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Sample records for photon energy spectrum

  1. Inclusive photon energy spectrum in B decays

    SciTech Connect

    Greub, C. )

    1992-02-01

    We present a theoretical estimate for the inclusive photon energy spectrum in direct decays of [ital B]-mesons taking into account both the charged current (CC) and flavour changing neutral current (FCNC) processes. It is shown that the various components in the inclusive spectrum can in principle be disentangled. In particular, the high energy part of the photon energy spectrum is dominated by the electromagnetic penguins. Its measurement could provide the first direct determination of the CKM matrix element [vert bar][ital V][sub [ital ts

  2. Monte Carlo Estimate to Improve Photon Energy Spectrum Reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawchuk, S.

    Improvements to planning radiation treatment for cancer patients and quality control of medical linear accelerators (linacs) can be achieved with the explicit knowledge of the photon energy spectrum. Monte Carlo (MC) simulations of linac treatment heads and experimental attenuation analysis are among the most popular ways of obtaining these spectra. Attenuation methods which combine measurements under narrow beam geometry and the associated calculation techniques to reconstruct the spectrum from the acquired data are very practical in a clinical setting and they can also serve to validate MC simulations. A novel reconstruction method [1] which has been modified [2] utilizes a Simpson's rule (SR) to approximate and discretize (1)

  3. High energy limit of single photon channeling radiation spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khokonov, M. Kh.; Efendiev, K. V.

    2006-11-01

    The properties of channeling radiation spectra for above 100 GeV electrons have been studied with account of multiple scattering and radiation cooling. It has been shown, that the shape of a spectrum does not depend neither on energy of electrons, nor on the atomic number of a target when the energy of electrons exceeds ˜1 TeV. The consideration is based on the uniform field approximation (UFA). Simple phenomenological expressions are presented which describe the radiation spectrum with good degree of accuracy. It has been shown, that the radiation length in the high energy limit depends weakly on the energy of incident electrons.

  4. Low energy photon mimic of the tritium beta decay energy spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malabre-O'Sullivan, Neville

    Tritium is a radioactive hydrogen isotope that is typically produced via neutron interaction with heavy water (D2O), producing tritiated water (DTO). As a result of this, tritium accounts for roughly a third of all occupational exposures at a CANDU type nuclear power plant. This identifies a need to study the biological effects associated with tritium (and low energy electrons in general). However, there are complications regarding the dosimetry of tritium, as well as difficulties in handling and using tritium for the purposes of biophysics experiments. To avoid these difficulties, an experiment has been proposed using photons to mimic the beta decay energy spectrum of tritium. This would allow simulation of the radiation properties of tritium, so that a surrogate photon source can be used for biophysics experiments. Through experimental and computational means, this work has explored the use of characteristic x-rays of various materials to modify the output spectrum of an x-ray source, such that it mimics the tritium beta decay spectrum. Additionally, the resultant primary electron spectrum generated in water from an x-ray source was simulated. The results from this research have indicated that the use of characteristic x-rays is not a viable method for simulating a tritium source. Also, the primary electron spectrum generated in water shows some promise for simulating tritium exposure, however further work must be done to investigate the slowing down electron spectrum. Keywords: Tritium, MCNP, low energy electrons, biophysics, characteristic x-rays.

  5. Effect of photon energy spectrum on dosimetric parameters of brachytherapy sources

    PubMed Central

    Ghorbani, Mahdi; Davenport, David

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Aim The aim of this study is to quantify the influence of the photon energy spectrum of brachytherapy sources on task group No. 43 (TG-43) dosimetric parameters. Background Different photon spectra are used for a specific radionuclide in Monte Carlo simulations of brachytherapy sources. Materials and methods MCNPX code was used to simulate 125I, 103Pd, 169Yb, and 192Ir brachytherapy sources. Air kerma strength per activity, dose rate constant, radial dose function, and two dimensional (2D) anisotropy functions were calculated and isodose curves were plotted for three different photon energy spectra. The references for photon energy spectra were: published papers, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), and National Nuclear Data Center (NNDC). The data calculated by these photon energy spectra were compared. Results Dose rate constant values showed a maximum difference of 24.07% for 103Pd source with different photon energy spectra. Radial dose function values based on different spectra were relatively the same. 2D anisotropy function values showed minor differences in most of distances and angles. There was not any detectable difference between the isodose contours. Conclusions Dosimetric parameters obtained with different photon spectra were relatively the same, however it is suggested that more accurate and updated photon energy spectra be used in Monte Carlo simulations. This would allow for calculation of reliable dosimetric data for source modeling and calculation in brachytherapy treatment planning systems. PMID:27247558

  6. The energy spectrum of 662 keV photons in a water equivalent phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akar Tarim, U.; Gurler, O.; Ozmutlu, E. N.; Yalcin, S.; Gundogdu, O.; Sharaf, J. M.; Bradley, D. A.

    2012-07-01

    Investigation is made on the energy spectrum of photons originating from interactions of 662 keV primary gamma-ray photons emitted by a point source positioned at the centre of a water equivalent solid phantom of dimensions 19 cm×19 cm×24 cm. Peaks resulting from total energy loss (photopeak) and multiple and back scattering have been observed using a 51 mm×51 mm NaI(Tl) detector; good agreement being found between the measured and simulated response functions. The energy spectrum of the gamma photons obtained through the Monte Carlo simulation reveals local maxima at about 100 keV and 210 keV, being also observed in the experimental response function. Such spectra can be used as a method of testing the water equivalence of solid phantom media before their use for dosimetry measurements.

  7. Variability in fluence and spectrum of high-energy photon bursts produced by lightning leaders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celestin, Sebastien; Xu, Wei; Pasko, Victor P.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we model the production and acceleration of thermal runaway electrons during negative corona flash stages of stepping lightning leaders and the corresponding terrestrial gamma ray flashes (TGFs) or negative cloud-to-ground (-CG) lightning-produced X-ray bursts in a unified fashion. We show how the source photon spectrum and fluence depend on the potential drop formed in the lightning leader tip region during corona flash and how the X-ray burst spectrum progressively converges toward typical TGF spectrum as the potential drop increases. Additionally, we show that the number of streamers produced in a negative corona flash, the source electron energy distribution function, the corresponding number of photons, and the photon energy distribution and transport through the atmosphere up to low-orbit satellite altitudes exhibit a very strong dependence on this potential drop. This leads to a threshold effect causing X-rays produced by leaders with potentials lower than those producing typical TGFs extremely unlikely to be detected by low-orbit satellites. Moreover, from the number of photons in X-ray bursts produced by -CGs estimated from ground observations, we show that the proportionality between the number of thermal runaway electrons and the square of the potential drop in the leader tip region during negative corona flash proposed earlier leads to typical photon fluences on the order of 1 ph/cm2 at an altitude of 500 km and a radial distance of 200 km for intracloud lightning discharges producing 300 MV potential drops, which is consistent with observations of TGF fluences and spectra from satellites.

  8. Exclusive Measurements of the b to s gamma Transition Rate and Photon Energy Spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Brown, David Nathan; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D.J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T.S.; McKenna, J.A.; Khan, A.; Blinov, V.E.; Buzykaev, A.R.; /more authors..

    2012-08-30

    We use 429 fb{sup -1} of e{sup +}e{sup -} collision data collected at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector to measure the radiative transition rate of b {yields} s{gamma} with a sum of 38 exclusive final states. The inclusive branching fraction with a minimum photon energy of 1.9 GeV is found to be {Beta}({bar B} {yields} Xs{gamma}) = (3.29 {+-} 0.19 {+-} 0.48) x 10{sup -4} where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic. We also measure the first and second moments of the photon energy spectrum and extract the best fit values for the heavy-quark parameters, m{sub b} and {mu}{sub {pi}}{sup 2}, in the kinetic and shape function models.

  9. Exclusive measurements of b→sγ transition rate and photon energy spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Brown, D. N.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Lynch, G.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D. J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; Khan, A.; Blinov, V. E.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Yushkov, A. N.; Bondioli, M.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Mandelkern, M.; Atmacan, H.; Gary, J. W.; Liu, F.; Long, O.; Vitug, G. M.; Campagnari, C.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Richman, J. D.; West, C. A.; Eisner, A. M.; Kroseberg, J.; Lockman, W. S.; Martinez, A. J.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Chao, D. S.; Cheng, C. H.; Doll, D. A.; Echenard, B.; Flood, K. T.; Hitlin, D. G.; Ongmongkolkul, P.; Porter, F. C.; Rakitin, A. Y.; Andreassen, R.; Huard, Z.; Meadows, B. T.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Sun, L.; Bloom, P. C.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, S. R.; Ayad, R.; Toki, W. H.; Spaan, B.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Bernard, D.; Verderi, M.; Clark, P. J.; Playfer, S.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cibinetto, G.; Fioravanti, E.; Garzia, I.; Luppi, E.; Munerato, M.; Negrini, M.; Piemontese, L.; Santoro, V.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Contri, R.; Guido, E.; Lo Vetere, M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Bhuyan, B.; Prasad, V.; Lee, C. L.; Morii, M.; Edwards, A. J.; Adametz, A.; Uwer, U.; Lacker, H. M.; Lueck, T.; Dauncey, P. D.; Behera, P. K.; Mallik, U.; Chen, C.; Cochran, J.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rubin, A. E.; Gritsan, A. V.; Guo, Z. J.; Arnaud, N.; Davier, M.; Derkach, D.; Grosdidier, G.; Le Diberder, F.; Lutz, A. M.; Malaescu, B.; Roudeau, P.; Schune, M. H.; Stocchi, A.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Chavez, C. A.; Coleman, J. P.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; Di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Sigamani, M.; Cowan, G.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Griessinger, K.; Hafner, A.; Prencipe, E.; Bailey, D.; Barlow, R. J.; Jackson, G.; Lafferty, G. D.; Behn, E.; Cenci, R.; Hamilton, B.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Dallapiccola, C.; Cowan, R.; Dujmic, D.; Sciolla, G.; Cheaib, R.; Lindemann, D.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Biassoni, P.; Neri, N.; Palombo, F.; Stracka, S.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Sonnek, P.; Summers, D. J.; Nguyen, X.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; De Nardo, G.; Monorchio, D.; Onorato, G.; Sciacca, C.; Martinelli, M.; Raven, G.; Jessop, C. P.; LoSecco, J. M.; Wang, W. F.; Honscheid, K.; Kass, R.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Torrence, E.; Feltresi, E.; Gagliardi, N.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simi, G.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Akar, S.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bomben, M.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Briand, H.; Calderini, G.; Chauveau, J.; Hamon, O.; Leruste, Ph.; Marchiori, G.; Ocariz, J.; Sitt, S.; Biasini, M.; Manoni, E.; Pacetti, S.; Rossi, A.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Carpinelli, M.; Casarosa, G.; Cervelli, A.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Oberhof, B.; Paoloni, E.; Perez, A.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Telnov, A. V.; Anulli, F.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Li Gioi, L.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Piredda, G.; Bünger, C.; Grünberg, O.; Hartmann, T.; Leddig, T.; Schröder, H.; Voss, C.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Olaiya, E. O.; Wilson, F. F.; Emery, S.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Vasseur, G.; Yèche, Ch.; Aston, D.; Bard, D. J.; Bartoldus, R.; Cartaro, C.; Convery, M. R.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dunwoodie, W.; Ebert, M.; Field, R. C.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Fulsom, B. G.; Gabareen, A. M.; Graham, M. T.; Grenier, P.; Hast, C.; Innes, W. R.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kim, P.; Kocian, M. L.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Lewis, P.; Lindquist, B.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; MacFarlane, D. B.; Muller, D. R.; Neal, H.; Nelson, S.; Perl, M.; Pulliam, T.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Schindler, R. H.; Snyder, A.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Va'vra, J.; Wagner, A. P.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wittgen, M.; Wright, D. H.; Wulsin, H. W.; Young, C. C.; Ziegler, V.; Park, W.; Purohit, M. V.; White, R. M.; Wilson, J. R.; Randle-Conde, A.; Sekula, S. J.; Bellis, M.; Benitez, J. F.; Burchat, P. R.; Miyashita, T. S.; Alam, M. S.; Ernst, J. A.; Gorodeisky, R.; Guttman, N.; Peimer, D. R.; Soffer, A.; Lund, P.; Spanier, S. M.; Eckmann, R.; Ritchie, J. L.; Ruland, A. M.; Schwitters, R. F.; Wray, B. C.; Izen, J. M.; Lou, X. C.; Bianchi, F.; Gamba, D.; Lanceri, L.; Vitale, L.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Oyanguren, A.; Ahmed, H.; Albert, J.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Choi, H. H. F.; King, G. J.; Kowalewski, R.; Lewczuk, M. J.; Nugent, I. M.; Roney, J. M.; Sobie, R. J.; Tasneem, N.; Gershon, T. J.; Harrison, P. F.; Latham, T. E.; Puccio, E. M. T.; Band, H. R.; Dasu, S.; Pan, Y.; Prepost, R.; Wu, S. L.

    2012-09-01

    We use 429fb-1 of e+e- collision data collected at the Υ(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector to measure the radiative transition rate of b→sγ with a sum of 38 exclusive final states. The inclusive branching fraction with a minimum photon energy of 1.9 GeV is found to be B(B¯→Xsγ)=(3.29±0.19±0.48)×10-4 where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic. We also measure the first and second moments of the photon energy spectrum and extract the best-fit values for the heavy-quark parameters, mb and μπ2, in the kinetic and shape function models.

  10. Estimation of a photon energy spectrum for a computed tomography scanner.

    PubMed

    Ruth, C; Joseph, P M

    1997-05-01

    Estimated photon energy spectra are derived from transmission measurements using aluminium, copper, and sodium iodide absorbers. Two spectral models are proposed. One is based on a previously published model that analyzes the electron's penetration into the anode, and the production and attenuation of bremsstrahlung photons. The second model does not include details regarding the underlying physics, but treats the spectrum as a sum of delta functions. A nonlinear regularization method is used to overcome ill conditioning in the second model. Both models fit the transmission data to an accuracy of 0.30%, which is consistent with the experimental error. A quantitative comparison of the models is made by calculating the average and variance (over the derived energy spectra) of several relevant mass attenuation coefficients. The maximum variation in the average and variance was 1.5% and 3.2%, respectively, indicating that the spectra exhibit similar attenuation and beam hardening properties. The spectra were tested with a simulation that predicts scanner CT numbers for phantom measurements consisting of dilutions of sodium iodide in a water equivalent background. The agreement between simulation and experiment ranged from 1.5% at 220 HU to 4.4% at 1700 HU.

  11. A Method for Determining the High Energy Photon Spectrum of a Pulsed Plasma Source.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-03-01

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  12. An analytical model of the effects of pulse pileup on the energy spectrum recorded by energy resolved photon counting x-ray detectors

    PubMed Central

    Taguchi, Katsuyuki; Frey, Eric C.; Wang, Xiaolan; Iwanczyk, Jan S.; Barber, William C.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Recently, novel CdTe photon counting x-ray detectors (PCXDs) with energy discrimination capabilities have been developed. When such detectors are operated under a high x-ray flux, however, coincident pulses distort the recorded energy spectrum. These distortions are called pulse pileup effects. It is essential to compensate for these effects on the recorded energy spectrum in order to take full advantage of spectral information PCXDs provide. Such compensation can be achieved by incorporating a pileup model into the image reconstruction process for computed tomography, that is, as a part of the forward imaging process, and iteratively estimating either the imaged object or the line integrals using, e.g., a maximum likelihood approach. The aim of this study was to develop a new analytical pulse pileup model for both peak and tail pileup effects for nonparalyzable detectors. Methods: The model takes into account the following factors: The bipolar shape of the pulse, the distribution function of time intervals between random events, and the input probability density function of photon energies. The authors used Monte Carlo simulations to evaluate the model. Results: The recorded spectra estimated by the model were in an excellent agreement with those obtained by Monte Carlo simulations for various levels of pulse pileup effects. The coefficients of variation (i.e., the root mean square difference divided by the mean of measurements) were 5.3%–10.0% for deadtime losses of 1%–50% with a polychromatic incident x-ray spectrum. Conclusions: The proposed pulse pileup model can predict recorded spectrum with relatively good accuracy. PMID:20879558

  13. Low dose out-of-field radiotherapy, part 2: Calculating the mean photon energy values for the out-of-field photon energy spectrum from scattered radiation using Monte Carlo methods.

    PubMed

    Skrobala, A; Adamczyk, S; Kruszyna-Mochalska, M; Skórska, M; Konefał, A; Suchorska, W; Zaleska, K; Kowalik, A; Jackowiak, W; Malicki, J

    2017-08-01

    During radiotherapy, leakage from the machine head and collimator expose patients to out-of-field irradiation doses, which may cause secondary cancers. To quantify the risks of secondary cancers due to out-of-field doses, it is first necessary to measure these doses. Since most dosimeters are energy-dependent, it is essential to first determine the type of photon energy spectrum in the out-of-field area. The aim of this study was to determine the mean photon energy values for the out-of-field photon energy spectrum for a 6 MV photon beam using the GEANT 4-Monte Carlo method. A specially-designed large water phantom was simulated with a static field at gantry 0°. The source-to-surface distance was 92cm for an open field size of 10×10cm2. The photon energy spectra were calculated at five unique positions (at depths of 0.5, 1.6, 4, 6, 8, and 10cm) along the central beam axis and at six different off-axis distances. Monte Carlo simulations showed that mean radiation energy levels drop rapidly beyond the edge of the 6 MV photon beam field: at a distance of 10cm, the mean energy level is close to 0.3MeV versus 1.5MeV at the central beam axis. In some cases, the energy level actually increased even as the distance from the field edge increased: at a depth of 1.6cm and 15cm off-axis, the mean energy level was 0.205MeV versus 0.252MeV at 20cm off-axis. The out-of-field energy spectra and dose distribution data obtained in this study with Monte Carlo methods can be used to calibrate dosimeters to measure out-of-field radiation from 6MV photons. Copyright © 2017 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Effective dose of A-bomb radiation in Hiroshima and Nagasaki as assessed by chromosomal effectiveness of spectrum energy photons and neutrons.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, M S; Endo, S; Ejima, Y; Saito, I; Okamura, K; Oka, Y; Hoshi, M

    2006-07-01

    The effective dose of combined spectrum energy neutrons and high energy spectrum gamma-rays in A-bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki has long been a matter of discussion. The reason is largely due to the paucity of biological data for high energy photons, particularly for those with an energy of tens of MeV. To circumvent this problem, a mathematical formalism was developed for the photon energy dependency of chromosomal effectiveness by reviewing a large number of data sets published in the literature on dicentric chromosome formation in human lymphocytes. The chromosomal effectiveness was expressed by a simple multiparametric function of photon energy, which made it possible to estimate the effective dose of spectrum energy photons and differential evaluation in the field of mixed neutron and gamma-ray exposure with an internal reference radiation. The effective dose of reactor-produced spectrum energy neutrons was insensitive to the fine structure of the energy distribution and was accessible by a generalized formula applicable to the A-bomb neutrons. Energy spectra of all sources of A-bomb gamma-rays at different tissue depths were simulated by a Monte Carlo calculation applied on an ICRU sphere. Using kerma-weighted chromosomal effectiveness of A-bomb spectrum energy photons, the effective dose of A-bomb neutrons was determined, where the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of neutrons was expressed by a dose-dependent variable RBE, RBE(gamma, D (n)), against A-bomb gamma-rays as an internal reference radiation. When the newly estimated variable RBE(gamma, D (n)) was applied to the chromosome data of A-bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, the city difference was completely eliminated. The revised effective dose was about 35% larger in Hiroshima, 19% larger in Nagasaki and 26% larger for the combined cohort compared with that based on a constant RBE of 10. Since the differences are significantly large, the proposed effective dose might have an

  15. The effect of energy spectrum change on DNA damage in and out of field in 10-MV clinical photon beams.

    PubMed

    Ezzati, A O; Xiao, Y; Sohrabpour, M; Studenski, M T

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to quantify the DNA damage induced in a clinical megavoltage photon beam at various depths in and out of the field. MCNPX was used to simulate 10 × 10 and 20 × 20 cm(2) 10-MV photon beams from a clinical linear accelerator. Photon and electron spectra were collected in a water phantom at depths of 2.5, 12.5 and 22.5 cm on the central axis and at off-axis points out to 10 cm. These spectra were used as an input to a validated microdosimetric Monte Carlo code, MCDS, to calculate the RBE of induced DSB in DNA at points in and out of the primary radiation field at three depths. There was an observable difference in the energy spectra for photons and electrons for points in the primary radiation field and those points out of field. In the out-of-field region, the mean energy for the photon and electron spectra decreased by a factor of about six and three from the in-field mean energy, respectively. Despite the differences in spectra and mean energy, the change in RBE was <1 % from the in-field region to the out-of-field region at any depth. There was no significant change in RBE regardless of the location in the phantom. Although there are differences in both the photon and electron spectra, these changes do not correlate with a change in RBE in a clinical MV photon beam as the electron spectra are dominated by electrons with energies >20 keV.

  16. Precision Measurement of the B→Xsγ Photon Energy Spectrum, Branching Fraction, and Direct CP Asymmetry ACP(B→Xs+dγ)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Brown, D. N.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Lynch, G.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D. J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; So, R. Y.; Khan, A.; Blinov, V. E.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Yushkov, A. N.; Bondioli, M.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Mandelkern, M.; Atmacan, H.; Gary, J. W.; Liu, F.; Long, O.; Vitug, G. M.; Campagnari, C.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Richman, J. D.; West, C. A.; Eisner, A. M.; Kroseberg, J.; Lockman, W. S.; Martinez, A. J.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Winstrom, L.; Chao, D. S.; Cheng, C. H.; Echenard, B.; Flood, K. T.; Hitlin, D. G.; Ongmongkolkul, P.; Porter, F. C.; Rakitin, A. Y.; Andreassen, R.; Huard, Z.; Meadows, B. T.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Sun, L.; Bloom, P. C.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, S. R.; Ayad, R.; Toki, W. H.; Spaan, B.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Bernard, D.; Verderi, M.; Clark, P. J.; Playfer, S.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cibinetto, G.; Fioravanti, E.; Garzia, I.; Luppi, E.; Munerato, M.; Piemontese, L.; Santoro, V.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Contri, R.; Guido, E.; Lo Vetere, M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Bhuyan, B.; Prasad, V.; Lee, C. L.; Morii, M.; Edwards, A. J.; Adametz, A.; Uwer, U.; Lacker, H. M.; Lueck, T.; Dauncey, P. D.; Mallik, U.; Chen, C.; Cochran, J.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rubin, A. E.; Gritsan, A. V.; Guo, Z. J.; Arnaud, N.; Davier, M.; Derkach, D.; Grosdidier, G.; Le Diberder, F.; Lutz, A. M.; Malaescu, B.; Roudeau, P.; Schune, M. H.; Stocchi, A.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Chavez, C. A.; Coleman, J. P.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; Di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Sigamani, M.; Cowan, G.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Griessinger, K.; Hafner, A.; Prencipe, E.; Barlow, R. J.; Jackson, G.; Lafferty, G. D.; Behn, E.; Cenci, R.; Hamilton, B.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Dallapiccola, C.; Cowan, R.; Dujmic, D.; Sciolla, G.; Cheaib, R.; Lindemann, D.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Biassoni, P.; Neri, N.; Palombo, F.; Stracka, S.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Sonnek, P.; Summers, D. J.; Nguyen, X.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; De Nardo, G.; Monorchio, D.; Onorato, G.; Sciacca, C.; Martinelli, M.; Raven, G.; Jessop, C. P.; Knoepfel, K.; LoSecco, J. M.; Wang, W. F.; Honscheid, K.; Kass, R.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Lu, M.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Torrence, E.; Feltresi, E.; Gagliardi, N.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simi, G.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Akar, S.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bomben, M.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Briand, H.; Calderini, G.; Chauveau, J.; Hamon, O.; Leruste, Ph.; Marchiori, G.; Ocariz, J.; Sitt, S.; Biasini, M.; Manoni, E.; Pacetti, S.; Rossi, A.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Carpinelli, M.; Casarosa, G.; Cervelli, A.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Oberhof, B.; Paoloni, E.; Perez, A.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Telnov, A. V.; Anulli, F.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Li Gioi, L.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Piredda, G.; Bünger, C.; Grünberg, O.; Hartmann, T.; Leddig, T.; Schröder, H.; Voss, C.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Olaiya, E. O.; Wilson, F. F.; Emery, S.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Vasseur, G.; Yèche, Ch.; Aston, D.; Bard, D. J.; Bartoldus, R.; Bechtle, P.; Benitez, J. F.; Cartaro, C.; Convery, M. R.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dunwoodie, W.; Ebert, M.; Field, R. C.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Fulsom, B. G.; Gabareen, A. M.; Graham, M. T.; Grenier, P.; Hast, C.; Innes, W. R.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kim, P.; Kocian, M. L.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Lewis, P.; Lindquist, B.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; MacFarlane, D. B.; Muller, D. R.; Neal, H.; Nelson, S.; Perl, M.; Pulliam, T.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Schindler, R. H.; Snyder, A.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Va'vra, J.; Wagner, A. P.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wittgen, M.; Wright, D. H.; Wulsin, H. W.; Young, C. C.; Ziegler, V.; Park, W.; Purohit, M. V.; White, R. M.; Wilson, J. R.; Randle-Conde, A.; Sekula, S. J.; Bellis, M.; Burchat, P. R.; Miyashita, T. S.; Alam, M. S.; Ernst, J. A.; Gorodeisky, R.; Guttman, N.; Peimer, D. R.; Soffer, A.; Lund, P.; Spanier, S. M.; Ritchie, J. L.; Ruland, A. M.; Schwitters, R. F.; Wray, B. C.; Izen, J. M.; Lou, X. C.; Bianchi, F.; Gamba, D.; Zambito, S.; Lanceri, L.; Vitale, L.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Oyanguren, A.; Ahmed, H.; Albert, J.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Choi, H. H. F.; King, G. J.; Kowalewski, R.; Lewczuk, M. J.; Nugent, I. M.; Roney, J. M.; Sobie, R. J.; Tasneem, N.; Gershon, T. J.; Harrison, P. F.; Latham, T. E.; Puccio, E. M. T.; Band, H. R.; Dasu, S.; Pan, Y.; Prepost, R.; Wu, S. L.

    2012-11-01

    The photon spectrum in the inclusive electromagnetic radiative decays of the B meson, B→Xsγ plus B→Xdγ, is studied using a data sample of (382.8±4.2)×106Υ(4S)→BB¯ decays collected by the BABAR experiment at SLAC. The spectrum is used to extract the branching fraction B(B→Xsγ)=(3.21±0.33)×10-4 for Eγ>1.8GeV and the direct CP asymmetry ACP(B→Xs+dγ)=0.057±0.063. The effects of detector resolution and Doppler smearing are unfolded to measure the photon energy spectrum in the B meson rest frame.

  17. Precision measurement of the B → Xs γ photon energy spectrum, branching fraction, and direct CP asymmetry A(CP)((B → X(s+d)γ).

    PubMed

    Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Garra Tico, J; Grauges, E; Palano, A; Eigen, G; Stugu, B; Brown, D N; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Lynch, G; Koch, H; Schroeder, T; Asgeirsson, D J; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; So, R Y; Khan, A; Blinov, V E; Buzykaev, A R; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Yushkov, A N; Bondioli, M; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; Atmacan, H; Gary, J W; Liu, F; Long, O; Vitug, G M; Campagnari, C; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; West, C A; Eisner, A M; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Martinez, A J; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Winstrom, L; Chao, D S; Cheng, C H; Echenard, B; Flood, K T; Hitlin, D G; Ongmongkolkul, P; Porter, F C; Rakitin, A Y; Andreassen, R; Huard, Z; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Sun, L; Bloom, P C; Ford, W T; Gaz, A; Nauenberg, U; Smith, J G; Wagner, S R; Ayad, R; Toki, W H; Spaan, B; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Bernard, D; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Playfer, S; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Fioravanti, E; Garzia, I; Luppi, E; Munerato, M; Piemontese, L; Santoro, V; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Contri, R; Guido, E; Lo Vetere, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Bhuyan, B; Prasad, V; Lee, C L; Morii, M; Edwards, A J; Adametz, A; Uwer, U; Lacker, H M; Lueck, T; Dauncey, P D; Mallik, U; Chen, C; Cochran, J; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rubin, A E; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Derkach, D; Grosdidier, G; Le Diberder, F; Lutz, A M; Malaescu, B; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Chavez, C A; Coleman, J P; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Di Lodovico, F; Sacco, R; Sigamani, M; Cowan, G; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Gradl, W; Griessinger, K; Hafner, A; Prencipe, E; Barlow, R J; Jackson, G; Lafferty, G D; Behn, E; Cenci, R; Hamilton, B; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Dallapiccola, C; Cowan, R; Dujmic, D; Sciolla, G; Cheaib, R; Lindemann, D; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Biassoni, P; Neri, N; Palombo, F; Stracka, S; Cremaldi, L; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sonnek, P; Summers, D J; Nguyen, X; Simard, M; Taras, P; De Nardo, G; Monorchio, D; Onorato, G; Sciacca, C; Martinelli, M; Raven, G; Jessop, C P; Knoepfel, K; Losecco, J M; Wang, W F; Honscheid, K; Kass, R; Brau, J; Frey, R; Lu, M; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Feltresi, E; Gagliardi, N; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simi, G; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Akar, S; Ben-Haim, E; Bomben, M; Bonneaud, G R; Briand, H; Calderini, G; Chauveau, J; Hamon, O; Leruste, Ph; Marchiori, G; Ocariz, J; Sitt, S; Biasini, M; Manoni, E; Pacetti, S; Rossi, A; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Carpinelli, M; Casarosa, G; Cervelli, A; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Oberhof, B; Paoloni, E; Perez, A; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Lopes Pegna, D; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Anulli, F; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Piredda, G; Bünger, C; Grünberg, O; Hartmann, T; Leddig, T; Schröder, H; Voss, C; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Aston, D; Bard, D J; Bartoldus, R; Bechtle, P; Benitez, J F; Cartaro, C; Convery, M R; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dunwoodie, W; Ebert, M; Field, R C; Franco Sevilla, M; Fulsom, B G; Gabareen, A M; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Hast, C; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Lewis, P; Lindquist, B; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Macfarlane, D B; Muller, D R; Neal, H; Nelson, S; Perl, M; Pulliam, T; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Snyder, A; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Va'vra, J; Wagner, A P; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Wulsin, H W; Young, C C; Ziegler, V; Park, W; Purohit, M V; White, R M; Wilson, J R; Randle-Conde, A; Sekula, S J; Bellis, M; Burchat, P R; Miyashita, T S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Gorodeisky, R; Guttman, N; Peimer, D R; Soffer, A; Lund, P; Spanier, S M; Ritchie, J L; Ruland, A M; Schwitters, R F; Wray, B C; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Bianchi, F; Gamba, D; Zambito, S; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Martinez-Vidal, F; Oyanguren, A; Ahmed, H; Albert, J; Banerjee, Sw; Bernlochner, F U; Choi, H H F; King, G J; Kowalewski, R; Lewczuk, M J; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Tasneem, N; Gershon, T J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Puccio, E M T; Band, H R; Dasu, S; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Wu, S L

    2012-11-09

    The photon spectrum in the inclusive electromagnetic radiative decays of the B meson, B → X(s)γ plus B → X(d)γ, is studied using a data sample of (382.8 ± 4.2) × 10(6)Υ(4S) → BB decays collected by the BABAR experiment at SLAC. The spectrum is used to extract the branching fraction B(B → X(s)γ) = (3.21 ± 0.33) × 10(-4) for E(γ) >1.8 GeV and the direct CP asymmetry A(CP) (B → X(s+d)γ) = 0.057 ± 0.063. The effects of detector resolution and Doppler smearing are unfolded to measure the photon energy spectrum in the B meson rest frame.

  18. Physics at high energy photon photon colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Chanowitz, M.S.

    1994-06-01

    I review the physic prospects for high energy photon photon colliders, emphasizing results presented at the LBL Gamma Gamma Collider Workshop. Advantages and difficulties are reported for studies of QCD, the electroweak gauge sector, supersymmetry, and electroweak symmetry breaking.

  19. Photonic spectrum of bichromatic optical lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Rist, Stefan; Morigi, Giovanna; Vignolo, Patrizia

    2009-05-15

    We study the photonic spectrum of a one-dimensional optical lattice possessing a double primitive cell, when the atoms are well localized at the lattice minima. While a one-dimensional lattice with a simple Wigner-Seitz cell always possesses a photonic band gap at the atomic resonance, in this configuration the photonic transmission spectrum may exhibit no, double, or multiple photonic band gaps depending on the ratio between the interparticle distance {rho} inside the cell and the cell size a. The transmission spectra of a weak incident probe are evaluated when the atoms are trapped in free space and inside an optical resonator for realistic experimental parameters.

  20. An Investigation into the Accuracy of the Photon Beam Energy Spectrum Modeled by the Pinnacle Treatment Planning System and Its Effects on Treatment Planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staley, Noah D.

    The convolution-superposition dose calculation algorithm of the Pinnacle 3 Treatment Planning System (TPS) necessitates that a model of the beam be created for every licensed energy during the TPS commissioning process. To model photon beams in Pinnacle3, the user is required to measure depth dose curves and beam profiles for a variety of geometries (combinations of various source-to-surface distances (SSD), beam modifiers, and field sizes) for each energy and then import the gathered data into the TPS. Achieving the best fit of the measured profiles is the main objective of this modeling process, with different modeling parameters derived from different profiles. Specifically, Pinnacle3 models beam spectrum and electron contamination to create curves that fit the measured depth dose curves. Although the curves produced by the auto-modeling process may closely fit the measured data, they depend on many variables and a range of acceptable solutions are possible. Due to the uncertainties inherent to the modeling process, the derived photon beam spectrum and electron contamination may not accurately represent the true physical nature of their real world counterparts. A study of the accuracy of Pinnacle3's models was performed for 6 and 10 MV flattening-filter free (FFF) beams of a Varian Edge linear accelerator using two distinct routes of investigation: first, direct comparison of the Pinnacle3 spectra with those previously published or derived with alternative models, and second, indirect comparison through the inspection of resulting percent depth dose (PDD) curves in water phantoms. For the former approach, the modeled spectra produced by Pinnacle3 were compared with phase-space file (PSF) Monte Carlo modeled spectra for TrueBeam (and Edge) linear accelerators, as well as spectra for the same energy found in models from other TPSs. As for the latter, a virtual model of the TrueBeam photon source with a water phantom set up directly beneath the accelerator head was

  1. Measurement of B (B→Xsγ), the B→Xsγ photon energy spectrum, and the direct CP asymmetry in B→Xs+dγ decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Brown, D. N.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Lynch, G.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D. J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; So, R. Y.; Khan, A.; Blinov, V. E.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Yushkov, A. N.; Bondioli, M.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Mandelkern, M.; Atmacan, H.; Gary, J. W.; Liu, F.; Long, O.; Vitug, G. M.; Campagnari, C.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Richman, J. D.; West, C. A.; Eisner, A. M.; Kroseberg, J.; Lockman, W. S.; Martinez, A. J.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Winstrom, L.; Chao, D. S.; Cheng, C. H.; Echenard, B.; Flood, K. T.; Hitlin, D. G.; Ongmongkolkul, P.; Porter, F. C.; Rakitin, A. Y.; Andreassen, R.; Huard, Z.; Meadows, B. T.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Sun, L.; Bloom, P. C.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, S. R.; Ayad, R.; Toki, W. H.; Spaan, B.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Bernard, D.; Verderi, M.; Clark, P. J.; Playfer, S.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cibinetto, G.; Fioravanti, E.; Garzia, I.; Luppi, E.; Munerato, M.; Piemontese, L.; Santoro, V.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Contri, R.; Guido, E.; Lo Vetere, M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Bhuyan, B.; Prasad, V.; Lee, C. L.; Morii, M.; Edwards, A. J.; Adametz, A.; Uwer, U.; Lacker, H. M.; Lueck, T.; Dauncey, P. D.; Mallik, U.; Chen, C.; Cochran, J.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rubin, A. E.; Gritsan, A. V.; Guo, Z. J.; Arnaud, N.; Davier, M.; Derkach, D.; Grosdidier, G.; Le Diberder, F.; Lutz, A. M.; Malaescu, B.; Roudeau, P.; Schune, M. H.; Stocchi, A.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Chavez, C. A.; Coleman, J. P.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; Di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Sigamani, M.; Cowan, G.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Griessinger, K.; Hafner, A.; Prencipe, E.; Barlow, R. J.; Jackson, G.; Lafferty, G. D.; Behn, E.; Cenci, R.; Hamilton, B.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Dallapiccola, C.; Cowan, R.; Dujmic, D.; Sciolla, G.; Cheaib, R.; Lindemann, D.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Biassoni, P.; Neri, N.; Palombo, F.; Stracka, S.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Sonnek, P.; Summers, D. J.; Nguyen, X.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; De Nardo, G.; Monorchio, D.; Onorato, G.; Sciacca, C.; Martinelli, M.; Raven, G.; Jessop, C. P.; Knoepfel, K.; LoSecco, J. M.; Wang, W. F.; Honscheid, K.; Kass, R.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Lu, M.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Torrence, E.; Feltresi, E.; Gagliardi, N.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simi, G.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Akar, S.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bomben, M.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Briand, H.; Calderini, G.; Chauveau, J.; Hamon, O.; Leruste, Ph.; Marchiori, G.; Ocariz, J.; Sitt, S.; Biasini, M.; Manoni, E.; Pacetti, S.; Rossi, A.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Carpinelli, M.; Casarosa, G.; Cervelli, A.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Oberhof, B.; Paoloni, E.; Perez, A.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Telnov, A. V.; Anulli, F.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Li Gioi, L.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Piredda, G.; Bünger, C.; Grünberg, O.; Hartmann, T.; Leddig, T.; Schröder, H.; Voss, C.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Olaiya, E. O.; Wilson, F. F.; Emery, S.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Vasseur, G.; Yèche, Ch.; Aston, D.; Bard, D. J.; Bartoldus, R.; Bechtle, P.; Benitez, J. F.; Cartaro, C.; Convery, M. R.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dunwoodie, W.; Ebert, M.; Field, R. C.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Fulsom, B. G.; Gabareen, A. M.; Graham, M. T.; Grenier, P.; Hast, C.; Innes, W. R.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kim, P.; Kocian, M. L.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Lewis, P.; Lindquist, B.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; MacFarlane, D. B.; Muller, D. R.; Neal, H.; Nelson, S.; Perl, M.; Pulliam, T.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Schindler, R. H.; Snyder, A.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Va'vra, J.; Wagner, A. P.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wittgen, M.; Wright, D. H.; Wulsin, H. W.; Young, C. C.; Ziegler, V.; Park, W.; Purohit, M. V.; White, R. M.; Wilson, J. R.; Randle-Conde, A.; Sekula, S. J.; Bellis, M.; Burchat, P. R.; Miyashita, T. S.; Alam, M. S.; Ernst, J. A.; Gorodeisky, R.; Guttman, N.; Peimer, D. R.; Soffer, A.; Lund, P.; Spanier, S. M.; Ritchie, J. L.; Ruland, A. M.; Schwitters, R. F.; Wray, B. C.; Izen, J. M.; Lou, X. C.; Bianchi, F.; Gamba, D.; Zambito, S.; Lanceri, L.; Vitale, L.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Oyanguren, A.; Ahmed, H.; Albert, J.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Choi, H. H. F.; King, G. J.; Kowalewski, R.; Lewczuk, M. J.; Nugent, I. M.; Roney, J. M.; Sobie, R. J.; Tasneem, N.; Gershon, T. J.; Harrison, P. F.; Latham, T. E.; Puccio, E. M. T.; Band, H. R.; Dasu, S.; Pan, Y.; Prepost, R.; Wu, S. L.

    2012-12-01

    The photon spectrum in B→Xsγ decay, where Xs is any strange hadronic state, is studied using a data sample of (382.8±4.2)×106 e+e-→Υ(4S)→BB¯ events collected by the BABAR experiment at the PEP-II collider. The spectrum is used to measure the branching fraction B(B→Xsγ)=(3.21±0.15±0.29±0.08)×10-4 and the first, second, and third moments ⟨Eγ⟩=2.267±0.019±0.032±0.003GeV, ⟨(Eγ-⟨Eγ⟩)2⟩=0.0484±0.0053±0.0077±0.0005GeV2, and ⟨(Eγ-⟨Eγ⟩)3⟩=-0.0048±0.0011±0.0011±0.0004GeV3, for the range Eγ>1.8GeV, where Eγ is the photon energy in the B-meson rest frame. Results are also presented for narrower Eγ ranges. In addition, the direct CP asymmetry ACP(B→Xs+dγ) is measured to be 0.057±0.063. The spectrum itself is also unfolded to the B-meson rest frame; that is the frame in which theoretical predictions for its shape are made.

  2. High energy photon-photon collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, S.J.; Zerwas, P.M.

    1994-07-01

    The collisions of high energy photons produced at a electron-positron collider provide a comprehensive laboratory for testing QCD, electroweak interactions and extensions of the standard model. The luminosity and energy of the colliding photons produced by back-scattering laser beams is expected to be comparable to that of the primary e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} collisions. In this overview, we shall focus on tests of electroweak theory in photon-photon annihilation, particularly {gamma}{gamma} {yields} W{sup +}W{sup {minus}}, {gamma}{gamma} {yields} Higgs bosons, and higher-order loop processes, such as {gamma}{gamma} {yields} {gamma}{gamma}, Z{gamma} and ZZ. Since each photon can be resolved into a W{sup +}W{sup minus} pair, high energy photon-photon collisions can also provide a remarkably background-free laboratory for studying WW collisions and annihilation. We also review high energy {gamma}{gamma} tests of quantum chromodynamics, such as the scaling of the photon structure function, t{bar t} production, mini-jet processes, and diffractive reactions.

  3. Measurement of the moments of the photon energy spectrum in B→Xsγ decays and determination of |Vcb| and mb at Belle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwanda, C.; Urquijo, P.; Barberio, E.; Limosani, A.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Arinstein, K.; Aushev, T.; Bahinipati, S.; Bakich, A. M.; Balagura, V.; Bedny, I.; Belous, K.; Bitenc, U.; Bondar, A.; Bozek, A.; Bračko, M.; Chang, M.-C.; Chen, A.; Chen, W. T.; Cheon, B. G.; Chistov, R.; Cho, I.-S.; Choi, Y.; Dalseno, J.; Dash, M.; Drutskoy, A.; Eidelman, S.; Golob, B.; Ha, H.; Haba, J.; Hara, T.; Hayasaka, K.; Hayashii, H.; Hazumi, M.; Heffernan, D.; Hoshi, Y.; Hou, W.-S.; Hyun, H. J.; Inami, K.; Ishikawa, A.; Ishino, H.; Itoh, R.; Iwasaki, M.; Iwasaki, Y.; Kah, D. H.; Kang, J. H.; Kapusta, P.; Katayama, N.; Kichimi, H.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, Y. J.; Kinoshita, K.; Korpar, S.; Kozakai, Y.; Križan, P.; Krokovny, P.; Kumar, R.; Kuo, C. C.; Kuroki, Y.; Kuzmin, A.; Kwon, Y.-J.; Lee, J. S.; Lee, M. J.; Lee, S. E.; Lesiak, T.; Li, J.; Liu, C.; Liventsev, D.; Mandl, F.; Matyja, A.; McOnie, S.; Medvedeva, T.; Mitaroff, W.; Miyake, H.; Miyata, H.; Miyazaki, Y.; Mizuk, R.; Moloney, G. R.; Nakano, E.; Nakao, M.; Natkaniec, Z.; Nishida, S.; Nitoh, O.; Noguchi, S.; Nozaki, T.; Ogawa, S.; Ohshima, T.; Okuno, S.; Pakhlov, P.; Pakhlova, G.; Palka, H.; Park, C. W.; Park, H.; Peak, L. S.; Pestotnik, R.; Piilonen, L. E.; Sahoo, H.; Sakai, Y.; Schneider, O.; Schümann, J.; Seidl, R.; Sekiya, A.; Senyo, K.; Sevior, M. E.; Shapkin, M.; Shibuya, H.; Shiu, J.-G.; Shwartz, B.; Somov, A.; Stanič, S.; Starič, M.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Takasaki, F.; Tanaka, M.; Taylor, G. N.; Teramoto, Y.; Tikhomirov, I.; Trabelsi, K.; Uehara, S.; Unno, Y.; Uno, S.; Varner, G.; Varvell, K. E.; Vervink, K.; Villa, S.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, P.; Watanabe, Y.; Wedd, R.; Won, E.; Yabsley, B. D.; Yamamoto, H.; Yamashita, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zupanc, A.

    2008-08-01

    Using the previous Belle measurement of the inclusive photon energy in B→Xsγ decays, we determine the first and second moments of this spectrum for minimum photon energies in the B meson rest frame ranging from 1.8 to 2.3 GeV. Combining these measurements with recent Belle data on the lepton energy and hadronic mass moments in B→Xcℓν decays, we perform fits to theoretical expressions derived in the 1S and kinetic mass schemes and extract the magnitude of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix element Vcb, the b-quark mass, and other nonperturbative parameters. In the 1S scheme analysis we find |Vcb|=(41.56±0.68(fit)±0.08(τB))×10-3 and mb1S=(4.723±0.055)GeV. In the kinetic scheme, we obtain |Vcb|=(41.58±0.69(fit)±0.08(τB)±0.58(th))×10-3 and mbkin=(4.543±0.075)GeV.

  4. Photon energy spectrum emitted by a novel polymer-encapsulated {sup 103}Pd source and its effect on the dose rate constant

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, Sabrina; Chen, Zhe Jay; Nath, Ravinder

    2008-04-15

    Two independent groups have published intrinsic dosimetry parameters for the recently introduced OptiSeed{sup 103} interstitial brachytherapy source which contains {sup 103}Pd encapsulated by a novel polymer shell. The dose rate constant ({lambda}) reported by the two groups, however, differed by more than 6% and there is currently no AAPM recommended consensus value for this source in clinical dosimetry. The aim of this work was to perform an independent determination of {lambda} for the OptiSeed{sup 103} source using a recently developed photon spectrometry technique. Three OptiSeed{sup 103} sources (model 1032P) with known air-kerma strength were used in this study. The photon energy spectrum emitted along the radial direction on the source's bisector was measured in air using a high-resolution intrinsic germanium spectrometer designed and established for low-energy brachytherapy source spectrometry. The dose rate constant of each source was determined from its emitted energy spectrum and the spatial distribution of radioactivity in the source. Unlike other sources made with traditional titanium encapsulation, the photons emitted by the OptiSeed{sup 103} sources exhibited only slight spectral hardening, yielding a relative energy spectrum closer to that emitted by bare {sup 103}Pd. The dose rate constant determined by the photon spectrometry technique for water was 0.664{+-}0.025 cGy h{sup -1} U{sup -1}. This value agreed, within experimental uncertainties, with the Monte Carlo-calculated value ({sub MC}{lambda}) of 0.665{+-}0.014 cGy h{sup -1} U{sup -1} and the TLD-measured value (with a Monte Carlo-calculated solid-phantom-to-water conversion factor) of 0.675{+-}0.051 cGy h{sup -1} U{sup -1} reported by Wang and Hertel [Appl. Radiat. Isot. 63, 311-321 (2005)]. However, it differed by -6.7% from the {sub MC}{lambda} of 0.712{+-}0.043 cGy h{sup -1} U{sup -1} reported by Bernard and Vynckier [Phys. Med. Biol. 50, 1493-1504 (2005)]. The results obtained in this

  5. Full-spectrum volumetric solar thermal conversion via photonic nanofluids.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xianglei; Xuan, Yimin

    2017-07-24

    Volumetric solar thermal conversion is an emerging technique for a plethora of applications such as solar thermal power generation, desalination, and solar water splitting. However, achieving broadband solar thermal absorption via dilute nanofluids is still a daunting challenge. In this work, full-spectrum volumetric solar thermal conversion is demonstrated over a thin layer of the proposed 'photonic nanofluids'. The underlying mechanism is found to be the photonic superposition of core resonances, shell plasmons, and core-shell resonances at different wavelengths, whose coexistence is enabled by the broken symmetry of specially designed composite nanoparticles, i.e., Janus nanoparticles. The solar thermal conversion efficiency can be improved by 10.8% compared with core-shell nanofluids. The extinction coefficient of Janus dimers with various configurations is also investigated to unveil the effects of particle couplings. This work provides the possibility to achieve full-spectrum volumetric solar thermal conversion, and may have potential applications in efficient solar energy harvesting and utilization.

  6. Formation of ions by high-energy photons

    SciTech Connect

    Drukarev, E. G.; Mikhailov, A. I.; Mikhailov, I. A.; Rakhimov, Kh. Yu.; Scheid, W.

    2007-03-15

    We calculate the electron energy spectrum of ionization by a high-energy photon, accompanied by creation of an e{sup -}e{sup +} pair. The total cross section of the process is also obtained. The asymptotics of the cross section does not depend on the photon energy. At the photon energies exceeding a certain value {omega}{sub 0} this appears to be the dominant mechanism of formation of the ions. The dependence of {omega}{sub 0} on the value of nuclear charge is obtained. Our results are consistent with experimental data.

