASMIP) code and carefully calibrated to match the x-ray tube in this study. Experiments were performed on a Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride (CZT) photon-counting detector with five energy thresholds. Energy bins were adjusted to evenly distribute the recorded counts above the noise floor. BR12 phantoms of various thicknesses were used for calibration. A nonlinear function was selected to fit the count correlation between the simulated and the measured spectra in the calibration process. To evaluate the proposed spectral distortion correction method, an empirical fitting derived from the calibration process was applied on the raw images recorded for polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) phantoms of 8.7, 48.8, and 100.0 mm. Both the corrected counts and the effective attenuation coefficient were compared to the simulated values for each of the five energy bins. The feasibility of applying the proposed method to quantitative material decomposition was tested using a dual-energy imaging technique with a three-material phantom that consisted of water, lipid, and protein. The performance of the spectral distortion correction method was quantified using the relative root-mean-square (RMS) error with respect to the expected values from simulations or areal analysis of the decomposition phantom. Results: The implementation of the proposed method reduced the relative RMS error of the output counts in the five energy bins with respect to the simulated incident counts from 23.0%, 33.0%, and 54.0% to 1.2%, 1.8%, and 7.7% for 8.7, 48.8, and 100.0 mm PMMA phantoms, respectively. The accuracy of the effective attenuation

  20. A real-time noise filtering strategy for photon counting 3D imaging lidar.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zijing; Zhao, Yuan; Zhang, Yong; Wu, Long; Su, Jianzhong

    2013-04-22

    For a direct-detection 3D imaging lidar, the use of Geiger mode avalanche photodiode (Gm-APD) could greatly enhance the detection sensitivity of the lidar system since each range measurement requires a single detected photon. Furthermore, Gm-APD offers significant advantages in reducing the size, mass, power and complexity of the system. However the inevitable noise, including the background noise, the dark count noise and so on, remains a significant challenge to obtain a clear 3D image of the target of interest. This paper presents a smart strategy, which can filter out false alarms in the stage of acquisition of raw time of flight (TOF) data and obtain a clear 3D image in real time. As a result, a clear 3D image is taken from the experimental system despite the background noise of the sunny day.

  1. Dear-Mama: A photon counting X-ray imaging project for medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanchot, G.; Chmeissani, M.; Díaz, A.; Díaz, F.; Fernández, J.; García, E.; García, J.; Kainberger, F.; Lozano, M.; Maiorino, M.; Martínez, R.; Montagne, J. P.; Moreno, I.; Pellegrini, G.; Puigdengoles, C.; Sentís, M.; Teres, L.; Tortajada, M.; Ullán, M.

    2006-12-01

    Dear-Mama ( Detection of Early Markers in Mammography) is an EU funded project devoted to develop an X-ray Medical imaging device based on room temperature solid-state pixel detector coupled to photon counting readout electronics via bump bonding. The technology being used leads to signal-to-noise ratio enhancement and thus the ability to detect low contrast anomalies such as micro-calcifications. The Dear-Mama machine is currently being evaluated and preliminary results show an excellent MTF response. Dear-Mama consortium is made up from six European institutions, the project runs from December 2001 to March 2006.

  2. Progress of NUV and FUV MCP-based photon-counting imaging detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yong'an; Zhao, Bao-sheng; Wei, Yong-lin; Sai, Xiao-feng; Yan, Qiu-rong; Sheng, Li-zhi

    2011-08-01

    In the World Space Observatory-Ultraviolet (WSO-UV) mission, the Long Slit Spectrograph (LSS) instrument will provide low resolution spectra in the range 102-320nm. Both the NUV (160-320nm) and the FUV (102-170nm) channels of LSS use microchannel plates (MCP) working in photon-counting modes as detectors. In this paper, the progress and parameters of NUV and FUV photon-counting imaging detectors were described. For the NUV detector, we developed the detector based on a sealed MCP-image intensifier which comprises input window, photocathode, MCP stack, Ge-layer and its ceramic substrate. To maximize the quantum efficiency, we adopted a Caesium Telluride (Cs2Te) photocathode, which was deposited on input window and mounted close to the MCP. For the FUV detector, because of the lower cut-off wavelength, there are no suitable window materials in this band and the open-faced design should be used to meet the requirements of the detection. Therefore, a Caesium Iodide (CsI) photocathode deposited on the input surface of the MCP was used to optimize detector efficiency. By using an existing wedge and strip anode (WSA), the imaging performance of the NUV and FUV detectors was tested respectively. Experimental results show that the quantum efficiency of Cs2Te is 12.1% (at 230nm), the spatial resolution of NUV and FUV detectors is better than 110μm, the dark count rate of NUV and FUV detectors is about 10.5- and 2.3-counts/s*cm2 respectively.

  3. Observer-model optimization of X-ray system in photon-counting breast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cederström, Björn; Fredenberg, Erik; Lundqvist, Mats; Ericson, Tove; Åslund, Magnus

    2011-08-01

    An ideal-observer model is applied to optimize the design of an X-ray tube intended for use in a multi-slit scanning photon-counting mammography system. The design is such that the anode and the heel effect are reversed and the projected focal spot is smallest at the chest wall. Using linear systems theory, detectability and dose efficiency for a 0.1-mm disk are calculated for different focal spot sizes and anode angles. It is shown that the image acquisition time can be reduced by about 25% with spatial resolution and dose efficiency improved near the chest wall and worsened further away. The image quality is significantly more homogeneous than for the conventional anode orientation, both with respect to noise and detectability of a small object. With the tube rotated 90∘, dose efficiency can be improved by 20% for a fixed image acquisition time.

  4. Sensitivity of photon-counting based K-edge imaging in X-ray computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Roessl, Ewald; Brendel, Bernhard; Engel, Klaus-Jürgen; Schlomka, Jens-Peter; Thran, Axel; Proksa, Roland

    2011-09-01

    The feasibility of K-edge imaging using energy-resolved, photon-counting transmission measurements in X-ray computed tomography (CT) has been demonstrated by simulations and experiments. The method is based on probing the discontinuities of the attenuation coefficient of heavy elements above and below the K-edge energy by using energy-sensitive, photon counting X-ray detectors. In this paper, we investigate the dependence of the sensitivity of K-edge imaging on the atomic number Z of the contrast material, on the object diameter D , on the spectral response of the X-ray detector and on the X-ray tube voltage. We assume a photon-counting detector equipped with six adjustable energy thresholds. Physical effects leading to a degradation of the energy resolution of the detector are taken into account using the concept of a spectral response function R(E,U) for which we assume four different models. As a validation of our analytical considerations and in order to investigate the influence of elliptically shaped phantoms, we provide CT simulations of an anthropomorphic Forbild-Abdomen phantom containing a gold-contrast agent. The dependence on the values of the energy thresholds is taken into account by optimizing the achievable signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) with respect to the threshold values. We find that for a given X-ray spectrum and object size the SNR in the heavy element's basis material image peaks for a certain atomic number Z. The dependence of the SNR in the high- Z basis-material image on the object diameter is the natural, exponential decrease with particularly deteriorating effects in the case where the attenuation from the object itself causes a total signal loss below the K-edge. The influence of the energy-response of the detector is very important. We observed that the optimal SNR values obtained with an ideal detector and with a CdTe pixel detector whose response, showing significant tailing, has been determined at a synchrotron differ by factors of

  5. TU-G-207-01: CT Imaging Using Energy-Sensitive Photon-Counting Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Taguchi, K.

    2015-06-15

    Last few years has witnessed the development of novel of X-ray imaging modalities, such as spectral CT, phase contrast CT, and X-ray acoustic/fluorescence/luminescence imaging. This symposium will present the recent advances of these emerging X-ray imaging modalities and update the attendees with knowledge in various related topics, including X-ray photon-counting detectors, X-ray physics underlying the emerging applications beyond the traditional X-ray imaging, image reconstruction for the novel modalities, characterization and evaluation of the systems, and their practical implications. In addition, the concept and practical aspects of X-ray activatable targeted nanoparticles for molecular X-ray imaging will be discussed in the context of X-ray fluorescence and luminescence CT. Learning Objectives: Present background knowledge of various emerging X-ray imaging techniques, such as spectral CT, phase contrast CT and X-ray fluorescence/luminescence CT. Discuss the practical need, technical aspects and current status of the emerging X-ray imaging modalities. Describe utility and future impact of the new generation of X-ray imaging applications.

  6. Solid-state image sensor with focal-plane digital photon-counting pixel array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fossum, Eric R. (Inventor); Pain, Bedabrata (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A photosensitive layer such as a-Si for a UV/visible wavelength band is provided for low light level imaging with at least a separate CMOS amplifier directly connected to each PIN photodetector diode to provide a focal-plane array of NxN pixels, and preferably a separate photon-counting CMOS circuit directly connected to each CMOS amplifier, although one row of counters may be time shared for reading out the photon flux rate of each diode in the array, together with a buffer memory for storing all rows of the NxN image frame before transfer to suitable storage. All CMOS circuitry is preferably fabricated in the same silicon layer as the PIN photodetector diode for a monolithic structure, but when the wavelength band of interest requires photosensitive material different from silicon, the focal-plane array may be fabricated separately on a different semiconductor layer bump-bonded or otherwise bonded for a virtually monolithic structure with one free terminal of each diode directly connected to the input terminal of its CMOS amplifier and digital counter for integration of the photon flux rate at each photodetector of the array.

  7. Dual adaptive statistical approach for quantitative noise reduction in photon-counting medical imaging: application to nuclear medicine images.

    PubMed

    Hannequin, Pascal Paul

    2015-06-07

    Noise reduction in photon-counting images remains challenging, especially at low count levels. We have developed an original procedure which associates two complementary filters using a Wiener-derived approach. This approach combines two statistically adaptive filters into a dual-weighted (DW) filter. The first one, a statistically weighted adaptive (SWA) filter, replaces the central pixel of a sliding window with a statistically weighted sum of its neighbors. The second one, a statistical and heuristic noise extraction (extended) (SHINE-Ext) filter, performs a discrete cosine transformation (DCT) using sliding blocks. Each block is reconstructed using its significant components which are selected using tests derived from multiple linear regression (MLR). The two filters are weighted according to Wiener theory. This approach has been validated using a numerical phantom and a real planar Jaszczak phantom. It has also been illustrated using planar bone scintigraphy and myocardial single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) data. Performances of filters have been tested using mean normalized absolute error (MNAE) between the filtered images and the reference noiseless or high-count images.Results show that the proposed filters quantitatively decrease the MNAE in the images and then increase the signal-to-noise Ratio (SNR). This allows one to work with lower count images. The SHINE-Ext filter is well suited to high-size images and low-variance areas. DW filtering is efficient for low-size images and in high-variance areas. The relative proportion of eliminated noise generally decreases when count level increases. In practice, SHINE filtering alone is recommended when pixel spacing is less than one-quarter of the effective resolution of the system and/or the size of the objects of interest. It can also be used when the practical interest of high frequencies is low. In any case, DW filtering will be preferable.The proposed filters have been applied to nuclear

  8. Dual adaptive statistical approach for quantitative noise reduction in photon-counting medical imaging: application to nuclear medicine images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannequin, Pascal Paul

    2015-06-01

    Noise reduction in photon-counting images remains challenging, especially at low count levels. We have developed an original procedure which associates two complementary filters using a Wiener-derived approach. This approach combines two statistically adaptive filters into a dual-weighted (DW) filter. The first one, a statistically weighted adaptive (SWA) filter, replaces the central pixel of a sliding window with a statistically weighted sum of its neighbors. The second one, a statistical and heuristic noise extraction (extended) (SHINE-Ext) filter, performs a discrete cosine transformation (DCT) using sliding blocks. Each block is reconstructed using its significant components which are selected using tests derived from multiple linear regression (MLR). The two filters are weighted according to Wiener theory. This approach has been validated using a numerical phantom and a real planar Jaszczak phantom. It has also been illustrated using planar bone scintigraphy and myocardial single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) data. Performances of filters have been tested using mean normalized absolute error (MNAE) between the filtered images and the reference noiseless or high-count images. Results show that the proposed filters quantitatively decrease the MNAE in the images and then increase the signal-to-noise Ratio (SNR). This allows one to work with lower count images. The SHINE-Ext filter is well suited to high-size images and low-variance areas. DW filtering is efficient for low-size images and in high-variance areas. The relative proportion of eliminated noise generally decreases when count level increases. In practice, SHINE filtering alone is recommended when pixel spacing is less than one-quarter of the effective resolution of the system and/or the size of the objects of interest. It can also be used when the practical interest of high frequencies is low. In any case, DW filtering will be preferable. The proposed filters have been applied to nuclear

  9. Task-based weights for photon counting spectral x-ray imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Bornefalk, Hans

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To develop a framework for taking the spatial frequency composition of an imaging task into account when determining optimal bin weight factors for photon counting energy sensitive x-ray systems. A second purpose of the investigation is to evaluate the possible improvement compared to using pixel based weights. Methods: The Fourier based approach of imaging performance and detectability index d' is applied to pulse height discriminating photon counting systems. The dependency of d' on the bin weight factors is made explicit, taking into account both differences in signal and noise transfer characteristics across bins and the spatial frequency dependency of interbin correlations from reabsorbed scatter. Using a simplified model of a specific silicon detector, d' values for a high and a low frequency imaging task are determined for optimal weights and compared to pixel based weights. Results: The method successfully identifies bins where a large point spread function degrades detection of high spatial frequency targets. The method is also successful in determining how to downweigh highly correlated bins. Quantitative predictions for the simplified silicon detector model indicate that improvements in the detectability index when applying task-based weights instead of pixel based weights are small for high frequency targets, but could be in excess of 10% for low frequency tasks where scatter-induced correlation otherwise degrade detectability. Conclusions: The proposed method makes the spatial frequency dependency of complex correlation structures between bins and their effect on the system detective quantum efficiency easier to analyze and allows optimizing bin weights for given imaging tasks. A potential increase in detectability of double digit percents in silicon detector systems operated at typical CT energies (100 kVp) merits further evaluation on a real system. The method is noted to be of higher relevance for silicon detectors than for cadmium (zink

  10. Breast Tissue Characterization with Photon-counting Spectral CT Imaging: A Postmortem Breast Study

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Huanjun; Klopfer, Michael J.; Ducote, Justin L.; Masaki, Fumitaro

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the feasibility of breast tissue characterization in terms of water, lipid, and protein contents with a spectral computed tomographic (CT) system based on a cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) photon-counting detector by using postmortem breasts. Materials and Methods Nineteen pairs of postmortem breasts were imaged with a CZT-based photon-counting spectral CT system with beam energy of 100 kVp. The mean glandular dose was estimated to be in the range of 1.8–2.2 mGy. The images were corrected for pulse pile-up and other artifacts by using spectral distortion corrections. Dual-energy decomposition was then applied to characterize each breast into water, lipid, and protein contents. The precision of the three-compartment characterization was evaluated by comparing the composition of right and left breasts, where the standard error of the estimations was determined. The results of dual-energy decomposition were compared by using averaged root mean square to chemical analysis, which was used as the reference standard. Results The standard errors of the estimations of the right-left correlations obtained from spectral CT were 7.4%, 6.7%, and 3.2% for water, lipid, and protein contents, respectively. Compared with the reference standard, the average root mean square error in breast tissue composition was 2.8%. Conclusion Spectral CT can be used to accurately quantify the water, lipid, and protein contents in breast tissue in a laboratory study by using postmortem specimens. © RSNA, 2014 PMID:24814180

  11. The role of x-ray Swank factor in energy-resolving photon-counting imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Tanguay, Jesse; Kim, Ho Kyung; Cunningham, Ian. A.

    2010-12-15

    Purpose: Energy-resolved x-ray imaging has the potential to improve contrast-to-noise ratio by measuring the energy of each interacting photon and applying optimal weighting factors. The success of energy-resolving photon-counting (EPC) detectors relies on the ability of an x-ray detector to accurately measure the energy of each interacting photon. However, the escape of characteristic emissions and Compton scatter degrades spectral information. This article makes the theoretical connection between accuracy and imprecision in energy measurements with the x-ray Swank factor for a-Se, Si, CdZnTe, and HgI{sub 2}-based detectors. Methods: For a detector that implements adaptive binning to sum all elements in which x-ray energy is deposited for a single interaction, energy imprecision is shown to depend on the Swank factor for a large element with x rays incident at the center. The response function for each converter material is determined using Monte Carlo methods and used to determine energy accuracy, Swank factor, and relative energy imprecision in photon-energy measurements. Results: For each material, at energies below the respective K edges, accuracy is close to unity and imprecision is only a few percent. Above the K-edge energies, characteristic emission results in a drop in accuracy and precision that depends on escape probability. In Si, and to some extent a-Se, Compton-scatter escape also degrades energy precision with increasing energy. The influence of converter thickness on energy accuracy and imprecision is modest for low-Z materials but becomes important when using high-Z materials at energies greater than the K-edge energies. Conclusions: Accuracy and precision in energy measurements by EPC detectors are determined largely by the energy-dependent x-ray Swank factor. Modest decreases in the Swank factor (5%-15%) result in large increases in relative imprecision (30%-40%).

  12. Advanced Photon Counting Imaging Detectors with 100ps Timing for Astronomical and Space Sensing Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegmund, O.; Vallerga, J.; Welsh, B.; Rabin, M.; Bloch, J.

    In recent years EAG has implemented a variety of high-resolution, large format, photon-counting MCP detectors in space instrumentation for satellite FUSE, GALEX, IMAGE, SOHO, HST-COS, rocket, and shuttle payloads. Our scheme of choice has been delay line readouts encoding photon event position centroids, by determination of the difference in arrival time of the event charge at the two ends of a distributed resistive-capacitive (RC) delay line. Our most commonly used delay line configuration is the cross delay line (XDL). In its simplest form the delay-line encoding electronics consists of a fast amplifier for each end of the delay line, followed by time-to-digital converters (TDC's). We have achieved resolutions of < 25 μm in tests over 65 mm x 65 mm (3k x3k resolution elements) with excellent linearity. Using high speed TDC's, we have been able to encode event positions for random photon rates of ~1 MHz, while time tagging events using the MCP output signal to better than 100 ps. The unique ability to record photon X,Y,T high fidelity information has advantages over "frame driven" recording devices for some important applications. For example we have built open face and sealed tube cross delay line detectors used for biological fluorescence lifetime imaging, observation of flare stars, orbital satellites and space debris with the GALEX satellite, and time resolved imaging of the Crab Pulsar with a telescope as small as 1m. Although microchannel plate delay line detectors meet many of the imaging and timing demands of various applications, they have limitations. The relatively high gain (107) reduces lifetime and local counting rate, and the fixed delay (10's of ns) makes multiple simultaneous event recording problematic. To overcome these limitations we have begun development of cross strip readout anodes for microchannel plate detectors. The cross strip (XS) anode is a coarse (~0.5 mm) multi-layer metal and ceramic pattern of crossed fingers on an alumina

  13. Third-order correlation function and ghost imaging of chaotic thermal light in the photon counting regime

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Yu; Simon, Jason; Liu Jianbin; Shih, Yanhua

    2010-04-15

    In a near-field three-photon correlation measurement, we observed the third-order temporal and spatial correlation functions of chaotic thermal light in the single-photon counting regime. In the study, we found that the probability of jointly detecting three randomly radiated photons from a chaotic thermal source by three individual detectors is 6 times greater if the photodetection events fall in the coherence time and coherence area of the radiation field than if they do not. From the viewpoint of quantum mechanics, the observed phenomenon is the result of three-photon interference. By making use of this property, we measured the three-photon thermal light lensless ghost image of a double spot and achieved higher visibility compared with the two-photon thermal light ghost image.

  14. Image-based Material Decomposition with a General Volume Constraint for Photon-Counting CT.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhoubo; Leng, Shuai; Yu, Lifeng; Yu, Zhicong; McCollough, Cynthia H

    Photon-counting CT (PCCT) potentially offers both improved dose efficiency and material decomposition capabilities relative to CT systems using energy integrating detectors. With respect to material decomposition, both projection-based and image-based methods have been proposed, most of which require accurate a priori information regarding the shape of the x-ray spectra and the response of the detectors. Additionally, projection-based methods require access to projection data. These data can be difficult to obtain, since spectra, detector response, and projection data formats are proprietary information. Further, some published image-based, 3-material decomposition methods require a volume conservation assumption, which is often violated in solutions. We have developed an image-based material decomposition method that can overcome those limitations. We introduced a general condition on volume constraint that does not require the volume to be conserved in a mixture. An empirical calibration can be performed with various concentrations of basis materials. The material decomposition method was applied to images acquired from a prototype whole-body PCCT scanner. The results showed good agreement between the estimation and known mass concentration values. Factors affecting the performance of material decomposition, such as energy threshold configuration and volume conservation constraint, were also investigated. Changes in accuracy of the mass concentration estimates were demonstrated for four different energy configurations and when volume conservation was assumed.

  15. Table-top phase-contrast imaging employing photon-counting detectors towards mammographic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palma, K. D.; Pichotka, M.; Hasn, S.; Granja, C.

    2017-02-01

    In mammography the difficult task to detect microcalcifications (≈ 100 μm) and low contrast structures in the breast has been a topic of interest from its beginnings. The possibility to improve the image quality requires the effort to employ novel X-ray imaging techniques, such as phase-contrast, and high resolution detectors. Phase-contrast techniques are promising tools for medical diagnosis because they provide additional and complementary information to traditional absorption-based X-ray imaging methods. In this work a Hamamatsu microfocus X-ray source with tungsten anode and a photon counting detector (Timepix operated in Medipix mode) was used. A significant improvement in the detection of phase-effects using Medipix detector was observed in comparison to an standard flat-panel detector. An optimization of geometrical parameters reveals the dependency on the X-ray propagation path and the small angle deviation. The quantification of these effects was achieved taking into account the image noise, contrast, spatial resolution of the phase-enhancement, absorbed dose, and energy dependence.

  16. Depth imaging in highly scattering underwater environments using time-correlated single-photon counting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maccarone, Aurora; McCarthy, Aongus; Halimi, Abderrahim; Tobin, Rachael; Wallace, Andy M.; Petillot, Yvan; McLaughlin, Steve; Buller, Gerald S.

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents an optical depth imaging system optimized for highly scattering environments such as underwater. The system is based on the time-correlated single-photon counting (TCSPC) technique and the time-of-flight approach. Laboratory-based measurements demonstrate the potential of underwater depth imaging, with specific attention given to environments with a high level of scattering. The optical system comprised a monostatic transceiver unit, a fiber-coupled supercontinuum laser source with a wavelength tunable acousto-optic filter (AOTF), and a fiber-coupled single-element silicon single-photon avalanche diode (SPAD) detector. In the optical system, the transmit and receive channels in the transceiver unit were overlapped in a coaxial optical configuration. The targets were placed in a 1.75 meter long tank, and raster scanned using two galvo-mirrors. Laboratory-based experiments demonstrate depth profiling performed with up to nine attenuation lengths between the transceiver and target. All of the measurements were taken with an average laser power of less than 1mW. Initially, the data was processed using a straightforward pixel-wise cross-correlation of the return timing signal with the system instrumental timing response. More advanced algorithms were then used to process these cross-correlation results. These results illustrate the potential for the reconstruction of images in highly scattering environments, and to permit the investigation of much shorter acquisition time scans. These algorithms take advantage of the data sparseness under the Discrete Cosine Transform (DCT) and the correlation between adjacent pixels, to restore the depth and reflectivity images.

  17. Optimization of beam quality for photon-counting spectral computed tomography in head imaging: simulation study

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Han; Xu, Cheng; Persson, Mats; Danielsson, Mats

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Head computed tomography (CT) plays an important role in the comprehensive evaluation of acute stroke. Photon-counting spectral detectors, as promising candidates for use in the next generation of x-ray CT systems, allow for assigning more weight to low-energy x-rays that generally contain more contrast information. Most importantly, the spectral information can be utilized to decompose the original set of energy-selective images into several basis function images that are inherently free of beam-hardening artifacts, a potential advantage for further improving the diagnosis accuracy. We are developing a photon-counting spectral detector for CT applications. The purpose of this work is to determine the optimal beam quality for material decomposition in two head imaging cases: nonenhanced imaging and K-edge imaging. A cylindrical brain tissue of 16-cm diameter, coated by a 6-mm-thick bone layer and 2-mm-thick skin layer, was used as a head phantom. The imaging target was a 5-mm-thick blood vessel centered in the head phantom. In K-edge imaging, two contrast agents, iodine and gadolinium, with the same concentration (5  mg/mL) were studied. Three parameters that affect beam quality were evaluated: kVp settings (50 to 130 kVp), filter materials (Z=13 to 83), and filter thicknesses [0 to 2 half-value layer (HVL)]. The image qualities resulting from the varying x-ray beams were compared in terms of two figures of merit (FOMs): squared signal-difference-to-noise ratio normalized by brain dose (SDNR2/BD) and that normalized by skin dose (SDNR2/SD). For nonenhanced imaging, the results show that the use of the 120-kVp spectrum filtered by 2 HVL copper (Z=29) provides the best performance in both FOMs. When iodine is used in K-edge imaging, the optimal filter is 2 HVL iodine (Z=53) and the optimal kVps are 60 kVp in terms of SDNR2/BD and 75 kVp in terms of SDNR2/SD. A tradeoff of 65 kVp was proposed to lower the potential risk of skin injuries if a

  18. Evaluation of conventional imaging performance in a research whole-body CT system with a photon-counting detector array.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhicong; Leng, Shuai; Jorgensen, Steven M; Li, Zhoubo; Gutjahr, Ralf; Chen, Baiyu; Halaweish, Ahmed F; Kappler, Steffen; Yu, Lifeng; Ritman, Erik L; McCollough, Cynthia H

    2016-02-21

    This study evaluated the conventional imaging performance of a research whole-body photon-counting CT system and investigated its feasibility for imaging using clinically realistic levels of x-ray photon flux. This research system was built on the platform of a 2nd generation dual-source CT system: one source coupled to an energy integrating detector (EID) and the other coupled to a photon-counting detector (PCD). Phantom studies were conducted to measure CT number accuracy and uniformity for water, CT number energy dependency for high-Z materials, spatial resolution, noise, and contrast-to-noise ratio. The results from the EID and PCD subsystems were compared. The impact of high photon flux, such as pulse pile-up, was assessed by studying the noise-to-tube-current relationship using a neonate water phantom and high x-ray photon flux. Finally, clinical feasibility of the PCD subsystem was investigated using anthropomorphic phantoms, a cadaveric head, and a whole-body cadaver, which were scanned at dose levels equivalent to or higher than those used clinically. Phantom measurements demonstrated that the PCD subsystem provided comparable image quality to the EID subsystem, except that the PCD subsystem provided slightly better longitudinal spatial resolution and about 25% improvement in contrast-to-noise ratio for iodine. The impact of high photon flux was found to be negligible for the PCD subsystem: only subtle high-flux effects were noticed for tube currents higher than 300 mA in images of the neonate water phantom. Results of the anthropomorphic phantom and cadaver scans demonstrated comparable image quality between the EID and PCD subsystems. There were no noticeable ring, streaking, or cupping/capping artifacts in the PCD images. In addition, the PCD subsystem provided spectral information. Our experiments demonstrated that the research whole-body photon-counting CT system is capable of providing clinical image quality at clinically realistic levels of x

  19. Evaluation of conventional imaging performance in a research whole-body CT system with a photon-counting detector array

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Zhicong; Leng, Shuai; Jorgensen, Steven M; Li, Zhoubo; Gutjahr, Ralf; Chen, Baiyu; Halaweish, Ahmed F; Kappler, Steffen; Yu, Lifeng; Ritman, Erik L; McCollough, Cynthia H

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the conventional imaging performance of a research whole-body photon-counting CT system and investigated its feasibility for imaging using clinically realistic levels of x-ray photon flux. This research system was built on the platform of a 2nd generation dual-source CT system: one source coupled to an energy integrating detector (EID) and the other coupled to a photon-counting detector (PCD). Phantom studies were conducted to measure CT number accuracy and uniformity for water, CT number energy dependency for high-Z materials, spatial resolution, noise, and contrast-to-noise ratio. The results from the EID and PCD subsystems were compared. The impact of high photon flux, such as pulse pile-up, was assessed by studying the noise-to-tube-current relationship using a neonate water phantom and high x-ray photon flux. Finally, clinical feasibility of the PCD subsystem was investigated using anthropomorphic phantoms, a cadaveric head, and a whole-body cadaver, which were scanned at dose levels equivalent to or higher than those used clinically. Phantom measurements demonstrated that the PCD subsystem provided comparable image quality to the EID subsystem, except that the PCD subsystem provided slightly better longitudinal spatial resolution and about 25% improvement in contrast-to-noise ratio for iodine. The impact of high photon flux was found to be negligible for the PCD subsystem: only subtle high-flux effects were noticed for tube currents higher than 300 mA in images of the neonate water phantom. Results of the anthropomorphic phantom and cadaver scans demonstrated comparable image quality between the EID and PCD subsystems. There were no noticeable ring, streaking, or cupping/capping artifacts in the PCD images. In addition, the PCD subsystem provided spectral information. Our experiments demonstrated that the research whole-body photon-counting CT system is capable of providing clinical image quality at clinically realistic levels of x

  20. Flare star monitoring with a new photon-counting imaging detector

    SciTech Connect

    Casperson, D.

    1997-12-31

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). A search for faint time-varying optical signals from the nighttime sky has been conducted in parallel with the programmatic development of a new type of imaging detector. This detector combines high spatial and high temporal resolution with single-photon-counting sensitivity over a 40-mm diameter large-area format. It is called a microchannel plate with crossed delay line readout, or MCP/CDL, and is placed in the focal plane of a telescope to collect time-resolved images from objects such as flaring stars and other astrophysical transient sources. A short-lived prototype MCP/CDL was used to provide the initial stellar images for this project, but the author could not generate any extended database with which to characterize flare star populations. Consequently, a supplementary experimental search for optical transients was begun, utilizing the NASA 3-meter-aperture Liquid Mirror Telescope (LMT) facility in Cloudcroft, NM.

  1. Metabolic imaging in microregions of tumors and normal tissues with bioluminescence and photon counting

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller-Klieser, W.; Walenta, S.; Paschen, W.; Kallinowski, F.; Vaupel, P.

    1988-08-03

    A method has been developed for metabolic imaging on a microscopic level in tumors, tumor spheroids, and normal tissues. The technique makes it possible to determine the spatial distribution of glucose, lactate, and ATP in absolute terms at similar locations within tissues or cell aggregates. The substrate distributions are registered in serial cryostat sections from tissue cryobiopsies or from frozen spheroids with the use of bioluminescence reactions. The light emission is measured directly by a special imaging photon counting system enabling on-line image analysis. The technique has been applied to human breast cancer xenografts, to spheroids originating from a human colon adenocarcinoma, and to skeletal rat muscle. Preliminary data obtained indicate that heterogeneities in the substrate distributions measured are much more pronounced in tumors than in normal tissue. There was no obvious correlation among the three quantities measured at similar locations within the tissues. The distribution of ATP corresponded well with the histological structure of larger spheroids; values were low in the necrotic center and high in the viable rim of these cell aggregates.

  2. Two-dimensional CdTe photon counting imager for hard x-ray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, Toru; Morii, Hisashi; Ohashi, Gosuke; Tomita, Yasuhiro; Hatanaka, Yoshinori

    2006-08-01

    Two dimension real-time radiation imaging device for the hard ray with photon-counting type CdTe radiation detector was researched and developed. It is a device with the 35×35 arranged 1225 pixels including a virtual pixel in pixel pitch 1/10-inch pitch. All pixels are independently connected by original ASIC, and it has the energy distinction ability with five energy thresholds. The desecrated CdTe diodes were adopted in the photoelectric conversion elements by using eight ASIC of original development with maximum count rate 2Mcps / pixel and 5 energy distinction thresholds in this prototype. This prototype is a portable type device that can be the room temperature operation, it is possible to connect it with the laptop computer as a camera device of two dimension type to be able to take move of a real-time scene (an actual frame rate depends on signal conditioning PC) via USB2.0. The imaging area is about 3.5-inch corner. This time, it has been understood to be able to detect slight information that has tended to be overlooked up to now because it is possible to take picture of Am241, Co57, and Cs137 simultaneously, to try the animation taking picture that distinguishes three isotopes, and to set the best range of each at the same time as being able to distinguish these three kinds by the energy distinction clearly. It characterizes in corresponding to an incidence rate at the X-ray tube level, and it corresponds to taking picture of the animation of the penetration image that uses X rays.

  3. Quasi-monochromatic imaging in x-ray CT via spectral deconvolution using photon-counting detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Sen; Gao, Hewei; Zhang, Li; Wu, Dufan; Xu, Xiaofei

    2017-03-01

    Photon-counting detectors can obtain the spectral information from an incident x-ray spectrum, although the detected counts may differ from the incident counts due to the detector response. If uncorrected or uncompensated, the response will lead to distortion in CT reconstruction. With the intention of reducing the distortion and exploring the potential of photon-counting detectors, a novel reconstruction strategy with spectral deconvolution, which attempts to set itself apart from traditional material decomposition frameworks, is proposed in this paper. It applies deconvolution to the energy window counts using a calibrated detector response and then uses the post-deconvolution photon counts to reconstruct images in multi-energy windows. The output has a quantitative meaning as a quasi-monochromatic attenuation coefficient, because a relatively narrow energy window width is selected. The deconvolution settings and results are carefully discussed in the numerical simulation. An experimental study is then carried out to verify the effectiveness and robustness. The results show that the reconstructed attenuation coefficients after deconvolution fit the standard reference data very well in most of the energy windows, which implies the feasibility of this quasi-monochromatic imaging method.

  4. Photon counting imaging with an electron-bombarded CCD: Towards a parallel-processing photoelectronic time-to-amplitude converter

    SciTech Connect

    Hirvonen, Liisa M.; Jiggins, Stephen; Sergent, Nicolas; Zanda, Gianmarco; Suhling, Klaus

    2014-12-15

    We have used an electron-bombarded CCD for optical photon counting imaging. The photon event pulse height distribution was found to be linearly dependent on the gain voltage. We propose on this basis that a gain voltage sweep during exposure in an electron-bombarded sensor would allow photon arrival time determination with sub-frame exposure time resolution. This effectively uses an electron-bombarded sensor as a parallel-processing photoelectronic time-to-amplitude converter, or a two-dimensional photon counting streak camera. Several applications that require timing of photon arrival, including Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy, may benefit from such an approach. A simulation of a voltage sweep performed with experimental data collected with different acceleration voltages validates the principle of this approach. Moreover, photon event centroiding was performed and a hybrid 50% Gaussian/Centre of Gravity + 50% Hyperbolic cosine centroiding algorithm was found to yield the lowest fixed pattern noise. Finally, the camera was mounted on a fluorescence microscope to image F-actin filaments stained with the fluorescent dye Alexa 488 in fixed cells.

  5. Photon counting imaging with an electron-bombarded CCD: Towards a parallel-processing photoelectronic time-to-amplitude converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirvonen, Liisa M.; Jiggins, Stephen; Sergent, Nicolas; Zanda, Gianmarco; Suhling, Klaus

    2014-12-01

    We have used an electron-bombarded CCD for optical photon counting imaging. The photon event pulse height distribution was found to be linearly dependent on the gain voltage. We propose on this basis that a gain voltage sweep during exposure in an electron-bombarded sensor would allow photon arrival time determination with sub-frame exposure time resolution. This effectively uses an electron-bombarded sensor as a parallel-processing photoelectronic time-to-amplitude converter, or a two-dimensional photon counting streak camera. Several applications that require timing of photon arrival, including Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy, may benefit from such an approach. A simulation of a voltage sweep performed with experimental data collected with different acceleration voltages validates the principle of this approach. Moreover, photon event centroiding was performed and a hybrid 50% Gaussian/Centre of Gravity + 50% Hyperbolic cosine centroiding algorithm was found to yield the lowest fixed pattern noise. Finally, the camera was mounted on a fluorescence microscope to image F-actin filaments stained with the fluorescent dye Alexa 488 in fixed cells.

  6. Efficient asymmetric image authentication schemes based on photon counting-double random phase encoding and RSA algorithms.

    PubMed

    Moon, Inkyu; Yi, Faliu; Han, Mingu; Lee, Jieun

    2016-06-01

    Recently, double random phase encoding (DRPE) has been integrated with the photon counting (PC) imaging technique for the purpose of secure image authentication. In this scheme, the same key should be securely distributed and shared between the sender and receiver, but this is one of the most vexing problems of symmetric cryptosystems. In this study, we propose an efficient asymmetric image authentication scheme by combining the PC-DRPE and RSA algorithms, which solves key management and distribution problems. The retrieved image from the proposed authentication method contains photon-limited encrypted data obtained by means of PC-DRPE. Therefore, the original image can be protected while the retrieved image can be efficiently verified using a statistical nonlinear correlation approach. Experimental results demonstrate the feasibility of our proposed asymmetric image authentication method.

  7. The MIC photon counting detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fordham, J. L. A.; Bone, D. A.; Oldfield, M. K.; Bellis, J. G.; Norton, T. J.

    1992-12-01

    The MIC (Microchannel plate Intensified CCD (Charge Coupled Device)) detector is an advanced performance Micro Channel Plate (MCP) intensified CCD photon counting detector developed for high resolution, high dynamic range, astronomical applications. The heart of the detector is an MCP intensifier developed specifically for photon counting applications. The maximum detector format is 3072 by 2304 pixels. The measured resolution of the detector system is 18 micrometers FWHM at 490 nm. The detector is linear to approximately 1,000,000 events/detector area/sec on a flat field and linear to count rates up to 200 events/object/s on star images. Two versions of the system have been developed. The first for ground based astronomical applications based around a 40 mm diameter intensifier, was proven in trials at a number of large optical telescopes. The second, specifically for the ESA X-Ray Multi Mirror Mission (XMM), where the MIC has been accepted as the blue detector for the incorporated Optical Monitor (OM). For the XMM-OM, the system is based around a 25 mm diameter intensifier. At present, under development, is a 75 mm diameter version of the detector which will have a maximum format of 6144 by 4608 pixels. Details of the MIC detector and its performance are presented.

  8. Optimized acquisition time for x-ray fluorescence imaging of gold nanoparticles: a preliminary study using photon counting detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Liqiang; Wu, Di; Li, Yuhua; Chen, Wei R.; Zheng, Bin; Liu, Hong

    2016-03-01

    X-ray fluorescence (XRF) is a promising spectroscopic technique to characterize imaging contrast agents with high atomic numbers (Z) such as gold nanoparticles (GNPs) inside small objects. Its utilization for biomedical applications, however, is greatly limited to experimental research due to longer data acquisition time. The objectives of this study are to apply a photon counting detector array for XRF imaging and to determine an optimized XRF data acquisition time, at which the acquired XRF image is of acceptable quality to allow the maximum level of radiation dose reduction. A prototype laboratory XRF imaging configuration consisting of a pencil-beam X-ray and a photon counting detector array (1 × 64 pixels) is employed to acquire the XRF image through exciting the prepared GNP/water solutions. In order to analyze the signal to noise ratio (SNR) improvement versus the increased exposure time, all the XRF photons within the energy range of 63 - 76KeV that include two Kα gold fluorescence peaks are collected for 1s, 2s, 3s, and so on all the way up to 200s. The optimized XRF data acquisition time for imaging different GNP solutions is determined as the moment when the acquired XRF image just reaches a quality with a SNR of 20dB which corresponds to an acceptable image quality.

  9. Photon counting compressive depth mapping.

    PubMed

    Howland, Gregory A; Lum, Daniel J; Ware, Matthew R; Howell, John C

    2013-10-07

    We demonstrate a compressed sensing, photon counting lidar system based on the single-pixel camera. Our technique recovers both depth and intensity maps from a single under-sampled set of incoherent, linear projections of a scene of interest at ultra-low light levels around 0.5 picowatts. Only two-dimensional reconstructions are required to image a three-dimensional scene. We demonstrate intensity imaging and depth mapping at 256 × 256 pixel transverse resolution with acquisition times as short as 3 seconds. We also show novelty filtering, reconstructing only the difference between two instances of a scene. Finally, we acquire 32 × 32 pixel real-time video for three-dimensional object tracking at 14 frames-per-second.

  10. Integral imaging acquisition and processing for visualization of photon counting images in the mid-wave infrared range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latorre-Carmona, P.; Pla, F.; Javidi, B.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we present an overview of our previously published work on the application of the maximum likelihood (ML) reconstruction method to integral images acquired with a mid-wave infrared detector on two different types of scenes: one of them consisting of a road, a group of trees and a vehicle just behind one of the trees (being the car at a distance of more than 200m from the camera), and another one consisting of a view of the Wright Air Force Base airfield, with several hangars and different other types of installations (including warehouses) at distances ranging from 600m to more than 2km. Dark current noise is considered taking into account the particular features this type of sensors have. Results show that this methodology allows to improve visualization in the photon counting domain.

  11. X-ray differential phase contrast imaging using a grating interferometer and a single photon counting detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Yongshuai; Zhang, Ran; Li, Ke; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2016-03-01

    For grating interferometer-based x-ray differential phase contrast (DPC) imaging systems, their noise performance is strongly dependent on both the visibility of the interference fringe pattern and the total number of photons used to acquire and extract the DPC signal. For a given interferometer, it is usually designed to work at a specific x-ray energy, therefore any deviation from the designed energy may result in certain visibility loss. In this work, a single photon counting detector (PCD) was incorporated into a DPC imaging system, which enabled photons with energies close to the designed operation energy of the interferometer to be selectively used for DPC signal extraction. This approach led to significant boost in the fringe visibility, but it also discarded x-ray photons with other energies incident on the detector and might result in degradations of the overall radiation dose efficiency of the DPC imaging systems. This work presents a novel singular value decomposition (SVD)-based method to leverage the entire spectrum of x-ray photons detected by the PCD, enabling both fringe visibility improvement and reduction in image noise. As evidenced by the results of experimental phantom studies, the contrast-to-noise ratio of the final DPC images could be effectively improved by the proposed method.

  12. On the single-photon-counting (SPC) modes of imaging using an XFEL source

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhehui

    2015-12-14

    In this study, the requirements to achieve high detection efficiency (above 50%) and gigahertz (GHz) frame rate for the proposed 42-keV X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) at Los Alamos are summarized. Direct detection scenarios using C (diamond), Si, Ge and GaAs semiconductor sensors are analyzed. Single-photon counting (SPC) mode and weak SPC mode using Si can potentially meet the efficiency and frame rate requirements and be useful to both photoelectric absorption and Compton physics as the photon energy increases. Multilayer three-dimensional (3D) detector architecture, as a possible means to realize SPC modes, is compared with the widely used two-dimensional (2D) hybrid planar electrode structure and 3D deeply entrenched electrode architecture. Demonstration of thin film cameras less than 100-μm thick with onboard thin ASICs could be an initial step to realize multilayer 3D detectors and SPC modes for XFELs.

  13. Grating-based interferometry and hybrid photon counting detectors: Towards a new era in X-ray medical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gkoumas, Spyridon; Wang, Zhentian; Abis, Matteo; Arboleda, Carolina; Tudosie, George; Donath, Tilman; Brönnimann, Christian; Schulze-Briese, Clemens; Stampanoni, Marco

    2016-02-01

    Progress in X-ray medical imaging and advances in detector developments have always been closely related. Similarly, a strong connection exists between innovations in synchrotron imaging and their implementation on table-top X-ray tube setups. The transfer of phase-based imaging to X-ray tubes can provide table-top setups with improved contrast between areas of low attenuation differences, by exploiting the unit decrement of the real part of the refractive index. Medical imaging is a potential application for such a system. Originally developed for synchrotron experiments, the novel generation of hybrid photon counting detectors is becoming increasingly popular due to their unique characteristics, such as small pixel size, negligible dark noise, fast counting and adjustable energy thresholds. Furthermore, novel room temperature semiconductor materials such as Cd(Zn)Te can provide higher quantum efficiency. In the first part of this article we review phase-contrast techniques and recent research towards medical applications. In the second part we present results and evaluate the potential of combining a table-top Talbot grating interferometry system with latest generation hybrid photon counting detectors.

  14. Photon Counting - One More Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanton, Richard H.

    2012-05-01

    Photon counting has been around for more than 60 years, and has been available to amateurs for most of that time. In most cases single photons are detected using photomultiplier tubes, "old technology" that became available after the Second World War. But over the last couple of decades the perfection of CCD devices has given amateurs the ability to perform accurate photometry with modest telescopes. Is there any reason to still count photons? This paper discusses some of the strengths of current photon counting technology, particularly relating to the search for fast optical transients. Technology advances in counters and photomultiplier modules are briefly mentioned. Illustrative data are presented including FFT analysis of bright star photometry and a technique for finding optical pulses in a large file of noisy data. This latter technique is shown to enable the discovery of a possible optical flare on the polar variable AM Her.

  15. Detection and Estimation of an Optical Image by Photon-Counting Techniques. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Lily Lee

    1973-01-01

    Statistical description of a photoelectric detector is given. The photosensitive surface of the detector is divided into many small areas, and the moment generating function of the photo-counting statistic is derived for large time-bandwidth product. The detection of a specified optical image in the presence of the background light by using the hypothesis test is discussed. The ideal detector based on the likelihood ratio from a set of numbers of photoelectrons ejected from many small areas of the photosensitive surface is studied and compared with the threshold detector and a simple detector which is based on the likelihood ratio by counting the total number of photoelectrons from a finite area of the surface. The intensity of the image is assumed to be Gaussian distributed spatially against the uniformly distributed background light. The numerical approximation by the method of steepest descent is used, and the calculations of the reliabilities for the detectors are carried out by a digital computer.

  16. Digital lock-in detection system based on single photon counting for near-infrared functional brain imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Wei; Guo, Hui; Liu, Ming; Yi, Xi; Wu, Linhui; Zhao, Huijuan; Gao, Feng

    2013-03-01

    Near infrared (NIR) diffuse optical imaging (DOI) are increasingly used to detect hemodynamic changes in the cerebral cortex induced by brain activity. For the sake of capturing the dynamic changes in real-time imaging applications, such as brain imaging, digital lock-in detection technique could be applied. Using particular modulation and sampling constraints and averaging filters, one can achieve optimal noise reduction and discrimination between sources in different modulation frequencies. In this paper, we designed and developed a compact dual-wavelength continuous wave DOI system based on the single photon counting digital lock-in detection technique. According to the frequency division multiplexing light source coding technique, sine waves with different frequencies are generated so as to amplitude-modulate two laser sources with different wavelengths. The diffuse light is detected by photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) and the data is collected by the detection channels simultaneously. A digital lock-in detection circuit for photon counting measurement module and a DDS (Direct Digital Synthesizer) signal generation module were separately implemented in two FPGA development platforms. To validate the feasibility and functionality of the developed system, a series of experimental tests were performed. Preliminary results show that the system could be used to reconstruct the absorption coefficient and could separate the response of the dual wavelength sources which were modulated by sine signals of different frequencies effectively. In addition, several imaging experiments were performed on the semi-infinite solid phantom to find the "best imaging position" for a given source-detector placement.

  17. On the single-photon-counting (SPC) modes of imaging using an XFEL source

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Zhehui

    2015-12-14

    In this study, the requirements to achieve high detection efficiency (above 50%) and gigahertz (GHz) frame rate for the proposed 42-keV X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) at Los Alamos are summarized. Direct detection scenarios using C (diamond), Si, Ge and GaAs semiconductor sensors are analyzed. Single-photon counting (SPC) mode and weak SPC mode using Si can potentially meet the efficiency and frame rate requirements and be useful to both photoelectric absorption and Compton physics as the photon energy increases. Multilayer three-dimensional (3D) detector architecture, as a possible means to realize SPC modes, is compared with the widely used two-dimensional (2D) hybridmore » planar electrode structure and 3D deeply entrenched electrode architecture. Demonstration of thin film cameras less than 100-μm thick with onboard thin ASICs could be an initial step to realize multilayer 3D detectors and SPC modes for XFELs.« less

  18. Comparison of photon counting and conventional scintillation detectors in a pinhole SPECT system for small animal imaging: Monte carlo simulation studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Young-Jin; Park, Su-Jin; Lee, Seung-Wan; Kim, Dae-Hong; Kim, Ye-Seul; Kim, Hee-Joung

    2013-05-01

    The photon counting detector based on cadmium telluride (CdTe) or cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) is a promising imaging modality that provides many benefits compared to conventional scintillation detectors. By using a pinhole collimator with the photon counting detector, we were able to improve both the spatial resolution and the sensitivity. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the photon counting and conventional scintillation detectors in a pinhole single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) system. We designed five pinhole SPECT systems of two types: one type with a CdTe photon counting detector and the other with a conventional NaI(Tl) scintillation detector. We conducted simulation studies and evaluated imaging performance. The results demonstrated that the spatial resolution of the CdTe photon counting detector was 0.38 mm, with a sensitivity 1.40 times greater than that of a conventional NaI(Tl) scintillation detector for the same detector thickness. Also, the average scatter fractions of the CdTe photon counting and the conventional NaI(Tl) scintillation detectors were 1.93% and 2.44%, respectively. In conclusion, we successfully evaluated various pinhole SPECT systems for small animal imaging.

  19. Characteristic performance evaluation of a photon counting Si strip detector for low dose spectral breast CT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Hyo-Min; Ding, Huanjun; Molloi, Sabee; Barber, William C.; Iwanczyk, Jan S.

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: The possible clinical applications which can be performed using a newly developed detector depend on the detector's characteristic performance in a number of metrics including the dynamic range, resolution, uniformity, and stability. The authors have evaluated a prototype energy resolved fast photon counting x-ray detector based on a silicon (Si) strip sensor used in an edge-on geometry with an application specific integrated circuit to record the number of x-rays and their energies at high flux and fast frame rates. The investigated detector was integrated with a dedicated breast spectral computed tomography (CT) system to make use of the detector's high spatial and energy resolution and low noise performance under conditions suitable for clinical breast imaging. The aim of this article is to investigate the intrinsic characteristics of the detector, in terms of maximum output count rate, spatial and energy resolution, and noise performance of the imaging system. Methods: The maximum output count rate was obtained with a 50 W x-ray tube with a maximum continuous output of 50 kVp at 1.0 mA. A{sup 109}Cd source, with a characteristic x-ray peak at 22 keV from Ag, was used to measure the energy resolution of the detector. The axial plane modulation transfer function (MTF) was measured using a 67 μm diameter tungsten wire. The two-dimensional (2D) noise power spectrum (NPS) was measured using flat field images and noise equivalent quanta (NEQ) were calculated using the MTF and NPS results. The image quality parameters were studied as a function of various radiation doses and reconstruction filters. The one-dimensional (1D) NPS was used to investigate the effect of electronic noise elimination by varying the minimum energy threshold. Results: A maximum output count rate of 100 million counts per second per square millimeter (cps/mm{sup 2}) has been obtained (1 million cps per 100 × 100 μm pixel). The electrical noise floor was less than 4 keV. The energy

  20. Characteristic performance evaluation of a photon counting Si strip detector for low dose spectral breast CT imaging

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hyo-Min; Barber, William C.; Ding, Huanjun; Iwanczyk, Jan S.; Molloi, Sabee

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The possible clinical applications which can be performed using a newly developed detector depend on the detector's characteristic performance in a number of metrics including the dynamic range, resolution, uniformity, and stability. The authors have evaluated a prototype energy resolved fast photon counting x-ray detector based on a silicon (Si) strip sensor used in an edge-on geometry with an application specific integrated circuit to record the number of x-rays and their energies at high flux and fast frame rates. The investigated detector was integrated with a dedicated breast spectral computed tomography (CT) system to make use of the detector's high spatial and energy resolution and low noise performance under conditions suitable for clinical breast imaging. The aim of this article is to investigate the intrinsic characteristics of the detector, in terms of maximum output count rate, spatial and energy resolution, and noise performance of the imaging system. Methods: The maximum output count rate was obtained with a 50 W x-ray tube with a maximum continuous output of 50 kVp at 1.0 mA. A109Cd source, with a characteristic x-ray peak at 22 keV from Ag, was used to measure the energy resolution of the detector. The axial plane modulation transfer function (MTF) was measured using a 67 μm diameter tungsten wire. The two-dimensional (2D) noise power spectrum (NPS) was measured using flat field images and noise equivalent quanta (NEQ) were calculated using the MTF and NPS results. The image quality parameters were studied as a function of various radiation doses and reconstruction filters. The one-dimensional (1D) NPS was used to investigate the effect of electronic noise elimination by varying the minimum energy threshold. Results: A maximum output count rate of 100 million counts per second per square millimeter (cps/mm2) has been obtained (1 million cps per 100 × 100 μm pixel). The electrical noise floor was less than 4 keV. The energy resolution

  1. A high-resolution imaging technique using a whole-body, research photon counting detector CT system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leng, S.; Yu, Z.; Halaweish, A.; Kappler, S.; Hahn, K.; Henning, A.; Li, Z.; Lane, J.; Levin, D. L.; Jorgensen, S.; Ritman, E.; McCollough, C.

    2016-03-01

    A high-resolution (HR) data collection mode has been introduced to a whole-body, research photon-counting-detector CT system installed in our laboratory. In this mode, 64 rows of 0.45 mm x 0.45 mm detector pixels were used, which corresponded to a pixel size of 0.25 mm x 0.25 mm at the iso-center. Spatial resolution of this HR mode was quantified by measuring the MTF from a scan of a 50 micron wire phantom. An anthropomorphic lung phantom, cadaveric swine lung, temporal bone and heart specimens were scanned using the HR mode, and image quality was subjectively assessed by two experienced radiologists. High spatial resolution of the HR mode was evidenced by the MTF measurement, with 15 lp/cm and 20 lp/cm at 10% and 2% modulation. Images from anthropomorphic phantom and cadaveric specimens showed clear delineation of small structures, such as lung vessels, lung nodules, temporal bone structures, and coronary arteries. Temporal bone images showed critical anatomy (i.e. stapes superstructure) that was clearly visible in the PCD system. These results demonstrated the potential application of this imaging mode in lung, temporal bone, and vascular imaging. Other clinical applications that require high spatial resolution, such as musculoskeletal imaging, may also benefit from this high resolution mode.

  2. Ideal-observer detectability in photon-counting differential phase-contrast imaging using a linear-systems approach

    SciTech Connect

    Fredenberg, Erik; Danielsson, Mats; Stayman, J. Webster; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H.; Aslund, Magnus

    2012-09-15

    Purpose: To provide a cascaded-systems framework based on the noise-power spectrum (NPS), modulation transfer function (MTF), and noise-equivalent number of quanta (NEQ) for quantitative evaluation of differential phase-contrast imaging (Talbot interferometry) in relation to conventional absorption contrast under equal-dose, equal-geometry, and, to some extent, equal-photon-economy constraints. The focus is a geometry for photon-counting mammography. Methods: Phase-contrast imaging is a promising technology that may emerge as an alternative or adjunct to conventional absorption contrast. In particular, phase contrast may increase the signal-difference-to-noise ratio compared to absorption contrast because the difference in phase shift between soft-tissue structures is often substantially larger than the absorption difference. We have developed a comprehensive cascaded-systems framework to investigate Talbot interferometry, which is a technique for differential phase-contrast imaging. Analytical expressions for the MTF and NPS were derived to calculate the NEQ and a task-specific ideal-observer detectability index under assumptions of linearity and shift invariance. Talbot interferometry was compared to absorption contrast at equal dose, and using either a plane wave or a spherical wave in a conceivable mammography geometry. The impact of source size and spectrum bandwidth was included in the framework, and the trade-off with photon economy was investigated in some detail. Wave-propagation simulations were used to verify the analytical expressions and to generate example images. Results: Talbot interferometry inherently detects the differential of the phase, which led to a maximum in NEQ at high spatial frequencies, whereas the absorption-contrast NEQ decreased monotonically with frequency. Further, phase contrast detects differences in density rather than atomic number, and the optimal imaging energy was found to be a factor of 1.7 higher than for absorption

  3. Photon counts from stellar occultation sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buglia, James J.

    1987-01-01

    The feasibility of using stars as radiation sources for Earth atmospheric occultation experiments is investigated. Exoatmospheric photon counts of the order of 10 to the 6th power photons/sq cm/sec are realized for the 15 visually brightest stars. Most photon counts appear to be marginally detectable unless photomultiplier or cascade detection devices can be used.

  4. Lock-in-photon-counting-based highly-sensitive and large-dynamic imaging system for continuous-wave diffuse optical tomography

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Weiting; Wang, Xin; Wang, Bingyuan; Wang, Yihan; Zhang, Yanqi; Zhao, Huijuan; Gao, Feng

    2016-01-01

    We implemented a novel lock-in photon-counting detection architecture that combines the ultra-high sensitivity of the photon-counting detection and the measurement parallelism of the lock-in technique. Based on this technique, a dual-wavelength simultaneous measurement continuous wave diffuse optical tomography system was developed with a configuration of 16 sources and 16 detectors that works in a tandem serial-to-parallel fashion. Methodology validation and performance assessment of the system were conducted using phantom experiments that demonstrate excellent measurement linearity, moderate-term system stability, robustness to noise and negligible inter-wavelength crosstalk. 2-D imaging experiments further validate high sensitivity of the lock-in photon-counting methodology as well as high reliability of the proposed system. The advanced detection principle can be adapted to achieving a fully parallelized instrumentation for the extended applications. PMID:26977358

  5. Particle and Photon Detection: Counting and Energy Measurement.

    PubMed

    Janesick, James; Tower, John

    2016-05-12

    Fundamental limits for photon counting and photon energy measurement are reviewed for CCD and CMOS imagers. The challenges to extend photon counting into the visible/nIR wavelengths and achieve energy measurement in the UV with specific read noise requirements are discussed. Pixel flicker and random telegraph noise sources are highlighted along with various methods used in reducing their contribution on the sensor's read noise floor. Practical requirements for quantum efficiency, charge collection efficiency, and charge transfer efficiency that interfere with photon counting performance are discussed. Lastly we will review current efforts in reducing flicker noise head-on, in hopes to drive read noise substantially below 1 carrier rms.

  6. Noise Reduction Techniques and Scaling Effects towards Photon Counting CMOS Image Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Boukhayma, Assim; Peizerat, Arnaud; Enz, Christian

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the read noise in CMOS image sensors (CISs) based on four-transistors (4T) pixels, column-level amplification and correlated multiple sampling. Starting from the input-referred noise analytical formula, process level optimizations, device choices and circuit techniques at the pixel and column level of the readout chain are derived and discussed. The noise reduction techniques that can be implemented at the column and pixel level are verified by transient noise simulations, measurement and results from recently-published low noise CIS. We show how recently-reported process refinement, leading to the reduction of the sense node capacitance, can be combined with an optimal in-pixel source follower design to reach a sub-0.3erms- read noise at room temperature. This paper also discusses the impact of technology scaling on the CIS read noise. It shows how designers can take advantage of scaling and how the Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor (MOS) transistor gate leakage tunneling current appears as a challenging limitation. For this purpose, both simulation results of the gate leakage current and 1/f noise data reported from different foundries and technology nodes are used.

  7. Monochromatic X-ray photon counting using an energy-selecting device and its application to iodine imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oda, Yasuyuki; Sato, Eiichi; Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Hagiwara, Osahiko; Matsukiyo, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Manabu; Kusachi, Shinya

    2015-08-01

    Quasi-monochromatic photon counting was performed using a cadmium telluride detector and an energy-selecting device, consisting of two comparators and a microcomputer (MC). The two threshold energies are determined using low and high-energy comparators, respectively. The MC produces a single logical pulse when only a logical pulse from a low-energy comparator is input to the MC. Next, the MC never produces the pulse when two pulses from low and high-energy comparators are input to the MC, simultaneously. The logical pulses from the MC are input to a frequency-voltage converter (FVC) to convert count rates into voltages; the rate is proportional to the voltage. The output voltage from the FVC is sent to a personal computer through an analog-digital converter to reconstruct tomograms. The X-ray projection curves for tomography are obtained by repeated linear scans and rotations of the object at a tube voltage of 70 kV and a current of 12 μA. Iodine (I) K-edge CT was performed using contrast media and X-ray photons with a count rate of 2.2 kilocounts per second and energies ranging from 34 to 50 keV, since these photons with energies beyond I-K-edge energy 33.2 keV are absorbed effectively by I atoms.

