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Sample records for photon emission microscope

  1. Ion photon emission microscope

    DOEpatents

    Doyle, Barney L.

    2003-04-22

    An ion beam analysis system that creates microscopic multidimensional image maps of the effects of high energy ions from an unfocussed source upon a sample by correlating the exact entry point of an ion into a sample by projection imaging of the ion-induced photons emitted at that point with a signal from a detector that measures the interaction of that ion within the sample. The emitted photons are collected in the lens system of a conventional optical microscope, and projected on the image plane of a high resolution single photon position sensitive detector. Position signals from this photon detector are then correlated in time with electrical effects, including the malfunction of digital circuits, detected within the sample that were caused by the individual ion that created these photons initially.

  2. Improved Photon-Emission-Microscope System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vu, Duc

    2006-01-01

    An improved photon-emission-microscope (PEM) instrumentation system has been developed for use in diagnosing failure conditions in semiconductor devices, including complex integrated circuits. This system is designed primarily to image areas that emit photons, at wavelengths from 400 to 1,100 nm, associated with device failures caused by leakage of electric current through SiO2 and other dielectric materials used in multilayer semiconductor structures. In addition, the system is sensitive enough to image areas that emit photons during normal operation.

  3. Design and Feasibility Study of a Single Photon Emission Microscope System for Small Animal I-125 Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Meng, L. J.; Clinthorne, N. H.; Skinner, S.; Hay, R. V.; Gross, M.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a design study of a single photon emission microscope (SPEM) system for small animal imaging using I-125 labelled radiotracers. This system is based on the use of a very-high resolution gamma camera coupled to a converging non-multiplexing multiple pinhole collimator. This enables one to “zoom” into a small local region inside the object to extract imaging information with a very high spatial resolution and a reasonable sensitivity for gamma rays emitted from this local region. The SPEM system also includes a pinhole (or multiple pinhole) gamma camera that has a full angular coverage of the entire object. The designed imaging spatial resolution for the SPEM system is between 250 μm to 500 μm FWHM.

  4. Stimulated Parametric Emission Microscope Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Kazuyoshi; Isobe, Keisuke

    2006-10-01

    We present a novel microscopy technique based on the fourwave mixing (FWM) process that is enhanced by two-photon electronic resonance induced by a pump pulse along with stimulated emission induced by a dump pulse. A Ti:sapphire laser and an optical parametric oscillator are used as light sources for the pump and dump pulses, respectively. We demonstrate that our FWM technique can be used to obtain two-dimensional microscopic images of an unstained leaf of Camellia sinensis and an unlabeled tobacco BY2 Cell.

  5. Ion photon emission microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, P.; Doyle, B. L.; Banks, J. C.; Battistella, A.; Gennaro, G.; McDaniel, F. D.; Mellon, M.; Vittone, E.; Vizkelethy, G.; Wing, N. D.

    2003-09-01

    A new ion-induced emission microscopy has been invented and demonstrated, which is called ion photon emission microscopy (IPEM). It employs a low current, broad ion beam impinging on a sample, previously coated or simply covered with a few microns of a fast, highly efficient phosphor layer. The light produced at the single ion impact point is collected with an optical microscope and projected at high magnification onto a single photon position sensitive detector (PSD). This allows maps of the ion strike effects to be produced, effectively removing the need for a microbeam. Irradiation in air and even the use of alpha particle sources with no accelerator are possible. Potential applications include ion beam induced charge collection studies of semiconducting and insulating materials, single event upset studies on microchips and even biological cells in radiobiological effectiveness experiments. We describe the IPEM setup, including a 60× OM-40 microscope with a 1.5 mm hole for the beam transmission and a Quantar PSD with 60 μm pixel. Bicron plastic scintillator blades of 10 μm were chosen as a phosphor for their nanosecond time resolution, homogeneity, utility and commercial availability. The results given in this paper are for a prototype IPEM system. They indicate a resolution of ˜12 μm, the presence of a spatial halo and a He-ion efficiency of ˜20%. This marks the first time that nuclear microscopy has been performed with a radioactive source.

  6. Non-Uniform Object-Space Pixelation (NUOP) for Penalized Maximum-Likelihood Image Reconstruction for a Single Photon Emission Microscope System

    PubMed Central

    Meng, L. J.; Li, Nan

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a non-uniform object-space pixelation (NUOP) approach for image reconstruction using the penalized maximum likelihood methods. This method was developed for use with a single photon emission microscope (SPEM) system that offers an ultrahigh spatial resolution for a targeted local region inside mouse brain. In this approach, the object-space is divided with non-uniform pixel sizes, which are chosen adaptively based on object-dependent criteria. These include (a) some known characteristics of a target-region, (b) the associated Fisher Information that measures the weighted correlation between the responses of the system to gamma ray emissions occurred at different spatial locations, and (c) the linear distance from a given location to the target-region. In order to quantify the impact of this non-uniform pixelation approach on image quality, we used the Modified Uniform Cramer-Rao bound (MUCRB) to evaluate the local resolution-variance and bias-variance tradeoffs achievable with different pixelation strategies. As demonstrated in this paper, an efficient object-space pixelation could improve the speed of computation by 1–2 orders of magnitude, whilst maintaining an excellent reconstruction for the target-region. This improvement is crucial for making the SPEM system a practical imaging tool for mouse brain studies. The proposed method also allows rapid computation of the first and second order statistics of reconstructed images using analytical approximations, which is the key for the evaluation of several analytical system performance indices for system design and optimization.

  7. Photon enhanced thermionic emission

    DOEpatents

    Schwede, Jared; Melosh, Nicholas; Shen, Zhixun

    2014-10-07

    Photon Enhanced Thermionic Emission (PETE) is exploited to provide improved efficiency for radiant energy conversion. A hot (greater than 200.degree. C.) semiconductor cathode is illuminated such that it emits electrons. Because the cathode is hot, significantly more electrons are emitted than would be emitted from a room temperature (or colder) cathode under the same illumination conditions. As a result of this increased electron emission, the energy conversion efficiency can be significantly increased relative to a conventional photovoltaic device. In PETE, the cathode electrons can be (and typically are) thermalized with respect to the cathode. As a result, PETE does not rely on emission of non-thermalized electrons, and is significantly easier to implement than hot-carrier emission approaches.

  8. Ballistic-Electron-Emission Microscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaiser, William J.; Bell, L. Douglas

    1990-01-01

    Ballistic-electron-emission microscope (BEEM) employs scanning tunneling-microscopy (STM) methods for nondestructive, direct electrical investigation of buried interfaces, such as interface between semiconductor and thin metal film. In BEEM, there are at least three electrodes: emitting tip, biasing electrode, and collecting electrode, receiving current crossing interface under investigation. Signal-processing device amplifies electrode signals and converts them into form usable by computer. Produces spatial images of surface by scanning tip; in addition, provides high-resolution images of buried interface under investigation. Spectroscopic information extracted by measuring collecting-electrode current as function of one of interelectrode voltages.

  9. Nanoscale coupling of photons to vibrational excitation of Ag nanoparticle 2D array studied by scanning tunneling microscope light emission spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Katano, Satoshi; Toma, Koji; Toma, Mana; Tamada, Kaoru; Uehara, Yoichi

    2010-11-28

    Scanning tunneling microscope light emission (STM-LE) spectroscopy has been utilized to elucidate the luminescence phenomena of Ag nanoparticles capped with myristate (myristate-capped AgNP) and 2-methyl-1-propanethiolate (C(4)S-capped AgNP) on the dodecanethiol-precovered Au substrate. The STM imaging revealed that myristate-capped AgNPs form an ordered hexagonal array whereas C(4)S-capped AgNPs show imperfect ordering, indicating that a shorter alkyl chain of C(4)S-capped AgNP is not sufficient to form rigid interdigitation. It should be noted that such a nanoparticle ordering affects the luminescence properties of the Ag nanoparticle. We found that the STM-LE is only detected from the Ag nanoparticles forming the two-dimensional superlattice. This indicates that the STM-LE of the Ag nanoparticle is radiated via the collective excitation of the local surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) spread over the Ag nanoparticles. Note that the STM-LE spectra of the Ag nanoparticles exhibit spike-like peaks superimposed on the broad light emission peak. Using Raman spectroscopy, we concluded that the spike-like structure appearing in the STM-LE spectra is associated with the vibrational excitation of the molecule embedded between Ag nanoparticles.

  10. Imaging penetrating radiation through ion photon emission microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hattar, Khalid; Branson, Janelle V.; Powell, Cody J.; Vizkelethy, Gyorgy; Rossi, Paolo; Doyle, Barney L.

    2010-08-01

    The ion photon emission microscope (IPEM), a new radiation effects microscope for the imaging of single event effects from penetrating radiation, is being developed at Sandia National Laboratories and implemented on the 88" cyclotron at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratories. The microscope is designed to permit the direct correlation between the locations of high-energy heavy-ion strikes and single event effects in microelectronic devices. The development of this microscope has required the production of a robust optical system that is compatible with the ion beam lines, design and assembly of a fast single photon sensitive measurement system to provide the necessary coincidence, and the development and testing of many scintillating films. A wide range of scintillating material for application to the ion photon emission microscope has been tested with few meeting the stringent radiation hardness, intensity, and photon lifetime requirements. The initial results of these luminescence studies and the current operation of the ion photon emission microscope will be presented. Finally, the planned development for future microscopes and ion luminescence testing chambers will be discussed.

  11. Thermodynamic Laws of Neutrino and Photon Emission.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, P. J.; Gallo, C. F.

    1980-01-01

    Compares neutrino and photon emissions, develops the thermodynamic blackbody laws of neutrino emission analogous to laws governing photon emission, points out that combined radiation from a "true blackbody" consists of both photon and neutrino emissions of comparable magnitude, and speculates upon the existence of blackbody neutrino…

  12. Thermodynamic Laws of Neutrino and Photon Emission.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, P. J.; Gallo, C. F.

    1980-01-01

    Compares neutrino and photon emissions, develops the thermodynamic blackbody laws of neutrino emission analogous to laws governing photon emission, points out that combined radiation from a "true blackbody" consists of both photon and neutrino emissions of comparable magnitude, and speculates upon the existence of blackbody neutrino…

  13. Photon upconversion with directed emission

    PubMed Central

    Börjesson, K.; Rudquist, P.; Gray, V.; Moth-Poulsen, K.

    2016-01-01

    Photon upconversion has the potential to increase the efficiency of single bandgap solar cells beyond the Shockley Queisser limit. Efficient light management is an important point in this context. Here we demonstrate that the direction of upconverted emission can be controlled in a reversible way, by embedding anthracene derivatives together with palladium porphyrin in a liquid crystalline matrix. The system is employed in a triplet-triplet annihilation photon upconversion scheme demonstrating controlled switching of directional anti Stokes emission. Using this approach an emission ratio of 0.37 between the axial and longitudinal emission directions and a directivity of 1.52 is achieved, reasonably close to the theoretical maximal value of 2 obtained from a perfectly oriented sample. The system can be switched for multiple cycles without any visible degradation and the speed of switching is only limited by the intrinsic rate of alignment of the liquid crystalline matrix. PMID:27573539

  14. Photon upconversion with directed emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Börjesson, K.; Rudquist, P.; Gray, V.; Moth-Poulsen, K.

    2016-08-01

    Photon upconversion has the potential to increase the efficiency of single bandgap solar cells beyond the Shockley Queisser limit. Efficient light management is an important point in this context. Here we demonstrate that the direction of upconverted emission can be controlled in a reversible way, by embedding anthracene derivatives together with palladium porphyrin in a liquid crystalline matrix. The system is employed in a triplet-triplet annihilation photon upconversion scheme demonstrating controlled switching of directional anti Stokes emission. Using this approach an emission ratio of 0.37 between the axial and longitudinal emission directions and a directivity of 1.52 is achieved, reasonably close to the theoretical maximal value of 2 obtained from a perfectly oriented sample. The system can be switched for multiple cycles without any visible degradation and the speed of switching is only limited by the intrinsic rate of alignment of the liquid crystalline matrix.

  15. Photon emission from gold surfaces in air using scanning tunneling microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallagher, Mark J.; Howells, Sam; Yi, Leon; Chen, Ting; Sarid, Dror

    1992-11-01

    Photon emission was observed at the tunnel junction of a scanning tunneling microscope while scanning Au structures in air. Emission levels of about 4000 counts per second (cps) were routinely achieved with Au tips, allowing photon maps to be produced. The similarity between these photon maps and the topographic images of the Au samples are discussed.

  16. Photon Emission from Ice during Fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizuno, Yukiko; Mizuno, Tadahiko

    2002-02-01

    We performed the first demonstration of photon emission from ice during deformation and fracture. Emission of visible photons was confirmed in accordance with crack generation and fracture. Time-resolved photon emission signals are presented along with load changing. Emission intensity roughly increased with increasing strain energy released by fracture, while scattering in the intensity data showed that emission intensity was strongly dependent on thc characteristics of an individual crack. Experimental evidence indicates that the generated electric charge on crack surfaces and at crack tips should have higher energy than that of electromagnetic emissions reported by Fifolt, Petrenko and Schulson. 23

  17. Correlation of photon emission with electric-field-initiated nanometer-scale surface modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strozewski, K. J.; McBride, S. E.; Wetsel, G. C., Jr.

    1996-06-01

    Photon emission during electric-field-initiated material transfer has been measured using a scanning tunneling microscope configured for surface modification. The instrument has been integrated with a photon-counting system that measures the emission originating from the tip-sample junction under both quiescent and transient conditions. The transient photon emission recorded during nanometer-scale surface modification of gold samples is correlated with the type of feature formed on the sample surface.

  18. Single photon emission computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Piez, C.W. Jr.; Holman, B.L.

    1985-07-01

    Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is becoming an increasingly important part of routine clinical nuclear medicine. By providing tomographic reconstructions in multiple planes through the patient, SPECT expands the clinical applications in nuclear medicine as well as providing better contrast, edge definition and separation of target from background activities. Imaging techniques have been developed for the evaluation of regional cerebral blood flow using radiolabeled amines. Thus, cerebral functional imaging can be used in the diagnosis of acute cerebral infarction, cerebral vascular disease, dementia and epilepsy. SPECT plays a complementary role in the evaluation of coronary artery disease, particularly when it is coupled with thallium-201 and exercise testing. SPECT extends our diagnostic capabilities in additional areas, such as liver and bone scintigraphy as well as tumor imaging with gallium-67.

  19. Two-Photon Fluorescence Microscope for Microgravity Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischer, David G.; Zimmerli, Gregory A.; Asipauskas, Marius

    2005-01-01

    A two-photon fluorescence microscope has been developed for the study of biophysical phenomena. Two-photon microscopy is a novel form of laser-based scanning microscopy that enables three-dimensional imaging without many of the problems inherent in confocal microscopy. Unlike one-photon optical microscopy, two-photon microscopy utilizes the simultaneous nonlinear absorption of two near-infrared photons. However, the efficiency of two-photon absorption is much lower than that of one-photon absorption, so an ultra-fast pulsed laser source is typically employed. On the other hand, the critical energy threshold for two-photon absorption leads to fluorophore excitation that is intrinsically localized to the focal volume. Consequently, two-photon microscopy enables optical sectioning and confocal performance without the need for a signal-limiting pinhole. In addition, there is a reduction (relative to one-photon optical microscopy) in photon-induced damage because of the longer excitation wavelength. This reduction is especially advantageous for in vivo studies. Relative to confocal microscopy, there is also a reduction in background fluorescence, and, because of a reduction in Rayleigh scattering, there is a 4 increase of penetration depth. The prohibitive cost of a commercial two-photon fluorescence-microscope system, as well as a need for modularity, has led to the construction of a custom-built system (see Figure 1). This system includes a coherent mode-locked titanium: sapphire laser emitting 120-fs-duration pulses at a repetition rate of 80 MHz. The pulsed laser has an average output power of 800 mW and a wavelength tuning range of 700 to 980 nm, enabling the excitation of a variety of targeted fluorophores. The output from the laser is attenuated, spatially filtered, and then directed into a confocal scanning head that has been modified to provide for side entry of the laser beam. The laser output coupler has been replaced with a dichroic filter that reflects the

  20. Mobile laser lithography station for microscopic two-photon polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leinenbach, F.; Breunig, H. G.; König, K.

    2015-03-01

    We present a mobile laser lithography station for 3D structuring by microscopic two-photon polymerization. For structuring the Coherent Vitara UBB titanium:sapphire femtosecond laser is used, which has a power output of 500mW and generates pulses with a central wavelength of 810nm. The laser pulses have a tunable bandwidth from 50nm to 250nm. The pulses are temporally compressed using chirped mirrors to a minimum duration of less than 15fs at the sample. The laser power reaching the sample can be motionless controlled by a combination of a liquid crystal retarder and a polarizer within milliseconds. The sample is placed onto a microscope stage which has a movement range of 300µm in the X, Y and Z direction with an accuracy of 2nm. Sample imaging is possible with a microscope camera simultaneous to the structuring. The pulses are focused by a 40X microscope objective (1.3NA) onto the sample. To operate the lithography station, we developed a LabVIEW-based software which controls sample position, laser power and objective height and as well as the microscope camera. Furthermore, CAD data can be read and converted into sample position data. By combining all these components, a fully automatic structuring of a sample with sub-micrometer precision is possible.

  1. Controlling spontaneous emission in bioreplica photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorgensen, Matthew R.; Butler, Elizabeth S.; Bartl, Michael H.

    2012-04-01

    Sophisticated methods have been created by nature to produce structure-based colors as a way to address the need of a wide variety of organisms. This pallet of available structures presents a unique opportunity for the investigation of new photonic crystal designs. Low-temperature sol-gel biotemplating methods were used to transform a single biotemplate into a variety of inorganic oxide structures. The density of optical states was calculated for a diamond-based natural photonic crystal, as well as several structures templated from it. Calculations were experimentally probed by spontaneous emission studies using time correlated single photon counting measurements.

  2. An ultrafast electron microscope gun driven by two-photon photoemission from a nanotip cathode

    SciTech Connect

    Bormann, Reiner; Strauch, Stefanie; Schäfer, Sascha Ropers, Claus

    2015-11-07

    We experimentally and numerically investigate the performance of an advanced ultrafast electron source, based on two-photon photoemission from a tungsten needle cathode incorporated in an electron microscope gun geometry. Emission properties are characterized as a function of the electrostatic gun settings, and operating conditions leading to laser-triggered electron beams of very low emittance (below 20 nm mrad) are identified. The results highlight the excellent suitability of optically driven nano-cathodes for the further development of ultrafast transmission electron microscopy.

  3. Controlling photon emission from silicon for photonic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalem, Seref

    2014-03-01

    The importance of a photon source that would be compatible with silicon circuitry is crucial for data communication networks. A photon source with energies ranging from UV to near infrared can be activated in Si as originationg from defects related to dislocations, vacancies, strain induced band edge transitions and quantum confinement effects. Using an etching method developed in this work, one can also enhance selectively the UV-VIS, band edge emission and emissions at telecom wavelengths, which are tunable depending on surface treatment. Deuterium D2O etching favors near infrared emission with a characteristic single peak at 1320 nm at room temperature. The result offers an exciting solution to advanced microelectronics The method involves the treatment of Si surface by deuterium Deuterium containing acid vapor, resulting in a layer that emits at 1320 nm. Etching without deuterium, a strong band edge emission can be induced at 1150 nm or an emission at 1550 nm can be created depending on the engineered surface structure of silicon. Schottky diodes fabricated on treated surfaces exhibit a strong rectifying characteristics in both cases.

  4. The mechanism of light emission from a scanning tunnelling microscope operating in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogez, B.; Cao, S.; Dujardin, G.; Comtet, G.; Le Moal, E.; Mayne, A.; Boer-Duchemin, E.

    2016-11-01

    The scanning tunnelling microscope (STM) may be used as a low-energy, electrical nanosource of surface plasmon polaritons and light. In this article, we demonstrate that the optimum mode of operation of the STM for maximum photon emission is completely different in air than in vacuum. To this end, we investigate the emission of photons, the variation in the relative tip-sample distance and the measured current as a function of time for an STM operating in air. Contrary to the case of an STM operating in vacuum, the measured current between the tip and sample for an STM in air is very unstable (rapidly fluctuating in time) when the applied voltage between the tip and sample is in the ˜1.5-3 V range (i.e., in the energy range of visible photons). The photon emission occurs in short (50 μs) bursts when the STM tip is closest to the sample. The current instabilities are shown to be a key ingredient for producing intense light emission from an STM operating in air (photon emission rate several orders of magnitude higher than for stable current). These results are explained in terms of the interplay between the tunnel current and the electrochemical current in the ubiquitous thin water layer that exists when working in air.

  5. Secondary photon emission in plasma processing

    SciTech Connect

    Moshkalyov, S.; Machida, M.; Campos, D.; Dulkin, A.

    1997-05-01

    Optical emission spectroscopy with high spatial resolution was applied for the study of plasma{endash}material interaction in low-pressure reactive ion etching. Atomic and molecular emission by sputtered material has been found to be strongly localized near the surface. Excited particles are produced during sputtering by energetic ions, with the mechanisms being different for atoms and molecules. In atomic secondary photon emission, a cascade from highly excited levels is shown to be important. This method can be used as a probe during plasma processing. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  6. Compact scanning transmission x-ray microscope at the photon factory

    SciTech Connect

    Takeichi, Yasuo Inami, Nobuhito; Ono, Kanta; Suga, Hiroki; Takahashi, Yoshio

    2016-01-28

    We report the design and performance of a compact scanning transmission X-ray microscope developed at the Photon Factory. Piezo-driven linear stages are used as coarse stages of the microscope to realize excellent compactness, mobility, and vibrational and thermal stability. An X-ray beam with an intensity of ∼10{sup 7} photons/s was focused to a diameter of ∼40 nm at the sample. At the soft X-ray undulator beamline used with the microscope, a wide range of photon energies (250–1600 eV) is available. The microscope has been used to research energy materials and in environmental sciences.

  7. Photon emission probabilities of 201Tl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawada, Y.; Hino, Y.; Gatot, W.

    1990-01-01

    Precise measurements of the gamma- and X-ray emission probabilities per decay of 201Tl have been performed using a photon spectrometer with a reverse electrode Ge coaxial detector (LO-AX). The source activity was determined by the 4πβ-γ coincidence technique, and the influence of the coincidence sum effects between the K X-rays and the gamma rays was assessed. Radioactive impurities such as 200Tl and 202Tl were also taken into account.

  8. Single photon emission based on coherent state preparation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ester, P.; Lackmann, L.; Michaelis de Vasconcellos, S.; Hübner, M. C.; Zrenner, A.; Bichler, M.

    2007-09-01

    The authors report here on deterministic single photon emission after coherent optical state preparation in the p-shell of a single InGaAs /GaAs quantum dot. In the approach, they use p-shell Rabi flopping followed by relaxation to the s-shell ground state with subsequent spontaneous single photon emission. Pulsed photon correlation experiments show complete suppression of the correlation peak at zero time delay and hence demonstrate clean single photon emission.

  9. Measuring calcium levels in Saprolegnia ferax using the two-photon laser scanning microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lilje, Osu

    2003-07-01

    xThe genus Saprolegnia in the phylum Oomycetes contains a number of parasitic species that can cause a range of important animal diseases. The aim of this study was to measure the calcium gradient, one of the growth regulating mechanisms, in Saprolegnia ferax. The two-photon laser scanning microscope allowed for detailed physiological measurements of calcium levels along the fungus-like hyphae of S.ferax. Calcium concentration was determined by making ratiometric calculation of emission levels of the calcium-sensitive fluorochrome Indo-1 at 485nm to 405nm. The calculated values were compared to the intracellular calibration values. The advantage of the two-photon laser scanning microscope is that it allows minor changes in concentration to be detected in highly localized regions of the hyphae. The technique used in this study minimized background and autofluorescence and therefore allowed for more accurate changes in intracellular Ca2+ concentration to be detected. The calcium concentration at the hyphal tip and 5, 10 and 40μm distal to the tip were calculated to be 65, 17, 38 and 20nM respectively, confirming other studies that suggest a tip-high calcium gradient.

  10. Applications of 1 MV field-emission transmission electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Tonomura, Akira

    2003-01-01

    A newly developed 1 MV field-emission transmission electron microscope has recently been applied to the field of superconductivity by utilizing its bright and monochromatic field-emission electron beam. This microscope allows individual magnetic vortices inside high-Tc superconductors to be observed, thus, opening the way to investigate the unusual behaviour of vortices, which reflects the anisotropic layered structure of these superconducting materials. One example is the observation of the arrangements of chain vortex lines that are formed when a magnetic field is applied obliquely to the layer plane of the materials.

  11. Auto-aligning stimulated emission depletion microscope using adaptive optics.

    PubMed

    Gould, Travis J; Kromann, Emil B; Burke, Daniel; Booth, Martin J; Bewersdorf, Joerg

    2013-06-01

    Stimulated emission depletion (STED) microscopy provides diffraction-unlimited resolution in fluorescence microscopy. Imaging at the nanoscale, however, requires precise alignment of the depletion and excitation laser foci of the STED microscope. We demonstrate here that adaptive optics can be implemented to automatically align STED and confocal images with a precision of 4.3 ± 2.3 nm.

  12. Ultraweak photon emission in the brain.

    PubMed

    Salari, V; Valian, H; Bassereh, H; Bókkon, I; Barkhordari, A

    2015-09-01

    Besides the low-frequency electromagnetic body-processes measurable through the electroencephalography (EEG), electrocardiography (ECG), etc. there are processes that do not need external excitation, emitting light within or close to the visible spectra. Such ultraweak photon emission (UPE), also named biophoton emission, reflects the cellular (and body) oxidative status. Recently, a growing body of evidence shows that UPE may play an important role in the basic functioning of living cells. Moreover, interesting evidences are beginning to emerge that UPE may well play an important role in neuronal functions. In fact, biophotons are byproducts in cellular metabolism and produce false signals (e.g., retinal discrete dark noise) but on the other side neurons contain many light sensitive molecules that makes it hard to imagine how they might not be influenced by UPE, and thus UPE may carry informational contents. Here, we investigate UPE in the brain from different points of view such as experimental evidences, theoretical modeling, and physiological significance.

  13. Atlas of solar hidden photon emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redondo, Javier

    2015-07-01

    Hidden photons, gauge bosons of a U(1) symmetry of a hidden sector, can constitute the dark matter of the universe and a smoking gun for large volume compactifications of string theory. In the sub-eV mass range, a possible discovery experiment consists on searching the copious flux of these particles emitted from the Sun in a helioscope setup à la Sikivie. In this paper, we compute in great detail the flux of HPs from the Sun, a necessary ingredient for interpreting such experiments. We provide a detailed exposition of transverse photon-HP oscillations in inhomogenous media, with special focus on resonance oscillations, which play a leading role in many cases. The region of the Sun emitting HPs resonantly is a thin spherical shell for which we justify an averaged-emission formula and which implies a distinctive morphology of the angular distribution of HPs on Earth in many cases. Low mass HPs with energies in the visible and IR have resonances very close to the photosphere where the solar plasma is not fully ionised and requires building a detailed model of solar refraction and absorption. We present results for a broad range of HP masses (from 0-1 keV) and energies (from the IR to the X-ray range), the most complete atlas of solar HP emission to date.

  14. Atlas of solar hidden photon emission

    SciTech Connect

    Redondo, Javier

    2015-07-01

    Hidden photons, gauge bosons of a U(1) symmetry of a hidden sector, can constitute the dark matter of the universe and a smoking gun for large volume compactifications of string theory. In the sub-eV mass range, a possible discovery experiment consists on searching the copious flux of these particles emitted from the Sun in a helioscope setup à la Sikivie. In this paper, we compute in great detail the flux of HPs from the Sun, a necessary ingredient for interpreting such experiments. We provide a detailed exposition of transverse photon-HP oscillations in inhomogenous media, with special focus on resonance oscillations, which play a leading role in many cases. The region of the Sun emitting HPs resonantly is a thin spherical shell for which we justify an averaged-emission formula and which implies a distinctive morphology of the angular distribution of HPs on Earth in many cases. Low mass HPs with energies in the visible and IR have resonances very close to the photosphere where the solar plasma is not fully ionised and requires building a detailed model of solar refraction and absorption. We present results for a broad range of HP masses (from 0–1 keV) and energies (from the IR to the X-ray range), the most complete atlas of solar HP emission to date.

  15. Atlas of solar hidden photon emission

    SciTech Connect

    Redondo, Javier

    2015-07-20

    Hidden photons, gauge bosons of a U(1) symmetry of a hidden sector, can constitute the dark matter of the universe and a smoking gun for large volume compactifications of string theory. In the sub-eV mass range, a possible discovery experiment consists on searching the copious flux of these particles emitted from the Sun in a helioscope setup à la Sikivie. In this paper, we compute in great detail the flux of HPs from the Sun, a necessary ingredient for interpreting such experiments. We provide a detailed exposition of transverse photon-HP oscillations in inhomogenous media, with special focus on resonance oscillations, which play a leading role in many cases. The region of the Sun emitting HPs resonantly is a thin spherical shell for which we justify an averaged-emission formula and which implies a distinctive morphology of the angular distribution of HPs on Earth in many cases. Low mass HPs with energies in the visible and IR have resonances very close to the photosphere where the solar plasma is not fully ionised and requires building a detailed model of solar refraction and absorption. We present results for a broad range of HP masses (from 0–1 keV) and energies (from the IR to the X-ray range), the most complete atlas of solar HP emission to date.

  16. Ultraweak photon emission from herbivory-injured maize plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshinaga, Naoko; Kato, Kimihiko; Kageyama, Chizuko; Fujisaki, Kenji; Nishida, Ritsuo; Mori, Naoki

    2006-01-01

    Following perception of herbivory or infection, plants exhibit a wide range of inducible responses. In this study, we found ultraweak photon emissions from maize leaves damaged by Helicoverpa armigera (Noctuidae). Interestingly, mechanically damaged maize leaves treated with caterpillar regurgitants emitted the same intensity and pattern of photon emissions as those from maize leaves damaged by caterpillars. Furthermore, two-dimensional imaging of the leaf section treated with the oral secretions clearly shows that photon emissions were observed specifically at the lip of the wound exposed to the secretions. These results suggest that the direct interaction between maize leaf cells and chemicals contained in caterpillar regurgitants triggers these photon emissions.

  17. Single photon emission from diamond nanocrystals in an opal photonic crystal.

    PubMed

    Stewart, L A; Zhai, Y; Dawes, J M; Steel, M J; Rabeau, J R; Withford, M J

    2009-09-28

    We present the first optical measurement of a single nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center in a three-dimensional photonic crystal. The photonic crystal, fabricated by self-assembly of polystyrene microspheres, exhibits a photonic stopband that overlaps the NV photoluminescence spectrum. A modified emission spectrum and photon antibunching were measured from the NV centers. Time-resolved fluorescence measurements revealed a 30% increase in the source lifetime. Encapsulation of single NV centers in a three-dimensional photonic crystal is a step towards controlling emission properties of a single photon source.

  18. Electron and photon emissions from gold nanoparticles irradiated by X-ray photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casta, R.; Champeaux, J.-P.; Moretto-Capelle, P.; Sence, M.; Cafarelli, P.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we develop a totally new probabilistic model for the electron and photon emission of gold nanoparticles irradiated by X-ray photons. This model allows direct applications to recent researches about the radiotherapy enhancement by gold nanoparticles in the context of cancer treatment. Our model uses, in a complete original way, simulated Auger cascade and stopping power to compute electron emission spectra, photon emission spectra and released energy inside the material of gold nanoparticles. It allows us to present new results about the electron and photon emission of gold nanoparticle irradiated by hard X-rays.

  19. Optical microscope using an interferometric source of two-color, two-beam entangled photons

    DOEpatents

    Dress, William B.; Kisner, Roger A.; Richards, Roger K.

    2004-07-13

    Systems and methods are described for an optical microscope using an interferometric source of multi-color, multi-beam entangled photons. A method includes: downconverting a beam of coherent energy to provide a beam of multi-color entangled photons; converging two spatially resolved portions of the beam of multi-color entangled photons into a converged multi-color entangled photon beam; transforming at least a portion of the converged multi-color entangled photon beam by interaction with a sample to generate an entangled photon specimen beam; and combining the entangled photon specimen beam with an entangled photon reference beam within a single beamsplitter. An apparatus includes: a multi-refringent device providing a beam of multi-color entangled photons; a condenser device optically coupled to the multi-refringent device, the condenser device converging two spatially resolved portions of the beam of multi-color entangled photons into a converged multi-color entangled photon beam; a beam probe director and specimen assembly optically coupled to the condenser device; and a beam splitter optically coupled to the beam probe director and specimen assembly, the beam splitter combining an entangled photon specimen beam from the beam probe director and specimen assembly with an entangled photon reference beam.

  20. Stimulated photon emission and two-photon Raman scattering in a coupled-cavity QED system

    PubMed Central

    Li, C.; Song, Z.

    2016-01-01

    We study the scattering problem of photon and polariton in a one-dimensional coupled-cavity system. Analytical approximate analysis and numerical simulation show that a photon can stimulate the photon emission from a polariton through polariton-photon collisions. This observation opens the possibility of photon-stimulated transition from insulating to radiative phase in a coupled-cavity QED system. Inversely, we also find that a polariton can be generated by a two-photon Raman scattering process. This paves the way towards single photon storage by the aid of atom-cavity interaction. PMID:26877252

  1. Stimulated photon emission and two-photon Raman scattering in a coupled-cavity QED system.

    PubMed

    Li, C; Song, Z

    2016-02-15

    We study the scattering problem of photon and polariton in a one-dimensional coupled-cavity system. Analytical approximate analysis and numerical simulation show that a photon can stimulate the photon emission from a polariton through polariton-photon collisions. This observation opens the possibility of photon-stimulated transition from insulating to radiative phase in a coupled-cavity QED system. Inversely, we also find that a polariton can be generated by a two-photon Raman scattering process. This paves the way towards single photon storage by the aid of atom-cavity interaction.

  2. Application and development of a spectrally-resolved confocal microscope: A study of lipofuscin emission properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haralampus-Grynaviski, Nicole Marie

    A unique spectrally-resolved confocal microscope is developed for use in biophysical applications. This microscope enables the rapid collection of the complete emission spectra for every pixel in a fluorescence image. The basic optical design and function of the device are assessed through examination of fluorescently labeled beads, using both one- and two-photon excitation. The spatial resolution of the device is found to approach the diffraction limit in the lateral plane and ˜2 mum in the axial plane. This device can readily distinguish between overlapping emissions which are not easily differentiated using standard filter techniques. The potential of this device to be used as a detection method in DNA sequence experiments is demonstrated. Images of a human skin tissue section and a mouse kidney section are presented which demonstrate the structure and spectra of biologic samples can be resolved. The emission properties of human ocular lipofuscin, LF, a heterogeneous auto-fluorescent material associated with age-related macular degeneration is investigated in detail. Isolated LF granules show substantial variation in emission spectra. Near-field scanning microscopy experiments find the emissive regions on a single LF granule are homogeneous on the ˜150 nm scale and confirm results obtained on the microscope developed here. For ˜100 studied LF deposits, the histogram of the measured peak emission is centered around 18,000 cm-1 (555 nm). The average emission spectra for large LF aggregates (peak 17,150 cm-1) is red-shifted compared to the average emission from small individual granules (peak 17,600 cm-1). The average LF granule emission observed here is similar to previously reported bulk LF emission and the emission of a previously identified LF chromophore, A2E. Individual LF granules show a broad range in emission maximum whether the LF is isolated from multiple donors or examined within the cells of a single donor. Multiple as yet unidentified chromophores

  3. Photon emission from massive projectile impacts on solids

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Lima, F. A.; Pinnick, V. T.; Della-Negra, S.; Schweikert, E. A.

    2011-01-01

    First evidence of photon emission from individual impacts of massive gold projectiles on solids for a number of projectile-target combinations is reported. Photon emission from individual impacts of massive Aun+q (1 ≤ n ≤ 400; q = 1–4) projectiles with impact energies in the range of 28–136 keV occurs in less than 10 ns after the projectile impact. Experimental observations show an increase in the photon yield from individual impacts with the projectile size and velocity. Concurrently with the photon emission, electron emission from the impact area has been observed below the kinetic emission threshold and under unlikely conditions for potential electron emission. We interpret the puzzling electron emission and correlated luminescence observation as evidence of the electronic excitation resulting from the high-energy density deposited by massive cluster projectiles during the impact. PMID:21603128

  4. Photon emission from massive projectile impacts on solids.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Lima, F A; Pinnick, V T; Della-Negra, S; Schweikert, E A

    2011-01-01

    First evidence of photon emission from individual impacts of massive gold projectiles on solids for a number of projectile-target combinations is reported. Photon emission from individual impacts of massive Au(n) (+q) (1 ≤ n ≤ 400; q = 1-4) projectiles with impact energies in the range of 28-136 keV occurs in less than 10 ns after the projectile impact. Experimental observations show an increase in the photon yield from individual impacts with the projectile size and velocity. Concurrently with the photon emission, electron emission from the impact area has been observed below the kinetic emission threshold and under unlikely conditions for potential electron emission. We interpret the puzzling electron emission and correlated luminescence observation as evidence of the electronic excitation resulting from the high-energy density deposited by massive cluster projectiles during the impact.

  5. Engineering photonic and plasmonic light emission enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrence, Nathaniel

    Semiconductor photonic devices are a rapidly maturing technology which currently occupy multi-billion dollar markets in the areas of LED lighting and optical data communication. LEDs currently demonstrate the highest luminous efficiency of any light source for general lighting. Long-haul optical data communication currently forms the backbone of the global communication network. Proper design of light management is required for photonic devices, which can increase the overall efficiency or add new device functionality. In this thesis, novel methods for the control of light propagation and confinement are developed for the use in integrated photonic devices. The first part of this work focuses on the engineering of field confinement within deep subwavelength plasmonic resonators for the enhancement of light-matter interaction. In this section, plasmonic ring nanocavities are shown to form gap plasmon modes confined to the dielectric region between two metal layers. The scattering properties, near-field enhancement and photonic density of states of nanocavity devices are studied using analytic theory and 3D finite difference time domain simulations. Plasmonic ring nanocavities are fabricated and characterized using photoluminescence intensity and decay rate measurements. A 25 times increase in the radiative decay rate of Er:Si02 is demonstrated in nanocavities where light is confined to volumes as small as 0.01( ln )3. The potential to achieve lasing, due to the enhancement of stimulated emission rate in ring nanocavities, is studied as a route to Si-compatible plasmon-enhanced nanolasers. The second part of this work focuses on the manipulation of light generated in planar semiconductor devices using arrays of dielectric nanopillars. In particular, aperiodic arrays of nanopillars are engineered for omnidirectional light extraction enhancement. Arrays of Er:SiNx, nanopillars are fabricated and a ten times increase in light extraction is experimentally demonstrated

  6. Ultraweak and induced photon emission after wounding of plants.

    PubMed

    Winkler, R; Guttenberger, H; Klima, H

    2009-01-01

    The ultraweak and induced photon emission were measured by a single photon counting equipment (Photomultiplier Hamamatsu R562) on Cucurbita pepo variaca styriacae after wounding. Wounding significantly changes the emission from a stationary to a nonstationary state and the shape of the decay curve obtained after light illumination. The rise in the ultraweak photon emission depends on the kind of wounding and its localization on the plant. The decay curves obtained after wounding could be better fit by an exponential function than by a hyperbolic one. So the biophoton emission correlates with physiological and bioelectrical changes like membrane depolarizations as they also depend on the kind of injury.

  7. Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT): Applications and potential

    SciTech Connect

    Holman, B.L.; Tumeh, S.S. )

    1990-01-26

    Single-photon emission computed tomography has received increasing attention as radiopharmaceuticals that reflect perfusion, metabolism, and receptor and cellular function have become widely available. Perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography of the brain provides functional information useful for the diagnosis and management of stroke, dementia, and epilepsy. Single-photon emission computed tomography has been applied to myocardial, skeletal, hepatic, and tumor scintigraphy, resulting in increased diagnostic accuracy over planar imaging because background activity and overlapping tissues interfere far less with activity from the target structure when tomographic techniques are used. Single-photon emission computed tomography is substantially less expensive and far more accessible than positron emission tomography and will become an increasingly attractive alternative for transferring the positron emission tomography technology to routine clinical use.

  8. Predicting vehicular emissions in high spatial resolution using pervasively measured transportation data and microscopic emissions model

    SciTech Connect

    Nyhan, Marguerite; Sobolevsky, Stanislav; Kang, Chaogui; Robinson, Prudence; Corti, Andrea; Szell, Michael; Streets, David; Lu, Zifeng; Britter, Rex; Barrett, Steven R. H.; Ratti, Carlo

    2016-06-07

    Air pollution related to traffic emissions pose an especially significant problem in cities; this is due to its adverse impact on human health and well-being. Previous studies which have aimed to quantify emissions from the transportation sector have been limited by either simulated or coarsely resolved traffic volume data. Emissions inventories form the basis of urban pollution models, therefore in this study, Global Positioning System (GPS) trajectory data from a taxi fleet of over 15,000 vehicles were analyzed with the aim of predicting air pollution emissions for Singapore. This novel approach enabled the quantification of instantaneous drive cycle parameters in high spatio-temporal resolution, which provided the basis for a microscopic emissions model. Carbon dioxide (CO2), nitrogen oxides (NOx), volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and particulate matter (PM) emissions were thus estimated. Highly localized areas of elevated emissions levels were identified, with a spatio-temporal precision not possible with previously used methods for estimating emissions. Relatively higher emissions areas were mainly concentrated in a few districts that were the Singapore Downtown Core area, to the north of the central urban region and to the east of it. Daily emissions quantified for the total motor vehicle population of Singapore were found to be comparable to another emissions dataset Results demonstrated that high resolution spatio-temporal vehicle traces detected using GPS in large taxi fleets could be used to infer highly localized areas of elevated acceleration and air pollution emissions in cities, and may become a complement to traditional emission estimates, especially in emerging cities and countries where reliable fine-grained urban air quality data is not easily available. This is the first study of its kind to investigate measured microscopic vehicle movement in tandem with microscopic emissions modeling for a substantial study domain.

  9. Predicting vehicular emissions in high spatial resolution using pervasively measured transportation data and microscopic emissions model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyhan, Marguerite; Sobolevsky, Stanislav; Kang, Chaogui; Robinson, Prudence; Corti, Andrea; Szell, Michael; Streets, David; Lu, Zifeng; Britter, Rex; Barrett, Steven R. H.; Ratti, Carlo

    2016-09-01

    Air pollution related to traffic emissions pose an especially significant problem in cities; this is due to its adverse impact on human health and well-being. Previous studies which have aimed to quantify emissions from the transportation sector have been limited by either simulated or coarsely resolved traffic volume data. Emissions inventories form the basis of urban pollution models, therefore in this study, Global Positioning System (GPS) trajectory data from a taxi fleet of over 15,000 vehicles were analyzed with the aim of predicting air pollution emissions for Singapore. This novel approach enabled the quantification of instantaneous drive cycle parameters in high spatio-temporal resolution, which provided the basis for a microscopic emissions model. Carbon dioxide (CO2), nitrogen oxides (NOx), volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and particulate matter (PM) emissions were thus estimated. Highly localized areas of elevated emissions levels were identified, with a spatio-temporal precision not possible with previously used methods for estimating emissions. Relatively higher emissions areas were mainly concentrated in a few districts that were the Singapore Downtown Core area, to the north of the central urban region and to the east of it. Daily emissions quantified for the total motor vehicle population of Singapore were found to be comparable to another emissions dataset. Results demonstrated that high-resolution spatio-temporal vehicle traces detected using GPS in large taxi fleets could be used to infer highly localized areas of elevated acceleration and air pollution emissions in cities, and may become a complement to traditional emission estimates, especially in emerging cities and countries where reliable fine-grained urban air quality data is not easily available. This is the first study of its kind to investigate measured microscopic vehicle movement in tandem with microscopic emissions modeling for a substantial study domain.

  10. Single photon emission from ZnO nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Sumin; Ton-That, Cuong; Phillips, Matthew R.; Aharonovich, Igor; Johnson, Brett C.; Castelletto, Stefania

    2014-06-30

    Room temperature single photon emitters are very important resources for photonics and emerging quantum technologies. In this work, we study single photon emission from defect centers in 20 nm zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles. The emitters exhibit bright broadband fluorescence in the red spectral range centered at 640 nm with polarized excitation and emission. The studied emitters showed continuous blinking; however, bleaching can be suppressed using a polymethyl methacrylate coating. Furthermore, hydrogen termination increased the density of single photon emitters. Our results will contribute to the identification of quantum systems in ZnO.

  11. Development and design of advanced two-photon microscope used in neuroscience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doronin, M. S.; Popov, A. V.

    2016-08-01

    This work represents the real steps to development and design advanced two-photon microscope by efforts of laboratory staff. Self-developed microscopy system provides possibility to service it and modify the structure of microscope depending on highly specialized experimental design and scientific goals. We are presenting here module-based microscopy system which provides an opportunity to looking for new applications of this setup depending on laboratories needs using with galvo and resonant scanners.

  12. Multi-photon microscope driven by novel green laser pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marti, Dominik; Djurhuus, Martin; Jensen, Ole Bjarlin; Andersen, Peter E.

    2016-03-01

    Multi-photon microscopy is extensively used in research due to its superior possibilities when compared to other microscopy modalities. The technique also has the possibility to advance diagnostics in clinical applications, due to its capabilities complementing existing technology in a multimodal system. However, translation is hindered due to the high cost, high training demand and large footprint of a standard setup. We show in this article that minification of the setup, while also reducing cost and complexity, is indeed possible without compromising on image quality, by using a novel diode laser replacing the commonly used conventional solid state laser as the pump for the femtosecond system driving the imaging.

  13. Absorption and emission properties of photonic crystals and metamaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Lili

    2007-01-01

    We study the emission and absorption properties of photonic crystals and metamaterials using Comsol Multiphysics and Ansoft HFSS as simulation tools. We calculate the emission properties of metallic designs using drude model and the results illustrate that an appropriate termination of the surface of the metallic structure can significantly increase the absorption and therefore the thermal emissivity. We investigate the spontaneous emission rate modifications that occur for emitters inside two-dimensional photonic crystals and find the isotropic and directional emissions with respect to different frequencies as we have expected.

  14. Development of a two photon microscope for tracking Drosophila larvae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karagyozov, Doycho; Mihovilovic Skanata, Mirna; Gershow, Marc

    Current in vivo methods for measuring neural activity in Drosophila larva require immobilization of the animal. Although we can record neural signals while stimulating the sensory organs, we cannot read the behavioral output because we have prevented the animal from moving. Many research questions cannot be answered without observation of neural activity in behaving (freely-moving) animals. Our project aims to develop a tracking microscope that maintains the neurons of interest in the field of view and in focus during the rapid three dimensional motion of a free larva.

  15. Deep two-photon microscopic imaging through brain tissue using the second singlet state from fluorescent agent chlorophyll α in spinach leaf.

    PubMed

    Shi, Lingyan; Rodríguez-Contreras, Adrián; Budansky, Yury; Pu, Yang; Nguyen, Thien An; Alfano, Robert R

    2014-06-01

    Two-photon (2P) excitation of the second singlet (S₂) state was studied to achieve deep optical microscopic imaging in brain tissue when both the excitation (800 nm) and emission (685 nm) wavelengths lie in the "tissue optical window" (650 to 950 nm). S₂ state technique was used to investigate chlorophyll α (Chl α) fluorescence inside a spinach leaf under a thick layer of freshly sliced rat brain tissue in combination with 2P microscopic imaging. Strong emission at the peak wavelength of 685 nm under the 2P S₂ state of Chl α enabled the imaging depth up to 450 μm through rat brain tissue.

  16. Deep two-photon microscopic imaging through brain tissue using the second singlet state from fluorescent agent chlorophyll α in spinach leaf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Lingyan; Rodríguez-Contreras, Adrián; Budansky, Yury; Pu, Yang; An Nguyen, Thien; Alfano, Robert R.

    2014-06-01

    Two-photon (2P) excitation of the second singlet (S) state was studied to achieve deep optical microscopic imaging in brain tissue when both the excitation (800 nm) and emission (685 nm) wavelengths lie in the "tissue optical window" (650 to 950 nm). S2 state technique was used to investigate chlorophyll α (Chl α) fluorescence inside a spinach leaf under a thick layer of freshly sliced rat brain tissue in combination with 2P microscopic imaging. Strong emission at the peak wavelength of 685 nm under the 2P S state of Chl α enabled the imaging depth up to 450 μm through rat brain tissue.

  17. Microscopic theory of Smith-Purcell radiation from 2D photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergeeva, D. Yu.; Tishchenko, A. A.; Strikhanov, M. N.

    2017-07-01

    The theory of Smith-Purcell effect for a 2D photonic crystal is constructed from the first principles proceeding from Maxwell's equations and microscopic characteristics of particles the crystal consists of. Two-dimensionality 2D is thought in two ways: i) the photonic crystal is an arranged system of particles disposed in a monolayer, ii) the periodicity is in two different directions. We derive the expression for the spectral and angular distribution of arising Smith-Purcell radiation. We analyse the features distinctive for the 2D photonic crystal and show that its spatial distribution differs drastically from the distribution of the radiation from conventional diffraction gratings.

  18. A modular two-photon microscope for simultaneous imaging of distant cortical areas in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voigt, Fabian F.; Chen, Jerry L.; Krueppel, Roland; Helmchen, Fritjof

    2015-03-01

    We have designed and built a two-photon microscope which allows calcium imaging in awake, behaving animals across field-of-views (FOV) of up to 1.7 × 1.7 mm. A special scan system enables independent x,y, and z-positioning of two smaller sub-areas within this FOV for simultaneous functional recordings. This microscope enables us to optically record neuronal activity with cellular resolution across much larger spatial scales than previously possible and should help in deciphering the behavior-dependent flow of information within the neocortex. The microscope hard- and software are modular and can be extended to other imaging and photostimulation modalities.

  19. COMPACT NON-CONTACT TOTAL EMISSION DETECTION FOR IN-VIVO MULTI-PHOTON EXCITATION MICROSCOPY

    PubMed Central

    Glancy, Brian; Karamzadeh, Nader S.; Gandjbakhche, Amir H.; Redford, Glen; Kilborn, Karl; Knutson, Jay R.; Balaban, Robert S.

    2014-01-01

    Summary We describe a compact, non-contact design for a Total Emission Detection (c-TED) system for intra-vital multi-photon imaging. To conform to a standard upright two-photon microscope design, this system uses a parabolic mirror surrounding a standard microscope objective in concert with an optical path that does not interfere with normal microscope operation. The non-contact design of this device allows for maximal light collection without disrupting the physiology of the specimen being examined. Tests were conducted on exposed tissues in live animals to examine the emission collection enhancement of the c-TED device compared to heavily optimized objective-based emission collection. The best light collection enhancement was seen from murine fat (5×-2× gains as a function of depth), while murine skeletal muscle and rat kidney showed gains of over two and just under two-fold near the surface, respectively. Gains decreased with imaging depth (particularly in the kidney). Zebrafish imaging on a reflective substrate showed close to a two-fold gain throughout the entire volume of an intact embryo (approximately 150 μm deep). Direct measurement of bleaching rates confirmed that the lower laser powers (enabled by greater light collection efficiency) yielded reduced photobleaching in vivo. The potential benefits of increased light collection in terms of speed of imaging and reduced photo-damage, as well as the applicability of this device to other multi-photon imaging methods is discussed. PMID:24251437

  20. SPECT (Single-Photon Emission Computerized Tomography) Scan

    MedlinePlus

    SPECT scan Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff A single-photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) scan lets your doctor analyze the function of some of your internal organs. A SPECT scan is a type of nuclear imaging test, ...

  1. Spectroscopy of Light Emission from a Scanning Tunneling Microscope in Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Péchou, R.; Coratger, R.; Girardin, C.; Ajustron, F.; Beauvillain, J.

    1996-11-01

    Light emission has been detected at the tip-sample junction of a Scanning Tunneling Microscope (S.T.M.) in air on noble metallic surfaces. A spectroscopic study of emitted photons for Au-Au and PtIr-Au tunneling junctions is presented. The general aspect of the spectra depends on the materials used in the junctions; a study of the spectra as a function of tunneling current and surface bias voltage reveals similar and reproducible characteristics. Une émission de lumière a été détectée au niveau de la jonction pointe-surface d'un microscope à effet tunnel dans l'air sur des surfaces de métaux nobles. Une étude spectroscopique des photons émis par des jonctions tunnel Au-Au et PtIr-Au est présentée. L'aspect général des spectres dépend des matériaux utilisés ; une étude en fonction du courant tunnel et de la tension de polarisation de la jonction révéle des caractéristiques similaires et reproductibles.

  2. Highly charged ion based time of flight emission microscope

    DOEpatents

    Barnes, Alan V.; Schenkel, Thomas; Hamza, Alex V.; Schneider, Dieter H.; Doyle, Barney

    2001-01-01

    A highly charged ion based time-of-flight emission microscope has been designed, which improves the surface sensitivity of static SIMS measurements because of the higher ionization probability of highly charged ions. Slow, highly charged ions are produced in an electron beam ion trap and are directed to the sample surface. The sputtered secondary ions and electrons pass through a specially designed objective lens to a microchannel plate detector. This new instrument permits high surface sensitivity (10.sup.10 atoms/cm.sup.2), high spatial resolution (100 nm), and chemical structural information due to the high molecular ion yields. The high secondary ion yield permits coincidence counting, which can be used to enhance determination of chemical and topological structure and to correlate specific molecular species.

  3. Virtual photon emission from a quark-gluon plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suryanarayana, S. V.

    2007-10-01

    We present phenomenological formulas for virtual photon emission rates from a thermalized quark-gluon plasma (QGP) that include bremsstrahlung and annihilation with scattering (AWS) mechanisms along with the Landau-Pomeranchuk-Migdal (LPM) effects. For this purpose we follow the approach of generalized emission functions (GEF) for virtual photon emission, we showed earlier for a fixed temperature and strong coupling constant. In the present work, we extend the LPM calculations for several temperatures and strong coupling strengths, photon energies (q0), photon mass (Q2), and quark energies (p0). We generalize the dynamical scaling variables, xT,xL, for bremsstrahlung and AWS processes that are now functions of variables p0,q0,Q2,T,αs. The GEF introduced earlier, gTb,gTa,gLb,gLa, are also generalized for any temperatures and coupling strengths. From this, the imaginary part of the photon polarization tensor as a function of photon mass and energy has been calculated as a one-dimensional integral over these GEF and parton distribution functions in the plasma. By fitting these polarization tensors obtained from GEF method, we obtained a phenomenological formula for virtual photon emission rates as a function of {q0,Q2,T,αs} that includes bremsstrahlung and AWS mechanisms with LPM effects.

  4. Spontaneous emission and nonlinear effects in photonic bandgap materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fogel, Ishella S.; Bendickson, Jon M.; Tocci, Michael D.; Bloemer, Mark J.; Scalora, Michael; Bowden, Charles M.; Dowling, Jonathan P.

    1998-03-01

    We summarize and review our theoretical and experimental work on spontaneous emission and nonlinear effects in one-dimensional, photonic bandgap (PBG) structures. We present a new result: a method for calculating the normal-mode solutions - and hence the spontaneous emission of embedded emitters - in an arbitrary, linear, lossless, one-dimensional, PBG structure.

  5. Dirac directional emission in anisotropic zero refractive index photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    He, Xin-Tao; Zhong, Yao-Nan; Zhou, You; Zhong, Zhi-Chao; Dong, Jian-Wen

    2015-08-14

    A certain class of photonic crystals with conical dispersion is known to behave as isotropic zero-refractive-index medium. However, the discrete building blocks in such photonic crystals are limited to construct multidirectional devices, even for high-symmetric photonic crystals. Here, we show multidirectional emission from low-symmetric photonic crystals with semi-Dirac dispersion at the zone center. We demonstrate that such low-symmetric photonic crystal can be considered as an effective anisotropic zero-refractive-index medium, as long as there is only one propagation mode near Dirac frequency. Four kinds of Dirac multidirectional emitters are achieved with the channel numbers of five, seven, eleven, and thirteen, respectively. Spatial power combination for such kind of Dirac directional emitter is also verified even when multiple sources are randomly placed in the anisotropic zero-refractive-index photonic crystal.

  6. Dirac directional emission in anisotropic zero refractive index photonic crystals

    PubMed Central

    He, Xin-Tao; Zhong, Yao-Nan; Zhou, You; Zhong, Zhi-Chao; Dong, Jian-Wen

    2015-01-01

    A certain class of photonic crystals with conical dispersion is known to behave as isotropic zero-refractive-index medium. However, the discrete building blocks in such photonic crystals are limited to construct multidirectional devices, even for high-symmetric photonic crystals. Here, we show multidirectional emission from low-symmetric photonic crystals with semi-Dirac dispersion at the zone center. We demonstrate that such low-symmetric photonic crystal can be considered as an effective anisotropic zero-refractive-index medium, as long as there is only one propagation mode near Dirac frequency. Four kinds of Dirac multidirectional emitters are achieved with the channel numbers of five, seven, eleven, and thirteen, respectively. Spatial power combination for such kind of Dirac directional emitter is also verified even when multiple sources are randomly placed in the anisotropic zero-refractive-index photonic crystal. PMID:26271208

  7. Magnetic two-photon scattering and two-photon emission - Cross sections and redistribution functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, S. G.; Meszaros, P.

    1991-01-01

    The magnetic two-photon scattering cross section is discussed within the framework of QED, and the corresponding scattering redistribution function for this process and its inverse, as well as the scattering source function are calculated explicitly. In a similar way, the magnetic two-photon emission process which follows the radiative excitation of Landau levels above ground is calculated. The two-photon scattering and two-photon emission are of the same order as the single-photon magnetic scattering. All three of these processes, and in optically thick cases also their inverses, are included in radiative transport calculations modeling accreting pulsars and gamma-ray bursters. These processes play a prominent role in determining the relative strength of the first two cyclotron harmonics, and their effects extend also to the higher harmonics.

  8. Multiple photon emission in heavy particle decays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asakimori, K.; Burnett, T. H.; Cherry, M. L.; Christl, M. J.; Dake, S.; Derrickson, J. H.; Fountain, W. F.; Fuki, M.; Gregory, J. C.; Hayashi, T.

    1994-01-01

    Cosmic ray interactions, at energies above 1 TeV/nucleon, in emulsion chambers flown on high altitude balloons have yielded two events showing apparent decays of a heavy particle into one charged particle and four photons. The photons converted into electron pairs very close to the decay vertex. Attempts to explain this decay topology with known particle decays are presented. Unless both events represent a b yields u transition, which is statistically unlikely, then other known decay modes for charmed or bottom particles do not account satisfactorily for these observations. This could indicate, possibly, a new decay channel.

  9. Photon and neutrino-pair emission from circulating quantum ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimura, M.; Sasao, N.

    2016-06-01

    The recent proposal of a photon and a neutrino-pair beam is investigated in detail. Production rates, both differential and total, of a single photon, two photons, and a neutrino pair emitted from quantum ions in circular motion are given for any velocity of ion. This part is an extension of our previous calculations at highest energies to lower energies of circulating ions, and hopefully helps to identify the new process of quantum ion circulation at a low energy ring. We clarify how to utilize the circulating ion for a new source of coherent neutrino beam despite much stronger background photons. Once one verifies that the coherence is maintained in the initial phases of time evolution after laser irradiation, large background photon emission rates are not an obstacle against utilizing the extracted neutrino-pair beam.

  10. Diagnosis of dementia with single photon emission computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Jagust, W.J.; Budinger, T.F.; Reed, B.R.

    1987-03-01

    Single photon emission computed tomography is a practical modality for the study of physiologic cerebral activity in vivo. We utilized single photon emission computed tomography and N-isopropyl-p-iodoamphetamine iodine 123 to evaluate regional cerebral blood flow in nine patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD), five healthy elderly control subjects, and two patients with multi-infarct dementia. We found that all subjects with AD demonstrated flow deficits in temporoparietal cortex bilaterally, and that the ratio of activity in bilateral temporoparietal cortex to activity in the whole slice allowed the differentiation of all patients with AD from both the controls and from the patients with multi-infarct dementia. Furthermore, this ratio showed a strong correlation with disease severity in the AD group. Single photon emission computed tomography appears to be useful in the differential diagnosis of dementia and reflects clinical features of the disease.

  11. Manipulating light propagation and emission using photonic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Nair, Rajesh V.; Jagatap, B. N.

    2014-03-31

    We discuss the synthesis and characterization of self-assembled photonic crystals using polymer colloids having sub-micron diameters. The angle resolved optical reflectivity measurements indicate the hybridization between stop gaps in the multiple Bragg diffraction regimes. Each diffraction resonances in the multiple Bragg diffraction regimes are assigned to respective crystal planes. We also discuss laser-induced studies of spontaneous emission in self-assembled photonic crystals having Rhodamine-B dye doped colloids. Our experimental results reveal more than 51% inhibition in emission intensity within the stop gap as compared to a proper reference sample.

  12. Polarized quantum dot emission in electrohydrodynamic jet printed photonic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    See, Gloria G.; Xu, Lu; Nuzzo, Ralph G.; Sutanto, Erick; Alleyne, Andrew G.; Cunningham, Brian T.

    2015-08-03

    Tailored optical output, such as color purity and efficient optical intensity, are critical considerations for displays, particularly in mobile applications. To this end, we demonstrate a replica molded photonic crystal structure with embedded quantum dots. Electrohydrodynamic jet printing is used to control the position of the quantum dots within the device structure. This results in significantly less waste of the quantum dot material than application through drop-casting or spin coating. In addition, the targeted placement of the quantum dots minimizes any emission outside of the resonant enhancement field, which enables an 8× output enhancement and highly polarized emission from the photonic crystal structure.

  13. Polarized quantum dot emission in electrohydrodynamic jet printed photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    See, Gloria G.; Xu, Lu; Sutanto, Erick; Alleyne, Andrew G.; Nuzzo, Ralph G.; Cunningham, Brian T.

    2015-08-01

    Tailored optical output, such as color purity and efficient optical intensity, are critical considerations for displays, particularly in mobile applications. To this end, we demonstrate a replica molded photonic crystal structure with embedded quantum dots. Electrohydrodynamic jet printing is used to control the position of the quantum dots within the device structure. This results in significantly less waste of the quantum dot material than application through drop-casting or spin coating. In addition, the targeted placement of the quantum dots minimizes any emission outside of the resonant enhancement field, which enables an 8× output enhancement and highly polarized emission from the photonic crystal structure.

  14. Thermodynamics of photon-enhanced thermionic emission solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Reck, Kasper; Hansen, Ole

    2014-01-13

    Photon-enhanced thermionic emission (PETE) cells in which direct photon energy as well as thermal energy can be harvested have recently been suggested as a new candidate for high efficiency solar cells. Here, we present an analytic thermodynamical model for evaluation of the efficiency of PETE solar cells including an analysis of the entropy production due to thermionic emission of general validity. The model is applied to find the maximum efficiency of a PETE cell for given cathode and anode work functions and temperatures.

  15. Single-wavelength two-photon excitation–stimulated emission depletion (SW2PE-STED) superresolution imaging

    PubMed Central

    Bianchini, Paolo; Harke, Benjamin; Galiani, Silvia; Vicidomini, Giuseppe; Diaspro, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    We developed a new class of two-photon excitation–stimulated emission depletion (2PE-STED) optical microscope. In this work, we show the opportunity to perform superresolved fluorescence imaging, exciting and stimulating the emission of a fluorophore by means of a single wavelength. We show that a widely used red-emitting fluorophore, ATTO647N, can be two-photon excited at a wavelength allowing both 2PE and STED using the very same laser source. This fact opens the possibility to perform 2PE microscopy at four to five times STED-improved resolution, while exploiting the intrinsic advantages of nonlinear excitation. PMID:22493221

  16. Polarization-entangled twin photons from two-photon quantum-dot emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinze, Dirk; Zrenner, Artur; Schumacher, Stefan

    2017-06-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots are promising sources for polarization-entangled photons. As an alternative to the usual cascaded biexciton-exciton emission, direct two-photon emission from the biexciton can be used. With a high-quality optical resonator tuned to half the biexciton energy, a large proportion of the photons can be steered into the two-photon emission channel. In this case the degree of polarization entanglement is inherently insensitive to the exciton fine-structure splitting. In the present work we analyze the biexciton emission with particular emphasis on the influence of coupling of the quantum-dot cavity system to its environment. Especially for a high-quality cavity, the coupling to the surrounding semiconductor material can open up additional phonon-assisted decay channels. Our analysis demonstrates that with the cavity tuned to half the biexciton energy, the potentially detrimental influence of the phonons on the polarization entanglement is strongly suppressed—high degrees of entanglement can still be achieved. We further discuss spectral properties and statistics of the emitted twin photons.

  17. Controlling the Two-Photon-Induced Photon Cascade Emission in a Gd3+/Tb3+-Codoped Glass for Multicolor Display

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Mao-Hui; Fan, Hai-Hua; Li, Hui; Lan, Sheng; Tie, Shao-Long; Yang, Zhong-Min

    2016-01-01

    We reported the first observation of the two-photon-induced quantum cutting phenomenon in a Gd3+/Tb3+-codoped glass in which two photons at ~400 nm are simultaneously absorbed, leading to the cascade emission of three photons in the visible spectral region. The two-photon absorption induced by femtosecond laser pulses allows the excitation of the energy states in Gd3+ which are inactive for single-photon excitation and enables the observation of many new electric transitions which are invisible in the single-photon-induced luminescence. The competition between the two-photon-induced photon cascade emission and the single-photon-induced emission was manipulated to control the luminescence color of the glass. We demonstrated the change of the luminescence color from red to yellow and eventually to green by varying either the excitation wavelength or the excitation power density. PMID:26899189

  18. Controlling the Two-Photon-Induced Photon Cascade Emission in a Gd(3+)/Tb(3+)-Codoped Glass for Multicolor Display.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Mao-Hui; Fan, Hai-Hua; Li, Hui; Lan, Sheng; Tie, Shao-Long; Yang, Zhong-Min

    2016-02-22

    We reported the first observation of the two-photon-induced quantum cutting phenomenon in a Gd(3+)/Tb(3+)-codoped glass in which two photons at ~400 nm are simultaneously absorbed, leading to the cascade emission of three photons in the visible spectral region. The two-photon absorption induced by femtosecond laser pulses allows the excitation of the energy states in Gd(3+) which are inactive for single-photon excitation and enables the observation of many new electric transitions which are invisible in the single-photon-induced luminescence. The competition between the two-photon-induced photon cascade emission and the single-photon-induced emission was manipulated to control the luminescence color of the glass. We demonstrated the change of the luminescence color from red to yellow and eventually to green by varying either the excitation wavelength or the excitation power density.