  7. Proliferative characteristics of intestinal stem cells. Response and protection to high-energy or fission spectrum neutrons or photons. Technical report, 1 December 1983-1 December 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, W.R.

    1986-04-30

    Cytosine Arabinoside (Ara/C) is an S-phase cytoxic agent. Since nearly half the proliferating cells in the murine crypt are in the S phase, Ara/c treatment, the clonogenic cells (the cells responsible for tissue regeneration) in the crypt are considerably less sensitive to photon radiation than colonogenic cells of control animals. Evidence suggests that the reason for this radioprotection by a toxic agent is the Ara/c-induced alteration in the cell age distribution of the clonogenic cells. Normally, the clonogenic cells are in a G/sub 1/ or G/sub 0/ stage of the cell cycle and are unaffected directly by Ara/c; however, following Ara/c treatment of an animal, the clonogenic cells enter the cell cycle. By 12 hours, the clonogenic cells proceed in a partially synchronized fashion to a mid toi late S phase of the cell cycle where they are less sensitive. WR-2721 appears to protect cells from radiation throughout the cell cycle and most likely acts through a mechanism different from Ara/c. Results of this contrast showed that the combination of Ara/c and WR-2721 protected the gut from photon injury to a greater extent than each agent alone. The protection from Fermilab neutrons by the combination was slightly better than each agent and there was no additional protection of Ara/c combined with WR-2721 for injury by JANUS fission spectrum neutrons. These treatments did not alter the animal response at doses in the bone marrow lethal range.

  8. Is there a low energy enhancement in the photon strength function in molybdenum?

    SciTech Connect

    Sheets, S A

    2008-01-30

    Recent claims of a low energy enhancement in the photon strength function of {sup 96}Mo are investigated. Using the DANCE detector the gamma-ray spectra following resonance neutron capture was measured. The spectrum fitting method was used to indirectly extract a photon strength function from the gamma-ray spectra. No strong low energy enhancement in the photon strength function was found.

  9. Photon Science for Renewable Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Hussain, Zahid; Tamura, Lori; Padmore, Howard; Schoenlein, Bob; Bailey, Sue

    2010-03-31

    Our current fossil-fuel-based system is causing potentially catastrophic changes to our planet. The quest for renewable, nonpolluting sources of energy requires us to understand, predict, and ultimately control matter and energy at the electronic, atomic, and molecular levels. Light-source facilities - the synchrotrons of today and the next-generation light sources of tomorrow - are the scientific tools of choice for exploring the electronic and atomic structure of matter. As such, these photon-science facilities are uniquely positioned to jump-start a global revolution in renewable and carbonneutral energy technologies. In these pages, we outline and illustrate through examples from our nation's light sources possible scientific directions for addressing these profound yet urgent challenges.

  10. THE PAIR BEAM PRODUCTION SPECTRUM FROM PHOTON-PHOTON ANNIHILATION IN COSMIC VOIDS

    SciTech Connect

    Schlickeiser, R.; Ibscher, D.; Elyiv, A.; Miniati, F. E-mail: ibscher@tp4.rub.de E-mail: fm@phys.ethz.ch

    2012-10-20

    Highly beamed relativistic e {sup {+-}}-pair energy distributions result in double photon collisions of the beamed gamma rays from TeV blazars at cosmological distances with the isotropically distributed extragalactic background light (EBL) in the intergalactic medium. The typical energies k {sub 0} {approx_equal} 10{sup -7} in units of m{sub e}c {sup 2} of the EBL are more than 10 orders of magnitude smaller than the observed gamma-ray energies k {sub 1} {>=} 10{sup 7}. Using the limit k {sub 0} << k {sub 1}, we demonstrate that the angular distribution of the generated pairs in the lab frame is highly beamed in the direction of the initial gamma-ray photons. For the astrophysically important case of power-law distributions of the emitted gamma-ray beam up to the maximum energy M interacting with Wien-type N(k {sub 0}){proportional_to}k{sup q} {sub 0}exp (- k {sub 0}/{Theta}) soft photon distributions with total number density N {sub 0}, we calculate analytical approximations for the electron production spectrum. For distant objects with luminosity distances d{sub L} >> r {sub 0} = ({sigma} {sub T} N {sub 0}){sup -1} = 0.49N {sup -1} {sub 0} Mpc (with Thomson cross section {sigma} {sub T}), the implied large values of the optical depth {tau}{sub 0} = d{sub L} /r {sub 0} indicate that the electron production spectra differ at energies inside and outside the interval [({Theta}ln {tau}{sub 0}){sup -1}, {tau}{sub 0}/{Theta}], given the maximum gamma-ray energy M >> {Theta}{sup -1}. In the case M >> {Theta}{sup -1}, the production spectrum is strongly peaked near E {approx_equal} {Theta}{sup -1}, being exponentially reduced at small energies and decreasing with the steep power law {proportional_to}E {sup -1-p} up to the maximum energy E = M - (1/2).

  11. Simulation of energy absorption spectrum in NaI crystal detector for multiple gamma energy using Monte Carlo method

    SciTech Connect

    Wirawan, Rahadi; Waris, Abdul; Djamal, Mitra; Handayani, Gunawan

    2015-04-16

    The spectrum of gamma energy absorption in the NaI crystal (scintillation detector) is the interaction result of gamma photon with NaI crystal, and it’s associated with the photon gamma energy incoming to the detector. Through a simulation approach, we can perform an early observation of gamma energy absorption spectrum in a scintillator crystal detector (NaI) before the experiment conducted. In this paper, we present a simulation model result of gamma energy absorption spectrum for energy 100-700 keV (i.e. 297 keV, 400 keV and 662 keV). This simulation developed based on the concept of photon beam point source distribution and photon cross section interaction with the Monte Carlo method. Our computational code has been successfully predicting the multiple energy peaks absorption spectrum, which derived from multiple photon energy sources.

  12. Direct photons in nuclear collisions at fair energies

    SciTech Connect

    Kiselev, S. M.

    2009-03-15

    Using the extrapolation of existing data, estimations of prompt-photon production at FAIR energies have been made. At y = y{sub c.m.} the rapidity density of prompt photons with p{sub t} > 1.5 GeV/c per central Au + Au event at 25 A GeV is estimated as {approx}10{sup -4}. With the planned beam intensity 10{sup 9} per second and 1% interaction probability, for 10% of most central events one can expect the prompt-photon rate {approx}10{sup 2} photons per second. Direct photons from the hadron scenario of ion collisions generated by the Hadron-String-Dynamics (HSD) transport approach with implemented meson scatterings {pi}{rho} {yields} {pi}{gamma}, {pi}{pi} {yields} {rho}{gamma} have been analyzed. Photons from short-living resonances (e.g., {omega} {yields} {pi}0{gamma}) decaying during the dense phase of the collision should be considered as direct photons. They contribute significantly in the direct photon spectrum at p{sub t} = 0.5-1 GeV/c. At the FAIR energy 25 A GeV in Au + Au central collisions the HSD generator predicts, as a lower estimate, {gamma}{sub direct}/{gamma} {sub ({pi}{sup 0})} {approx_equal} 0.5% in the region p{sub t} = 0.5-1 GeV/c. At p{sub t} = 1.5-2 GeV/c {gamma}{sub prompt}/ {gamma} {sub ({pi}{sup 0})} {approx_equal} 2%. Thermal direct photons have been evaluated with the Bjorken Hydro-Dynamics (BHD) model. The BHD spectra differ strongly from the HSD predictions. The direct-photon spectrum is very sensitive to the initial temperature parameter T{sub 0} of the model. The 10-MeV increase in the T{sub 0} value leads to {approx}2 times higher photon yield.

  13. High Energy Photon-Photon Collisions at a Linear Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, S

    2004-04-19

    High intensity back-scattered laser beams will allow the efficient conversion of a substantial fraction of the incident lepton energy into high energy photons, thus significantly extending the physics capabilities of an e{sup -}e{sup +} linear collider. The annihilation of two photons produces C = + final states in virtually all angular momentum states. An important physics measurement is the measurement of the Higgs coupling to two photons. The annihilation of polarized photons into the Higgs boson determines its fundamental H{sup 0} {yields} {gamma}{gamma} coupling as well as determining its parity. Other novel two-photon processes include the two-photon production of charged pairs {tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup -}, W{sup +}W{sup -}, t{bar t} and supersymmetric squark and slepton pairs. The one-loop box diagram leads to the production of pairs of neutral particles such as {gamma}{gamma} {yields} Z{sup 0}Z{sup 0}, {gamma}Z{sup 0}, and {gamma}{gamma}. At the next order one can study Higgstrahlung processes, such as {gamma}{gamma} {yields} W{sup +}W{sup -}H. Since each photon can be resolved into a W{sup +}W{sup -} pair, high energy photon-photon collisions can also provide a remarkably background-free laboratory for studying possibly anomalous WW collisions and annihilation. In the case of QCD, each photon can materialize as a quark anti-quark pair which interact via multiple gluon exchange. The diffractive channels in photon-photon collisions allow a novel look at the QCD pomeron and odderon. The C = - odderon exchange contribution can be identified by looking at the heavy quark asymmetry. In the case of e{gamma} {yields} e{prime} collisions, one can measure the photon structure functions and its various components. Exclusive hadron production processes in photon-photon collisions provide important tests of QCD at the amplitude level, particularly as measures of hadron distribution amplitudes which are also important for the analysis of exclusive semi-leptonic and two

  14. Photon energy conversion efficiency in gamma-ray spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Švec, Anton

    2016-01-01

    Photon energy conversion efficiency coefficient is presented as the ratio of total energy registered in the collected spectrum to the emitted photon energy. This parameter is calculated from the conventional gamma-ray histogram and in principle is not affected by coincidence phenomena. This feature makes it particularly useful for calibration and measurement of radionuclide samples at close geometries. It complements the number of efficiency parameters used in gamma-ray spectrometry and can partly change the view as to how the gamma-ray spectra are displayed and processed.

  15. Photon Detector For Inverse Photoemission Spectroscopy With Improved Energy Resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Maniraj, M.; D'Souza, S. W.; Barman, S. R.

    2011-07-15

    We present the results from newly designed and fabricated double window photon detector to improve the overall energy resolution for inverse photoemission spectroscopy (IPES). This simple design allows us to introduce an absorption gas (Krypton) to decrease the band-width of the energy selective photon detector and thus improve the resolution. Resonance absorption line of Kr of wavelength of 123.6 nm was used. By fitting the Fermi edge of the IPES spectrum of silver, we find an overall energy resolution improved by 73 meV. The design is modular and ensures ease and safety of handling.

  16. Energy deposition model for I-125 photon radiation in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuss, M. C.; Muñoz, A.; Oller, J. C.; Blanco, F.; Limão-Vieira, P.; Williart, A.; Huerga, C.; Téllez, M.; García, G.

    2010-10-01

    In this study, an electron-tracking Monte Carlo algorithm developed by us is combined with established photon transport models in order to simulate all primary and secondary particle interactions in water for incident photon radiation. As input parameters for secondary electron interactions, electron scattering cross sections by water molecules and experimental energy loss spectra are used. With this simulation, the resulting energy deposition can be modelled at the molecular level, yielding detailed information about localization and type of single collision events. The experimental emission spectrum of I-125 seeds, as used for radiotherapy of different tumours, was used for studying the energy deposition in water when irradiating with this radionuclide.

  17. Strong impact parameter dependence of hard photon production in intermediate energy heavy ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Migneco, E.; Agodi, C.; Alba, R.; Bellia, G.; Coniglione, R.; Del Zoppo, A.; Finocchiaro, P.; Maiolino, C.; Piattelli, P.; Russo, G.; Sapienza, P.; Badalá, A.; Barbera, R.; Palmeri, A.; Pappalardo, G. S.; Riggi, F.; Russo, A. C.; Peghaire, A.; Bonasera, A.

    1993-01-01

    The dependence of the high energy photon production on the impact parameter has been investigated in the reaction 129Xe+ 197Au at 44 MeV/u using the multidetector array MEDEA. A strong dependence of the high energy photon production probability on the impact parameter has been observed, while the slope parameter of the photon spectrum is almost constant. The data support the interpretation of the hard photon production in terms of first chance n-p collisions.

  18. Energy-correction photon counting pixel for photon energy extraction under pulse pile-up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Daehee; Park, Kyungjin; Lim, Kyung Taek; Cho, Gyuseong

    2017-06-01

    A photon counting detector (PCD) has been proposed as an alternative solution to an energy-integrating detector (EID) in medical imaging field due to its high resolution, high efficiency, and low noise. The PCD has expanded to variety of fields such as spectral CT, k-edge imaging, and material decomposition owing to its capability to count and measure the number and the energy of an incident photon, respectively. Nonetheless, pulse pile-up, which is a superimposition of pulses at the output of a charge sensitive amplifier (CSA) in each PC pixel, occurs frequently as the X-ray flux increases due to the finite pulse processing time (PPT) in CSAs. Pulse pile-up induces not only a count loss but also distortion in the measured X-ray spectrum from each PC pixel and thus it is a main constraint on the use of PCDs in high flux X-ray applications. To minimize these effects, an energy-correction PC (ECPC) pixel is proposed to resolve pulse pile-up without cutting off the PPT by adding an energy correction logic (ECL) via a cross detection method (CDM). The ECPC pixel with a size of 200×200 μm2 was fabricated by using a 6-metal 1-poly 0.18 μm CMOS process with a static power consumption of 7.2 μW/pixel. The maximum count rate of the ECPC pixel was extended by approximately three times higher than that of a conventional PC pixel with a PPT of 500 nsec. The X-ray spectrum of 90 kVp, filtered by 3 mm Al filter, was measured as the X-ray current was increased using the CdTe and the ECPC pixel. As a result, the ECPC pixel dramatically reduced the energy spectrum distortion at 2 Mphotons/pixel/s when compared to that of the ERCP pixel with the same 500 nsec PPT.

  19. Partial cross sections of helium satellites at medium photon energies

    SciTech Connect

    Wehlitz, R.; Sellin, I.A.; Hemmers, O.

    1997-04-01

    Still of current interest is the important role of single ionization with excitation compared to single ionization alone. The coupling between the electrons and the incoming photon is a single-particle operator. Thus, an excitation in addition to an ionization, leading to a so-called satellite line in a photoelectron spectrum, is entirely due to electron-electron interaction and probes the electron correlation in the ground and final state. Therefore the authors have undertaken the study of the intensity of helium satellites He{sup +}nl (n = 2 - 6) relative to the main photoline (n = 1) as a function of photon energy at photon energies well above threshold up to 900 eV. From these results they could calculate the partial cross-sections of the helium satellites. In order to test the consistency of their satellite-to-1s ratios with published double-to-single photoionization ratios, the authors calculated the double-to-single photoionization ratio from their measured ratios using the theoretical energy-distribution curves of Chang and Poe and Le Rouzo and Dal Cappello which proved to be valid for photon energies below 120 eV. These calculated double-to-single ionization ratios agree fairly well with recent ion measurements. In the lower photon energy range the authors ratios agree better with the ratios of Doerner et al. while for higher photon energies the agreement is better with the values of Levin et al.

  20. Energy spectrum of sputtered uranium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weller, R. A.; Tombrello, T. A.

    1977-01-01

    The fission track technique for detecting uranium 235 was used in conjunction with a mechanical time-of-flight spectrometer to measure the energy spectrum in the region 1 eV to 1 keV of material sputtered from a 93% enriched U-235 foil by 80 keV Ar-40(+) ions. The spectrum was found to exhibit a peak in the region 2-4 eV and to decrease approximately as E to the -1.77 power for E is approximately greater than 100 eV. The design, construction and resolution of the mechanical spectrometer are discussed and comparisons are made between the data and the predictions of the ramdom collision cascade model of sputtering.

  1. Photonic crystal: energy-related applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Zhuo; Park, Joong-Mok; Constant, Kristen; Kim, Tae-Geun; Ho, Kai-Ming

    2012-06-08

    We review recent work on photonic-crystal fabrication using soft-lithography techniques. We consider applications of the resulting structures in energy-related areas such as lighting and solar-energy harvesting. In general, our aim is to introduce the reader to the concepts of photonic crystals, describe their history, development, and fabrication techniques and discuss a selection of energy-related applications.

  2. Bremssstrahlung and zero-energy Rindler photons

    SciTech Connect

    Higuchi, A.; Matsas, G.E.A.; Sudarsky, D. )

    1992-05-15

    The bremsstrahlung effect is analyzed in the frame coaccelerating with the charge. In particular, it is shown that the usual rate of photon emission with a given transverse momentum computed in the inertial frame can be interpreted as the combined rate of emission (adsorption) of zero-energy Rindler photons into (from) the thermal bath as calculated in the particle rest frame.

  3. Axionic shortcuts for high energy photons

    SciTech Connect

    Nicolaidis, A.

    2010-04-01

    We study the photon axion mixing in the presence of large extra dimensions. The eigenvalues and eigenstates of the mixing matrix are analyzed and we establish the resonance condition for the total conversion of a high energy photon into a Kaluza-Klein (KK) axion state. This resonant transition, a photon transformed into a KK axion traveling freely through the bulk and converting back into a photon, may provide a plausible explanation for the transparency of the universe to energetic photons. If the brane we live in is curved, then there are shortcuts through the bulk, which the axion can take. Within our model, the photons having the appropriate resonance energy are using the axionic shortcut and arrive earlier compared to the photons which follow the geodesic on the brane. We suggest that such axionic shortcuts are at the root of the dispersion of time arrival of photons observed by the MAGIC telescope. We indicate also the cosmological significance of the existence of axionic shortcuts for the photon.

  4. Triplet-triplet annihilation photon-upconversion: towards solar energy applications.

    PubMed

    Gray, Victor; Dzebo, Damir; Abrahamsson, Maria; Albinsson, Bo; Moth-Poulsen, Kasper

    2014-06-14

    Solar power production and solar energy storage are important research areas for development of technologies that can facilitate a transition to a future society independent of fossil fuel based energy sources. Devices for direct conversion of solar photons suffer from poor efficiencies due to spectrum losses, which are caused by energy mismatch between the optical absorption of the devices and the broadband irradiation provided by the sun. In this context, photon-upconversion technologies are becoming increasingly interesting since they might offer an efficient way of converting low energy solar energy photons into higher energy photons, ideal for solar power production and solar energy storage. This perspective discusses recent progress in triplet-triplet annihilation (TTA) photon-upconversion systems and devices for solar energy applications. Furthermore, challenges with evaluation of the efficiency of TTA-photon-upconversion systems are discussed and a general approach for evaluation and comparison of existing systems is suggested.

  5. Is there a low-energy enhancement in the photon strength function in molybdenum?

    SciTech Connect

    Sheets, S. A.

    2008-04-17

    Recent claims of a low-energy enhancement in the photon strength function of {sup 96}Mo are investigated. Using the DANCE detector the gamma-ray spectra following resonance neutron capture was measured. The spectrum fitting method was used to indirectly extract a photon strength function from the gamma-ray spectra. No strong low energy enhancement in the photon strength function was found.

  6. Ultrahigh energy photons, electrons, and neutrinos, the microwave background, and the universal cosmic-ray hypothesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.

    1972-01-01

    The production of ultrahigh energy photons, electrons and neutrinos as the decay products of pions produced in photomeson interactions between cosmic ray nucleons and the blackbody microwave background is discussed in terms of the resultant energy spectra of these particles. Simple asymptotic formulas are given for calculating the ultrahigh energy photon spectrum predicted for the universal cosmic ray hypothesis and the resulting spectra are compared with those obtained previously by numerical means using a different propagation equation for the photons. Approximate analytic solutions for the photon spectra are given in terms of simple power-law energy functions and slowly varying logarithmic functions.

  7. Low-energy photons in high-energy photon fields--Monte Carlo generated spectra and a new descriptive parameter.

    PubMed

    Chofor, Ndimofor; Harder, Dietrich; Willborn, Kay; Rühmann, Antje; Poppe, Björn

    2011-09-01

    The varying low-energy contribution to the photon spectra at points within and around radiotherapy photon fields is associated with variations in the responses of non-water equivalent dosimeters and in the water-to-material dose conversion factors for tissues such as the red bone marrow. In addition, the presence of low-energy photons in the photon spectrum enhances the RBE in general and in particular for the induction of second malignancies. The present study discusses the general rules valid for the low-energy spectral component of radiotherapeutic photon beams at points within and in the periphery of the treatment field, taking as an example the Siemens Primus linear accelerator at 6 MV and 15 MV. The photon spectra at these points and their typical variations due to the target system, attenuation, single and multiple Compton scattering, are described by the Monte Carlo method, using the code BEAMnrc/EGSnrc. A survey of the role of low energy photons in the spectra within and around radiotherapy fields is presented. In addition to the spectra, some data compression has proven useful to support the overview of the behaviour of the low-energy component. A characteristic indicator of the presence of low-energy photons is the dose fraction attributable to photons with energies not exceeding 200 keV, termed P(D)(200 keV). Its values are calculated for different depths and lateral positions within a water phantom. For a pencil beam of 6 or 15 MV primary photons in water, the radial distribution of P(D)(200 keV) is bellshaped, with a wide-ranging exponential tail of half value 6 to 7 cm. The P(D)(200 keV) value obtained on the central axis of a photon field shows an approximately proportional increase with field size. Out-of-field P(D)(200 keV) values are up to an order of magnitude higher than on the central axis for the same irradiation depth. The 2D pattern of P(D)(200 keV) for a radiotherapy field visualizes the regions, e.g. at the field margin, where changes of

  8. Photon induced L3 vacancy alignment at tuned photon energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bansal, Himani; Kaur, Gurpreet; Tiwari, Manoj K.; Mittal, Raj

    2016-04-01

    Photon induced L3 X-ray measurements for Lα/Lℓ cross-section ratios in elements, 66 ⩽ Z ⩽ 83, at tuned photon energies on synchrotron Beamline-16 at Indus-2, India have been used to study the effect of Coster-Kronig (CK) transitions and photon energies on alignment of L3 vacancies. Certainty and reliability of the measurements were checked from comparison of measured Lα and Lℓ fluorescence cross-sections at E1 excitation with available theoretical/empirical/experimental values that required additional measurements for source, geometry and efficiency factor S0GɛLα/ℓ in the used set-up. Fall/rise trend of the ratios with energy for different Z's was found to resemble the off/on-set pattern of CK transitions as pointed out by Bambynek et al. and Campbell. Evaluated alignment parameter A2 values are very much within the limits, 0.05 energy for Dy, W, Pt, Hg and Bi resembles our previously reported theoretical patterns that lends mutual support for both current measurements and earlier theoretical results.

  9. High-Energy QCD Asymptotics of Photon--Photon Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.

    2002-07-26

    The high-energy behavior of the total cross section for highly virtual photons, as predicted by the BFKL equation at next-to-leading order (NLO) in QCD, is discussed. The NLO BFKL predictions, improved by the BLM optimal scale setting, are in good agreement with recent OPAL and L3 data at CERN LEP2. NLO BFKL predictions for future linear colliders are presented.

  10. Continuous Energy Photon Transport Implementation in MCATK

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, Terry R.; Trahan, Travis John; Sweezy, Jeremy Ed; Nolen, Steven Douglas; Hughes, Henry Grady; Pritchett-Sheats, Lori A.; Werner, Christopher John

    2016-10-31

    The Monte Carlo Application ToolKit (MCATK) code development team has implemented Monte Carlo photon transport into the MCATK software suite. The current particle transport capabilities in MCATK, which process the tracking and collision physics, have been extended to enable tracking of photons using the same continuous energy approximation. We describe the four photoatomic processes implemented, which are coherent scattering, incoherent scattering, pair-production, and photoelectric absorption. The accompanying background, implementation, and verification of these processes will be presented.

  11. Photonic crystal biosensor based on angular spectrum analysis.

    PubMed

    Hallynck, Elewout; Bienstman, Peter

    2010-08-16

    The need for cost effective and reliable biosensors in e.g. medical applications is an ever growing and everlasting one. Not only do we strive to increase sensitivity and detection limit of such sensors; ease of fabrication or implementation are equally important. In this work, we propose a novel, photonic crystal based biosensor that is able to operate at a single frequency, contrary to resonance based sensors. In a certain frequency range, guided photonic crystal modes can couple to free space modes resulting in a Lorentzian shape in the angular spectrum. This Lorentzian can shift due to refractive index changes and simulations have shown sensitivities of 65 degrees per refractive index unit and more.

  12. The grand unified photon spectrum: A coherent view of the diffuse extragalactic background radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ressell, M. Ted; Turner, Michael S.

    1989-10-01

    The spectrum of diffuse extragalactic background radiation (DEBRA) at wavelengths from 105 to 10-24 cm is presented in a coherent fashion. Each wavelength region, from the radio to ultra-high energy photons and cosmic rays, is treated both separately and as part of the grand unified photon spectrum (GUPS). A discussion of, and references to, the relevant literature for each wavelength region is included. This review should provide a useful tool for those interested in diffuse backgrounds, the epoch of galaxy formation, astrophysical/cosmological constraints to particle properties, exotic early Universe processes, and many other astrophysical and cosmological enterprises. As a worked example, researchers derive the cosmological constraints to an unstable-neutrino spies (with arbitrary branching ratio to a radiative decay mode) that follow from the GUPS.

  13. The grand unified photon spectrum: A coherent view of the diffuse extragalactic background radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ressell, M. Ted; Turner, Michael S.

    1989-01-01

    The spectrum of diffuse extragalactic background radiation (DEBRA) at wavelengths from 10(exp 5) to 10(exp -24) cm is presented in a coherent fashion. Each wavelength region, from the radio to ultra-high energy photons and cosmic rays, is treated both separately and as part of the grand unified photon spectrum (GUPS). A discussion of, and references to, the relevant literature for each wavelength region is included. This review should provide a useful tool for those interested in diffuse backgrounds, the epoch of galaxy formation, astrophysical/cosmological constraints to particle properties, exotic early Universe processes, and many other astrophysical and cosmological enterprises. As a worked example, researchers derive the cosmological constraints to an unstable-neutrino spies (with arbitrary branching ratio to a radiative decay mode) that follow from the GUPS.

  14. Loophole to the universal photon spectrum in electromagnetic cascades and application to the cosmological lithium problem.

    PubMed

    Poulin, Vivian; Serpico, Pasquale Dario

    2015-03-06

    The standard theory of electromagnetic cascades onto a photon background predicts a quasiuniversal shape for the resulting nonthermal photon spectrum. This has been applied to very disparate fields, including nonthermal big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN). However, once the energy of the injected photons falls below the pair-production threshold the spectral shape is much harder, a fact that has been overlooked in past literature. This loophole may have important phenomenological consequences, since it generically alters the BBN bounds on nonthermal relics; for instance, it allows us to reopen the possibility of purely electromagnetic solutions to the so-called "cosmological lithium problem," which were thought to be excluded by other cosmological constraints. We show this with a proof-of-principle example and a simple particle physics model, compared with previous literature.

  15. Loophole to the Universal Photon Spectrum in Electromagnetic Cascades and Application to the Cosmological Lithium Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulin, Vivian; Serpico, Pasquale Dario

    2015-03-01

    The standard theory of electromagnetic cascades onto a photon background predicts a quasiuniversal shape for the resulting nonthermal photon spectrum. This has been applied to very disparate fields, including nonthermal big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN). However, once the energy of the injected photons falls below the pair-production threshold the spectral shape is much harder, a fact that has been overlooked in past literature. This loophole may have important phenomenological consequences, since it generically alters the BBN bounds on nonthermal relics; for instance, it allows us to reopen the possibility of purely electromagnetic solutions to the so-called "cosmological lithium problem," which were thought to be excluded by other cosmological constraints. We show this with a proof-of-principle example and a simple particle physics model, compared with previous literature.

  16. Modeling of High-Energy Photon Bursts From Lightning Leader

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celestin, S. J.; Xu, W.; Pasko, V. P.

    2015-12-01

    Terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) are bursts of high-energy photons originating from the Earth's atmosphere in association with thunderstorm activity [e.g., Briggs et al., JGR, 118, 3805, 2013]. Additionally, X-ray bursts observed from the ground have been discovered to be produced by negative cloud-to-ground (-CG) lightning leaders in association with stepping processes [Dwyer et al., GRL, 32, L01803, 2005]. Using numerical modeling, it has been shown that the production of thermal runaway electrons by stepping lightning leaders and their further acceleration could explain the TGF spectrum for intracloud (IC) lightning potentials above ~100 MV [Xu et al., GRL, 39, L08801, 2012] and X-ray burst spectrum for -CG lightning potentials of ~5 MV [Xu et al., GRL, 41, 7406, 2014]. In this work, we address the physical processes leading to X-ray bursts from -CG discharges and TGFs produced by IC discharges in a unified fashion. We show how the leader-produced photon spectrum becomes harder with increasing lightning leader potential and how it progressively converges to typical photon spectrum associated with relativistic runaway electron avalanches (RREAs) in large-scale ambient electric fields for potentials greater than ~150 MV. We also demonstrate that the photon fluence in a burst is a very sharp function of the potential. This implies that only lightning leaders forming the strongest potentials can lead to the production of observable TGFs from space. We specifically study the effects of source altitudes on the results and the production of the required high potentials in lightning leaders in realistic thunderstorm charge configurations.

  17. NREL Spectrum of Clean Energy Innovation (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-09-01

    This brochure describes the NREL Spectrum of Clean Energy Innovation, which includes analysis and decision support, fundamental science, market relevant research, systems integration, testing and validation, commercialization and deployment. Through deep technical expertise and an unmatched breadth of capabilities, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) leads an integrated approach across the spectrum of renewable energy innovation. From scientific discovery to accelerating market deployment, NREL works in partnership with private industry to drive the transformation of our nation's energy systems. NREL integrates the entire spectrum of innovation, including fundamental science, market relevant research, systems integration, testing and validation, commercialization, and deployment. Our world-class analysis and decision support informs every point on the spectrum. The innovation process at NREL is inter-dependent and iterative. Many scientific breakthroughs begin in our own laboratories, but new ideas and technologies may come to NREL at any point along the innovation spectrum to be validated and refined for commercial use.

  18. A freon-filled, holographic bubble chamber as a high-energy photon burst spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Dendooven, P.G.; Lerche, R.A. )

    1995-01-01

    A small holographic, freon-filled bubble chamber is being built to measure the energy spectrum of high-energy photons (energy above a few 100 keV) emitted in a short burst (less than about 1-[mu]s duration). The photon energy is calculated from the scattered electron's energy and direction in the case of Compton scattering or from the electron and positron energies in the case of pair production. Electron and positron energies are determined from the curvature of the tracks in a magnetic field. The use of freon results in a large photon interaction probability. Holography combines good spatial resolution with large depth of field. The main concern for the holographic system is the minimization of the bubble image size, so as to maximize the number of bubbles visible in one hologram. A high-energy photon burst spectrometer has several potential applications in inertial confinement fusion research.

  19. A freon-filled, holographic bubble chamber as a high energy photon burst spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Dendooven, P.G.; Lerche, R.A.

    1994-04-26

    A small holographic, freon-filled bubble chamber is being built to measure the energy spectrum of high-energy photons (energy above a few 100 keV) emitted in a short burst (less than about 1 ms duration). The photon energy is calculated from the scattered electron`s energy and direction in the case of Compton scattering or from the electron and positron energies in the case of pair production. Electron and positron energies are determined from the curvature of the tracks in a magnetic field. The use of freon results in a large photon interaction probability. Holography combines good spatial resolution with large depth of field. The main concern for the holographic system is the minimization of the bubble image size, so as to maximize the number of bubbles visible in one hologram. A high energy photon burst spectrometer has several potential applications in Inertial Confinement Fusion research.

  20. Towards energy-efficient photonic interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demir, Yigit; Hardavellas, Nikos

    2015-03-01

    Silicon photonics have emerged as a promising solution to meet the growing demand for high-bandwidth, low-latency, and energy-efficient on-chip and off-chip communication in many-core processors. However, current silicon-photonic interconnect designs for many-core processors waste a significant amount of power because (a) lasers are always on, even during periods of interconnect inactivity, and (b) microring resonators employ heaters which consume a significant amount of power just to overcome thermal variations and maintain communication on the photonic links, especially in a 3D-stacked design. The problem of high laser power consumption is particularly important as lasers typically have very low energy efficiency, and photonic interconnects often remain underutilized both in scientific computing (compute-intensive execution phases underutilize the interconnect), and in server computing (servers in Google-scale datacenters have a typical utilization of less than 30%). We address the high laser power consumption by proposing EcoLaser+, which is a laser control scheme that saves energy by predicting the interconnect activity and opportunistically turning the on-chip laser off when possible, and also by scaling the width of the communication link based on a runtime prediction of the expected message length. Our laser control scheme can save up to 62 - 92% of the laser energy, and improve the energy efficiency of a manycore processor with negligible performance penalty. We address the high trimming (heating) power consumption of the microrings by proposing insulation methods that reduce the impact of localized heating induced by highly-active components on the 3D-stacked logic die.

  1. The energy spectrum in a barotropic atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurgansky, M. V.

    2008-03-01

    In a forced-dissipative barotropic model of the atmosphere on a spherical planet, by following mathematical techniques in (Thompson, P. D.: The equilibrium energy spectrum of randomly forced two-dimensional turbulence, Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences, 30, 1593-1598, 1973) but applying them in a novel context of the discrete spectrum on a rotating sphere, the "minus 2" energy spectrum for wavenumbers much greater than a characteristic wavenumber of the baroclinic forcing has been obtained if the forcing is taken in the simplest and most fundamental form. Some observation-based atmospheric kinetic energy spectra, with their slopes lying between "minus 2" and "minus 3" laws, are discussed from the perspective of the deduced "minus 2" energy spectrum.

  2. Cosmological recombination: feedback of helium photons and its effect on the recombination spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chluba, J.; Sunyaev, R. A.

    2010-02-01

    In this paper, we consider the reprocessing of high-frequency photons emitted by HeII and HeI during the epoch of cosmological recombination by HeI and HI. We demonstrate that, in comparison to computations which neglect all feedback processes, the number of cosmological recombination photons that are related to the presence of helium in the early Universe could be increased by ~40-70 per cent. Our computations imply that per helium nucleus ~3-6 additional photons could be produced. Therefore, a total of ~12-14 helium-related photons per helium atom are emitted during cosmological recombination. This is an important addition to cosmological recombination spectrum which in the future may render it slightly easier to determine the primordial abundance of helium using differential measurements of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) energy spectrum. Also, since these photons are the only witnesses of the feedback process at high redshift, observing them in principle offers a way to check our understanding of the recombination physics. Here, most interestingly, the feedback of HeII photons on HeI leads to the appearance of several additional, rather narrow spectral features in the HeI recombination spectrum at low frequencies. Consequently, the signatures of helium-related features in the CMB spectral distortion from cosmological recombination at some given frequency can exceed the average level of ~17 per cent several times. We find that in particular the bands around ν ~ 10, ~35, ~80 and ~200GHz seem to be affected strongly. In addition, we computed the changes in the cosmological ionization history, finding that only the feedback of primary HeI photons on the dynamics of HeII -> HeI recombination has an effect, producing a change of ΔNe/Ne ~ +0.17 per cent at z ~ 2300. This result seems to be ~2-3 times smaller than the one obtained in earlier computations for this process, however, the difference will not be very important for the analysis of future CMB data.

  3. Temperature effect on the two-photon absorption spectrum of all-trans-β-carotene.

    PubMed

    Vivas, M G; Mendonca, C R

    2012-07-05

    In this report, we investigate the influence of temperature on the two-photon absorption (2PA) spectrum of all-trans-β-carotene using the femtosecond white-light-continuum Z-scan technique. We observed that the 2PA cross-section decreases quadratically with the temperature. Such effect was modeled using a three-energy-level diagram within the sum-over-essential states approach, assuming temperature dependencies to the transition dipole moment and refractive index of the solvent. The results show that the transition dipole moments from ground to excited state and between the excited states, which governed the two-photon matrix element, have distinct behaviors with the temperature. The first one presents a quadratic dependence, while the second exhibits a linear dependence. Such effects were attributed mainly to the trans→cis thermal interconversion process, which decreases the effective conjugation length, contributing to diminishing the transition dipole moments and, consequently, the 2PA cross-section.

  4. Modeling silicon diode energy response factors for use in therapeutic photon beams.

    PubMed

    Eklund, Karin; Ahnesjö, Anders

    2009-10-21

    Silicon diodes have good spatial resolution, which makes them advantageous over ionization chambers for dosimetry in fields with high dose gradients. However, silicon diodes overrespond to low-energy photons, that are more abundant in scatter which increase with large fields and larger depths. We present a cavity-theory-based model for a general response function for silicon detectors at arbitrary positions within photon fields. The model uses photon and electron spectra calculated from fluence pencil kernels. The incident photons are treated according to their energy through a bipartition of the primary beam photon spectrum into low- and high-energy components. Primary electrons from the high-energy component are treated according to Spencer-Attix cavity theory. Low-energy primary photons together with all scattered photons are treated according to large cavity theory supplemented with an energy-dependent factor K(E) to compensate for energy variations in the electron equilibrium. The depth variation of the response for an unshielded silicon detector has been calculated for 5 x 5 cm(2), 10 x 10 cm(2) and 20 x 20 cm(2) fields in 6 and 15 MV beams and compared with measurements showing that our model calculates response factors with deviations less than 0.6%. An alternative method is also proposed, where we show that one can use a correlation with the scatter factor to determine the detector response of silicon diodes with an error of less than 3% in 6 MV and 15 MV photon beams.

  5. The effects of photon flux on energy spectra and imaging characteristics in a photon-counting x-ray detector.

    PubMed

    Cho, H-M; Kim, H-J; Choi, Y-N; Lee, S-W; Ryu, H-J; Lee, Y-J

    2013-07-21

    The purpose of this paper was to investigate the effect of photon flux on the recorded energy spectrum and images produced with a photon-counting detector. We used a photon-counting cadmium telluride (CdTe) x-ray detector (model PID350, Oy Ajat, Finland). The CdTe array was composed of 16 384 pixels, each 0.35 × 0.35 × 0.75 mm(3) in dimension. The photon flux is controlled by an additional aluminum filter (1, 10, 20, 30 and 40 mm). Images were acquired at three different tube voltages (50, 70 and 90 kVp) with various thicknesses of photon flux control (PFC) filters. The data acquisition time was changed to acquire an approximately equal number of counts within the selected energy window between different thicknesses of PFC filters at the same tube voltage. A phantom was manufactured to evaluate the photon flux effect on the image. The phantom was made from polymethyl methacrylate and four concentrations of iodine. The photon flux effect on the image was evaluated by the signal-difference-to-noise ratio (SDNR) between iodine and the background material. The changes of photon flux affected the recorded energy spectra and image. The thickness of the PFC filter that showed the maximum SDNR differed according to the tube voltage. The 10 mm PFC filter showed the highest SDNR at 50 and 70 kVp, while the 30 mm PFC filter exhibited the highest SDNR at 90 kVp. The SDNR was improved up to, on average, 30-fold in optimal photon flux conditions which acquired a spectrum including the lowest electronic noise with no pulse pile-up effect. The results of this study showed that the photon flux affected not only the acquired energy spectrum but also the image. Based on these results, the spectral distortion correction should be considered in connection with the image that is the ultimate purpose of medical imaging.

  6. The effects of photon flux on energy spectra and imaging characteristics in a photon-counting x-ray detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, H.-M.; Kim, H.-J.; Choi, Y.-N.; Lee, S.-W.; Ryu, H.-J.; Lee, Y.-J.

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this paper was to investigate the effect of photon flux on the recorded energy spectrum and images produced with a photon-counting detector. We used a photon-counting cadmium telluride (CdTe) x-ray detector (model PID350, Oy Ajat, Finland). The CdTe array was composed of 16 384 pixels, each 0.35 × 0.35 × 0.75 mm3 in dimension. The photon flux is controlled by an additional aluminum filter (1, 10, 20, 30 and 40 mm). Images were acquired at three different tube voltages (50, 70 and 90 kVp) with various thicknesses of photon flux control (PFC) filters. The data acquisition time was changed to acquire an approximately equal number of counts within the selected energy window between different thicknesses of PFC filters at the same tube voltage. A phantom was manufactured to evaluate the photon flux effect on the image. The phantom was made from polymethyl methacrylate and four concentrations of iodine. The photon flux effect on the image was evaluated by the signal-difference-to-noise ratio (SDNR) between iodine and the background material. The changes of photon flux affected the recorded energy spectra and image. The thickness of the PFC filter that showed the maximum SDNR differed according to the tube voltage. The 10 mm PFC filter showed the highest SDNR at 50 and 70 kVp, while the 30 mm PFC filter exhibited the highest SDNR at 90 kVp. The SDNR was improved up to, on average, 30-fold in optimal photon flux conditions which acquired a spectrum including the lowest electronic noise with no pulse pile-up effect. The results of this study showed that the photon flux affected not only the acquired energy spectrum but also the image. Based on these results, the spectral distortion correction should be considered in connection with the image that is the ultimate purpose of medical imaging.

  7. Measurement of photon-energy albedo from stratified shielding materials.

    PubMed

    Sinha, A K; Bhattacharjee, A

    1991-11-01

    In the conventional method of measuring photon-energy albedo using a scintillation detector coupled with a multichannel analyzer, tedious efficiency correction by the inverse matrix method was needed. The indigenously designed proportional-response photon counter, with its detection efficiency proportional to energy of incident photons, was used in the present investigation. Use of the proportional-response photon counter makes the measurement straightforward and more accurate. Measurements of energy albedo from stratified layers of aluminum, iron, lead, and concrete using 662-keV and 1250-keV photon energies are reported.

  8. Photon flux and spectrum of γ-rays Compton sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrillo, V.; Bacci, A.; Ben Alì Zinati, R.; Chaikovska, I.; Curatolo, C.; Ferrario, M.; Maroli, C.; Ronsivalle, C.; Rossi, A. R.; Serafini, L.; Tomassini, P.; Vaccarezza, C.; Variola, A.

    2012-11-01

    We analyze the characteristics of the γ radiation produced by Compton back-scattering of a high brightness electron beam produced by a photoinjector and accelerated in a linac up to energies of 360-720 MeV and a laser operated at about 500 nm, by comparing classical and quantum models and codes. The interaction produces γ rays in the range 4.9-18.8 MeV. In view of the application to nuclear resonance fluorescence a relative bandwidth of few 10-3 is needed. The bandwidth is reduced by taking advantage of the frequency-angular correlation typical of the phenomenon and selecting the radiation in an angle of tens of μrads. The foreseen spectral density is 20-6 photons per eV in a single shot, a number that can be increased by developing multi-bunch techniques and laser recirculation. In this way a final value of 104 photon per eV per second can be achieved.

  9. Energy spectrum control for modulated proton beams

    SciTech Connect

    Hsi, Wen C.; Moyers, Michael F.; Nichiporov, Dmitri; Anferov, Vladimir; Wolanski, Mark; Allgower, Chris E.; Farr, Jonathan B.; Mascia, Anthony E.; Schreuder, Andries N.

    2009-06-15

    In proton therapy delivered with range modulated beams, the energy spectrum of protons entering the delivery nozzle can affect the dose uniformity within the target region and the dose gradient around its periphery. For a cyclotron with a fixed extraction energy, a rangeshifter is used to change the energy but this produces increasing energy spreads for decreasing energies. This study investigated the magnitude of the effects of different energy spreads on dose uniformity and distal edge dose gradient and determined the limits for controlling the incident spectrum. A multilayer Faraday cup (MLFC) was calibrated against depth dose curves measured in water for nonmodulated beams with various incident spectra. Depth dose curves were measured in a water phantom and in a multilayer ionization chamber detector for modulated beams using different incident energy spreads. Some nozzle entrance energy spectra can produce unacceptable dose nonuniformities of up to {+-}21% over the modulated region. For modulated beams and small beam ranges, the width of the distal penumbra can vary by a factor of 2.5. When the energy spread was controlled within the defined limits, the dose nonuniformity was less than {+-}3%. To facilitate understanding of the results, the data were compared to the measured and Monte Carlo calculated data from a variable extraction energy synchrotron which has a narrow spectrum for all energies. Dose uniformity is only maintained within prescription limits when the energy spread is controlled. At low energies, a large spread can be beneficial for extending the energy range at which a single range modulator device can be used. An MLFC can be used as part of a feedback to provide specified energy spreads for different energies.

  10. Energy spectrum control for modulated proton beams

    PubMed Central

    Hsi, Wen C.; Moyers, Michael F.; Nichiporov, Dmitri; Anferov, Vladimir; Wolanski, Mark; Allgower, Chris E.; Farr, Jonathan B.; Mascia, Anthony E.; Schreuder, Andries N.

    2009-01-01

    In proton therapy delivered with range modulated beams, the energy spectrum of protons entering the delivery nozzle can affect the dose uniformity within the target region and the dose gradient around its periphery. For a cyclotron with a fixed extraction energy, a rangeshifter is used to change the energy but this produces increasing energy spreads for decreasing energies. This study investigated the magnitude of the effects of different energy spreads on dose uniformity and distal edge dose gradient and determined the limits for controlling the incident spectrum. A multilayer Faraday cup (MLFC) was calibrated against depth dose curves measured in water for nonmodulated beams with various incident spectra. Depth dose curves were measured in a water phantom and in a multilayer ionization chamber detector for modulated beams using different incident energy spreads. Some nozzle entrance energy spectra can produce unacceptable dose nonuniformities of up to ±21% over the modulated region. For modulated beams and small beam ranges, the width of the distal penumbra can vary by a factor of 2.5. When the energy spread was controlled within the defined limits, the dose nonuniformity was less than ±3%. To facilitate understanding of the results, the data were compared to the measured and Monte Carlo calculated data from a variable extraction energy synchrotron which has a narrow spectrum for all energies. Dose uniformity is only maintained within prescription limits when the energy spread is controlled. At low energies, a large spread can be beneficial for extending the energy range at which a single range modulator device can be used. An MLFC can be used as part of a feedback to provide specified energy spreads for different energies. PMID:19610318

  11. Energy spectrum of buoyancy-driven turbulence.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Abhishek; Chatterjee, Anando G; Verma, Mahendra K

    2014-08-01

    Using high-resolution direct numerical simulation and arguments based on the kinetic energy flux Π(u), we demonstrate that, for stably stratified flows, the kinetic energy spectrum E(u)(k)∼k(-11/5), the potential energy spectrum E(θ)(k)∼k(-7/5), and Π(u)(k)∼k(-4/5) are consistent with the Bolgiano-Obukhov scaling. This scaling arises due to the conversion of kinetic energy to the potential energy by buoyancy. For weaker buoyancy, this conversion is weak, hence E(u)(k) follows Kolmogorov's spectrum with a constant energy flux. For Rayleigh-Bénard convection, we show that the energy supply rate by buoyancy is positive, which leads to an increasing Π(u)(k) with k, thus ruling out Bolgiano-Obukhov scaling for the convective turbulence. Our numerical results show that convective turbulence for unit Prandt number exhibits a constant Π(u)(k) and E(u)(k)∼k(-5/3) for a narrow band of wave numbers.

  12. Adaptive, full-spectrum solar energy system

    DOEpatents

    Muhs, Jeffrey D.; Earl, Dennis D.

    2003-08-05

    An adaptive full spectrum solar energy system having at least one hybrid solar concentrator, at least one hybrid luminaire, at least one hybrid photobioreactor, and a light distribution system operably connected to each hybrid solar concentrator, each hybrid luminaire, and each hybrid photobioreactor. A lighting control system operates each component.

  13. Precision timing measurements for high energy photons

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Dustin; Apreysan, Artur; Bornheim, Adi; Duarte, Javier; Newman, Harvey; Pena, Cristian; Ronzhin, Anatoly; Spiropulu, Maria; Trevor, Jason; Xie, Si; Zhu, Ren-Yuan

    2014-11-21

    Particle colliders operating at high luminosities present challenging environments for high energy physics event reconstruction and analysis. We discuss how timing information, with a precision on the order of 10 ps, can aid in the reconstruction of physics events under such conditions. We present calorimeter based timing measurements from test beam experiments in which we explore the ultimate timing precision achievable for high energy photons or electrons of 10 GeV and above. Using a prototype calorimeter consisting of a 1.7×1.7×1.7 cm3 lutetium–yttrium oxyortho-silicate (LYSO) crystal cube, read out by micro-channel plate photomultipliers, we demonstrate a time resolution of 33.5±2.1 ps for an incoming beam energy of 32 GeV. In a second measurement, using a 2.5×2.5×20 cm3 LYSO crystal placed perpendicularly to the electron beam, we achieve a time resolution of 59±11 ps using a beam energy of 4 GeV. We also present timing measurements made using a shashlik-style calorimeter cell made of LYSO and tungsten plates, and demonstrate that the apparatus achieves a time resolution of 54±5 ps for an incoming beam energy of 32 GeV.

  14. Photon spectrum produced by the late decay of a cosmic neutrino background

    SciTech Connect

    Masso, E.; Toldra, R.