  8. A Monte Carlo simulation study of the effect of energy windows in computed tomography images based on an energy-resolved photon counting detector.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung-Wan; Choi, Yu-Na; Cho, Hyo-Min; Lee, Young-Jin; Ryu, Hyun-Ju; Kim, Hee-Joung

    2012-08-07

    The energy-resolved photon counting detector provides the spectral information that can be used to generate images. The novel imaging methods, including the K-edge imaging, projection-based energy weighting imaging and image-based energy weighting imaging, are based on the energy-resolved photon counting detector and can be realized by using various energy windows or energy bins. The location and width of the energy windows or energy bins are important because these techniques generate an image using the spectral information defined by the energy windows or energy bins. In this study, the reconstructed images acquired with K-edge imaging, projection-based energy weighting imaging and image-based energy weighting imaging were simulated using the Monte Carlo simulation. The effect of energy windows or energy bins was investigated with respect to the contrast, coefficient-of-variation (COV) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). The three images were compared with respect to the CNR. We modeled the x-ray computed tomography system based on the CdTe energy-resolved photon counting detector and polymethylmethacrylate phantom, which have iodine, gadolinium and blood. To acquire K-edge images, the lower energy thresholds were fixed at K-edge absorption energy of iodine and gadolinium and the energy window widths were increased from 1 to 25 bins. The energy weighting factors optimized for iodine, gadolinium and blood were calculated from 5, 10, 15, 19 and 33 energy bins. We assigned the calculated energy weighting factors to the images acquired at each energy bin. In K-edge images, the contrast and COV decreased, when the energy window width was increased. The CNR increased as a function of the energy window width and decreased above the specific energy window width. When the number of energy bins was increased from 5 to 15, the contrast increased in the projection-based energy weighting images. There is a little difference in the contrast, when the number of energy bin is

  9. Improved photon counting efficiency calibration using superconducting single photon detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Haiyong; Xu, Nan; Li, Jianwei; Sun, Ruoduan; Feng, Guojin; Wang, Yanfei; Ma, Chong; Lin, Yandong; Zhang, Labao; Kang, Lin; Chen, Jian; Wu, Peiheng

    2015-10-01

    The quantum efficiency of photon counters can be measured with standard uncertainty below 1% level using correlated photon pairs generated through spontaneous parametric down-conversion process. Normally a laser in UV, blue or green wavelength range with sufficient photon energy is applied to produce energy and momentum conserved photon pairs in two channels with desired wavelengths for calibration. One channel is used as the heralding trigger, and the other is used for the calibration of the detector under test. A superconducting nanowire single photon detector with advantages such as high photon counting speed (<20 MHz), low dark count rate (<50 counts per second), and wideband responsivity (UV to near infrared) is used as the trigger detector, enabling correlated photons calibration capabilities into shortwave visible range. For a 355nm single longitudinal mode pump laser, when a superconducting nanowire single photon detector is used as the trigger detector at 1064nm and 1560nm in the near infrared range, the photon counting efficiency calibration capabilities can be realized at 532nm and 460nm. The quantum efficiency measurement on photon counters such as photomultiplier tubes and avalanche photodiodes can be then further extended in a wide wavelength range (e.g. 400-1000nm) using a flat spectral photon flux source to meet the calibration demands in cutting edge low light applications such as time resolved fluorescence and nonlinear optical spectroscopy, super resolution microscopy, deep space observation, and so on.

  10. Enabling photon counting detectors with dynamic attenuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Scott S.; Pelc, Norbert J.

    2014-03-01

    Photon-counting x-ray detectors (PCXDs) are being investigated as a replacement for conventional x-ray detectors because they promise several advantages, including better dose efficiency, higher resolution and spectral imaging. However, many of these advantages disappear when the x-ray flux incident on the detector is too high. We recently proposed a dynamic, piecewise-linear attenuator (or beam shaping filter) that can control the flux incident on the detector. This can restrict the operating range of the PCXD to keep the incident count rate below a given limit. We simulated a system with the piecewise-linear attenuator and a PCXD using raw data generated from forward projected DICOM files. We investigated the classic paralyzable and nonparalyzable PCXD as well as a weighted average of the two, with the weights chosen to mimic an existing PCXD (Taguchi et al, Med Phys 2011). The dynamic attenuator has small synergistic benefits with the nonparalyzable detector and large synergistic benefits with the paralyzable detector. Real PCXDs operate somewhere between these models, and the weighted average model still shows large benefits from the dynamic attenuator. We conclude that dynamic attenuators can reduce the count rate performance necessary for adopting PCXDs.

  11. Femtosecond Photon-Counting Receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krainak, Michael A.; Rambo, Timothy M.; Yang, Guangning; Lu, Wei; Numata, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    An optical correlation receiver is described that provides ultra-precise distance and/or time-pulse-width measurements even for weak (single photons) and short (femtosecond) optical signals. A new type of optical correlation receiver uses a fourth-order (intensity) interferometer to provide micron distance measurements even for weak (single photons) and short (femtosecond) optical signals. The optical correlator uses a low-noise-integrating detector that can resolve photon number. The correlation (range as a function of path delay) is calculated from the variance of the photon number of the difference of the optical signals on the two detectors. Our preliminary proof-of principle data (using a short-pulse diode laser transmitter) demonstrates tens of microns precision.

  12. Femtosecond Photon-Counting Receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krainak, Michael A.; Rambo, Timothy M.; Yang, Guangning; Lu, Wei; Numata, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    An optical correlation receiver is described that provides ultra-precise distance and/or time/pulse-width measurements even for weak (single photons) and short (femtosecond) optical signals. A new type of optical correlation receiver uses a fourth-order (intensity) interferometer to provide micron distance measurements even for weak (single photons) and short (femtosecond) optical signals. The optical correlator uses a low-noise-integrating detector that can resolve photon number. The correlation (range as a function of path delay) is calculated from the variance of the photon number of the difference of the optical signals on the two detectors. Our preliminary proof-of principle data (using a short-pulse diode laser transmitter) demonstrates tens of microns precision.

  13. Femtosecond photon-counting receiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krainak, Michael A.; Rambo, Timothy M.; Yang, Guangning; Lu, Wei; Numata, Kenji

    2016-05-01

    An optical correlation receiver is described that provides ultra-precise distance and/or time/pulsewidth measurements even for weak (single photons) and short (femtosecond) optical signals. A new type of optical correlation receiver uses a fourth-order (intensity) interferometer to provide micron distance measurements even for weak (single photons) and short (femtosecond) optical signals. The optical correlator uses a low-noise-integrating detector that can resolve photon number. The correlation (range as a function of path delay) is calculated from the variance of the photon number of the difference of the optical signals on the two detectors. Our preliminary proof-of principle data (using a short-pulse diode laser transmitter) demonstrates tens of microns precision.

  14. Cascaded systems analysis of photon counting detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, J.; Zbijewski, W.; Gang, G.; Stayman, J. W.; Taguchi, K.; Carrino, J. A.; Lundqvist, M.; Fredenberg, E.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2014-10-15

    Purpose: Photon counting detectors (PCDs) are an emerging technology with applications in spectral and low-dose radiographic and tomographic imaging. This paper develops an analytical model of PCD imaging performance, including the system gain, modulation transfer function (MTF), noise-power spectrum (NPS), and detective quantum efficiency (DQE). Methods: A cascaded systems analysis model describing the propagation of quanta through the imaging chain was developed. The model was validated in comparison to the physical performance of a silicon-strip PCD implemented on an experimental imaging bench. The signal response, MTF, and NPS were measured and compared to theory as a function of exposure conditions (70 kVp, 1–7 mA), detector threshold, and readout mode (i.e., the option for coincidence detection). The model sheds new light on the dependence of spatial resolution, charge sharing, and additive noise effects on threshold selection and was used to investigate the factors governing PCD performance, including the fundamental advantages and limitations of PCDs in comparison to energy-integrating detectors (EIDs) in the linear regime for which pulse pileup can be ignored. Results: The detector exhibited highly linear mean signal response across the system operating range and agreed well with theoretical prediction, as did the system MTF and NPS. The DQE analyzed as a function of kilovolt (peak), exposure, detector threshold, and readout mode revealed important considerations for system optimization. The model also demonstrated the important implications of false counts from both additive electronic noise and charge sharing and highlighted the system design and operational parameters that most affect detector performance in the presence of such factors: for example, increasing the detector threshold from 0 to 100 (arbitrary units of pulse height threshold roughly equivalent to 0.5 and 6 keV energy threshold, respectively), increased the f{sub 50} (spatial

  15. Cascaded systems analysis of photon counting detectors

    PubMed Central

    Xu, J.; Zbijewski, W.; Gang, G.; Stayman, J. W.; Taguchi, K.; Lundqvist, M.; Fredenberg, E.; Carrino, J. A.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Photon counting detectors (PCDs) are an emerging technology with applications in spectral and low-dose radiographic and tomographic imaging. This paper develops an analytical model of PCD imaging performance, including the system gain, modulation transfer function (MTF), noise-power spectrum (NPS), and detective quantum efficiency (DQE). Methods: A cascaded systems analysis model describing the propagation of quanta through the imaging chain was developed. The model was validated in comparison to the physical performance of a silicon-strip PCD implemented on an experimental imaging bench. The signal response, MTF, and NPS were measured and compared to theory as a function of exposure conditions (70 kVp, 1–7 mA), detector threshold, and readout mode (i.e., the option for coincidence detection). The model sheds new light on the dependence of spatial resolution, charge sharing, and additive noise effects on threshold selection and was used to investigate the factors governing PCD performance, including the fundamental advantages and limitations of PCDs in comparison to energy-integrating detectors (EIDs) in the linear regime for which pulse pileup can be ignored. Results: The detector exhibited highly linear mean signal response across the system operating range and agreed well with theoretical prediction, as did the system MTF and NPS. The DQE analyzed as a function of kilovolt (peak), exposure, detector threshold, and readout mode revealed important considerations for system optimization. The model also demonstrated the important implications of false counts from both additive electronic noise and charge sharing and highlighted the system design and operational parameters that most affect detector performance in the presence of such factors: for example, increasing the detector threshold from 0 to 100 (arbitrary units of pulse height threshold roughly equivalent to 0.5 and 6 keV energy threshold, respectively), increased the f50 (spatial-frequency at

  16. Photon-counting spaceborne altimeter simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blazej, Josef

    2004-11-01

    We are presenting of a photon counting laser altimeter simulator. The simulator is designed to be a theoretical and numerical complement for a Technology Demonstrator of the space born laser altimeter for planetary studies built on our university. The European Space Agency has nominated the photon counting altimeter as one of the attractive devices for planetary research. The device should provide altimetry in the range 400 to 1400 km with one meter range resolution under rough conditions - Sun illumination, radiation, etc. The general altimeter concept expects the photon counting principle laser radar. According to this concept, the simulator is based on photon counting radar simulation, which has been enhanced to handle planetary surface roughness, vertical terrain profile and its reflectivity. The simulator is useful complement for any photon counting altimeter both for altimeter design and for measured data analysis. Our simulator enables to model the orbital motion, range, terrain profile, reflectivity, and their influence on the over all energy budget and the ultimate signal to noise ratio acceptable for the altimetry. The simulator can be adopted for various air or space born application.

  17. Particle and Photon Detection: Counting and Energy Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Janesick, James; Tower, John

    2016-01-01

    Fundamental limits for photon counting and photon energy measurement are reviewed for CCD and CMOS imagers. The challenges to extend photon counting into the visible/nIR wavelengths and achieve energy measurement in the UV with specific read noise requirements are discussed. Pixel flicker and random telegraph noise sources are highlighted along with various methods used in reducing their contribution on the sensor’s read noise floor. Practical requirements for quantum efficiency, charge collection efficiency, and charge transfer efficiency that interfere with photon counting performance are discussed. Lastly we will review current efforts in reducing flicker noise head-on, in hopes to drive read noise substantially below 1 carrier rms. PMID:27187398

  18. Towards whole-body ultra-weak photon counting and imaging with a focus on human beings: a review.

    PubMed

    Van Wijk, Roeland; Van Wijk, Eduard P A; van Wietmarschen, Herman A; van der Greef, Jan

    2014-10-05

    For decades, the relationship between ultra-weak photon emission (UPE) and the health state of the body is being studied. With the advent of systems biology, attention shifted from the association between UPE and reactive oxygen species towards UPE as a reflection of changed metabolic networks. Essential for this shift in thinking is the development of novel photon count statistical methods that more reflect the dynamics of the systems organization. Additionally, efforts to combine and correlate UPE data with other types of measurements such as metabolomics be key to understand the complexity of the human body. This review describes the history and developments in the area of human UPE research from a technical - methodological perspective, an experimental perspective and a theoretical perspective. There is ample evidence that human UPE research will allow a better understanding of the body as a complex dynamical system. The future lies in the further development of an integrated UPE and metabolomics platform for a personalized monitoring of changes of the system towards health or disease.

  19. High-speed multi-exposure laser speckle contrast imaging with a single-photon counting camera.

    PubMed

    Dragojević, Tanja; Bronzi, Danilo; Varma, Hari M; Valdes, Claudia P; Castellvi, Clara; Villa, Federica; Tosi, Alberto; Justicia, Carles; Zappa, Franco; Durduran, Turgut

    2015-08-01

    Laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI) has emerged as a valuable tool for cerebral blood flow (CBF) imaging. We present a multi-exposure laser speckle imaging (MESI) method which uses a high-frame rate acquisition with a negligible inter-frame dead time to mimic multiple exposures in a single-shot acquisition series. Our approach takes advantage of the noise-free readout and high-sensitivity of a complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) single-photon avalanche diode (SPAD) array to provide real-time speckle contrast measurement with high temporal resolution and accuracy. To demonstrate its feasibility, we provide comparisons between in vivo measurements with both the standard and the new approach performed on a mouse brain, in identical conditions.

  20. Photon-counting-based dust monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamal, Karel; Prochazka, Ivan; Blazej, Josef; Eslerova, Iva; Sopko, Bruno; Pasta, Armin

    1999-05-01

    Most of the dust monitors are based on optical principle: the scattered light intensity is registered. The classical approach is using the multiple photon optical signal intensity and processing. Single photon detection -- photon counting is exploited in Satellite Laser Ranging and was implemented in space born application for Mars Surveyor Program 98, as well. The main advantage of single photon detection is an extreme sensitivity, the entire digital approach, no analog signal is treated. All the light intensity information is acquired on the basis of statistical data treatment. The dust detector consists of the LED diode based transmitter, single photon solid state diode detector and the digital data processing unit. The light beam from the LED diode passing the dust column is detected in a photo detector. The detector employs the avalanche Silicon photodiode 40 micrometers diameter active area and is operated in a passive gating and active quenching mode above its breakdown voltage. The detector provides uniform digital pulses, one for each photon detected. The light intensity measurement is converted into the photon flux counting -- frequency or event counting. The microcomputer controlled data processing electronics counts the detector output pulses, accounts for detector dark count rate, calibration constants, and computes the corresponding dust concentration averaged over desired period. The second LED located close to the detector is used as a reference light source to eliminate the temperature, aging and sensor contamination influence. The laboratory measurements show the long term and temperature stability of the scale within 1%. The setup was tested at the cement plant smoke stack and compared to the commercial optical dust concentration monitor operating on analog multiphoton principle. Due to an extreme optical sensitivity of the photon counting detector, the energy balance is favorable to realize lightweight equipment by a factor of ten in comparison

  1. 3D passive photon counting automatic target recognition using advanced correlation filters.

    PubMed

    Cho, Myungjin; Mahalanobis, Abhijit; Javidi, Bahram

    2011-03-15

    In this Letter, we present results for detecting and recognizing 3D objects in photon counting images using integral imaging with maximum average correlation height filters. We show that even under photon starved conditions objects may be automatically recognized in passively sensed 3D images using advanced correlation filters. We show that the proposed filter synthesized with ideal training images can detect and recognize a 3D object in photon counting images, even in the presence of occlusions and obscuration.

  2. Photon counting detectors for Fabry-Perot interferometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Darlington, E. H.; Haviland, J. R.

    1989-01-01

    Sealed channel plate photomultipliers with multiple discrete anodes for use as photon counting detectors in the image plane of Fabry-Perot interferometers are described. The influence of design and construction on performance of completed devices is discussed. Effects on spatial resolution, lifetime, and counting efficiency are described. It is shown that devices can be optimized for particular applications. The results should be generally applicable to resistive anode and wedge and strip anode types of sealed detectors.

  3. Size-dependent scanning parameters (kVp and mAs) for photon-counting spectral CT system in pediatric imaging: simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Han; Danielsson, Mats; Xu, Cheng

    2016-06-01

    We are developing a photon-counting spectral CT detector with a small pixel size of 0.4× 0.5 mm2, offering a potential advantage for better visualization of small structures in pediatric patients. The purpose of this study is to determine the patient size dependent scanning parameters (kVp and mAs) for pediatric CT in two imaging cases: adipose imaging and iodinated blood imaging. Cylindrical soft-tissue phantoms of diameters between 10-25 cm were used to mimic patients of different ages from 0 to 15 y. For adipose imaging, a 5 mm diameter adipose sphere was assumed as an imaging target, while in the case of iodinated imaging, an iodinated blood sphere of 1 mm in diameter was assumed. By applying the geometry of a commercial CT scanner (GE Lightspeed VCT), simulations were carried out to calculate the detectability index, {{d}\\prime 2} , with tube potentials varying from 40 to 140 kVp. The optimal kVp for each phantom in each imaging case was determined such that the dose-normalized detectability index, {{d}\\prime 2}/ dose, is maximized. With the assumption that the detectability index in pediatric imaging is required the same as in typical adult imaging, the value of mAs at optimal kVp for each phantom was selected to achieve a reference detectability index that was obtained by scanning an adult phantom (30 cm in diameter) in a typical adult CT procedure (120 kVp and 200 mAs) using a modeled energy-integrating system. For adipose imaging, the optimal kVps are 50, 60, 80, and 120 kVp, respectively, for phantoms of 10, 15, 20, and 25 cm in diameter. The corresponding mAs values required to achieve the reference detectability index are only 9%, 23%, 24%, and 54% of the mAs that is used for adult patients at 120 kVp, for 10, 15, 20, and 25 cm diameter phantoms, respectively. In the case of iodinated imaging, a tube potential of 60 kVp was found optimal for all phantoms investigated, and the mAs values required to achieve the reference detectability

  4. Co-phasing of a diluted aperture synthesis instrument for direct imaging. II. Experimental demonstration in the photon-counting regime with a temporal hypertelescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouyeron, L.; Delage, L.; Baudoin, R.; Gomes, J. T.; Grossard, L.; Reynaud, F.

    2014-07-01

    Context. Amongst the new techniques currently developed for high-resolution and high-dynamics imaging, the hypertelescope architecture is very promising for direct imaging of objects such as exoplanets. The performance of this instrument strongly depends on the co-phasing process accuracy. In a previous high-flux experimental study with an eight-telescope array, we successfully implemented a co-phasing system based on the joint use of a genetic algorithm and a sub-aperture piston phase diversity using the object itself as a source for metrology. Aims: To fit the astronomical context, we investigate the impact of photon noise on the co-phasing performance operating our laboratory prototype at low flux. This study provides experimental results on the sensitivity and the dynamics that could be reached for real astrophysical observations. Methods: Simulations were carried out to optimize the critical parameters to be applied in the co-phasing system running in the photon-counting regime. We used these parameters experimentally to acquire images with our temporal hypertelescope test bench for different photon flux levels. A data reduction method allows highly contrasted images to be extracted. Results: The optical path differences have been servo-controlled over one hour with an accuracy of 22.0 nm and 15.7 nm for 200 and 500 photons/frame, respectively. The data reduction greatly improves the signal-to-noise ratio and allows us to experimentally obtain highly contrasted images. The related normalized point spread function is characterized by a 1.1 × 10-4 and 5.4 × 10-5 intensity standard deviation over the dark field (for 15 000 snapshots with 200 and 500 photons/frame, respectively). Conclusions: This laboratory experiment demonstrates the potential of our hypertelescope concept, which could be directly transposed to a space-based telescope array. Assuming eight telescopes with a 30 cm diameter, the I-band limiting magnitude of the main star would be 7.3, allowing

  5. Imaging performance comparison between a LaBr{sub 3}:Ce scintillator based and a CdTe semiconductor based photon counting compact gamma camera

    SciTech Connect

    Russo, P.; Mettivier, G.; Pani, R.; Pellegrini, R.; Cinti, M. N.; Bennati, P.

    2009-04-15

    The authors report on the performance of two small field of view, compact gamma cameras working in single photon counting in planar imaging tests at 122 and 140 keV. The first camera is based on a LaBr{sub 3}:Ce scintillator continuous crystal (49x49x5 mm{sup 3}) assembled with a flat panel multianode photomultiplier tube with parallel readout. The second one belongs to the class of semiconductor hybrid pixel detectors, specifically, a CdTe pixel detector (14x14x1 mm{sup 3}) with 256x256 square pixels and a pitch of 55 {mu}m, read out by a CMOS single photon counting integrated circuit of the Medipix2 series. The scintillation camera was operated with selectable energy window while the CdTe camera was operated with a single low-energy detection threshold of about 20 keV, i.e., without energy discrimination. The detectors were coupled to pinhole or parallel-hole high-resolution collimators. The evaluation of their overall performance in basic imaging tasks is presented through measurements of their detection efficiency, intrinsic spatial resolution, noise, image SNR, and contrast recovery. The scintillation and CdTe cameras showed, respectively, detection efficiencies at 122 keV of 83% and 45%, intrinsic spatial resolutions of 0.9 mm and 75 {mu}m, and total background noises of 40.5 and 1.6 cps. Imaging tests with high-resolution parallel-hole and pinhole collimators are also reported.

  6. Optimization of K-edge imaging for vulnerable plaques using gold nanoparticles and energy resolved photon counting detectors: a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Alivov, Yahya; Baturin, Pavlo; Le, Huy Q; Ducote, Justin; Molloi, Sabee

    2014-01-06

    We investigated the effect of different imaging parameters, such as dose, beam energy, energy resolution and the number of energy bins, on the image quality of K-edge spectral computed tomography (CT) of gold nanoparticles (GNP) accumulated in an atherosclerotic plaque. A maximum likelihood technique was employed to estimate the concentration of GNP, which served as a targeted intravenous contrast material intended to detect the degree of the plaque's inflammation. The simulation studies used a single-slice parallel beam CT geometry with an x-ray beam energy ranging between 50 and 140 kVp. The synthetic phantoms included small (3 cm in diameter) cylinder and chest (33 × 24 cm(2)) phantoms, where both phantoms contained tissue, calcium and gold. In the simulation studies, GNP quantification and background (calcium and tissue) suppression tasks were pursued. The x-ray detection sensor was represented by an energy resolved photon counting detector (e.g., CdZnTe) with adjustable energy bins. Both ideal and more realistic (12% full width at half maximum (FWHM) energy resolution) implementations of the photon counting detector were simulated. The simulations were performed for the CdZnTe detector with a pixel pitch of 0.5-1 mm, which corresponds to a performance without significant charge sharing and cross-talk effects. The Rose model was employed to estimate the minimum detectable concentration of GNPs. A figure of merit (FOM) was used to optimize the x-ray beam energy (kVp) to achieve the highest signal-to-noise ratio with respect to the patient dose. As a result, the successful identification of gold and background suppression was demonstrated. The highest FOM was observed at the 125 kVp x-ray beam energy. The minimum detectable GNP concentration was determined to be approximately 1.06 µmol mL(-1) (0.21 mg mL(-1)) for an ideal detector and about 2.5 µmol mL(-1) (0.49 mg mL(-1)) for a more realistic (12% FWHM) detector. The studies show the optimal

  7. Optimization of the K-edge imaging for vulnerable plaques using gold nanoparticles and energy-resolved photon counting detectors: a simulation study

    PubMed Central

    Alivov, Yahya; Baturin, Pavlo; Le, Huy Q.; Ducote, Justin; Molloi, Sabee

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the effect of different imaging parameters such as dose, beam energy, energy resolution, and number of energy bins on image quality of K-edge spectral computed tomography (CT) of gold nanoparticles (GNP) accumulated in an atherosclerotic plaque. Maximum likelihood technique was employed to estimate the concentration of GNP, which served as a targeted intravenous contrast material intended to detect the degree of plaque's inflammation. The simulations studies used a single slice parallel beam CT geometry with an X-ray beam energy ranging between 50 and 140 kVp. The synthetic phantoms included small (3 cm in diameter) cylinder and chest (33x24 cm2) phantom, where both phantoms contained tissue, calcium, and gold. In the simulation studies GNP quantification and background (calcium and tissue) suppression task were pursued. The X-ray detection sensor was represented by an energy resolved photon counting detector (e.g., CdZnTe) with adjustable energy bins. Both ideal and more realistic (12% FWHM energy resolution) implementations of photon counting detector were simulated. The simulations were performed for the CdZnTe detector with pixel pitch of 0.5-1 mm, which corresponds to the performance without significant charge sharing and cross-talk effects. The Rose model was employed to estimate the minimum detectable concentration of GNPs. A figure of merit (FOM) was used to optimize the X-ray beam energy (kVp) to achieve the highest signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) with respect to patient dose. As a result, the successful identification of gold and background suppression was demonstrated. The highest FOM was observed at 125 kVp X-ray beam energy. The minimum detectable GNP concentration was determined to be approximately 1.06 μmol/mL (0.21 mg/mL) for an ideal detector and about 2.5 μmol/mL (0.49 mg/mL) for more realistic (12% FWHM) detector. The studies show the optimal imaging parameters at lowest patient dose using an energy resolved photon counting detector

  8. Photon Counts Statistics in Leukocyte Cell Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Wijk, Eduard; van der Greef, Jan; van Wijk, Roeland

    2011-12-01

    In the present experiment ultra-weak photon emission/ chemiluminescence from isolated neutrophils was recorded. It is associated with the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the "respiratory burst" process which can be activated by PMA (Phorbol 12-Myristate 13-Acetate). Commonly, the reaction is demonstrated utilizing the enhancer luminol. However, with the use of highly sensitive photomultiplier equipment it is also recorded without enhancer. In that case, it can be hypothesized that photon count statistics may assist in understanding the underlying metabolic activity and cooperation of these cells. To study this hypothesis leukocytes were stimulated with PMA and increased photon signals were recorded in the quasi stable period utilizing Fano factor analysis at different window sizes. The Fano factor is defined by the variance over the mean of the number of photon within the observation time. The analysis demonstrated that the Fano factor of true signal and not of the surrogate signals obtained by random shuffling increases when the window size increased. It is concluded that photon count statistics, in particular Fano factor analysis, provides information regarding leukocyte interactions. It opens the perspective to utilize this analytical procedure in (in vivo) inflammation research. However, this needs further validation.

  9. Photon Counting Using Edge-Detection Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gin, Jonathan W.; Nguyen, Danh H.; Farr, William H.

    2010-01-01

    New applications such as high-datarate, photon-starved, free-space optical communications require photon counting at flux rates into gigaphoton-per-second regimes coupled with subnanosecond timing accuracy. Current single-photon detectors that are capable of handling such operating conditions are designed in an array format and produce output pulses that span multiple sample times. In order to discern one pulse from another and not to overcount the number of incoming photons, a detection algorithm must be applied to the sampled detector output pulses. As flux rates increase, the ability to implement such a detection algorithm becomes difficult within a digital processor that may reside within a field-programmable gate array (FPGA). Systems have been developed and implemented to both characterize gigahertz bandwidth single-photon detectors, as well as process photon count signals at rates into gigaphotons per second in order to implement communications links at SCPPM (serial concatenated pulse position modulation) encoded data rates exceeding 100 megabits per second with efficiencies greater than two bits per detected photon. A hardware edge-detection algorithm and corresponding signal combining and deserialization hardware were developed to meet these requirements at sample rates up to 10 GHz. The photon discriminator deserializer hardware board accepts four inputs, which allows for the ability to take inputs from a quadphoton counting detector, to support requirements for optical tracking with a reduced number of hardware components. The four inputs are hardware leading-edge detected independently. After leading-edge detection, the resultant samples are ORed together prior to deserialization. The deserialization is performed to reduce the rate at which data is passed to a digital signal processor, perhaps residing within an FPGA. The hardware implements four separate analog inputs that are connected through RF connectors. Each analog input is fed to a high-speed 1

  10. A Ring Artifact Correction Method: Validation by Micro-CT Imaging with Flat-Panel Detectors and a 2D Photon-Counting Detector

    PubMed Central

    Eldib, Mohamed Elsayed; Hegazy, Mohamed; Mun, Yang Ji; Cho, Myung Hye; Cho, Min Hyoung; Lee, Soo Yeol

    2017-01-01

    We introduce an efficient ring artifact correction method for a cone-beam computed tomography (CT). In the first step, we correct the defective pixels whose values are close to zero or saturated in the projection domain. In the second step, we compute the mean value at each detector element along the view angle in the sinogram to obtain the one-dimensional (1D) mean vector, and we then compute the 1D correction vector by taking inverse of the mean vector. We multiply the correction vector with the sinogram row by row over all view angles. In the third step, we apply a Gaussian filter on the difference image between the original CT image and the corrected CT image obtained in the previous step. The filtered difference image is added to the corrected CT image to compensate the possible contrast anomaly that may appear due to the contrast change in the sinogram after removing stripe artifacts. We applied the proposed method to the projection data acquired by two flat-panel detectors (FPDs) and a silicon-based photon-counting X-ray detector (PCXD). Micro-CT imaging experiments of phantoms and a small animal have shown that the proposed method can greatly reduce ring artifacts regardless of detector types. Despite the great reduction of ring artifacts, the proposed method does not compromise the original spatial resolution and contrast. PMID:28146088

  11. A Ring Artifact Correction Method: Validation by Micro-CT Imaging with Flat-Panel Detectors and a 2D Photon-Counting Detector.

    PubMed

    Eldib, Mohamed Elsayed; Hegazy, Mohamed; Mun, Yang Ji; Cho, Myung Hye; Cho, Min Hyoung; Lee, Soo Yeol

    2017-01-30

    We introduce an efficient ring artifact correction method for a cone-beam computed tomography (CT). In the first step, we correct the defective pixels whose values are close to zero or saturated in the projection domain. In the second step, we compute the mean value at each detector element along the view angle in the sinogram to obtain the one-dimensional (1D) mean vector, and we then compute the 1D correction vector by taking inverse of the mean vector. We multiply the correction vector with the sinogram row by row over all view angles. In the third step, we apply a Gaussian filter on the difference image between the original CT image and the corrected CT image obtained in the previous step. The filtered difference image is added to the corrected CT image to compensate the possible contrast anomaly that may appear due to the contrast change in the sinogram after removing stripe artifacts. We applied the proposed method to the projection data acquired by two flat-panel detectors (FPDs) and a silicon-based photon-counting X-ray detector (PCXD). Micro-CT imaging experiments of phantoms and a small animal have shown that the proposed method can greatly reduce ring artifacts regardless of detector types. Despite the great reduction of ring artifacts, the proposed method does not compromise the original spatial resolution and contrast.

  12. Photon counting micrometer and video CCD.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tie, Qiongxian; Li, Chennfei

    The structure and observational method of the photon counting slotted micrometer are proposed. The micrometer is made up of a piece of slotted plate and a photomultiplier. The photon counting micrometer is replaced by a video CCD for regular trial observation and as a test for the equipment of one scientific CCD, because the micrometer transmission in the instrumental vertical angle transmission mechanism is dull, and the telescope is not able to observe regularly since the optical axis changes greatly as the telescope points to different vertical distance. The video CCD is fixed in the course of observation, recording a picture every forty milliseconds, or one hundred pictures within four seconds, resulting in simultaneously after smoothing treatment the moment and stellar zenith distance when a star passes through the meridian or prime vertical.

  13. High resolution cross strip anodes for photon counting detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegmund, O. H. W.; Tremsin, A. S.; Vallerga, J. V.; Abiad, R.; Hull, J.

    2003-05-01

    A new photon counting, imaging readout for microchannel plate sensors, the cross strip (XS) anode, has been investigated. Charge centroiding of signals detected on two orthogonal layers of sense strip sets are used to derive photon locations. The XS anode spatial resolution (<3 μm FWHM) exceeds the spatial resolution of most direct charge sensing anodes, and does so at low gain (<2×10 6). The image linearity and fidelity are high enough to resolve and map 7 μm MCP pores, offering new possibilities for astronomical and other applications.

  14. A Monte Carlo simulation study of an improved K-edge log-subtraction X-ray imaging using a photon counting CdTe detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Youngjin; Lee, Amy Candy; Kim, Hee-Joung

    2016-09-01

    Recently, significant effort has been spent on the development of photons counting detector (PCD) based on a CdTe for applications in X-ray imaging system. The motivation of developing PCDs is higher image quality. Especially, the K-edge subtraction (KES) imaging technique using a PCD is able to improve image quality and useful for increasing the contrast resolution of a target material by utilizing contrast agent. Based on above-mentioned technique, we presented an idea for an improved K-edge log-subtraction (KELS) imaging technique. The KELS imaging technique based on the PCDs can be realized by using different subtraction energy width of the energy window. In this study, the effects of the KELS imaging technique and subtraction energy width of the energy window was investigated with respect to the contrast, standard deviation, and CNR with a Monte Carlo simulation. We simulated the PCD X-ray imaging system based on a CdTe and polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) phantom which consists of the various iodine contrast agents. To acquired KELS images, images of the phantom using above and below the iodine contrast agent K-edge absorption energy (33.2 keV) have been acquired at different energy range. According to the results, the contrast and standard deviation were decreased, when subtraction energy width of the energy window is increased. Also, the CNR using a KELS imaging technique is higher than that of the images acquired by using whole energy range. Especially, the maximum differences of CNR between whole energy range and KELS images using a 1, 2, and 3 mm diameter iodine contrast agent were acquired 11.33, 8.73, and 8.29 times, respectively. Additionally, the optimum subtraction energy width of the energy window can be acquired at 5, 4, and 3 keV for the 1, 2, and 3 mm diameter iodine contrast agent, respectively. In conclusion, we successfully established an improved KELS imaging technique and optimized subtraction energy width of the energy window, and based on

  15. 15Mcps photon-counting X-ray computed tomography system using a ZnO-MPPC detector and its application to gadolinium imaging.

    PubMed

    Sato, Eiichi; Sugimura, Shigeaki; Endo, Haruyuki; Oda, Yasuyuki; Abudurexiti, Abulajiang; Hagiwara, Osahiko; Osawa, Akihiro; Matsukiyo, Hiroshi; Enomoto, Toshiyuki; Watanabe, Manabu; Kusachi, Shinya; Sato, Shigehiro; Ogawa, Akira; Onagawa, Jun

    2012-01-01

    15Mcps photon-counting X-ray computed tomography (CT) system is a first-generation type and consists of an X-ray generator, a turntable, a translation stage, a two-stage controller, a detector consisting of a 2mm-thick zinc-oxide (ZnO) single-crystal scintillator and an MPPC (multipixel photon counter) module, a counter card (CC), and a personal computer (PC). High-speed photon counting was carried out using the detector in the X-ray CT system. The maximum count rate was 15Mcps (mega counts per second) at a tube voltage of 100kV and a tube current of 1.95mA. Tomography is accomplished by repeated translations and rotations of an object, and projection curves of the object are obtained by the translation. The pulses of the event signal from the module are counted by the CC in conjunction with the PC. The minimum exposure time for obtaining a tomogram was 15min, and photon-counting CT was accomplished using gadolinium-based contrast media.

  16. Phase unwrapping in spectral X-ray differential phase-contrast imaging with an energy-resolving photon-counting pixel detector.

    PubMed

    Epple, Franz M; Ehn, Sebastian; Thibault, Pierre; Koehler, Thomas; Potdevin, Guillaume; Herzen, Julia; Pennicard, David; Graafsma, Heinz; Noël, Peter B; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2015-03-01

    Grating-based differential phase-contrast imaging has proven to be feasible with conventional X-ray sources. The polychromatic spectrum generally limits the performance of the interferometer but benefit can be gained with an energy-sensitive detector. In the presented work, we employ the energy-discrimination capability to correct for phase-wrapping artefacts. We propose to use the phase shifts, which are measured in distinct energy bins, to estimate the optimal phase shift in the sense of maximum likelihood. We demonstrate that our method is able to correct for phase-wrapping artefacts, to improve the contrast-to-noise ratio and to reduce beam hardening due to the modelled energy dependency. The method is evaluated on experimental data which are measured with a laboratory Talbot-Lau interferometer equipped with a conventional polychromatic X-ray source and an energy-sensitive photon-counting pixel detector. Our work shows, that spectral imaging is an important step to move differential phase-contrast imaging closer to pre-clinical and clinical applications, where phase wrapping is particularly problematic.

  17. Quantum-enhanced microscopy with binary-outcome photon counting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, G. R.; Yang, W.; Sun, C. P.

    2017-01-01

    Polarized light microscopy using path-entangled N -photon states (i.e., the N00N states) has been demonstrated to surpass the shot-noise limit at very low light illumination. However, the microscopy images suffer from divergence of phase sensitivity, which inevitably reduces the image quality. Here we show that due to experimental imperfections, such a singularity also takes place in the microscopy that uses twin-Fock states of light for illumination. We propose two schemes to completely eliminate this singularity: (i) locking the phase shift sensed by the beams at the optimal working point using a spatially dependent offset phase; (ii) a combination of two binary-outcome photon counting measurements, one with a fixed offset phase and the other without any offset phase. Our observations remain valid for any kind of binary-outcome measurement and may open the way for quantum-enhanced microscopy with high N photon states.

  18. Photon counting detector for the personal radiography inspection system "SIBSCAN"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babichev, E. A.; Baru, S. E.; Grigoriev, D. N.; Leonov, V. V.; Oleynikov, V. P.; Porosev, V. V.; Savinov, G. A.

    2017-02-01

    X-ray detectors operating in the energy integrating mode are successfully used in many different applications. Nevertheless the direct photon counting detectors, having the superior parameters in comparison with the integrating ones, are rarely used yet. One of the reasons for this is the low value of the electrical signal generated by a detected photon. Silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) based scintillation counters have a high detection efficiency, high electronic gain and compact dimensions. This makes them a very attractive candidate to replace routinely used detectors in many fields. More than 10 years ago the digital scanning radiography system based on multistrip ionization chamber (MIC) was suggested at Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics. The detector demonstrates excellent radiation resistance and parameter stability after 5 year operations and an imaging of up to 1000 persons per day. Currently, the installations operate at several Russian airports and at subway stations in some cities. At the present time we design a new detector operating in the photon counting mode, having superior parameters than the gas one, based on scintillator - SiPM assemblies. This detector has close to zero noise, higher quantum efficiency and a count rate capability of more than 5 MHz per channel (20% losses), which leads to better image quality and improved detection capability. The suggested detector technology could be expanded to medical applications.

  19. Performance limits of a single photon counting pixel system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chmeissani, M.; Mikulec, B.

    2001-03-01

    X-ray imaging using hybrid pixel detectors in single photon counting mode is a relatively recent and exciting development. The photon counting mode implies that each pixel has a threshold in energy above which a hit is recorded. Sharing of charge between adjacent pixels would therefore lead to a loss of registered hits and for medical imaging applications to a higher patient dose. This explains why the demand for high spatial resolution and consequently small pixel sizes (<100 μm) motivates the Medipix2 collaboration to study the effects of charge sharing between pixels on system performance. Two different simulation codes are used to simulate the energy loss inside the detector and the charge transport towards the pixel electrodes. The largest contribution to the lateral spreading of charge comes from diffusion and can result in a considerable loss of detection efficiency in photon counting systems for small pixel sizes. The Medipix2 collaboration consists of groups from Barcelona, Cagliari, CEA/Leti DEIN, CERN, Freiburg, Glasgow, Mitthögskolan, Napoli, NIKHEF, MRC lab Cambridge, Pisa, Prague and Sassari.

  20. Fully integrated sub 100ps photon counting platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckley, S. J.; Bellis, S. J.; Rosinger, P.; Jackson, J. C.

    2007-02-01

    Current state of the art high resolution counting modules, specifically designed for high timing resolution applications, are largely based on a computer card format. This has tended to result in a costly solution that is restricted to the computer it resides in. We describe a four channel timing module that interfaces to a computer via a USB port and operates with a resolution of less than 100 picoseconds. The core design of the system is an advanced field programmable gate array (FPGA) interfacing to a precision time interval measurement module, mass memory block and a high speed USB 2.0 serial data port. The FPGA design allows the module to operate in a number of modes allowing both continuous recording of photon events (time-tagging) and repetitive time binning. In time-tag mode the system reports, for each photon event, the high resolution time along with the chronological time (macro time) and the channel ID. The time-tags are uploaded in real time to a host computer via a high speed USB port allowing continuous storage to computer memory of up to 4 millions photons per second. In time-bin mode, binning is carried out with count rates up to 10 million photons per second. Each curve resides in a block of 128,000 time-bins each with a resolution programmable down to less than 100 picoseconds. Each bin has a limit of 65535 hits allowing autonomous curve recording until a bin reaches the maximum count or the system is commanded to halt. Due to the large memory storage, several curves/experiments can be stored in the system prior to uploading to the host computer for analysis. This makes this module ideal for integration into high timing resolution specific applications such as laser ranging and fluorescence lifetime imaging using techniques such as time correlated single photon counting (TCSPC).

  1. Experimental feasibility of multi-energy photon-counting K-edge imaging in pre-clinical computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlomka, J. P.; Roessl, E.; Dorscheid, R.; Dill, S.; Martens, G.; Istel, T.; Bäumer, C.; Herrmann, C.; Steadman, R.; Zeitler, G.; Livne, A.; Proksa, R.

    2008-08-01

    Theoretical considerations predicted the feasibility of K-edge x-ray computed tomography (CT) imaging using energy discriminating detectors with more than two energy bins. This technique enables material-specific imaging in CT, which in combination with high-Z element based contrast agents, opens up possibilities for new medical applications. In this paper, we present a CT system with energy detection capabilities, which was used to demonstrate the feasibility of quantitative K-edge CT imaging experimentally. A phantom was imaged containing PMMA, calcium-hydroxyapatite, water and two contrast agents based on iodine and gadolinium, respectively. Separate images of the attenuation by photoelectric absorption and Compton scattering were reconstructed from energy-resolved projection data using maximum-likelihood basis-component decomposition. The data analysis further enabled the display of images of the individual contrast agents and their concentrations, separated from the anatomical background. Measured concentrations of iodine and gadolinium were in good agreement with the actual concentrations. Prior to the tomographic measurements, the detector response functions for monochromatic illumination using synchrotron radiation were determined in the energy range 25 keV-60 keV. These data were used to calibrate the detector and derive a phenomenological model for the detector response and the energy bin sensitivities.

  2. A high-resolution photon-counting breast CT system with tensor-framelet based iterative image reconstruction for radiation dose reduction

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Huanjun; Gao, Hao; Zhao, Bo; Cho, Hyo-Min; Molloi, Sabee

    2016-01-01

    Both computer simulations and experimental phantom studies were carried out to investigate the radiation dose reduction with tensor framelet based iterative image reconstruction (TFIR) for a dedicated high-resolution spectral breast computed tomography (CT) based on a silicon strip photon-counting detector. The simulation was performed with a 10 cm-diameter water phantom including three contrast materials (polyethylene, 8 mg/ml iodine and B-100 bone-equivalent plastic). In the experimental study, the data were acquired with a 1.3 cm-diameter polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) phantom containing iodine in three concentrations (8, 16 and 32 mg/ml) at various radiation doses (1.2, 2.4 and 3.6 mGy) and then CT images were reconstructed using filtered-back-projection (FBP) technique and TFIR technique, respectively. The image quality between these two techniques was evaluated by the quantitative analysis on contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and spatial resolution that was evaluated using the tasked-based modulation transfer function (MTF). Both simulation and experimental results indicated that the task-based MTF obtained from TFIR reconstruction with one-third of the radiation dose was comparable to that from FBP reconstruction for low contrast target. For high contrast target, TFIR was substantially superior to FBP reconstruction in term of spatial resolution. In addition, TFIR was able to achieve a factor of 1.6 to 1.8 increase in CNR depending on the target contrast level. This study demonstrates that TFIR can reduce the required radiation dose by a factor of two-third for a CT image reconstruction compared to FBP technique. It achieves much better CNR and spatial resolution for high contrast target in addition to retaining similar spatial resolution for low contrast target. This TFIR technique has been implemented with a graphic processing unit (GPU) system and it takes approximately 10 seconds to reconstruct a single-slice CT image, which can be potentially used in a

  3. Negative Avalanche Feedback Detectors for Photon-Counting Optical Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farr, William H.

    2009-01-01

    Negative Avalanche Feedback photon counting detectors with near-infrared spectral sensitivity offer an alternative to conventional Geiger mode avalanche photodiode or phototube detectors for free space communications links at 1 and 1.55 microns. These devices demonstrate linear mode photon counting without requiring any external reset circuitry and may even be operated at room temperature. We have now characterized the detection efficiency, dark count rate, after-pulsing, and single photon jitter for three variants of this new detector class, as well as operated these uniquely simple to use devices in actual photon starved free space optical communications links.

  4. Photon counting modules using RCA silicon avalanche photodiodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lightstone, Alexander W.; Macgregor, Andrew D.; Macsween, Darlene E.; Mcintyre, Robert J.; Trottier, Claude; Webb, Paul P.

    1989-01-01

    Avalanche photodiodes (APD) are excellent small area, solid state detectors for photon counting. Performance possibilities include: photon detection efficiency in excess of 50 percent; wavelength response from 400 to 1000 nm; count rate to 10 (exp 7) counts per sec; afterpulsing at negligible levels; timing resolution better than 1 ns. Unfortunately, these performance levels are not simultaneously available in a single detector amplifier configuration. By considering theoretical performance predictions and previous and new measurements of APD performance, the anticipated performance of a range of proposed APD-based photon counting modules is derived.

  5. Photon Counting Airborne Laser Swath Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, W. E.; Shrestha, R. L.; Slatton, K. C.

    2004-05-01

    During the past decade airborne laser swath mapping (ALSM) has brought topographic mapping to the forefront of geodesy. ALSM has made it possible, for the first time, to study natural geo-surficial processes on spatial scales extending from meters to hundreds of kilometers, all in a consistent geodetic frame of reference. The conventional approach to ALSM has been to use lasers with enough energy per pulse, and optics with large enough collecting areas, to obtain returns of thousands of photons per shot. This approach minimizes the impact of spurious range values caused by noise, such as background solar radiation and sensor thermal noise, but also constrains the minimum size, weight and power consumption of the hardware. Current systems typically operate at rates approaching 100,000 pulses per second, and another order of magnitude increase would be needed to provide contiguous coverage with a spatial resolution of 30 cm or better. This high signal-to-noise ratio approach affords little scalability for significantly downsizing the hardware, or reducing the costs. University of Florida (UF) researchers are developing an ALSM unit based on a different paradigm, which we refer to as photon counting ALSM, or simply PC-ALSM. The approach is to transmit relatively low energy laser pulses, and to illuminate a surface `patch' about an order of magnitude larger than the typical footprint of a conventional ALSM system. The returning signal will have far fewer photons per unit area of the receive optics, making it more difficult to discriminate between return signal and noise. If a single channel detector were used, the spatial resolution would also be degraded. However, by using a multi-channel photomultiplier tube to detect the returns, the surface patch can be divided into an array of groundals, and by using a multi-stop timing system false ranges can be filtered out of the data during post flight processing. Researchers at NASA GSFC have already tested a first generation

  6. Improvement in the energy resolving capabilities of photon counting detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, D.; Lim, K. T.; Park, K.; Cho, G.

    2016-12-01

    Patterned pixel array was proposed to increase the number of energy bins in a single pixel of photon counting detectors without adding more comparators and counters. The pixels were grouped into four different types and each pixel has a common threshold and a specific threshold assigned to each pixel type. The common threshold in every pixel records the total number of incident photons regardless of its pixel type and the specific thresholds classify incident photon energies. The patterned pixel array was evaluated with the pinhole gamma camera system based on the XRI-UNO detector flip-chip bonded with a 1mm thick CdTe sensor. The experimental data was acquired with time-over-threshold mode to avoid the charge sharing problem. The shared total charges created by one photon can be found by summing all pixels within the cluster. To correct the different response to the same energy of photon, the energy calibration of the time-over-threshold value was perfomed independently depending on the cluster size. The time-over-threshold values were separated into two energy bins since we assumed that each pixel has two thresholds. Although each pixel has only two thresholds, five images from different energy windows were obtained by sharing the spectal information from four adjacent pixels. Thus, degradation of the spatial resolution in the image occured in each energy window. The image of the entire energy, however, was not degraded since all four different types of pixels have a common threshold just above the noise level. In addition, the number of steps for the threshold scan method can be drastically reduced with the increased number of effective thresholds in a single pixel.

  7. Maturing CCD Photon-Counting Technology for Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mallik, Udayan; Lyon, Richard; Petrone, Peter; McElwain, Michael; Benford, Dominic; Clampin, Mark; Hicks, Brian

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses charge blooming and starlight saturation - two potential technical problems - when using an Electron Multiplying Charge Coupled Device (EMCCD) type detector in a high-contrast instrument for imaging exoplanets. These problems especially affect an interferometric type coronagraph - coronagraphs that do not use a mask to physically block starlight in the science channel of the instrument. These problems are presented using images taken with a commercial Princeton Instrument EMCCD camera in the Goddard Space Flight Center's (GSFC), Interferometric Coronagraph facility. In addition, this paper discusses techniques to overcome such problems. This paper also discusses the development and architecture of a Field Programmable Gate Array and Digital-to-Analog Converter based shaped clock controller for a photon-counting EMCCD camera. The discussion contained here will inform high-contrast imaging groups in their work with EMCCD detectors.

  8. Beam hardening artefacts in computed tomography with photon counting, charge integrating and energy weighting detectors: a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Shikhaliev, Polad M

    2005-12-21

    Photon counting x-ray imaging provides efficient rejection of the electronics noise, no pulse height (Swank) noise, less noise due to optimal photon energy weighting and the possibility of energy resolved image acquisition. These advantages apply also to CT when projection data are acquired using a photon counting detector. However, photon counting detectors assign a weighting factor of 1 to all detected photons whereas the weighting factor of a charge integrating detector is proportional to the energy of the detected photon. Therefore, data collected by photon counting and charge integrating detectors represent the 'hardening' of the photon beam passed through the object differently. This affects the beam hardening artefacts in the reconstructed CT images. This work represents the first comparative evaluation of the effect of photon counting, charge integrating and energy weighting photon detectors on beam hardening artefacts in CT. Beam hardening artefacts in CT images were evaluated for 20 cm and 14 cm diameter water cylinders with bone and low contrast inserts, at 120 kVp and 90 kVp x-ray tube voltages, respectively. It was shown that charge integrating results in 1.8% less beam hardening artefacts from bone inserts (i.e., CT numbers in the 'shadow' of the bone are less by 1.8% as compared to CT numbers over the periphery of the image), as compared to photon counting. However, optimal photon energy weighting, which provides highest SNR, results in 7.7% higher beam hardening artefacts from bone inserts as compared to photon counting. The magnitude of the 'cupping' artefacts was lower by 1% for charge integrating and higher by 6.1% for energy weighting acquisitions as compared to photon counting. Only the photon counting systems provide an accurate representation of the beam hardening effect due to its flat energy weighting. Because of their energy dependent weighting factors, the charge integrating and energy weighting systems do not provide accurate

  9. Avalanche photodiode photon counting receivers for space-borne lidars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Xiaoli; Davidson, Frederic M.

    1991-01-01

    Avalanche photodiodes (APD) are studied for uses as photon counting detectors in spaceborne lidars. Non-breakdown APD photon counters, in which the APD's are biased below the breakdown point, are shown to outperform: (1) conventional APD photon counters biased above the breakdown point; (2) conventional APD photon counters biased above the breakdown point; and (3) APD's in analog mode when the received optical signal is extremely weak. Non-breakdown APD photon counters were shown experimentally to achieve an effective photon counting quantum efficiency of 5.0 percent at lambda = 820 nm with a dead time of 15 ns and a dark count rate of 7000/s which agreed with the theoretically predicted values. The interarrival times of the counts followed an exponential distribution and the counting statistics appeared to follow a Poisson distribution with no after pulsing. It is predicted that the effective photon counting quantum efficiency can be improved to 18.7 percent at lambda = 820 nm and 1.46 percent at lambda = 1060 nm with a dead time of a few nanoseconds by using more advanced commercially available electronic components.

  10. The photon counting histogram in fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Y; Müller, J D; So, P T; Gratton, E

    1999-01-01

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) is generally used to obtain information about the number of fluorescent particles in a small volume and the diffusion coefficient from the autocorrelation function of the fluorescence signal. Here we demonstrate that photon counting histogram (PCH) analysis constitutes a novel tool for extracting quantities from fluorescence fluctuation data, i.e., the measured photon counts per molecule and the average number of molecules within the observation volume. The photon counting histogram of fluorescence fluctuation experiments, in which few molecules are present in the excitation volume, exhibits a super-Poissonian behavior. The additional broadening of the PCH compared to a Poisson distribution is due to fluorescence intensity fluctuations. For diffusing particles these intensity fluctuations are caused by an inhomogeneous excitation profile and the fluctuations in the number of particles in the observation volume. The quantitative relationship between the detected photon counts and the fluorescence intensity reaching the detector is given by Mandel's formula. Based on this equation and considering the fluorescence intensity distribution in the two-photon excitation volume, a theoretical expression for the PCH as a function of the number of molecules in the excitation volume is derived. For a single molecular species two parameters are sufficient to characterize the histogram completely, namely the average number of molecules within the observation volume and the detected photon counts per molecule per sampling time epsilon. The PCH for multiple molecular species, on the other hand, is generated by successively convoluting the photon counting distribution of each species with the others. The influence of the excitation profile upon the photon counting statistics for two relevant point spread functions (PSFs), the three-dimensional Gaussian PSF conventionally employed in confocal detection and the square of the Gaussian

  11. Photon Counting Chirped AM Ladar: Concept, Simulation, and Experimental Results

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-11-01

    sensitivity. This noise is well above the signal shot noise limit. We are developing a method using Geiger -mode avalanche photodiode (Gm-APD) photon counting...Reports, 1215 Jefferson Davis Highway, Suite 1204, Arlington VA 22202-4302. Respondents should be aware that notwithstanding any other provision of law ...photon counting receiver bandwidth, and therefore, sets the minimum achievable timing/range resolution. The inverse of the dead time sets the upper

  12. Feasibility of Amorphous Selenium Based Photon Counting Detectors for Digital Breast Tomosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.; O'Connor, P.; Lehnert, J., De Geronimo, G., Dolazza, E., Tousignant, O., Laperriere, L., Greenspan, J., Zhao, W.

    2009-02-27

    Amorphous selenium (a-Se) has been incorporated successfully in direct conversion flat panel x-ray detectors, and has demonstrated superior image quality in screening mammography and digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) under energy integration mode. The present work explores the potential of a-Se for photon counting detectors in DBT. We investigated major factors contributing to the variation in the charge collected by a pixel upon absorption of each x-ray photon. These factors included x-ray photon interaction, detector geometry, charge transport, and the pulse shaping and noise properties of the photon counting readout circuit. Experimental measurements were performed on a linear array test structure constructed by evaporating an a-Se layer onto an array of 100 {mu}m pitch strip electrodes, which are connected to a 32 channel low noise photon counting integrated circuit. The measured pulse height spectrum (PHS) under polychromatic xray exposure was interpreted quantitatively using the factors identified. Based on the understanding of a-Se photon counting performance, design parameters were proposed for a 2D detector with high quantum efficiency and count rate that could meet the requirements of photon counting detector for DBT.

  13. Photon counting spectroscopy as done with a Thomson scattering diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Den Hartog, D.J.; Ruppert, D.E.

    1993-11-01

    The measurement and reduction of photon counting spectral data is demonstrated within the context of a Thomson scattering diagnostic. This diagnostic contains a microchannel plate (MCP) photomultiplier tube (PMT) as the photon sensing device. The MCP PMT is not an ideal photon sensor, the loss of photoelectrons at the MCP input and the broad charge pulse distribution at the output add to the uncertainty in recorded data. Computer simulations are used to demonstrate an approach to quantification of this added uncertainty and to develop an understanding of its source; the methodology may be applicable to the development of an understanding of photon detectors other than an MCP PMT. Emphasis is placed on the Poisson statistical character of the data, because the assumption that a Gaussian probability distribution is a reasonable statistical description of photon counting data is often questionable. When the count rate is low, the product the possible number of photon counts and the probability of measurement of a single photon is usually not sufficiently large to justify Gaussian statistics. Rather, because probabilities of measurement are so low, the Poisson probability distribution best quantifies the inherent statistical fluctuations in such counting measurements. The method of maximum likelihood is applied to derive the Poisson statistics equivalent of {sub X}{sup 2}. A Poisson statistics based data fitting code is implemented using the Newton-Raphson method of multi-dimensional root finding; we also demonstrate an algorithm to estimate the uncertainties in derived quantities.

  14. Single photon counting fluorescence lifetime detection of pericellular oxygen concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosny, Neveen A.; Lee, David A.; Knight, Martin M.

    2012-01-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy offers a non-invasive method for quantifying local oxygen concentrations. However, existing methods are either invasive, require custom-made systems, or show limited spatial resolution. Therefore, these methods are unsuitable for investigation of pericellular oxygen concentrations. This study describes an adaptation of commercially available equipment which has been optimized for quantitative extracellular oxygen detection with high lifetime accuracy and spatial resolution while avoiding systematic photon pile-up. The oxygen sensitive fluorescent dye, tris(2,2'-bipyridyl)ruthenium(II) chloride hexahydrate [Ru(bipy)3]2+, was excited using a two-photon excitation laser. Lifetime was measured using a Becker & Hickl time-correlated single photon counting, which will be referred to as a TCSPC card. [Ru(bipy)3]2+ characterization studies quantified the influences of temperature, pH, cellular culture media and oxygen on the fluorescence lifetime measurements. This provided a precisely calibrated and accurate system for quantification of pericellular oxygen concentration based on measured lifetimes. Using this technique, quantification of oxygen concentrations around isolated viable chondrocytes, seeded in three-dimensional agarose gel, revealed a subpopulation of cells that exhibited significant spatial oxygen gradients such that oxygen concentration reduced with increasing proximity to the cell. This technique provides a powerful tool for quantifying spatial oxygen gradients within three-dimensional cellular models.

  15. Photon counting detector array algorithms for deep space optical communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, Meera; Andrews, Kenneth S.; Farr, William H.; Wong, Andre

    2016-03-01

    For deep-space optical communications systems utilizing an uplink optical beacon, a single-photon-counting detector array on the flight terminal can be used to simultaneously perform uplink tracking and communications as well as accurate downlink pointing at photon-starved (pW=m2) power levels. In this paper, we discuss concepts and algorithms for uplink signal acquisition, tracking, and parameter estimation using a photon-counting camera. Statistical models of detector output data and signal processing algorithms are presented, incorporating realistic effects such as Earth background and detector/readout blocking. Analysis and simulation results are validated against measured laboratory data using state-of-the-art commercial photon-counting detector arrays, demonstrating sub-microradian tracking errors under channel conditions representative of deep space optical links.

  16. Photon counting readout pixel array in 0.18-μm CMOS technology for on-line gamma-ray imaging of 103palladium seeds for permanent breast seed implant (PBSI) brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldan, A. H.; Karim, K. S.; Reznik, A.; Caldwell, C. B.; Rowlands, J. A.