  19. Photonic band-edge-induced enhancement in absorption and emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ummer, Karikkuzhi Variyath; Vijaya, Ramarao

    2015-01-01

    An enhancement in photonic band-edge-induced absorption and emission from rhodamine-B dye doped polystyrene pseudo gap photonic crystals is studied. The band-edge-induced enhancement in absorption is achieved by selecting the incident angle of the excitation beam so that the absorption spectrum of the emitter overlaps the photonic band edge. The band-edge-induced enhancement in emission, on the other hand, is possible with and without an enhancement in band-edge-induced absorption, depending on the collection angle of emission. Through a simple set of measurements with suitably chosen angles for excitation and emission, we achieve a maximum enhancement of 70% in emission intensity with band-edge-induced effects over and above the intrinsic emission in the case of self-assembled opals. This is a comprehensive effort to interpret tunable lasing in opals as well as to predict the wavelength of lasing arising as a result of band-edge-induced distributed feedback effects.

  20. Cavity-induced backaction in Purcell-enhanced photon emission of a single ion in an ultraviolet fiber cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballance, T. G.; Meyer, H. M.; Kobel, P.; Ott, K.; Reichel, J.; Köhl, M.

    2017-03-01

    We study the behavior of a single laser-driven trapped ion inside a microscopic optical Fabry-Perot cavity. In particular, we demonstrate a fiber Fabry-Perot cavity operating on the principal S1 /2→P1 /2 electric dipole transition of an Yb+ ion at 369 nm with an ion-cavity coupling strength of g =2 π ×67 (1 ) MHz. We employ the cavity to study the generation of single photons and observe cavity-induced backaction in the Purcell-enhanced emission of photons. Tuning of the amplitude and phase between the driving field and the cavity field built up from photons scattered into the cavity mode by the ion allows us to enhance or suppress the total rate of photon emission from the ion-cavity system.

  1. Spatially resolved quantum nano-optics of single photons using an electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Tizei, L H G; Kociak, M

    2013-04-12

    We report on the experimental demonstration of single-photon state generation and characterization in an electron microscope. In this aim we have used low intensity relativistic (energy between 60 and 100 keV) electrons beams focused in a ca. 1 nm probe to excite diamond nanoparticles. This triggered individual neutral nitrogen-vacancy centers to emit photons which could be gathered and sent to a Hanbury Brown-Twiss intensity interferometer. The detection of a dip in the correlation function at small time delays clearly demonstrates antibunching and thus the creation of nonclassical light states. Specifically, we have also demonstrated single-photon states detection. We unveil the mechanism behind quantum states generation in an electron microscope, and show that it clearly makes cathodoluminescence the nanometer scale analog of photoluminescence. By using an extremely small electron probe size and the ability to monitor its position with subnanometer resolution, we also show the possibility of measuring the quantum character of the emitted beam with deep subwavelength resolution.

  2. Adapting a compact confocal microscope system to a two-photon excitation fluorescence imaging architecture.

    PubMed

    Diaspro, A; Corosu, M; Ramoino, P; Robello, M

    1999-11-01

    Within the framework of a national National Institute of Physics of Matter (INFM) project, we have realised a two-photon excitation (TPE) fluorescence microscope based on a new generation commercial confocal scanning head. The core of the architecture is a mode-locked Ti:Sapphire laser (Tsunami 3960, Spectra Physics Inc., Mountain View, CA) pumped by a high-power (5 W, 532 nm) laser (Millennia V, Spectra Physics Inc.) and an ultracompact confocal scanning head, Nikon PCM2000 (Nikon Instruments, Florence, Italy) using a single-pinhole design. Three-dimensional point-spread function has been measured to define spatial resolution performances. The TPE microscope has been used with a wide range of excitable fluorescent molecules (DAPI, Fura-2, Indo-1, DiOC(6)(3), fluoresceine, Texas red) covering a single photon spectral range from UV to green. An example is reported on 3D imaging of the helical structure of the sperm head of the Octopus Eledone cirrhosa labelled with an UV excitable dye, i.e., DAPI. The system can be easily switched for operating both in conventional and two-photon mode.

  3. Wide-band acousto-optic deflectors for large field of view two-photon microscope.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Runhua; Zhou, Zhenqiao; Lv, Xiaohua; Zeng, Shaoqun

    2012-04-01

    Acousto-optic deflector (AOD) is an attractive scanner for two-photon microscopy because it can provide fast and versatile laser scanning and does not involve any mechanical movements. However, due to the small scan range of available AOD, the field of view (FOV) of the AOD-based microscope is typically smaller than that of the conventional galvanometer-based microscope. Here, we developed a novel wide-band AOD to enlarge the scan angle. Considering the maximum acceptable acoustic attenuation in the acousto-optic crystal, relatively lower operating frequencies and moderate aperture were adopted. The custom AOD was able to provide 60 MHz 3-dB bandwidth and 80% peak diffraction efficiency at 840 nm wavelength. Based on a pair of such AOD, a large FOV two-photon microscope was built with a FOV up to 418.5 μm (40× objective). The spatiotemporal dispersion was compensated simultaneously with a single custom-made prism. By means of dynamic power modulation, the variation of laser intensity within the FOV was reduced below 5%. The lateral and axial resolution of the system were 0.58-2.12 μm and 2.17-3.07 μm, respectively. Pollen grain images acquired by this system were presented to demonstrate the imaging capability at different positions across the entire FOV.

  4. Reassignment of scattered emission photons in multifocal multiphoton microscopy.

    PubMed

    Cha, Jae Won; Singh, Vijay Raj; Kim, Ki Hean; Subramanian, Jaichandar; Peng, Qiwen; Yu, Hanry; Nedivi, Elly; So, Peter T C

    2014-06-05

    Multifocal multiphoton microscopy (MMM) achieves fast imaging by simultaneously scanning multiple foci across different regions of specimen. The use of imaging detectors in MMM, such as CCD or CMOS, results in degradation of image signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) due to the scattering of emitted photons. SNR can be partly recovered using multianode photomultiplier tubes (MAPMT). In this design, however, emission photons scattered to neighbor anodes are encoded by the foci scan location resulting in ghost images. The crosstalk between different anodes is currently measured a priori, which is cumbersome as it depends specimen properties. Here, we present the photon reassignment method for MMM, established based on the maximum likelihood (ML) estimation, for quantification of crosstalk between the anodes of MAPMT without a priori measurement. The method provides the reassignment of the photons generated by the ghost images to the original spatial location thus increases the SNR of the final reconstructed image.

  5. Reassignment of Scattered Emission Photons in Multifocal Multiphoton Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Jae Won; Singh, Vijay Raj; Kim, Ki Hean; Subramanian, Jaichandar; Peng, Qiwen; Yu, Hanry; Nedivi, Elly; So, Peter T. C.

    2014-01-01

    Multifocal multiphoton microscopy (MMM) achieves fast imaging by simultaneously scanning multiple foci across different regions of specimen. The use of imaging detectors in MMM, such as CCD or CMOS, results in degradation of image signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) due to the scattering of emitted photons. SNR can be partly recovered using multianode photomultiplier tubes (MAPMT). In this design, however, emission photons scattered to neighbor anodes are encoded by the foci scan location resulting in ghost images. The crosstalk between different anodes is currently measured a priori, which is cumbersome as it depends specimen properties. Here, we present the photon reassignment method for MMM, established based on the maximum likelihood (ML) estimation, for quantification of crosstalk between the anodes of MAPMT without a priori measurement. The method provides the reassignment of the photons generated by the ghost images to the original spatial location thus increases the SNR of the final reconstructed image. PMID:24898470

  6. Sum rules and photon emission in hadronic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holt, Nathan Prescott Montgomery

    In this work, we examine properties of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) at moderate temperatures and density. These conditions are reached in the later stages of ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions after the matter has cooled sufficiently to re-hadronize from a quark-gluon plasma. The properties of matter in this stage are expected to change smoothly with temperature. We explore this behavior in two ways. First, we use finite-temperature sum rules to analyze the properties of vector and axial-vector spectral functions at low temperatures. Previous models used in sum rule analyses frequently led to ambiguous applications. Here we avoid such ambiguities by using an improved vacuum spectral function model together with a strict leading-order-in-temperature expansion. This results in well-defined finite temperature spectral functions. Additionally, we incorporate a finite pion mass, which we show induces an analytical violation of the sum rules. We then proceed to numerically measure that violation. Second, we calculate thermal photon emissivities of QCD matter from interactions involving both mesons and baryons. We identify a novel source of thermal photons from a system composed of pi, rho, and o mesons, then calculate photon emission rates from this system using both relativistic kinetic theory and thermal field theory. These rates are compared to existing calculations and found to be significant. We then calculate thermal photon emission rates from baryon interactions, using an exhaustive set of both strange and non-strange particles. We again find novel sources of photons from this system, compare the total rates to calculations of current state-of-the-art photon emission rates, and find them to be comparable.

  7. A three-photon microscope with adaptive optics for deep-tissue in vivo structural and functional brain imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Xiaodong; Lu, Ju; Lam, Tuwin; Rodriguez, Ramiro; Zuo, Yi; Kubby, Joel

    2017-02-01

    We developed a three-photon adaptive optics add-on to a commercial two-photon laser scanning microscope. We demonstrated its capability for structural and functional imaging of neurons labeled with genetically encoded red fluorescent proteins or calcium indicators deep in the living mouse brain with cellular and subcellular resolution.

  8. Coherent fluorescence emission by using hybrid photonic-plasmonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Shi, Lei; Yuan, Xiaowen; Zhang, Yafeng; Hakala, Tommi; Yin, Shaoyu; Han, Dezhuan; Zhu, Xiaolong; Zhang, Bo; Liu, Xiaohan; Törmä, Päivi; Lu, Wei; Zi, Jian

    2014-09-01

    The spatial and temporal coherence of the fluorescence emission controlled by a quasi-two-dimensional hybrid photonic-plasmonic crystal structure covered with a thin fluorescent-molecular-doped dielectric film is investigated experimentally. A simple theoretical model to describe how a confined quasi-two-dimensional optical mode may induce coherent fluorescence emission is also presented. Concerning the spatial coherence, it is experimentally observed that the coherence area in the plane of the light source is in excess of 49 μm(2), which results in enhanced directional fluorescence emission. Concerning temporal coherence, the obtained coherence time is 4 times longer than that of the normal fluorescence emission in vacuum. Moreover, a Young's double-slit interference experiment is performed to directly confirm the spatially coherent emission. This smoking gun proof of spatial coherence is reported here for the first time for the optical-mode-modified emission.

  9. Tailoring thermal emission via Q matching of photonic crystal resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Ghebrebrhan, M.; Bermel, P.; Yeng, Y. X.; Celanovic, I.; Soljacic, M.; Joannopoulos, J. D.

    2011-03-15

    We develop a model for predicting the thermal emission spectrum of a two-dimensional metallic photonic crystal for arbitrary angles based on coupled-mode theory. Calculating the appropriate coupled-mode parameters over a range of geometrical parameters allows one to tailor the emissivity spectrum to a specific application. As an example, we design an emitter with a step-function cutoff suppressing long-wavelength emission, which is necessary for high-efficiency thermophotovoltaic systems. We also confirm the accuracy of the results of our model with finite-difference time-domain simulations.

  10. Improving z-tracking accuracy in the two-photon single-particle tracking microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.; Liu, Y.-L.; Perillo, E. P.; Jiang, N.; Dunn, A. K. E-mail: tim.yeh@austin.utexas.edu; Yeh, H.-C. E-mail: tim.yeh@austin.utexas.edu

    2015-10-12

    Here, we present a method that can improve the z-tracking accuracy of the recently invented TSUNAMI (Tracking of Single particles Using Nonlinear And Multiplexed Illumination) microscope. This method utilizes a maximum likelihood estimator (MLE) to determine the particle's 3D position that maximizes the likelihood of the observed time-correlated photon count distribution. Our Monte Carlo simulations show that the MLE-based tracking scheme can improve the z-tracking accuracy of TSUNAMI microscope by 1.7 fold. In addition, MLE is also found to reduce the temporal correlation of the z-tracking error. Taking advantage of the smaller and less temporally correlated z-tracking error, we have precisely recovered the hybridization-melting kinetics of a DNA model system from thousands of short single-particle trajectories in silico. Our method can be generally applied to other 3D single-particle tracking techniques.

  11. Two-photon microscope for multisite microphotolysis of caged neurotransmitters in acute brain slices

    PubMed Central

    Losavio, Bradley E.; Iyer, Vijay; Saggau, Peter

    2009-01-01

    We developed a two-photon microscope optimized for physiologically manipulating single neurons through their postsynaptic receptors. The optical layout fulfills the stringent design criteria required for high-speed, high-resolution imaging in scattering brain tissue with minimal photodamage. We detail the practical compensation of spectral and temporal dispersion inherent in fast laser beam scanning with acousto-optic deflectors, as well as a set of biological protocols for visualizing nearly diffraction-limited structures and delivering physiological synaptic stimuli. The microscope clearly resolves dendritic spines and evokes electrophysiological transients in single neurons that are similar to endogenous responses. This system enables the study of multisynaptic integration and will assist our understanding of single neuron function and dendritic computation. PMID:20059271

  12. Improving z-tracking accuracy in the two-photon single-particle tracking microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, C.; Liu, Y.-L.; Perillo, E. P.; Jiang, N.; Dunn, A. K.; Yeh, H.-C.

    2015-10-01

    Here, we present a method that can improve the z-tracking accuracy of the recently invented TSUNAMI (Tracking of Single particles Using Nonlinear And Multiplexed Illumination) microscope. This method utilizes a maximum likelihood estimator (MLE) to determine the particle's 3D position that maximizes the likelihood of the observed time-correlated photon count distribution. Our Monte Carlo simulations show that the MLE-based tracking scheme can improve the z-tracking accuracy of TSUNAMI microscope by 1.7 fold. In addition, MLE is also found to reduce the temporal correlation of the z-tracking error. Taking advantage of the smaller and less temporally correlated z-tracking error, we have precisely recovered the hybridization-melting kinetics of a DNA model system from thousands of short single-particle trajectories in silico. Our method can be generally applied to other 3D single-particle tracking techniques.

  13. Design and performance of an ultra-flexible two-photon microscope for in vivo research

    PubMed Central

    Mayrhofer, Johannes M.; Haiss, Florent; Haenni, Dominik; Weber, Stefan; Zuend, Marc; Barrett, Matthew J. P.; Ferrari, Kim David; Maechler, Philipp; Saab, Aiman S.; Stobart, Jillian L.; Wyss, Matthias T.; Johannssen, Helge; Osswald, Harald; Palmer, Lucy M.; Revol, Vincent; Schuh, Claus-Dieter; Urban, Claus; Hall, Andrew; Larkum, Matthew E.; Rutz-Innerhofer, Edith; Zeilhofer, Hanns Ulrich; Ziegler, Urs; Weber, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    We present a cost-effective in vivo two-photon microscope with a highly flexible frontend for in vivo research. Our design ensures fast and reproducible access to the area of interest, including rotation of imaging plane, and maximizes space for auxiliary experimental equipment in the vicinity of the animal. Mechanical flexibility is achieved with large motorized linear stages that move the objective in the X, Y, and Z directions up to 130 mm. 360° rotation of the frontend (rotational freedom for one axis) is achieved with the combination of a motorized high precision bearing and gearing. Additionally, the modular design of the frontend, based on commercially available optomechanical parts, allows straightforward updates to future scanning technologies. The design exceeds the mobility of previous movable microscope designs while maintaining high optical performance. PMID:26600989

  14. Photon emission near extreme Kerr black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porfyriadis, Achilleas P.; Shi, Yichen; Strominger, Andrew

    2017-03-01

    Ongoing astronomical efforts extract physical properties of black holes from electromagnetic emissions in their near-vicinity. This requires finding the null geodesics which extend from the near-horizon region out to a distant observatory. In general these are given by elliptic integrals which are often studied numerically. In this paper, for the interesting special case of extremally spinning Kerr black holes, we use an emergent near-horizon conformal symmetry to find near-superradiant geodesics analytically in terms of elementary functions.

  15. Ultra-weak photon emission of hands in aging prediction.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xin; van Wijk, Eduard; Yan, Yu; van Wijk, Roeland; Yang, Huanming; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Jian

    2016-09-01

    Aging has been one of the several topics intensely investigated during recent decades. More scientists have been scrutinizing mechanisms behind the human aging process. Ultra-weak photon emission is known as one type of spontaneous photon emission that can be detected with a highly sensitive single photon counting photomultiplier tube (PMT) from the surface of human bodies. It may reflect the body's oxidative damage. Our aim was to examine whether ultra-weak photon emission from a human hand is able to predict one's chronological age. Sixty subjects were recruited and grouped by age. We examined four areas of each hand: palm side of fingers, palm side of hand, dorsum side of fingers, and dorsum side of hand. Left and right hand were measured synchronously with two independent PMTs. Mean strength and Fano factor values of photon counts were utilized to compare the UPE patterns of males and females of different age groups. Subsequently, we utilized UPE data from the most sensitive PMT to develop an age prediction model. We randomly picked 49 subjects to construct the model, whereas the remaining 11 subjects were utilized for validation. The results demonstrated that the model was a good regression compared to the observed values (Pearson's r=0.6, adjusted R square=0.4, p=9.4E-7, accuracy=49/60). Further analysis revealed that the average difference between the chronological age and predicted age was only 7.6±0.8years. It was concluded that this fast and non-invasive photon technology is sufficiently promising to be developed for the estimation of biological aging. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Photon emission and decay from generic Lorentz invariance violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Huerta, H.; Pérez-Lorenzana, A.

    2017-06-01

    One of the most studied approaches in phenomenology to introduce the breaking of Lorentz symmetry is the generic approach. This consist on the modification of the free particle dispersion relation by the addition of an extra power law term of order n on energy or momentum. Using this approach in the photon sector, we have calculated the generic rates for vacuum Cherenkov radiation and photon decay, for any order n, at leading order. Explicit results for the decay and emission rates for the lowest values of n are also presented.

  17. Photonic Crystals-Inhibited Spontaneous Emission: Optical Antennas-Enhanced Spontaneous Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yablonovitch, Eli

    Photonic crystals are also part of everyday technological life in opto-electronic telecommunication devices that provide us with internet, cloud storage, and email. But photonic crystals have also been identified in nature, in the coloration of peacocks, parrots, chameleons, butterflies and many other species.In spite of its broad applicability, the original motivation of photonic crystals was to create a ``bandgap'' in which the spontaneous emission of light would be inhibited. Conversely, the opposite is now possible. The ``optical antenna'' can accelerate spontaneous emission. Over 100 years after the radio antenna, we finally have tiny ``optical antennas'' which can act on molecules and quantum dots. Employing optical antennas, spontaneous light emission can become faster than stimulated emission.

  18. High energy photon emission from wakefields

    SciTech Connect

    Farinella, D. M. Lau, C. K.; Taimourzadeh, S.; Hwang, Y.; Abazajian, K.; Canac, N.; Taborek, P.; Tajima, T.; Zhang, X. M.; Koga, J. K.; Ebisuzaki, T.

    2016-07-15

    Experimental evidence has accumulated to indicate that wakefield acceleration (WFA) accompanies intense and sometimes coherent emission of radiation such as from betatron radiation. The investigation of this issue has additional impetus nowadays because we are learning (1) there is an additional acceleration process of the ponderomotive acceleration; (2) WFA may become relevant in much higher density regimes; (3) WFA has been proposed as the mechanism for extreme high energy cosmic ray acceleration and gamma ray bursts for active galactic nuclei. These require us to closely examine the radiative mechanisms in WFA anew. We report studies of radiation from wakefield (self-injected betatron) and ponderomotive (laser field) mechanisms in scalings of the frequency and intensity of the driver, as well as the plasma density.

  19. Enhanced trion emission from colloidal quantum dots with photonic crystals by two-photon excitation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xingsheng

    2013-11-15

    For colloidal quantum dots, the ongoing biggest problem is their fluorescence blinking. Until now, there is no generally accepted model for this fluorescence blinking. Here, two-photon excited fluorescence from CdSe/ZnS nanocrystals on silicon nitride photonic crystals is studied using a femtosecond laser. From analysis of the spectra and decay processes, most of the relative trion efficiency is larger than 10%, and the largest relative trion efficiency reaches 46.7%. The photonic crystals enhance the trion emission of CdSe/ZnS nanocrystals, where the enhancement is due to the coupling of the trion emission to the leaky mode of the photonic crystal slab. Moreover, the photonic crystals enhance the Auger-assisted trapping efficiency of electrons/holes to surface states, and then enhance the efficiency of the generations of charge separation and DC electric field, which modifies the trion spectrum. Therefore, a model is present for explaining the mechanism of fluorescence blinking including the effect of the environment.

  20. High-performance imaging of stem cells using single-photon emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagenaar, Douglas J.; Moats, Rex A.; Hartsough, Neal E.; Meier, Dirk; Hugg, James W.; Yang, Tang; Gazit, Dan; Pelled, Gadi; Patt, Bradley E.

    2011-10-01

    Radiolabeled cells have been imaged for decades in the field of autoradiography. Recent advances in detector and microelectronics technologies have enabled the new field of "digital autoradiography" which remains limited to ex vivo specimens of thin tissue slices. The 3D field-of-view (FOV) of single cell imaging can be extended to millimeters if the low energy (10-30 keV) photon emissions of radionuclides are used for single-photon nuclear imaging. This new microscope uses a coded aperture foil made of highly attenuating elements such as gold or platinum to form the image as a kind of "lens". The detectors used for single-photon emission microscopy are typically silicon detectors with a pixel pitch less than 60 μm. The goal of this work is to image radiolabeled mesenchymal stem cells in vivo in an animal model of tendon repair processes. Single-photon nuclear imaging is an attractive modality for translational medicine since the labeled cells can be imaged simultaneously with the reparative processes by using the dual-isotope imaging technique. The details our microscope's two-layer gold aperture and the operation of the energy-dispersive, pixellated silicon detector are presented along with the first demonstration of energy discrimination with a 57Co source. Cell labeling techniques have been augmented by genetic engineering with the sodium-iodide symporter, a type of reporter gene imaging method that enables in vivo uptake of free 99mTc or an iodine isotope at a time point days or weeks after the insertion of the genetically modified stem cells into the animal model. This microscopy work in animal research may expand to the imaging of reporter-enabled stem cells simultaneously with the expected biological repair process in human clinical trials of stem cell therapies.

  1. Spontaneous heavy cluster emission rates using microscopic potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, D. N.

    2002-08-01

    The nuclear cluster radioactivities have been studied theoretically in the framework of a microscopic superasymmetric fission model (MSAFM). The nuclear interaction potentials required for binary cold fission processes are calculated by folding in the density distribution functions of the two fragments with a realistic effective interaction. The microscopic nuclear potential thus obtained has been used to calculate the action integral within the WKB approximation. The calculated half-lives of the present MSAFM calculations are found to be in good agreement over a wide range of observed experimental data.

  2. Photon-enhanced thermionic emission for solar concentrator systems.

    PubMed

    Schwede, Jared W; Bargatin, Igor; Riley, Daniel C; Hardin, Brian E; Rosenthal, Samuel J; Sun, Yun; Schmitt, Felix; Pianetta, Piero; Howe, Roger T; Shen, Zhi-Xun; Melosh, Nicholas A

    2010-09-01

    Solar-energy conversion usually takes one of two forms: the 'quantum' approach, which uses the large per-photon energy of solar radiation to excite electrons, as in photovoltaic cells, or the 'thermal' approach, which uses concentrated sunlight as a thermal-energy source to indirectly produce electricity using a heat engine. Here we present a new concept for solar electricity generation, photon-enhanced thermionic emission, which combines quantum and thermal mechanisms into a single physical process. The device is based on thermionic emission of photoexcited electrons from a semiconductor cathode at high temperature. Temperature-dependent photoemission-yield measurements from GaN show strong evidence for photon-enhanced thermionic emission, and calculated efficiencies for idealized devices can exceed the theoretical limits of single-junction photovoltaic cells. The proposed solar converter would operate at temperatures exceeding 200 degrees C, enabling its waste heat to be used to power a secondary thermal engine, boosting theoretical combined conversion efficiencies above 50%.

  3. Modification of Thermal Emission via Metallic Photonic Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Norris, David J.; Stein, Andreas; George, Steven M.

    2012-07-30

    Photonic crystals are materials that are periodically structured on an optical length scale. It was previously demonstrated that the glow, or thermal emission, of tungsten photonic crystals that have a specific structure - known as the 'woodpile structure' - could be modified to reduce the amount of infrared radiation from the material. This ability has implications for improving the efficiency of thermal emission sources and for thermophotovoltaic devices. The study of this effect had been limited because the fabrication of metallic woodpile structures had previously required a complex fabrication process. In this project we pursued several approaches to simplify the fabrication of metallic photonic crystals that are useful for modification of thermal emission. First, we used the self-assembly of micrometer-scale spheres into colloidal crystals known as synthetic opals. These opals can then be infiltrated with a metal and the spheres removed to obtain a structure, known as an inverse opal, in which a three-dimensional array of bubbles is embedded in a film. Second, we used direct laser writing, in which the focus of an infrared laser is moved through a thin film of photoresist to form lines by multiphoton polymerization. Proper layering of such lines can lead to a scaffold with the woodpile structure, which can be coated with a refractory metal. Third, we explored a completely new approach to modified thermal emission - thin metal foils that contain a simple periodic surface pattern, as shown in Fig. 1. When such a foil is heated, surface plasmons are excited that propagate along the metal interface. If these waves strike the pattern, they can be converted into thermal emission with specific properties.

  4. Photon assisted processes: Probability amplitudes for the absorption and emission of photons and dc-photocurrents

    SciTech Connect

    Micu, C.; Racolta, D.; Papp, E.

    2014-11-24

    In this paper one deals with the derivation of probability amplitudes characterizing the photon assisted injection of electrons in a two-terminal quantum conductor. For this purpose one accounts for spatially constant but time dependent periodic voltages applied on an Ohmic contact. Resorting to the discrete Fourier transform provides the probability amplitudes for the emission and absorption of photons in terms of squared Bessel functions of the first kind and integer order. Several kinds of ac-pulses like sinusoidal and dc+sinusoidal are assumed. Mean square values concerning photon numbers have been discussed in some more detail. Time averages of squared time dependent classical currents and leading corrections to the rescaled dc-photocurrent have also been accounted for.

  5. Two-photon spectral fluorescence lifetime and second-harmonic generation imaging of the porcine cornea with a 12-femtosecond laser microscope.

    PubMed

    Batista, Ana; Breunig, Hans Georg; Uchugonova, Aisada; Morgado, António Miguel; König, Karsten

    2016-03-01

    Five dimensional microscopy with a 12-fs laser scanning microscope based on spectrally resolved two-photon autofluorescence lifetime and second-harmonic generation (SHG) imaging was used to characterize all layers of the porcine cornea. This setup allowed the simultaneous excitation of both metabolic cofactors, NAD(P)H and flavins, and their discrimination based on their spectral emission properties and fluorescence decay characteristics. Furthermore, the architecture of the stromal collagen fibrils was assessed by SHG imaging in both forward and backward directions. Information on the metabolic state and the tissue architecture of the porcine cornea were obtained with subcellular resolution, and high temporal and spectral resolutions.

  6. Two-photon spectral fluorescence lifetime and second-harmonic generation imaging of the porcine cornea with a 12-femtosecond laser microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batista, Ana; Breunig, Hans Georg; Uchugonova, Aisada; Morgado, António Miguel; König, Karsten

    2016-03-01

    Five dimensional microscopy with a 12-fs laser scanning microscope based on spectrally resolved two-photon autofluorescence lifetime and second-harmonic generation (SHG) imaging was used to characterize all layers of the porcine cornea. This setup allowed the simultaneous excitation of both metabolic cofactors, NAD(P)H and flavins, and their discrimination based on their spectral emission properties and fluorescence decay characteristics. Furthermore, the architecture of the stromal collagen fibrils was assessed by SHG imaging in both forward and backward directions. Information on the metabolic state and the tissue architecture of the porcine cornea were obtained with subcellular resolution, and high temporal and spectral resolutions.

  7. Microscopic probabilistic model for the simulation of secondary electron emission

    SciTech Connect

    Furman, M.A.; Pivi, M.T.F.

    2002-07-29

    We provide a detailed description of a model and its computational algorithm for the secondary electron emission process. The model is based on a broad phenomenological fit to data for the secondary emission yield (SEY) and the emitted-energy spectrum. We provide two sets of values for the parameters by fitting our model to two particular data sets, one for copper and the other one for stainless steel.

  8. Generation of reactive oxygen species and photon emission from a browned product.

    PubMed

    Iida, Tetsuo; Yoshiki, Yumiko; Someya, Shinich; Okubo, Kazuyoshi

    2002-08-01

    The properties of photon emission arising from a browned product were investigated. The photon intensity of the browned product was proportional to the absorbancy at 420 nm, and was influenced by the amino acid structure. The fluorescence spectrum showed similar compounds in the browned product to be related with this photon emission. Superoxide and hydrogen peroxide contributed highly to this photon emission, and several redox compounds enhanced the photon intensity at appropriate concentrations. Our work suggests that the photon intensity was closely related to the reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated from the browned product, and this effect may be utilized to evaluate the function and quality of browned food.

  9. Novel microfabrication stage allowing for one-photon and multi-photon light assisted molecular immobilization and for multi-photon microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonçalves, Odete; Snider, Scott; Zadoyan, Ruben; Nguyen, Quoc-Thang; Vorum, Henrik; Petersen, Steffen B.; Neves-Petersen, Maria Teresa

    2017-02-01

    Light Assisted Molecular Immobilization (LAMI) results in spatially oriented and localized covalent coupling of biomolecules onto thiol reactive surfaces. LAMI is possible due to the conserved spatial proximity between aromatic residues and disulfide bridges in proteins. When aromatic residues are excited with UV light (275-295nm), disulphide bridges are disrupted and the formed thiol groups covalently bind to surfaces. Immobilization hereby reported is achieved in a microfabrication stage coupled to a fs-laser, through one- or multi-photon excitation. The fundamental 840nm output is tripled to 280nm and focused onto the sample, leading to one-photon excitation and molecular immobilization. The sample rests on a xyz-stage with micrometer step resolution and is illuminated according to a pattern uploaded to the software controlling the stage and the shutter. Molecules are immobilized according to such pattern, with micrometer spatial resolution. Spatial masks inserted in the light path lead to light diffraction patterns used to immobilize biomolecules with submicrometer spatial resolution. Light diffraction patterns are imaged by an inbuilt microscope. Two-photon microscopy and imaging of the fluorescent microbeads is shown. Immobilization of proteins, e.g. C-reactive protein, and of an engineered molecular beacon has been successfully achieved. The beacon was coupled to a peptide containing a disulfide bridge neighboring a tryptophan residue, being this way possible to immobilize the beacon on a surface using one-photon LAMI. This technology is being implemented in the creation of point-of-care biosensors aiming at the detection of cancer and cardiovascular disease markers.

  10. A photonic microscope for observing real-time vibrations of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnard, Arthur W.; Zhang, Mian; Wiederhecker, Gustavo; Lipson, Michal; McEuen, Paul L.

    Vibrational modes in suspended carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are incredibly responsive to small forces, which makes them a prime candidate as nano-mechanical sensors. However, transducing this mechanical motion into detectable signals is a considerable challenge. Electrical detection, which has been the prevailing method thus far, suffers a significant impedance mismatch to macroscopic electronics and is thus susceptible to noise. We demonstrate an alternative: optical readout of CNT vibrations in real-time. By combining a unique CNT microtweezer platform with a high-finesse optical microdisk resonator, we dramatically enhance the naturally small optical cross-section of CNTs and thereby achieve unprecedented detection sensitivity. With this novel photonic microscope, we directly measure the thermal Brownian motion of CNTs and observe marked spectral diffusion at room temperature, shedding light on CNTs unique thermal physics. By further enhancing the optical coupling, we demonstrate optical amplification of CNT vibrations and directly observe period-doubling in the amplified state.

  11. Two-photon excited fluorescence emission from hemoglobin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Qiqi; Zeng, Yan; Zhang, Wei; Zheng, Wei; Luo, Yi; Qu, Jianan Y.

    2015-03-01

    Hemoglobin, one of the most important proteins in blood, is responsible for oxygen transportation in almost all vertebrates. Recently, we discovered two-photon excited hemoglobin fluorescence and achieved label-free microvascular imaging based on the hemoglobin fluorescence. However, the mechanism of its fluorescence emission still remains unknown. In this work, we studied the two-photon excited fluorescence properties of the hemoglobin subunits, heme/hemin (iron (II)/(III) protoporphyrin IX) and globin. We first studied the properties of heme and the similar spectral and temporal characteristics of heme and hemoglobin fluorescence provide strong evidence that heme is the fluorophore in hemoglobin. Then we studied the fluorescence properties of hemin, globin and methemoglobin, and found that the hemin may have the main effect on the methemoglobin fluorescence and that globin has tryptophan fluorescence like other proteins. Finally, since heme is a centrosymmetric molecule, that the Soret band fluorescence of heme and hemoglobin was not observed in the single photon process in the previous study may be due to the parity selection rule. The discovery of heme two-photon excited fluorescence may open a new window for heme biology research, since heme as a cofactor of hemoprotein has many functions, including chemical catalysis, electron transfer and diatomic gases transportation.

  12. Disorder in Stimuli-responsive Microgel Photonic Crystals: A Confocal Microscopic Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Deepak Kumar; Tata, B. V. R.; Brijitta, J.; Joshi, R. G.

    2011-10-01

    Crystalline arrays of sub-micron sized particles have lattice constants in the visible range and serve as photonic crystals. Highly diffracting photonic crystals (PCs) can be prepared through colloidal route by self-assembly of monodisperse particles. Size polydispersity (SPD) is known to induce second type disorder in these crystals.SPD is inherent to hard-sphere as well as charged colloidal suspensions and cannot be tailored through external conditions. We employ a confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM) to study the disorder in PCs of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-Acrylic acid) (PNIPAM-co-AAc) stimuli-responsive microgel suspensions and show here for the first time, that osmotic pressure reduces the SPD; hence the second type disorder in these crystals. Different samples with varying particle concentrations have been prepared by subjecting the dilute suspensions to different amounts of osmotic pressure. The crystallized samples were investigated for their structure and disorder using CLSM. (111) planes of single crystalline domains have been imaged and real-space coordinates of the particles and the SPD have been determined by image analysis. Different types of disorder present in these crystals are investigated by analyzing the diffraction peaks computed from the particle coordinates. The analysis revealed presence of second-type disorder in these crystals. Our results indicate that second type disorder in these crystals arises due to SPD which is found to decrease with increase in osmotic pressure.

  13. Novel failure analysis techniques using photon probing with a scanning optical microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, E.I. Jr.; Soden, J.M.; Rife, J.L.; Barton, D.L.; Henderson, C.L.

    1993-12-31

    Three new failure analysis techniques for integrated circuits (ICs) have been developed using localized photon probing with a scanning optical microscope (SOM). The first two are light-induced voltage alteration (LIVA) imaging techniques that (1) localize open-circuited and damaged junctions and (2) image transistor logic states. The third technique uses the SOM to control logic states optically from the IC backside. LIVA images are produced by monitoring the voltage fluctuations of a constant current power supply as a laser beam is scanned over the IC. High selectivity for localizing defects has been demonstrated using the LIVA approach. Logic state mapping results, similar to previous work using biased optical beam induced current (OBIC) and laser probing approaches have also been produced using LIVA. Application of the two LIVA based techniques to backside failure analysis has been demonstrated using an infrared laser source. Optical logic state control is based upon earlier work examining transistor response to photon injection. The physics of each method and their applications for failure analysis are described.

  14. Spatial frequencies from human periosteum at different depths using two-photon microscopic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sordillo, Laura A.; Shi, Lingyan; Bhagroo, Stephen; Nguyen, Theinan; Lubicz, Stephanie; Pu, Yang; Budansky, Yuri; Hatak, Noella; Alfano, R. R.

    2014-03-01

    The outer layer of human bone, the periosteum, was studied using two-photon (2P) fluorescence microscopy. This layer of the periosteum is composed mostly of fibrous collagen. The inner cambium layer has less collagen and contains osteoblasts necessary for bone remodeling. The spatial frequencies from the layers of the periosteum of human bone at different depths were investigated using images acquired with two-photon excitation microscopy. This 2P spectroscopic method offers deeper depth penetration into samples, high fluorescence collection efficiency, and a reduction in photobleaching and photodamage. Using 130 femtosecond pulses with an 800 nm wavelength excitation, a 40× microscope objective, and a photomultiplier tube (PMT) detector, high contrast images of the collagen present in the periosteum at various micrometers depths from the surface were obtained. Fourier transform analysis of the 2P images was used to assess the structure of the periosteum at different depths in terms of spatial frequencies. The spatial frequency spectra from the outer and inner periosteal regions show significant spectral peak differences which can provide information on the structure of the layers of the periosteum. One may be able to use spatial frequency spectra for optical detection of abnormalities of the periosteum which can occur in disease.

  15. Brain single-photon emission CT physics principles.

    PubMed

    Accorsi, R

    2008-08-01

    The basic principles of scintigraphy are reviewed and extended to 3D imaging. Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is a sensitive and specific 3D technique to monitor in vivo functional processes in both clinical and preclinical studies. SPECT/CT systems are becoming increasingly common and can provide accurately registered anatomic information as well. In general, SPECT is affected by low photon-collection efficiency, but in brain imaging, not all of the large FOV of clinical gamma cameras is needed: The use of fan- and cone-beam collimation trades off the unused FOV for increased sensitivity and resolution. The design of dedicated cameras aims at increased angular coverage and resolution by minimizing the distance from the patient. The corrections needed for quantitative imaging are challenging but can take advantage of the relative spatial uniformity of attenuation and scatter. Preclinical systems can provide submillimeter resolution in small animal brain imaging with workable sensitivity.

  16. Photon, Electron and Secondary Ion Emission from Single C60 keV Impacts

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Lima, F. A.; Eller, M. J.; Verkhoturov, S. V.; Della-Negra, S.; Schweikert, E. A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the first observation of coincidental emission of photons, electrons and secondary ions from individual C60 keV impacts. An increase in photon, electron and secondary ion yields is observed as a function of C60 projectile energy. The effect of target structure/composition on photon and electron emissions at the nanometer level is shown for a CsI target. The time-resolved photon emission may be characterized by a fast component emission in the UV-Vis range with a short decay time, while the electron and secondary ion emission follow a Poisson distribution. PMID:21218166

  17. Application of two-photon flash photolysis to measure microscopic diffusion and calcium fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannell, Mark B.; Jacobs, Marc D.; Donaldson, Paul J.; Soeller, Christian

    2005-03-01

    Two-photon excitation (TPE) via a microscope objective lens produces a spatially confined excitation volume where UV-excited caged molecules may be broken (uncaged) to release active products. We describe an optical system that creates a stationary parfocal TPE uncaging spot on the stage of a conventional confocal microscope. With this system, we have examined the ability of two dyes to track microscopic calcium changes produced by TPE photolysis of DM-nitrophen. We find that, even when EGTA is used with a low affinity indicator, the dye signals are complicated by diffusion of both indicator-Ca complex and CaEGTA to produce a signal that does not simply report the spatial dimensions of the calcium release site. In addition, the time course of calcium release is poorly reported. This suggests that considerable caution must be applied to the interpretation of spatially resolved calcium signals inside cells. We have also used TPE of CMND-caged fluorescein to measure the rate of fluorescein production in test solution (2500 s-1) as well as the diffusion of fluorescein in drops of solution and within and between between eye lens fiber cells. While diffusion of uncaged fluorescein was about an order of magnitude slower inside fiber cells than in aequeous solution, slower diffusion between cells could also be detected and could be explained by the gap junctions joining the cells behaving as a barrier to diffusion. By using a computer model, parameter fits to experimental data gave estimates for both intracellular and intercellular diffusion coefficients. From this analysis, the gap junctions in eye lens fiber cells permit exchange of low molecular weight compounds between cells at about 0.4% of the rate of free diffusion.

  18. Single-Photon Emission of a Hydrogenlike Atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skobelev, V. V.

    2016-11-01

    Implementing a previously obtained, original solution of the Dirac equation for an electron in the field of a nucleus ( Ze) expressed in terms of the wave function of the corresponding Schrödinger equation and its derivatives in spherical coordinates and the spin projection operator Σ3 associated with the eigenfunction, taking into account in each component of the spinor the leading term of the expansion in the small parameter ( Zα), α = e 2 / ħc ≈ 1 / 137, the partial probabilities W of emission of a photon ( Zα)* → ( Zα) + γ have been calculated. Here two orthogonal states of the linear polarization of the photon, and also the spin states of the electron, which previously had not been taken into consideration, have been taken into account in the transverse gauge. It turns out that the probabilities W of emission of a photon per unit time for any allowed transitions are proportional to (Zα)4, as was previously accepted, and the selection rules for the quantum number m have the usual form ∆ m = 0,±1. It was found that a spin flip does not take place during emission. In contrast to the customary situation with the selection rules for the quantum number l being of the form ∆ l = ±1, for ∆ m = ±1 there also exist integrals over dcosθ which are not equal to zero for undetermined odd values of ∆ l. In this, and also in a fundamentally different dependence of the amplitude on the quantum numbers consist the differences from the traditional approach to the problem. Necessary conditions are formulated, under the fulfillment of which the selection rules for l are not changed, having values ∆ l = ±1 for arbitrary ∆ m, but it was not possible, however, to give a complete proof of these rules.

  19. Quantitative analysis of directional spontaneous emission spectra from light sources in photonic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolaev, Ivan S.; Lodahl, Peter; Vos, Willem L.

    2005-05-15

    We have performed angle-resolved measurements of spontaneous-emission spectra from laser dyes and quantum dots in opal and inverse opal photonic crystals. Pronounced directional dependencies of the emission spectra are observed: angular ranges of strongly reduced emission adjoin with angular ranges of enhanced emission. It appears that emission from embedded light sources is affected both by the periodicity and by the structural imperfections of the crystals: the photons are Bragg diffracted by lattice planes and scattered by unavoidable structural disorder. Using a model comprising diffuse light transport and photonic band structure, we quantitatively explain the directional emission spectra. This work provides detailed understanding of the transport of spontaneously emitted light in real photonic crystals, which is essential in the interpretation of quantum optics in photonic-band-gap crystals and for applications wherein directional emission and total emission power are controlled.

  20. Spontaneous emission control in a tunable hybrid photonic system.

    PubMed

    Frimmer, Martin; Koenderink, A Femius

    2013-05-24

    We experimentally demonstrate control of the rate of spontaneous emission in a tunable hybrid photonic system that consists of two canonical building blocks for spontaneous emission control, an optical antenna and a mirror, each providing a modification of the local density of optical states (LDOS). We couple fluorophores to a plasmonic antenna to create a superemitter with an enhanced decay rate. In a superemitter analog of the seminal Drexhage experiment we probe the LDOS of a nanomechanically approached mirror. Because of the electrodynamic interaction of the antenna with its own mirror image, the superemitter traces the inverse of the LDOS enhancement provided by the mirror, in stark contrast to a bare source, whose decay rate is proportional to the mirror LDOS.

  1. Nonlinear Shock Acceleration and Photon Emission in Supernova Remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellison, Donald C.; Berezhko, Evgeny G.; Baring, Matthew G.

    2000-01-01

    We have extended a simple model of nonlinear diffusive shock acceleration (Berezhko & Ellison 1999: Ellison &, Berezhko 1999a) to include the injection and acceleration of electrons and the production of photons from bremsstrahlung, synchrotron, inverse Compton, and pion-decay processes. We argue that, the results of this model, which is simpler to use than more elaborate ones, offer a significant improvement, over test-particle, power-law spectra which are often used in astrophysical applications of diffusive shock acceleration. With an evolutionary supernova remnant (SNR) model to obtain shock parameters as functions of ambient interstellar medium parameters and time, we predict broad-band continuum photon emission from supernova remnants in general, and SN1006 in particular, showing that our results compare well with the more complete time-dependent and spherically symmetric nonlinear model of Berezhko, Ksenofontov, & Petukhov (1999a). We discuss the implications nonlinear shock acceleration has for X-ray line emission, and use our model to describe how ambient conditions determine the TeV/radio flux ratio, an important parameter for gamma-ray observations of radio SNRs.

  2. Application of ultra-weak photon emission measurements in agriculture.

    PubMed

    Kato, Kimihiko; Iyozumi, Hiroyuki; Kageyama, Chizuko; Inagaki, Hidehiro; Yamaguchi, Akira; Nukui, Hideki

    2014-10-05

    Here we report our two applications of ultra-weak photon emission (UPE) measurements in agriculture. One is to find new types of agrochemicals that potentiate plants' defense, so-called "plant activator". We first analyzed the relation between plant defense and Elicitor-Responsive Photon Emission (ERPE) using a combination of rice cells and a chitin elicitor. Pharmacological analyses clarified that ERPE was generated as a part of the chitin elicitor-responsive defense in close relation with the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Then we successfully detected the activity of plant activators as the potentiation of ERPE, and developed a new screening system for plant activators based on this principle. Another UPE application is to distinguish herbicide-resistant weeds from susceptible ones by measuring UPE in weeds. In our study, it was revealed that the weed biotypes resistant to sulfonylurea (SU) herbicides, one of the major herbicide groups, showed stronger UPE than susceptible ones after an SU herbicide treatment. By further analysis with a pharmacological and RNAi study, we found that the detoxifying enzyme P450s contributed to the UPE increase in SU herbicide resistant weeds. It is considered that weeds resistant to herbicides other than SU might also be able to be distinguished from susceptible ones by UPE measurement, as long as the herbicides are subject to detoxification by P450s.

  3. Photon-enhanced thermionic emission from heterostructures with low interface recombination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwede, J. W.; Sarmiento, T.; Narasimhan, V. K.; Rosenthal, S. J.; Riley, D. C.; Schmitt, F.; Bargatin, I.; Sahasrabuddhe, K.; Howe, R. T.; Harris, J. S.; Melosh, N. A.; Shen, Z.-X.

    2013-03-01

    Photon-enhanced thermionic emission is a method of solar-energy conversion that promises to combine photon and thermal processes into a single mechanism, overcoming fundamental limits on the efficiency of photovoltaic cells. Photon-enhanced thermionic emission relies on vacuum emission of photoexcited electrons that are in thermal equilibrium with a semiconductor lattice, avoiding challenging non-equilibrium requirements and exotic material properties. However, although previous work demonstrated the photon-enhanced thermionic emission effect, efficiency has until now remained very low. Here we describe electron-emission measurements on a GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure that introduces an internal interface, decoupling the basic physics of photon-enhanced thermionic emission from the vacuum emission process. Quantum efficiencies are dramatically higher than in previous experiments because of low interface recombination and are projected to increase another order of magnitude with more stable, low work-function coatings. The results highlight the effectiveness of the photon-enhanced thermionic emission process and demonstrate that efficient photon-enhanced thermionic emission is achievable, a key step towards realistic photon-enhanced thermionic emission based energy conversion.

  4. Photon event distribution sampling: an image formation technique for scanning microscopes that permits tracking of sub-diffraction particles with high spatial and temporal resolutions.

    PubMed

    Larkin, J D; Publicover, N G; Sutko, J L

    2011-01-01

    In photon event distribution sampling, an image formation technique for scanning microscopes, the maximum likelihood position of origin of each detected photon is acquired as a data set rather than binning photons in pixels. Subsequently, an intensity-related probability density function describing the uncertainty associated with the photon position measurement is applied to each position and individual photon intensity distributions are summed to form an image. Compared to pixel-based images, photon event distribution sampling images exhibit increased signal-to-noise and comparable spatial resolution. Photon event distribution sampling is superior to pixel-based image formation in recognizing the presence of structured (non-random) photon distributions at low photon counts and permits use of non-raster scanning patterns. A photon event distribution sampling based method for localizing single particles derived from a multi-variate normal distribution is more precise than statistical (Gaussian) fitting to pixel-based images. Using the multi-variate normal distribution method, non-raster scanning and a typical confocal microscope, localizations with 8 nm precision were achieved at 10 ms sampling rates with acquisition of ~200 photons per frame. Single nanometre precision was obtained with a greater number of photons per frame. In summary, photon event distribution sampling provides an efficient way to form images when low numbers of photons are involved and permits particle tracking with confocal point-scanning microscopes with nanometre precision deep within specimens.

  5. Automatic quantification of mitochondrial fragmentation from two-photon microscope images of mouse brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Lihavainen, E; Kislin, M; Toptunov, D; Khiroug, L; Ribeiro, A S

    2015-12-01

    The morphology of mitochondria can inform about their functional state and, thus, about cell vitality. For example, fragmentation of the mitochondrial network is associated with many diseases. Recent advances in neuronal imaging have enabled the observation of mitochondria in live brains for long periods of time, enabling the study of their dynamics in animal models of diseases. To aid these studies, we developed an automatic method, based on supervised learning, for quantifying the degree of mitochondrial fragmentation in tissue images acquired via two-photon microscopy from transgenic mice, which exclusively express Enhanced cyan fluorescent protein (ECFP) under Thy1 promoter, targeted to the mitochondrial matrix in subpopulations of neurons. We tested the method on images prior to and after cardiac arrest, and found it to be sensitive to significant changes in mitochondrial morphology because of the arrest. We conclude that the method is useful in detecting morphological abnormalities in mitochondria and, likely, in other subcellular structures as well. © 2015 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2015 Royal Microscopical Society.

  6. Single photon emission computed tomography in seizure disorders.

    PubMed Central

    Denays, R; Rubinstein, M; Ham, H; Piepsz, A; Noël, P

    1988-01-01

    Fourteen children with various seizure disorders were studied using a cerebral blood flow tracer, 123I iodoamphetamine (0.05 mCi/kg), and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). In the five patients with radiological lesions, SPECT showed congruent or more extensive abnormalities. Five of the nine children with a normal scan on computed tomography had abnormal SPECT studies consisting of focal hypoperfusion, diffuse hemispheric hypoperfusion, multifocal and bilateral hypoperfusion, or focal hyperperfusion. A focal lesion seen on SPECT has been found in children with tonic-clonic seizures suggesting secondarily generalised seizures. Moreover the pattern seen on SPECT seemed to be related to the clinical status. An extensive impairment found on SPECT was associated with a poor evolution in terms of intellectual performance and seizure frequency. Conversely all children with a normal result on SPECT had less than two seizures per year and normal neurological and intellectual development. Images Figure PMID:3264135

  7. Photon emission and quantum signalling in biological systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayburov, S. N.

    2015-05-01

    Ultra-weak, non-termal photon emission is universal feature of living organisms and plants. In our experiment the fine structure of optical radiation emitted by the loach fish eggs is studied. It was shown earlier that such radiation performs the signaling between the distant fish egg samples, which result in significant correlations of their growth. The optical radiation of biological sample was measured by the cooled photomultiplier in photocurrent regime, it was found that the main bulk of radiation is produced in form of short-time quasi-periodic bursts. The analysis of radiation temporal structure indicates that the information about egg age and growth is encoded via the values of time intervals between neighbor bursts with the height higher than some fixed level. The applications of such biological radiation in medical diagnostics and biotechnology are considered.

  8. Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in epilepsy

    SciTech Connect

    Leroy, R.F.

    1991-12-31

    Epilepsy is a common neurologic disorder which has just begun to be studied with single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT). Epilepsy usually is studied with electroencephalographic (EEG) techniques that demonstrate the physiologic changes that occur during seizures, and with neuroimaging techniques that show the brain structures where seizures originate. Neither method alone has been adequate to describe the pathophysiology of the patient with epilepsy. EEG techniques lack anatomic sensitivity, and there are no structural abnormalities shown by neuroimaging which are specific for epilepsy. Functional imaging (FI) has developed as a physiologic tool with anatomic sensitivity, and SPECT has been promoted as a FI technique because of its potentially wide availability. However, SPECT is early in its development and its clinical utility for epilepsy still has to be demonstrated. To understand this role of SPECT, consideration must be given to the pathophysiology of epilepsy, brain physiology, types of seizure, epileptic syndromes, and the SPECT technique itself. 44 refs., 2 tabs.

  9. The investigation of Alzheimer's disease with single photon emission tomography.

    PubMed Central

    Burns, A; Philpot, M P; Costa, D C; Ell, P J; Levy, R

    1989-01-01

    Twenty patients satisfying standard clinical criteria for Alzheimer's disease (AD) and six age-matched normal controls were studied using 99mTc hexamethyl-propyleneamine oxime and single photon emission tomography. The AD patients had lower regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in the temporal and posterior parietal lobes compared to controls. AD patients with apraxia and aphasia had lower rCBF in the lateral temporal and posterior parietal lobes than AD patients without these features. Within the AD group, correlations were found between neuropsychological tests and rCBF: praxis correlated with posterior parietal activity, memory with left temporal lobe activity and language with activity throughout the left hemisphere. Images PMID:2467967

  10. Single photon emission computed tomography in AIDS dementia complex

    SciTech Connect

    Pohl, P.; Vogl, G.; Fill, H.; Roessler, H.Z.; Zangerle, R.; Gerstenbrand, F.

    1988-08-01

    Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) studies were performed in AIDS dementia complex using IMP in 12 patients (and HM-PAO in four of these same patients). In all patients, SPECT revealed either multiple or focal uptake defects, the latter corresponding with focal signs or symptoms in all but one case. Computerized tomography showed a diffuse cerebral atrophy in eight of 12 patients, magnetic resonance imaging exhibited changes like atrophy and/or leukoencephalopathy in two of five cases. Our data indicate that both disturbance of cerebral amine metabolism and alteration of local perfusion share in the pathogenesis of AIDS dementia complex. SPECT is an important aid in the diagnosis of AIDS dementia complex and contributes to the understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms of this disorder.

  11. Heavy Ion Radiation Effects Studies With Ion Photon Emission Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Branson, J. V.; Hattar, K.; Vizkelethy, G.; Powell, C. J.; Doyle, B. L.; Rossi, P.

    2011-06-01

    The development of a new radiation effects microscopy (REM) technique is crucial as emerging semiconductor technologies demonstrate smaller feature sizes and thicker back end of line (BEOL) layers. To penetrate these materials and still deposit sufficient energy into the device to induce single event effects, high energy heavy ions are required. Ion photon emission microscopy (IPEM) is a technique that utilizes coincident photons, which are emitted from the location of each ion impact to map out regions of radiation sensitivity in integrated circuits and devices, circumventing the obstacle of focusing high-energy heavy ions. Several versions of the IPEM have been developed and implemented at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). One such instrument has been utilized on the microbeam line of the 6 MV tandem accelerator at SNL. Another IPEM was designed for ex-vacu use at the 88'' cyclotron at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). Extensive engineering is involved in the development of these IPEM systems, including resolving issues with electronics, event timing, optics, phosphor selection, and mechanics. The various versions of the IPEM and the obstacles, as well as benefits associated with each will be presented. In addition, the current stage of IPEM development as a user instrument will be discussed in the context of recent results.

  12. Heavy ion radiation effects studies with ion photon emission microscopy.

    SciTech Connect

    Doyle, Barney Lee; Rossi, Paolo; Powell, Cody Joseph; Hattar, Khalid Mikhiel; Vizkelethy, Gyorgy; Branson, Janelle Villone

    2010-08-01

    The development of a new radiation effects microscopy (REM) technique is crucial as emerging semiconductor technologies demonstrate smaller feature sizes and thicker back end of line (BEOL) layers. To penetrate these materials and still deposit sufficient energy into the device to induce single event effects, high energy heavy ions are required. Ion photon emission microscopy (IPEM) is a technique that utilizes coincident photons, which are emitted from the location of each ion impact to map out regions of radiation sensitivity in integrated circuits and devices, circumventing the obstacle of focusing high-energy heavy ions. Several versions of the IPEM have been developed and implemented at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). One such instrument has been utilized on the microbeam line of the 6 MV tandem accelerator at SNL. Another IPEM was designed for ex-vacu use at the 88 cyclotron at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). Extensive engineering is involved in the development of these IPEM systems, including resolving issues with electronics, event timing, optics, phosphor selection, and mechanics. The various versions of the IPEM and the obstacles, as well as benefits associated with each will be presented. In addition, the current stage of IPEM development as a user instrument will be discussed in the context of recent results.

  13. Simultaneous inhibition and redistribution of spontaneous light emission in photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Masayuki; Takahashi, Shigeki; Tanaka, Yoshinori; Asano, Takashi; Noda, Susumu

    2005-05-27

    Inhibiting spontaneous light emission and redistributing the energy into useful forms are desirable objectives for advances in various fields, including photonics, illuminations, displays, solar cells, and even quantum-information systems. We demonstrate both the "inhibition" and "redistribution" of spontaneous light emission by using two-dimensional (2D) photonic crystals, in which the refractive index is changed two-dimensionally. The overall spontaneous emission rate is found to be reduced by a factor of 5 as a result of the 2D photonic bandgap effect. Simultaneously, the light energy is redistributed from the 2D plane to the direction normal to the photonic crystal.

  14. Spectral narrowing of emission in self-assembled colloidal photonic superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baert, Kasper; Song, Kai; Vallée, Renaud A. L.; Van der Auweraer, Mark; Clays, Koen

    2006-12-01

    We report on the influence of a well-designed passband in the stop band of a suitably engineered self-assembled colloidal photonic crystal superlattice on the steady-state emission properties of infiltrated fluorophores. The photonic superlattice was built by convective self-assembly of slabs of silica spheres of two different sizes. Transmission experiments on the engineered photonic crystal structure show two stop bands with an effective passband in between. The presence of this passband results in a narrow spectral range of increased density of states for photon modes. This shows up as a decrease in the emission suppression (enhancement of the emission) in the narrow effective passband spectral region. These experiments indicate that the threshold for lasing can possibly be lowered by spectrally narrowing the emission of fluorophores infiltrated in suitably engineered self-assembled photonic crystal superlattices, and are therefore important towards the realization of efficient all-optical integrated circuits from functionalized photonic superlattices and heterostructures.

  15. Optical nanoantennas: controlled emission of single photon sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Hulst, Niek

    2011-03-01

    Nanoscale quantum emitters are key elements in quantum optics and sensing. However, efficient optical excitation and detection of such emitters involves large solid angles, due to their omnidirectional interaction with freely propagating light and due to limits of diffraction. Optical nanoantennas offer both nanoscale localization and efficient interaction. Here we focus on the control of the interaction of single photon emitters (molecules, quantum dots) with radiation through metal nanorod antennas. First a novel analytical model is presented, which shows the continuous evolution of the properties of optical antennas as they become increasingly bound, i.e. plasmonic. The model accurately describes the complete emission process, the radiative decay rate, quantum efficiency, and angular emission, moreover gives a quantitative description of the gradual emergence of sub-radiant, super-radiant, and dark modes. Next we investigate experimentally the coupling of a single quantum dot to a nanorod of increasing length. The angular luminescence of the quantum dot is detected through increasingly higher order antenna modes. Simultaneously the emission is strongly polarized and enhanced. Direct confrontation with theory allows to determine the coupling efficiency of the quantum dot to the antenna. Finally, we present unidirectional emission of a single emitter by coupling to a nanofabricated Yagi-Uda antenna. A quantum dot is placed in the near field of the antenna so that it drives the resonant feed element of the antenna. The resulting quantum-dot luminescence is strongly polarized and highly directed into a narrow forward angular cone. The directionality of the quantum dot can be controlled by tuning the antenna dimensions. Thus our results show the potential of optical antennas to communicate energy to, from, and between nano-emitters. A.G.Curto et al., Science 329, 930 (2010)

  16. A custom-built two-photon microscope based on a mode-locked Yb3+ doped fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dong Uk; Song, Hoseong; Song, Woosub, III; Kwon, Hyuk-Sang; Kim, Dug Yong

    2012-03-01

    Two-photon microscopy is a very attractive tool for the study of the three-dimensional (3D) and dynamic processes in cells and tissues. One of the feasible constructions of two-photon microscopy is the combination a confocal laser scanning microscope and a mode-locked Ti:sapphire laser. Even though this approach is the simplest and fastest implementation, this system is highly cost-intensive and considerably difficult in modification. Many researcher therefore decide to build a more cost-effective and flexible system with a self-developed software for operation and data acquisition. We present a custom-built two-photon microscope based on a mode-locked Yb3+ doped fiber laser and demonstrate two-photon fluorescence imaging of biological specimens. The mode-locked fiber laser at 1060 nm delivers 320 fs laser pulses at a frequency of 36 MHz up to average power of 80 mW. The excitation at 1060 nm can be more suitable in thick, turbid samples for 3D image construction as well as cell viability. The system can simply accomplish confocal and two-photon mode by an additional optical coupler that allows conventional laser source to transfer to the scanning head. The normal frame rate is 1 frames/s for 400 x 400 pixel images. The measured full width at half maximum resolutions were about 0.44 μm laterally and 1.34 μm axially. A multi-color stained convallaria, rat basophilic leukemia cells and a rat brain tissue were observed by two-photon fluorescence imaging in our system.

  17. Direct calculation of thermal emission for three-dimensionally periodic photonic crystal slabs.

    PubMed

    Chan, David L C; Soljacić, Marin; Joannopoulos, J D

    2006-09-01

    We perform direct thermal emission calculations for three-dimensionally periodic photonic crystal slabs using stochastic electrodynamics following the Langevin approach, implemented via a finite-difference time-domain algorithm. We demonstrate that emissivity and absorptivity are equal, by showing that such photonic crystal systems emit as much radiation as they absorb, for every frequency, up to statistical fluctuations. We also study the effect of surface termination on absorption and emission spectra from these systems.

  18. Direct calculation of thermal emission for three-dimensionally periodic photonic crystal slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, David L. C.; Soljačić, Marin; Joannopoulos, J. D.

    2006-09-01

    We perform direct thermal emission calculations for three-dimensionally periodic photonic crystal slabs using stochastic electrodynamics following the Langevin approach, implemented via a finite-difference time-domain algorithm. We demonstrate that emissivity and absorptivity are equal, by showing that such photonic crystal systems emit as much radiation as they absorb, for every frequency, up to statistical fluctuations. We also study the effect of surface termination on absorption and emission spectra from these systems.

  19. Two-Photon Emission of a Hydrogenlike Atom with Photon Polarization and Electron Spin States Taken into Account

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skobelev, V. V.

    2017-02-01

    The process of two-photon emission ( Ze)* → ( Ze) + 2 γ of a hydrogenlike atom is considered with spin states of the electron and polarization of the photons taken into account, which had not been done before. A general expression for the probability of the process per unit time has been obtained for different polarization states of the photons with a formulation of hard and soft selection rules for the quantum numbers m and l. It is shown that by virtue of the established specifics of the properties of the two-photon emission process (absence of a Zeeman effect and dependence of the probability on the polarization states of the photons), it can in principle be identified against the background of single-photon emission ( Ze)* → ( Ze) + γ, despite the presence of additional small factors: 1) α = e 2/ ћc ≈ 1/137 of the perturbation theory in e, and 2) the square of the atomic expansion parameter ( Zα)2 in the expression for the probability.

  20. Study of photon emission by electron capture during solar nuclei acceleration. 3: Photon production evaluations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perez-Peraza, J.; Alvarez, M.; Gallegos, A.

    1985-01-01

    Lower limits of photon fluxes were evaluated from electron capture during acceleration in solar flares, because the arbitrary q sub c asterisk assumed in this work evolves very slow with velocity, probably much more slowly than the physical actual situation: in fact, more emission is expected toward the IR region. Nevertheless the authors claim to show that the factibility of sounding acceleration processes, charge evolution processes and physical parameters of the source itself, by the observational analysis of this kind of emissions. For instance, it would be interesting to search observationally, for the predicted flux and energy drift of F sub e ions interacting with the atomic 0 and F sub e of the source matter, or, even more feasible for the X-ray lines at 4.2 keV and 2.624 + 0.003 KeV from Fe and S ions in ionized Fe at T = 10 to the 7th power K respectively, the 418 + or - 2 eV and 20 + or - 4 eV lines of Fe and S in ionized Fe at 5 x 10 to the 6th power K, which are predicted from Fermi acceleration.

  1. Comparison between laser terahertz emission microscope and conventional methods for analysis of polycrystalline silicon solar cell

    SciTech Connect

    Nakanishi, Hidetoshi Ito, Akira; Takayama, Kazuhisa Kawayama, Iwao Murakami, Hironaru Tonouchi, Masayoshi

    2015-11-15

    A laser terahertz emission microscope (LTEM) can be used for noncontact inspection to detect the waveforms of photoinduced terahertz emissions from material devices. In this study, we experimentally compared the performance of LTEM with conventional analysis methods, e.g., electroluminescence (EL), photoluminescence (PL), and laser beam induced current (LBIC), as an inspection method for solar cells. The results showed that LTEM was more sensitive to the characteristics of the depletion layer of the polycrystalline solar cell compared with EL, PL, and LBIC and that it could be used as a complementary tool to the conventional analysis methods for a solar cell.