    1999-10-01

    We obtain the photon spectrum induced by a cosmic background of unstable neutrinos. We study the spectrum in a variety of cosmological scenarios and also we allow for the neutrinos having a momentum distribution (only a critical matter-dominated universe and neutrinos at rest have been considered until now). Our results can be helpful when extracting bounds on neutrino electric and magnetic moments from cosmic photon background observations. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  15. Energy spectrum of the electroweak Pomeron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartels, Jochen; Levin, Eugene; Siddikov, Marat

    2016-09-01

    In this paper we study the high energy behavior of electroweak Standard Model for a nonzero Weinberg angle θW . We evaluate the spectrum of the electroweak Pomeron and demonstrate that the leading intercept is given by αe .w .4 ln 2 and does not depend on the mixing angle θW. Due to its very small numerical value, we conclude that the high energy behavior of electroweak theory cannot be discussed without including the QCD Pomeron which, at sufficiently large energies, will dominate.

  16. High energy photon-neutrino interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Abbasabadi, A.; Devoto, A.; Dicus, D.A.; Repko, W.W.

    1999-01-01

    A general decomposition of the amplitudes for the 2{r_arrow}2 processes {gamma}{nu}{r_arrow}{gamma}{nu} and {gamma}{gamma}{r_arrow}{nu}{bar {nu}} is obtained using gauge invariance and Bose symmetry. The restrictions implied by this decomposition are investigated for the reaction {gamma}{gamma}{r_arrow}{nu}{bar {nu}} by computing the one-loop helicity amplitudes in the standard model. In the center of mass, where {radical} (s) =2{omega}, the cross section grows roughly as {omega}{sup 6} up to the threshold for W-boson production, {radical} (s) =2m{sub W}. Astrophysical implications of very high energy photon-neutrino interactions are discussed. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  17. High energy photon-neutrino interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Abbasabadi, A.; Devoto, A. |; Dicus, D.A.; Repko, W.W.

    1998-07-14

    A general decomposition of the amplitudes for the 2 {r_arrow} 2 processes {gamma}{nu} {r_arrow} {gamma}{nu} and {gamma}{gamma} {r_arrow} {nu}{bar {nu}} is obtained using gauge invariance and Bose symmetry. The restrictions implied by this decomposition are investigated for the reaction {gamma}{gamma} {r_arrow} {nu}{bar {nu}} by computing the one-loop helicity amplitudes in the standard model. In the center of mass, where {radical}s = 2{omega}, the cross section grows roughly as {omega}{sup 6} up to the threshold for W-boson production, {radical}s = 2m{sub W}. Astrophysical implications of very high energy photon-neutrino interactions are discussed.

  18. Electrical conductivity of the quark-gluon plasma and soft photon spectrum in heavy-ion collisions

    DOE PAGES

    Yin, Yi

    2014-10-06

    We extract the electrical conductivity σ0 of the quark gluon plasma (QGP) and study the effects of magnetic field and chiral anomaly on soft photon azimuthal anisotropy, v₂, based on the thermal photon spectrum at 0.4GeV < p⊥< 0.6GeV at the RHIC energy. As a basis for my analysis, we derive the behavior of retarded photon self-energy of a strongly interacting neutral plasma in hydrodynamic regime in the presence of magnetic field and chiral anomaly. By evolving the resulting soft thermal photon production rate over the realistic hydrodynamic background and comparing the results with the data from the PHENIX Collaboration,more » I found that the electrical conductivity at QGP temperature is in the range: 0.4 < σ₀/(e²T) < 1.1, which is comparable with recent studies on lattice. I also compare the contribution from the magnetic field and chiral anomaly to soft thermal photon v₂ with the data. I argue that at the CERN Large Hadron Collider, the chiral magnetic wave would give negative contribution to photon v₂.« less

  19. Electrical conductivity of the quark-gluon plasma and soft photon spectrum in heavy-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, Yi

    2014-10-06

    We extract the electrical conductivity σ0 of the quark gluon plasma (QGP) and study the effects of magnetic field and chiral anomaly on soft photon azimuthal anisotropy, v₂, based on the thermal photon spectrum at 0.4GeV < p⊥< 0.6GeV at the RHIC energy. As a basis for my analysis, we derive the behavior of retarded photon self-energy of a strongly interacting neutral plasma in hydrodynamic regime in the presence of magnetic field and chiral anomaly. By evolving the resulting soft thermal photon production rate over the realistic hydrodynamic background and comparing the results with the data from the PHENIX Collaboration, I found that the electrical conductivity at QGP temperature is in the range: 0.4 < σ₀/(e²T) < 1.1, which is comparable with recent studies on lattice. I also compare the contribution from the magnetic field and chiral anomaly to soft thermal photon v₂ with the data. I argue that at the CERN Large Hadron Collider, the chiral magnetic wave would give negative contribution to photon v₂.

  20. 2D photonic crystal and its angular reflective azimuthal spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senderakova, Dagmar; Drzik, Milan; Tomekova, Juliana

    2016-12-01

    Contemporary, attention is paid to photonic crystals, which can strongly modify light propagation through them and enable a controllable light manipulation. The contribution is focused on a sub-wavelength 2D structure formed by Al2O3 layer on silicon substrate, patterned with periodic hexagonal lattice of deep air holes. Using various laser sources of light at single wavelength, azimuthal angle dependence of the mirror-like reflected light intensity was recorded photo-electrically. The results obtained can be used to sample the band-structure of leaky modes of the photonic crystal more reliably and help us to map the photonic dispersion diagram.

  1. Reproducing the spectral energy distribution of PKS 1424+240: the role of automatic photon quenching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Quan-Gui; Lu, Fang-Wu; Zhang, Li

    2017-01-01

    We present a one-zone homogeneous self-consistent model for the multiwavelength emission features of PKS 1424+240 that allows the effects of automatic photon quenching to be studied. In the model, a steady γ-ray injection rate in the source is assumed and the non-linear time-dependent kinematic equations describing the evolution of both electrons and photons are then acquired; these self-consistently involve photon-photon interaction, synchrotron radiation of electron/positron pairs, inverse Compton scattering and synchrotron self-absorption. The model is applied to reproduce the multiwavelength spectrum of PKS 1424+240; our results indicate that the observed spectral energy distribution (SED) of PKS 1424+240 can be reproduced well in the case of both electron injection and photon injection. The injected electrons mainly influence the SED over radio, optical and X-ray bands and the SED in the high-energy γ-ray band is determined mainly by automatic photon quenching; in particular, the break form of the spectrum in the energy range ≥ a few GeV is caused by this. It should be noted that the observed SED from X-ray to γ-ray bands can be reproduced only through quenching, provided the observed data in the optical band are produced through some other mechanism, e.g. electron synchrotron radiation.

  2. Collective radiation spectrum for ensembles with Zeeman splitting in single-photon superradiance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Xiangjin; Pálffy, Adriana

    2017-09-01

    In an ensemble of identical atoms, cooperative effects like sub- and superradiance may alter the decay rates and the energies of specific transitions may be shifted from the single-atom value by the so-called collective Lamb shift. While such effects in ensembles of two-level systems are by now well understood, realistic multilevel systems are more difficult to handle. In this work we show that in a system of atoms under the action of an external magnetic field, the collective contribution to the level shifts can amount to sizable quantitative and qualitative deviations from the single-atom Zeeman splitting picture. We develop a formalism to describe single-photon superradiance in multilevel systems and identify three-parameter regimes, two of which present measurable deviations in the radiation spectrum compared to the case of single-atom magnetic-field-induced splitting.

  3. Full spectrum of the two-photon and the two-mode quantum Rabi models

    SciTech Connect

    Dossa, Anselme F. E-mail: ansdossa@gmail.com; Avossevou, Gabriel Y. H. E-mail: gavossevou@gmail.com

    2014-10-15

    This paper is concerned with the rigorous analytical determination of the spectrum of the two-photon and the two-mode quantum Rabi models. To reach this goal, we exploit the hidden symmetries in these models by means of the unitary and similarity transformations in addition to the Bargmann-Fock space description. In each case, the purely quantum mechanical problem of the Rabi model studied is reduced to solutions for differential equations. This eventually gives a third-order differential equation for each of these models, which is reduced to a second-order differential equation by additional transformations. The analytical expressions of the wave functions describing the energy levels are obtained in terms of the confluent hypergeometric functions.

  4. Pulse pileup statistics for energy discriminating photon counting x-ray detectors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Adam S; Harrison, Daniel; Lobastov, Vladimir; Tkaczyk, J Eric

    2011-07-01

    Energy discriminating photon counting x-ray detectors can be subject to a wide range of flux rates if applied in clinical settings. Even when the incident rate is a small fraction of the detector's maximum periodic rate No, pulse pileup leads to count rate losses and spectral distortion. Although the deterministic effects can be corrected, the detrimental effect of pileup on image noise is not well understood and may limit the performance of photon counting systems. Therefore, the authors devise a method to determine the detector count statistics and imaging performance. The detector count statistics are derived analytically for an idealized pileup model with delta pulses of a nonparalyzable detector. These statistics are then used to compute the performance (e.g., contrast-to-noise ratio) for both single material and material decomposition contrast detection tasks via the Cramdr-Rao lower bound (CRLB) as a function of the detector input count rate. With more realistic unipolar and bipolar pulse pileup models of a nonparalyzable detector, the imaging task performance is determined by Monte Carlo simulations and also approximated by a multinomial method based solely on the mean detected output spectrum. Photon counting performance at different count rates is compared with ideal energy integration, which is unaffected by count rate. The authors found that an ideal photon counting detector with perfect energy resolution outperforms energy integration for our contrast detection tasks, but when the input count rate exceeds 20% N0, many of these benefits disappear. The benefit with iodine contrast falls rapidly with increased count rate while water contrast is not as sensitive to count rates. The performance with a delta pulse model is overoptimistic when compared to the more realistic bipolar pulse model. The multinomial approximation predicts imaging performance very close to the prediction from Monte Carlo simulations. The monoenergetic image with maximum contrast

  5. Particle and Photon Detection: Counting and Energy Measurement.

    PubMed

    Janesick, James; Tower, John

    2016-05-12

    Fundamental limits for photon counting and photon energy measurement are reviewed for CCD and CMOS imagers. The challenges to extend photon counting into the visible/nIR wavelengths and achieve energy measurement in the UV with specific read noise requirements are discussed. Pixel flicker and random telegraph noise sources are highlighted along with various methods used in reducing their contribution on the sensor's read noise floor. Practical requirements for quantum efficiency, charge collection efficiency, and charge transfer efficiency that interfere with photon counting performance are discussed. Lastly we will review current efforts in reducing flicker noise head-on, in hopes to drive read noise substantially below 1 carrier rms.

  6. RESIDUAL ENERGY SPECTRUM OF SOLAR WIND TURBULENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C. H. K.; Bale, S. D.; Salem, C. S.; Maruca, B. A.

    2013-06-20

    It has long been known that the energy in velocity and magnetic field fluctuations in the solar wind is not in equipartition. In this paper, we present an analysis of 5 yr of Wind data at 1 AU to investigate the reason for this. The residual energy (difference between energy in velocity and magnetic field fluctuations) was calculated using both the standard magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) normalization for the magnetic field and a kinetic version, which includes temperature anisotropies and drifts between particle species. It was found that with the kinetic normalization, the fluctuations are closer to equipartition, with a mean normalized residual energy of {sigma}{sub r} = -0.19 and mean Alfven ratio of r{sub A} = 0.71. The spectrum of residual energy, in the kinetic normalization, was found to be steeper than both the velocity and magnetic field spectra, consistent with some recent MHD turbulence predictions and numerical simulations, having a spectral index close to -1.9. The local properties of residual energy and cross helicity were also investigated, showing that globally balanced intervals with small residual energy contain local patches of larger imbalance and larger residual energy at all scales, as expected for nonlinear turbulent interactions.

  7. Energy response improvement for photon dosimetry using pulse analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaki, Dizaji H.

    2016-02-01

    During the last few years, active personal dosimeters have been developed and have replaced passive personal dosimeters in some external monitoring systems, frequently using silicon diode detectors. Incident photons interact with the constituents of the diode detector and produce electrons. These photon-induced electrons deposit energy in the detector's sensitive region and contribute to the response of diode detectors. To achieve an appropriate photon dosimetry response, the detectors are usually covered by a metallic layer with an optimum thickness. The metallic cover acts as an energy compensating shield. In this paper, a software process is performed for energy compensation. Selective data sampling based on pulse height is used to determine the photon dose equivalent. This method is applied to improve the energy response in photon dosimetry. The detector design is optimized for the response function and determination of the photon dose equivalent. Photon personal dose equivalent is determined in the energy range of 0.3-6 MeV. The error values of the calculated data for this wide energy range and measured data for 133Ba, 137Cs, 60Co and 241Am-Be sources respectively are up to 20% and 15%. Fairly good agreement is seen between simulation and dose values obtained from our process and specifications from several photon sources.

  8. [Two-photon excitation fluorescence spectrum of the light-harvesting complex LH2 from Chromatium minutissimum within 650-745 nm range is determined by two-photon absorption of bacteriochlorophyll rather than of carotenoids].

    PubMed

    Krikunova, M A; Leupold, D; Rini, M; Voigt, B; Moskalenko, A A; Toropygina, O A; Razzhivin, A P

    2002-01-01

    Two-photon fluorescence excitation spectra of the peripheral light-harvesting complex LH2 from the purple photosynthetic bacterium Chromatium minutissimum were examined within the expected spectral range of the optically forbidden S1 singlet state of carotenoids. LH2 preparations isolated from wild-type and carotenoid-depleted cells were used. 100-fs laser pulses in the range of 1300-1490 nm with an energy of 7-9 mW (corresponding to one-photon absorption between 650 and 745 nm) were used for two-photon fluorescence excitation. It was shown that two-photon fluorescence excitation spectra of LH2 complex from wild and carotenoid-depleted cells are very similar to each other and to the two-photon fluorescence excitation spectrum of bacteriochlorophyll a in acetone. It was concluded that direct two-photon excitation of bacteriochlorophyll a determines the fluorescence of both samples within the 650-745 nm spectral range.

  9. Scaling-law for the energy dependence of anatomic power spectrum in dedicated breast CT

    SciTech Connect

    Vedantham, Srinivasan; Shi, Linxi; Glick, Stephen J.; Karellas, Andrew

    2013-01-15

    Purpose: To determine the x-ray photon energy dependence of the anatomic power spectrum of the breast when imaged with dedicated breast computed tomography (CT). Methods: A theoretical framework for scaling the empirically determined anatomic power spectrum at one x-ray photon energy to that at any given x-ray photon energy when imaged with dedicated breast CT was developed. Theory predicted that when the anatomic power spectrum is fitted with a power curve of the form k f{sup -{beta}}, where k and {beta} are fit coefficients and f is spatial frequency, the exponent {beta} would be independent of x-ray photon energy (E), and the amplitude k scales with the square of the difference in energy-dependent linear attenuation coefficients of fibroglandular and adipose tissues. Twenty mastectomy specimens based numerical phantoms that were previously imaged with a benchtop flat-panel cone-beam CT system were converted to 3D distribution of glandular weight fraction (f{sub g}) and were used to verify the theoretical findings. The 3D power spectrum was computed in terms of f{sub g} and after converting to linear attenuation coefficients at monoenergetic x-ray photon energies of 20-80 keV in 5 keV intervals. The 1D power spectra along the axes were extracted and fitted with a power curve of the form k f{sup -{beta}}. The energy dependence of k and {beta} were analyzed. Results: For the 20 mastectomy specimen based numerical phantoms used in the study, the exponent {beta} was found to be in the range of 2.34-2.42, depending on the axis of measurement. Numerical simulations agreed with the theoretical predictions that for a power-law anatomic spectrum of the form k f{sup -{beta}}, {beta} was independent of E and k(E) =k{sub 1}[{mu}{sub g}(E) -{mu}{sub a}(E)]{sup 2}, where k{sub 1} is a constant, and {mu}{sub g}(E) and {mu}{sub a}(E) represent the energy-dependent linear attenuation coefficients of fibroglandular and adipose tissues, respectively. Conclusions: Numerical

  10. Thermophotovoltaic energy conversion using photonic bandgap selective emitters

    DOEpatents

    Gee, James M.; Lin, Shawn-Yu; Fleming, James G.; Moreno, James B.

    2003-06-24

    A method for thermophotovoltaic generation of electricity comprises heating a metallic photonic crystal to provide selective emission of radiation that is matched to the peak spectral response of a photovoltaic cell that converts the radiation to electricity. The use of a refractory metal, such as tungsten, for the photonic crystal enables high temperature operation for high radiant flux and high dielectric contrast for a full 3D photonic bandgap, preferable for efficient thermophotovoltaic energy conversion.

  11. VIM3.0. Continuous Energy MC Neutron/Photon

    SciTech Connect

    Blomquist, R.N.

    1991-08-01

    VIM solves the three-dimensional steady-state multiplication eigenvalue or fixed source neutron or photon (VIM3.0) transport problem using continuous energy-dependent nuclear data. It was designed for the analysis of fast critical experiments. In VIM3.0, the photon interactions i.e., pair production, coherent and incoherent scattering, and photoelectric events, and photon heating are tallied by group, region, and isotope.

  12. VIM3.0. Continuous Energy MC Neutron/Photon

    SciTech Connect

    Blomquist, R.N.

    1991-10-10

    VIM solves the three-dimensional steady-state multiplication eigenvalue or fixed source neutron or photon (VIM3.0) transport problem using continuous energy-dependent nuclear data. It was designed for the analysis of fast critical experiments. In VIM3.0, the photon interactions i.e., pair production, coherent and incoherent scattering, and photoelectric events, and photon heating are tallied by group, region, and isotope.

  13. The energy spectrum for stochastic eddies with gamma distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kara, Rukiye; Caglar, Mine

    2012-09-01

    Lundgren (1982) showed that strained spiral vortex model for turbulent fine structure has exponential Kolmogorov energy spectrum form. Caglar (2007) has generalized Cinlar velocity field which defined a similar structure with Lundgren vortex and computed the energy spectrum. In this study, we investigate the energy spectrum of the stochastic velocity field using Gamma distribution for small scale eddies.

  14. Partial angular coherence and the angular Schmidt spectrum of entangled two-photon fields

    SciTech Connect

    Jha, Anand Kumar; Boyd, Robert W.; Agarwal, Girish S.

    2011-12-15

    We study partially coherent fields that have a coherent-mode representation in the orbital-angular-momentum-mode basis. For such fields, we introduce the concepts of the angular coherence function and the coherence angle. Such fields are naturally produced by the process of parametric down-conversion--a second-order nonlinear optical process in which a pump photon breaks up into two entangled photons, known as the signal and idler photons. We show that the angular coherence functions of the signal and idler fields are directly related to the angular Schmidt (spiral) spectrum of the down-converted two-photon field and thus that the angular Schmidt spectrum can be measured directly by measuring the angular coherence function of either the signal or the idler field, without requiring coincidence detection.

  15. No Photon Left Behind: Advanced Optics at ARPA-E for Buildings and Solar Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branz, Howard M.

    2015-04-01

    Key technology challenges in building efficiency and solar energy utilization require transformational optics, plasmonics and photonics technologies. We describe advanced optical technologies funded by the Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy. Buildings technologies include a passive daytime photonic cooler, infra-red computer vision mapping for energy audit, and dual-band electrochromic windows based on plasmonic absorption. Solar technologies include novel hybrid energy converters that combine high-efficiency photovoltaics with concentrating solar thermal collection and storage. Because the marginal cost of thermal energy storage is low, these systems enable generation of inexpensive and dispatchable solar energy that can be deployed when the sun doesn't shine. The solar technologies under development include nanoparticle plasmonic spectrum splitting, Rugate filter interference structures and photovoltaic cells that can operate efficiently at over 400° C.

  16. Two-photon excitation spectrum of light-harvesting complex II and fluorescence upconversion after one- and two-photon excitation of the carotenoids

    SciTech Connect

    Walla, P.J.; Yom, J.; Krueger, B.P.; Fleming, G.R.

    2000-05-18

    The two-photon excitation (TPE) spectrum of light-harvesting complex II (LHC II) has been measured in the spectral region of 1,000--1,600 nm, corresponding to one-photon wavelengths of 500--800 nm. The authors observed a band with an origin at {approximately}2 x 660 nm (ca. 15,100 {+-} 300 cm{sup {minus}1}) and a maximum at {approximately}2 x 600 nm. The line shape and origin of this band strongly suggest that the observed signal is due to the two-photon-allowed S{sub 1} state of the energy-transferring carotenoids (Car ) in LHC II. The authors also report the time dependence of the upconverted chlorophyll (Chl) fluorescence after TPE at the maximum of the observed band. Surprisingly, a fast rise of 250 {+-} 50 fs followed by a multiexponential decay on the picosecond time scale was observed. This result provides strong indication that there is a fast energy transfer even from the dipole-forbidden Car S{sub 1} state to the Chl's. The sub picosecond energy transfer from the Car S{sub 1} state is likely a consequence of the large number of energy-accepting Chls in van der Waals contact with the central Car's in LHC II. They also present upconversion data of the Car S{sub 2}, Chl a, and Chl b fluorescence observed after one-photon excitation into the dipole-allowed Car S{sub 2} state. The lifetime of the Car S{sub 2} state is {approximately}120 {+-} 30 fs. With the observed time constants they are able to calculate quantum yields for the different possible pathways contributing to the overall Car to Chl energy transfer in LHC II.

  17. ADAPTIVE FULL-SPECTRUM SOLOR ENERGY SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Byard D. Wood

    2004-04-01

    This RD&D project is a three year team effort to develop a hybrid solar lighting (HSL) system that transports solar light from a paraboloidal dish concentrator to a luminaire via a large core polymer fiber optic. The luminaire can be a device to distribute sunlight into a space for the production of algae or it can be a device that is a combination of solar lighting and electric lighting. A benchmark prototype system has been developed to evaluate the HSL system. Sunlight is collected using a one-meter paraboloidal concentrator dish with two-axis tracking. A secondary mirror consisting of eight planar-segmented mirrors directs the visible part of the spectrum to eight fibers (receiver) and subsequently to eight luminaires. This results in about 8,200 lumens incident at each fiber tip. Each fiber can illuminate about 16.7 m{sup 2} (180 ft{sup 2}) of office space. The IR spectrum is directed to a thermophotovoltaic (TPV) array to produce electricity. During this reporting period, the project team made advancements in the design of the second generation (Alpha) system. For the Alpha system, the eight individual 12 mm fibers have been replaced with a centralized bundle of 3 mm fibers. The TRNSYS Full-Spectrum Solar Energy System model has been updated and new components have been added. The TPV array and nonimaging device have been tested and progress has been made in the fiber transmission models. A test plan was developed for both the high-lumen tests and the study to determine the non-energy benefits of daylighting. The photobioreactor team also made major advancements in the testing of model scale and bench top lab-scale systems.

  18. Waveguiding properties and the spectrum of modes of hollow-core photonic-crystal fibres

    SciTech Connect

    Fedotov, Andrei B; Konorov, Stanislav O; Kolevatova, O A; Zheltikov, Aleksei M; Beloglazov, V I; Skibina, N B; Shcherbakov, Andrei V; Mel'nikov, L A

    2003-03-31

    Glass fibres with a hollow core and a two-dimensionally periodic cladding are studied experimentally and theoretically. The spectrum of modes guided in the hollow core of these fibres displays isolated maxima, indicating that waveguiding is supported due to the high reflectivity of the fibre cladding within photonic band gaps. The main properties of the spectrum of modes guided in a hollow core of a photonic-crystal fibre and radiation intensity distribution in these modes are qualitatively explained in terms of the model of a periodic coaxial waveguide. (fibre optics)

  19. Two-Photon Absorption Spectrum of a Single Crystal Cyanine-like Dye.

    PubMed

    Hu, Honghua; Fishman, Dmitry A; Gerasov, Andrey O; Przhonska, Olga V; Webster, Scott; Padilha, Lazaro A; Peceli, Davorin; Shandura, Mykola; Kovtun, Yuriy P; Kachkovski, Alexey D; Nayyar, Iffat H; Masunov, Artëm E; Tongwa, Paul; Timofeeva, Tatiana V; Hagan, David J; Van Stryland, Eric W

    2012-05-03

    The two-photon absorption (2PA) spectrum of an organic single crystal is reported. The crystal is grown by self-nucleation of a subsaturated hot solution of acetonitrile, and is composed of an asymmetrical donor-π-acceptor cyanine-like dye molecule. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the 2PA spectrum of single crystals made from a cyanine-like dye. The linear and nonlinear properties of the single crystalline material are investigated and compared with the molecular properties of a toluene solution of its monomeric form. The maximum polarization-dependent 2PA coefficient of the single crystal is 52 ± 9 cm/GW, which is more than twice as large as that for the inorganic semiconductor CdTe with a similar absorption edge. The optical properties, linear and nonlinear, are strongly dependent upon incident polarization due to anisotropic molecular packing. X-ray diffraction analysis shows π-stacking dimers formation in the crystal, similar to H-aggregates. Quantum chemical calculations demonstrate that this dimerization leads to the splitting of the energy bands and the appearance of new red-shifted 2PA bands when compared to the solution of monomers. This trend is opposite to the blue shift in the linear absorption spectra upon H-aggregation.

  20. Time-dependent spectrum of a single photon and its positive-operator-valued measure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Enk, S. J.

    2017-09-01

    Suppose we measure the time-dependent spectrum of a single photon. That is, we first send the photon through a set of frequency filters (which we assume to have different filter frequencies but the same finite bandwidth Γ ) and then record at what time (with some finite precision Δ t and some finite efficiency η ) and after passing what filter the photon is detected. What is the positive-operator-valued measure (POVM), the most general description of a quantum measurement, corresponding to such a measurement? We show how to construct the POVM in various cases, with special interest in the case Γ Δ t ≪1 (time-frequency uncertainty still holds, even in that limit). One application of the formalism is to heralding single photons. We also find a Hong-Ou-Mandel type of interference effect with two photons entering a frequency filter.

  1. Identifying nearby accelerators of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays using ultrahigh energy (and very high energy) photons.

    PubMed

    Taylor, A M; Hinton, J A; Blasi, P; Ave, M

    2009-07-31

    Ultrahigh energy photons (UHE, E>10(19) eV) are inevitably produced during the propagation of approximately 10(20) eV protons in extragalactic space. Their short interaction lengths (<20 Mpc) at these energies, combined with the impressive sensitivity of the Pierre Auger Observatory detector to these particles, makes them an ideal probe of nearby ultrahigh energy cosmic ray (UHECR) sources. We here discuss the particular case of photons from a single nearby (within 30 Mpc) source in light of the possibility that such an object might be responsible for several of the UHECR events published by the Auger collaboration. We demonstrate that the photon signal accompanying a cluster of a few >6 x 10(19) eV UHECRs from such a source should be detectable by Auger in the near future. The detection of these photons would also be a signature of a light composition of the UHECRs from the nearby source.

  2. Direct photon production in high-energy nuclear collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Peitzmann, T.

    2016-01-22

    Direct photons have always been considered a promising probe for the very early phases of high-energy nuclear collisions. Prompt photons reveal information about the initial state and its possible modifications in nuclei. In this context they should be one of the best probes for effects of gluon saturation. Thermal photons emitted from the produced matter in nuclear collisions carry information on the temperature of the very early phase. In particular a simultaneous measurement of yield and elliptic flow of thermal photons can put strong constraints on the early time dynamics of the system. I review the status of results on direct photon measurements at RHIC and LHC and their interpretation. Prompt photons at high p{sub T} are consistent with expectations from NLO pQCD in pp and show no strong nuclear modifications in A–A collisions. Recent analysis at RHIC has shown very intriguing results for lower p{sub T}, with high thermal photon yield and strong elliptic flow of direct photons, which are not fully understood theoretically. Also the ALICE experiment at the LHC has measured a high yield of thermal photons. Furthermore I discuss prospects for future measurements of forward direct photons at the LHC.

  3. Absorbed Dose and Collision Kerma Relationship for High-Energy Photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibata, Claudio Hissao

    Historically, exposure has been used as an important quantity to specify X- or (gamma)- ray beams. For any photon beam the energy fluence is proportional to the exposure. Exposure can be calculated and/or measured if the spectrum of the beam is known and charged particle equilibrium (CPE) exists. For low energy photons (up to approximately 1 MeV), due to the existence of CPE, absorbed dose (D) is equal to the collision kerma (K(,c)). For megavoltage photons this equality is lost due to CPE failure, which also restricts the measurement of exposure. It is possible, though, to find a relationship between the absorbed dose and collision kerma when transient charged particle equilibrium (TCPE) exists. This basic idea was originally proposed by Roesch in 1958 and its refinement has been discussed by Attix in 1979 and 1983. The modified Roesch's formula which enables us to measure exposure even for high-energy photons is given by D = (beta) K(,c) (TURNEQ) K(,c) (1 + (mu)' ) where (mu)' is the effective linear attenuation coefficient and is the mean distance the secondary electrons carry kinetic energy in the direction of the photon beam while depositing it as absorbed dose. The symbol (beta) is the quotient of the absorbed dose and the collision kerma. The importance of Roesch's formula has been recognized and used implicitly in the recent dosimetry protocol of the AAPM (Task Group 21). However, the value used in the protocol is based on theoretical calculations which do not include photon scattering. As a result of the present effort the parameters (mu)' and have been determined experimentally, for the first time. The dependence of (beta) on several factors has been studied and (beta) has been obtained including the effects of scattering. Calculations were also performed for several photon energies and materials, using the Roesch method, which does not include photon scattering effects. Comparisons of measured and calculated values of show

  4. Probing dark energy using convergence power spectrum and bi-spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinda, Bikash R.

    2017-09-01

    Weak lensing convergence statistics is a powerful tool to probe dark energy. Dark energy plays an important role to the structure formation and the effects can be detected through the convergence power spectrum, bi-spectrum etc. One of the most promising and simplest dark energy model is the ΛCDM . However, it is worth investigating different dark energy models with evolving equation of state of the dark energy. In this work, detectability of different dark energy models from ΛCDM model has been explored through convergence power spectrum and bi-spectrum.

  5. Segmentation-free x-ray energy spectrum estimation for computed tomography using dual-energy material decomposition.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wei; Xing, Lei; Zhang, Qiude; Xie, Qingguo; Niu, Tianye

    2017-04-01

    An x-ray energy spectrum plays an essential role in computed tomography (CT) imaging and related tasks. Because of the high photon flux of clinical CT scanners, most of the spectrum estimation methods are indirect and usually suffer from various limitations. In this study, we aim to provide a segmentation-free, indirect transmission measurement-based energy spectrum estimation method using dual-energy material decomposition. The general principle of this method is to minimize the quadratic error between the polychromatic forward projection and the raw projection to calibrate a set of unknown weights, which are used to express the unknown spectrum together with a set of model spectra. The polychromatic forward projection is performed using material-specific images, which are obtained using dual-energy material decomposition. The algorithm was evaluated using numerical simulations, experimental phantom data, and realistic patient data. The results show that the estimated spectrum matches the reference spectrum quite well and the method is robust. Extensive studies suggest that the method provides an accurate estimate of the CT spectrum without dedicated physical phantom and prolonged workflow. This paper may be attractive for CT dose calculation, artifacts reduction, polychromatic image reconstruction, and other spectrum-involved CT applications.

  6. Effects of Photon Absorption in High Energy Heavy Ion Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winchell, Joshua; Somanathan, Sidharth; Fries, Ranier

    2014-09-01

    Photons are an important probe of the hot and dense nuclear matter created in high-energy collisions of nuclei at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Since the mean free path of photons is larger than the size of the fireball of nuclear matter, final state interactions of photons are usually neglected. In light of recent tension between theoretical calculations and data from RHIC and LHC, we study the effect of reabsorption of photons on elliptic flow v2 and on the nuclear modification factor RAA. We consider photons emitted in primary hard collisions and thermal photons from quark-gluon plasma and hot hadron gas. We use the jet-quenching code PPM to simulate the propagation of those photons in a fireball of quark-gluon plasma and hot hadron gas created by collisions of heavy nuclei. For the absorption cross-sections we consider three different approaches: (a) Compton and pair production processes calculated by us in a static approximation, (b) the photon damping rates calculated by Thoma (1995), and (c) absorption rates derived from a recent photon calculation by van Hees et al.

  7. Degenerate two-photon absorption in all-trans retinal: nonlinear spectrum and theoretical calculations.

    PubMed

    Vivas, M G; Silva, D L; Misoguti, L; Zaleśny, R; Bartkowiak, W; Mendonca, C R

    2010-03-18

    In this work we investigate the degenerate two-photon absorption spectrum of all-trans retinal in ethanol employing the Z-scan technique with femtosecond pulses. The two-photon absorption (2PA) spectrum presents a monotonous increase as the excitation wavelength approaches the one-photon absorption band and a peak at 790 nm. We attribute the 2PA band to the mixing of states (1)B(u)(+)-like and |S(1)>, which are strongly allowed by one- and two-photon, respectively. We modeled the 2PA spectrum by using the sum-over-states approach and obtained spectroscopic parameters of the electronic transitions to |S(1)>, |S(2)> ("(1)B(u)(+)"), |S(3)>, and |S(4)> singlet-excited states. The results were compared with theoretical predictions of one- and two-photon transition calculations using the response functions formalism within the density functional theory framework with the aid of the CAM-B3LYP functional.

  8. Nondestructive low-energy photon analysis of environmental samples

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, I.L.; Cutshall, N.H.; Olsen, C.R.

    1984-01-01

    Low-energy photons that accompany the decay of alpha- or beta-emitting radionuclides (e.g., /sup 241/Am, /sup 210/Pb, and /sup 238/U-/sup 234/Th) may be used to quantify concentrations of these radionuclides in environmental samples. Previous attempts to quantify these low-energy photons have had limited success because of the uncertainty associated with photon attenuation in samples of variable matrix composition. A method for directly measuring and applying the self-absorption correction factor is presented. Results obtained by this nondestructive technique for counting low-energy photons are in agreement with values obtained from intracalibrated samples using radiochemical separations and alpha or beta analysis. 8 references, 1 figure, 3 tables.

  9. Quantum teleportation of the angular spectrum of a single-photon field

    SciTech Connect

    Walborn, S. P.; Ether, D. S.; Matos Filho, R. L. de; Zagury, N.

    2007-09-15

    We propose a quantum teleportation scheme for the angular spectrum of a single-photon field, which allows for the transmission of a large amount of information. Our proposal also provides a method to tune the frequencies of spatially entangled fields, which is useful for interactions with stationary qubits.

  10. Deriving eigenmode excitation spectrum of synthetic photonic lattices by means of optical heterodyning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tikan, A. M.; Vatnik, I. D.; Churkin, D. V.; Sukhorukov, A. A.

    2017-02-01

    A method based on optical heterodyning is proposed for measuring relative optical phases of pulses circulating in synthetic photonic lattices (SPL). The knowledge of the phases can be further used for qualitative reconstruction of an eigenmode excitation spectrum in the SPL.

  11. Wigner spectrum and coherent feedback control of continuous-mode single-photon Fock states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Zhiyuan; Cui, Lei; Zhang, Guofeng; Fu, Hongchen

    2016-10-01

    Single photons are very useful resources in quantum information science. In real applications it is often required that the photons have a well-defined spectral (or equivalently temporal) modal structure. For example, a rising exponential pulse is able to fully excite a two-level atom while a Gaussian pulse cannot. This motivates the study of continuous-mode single-photon Fock states. Such states are characterized by a spectral (or temporal) pulse shape. In this paper we investigate the statistical property of continuous-mode single-photon Fock states. Instead of the commonly used normal ordering (Wick order), the tool we proposed is the Wigner spectrum. The Wigner spectrum has two advantages: (1) it allows to study continuous-mode single-photon Fock states in the time domain and frequency domain simultaneously; (2) because it can deal with the Dirac delta function directly, it has the potential to provide more information than the normal ordering where the Dirac delta function is always discarded. We also show how various control methods in particular coherent feedback control can be used to manipulate the pulse shapes of continuous-mode single-photon Fock states.

  12. Ultra high energy photons and neutrinos with JEM-EUSO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, J. H.; Ahmad, S.; Albert, J.-N.; Allard, D.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andreev, V.; Anzalone, A.; Arai, Y.; Asano, K.; Ave Pernas, M.; Baragatti, P.; Barrillon, P.; Batsch, T.; Bayer, J.; Bechini, R.; Belenguer, T.; Bellotti, R.; Belov, K.; Berlind, A. A.; Bertaina, M.; Biermann, P. L.; Biktemerova, S.; Blaksley, C.; Blanc, N.; Błȩcki, J.; Blin-Bondil, S.; Blümer, J.; Bobik, P.; Bogomilov, M.; Bonamente, M.; Briggs, M. S.; Briz, S.; Bruno, A.; Cafagna, F.; Campana, D.; Capdevielle, J.-N.; Caruso, R.; Casolino, M.; Cassardo, C.; Castellinic, G.; Catalano, C.; Catalano, G.; Cellino, A.; Chikawa, M.; Christl, M. J.; Cline, D.; Connaughton, V.; Conti, L.; Cordero, G.; Crawford, H. J.; Cremonini, R.; Csorna, S.; Dagoret-Campagne, S.; de Castro, A. J.; De Donato, C.; de la Taille, C.; De Santis, C.; del Peral, L.; Dell'Oro, A.; De Simone, N.; Di Martino, M.; Distratis, G.; Dulucq, F.; Dupieux, M.; Ebersoldt, A.; Ebisuzaki, T.; Engel, R.; Falk, S.; Fang, K.; Fenu, F.; Fernández-Gómez, I.; Ferrarese, S.; Finco, D.; Flamini, M.; Fornaro, C.; Franceschi, A.; Fujimoto, J.; Fukushima, M.; Galeotti, P.; Garipov, G.; Geary, J.; Gelmini, G.; Giraudo, G.; Gonchar, M.; González Alvarado, C.; Gorodetzky, P.; Guarino, F.; Guzmán, A.; Hachisu, Y.; Harlov, B.; Haungs, A.; Hernández Carretero, J.; Higashide, K.; Ikeda, D.; Ikeda, H.; Inoue, N.; Inoue, S.; Insolia, A.; Isgrò, F.; Itow, Y.; Joven, E.; Judd, E. G.; Jung, A.; Kajino, F.; Kajino, T.; Kaneko, I.; Karadzhov, Y.; Karczmarczyk, J.; Karus, M.; Katahira, K.; Kawai, K.; Kawasaki, Y.; Keilhauer, B.; Khrenov, B. A.; Kim, J.-S.; Kim, S.-W.; Kim, S.-W.; Kleifges, M.; Klimov, P. A.; Kolev, D.; Kreykenbohm, I.; Kudela, K.; Kurihara, Y.; Kusenko, A.; Kuznetsov, E.; Lacombe, M.; Lachaud, C.; Lee, J.; Licandro, J.; Lim, H.; López, F.; Maccarone, M. C.; Mannheim, K.; Maravilla, D.; Marcelli, L.; Marini, A.; Martinez, O.; Masciantonio, G.; Mase, K.; Matev, R.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Mernik, T.; Miyamoto, H.; Miyazaki, Y.; Mizumoto, Y.; Modestino, G.; Monaco, A.; Monnier-Ragaigne, D.; Morales de los Ríos, J. A.; Moretto, C.; Morozenko, V. S.; Mot, B.; Murakami, T.; Murakami, M. Nagano; Nagata, M.; Nagataki, S.; Nakamura, T.; Napolitano, T.; Naumov, D.; Nava, R.; Neronov, A.; Nomoto, K.; Nonaka, T.; Ogawa, T.; Ogio, S.; Ohmori, H.; Olinto, A. V.; Orleański, P.; Osteria, G.; Panasyuk, M. I.; Parizot, E.; Park, I. H.; Park, H. W.; Pastircak, B.; Patzak, T.; Paul, T.; Pennypacker, C.; Perez Cano, S.; Peter, T.; Picozza, P.; Pierog, T.; Piotrowski, L. W.; Piraino, S.; Plebaniak, Z.; Pollini, A.; Prat, P.; Prévôt, G.; Prieto, H.; Putis, M.; Reardon, P.; Reyes, M.; Ricci, M.; Rodríguez, I.; Rodríguez Frías, M. D.; Ronga, F.; Roth, M.; Rothkaehl, H.; Roudil, G.; Rusinov, I.; Rybczyński, M.; Sabau, M. D.; Sáez-Cano, G.; Sagawa, H.; Saito, A.; Sakaki, N.; Sakata, M.; Salazar, H.; Sánchez, S.; Santangelo, A.; Santiago Crúz, L.; Sanz Palomino, M.; Saprykin, O.; Sarazin, F.; Sato, H.; Sato, M.; Schanz, T.; Schieler, H.; Scotti, V.; Segreto, A.; Selmane, S.; Semikoz, D.; Serra, M.; Sharakin, S.; Shibata, T.; Shimizu, H. M.; Shinozaki, K.; Shirahama, T.; Siemieniec-Oziȩbło, G.; Silva López, H. H.; Sledd, J.; Słomińska, K.; Sobey, A.; Sugiyama, T.; Supanitsky, D.; Suzuki, M.; Szabelska, B.; Szabelski, J.; Tajima, F.; Tajima, N.; Tajima, T.; Takahashi, Y.; Takami, H.; Takeda, M.; Takizawa, Y.; Tenzer, C.; Tibolla, O.; Tkachev, L.; Tokuno, H.; Tomida, T.; Tone, N.; Toscano, S.; Trillaud, F.; Tsenov, R.; Tsunesada, Y.; Tsuno, K.; Tymieniecka, T.; Uchihori, Y.; Unger, M.; Vaduvescu, O.; Valdés-Galicia, J. F.; Vallania, P.; Valore, L.; Vankova, G.; Vigorito, C.; Villaseñor, L.; von Ballmoos, P.; Wada, S.; Watanabe, J.; Watanabe, S.; Watts, J.; Weber, M.; Weiler, T. J.; Wibig, T.; Wiencke, L.; Wille, M.; Wilms, J.; Włodarczyk, Z.; Yamamoto, T.; Yamamoto, Y.; Yang, J.; Yano, H.; Yashin, I. V.; Yonetoku, D.; Yoshida, K.; Yoshida, S.; Young, R.; Zotov, M. Yu.; Zuccaro Marchi, A.

    2015-11-01

    Ultra high energy photons and neutrinos are carriers of very important astrophysical information. They may be produced at the sites of cosmic ray acceleration or during the propagation of the cosmic rays in the intergalactic medium. In contrast to charged cosmic rays, photon and neutrino arrival directions point to the production site because they are not deflected by the magnetic fields of the Galaxy or the intergalactic medium. In this work we study the characteristics of the longitudinal development of showers initiated by photons and neutrinos at the highest energies. These studies are relevant for development of techniques for neutrino and photon identification by the JEM-EUSO telescope. In particular, we study the possibility of observing the multi-peak structure of very deep horizontal neutrino showers with JEM-EUSO. We also discuss the possibility to determine the flavor content of the incident neutrino flux by taking advantage of the different characteristics of the longitudinal profiles generated by different type of neutrinos. This is of grate importance for the study of the fundamental properties of neutrinos at the highest energies. Regarding photons, we discuss the detectability of the cosmogenic component by JEM-EUSO and also estimate the expected upper limits on the photon fraction which can be obtained from the future JEM-EUSO data for the case in which there are no photons in the samples.

  13. Photon spectrum and polarization for high conversion coefficient in the Compton backscattering process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potylitsyn, A. P.; Kolchuzhkin, A. M.; Strikhanov, M. N.; Strokov, S. A.

    2017-07-01

    This study looks to simulate the nonlinear Compton backscattering (CBS) process based on the Monte Carlo technique for the conversion coefficient Kc ⩾ 1 , which can be considered as the average number of photons emitted by each electron. The characteristics of the nonlinear CBS process simulated in this work are as follows: the number of absorbed photons of a laser, the distance in the laser pulse in which the electron passes between two collisions, the energy and the polarization of the emitted photon in each collision, and the polarization of the electron before and after collision. The developed approach allows us to find the spectra and polarization characteristics of the final electrons and photons. When Kc > 1 , the spin-flip processes need to be considered for a correct simulation of the polarization of the final photons and electrons for energies typical of a γ- γ collider.

  14. Constraining photon mass by energy-dependent gravitational light bending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Lei

    2012-03-01

    In the standard model of particle physics, photons are massless particles with a particular dispersion relation. Tests of this claim at different scales are both interesting and important. Experiments in territory labs and several exterritorial tests have put some upper limits on photon mass, e.g., torsion balance experiment in the lab shows that photon mass should be smaller than 1.2 × 10-51g. In this work, this claim is tested at a cosmological scale by looking at strong gravitational lensing data available and an upper limit of 8.71 × 10-39g on photon mass is given. Observations of energy-dependent gravitational lensing with not yet available higher accuracy astrometry instruments may constrain photon mass better.

  15. Spectrum and energy levels of Mo VI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reader, Joseph

    1998-05-01

    We have photographed the spectrum of the Rb-like ion Mo VI from 200 to 5300 Å with a sliding-spark discharge on our 10.7-m normal- and grazing-incidence spectrographs and have observed most of the yrast transitions given by Romanov et al.(N. P. Romanov and A. R. Striganov, Opt. Spectrosc. 27), 8 (1969). from a Penning discharge. We have obtained improved values for all of the energy levels. We confirm the odd levels of Kancerevicius et al.,(A. Kancerevicius et al.), Lithuanian Phys. J. 31, 143 (1991). but have revised a number of the even levels of Edlén et al.(B. Edlén et al.), Phys. Scr. 32, 215 (1985). The ionization energy of Edlén et al.,footnotemark[4] which had been called into question by Kancerevicius et al.footnotemark[3] as a result of their revision of the odd levels,footnotemark[4] is confirmed.

  16. Photonic Crystal Emitters for Thermophotovoltaic Energy Conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stelmakh, Veronika; Chan, Walker R.; Ghebrebrhan, Michael; Soljacic, Marin; Joannopoulos, John D.; Celanovic, Ivan

    2015-12-01

    This paper reports the design, fabrication, and characterization of 2D photonic crystal (PhC) thermal emitters for a millimeter-scale hydrocarbon TPV microgenerator as a possible replacement for batteries in portable microelectronics, robotics, etc. In our TPV system, combustion heats a PhC emitter to incandescence and the resulting radiation is converted by a low-bandgap TPV cell. The PhC tailors the photonic density of states to produce spectrally confined thermal emission that matches the bandgap of the TPV cell, enabling high heat-to-electricity conversion efficiency. The work builds on a previously developed fabrication process to produce a square array of cylindrical cavities in a metal substrate. We will present ongoing incremental improvements in the optical and thermo-mechanical properties, the fabrication process, and the system integration, as recently combined with fabrication using novel materials, such as sputtered coatings, to enable a monolithic system.

  17. The Dosepix detector—an energy-resolving photon-counting pixel detector for spectrometric measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zang, A.; Anton, G.; Ballabriga, R.; Bisello, F.; Campbell, M.; Celi, J. C.; Fauler, A.; Fiederle, M.; Jensch, M.; Kochanski, N.; Llopart, X.; Michel, N.; Mollenhauer, U.; Ritter, I.; Tennert, F.; Wölfel, S.; Wong, W.; Michel, T.

    2015-04-01

    The Dosepix detector is a hybrid photon-counting pixel detector based on ideas of the Medipix and Timepix detector family. 1 mm thick cadmium telluride and 300 μm thick silicon were used as sensor material. The pixel matrix of the Dosepix consists of 16 x 16 square pixels with 12 rows of (200 μm)2 and 4 rows of (55 μm)2 sensitive area for the silicon sensor layer and 16 rows of pixels with 220 μm pixel pitch for CdTe. Besides digital energy integration and photon-counting mode, a novel concept of energy binning is included in the pixel electronics, allowing energy-resolved measurements in 16 energy bins within one acquisition. The possibilities of this detector concept range from applications in personal dosimetry and energy-resolved imaging to quality assurance of medical X-ray sources by analysis of the emitted photon spectrum. In this contribution the Dosepix detector, its response to X-rays as well as spectrum measurements with Si and CdTe sensor layer are presented. Furthermore, a first evaluation was carried out to use the Dosepix detector as a kVp-meter, that means to determine the applied acceleration voltage from measured X-ray tubes spectra.

  18. Dual concentric crystal low energy photon detector

    DOEpatents

    Guilmette, R.A.

    A photon detector for biological samples includes a block of NaI(T1) having a hole containing a thin walled cylinder of CsI(T1). At least three photo multiplier tubes are evenly spaced around the parameter of the block. Biological samples are placed within the hole, and emissions which are sensed by at least two of the photo multipliers from only the NaI(T1) detector are counted.

  19. Continuous energy adjoint transport for photons in PHITS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malins, Alex; Machida, Masahiko; Niita, Koji

    2017-09-01

    Adjoint Monte Carlo can be an effcient algorithm for solving photon transport problems where the size of the tally is relatively small compared to the source. Such problems are typical in environmental radioactivity calculations, where natural or fallout radionuclides spread over a large area contribute to the air dose rate at a particular location. Moreover photon transport with continuous energy representation is vital for accurately calculating radiation protection quantities. Here we describe the incorporation of an adjoint Monte Carlo capability for continuous energy photon transport into the Particle and Heavy Ion Transport code System (PHITS). An adjoint cross section library for photon interactions was developed based on the JENDL- 4.0 library, by adding cross sections for adjoint incoherent scattering and pair production. PHITS reads in the library and implements the adjoint transport algorithm by Hoogenboom. Adjoint pseudo-photons are spawned within the forward tally volume and transported through space. Currently pseudo-photons can undergo coherent and incoherent scattering within the PHITS adjoint function. Photoelectric absorption is treated implicitly. The calculation result is recovered from the pseudo-photon flux calculated over the true source volume. A new adjoint tally function facilitates this conversion. This paper gives an overview of the new function and discusses potential future developments.