    2008-03-01

    Permanent breast seed implant (PBSI) brachytherapy technique was recently introduced as an alternative to high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy and involves the permanent implantation of radioactive 103Palladium seeds into the surgical cavity of the breast for cancer treatment. To enable accurate seed implantation, this research introduces a gamma camera based on a hybrid amorphous selenium detector and CMOS readout pixel architecture for real-time imaging of 103Palladium seeds during the PBSI procedure. A prototype chip was designed and fabricated in 0.18-μm n-well CMOS process. We present the experimental results obtained from this integrated photon counting readout pixel.

  17. Lossless compression of projection data from photon counting detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shunhavanich, Picha; Pelc, Norbert J.

    2016-03-01

    With many attractive attributes, photon counting detectors with many energy bins are being considered for clinical CT systems. In practice, a large amount of projection data acquired for multiple energy bins must be transferred in real time through slip rings and data storage subsystems, causing a bandwidth bottleneck problem. The higher resolution of these detectors and the need for faster acquisition additionally contribute to this issue. In this work, we introduce a new approach to lossless compression, specifically for projection data from photon counting detectors, by utilizing the dependencies in the multi-energy data. The proposed predictor estimates the value of a projection data sample as a weighted average of its neighboring samples and an approximation from other energy bins, and the prediction residuals are then encoded. Context modeling using three or four quantized local gradients is also employed to detect edge characteristics of the data. Using three simulated phantoms including a head phantom, compression of 2.3:1-2.4:1 was achieved. The proposed predictor using zero, three, and four gradient contexts was compared to JPEG-LS and the ideal predictor (noiseless projection data). Among our proposed predictors, three-gradient context is preferred with a compression ratio from Golomb coding 7% higher than JPEG-LS and only 3% lower than the ideal predictor. In encoder efficiency, the Golomb code with the proposed three-gradient contexts has higher compression than block floating point. We also propose a lossy compression scheme, which quantizes the prediction residuals with scalar uniform quantization using quantization boundaries that limit the ratio of quantization error variance to quantum noise variance. Applying our proposed predictor with three-gradient context, the lossy compression achieved a compression ratio of 3.3:1 but inserted a 2.1% standard deviation of error compared to that of quantum noise in reconstructed images. From the initial

  18. Extending single-photon optimized superconducting transition edge sensors beyond the single-photon counting regime.

    PubMed

    Gerrits, Thomas; Calkins, Brice; Tomlin, Nathan; Lita, Adriana E; Migdall, Alan; Mirin, Richard; Nam, Sae Woo

    2012-10-08

    Typically, transition edge sensors resolve photon number of up to 10 or 20 photons, depending on the wavelength and TES design. We extend that dynamic range up to 1000 photons, while maintaining sub-shot noise detection process uncertainty of the number of detected photons and beyond that show a monotonic response up to ≈ 6 · 10(6) photons in a single light pulse. This mode of operation, which heats the sensor far beyond its transition edge into the normal conductive regime, offers a technique for connecting single-photon-counting measurements to radiant-power measurements at picowatt levels. Connecting these two usually incompatible operating regimes in a single detector offers significant potential for directly tying photon counting measurements to conventional cryogenic radiometric standards. In addition, our measurements highlight the advantages of a photon-number state source over a coherent pulse source as a tool for characterizing such a detector.

  19. Photon-counting spectral phase-contrast mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fredenberg, E.; Roessl, E.; Koehler, T.; van Stevendaal, U.; Schulze-Wenck, I.; Wieberneit, N.; Stampanoni, M.; Wang, Z.; Kubik-Huch, R. A.; Hauser, N.; Lundqvist, M.; Danielsson, M.; Åslund, M.

    2012-03-01

    Phase-contrast imaging is an emerging technology that may increase the signal-difference-to-noise ratio in medical imaging. One of the most promising phase-contrast techniques is Talbot interferometry, which, combined with energy-sensitive photon-counting detectors, enables spectral differential phase-contrast mammography. We have evaluated a realistic system based on this technique by cascaded-systems analysis and with a task-dependent ideal-observer detectability index as a figure-of-merit. Beam-propagation simulations were used for validation and illustration of the analytical framework. Differential phase contrast improved detectability compared to absorption contrast, in particular for fine tumor structures. This result was supported by images of human mastectomy samples that were acquired with a conventional detector. The optimal incident energy was higher in differential phase contrast than in absorption contrast when disregarding the setup design energy. Further, optimal weighting of the transmitted spectrum was found to have a weaker energy dependence than for absorption contrast. Taking the design energy into account yielded a superimposed maximum on both detectability as a function of incident energy, and on optimal weighting. Spectral material decomposition was not facilitated by phase contrast, but phase information may be used instead of spectral information.

  20. Progress towards photon-counting infrared arrays for interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buscher, David F.; Seneta, Eugene B.; Sun, Xiaowei; Young, John S.; Finger, Gert

    2016-08-01

    The advent of low-dark-current eAPD arrays in the near infrared ushers in the possibility for photon-counting, high quantum efficiency detectors at these wavelengths. Such detectors would revolutionise the sensitivity of interferometry because near-infrared wavelengths are at the "sweet spot" between the corrupting effects of atmospheric seeing at shorter wavelengths and thermal noise at longer wavelengths. We report on laboratory experiments with cooled Selex Saphira detectors aimed at demonstrating photon-counting performance with these devices by exploiting enhanced avalanche gain and multiple non-destructive readouts. We explain the optimum modes for employing these detectors in interferometry.

  1. Species-resolved imaging and gated photon counting spectroscopy of laser ablation plume dynamics during KrF- and ArF-laser PLD of amorphous diamond films

    SciTech Connect

    Geohegan, D.B.; Puretzky, A.A.

    1995-12-01

    Gated photon counting spectroscopy and species-resolved ICCD photography were used to study the weak plasma luminescence following the propagation of the initial ablation plume in vacuum and during the rebound of the plume with a substrate during pulsed laser deposition of amorphous diamond. These methods techniques were required in order to investigate notable differences between amorphous diamond-like carbon films formed by pulsed laser deposition from ArF (193 nm) and KrF (248 nm) irradiation of pyrolytic graphite in vacuum. Three principal regions of plume emission were found: (1) a bright luminescent ball (v {approximately}3--5 cm/{mu}s) displaying nearly entirely C{sup +} emission which appears to result from laser interaction with the initial ejecta, (2) a spherical ball of emission (v {approximately} 1 cm/{mu}s) displaying neutral carbon atomic emission lines and, at early times, jets of excited C{sub 2}, and (3) a well-defined region of broadband emission (v {approximately} 0.3 cm/{mu}s) near the target surface first containing emission bands from C{sub 2}, then weak, continuum emission thought to result from C{sub 3} and higher clusters and/or blackbody emission from hot clusters or nanoparticles.

  2. Imaging of Lactobacillus brevis single cells and microcolonies without a microscope by an ultrasensitive chemiluminescent enzyme immunoassay with a photon-counting television camera.

    PubMed Central

    Yasui, T; Yoda, K

    1997-01-01

    An ultrasensitive chemiluminescent enzyme immunoassay (CLEIA) was developed for the rapid detection and quantification of Lactobacillus brevis contaminants in beer and pitching yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae slurry collected for reinoculation). L. brevis cells trapped on a 47-mm nucleopore membrane (0.4-micron pore size) were reacted with a peroxidase-labelled Lactobacillus group E antibody and then subjected to an enhanced CLEIA analysis with 4-iodophenol as the enhancer. The combination of a nucleopore membrane with low background characteristics that enables the antigen-antibody reaction to proceed through the pores of the membrane and a labelled antibody prepared by the maleimide hinge method with minimal nonspecific binding characteristics was essential to minimize background in the detection of single cells. An ultrahigh sensitive charge-coupled device (CCD) camera equipped with a fiber optics image intensifier permitted the imaging of single cells. A clear correlation existed between the number of luminescent spots observed and the plate count [y (CLEIA) = 0.990x (plate count) + 15.9, where n = 7, r = 0.993, and P < 0.001]. Microscopic observation confirmed that the luminescent spots were produced by single cells. This assay could be used to detect approximately 20 L. brevis cells in 633 ml of beer within 4 h. Our ultrasensitive CLEIA could also be used to detect microcolonies approximately 20 microns in diameter which had formed on a membrane after 15 to 18 h of incubation. This method, which we called the microcolony immunoluminescence (MIL) method, increased the signal-to-noise ratio dramatically. The MIL method could be used to detect a 10(0) level of L. brevis contamination in 633 ml of beer and a 1/10(8) level of L. brevis contamination in pitching yeast within 1 day (15 to 18 h to form microcolonies and 2 h for CLEIA). PMID:9361439

  3. Imaging of Lactobacillus brevis single cells and microcolonies without a microscope by an ultrasensitive chemiluminescent enzyme immunoassay with a photon-counting television camera.

    PubMed

    Yasui, T; Yoda, K

    1997-11-01

    An ultrasensitive chemiluminescent enzyme immunoassay (CLEIA) was developed for the rapid detection and quantification of Lactobacillus brevis contaminants in beer and pitching yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae slurry collected for reinoculation). L. brevis cells trapped on a 47-mm nucleopore membrane (0.4-micron pore size) were reacted with a peroxidase-labelled Lactobacillus group E antibody and then subjected to an enhanced CLEIA analysis with 4-iodophenol as the enhancer. The combination of a nucleopore membrane with low background characteristics that enables the antigen-antibody reaction to proceed through the pores of the membrane and a labelled antibody prepared by the maleimide hinge method with minimal nonspecific binding characteristics was essential to minimize background in the detection of single cells. An ultrahigh sensitive charge-coupled device (CCD) camera equipped with a fiber optics image intensifier permitted the imaging of single cells. A clear correlation existed between the number of luminescent spots observed and the plate count [y (CLEIA) = 0.990x (plate count) + 15.9, where n = 7, r = 0.993, and P < 0.001]. Microscopic observation confirmed that the luminescent spots were produced by single cells. This assay could be used to detect approximately 20 L. brevis cells in 633 ml of beer within 4 h. Our ultrasensitive CLEIA could also be used to detect microcolonies approximately 20 microns in diameter which had formed on a membrane after 15 to 18 h of incubation. This method, which we called the microcolony immunoluminescence (MIL) method, increased the signal-to-noise ratio dramatically. The MIL method could be used to detect a 10(0) level of L. brevis contamination in 633 ml of beer and a 1/10(8) level of L. brevis contamination in pitching yeast within 1 day (15 to 18 h to form microcolonies and 2 h for CLEIA).

  4. The piecewise-linear dynamic attenuator reduces the impact of count rate loss with photon-counting detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Scott S.; Pelc, Norbert J.

    2014-06-01

    Photon counting x-ray detectors (PCXDs) offer several advantages compared to standard energy-integrating x-ray detectors, but also face significant challenges. One key challenge is the high count rates required in CT. At high count rates, PCXDs exhibit count rate loss and show reduced detective quantum efficiency in signal-rich (or high flux) measurements. In order to reduce count rate requirements, a dynamic beam-shaping filter can be used to redistribute flux incident on the patient. We study the piecewise-linear attenuator in conjunction with PCXDs without energy discrimination capabilities. We examined three detector models: the classic nonparalyzable and paralyzable detector models, and a ‘hybrid’ detector model which is a weighted average of the two which approximates an existing, real detector (Taguchi et al 2011 Med. Phys. 38 1089-102 ). We derive analytic expressions for the variance of the CT measurements for these detectors. These expressions are used with raw data estimated from DICOM image files of an abdomen and a thorax to estimate variance in reconstructed images for both the dynamic attenuator and a static beam-shaping (‘bowtie’) filter. By redistributing flux, the dynamic attenuator reduces dose by 40% without increasing peak variance for the ideal detector. For non-ideal PCXDs, the impact of count rate loss is also reduced. The nonparalyzable detector shows little impact from count rate loss, but with the paralyzable model, count rate loss leads to noise streaks that can be controlled with the dynamic attenuator. With the hybrid model, the characteristic count rates required before noise streaks dominate the reconstruction are reduced by a factor of 2 to 3. We conclude that the piecewise-linear attenuator can reduce the count rate requirements of the PCXD in addition to improving dose efficiency. The magnitude of this reduction depends on the detector, with paralyzable detectors showing much greater benefit than nonparalyzable detectors.

  5. The piecewise-linear dynamic attenuator reduces the impact of count rate loss with photon-counting detectors.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Scott S; Pelc, Norbert J

    2014-06-07

    Photon counting x-ray detectors (PCXDs) offer several advantages compared to standard energy-integrating x-ray detectors, but also face significant challenges. One key challenge is the high count rates required in CT. At high count rates, PCXDs exhibit count rate loss and show reduced detective quantum efficiency in signal-rich (or high flux) measurements. In order to reduce count rate requirements, a dynamic beam-shaping filter can be used to redistribute flux incident on the patient. We study the piecewise-linear attenuator in conjunction with PCXDs without energy discrimination capabilities. We examined three detector models: the classic nonparalyzable and paralyzable detector models, and a 'hybrid' detector model which is a weighted average of the two which approximates an existing, real detector (Taguchi et al 2011 Med. Phys. 38 1089-102). We derive analytic expressions for the variance of the CT measurements for these detectors. These expressions are used with raw data estimated from DICOM image files of an abdomen and a thorax to estimate variance in reconstructed images for both the dynamic attenuator and a static beam-shaping ('bowtie') filter. By redistributing flux, the dynamic attenuator reduces dose by 40% without increasing peak variance for the ideal detector. For non-ideal PCXDs, the impact of count rate loss is also reduced. The nonparalyzable detector shows little impact from count rate loss, but with the paralyzable model, count rate loss leads to noise streaks that can be controlled with the dynamic attenuator. With the hybrid model, the characteristic count rates required before noise streaks dominate the reconstruction are reduced by a factor of 2 to 3. We conclude that the piecewise-linear attenuator can reduce the count rate requirements of the PCXD in addition to improving dose efficiency. The magnitude of this reduction depends on the detector, with paralyzable detectors showing much greater benefit than nonparalyzable detectors.

  6. Novel Photon-Counting Detectors for Free-Space Communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krainak, Michael A.; Yang, Guan; Sun, Xiaoli; Lu, Wei; Merritt, Scott; Beck, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    We present performance data for novel photon counting detectors for free space optical communication. NASA GSFC is testing the performance of three novel photon counting detectors 1) a 2x8 mercury cadmium telluride avalanche array made by DRS Inc. 2) a commercial 2880 silicon avalanche photodiode array and 3) a prototype resonant cavity silicon avalanche photodiode array. We will present and compare dark count, photon detection efficiency, wavelength response and communication performance data for these detectors. We discuss system wavelength trades and architectures for optimizing overall communication link sensitivity, data rate and cost performance. The HgCdTe APD array has photon detection efficiencies of greater than 50 were routinely demonstrated across 5 arrays, with one array reaching a maximum PDE of 70. High resolution pixel-surface spot scans were performed and the junction diameters of the diodes were measured. The junction diameter was decreased from 31 m to 25 m resulting in a 2x increase in e-APD gain from 470 on the 2010 array to 1100 on the array delivered to NASA GSFC. Mean single photon SNRs of over 12 were demonstrated at excess noise factors of 1.2-1.3.The commercial silicon APD array has a fast output with rise times of 300ps and pulse widths of 600ps. Received and filtered signals from the entire array are multiplexed onto this single fast output. The prototype resonant cavity silicon APD array is being developed for use at 1 micron wavelength.

  7. Correction for nonlinear photon counting effects in lidar systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donovan, D. P.; Whiteway, J. A.; Carswell, A. I.

    1992-01-01

    Photomultiplier tubes (PMT's) employed in the photon counting (PC) mode of operation are widely used as detectors in lidar systems. In our laboratory, we have developed a versatile Nd:YAG lidar which is used for measurement of both the middle atmosphere and the troposphere. With this system, we encounter a very wide range of signal levels ranging from the extremely weak signals from the top of the mesosphere to the very strong returns from low level clouds. Although the system is capable of operating the PMT's in either the analog detection or photon counting mode, we find that often when we use photon counting we have portions of our lidar return which contain very useful information but are not within the linear operating regime of the PC system. We report the results of our efforts to explore the extent to which such high intensity PC signals can be quantitatively analyzed. In particular, a useful model relating the mean 'true' count rate and the observed count rate is presented and it's application to our system demonstrated. This model takes into account the variation in height of the PMT output pulses and the effect of the pulse height discrimination threshold.

  8. Towards a Graphene-Based Low Intensity Photon Counting Photodetector

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Jamie O. D.; Alexander-Webber, Jack A.; Lapington, Jon S.; Roy, Mervyn; Hutchinson, Ian B.; Sagade, Abhay A.; Martin, Marie-Blandine; Braeuninger-Weimer, Philipp; Cabrero-Vilatela, Andrea; Wang, Ruizhi; De Luca, Andrea; Udrea, Florin; Hofmann, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    Graphene is a highly promising material in the development of new photodetector technologies, in particular due its tunable optoelectronic properties, high mobilities and fast relaxation times coupled to its atomic thinness and other unique electrical, thermal and mechanical properties. Optoelectronic applications and graphene-based photodetector technology are still in their infancy, but with a range of device integration and manufacturing approaches emerging this field is progressing quickly. In this review we explore the potential of graphene in the context of existing single photon counting technologies by comparing their performance to simulations of graphene-based single photon counting and low photon intensity photodetection technologies operating in the visible, terahertz and X-ray energy regimes. We highlight the theoretical predictions and current graphene manufacturing processes for these detectors. We show initial experimental implementations and discuss the key challenges and next steps in the development of these technologies. PMID:27563903

  9. Bayesian Blocks: A New Method to Analyze Photon Counting Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scargle, Jeffrey D.; Bloom, Elliott D.; Young, Richard E. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    A Bayesian analysis of photon-counting data leads to a new time-domain algorithm for detecting localized structures (bursts), revealing pulse shapes, and generally characterizing intensity variations. The raw counting data -- time-tag events (TTE), time-to-spill (TTS) data, or binned counts -- is converted to a maximum likelihood segmentation of the observation into time intervals during which the photon arrival rate is perceptibly constant -- i.e. has a fixed intensity without statistically significant variations. The resulting structures, Bayesian Blocks, can be thought of as bins with arbitrary spacing determined by the data. The method itself sets no lower limit to the time scale on which variability can be detected. We have applied the method to RXTE data on Cyg X-1, yielding information on this source's short-time-scale variability.

  10. Novel Photon-Counting Detectors for Free-Space Communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krainak, M. A.; Yang, G.; Sun, X.; Lu, W.; Merritt, S.; Beck, J.

    2016-01-01

    We present performance data for novel photon-counting detectors for free space optical communication. NASA GSFC is testing the performance of two types of novel photon-counting detectors 1) a 2x8 mercury cadmium telluride (HgCdTe) avalanche array made by DRS Inc., and a 2) a commercial 2880-element silicon avalanche photodiode (APD) array. We present and compare dark count, photon-detection efficiency, wavelength response and communication performance data for these detectors. We successfully measured real-time communication performance using both the 2 detected-photon threshold and AND-gate coincidence methods. Use of these methods allows mitigation of dark count, after-pulsing and background noise effects. The HgCdTe APD array routinely demonstrated photon detection efficiencies of greater than 50% across 5 arrays, with one array reaching a maximum PDE of 70%. We performed high-resolution pixel-surface spot scans and measured the junction diameters of its diodes. We found that decreasing the junction diameter from 31 micrometers to 25 micrometers doubled the e- APD gain from 470 for an array produced in the year 2010 to a gain of 1100 on an array delivered to NASA GSFC recently. The mean single-photon SNR was over 12 and the excess noise factors measurements were 1.2-1.3. The commercial silicon APD array exhibited a fast output with rise times of 300 ps and pulse widths of 600 ps. On-chip individually filtered signals from the entire array were multiplexed onto a single fast output.

  11. Energy response calibration of photon-counting detectors using X-ray fluorescence: a feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Cho, H-M; Ding, H; Ziemer, BP; Molloi, S

    2014-01-01

    Accurate energy calibration is critical for the application of energy-resolved photon-counting detectors in spectral imaging. The aim of this study is to investigate the feasibility of energy response calibration and characterization of a photon-counting detector using X-ray fluorescence. A comprehensive Monte Carlo simulation study was performed using Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission (GATE) to investigate the optimal technique for X-ray fluorescence calibration. Simulations were conducted using a 100 kVp tungsten-anode spectra with 2.7 mm Al filter for a single pixel cadmium telluride (CdTe) detector with 3 × 3 mm2 in detection area. The angular dependence of X-ray fluorescence and scatter background was investigated by varying the detection angle from 20° to 170° with respect to the beam direction. The effects of the detector material, shape, and size on the recorded X-ray fluorescence were investigated. The fluorescent material size effect was considered with and without the container for the fluorescent material. In order to provide validation for the simulation result, the angular dependence of X-ray fluorescence from five fluorescent materials was experimentally measured using a spectrometer. Finally, eleven of the fluorescent materials were used for energy calibration of a CZT-based photon-counting detector. The optimal detection angle was determined to be approximately at 120° with respect to the beam direction, which showed the highest fluorescence to scatter ratio (FSR) with a weak dependence on the fluorescent material size. The feasibility of X-ray fluorescence for energy calibration of photon-counting detectors in the diagnostic X-ray energy range was verified by successfully calibrating the energy response of a CZT-based photon-counting detector. The results of this study can be used as a guideline to implement the X-ray fluorescence calibration method for photon-counting detectors in a typical imaging laboratory. PMID:25369288

  12. Photon statistics of light fields based on single-photon-counting modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, G.; Zhang, T. C.; Li, Y.; Wang, J. M.

    2005-02-01

    Single-photon-counting modules (SPCM’s), with their high quantum efficiency, have been widely used to investigate effectively the photon statistics of various light sources, such as the single-photon state and emission light from controlled molecules, atoms, and quantum dots. However, such SPCM’s cannot distinguish the arrivals of one photon and two (or more than two) photons at a moment, which makes measurement correction in real experiments. We analyze the effect of SPCM’s on photon statistics based on the Hanbury-Brown-Twiss configuration when the total efficiency and background are considered, and it shows that the measured second-order degree of coherence and Mandel Q factor for different quantum states, including single-photon states and squeezed vacuum states, are corrected in different forms. A way of determining the squeezing of a squeezed vacuum state based on single-photon detection is presented.

  13. Direct charge sharing observation in single-photon-counting pixel detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellegrini, G.; Maiorino, M.; Blanchot, G.; Chmeissani, M.; Garcia, J.; Lozano, M.; Martinez, R.; Puigdengoles, C.; Ullan, M.

    2007-04-01

    In photon-counting imaging devices, charge sharing can limit the detector spatial resolution and contrast, as multiple counts can be induced in adjacent pixels as a result of the spread of the charge cloud generated from a single X-ray photon of high energy in the detector bulk. Although debated for a long time, the full impact of charge sharing has not been completely assessed. In this work, the importance of charge sharing in pixellated CdTe and silicon detectors is studied by exposing imaging devices to different low activity sources. These devices are made of Si and CdTe pixel detector bump-bonded to Medipix2 single-photon-counting chips with a 55 μm pixel pitch. We will show how charge sharing affects the spatial detector resolution depending on incident particle type (alpha, beta and gamma), detector bias voltage and read-out chip threshold. This study will give an insight on the impact on the design and operation of pixel detectors coupled to photon-counting devices for imaging applications.

  14. Non-destructive imaging of fragments of historical beeswax seals using high-contrast X-ray micro-radiography and micro-tomography with large area photon-counting detector array.

    PubMed

    Karch, Jakub; Bartl, Benjamin; Dudak, Jan; Zemlicka, Jan; Krejci, Frantisek

    2016-12-01

    Historical beeswax seals are unique cultural heritage objects. Unfortunately, a number of historical sealing waxes show a porous structure with a strong tendency to stratification and embrittlement, which makes these objects extremely prone to mechanical damage. The understanding of beeswax degradation processes therefore plays an important role in the preservation and consequent treatment of these objects. Conventional methods applied for the investigation of beeswax materials (e.g. gas chromatography) are of a destructive nature or bring only limited information about the sample surface (microscopic techniques). Considering practical limitations of conventional methods and ethical difficulties connected with the sampling of the historical material, radiation imaging methods such as X-ray micro-tomography presents a promising non-destructive tool for the onward scientific research in this field. In this contribution, we present the application of high-contrast X-ray micro-radiography and micro-tomography for the investigation of beeswax seal fragments. The method is based on the application of the large area photon-counting detector recently developed at our institute. The detector combines the advantages of single-photon counting technology with a large field of view. The method, consequently, enables imaging of relatively large objects with high geometrical magnification. In the reconstructed micro-tomographies of investigated historical beeswax seals, we are able to reveal morphological structures such as stratification, micro-cavities and micro-fractures with spatial resolution down to 5μm non-destructively and with high imaging quality. The presented work therefore demonstrates that a combination of state-of-the-art hybrid pixel semiconductor detectors and currently available micro-focus x-ray sources makes it possible to apply X-ray micro-radiography and micro-tomography as a valuable non-destructive tool for volumetric beeswax seal morphological studies.

  15. Photon extrabunching in ultrabright twin beams measured by two-photon counting in a semiconductor

    PubMed Central

    Boitier, F.; Godard, A.; Dubreuil, N.; Delaye, P.; Fabre, C.; Rosencher, E.

    2011-01-01

    For many years twin beams originating from parametric down-converted light beams have aroused great interest and attention in the photonics community. One particular aspect of the twin beams is their peculiar intensity correlation functions, which are related to the coincidence rate of photon pairs. Here we take advantage of the huge bandwidth offered by two-photon absorption in a semiconductor to quantitatively determine correlation functions of twin beams generated by spontaneous parametric down-conversion. Compared with classical incoherent sources, photon extrabunching is unambiguously and precisely measured, originating from exact coincidence between down-converted pairs of photons, travelling in unison. These results strongly establish that two-photon counting in semiconductors is a powerful tool for the absolute measurement of light beam photon correlations at ultrashort timescales. PMID:21829187

  16. Spectroscopic micro-tomography of metallic-organic composites by means of photon-counting detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pichotka, M.; Jakubek, J.; Vavrik, D.

    2015-12-01

    The presumed capabilities of photon counting detectors have aroused major expectations in several fields of research. In the field of nuclear imaging ample benefits over standard detectors are to be expected from photon counting devices. First of all a very high contrast, as has by now been verified in numerous experiments. The spectroscopic capabilities of photon counting detectors further allow material decomposition in computed tomography and therefore inherently adequate beam hardening correction. For these reasons measurement setups featuring standard X-ray tubes combined with photon counting detectors constitute a possible replacement of the much more cost intensive tomographic setups at synchrotron light-sources. The actual application of photon counting detectors in radiographic setups in recent years has been impeded by a number of practical issues, above all by restrictions in the detectors size. Currently two tomographic setups in Czech Republic feature photon counting large-area detectors (LAD) fabricated in Prague. The employed large area hybrid pixel-detector assemblies [1] consisting of 10×10/10×5 Timepix devices have a surface area of 143×143 mm2 / 143×71,5 mm2 respectively, suitable for micro-tomographic applications. In the near future LAD devices featuring the Medipix3 readout chip as well as heavy sensors (CdTe, GaAs) will become available. Data analysis is obtained by a number of in house software tools including iterative multi-energy volume reconstruction.In this paper tomographic analysis of of metallic-organic composites is employed to illustrate the capabilities of our technology. Other than successful material decomposition by spectroscopic tomography we present a method to suppress metal artefacts under certain conditions.

  17. Photon-counting spatial light modulator technology development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, Richard B.; Hunt, Jeffrey H.

    1994-10-01

    The goal of this program is to measure and improve the performance of photon-counting spatial light modulators operating in an optically-addressed reflection mode. Experimental results are obtained for silicon devices. These device consists of an avalanche photodiode (APD) operated in the Geiger mode with the front and back surface of the diode forming an asymmetric Fabry-Perot cavity. The phase delay within the cavity is modified directly by the avalanche via the free-carrier refractive index or by Joule heating. Experiments were conducted first with the write laser beam at 1064 nm and the read beam at the same wavelength and second with the write beam at 850 nm and the read beam at 1300 nm. The device differs qualitatively from other approaches such as smart pixels by virtue of its photon-counting sensitivity its low cost and its ability to form a spatially-coherent read-out wavefront.

  18. ON THE USE OF SHOT NOISE FOR PHOTON COUNTING

    SciTech Connect

    Zmuidzinas, Jonas

    2015-11-01

    Lieu et al. have recently claimed that it is possible to substantially improve the sensitivity of radio-astronomical observations. In essence, their proposal is to make use of the intensity of the photon shot noise as a measure of the photon arrival rate. Lieu et al. provide a detailed quantum-mechanical calculation of a proposed measurement scheme that uses two detectors and conclude that this scheme avoids the sensitivity degradation that is associated with photon bunching. If correct, this result could have a profound impact on radio astronomy. Here I present a detailed analysis of the sensitivity attainable using shot-noise measurement schemes that use either one or two detectors, and demonstrate that neither scheme can avoid the photon bunching penalty. I perform both semiclassical and fully quantum calculations of the sensitivity, obtaining consistent results, and provide a formal proof of the equivalence of these two approaches. These direct calculations are furthermore shown to be consistent with an indirect argument based on a correlation method that establishes an independent limit to the sensitivity of shot-noise measurement schemes. Furthermore, these calculations are directly applicable to the regime of interest identified by Lieu et al. Collectively, these results conclusively demonstrate that the photon-bunching sensitivity penalty applies to shot-noise measurement schemes just as it does to ordinary photon counting, in contradiction to the fundamental claim made by Lieu et al. The source of this contradiction is traced to a logical fallacy in their argument.

  19. On the Use of Shot Noise for Photon Counting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zmuidzinas, Jonas

    2015-11-01

    Lieu et al. have recently claimed that it is possible to substantially improve the sensitivity of radio-astronomical observations. In essence, their proposal is to make use of the intensity of the photon shot noise as a measure of the photon arrival rate. Lieu et al. provide a detailed quantum-mechanical calculation of a proposed measurement scheme that uses two detectors and conclude that this scheme avoids the sensitivity degradation that is associated with photon bunching. If correct, this result could have a profound impact on radio astronomy. Here I present a detailed analysis of the sensitivity attainable using shot-noise measurement schemes that use either one or two detectors, and demonstrate that neither scheme can avoid the photon bunching penalty. I perform both semiclassical and fully quantum calculations of the sensitivity, obtaining consistent results, and provide a formal proof of the equivalence of these two approaches. These direct calculations are furthermore shown to be consistent with an indirect argument based on a correlation method that establishes an independent limit to the sensitivity of shot-noise measurement schemes. Furthermore, these calculations are directly applicable to the regime of interest identified by Lieu et al. Collectively, these results conclusively demonstrate that the photon-bunching sensitivity penalty applies to shot-noise measurement schemes just as it does to ordinary photon counting, in contradiction to the fundamental claim made by Lieu et al. The source of this contradiction is traced to a logical fallacy in their argument.

  20. OPTIMA: A Photon Counting High-Speed Photometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straubmeier, C.; Kanbach, G.; Schrey, F.

    OPTIMA is a small, versatile high-speed photometer which is primarily intended for time resolved observations of young high energy pulsars at optical wavelengths. The detector system consists of eight fiber fed photon counters based on avalanche photodiodes, a GPS timing receiver, an integrating CCD camera to ensure the correct pointing of the telescope and a computerized control unit. Since January 1999 OPTIMA proves its scientific potential by measuring a very detailed lightcurve of the Crab Pulsar as well as by observing cataclysmic variable stars on very short timescales. In this article we describe the design of the detector system focussing on the photon counting units and the software control which correlates the detected photons with the GPS timing signal.

  1. Multimode model for projective photon-counting measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Tualle-Brouri, Rosa; Ourjoumtsev, Alexei; Dantan, Aurelien; Grangier, Philippe; Wubs, Martijn; Soerensen, Anders S.

    2009-07-15

    We present a general model to account for the multimode nature of the quantum electromagnetic field in projective photon-counting measurements. We focus on photon-subtraction experiments, where non-Gaussian states are produced conditionally. These are useful states for continuous-variable quantum-information processing. We present a general method called mode reduction that reduces the multimode model to an effective two-mode problem. We apply this method to a multimode model describing broadband parametric down-conversion, thereby improving the analysis of existing experimental results. The main improvement is that spatial and frequency filters before the photon detector are taken into account explicitly. We find excellent agreement with previously published experimental results, using fewer free parameters than before, and discuss the implications of our analysis for the optimized production of states with negative Wigner functions.

  2. Dead time correction in coincidence counting of photon pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, M. S.; Lee, D.-H.; Lee, J.; Lee, J. Y.; Choi, S.-K.; Park, H. S.

    2008-08-01

    We describe two methods for evaluating the dead time of a time-to-amplitude converter (TAC). The dead time is obtained by measuring either the corresponding time interval in an oscilloscope trace or the relation between the single count rate and the coincidence count rate. Values for the TAC dead time are obtained in the range from 3.4 µs to 14.3 µs for the two methods with respective standard uncertainties of 2.9 × 10-8 s and 3.3 × 10-9 s. The TAC dead time is applied to the calibration of coincidence-counting measurements of optical transmission and photon-heralding efficiency.

  3. 6 Mcps photon-counting X-ray computed tomography system using a 25 mm/s-scan linear LSO-MPPC detector and its application to gadolinium imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Eiichi; Oda, Yasuyuki; Abudurexiti, Abulajiang; Hagiwara, Osahiko; Matsukiyo, Hiroshi; Osawa, Akihiro; Enomoto, Toshiyuki; Watanabe, Manabu; Kusachi, Shinya; Sugimura, Shigeaki; Endo, Haruyuki; Sato, Shigehiro; Ogawa, Akira; Onagawa, Jun

    2011-12-01

    6 Mcps photon counting was carried out using a detector consisting of a 1.0 mm-thick LSO [Lu 2(SiO 4)O] single-crystal scintillator and an MPPC (multipixel photon counter) module in an X-ray computed tomography (CT) system. The maximum count rate was 6 Mcps (mega counts per second) at a tube voltage of 100 kV and a tube current of 0.91 mA. Next, a photon-counting X-ray CT system consists of an X-ray generator, a turntable, a scan stage, a two-stage controller, the LSO-MPPC detector, a counter card (CC), and a personal computer (PC). Tomography is accomplished by repeated linear scans and rotations of an object, and projection curves of the object are obtained by the linear scan with a scan velocity of 25 mm/s. The pulses of the event signal from the module are counted by the CC in conjunction with the PC. The exposure time for obtaining a tomogram was 600 s at a scan step of 0.5 mm and a rotation step of 1.0°, and photon-counting CT was accomplished using gadolinium-based contrast media.

  4. Bayesian photon counting with electron-multiplying charge coupled devices (EMCCDs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harpsøe, K. B. W.; Andersen, M. I.; Kjægaard, P.

    2012-01-01

    Context. The EMCCD is a charge coupled devices (CCD) type that delivers fast readout and negligible detector noise, making it an ideal detector for high frame rate applications. Because of the very low detector noise, this detector can potentially count single photons. Aims: Considering that an EMCCD has a limited dynamical range and negligible detector noise, one would typically apply an EMCCD in such a way that multiple images of the same object are available, for instance, in so called lucky imaging. The problem of counting photons can then conveniently be viewed as statistical inference of flux or photon rates, based on a stack of images. Methods: A simple probabilistic model for the output of an EMCCD is developed. Based on this model and the prior knowledge that photons are Poisson distributed, we derive two methods for estimating the most probable flux per pixel, one based on thresholding, and another based on full Bayesian inference. Results: We find that it is indeed possible to derive such expressions, and tests of these methods show that estimating fluxes with only shot noise is possible, up to fluxes of about one photon per pixel per readout.

  5. Linear operating region in the ozone dial photon counting system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrawis, Madeleine

    1995-01-01

    Ozone is a relatively unstable molecule found in Earth's atmosphere. An ozone molecule is made up of three atoms of oxygen. Depending on where ozone resides, it can protect or harm life on Earth. High in the atmosphere, about 15 miles up, ozone acts as a shield to protect Earth's surface from the sun's harmful ultraviolet radiation. Without this shield, we would be more susceptible to skin cancer, cataracts, and impaired immune systems. Closer to Earth, in the air we breathe, ozone is a harmful pollutant that causes damage to lung tissue and plants. Since the early 1980's, airborne lidar systems have been used for making measurements of ozone. The differential absorption lidar (DIAL) technique is used in the remote measurement of O3. This system allows the O3 to be measured as function of the range in the atmosphere. Two frequency-doubled Nd:YAG lasers are used to pump tunable dye lasers. The lasers are operating at 289 nm for the DIAL on-line wavelength of O3, and the other one is operated at 300 nm for the off-line wavelength. The DIAL wavelengths are produced in sequential laser pulses with a time separation of 300 micro s. The backscattered laser energy is collected by telescopes and measured using photon counting systems. The photon counting system measures the light signal by making use of the photon nature of light. The output pulse from the Photo-Multiplier Tube (PE), caused by a photon striking the PMT photo-cathode, is amplified and passed to a pulse height discriminator. The peak value of the pulse is compared to a reference voltage (discrimination level). If the pulse amplitude exceeds the discrimination level, the discriminator generates a standard pulse which is counted by the digital counter. Non-linearity in the system is caused by the overlapping of pulses and the finite response time of the electronics. At low count rates one expects the system to register one event for each output pulse from the PMT corresponding to a photon incident upon the

  6. Investigation of energy weighting using an energy discriminating photon counting detector for breast CT

    SciTech Connect

    Kalluri, Kesava S.; Mahd, Mufeed; Glick, Stephen J.

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: Breast CT is an emerging imaging technique that can portray the breast in 3D and improve visualization of important diagnostic features. Early clinical studies have suggested that breast CT has sufficient spatial and contrast resolution for accurate detection of masses and microcalcifications in the breast, reducing structural overlap that is often a limiting factor in reading mammographic images. For a number of reasons, image quality in breast CT may be improved by use of an energy resolving photon counting detector. In this study, the authors investigate the improvements in image quality obtained when using energy weighting with an energy resolving photon counting detector as compared to that with a conventional energy integrating detector.Methods: Using computer simulation, realistic CT images of multiple breast phantoms were generated. The simulation modeled a prototype breast CT system using an amorphous silicon (a-Si), CsI based energy integrating detector with different x-ray spectra, and a hypothetical, ideal CZT based photon counting detector with capability of energy discrimination. Three biological signals of interest were modeled as spherical lesions and inserted into breast phantoms; hydroxyapatite (HA) to represent microcalcification, infiltrating ductal carcinoma (IDC), and iodine enhanced infiltrating ductal carcinoma (IIDC). Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of these three lesions was measured from the CT reconstructions. In addition, a psychophysical study was conducted to evaluate observer performance in detecting microcalcifications embedded into a realistic anthropomorphic breast phantom.Results: In the energy range tested, improvements in SNR with a photon counting detector using energy weighting was higher (than the energy integrating detector method) by 30%–63% and 4%–34%, for HA and IDC lesions and 12%–30% (with Al filtration) and 32%–38% (with Ce filtration) for the IIDC lesion, respectively. The average area under the receiver

  7. Investigation of energy weighting using an energy discriminating photon counting detector for breast CT

    PubMed Central

    Kalluri, Kesava S.; Mahd, Mufeed; Glick, Stephen J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Breast CT is an emerging imaging technique that can portray the breast in 3D and improve visualization of important diagnostic features. Early clinical studies have suggested that breast CT has sufficient spatial and contrast resolution for accurate detection of masses and microcalcifications in the breast, reducing structural overlap that is often a limiting factor in reading mammographic images. For a number of reasons, image quality in breast CT may be improved by use of an energy resolving photon counting detector. In this study, the authors investigate the improvements in image quality obtained when using energy weighting with an energy resolving photon counting detector as compared to that with a conventional energy integrating detector. Methods: Using computer simulation, realistic CT images of multiple breast phantoms were generated. The simulation modeled a prototype breast CT system using an amorphous silicon (a-Si), CsI based energy integrating detector with different x-ray spectra, and a hypothetical, ideal CZT based photon counting detector with capability of energy discrimination. Three biological signals of interest were modeled as spherical lesions and inserted into breast phantoms; hydroxyapatite (HA) to represent microcalcification, infiltrating ductal carcinoma (IDC), and iodine enhanced infiltrating ductal carcinoma (IIDC). Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of these three lesions was measured from the CT reconstructions. In addition, a psychophysical study was conducted to evaluate observer performance in detecting microcalcifications embedded into a realistic anthropomorphic breast phantom. Results: In the energy range tested, improvements in SNR with a photon counting detector using energy weighting was higher (than the energy integrating detector method) by 30%–63% and 4%–34%, for HA and IDC lesions and 12%–30% (with Al filtration) and 32%–38% (with Ce filtration) for the IIDC lesion, respectively. The average area under the

  8. Speckle imaging with the PAPA detector. [Precision Analog Photon Address

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papaliolios, C.; Nisenson, P.; Ebstein, S.

    1985-01-01

    A new 2-D photon-counting camera, the PAPA (precision analog photon address) detector has been built, tested, and used successfully for the acquisition of speckle imaging data. The camera has 512 x 512 pixels and operates at count rates of at least 200,000/sec. In this paper, technical details on the camera are presented and some of the laboratory and astronomical results are included which demonstrate the detector's capabilities.

  9. Resonant-scanning dual-color STED microscopy with ultrafast photon counting: a concise guide

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yong; Wu, Xundong; Toro, Ligia; Stefani, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    STED (stimulated emission depletion) is a popular super-resolution fluorescence microscopy technique. In this paper, we present a concise guide to building a resonant-scanning STED microscope with ultrafast photon-counting acquisition. The STED microscope has two channels, using a pulsed laser and a continuous-wave (CW) laser as the depletion laser source, respectively. The CW STED channel preforms time-gated detection to enhance optical resolution in this channel. We use a resonant mirror to attain high scanning speed and ultrafast photon counting acquisition to scan a large field of view, which help reduce photobleaching. We discuss some practical issues in building a STED microscope, including creating a hollow depletion beam profile, manipulating polarization, and monitoring optical aberration. We also demonstrate a STED image enhancement method using stationary wavelet expansion and image analysis methods to register objects and to quantify colocalization in STED microscopy. PMID:26123183

  10. Statistical treatment of photon/electron counting: extending the linear dynamic range from the dark count rate to saturation.

    PubMed

    Kissick, David J; Muir, Ryan D; Simpson, Garth J

    2010-12-15

    An experimentally simple photon counting method is demonstrated providing 7 orders of magnitude in linear dynamic range (LDR) for a single photomultiplier tube (PMT) detector. In conventional photon/electron counting methods, the linear range is dictated by the agreement between the binomially distributed measurement of counted events and the underlying Poisson distribution of photons/electrons. By explicitly considering the log-normal probability distribution in voltage transients as a function of the number of photons present and the Poisson distribution of photons, observed counts for a given threshold can be related to the mean number of photons well beyond the conventional limit. Analytical expressions are derived relating counts and photons that extend the linear range to an average of ∼11 photons arriving simultaneously with a single threshold. These expressions can be evaluated numerically for multiple thresholds extending the linear range to the saturation point of the PMT. The peak voltage distributions are experimentally shown to follow a Poisson weighted sum of log-normal distributions that can all be derived from the single photoelectron voltage peak-height distribution. The LDR that results from this method is compared to conventional single photon counting (SPC) and to signal averaging by analog to digital conversion (ADC).

  11. MicroCT with energy-resolved photon-counting detectors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, X; Meier, D; Mikkelsen, S; Maehlum, G E; Wagenaar, D J; Tsui, BMW; Patt, B E; Frey, E C

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this paper was to investigate the benefits that could be realistically achieved on a microCT imaging system with an energy-resolved photon-counting x-ray detector. To this end, we built and evaluated a prototype microCT system based on such a detector. The detector is based on cadmium telluride (CdTe) radiation sensors and application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) readouts. Each detector pixel can simultaneously count x-ray photons above six energy thresholds, providing the capability for energy-selective x-ray imaging. We tested the spectroscopic performance of the system using polychromatic x-ray radiation and various filtering materials with Kabsorption edges. Tomographic images were then acquired of a cylindrical PMMA phantom containing holes filled with various materials. Results were also compared with those acquired using an intensity-integrating x-ray detector and single-energy (i.e. non-energy-selective) CT. This paper describes the functionality and performance of the system, and presents preliminary spectroscopic and tomographic results. The spectroscopic experiments showed that the energy-resolved photon-counting detector was capable of measuring energy spectra from polychromatic sources like a standard x-ray tube, and resolving absorption edges present in the energy range used for imaging. However, the spectral quality was degraded by spectral distortions resulting from degrading factors, including finite energy resolution and charge sharing. We developed a simple charge-sharing model to reproduce these distortions. The tomographic experiments showed that the availability of multiple energy thresholds in the photon-counting detector allowed us to simultaneously measure target-to-background contrasts in different energy ranges. Compared with single-energy CT with an integrating detector, this feature was especially useful to improve differentiation of materials with different attenuation coefficient energy dependences. PMID:21464527

  12. Photon counting photodiode array detector for far ultraviolet (FUV) astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartig, G. F.; Moos, H. W.; Pembroke, R.; Bowers, C.

    1982-01-01

    A compact, stable, single-stage intensified photodiode array detector designed for photon-counting, far ultraviolet astronomy applications employs a saturable, 'C'-type MCP (Galileo S. MCP 25-25) to produce high gain pulses with a narrowly peaked pulse height distribution. The P-20 output phosphor exhibits a very short decay time, due to the high current density of the electron pulses. This intensifier is being coupled to a self-scanning linear photodiode array which has a fiber optic input window which allows direct, rigid mechanical coupling with minimal light loss. The array was scanned at a 250 KHz pixel rate. The detector exhibits more than adequate signal-to-noise ratio for pulse counting and event location. Previously announced in STAR as N82-19118

  13. Pseudo-random single photon counting: a high-speed implementation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qiang; Chen, Ling; Chen, Nanguang

    2010-01-01

    Pseudo-random single photon counting (PRSPC) is a new time-resolved optical measurement method which combines the spread spectrum time-resolved method with single photon counting. A pseudo-random bit sequence is used to modulate a continuous wave laser diode, while single photon counting is used to build up the optical signal in response to the modulated excitation. Periodic cross-correlation is performed to obtain the temporal profile of the subject of interest. Compared with conventional time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC), PRSPC enjoys many advantages such as low cost and high count rate without compromising the sensitivity and time-resolution. In this paper, we report a PRSPC system that can be used for high-speed acquisition of the temporal point spread function of diffuse photons. It can reach a photon count rate as high as 3 Mcps (counts per second). Phantom experiments have been conducted to demonstrate the system performance. PMID:21258444

  14. Detecting small debris using a ground-based photon counting detector

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, C.; Priedhorsky, W.C.; Baron, M.H.

    1993-05-01

    We describe a sensitive technique for detecting small space debris that exploits a fast photon-counting imager. Microchannel plate detectors using crossed delay-line readout can achieve a resolution of 2048 {times} 2048 spatial pixels and a maximum count rate of about 10{sup 6} photons per second. A baseline debris-tracking system might couple this detector to a 16-cm aperture telescope. The detector yields x, y, and time information for each detected photon. When visualized in (x, y, t) space, photons from a fast-moving orbital object appear on a straight line. They can be distinguished from diffuse background photons, randomly scattered in the space, and star photons, which fall on a line with sidereal velocity. By searching for this unique signature, we can detect and track small debris objects. At dawn and dusk, a spherical object of 1.3 cm diameter at 400 km will reflect sunlight for an apparent magnitude of V {approx} 16. The baseline system would detect about 16 photons from this object as it crosses a 1 degree field of view in about 1 second. The Ene in (x, y, t) space will be significant in a diffuse background of {approximately} 10{sup 6} photons. We discuss the data processing scheme and line detection algorithm. The advantages of this technique are that one can (1) detect cm-size debris objects with a small telescope, and (2) detect debris moving with any direction and velocity. In this paper, we describe the progress in the development of detector and data acquisition system, the preparation for a field test for such a system, and the development and optimization of the data analysis algorithm. Detection sensitivity would currently be constrained by the capability of the data acquisition and the data processing systems, but further improvements could alleviate these bottlenecks.

  15. Detecting small debris using a ground-based photon counting detector

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, C.; Priedhorsky, W.C.; Baron, M.H.

    1993-01-01

    We describe a sensitive technique for detecting small space debris that exploits a fast photon-counting imager. Microchannel plate detectors using crossed delay-line readout can achieve a resolution of 2048 [times] 2048 spatial pixels and a maximum count rate of about 10[sup 6] photons per second. A baseline debris-tracking system might couple this detector to a 16-cm aperture telescope. The detector yields x, y, and time information for each detected photon. When visualized in (x, y, t) space, photons from a fast-moving orbital object appear on a straight line. They can be distinguished from diffuse background photons, randomly scattered in the space, and star photons, which fall on a line with sidereal velocity. By searching for this unique signature, we can detect and track small debris objects. At dawn and dusk, a spherical object of 1.3 cm diameter at 400 km will reflect sunlight for an apparent magnitude of V [approx] 16. The baseline system would detect about 16 photons from this object as it crosses a 1 degree field of view in about 1 second. The Ene in (x, y, t) space will be significant in a diffuse background of [approximately] 10[sup 6] photons. We discuss the data processing scheme and line detection algorithm. The advantages of this technique are that one can (1) detect cm-size debris objects with a small telescope, and (2) detect debris moving with any direction and velocity. In this paper, we describe the progress in the development of detector and data acquisition system, the preparation for a field test for such a system, and the development and optimization of the data analysis algorithm. Detection sensitivity would currently be constrained by the capability of the data acquisition and the data processing systems, but further improvements could alleviate these bottlenecks.

  16. Signal-to-noise ratio of Geiger-mode avalanche photodiode single-photon counting detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolb, Kimberly

    2014-08-01

    Geiger-mode avalanche photodiodes (GM-APDs) use the avalanche mechanism of semiconductors to amplify signals in individual pixels. With proper thresholding, a pixel will be either "on" (avalanching) or "off." This discrete detection scheme eliminates read noise, which makes these devices capable of counting single photons. Using these detectors for imaging applications requires a well-developed and comprehensive expression for the expected signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). This paper derives the expected SNR of a GM-APD detector in gated operation based on gate length, number of samples, signal flux, dark count rate, photon detection efficiency, and afterpulsing probability. To verify the theoretical results, carrier-level Monte Carlo simulation results are compared to the derived equations and found to be in good agreement.

  17. Polarimetric 3D integral imaging in photon-starved conditions.

    PubMed

    Carnicer, Artur; Javidi, Bahram

    2015-03-09

    We develop a method for obtaining 3D polarimetric integral images from elemental images recorded in low light illumination conditions. Since photon-counting images are very sparse, calculation of the Stokes parameters and the degree of polarization should be handled carefully. In our approach, polarimetric 3D integral images are generated using the Maximum Likelihood Estimation and subsequently reconstructed by means of a Total Variation Denoising filter. In this way, polarimetric results are comparable to those obtained in conventional illumination conditions. We also show that polarimetric information retrieved from photon starved images can be used in 3D object recognition problems. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on 3D polarimetric photon counting integral imaging.

  18. Detective quantum efficiency of photon-counting x-ray detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Tanguay, Jesse; Yun, Seungman; Kim, Ho Kyung; Cunningham, Ian A.

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: Single-photon-counting (SPC) x-ray imaging has the potential to improve image quality and enable novel energy-dependent imaging methods. Similar to conventional detectors, optimizing image SPC quality will require systems that produce the highest possible detective quantum efficiency (DQE). This paper builds on the cascaded-systems analysis (CSA) framework to develop a comprehensive description of the DQE of SPC detectors that implement adaptive binning. Methods: The DQE of SPC systems can be described using the CSA approach by propagating the probability density function (PDF) of the number of image-forming quanta through simple quantum processes. New relationships are developed to describe PDF transfer through serial and parallel cascades to accommodate scatter reabsorption. Results are applied to hypothetical silicon and selenium-based flat-panel SPC detectors including the effects of reabsorption of characteristic/scatter photons from photoelectric and Compton interactions, stochastic conversion of x-ray energy to secondary quanta, depth-dependent charge collection, and electronic noise. Results are compared with a Monte Carlo study. Results: Depth-dependent collection efficiency can result in substantial broadening of photopeaks that in turn may result in reduced DQE at lower x-ray energies (20–45 keV). Double-counting interaction events caused by reabsorption of characteristic/scatter photons may result in falsely inflated image signal-to-noise ratio and potential overestimation of the DQE. Conclusions: The CSA approach is extended to describe signal and noise propagation through photoelectric and Compton interactions in SPC detectors, including the effects of escape and reabsorption of emission/scatter photons. High-performance SPC systems can be achieved but only for certain combinations of secondary conversion gain, depth-dependent collection efficiency, electronic noise, and reabsorption characteristics.

  19. A comparison of simulation tools for photon-counting spectral CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasirudin, Radin A.; Penchev, Petar; Mei, Kai; Rummeny, Ernst J.; Fiebich, Martin; Noël, Peter B.

    2014-03-01

    Photon-counting detectors (PCD) not only have the advantage of providing spectral information but also offer high quantum efficiencies, producing high image quality in combination with a minimal amount of radiation dose. Due to the clinical unavailability of photon-counting CT, the need to evaluate different CT simulation tools for researching different applications for photon-counting systems is essential. In this work, we investigate two different methods to simulate PCD data: Monte-Carlo based simulation (MCS) and analytical based simulation (AS). The MCS is a general-purpose photon transport simulation based on EGSnrc C++ class library. The AS uses analytical forward-projection in combination with additional acquisition parameters. MCS takes into account all physical effects, but is computationally expensive (several days per CT acquisition). AS is fast (several minutes), but lacks the accurateness of MCS with regard to physical interactions. To evaluate both techniques an entrance spectra of 100kvp, a modified CTP515 module of the CatPhan 600 phantom, and a detector system with six thresholds was simulated. For evaluation the simulated projection data are decomposed via a maximum likelihood technique, and reconstructed via standard filtered-back projection (FBP). Image quality from both methods is subjectively and objectively assessed. Visually, the difference in the image quality was not significant. When further evaluated, the relative difference was below 4%. As a conclusion, both techniques offer different advantages, while at different stages of development the accelerated calculations via AS can make a significant difference. For the future one could foresee a combined method to join accuracy and speed.

  20. Development of a Photon Counting System for Differential Lidar Signal Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elsayed-Ali, Hani

    1997-01-01

    Photon counting has been chosen as a means to extend the detection range of current airborne DIAL ozone measurements. Lidar backscattered return signals from the on and off-line lasers experience a significant exponential decay. To extract further data from the decaying ozone return signals, photon counting will be used to measure the low light levels, thus extending the detection range. In this application, photon counting will extend signal measurement where the analog return signal is too weak. The current analog measurement range is limited to approximately 25 kilometers from an aircraft flying at 12 kilometers. Photon counting will be able to exceed the current measurement range so as to follow the mid-latitude model of ozone density as a function of height. This report describes the development of a photon counting system. The initial development phase begins with detailed evaluation of individual photomultiplier tubes. The PMT qualities investigated are noise count rates, single electron response peaks, voltage versus gain values, saturation effects, and output signal linearity. These evaluations are followed by analysis of two distinctive tube base gating schemes. The next phase is to construct and operate a photon counting system in a laboratory environment. The laboratory counting simulations are used to determine optimum discriminator setpoints and to continue further evaluations of PMT properties. The final step in the photon counting system evaluation process is the compiling of photon counting measurements on the existing ozone DIAL laser system.

  1. Photon Counting Detectors for the 1.0 - 2.0 Micron Wavelength Range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krainak, Michael A.

    2004-01-01

    We describe results on the development of greater than 200 micron diameter, single-element photon-counting detectors for the 1-2 micron wavelength range. The technical goals include quantum efficiency in the range 10-70%; detector diameter greater than 200 microns; dark count rate below 100 kilo counts-per-second (cps), and maximum count rate above 10 Mcps.

  2. Development of new photon-counting detectors for single-molecule fluorescence microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Michalet, X.; Colyer, R. A.; Scalia, G.; Ingargiola, A.; Lin, R.; Millaud, J. E.; Weiss, S.; Siegmund, Oswald H. W.; Tremsin, Anton S.; Vallerga, John V.; Cheng, A.; Levi, M.; Aharoni, D.; Arisaka, K.; Villa, F.; Guerrieri, F.; Panzeri, F.; Rech, I.; Gulinatti, A.; Zappa, F.; Ghioni, M.; Cova, S.

    2013-01-01

    Two optical configurations are commonly used in single-molecule fluorescence microscopy: point-like excitation and detection to study freely diffusing molecules, and wide field illumination and detection to study surface immobilized or slowly diffusing molecules. Both approaches have common features, but also differ in significant aspects. In particular, they use different detectors, which share some requirements but also have major technical differences. Currently, two types of detectors best fulfil the needs of each approach: single-photon-counting avalanche diodes (SPADs) for point-like detection, and electron-multiplying charge-coupled devices (EMCCDs) for wide field detection. However, there is room for improvements in both cases. The first configuration suffers from low throughput owing to the analysis of data from a single location. The second, on the other hand, is limited to relatively low frame rates and loses the benefit of single-photon-counting approaches. During the past few years, new developments in point-like and wide field detectors have started addressing some of these issues. Here, we describe our recent progresses towards increasing the throughput of single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy in solution using parallel arrays of SPADs. We also discuss our development of large area photon-counting cameras achieving subnanosecond resolution for fluorescence lifetime imaging applications at the single-molecule level. PMID:23267185

  3. Multiplexed photonic Doppler velocimetry for large channel count experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daykin, Edward; Burk, Martin; Holtkamp, David; Miller, Edward Kirk; Rutkowski, Araceli; Strand, Oliver Ted; Pena, Michael; Perez, Carlos; Gallegos, Cenobio

    2017-01-01

    Photonic Doppler Velocimetry (PDV) is routinely employed as a means of measuring surface velocities for shockwave experimentation. Scientists typically collect ˜4 to 12 channels of PDV data and use extrapolation, assumptions, and models to determine the velocities in regions of the experiment that were not observed directly. We have designed, built and applied a new optical velocimetry diagnostic—the Multiplexed Photonic Doppler Velocimeter (MPDV)—for use on shock physics experiments that require a large number (100s) of spatial points to be measured. MPDV expands upon PDV measurement capabilities via frequency and time multiplexing using commercially available products developed for the telecommunications industry. The MPDV uses the heterodyne method to multiplex four data channels in the frequency domain combined with fiber delays to multiplex an additional four-channel dataset in the time domain, all of which are recorded onto the same digitizer input. This means that each digitizer input records data from eight separate spatial points, so that a single 4-input digitizer may record a total of 32 channels of data. Motivation for development of a multiplexed PDV was driven by requirements for an economical, high-fidelity, high channel-count optical velocimetry system. We present a survey of the methods, components, and trade-offs incorporated into this recent development in optical velocimetry.

  4. Multiplexed Photonic Doppler Velocimetry for Large Channel Count Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daykin, Edward; Burk, Martin; Gallegos, Cenobio; Pena, Michael; Perez, Carlos; Rutkowski, Araceli; Strand, Oliver; Holtkamp, David

    2015-06-01

    The Photonic Doppler Velocimeter (PDV) is routinely employed as a means of measuring surface velocities for shockwave experimentation. Scientists typically collect ~ 4 to 12 channels of PDV data and use extrapolation, assumptions and models to determine the velocities in regions of the experiment that were not observed directly. We have designed, built and applied a new optical velocimetry diagnostic - the Multiplexed Photonic Doppler Velocimeter (MPDV) - for use on shock physics experiments that requires a large number (~ 100) of spatial points to be measured. MPDV expands upon PDV measurement capabilities via frequency and time multiplexing. The MPDV is built using commercially available products. The MPDV uses the heterodyne method to multiplex four data channels in the frequency domain combined with fiber delays to multiplex an additional four channel data set in the time domain, all of which are recorded onto the same digitizer input. This means that each digitizer input records data from eight separate spatial points, so that a single 4-input digitizer may record a total of 32 channels of data. Motivation for development of a multiplexed PDV was driven by requirements for an economical, high channel count optical velocimetry system. We will present a survey of methods, components and trade-offs incorporated into this recent development in optical velocimetry.