  2. Impressive europium red emission induced by two-photon excitation for biological applications.

    PubMed

    Lo, Wai-Sum; Kwok, Wai-Ming; Law, Ga-Lai; Yeung, Chi-Tung; Chan, Chris Tsz-Leung; Yeung, Ho-Lun; Kong, Hoi-Kuan; Chen, Chi-Hang; Murphy, Margaret B; Wong, Ka-Leung; Wong, Wing-Tak

    2011-06-20

    Three triazine-based europium(III) complexes were synthesized that demonstrated strong two-photon induced europium emission with a high two-photon absorption cross-section. The modified triazine ligand of complex 3 initiated over 100% enhancement of the two-photon absorption cross-section (σ(2): 320 GM) when compared with complex 1 (σ(2): 128 GM) in a solution of DMSO. Europium complex 3 is also stable in vitro, and power-dependence curves were obtained in vitro to confirm the two-photon-induced f-f emission in HeLa cells. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  3. Three-dimensional self-assembled photonic crystals with high temperature stability for thermal emission modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arpin, Kevin A.; Losego, Mark D.; Cloud, Andrew N.; Ning, Hailong; Mallek, Justin; Sergeant, Nicholas P.; Zhu, Linxiao; Yu, Zongfu; Kalanyan, Berç; Parsons, Gregory N.; Girolami, Gregory S.; Abelson, John R.; Fan, Shanhui; Braun, Paul V.

    2013-10-01

    Selective thermal emission in a useful range of energies from a material operating at high temperatures is required for effective solar thermophotovoltaic energy conversion. Three-dimensional metallic photonic crystals can exhibit spectral emissivity that is modified compared with the emissivity of unstructured metals, resulting in an emission spectrum useful for solar thermophotovoltaics. However, retention of the three-dimensional mesostructure at high temperatures remains a significant challenge. Here we utilize self-assembled templates to fabricate high-quality tungsten photonic crystals that demonstrate unprecedented thermal stability up to at least 1,400 °C and modified thermal emission at solar thermophotovoltaic operating temperatures. We also obtain comparable thermal and optical results using a photonic crystal comprising a previously unstudied material, hafnium diboride, suggesting that refractory metallic ceramic materials are viable candidates for photonic crystal-based solar thermophotovoltaic devices and should be more extensively studied.

  4. Positron emission tomography and single-photon emission computed tomography in substance abuse research.

    PubMed

    Volkow, Nora D; Fowler, Joanna S; Wang, Gene-Jack

    2003-04-01

    Many advances in the conceptualization of addiction as a disease of the brain have come from the application of imaging technologies directly in the human drug abuser. New knowledge has been driven by advances in radiotracer design and chemistry and positron emission tomography (PET) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) instrumentation and the integration of these scientific tools with the tools of biochemistry, pharmacology, and medicine. This topic cuts across the medical specialties of neurology, psychiatry, oncology, and cardiology because of the high medical, social, and economic toll that drugs of abuse, including the legal drugs, cigarettes and alcohol, take on society. This article highlights recent advances in the use of PET and SPECT imaging to measure the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic effects of drugs of abuse on the human brain.

  5. Calorimetry in Medical Applications: Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography and Positron Emission Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.-T.

    2006-10-27

    Positron emission tomography (PET) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), two nuclear medicine imaging modalities broadly used in clinics and research, share many common instrumentation, detector, and electronics technology platforms with calorimetry in high-energy physics, astronomy, and other physics sciences. Historically, advances made in calorimetry had played major roles in the development of novel approaches and critical technologies essential to the evolution of PET and SPECT. There have also been examples in which PET/SPECT developments had led to new techniques in calorimetry for other application areas. In recent years, several innovations have propelled advances in both calorimetry in general and PET/SPECT in particular. Examples include time-of-flight (TOF) measurements, silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs), etc.

  6. In-plane emission of indistinguishable photons generated by an integrated quantum emitter

    SciTech Connect

    Kalliakos, Sokratis Bennett, Anthony J.; Ward, Martin B.; Ellis, David J. P.; Skiba-Szymanska, Joanna; Shields, Andrew J.; Brody, Yarden; Schwagmann, Andre; Farrer, Ian; Griffiths, Jonathan P.; Jones, Geb A. C.; Ritchie, David A.

    2014-06-02

    We demonstrate the emission of indistinguishable photons along a semiconductor chip originating from carrier recombination in an InAs quantum dot. The emitter is integrated in the waveguiding region of a photonic crystal structure, allowing for on-chip light propagation. We perform a Hong-Ou-Mandel-type of experiment with photons collected from the exit of the waveguide, and we observe two-photon interference under continuous wave excitation. Our results pave the way for the integration of quantum emitters in advanced photonic quantum circuits.

  7. Imaging of Ultraweak Spontaneous Photon Emission from Human Body Displaying Diurnal Rhythm

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Masaki; Kikuchi, Daisuke; Okamura, Hitoshi

    2009-01-01

    The human body literally glimmers. The intensity of the light emitted by the body is 1000 times lower than the sensitivity of our naked eyes. Ultraweak photon emission is known as the energy released as light through the changes in energy metabolism. We successfully imaged the diurnal change of this ultraweak photon emission with an improved highly sensitive imaging system using cryogenic charge-coupled device (CCD) camera. We found that the human body directly and rhythmically emits light. The diurnal changes in photon emission might be linked to changes in energy metabolism. PMID:19606225

  8. Imaging of ultraweak spontaneous photon emission from human body displaying diurnal rhythm.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Masaki; Kikuchi, Daisuke; Okamura, Hitoshi

    2009-07-16

    The human body literally glimmers. The intensity of the light emitted by the body is 1000 times lower than the sensitivity of our naked eyes. Ultraweak photon emission is known as the energy released as light through the changes in energy metabolism. We successfully imaged the diurnal change of this ultraweak photon emission with an improved highly sensitive imaging system using cryogenic charge-coupled device (CCD) camera. We found that the human body directly and rhythmically emits light. The diurnal changes in photon emission might be linked to changes in energy metabolism.

  9. Proceedings of clinical SPECT (single photon emission computed tomography) symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-09-01

    It has been five years since the last in-depth American College of Nuclear Physicians/Society of Nuclear Medicine Symposium on the subject of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) was held. Because this subject was nominated as the single most desired topic we have selected SPECT imaging as the basis for this year's program. The objectives of this symposium are to survey the progress of SPECT clinical applications that have taken place over the last five years and to provide practical and timely guidelines to users of SPECT so that this exciting imaging modality can be fully integrated into the evaluation of pathologic processes. The first half was devoted to a consideration of technical factors important in SPECT acquisition and the second half was devoted to those organ systems about which sufficient clinical SPECT imaging data are available. With respect to the technical aspect of the program we have selected the key areas which demand awareness and attention in order to make SPECT operational in clinical practice. These include selection of equipment, details of uniformity correction, utilization of phantoms for equipment acceptance and quality assurance, the major aspect of algorithms, an understanding of filtered back projection and appropriate choice of filters and an awareness of the most commonly generated artifacts and how to recognize them. With respect to the acquisition and interpretation of organ images, the faculty will present information on the major aspects of hepatic, brain, cardiac, skeletal, and immunologic imaging techniques. Individual papers are processed separately for the data base. (TEM)

  10. Stress-first single photon emission computed myocardial perfusion imaging

    PubMed Central

    Aquino, C I; Scarano, M; Squame, F; Casaburi, G; Nori, S L; Pace, L

    2016-01-01

    Background Myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) with single photon emission tomography (SPET) is widely used in coronary artery disease evaluation. Recently major dosimetric concerns have arisen. The aim of this study was to evaluate if a pre-test scoring system could predict the results of stress SPET MPI, thus avoiding two radionuclide injections. Methods All consecutive patients (n=309) undergoing SPET MPI during the first 6 months of 2014 constituted the study group. The scoring system is based on these characteristics: age >65 years (1 point), diabetes (2 points), typical chest pain (2 points), congestive heart failure (3 points), abnormal ECG (4 points), male gender (4 points), and documented previous CAD (5 points). The patients were divided on the basis of the prediction score into 3 classes of risk for an abnormal stress-first protocol. Results An abnormal stress SPET MPI was present in 7/31 patients (23%) with a low risk score, in 24/90 (27%) with an intermediate score risk, and in 124/188 (66%) with an high score risk. ROC curve analysis showed good prediction of abnormal stress MPI. Conclusions Our results suggest an appropriate use of a pre-test clinical prediction formula of abnormal stress MPI in a routine clinical setting. PMID:27896227

  11. Brain single photon emission computed tomography in neonates

    SciTech Connect

    Denays, R.; Van Pachterbeke, T.; Tondeur, M.; Spehl, M.; Toppet, V.; Ham, H.; Piepsz, A.; Rubinstein, M.; Nol, P.H.; Haumont, D. )

    1989-08-01

    This study was designed to rate the clinical value of ({sup 123}I)iodoamphetamine (IMP) or ({sup 99m}Tc) hexamethyl propylene amine oxyme (HM-PAO) brain single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in neonates, especially in those likely to develop cerebral palsy. The results showed that SPECT abnormalities were congruent in most cases with structural lesions demonstrated by ultrasonography. However, mild bilateral ventricular dilatation and bilateral subependymal porencephalic cysts diagnosed by ultrasound were not associated with an abnormal SPECT finding. In contrast, some cortical periventricular and sylvian lesions and all the parasagittal lesions well visualized in SPECT studies were not diagnosed by ultrasound scans. In neonates with subependymal and/or intraventricular hemorrhage the existence of a parenchymal abnormality was only diagnosed by SPECT. These results indicate that ({sup 123}I)IMP or ({sup 99m}Tc)HM-PAO brain SPECT shows a potential clinical value as the neurodevelopmental outcome is clearly related to the site, the extent, and the number of cerebral lesions. Long-term clinical follow-up is, however, mandatory in order to define which SPECT abnormality is associated with neurologic deficit.

  12. Single photon emission computed tomography-guided Cerenkov luminescence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zhenhua; Chen, Xueli; Liang, Jimin; Qu, Xiaochao; Chen, Duofang; Yang, Weidong; Wang, Jing; Cao, Feng; Tian, Jie

    2012-07-01

    Cerenkov luminescence tomography (CLT) has become a valuable tool for preclinical imaging because of its ability of reconstructing the three-dimensional distribution and activity of the radiopharmaceuticals. However, it is still far from a mature technology and suffers from relatively low spatial resolution due to the ill-posed inverse problem for the tomographic reconstruction. In this paper, we presented a single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)-guided reconstruction method for CLT, in which a priori information of the permissible source region (PSR) from SPECT imaging results was incorporated to effectively reduce the ill-posedness of the inverse reconstruction problem. The performance of the method was first validated with the experimental reconstruction of an adult athymic nude mouse implanted with a Na131I radioactive source and an adult athymic nude mouse received an intravenous tail injection of Na131I. A tissue-mimic phantom based experiment was then conducted to illustrate the ability of the proposed method in resolving double sources. Compared with the traditional PSR strategy in which the PSR was determined by the surface flux distribution, the proposed method obtained much more accurate and encouraging localization and resolution results. Preliminary results showed that the proposed SPECT-guided reconstruction method was insensitive to the regularization methods and ignored the heterogeneity of tissues which can avoid the segmentation procedure of the organs.

  13. Design of rare-earth-ion doped chalcogenide photonic crystals for enhancing the fluorescence emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Peiqing; Dai, Shixun; Niu, Xueke; Xu, Yinsheng; Zhang, Wei; Wu, Yuehao; Xu, Tiefeng; Nie, Qiuhua

    2014-07-01

    Rare-earth-ion doped chalcogenide glass is a promising material for developing mid-infrared light sources. In this work, Tm3+-doped chalcogenide glass was prepared and photonic crystal structures were designed to enhance its fluorescence emission at approximately 3.8 μm. By employing the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulation, the emission characteristics of the luminescent centers in the bulk material and in the photonic crystals were worked out. Utilizing analysis of the photon excitation inside the sample and the photon extraction on the sample surface, it was found that fluorescence emission can be significantly enhanced 260-fold with the designed photonic crystal structure. The results of this work can be used to realize high-efficiency mid-infrared light sources.

  14. Estimation of Photon Effects on Townsend Discharges for SecondaryElectronEmission Coefficient Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshinaga, Tomokazu; Akashi, Haruaki

    2015-09-01

    A Monte Carlo simulation (MCS) is applied to investigate the secondary electron emission in Argon Townsend discharges. The influxes of ions, photons and metastable species onto the cathode surface are estimated simply from the number of inelastic collisions. The effect of photons becomes significant especially under higher pd conditions since the photon influx increases. This suggests the possibility of the estimation of the secondary electron emission coefficient of photons by examining breakdown voltage characteristics (Paschen curves). The effect of metastable species is much smaller than those of ions and photons and is negligible. The Paschen curves evaluated with MCS agrees well with the results of one-dimensional fluid model simulation when the photon effect is neglected, showing the necessity of further improvement. Supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number 26820108.

  15. p-Shell Rabi-flopping and single photon emission in an InGaAs/GaAs quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ester, P.; Lackmann, L.; Hübner, M. C.; Michaelis de Vasconcellos, S.; Zrenner, A.; Bichler, M.

    2008-04-01

    Very clean single photon emission from a single InGaAs/GaAs quantum dot is demonstrated by the use of a coherent optical state preparation. We present a concept for single photon emission, which uses p-shell Rabi-flopping followed by a sequence of relaxation and recombination. The proof of the (clean) single photon emission is performed by photon correlation measurements.

  16. Single-photon emission of two-level system via rapid adiabatic passage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Qiang; Zheng, Yujun

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we present a high quality single-photon source based on the two-level system undergoing rapid adiabatic passage (RAP). A trigger strategy (sweet region) is suggested to optimize the single-photon emission and explain a counter-intuitive phenomenon on the optimal parameters. The RAP strategy of single-photon source is robust against control error and environmental fluctuation.

  17. Single-photon emission of two-level system via rapid adiabatic passage

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Qiang; Zheng, Yujun

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we present a high quality single-photon source based on the two-level system undergoing rapid adiabatic passage (RAP). A trigger strategy (sweet region) is suggested to optimize the single-photon emission and explain a counter-intuitive phenomenon on the optimal parameters. The RAP strategy of single-photon source is robust against control error and environmental fluctuation. PMID:27601295

  18. Photon path distribution and optical responses of turbid media: theoretical analysis based on the microscopic Beer-Lambert law.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, Y

    2001-08-01

    A concise theoretical treatment has been developed to describe the optical responses of a highly scattering inhomogeneous medium using functions of the photon path distribution (PPD). The treatment is based on the microscopic Beer-Lambert law and has been found to yield a complete set of optical responses by time- and frequency-domain measurements. The PPD is defined for possible photons having a total zigzag pathlength of l between the points of light input and detection. Such a distribution is independent of the absorption properties of the medium and can be uniquely determined for the medium under quantification. Therefore, the PPD can be calculated with an imaginary reference medium having the same optical properties as the medium under quantification except for the absence of absorption. One of the advantages of this method is that the optical responses, the total attenuation, the mean pathlength, etc are expressed by functions of the PPD and the absorption distribution.

  19. PHOTONIC CRYSTAL SURFACE ENHANCED UPCONVERSION EMISSION OF YF3:Yb3+, Er3+ NANOPARTICLES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Bo; Yang, Zhengwen; Li, Jun; Liao, Jiayan; Lai, Shenfeng; Qiu, Jianbei; Song, Zhiguo; Yang, Yong; Zhou, Dacheng

    2015-11-01

    The opal photonic crystals made of polystyrene microspheres with 155, 230, 270 or 410 nm in diameter were used to enhance upconversion (UC) emission of YF3:Yb3+, Er3+ nanoparticles, respectively. The red or green UC emission of YF3:Yb3+, Er3+ nanoparticles can be selectively enhanced when the red or green UC emission wavelength overlapped with the photonic bandgaps of opals, which is attributed to Bragg reflection of photonic bandgap. In addition, when the 980 nm excitation light wavelength was in the region of the photonic bandgap, red and green UC emissions of YF3:Yb3+, Er3+ nanoparticles were enhanced due to the enhancement of excitation field.

  20. Analysis of photon-scanning tunneling microscope images of inhomogeneous samples: determination of the local refractive index of channel waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourillot, E.; de Fornel, F.; Goudonnet, J. P.; Persegol, D.; Kevorkian, A.; Delacourt, D.

    1995-01-01

    Channel waveguides are imaged by a photon-scanning tunneling microscope (PSTM). The polarization of the light and its orientation with respect to the guide axis are shown to be very important parameters in the analysis of the images of such samples. We simulated image formation for the plane of incidence parallel to the axis of the guide. Our theoretical results are qualitatively in agreement with our measurements. These results show the ability of the PSTM to give information about the local refractive-index variations of a sample.

  1. Single photon emission from deep-level defects in monolayer WS e2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Yanxia; Dou, Xiuming; Ding, Kun; Chen, Yu; Jiang, Desheng; Yang, Fuhua; Sun, Baoquan

    2017-06-01

    We report an efficient method to observe single photon emissions in monolayer WS e2 by applying hydrostatic pressure. The photoluminescence peaks of typical two-dimensional excitons show a nearly identical pressure-induced blueshift, whereas the energy of pressure-induced discrete emission lines (quantum emitters) demonstrates a pressure insensitive behavior. The decay time of these discrete line emissions is approximately 10 ns, which is at least one order longer than the lifetime of the broad localized (L ) excitons. These characteristics lead to a conclusion that the excitons bound to deep-level defects can be responsible for the observed single photon emissions.

  2. Revisiting the mitogenetic effect of ultra-weak photon emission

    PubMed Central

    Volodyaev, Ilya; Beloussov, Lev V.

    2015-01-01

    This paper reviews the 90 years long controversial history of the so-called “mitogenetic radiation,” the first case of non-chemical distant interactions, reported by Gurwitsch (1923). It was soon described as ultraweak UV, emitted by a number of biological systems, and stimulating mitosis in “competent” (in this sense) cells. In the following 20 years this phenomenon attracted enormous interest of the scientific community, and gave rise to more than 700 publications around the world. Yet, this wave of research vanished after several ostensibly disproving works in late 1930-s, and was not resumed later, regardless of quite serious grounds for that. The authors discuss separately two aspects of the problem: (1) do living organisms emit ultraweak radiation in the UV range (irrespective of whether it has any biological role), and (2) are there any real effects of this ultraweak photon emission (UPE) upon cell division and/or other biological functions? Analysis of the available data permits to conclude, that UV fraction of UPE should be regarded real, while its biological effects are difficult to reproduce. This causes a paradox. A number of presently known qualities of UPE were initially discovered (predicted?) by the “early workers” on the basis of biological effects. Yet the qualities they discovered were proved later (the UV component of UPE, the sources of UPE among biological systems, etc…), while the biological effect they used for UPE “detection” remains questionable. Importance of this area for basic biology and medicine, and potential usefulness of UPE as a non-invasive research method, invite scientists to attack this problem again, applying powerful research facilities of modern science. Yet, because of complexity and uncertainty of the problem, further progress in this area demands comprehensive examination of both positive and negative works, with particular attention to their methodical details. PMID:26441668

  3. Ictal single photon emission computed tomography of myoclonic absence seizures.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Hiroko; Imai, Katsumi; Ikeda, Hitoshi; Matsuda, Kazumi; Takahashi, Yukitoshi; Inoue, Yushi

    2017-08-16

    Epilepsy with myoclonic absences (EMAs) is a rare epileptic disorder characterized by a predominant type of seizures, myoclonic absences (MAs). The pathophysiology of MAs in patients with EMAs remains unknown. Here, we report the first characterization of the ictal phase of MAs by single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). We evaluated 1 male (Patient 1) and 1 female (Patient 2) patient with EMAs, aged 8 and 4years at first SPECT investigation, respectively. We performed ictal and interictal (99 m)Tc-ethyl cysteinate dimer (ECD) SPECT. We then generated images of subtraction ictal SPECT co-registered to MRI (SISCOM) from the interictal and ictal data to evaluate topographic changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF) during MAs as compared to the interictal state. In Patient 1, the CBF increased in the perirolandic areas, thalamus, caudate nucleus, and precuneus, and decreased in the middle frontal gyrus and bilateral orbitofrontal regions. In Patient 2, CBF increased in the thalamus, putamen, and globus pallidus. In contrast to the CBF in Patient 1, CBF was decreased in the precuneus. Using SPECT, we showed that, in addition to the thalamus and basal ganglia, the perirolandic cortical motor area is involved in MAs. We hypothesize that in MAs the blood perfusion in the perirolandic cortical motor area might have changed under the influence of the cortico-thalamic network oscillation features. The CBF properties observed by means of our SPECT procedure may represent key features of the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying MAs. Copyright © 2017 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Using AIE Luminogen for Long-term and Low-background Three-Photon Microscopic Functional Bioimaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zhenfeng; Leung, Chris W. T.; Zhao, Xinyuan; Wang, Yalun; Qian, Jun; Tang, Ben Zhong; He, Sailing

    2015-10-01

    Fluorescent probes are one of the most popularly used bioimaging markers to monitor metabolic processes of living cells. However, long-term light excitation always leads to photobleaching of fluorescent probes, unavoidable autofluorescence as well as photodamage of cells. To overcome these limitations, we synthesized a type of photostable luminogen named TPE-TPP with an aggregation induced emission (AIE) characteristic, and achieved its three-photon imaging with femtosecond laser excitation of 1020 nm. By using TPE-TPP as fluorescent probes, three-photon microscopy under 1020 nm excitation showed little photo-damage, as well as low autofluorescence to HeLa cells. Due to the AIE effect, the TPE-TPP nanoaggregates uptaken by cells were resistant to photobleaching under three-photon excitation for an extended period of time. Furthermore, we demonstrated that for the present TPE-TPP AIE the three-photon microscopy (with 1020 nm excitation) had a better signal to noise ratio than the two-photon microscopy (with 810 nm excitation) in tissue imaging.

  5. Fabrication and characterization of solid-state nanopores using a field emission scanning electron microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Chang Hung; Iqbal, Samir M.; Stach, Eric A.; King, Alexander H.; Zaluzec, Nestor J.; Bashir, Rashid

    2006-03-06

    The fabrication of solid-state nanopores using the electron beam of a transmission electron microscope (TEM) has been reported in the past. Here, we report a similar method to fabricate solid-state nanopores using the electron source of a conventional field-emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) instead. Micromachining was used to create initial pore diameters between 50 nm and 200 nm, and controlled pore shrinking to sub 10 nm diameters was performed subsequently during in situ processing in the FESEM. Noticeably, different shrinking behavior was observed when using irradiation from the electron source of the FESEM than the TEM. Unlike previous reports of TEM mediated pore shrinkage, the mechanism of pore shrinkage when using the FESEM could be a result of surface defects generated by radiolysis and subsequent motion of silicon atoms to the pore periphery.

  6. Use of emission electron microscope for potential mapping in semiconductor microelectronics.

    PubMed

    Nepijko, S A; Sedov, N N; Schönhense, G; Escher, M

    2002-05-01

    An emission electron microscope was used for visualization and measurement of the distribution of electric fields and potentials on the surface under study. The contrast of microfields is caused by the fact that slow-moving electrons emitted from the object surface are deflected by these fields. The measurements were performed on a p-n junction to which a voltage was applied. It is shown that the type of contrast from the p-n junction can be reversed depending on the position of the contrast aperture restricting the electron beam. The same result was obtained by means of a computer simulation.

  7. Quantum information-holding single-photon router based on spontaneous emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, GuoAn; Qiao, HaoXue; Lu, Hua; Chen, AiXi

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, we propose a single-photon router via the use of a four-level atom system coupled with two one-dimensional coupled-resonator waveguides. A single photon can be directed from one quantum channel into another by atomic spontaneous emission. The coherent resonance and the photonic bound states lead to the perfect reflection appearing in the incident channel. The fidelity of the atom is related to the magnitude of the coupling strength and can reach unit when the coupling strength matches g a = g b . This shows that the transfer of a single photon into another quantum channel has no influence on the fidelity at special points.

  8. Enhancement of Tb-Yb quantum cutting emission by inverse opal photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qi; Qiu, Jianbei; Song, Zhiguo; Yang, Zhengwen; Yin, Zhaoyi; Zhou, Dacheng; Wang, Siqin

    2016-04-01

    Yb3+, Tb3+ co-doped YPO4 inverse opal photonic crystal was prepared directly by sol-gel technique in combination with self-assembly method. With the influence of the photonic band gap, quantum cutting emission of Tb3+, Yb3+ was investigated in photonic crystals by photoluminescence and fluorescence lifetime. The result clearly shows that, when the spontaneous emission of donor Tb3+ is inhibited by photonic band gap, Tb3+-Yb3+ quantum cutting quantum efficiency from Tb3+ to Yb3+ could be enhanced from 131.2% to 140.5%. The mechanisms for the influence of the photonic band gap on quantum cutting process of Tb3+ and Yb3+ are discussed. We believe that the present work will be valuable for the foundational study of quantum cutting energy transfer process and application of quantum cutting optical devices in spectral modification materials for silicon solar cells.

  9. 3D orbital tracking in a modified two-photon microscope: an application to the tracking of intracellular vesicles.

    PubMed

    Anzalone, Andrea; Annibale, Paolo; Gratton, Enrico

    2014-10-01

    The objective of this video protocol is to discuss how to perform and analyze a three-dimensional fluorescent orbital particle tracking experiment using a modified two-photon microscope(1). As opposed to conventional approaches (raster scan or wide field based on a stack of frames), the 3D orbital tracking allows to localize and follow with a high spatial (10 nm accuracy) and temporal resolution (50 Hz frequency response) the 3D displacement of a moving fluorescent particle on length-scales of hundreds of microns(2). The method is based on a feedback algorithm that controls the hardware of a two-photon laser scanning microscope in order to perform a circular orbit around the object to be tracked: the feedback mechanism will maintain the fluorescent object in the center by controlling the displacement of the scanning beam(3-5). To demonstrate the advantages of this technique, we followed a fast moving organelle, the lysosome, within a living cell(6,7). Cells were plated according to standard protocols, and stained using a commercially lysosome dye. We discuss briefly the hardware configuration and in more detail the control software, to perform a 3D orbital tracking experiment inside living cells. We discuss in detail the parameters required in order to control the scanning microscope and enable the motion of the beam in a closed orbit around the particle. We conclude by demonstrating how this method can be effectively used to track the fast motion of a labeled lysosome along microtubules in 3D within a live cell. Lysosomes can move with speeds in the range of 0.4-0.5 µm/sec, typically displaying a directed motion along the microtubule network(8).

  10. 3D Orbital Tracking in a Modified Two-photon Microscope: An Application to the Tracking of Intracellular Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Gratton, Enrico

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this video protocol is to discuss how to perform and analyze a three-dimensional fluorescent orbital particle tracking experiment using a modified two-photon microscope1. As opposed to conventional approaches (raster scan or wide field based on a stack of frames), the 3D orbital tracking allows to localize and follow with a high spatial (10 nm accuracy) and temporal resolution (50 Hz frequency response) the 3D displacement of a moving fluorescent particle on length-scales of hundreds of microns2. The method is based on a feedback algorithm that controls the hardware of a two-photon laser scanning microscope in order to perform a circular orbit around the object to be tracked: the feedback mechanism will maintain the fluorescent object in the center by controlling the displacement of the scanning beam3-5. To demonstrate the advantages of this technique, we followed a fast moving organelle, the lysosome, within a living cell6,7. Cells were plated according to standard protocols, and stained using a commercially lysosome dye. We discuss briefly the hardware configuration and in more detail the control software, to perform a 3D orbital tracking experiment inside living cells. We discuss in detail the parameters required in order to control the scanning microscope and enable the motion of the beam in a closed orbit around the particle. We conclude by demonstrating how this method can be effectively used to track the fast motion of a labeled lysosome along microtubules in 3D within a live cell. Lysosomes can move with speeds in the range of 0.4-0.5 µm/sec, typically displaying a directed motion along the microtubule network8. PMID:25350070

  11. [Ventricular volumes determined by single-photon emission computed tomography].

    PubMed

    Katohno, E; Ono, K; Owada, K; Fujino, A; Watanabe, N; Sato, M; Konno, I; Yaoita, H; Tsuda, F; Kariyone, S

    1987-06-01

    To determine right (RV) and left ventricular (LV) volumes, a new technique was developed using ECG-gated single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). RV volumes of nine patients and LV volumes of 22 patients measured by SPECT and biplane contrast cineangiography were compared. In addition, volume and ejection fraction (EF) of the RV and LV were obtained by SPECT for 10 normal controls, 21 patients with old myocardial infarction (OMI), eight patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) and 12 patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), and these results were compared. The intracardiac blood pool was labeled with Tc-99m sodium pertechnetate and 32 images were recorded through 180 degrees by a rotating gamma-camera. End-diastolic and end-systolic counts during 50 msec were recorded during 50 or 60 cardiac cycles. These counting data were reconstructed as tomographic images of vertical long-axial slices with thickness of a pixel without any attenuation correction. The numbers of voxels within the % cut-off level were summed, and the sum was multiplied by the one voxel volume. The cut-off level for ventricular delineation was determined as 45% by phantom studies. 1. The values obtained from SPECT and contrast angiography correlated well. 2. In normal controls, LV end-diastolic and end-systolic volumes were significantly less than those of the RV (p less than 0.05, p less than 0.001) and LVEF was significantly greater than the RVEF (p less than 0.001). 3. In OMI (single vessel disease), both end-diastolic and end-systolic volumes of the LV were significantly greater than those of normals (p less than 0.01, p less than 0.001) and LVEF was significantly less. In HCM end-systolic volumes of the RV were significantly less (p less than 0.05) than those of the normals. 4. LV volume was greater and LVEF was extremely low both in DCM and in OMI (multivessel disease) compared to that of the normals. In DCM, RV end-systolic volumes was greater and RVEF was lower than

  12. Emission of photons and relativistic axions from axion stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braaten, Eric; Mohapatra, Abhishek; Zhang, Hong

    2017-08-01

    The number of nonrelativistic axions can be changed by inelastic reactions that produce photons or relativistic axions. Any odd number of axions can annihilate into two photons. Any even number of nonrelativistic axions can scatter into two relativistic axions. We calculate the rate at which axions are lost from axion stars from these inelastic reactions. In dilute systems of axions, the dominant inelastic reaction is axion decay into two photons. In sufficiently dense systems of axions, the dominant inelastic reaction is the scattering of four nonrelativistic axions into two relativistic axions. The scattering of odd numbers of axions into two photons produces monochromatic radio-frequency signals at odd-integer harmonics of the fundamental frequency set by the axion mass. This provides a unique signature for dense systems of axions, such as a dense axion star or a collapsing dilute axion star.

  13. Deep, high contrast microscopic cell imaging using three-photon luminescence of β-(NaYF4:Er(3+)/NaYF4) nanoprobe excited by 1480-nm CW laser of only 1.5-mW.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Wu, Ruitao; Li, Nana; Zhang, Xin; Zhan, Qiuqiang; He, Sailing

    2015-05-01

    It is challenging to achieve deep microscopic imaging for the strong scattering in biotissue. An efficient three-photon luminescence can effectively increase the penetration depth. Here we report that β-NaYF4: Er(3+)/NaYF4 UCNPs were excited by a 1480-nm CW-laser and emitted 543/653-nm light through a three-photon process. With the merit of the hexagonal crystal phase, sub-milliwatt laser power was utilized to excite the UCNP-probed cells to minimize the heating effect. The polymer-coated UCNPs were shown to be harmless to cells. The deep, high contrast in vitro microscopic imaging was implemented through an artificial phantom. Imaging depth of 800 μm was achieved using only 1.5 mW excitation and a 0.7 NA objective. The green/red emission intensities ratio after penetrating the phantom was studied, indicating that longer emission wavelength is preferred for deep multiphoton microscopy. The proposed and demonstrated β-UCNPs would have great potential in three-photon microscopy.

  14. Deep, high contrast microscopic cell imaging using three-photon luminescence of β-(NaYF4:Er3+/NaYF4) nanoprobe excited by 1480-nm CW laser of only 1.5-mW

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jing; Wu, Ruitao; Li, Nana; Zhang, Xin; Zhan, Qiuqiang; He, Sailing

    2015-01-01

    It is challenging to achieve deep microscopic imaging for the strong scattering in biotissue. An efficient three-photon luminescence can effectively increase the penetration depth. Here we report that β-NaYF4: Er3+/NaYF4 UCNPs were excited by a 1480-nm CW-laser and emitted 543/653-nm light through a three-photon process. With the merit of the hexagonal crystal phase, sub-milliwatt laser power was utilized to excite the UCNP-probed cells to minimize the heating effect. The polymer-coated UCNPs were shown to be harmless to cells. The deep, high contrast in vitro microscopic imaging was implemented through an artificial phantom. Imaging depth of 800 μm was achieved using only 1.5 mW excitation and a 0.7 NA objective. The green/red emission intensities ratio after penetrating the phantom was studied, indicating that longer emission wavelength is preferred for deep multiphoton microscopy. The proposed and demonstrated β-UCNPs would have great potential in three-photon microscopy. PMID:26137385

  15. The hydrogen molecule under the reaction microscope: single photon double ionization at maximum cross section and threshold (doubly differential cross sections)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Thorsten; Foucar, Lutz; Jahnke, Till; Schoeffler, Markus; Schmidt, Lothar; Prior, Michael; Doerner, Reinhard

    2017-08-01

    We studied the photo double ionization of hydrogen molecules in the threshold region (50 eV) and the complete photo fragmentation of deuterium molecules at maximum cross section (75 eV) with single photons (linearly polarized) from the Advanced Light Source, using the reaction microscope imaging technique. The 3D-momentum vectors of two recoiling ions and up to two electrons were measured in coincidence. We present the kinetic energy sharing between the electrons and ions, the relative electron momenta, the azimuthal and polar angular distributions of the electrons in the body-fixed frame. We also present the dependency of the kinetic energy release in the Coulomb explosion of the two nuclei on the electron emission patterns. We find that the electronic emission in the body-fixed frame is strongly influenced by the orientation of the molecular axis to the polarization vector and the internuclear distance as well as the electronic energy sharing. Traces of a possible breakdown of the Born-Oppenheimer approximation are observed near threshold.

  16. Dynamically controlling the emission of single excitons in photonic crystal cavities

    PubMed Central

    Pagliano, Francesco; Cho, YongJin; Xia, Tian; van Otten, Frank; Johne, Robert; Fiore, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Single excitons in semiconductor microcavities represent a solid state and scalable platform for cavity quantum electrodynamics, potentially enabling an interface between flying (photon) and static (exciton) quantum bits in future quantum networks. While both single-photon emission and the strong coupling regime have been demonstrated, further progress has been hampered by the inability to control the coherent evolution of the cavity quantum electrodynamics system in real time, as needed to produce and harness charge–photon entanglement. Here using the ultrafast electrical tuning of the exciton energy in a photonic crystal diode, we demonstrate the dynamic control of the coupling of a single exciton to a photonic crystal cavity mode on a sub-nanosecond timescale, faster than the natural lifetime of the exciton. This opens the way to the control of single-photon waveforms, as needed for quantum interfaces, and to the real-time control of solid-state cavity quantum electrodynamics systems. PMID:25503405

  17. Fully kinetic simulations of collisionless, mesothermal plasma emission: Macroscopic plume structure and microscopic electron characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yuan; Wang, Joseph

    2017-03-01

    This paper presents a fully kinetic particle particle-in-cell simulation study on the emission of a collisionless plasma plume consisting of cold beam ions and thermal electrons. Results are presented for both the two-dimensional macroscopic plume structure and the microscopic electron kinetic characteristics. We find that the macroscopic plume structure exhibits several distinctive regions, including an undisturbed core region, an electron cooling expansion region, and an electron isothermal expansion region. The properties of each region are determined by microscopic electron kinetic characteristics. The division between the undisturbed region and the cooling expansion region approximately matches the Mach line generated at the edge of the emission surface, and that between the cooling expansion region and the isothermal expansion region approximately matches the potential well established in the beam. The interactions between electrons and the potential well lead to a new, near-equilibrium state different from the initial distribution for the electrons in the isothermal expansion region. The electron kinetic characteristics in the plume are also very anisotropic. As the electron expansion process is mostly non-equilibrium and anisotropic, the commonly used assumption that the electrons in a collisionless, mesothermal plasma plume may be treated as a single equilibrium fluid in general is not valid.

  18. Emission in a SnS{sub 2} inverted opaline photonic crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Romanov, S. G.; Maka, T.; Sotomayor Torres, C. M.; Mueller, M.; Zentel, R.

    2001-08-06

    The photoluminescence of a dye embedded in the three-dimensional SnS{sub 2} inverted opal has been studied. Changes of the emission spectrum compared with the free-space dye emission was observed in the stop-band frequency range in accord with reflectance/transmission spectra of this photonic crystal. The angular-dependent component, due to the Bragg stop band, and the angular-independent component, which is, possibly, related to the minimum in the density of photon states, have been distinguished in the dye emission spectrum. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  19. Simulation of multi-photon emission isotopes using time-resolved SimSET multiple photon history generator

    SciTech Connect

    Chiang, Chih-Chieh; Lin, Hsin-Hon; Lin, Chang-Shiun; Chuang, Keh-Shih; Jan, Meei-Ling

    2015-07-01

    Abstract-Multiple-photon emitters, such as In-111 or Se-75, have enormous potential in the field of nuclear medicine imaging. For example, Se-75 can be used to investigate the bile acid malabsorption and measure the bile acid pool loss. The simulation system for emission tomography (SimSET) is a well-known Monte Carlo simulation (MCS) code in nuclear medicine for its high computational efficiency. However, current SimSET cannot simulate these isotopes due to the lack of modeling of complex decay scheme and the time-dependent decay process. To extend the versatility of SimSET for simulation of those multi-photon emission isotopes, a time-resolved multiple photon history generator based on SimSET codes is developed in present study. For developing the time-resolved SimSET (trSimSET) with radionuclide decay process, the new MCS model introduce new features, including decay time information and photon time-of-flight information, into this new code. The half-life of energy states were tabulated from the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF) database. The MCS results indicate that the overall percent difference is less than 8.5% for all simulation trials as compared to GATE. To sum up, we demonstrated that time-resolved SimSET multiple photon history generator can have comparable accuracy with GATE and keeping better computational efficiency. The new MCS code is very useful to study the multi-photon imaging of novel isotopes that needs the simulation of lifetime and the time-of-fight measurements. (authors)

  20. Ultra-weak photon emission from biological samples: definition, mechanisms, properties, detection and applications.

    PubMed

    Cifra, Michal; Pospíšil, Pavel

    2014-10-05

    This review attempts to summarize molecular mechanisms, spectral and intensity properties, detection techniques and applications of ultra-weak photon emission. Ultra-weak photon emission is the chemiluminescence from biological systems where electronically excited species are formed during oxidative metabolic or oxidative stress processes. It is generally accepted that photons are emitted (1) at near UVA, visible, and near IR spectral ranges from 350 to 1300nm and (2) at the intensity of photon emission in the range of several units to several hundreds (oxidative metabolic process) and several hundreds to several thousands (oxidative stress process) photons s(-1)cm(-2). Current development in detection using low-noise photomultiplier tubes and imaging using highly sensitive charge coupled device cameras allows temporal and spatial visualization of oxidative metabolic or oxidative stress processes, respectively. As the phenomenon of ultra-weak photon emission reflects oxidative metabolic or oxidative stress processes, it can be widely used as a non-invasive tool for monitoring of the physiological state of biological systems. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Broadband enhancement of spontaneous emission in a photonic-plasmonic structure.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaolong; Xie, Fengxian; Shi, Lei; Liu, Xiaohan; Mortensen, N Asger; Xiao, Sanshui; Zi, Jian; Choy, Wallace

    2012-06-01

    We demonstrate that a broadband enhancement of spontaneous emission can be achieved within a photonic-plasmonic structure. The structure can strongly modify the spontaneous emission by exciting plasmonic modes. Because of the excited plasmonic modes, an enhancement up to 30 times is observed, leading to a 4 times broader emission spectrum. The reflectance measurement and the finite-difference time-domain simulation are carried out to support these results.

  2. Factors affecting ultraviolet-A photon emission from β-irradiated human keratinocyte cells.

    PubMed

    Le, M; Mothersill, C E; Seymour, C B; Ahmad, S B; Armstrong, A; Rainbow, A J; McNeill, F E

    2015-08-21

    The luminescence intensity of 340±5 nm photons emitted from HaCaT (human keratinocyte) cells was investigated using a single-photon-counting system during cellular exposure to (90)Y β-particles. Multiple factors were assessed to determine their influence upon the quantity and pattern of photon emission from β-irradiated cells. Exposure of 1 x 10(4) cells/5 mL to 703 μCi resulted in maximum UVA photoemission at 44.8 x 10(3)±2.5 x 10(3) counts per second (cps) from live HaCaT cells (background: 1-5 cps); a 16-fold increase above cell-free controls. Significant biophoton emission was achieved only upon stimulation and was also dependent upon presence of cells. UVA luminescence was measured for (90)Y activities 14 to 703 μCi where a positive relationship between photoemission and (90)Y activity was observed. Irradiation of live HaCaT cells plated at various densities produced a distinct pattern of emission whereby luminescence increased up to a maximum at 1 x 10(4) cells/5 mL and thereafter decreased. However, this result was not observed in the dead cell population. Both live and dead HaCaT cells were irradiated and were found to demonstrate different rates of photon emission at low β activities (⩽400 μCi). Dead cells exhibited greater photon emission rates than live cells which may be attributable to metabolic processes taking place to modulate the photoemissive effect. The results indicate that photon emission from HaCaT cells is perturbed by external stimulation, is dependent upon the activity of radiation delivered, the density of irradiated cells, and cell viability. It is postulated that biophoton emission may be modulated by a biological or metabolic process.

  3. Factors affecting ultraviolet-A photon emission from β-irradiated human keratinocyte cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, M.; Mothersill, C. E.; Seymour, C. B.; Ahmad, S. B.; Armstrong, A.; Rainbow, A. J.; McNeill, F. E.

    2015-08-01

    The luminescence intensity of 340+/- 5 nm photons emitted from HaCaT (human keratinocyte) cells was investigated using a single-photon-counting system during cellular exposure to 90Y β-particles. Multiple factors were assessed to determine their influence upon the quantity and pattern of photon emission from β-irradiated cells. Exposure of 1× {{10}4} cells/5 mL to 703 μCi resulted in maximum UVA photoemission at 44.8× {{10}3}+/- 2.5× {{10}3} counts per second (cps) from live HaCaT cells (background: 1-5 cps); a 16-fold increase above cell-free controls. Significant biophoton emission was achieved only upon stimulation and was also dependent upon presence of cells. UVA luminescence was measured for 90Y activities 14 to 703 μCi where a positive relationship between photoemission and 90Y activity was observed. Irradiation of live HaCaT cells plated at various densities produced a distinct pattern of emission whereby luminescence increased up to a maximum at 1× {{10}4} cells/5 mL and thereafter decreased. However, this result was not observed in the dead cell population. Both live and dead HaCaT cells were irradiated and were found to demonstrate different rates of photon emission at low β activities (⩽400 μCi). Dead cells exhibited greater photon emission rates than live cells which may be attributable to metabolic processes taking place to modulate the photoemissive effect. The results indicate that photon emission from HaCaT cells is perturbed by external stimulation, is dependent upon the activity of radiation delivered, the density of irradiated cells, and cell viability. It is postulated that biophoton emission may be modulated by a biological or metabolic process.

  4. Spontaneous ultraweak photon emission imaging of oxidative metabolic processes in human skin: effect of molecular oxygen and antioxidant defense system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastogi, Anshu; Pospíšil, Pavel

    2011-09-01

    All living organisms emit spontaneous ultraweak photon emission as a result of cellular metabolic processes. In this study, the involvement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) formed as the byproduct of oxidative metabolic processes in spontaneous ultraweak photon emission was studied in human hand skin. The effect of molecular oxygen and ROS scavengers on spontaneous ultraweak photon emission from human skin was monitored using a highly sensitive photomultiplier tube and charged coupled device camera. When spontaneous ultraweak photon emission was measured under anaerobic conditions, the photon emission was decreased, whereas under hyperaerobic condition the enhancement in photon emission was observed. Spontaneous ultraweak photon emission measured after topical application of glutathione, α-tocopherol, ascorbate, and coenzyme Q10 was observed to be decreased. These results reveal that ROS formed during the cellular metabolic processes in the epidermal cells play a significant role in the spontaneous ultraweak photon emission. It is proposed that spontaneous ultraweak photon emission can be used as a noninvasive tool for the temporal and spatial monitoring of the oxidative metabolic processes and intrinsic antioxidant system in human skin.

  5. Development and design of up-to-date laser scanning two-photon microscope using in neuroscience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doronin, Maxim; Popov, Alexander

    2017-02-01

    Today one of the main areas of application of two-photon microscopy is biology. This is due to the fact that this technique allows to obtain 3D images of tissues due to laser focus change, that is possible due to substantially greater penetration depth on the main wavelength into biological tissues. Self-developed microscopy system provides possibility to service it and modify the structure of microscope depending on highly specialized experimental design and scientific goals. This article may be regarded as a quick reference to laboratory staff who are wishing to develop their own microscopy system for self-service and modernization of the system and in order to save the lab budget.

  6. Low-cost two-photon microscope with fully customized trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lodo, Stefano; Tomaselli, Alessandra; Vacchi, Carla; Ugolotti, Elena

    2010-02-01

    A modular and efficient nonlinear scanning microscope using an ultrashort pulse laser has been developed. The system is fully supervised by with an ad-hoc electronic system based on FPGA (Field Programmable Gate Array). A closed-loop control allows the compensation of scanning system non-idealities. Fully customizable trajectories can be used, in order to find best performances of the mechanical system. The electronic system is also characterized by the management of the target focusing on different focal planes and automatic research of the best focal plane. An ad-hoc software controls the system by a standard USB interface and processes images.

  7. Broadband Enhancement of Spontaneous Emission in Two-Dimensional Semiconductors Using Photonic Hypercrystals.

    PubMed

    Galfsky, Tal; Sun, Zheng; Considine, Christopher R; Chou, Cheng-Tse; Ko, Wei-Chun; Lee, Yi-Hsien; Narimanov, Evgenii E; Menon, Vinod M

    2016-08-10

    The low quantum yield observed in two-dimensional semiconductors of transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) has motivated the quest for approaches that can enhance the light emission from these systems. Here, we demonstrate broadband enhancement of spontaneous emission and increase in Raman signature from archetype two-dimensional semiconductors: molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) and tungsten disulfide (WS2) by placing the monolayers in the near field of a photonic hypercrystal having hyperbolic dispersion. Hypercrystals are characterized by a large broadband photonic density of states due to hyperbolic dispersion while having enhanced light in/out coupling by a subwavelength photonic crystal lattice. This dual advantage is exploited here to enhance the light emission from the 2D TMDs and can be utilized for developing light emitters and solar cells using two-dimensional semiconductors.

  8. Highly directional emission and photon beaming from nanocrystal quantum dots embedded in metallic nanoslit arrays.

    PubMed

    Livneh, Nitzan; Strauss, Ayelet; Schwarz, Ilai; Rosenberg, Itamar; Zimran, Adiel; Yochelis, Shira; Chen, Gang; Banin, Uri; Paltiel, Yossi; Rapaport, Ronen

    2011-04-13

    We demonstrate a directional beaming of photons emitted from nanocrystal quantum dots that are embedded in a subwavelength metallic nanoslit array with a divergence angle of less than 4°. We show that the eigenmodes of the structure result in localized electromagnetic field enhancements at the Bragg cavity resonances, which could be controlled and engineered in both real and momentum space. The photon beaming is achieved using the enhanced resonant coupling of the quantum dots to these Bragg cavity modes, which dominates the emission properties of the quantum dots. We show that the emission probability of a quantum dot into the narrow angular mode is 20 times larger than the emission probability to all other modes. Engineering nanocrystal quantum dots with subwavelength metallic nanostructures is a promising way for a range of new types of active optical devices, where spatial control of the optical properties of nanoemitters is essential, on both the single and many photons level.

  9. Quantum-confined single photon emission at room temperature from SiC tetrapods.

    PubMed

    Castelletto, Stefania; Bodrog, Zoltán; Magyar, Andrew P; Gentle, Angus; Gali, Adam; Aharonovich, Igor

    2014-09-07

    Controlled engineering of isolated solid state quantum systems is one of the most prominent goals in modern nanotechnology. In this letter we demonstrate a previously unknown quantum system namely silicon carbide tetrapods. The tetrapods have a cubic polytype core (3C) and hexagonal polytype legs (4H)--a geometry that creates spontaneous polarization within a single tetrapod. Modeling of the tetrapod structures predicts that a bound exciton should exist at the 3C-4H interface. The simulations are confirmed by the observation of fully polarized and narrowband single photon emission from the tetrapods at room temperature. The single photon emission provides important insights into understanding the quantum confinement effects in non-spherical nanostructures. Our results pave the way to a new class of crystal phase nanomaterials that exhibit single photon emission at room temperature and therefore are suitable for sensing, quantum information and nanophotonics.

  10. Apertureless scanning microscope probe as a detector of semiconductor laser emission

    SciTech Connect

    Dunaevskiy, Mikhail; Dontsov, Anton; Monakhov, Andrei; Alekseev, Prokhor; Titkov, Alexander; Baranov, Alexei; Girard, Paul; Arinero, Richard; Teissier, Roland

    2015-04-27

    An operating semiconductor laser has been studied using a scanning probe microscope. A shift of the resonance frequency of probe that is due to its heating by laser radiation has been analyzed. The observed shift is proportional to the absorbed radiation and can be used to measure the laser near field or its output power. A periodical dependence of the measured signal has been observed as a function of distance between the probe and the surface of the laser due to the interference of the outgoing and cantilever-reflected waves. Due to the multiple reflections resulting in the interference, the light absorption by the probe cantilever is greatly enhanced compared with a single pass case. Interaction of infrared emission of a diode laser with different probes has been studied.

  11. Frequency splitter based on the directional emission from surface modes in dielectric photonic crystal structures

    SciTech Connect

    Tasolamprou, Anna C.; Zhang, Lei; Kafesaki, Maria; Koschny, Thomas; Soukoulis, Costas M.

    2015-05-19

    We demonstrate the numerical design and the experimental validation of frequency dependent directional emission from a dielectric photonic crystal structure. The wave propagates through a photonic crystal line-defect waveguide, while a surface layer at the termination of the photonic crystal enables the excitation of surface modes and a subsequent grating layer transforms the surface energy into outgoing propagating waves of the form of a directional beam. Furthermore, the angle of the beam is controlled by the frequency and the structure operates as a frequency splitter in the intermediate and far field region.

  12. Surface acoustic wave regulated single photon emission from a coupled quantum dot-nanocavity system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiß, M.; Kapfinger, S.; Reichert, T.; Finley, J. J.; Wixforth, A.; Kaniber, M.; Krenner, H. J.

    2016-07-01

    A coupled quantum dot-nanocavity system in the weak coupling regime of cavity-quantumelectrodynamics is dynamically tuned in and out of resonance by the coherent elastic field of a fSAW ≃ 800 MHz surface acoustic wave. When the system is brought to resonance by the sound wave, light-matter interaction is strongly increased by the Purcell effect. This leads to a precisely timed single photon emission as confirmed by the second order photon correlation function, g(2). All relevant frequencies of our experiment are faithfully identified in the Fourier transform of g(2), demonstrating high fidelity regulation of the stream of single photons emitted by the system.

  13. Design of highly efficient metallo-dielectric patch antennas for single-photon emission.

    PubMed

    Bigourdan, F; Marquier, F; Hugonin, J-P; Greffet, J-J

    2014-02-10

    Quantum emitters such as NV-centers or quantum dots can be used as single-photon sources. To improve their performance, they can be coupled to microcavities or nano-antennas. Plasmonic antennas offer an appealing solution as they can be used with broadband emitters. When properly designed, these antennas funnel light into useful modes, increasing the emission rate and the collection of single-photons. Yet, their inherent metallic losses are responsible for very low radiative efficiencies. Here, we introduce a new design of directional, metallo-dielectric, optical antennas with a Purcell factor of 150, a total efficiency of 74% and a collection efficiency of emitted photons of 99%.

  14. Modulation of the pupil function of microscope objective lens for multifocal multi-photon microscopy using a spatial light modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Naoya; Okazaki, Shigetoshi; Takamoto, Hisayoshi; Inoue, Takashi; Terakawa, Susumu

    2014-02-01

    We propose a method for high precision modulation of the pupil function of a microscope objective lens to improve the performance of multifocal multi-photon microscopy (MMM). To modulate the pupil function, we adopt a spatial light modulator (SLM) and place it at the conjugate position of the objective lens. The SLM can generate an arbitrary number of spots to excite the multiple fluorescence spots (MFS) at the desired positions and intensities by applying an appropriate computer-generated hologram (CGH). This flexibility allows us to control the MFS according to the photobleaching level of a fluorescent protein and phototoxicity of a specimen. However, when a large number of excitation spots are generated, the intensity distribution of the MFS is significantly different from the one originally designed due to misalignment of the optical setup and characteristics of the SLM. As a result, the image of a specimen obtained using laser scanning for the MFS has block noise segments because the SLM could not generate a uniform MFS. To improve the intensity distribution of the MFS, we adaptively redesigned the CGH based on the observed MFS. We experimentally demonstrate an improvement in the uniformity of a 10 × 10 MFS grid using a dye solution. The simplicity of the proposed method will allow it to be applied for calibration of MMM before observing living tissue. After the MMM calibration, we performed laser scanning with two-photon excitation to observe a real specimen without detecting block noise segments.

  15. Single-photon pulse propagation in and into a medium of two-level atoms: Microscopic Fresnel equations

    SciTech Connect

    Berman, P. R.; Ooi, C. H. Raymond

    2011-12-15

    The propagation of an off-resonant, single-photon pulse in and into a medium of two-level atoms is considered. When the pulse is launched from within the medium, there are two propagation speeds, neither of which is the normal group velocity. For densities as small as 10{sup 11} atoms/cm{sup 3} and detunings of order 10{sup 11} s{sup -1}, both propagation speeds approach one half the speed of light in vacuum. Moreover, rather remarkably, there are Rabi oscillations between the field and atomic excitation, even for this single-photon pulse. In contrast, for a pulse sent into the medium, the atom-field system remains adiabatically in a dressed state that propagates with the normal group velocity. In the limit that the index of refraction is approximately equal to unity, we obtain the Fresnel equations for the reflection and transmission coefficients based on this microscopic model. The transmission coefficient differs from the conventional result owing to the fact that we quantize the field in free space.

  16. Method to quantify accuracy of position feedback signals of a three-dimensional two-photon laser-scanning microscope.

    PubMed

    Kummer, Michael; Kirmse, Knut; Witte, Otto W; Haueisen, Jens; Holthoff, Knut

    2015-10-01

    Two-photon laser-scanning microscopy enables to record neuronal network activity in three-dimensional space while maintaining single-cellular resolution. One of the proposed approaches combines galvanometric x-y scanning with piezo-driven objective movements and employs hardware feedback signals for position monitoring. However, readily applicable methods to quantify the accuracy of those feedback signals are currently lacking. Here we provide techniques based on contact-free laser reflection and laser triangulation for the quantification of positioning accuracy of each spatial axis. We found that the lateral feedback signals are sufficiently accurate (defined as <2.5 µm) for a wide range of scan trajectories and frequencies. We further show that axial positioning accuracy does not only depend on objective acceleration and mass but also its geometry. We conclude that the introduced methods allow a reliable quantification of position feedback signals in a cost-efficient, easy-to-install manner and should be applicable for a wide range of two-photon laser scanning microscopes.

  17. Method to quantify accuracy of position feedback signals of a three-dimensional two-photon laser-scanning microscope

    PubMed Central

    Kummer, Michael; Kirmse, Knut; Witte, Otto W.; Haueisen, Jens; Holthoff, Knut

    2015-01-01

    Two-photon laser-scanning microscopy enables to record neuronal network activity in three-dimensional space while maintaining single-cellular resolution. One of the proposed approaches combines galvanometric x-y scanning with piezo-driven objective movements and employs hardware feedback signals for position monitoring. However, readily applicable methods to quantify the accuracy of those feedback signals are currently lacking. Here we provide techniques based on contact-free laser reflection and laser triangulation for the quantification of positioning accuracy of each spatial axis. We found that the lateral feedback signals are sufficiently accurate (defined as <2.5 µm) for a wide range of scan trajectories and frequencies. We further show that axial positioning accuracy does not only depend on objective acceleration and mass but also its geometry. We conclude that the introduced methods allow a reliable quantification of position feedback signals in a cost-efficient, easy-to-install manner and should be applicable for a wide range of two-photon laser scanning microscopes. PMID:26504620

  18. Dynamic performance of microelectromechanical systems deformable mirrors for use in an active/adaptive two-photon microscope.

    PubMed

    Archer-Zhang, Christian Chunzi; Foster, Warren B; Downey, Ryan D; Arrasmith, Christopher L; Dickensheets, David L

    2016-12-01

    Active optics such as deformable mirrors can be used to control both focal depth and aberrations during scanning laser microscopy. If the focal depth can be changed dynamically during scanning, then imaging of oblique surfaces becomes possible. If aberrations can be corrected dynamically during scanning, an image can be optimized throughout the field of view. Here, we characterize the speed and dynamic precision of a Boston Micromachines Corporation Multi-DM 140 element aberration correction mirror and a Revibro Optics 4-zone focus control mirror to assess suitability for use in an active and adaptive two-photon microscope. Tests for the multi-DM include both step response and sinusoidal frequency sweeps of specific Zernike modes (defocus, spherical aberration, coma, astigmatism, and trefoil). We find wavefront error settling times for mode amplitude steps as large as 400 nm to be less than 52???s, with 3 dB frequencies ranging from 6.5 to 10 kHz. The Revibro Optics mirror was tested for step response only, with wavefront error settling time less than 80???s for defocus steps up to 3000 nm, and less than 45???s for spherical aberration steps up to 600 nm. These response speeds are sufficient for intrascan correction at scan rates typical of two-photon microscopy.

  19. Dynamic performance of microelectromechanical systems deformable mirrors for use in an active/adaptive two-photon microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archer-Zhang, Christian Chunzi; Foster, Warren B.; Downey, Ryan D.; Arrasmith, Christopher L.; Dickensheets, David L.

    2016-12-01

    Active optics such as deformable mirrors can be used to control both focal depth and aberrations during scanning laser microscopy. If the focal depth can be changed dynamically during scanning, then imaging of oblique surfaces becomes possible. If aberrations can be corrected dynamically during scanning, an image can be optimized throughout the field of view. Here, we characterize the speed and dynamic precision of a Boston Micromachines Corporation Multi-DM 140 element aberration correction mirror and a Revibro Optics 4-zone focus control mirror to assess suitability for use in an active and adaptive two-photon microscope. Tests for the multi-DM include both step response and sinusoidal frequency sweeps of specific Zernike modes (defocus, spherical aberration, coma, astigmatism, and trefoil). We find wavefront error settling times for mode amplitude steps as large as 400 nm to be less than 52 μs, with 3 dB frequencies ranging from 6.5 to 10 kHz. The Revibro Optics mirror was tested for step response only, with wavefront error settling time less than 80 μs for defocus steps up to 3000 nm, and less than 45 μs for spherical aberration steps up to 600 nm. These response speeds are sufficient for intrascan correction at scan rates typical of two-photon microscopy.

  20. Acquisition of a High Resolution Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope for the Analysis of Returned Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nittler, Larry R.

    2003-01-01

    This grant furnished funds to purchase a state-of-the-art scanning electron microscope (SEM) to support our analytical facilities for extraterrestrial samples. After evaluating several instruments, we purchased a JEOL 6500F thermal field emission SEM with the following analytical accessories: EDAX energy-dispersive x-ray analysis system with fully automated control of instrument and sample stage; EDAX LEXS wavelength-dispersive x-ray spectrometer for high sensitivity light-element analysis; EDAX/TSL electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) system with software for phase identification and crystal orientation mapping; Robinson backscatter electron detector; and an in situ micro-manipulator (Kleindiek). The total price was $550,000 (with $150,000 of the purchase supported by Carnegie institution matching funds). The microscope was delivered in October 2002, and most of the analytical accessories were installed by January 2003. With the exception of the wavelength spectrometer (which has been undergoing design changes) everything is working well and the SEM is in routine use in our laboratory.

  1. Acquisition of a High Resolution Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope for the Analysis of Returned Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nittler, Larry R.

    2003-01-01

    This grant furnished funds to purchase a state-of-the-art scanning electron microscope (SEM) to support our analytical facilities for extraterrestrial samples. After evaluating several instruments, we purchased a JEOL 6500F thermal field emission SEM with the following analytical accessories: EDAX energy-dispersive x-ray analysis system with fully automated control of instrument and sample stage; EDAX LEXS wavelength-dispersive x-ray spectrometer for high sensitivity light-element analysis; EDAX/TSL electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) system with software for phase identification and crystal orientation mapping; Robinson backscatter electron detector; and an in situ micro-manipulator (Kleindiek). The total price was $550,000 (with $150,000 of the purchase supported by Carnegie institution matching funds). The microscope was delivered in October 2002, and most of the analytical accessories were installed by January 2003. With the exception of the wavelength spectrometer (which has been undergoing design changes) everything is working well and the SEM is in routine use in our laboratory.

  2. Quantifying distortions in two-photon remote focussing microscope images using a volumetric calibration specimen

    PubMed Central

    Corbett, Alexander D.; Burton, Rebecca A. B.; Bub, Gil; Salter, Patrick S.; Tuohy, Simon; Booth, Martin J.; Wilson, Tony

    2014-01-01

    Remote focussing microscopy allows sharp, in-focus images to be acquired at high speed from outside of the focal plane of an objective lens without any agitation of the specimen. However, without careful optical alignment, the advantages of remote focussing microscopy could be compromised by the introduction of depth-dependent scaling artifacts. To achieve an ideal alignment in a point-scanning remote focussing microscope, the lateral (XY) scan mirror pair must be imaged onto the back focal plane of both the reference and imaging objectives, in a telecentric arrangement. However, for many commercial objective lenses, it can be difficult to accurately locate the position of the back focal plane. This paper investigates the impact of this limitation on the fidelity of three-dimensional data sets of living cardiac tissue, specifically the introduction of distortions. These distortions limit the accuracy of sarcomere measurements taken directly from raw volumetric data. The origin of the distortion is first identified through simulation of a remote focussing microscope. Using a novel three-dimensional calibration specimen it was then possible to quantify experimentally the size of the distortion as a function of objective misalignment. Finally, by first approximating and then compensating the distortion in imaging data from whole heart rodent studies, the variance of sarcomere length (SL) measurements was reduced by almost 50%. PMID:25339910

  3. Intracellular nanomanipulation by a photonic-force microscope with real-time acquisition of a 3D stiffness matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertseva, E.; Singh, A. S. G.; Lekki, J.; Thévenaz, P.; Lekka, M.; Jeney, S.; Gremaud, G.; Puttini, S.; Nowak, W.; Dietler, G.; Forró, L.; Unser, M.; Kulik, A. J.

    2009-07-01

    A traditional photonic-force microscope (PFM) results in huge sets of data, which requires tedious numerical analysis. In this paper, we propose instead an analog signal processor to attain real-time capabilities while retaining the richness of the traditional PFM data. Our system is devoted to intracellular measurements and is fully interactive through the use of a haptic joystick. Using our specialized analog hardware along with a dedicated algorithm, we can extract the full 3D stiffness matrix of the optical trap in real time, including the off-diagonal cross-terms. Our system is also capable of simultaneously recording data for subsequent offline analysis. This allows us to check that a good correlation exists between the classical analysis of stiffness and our real-time measurements. We monitor the PFM beads using an optical microscope. The force-feedback mechanism of the haptic joystick helps us in interactively guiding the bead inside living cells and collecting information from its (possibly anisotropic) environment. The instantaneous stiffness measurements are also displayed in real time on a graphical user interface. The whole system has been built and is operational; here we present early results that confirm the consistency of the real-time measurements with offline computations.

  4. Quantum-confined single photon emission at room temperature from SiC tetrapods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castelletto, Stefania; Bodrog, Zoltán; Magyar, Andrew P.; Gentle, Angus; Gali, Adam; Aharonovich, Igor

    2014-08-01

    Controlled engineering of isolated solid state quantum systems is one of the most prominent goals in modern nanotechnology. In this letter we demonstrate a previously unknown quantum system namely silicon carbide tetrapods. The tetrapods have a cubic polytype core (3C) and hexagonal polytype legs (4H) - a geometry that creates spontaneous polarization within a single tetrapod. Modeling of the tetrapod structures predicts that a bound exciton should exist at the 3C-4H interface. The simulations are confirmed by the observation of fully polarized and narrowband single photon emission from the tetrapods at room temperature. The single photon emission provides important insights into understanding the quantum confinement effects in non-spherical nanostructures. Our results pave the way to a new class of crystal phase nanomaterials that exhibit single photon emission at room temperature and therefore are suitable for sensing, quantum information and nanophotonics.Controlled engineering of isolated solid state quantum systems is one of the most prominent goals in modern nanotechnology. In this letter we demonstrate a previously unknown quantum system namely silicon carbide tetrapods. The tetrapods have a cubic polytype core (3C) and hexagonal polytype legs (4H) - a geometry that creates spontaneous polarization within a single tetrapod. Modeling of the tetrapod structures predicts that a bound exciton should exist at the 3C-4H interface. The simulations are confirmed by the observation of fully polarized and narrowband single photon emission from the tetrapods at room temperature. The single photon emission provides important insights into understanding the quantum confinement effects in non-spherical nanostructures. Our results pave the way to a new class of crystal phase nanomaterials that exhibit single photon emission at room temperature and therefore are suitable for sensing, quantum information and nanophotonics. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available

  5. Coupling of semiconductor carbon nanotubes emission with silicon photonic micro ring resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarti, Francesco; Caselli, Niccolò; La China, Federico; Biccari, Francesco; Torrini, Ughetta; Intonti, Francesca; Vinattieri, Anna; Durán-Valdeiglesias, Elena; Zhang, Weiwei; Noury, Adrien; Alonso-Ramos, Carlos; Hoang, ThiHong Cam; Serna, Samuel; Le Roux, Xavier; Cassan, Eric; Izard, Nicolas; Yang, Hongliu; Bezugly, Viktor; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio; Filoramo, Arianna; Vivien, Laurent; Gurioli, Massimo

    2016-05-01

    Hybrid structures are needed to fully exploit the great advantages of Si photonics and several approaches have been addressed where Si devices are bonded to different materials and nanostructures. Here we study the use of semiconductor carbon nanotubes for emission in the 1300 nm wavelength range to functionalize Si photonic structures in view of optoelectronic applications. The Si micro-rings are fully characterized by near field forward resonant scattering with 100 nm resolution. We show that both TE and TM modes can be addressed on the top of the micro-rings in a vectorial imaging of the in-plane polarization components. We coupled the Si micro-resonators with selected carbon nanotubes for high photoluminescence emission. Coupling nanotubes with the evanescent tails in air of the electric field localized in the photonic modes of the micro-resonators is demonstrated by sharp resonances over imposed to the nanotube emission bands. By mapping the Si and the nanotube emission we demonstrate that strong enhancement of the nanotube photoluminescence can be achieved both in the photonic modes of micro-disks and slot micro-rings, whenever the spatial overlap between nano-emitters and photonic modes is fulfilled.