  20. Particle and Photon Detection: Counting and Energy Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Janesick, James; Tower, John

    2016-01-01

    Fundamental limits for photon counting and photon energy measurement are reviewed for CCD and CMOS imagers. The challenges to extend photon counting into the visible/nIR wavelengths and achieve energy measurement in the UV with specific read noise requirements are discussed. Pixel flicker and random telegraph noise sources are highlighted along with various methods used in reducing their contribution on the sensor’s read noise floor. Practical requirements for quantum efficiency, charge collection efficiency, and charge transfer efficiency that interfere with photon counting performance are discussed. Lastly we will review current efforts in reducing flicker noise head-on, in hopes to drive read noise substantially below 1 carrier rms. PMID:27187398

  1. High-energy photon splitting on heavy atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, R. N.; Milstein, A. I.; Strakhovenko, V. M.

    1998-04-01

    The helicity amplitudes of high-energy photon splitting in an external Coulomb field are obtained exactly in the parameter Zα. The consideration is based on the quasiclassical approach, valid for small angles between all photon momenta. A new representation of the quasiclassical electron Green function is exploited. General expressions obtained are analyzed in detail when the transverse momenta of both final photons are much larger than the electron mass. It is shown that, at Zα~1, Coulomb corrections essentially change the cross section as compared to the Born approximation. Screened and unscreened potentials are considered.

  2. A photon counting and a squeezing measurement method by the exact absorption and dispersion spectrum of Λ-type Atoms.

    PubMed

    Naeimi, Ghasem; Alipour, Samira; Khademi, Siamak

    2016-01-01

    Recently, the master equations for the interaction of two-mode photons with a three-level Λ-type atom are exactly solved for the coherence terms. In this paper the exact absorption spectrum is applied for the presentation of a non-demolition photon counting method, for a few number of coupling photons, and its benefits are discussed. The exact scheme is also applied where the coupling photons are squeezed and the photon counting method is also developed for the measurement of the squeezing parameter of the coupling photons.

  3. The DHG sum rule measured with medium energy photons

    SciTech Connect

    Hicks, K.; Ardashev, K.; Babusci, D.

    1997-12-31

    The structure of the nucleon has many important features that are yet to be uncovered. Of current interest is the nucleon spin-structure which can be measured by doing double-polarization experiments with photon beams of medium energies (0.1 to 2 GeV). One such experiment uses dispersion relations, applied to the Compton scattering amplitude, to relate measurement of the total reaction cross section integrated over the incident photon energy to the nucleon anomalous magnetic moment. At present, no single facility spans the entire range of photon energies necessary to test this sum rule. The Laser-Electron Gamma Source (LEGS) facility will measure the double-polarization observables at photon energies between 0.15--0.47 MeV. Either the SPring8 facility, the GRAAL facility (France), or Jefferson Laboratory could make similar measurements at higher photon energies. A high-precision measurement of the spin-polarizability and the Drell-Hearn-Gerasimov sum rule is now possible with the advent of high-polarization solid HD targets at medium energy polarized photon facilities such as LEGS, GRAAL and SPring8. Other facilities with lower polarization in either the photon beam or target (or both) are also pursuing these measurements because of the high priority associated with this physics. The Spin-asymmetry (SASY) detector that will be used at LEGS has been briefly outlined in this paper. The detector efficiencies have been explored with simulations studies using the GEANT software, with the result that both charged and uncharged pions can be detected with a reasonable efficiency (> 30%) over a large solid angle. Tracking with a TPC, which will be built at LEGS over the next few years, will improve the capabilities of these measurements.

  4. Experimental demonstration of photon upconversion via cooperative energy pooling

    DOE PAGES

    Weingarten, Daniel H.; LaCount, Michael D.; van de Lagemaat, Jao; ...

    2017-03-15

    Photon upconversion is a fundamental interaction of light and matter that has applications in fields ranging from bioimaging to microfabrication. However, all photon upconversion methods demonstrated thus far involve challenging aspects, including requirements of high excitation intensities, degradation in ambient air, requirements of exotic materials or phases, or involvement of inherent energy loss processes. Here we experimentally demonstrate a mechanism of photon upconversion in a thin film, binary mixture of organic chromophores that provides a pathway to overcoming the aforementioned disadvantages. This singlet-based process, called Cooperative Energy Pooling (CEP), utilizes a sensitizer-acceptor design in which multiple photoexcited sensitizers resonantly andmore » simultaneously transfer their energies to a higher-energy state on a single acceptor. Data from this proof-of-concept implementation is fit by a proposed model of the CEP process. As a result, design guidelines are presented to facilitate further research and development of more optimized CEP systems.« less

  5. Experimental demonstration of photon upconversion via cooperative energy pooling

    PubMed Central

    Weingarten, Daniel H.; LaCount, Michael D.; van de Lagemaat, Jao; Rumbles, Garry; Lusk, Mark T.; Shaheen, Sean E.

    2017-01-01

    Photon upconversion is a fundamental interaction of light and matter that has applications in fields ranging from bioimaging to microfabrication. However, all photon upconversion methods demonstrated thus far involve challenging aspects, including requirements of high excitation intensities, degradation in ambient air, requirements of exotic materials or phases, or involvement of inherent energy loss processes. Here we experimentally demonstrate a mechanism of photon upconversion in a thin film, binary mixture of organic chromophores that provides a pathway to overcoming the aforementioned disadvantages. This singlet-based process, called Cooperative Energy Pooling (CEP), utilizes a sensitizer-acceptor design in which multiple photoexcited sensitizers resonantly and simultaneously transfer their energies to a higher-energy state on a single acceptor. Data from this proof-of-concept implementation is fit by a proposed model of the CEP process. Design guidelines are presented to facilitate further research and development of more optimized CEP systems. PMID:28294129

  6. Experimental demonstration of photon upconversion via cooperative energy pooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weingarten, Daniel H.; Lacount, Michael D.; van de Lagemaat, Jao; Rumbles, Garry; Lusk, Mark T.; Shaheen, Sean E.

    2017-03-01

    Photon upconversion is a fundamental interaction of light and matter that has applications in fields ranging from bioimaging to microfabrication. However, all photon upconversion methods demonstrated thus far involve challenging aspects, including requirements of high excitation intensities, degradation in ambient air, requirements of exotic materials or phases, or involvement of inherent energy loss processes. Here we experimentally demonstrate a mechanism of photon upconversion in a thin film, binary mixture of organic chromophores that provides a pathway to overcoming the aforementioned disadvantages. This singlet-based process, called Cooperative Energy Pooling (CEP), utilizes a sensitizer-acceptor design in which multiple photoexcited sensitizers resonantly and simultaneously transfer their energies to a higher-energy state on a single acceptor. Data from this proof-of-concept implementation is fit by a proposed model of the CEP process. Design guidelines are presented to facilitate further research and development of more optimized CEP systems.

  7. Experimental demonstration of photon upconversion via cooperative energy pooling.

    PubMed

    Weingarten, Daniel H; LaCount, Michael D; van de Lagemaat, Jao; Rumbles, Garry; Lusk, Mark T; Shaheen, Sean E

    2017-03-15

    Photon upconversion is a fundamental interaction of light and matter that has applications in fields ranging from bioimaging to microfabrication. However, all photon upconversion methods demonstrated thus far involve challenging aspects, including requirements of high excitation intensities, degradation in ambient air, requirements of exotic materials or phases, or involvement of inherent energy loss processes. Here we experimentally demonstrate a mechanism of photon upconversion in a thin film, binary mixture of organic chromophores that provides a pathway to overcoming the aforementioned disadvantages. This singlet-based process, called Cooperative Energy Pooling (CEP), utilizes a sensitizer-acceptor design in which multiple photoexcited sensitizers resonantly and simultaneously transfer their energies to a higher-energy state on a single acceptor. Data from this proof-of-concept implementation is fit by a proposed model of the CEP process. Design guidelines are presented to facilitate further research and development of more optimized CEP systems.

  8. Photon Upconversion Through Tb(3+) -Mediated Interfacial Energy Transfer.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Bo; Yang, Weifeng; Han, Sanyang; Sun, Qiang; Liu, Xiaogang

    2015-10-28

    A strategy of interfacial energy transfer upconversion is demonstrated through the use of a terbium (Tb(3+) ) dopant as energy donor or energy migrator in core-shell-structured nanocrystals. This mechanistic investigation presents a new pathway for photon upconversion, and, more importantly, contributes to the better control of energy transfer at the nanometer length scale. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Shaping the joint spectrum of down-converted photons through optimized custom poling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dosseva, Annamaria; Cincio, Łukasz; Brańczyk, Agata M.

    2016-01-01

    We present a scheme for engineering the joint spectrum of photon pairs created via spontaneous parametric down-conversion. Our method relies on customizing the poling configuration of a quasi-phase-matched crystal. We use simulated annealing to find an optimized poling configuration which allows almost arbitrary shaping of the crystal's phase-matching function. This has direct application in the creation of pure single photons—currently one of the most important goals of single-photon quantum optics. We describe the general algorithm and provide code, written in C++, that outputs an optimized poling configuration given specific experimental parameters.

  10. Tilted angle CZT detector for photon counting/energy weighting x-ray and CT imaging.

    PubMed

    Shikhaliev, Polad M

    2006-09-07

    improvement was 42% and 31% when CaCO(3) contrast element, inserted in soft tissue with 10 cm and 20 cm thickness, respectively, was imaged using 5 energy bins and weighting factors optimized for CaCO(3). The SNRs of the photon counting single-kVp dual-energy subtracted images of CaCO(3) and adipose were higher by 2.04 and 2.74 times, respectively, as compared to currently used dual-kVp dual-energy subtracted images. Experiments with a CZT crystal with 2 mm thickness have shown significant decrease in the tailing effect of the CZT pulse spectrum at 59 keV and 122 keV photon energies, when the tilting angle configuration was used. Finally, feasibility of the tilted angle CZT detector for photon counting cone beam breast CT imaging was demonstrated.

  11. Tilted angle CZT detector for photon counting/energy weighting x-ray and CT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shikhaliev, Polad M.

    2006-09-01

    improvement was 42% and 31% when CaCO3 contrast element, inserted in soft tissue with 10 cm and 20 cm thickness, respectively, was imaged using 5 energy bins and weighting factors optimized for CaCO3. The SNRs of the photon counting single-kVp dual-energy subtracted images of CaCO3 and adipose were higher by 2.04 and 2.74 times, respectively, as compared to currently used dual-kVp dual-energy subtracted images. Experiments with a CZT crystal with 2 mm thickness have shown significant decrease in the tailing effect of the CZT pulse spectrum at 59 keV and 122 keV photon energies, when the tilting angle configuration was used. Finally, feasibility of the tilted angle CZT detector for photon counting cone beam breast CT imaging was demonstrated.

  12. Energy calibration of energy-resolved photon-counting pixel detectors using laboratory polychromatic x-ray beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youn, Hanbean; Han, Jong Chul; Kam, Soohwa; Yun, Seungman; Kim, Ho Kyung

    2014-10-01

    Recently, photon-counting detectors capable of resolving incident x-ray photon energies have been considered for use in spectral x-ray imaging applications. For reliable use of energy-resolved photon-counting detectors (ERPCDs), energy calibration is an essential procedure prior to their use because variations in responses from each pixel of the ERPCD for incident photons, even at the same energy, are inevitable. Energy calibration can be performed using a variety of methods. In all of these methods, the photon spectra with well-defined peak energies are recorded. Every pixel should be calibrated on its own. In this study, we suggest the use of a conventional polychromatic x-ray source (that is typically used in laboratories) for energy calibration. The energy calibration procedure mainly includes the determination of the peak energies in the spectra, flood-field irradiation, determination of peak channels, and determination of calibration curves (i.e., the slopes and intercepts of linear polynomials). We applied a calibration algorithm to a CdTe ERPCD comprised of 128×128 pixels with a pitch of 0.35 mm using highly attenuated polychromatic x-ray beams to reduce the pulse pile-up effect, and to obtain a narrow-shaped spectrum due to beam hardening. The averaged relative error in calibration curves obtained from 16,384 pixels was about 0.56% for 59.6 keV photons from an Americium radioisotope. This pixel-by-pixel energy calibration enhanced the signal- and contrast-to-noise ratios in images, respectively, by a factor of ~5 and 3 due to improvement in image homogeneity, compared to those obtained without energy calibration. One secondary finding of this study was that the x-ray photon spectra obtained using a common algorithm for computing x-ray spectra reasonably described the peaks in the measured spectra, which implies easier peak detection without the direct measurement of spectra using a separate spectrometer. The proposed method will be a useful alternative to

  13. Octave-spanning spectrum generation in tapered silica photonic crystal fiber by Yb:fiber ring laser above 500 MHz.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Tongxiao; Wang, Guizhong; Zhang, Wei; Li, Chen; Wang, Aimin; Zhang, Zhigang

    2013-02-15

    We report octave-spanning spectrum generated in a tapered silica photonic crystal fiber by a mode-locked Yb:fiber ring laser at a repetition rate as high as 528 MHz. The output pulses from this laser were compressed to 62 fs. By controlling the hole expansion and core diameter, a silica PCF was tapered to 20 cm with an optimal d/Λ ratio of 0.6. Pulses with the energy of 280 pJ and the peak power of 4.5 kW were injected into the tapered fiber and the pulse spectrum was expanded from 500 to 1600 nm at the level of -30 dB.

  14. Self-energy shift of the energy levels of atomic hydrogen in photonic crystal medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gainutdinov, R. Kh; Khamadeev, M. A.; Steryakov, O. V.; Ziyatdinova, K. A.; Salakhov, M. Kh

    2016-05-01

    Corrections to the average kinetic energy of atomic electrons caused by the change in electron mass in the photonic crystal medium are investigated. Corresponding shift of energy levels of atoms placed in a photonic crystal is shown to be of order of the ordinary Lamb shift.

  15. Segmentation-free x-ray energy spectrum estimation for computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Wei; Zhang, Qiude; Niu, Tianye

    2016-03-01

    X-ray energy spectrum plays an essential role in imaging and related tasks. Due to the high photon flux of clinical CT scanners, most of the spectrum estimation methods are indirect and are usually suffered from various limitations. The recently proposed indirect transmission measurement-based method requires at least the segmentation of one material, which is insufficient for CT images of highly noisy and with artifacts. To combat for the bottleneck of spectrum estimation using segmented CT images, in this study, we develop a segmentation-free indirect transmission measurement based energy spectrum estimation method using dual-energy material decomposition. The general principle of the method is to compare polychromatic forward projection with raw projection to calibrate a set of unknown weights which are used to express the unknown spectrum together with a set of model spectra. After applying dual-energy material decomposition using high-and low-energy raw projection data, polychromatic forward projection is conducted on material-specific images. The unknown weights are then iteratively updated to minimize the difference between the raw projection and estimated projection. Both numerical simulations and experimental head phantom are used to evaluate the proposed method. The results indicate that the method provides accurate estimate of the spectrum and it may be attractive for dose calculations, artifacts correction and other clinical applications.

  16. Metal photonics and plasmonics for energy generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagpal, Prashant

    Energy generation from renewable sources and conservation of energy are important goals for reducing our carbon footprint on the environment. Important sources of renewable energy like sun and geothermal energy are difficult to harness because of their energetically broad radiation. Most of our current energy requirements are met through consumption of fossil fuels, and more than 60% of this energy is released to the environment as "waste heat". Thus, converting heat from sun, or inefficient furnaces and automobiles can provide an important source of energy generation. In the present work, I describe design, fabrication, and characterization two and three dimensional patterned metals. These nanofabricated structures can be used as selective emitters to tailor the glow of hot objects. The tailored radiation can then be converted efficiently into electricity using an infrared photocell. This thermophotovoltaic conversion can be very efficient, and useful for converting heat-to-electricity from a wide variety of sources.

  17. Ultrafast magnetization dynamics in Nickel: impact of pump photon energy.

    PubMed

    Bierbrauer, Ute; Weber, Sebastian T; Schummer, David; Barkowski, Moritz; Mahro, Anna-Katharina; Mathias, Stefan; Christian Schneider, Hans; Stadtmüller, Benjamin; Aeschlimann, Martin; Rethfeld, Baerbel

    2017-06-21

    Magnetization dynamics on a femtosecond timescale has been observed for a huge variety of magnetic structures. However, the influence of different excitation photon energies has not been studied in detail yet. In our time-resolved magneto-optical Kerr effect setup we excite a Nickel bulk system with 1.55 and 3.1 eV, respectively, leading to different remagnetization dynamics depending on the chosen photon energy. Furthermore we complement our experimental data with a theoretical approach applying appropriate Boltzmann collision integrals including the density of states of Nickel. The comparison between the experimental data and the theoretical approach indicates that photon-energy dependent transport processes play a major role in this setup.

  18. On the highest photon energy of Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marisaldi, Martino; Fuschino, Fabio; Tavani, Marco; Dietrich, Stefano; Price, Colin; Argan, Andrea; Labanti, Claudio; Galli, Marcello; Longo, Francesco; Del Monte, Ettore; Barbiellini, Guido; Giuliani, Andrea; Bulgarelli, Andrea; Gianotti, Fulvio; Trifoglio, Massimo; Trois, Alessio; Pittori, Carlotta; Verrecchia, Francesco; Giommi, Paolo

    2014-05-01

    TGFs are known to include photons of energy up to several tens of MeV. Results by the AGILE satellite have shown that the cumulative spectrum of TGFs is significantly above background up to about 100 MeV and that the spectral shape deviates from a cutoff power law at high energy suggesting a production mechanism different from canonical Relativistic Runaway Electron Avalanche (RREA). Subsequent analysis of AGILE data have shown that about 15% of TGFs exhibit photon energies above 30 MeV and that these events have different properties than lower energy TGFs. From the theoretical point of view, it has been shown that a production model based on electron acceleration in strong electric fields at lightning leader tips may account for the high energies observed by AGILE. In this presentation we report on the detection of high-energy photons in TGFs for five years of AGILE observation. Possible sources of error such as energy calibration, background and cosmic rays contamination are discussed as well.

  19. Variations in photon energy spectra of a 6 MV beam and their impact on TLD response

    PubMed Central

    Scarboro, Sarah B.; Followill, David S.; Howell, Rebecca M.; Kry, Stephen F.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Measurement of the absorbed dose from radiotherapy beams is an essential component of providing safe and reproducible treatment. For an energy-dependent dosimeter such as thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs), it is generally assumed that the energy spectrum is constant throughout the treatment field and is unperturbed by field size, depth, field modulation, or heterogeneities. However, this does not reflect reality and introduces error into clinical dose measurements. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the variability in the energy spectrum of a Varian 6 MV beam and to evaluate the impact of these variations in photon energy spectra on the response of a common energy-dependent dosimeter, TLD. Methods: Using Monte Carlo methods, we calculated variations in the photon energy spectra of a 6 MV beam as a result of variations of treatment parameters, including field size, measurement location, the presence of heterogeneities, and field modulation. The impact of these spectral variations on the response of the TLD is largely based on increased photoelectric effect in the dosimeter, and this impact was calculated using Burlin cavity theory. Measurements of the energy response were also made to determine the additional energy response due to all intrinsic and secondary effects. Results: For most in-field measurements, regardless of treatment parameter, the dosimeter response was not significantly affected by the spectral variations (<1% effect). For measurement points outside of the treatment field, where the spectrum is softer, the TLD over-responded by up to 12% due to an increased probability of photoelectric effect in the TLD material as well as inherent ionization density effects that play a role at low photon energies. Conclusions: It is generally acceptable to ignore the impact of variations in the photon spectrum on the measured dose for locations within the treatment field. However, outside the treatment field, the spectra are much softer, and a

  20. Design and construction of a high-energy photon polarimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dugger, M.; Ritchie, B. G.; Sparks, N.; Moriya, K.; Tucker, R. J.; Lee, R. J.; Thorpe, B. N.; Hodges, T.; Barbosa, F. J.; Sandoval, N.; Jones, R. T.

    2017-09-01

    We report on the design and construction of a high-energy photon polarimeter for measuring the degree of polarization of a linearly-polarized photon beam. The photon polarimeter uses the process of pair production on an atomic electron (triplet production). The azimuthal distribution of scattered atomic electrons following triplet production yields information regarding the degree of linear polarization of the incident photon beam. The polarimeter, operated in conjunction with a pair spectrometer, uses a silicon strip detector to measure the recoil electron distribution resulting from triplet photoproduction in a beryllium target foil. The analyzing power ΣA for the device using a 75 μm beryllium converter foil is about 0.2, with a relative systematic uncertainty in ΣA of 1.5%.

  1. Design and construction of a high-energy photon polarimeter

    DOE PAGES

    Dugger, M.; Ritchie, B. G.; Sparks, N.; ...

    2017-06-12

    Here, we report on the design and construction of a high-energy photon polarimeter for measuring the degree of polarization of a linearly-polarized photon beam. The photon polarimeter uses the process of pair production on an atomic electron (triplet production). The azimuthal distribution of scattered atomic electrons following triplet production yields information regarding the degree of linear polarization of the incident photon beam. Furthermore, the polarimeter, operated in conjunction with a pair spectrometer, uses a silicon strip detector to measure the recoil electron distribution resulting from triplet photoproduction in a beryllium target foil. The analyzing power ΣA for the device usingmore » a 75 μm beryllium converter foil is about 0.2, with a relative systematic uncertainty in ΣA of 1.5%.« less

  2. Photon plus heavy-quark production in high-energy collisions within the target rest frame formalism

    SciTech Connect

    Betemps, M. A.; Machado, M. V. T.

    2010-11-01

    We apply the target rest frame formalism to photon+heavy quark production cross section in hadronic collisions at high energies. We investigate the dependence of the production cross section on the photon and quark rapidities and transverse momenta. It is shown that the photon transverse momentum spectrum is a sensitive probe of color dipole scattering amplitude. The theoretical results are compared to Tevatron measurements of the differential {gamma}+c+X and {gamma}+b+X production cross sections at {radical}(s)=1.96 TeV. An analysis for proton-proton and proton-lead collisions at the LHC regime is also performed.

  3. Energy Modulated Photon Radiotherapy: A Monte Carlo Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ying; Feng, Yuanming; Ming, Xin

    2016-01-01

    A novel treatment modality termed energy modulated photon radiotherapy (EMXRT) was investigated. The first step of EMXRT was to determine beam energy for each gantry angle/anatomy configuration from a pool of photon energy beams (2 to 10 MV) with a newly developed energy selector. An inverse planning system using gradient search algorithm was then employed to optimize photon beam intensity of various beam energies based on presimulated Monte Carlo pencil beam dose distributions in patient anatomy. Finally, 3D dose distributions in six patients of different tumor sites were simulated with Monte Carlo method and compared between EMXRT plans and clinical IMRT plans. Compared to current IMRT technique, the proposed EMXRT method could offer a better paradigm for the radiotherapy of lung cancers and pediatric brain tumors in terms of normal tissue sparing and integral dose. For prostate, head and neck, spine, and thyroid lesions, the EMXRT plans were generally comparable to the IMRT plans. Our feasibility study indicated that lower energy (<6 MV) photon beams could be considered in modern radiotherapy treatment planning to achieve a more personalized care for individual patient with dosimetric gains. PMID:26977413

  4. A new universal photon energy-luminosity relationship for GRBs

    SciTech Connect

    Willingale, Dick; O'Brien, Paul; Goad, Mike; Osborne, Julian; Page, Kim; Tanvir, Nial

    2008-05-22

    We define a new characteristic photon energy for the Band function, E{sub wz}, and describe a new way of estimating the peak luminosity of the prompt emission from GRBs, L{sub iso}, which is not dependent on the time binning. We show that E{sub wz} and L{sub iso} are correlated for all bursts, long and short. The new photon energy-luminosity relationship gives us a strong indication that the underlying process responsible for the prompt GRB emission is thermal.

  5. NOTE: Near surface photon energy spectra outside a 6 MV field edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, C. R.; Mountford, P. J.

    2004-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the difference between a 6 MV linear accelerator x-ray energy spectrum outside the field edge near a phantom surface, and the corresponding spectrum on the central axis. The Monte Carlo code MCNP-4A was used to calculate the spectra on the central axis and at 1, 2, 5 and 10 cm from the edge of a 4 × 4 cm2, 10 × 10 cm2 and 15 × 15 cm2 field. Compared to the spectrum on the central axis, the spectra outside the field edge showed two distinct regions: a broad peak below about 0.5 MeV, and a lower amplitude, less rapidly changing region at higher energies from 0.5 to 6 MeV. The lower energy peak was due to scattered photons, and the higher energy component was due mainly to primary photons transmitted through the jaws of the secondary collimator. The potential impact of these spectral differences on critical organ photon dosimetry was determined by calculating the ratio of the sensitivity of a Scanditronix EDD-5 diode and of a LiF:Mg:Ti thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) outside the field edge to their respective sensitivity at the calibration position on the central axis. The lower energy peak combined with the non-uniform energy sensitivity of each detector produced up to a two-thirds overestimate of x-ray dose outside the field by the diode, whereas the response ratio of the TLD was about unity. These results indicated that a similar evaluation was required for profile measurements of a dynamic wedged field and measurements in an intensity modulated beam with either type of detector.

  6. Effect of electromagnetically induced transparency on the spectrum of defect modes in a one-dimensional photonic crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Arkhipkin, Vasilii G; Myslivets, S A

    2009-02-28

    We studied the transmission spectrum of a one-dimensional photonic crystal containing a defect layer in which electromagnetically induced transparency is possible. The analysis is performed taking into account the spatial inhomogeneity of interacting fields in the photonic crystal. It is found that the transmission spectrum of such a photonic crystal depends on the spatial overlap of defect modes excited by probe and control radiations. It is shown that electromagnetically induced transparency can result in a considerable narrowing of the defect mode spectrum. (nonlinear optical phenomena)

  7. Design of an innovative gamma ray spectroscopy image-based telescope by assigning reciprocal vision color to each gamma photon depending on the energy of gamma photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmani Nejad, Akbar; Olia, M. A.

    2009-08-01

    In this paper an innovative method to devise a new astronomical observation instrument by simultaneous implementation of a gamma telescope and a gamma spectroscope is presented. Electromagnetic beams emitted from a star e.g. the sun is spread all electromagnetic spectrum from gamma rays to radio waves, but there is a fingerprint in such a wide spectrum that shows the exact fusion reaction which can be traced by associated gamma photons. This means if gamma photons, emitted from each part of sun, to be detected by this instrument, then spatial information is provided by telescope and information about the energy is recorded by spectrometer, by convolving two above mentioned data, there will be an illustration of a star like the sun that can show which area emits associated gamma photons that in turn illustrates the spatial distribution of elements that produce these gamma photons e.g. hydrogen, deuterium, tritium, helium, etc. we choose a reference color for each principle gamma photon, according to method similar to gamut color space of CIE [1], by specific linear transformation, or transformation matrix having photon-energy dependence coefficients, then there will be a colorful illustration of sun or any star (or even a GRB) that depicts distribution of elements, released energy, density of elements, etc. This information in turn will reveal the rate and topological variation of matter, energy, magnetic fields, etc. This information will also help to provide enough data to find spatial distribution function of energy, matter, variation and displacement of matters on stars and in turn, it will provide unique information about behaviors of stars. Finally, the method of vibrating holes to increase the spatial resolution of gamma detectors to hundreds times is presented. This method increases the spatial resolution of semiconductor-gamma telescopes to hundreds of times without decreasing the size of gamma sensor pixels and without any major effort to improve the

  8. Improvement in the energy resolving capabilities of photon counting detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, D.; Lim, K. T.; Park, K.; Cho, G.

    2016-12-01

    Patterned pixel array was proposed to increase the number of energy bins in a single pixel of photon counting detectors without adding more comparators and counters. The pixels were grouped into four different types and each pixel has a common threshold and a specific threshold assigned to each pixel type. The common threshold in every pixel records the total number of incident photons regardless of its pixel type and the specific thresholds classify incident photon energies. The patterned pixel array was evaluated with the pinhole gamma camera system based on the XRI-UNO detector flip-chip bonded with a 1mm thick CdTe sensor. The experimental data was acquired with time-over-threshold mode to avoid the charge sharing problem. The shared total charges created by one photon can be found by summing all pixels within the cluster. To correct the different response to the same energy of photon, the energy calibration of the time-over-threshold value was perfomed independently depending on the cluster size. The time-over-threshold values were separated into two energy bins since we assumed that each pixel has two thresholds. Although each pixel has only two thresholds, five images from different energy windows were obtained by sharing the spectal information from four adjacent pixels. Thus, degradation of the spatial resolution in the image occured in each energy window. The image of the entire energy, however, was not degraded since all four different types of pixels have a common threshold just above the noise level. In addition, the number of steps for the threshold scan method can be drastically reduced with the increased number of effective thresholds in a single pixel.

  9. Scattering of a photon by an electron of the atom continuous spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khopersky, A. N.; Nadolinsky, A. M.; Koneev, R. V.; Yavna, V. A.

    2015-08-01

    The quantum effect of anomalous inelastic scattering of an X-ray photon by an ɛ p-electron of the 1 s → ɛ p continuous spectrum of the state of atom photoionization is predicted theoretically. It is established that, in the region of elastic photon scattering by an electron of the continuous spectrum, together with the known contribution of the Thomson component ( l = 0), there appears a contribution of the infinite (and countable) number of scattering harmonics l ∈ [1;∞]. As an object of the investigation, the Be atom is taken. The absolute values and shape of the triple differential cross section of the elastic, normal, and anomalous Compton scattering have been obtained.

  10. The Cosmic Ray All-Particle Energy Spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jeongin

    1998-07-01

    The cosmic ray all-particle energy spectrum in the energy range from 10 GeV to ~100 TeV is presented here. Data were obtained from the Thin Ionisation Calorimeter (TIC) experiment flown on balloon for 76 hours in August 1994 over northern Canada. TIC was calibrated with a 2.3 TeV gold beam at Brookhaven National Laboratory in 1994 and with a 800 GeV proton beam at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in 1997. Extensive Monte Carlo simulations were conducted using GEANT/FLUKA to (1) evaluate the instrument performance including energy calibration and energy resolution, (2) calculate the energy deposited by interacting particles, and (3) reconstruct the cosmic ray all-particle energy spectrum. The derived integral spectral index of the cosmic ray spectrum is γCR=1.68± 0.01 from the measured deposited energy spectrum.

  11. Determining photon energy absorption parameters for different soil samples.

    PubMed

    Kucuk, Nil; Tumsavas, Zeynal; Cakir, Merve

    2013-05-01

    The mass attenuation coefficients (μs) for five different soil samples were measured at 661.6, 1173.2 and 1332.5 keV photon energies. The soil samples were separately irradiated with (137)Cs and (60)Co (370 kBq) radioactive point gamma sources. The measurements were made by performing transmission experiments with a 2″ × 2″ NaI(Tl) scintillation detector, which had an energy resolution of 7% at 0.662 MeV for the gamma-rays from the decay of (137)Cs. The effective atomic numbers (Zeff) and the effective electron densities (Neff) were determined experimentally and theoretically using the obtained μs values for the soil samples. Furthermore, the Zeff and Neff values of the soil samples were computed for the total photon interaction cross-sections using theoretical data over a wide energy region ranging from 1 keV to 15 MeV. The experimental values of the soils were found to be in good agreement with the theoretical values. Sandy loam and sandy clay loam soils demonstrated poor photon energy absorption characteristics. However, clay loam and clay soils had good photon energy absorption characteristics.

  12. Detector response function of an energy-resolved CdTe single photon counting detector.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin; Lee, Hyoung Koo

    2014-01-01

    While spectral CT using single photon counting detector has shown a number of advantages in diagnostic imaging, knowledge of the detector response function of an energy-resolved detector is needed to correct the signal bias and reconstruct the image more accurately. The objective of this paper is to study the photo counting detector response function using laboratory sources, and investigate the signal bias correction method. Our approach is to model the detector response function over the entire diagnostic energy range (20 keV photon energies. The 12 parameters are obtained by non-linear least-square fitting with the measured detector response functions at the six energies. The correlations of the 12 parameters with energy are also investigated with the measured data. The analytical model generally describes the detector response function and is in good agreement with the measured data. The trend lines of the 12 parameters indicate higher energies tend to cause grater spectrum distortion. The spectrum distortion caused by the detector response function on spectral CT reconstruction is analyzed theoretically, and a solution to correct this spectrum distortion is also proposed. In spectral and fluorescence CT, the spectrum distortion caused by detector response function poses a problem and cannot be ignored in any quantitative analysis. The detector response function of a CdTe detector can be obtained by a semi-analytical method.

  13. Pulse pileup statistics for energy discriminating photon counting x-ray detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Adam S.; Harrison, Daniel; Lobastov, Vladimir; Tkaczyk, J. Eric

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: Energy discriminating photon counting x-ray detectors can be subject to a wide range of flux rates if applied in clinical settings. Even when the incident rate is a small fraction of the detector's maximum periodic rate N{sub 0}, pulse pileup leads to count rate losses and spectral distortion. Although the deterministic effects can be corrected, the detrimental effect of pileup on image noise is not well understood and may limit the performance of photon counting systems. Therefore, the authors devise a method to determine the detector count statistics and imaging performance. Methods: The detector count statistics are derived analytically for an idealized pileup model with delta pulses of a nonparalyzable detector. These statistics are then used to compute the performance (e.g., contrast-to-noise ratio) for both single material and material decomposition contrast detection tasks via the Cramer-Rao lower bound (CRLB) as a function of the detector input count rate. With more realistic unipolar and bipolar pulse pileup models of a nonparalyzable detector, the imaging task performance is determined by Monte Carlo simulations and also approximated by a multinomial method based solely on the mean detected output spectrum. Photon counting performance at different count rates is compared with ideal energy integration, which is unaffected by count rate. Results: The authors found that an ideal photon counting detector with perfect energy resolution outperforms energy integration for our contrast detection tasks, but when the input count rate exceeds 20%N{sub 0}, many of these benefits disappear. The benefit with iodine contrast falls rapidly with increased count rate while water contrast is not as sensitive to count rates. The performance with a delta pulse model is overoptimistic when compared to the more realistic bipolar pulse model. The multinomial approximation predicts imaging performance very close to the prediction from Monte Carlo simulations. The

  14. Imaging high energy photons with PILATUS II at the tagged photon beam at MAX-lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, V.; Peake, D. J.; Sobott, B.; Schröder, B.; Brönnimann, Ch.; Henrich, B.; Hansen, K.; O'Keefe, G. J.; Taylor, G. N.; Boland, M. J.; Thompson, M. N.; Rassool, R. P.

    2009-05-01

    In photonuclear experiments precise location of the photon beam relative to the experimental sample is critical. Previously used techniques such as using photographic film to identify the position, intensity and centroid of the beam is time-consuming and a faster method is required. PILATUS is a single-photon-counting pixel detector developed at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), Switzerland. It is a silicon-based, two-dimensional detector with a large dynamic range and zero readout noise. Designed as an X-ray detector, its optimal quantum efficiency is between 3 and 30 keV. This paper reports measurements carried out at the MAX-lab tagged photon facility in Lund, Sweden. The beam endpoint energy of approximately 200 MeV is far above the designed optimal energy detection range of PILATUS, and provides a critical test of the use of PILATUS under high energy conditions. The detector was placed in the photon beam and images were taken both downstream of other experiments, and in close range of a 19 mm collimator. The successful measurements demonstrate the versatility and robustness of the detector and provide an effective way of quickly and accurately monitoring beam position and profile in real time.

  15. Photon and dilepton production in high energy heavy ion collisions

    DOE PAGES

    Sakaguchi, Takao

    2015-05-07

    The recent results on direct photons and dileptons in high energy heavy ion collisions, obtained particularly at RHIC and LHC are reviewed. The results are new not only in terms of the probes, but also in terms of the precision. We shall discuss the physics learned from the results.

  16. Photon and dilepton production in high energy heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Sakaguchi, Takao

    2015-05-07

    The recent results on direct photons and dileptons in high energy heavy ion collisions, obtained particularly at RHIC and LHC are reviewed. The results are new not only in terms of the probes, but also in terms of the precision. We shall discuss the physics learned from the results.

  17. Scoping studies - photon and low energy neutron interrogation

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, G.; Harker, Y.; Jones, J.; Harmon, F.

    1997-11-01

    High energy photon interrogation of waste containers, with the aim of producing photo nuclear reactions, in specific materials, holds the potential of good penetration and rapid analysis. Compact high energy ({le} 10 MeV) photon sources in the form of electron linacs producing bremstrahlung radiation are readily available. Work with the Varitron variable energy accelerator at ISU will be described. Advantages and limitations of the technique will be discussed. Using positive ion induced neutron producing reactions, it is possible to generate neutrons in a specific energy range. By this means, variable penetration and specific reactions can be excited in the assayed material. Examples using the {sup 3}H(p,n) and {sup 7}Li(p,n) reactions as neutron sources will be discussed. 4 refs., 7 figs.

  18. Energy loss by resonance line photons in an absorbing medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hummer, D. G.; Kunasz, P. B.

    1980-01-01

    The mean path length of photons undergoing repeated scatterings in media of large optical thickness is calculated from accurate numerical solutions of the transfer equation including the effect of frequency redistribution characteristic of combined Doppler and natural broadening. Energy loss by continuous absorption processes, such as ionization or dust absorption, is discussed, and asymptotic scaling laws for the energy loss, the mean path length, and the mean number of scatterings are inferred from the numerical data.

  19. High-energy resummation in direct photon production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diana, Giovanni

    2010-01-01

    We present the computation of the direct photon production cross-section in perturbative QCD to all orders in the limit of high partonic center-of-mass energy. We show how the high-energy resummation can be performed consistently in the presence of a collinear singularity in the final state, we compare our results to the fixed order NLO cross-section in the MS¯ scheme, and we provide predictions at NNLO and beyond.

  20. Cerenkov light spectrum in an optical fiber exposed to a photon or electron radiation therapy beam

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, Jamil; Yin Yongbai; McKenzie, David R.; Law, Sue; Suchowerska, Natalka

    2009-06-20

    A Cerenkov signal is generated when energetic charged particles enter the core of an optical fiber. The Cerenkov intensity can be large enough to interfere with signals transmitted through the fiber. We determine the spectrum of the Cerenkov background signal generated in a poly(methyl methacrylate) optical fiber exposed to photon and electron therapeutic beams from a linear accelerator. This spectral measurement is relevant to discrimination of the signal from the background, as in scintillation dosimetry using optical fiber readouts. We find that the spectrum is approximated by the theoretical curve after correction for the wavelength dependent attenuation of the fiber. The spectrum does not depend significantly on the angle between the radiation beam and the axis of the fiber optic but is dependent on the depth in water at which the fiber is exposed to the beam.

  1. Fragmentation of light nuclei by intermediate energy photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turinge, A. A.; Lapik, A. M.; Mushkarenkov, A. N.; Nedorezov, V. G.; Rudnev, N. V.

    2017-01-01

    New data on the fragmentation of carbon nuclei by photons with energies from 800 to 1500 MeV, obtained in the collaboration GRAAL, are presented. These data include the yields of heavier fragments than nucleons. Comparison of new results with literature data, obtained with real and virtual photons in reactions with electrons and relativistic ions (Coulomb dissociation) is done using a general approach in frame of the Weizsäcker-Williams model. Possible reasons for the observed differences between them are discussed.

  2. On muon energy spectrum in muon groups underground

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bakatanov, V. N.; Chudakov, A. E.; Novoseltsev, Y. F.; Novoseltseva, M. V.; Stenkin, Y. V.

    1985-01-01

    A method is described which was used to measure muon energy spectrum characteristics in muon groups underground using mu-e decays recording. The Baksan Telescope's experimental data on mu-e decays intensity in muon groups of various multiplicities are analyzed. The experimental data indicating very flat spectrum does not however represent the total spectrum in muon groups. Obviously the muon energy spectrum depends strongly on a distance from the group axis. The core attraction effect makes a significant distortion, making the spectrum flatter. After taking this into account and making corrections for this effect the integral total spectrum index in groups has a very small depencence on muon multiplicity and agrees well with expected one: beta=beta (sub expected) = 1.75.

  3. Turbulent diffusion phase transition is due to singular energy spectrum.

    PubMed

    Wallstrom, T C

    1995-11-21

    The phase transition for turbulent diffusion, reported by Avellaneda and Majda [Avellaneda, M. & Majda, A. J. (1994) Philos. Trans. R. Soc. London A 346, 205-233, and several earlier papers], is traced to a modeling assumption in which the energy spectrum of the turbulent fluid is singularly dependent on the viscosity in the inertial range. Phenomenological models of turbulence and intermittency, by contrast, require that the energy spectrum be independent of the viscosity in the inertial range. When the energy spectrum is assumed to be consistent with the phenomenological models, there is no phase transition for turbulent diffusion.

  4. Turbulent diffusion phase transition is due to singular energy spectrum.

    PubMed Central

    Wallstrom, T C

    1995-01-01

    The phase transition for turbulent diffusion, reported by Avellaneda and Majda [Avellaneda, M. & Majda, A. J. (1994) Philos. Trans. R. Soc. London A 346, 205-233, and several earlier papers], is traced to a modeling assumption in which the energy spectrum of the turbulent fluid is singularly dependent on the viscosity in the inertial range. Phenomenological models of turbulence and intermittency, by contrast, require that the energy spectrum be independent of the viscosity in the inertial range. When the energy spectrum is assumed to be consistent with the phenomenological models, there is no phase transition for turbulent diffusion. Images Fig. 2 PMID:11607590

  5. Signal to noise ratio of energy selective x-ray photon counting systems with pileup.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Robert E

    2014-11-01

    To derive fundamental limits on the effect of pulse pileup and quantum noise in photon counting detectors on the signal to noise ratio (SNR) and noise variance of energy selective x-ray imaging systems. An idealized model of the response of counting detectors to pulse pileup is used. The model assumes a nonparalyzable response and delta function pulse shape. The model is used to derive analytical formulas for the noise and energy spectrum of the recorded photons with pulse pileup. These formulas are first verified with a Monte Carlo simulation. They are then used with a method introduced in a previous paper [R. E. Alvarez, "Near optimal energy selective x-ray imaging system performance with simple detectors," Med. Phys. 37, 822-841 (2010)] to compare the signal to noise ratio with pileup to the ideal SNR with perfect energy resolution. Detectors studied include photon counting detectors with pulse height analysis (PHA), detectors that simultaneously measure the number of photons and the integrated energy (NQ detector), and conventional energy integrating and photon counting detectors. The increase in the A-vector variance with dead time is also computed and compared to the Monte Carlo results. A formula for the covariance of the NQ detector is developed. The validity of the constant covariance approximation to the Cramèr-Rao lower bound (CRLB) for larger counts is tested. The SNR becomes smaller than the conventional energy integrating detector (Q) SNR for 0.52, 0.65, and 0.78 expected number photons per dead time for counting (N), two, and four bin PHA detectors, respectively. The NQ detector SNR is always larger than the N and Q SNR but only marginally so for larger dead times. Its noise variance increases by a factor of approximately 3 and 5 for the A1 and A2 components as the dead time parameter increases from 0 to 0.8 photons per dead time. With four bin PHA data, the increase in variance is approximately 2 and 4 times. The constant covariance approximation

  6. Lorentz violation for photons and ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays.

    PubMed

    Galaverni, Matteo; Sigl, Günter

    2008-01-18

    Lorentz symmetry breaking at very high energies may lead to photon dispersion relations of the form omega2=k2+xink2(k/MPl)n with new terms suppressed by a power n of the Planck mass MPl. We show that first and second order terms of size |xi1|>orsimilar10(-14) and xi2photon component in cosmic rays above 10(19) eV that should already have been detected, if corresponding terms for e+/- are significantly smaller. This suggests that LI breaking suppressed up to second order in the Planck scale is unlikely to be phenomenologically viable for photons.

  7. One particularity of energy-angular secondary electrons spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisov, S. S.; Zaitsev, S. I.

    2006-05-01

    In this work we discuss the problems of the energy-angular spectrum of backscattered and true secondary electrons simulation using the discrete (DLA) and the continuous (CLA) loss approximations. The presence of an angular spectrum artefact - the deviation from the sinusoidal distribution over the range of 177-18O° from the beam direction is shown.

  8. ELECTROMAGNETISM, OPTICS, ACOUSTICS, HEAT TRANSFER, CLASSICAL MECHANICS, AND FLUID DYNAMICS: Influence of a Single Frequency Electromagnetic Wave on Energy Spectrum of Nonpolariton System in a Kerr Nonlinear Blackbody

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Qi-Jun; Cheng, Ze

    2010-06-01

    In a Kerr nonlinear blackbody, bare photons with opposite wave vectors and helicities are bound into pairs and unpaired photons are transformed into a different kind of quasiparticle, the nonpolariton. The present paper investigates the influence of a single frequency electromagnetic wave on the energy spectrum of the nonpolariton system. We find that the wave can lead to an energy shift of nonpolaritons. Moreover, we calculate the first-order energy shift on certain conditions.

  9. High energy photon emission from wakefields

    SciTech Connect

    Farinella, D. M. Lau, C. K.; Taimourzadeh, S.; Hwang, Y.; Abazajian, K.; Canac, N.; Taborek, P.; Tajima, T.; Zhang, X. M.; Koga, J. K.; Ebisuzaki, T.

    2016-07-15

    Experimental evidence has accumulated to indicate that wakefield acceleration (WFA) accompanies intense and sometimes coherent emission of radiation such as from betatron radiation. The investigation of this issue has additional impetus nowadays because we are learning (1) there is an additional acceleration process of the ponderomotive acceleration; (2) WFA may become relevant in much higher density regimes; (3) WFA has been proposed as the mechanism for extreme high energy cosmic ray acceleration and gamma ray bursts for active galactic nuclei. These require us to closely examine the radiative mechanisms in WFA anew. We report studies of radiation from wakefield (self-injected betatron) and ponderomotive (laser field) mechanisms in scalings of the frequency and intensity of the driver, as well as the plasma density.

  10. Energy spectrum of the NCAR-TIGCM lower thermosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raskin, R. G.; Bums, A. G.; Killeen, T. L.; Roble, R. G.

    The spatial energy spectrum of the 110-150 km region is evaluated using a base case run of the NCAR-TIGCM. Available potential energy, divergent kinetic energy, and rotational kinetic energy are decomposed into spherical harmonic modes and the relative sizes of the reservoirs are compared to those observed in the lower atmosphere. The lower thermospheric spectrum is dominated by the signals of diurnal and semidiurnal tides, but dissipation occurs within the study region. The total potential energy exceeds the available potential energy by three orders of magnitude, but unlike the tropospheric case, more energy resides as kinetic energy than as available potential energy, a result that is typical of propagating tides. A modified definition of available potential energy appropriate for thermospheric heights is presented.

  11. Impact of low-energy photons on the characteristics of prompt fission γ -ray spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberstedt, A.; Billnert, R.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Oberstedt, S.

    2015-07-01

    In this paper we report on a new study of prompt γ -rays from the spontaneous fission of 252Cf . Photons were measured in coincidence with fission fragments by employing four different lanthanide halide scintillation detectors. Together with results from a previous work of ours, we determined characteristic parameters with high precision, such as the average γ -ray multiplicity ν¯γ=(8.29 ±0.13 ), the average energy per photon ɛγ=(0.80 ±0.02 ) MeV, and the total γ -ray energy release per fission Eγ ,tot=(6.65 ±0.10 ) MeV. The excellent agreement between the individual results obtained in all six measurements proves the good repeatability of the applied experimental technique. The impact of low-energy photons, i.e., below 500 keV, on prompt fission γ -ray spectra characteristics has been investigated as well by comparing our results with those taken with the DANCE detector system, which appears to suffer from absorption effects in the low-energy region. Correction factors for this effect were estimated, giving results comparable to ours as well as to historical ones. From this we demonstrate that the different techniques of determining the average γ -ray multiplicity, either from a properly measured and normalized spectrum or a measured multiplicity distribution, give equivalent and consistent results.

  12. Enhanced harvesting of red photons in nanowire solar cells: evidence of resonance energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Shankar, Karthik; Feng, Xinjian; Grimes, Craig A

    2009-04-28

    Modern excitonic solar cells efficiently harvest photons in the 350-650 nm spectral range; however, device efficiencies are typically limited by poor quantum yields for red and near-infrared photons. Using Forster-type resonance energy transfer from zinc phthalocyanine donor molecules to ruthenium polypyridine complex acceptors, we demonstrate a four-fold increase in quantum yields for red photons in dye-sensitized nanowire array solar cells. The dissolved donor and surface anchored acceptor molecules are not tethered to each other, through either a direct chemical bond or a covalent linker layer. The spatial confinement of the electrolyte imposed by the wire-to-wire spacing of the close-packed nanowire array architecture ensures that the distances between a significant fraction of donors and acceptors are within a Förster radius. The critical distance for energy transfer from an isolated donor chromophore to a self-assembled monolayer of acceptors on a plane follows the inverse fourth power instead of the inverse sixth power relation. Consequently, we observe near quantitative energy transfer efficiencies in our devices. Our results represent a new design paradigm in excitonic solar cells and show it is possible to more closely match the spectral response of the device to the AM 1.5 solar spectrum through use of electronic energy transfer.