  5. A simulator for airborne laser swath mapping via photon counting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slatton, K. C.; Carter, W. E.; Shrestha, R.

    2005-06-01

    Commercially marketed airborne laser swath mapping (ALSM) instruments currently use laser rangers with sufficient energy per pulse to work with return signals of thousands of photons per shot. The resulting high signal to noise level virtually eliminates spurious range values caused by noise, such as background solar radiation and sensor thermal noise. However, the high signal level approach requires laser repetition rates of hundreds of thousands of pulses per second to obtain contiguous coverage of the terrain at sub-meter spatial resolution, and with currently available technology, affords little scalability for significantly downsizing the hardware, or reducing the costs. A photon-counting ALSM sensor has been designed by the University of Florida and Sigma Space, Inc. for improved topographic mapping with lower power requirements and weight than traditional ALSM sensors. Major elements of the sensor design are presented along with preliminary simulation results. The simulator is being developed so that data phenomenology and target detection potential can be investigated before the system is completed. Early simulations suggest that precise estimates of terrain elevation and target detection will be possible with the sensor design.

  6. Photon counting altimeter and lidar for air and spaceborne applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vacek, Michael; Michalek, Vojtech; Peca, Marek; Prochazka, Ivan; Blazej, Josef; Kodet, Jan

    2011-06-01

    We are presenting the concept and preliminary design of modular multipurpose device for space segment: single photon counting laser altimeter, atmospheric lidar, laser transponder and one way laser ranging receiver. For all the mentioned purposes, the same compact configuration of the device is appropriate. Overall estimated device weight should not exceed 5 kg with the power consumption below 10 W. The device will consists of three main parts, namely, receiver, transmitter and control and processing unit. As a transmitter a commercial solid state laser at 532 nm wavelength with 10 mW power will be used. The transmitter optics will have a diameter at most of 50 mm. The laser pulse width will be of hundreds of picoseconds order. For the laser altimeter and atmospheric lidar application, the repetition rate of 10 kHz is planned in order to obtain sufficient number of data for a distance value computing. The receiver device will be composed of active quenched Single Photon Avalanche Diode module, tiny optics, and narrow-band optical filter. The core part of the control and processing unit including high precision timing unit is implemented using single FPGA chip. The preliminary device concept includes considerations on energy balance, and statistical algorithms to meet all the mentioned purposes. Recently, the bread board version of the device is under construction in our labs. The concept, construction, and timing results will be presented.

  7. Comparing human observer performance in detecting microcalcifications with energy weighting and photon counting breast CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalluri, Kesava; Mahd, Mufeed; Glick, Stephen J.

    2012-03-01

    Breast CT (BCT) using a photon counting detector (PCD) has a number of advantages that can potentially improve clinical performance. Previous computer simulation studies showed that the signal to noise ratio (SNR) for microcalcifications is higher with energy weighted photon counting BCT as compared to cesium iodide energy integrating detector (CsI-EID) based BCT. CsI-EID inherently weighs the incident x-ray photons in direct proportion to the energy (contradicting the information content) which is not an optimal approach. PCD do not inherently weigh the incident photons. By choosing optimal energy weights, higher SNR can be achieved for microcalcifications and hence better detectability. In this simulation study, forward projection data of a numerical breast phantom with microcalcifications inserted were acquired using CsI-EID and PCD. The PCD projections were optimally weighed, and reconstructed using filtered back-projection. We compared observer performance in identifying microcalcifications in the reconstructed images using ROC analysis. ROC based results show that the average area(s) under curve(s) (AUC) for AUCPCD based methods are higher than the average AUCCsI-EID method.

  8. High spatial and temporal resolution photon/electron counting detector for synchrotron radiation research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremsin, A. S.; Lebedev, G. V.; Siegmund, O. H. W.; Vallerga, J. V.; Hull, J. S.; McPhate, J. B.; Jozwiak, C.; Chen, Y.; Guo, J. H.; Shen, Z. X.; Hussain, Z.

    2007-10-01

    This paper reports on the development of a high resolution electron/photon/ion imaging system which detects events with a timing accuracy of <160 ps FWHM and a two-dimensional spatial accuracy of ˜50 μm FWHM. The event counting detector uses microchannel plates for signal amplification and can sustain counting rates exceeding 1.5 MHz for evenly distributed events (0.4 MHz with 10% dead time for randomly distributed events). The detector combined with a time-of-flight angular resolved photoelectron energy analyzer was tested at a synchrotron beamline. The results of these measurements illustrate the unique capabilities of the analytical system, allowing simultaneous imaging of photoelectrons in momentum space and measurement of the energy spectrum, as well as filtering the data in user defined temporal and/or spatial windows.

  9. Multi-Material Decomposition using Low-Current X-Ray and a Photon-Counting CZT Detector

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sangtaek; Hernandez, Andrew; Alhassen, Fares; Pivovaroff, Michael; Cho, Hyo-Min; Gould, Robert G.; Seo, Youngho

    2013-01-01

    We developed and evaluated an x-ray photon-counting imaging system using an energy-resolving cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detector coupled with application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) readouts. This x-ray imaging system can be used to identify different materials inside the object. The CZT detector has a large active area (5×5 array of 25 CZT modules, each with 16×16 pixels, cover a total area of 200 mm × 200 mm), high stopping efficiency for x-ray photons (~ 100 % at 60 keV and 5 mm thickness). We explored the performance of this system by applying different energy windows around the absorption edges of target materials, silver and indium, in order to distinguish one material from another. The photon-counting CZT-based x-ray imaging system was able to distinguish between the materials, demonstrating its capability as a radiation-spectroscopic decomposition system. PMID:23503709

  10. Multi-Material Decomposition using Low-Current X-Ray and a Photon-Counting CZT Detector.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sangtaek; Hernandez, Andrew; Alhassen, Fares; Pivovaroff, Michael; Cho, Hyo-Min; Gould, Robert G; Seo, Youngho

    2011-01-01

    We developed and evaluated an x-ray photon-counting imaging system using an energy-resolving cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detector coupled with application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) readouts. This x-ray imaging system can be used to identify different materials inside the object. The CZT detector has a large active area (5×5 array of 25 CZT modules, each with 16×16 pixels, cover a total area of 200 mm × 200 mm), high stopping efficiency for x-ray photons (~ 100 % at 60 keV and 5 mm thickness). We explored the performance of this system by applying different energy windows around the absorption edges of target materials, silver and indium, in order to distinguish one material from another. The photon-counting CZT-based x-ray imaging system was able to distinguish between the materials, demonstrating its capability as a radiation-spectroscopic decomposition system.

  11. Material separation in x-ray CT with energy resolved photon-counting detectors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaolan; Meier, Dirk; Taguchi, Katsuyuki; Wagenaar, Douglas J.; Patt, Bradley E.; Frey, Eric C.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The objective of the study was to demonstrate that, in x-ray computed tomography (CT), more than two types of materials can be effectively separated with the use of an energy resolved photon-counting detector and classification methodology. Specifically, this applies to the case when contrast agents that contain K-absorption edges in the energy range of interest are present in the object. This separation is enabled via the use of recently developed energy resolved photon-counting detectors with multiple thresholds, which allow simultaneous measurements of the x-ray attenuation at multiple energies. Methods: To demonstrate this capability, we performed simulations and physical experiments using a six-threshold energy resolved photon-counting detector. We imaged mouse-sized cylindrical phantoms filled with several soft-tissue-like and bone-like materials and with iodine-based and gadolinium-based contrast agents. The linear attenuation coefficients were reconstructed for each material in each energy window and were visualized as scatter plots between pairs of energy windows. For comparison, a dual-kVp CT was also simulated using the same phantom materials. In this case, the linear attenuation coefficients at the lower kVp were plotted against those at the higher kVp. Results: In both the simulations and the physical experiments, the contrast agents were easily separable from other soft-tissue-like and bone-like materials, thanks to the availability of the attenuation coefficient measurements at more than two energies provided by the energy resolved photon-counting detector. In the simulations, the amount of separation was observed to be proportional to the concentration of the contrast agents; however, this was not observed in the physical experiments due to limitations of the real detector system. We used the angle between pairs of attenuation coefficient vectors in either the 5-D space (for non-contrast-agent materials using energy resolved photon-counting

  12. Small-angle scatter tomography with a photon-counting detector array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Shuo; Zhu, Zheyuan; Wang, Ge; Cong, Wenxiang

    2016-05-01

    Small-angle x-ray scatter imaging has a high intrinsic contrast in cancer research and other applications, and provides information on molecular composition and micro-structure of the tissue. In general, the implementations of small-angle coherent scatter imaging can be divided into two main categories: direct tomography and angular dispersive computerized tomography. Based on the recent development of energy-discriminative photon-counting detector array, here we propose a computerized tomography setup based on energy-dispersive measurement with a photon-counting detector array. To show merits of the energy-dispersive approach, we have performed numerical tests with a phantom containing various tissue types, in comparison with the existing imaging approaches. The results show that with an energy resolution of ~6 keV, the energy dispersive tomography system with a broadband tabletop x-ray would outperform the angular dispersive system, which makes the x-ray small-angle scatter tomography promising for high-specificity tissue imaging.

  13. Time-gating scheme based on a photodiode for single-photon counting

    PubMed Central

    Kumavor, Patrick D.; Tavakoli, Behnoosh; Donkor, Eric; Zhu, Quing

    2012-01-01

    A fast, simple, and low-cost optical time-gating scheme for counting single photons is presented. Its construction consists of a silicon photodiode connected in series with a 50 Ω resistor and that operates in the photoconductive mode. The temporal resolution at the FWHM of the photon counting system was measured to be 62 ps. The profile of a single-photon pulse measured with the counting system agreed well with analytical results. The system was also used to successfully resolve a pair of targets with 4 mm separation inside a highly scattering medium by the use of time-gated early-arriving photons. PMID:21725458

  14. Exploration of maximum count rate capabilities for large-area photon counting arrays based on polycrystalline silicon thin-film transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Albert K.; Koniczek, Martin; Antonuk, Larry E.; El-Mohri, Youcef; Zhao, Qihua

    2016-03-01

    Pixelated photon counting detectors with energy discrimination capabilities are of increasing clinical interest for x-ray imaging. Such detectors, presently in clinical use for mammography and under development for breast tomosynthesis and spectral CT, usually employ in-pixel circuits based on crystalline silicon - a semiconductor material that is generally not well-suited for economic manufacture of large-area devices. One interesting alternative semiconductor is polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si), a thin-film technology capable of creating very large-area, monolithic devices. Similar to crystalline silicon, poly-Si allows implementation of the type of fast, complex, in-pixel circuitry required for photon counting - operating at processing speeds that are not possible with amorphous silicon (the material currently used for large-area, active matrix, flat-panel imagers). The pixel circuits of two-dimensional photon counting arrays are generally comprised of four stages: amplifier, comparator, clock generator and counter. The analog front-end (in particular, the amplifier) strongly influences performance and is therefore of interest to study. In this paper, the relationship between incident and output count rate of the analog front-end is explored under diagnostic imaging conditions for a promising poly-Si based design. The input to the amplifier is modeled in the time domain assuming a realistic input x-ray spectrum. Simulations of circuits based on poly-Si thin-film transistors are used to determine the resulting output count rate as a function of input count rate, energy discrimination threshold and operating conditions.

  15. Direct imaging of photonic nanojets.

    PubMed

    Ferrand, Patrick; Wenger, Jérôme; Devilez, Alexis; Pianta, Martina; Stout, Brian; Bonod, Nicolas; Popov, Evgueni; Rigneault, Hervé

    2008-05-12

    We report the direct experimental observation of photonic nanojets created by single latex microspheres illuminated by a plane wave at a wavelength of 520 nm. Measurements are performed with a fast scanning confocal microscope in detection mode, where the detection pinhole defines a diffraction-limited observation volume that is scanned in three dimensions over the microsphere vicinity. From the collected stack of images, we reconstruct the full 3 dimensional photonic nanojet beam. Observations are conducted for polystyrene spheres of 1, 3 and 5 microm diameter deposited on a glass substrate, the upper medium being air or water. Experimental results are compared to calculations performed using the Mie theory. We measure nanojet sizes as small as 270 nm FWHM for a 3 microm sphere at a wavelength lambda of 520 nm. The beam keeps a subwavelength FWHM over a propagation distance of more than 3 lambda, displaying all the specificities of a photonic nanojet.

  16. Monitoring cellular mechanosensing using time-correlated single photon counting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabouillot, Tristan; Gullapalli, Ramachandra; Butler, Peter J.

    2006-10-01

    Endothelial cells (ECs) convert mechanical stimuli into chemical signaling pathways to regulate their functions and properties. It is hypothesized that perturbation of cellular structures by force is accompanied by changes in molecular dynamics. In order to address these fundamental issues in mechanosensation and transduction, we have developed a hybrid multimodal microscopy - time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) spectroscopy system intended to determine time- and position dependent mechanically-induced changes in the dynamics of molecules in live cells as determined from fluorescence lifetimes and autocorrelation analysis (fluorescence correlation spectroscopy). Colocalization of cell-structures and mechanically-induced changes in molecular dynamics can be done in post-processing by comparing TCSPC data with 3-D models generated from total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF), differential interference contrast (DIC), epifluorescence, and deconvolution. We present control experiments in which the precise location of the apical cell membrane with respect to a confocal probe is assessed using information obtainable only from TCSPC. Such positional accuracy of TCSPC measurements is essential to understanding the role of the membrane in mechanotransduction. We predict that TCSPC will become a useful method to obtain high temporal and spatial resolution information on localized mechanical phenomena in living endothelial cells. Such insight into mechanotransduction phenomenon may uncover the origins of mechanically-related diseases such as atherosclerosis.

  17. Polarimetric, Two-Color, Photon-Counting Laser Altimeter Measurements of Forest Canopy Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, David J.; Dabney, Philip W.; Valett, Susan

    2011-01-01

    Laser altimeter measurements of forest stands with distinct structures and compositions have been acquired at 532 nm (green) and 1064 nm (near-infrared) wavelengths and parallel and perpendicular polarization states using the Slope Imaging Multi-polarization Photon Counting Lidar (SIMPL). The micropulse, single photon ranging measurement approach employed by SIMPL provides canopy structure measurements with high vertical and spatial resolution. Using a height distribution analysis method adapted from conventional, 1064 nm, full-waveform lidar remote sensing, the sensitivity of two parameters commonly used for above-ground biomass estimation are compared as a function of wavelength. The results for the height of median energy (HOME) and canopy cover are for the most part very similar, indicating biomass estimations using lidars operating at green and near-infrared wavelengths will yield comparable estimates. The expected detection of increasing depolarization with depth into the canopies due to volume multiple-scattering was not observed, possibly due to the small laser footprint and the small detector field of view used in the SIMPL instrument. The results of this work provide pathfinder information for NASA's ICESat-2 mission that will employ a 532 nm, micropulse, photon counting laser altimeter.

  18. Antimonide-based Geiger-mode avalanche photodiodes for SWIR and MWIR photon counting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duerr, Erik K.; Manfra, Michael J.; Diagne, Mohamed A.; Bailey, Robert J.; Zayhowski, John J.; Donnelly, Joseph P.; Connors, Michael K.; Grzesik, Michael J.; Turner, George W.

    2010-04-01

    At MIT Lincoln Laboratory, avalanche photodiodes (APDs) have been developed for both 2-μm and 3.4-μm detection using the antimonide material system. These bulk, lattice-matched detectors operate in Geiger mode at temperatures up to 160 K. The 2-μm APDs use a separate-absorber-multiplier design with an InGaAsSb absorber and electron-initiated avalanching in the multiplier. These APDs have exhibited normalized avalanche probability (product of avalanche probability and photo-carrier-injection probability) of 0.4 and dark count rates of ~150 kHz at 77 K for a 30-μm-diameter device. A 1000- element imaging array of the 2-μm detectors has been demonstrated, which operate in a 5 kg dewar with an integrated Stirling-cycle cooler. The APD array is interfaced with a CMOS readout circuit, which provides photon time-of-arrival information for each pixel, allowing the focal plane array to be used in a photon-counting laser radar system. The 3.4-μm APDs use an InAsSb absorber and hole-initiated avalanching and have shown dark count rates of ~500 kHz at 77 K but normalized avalanche probability of < 1%. Research is ongoing to determine the cause of the low avalanche probability and improve the device performance.

  19. An innovative method to reduce count loss from pulse pile-up in a photon-counting pixel for high flux X-ray applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, D.; Lim, K.; Park, K.; Lee, C.; Alexander, S.; Cho, G.

    2017-03-01

    In this study, an innovative fast X-ray photon-counting pixel for high X-ray flux applications is proposed. A computed tomography system typically uses X-ray fluxes up to 108 photons/mm2/sec at the detector and thus a fast read-out is required in order to process individual X-ray photons. Otherwise, pulse pile-up can occur at the output of the signal processing unit. These superimposed signals can distort the number of incident X-ray photons leading to count loss. To minimize such losses, a cross detection method was implemented in the photon-counting pixel. A maximum count rate under X-ray tube voltage of 90 kV was acquired which reflect electrical test results of the proposed photon counting pixel. A maximum count of 780 kcps was achieved with a conventional photon-counting pixel at the pulse processing time of 500 ns, which is the time for a pulse to return to the baseline from the initial rise. In contrast, the maximum count of about 8.1 Mcps was achieved with the proposed photon-counting pixel. From these results, it was clear that the maximum count rate was increased by approximately a factor 10 times by adopting the cross detection method. Therefore, it is an innovative method to reduce count loss from pulse pile-up in a photon-counting pixel while maintaining the pulse processing time.

  20. Development of a single-photon-counting camera with use of a triple-stacked micro-channel plate.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Naruomi; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Katafuchi, Tetsuro

    2016-01-01

    At the quantum-mechanical level, all substances (not merely electromagnetic waves such as light and X-rays) exhibit wave–particle duality. Whereas students of radiation science can easily understand the wave nature of electromagnetic waves, the particle (photon) nature may elude them. Therefore, to assist students in understanding the wave–particle duality of electromagnetic waves, we have developed a photon-counting camera that captures single photons in two-dimensional images. As an image intensifier, this camera has a triple-stacked micro-channel plate (MCP) with an amplification factor of 10(6). The ultra-low light of a single photon entering the camera is first converted to an electron through the photoelectric effect on the photocathode. The electron is intensified by the triple-stacked MCP and then converted to a visible light distribution, which is measured by a high-sensitivity complementary metal oxide semiconductor image sensor. Because it detects individual photons, the photon-counting camera is expected to provide students with a complete understanding of the particle nature of electromagnetic waves. Moreover, it measures ultra-weak light that cannot be detected by ordinary low-sensitivity cameras. Therefore, it is suitable for experimental research on scintillator luminescence, biophoton detection, and similar topics.

  1. High-speed photon-counting x-ray computed tomography system utilizing a multipixel photon counter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Eiichi; Enomoto, Toshiyuki; Watanabe, Manabu; Hitomi, Keitaro; Takahashi, Kiyomi; Sato, Shigehiro; Ogawa, Akiro; Onagawa, Jun

    2009-07-01

    High-speed photon counting is useful for discriminating photon energy and for decreasing absorbed dose for patients in medical radiography, and the counting is usable for constructing an x-ray computed tomography (CT) system. A photon-counting x-ray CT system is of the first generation type and consists of an x-ray generator, a turn table, a translation stage, a two-stage controller, a multipixel photon counter (MPPC) module, a 1.0-mm-thick LSO crystal (scintillator), a counter card (CC), and a personal computer (PC). Tomography is accomplished by repeating the linear scanning and the rotation of an object, and projection curves of the object are obtained by the linear scanning using the detector consisting of a MPPC module and the LSO. The pulses of the event signal from the module are counted by the CC in conjunction with the PC. The lower level of the photon energy is roughly determined by a comparator circuit in the module, and the unit of the level is the photon equivalent (pe). Thus, the average photon energy of the x-ray spectra increases with increasing the lower-level voltage of the comparator. The maximum count rate was approximately 20 Mcps, and energy-discriminated CT was roughly carried out.

  2. SU-E-I-77: A Noise Reduction Technique for Energy-Resolved Photon-Counting Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Lam Ng, A; Ding, H; Cho, H; Molloi, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Finding the optimal energy threshold setting for an energy-resolved photon-counting detector has an important impact on the maximization of contrast-to-noise-ratio (CNR). We introduce a noise reduction method to enhance CNR by reducing the noise in each energy bin without altering the average gray levels in the projection and image domains. Methods: We simulated a four bin energy-resolved photon-counting detector based on Si with a 10 mm depth of interaction. TASMIP algorithm was used to simulate a spectrum of 65 kVp with 2.7 mm Al filter. A 13 mm PMMA phantom with hydroxyapatite and iodine at different concentrations (100, 200 and 300 mg/ml for HA, and 2, 4, and 8 mg/ml for Iodine) was used. Projection-based and Image-based energy weighting methods were used to generate weighted images. A reference low noise image was used for noise reduction purposes. A Gaussian-like weighting function which computes the similarity between pixels of interest was calculated from the reference image and implemented on a pixel by pixel basis for the noisy images. Results: CNR improvement compared to different methods (Charge-Integrated, Photon-Counting and Energy-Weighting) and after noise reduction was highly task-dependent. The CNR improvement with respect to the Charge-Integrated CNR for hydroxyapatite and iodine were 1.8 and 1.5, respectively. In each of the energy bins, the noise was reduced by approximately factor of two without altering their respective average gray levels. Conclusion: The proposed noise reduction technique for energy-resolved photon-counting detectors can significantly reduce image noise. This technique can be used as a compliment to the current energy-weighting methods in CNR optimization.

  3. Spectral Performance of Photon Counting Pixel Detector Using Attenuation Spectra for Test Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Esebamen, Omeime Xerviar Ohi; Norlin, Boerje; Thungstroem, Goeran

    2010-01-05

    When a material is placed along the path of an X-ray beam using a broad range of energy X-ray source, the energy dependence of the attenuation for the X-ray photons will be substantially dissimilar for different materials. The process at which X-ray radiation loses its penetrating strength as it travels through a material will be significantly larger for photons with energy above k-edge energy of that material than for those with slightly lower energy. Hence energy resolved X-ray imaging can be used to achieve colour images revealing the material content of the test sample. The attenuation of the spectrum done by scanning an energy window through the spectrum was measured for a number of samples of different materials. The test samples include Sn, Gd and I with K-edge energy at 29 keV, 50 keV and 33 keV, respectively, using a Feinfocus microfocus X-ray source (FTP-105.02) with Medipix2 photon counting chip.

  4. Rapid detection and counting of viable bacteria in vegetables and environmental water using a photon-counting TV camera.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, T; Kuramitsu, Y; Ookuma, A; Trevanich, S; Honjoh, K; Hatano, S

    1998-10-01

    A bioluminescence assay carried out with a photon-counting TV camera was evaluated for rapid enumeration of viable bacterial counts. The test sample was filtered through a membrane filter, and the membrane filter retaining bacteria was incubated at 37 degrees C for 6 h on a filter paper soaked with nutrient broth supplemented with 0.5% NaCl. The membrane filter was then subjected to a bioluminescence reaction, and the intensity of light and numbers of light emission points on the filter were measured with a photon-counting TV camera. The light intensity measured on seven different bacteria correlated with initial viable counts; the correlation coefficient was calculated to be 0.89. The number of light emission points measured on Escherichia coli also correlated with the initial viable counts (r = 0.81) in a range from 1 to 100 CFU. Presumptive bacterial counts by the present bioluminescence assay determined on 79 samples of vegetables and 122 samples of environmental water correlated well with the viable counts obtained by the conventional plating method, with correlation coefficients of 0.87 and 0.82, respectively.

  5. Dual energy CT with photon counting and dual source systems: comparative evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atak, Haluk; Shikhaliev, Polad M.

    2015-12-01

    Recently, new dual energy (DE) computed tomography (CT) systems—dual source CT (DSCT) and photon counting CT (PCCT) have been introduced. Although these systems have the same clinical targets, they have major differences as they use dual and single kVp acquisitions and different x-ray detection and energy resolution concepts. The purpose of this study was theoretical and experimental comparisons of DSCT and PCCT. The DSCT Siemens Somatom Flash was modeled for simulation study. The PCCT had the same configuration as DSCT except it used a photon counting detector. The soft tissue phantoms with 20, 30, and 38 cm diameters included iodine, CaCO3, adipose, and water samples. The dose (air kerma) was 14 mGy for all studies. The low and high energy CT data were simulated at 80 kVp and 140 kVp for DSCT, and in 20-58 keV and 59-120 keV energy ranges for PCCT, respectively. The experiments used Somatom Flash DSCT system and PCCT system based on photon counting CdZnTe detector with 2  ×  256 pixel configuration and 1  ×  1 mm2 pixels size. In simulated general CT images, PCCT provided higher contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) than DSCT with 0.4/0.8 mm Sn filters. The PCCT with K-edge filter provided higher CNR than the PCCT with a Cu filter, and DSCT with 0.4 mm Sn filter provided higher CNR than the DSCT with a 0.8 mm Sn filter. In simulated DE subtracted images, CNR of the DSCT was comparable to the PCCT with a Cu filter. However, DE PCCT with Ho a K-edge filter provided 30-40% higher CNR than the DE DSCT with 0.4/0.8 mm Sn filters. The experimental PCCT provided higher CNR in general imaging compared to the DSCT. In experimental DE subtracted images, the DSCT provided higher CNR than the PCCT with a Cu filter. However, experimental CNR with DE PCCT with K-edge filter was 15% higher than in DE DSCT, which is less than 30-40% increase predicted by the simulation study. It is concluded that ideal PCCT can provide substantial advantages over ideal

  6. High event rate ROICs (HEROICs) for astronomical UV photon counting detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harwit, Alex; France, Kevin; Argabright, Vic; Franka, Steve; Freymiller, Ed; Ebbets, Dennis

    2014-07-01

    The next generation of astronomical photocathode / microchannel plate based UV photon counting detectors will overcome existing count rate limitations by replacing the anode arrays and external cabled electronics with anode arrays integrated into imaging Read Out Integrated Circuits (ROICs). We have fabricated a High Event Rate ROIC (HEROIC) consisting of a 32 by 32 array of 55 μm square pixels on a 60 μm pitch. The pixel sensitivity (threshold) has been designed to be globally programmable between 1 × 103 and 1 × 106 electrons. To achieve the sensitivity of 1 × 103 electrons, parasitic capacitances had to be minimized and this was achieved by fabricating the ROIC in a 65 nm CMOS process. The ROIC has been designed to support pixel counts up to 4096 events per integration period at rates up to 1 MHz per pixel. Integration time periods can be controlled via an external signal with a time resolution of less than 1 microsecond enabling temporally resolved imaging and spectroscopy of astronomical sources. An electrical injection port is provided to verify functionality and performance of each ROIC prior to vacuum integration with a photocathode and microchannel plate amplifier. Test results on the first ROICs using the electrical injection port demonstrate sensitivities between 3 × 103 and 4 × 105 electrons are achieved. A number of fixes are identified for a re-spin of this ROIC.

  7. Initial steps toward the realization of large area arrays of single photon counting pixels based on polycrystalline silicon TFTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Albert K.; Koniczek, Martin; Antonuk, Larry E.; El-Mohri, Youcef; Zhao, Qihua; Jiang, Hao; Street, Robert A.; Lu, Jeng Ping

    2014-03-01

    The thin-film semiconductor processing methods that enabled creation of inexpensive liquid crystal displays based on amorphous silicon transistors for cell phones and televisions, as well as desktop, laptop and mobile computers, also facilitated the development of devices that have become ubiquitous in medical x-ray imaging environments. These devices, called active matrix flat-panel imagers (AMFPIs), measure the integrated signal generated by incident X rays and offer detection areas as large as ~43×43 cm2. In recent years, there has been growing interest in medical x-ray imagers that record information from X ray photons on an individual basis. However, such photon counting devices have generally been based on crystalline silicon, a material not inherently suited to the cost-effective manufacture of monolithic devices of a size comparable to that of AMFPIs. Motivated by these considerations, we have developed an initial set of small area prototype arrays using thin-film processing methods and polycrystalline silicon transistors. These prototypes were developed in the spirit of exploring the possibility of creating large area arrays offering single photon counting capabilities and, to our knowledge, are the first photon counting arrays fabricated using thin film techniques. In this paper, the architecture of the prototype pixels is presented and considerations that influenced the design of the pixel circuits, including amplifier noise, TFT performance variations, and minimum feature size, are discussed.

  8. SiPM for fast Photon-Counting and Multiphoton Detection.

    PubMed

    Eraerds, P; Legré, M; Rochas, A; Zbinden, H; Gisin, N

    2007-10-29

    We demonstrate fast counting and multiphoton detection abilities of a Silicon Photo Multiplier (SiPM). In fast counting mode we are able to detect two consecutive photons separated by only 2.3 ns corresponding to 430 MHz. The counting efficiency for small optical intensities at lambda= 532 nm was found to be around 16% with a dark count rate of 52 kHz at T= -5 masculine C. Using the SiPM in multiphoton detection mode, we find a good signal discrimination for different numbers of simultaneously detected photons.

  9. Improving the counting efficiency in time-correlated single photon counting experiments by dead-time optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peronio, P.; Acconcia, G.; Rech, I.; Ghioni, M.

    2015-11-01

    Time-Correlated Single Photon Counting (TCSPC) has been long recognized as the most sensitive method for fluorescence lifetime measurements, but often requiring "long" data acquisition times. This drawback is related to the limited counting capability of the TCSPC technique, due to pile-up and counting loss effects. In recent years, multi-module TCSPC systems have been introduced to overcome this issue. Splitting the light into several detectors connected to independent TCSPC modules proportionally increases the counting capability. Of course, multi-module operation also increases the system cost and can cause space and power supply problems. In this paper, we propose an alternative approach based on a new detector and processing electronics designed to reduce the overall system dead time, thus enabling efficient photon collection at high excitation rate. We present a fast active quenching circuit for single-photon avalanche diodes which features a minimum dead time of 12.4 ns. We also introduce a new Time-to-Amplitude Converter (TAC) able to attain extra-short dead time thanks to the combination of a scalable array of monolithically integrated TACs and a sequential router. The fast TAC (F-TAC) makes it possible to operate the system towards the upper limit of detector count rate capability (˜80 Mcps) with reduced pile-up losses, addressing one of the historic criticisms of TCSPC. Preliminary measurements on the F-TAC are presented and discussed.

  10. Improving the counting efficiency in time-correlated single photon counting experiments by dead-time optimization.

    PubMed

    Peronio, P; Acconcia, G; Rech, I; Ghioni, M

    2015-11-01

    Time-Correlated Single Photon Counting (TCSPC) has been long recognized as the most sensitive method for fluorescence lifetime measurements, but often requiring "long" data acquisition times. This drawback is related to the limited counting capability of the TCSPC technique, due to pile-up and counting loss effects. In recent years, multi-module TCSPC systems have been introduced to overcome this issue. Splitting the light into several detectors connected to independent TCSPC modules proportionally increases the counting capability. Of course, multi-module operation also increases the system cost and can cause space and power supply problems. In this paper, we propose an alternative approach based on a new detector and processing electronics designed to reduce the overall system dead time, thus enabling efficient photon collection at high excitation rate. We present a fast active quenching circuit for single-photon avalanche diodes which features a minimum dead time of 12.4 ns. We also introduce a new Time-to-Amplitude Converter (TAC) able to attain extra-short dead time thanks to the combination of a scalable array of monolithically integrated TACs and a sequential router. The fast TAC (F-TAC) makes it possible to operate the system towards the upper limit of detector count rate capability (∼80 Mcps) with reduced pile-up losses, addressing one of the historic criticisms of TCSPC. Preliminary measurements on the F-TAC are presented and discussed.

  11. Improving the counting efficiency in time-correlated single photon counting experiments by dead-time optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Peronio, P.; Acconcia, G.; Rech, I.; Ghioni, M.

    2015-11-15

    Time-Correlated Single Photon Counting (TCSPC) has been long recognized as the most sensitive method for fluorescence lifetime measurements, but often requiring “long” data acquisition times. This drawback is related to the limited counting capability of the TCSPC technique, due to pile-up and counting loss effects. In recent years, multi-module TCSPC systems have been introduced to overcome this issue. Splitting the light into several detectors connected to independent TCSPC modules proportionally increases the counting capability. Of course, multi-module operation also increases the system cost and can cause space and power supply problems. In this paper, we propose an alternative approach based on a new detector and processing electronics designed to reduce the overall system dead time, thus enabling efficient photon collection at high excitation rate. We present a fast active quenching circuit for single-photon avalanche diodes which features a minimum dead time of 12.4 ns. We also introduce a new Time-to-Amplitude Converter (TAC) able to attain extra-short dead time thanks to the combination of a scalable array of monolithically integrated TACs and a sequential router. The fast TAC (F-TAC) makes it possible to operate the system towards the upper limit of detector count rate capability (∼80 Mcps) with reduced pile-up losses, addressing one of the historic criticisms of TCSPC. Preliminary measurements on the F-TAC are presented and discussed.

  12. Improving the counting efficiency in time-correlated single photon counting experiments by dead-time optimization

    PubMed Central

    Peronio, P.; Acconcia, G.; Rech, I.; Ghioni, M.

    2015-01-01

    Time-Correlated Single Photon Counting (TCSPC) has been long recognized as the most sensitive method for fluorescence lifetime measurements, but often requiring “long” data acquisition times. This drawback is related to the limited counting capability of the TCSPC technique, due to pile-up and counting loss effects. In recent years, multi-module TCSPC systems have been introduced to overcome this issue. Splitting the light into several detectors connected to independent TCSPC modules proportionally increases the counting capability. Of course, multi-module operation also increases the system cost and can cause space and power supply problems. In this paper, we propose an alternative approach based on a new detector and processing electronics designed to reduce the overall system dead time, thus enabling efficient photon collection at high excitation rate. We present a fast active quenching circuit for single-photon avalanche diodes which features a minimum dead time of 12.4 ns. We also introduce a new Time-to-Amplitude Converter (TAC) able to attain extra-short dead time thanks to the combination of a scalable array of monolithically integrated TACs and a sequential router. The fast TAC (F-TAC) makes it possible to operate the system towards the upper limit of detector count rate capability (∼80 Mcps) with reduced pile-up losses, addressing one of the historic criticisms of TCSPC. Preliminary measurements on the F-TAC are presented and discussed. PMID:26628115

  13. SWAD: inherent photon counting performance of amorphous selenium multi-well avalanche detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stavro, Jann; Goldan, Amir H.; Zhao, Wei

    2016-03-01

    Photon counting detectors (PCDs) have the potential to improve x-ray imaging, however they are still hindered by several performance limitations and high production cost. By using amorphous Selenium (a-Se) the cost of PCDs can be significantly reduced compared to crystalline materials and enable large area detector fabrication. To overcome the problem of low carrier mobility and low charge conversion gain in a-Se, we are developing a novel direct conversion a- Se field-Shaping multi-Well Avalanche Detector (SWAD). SWAD circumvents the charge transport limitation by using a Frisch grid built within the readout circuit, reducing charge collection time to ~200 ns. Field shaping permits depth independent avalanche gain in wells, resulting in total conversion gain that is comparable to Si and CdTe. In the present work we investigate the effects of charge sharing and energy loss to understand the inherent photon counting performance for SWAD at x-ray energies used in breast imaging applications (20-50keV). The energy deposition profile for each interacting x-ray was determined with Monte Carlo simulation. For the energy ranges we are interested in, photoelectric interaction dominates, with a k-fluorescence yield of approximately 60%. Using a monoenergetic 45 keV beam incident on a target pixel in 400um of a-Se, our results show that only 20.42 % and 22.4 % of primary interacting photons have kfluorescence emissions which escape the target pixel for 100um and 85um pixel sizes respectively, demonstrating SWAD's potential for high spatial resolution applications.

  14. Characterization of energy response for photon-counting detectors using x-ray fluorescence

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Huanjun; Cho, Hyo-Min; Barber, William C.; Iwanczyk, Jan S.; Molloi, Sabee

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of characterizing a Si strip photon-counting detector using x-ray fluorescence. Methods: X-ray fluorescence was generated by using a pencil beam from a tungsten anode x-ray tube with 2 mm Al filtration. Spectra were acquired at 90° from the primary beam direction with an energy-resolved photon-counting detector based on an edge illuminated Si strip detector. The distances from the source to target and the target to detector were approximately 19 and 11 cm, respectively. Four different materials, containing silver (Ag), iodine (I), barium (Ba), and gadolinium (Gd), were placed in small plastic containers with a diameter of approximately 0.7 cm for x-ray fluorescence measurements. Linear regression analysis was performed to derive the gain and offset values for the correlation between the measured fluorescence peak center and the known fluorescence energies. The energy resolutions and charge-sharing fractions were also obtained from analytical fittings of the recorded fluorescence spectra. An analytical model, which employed four parameters that can be determined from the fluorescence calibration, was used to estimate the detector response function. Results: Strong fluorescence signals of all four target materials were recorded with the investigated geometry for the Si strip detector. The average gain and offset of all pixels for detector energy calibration were determined to be 6.95 mV/keV and −66.33 mV, respectively. The detector’s energy resolution remained at approximately 2.7 keV for low energies, and increased slightly at 45 keV. The average charge-sharing fraction was estimated to be 36% within the investigated energy range of 20–45 keV. The simulated detector output based on the proposed response function agreed well with the experimental measurement. Conclusions: The performance of a spectral imaging system using energy-resolved photon-counting detectors is very dependent on the energy calibration of the

  15. Performance of in-pixel circuits for photon counting arrays (PCAs) based on polycrystalline silicon TFTs.

    PubMed

    Liang, Albert K; Koniczek, Martin; Antonuk, Larry E; El-Mohri, Youcef; Zhao, Qihua; Street, Robert A; Lu, Jeng Ping

    2016-03-07

    Photon counting arrays (PCAs), defined as pixelated imagers which measure the absorbed energy of x-ray photons individually and record this information digitally, are of increasing clinical interest. A number of PCA prototypes with a 1 mm pixel-to-pixel pitch have recently been fabricated with polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si)-a thin-film technology capable of creating monolithic imagers of a size commensurate with human anatomy. In this study, analog and digital simulation frameworks were developed to provide insight into the influence of individual poly-Si transistors on pixel circuit performance-information that is not readily available through empirical means. The simulation frameworks were used to characterize the circuit designs employed in the prototypes. The analog framework, which determines the noise produced by individual transistors, was used to estimate energy resolution, as well as to identify which transistors contribute the most noise. The digital framework, which analyzes how well circuits function in the presence of significant variations in transistor properties, was used to estimate how fast a circuit can produce an output (referred to as output count rate). In addition, an algorithm was developed and used to estimate the minimum pixel pitch that could be achieved for the pixel circuits of the current prototypes. The simulation frameworks predict that the analog component of the PCA prototypes could have energy resolution as low as 8.9% full width at half maximum (FWHM) at 70 keV; and the digital components should work well even in the presence of significant thin-film transistor (TFT) variations, with the fastest component having output count rates as high as 3 MHz. Finally, based on conceivable improvements in the underlying fabrication process, the algorithm predicts that the 1 mm pitch of the current PCA prototypes could be reduced significantly, potentially to between ~240 and 290 μm.

  16. Performance of in-pixel circuits for photon counting arrays (PCAs) based on polycrystalline silicon TFTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Albert K.; Koniczek, Martin; Antonuk, Larry E.; El-Mohri, Youcef; Zhao, Qihua; Street, Robert A.; Lu, Jeng Ping

    2016-03-01

    Photon counting arrays (PCAs), defined as pixelated imagers which measure the absorbed energy of x-ray photons individually and record this information digitally, are of increasing clinical interest. A number of PCA prototypes with a 1 mm pixel-to-pixel pitch have recently been fabricated with polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si)—a thin-film technology capable of creating monolithic imagers of a size commensurate with human anatomy. In this study, analog and digital simulation frameworks were developed to provide insight into the influence of individual poly-Si transistors on pixel circuit performance—information that is not readily available through empirical means. The simulation frameworks were used to characterize the circuit designs employed in the prototypes. The analog framework, which determines the noise produced by individual transistors, was used to estimate energy resolution, as well as to identify which transistors contribute the most noise. The digital framework, which analyzes how well circuits function in the presence of significant variations in transistor properties, was used to estimate how fast a circuit can produce an output (referred to as output count rate). In addition, an algorithm was developed and used to estimate the minimum pixel pitch that could be achieved for the pixel circuits of the current prototypes. The simulation frameworks predict that the analog component of the PCA prototypes could have energy resolution as low as 8.9% full width at half maximum (FWHM) at 70 keV; and the digital components should work well even in the presence of significant thin-film transistor (TFT) variations, with the fastest component having output count rates as high as 3 MHz. Finally, based on conceivable improvements in the underlying fabrication process, the algorithm predicts that the 1 mm pitch of the current PCA prototypes could be reduced significantly, potentially to between ~240 and 290 μm.

  17. Evaluation of a photon counting Medipix3RX CZT spectral x-ray detector

    PubMed Central

    Jorgensen, Steven M.; Vercnocke, Andrew J.; Rundle, David S.; Butler, Philip H.; McCollough, Cynthia H.; Ritman, Erik L.

    2016-01-01

    We assessed the performance of a cadmium zinc telluride (CZT)-based Medipix3RX x-ray detector as a candidate for micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) imaging. This technology was developed at CERN for the Large Hadron Collider. It features an array of 128 by 128, 110 micrometer square pixels, each with eight simultaneous threshold counters, five of which utilize real-time charge summing, significantly reducing the charge sharing between contiguous pixels. Pixel response curves were created by imaging a range of x-ray intensities by varying x-ray tube current and by varying the exposure time with fixed x-ray current. Photon energy-related assessments were made by flooding the detector with the tin foil filtered emission of an I-125 radioisotope brachytherapy seed and sweeping the energy threshold of each of the four charge-summed counters of each pixel in 1 keV steps. Long term stability assessments were made by repeating exposures over the course of one hour. The high properly-functioning pixel yield (99%), long term stability (linear regression of whole-chip response over one hour of acquisitions: y = −0.0038x + 2284; standard deviation: 3.7 counts) and energy resolution (2.5 keV FWHM (single pixel), 3.7 keV FWHM across the full image) make this device suitable for spectral micro-CT. The charge summing performance effectively reduced the measurement corruption caused by charge sharing which, when unaccounted for, shifts the photon energy assignment to lower energies, degrading both count and energy accuracy. Effective charge summing greatly improves the potential for calibrated, energy-specific material decomposition and K edge difference imaging approaches. PMID:27795606

  18. Evaluation of a photon counting Medipix3RX CZT spectral x-ray detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorgensen, Steven M.; Vercnocke, Andrew J.; Rundle, David S.; Butler, Philip H.; McCollough, Cynthia H.; Ritman, Erik L.

    2016-10-01

    We assessed the performance of a cadmium zinc telluride (CZT)-based Medipix3RX x-ray detector as a candidate for micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) imaging. This technology was developed at CERN for the Large Hadron Collider. It features an array of 128 by 128, 110 micrometer square pixels, each with eight simultaneous threshold counters, five of which utilize real-time charge summing, significantly reducing the charge sharing between contiguous pixels. Pixel response curves were created by imaging a range of x-ray intensities by varying x-ray tube current and by varying the exposure time with fixed x-ray current. Photon energy-related assessments were made by flooding the detector with the tin foil filtered emission of an I-125 radioisotope brachytherapy seed and sweeping the energy threshold of each of the four charge-summed counters of each pixel in 1 keV steps. Long term stability assessments were made by repeating exposures over the course of one hour. The high properly-functioning pixel yield (99%), long term stability (linear regression of whole-chip response over one hour of acquisitions: y = -0.0038x + 2284; standard deviation: 3.7 counts) and energy resolution (2.5 keV FWHM (single pixel), 3.7 keV FWHM across the full image) make this device suitable for spectral micro-CT. The charge summing performance effectively reduced the measurement corruption caused by charge sharing which, when unaccounted for, shifts the photon energy assignment to lower energies, degrading both count and energy accuracy. Effective charge summing greatly improves the potential for calibrated, energy-specific material decomposition and K edge difference imaging approaches.

  19. Evaluation of ZnS-family phosphors for neutron detectors using photon counting method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubota, N.; Katagiri, M.; Kamijo, K.; Nanto, H.

    2004-08-01

    A neutron detection sheet composed of ZnS:Ag as phosphor and 6LiF as neutron converter has been conventionally used for neutron detectors including imaging detectors because of its larger luminescence rate for α ray and shorter lifetime. However, the week point of ZnS:Ag phosphor is the slow component of the lifetime. Thus, we began to investigate other ZnS-family phosphors without the slow component of lifetime for neutron detectors using the photon counting method which needs a smaller number of photons of one order of magnitude. In this study, ZnO:Zn, ZnO:Ga, ZnSSe:Ag phosphor ceramics without the slow component of lifetime has been tried to fabricate using an electric furnace or a Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS) apparatus to appropriate for neutron detectors under high counting rates. The ZnO:Zn fabricated by means of the SPS method had the fastest lifetime of 4 ns though its detection efficiency was to be one-eighths as compared with a standard ZnS:Ag/ 6LiF detection sheet.

  20. Merged analog and photon counting profiles used as input for other RLPROF VAPs

    DOE Data Explorer

    Newsom, Rob

    1998-03-01

    The rlprof_merge VAP "merges" the photon counting and analog signals appropriately for each channel, creating an output data file that is very similar to the original raw data file format that the Raman lidar initially had.

  1. A comparison of photon counting and current measuring techniques in spectrophotometry of faint sources.

    PubMed

    Tull, R G

    1968-10-01

    The component of dark noise produced by Cerenkov pulses in photomultipliers due to cosmic ray mu mesons is discussed. It is shown by integration of pulse height spectra that this source of noise can be the limiting factor in de measuring spectrophotometry of faint astronomical sources. Direct current methods of photometry are compared with photon counting, and the advantage of photon counting is demonstrated under various operating conditions.

  2. Photon number resolving SiPM detector with 1 GHz count rate.

    PubMed

    Akiba, M; Inagaki, K; Tsujino, K

    2012-01-30

    We demonstrate 1 GHz count rate photon detection with photon number resolution by using a multi-pixel photon counter (MPPC) and performing baseline correction. A bare MPPC chip mounted on a high-frequency circuit board is employed to increase response speed. The photon number resolving capability is investigated at high repetition rates. This capability remains at a repetition rate of 1 GHz and at rates as high as an average of 2.6 photons detected per optical pulse. The photon detection efficiencies are 16% at λ = 450 nm and 4.5% at λ = 775 nm with a dark count rate of 270 kcps and an afterpulse probability of 0.007.

  3. Single photon counting for space based quantum experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandrasekara, R.; Tang, Z. K.; Tan, Y. C.; Cheng, C.; Wildfeuer, C.; Ling, A.

    2015-05-01

    We present a software based control system for Geiger-mode avalanche photodiodes (GM-APDs) that enables constant photon detection efficiency irrespective of the diode's junction temperature. Furthermore, we demonstrate that this control system enables passively quenched GM-APDs to double the rate of photon detection events before saturation compared to the standard control method that fixes the junction temperature and applied bias voltage. We present data demonstrating the robustness of the GM-APD control system when tested in near-space conditions using a correlated photon pair source carried by a weather balloon to an altitude of 35.5 km.

  4. High resolution micro-CT of low attenuating organic materials using large area photon-counting detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumpová, I.; Vavřík, D.; Fíla, T.; Koudelka, P.; Jandejsek, I.; Jakůbek, J.; Kytýř, D.; Zlámal, P.; Vopálenský, M.; Gantar, A.

    2016-02-01

    To overcome certain limitations of contemporary materials used for bone tissue engineering, such as inflammatory response after implantation, a whole new class of materials based on polysaccharide compounds is being developed. Here, nanoparticulate bioactive glass reinforced gelan-gum (GG-BAG) has recently been proposed for the production of bone scaffolds. This material offers promising biocompatibility properties, including bioactivity and biodegradability, with the possibility of producing scaffolds with directly controlled microgeometry. However, to utilize such a scaffold with application-optimized properties, large sets of complex numerical simulations using the real microgeometry of the material have to be carried out during the development process. Because the GG-BAG is a material with intrinsically very low attenuation to X-rays, its radiographical imaging, including tomographical scanning and reconstructions, with resolution required by numerical simulations might be a very challenging task. In this paper, we present a study on X-ray imaging of GG-BAG samples. High-resolution volumetric images of investigated specimens were generated on the basis of micro-CT measurements using a large area flat-panel detector and a large area photon-counting detector. The photon-counting detector was composed of a 010× 1 matrix of Timepix edgeless silicon pixelated detectors with tiling based on overlaying rows (i.e. assembled so that no gap is present between individual rows of detectors). We compare the results from both detectors with the scanning electron microscopy on selected slices in transversal plane. It has been shown that the photon counting detector can provide approx. 3× better resolution of the details in low-attenuating materials than the integrating flat panel detectors. We demonstrate that employment of a large area photon counting detector is a good choice for imaging of low attenuating materials with the resolution sufficient for numerical simulations.

  5. Photon-efficient imaging with a single-photon camera

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Dongeek; Xu, Feihu; Venkatraman, Dheera; Lussana, Rudi; Villa, Federica; Zappa, Franco; Goyal, Vivek K.; Wong, Franco N. C.; Shapiro, Jeffrey H.

    2016-01-01

    Reconstructing a scene's 3D structure and reflectivity accurately with an active imaging system operating in low-light-level conditions has wide-ranging applications, spanning biological imaging to remote sensing. Here we propose and experimentally demonstrate a depth and reflectivity imaging system with a single-photon camera that generates high-quality images from ∼1 detected signal photon per pixel. Previous achievements of similar photon efficiency have been with conventional raster-scanning data collection using single-pixel photon counters capable of ∼10-ps time tagging. In contrast, our camera's detector array requires highly parallelized time-to-digital conversions with photon time-tagging accuracy limited to ∼ns. Thus, we develop an array-specific algorithm that converts coarsely time-binned photon detections to highly accurate scene depth and reflectivity by exploiting both the transverse smoothness and longitudinal sparsity of natural scenes. By overcoming the coarse time resolution of the array, our framework uniquely achieves high photon efficiency in a relatively short acquisition time. PMID:27338821

  6. TU-EF-207-02: Spectral Mammography Based on Photon Counting Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Molloi, S.

    2015-06-15

    Breast imaging technology is advancing on several fronts. In digital mammography, the major technological trend has been on optimization of approaches for performing combined mammography and tomosynthesis using the same system. In parallel, photon-counting slot-scan mammography is now in clinical use and more efforts are directed towards further development of this approach for spectral imaging. Spectral imaging refers to simultaneous acquisition of two or more energy-windowed images. Depending on the detector and associated electronics, there are a number of ways this can be accomplished. Spectral mammography using photon-counting detectors can suppress electronic noise and importantly, it enables decomposition of the image into various material compositions of interest facilitating quantitative imaging. Spectral imaging can be particularly important in intravenously injected contrast mammography and eventually tomosynthesis. The various approaches and applications of spectral mammography are discussed. Digital breast tomosynthesis relies on the mechanical movement of the x-ray tube to acquire a number of projections in a predefined arc, typically from 9 to 25 projections over a scan angle of +/−7.5 to 25 degrees depending on the particular system. The mechanical x-ray tube motion requires relatively long acquisition time, typically between 3.7 to 25 seconds depending on the system. Moreover, mechanical scanning may have an effect on the spatial resolution due to internal x-ray filament or external mechanical vibrations. New x-ray source arrays have been developed and they are aimed at replacing the scanned x-ray tube for improved acquisition time and potentially for higher spatial resolution. The potential advantages and challenges of this approach are described. Combination of digital mammography and tomosynthesis in a single system places increased demands on certain functional aspects of the detector and overall performance, particularly in the tomosynthesis

  7. Photon-Counting Multikilohertz Microlaser Altimeters for Airborne and Spaceborne Topographic Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degnan, John J.; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We consider the optimum design of photon-counting microlaser altimeters operating from airborne and spaceborne platforms under both day and night conditions. Extremely compact Q-switched microlaser transmitters produce trains of low energy pulses at multi-kHz rates and can easily generate subnanosecond pulse-widths for precise ranging. To guide the design, we have modeled the solar noise background and developed simple algorithms, based on Post-Detection Poisson Filtering (PDPF), to optimally extract the weak altimeter signal from a high noise background during daytime operations. Practical technology issues, such as detector and/or receiver dead times, have also been considered in the analysis. We describe an airborne prototype, being developed under NASA's instrument Incubator Program, which is designed to operate at a 10 kHz rate from aircraft cruise altitudes up to 12 km with laser pulse energies on the order of a few microjoules. We also analyze a compact and power efficient system designed to operate from Mars orbit at an altitude of 300 km and sample the Martian surface at rates up to 4.3 kHz using a 1 watt laser transmitter and an 18 cm telescope. This yields a Power-Aperture Product of 0.24 W-square meter, corresponding to a value almost 4 times smaller than the Mars Orbiting Laser Altimeter (0. 88W-square meter), yet the sampling rate is roughly 400 times greater (4 kHz vs 10 Hz) Relative to conventional high power laser altimeters, advantages of photon-counting laser altimeters include: (1) a more efficient use of available laser photons providing up to two orders of magnitude greater surface sampling rates for a given laser power-telescope aperture product; (2) a simultaneous two order of magnitude reduction in the volume, cost and weight of the telescope system; (3) the unique ability to spatially resolve the source of the surface return in a photon counting mode through the use of pixellated or imaging detectors; and (4) improved vertical and

  8. ChromAIX: Fast photon-counting ASIC for Spectral Computed Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steadman, Roger; Herrmann, Christoph; Mülhens, Oliver; Maeding, Dale G.

    2011-08-01

    X-ray attenuation properties of matter (i.e. human body in medical Computed Tomography) are energy and material dependent. This dependency is largely neglected in conventional CT techniques, which require the introduction of correction algorithms in order to prevent image artefacts. The exploitation of the inherent energy information contained in the X-ray spectrum allows distinguishing the two main physical causes of energy-dependent attenuation (photo-electric effect and Compton effect). Currently a number of methods exist that allow assessing the energy-dependent attenuation in conventional systems. These methods consist of using two distinct spectra (kVp switching or dual source) or of discriminating low and high energy photons by means of stacking two detectors. Further improvements can be achieved by transitioning to direct-conversion technologies and counting-mode detection, which inherently exhibits a better signal-to-noise ratio. Further including energy discrimination enables new applications, which are not feasible with dual-energy techniques, e.g. the possibility to discriminate K-edge features (contrast agents, e.g. gadolinium) from other contributions to the X-ray attenuation of a human body. The capability of providing energy-resolved information with two or more independent measurements is referred to as Spectral CT.A new proprietary photon-counting ASIC (ChromAIX) has been developed to provide high count-rate capabilities while offering energy discrimination. ChromAIX consists of a pixel array with an isotropic pitch of 300 μm. Each pixel contains independent discriminators that enable the possibility to discretize the incoming photons into a number of energy levels. Extensive electrical characterization has been carried out to assess the performance in terms of count-rate performance and noise. Observed rates exceed 10 Mcps/pixel (Poissonian, mean incoming rates >27 Mcps). The energy resolution is better than 4.1 keV FWHM and has been shown to be

  9. Combination of current-integrating/photon-counting detector modules for spectral CT.

    PubMed

    Chu, Jiyang; Cong, Wenxiang; Li, Liang; Wang, Ge

    2013-10-07

    Inspired by compressive sensing theory and spectral detection technology, here we propose a novel design of a CT detector array that uses current-integrating/photon-counting modules in an interlacing fashion so that strengths of each detector type can be synergistically combined. For geometrical symmetry, an evenly alternating pattern is initially assumed for these detector modules to form a hybrid detector array. While grayscale detector modules acquire regular raw data in a large dynamic range cost-effectively, spectral detector modules simultaneously sense energy-discriminative data in multiple energy bins. A split Bregman iterative algorithm is developed for spectral CT reconstruction from projection data of an object collected with the hybrid detector array. With mathematical phantoms, an optimal ratio of the number of the spectral elements over the number of grayscale elements is determined based on classic image quality evaluation. This hybrid detector array is capable of delivering a performance comparable with that of a full spectral detector array.

  10. Picosecond wide-field time-correlated single photon counting fluorescence microscopy with a delay line anode detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirvonen, Liisa M.; Becker, Wolfgang; Milnes, James; Conneely, Thomas; Smietana, Stefan; Le Marois, Alix; Jagutzki, Ottmar; Suhling, Klaus

    2016-08-01

    We perform wide-field time-correlated single photon counting-based fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) with a crossed delay line anode image intensifier, where the pulse propagation time yields the photon position. This microchannel plate-based detector was read out with conventional fast timing electronics and mounted on a fluorescence microscope with total internal reflection (TIR) illumination. The picosecond time resolution of this detection system combines low illumination intensity of microwatts with wide-field data collection. This is ideal for fluorescence lifetime imaging of cell membranes using TIR. We show that fluorescence lifetime images of living HeLa cells stained with membrane dye di-4-ANEPPDHQ exhibit a reduced lifetime near the coverslip in TIR compared to epifluorescence FLIM.

  11. Gallium nitride photocathodes for imaging photon counters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegmund, Oswald H. W.; Hull, Jeffrey S.; Tremsin, Anton S.; McPhate, Jason B.; Dabiran, Amir M.

    2010-07-01

    Gallium nitride opaque and semitransparent photocathodes provide high ultraviolet quantum efficiencies from 100 nm to a long wavelength cutoff at ~380 nm. P (Mg) doped GaN photocathode layers ~100 nm thick with a barrier layer of AlN (22 nm) on sapphire substrates also have low out of band response, and are highly robust. Opaque GaN photocathodes are relatively easy to optimize, and consistently provide high quantum efficiency (70% at 120 nm) provided the surface cleaning and activation (Cs) processes are well established. We have used two dimensional photon counting imaging microchannel plate detectors, with an active area of 25 mm diameter, to investigate the imaging characteristics of semitransparent GaN photocathodes. These can be produced with high (20%) efficiency, but the thickness and conductivity of the GaN must be carefully optimized. High spatial resolution of ~50 μm with low intrinsic background (~7 events sec-1 cm-2) and good image uniformity have been achieved. Selectively patterned deposited GaN photocathodes have also been used to allow quick diagnostics of optimization parameters. GaN photocathodes of both types show great promise for future detector applications in ultraviolet Astrophysical instruments.

  12. Spectral response model for a multibin photon-counting spectral computed tomography detector and its applications

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xuejin; Persson, Mats; Bornefalk, Hans; Karlsson, Staffan; Xu, Cheng; Danielsson, Mats; Huber, Ben

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Variations among detector channels in computed tomography can lead to ring artifacts in the reconstructed images and biased estimates in projection-based material decomposition. Typically, the ring artifacts are corrected by compensation methods based on flat fielding, where transmission measurements are required for a number of material-thickness combinations. Phantoms used in these methods can be rather complex and require an extensive number of transmission measurements. Moreover, material decomposition needs knowledge of the individual response of each detector channel to account for the detector inhomogeneities. For this purpose, we have developed a spectral response model that binwise predicts the response of a multibin photon-counting detector individually for each detector channel. The spectral response model is performed in two steps. The first step employs a forward model to predict the expected numbers of photon counts, taking into account parameters such as the incident x-ray spectrum, absorption efficiency, and energy response of the detector. The second step utilizes a limited number of transmission measurements with a set of flat slabs of two absorber materials to fine-tune the model predictions, resulting in a good correspondence with the physical measurements. To verify the response model, we apply the model in two cases. First, the model is used in combination with a compensation method which requires an extensive number of transmission measurements to determine the necessary parameters. Our spectral response model successfully replaces these measurements by simulations, saving a significant amount of measurement time. Second, the spectral response model is used as the basis of the maximum likelihood approach for projection-based material decomposition. The reconstructed basis images show a good separation between the calcium-like material and the contrast agents, iodine and gadolinium. The contrast agent concentrations are reconstructed

  13. Amplitude distributions of dark counts and photon counts in NbN superconducting single-photon detectors integrated with the HEMT readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitaygorsky, J.; Słysz, W.; Shouten, R.; Dorenbos, S.; Reiger, E.; Zwiller, V.; Sobolewski, Roman

    2017-01-01

    We present a new operation regime of NbN superconducting single-photon detectors (SSPDs) by integrating them with a low-noise cryogenic high-electron-mobility transistor and a high-load resistor. The integrated sensors are designed to get a better understanding of the origin of dark counts triggered by the detector, as our scheme allows us to distinguish the origin of dark pulses from the actual photon pulses in SSPDs. The presented approach is based on a statistical analysis of amplitude distributions of recorded trains of the SSPD photoresponse transients. It also enables to obtain information on energy of the incident photons, as well as demonstrates some photon-number-resolving capability of meander-type SSPDs.