  6. Femtosecond photoelectron point projection microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Quinonez, Erik; Handali, Jonathan; Barwick, Brett

    2013-10-15

    By utilizing a nanometer ultrafast electron source in a point projection microscope we demonstrate that images of nanoparticles with spatial resolutions of the order of 100 nanometers can be obtained. The duration of the emission process of the photoemitted electrons used to make images is shown to be of the order of 100 fs using an autocorrelation technique. The compact geometry of this photoelectron point projection microscope does not preclude its use as a simple ultrafast electron microscope, and we use simple analytic models to estimate temporal resolutions that can be expected when using it as a pump-probe ultrafast electron microscope. These models show a significant increase in temporal resolution when comparing to ultrafast electron microscopes based on conventional designs. We also model the microscopes spectroscopic abilities to capture ultrafast phenomena such as the photon induced near field effect.

  7. Spectral discrimination between healthy people and cold patients using spontaneous photon emission

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Meina; Pang, Jiangxiang; Liu, Junyan; Liu, Yanli; Fan, Hua; Han, Jinxiang

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, ultra-weak photon emission (UPE) was used to distinguish cold patients from healthy subjects. The UPE intensity of fingertips of two hands from healthy subjects and cold patients was measured using a two-hand UPE detecting system and a group of cut-off filters. We found a significant difference in the maximum spectral peak and photon emission ratio between the filter of 550nm and 495nm, which can be used in distinguish cold patients from healthy people. Methods and results in this work could be useful for developing a new optical diagnostic tool for early disease diagnosis in the future. PMID:25909016

  8. Emission polarization control in semiconductor quantum dots coupled to a photonic crystal microcavity.

    PubMed

    Gallardo, E; Martínez, L J; Nowak, A K; van der Meulen, H P; Calleja, J M; Tejedor, C; Prieto, I; Granados, D; Taboada, A G; García, J M; Postigo, P A

    2010-06-07

    We study the optical emission of single semiconductor quantum dots weakly coupled to a photonic-crystal micro-cavity. The linearly polarized emission of a selected quantum dot changes continuously its polarization angle, from nearly perpendicular to the cavity mode polarization at large detuning, to parallel at zero detuning, and reversing sign for negative detuning. The linear polarization rotation is qualitatively interpreted in terms of the detuning dependent mixing of the quantum dot and cavity states. The present result is relevant to achieve continuous control of the linear polarization in single photon emitters.

  9. Photon scattering from /sup 90/Zr below neutron emission threshold

    SciTech Connect

    Alarcon, R.; Laszewski, R.M.; Nathan, A.M.; Hoblit, S.D.

    1987-09-01

    Cross sections for elastic and inelastic scattering of monochromatic photons from /sup 90/Zr have been measured for excitations between 8.1 and 10.5 MeV. The observed inelastic cross sections sigma/sub el//sub el//sub i/ correspond to transitions to the 02 , 21 , 22 , and 23 states. A simple theoretical description using the Brink-Axel hypothesis and estimates of the level density and of the total photon interaction cross section sigma/sub el//sub T/ gives predictions for the individual cross sections that are in very good agreement with data. The E1 strength corresponding to the inferred sigma/sub el//sub T/ amounts to about B(E1up-arrow)--0.5 eS fmS for the energy range under consideration.

  10. Emission of Photons and Relativistic Axions from Axion stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohapatra, Abhishek; Braaten, Eric; Zhang, Hong

    2017-01-01

    The number of nonrelativistic axions can be changed by inelastic reactions that produce relativistic axions or photons. Any even number of nonrelativistic axions can scatter inelastically into two relativistic axions. Any odd number of axions can annihilate into two photons. This reaction produces a monochromatic radio-frequency signal at an odd-integer harmonic of the fundamental frequency set by the axion mass. The loss rates of axions from axion stars through these inelastic relations are calculated using the framework of a nonrelativistic effective field theory. Odd-integer harmonics of a fundamental radio-frequency signal provide a unique signature for collapsing axion stars or any dense configuration of axions. Supported by NSF and the DOE.

  11. Efficiently tunable photon emission from an optically driven artificial molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotrino-Lemus, Jonathan; Ramírez, Hanz Y.

    2017-06-01

    In this work, the emission properties of double quantum dots driven by an intense monochromatic electromagnetic field, while undergoing resonant tunnelling, are investigated. We find the optically active energy transitions and their corresponding emission intensity, and compute resonance fluorescence spectra for different detunings between the direct and indirect exciton energies. The simulated emission exhibit either three, five, or seven peaks, tunable on demand. On the basis of the obtained results, our proposal offers efficient control of the resonance fluorescence of an artificial molecule, suitable for optoelectronic applications.

  12. Plasmonic Structures for CMOS Photonics and Control of Spontaneous Emission

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-01

    record low coupling loss from silicon-on-insulator waveguides to dielectrically-loaded surface plasmon polariton waveguides with 1 dB/transition...loaded surface plasmon polariton waveguides with < 1 dB/transition insertion loss, iii. efficient coupling from silicon-on-insulator waveguides to...Plasmonic  and  Silicon  Photonic  Waveguides In this work, we demonstrate dielectric-loaded surface plasmon polariton (DLSPP) waveguides

  13. Photon emission of extremal Kerr-Newman black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Shao-Wen; Gu, Bao-Min; Wang, Yong-Qiang; Liu, Yu-Xiao

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we deal with the null geodesics extending from the near-horizon region out to a distant observatory in an extremal Kerr-Newman black hole background. In particular, using the matched asymptotic expansion method, we analytically solve the null geodesics near the superradiant bound in the form of algebraic equations. For the case that the photon trajectories are limited in the equatorial plane, the shifts in the azimuthal angle and time are obtained.

  14. Detection efficiency and spatial resolution of the SIRAD ion electron emission microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisello, D.; Giubilato, P.; Kaminsky, A.; Mattiazzo, S.; Nigro, M.; Pantano, D.; Silvestrin, L.; Tessaro, M.; Wyss, J.; Bertazzoni, S.; Mongiardo, L.; Salmeri, M.; Salsano, A.

    2009-06-01

    An axial ion electron emission microscope (IEEM) has been built at the SIRAD irradiation facility at the 15 MV Tandem accelerator of INFN Legnaro National Laboratory (Padova, Italy) to obtain a micrometric sensitivity map to single event effects (SEE) of electronic devices. In this contribution we report on two experiments performed with the IEEM. Si 3N 4 ultra-thin membranes with a gold deposition were placed on the device under test (DUT) to ensure a uniform and abundant secondary electron emission In the first experiment we measured an IEEM ion detection efficiency of 83% with a 58Ni (220 MeV) beam, in good agreement with the expected value. The second experiment allowed us to estimate the lateral resolution of the IEEM. The positions of ion induced single event upsets (SEU) in a synchronous dynamic random access memory (SDRAM), used as a reference target, were compared with the corresponding ion impact points reconstructed by the IEEM. The result (FWHM ˜4.4 μm with a 79Br beam of 214 MeV) is encouraging because of the residual presence of distortions of the image and mechanical vibrations.

  15. Optical spectral analysis of ultra-weak photon emission from tissue culture and yeast cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nerudová, Michaela; Červinková, Kateřina; Hašek, Jiří; Cifra, Michal

    2015-01-01

    Optical spectral analysis of the ultra-weak photon emission (UPE) could be utilized for non-invasive diagnostic of state of biological systems and for elucidation of underlying mechanisms of UPE generation. Optical spectra of UPE from differentiated HL-60 cells and yeast cells (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) were investigated. Induced photon emission of neutrophil-like cells and spontaneous photon emission of yeast cells were measured using highly sensitive photomultiplier module Hamamatsu H7360-01 in a thermally regulated light-tight chamber. The respiratory burst of neutrophil-like HL-60 cells was induced with the PMA (phorbol 12-myristate, 13-acetate). PMA activates an assembly of NADPH oxidase, which induces a rapid formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Long-pass edge filters (wavelength 350, from 400 to 600 with 25 nm resolution and 650 nm) were used for optical spectral analysis. Propagation of error of indirect measurements and standard deviation were used to assess reliability of the measured spectra. Results indicate that the photon emission from both cell cultures is detectable in the six from eight examined wavelength ranges with different percentage distribution of cell suspensions, particularly 450-475, 475-500, 500-525, 525-550, 550-575 and 575-600 nm. The wavelength range of spectra from 450 to 550 nm coincides with the range of photon emission from triplet excited carbonyls (350-550 nm). The both cells cultures emitted photons in wavelength range from 550 to 600 nm but this range does not correspond with any known emitter. To summarize, we have demonstrated a clear difference in the UPE spectra between two organisms using rigorous methodology and error analysis.

  16. A High Performance, Cost-Effective, Open-Source Microscope for Scanning Two-Photon Microscopy that Is Modular and Readily Adaptable

    PubMed Central

    Rosenegger, David G.; Tran, Cam Ha T.; LeDue, Jeffery; Zhou, Ning; Gordon, Grant R.

    2014-01-01

    Two-photon laser scanning microscopy has revolutionized the ability to delineate cellular and physiological function in acutely isolated tissue and in vivo. However, there exist barriers for many laboratories to acquire two-photon microscopes. Additionally, if owned, typical systems are difficult to modify to rapidly evolving methodologies. A potential solution to these problems is to enable scientists to build their own high-performance and adaptable system by overcoming a resource insufficiency. Here we present a detailed hardware resource and protocol for building an upright, highly modular and adaptable two-photon laser scanning fluorescence microscope that can be used for in vitro or in vivo applications. The microscope is comprised of high-end componentry on a skeleton of off-the-shelf compatible opto-mechanical parts. The dedicated design enabled imaging depths close to 1 mm into mouse brain tissue and a signal-to-noise ratio that exceeded all commercial two-photon systems tested. In addition to a detailed parts list, instructions for assembly, testing and troubleshooting, our plan includes complete three dimensional computer models that greatly reduce the knowledge base required for the non-expert user. This open-source resource lowers barriers in order to equip more laboratories with high-performance two-photon imaging and to help progress our understanding of the cellular and physiological function of living systems. PMID:25333934

  17. Spontaneous emission enhancement and saturable absorption of colloidal quantum dots coupled to photonic crystal cavity.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Shilpi; Waks, Edo

    2013-12-02

    We demonstrate spontaneous emission rate enhancement and saturable absorption of cadmium selenide colloidal quantum dots coupled to a nanobeam photonic crystal cavity. We perform time-resolved lifetime measurements and observe an average enhancement of 4.6 for the spontaneous emission rate of quantum dots located at the cavity as compared to those located on an unpatterned surface. We also demonstrate that the cavity linewidth narrows with increasing pump intensity due to quantum dot saturable absorption.

  18. Biocompatible and Photostable AIE Dots with Red Emission for In Vivo Two-Photon Bioimaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dan; Qian, Jun; Qin, Wei; Qin, Anjun; Tang, Ben Zhong; He, Sailing

    2014-03-01

    Bioimaging systems with cytocompatibility, photostability, red fluorescence, and optical nonlinearity are in great demand. Herein we report such a bioimaging system. Integration of tetraphenylethene (T), triphenylamine (T), and fumaronitrile (F) units yielded adduct TTF with aggregation-induced emission (AIE). Nanodots of the AIE fluorogen with efficient red emission were fabricated by encapsulating TTF with phospholipid. The AIE dots enabled three-dimensional dynamic imaging with high resolution in blood vessels of mouse brain under two-photon excitation.

  19. Biocompatible and photostable AIE dots with red emission for in vivo two-photon bioimaging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dan; Qian, Jun; Qin, Wei; Qin, Anjun; Tang, Ben Zhong; He, Sailing

    2014-03-17

    Bioimaging systems with cytocompatibility, photostability, red fluorescence, and optical nonlinearity are in great demand. Herein we report such a bioimaging system. Integration of tetraphenylethene (T), triphenylamine (T), and fumaronitrile (F) units yielded adduct TTF with aggregation-induced emission (AIE). Nanodots of the AIE fluorogen with efficient red emission were fabricated by encapsulating TTF with phospholipid. The AIE dots enabled three-dimensional dynamic imaging with high resolution in blood vessels of mouse brain under two-photon excitation.

  20. New cardiac cameras: single-photon emission CT and PET.

    PubMed

    Slomka, Piotr J; Berman, Daniel S; Germano, Guido

    2014-07-01

    Nuclear cardiology instrumentation has evolved significantly in the recent years. Concerns about radiation dose and long acquisition times have propelled developments of dedicated high-efficiency cardiac SPECT scanners. Novel collimator designs, such as multipinhole or locally focusing collimators arranged in geometries that are optimized for cardiac imaging, have been implemented to enhance photon-detection sensitivity. Some of these new SPECT scanners use solid-state photon detectors instead of photomultipliers to improve image quality and to reduce the scanner footprint. These new SPECT devices allow dramatic up to 7-fold reduction in acquisition times or similar reduction in radiation dose. In addition, new hardware for photon attenuation correction allowing ultralow radiation doses has been offered by some vendors. To mitigate photon attenuation artifacts for the new SPECT scanners not equipped with attenuation correction hardware, 2-position (upright-supine or prone-supine) imaging has been proposed. PET hardware developments have been primarily driven by the requirements of oncologic imaging, but cardiac imaging can benefit from improved PET image quality and improved sensitivity of 3D systems. The time-of-flight reconstruction combined with resolution recovery techniques is now implemented by all major PET vendors. These new methods improve image contrast and image resolution and reduce image noise. High-sensitivity 3D PET without interplane septa allows reduced radiation dose for cardiac perfusion imaging. Simultaneous PET/MR hybrid system has been developed. Solid-state PET detectors with avalanche photodiodes or digital silicon photomultipliers have been introduced, and they offer improved imaging characteristics and reduced sensitivity to electromagnetic MR fields. Higher maximum count rate of the new PET detectors allows routine first-pass Rb-82 imaging, with 3D PET acquisition enabling clinical utilization of dynamic imaging with myocardial flow

  1. Ultrafast Room-Temperature Single Photon Emission from Quantum Dots Coupled to Plasmonic Nanocavities.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Thang B; Akselrod, Gleb M; Mikkelsen, Maiken H

    2016-01-13

    Efficient and bright single photon sources at room temperature are critical components for quantum information systems such as quantum key distribution, quantum state teleportation, and quantum computation. However, the intrinsic radiative lifetime of quantum emitters is typically ∼10 ns, which severely limits the maximum single photon emission rate and thus entanglement rates. Here, we demonstrate the regime of ultrafast spontaneous emission (∼10 ps) from a single quantum emitter coupled to a plasmonic nanocavity at room temperature. The nanocavity integrated with a single colloidal semiconductor quantum dot produces a 540-fold decrease in the emission lifetime and a simultaneous 1900-fold increase in the total emission intensity. At the same time, the nanocavity acts as a highly efficient optical antenna directing the emission into a single lobe normal to the surface. This plasmonic platform is a versatile geometry into which a variety of other quantum emitters, such as crystal color centers, can be integrated for directional, room-temperature single photon emission rates exceeding 80 GHz.

  2. Photon-splitting limits to the hardness of emission in strongly magnetized soft gamma repeaters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baring, Matthew G.

    1995-01-01

    Soft gamma repeaters are characterized by recurrent activity consisting of short-duration outbursts of high-energy emission that is typically of temperature less than 40 keV. One recent model of repeaters is that they originate in the environs of neutron stars with superstrong magnetic fields, perhaps greater than 10(exp 14) G. In such fields, the exotic process of magnetic photon splitting gamma yields gamma gamma acts very effectively to reprocess gamma-ray radiation down to hard X-ray energies. In this Letter, the action of photon splitting is considered in some detail, via the solution of photon kinetic equations, determining how it limits the hardness of emission in strongly magnetized repeaters, and thereby obtaining observational constraints to the field in SGR 1806-20.

  3. Polarisation-controlled single photon emission at high temperatures from InGaN quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Wang, T; Puchtler, T J; Zhu, T; Jarman, J C; Nuttall, L P; Oliver, R A; Taylor, R A

    2017-07-13

    Solid-state single photon sources with polarisation control operating beyond the Peltier cooling barrier of 200 K are desirable for a variety of applications in quantum technology. Using a non-polar InGaN system, we report the successful realisation of single photon emission with a g((2))(0) of 0.21, a high polarisation degree of 0.80, a fixed polarisation axis determined by the underlying crystallography, and a GHz repetition rate with a radiative lifetime of 357 ps at 220 K in semiconductor quantum dots. The temperature insensitivity of these properties, together with the simple planar epitaxial growth method and absence of complex device geometries, demonstrates that fast single photon emission with polarisation control can be achieved in solid-state quantum dots above the Peltier temperature threshold, making this system a potential candidate for future on-chip applications in integrated systems.

  4. Frequency-upconverted stimulated emission by simultaneous five-photon absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Qingdong; Zhu, Haomiao; Chen, Shan-Ci; Tang, Changquan; Ma, En; Chen, Xueyuan

    2013-03-01

    Since the invention of the laser in 1960, multiphoton effects have become useful in techniques for real applications as well as conceptual predictions. Here, we report the first experimental observation of frequency-upconverted stimulated emission from a novel fluorophore through simultaneous five-photon absorption. Compared to lower-order nonlinear absorption, the fifth-order dependence on input light intensity of the five-photon absorption process will provide much stronger spatial confinement, allowing the achievement of a much higher contrast in imaging. Stimulated emission has also been achieved by the absorption of two to four photons under near-infrared laser excitation, making this gain medium a promising multiphoton imaging probe with attractive features, including the absence of autofluorescence from biological samples, large penetration depth, and improved sensitivity and resolution.

  5. Photon-splitting limits to the hardness of emission in strongly magnetized soft gamma repeaters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baring, Matthew G.

    1995-01-01

    Soft gamma repeaters are characterized by recurrent activity consisting of short-duration outbursts of high-energy emission that is typically of temperature less than 40 keV. One recent model of repeaters is that they originate in the environs of neutron stars with superstrong magnetic fields, perhaps greater than 10(exp 14) G. In such fields, the exotic process of magnetic photon splitting gamma yields gamma gamma acts very effectively to reprocess gamma-ray radiation down to hard X-ray energies. In this Letter, the action of photon splitting is considered in some detail, via the solution of photon kinetic equations, determining how it limits the hardness of emission in strongly magnetized repeaters, and thereby obtaining observational constraints to the field in SGR 1806-20.

  6. Three-dimensional image cytometer based on a high-speed two-photon scanning microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ki H.; Stitt, Molly S.; Hendricks, Carrie A.; Almeida, Karen H.; Engelward, Bevin P.; So, Peter T. C.

    2001-04-01

    We developed a 3-D image cytometer based on two-photon scanning microscopy. The system keeps the inherent advantages from two-photon scanning microscopy: (1) The ability of imaging thick tissue samples up to a few hundred micrometers, (2) The ability to study tissue structures with subcellular resolution, (3) The ability to monitor tissue biochemistry and metabolism, and (4) The reduction of specimen photobleaching and photodamage. Therefore, 3-D image cytometer has the ability to characterize multiple cell layer specimens, in contrast with 2-D image cytometer where only single cell layer samples can be imaged. 3-D image cytometry increases its frame rate by adapting a polygonal mirror scanner and high-speed photomultiplier tubes. The current frame rate is 13 frames per second. High throughput rate is achieved by imaging multiple cell layer specimens in 3-D at a high frame rate. The throughput rate of this system is dependent on the choice of objective lenses, specimen properties, and the speed of computer-controlled specimen stage. It can be up to approximately 100 cells per second which is comparable with that of 2-D image cytometers. With the high throughput rate and deep tissue imaging capability, 3-D image cytometer has the potential for the detection of rare cellular events inside living, intact tissues. A promising application of this 3-D image cytometer is the study of mitotic recombination in tissues. Mitotic recombination is a mechanism for genetic change. Therefore it is one of causes for carcinogenesis. However, the study of this process is difficult because recombination event is rare and it occurs at a rate of one cell in 105 cells. The new method for the study is (1) to engineer transgenic mice whose cells will express fluorescence in the presence of mitotic recombination, (2) to detect cells which have undergone mitotic recombination with 3-D image cytometry. The estimated time required to quantify spontaneous recombination rate is approximately

  7. Multi-photon excited coherent random laser emission in ZnO powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolentino Dominguez, Christian; Gomes, Maria De A.; Macedo, Zélia S.; de Araújo, Cid B.; Gomes, Anderson S. L.

    2014-11-01

    We report the observation and analysis of anti-Stokes coherent random laser (RL) emission from zinc oxide (ZnO) powders excited by one-, two- or three-photon femtosecond laser radiation. The ZnO powders were produced via a novel proteic sol-gel, low-cost and environmentally friendly route using coconut water in the polymerization step of the metal precursor. One- and two-photon excitation at 354 nm and 710 nm, respectively, generated single-band emissions centred at about 387 nm. For three-photon excitation, the emission spectra showed a strong ultraviolet (UV) band (380-396 nm) attributed to direct three-photon absorption from the valence band to the conduction band. The presence of an intensity threshold and a bandwidth narrowing of the UV band from about 20 to 4 nm are clear evidence of RL action. The observation of multiple sub-nanometre narrow peaks in the emission spectra for excitation above the RL threshold is consistent with random lasing by coherent feedback.

  8. Multi-photon excited coherent random laser emission in ZnO powders.

    PubMed

    Tolentino Dominguez, Christian; Gomes, Maria de A; Macedo, Zélia S; de Araújo, Cid B; Gomes, Anderson S L

    2015-01-07

    We report the observation and analysis of anti-Stokes coherent random laser (RL) emission from zinc oxide (ZnO) powders excited by one-, two- or three-photon femtosecond laser radiation. The ZnO powders were produced via a novel proteic sol-gel, low-cost and environmentally friendly route using coconut water in the polymerization step of the metal precursor. One- and two-photon excitation at 354 nm and 710 nm, respectively, generated single-band emissions centred at about 387 nm. For three-photon excitation, the emission spectra showed a strong ultraviolet (UV) band (380-396 nm) attributed to direct three-photon absorption from the valence band to the conduction band. The presence of an intensity threshold and a bandwidth narrowing of the UV band from about 20 to 4 nm are clear evidence of RL action. The observation of multiple sub-nanometre narrow peaks in the emission spectra for excitation above the RL threshold is consistent with random lasing by coherent feedback.

  9. Final LDRD report : enhanced spontaneous emission rate in visible III-nitride LEDs using 3D photonic crystal cavities.

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, Arthur Joseph; Subramania, Ganapathi S.; Coley, Anthony J.; Lee, Yun-Ju; Li, Qiming; Wang, George T.; Luk, Ting Shan; Koleske, Daniel David; Fullmer, Kristine Wanta

    2009-09-01

    The fundamental spontaneous emission rate for a photon source can be modified by placing the emitter inside a periodic dielectric structure allowing the emission to be dramatically enhanced or suppressed depending on the intended application. We have investigated the relatively unexplored realm of interaction between semiconductor emitters and three dimensional photonic crystals in the visible spectrum. Although this interaction has been investigated at longer wavelengths, very little work has been done in the visible spectrum. During the course of this LDRD, we have fabricated TiO{sub 2} logpile photonic crystal structures with the shortest wavelength band gap ever demonstrated. A variety of different emitters with emission between 365 nm and 700 nm were incorporated into photonic crystal structures. Time-integrated and time-resolved photoluminescence measurements were performed to measure changes to the spontaneous emission rate. Both enhanced and suppressed emission were demonstrated and attributed to changes to the photonic density of states.

  10. Acute stress in seedlings detected by ultra-weak photon emission.

    PubMed

    Bertogna, E; Bezerra, J; Conforti, E; Gallep, C M

    2013-01-05

    The ultra-weak photon emission (biophoton) patterns of wheat germination tests under chemical stress (mercury and fluoride solutions) are presented in comparison to respective control groups run simultaneously in two similar, automatic photon-count chambers. Solutions of Hg (EC(50) and EC(100)) and NaF (EC(50)) were applied at the fourth day, after the first 72 h of imbibition in water, with photon-count experiments in controlled conditions. Seedlings' growth performance were checked by total mass increase as well as root development, and plotted against the respective angular factor of photon-count curve's linear regression. Both Hg and NaF series presented very distinguishable patterns when compared to each respective control groups. Higher counts appear all over the 24 h test for the Hg series and just in the first 6 h for the NaF series. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Effect of meditation on ultraweak photon emission from hands and forehead.

    PubMed

    Van Wijk, Eduard P A; Ackerman, John; Van Wijk, Roeland

    2005-04-01

    Various physiologic and biochemical shifts can follow meditation. Meditation has been implicated in impacting free radical activity. Ultraweak photon emission (UPE, biophoton emission) is a constituent of the metabolic processes in a living system. Spectral analysis showed the characteristics of radical reactions. Recording and analysing photon emission in 5 subjects before, during and after meditation. UPE in 5 subjects who meditated in sitting or supine positions was recorded in a darkroom utilising a photomultiplier designed for manipulation in three directions. Data indicated that UPE changes after meditation. In 1 subject with high pre-meditation values, UPE decreased during meditation and remained low in the postmeditation phase. In the other subjects, only a slight decrease in photon emission was found, but commonly a decrease was observed in the kurtosis and skewness values of the photon count distribution. A second set of data on photon emission from the hands before and after meditation was collected from 2 subjects. These data were characterised by the Fano factor, F(T), i.e. variance over mean of the number of photoelectrons observed within observation time T. All data were compared to surrogate data sets which were constructed by random shuffling of the data sets. In the pre-meditation period, F(T) increased with observation time, significantly at time windows >6 s. No such effect was found after meditation, when F(T) was in the range of the surrogate data set. The data support the hypothesis that human photon emission can be influenced by meditation. Data from time series recordings suggest that this non-invasive tool for monitoring radical reactions during meditation is useful to characterise the effect of meditation. Fano factor analysis demonstrated that the time series before meditation do not represent a simple Poisson process. Instead, UPE has characteristics of a fractal process, showing long-range correlations. The effect of meditation waives

  12. Precise Two-Photon Photodynamic Therapy using an Efficient Photosensitizer with Aggregation-Induced Emission Characteristics.

    PubMed

    Gu, Bobo; Wu, Wenbo; Xu, Gaixia; Feng, Guangxue; Yin, Feng; Chong, Peter Han Joo; Qu, Junle; Yong, Ken-Tye; Liu, Bin

    2017-07-01

    Two-photon photodynamic therapy (PDT) is able to offer precise 3D manipulation of treatment volumes, providing a target level that is unattainable with current therapeutic techniques. The advancement of this technique is greatly hampered by the availability of photosensitizers with large two-photon absorption (TPA) cross section, high reactive-oxygen-species (ROS) generation efficiency, and bright two-photon fluorescence. Here, an effective photosensitizer with aggregation-induced emission (AIE) characteristics is synthesized, characterized, and encapsulated into an amphiphilic block copolymer to form organic dots for two-photon PDT applications. The AIE dots possess large TPA cross section, high ROS generation efficiency, and excellent photostability and biocompatibility, which overcomes the limitations of many conventional two-photon photosensitizers. Outstanding therapeutic performance of the AIE dots in two-photon PDT is demonstrated using in vitro cancer cell ablation and in vivo brain-blood-vessel closure as examples. This shows therapy precision up to 5 µm under two-photon excitation. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. A quantum dot single-photon source with on-the-fly all-optical polarization control and timed emission

    PubMed Central

    Heinze, Dirk; Breddermann, Dominik; Zrenner, Artur; Schumacher, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Sources of single photons are key elements for applications in quantum information science. Among the different sources available, semiconductor quantum dots excel with their integrability in semiconductor on-chip solutions and the potential that photon emission can be triggered on demand. Usually, the photon is emitted from a single-exciton ground state. Polarization of the photon and time of emission are either probabilistic or pre-determined by electronic properties of the system. Here, we study the direct two-photon emission from the biexciton. The two-photon emission is enabled by a laser pulse driving the system into a virtual state inside the band gap. From this intermediate state, the single photon of interest is then spontaneously emitted. We show that emission through this higher-order transition provides a versatile approach to generate a single photon. Through the driving laser pulse, polarization state, frequency and emission time of the photon can be controlled on-the-fly. PMID:26436776

  14. Multiphoton microscopic imaging of adipose tissue based on second-harmonic generation and two-photon excited fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zufang; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Chen, Jianxin; Chen, Rong; Jiang, Xingshan

    2008-01-01

    The fresh adipose tissue was investigated by the use of multiphoton microscopy (MPM) based on two-photon excited fluorescence and second-harmonic generation (SHG). Microstructure of collagen and adipose cells in the adipose tissue is clearly imaged at a subcellular level with the excitation light wavelengths of 850 and 730 nm, respectively. The emission spectrum of collagen SHG signal and NADH and FAD fluorescence signal can also be obtained, which can be used to quantify the content of collagen and adipose cells and reflect the degree of pathological changes when comparing normal tissue with abnormal adipose tissue in the same condition. The results indicate that MPM has the potential to be applied to investigate the adipose tissue and can be used in the research field of lipid and connective tissues.

  15. Dynamic performance of MEMS deformable mirrors for use in an active/adaptive two-photon microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Christian C.; Foster, Warren B.; Downey, Ryan D.; Arrasmith, Christopher L.; Dickensheets, David L.

    2016-03-01

    Active optics can facilitate two-photon microscopic imaging deep in tissue. We are investigating fast focus control mirrors used in concert with an aberration correction mirror to control the axial position of focus and system aberrations dynamically during scanning. With an adaptive training step, sample-induced aberrations may be compensated as well. If sufficiently fast and precise, active optics may be able to compensate under-corrected imaging optics as well as sample aberrations to maintain diffraction-limited performance throughout the field of view. Toward this end we have measured a Boston Micromachines Corporation Multi-DM 140 element deformable mirror, and a Revibro Optics electrostatic 4-zone focus control mirror to characterize dynamic performance. Tests for the Multi-DM included both step response and sinusoidal frequency sweeps of specific Zernike modes. For the step response we measured 10%-90% rise times for the target Zernike amplitude, and wavefront rms error settling times. Frequency sweeps identified the 3dB bandwidth of the mirror when attempting to follow a sinusoidal amplitude trajectory for a specific Zernike mode. For five tested Zernike modes (defocus, spherical aberration, coma, astigmatism and trefoil) we find error settling times for mode amplitudes up to 400nm to be less than 52 us, and 3 dB frequencies range from 6.5 kHz to 10 kHz. The Revibro Optics mirror was tested for step response only, with error settling time of 80 μs for a large 3 um defocus step, and settling time of only 18 μs for a 400nm spherical aberration step. These response speeds are sufficient for intra-scan correction at scan rates typical of two-photon microscopy.

  16. Dynamic confocal imaging in acute brain slices and organotypic slice cultures using a spectral confocal microscope with single photon excitation.

    PubMed

    Kasparov, S; Teschemacher, A G; Paton, J F R

    2002-11-01

    Confocal imaging in living brain slices allows the resolution of submicrometre structures of nerve cells, glia and brain vessels. Imaging living brain slices is in many respects different from conventional fixed histological preparations for which confocal microscopes were designed originally. Several problems (i.e. mechanical and thermal drift, and autofluorescence) resulting from the optical and structural properties of brain slices are discussed. Fluorescent indicators may be used to monitor numerous intracellular parameters such as pH and Ca(2+) concentration, but not all of them are equally suitable for this type of work. Genetically engineered fluorescent proteins can be used to visualise the fine dendritic structure of neurones or track particular intracellular structures and proteins. They have also been used to generate indicators for Ca(2+), cAMP and other molecules. While conventional chemical indicators can be either loaded into neurones via patch pipettes or as membrane-permeable esters, protein indicators can be expressed in various types of cells using adenoviral vectors. Adenoviral transgenesis can be performed in vitro in both acute slices and organotypic slice cultures. Organotypic slice cultures give excellent optical access to neurones loaded with either conventional fluorescent indicators or transfected with adenovirus to express fluorescent proteins. They are most suitable for experiments where both conventional and genetically engineered indicators are combined. Single photon imaging in brain slices is limited to the superficial layers (approximatelyphoton mode is at least as good as when using multiphoton excitation.

  17. Measurement of direct photon emission in the K(L) ---> pi+ pi- gamma decay mode

    SciTech Connect

    Abouzaid, E.; Arenton, M.; Barker, A.R.; Bellantoni, L.; Bellavance, A.; Blucher, E.; Bock, G.J.; Cheu, E.; Coleman, R.; Corcoran, M.D.; Corti, G.; /Virginia U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2006-04-01

    In this paper the KTeV collaboration reports the analysis of 112.1 x 10{sup 3} candidate K{sub L} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{gamma} decays including a background of 671 {+-} 41 events with the objective of determining the photon production mechanisms intrinsic to the decay process. These decays have been analyzed to extract the relative contributions of the Cp violating bremsstrahlung process and the CP conserving M1 and CP violating E1 direct photon emission processes. The M1 direct photon emission amplitude and its associated vector form factor parameterized as |{bar g}{sub M1}|(1 + a{sub 1}/a{sub 2}/(M{sub {rho}}{sup 2}-M{sub K}{sup 2}) + 2M{sub K}E{sub {gamma}}) have been measured to be |{bar g}{sub M1}| = 1.198 {+-} 0.035(stat) {+-} 0.086(syst) and a{sub 1}/a{sub 2} = =0.738 {+-} 0.007(stat) {+-} 0.018(syst) GeV{sup 2}/c{sup 2} respectively. An upper limit for the CP violating E1 direct emission amplitude |g{sub E1}| {le} 0.1 (90%CL) has been found. The overall ratio of direct photon emission (DE) to total photon emission including the bremsstrahlung process (IB) has been determined to be DE/(DE + IB) = 0.689 {+-} 0.021 for E{sub {gamma}} {ge} 20 MeV.

  18. Ultraweak, spontaneous photon emission in seedlings: toxicological and chronobiological applications.

    PubMed

    de Mello Gallep, Cristiano

    2014-12-01

    The detection of ultraweak light emission in seedlings has been explored in toxicological and chronobiological studies. The main studies in this area are reviewed briefly, including a report on applied tests held in the last 7 years at LaFA--UNICAMP (Brazil). In general, results indicate that a linear relation for total light emission versus germination performance is found if only strong stress situations are considered, when external factors depress a seedling's development, even when considering a sequential series of tests. Light emitted by a single seedling was detected in a compact apparatus, and data are presented here for the first time showing pronounced circadian cycles are evident, with similar time and frequency profiles as those of the local gravimetric tide. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Enhanced light extraction by heterostructure photonic crystals toward white-light-emission.

    PubMed

    Li, Heng; Xu, Zhaohua; Bao, Bin; Song, Yanlin

    2016-03-01

    In this work, we present a novel approach on the simultaneous enhancement of intensity of red, green, and blue (RGB) emission by heterostructure colloidal photonic crystals (PCs) with tri-stopbands. The intensity of RGB emission on heterostructure PCs with tri-stopbands overlapping emission wavelengths of RGB QDs can be up to about 8-fold enhancement in comparison to that on the control sample. Furthermore, CIE diagrams show the chromaticity parameters approaching that of white light. The method will be favorable for developing optical devices of high performance. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Tailoring Self-Assembled Metallic Photonic Crystals for Modified Thermal Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eon Han, Sang; Stein, Andreas; Norris, David

    2008-03-01

    Photonic crystals are solids that are periodically structured on an optical length scale. Previous work has shown that specific photonic crystal structures can lead to changes in the thermal emission spectra of a material. This may allow elimination of unwanted heat from emission sources, such as tungsten filaments in conventional light bulbs, or lead to new materials for thermophotovoltaics. Here, we study the possibility that metallic photonic crystals obtained via self-assembly can modify thermal emission. These structures, known as inverse opals, are easy to fabricate. However, experiments on tungsten inverse opals suggest that they also have strong optical absorption. In this case, the light does not interact sufficiently with the periodicity of the crystal and modification of thermal emission does not occur. We consider the origin of this effect and show theoretically how to tailor both absorption and surface coupling in experimentally realizable metallic inverse opals. Calculations for tailored inverse opals made from tungsten, molybdenum, and tantalum show that their optical properties can be similar to or even better than the tungsten woodpile structure, which has previously shown modified thermal emission.

  1. Probing the intrinsic optical Bloch-mode emission from a 3D photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Mei-Li; Bur, James A.; Du, Qingguo; John, Sajeev; Lin, Shawn-Yu

    2016-10-01

    We report experimental observation of intrinsic Bloch-mode emission from a 3D tungsten photonic crystal at low thermal excitation. After the successful removal of conventional metallic emission (normal emission), it is possible to make an accurate comparison of the Bloch-mode and the normal emission. For all biases, we found that the emission intensity of the Bloch-mode is higher than that of the normal emission. The Bloch-mode emission also exhibits a slower dependence on (\\hslash ω /{k}bT) than that of the normal emission. The observed higher emission intensity and a different T-dependence is attributed to Bloch-mode assisted emission where emitters have been located into a medium having local density of states different than the isotropic case. Furthermore, our finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulation shows the presence of localized spots at metal-air boundaries and corners, having intense electric field. The enhanced plasmonic field and local non-equilibrium could induce a strong thermally stimulated emission and may be the cause of our unusual observation.

  2. Cascaded emission of single photons from the biexciton in monolayered WSe2

    PubMed Central

    He, Yu-Ming; Iff, Oliver; Lundt, Nils; Baumann, Vasilij; Davanco, Marcelo; Srinivasan, Kartik; Höfling, Sven; Schneider, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Monolayers of transition metal dichalcogenide materials emerged as a new material class to study excitonic effects in solid state, as they benefit from enormous Coulomb correlations between electrons and holes. Especially in WSe2, sharp emission features have been observed at cryogenic temperatures, which act as single photon sources. Tight exciton localization has been assumed to induce an anharmonic excitation spectrum; however, the evidence of the hypothesis, namely the demonstration of a localized biexciton, is elusive. Here we unambiguously demonstrate the existence of a localized biexciton in a monolayer of WSe2, which triggers an emission cascade of single photons. The biexciton is identified by its time-resolved photoluminescence, superlinearity and distinct polarization in micro-photoluminescence experiments. We evidence the cascaded nature of the emission process in a cross-correlation experiment, which yields a strong bunching behaviour. Our work paves the way to a new generation of quantum optics experiments with two-dimensional semiconductors. PMID:27830703

  3. Photon Emission and Reabsorption Processes in CH3NH3PbBr3 Single Crystals Revealed by Time-Resolved Two-Photon-Excitation Photoluminescence Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Takumi; Yamada, Yasuhiro; Nakaike, Yumi; Wakamiya, Atsushi; Kanemitsu, Yoshihiko

    2017-01-01

    The dynamical processes of radiative recombination of photocarriers and reabsorption of emitted photons in CH3NH3PbBr3 single crystals are studied using time-resolved two-photon-excitation photoluminescence (PL) microscopy. We find that the PL spectrum and its decay dynamics depend on the excitation-depth profile. As the excitation depth increases, the PL spectrum becomes asymmetric, the peak energy redshifts, and the PL decay time becomes longer. These observations can be well explained by a simple model including photon recycling (photon emission and reabsorption) in thick samples with strong band-to-band transitions and high radiative recombination efficiencies.

  4. Continuous-Wave Stimulated Emission Depletion Microscope for Imaging Actin Cytoskeleton in Fixed and Live Cells

    PubMed Central

    Neupane, Bhanu; Jin, Tao; Mellor, Liliana F.; Loboa, Elizabeth G.; Ligler, Frances S.; Wang, Gufeng

    2015-01-01

    Stimulated emission depletion (STED) microscopy provides a new opportunity to study fine sub-cellular structures and highly dynamic cellular processes, which are challenging to observe using conventional optical microscopy. Using actin as an example, we explored the feasibility of using a continuous wave (CW)-STED microscope to study the fine structure and dynamics in fixed and live cells. Actin plays an important role in cellular processes, whose functioning involves dynamic formation and reorganization of fine structures of actin filaments. Frequently used confocal fluorescence and STED microscopy dyes were employed to image fixed PC-12 cells (dyed with phalloidin- fluorescein isothiocyante) and live rat chondrosarcoma cells (RCS) transfected with actin-green fluorescent protein (GFP). Compared to conventional confocal fluorescence microscopy, CW-STED microscopy shows improved spatial resolution in both fixed and live cells. We were able to monitor cell morphology changes continuously; however, the number of repetitive analyses were limited primarily by the dyes used in these experiments and could be improved with the use of dyes less susceptible to photobleaching. In conclusion, CW-STED may disclose new information for biological systems with a proper characteristic length scale. The challenges of using CW-STED microscopy to study cell structures are discussed. PMID:26393614

  5. Classical microscopic theory of dispersion, emission and absorption of light in dielectrics. Classical microscopic theory of dielectric susceptibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carati, Andrea; Galgani, Luigi

    2014-10-01

    This paper is a continuation of a recent one in which, apparently for the first time, the existence of polaritons in ionic crystals was proven in a microscopic electrodynamic theory. This was obtained through an explicit computation of the dispersion curves. Here the main further contribution consists in studying electric susceptibility, from which the spectrum can be inferred. We show how susceptibility is obtained by the Green-Kubo methods of Hamiltonian statistical mechanics, and give for it a concrete expression in terms of time-correlation functions. As in the previous paper, here too we work in a completely classical framework, in which the electrodynamic forces acting on the charges are all taken into account, both the retarded forces and the radiation reaction ones. So, in order to apply the methods of statistical mechanics, the system has to be previously reduced to a Hamiltonian one. This is made possible in virtue of two global properties of classical electrodynamics, namely, the Wheeler-Feynman identity and the Ewald resummation properties, the proofs of which were already given for ordered system. The second contribution consists in formulating the theory in a completely general way, so that in principle it applies also to disordered systems such as glasses, or liquids or gases, provided the two general properties mentioned above continue to hold. A first step in this direction is made here by providing a completely general proof of the Wheeler-Feynman identity, which is shown to be the counterpart of a general causality property of classical electrodynamics. Finally it is shown how a line spectrum can appear at all in classical systems, as a counterpart of suitable stability properties of the motions, with a broadening due to a coexistence of chaoticity. The relevance of some recent results of the theory of dynamical systems in this connection is also pointed out.

  6. 3-D Particle Tracking in a Two-Photon Microscope: Application to the Study of Molecular Dynamics in Cells

    PubMed Central

    Levi, Valeria; Ruan, QiaoQiao; Gratton, Enrico

    2005-01-01

    We developed a method for tracking particles in three dimensions designed for a two-photon microscope, which holds great promise to study cellular processes because of low photodamage, efficient background rejection, and improved depth discrimination. During a standard cycle of the tracking routine (32 ms), the laser beam traces four circular orbits surrounding the particle in two z planes above and below the particle. The radius of the orbits is half of the x,y-width of the point spread function, and the distance between the z planes is the z-width of the point spread function. The z-position is adjusted by moving the objective with a piezoelectric-nanopositioner. The particle position is calculated on the fly from the intensity profile obtained during the cycle, and these coordinates are used to set the scanning center for the next cycle. Applying this method, we were able to follow the motion of 500-nm diameter fluorescent polystyrene microspheres moved by a nanometric stage in either steps of 20–100 nm or sine waves of 0.1–10 μm amplitude with 20 nm precision. We also measured the diffusion coefficient of fluorospheres in glycerol solutions and recovered the values expected according to the Stokes-Einstein relationship for viscosities higher than 3.7 cP. The feasibility of this method for live cell measurements is demonstrated studying the phagocytosis of protein-coated fluorospheres by fibroblasts. PMID:15653748

  7. Time-resolved photon emission from layered turbid media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hielscher, Andreas H.; Liu, Hanli; Chance, Britton; Tittel, Frank K.; Jacques, Steven L.

    1996-02-01

    We present numerical and experimental results of time-resolved emission profiles from various layered turbid media. Numerical solutions determined by time-resolved Monte Carlo simulations are compared with measurements on layered-tissue phantoms made from gelatin. In particular, we show that in certain cases the effects of the upper layers can be eliminated. As a practical example, these results are used to analyze in vivo measurements on the human head. This demonstrates the influence of skin, skull, and meninges on the determination of the blood oxygenation in the brain.

  8. Time-resolved photon emission from layered turbid media

    SciTech Connect

    Hielscher, A.H.; Liu, H.; Chance, B.; Tittel, F.K.; Jacques, S.L.

    1996-02-01

    We present numerical and experimental results of time-resolved emission profiles from various layered turbid media. Numerical solutions determined by time-resolved Monte Carlo simulations are compared with measurements on layered-tissue phantoms made from gelatin. In particular, we show that in certain cases the effects of the upper layers can be eliminated. As a practical example, these results are used to analyze {ital in} {ital vivo} measurements on the human head. This demonstrates the influence of skin, skull, and meninges on the determination of the blood oxygenation in the brain. {copyright} {ital 1996 Optical Society of America.}

  9. Spatially adjusted spontaneous emissions from photonic crystals embedded light-emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Yu-Feng; Lin, Yen-Chen; Liu, Yi-Chen; Chiang, Hai-Pang; Huang, JianJang

    2014-09-01

    In this work, the angular light output enhancements of LEDs were investigated from the spontaneous emission and light scattering of devices with different photonic crystal (PhC) geometries. The emitted photon coupled into a leaky mode is differentiated by the manipulation of the quality factor in various spatial frequencies. Therefore, light extraction in this light-emitting device is determined by the modal extraction lengths and the quality factor obtained from the measured photonic bands. Furthermore, the higher- and lower-order mode spontaneous emissions are affected by the nonradiative process in the PhC structures with different periods. In our cases, the photonic crystal device with the largest period of 500 nm exhibits the highest lower-order mode extraction and quality factor. As a result, a self-collimation behavior toward the surface-normal is demonstrated in the 3D far-field pattern of such a device. We conclude that, with the coherent light scattering from the PhC region, the spontaneous emission of the material and spatial behavior of the extracted mode can be both managed by the proper design of the device.

  10. Collective Evidence for Inverse Compton Emission from External Photons in High-Power Blazars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Eileen T.; Fossati, Giovanni; Georganopoulos, Markos; Lister, Matthew L.

    2012-01-01

    We present the first collective evidence that Fermi-detected jets of high kinetic power (L(sub kin)) are dominated by inverse Compton emission from upscattered external photons. Using a sample with a broad range in orientation angle, including radio galaxies and blazars, we find that very high power sources (L(sub kin) > 10(exp 45.5) erg/s) show a significant increase in the ratio of inverse Compton to synchrotron power (Compton dominance) with decreasing orientation angle, as measured by the radio core dominance and confirmed by the distribution of superluminal speeds. This increase is consistent with beaming expectations for external Compton (EC) emission, but not for synchrotron self Compton (SSC) emission. For the lowest power jets (L(sub kin) < 10(exp 43.5) erg /s), no trend between Compton and radio core dominance is found, consistent with SSC. Importantly, the EC trend is not seen for moderately high power flat spectrum radio quasars with strong external photon fields. Coupled with the evidence that jet power is linked to the jet speed, this finding suggests that external photon fields become the dominant source of seed photons in the jet comoving frame only for the faster and therefore more powerful jets.

  11. Collective Evidence for Inverse Compton Emission from External Photons in High-power Blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Eileen T.; Fossati, Giovanni; Georganopoulos, Markos; Lister, Matthew L.

    2012-06-01

    We present the first collective evidence that Fermi-detected jets of high kinetic power (L kin) are dominated by inverse Compton emission from upscattered external photons. Using a sample with a broad range in orientation angle, including radio galaxies and blazars, we find that very high power sources (L kin > 1045.5 erg s-1) show a significant increase in the ratio of inverse Compton to synchrotron power (Compton dominance) with decreasing orientation angle, as measured by the radio core dominance and confirmed by the distribution of superluminal speeds. This increase is consistent with beaming expectations for external Compton (EC) emission, but not for synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) emission. For the lowest power jets (L kin < 1043.5 erg s-1), no trend between Compton and radio core dominance is found, consistent with SSC. Importantly, the EC trend is not seen for moderately high power flat spectrum radio quasars with strong external photon fields. Coupled with the evidence that jet power is linked to the jet speed, this finding suggests that external photon fields become the dominant source of seed photons in the jet comoving frame only for the faster and therefore more powerful jets.

  12. Tunable and high-purity room temperature single-photon emission from atomic defects in hexagonal boron nitride.

    PubMed

    Grosso, Gabriele; Moon, Hyowon; Lienhard, Benjamin; Ali, Sajid; Efetov, Dmitri K; Furchi, Marco M; Jarillo-Herrero, Pablo; Ford, Michael J; Aharonovich, Igor; Englund, Dirk

    2017-09-26

    Two-dimensional van der Waals materials have emerged as promising platforms for solid-state quantum information processing devices with unusual potential for heterogeneous assembly. Recently, bright and photostable single photon emitters were reported from atomic defects in layered hexagonal boron nitride (hBN), but controlling inhomogeneous spectral distribution and reducing multi-photon emission presented open challenges. Here, we demonstrate that strain control allows spectral tunability of hBN single photon emitters over 6 meV, and material processing sharply improves the single photon purity. We observe high single photon count rates exceeding 7 × 10(6) counts per second at saturation, after correcting for uncorrelated photon background. Furthermore, these emitters are stable to material transfer to other substrates. High-purity and photostable single photon emission at room temperature, together with spectral tunability and transferability, opens the door to scalable integration of high-quality quantum emitters in photonic quantum technologies.Inhomogeneous spectral distribution and multi-photon emission are currently hindering the use of defects in layered hBN as reliable single photon emitters. Here, the authors demonstrate strain-controlled wavelength tuning and increased single photon purity through suitable material processing.

  13. Relative-phase and time-delay maps all over the emission cone of hyperentangled photon source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegazy, Salem F.; Badr, Yahia A.; Obayya, Salah S. A.

    2017-02-01

    Realizing high flux of hyperentangled photons requires collecting photon pairs simultaneously entangled in multiple degrees of freedom over relatively wide spectral and angular emission ranges. We consider the hyperentangled photons produced by superimposing noncollinear spontaneous parametric down conversion (SPDC) emissions of two crossed and coherently pumped nonlinear crystals. We present an approach for determining the directional-spectral relative-phase and time-delay maps of hyperentangled photons all over the SPDC emission cone. A vectorial representation is adopted for all parameters of concern. This enables us to examine unconventional arrangements such as the autocompensation of relative-phase and time-delay via oblique pump incidence. While prior works often adopt first-order approximation, it is shown that the actual directional relative-phase map is very well approximated by a quadratic function of the polar angle of the two-photon emission while negligibly varying with the azimuthal angle.

  14. Ultraweak photon emission and proteomics analyses in soybean under abiotic stress.

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Setsuko; Kamal, Abu Hena Mostafa; Makino, Takahiro; Hossain, Zahed

    2014-07-01

    Biophotons are ultraweak photon emissions that are closely related to various biological activities and processes. In mammals, biophoton emissions originate from oxidative bursts in immunocytes during immunological responses. Biophotons emitted from plant organs provide novel information about the physiological state of plant under in vivo condition. In this review, the principles and recent advances in the measurement of biophoton emissions in plants are described. Furthermore, examples of biophoton emission and proteomics in soybean under abiotic stress are reviewed and discussed. Finally, this review suggests that the application of proteomics should provide a better interpretation of plant response to biophoton emission and allow the identification of genes that will allow the screening of crops able to produce maximal yields, even in stressful environments. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Flexible nanomembrane photonic-crystal cavities for tensilely strained-germanium light emission

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, Jian; Wang, Xiaowei; Paiella, Roberto; Cui, Xiaorui; Sookchoo, Pornsatit; Lagally, Max G.

    2016-06-13

    Flexible photonic-crystal cavities in the form of Si-column arrays embedded in polymeric films are developed on Ge nanomembranes using direct membrane assembly. The resulting devices can sustain large biaxial tensile strain under mechanical stress, as a way to enhance the Ge radiative efficiency. Pronounced emission peaks associated with photonic-crystal cavity resonances are observed in photoluminescence measurements. These results show that ultrathin nanomembrane active layers can be effectively coupled to an optical cavity, while still preserving their mechanical flexibility. Thus, they are promising for the development of strain-enabled Ge lasers, and more generally uniquely flexible optoelectronic devices.

  16. Kinetics of single-photon emission from electrically pumped NV centers in diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khramtsov, I. A.; Agio, M.; Fedyanin, D. Yu.

    2017-09-01

    Nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond are considered to be promising building blocks for emerging quantum technologies. At the same time, practical applications require them to be excited and controlled electrically. However, there is a lack of knowledge about their behavior in electrical driven systems. Here, we introduce a physical model to address the single-photon emission dynamics of electrically pumped NV center in diamond in a quantitative manner and present a detailed study of the single-photon emitting diode based on NV centers.

  17. Soft-photon emission effects and radiative corrections for electromagnetic processes at very high energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gould, R. J.

    1979-01-01

    Higher-order electromagnetic processes involving particles at ultrahigh energies are discussed, with particular attention given to Compton scattering with the emission of an additional photon (double Compton scattering). Double Compton scattering may have significance in the interaction of a high-energy electron with the cosmic blackbody photon gas. At high energies the cross section for double Compton scattering is large, though this effect is largely canceled by the effects of radiative corrections to ordinary Compton scattering. A similar cancellation takes place for radiative pair production and the associated radiative corrections to the radiationless process. This cancellation is related to the well-known cancellation of the infrared divergence in electrodynamics.

  18. Multi-site recording and spectral analysis of spontaneous photon emission from human body.

    PubMed

    Wijk, Eduard P A Van; Wijk, Roeland Van

    2005-04-01

    In the past years, research on ultraweak photon emission (UPE) from human body has increased for isolated cells and tissues. However, there are only limited data on UPE from the whole body, in particular from the hands. To describe a protocol for the management of subjects that (1) avoids interference with light-induced longterm delayed luminescence, and (2) includes the time slots for recording photon emission. The protocol was utilised for multi-site recording of 4 subjects at different times of the day and different seasons, and for one subject to complete spectral analysis of emission from different body locations. An especially selected low-noise end-window photomultiplier was utilised for the detection of ultraviolet / visible light (200-650 nm) photon emission. For multi-site recording it was manipulated in three directions in a darkroom with a very low count rate. A series of cut-off filters was used for spectral analysis of UPE. 29 body sites were selected such that the distribution in UPE could be studied as right-left symmetry, dorsal-ventral symmetry, and the ratio between the central body part and extremities. Generally, the fluctuation in photon counts over the body was lower in the morning than in the afternoon. The thorax-abdomen region emitted lowest and most constantly. The upper extremities and the head region emitted most and increasingly over the day. Spectral analysis of low, intermediate and high emission from the superior frontal part of the right leg, the forehead and the palms in the sensitivity range of the photomultiplier showed the major spontaneous emission at 470-570 nm. The central palm area of hand emission showed a larger contribution of the 420-470 nm range in the spectrum of spontaneous emission from the hand in autumn/winter. The spectrum of delayed luminescence from the hand showed major emission in the same range as spontaneous emission. Examples of multi-site UPE recordings and spectral analysis revealed individual patterns

  19. Monolithic integration of III-V nanowire with photonic crystal microcavity for vertical light emission.

    PubMed

    Larrue, Alexandre; Wilhelm, Christophe; Vest, Gwenaelle; Combrié, Sylvain; de Rossi, Alfredo; Soci, Cesare

    2012-03-26

    A novel photonic structure formed by the monolithic integration of a vertical III-V nanowire on top of a L3 two-dimensional photonic crystal microcavity is proposed to enhance light emission from the nanowire. The impact on the nanowire spontaneous emission rate is evaluated by calculating the spontaneous emission factor β, and the material gain at threshold is used as a figure of merit of this vertical emitting nanolaser. An optimal design is identified for a GaAs nanowire geometry with r = 155 nm and L~1.1 μm, where minimum gain at threshold (gth~13×10³ cm⁻¹) and large spontaneous emission factor (β~0.3) are simultaneously achieved. Modification of the directivity of the L3 photonic crystal cavity via the band-folding principle is employed to further optimize the far-field radiation pattern and to increase the directivity of the device. These results lay the foundation for a new approach toward large-scale integration of vertical emitting nanolasers and may enable applications such as intra-chip optical interconnects.

  20. Unsupervised image processing scheme for transistor photon emission analysis in order to identify defect location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chef, Samuel; Jacquir, Sabir; Sanchez, Kevin; Perdu, Philippe; Binczak, Stéphane

    2015-01-01

    The study of the light emitted by transistors in a highly scaled complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) integrated circuit (IC) has become a key method with which to analyze faulty devices, track the failure root cause, and have candidate locations for where to start the physical analysis. The localization of defective areas in IC corresponds to a reliability check and gives information to the designer to improve the IC design. The scaling of CMOS leads to an increase in the number of active nodes inside the acquisition area. There are also more differences between the spot's intensities. In order to improve the identification of all of the photon emission spots, we introduce an unsupervised processing scheme. It is based on iterative thresholding decomposition (ITD) and mathematical morphology operations. It unveils all of the emission spots and removes most of the noise from the database thanks to a succession of image processing. The ITD approach based on five thresholding methods is tested on 15 photon emission databases (10 real cases and 5 simulated cases). The photon emission areas' localization is compared to an expert identification and the estimation quality is quantified using the object consistency error.

  1. Controlled waveguide coupling for photon emission from colloidal PbS quantum dot using tunable microcavity made of optical polymer and silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nozaka, Takahiro; Mukai, Kohki

    2016-04-01

    A tunable microcavity device composed of optical polymer and Si with a colloidal quantum dot (QD) is proposed as a single-photon source for planar optical circuit. Cavity size is controlled by electrostatic micromachine behavior with the air bridge structure to tune timing of photon injection into optical waveguide from QD. Three-dimensional positioning of a QD in the cavity structure is available using a nanohole on Si processed by scanning probe microscope lithography. We fabricated the prototype microcavity with PbS-QD-mixed polymenthyl methacrylate on a SOI (semiconductor-on-insulator) substrate to show the tunability of cavity size as the shift of emission peak wavelength of QD ensemble.

  2. Spontaneous emission from a microwave-driven four-level atom in an anisotropic photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Li; Wan, Ren-Gang; Yao, Zhi-Hai

    2016-10-01

    The spontaneous emission from a microwave-driven four-level atom embedded in an anisotropic photonic crystal is studied. Due to the modified density of state (DOS) in the anisotropic photonic band gap (PBG) and the coherent control induced by the coupling fields, spontaneous emission can be significantly enhanced when the position of the spontaneous emission peak gets close to the band gap edge. As a result of the closed-loop interaction between the fields and the atom, the spontaneous emission depends on the dynamically induced Autler-Townes splitting and its position relative to the PBG. Interesting phenomena, such as spectral-line suppression, enhancement and narrowing, and fluorescence quenching, appear in the spontaneous emission spectra, which are modulated by amplitudes and phases of the coherently driven fields and the effect of PBG. This theoretical study can provide us with more efficient methods to manipulate the atomic spontaneous emission. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11447232, 11204367, 11447157, and 11305020).

  3. Tamm plasmon- and surface plasmon-coupled emission from hybrid plasmonic–photonic structures

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yikai; Zhang, Douguo; Zhu, Liangfu; Wang, Ruxue; Wang, Pei; Ming, Hai; Badugu, Ramachandram; Lakowicz, Joseph R.

    2015-01-01

    Photonic and plasmon-coupled emissions present new opportunities for control on light emission from fluorophores, and have many applications in the physical and biological sciences. The mechanism of and the influencing factors for the coupling between the fluorescent molecules and plasmon and/or photonic modes are active areas of research. In this paper, we describe a hybrid photonic–plasmonic structure that simultaneously contains two plasmon modes: surface plasmons (SPs) and Tamm plasmons (TPs), both of which can modulate fluorescence emission. Experimental results show that both SP-coupled emission (SPCE) and TP-coupled emission (TPCE) can be observed simultaneously with this hybrid structure. Due to the different resonant angles of the TP and SP modes, the TPCE and SPCE can be beamed in different directions and can be separated easily. Back focal plane images of the fluorescence emission show that the relative intensities of the SPCE and TPCE can be changed if the probes are at different locations inside the hybrid structure, which reveals the probe location-dependent different coupling strengths of the fluorescent molecules with SPs and TPs. The different coupling strengths are ascribed to the electric field distribution of the two modes in the structure. Here, we present an understanding of these factors influencing mode coupling with probes, which is vital for structure design for suitable applications in sensing and diagnostics. PMID:26526929

  4. Single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography for malignant otitis externa: lesion not shown on planar image.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Hung; Hsieh, Hung-Jen

    2013-01-01

    Malignant otitis externa is a severe and rare infection of the external acoustic meatus. Triphasic bone and (67)Ga scintigraphies are used to initial detect and follow-up the response of therapy. With single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography images, the diagnostic sensitivity is higher. We presented a case with malignant otitis externa with initial negative planar scintigraphic finding. The lesion was detected by photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography images. We concluded that the photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography should be performed routinely for patients with suspected malignant otitis externa, even without evidence of lesion on planar images. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Enhancement of molecular sensitivity in positron emission tomography with quantum correlation of γ-ray photons

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, K.; Kobayashi, Y.

    2015-05-15

    Enhancement of molecular sensitivity in positron emission tomography (PET) has long been discussed with respect to imaging instrumentation and algorithms for data treatment. Here, the molecular sensitivity in PET is discussed on the basis of 2-dimensional coincident measurements of 511 keV γ ray photons resultant from two-photon annihilation. Introduction of an additional selection window based on the energy sum and difference of the coincidently measured γ ray photons, without any significant instrumental and algorithmic changes, showed an improvement in the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) by an order of magnitude. Improvement of performance characteristics in the PET imaging system was demonstrated by an increase in the noise equivalent count rate (NECR) which takes both the SNR and the detection efficiency into consideration. A further improvement of both the SNR and the NECR is expected for the present system in real clinical and in-vivo environments, where much stronger positron sources are employed.

  6. Enhancement of molecular sensitivity in positron emission tomography with quantum correlation of γ-ray photons.

    PubMed

    Sato, K; Kobayashi, Y

    2015-05-01

    Enhancement of molecular sensitivity in positron emission tomography (PET) has long been discussed with respect to imaging instrumentation and algorithms for data treatment. Here, the molecular sensitivity in PET is discussed on the basis of 2-dimensional coincident measurements of 511 keV γ ray photons resultant from two-photon annihilation. Introduction of an additional selection window based on the energy sum and difference of the coincidently measured γ ray photons, without any significant instrumental and algorithmic changes, showed an improvement in the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) by an order of magnitude. Improvement of performance characteristics in the PET imaging system was demonstrated by an increase in the noise equivalent count rate (NECR) which takes both the SNR and the detection efficiency into consideration. A further improvement of both the SNR and the NECR is expected for the present system in real clinical and in-vivo environments, where much stronger positron sources are employed.

  7. Surface acoustic wave regulated single photon emission from a coupled quantum dot–nanocavity system

    SciTech Connect

    Weiß, M.; Kapfinger, S.; Wixforth, A.; Krenner, H. J.; Reichert, T.; Finley, J. J.; Kaniber, M.

    2016-07-18

    A coupled quantum dot–nanocavity system in the weak coupling regime of cavity-quantumelectrodynamics is dynamically tuned in and out of resonance by the coherent elastic field of a f{sub SAW} ≃ 800 MHz surface acoustic wave. When the system is brought to resonance by the sound wave, light-matter interaction is strongly increased by the Purcell effect. This leads to a precisely timed single photon emission as confirmed by the second order photon correlation function, g{sup (2)}. All relevant frequencies of our experiment are faithfully identified in the Fourier transform of g{sup (2)}, demonstrating high fidelity regulation of the stream of single photons emitted by the system.

  8. The Number of Accumulated Photons and the Quality of Stimulated Emission Depletion Lifetime Images

    SciTech Connect

    Syed, Aleem; Lesoine, Michael D; Bhattacharjee, Ujjal; Petrich, Jacob W; Smith, Emily A

    2014-03-03

    Time binning is used to increase the number of photon counts in the peak channel of stimulated emission depletion (STED) fluorescence lifetime decay curves to determine how it affects the resulting lifetime image. The fluorescence lifetime of the fluorophore, Alexa Fluor 594 phalloidin, bound to F-actin is probed in cultured S2 cells at a spatial resolution of ~40 nm. This corresponds to a tenfold smaller probe volume compared to confocal imaging, and a reduced number of photons contributing to the signal. Pixel-by-pixel fluorescence lifetime measurements and error analysis show that an average of 40 ± 30 photon counts in the peak channel with a signal-to-noise ratio of 20 is enough to calculate a reliable fluorescence lifetime from a single exponential fluorescence decay. No heterogeneity in the actin cytoskeleton in different regions of the cultured cells was measured in the 40- to 400-nm spatial regime.

  9. Enhancement of molecular sensitivity in positron emission tomography with quantum correlation of γ-ray photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, K.; Kobayashi, Y.

    2015-05-01

    Enhancement of molecular sensitivity in positron emission tomography (PET) has long been discussed with respect to imaging instrumentation and algorithms for data treatment. Here, the molecular sensitivity in PET is discussed on the basis of 2-dimensional coincident measurements of 511 keV γ ray photons resultant from two-photon annihilation. Introduction of an additional selection window based on the energy sum and difference of the coincidently measured γ ray photons, without any significant instrumental and algorithmic changes, showed an improvement in the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) by an order of magnitude. Improvement of performance characteristics in the PET imaging system was demonstrated by an increase in the noise equivalent count rate (NECR) which takes both the SNR and the detection efficiency into consideration. A further improvement of both the SNR and the NECR is expected for the present system in real clinical and in-vivo environments, where much stronger positron sources are employed.