  13. [Study on phase-matching of four-wave mixing spectrum in photonic crystal fiber].

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-xu; Wang, Shu-tao; Zhao, Xing-tao; Chen, Shuang; Zhou, Gui-yao; Wu, Xi-jun; Li, Shu-guang; Hou, Lan-Tian

    2014-06-01

    In the present paper, the four-wave mixing principle of fiber was analyzed, and the high-gain phase-matching conditions were shown. The nonlinear coefficient and dispersion characteristics of photonic crystal fibers were calculated by multipole method. The phase mismatch characteristics of fibers with multiple zero-dispersion wavelengths were analyzed for the first time. The changing rules of phase matching wavelength with the pump wavelength and the pump power were obtained, and the phase matching curves were shown. The characteristics of phase matching wavelengths for different dispersion curves were analyzed. There are four new excitation wavelengths of four-wave mixing spectrum in two zero-dispersion wavelength photonic crystal fiers. Four-wave mixing spectroscopy of photonic crystal fibers with two zero-dispersion wavelengths was obtained in the experi-ent, which is consistent with the theoretical analysis, and verified the reliability of the phase matching theory. The fiber with multiple zero-dispersion wavelengths can create a ricbhphase-matching topology, excite more four-wave mixing wavelengths, ena-ling enhanced control over the spectral locations of the four-wave mixing and resonant-radiation bands emitted by solitons and short pulses. These provide theoretical guidance for photonic crystal fiber wavelength conversion and supercontinoum generation based on four-wave mixing.

  14. Response of plastic scintillators to low-energy photons.

    PubMed

    Peralta, Luis; Rêgo, Florbela

    2014-08-21

    Diagnostic radiology typically uses x-ray beams between 25 and 150 kVp. Plastic scintillation detectors (PSDs) are potentially successful candidates as field dosimeters but careful selection of the scintillator is crucial. It has been demonstrated that they can suffer from energy dependence in the low-energy region, an undesirable dosimeter characteristic. This dependence is partially due to the nonlinear light yield of the scintillator to the low-energy electrons set in motion by the photon beam. In this work, PSDs made of PMMA, PVT or polystyrene were studied for the x-ray beam range 25 to 100 kVp. For each kVp data has been acquired for additional aluminium filtrations of 0.5, 1.0, 2.0 and 4.0 mm. Absolute dose in the point of measurement was obtained with an ionization chamber calibrated to dose in water. From the collected data, detector sensitivities were obtained as function of the beam kVp and additional filtration. Using Monte Carlo simulations relative scintillator sensitivities were computed. For some of the scintillators these sensitivities show strong energy-dependence for beam average energy below 35 keV for each additional filtration but fair constancy above. One of the scintillators (BC-404) has smaller energy-dependence at low photon average energy and could be considered a candidate for applications (like mammography) where beam energy has small span.

  15. Application of Origen2.1 in the decay photon spectrum calculation of spallation products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Shuang; Yang, Yong-Wei; Xu, Hu-Shan; Meng, Hai-Yan; Zhang, Lu; Liu, Zhao-Qing; Gao, Yu-Cui; Chen, Kang

    2016-11-01

    Origen2.1 is a widely used computer code for calculating the burnup, decay, and processing of radioactive materials. However, the nuclide library of Origen2.1 is used for existing reactors like pressurized water reactors. To calculate the photon spectrum released by the decay of spallation products, we have made specific libraries for the ADS tungsten spallation target, based on the results given by the FLUKA Monte Carlo code. All the data used to make the Origen2.1 libraries are obtained from Nuclear structure & decay Data (NuDat2.6). The accumulated activity of spallation products and the contribution of nuclides to photon emission are given in this paper. Supported by Strategic Priority Research Program of Chinese Academy of Sciences (XDA03030102)

  16. Single-shot photonic time-intensity integration based on a time-spectrum convolution system.

    PubMed

    Malacarne, Antonio; Ashrafi, Reza; Li, Ming; LaRochelle, Sophie; Yao, Jianping; Azaña, José

    2012-04-15

    Real-time and single-shot ultra-fast photonic time-intensity integration of arbitrary temporal waveforms is proposed and demonstrated. The intensity-integration concept is based on a time-spectrum convolution system, where the use of a multi-wavelength laser with a flat envelope, employed as the incoherent broadband source, enables single-shot operation. The experimental implementation is based on optical intensity modulation of the multi-wavelength laser with the input waveform, followed by linear dispersion. In particular, photonic temporal intensity integration with a processing bandwidth of 36.8 GHz over an integration time window of 1.24 ns is verified by experimentally measuring the integration of an ultra-short microwave pulse and an arbitrary microwave waveform.

  17. Energy calibration of photon counting detectors using a single monochromatic source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, C.; Shen, Q.; Kang, K.; Xing, Y.

    2017-06-01

    In recent years, spectral X-ray imaging using photon counting detectors (PCDs) becomes a hot topic in the field. For a PCD, each individual incident photon with different energies is analyzed and assigned to different energy channels according to pre-set thresholds respectively. Thus, the data from an energy channel carry spectral information. Because of the influence of pulse pileup, charge sharing and other physical effects, energy calibration of PCDs is a piece of challenging work. Various energy calibration methods of PCDs have been researched. Most of them demand extensive work with additional sources or equipments. In this work, we propose a novel approach for energy calibration by using only one monochromatic source. We use iterative optimization method to fully excavate and utilize the data. The method requires fewer experiments than other common-used calibration methods. Moreover, the charge sharing effect is implicitly taken into account in this method which is an important factor in the calibration of pixel detectors. We validated our method with radioactive sources. The resulting energy spectrum matched well as expected.

  18. Revealing spectral features in two-photon absorption spectrum of Hoechst 33342: a combined experimental and quantum-chemical study.

    PubMed

    Olesiak-Banska, Joanna; Matczyszyn, Katarzyna; Zaleśny, Robert; Murugan, N Arul; Kongsted, Jacob; Ågren, Hans; Bartkowiak, Wojciech; Samoc, Marek

    2013-10-10

    We present the results of wide spectral range Z-scan measurements of the two-photon absorption (2PA) spectrum of the Hoechst 33342 dye. The strongest 2PA of the dye in aqueous solution is found at 575 nm, and the associated two-photon absorption cross section is 245 GM. A weak but clearly visible 2PA band at ∼850 nm is also observed, a feature that could not be anticipated from the one-photon absorption spectrum. On the basis of the results of hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics calculations, we put forward a notion that the long-wavelength feature observed in the two-photon absorption spectrum of Hoechst 33342 is due to the formation of dye aggregates.

  19. Per-pixel energy calibration of photon counting detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atharifard, A.; Healy, J. L.; Goulter, B. P.; Ramyar, M.; Vanden Broeke, L.; Walsh, M. F.; Onyema, C. C.; Panta, R. K.; Aamir, R.; Smithies, D. J.; Doesburg, R.; Anjomrouz, M.; Shamshad, M.; Bheesette, S.; Rajendran, K.; de Ruiter, N. J. A.; Knight, D.; Chernoglazov, A.; Mandalika, H.; Bell, S. T.; Bateman, C. J.; Butler, A. P. H.; Butler, P. H.

    2017-03-01

    Energy resolving performance of spectral CT systems is influenced by the accuracy of the detector's energy calibration. Global energy calibration maps a given threshold to the average energy response of all pixels of the detector. Variations arising from CMOS manufacturing processes and properties of the sensor cause different pixels to respond differently to photons of the same energy. Threshold dispersion adversely affects spectral imaging by degrading energy resolution, which contributes to blurring of the energy information. In this paper, we present a technique for per-pixel energy calibration of photon-counting x-ray detectors (PCXDs) that quantifies the energy response of individual pixels relative to the average response. This technique takes advantage of the measurements made by an equalized chip. It uses a known global energy map to quantify the effect of threshold dispersion on the energy response of the detector pixels across an energy range of interest. The proposed technique was assessed using a MARS scanner with an equalized Medipix3RX chip flip-bonded to 2 mm thick CdTe semiconductor crystal at a pitch of 110 μ m. Measurements were made of characteristic x-rays of a molybdenum foil. Results were compared between the case that the global calibration was used on its own and the case of using it in conjunction with our per-pixel calibration technique. The proposed technique quantified up to 1.87 keV error in energy response of 100 pixels of a selected region of interest (ROI). It made an improvement of 28.3% in average FWHM. The additional information provided by this per-pixel calibration technique can be used to improve spectral reconstruction.

  20. Trigonal warping in bilayer graphene: Energy versus entanglement spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Predin, Sonja; Wenk, Paul; Schliemann, John

    2016-03-01

    We present a mainly analytical study of the entanglement spectrum of Bernal-stacked graphene bilayers in the presence of trigonal warping in the energy spectrum. Upon tracing out one layer, the entanglement spectrum shows qualitative geometric differences to the energy spectrum of a graphene monolayer. However, topological quantities such as Berry-phase-type contributions to Chern numbers agree. The latter analysis involves not only the eigenvalues of the entanglement Hamiltonian but also its eigenvectors. We also discuss the entanglement spectra resulting from tracing out other sublattices. As a technical basis of our analysis, we provide closed analytical expressions for the full eigensystem of bilayer graphene in the entire Brillouin zone with a trigonally warped spectrum.

  1. Fast IMRT with narrow high energy scanned photon beams.

    PubMed

    Andreassen, Björn; Strååt, Sara Janek; Holmberg, Rickard; Näfstadius, Peder; Brahme, Anders

    2011-08-01

    Since the first publications on intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in the early 1980s almost all efforts have been focused on fairly time consuming dynamic or segmental multileaf collimation. With narrow fast scanned photon beams, the flexibility and accuracy in beam shaping increases, not least in combination with fast penumbra trimming multileaf collimators. Previously, experiments have been performed with full range targets, generating a broad bremsstrahlung beam, in combination with multileaf collimators or material compensators. In the present publication, the first measurements with fast narrow high energy (50 MV) scanned photon beams are presented indicating an interesting performance increase even though some of the hardware used were suboptimal. Inverse therapy planning was used to calculate optimal scanning patterns to generate dose distributions with interesting properties for fast IMRT. To fully utilize the dose distributional advantages with scanned beams, it is necessary to use narrow high energy beams from a thin bremsstrahlung target and a powerful purging magnet capable of deflecting the transmitted electron beam away from the generated photons onto a dedicated electron collector. During the present measurements the scanning system, purging magnet, and electron collimator in the treatment head of the MM50 racetrack accelerator was used with 3-6 mm thick bremsstrahlung targets of beryllium. The dose distributions were measured with diodes in water and with EDR2 film in PMMA. Monte Carlo simulations with GEANT4 were used to study the influence of the electrons transmitted through the target on the photon pencil beam kernel. The full width at half-maximum (FWHM) of the scanned photon beam was 34 mm measured at isocenter, below 9.5 cm of water, 1 m from the 3 mm Be bremsstrahlung target. To generate a homogeneous dose distribution in a 10 x 10 cm2 field, the authors used a spot matrix of 100 equal intensity beam spots resulting in a

  2. Spectrum and energy transfer in steady Burgers turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Girimaji, Sharath S.; Zhou, YE

    1995-01-01

    The spectrum, energy transfer, and spectral interactions in steady Burgers turbulence are studied using numerically generated data. The velocity field is initially random and the turbulence is maintained steady by forcing the amplitude of a band of low wavenumbers to be invariant in time, while permitting the phase to change as dictated by the equation. The spectrum, as expected, is very different from that of Navier-Stokes turbulence. It is demonstrated that the far range of the spectrum scales as predicted by Burgers. Despite the difference in their spectra, in matters of the spectral energy transfer and triadic interactions Burgers turbulence is similar to Navier-Stokes turbulence.

  3. High energy cosmic ray iron spectrum experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arens, J. F.; Balasubrahmanyan, V. K.; Ormes, J. F.; Schmidt, W. K. H.; Simon, M.; Spiegelhauer, H.

    1978-01-01

    An instrument containing a gas Cerenkov counter and an iron ionization spectrometer was constructed in order to measure the cosmic-ray iron spectrum to 300 GeV/nucleon. Trajectories of particles were determined by entopistic or position-determining scintillator systems. The geometric factors with and without the gas Cerenkov counter were 0.3 and 0.6 sq m-ster, respectively. The instrument was successfully flown in June 1976 without the spectrometer and in October 1976 with the spectrometer from Palestine, Texas. The June flight yielded 14.5 h of data; the October flight, 25 h.

  4. Radiative electronic energy transfer-time studies of naphthalene-biacetyl system by one and two-photon excitation, and optical antenna mechanism.

    PubMed

    Bayrakceken, Fuat

    2005-04-01

    In principle, the optical energy absorbed by a complex molecule raises that molecule to one of its excited states, and afterwards this excitation energy decays through the relaxation channels. Initially, electronically excited naphthalene emits photons and these emitted photons are absorbed by the acceptor molecule biacetyl, then excited biacetyl fluoresces. In this investigation radiative energy transfer-time is measured in cyclohexane by one and two-photon excitations. The UV-vis spectrum of biacetyl vapor at room temperature conditions was broad and structureless.

  5. Analysis of the 237Np-233Pa photon spectrum using the full response function method.

    PubMed

    Shchukin, G; Iakovlev, K; Morel, J

    2004-01-01

    A study has been made of X- and gamma-ray emission from 237Np in equilibrium with 233Pa using the full response function method. This analysis process is characterised by photon spectrometry in which the entire spectrum is modelled in a pseudo-empirical way by means of elementary functions describing the total absorption and escape peaks, the Compton diffusion internal and external to the detector and the peaks resulting from detection of internal conversion electrons. This method has been applied to determine the L X-, K X- and gamma-rays emission probabilities in 237Np and 233Pa decay studies.

  6. The High Energy Spectrum of NGC 4151

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beckmann, V.; Gehrels, N.; Shrader, C.; Soldi, S.; Lubinski, P.; Zdziarski, A. A.; Petrucci, P.-O.; Malzac, J.

    2005-01-01

    We present first INTEGRAL observations of the type 1.5 Seyfert galaxy NGC 4151. Combining several INTEGRAL observations performed during 2003, totaling approximately 400 ksec of exposure time, allow us to study the spectrum in the 3 - 300 keV range. The measurements presented here reveal an overall spectrum from X-rays up to the soft gamma-rays that can be described by an absorbed (N(sub H) approximately equal to 5 x 10(exp 22) per square centimeter) and non-variable thermal component, plus a Fe Kalpha line, and an exponential cutoff occurs at 110 keV, consistent with earlier claims. The Galactic hydrogen column density in the line of sight is N(sub H), Gal approximately equal to 2.1 x 10 (exp 20) per square centimeter. The time resolved analysis shows little variation of the spectral parameters. The comparison with CGRO/OSSE data shows that the same spectral model can be applied over a time span of 15 years, while the flux varied by a factor of 2. Applying a Compton reflection component improves the model fit to the INTEGRAL data. Nonetheless the data available to date cannot significantly confirm or exclude the existence of reflection, nor is a high iron overabundance in the absorber, as had been previously suggested, clearly detectable.

  7. Photonic Band Gap resonators for high energy accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, S.; Smith, D.R.; Kroll, N. |

    1993-12-31

    We have proposed that a new type of microwave resonator, based on Photonic Band Gap (PBG) structures, may be particularly useful for high energy accelerators. We provide an explanation of the PBG concept and present data which illustrate some of the special properties associated with such structures. Further evaluation of the utility of PBG resonators requires laboratory testing of model structures at cryogenic temperatures, and at high fields. We provide a brief discussion of our test program, which is currently in progress.

  8. Heavy Meson Production at a Low-Energy Photon Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Asztalos, S

    2004-04-15

    A low-energy {gamma}{gamma} collider has been discussed in the context of a testbed for a {gamma}{gamma} interaction region at the Next Linear Collider(NLC). We consider the production of heavy mesons at such a testbed using Compton-backscattered photons and demonstrate that their production rivals or exceeds those by BELLE, BABAR or LEP where they are produced indirectly via virtual {gamma}{gamma} luminosities.

  9. Extra Dimensions in Photon or Jet plus Missing Transverse Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardaci, Marco

    2010-02-01

    Recent studies of the CMS collaboration are presented on the sensitivity to searches for large (ADD) extra dimensions in channels with missing transverse energy (MET), i.e. the channels jets plus MET and photon plus MET. These studies are based on detailed detector simulation, including all Standard Model backgrounds. Particular emphasis is given to possible early discoveries, i.e. with 100 pb-1 or less. Projected 95% CL exclusion limits as function of luminosity are presented as well.

  10. Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy with High Energy Photon and Hadron Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oelfke, U.

    2004-07-01

    This short contribution will briefly describe the basic concepts of intensity modulated radiation therapy with high energy photons (IMRT) and charged particle beams (IMPT). Dose delivery and optimization strategies like the `Inverse Planning' approach will be explained for both radiation modalities and their potential advantages are demonstrated for characteristic clinical examples. Finally, future development like image guided radiotherapy (IGRT) and adaptive radiation therapy, based on functional imaging methods, will be introduced.

  11. Photon-photon and electron-photon colliders with energies below a TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Mayda M. Velasco et al.

    2001-11-29

    We investigate the potential for detecting and studying Higgs bosons in {gamma}{gamma} and e{gamma} collisions at future linear colliders with energies below a TeV. Our study incorporates realistic {gamma}{gamma}spectra based on available laser technology, and NLC and CLIC acceleration techniques. Results include detector simulations. We study the cases of: (a) a SM-like Higgs boson based on a devoted low energy machine with {radical}s{sub ee} {le} 200 GeV; (b) the heavy MSSM Higgs bosons; and (c) charged Higgs bosons in e{gamma} collisions.

  12. Photon-Photon and Electron-Photon Colliders with Energies Below a TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Hewett, JoAnne L

    2002-01-07

    We investigate the potential for detecting and studying Higgs bosons in {gamma}{gamma} and e{gamma} collisions at future linear colliders with energies below a TeV. Our study incorporates realistic {gamma}{gamma} spectra based on available laser technology, and NLC and CLIC acceleration techniques. Results include detector simulations. We study the cases of: (a) a SM-like Higgs boson based on a devoted low energy machine with {radical}(s{sub ee}) {le} 200 GeV; (b) the heavy MSSM Higgs bosons; and (c) charged Higgs bosons in e{gamma} collisions.

  13. Indirect dark matter signatures in the cosmic dark ages. II. Ionization, heating, and photon production from arbitrary energy injections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slatyer, Tracy R.

    2016-01-01

    Any injection of electromagnetically interacting particles during the cosmic dark ages will lead to increased ionization, heating, production of Lyman-α photons and distortions to the energy spectrum of the cosmic microwave background, with potentially observable consequences. In this paper we describe numerical results for the low-energy electrons and photons produced by the cooling of particles injected at energies from keV to multi-TeV scales, at arbitrary injection redshifts (but focusing on the post-recombination epoch). We use these data, combined with existing calculations modeling the cooling of these low-energy particles, to estimate the resulting contributions to ionization, excitation and heating of the gas, and production of low-energy photons below the threshold for excitation and ionization. We compute corrected deposition-efficiency curves for annihilating dark matter, and demonstrate how to compute equivalent curves for arbitrary energy-injection histories. These calculations provide the necessary inputs for the limits on dark matter annihilation presented in the accompanying paper I, but also have potential applications in the context of dark matter decay or deexcitation, decay of other metastable species, or similar energy injections from new physics. We make our full results publicly available at http://nebel.rc.fas.harvard.edu/epsilon, to facilitate further independent studies. In particular, we provide the full low-energy electron and photon spectra, to allow matching onto more detailed codes that describe the cooling of such particles at low energies.

  14. TOPICAL REVIEW: RBE of low energy electrons and photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikjoo, Hooshang; Lindborg, Lennart

    2010-05-01

    Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) compares the severity of damage induced by a radiation under test at a dose D relative to the reference radiation Dx for the same biological endpoint. RBE is an important parameter in estimation of risk from exposure to ionizing radiation (IR). The present work provides a review of the recently published data and the knowledge of the RBE of low energy electrons and photons. The review presents RBE values derived from experimental data and model calculations including cell inactivation, chromosome aberration, cell transformation, micronuclei formation and induction of double-strand breaks. Biophysical models, including physical features of radiation track, and microdosimetry parameters are presented, analysed and compared with experimental data. The biological effects of low energy electrons and photons are of particular interest in radiation biology as these are strongly absorbed in micrometer and sub-micrometer layers of tissue. RBE values not only depend on the electron and photon energies but also on the irradiation condition, cell type and experimental conditions.

  15. The mechanism of producing energy-polarization entangled photon pairs in the cavity-quantum electrodynamics scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, Chang-Gan; Xin, Xia; Liu, Yu-Min; Yu, Zhong-Yuan; Yao, Wen-Jie; Wang, Dong-Lin; Cao, Gui

    2012-04-01

    We investigate theoretically two photon entanglement processes in a photonic-crystal cavity embedding a quantum dot in the strong-coupling regime. The model proposed by Johne et al. (Johne R, Gippius N A, Pavlovic G, Solnyshkov D D, Shelykh I A and Malpuech G 2008 Phys. Rev. Lett. 100 240404), and by Robert et al. (Robert J, Gippius N A and Malpuech G 2009 Phys. Rev. B 79 155317) is modified by considering irreversible dissipation and incoherent continuous pumping for the quantum dot, which is necessary to connect the realistic experiment. The dynamics of the system is analysed by employing the Born—Markov master equation, through which the spectra for the system are computed as a function of various parameters. By means of this analysis the photon-reabsorption process in the strong-coupling regime is first observed and analysed from the perspective of radiation spectrum and the optimal parameters for observing energy-entangled photon pairs are identified.

  16. On the Linearly-Balanced Kinetic Energy Spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Huei,-Iin; Robertson, F. R.

    1999-01-01

    It is well known that the earth's atmospheric motion can generally be characterized by the two dimensional quasi-geostrophic approximation, in which the constraints on global integrals of kinetic energy, entrophy and potential vorticity play very important roles in redistributing the wave energy among different scales of motion. Assuming the hypothesis of Kolmogrov's local isotropy, derived a -3 power law of the equilibrium two-dimensional kinetic energy spectrum that entails constant vorticity and zero energy flows from the energy-containing wave number up to the viscous cutoff. In his three dimensional quasi-geostrophic theory, showed that the spectrum function of the vertical scale turbulence - expressible in terms of the available potential energy - possesses the same power law as the two dimensional kinetic energy spectrum. As the slope of kinetic energy spectrum in the inertial range is theoretically related to the predictability of the synoptic scales (Lorenz, 1969), many general circulation models includes a horizontal diffusion to provide reasonable kinetic energy spectra, although the actual power law exhibited in the atmospheric general circulation is controversial. Note that in either the atmospheric modeling or the observational analyses, the proper choice of wave number Index to represent the turbulence scale Is the degree of the Legendre polynomial.

  17. On the Linearly-Balanced Kinetic Energy Spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Huei,-Iin; Robertson, F. R.

    1999-01-01

    It is well known that the earth's atmospheric motion can generally be characterized by the two dimensional quasi-geostrophic approximation, in which the constraints on global integrals of kinetic energy, entrophy and potential vorticity play very important roles in redistributing the wave energy among different scales of motion. Assuming the hypothesis of Kolmogrov's local isotropy, derived a -3 power law of the equilibrium two-dimensional kinetic energy spectrum that entails constant vorticity and zero energy flows from the energy-containing wave number up to the viscous cutoff. In his three dimensional quasi-geostrophic theory, showed that the spectrum function of the vertical scale turbulence - expressible in terms of the available potential energy - possesses the same power law as the two dimensional kinetic energy spectrum. As the slope of kinetic energy spectrum in the inertial range is theoretically related to the predictability of the synoptic scales (Lorenz, 1969), many general circulation models includes a horizontal diffusion to provide reasonable kinetic energy spectra, although the actual power law exhibited in the atmospheric general circulation is controversial. Note that in either the atmospheric modeling or the observational analyses, the proper choice of wave number Index to represent the turbulence scale Is the degree of the Legendre polynomial.

  18. Energy spectrum of the bound polaron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamowski, Janusz

    1985-08-01

    An eigenvalue problem for an electron interacting with a Coulomb center and a field of LO phonons is solved by a method of optimized canonical transformation. This method can be applied to arbitrary values of the electron-phonon coupling constant α. The energy eigenvalues for the 1s through 4f states have been calculated as function of α and of the ratio R of the donor rydberg mee4/2ħ2ɛ20 to the LO-phonon energy ħω. These values are the upper bounds to the energy E1s of the ground state as well to all the energy levels of the excited states lying below E1s+ħω. In a broad range of α and R, the present upper bounds are lower than previous variational results for the states 1s, 2s, and 2p. The energy levels for the 3s-4f states have been calculated for the first time by variational means. The calculated energy eigenvalues Enl lie always below the corresponding hydrogenlike levels, i.e., Enl/ħω<=-α-R/n2, where n and l are the principal and angular momentum quantum numbers, respectively. For all values of α and R, the following sequence of the energy levels for a given n has been obtained: Enl<=Enl' if l>l'. In particular, it leads to the positive Lamb shift E2s-E2p. The model of the bound polaron has been applied to the description of shallow donor spectra. The calculated values agree rather well with the measured 1s-2p transition energies for CdTe and ZnSe, and 1s-2s transition energies for CdS. For AgBr, AgCl, and CdF2 the upper bounds for the 1s level are too low, but the 2p-3p energy differences agree well with the experimental data. It means that the short-range donor potential neglected in the polaron model is repulsive for the considered impurities in the ionic crystals.

  19. Target, purging magnet and electron collector design for scanned high-energy photon beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svensson, Roger; Åsell, Mats; Näfstadius, Peder; Brahme, Anders

    1998-05-01

    A new method for producing very narrow and intense 50 MV bremsstrahlung beams with a half-width as low as 35 mm at a distance of 1 m from the target is presented. Such a beam is well suited for intensity modulation using scanned photon beams. An algorithm has been developed to minimize the width of the bremsstrahlung beam generated in a multilayer target by varying the individual layer thicknesses and atomic numbers under given constraints on the total target thickness and the mean energy of the transmitted electrons. Under such constraints the narrowest possible bremsstrahlung beam is obtained with a target composed of layers of monotonically increasing atomic number starting with the lowest possible value at the entrance side where the electrons impinge. It is also shown that the narrowest photon beam profile is associated with the highest possible forward photon yield. To be able to use the optimized target clinically it is desirable to be able to collect and stop all the electrons that are transmitted through the target. The electrons are most efficiently collected if they are kept close together, i.e. by minimizing the multiple scatter of the electrons and consequently the half-width of the generated bremsstrahlung beam. This is achieved by a thin low-atomic-number target. A dedicated electron stopper has been developed and integrated with the purging magnet. When the electron stopper is combined with a purging magnet, a primary photon collimator and a multileaf collimator, almost all of the transmitted electrons and their associated bremsstrahlung contamination can effectively be collected. The narrow photon beams from thin low-atomic-number targets have the additional advantage of producing the hardest and most penetrative photon spectrum possible, which is ideal for treating large deep-seated tumours.

  20. Target, purging magnet and electron collector design for scanned high-energy photon beams.

    PubMed

    Svensson, R; Asell, M; Näfstadius, P; Brahme, A

    1998-05-01

    A new method for producing very narrow and intense 50 MV bremsstrahlung beams with a half-width as low as 35 mm at a distance of 1 m from the target is presented. Such a beam is well suited for intensity modulation using scanned photon beams. An algorithm has been developed to minimize the width of the bremsstrahlung beam generated in a multilayer target by varying the individual layer thicknesses and atomic numbers under given constraints on the total target thickness and the mean energy of the transmitted electrons. Under such constraints the narrowest possible bremsstrahlung beam is obtained with a target composed of layers of monotonically increasing atomic number starting with the lowest possible value at the entrance side where the electrons impinge. It is also shown that the narrowest photon beam profile is associated with the highest possible forward photon yield. To be able to use the optimized target clinically it is desirable to be able to collect and stop all the electrons that are transmitted through the target. The electrons are most efficiently collected if they are kept close together, i.e. by minimizing the multiple scatter of the electrons and consequently the half-width of the generated bremsstrahlung beam. This is achieved by a thin low-atomic-number target. A dedicated electron stopper has been developed and integrated with the purging magnet. When the electron stopper is combined with a purging magnet, a primary photon collimator and a multileaf collimator, almost all of the transmitted electrons and their associated bremsstrahlung contamination can effectively be collected. The narrow photon beams from thin low-atomic-number targets have the additional advantage of producing the hardest and most penetrative photon spectrum possible, which is ideal for treating large deep-seated tumours.

  1. High-energy diffraction microscopy at the advanced photon source

    SciTech Connect

    Lienert, U.; Li, S.; Hefferan, C.; Lind, J.; Suter, R.; Bernier, J.; Barton, N.; Brandes, M.; Mills, M.; Miller, M.; Jakobsen, B.; Pantleon, W.

    2012-02-28

    The status of the High Energy Diffraction Microscopy (HEDM) program at the 1-ID beam line of the Advanced Photon Source is reported. HEDM applies high energy synchrotron radiation for the grain and sub-grain scale structural and mechanical characterization of polycrystalline bulk materials in situ during thermomechanical loading. Case studies demonstrate the mapping of grain boundary topology, the evaluation of stress tensors of individual grains during tensile deformation and comparison to a finite element modeling simulation, and the characterization of evolving dislocation structure. Complementary information is obtained by post mortem electron microscopy on the same sample volume previously investigated by HEDM.

  2. LDRD project 151362 : low energy electron-photon transport.

    SciTech Connect

    Kensek, Ronald Patrick; Hjalmarson, Harold Paul; Magyar, Rudolph J.; Bondi, Robert James; Crawford, Martin James

    2013-09-01

    At sufficiently high energies, the wavelengths of electrons and photons are short enough to only interact with one atom at time, leading to the popular %E2%80%9Cindependent-atom approximation%E2%80%9D. We attempted to incorporate atomic structure in the generation of cross sections (which embody the modeled physics) to improve transport at lower energies. We document our successes and failures. This was a three-year LDRD project. The core team consisted of a radiation-transport expert, a solid-state physicist, and two DFT experts.

  3. Projection x-ray imaging with photon energy weighting: experimental evaluation with a prototype detector.

    PubMed

    Shikhaliev, Polad M

    2009-08-21

    The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in x-ray imaging can be increased using a photon counting detector which could allow for rejecting electronics noise and for weighting x-ray photons according to their energies. This approach, however, was not feasible for a long time because photon counting x-ray detectors with very high count rates, good energy resolution and a large number of small pixels were required. These problems have been addressed with the advent of new detector materials, fast readout electronics and powerful computers. In this work, we report on the experimental evaluation of projection x-ray imaging with a photon counting cadmium-zinc-telluride (CZT) detector with energy resolving capabilities. The detector included two rows of pixels with 128 pixels per row with 0.9 x 0.9 mm(2) pixel size, and a 2 Mcount pixel(-1) s(-1) count rate. The x-ray tube operated at 120 kVp tube voltage with 2 mm Al-equivalent inherent filtration. The x-ray spectrum was split into five regions, and five independent x-ray images were acquired at a time. These five quasi-monochromatic x-ray images were used for x-ray energy weighting and material decomposition. A tissue-equivalent phantom was used including contrast elements simulating adipose, calcifications, iodine and air. X-ray energy weighting improved the SNR of calcifications and iodine by a factor of 1.32 and 1.36, respectively, as compared to charge integrating. Material decomposition was performed by dual energy subtraction. The low- and high-energy images were generated in the energy ranges of 25-60 keV and 60-120 keV, respectively, by combining five monochromatic image data into two. X-ray energy weighting was applied to low- and high-energy images prior to subtraction, and this improved the SNR of calcifications and iodine in dual energy subtracted images by a factor of 1.34 and 1.25, respectively, as compared to charge integrating. The detector energy resolution, spatial resolution, linearity, count rate, noise and

  4. Projection x-ray imaging with photon energy weighting: experimental evaluation with a prototype detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shikhaliev, Polad M.

    2009-08-01

    The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in x-ray imaging can be increased using a photon counting detector which could allow for rejecting electronics noise and for weighting x-ray photons according to their energies. This approach, however, was not feasible for a long time because photon counting x-ray detectors with very high count rates, good energy resolution and a large number of small pixels were required. These problems have been addressed with the advent of new detector materials, fast readout electronics and powerful computers. In this work, we report on the experimental evaluation of projection x-ray imaging with a photon counting cadmium-zinc-telluride (CZT) detector with energy resolving capabilities. The detector included two rows of pixels with 128 pixels per row with 0.9 × 0.9 mm2 pixel size, and a 2 Mcount pixel-1 s-1 count rate. The x-ray tube operated at 120 kVp tube voltage with 2 mm Al-equivalent inherent filtration. The x-ray spectrum was split into five regions, and five independent x-ray images were acquired at a time. These five quasi-monochromatic x-ray images were used for x-ray energy weighting and material decomposition. A tissue-equivalent phantom was used including contrast elements simulating adipose, calcifications, iodine and air. X-ray energy weighting improved the SNR of calcifications and iodine by a factor of 1.32 and 1.36, respectively, as compared to charge integrating. Material decomposition was performed by dual energy subtraction. The low- and high-energy images were generated in the energy ranges of 25-60 keV and 60-120 keV, respectively, by combining five monochromatic image data into two. X-ray energy weighting was applied to low- and high-energy images prior to subtraction, and this improved the SNR of calcifications and iodine in dual energy subtracted images by a factor of 1.34 and 1.25, respectively, as compared to charge integrating. The detector energy resolution, spatial resolution, linearity, count rate, noise and image

  5. Energy Spectrum of Nonthermal Electrons Accelerated at a Plane Shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Hyesung

    2011-04-01

    We calculate the energy spectra of cosmic ray (CR) protons and electrons at a plane shock with quasi-parallel magnetic fields,using time-dependent, diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) simulations,including energy losses via synchrotron emission and Inverse Compton (IC) scattering. A thermal leakage injection model and a Bohm type diffusion coefficient are adopted. The electron spectrum at the shock becomes steady after the DSA energy gains balance the synchrotron/IC losses, and it cuts off at the equilibrium momentum p_{eq}.In the postshock region the cutoff momentum of the electron spectrum decreases with the distance from the shock due to the energy losses and the thickness of the spatial distribution of electrons scales as p^{-1}. Thus the slope of the downstream integrated spectrum steepens by one power of p for p_{br}spectrum exhibit a concave curvature and deviate from the canonical test-particle power-law, and the upstream integrated electron spectrum could dominate over the downstream integrated spectrum near the cutoff momentum. Thus the spectral shape near the cutoff of X-ray synchrotron emission could reveal a signature of nonlinear DSA.

  6. NREL Spectrum of Clean Energy Innovation: Issue 3 (Book)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2012-11-01

    This quarterly magazine is dedicated to stepping beyond the technical journals to reveal NREL's vital work in a real-world context for our stakeholders. Continuum provides insights into the latest and most impactful clean energy innovations, while spotlighting those talented researchers and unique facilities that make it all happen. This edition focuses on the NREL Spectrum of Clean Energy Innovation.

  7. Hadron intensity and energy spectrum at 4380 m above level

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cananov, S. D.; Chadranyan, E. K.; Khizanishvili, L. A.; Ladaria, N. K.; Roinishvili, N. N.

    1985-01-01

    The flux value of hadrons with E (sup gamma) h or = 5 TeV, where E (sup gamma) h or = is the energy transferred into electromagnetic component is presented. It is shown that the energy spectrum slope beta of hadrons with E h or = 20 TeV is equal to 1.9.

  8. Using the CMB angular power spectrum to study Dark Matter-photon interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkinson, Ryan J.; Boehm, Céline; Lesgourgues, Julien E-mail: julien.lesgourgues@cern.ch

    2014-04-01

    In this paper, we explore the impact of Dark Matter-photon interactions on the CMB angular power spectrum. Using the one-year data release of the Planck satellite, we derive an upper bound on the Dark Matter-photon elastic scattering cross section of σ{sub DM−γ} ≤ 8 × 10{sup −31} (m{sub DM}/GeV) cm{sup 2} (68% CL) if the cross section is constant and a present-day value of σ{sub DM−γ} ≤ 6 × 10{sup −40}(m{sub DM}/GeV) cm{sup 2} (68% CL) if it scales as the temperature squared. For such a limiting cross section, both the B-modes and the TT angular power spectrum are suppressed with respect to ΛCDM predictions for ℓ∼>500 and ℓ∼>3000 respectively, indicating that forthcoming data from CMB polarisation experiments and Planck could help to constrain and characterise the physics of the dark sector. This essentially initiates a new type of dark matter search that is independent of whether dark matter is annihilating, decaying or asymmetric. Thus, any CMB experiment with the ability to measure the temperature and/or polarisation power spectra at high ℓ should be able to investigate the potential interactions of dark matter and contribute to our fundamental understanding of its nature.

  9. Photon strength and the low-energy enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiedeking, M.; Bernstein, L. A.; Krtička, M.; Bleuel, D. L.; Allmond, J. M.; Basunia, M. S.; Burke, J. T.; Fallon, P.; Firestone, R. B.; Goldblum, B. L.; Hatarik, R.; Lake, P. T.; Lee, I.-Y.; Lesher, S. R.; Paschalis, S.; Petri, M.; Phair, L.; Scielzo, N. D.

    2014-08-01

    Several measurements in medium mass nuclei have reported a low-energy enhancement in the photon strength function. Although, much effort has been invested in unraveling the mysteries of this effect, its physical origin is still not conclusively understood. Here, a completely model-independent experimental approach to investigate the existence of this enhancement is presented. The experiment was designed to study statistical feeding from the quasi-continuum (below the neutron separation energy) to individual low-lying discrete levels in 95Mo produced in the (d, p) reaction. A key aspect to successfully study gamma decay from the region of high-level density is the detection and extraction of correlated particle-gamma-gamma events which was accomplished using an array of Clover HPGe detectors and large area annular silicon detectors. The entrance channel excitation energy into the residual nucleus produced in the reaction was inferred from the detected proton energies in the silicon detectors. Gating on gamma-transitions originating from low-lying discrete levels specifies the state fed by statistical gamma-rays. Any particle-gamma-gamma event in combination with specific energy sum requirements ensures a clean and unambiguous determination of the initial and final state of the observed gamma rays. With these requirements the statistical feeding to individual discrete levels is extracted on an event-by-event basis. The results are presented and compared to 95Mo photon strength function data measured at the University of Oslo.

  10. Energy spectrum of a Langevin oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishin, Y.; Hickman, J.

    2016-12-01

    We derive analytical solutions for the autocorrelation and cross-correlation functions of the kinetic, potential, and total energy of a Langevin oscillator. These functions are presented in both the time and frequency domains and validated by independent numerical simulations. The results are applied to address the long-standing issue of temperature fluctuations in canonical systems.

  11. A comparison of methods for monitoring photon beam energy constancy.

    PubMed

    Gao, Song; Balter, Peter A; Rose, Mark; Simon, William E

    2016-11-08

    In extension of a previous study, we compared several photon beam energy metrics to determine which was the most sensitive to energy change; in addition to those, we accounted for both the sensitivity of each metric and the uncertainty in determining that metric for both traditional flattening filter (FF) beams (4, 6, 8, and 10 MV) and for flattening filter-free (FFF) beams (6 and 10 MV) on a Varian TrueBeam. We examined changes in these energy metrics when photon energies were changed to ± 5% and ± 10% from their nominal energies: 1) an attenuation-based metric (the percent depth dose at 10 cm depth, PDD(10)) and, 2) profile-based metrics, including flatness (Flat) and off-axis ratios (OARs) measured on the orthogonal axes or on the diagonals (diagonal normalized flatness, FDN). Profile-based metrics were measured near dmax and also near 10 cm depth in water (using a 3D scanner) and with ioniza-tion chamber array (ICA). PDD(10) was measured only in water. Changes in PDD, OAR, and FDN were nearly linear to the changes in the bend magnet current (BMI) over the range from -10% to +10% for both FF and FFF beams: a ± 10% change in energy resulted in a ± 1.5% change in PDD(10) for both FF and FFF beams, and changes in OAR and FDN were > 3.0% for FF beams and > 2.2% for FFF beams. The uncertainty in determining PDD(10) was estimated to be 0.15% and that for OAR and FDN about 0.07%. This resulted in minimally detectable changes in energy of 2.5% for PDD(10) and 0.5% for OAR and FDN. We found that the OAR- or FDN- based metrics were the best for detecting energy changes for both FF and FFF beams. The ability of the OAR-based metrics determined with a water scanner to detect energy changes was equivalent to that using an ionization chamber array. We recommend that OAR be measured either on the orthogonal axes or the diagonals, using an ionization chamber array near the depth of maximum dose, as a sensitive and efficient way to confirm stability of photon beam energy.

  12. Energy spectrum analysis - A model of echolocation processing. [in animals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. A.; Titlebaum, E. L.

    1976-01-01

    The paper proposes a frequency domain approach based on energy spectrum analysis of the combination of a signal and its echoes as the processing mechanism for the echolocation process used by bats and other animals. The mechanism is a generalized wide-band one and can account for the large diversity of wide-band signals used for orientation. The coherency in the spectrum of the signal-echo combination is shown to be equivalent to correlation.

  13. Energy spectrum analysis - A model of echolocation processing. [in animals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. A.; Titlebaum, E. L.

    1976-01-01

    The paper proposes a frequency domain approach based on energy spectrum analysis of the combination of a signal and its echoes as the processing mechanism for the echolocation process used by bats and other animals. The mechanism is a generalized wide-band one and can account for the large diversity of wide-band signals used for orientation. The coherency in the spectrum of the signal-echo combination is shown to be equivalent to correlation.

  14. Energy spectrum of black holes: A new view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majhi, Abhishek

    2017-01-01

    Energy of a black hole is usually quantized by invoking some area quantization scheme after expressing the energy in terms of the horizon area. However, in this approach one has to quantize the local and asymptotic energy of the black hole separately and the two results do not manifest any physical correspondence with each other. Here, as opposed to this practice, we find the unique energy spectrum of black holes by adopting a top-down approach. The physical links among the underlying quantum theory, statistical mechanics and thermodynamics of the black hole horizon play the central role in determining the energy spectrum. The energy spectrum that we obtain explicitly reveals the correspondence between asymptotic and local observations through the presence of the surface gravity of the horizon as a parameter in the spectrum, rather than being expressed as a function of area and consequently getting quantized in the usual approach. Thus, our result presents a new view as far as black hole energy quantization is concerned. The calculations are performed using the quantum geometric description of black hole horizons as laid down by loop quantum gravity.

  15. On the interpretation of the geomagnetic energy spectrum

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Benton, E.R.; Alldredge, L.R.

    1987-01-01

    Two recent high-degree magnetic energy spectra, based mostly on MAGSAT data, are compared and found to agree very well out to order and degree n = 15, but the spectrum remains somewhat uncertain for higher degrees. The hypothesis that a primary break in the slope of the spectrum, plotted semi-logarithmically, is due to a transition from dominance by core sources to dominance by crustal magnetization is tested. Simple arrays of dipoles and current loops are found whose combined fields fit the spectrum. Two distinctly different ranges of source depth are found to be adequate. Because one range is shallow and the other deep, the hypothesis is supported. ?? 1987.

  16. Energy dispersive photon counting detectors for breast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barber, William C.; Wessel, Jan C.; Malakhov, Nail; Wawrzyniak, Gregor; Hartsough, Neal E.; Gandhi, Thulasidharan; Nygard, Einar; Iwanczyk, Jan S.

    2013-09-01

    We report on our efforts toward the development of silicon (Si) strip detectors for energy-resolved clinical breast imaging. Typically, x-ray integrating detectors based on scintillating cesium iodide CsI(Tl) or amorphous selenium (a- Se) are used in most commercial systems. Recently, mammography instrumentation has been introduced based on photon counting silicon Si strip detectors. Mammography requires high flux from the x-ray generator, therefore, in order to achieve energy resolved single photon counting, a high output count rate (OCR) for the detector must be achieved at the required spatial resolution and across the required dynamic range for the application. The required performance in terms of the OCR, spatial resolution, and dynamic range must be obtained with sufficient field of view (FOV) for the application thus requiring the tiling of pixel arrays and scanning techniques. Room temperature semiconductors, operating as direct conversion x-ray sensors, can provide the required speed when connected to application specific integrated circuits (ASICs) operating at fast peaking times with multiple fixed thresholds per pixel, provided that the sensors are designed for rapid signal formation across the x-ray energy ranges of the application at the required energy and spatial resolutions. We present our methods and results from the optimization of prototype detectors based on Si strip structures. We describe the detector optimization and the development of ASIC readout electronics that provide the required spatial resolution, low noise, high count rate capabilities and minimal power consumption.

  17. Photon Strength and the Low-Energy Enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    Wiedeking, M; Bernstein, L A; Krticka, M; Bleuel, D L; Allmond, J M; Basunia, M S; Burke, J T; Fallon, P; Firestone, R B; Goldblum, B L; Hatarik, R; Lake, P T; Lee, I Y; Lesher, S R; Paschalis, S; Petri, M; Phair, L; Scielzo, N D

    2012-02-22

    The ability of atomic nuclei to emit and absorb photons with energy E{sub {gamma}} is known as the photon strength function f(E{sub {gamma}}). It has direct relevance to astrophysical element formation via neutron capture processes due to its central role in nuclear reactions. Studies of f(E{sub {gamma}}) have benefited from a wealth of data collected in neutron capture and direct reactions but also from newly commissioned inelastic photon scattering facilities. The majority of these experimental methods, however, rely on the use of models because measured {gamma}-ray spectra are simultaneously sensitive to both the nuclear level density and f(E{sub {gamma}}). As excitation energy increases towards the particle separation energies, the level density increases rapidly, creating the quasi-continuum. Nuclear properties in this excitation energy region are best characterized using statistical quantities, such as f(E{sub {gamma}}). A point of contention in studies of the quasi-continuum has been an unexpected and unexplained increase in f(E{sub {gamma}}) at low {gamma}-ray energies (i.e. below E{sub {gamma}} {approx}3 MeV) in a subset of light-to-medium mass nuclei. Ideally, a new model-independent experimental technique is required to address questions regarding the existence and origin of this low-energy enhancement in f(E{sub {gamma}}). Here such a model-independent approach is presented for determining the shape of f(E{sub {gamma}}) over a wide range of energies. The method involves the use of coupled high-resolution particle and {gamma}-ray spectroscopy to determine the emission of {gamma} rays from the quasi-continuum in a nucleus with defined excitation energy to individual discrete levels of known spins and parities. This method shares characteristics of two neutron capture-based techniques: the Average Resonance Capture (ARC) and the Two-Step Cascade analysis (TSC). The power of the new technique lies in the additional ability to positively identify primary

  18. Lorentz Invariance Violation and the Observed Spectrum of Ultrahigh Energy Cosmic Rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scully, S. T.; Stecker, F. W.

    2009-01-01

    There has been much interest in possible violations of Lorentz invariance, particularly motivated by quantum gravity theories. It has been suggested that a small amount of Lorentz invariance violation (LIV) could turn of photomeson interactions of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) with photons of the cosmic background radiation and thereby eliminate the resulting sharp steepening in the spectrum of the highest energy CRs predicted by Greisen Zatsepin and Kuzmin (GZK). Recent measurements of the UHECR spectrum reported by the HiRes and Auger collaborations, however, indicate the presence of the GZK effect. We present the results of a detailed calculation of the modification of the UHECR spectrum caused by LIV using the formalism of Coleman and Glashow. We then compare these results with the experimental UHECR data from Auger and HiRes. Based on these data, we find a best fit amount of LIV of 4.5+1:5 ..4:5 x 10(exp -23),consistent with an upper limit of 6 x 10(exp -23). This possible amount of LIV can lead to a recovery of the cosmic ray spectrum at higher energies than presently observed. Such an LIV recovery effect can be tested observationally using future detectors.

  19. Broadband Photon Spectrum and its Radial Profile of Pulsar Wind Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishizaki, Wataru; Tanaka, Shuta J.; Asano, Katsuaki; Terasawa, Toshio

    2017-04-01

    The observed radial profiles of the X-ray emission from pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe) have been claimed to contradict the standard 1D steady model. However, the 1D model has not been tested to simultaneously reproduce the volume-integrated spectrum and the radial profile of the surface brightness. We revisit the 1D steady model and apply it to PWNe 3C 58 and G21.5‑0.9. We find that the parameters of the pulsar wind, the radius of the termination shock {r}{{s}}, and magnetization σ greatly affect both the photon spectrum and radial profile of the emission. We have shown that the parameters constrained by the entire spectrum lead to an X-ray nebula smaller than the observed nebula. We have also tested the case that reproduces only the observations in X- and gamma-rays, ignoring the radio and optical components. In this case, there are parameter sets that reproduce both the spectrum and emission profile, but the advection time to the edge of the nebula becomes much smaller than the age. Our detailed discussion clarifies that the standard 1D steady model has severe difficulty to simultaneously reproduce both the volume-integrated spectrum and the surface brightness. This implies that the model should be improved by taking into account extra physical processes such as spatial diffusion of particles. Additionally, we calculate the surface brightness profile of the radio, optical, and TeV gamma-rays. The future observations in these wavelengths are also important to probe the spatial distributions of the relativistic plasma and the magnetic field of PWNe.