  14. Performance of three-photon PET imaging: Monte Carlo simulations.

    PubMed

    Kacperski, Krzysztof; Spyrou, Nicholas M

    2005-12-07

    We have recently introduced the idea of making use of three-photon positron annihilations in positron emission tomography. In this paper, the basic characteristics of the three-gamma imaging in PET are studied by means of Monte Carlo simulations and analytical computations. Two typical configurations of human and small animal scanners are considered. Three-photon imaging requires high-energy resolution detectors. Parameters currently attainable by CdZnTe semiconductor detectors, the technology of choice for the future development of radiation imaging, are assumed. Spatial resolution is calculated as a function of detector energy resolution and size, position in the field of view, scanner size and the energies of the three-gamma annihilation photons. Possible ways to improve the spatial resolution obtained for nominal parameters, 1.5 cm and 3.2 mm FWHM for human and small animal scanners, respectively, are indicated. Counting rates of true and random three-photon events for typical human and small animal scanning configurations are assessed. A simple formula for minimum size of lesions detectable in the three-gamma based images is derived. Depending on the contrast and total number of registered counts, lesions of a few mm size for human and sub mm for small animal scanners can be detected.

  15. Multiscale Analysis of Photon-Limited Astronomical Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willett, R.

    2007-11-01

    Many astronomical studies rely upon the accurate reconstruction of spatially distributed phenomena from photon-limited data. These measurements are inherently ``noisy'' due to low photon counts. In addition, the behavior of the underlying photon intensity functions can be very rich and complex, and consequently difficult to model a priori. Nonparametric multiscale reconstruction methods overcome these challenges and facilitate characterization of fundamental performance limits. In this paper, we review several multiscale approaches to photon-limited image reconstruction, including wavelets combined with variance stabilizing transforms, corrected Haar wavelet transforms, multiplicative multiscale innovations, platelets, and the à trous wavelet transform. We discuss the performance of these methods in simulation studies, and describe statistical analyses of their performances.

  16. Microscopic images dataset for automation of RBCs counting.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Sherif

    2015-12-01

    A method for Red Blood Corpuscles (RBCs) counting has been developed using RBCs light microscopic images and Matlab algorithm. The Dataset consists of Red Blood Corpuscles (RBCs) images and there RBCs segmented images. A detailed description using flow chart is given in order to show how to produce RBCs mask. The RBCs mask was used to count the number of RBCs in the blood smear image.

  17. Microscopic images dataset for automation of RBCs counting

    PubMed Central

    Abbas, Sherif

    2015-01-01

    A method for Red Blood Corpuscles (RBCs) counting has been developed using RBCs light microscopic images and Matlab algorithm. The Dataset consists of Red Blood Corpuscles (RBCs) images and there RBCs segmented images. A detailed description using flow chart is given in order to show how to produce RBCs mask. The RBCs mask was used to count the number of RBCs in the blood smear image. PMID:26380843

  18. HEPS-BPIX, a single photon counting pixel detector with a high frame rate for the HEPS project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Wei; Zhang, Jie; Ning, Zhe; Lu, Yunpeng; Fan, Lei; Li, Huaishen; Jiang, Xiaoshan; Lan, Allan K.; Ouyang, Qun; Wang, Zheng; Zhu, Kejun; Chen, Yuanbo; Liu, Peng

    2016-11-01

    China's next generation light source, named the High Energy Photon Source (HEPS), is currently under construction. HEPS-BPIX (HEPS-Beijing PIXel) is a dedicated pixel readout chip that operates in single photon counting mode for X-ray applications in HEPS. Designed using CMOS 0.13 μm technology, the chip contains a matrix of 104×72 pixels. Each pixel measures 150 μm×150 μm and has a counting depth of 20 bits. A bump-bonded prototyping detector module with a 300-μm thick silicon sensor was tested in the beamline of Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility. A fast stream of X-ray images was demonstrated, and a frame rate of 1.2 kHz was proven, with a negligible dead time. The test results showed an equivalent noise charge of 115 e- rms after bump bonding and a threshold dispersion of 55 e- rms after calibration.

  19. 32-channel single photon counting module for ultrasensitive detection of DNA sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudkov, Georgiy; Dhulla, Vinit; Borodin, Anatoly; Gavrilov, Dmitri; Stepukhovich, Andrey; Tsupryk, Andrey; Gorbovitski, Boris; Gorfinkel, Vera

    2006-10-01

    We continue our work on the design and implementation of multi-channel single photon detection systems for highly sensitive detection of ultra-weak fluorescence signals, for high-performance, multi-lane DNA sequencing instruments. A fiberized, 32-channel single photon detection (SPD) module based on single photon avalanche diode (SPAD), model C30902S-DTC, from Perkin Elmer Optoelectronics (PKI) has been designed and implemented. Unavailability of high performance, large area SPAD arrays and our desire to design high performance photon counting systems drives us to use individual diodes. Slight modifications in our quenching circuit has doubled the linear range of our system from 1MHz to 2MHz, which is the upper limit for these devices and the maximum saturation count rate has increased to 14 MHz. The detector module comprises of a single board computer PC-104 that enables data visualization, recording, processing, and transfer. Very low dark count (300-1000 counts/s), robust, efficient, simple data collection and processing, ease of connectivity to any other application demanding similar requirements and similar performance results to the best commercially available single photon counting module (SPCM from PKI) are some of the features of this system.

  20. Mcps-range photon-counting x-ray computed tomography system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Eiichi; Oda, Yasuyuki; Abudurexiti, Abulajiang; Hagiwara, Osahiko; Enomoto, Toshiyuki; Sugimura, Shigeaki; Endo, Haruyuki; Sato, Shigehiro; Ogawa, Akira; Onagawa, Jun

    2011-10-01

    10 Mcps photon counting was carried out using a detector consisting of a 2.0 mm-thick ZnO (zinc oxide) single-crystal scintillator and an MPPC (multipixel photon counter) module in an X-ray computed tomography (CT) system. The maximum count rate was 10 Mcps (mega counts per second) at a tube voltage of 70 kV and a tube current of 2.0 mA. Next, a photon-counting X-ray CT system consists of an X-ray generator, a turntable, a scan stage, a two-stage controller, the ZnO-MPPC detector, a counter card (CC), and a personal computer (PC). Tomography is accomplished by repeated linear scans and rotations of an object, and projection curves of the object are obtained by the linear scan with a scan velocity of 25 mm/s. The pulses of the event signal from the module are counted by the CC in conjunction with the PC. The exposure time for obtaining a tomogram was 600 s at a scan step of 0.5 mm and a rotation step of 1.0°, and photon-counting CT was accomplished using iodine-based contrast media.

  1. Noise models for low counting rate coherent diffraction imaging.

    PubMed

    Godard, Pierre; Allain, Marc; Chamard, Virginie; Rodenburg, John

    2012-11-05

    Coherent diffraction imaging (CDI) is a lens-less microscopy method that extracts the complex-valued exit field from intensity measurements alone. It is of particular importance for microscopy imaging with diffraction set-ups where high quality lenses are not available. The inversion scheme allowing the phase retrieval is based on the use of an iterative algorithm. In this work, we address the question of the choice of the iterative process in the case of data corrupted by photon or electron shot noise. Several noise models are presented and further used within two inversion strategies, the ordered subset and the scaled gradient. Based on analytical and numerical analysis together with Monte-Carlo studies, we show that any physical interpretations drawn from a CDI iterative technique require a detailed understanding of the relationship between the noise model and the used inversion method. We observe that iterative algorithms often assume implicitly a noise model. For low counting rates, each noise model behaves differently. Moreover, the used optimization strategy introduces its own artefacts. Based on this analysis, we develop a hybrid strategy which works efficiently in the absence of an informed initial guess. Our work emphasises issues which should be considered carefully when inverting experimental data.

  2. Indirect-detection single-photon-counting x-ray detector for breast tomosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Hao; Kaercher, Joerg; Durst, Roger

    2016-03-01

    X-ray mammography is a crucial screening tool for early identification of breast cancer. However, the overlap of anatomical features present in projection images often complicates the task of correctly identifying suspicious masses. As a result, there has been increasing interest in acquisition of volumetric information through digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) which, compared to mammography, offers the advantage of depth information. Since DBT requires acquisition of many projection images, it is desirable that the noise in each projection image be dominated by the statistical noise of the incident x-ray quanta and not by the additive noise of the imaging system (referred to as quantum-limited imaging) and that the cumulative dose be as low as possible (e.g., no more than for a mammogram). Unfortunately, the electronic noise (~2000 electrons) present in current DBT systems based on active matrix, flat-panel imagers (AMFPIs) is still relatively high compared with modest x-ray gain of the a-Se and CsI:Tl x-ray converters often used. To overcome the modest signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) limitations of current DBT systems, we have developed a large-area x-ray imaging detector with the combination of an extremely low noise (~20 electrons) active-pixel CMOS and a specially designed high resolution scintillator. The high sensitivity and low noise of such system provides better SNR by at least an order of magnitude than current state-of-art AMFPI systems and enables x-ray indirect-detection single photon counting (SPC) at mammographic energies with the potential of dose reduction.

  3. Discriminating orthogonal single-photon images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broadbent, Curtis J.; Zerom, Petros; Shin, Heedeuk; Howell, John C.; Boyd, Robert W.

    2009-03-01

    We can encode an image from an orthogonal basis set onto a single photon from a downconverted pair via the use of an amplitude mask. We can then discriminate the image imprinted on the photon from other images in the set using holographic-matched filtering techniques. We demonstrate this procedure experimentally for an image space of two objects, and we discuss the possibility of applying this method to a much larger image space. This process could have important implications for the manipulation of images at the quantum level.

  4. The detective quantum efficiency of photon-counting x-ray detectors using cascaded-systems analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Tanguay, Jesse; Yun, Seungman; Kim, Ho Kyung; Cunningham, Ian A.

    2013-04-15

    Purpose: Single-photon counting (SPC) x-ray imaging has the potential to improve image quality and enable new advanced energy-dependent methods. The purpose of this study is to extend cascaded-systems analyses (CSA) to the description of image quality and the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) of SPC systems. Methods: Point-process theory is used to develop a method of propagating the mean signal and Wiener noise-power spectrum through a thresholding stage (required to identify x-ray interaction events). The new transfer relationships are used to describe the zero-frequency DQE of a hypothetical SPC detector including the effects of stochastic conversion of incident photons to secondary quanta, secondary quantum sinks, additive noise, and threshold level. Theoretical results are compared with Monte Carlo calculations assuming the same detector model. Results: Under certain conditions, the CSA approach can be applied to SPC systems with the additional requirement of propagating the probability density function describing the total number of image-forming quanta through each stage of a cascaded model. Theoretical results including DQE show excellent agreement with Monte Carlo calculations under all conditions considered. Conclusions: Application of the CSA method shows that false counts due to additive electronic noise results in both a nonlinear image signal and increased image noise. There is a window of allowable threshold values to achieve a high DQE that depends on conversion gain, secondary quantum sinks, and additive noise.

  5. FPGA-based gating and logic for multichannel single photon counting

    SciTech Connect

    Pooser, Raphael C; Earl, Dennis Duncan; Evans, Philip G; Williams, Brian P; Schaake, Jason; Humble, Travis S

    2012-01-01

    We present results characterizing multichannel InGaAs single photon detectors utilizing gated passive quenching circuits (GPQC), self-differencing techniques, and field programmable gate array (FPGA)-based logic for both diode gating and coincidence counting. Utilizing FPGAs for the diode gating frontend and the logic counting backend has the advantage of low cost compared to custom built logic circuits and current off-the-shelf detector technology. Further, FPGA logic counters have been shown to work well in quantum key distribution (QKD) test beds. Our setup combines multiple independent detector channels in a reconfigurable manner via an FPGA backend and post processing in order to perform coincidence measurements between any two or more detector channels simultaneously. Using this method, states from a multi-photon polarization entangled source are detected and characterized via coincidence counting on the FPGA. Photons detection events are also processed by the quantum information toolkit for application testing (QITKAT)

  6. Single Photon Counting UV Solar-Blind Detectors Using Silicon and III-Nitride Materials

    PubMed Central

    Nikzad, Shouleh; Hoenk, Michael; Jewell, April D.; Hennessy, John J.; Carver, Alexander G.; Jones, Todd J.; Goodsall, Timothy M.; Hamden, Erika T.; Suvarna, Puneet; Bulmer, J.; Shahedipour-Sandvik, F.; Charbon, Edoardo; Padmanabhan, Preethi; Hancock, Bruce; Bell, L. Douglas

    2016-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) studies in astronomy, cosmology, planetary studies, biological and medical applications often require precision detection of faint objects and in many cases require photon-counting detection. We present an overview of two approaches for achieving photon counting in the UV. The first approach involves UV enhancement of photon-counting silicon detectors, including electron multiplying charge-coupled devices and avalanche photodiodes. The approach used here employs molecular beam epitaxy for delta doping and superlattice doping for surface passivation and high UV quantum efficiency. Additional UV enhancements include antireflection (AR) and solar-blind UV bandpass coatings prepared by atomic layer deposition. Quantum efficiency (QE) measurements show QE > 50% in the 100–300 nm range for detectors with simple AR coatings, and QE ≅ 80% at ~206 nm has been shown when more complex AR coatings are used. The second approach is based on avalanche photodiodes in III-nitride materials with high QE and intrinsic solar blindness. PMID:27338399

  7. Reconfigurable Computing As an Enabling Technology for Single-Photon-Counting Laser Altimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, Wesley; Hicks, Edward; Pinchinat, Maxime; Dabney, Philip; McGarry, Jan; Murray, Paul

    2003-01-01

    Single-photon-counting laser altimetry is a new measurement technique offering significant advantages in vertical resolution, reducing instrument size, mass, and power, and reducing laser complexity as compared to analog or threshold detection laser altimetry techniques. However, these improvements come at the cost of a dramatically increased requirement for onboard real-time data processing. Reconfigurable computing has been shown to offer considerable performance advantages in performing this processing. These advantages have been demonstrated on the Multi-KiloHertz Micro-Laser Altimeter (MMLA), an aircraft based single-photon-counting laser altimeter developed by NASA Goddard Space Flight Center with several potential spaceflight applications. This paper describes how reconfigurable computing technology was employed to perform MMLA data processing in real-time under realistic operating constraints, along with the results observed. This paper also expands on these prior results to identify concepts for using reconfigurable computing to enable spaceflight single-photon-counting laser altimeter instruments.

  8. Single Photon Counting UV Solar-Blind Detectors Using Silicon and III-Nitride Materials.

    PubMed

    Nikzad, Shouleh; Hoenk, Michael; Jewell, April D; Hennessy, John J; Carver, Alexander G; Jones, Todd J; Goodsall, Timothy M; Hamden, Erika T; Suvarna, Puneet; Bulmer, J; Shahedipour-Sandvik, F; Charbon, Edoardo; Padmanabhan, Preethi; Hancock, Bruce; Bell, L Douglas

    2016-06-21

    Ultraviolet (UV) studies in astronomy, cosmology, planetary studies, biological and medical applications often require precision detection of faint objects and in many cases require photon-counting detection. We present an overview of two approaches for achieving photon counting in the UV. The first approach involves UV enhancement of photon-counting silicon detectors, including electron multiplying charge-coupled devices and avalanche photodiodes. The approach used here employs molecular beam epitaxy for delta doping and superlattice doping for surface passivation and high UV quantum efficiency. Additional UV enhancements include antireflection (AR) and solar-blind UV bandpass coatings prepared by atomic layer deposition. Quantum efficiency (QE) measurements show QE > 50% in the 100-300 nm range for detectors with simple AR coatings, and QE ≅ 80% at ~206 nm has been shown when more complex AR coatings are used. The second approach is based on avalanche photodiodes in III-nitride materials with high QE and intrinsic solar blindness.

  9. All Photons Imaging Through Volumetric Scattering

    PubMed Central

    Satat, Guy; Heshmat, Barmak; Raviv, Dan; Raskar, Ramesh

    2016-01-01

    Imaging through thick highly scattering media (sample thickness ≫ mean free path) can realize broad applications in biomedical and industrial imaging as well as remote sensing. Here we propose a computational “All Photons Imaging” (API) framework that utilizes time-resolved measurement for imaging through thick volumetric scattering by using both early arrived (non-scattered) and diffused photons. As opposed to other methods which aim to lock on specific photons (coherent, ballistic, acoustically modulated, etc.), this framework aims to use all of the optical signal. Compared to conventional early photon measurements for imaging through a 15 mm tissue phantom, our method shows a two fold improvement in spatial resolution (4db increase in Peak SNR). This all optical, calibration-free framework enables widefield imaging through thick turbid media, and opens new avenues in non-invasive testing, analysis, and diagnosis. PMID:27683065

  10. All Photons Imaging Through Volumetric Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satat, Guy; Heshmat, Barmak; Raviv, Dan; Raskar, Ramesh

    2016-09-01

    Imaging through thick highly scattering media (sample thickness ≫ mean free path) can realize broad applications in biomedical and industrial imaging as well as remote sensing. Here we propose a computational “All Photons Imaging” (API) framework that utilizes time-resolved measurement for imaging through thick volumetric scattering by using both early arrived (non-scattered) and diffused photons. As opposed to other methods which aim to lock on specific photons (coherent, ballistic, acoustically modulated, etc.), this framework aims to use all of the optical signal. Compared to conventional early photon measurements for imaging through a 15 mm tissue phantom, our method shows a two fold improvement in spatial resolution (4db increase in Peak SNR). This all optical, calibration-free framework enables widefield imaging through thick turbid media, and opens new avenues in non-invasive testing, analysis, and diagnosis.

  11. The Los Alamos Photon Counting Detector Debris Detection Project: An update

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Cheng; Priedhorsky, W.; Baron, M.; Casperson, D.

    1995-03-01

    At Los Alamos, the authors have been pursuing a project for space debris detection using a photon counting detector with high spatial and time resolution. By exploiting the three dimensionality of the high quality data, they expect to be able to detect an orbiting object of size below 2 cm, using a moderate size telescope and state-of-the-art photon counting detector. A working tube has been used to collect skyward looking data during dusk. In this paper, they discuss the progress in the development of detector and data acquisition system. They also report on analysis and results of these data sets.

  12. Photon-Counting Microlaser Rangers, Transponders, and Altimeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degnan, John J.; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Unlike current manned systems, NASA's next generation SLR2000 Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) station is fully autonomous. eye-safe, relatively compact and inexpensive. and, during daytime tracking operates at signal-to-noise ratios several orders of magnitude below unity. Tiny, passively Q-switched microlasers generate ultra-short pulses with output energies on the order of 100 micron-J at few kHz rates to achieve mm-level ranging precision to satellite altitudes of 20,000 km. Special ranging receivers, combined with Poisson statistical analysis of the received photon distribution, enable the system to rapidly and reliably identify and extract the single photon laser echoes from the solar background. The enhanced rate of return, combined with a uniform signal strength, can actually drive down both systematic and random range errors. The new SLR2000 technology has already spawned exciting new applications. Compact microlaser altimeters, capable of mapping the surface of a planet or other celestial body at multikilohertz rates, is one such application, and a high altitude, airborne version is currently being developed under NASA's Instrument Incubator Program. Interplanetary microlaser transponders would be capable of performing decimeter ranging or subnanosecond time transfer to spacecraft throughout the inner Solar System. resulting in improved knowledge of planetary motions and liberations and enhanced General Relativity experiments.

  13. Development of CdTe pixel detectors combined with an aluminum Schottky diode sensor and photon-counting ASICs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyokawa, H.; Saji, C.; Kawase, M.; Wu, S.; Furukawa, Y.; Kajiwara, K.; Sato, M.; Hirono, T.; Shiro, A.; Shobu, T.; Suenaga, A.; Ikeda, H.

    2017-01-01

    We have been developing CdTe pixel detectors combined with a Schottky diode sensor and photon-counting ASICs. The hybrid pixel detector was designed with a pixel size of 200 μ m by 200 μm and an area of 19 mm by 20 mm or 38.2 mm by 40.2 mm. The photon-counting ASIC, SP8-04F10K, has a preamplifier, a shaper, 3-level window-type discriminators and a 24-bits counter in each pixel. The single-chip detector with 100 by 95 pixels successfully operated with a photon-counting mode selecting X-ray energy with the window comparator and stable operation was realized at 20 degrees C. We have performed a feasibility study for a white X-ray microbeam experiment. Laue diffraction patterns were measured during the scan of the irradiated position in a silicon steel sample. The grain boundaries were identified by using the differentials between adjacent images at each position.

  14. Quantitative material decomposition using spectral computed tomography with an energy-resolved photon-counting detector.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seungwan; Choi, Yu-Na; Kim, Hee-Joung

    2014-09-21

    Dual-energy computed tomography (CT) techniques have been used to decompose materials and characterize tissues according to their physical and chemical compositions. However, these techniques are hampered by the limitations of conventional x-ray detectors operated in charge integrating mode. Energy-resolved photon-counting detectors provide spectral information from polychromatic x-rays using multiple energy thresholds. These detectors allow simultaneous acquisition of data in different energy ranges without spectral overlap, resulting in more efficient material decomposition and quantification for dual-energy CT. In this study, a pre-reconstruction dual-energy CT technique based on volume conservation was proposed for three-material decomposition. The technique was combined with iterative reconstruction algorithms by using a ray-driven projector in order to improve the quality of decomposition images and reduce radiation dose. A spectral CT system equipped with a CZT-based photon-counting detector was used to implement the proposed dual-energy CT technique. We obtained dual-energy images of calibration and three-material phantoms consisting of low atomic number materials from the optimal energy bins determined by Monte Carlo simulations. The material decomposition process was accomplished by both the proposed and post-reconstruction dual-energy CT techniques. Linear regression and normalized root-mean-square error (NRMSE) analyses were performed to evaluate the quantitative accuracy of decomposition images. The calibration accuracy of the proposed dual-energy CT technique was higher than that of the post-reconstruction dual-energy CT technique, with fitted slopes of 0.97-1.01 and NRMSEs of 0.20-4.50% for all basis materials. In the three-material phantom study, the proposed dual-energy CT technique decreased the NRMSEs of measured volume fractions by factors of 0.17-0.28 compared to the post-reconstruction dual-energy CT technique. It was concluded that the

  15. Limits of the time-multiplexed photon-counting method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruse, Regina; Tiedau, Johannes; Bartley, Tim J.; Barkhofen, Sonja; Silberhorn, Christine

    2017-02-01

    The progress in building large quantum states and networks requires sophisticated detection techniques to verify the desired operation. To achieve this aim, a cost- and resource-efficient detection method is the time multiplexing of photonic states. This design is assumed to be efficiently scalable; however, it is restricted by inevitable losses and limited detection efficiencies. Here, we investigate the scalability of time-multiplexed detectors under the effects of fiber dispersion and losses. We use the distinguishability of Fock states up to n =20 after passing the time-multiplexed detector as our figure of merit and find that, for realistic setup efficiencies of η =0.85 , the optimal size for time-multiplexed detectors is 256 bins.

  16. Temporal ghost imaging with twin photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denis, Séverine; Moreau, Paul-Antoine; Devaux, Fabrice; Lantz, Eric

    2017-03-01

    We use twin photons generated by spontaneous parametric down conversion to perform temporal ghost imaging of a single time signal. The retrieval of a binary signal containing eight bits is performed with an error rate below 1%.

  17. Estimation of mammary gland composition using CdTe series detector developed for photon-counting mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ihori, Akiko; Okamoto, Chizuru; Yamakawa, Tsutomu; Yamamoto, Shuichiro; Okada, Masahiro; Nakajima, Ai; Kato, Misa; Kodera, Yoshie

    2016-03-01

    Energy resolved photon-counting mammography is a new technology, which counts the number of photons that passes through an object, and presents it as a pixel value in an image of the object. Silicon semiconductor detectors are currently used in commercial mammography. However, the disadvantage of silicon is the low absorption efficiency for high X-ray energies. A cadmium telluride (CdTe) series detector has a high absorption efficiency over a wide energy range. In this study, we proposed a method to estimate the composition of the mammary gland using a CdTe series detector as a photon-counting detector. The fact that the detection rate of breast cancer in mammography is affected by mammary gland composition is now widely accepted. Assessment of composition of the mammary gland has important implications. An important advantage of our proposed technique is its ability to discriminate photons using three energy bins. We designed the CdTe series detector system using the MATLAB simulation software. The phantom contains nine regions with the ratio of glandular tissue and adipose varying in increments of 10%. The attenuation coefficient for each bin's energy was calculated from the number of input and output photons possessed by each. The evaluation results obtained by plotting the attenuation coefficient μ in a three-dimensional (3D) scatter plot show that the plots had a regular composition order congruent with that of the mammary gland. Consequently, we believe that our proposed method can be used to estimate the composition of the mammary gland.

  18. Fluorescence measurement by a streak camera in a single-photon-counting mode.

    PubMed

    Komura, Masayuki; Itoh, Shigeru

    2009-01-01

    We describe here a recently developed fluorescence measurement system that uses a streak camera to detect fluorescence decay in a single photon-counting mode. This system allows for easy measurements of various samples and provides 2D images of fluorescence in the wavelength and time domains. The great advantage of the system is that the data can be handled with ease; furthermore, the data are amenable to detailed analysis. We describe the picosecond kinetics of fluorescence in spinach Photosystem (PS) II particles at 4-77 K as a typical experimental example. Through the global analysis of the data, we have identified a new fluorescence band (F689) in addition to the already established F680, F685, and F695 emission bands. The blue shift of the steady-state fluorescence spectrum upon cooling below 77 K can be interpreted as an increase of the shorter-wavelength fluorescence, especially F689, due to the slowdown of the excitation energy transfer process. The F685 and F695 bands seem to be thermally equilibrated at 77 K but not at 4 K. The simple and efficient photon accumulation feature of the system allows us to measure fluorescence from leaves, solutions, single colonies, and even single cells. The 2D fluorescence images obtained by this system are presented for isolated spinach PS II particles, intact leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana, the PS I super-complex of a marine centric diatom, Chaetoceros gracilis, isolated membranes of a purple photosynthetic bacterium, Acidiphilium rubrum, which contains Zn-BChl a, and a coral that contains a green fluorescent protein and an algal endosymbiont, Zooxanthella.

  19. Preliminary evaluation of a novel energy-resolved photon-counting gamma ray detector

    PubMed Central

    Meng, L.-J.; Tan, J.W.; Spartiotis, K.; Schulman, T.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we present the design and preliminary performance evaluation of a novel energy-resolved photon-counting (ERPC) detector for gamma ray imaging applications. The prototype ERPC detector has an active area of 4.4 cm × 4.4 cm, which is pixelated into 128 × 128 square pixels with a pitch size of 350 µm × 350µm. The current detector consists of multiple detector hybrids, each with a CdTe crystal of 1.1 cm × 2.2 cm × 1 mm, bump-bonded onto a custom-designed application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC). The ERPC ASIC has 2048 readout channels arranged in a 32 × 64 array. Each channel is equipped with pre- and shaping-amplifiers, a discriminator, peak/hold circuitry and an analog-to-digital converter (ADC) for digitizing the signal amplitude. In order to compensate for the pixel-to-pixel variation, two 8-bit digital-to-analog converters (DACs) are implemented into each channel for tuning the gain and offset. The ERPC detector is designed to offer a high spatial resolution, a wide dynamic range of 12–200 keV and a good energy resolution of 3–4 keV. The hybrid detector configuration provides a flexible detection area that can be easily tailored for different imaging applications. The intrinsic performance of a prototype ERPC detector was evaluated with various gamma ray sources, and the results are presented. PMID:28260825

  20. A photon counting and a squeezing measurement method by the exact absorption and dispersion spectrum of Λ-type Atoms.

    PubMed

    Naeimi, Ghasem; Alipour, Samira; Khademi, Siamak

    2016-01-01

    Recently, the master equations for the interaction of two-mode photons with a three-level Λ-type atom are exactly solved for the coherence terms. In this paper the exact absorption spectrum is applied for the presentation of a non-demolition photon counting method, for a few number of coupling photons, and its benefits are discussed. The exact scheme is also applied where the coupling photons are squeezed and the photon counting method is also developed for the measurement of the squeezing parameter of the coupling photons.

  1. Near-infrared Single-photon-counting Detectors for Free-space Laser Receivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krainak, Michael A.; Sun, Xiaoli; Hasselbrack, William; Wu, Stewart; Waczynski, Augustyn; Miko, Laddawan

    2007-01-01

    We compare several photon-counting detector technologies for use as near-infrared timeresolved laser receivers in science instrument, communication and navigation systems. The key technologies are InGaAs(P) photocathode hybrid photomultiplier tubes and InGaAs(P) and HgCdTe avalanche photodiodes. We discuss recent experimental results and application.

  2. Multiple wavelength time-of-flight sensor based on time-correlated single-photon counting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buller, Gerald S.; Harkins, Ross D.; McCarthy, Aongus; Hiskett, Philip A.; MacKinnon, Gordon R.; Smith, George R.; Sung, Raymond; Wallace, Andrew M.; Lamb, Robert A.; Ridley, Kevin D.; Rarity, John G.

    2005-08-01

    This article describes a time-of-flight sensor based on multiple pulsed laser sources which utilizes time-correlated single-photon counting. The sensor has demonstrated good performance at ranges of up to 17 km in daylight conditions. Analysis techniques were developed to examine the returns from targets containing more than one scattering surface.

  3. Photoionization of Trapped Carriers in Avalanche Photodiodes to Reduce Afterpulsing During Geiger-Mode Photon Counting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krainak, Michael A.

    2005-01-01

    We reduced the afterpulsing probability by a factor of five in a Geiger-mode photon-counting InGaAs avalanche photodiode by using sub-band-gap (lambda = 1.95 micron) laser diode illumination, which we believe photoionizes the trapped carriers.

  4. Historical review of lung counting efficiencies for low energy photon emitters

    DOE PAGES

    Jeffers, Karen L.; Hickman, David P.

    2014-03-01

    This publication reviews the measured efficiency and variability over time of a high purity planar germanium in vivo lung count system for multiple photon energies using increasingly thick overlays with the Lawrence Livermore Torso Phantom. Furthermore, the measured variations in efficiency are compared with the current requirement for in vivo bioassay performance as defined by the American National Standards Institute Standard.

  5. An optical receiver for the Lunar Laser Communication Demonstration based on photon-counting superconducting nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grein, Matthew E.; Kerman, Andrew J.; Dauler, Eric A.; Willis, Matthew M.; Romkey, Barry; Molnar, Richard J.; Robinson, Bryan S.; Murphy, Daniel V.; Boroson, Don M.

    2015-05-01

    The Lunar Laser Communication Demonstration (LLCD) successfully demonstrated for the first time duplex laser communications between a lunar-orbiting satellite and ground stations on Earth with error-free downlink data rates up to 622 Mb/s utilizing an optical receiver based on photon-counting superconducting nanowires and operating near 1550 nm.

  6. Single-photon imaging in complementary metal oxide semiconductor processes

    PubMed Central

    Charbon, E.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the basics of single-photon counting in complementary metal oxide semiconductors, through single-photon avalanche diodes (SPADs), and the making of miniaturized pixels with photon-counting capability based on SPADs. Some applications, which may take advantage of SPAD image sensors, are outlined, such as fluorescence-based microscopy, three-dimensional time-of-flight imaging and biomedical imaging, to name just a few. The paper focuses on architectures that are best suited to those applications and the trade-offs they generate. In this context, architectures are described that efficiently collect the output of single pixels when designed in large arrays. Off-chip readout circuit requirements are described for a variety of applications in physics, medicine and the life sciences. Owing to the dynamic nature of SPADs, designs featuring a large number of SPADs require careful analysis of the target application for an optimal use of silicon real estate and of limited readout bandwidth. The paper also describes the main trade-offs involved in architecting such chips and the solutions adopted with focus on scalability and miniaturization. PMID:24567470

  7. Single photon imaging at ultra-high resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellazzini, R.; Spandre, G.; Minuti, M.; Brez, A.; Baldini, L.; Latronico, L.; Omodei, N.; Sgrò, C.; Bregeon, J.; Razzano, M.; Pinchera, M.; Tremsin, A.; McPhate, J.; Vallerga, J. V.; Siegmund, O.

    2008-06-01

    We present a detection system capable of imaging both single photon/positive ion and multiple coincidence photons/positive ions with extremely high spatial resolution. In this detector the photoelectrons excited by the incoming photons are multiplied by microchannel plate(s) (MCP). The process of multiplication is spatially constrained within an MCP pore, which can be as small as 4 μm for commercially available MCPs. An electron cloud originated by a single photoelectron is then encoded by a pixellated custom analog ASIC consisting of 105 K charge sensitive pixels of 50 μm in size arranged on a hexagonal grid. Each pixel registers the charge with an accuracy of <100 electrons rms. Computation of the event centroid from the readout charges results in an accurate event position. A large number of simultaneous photons spatially separated by ˜0.4 mm can be detected simultaneously allowing multiple coincidence operation for the experiments where a large number of incoming photons/positive ions have to be detected simultaneously. The experimental results prove that the spatial resolution of the readout system itself is ˜3 μm FWHM enabling detection resolution better than 6 μm for the small pore MCPs. An attractive feature of the detection system is its capability to register the timing of each incoming photon/positive ion (in single photon detection mode) or of the first incoming particle (for the multiple coincidence detection) with an accuracy of ˜130 ps FWHM. There is also virtually no dark count noise in the detection system making it suitable for low count rate applications.

  8. Ultra-High Spatial Resolution, Multi-Energy CT using Photon Counting Detector Technology

    PubMed Central

    Leng, S.; Gutjahr, R.; Ferrero, A.; Kappler, S.; Henning, A.; Halaweish, A.; Zhou, W.; Montoya, J.; McCollough, C.

    2017-01-01

    Two ultra-high-resolution (UHR) imaging modes, each with two energy thresholds, were implemented on a research, whole-body photon-counting-detector (PCD) CT scanner, referred to as sharp and UHR, respectively. The UHR mode has a pixel size of 0.25 mm at iso-center for both energy thresholds, with a collimation of 32 × 0.25 mm. The sharp mode has a 0.25 mm pixel for the low-energy threshold and 0.5 mm for the high-energy threshold, with a collimation of 48 × 0.25 mm. Kidney stones with mixed mineral composition and lung nodules with different shapes were scanned using both modes, and with the standard imaging mode, referred to as macro mode (0.5 mm pixel and 32 × 0.5 mm collimation). Evaluation and comparison of the three modes focused on the ability to accurately delineate anatomic structures using the high-spatial resolution capability and the ability to quantify stone composition using the multi-energy capability. The low-energy threshold images of the sharp and UHR modes showed better shape and texture information due to the achieved higher spatial resolution, although noise was also higher. No noticeable benefit was shown in multi-energy analysis using UHR compared to standard resolution (macro mode) when standard doses were used. This was due to excessive noise in the higher resolution images. However, UHR scans at higher dose showed improvement in multi-energy analysis over macro mode with regular dose. To fully take advantage of the higher spatial resolution in multi-energy analysis, either increased radiation dose, or application of noise reduction techniques, is needed. PMID:28392615

  9. Ultra-High Spatial Resolution, Multi-Energy CT using Photon Counting Detector Technology.

    PubMed

    Leng, S; Gutjahr, R; Ferrero, A; Kappler, S; Henning, A; Halaweish, A; Zhou, W; Montoya, J; McCollough, C

    2017-02-11

    Two ultra-high-resolution (UHR) imaging modes, each with two energy thresholds, were implemented on a research, whole-body photon-counting-detector (PCD) CT scanner, referred to as sharp and UHR, respectively. The UHR mode has a pixel size of 0.25 mm at iso-center for both energy thresholds, with a collimation of 32 × 0.25 mm. The sharp mode has a 0.25 mm pixel for the low-energy threshold and 0.5 mm for the high-energy threshold, with a collimation of 48 × 0.25 mm. Kidney stones with mixed mineral composition and lung nodules with different shapes were scanned using both modes, and with the standard imaging mode, referred to as macro mode (0.5 mm pixel and 32 × 0.5 mm collimation). Evaluation and comparison of the three modes focused on the ability to accurately delineate anatomic structures using the high-spatial resolution capability and the ability to quantify stone composition using the multi-energy capability. The low-energy threshold images of the sharp and UHR modes showed better shape and texture information due to the achieved higher spatial resolution, although noise was also higher. No noticeable benefit was shown in multi-energy analysis using UHR compared to standard resolution (macro mode) when standard doses were used. This was due to excessive noise in the higher resolution images. However, UHR scans at higher dose showed improvement in multi-energy analysis over macro mode with regular dose. To fully take advantage of the higher spatial resolution in multi-energy analysis, either increased radiation dose, or application of noise reduction techniques, is needed.

  10. Time-and-frequency-gated photon coincidence counting; a novel multidimensional spectroscopy tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorfman, Konstantin E.; Mukamel, Shaul

    2016-08-01

    Coherent multidimensional optical spectroscopy is broadly applied across the electromagnetic spectrum ranging from NMR to UV. These techniques reveal the properties of matter through the correlation plots of signal fields generated in response to sequences of short pulses with variable delays. Here we discuss a new class of multidimensional techniques obtained by the time-and-frequency-resolved photon coincidence counting measurements of N photons, which constitute a 2N dimensional spectrum. A compact description of these signals is developed based on time-ordered superoperators rather than the normally ordered ordinary operators used in Glauber's photon counting formalism. The independent control of the time and frequency gate parameters reveals fine details of matter dynamics not available otherwise. These signal are illustrated for application to an anharmonic oscillator model with fluctuating energy and anharmonicity.

  11. Photon Counting System for High-Sensitivity Detection of Bioluminescence at Optical Fiber End.

    PubMed

    Iinuma, Masataka; Kadoya, Yutaka; Kuroda, Akio

    2016-01-01

    The technique of photon counting is widely used for various fields and also applicable to a high-sensitivity detection of luminescence. Thanks to recent development of single photon detectors with avalanche photodiodes (APDs), the photon counting system with an optical fiber has become powerful for a detection of bioluminescence at an optical fiber end, because it allows us to fully use the merits of compactness, simple operation, highly quantum efficiency of the APD detectors. This optical fiber-based system also has a possibility of improving the sensitivity to a local detection of Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) by high-sensitivity detection of the bioluminescence. In this chapter, we are introducing a basic concept of the optical fiber-based system and explaining how to construct and use this system.

  12. Development of a fast read-out system of a single photon counting detector for mammography with synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, F. C.; Rigon, L.; Longo, R.; Arfelli, F.; Bergamaschi, A.; Chen, R. C.; Dreossi, D.; Schmitt, B.; Vallazza, E.; Castelli, E.

    2011-12-01

    A single-photon counting detector read-out system for mammography with synchrotron radiation has been developed with the aim to meet the needs of the mammographic imaging station of the SYRMEP beamline at ELETTRA. The system called PICASSO (Phase Imaging for Clinical Application with Silicon detector and Synchrotron radiatiOn) is a modular detector that implements a read-out system with MYTHEN II ASICs, an embedded Linux-based controller board and a Scientific Linux acquisition workstation. The system architecture and characteristics are herein presented. The system was tested at the SYRMEP beamline and achieved a frame rate of 33 Hz for 8448 channels at 24-bit dynamic range, and it is capable of continuously acquiring up to 2000 frames. Standard mammographic phantoms were imaged and good quality images were obtained at doses comparable with what is delivered in conventional full field mammographic systems.

  13. Transuranic waste detection by photon interrogation and on-line delayed neutron counting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyoussi, A.; Romeyer-Dherbey, J.; Jallu, F.; Payan, E.; Buisson, A.; Nurdin, G.; Allano, J.

    2000-02-01

    A comprehensive program is currently in progress at several laboratories for the development of sensitive, practical, non-destructive assay techniques for the quantification of low-level transuranics (TRUs) in bulk solid wastes. This paper describes the method being developed to assay high density TRU waste packages using photon interrogation. The system uses a pulsed electron beam from an electron linear accelerator to produce high-energy photon bursts from a metallic converter. The photons induce fissions in a TRU waste package which is inside an original neutron separating and counting cavity (NS2C). When fission is induced in trace amounts of TRU contaminants in waste material, it provides “signatures” from fission products that can be used to assay the material before disposal. We give here the results from counting photofission-induced delayed neutrons from 239Pu, 235U and 238U in sample matrices. We counted delayed neutrons emitted after each pulse of the LINAC by using the sequential photon interrogation and neutron counting signatures (SPHINCS) technique which had been developed in the present framework. The SPHINCS method enhances the available counts by a factor of about 20 compared with the counting of delayed neutrons only, after the irradiation period. Furthermore, the use of SPHINCS measurement technique coupled with the NS2C facility improves the signal-to-noise ratio by a factor of about 30. This decreases the detection limit. The electron linear accelerator operates at 15 MeV, 140 mA, and 2.5 μs wide pulse at a 50 and 6.25 Hz rate. The dynamics of photofission and delayed neutron production, NS2C advantages and performances, use of an electron linear accelerator as a particle source, experimental and electronics details, and future experimental works are discussed.

  14. Transuranic waste detection by photon interrogation and on-line delayed neutron counting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyoussi, A.; Romeyer-Dherbey, J.; Jallu, F.; Payan, E.; Buisson, A.; Nurdin, G.; Allano, J.

    1999-02-01

    A comprehensive program is currently in progress at several laboratories for the development of sensitive, practical, non-destructive assay techniques for the quantification of low-level transuranics (TRUs) in bulk solid wastes. This paper describes the method being developed to assay high density TRU waste packages using photon interrogation. The system uses a pulsed electron beam from an electron linear accelerator to produce high-energy photon bursts from a metallic converter. The photons induce fissions in a TRU waste package which is inside an original neutron separating and counting cavity (NS2C). When fission is induced in trace amounts of TRU contaminants in waste material, it provides "signatures" from fission products that can be used to assay the material before disposal. We give here the results from counting photofission-induced delayed neutrons from 239Pu, 235U and 238U in sample matrices. We counted delayed neutrons emitted after each pulse of the LINAC by using the sequential photon interrogation and neutron counting signatures (SPHINCS) technique which had been developed in the present framework. The SPHINCS method enhances the available counts by a factor of about 20 compared with the counting of delayed neutrons only, after the irradiation period. Furthermore, the use of SPHINCS measurement technique coupled with the NS2C facility improves the signal-to-noise ratio by a factor of about 30. This decreases the detection limit. The electron linear accelerator operates at 15 MeV, 140 mA, and 2.5 μs wide pulse at a 50 and 6.25 Hz rate. The dynamics of photofission and delayed neutron production, NS2C advantages and performances, use of an electron linear accelerator as a particle source, experimental and electronics details, and future experimental works are discussed.

  15. Studying fermionic ghost imaging with independent photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jianbin; Zhou, Yu; Zheng, Huaibin; Chen, Hui; Li, Fu-li; Xu, Zhuo

    2016-12-01

    Ghost imaging with thermal fermions is calculated based on two-particle interference in Feynman's path integral theory. It is found that ghost imaging with thermal fermions can be simulated by ghost imaging with thermal bosons and classical particles. Photons in pseudothermal light are employed to experimentally study fermionic ghost imaging. Ghost imaging with thermal bosons and fermions is discussed based on the point-to-point (spot) correlation between the object and image planes. The employed method offers an efficient guidance for future ghost imaging with real thermal fermions, which may also be generalized to study other second-order interference phenomena with fermions.

  16. A comparative analysis of OTF, NPS, and DQE in energy integrating and photon counting digital x-ray detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Acciavatti, Raymond J.; Maidment, Andrew D. A.

    2010-12-15

    Purpose: One of the benefits of photon counting (PC) detectors over energy integrating (EI) detectors is the absence of many additive noise sources, such as electronic noise and secondary quantum noise. The purpose of this work is to demonstrate that thresholding voltage gains to detect individual x rays actually generates an unexpected source of white noise in photon counters. Methods: To distinguish the two detector types, their point spread function (PSF) is interpreted differently. The PSF of the energy integrating detector is treated as a weighting function for counting x rays, while the PSF of the photon counting detector is interpreted as a probability. Although this model ignores some subtleties of real imaging systems, such as scatter and the energy-dependent amplification of secondary quanta in indirect-converting detectors, it is useful for demonstrating fundamental differences between the two detector types. From first principles, the optical transfer function (OTF) is calculated as the continuous Fourier transform of the PSF, the noise power spectra (NPS) is determined by the discrete space Fourier transform (DSFT) of the autocovariance of signal intensity, and the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) is found from combined knowledge of the OTF and NPS. To illustrate the calculation of the transfer functions, the PSF is modeled as the convolution of a Gaussian with the product of rect functions. The Gaussian reflects the blurring of the x-ray converter, while the rect functions model the sampling of the detector. Results: The transfer functions are first calculated assuming outside noise sources such as electronic noise and secondary quantum noise are negligible. It is demonstrated that while OTF is the same for two detector types possessing an equivalent PSF, a frequency-independent (i.e., ''white'') difference in their NPS exists such that NPS{sub PC}{>=}NPS{sub EI} and hence DQE{sub PC}{<=}DQE{sub EI}. The necessary and sufficient condition for

  17. Statistical connection of binomial photon counting and photon averaging in high dynamic range beam-scanning microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Muir, Ryan D.; Kissick, David J.; Simpson, Garth J.

    2012-01-01

    Data from photomultiplier tubes are typically analyzed using either counting or averaging techniques, which are most accurate in the dim and bright signal limits, respectively. A statistical means of adjoining these two techniques is presented by recovering the Poisson parameter from averaged data and relating it to the statistics of binomial counting from Kissick et al. [Anal. Chem. 82, 10129 (2010)]. The point at which binomial photon counting and averaging have equal signal to noise ratios is derived. Adjoining these two techniques generates signal to noise ratios at 87% to approaching 100% of theoretical maximum across the full dynamic range of the photomultiplier tube used. The technique is demonstrated in a second harmonic generation microscope. PMID:22535131

  18. Image reconstruction from photon sparse data

    PubMed Central

    Mertens, Lena; Sonnleitner, Matthias; Leach, Jonathan; Agnew, Megan; Padgett, Miles J.

    2017-01-01

    We report an algorithm for reconstructing images when the average number of photons recorded per pixel is of order unity, i.e. photon-sparse data. The image optimisation algorithm minimises a cost function incorporating both a Poissonian log-likelihood term based on the deviation of the reconstructed image from the measured data and a regularization-term based upon the sum of the moduli of the second spatial derivatives of the reconstructed image pixel intensities. The balance between these two terms is set by a bootstrapping technique where the target value of the log-likelihood term is deduced from a smoothed version of the original data. When compared to the original data, the processed images exhibit lower residuals with respect to the true object. We use photon-sparse data from two different experimental systems, one system based on a single-photon, avalanche photo-diode array and the other system on a time-gated, intensified camera. However, this same processing technique could most likely be applied to any low photon-number image irrespective of how the data is collected. PMID:28169363

  19. Image reconstruction from photon sparse data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mertens, Lena; Sonnleitner, Matthias; Leach, Jonathan; Agnew, Megan; Padgett, Miles J.

    2017-02-01

    We report an algorithm for reconstructing images when the average number of photons recorded per pixel is of order unity, i.e. photon-sparse data. The image optimisation algorithm minimises a cost function incorporating both a Poissonian log-likelihood term based on the deviation of the reconstructed image from the measured data and a regularization-term based upon the sum of the moduli of the second spatial derivatives of the reconstructed image pixel intensities. The balance between these two terms is set by a bootstrapping technique where the target value of the log-likelihood term is deduced from a smoothed version of the original data. When compared to the original data, the processed images exhibit lower residuals with respect to the true object. We use photon-sparse data from two different experimental systems, one system based on a single-photon, avalanche photo-diode array and the other system on a time-gated, intensified camera. However, this same processing technique could most likely be applied to any low photon-number image irrespective of how the data is collected.

  20. Image reconstruction from photon sparse data.

    PubMed

    Mertens, Lena; Sonnleitner, Matthias; Leach, Jonathan; Agnew, Megan; Padgett, Miles J

    2017-02-07

    We report an algorithm for reconstructing images when the average number of photons recorded per pixel is of order unity, i.e. photon-sparse data. The image optimisation algorithm minimises a cost function incorporating both a Poissonian log-likelihood term based on the deviation of the reconstructed image from the measured data and a regularization-term based upon the sum of the moduli of the second spatial derivatives of the reconstructed image pixel intensities. The balance between these two terms is set by a bootstrapping technique where the target value of the log-likelihood term is deduced from a smoothed version of the original data. When compared to the original data, the processed images exhibit lower residuals with respect to the true object. We use photon-sparse data from two different experimental systems, one system based on a single-photon, avalanche photo-diode array and the other system on a time-gated, intensified camera. However, this same processing technique could most likely be applied to any low photon-number image irrespective of how the data is collected.

  1. Single photon imaging and timing array sensor apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Smith, R. Clayton

    2003-06-24

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for generating a three-dimension image of an object or target. The apparatus is comprised of a photon source for emitting a photon at a target. The emitted photons are received by a photon receiver for receiving the photon when reflected from the target. The photon receiver determines a reflection time of the photon and further determines an arrival position of the photon on the photon receiver. An analyzer is communicatively coupled to the photon receiver, wherein the analyzer generates a three-dimensional image of the object based upon the reflection time and the arrival position.

  2. Energy calibration of energy-resolved photon-counting pixel detectors using laboratory polychromatic x-ray beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youn, Hanbean; Han, Jong Chul; Kam, Soohwa; Yun, Seungman; Kim, Ho Kyung

    2014-10-01

    Recently, photon-counting detectors capable of resolving incident x-ray photon energies have been considered for use in spectral x-ray imaging applications. For reliable use of energy-resolved photon-counting detectors (ERPCDs), energy calibration is an essential procedure prior to their use because variations in responses from each pixel of the ERPCD for incident photons, even at the same energy, are inevitable. Energy calibration can be performed using a variety of methods. In all of these methods, the photon spectra with well-defined peak energies are recorded. Every pixel should be calibrated on its own. In this study, we suggest the use of a conventional polychromatic x-ray source (that is typically used in laboratories) for energy calibration. The energy calibration procedure mainly includes the determination of the peak energies in the spectra, flood-field irradiation, determination of peak channels, and determination of calibration curves (i.e., the slopes and intercepts of linear polynomials). We applied a calibration algorithm to a CdTe ERPCD comprised of 128×128 pixels with a pitch of 0.35 mm using highly attenuated polychromatic x-ray beams to reduce the pulse pile-up effect, and to obtain a narrow-shaped spectrum due to beam hardening. The averaged relative error in calibration curves obtained from 16,384 pixels was about 0.56% for 59.6 keV photons from an Americium radioisotope. This pixel-by-pixel energy calibration enhanced the signal- and contrast-to-noise ratios in images, respectively, by a factor of ~5 and 3 due to improvement in image homogeneity, compared to those obtained without energy calibration. One secondary finding of this study was that the x-ray photon spectra obtained using a common algorithm for computing x-ray spectra reasonably described the peaks in the measured spectra, which implies easier peak detection without the direct measurement of spectra using a separate spectrometer. The proposed method will be a useful alternative to

  3. Note: Spectrometer with multichannel photon-counting detector for beam emission spectroscopy in magnetic fusion devices

    SciTech Connect

    Lizunov, A.; Khilchenko, A.; Khilchenko, V.; Kvashnin, A.; Zubarev, P.

    2015-12-15

    A spectrometer based on a linear array photomultiplier tube (PMT) has been developed and calibrated. A 0.635 m focal length Czerny-Turner monochromator combined with a coupling optics provides an image of a narrow 0.5 nm spectral range with a resolution of 0.015 nm/channel on a 32-anode PMT. The system aims at spectroscopy of D{sub α} or H{sub α} lines emitted by a diagnostic atomic beam in a plasma (primarily a motional Stark effect diagnostics). To record a low photon flux of ∼10{sup 6} s{sup −1} per channel with the time resolution of 100 μs, a pulse counting approach has been used. Wideband amplifiers scale single-electron pulses and transmit them to a digital data processing core hardwired in a programmable logic matrix. Calibrations have shown that the aberration-limited instrument function fits to a single detector channel of 1 mm width. Pilot results of passive measurements of D{sub α} light emission from the plasma confined in a magnetic trap are presented.

  4. Maximum Likelihood Time-of-Arrival Estimation of Optical Pulses via Photon-Counting Photodetectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erkmen, Baris I.; Moision, Bruce E.

    2010-01-01

    Many optical imaging, ranging, and communications systems rely on the estimation of the arrival time of an optical pulse. Recently, such systems have been increasingly employing photon-counting photodetector technology, which changes the statistics of the observed photocurrent. This requires time-of-arrival estimators to be developed and their performances characterized. The statistics of the output of an ideal photodetector, which are well modeled as a Poisson point process, were considered. An analytical model was developed for the mean-square error of the maximum likelihood (ML) estimator, demonstrating two phenomena that cause deviations from the minimum achievable error at low signal power. An approximation was derived to the threshold at which the ML estimator essentially fails to provide better than a random guess of the pulse arrival time. Comparing the analytic model performance predictions to those obtained via simulations, it was verified that the model accurately predicts the ML performance over all regimes considered. There is little prior art that attempts to understand the fundamental limitations to time-of-arrival estimation from Poisson statistics. This work establishes both a simple mathematical description of the error behavior, and the associated physical processes that yield this behavior. Previous work on mean-square error characterization for ML estimators has predominantly focused on additive Gaussian noise. This work demonstrates that the discrete nature of the Poisson noise process leads to a distinctly different error behavior.

  5. Note: Spectrometer with multichannel photon-counting detector for beam emission spectroscopy in magnetic fusion devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lizunov, A.; Khilchenko, A.; Khilchenko, V.; Kvashnin, A.; Zubarev, P.

    2015-12-01

    A spectrometer based on a linear array photomultiplier tube (PMT) has been developed and calibrated. A 0.635 m focal length Czerny-Turner monochromator combined with a coupling optics provides an image of a narrow 0.5 nm spectral range with a resolution of 0.015 nm/channel on a 32-anode PMT. The system aims at spectroscopy of Dα or Hα lines emitted by a diagnostic atomic beam in a plasma (primarily a motional Stark effect diagnostics). To record a low photon flux of ˜106 s-1 per channel with the time resolution of 100 μs, a pulse counting approach has been used. Wideband amplifiers scale single-electron pulses and transmit them to a digital data processing core hardwired in a programmable logic matrix. Calibrations have shown that the aberration-limited instrument function fits to a single detector channel of 1 mm width. Pilot results of passive measurements of Dα light emission from the plasma confined in a magnetic trap are presented.

  6. Photon counting with a FDIRC Cherenkov prototype readout by SiPM arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrocchesi, P. S.; Bagliesi, M. G.; Basti, A.; Bigongiari, G.; Bonechi, S.; Brogi, P.; Checchia, C.; Collazuol, G.; Maestro, P.; Morsani, F.; Piemonte, C.; Stolzi, F.; Suh, J. E.; Sulaj, A.

    2017-02-01

    A prototype of a Focused Internal Reflection Cherenkov, equipped with 16 arrays of NUV-SiPM, was tested at CERN SPS in March 2015 with beams of relativistic ions at 13, 19 and 30 GeV/n obtained from fragmentation of an Ar primary beam. The detector, designed to identify cosmic nuclei, features a Fused Silica radiator bar optically connected to a cylindrical mirror of the same material and an imaging focal plane of dimensions ∼4 cm×3 cm covered with a total of 1024 SiPM photosensors. Thanks to the outstanding performance of the SiPM arrays, the detector could be operated in photon counting mode as a fully digital device. The Cherenkov pattern was recorded together with the total number of detected photoelectrons increasing as Z2 as a function of the atomic number Z of the beam particle. In this paper, we report on the characterization and test of the SiPM arrays and the performance of the Cherenkov prototype for the charge identification of the beam particles.

  7. The statistical distribution of the number of counted scintillation photons in digital silicon photomultipliers: model and validation.

    PubMed

    van Dam, Herman T; Seifert, Stefan; Schaart, Dennis R

    2012-08-07

    In the design and application of scintillation detectors based on silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs), e.g. in positron emission tomography imaging, it is important to understand and quantify the non-proportionality of the SiPM response due to saturation, crosstalk and dark counts. A new type of SiPM, the so-called digital silicon photomultiplier (dSiPM), has recently been introduced. Here, we develop a model of the probability distribution of the number of fired microcells, i.e. the number of counted scintillation photons, in response to a given amount of energy deposited in a scintillator optically coupled to a dSiPM. Based on physical and functional principles, the model elucidates the statistical behavior of dSiPMs. The model takes into account the photon detection efficiency of the detector; the light yield, excess variance and time profile of the scintillator; and the crosstalk probability, dark count rate, integration time and the number of microcells of the dSiPM. Furthermore, relations for the expectation value and the variance of the number of fired cells are deduced. These relations are applied in the experimental validation of the model using a dSiPM coupled to a LSO:Ce,Ca scintillator. Finally, we propose an accurate method for the correction of energy spectra measured with dSiPM-based scintillation detectors.

  8. Revealing Invisible Photonic Inscriptions: Images from Strain

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Photonic structural materials have received intensive interest and have been strongly developed over the past few years for image displays, sensing, and anticounterfeit materials. Their “smartness” arises from their color responsivity to changes of environment, strain, or external fields. Here, we introduce a novel invisible photonic system that reveals encrypted images or characters by simply stretching, or immersing in solvents. This type of intriguing photonic material is composed of regularly arranged core–shell particles that are selectively cross-linked by UV irradiation, giving different strain response compared to un-cross-linked regions. The images reversibly appear and disappear when cycling the strain and releasing it. The unique advantages of this soft polymer opal system compared with other types of photonic gels are that it can be produced in roll to roll quantities, can be vigorously deformed to achieve strong color changes, and has no solvent evaporation issues because it is a photonic rubber system. We demonstrate potential applications together with a fabrication procedure which is straightforward and scalable, vital for user take-up. Our work deepens understanding of this rubbery photonic system based on core–shell nanospheres. PMID:26039279

  9. Mcps-range photon-counting X-ray computed tomography system utilizing an oscillating linear-YAP(Ce) photon detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oda, Yasuyuki; Sato, Eiichi; Abudurexiti, Abulajiang; Hagiwara, Osahiko; Osawa, Akihiro; Matsukiyo, Hiroshi; Enomoto, Toshiyuki; Watanabe, Manabu; Kusachi, Shinya; Sugimura, Shigeaki; Endo, Haruyuki; Sato, Shigehiro; Ogawa, Akira; Onagawa, Jun

    2011-07-01

    High-speed X-ray photon counting is useful for discriminating photon energy, and the counting can be used for constructing an X-ray computed tomography (CT) system. A photon-counting X-ray CT system consists of an X-ray generator, a turntable, an oscillation linear detector, a two-stage controller, a multipixel photon counter (MPPC) module, a 1.0 mm-thick crystal (scintillator) of YAP(Ce) (cerium-doped yttrium aluminum perovskite), a counter card (CC), and a personal computer (PC). Tomography is accomplished by repeating the linear scanning and the rotation of an object, and projection curves of the object are obtained by the linear scanning using the detector consisting of an MPPC module, the YAP(Ce), and a scan stage. The pulses of the event signal from the module are counted by the CC in conjunction with the PC. Because the lower level of the photon energy was roughly determined by a comparator in the module, the average photon energy of the X-ray spectra increased with increase in the lower-level voltage of the comparator at a constant tube voltage. The maximum count rate was approximately 3 Mcps (mega counts per second), and photon-counting CT was carried out.