  10. Single photon infrared emission spectroscopy: a study of IR emission from UV laser excited PAHs between 3 and 15 micrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, D. J.; Schlemmer, S.; Balucani, N.; Wagner, D. R.; Harrison, J. A.; Steiner, B.; Saykally, R. J.

    1998-01-01

    Single-photon infrared emission spectroscopy (SPIRES) has been used to measure emission spectra from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). A supersonic free-jet expansion has been used to provide emission spectra of rotationally cold and vibrationally excited naphthalene and benzene. Under these conditions, the observed width of the 3.3-micrometers (C-H stretch) band resembles the bandwidths observed in experiments in which emission is observed from naphthalene with higher rotational energy. To obtain complete coverage of IR wavelengths relevant to the unidentified infrared bands (UIRs), UV laser-induced desorption was used to generate gas-phase highly excited PAHs. Lorentzian band shapes were convoluted with the monochromator-slit function in order to determine the widths of PAH emission bands under astrophysically relevant conditions. Bandwidths were also extracted from bands consisting of multiple normal modes blended together. These parameters are grouped according to the functional groups mostly involved in the vibration, and mean bandwidths are obtained. These bandwidths are larger than the widths of the corresponding UIR bands. However, when the comparison is limited to the largest PAHs studied, the bandwidths are slightly smaller than the corresponding UIR bands. These parameters can be used to model emission spectra from PAH cations and cations of larger PAHs, which are better candidate carriers of the UIRs.

  11. Single photon infrared emission spectroscopy: a study of IR emission from UV laser excited PAHs between 3 and 15 micrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, D. J.; Schlemmer, S.; Balucani, N.; Wagner, D. R.; Harrison, J. A.; Steiner, B.; Saykally, R. J.

    1998-01-01

    Single-photon infrared emission spectroscopy (SPIRES) has been used to measure emission spectra from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). A supersonic free-jet expansion has been used to provide emission spectra of rotationally cold and vibrationally excited naphthalene and benzene. Under these conditions, the observed width of the 3.3-micrometers (C-H stretch) band resembles the bandwidths observed in experiments in which emission is observed from naphthalene with higher rotational energy. To obtain complete coverage of IR wavelengths relevant to the unidentified infrared bands (UIRs), UV laser-induced desorption was used to generate gas-phase highly excited PAHs. Lorentzian band shapes were convoluted with the monochromator-slit function in order to determine the widths of PAH emission bands under astrophysically relevant conditions. Bandwidths were also extracted from bands consisting of multiple normal modes blended together. These parameters are grouped according to the functional groups mostly involved in the vibration, and mean bandwidths are obtained. These bandwidths are larger than the widths of the corresponding UIR bands. However, when the comparison is limited to the largest PAHs studied, the bandwidths are slightly smaller than the corresponding UIR bands. These parameters can be used to model emission spectra from PAH cations and cations of larger PAHs, which are better candidate carriers of the UIRs.

  12. The application of ultra-weak photon emission in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Ou-Yang, Hao

    2014-10-05

    Ultra-weak photo emission (UPE) is a phenomenon closely associated with life and provides us a rare window to look into oxidative reactions in life directly without the aid of other agents. Dozens of independent studies have investigated UPE in skin in the last 2 decades. Skin serves as a convenient target for the application of UPE. As the outmost layer of our body, skin is also subjected to the influences from environmental factors such as ultraviolet light. Therefore UPE measurement can help us better understand the interaction between skin and the outside world. A variety of dermatological interventions may benefit from UPE studies. In particular, those treatments aiming to manage the oxidative status of the skin can be monitored directly by UPE measurements. In recent years, UPE has already been used as a valuable in vivo tool to assist the selection of better skin care ingredients and products. The knowledge gained by UPE studies of skin may also help generate new insights and new targets for future treatments. This review emphasizes in vivo and clinical measurement of UPE in skin. The applications of UPE in skin research related to antioxidants and sunscreens are discussed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Nonlinear mechanism for weak photon emission from biosystems.

    PubMed

    Brizhik, Larissa

    2008-05-01

    The nonlinear mechanism for the origin of the weak biophoton emission from biological systems is suggested. The mechanism is based on the properties of solitons that provide energy transfer and charge transport in metabolic processes. Such soliton states are formed in alpha-helical proteins. Account of the electron-phonon interaction in macromolecules results in the self-trapping of electrons in a localized soliton-like state, known as Davydov's solitons. The important role of the helical symmetry of macromolecules is elucidated for the formation, stability and dynamical properties of solitons. It is shown that the soliton with the lowest energy has an inner structure with the many-hump envelope. The total probability of the excitation in the helix is characterized by interspine oscillations with the frequency of oscillations, proportional to the soliton velocity. The radiative life-time of a soliton is calculated and shown to exceed the life-time of an excitation on an isolated peptide group by several orders of magnitude.

  14. FAINT HIGH-ENERGY GAMMA-RAY PHOTON EMISSION OF GRB 081006A FROM FERMI OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng Weikang; Akerlof, Carl W.; Pandey, Shashi B.; McKay, Timothy A.; Zhang Binbin; Zhang Bing

    2012-01-20

    Since the launch of the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope on 2008 June 11, the Large Area Telescope (LAT) instrument has firmly detected more than 20 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with high-energy photon emission above 100 MeV. Using the matched filter technique, three more GRBs have also shown evidence of correlation with high-energy photon emission as demonstrated by Akerlof et al. In this paper, we present another GRB, GRB 081006A, unambiguously detected by the matched filter technique. This event is associated with more than 13 high-energy photons above 100 MeV. The likelihood analysis code provided by the Fermi Science Support Center generated an independent verification of this detection using a comparison of the test statistics value with similar calculations for random LAT data fields. We have performed detailed temporal and spectral analysis of photons from 8 keV up to 0.8 GeV from the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor and the LAT. The properties of GRB 081006A can be compared to those of the other two long-duration GRBs detected at similar significance, GRB 080825C and GRB 090217A. We find that GRB 081006A is more similar to GRB 080825C with comparable appearances of late high-energy photon emission. As demonstrated previously, there appears to be a surprising dearth of faint LAT GRBs, with only one additional GRB identified in a sample of 74. In this unique period when both Swift and Fermi are operational, there is some urgency to explore this aspect of GRBs as fully as possible.

  15. Novel photonic crystal cavities and related structures.

    SciTech Connect

    Luk, Ting Shan

    2007-11-01

    The key accomplishment of this project is to achieve a much more in-depth understanding of the thermal emission physics of metallic photonic crystal through theoretical modeling and experimental measurements. An improved transfer matrix technique was developed to enable incorporation of complex dielectric function. Together with microscopic theory describing emitter radiative and non-radiative relaxation dynamics, a non-equilibrium thermal emission model is developed. Finally, experimental methodology was developed to measure absolute emissivity of photonic crystal at high temperatures with accuracy of +/-2%. Accurate emissivity measurements allow us to validate the procedure to treat the effect of the photonic crystal substrate.

  16. Nursing benefits of using an automated injection system for ictal brain single photon emission computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Vonhofen, Geraldine; Evangelista, Tonya; Lordeon, Patricia

    2012-04-01

    The traditional method of administering radioactive isotopes to pediatric patients undergoing ictal brain single photon emission computed tomography testing has been by manual injections. This method presents certain challenges for nursing, including time requirements and safety risks. This quality improvement project discusses the implementation of an automated injection system for isotope administration and its impact on staffing, safety, and nursing satisfaction. It was conducted in an epilepsy monitoring unit at a large urban pediatric facility. Results of this project showed a decrease in the number of nurses exposed to radiation and improved nursing satisfaction with the use of the automated injection system. In addition, there was a decrease in the number of nursing hours required during ictal brain single photon emission computed tomography testing.

  17. Emission properties and photon statistics of a single quantum dot laser.

    PubMed

    Ritter, S; Gartner, P; Gies, C; Jahnke, F

    2010-05-10

    A theoretical description for a single quantum-dot emitter in a microcavity is developed.We analyze for increasing steady-state pump rate the transition from the strong-coupling regime with photon antibunching to the weak-coupling regime with coherent emission. It is demonstrated how Coulomb interaction of excited carriers and excitation-induced dephasing can strongly modify the emission properties. Our theoretical investigations are based on a direct solution of the Liouville-von Neumann equation for the coupled carrier-photon system. We include multiple carrier excitations in the quantum dot, their Coulomb interaction, as well as excitation-induced dephasing and screening. Similarities and differences to atomic systems are discussed and results in the regime of recent experiments are interpreted. (c) 2010 Optical Society of America.

  18. Inhibition of light emission in a 2.5D photonic structure

    SciTech Connect

    Peretti, Romain; Seassal, Christian; Viktorovich, Pierre; Letartre, Xavier

    2014-07-14

    We analyse inhibition of emission in a 2.5D photonic structures made up of a photonic crystal (PhC) and Bragg mirrors using Finite Differences Time Domaine (FDTD) simulations. A comparison is made between an isolated PhC membrane and the same PhC suspended onto a Bragg mirror or sandwiched between 2 Bragg mirrors. Strong inhibition of the Purcell factor is observed in a broad spectral range, whatever the in-plane orientation and location of the emitting dipole. We analysed these results numerically and theoretically by simulating the experimentally observed lifetime of a collection of randomly distributed emitters, showing that their average emission rate is decreased by more than one decade, both for coupled or isolated emitters.

  19. Quantum state-controlled directional spontaneous emission of photons into a nanophotonic waveguide

    PubMed Central

    Mitsch, R.; Sayrin, C.; Albrecht, B.; Schneeweiss, P.; Rauschenbeutel, A.

    2014-01-01

    The spin of light in subwavelength-diameter waveguides can be orthogonal to the propagation direction of the photons because of the strong transverse confinement. This transverse spin changes sign when the direction of propagation is reversed. Using this effect, we demonstrate the directional spontaneous emission of photons by laser-trapped caesium atoms into an optical nanofibre and control their propagation direction by the excited state of the atomic emitters. In particular, we tune the spontaneous emission into the counter-propagating guided modes from symmetric to strongly asymmetric, where more than % of the optical power is launched into one or the other direction. We expect our results to have important implications for research in quantum nanophotonics and for implementations of integrated optical signal processing in the quantum regime. PMID:25502565

  20. Photon and radiowave emission from peeling pressure sensitive adhesives in air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donaldson, E. E.; Shen, X. A.; Dickinson, J. T.

    1985-01-01

    During separation of an adhesive from a polymer substrate in air, intense bursts of photons ('phE', for photon emission) and long wavelength electromagnetic radiation ('RE', for radiowave emission), similar to those reported earlier by Deryagin, et al. (1978) have been observed. In this paper, careful measurements of the phE time distributions, as well as time correlations between bursts of phE and RE, are reported. These results support the view that patches of electrical charge produced by charge separation between dissimilar materials lead to microdischarges in and near the crack tip. The role of these discharges in producing sustained phE after the discharge has been extinguished is also discussed.

  1. Single photon emission computed tomography in Alzheimer's disease. Abnormal iofetamine I 123 uptake reflects dementia severity

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, K.A.; Holman, B.L.; Mueller, S.P.; Rosen, T.J.; English, R.; Nagel, J.S.; Growdon, J.H.

    1988-04-01

    To determine whether abnormalities in regional cerebral functional activity estimated by iofetamine hydrochloride I 123 and single photon emission computed tomography can be detected in mild or moderate as well as severe cases of Alzheimer's disease (AD), we performed iofetamine I 123-single photon emission computed tomography in 37 patients with probable AD (nine patients with mild, 18 patients with moderate, and ten patients with severe dementia) and nine age-matched control subjects. Iofetamine I 123 uptake was measured in right and left frontal, temporal, parietal, and occipital cortices. Mean (right and left) iofetamine I 123 activity was lowest in the parietal region of patients with AD and was significantly reduced in the other three regions compared with control subjects. Only in the parietal region was lower relative iofetamine I 123 activity associated with an impaired level of patient function and with cognitive deficit.

  2. Upconversion emission properties of CeO2: Tm3+, Yb3+ inverse opal photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Gong; Wu, Hangjun; Yang, Zhengwen; Liao, Jiayan; Lai, Shenfeng; Qiu, Jianbei; Song, Zhiguo

    2014-10-01

    The ordered and disordered templates were assembled by vertical deposition of polystyrene microspheres. The CeO2: Tm3+, Yb3+ precursor solution was used to infiltrate into the voids of the ordered and disordered templates, respectively. Then the ordered and disordered templates were calcined at 950°C in an air furnace, and the CeO2: Tm3+, Yb3+ inverse opals were obtained. The upconversion emissions from CeO2: Tm3+, Yb3+ inverse opals were suppressed due to the photon trapping caused by Bragg reflection of lattice planes when the upconversion emission band was in the range of the photonic band gaps in the inverse opals.

  3. Analytic treatment of source photon emission times to reduce noise in implicit Monte Carlo calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Trahan, Travis J.; Gentile, Nicholas A.

    2012-09-10

    Statistical uncertainty is inherent to any Monte Carlo simulation of radiation transport problems. In space-angle-frequency independent radiative transfer calculations, the uncertainty in the solution is entirely due to random sampling of source photon emission times. We have developed a modification to the Implicit Monte Carlo algorithm that eliminates noise due to sampling of the emission time of source photons. In problems that are independent of space, angle, and energy, the new algorithm generates a smooth solution, while a standard implicit Monte Carlo solution is noisy. For space- and angle-dependent problems, the new algorithm exhibits reduced noise relative to standard implicit Monte Carlo in some cases, and comparable noise in all other cases. In conclusion, the improvements are limited to short time scales; over long time scales, noise due to random sampling of spatial and angular variables tends to dominate the noise reduction from the new algorithm.

  4. Photon and radiowave emission from peeling pressure sensitive adhesives in air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donaldson, E. E.; Shen, X. A.; Dickinson, J. T.

    1985-01-01

    During separation of an adhesive from a polymer substrate in air, intense bursts of photons ('phE', for photon emission) and long wavelength electromagnetic radiation ('RE', for radiowave emission), similar to those reported earlier by Deryagin, et al. (1978) have been observed. In this paper, careful measurements of the phE time distributions, as well as time correlations between bursts of phE and RE, are reported. These results support the view that patches of electrical charge produced by charge separation between dissimilar materials lead to microdischarges in and near the crack tip. The role of these discharges in producing sustained phE after the discharge has been extinguished is also discussed.

  5. Single photon emission computed tomography in Alzheimer's disease. Abnormal iofetamine I 123 uptake reflects dementia severity

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, K.A.; Holman, B.L.; Mueller, S.P.; Rosen, T.J.; English, R.; Nagel, J.S.; Growdon, J.H.

    1988-04-01

    To determine whether abnormalities in regional cerebral functional activity estimated by iofetamine hydrochloride I 123 and single photon emission computed tomography can be detected in mild or moderate as well as severe cases of Alzheimer's disease (AD), we performed iofetamine I 123-single photon emission computed tomography in 37 patients with probable AD (nine patients with mild, 18 patients with moderate, and ten patients with severe dementia) and nine age-matched control subjects. Iofetamine I 123 uptake was measured in right and left frontal, temporal, parietal, and occipital cortices. Mean (right and left) iofetamine I 123 activity was lowest in the parietal region of patients with AD and was significantly reduced in the other three regions compared with control subjects. Only in the parietal region was lower relative iofetamine I 123 activity associated with an impaired level of patient function and with cognitive deficit.

  6. Deterministic control of the emission from light sources in 1D nanoporous photonic crystals (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galisteo-López, Juan F.

    2017-02-01

    Controlling the emission of a light source demands acting on its local photonic environment via the local density of states (LDOS). Approaches to exert such control on large scale samples, commonly relying on self-assembly methods, usually lack from a precise positioning of the emitter within the material. Alternatively expensive and time consuming techniques can be used to produce samples of small dimensions where a deterministic control on emitter position can be achieved. In this work we present a full solution process approach to fabricate photonic architectures containing nano-emitters which position can be controlled with nanometer precision over squared milimiter regions. By a combination of spin and dip coating we fabricate one-dimensional (1D) nanoporous photonic crystals, which potential in different fields such as photovoltaics or sensing has been previously reported, containing monolayers of luminescent polymeric nanospheres. We demonstrate how, by modifying the position of the emitters within the photonic crystal, their emission properties (photoluminescence intensity and angular distribution) can be deterministically modified. Further, the nano-emitters can be used as a probe to study the LDOS distribution within these systems with a spatial resolution of 25 nm (provided by the probe size) carrying out macroscopic measurements over squared milimiter regions. Routes to enhance light-matter interaction in this kind of systems by combining them with metallic surfaces are finally discussed.

  7. Dynamics of Single-Photon Emission from Electrically Pumped Color Centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khramtsov, Igor A.; Agio, Mario; Fedyanin, Dmitry Yu.

    2017-08-01

    Low-power, high-speed, and bright electrically driven true single-photon sources, which are able to operate at room temperature, are vital for the practical realization of quantum-communication networks and optical quantum computations. Color centers in semiconductors are currently the best candidates; however, in spite of their intensive study in the past decade, the behavior of color centers in electrically controlled systems is poorly understood. Here we present a physical model and establish a theoretical approach to address single-photon emission dynamics of electrically pumped color centers, which interprets experimental results. We support our analysis with self-consistent numerical simulations of a single-photon emitting diode based on a single nitrogen-vacancy center in diamond and predict the second-order autocorrelation function and other emission characteristics. Our theoretical findings demonstrate remarkable agreement with the experimental results and pave the way to the understanding of single-electron and single-photon processes in semiconductors.

  8. Photon-assisted field emission from a Si tip at addition of an AC low voltage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaporozhchenko, A. V.; Chernov, S. V.; Odnodvorets, L. V.; Stetsenko, B. V.; Nepijko, S. A.; Elmers, H. J.; Schönhense, G.

    2015-07-01

    We investigated the field emission current from a p-type silicon tip with large resistivity of 4 × 103 Ω cm for light illumination with a photon energy of 1.3 eV and tip-anode voltages of 0.7-5.0 kV. Additional AC voltage with amplitude 30-60 V and frequency varying in the range of 10-107 Hz was applied to the tip which resulted in variations of emission current. We investigated the dependence of this phenomenon on the AC signal parameters, light intensity and temperature. The resonant-like frequency dependence of the emission current is because the tip acts as a driven plasmonic resonator. The results represent an important step forward for the development of high-frequency display systems based on electron field emission.

  9. Lorentz microscopy observation of vortices in high-Tc superconductors using a 1-MV field emission transmission electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Harada, Ken

    2013-06-01

    Lorentz microscopy has opened the door to observing a single quantized magnetic flux line (i.e. a vortex) and its dynamic behavior inside a superconductor in real time. It resulted from the efforts of Dr Akira Tonomura and his collaborators, who developed a field emission electron microscope and advanced the technologies used for visualizing vortices (e.g. a low-temperature specimen stage and a magnetic-field application system). They used a 1-MV field emission transmission electron microscope with an electron beam that can penetrate thick specimens of high-temperature superconductors (Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ and YB2C3O7-δ) to reveal the flux-line features inside materials and their interactions with defects. This memorial paper reviews the results of research in the area of vortex matter physics.

  10. Aberration corrected 1.2-MV cold field-emission transmission electron microscope with a sub-50-pm resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Akashi, Tetsuya; Takahashi, Yoshio; Tanigaki, Toshiaki Shimakura, Tomokazu; Kawasaki, Takeshi; Furutsu, Tadao; Shinada, Hiroyuki; Osakabe, Nobuyuki; Müller, Heiko; Haider, Maximilian; Tonomura, Akira

    2015-02-16

    Atomic-resolution electromagnetic field observation is critical to the development of advanced materials and to the unveiling of their fundamental physics. For this purpose, a spherical-aberration corrected 1.2-MV cold field-emission transmission electron microscope has been developed. The microscope has the following superior properties: stabilized accelerating voltage, minimized electrical and mechanical fluctuation, and coherent electron emission. These properties have enabled to obtain 43-pm information transfer. On the bases of these performances, a 43-pm resolution has been obtained by correcting lens aberrations up to the third order. Observations of GaN [411] thin crystal showed a projected atomic locations with a separation of 44 pm.

  11. Determination of the absolute photon emission intensities of some gamma rays of (166m)Ho.

    PubMed

    Peyres, Virginia; García-Toraño, Eduardo

    2017-06-24

    This paper presents the results of the absolute measurement of some photon emission intensities in the decay of (166m)Ho. Point sources from a reference solution standardized in the frame of the EURAMET.RI (II)-K2. Ho-166m activity comparison were measured by gamma spectrometry. The detection efficiency was obtained by Monte Carlo calculations including the complete decay scheme. Results obtained for 27 gamma and X-ray emissions are compared to reference values. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Single photon emission computed tomography-CT in ectopic parathyroid adenoma

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, K. V. S. Hari; Jha, Sangeeta; Shaikh, Altamash; Modi, K. D.

    2011-01-01

    Primary hyperparathyroidism often presents with protean manifestations, resulting in delayed diagnosis. At times, aberrant development and migration of the gland leads to ectopic location leading to problems in localization. Judicious use of combination methods of localization is recommended in treatment failure or recurrent disease. We report the use of single photon emission computed tomography-CT in precise localization of parathyroid adenoma in a patient with failed initial surgery. PMID:22029007

  13. Advances in Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography Hardware and Software.

    PubMed

    Piccinelli, Marina; Garcia, Ernest V

    2016-02-01

    Nuclear imaging techniques remain today's most reliable modality for the assessment and quantification of myocardial perfusion. In recent years, the field has experienced tremendous progress both in terms of dedicated cameras for cardiac applications and software techniques for image reconstruction. The most recent advances in single-photon emission computed tomography hardware and software are reviewed, focusing on how these improvements have resulted in an even more powerful diagnostic tool with reduced injected radiation dose and acquisition time.

  14. Ultraweak Photon Emission as a Non-Invasive Health Assessment: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Ives, John A.; van Wijk, Eduard P. A.; Bat, Namuun; Crawford, Cindy; Walter, Avi; Jonas, Wayne B.; van Wijk, Roeland; van der Greef, Jan

    2014-01-01

    We conducted a systematic review (SR) of the peer reviewed scientific literature on ultraweak photon emissions (UPE) from humans. The question was: Can ultraweak photon emissions from humans be used as a non-invasive health assessment? A systematic search was conducted across eight relevant databases: PubMed/MEDLINE, BIOSIS, CINAHL, PSYCHINFO, All of Cochrane EBM databases, GIDEON, DoD Biomedical Research, and clinicaltrials.gov from database inception to October 2011. Of the 1315 studies captured by the search strategy, 56 met the inclusion criteria, out of which 1 was a RCT, 27 were CCT, and 28 were observational and descriptive studies. There were no systematic reviews/meta-analyses that fit the inclusion criteria. In this report, the authors provide an assessment of the quality of the RCT included; describe the characteristics of all the included studies, the outcomes assessed, and the effectiveness of photon emission as a potential health assessment tool. This report demonstrates that the peer reviewed literature on UPE and human UPE measurement in particular is surprisingly large. Most of the human UPE literature is of good to high quality based on our systematic evaluation. However, an evaluation tool for systematically evaluating this type of “bio-evaluation” methodology is not currently available and would be worth developing. Publications in the peer reviewed literature over the last 50 years demonstrate that the use of “off-the-shelf” technologies and well described methodologies for the detection of human photon emissions are being used on a regular basis in medical and research settings. The overall quality of this literature is good and the use of this approach for determining inflammatory and oxidative states of patients indicate the growing use and value of this approach as both a medical and research tool. PMID:24586274

  15. Hard photon and energetic proton emission in heavy ion collisions at intermediate energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapienza, P.; Coniglione, R.; Migneco, E.; Agodi, C.; Alba, R.; Bellia, G.; Del Zoppo, A.; Finocchiaro, P.; Loukachine, K.; Maiolino, C.; Piattelli, P.; Santonocito, D.; Blumenfeld, Y.; Le Faou, J. H.; Suomijarvi, T.; Frascaria, N.; Roynette, J. C.; Scarpaci, J. A.; Garron, J. P.; Gillibert, A.; Alamanos, N.; Auger, F.; Peghaire, A.; Chomaz, Ph.

    1998-02-01

    The emission of hard photons and pre-equilibrium protons has been investigated in exclusive clusive experiments performed with MEDEA detector. The observation of the γ-proton anticorrelation indicate that the dominant production mechanism is the first chance neutron-proton collisions. Very energetic protons, with energy more than twice the kinematical limit for nucleon-nucleon collisions, have been observed in several reactions.

  16. Monitoring CBF in clinical routine by dynamic single photon emission tomography (SPECT) of inhaled xenon-133

    SciTech Connect

    Sugiyama, H.; Christensen, J.; Skyhoj Olsen, T.; Lassen, N.A.

    1986-11-01

    A very simple and low-cost brain dedicated, rapidly rotating Single Photon Emission Tomograph SPECT is described. Its use in following patients with ischemic stroke is illustrated by two middle cerebral artery occlusion cases, one with persistent occlusion and low CBF in MCA territory, and one with early lysis of the occlusion having high CBF (massive luxury perfusion) for some weeks. Evidence of this kind may be essential in the evaluation of therapeutic measures in ischemic stroke.

  17. Multidimensional characterization of an entangled photon-pair source via stimulated emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Fang, B; Liscidini, M; Sipe, J E; Lorenz, V O

    2016-05-02

    Using stimulated emission tomography, we characterize an entangled photon-pair source in the energy and polarization degrees of freedom, with a precision far exceeding what could be obtained by quantum state tomography. Through this multidimensional tomography we find that energy-polarization correlations are a cause of polarization-entanglement degradation, demonstrating that this technique provides useful information for source engineering and can accelerate the development of quantum information processing systems dependent on many degrees of freedom.

  18. Information transfer of 25.5 nm-1 in a 1-MV field-emission transmission electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Akashi, Tetsuya; Takahashi, Yoshio; Onai, Toshio; Kasai, Hiroto; Shinada, Hiroyuki; Osakabe, Nobuyuki; Tonomura, Akira

    2016-08-01

    Information transfer of a 1-MV field-emission transmission electron microscope (TEM) was improved by reducing mechanical vibrations and improving the stability of an acceleration voltage. The resulting mechanical stability was estimated from lattice fringes with an obtained spacing of 19.6 pm under achromatic conditions. This value corresponds to a vibration amplitude of <19.6 pm. The stability of the acceleration voltage was improved by reducing thermal noises in the power supply. As a result, 39.2-pm-spacing linear lattice fringes were obtained under chromatic conditions. This indicates that 25.5 nm(-1) information transfer was accomplished in the 1 MV field-emission TEM.

  19. Giant photon bunching, superradiant pulse emission and excitation trapping in quantum-dot nanolasers

    PubMed Central

    Jahnke, Frank; Gies, Christopher; Aßmann, Marc; Bayer, Manfred; Leymann, H. A. M.; Foerster, Alexander; Wiersig, Jan; Schneider, Christian; Kamp, Martin; Höfling, Sven

    2016-01-01

    Light is often characterized only by its classical properties, like intensity or coherence. When looking at its quantum properties, described by photon correlations, new information about the state of the matter generating the radiation can be revealed. In particular the difference between independent and entangled emitters, which is at the heart of quantum mechanics, can be made visible in the photon statistics of the emitted light. The well-studied phenomenon of superradiance occurs when quantum–mechanical correlations between the emitters are present. Notwithstanding, superradiance was previously demonstrated only in terms of classical light properties. Here, we provide the missing link between quantum correlations of the active material and photon correlations in the emitted radiation. We use the superradiance of quantum dots in a cavity-quantum electrodynamics laser to show a direct connection between superradiant pulse emission and distinctive changes in the photon correlation function. This directly demonstrates the importance of quantum–mechanical correlations and their transfer between carriers and photons in novel optoelectronic devices. PMID:27161302

  20. Giant photon bunching, superradiant pulse emission and excitation trapping in quantum-dot nanolasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahnke, Frank; Gies, Christopher; Aßmann, Marc; Bayer, Manfred; Leymann, H. A. M.; Foerster, Alexander; Wiersig, Jan; Schneider, Christian; Kamp, Martin; Höfling, Sven

    2016-05-01

    Light is often characterized only by its classical properties, like intensity or coherence. When looking at its quantum properties, described by photon correlations, new information about the state of the matter generating the radiation can be revealed. In particular the difference between independent and entangled emitters, which is at the heart of quantum mechanics, can be made visible in the photon statistics of the emitted light. The well-studied phenomenon of superradiance occurs when quantum-mechanical correlations between the emitters are present. Notwithstanding, superradiance was previously demonstrated only in terms of classical light properties. Here, we provide the missing link between quantum correlations of the active material and photon correlations in the emitted radiation. We use the superradiance of quantum dots in a cavity-quantum electrodynamics laser to show a direct connection between superradiant pulse emission and distinctive changes in the photon correlation function. This directly demonstrates the importance of quantum-mechanical correlations and their transfer between carriers and photons in novel optoelectronic devices.

  1. Iofetamine I 123 single photon emission computed tomography is accurate in the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, K.A.; Holman, B.L.; Rosen, T.J.; Nagel, J.S.; English, R.J.; Growdon, J.H. )

    1990-04-01

    To determine the diagnostic accuracy of iofetamine hydrochloride I 123 (IMP) with single photon emission computed tomography in Alzheimer's disease, we studied 58 patients with AD and 15 age-matched healthy control subjects. We used a qualitative method to assess regional IMP uptake in the entire brain and to rate image data sets as normal or abnormal without knowledge of subjects'clinical classification. The sensitivity and specificity of IMP with single photon emission computed tomography in AD were 88% and 87%, respectively. In 15 patients with mild cognitive deficits (Blessed Dementia Scale score, less than or equal to 10), sensitivity was 80%. With the use of a semiquantitative measure of regional cortical IMP uptake, the parietal lobes were the most functionally impaired in AD and the most strongly associated with the patients' Blessed Dementia Scale scores. These results indicated that IMP with single photon emission computed tomography may be a useful adjunct in the clinical diagnosis of AD in early, mild disease.

  2. Photon and dilepton production at the Facility for Proton and Anti-Proton Research and beam-energy scan at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider using coarse-grained microscopic transport simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endres, Stephan; van Hees, Hendrik; Bleicher, Marcus

    2016-05-01

    We present calculations of dilepton and photon spectra for the energy range Elab=2 A to35 A GeV which will be available for the Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment at the future Facility for Proton and Anti-Proton Research (FAIR). The same energy regime will also be covered by phase II of the beam-energy scan at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC-BES). Coarse-grained dynamics from microscopic transport calculations of the Ultrarelativistic Quantum Molecular Dynamics (UrQMD) model is used to determine temperature and chemical potentials, which allows for the use of dilepton and photon-emission rates from equilibrium quantum-field-theory calculations. The results indicate that nonequilibrium effects, the presence of baryonic matter, and the creation of a deconfined phase might show up in specific manners in the measurable dilepton invariant-mass spectra and in the photon transverse-momentum spectra. However, as the many influences are difficult to disentangle, we argue that the challenge for future measurements of electromagnetic probes will be to provide a high precision with uncertainties much lower than in previous experiments. Furthermore, a systematic study of the whole energy range covered by CBM at FAIR and RHIC-BES is necessary to discriminate between different effects, which influence the spectra, and to identify possible signatures of a phase transition.

  3. Selective two-photon fluorescence suppression by ultrafast pulse-pair excitation: control by selective one-color stimulated emission.

    PubMed

    Kumar De, Arijit; Roy, Debjit; Goswami, Debabrata

    2011-10-01

    Controlling two-photon molecular fluorescence leading to selective fluorophore excitation has been a long sought after goal in fluorescence microscopy. In this letter, we thoroughly explore selective fluorescence suppression through simultaneous two-photon absorption by two different fluorophores followed by selective one-photon stimulated emission for one particular fluorophore. We achieve this by precisely controlling the time delay between two identical ultrafast near infrared laser pulses.

  4. Comparison of HORACE and PHOTOS Algorithms for Multi-Photon Emission in the Context of the W Boson Mass Measurement

    DOE PAGES

    Kotwal, Ashutosh V.; Jayatilaka, Bodhitha

    2016-01-01

    W boson mass measurement is sensitive to QED radiative corrections due to virtual photon loops and real photon emission. The largest shift in the measured mass, which depends on the transverse momentum spectrum of the charged lepton from the boson decay, is caused by the emission of real photons from the final-state lepton. There are a number of calculations and codes available to model the final-state photon emission. We perform a detailed study, comparing the results from HORACE and PHOTOS implementations of the final-state multiphoton emission in the context of a direct measurement ofW boson mass at Tevatron. Mass fitsmore » are performed using a simulation of the CDF II detector.« less

  5. Comparison of HORACE and PHOTOS Algorithms for Multi-Photon Emission in the Context of the W Boson Mass Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Kotwal, Ashutosh V.; Jayatilaka, Bodhitha

    2016-01-01

    W boson mass measurement is sensitive to QED radiative corrections due to virtual photon loops and real photon emission. The largest shift in the measured mass, which depends on the transverse momentum spectrum of the charged lepton from the boson decay, is caused by the emission of real photons from the final-state lepton. There are a number of calculations and codes available to model the final-state photon emission. We perform a detailed study, comparing the results from HORACE and PHOTOS implementations of the final-state multiphoton emission in the context of a direct measurement ofW boson mass at Tevatron. Mass fits are performed using a simulation of the CDF II detector.

  6. Using spontaneous photon emission to image lipid oxidation patterns in plant tissues.

    PubMed

    Birtic, Simona; Ksas, Brigitte; Genty, Bernard; Mueller, Martin J; Triantaphylidès, Christian; Havaux, Michel

    2011-09-01

    Plants, like almost all living organisms, spontaneously emit photons of visible light. We used a highly sensitive, low-noise cooled charge coupled device camera to image spontaneous photon emission (autoluminescence) of plants. Oxidative stress and wounding induced a long-lasting enhancement of plant autoluminescence, the origin of which is investigated here. This long-lived phenomenon can be distinguished from the short-lived chlorophyll luminescence resulting from charge recombinations within the photosystems by pre-adapting the plant to darkness for about 2 h. Lipids in solvent were found to emit a persistent luminescence after oxidation in vitro, which exhibited the same time and temperature dependence as plant autoluminescence. Other biological molecules, such as DNA or proteins, either did not produce measurable light upon oxidation or they did produce a chemiluminescence that decayed rapidly, which excludes their significant contribution to the in vivo light emission signal. Selective manipulation of the lipid oxidation levels in Arabidopsis mutants affected in lipid hydroperoxide metabolism revealed a causal link between leaf autoluminescence and lipid oxidation. Addition of chlorophyll to oxidized lipids enhanced light emission. Both oxidized lipids and plants predominantly emit light at wavelengths higher than 600 nm; the emission spectrum of plant autoluminescence was shifted towards even higher wavelengths, a phenomenon ascribable to chlorophyll molecules acting as luminescence enhancers in vivo. Taken together, the presented results show that spontaneous photon emission imaged in plants mainly emanates from oxidized lipids. Imaging of this signal thus provides a simple and sensitive non-invasive method to selectively visualize and map patterns of lipid oxidation in plants. © 2011 The Authors. The Plant Journal © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  7. Direct evidence of single quantum dot emission from GaN islands formed at threading dislocations using nanoscale cathodoluminescence: A source of single photons in the ultraviolet

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, Gordon Berger, Christoph; Veit, Peter; Metzner, Sebastian; Bertram, Frank; Bläsing, Jürgen; Dadgar, Armin; Strittmatter, André; Christen, Jürgen; Callsen, Gordon; Kalinowski, Stefan; Hoffmann, Axel

    2015-06-22

    Intense emission from GaN islands embedded in AlN resulting from GaN/AlN quantum well growth is directly resolved by performing cathodoluminescence spectroscopy in a scanning transmission electron microscope. Line widths down to 440 μeV are measured in a wavelength region between 220 and 310 nm confirming quantum dot like electronic properties in the islands. These quantum dot states can be structurally correlated to islands of slightly enlarged thicknesses of the GaN/AlN quantum well layer preferentially formed in vicinity to dislocations. The quantum dot states exhibit single photon emission in Hanbury Brown-Twiss experiments with a clear antibunching in the second order correlation function at zero time delay.

  8. Anisotropic emission and photon-recycling in strain-balanced quantum well solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Cabrera, C. I.; Enciso, A.; Contreras-Solorio, D. A.; Hernandez, L.; Connolly, J. P.

    2014-04-28

    Strain-balanced quantum well solar cells (SB-QWSCs) extend the photon absorption edge beyond that of bulk GaAs by incorporation of quantum wells in the i-region of a p–i–n device. Anisotropy arises from a splitting of the valence band due to compressive strain in the quantum wells, suppressing a transition which contributes to emission from the edge of the quantum wells. We have studied both the emission light polarized in the plane perpendicular (TM) to the quantum well which couples exclusively to the light hole transition and the emission polarized in the plane of the quantum wells (TE) which couples mainly to the heavy hole transition. It was found that the spontaneous emission rates TM and TE increase when the quantum wells are deeper. The addition of a distributed Bragg reflector can substantially increase the photocurrent while decreasing the radiative recombination current. We have examined the impact of the photon recycling effect on SB-QWSC performance. We have optimized SB-QWSC design to achieve single junction efficiencies above 30%.

  9. Simulation Study of Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography for Industrial Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Tushar; Sarkar, P. S.; Sinha, Amar

    2008-09-26

    SPECT (Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography) provides for an invaluable non-invasive technique for the characterization and activity distribution of the gamma-emitting source. For many applications of radioisotopes for medical and industrial application, not only the positional information of the distribution of radioisotopes is needed but also its strength. The well-established X-ray radiography or transmission tomography techniques do not yield sufficient quantitative information about these objects. Emission tomography is one of the important methods for such characterization. Application of parallel beam, fan beam and 3D cone beam emission tomography methods have been discussed in this paper. Simulation studies to test these algorithms have been carried out to validate the technique.

  10. On-chip time resolved detection of quantum dot emission using integrated superconducting single photon detectors

    PubMed Central

    Reithmaier, G.; Lichtmannecker, S.; Reichert, T.; Hasch, P.; Müller, K.; Bichler, M.; Gross, R.; Finley, J. J.

    2013-01-01

    We report the routing of quantum light emitted by self-assembled InGaAs quantum dots (QDs) into the optical modes of a GaAs ridge waveguide and its efficient detection on-chip via evanescent coupling to NbN superconducting nanowire single photon detectors (SSPDs). The waveguide coupled SSPDs primarily detect QD luminescence, with scattered photons from the excitation laser onto the proximal detector being negligible by comparison. The SSPD detection efficiency from the evanescently coupled waveguide modes is shown to be two orders of magnitude larger when compared with operation under normal incidence illumination, due to the much longer optical interaction length. Furthermore, in-situ time resolved measurements performed using the integrated detector show an average QD spontaneous emission lifetime of 0.95 ns, measured with a timing jitter of only 72 ps. The performance metrics of the SSPD integrated directly onto GaAs nano-photonic hardware confirms the strong potential for on-chip few-photon quantum optics using such semiconductor-superconductor hybrid systems. PMID:23712624

  11. On-chip time resolved detection of quantum dot emission using integrated superconducting single photon detectors.

    PubMed

    Reithmaier, G; Lichtmannecker, S; Reichert, T; Hasch, P; Müller, K; Bichler, M; Gross, R; Finley, J J

    2013-01-01

    We report the routing of quantum light emitted by self-assembled InGaAs quantum dots (QDs) into the optical modes of a GaAs ridge waveguide and its efficient detection on-chip via evanescent coupling to NbN superconducting nanowire single photon detectors (SSPDs). The waveguide coupled SSPDs primarily detect QD luminescence, with scattered photons from the excitation laser onto the proximal detector being negligible by comparison. The SSPD detection efficiency from the evanescently coupled waveguide modes is shown to be two orders of magnitude larger when compared with operation under normal incidence illumination, due to the much longer optical interaction length. Furthermore, in-situ time resolved measurements performed using the integrated detector show an average QD spontaneous emission lifetime of 0.95 ns, measured with a timing jitter of only 72 ps. The performance metrics of the SSPD integrated directly onto GaAs nano-photonic hardware confirms the strong potential for on-chip few-photon quantum optics using such semiconductor-superconductor hybrid systems.

  12. Region specific enhancement of quantum dot emission using interleaved two-dimensional photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    See, Gloria G; Xu, Lu; Naughton, Matt S; Tang, Tiantian; Bonita, Yolanda; Joo, Jake; Trefonas, Peter; Deshpande, Kishori; Kenis, Paul J A; Nuzzo, Ralph G; Cunningham, Brian T

    2015-03-20

    The power efficiency, spectral characteristics, and output directionality of light emitting diodes (LEDs) used for lighting and video display may be tailored by integrating nanostructures that interact with photon emitters. In this work, we demonstrate an approach in which visible-wavelength-emitting quantum dots (QDs) are integrated within a polymer-based photonic crystal (PC) and excited by an ultraviolet-emitting LED. The PC design incorporates two interleaved regions, each with distinct periods in orthogonal directions. The structure enables simultaneous resonant coupling of ultraviolet excitation photons to the QDs and visible QD emission at two different wavelengths to efficiently extract photons normal to the PC surface. The combined excitation and extraction enhancements result in a 5.8X increase in the QD output intensity. Further, we demonstrate multiple QD-doped PCs combined on a single surface to optimally couple with distinct populations of QDs, offering a means for blending color output and directionality of multiple wavelengths. Devices are fabricated upon flexible plastic surfaces by a manufacturable replica molding approach.

  13. Measurements of wavelength-dependent double photoelectron emission from single photons in VUV-sensitive photomultiplier tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faham, C. H.; Gehman, V. M.; Currie, A.; Dobi, A.; Sorensen, P.; Gaitskell, R. J.

    2015-09-01

    Measurements of double photoelectron emission (DPE) probabilities as a function of wavelength are reported for Hamamatsu R8778, R8520, and R11410 VUV-sensitive photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). In DPE, a single photon strikes the PMT photocathode and produces two photoelectrons instead of a single one. It was found that the fraction of detected photons that result in DPE emission is a function of the incident photon wavelength, and manifests itself below ~250 nm. For the xenon scintillation wavelength of 175 nm, a DPE probability of 18-24% was measured depending on the tube and measurement method. This wavelength-dependent single photon response has implications for the energy calibration and photon counting of current and future liquid xenon detectors such as LUX, LZ, XENON100/1T, Panda-X and XMASS.

  14. Infrared spectrally selective low emissivity from Ge/ZnS one-dimensional heterostructure photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Weigang; Xu, Guoyue; Zhang, Jianchao; Wang, Huihui; Hou, Haili

    2014-11-01

    Ge/ZnS one-dimensional heterostructure photonic crystal (1DHPC) was successfully prepared by alternating thin films of Ge and ZnS on the quartz substrate by using the optical coating technology. The microstructure and spectral emissivity of as-prepared 1DHPC were characterized by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR), respectively. The test result of spectral emissivity shows that the average emissivities of as-prepared Ge/ZnS 1DHPC in the atmospheric windows of 3-5 μm and 8-14 μm can be as low as 0.046 and 0.190, respectively, but the average emissivity in the non-atmospheric window of 5-8 μm can be as high as 0.579. The results indicate that the as-prepared Ge/ZnS 1DHPC has obviously infrared spectrally selective low emissivity characteristic, basically meets the requirements of our design. The as-prepared 1DHPC with infrared spectrally selective low emissivity is promising for use as a material to unify the infrared stealth and effective cooling of the aircraft.

  15. Single-photon and photon pair emission from MOVPE-grown In(Ga)As quantum dots: shifting the emission wavelength from 1.0 to 1.3 μm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kettler, Jan; Paul, Matthias; Olbrich, Fabian; Zeuner, Katharina; Jetter, Michael; Michler, Peter

    2016-03-01

    InAs quantum dots grown on a GaAs substrate have been one of the most successful semiconductor material systems to demonstrate single-photon-based quantum optical phenomena. In this context, we present the feasibility to extend the low-temperature photoluminescence emission range of In(Ga)As/GaAs quantum dots grown by metal-organic vapor-phase epitaxy from the typical window between 880 and 960 nm to wavelengths above 1.3 μm. A low quantum dot density can be obtained throughout this range, enabling the demonstration of single- and cascaded photon emission. We further analyze polarization-resolved micro-photoluminescence from a large number of individual quantum dots with respect to anisotropy and size of the underlying fine-structure splittings in the emission spectra. For samples with elevated emission wavelengths, we observe an increasing tendency of the emitted photons to be polarized along the main crystal axes.

  16. Laser emissions from one-dimensional photonic crystal rings on silicon-dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Tsan-Wen; Tsai, Wei-Chi; Wu, Tze-Yao; Lee, Po-Tsung

    2013-02-01

    In this report, we design and utilize one-dimensional photonic crystal ring resonators (1D PhCRRs) to realize InGaAsP/SiO2 hybrid lasers via adhesive bonding technique. Single-mode lasing with low threshold from the dielectric mode is observed. To further design a nanocavity with mode gap effect in 1D PhCRR results in the reduced lasing threshold and increased vertical laser emissions, owing to the reduced dielectric mode volume and the broken rotational symmetry by the nanocavity. Such hybrid lasers based on 1D PhC rings provides good geometric integration ability and new scenario for designing versatile devices in photonic integrated circuits.

  17. Phenomenology of collinear photon emission from quark-gluon plasma in AA collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharov, B. G.

    2017-09-01

    We study the role of running coupling and the effect of variation of the thermal quark mass on contribution of the collinear bremsstrahlung and annihilation to photon emission in AA collisions in a scheme similar to that used in our previous jet quenching analyses. We find that for a scenario with the thermal quark mass m q ˜ 50-100 MeV contribution of the higher order collinear processes summed with the 2 → 2 processes can explain a considerable part (˜ 50 %) of the experimental photon spectrum at k T ˜ 2-3 GeV for Au+Au collisions at √s = 0.2 TeV. But for m q = 300 MeV and for the thermal quark mass predicted by the HTL scheme the theoretical predictions underestimate considerably the experimental spectrum.

  18. Multicolor upconversion emissions in Tm 3+/Er3+ codoped tellurite photonic microwire between silica fiber tapers.

    PubMed

    Chen, Nan-Kuang; Kuan, Pei-Wen; Zhang, Junjie; Zhang, Liyan; Hu, Lili; Lin, Chinlon; Tong, Limin

    2010-12-06

    We report multicolor upconversion emissions including the blue-violet, green, and red lights in a Tm 3+/Er3+codoped tellurite glass photonic microwire between two silica fiber tapers. A silica fiber is tapered until its evanescent field is exposed and then angled-cleaved at the tapered center to divide the tapered fibers into two parts. A tellurite glass is melted by a gas flame to cluster into a sphere at the tip of one tapered fiber. The other angled-cleaved tapered fiber is blended into the melted tellurite glass. When the tellurite glass is melted, the two silica fiber tapers are simultaneously moving outwards to draw the tellurite glass into a microwire in between. The advantage of angled-cleaving on fiber tapers is to avoid cavity resonances in high index photonic microwire. Thus, the broadband white light can be transmitted between silica fibers and a special optical property like high intensity upconversion emission can be achieved. A cw 1064 nm Nd:YAG laser light is launched into the Tm 3+/Er3+ codoped tellurite microwire through a silica fiber taper to generate the multicolor upconversion emissions, including the blue-violet, green, and red lights, simultaneously.

  19. Loss mechanisms and back surface field effect in photon enhanced thermionic emission converters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segev, Gideon; Rosenwaks, Yossi; Kribus, Abraham

    2013-07-01

    Photon Enhanced Thermionic Emission (PETE) solar converters are based on emission of energetic electrons from a semiconductor cathode that is illuminated and heated with solar radiation. By using a semiconductor cathode, photo generated electrons enable high electron emission at temperatures much lower than the common range for thermionic emitters. Simple models show that PETE conversion can theoretically reach high efficiency, for example, above 40% at concentration of 1000 suns. In this work, we present a detailed one-dimensional model of PETE conversion, accounting for recombination mechanisms, surface effects, and spatial distribution of potential and carrier concentration. As in the previous PETE models, negative space charge effects, photon recycling, and temperature gradients are not considered. The conversion efficiency was calculated for Si and GaAs based cathodes under a wide range of operating conditions. The calculated efficiencies are lower than predictions of previous zero-dimensional models. We analyze the loss mechanisms and show that electron recombination at the cathode contact is a significant loss. An electron-blocking junction at the cathode back contact is therefore essential for achieving high efficiency. The predicted efficiencies for Si and GaAs cathodes with homo-junction back surface field layers are both around 31%, but with more favorable assumptions on the contact structure, it may be near 40%. The analysis leads to important conclusions regarding the selection of cathode material and back surface junction configuration.

  20. Radiative Decay Engineering 7: Tamm State-Coupled Emission Using a Hybrid Plasmonic-Photonic Structure

    PubMed Central

    Badugu, Ramachandram; Descrovi, Emiliano; Lakowicz, Joseph R.

    2014-01-01

    and display Tamm state-coupled emission (TSCE). In contrast to SPCE, the Tamm states can display either S- or P-polarization. The TSCE angle is highly sensitive to wavelength which suggests the use of Tamm structures to provide both directional emission and wavelength dispersion. Metallic structures can modify fluorophore decay rates but also have high losses. Photonic crystals have low losses, but may lack the enhanced light-induced fields near metals. The combination of plasmonic and photonic structures offers the opportunity for radiative decay engineering to design new formats for clinical testing and other fluorescence-based applications. PMID:24135654

  1. Spontaneous ultraweak photon emission from biological systems and the endogenous light field.

    PubMed

    Schwabl, Herbert; Klima, Herbert

    2005-04-01

    Still one of the most astonishing biological electromagnetic phenomena is the ultraweak photon emission (UPE) from living systems. Organisms and tissues spontaneously emit measurable intensities of light, i.e. photons in the visible part of the electromagnetic spectrum (380-780 nm), in the range from 1 to 1,000 photons x s-1 x cm-2, depending on their condition and vitality. It is important not to confuse UPE from living systems with other biogenic light emitting processes such as bioluminescence or chemiluminescence. This article examines with basic considerations from physics on the quantum nature of photons the empirical phenomenon of UPE. This leads to the description of the non-thermal origin of this radiation. This is in good correspondence with the modern understanding of life phenomena as dissipative processes far from thermodynamic equilibrium. UPE also supports the understanding of life sustaining processes as basically driven by electromagnetic fields. The basic features of UPE, like intensity and spectral distribution, are known in principle for many experimental situations. The UPE of human leukocytes contributes to an endogenous light field of about 1011 photons x s-1 which can be influenced by certain factors. Further research is needed to reveal the statistical properties of UPE and in consequence to answer questions about the underlying mechanics of the biological system. In principle, statistical properties of UPE allow to reconstruct phase-space dynamics of the light emitting structures. Many open questions remain until a proper understanding of the electromagnetic interaction of the human organism can be achieved: which structures act as receptors and emitters for electromagnetic radiation? How is electromagnetic information received and processed within cells?

  2. Microscopic emission and reflectance thermal infrared spectroscopy: instrumentation for quantitative in situ mineralogy of complex planetary surfaces.

    PubMed

    Edwards, C S; Christensen, P R

    2013-04-10

    The diversity of investigations of planetary surfaces, especially Mars, using in situ instrumentation over the last decade is unprecedented in the exploration history of our solar system. The style of instrumentation that landed spacecraft can support is dependent on several parameters, including mass, power consumption, instrument complexity, cost, and desired measurement type (e.g., chemistry, mineralogy, petrology, morphology, etc.), all of which must be evaluated when deciding an appropriate spacecraft payload. We present a laboratory technique for a microscopic emission and reflectance spectrometer for the analysis of martian analog materials as a strong candidate for the next generation of in situ instruments designed to definitively assess sample mineralogy and petrology while preserving geologic context. We discuss the instrument capabilities, signal and noise, and overall system performance. We evaluate the ability of this instrument to quantitatively determine sample mineralogy, including bulk mineral abundances. This capability is greatly enhanced. Whereas the number of mineral components observed from existing emission spectrometers is high (often >5 to 10 depending on the number of accessory and alteration phases present), the number of mineral components at any microscopic measurement spot is low (typically <2 to 3). Since this style of instrument is based on a long heritage of thermal infrared emission spectrometers sent to orbit (the thermal emission spectrometer), sent to planetary surfaces [the mini-thermal emission spectrometers (mini-TES)], and evaluated in laboratory environments (e.g., the Arizona State University emission spectrometer laboratory), direct comparisons to existing data are uniquely possible with this style of instrument. The ability to obtain bulk mineralogy and atmospheric data, much in the same manner as the mini-TESs, is of significant additional value and maintains the long history of atmospheric monitoring for Mars

  3. Narrow-band single-photon emission in the near infrared for quantum key distribution.

    PubMed

    Wu, E; Jacques, Vincent; Zeng, Heping; Grangier, Philippe; Treussart, François; Roch, Jean-François

    2006-02-06

    We present a detailed study of photophysical properties of single color centers in natural diamond samples emitting in the near infrared under optical excitation. Photoluminescence of these single emitters has several striking features, including narrow-band (FWHM 2 nm) fully polarized emission around 780 nm, a short excited-state lifetime of about 2 ns, and perfect photostability at room temperature under our excitation conditions. Development of a triggered single-photon source relying on this single color center is discussed for application to quantum key distribution.

  4. Painful spondylolysis or spondylolisthesis studied by radiography and single-photon emission computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Collier, B.D.; Johnson, R.P.; Carrera, G.F.; Meyer, G.A.; Schwab, J.P.; Flatley, T.J.; Isitman, A.T.; Hellman, R.S.; Zielonka, J.S.; Knobel, J.

    1985-01-01

    Planar bone scintigraphy (PBS) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) were compared in 19 adults with radiographic evidence of spondylolysis and/or spondylolisthesis. SPECT was more sensitive than PBS when used to identify symptomatic patients and sites of painful defects in the pars interarticularis. In addition, SPECT allowed more accurate localization than PBS. In 6 patients, spondylolysis or spondylolisthesis was unrealted to low back pain, and SPECT images of the posterior neural arch were normal. The authors conclude that when spondylolysis or spondylolisthesis is the cause of low back pain, pars defects are frequently heralded by increased scintigraphic activity which is best detected and localized by SPECT.

  5. Single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography of the skull in malignant otitis externa.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Dhritiman; Bhattacharya, Anish; Kamaleshwaran, Koramadai Karuppusamy; Agrawal, Kanhaiyalal; Gupta, Ashok Kumar; Mittal, Bhagwant Rai

    2012-01-01

    Malignant otitis externa is a severe, rare infective condition of the external auditory canal and skull base. The diagnosis is generally made from a range of clinical, laboratory, and imaging findings. Technetium 99m methylene diphosphonate bone scintigraphy is known to detect osteomyelitis earlier than computed tomography. The authors present a patient with bilateral malignant otitis externa where the extent of skull base involvement was determined on 3-phase bone scintigraphy with single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Diamond photonic crystal slab: leaky modes and modified photoluminescence emission of surface-deposited quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Ondič, Lukáš; Babchenko, Oleg; Varga, Marián; Kromka, Alexander; Ctyroký, Jiří; Pelant, Ivan

    2012-01-01

    Detailed analysis of a band diagram of a photonic crystal (PhC) slab prepared on a nano-diamond layer is presented. Even though the PhC is structurally imperfect, the existence of leaky modes, determined both theoretically and experimentally in the broad spectral region, implies that an efficient light interaction with a material periodicity occurs in the sample. It is shown that the luminescence emission spectrum of a light source placed directly on the PhC surface can be modified by employing the optical modes of the studied structure. We stress also the impact of intrinsic optical losses of the nano-diamond on this modification.

  7. Depiction of ventriculoperitoneal shunt obstruction with single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Aksoy, Sabire Yılmaz; Vatankulu, Betül; Uslu, Lebriz; Halac, Metin

    2016-01-01

    An 83-year-old male patient with ventriculoperitoneal shunt underwent radionuclide shunt study using single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) to evaluate the shunt patency. The planar images showed activity at the cranial region and spinal canal but no significant activity at the peritoneal cavity. However, SPECT/CT images clearly demonstrated accumulation of activity at the superior part of bifurcation level with no activity at the distal end of shunt as well as no spilling of radiotracer into the peritoneal cavity indicating shunt obstruction. SPECT/CT makes the interpretation of radionuclide shunt study more accurate and easier as compared with traditional planar images.

  8. In situ monitoring of collagen fibers in human skin using a photonic-crystal-fiber-coupled, hand-held, second-harmonic-generation microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atsuta, K.; Ogura, Y.; Hase, E.; Minamikawa, T.; Yasui, T.

    2017-02-01

    Second-harmonic-generation (SHG) microscopy is a powerful tool for in situ monitoring of collagen fibers in human skin. However, its practical use is still limited in the dermatological field due to the bulky and complicated setup. In this paper, we constructed a photonic-crystal-fiber-coupled, hand-held SHG microscope for in situ monitoring of collagen fibers in human skin. Fiber delivery of femtosecond pulse light was achieved by a large-mode-area photonic-crystal-fiber whereas the compact SHG microscopy setup was enclosed into a lens tube system. The combination of PCF with the lens tube system largely enhances the flexibility of measurement sites in the human skin.

  9. Quantification of re-absorption and re-emission processes to determine photon recycling efficiency in perovskite single crystals

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Yanjun; Wei, Haotong; Dong, Qingfeng; Huang, Jinsong

    2017-01-01

    Photon recycling, that is, iterative self-absorption and re-emission by the photoactive layer itself, has been speculated to contribute to the high open-circuit voltage in several types of high efficiency solar cells. For organic–inorganic halide perovskites that have yielded highly efficient photovoltaic devices, however, it remains unclear whether the photon recycling effect is significant enough to improve solar cell efficiency. Here we quantitatively evaluate the re-absorption and re-emission processes to determine photon recycling efficiency in hybrid perovskite with its single crystals by measuring the ratio of the re-emitted photons to the initially excited photons, which is realized by modulating their polarization to differentiate them. The photon recycling efficiencies are revealed to be less than 0.5% in CH3NH3PbI3 and CH3NH3PbBr3 single crystals under excitation intensity close to one sun, highlighting the intrinsically long carrier recombination lifetime instead of the photon-recycling-induced photon propagation as the origin of their long carrier diffusion length. PMID:28220791

  10. Quantification of re-absorption and re-emission processes to determine photon recycling efficiency in perovskite single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Yanjun; Wei, Haotong; Dong, Qingfeng; Huang, Jinsong

    2017-02-01

    Photon recycling, that is, iterative self-absorption and re-emission by the photoactive layer itself, has been speculated to contribute to the high open-circuit voltage in several types of high efficiency solar cells. For organic-inorganic halide perovskites that have yielded highly efficient photovoltaic devices, however, it remains unclear whether the photon recycling effect is significant enough to improve solar cell efficiency. Here we quantitatively evaluate the re-absorption and re-emission processes to determine photon recycling efficiency in hybrid perovskite with its single crystals by measuring the ratio of the re-emitted photons to the initially excited photons, which is realized by modulating their polarization to differentiate them. The photon recycling efficiencies are revealed to be less than 0.5% in CH3NH3PbI3 and CH3NH3PbBr3 single crystals under excitation intensity close to one sun, highlighting the intrinsically long carrier recombination lifetime instead of the photon-recycling-induced photon propagation as the origin of their long carrier diffusion length.

  11. Imaging in breast cancer: Single-photon computed tomography and positron-emission tomography

    PubMed Central

    Bénard, François; Turcotte, Éric

    2005-01-01

    Although mammography remains a key imaging method for the early detection and screening of breast cancer, the overall accuracy of this test remains low. Several radiopharmaceuticals have been proposed as adjunct imaging methods to characterize breast masses by single-photon-emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron-emission tomography (PET). Useful in characterizing indeterminate palpable masses and in the detection of axillary metastases, these techniques are insufficiently sensitive to detect subcentimetric tumor deposits. Their role in staging nodal involvement of the axillary areas therefore currently remains limited. Several enzymes and receptors have been targeted for imaging breast cancers with PET. [18F]Fluorodeoxyglucose is particularly useful in the detection and staging of recurrent breast cancer and in assessing the response to chemotherapy. Several other ligands targeting proliferative activity, protein synthesis, and hormone and cell-membrane receptors may complement this approach by providing unique information about biological characteristics of breast cancer across primary and metastatic tumor sites. PMID:15987467

  12. Dementias appear to have individual profiles in single photon emission computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-02-17

    A number of researchers are seeking clinical applications for single photon emission computed tomographic (SPECT) images of demented patients. They have found that dementias have somewhat individual SPECT profiles. The challenge now, they say, is to determine if the SPECT information is meaningful to the clinician and to develop more specific radiotracers, such as tracers for individual neuroreceptors. The initial work was done with positron emission tomography (PET), a sometimes more sensitive, but much more expensive technique. Recently, a number of centers began trying to duplicate the PET findings using SPECT. Developing SPECT could actually make dementia scanning fairly available, they say. Radiologists estimate that three fourths of the nation's nuclear medicine departments have SPECT scanning machines-either rotating or multiaperature gamma cameras.

  13. Brain single photon emission computed tomography: Newer activation and intervention studies

    SciTech Connect

    Tikofsky, R.S.; Hellman, R.S. )

    1991-01-01

    Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) findings using non-xenon 133 tracers in combination with activation and intervention techniques are reviewed. Examination of the currently available data indicates that it is possible to detect the effects of a variety of activations and interventional procedures using SPECT rCBF with non-xenon 133 tracers. There are still many issues to be resolved before SPECT can reach the level of sophistication attained by xenon 133 and positron emission tomography in studying rCBF during activation or intervention. However, research to date indicates that SPECT rCBF studied with tracers other than xenon 133 has an excellent potential for increasing the ability to differentiate normal and pathological states. 97 refs.

  14. Development of radioiodinated receptor ligands for cerebral single photon emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, F.F. Jr.; McPherson, D.W.

    1992-01-01

    In the last decade the use of radiolabeled ligands for the imaging of cerebral receptors by emission computed tomography (ECT) has seen rapid growth. The opportunity to routinely perform cerebral single photon emission tomography (SPET) with iodine-123-labeled ligands depends on the availability of receptor ligands into which iodine can be introduced without decreasing the required high target receptor specificity. The use of iodine-123-labeled receptor-specific ligands also depends on the availability of high purity iodine-123 at reasonable costs and the necessary imaging instrumentation. In this paper, the development and current stage of evaluation of various iodine-123-labeled ligands for SPET imaging of dopaminergic, serotonergic and muscarinic acetylcholinergic receptor classes are discussed.

  15. Development of radioiodinated receptor ligands for cerebral single photon emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, F.F. Jr.; McPherson, D.W.

    1992-03-01

    In the last decade the use of radiolabeled ligands for the imaging of cerebral receptors by emission computed tomography (ECT) has seen rapid growth. The opportunity to routinely perform cerebral single photon emission tomography (SPET) with iodine-123-labeled ligands depends on the availability of receptor ligands into which iodine can be introduced without decreasing the required high target receptor specificity. The use of iodine-123-labeled receptor-specific ligands also depends on the availability of high purity iodine-123 at reasonable costs and the necessary imaging instrumentation. In this paper, the development and current stage of evaluation of various iodine-123-labeled ligands for SPET imaging of dopaminergic, serotonergic and muscarinic acetylcholinergic receptor classes are discussed.

  16. Nebular emission and the Lyman continuum photon escape fraction in CALIFA early-type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papaderos, P.; Gomes, J. M.; Vílchez, J. M.; Kehrig, C.; Lehnert, M. D.; Ziegler, B.; Sánchez, S. F.; Husemann, B.; Monreal-Ibero, A.; García-Benito, R.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Cortijo-Ferrero, C.; de Lorenzo-Cáceres, A.; del Olmo, A.; Falcón-Barroso, J.; Galbany, L.; Iglesias-Páramo, J.; López-Sánchez, Á. R.; Marquez, I.; Mollá, M.; Mast, D.; van de Ven, G.; Wisotzki, L.

    2013-07-01

    We use deep integral field spectroscopy data from the CALIFA survey to study the warm interstellar medium (wim) over the entire extent and optical spectral range of 32 nearby early-type galaxies (ETGs). We find that faint nebular emission is extended in all cases, and its surface brightness decreases roughly as ∝ r-α. The large standard deviation in the derived α (1.09 ± 0.67) argues against a universal power-law index for the radial drop-off of nebular emission in ETGs. Judging from the properties of their extranuclear component, our sample ETGs span a broad, continuous sequence with respect to their α, Hα equivalent width (EW) and Lyman continuum (Lyc) photon leakage fraction (plf). We propose a tentative subdivision into two groups: Type i ETGs are characterized by rather steep Hα profiles (α ≃ 1.4), comparatively large (≳1 Å), nearly radially constant EWs, and plf ≃ 0. Photoionization by post-AGB stars appears to be the main driver of extended nebular emission in these systems, with nonthermal sources being potentially important only in their nuclei. Typical properties of type II ETGs are shallower Hα profiles (α ≃ 0.8), very low (≲0.5 Å) EWs with positive radial gradients, and a mean plf ≳ 0.7, rising to ≳0.9 in their centers. Such properties point to a low, and inwardly decreasing wim density and/or volume filling factor. We argue that, because of extensive Lyc photon leakage, emission-line luminosities and EWs are reduced in type II ETG nuclei by at least one order of magnitude. Consequently, the line weakness of these ETGs is by itself no compelling evidence for their containing merely "weak"(sub-Eddington accreting) active galactic nuclei (AGN). In fact, Lyc photon escape, which has heretofore not been considered, may constitute a key element in understanding why many ETGs with prominent signatures of AGN activity in radio continuum and/or X-ray wavelengths show only faint emission lines and weak signatures of AGN activity in

  17. Saturation behaviour of colloidal PbSe quantum dot exciton emission coupled into silicon photonic circuits.

    PubMed

    Foell, Charles A; Schelew, Ellen; Qiao, Haijun; Abel, Keith A; Hughes, Stephen; van Veggel, Frank C J M; Young, Jeff F

    2012-05-07

    We report coupling of the excitonic photon emission from photoexcited PbSe colloidal quantum dots (QDs) into an optical circuit that was fabricated in a silicon-on-insulator wafer using a CMOS-compatible process. The coupling between excitons and sub-μm sized silicon channel waveguides was mediated by a photonic crystal microcavity. The intensity of the coupled light saturates rapidly with the optical excitation power. The saturation behaviour was quantitatively studied using an isolated photonic crystal cavity with PbSe QDs site-selectively located at the cavity mode antinode position. Saturation occurs when a few μW of continuous wave HeNe pump power excites the QDs with a Gaussian spot size of 2 μm. By comparing the results with a master equation analysis that rigorously accounts for the complex dielectric environment of the QD excitons, the saturation is attributed to ground state depletion due to a non-radiative exciton decay channel with a trap state lifetime ~ 3 μs.