  20. Energy calibration of tagged photons by the d(γ,π-pp) reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Yun-Cheng; Nobuyuki, Chiga; Yu, Fujii; Kenta, Futatsukawa; Osamu, Hashimoto; Kentaro, Hirose; Takatsugu, Ishikawa; Hiroki, Kanda; Masashi, Kaneta; Daisuke, Kawama; Yue, Ma; Kazushige, Maeda; Tomofumi, Maruta; Nayuta, Maruyama; Akihiko, Matsumura; Youhei, Miyagi; Koji, Miwa; Satoshi, Nakamura N.; Hajime, Shimizu; Koutarou, Shirotori; Koutaku, Suzuki; Tadaaki, Tamae; Hirokazu, Tamura; Kyo, Tsukada; Wang, Tie-Shan; Hirohito, Yamazaki

    2010-01-01

    The energy of tagged photons, which were provided from the internal photon tagging system of the Laboratory of Nuclear Science, Tohoku University, has been calibrated using the d(γ,π-pp) reaction. Charged pions and protons in the final state were detected with the Neutral Kaon Spectrometer (NKS2). Photon energies were obtained from the reaction of d(γ,π-pp). The derived photon energy was consistent with the design of the tagger system and the previous measurement using electron-positron pair production. The consistency demonstrates the performance of NKS2 and the capability of the photon energy calibration using d(γ,π-pp).

  1. Spectrum of energy depositions in the Auger Water Cherenkov Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salazar, Humberto

    1999-08-01

    The measured spectrum of energy depositions in a Water Cherenkov Detector (WCD) prototype for the Pierre Auger Observatory is presented. A WCD (area 10 m2 )is located in the Puebla University campus at a depth of 800 g/cm2 (2200 m above sea level). Differential and integral spectra in a wide energy deposition range (0.5 - 150 of vertical equivalent muons) are presented. The problem of the WCD "self calibration" procedure (by rate of the muon events) is discussed. The characteristic change of the slopes of the differential spectrum at the transition from single muon signals to EAS signals is also discussed. The measured energy deposition spectrum at extreme signals is used to estimate the linearity of the response of the WCD PMTs. Key words: Auger array, water Cherenkov detector, extensive air showers

  2. The energy dependence of the lateral dose response functions of detectors with various densities in photon-beam dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khee Looe, Hui; Harder, Dietrich; Poppe, Björn

    2017-02-01

    The lateral dose response function is a general characteristic of the volume effect of a detector used for photon dosimetry in a water phantom. It serves as the convolution kernel transforming the true absorbed dose to water profile, which would be produced within the undisturbed water phantom, into the detector-measured signal profile. The shape of the lateral dose response function characterizes (i) the volume averaging attributable to the detector’s size and (ii) the disturbance of the secondary electron field associated with the deviation of the electron density of the detector material from the surrounding water. In previous work, the characteristic dependence of the shape of the lateral dose response function upon the electron density of the detector material was studied for 6 MV photons by Monte Carlo simulation of a wall-less voxel-sized detector (Looe et al 2015 Phys. Med. Biol. 60 6585-07). This study is here continued for 60Co gamma rays and 15 MV photons in comparison with 6 MV photons. It is found (1) that throughout these photon spectra the shapes of the lateral dose response functions are retaining their characteristic dependence on the detector’s electron density, and (2) that their energy-dependent changes are only moderate. This appears as a practical advantage because the lateral dose response function can then be treated as practically invariant across a clinical photon beam in spite of the known changes of the photon spectrum with increasing distance from the beam axis.

  3. ENERGY SPECTRUM AND CHEMICAL COMPOSITION OF ULTRAHIGH ENERGY COSMIC RAYS FROM SEMI-RELATIVISTIC HYPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Ruoyu; Wang Xiangyu

    2012-02-10

    It has been suggested that hypernova remnants, with a substantial amount of energy in semi-relativistic ejecta, can accelerate intermediate mass or heavy nuclei to ultrahigh energies and provide a sufficient amount of energy in cosmic rays to account for the observed flux. We here calculate the expected energy spectrum and chemical composition of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays from such semi-relativistic hypernovae. With a chemical composition equal to that of the hypernova ejecta and a flat or hard spectrum for cosmic rays at the sources, the spectrum and composition of the propagated cosmic rays observed at the Earth can be compatible with the measurements by the Pierre Auger Observatory.

  4. Energy Spectrum in the Dissipation Range of Fluid Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinez, D. O.; Chen, S.; Doolen, G. D.; Kraichnan, R. H.; Wang, L.-P.; Zhou, Y.

    1996-01-01

    High resolution, direct numerical simulations of the three-dimensional incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are carried out to study the energy spectrum in the dissipation range. An energy spectrum of the form A(k/k( sub d))(sup alpha) exp[- betak/k(sub d) is confirmed. The possible values of the parameters alpha and beta, as well as their dependence on Revnolds numbers and length scales, are investigated, showing good agreement with recent theoretical predictions. A "bottleneck'-type effect is reported at k/k(sub d) approximately 4, exhibiting a possible transition from near-dissipation to far- dissipation.

  5. Parameterizations of Pion Energy Spectrum in Nucleon-Nucleon Collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Franics A.; Wilson, John W.; Norbury, John W.

    1998-01-01

    The effects of pion (PI) production are expected to play an important role in radiation exposures in the upper atmosphere or on the Martian surface. Nuclear databases for describing pion production are developed for radiation transport codes to support these studies. We analyze the secondary energy spectrum of pions produced in nucleon-nucleon (NN) collisions in the relativistic one-pion exchange model. Parametric formulas of the isospin cross sections for one-pion production channels are discussed and are used to renormalize the model spectrum. Energy spectra for the deuteron related channels (NN yields dPi) are also described.

  6. Silicon photonics for compact, energy-efficient interconnects [Invited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barwicz, T.; Byun, H.; Gan, F.; Holzwarth, C. W.; Popovic, M. A.; Rakich, P. T.; Watts, M. R.; Ippen, E. P.; Kã¤Rtner, F. X.; Smith, H. I.; Orcutt, J. S.; Ram, R. J.; Stojanovic, V.; Olubuyide, O. O.; Hoyt, J. L.; Spector, S.; Geis, M.; Grein, M.; Lyszczarz, T.; Yoon, J. U.

    2007-01-01

    The goal of the research program that we describe is to break the emerging performance wall in microprocessor development arising from limited bandwidth and density of on-chip interconnects and chip-to-chip (processor-to-memory) electrical interfaces. Complementary metal-oxide semiconductor compatible photonic devices provide an infrastructure for deployment of a range of integrated photonic networks, which will replace state-of-the-art electrical interconnects, providing significant gains at the system level. Scaling of wavelength-division-multiplexing (WDM) architectures using high-index-contrast (HIC) waveguides offers one path to realizing the energy efficiency and density requirements of high data rate links. HIC microring-resonator filters are well suited to support add-drop nodes in dense WDM photonic networks with high aggregate data rates because they support high Q's and, due to their traveling-wave character, naturally support physically separated input and drop ports. A novel reconfigurable, 'hitless' switch is presented that does not perturb the express channels either before, during, or after reconfiguration. In addition, multigigahertz operation of low-power, Mach-Zehnder silicon modulators as well as germanium-on-silicon photodiodes are presented.

  7. The effective penetration distance of ultrahigh-energy electrons and photons traversing a cosmic blackbody photon gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gould, R. J.; Rephaeli, Y.

    1978-01-01

    The effective average energy loss for an energetic (at least about 10 to the 15th power eV) particle traversing the microwave background radiation is evaluated. Electron-photon transformations by Compton scattering and pair production (in photon-photon collisions) are computed, with the energy loss considered to be carried away by the least energetic of the outgoing particles. Considering the most energetic of the outgoing particles as the high-energy particle, the relative probability and mean time for the particle to be a photon or electron (or positron) is evaluated. The effects of synchrotron losses for electrons and positrons are emphasized and compared with Compton losses to determine a critical energy (for given magnetic field) above which synchrotron losses dominate. Magnetic deflections are also treated for the case where the magnetic field is disordered, having a characteristic 'cell' size.

  8. Photon energy upconverting nanopaper: a bioinspired oxygen protection strategy.

    PubMed

    Svagan, Anna J; Busko, Dmitry; Avlasevich, Yuri; Glasser, Gunnar; Baluschev, Stanislav; Landfester, Katharina

    2014-08-26

    The development of solid materials which are able to upconvert optical radiation into photons of higher energy is attractive for many applications such as photocatalytic cells and photovoltaic devices. However, to fully exploit triplet-triplet annihilation photon energy upconversion (TTA-UC), oxygen protection is imperative because molecular oxygen is an ultimate quencher of the photon upconversion process. So far, reported solid TTA-UC materials have focused mainly on elastomeric matrices with low barrier properties because the TTA-UC efficiency generally drops significantly in glassy and semicrystalline matrices. To overcome this limit, for example, combine effective and sustainable annihilation upconversion with exhaustive oxygen protection of dyes, we prepare a sustainable solid-state-like material based on nanocellulose. Inspired by the structural buildup of leaves in Nature, we compartmentalize the dyes in the liquid core of nanocellulose-based capsules which are then further embedded in a cellulose nanofibers (NFC) matrix. Using pristine cellulose nanofibers, a sustainable and environmentally friendly functional nanomaterial with ultrahigh barrier properties is achieved. Also, an ensemble of sensitizers and emitter compounds are encapsulated, which allow harvesting of the energy of the whole deep-red sunlight region. The films demonstrate excellent lifetime in synthetic air (20.5/79.5, O2/N2)-even after 1 h operation, the intensity of the TTA-UC signal decreased only 7.8% for the film with 8.8 μm thick NFC coating. The lifetime can be further modulated by the thickness of the protective NFC coating. For comparison, the lifetime of TTA-UC in liquids exposed to air is on the level of seconds to minutes due to fast oxygen quenching.

  9. Improving the neutron-to-photon discrimination capability of detectors used for neutron dosimetry in high energy photon beam radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Irazola, L; Terrón, J A; Bedogni, R; Pola, A; Lorenzoli, M; Sánchez-Nieto, B; Gómez, F; Sánchez-Doblado, F

    2016-09-01

    The increasing interest of the medical community to radioinduced second malignancies due to photoneutrons in patients undergoing high-energy radiotherapy, has stimulated in recent years the study of peripheral doses, including the development of some dedicated active detectors. Although these devices are designed to respond to neutrons only, their parasitic photon response is usually not identically zero and anisotropic. The impact of these facts on measurement accuracy can be important, especially in points close to the photon field-edge. A simple method to estimate the photon contribution to detector readings is to cover it with a thermal neutron absorber with reduced secondary photon emission, such as a borated rubber. This technique was applied to the TNRD (Thermal Neutron Rate Detector), recently validated for thermal neutron measurements in high-energy photon radiotherapy. The positive results, together with the accessibility of the method, encourage its application to other detectors and different clinical scenarios. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Aperiodic TiO2 nanotube photonic crystal: full-visible-spectrum solar light harvesting in photovoltaic devices.

    PubMed

    Guo, Min; Xie, Keyu; Wang, Yu; Zhou, Limin; Huang, Haitao

    2014-09-23

    Bandgap engineering of a photonic crystal is highly desirable for photon management in photonic sensors and devices. Aperiodic photonic crystals (APCs) can provide unprecedented opportunities for much more versatile photon management, due to increased degrees of freedom in the design and the unique properties brought about by the aperiodic structures as compared to their periodic counterparts. However, many efforts still remain on conceptual approaches, practical achievements in APCs are rarely reported due to the difficulties in fabrication. Here, we report a simple but highly controllable current-pulse anodization process to design and fabricate TiO2 nanotube APCs. By coupling an APC into the photoanode of a dye-sensitized solar cell, we demonstrate the concept of using APC to achieve nearly full-visible-spectrum light harvesting, as evidenced by both experimental and simulated results. It is anticipated that this work will lead to more fruitful practical applications of APCs in high-efficiency photovoltaics, sensors and optoelectronic devices.

  11. Collapsed cone convolution of radiant energy for photon dose calculation in heterogeneous media.

    PubMed

    Ahnesjö, A

    1989-01-01

    A method for photon beam dose calculations is described. The primary photon beam is raytraced through the patient, and the distribution of total radiant energy released into the patient is calculated. Polyenergetic energy deposition kernels are calculated from the spectrum of the beam, using a database of monoenergetic kernels. It is shown that the polyenergetic kernels can be analytically described with high precision by (A exp( -ar) + B exp( -br)/r2, where A, a, B, and b depend on the angle with respect to the impinging photons and the accelerating potential, and r is the radial distance. Numerical values of A, a, B, and b are derived and used to convolve energy deposition kernels with the total energy released per unit mass (TERMA) to yield dose distributions. The convolution is facilitated by the introduction of the collapsed cone approximation. In this approximation, all energy released into coaxial cones of equal solid angle, from volume elements on the cone axis, is rectilinearly transported, attenuated, and deposited in elements on the axis. Scaling of the kernels is implicitly done during the convolution procedure to fully account for inhomogeneities present in the irradiated volume. The number of computational operations needed to compute the dose with the method is proportional to the number of calculation points. The method is tested for five accelerating potentials; 4, 6, 10, 15, and 24 MV, and applied to two geometries; one is a stack of slabs of tissue media, and the other is a mediastinum-like phantom of cork and water. In these geometries, the EGS4 Monte Carlo system has been used to generate reference dose distributions with which the dose computed with the collapsed cone convolution method is compared. Generally, the agreement between the methods is excellent. Deviations are observed in situations of lateral charged particle disequilibrium in low density media, however, but the result is superior compared to that of the generalized Batho method.

  12. Uranium enrichment determination by high-energy photon interrogation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jianyu; Zhang, Songbai; Wu, Jun

    2011-11-01

    Uranium enrichment determination by non-destructive assay is an important method in authenticating the nuclear warhead or uranium component in deep nuclear reduction verifications. In this paper, the feasibility of applying the high-energy photon interrogation to determine the uranium enrichment is studied. Simplified models are presented which were simulated by particle Monte Carlo transport code. The results indicate that the relation curves of the released neutrons and the enrichment of uranium objects are almost linear. For a uranium object of a given shape, the uranium enrichment can be obtained with the relation curves, which could be got in advance by calibration experiments or simulations.

  13. Soft X-Ray Irradiation of Methanol Ice: Formation of Products as a Function of Photon Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.-J.; Ciaravella, A.; Muñoz Caro, G. M.; Cecchi-Pestellini, C.; Jiménez-Escobar, A.; Juang, K.-J.; Yih, T.-S.

    2013-12-01

    Pure methanol ices have been irradiated with monochromatic soft X-rays of 300 and 550 eV close to the 1s resonance edges of C and O, respectively, and with a broadband spectrum (250-1200 eV). The infrared (IR) spectra of the irradiated ices show several new products of astrophysical interest such as CH2OH, H2CO, CH4, HCOOH, HCOCH2OH, CH3COOH, CH3OCH3, HCOOCH3, and (CH2OH)2, as well as HCO, CO, and CO2. The effect of X-rays is the result of the combined interactions of photons and electrons with the ice. A significant contribution to the formation and growth of new species in the CH3OH ice irradiated with X-rays is given by secondary electrons, whose energy distribution depends on the energy of X-ray photons. Within a single experiment, the abundances of the new products increase with the absorbed energy. Monochromatic experiments show that product abundances also increase with the photon energy. However, the abundances per unit energy of newly formed species show a marked decrease in the broadband experiment as compared to irradiations with monochromatic photons, suggesting a possible regulatory role of the energy deposition rate. The number of new molecules produced per absorbed eV in the X-ray experiments has been compared to those obtained with electron and ultraviolet (UV) irradiation experiments.

  14. High Energy Atmospheric Neutrino Fluxes From a Realistic Primary Spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campos Penha, Felipe; Dembinski, Hans; Gaisser, Thomas K.; Tilav, Serap

    2016-03-01

    Atmospheric neutrino fluxes depend on the energy spectrum of primary nucleons entering the top of the atmosphere. Before the advent of AMANDA and the IceCube Neutrino Observatory, measurements of the neutrino fluxes were generally below ~ 1TeV , a regime in which a simple energy power law sufficed to describe the primary spectrum. Now, IceCube's muon neutrino data extends beyond 1PeV , including a combination of neutrinos from astrophysical sources with background from atmospheric neutrinos. At such high energies, the steepening at the knee of the primary spectrum must be accounted for. Here, we describe a semi-analytical approach for calculating the atmospheric differential neutrino fluxes at high energies. The input is a realistic primary spectrum consisting of 4 populations with distinct energy cutoffs, each with up to 7 representative nuclei, where the parameters were extracted from a global fit. We show the effect of each component on the atmospheric neutrino spectra, above 10TeV . The resulting features follow directly from recent air shower measurements included in the fit. Felipe Campos Penha gratefully acknowledges financial support from CAPES (Processo BEX 5348/14-5), CNPq (Processo 142180/2012-2), and the Bartol Research Institute.

  15. The effect of energy weighting on x-ray imaging based on photon counting detector: a Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seung-Wan; Choi, Yu-Na; Cho, Hyo-Min; Lee, Young-Jin; Ryu, Hyun-Ju; Kim, Hee-Joung

    2012-03-01

    Photon counting detector based on semiconductor materials is a promising imaging modality and provides many benefits for x-ray imaging compared with conventional detectors. This detector is able to measure the x-ray photon energy deposited by each event and provide the x-ray spectrum formed by detected photon. Recently, photon counting detectors have been developed for x-ray imaging. However, there has not been done many works for developing the novel x-ray imaging techniques and evaluating the image quality in x-ray system based on photon counting detectors. In this study, we simulated computed tomography (CT) images using projection-based and image-based energy weighting techniques and evaluate the effect of energy weighting in CT images. We designed the x-ray CT system equipped with cadmium telluride (CdTe) detector operating in the photon counting mode using Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission (GATE) simulation. A micro focus X-ray source was modeled to reduce the flux of photons and minimize the spectral distortion. The phantom had a cylindrical shape of 30 mm diameter and consisted of ploymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) which includes the blood (1.06 g/cm3), iodine, and gadolinium (50 mg/cm3). The reconstructed images of phantom were acquired with projection-based and image-based energy weighting techniques. To evaluate the image quality, the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) is calculated as a function of the number of energy-bins. The CNR of both images acquired with energy weighting techniques were improved compared with those of integrating and counting images and increased as a function of the number of energy-bins. When the number of energy-bins was increased, the CNR in the image-based energy weighting image is higher than the projection-based energy weighting image. The results of this study show that the energy weighting techniques based on the photon counting detector can improve the image quality and the number of energy-bins used for generating the

  16. Examination of energy spectrum acquisition method using shielded radiopharmaceutical syringes.

    PubMed

    Uto, Tomoyuki

    2009-09-20

    I previously reported on a spectrum sampling method with shielded syringes before use, although the report included only data obtained using technetium-99m. In this study, we sampled the energy spectrum in a similar manner using thallium-201, iodine-123, and gallium-67. In spectrum sampling, a radioisotopic source in a cylindrical shield is located midway between two opposed gamma-camera detectors equipped with collimators. An unshielded syringe before use emits excessive radiation and makes count rates too high to obtain accurate photopeak values. With a shielded syringe, we can sample the spectrum of radiation leaked from the needle side of the syringe and the unshielded part of its plunger side. Consequently, the detectors are exposed to lower-dose gamma rays and probably offer count rates appropriate to measure accurate photopeak values. The study results show the general validity of spectrum sampling and photopeak acquisition in our method. However, a syringe should be located accurately perpendicular to each detector; otherwise, gamma rays did not reach the detectors in some cases, resulting in measurement failures. In addition, when low-energy collimators are used for sampling from (123)I sources, photopeak values depend on penetration. More accurate measurements require the use of high-energy collimators.

  17. Optimized undulator to generate low energy photons from medium to high energy accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Ting-Yi; Chiu, Mau-Sen; Luo, Hao-Wen; Yang, Chin-Kang; Huang, Jui-Che; Jan, Jyh-Chyuan; Hwang, Ching-Shiang

    2017-07-01

    While emitting low energy photons from a medium or high energy storage ring, the on-axis heat load on the beam line optics can become a critical issue. In addition, the heat load in the bending magnet chamber, especially in the vertical and circular polarization mode of operation may cause some concern. In this work, we compare the heat loads for the APPLE-II and the Knot-APPLE, both optimized to emit 10 eV photons from the 3 GeV TPS. Under this constraint the heat load analysis, synchrotron radiation performance and features in various polarization modes are presented. Additional consideration is given to beam dynamics effect.

  18. Unfolding linac photon spectra and incident electron energies from experimental transmission data, with direct independent validation

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, E. S. M.; McEwen, M. R.; Rogers, D. W. O.

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: In a recent computational study, an improved physics-based approach was proposed for unfolding linac photon spectra and incident electron energies from transmission data. In this approach, energy differentiation is improved by simultaneously using transmission data for multiple attenuators and detectors, and the unfolding robustness is improved by using a four-parameter functional form to describe the photon spectrum. The purpose of the current study is to validate this approach experimentally, and to demonstrate its application on a typical clinical linac. Methods: The validation makes use of the recent transmission measurements performed on the Vickers research linac of National Research Council Canada. For this linac, the photon spectra were previously measured using a NaI detector, and the incident electron parameters are independently known. The transmission data are for eight beams in the range 10-30 MV using thick Be, Al and Pb bremsstrahlung targets. To demonstrate the approach on a typical clinical linac, new measurements are performed on an Elekta Precise linac for 6, 10 and 25 MV beams. The different experimental setups are modeled using EGSnrc, with the newly added photonuclear attenuation included. Results: For the validation on the research linac, the 95% confidence bounds of the unfolded spectra fall within the noise of the NaI data. The unfolded spectra agree with the EGSnrc spectra (calculated using independently known electron parameters) with RMS energy fluence deviations of 4.5%. The accuracy of unfolding the incident electron energy is shown to be {approx}3%. A transmission cutoff of only 10% is suitable for accurate unfolding, provided that the other components of the proposed approach are implemented. For the demonstration on a clinical linac, the unfolded incident electron energies and their 68% confidence bounds for the 6, 10 and 25 MV beams are 6.1 {+-} 0.1, 9.3 {+-} 0.1, and 19.3 {+-} 0.2 MeV, respectively. The unfolded spectra

  19. Effective-medium theory for energy velocity in one-dimensional finite lossless photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Torrese, Guido; Taylor, Jason; Hall, Trevor J; Mégret, Patrice

    2006-06-01

    The effective medium theory is a useful approach for investigating the electromagnetic wave propagation in periodic multilayer slabs. It allows accurate computation of transmission and reflection spectra as well as of phase and group velocities. In this paper we derive an exact analytical expression for the energy velocity of a one-dimensional finite photonic crystal based on the effective medium approach. It accounts for the multiple reflections within the structure which results in the characteristic oscillations of the transmission spectrum. Our analytical expression holds for an arbitrary refractive index contrast and goes beyond the limits of the standard homogenization method. In order to validate our approach, results obtained by using the all-frequency effective energy velocity have been compared to those obtained using the transfer matrix method.

  20. Effect of pulse propagation on the two-dimensional photon echo spectrum of multilevel systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keusters, Dorine; Warren, Warren S.

    2003-08-01

    The effect of pulse propagation on the two-dimensional photon echo (2DPE) spectrum of multilevel systems is investigated using a perturbative method. At high optical densities (OD) peak profiles are broadened asymmetrically, in most cases more strongly along the ω2 direction than along the ω1 direction. The amount of broadening is determined both by the OD and by the dynamics of the system. In addition, especially if the different transitions in the system are of unequal strength, the relative intensity of the peaks changes with OD. But even if the transition strengths are the same, the behavior of the cross peaks is different from the diagonal peaks. Since peak shape and relative intensity are important parameters in the interpretation of 2DPE spectra, such OD effects should be taken into account.

  1. Angular spectrum detection instrument for label-free photonic crystal sensors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Longju; Xu, Zhen; Dong, Liang; Lu, Meng

    2014-05-01

    An angular spectrum analysis system was demonstrated to monitor the optical resonant mode of a photonic crystal (PC) sensor comprised of a one-dimensional grating structure. Exposed to solutions with different refractive indices or adsorbed with biomaterials, the PC sensor exhibited changes of the optical resonant modes. The developed detection system utilized a focused laser beam to detect shifts of the resonant angle, and thereby allowed a kinetic analysis of chemical absorption. Such a detection apparatus offers an adjustable angular resolution and a tunable detection range for a wide variety of refractometric sensing applications. A limit of detection of 6.57×10(-5) refractive index unit has been observed. The instrument also offers an imaging capability of rapidly characterizing low-contrast samples deposited on the PC surface with a spatial resolution of 10 μm.

  2. Energy spectrum of extragalactic gamma-ray sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Protheroe, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    The result of Monte Carlo electron photon cascade calculations for propagation of gamma rays through regions of extragalactic space containing no magnetic field are given. These calculations then provide upper limits to the expected flux from extragalactic sources. Since gamma rays in the 10 to the 14th power eV to 10 to the 17th power eV energy range are of interest, interactions of electrons and photons with the 3 K microwave background radiation are considered. To obtain an upper limit to the expected gamma ray flux from sources, the intergalactic field is assumed to be so low that it can be ignored. Interactions with photons of the near-infrared background radiation are not considered here although these will have important implications for gamma rays below 10 to the 14th power eV if the near infrared background radiation is universal. Interaction lengths of electrons and photons in the microwave background radiation at a temperature of 2.96 K were calculated and are given.

  3. Energy Spectrum of Cosmic-Ray Electrons at TeV Energies

    SciTech Connect

    Aharonian, F.; Akhperjanian, A. G.; Sahakian, V.; Barres de Almeida, U.; Chadwick, P. M.; Cheesebrough, A.; Dickinson, H. J.; Hadjichristidis, C.; Keogh, D.; McComb, T. J. L.; Nolan, S. J.; Orford, K. J.; Osborne, J. L.; Rayner, S. M.; Rulten, C. B.; Spangler, D.; Ward, M.; Bazer-Bachi, A. R.; Borrel, V.; Olive, J-F.

    2008-12-31

    The very large collection area of ground-based {gamma}-ray telescopes gives them a substantial advantage over balloon or satellite based instruments in the detection of very-high-energy (>600 GeV) cosmic-ray electrons. Here we present the electron spectrum derived from data taken with the High Energy Stereoscopic System (H.E.S.S.) of imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes. In this measurement, the first of this type, we are able to extend the measurement of the electron spectrum beyond the range accessible to direct measurements. We find evidence for a substantial steepening in the energy spectrum above 600 GeV compared to lower energies.

  4. Energy spectrum of cosmic-ray electrons at TeV energies.

    PubMed

    Aharonian, F; Akhperjanian, A G; Barres de Almeida, U; Bazer-Bachi, A R; Becherini, Y; Behera, B; Benbow, W; Bernlöhr, K; Boisson, C; Bochow, A; Borrel, V; Braun, I; Brion, E; Brucker, J; Brun, P; Brucker, R; Bulik, T; Büsching, I; Boutelier, T; Carrigan, S; Chadwick, P M; Charbonnier, A; Chaves, R C G; Cheesebrough, A; Chounet, L M; Clapson, A C; Coignet, G; Costamante, L; Dalton, M; Degrange, B; Deil, C; Dickinson, H J; Djannati-Ataï, A; Domainko, W; Drury, L O'C; Dubois, F; Dubus, G; Dyks, J; Dyrda, M; Egberts, K; Emmanoulopoulos, D; Espigat, P; Farnier, C; Feinstein, F; Fiasson, A; Fontaine, G; Füsling, M; Gabici, S; Gallant, Y A; Gérard, L; Giebels, B; Glicenstein, J F; Glück, B; Goret, P; Hadjichristidis, C; Hauser, D; Hauser, M; Heinz, S; Heinzelmann, G; Henri, G; Hermann, G; Hinton, J A; Hoffmann, A; Hofmann, W; Holleran, M; Hoppe, S; Horns, D; Jacholkowska, A; de Jager, O C; Jung, I; Katarzyński, K; Kaufmann, S; Kendziorra, E; Kerschhaggl, M; Khangulyan, D; Khélifi, B; Keogh, D; Komin, Nu; Kosack, K; Lamanna, G; Lenain, J P; Lohse, T; Marandon, V; Martin, J M; Martineau-Huynh, O; Marcowith, A; Maurin, D; McComb, T J L; Medina, C; Moderski, R; Moulin, E; Naumann-Godo, M; de Naurois, M; Nedbal, D; Nekrassov, D; Niemiec, J; Nolan, S J; Ohm, S; Olive, J F; de Oña Wilhelmi, E; Orford, K J; Osborne, J L; Ostrowski, M; Panter, M; Pedaletti, G; Pelletier, G; Petrucci, P O; Pita, S; Pühlhofer, G; Punch, M; Quirrenbach, A; Raubenheimer, B C; Raue, M; Rayner, S M; Renaud, M; Rieger, F; Ripken, J; Rob, L; Rosier-Lees, S; Rowell, G; Rudak, B; Rulten, C B; Ruppel, J; Sahakian, V; Santangelo, A; Schlickeiser, R; Schöck, F M; Schröder, R; Schwanke, U; Schwarzburg, S; Schwemmer, S; Shalchi, A; Skilton, J L; Sol, H; Spangler, D; Stawarz, Ł; Steenkamp, R; Stegmann, C; Superina, G; Tam, P H; Tavernet, J P; Terrier, R; Tibolla, O; van Eldik, C; Vasileiadis, G; Venter, C; Vialle, J P; Vincent, P; Vivier, M; Völk, H J; Volpe, F; Wagner, S J; Ward, M; Zdziarski, A A; Zech, A

    2008-12-31

    The very large collection area of ground-based gamma-ray telescopes gives them a substantial advantage over balloon or satellite based instruments in the detection of very-high-energy (>600 GeV) cosmic-ray electrons. Here we present the electron spectrum derived from data taken with the High Energy Stereoscopic System (H.E.S.S.) of imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes. In this measurement, the first of this type, we are able to extend the measurement of the electron spectrum beyond the range accessible to direct measurements. We find evidence for a substantial steepening in the energy spectrum above 600 GeV compared to lower energies.

  5. High energy primary electron spectrum observed by the emulsion chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishimura, J.; Fujii, M.; Aizu, H.; Hiraiwa, N.; Taira, T.; Kobayashi, T.; Niu, K.; Koss, T. A.; Lord, J. J.; Golden, R. L.

    1978-01-01

    A detector of the emulsion chamber type is used to measure the energy spectrum of cosmic-ray electrons. Two large emulsion chambers, each having an area of 40 by 50 sq cm, are exposed for about 25.5 hr at an average pressure altitude of 3.9 mbar. About 500 high-energy cascades (no less than about 600 GeV) are detected by searching for dark spots on the X-ray films. A power-law energy dependence formula is derived for the spectrum of primary cosmic-ray electrons in the energy region over 100 GeV. The results are in good agreement with the transition curves obtained previously by theoretical and Monte Carlo calculations.

  6. Limiting energy spectrum of a saturated radiation belt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulz, Michael; Davidson, Gerald T.

    1988-01-01

    The condition for magnetospheric wave growth in the presence of anisotropic charged particle distributions is used to extend the Kennel-Petschek theory that traditionally imposes an upper bound on the integral flux of charged particles at energies above a certain threshold to provide a limit on the differential flux at any energy above this threshold. A closed-form expression is derived for the limiting energy spectrum consistent with marginal occurrence of a magnetospheric maser at all wave frequencies below a certain fraction of the electron or proton gyrofrequency. The bounded integral can be recast in such a way that repeated differentiations with respect to v(parallel) actually generate a closed expression for the limiting form of the velocity space distribution, and thus for the limiting energy spectrum of the corresponding particles, whenever the anisotropy parameter is an integer.

  7. Investigation of energy weighting using an energy discriminating photon counting detector for breast CT

    PubMed Central

    Kalluri, Kesava S.; Mahd, Mufeed; Glick, Stephen J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Breast CT is an emerging imaging technique that can portray the breast in 3D and improve visualization of important diagnostic features. Early clinical studies have suggested that breast CT has sufficient spatial and contrast resolution for accurate detection of masses and microcalcifications in the breast, reducing structural overlap that is often a limiting factor in reading mammographic images. For a number of reasons, image quality in breast CT may be improved by use of an energy resolving photon counting detector. In this study, the authors investigate the improvements in image quality obtained when using energy weighting with an energy resolving photon counting detector as compared to that with a conventional energy integrating detector. Methods: Using computer simulation, realistic CT images of multiple breast phantoms were generated. The simulation modeled a prototype breast CT system using an amorphous silicon (a-Si), CsI based energy integrating detector with different x-ray spectra, and a hypothetical, ideal CZT based photon counting detector with capability of energy discrimination. Three biological signals of interest were modeled as spherical lesions and inserted into breast phantoms; hydroxyapatite (HA) to represent microcalcification, infiltrating ductal carcinoma (IDC), and iodine enhanced infiltrating ductal carcinoma (IIDC). Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of these three lesions was measured from the CT reconstructions. In addition, a psychophysical study was conducted to evaluate observer performance in detecting microcalcifications embedded into a realistic anthropomorphic breast phantom. Results: In the energy range tested, improvements in SNR with a photon counting detector using energy weighting was higher (than the energy integrating detector method) by 30%–63% and 4%–34%, for HA and IDC lesions and 12%–30% (with Al filtration) and 32%–38% (with Ce filtration) for the IIDC lesion, respectively. The average area under the

  8. Investigation of energy weighting using an energy discriminating photon counting detector for breast CT.

    PubMed

    Kalluri, Kesava S; Mahd, Mufeed; Glick, Stephen J

    2013-08-01

    Breast CT is an emerging imaging technique that can portray the breast in 3D and improve visualization of important diagnostic features. Early clinical studies have suggested that breast CT has sufficient spatial and contrast resolution for accurate detection of masses and microcalcifications in the breast, reducing structural overlap that is often a limiting factor in reading mammographic images. For a number of reasons, image quality in breast CT may be improved by use of an energy resolving photon counting detector. In this study, the authors investigate the improvements in image quality obtained when using energy weighting with an energy resolving photon counting detector as compared to that with a conventional energy integrating detector. Using computer simulation, realistic CT images of multiple breast phantoms were generated. The simulation modeled a prototype breast CT system using an amorphous silicon (a-Si), CsI based energy integrating detector with different x-ray spectra, and a hypothetical, ideal CZT based photon counting detector with capability of energy discrimination. Three biological signals of interest were modeled as spherical lesions and inserted into breast phantoms; hydroxyapatite (HA) to represent microcalcification, infiltrating ductal carcinoma (IDC), and iodine enhanced infiltrating ductal carcinoma (IIDC). Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of these three lesions was measured from the CT reconstructions. In addition, a psychophysical study was conducted to evaluate observer performance in detecting microcalcifications embedded into a realistic anthropomorphic breast phantom. In the energy range tested, improvements in SNR with a photon counting detector using energy weighting was higher (than the energy integrating detector method) by 30%-63% and 4%-34%, for HA and IDC lesions and 12%-30% (with Al filtration) and 32%-38% (with Ce filtration) for the IIDC lesion, respectively. The average area under the receiver operating characteristic curve

  9. Investigation of energy weighting using an energy discriminating photon counting detector for breast CT

    SciTech Connect

    Kalluri, Kesava S.; Mahd, Mufeed; Glick, Stephen J.

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: Breast CT is an emerging imaging technique that can portray the breast in 3D and improve visualization of important diagnostic features. Early clinical studies have suggested that breast CT has sufficient spatial and contrast resolution for accurate detection of masses and microcalcifications in the breast, reducing structural overlap that is often a limiting factor in reading mammographic images. For a number of reasons, image quality in breast CT may be improved by use of an energy resolving photon counting detector. In this study, the authors investigate the improvements in image quality obtained when using energy weighting with an energy resolving photon counting detector as compared to that with a conventional energy integrating detector.Methods: Using computer simulation, realistic CT images of multiple breast phantoms were generated. The simulation modeled a prototype breast CT system using an amorphous silicon (a-Si), CsI based energy integrating detector with different x-ray spectra, and a hypothetical, ideal CZT based photon counting detector with capability of energy discrimination. Three biological signals of interest were modeled as spherical lesions and inserted into breast phantoms; hydroxyapatite (HA) to represent microcalcification, infiltrating ductal carcinoma (IDC), and iodine enhanced infiltrating ductal carcinoma (IIDC). Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of these three lesions was measured from the CT reconstructions. In addition, a psychophysical study was conducted to evaluate observer performance in detecting microcalcifications embedded into a realistic anthropomorphic breast phantom.Results: In the energy range tested, improvements in SNR with a photon counting detector using energy weighting was higher (than the energy integrating detector method) by 30%–63% and 4%–34%, for HA and IDC lesions and 12%–30% (with Al filtration) and 32%–38% (with Ce filtration) for the IIDC lesion, respectively. The average area under the receiver

  10. Strong optimized conservative Fermi-LAT constraints on dark matter models from the inclusive photon spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Massari, Andrea; Izaguirre, Eder; Essig, Rouven; Albert, Andrea; Bloom, Elliott; Gómez-Vargas, Germán Arturo

    2015-04-29

    Here, we set conservative, robust constraints on the annihilation and decay of dark matter into various Standard Model final states under various assumptions about the distribution of the dark matter in the Milky Way halo. We use the inclusive photon spectrum observed by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope through its main instrument, the Large Area Telescope. We use simulated data to first find the “optimal” regions of interest in the γ-ray sky, where the expected dark matter signal is largest compared with the expected astrophysical foregrounds. We then require the predicted dark matter signal to be less than the observed photon counts in the a priori optimal regions. This yields a very conservative constraint as we do not attempt to model or subtract astrophysical foregrounds. The resulting limits are competitive with other existing limits and, for some final states with cuspy dark-matter distributions in the Galactic Center region, disfavor the typical cross section required during freeze-out for a weakly interacting massive particle to obtain the observed relic abundance.

  11. Strong optimized conservative Fermi-LAT constraints on dark matter models from the inclusive photon spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massari, Andrea; Izaguirre, Eder; Essig, Rouven; Albert, Andrea; Bloom, Elliott; Gómez-Vargas, Germán Arturo

    2015-04-01

    We set conservative, robust constraints on the annihilation and decay of dark matter into various Standard Model final states under various assumptions about the distribution of the dark matter in the Milky Way halo. We use the inclusive photon spectrum observed by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope through its main instrument, the Large Area Telescope. We use simulated data to first find the "optimal" regions of interest in the γ -ray sky, where the expected dark matter signal is largest compared with the expected astrophysical foregrounds. We then require the predicted dark matter signal to be less than the observed photon counts in the a priori optimal regions. This yields a very conservative constraint as we do not attempt to model or subtract astrophysical foregrounds. The resulting limits are competitive with other existing limits and, for some final states with cuspy dark-matter distributions in the Galactic Center region, disfavor the typical cross section required during freeze-out for a weakly interacting massive particle to obtain the observed relic abundance.

  12. Strong optimized conservative Fermi-LAT constraints on dark matter models from the inclusive photon spectrum

    DOE PAGES

    Massari, Andrea; Izaguirre, Eder; Essig, Rouven; ...

    2015-04-29

    Here, we set conservative, robust constraints on the annihilation and decay of dark matter into various Standard Model final states under various assumptions about the distribution of the dark matter in the Milky Way halo. We use the inclusive photon spectrum observed by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope through its main instrument, the Large Area Telescope. We use simulated data to first find the “optimal” regions of interest in the γ-ray sky, where the expected dark matter signal is largest compared with the expected astrophysical foregrounds. We then require the predicted dark matter signal to be less than the observedmore » photon counts in the a priori optimal regions. This yields a very conservative constraint as we do not attempt to model or subtract astrophysical foregrounds. The resulting limits are competitive with other existing limits and, for some final states with cuspy dark-matter distributions in the Galactic Center region, disfavor the typical cross section required during freeze-out for a weakly interacting massive particle to obtain the observed relic abundance.« less

  13. Two-photon double ionization of helium in the region of photon energies 42-50eV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, I. A.; Kheifets, A. S.

    2007-03-01

    We report the total integrated cross section (TICS) of two-photon double ionization of helium in the photon energy range from 42to50eV . Our computational procedure relies on a numerical solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation on a square-integrable basis and subsequent projection of this solution on a set of final field-free states describing correlation in the two-electron continuum. Our results suggest that the TICS grows monotonically as a function of photon energy in the region of 42-50eV , possibly reaching a maximum in the vicinity of 50eV . We also present fully resolved triple-differential cross sections for selected photon energies.

  14. Two-photon double ionization of helium in the region of photon energies 42-50 eV

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, I. A.; Kheifets, A. S.

    2007-03-15

    We report the total integrated cross section (TICS) of two-photon double ionization of helium in the photon energy range from 42 to 50 eV. Our computational procedure relies on a numerical solution of the time-dependent Schroedinger equation on a square-integrable basis and subsequent projection of this solution on a set of final field-free states describing correlation in the two-electron continuum. Our results suggest that the TICS grows monotonically as a function of photon energy in the region of 42-50 eV, possibly reaching a maximum in the vicinity of 50 eV. We also present fully resolved triple-differential cross sections for selected photon energies.

  15. Illuminating dark photons with high-energy colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curtin, David; Essig, Rouven; Gori, Stefania; Shelton, Jessie

    2015-02-01

    High-energy colliders offer a unique sensitivity to dark photons, the mediators of a broken dark U(1) gauge theory that kinetically mixes with the Standard Model (SM) hypercharge. Dark photons can be detected in the exotic decay of the 125 GeV Higgs boson, h→ ZZ D →4 ℓ, and in Drell-Yan events, pp→ Z D → ℓℓ. If the dark U(1) is broken by a hidden-sector Higgs mechanism, then mixing between the dark and SM Higgs bosons also allows the exotic decay h → Z D Z D → 4 ℓ. We show that the 14 TeV LHC and a 100 TeV proton-proton collider provide powerful probes of both exotic Higgs decay channels. In the case of kinetic mixing alone, direct Drell-Yan production offers the best sensitivity to Z D , and can probe ɛ ≳ 9 × 10-4 (4 × 10-4) at the HL-LHC (100 TeV pp collider). The exotic Higgs decay h → ZZ D offers slightly weaker sensitivity, but both measurements are necessary to distinguish the kinetically mixed dark photon from other scenarios. If Higgs mixing is also present, then the decay h → Z D Z D can allow sensitivity to the Z D for ɛ ≳ 10-9 - 10-6 (10-10 - 10-7) for the mass range by searching for displaced dark photon decays. We also compare the Z D sensitivity at pp colliders to the indirect, but model-independent, sensitivity of global fits to electroweak precision observables. We perform a global electroweak fit of the dark photon model, substantially updating previous work in the literature. Electroweak precision measurements at LEP, Tevatron, and the LHC exclude ɛ as low as 3 × 10-2. Sensitivity can be improved by up to a factor of ˜ 2 with HL-LHC data, and an additional factor of ˜ 4 with ILC/GigaZ data.

  16. Energy-resolved CT imaging with a photon-counting silicon-strip detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persson, Mats; Huber, Ben; Karlsson, Staffan; Liu, Xuejin; Chen, Han; Xu, Cheng; Yveborg, Moa; Bornefalk, Hans; Danielsson, Mats

    2014-11-01

    Photon-counting detectors are promising candidates for use in the next generation of x-ray computed tomography (CT) scanners. Among the foreseen benefits are higher spatial resolution, better trade-off between noise and dose and energy discriminating capabilities. Silicon is an attractive detector material because of its low cost, mature manufacturing process and high hole mobility. However, it is sometimes overlooked for CT applications because of its low absorption efficiency and high fraction of Compton scatter. The purpose of this work is to demonstrate that silicon is a feasible material for CT detectors by showing energy-resolved CT images acquired with an 80 kVp x-ray tube spectrum using a photon-counting silicon-strip detector with eight energy thresholds developed in our group. We use a single detector module, consisting of a linear array of 50 0.5 × 0.4 mm detector elements, to image a phantom in a table-top lab setup. The phantom consists of a plastic cylinder with circular inserts containing water, fat and aqueous solutions of calcium, iodine and gadolinium, in different concentrations. By using basis material decomposition we obtain water, calcium, iodine and gadolinium basis images and demonstrate that these basis images can be used to separate the different materials in the inserts. We also show results showing that the detector has potential for quantitative measurements of substance concentrations.

  17. Implications of high-energy photons and electrons on target preheat at Z

    SciTech Connect

    Derzon, M.; Nash, T.; Chandler, G.

    1998-06-01

    High-energy photons and electrons on the Z accelerator will deposit energy into a capsule and fuel; this may create a potential preheat problem for ICF. In this paper the authors discuss heating of the capsule and fuel by high-energy photons and electrons. The fuel is heated to <2 eV, in a time-integrated sense, on Z by these particles. Because peak implosion occurs at the peak in the soft x-ray emission on Z, the heating at times of interest is reduced roughly an order of magnitude to {approximately}0.2 eV for times of interest and fuel preheat from this mechanism is concluded to be small. These estimates are generated from time-integrated bremsstrahlung measurements. The uncertainty in the heating is high because the electron spectrum is not known directly, but inferred. In addition the influence of the particles between 5 keV and 60 keV is not known. Given the uncertainties the authors do not know the impact on the feasibility of internal dynamic hohlraums on z-pinch driven ICF implosions on X-1. The authors discuss these issues and suggest directions for further study.

  18. Energy-resolved CT imaging with a photon-counting silicon-strip detector.

    PubMed

    Persson, Mats; Huber, Ben; Karlsson, Staffan; Liu, Xuejin; Chen, Han; Xu, Cheng; Yveborg, Moa; Bornefalk, Hans; Danielsson, Mats

    2014-11-21

    Photon-counting detectors are promising candidates for use in the next generation of x-ray computed tomography (CT) scanners. Among the foreseen benefits are higher spatial resolution, better trade-off between noise and dose and energy discriminating capabilities. Silicon is an attractive detector material because of its low cost, mature manufacturing process and high hole mobility. However, it is sometimes overlooked for CT applications because of its low absorption efficiency and high fraction of Compton scatter. The purpose of this work is to demonstrate that silicon is a feasible material for CT detectors by showing energy-resolved CT images acquired with an 80 kVp x-ray tube spectrum using a photon-counting silicon-strip detector with eight energy thresholds developed in our group. We use a single detector module, consisting of a linear array of 50 0.5×0.4 mm detector elements, to image a phantom in a table-top lab setup. The phantom consists of a plastic cylinder with circular inserts containing water, fat and aqueous solutions of calcium, iodine and gadolinium, in different concentrations. By using basis material decomposition we obtain water, calcium, iodine and gadolinium basis images and demonstrate that these basis images can be used to separate the different materials in the inserts. We also show results showing that the detector has potential for quantitative measurements of substance concentrations.

  19. Energy Transport in Quantum Systems with Discrete Spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, George; Jones, Wesley; Walczak, Kamil; Yerkes, Kirk

    2012-02-01

    Energy transport in quantum system driven by stochastic perturbations is examined. One of the goals of this study is to determine how the Landauer channels can be defined in a system with discrete energy spectrum. A model describes a particle trapped in a confining potential and subjected to a stochastic perturbation localized off-center of the potential well. The perturbation pumps energy into the system which results in non-zero average energy flux between different regions of the confining potential. The energy flux can be defined in terms of quantum advection modes, where each mode is associated with an off-diagonal element of the density matrix and carries a finite, quantized amount of energy per unit of the probability flux. Statistical correlations between different modes and the net energy flux will be discussed.

  20. A new measurement of the cosmic ray energy spectrum between 3 x 10 to the 15th power eV and 3 x 10 to the 16th power eV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, A. G.; Patterson, J. R.; Protheroe, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    A new Cerenkov photon density spectrum measurement is reported. The derivation of the primary cosmic ray energy spectrum for energies from 3x10 to the 15th power eV to 3x10 to the 16th power eV are presented.

  1. The Spectrum of Ultrahigh Energy Cosmic Rays and Constraints on Lorentz Invariance Violation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.

    2008-01-01

    There has been much interest in possible violations of Lorentz invariance, particularly motivated by quantum gravity theories. It has been suggested that a small amount of Lorentz invariance violation (LIV) could turn off photomeson interactions of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) with photons of the cosmic background radiation and thereby eliminate the resulting sharp steepening in the spectrum of the highest energy CRs predicted by Greisen Zatsepin and Kuzmin (GZK). Recent measurements of the UHECR spectrum reported by the HiRes and Auger collaborations, however, indicate the presence of the GZK effect. We present the results of a detailed calculation of the modification of the UHECR spectrum caused by LIV using the formalism of Coleman and Glashow. We then use a chi-squared analysis to compare our results with the experimental UHECR data and thereby place limits on the amount of LIV. We also discuss how a small amount of LIV that is consistent with the experimental data can still lead to a recovery of the cosmic ray flux at higher energies than presently observed.