  10. Non-invasive imaging of skin cancer with fluorescence lifetime imaging using two photon tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patalay, Rakesh; Talbot, Clifford; Alexandrov, Yuriy; Munro, Ian; Breunig, Hans Georg; König, Karsten; Warren, Sean; Neil, Mark A. A.; French, Paul M. W.; Chu, Anthony; Stamp, Gordon W.; Dunsby, Christopher

    2011-07-01

    Multispectral fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) using two photon microscopy as a non-invasive technique for the diagnosis of skin lesions is described. Skin contains fluorophores including elastin, keratin, collagen, FAD and NADH. This endogenous contrast allows tissue to be imaged without the addition of exogenous agents and allows the in vivo state of cells and tissues to be studied. A modified DermaInspect® multiphoton tomography system was used to excite autofluorescence at 760 nm in vivo and on freshly excised ex vivo tissue. This instrument simultaneously acquires fluorescence lifetime images in four spectral channels between 360-655 nm using time-correlated single photon counting and can also provide hyperspectral images. The multispectral fluorescence lifetime images were spatially segmented and binned to determine lifetimes for each cell by fitting to a double exponential lifetime model. A comparative analysis between the cellular lifetimes from different diagnoses demonstrates significant diagnostic potential.

  11. A study of pile-up in integrated time-correlated single photon counting systems.

    PubMed

    Arlt, Jochen; Tyndall, David; Rae, Bruce R; Li, David D-U; Richardson, Justin A; Henderson, Robert K

    2013-10-01

    Recent demonstration of highly integrated, solid-state, time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) systems in CMOS technology is set to provide significant increases in performance over existing bulky, expensive hardware. Arrays of single photon single photon avalanche diode (SPAD) detectors, timing channels, and signal processing can be integrated on a single silicon chip with a degree of parallelism and computational speed that is unattainable by discrete photomultiplier tube and photon counting card solutions. New multi-channel, multi-detector TCSPC sensor architectures with greatly enhanced throughput due to minimal detector transit (dead) time or timing channel dead time are now feasible. In this paper, we study the potential for future integrated, solid-state TCSPC sensors to exceed the photon pile-up limit through analytic formula and simulation. The results are validated using a 10% fill factor SPAD array and an 8-channel, 52 ps resolution time-to-digital conversion architecture with embedded lifetime estimation. It is demonstrated that pile-up insensitive acquisition is attainable at greater than 10 times the pulse repetition rate providing over 60 dB of extended dynamic range to the TCSPC technique. Our results predict future CMOS TCSPC sensors capable of live-cell transient observations in confocal scanning microscopy, improved resolution of near-infrared optical tomography systems, and fluorescence lifetime activated cell sorting.

  12. A study of pile-up in integrated time-correlated single photon counting systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arlt, Jochen; Tyndall, David; Rae, Bruce R.; Li, David D.-U.; Richardson, Justin A.; Henderson, Robert K.

    2013-10-01

    Recent demonstration of highly integrated, solid-state, time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) systems in CMOS technology is set to provide significant increases in performance over existing bulky, expensive hardware. Arrays of single photon single photon avalanche diode (SPAD) detectors, timing channels, and signal processing can be integrated on a single silicon chip with a degree of parallelism and computational speed that is unattainable by discrete photomultiplier tube and photon counting card solutions. New multi-channel, multi-detector TCSPC sensor architectures with greatly enhanced throughput due to minimal detector transit (dead) time or timing channel dead time are now feasible. In this paper, we study the potential for future integrated, solid-state TCSPC sensors to exceed the photon pile-up limit through analytic formula and simulation. The results are validated using a 10% fill factor SPAD array and an 8-channel, 52 ps resolution time-to-digital conversion architecture with embedded lifetime estimation. It is demonstrated that pile-up insensitive acquisition is attainable at greater than 10 times the pulse repetition rate providing over 60 dB of extended dynamic range to the TCSPC technique. Our results predict future CMOS TCSPC sensors capable of live-cell transient observations in confocal scanning microscopy, improved resolution of near-infrared optical tomography systems, and fluorescence lifetime activated cell sorting.

  13. An improved differential box-counting method of image segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Cancan; Cheng, Longfei; He, Tao; Chen, Lang; Yu, Fei; Yang, Liangen

    2016-01-01

    Fractal dimension is an important quantitative characteristic of a image, which can be widely used in image analysis. Differential box-counting method which is one of many calculation methods of a fractal dimension has been frequently used due to its simple calculation . In differential box-counting method, a window size M is limited in the integer power of 2. It leads to inaccurate calculation results of a fractal dimension. Aiming at solving the issues , in this paper, an improved algorithm is discussed that the window size M has been improved to be able to accommodate non-integer power of 2, and making the calculated fractal dimension error smaller. In order to verify superiority of the improved algorithm, the values of fractal dimension are regarded as parameters, and are applied for image segmentation combined with Ostu algorithm . Both traditional and improved differential box-counting methods are respectively used to estimate fractal dimensions and do threshold segmentation for a thread image . The experimental results show that image segmentation details by improved differential box-counting method are more obvious than that by traditional differential box-counting method, with less impurities, clearer target outline and better segmentation effect.

  14. Bubble Counts for Rayleigh-Taylor Instability Using Image Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, P L; Gezahegne, A G; Cook, A W; Cabot, W H; Kamath, C

    2007-01-24

    We describe the use of image analysis to count bubbles in 3-D, large-scale, LES [1] and DNS [2] of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. We analyze these massive datasets by first converting the 3-D data to 2-D, then counting the bubbles in the 2-D data. Our plots for the bubble count indicate there are four distinct regimes in the process of the mixing of the two fluids. We also show that our results are relatively insensitive to the choice of parameters in our analysis algorithms.

  15. Slope characterization in combining analog and photon count data from atmospheric lidar measurements.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yunpeng; Yi, Fan; Kong, Wei; Yi, Yang

    2014-11-01

    A transient digitizer (Licel) connecting to a photomultiplier tube (PMT) can obtain lidar backscatter profiles in both photon count and analog signal. A lidar can detect higher atmospheric regions by combining (gluing) simultaneous analog and photon count data via the slope coefficient. In this work, the output of a PMT has been measured with a transient digitizer based on an intensity-stable light source. The slope value and dynamic range of the lidar profile have been characterized. The slope value is determined only by the gain of the PMT as it works in a linear range with a fixed pulse height discrimination threshold. The dynamic range of a glued lidar profile is settled by the slope value. The fitted slope has a more exact value when the selection criterion is given in terms of the independent variable for fitting. For practical lidar data, the fitted slope is more stable and reliable when the lower limit of the data range for fitting rises.

  16. Time-autocorrelated two-photon counting technique for time-resolved fluorescence measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borst, Walter L.; Liu, Lin-I.

    1999-01-01

    We describe a new instrumental technique for the excitation, acquisition, and analysis of fluorescence decays from a variety of substances, in the present case plastic scintillators. The fluorescence is excited by β particles from a radioactive source (100 μCi Sr-90). A random photon from the resulting fluorescence decay provides a trigger pulse to start a time-to-amplitude converter (TAC), while another random photon from the same β-excitation event provides the stop pulse. The optical components and geometry for detecting these two photons, i.e., the two photomultipliers (PMT), the filters, and the pulse counting system, are identical. As a consequence, the measured fluorescence signal is the autocorrelation function of the fluorescence decay from the sample. A delay line of 50 ns is inserted between the "stop" signal PMT and the TAC so that those "stop" pulses which arrive before "start pulses" also are recorded. Thus the acquired fluorescence signal versus time is symmetric about the delay time and contains twice as many counts as without delay. We call the new technique the "time-autocorrelated two-photon counting technique" (TATPC) in distinction to the conventional "time-correlated single-photon counting technique" (TCSPC). We compared both techniques with the same equipment and scintillators, where in the TCSPC case, a β particle is used for the start of the TAC instead of a random photon in the TATPC technique. We find that under similar experimental circumstances, the signal count rate with TATPC is about 50 times larger than with TCSPC. The new method is well suited for obtaining fluorescence decay times from plastic scintillators, which we use in this article to exemplify the technique. More generally, β-particle excitation in combination with TATPC should prove useful for materials with high energy levels or band gaps, which cannot be excited with pulsed lasers in the visible region. The length of our excitation pulse is less than 20 ps and is

  17. Development of photodetectors for recording lidar signals in the photon counting and analog modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slesar, A. S.; Chaikovskii, A. P.; Denisov, S. V.; Korol, M. M.; Osipenko, F. P.; Balin, Yu. S.; Kokhanenko, G. P.; Penner, I. E.; Novoselov, M. M.

    2015-11-01

    A number of unified photodetector modules providing for recording lidar signals in the wavelength range from 0.26 to 1.6 μm in the modes of analog signals and photon counting are developed on the basis of photomultiplier tubes and avalanche photodiodes. The software is created for control of the photodetector modules, as well as the test bench for measuring their characteristics is designed.

  18. Approaching the Ultimate Limits of Communication Efficiency with a Photon-Counting Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erkmen, Baris; Moision, Bruce; Dolinar, Samuel J.; Birnbaum, Kevin M.; Divsalar, Dariush

    2012-01-01

    Coherent states achieve the Holevo capacity of a pure-loss channel when paired with an optimal measurement, but a physical realization of this measurement is as of yet unknown, and it is also likely to be of high complexity. In this paper, we focus on the photon-counting measurement and study the photon and dimensional efficiencies attainable with modulations over classical- and nonclassical-state alphabets. We first review the state-of-the-art coherent on-off-keying (OOK) with a photoncounting measurement, illustrating its asymptotic inefficiency relative to the Holevo limit. We show that a commonly made Poisson approximation in thermal noise leads to unbounded photon information efficiencies, violating the conjectured Holevo limit. We analyze two binary-modulation architectures that improve upon the dimensional versus photon efficiency tradeoff achievable with conventional OOK. We show that at high photon efficiency these architectures achieve an efficiency tradeoff that differs from the best possible tradeoff--determined by the Holevo capacity--by only a constant factor. The first architecture we analyze is a coherent-state transmitter that relies on feedback from the receiver to control the transmitted energy. The second architecture uses a single-photon number-state source.

  19. Update on Linear Mode Photon Counting with the HgCdTe Linear Mode Avalanche Photodiode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, Jeffrey D.; Kinch, Mike; Sun, Xiaoli

    2014-01-01

    The behavior of the gain-voltage characteristic of the mid-wavelength infrared cutoff HgCdTe linear mode avalanche photodiode (e-APD) is discussed both experimentally and theoretically as a function of the width of the multiplication region. Data are shown that demonstrate a strong dependence of the gain at a given bias voltage on the width of the n- gain region. Geometrical and fundamental theoretical models are examined to explain this behavior. The geometrical model takes into account the gain-dependent optical fill factor of the cylindrical APD. The theoretical model is based on the ballistic ionization model being developed for the HgCdTe APD. It is concluded that the fundamental theoretical explanation is the dominant effect. A model is developed that combines both the geometrical and fundamental effects. The model also takes into account the effect of the varying multiplication width in the low bias region of the gain-voltage curve. It is concluded that the lower than expected gain seen in the first 2 × 8 HgCdTe linear mode photon counting APD arrays, and higher excess noise factor, was very likely due to the larger than typical multiplication region length in the photon counting APD pixel design. The implications of these effects on device photon counting performance are discussed.

  20. Time-Correlated Single-Photon Counting Range Profiling of Moving Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedborg, Julia; Jonsson, Per; Henriksson, Markus; Sjöqvist, Lars

    2016-06-01

    Time-correlated single-photon counting (TCSPC) is a laser radar technique that can provide range profiling with very high resolution. Range profiles of multiple surface objects and geometrical shapes are revealed using multiple laser pulses with very low pulse energy. The method relies on accurate time measurements between a laser pulse sync signal and the registration of a single-photon event of reflected photons from a target. TCSPC is a statistic method that requires an acquisition time and therefore the range profile of a non-stationary object (target) may be corrupted. Here, we present results showing that it is possible to reconstruct the range profile of a moving target and calculate the velocity of the target.

  1. Development of Data Acquisition Methods for an FPGA-Based Photon Counting Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambily, S.; Sarpotdar, Mayuresh; Mathew, Joice; Sreejith, A. G.; Nirmal, K.; Prakash, Ajin; Safonova, Margarita; Murthy, Jayant

    MCP-based detectors are widely used in the ultraviolet (UV) region due to their low noise levels, high sensitivity and good spatial and temporal resolution. We have developed a compact near-UV (NUV) detector for high-altitude balloon and space flights, using off-the-shelf MCP, CMOS sensor, and optics. The detector is designed to be capable of working in the direct frame transfer mode as well in the photon counting mode for single photon event detection. The identification and centroiding of each photon event are done using an FPGA-based data acquisition and real-time processing system. In this paper, we discuss various algorithms and methods used in both operating modes, as well as their implementation on the hardware.

  2. Linear Mode HgCdTe Avalanche Photodiodes for Photon Counting Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, William, III; Beck, Jeffrey; Scritchfield, Richard; Skokan, Mark; Mitra, Pradip; Sun, Xiaoli; Abshire, James; Carpenter, Darren; Lane, Barry

    2015-01-01

    An overview of recent improvements in the understanding and maturity of linear mode photon counting with HgCdTe electron-initiated avalanche photodiodes is presented. The first HgCdTe LMPC 2x8 format array fabricated in 2011 with 64 micron pitch was a remarkable success in terms of demonstrating a high single photon signal to noise ratio of 13.7 with an excess noise factor of 1.3-1.4, a 7 ns minimum time between events, and a broad spectral response extending from 0.4 micron to 4.2 micron. The main limitations were a greater than 10x higher false event rate than expected of greater than 1 MHz, a 5-7x lower than expected APD gain, and a photon detection efficiency of only 50% when greater than 60% was expected. This paper discusses the reasons behind these limitations and the implementation of their mitigations with new results.

  3. Photon dynamics in tissue imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chance, Britton; Haselgrove, John C.; Wang, NaiGuang; Maris, Michael B.; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M.

    1991-11-01

    The emerging need for a fast, safe economical approach to global and localized measures of desaturation of hemoglobin with oxygen (HbO2) in the human brain motivates further research on time-resolved spectroscopy in four areas of study. (1) To afford quantization of hemoglobin saturation through time-resolved spectroscopy in the time domain (TD) and in the frequency domain (FD). Evaluation of dual-wavelength TD and FD spectrometers for determining quantitatively hemoglobin desaturation and blood-volume changes by calculations that are insensitive to mutual interference is proposed. The diffusion equation, as it applies especially to TD studies, and the absorption ((mu) a) and scattering ((mu) s) coefficients provide their independent determination from the late and early respective portions of the kinetics of the emergent photons in response to a short input pulse (50-100 psec). (2) The identification of the photon-pathlength change due to the arterial pulse in the brain tissue by FD methods with Fourier transformation affords an opportunity to employ principles of pulse oximetry to vessels localized deep within the brain tissue. (3) Localization of desaturation of hemoglobin in portions of the brain can be achieved through dual-wavelength scanning of the input/output optical fibers across the head for an X-Y coordinate and varying the distance between input and output ((rho) ) or the time delay in data acquisition to afford an in-depth Z scan. Localizations of shed blood, which have an effective concentration of over 10 times that of capillary-bed blood, are identified by X, Y, Z scans using only a single wavelength. (4) Independent measurements of absorption ((mu) a) and scattering ((mu) s) coefficients, particularly by TD techniques, affords structural mapping of the brain, which can be used to diagnose brain tumor and neuronal degeneration. Two experimental systems are used to critically evaluate these studies; the first, a hemoglobin/lipid/yeast model in which

  4. Linear-mode photon counting with the noiseless gain HgCdTe e-APD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Jeffrey D.; Scritchfield, Richard; Mitra, Pradip; Sullivan, William, III; Gleckler, Anthony D.; Strittmatter, Robert; Martin, Robert J.

    2011-05-01

    A linear mode photon counting FPA using HgCdTe MWIR cutoff e-APDs has been designed, fabricated, and characterized. The broad spectral range (0.4 μm to 4.3 μm) is unique among photon counters, making this a "first of its kind" system spanning the visible to the MWIR. The low excess noise ((F(M) ~ 1) of the e-APDs allows for robust photon detection while operating at a stable linear avalanche gain in the range of 500 to 1000. The ROIC design included a very high gain-bandwidth product RTIA (3x1011 Ohm-Hz) and a 4 ns output digital pulse width comparator. The ROIC had 16 high bandwidth analog and 16 LVDS digital outputs. The 2x8 array was integrated into an LN2 Dewar with a custom LCC and daughter board design that preserved high bandwidth analog and digital signal integrity. The 2x8 e-APD arrays were fabricated on 4.3 μm cutoff HgCdTe and operated at 84 K. The measured dark currents were approximately 1 pA at 13 V bias where the measured APD gain was 500. This translates to a predicted dark current induced dark count rate of less than 20 KHz. Single photon detection was achieved with a photon pulse SNR of 13.7 above the amplifier noise floor. A photon detection efficiency of 50% was measured at a background limited false event rate (FER) of about 1 MHz. The measured jitter was in the range of 550 ps to 800 ps. The demonstrated minimum time between distinguishable events was less than 10 ns.

  5. A fast and high-sensitive dual-wavelength diffuse optical tomography system using digital lock-in photon-counting technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Weiting; Yi, Xi; Zhao, Huijuan; Gao, Feng

    2014-09-01

    We presented a novel dual-wavelength diffuse optical imaging system which can perform 2-D or 3-D imaging fast and high-sensitively for monitoring the dynamic change of optical parameters. A newly proposed lock-in photon-counting detection method was adopted for week optical signal collection, which brought in excellent property as well as simplified geometry. Fundamental principles of the lock-in photon-counting detection were elaborately demonstrated, and the feasibility was strictly verified by the linearity experiment. Systemic performance of the prototype set up was experimentally accessed, including stray light rejection and inherent interference. Results showed that the system possessed superior anti-interference capability (under 0.58% in darkroom) compared with traditional photon-counting detection, and the crosstalk between two wavelengths was lower than 2.28%. For comprehensive assessment, 2-D phantom experiments towards relatively large dimension model (diameter of 4cm) were conducted. Different absorption targets were imaged to investigate detection sensitivity. Reconstruction image under all conditions was exciting, with a desirable SNR. Study on image quality v.s. integration time put forward a new method for accessing higher SNR with the sacrifice of measuring speed. In summary, the newly developed system showed great potential in promoting detection sensitivity as well as measuring speed. This will make substantial progress in dynamically tracking the blood concentration distribution in many clinical areas, such as small animal disease modeling, human brain activity research and thick tissues (for example, breast) diagnosis.

  6. Linear fitting of multi-threshold counting data with a pixel-array detector for spectral X-ray imaging

    PubMed Central

    Muir, Ryan D.; Pogranichney, Nicholas R.; Muir, J. Lewis; Sullivan, Shane Z.; Battaile, Kevin P.; Mulichak, Anne M.; Toth, Scott J.; Keefe, Lisa J.; Simpson, Garth J.

    2014-01-01

    Experiments and modeling are described to perform spectral fitting of multi-threshold counting measurements on a pixel-array detector. An analytical model was developed for describing the probability density function of detected voltage in X-ray photon-counting arrays, utilizing fractional photon counting to account for edge/corner effects from voltage plumes that spread across multiple pixels. Each pixel was mathematically calibrated by fitting the detected voltage distributions to the model at both 13.5 keV and 15.0 keV X-ray energies. The model and established pixel responses were then exploited to statistically recover images of X-ray intensity as a function of X-ray energy in a simulated multi-wavelength and multi-counting threshold experiment. PMID:25178010

  7. An image-processing program for automated counting

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cunningham, D.J.; Anderson, W.H.; Anthony, R.M.

    1996-01-01

    An image-processing program developed by the National Institute of Health, IMAGE, was modified in a cooperative project between remote sensing specialists at the Ohio State University Center for Mapping and scientists at the Alaska Science Center to facilitate estimating numbers of black brant (Branta bernicla nigricans) in flocks at Izembek National Wildlife Refuge. The modified program, DUCK HUNT, runs on Apple computers. Modifications provide users with a pull down menu that optimizes image quality; identifies objects of interest (e.g., brant) by spectral, morphometric, and spatial parameters defined interactively by users; counts and labels objects of interest; and produces summary tables. Images from digitized photography, videography, and high- resolution digital photography have been used with this program to count various species of waterfowl.

  8. Arterial wall perfusion measured with photon counting spectral x-ray CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorgensen, Steven M.; Korinek, Mark J.; Vercnocke, Andrew J.; Anderson, Jill L.; Halaweish, Ahmed; Leng, Shuai; McCollough, Cynthia H.; Ritman, Erik L.

    2016-10-01

    Early atherosclerosis changes perfusion of the arterial wall due to localized proliferation of the vasa vasorum. When contrast agent passes through the artery, some enters the vasa vasorum and increases radiopacity of the arterial wall. Technical challenges to detecting changes in vasa vasorum density include the thin arterial wall, partial volume averaging at the arterial lumen/wall interface and calcification within the wall. We used a photon-counting spectral CT scanner to study carotid arteries of anesthetized pigs and micro-CT of these arteries to quantify vasa vasorum density. The left carotid artery wall was injected with autologous blood to stimulate vasa vasorum angiogenesis. The scans were performed at 25-120 keV; the tube-current-time product was 550 mAs. A 60 mL bolus of iodine contrast agent was injected into the femoral vein at 5mL/s. Two seconds post injection, an axial scan was acquired at every 3 s over 60 s (i.e., 20 time points). Each time point acquired 28 contiguous transaxial slices with reconstructed voxels 0.16 x 0.16 x 1 mm3. Regions-of-interest in the outer 2/3 of the arterial wall and in the middle 2/3 of the lumen were drawn and their enhancements plotted versus time. Lumenal CT values peaked several seconds after injection and then returned towards baseline. Arterial wall CT values peaked concurrent to the lumen. The peak arterial wall enhancement in the left carotid arterial wall correlated with increased vasa vasorum density observed in micro-CT images of the isolated arteries.

  9. Arterial Wall Perfusion Measured with Photon Counting Spectral X-ray CT

    PubMed Central

    Jorgensen, Steven M.; Korinek, Mark J.; Vercnocke, Andrew J.; Anderson, Jill L.; Halaweish, Ahmed; Leng, Shuai; McCollough, Cynthia H.; Ritman, Erik L.

    2016-01-01

    Early atherosclerosis changes perfusion of the arterial wall due to localized proliferation of the vasa vasorum. When contrast agent passes through the artery, some enters the vasa vasorum and increases radiopacity of the arterial wall. Technical challenges to detecting changes in vasa vasorum density include the thin arterial wall, partial volume averaging at the arterial lumen/wall interface and calcification within the wall. We used a photon-counting spectral CT scanner to study carotid arteries of anesthetized pigs and micro-CT of these arteries to quantify vasa vasorum density. The left carotid artery wall was injected with autologous blood to stimulate vasa vasorum angiogenesis. The scans were performed at 25–120 keV; the tube-current-time product was 550 mAs. A 60 mL bolus of iodine contrast agent was injected into the femoral vein at 5mL/s. Two seconds post injection, an axial scan was acquired at every 3 s over 60 s (i.e., 20 time points). Each time point acquired 28 contiguous transaxial slices with reconstructed voxels 0.16 × 0.16 × 1 mm3. Regions-of-interest in the outer 2/3 of the arterial wall and in the middle 2/3 of the lumen were drawn and their enhancements plotted versus time. Lumenal CT values peaked several seconds after injection and then returned towards baseline. Arterial wall CT values peaked concurrent to the lumen. The peak arterial wall enhancement in the left carotid arterial wall correlated with increased vasa vasorum density observed in micro-CT images of the isolated arteries. PMID:27807391

  10. Arterial Wall Perfusion Measured with Photon Counting Spectral X-ray CT.

    PubMed

    Jorgensen, Steven M; Korinek, Mark J; Vercnocke, Andrew J; Anderson, Jill L; Halaweish, Ahmed; Leng, Shuai; McCollough, Cynthia H; Ritman, Erik L

    2016-08-28

    Early atherosclerosis changes perfusion of the arterial wall due to localized proliferation of the vasa vasorum. When contrast agent passes through the artery, some enters the vasa vasorum and increases radiopacity of the arterial wall. Technical challenges to detecting changes in vasa vasorum density include the thin arterial wall, partial volume averaging at the arterial lumen/wall interface and calcification within the wall. We used a photon-counting spectral CT scanner to study carotid arteries of anesthetized pigs and micro-CT of these arteries to quantify vasa vasorum density. The left carotid artery wall was injected with autologous blood to stimulate vasa vasorum angiogenesis. The scans were performed at 25-120 keV; the tube-current-time product was 550 mAs. A 60 mL bolus of iodine contrast agent was injected into the femoral vein at 5mL/s. Two seconds post injection, an axial scan was acquired at every 3 s over 60 s (i.e., 20 time points). Each time point acquired 28 contiguous transaxial slices with reconstructed voxels 0.16 × 0.16 × 1 mm(3). Regions-of-interest in the outer 2/3 of the arterial wall and in the middle 2/3 of the lumen were drawn and their enhancements plotted versus time. Lumenal CT values peaked several seconds after injection and then returned towards baseline. Arterial wall CT values peaked concurrent to the lumen. The peak arterial wall enhancement in the left carotid arterial wall correlated with increased vasa vasorum density observed in micro-CT images of the isolated arteries.

  11. On Approaching the Ultimate Limits of Communication Using a Photon-Counting Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erkmen, Baris I.; Moision, Bruce E.; Dolinar, Samuel J.; Birnbaum, Kevin M.; Divsalar, Dariush

    2012-01-01

    Coherent states achieve the Holevo capacity of a pure-loss channel when paired with an optimal measurement, but a physical realization of this measurement scheme is as of yet unknown, and it is also likely to be of high complexity. In this paper, we focus on the photon-counting measurement and study the photon and dimensional efficiencies attainable with modulations over classical- and nonclassical-state alphabets. We analyze two binary modulation architectures that improve upon the dimensional versus photon efficiency tradeoff achievable with the state-of-the-art coherent-state on-off keying modulation. We show that at high photon efficiency these architectures achieve an efficiency tradeoff that differs from the best possible tradeoff--determined by the Holevo capacity--by only a constant factor. The first architecture we analyze is a coherent-state transmitter that relies on feedback from the receiver to control the transmitted energy. The second architecture uses a single-photon number-state source.

  12. Two-Photon Ghost Image and Interference-Diffraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, Y. H.; Sergienko, A. V.; Pittman, T. B.; Strekalov, D. V.; Klyshko, D. N.

    1996-01-01

    One of the most surprising consequences of quantum mechanics is entanglement of two or more distance particles. The two-particle entangled state was mathematically formulated by Schrodinger. Based on this unusual quantum behavior, EPR defined their 'physical reality' and then asked the question: 'Can Quantum-Mechanical Description of Physical Reality Be Considered Complete?' One may not appreciate EPR's criterion of physical reality and insist that 'no elementary quantum phenomenon is a phenomenon until it is a recorded phenomenon'. Optical spontaneous parametric down conversion (SPDC) is the most effective mechanism to generate an EPR type entangled two-photon state. In SPDC, an optical beam, called the pump, is incident on a birefringent crystal. The pump is intense enough so that nonlinear effects lead to the conversion of pump photons into pairs of photons, historically called signal and idler. Technically, the SPDC is said to be type-1 or type-2, depending on whether the signal and idler beams have parallel or orthogonal polarization. The SPDC conversion efficiency is typically on the order of 10(exp -9) to 10(exp -11), depending on the SPDC nonlinear material. The signal and idler intensities are extremely low, only single photon detection devices can register them. The quantum entanglement nature of SPDC has been demonstrated in EPR-Bohm experiments and Bell's inequality measurements. The following two experiments were recently performed in our laboratory, which are more closely related to the original 1935 EPR gedankenezperiment. The first experiment is a two-photon optical imaging type experiment, which has been named 'ghost image' by the physics community. The signal and idler beams of SPDC are sent in different directions, so that the detection of the signal and idler photons can be performed by two distant photon counting detectors. An aperture object (mask) is placed in front of the signal photon detector and illuminated by the signal beam through a

  13. Denoising two-photon calcium imaging data.

    PubMed

    Malik, Wasim Q; Schummers, James; Sur, Mriganka; Brown, Emery N

    2011-01-01

    Two-photon calcium imaging is now an important tool for in vivo imaging of biological systems. By enabling neuronal population imaging with subcellular resolution, this modality offers an approach for gaining a fundamental understanding of brain anatomy and physiology. Proper analysis of calcium imaging data requires denoising, that is separating the signal from complex physiological noise. To analyze two-photon brain imaging data, we present a signal plus colored noise model in which the signal is represented as harmonic regression and the correlated noise is represented as an order autoregressive process. We provide an efficient cyclic descent algorithm to compute approximate maximum likelihood parameter estimates by combing a weighted least-squares procedure with the Burg algorithm. We use Akaike information criterion to guide selection of the harmonic regression and the autoregressive model orders. Our flexible yet parsimonious modeling approach reliably separates stimulus-evoked fluorescence response from background activity and noise, assesses goodness of fit, and estimates confidence intervals and signal-to-noise ratio. This refined separation leads to appreciably enhanced image contrast for individual cells including clear delineation of subcellular details and network activity. The application of our approach to in vivo imaging data recorded in the ferret primary visual cortex demonstrates that our method yields substantially denoised signal estimates. We also provide a general Volterra series framework for deriving this and other signal plus correlated noise models for imaging. This approach to analyzing two-photon calcium imaging data may be readily adapted to other computational biology problems which apply correlated noise models.

  14. Note: Fully integrated active quenching circuit achieving 100 MHz count rate with custom technology single photon avalanche diodes.

    PubMed

    Acconcia, G; Labanca, I; Rech, I; Gulinatti, A; Ghioni, M

    2017-02-01

    The minimization of Single Photon Avalanche Diodes (SPADs) dead time is a key factor to speed up photon counting and timing measurements. We present a fully integrated Active Quenching Circuit (AQC) able to provide a count rate as high as 100 MHz with custom technology SPAD detectors. The AQC can also operate the new red enhanced SPAD and provide the timing information with a timing jitter Full Width at Half Maximum (FWHM) as low as 160 ps.

  15. Note: Fully integrated active quenching circuit achieving 100 MHz count rate with custom technology single photon avalanche diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acconcia, G.; Labanca, I.; Rech, I.; Gulinatti, A.; Ghioni, M.

    2017-02-01

    The minimization of Single Photon Avalanche Diodes (SPADs) dead time is a key factor to speed up photon counting and timing measurements. We present a fully integrated Active Quenching Circuit (AQC) able to provide a count rate as high as 100 MHz with custom technology SPAD detectors. The AQC can also operate the new red enhanced SPAD and provide the timing information with a timing jitter Full Width at Half Maximum (FWHM) as low as 160 ps.

  16. Two-photon fluorescence correlation spectroscopy with high count rates and low background using dielectric microspheres

    PubMed Central

    Aouani, Heykel; Schön, Peter; Brasselet, Sophie; Rigneault, Hervé; Wenger, Jérôme

    2010-01-01

    Two-photon excitation fluorescence is a powerful technique commonly used for biological imaging. However, the low absorption cross section of this non-linear process is a critical issue for performing biomolecular spectroscopy at the single molecule level. Enhancing the two-photon fluorescence signal would greatly improve the effectiveness of this technique, yet current methods struggle with medium enhancement factors and/or high background noise. Here, we show that the two-photon fluorescence signal from single Alexa Fluor 488 molecules can be enhanced up to 10 times by using a 3 µm diameter latex sphere while adding almost no photoluminescence background. We report a full characterization of the two-photon fluorescence enhancement by a single microsphere using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. This opens new routes to enhance non-linear optical signals and extend biophotonic applications. PMID:21258531

  17. Method to simulate the object tracking with photon-counting laser ranging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Xian; Xing, JiChuan; Huang, Hao

    2015-11-01

    We provide a new method to simulate the process of tracking the noncooperative object that moves beyond visual range with a photon-counting laser ranging system. Based on fundamentals of photon-counting laser ranging techniques and parameters of the experimental prototype, we generate echo events according to their probability. Then, we accumulate the echo data in a certain period of time and accurately extract the object's trajectory with mean-shift and random sample consensus algorithms. Depending on the trajectory during the accumulation period, we predict the relative movement of the object in succeeding cycles by using self-tuning α-β filtering and carefully pick out photon echo signals and apply the polynomial fitting to them to compute the trajectory of the object. The simulation shows that the error between the theoretical trajectory and the extracted trajectory is decreasing all the time, which suggests that we can track the object precisely as the time goes by. The simulation in this paper provides a new way for applications like satellite orientation, identification, troubleshooting, etc.

  18. Three-photon imaging of ovarian cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, Jennifer K.; Amirsolaimani, Babak; Rice, Photini; Hatch, Kenneth; Kieu, Khanh

    2016-02-01

    Optical imaging methods have the potential to detect ovarian cancer at an early, curable stage. Optical imaging has the disadvantage that high resolution techniques require access to the tissue of interest, but miniature endoscopes that traverse the natural orifice of the reproductive tract, or access the ovaries and fallopian tubes through a small incision in the vagina wall, can provide a minimally-invasive solution. We have imaged both rodent and human ovaries and fallopian tubes with a variety of endoscope-compatible modalities. The recent development of fiber-coupled femtosecond lasers will enable endoscopic multiphoton microscopy (MPM). We demonstrated two- and three-photon excited fluorescence (2PEF, 3PEF), and second- and third-harmonic generation microscopy (SHG, THG) in human ovarian and fallopian tube tissue. A study was undertaken to understand the mechanisms of contrast in these images. Six patients (normal, cystadenoma, and ovarian adenocarcinoma) provided ovarian and fallopian tube biopsies. The tissue was imaged with three-dimensional optical coherence tomography, multiphoton microscopy, and frozen for histological sectioning. Tissue sections were stained with hematoxylin and eosin, Masson's trichrome, and Sudan black. Approximately 1 μm resolution images were obtained with an excitation source at 1550 nm. 2PEF signal was absent. SHG signal was mainly from collagen. 3PEF and THG signal came from a variety of sources, including a strong signal from fatty connective tissue and red blood cells. Adenocarcinoma was characterized by loss of SHG signal, whereas cystic abnormalities showed strong SHG. There was limited overlap of two- and three- photon signals, suggesting that three-photon imaging can provide additional information for early diagnosis of ovarian cancer.

  19. Note: Simple calibration of the counting-rate dependence of the timing shift of single photon avalanche diodes by photon interval analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Otosu, Takuhiro; Ishii, Kunihiko; Tahara, Tahei

    2013-03-15

    The counting-rate dependence of the temporal response of single photon avalanche diodes (SPADs) is a critical issue for the accurate determination of the fluorescence lifetime. In this study, the response of SPADs was examined with analyzing the time interval of the detected photons. The results clearly show that the shift of the detection timing causes the counting-rate dependence of the temporal response, and this timing shift is solely determined by the time interval from the preceding photon. We demonstrate that this timing instability is readily calibrated by utilizing the macrotime data taken with the time-tag mode that is implemented in the time-correlated single photon counting modules.

  20. Low-noise low-jitter 32-pixels CMOS single-photon avalanche diodes array for single-photon counting from 300 nm to 900 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Scarcella, Carmelo; Tosi, Alberto Villa, Federica; Tisa, Simone; Zappa, Franco

    2013-12-15

    We developed a single-photon counting multichannel detection system, based on a monolithic linear array of 32 CMOS SPADs (Complementary Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Single-Photon Avalanche Diodes). All channels achieve a timing resolution of 100 ps (full-width at half maximum) and a photon detection efficiency of 50% at 400 nm. Dark count rate is very low even at room temperature, being about 125 counts/s for 50 μm active area diameter SPADs. Detection performance and microelectronic compactness of this CMOS SPAD array make it the best candidate for ultra-compact time-resolved spectrometers with single-photon sensitivity from 300 nm to 900 nm.

  1. The solid state photomultiplier: Status of photon counting beyond the near-infrared

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hays, K. M.; Laviolette, R. A.; Stapelbroek, M. G.; Petroff, M. D.

    1989-01-01

    Rockwell International's Solid State Photomultiplier (SSPM) is an impurity-band avalanche device which can count individual photons with wavelengths between 0.4 and 28 micrometers. Its response to a photon is a pulse of between 10(exp 4) and 10(exp 5) conduction electrons, making it an important device for use in phenomenology. The characteristics of the SSPM make it a potentially important device for use in astronomical applications. Contract NAS2-12400 was initiated in June 1986 to conduct modeling and characterization studies of the SSPM to provide a basis for assessing its use in astronomical systems. Some SSPM models and results of measurements which characterize the group of SSPMs recently fabricated on this contract are discussed.

  2. Role of the doubly stochastic Neyman type-A and Thomas counting distributions in photon detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teich, M. C.

    1981-01-01

    The sums of Meyman type-A and Thomas random variables are shown to retain their form under the constant multiplication parameter constraint. The conditions under which the two random variables converge in distribution to the fixed multiplicative Poisson, and to the Gaussian, are presented. It is shown that the latter result is important, in that it provides a solution to likelihood-ratio detection, estimation and discrimination problems in the presence of many kinds of signal and noise. Among the explicit applications presented are: (1) the photon-counter scintillation detection of nuclear particles when particle flux is low, (2) the photon-counting detection of weak optical signals in the presence of ionizing radiation, and (3) the design of a star-scanner spacecraft guidance system adequate for hostile space environments.

  3. Measurement of Sub-Shot-Noise Correlations of Spatial Fluctuations in the Photon-Counting Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanchet, Jean-Luc; Devaux, Fabrice; Furfaro, Luca; Lantz, Eric

    2008-12-01

    We have measured sub-shot-noise quantum correlations of spatial fluctuations in the far-field image of the parametric fluorescence created in a type I beta-barium-borate nonlinear crystal. Imaging is performed at very low light level (0.15 photons per pixel) with an electron multiplying charge coupled device camera. Experimental results overcome the standard quantum limit shot-noise level without subtraction of the variance of the detection noise.

  4. A photon-counting photodiode array detector for far ultraviolet (FUV) astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartig, G. F.; Moos, H. W.; Pembroke, R.; Bowers, C.

    1982-01-01

    A compact, stable, single-stage intensified photodiode array detector designed for photon-counting, far ultraviolet astronomy applications employs a saturable, 'C'-type MCP (Galileo S. MCP 25-25) to produce high gain pulses with a narrowly peaked pulse height distribution. The P-20 output phosphor exhibits a very short decay time, due to the high current density of the electron pulses. This intensifier is being coupled to a self-scanning linear photodiode array which has a fiber optic input window which allows direct, rigid mechanical coupling with minimal light loss. The array was scanned at a 250 KHz pixel rate. The detector exhibits more than adequate signal-to-noise ratio for pulse counting and event location.

  5. Development and test of photon-counting microchannel plate detector arrays for use on space telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Timothy, J. G.

    1976-01-01

    The full sensitivity, dynamic range, and photometric stability of microchannel array plates(MCP) are incorporated into a photon-counting detection system for space operations. Components of the system include feedback-free MCP's for high gain and saturated output pulse-height distribution with a stable response; multi-anode readout arrays mounted in proximity focus with the output face of the MCP; and multi-layer ceramic headers to provide electrical interface between the anode array in a sealed detector tube and the associated electronics.

  6. Lightweight Raman spectroscope using time-correlated photon-counting detection.

    PubMed

    Meng, Zhaokai; Petrov, Georgi I; Cheng, Shuna; Jo, Javier A; Lehmann, Kevin K; Yakovlev, Vladislav V; Scully, Marlan O

    2015-10-06

    Raman spectroscopy is an important tool in understanding chemical components of various materials. However, the excessive weight and energy consumption of a conventional CCD-based Raman spectrometer forbids its applications under extreme conditions, including unmanned aircraft vehicles (UAVs) and Mars/Moon rovers. In this article, we present a highly sensitive, shot-noise-limited, and ruggedized Raman signal acquisition using a time-correlated photon-counting system. Compared with conventional Raman spectrometers, over 95% weight, 65% energy consumption, and 70% cost could be removed through this design. This technique allows space- and UAV-based Raman spectrometers to robustly perform hyperspectral Raman acquisitions without excessive energy consumption.

  7. Adaptive optics wavefront sensors based on photon-counting detector arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aull, Brian F.; Schuette, Daniel R.; Reich, Robert K.; Johnson, Robert L.

    2010-07-01

    For adaptive optics systems, there is a growing demand for wavefront sensors that operate at higher frame rates and with more pixels while maintaining low readout noise. Lincoln Laboratory has been investigating Geiger-mode avalanche photodiode arrays integrated with CMOS readout circuits as a potential solution. This type of sensor counts photons digitally within the pixel, enabling data to be read out at high rates without the penalty of readout noise. After a brief overview of adaptive optics sensor development at Lincoln Laboratory, we will present the status of silicon Geigermode- APD technology along with future plans to improve performance.

  8. Lightweight Raman spectroscope using time-correlated photon-counting detection

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Zhaokai; Petrov, Georgi I.; Cheng, Shuna; Jo, Javier A.; Lehmann, Kevin K.; Yakovlev, Vladislav V.; Scully, Marlan O.

    2015-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy is an important tool in understanding chemical components of various materials. However, the excessive weight and energy consumption of a conventional CCD-based Raman spectrometer forbids its applications under extreme conditions, including unmanned aircraft vehicles (UAVs) and Mars/Moon rovers. In this article, we present a highly sensitive, shot-noise–limited, and ruggedized Raman signal acquisition using a time-correlated photon-counting system. Compared with conventional Raman spectrometers, over 95% weight, 65% energy consumption, and 70% cost could be removed through this design. This technique allows space- and UAV-based Raman spectrometers to robustly perform hyperspectral Raman acquisitions without excessive energy consumption. PMID:26392538

  9. Longitudinal Bunch Pattern Measurements through Single Photon Counting at SPEAR3

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hongyi; /UC, San Diego

    2012-09-07

    The Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL), a division of SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, is a synchrotron light source that provides x-rays for experimental use. As electrons are bent in the storage ring, they emit electromagnetic radiation. There are 372 different buckets which electrons can be loaded into. Different filling patterns produce different types of x-rays. What is the bunch pattern at a given time? Which filling pattern is better? Are there any flaws to the current injection system? These questions can be answered with this single photon counting experiment.

  10. Nanoscale optical thermometry using a time-correlated single-photon counting in an illumination-collection mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seto, Daichi; Nikka, Ren; Nishio, Shogo; Taguchi, Yoshihiro; Saiki, Toshiharu; Nagasaka, Yuji

    2017-01-01

    A nanoscale thermometry method called fluorescence near-field optics thermal nanoscopy (Fluor-NOTN) has been developed using near-field fluorescence imaging. This method can detect local temperature distributions with a nanoscale spatial resolution by measuring the fluorescence lifetimes of Cd/Se quantum dots (QDs) as a temperature probe. To increase the sensitivity of Fluor-NOTN, time-correlated single-photon counting (TCSPC) was introduced with a triple-tapered fusion-spliced near-field (TFN) optical fiber probe. This highly sensitive technique for measuring the fluorescence lifetime of QDs enabled the detection of low-level light signals with a picosecond time resolution at high-precision in an illumination-collection mode for Fluor-NOTN. The feasibility of this proposed method was experimentally verified by measuring the temperature dependence of the fluorescence lifetimes of the QDs by Fluor-NOTN using TCSPC with a TFN optical fiber probe with an aperture of 70 nm.

  11. Development of a Schottky CdTe Medipix3RX hybrid photon counting detector with spatial and energy resolving capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gimenez, E. N.; Astromskas, V.; Horswell, I.; Omar, D.; Spiers, J.; Tartoni, N.

    2016-07-01

    A multichip CdTe-Medipix3RX detector system was developed in order to bring the advantages of photon-counting detectors to applications in the hard X-ray range of energies. The detector head consisted of 2×2 Medipix3RX ASICs bump-bonded to a 28 mm×28 mm e- collection Schottky contact CdTe sensor. Schottky CdTe sensors undergo performance degrading polarization which increases with temperature, flux and the longer the HV is applied. Keeping the temperature stable and periodically refreshing the high voltage bias supply was used to minimize the polarization and achieve a stable and reproducible detector response. This leads to good quality images and successful results on the energy resolving capabilities of the system.

  12. Photonics-enhanced smart imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ottevaere, Heidi; Belay, Gebirie Y.; Thienpont, Hugo

    2016-09-01

    We discuss different photonics-enhanced multichannel multiresolution imaging systems in which the different channels have different imaging properties, namely a different FOV and angular resolution, over different areas of an image sensor. This could allow different image processing algorithms to be implemented to process the different images. A basic threechannel multiresolution imaging system was designed at 587.6 nm where each of the three channels consist of four aspherical lens surfaces. These lenses have been fabricated in PMMA through ultra-precision diamond tooling and afterwards assembled with aperture stops, baffles and a commercial CMOS sensor. To reduce the influence of chromatic aberrations, hybrid lenses, which contain diffractive surfaces on top of refractive ones, have been included within the previous designs of the three channels. These hybrid lenses have also been fabricated through ultra-precision diamond tooling, assembled and verified in an experimental demonstration. The three channels with hybrid lenses show better image quality (both in the simulation and experiment) compared to the purely refractive three channel design. Because of a limited depth of field of the aforementioned multichannel multiresolution imaging systems, a voltage tunable lens has been integrated in the first channel to extend the depth of field of the overall system. The refocusing capability has significantly improved the depth of field of the system and ranged from 0.25 m to infinity compared to 9 m to infinity for the aforementioned basic three-channel multiresolution imaging system.

  13. WE-FG-207A-04: Performance Characteristics of Photon-Counting Breast CT.

    PubMed

    Kalender, W

    2016-06-01

    dedicated breast CT. The development of large-area flat-panel detectors with field-of-view sufficient to image the entire breast in each projection enabled development of flat-panel cone-beam breast CT. More recently, the availability of complimentary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) detectors with lower system noise and finer pixel pitch, combined with the development of x-ray tubes with focal spot dimensions similar to mammography systems, has shown improved spatial resolution and could improve visualization of microcalcifications. These technological developments promise clinical translation of low-dose cone-beam breast CT. Dedicated photon-counting breast CT (pcBCT) systems represent a novel detector design, which provide high spatial resolution (∼ 100µm) and low mean glandular dose (MGD). The CdTe-based direct conversion detector technology was previously evaluated and confirmed by simulations and basic experiments on laboratory setups [Kalender et al., Eur Radiol 22: 1-8, 2012]. Measurements of dose, technical image quality parameters, and surgical specimens on a pcBCT scanner have been completed. Comparative evaluation of surgical specimens showed that pcBCT outperformed mammography and digital breast tomosynthesis with respect to 3D spatial resolution, detectability of calcifications, and soft tissue delineation. Major barriers to widespread clinical use of BCT relate to radiation dose, imaging of microcalcifications, and adequate coverage of breast tissue near the chest wall. Adequate chest wall coverage is also technically challenging but recent progress in x-ray tube, detector and table design now enables full breast coverage in the majority of patients. At this time, BCT has been deemed to be suitable for diagnostic imaging but not yet for screening. The mean glandular dose (MGD) from BCT has been reported to be between 5.7 to 27.8 mGy, and this range is comparable to, and within the range of, the MGD of 2.6 to 31.6 mGy in diagnostic mammography. In

  14. Sea-Ice Freeboard Retrieval Using Digital Photon-Counting Laser Altimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrell, Sinead L.; Brunt, Kelly M.; Ruth, Julia M.; Kuhn, John M.; Connor, Laurence N.; Walsh, Kaitlin M.

    2015-01-01

    Airborne and spaceborne altimeters provide measurements of sea-ice elevation, from which sea-ice freeboard and thickness may be derived. Observations of the Arctic ice pack by satellite altimeters indicate a significant decline in ice thickness, and volume, over the last decade. NASA's Ice, Cloud and land Elevation Satellite-2 (ICESat-2) is a next-generation laser altimeter designed to continue key sea-ice observations through the end of this decade. An airborne simulator for ICESat-2, the Multiple Altimeter Beam Experimental Lidar (MABEL), has been deployed to gather pre-launch data for mission development. We present an analysis of MABEL data gathered over sea ice in the Greenland Sea and assess the capabilities of photon-counting techniques for sea-ice freeboard retrieval. We compare freeboard estimates in the marginal ice zone derived from MABEL photon-counting data with coincident data collected by a conventional airborne laser altimeter. We find that freeboard estimates agree to within 0.03m in the areas where sea-ice floes were interspersed with wide leads, and to within 0.07m elsewhere. MABEL data may also be used to infer sea-ice thickness, and when compared with coincident but independent ice thickness estimates, MABEL ice thicknesses agreed to within 0.65m or better.

  15. Photon-counting 1.0 GHz-phase-modulation fluorometer

    SciTech Connect

    Mizuno, T.; Nakao, S.; Mizutani, Y.; Iwata, T.

    2015-04-15

    We have constructed an improved version of a photon-counting phase-modulation fluorometer (PC-PMF) with a maximum modulation frequency of 1.0 GHz, where a phase domain measurement is conducted with a time-correlated single-photon-counting electronics. While the basic concept of the PC-PMF has been reported previously by one of the authors, little attention has been paid to its significance, other than its weak fluorescence measurement capability. Recently, we have recognized the importance of the PC-PMF and its potential for fluorescence lifetime measurements. One important aspect of the PC-PMF is that it enables us to perform high-speed measurements that exceed the frequency bandwidths of the photomultiplier tubes that are commonly used as fluorescence detectors. We describe the advantages of the PC-PMF and demonstrate its usefulness based on fundamental performance tests. In our new version of the PC-PMF, we have used a laser diode (LD) as an excitation light source rather than the light-emitting diode that was used in the primary version. We have also designed a simple and stable LD driver to modulate the device. Additionally, we have obtained a sinusoidal histogram waveform that has multiple cycles within a time span to be measured, which is indispensable for precise phase measurements. With focus on the fluorescence intensity and the resolution time, we have compared the performance of the PC-PMF with that of a conventional PMF using the analogue light detection method.

  16. ERICA: an energy resolving photon counting readout ASIC for X-ray in-line cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macias-Montero, J.-G.; Sarraj, M.; Chmeissani, M.; Moore, T.; Casanova, R.; Martinez, R.; Puigdengoles, C.; Prats, X.; Kolstein, M.

    2016-12-01

    We present ERICA (Energy Resolving Inline X-ray Camera) a photon-counting readout ASIC, with 6 energy bins. The ASIC is composed of a matrix of 8 × 20 pixels controlled by a global digital controller and biased with 7 independent digital to analog converters (DACs) and a band-gap current reference. The pixel analog front-end includes a charge sensitive amplifier with 16 mV/ke- gain and dynamic range of 45 ke-. ERICA has programmable pulse width, an adjustable constant current feedback resistor, a linear test pulse generator, and six discriminators with 6-bit local threshold adjustment. The pixel digital back-end includes the digital controller, 8 counters of 8-bit depth, half-full buffer flag for any of the 8 counters, a 74-bit shadow/shift register, a 74-bit configuration latch, and charge sharing compensation processing to perform the energy classification and counting operations of every detected photon in 1 μ s. The pixel size is 330 μm × 330 μm and its average consumption is 150 μW. Implemented in TSMC 0.25 μm CMOS process, the ASIC pixel's equivalent noise charge (ENC) is 90 e- RMS connected to a 1 mm thickness matching CdTe detector biased at -300 V with a total leakage current of 20 nA.

  17. Sequential data assimilation for single-molecule FRET photon-counting data

    SciTech Connect

    Matsunaga, Yasuhiro; Kidera, Akinori; Sugita, Yuji

    2015-06-07

    Data assimilation is a statistical method designed to improve the quality of numerical simulations in combination with real observations. Here, we develop a sequential data assimilation method that incorporates one-dimensional time-series data of smFRET (single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer) photon-counting into conformational ensembles of biomolecules derived from “replicated” molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. A particle filter using a large number of “replicated” MD simulations with a likelihood function for smFRET photon-counting data is employed to screen the conformational ensembles that match the experimental data. We examine the performance of the method using emulated smFRET data and coarse-grained (CG) MD simulations of a dye-labeled polyproline-20. The method estimates the dynamics of the end-to-end distance from smFRET data as well as revealing that of latent conformational variables. The particle filter is also able to correct model parameter dependence in CG MD simulations. We discuss the applicability of the method to real experimental data for conformational dynamics of biomolecules.

  18. MABEL photon-counting laser altimetry data in Alaska for ICESat-2 simulations and development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunt, Kelly M.; Neumann, Thomas A.; Amundson, Jason M.; Kavanaugh, Jeffrey L.; Moussavi, Mahsa S.; Walsh, Kaitlin M.; Cook, William B.; Markus, Thorsten

    2016-08-01

    Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite-2 (ICESat-2) is scheduled to launch in late 2017 and will carry the Advanced Topographic Laser Altimeter System (ATLAS), which is a photon-counting laser altimeter and represents a new approach to satellite determination of surface elevation. Given the new technology of ATLAS, an airborne instrument, the Multiple Altimeter Beam Experimental Lidar (MABEL), was developed to provide data needed for satellite-algorithm development and ICESat-2 error analysis. MABEL was deployed out of Fairbanks, Alaska, in July 2014 to provide a test dataset for algorithm development in summer conditions with water-saturated snow and ice surfaces. Here we compare MABEL lidar data to in situ observations in Southeast Alaska to assess instrument performance in summer conditions and in the presence of glacier surface melt ponds and a wet snowpack. Results indicate the following: (1) based on MABEL and in situ data comparisons, the ATLAS 90 m beam-spacing strategy will provide a valid assessment of across-track slope that is consistent with shallow slopes (< 1°) of an ice-sheet interior over 50 to 150 m length scales; (2) the dense along-track sampling strategy of photon counting systems can provide crevasse detail; and (3) MABEL 532 nm wavelength light may sample both the surface and subsurface of shallow (approximately 2 m deep) supraglacial melt ponds. The data associated with crevasses and melt ponds indicate the potential ICESat-2 will have for the study of mountain and other small glaciers.

  19. 18k Channels single photon counting readout circuit for hybrid pixel detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maj, P.; Grybos, P.; Szczygiel, R.; Zoladz, M.; Sakumura, T.; Tsuji, Y.

    2013-01-01

    We have performed measurements of an integrated circuit named PXD18k designed for hybrid pixel semiconductor detectors used in X-ray imaging applications. The PXD18k integrated circuit, fabricated in CMOS 180 nm technology, has dimensions of 9.64 mm×20 mm and contains approximately 26 million transistors. The core of the IC is a matrix of 96×192 pixels with 100 μm×100 μm pixel size. Each pixel works in a single photon counting mode. A single pixel contains two charge sensitive amplifiers with Krummenacher feedback scheme, two shapers, two discriminators (with independent thresholds A and B) and two 16-bit ripple counters. The data are read out via eight low voltage differential signaling (LVDS) outputs with 100 Mbps rate. The power consumption is dominated by analog blocks and it is about 23 μW/pixel. The effective peaking time at the discriminator input is 30 ns and is mainly determined by the time constants of the charge sensitive amplifier (CSA). The gain is equal to 42.5 μV/e- and the equivalent noise charge is 168 e- rms (with bump-bonded silicon pixel detector). Thanks to the use of trim DACs in each pixel, the effective threshold spread at the discriminator input is only 1.79 mV. The dead time of the front end electronics for a standard setting is 172 ns (paralyzable model). In the standard readout mode (when the data collection time is separated from the time necessary to readout data from the chip) the PXD18k IC works with two energy thresholds per pixel. The PXD18k can also be operated in the continuous readout mode (with a zero dead time) where one can select the number of bits readout from each pixel to optimize the PXD18k frame rate. For example, for reading out 16 bits/pixel the frame rate is 2.7 kHz and for 4 bits/pixel it rises to 7.1 kHz.

  20. EIGER: Next generation single photon counting detector for X-ray applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinapoli, Roberto; Bergamaschi, Anna; Henrich, Beat; Horisberger, Roland; Johnson, Ian; Mozzanica, Aldo; Schmid, Elmar; Schmitt, Bernd; Schreiber, Akos; Shi, Xintian; Theidel, Gerd

    2011-09-01

    EIGER is an advanced family of single photon counting hybrid pixel detectors, primarily aimed at diffraction experiments at synchrotrons. Optimization of maximal functionality and minimal pixel size (using a 0.25 μm process and conserving the radiation tolerant design) has resulted in 75×75 μm2 pixels. Every pixel comprises a preamplifier, shaper, discriminator (with a 6 bit DAC for threshold trimming), a configurable 4/8/12 bit counter with double buffering, as well as readout, control and test circuitry. A novel feature of this chip is its double buffered counter, meaning a next frame can be acquired while the previous one is being readout. An array of 256×256 pixels fits on a ˜2×2 cm2 chip and a sensor of ˜8×4 cm2 will be equipped with eight readout chips to form a module containing 0.5 Mpixel. Several modules can then be tiled to form larger area detectors. Detectors up to 4×8 modules (16 Mpixel) are planned. To achieve frame rates of up to 24 kHz the readout architecture is highly parallel, and the chip readout happens in parallel on 32 readout lines with a 100 MHz Double Data Rate clock. Several chips and singles (i.e. a single chip bump-bonded to a single chip silicon sensor) were tested both with a lab X-ray source and at Swiss Light Source (SLS) beamlines. These tests demonstrate the full functionality of the chip and provide a first assessment of its performance. High resolution X-ray images and "high speed movies" were produced, even without threshold trimming, at the target system frame rates (up to ˜24 kHz in 4 bit mode). In parallel, dedicated hardware, firmware and software had to be developed to comply with the enormous data rate the chip is capable of delivering. Details of the chip design and tests will be given, as well as highlights of both test and final readout systems.

  1. Experimental study of two material decomposition methods using multi-bin photon counting detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmerman, Kevin C.; Sidky, Emil Y.; Gilat Schmidt, Taly

    2014-03-01

    Photon-counting detectors with multi-bin pulse height analysis (PHA) are capable of extracting energy dependent information which can be exploited for material decomposition. Iterative decomposition algorithms have been previously implemented which require prior knowledge of the source spectrum, detector spectral response, and energy threshold settings. We experimentally investigated two material decomposition methods that do not require explicit knowledge of the source spectrum and spectral response. In the first method, the effective spectrum for each energy bin is estimated from calibration transmission measurements, followed by an iterative maximum likelihood decomposition algorithm. The second investigated method, first proposed and tested through simulations by Alvarez, uses a linearized maximum likelihood estimator which requires calibration transmission measurements. The Alvarez method has the advantage of being non-iterative. This study experimentally quantified and compared the material decomposition bias, as a percentage of material thickness, and standard deviation resulting from these two material decomposition estimators. Multi-energy x-ray transmission measurements were acquired through varying thicknesses of Teon, Delrin, and neoprene at two different flux settings and decomposed into PMMA and aluminum thicknesses using the investigated methods. In addition, a series of 200 equally spaced projections of a rod phantom were acquired over 360°. The multi-energy sinograms were decomposed using both empirical methods and then reconstructed using filtered backprojection producing two images representing each basis material. The Alvarez method decomposed Delrin into PMMA with a bias of 0.5-19% and decomposed neoprene into aluminum with a bias of less than 3%. The spectral estimation method decomposed Delrin into PMMA with a bias of 0.6-16% and decomposed neoprene into aluminum with a bias of 0.1-58%. In general, the spectral estimation method resulted in

  2. Low-dose lung cancer screening with photon-counting CT: a feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Symons, Rolf; Cork, Tyler E.; Sahbaee, Pooyan; Fuld, Matthew K.; Kappler, Steffen; Folio, Les R.; Bluemke, David A.; Pourmorteza, Amir

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of using a whole-body photon-counting detector (PCD) CT scanner for low-dose lung cancer screening compared to a conventional energy integrating detector (EID) system. Radiation dose-matched EID and PCD scans of the COPDGene 2 phantom were acquired at different radiation dose levels (CTDIvol: 3.0, 1.5, and 0.75 mGy) and different tube voltages (120, 100, and 80 kVp). EID and PCD images were compared for quantitative Hounsfield unit (HU) accuracy, noise levels, and contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR) for detection of ground-glass nodules (GGN) and emphysema. The PCD HU accuracy was better than EID for water at all scan parameters. PCD HU stability for lung, GGN and emphysema regions were superior to EID and PCD attenuation values were more reproducible than EID for all scan parameters (all P  <  0.01), while HUs for lung, GGN and emphysema ROIs changed significantly for EID with decreasing dose (all P  <  0.001). PCD showed lower noise levels at the lowest dose setting at 120, 100 and 80 kVp (15.2  ±  0.3 HU versus 15.8  ±  0.2 HU, P  =  0.03 16.1  ±  0.3 HU versus 18.0  ±  0.4 HU, P  =  0.003 and 16.1  ±  0.3 HU versus 17.9  ±  0.3 HU, P  =  0.001, respectively), resulting in superior CNR for evaluation of GGNs and emphysema at 100 and 80 kVp. PCD provided better HU stability for lung, ground-glass, and emphysema-equivalent foams at lower radiation dose settings with better reproducibility than EID. Additionally, PCD showed up to 10% less noise, and 11% higher CNR at 0.75 mGy for both 100 and 80 kVp. PCD technology may help reduce radiation exposure in lung cancer screening while maintaining diagnostic quality.