  18. The Physical Mechanism for Retinal Discrete Dark Noise: Thermal Activation or Cellular Ultraweak Photon Emission?

    PubMed

    Salari, Vahid; Scholkmann, Felix; Bokkon, Istvan; Shahbazi, Farhad; Tuszynski, Jack

    2016-01-01

    For several decades the physical mechanism underlying discrete dark noise of photoreceptors in the eye has remained highly controversial and poorly understood. It is known that the Arrhenius equation, which is based on the Boltzmann distribution for thermal activation, can model only a part (e.g. half of the activation energy) of the retinal dark noise experimentally observed for vertebrate rod and cone pigments. Using the Hinshelwood distribution instead of the Boltzmann distribution in the Arrhenius equation has been proposed as a solution to the problem. Here, we show that the using the Hinshelwood distribution does not solve the problem completely. As the discrete components of noise are indistinguishable in shape and duration from those produced by real photon induced photo-isomerization, the retinal discrete dark noise is most likely due to 'internal photons' inside cells and not due to thermal activation of visual pigments. Indeed, all living cells exhibit spontaneous ultraweak photon emission (UPE), mainly in the optical wavelength range, i.e., 350-700 nm. We show here that the retinal discrete dark noise has a similar rate as UPE and therefore dark noise is most likely due to spontaneous cellular UPE and not due to thermal activation.

  19. The photon emission, ATP level and motility of boar spermatozoa during liquid storage.

    PubMed

    Gogol, Piotr; Szcześniak-Fabiańczyk, Barbara; Wierzchoś-Hilczer, Agnieszka

    2009-03-01

    Changes were studied in induced photon emission (as an indicator of oxidative stress), ATP level and sperm motility during seven day-storage of boar semen at 15 degrees C extended with the use of BTS extender. Photon emission was measured using a luminometer equipped with a cooled photomultiplier with a spectral response range from 370 to 620 nm. The time of storage had a significant effect on luminescence parameters (integral and peak max), intracellular ATP level and percentage of motile spermatozoa. The increase in luminescence parameters was paralleled by a decrease in ATP level and sperm motility. A significant correlation was found between the percentage of motile spermatozoa and integral (r=-0.27) and peak max (r=-0.31). ATP level was correlated with integral (r=-0.25) but not with peak max. Our results suggest that reactive oxygen species and products of cell membrane lipid peroxidation have a negative effect on ATP level and sperm motility. Induced luminescence assessment in combination with sperm motility and ATP level can give valuable information about the status and function of spermatozoa which may be relevant for predicting the fertilizing potential of the semen.

  20. A novel phantom design for emission tomography enabling scatter- and attenuation-"free" single-photon emission tomography imaging.

    PubMed

    Larsson, S A; Jonsson, C; Pagani, M; Johansson, L; Jacobsson, H

    2000-02-01

    A newly designed technique for experimental single-photon emission tomography (SPET) and positron emission tomography (PET) data acquisition with minor disturbing effects from scatter and attenuation has been developed. In principle, the method is based on discrete sampling of the radioactivity distribution in 3D objects by means of equidistant 2D planes. The starting point is a set of digitised 2D sections representing the radioactivity distribution of the 3D object. Having a radioactivity-related grey scale, the 2D images are printed on paper sheets using radioactive ink. The radioactive sheets can be shaped to the outline of the object and stacked into a 3D structure with air or some arbitrary dense material in between. For this work, equidistantly spaced transverse images of a uniform cylindrical phantom and of the digitised Hoffman rCBF phantom were selected and printed out on paper sheets. The uniform radioactivity sheets were imaged on the surface of a low-energy ultra-high-resolution collimator (4 mm full-width at half-maximum) of a three-headed SPET camera. The reproducibility was 0.7% and the uniformity was 1.2%. Each rCBF sheet, containing between 8.3 and 80 MBq of 99mTcO4- depending on size, was first imaged on the collimator and then stacked into a 3D structure with constant 12 mm air spacing between the slices. SPET was performed with the sheets perpendicular to the central axis of the camera. The total weight of the stacked rCBF phantom in air was 63 g, giving a scatter contribution comparable to that of a point source in air. The overall attenuation losses were <20%. A second SPET study was performed with 12-mm polystyrene plates in between the radioactive sheets. With polystyrene plates, the total phantom weight was 2300 g, giving a scatter and attenuation magnitude similar to that of a patient study. With the proposed technique, it is possible to obtain "ideal" experimental images (essentially built up by primary photons) for comparison with "real

  1. Silicon nanocrystal-based photonic crystal slabs with broadband and efficient directional light emission.

    PubMed

    Ondič, L; Varga, M; Pelant, I; Valenta, J; Kromka, A; Elliman, R G

    2017-07-18

    Light extraction from a thin planar layer can be increased by introducing a two-dimensional periodic pattern on its surface. This structure, the so-called photonic crystal (PhC) slab, then not only enhances the extraction efficiency of light but can direct the extracted emission into desired angles. Careful design of the structures is important in order to have a spectral overlap of the emission with extraction (leaky) modes. We show that by fabricating PhC slabs with optimized dimensions from silicon nanocrystals (SiNCs) active layers, the extraction efficiency of vertical light emission from SiNCs at a particular wavelength can be enhanced ∼ 11 times compared to that of uncorrugated SiNCs-rich layer. More importantly, increased light emission can be obtained in a broad spectral range and, simultaneously, the extracted light can stay confined within relatively narrow angle around the normal to the sample plane. We demonstrate experimentally and theoretically that the physical origin of the enhancement is such that light originating from SiNCs first couples to leaky modes of the PhCs and is then efficiently extracted into the surrounding.

  2. Narrow-linewidth carbon nanotube emission in silicon hollow-core photonic crystal cavity.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Thi Hong Cam; Durán-Valdeiglesias, Elena; Alonso-Ramos, Carlos; Serna, Samuel; Zhang, Weiwei; Balestrieri, Matteo; Keita, Al-Saleh; Caselli, Niccolò; Biccari, Francesco; Le Roux, Xavier; Filoramo, Arianna; Gurioli, Massimo; Vivien, Laurent; Cassan, Eric

    2017-06-01

    Polymer-sorted semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) provide room-temperature emission at near-infrared wavelengths, with potential for large volume production of high-quality solutions and wafer-scale deposition. These features make SWNTs a very attractive material for the realization of on-chip light sources. Coupling SWNT into optical microcavities could enhance and guide their emission, while enabling spectral selection by cavity resonance engineering. This could allow the realization of bright, narrowband sources. Here, we report the first demonstration of coupling SWNTs into the resonant modes of Si hollow-core photonic crystal cavities. We exploit the strong evanescent field in these resonators to interact with SWNT emission, coupling it into an integrated access waveguide. Based on this concept, we demonstrate narrowband SWNT emission resonantly coupled into a Si bus waveguide with a full width at half-maximum of 0.34 nm and an off-resonance rejection exceeding 5 dB.

  3. Photon emission by nanocavity-enhanced quantum anti-Zeno effect in solid-state cavity quantum-electrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Makoto; Asano, Takashi; Noda, Susumu

    2008-10-27

    Solid-state cavity quantum-electrodynamics (QED) has great potential owing to advances such as coupled systems combining a nanocavity and a quantum dot (QD). These systems involve two photon-emission mechanisms: the Purcell effect in the weak coupling regime and vacuum Rabi-splitting in the strong coupling regime. In this paper, we describe a third emission mechanism based on the quantum anti-Zeno effect (AZE) induced by the pure-dephasing in a QD. This is significantly enhanced by the inherent characteristics of the nanocavity. This mechanism explains the origin of strong photon emission at a cavity mode largely detuned from a QD, previously considered a counterintuitive, prima facie non-energy-conserving, light-emission phenomenon. These findings could help in controlling the decay and emission characteristics of solid-state cavity QED, and developing solid-state quantum devices.

  4. CO2BOLD assessment of moyamoya syndrome: Validation with single photon emission computed tomography and positron emission tomography imaging

    PubMed Central

    Pellaton, Alain; Bijlenga, Philippe; Bouchez, Laurie; Cuvinciuc, Victor; Barnaure, Isabelle; Garibotto, Valentina; Lövblad, Karl-Olof; Haller, Sven

    2016-01-01

    AIM To compare the assessment of cerebrovascular reserve (CVR) using CO2BOLD magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) vs positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) as reference standard. METHODS Ten consecutive patients (8 women, mean age of 41 ± 26 years) with moyamoya syndrome underwent 14 pre-surgical evaluations for external-internal carotid artery bypass surgery. CVR was assessed using CO2BOLD and PET (4)/SPECT (11) with a maximum interval of 36 d, and evaluated by two experienced neuroradiologists. RESULTS The inter-rater agreement was 0.81 for SPECT (excellent), 0.43 for PET (fair) and 0.7 for CO2BOLD (good). In 9/14 cases, there was a correspondence between CO2BOLD and PET/SPECT. In 4/14 cases, CVR was over-estimated in CO2BOLD, while in 1/14 case, CVR was underestimated in CO2BOLD. The sensitivity of CO2BOLD was 86% and a specificity of 43%. CONCLUSION CO2BOLD can be used for pre-surgical assessment of CVR in patients with moyamoya syndrome and combines the advantages of absent irradiation, high availability of MRI and assessment of brain parenchyma, cerebral vessels and surrogate CVR in one stop. PMID:27928470

  5. Modelling gamma-ray photon emission and pair production in high-intensity laser–matter interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Ridgers, C.P.; Kirk, J.G.; Duclous, R.; Blackburn, T.G.; Brady, C.S.; Bennett, K.; Arber, T.D.; Bell, A.R.

    2014-03-01

    In high-intensity (>10{sup 21} Wcm{sup −2}) laser–matter interactions gamma-ray photon emission by the electrons can strongly affect the electron's dynamics and copious numbers of electron–positron pairs can be produced by the emitted photons. We show how these processes can be included in simulations by coupling a Monte Carlo algorithm describing the emission to a particle-in-cell code. The Monte Carlo algorithm includes quantum corrections to the photon emission, which we show must be included if the pair production rate is to be correctly determined. The accuracy, convergence and energy conservation properties of the Monte Carlo algorithm are analysed in simple test problems.

  6. Cascaded emission of linearly polarized single photons from positioned InP/GaInP quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Braun, T.; Unsleber, S.; Baumann, V.; Schneider, C.; Höfling, S.; Kamp, M.; Gschrey, M.; Rodt, S.; Reitzenstein, S.

    2013-11-04

    We report on the optical characterization of site-controlled InP/GaInP quantum dots (QDs). Spatially resolved low temperature cathodoluminescence proves the long-range ordering of the buried emitters, revealing a yield of ∼90% of optically active, positioned QDs and a strong suppression of emitters on interstitial positions. The emission of single QDs shows a pronounced degree of linear polarization along the [0,−1,1] crystal axis with an average degree of polarization of 94%. Photon correlation measurements of the emission from a single QD indicate the single-photon character of the exciton and biexciton emission lines as well as the cascaded nature of the photon pair.

  7. Electron microscopic study of soot particulate matter emissions from aircraft turbine engines.

    PubMed

    Liati, Anthi; Brem, Benjamin T; Durdina, Lukas; Vögtli, Melanie; Dasilva, Yadira Arroyo Rojas; Eggenschwiler, Panayotis Dimopoulos; Wang, Jing

    2014-09-16

    The microscopic characteristics of soot particulate matter (PM) in gas turbine exhaust are critical for an accurate assessment of the potential impacts of the aviation industry on the environment and human health. The morphology and internal structure of soot particles emitted from a CFM 56-7B26/3 turbofan engine were analyzed in an electron microscopic study, down to the nanoscale, for ∼ 100%, ∼ 65%, and ∼ 7% static engine thrust as a proxy for takeoff, cruising, and taxiing, respectively. Sampling was performed directly on transmission electron microscopy (TEM) grids with a state-of-the-art sampling system designed for nonvolatile particulate matter. The electron microscopy results reveal that ∼ 100% thrust produces the highest amount of soot, the highest soot particle volume, and the largest and most crystalline primary soot particles with the lowest oxidative reactivity. The opposite is the case for soot produced during taxiing, where primary soot particles are smallest and most reactive and the soot amount and volume are lowest. The microscopic characteristics of cruising condition soot resemble the ones of the ∼ 100% thrust conditions, but they are more moderate. Real time online measurements of number and mass concentration show also a clear correlation with engine thrust level, comparable with the TEM study. The results of the present work, in particular the small size of primary soot particles present in the exhaust (modes of 24, 20, and 13 nm in diameter for ∼ 100%, ∼ 65% and ∼ 7% engine thrust, respectively) could be a concern for human health and the environment and merit further study. This work further emphasizes the significance of the detailed morphological characteristics of soot for assessing environmental impacts.

  8. The microscopic approach to the rates of radioactive decay by emission of heavy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivaşcu, M.; Silişteanu, I.

    1988-08-01

    We have applied a simple microscopic decay theory to the analysis of the rare decay modes. The absolute decay rates are estimated by using the shell model and resonance formation factors and optical model penetrabilities. The resonance formation factors are deduced from the strong interaction form of the theory where the wave function in the internal region is represented in terms of compound nucleus decay. In order to account fully for the data, the implication of internal degrees of freedom was found to be necessary, but no adjustment of Gamow factor was needed. The results have been discussed in the light of the previously reported results and data.

  9. Microscopic calculation for α and heavier cluster emissions from proton rich Ba and Ce isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florescu, A.; Insolia, A.

    1995-08-01

    We present a completely microscopic approach for obtaining the preformation factors and the decay widths of α, 12Ca, and 16O cluster decays. We start from realistic single particle Woods-Saxon wave functions and include a large space BCS-type configuration mixing. A pairing interaction acting among valence particles, placed above a double magic core, was considered. The penetrability is evaluated within the WKB approximation. The model predictions are also checked for some well-known α and 14C decays from even-even nuclei.

  10. Nonlinear theory of a two-photon correlated-spontaneous-emission laser: A coherently pumped two-level--two-photon laser

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, N.; Zhao, F.; Bergou, J.

    1989-05-15

    We develop a nonlinear theory of a two-photon correlated-spontaneous-emission laser (CEL) by using an effective interaction Hamiltonian for a two-level system coupled by a two-photon transition. Assuming that the active atoms are prepared initially in a coherent superposition of two atomic levels involved in the two-photon transition, we derive a master equation for the field-density operator by using our quantum theory for coherently pumped lasers. The steady-state properties of the two-photon CEL are studied by converting the field master equation into a Fokker-Planck equation for the antinormal-ordering Q representation of the field-density operator. Because of the injected atomic coherence, the drift and diffusion coefficients become phase sensitive. This leads to laser phase locking and an extra two-photon CEL gain. The laser field can build up from a vacuum in the no-population-inversion region, in contrast to an ordinary two-photon laser for which triggering is needed. We find an approximate steady-state solution of the Q representation for the laser field, which consists of two identical peaks of elliptical type. We calculate the phase variance and, for any given mean photon number, obtain the minimum variance in the phase quadrature as a function of the initial atomic variables. Squeezing of the quantum noise in the phase quadrature is found and it exhibits the following features: (1) it is possible only when the laser intensity is smaller than a certain value; (2) it becomes most significant for small mean photon number, which is achievable in the no-population-inversion region; and (3) a maximum of 50% squeezing can be asymptotically approached in the small laser intensity limit.

  11. Experimental study of photon induced gamma emission of hafnium-178(m2) by nuclear spectroscopy methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoita, Nicolae Catalin

    The induced release of the energy stored in nuclear isomers in the form of an incoherent gamma burst is of great scientific and technological importance. Powerful sources of induced gamma-ray radiation could be obtained, which would be an intermediary step to the development of a gamma-ray laser. High-energy nuclear isomers with very long lifetimes of the order of years and higher can serve as good active media. For instance, a macroscopic sample of 178Hfm2 isomer stores about 1 GJ/g as excitation energy of the isomeric state. Photonuclear reactions induced by real or virtual photons are the most promising mechanisms to release the energy stored by 178Hfm2 nuclei. The isomeric nucleus is excited to an intermediate level from which cascade to the ground state emitting gamma-photons. The nuclear level density approaches one per keV at those excitation energies. Experimental investigations by nuclear spectroscopy methods conducted in this work revealed that the decay of 178Hfm2 is accelerated when the energies of the incident photons were tuned at about 20,825 keV, 11.15 keV or near the L3 photoionization threshold of atomic hafnium at 9561 keV. In the first case, the presumed mechanism was the direct photoexcitation of the m2 isomeric nucleus to a trigger level at about 2466.9 keV. There was a strong decay branch from this trigger level to the 11- level of the 8 - band that caused the accelerated emission of gamma photons from many of the transitions detected in the unperturbed spontaneous decay. In the second case, a trigger level at about 2457.2 keV, that meant 11.15 keV above the 16+ isomeric level, was mediating the energy release. The direct transition from this level to ground state was observed. Other branches of its decay enhanced the gamma-emission of the ground state band (GSB) members. In the third case, complex electron bridging mechanisms were implied when incident X-ray photons were tuned at energies near the L3 photoionization threshold. Those

  12. 3D Magnetohydrodynamic Models of Nonthermal Photon Emission in the Binary System γ 2 Velorum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reitberger, K.; Kissmann, R.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.

    2017-09-01

    Recent reports claiming an association of the massive star binary system {γ }2 Velorum (WR 11) with a high-energy γ-ray source observed by Fermi-LAT contrast the so far exclusive role of η Carinae as the hitherto only detected γ-ray emitter in the source class of particle-accelerating colliding-wind binary (CWB) systems. We offer support to this claim of association by providing dedicated model predictions for the nonthermal photon emission spectrum of {γ }2 Velorum. We use 3D magnetohydrodynamic modeling (MHD) to investigate the structure and conditions of the wind-collision region (WCR) of {γ }2 Velorum including the important effect of radiative braking in the stellar winds. A transport equation is then solved for the entire computational domain to study the propagation of relativistic electrons and protons. The resulting distributions of particles are subsequently used to compute nonthermal photon emission components. In agreement with observation in X-ray spectroscopy, our simulations yield a large shock-cone opening angle. We find the nonthermal γ-ray emission of {γ }2 Velorum to be of hadronic origin owing to the strong radiation fields in the binary system, which inhibit the acceleration of electrons to energies sufficiently high for efficient inverse-Compton radiation. We also discuss the strong dependence of a hadronic γ-ray component on the energy-dependent diffusion used in the simulations. Of two mass-loss rates for the WR star found in literature, only the higher rate is able to accommodate the observed γ-ray spectrum with reasonable values for important simulation parameters such as the injection ratio of high-energy particles within the WCR.

  13. Quantitative and Qualitative Imaging in Single Photon Emission Tomography for Nuclear Medicine Applications.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masoomi, Mojtaba (Arash).

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. An important goal of single photon emission tomography (SPECT) is the determination of absolute regional radionuclide concentration as a function of time. Quantitative and qualitative studies of SPECT with regard to clinical application is the object of this work. Three basic approaches for image reconstruction and factors which affect the choice of a reconstruction algorithm have been reviewed, discussed and the reconstruction techniques, GRADY and CBP evaluated, based on computer modelling. A sophisticated package of computational subroutines, RECLBL, for image reconstruction and for generation of phantoms, which was fully implemented on PRIME was used throughout this study. Two different systems, a rotating gamma-camera and a prototype scanning-rig have been used to carry out tomography experiments with different phantoms in emission and transmission mode. Performance assessment and reproducibility of the gamma-camera was tested prior to the experimental work. SPECT studies are generally hampered for a number of reasons, the most severe being attenuation and scattering. The effect of scattered photons on image quality was discussed, three distinct techniques were utilised to correct the images and results were compared. Determination of the depth of the source, Am-241 and Tc-99m in the attenuating media, water and TEMEX by analysing the spectroscopic data base on the SPR and spatial resolution was studied, results revealed that both techniques had the same range of depth sensitivity. A method of simultaneous emission and transmission tomography was developed to correct the images for attenuation. The reproducibility of the technique was examined. Results showed that the technique is able to present a promising and a practical approach to more accurate quantitative SPECT imaging. A procedure to evaluate images, under certain conditions has been defined, its properties were evaluated using computer

  14. Terahertz Microscope

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-01

    bases and bacterial spores , etc. Recently, biomolecular nanoparticles have been successfully imaged using a THz microscope by the group of Prof. Han...compounds, pharmaceutical materials, illegal drugs, amino acids, nuclei-bases and 30 bacterial spores , etc. THz waves can also penetrate through many...Am. B, vol. 7, pp. 2006-2015, 1990. 25. J. D. Joannopoulos, R. D. Meade, and J. N. Winn, Photonic Crystals: Molding the Flow of Light, Princeton U

  15. Single-photon emission from InAsP quantum dots embedded in density-controlled InP nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanase, Shougo; Sasakura, Hirotaka; Hara, Shinjiro; Motohisa, Junichi

    2017-04-01

    We attempted to control the density and size of InP-based nanowires (NWs) and nanowire quantum dots (NW-QDs) during selective-area metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy. InP nanowire arrays with a 5 µm pitch and an average NW diameter d of 67 nm were successfully grown by optimization of growth conditions. InAsP quantum dots were embedded in these density-controlled InP NW arrays, and clear single-photon emission and exciton-biexciton cascaded emission were confirmed by excitation-dependent photoluminescence and photon correlation measurements.

  16. Simultaneous control of emission localization and two-photon absorption efficiency in dissymmetrical chromophores

    SciTech Connect

    Tretiak, Sergei

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the present work is to demonstrate that combined spectral tuning of fluorescence and two-photon absorption (TPA) properties of multipolar chromophores can be achieved by introduction of slight electronic chemical dissymmetry. In that perspective, two novel series of structurally related chromophores have been designed and studied: a first series based on rod-like quadrupolar chromophores bearing different electron-donating (D) end groups and a second series based on three-branched octupolar chromophores built from a trigonal donating moiety and bearing various acceptor (A) peripheral groups. The influence of the electronic dissymmetry is investigated by combined experimental and theoretical studies of the linear and nonlinear optical properties of dissymmetric chromophores compared to their symmetrical counterparts. In both types of systems (i.e. quadrupoles and octupoles) experiments and theory reveal that excitation is essentially delocalized and that excitation involves synchronized charge redistribution between the different D and A moieties within the multipolar structure (i.e. concerted intramolecular charge transfer). In contrast, the emission stems only from a particular dipolar subunit bearing the strongest D or A moieties due to fast excitation localization after excitation prior to emission. Hence control of emission characteristics (polarization and emission spectrum) in addition to localization can be achieved by controlled introduction of electronic dissymmetry (i.e. replacement of one of the D or A end-groups by a slightly stronger D{prime} or A{prime} units). Interestingly dissymmetrical functionalization of both quadrupolar and octupolar compounds does not lead to significant loss in TPA responses and can even be beneficial due to the spectral broadening and peak position tuning that it allows. This study thus reveals an original molecular engineering route strategy allowing major TPA enhancement in multipolar structures due to concerted

  17. Soft x-ray spectromicroscopy using compact scanning transmission x-ray microscope at the photon factory

    SciTech Connect

    Takeichi, Yasuo Inami, Nobuhito; Ono, Kanta; Ueno, Tetsuro; Suga, Hiroki; Takahashi, Yoshio

    2016-07-27

    We report the stability and recent performances of a new type of scanning transmission X-ray microscopy. The optics and compact design of the microscope realized mobility and robust performance. Detailed consideration to the vibration control will be described. The insertion device upgraded to elliptical polarization undulator enabled linear dichroism and circular dichroism experiments.

  18. Enhanced single-photon emission from a diamond-silver aperture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choy, Jennifer T.; Hausmann, Birgit J. M.; Babinec, Thomas M.; Bulu, Irfan; Khan, Mughees; Maletinsky, Patrick; Yacoby, Amir; Lončar, Marko

    2011-12-01

    Solid-state quantum emitters, such as the nitrogen-vacancy centre in diamond, are robust systems for practical realizations of various quantum information processing protocols and nanoscale magnetometry schemes at room temperature. Such applications benefit from the high emission efficiency and flux of single photons, which can be achieved by engineering the electromagnetic environment of the emitter. One attractive approach is based on plasmonic resonators, in which sub-wavelength confinement of optical fields can strongly modify the spontaneous emission of a suitably embedded dipole despite having only modest quality factors. Meanwhile, the scalability of solid-state quantum systems critically depends on the ability to control such emitter-cavity interaction in a number of devices arranged in parallel. Here, we demonstrate a method to enhance the radiative emission rate of single nitrogen-vacancy centres in ordered arrays of plasmonic apertures that promises greater scalability over the previously demonstrated bottom-up approaches for the realization of on-chip quantum networks.

  19. Active Mediation of Plasmon Enhanced Localized Exciton Generation, Carrier Diffusion and Enhanced Photon Emission.

    PubMed

    Haq, Sharmin; Addamane, Sadhvikas; Kafle, Bijesh; Huang, Danhong; Balakrishnan, Ganesh; Habteyes, Terefe G

    2017-04-13

    Understanding the enhancement of charge carrier generation and their diffusion is imperative for improving the efficiency of optoelectronic devices particularly infrared photodetectors that are less developed than their visible counterpart. Here, using gold nanorods as model plasmonic systems, InAs quantum dots (QDs) embedded in an InGaAs quantum well as an emitter, and GaAs as an active mediator of surface plasmons for enhancing carrier generation and photon emission, the distance dependence of energy transfer and carrier diffusion have been investigated both experimentally and theoretically. Analysis of the QD emission enhancement as a function of distance reveals a Förster radius of 3.85 ± 0.15 nm, a near-field decay length of 4.8 ± 0.1 nm and an effective carrier diffusion length of 64.0 ± 3.0 nm. Theoretical study of the temporal-evolution of the electron-hole occupation number of the excited states of the QDs indicates that the emission enhancement trend is determined by the carrier diffusion and capture rates.

  20. Polychromatic spectral pattern analysis of ultra-weak photon emissions from a human body.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Masaki; Iwasa, Torai; Tada, Mika

    2016-06-01

    Ultra-weak photon emission (UPE), often designated as biophoton emission, is generally observed in a wide range of living organisms, including human beings. This phenomenon is closely associated with reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated during normal metabolic processes and pathological states induced by oxidative stress. Application of UPE extracting the pathophysiological information has long been anticipated because of its potential non-invasiveness, facilitating its diagnostic use. Nevertheless, its weak intensity and UPE mechanism complexity hinder its use for practical applications. Spectroscopy is crucially important for UPE analysis. However, filter-type spectroscopy technique, used as a conventional method for UPE analysis, intrinsically limits its performance because of its monochromatic scheme. To overcome the shortcomings of conventional methods, the authors developed a polychromatic spectroscopy system for UPE spectral pattern analysis. It is based on a highly efficient lens systems and a transmission-type diffraction grating with a highly sensitive, cooled, charge-coupled-device (CCD) camera. Spectral pattern analysis of the human body was done for a fingertip using the developed system. The UPE spectrum covers the spectral range of 450-750nm, with a dominant emission region of 570-670nm. The primary peak is located in the 600-650nm region. Furthermore, application of UPE source exploration was demonstrated with the chemiluminescence spectrum of melanin and coexistence with oxidized linoleic acid.

  1. Tip-geometry effects in circularly polarized light emission from a scanning tunneling microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anisimovas, Egidijus; Johansson, Peter

    1999-02-01

    We present a calculation of the degree of circular polarization ρ, of the light emitted from a scanning tunneling microscope due to tip asymmetry. In order to take into account the essential geometrical features of an imperfect tip its shape is approximated by a tilted spheroid. We work in the nonretarded limit and use experimentally measured dielectric functions to describe the electromagnetic properties of the tip (W and Ir) and sample (noble metals) materials. The results show that the polarization can reach 20-30 % for what we think are moderately asymmetric tips. This result, as well as the strong dependence of ρ on the azimuthal observation angle, is in reasonable agreement with experimental findings [A. L. Vázquez de Parga and S. F. Alvarado, Europhys. Lett. 36, 577 (1996)].

  2. Myocardial stunning in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: recovery predicted by single photon emission computed tomographic thallium-201 scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Fine, D.G.; Clements, I.P.; Callahan, M.J.

    1989-05-01

    A young woman with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy confirmed by echocardiography and cardiac catheterization presented with chest pain and features of a large left ventricular aneurysm. The initial diagnosis was myocardial ischemia with either an evolving or an ancient myocardial infarction. Subsequently, verapamil therapy was associated with complete resolution of the extensive left ventricular wall motion abnormalities, normalization of left ventricular ejection fraction and a minimal myocardial infarction. Normal thallium uptake on single photon emission computed tomographic scintigraphy early in the hospital course predicted myocardial viability in the region of the aneurysm. Thus, orally administered verapamil may reverse spontaneous extensive myocardial ischemia in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and possibly limit the extent of myocardial infarction in such circumstances.

  3. Hot water epilepsy: Phenotype and single photon emission computed tomography observations

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Mehul; Satishchandra, Parthasarathy; Aravinda, Hanumanthapura; Bharath, Rose D.; Sinha, Sanjib

    2014-01-01

    We studied the anatomical correlates of reflex hot water epilepsy (HWE) using multimodality investigations viz. magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), electroencephalography (EEG), and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Five men (mean age: 27.0 ΁ 5.8 years) with HWE were subjected to MRI of brain, video-EEG studies, and SPECT scan. These were correlated with phenotypic presentations. Seizures could be precipitated in three patients with pouring of hot water over the head and semiology of seizures was suggestive of temporal lobe epilepsy. Ictal SPECT showed hyperperfusion in: left medial temporal — one, left lateral temporal — one, and right parietal — one. Interictal SPECT was normal in all five patients and did not help in localization. MRI and interictal EEG was normal in all the patients. The clinical and SPECT studies suggested temporal lobe as the seizure onset zone in some of the patients with HWE. PMID:25506178

  4. Single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) in detecting neurodegeneration in Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, N C; Hellman, R S; Tikofsky, R S; Prost, R W; Mark, L P; Elejalde, B R; Lebel, R; Hamsher, K S; Swanson, S; Benezra, E E

    2002-01-01

    Single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) studies were performed on 34 manifest Huntington's disease (HD) patients at various stages of clinical pathology ranging from early chorea to late dystonia with or without signs of dementia and 12 pre-symptomatic patients with abnormal terminal CAG expansions. Thirty HD patients with obvious clinical signs and seven pre-symptomatic patients without signs or symptoms of HD displayed selective caudate hypoperfusion by direct visual inspection. Such qualitative, selective striatal hypoperfusion patterns can be indicative of early and persistent metabolic changes in striatal neuropathology. SPECT studies can be useful in documenting early pre-clinical changes in patients with abnormal terminal CAG expansions and in confirming the presence of caudate pathology in patients with clinical signs of HD.

  5. Novel cone lasing emission in a non-uniform one-dimensional photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yi; Zhou, Wen-Yuan; Ying, Cui-Feng; Yang, Na; Chen, Shao-Jie; Ye, Qing; Tian, Jian-Guo

    2015-06-01

    Novel cone lasing emission is observed from a photonic crystal (PC) with graded layers, which is fabricated by two-beam holographic interference in dichromated gelatin. The cone lasing is composed of one lasing spot and one concentric lasing ring. The good agreement between the experimental results and a numerical simulation performed using the transfer matrix method demonstrates that this lasing ring is induced by the coupling between the band edge and minigap, which is represented as some oscillations near the band edge in the passband of the reflection spectrum. The cone lasing may be useful for multi-wavelength fluorescence detection since the dual-colour directional enhanced fluorescence can be achieved without the mutual interference of lasing modes. Moreover, this readily observable cone lasing provides a direct visualization of the dispersion relation of non-uniform PCs.

  6. Tc99m HM-PAO single photon emission computed tomography in temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Duncan, R; Patterson, J; Hadley, D M; Wyper, D J; McGeorge, A P; Bone, I

    1990-04-01

    We present the results of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in 40 patients with temporal lobe epilepsy and normal computed transmission tomography (CT). Abnormalities of regional cerebral blood flow were found in 26 patients. There was focal hypoperfusion alone in 14, focal hyperperfusion alone in 6, and both types of abnormality in 6. In 4 patients there were bilateral abnormalities. Repeat SPECT showed persistence of interictal hyperperfusion in 5/12 patients. There were no significant correlations between SPECT findings and clinical parameters, and no relation between the persistence of interictal hyperperfusion and time since last seizure or seizure frequency. Where SPECT and multiple surface EEG recordings were both lateralising, agreement between them was good. The results of this study support the usefulness of HMPAO SPECT in detecting lateralising abnormalities in temporal lobe epilepsy. Interictal hyperperfusion may be commoner than previous publications suggest, and may be persistent in some cases.

  7. Polarization control of quantum dot emission by chiral photonic crystal slabs.

    PubMed

    Lobanov, Sergey V; Weiss, Thomas; Gippius, Nikolay A; Tikhodeev, Sergei G; Kulakovskii, Vladimir D; Konishi, Kuniaki; Kuwata-Gonokami, Makoto

    2015-04-01

    We investigate theoretically the polarization properties of the quantum dot's (QDs) optical emission from chiral photonic crystal structures made of achiral materials in the absence of external magnetic field at room temperature. The mirror symmetry of the local electromagnetic field is broken in this system due to the decreased symmetry of the chiral modulated layer. As a result, the radiation of randomly polarized QDs normal to the structure becomes partially circularly polarized. The sign and degree of circular polarization are determined by the geometry of the chiral modulated structure and depend on the radiation frequency. A degree of circular polarization up to 99% can be achieved for randomly distributed QDs, and can be close to 100% for some single QDs.

  8. High-energy two-electron capture with emission of a single photon

    SciTech Connect

    Drukarev, E. G.; Mikhailov, A. I.; Mikhailov, I. A.; Scheid, W.

    2007-12-15

    We investigate the two-electron capture with emission of a single photon to the ground state in the Coulomb field of a heavy nucleus in its collision with a light atom. Describing electron-electron interactions in the bound state perturbatively, we obtained an analytical formula for the high-energy limit of the cross section. In combination with previous results obtained in the same approach we calculated the cross section in a broad interval of energies of the collision. We show that the amplitude of the process at high energy depends on the behavior of the bound state wave function near the triple coalescence point. We analyze the properties of the approximate wave functions which are necessary for the description of the high-energy limit.

  9. Brain perfusion single photon emission computed tomography in major psychiatric disorders: From basics to clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Santra, Amburanjan; Kumar, Rakesh

    2014-01-01

    Brain single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is a well-established and reliable method to assess brain function through measurement of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF). It can be used to define a patient's pathophysiological status when neurological or psychiatric symptoms cannot be explained by anatomical neuroimaging findings. Though there is ample evidence validating brain SPECT as a technique to track human behavior and correlating psychiatric disorders with dysfunction of specific brain regions, only few psychiatrists have adopted brain SPECT in routine clinical practice. It can be utilized to evaluate the involvement of brain regions in a particular patient, to individualize treatment on basis of SPECT findings, to monitor the treatment response and modify treatment, if necessary. In this article, we have reviewed the available studies in this regard from existing literature and tried to present the evidence for establishing the clinical role of brain SPECT in major psychiatric illnesses. PMID:25400359

  10. Detection of avascular necrosis in adults by single photon emission computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Collier, B.D.; Johnston, R.P.; Carrera, G.; Isitman, A.T.; Hellman, R.S.; Zielonka, J.S.

    1984-01-01

    Twenty-one adult patients with the clinical diagnosis of avascular necrosis (AVN) of the femoral head were examined with planar bone scintigraphy (high resolution collimator) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). The duration of hip pain ranged from 1 day to 18 months. Risk factors (including steroids, renal transplantation, alcoholism, and trauma) were present in 17 cases. A final diagnosis of AVN (20 hips), osteochondral facture, or stress fracture, was established for 17 patients. The 4 remaining patients, who were radiographically normal and did not complain of pain 3 months later, were thought to have no significant bone pathology. SPECT and planar bone scintigraphy were reported as positive for AVN only if a photopenic bony defect could be identified. In particular, uniformly increased activity throughout the femoral head was not considered to be diagnostic of AVN. The authors conclude that by identifying a photopenic defect which is not evident on planar bone scintigraphy, SPECT can contribute to accurate diagnosis of AVN.

  11. Definition of hepatic tumor microcirculation by Single Photon Emission Computerized Tomography (SPECT)

    SciTech Connect

    Gyves, J.W.; Ziessman, H.A.; Ensminger, W.D.; Thrall, J.H.; Niederhuber, J.E.; Keyes, J.W. Jr.; Walker, S.

    1984-09-01

    Single photon emission computerized tomography coupled with Tc-99m MAA hepatic-arterial perfusion scintigraphy has been used to examine the density of the functional microcirculation of hepatic tumors relative to normal liver in 24 patients. In both colorectal and carcinoid tumors the authors have demonstrated an average three-fold greater arteriolar-capillary density in areas of tumor proliferation. The depth of the evoked tumor hypervascularity was found to extend about 4 cm. Tumors greater than 8-9 cm in diameter were uniformly found to have a central hypovascular core. These observations are of importance in the design of selective strategies utilizing therapeutic microspheres directed against the hypervascular proliferating regions of human tumors.

  12. Depiction of ventriculoperitoneal shunt obstruction with single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Aksoy, Sabire Yılmaz; Vatankulu, Betül; Uslu, Lebriz; Halac, Metin

    2016-01-01

    An 83-year-old male patient with ventriculoperitoneal shunt underwent radionuclide shunt study using single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) to evaluate the shunt patency. The planar images showed activity at the cranial region and spinal canal but no significant activity at the peritoneal cavity. However, SPECT/CT images clearly demonstrated accumulation of activity at the superior part of bifurcation level with no activity at the distal end of shunt as well as no spilling of radiotracer into the peritoneal cavity indicating shunt obstruction. SPECT/CT makes the interpretation of radionuclide shunt study more accurate and easier as compared with traditional planar images. PMID:27385906

  13. Single-photon emission computed tomography in human immunodeficiency virus encephalopathy: A preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Masdeu, J.C.; Yudd, A.; Van Heertum, R.L.; Grundman, M.; Hriso, E.; O'Connell, R.A.; Luck, D.; Camli, U.; King, L.N. )

    1991-08-01

    Depression or psychosis in a previously asymptomatic individual infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) may be psychogenic, related to brain involvement by the HIV or both. Although prognosis and treatment differ depending on etiology, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are usually unrevealing in early HIV encephalopathy and therefore cannot differentiate it from psychogenic conditions. Thirty of 32 patients (94%) with HIV encephalopathy had single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) findings that differed from the findings in 15 patients with non-HIV psychoses and 6 controls. SPECT showed multifocal cortical and subcortical areas of hypoperfusion. In 4 cases, cognitive improvement after 6-8 weeks of zidovudine (AZT) therapy was reflected in amelioration of SPECT findings. CT remained unchanged. SPECT may be a useful technique for the evaluation of HIV encephalopathy.

  14. Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) findings of a patient with a novel prion mutation.

    PubMed

    Matsuzono, Kosuke; Morihara, Ryuta; Sato, Kota; Hishikawa, Nozomi; Yamashita, Toru; Deguchi, Kentaro; Abe, Koji

    2015-01-01

    We experienced a unique case of familial prion disease with a prion gene mutation that caused pan-autonomic failure, sensory neuropathy and mild cognitive impairment. No abnormal sites of intensity were observed on diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance image (MRI) over six to 11 years or fluid attenuated inversion recovery MRI at six or nine years. However, (99m)Tc-ethylcysteinate dimer single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) showed a decreased cerebral blood flow in the bilateral parietal and occipital lobes at nine years, which then expanded at 11 years, corresponding to mild atrophy in these areas on MRI. In some cases of prion mutations, particularly the slowly progressive type, SPECT may show abnormalities, while MRI does not.

  15. Emission characteristics of holmium ions in fluoro-phosphate glasses for photonic applications

    SciTech Connect

    Babu, S.; Ratnakaram, Y. C.

    2016-05-23

    Optical properties of Ho{sup 3+} doped different fluorophosphate (FP) glasses have been synthesized and discussed. Thermal properties have been studied through differential scanning calorimetry (DSC).The Judd-Ofelt (J-O) intensity parameters Ω{sub λ} (λ= 2, 4, 6) from absorption spectra have been evaluated. Various radiative parameters have been obtained for the different excited states using J-O theory. From the emission spectra, different laser properties have been studied and discussed. The nature of decay curve analysis was performed for the {sup 5}F{sub 4}({sup 5}S{sub 2}) level. These glasses are expected to give interesting application in the field of photonic applications.

  16. Diagnosis of partial and total physeal arrest by bone single-photon emission computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Wioland, M; Bonnerot, V

    1993-09-01

    Bone single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), capable of creating maps of the distribution of osteoblastic activity in every spatial plane of a physis, should provide images of diagnostic value in the case of patients suffering from growth arrests (epiphysiodeses). Seventy-five bone SPECT scans were obtained in 64 children suspected to have developed physeal arrests. The transaxial slices of the physis, in the case of partial epiphysiodeses: (a) indicated the percentage of the remaining normal physis, (b) located the bony bridge within the physis and (c) showed the slowdown of the growth of the remaining normal physis induced by the bony bridge in some children. Misdiagnosis occurred in six patients. For total epiphysiodeses, the radionuclide diagnosis was confirmed in 20 of 21 patients. Radionuclide, x-ray and MRI examinations in the study of growth disturbances were found to be complementary.

  17. Antenna-coupled photon emission from hexagonal boron nitride tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parzefall, M.; Bharadwaj, P.; Jain, A.; Taniguchi, T.; Watanabe, K.; Novotny, L.

    2015-12-01

    The ultrafast conversion of electrical signals to optical signals at the nanoscale is of fundamental interest for data processing, telecommunication and optical interconnects. However, the modulation bandwidths of semiconductor light-emitting diodes are limited by the spontaneous recombination rate of electron-hole pairs, and the footprint of electrically driven ultrafast lasers is too large for practical on-chip integration. A metal-insulator-metal tunnel junction approaches the ultimate size limit of electronic devices and its operating speed is fundamentally limited only by the tunnelling time. Here, we study the conversion of electrons (localized in vertical gold-hexagonal boron nitride-gold tunnel junctions) to free-space photons, mediated by resonant slot antennas. Optical antennas efficiently bridge the size mismatch between nanoscale volumes and far-field radiation and strongly enhance the electron-photon conversion efficiency. We achieve polarized, directional and resonantly enhanced light emission from inelastic electron tunnelling and establish a novel platform for studying the interaction of electrons with strongly localized electromagnetic fields.

  18. The Physical Mechanism for Retinal Discrete Dark Noise: Thermal Activation or Cellular Ultraweak Photon Emission?

    PubMed Central

    Salari, Vahid; Scholkmann, Felix; Bokkon, Istvan; Shahbazi, Farhad; Tuszynski, Jack

    2016-01-01

    For several decades the physical mechanism underlying discrete dark noise of photoreceptors in the eye has remained highly controversial and poorly understood. It is known that the Arrhenius equation, which is based on the Boltzmann distribution for thermal activation, can model only a part (e.g. half of the activation energy) of the retinal dark noise experimentally observed for vertebrate rod and cone pigments. Using the Hinshelwood distribution instead of the Boltzmann distribution in the Arrhenius equation has been proposed as a solution to the problem. Here, we show that the using the Hinshelwood distribution does not solve the problem completely. As the discrete components of noise are indistinguishable in shape and duration from those produced by real photon induced photo-isomerization, the retinal discrete dark noise is most likely due to ‘internal photons’ inside cells and not due to thermal activation of visual pigments. Indeed, all living cells exhibit spontaneous ultraweak photon emission (UPE), mainly in the optical wavelength range, i.e., 350–700 nm. We show here that the retinal discrete dark noise has a similar rate as UPE and therefore dark noise is most likely due to spontaneous cellular UPE and not due to thermal activation. PMID:26950936

  19. Enhancement and Inhibition of Spontaneous Photon Emission by Resonant Silicon Nanoantennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchet, Dorian; Mivelle, Mathieu; Proust, Julien; Gallas, Bruno; Ozerov, Igor; Garcia-Parajo, Maria F.; Gulinatti, Angelo; Rech, Ivan; De Wilde, Yannick; Bonod, Nicolas; Krachmalnicoff, Valentina; Bidault, Sébastien

    2016-12-01

    Substituting noble metals for high-index dielectrics has recently been proposed as an alternative strategy in nanophotonics to design broadband optical resonators and circumvent the Ohmic losses of plasmonic materials. In this paper, we demonstrate that subwavelength silicon nanoantennas can manipulate the photon emission dynamics of fluorescent molecules. In practice, we show that dielectric nanoantennas can both increase and decrease the local density of optical states at room temperature, a process that is inaccessible with noble metals at the nanoscale. Using scanning probe microscopy, we analyze quantitatively, in three dimensions, the near-field interaction between a 100-nm fluorescent nanosphere and silicon nanoantennas with diameters ranging between 170 and 250 nm. Associated with numerical simulations, these measurements indicate increased or decreased total spontaneous decay rates by up to 15% and a gain in the collection efficiency of emitted photons by up to 85%. Our study demonstrates the potential of silicon-based nanoantennas for the low-loss manipulation of solid-state emitters at the nanoscale and at room temperature.

  20. Morphology and chemical composition analysis of inorganic nanosheets by the field-emission scanning electron microscope system.

    PubMed

    Li, Qinghui; Ono, Yuki; Homma, Yoshikazu; Nakai, Izumi; Fukuda, Katsutoshi; Sasaki, Takayoshi; Tanaka, Keiichi; Nakayama, Satoshi

    2009-01-01

    Nanosheets can be used as building blocks to fabricate versatile nanostructured materials. In this paper, morphology of the Cs(4)W(11)O(36) and Nb(3)O(8) and TaO(3) sheets with different layers are analyzed by different field-emission scanning electron microscopes (FE-SEMs). Chemical composition of the single-layered Cs(4)W(11)O(36) with thickness of about 2 nm, and multilayered Nb(3)O(8) nanosheets with thickness of less than 14 nm are analyzed by both the Si(Li) solid-state detector and transition edge sensor (TES) microcalorimeter, successfully. The effects of energy resolution, accelerating voltage and substrate on the quantitative analysis are discussed briefly.

  1. Engineering the emission of light from a scanning tunneling microscope using the plasmonic modes of a nanoparticle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Moal, Eric; Marguet, Sylvie; Canneson, Damien; Rogez, Benoît; Boer-Duchemin, Elizabeth; Dujardin, Gérald; Teperik, Tatiana V.; Marinica, Dana-Codruta; Borisov, Andrey G.

    2016-01-01

    The inelastic tunnel current in the junction formed between the tip of a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) and the sample can electrically generate optical signals. This phenomenon is potentially of great importance for nano-optoelectronic devices. In practice, however, the properties of the emitted light are difficult to control because of the strong influence of the STM tip. In this work, we show both theoretically and experimentally that the sought-after, well-controlled emission of light from an STM tunnel junction may be achieved using a nonplasmonic STM tip and a plasmonic nanoparticle on a transparent substrate. We demonstrate that the native plasmon modes of the nanoparticle may be used to engineer the light emitted in the substrate. Both the angular distribution and intensity of the emitted light may be varied in a predictable way by choosing the excitation position of the STM tip on the particle.

  2. Increased light extraction and directional emission control in gallium nitride photonic crystal light emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGroddy, Kelly C.

    GaN has become the prominent material for blue-green light emitting diodes (LEDs) and efficient white light sources. Advancements in LED efficiency for lighting has the potential to dramatically impact energy consumption world wide. A limiting factor to achieving high efficiencies in GaN LEDs is the light extraction efficiency. This work addresses many key issues pertaining to the use of PhCs to increase the extraction efficiency and emission directionality of GaN LEDs. Limitations in extraction efficiency of GaN photonic crystal light emitting diodes (LEDs) are addressed by implementing an LED design using both 2D photonic crystals (PhCs) in-plane and index guiding layers (IGLs) in the vertical direction. The effects of PhCs on light extraction and emission directionality from GaN LEDs are studied experimentally. Angular resolved electroluminescence clearly shows the combined effect of controlling the vertical mode profile with the IGLs and tailoring the emission profile with the periodicity of the PhC lattice. Various materials are used to increase the index contrast of the IGL and the effects are measured. Increases in vertical emission as high as 3.5x are achieved for PhC LEDs with an Al0.12Ga0.88N IGL over non-PhC LEDs with a ˜30% improvement attributed to the incorporation of the AlGaN IGL. This enhancement is achieved by tailoring both the directionality and guided mode control. The impact of incorporating PhCs and IGLs on LED device design and performance are addressed. Effects of etching the PhCs near the QWs have been observed and explanations for this behavior will be discussed. It will be shown that an un-doped IGL can severely limit current spreading in the n-type side of the device and have a detrimental impact on device performance. Finally, a method of patterning PhCs with periodicities as small as 230nm by laser interference lithography and imprint lithography has been developed to provide a fast, inexpensive method of pattering PhCs over large

  3. Ag@Aggregation-induced emission dye core/shell nanostructures with enhanced one- and two-photon fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Cheng; Li, Yang; Xu, Qiujin; Luo, Liang

    2017-10-01

    Combining plasmonic nanostructures with two-photon fluorescence materials is a promising way to significantly enhance two-photon fluorescence. Ag@1,4-bis(2-cyano-2-phenylethenyl) benzene (BCPEB) core/shell nanostructures were fabricated by simply incubating the isolated Ag nanoparticles with BCPEB microrods in ethanol. BCPEB was chosen as the fluorescent organic molecule owing to the aggregation-induced-emission (AIE) nature which would reduce the emission loss as being practically applied in solid phase. By utilizing the match of the extinction spectrum of Ag nanoparticles and BCPEB's absorption band, the target Ag@BCPEB core/shell nanostructures showed an enhanced one-photon (12×) fluorescence, integrating with SERS signal as well. Moreover, the resultant second harmonic generation of Ag nanoparticles under two-photon excitation also well matched with the absorption band of BCPEB, and significant enhanced two-photon (17×) fluorescence was obtained. The confocal images of NIH-3T3 cells with these nanostructures under one- and two-photon excitation showed good contrast and brightness for bio-imaging.

  4. Emission FTIR analyses of thin microscopic patches of jet fuel residue deposited on heated metal surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauer, J. L.; Vogel, P.

    1984-01-01

    Deposits laid down in patches on metal strips in a high pressure/high temperature fuel system simulator operated with aerated fuel at varying flow rates were analyzed by emission FTIR in terms of functional groups. Significant differences were found in the spectra and amounts of deposits derived from fuels to which small concentrations of oxygen-, nitrogen-, or sulfur-containing heterocyclics or metal naphthenates were added. The spectra of deposits generated on strips by heating fuels and air in a closed container were very different from those of the flowing fluid deposits. One such closed-container dodecane deposit on silver gave a strong surface-enhanced Raman spectrum.

  5. Scanning tunneling microscope light emission: Effect of the strong dc field on junction plasmons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalathingal, Vijith; Dawson, Paul; Mitra, J.

    2016-07-01

    The observed energies of the localized surface plasmons (LSPs) excited at the tip-sample junction of a scanning tunneling microscope, as identified by spectral peaks in the light output, are very significantly redshifted with respect to calculations that use standard optical data for the tip and sample material, gold in this case. We argue that this anomaly depends on the extreme field in the sub-nm tunneling proximity of the tip and the sample, across which a dc bias (1-2 V) is applied. Finite element modeling analysis is presented of a gold nanosphere-plane (NS-P) combination in tunneling proximity and, crucially, in the presence of a high static electric field (˜109V /m ). It is argued that the strong dc field induces nonlinear corrections to the dielectric function of the gold via the effect of a large background polarizability through the nonlinear, χ(3 ) susceptibility contribution. When fed into the model system the modified optical data alters the LSP cavity modes of the NS-P system to indeed reveal a large redshift in energy compared to those of the virgin gold NS-P system. The net outcome may be regarded as equivalent to lowering the bulk plasmon energy, the physical interpretation being that the intense field of the tunneling environment leads to surface charge screening, effectively reducing the density of free electrons available to participate in the plasmon oscillations.

  6. Two-color single-photon emission from InAs quantum dots: toward logic information management using quantum light.

    PubMed

    Rivas, David; Muñoz-Matutano, Guillermo; Canet-Ferrer, Josep; García-Calzada, Raúl; Trevisi, Giovanna; Seravalli, Luca; Frigeri, Paola; Martínez-Pastor, Juan P

    2014-02-12

    In this work, we propose the use of the Hanbury-Brown and Twiss interferometric technique and a switchable two-color excitation method for evaluating the exciton and noncorrelated electron-hole dynamics associated with single photon emission from indium arsenide (InAs) self-assembled quantum dots (QDs). Using a microstate master equation model we demonstrate that our single QDs are described by nonlinear exciton dynamics. The simultaneous detection of two-color, single photon emission from InAs QDs using these nonlinear dynamics was used to design a NOT AND logic transference function. This computational functionality combines the advantages of working with light/photons as input/output device parameters (all-optical system) and that of a nanodevice (QD size of ∼ 20 nm) while also providing high optical sensitivity (ultralow optical power operational requirements). These system features represent an important and interesting step toward the development of new prototypes for the incoming quantum information technologies.

  7. Electric-Field-Induced Energy Tuning of On-Demand Entangled-Photon Emission from Self-Assembled Quantum Dots.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiaxiang; Zallo, Eugenio; Höfer, Bianca; Chen, Yan; Keil, Robert; Zopf, Michael; Böttner, Stefan; Ding, Fei; Schmidt, Oliver G

    2017-01-11

    We explore a method to achieve electrical control over the energy of on-demand entangled-photon emission from self-assembled quantum dots (QDs). The device used in our work consists of an electrically tunable diode-like membrane integrated onto a piezoactuator, which is capable of exerting a uniaxial stress on QDs. We theoretically reveal that, through application of the quantum-confined Stark effect to QDs by a vertical electric field, the critical uniaxial stress used to eliminate the fine structure splitting of QDs can be linearly tuned. This feature allows experimental realization of a triggered source of energy-tunable entangled-photon emission. Our demonstration represents an important step toward realization of a solid-state quantum repeater using indistinguishable entangled photons in Bell state measurements.

  8. Room-temperature triggered single photon emission from a III-nitride site-controlled nanowire quantum dot.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Mark J; Choi, Kihyun; Kako, Satoshi; Arita, Munetaka; Arakawa, Yasuhiko

    2014-02-12

    We demonstrate triggered single photon emission at room temperature from a site-controlled III-nitride quantum dot embedded in a nanowire. Moreover, we reveal a remarkable temperature insensitivity of the single photon statistics, and a g((2))[0] value at 300 K of just 0.13. The combination of using high-quality, small, site-controlled quantum dots with a wide-bandgap material system is crucial for providing both sufficient exciton confinement and an emission spectrum with minimal contamination in order to enable room temperature operation. Arrays of such single photon emitters will be useful for room-temperature quantum information processing applications such as on-chip quantum communication.

  9. Tunable room-temperature single-photon emission at telecom wavelengths from sp3 defects in carbon nanotubes

    DOE PAGES

    He, Xiaowei; Hartmann, Nicolai F.; Ma, Xuedan; ...

    2017-07-31

    Generating quantum light emitters that operate at room temperature and at telecom wavelengths remains a significant materials challenge. To achieve this goal requires light sources that emit in the near-infrared wavelength region and that, ideally, are tunable to allow desired output wavelengths to be accessed in a controllable manner. Here, we show that exciton localization at covalently introduced aryl sp3 defect sites in single-walled carbon nanotubes provides a route to room-temperature single-photon emission with ultrahigh single-photon purity (99%) and enhanced emission stability approaching the shot-noise limit. Moreover, we demonstrate that the inherent optical tunability of single-walled carbon nanotubes, present inmore » their structural diversity, allows us to generate room-temperature single-photon emission spanning the entire telecom band. Furthermore, single-photon emission deep into the centre of the telecom C band (1.55 um) is achieved at the largest nanotube diameters we explore (0.936 nm).« less

  10. Accuracy of coregistration of single-photon emission CT with MR via a brain surface matching technique.

    PubMed

    Hogan, R E; Cook, M J; Kilpatrick, C J; Binns, D W; Desmond, P M; Morris, K

    1996-04-01

    We describe a technique of brain surface matching of single-photon emission CT and MR images in human subjects and document the accuracy of this technique with the use of fiduciary markers. This mismatch averaged 4.3 mm as measured by the fiduciary markers and 2.1 mm as measured by the root mean square distance.

  11. Local detection efficiency of a NbN superconducting single photon detector explored by a scattering scanning near-field optical microscope.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiang; Renema, Jelmer J; Engel, Andreas; van Exter, Martin P; de Dood, Michiel J A

    2015-09-21

    We propose an experiment to directly probe the local response of a superconducting single photon detector using a sharp metal tip in a scattering scanning near-field optical microscope. The optical absorption is obtained by simulating the tip-detector system, where the tip-detector is illuminated from the side, with the tip functioning as an optical antenna. The local detection efficiency is calculated by considering the recently introduced position-dependent threshold current in the detector. The calculated response for a 150 nm wide detector shows a peak close to the edge that can be spatially resolved with an estimated resolution of ∼ 20 nm, using a tip with parameters that are experimentally accessible.

  12. Determination of the spatial extension of the surface-plasmon evanescent field of a silver film with a photon scanning tunneling microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Adam, P.M.; Salomon, L.; de Fornel, F.; Goudonnet, J.P. )

    1993-07-15

    A photon scanning tunneling microscope is employed to probe the surface-plasmon field in the evanescent region of a silver film for [ital p] (parallel to the plane of incidence) and [ital s] (perpendicular to the plane of incidence) polarizations of the light beam at several angles of incidence near the critical angle. The interaction between the field and the probe is measured and compared to theoretical calculations involving a single four-media model. A systematic analysis of images obtained for several positions of the optical fiber above the film is presented and it is shown that, for tip-to-sample distances smaller than half the wavelength of the incoming light, the collected intensity curves are identical in any area of the sample.

  13. Analysis of photon emission from 50--350-keV proton impact on H2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldman, Benjamin D.; Timpone, Stephanie A.; Monce, Michael N.; Mitchell, Laurel; Griffin, Brian

    2011-04-01

    We have measured photon emission cross sections from neutral fragments produced by collisions of 50-350 keV protons with H2O molecules. Balmer α-δ emissions from both the target and projectile were recorded. We also analyzed A2Σ+-X2Π (0,0) and (1,0) emission from the excited OH fragment produced during target dissociation. Trends in the cross sections revealed two key properties of the collision process: (1) The Bethe theory accurately describes target emission from both H and OH fragments and (2) the ratio of any two Balmer emission cross sections for both the target and projectile can be approximated by simple functions of the respective optical oscillator strengths. Finally, we provide the Bethe fit parameters necessary to calculate the target emission cross sections at all nonrelativistic impact energies.

  14. Emission FTIR analyses of thin microscopic patches of jet fuel residues deposited on heated metal surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauer, J. L.; Vogel, P.

    1986-01-01

    The relationship of fuel stability to fuel composition and the development of mechanisms for deposit formation were investigated. Fuel deposits reduce heat transfer efficiency and increase resistance to fuel flow and are highly detrimental to aircraft performance. Infrared emission Fourier transform spectroscopy was chosen as the primary method of analysis because it was sensitive enough to be used in-situ on tiny patches of monolayers or of only a few molecular layers of deposits which generally proved completely insoluble in any nondestructive solvents. Deposits of four base fuels were compared; dodecane, a dodecane/tetralin blend, commercial Jet A fuel, and a broadened-properties jet fuel particularly rich in polynuclear aromatics. Every fuel in turn was provided with and without small additions of such additives as thiophene, furan, pyrrole, and copper and iron naphthenates.

  15. Effects of nanoscale vacuum gap on photon-enhanced thermionic emission devices

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yuan; Liao, Tianjun; Zhang, Yanchao; Chen, Xiaohang E-mail: jcchen@xmu.edu.cn; Su, Shanhe; Chen, Jincan E-mail: jcchen@xmu.edu.cn

    2016-01-28

    A new model of the photon-enhanced thermionic emission (PETE) device with a nanoscale vacuum gap is established by introducing the quantum tunneling effect and the image force correction. Analytic expressions for both the thermionic emission and tunneling currents are derived. The electron concentration and the temperature of the cathode are determined by the particle conservation and energy balance equations. The effects of the operating voltage on the maximum potential barrier, cathode temperature, electron concentration and equilibrium electron concentration of the conduction band, and efficiency of the PETE device are discussed in detail for different given values of the vacuum gap length. The influence of the band gap of the cathode and flux concentration on the efficiency is further analyzed. The maximum efficiency of the PETE and the corresponding optimum values of the band gap and the operating voltage are determined. The results obtained here show that the efficiency of the PETE device can be significantly improved by employing a nanoscale vacuum gap.

  16. Negative space charge effects in photon-enhanced thermionic emission solar converters

    SciTech Connect

    Segev, G.; Weisman, D.; Rosenwaks, Y.; Kribus, A.

    2015-07-06

    In thermionic energy converters, electrons in the gap between electrodes form a negative space charge and inhibit the emission of additional electrons, causing a significant reduction in conversion efficiency. However, in Photon Enhanced Thermionic Emission (PETE) solar energy converters, electrons that are reflected by the electric field in the gap return to the cathode with energy above the conduction band minimum. These electrons first occupy the conduction band from which they can be reemitted. This form of electron recycling makes PETE converters less susceptible to negative space charge loss. While the negative space charge effect was studied extensively in thermionic converters, modeling its effect in PETE converters does not account for important issues such as this form of electron recycling, nor the cathode thermal energy balance. Here, we investigate the space charge effect in PETE solar converters accounting for electron recycling, with full coupling of the cathode and gap models, and addressing conservation of both electric and thermal energy. The analysis shows that the negative space charge loss is lower than previously reported, allowing somewhat larger gaps compared to previous predictions. For a converter with a specific gap, there is an optimal solar flux concentration. The optimal solar flux concentration, the cathode temperature, and the efficiency all increase with smaller gaps. For example, for a gap of 3 μm the maximum efficiency is 38% and the optimal flux concentration is 628, while for a gap of 5 μm the maximum efficiency is 31% and optimal flux concentration is 163.

  17. Extended calibration range for prompt photon emission in ion beam irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellini, F.; Boehlen, T. T.; Chin, M. P. W.; Collamati, F.; De Lucia, E.; Faccini, R.; Ferrari, A.; Lanza, L.; Mancini-Terracciano, C.; Marafini, M.; Mattei, I.; Morganti, S.; Ortega, P. G.; Patera, V.; Piersanti, L.; Russomando, A.; Sala, P. R.; Sarti, A.; Sciubba, A.; Solfaroli Camillocci, E.; Voena, C.

    2014-05-01

    Monitoring the dose delivered during proton and carbon ion therapy is still a matter of research. Among the possible solutions, several exploit the measurement of the single photon emission from nuclear decays induced by the irradiation. To fully characterize such emission the detectors need development, since the energy spectrum spans the range above the MeV that is not traditionally used in medical applications. On the other hand, a deeper understanding of the reactions involving gamma production is needed in order to improve the physic models of Monte Carlo codes, relevant for an accurate prediction of the prompt-gamma energy spectrum. This paper describes a calibration technique tailored for the range of energy of interest and reanalyzes the data of the interaction of a 80 MeV/u fully stripped carbon ion beam with a Poly-methyl methacrylate target. By adopting the FLUKA simulation with the appropriate calibration and resolution a significant improvement in the agreement between data and simulation is reported.

  18. Highly sensitive imaging for ultra-weak photon emission from living organisms.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Masaki

    2014-10-05

    Spontaneous ultra-weak photon emissions (UPEs) are from living organisms. Often designated as biophoton emissions, they are associated with reactive oxygen species production. They have long been explored for use in the extraction of pathophysiological information of living bodies. Because of its potential non-invasiveness and because it is completely passive, it has been anticipated for application to human diagnosis. However, because of the weakness of its signal and the complexity of the mechanisms, practical applications of UPE and efforts have remained restricted. Imaging of UPE is a powerful tool for the practical application of UPE. Furthermore, efforts to develop imaging technique have been made from the early period of UPE study. This report explains the history of UPE study, particularly describing the development of imaging technology and its application covering agriculture and medicine are reviewed. Furthermore, the issue of what was achieved and what is necessary for the additional advancement of UPE will be discussed for practical application. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Suppression of single-cesium-atom heating in a microscopic optical dipole trap for demonstration of an 852-nm triggered single-photon source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bei; Jin, Gang; He, Jun; Wang, Junmin

    2016-07-01

    We investigate single-cesium-atom heating owing to the momentum accumulation process induced by the resonant pulsed excitation in a microscopic optical dipole trap formed by a strongly focused 1064-nm laser beam. The heating depends on the trap frequency, which restricts the maximum repetition rate of the pulsed excitation. We experimentally verify the heating of a single atom and then demonstrate how to suppress it with an optimized pulsed excitation and cooling method. The typical trap lifetime of a single cesium atom is extended from 108 ±6 μ s to 2536 ±31 ms , and the corresponding number of excitations increases from ˜108 to ˜360 000 . In applying this faster cooling method, we use the trapped single cesium atom as a triggered single-photon source at an excitation repetition rate of 10 MHz. The second-order intensity correlations of the emitted single photons are characterized by implementing a Hanbury Brown and Twiss setup, and a clear antibunching effect has been observed.

  20. Hydrogen-like atom in a superstrong magnetic field: Photon emission and relativistic energy level shift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skobelev, V. V.