  2. Anisotropy and the knee of the energy spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clay, R. W.

    1985-01-01

    The measured cosmic ray energy spectrum exhibits clear structure (the knee) at approx 3 x 10 to the 15th power eV (sea level shower size approx 3 x 10 to the 5th power particles). Additionally, at energies in this general region, there occur apparent changes in shower development such that the observed characteristics of showers at this energy appear different to those characteristics observed at somewhat higher energies. At energies just below this region, the cosmic ray anisotropy amplitude apparently begins a progressive increase with energy. The latter effect does not clearly fit with the first two since there appears to be no significant change exactly at the knee. However, the phase of the first harmonic of the anisotropy appears to show a substantial change just where the energy spectrum shows structure and in the middle of the shower development changes. The first harmonic phase appears to change from approx. 18 hours R.A. to approx. 5 hours R.A. as the energy of observation moves through the knee. In this paper the latter change is examined in some detail by taking into account information contained in the second harmonic of the anisotropy.

  3. Spectrum tailoring of the neutron energy spectrum in the context of delayed neutron detection

    SciTech Connect

    Koehler, William E; Tobin, Steve J; Sandoval, Nathan P; Fensin, Mike L

    2010-01-01

    For the purpose of measuring plutonium mass in spent fuel, a delayed neutron instrument is of particular interest since, if properly designed, the delayed neutron signal from {sup 235}U is significantly stronger than the signature from {sup 239}Pu or {sup 241}Pu. A key factor in properly designing a delayed neutron instrument is to minimize the fission of {sup 238}U. This minimization is achieved by keeping the interrogating neutron spectrum below {approx} 1 MeV. In the context of spent fuel measurements it is desirable to use a 14 MeV (deuterium and tritium) neutron generator for economic reasons. Spectrum tailoring is the term used to describe the inclusion of material between the 14 MeV neutrons and the interrogated object that lower the neutron energy through nuclear reactions and moderation. This report quantifies the utility of different material combination for spectrum tailoring.

  4. Signal to noise ratio of energy selective x-ray photon counting systems with pileup

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, Robert E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To derive fundamental limits on the effect of pulse pileup and quantum noise in photon counting detectors on the signal to noise ratio (SNR) and noise variance of energy selective x-ray imaging systems. Methods: An idealized model of the response of counting detectors to pulse pileup is used. The model assumes a nonparalyzable response and delta function pulse shape. The model is used to derive analytical formulas for the noise and energy spectrum of the recorded photons with pulse pileup. These formulas are first verified with a Monte Carlo simulation. They are then used with a method introduced in a previous paper [R. E. Alvarez, “Near optimal energy selective x-ray imaging system performance with simple detectors,” Med. Phys. 37, 822–841 (2010)] to compare the signal to noise ratio with pileup to the ideal SNR with perfect energy resolution. Detectors studied include photon counting detectors with pulse height analysis (PHA), detectors that simultaneously measure the number of photons and the integrated energy (NQ detector), and conventional energy integrating and photon counting detectors. The increase in the A-vector variance with dead time is also computed and compared to the Monte Carlo results. A formula for the covariance of the NQ detector is developed. The validity of the constant covariance approximation to the Cramèr–Rao lower bound (CRLB) for larger counts is tested. Results: The SNR becomes smaller than the conventional energy integrating detector (Q) SNR for 0.52, 0.65, and 0.78 expected number photons per dead time for counting (N), two, and four bin PHA detectors, respectively. The NQ detector SNR is always larger than the N and Q SNR but only marginally so for larger dead times. Its noise variance increases by a factor of approximately 3 and 5 for the A1 and A2 components as the dead time parameter increases from 0 to 0.8 photons per dead time. With four bin PHA data, the increase in variance is approximately 2 and 4 times. The

  5. Variability in High-Energy Photon Bursts Produced by Lightning Discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celestin, Sebastien; Xu, Wei; Pasko, Victor

    2015-04-01

    Terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) are bursts of high-energy photons originating from the Earth's atmosphere in association with thunderstorm activity. They have been discovered by Fishman et al. [Science, 264, 1313, 1994] using BATSE detectors aboard the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory originally launched to perform observations of celestial gamma-ray sources. These events have also been detected by the RHESSI [Smith et al., Science, 307, 1085, 2005], AGILE [Marisaldi et al., JGR, 115, A00E13, 2010], and the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope [Briggs et al., JGR, 115, A07323, 2010]. Moreover, measurements have correlated TGFs with initial development stages of normal polarity intra-cloud lightning that transports negative charge upward (+IC) [e.g, Lu et al., JGR, 116, A03316, 2011]. Photon spectra corresponding to relativistic runaway electron avalanches (RREAs) in large-scale thunderstorm electric fields usually provide a very good agreement with satellite observations [Dwyer and Smith, GRL, 32, L22804, 2005]. However, it has been suggested that high-potential +IC lightning leaders could produce a sufficient number of energetic electrons to explain TGFs [Celestin and Pasko, JGR, 116, A03315, 2011], and Xu et al. [GRL, 39, L08801, 2012] have shown that this mechanism could explain the TGF spectrum for lightning potentials higher than 100 MV. In addition to TGFs, X-ray bursts are produced by negative cloud-to-ground (-CGs) lightning leaders in association with stepping processes and are observed from the ground [Dwyer et al., GRL, 32, L01803, 2005]. In this work, we will investigate the variation of photon spectra and photon fluences with respect to the electrical properties of the causative lightning discharge in a unified fashion for TGFs and CG-lightning-produced X-ray bursts. We will show how the lightning-produced X-ray spectrum converges toward the RREA spectrum for very high potential drops in the vicinity of the lightning leader tip, and demonstrate why only

  6. Molecular frame Auger electron energy spectrum from N2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cryan, J. P.; Glownia, J. M.; Andreasson, J.; Belkacem, A.; Berrah, N.; Blaga, C. I.; Bostedt, C.; Bozek, J.; Cherepkov, N. A.; DiMauro, L. F.; Fang, L.; Gessner, O.; Gühr, M.; Hajdu, J.; Hertlein, M. P.; Hoener, M.; Kornilov, O.; Marangos, J. P.; March, A. M.; McFarland, B. K.; Merdji, H.; Messerschmidt, M.; Petrović, V. S.; Raman, C.; Ray, D.; Reis, D. A.; Semenov, S. K.; Trigo, M.; White, J. L.; White, W.; Young, L.; Bucksbaum, P. H.; Coffee, R. N.

    2012-03-01

    Here we present the first angle-resolved, non-resonant (normal) Auger spectra for impulsively aligned nitrogen molecules. We have measured the angular pattern of Auger electron emission following K-shell photoionization by 1.1 keV photons from the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). Using strong-field-induced molecular alignment to make molecular frame measurements is equally effective for both repulsive and quasi-bound final states. The capability to resolve Auger emission angular distributions in the molecular frame of reference provides a new tool for spectral assignments in congested Auger electron spectra that takes advantage of the symmetries of the final diction states. Based on our experimental results and theoretical predictions, we propose the assignment of the spectral features in the Auger electron spectrum.

  7. Advanced Photonic Processes for Photovoltaic and Energy Storage Systems.

    PubMed

    Sygletou, Maria; Petridis, Constantinos; Kymakis, Emmanuel; Stratakis, Emmanuel

    2017-08-24

    Solar-energy harvesting through photovoltaic (PV) conversion is the most promising technology for long-term renewable energy production. At the same time, significant progress has been made in the development of energy-storage (ES) systems, which are essential components within the cycle of energy generation, transmission, and usage. Toward commercial applications, the enhancement of the performance and competitiveness of PV and ES systems requires the adoption of precise, but simple and low-cost manufacturing solutions, compatible with large-scale and high-throughput production lines. Photonic processes enable cost-efficient, noncontact, highly precise, and selective engineering of materials via photothermal, photochemical, or photophysical routes. Laser-based processes, in particular, provide access to a plethora of processing parameters that can be tuned with a remarkably high degree of precision to enable innovative processing routes that cannot be attained by conventional approaches. The focus here is on the application of advanced light-driven approaches for the fabrication, as well as the synthesis, of materials and components relevant to PV and ES systems. Besides presenting recent advances on recent achievements, the existing limitations are outlined and future possibilities and emerging prospects discussed. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Scattering of High Energy Photons in Condensed Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Jochen R.

    Modern synchrotron radiation facilities provide bright beams at photon energies higher than 80 keV which only weakly interact with matter; most diffraction experiments can be interpreted within 1. order Born approximation. The technique is considered a new probe in condensed matter research because it combines the high penetration power of thermal neutrons with the extreme momentum space resolution obtained in state of the art X-ray diffraction experiments. Identical samples can be studied with both probes and the information content is strongly enhanced by combining their results because of the difference in the intrinsic cross section, or in cases where high resolution inelastic neutron scattering experiments can be performed on the same crystal. After a short description of the experimental technique examples are presented including accurate structure factor measurements for charge density studies, defect induced diffuse scattering, structural phase transitions including critical scattering, and non-resonant bulk magnetic scattering.

  9. Color Fluctuations in High Energy Hadronand Photon-Nucleus Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frankfurt, Leonid; Strikman, Mark

    We explain that coherence of high energy QED and QCD processes implies existence of new kind of phenomena which are beyond a framework based on Regge poles (cuts). New phenomena emerge as the consequence of compositeness of the bound states and the Lorentz slowing down of interaction. We focus on the color fluctuations phenomena predicted earlier for pA collisions within QCD and recent evidence for this phenomenon from pA LHC run, significant modification of nuclear shadowing phenomenon in the diffractive photoproduction of vector mesons observed recently in the ultra peripheral collisions at LHC. We outlined briefly general properties of color fluctuations phenomena and perspectives of future studies of this phenomenon in electron (photon) collisions with nuclei.

  10. The Spatial Energy Spectrum of Magnetic Fields in Our Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, J. L.; Ferriere, K.; Manchester, R. N.

    2004-08-01

    Interstellar magnetic fields exist over a broad range of spatial scales, extending from large Galactic scales (~10 kpc) down to very small dissipative scales (<<1 pc). In this paper, we use a set of 490 pulsars distributed over roughly one-third of the Galactic disk out to a radius R~=10 kpc (assuming Rsolar=8.5 kpc) and combine their observed rotation and dispersion measures with their estimated distances to derive the spatial energy spectrum of the Galactic interstellar magnetic field over the scale range 0.5-15 kpc. We obtain a nearly flat spectrum, with a one-dimensional power-law index α=-0.37+/-0.10 for EB(k)=Ckα and an rms field strength of approximately 6 μG over the relevant scales. Our study complements the derivation of the magnetic energy spectrum over the scale range 0.03-100 pc by Minter & Spangler, showing that the magnetic spectrum becomes flatter at larger scales. This observational result is discussed in the framework of current theoretical and numerical models.

  11. Quantitative material characterization from multi-energy photon counting CT.

    PubMed

    Alessio, Adam M; MacDonald, Lawrence R

    2013-03-01

    To quantify the concentration of soft-tissue components of water, fat, and calcium through the decomposition of the x-ray spectral signatures in multi-energy CT images. Decomposition of dual-energy and multi-energy x-ray data into basis materials can be performed in the projection domain, image domain, or during image reconstruction. In this work, the authors present methodology for the decomposition of multi-energy x-ray data in the image domain for the application of soft-tissue characterization. To demonstrate proof-of-principle, the authors apply several previously proposed methods and a novel content-aware method to multi-energy images acquired with a prototype photon counting CT system. Data from phantom and ex vivo specimens are evaluated. The number and type of materials in a region can be limited based on a priori knowledge or classification strategies. The proposed difference classifier successfully classified the image into air only, water+fat, water+fat+iodine, and water+calcium regions. Then, the content-aware material decomposition based on weighted least-square optimization generated quantitative maps of concentration. Bias in the estimation of the concentration of water and oil components in a phantom study was <0.10 ± 0.15 g/cc on average. Decomposition of ex vivo carotid endarterectomy specimens suggests the presence of water, lipid, and calcium deposits in the plaque walls. Initial application of the proposed methodology suggests that it can decompose multi-energy CT images into quantitative maps of water, adipose, iodine, and calcium concentrations.

  12. Field test analysis of concentrator photovoltaic system focusing on average photon energy and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husna, Husyira Al; Ota, Yasuyuki; Minemoto, Takashi; Nishioka, Kensuke

    2015-08-01

    The concentrator photovoltaic (CPV) system is unique and different from the common flat-plate PV system. It uses a multi-junction solar cell and a Fresnel lens to concentrate direct solar radiation onto the cell while tracking the sun throughout the day. The cell efficiency could reach over 40% under high concentration ratio. In this study, we analyzed a one year set of environmental condition data of the University of Miyazaki, Japan, where the CPV system was installed. Performance ratio (PR) was discussed to describe the system’s performance. Meanwhile, the average photon energy (APE) was used to describe the spectrum distribution at the site where the CPV system was installed. A circuit simulator network was used to simulate the CPV system electrical characteristics under various environmental conditions. As for the result, we found that the PR of the CPV systems depends on the APE level rather than the cell temperature.

  13. Development of a continuous broad-energy-spectrum electron source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamo, R. C.; Nanevicz, J. E.

    1985-01-01

    The development of a practical prototype, large-area, continuous-spectrum, multienergy electron source to simulate the lower energy (approx = 1 to 30 keV) portion of the geosynchronous orbit electron environment was investigated. The results of future materials-charging tests using this multienergy source should significantly improve the understanding of actual in-orbit charging processes and should help to resolve some of the descrepancies between predicted and observed spacecraft materials performance.

  14. SU-E-I-77: A Noise Reduction Technique for Energy-Resolved Photon-Counting Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Lam Ng, A; Ding, H; Cho, H; Molloi, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Finding the optimal energy threshold setting for an energy-resolved photon-counting detector has an important impact on the maximization of contrast-to-noise-ratio (CNR). We introduce a noise reduction method to enhance CNR by reducing the noise in each energy bin without altering the average gray levels in the projection and image domains. Methods: We simulated a four bin energy-resolved photon-counting detector based on Si with a 10 mm depth of interaction. TASMIP algorithm was used to simulate a spectrum of 65 kVp with 2.7 mm Al filter. A 13 mm PMMA phantom with hydroxyapatite and iodine at different concentrations (100, 200 and 300 mg/ml for HA, and 2, 4, and 8 mg/ml for Iodine) was used. Projection-based and Image-based energy weighting methods were used to generate weighted images. A reference low noise image was used for noise reduction purposes. A Gaussian-like weighting function which computes the similarity between pixels of interest was calculated from the reference image and implemented on a pixel by pixel basis for the noisy images. Results: CNR improvement compared to different methods (Charge-Integrated, Photon-Counting and Energy-Weighting) and after noise reduction was highly task-dependent. The CNR improvement with respect to the Charge-Integrated CNR for hydroxyapatite and iodine were 1.8 and 1.5, respectively. In each of the energy bins, the noise was reduced by approximately factor of two without altering their respective average gray levels. Conclusion: The proposed noise reduction technique for energy-resolved photon-counting detectors can significantly reduce image noise. This technique can be used as a compliment to the current energy-weighting methods in CNR optimization.

  15. Photon Energy Deposition in Strong-Field Single Ionization of Multielectron Molecules.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenbin; Li, Zhichao; Lu, Peifen; Gong, Xiaochun; Song, Qiying; Ji, Qinying; Lin, Kang; Ma, Junyang; He, Feng; Zeng, Heping; Wu, Jian

    2016-09-02

    Molecules exposed to strong laser fields may coherently absorb multiple photons and deposit the energy into electrons and nuclei, triggering the succeeding dynamics as the primary stage of the light-molecule interaction. We experimentally explore the electron-nuclear sharing of the absorbed photon energy in above-threshold multiphoton single ionization of multielectron molecules. Using CO as a prototype, vibrational and orbital resolved electron-nuclear sharing of the photon energy is observed. Different from the simplest one- or two-electron systems, the participation of the multiple orbitals and the coupling of various electronic states in the strong-field ionization and dissociation processes alter the photon energy deposition dynamics of the multielectron molecule. The population of numerous vibrational states of the molecular cation as the energy reservoir in the ionization process plays an important role in photon energy sharing between the emitted electron and the nuclear fragments.

  16. Single Crystal as a High Energy Photons Detector for γ-Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galper, A. M.; Kalashnikov, N. P.; Mulyarchik, E. I.; Olchak, A. S.

    One of the important problems of modern astrophysics and gamma-astronomy is in designing detectors for high energy photons (more than 1 GeV) with high angular resolution. In this energy range the dominating phenomenon in interaction of photons with matter is the e-e+ pair production. High angular resolution can be achieved using single crystals as effective converters of photons into e-e+ pairs due to coherent production of pairs in the channeling regime.

  17. Exact ultra cold neutrons' energy spectrum in gravitational quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedram, Pouria

    2013-10-01

    We find exact energy eigenvalues and eigenfunctions of the quantum bouncer in the presence of the minimal length uncertainty and the maximal momentum. This form of Generalized (Gravitational) Uncertainty Principle (GUP) agrees with various theories of quantum gravity and predicts a minimal length uncertainty proportional to and a maximal momentum proportional to , where β is the deformation parameter. We also find the semiclassical energy spectrum and discuss the effects of this GUP on the transition rate of the ultra cold neutrons in gravitational spectrometers. Then, based on Nesvizhevsky's famous experiment, we obtain an upper bound on the dimensionless GUP parameter.

  18. XTE Proposal #20102--"SS 433's High Energy Spectrum"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Band, David L.; Blanco, P.; Rothschild, R.; Kawai, N.; Kotani, T.; Oka, T.; Wagner, R. M.; Hjellming, R.; Rupen, M.; Brinkmann, W.

    1999-01-01

    We observed the jet-producing compact binary system SS 433 with RXTE during three multiwavelength campaigns, the first in conjunction with ASCA observations, the second simultaneous with a VLA-VLBA-MERLIN campaign, and the third associated with a Nobeyama millimeter-band campaign. All these campaigns included optical observations. Occurring at different jet precession and binary phases, the observations also monitored the system during a radio flare. The data provide SS 433's X-ray spectrum over more than an energy decade, and track the spectral variations as the X-ray source was partially eclipsed. The continuum can be modeled as a power law with an exponential cutoff, which can be detected to approximately 50 keV. Strong line emission is evident in the 5-10 keV range which can be modeled as a broad line whose energy is precession independent and a narrow line whose energy does vary with jet precession phase; this line model is clearly an over simplification since the PCA does not have sufficient energy resolution to detect the lines ASCA observed. The eclipses are deeper at high energy and at jet precession phases when the jets are more inclined towards and away from us. A large radio flare occurred between two sets of X-ray monitoring observations; an X-ray observation at the peak of the flare found a softer spectrum with a flux approximately 1/3 that of the quiescent level.

  19. Measurement of inclusive radiative B-meson decays with a photon energy threshold of 1.7 GeV.

    PubMed

    Limosani, A; Aihara, H; Arinstein, K; Aushev, T; Bakich, A M; Balagura, V; Barberio, E; Bay, A; Belous, K; Bischofberger, M; Bondar, A; Bozek, A; Bracko, M; Browder, T E; Chang, P; Chao, Y; Chen, A; Cheon, B G; Choi, Y; Dalseno, J; Danilov, M; Drutskoy, A; Dungel, W; Eidelman, S; Goldenzweig, P; Golob, B; Ha, H; Hayashii, H; Hoshi, Y; Hou, W-S; Hyun, H J; Inami, K; Itoh, R; Iwasaki, Y; Julius, T; Kah, D H; Kim, H O; Kim, S K; Kim, Y I; Kim, Y J; Kinoshita, K; Ko, B R; Korpar, S; Kreps, M; Krizan, P; Krokovny, P; Kuhr, T; Kumar, R; Kwon, Y-J; Kyeong, S-H; Lesiak, T; Li, J; Liu, C; Liventsev, D; Louvot, R; Matyja, A; Miyabayashi, K; Miyata, H; Miyazaki, Y; Mizuk, R; Mori, T; Nakao, M; Nakazawa, H; Nishida, S; Nishimura, K; Nitoh, O; Nozaki, T; Ogawa, S; Ohshima, T; Okuno, S; Ozaki, H; Pakhlova, G; Park, C W; Park, H; Piilonen, L E; Rozanska, M; Sahoo, H; Sakai, Y; Schneider, O; Schümann, J; Schwanda, C; Schwartz, A J; Senyo, K; Sevior, M E; Shapkin, M; Shebalin, V; Shen, C P; Shiu, J-G; Singh, J B; Stanic, S; Staric, M; Sumisawa, K; Sumiyoshi, T; Suzuki, S; Taylor, G N; Teramoto, Y; Trabelsi, K; Tsuboyama, T; Uehara, S; Unno, Y; Uno, S; Urquijo, P; Ushiroda, Y; Varner, G; Varvell, K E; Vervink, K; Wang, C H; Wang, M-Z; Wang, P; Watanabe, Y; Wedd, R; Wicht, J; Won, E; Yabsley, B D; Yamamoto, H; Yamashita, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zivko, T; Zupanc, A

    2009-12-11

    Using 605 fb(-1) of data collected at the Upsilon(4S) resonance we present a measurement of the inclusive radiative B-meson decay channel, B-->X(s)gamma. For the lower photon energy thresholds of 1.7, 1.8, 1.9, and 2.0 GeV, as defined in the rest frame of the B meson, we measure the partial branching fraction and the mean and variance of the photon energy spectrum. At the 1.7 GeV threshold we obtain the partial branching fraction BF(B-->X(s)}gamma)=(3.45+/-0.15+/-0.40)x10(-4), where the errors are statistical and systematic.

  20. Measurement of Inclusive Radiative B-Meson Decays with a Photon Energy Threshold of 1.7 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limosani, A.; Aihara, H.; Arinstein, K.; Aushev, T.; Bakich, A. M.; Balagura, V.; Barberio, E.; Bay, A.; Belous, K.; Bischofberger, M.; Bondar, A.; Bozek, A.; Bračko, M.; Browder, T. E.; Chang, P.; Chao, Y.; Chen, A.; Cheon, B. G.; Choi, Y.; Dalseno, J.; Danilov, M.; Drutskoy, A.; Dungel, W.; Eidelman, S.; Goldenzweig, P.; Golob, B.; Ha, H.; Hayashii, H.; Hoshi, Y.; Hou, W.-S.; Hyun, H. J.; Inami, K.; Itoh, R.; Iwasaki, Y.; Julius, T.; Kah, D. H.; Kim, H. O.; Kim, S. K.; Kim, Y. I.; Kim, Y. J.; Kinoshita, K.; Ko, B. R.; Korpar, S.; Kreps, M.; Križan, P.; Krokovny, P.; Kuhr, T.; Kumar, R.; Kwon, Y.-J.; Kyeong, S.-H.; Lesiak, T.; Li, J.; Liu, C.; Liventsev, D.; Louvot, R.; Matyja, A.; Miyabayashi, K.; Miyata, H.; Miyazaki, Y.; Mizuk, R.; Mori, T.; Nakao, M.; Nakazawa, H.; Nishida, S.; Nishimura, K.; Nitoh, O.; Nozaki, T.; Ogawa, S.; Ohshima, T.; Okuno, S.; Ozaki, H.; Pakhlova, G.; Park, C. W.; Park, H.; Piilonen, L. E.; Rozanska, M.; Sahoo, H.; Sakai, Y.; Schneider, O.; Schümann, J.; Schwanda, C.; Schwartz, A. J.; Senyo, K.; Sevior, M. E.; Shapkin, M.; Shebalin, V.; Shen, C. P.; Shiu, J.-G.; Singh, J. B.; Stanič, S.; Starič, M.; Sumisawa, K.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Suzuki, S.; Taylor, G. N.; Teramoto, Y.; Trabelsi, K.; Tsuboyama, T.; Uehara, S.; Unno, Y.; Uno, S.; Urquijo, P.; Ushiroda, Y.; Varner, G.; Varvell, K. E.; Vervink, K.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, M.-Z.; Wang, P.; Watanabe, Y.; Wedd, R.; Wicht, J.; Won, E.; Yabsley, B. D.; Yamamoto, H.; Yamashita, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zivko, T.; Zupanc, A.

    2009-12-01

    Using 605fb-1 of data collected at the Υ(4S) resonance we present a measurement of the inclusive radiative B-meson decay channel, B→Xsγ. For the lower photon energy thresholds of 1.7, 1.8, 1.9, and 2.0 GeV, as defined in the rest frame of the B meson, we measure the partial branching fraction and the mean and variance of the photon energy spectrum. At the 1.7 GeV threshold we obtain the partial branching fraction BF(B→Xsγ)=(3.45±0.15±0.40)×10-4, where the errors are statistical and systematic.

  1. Model-based x-ray energy spectrum estimation algorithm from CT scanning data with spectrum filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lei; Wang, Lin-Yuan; Yan, Bin

    2016-10-01

    With the development of technology, the traditional X-ray CT can't meet the modern medical and industry needs for component distinguish and identification. This is due to the inconsistency of X-ray imaging system and reconstruction algorithm. In the current CT systems, X-ray spectrum produced by X-ray source is continuous in energy range determined by tube voltage and energy filter, and the attenuation coefficient of object is varied with the X-ray energy. So the distribution of X-ray energy spectrum plays an important role for beam-hardening correction, dual energy CT image reconstruction or dose calculation. However, due to high ill-condition and ill-posed feature of system equations of transmission measurement data, statistical fluctuations of X ray quantum and noise pollution, it is very hard to get stable and accurate spectrum estimation using existing methods. In this paper, a model-based X-ray energy spectrum estimation method from CT scanning data with energy spectrum filter is proposed. First, transmission measurement data were accurately acquired by CT scan and measurement using phantoms with different energy spectrum filter. Second, a physical meaningful X-ray tube spectrum model was established with weighted gaussian functions and priori information such as continuity of bremsstrahlung and specificity of characteristic emission and estimation information of average attenuation coefficient. The parameter in model was optimized to get the best estimation result for filtered spectrum. Finally, the original energy spectrum was reconstructed from filtered spectrum estimation with filter priori information. Experimental results demonstrate that the stability and accuracy of X ray energy spectrum estimation using the proposed method are improved significantly.

  2. Photonic-chip-based radio-frequency spectrum analyser with terahertz bandwidth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelusi, Mark; Luan, Feng; Vo, Trung D.; Lamont, Michael R. E.; Madden, Steven J.; Bulla, Douglas A.; Choi, Duk-Yong; Luther-Davies, Barry; Eggleton, Benjamin J.

    2009-03-01

    Signal processing at terahertz speeds calls for an enormous leap in bandwidth beyond the current capabilities of electronics, for which practical operation is currently limited to tens of gigahertz. This can be achieved through all-optical schemes making use of the ultrafast response of χ(3) nonlinear waveguides. Towards this objective, we have developed compact planar rib waveguides based on As2S3 glass, providing a virtual `lumped' high nonlinearity in a monolithic platform capable of integrating multiple functions. Here, we apply it to demonstrate, for the first time, a photonic-chip-based, all-optical, radio-frequency spectrum analyser with the performance advantages of distortion-free, broad measurement bandwidth (>2.5 THz) and flexible wavelength operation (that is, colourless). The key to this is the waveguide's high optical nonlinearity and dispersion-shifted design. Using the device, we characterize high-bit-rate (320 Gb s-1) optical signals impaired by various distortions. The demonstrated ultrafast, broadband capability highlights the potential for integrated chip-based signal processing at bit rates approaching and beyond Tb s-1.

  3. THE {gamma}-RAY SPECTRUM OF GEMINGA AND THE INVERSE COMPTON MODEL OF PULSAR HIGH-ENERGY EMISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Lyutikov, Maxim

    2012-09-20

    We reanalyze the Fermi spectra of the Geminga and Vela pulsars. We find that the spectrum of Geminga above the break is well approximated by a simple power law without the exponential cutoff, making Geminga's spectrum similar to that of Crab. Vela's broadband {gamma}-ray spectrum is equally well fit with both the exponential cutoff and the double power-law shapes. In the broadband double power-law fits, for a typical Fermi spectrum of a bright {gamma}-ray pulsar, most of the errors accumulate due to the arbitrary parameterization of the spectral roll-off. In addition, a power law with an exponential cutoff gives an acceptable fit for the underlying double power-law spectrum for a very broad range of parameters, making such fitting procedures insensitive to the underlying Fermi photon spectrum. Our results have important implications for the mechanism of pulsar high-energy emission. A number of observed properties of {gamma}-ray pulsars-i.e., the broken power-law spectra without exponential cutoffs and stretching in the case of Crab beyond the maximal curvature limit, spectral breaks close to or exceeding the maximal breaks due to curvature emission, patterns of the relative intensities of the leading and trailing pulses in the Crab repeated in the X-ray and {gamma}-ray regions, presence of profile peaks at lower energies aligned with {gamma}-ray peaks-all point to the inverse Compton origin of the high-energy emission from majority of pulsars.

  4. High energy resolution bandpass photon detector for inverse photoemission spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Maniraj, M; D'Souza, S W; Nayak, J; Rai, Abhishek; Singh, Sanjay; Sekhar, B N Raja; Barman, S R

    2011-09-01

    We report a bandpass ultraviolet photon detector for inverse photoemission spectroscopy with energy resolution of 82 ± 2 meV. The detector (Sr(0.7)Ca(0.3)F(2)/acetone) consists of Sr(0.7)Ca(0.3)F(2) entrance window with energy transmission cutoff of 9.85 eV and acetone as detection gas with 9.7 eV photoionization threshold. The response function of the detector, measured using synchrotron radiation, has a nearly Gaussian shape. The n = 1 image potential state of Cu(100) and the Fermi edge of silver have been measured to demonstrate the improvement in resolution compared to the CaF(2)/acetone detector. To show the advantage of improved resolution of the Sr(0.7)Ca(0.3)F(2)/acetone detector, the metal to semiconductor transition in Sn has been studied. The pseudogap in the semiconducting phase of Sn could be identified, which is not possible with the CaF(2)/acetone detector because of its worse resolution. © 2011 American Institute of Physics

  5. Portable radiation detection system for pulsed high energy photon sources

    SciTech Connect

    Harker, Y.D.; Lawrence, R.S.; Yoon, W.Y.

    1994-12-31

    Portable, battery-operated, radiation detection systems for measuring the intensity and energy characteristics of intense, pulsed photon sources (either high energy X-ray or gamma) have been developed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. These field-deployable, suitcase-sized detection units are designed to measure and record the characteristics of a single radiation burst or multiple bursts from a pulsed ionizing radiation source. The recorded information can then be analyzed on a simple laptop computer at a location remote from the detection system and completely independent of the ongoing data acquisition process. Two detection unit designs are described. The first, called the MARK-1, has eight bismuth germanate (BGO) radiation detectors. Four of which are unshielded and have different thicknesses (diameters). The remaining four are the same size as the largest unshielded detector but have different thicknesses of lead shielding surrounding each detector. The second unit design, called the MARK-1 A, utilizes the same detection methodology as the MARK-1 but has ten BGO detectors instead of eight and utilizes a different method of amplifying detector signals enabling reduced overall size and weight of the detection unit. Both the detection system designs have sensitivity ranges from 3 x 10{sup {minus}9} cGy to 9 x 10{sup {minus}5} cGy per radiation burst. Experimental detection results will be presented and discussed along the systems` potential for commercial applications.

  6. Sharp knee phenomenon of primary cosmic ray energy spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ter-Antonyan, Samvel

    2014-06-01

    Primary energy spectral models are tested in the energy range of 1-200 PeV using standardized extensive air shower responses from BASJE-MAS, Tibet, GAMMA and KASCADE scintillation shower arrays. Results point toward the two-component origin of observed cosmic ray energy spectra in the knee region consisting of a pulsar component superimposed upon rigidity-dependent power law diffuse Galactic flux. The two-component energy spectral model accounts for both the sharp knee shower spectral phenomenon and observed irregularity of all-particle energy spectrum in the region of 50-100 PeV. Alternatively, tested multipopulation primary energy spectra predicted by nonlinear diffusive shock acceleration models describe observed shower spectra in the knee region provided that the cutoff magnetic rigidities of accelerating particles are 6±0.3 and 45±2 PV for the first two populations, respectively. Both tested spectral models confirm the predominant H-He primary nuclei origin of observed shower spectral knee. The parameters of tested energy spectra are evaluated using solutions of the inverse problem on the basis of the corresponding parameterizations of energy spectra for primary H, He, O-like and Fe-like nuclei, standardized shower size spectral responses in the 550-1085 g/cm2 atmospheric slant depth range and near vertical muon truncated size spectra detected by the GAMMA array.

  7. Photon spectrum behind biological shielding of the LVR-15 research reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Klupak, V.; Viererbl, L.; Lahodova, Z.; Marek, M.; Vins, M.

    2011-07-01

    The LVR-15 reactor is a light water research reactor situated at the Research Centre Rez, near Prague. It operates as a multipurpose facility with a maximum thermal power of 10 MW. The reactor core usually contains from 28 to 32 fuel assemblies with a total mass of {sup 235}U of about 5 kg. Emitted radiation from the fuel caused by fission is shielded by moderating water, a steel reactor vessel, and heavy concrete. This paper deals with measurement and analysis of the gamma spectrum near the outer surface of the concrete wall, behind biological shielding, mainly in the 3- to 10-MeV energy range. A portable HPGe detector with a portable multichannel analyzer was used to measure gamma spectra. The origin of energy lines in gamma detector spectra was identified. (authors)

  8. One-photon mass-analyzed threshold ionization (MATI) spectroscopy of pyridine: Determination of accurate ionization energy and cationic structure

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Yu Ran; Kang, Do Won; Kim, Hong Lae E-mail: hlkim@kangwon.ac.kr; Kwon, Chan Ho E-mail: hlkim@kangwon.ac.kr

    2014-11-07

    Ionization energies and cationic structures of pyridine were intensively investigated utilizing one-photon mass-analyzed threshold ionization (MATI) spectroscopy with vacuum ultraviolet radiation generated by four-wave difference frequency mixing in Kr. The present one-photon high-resolution MATI spectrum of pyridine demonstrated a much finer and richer vibrational structure than that of the previously reported two-photon MATI spectrum. From the MATI spectrum and photoionization efficiency curve, the accurate ionization energy of the ionic ground state of pyridine was confidently determined to be 73 570 ± 6 cm{sup −1} (9.1215 ± 0.0007 eV). The observed spectrum was almost completely assigned by utilizing Franck-Condon factors and vibrational frequencies calculated through adjustments of the geometrical parameters of cationic pyridine at the B3LYP/cc-pVTZ level. A unique feature unveiled through rigorous analysis was the prominent progression of the 10 vibrational mode, which corresponds to in-plane ring bending, and the combination of other totally symmetric fundamentals with the ring bending overtones, which contribute to the geometrical change upon ionization. Notably, the remaining peaks originate from the upper electronic state ({sup 2}A{sub 2}), as predicted by high-resolution photoelectron spectroscopy studies and symmetry-adapted cluster configuration interaction calculations. Based on the quantitatively good agreement between the experimental and calculated results, it was concluded that upon ionization the pyridine cation in the ground electronic state should have a planar structure of C{sub 2v} symmetry through the C-N axis.

  9. One-photon mass-analyzed threshold ionization (MATI) spectroscopy of pyridine: Determination of accurate ionization energy and cationic structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yu Ran; Kang, Do Won; Kim, Hong Lae; Kwon, Chan Ho

    2014-11-01

    Ionization energies and cationic structures of pyridine were intensively investigated utilizing one-photon mass-analyzed threshold ionization (MATI) spectroscopy with vacuum ultraviolet radiation generated by four-wave difference frequency mixing in Kr. The present one-photon high-resolution MATI spectrum of pyridine demonstrated a much finer and richer vibrational structure than that of the previously reported two-photon MATI spectrum. From the MATI spectrum and photoionization efficiency curve, the accurate ionization energy of the ionic ground state of pyridine was confidently determined to be 73 570 ± 6 cm-1 (9.1215 ± 0.0007 eV). The observed spectrum was almost completely assigned by utilizing Franck-Condon factors and vibrational frequencies calculated through adjustments of the geometrical parameters of cationic pyridine at the B3LYP/cc-pVTZ level. A unique feature unveiled through rigorous analysis was the prominent progression of the 10 vibrational mode, which corresponds to in-plane ring bending, and the combination of other totally symmetric fundamentals with the ring bending overtones, which contribute to the geometrical change upon ionization. Notably, the remaining peaks originate from the upper electronic state (2A2), as predicted by high-resolution photoelectron spectroscopy studies and symmetry-adapted cluster configuration interaction calculations. Based on the quantitatively good agreement between the experimental and calculated results, it was concluded that upon ionization the pyridine cation in the ground electronic state should have a planar structure of C2v symmetry through the C-N axis.

  10. Energy spectrum of sputtered uranium - A new technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weller, R. A.; Tombrello, T. A.

    1978-01-01

    The fission track technique for detecting U-235 has been used in conjunction with a mechanical time-of-flight spectrometer in order to measure the energy spectrum in the region 1 eV to 1 keV of material sputtered from a 93% enriched U-235 foil by 80 keV Ar-40(+) ions. The spectrum was found to exhibit a peak in the region 2-4 eV and to decrease approximately as E exp -1.77 for E not less than 100 eV. The design, construction and resolution of the mechanical spectrometer are discussed and comparisons are made between the data and the predictions of the random collision cascade model of sputtering.

  11. Proton therapy monitoring by Compton imaging: influence of the large energy spectrum of the prompt-γ radiation.

    PubMed

    Hilaire, Estelle; Sarrut, David; Peyrin, Françoise; Maxim, Voichiţa

    2016-04-21

    In proton therapy, the prompt-γ (PG) radiation produced by the interactions between protons and matter is related to the range of the beam in the patient. Tomographic Compton imaging is currently studied to establish a PG image and verify the treatment. However the quality of the reconstructed images depends on a number of factors such as the volume attenuation, the spatial and energy resolutions of the detectors, incomplete absorptions of high energy photons and noise from other particles reaching the camera. The impact of all these factors was not assessed in details. In this paper we investigate the influence of the PG energy spectrum on the reconstructed images. To this aim, we describe the process from the Monte Carlo simulation of the proton irradiation, through the Compton imaging of the PG distribution, up to the image reconstruction with a statistical MLEM method. We identify specific PG energy windows that are more relevant to detect discrepancies with the treatment plan. We find that for the simulated Compton device, the incomplete absorption of the photons with energy above about 2 MeV prevents the observation of the PG distributions at specific energies. It also leads to blurred images and smooths the distal slope of the 1D PG profiles obtained as projections on the central beam axis. We show that a selection of the events produced by γ photons having deposited almost all their energy in the camera allows to largely improve the images, a result that emphasizes the importance of the choice of the detector. However, this initial-energy-based selection is not accessible in practice. We then propose a method to estimate the range of the PG profile both for specific deposited-energy windows and for the full spectrum emission. The method relies on two parameters. We use a learning approach for their estimation and we show that it allows to detect few millimeter shifts of the PG profiles.

  12. Proton therapy monitoring by Compton imaging: influence of the large energy spectrum of the prompt-γ radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilaire, Estelle; Sarrut, David; Peyrin, Françoise; Maxim, Voichiţa

    2016-04-01

    In proton therapy, the prompt-γ (PG) radiation produced by the interactions between protons and matter is related to the range of the beam in the patient. Tomographic Compton imaging is currently studied to establish a PG image and verify the treatment. However the quality of the reconstructed images depends on a number of factors such as the volume attenuation, the spatial and energy resolutions of the detectors, incomplete absorptions of high energy photons and noise from other particles reaching the camera. The impact of all these factors was not assessed in details. In this paper we investigate the influence of the PG energy spectrum on the reconstructed images. To this aim, we describe the process from the Monte Carlo simulation of the proton irradiation, through the Compton imaging of the PG distribution, up to the image reconstruction with a statistical MLEM method. We identify specific PG energy windows that are more relevant to detect discrepancies with the treatment plan. We find that for the simulated Compton device, the incomplete absorption of the photons with energy above about 2 MeV prevents the observation of the PG distributions at specific energies. It also leads to blurred images and smooths the distal slope of the 1D PG profiles obtained as projections on the central beam axis. We show that a selection of the events produced by γ photons having deposited almost all their energy in the camera allows to largely improve the images, a result that emphasizes the importance of the choice of the detector. However, this initial-energy-based selection is not accessible in practice. We then propose a method to estimate the range of the PG profile both for specific deposited-energy windows and for the full spectrum emission. The method relies on two parameters. We use a learning approach for their estimation and we show that it allows to detect few millimeter shifts of the PG profiles.

  13. Nonlinear optical conductivity resulting from the local energy spectrum at the M point in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zheng; Zhang, Chao; Cao, J. C.

    2017-07-01

    Based on the tight-binding model we construct a nonlinear Hamiltonian to describe the effective electric system around the M point for the single layer graphene. The local energy spectrum at the M point is approximated by the perfect hyperbolic geometry, and the modification by the screening effect from the substrate is taken into account. With the method based on the concept of the Floquet states and quasienergies (FSQ) we investigate the third order nonlinear conductivity σ3(ω ) ,σ3(3 ω ) for the different frequency ranges, respectively, in which only the π -π* bands are involved. A positive cusplike peak arises at ℏ ω =ɛgap(M) /3 for σ3(3 ω ) which originates from the three-photon processes. Also, there is a peak at ɛgap(M) /2 for σ3(ω ) resulting from two-photon-resonant processes. The analysis of the pole processes indicates that a self-energy-like term transition process plays a role in the nonlinear optical response, and the different transition processes interact with each other during the response to the external field. These interactions can be influenced by the polarization of the external field.

  14. Photon spectrometry for the determination of the dose-rate constant of low-energy photon-emitting brachytherapy sources.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhe Jay; Nath, Ravinder

    2007-04-01

    Accurate determination of dose-rate constant (lambda) for interstitial brachytherapy sources emitting low-energy photons (< 50 keV) has remained a challenge in radiation dosimetry because of the lack of a suitable absolute dosimeter for accurate measurement of the dose rates near these sources. Indeed, a consensus value of lambda taken as the arithmetic mean of the dose-rate constants determined by different research groups and dosimetry techniques has to be used at present for each source model in order to minimize the uncertainties associated with individual determinations of lambda. Because the dosimetric properties of a source are fundamentally determined by the characteristics of the photons emitted by the source, a new technique based on photon spectrometry was developed in this work for the determination of dose-rate constant. The photon spectrometry technique utilized a high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometer to measure source-specific photon characteristics emitted by the low-energy sources and determine their dose-rate constants based on the measured photon-energy spectra and known dose-deposition properties of mono-energetic photons in water. This technique eliminates many of the difficulties arising from detector size, the energy dependence of detector sensitivity, and the use of non-water-equivalent solid phantoms in absolute dose rate measurements. It also circumvents the uncertainties that might be associated with the source modeling in Monte Carlo simulation techniques. It was shown that the estimated overall uncertainty of the photon spectrometry technique was less than 4%, which is significantly smaller than the reported 8-10% uncertainty associated with the current thermo-luminescent dosimetry technique. In addition, the photon spectrometry technique was found to be stable and quick in lambda determination after initial setup and calibration. A dose-rate constant can be determined in less than two hours for each source. These features make it

  15. Ultra-compact and wide-spectrum-range thermo-optic switch based on silicon coupled photonic crystal microcavities

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xingyu E-mail: swapnajit.chakravarty@omegaoptics.com Chung, Chi-Jui; Pan, Zeyu; Yan, Hai; Chakravarty, Swapnajit E-mail: swapnajit.chakravarty@omegaoptics.com; Chen, Ray T. E-mail: swapnajit.chakravarty@omegaoptics.com

    2015-11-30

    We design, fabricate, and experimentally demonstrate a compact thermo-optic gate switch comprising a 3.78 μm-long coupled L0-type photonic crystal microcavities on a silicon-on-insulator substrate. A nanohole is inserted in the center of each individual L0 photonic crystal microcavity. Coupling between identical microcavities gives rise to bonding and anti-bonding states of the coupled photonic molecules. The coupled photonic crystal microcavities are numerically simulated and experimentally verified with a 6 nm-wide flat-bottom resonance in its transmission spectrum, which enables wider operational spectrum range than microring resonators. An integrated micro-heater is in direct contact with the silicon core to efficiently drive the device. The thermo-optic switch is measured with an optical extinction ratio of 20 dB, an on-off switching power of 18.2 mW, a thermo-optic tuning efficiency of 0.63 nm/mW, a rise time of 14.8 μs, and a fall time of 18.5 μs. The measured on-chip loss on the transmission band is as low as 1 dB.

  16. A new cross-detection method for improved energy-resolving photon counting under pulse pile-up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Daehee; Lim, Kyung Taek; Park, Kyungjin; Lee, Changyeop; Cho, Gyuseong

    2017-09-01

    In recent, photon counting detectors (PCDs) have been replacing the energy-integrating detectors in many medical imaging applications due to the formers' high resolution, low noise, and high efficiency. Under a high flux X-ray exposure, however, a superimposition of pulses, i.e., pulse pile-up, frequently occurs due to the finite output pulse width, causing distortions in the energy spectrum as a consequence. Therefore, pulse pile-up is considered as a major constraint in using PCDs for high flux X-ray applications. In this study, a new photon counting method is proposed to minimize degradations in PCD performance due to pulse pile-up. The proposed circuit was incorporated into a pixel with a size of 200 × 200 μm2. It was fabricated by using a 1-poly 6-metal 0 . 18 μm complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) process and had a power consumption of 7 . 8 μW / pixel. From the result, it was shown that the maximum count rate of the proposed circuit was increased by a factor of 4.7 when compared to that of the conventional circuit at the same pulse width of 700 ns. This implies that the energy spectrum obtained by the proposed circuit is 4.7 times more resistant to distortions than the conventional energy-resolving circuit does under higher X-ray fluxes.

  17. Optimization of photon beam energies in gold nanoparticle enhanced arc radiation therapy using Monte Carlo methods.

    PubMed

    Koger, B; Kirkby, C

    2016-12-02

    As a recent area of development in radiation therapy, gold nanoparticle (GNP) enhanced radiation therapy has shown potential to increase tumour dose while maintaining acceptable levels of healthy tissue toxicity. In this study, the effect of varying photon beam energy in GNP enhanced arc radiation therapy (GEART) is quantified through the introduction of a dose scoring metric, and GEART is compared to a conventional radiotherapy treatment. The PENELOPE Monte Carlo code was used to model several simple phantoms consisting of a spherical tumour containing GNPs (concentration: 15 mg Au g(-1) tumour, 0.8 mg Au g(-1) normal tissue) in a cylinder of tissue. Several monoenergetic photon beams, with energies ranging from 20 keV to 6 MeV, as well as 100, 200, and 300 kVp spectral beams, were used to irradiate the tumour in a 360° arc treatment. A dose metric was then used to compare tumour and tissue doses from GEART treatments to a similar treatment from a 6 MV spectrum. This was also performed on a simulated brain tumour using patient computed tomography data. GEART treatments showed potential over the 6 MV treatment for many of the simulated geometries, delivering up to 88% higher mean dose to the tumour for a constant tissue dose, with the effect greatest near a source energy of 50 keV. This effect is also seen with the inclusion of bone in a brain treatment, with a 14% increase in mean tumour dose over 6 MV, while still maintaining acceptable levels of dose to the bone and brain.

  18. Optimization of photon beam energies in gold nanoparticle enhanced arc radiation therapy using Monte Carlo methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koger, B.; Kirkby, C.

    2016-12-01

    As a recent area of development in radiation therapy, gold nanoparticle (GNP) enhanced radiation therapy has shown potential to increase tumour dose while maintaining acceptable levels of healthy tissue toxicity. In this study, the effect of varying photon beam energy in GNP enhanced arc radiation therapy (GEART) is quantified through the introduction of a dose scoring metric, and GEART is compared to a conventional radiotherapy treatment. The PENELOPE Monte Carlo code was used to model several simple phantoms consisting of a spherical tumour containing GNPs (concentration: 15 mg Au g-1 tumour, 0.8 mg Au g-1 normal tissue) in a cylinder of tissue. Several monoenergetic photon beams, with energies ranging from 20 keV to 6 MeV, as well as 100, 200, and 300 kVp spectral beams, were used to irradiate the tumour in a 360° arc treatment. A dose metric was then used to compare tumour and tissue doses from GEART treatments to a similar treatment from a 6 MV spectrum. This was also performed on a simulated brain tumour using patient computed tomography data. GEART treatments showed potential over the 6 MV treatment for many of the simulated geometries, delivering up to 88% higher mean dose to the tumour for a constant tissue dose, with the effect greatest near a source energy of 50 keV. This effect is also seen with the inclusion of bone in a brain treatment, with a 14% increase in mean tumour dose over 6 MV, while still maintaining acceptable levels of dose to the bone and brain.

  19. A hybrid Monte Carlo model for the energy response functions of X-ray photon counting detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Dufan; Xu, Xiaofei; Zhang, Li; Wang, Sen

    2016-09-01

    In photon counting computed tomography (CT), it is vital to know the energy response functions of the detector for noise estimation and system optimization. Empirical methods lack flexibility and Monte Carlo simulations require too much knowledge of the detector. In this paper, we proposed a hybrid Monte Carlo model for the energy response functions of photon counting detectors in X-ray medical applications. GEANT4 was used to model the energy deposition of X-rays in the detector. Then numerical models were used to describe the process of charge sharing, anti-charge sharing and spectral broadening, which were too complicated to be included in the Monte Carlo model. Several free parameters were introduced in the numerical models, and they could be calibrated from experimental measurements such as X-ray fluorescence from metal elements. The method was used to model the energy response function of an XCounter Flite X1 photon counting detector. The parameters of the model were calibrated with fluorescence measurements. The model was further tested against measured spectrums of a VJ X-ray source to validate its feasibility and accuracy.