  3. Fluorescence-lifetime imaging using a novel photon sensing module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLoskey, David; Suhling, Klaus; Birch, David J. S.

    1997-05-01

    We report the first read-out module for use with single- photon timing array detectors such as multi-anode MCP-PMTs. The IBH Model 5000MXR interfaces to the time-correlated single-photon counting (TCSPC) technique using a single time-to-amplitude converter. In addition to performing established multiplexing tasks, such as simultaneous acquisition of fluorescence and excitation and anisotropy, the new module enables spectral and spatial imaging of kinetic parameters such as fluorescence lifetimes and amplitudes. The system retains the inherent advantages of TCSPC with respect to picosecond time resolution and wide dynamic range, while featuring parallel data acquisition and enhanced data acquisition rates. Unlike early TTL implementations of multiplexing which were limited to four channels, our system uses an application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) which can read out the data from up to sixteen detection channels with higher reliability and less time-dispersion. The Model 5000MXR can be packaged as a NIM standard module, packaged to serve more channels or be close coupled to detector arrays for specific applications such as microscopy and lifetime based sensors. The theory, design and performance of ASIC data read-out will be described. Other applications include photon migration in tissue, time- of-flight reflectometry/mass spectrometry and nucleonics.

  4. Reticulocyte quantification by flow cytometry, image analysis, and manual counting.

    PubMed

    Schimenti, K J; Lacerna, K; Wamble, A; Maston, L; Iaffaldano, C; Straight, M; Rabinovitch, A; Lazarus, H M; Jacobberger, J W

    1992-01-01

    Reticulocyte counting by flow cytometry with thiazole orange was compared to manual or automated counting of new methylene blue stained blood smears. Forty-nine samples were compared for manual counting from randomly chosen clinical samples. Two hundred and eighty-nine samples from bone marrow transplant patients were compared during the period before and through chemo-irradiation and engraftment. The slopes of correlation plots were less than 1 when flow cytometric data were the dependent variable, suggesting that thiazole orange is less sensitive than new methylene blue. In a third study, 407 samples from bone marrow transplant patients were compared after increasing the thiazole orange concentration. The reticulocyte fluorescence distribution was divided into four groups of the brightest (youngest) 40, 60, 80, and 100% of reticulocytes. The slopes from regression analysis were 0.25, 0.49, 0.78, and 1.14, respectively. This demonstrates that thiazole orange is more sensitive than new methylene blue because the window of analysis includes an increased fraction of mature reticulocytes. In addition, the precision of each assay as measured. The rank order of precision from high to low was flow cytometry > image analysis > manual counting.

  5. The Number of Accumulated Photons and the Quality of Stimulated Emission Depletion Lifetime Images

    SciTech Connect

    Syed, Aleem; Lesoine, Michael D; Bhattacharjee, Ujjal; Petrich, Jacob W; Smith, Emily A

    2014-03-03

    Time binning is used to increase the number of photon counts in the peak channel of stimulated emission depletion (STED) fluorescence lifetime decay curves to determine how it affects the resulting lifetime image. The fluorescence lifetime of the fluorophore, Alexa Fluor 594 phalloidin, bound to F-actin is probed in cultured S2 cells at a spatial resolution of ~40 nm. This corresponds to a tenfold smaller probe volume compared to confocal imaging, and a reduced number of photons contributing to the signal. Pixel-by-pixel fluorescence lifetime measurements and error analysis show that an average of 40 ± 30 photon counts in the peak channel with a signal-to-noise ratio of 20 is enough to calculate a reliable fluorescence lifetime from a single exponential fluorescence decay. No heterogeneity in the actin cytoskeleton in different regions of the cultured cells was measured in the 40- to 400-nm spatial regime.

  6. Nuclear photonics at ultra-high counting rates and higher multipole excitations

    SciTech Connect

    Thirolf, P. G.; Habs, D.; Filipescu, D.; Gernhaeuser, R.; Guenther, M. M.; Jentschel, M.; Marginean, N.; Pietralla, N.

    2012-07-09

    Next-generation {gamma} beams from laser Compton-backscattering facilities like ELI-NP (Bucharest)] or MEGa-Ray (Livermore) will drastically exceed the photon flux presently available at existing facilities, reaching or even exceeding 10{sup 13}{gamma}/sec. The beam structure as presently foreseen for MEGa-Ray and ELI-NP builds upon a structure of macro-pulses ({approx}120 Hz) for the electron beam, accelerated with X-band technology at 11.5 GHz, resulting in a micro structure of 87 ps distance between the electron pulses acting as mirrors for a counterpropagating intense laser. In total each 8.3 ms a {gamma} pulse series with a duration of about 100 ns will impinge on the target, resulting in an instantaneous photon flux of about 10{sup 18}{gamma}/s, thus introducing major challenges in view of pile-up. Novel {gamma} optics will be applied to monochromatize the {gamma} beam to ultimately {Delta}E/E{approx}10{sup -6}. Thus level-selective spectroscopy of higher multipole excitations will become accessible with good contrast for the first time. Fast responding {gamma} detectors, e.g. based on advanced scintillator technology (e.g. LaBr{sub 3}(Ce)) allow for measurements with count rates as high as 10{sup 6}-10{sup 7}{gamma}/s without significant drop of performance. Data handling adapted to the beam conditions could be performed by fast digitizing electronics, able to sample data traces during the micro-pulse duration, while the subsequent macro-pulse gap of ca. 8 ms leaves ample time for data readout. A ball of LaBr{sub 3} detectors with digital readout appears to best suited for this novel type of nuclear photonics at ultra-high counting rates.

  7. Reconstruction of time-correlated single-photon counting range profiles of moving objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonsson, Per; Hedborg, Julia; Henriksson, Markus; Sjöqvist, Lars

    2015-10-01

    Time-correlated single-photon counting (TCSPC) is a laser radar technique that can provide range profiling with subcentimetre range resolution. The method relies on accurate time measurements between a laser pulse sync signal and the registration of a single-photon detection of photons reflected from an object. The measurement is performed multiple times and a histogram of arrival times is computed to gain information about surfaces at different distances within the field of view of the laser radar. TCSPC is a statistic method that requires an integration time and therefore the range profile of a non-stationary object (target) will be corrupted. However, by dividing the measurement into time intervals much shorter than the total acquisition time and cross correlating the histogram from each time interval it is possible calculate how the target has moved relative to the first time interval. The distance as a function of time was fitted to a polynomic function. This result was used to calculate a distance correction of every single detection event and the equivalent stationary histogram was reconstructed. Series of measurements on the objects with constant or non-linear velocities up to 0.5 m/s were performed and compared with stationary measurements. The results show that it is possible to reconstruct range profiles of moving objects with this technique. Reconstruction of the signal requires no prior information of the original range profile and the instantaneous and average velocities of the object can be calculated.

  8. Silicon photon-counting avalanche diodes for single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Michalet, Xavier; Ingargiola, Antonino; Colyer, Ryan A.; Scalia, Giuseppe; Weiss, Shimon; Maccagnani, Piera; Gulinatti, Angelo; Rech, Ivan; Ghioni, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    Solution-based single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy is a powerful experimental tool with applications in cell biology, biochemistry and biophysics. The basic feature of this technique is to excite and collect light from a very small volume and work in a low concentration regime resulting in rare burst-like events corresponding to the transit of a single molecule. Detecting photon bursts is a challenging task: the small number of emitted photons in each burst calls for high detector sensitivity. Bursts are very brief, requiring detectors with fast response time and capable of sustaining high count rates. Finally, many bursts need to be accumulated to achieve proper statistical accuracy, resulting in long measurement time unless parallelization strategies are implemented to speed up data acquisition. In this paper we will show that silicon single-photon avalanche diodes (SPADs) best meet the needs of single-molecule detection. We will review the key SPAD parameters and highlight the issues to be addressed in their design, fabrication and operation. After surveying the state-of-the-art SPAD technologies, we will describe our recent progress towards increasing the throughput of single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy in solution using parallel arrays of SPADs. The potential of this approach is illustrated with single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer measurements. PMID:25309114

  9. Progress on the Use of Combined Analog and Photon Counting Detection for Raman Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newsom, Rob; Turner, Dave; Clayton, Marian; Ferrare, Richard

    2008-01-01

    The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program Raman Lidar (CARL) was upgraded in 2004 with a new data system that provides simultaneous measurements of both the photomultiplier analog output voltage and photon counts. The so-called merge value added procedure (VAP) was developed to combine the analog and count-rate signals into a single signal with improved dynamic range. Earlier versions of this VAP tended to cause unacceptably large biases in the water vapor mixing ratio during the daytime as a result of improper matching between the analog and count-rate signals in the presence of elevated solar background levels. We recently identified several problems and tested a modified version of the merge VAP by comparing profiles of water vapor mixing ratio derived from CARL with simultaneous sonde data over a six month period. We show that the modified merge VAP significantly reduces the daytime bias, and results in mean differences that are within approximately 1% for both nighttime and daytime measurements.

  10. How to Use Image Analysis for Islet Counting

    PubMed Central

    Girman, Peter; Berkova, Zuzana; Dobolilova, Eva; Saudek, Frantisek

    2008-01-01

    AIM: Assessment of islet mass before islet transplantation requires a reliable technique to enable exact analysis of islet volume. This study aimed to test the applicability of digital image analysis (DIA) for evaluation of samples of purified and non-purified islets. METHODS: Pancreatic islets were isolated from 10 Lewis rats. Samples of purified (n = 10) and non-purified islets (n = 30) were counted conventionally and by using a computerized method. The equipment for the computerized counting consisted of a digital camera installed on a stereomicroscope and connected to a personal computer. Images of 2272x1704 pixels were processed using a previously described non-commercial program originally developed for this purpose. Islets were converted to equivalents using globe and ellipsoid models. The insulin content of purified islets was assessed using radioimmunoassay and was correlated to the absolute and standardized islet number. RESULTS: Mean absolute numbers of purified islets ± SD were 908 ± 130 and 1049 ± 230 (manually and DIA respectively). Mean insulin content ± SD obtained from purified islets was 161 ± 45 mU. The mean equivalents of purified islets (1589 ± 555 for globe and 1219 ± 452 for ellipsoid) significantly correlated with insulin content. However, this correlation was not significant when absolute islet numbers were used, counted using either method. There was no significant difference in absolute non-purified islet numbers assessed by manual and computerized methods (average ± SD in 50 µl samples; 12.6 ± 4.1 and 13.3 ± 5.3 respectively; p = 0.22). The manual method showed a significantly higher yield of islet equivalents (IE; p < 0.001 for both globe and ellipsoid). CONCLUSION: The computer-based system for islet counting correlated better to insulin content than conventional islet estimation and prevented overestimation. Reproducibility and ease of assessment make it potentially applicable to clinical islet transplantation. PMID

  11. Discrimination between normal breast tissue and tumor tissue using CdTe series detector developed for photon-counting mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Chizuru; Ihori, Akiko; Yamakawa, Tsutomu; Yamamoto, Shuichiro; Okada, Masahiro; Kato, Misa; Nakajima, Ai; Kodera, Yoshie

    2016-03-01

    We propose a new mammography system using a cadmium telluride (CdTe) series photon-counting detector, having high absorption efficiency over a wide energy range. In a previous study, we showed that the use of high X-ray energy in digital mammography is useful from the viewpoint of exposure dose and image quality. In addition, the CdTe series detector can acquire X-ray spectrum information following transmission through a subject. This study focused on the tissue composition identified using spectral information obtained by a new photon-counting detector. Normal breast tissue consists entirely of adipose and glandular tissues. However, it is very difficult to find tumor tissue in the region of glandular tissue via a conventional mammogram, especially in dense breast because the attenuation coefficients of glandular tissue and tumor tissue are very close. As a fundamental examination, we considered a simulation phantom and showed the difference between normal breast tissue and tumor tissue of various thicknesses in a three-dimensional (3D) scatter plot. We were able to discriminate between both types of tissues. In addition, there was a tendency for the distribution to depend on the thickness of the tumor tissue. Thinner tumor tissues were shown to be closer in appearance to normal breast tissue. This study also demonstrated that the difference between these tissues could be made obvious by using a CdTe series detector. We believe that this differentiation is important, and therefore, expect this technology to be applied to new tumor detection systems in the future.

  12. Projection imaging of photon beams by the Cerenkov effect

    SciTech Connect

    Glaser, Adam K.; Davis, Scott C.; McClatchy, David M.; Zhang, Rongxiao; Pogue, Brian W.; Gladstone, David J.

    2013-01-15

    Purpose: A novel technique for beam profiling of megavoltage photon beams was investigated for the first time by capturing images of the induced Cerenkov emission in water, as a potential surrogate for the imparted dose in irradiated media. Methods: A high-sensitivity, intensified CCD camera (ICCD) was configured to acquire 2D projection images of Cerenkov emission from a 4 Multiplication-Sign 4 cm{sup 2} 6 MV linear accelerator (LINAC) x-ray photon beam operating at a dose rate of 400 MU/min incident on a water tank with transparent walls. The ICCD acquisition was gated to the LINAC sync pulse to reduce background light artifacts, and the measurement quality was investigated by evaluating the signal to noise ratio and measurement repeatability as a function of delivered dose. Monte Carlo simulations were used to derive a calibration factor for differences between the optical images and deposited dose arising from the anisotropic angular dependence of Cerenkov emission. Finally, Cerenkov-based beam profiles were compared to a percent depth dose (PDD) and lateral dose profile at a depth of d{sub max} from a reference dose distribution generated from the clinical Varian ECLIPSE treatment planning system (TPS). Results: The signal to noise ratio was found to be 20 at a delivered dose of 66.6 cGy, and proportional to the square root of the delivered dose as expected from Poisson photon counting statistics. A 2.1% mean standard deviation and 5.6% maximum variation in successive measurements were observed, and the Monte Carlo derived calibration factor resulted in Cerenkov emission images which were directly correlated to deposited dose, with some spatial issues. The dose difference between the TPS and PDD predicted by Cerenkov measurements was within 20% in the buildup region with a distance to agreement (DTA) of 1.5-2 mm and {+-}3% at depths beyond d{sub max}. In the lateral profile, the dose difference at the beam penumbra was within {+-}13% with a DTA of 0-2 mm

  13. Limits on Achievable Dimensional and Photon Efficiencies with Intensity-Modulation and Photon-Counting Due to Non-Ideal Photon-Counter Behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moision, Bruce; Erkmen, Baris I.; Farr, William; Dolinar, Samuel J.; Birnbaum, Kevin M.

    2012-01-01

    An ideal intensity-modulated photon-counting channel can achieve unbounded photon information efficiencies (PIEs). However, a number of limitations of a physical system limit the practically achievable PIE. In this paper, we discuss several of these limitations and illustrate their impact on the channel. We show that, for the Poisson channel, noise does not strictly bound PIE, although there is an effective limit, as the dimensional information efficiency goes as e[overline] e PIE beyond a threshold PIE. Since the Holevo limit is bounded in the presence of noise, this illustrates that the Poisson approximation is invalid at large PIE for any number of noise modes. We show that a finite transmitter extinction ratio bounds the achievable PIE to a maximum that is logarithmic in the extinction ratio. We show how detector jitter limits the ability to mitigate noise in the PPM signaling framework. We illustrate a method to model detector blocking when the number of detectors is large, and illustrate mitigation of blocking with spatial spreading and altering. Finally, we illustrate the design of a high photon efficiency system using state-of-the-art photo-detectors and taking all these effects into account.

  14. Towards a colony counting system using hyperspectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masschelein, B.; Robles-Kelly, A.; Blanch, C.; Tack, N.; Simpson-Young, B.; Lambrechts, A.

    2012-03-01

    Colony counting is a procedure used in microbiology laboratories for food quality monitoring, environmental management, etc. Its purpose is to detect the level of contamination due to the presence and growth of bacteria, yeasts and molds in a given product. Current automated counters require a tedious training and setup procedure per product and bacteria type and do not cope well with diversity. This contrasts with the setting at microbiology laboratories, where a wide variety of food and bacteria types have to be screened on a daily basis. To overcome the limitations of current systems, we propose the use of hyperspectral imaging technology and examine the spectral variations induced by factors such as illumination, bacteria type, food source and age and type of the agar. To this end, we perform experiments making use of two alternative hyperspectral processing pipelines and compare our classification results to those yielded by color imagery. Our results show that colony counting may be automated through the automatic recovery of the illuminant power spectrum and reflectance. This is consistent with the notion that the recovery of the illuminant should minimize the variations in the spectra due to reflections, shadows and other photometric artifacts. We also illustrate how, with the reflectance at hand, the colonies can be counted making use of classical segmentation and classification algorithms.

  15. In situ detection of warfarin using time-correlated single-photon counting

    SciTech Connect

    Rosengren, Annika M.; Karlsson, Bjoern C.G.; Naeslund, Inga; Andersson, Per Ola; Nicholls, Ian A.

    2011-04-01

    Highlights: {yields} Direct in situ measurement of specific isomeric forms of the anticoagulant warfarin. {yields} TCSPC spectroscopy in conjunction with synthetic Sudlow I binding site receptors. {yields} Development of sensor principle for use in clinical and environmental monitoring. -- Abstract: Here we report on a novel method for the direct in situ measurement of specific isomeric forms of the anticoagulant warfarin using time correlated single-photon counting (TCSPC) spectroscopy in conjunction with synthetic Sudlow I binding site receptors. The method is highly robust over the clinically significant concentration range, and demonstrates the potential of the binding site mimics in conjunction with the spectroscopic strategy employed here for the determination of this important pharmaceutical in clinical or even environmental samples.

  16. Mu-Spec - A High Performance Ultra-Compact Photon Counting spectrometer for Space Submillimeter Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moseley, H.; Hsieh, W.-T.; Stevenson, T.; Wollack, E.; Brown, A.; Benford, D.; Sadleir; U-Yen, I.; Ehsan, N.; Zmuidzinas, J.; Bradford, M.

    2011-01-01

    We have designed and are testing elements of a fully integrated submillimeter spectrometer based on superconducting microstrip technology. The instrument can offer resolving power R approximately 1500, and its high frequency cutoff is set by the gap of available high performance superconductors. All functions of the spectrometer are integrated - light is coupled to the microstrip circuit with a planar antenna, the spectra discrimination is achieved using a synthetic grating, orders are separated using planar filter, and detected using photon counting MKID detector. This spectrometer promises to revolutionize submillimeter spectroscopy from space. It replaces instruments with the scale of 1m with a spectrometer on a 10 cm Si wafer. The reduction in mass and volume promises a much higher performance system within available resource in a space mission. We will describe the system and the performance of the components that have been fabricated and tested.

  17. Performance and capacity analysis of Poisson photon-counting based Iter-PIC OCDMA systems.

    PubMed

    Li, Lingbin; Zhou, Xiaolin; Zhang, Rong; Zhang, Dingchen; Hanzo, Lajos

    2013-11-04

    In this paper, an iterative parallel interference cancellation (Iter-PIC) technique is developed for optical code-division multiple-access (OCDMA) systems relying on shot-noise limited Poisson photon-counting reception. The novel semi-analytical tool of extrinsic information transfer (EXIT) charts is used for analysing both the bit error rate (BER) performance as well as the channel capacity of these systems and the results are verified by Monte Carlo simulations. The proposed Iter-PIC OCDMA system is capable of achieving two orders of magnitude BER improvements and a 0.1 nats of capacity improvement over the conventional chip-level OCDMA systems at a coding rate of 1/10.

  18. Evaluation of single-photon-counting measurements of excited-state lifetimes

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, Howard E.; Penn, John H.; Carpenter, Clint W.

    1982-01-01

    An extremely short instrumental response function for a single-photon-counting system has been obtained by using a low-jitter photomultiplier tube, fast amplification of the single photoelectron pulse from this photomultiplier, a constant fraction discriminator with a wide bandwidth input, and a stable reference timing signal. This synchronously mode-locked laser system has been shown to be capable of measuring the fluorescence lifetimes of compounds from 66 psec to 4.5 nsec. The estimated error in these determinations is 6% or 10 psec, whichever is greater. This apparatus has proved itself to be superior to the previously used nitrogen flashlamp apparatus for the determination of subnanosecond lifetimes. The validity of using deconvolution to determine lifetimes shorter than the instrumental response function has been verified. PMID:16593174

  19. Equipment for Nonlinear Photonics Research - Light Control and Image Transmission in Specially-Designed Photonic

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-14

    AFRL-OSR-VA-TR-2014-0068 Equipment for Nonlinear Photonics Research Zhigang Chen SAN FRANCISCO STATE UNIVERSITY Final Report 03/14/2014 DISTRIBUTION...34Equipment for Nonlinear Photonics Research - Light control and image transmission in specially-designed photonic " Contract/Grant #: FA9550...project is to develop research programs at the frontier of nonlinear optics/ photonics that could lead to fundamental understandings in scientific

  20. Usefulness of an energy-binned photon-counting x-ray detector for dental panoramic radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukui, Tatsumasa; Katsumata, Akitoshi; Ogawa, Koichi; Fujiwara, Shuu

    2015-03-01

    A newly developed dental panoramic radiography system is equipped with a photon-counting semiconductor detector. This photon-counting detector acquires transparent X-ray beams by dividing them into several energy bands. We developed a method to identify dental materials in the patient's teeth by means of the X-ray energy analysis of panoramic radiographs. We tested various dental materials including gold alloy, dental amalgam, dental cement, and titanium. The results of this study suggest that X-ray energy scattergram analysis could be used to identify a range of dental materials in a patient's panoramic radiograph.

  1. Near-Infrared Single-Photon-Counting Detectors for Laser Instrument Applications at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krainak, Michael A.; Xiaoli, Sun; Abshire, James B.

    2005-01-01

    We discuss single-photon-counting detectors requirements for NASA remote sensing and communications systems. We present experimental measurements on several different near-infrared single-photon-counting detectors including InGaAs/InP and InGaAs/InAlAs avalanche photodiodes (APD), an InGaAsP photocathode hybrid photomultiplier (PMT) and an InGaAs photomultiplier. We present the experimental performance of prototype instruments for laser ranging, communication, and trace-gas detection that use these detectors.

  2. Resolving heterogeneity on the single molecular level with the photon-counting histogram.

    PubMed Central

    Müller, J D; Chen, Y; Gratton, E

    2000-01-01

    The diffusion of fluorescent particles through a small, illuminated observation volume gives rise to intensity fluctuations caused by particle number fluctuations in the open observation volume and the inhomogeneous excitation-beam profile. The intensity distribution of these fluorescence fluctuations is experimentally captured by the photon-counting histogram (PCH). We recently introduced the theory of the PCH for diffusing particles (Chen et al., Biophys. J., 77:553-567), where we showed that we can uniquely describe the distribution of photon counts with only two parameters for each species: the molecular brightness of the particle and the average number of particles within the observation volume. The PCH is sensitive to the molecular brightness and thus offers the possibility to separate a mixture of fluorescent species into its constituents, based on a difference in their molecular brightness alone. This analysis is complementary to the autocorrelation function, traditionally used in fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy, which separates a mixture of species by a difference in their diffusion coefficient. The PCH of each individual species is convoluted successively to yield the PCH of the mixture. Successful resolution of the histogram into its components is largely a matter of the signal statistics. Here, we discuss the case of two species in detail and show that a concentration for each species exists, where the signal statistics is optimal. We also discuss the influence of the absolute molecular brightness and the brightness contrast between two species on the resolvability of two species. A binary dye mixture serves as a model system to demonstrate that the molecular brightness and the concentration of each species can be resolved experimentally from a single or from several histograms. We extend our study to biomolecules, where we label proteins with a fluorescent dye and show that a brightness ratio of two can be resolved. The ability to resolve a

  3. Single-photon counting for the 1300-1600-nm range by use of peltier-cooled and passively quenched InGaAs avalanche photodiodes.

    PubMed

    Rarity, J G; Wall, T E; Ridley, K D; Owens, P C; Tapster, P R

    2000-12-20

    We evaluate the performance of various commercially available InGaAs/InP avalanche photodiodes for photon counting in the infrared at temperatures that can be reached by Peltier cooling. We find that dark count rates are high, and this can partially saturate devices before optimum performance is achieved. At low temperatures the dark count rate rises because of a strong contribution from correlated afterpulses. We discuss ways of suppressing these afterpulses for different photon-counting applications.

  4. Photon counting image sensor development for astronomical applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, Edward B.

    1987-01-01

    Specially built intensified CCD (ICCD) detector tubes were purchased and the performance of the electron bombardment process was investigated. In addition to studying the signal characteristics of the photoevents, there was interest in demonstrating that back-illuminated chips were not susceptible to radiation damage to their clocking electrodes. How to perform a centroid analysis for a 2-dimensional Gaussian distribution of charge is described. Measurement of the projection (along columns or rows) of the average charge spread profile is discussed. The development and flight of the Interstellar Medium Absorption Profile Spectrograph (IMAPS) is discussed.

  5. Estimation of signal and noise for a whole-body photon counting research CT system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhoubo; Leng, Shuai; Yu, Zhicong; Kappler, Steffen; McCollough, Cynthia H.

    2016-03-01

    Photon-counting CT (PCCT) may yield potential value for many clinical applications due to its relative immunity to electronic noise, increased geometric efficiency relative to current scintillating detectors, and the ability to resolve energy information about the detected photons. However, there are a large number of parameters that require optimization, particularly the energy thresholds configuration. Fast and accurate estimation of signal and noise in PCCT can benefit the optimization of acquisition parameters for specific diagnostic tasks. Based on the acquisition parameters and detector response of our research PCCT system, we derived mathematical models for both signal and noise. The signal model took the tube spectrum, beam filtration, object attenuation, water beam hardening, and detector response into account. The noise model considered the relationship between noise and radiation dose, as well as the propagation of noise as threshold data are subtracted to yield energy bin data. To determine the absolute noise value, a noise look-up table (LUT) was acquired using a limited number of calibration scans. The noise estimation algorithm then used the noise LUT to estimate noise for scans with a variety of combination of energy thresholds, dose levels, and object attenuation. Validation of the estimation algorithms was performed on our whole-body research PCCT system using semianthropomorphic water phantoms and solutions of calcium and iodine. The algorithms achieved accurate estimation of signal and noise for a variety of scanning parameter combinations. The proposed method can be used to optimize energy thresholds configuration for many clinical applications of PCCT.

  6. Determination of confidence limits for experiments with low numbers of counts. [Poisson-distributed photon counts from astrophysical sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraft, Ralph P.; Burrows, David N.; Nousek, John A.

    1991-01-01

    Two different methods, classical and Bayesian, for determining confidence intervals involving Poisson-distributed data are compared. Particular consideration is given to cases where the number of counts observed is small and is comparable to the mean number of background counts. Reasons for preferring the Bayesian over the classical method are given. Tables of confidence limits calculated by the Bayesian method are provided for quick reference.

  7. Energy calibration of photon counting detectors using x-ray tube potential as a reference for material decomposition applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Mini; Kandel, Bigyan; Park, Chan Soo; Liang, Zhihua

    2015-03-01

    Photon counting spectral detectors (PCSD) with smaller pixels and efficient sensors are desirable in applications like material decomposition and phase contrast x-ray imaging where discrimination of small signals and fine structure may be desired. Charge sharing in PCSD increases with decreasing pixel sizes and increasing sensor thickness such that the energy calibration or utility of spectral information can become a major hurdle. Utility of a combination of high Z sensors and small pixel sizes in PCSD is limited without efficient threshold calibration and charge sharing mitigation. Here we explore the utility of x-ray tube kVp as a reference to achieve efficient and fast calibration of PCSDs. This calibration method itself does not require rearranging the imaging setup and is not impacted by charge sharing. Our preliminary results indicate that this method can be useful even in scenarios where metal fluorescence and radioactive source based calibration techniques may be practically impossible. Our results are validated using x-ray fluorescence based calibration for a Silicon detector with moderate charge sharing. Calibration of a particularly challenging case of a Medipix2 detector (55 μm pixel size) with a 1 mm thick CdTe sensor and a Medipix3 detector with CdTe sensor is also demonstrated. A cross validation with K-edge identification of Gd is also presented here.

  8. Photon event distribution sampling: an image formation technique for scanning microscopes that permits tracking of sub-diffraction particles with high spatial and temporal resolutions.

    PubMed

    Larkin, J D; Publicover, N G; Sutko, J L

    2011-01-01

    In photon event distribution sampling, an image formation technique for scanning microscopes, the maximum likelihood position of origin of each detected photon is acquired as a data set rather than binning photons in pixels. Subsequently, an intensity-related probability density function describing the uncertainty associated with the photon position measurement is applied to each position and individual photon intensity distributions are summed to form an image. Compared to pixel-based images, photon event distribution sampling images exhibit increased signal-to-noise and comparable spatial resolution. Photon event distribution sampling is superior to pixel-based image formation in recognizing the presence of structured (non-random) photon distributions at low photon counts and permits use of non-raster scanning patterns. A photon event distribution sampling based method for localizing single particles derived from a multi-variate normal distribution is more precise than statistical (Gaussian) fitting to pixel-based images. Using the multi-variate normal distribution method, non-raster scanning and a typical confocal microscope, localizations with 8 nm precision were achieved at 10 ms sampling rates with acquisition of ~200 photons per frame. Single nanometre precision was obtained with a greater number of photons per frame. In summary, photon event distribution sampling provides an efficient way to form images when low numbers of photons are involved and permits particle tracking with confocal point-scanning microscopes with nanometre precision deep within specimens.

  9. Time-resolved spectral imaging: better photon economy, higher accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fereidouni, Farzad; Reitsma, Keimpe; Blab, Gerhard A.; Gerritsen, Hans C.

    2015-03-01

    Lifetime and spectral imaging are complementary techniques that offer a non-invasive solution for monitoring metabolic processes, identifying biochemical compounds, and characterizing their interactions in biological tissues, among other tasks. Newly developed instruments that perform time-resolved spectral imaging can provide even more information and reach higher sensitivity than either modality alone. Here we report a multispectral lifetime imaging system based on a field-programmable gate array (FPGA), capable of operating at high photon count rates (12 MHz) per spectral detection channel, and with time resolution of 200 ps. We performed error analyses to investigate the effect of gate width and spectral-channel width on the accuracy of estimated lifetimes and spectral widths. Temporal and spectral phasors were used for analysis of recorded data, and we demonstrated blind un-mixing of the fluorescent components using information from both modalities. Fractional intensities, spectra, and decay curves of components were extracted without need for prior information. We further tested this approach with fluorescently doubly-labeled DNA, and demonstrated its suitability for accurately estimating FRET efficiency in the presence of either non-interacting or interacting donor molecules.

  10. Measuring PET scanner sensitivity; Relating count rates to image signal-to-noise ratios using noise equivalent counts

    SciTech Connect

    Strother, S.C. ); Casey, M.E. ); Hoffman, E.J. . Nuclear Medicine Lab.)

    1990-04-01

    Sensitivity parameters derived from a plot of a scanner's true coincidence count (TCC) rates as a function of activity in a 20 cm cylindrical phantom have no direct link to image quality. Noise equivalent count (NEC) rate curves, which incorporate the noise effects of subtracting the randoms and scatter count components provide a direct link between image signal-to-noise ratios and the scatter, randoms and trues coincidence count rates. The authors have measured TCC and NEC curves with a standardized 20 cm diameter nylon cylinder for five different PET scanners with several scanner-collimator combinations. In addition, the authors have compared TCC and NEC curves on one scanner with those from an Alderson brain phantom.

  11. Two-photon fluorescence anisotropy imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wei; Wang, Yi; Shao, Hanrong; He, Yonghong; Ma, Hui

    2006-09-01

    We have developed a novel method for imaging the fluorescence intensity and anisotropy by two-photon fluorescence microscopy and tested its capability in biological application. This method is applied to model sample including FITC and FITC-CD44 antibody solution and also FITC-CD44 stained cells. The fluorescence anisotropy (FA) of FITC-CD44ab solution is higher than the FITC solution with the same concentration. The fluorescence in cell sample has even higher FA than in solution because the rotation diffusion is restrained in membrane. The method is employed to study the effect of berberine a kind of Chinese medicine, on tumor metastasis. The results indicated that tumor cell membrane fluidity is decreasing with increasing the concentration of berberine in culture medium.

  12. Photon counting with photon number resolution through superconducting nanowires coupled to a multi-channel TDC in FPGA.

    PubMed

    Lusardi, N; Los, J W N; Gourgues, R B M; Bulgarini, G; Geraci, A

    2017-03-01

    The paper presents a system for measuring photon statistics and photon timing in the few-photon regime down to the single-photon level. The measurement system is based on superconducting nanowire single photon detectors and a time-to-digital converter implemented into a programmable device. The combination of these devices gives high performance to the system in terms of resolution and adaptability to the actual experimental conditions. As a case of application, we present the measurement of photon statistics for coherent light states. In this measurement, we make use of 8th order single photon correlations to reconstruct with high fidelity the statistics of a coherent state with average photon number up to 4. The processing is performed by means of a tapped-delay-line time-to-digital converter architecture that also hosts an asynchronous-correlated-digital-counter implemented in a field programmable gate array device and specifically designed for performance optimization in multi-channel usage.

  13. Photon counting with photon number resolution through superconducting nanowires coupled to a multi-channel TDC in FPGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lusardi, N.; Los, J. W. N.; Gourgues, R. B. M.; Bulgarini, G.; Geraci, A.

    2017-03-01

    The paper presents a system for measuring photon statistics and photon timing in the few-photon regime down to the single-photon level. The measurement system is based on superconducting nanowire single photon detectors and a time-to-digital converter implemented into a programmable device. The combination of these devices gives high performance to the system in terms of resolution and adaptability to the actual experimental conditions. As a case of application, we present the measurement of photon statistics for coherent light states. In this measurement, we make use of 8th order single photon correlations to reconstruct with high fidelity the statistics of a coherent state with average photon number up to 4. The processing is performed by means of a tapped-delay-line time-to-digital converter architecture that also hosts an asynchronous-correlated-digital-counter implemented in a field programmable gate array device and specifically designed for performance optimization in multi-channel usage.

  14. Molecular imaging by single-photon emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cusanno, F.; Accorsi, R.; Cinti, M. N.; Colilli, S.; Fortuna, A.; Garibaldi, F.; Giuliani, F.; Gricia, M.; Lanza, R. C.; Loizzo, A.; Lucentini, M.; Pani, R.; Pellegrini, R.; Santavenere, F.; Scopinaro, F.

    2004-07-01

    In vivo imaging of pharmaceuticals labeled with radionuclides has proven to be a powerful tool in human subjects. The same imaging methods have often been applied to small animal but usually only within the nuclear medicine (NM) community, and usually only to evaluate the efficacy of new radiopharmaceuticals. We have built a compact mini gamma camera, a pixellated array of NaI(Tl) crystals coupled to 3'' R2486 Hamamatsu Position Sensitive PMT; in combination with a pinhole collimator, which allows for high resolution in vivo SPECT imaging. Calculations show that reasonable counting rates are possible. The system has been tested and preliminary measurements on mice have been done. The performances of the camera are in the expectations. Improvements will be done both on the collimation technique and on the detector. Simulations have been performed to study a coded aperture collimator. The results show that the efficiency can be greatly improved without sacrificing the spatial resolution. A dedicated mask has been designed and will be used soon.

  15. Energy Calibration of a CdTe Photon Counting Spectral Detector with Consideration of its Non-Convergent Behavior.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeong Seok; Kang, Dong-Goo; Jin, Seung Oh; Kim, Insoo; Lee, Soo Yeol

    2016-04-11

    Fast and accurate energy calibration of photon counting spectral detectors (PCSDs) is essential for their biomedical applications to identify and characterize bio-components or contrast agents in tissues. Using the x-ray tube voltage as a reference for energy calibration is known to be an efficient method, but there has been no consideration in the energy calibration of non-convergent behavior of PCSDs. We observed that a single pixel mode (SPM) CdTe PCSD based on Medipix-2 shows some non-convergent behaviors in turning off the detector elements when a high enough threshold is applied to the comparator that produces a binary photon count pulse. More specifically, the detector elements are supposed to stop producing photon count pulses once the threshold reaches a point of the highest photon energy determined by the tube voltage. However, as the x-ray exposure time increases, the threshold giving 50% of off pixels also increases without converging to a point. We established a method to take account of the non-convergent behavior in the energy calibration. With the threshold-to-photon energy mapping function established by the proposed method, we could better identify iodine component in a phantom consisting of iodine and other components.

  16. Low-Noise Free-Running High-Rate Photon-Counting for Space Communication and Ranging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Wei; Krainak, Michael A.; Yang, Guan; Sun, Xiaoli; Merritt, Scott

    2016-01-01

    We present performance data for low-noise free-running high-rate photon counting method for space optical communication and ranging. NASA GSFC is testing the performance of two types of novel photon-counting detectors 1) a 2x8 mercury cadmium telluride (HgCdTe) avalanche array made by DRS Inc., and a 2) a commercial 2880-element silicon avalanche photodiode (APD) array. We successfully measured real-time communication performance using both the 2 detected-photon threshold and logic AND-gate coincidence methods. Use of these methods allows mitigation of dark count, after-pulsing and background noise effects without using other method of Time Gating The HgCdTe APD array routinely demonstrated very high photon detection efficiencies (50) at near infrared wavelength. The commercial silicon APD array exhibited a fast output with rise times of 300 ps and pulse widths of 600 ps. On-chip individually filtered signals from the entire array were multiplexed onto a single fast output. NASA GSFC has tested both detectors for their potential application for space communications and ranging. We developed and compare their performances using both the 2 detected photon threshold and coincidence methods.

  17. Low-Noise Free-Running High-Rate Photon-Counting for Space Communication and Ranging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Wei; Krainak, Michael A.; Yang, Guangning; Sun, Xiaoli; Merritt, Scott

    2016-01-01

    We present performance data for low-noise free-running high-rate photon counting method for space optical communication and ranging. NASA GSFC is testing the performance of two types of novel photon-counting detectors 1) a 2x8 mercury cadmium telluride (HgCdTe) avalanche array made by DRS Inc., and a 2) a commercial 2880-element silicon avalanche photodiode (APD) array. We successfully measured real-time communication performance using both the 2 detected-photon threshold and logic AND-gate coincidence methods. Use of these methods allows mitigation of dark count, after-pulsing and background noise effects without using other method of Time Gating The HgCdTe APD array routinely demonstrated very high photon detection efficiencies ((is) greater than 50%) at near infrared wavelength. The commercial silicon APD array exhibited a fast output with rise times of 300 ps and pulse widths of 600 ps. On-chip individually filtered signals from the entire array were multiplexed onto a single fast output. NASA GSFC has tested both detectors for their potential application for space communications and ranging. We developed and compare their performances using both the 2 detected photon threshold and coincidence methods.

  18. TU-F-18A-08: Effect of Quantum Detection Efficiency and Energy Bin Selection On Contrast-To-Noise-Ratio for Energy-Resolved Photon-Counting Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Lam Ng, A; Ding, H; Cho, H; Molloi, S

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Energy-resolved photon-counting detectors have the capability to discriminate photons according to their energies. By using optimal energy weighting factors, the contrast-to-noise-ratio (CNR) of the reconstructed image can be improved. In this work, we investigate how quantum detection efficiency (QDE) affects the determination of the optimal energy threshold bins, and therefore the CNR improvement of photon-counting detectors. Methods: In this simulation study a photon-counting detector, based on Silicon (Si), was investigated. A task-oriented algorithm was used to determine the optimal energy bin setting in order to maximize CNR. Projection-based and Image-based energy weighting techniques were implemented. A 13 mm PMMA phantom with two contrast materials, hydroxyapatite (HA) and iodine (I), at different concentrations (100, 200, and 300 mg/mL for HA and 2, 4, and 8 mg/mL for I) was used. TASMIP algorithm was used to generate the spectrum with 2.7 mm Al filter. Different tube voltages, number of energy bins, and bin widths were investigated. Different thicknesses of Si were also investigated to determine the QDE effect on CNR. Results: CNR increased as the detector material thickness increased until it reached 30 mm for Si thickness such that the CNR value was near to the value predicted by an ideal detector. Also, the results indicated that the improvement of CNR due to the QDE is task-dependent when comparing weighted images to photon-counting images. For hydroxyapatite the improvement is approximately 20%, whereas for iodine it is less than 10%. Conclusion: The results showed that the improvement of CNR for an energy-resolved photon-counting detector is highly task-dependent when QDE is taken into account.

  19. A Single-Photon Avalanche Diode Array for Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, David Eric; Charbon, Edoardo; Shepard, Kenneth L.

    2013-01-01

    We describe the design, characterization, and demonstration of a fully integrated single-photon avalanche diode (SPAD) imager for use in time-resolved fluorescence imaging. The imager consists of a 64-by-64 array of active SPAD pixels and an on-chip time-to-digital converter (TDC) based on a delay-locked loop (DLL) and calibrated interpolators. The imager can perform both standard time-correlated single-photon counting (TCSPC) and an alternative gated-window detection useful for avoiding pulse pile-up when measuring bright signal levels. To illustrate the use of the imager, we present measurements of the decay lifetimes of fluorescent dyes of several types with a timing resolution of 350 ps. PMID:23976789

  20. A Single-Photon Avalanche Diode Array for Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, David Eric; Charbon, Edoardo; Shepard, Kenneth L

    2008-11-21

    We describe the design, characterization, and demonstration of a fully integrated single-photon avalanche diode (SPAD) imager for use in time-resolved fluorescence imaging. The imager consists of a 64-by-64 array of active SPAD pixels and an on-chip time-to-digital converter (TDC) based on a delay-locked loop (DLL) and calibrated interpolators. The imager can perform both standard time-correlated single-photon counting (TCSPC) and an alternative gated-window detection useful for avoiding pulse pile-up when measuring bright signal levels. To illustrate the use of the imager, we present measurements of the decay lifetimes of fluorescent dyes of several types with a timing resolution of 350 ps.

  1. Dual-particle imaging system based on simultaneous detection of photon and neutron collision events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poitrasson-Rivière, Alexis; Hamel, Michael C.; Polack, J. Kyle; Flaska, Marek; Clarke, Shaun D.; Pozzi, Sara A.

    2014-10-01

    A dual-particle imaging (DPI) system capable of simultaneously detecting and imaging fast neutrons and photons has been designed and built. Imaging fast neutrons and photons simultaneously is particularly desirable for nuclear nonproliferation and/or safeguards applications because typical sources of interest (special nuclear material) emit both particle types. The DPI system consists of three detection planes: the first two planes consist of organic-liquid scintillators and the third plane consists of NaI(Tl) inorganic scintillators. Pulse shape discrimination technique(s) may be used for the liquid scintillators to differentiate neutron and photon pulses whereas the NaI(Tl) scintillators are highly insensitive to neutrons. A prototype DPI system was set up using a digital data acquisition system as a proof of concept. Initial measurements showed potential for use of the DPI system with special nuclear material. The DPI system has efficiencies of the order of 10-4 correlated counts per incident particles for both neutron and photon correlated counts, with simple-backprojection images displaying peaks within a few degrees of the source location. This uncertainty is expected to decrease with more extensive data interpretation.

  2. Superconducting single-photon counting system for optical experiments requiring time-resolution in the picosecond range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toussaint, Julia; Grüner, Roman; Schubert, Marco; May, Torsten; Meyer, Hans-Georg; Dietzek, Benjamin; Popp, Jürgen; Hofherr, Matthias; Arndt, Matthias; Henrich, Dagmar; Il'in, Konstantin; Siegel, Michael

    2012-12-01

    We have developed a cryogenic measurement system for single-photon counting, which can be used in optical experiments requiring high time resolution in the picosecond range. The system utilizes niobium nitride superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors which are integrated in a time-correlated single-photon counting (TCSPC) setup. In this work, we describe details of the mechanical design, the electrical setup, and the cryogenic optical components. The performance of the complete system in TCSPC mode is tentatively benchmarked using 140 fs long laser pulses at a repetition frequency of 75 MHz. Due to the high temporal stability of these pulses, the measured time resolution of 35 ps (FWHM) is limited by the timing jitter of the measurement system. The result was cross-checked in a Coherent Anti-stokes Raman Scattering (CARS) setup, where scattered pulses from a β-barium borate crystal have been detected with the same time resolution.

  3. A Poisson resampling method for simulating reduced counts in nuclear medicine images.

    PubMed

    White, Duncan; Lawson, Richard S

    2015-05-07

    Nuclear medicine computers now commonly offer resolution recovery and other software techniques which have been developed to improve image quality for images with low counts. These techniques potentially mean that these images can give equivalent clinical information to a full-count image. Reducing the number of counts in nuclear medicine images has the benefits of either allowing reduced activity to be administered or reducing acquisition times. However, because acquisition and processing parameters vary, each user should ideally evaluate the use of images with reduced counts within their own department, and this is best done by simulating reduced-count images from the original data. Reducing the counts in an image by division and rounding off to the nearest integer value, even if additional Poisson noise is added, is inadequate because it gives incorrect counting statistics. This technical note describes how, by applying Poisson resampling to the original raw data, simulated reduced-count images can be obtained while maintaining appropriate counting statistics. The authors have developed manufacturer independent software that can retrospectively generate simulated data with reduced counts from any acquired nuclear medicine image.

  4. A Poisson resampling method for simulating reduced counts in nuclear medicine images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Duncan; Lawson, Richard S.

    2015-05-01

    Nuclear medicine computers now commonly offer resolution recovery and other software techniques which have been developed to improve image quality for images with low counts. These techniques potentially mean that these images can give equivalent clinical information to a full-count image. Reducing the number of counts in nuclear medicine images has the benefits of either allowing reduced activity to be administered or reducing acquisition times. However, because acquisition and processing parameters vary, each user should ideally evaluate the use of images with reduced counts within their own department, and this is best done by simulating reduced-count images from the original data. Reducing the counts in an image by division and rounding off to the nearest integer value, even if additional Poisson noise is added, is inadequate because it gives incorrect counting statistics. This technical note describes how, by applying Poisson resampling to the original raw data, simulated reduced-count images can be obtained while maintaining appropriate counting statistics. The authors have developed manufacturer independent software that can retrospectively generate simulated data with reduced counts from any acquired nuclear medicine image.

  5. InGaAsP Avalanche Photodetectors for Non-Gated 1.06 micrometer Photon-Counting Receivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Itzler, Mark A.; Jiang, Xudong; Ben-Michael, Rafael; Slomkowski, Krystyna; Krainak, Michael A.

    2007-01-01

    The efficient detection of single photons at 1.06 micron is of considerable interest for lidar/ladar systems designed for remote sensing an d ranging as well as for free-space optical transmission in photon-st arved applications. However, silicon-based single photon avalanche diodes (SPADs) used at shorter wavelengths have very low single photon d etection efficiency (approximately 1 - 2%) at 1.06 micron, and InP/In GaAs SPADs designed for telecommunications wavelengths near 1.5 micro n exhibit high dark count rates that generally inhibit non-gated (free-running) operation. To bridge this "single photon detection gap" for wavelengths just beyond 1 micron, we have developed high performance , large area (80 - 200 micron diameter) InP-based InGaAsP quaternary absorber SPADs optimized for operation at 1.06 micron and based on a highly reliable planar geometry avalanche photodiode structure. We wil l show that dark count rates are sufficiently low to allow for non-ga ted operation while achieving detection efficiencies far surpassing t hose found for Si SPADs. At a detection efficiency of 10%, 80 micron diameter devices exhibit dark count rates below 1000 Hz and count rate s of at least 3 MHz when operated at -40 C. Significantly higher dete ction efficiencies (30 - 50%) are achievable with acceptable tradeoff s in dark count rate. In this paper, we will also discuss performance modeling for these devices and compare their behavior with longer wav elength InP-based InGaAs ternary absorber SPADs fabricated on a relat ed device design platform.

  6. Label-free fluorescence detection of aromatic compounds in chip electrophoresis applying two-photon excitation and time-correlated single-photon counting.

    PubMed

    Beyreiss, Reinhild; Geißler, David; Ohla, Stefan; Nagl, Stefan; Posch, Tjorben Nils; Belder, Detlev

    2013-09-03

    In this study, we introduce time-resolved fluorescence detection with two-photon excitation at 532 nm for label-free analyte determination in microchip electrophoresis. In the developed method, information about analyte fluorescence lifetimes is collected by time-correlated single-photon counting, improving reliable peak assignment in electrophoretic separations. The determined limits of detection for serotonin, propranolol, and tryptophan were 51, 37, and 280 nM, respectively, using microfluidic chips made of fused silica. Applying two-photon excitation microchip separations and label-free detection could also be performed in borosilicate glass chips demonstrating the potential for label-free fluorescence detection in non-UV-transparent devices. Microchip electrophoresis with two-photon excited fluorescence detection was then applied for analyses of active compounds in plant extracts. Harmala alkaloids present in methanolic plant extracts from Peganum harmala could be separated within seconds and detected with on-the-fly determination of fluorescence lifetimes.

  7. In vivo imaging of cerebral energy metabolism with two-photon fluorescence lifetime microscopy of NADH

    PubMed Central

    Yaseen, Mohammad A.; Sakadžić, Sava; Wu, Weicheng; Becker, Wolfgang; Kasischke, Karl A.; Boas, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Minimally invasive, specific measurement of cellular energy metabolism is crucial for understanding cerebral pathophysiology. Here, we present high-resolution, in vivo observations of autofluorescence lifetime as a biomarker of cerebral energy metabolism in exposed rat cortices. We describe a customized two-photon imaging system with time correlated single photon counting detection and specialized software for modeling multiple-component fits of fluorescence decay and monitoring their transient behaviors. In vivo cerebral NADH fluorescence suggests the presence of four distinct components, which respond differently to brief periods of anoxia and likely indicate different enzymatic formulations. Individual components show potential as indicators of specific molecular pathways involved in oxidative metabolism. PMID:23412419

  8. In vivo imaging of cerebral energy metabolism with two-photon fluorescence lifetime microscopy of NADH.

    PubMed

    Yaseen, Mohammad A; Sakadžić, Sava; Wu, Weicheng; Becker, Wolfgang; Kasischke, Karl A; Boas, David A

    2013-02-01

    Minimally invasive, specific measurement of cellular energy metabolism is crucial for understanding cerebral pathophysiology. Here, we present high-resolution, in vivo observations of autofluorescence lifetime as a biomarker of cerebral energy metabolism in exposed rat cortices. We describe a customized two-photon imaging system with time correlated single photon counting detection and specialized software for modeling multiple-component fits of fluorescence decay and monitoring their transient behaviors. In vivo cerebral NADH fluorescence suggests the presence of four distinct components, which respond differently to brief periods of anoxia and likely indicate different enzymatic formulations. Individual components show potential as indicators of specific molecular pathways involved in oxidative metabolism.

  9. Quantification of breast density with spectral mammography based on a scanned multi-slit photon-counting detector: A feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Huanjun; Molloi, Sabee

    2012-01-01

    Purpose A simple and accurate measurement of breast density is crucial for the understanding of its impact in breast cancer risk models. The feasibility to quantify volumetric breast density with a photon-counting spectral mammography system has been investigated using both computer simulations and physical phantom studies. Methods A computer simulation model involved polyenergetic spectra from a tungsten anode x-ray tube and a Si-based photon-counting detector has been evaluated for breast density quantification. The figure-of-merit (FOM), which was defined as the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the dual energy image with respect to the square root of mean glandular dose (MGD), was chosen to optimize the imaging protocols, in terms of tube voltage and splitting energy. A scanning multi-slit photon-counting spectral mammography system has been employed in the experimental study to quantitatively measure breast density using dual energy decomposition with glandular and adipose equivalent phantoms of uniform thickness. Four different phantom studies were designed to evaluate the accuracy of the technique, each of which addressed one specific variable in the phantom configurations, including thickness, density, area and shape. In addition to the standard calibration fitting function used for dual energy decomposition, a modified fitting function has been proposed, which brought the tube voltages used in the imaging tasks as the third variable in dual energy decomposition. Results For an average sized breast of 4.5 cm thick, the FOM was maximized with a tube voltage of 46kVp and a splitting energy of 24 keV. To be consistent with the tube voltage used in current clinical screening exam (~ 32 kVp), the optimal splitting energy was proposed to be 22 keV, which offered a FOM greater than 90% of the optimal value. In the experimental investigation, the root-mean-square (RMS) error in breast density quantification for all four phantom studies was estimated to be

  10. High Throughput, High Yield Fabrication of High Quantum Efficiency Back-Illuminated Photon Counting, Far UV, UV, and Visible Detector Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nikzad, Shouleh; Hoenk, M. E.; Carver, A. G.; Jones, T. J.; Greer, F.; Hamden, E.; Goodsall, T.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the high throughput end-to-end post fabrication processing of high performance delta-doped and superlattice-doped silicon imagers for UV, visible, and NIR applications. As an example, we present our results on far ultraviolet and ultraviolet quantum efficiency (QE) in a photon counting, detector array. We have improved the QE by nearly an order of magnitude over microchannel plates (MCPs) that are the state-of-the-art UV detectors for many NASA space missions as well as defense applications. These achievements are made possible by precision interface band engineering of Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE) and Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD).

  11. Estimation of signal and noise for a whole-body photon counting research CT system

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhoubo; Leng, Shuai; Yu, Zhicong; Kappler, Stephen; McCollough, Cynthia H.

    2016-01-01

    Photon-counting CT (PCCT) may yield potential value for many clinical applications due to its relative immunity to electronic noise, increased geometric efficiency relative to current scintillating detectors, and the ability to resolve energy information about the detected photons. However, there are a large number of parameters that require optimization, particularly the energy thresholds configurations. Fast and accurate estimation of signal and noise in PCCT can benefit the optimization of acquisition parameters for specific diagnostic tasks. Based on the acquisition parameters and detector response of our research PCCT system, we derived mathematical models for both signal and noise. The signal model took the tube spectrum, beam filtration, object attenuation, water beam hardening, and detector response into account. The noise model considered the relationship between noise and radiation dose, as well as the propagation of noise as threshold data are subtracted to yield energy bin data. To determine the absolute noise value, a noise look-up table (LUT) was acquired using a limited number of calibration scans. The noise estimation algorithm then used the noise LUT to estimate noise for scans with a variety of combination of energy thresholds, dose levels, and object attenuation. Validation of the estimation algorithms was performed on our whole-body research PCCT system using semi-anthropomorphic water phantoms and solutions of calcium and iodine. The algorithms achieved accurate estimation of signal and noise for a variety of scanning parameter combinations. The proposed method can be used to optimize energy thresholds configuration for many clinical applications of PCCT. PMID:27346908

  12. Ultra-compact 32-channel system for time-correlated single-photon counting measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonioli, S.; Cuccato, A.; Miari, L.; Labanca, I.; Rech, I.; Ghioni, M.

    2013-05-01

    Modern Time-Correlated Single-Photon Counting applications require to detect spectral and temporal fluorescence data simultaneously and from different areas of the analyzed sample. These rising quests have led the development of multichannel systems able to perform high count rate and high performance analysis. In this work we describe a new 32-channel TCSPC system designed to be used in modern setups. The presented module consists of four independent 8-channel TCSPC boards, each of them including two 4-channel Time-Amplitude Converter arrays. These TAC arrays are built-in 0.35 μm Si-Ge BiCMOS technology and are characterized by low crosstalk, high resolution, high conversion rate and variable full-scale range. The 8-channel TCSPC board implements an 8-channel ADC to sample the TAC outputs, an FPGA to record and organize the measurement results and a USB 2.0 interface to enable real-time data transmission to and from an external PC. Experimental results demonstrate that the acquisition system ensures high performance TCSPC measurements, in particular: high conversion rate (5 MHz), good time resolution (down to 30 psFWHM with the full scale range set to 11 ns) and low differential non-linearity (rms value lower than 0.15% of the time bin width). We design the module to be very compact and, thanks to the reduced dimensions of the 8-channel TCSPC board (95×40 mm), the whole system can be enclosed in a small aluminum case (160×125×30 mm).

  13. Mode-Selective Photon Counting Via Quantum Frequency Conversion Using Spectrally-Engineered Pump Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manurkar, Paritosh

    phase of each spectral frequency from an optical frequency comb. The latter is generated using a cascaded configuration of phase and amplitude modulators. We characterize the mode selectivity using classical signals by arranging the six TMs into two orthogonal signal sets. Furthermore, we also demonstrate that mode selectivity is preserved if we use sub-photon signals (weak coherent light). Thus, this work supports the idea that QFC has the basic properties needed for advanced multi-dimensional quantum measurements given that we have demonstrated for the first time the ability to move to high dimensions (d=4), measure coherent superposition modes, and measure sub-photon signal levels. In addition to mode-selective photon counting, we also experimentally demonstrate a method of reshaping optical pulses based on QFC. Such a method has the potential to serve as the interface between quantum memories and the existing fiber infrastructure. At the same time, it can be employed in all-optical systems for optical signal regeneration.

  14. Studying the optical second-order interference pattern formation process with classical light in the photon counting regime.

    PubMed

    He, Yuchen; Liu, Jianbin; Zhang, Songlin; Wang, Wentao; Bai, Bin; Le, Mingnan; Xu, Zhuo

    2015-12-01

    The formation process of the second-order interference pattern is studied experimentally in the photon counting regime by superposing two independent single-mode continuous-wave lasers. Two-photon interference based on the superposition principle in Feynman's path integral theory is employed to interpret the experimental results. The second-order interference pattern of classical light can be formulated when, with high probability, there are only two photons in the interferometer at one time. The studies are helpful in understanding the second-order interference of classical light in the language of photons. The method and conclusions can be generalized to the third- and higher-order interference of light and interference of massive particles.

  15. Note: Space qualified photon counting detector for laser time transfer with picosecond precision and stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prochazka, Ivan; Kodet, Jan; Blazej, Josef

    2016-05-01

    The laser time transfer link is under construction for the European Space Agency in the frame of Atomic Clock Ensemble in Space. We have developed and tested the flying unit of the photon counting detector optimized for this space mission. The results are summarized in this Note. An extreme challenge was to build a detector package, which is rugged, small and which provides long term detection delay stability on picosecond level. The device passed successfully all the tests required for space missions on the low Earth orbits. The detector is extremely rugged and compact. Its long term detection delay stability is excellent, it is better than ±1 ps/day, in a sense of time deviation it is better than 0.5 ps for averaging times of 2000 s to several hours. The device is capable to operate in a temperature range of -55 °C up to +60 °C, the change of the detection delay with temperature is +0.5 ps/K. The device is ready for integration into the space structure now.

  16. Synchrotron beam test of a photon counting pixel prototype based on Double-SOI technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Y.; Lu, Y.; Hashimoto, R.; Nishimura, R.; Kishimoto, S.; Arai, Y.; Ouyang, Q.