    2017-06-01

    Following our previous work, additional arguments are presented that in superstrong magnetic fields B ≫ (Zα)2 B 0, B 0 = m 2 c 3/ eħ ≈ 4.41 × 1013 G, the Dirac equation and the Schrödinger equation for an electron in the nucleus field following from it become spatially one-dimensional with the only z coordinate along the magnetic field, "Dirac" spinors become two-component, while the 2 × 2 matrices operate in the {0; 3} subspace. Based on the obtained solution of the Dirac equation and the known solution of the "onedimensional" Schrödinger equation by ordinary QED methods extrapolated to the {0; 3} subspace, the probability of photon emission by a "one-dimensional" hydrogen-like atom is calculated, which, for example, for the Lyman-alpha line differs almost twice from the probability in the "three-dimensional" case. Similarly, despite the coincidence of nonrelativistic energy levels, the calculated relativistic corrections of the order of (Zα)4 substantially differ from corrections in the absence of a magnetic field. A conclusion is made that, by analyzing the hydrogen emission spectrum and emission spectra at all, we can judge in principle about the presence or absence of superstrong magnetic fields in the vicinity of magnetars (neutron stars and probably brown dwarfs). Possible prospects of applying the proposed method for calculations of multielectron atoms are pointed out and the possibility of a more reliable determination of the presence of superstrong magnetic fields in magnetars by this method is considered.

  1. Measurement of spontaneous-emission enhancement near the one-dimensional photonic band edge of semiconductor heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tocci, Michael D.; Scalora, Michael; Bloemer, Mark J.; Dowling, Jonathan P.; Bowden, Charles M.

    1996-04-01

    We present results of an experimental investigation into alteration of the spontaneous emission spectrum of GaAs from within one-dimensional photonic band gap (PBG) structures. The PBG samples are multilayer AlAs/Al0.2Ga0.8As/GaAs p-i-n light-emitting diodes, with layers arranged as a distributed Bragg reflector. The emission spectra normal to the layers are measured, and we use a simple method to model the power spectrum of spontaneous emission from within the structures. We find that the emitted power is enhanced by a factor of 3.5 at the frequencies near the photonic band edge.

  2. Single Cesium Lead Halide Perovskite Nanocrystals at Low Temperature: Fast Single-Photon Emission, Reduced Blinking, and Exciton Fine Structure

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Metal-halide semiconductors with perovskite crystal structure are attractive due to their facile solution processability, and have recently been harnessed very successfully for high-efficiency photovoltaics and bright light sources. Here, we show that at low temperature single colloidal cesium lead halide (CsPbX3, where X = Cl/Br) nanocrystals exhibit stable, narrow-band emission with suppressed blinking and small spectral diffusion. Photon antibunching demonstrates unambiguously nonclassical single-photon emission with radiative decay on the order of 250 ps, representing a significant acceleration compared to other common quantum emitters. High-resolution spectroscopy provides insight into the complex nature of the emission process such as the fine structure and charged exciton dynamics. PMID:26771336

  3. Spontaneous emission intensity and anisotropy of quantum dot films in proximity to nanoscale photonic-plasmonic templates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Indukuri, Chaitanya; Basu, J. K.

    2016-07-01

    We discuss results on spontaneous emission intensity and lifetime anisotropy of cadmium selenide quantum dot monolayer films placed in close proximity to a porous block copolymer based photonic-plasmonic two dimensional array. The porous block copolymer cylinders can be filled with metal nanoparticles and the concentration of these nanoparticles is varied to control both the photoluminescence intensity and lifetime of a layer of quantum dots placed above the template. Significant emission enhancement is achieved even for the quantum dot layer whose core lies about 1 nm above the template surface. Interestingly, polarised decay lifetime analysis indicates considerable emission anisotropy, as well for these quantum dots. Our results thus demonstrates how such hybrid optical materials can be created with controlled optical properties and suggests extension of this method to other novel two dimensional materials in combination with the photonic-plasmonic template.

  4. Microscopic imaging of glyceraldehyde-induced tissue glycation with intrinsic second harmonic generation and two-photon fluorescence contrasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Yu Jer; Granelli, Joseph; Tirumalasetty, Manasa; Lyubovitsky, Julia

    2013-02-01

    The bioinspired approaches to tissue strengthening and preservation rely on non-toxic cross-linking agents one of which is glyceraldehyde. In this study we used multiphoton microscopy that employs second harmonic generation (SHG) contrast to evaluate collagen microstructures and two-photon fluorescence (TPF) contrast to monitor progression of cross-linking upon treatment of tissues with glyceraldehyde. We examined collagen hydrogels assembled at 37 °C and 27 °C, bovine scleral and corneal tissues, skin as well as rat tail tendons. The results show a different effect of glyceraldehyde on collagen microstructures within the above tissues. This effect depends on the original microstructural assembly of collagen within a specific tissue. Our data suggests that epidermis (in skin and cornea) will protect collagen from cross-linking with glyceraldehyde. The work highlights benefits of monitoring progression of collagen cross-linking and effects of cross-linking on fiber microstructures as imaged with SHG and TPF signals.

  5. Room Temperature Single-Photon Emission from Individual Perovskite Quantum Dots.

    PubMed

    Park, Young-Shin; Guo, Shaojun; Makarov, Nikolay S; Klimov, Victor I

    2015-10-27

    Lead-halide-based perovskites have been the subject of numerous recent studies largely motivated by their exceptional performance in solar cells. Electronic and optical properties of these materials have been commonly controlled by varying the composition (e.g., the halide component) and/or crystal structure. Use of nanostructured forms of perovskites can provide additional means for tailoring their functionalities via effects of quantum confinement and wave function engineering. Furthermore, it may enable applications that explicitly rely on the quantum nature of electronic excitations. Here, we demonstrate that CsPbX3 quantum dots (X = I, Br) can serve as room-temperature sources of quantum light, as indicated by strong photon antibunching detected in single-dot photoluminescence measurements. We explain this observation by the presence of fast nonradiative Auger recombination, which renders multiexciton states virtually nonemissive and limits the fraction of photon coincidence events to ∼6% on average. We analyze limitations of these quantum dots associated with irreversible photodegradation and fluctuations ("blinking") of the photoluminescence intensity. On the basis of emission intensity-lifetime correlations, we assign the "blinking" behavior to random charging/discharging of the quantum dot driven by photoassisted ionization. This study suggests that perovskite quantum dots hold significant promise for applications such as quantum emitters; however, to realize this goal, one must resolve the problems of photochemical stability and photocharging. These problems are largely similar to those of more traditional quantum dots and, hopefully, can be successfully resolved using advanced methodologies developed over the years in the field of colloidal nanostructures.

  6. Electrically driven single photon emission from a CdSe/ZnSSe single quantum dot at 200 K

    SciTech Connect

    Quitsch, Wolf; Kümmell, Tilmar; Bacher, Gerd; Gust, Arne; Kruse, Carsten; Hommel, Detlef

    2014-09-01

    High temperature operation of an electrically driven single photon emitter based on a single epitaxial quantum dot is reported. CdSe/ZnSSe/MgS quantum dots are embedded into a p-i-n diode architecture providing almost background free excitonic and biexcitonic electroluminescence from individual quantum dots through apertures in the top contacts. Clear antibunching with g{sup 2}(τ = 0) = 0.28 ± 0.20 can be tracked up to T = 200 K, representing the highest temperature for electrically triggered single photon emission from a single quantum dot device.

  7. Tuning Ag29 nanocluster light emission from red to blue with one and two-photon excitation.

    PubMed

    Russier-Antoine, Isabelle; Bertorelle, Franck; Hamouda, Ramzi; Rayane, Driss; Dugourd, Philippe; Sanader, Željka; Bonačić-Koutecký, Vlasta; Brevet, Pierre-François; Antoine, Rodolphe

    2016-02-07

    We demonstrate that the tuning of the light emission from red to blue in dihydrolipoic acid (DHLA) capped Ag29 nanoclusters can be trigged with one and two photon excitations. The cluster stoichiometry was determined with mass spectrometry and found to be Ag29(DHLA)12. In a detailed optical investigation, we show that these silver nanoclusters exhibit a strong red photoluminescence visible to the naked eye and characterized by a quantum yield of nearly ∼2% upon one-photon excitation. In the nonlinear optical (NLO) study of the properties of the clusters, the two-photon excited fluorescence spectra were recorded and their first hyperpolarizability obtained. The two-photon absorption cross-section at ∼800 nm for Ag29(DHLA)12 is higher than 10(4) GM and the hyperpolarizability is 106 × 10(-30) esu at the same excitation wavelength. The two-photon excited fluorescence spectrum appears strongly blue-shifted as compared to the one-photon excited spectrum, displaying a broad band between 400 and 700 nm. The density functional theory (DFT) provides insight into the structural and electronic properties of Ag29(DHLA)12 as well as into interplay between metallic subunit or core and ligands which is responsible for unique optical properties.

  8. Linoleic Acid-Induced Ultra-Weak Photon Emission from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii as a Tool for Monitoring of Lipid Peroxidation in the Cell Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Ankush; Pospíšil, Pavel

    2011-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species formed as a response to various abiotic and biotic stresses cause an oxidative damage of cellular component such are lipids, proteins and nucleic acids. Lipid peroxidation is considered as one of the major processes responsible for the oxidative damage of the polyunsaturated fatty acid in the cell membranes. Various methods such as a loss of polyunsaturated fatty acids, amount of the primary and the secondary products are used to monitor the level of lipid peroxidation. To investigate the use of ultra-weak photon emission as a non-invasive tool for monitoring of lipid peroxidation, the involvement of lipid peroxidation in ultra-weak photon emission was studied in the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Lipid peroxidation initiated by addition of exogenous linoleic acid to the cells was monitored by ultra-weak photon emission measured with the employment of highly sensitive charged couple device camera and photomultiplier tube. It was found that the addition of linoleic acid to the cells significantly increased the ultra-weak photon emission that correlates with the accumulation of lipid peroxidation product as measured using thiobarbituric acid assay. Scavenging of hydroxyl radical by mannitol, inhibition of intrinsic lipoxygenase by catechol and removal of molecular oxygen considerably suppressed ultra-weak photon emission measured after the addition of linoleic acid. The photon emission dominated at the red region of the spectrum with emission maximum at 680 nm. These observations reveal that the oxidation of linoleic acid by hydroxyl radical and intrinsic lipoxygenase results in the ultra-weak photon emission. Electronically excited species such as excited triplet carbonyls are the likely candidates for the primary excited species formed during the lipid peroxidation, whereas chlorophylls are the final emitters of photons. We propose here that the ultra-weak photon emission can be used as a non-invasive tool for the

  9. Endocrine radionuclide scintigraphy with fusion single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Ka-Kit; Gandhi, Arpit; Viglianti, Benjamin L; Fig, Lorraine M; Rubello, Domenico; Gross, Milton D

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To review the benefits of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/computed tomography (CT) hybrid imaging for diagnosis of various endocrine disorders. METHODS: We performed MEDLINE and PubMed searches using the terms: “SPECT/CT”; “functional anatomic mapping”; “transmission emission tomography”; “parathyroid adenoma”; “thyroid cancer”; “neuroendocrine tumor”; “adrenal”; “pheochromocytoma”; “paraganglioma”; in order to identify relevant articles published in English during the years 2003 to 2015. Reference lists from the articles were reviewed to identify additional pertinent articles. Retrieved manuscripts (case reports, reviews, meta-analyses and abstracts) concerning the application of SPECT/CT to endocrine imaging were analyzed to provide a descriptive synthesis of the utility of this technology. RESULTS: The emergence of hybrid SPECT/CT camera technology now allows simultaneous acquisition of combined multi-modality imaging, with seamless fusion of three-dimensional volume datasets. The usefulness of combining functional information to depict the bio-distribution of radiotracers that map cellular processes of the endocrine system and tumors of endocrine origin, with anatomy derived from CT, has improved the diagnostic capability of scintigraphy for a range of disorders of endocrine gland function. The literature describes benefits of SPECT/CT for 99mTc-sestamibi parathyroid scintigraphy and 99mTc-pertechnetate thyroid scintigraphy, 123I- or 131I-radioiodine for staging of differentiated thyroid carcinoma, 111In- and 99mTc- labeled somatostatin receptor analogues for detection of neuroendocrine tumors, 131I-norcholesterol (NP-59) scans for assessment of adrenal cortical hyperfunction, and 123I- or 131I-metaiodobenzylguanidine imaging for evaluation of pheochromocytoma and paraganglioma. CONCLUSION: SPECT/CT exploits the synergism between the functional information from radiopharmaceutical imaging and anatomy

  10. Single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography in brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Schillaci, Orazio; Filippi, Luca; Manni, Carlo; Santoni, Riccardo

    2007-01-01

    Anatomic imaging procedures (computed tomography [CT] and magnetic resonance imaging [MRI]) have become essential tools for brain tumor assessment. Functional images (positron emission tomography [PET] and single-photon emission computed tomography [SPECT]) can provide additional information useful during the diagnostic workup to determine the degree of malignancy and as a substitute or guide for biopsy. After surgery and/or radiotherapy, nuclear medicine examinations are essential to assess persistence of tumor, to differentiate recurrence from radiation necrosis and gliosis, and to monitor the disease. The combination of functional images with anatomic ones is of the utmost importance for a full evaluation of these patients, which can be obtained by means of imaging fusion. Despite the fast-growing diffusion of PET, in most cases of brain tumors, SPECT studies are adequate and provide results that parallel those obtained with PET. The main limitation of SPECT imaging with brain tumor-seeking radiopharmaceuticals is the lack of precise anatomic details; this drawback is overcome by the fusion with morphological studies that provide an anatomic map to scintigraphic data. In the past, software-based fusion of independently performed SPECT and CT or MRI demonstrated usefulness for brain tumor assessment, but this process is often time consuming and not practical for everyday nuclear medicine studies. The recent development of dual-modality integrated imaging systems, which allow the acquisition of SPECT and CT images in the same scanning session, and their co-registration by means of the hardware, has facilitated this process. In SPECT studies of brain tumors with various radiopharmaceuticals, fused images are helpful in providing the precise localization of neoplastic lesions, and in excluding the disease in sites of physiologic tracer uptake. This information is useful for optimizing diagnosis, therapy monitoring, and radiotherapy treatment planning, with a

  11. Low-noise cold-field emission current obtained between two opposed carbon cone nanotips during in situ transmission electron microscope biasing

    SciTech Connect

    Knoop, L. de; Gatel, C.; Houdellier, F.; Monthioux, M.; Masseboeuf, A.; Snoeck, E.; Hÿtch, M. J.

    2015-06-29

    A dedicated transmission electron microscope sample holder has been used to study in situ the cold-field emission process of carbon cone nanotips (CCnTs). We show that when using a CCnT instead of a Au plate-anode, the standard deviation of the emission current noise can be decreased from the 10 nA range to the 1 nA range under vacuum conditions of 10{sup −5 }Pa. This shows the strong influence of the anode on the cold-field emission current noise.

  12. Strong enhancement of spontaneous emission in amorphous-silicon-nitride photonic crystal based coupled-microcavity structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayindir, M.; Tanriseven, S.; Aydinli, A.; Ozbay, E.

    We investigated photoluminescence (PL) from one-dimensional photonic band gap structures. The photonic crystals, a Fabry-Perot (FP) resonator and a coupled-microcavity (CMC) structure, were fabricated by using alternating hydrogenated amorphous-silicon-nitride and hydrogenated amorphous-silicon-oxide layers. It was observed that these structures strongly modify the PL spectra from optically active amorphous-silicon-nitride thin films. Narrow-band and wide-band PL spectra were achieved in the FP microcavity and the CMC structure, respectively. The angle dependence of PL peak of the FP resonator was also investigated. We also observed that the spontaneous emission increased drastically at the coupled-cavity band edge of the CMC structure due to extremely low group velocity and long photon lifetime. The measurements agree well with the transfer-matrix method results and the prediction of the tight-binding approximation.

  13. Spontaneous emission from a two-level atom in anisotropic one-band photonic crystals: A fractional calculus approach

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, J.-N.; Huang, C.-H.; Cheng, S.-C.; Hsieh, W.-F.

    2010-02-15

    Spontaneous emission (SE) from a two-level atom in an anisotropic photonic crystal (PC) is investigated by the fractional calculus. Physical phenomena of the SE are studied analytically by solving the fractional kinetic equations of the SE. There is a dynamical discrepancy between the SE of anisotropic and isotropic PCs. We find that, contrary to the SE phenomenon of the isotropic PC, the SE near the band edge of an anisotropic PC shows no photon-atom bound state. It is consistent with the experimental results of Barth, Schuster, Gruber, and Cichos [Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 243902 (2006)] that the anisotropic property of the system enhances the SE. We also study effects of dispersion curvatures on the changes of the photonic density of states and the appearance of the diffusion fields in the SE.

  14. Multicenter evaluation of single-photon emission computed tomography quantification with third-party reconstruction software.

    PubMed

    Kangasmaa, Tuija S; Constable, Chris; Hippeläinen, Eero; Sohlberg, Antti O

    2016-09-01

    Reliable and reproducible quantification is essential in many clinical situations. Previously, single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) has not been considered a quantitative imaging modality, but recent advances in reconstruction algorithm development have made SPECT quantitative. In this study, we investigate the reproducibility of SPECT quantification with phantoms in a multicenter setting using novel third-party reconstruction software. A total of five hospitals and eight scanners (three GE scanners and five Siemens scanners) participated in the study. A Jaszczak phantom without inserts was used to calculate counts to activity concentration conversion factors. The quantitative accuracy was tested using the NEMA-IEC phantom with six spherical inserts (diameters from 10 to 37 mm) filled to an 8 : 1 insert-background concentration ratio. Phantom studies were reconstructed at one central location using HERMES HybridRecon applying corrections for attenuation, collimator-detector response, and scatter. Spherical volumes of interest with the same diameter as the inserts were drawn on the images and recovery coefficients for the spheres were calculated. The coefficient of variation (CoV) of the NEMA-IEC phantom recovery coefficients ranged from ∼19 to 5% depending on the insert diameter so that the lowest CoV was obtained with the largest spheres. The intersite CoV was almost equal to intrasite CoV. In conclusion, quantitative SPECT is reproducible in a multicenter setting with third-party reconstruction software.

  15. Photocount statistics of ultra-weak photon emission from germinating mung bean.

    PubMed

    Rafieiolhosseini, Neda; Poplová, Michaela; Sasanpour, Pezhman; Rafii-Tabar, Hashem; Alhossaini, Mahsa Rafiee; Cifra, Michal

    2016-09-01

    Ultra-weak photon emission (UPE) is an endogenous bioluminescence phenomenon present in all biological samples with an active oxidative metabolism, even without an external pre-illumination. To verify the potential of UPE for non-invasive monitoring of metabolism and growth in germinating plants, the aim of this study was to investigate the UPE from a model system - germinating mung bean seedlings (Vigna radiata) - and analyze the statistical properties of UPE during the growth in two different conditions of imbibition (pure water and 1% sucrose). We found that in all days and in both conditions, photocount distributions of UPE time series follow the negative binomial distribution whose parameters changed during the growth due to the increasing ratio of signal-to-detector dark count. Correspondingly for both groups, the mean values of UPE increased during the seedlings growth, while the values of Fano factor show a decreasing trend towards 1 during the 6day period. While our results do not show any significant difference in hypocotyl length and weight gain between the two groups of mung seedlings, there is an indication of a tiny suppressing effect of sucrose on UPE intensity. We believe that UPE can be exploited for a sensitive non-invasive analysis of oxidative metabolism during the plant development and growth with potential applications in agricultural research. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Note: Spectrometer with multichannel photon-counting detector for beam emission spectroscopy in magnetic fusion devices

    SciTech Connect

    Lizunov, A.; Khilchenko, A.; Khilchenko, V.; Kvashnin, A.; Zubarev, P.

    2015-12-15

    A spectrometer based on a linear array photomultiplier tube (PMT) has been developed and calibrated. A 0.635 m focal length Czerny-Turner monochromator combined with a coupling optics provides an image of a narrow 0.5 nm spectral range with a resolution of 0.015 nm/channel on a 32-anode PMT. The system aims at spectroscopy of D{sub α} or H{sub α} lines emitted by a diagnostic atomic beam in a plasma (primarily a motional Stark effect diagnostics). To record a low photon flux of ∼10{sup 6} s{sup −1} per channel with the time resolution of 100 μs, a pulse counting approach has been used. Wideband amplifiers scale single-electron pulses and transmit them to a digital data processing core hardwired in a programmable logic matrix. Calibrations have shown that the aberration-limited instrument function fits to a single detector channel of 1 mm width. Pilot results of passive measurements of D{sub α} light emission from the plasma confined in a magnetic trap are presented.

  17. Image-Guided Drug Delivery with Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography: A Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Chakravarty, Rubel; Hong, Hao; Cai, Weibo

    2014-01-01

    Tremendous resources are being invested all over the world for prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of various types of cancer. Successful cancer management depends on accurate diagnosis of the disease along with precise therapeutic protocol. The conventional systemic drug delivery approaches generally cannot completely remove the competent cancer cells without surpassing the toxicity limits to normal tissues. Therefore, development of efficient drug delivery systems holds prime importance in medicine and healthcare. Also, molecular imaging can play an increasingly important and revolutionizing role in disease management. Synergistic use of molecular imaging and targeted drug delivery approaches provides unique opportunities in a relatively new area called `image-guided drug delivery' (IGDD). Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is the most widely used nuclear imaging modality in clinical context and is increasingly being used to guide targeted therapeutics. The innovations in material science have fueled the development of efficient drug carriers based on, polymers, liposomes, micelles, dendrimers, microparticles, nanoparticles, etc. Efficient utilization of these drug carriers along with SPECT imaging technology have the potential to transform patient care by personalizing therapy to the individual patient, lessening the invasiveness of conventional treatment procedures and rapidly monitoring the therapeutic efficacy. SPECT-IGDD is not only effective for treatment of cancer but might also find utility in management of several other diseases. Herein, we provide a concise overview of the latest advances in SPECT-IGDD procedures and discuss the challenges and opportunities for advancement of the field. PMID:25182469

  18. Comparison of Ga-67 planar imaging and single photon emission computed tomography in malignant chest disease

    SciTech Connect

    Tumeh, S.S.; Rosenthal, D.; Kaplan, W.D.; English, R.E.; Holman, B.L.

    1985-05-01

    To determine the value of Ga-67 single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in patients (pts) with malignant chest disease, the authors compared Ga-67 planar scans (ps) and SPECT with the medical records in twenty-five consecutive patients. Twenty-three examinations were performed on 17 pts with Hodgkin's disease (HD) and three pts with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Five examinations were performed on 5 pts with bronchogenic carcinoma (BC). The two modalities were evaluated for (1) presence or absence of disease, (2) number of foci of abnormal uptake and (3) extent of disease. In pts with lymphoma, SPECT defined the extent of disease better than planar imaging in eight examinations; it demonstrated para-cardial involvement in one pt, separated hilar from mediastinal disease in 4, and demonstrated posterior mediastinal disease in 3. SPECT clarified suspicious foci on planar images in seven examinations, correctly ruled out disease in two pts with equivocal planar images and did not exchange planar image findings in six examinations. In pts with bronchogenic carcinoma, both medalities correctly ruled out mediastinal involvement in three pts. SPECT detected mediastinal lymph node involvement in one pt with equivocal planar images. Both SPECT and planar imaging missed direct tumor extension to the mediastinum in one pt. They conclude that Ga-67 with SPECT is better than planar images for staging of chest lymphoma and BC. Since it defines different lymph node groups it carries a good potential for staging as well as follow up of those pts.

  19. Single photon emission computed tomography: An alternative imaging modality in left ventricular evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Yalçin, Hulya; Maza, Sofiane; Yalçin, Fatih

    2008-01-01

    Various diagnostic imaging modalities have been used for quantitative left ventricular (LV) parameters. Because of the suboptimal value of the most widely used technology, two-dimensional (2D) echocardiography, 3D ultrasonographic imaging has improved accuracy for LV volume and function. Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is another diagnostic method where LV volumetric and functional parameters can be accurately provided by gated myocardial perfusion tomographic slices. First pass radionuclide venticulography is another imaging modality which has some practical limitations. Despite lower ejection fraction (EF) values compared with invasive approach, noninvasive techniques are accurate in determination of normal and depressed EF. Noninvasive techniques with 3D approach including gated SPECT are beneficial for not only global but also regional LV evaluation. It has been mentioned that the slight difference between echocardiography and SPECT could be caused by the diverse population studied. The results of diagnostic stress tests support that SPECT is feasible to use in evaluation of LV volume and functional analysis. Magnetic resonance imaging is an expensive modality to use routinely, but it preserves its importance in selected patients for providing precise LV geometric data. PMID:19183754

  20. Rapid calculation of detectability in Bayesian single photon emission computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Yuxiang; Hsiao, Ing-Tsung; Gindi, Gene

    2003-11-01

    We consider the calculation of lesion detectability using a mathematical model observer, the channelized Hotelling observer (CHO), in a signal-known-exactly/background-known-exactly detection task for single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). We focus on SPECT images reconstructed with Bayesian maximum a posteriori methods. While model observers are designed to replace time-consuming studies using human observers, the calculation of CHO detectability is usually accomplished using a large number of sample images, which is still time consuming. We develop theoretical expressions for a measure of detectability, the signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) of a CHO observer, that can be very rapidly evaluated. Key to our expressions are approximations to the reconstructed image covariance. In these approximations, we use methods developed in the PET literature, but modify them to reflect the different nature of attenuation and distance-dependent blur in SPECT. We validate our expressions with Monte Carlo methods. We show that reasonably accurate estimates of the SNR can be obtained at a computational expense equivalent to approximately two projection operations, and that evaluating SNR for subsequent lesion locations requires negligible additional computation.

  1. Advances in Pinhole and Multi-Pinhole Collimators for Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Islamian, Jalil Pirayesh; Azazrm, AhmadReza; Mahmoudian, Babak; Gharapapagh, Esmail

    2015-01-01

    The collimator in single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), is an important part of the imaging chain. One of the most important collimators that used in research, preclinical study, small animal, and organ imaging is the pinhole collimator. Pinhole collimator can improve the tradeoff between sensitivity and resolution in comparison with conventional parallel-hole collimator and facilities diagnosis. However, a major problem with pinhole collimator is a small field of view (FOV). Multi-pinhole collimator has been investigated in order to increase the sensitivity and FOV with a preserved spatial resolution. The geometry of pinhole and multi-pinhole collimators is a critical factor in the image quality and plays a key role in SPECT imaging. The issue of the material and geometry for pinhole and multi-pinhole collimators have been a controversial and much disputed subject within the field of SPECT imaging. On the other hand, recent developments in collimator optimization have heightened the need for appropriate reconstruction algorithms for pinhole SPECT imaging. Therefore, iterative reconstruction algorithms were introduced to minimize the undesirable effect on image quality. Current researches have focused on geometry and configuration of pinhole and multi-pinhole collimation rather than reconstruction algorithm. The lofthole and multi-lofthole collimator are samples of novel designs. The purpose of this paper is to provide a review on recent researches in the pinhole and multi-pinhole collimators for SPECT imaging. PMID:25709537

  2. Advances in pinhole and multi-pinhole collimators for single photon emission computed tomography imaging.

    PubMed

    Islamian, Jalil Pirayesh; Azazrm, AhmadReza; Mahmoudian, Babak; Gharapapagh, Esmail

    2015-01-01

    The collimator in single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), is an important part of the imaging chain. One of the most important collimators that used in research, preclinical study, small animal, and organ imaging is the pinhole collimator. Pinhole collimator can improve the tradeoff between sensitivity and resolution in comparison with conventional parallel-hole collimator and facilities diagnosis. However, a major problem with pinhole collimator is a small field of view (FOV). Multi-pinhole collimator has been investigated in order to increase the sensitivity and FOV with a preserved spatial resolution. The geometry of pinhole and multi-pinhole collimators is a critical factor in the image quality and plays a key role in SPECT imaging. The issue of the material and geometry for pinhole and multi-pinhole collimators have been a controversial and much disputed subject within the field of SPECT imaging. On the other hand, recent developments in collimator optimization have heightened the need for appropriate reconstruction algorithms for pinhole SPECT imaging. Therefore, iterative reconstruction algorithms were introduced to minimize the undesirable effect on image quality. Current researches have focused on geometry and configuration of pinhole and multi-pinhole collimation rather than reconstruction algorithm. The lofthole and multi-lofthole collimator are samples of novel designs. The purpose of this paper is to provide a review on recent researches in the pinhole and multi-pinhole collimators for SPECT imaging.

  3. Scintigraphic appearance of focal fatty infiltration of the liver using single-photon emission computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Kudo, M.; Hirasa, M.; Ibuki, Y.; Takakuwa, H.; Fujimi, K.; Veda, S.; Tomita, S.; Komori, H.; Todo, A.; Kitaura, Y.

    1984-01-01

    Fatty infiltration of the liver had been considered to assume a uniform distribution until quite recently. However, the development of X-ray computed tomography (XCT) and the ultrasound (US) has proven that fatty infiltration of the liver may sometimes assume a nonuniform distribution (focal fatty infiltration (FFI)). This investigation was undertaken to evaluate the scintigraphic appearance of FFI using single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with a GE Maxicamera 400T. Radionuclide images including SPECT were evaluated in 12 cases with FFI which were diagnosed by XCT and US. Most of them were histrogically confirmed to be positive fatty infiltration in the liver. The results were as follows. The fatty infiltrated area was visualized as a hot spot in one case, a defect in 2 cases, a low uptake in one case and a normal uptake in 8 cases. Radionuclide imaging of FFI shows a large variety of findings and it suggests that Kupffer cell function varies with the causes or stage of fatty infiltration. And one can understand the pathological state of FFI from a viewpoint of Kupffer cell function only by radionuclide imaging including SPECT, which is very useful to compare the images with XCT images.

  4. Single photon emission computed tomograms of the liver: normal vascular intrahepatic structures.

    PubMed

    Pettigrew, R I; Witztum, K F; Perkins, G C; Johnson, M L; Burks, R N; Verba, J W; Halpern, S E

    1984-01-01

    Because of the high target-to-background contrast obtained with single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), normal intrahepatic vessels approximately 2 cm in diameter may appear as distinct focal defects in tomographic sections throughout the liver even though normal vessels rarely cause such defects on planar images. To assess this problem, five subjects without evidence of liver disease underwent tomography of the liver with Tc-99m sulfur colloid (TSC) and on a separate occasion tomography of the intrahepatic blood pool with Tc-99m autologous red blood cells (RBC). In each case, well demarcated defects were obvious in contiguous TSC liver tomograms in various planes. Direct comparison with RBC tomograms showed that all of these defects corresponded to intrahepatic veins, typically the right portal vein, its posterior branch, and the left portal vein. Knowledge of the intrahepatic vascular anatomy in a variety of tomographic planes, with examination of each defect in multiple orthogonal planes is necessary to avoid false positive interpretations. In some instances a study with RBC may also be required for more conclusive evaluation of defects seen on TSC liver tomograms.

  5. Design of a serotonin 4 receptor radiotracer with decreased lipophilicity for single photon emission computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Fresneau, Nathalie; Dumas, Noé; Tournier, Benjamin B; Fossey, Christine; Ballandonne, Céline; Lesnard, Aurélien; Millet, Philippe; Charnay, Yves; Cailly, Thomas; Bouillon, Jean-Philippe; Fabis, Frédéric

    2015-04-13

    With the aim to develop a suitable radiotracer for the brain imaging of the serotonin 4 receptor subtype (5-HT4R) using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), we synthesized and evaluated a library of di- and triazaphenanthridines with lipophilicity values which were in the range expected to favour brain penetration, and which demonstrated specific binding to the target of interest. Adding additional nitrogen atoms to previously described phenanthridine ligands exhibiting a high unspecific binding, we were able to design a radioiodinated compound [(125)I]14. This compound exhibited a binding affinity value of 0.094 nM toward human 5-HT4R and a high selectivity over other serotonin receptor subtypes (5-HTR). In vivo SPECT imaging studies and competition experiments demonstrated that the decreased lipophilicity (in comparison with our previously reported compounds 4 and 5) allowed a more specific labelling of the 5-HT4R brain-containing regions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Periprosthetic bone turnover after primary total hip arthroplasty measured by single-photon emission computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Venesmaa, P; Vanninen, E; Miettinen, H; Kröger, H

    2012-01-01

    Alterations in periprosthetic bone are common sequlae of prosthetic implants.This prospective 3-year study was performed to follow regional periprosthetic bone turnover after uncomplicated total hip arthroplasty (THA) using single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Eighteen patients (nine men, nine women: mean age 61 years, range from 50 to 73 years) with primary hip osteoarthritis underwent either uncemented or cemented THA. The SPECT measurements were taken 6, 12, and 36 months after THA. Bone mineral density (BMD) measurements were performed on the patients during follow-up. The mean SPECT uptake ratios decreased significantly in the regions of interest (ROIs) during follow-up compared to baseline value, in the trochanter major (p = 0.006), the trochanter minor (p = 0.009) and the total area (p = 0.018). Despite these decreases the uptake ratios in the medial cortex (p = 0.014), tip (p = 0.002) and total area (p = 0.016) remained significantly higher in the operated side than in the contralateral side (non-operated) 3 years after THA. Changes in bone turnover in the vicinity of the implant did not correlate with changes in periprosthetic BMD. Local periprosthetic bone turnover decreased slowly after THA and did not recover to the level typical of non-operated hips. This led us to suggest that bone turnover around the femoral implants remains increased more than 3 years after THA even if there are no signs of failure of the prosthesis.

  7. Cardiac single-photon emission-computed tomography using combinedcone-beam/fan-beam collimation

    SciTech Connect

    Gullberg, Grant T.; Zeng, Gengsheng L.

    2004-12-03

    The objective of this work is to increase system sensitivity in cardiac single-photon emission-computed tomography (SPECT) studies without increasing patient imaging time. For imaging the heart, convergent collimation offers the potential of increased sensitivity over that of parallel-hole collimation. However, if a cone-beam collimated gamma camera is rotated in a planar orbit, the projection data obtained are not complete. Two cone-beam collimators and one fan-beam collimator are used with a three-detector SPECT system. The combined cone-beam/fan-beam collimation provides a complete set of data for image reconstruction. The imaging geometry is evaluated using data acquired from phantom and patient studies. For the Jaszazck cardiac torso phantom experiment, the combined cone-beam/fan-beam collimation provided 1.7 times greater sensitivity than standard parallel-hole collimation (low-energy high-resolution collimators). Also, phantom and patient comparison studies showed improved image quality. The combined cone-beam/fan-beam imaging geometry with appropriate weighting of the two data sets provides improved system sensitivity while measuring sufficient data for artifact free cardiac images.

  8. Quantitation of postexercise lung thallium-201 uptake during single photon emission computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Kahn, J.K.; Carry, M.M.; McGhie, I.; Pippin, J.J.; Akers, M.S.; Corbett, J.R.

    1989-03-01

    To test the hypothesis that analysis of lung thallium uptake measured during single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) yields supplementary clinical information as reported for planar imaging, quantitative analysis of lung thallium uptake following maximal exercise was performed in 40 clinically normal subjects (Group 1) and 15 angiographically normal subjects (Group 2). Lung thallium uptake was measured from anterior projection images using a ratio of heart-to-lung activities. Seventy subjects with coronary artery disease (CAD) (Group 3) determined by angiography (greater than or equal to 70% luminal stenosis) underwent thallium perfusion SPECT. Thirty-nine percent of these subjects had multivessel and 61% had single vessel CAD. Lung thallium uptake was elevated in 47 of 70 (67%) Group 3 subjects. Group 3 subjects with elevated lung thallium uptake did not differ from Group 3 subjects with normal lung thallium uptake with respect to extent or distribution of coronary artery disease, left ventricular function, or severity of myocardial ischemia as determined by exercise and redistribution thallium SPECT. Thus, the measurement of thallium lung uptake from anterior projection images obtained during SPECT frequently identifies patients with CAD, but it may not provide supplementary information regarding the extent of myocardial ischemia or ventricular dysfunction.

  9. Photon-enhanced thermionic emission from p-GaAs with nonequilibrium Cs overlayers

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuravlev, A. G.; Romanov, A. S.; Alperovich, V. L.

    2014-12-22

    Photon-enhanced thermionic emission (PETE), which is promising for increasing the efficiency of solar energy conversion, is studied during cesium deposition on the As- and Ga-rich p-GaAs(001) surfaces and subsequent relaxation in the nonequilibrium Cs overlayer by means of photoemission quantum yield spectroscopy adapted for systems with time-variable parameters. Along with direct photoemission of “hot” electrons excited by light above the vacuum level, the spectra contain PETE contribution of “thermalized” electrons, which are excited below the vacuum level and emit in vacuum due to thermalization up in energy by phonon absorption. Comparing the measured and calculated spectra, the effective electron affinity and escape probabilities of hot and thermalized electrons are obtained as functions of submonolayer Cs coverage. The minima in the affinity and pronounced peaks in the escape probabilities are observed for Cs deposition on both the As- and Ga-rich surfaces. Possible reasons for the low mean values of the electron escape probabilities and for the observed enhancement of the probabilities at certain Cs coverages are discussed, along with the implications for the PETE device realization.

  10. Imaging-guided two-photon excitation-emission-matrix measurements of human skin tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yingqiu; Lee, Anthony M. D.; Wang, Hequn; Tang, Shuo; Zhao, Jianhua; Lui, Harvey; Zeng, Haishan

    2012-07-01

    There are increased interests on using multiphoton imaging and spectroscopy for skin tissue characterization and diagnosis. However, most studies have been done with just a few excitation wavelengths. Our objective is to perform a systematic study of the two-photon fluorescence (TPF) properties of skin fluorophores, normal skin, and diseased skin tissues. A nonlinear excitation-emission-matrix (EEM) spectroscopy system with multiphoton imaging guidance was constructed. A tunable femtosecond laser was used to vary excitation wavelengths from 730 to 920 nm for EEM data acquisition. EEM measurements were performed on excised fresh normal skin tissues, seborrheic keratosis tissue samples, and skin fluorophores including: NADH, FAD, keratin, melanin, collagen, and elastin. We found that in the stratum corneum and upper epidermis of normal skin, the cells have large sizes and the TPF originates from keratin. In the lower epidermis, cells are smaller and TPF is dominated by NADH contributions. In the dermis, TPF is dominated by elastin components. The depth resolved EEM measurements also demonstrated that keratin structure has intruded into the middle sublayers of the epidermal part of the seborrheic keratosis lesion. These results suggest that the imaging guided TPF EEM spectroscopy provides useful information for the development of multiphoton clinical devices for skin disease diagnosis.

  11. An audit of manufacturers' implementation of reconstruction filters in single-photon emission computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Richard S; White, Duncan; Cade, Sarah C; Hall, David O; Kenny, Bob; Knight, Andy; Livieratos, Lefteris; Nijran, Kuldip

    2013-08-01

    The Nuclear Medicine Software Quality Group of the Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine has conducted an audit to compare the ways in which different manufacturers implement the filters used in single-photon emission computed tomography. The aim of the audit was to identify differences between manufacturers' implementations of the same filter and to find means for converting parameters between systems. Computer-generated data representing projection images of an ideal test object were processed using seven different commercial nuclear medicine systems. Images were reconstructed using filtered back projection and a Butter worth filter with three different cutoff frequencies and three different orders. The audit found large variations between the frequency-response curves of what were ostensibly the same filters on different systems. The differences were greater than could be explained simply by different Butter worth formulae. Measured cutoff frequencies varied between 40 and 180% of that expected. There was also occasional confusion with respect to frequency units. The audit concluded that the practical implementation of filtering, such as the size of the kernel, has a profound effect on the results, producing large differences between systems. Nevertheless, this work shows how users can quantify the frequency response of their own systems so that it will be possible to compare two systems in order to find filter parameters on each that produce equivalent results. These findings will also make it easier for users to replicate filters similar to other published results, even if they are using a different computer system.

  12. Brain uptake of iomazenil in cirrhotic patients: a single photon emission tomography study.

    PubMed

    Kapczinski, F; Quevedo, J; Curran, H V; Fleminger, S; Toone, B; Cluckie, A; Lader, M

    1999-01-01

    Brain uptake of 123I-iomazenil was studied in seven cirrhotic patients and eight normal controls using single photon emission computerized tomography. The highest concentration of the ligand was found in the occipital cortex, which corresponds to the brain region with the highest concentration of benzodiazepine receptors. The peak uptake was delayed in patients across all brain regions. The uptake in occipital cortex was higher in low albumin cirrhotics. Patients with low albumin also presented a more delayed peak uptake in occipital cortex and a higher volume of distribution of iomazenil in plasma, compared to patients with normal albumin levels and controls. The changes in brain uptake (delayed peak uptake and increased maximal uptake in occipital cortex) appears to reflect changes in the pharmacokinetics of the ligand, particularly in cirrhotics with low levels of plasma albumin. The curve of brain uptake of the tracer was modelled into a two compartments equation, which seems to provide a practical and reliable method to calculate the slopes of acquisition and decay, time to peak and maximal acquisition.

  13. Note: Spectrometer with multichannel photon-counting detector for beam emission spectroscopy in magnetic fusion devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lizunov, A.; Khilchenko, A.; Khilchenko, V.; Kvashnin, A.; Zubarev, P.

    2015-12-01

    A spectrometer based on a linear array photomultiplier tube (PMT) has been developed and calibrated. A 0.635 m focal length Czerny-Turner monochromator combined with a coupling optics provides an image of a narrow 0.5 nm spectral range with a resolution of 0.015 nm/channel on a 32-anode PMT. The system aims at spectroscopy of Dα or Hα lines emitted by a diagnostic atomic beam in a plasma (primarily a motional Stark effect diagnostics). To record a low photon flux of ˜106 s-1 per channel with the time resolution of 100 μs, a pulse counting approach has been used. Wideband amplifiers scale single-electron pulses and transmit them to a digital data processing core hardwired in a programmable logic matrix. Calibrations have shown that the aberration-limited instrument function fits to a single detector channel of 1 mm width. Pilot results of passive measurements of Dα light emission from the plasma confined in a magnetic trap are presented.

  14. Fragile X syndrome and cerebral perfusion abnormalities: single-photon emission computed tomographic study.

    PubMed

    Kabakus, Nimet; Aydin, Mustafa; Akin, Haluk; Balci, Tansel Ansal; Kurt, Abdullah; Kekilli, Ersoy

    2006-12-01

    Fragile X syndrome is an inherited disorder caused by a defective gene on the X chromosome. It is associated with developmental or behavioral symptoms and various degrees of mental retardation. Morphologic abnormalities and altered perfusion of various brain areas can underlie these functional disturbances. The aim of this study was to investigate the cerebral perfusion state in patients with fragile X syndrome using single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Structural and functional assessment was also performed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and electroencephalography (EEG). Eight boys with cytogenetically confirmed fragile X syndrome (mean age 8.8 +/- 4.4 years, range 5-18 years), were included. All patients had mental retardation, with a mean IQ of 58.9 +/- 8.8 (range 40-68), and additional neurobehavioral symptoms. SPECT revealed cerebral perfusion abnormalities in six patients (75%), most commonly in the frontoparietotemporal area and prominent in the right hemisphere. The SPECT and EEG findings were concordant: hypoperfused areas in SPECT corresponded to regions of persistent slow-wave paroxysms on EEG. On the other hand, cranial MRI was abnormal qualitatively only in two patients (25%) showing cerebellar and vermal hypoplasia and cerebral hemispheric asymmetry. Our results indicate that cerebral perfusion abnormalities, which are correlated with electrophysiologic findings but not necessarily with anatomic abnormalities, can underlie the pathogenesis of the clinical findings observed in fragile X syndrome.

  15. Regional brain hematocrit in stroke by single photon emission computed tomography imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Loutfi, I.; Frackowiak, R.S.; Myers, M.J.; Lavender, J.P.

    1987-01-01

    Nineteen studies on 18 subjects were performed by single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) of the head after the successive intravenous administration of a plasma label (/sup 99m/Tc-human serum albumin (HSA)) and /sup 99m/Tc-labeled autologous red blood cells (RBC). Two sets of cerebral tomographic sections were generated: for cerebral /sup 99m/Tc-HSA alone and for combined /sup 99m/Tc-HSA and /sup 99m/Tc-RBC. By relating counts in regions of interest from the cerebral tomograms to counts from blood samples obtained during each tomographic acquisition, regional cerebral haematocrit (Hct) was calculated by the application of a simple formula. Results show 1) lower cerebral Hct than venous Hct (ratio of HCT brain/Hct venous 0.65-0.90) in all subjects, and 2) comparison between right and left hemisphere Hct in 3/3 normal subjects, 6/6 patients with transient ischaemic attacks and 3/8 patients with stroke showed no significant difference. However, in 3/8 patients with stroke (most recent strokes) significant differences were found, the higher Hct value corresponding to the affected side.

  16. [Visualized study on acupuncture treatment of children autism using single photon emission computed tomography].

    PubMed

    Jia, Shao-Wei; Sun, Tao-Tao; Fan, Rong

    2008-10-01

    To provide the molecular iconographic evidence for acupuncture treatment of children autism (CA). Electric acupuncture (EA) was applied on acupoints of bilateral Hegu (LI4), Quchi (LI11), Zusanli (ST36) and Sanyinjiao (SP6) in 34 CA patients' with ABC scale > 57 scores. Using SIEMENS ECAM / ICON double head system, single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) brain perfusion imaging were performed before and during EA with 99mTc-ECD. Then SPECT images were analyzed visually and quantitatively. Visual analysis showed that 114 foci of low cerebral perfusion and function were found in 34 CA patients before EA, 28 cases (82.35%) of them with abnormalities in left (or both) front lobes, left Broca area and left Wernicke area. During EA, the affected areas improved to different extent. Quantitative analysis showed that significant difference existed between pre-EA focal Ff and mirror-side Ff, pre-EA Ff and mid-EA Fe, focal BFCR% and mirror-side BFCR % (all P < 0.01). The improving analysis of cerebral perfusion and function showed that the efficacy of EA was 78.95%. Acupuncture was proved preliminarily effective in treating children autism.

  17. Enhanced fluorescence emission using bound states in continuum in a photonic crystal membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, S.; Zito, G.; Managò, S.; Penzo, E.; Dhuey, S.; De Luca, A. C.; Cabrini, S.; Mocella, V.

    2017-05-01

    Metasurfaces are two-dimensional structures, arrays of scatterers with subwavelength separation or optically thin planar films, allowing light manipulation and enabling specific changes of optical properties, as for example beam-steering, anomalous refraction and optical-wavefront shaping. Due to the fabrication simplicity, the metasurfaces offer an alternative to 3-D metamaterials and providing a novel method for optical elements miniaturization. It has been demonstrated that a metasurface can support Bound States in Continuum (BIC), that are resonant states by zero width, due to the interaction between trapped electromagnetic. Experimentally, this involves very narrow coupled resonances, with a high Q-factor and an extremely large field intensity enhancement, up to 6 orders of magnitude larger than the intensity of the incident beam. Here, we demonstrate that the field enhancement in proximity of the surface can be applied to boost fluorescence emission of probe molecules dispersed on the surface of a photonic crystal membrane fabricated in silicon nitride. Our results provide new solutions for light manipulation at the nanoscale, especially for sensing and nonlinear optics applications.

  18. [Cost-effectiveness of stress-only myocardial perfusion single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging].

    PubMed

    Vallejo, Enrique; Acevedo, César; Varela, Samuel; Alburez, José Carlos; Bialostozky, David

    2012-01-01

    Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) myocardial perfusion imaging is widely used for diagnosing coronary artery disease (CAD). However, SPECT costs, imaging time, and radiation exposure, limit SPECT indications. Determine whether a stress-only SPECT imaging would be enough to obtain a diagnosis of CAD improving nuclear laboratory efficiency. 122 patients with unknown CAD were evaluated with stress-only SPECT imaging. In order to evaluate diagnostic accuracy and the prognostic value of the stress-only protocol, patients with abnormal SPECT underwent invasive angiography and patients with normal SPECT were followed-up during 3 years. Diagnosis time, SPECT cost, and radiopharmaceutical dosage were significantly lower as compared with the conventional SPECT imaging protocol (30, 40 and 55%, respectively). Diagnostic accuracy and cardiac prognosis information were comparable to those obtained with the conventional imaging protocol (positive predictive value for CAD of 85% and negative predictive value for cardiac events of 97%). In patients with intermediate risk for CAD, stress-only SPECT imaging will significantly improve nuclear laboratory efficiency, and with similar accuracy than that the one obtained with the conventional protocol.

  19. Microwave response and photon emission of a voltage baised Josephson junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jebari, Salha; Grimm, Alexander; Hazra, Dibyendu; Hofheinz, Max

    The readout of superconducting qubits requires amplifiers combining noise close to the quantum limit, high gain, large bandwidth, and sufficient dynamic range. Josephson parametric amplifiers using Josephson junctions in the 0-voltage state, driven by a large microwave signals, begin to perform sufficiently well in all 4 of these aspects to be of practical use, but remain difficult to optimize and use. Recent experiments with superconducting circuits consisting of a DC voltage-biased Josephson junction in series with a resonator, showed that a tunneling Cooper pair can emit one or several photons with a total energy of 2e times the applied voltage. We present microwave reflection measurements on this device indicating that amplification is possible with a simple DC voltage-biased Josephson junction. We compare these measurements with the noise power emitted by the junction and show that, for low Josephson energy, transmission and noise emission can be explained within the framework of P(E) theory of inelastic Cooper pair tunneling. Combined with a theoretical model, our results indicate that voltage-biased Josephson junctions might be useful for amplification near the quantum limit, offering simpler design and a different trade-off between gain, bandwidth and dynamic range.

  20. Design of a 300-kV gas environmental transmission electron microscope equipped with a cold field emission gun.

    PubMed

    Isakozawa, Shigeto; Nagaoki, Isao; Watabe, Akira; Nagakubo, Yasuhira; Saito, Nobuhiro; Matsumoto, Hiroaki; Zhang, Xiao Feng; Taniguchi, Yoshifumi; Baba, Norio

    2016-08-01

    A new in situ environmental transmission electron microscope (ETEM) was developed based on a 300 kV TEM with a cold field emission gun (CFEG). Particular caution was taken in the ETEM design to assure uncompromised imaging and analytical performance of the TEM. Because of the improved pumping system between the gun and column, the vacuum of CFEG was largely improved and the probe current was sufficiently stabilized to operate without tip flashing for 2-3 h or longer. A high brightness of 2.5 × 10(9) A/cm(2) sr was measured at 300 kV, verifying the high quality of the CFEG electron beam. A specially designed gas injection-heating holder was used in the in situ TEM study at elevated temperatures with or without gas around the TEM specimen. Using this holder in a 10 Pa gas atmosphere and specimen temperatures up to 1000°C, high-resolution ETEM performance and analysis were achieved.

  1. Application of Spontaneous Photon Emission in the Growth Ages and Varieties Screening of Fresh Chinese Herbal Medicines

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xiaolei; Fu, Jialei; Van Wijk, Eduard; Liu, Yanli; Fan, Hua; Zhang, Yufeng

    2017-01-01

    Ultraweak photon emission emitted by all living organisms has been confirmed to be a noninvasive indicator for their physiological and pathological characteristics. In this study, we investigated the characteristics of spontaneous photon emission (SPE) and the contents of specific active compounds of roots and flowers buds of several fresh Chinese herbal medicines (natural medicines) with different growth ages and varieties. The results revealed that the contents of specific active compounds from same species herbs with different growth ages and varieties were significantly different, and this difference could be reflected by their SPE. Because the contents of specific bioactive constituents in Chinese herbs are closely related to their quality and curative effect, the SPE measurement technique may contribute to the quality control of Chinese herbal medicine in the future. PMID:28250790

  2. Two-photon emission of an electron in the weak pulsed laser field for the resonant case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nedoreshta, V. N.; Voroshilo, A. I.; Roshchupkin, S. P.; Dubov, V. V.

    2017-02-01

    Resonant two-photon emission of an electron in the weak field of a pulsed laser wave is studied theoretically. The assumption that a laser pulse duration is significantly greater than the characteristic oscillation time is used. It is shown that resonant conditions depend considerably on the energy and the angle of initial-electron incidence. These values determine the possible ranges of emission angles and frequencies of the first and second photon. An analytic expression for the resonant rate of the investigated process was obtained for a range of weak fields. The resonant rate decreases with increasing energy and decreases with the initial-electron incidence angle. It has order of magnitude {{10}-6}~{{\\text{s}}-1}~\\text{Me}{{\\text{V}}-1} for {{E}i}=500~\\text{MeV} and {{10}-5}~{{\\text{s}}-1}~\\text{Me}{{\\text{V}}-1} for {{E}i}=50~\\text{MeV} .

  3. Chemical modulation of the ultra-weak photon emission from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and differentiated HL-60 cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Červinková, Kateřina; Nerudová, Michaela; Hašek, Jiří; Cifra, Michal

    2015-01-01

    The ultra-weak photon emission (UPE) is a universal phenomenon common to all cells with active oxidative metabolism. Generally accepted mechanism of the origin of the ultra-weak photon emission considers reactions of radical or nonradical reactive oxygen species (ROS) with biomolecules such as lipids and proteins which lead to the formation of electron excited species. During the transition to the ground state the excess energy is released as a photon with a wavelength in the visible range of the electromagnetic spectrum. Since the intensity of the light is very low it is possible to be measured only by highly sensitive devices. We used Hamamatsu Photonics PMT module H7360-01 mounted into a light-tight chamber for the purposes of this work. The goal of our research is to delineate an origin of UPE from two model organisms; differentiated HL-60 cells (human promyelocytic leukemia) and yeast cells Saccharomyces cerevisiae. While the UPE from the yeast cells arises spontaneously during the growth without any external stimuli, UPE from HL-60 is induced by phorbol 12-myristate, 13-acetate (PMA). It is possible to modulate the UPE production by certain antioxidants which scavenge ROS formed during the metabolism (yeast cells) or respiratory burst (HL-60 cells). The experiments are focused on the description of effects caused by antioxidants. Several kinds of antioxidants (ascorbic acid, mannitol, glutathione) with different concentration were used and we studied the changes in the UPE intensities of and the temporal developments of the optical signal.

  4. Cavity Photons as a Probe for Charge Relaxation Resistance and Photon Emission in a Quantum Dot Coupled to Normal and Superconducting Continua

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruhat, L. E.; Viennot, J. J.; Dartiailh, M. C.; Desjardins, M. M.; Kontos, T.; Cottet, A.

    2016-04-01

    Microwave cavities have been widely used to investigate the behavior of closed few-level systems. Here, we show that they also represent a powerful probe for the dynamics of charge transfer between a discrete electronic level and fermionic continua. We have combined experiment and theory for a carbon nanotube quantum dot coupled to normal metal and superconducting contacts. In equilibrium conditions, where our device behaves as an effective quantum dot-normal metal junction, we approach a universal photon dissipation regime governed by a quantum charge relaxation effect. We observe how photon dissipation is modified when the dot admittance turns from capacitive to inductive. When the fermionic reservoirs are voltage biased, the dot can even cause photon emission due to inelastic tunneling to/from a Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer peak in the density of states of the superconducting contact. We can model these numerous effects quantitatively in terms of the charge susceptibility of the quantum dot circuit. This validates an approach that could be used to study a wide class of mesoscopic QED devices.

  5. Phase-matched emission from an optically thin medium following one-photon pulse excitation: Energy considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Berman, P. R.; Le Goueet, J.-L.

    2011-03-15

    Scully and coworkers [M. O. Scully, E. S. Fry, C. H. R. Oii, and K. Wodkiewicz, Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 010501 (2006)] demonstrated that there is directional, phase-matched emission following the excitation of an ensemble of atoms by a single-photon pulse. While the phase-matched emission intensity is proportional to the the number of atoms, for optically thin samples the total energy emitted in the phase-matched direction is much less than that radiated in other directions. Moreover, even for optically thin samples, it is necessary to take into account effects related to cooperative decay if energy is to be conserved in the overall emission process. An analytic calculation is presented to show explicitly how cooperative decay reduces the incoherent emission and restores energy conservation in this low-density limit.

  6. Tuning Ag29 nanocluster light emission from red to blue with one and two-photon excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russier-Antoine, Isabelle; Bertorelle, Franck; Hamouda, Ramzi; Rayane, Driss; Dugourd, Philippe; Sanader, Željka; Bonačić-Koutecký, Vlasta; Brevet, Pierre-François; Antoine, Rodolphe

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate that the tuning of the light emission from red to blue in dihydrolipoic acid (DHLA) capped Ag29 nanoclusters can be trigged with one and two photon excitations. The cluster stoichiometry was determined with mass spectrometry and found to be Ag29(DHLA)12. In a detailed optical investigation, we show that these silver nanoclusters exhibit a strong red photoluminescence visible to the naked eye and characterized by a quantum yield of nearly ~2% upon one-photon excitation. In the nonlinear optical (NLO) study of the properties of the clusters, the two-photon excited fluorescence spectra were recorded and their first hyperpolarizability obtained. The two-photon absorption cross-section at ~800 nm for Ag29(DHLA)12 is higher than 104 GM and the hyperpolarizability is 106 × 10-30 esu at the same excitation wavelength. The two-photon excited fluorescence spectrum appears strongly blue-shifted as compared to the one-photon excited spectrum, displaying a broad band between 400 and 700 nm. The density functional theory (DFT) provides insight into the structural and electronic properties of Ag29(DHLA)12 as well as into interplay between metallic subunit or core and ligands which is responsible for unique optical properties.We demonstrate that the tuning of the light emission from red to blue in dihydrolipoic acid (DHLA) capped Ag29 nanoclusters can be trigged with one and two photon excitations. The cluster stoichiometry was determined with mass spectrometry and found to be Ag29(DHLA)12. In a detailed optical investigation, we show that these silver nanoclusters exhibit a strong red photoluminescence visible to the naked eye and characterized by a quantum yield of nearly ~2% upon one-photon excitation. In the nonlinear optical (NLO) study of the properties of the clusters, the two-photon excited fluorescence spectra were recorded and their first hyperpolarizability obtained. The two-photon absorption cross-section at ~800 nm for Ag29(DHLA)12 is higher than 104

  7. Wide spectral range confocal microscope based on endlessly single-mode fiber.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, R; Ovchinnikov, Yu B; Hayes, J; Richardson, D J; Fu, Y J; Lin, S D; See, P; Sinclair, A G

    2010-08-30

    We report an endlessly single mode, fiber-optic confocal microscope, based on a large mode area photonic crystal fiber. The microscope confines a very broad spectral range of excitation and emission wavelengths to a single spatial mode in the fiber. Single-mode operation over an optical octave is feasible. At a magnification of 10 and λ = 900 nm, its resolution was measured to be 1.0 μm (lateral) and 2.5 μm (axial). The microscope's use is demonstrated by imaging single photons emitted by individual InAs quantum dots in a pillar microcavity.

  8. Enhanced emission of quantum dots embedded within the high-index dielectric regions of photonic crystal slabs

    SciTech Connect

    See, Gloria G.; Naughton, Matt S.; Kenis, Paul J. A.; Xu, Lu; Nuzzo, Ralph G.; Cunningham, Brian T.

    2016-04-25

    We demonstrate a method for combining sputtered TiO{sub 2} deposition with liquid phase dip-coating of a quantum dot (QD) layer that enables precise depth placement of QD emitters within a high-index dielectric film, using a photonic crystal (PC) slab resonator to demonstrate enhanced emission from the QDs when they are located at a specific depth within the film. The depth of the QDs within the PC is found to modulate the resonant wavelength of the PC as well as the emission enhancement efficiency, as the semiconducting material embedded within the dielectric changes its spatial overlap with the resonant mode.

  9. Dinuclear Ruthenium(II) Complexes as Two-Photon, Time-Resolved Emission Microscopy Probes for Cellular DNA**

    PubMed Central

    Baggaley, Elizabeth; Gill, Martin R; Green, Nicola H; Turton, David; Sazanovich, Igor V; Botchway, Stanley W; Smythe, Carl; Haycock, John W; Weinstein, Julia A; Thomas, Jim A

    2014-01-01

    The first transition-metal complex-based two-photon absorbing luminescence lifetime probes for cellular DNA are presented. This allows cell imaging of DNA free from endogenous fluorophores and potentially facilitates deep tissue imaging. In this initial study, ruthenium(II) luminophores are used as phosphorescent lifetime imaging microscopy (PLIM) probes for nuclear DNA in both live and fixed cells. The DNA-bound probes display characteristic emission lifetimes of more than 160 ns, while shorter-lived cytoplasmic emission is also observed. These timescales are orders of magnitude longer than conventional FLIM, leading to previously unattainable levels of sensitivity, and autofluorescence-free imaging. PMID:24458590

  10. [Analysis of single-photon emission computed tomography in patients with hypertensive encephalopathy complicated with previous hypertensive crisis].

    PubMed

    Kustkova, H S

    2012-01-01

    In cerebrovascular diseases pefuzionnaya single photon emission computed tomography with lipophilic amines used for the diagnosis of functional disorders of cerebral blood flow. Quantitative calculations helps clarify the nature of vascular disease and clarify the adequacy and effectiveness of the treatment. In this modern program for SPECT ensure conduct not only as to the calculation of blood flow, but also make it possible to compute also the absolute values of cerebral blood flow.

  11. Organic nanostructure-based probes for two-photon imaging of mitochondria and microbes with emission between 430 nm and 640 nm.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xinglong; Wang, Nuoxin; Zhang, Lingmin; Dai, Luru; Shao, Huawu; Jiang, Xingyu

    2017-04-06

    Multi-photon excitation and versatile fluorescent probes are in high need for biological imaging, since one probe can satisfy many needs as a biosensor. Herein we synthesize a series of two-photon excited probes based on tetraphenylethene (TPE) structures (TPE-Acr, TPE-Py, and TPE-Quino), which can image both mammalian cells and bacteria based on aggregation-induced emission (AIE) without washing them. Because of cationic moieties, the fluorescent molecules can aggregate into nanoscale fluorescent organic nanoscale dots to image mitochondria and bacteria with tunable emissions using both one-photon and two-photon excitation. Our research demonstrates that these AIE-dots expand the functions of luminescent organic dots to construct efficient fluorescent sensors applicable to both one-photon and two-photon excitation for bio-imaging of bacteria and mammalian cells.

  12. Nearly Blinking-Free, High-Purity Single-Photon Emission by Colloidal InP/ZnSe Quantum Dots.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekaran, Vigneshwaran; Tessier, Mickaël D; Dupont, Dorian; Geiregat, Pieter; Hens, Zeger; Brainis, Edouard

    2017-10-11

    Colloidal core/shell InP/ZnSe quantum dots (QDs), recently produced using an improved synthesis method, have a great potential in life-science applications as well as in integrated quantum photonics and quantum information processing as single-photon emitters. Single-particle spectroscopy of 10 nm QDs with 3.2 nm cores reveals strong photon antibunching attributed to fast (70 ps) Auger recombination of multiple excitons. The QDs exhibit very good photostability under strong optical excitation. We demonstrate that the antibunching is preserved when the QDs are excited above the saturation intensity of the fundamental-exciton transition. This result paves the way toward their usage as high-purity on-demand single-photon emitters at room temperature. Unconventionally, despite the strong Auger blockade mechanism, InP/ZnSe QDs also display very little luminescence intermittency ("blinking"), with a simple on/off blinking pattern. The analysis of single-particle luminescence statistics places these InP/ZnSe QDs in the class of nearly blinking-free QDs, with emission stability comparable to state-of-the-art thick-shell and alloyed-interface CdSe/CdS, but with improved single-photon purity.

  13. Efficient two-photon fluorescent probe with red emission for imaging of thiophenols in living cells and tissues.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hong-Wen; Zhang, Xiao-Bing; Zhang, Jing; Wang, Qian-Qian; Hu, Xiao-Xiao; Wang, Peng; Tan, Weihong

    2015-09-01

    Thiophenols, a class of highly toxic and pollutant compounds, are widely used in industrial production. Some aliphatic thiols play important roles in living organisms. Therefore, the development of efficient methods to discriminate thiophenols from aliphatic thiols is of great importance. Although several one-photon fluorescent probes have been reported for thiophenols, two-photon fluorescent probes are more favorable for biological imaging due to its low background fluorescence, deep penetration depth, and so on. In this work, a two-photon fluorescent probe for thiophenols, termed NpRb1, has been developed for the first time by employing 2,4-dinitrobenzene-sulfonate (DNBS) as a recognition unit (also a fluorescence quencher) and a naphthalene-BODIPY-based through-bond energy transfer (TBET) cassette as a fluorescent reporter. The TBET system consists of a D-π-A structured two-photon naphthalene fluorophore and a red-emitting BODIPY. It displayed highly energy transfer efficiency (93.5%), large pseudo-Stokes shifts upon one-photon excitation, and red fluorescence emission (λem = 586 nm), which is highly desirable for bioimaging applications. The probe exhibited a 163-fold thiophenol-triggered two-photon excited fluorescence enhancement at 586 nm. It showed a high selectivity and excellent sensitivity to thiophenols, with a detection limit of 4.9 nM. Moreover, it was successfully applied for practical detection of thiophenol in water samples with a good recovery, two-photon imaging of thiophenol in living cells, and tissues with tissue-imaging depths of 90-220 μm, demonstrating its practical application in environmental samples and biological systems.

  14. Quantum theory of two-photon correlated-spontaneous-emission lasers: Exact atom-field interaction Hamiltonian approach

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, N.; Zhu, S. )

    1989-11-15

    A quantum theory of two-photon correlated-spontaneous-emission lasers (CEL's) is developed, starting from the exact atom-field interaction Hamiltonian for cascade three-level atoms interacting with a single-mode radiation field. We consider the situation where the active atoms are prepared initially in a coherent superposition of three atomic levels and derive a master equation for the field-density operator by using a quantum theory for coherently pumped lasers. The master equation is transformed into a Fokker-Planck equation for the antinormal-ordering {ital Q} function. The drift coefficients of the Fokker-Planck equation enable us to study the steady-state operation of the two-photon CEL's analytically. We have studied both resonant two-photon CEL for which there is no threshold, and off-resonant two-photon CEL for which there exists a threshold. In both cases the initial atomic coherences provide phase locking, and squeezing in the phase quadrature of the field is found. The off-resonant two-photon CEL can build up from a vacuum when its linear gain is larger than the cavity loss (even without population inversion). Maximum squeezing is found in the no-population-inversion region with the laser intensities far below saturation in both cases, which are more than 90% for the resonant two-photon CEL and nearly 50% for the off-resonant one. Approximate steady-state {ital Q} functions are obtained for the resonant two-photon CEL and, in certain circumstances, for the off-resonant one.