    2017-01-01

    The overall noise performances and first synchrotron beam measurement results of CPIXETEG3b, the first counting type Silicon-On-Insulator (SOI) pixel sensor prototype without crosstalk issue, are reported. The prototype includes a 64 × 64 pixel matrix with 50 μm pitch size. Each pixel consists of an N-in-P charge collection diode, a charge sensitive preamplifier, a shaper, a discriminator with thresholds adjustable by an in-pixel 4-bit DAC, and a 6-bit counter. The study was performed using the beam line 14A at KEK Photon Factory (KEK-PF) . The homogeneous response of the prototype, including charging-sharing effects between pixels were studied. 16 keV and 8 keV monochromatic small size (~ 10 μm diameter) X-ray beams were used for the charge sharing study, and a flat-field was added for homogenous response investigation. The overall detector homogeneity and the influence of basic detector parameters on charge sharing between pixels has been investigated.

  17. Optimal fine ϕ-slicing for single-photon-counting pixel detectors

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Marcus; Wang, Meitian; Schulze-Briese, Clemens

    2012-01-01

    The data-collection parameters used in a macromolecular diffraction experiment have a strong impact on data quality. A careful choice of parameters leads to better data and can make the difference between success and failure in phasing attempts, and will also result in a more accurate atomic model. The selection of parameters has to account for the application of the data in various phasing methods or high-resolution refinement. Furthermore, experimental factors such as crystal characteristics, available experiment time and the properties of the X-ray source and detector have to be considered. For many years, CCD detectors have been the prevalent type of detectors used in macromolecular crystallography. Recently, hybrid pixel X-ray detectors that operate in single-photon-counting mode have become available. These detectors have fundamentally different characteristics compared with CCD detectors and different data-collection strategies should be applied. Fine ϕ-slicing is a strategy that is particularly well suited to hybrid pixel detectors because of the fast readout time and the absence of readout noise. A large number of data sets were systematically collected from crystals of four different proteins in order to investigate the benefit of fine ϕ-­slicing on data quality with a noise-free detector. The results show that fine ϕ-slicing can substantially improve scaling statistics and anomalous signal provided that the rotation angle is comparable to half the crystal mosaicity. PMID:22194332

  18. A photon counting dynamic digital lock-in amplifier for background suppression in glow discharge atomic emission spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gökmen, Ali; Ulgen, Ahmet; Yalçin, Şerife

    1996-01-01

    A photon counting dynamic digital lock-in amplifier, (PC-DDLIA), has been developed for the suppression of Ar lines in glow discharge lamp atomic emission spectrometry, (GDL-AES). The experimental set-up consists of a Grimm-type GDL, a prism-type scanning monochromator, photon counting electronics, an Apple Ile computer with an interface card and a computer controllable high voltage power supply. The photon counting electronics are designed to convert the photon pulses to logic pulses. A discriminator is used to reject pulses below a threshold level. The high voltage power supply is modulated with a square waveform generated from DAC and photon pulses are counted synchronously by the timer/counter chip, versatile interface adaptor (VIA-6522) on the interface card of computer. The data are analyzed in two steps. In the "learn mode", the GDL is modulated with a square waveform between 370 and 670 V and two spectra consisting of only Ar lines are obtained in a spectral window between 287.1 and 290.0 nm. A new modulation waveform is computed from these spectra which yields two overlapped spectra when the PC-DDLIA is scanned over the same spectral window. In the "analysis mode" of data acquisition, a target material with the analyte element(s) in it is used and the spectrometer is scanned with a dynamically varying rectangular waveform over the same spectral window. The net spectrum consists of pure atomic lines free from any Ar lines. The detection limit for the determination of Si (288.2 nm) in the presence of interfering Ar lines (288.1 and 288.4 nm) is found to be 0.083%, whereas suppression of Ar lines over the same spectral window lowers the detection limit to 0.013%.

  19. Spatio-energetic cross-talks in photon counting detectors: detector model and correlated Poisson data generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taguchi, Katsuyuki; Polster, Christoph; Lee, Okkyun; Kappler, Steffen

    2016-03-01

    An x-ray photon interacts with photon counting detectors (PCDs) and generates an electron charge cloud or multiple clouds. The clouds (thus, the photon energy) may be split between two adjacent PCD pixels when the interaction occurs near pixel boundaries, producing a count at both of the two pixels. This is called double-counting with charge sharing. The output of individual PCD pixel is Poisson distributed integer counts; however, the outputs of adjacent pixels are correlated due to double-counting. Major problems are the lack of detector noise model for the spatio-energetic crosstalk and the lack of an efficient simulation tool. Monte Carlo simulation can accurately simulate these phenomena and produce noisy data; however, it is not computationally efficient. In this study, we developed a new detector model and implemented into an efficient software simulator which uses a Poisson random number generator to produce correlated noisy integer counts. The detector model takes the following effects into account effects: (1) detection efficiency and incomplete charge collection; (2) photoelectric effect with total absorption; (3) photoelectric effect with fluorescence x-ray emission and re-absorption; (4) photoelectric effect with fluorescence x-ray emission which leaves PCD completely; and (5) electric noise. The model produced total detector spectrum similar to previous MC simulation data. The model can be used to predict spectrum and correlation with various different settings. The simulated noisy data demonstrated the expected performance: (a) data were integers; (b) the mean and covariance matrix was close to the target values; (c) noisy data generation was very efficient

  20. Two-photon excitation based photochemistry and neural imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatch, Kevin Andrew

    Two-photon microscopy is a fluorescence imaging technique which provides distinct advantages in three-dimensional cellular and molecular imaging. The benefits of this technology may extend beyond imaging capabilities through exploitation of the quantum processes responsible for fluorescent events. This study utilized a two-photon microscope to investigate a synthetic photoreactive collagen peptidomimetic, which may serve as a potential material for tissue engineering using the techniques of two-photon photolysis and two-photon polymerization. The combination of these techniques could potentially be used to produce a scaffold for the vascularization of engineered three-dimensional tissues in vitro to address the current limitations of tissue engineering. Additionally, two-photon microscopy was used to observe the effects of the application of the neurotransmitter dopamine to the mushroom body neural structures of Drosophila melanogaster to investigate dopamine's connection to cognitive degeneration.

  1. Time-over-threshold readout to enhance the high flux capabilities of single-photon-counting detectors.

    PubMed

    Bergamaschi, Anna; Dinapoli, Roberto; Greiffenberg, Dominic; Henrich, Beat; Johnson, Ian; Mozzanica, Aldo; Radicci, Valeria; Schmitt, Bernd; Shi, Xintian; Stoppani, Laura

    2011-11-01

    The MYTHEN single-photon-counting (SPC) detector has been characterized using the time-over-threshold (ToT) readout method, i.e. measuring the time that the signal produced by the detected X-rays remains above the comparator threshold. In the following it is shown that the ToT readout preserves the sensitivity, dynamic range and capability of background suppression of the SPC mode, while enhancing the count-rate capability, which is the main limitation of state-of-the-art SPC systems.

  2. Sensitivity Measurements For Cargo Scanning Applications Using Photon Interrogation and Neutron Signature Counting Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ankrah, Maxwell

    2011-12-01

    In recent years, non-destructive evaluation techniques which use either photon or neutron sources from accelerators followed by neutron counting signatures have been used in many national security and nuclear nonproliferation applications [4, 60]. Although the United States customs and border protection initiated and implemented a cargo security initiative to discover threats from others countries before they embark to the US, detectors with better sensitivities are more necessary than ever in view of the global threats faced by nations around the world. Photofission based applications which use delayed neutron signal ores as viable detection schemes for fissile material detection have been ongoing for many years. Applications of this technology to include cargo scanning applications are however lacking. This work in this dissertation used the delayed neutron signature counting technique for fissile material detection in conjunction with new formulated Curries' expressions to establish the sensitivity (minimum detectable mass) limits. The fission reactions were induced in a uranyl nitrate solution containing 94.1 g of 238U using bremsstrahlung endpoint cue pies of 9 MeV to 21 MeV in 2 MeV steps. Preliminary data on the sensitvity measurement at bremsstrahlung end point energies of 9, 14, 18 and 22 MeV are also presented. We also present the effect of borated polyethylene and lead shielding on the sensitivity at 9 and 22 N1cV. The sensitivities were calculated for 5%u false positives and 5% fake negatives as well as for 1% false positives and 0.1% false negatives. A dose of 4 Gy, 5 mGy and 1 mGy were assumed to be delivered to Mutt cargo container. For a radiator and target-to-detector distance of 150 cm and 200 cup, the delayed neutron yield from calculation and experiment was also compared. Finally, feasibility studies was conducted to determine if the linac parameters used in this research was capable of detecting 1 mg, 1 g and 1 kg of 238U. This work was funded

  3. Novel approaches to address spectral distortions in photon counting x-ray CT using artificial neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Touch, M.; Clark, D. P.; Barber, W.; Badea, C. T.

    2016-04-01

    Spectral CT using a photon-counting x-ray detector (PCXD) can potentially increase accuracy of measuring tissue composition. However, PCXD spectral measurements suffer from distortion due to charge sharing, pulse pileup, and Kescape energy loss. This study proposes two novel artificial neural network (ANN)-based algorithms: one to model and compensate for the distortion, and another one to directly correct for the distortion. The ANN-based distortion model was obtained by training to learn the distortion from a set of projections with a calibration scan. The ANN distortion was then applied in the forward statistical model to compensate for distortion in the projection decomposition. ANN was also used to learn to correct distortions directly in projections. The resulting corrected projections were used for reconstructing the image, denoising via joint bilateral filtration, and decomposition into three-material basis functions: Compton scattering, the photoelectric effect, and iodine. The ANN-based distortion model proved to be more robust to noise and worked better compared to using an imperfect parametric distortion model. In the presence of noise, the mean relative errors in iodine concentration estimation were 11.82% (ANN distortion model) and 16.72% (parametric model). With distortion correction, the mean relative error in iodine concentration estimation was improved by 50% over direct decomposition from distorted data. With our joint bilateral filtration, the resulting material image quality and iodine detectability as defined by the contrast-to-noise ratio were greatly enhanced allowing iodine concentrations as low as 2 mg/ml to be detected. Future work will be dedicated to experimental evaluation of our ANN-based methods using 3D-printed phantoms.

  4. SOI metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor photon detector based on single-hole counting.

    PubMed

    Du, Wei; Inokawa, Hiroshi; Satoh, Hiroaki; Ono, Atsushi

    2011-08-01

    In this Letter, a scaled-down silicon-on-insulator (SOI) metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) is characterized as a photon detector, where photogenerated individual holes are trapped below the negatively biased gate and modulate stepwise the electron current flowing in the bottom channel induced by the positive substrate bias. The output waveforms exhibit clear separation of current levels corresponding to different numbers of trapped holes. Considering this capability of single-hole counting, a small dark count of less than 0.02 s(-1) at room temperature, and low operation voltage of 1 V, SOI MOSFET could be a unique photon-number-resolving detector if the small quantum efficiency were improved.

  5. Limiting Factors on Image Quality in Imaging through Turbid Media under Single-photon and Two-photon Excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schilders, S. P.; Gu, M.

    2000-03-01

    The effect of multiple scattering in a turbid medium on single-photon and two-photon fluorescence microscopy is experimentally investigated for different scattering characteristics including scattering anisotrophy and optical thickness of a turbid medium. It is demonstrated that two-photon excitation can provide significant improvement in penetration depth through turbid media, due to reduced scattering experienced by the excitation beam. It is also shown that the limiting factor in obtaining high-quality images under singlephoton excitation is the fast degradation of image resolution caused by multiple scattering, while for twophoton excitation it is limited by the degradation of image contrast due to the reduction in fluorescence strength.

  6. A unified statistical framework for material decomposition using multienergy photon counting x-ray detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Jiyoung; Kang, Dong-Goo; Kang, Sunghoon; Sung, Younghun; Ye, Jong Chul

    2013-09-15

    Purpose: Material decomposition using multienergy photon counting x-ray detectors (PCXD) has been an active research area over the past few years. Even with some success, the problem of optimal energy selection and three material decomposition including malignant tissue is still on going research topic, and more systematic studies are required. This paper aims to address this in a unified statistical framework in a mammographic environment.Methods: A unified statistical framework for energy level optimization and decomposition of three materials is proposed. In particular, an energy level optimization algorithm is derived using the theory of the minimum variance unbiased estimator, and an iterative algorithm is proposed for material composition as well as system parameter estimation under the unified statistical estimation framework. To verify the performance of the proposed algorithm, the authors performed simulation studies as well as real experiments using physical breast phantom and ex vivo breast specimen. Quantitative comparisons using various performance measures were conducted, and qualitative performance evaluations for ex vivo breast specimen were also performed by comparing the ground-truth malignant tissue areas identified by radiologists.Results: Both simulation and real experiments confirmed that the optimized energy bins by the proposed method allow better material decomposition quality. Moreover, for the specimen thickness estimation errors up to 2 mm, the proposed method provides good reconstruction results in both simulation and real ex vivo breast phantom experiments compared to existing methods.Conclusions: The proposed statistical framework of PCXD has been successfully applied for the energy optimization and decomposition of three material in a mammographic environment. Experimental results using the physical breast phantom and ex vivo specimen support the practicality of the proposed algorithm.

  7. Integrated four-channel all-fiber up-conversion single-photon-detector with adjustable efficiency and dark count

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Ming-Yang; Shentu, Guo-Liang; Ma, Fei; Zhou, Fei; Zhang, Hai-Ting; Dai, Yun-Qi; Xie, Xiuping; Zhang, Qiang; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2016-09-01

    Up-conversion single photon detector (UCSPD) has been widely used in many research fields including quantum key distribution, lidar, optical time domain reflectrometry, and deep space communication. For the first time in laboratory, we have developed an integrated four-channel all-fiber UCSPD which can work in both free-running and gate modes. This compact module can satisfy different experimental demands with adjustable detection efficiency and dark count. We have characterized the key parameters of the UCSPD system.

  8. Photon-noise effect on detection in coherent active images.

    PubMed

    Réfrégier, Philippe; Goudail, François; Delyon, Guillaume

    2004-01-15

    We analyze photon-noise effects on target detection performance in low-flux coherent active imagery systems. We show that when photon noise is expected, the performance of classical detection techniques designed for pure and fully developed speckle images can be improved with no increase in algorithm complexity. Furthermore, the mean photon number under which photon noise becomes sensitive is higher when the target and background mean values are unknown than in the idealized case, where they are assumed to be known, and when the reflectivity ratio between the target and the background is low.

  9. Bi-dimensional arrays of SPAD for time-resolved single photon imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tudisco, S.; Lanzanò, L.; Musumeci, F.; Neri, L.; Privitera, S.; Scordino, A.; Condorelli, G.; Fallica, G.; Mazzillo, M.; Sanfilippo, D.; Valvo, G.

    2009-10-01

    Many scientific areas like astronomy, biophysics, biomedicine, nuclear and plasma science, etc. are interested in the development of a new time-resolved single photon imaging device. Such a device represents today one of the most challenging goals in the field of photonics. In collaboration with Catania R&D staff of ST-Microelectronics (STM) we created, during the last few years, a new avalanche photosensor—Single Photon Avalanche Diode (SPAD) able to detect and count, with excellent performance, single photons. Further we will discuss the possible realization of a single photon imaging device through the many elements integration (bi-dimensional arrays) of SPADs. In order to achieve the goal, it is also important to develop an appropriate readout strategy able to address the time information of each individual sensor and in order to read a great number of elements easily. First prototypes were designed and manufactured by STM and the results are reported here. In the paper we will discuss in particular: (i) sensor performance (gain, photodetection efficiency, timing, after-pulsing, etc.); (ii) array performance (layout, cross-talk, etc.); (iii) readout strategy (quenching, electronics), and (iv) first imaging results (general performance).

  10. Photon counting performance measurements of transfer electron InGaAsP photocathode hybrid photomultiplier tubes at 1064 nm wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiaoli; Krainak, Michael A.; Hasselbrack, William B.; La Rue, Ross A.

    2007-05-01

    We report the test results of a hybrid photomultiplier tube (HPMT) with a transfer electron (TE) InGaAsP photocathode and GaAs Schottky avalanche photodiode (APD) anode. Unlike Geiger mode InGaAsP APDs, these HPMTs (also known as intensified photodiode (IPD), vacuum APD, or hybrid photodetector) operate in linear mode without the need for quenching and gating. Their greatest advantages are wide dynamic range, high speed, large photosensitive area, and potential for photon counting and analog detection dual mode operation. The photon detection efficiency we measured was 25% at 1064 nm wavelength with a dark count rate of 60,000/s at -22 degrees Celsius. The output pulse width in response to a single photon detection is about 0.9 ns. The maximum count rate was 90 Mcts/s and was limited solely by the speed of the discriminator used in the measurement (10 ns dead time). The spectral response of these devices extended from 900 to 1300 nm. We also measured the HPMT response to 60 ps laser pulses. The average output pulse amplitude increased monotonically with the input pulse energy, which suggested that we can resolve photon number in an incident pulse. The jitter of the HPMT output was found to be about 0.5 ns standard deviation and depended on bias voltage applied to the TE photocathode. To our knowledge, these HPMTs are the most sensitive non gating photon detectors at 1064 nm wavelength, and they will have many applications in laser altimeters, atmospheric lidars, and free space laser communication systems.

  11. Automatic counting and classification of bacterial colonies using hyperspectral imaging

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Detection and counting of bacterial colonies on agar plates is a routine microbiology practice to get a rough estimate of the number of viable cells in a sample. There have been a variety of different automatic colony counting systems and software algorithms mainly based on color or gray-scale pictu...

  12. A hybrid Monte Carlo model for the energy response functions of X-ray photon counting detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Dufan; Xu, Xiaofei; Zhang, Li; Wang, Sen

    2016-09-01

    In photon counting computed tomography (CT), it is vital to know the energy response functions of the detector for noise estimation and system optimization. Empirical methods lack flexibility and Monte Carlo simulations require too much knowledge of the detector. In this paper, we proposed a hybrid Monte Carlo model for the energy response functions of photon counting detectors in X-ray medical applications. GEANT4 was used to model the energy deposition of X-rays in the detector. Then numerical models were used to describe the process of charge sharing, anti-charge sharing and spectral broadening, which were too complicated to be included in the Monte Carlo model. Several free parameters were introduced in the numerical models, and they could be calibrated from experimental measurements such as X-ray fluorescence from metal elements. The method was used to model the energy response function of an XCounter Flite X1 photon counting detector. The parameters of the model were calibrated with fluorescence measurements. The model was further tested against measured spectrums of a VJ X-ray source to validate its feasibility and accuracy.

  13. Few-photon color imaging using energy-dispersive superconducting transition-edge sensor spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Niwa, Kazuki; Numata, Takayuki; Hattori, Kaori; Fukuda, Daiji

    2017-04-04

    Highly sensitive spectral imaging is increasingly being demanded in bioanalysis research and industry to obtain the maximum information possible from molecules of different colors. We introduce an application of the superconducting transition-edge sensor (TES) technique to highly sensitive spectral imaging. A TES is an energy-dispersive photodetector that can distinguish the wavelength of each incident photon. Its effective spectral range is from the visible to the infrared (IR), up to 2800 nm, which is beyond the capabilities of other photodetectors. TES was employed in this study in a fiber-coupled optical scanning microscopy system, and a test sample of a three-color ink pattern was observed. A red-green-blue (RGB) image and a near-IR image were successfully obtained in the few-incident-photon regime, whereas only a black and white image could be obtained using a photomultiplier tube. Spectral data were also obtained from a selected focal area out of the entire image. The results of this study show that TES is feasible for use as an energy-dispersive photon-counting detector in spectral imaging applications.

  14. Few-photon color imaging using energy-dispersive superconducting transition-edge sensor spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Niwa, Kazuki; Numata, Takayuki; Hattori, Kaori; Fukuda, Daiji

    2017-01-01

    Highly sensitive spectral imaging is increasingly being demanded in bioanalysis research and industry to obtain the maximum information possible from molecules of different colors. We introduce an application of the superconducting transition-edge sensor (TES) technique to highly sensitive spectral imaging. A TES is an energy-dispersive photodetector that can distinguish the wavelength of each incident photon. Its effective spectral range is from the visible to the infrared (IR), up to 2800 nm, which is beyond the capabilities of other photodetectors. TES was employed in this study in a fiber-coupled optical scanning microscopy system, and a test sample of a three-color ink pattern was observed. A red–green–blue (RGB) image and a near-IR image were successfully obtained in the few-incident-photon regime, whereas only a black and white image could be obtained using a photomultiplier tube. Spectral data were also obtained from a selected focal area out of the entire image. The results of this study show that TES is feasible for use as an energy-dispersive photon-counting detector in spectral imaging applications. PMID:28374801

  15. Digital spiral-slit for bi-photon imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLaren, Melanie; Forbes, Andrew

    2017-04-01

    Quantum ghost imaging using entangled photon pairs has become a popular field of investigation, highlighting the quantum correlation between the photon pairs. We introduce a technique using spatial light modulators encoded with digital holograms to recover both the amplitude and the phase of the digital object. Down-converted photon pairs are entangled in the orbital angular momentum basis, and are commonly measured using spiral phase holograms. Consequently, by encoding a spiral ring-slit hologram into the idler arm, and varying it radially we can simultaneously recover the phase and amplitude of the object in question. We demonstrate that a good correlation between the encoded field function and the reconstructed images exists.

  16. Channel-capacity gain in entanglement-assisted communication protocols based exclusively on linear optics, single-photon inputs, and coincidence photon counting

    DOE PAGES

    Lougovski, P.; Uskov, D. B.

    2015-08-04

    Entanglement can effectively increase communication channel capacity as evidenced by dense coding that predicts a capacity gain of 1 bit when compared to entanglement-free protocols. However, dense coding relies on Bell states and when implemented using photons the capacity gain is bounded by 0.585 bits due to one's inability to discriminate between the four optically encoded Bell states. In this research we study the following question: Are there alternative entanglement-assisted protocols that rely only on linear optics, coincidence photon counting, and separable single-photon input states and at the same time provide a greater capacity gain than 0.585 bits? In thismore » study, we show that besides the Bell states there is a class of bipartite four-mode two-photon entangled states that facilitate an increase in channel capacity. We also discuss how the proposed scheme can be generalized to the case of two-photon N-mode entangled states for N=6,8.« less

  17. Channel-capacity gain in entanglement-assisted communication protocols based exclusively on linear optics, single-photon inputs, and coincidence photon counting

    SciTech Connect

    Lougovski, P.; Uskov, D. B.

    2015-08-04

    Entanglement can effectively increase communication channel capacity as evidenced by dense coding that predicts a capacity gain of 1 bit when compared to entanglement-free protocols. However, dense coding relies on Bell states and when implemented using photons the capacity gain is bounded by 0.585 bits due to one's inability to discriminate between the four optically encoded Bell states. In this research we study the following question: Are there alternative entanglement-assisted protocols that rely only on linear optics, coincidence photon counting, and separable single-photon input states and at the same time provide a greater capacity gain than 0.585 bits? In this study, we show that besides the Bell states there is a class of bipartite four-mode two-photon entangled states that facilitate an increase in channel capacity. We also discuss how the proposed scheme can be generalized to the case of two-photon N-mode entangled states for N=6,8.

  18. Two-photon in vivo imaging of retinal microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schejter, Adi; Farah, Nairouz; Shoham, Shy

    2014-02-01

    Non-invasive fluorescence retinal imaging in small animals is an important requirement in an array of translational vision applications. Two-photon imaging has the potential for long-term investigation of healthy and diseased retinal function and structure in vivo. Here, we demonstrate that two-photon microscopy through a mouse's pupil can yield high-quality optically sectioned fundus images. By remotely scanning using an electronically tunable lens we acquire highly-resolved 3D fluorescein angiograms. These results provide an important step towards various applications that will benefit from the use of infrared light, including functional imaging of retinal responses to light stimulation.

  19. Three-dimensional two-photon imaging in polymeric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belfield, Kevin D.; Schafer, Katherine J.; Andrasik, Stephen; Yavuz, Ozlem; Van Stryland, Eric W.; Hagan, David J.; Hales, Joel M.

    2002-01-01

    We report image formation via single and two-photon photoinduced fluorescence changes in a polymeric medium with two-photon fluorescence readout of multiplayer structures. Photoinduced acid generation in the presence of a two-photon fluorescent dye possessing strongly basic functional groups (7-benzothiazolyl-9,9-didecyl-2,2-(N,N- diphenylamino)fluorene underwent protonation upon exposure with UV or near-IR (740 nm fs pulses). Solution studies demonstrate formation of monoprotonated and diprotonated species upon irradiation, each resulting in distinctly different absorption and fluorescence properties. The fluorescence of the original, neutral, fluorophore is quenched upon monoprotonation with a concomitant increase in fluorescence at longer wavelengths due to the monoprotonated form. Hence, two channel two-photon fluorescence imaging provides 'positive' or 'negative' image readout capability. Results of solution and solid polymer thin films experiments are presented.

  20. Non-line-of-sight active imaging of scattered photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurenzis, Martin; Velten, Andreas

    2013-10-01

    Laser Gated Viewing is a prominent sensing technology for optical imaging in harsh environments and can be applied to the vision through fog, smoke and other degraded environmental conditions as well as to the vision through sea water in submarine operation. A direct imaging of non-scattered photons (or ballistic photons) is limited in range and performance by the free optical path length i.e. the length in which a photon can propagate without interaction with scattering particles or object surfaces. The imaging and analysis of scattered photons can overcome these classical limitations and it is possible to realize a non-line-of-sight imaging. The spatial and temporal distribution of scattered photons can be analyzed by means of computational optics and their information of the scenario can be restored. In the case of Lambertian scattering sources the scattered photons carry information of the complete environment. Especial the information outside the line of sight or outside the visibility range is of high interest. Here, we discuss approaches for non line of sight active imaging with different indirect and direct illumination concepts (point, surface and volume scattering sources).

  1. Improving reliability of live/dead cell counting through automated image mosaicing.

    PubMed

    Piccinini, Filippo; Tesei, Anna; Paganelli, Giulia; Zoli, Wainer; Bevilacqua, Alessandro

    2014-12-01

    Cell counting is one of the basic needs of most biological experiments. Numerous methods and systems have been studied to improve the reliability of counting. However, at present, manual cell counting performed with a hemocytometer still represents the gold standard, despite several problems limiting reproducibility and repeatability of the counts and, at the end, jeopardizing their reliability in general. We present our own approach based on image processing techniques to improve counting reliability. It works in two stages: first building a high-resolution image of the hemocytometer's grid, then counting the live and dead cells by tagging the image with flags of different colours. In particular, we introduce GridMos (http://sourceforge.net/p/gridmos), a fully-automated mosaicing method to obtain a mosaic representing the whole hemocytometer's grid. In addition to offering more significant statistics, the mosaic "freezes" the culture status, thus permitting analysis by more than one operator. Finally, the mosaic achieved can thus be tagged by using an image editor, thus markedly improving counting reliability. The experiments performed confirm the improvements brought about by the proposed counting approach in terms of both reproducibility and repeatability, also suggesting the use of a mosaic of an entire hemocytometer's grid, then labelled trough an image editor, as the best likely candidate for the new gold standard method in cell counting.

  2. X-ray photon-in/photon-out methods for chemical imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Marcus, Matthew A.

    2010-03-24

    Most interesting materials in nature are heterogeneous, so it is useful to have analytical techniques with spatial resolution sufficient to resolve these heterogeneities.This article presents the basics of X-ray photon-in/photon-out chemical imaging. This family of methods allows one to derive images reflectingthe chemical state of a given element in a complex sample, at micron or deep sub-micron scale. X-ray chemical imaging is relatively non-destructiveand element-selective, and requires minimal sample preparation. The article presents the basic concepts and some considerations of data takingand data analysis, along with some examples.

  3. An ASIC for fast single photon counting in the LHCb RICH upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotti, C.

    2017-03-01

    The LHCb experiment will be upgraded during the second LHC long shutdown (years 2019–2020) to operate at higher luminosity. The new triggerless architecture of LHCb requires data from the entire detector to be read out at 40 MHz. The basic element of the front-end electronics of the Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detector upgrade is the "Elementary Cell" (EC), a readout system for multianode photomultiplier tubes designed to minimise parasitic capacitance at the anodes, to obtain a fast readout with low noise and low crosstalk. At the heart of the EC is the CLARO, an 8 channel, low power and radiation hard front-end ASIC designed in 0.35 μm CMOS technology. Each channel compares the charge signals from the photomultiplier anodes with a programmable threshold, and gives a digital pulse at the output when the threshold is exceeded. Baseline recovery occurs in less than 25 ns for typical single photon signals. In the LHCb RICH upgrade environment, the chips will have to withstand radiation up to a total ionising dose of 2 kGy (200 krad) and neutron and hadron fluences up to 03×112 cm‑2 and following irradiation, the chips have been shown to tolerate such doses with a margin of safety.

  4. Towards arrays of smart-pixels for time-correlated single photon counting and time of flight application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markovic, Bojan; Tisa, Simone; Tosi, Alberto; Zappa, Franco

    2011-01-01

    We present a novel "smart-pixel" able to detect single photons and to measure and record in-pixel the time delay between a START pulse (e.g., laser excitation, cell stimulus, or LIDAR flash) and a STOP pulse given by the detection of a single photon (e. g., fluorescence decay signal or back reflection from an object). This smart-pixel represents the basic building block of SPAD arrays aimed at time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) applications (like FLIM, FCS, FRET), but also at photon timing and direct Time-of-Flight (dTOF) measurements for 3D ranging applications (e.g., in LIDAR systems). The pixel comprises a Single-Photon Avalanche Diode (SPAD) detector, an analog sensing and driving electronics, and a Time-to-Digital Converter monolithically designed and manufactured into the same chip. We report on the design and characterization of prototype circuits, fabricated in a 0.35 μm standard CMOS technology containing complete conversion channels, smart-pixels and ancillary electronics with 20 μm active area diameter SPAD detectors and related quenching circuitry. With a 100 MHz reference clock, the TDC provides a time-resolution of 10 ps, a dynamic range of 160 ns and very high conversion linearity.

  5. Measurement of uranium and plutonium in solid waste by passive photon or neutron counting and isotopic neutron source interrogation

    SciTech Connect

    Crane, T.W.

    1980-03-01

    A summary of the status and applicability of nondestructive assay (NDA) techniques for the measurement of uranium and plutonium in 55-gal barrels of solid waste is reported. The NDA techniques reviewed include passive gamma-ray and x-ray counting with scintillator, solid state, and proportional gas photon detectors, passive neutron counting, and active neutron interrogation with neutron and gamma-ray counting. The active neutron interrogation methods are limited to those employing isotopic neutron sources. Three generic neutron sources (alpha-n, photoneutron, and /sup 252/Cf) are considered. The neutron detectors reviewed for both prompt and delayed fission neutron detection with the above sources include thermal (/sup 3/He, /sup 10/BF/sub 3/) and recoil (/sup 4/He, CH/sub 4/) proportional gas detectors and liquid and plastic scintillator detectors. The instrument found to be best suited for low-level measurements (< 10 nCi/g) is the /sup 252/Cf Shuffler. The measurement technique consists of passive neutron counting followed by cyclic activation using a /sup 252/Cf source and delayed neutron counting with the source withdrawn. It is recommended that a waste assay station composed of a /sup 252/Cf Shuffler, a gamma-ray scanner, and a screening station be tested and evaluated at a nuclear waste site. 34 figures, 15 tables.

  6. A neural network-based method for spectral distortion correction in photon counting x-ray CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Touch, Mengheng; Clark, Darin P.; Barber, William; Badea, Cristian T.

    2016-08-01

    Spectral CT using a photon counting x-ray detector (PCXD) shows great potential for measuring material composition based on energy dependent x-ray attenuation. Spectral CT is especially suited for imaging with K-edge contrast agents to address the otherwise limited contrast in soft tissues. We have developed a micro-CT system based on a PCXD. This system enables both 4 energy bins acquisition, as well as full-spectrum mode in which the energy thresholds of the PCXD are swept to sample the full energy spectrum for each detector element and projection angle. Measurements provided by the PCXD, however, are distorted due to undesirable physical effects in the detector and can be very noisy due to photon starvation in narrow energy bins. To address spectral distortions, we propose and demonstrate a novel artificial neural network (ANN)-based spectral distortion correction mechanism, which learns to undo the distortion in spectral CT, resulting in improved material decomposition accuracy. To address noise, post-reconstruction denoising based on bilateral filtration, which jointly enforces intensity gradient sparsity between spectral samples, is used to further improve the robustness of ANN training and material decomposition accuracy. Our ANN-based distortion correction method is calibrated using 3D-printed phantoms and a model of our spectral CT system. To enable realistic simulations and validation of our method, we first modeled the spectral distortions using experimental data acquired from 109Cd and 133Ba radioactive sources measured with our PCXD. Next, we trained an ANN to learn the relationship between the distorted spectral CT projections and the ideal, distortion-free projections in a calibration step. This required knowledge of the ground truth, distortion-free spectral CT projections, which were obtained by simulating a spectral CT scan of the digital version of a 3D-printed phantom. Once the training was completed, the trained ANN was used to perform

  7. In Orbit Performance of Si Avalanche Photodiode Single Photon Counting Modules in the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System on ICESat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, X.; Jester, P. L.; Palm, S. P.; Abshire, J. B.; Spinhime, J. D.; Krainak, M. A.

    2006-01-01

    Si avalanche photodiode (APD) single photon counting modules (SPCMs) are used in the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) on Ice, Cloud, anti land Elevation Satellite (ICESat), currently in orbit measuring Earth surface elevation and atmosphere backscattering. These SPCMs are used to measure cloud and aerosol backscatterings to the GLAS laser light at 532-nm wavelength with 60-70% quantum efficiencies and up to 15 millions/s maximum count rates. The performance of the SPCMs has been closely monitored since ICESat launch on January 12, 2003. There has been no measurable change in the quantum efficiency, as indicated by the average photon count rates in response to the background light from the sunlit earth. The linearity and the afterpulsing seen from the cloud and surface backscatterings profiles have been the same as those during ground testing. The detector dark count rates monitored while the spacecraft was in the dark side of the globe have increased almost linearly at about 60 counts/s per day due to space radiation damage. The radiation damage appeared to be independent of the device temperature and power states. There was also an abrupt increase in radiation damage during the solar storm in 28-30 October 2003. The observed radiation damage is a factor of two to three lower than the expected and sufficiently low to provide useful atmosphere backscattering measurements through the end of the ICESat mission. To date, these SPCMs have been in orbit for more than three years. The accumulated operating time to date has reached 290 days (7000 hours). These SPCMs have provided unprecedented receiver sensitivity and dynamic range in ICESat atmosphere backscattering measurements.

  8. Tissue characterization with ballistic photons: counting scattering and/or absorption centres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corral, F.; Strojnik, M.; Paez, G.

    2015-03-01

    We describe a new method to separate ballistic from the scattered photons for optical tissue characterization. It is based on the hypothesis that the scattered photons acquire a phase delay. The photons passing through the sample without scattering or absorption preserve their coherence so they may participate in interference. We implement a Mach-Zehnder experimental setup where the ballistic photons pass through the sample with the delay caused uniquely by the sample indices of refraction. We incorporate a movable mirror on the piezoelectric actuator in the sample arm to detect the amplitude of the modulation term. We present the theory that predicts the path-integrated (or total) concentration of the scattering and absorption centres. The proposed technique may characterize samples with transmission attenuation of ballistic photons by a factor of 10-14.

  9. Non-Gaussian control of continuous variables with photon counting and filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, M.; Wakui, K.; Takahashi, H.; Takeoka, M.; Suzuki, S.

    2007-09-01

    We study various non-Gaussian states generated by photon subtrastion from a squeezed light source. The source is a cw beam generated by optical parametric oscillator. The photon subtraction is made by tapping a small fraction of the squeezed light source and by guiding it into two Si-APDs, which enable the subtraction of one to two photons. Trigger photon clicks specify a certain temporally localized mode in the remaining squeezed beam. By filtering the remaining squeezed beam through an appropriate mode function, one can generate a variety of non-Gaussian states. This includes single and two photon states, the NOON state (N = 2), Schrödinger kitten states of both odd and even parities, and their arbitrarily desired superposition.

  10. Dual-energy X-ray photon counting using an LSO-MPPC spectrometer and an energy-selecting device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Eiichi; Oda, Yasuyuki; Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Hagiwara, Osahiko; Matsukiyo, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Manabu; Kusachi, Shinya

    2015-08-01

    Dual-energy photon counting was performed using an energy-selecting device (ESD) and a detector, consisting of a Lu2(SiO4)O [LSO)] crystal and a multipixel photon counter (MPPC). The ESD is used to determine a low-energychannel range for CT and consists of two comparators and a microcomputer (MC). The two threshold channels in proportion to energies are determined using low and high-energy comparators, respectively. The MC in the ESD produces a single logical pulse when only a logical pulse from the low-energy comparator is input to the MC. To determine the high-energy-channel range for CT, logical pulses from the high-energy comparator are input to the MC outside the ESD. Logical pulses from the two MCs are input to frequency-voltage converters (FVCs) to convert count rates into voltages. The output voltages from the two FVCs are sent to a personal computer through an analog-digital converter to reconstruct tomograms. Dual-energy computed tomography was accomplished at a tube voltage of 70 kV and a maximum count rate of 14.3 kilocounts per second, and two-different-energy tomograms were obtained simultaneously.

  11. Comment on: 'A Poisson resampling method for simulating reduced counts in nuclear medicine images'.

    PubMed

    de Nijs, Robin

    2015-07-21

    In order to be able to calculate half-count images from already acquired data, White and Lawson published their method based on Poisson resampling. They verified their method experimentally by measurements with a Co-57 flood source. In this comment their results are reproduced and confirmed by a direct numerical simulation in Matlab. Not only Poisson resampling, but also two direct redrawing methods were investigated. Redrawing methods were based on a Poisson and a Gaussian distribution. Mean, standard deviation, skewness and excess kurtosis half-count/full-count ratios were determined for all methods, and compared to the theoretical values for a Poisson distribution. Statistical parameters showed the same behavior as in the original note and showed the superiority of the Poisson resampling method. Rounding off before saving of the half count image had a severe impact on counting statistics for counts below 100. Only Poisson resampling was not affected by this, while Gaussian redrawing was less affected by it than Poisson redrawing. Poisson resampling is the method of choice, when simulating half-count (or less) images from full-count images. It simulates correctly the statistical properties, also in the case of rounding off of the images.

  12. High resolution reversible color images on photonic crystal substrates.

    PubMed

    Kang, Pilgyu; Ogunbo, Samuel O; Erickson, David

    2011-08-16

    When light is incident on a crystalline structure with appropriate periodicity, some colors will be preferentially reflected (Joannopoulos, J. D.; Meade, R. D.; Winn, J. N. Photonic crystals: molding the flow of light; Princeton University Press: Princeton, NJ, 1995; p ix, 137 pp). These photonic crystals and the structural color they generate represent an interesting method for creating reflective displays and drawing devices, since they can achieve a continuous color response and do not require back lighting (Joannopoulos, J. D.; Villeneuve, P. R.; Fan, S. H. Photonic crystals: Putting a new twist on light. Nature 1997, 386, 143-149; Graham-Rowe, D. Tunable structural colour. Nat. Photonics 2009, 3, 551-553.; Arsenault, A. C.; Puzzo, D. P.; Manners, I.; Ozin, G. A. Photonic-crystal full-colour displays. Nat. Photonics 2007, 1, 468-472; Walish, J. J.; Kang, Y.; Mickiewicz, R. A.; Thomas, E. L. Bioinspired Electrochemically Tunable Block Copolymer Full Color Pixels. Adv. Mater.2009, 21, 3078). Here we demonstrate a technique for creating erasable, high-resolution, color images using otherwise transparent inks on self-assembled photonic crystal substrates (Fudouzi, H.; Xia, Y. N. Colloidal crystals with tunable colors and their use as photonic papers. Langmuir 2003, 19, 9653-9660). Using inkjet printing, we show the ability to infuse fine droplets of silicone oils into the crystal, locally swelling it and changing the reflected color (Sirringhaus, H.; Kawase, T.; Friend, R. H.; Shimoda, T.; Inbasekaran, M.; Wu, W.; Woo, E. P. High-resolution inkjet printing of all-polymer transistor circuits. Science 2000, 290, 2123-2126). Multicolor images with resolutions as high as 200 μm are obtained from oils of different molecular weights with the lighter oils being able to penetrate deeper, yielding larger red shifts. Erasing of images is done simply by adding a low vapor pressure oil which dissolves the image, returning the substrate to its original state.

  13. Quantum imaging with N-photon states in position space.

    PubMed

    Brainis, E

    2011-11-21

    We investigate the physics of quantum imaging with N > 2 entangled photons in position space. It is shown that, in paraxial approximation, the space-time propagation of the quantum state can be described by a generalized Huygens-Fresnel principle for the N-photon wave function. The formalism allows the initial conditions to be set on multiple reference planes, which is very convenient to describe the generation of multiple photon pairs in separate thin crystals. Applications involving state shaping and spatial entanglement swapping are developed.

  14. Bayesian inference on multiscale models for poisson intensity estimation: applications to photon-limited image denoising.

    PubMed

    Lefkimmiatis, Stamatios; Maragos, Petros; Papandreou, George

    2009-08-01

    We present an improved statistical model for analyzing Poisson processes, with applications to photon-limited imaging. We build on previous work, adopting a multiscale representation of the Poisson process in which the ratios of the underlying Poisson intensities (rates) in adjacent scales are modeled as mixtures of conjugate parametric distributions. Our main contributions include: 1) a rigorous and robust regularized expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm for maximum-likelihood estimation of the rate-ratio density parameters directly from the noisy observed Poisson data (counts); 2) extension of the method to work under a multiscale hidden Markov tree model (HMT) which couples the mixture label assignments in consecutive scales, thus modeling interscale coefficient dependencies in the vicinity of image edges; 3) exploration of a 2-D recursive quad-tree image representation, involving Dirichlet-mixture rate-ratio densities, instead of the conventional separable binary-tree image representation involving beta-mixture rate-ratio densities; and 4) a novel multiscale image representation, which we term Poisson-Haar decomposition, that better models the image edge structure, thus yielding improved performance. Experimental results on standard images with artificially simulated Poisson noise and on real photon-limited images demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed techniques.

  15. High-Resolution Solar Imaging With Photon Sieves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oktem, F. S.; Kamalabadi, F.; Davila, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    A photon sieve is a modification of a Fresnel zone plate in which open zones are replaced by a large number of circular holes. This lightweight optical device offers a superior image forming capability compared with the Fresnel zone plate, and is specially suited to observations at UV and x-ray wavelengths where refractive lenses are not available due to strong absorption of materials, and reflective mirrors are difficult to manufacture to achieve near diffraction-limited resolution. At these shorter wavelengths, photon sieves enable diffraction-limited imaging performance with relaxed manufacturing tolerances, and simple and low-cost fabrication. In this work, we present a new photon sieve imaging modality that, unlike previous designs, takes advantage of chromatic aberration. The fact that different wavelengths are focused at different distances from photon sieve is exploited to develop a novel multi-spectral imaging technique. The idea is to use a photon sieve imaging system with a moving detector which records images at different planes. Each measurement consists of superimposed images of different wavelengths, with each individual image being either in focus or out of focus. For spatially incoherent illumination, we study the problem of recovering the individual images from these superimposed measurements. We first formulate the discrete forward problem using the closed-form Fresnel imaging formulas. The inverse problem is then a multi-frame deconvolution problem involving multiple objects, and is formulated as a maximum posterior estimation problem. The resulting nonlinear optimization problem is solved using a fixed-point iterative algorithm. In contrast to traditional spectral imagers employing a series of wavelength filters, the proposed technique relies on a simple optical system, but incorporates powerful image processing methods to form spectral images computationally. In addition to diffraction-limited high spatial resolution enabled by photon sieves

  16. Time-correlated Raman and fluorescence spectroscopy based on a silicon photomultiplier and time-correlated single photon counting technique.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chunling; Zhang, Liying; Yang, Ru; Liang, Kun; Han, Dejun

    2013-02-01

    We report a time-correlated Raman spectroscopy technique based on a silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) and a time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) technique to exploit the natural temporal separation between Raman and fluorescence phenomena to alleviate the high fluorescence background with conventional Raman detection. The TCSPC technique employed can greatly reduce the effect of high dark count rate (DCR) and crosstalk of SiPM that seriously hinder its application in low light level detection. The operating principle and performance of the 400 ps time resolution system are discussed along with the improvement of the peak-to-background ratio (PBR) for bulk trinitrotoluene (TNT) Raman spectrum relative to a commercial Raman spectrometer with charge coupled device (CCD). The fluorescence lifetime for solid TNT and Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) spectrum for 10(-6) mol/L trace TNT have also been obtained by this system, showing excellent versatility and convenience in spectroscopy measurement.

  17. Comprehensive understanding of dark count mechanisms of single-photon avalanche diodes fabricated in deep sub-micron CMOS technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yux; Xiang, Ping; Xie, Xiaopeng

    2017-03-01

    The dark count noise mechanisms of single-photon avalanche diodes (SPADs) fabricated in deep sub-micron (DSM) CMOS technologies are investigated in depth. An electric field dependence of tunneling model combined with carrier thermal generation is established for dark count rate (DCR) prediction. Applying the crucial parameters provided by Geiger mode TCAD simulation such as avalanche triggering probability and electric field distribution in the SPAD avalanche region, the individual contribution of each noise source to DCR is calculated for several SPADs in DSM CMOS technologies. The model calculation results reveal that the trap-assisted tunneling is the main DCR generation source for these DSM CMOS SPADs. With the increase of doping levels in the device avalanche region, the band-to-band tunneling will be the dominant factor that could lead to the higher DCR in scaled DSM CMOS technologies.

  18. Photoreceptor counting and montaging of en-face retinal images from an adaptive optics fundus camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Bai; Choi, Stacey S.; Doble, Nathan; Werner, John S.

    2007-05-01

    A fast and efficient method for quantifying photoreceptor density in images obtained with an en-face flood-illuminated adaptive optics (AO) imaging system is described. To improve accuracy of cone counting, en-face images are analyzed over extended areas. This is achieved with two separate semiautomated algorithms: (1) a montaging algorithm that joins retinal images with overlapping common features without edge effects and (2) a cone density measurement algorithm that counts the individual cones in the montaged image. The accuracy of the cone density measurement algorithm is high, with >97% agreement for a simulated retinal image (of known density, with low contrast) and for AO images from normal eyes when compared with previously reported histological data. Our algorithms do not require spatial regularity in cone packing and are, therefore, useful for counting cones in diseased retinas, as demonstrated for eyes with Stargardt's macular dystrophy and retinitis pigmentosa.

  19. Design of a control system for ultrafast x-ray camera working in a single photon counting mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoladz, Miroslaw; Rauza, Jacek; Kasinski, Krzysztof; Maj, Piotr; Grybos, Pawel

    2015-09-01

    Prototype of Ultra-Fast X-Ray Camera Controller working in a single photon counting mode and based on ASIC has been presented in this paper. An ASIC architecture has been discussed with special attention to digital part. We present the Custom Soft Processor as an ASIC control sequences generator. The Processor allows for dynamic program downloading and generating control sequences with up to 80MHz clock rate (preliminary results). Assembler with a very simple syntax has been defined to speed up Processor programs development. Discriminators threshold dispersion correction has been performed to confirm proper Camera Controller operation.

  20. Security against jamming in imaging with partially-distinguishable photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roga, Wojciech; Jeffers, John

    2016-10-01

    We describe a protocol in which we detect intercept-resend jamming of imaging and can reverse its effects. The security is based on control of the polarization states of photons that are sent to interrogate an object and form an image at a camera. The scheme presented here is a particular implementation of a general anti-jamming protocol established by Roga and Jeffers in Ref. 5. It is applied here to imaging by photons with partially distinguishable polarisation states. The protocol in this version is easily applicable as only single photon states are involved, however the efficiency is traded off against the intrusion detectability because of a leak of information to the intruder.

  1. Density estimation in aerial images of large crowds for automatic people counting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrmann, Christian; Metzler, Juergen

    2013-05-01

    Counting people is a common topic in the area of visual surveillance and crowd analysis. While many image-based solutions are designed to count only a few persons at the same time, like pedestrians entering a shop or watching an advertisement, there is hardly any solution for counting large crowds of several hundred persons or more. We addressed this problem previously by designing a semi-automatic system being able to count crowds consisting of hundreds or thousands of people based on aerial images of demonstrations or similar events. This system requires major user interaction to segment the image. Our principle aim is to reduce this manual interaction. To achieve this, we propose a new and automatic system. Besides counting the people in large crowds, the system yields the positions of people allowing a plausibility check by a human operator. In order to automatize the people counting system, we use crowd density estimation. The determination of crowd density is based on several features like edge intensity or spatial frequency. They indicate the density and discriminate between a crowd and other image regions like buildings, bushes or trees. We compare the performance of our automatic system to the previous semi-automatic system and to manual counting in images. By counting a test set of aerial images showing large crowds containing up to 12,000 people, the performance gain of our new system will be measured. By improving our previous system, we will increase the benefit of an image-based solution for counting people in large crowds.

  2. Dose optimization for dual-energy contrast-enhanced digital mammography based on an energy-resolved photon-counting detector: A Monte Carlo simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Youngjin; Lee, Seungwan; Kang, Sooncheol; Eom, Jisoo

    2017-03-01

    Dual-energy contrast-enhanced digital mammography (CEDM) has been used to decompose breast images and improve diagnostic accuracy for tumor detection. However, this technique causes an increase of radiation dose and an inaccuracy in material decomposition due to the limitations of conventional X-ray detectors. In this study, we simulated the dual-energy CEDM with an energy-resolved photon-counting detector (ERPCD) for reducing radiation dose and improving the quantitative accuracy of material decomposition images. The ERPCD-based dual-energy CEDM was compared to the conventional dual-energy CEDM in terms of radiation dose and quantitative accuracy. The correlation between radiation dose and image quality was also evaluated for optimizing the ERPCD-based dual-energy CEDM technique. The results showed that the material decomposition errors of the ERPCD-based dual-energy CEDM were 0.56-0.67 times lower than those of the conventional dual-energy CEDM. The imaging performance of the proposed technique was optimized at the radiation dose of 1.09 mGy, which is a half of the MGD for a single view mammogram. It can be concluded that the ERPCD-based dual-energy CEDM with an optimal exposure level is able to improve the quality of material decomposition images as well as reduce radiation dose.

  3. Hybrid statistics-simulations based method for atom-counting from ADF STEM images.

    PubMed

    De Wael, Annelies; De Backer, Annick; Jones, Lewys; Nellist, Peter D; Van Aert, Sandra

    2017-01-25

    A hybrid statistics-simulations based method for atom-counting from annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy (ADF STEM) images of monotype crystalline nanostructures is presented. Different atom-counting methods already exist for model-like systems. However, the increasing relevance of radiation damage in the study of nanostructures demands a method that allows atom-counting from low dose images with a low signal-to-noise ratio. Therefore, the hybrid method directly includes prior knowledge from image simulations into the existing statistics-based method for atom-counting, and accounts in this manner for possible discrepancies between actual and simulated experimental conditions. It is shown by means of simulations and experiments that this hybrid method outperforms the statistics-based method, especially for low electron doses and small nanoparticles. The analysis of a simulated low dose image of a small nanoparticle suggests that this method allows for far more reliable quantitative analysis of beam-sensitive materials.

  4. Cross strip anode readouts for large format, photon counting microchannel plate detectors: developing flight qualified prototypes of the detector and electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallerga, John; Raffanti, Rick; Cooney, Michael; Cumming, Harley; Varner, Gary; Seljak, Andrej

    2014-07-01

    Photon counting microchannel plate (MCP) imagers have been the detector of choice for most UV astronomical missions over the last two decades (e.g. EUVE, FUSE, COS on Hubble etc.). Over this duration, improvements in the MCP laboratory readout technology have resulted in better spatial resolution (x10), temporal resolution (x1000) and output event rate (x100), all the while operating at lower gain (x 10) resulting in lower high voltage requirements and longer MCP lifetimes. One such technology is the parallel cross strip (PXS) readout. Laboratory versions of PXS electronics have demonstrated < 20 μm FWHM spatial resolution, count rates on the order of 2 MHz, and temporal resolution of ~ 1ns. In 2012 our group at U.C. Berkeley, along with our partners at the U. Hawaii, received a Strategic Astrophysics Technology grant to raise the TRL of the PXS detector and electronics from 4 to 6 by replacing most of the high powered electronics with application specific integrated circuits (ASICs) which will lower the power, mass and volume requirements of the PXS detector. We were also tasked to design and fabricate a "standard" 50mm square active area MCP detector incorporating these electronics that can be environmentally qualified for flight (temperature, vacuum, vibration). The first ASICs designed for this program have been fabricated and are undergoing testing. We present the latest progress on these ASIC designs and performance and show imaging results from the new 50 x 50 mm XS detector.

  5. A Method for Counting Multidirection Passer-by by Using Circular Space-Time Image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terada, Kenji; Matsubara, Kazutaka

    Recently, the importance of understanding the number of people and the flow of the persons at public accommodation or department stores have increased more and more. This information is useful for congestion reducing, efficient promotion of the institution management and sales improvement, etc. The conventional methods of counting number of people are carried out by human viewing and by a machine of rotary stick-type counter. Therefore, we have already proposed an automatic system for counting number of people by the image processing to use a straight measurement line and a space-time image. However, these methods are not suitable for the counting at a wide place. In this paper, we propose a method of counting multidirection passer-by by using circular space-time image. In this method, a circular measurment line is set on a sequence of the background subtraction images. All pixels on this line is transformed to the space-time image. The number of passer-by can be counted by using this space-time image. But the direction information of passer-by cannot be obtained from this space-time image. Therefore, two circular measurment lines are set on a sequence of the background subtraction images. Two space-time images are generated from the outside line and the inside line. The directions of passer-by can be obtained by detecting which line passer-by passed previously.

  6. Photon counting altimetry for Operation Ice Bridge over East Antarctica: Comparison of ICECAP's ALAMO dataset to GLAS altimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, D. A.; Lindzey, L. E.; Blankenship, D. D.; Greenbaum, J. S.; Kempf, S. D.; Fisher, J. R.

    2013-12-01

    The ICECAP portion of NASA's Operation Ice Bridge collected over 200,000 line kilometers of low elevation swath photon counting lidar data over both East Antarctic and Greenland between 2010 and 2012, as part of a comprehensive multi-instrumented campaign of aerogeophysical mapping. A primary goal of this project was to refly GLAS satellite altimetry tracks collected between 2003 and 2009, to reduce the cross track uncertainty inherent in the GLAS dataset and obtain a longer time series of ice sheet change. We combined data from our well understood nadir pointing laser altimeter and a subset version of the photon counting lidar to obtain the hybrid Airborne Laser Altimeter with Mapping Optics (ALAMO) product, which provides accurate cross track slope information. We compare this with the GLAH12 Release 33 product with the new gaussian-centroid correction applied. Over the Wilkes land margin, we find this comparison yields more stable dhdt results for the 2003-2009 record than GLAS alone approaches, and continue the time series for an additional three years in places.

  7. Temperature study of Al0.52In0.48P detector photon counting X-ray spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butera, S.; Gohil, T.; Lioliou, G.; Krysa, A. B.; Barnett, A. M.

    2016-11-01

    A prototype 200 μm diameter Al0.52In0.48P p+-i-n+ mesa photodiode (2 μm i-layer) was characterised at temperatures from 100 °C to -20 °C for the development of a temperature tolerant photon counting X-ray spectrometer. At each temperature, X-ray spectra were accumulated with the AlInP detector reverse biased at 0 V, 5 V, 10 V, and 15 V and using different shaping times. The detector was illuminated by an 55Fe radioisotope X-ray source. The best energy resolution, as quantified by the full width at half maximum (FWHM) at 5.9 keV, was observed at 15 V for all the temperatures studied; at 100 °C, a FWHM of 1.57 keV was achieved, and this value improved to 770 eV FWHM at -20 °C. System noise analysis was also carried out, and the different noise contributions were computed as functions of temperature. The results are the first demonstration of AlInP's suitability for photon counting X-ray spectroscopy at temperatures other than ≈20 °C.

  8. Three Temperature Regimes in Superconducting Photon Detectors: Quantum, Thermal and Multiple Phase-Slips as Generators of Dark Counts

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Andrew; Semenov, Alexander; Korneev, Alexander; Korneeva, Yulia; Gol’tsman, Gregory; Bezryadin, Alexey

    2015-01-01

    We perform measurements of the switching current distributions of three w ≈ 120 nm wide, 4 nm thick NbN superconducting strips which are used for single-photon detectors. These strips are much wider than the diameter of the vortex cores, so they are classified as quasi-two-dimensional (quasi-2D). We discover evidence of macroscopic quantum tunneling by observing the saturation of the standard deviation of the switching distributions at temperatures around 2 K. We analyze our results using the Kurkijärvi-Garg model and find that the escape temperature also saturates at low temperatures, confirming that at sufficiently low temperatures, macroscopic quantum tunneling is possible in quasi-2D strips and can contribute to dark counts observed in single photon detectors. At the highest temperatures the system enters a multiple phase-slip regime. In this range single phase-slips are unable to produce dark counts and the fluctuations in the switching current are reduced. PMID:25988591

  9. Three temperature regimes in superconducting photon detectors: quantum, thermal and multiple phase-slips as generators of dark counts.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Andrew; Semenov, Alexander; Korneev, Alexander; Korneeva, Yulia; Gol'tsman, Gregory; Bezryadin, Alexey

    2015-05-19

    We perform measurements of the switching current distributions of three w ≈ 120 nm wide, 4 nm thick NbN superconducting strips which are used for single-photon detectors. These strips are much wider than the diameter of the vortex cores, so they are classified as quasi-two-dimensional (quasi-2D). We discover evidence of macroscopic quantum tunneling by observing the saturation of the standard deviation of the switching distributions at temperatures around 2 K. We analyze our results using the Kurkijärvi-Garg model and find that the escape temperature also saturates at low temperatures, confirming that at sufficiently low temperatures, macroscopic quantum tunneling is possible in quasi-2D strips and can contribute to dark counts observed in single photon detectors. At the highest temperatures the system enters a multiple phase-slip regime. In this range single phase-slips are unable to produce dark counts and the fluctuations in the switching current are reduced.

  10. Every photon counts: improving low, mid, and high-spatial frequency errors on astronomical optics and materials with MRF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maloney, Chris; Lormeau, Jean Pierre; Dumas, Paul

    2016-07-01

    Many astronomical sensing applications operate in low-light conditions; for these applications every photon counts. Controlling mid-spatial frequencies and surface roughness on astronomical optics are critical for mitigating scattering effects such as flare and energy loss. By improving these two frequency regimes higher contrast images can be collected with improved efficiency. Classically, Magnetorheological Finishing (MRF) has offered an optical fabrication technique to correct low order errors as well has quilting/print-through errors left over in light-weighted optics from conventional polishing techniques. MRF is a deterministic, sub-aperture polishing process that has been used to improve figure on an ever expanding assortment of optical geometries, such as planos, spheres, on and off axis aspheres, primary mirrors and freeform optics. Precision optics are routinely manufactured by this technology with sizes ranging from 5-2,000mm in diameter. MRF can be used for form corrections; turning a sphere into an asphere or free form, but more commonly for figure corrections achieving figure errors as low as 1nm RMS while using careful metrology setups. Recent advancements in MRF technology have improved the polishing performance expected for astronomical optics in low, mid and high spatial frequency regimes. Deterministic figure correction with MRF is compatible with most materials, including some recent examples on Silicon Carbide and RSA905 Aluminum. MRF also has the ability to produce `perfectly-bad' compensating surfaces, which may be used to compensate for measured or modeled optical deformation from sources such as gravity or mounting. In addition, recent advances in MRF technology allow for corrections of mid-spatial wavelengths as small as 1mm simultaneously with form error correction. Efficient midspatial frequency corrections make use of optimized process conditions including raster polishing in combination with a small tool size. Furthermore, a novel MRF

  11. Chest Imaging in CF Studies: What Counts