  15. Size-dependent one-photon- and two-photon-pumped amplified spontaneous emission from organometal halide CH3NH3PbBr3 perovskite cubic microcrystals.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhen-Yu; Wang, Hai-Yu; Zhang, Yan-Xia; Li, Kai-Jiao; Zhan, Xue-Peng; Gao, Bing-Rong; Chen, Qi-Dai; Sun, Hong-Bo

    2017-01-18

    In the past few years, organometal halide light-emitting perovskite thin films and colloidal nanocrystals (NCs) have attracted significant research interest in the field of highly purified illuminating applications. However, knowledge of photoluminescence (PL) characteristics, such as amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) of larger-sized perovskite crystals, is still relatively scarce. Here, we presented room-temperature size-dependent spontaneous emission (SE) and ASE of the organometal halide CH3NH3PbBr3 perovskite cubic microcrystals pumped through one-photon-(1P) and two-photon-(2P) excitation paradigms. The results showed that the optical properties of SE and ASE were sensitively dependent on the sizes of perovskite microcrystals irrespective of whether 1P or 2P excitation was used. Moreover, by comparing the spectral results of 1P- and 2P-pumped experiments, 2P pumping was found to be an effective paradigm to reduce thresholds by one order of magnitude. Finally, we carried out fluences-dependent time-resolved fluorescence dynamics experiments to study the underlying effects of these scale-dependent SE and ASE. We found that the photoluminescence (PL) recombination rates sensitively became faster with increasing carriers' densities, and that the ASE pumped from larger-sized CH3NH3PbBr3 perovskite cubic microcrystals showed faster lifetimes. This work shows that micro-sized perovskite cubic crystals could be the ideal patterns of perovskite materials for realizing ASE applications in the future.

  16. Control of spontaneous emission of a single quantum emitter through a time-modulated photonic-band-gap environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calajò, Giuseppe; Rizzuto, Lucia; Passante, Roberto

    2017-08-01

    We consider the spontaneous emission of a two-level quantum emitter, such as an atom or a quantum dot, in a modulated time-dependent environment with a photonic band gap. An example of such an environment is a dynamical photonic crystal or any other environment with a band gap whose properties are modulated in time, in the effective mass approximation. After introducing our model of a dynamical photonic crystal, we show that it allows new possibilities to control and tailor the physical features of the emitted radiation, specifically its frequency spectrum. In the weak-coupling limit and in an adiabatic case, we obtain the emitted spectrum and we show the appearance of two lateral peaks due to the presence of the modulated environment, separated from the central peak by the modulation frequency. We show that the two side peaks are not symmetric in height, and that their height ratio can be exploited to investigate the density of states of the environment. Our results show that a dynamical environment can give further possibilities to modify the spontaneous emission features, such as its spectrum and emission rate, with respect to a static one. Observability of the phenomena we obtain is discussed, as well as relevance for tailoring and engineering radiative processes.

  17. A comparison of two micro-beam X-ray emission techniques for actinide elemental distribution in microscopic particles originating from the hydrogen bombs involved in the Palomares (Spain) and Thule (Greenland) accidents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimenez-Ramos, M. C.; Eriksson, M.; García-López, J.; Ranebo, Y.; García-Tenorio, R.; Betti, M.; Holm, E.

    2010-09-01

    In order to validate and to gain confidence in two micro-beam techniques: particle induced X-ray emission with nuclear microprobe technique (μ-PIXE) and synchrotron radiation induced X-ray fluorescence in a confocal alignment (confocal SR μ-XRF) for characterization of microscopic particles containing actinide elements (mixed plutonium and uranium) a comparative study has been performed. Inter-comparison of the two techniques is essential as the X-ray production cross-sections for U and Pu are different for protons and photons and not well defined in the open literature, especially for Pu. The particles studied consisted of nuclear weapons material, and originate either in the so called Palomares accident in Spain, 1966 or in the Thule accident in Greenland, 1968. In the determination of the average Pu/U mass ratios (not corrected by self-absorption) in the analysed microscopic particles the results from both techniques show a very good agreement. In addition, the suitability of both techniques for the analysis with good resolution (down to a few μm) of the Pu/U distribution within the particles has been proved. The set of results obtained through both techniques has allowed gaining important information concerning the characterization of the remaining fissile material in the areas affected by the aircraft accidents. This type of information is essential for long-term impact assessments of contaminated sites.

  18. Stimulated emission and lasing from CdSe/CdS/ZnS core-multi-shell quantum dots by simultaneous three-photon absorption.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yue; Ta, Van Duong; Gao, Yuan; He, Ting Chao; Chen, Rui; Mutlugun, Evren; Demir, Hilmi Volkan; Sun, Han Dong

    2014-05-01

    Three-photon pumped stimulated emission and coherent random lasing from colloidal CdSe/CdS/ZnS core-multishell quantum dots are achieved for the first time. These results can offer new possibilities in biology and photonics, as well as at their intersection of biophotonics.

  19. Development of wavelength-dispersive soft X-ray emission spectrometers for transmission electron microscopes--an introduction of valence electron spectroscopy for transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Terauchi, Masami; Koike, Masato; Fukushima, Kurio; Kimura, Atsushi

    2010-01-01

    Two types of wavelength-dispersive soft X-ray spectrometers, a high-dispersion type and a conventional one, for transmission electron microscopes were constructed. Those spectrometers were used to study the electronic states of valence electrons (bonding electrons). Both spectrometers extended the acceptable energy regions to higher than 2000 eV. The best energy resolution of 0.08 eV was obtained for an Al L-emission spectrum by using the high-dispersion type spectrometer. By using the spectrometer, C K-emission of carbon allotropes, Cu L-emission of Cu(1-x)Zn(x) alloys and Pt M-emission spectra were presented. The FWHM value of 12 eV was obtained for the Pt Malpha-emission peak. The performance of the conventional one was also presented for ZnS and a section specimen of a multilayer device. W-M and Si-K emissions were clearly resolved. Soft X-ray emission spectroscopy based on transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has an advantage for obtaining spectra from a single crystalline specimen with a defined crystal setting. As an example of anisotropic soft X-ray emission, C K-emission spectra of single crystalline graphite with different crystal settings were presented. From the spectra, density of states of pi- and sigma-bondings were separately derived. These results demonstrated a method to analyse the electronic states of valence electrons of materials in the nanometre scale based on TEM.

  20. Abnormal 201Tl myocardial single photon emission computed tomography in energetic male patients with myocardial bridge.

    PubMed

    Huang, W S; Chang, H D; Yang, S P; Tsao, T P; Cheng, C Y; Cherng, S C

    2002-11-01

    Myocardial bridge is a relatively benign condition where a major coronary artery is bridged by a band of muscle and narrows during systole, particularly during rapid heart rates. Its clinical presentation and electrocardiogram (ECG) changes overlap with that of coronary artery disease. 201Tl myocardial perfusion imaging is thus frequently prescribed for further evaluation. This retrospective study was carried out to determine the 201Tl image patterns in patients with myocardial bridge. A total of 17 male patients (aged from 30 to 63 years) who had a positive exercise ECG and angiographic evidence of myocardial bridge in the mid-third of the left anterior descending coronary artery were recruited. Most of them were robust and received routine physical check-ups. They had no known heart disease or medication that affected cardiac function. The patients' clinical presentations, echocardiograph and exercise ECG findings were analysed. 201Tl single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) was performed by intravenous injection of 201Tl (111 MBq) immediately following stress (treadmill or dipyridamole induced) and 4 h after stress, using a fixed, right angle camera equipped with a low energy, general purpose collimator. The images were interpreted independently by two experienced nuclear medicine physicians. Nine of the 17 patients had anterior chest pain during exercise. All patients had an abnormal ECG during exercise, including ST-T wave depression in leads II, III and aVF, and v4-6. Except for eight patients revealing reversible perfusion defect (R), 16 of the 17 patients also exhibited a partial reversible perfusion defect (PR) or a significant reverse redistribution (RR) scan pattern in the anterior or inferior walls of the left ventricle. Myocardial bridge should be taken into consideration in energetic male patients who had abnormal exercise ECGs and the corresponding patterns of Tl SPECT abnormalities including R, PR and RR.

  1. Incremental prognostic value of coronary flow reserve assessed with single-photon emission computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Daniele, Stefania; Nappi, Carmela; Acampa, Wanda; Storto, Giovanni; Pellegrino, Teresa; Ricci, Francesca; Xhoxhi, Evgjeni; Porcaro, Francesco; Petretta, Mario; Cuocolo, Alberto

    2011-08-01

    We assessed the prognostic value of coronary flow reserve (CFR) estimated by single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in patients with suspected myocardial ischemia. Myocardial perfusion and CFR were assessed in 106 patients using dipyridamole/rest Tc-99m sestamibi SPECT and follow-up was obtained in 103 (97%) patients. Four early revascularized patients were excluded and 99 were assigned to normal (summed stress score <3) vs abnormal myocardial perfusion and to normal (≥2.0) vs abnormal CFR. During the follow-up (5.8 ± 2.1 years), 28 patients experienced a cardiac event (cardiac death, nonfatal myocardial infarction, and late revascularization). Abnormal perfusion (P < .01) and abnormal CFR (P < .05) were independent predictors of cardiac events at Cox proportional hazard regression analysis. Also in patients with normal perfusion, abnormal CFR was associated with a higher annual event rate compared with normal CFR (5.2% vs 0.7%; P < .05). CFR data improved the prognostic power of the model including clinical and myocardial perfusion data increasing the global chi-square from 18.6 to 22.8 (P < .05). Finally, at parametric survival analysis, in patients with normal perfusion the time to achieve ≥2% risk of events was >60 months in those with normal and <12 months in those with abnormal CFR. Myocardial perfusion findings and CFR at SPECT imaging are both independent predictors of cardiac events. Estimated CFR provides incremental prognostic information over those obtained from clinical and myocardial perfusion data, particularly in patients with normal perfusion findings.

  2. UK audit of single photon emission computed tomography reconstruction software using software generated phantoms.

    PubMed

    Jarritt, P H; Whalley, D R; Skrypniuk, J V; Houston, A S; Fleming, J S; Cosgriff, P S

    2002-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to undertake an audit of the quantitative characteristics of single photon emission computed tomography software using projection data from an analytically generated software phantom and a measured line source. The phantom consisted of three structures. A uniformly filled cylinder, a series of cylindrical rods of various diameters in a background activity with a rod to background ratio of 2:1 and lastly, a set of three concentric rings of activity in the ratio 1:0:1. The phantom contained no added statistical noise. No attenuation was imposed on the data. The phantom was generated analytically and projections were distributed at six different count densities. A single set of projections from a thin line source was also distributed. These data were distributed to centres throughout the UK. Centres were asked to reconstruct the data using a 'ramp only' reconstruction with no additional smoothing function applied. Data were requested for mean and standard deviation in the uniform cylinder, the maximum counts for each cylindrical rod and the mean counts in regions placed within the concentric rings. For the measured line source, centres were asked to measure the full width at half maximum and peak pixel counts for a profile through the reconstructed line. Results from 115 systems were obtained from 100 centres throughout the UK. These provided data from 12 software providers, 11 of these being commercial companies. Data were compared with the known input values and histograms of the distribution of results obtained. Significant differences in quantitative parameters were noted for the different input count densities as well as between suppliers and revisions of software from single suppliers.

  3. A Study on Determination of an Optimized Detector for Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography.

    PubMed

    Khoshakhlagh, Mohammad; Islamian, Jalil Pirayesh; Abedi, Mohammad; Mahmoudian, Babak; Mardanshahi, Ali Reza

    2016-01-01

    The detector is a critical component of the single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging system for giving accurate information from the exact pattern of radionuclide distribution in the target organ. The SIMIND Monte Carlo program was utilized for the simulation of a Siemen's dual head variable angle SPECT imaging system with a low energy high resolution (LEHR) collimator. The Planar and SPECT scans for a (99m)Tc point source and a Jaszczak Phantom with the both experiment and simulated systems were prepared and after verification and validation of the simulated system, the similar scans of the phantoms were compared (from the point of view of the images' quality), namely, the simulated system with the detectors including bismuth germanate (BGO), yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG:Ce), Cerium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG:Ce), yttrium aluminum perovslite (YAP:Ce), lutetium aluminum garnet (LuAG:Ce), cerium activated lanthanum bromide (LaBr3), cadmium zinc telluride (CZT), and sodium iodide activated with thallium [NaI(Tl)]. The parameters of full width at half maximum (FWHM), energy and special resolution, sensitivity, and also the comparison of images' quality by the structural similarity (SSIM) algorithm with the Zhou Wang and Rouse/Hemami methods were analyzed. FWHMs for the crystals were calculated at 13.895, 14.321, 14.310, 14.322, 14.184, and 14.312 keV and the related energy resolutions obtained 9.854, 10.229, 10.221, 10.230, 10.131, and 10.223 %, respectively. Finally, SSIM indexes for comparison of the phantom images were calculated at 0.22172, 0.16326, 0.18135, 0.17301, 0.18412, and 0.20433 as compared to NaI(Tl). The results showed that BGO and LuAG: Ce crystals have high sensitivity and resolution, and better image quality as compared to other scintillation crystals.

  4. Development of correction methods for variable pinhole single-photon emission computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, S.; Bae, J.; Lee, H.; Lee, K.

    2016-02-01

    We propose a novel pinhole collimator in which the pinhole shape can be changed in real-time, and a new single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) system that utilizes this variable pinhole (VP) collimator. The acceptance angle and distance between the collimator and the object of VP SPECT are varied so that the optimum value of the region-of-interest (ROI) can be obtained for each rotation angle. Because of these geometrical variations, new correction methods are required for image reconstruction. In this study, we developed two correction methods. The first is the sensitivity-correction algorithm, which minimizes the variation of a system matrix caused by varying the acceptance angle for each rotation angle. The second is the acquisition-time-correction method, which reduces the variation of uniformity caused by varying the distance between the collimator and the object for each rotation angle. A 3D maximum likelihood expectation maximization (MLEM) algorithm was applied to image reconstruction, and two digital phantoms were studied to evaluate the resolution and sensitivity of the images obtained using the proposed methods. The images obtained by using the proposed correction methods show higher uniformity and resolution than those obtained without using these methods. In particular, the results of the resolution phantom study show that hot rods (0.8-mm-diameter) can be clearly distinguished using the proposed correction methods. A quantitative analysis of the ROI phantom revealed that the mean square error (MSE) was 0.42 without the acquisition-time-correction method, and 0.04 with the acquisition-time-correction method. The MSEs of the resolution phantom without and with the acquisition-time-correction method were calculated as 55.14 and 14.69, respectively.

  5. Dynamic single photon emission computed tomography—basic principles and cardiac applications

    PubMed Central

    Gullberg, Grant T; Reutter, Bryan W; Sitek, Arkadiusz; Maltz, Jonathan S; Budinger, Thomas F

    2011-01-01

    The very nature of nuclear medicine, the visual representation of injected radiopharmaceuticals, implies imaging of dynamic processes such as the uptake and wash-out of radiotracers from body organs. For years, nuclear medicine has been touted as the modality of choice for evaluating function in health and disease. This evaluation is greatly enhanced using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), which permits three-dimensional (3D) visualization of tracer distributions in the body. However, to fully realize the potential of the technique requires the imaging of in vivo dynamic processes of flow and metabolism. Tissue motion and deformation must also be addressed. Absolute quantification of these dynamic processes in the body has the potential to improve diagnosis. This paper presents a review of advancements toward the realization of the potential of dynamic SPECT imaging and a brief history of the development of the instrumentation. A major portion of the paper is devoted to the review of special data processing methods that have been developed for extracting kinetics from dynamic cardiac SPECT data acquired using rotating detector heads that move as radiopharmaceuticals exchange between biological compartments. Recent developments in multi-resolution spatiotemporal methods enable one to estimate kinetic parameters of compartment models of dynamic processes using data acquired from a single camera head with slow gantry rotation. The estimation of kinetic parameters directly from projection measurements improves bias and variance over the conventional method of first reconstructing 3D dynamic images, generating time–activity curves from selected regions of interest and then estimating the kinetic parameters from the generated time–activity curves. Although the potential applications of SPECT for imaging dynamic processes have not been fully realized in the clinic, it is hoped that this review illuminates the potential of SPECT for dynamic imaging

  6. TOPICAL REVIEW: Dynamic single photon emission computed tomography—basic principles and cardiac applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gullberg, Grant T.; Reutter, Bryan W.; Sitek, Arkadiusz; Maltz, Jonathan S.; Budinger, Thomas F.

    2010-10-01

    The very nature of nuclear medicine, the visual representation of injected radiopharmaceuticals, implies imaging of dynamic processes such as the uptake and wash-out of radiotracers from body organs. For years, nuclear medicine has been touted as the modality of choice for evaluating function in health and disease. This evaluation is greatly enhanced using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), which permits three-dimensional (3D) visualization of tracer distributions in the body. However, to fully realize the potential of the technique requires the imaging of in vivo dynamic processes of flow and metabolism. Tissue motion and deformation must also be addressed. Absolute quantification of these dynamic processes in the body has the potential to improve diagnosis. This paper presents a review of advancements toward the realization of the potential of dynamic SPECT imaging and a brief history of the development of the instrumentation. A major portion of the paper is devoted to the review of special data processing methods that have been developed for extracting kinetics from dynamic cardiac SPECT data acquired using rotating detector heads that move as radiopharmaceuticals exchange between biological compartments. Recent developments in multi-resolution spatiotemporal methods enable one to estimate kinetic parameters of compartment models of dynamic processes using data acquired from a single camera head with slow gantry rotation. The estimation of kinetic parameters directly from projection measurements improves bias and variance over the conventional method of first reconstructing 3D dynamic images, generating time-activity curves from selected regions of interest and then estimating the kinetic parameters from the generated time-activity curves. Although the potential applications of SPECT for imaging dynamic processes have not been fully realized in the clinic, it is hoped that this review illuminates the potential of SPECT for dynamic imaging

  7. A Study on Determination of an Optimized Detector for Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Khoshakhlagh, Mohammad; Islamian, Jalil Pirayesh; Abedi, Mohammad; Mahmoudian, Babak; Mardanshahi, Ali Reza

    2016-01-01

    The detector is a critical component of the single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging system for giving accurate information from the exact pattern of radionuclide distribution in the target organ. The SIMIND Monte Carlo program was utilized for the simulation of a Siemen's dual head variable angle SPECT imaging system with a low energy high resolution (LEHR) collimator. The Planar and SPECT scans for a 99mTc point source and a Jaszczak Phantom with the both experiment and simulated systems were prepared and after verification and validation of the simulated system, the similar scans of the phantoms were compared (from the point of view of the images’ quality), namely, the simulated system with the detectors including bismuth germanate (BGO), yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG:Ce), Cerium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG:Ce), yttrium aluminum perovslite (YAP:Ce), lutetium aluminum garnet (LuAG:Ce), cerium activated lanthanum bromide (LaBr3), cadmium zinc telluride (CZT), and sodium iodide activated with thallium [NaI(Tl)]. The parameters of full width at half maximum (FWHM), energy and special resolution, sensitivity, and also the comparison of images’ quality by the structural similarity (SSIM) algorithm with the Zhou Wang and Rouse/Hemami methods were analyzed. FWHMs for the crystals were calculated at 13.895, 14.321, 14.310, 14.322, 14.184, and 14.312 keV and the related energy resolutions obtained 9.854, 10.229, 10.221, 10.230, 10.131, and 10.223 %, respectively. Finally, SSIM indexes for comparison of the phantom images were calculated at 0.22172, 0.16326, 0.18135, 0.17301, 0.18412, and 0.20433 as compared to NaI(Tl). The results showed that BGO and LuAG: Ce crystals have high sensitivity and resolution, and better image quality as compared to other scintillation crystals. PMID:26912973

  8. Prognostic value of single-photon emission tomography in acute ischaemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Weir, C J; Bolster, A A; Tytler, S; Murray, G D; Corrigall, R S; Adams, F G; Lees, K R

    1997-01-01

    Single-photon emission tomography (SPET) is widely used in the investigation of acute stroke. We investigated the relationship between SPET data and functional outcome in a large group of acute stroke patients. One hundred and eight patients underwent cerebral computed tomography (CT) and technetium-99m hexamethylpropylene amine oxime SPET after acute ischaemic stroke. We categorised the clinical presentation according to the Oxford classification of acute stroke. Outcome was measured 1 year after stroke using mortality and the Barthel Index for survivors. SPET scans were interpreted without reference to the clinical data using a semi-automatic technique. Three experienced observers determined the presence of luxury perfusion using suitably scaled SPET images in conjunction with the CT scan. Both SPET volume and severity of deficit were significantly negatively correlated with Barthel Index at 1 year (rs=-0.310, P<0.0001, and rs=-0.316, P<0.0001 respectively). In patients scanned with SPET within 16 h of stroke onset, the correlations were more strongly negative (rs=-0.606, P<0. 001, and rs=-0.492, P<0.005 respectively). Luxury perfusion was not associated (chi2=0.073, df=1, P=0.79) with good functional outcome (Barthel score >/=60). Stepwise logistic regression identified Oxford classification, total deficit volume and patient's age as significant predictors of functional outcome. Overall predictive accuracy was 72%. Predictive accuracy was better in patients who received SPET within 16 h of stroke onset. SPET provides useful information about the functional outcome of acute stroke at 1 year. However, the accuracy of prediction decreases the longer SPET is delayed. Prognostication using SPET in combination with clinical assessment and other investigations may also be considered.

  9. 3-Dimensional photonic crystal surface enhanced upconversion emission for improved near-infrared photoresponse.

    PubMed

    Niu, Wenbin; Su, Liap Tat; Chen, Rui; Chen, Hu; Wang, Yi; Palaniappan, Alagappan; Sun, Handong; Tok, Alfred Iing Yoong

    2014-01-21

    The enhancement of upconversion luminescence of lanthanide-ion doped fluoride upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) is particularly important and highly required for their myriad applications in sensing, photoelectronic devices and bio-imaging. In this work, the amplification of luminescence in NaYF4:Yb/Er and NaYF4:Yb/Tm UCNPs in close proximity to the three-dimensional photonic crystal (3D PC) surface for improved near-infrared photoresponse of a carbon nanotube-based phototransistor is reported. The self-assembled opal 3D PCs with polystyrene sphere sizes of 200, 290 and 360 nm that exhibit reflection peaks of 450, 650 and 800 nm respectively were used for upconversion enhancement, and around 30 times enhancement was obtained for NaYF4:Yb/Er and NaYF4:Yb/Tm UCNPs. Time-resolved upconversion emission and 3D PC transmittance-dependent upconversion enhancement reveal that the enhanced absorption and the extraction effects, resulting from the enhanced non-resonant pump excitation field and the strong coherent scattering provided by 3D PCs respectively, are responsible for the large enhancement. As a proof-of-concept experiment, the prepared 3D PC/NaYF4:Yb/Tm UCNP coupled material layer was introduced into the carbon nanotube-based phototransistor. It is shown that the photoresponsivity of the device to near-infrared light was improved by 10 times with respect to the control device with carbon nanotubes only, which reveals the promising applications of this coupled material in photoelectronic devices such as photovoltaics and other types of phototransistors.

  10. The Usefulness of Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography in Defining Painful Upper Cervical Facet Arthropathy.

    PubMed

    Ravindra, Vijay M; Mazur, Marcus D; Bisson, Erica F; Barton, Craig; Shah, Lubdha M; Dailey, Andrew T

    2016-12-01

    Standard imaging techniques have low predictive value for identifying sources of neck pain. Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging in conjunction with computed tomography (CT) provides the sensitivity of bone scanning for areas of high metabolic activity with the sensitivity of CT for anatomic localization. We evaluated the usefulness of SPECT-CT imaging in identifying pain generators in upper cervical facet arthropathy. In a retrospective study, we reviewed 7 patients (mean age, 68.7 years) who underwent diagnostic SPECT-CT imaging for upper cervical neck pain at our institution from August 2011 to February 2015. We assessed SPECT-CT radiotracer uptake and postoperative neck disability index (NDI) and visual analog scale (VAS) scores. Mean preoperative NDI and VAS scores were 42% (range, 34%-72%) and 7/10 (range, 5-8), respectively. SPECT-CT showed increased radiotracer uptake and inflammation at the level of pain generation indicated by history and physical examination. Intraoperatively, all patients had corresponding facet hypertrophy with degeneration at the site of increased radiotracer uptake. The mean postoperative NDI and VAS scores at 9 months were 23% (0%-54%) and 2/10 (0-5), respectively, representing improvements of 20% (P = 0.025) and 4 (P = 0.0028), respectively. SPECT-CT imaging of the upper cervical spine is a potentially sensitive diagnostic test that can implicate pain generators with increased metabolic activity. We propose that SPECT-CT may be a useful adjunct in the workup for neck pain secondary to facet arthropathy that could obviate diagnostic injections. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Quantitative single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography for technetium pertechnetate thyroid uptake measurement.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyunjong; Kim, Ji Hyun; Kang, Yeon-Koo; Moon, Jae Hoon; So, Young; Lee, Won Woo

    2016-07-01

    Technetium pertechnetate (TcO4) is a radioactive tracer used to assess thyroid function by thyroid uptake system (TUS). However, the TUS often fails to deliver accurate measurements of the percent of thyroid uptake (%thyroid uptake) of TcO4. Here, we investigated the usefulness of quantitative single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) after injection of TcO4 in detecting thyroid function abnormalities. We retrospectively reviewed data from 50 patients (male:female = 15:35; age, 46.2 ± 16.3 years; 17 Graves disease, 13 thyroiditis, and 20 euthyroid). All patients underwent TcO4 quantitative SPECT/CT (185 MBq = 5 mCi), which yielded %thyroid uptake and standardized uptake value (SUV). Twenty-one (10 Graves disease and 11 thyroiditis) of the 50 patients also underwent conventional %thyroid uptake measurements using a TUS. Quantitative SPECT/CT parameters (%thyroid uptake, SUVmean, and SUVmax) were the highest in Graves disease, second highest in euthyroid, and lowest in thyroiditis (P < 0.0001, Kruskal-Wallis test). TUS significantly overestimated the %thyroid uptake compared with SPECT/CT (P < 0.0001, paired t test) because other TcO4 sources in addition to thyroid, such as salivary glands and saliva, contributed to the %thyroid uptake result by TUS, whereas %thyroid uptake, SUVmean and SUVmax from the SPECT/CT were associated with the functional status of thyroid. Quantitative SPECT/CT is more accurate than conventional TUS for measuring TcO4 %thyroid uptake. Quantitative measurements using SPECT/CT may facilitate more accurate assessment of thyroid tracer uptake.

  12. Predicting exercise capacity after lobectomy by single photon emission computed tomography and computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Nagamatsu, Yoshinori; Sueyoshi, Susumu; Sasahara, Hiroko; Oka, Yousuke; Kumazoe, Hiroyuki; Mitsuoka, Masahiro; Akagi, Yoshito

    2016-09-01

    This study compared the prediction of postoperative exercise capacity by employing lung perfusion scintigraphy images obtained with single photon emission computed tomography together with computed tomography (SPECT/CT) versus the common method of counting subsegments (SC method). In 18 patients scheduled for lobectomy, predicted postoperative maximum oxygen uptake per kilogram body weight ([Formula: see text]) was calculated by the SPECT/CT and SC methods. Correlations were examined between the [Formula: see text] predicted by SPECT/CT or the SC method, and the actual [Formula: see text] measured at 2 weeks (mean 15.4 ± 1.5 days) and 1 month (mean 29.1 ± 0.75 days) after surgery to determine whether SPECT/CT was more accurate than SC for predicting postoperative exercise capacity. There was a significant positive correlation between the [Formula: see text] predicted by SPECT/CT and the actual value at 2 weeks (r = 0.802, p < 0.0001) or 1 month (r = 0.770, p < 0.0001). There was also a significant positive correlation between the [Formula: see text] predicted by SC and the actual value at 2 weeks (r = 0.785, p < 0.0001) or 1 month (r = 0.784, p < 0.0001). This study showed that both SPECT/CT and the SC method were useful for predicting postoperative [Formula: see text] in the clinical setting.

  13. Evaluation of Technetium-99m glucoheptonate single photon emission computed tomography for brain tumor grading

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Syed Shafiq; Junaid, Syed; Ahmed, Syed Mushtaq

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study is designed to appraise the diagnostic value of technetium-99m glucoheptonate (Tc-99m GHA) single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in brain tumor grading. Subjects and Methods: The study was performed on 30 patients referred from the Department of Neurosurgery, who were from both urban and rural areas. Data were collected through interview, history taking, and clinical examination followed by recording the desired parameters and finally imaging. The study subjects were divided into five groups: Controls (n = 4), low-grade tumors (n = 8), high-grade tumors (n = 8), metastases (n = 5), and nonneoplastic lesions (n = 5). This division was based on the World Health Organization (WHO) classification postclinico-histological diagnosis. Each of the subjects underwent contrast-enhanced computed tomography/contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance and Tc-99m GHA SPECT preoperatively. All were followed up postoperatively, and histopathological reports were regarded as the gold standard for tumor grading wherever available. Results: It was found that high-grade tumors (Grades III/IV and IV/IV according to the WHO classification) showed significantly higher tumor to normal (T/N) ratios as well as Tmax/N ratios when compared with low-grade tumors (Grades I/IV and II/IV), metastases or nonneoplastic lesions. Conclusions: In summary, the results of this study suggest that in situations where a preoperative grading of tumor is required Tc-99m GHA can be used in tumor grading and its use should be encouraged. Semi-quantitative analysis using both T/N as well as Tmax/N can be used in differentiating high-grade tumors from low-grade ones. PMID:27057217

  14. Quantitative single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography for technetium pertechnetate thyroid uptake measurement

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyunjong; Kim, Ji Hyun; Kang, Yeon-koo; Moon, Jae Hoon; So, Young; Lee, Won Woo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objectives: Technetium pertechnetate (99mTcO4) is a radioactive tracer used to assess thyroid function by thyroid uptake system (TUS). However, the TUS often fails to deliver accurate measurements of the percent of thyroid uptake (%thyroid uptake) of 99mTcO4. Here, we investigated the usefulness of quantitative single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) after injection of 99mTcO4 in detecting thyroid function abnormalities. Materials and methods: We retrospectively reviewed data from 50 patients (male:female = 15:35; age, 46.2 ± 16.3 years; 17 Graves disease, 13 thyroiditis, and 20 euthyroid). All patients underwent 99mTcO4 quantitative SPECT/CT (185 MBq = 5 mCi), which yielded %thyroid uptake and standardized uptake value (SUV). Twenty-one (10 Graves disease and 11 thyroiditis) of the 50 patients also underwent conventional %thyroid uptake measurements using a TUS. Results: Quantitative SPECT/CT parameters (%thyroid uptake, SUVmean, and SUVmax) were the highest in Graves disease, second highest in euthyroid, and lowest in thyroiditis (P < 0.0001, Kruskal–Wallis test). TUS significantly overestimated the %thyroid uptake compared with SPECT/CT (P < 0.0001, paired t test) because other 99mTcO4 sources in addition to thyroid, such as salivary glands and saliva, contributed to the %thyroid uptake result by TUS, whereas %thyroid uptake, SUVmean and SUVmax from the SPECT/CT were associated with the functional status of thyroid. Conclusions: Quantitative SPECT/CT is more accurate than conventional TUS for measuring 99mTcO4 %thyroid uptake. Quantitative measurements using SPECT/CT may facilitate more accurate assessment of thyroid tracer uptake. PMID:27399139

  15. Photon Emissions from a Spinor Bose-Einstein Condensate of Positroniums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Chen; Zhang, Peng; Yi, Su

    2017-08-01

    We investigate the quantum dynamics of the decay of a multiple-component positronium condensate into pairs of photons. A positronium atom has four internal spin states which are interconvertible through s-wave interactions. The quantum fields of all spin states of positroniums and photons are simulated from first principle in quasi-one-dimensional system using the truncated Wigner method. This method warrants us a full treatment of the depletion of positronium fields and the spin mixing induced by s-wave collisions between positronium atoms. Particularly, it yields the momentum spectrum of the emitted photons and the photon-photon correlations. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos. 11434011, 11674334, 11421063, and 11674393, National Key Basic Research Special Foundation of China under Grant No. 2012CB922104, the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, and the Research Funds of Renmin University of China under Grant Nos. 16XNLQ03 and 17XNH054

  16. The mechanism and properties of bio-photon emission and absorption in protein molecules in living systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Xiao-feng

    2012-05-01

    The mechanism and properties of bio-photon emission and absorption in bio-tissues were studied using Pang's theory of bio-energy transport, in which the energy spectra of protein molecules are obtained from the discrete dynamic equation. From the energy spectra, it was determined that the protein molecules could both radiate and absorb bio-photons with wavelengths of <3 μm and 5-7 μm, consistent with the energy level transitions of the excitons. These results were consistent with the experimental data; this consisted of infrared absorption data from collagen, bovine serum albumin, the protein-like molecule acetanilide, plasma, and a person's finger, and the laser-Raman spectra of acidity I-type collagen in the lungs of a mouse, and metabolically active Escherichia coli. We further elucidated the mechanism responsible for the non-thermal biological effects produced by the infrared light absorbed by the bio-tissues, using the above results. No temperature rise was observed; instead, the absorbed infrared light promoted the vibrations of amides as well the transport of the bio-energy from one place to other in the protein molecules, which changed their conformations. These experimental results, therefore, not only confirmed the validity of the mechanism of bio-photon emission, and the newly developed theory of bio-energy transport mentioned above, but also explained the mechanism and properties of the non-thermal biological effects produced by the absorption of infrared light by the living systems.

  17. Enhanced Extraction of Silicon-Vacancy Centers Light Emission Using Bottom-Up Engineered Polycrystalline Diamond Photonic Crystal Slabs.

    PubMed

    Ondič, Lukáš; Varga, Marian; Hruška, Karel; Fait, Jan; Kapusta, Peter

    2017-03-28

    Silicon vacancy (SiV) centers are optically active defects in diamond. The SiV centers, in contrast to nitrogen vacancy (NV) centers, possess narrow and efficient luminescence spectrum (centered at ≈738 nm) even at room temperature, which can be utilized for quantum photonics and sensing applications. However, most of light generated in diamond is trapped in the material due to the phenomenon of total internal reflection. In order to overcome this issue, we have prepared two-dimensional photonic crystal slabs from polycrystalline diamond thin layers with high density of SiV centers employing bottom-up growth on quartz templates. We have shown that the spectral overlap between the narrow light emission of the SiV centers and the leaky modes extracting the emission into almost vertical direction (where it can be easily detected) can be obtained by controlling the deposition time. More than 14-fold extraction enhancement of the SiV centers photoluminescence was achieved compared to an uncorrugated sample. Computer simulation confirmed that the extraction enhancement originates from the efficient light-matter interaction between light emitted from the SiV centers and the photonic crystal slab.

  18. Towards the two-dimensional imaging of spontaneous ultra-weak photon emission from microbial, plant and animal cells

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Ankush; Pospíšil, Pavel

    2013-01-01

    Two-dimensional imaging of spontaneous ultra-weak photon emission was measured in the yeast cells, Arabidopsis plant and the human hand using highly sensitive charge coupled device (CCD) camera. For the first time, the detail analysis of measuring parameters such as accumulation time and binning is provided with the aim to achieve two-dimensional images of spontaneous ultra-weak photon emission of good quality. We present data showing that using a hardware binning with binning factor 4 × 4, the accumulation time decreases in the following order: yeast cells (30 min) > the human hand (20 min) > Arabidopsis plant (10 min). Analysis of measuring parameters provides a detailed description of standard condition to be used for two-dimensional spontaneous ultra-weak photon imaging in microbes, plants and animals. Thus, CCD imaging can be employed as a unique tool to examine the oxidative state of the living organism with the application in microbiological, plant and medical research. PMID:23386970

  19. Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography for the Diagnosis of Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Executive Summary In July 2009, the Medical Advisory Secretariat (MAS) began work on Non-Invasive Cardiac Imaging Technologies for the Diagnosis of Coronary Artery Disease (CAD), an evidence-based review of the literature surrounding different cardiac imaging modalities to ensure that appropriate technologies are accessed by patients suspected of having CAD. This project came about when the Health Services Branch at the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care asked MAS to provide an evidentiary platform on effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of non-invasive cardiac imaging modalities. After an initial review of the strategy and consultation with experts, MAS identified five key non-invasive cardiac imaging technologies for the diagnosis of CAD. Evidence-based analyses have been prepared for each of these five imaging modalities: cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, single photon emission computed tomography, 64-slice computed tomographic angiography, stress echocardiography, and stress echocardiography with contrast. For each technology, an economic analysis was also completed (where appropriate). A summary decision analytic model was then developed to encapsulate the data from each of these reports (available on the OHTAC and MAS website). The Non-Invasive Cardiac Imaging Technologies for the Diagnosis of Coronary Artery Disease series is made up of the following reports, which can be publicly accessed at the MAS website at: www.health.gov.on.ca/mas or at www.health.gov.on.ca/english/providers/program/mas/mas_about.html Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography for the Diagnosis of Coronary Artery Disease: An Evidence-Based Analysis Stress Echocardiography for the Diagnosis of Coronary Artery Disease: An Evidence-Based Analysis Stress Echocardiography with Contrast for the Diagnosis of Coronary Artery Disease: An Evidence-Based Analysis 64-Slice Computed Tomographic Angiography for the Diagnosis of Coronary Artery Disease: An Evidence-Based Analysis Cardiac

  20. Shifting wavelengths of ultraweak photon emissions from dying melanoma cells: their chemical enhancement and blocking are predicted by Cosic's theory of resonant recognition model for macromolecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dotta, Blake T.; Murugan, Nirosha J.; Karbowski, Lukasz M.; Lafrenie, Robert M.; Persinger, Michael A.

    2014-02-01

    During the first 24 h after removal from incubation, melanoma cells in culture displayed reliable increases in emissions of photons of specific wavelengths during discrete portions of this interval. Applications of specific filters revealed marked and protracted increases in infrared (950 nm) photons about 7 h after removal followed 3 h later by marked and protracted increases in near ultraviolet (370 nm) photon emissions. Specific wavelengths within the visible (400 to 800 nm) peaked 12 to 24 h later. Specific activators or inhibitors for specific wavelengths based upon Cosic's resonant recognition model elicited either enhancement or diminishment of photons at the specific wavelength as predicted. Inhibitors or activators predicted for other wavelengths, even within 10 nm, were less or not effective. There is now evidence for quantitative coupling between the wavelength of photon emissions and intrinsic cellular chemistry. The results are consistent with initial activation of signaling molecules associated with infrared followed about 3 h later by growth and protein-structural factors associated with ultraviolet. The greater-than-expected photon counts compared with raw measures through the various filters, which also function as reflective material to other photons, suggest that photons of different wavelengths might be self-stimulatory and could play a significant role in cell-to-cell communication.

  1. Shifting wavelengths of ultraweak photon emissions from dying melanoma cells: their chemical enhancement and blocking are predicted by Cosic's theory of resonant recognition model for macromolecules.

    PubMed

    Dotta, Blake T; Murugan, Nirosha J; Karbowski, Lukasz M; Lafrenie, Robert M; Persinger, Michael A

    2014-02-01

    During the first 24 h after removal from incubation, melanoma cells in culture displayed reliable increases in emissions of photons of specific wavelengths during discrete portions of this interval. Applications of specific filters revealed marked and protracted increases in infrared (950 nm) photons about 7 h after removal followed 3 h later by marked and protracted increases in near ultraviolet (370 nm) photon emissions. Specific wavelengths within the visible (400 to 800 nm) peaked 12 to 24 h later. Specific activators or inhibitors for specific wavelengths based upon Cosic's resonant recognition model elicited either enhancement or diminishment of photons at the specific wavelength as predicted. Inhibitors or activators predicted for other wavelengths, even within 10 nm, were less or not effective. There is now evidence for quantitative coupling between the wavelength of photon emissions and intrinsic cellular chemistry. The results are consistent with initial activation of signaling molecules associated with infrared followed about 3 h later by growth and protein-structural factors associated with ultraviolet. The greater-than-expected photon counts compared with raw measures through the various filters, which also function as reflective material to other photons, suggest that photons of different wavelengths might be self-stimulatory and could play a significant role in cell-to-cell communication.

  2. Anatomic characterization of human ultra-weak photon emission in practitioners of transcendental meditation(TM) and control subjects.

    PubMed

    Van Wijk, Eduard P A; Koch, Heike; Bosman, Saskia; Van Wijk, Roeland

    2006-01-01

    Research on human ultra-weak photon emission (UPE, biophoton emission) has raised the question whether a typical human emission anatomic percentage distribution pattern exists in addition to individual subject overall anatomic summation intensity differences. The lowest UPE intensities were observed in two subjects who regularly meditate. Spectral analysis of human UPE has suggested that ultra-weak emission is probably, at least in part, a reflection of free radical reactions in a living system. It has been documented that various physiologic and biochemical shifts follow the long-term practice of meditation and it is inferred that meditation may impact free radical activity. To systematically quantify, in subjects with long-term transcendental meditation (TM) experience and subjects without this experience, the UPE emission of the anterior torso, head and neck plus the hands in an attempt to document the differences by the two groups. Subjects were 20 men reported to be healthy and nonsmokers. Each of the subjects in the meditation group had practiced TM twice daily for at least the past 10 years. UPE in 20 subjects was recorded in a dark room using a highly sensitive, cooled photomultiplier system designed for manipulation in three directions. The protocol for multisite registration of spontaneous emission includes recording of 12 anatomic locations of anterior torso, head, and hands. Data demonstrate emission intensities that are lower in TM practitioners as compared to control subjects. The percent contribution of emission from most anatomic locations was not significantly different for TM practitioners and control subjects. Exceptions are the contributions of throat and palm. In subjects with long-term TM experience, the UPE emission is different from control subjects. Data support the hypothesis that free radical reactions can be influenced by TM.

  3. Enhanced fluorescence emission using a photonic crystal coupled to an optical cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokhriyal, Anusha; Lu, Meng; Chaudhery, Vikram; George, Sherine; Cunningham, Brian T.

    2013-06-01

    All fluorescent assays would benefit from greater signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs), which enable detection of disease biomarkers at lower concentrations for earlier disease diagnosis and detection of genes that are expressed at the lowest levels. Here, we report an approach to enhance fluorescence in which surface adsorbed fluorophore-tagged biomolecules are excited on a photonic crystal surface that is coupled to an underlying Fabry-Perot type cavity through a gold mirror reflector beneath the photonic crystal. This approach leads to 6× increase in signal-to-noise ratio of a dye labeled polypeptide compared to ordinary photonic crystal enhanced fluorescence.

  4. Enhanced fluorescence emission using a photonic crystal coupled to an optical cavity

    PubMed Central

    Pokhriyal, Anusha; Lu, Meng; Chaudhery, Vikram; George, Sherine; Cunningham, Brian T.

    2013-01-01

    All fluorescent assays would benefit from greater signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs), which enable detection of disease biomarkers at lower concentrations for earlier disease diagnosis and detection of genes that are expressed at the lowest levels. Here, we report an approach to enhance fluorescence in which surface adsorbed fluorophore-tagged biomolecules are excited on a photonic crystal surface that is coupled to an underlying Fabry-Perot type cavity through a gold mirror reflector beneath the photonic crystal. This approach leads to 6× increase in signal-to-noise ratio of a dye labeled polypeptide compared to ordinary photonic crystal enhanced fluorescence. PMID:23825806

  5. Five-element Johann-type x-ray emission spectrometer with a single-photon-counting pixel detector

    SciTech Connect

    Kleymenov, Evgeny; Bokhoven, Jeroen A. van; David, Christian; Janousch, Markus; Studer, Marco; Willimann, Markus; Bergamaschi, Anna; Henrich, Beat; Nachtegaal, Maarten; Glatzel, Pieter; Alonso-Mori, Roberto

    2011-06-15

    A Johann-type spectrometer with five spherically bent crystals and a pixel detector was constructed for a range of hard x-ray photon-in photon-out synchrotron techniques, covering a Bragg-angle range of 60 deg. - 88 deg. The spectrometer provides a sub emission line width energy resolution from sub-eV to a few eV and precise energy calibration, better than 1.5 eV for the full range of Bragg angles. The use of a pixel detector allows fast and easy optimization of the signal-to-background ratio. A concentration detection limit below 0.4 wt% was reached at the Cu K{alpha}{sub 1} line. The spectrometer is designed as a modular mobile device for easy integration in a multi-purpose hard x-ray synchrotron beamline, such as the SuperXAS beamline at the Swiss Light Source.

  6. Effective theory of dark matter decay into monochromatic photons and its implications: Constraints from associated cosmic-ray emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gustafsson, Michael; Hambye, Thomas; Scarnà, Tiziana

    2013-07-01

    We show that there exists only a quite limited number of higher dimensional operators which can naturally lead to a slow decay of dark matter particles into monochromatic photons. As each of these operators inevitably induces decays into particles other than photons, we show that the γ-lines it induces are always accompanied by a continuum flux of cosmic rays. Hence constraints on cosmic-ray fluxes imply constraints on the intensity of γ-lines and vice versa. A comparison with up to date observational bounds shows the possibilities to observe or exclude cosmic rays associated to γ-line emission, so that one could better determine the properties of the DM particle, possibly discriminating between some of the operators.

  7. Five-element Johann-type x-ray emission spectrometer with a single-photon-counting pixel detector.

    PubMed

    Kleymenov, Evgeny; van Bokhoven, Jeroen A; David, Christian; Glatzel, Pieter; Janousch, Markus; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Studer, Marco; Willimann, Markus; Bergamaschi, Anna; Henrich, Beat; Nachtegaal, Maarten

    2011-06-01

    A Johann-type spectrometer with five spherically bent crystals and a pixel detector was constructed for a range of hard x-ray photon-in photon-out synchrotron techniques, covering a Bragg-angle range of 60°-88°. The spectrometer provides a sub emission line width energy resolution from sub-eV to a few eV and precise energy calibration, better than 1.5 eV for the full range of Bragg angles. The use of a pixel detector allows fast and easy optimization of the signal-to-background ratio. A concentration detection limit below 0.4 wt% was reached at the Cu Kα(1) line. The spectrometer is designed as a modular mobile device for easy integration in a multi-purpose hard x-ray synchrotron beamline, such as the SuperXAS beamline at the Swiss Light Source.

  8. Cerebral Hypoperfusion in Hereditary Coproporphyria (HCP): A Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) Study

    PubMed Central

    Valle, Guido; Guida, Claudio Carmine; Nasuto, Michelangelo; Totaro, Manuela; Aucella, Filippo; Frusciante, Vincenzo; Di Mauro, Lazzaro; Potenza, Adele; Savino, Maria; Stanislao, Mario; Popolizio, Teresa; Guglielmi, Giuseppe; Giagulli, Vito Angelo; Guastamacchia, Edoardo; Triggiani, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hereditary Coproporphyria (HCP) is characterized by abdominal pain, neurologic symptoms and psychiatric disorders, even if it might remain asymptomatic. The pathophysiology of both neurologic and psychiatric symptoms is not fully understood. Therefore, aiming to evaluate a possible role of brain blood flow disorders, we have retrospectively investigated cerebral perfusion patterns in Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) studies in HCP patients. Materials & Methods: We retrospectively evaluated the medical records of patients diagnosed as being affected by HCP. A total of seven HCP patients had been submitted to brain perfusion SPECT study with 99mTc-Exametazime (hexamethylpropyleneamine oxime, HMPAO) or with its functionally equivalent 99mTc-Bicisate (ECD or Neurolite) according with common procedures. In 3 patients the scintigraphic study had been repeated for a second time after the first evaluation at 3, 10 and 20 months, respectively. All the studied subjects had been also submitted to an electromyographic and a Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) study of the brain. Results: Mild to moderate perfusion defects were detected in temporal lobes (all 7 patients), frontal lobes (6 patients) and parietal lobes (4 patients). Occipital lobe, basal ganglia and cerebellar involvement were never observed. In the three subjects in which SPECT study was repeated, some recovery of hypo-perfused areas and appearance of new perfusion defects in other brain regions have been found. In all patients electromyography resulted normal and MRI detected few unspecific gliotic lesions only in one patient. Discussion & Conclusions: Since perfusion abnormalities were usually mild to moderate, this can probably explain the normal pattern observed at MRI studies. Compared to MRI, SPECT with 99mTc showed higher sensitivity in HCP patients. Changes observed in HCP patients who had more than one study suggest that transient perfusion defects might be due to a brain

  9. Central representation of phantom limb phenomenon in amputees studied with single photon emission computerized tomography.

    PubMed

    Liaw, M Y; You, D L; Cheng, P T; Kao, P F; Wong, A M

    1998-01-01

    To explore the possible mechanisms of phantom limb discomfort after amputation, three amputees with phantom limb pain were studied. This study examined the change of regional cerebral blood flow using technetium-99m hexamethylpropyleneamine oxime-single photon emission computerized tomography, which was arranged at the time of severe phantom limb discomfort and after the discomfort subsided or was completely relieved. Nine representative transverse slices parallel to the orbitomeatal line were selected for quantification. The cortical ribbon (2-cm thickness) was equally subdivided into 12 symmetrical pairs of sector regions of interest in each slice. The irregularly shaped regions of interest were drawn manually around the right thalamus and basal ganglion and then mirrored to the left thalamus and basal ganglion. The contralateral to ipsilateral ratio of regional cerebral blood flow for each area was calculated. The intensity of phantom limb pain was evaluated on a 0 to 10 visual analog scale. In Cases 1 and 2, the contralateral to ipsilateral regional cerebral blood flow ratios of multiple areas of the frontal, temporal, or parietal lobes were increased at the time of more severe phantom limb pain, and the ratios were normalized or even decreased when the phantom limb pain subsided. In Case 3, increased contralateral to ipsilateral regional cerebral blood flow ratios were also found over the frontal, temporal, and parietal lobe. However, most of the increased regional cerebral blood flow ratios of regions of interest in the first study persisted in the follow-up study. Also, the regional cerebral blood flow ratios of greater number of regions of interest of the same gyrus and new gyrus were increased. There was no significant right-left difference of regional cerebral blood flow over bilateral thalami and basal ganglia in all three cases. The results suggested that phantom limb pain might be associated with cortical activation involving the frontal, temporal, or

  10. Quantitative pulmonary single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with radiotherapy applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarfone, Christopher

    1998-09-01

    The potential benefits of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) lung perfusion imaging for 3- dimensional radiation treatment planning and dose- response analysis, are currently being investigated. Accurate and precise SPECT quantification may facilitate the development of models to predict radiation-induced pulmonary dysfunction prior to treatment. The purpose of this research was to quantitatively evaluate the accuracy and precision of SPECT filtered backprojection (FBP) and maximum likelihood-expectation maximization (ML-EM) image reconstruction methods for measuring absolute and relative activity concentration estimates in the lungs. The investigation is conducted using Monte Carlo simulation and validation, experimental phantom studies and applications to patient data. The scatter response function and scatter fraction (SF) for the lung is measured using Monte Carlo simulation and experimental imaging of point and line sources surrounded by lung density media. The Monte Carlo (experimental) SF value for lung density material is determined to be 14.86% (14.01%) for the line source and 18.88% (20.32%) for the point source. Quantitative experimental evaluation of FBP and ML-EM reconstruction techniques is performed using an anthropomorphic torso phantom containing spherical defects (simulating areas of reduced perfusion) of inner diameters 1.4 cm, 3.4 cm, and 5.6 cm at sphere:background concentration ratios of 0:1, 0.38:1, 0.47:1, 0.51:1, 0.70:1. Quantification is examined as a function of attenuation, scatter constant (k, range = 0.45 to 2.00), total iteration number (5 → 500) and deconvolution (Metz) filter power (X, range = 2.0 to 10.0). Relative (to lung background) and absolute quantification is performed using region of interest (ROI) analysis. A dependence of quantitative accuracy on both defect diameter and density is observed. In general, percent bias increases as defect diameter and density decrease. Also, negative bias in the lung

  11. [Myocardial single photon emission tomography imaging of reporter gene expression in rabbits].

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Lan, Xiao-li; Zhang, Liang; Wu, Tao; Jiang, Ri-feng; Zhang, Yong-xue

    2009-06-01

    To explore the feasibility of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) detection of heart reporter gene expression and observed the optimal transfecting titer and imaging time by using herpes simplex virus 1-thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) as reporter gene and 131I-2'-fluoro-2'-deoxy-1-beta-D-arabinofuranosyl-5-iodouracil (131I-FIAU) as reporter probe in rabbit myocardium. The recombinant Ad-tk carrying HSV1-tk gene and adenovirus (Ad) as vector was constructed and intramyocardially injected to rabbits at various concentrations (1 x 10(9) pfu, 5 x 10(8) pfu, 1 x 10(8) pfu, 5 x 10(7) pfu, 1 x 10(7) pfu). Two days later, rabbits were injected with 600 microCi 131I-FIAU in ear-margin vein and then underwent SPECT myocardium imaging for detection of HSV1-tk expression at 6 h, 24 h, 48 h and 72 h after injection, rabbits with 1 x 10(9) pfu Ad-tk injection were imaged at 96 h and 120 h. Rabbits were sacrificed after imaging and the total myocardial 131I-FIAU accumulation was quantified in percent of injected dose per gram myocardium (% ID/g). The myocardial Ad-tk expression was determined with RT-PCR. Reporter gene was detected by SPECT imaging in the injection site while not detected in the control myocardium and site remote from injection. RT-PCR results also evidenced HSV1-tk express in the injection site. The SPECT target/nontarget ratio was correlated with ex vivo gamma-counting (r2 = 0.933, P<0.01) and expression of HSV1-tk (r2 = 0.877, P<0.01). Myocardial accumulation could be identified at viral titers as low as 1 x 10(7) pfu by SPECT imaging. The cardiac SPECT reporter gene imaging with HSV1-tk as reporter gene and 131I-FIAU as reporter probe is feasible.

  12. Evaluating the role of single-photon emission computed tomography in the assessment of neurotologic complaints.

    PubMed

    Joglekar, Shruti S; Bell, Jason R; Caroline, Malka; Chase, Paul J; Domesek, James; Patel, Pinal S; Sataloff, Robert T

    2014-01-01

    We conducted a retrospective study to reexamine the value of single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in the evaluation of patients with neurotologic complaints, and to assess the intra- and inter-radiologist variability of SPECT readings. Our study population was made up of 63 patients--23 men and 40 women, aged 34 to 91 years (mean: 59)--who had presented to a tertiary care otolaryngology practice and university hospital for evaluation of head trauma, sensorineural hearing loss, tinnitus, and/or vertigo. All patients had undergone brain scanning with SPECT during their evaluation, and almost all had also undergone magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and standard computed tomography (CT). We compared the findings of all three imaging modalities in terms of their ability to detect neurotologic abnormalities. We found that detection rates were very similar among the three modalities; abnormalities were found in 24% of SPECT scans, 26% of MRIs, and 23% of CTs. Nevertheless, we did find that among 60 patients who underwent all three types of imaging, 13 (22%) exhibited areas of cerebral hypoperfusion on SPECT while their MRIs and CTs were read as either normal or nonspecific. In all, 18 of these 60 patients (30%) exhibited normal or nonspecific findings on all three types of imaging. In addition, when SPECT scans were read by the same radiologist at different times, different results were reported for 17 of the 63 scans (27%). Likewise, when SPECT scans were read by different radiologists, different results were reported for 21 of 63 scans (33%). We conclude that SPECT may be a valuable complementary diagnostic modality for making a comprehensive neurotologic evaluation and that it may detect abnormalities in some patients whose other imaging is read as normal. However, we did not find that SPECT was the most sensitive of the three modalities in neurotologic evaluation, as we had previously found in a preliminary study that the senior author (R.T.S.) published

  13. Cerebral Hypoperfusion in Hereditary Coproporphyria (HCP): A Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) Study.

    PubMed

    Valle, Guido; Guida, Claudio Carmine; Nasuto, Michelangelo; Totaro, Manuela; Aucella, Filippo; Frusciante, Vincenzo; Di Mauro, Lazzaro; Potenza, Adele; Savino, Maria; Stanislao, Mario; Popolizio, Teresa; Guglielmi, Giuseppe; Giagulli, Vito Angelo; Guastamacchia, Edoardo; Triggiani, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Hereditary Coproporphyria (HCP) is characterized by abdominal pain, neurologic symptoms and psychiatric disorders, even if it might remain asymptomatic. The pathophysiology of both neurologic and psychiatric symptoms is not fully understood. Therefore, aiming to evaluate a possible role of brain blood flow disorders, we have retrospectively investigated cerebral perfusion patterns in Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) studies in HCP patients. We retrospectively evaluated the medical records of patients diagnosed as being affected by HCP. A total of seven HCP patients had been submitted to brain perfusion SPECT study with 99mTc-Exametazime (hexamethylpropyleneamine oxime, HMPAO) or with its functionally equivalent 99mTc-Bicisate (ECD or Neurolite) according with common procedures. In 3 patients the scintigraphic study had been repeated for a second time after the first evaluation at 3, 10 and 20 months, respectively. All the studied subjects had been also submitted to an electromyographic and a Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) study of the brain. Mild to moderate perfusion defects were detected in temporal lobes (all 7 patients), frontal lobes (6 patients) and parietal lobes (4 patients). Occipital lobe, basal ganglia and cerebellar involvement were never observed. In the three subjects in which SPECT study was repeated, some recovery of hypo-perfused areas and appearance of new perfusion defects in other brain regions have been found. In all patients electromyography resulted normal and MRI detected few unspecific gliotic lesions only in one patient. Discussion & Conclusions: Since perfusion abnormalities were usually mild to moderate, this can probably explain the normal pattern observed at MRI studies. Compared to MRI, SPECT with 99mTc showed higher sensitivity in HCP patients. Changes observed in HCP patients who had more than one study suggest that transient perfusion defects might be due to a brain artery spasm possibly leading to psychiatric

  14. Temperature-dependent spontaneous emission of PbS quantum dots inside photonic nanostructures at telecommunication wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birowosuto, Muhammad Danang; Takiguchi, Masato; Olivier, Aurelien; Tobing, Landobasa Y.; Kuramochi, Eiichi; Yokoo, Atsushi; Hong, Wang; Notomi, Masaya

    2017-01-01

    Spontaneous emission of PbS quantum dots (QDs) in different photonic nanostructures has been studied. We use the temperature-dependent exciton photoluminescence and the classic dipole near interface models to understand the spontaneous emission control at various temperatures. Then, we demonstrate that the enhancement and the inhibition of PbS QDs due to the local density of states (LDOS) inside nanostructures are more efficient at temperature as low as 77 K than the inhibition at 300 K. Largest emission rate enhancement at 77 K of 1.67 ± 0.10 and inhibition factors at 100 K of 2.27 ± 0.15 are reported for the gold (Au) planar mirror and silicon (Si) two-dimensional photonic crystal bandgap, respectively. We attribute those enhancement and inhibition to the large quantum yields Qe at low temperatures, which is much larger than that at 300 K. These results are relevant for application and optimization of PbS QDs in nanophotonics at telecommunication wavelength.

  15. AURORA on MEGSAT 1: a photon counting observatory for the Earth UV night-sky background and Aurora emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monfardini, A.; Trampus, P.; Stalio, R.; Mahne, N.; Battiston, R.; Menichelli, M.; Mazzinghi, P.

    2001-08-01

    A low-mass, low-cost photon-counting scientific payload has been developed and launched on a commercial microsatellite in order to study the near-UV night-sky background emission with a telescope nicknamed ``Notte'' and the Aurora emission with ``Alba''. AURORA, this is the name of the experiment, will determine, with the ``Notte'' channel, the overall night-side photon background in the 300-400nm spectral range, together with a particular 2+N2 line (λc=337nm). The ``Alba'' channel, on the other hand, will study the Aurora emissions in four different spectral bands (FWHM=8.4-9.6nm) centered on: 367nm (continuum evaluation), 391nm (1-N+2), 535nm (continuum evaluation), 560nm (OI). The instrument has been launched on the 26 September, 2000 from the Baikonur cosmodrome on a modified SS18 Dnepr-1 ``Satan'' rocket. The satellite orbit is nearly circular (hapogee=648km, /e=0.0022), and the inclination of the orbital plane is 64.56°. An overview of the techniques adopted is given in this paper.

  16. Controlled single-photon emission from a single trapped two-level atom.

    PubMed

    Darquié, B; Jones, M P A; Dingjan, J; Beugnon, J; Bergamini, S; Sortais, Y; Messin, G; Browaeys, A; Grangier, P

    2005-07-15

    By illuminating an individual rubidium atom stored in a tight optical tweezer with short resonant light pulses, we created an efficient triggered source of single photons with a well-defined polarization. The measured intensity correlation of the emitted light pulses exhibits almost perfect antibunching. Such a source of high-rate, fully controlled single-photon pulses has many potential applications for quantum information processing.

  17. Optical patch antennas for single photon emission using surface plasmon resonances.

    PubMed

    Esteban, R; Teperik, T V; Greffet, J J

    2010-01-15

    Single photon sources can greatly benefit from specially designed structures that modify the properties of the photon emitter. Dielectric cavities are often discussed, but they require a compromise between the spectral width and Purcell factor. In this Letter, we introduce plasmonic cavities as promising alternatives. We first study how the emitter couples with the modes of such structures. We then show how a patch antenna configuration simultaneously presents a large Purcell factor, collection efficiency, and spectral width.

  18. Coupling of Ag Nanoparticle with Inverse Opal Photonic Crystals as a Novel Strategy for Upconversion Emission Enhancement of NaYF4: Yb(3+), Er(3+) Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Shao, Bo; Yang, Zhengwen; Wang, Yida; Li, Jun; Yang, Jianzhi; Qiu, Jianbei; Song, Zhiguo

    2015-11-18

    Rare-earth-ion-doped upconversion (UC) nanoparticles have generated considerable interest because of their potential application in solar cells, biological labeling, therapeutics, and imaging. However, the applications of UC nanoparticles were still limited because of their low emission efficiency. Photonic crystals and noble metal nanoparticles are applied extensively to enhance the UC emission of rare earth ions. In the present work, a novel substrate consisting of inverse opal photonic crystals and Ag nanoparticles was prepared by the template-assisted method, which was used to enhance the UC emission of NaYF4: Yb(3+), Er(3+) nanoparticles. The red or green UC emissions of NaYF4: Yb(3+), Er(3+) nanoparticles were selectively enhanced on the inverse opal substrates because of the Bragg reflection of the photonic band gap. Additionally, the UC emission enhancement of NaYF4: Yb(3+), Er(3+) nanoparticles induced by the coupling of metal nanoparticle plasmons and photonic crystal effects was realized on the Ag nanoparticles included in the inverse opal substrate. The present results demonstrated that coupling of Ag nanoparticle with inverse opal photonic crystals provides a useful strategy to enhance UC emission of rare-earth-ion-doped nanoparticles.

  19. Single photon emission tomography in neurological studies: Instrumentation and clinical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikkinen, Paivi Helena

    One triple head and two single head gamma camera systems were used for single photon emission tomography (SPET) imaging of both patients and brain phantoms. Studies with an anatomical brain phantom were performed for evaluation of reconstruction and correction methods in brain perfusion SPET studies. The use of the triple head gamma camera system resulted in a significant increase in image contrast and resolution. This was mainly due to better imaging geometry and the use of a high resolution collimator. The conventional Chang attenuation correction was found suitable for the brain perfusion studies. In the brain perfusion studies region of interest (ROI) based semiquantitation methods were used. A ROI map based on anatomical areas was used in 70 elderly persons (age range 55-85 years) without neurological diseases and in patients suffering from encephalitis or having had a cardiac arrest. Semiquantitative reference values are presented. For the 14 patients with encephalitis the right-to-left side differences were calculated. Defect volume indexes were calculated for 64 patients with brain infarcts. For the 30 cardiac arrest patients the defect percentages and the anteroposterior ratios were used for semiquantitation. It is concluded that different semiquantitation methods are needed for the various patient groups. Age-related reference values will improve the interpretation of SPET data. For validation of the basal ganglia receptor studies measurements were performed using a cylindrical and an anatomical striatal phantom. In these measurements conventional and transmission imaging based non-uniform attenuation corrections were compared. A calibration curve was calculated for the determination of the specific receptor uptake ratio. In the phantom studies using the triple head camera the uptake ratio obtained from simultaneous transmission-emission protocol (STEP) acquisition and iterative reconstruction was closest to the true activity ratio. Conventional

  20. Diagnosis of sclerosing cholangitis with technetium 99m-labeled iminodiacetic acid planar and single photon emission computed tomographic scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Rodman, C.A.; Keeffe, E.B.; Lieberman, D.A.; Krishnamurthy, S.; Krishnamurthy, G.T.; Gilbert, S.; Eklem, M.J.

    1987-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether /sup 99m/Tc-iminodiacetic acid planar biliary scintigraphy combined with single photon emission computed tomography could detect sclerosing cholangitis and provide additional information regarding the extent and severity of disease. Thirteen patients with sclerosing cholangitis and 13 normal control subjects were studied. Scintigraphic results were also compared with previously reported studies of patients with isolated common bile duct obstruction and with primary biliary cirrhosis. The planar scintigraphy in patients with sclerosing cholangitis showed beading or bandlike constrictions of the biliary tract corresponding to lesions seen on cholangiography, and the image pattern was distinctly different from images obtained from patients with isolated common bile duct obstruction or primary biliary cirrhosis. The single photon emission computed tomography images of the liver in patients with sclerosing cholangitis demonstrated multiple focal areas of /sup 99m/Tc-iminodiacetic acid retention, representing bile stasis in intrahepatic bile ducts. Compared to controls, the mean hepatic clearance half-time of /sup 99m/Tc-iminodiacetic acid was markedly delayed in patients with sclerosing cholangitis (6-10 times normal). Individual patients with sclerosing cholangitis had wider variation in isotope clearance half-time from three regions of the liver than patients with isolated common bile duct obstruction, consistent with regional difference in disease severity and variable impairment of bile flow. In 4 patients with sclerosing cholangitis with incomplete filling of the right and left hepatic ducts at cholangiography, planar and single photon emission computed tomographic scintigraphy provided evidence of significant intrahepatic sclerosing cholangitis.