  20. High-energy x-ray backlighter spectrum measurements using calibrated image plates

    SciTech Connect

    Maddox, B.R.; Park, H.S.; Remington, B.A.; Izumi, N.; Chen, S.; Chen, C.; Kimminau, G.; Ali, Z.; Haugh, M.J.; Ma, Q.

    2012-10-10

    The x-ray spectrum between 18 and 88 keV generated by a petawatt laser driven x-ray backlighter target was measured using a 12-channel differential filter pair spectrometer. The spectrometer consists of a series of filter pairs on a Ta mask coupled with an x-ray sensitive image plate. A calibration of Fuji{trademark} MS and SR image plates was conducted using a tungsten anode x-ray source and the resulting calibration applied to the design of the Ross pair spectrometer. Additionally, the fade rate and resolution of the image plate system were measured for quantitative radiographic applications. The conversion efficiency of laser energy into silver K{alpha} x rays from a petawatt laser target was measured using the differential filter pair spectrometer and compared to measurements using a single photon counting charge coupled device.

  1. Search for the end of the cosmic ray energy spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Linsley, John

    1998-06-15

    The title I was asked to speak about expresses an idea that occurred rather recently in the history of cosmic ray studies. I argue that the idea of a possible end of the cosmic ray energy spectrum came into being after a sequence of three rapid advances in knowledge which I describe, calling them 'breakthroughs'. I suggest that the present workshop be regarded as a step toward a fourth breakthrough. I argue that this may occur through application of the Space Airwatch concept--the earth atmosphere as target and signal generator--as embodied in the NASA OWL project.

  2. Soft X-ray irradiation of methanol ice: Formation of products as a function of photon energy

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y.-J.; Juang, K.-J.; Yih, T.-S.; Ciaravella, A.; Cecchi-Pestellini, C.; Muñoz Caro, G. M.; Jiménez-Escobar, A.

    2013-12-01

    Pure methanol ices have been irradiated with monochromatic soft X-rays of 300 and 550 eV close to the 1s resonance edges of C and O, respectively, and with a broadband spectrum (250-1200 eV). The infrared (IR) spectra of the irradiated ices show several new products of astrophysical interest such as CH{sub 2}OH, H{sub 2}CO, CH{sub 4}, HCOOH, HCOCH{sub 2}OH, CH{sub 3}COOH, CH{sub 3}OCH{sub 3}, HCOOCH{sub 3}, and (CH{sub 2}OH){sub 2}, as well as HCO, CO, and CO{sub 2}. The effect of X-rays is the result of the combined interactions of photons and electrons with the ice. A significant contribution to the formation and growth of new species in the CH{sub 3}OH ice irradiated with X-rays is given by secondary electrons, whose energy distribution depends on the energy of X-ray photons. Within a single experiment, the abundances of the new products increase with the absorbed energy. Monochromatic experiments show that product abundances also increase with the photon energy. However, the abundances per unit energy of newly formed species show a marked decrease in the broadband experiment as compared to irradiations with monochromatic photons, suggesting a possible regulatory role of the energy deposition rate. The number of new molecules produced per absorbed eV in the X-ray experiments has been compared to those obtained with electron and ultraviolet (UV) irradiation experiments.

  3. Extragalactic photon-ALP conversion at CTA energies

    DOE PAGES

    Kartavtsev, A.; Raffelt, G.; Vogel, H.

    2017-01-12

    Magnetic fields in extragalactic space between galaxy clusters may induce conversions between photons and axion-like particles (ALPs), thereby shielding the photons from absorption on the extragalactic background light. For TeV gamma rays, the oscillation length (losc) of the photon-ALP system becomes inevitably of the same order as the coherence length of the magnetic field l and the length over which the field changes significantly (transition length lt) due to refraction on background photons. We derive exact statistical evolution equations for the mean and variance of the photon and ALP transfer functions in the non-adiabatic regime (losc ~ l >> lt).more » We also make analytical predictions for the transfer functions in the quasi-adiabatic regime (losc

  4. Extragalactic photon-ALP conversion at CTA energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kartavtsev, A.; Raffelt, G.; Vogel, H.

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic fields in extragalactic space between galaxy clusters may induce conversions between photons and axion-like particles (ALPs), thereby shielding the photons from absorption on the extragalactic background light. For TeV gamma rays, the oscillation length (losc) of the photon-ALP system becomes inevitably of the same order as the coherence length of the magnetic field l and the length over which the field changes significantly (transition length lt) due to refraction on background photons. We derive exact statistical evolution equations for the mean and variance of the photon and ALP transfer functions in the non-adiabatic regime (losc ~ l gg lt). We also make analytical predictions for the transfer functions in the quasi-adiabatic regime (losc ll l, lt). Our results are important in light of the upcoming Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA), and may also be applied to models with non-zero ALP masses.

  5. Directing solar photons to sustainably meet food, energy, and water needs

    DOE PAGES

    Gencer, Emre; Miskin, Caleb; Sun, Xingshu; ...

    2017-06-09

    As we approach a “Full Earth” of over ten billion people within the next century, unprecedented demands will be placed on food, energy and water (FEW) supplies. The grand challenge before us is to sustainably meet humanity’s FEW needs using scarcer resources. To overcome this challenge, we propose the utilization of the entire solar spectrum by redirecting solar photons to maximize FEW production from a given land area. We present novel solar spectrum unbundling FEW systems (SUFEWS), which can meet FEW needs locally while reducing the overall environmental impact of meeting these needs. The ability to meet FEW needs locallymore » is critical, as significant population growth is expected in less-developed areas of the world. As a result, the proposed system presents a solution to harness the same amount of solar products (crops, electricity, and purified water) that could otherwise require ~60% more land if SUFEWS were not used—a major step for Full Earth preparedness.« less

  6. Energy spectrum of oscillations in generalized Sagdeev potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbari-Moghanjoughi, M.

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, the full energy spectrum of nonlinear oscillations, known as the cnoidal waves, is studied in the framework of small-amplitude Korteweg de Vries and modified Korteweg de Vries (mKdV) theories based on the pseudoparticle motion in Helmholtz and Duffing potentials by employing the newly introduced pseudoenergy concept. The pseudoenergy dependence of various cnoidal oscillation parameters is then studied, and it is shown that superposition of cnoidal waves leads to familiar beating and Lissajous profiles. One of the most important aspects of the nonlinear oscillation is found to be the frequency dependence of the oscillation amplitude which mainly characterizes the nature of oscillations. It is shown that the developed method can be used to study the spectrum of oscillations and shock waves in the fully nonlinear Sagdeev pseudopotential and to directly calculate many dynamic parameters of the given nonlinear system. Current research may be helpful in understanding of basic excitations and interaction of nonlinear oscillation in various hydrodynamic systems including plasmas. It is also shown that nonlinear excitations in a hydrodynamic fluid can be effectively investigated by close inspection of shock waves which contain the full nonlinear spectrum of dynamical systems.

  7. Energy and electron transfer in enhanced two-photon-absorbing systems with triplet cores.

    PubMed

    Finikova, Olga S; Troxler, Thomas; Senes, Alessandro; DeGrado, William F; Hochstrasser, Robin M; Vinogradov, Sergei A

    2007-08-02

    Enhanced two-photon-absorbing (2PA) systems with triplet cores are currently under scrutiny for several biomedical applications, including photodynamic therapy (PDT) and two-photon microscopy of oxygen. The performance of so far developed molecules, however, is substantially below expected. In this study we take a detailed look at the processes occurring in these systems and propose ways to improve their performance. We focus on the interchromophore distance tuning as a means for optimization of two-photon sensors for oxygen. In these constructs, energy transfer from several 2PA chromophores is used to enhance the effective 2PA cross section of phosphorescent metalloporphyrins. Previous studies have indicated that intramolecular electron transfer (ET) can act as an effective quencher of phosphorescence, decreasing the overall sensor efficiency. We studied the interplay between 2PA, energy transfer, electron transfer, and phosphorescence emission using Rhodamine B-Pt tetrabenzoporphyrin (RhB-PtTBP) adducts as model compounds. 2PA cross sections (sigma2) of tetrabenzoporphyrins (TBPs) are in the range of several tens of GM units (near 800 nm), making TBPs superior 2PA chromophores compared to regular porphyrins (sigma2 values typically 1-2 GM). Relatively large 2PA cross sections of rhodamines (about 200 GM in 800-850 nm range) and their high photostabilities make them good candidates as 2PA antennae. Fluorescence of Rhodamine B (lambda(fl) = 590 nm, phi(fl) = 0.5 in EtOH) overlaps with the Q-band of phosphorescent PtTBP (lambda(abs) = 615 nm, epsilon = 98 000 M(-1) cm(-1), phi(p) approximately 0.1), suggesting that a significant amplification of the 2PA-induced phosphorescence via fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) might occur. However, most of the excitation energy in RhB-PtTBP assemblies is consumed in several intramolecular ET processes. By installing rigid nonconducting decaproline spacers (Pro10) between RhB and PtTBP, the intramolecular ETs were

  8. Aperiodic TiO2 Nanotube Photonic Crystal: Full-Visible-Spectrum Solar Light Harvesting in Photovoltaic Devices

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Min; Xie, Keyu; Wang, Yu; Zhou, Limin; Huang, Haitao

    2014-01-01

    Bandgap engineering of a photonic crystal is highly desirable for photon management in photonic sensors and devices. Aperiodic photonic crystals (APCs) can provide unprecedented opportunities for much more versatile photon management, due to increased degrees of freedom in the design and the unique properties brought about by the aperiodic structures as compared to their periodic counterparts. However, many efforts still remain on conceptual approaches, practical achievements in APCs are rarely reported due to the difficulties in fabrication. Here, we report a simple but highly controllable current-pulse anodization process to design and fabricate TiO2 nanotube APCs. By coupling an APC into the photoanode of a dye-sensitized solar cell, we demonstrate the concept of using APC to achieve nearly full-visible-spectrum light harvesting, as evidenced by both experimental and simulated results. It is anticipated that this work will lead to more fruitful practical applications of APCs in high-efficiency photovoltaics, sensors and optoelectronic devices. PMID:25245854

  9. Light propagation in two-dimensional photonic crystals based on uniaxial polar materials: results on polaritonic spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-Urrea, H. A.; Duque, C. A.; Pérez-Quintana, I. V.; Mora-Ramos, M. E.

    2017-03-01

    The dispersion relations of two-dimensional photonic crystals made of uniaxial polaritonic cylinders arranged in triangular lattice are calculated. The particular case of the transverse magnetic polarization is taken into account. Three different uniaxial materials showing transverse phonon-polariton excitations are considered: aluminum nitride, gallium nitride, and indium nitride. The study is carried out by means of the finite-difference time-domain technique for the solution of Maxwell equations, together with the method of the auxiliary differential equation. It is shown that changing the filling fraction can result in the modification of both the photonic and polaritonic bandgaps in the optical dispersion relations. Wider gaps appear for smaller filling fraction values, whereas a larger number of photonic bandgaps will occur within the frequency range considered when a larger filling fraction is used. The effect of including the distinct wurtzite III-V nitride semiconductors as core materials in the cylinders embedded in the air on the photonic properties is discussed as well, highlighting the effect of the dielectric anisotropy on the properties of the polaritonic part of the photonic spectrum.

  10. The energy spectrum of X-rays from rocket-triggered lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arabshahi, S.; Dwyer, J. R.; Cramer, E. S.; Grove, J. E.; Gwon, C.; Hill, J. D.; Jordan, D. M.; Lucia, R. J.; Vodopiyanov, I. B.; Uman, M. A.; Rassoul, H. K.

    2015-10-01

    Although the production of X-rays from natural and rocket-triggered lightning leaders have been studied in detail over the last 10 years, the energy spectrum of the X-rays has never been well measured because the X-rays are emitted in very short but intense bursts that result in pulse pileup in the detectors. The energy spectrum is important because it provides information about the source mechanism for producing the energetic runaway electrons and about the electric fields that they traverse. We have recently developed and operated the first spectrometer for the energetic radiation from lightning. The instrument is part of the Atmospheric Radiation Imagery and Spectroscopy (ARIS) project and will be referred to as ARIS-S (ARIS Spectrometer). It consists of seven 3'' NaI(Tl)/photomultiplier tube scintillation detectors with different thicknesses of attenuators, ranging from no attenuator to more than 1'' of lead placed over the detector (all the detectors are in a 1/8'' thick aluminum box). Using X-ray pulses preceding 48 return strokes in 8 rocket-triggered lightnings, we found that the spectrum of X-rays from leaders is too soft to be consistent with Relativistic Runaway Electron Avalanche. It has a power law dependence on the energies of the photons, and the power index, λ, is between 2.5 and 3.5. We present the details of the design of the instrument and the results of the analysis of the lightning data acquired during the summer of 2012.

  11. Two-photon-excited fluorescence resonance energy transfer in an aqueous system of CdTe quantum dots and Rhodamine B

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Muye; Lu, Peixiang; Li, Fang He, Zhicong; Zhang, Junpei; Han, Junbo

    2014-12-21

    Two-photon excited fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between CdTe quantum dots with different emission peaks and Rhodamine B in aqueous solution are investigated both experimentally and theoretically. The photoluminescence and lifetime are measured using a time-resolved fluorescence test system. The two-photon excited FRET efficiency is found to increase as the degree of spectral overlap of the emission spectrum of CdTe and the absorption spectrum of Rhodamine B increases, which is due to the increase of Forster radius of the sample. Moreover, FRET efficiency increases when the ratio of acceptor/donor concentration increases. The two-photon excited FRET efficiency was found to reach 40%.

  12. Cosmic-ray positron energy spectrum measured by PAMELA.

    PubMed

    Adriani, O; Barbarino, G C; Bazilevskaya, G A; Bellotti, R; Bianco, A; Boezio, M; Bogomolov, E A; Bongi, M; Bonvicini, V; Bottai, S; Bruno, A; Cafagna, F; Campana, D; Carbone, R; Carlson, P; Casolino, M; Castellini, G; De Donato, C; De Santis, C; De Simone, N; Di Felice, V; Formato, V; Galper, A M; Karelin, A V; Koldashov, S V; Koldobskiy, S A; Krutkov, S Y; Kvashnin, A N; Leonov, A; Malakhov, V; Marcelli, L; Martucci, M; Mayorov, A G; Menn, W; Mergé, M; Mikhailov, V V; Mocchiutti, E; Monaco, A; Mori, N; Munini, R; Osteria, G; Palma, F; Papini, P; Pearce, M; Picozza, P; Pizzolotto, C; Ricci, M; Ricciarini, S B; Rossetto, L; Sarkar, R; Scotti, V; Simon, M; Sparvoli, R; Spillantini, P; Stochaj, S J; Stockton, J C; Stozhkov, Y I; Vacchi, A; Vannuccini, E; Vasilyev, G I; Voronov, S A; Yurkin, Y T; Zampa, G; Zampa, N; Zverev, V G

    2013-08-23

    Precision measurements of the positron component in the cosmic radiation provide important information about the propagation of cosmic rays and the nature of particle sources in our Galaxy. The satellite-borne experiment PAMELA has been used to make a new measurement of the cosmic-ray positron flux and fraction that extends previously published measurements up to 300 GeV in kinetic energy. The combined measurements of the cosmic-ray positron energy spectrum and fraction provide a unique tool to constrain interpretation models. During the recent solar minimum activity period from July 2006 to December 2009, approximately 24,500 positrons were observed. The results cannot be easily reconciled with purely secondary production, and additional sources of either astrophysical or exotic origin may be required.

  13. The energy spectrum and the optical absorption spectrum of C{sub 60} fullerene within the Hubbard model

    SciTech Connect

    Silant’ev, A. V.

    2015-10-15

    Anticommutator Green’s functions and the energy spectrum of C{sub 60} fullerene are calculated in the approximation of static fluctuations within the Hubbard model. On the basis of this spectrum, an interpretation is proposed for the experimentally observed optical absorption bands of C{sub 60} fullerene. The parameters of C{sub 60} fullerene that characterize it within the Hubbard model are calculated by the optical absorption spectrum.

  14. Sensitivity of EAS measurements to the energy spectrum of muons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espadanal, J.; Cazon, L.; Conceição, R.

    2017-01-01

    We have studied how the energy spectrum of muons at production affects some of the most common measurements related to muons in extensive air shower studies, namely, the number of muons at the ground, the slope of the lateral distribution of muons, the apparent muon production depth, and the arrival time delay of muons at ground. We found that by changing the energy spectrum by an amount consistent with the difference between current models (namely EPOS-LHC and QGSJET-II.04), the muon surface density at ground increases 5% at 20° zenith angle and 17% at 60° zenith angle. This effect introduces a zenith angle dependence on the reconstructed number of muons which might be experimentally observed. The maximum of the muon production depth distribution at 40° increases ∼ 10 g/cm2 and ∼ 0 g/cm2 at 60°, which, from pure geometrical considerations, increases the arrival time delay of muons. There is an extra contribution to the delay due to the subluminal velocities of muons of the order of ∼ 3 ns at all zenith angles. Finally, changes introduced in the logarithmic slope of the lateral density function are less than 2%.

  15. Evolution of and High-Energy Emission from GHz-Peaked Spectrum Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stawarz, Ł.; Ostorero, L.; Begelman, M. C.; Moderski, R.; Kataoka, J.; Wagner, S.

    2008-06-01

    Here we discuss evolution and broadband emission of compact (energy losses, as well as radiative cooling. This allows us to discuss the broadband lobe emission of young radio sources. In particular, we argue that the observed spectral turnover in the radio synchrotron spectra of these objects cannot originate from the synchrotron self-absorption process but is most likely due to free-free absorption effects connected with neutral clouds of interstellar medium engulfed by the expanding lobes and photoionized by active centers. We also find a relatively strong and complex high-energy emission component produced by inverse Compton upscattering of various surrounding photon fields by the lobes' electrons. We argue that such high-energy radiation is strong enough to account for several observed properties of GHz-peaked spectrum (GPS) radio galaxies at UV and X-ray frequencies. In addition, this emission is expected to extend up to GeV (or possibly even TeV) photon energies and can thus be probed by several modern γ-ray instruments. In particular, we suggest that GPS radio galaxies should constitute a relatively numerous class of extragalactic sources detected by GLAST.

  16. On the Evolution of and High-Energy Emission from GHz-Peaked-Spectrum Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Stawarz, L.; Ostorero, L.; Begelman, M.C.; Moderski, R.; Kataoka, J.; Wagner, S.

    2007-12-18

    Here we discuss evolution and broad-band emission of compact (< kpc) lobes in young radio sources. We propose a simple dynamical description for these objects, consisting of a relativistic jet propagating into a uniform gaseous medium in the central parts of an elliptical host. In the framework of the proposed model, we follow the evolution of ultrarelativistic electrons injected from a terminal hotspot of a jet to expanding lobes, taking into account their adiabatic energy losses as well as radiative cooling. This allows us to discuss the broad-band lobe emission of young radio sources. In particular, we argue that the observed spectral turnover in the radio synchrotron spectra of these objects cannot originate from the synchrotron self-absorption process but is most likely due to free-free absorption effects connected with neutral clouds of interstellar medium engulfed by the expanding lobes and photoionized by active centers. We also find a relatively strong and complex high-energy emission component produced by inverse-Compton up-scattering of various surrounding photon fields by the lobes electrons. We argue that such high energy radiation is strong enough to account for several observed properties of GHz-peaked-spectrum (GPS) radio galaxies at UV and X-ray frequencies. In addition, this emission is expected to extend up to GeV (or possibly even TeV) photon energies and can thus be probed by several modern {gamma}-ray instruments. In particular, we suggest that GPS radio galaxies should constitute a relatively numerous class of extragalactic sources detected by GLAST.

  17. A rare gas optics-free absolute photon flux and energy analyzer for solar and planetary observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Judge, Darrell L.

    1994-01-01

    We have developed a prototype spectrometer for space applications requiring long term absolute EUV photon flux measurements. In this recently developed spectrometer, the energy spectrum of the incoming photons is transformed directly into an electron energy spectrum by taking advantage of the photoelectric effect in one of several rare gases at low pressures. Using an electron energy spectrometer, followed by an electron multiplier detector, pulses due to individual electrons are counted. The overall efficiency of this process can be made essentially independent of gain drifts in the signal path, and the secular degradation of optical components which is often a problem in other techniques is avoided. A very important feature of this approach is its freedom from the problem of overlapping spectral orders that plagues grating EUV spectrometers. An instrument with these features has not been flown before, but is essential to further advances in our understanding of solar EUV flux dynamics, and the coupled dynamics of terrestrial and planetary atmospheres. The detailed characteristics of this optics-free spectrometer are presented in the publications section.

  18. Determination of neutron spectrum outside the lateral shielding of Taiwan Photon Source using high-sensitivity Bonner cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yu-Chi; Chen, Ang-Yu; Liu, Joseph; Lee, Kuo-Wei; Sheu, Rong-Jiun

    2017-09-01

    A homemade Bonner cylinder spectrometer was used to determine the neutron spectrum from thermal energy up to several GeV at a heavily-shielded light source facility. The spectrometer, similar to the design of Bonner spheres, features high sensitivity of neutron detection because of using a long cylindrical 3He proportional counter. The spectrum measurement was performed during the facility commissioning by intentionally parking the injected electrons at the septum of the storage ring. Based on a high-fidelity FLUKA simulation, the predicted neutron spectrum at the location of measurement was adopted as the initial guess of spectrum unfolding. The unfolded result indicated an underestimation of the calculated neutron spectrum in the high-energy portion, leading to a substantial revision of the neutron dose rate at the location.

  19. A surface energy spectral study on the bone heterogeneity and beam obliquity using the flattened and unflattened photon beams.

    PubMed

    Chow, James C L; Owrangi, Amir M

    2016-01-01

    Using flattened and unflattened photon beams, this study investigated the spectral variations of surface photon energy and energy fluence in the bone heterogeneity and beam obliquity. Surface dose enhancement is a dosimetric concern when using unflattened photon beam in radiotherapy. It is because the unflattened photon beam contains more low-energy photons which are removed by the flattening filter of the flattened photon beam. We used a water and bone heterogeneity phantom to study the distributions of energy, energy fluence and mean energy of the 6 MV flattened and unflattened photon beams (field size = 10 cm × 10 cm) produced by a Varian TrueBEAM linear accelerator. These elements were calculated at the phantom surfaces using Monte Carlo simulations. The photon energy and energy fluence calculations were repeated with the beam angle turned from 0° to 15°, 30° and 45° in the water and bone phantom. Spectral results at the phantom surfaces showed that the unflattened photon beams contained more photons concentrated mainly in the low-energy range (0-2 MeV) than the flattened beams associated with a flattening filter. With a bone layer of 1 cm under the phantom surface and within the build-up region of the 6 MV photon beam, it is found that both the flattened and unflattened beams had slightly less photons in the energy range <0.4 MeV compared to the water phantom. This shows that the presence of the bone decreased the low-energy photon backscatters to the phantom surface. When both the flattened and unflattened photon beams were rotated from 0° to 45°, the number of photon and mean photon energy increased. This indicates that both photon beams became more hardened or penetrate when the beam angle increased. In the presence of bone, the mean energies of both photon beams increased. This is due to the absorption of low-energy photons by the bone, resulting in more beam hardening. This study explores the spectral relationships of surface photon

  20. A surface energy spectral study on the bone heterogeneity and beam obliquity using the flattened and unflattened photon beams

    PubMed Central

    Chow, James C.L.; Owrangi, Amir M.

    2016-01-01

    Aim Using flattened and unflattened photon beams, this study investigated the spectral variations of surface photon energy and energy fluence in the bone heterogeneity and beam obliquity. Background Surface dose enhancement is a dosimetric concern when using unflattened photon beam in radiotherapy. It is because the unflattened photon beam contains more low-energy photons which are removed by the flattening filter of the flattened photon beam. Materials and methods We used a water and bone heterogeneity phantom to study the distributions of energy, energy fluence and mean energy of the 6 MV flattened and unflattened photon beams (field size = 10 cm × 10 cm) produced by a Varian TrueBEAM linear accelerator. These elements were calculated at the phantom surfaces using Monte Carlo simulations. The photon energy and energy fluence calculations were repeated with the beam angle turned from 0° to 15°, 30° and 45° in the water and bone phantom. Results Spectral results at the phantom surfaces showed that the unflattened photon beams contained more photons concentrated mainly in the low-energy range (0–2 MeV) than the flattened beams associated with a flattening filter. With a bone layer of 1 cm under the phantom surface and within the build-up region of the 6 MV photon beam, it is found that both the flattened and unflattened beams had slightly less photons in the energy range <0.4 MeV compared to the water phantom. This shows that the presence of the bone decreased the low-energy photon backscatters to the phantom surface. When both the flattened and unflattened photon beams were rotated from 0° to 45°, the number of photon and mean photon energy increased. This indicates that both photon beams became more hardened or penetrate when the beam angle increased. In the presence of bone, the mean energies of both photon beams increased. This is due to the absorption of low-energy photons by the bone, resulting in more beam hardening. Conclusions This study

  1. Development of dose delivery verification by PET imaging of photonuclear reactions following high energy photon therapy.

    PubMed

    Janek, S; Svensson, R; Jonsson, C; Brahme, A

    2006-11-21

    A method for dose delivery monitoring after high energy photon therapy has been investigated based on positron emission tomography (PET). The technique is based on the activation of body tissues by high energy bremsstrahlung beams, preferably with energies well above 20 MeV, resulting primarily in 11C and 15O but also 13N, all positron-emitting radionuclides produced by photoneutron reactions in the nuclei of 12C, 16O and 14N. A PMMA phantom and animal tissue, a frozen hind leg of a pig, were irradiated to 10 Gy and the induced positron activity distributions were measured off-line in a PET camera a couple of minutes after irradiation. The accelerator used was a Racetrack Microtron at the Karolinska University Hospital using 50 MV scanned photon beams. From photonuclear cross-section data integrated over the 50 MV photon fluence spectrum the predicted PET signal was calculated and compared with experimental measurements. Since measured PET images change with time post irradiation, as a result of the different decay times of the radionuclides, the signals from activated 12C, 16O and 14N within the irradiated volume could be separated from each other. Most information is obtained from the carbon and oxygen radionuclides which are the most abundant elements in soft tissue. The predicted and measured overall positron activities are almost equal (-3%) while the predicted activity originating from nitrogen is overestimated by almost a factor of two, possibly due to experimental noise. Based on the results obtained in this first feasibility study the great value of a combined radiotherapy-PET-CT unit is indicated in order to fully exploit the high activity signal from oxygen immediately after treatment and to avoid patient repositioning. With an RT-PET-CT unit a high signal could be collected even at a dose level of 2 Gy and the acquisition time for the PET could be reduced considerably. Real patient dose delivery verification by means of PET imaging seems to be

  2. Measuring the low energy solar neutrino spectrum with the LENS experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tayloe, Rex

    2008-10-01

    The Low-Energy Neutrino Spectroscopy (LENS) experiment is designed for a precision measurement in real time of the fluxes of low energy solar neutrinos (pp, ^7Be, pep, and CNO, comprising > 99 % of the solar neutrino energy) via charged-current capture on Indium-115 (with threshold of 114 keV). LENS will allow a comparison of the neutrino and photon luminosities of the sun that will test the basic assumptions of solar astrophysics and the overall validity of the MSW-LMA neutrino model. The individual flux results will improve limits on θ12 and the pp spectrum can directly probe the temperature profile of fusion energy production. A detector technology, utilizing a novel optical segmentation method with indium-loaded liquid scintillator has been developed. A modest 1 m^3 prototype (miniLENS), in development for installation in the Kimballton Underground Research Facility (KURF), will demonstrate experimental feasibility and will allow for optimization for a 200 ton, full-scale LENS experiment.

  3. Dose to tissue medium or water cavities as surrogate for the dose to cell nuclei at brachytherapy photon energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enger, Shirin A.; Ahnesjö, Anders; Verhaegen, Frank; Beaulieu, Luc

    2012-07-01

    considered for source spectra well below 50 keV, since contributions to the absorbed dose inside the nucleus to a large degree stem from electrons released in the surrounding medium. MC-Dm,m is not an appropriate substitute for MC-Dn,m for the lowest photon energies for adipose and breast tissues. The ratio of MC-Dm,m to MC-Dn,m for adipose and breast tissue deviates from unity by 34% and 15% respectively for the lowest photon energy (20 keV), whereas the ratio is close to unity for higher energies. For prostate and muscle tissue MC-Dm,m is a good substitute for MC-Dn,m. However, for all photon energies and tissue types the nucleus composition with the highest hydrogen content behaves differently than other compositions. Elemental compositions of the tissue and nuclei affect considerably the absorbed dose to the cell nuclei for brachytherapy sources, in particular those at the low-energy end of the spectrum. Thus, there is a need for more accurate data for the elemental compositions of tumours and healthy cells. For the nucleus compositions and tissue types investigated, MC-Dw,m is a good substitute to MC-Dn,m for all simulated photon energies. Whether other studied surrogates are good approximations to MC-Dn,m depends on the target size, target composition, composition of the surrounding tissue and photon energy.

  4. Lorentz Violation Effects on Astrophysical Propagation of Very High Energy Photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Lijing; Ma, Bo-Qiang

    Lorentz violation (LV) is predicted by some quantum gravity (QG) candidates, wherein the canonical energy-momentum dispersion relation, E2 = p2+m2, is modified. Consequently, new phenomena beyond the standard model are predicted. In particular, the presence of LV highly affects the propagation of astrophysical photons with very high energies from distant galaxies. In this paper, we review the updating theoretical and experimental results on this topic. We classify the effects into three categories: (i) time lags between photons with different energies; (ii) a cutoff of photon flux above the threshold energy of photon decay, γ→e++e- (iii) new patterns in the spectra of multi-TeV photons and EeV photons, due to the absorption of background lights. As we can see, the details of LV effects on astrophysical photons depend heavily on the "phase space" of LV parameters. From observational aspects, available and upcoming instruments can study these phenomena hopefully, and shed light onto LV issues and QG theories. The most recent progresses and constraints on the ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) are also discussed.

  5. Two-photon excitation into low-energy singlet states of anthracene in mixed crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bree, A.; Leyderman, A.; Taliani, C.

    1985-08-01

    The two-photon excitation spectrum of the first excited state of anthracene in fluorene and biphenyl at 4.2 K has been measured. Intensity is induced into the origin by the static dipole moment of fluorene, and into b 1u vibrons through coupling to an A g state near 29400 cm -1; the nature of this A g state is discussed.

  6. Doubly excited states of water as studied by electron energy loss spectroscopy in coincidence with detecting Lyman-α photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuchida, Toshinori; Odagiri, Takeshi; Ishikawa, Lisa; Yachi, Kazufumi; Shigemura, Keisuke; Ohno, Naruhito; Hosaka, Kouichi; Kitajima, Masashi; Kouchi, Noriyuki

    2011-09-01

    The electron energy loss spectrum of H2O in coincidence with detecting Lyman-α photons (CoEELS) has been measured at the incident electron energy of 100 eV and electron scattering angle of 8° in the inner valence range in order to investigate the formation and decay of the doubly excited states. The present CoEELS has been compared with that at the infinite incident electron energy and 0° electron scattering angle, which was derived from the density of the dipole oscillator strength of H2O for the emission of the Lyman-α photons against the incident photon energy (Nakano et al 2010 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 43 215206). It is remarkable that there exists a large difference in shape between these CoEELSs. This difference has turned out to be attributed to the noticeable contribution of the forbidden doubly excited states at 100 eV incident electron energy and 8° scattering angle. They lie at 25.0 and 27.4 eV and have been found out in this study. The differential cross sections for the excitation to the superexcited states resulting in H(2p) formation have been obtained at 100 eV and 8° and compared with those at the infinite energy and 0°. The electron collisions at 100 eV and 8° enhance the dissociative double excitation against the dissociative single excitation as compared with the electron collision at the infinite energy and 0°.

  7. Secondary bremsstrahlung and the energy-conservation aspects of kerma in photon-irradiated media.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sudhir; Nahum, Alan E

    2016-02-07

    Kerma, collision kerma and absorbed dose in media irradiated by megavoltage photons are analysed with respect to energy conservation. The user-code DOSRZnrc was employed to compute absorbed dose D, kerma K and a special form of kerma, K ncpt, obtained by setting the charged-particle transport energy cut-off very high, thereby preventing the generation of 'secondary bremsstrahlung' along the charged-particle paths. The user-code FLURZnrc was employed to compute photon fluence, differential in energy, from which collision kerma, K col and K were derived. The ratios K/D, K ncpt/D and K col/D have thereby been determined over a very large volumes of water, aluminium and copper irradiated by broad, parallel beams of 0.1 to 25 MeV monoenergetic photons, and 6, 10 and 15 MV 'clinical' radiotherapy qualities. Concerning depth-dependence, the 'area under the kerma, K, curve' exceeded that under the dose curve, demonstrating that kerma does not conserve energy when computed over a large volume. This is due to the 'double counting' of the energy of the secondary bremsstrahlung photons, this energy being (implicitly) included in the kerma 'liberated' in the irradiated medium, at the same time as this secondary bremsstrahlung is included in the photon fluence which gives rise to kerma elsewhere in the medium. For 25 MeV photons this 'violation' amounts to 8.6%, 14.2% and 25.5% in large volumes of water, aluminium and copper respectively but only 0.6% for a 'clinical' 6 MV beam in water. By contrast, K col/D and K ncpt/D, also computed over very large phantoms of the same three media, for the same beam qualities, are equal to unity within (very low) statistical uncertainties, demonstrating that collision kerma and the special type of kerma, K ncpt, do conserve energy over a large volume. A comparison of photon fluence spectra for the 25 MeV beam at a depth of  ≈51 g cm−2 for both very high and very low charged-particle transport cut-offs reveals the considerable

  8. Secondary bremsstrahlung and the energy-conservation aspects of kerma in photon-irradiated media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sudhir; Nahum, Alan E.

    2016-02-01

    Kerma, collision kerma and absorbed dose in media irradiated by megavoltage photons are analysed with respect to energy conservation. The user-code DOSRZnrc was employed to compute absorbed dose D, kerma K and a special form of kerma, K ncpt, obtained by setting the charged-particle transport energy cut-off very high, thereby preventing the generation of ‘secondary bremsstrahlung’ along the charged-particle paths. The user-code FLURZnrc was employed to compute photon fluence, differential in energy, from which collision kerma, K col and K were derived. The ratios K/D, K ncpt/D and K col/D have thereby been determined over a very large volumes of water, aluminium and copper irradiated by broad, parallel beams of 0.1 to 25 MeV monoenergetic photons, and 6, 10 and 15 MV ‘clinical’ radiotherapy qualities. Concerning depth-dependence, the ‘area under the kerma, K, curve’ exceeded that under the dose curve, demonstrating that kerma does not conserve energy when computed over a large volume. This is due to the ‘double counting’ of the energy of the secondary bremsstrahlung photons, this energy being (implicitly) included in the kerma ‘liberated’ in the irradiated medium, at the same time as this secondary bremsstrahlung is included in the photon fluence which gives rise to kerma elsewhere in the medium. For 25 MeV photons this ‘violation’ amounts to 8.6%, 14.2% and 25.5% in large volumes of water, aluminium and copper respectively but only 0.6% for a ‘clinical’ 6 MV beam in water. By contrast, K col/D and K ncpt/D, also computed over very large phantoms of the same three media, for the same beam qualities, are equal to unity within (very low) statistical uncertainties, demonstrating that collision kerma and the special type of kerma, K ncpt, do conserve energy over a large volume. A comparison of photon fluence spectra for the 25 MeV beam at a depth of  ≈51 g cm-2 for both very high and very low charged-particle transport cut

  9. Energy spectrum of thermal counterflow turbulence in superfluid helium-4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, J.; Varga, E.; Guo, W.; Vinen, W. F.

    2017-09-01

    Recent preliminary experiments [A. Marakov et al., Phys. Rev. B 91, 094503 (2015)., 10.1103/PhysRevB.91.094503] using triplet-state He2 excimer molecules as tracers of the motion of the normal fluid have shown that, in thermal counterflow turbulence in superfluid 4He, small-scale turbulence in the superfluid component is accompanied, above a critical heat flux, by partially coupled large-scale turbulence in both fluids, with an energy spectrum proportional to k-m, where m is greater than the Kolmogorov value of 5/3. Here we report the results of a more detailed study of this spectrum over a range of temperatures and heat fluxes using the same experimental technique. We show that the exponent m varies systematically with heat flux but is always greater than 5/3. We interpret this as arising from the steady counterflow, which causes large-scale eddies in the two fluids to be pulled in opposite directions, giving rise to dissipation by mutual friction at all wave numbers, mutual friction tending also to oppose the effect of the counterflow. Comparison of the experimental results with a simple theory suggests that this process may be more complicated than we might have hoped, but experiments covering a wider range of heat fluxes, which are technically very difficult, will probably be required before we can arrive at a convincing theory.

  10. Spectrum of Quantized Energy for a Lengthening Pendulum

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Jeong Ryeol; Song, Ji Nny; Hong, Seong Ju

    2010-09-30

    We considered a quantum system of simple pendulum whose length of string is increasing at a steady rate. Since the string length is represented as a time function, this system is described by a time-dependent Hamiltonian. The invariant operator method is very useful in solving the quantum solutions of time-dependent Hamiltonian systems like this. The invariant operator of the system is represented in terms of the lowering operator a(t) and the raising operator a{sup {dagger}}(t). The Schroedinger solutions {psi}{sub n}({theta}, t) whose spectrum is discrete are obtained by means of the invariant operator. The expectation value of the Hamiltonian in the {psi}{sub n}({theta}, t) state is the same as the quantum energy. At first, we considered only {theta}{sup 2} term in the Hamiltonian in order to evaluate the quantized energy. The numerical study for quantum energy correction is also made by considering the angle variable not only up to {theta}{sup 4} term but also up to {theta}{sup 6} term in the Hamiltonian, using the perturbation theory.

  11. Possible dark energy imprints in the gravitational wave spectrum of mixed neutron-dark-energy stars

    SciTech Connect

    Yazadjiev, Stoytcho S.; Doneva, Daniela D. E-mail: daniela.doneva@uni-tuebingen.de

    2012-03-01

    In the present paper we study the oscillation spectrum of neutron stars containing both ordinary matter and dark energy in different proportions. Within the model we consider, the equilibrium configurations are numerically constructed and the results show that the properties of the mixed neuron-dark-energy star can differ significantly when the amount of dark energy in the stars is varied. The oscillations of the mixed neuron-dark-energy stars are studied in the Cowling approximation. As a result we find that the frequencies of the fundamental mode and the higher overtones are strongly affected by the dark energy content. This can be used in the future to detect the presence of dark energy in the neutron stars and to constrain the dark-energy models.

  12. High Energy Photon Beam Generation For QCD Explorer Based γP Colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciftci, A. K.; Aksakal, H.; Nergiz, Z.

    2007-04-01

    Combination of two linear accelerator projects, namely CLIC (Compact Linear Collider) and ILC (International Linear Collider) with LHC(Large Hadron Collider) offer an opportunity to build γp collider. High energy photons are produced by the Compton backscattering of the laser photons off high energy electrons at the conversion region. Then, Compton backscattered photons are collided with protons at the interaction region. In this study, conversion properties and optimum laser and electron beam parameters for CLIC and ILC are determined using CAIN simulation program.

  13. A review on photoneutrons characteristics in radiation therapy with high-energy photon beams.

    PubMed

    Naseri, Alireza; Mesbahi, Asghar

    2010-09-22

    In radiation therapy with high-energy photon beams (E > 10 MeV) neutrons are generated mainly in linacs head thorough (γ,n) interactions of photons with nuclei of high atomic number materials that constitute the linac head and the beam collimation system. These neutrons affect the shielding requirements in radiation therapy rooms and also increase the out-of-field radiation dose of patients undergoing radiation therapy with high-energy photon beams. In the current review, the authors describe the factors influencing the neutron production for different medical linacs based on the performed measurements and Monte Carlo studies in the literature.

  14. A review on photoneutrons characteristics in radiation therapy with high-energy photon beams

    PubMed Central

    Naseri, Alireza; Mesbahi, Asghar

    2010-01-01

    In radiation therapy with high-energy photon beams (E > 10 MeV) neutrons are generated mainly in linacs head thorough (γ,n) interactions of photons with nuclei of high atomic number materials that constitute the linac head and the beam collimation system. These neutrons affect the shielding requirements in radiation therapy rooms and also increase the out-of-field radiation dose of patients undergoing radiation therapy with high-energy photon beams. In the current review, the authors describe the factors influencing the neutron production for different medical linacs based on the performed measurements and Monte Carlo studies in the literature. PMID:24376940

  15. Low latency, area, and energy efficient Hybrid Photonic Plasmonic on-chip Interconnects (HyPPI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Shuai; Badaway, Abdel-Hameed A.; Narayana, Vikram; El-Ghazawi, Tarek; Sorger, Volker J.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper we benchmark various interconnect technologies including electrical, photonic, and plasmonic options. We contrast them with hybridizations where we consider plasmonics for active manipulation devices, and photonics for passive propagation integrated circuit elements, and further propose another novel hybrid link that utilizes an on chip laser for intrinsic modulation thus bypassing electro-optic modulation. Link benchmarking proves that hybridization can overcome the shortcomings of both pure photonic and plasmonic links. We show superiority in a variety of performance parameters such as point-to-point latency, energy efficiency, capacity, ability to support wavelength division multiplexing, crosstalk coupling length, bit flow density and Capability-to-Latency-Energy-Area Ratio.

  16. Single photon energy dispersive x-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higginbotham, Andrew; Patel, Shamim; Hawreliak, James A.; Ciricosta, Orlando; Collins, Gilbert W.; Coppari, Federica; Eggert, Jon H.; Suggit, Matthew J.; Tang, Henry; Wark, Justin S.

    2014-03-01

    With the pressure range accessible to laser driven compression experiments on solid material rising rapidly, new challenges in the diagnosis of samples in harsh laser environments are emerging. When driving to TPa pressures (conditions highly relevant to planetary interiors), traditional x-ray diffraction techniques are plagued by increased sources of background and noise, as well as a potential reduction in signal. In this paper we present a new diffraction diagnostic designed to record x-ray diffraction in low signal-to-noise environments. By utilising single photon counting techniques we demonstrate the ability to record diffraction patterns on nanosecond timescales, and subsequently separate, photon-by-photon, signal from background. In doing this, we mitigate many of the issues surrounding the use of high intensity lasers to drive samples to extremes of pressure, allowing for structural information to be obtained in a regime which is currently largely unexplored.

  17. Single photon energy dispersive x-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Higginbotham, Andrew; Patel, Shamim; Ciricosta, Orlando; Suggit, Matthew J.; Wark, Justin S.; Hawreliak, James A.; Collins, Gilbert W.; Coppari, Federica; Eggert, Jon H.; Tang, Henry

    2014-03-15

    With the pressure range accessible to laser driven compression experiments on solid material rising rapidly, new challenges in the diagnosis of samples in harsh laser environments are emerging. When driving to TPa pressures (conditions highly relevant to planetary interiors), traditional x-ray diffraction techniques are plagued by increased sources of background and noise, as well as a potential reduction in signal. In this paper we present a new diffraction diagnostic designed to record x-ray diffraction in low signal-to-noise environments. By utilising single photon counting techniques we demonstrate the ability to record diffraction patterns on nanosecond timescales, and subsequently separate, photon-by-photon, signal from background. In doing this, we mitigate many of the issues surrounding the use of high intensity lasers to drive samples to extremes of pressure, allowing for structural information to be obtained in a regime which is currently largely unexplored.

  18. Single photon energy dispersive x-ray diffraction.

    PubMed

    Higginbotham, Andrew; Patel, Shamim; Hawreliak, James A; Ciricosta, Orlando; Collins, Gilbert W; Coppari, Federica; Eggert, Jon H; Suggit, Matthew J; Tang, Henry; Wark, Justin S

    2014-03-01

    With the pressure range accessible to laser driven compression experiments on solid material rising rapidly, new challenges in the diagnosis of samples in harsh laser environments are emerging. When driving to TPa pressures (conditions highly relevant to planetary interiors), traditional x-ray diffraction techniques are plagued by increased sources of background and noise, as well as a potential reduction in signal. In this paper we present a new diffraction diagnostic designed to record x-ray diffraction in low signal-to-noise environments. By utilising single photon counting techniques we demonstrate the ability to record diffraction patterns on nanosecond timescales, and subsequently separate, photon-by-photon, signal from background. In doing this, we mitigate many of the issues surrounding the use of high intensity lasers to drive samples to extremes of pressure, allowing for structural information to be obtained in a regime which is currently largely unexplored.

  19. Electromagnetic cascade in high-energy electron, positron, and photon interactions with intense laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulanov, S. S.; Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2013-06-01

    The interaction of high-energy electrons, positrons, and photons with intense laser pulses is studied in head-on collision geometry. It is shown that electrons and/or positrons undergo a cascade-type process involving multiple emissions of photons. These photons can consequently convert into electron-positron pairs. As a result charged particles quickly lose their energy developing an exponentially decaying energy distribution, which suppresses the emission of high-energy photons, thus reducing the number of electron-positron pairs being generated. Therefore, this type of interaction suppresses the development of the electromagnetic avalanche-type discharge, i.e., the exponential growth of the number of electrons, positrons, and photons does not occur in the course of interaction. The suppression will occur when three-dimensional effects can be neglected in the transverse particle orbits, i.e., for sufficiently broad laser pulses with intensities that are not too extreme. The final distributions of electrons, positrons, and photons are calculated for the case of a high-energy e-beam interacting with a counterstreaming, short intense laser pulse. The energy loss of the e-beam, which requires a self-consistent quantum description, plays an important role in this process, as well as provides a clear experimental observable for the transition from the classical to quantum regime of interaction.

  20. Controlling the spectrum of photons generated on a silicon nanophotonic chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Ranjeet; Ong, Jun Rong; Savanier, Marc; Mookherjea, Shayan

    2014-11-01

    Directly modulated semiconductor lasers are widely used, compact light sources in optical communications. Semiconductors can also be used to generate nonclassical light; in fact, CMOS-compatible silicon chips can be used to generate pairs of single photons at room temperature. Unlike the classical laser, the photon-pair source requires control over a two-dimensional joint spectral intensity (JSI) and it is not possible to process the photons separately, as this could destroy the entanglement. Here we design a photon-pair source, consisting of planar lightwave components fabricated using CMOS-compatible lithography in silicon, which has the capability to vary the JSI. By controlling either the optical pump wavelength, or the temperature of the chip, we demonstrate the ability to select different JSIs, with a large variation in the Schmidt number. Such control can benefit high-dimensional communications where detector-timing constraints can be relaxed by realizing a large Schmidt number in a small frequency range.

  1. Controlling the spectrum of photons generated on a silicon nanophotonic chip.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ranjeet; Ong, Jun Rong; Savanier, Marc; Mookherjea, Shayan

    2014-11-20

    Directly modulated semiconductor lasers are widely used, compact light sources in optical communications. Semiconductors can also be used to generate nonclassical light; in fact, CMOS-compatible silicon chips can be used to generate pairs of single photons at room temperature. Unlike the classical laser, the photon-pair source requires control over a two-dimensional joint spectral intensity (JSI) and it is not possible to process the photons separately, as this could destroy the entanglement. Here we design a photon-pair source, consisting of planar lightwave components fabricated using CMOS-compatible lithography in silicon, which has the capability to vary the JSI. By controlling either the optical pump wavelength, or the temperature of the chip, we demonstrate the ability to select different JSIs, with a large variation in the Schmidt number. Such control can benefit high-dimensional communications where detector-timing constraints can be relaxed by realizing a large Schmidt number in a small frequency range.

  2. Primary cosmic ray energy spectrum in terms of the GAMMA muon data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garyaka, A. P.; Martirosov, R. M.; Ter-Antonyan, S. V.; Erlykin, A. D.; Nikolskaya, N. M.; Gallant, Y. A.; Jones, L. W.; Procureur, J.

    2009-12-01

    The energy spectrum of the primary cosmic rays is obtained by conversion from the truncated muon size spectrum of EAS studied with the GAMMA array. The previously observed dependence of E on Nμtr at various zenith angles is used. It is shown that the present spectrum has the same structure (“bump”) as the spectrum determined by another independent multi-parametric energy estimation method confirming that the “bump” structure is not produced by uncertainties in our methods.

  3. Improving measurement quality assurance for photon irradiations at Department of Energy facilities. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-05-01

    For radiation-instrument calibration to be generally acceptable throughout the US, direct or indirect traceability to a primary standard is required. In most instances, one of the primary standards established at NIST is employed for this purpose. The Department of Energy Laboratory Accreditation Program (DOELAP) is an example of a program employing dosimetry based on the NIST primary photon-, beta particle- and neutron-dosimetry standards. The NIST primary dosimetry standards for bremsstrahlung were first established in the 1950s. They have been updated since then on several occasions. In the 1970s, Technical Committee 85 of the International Standards Organization (ISO) started its work on establishing sets of internationally acceptable, well-characterized photon beams for the calibration of radiation-protection instruments. It is the intent of this paper to make a detailed comparison between the current NIST and the most up-to-date ISO techniques. At present, 41 bremsstrahlung techniques are specified in ISO 4037 while NIST supports a total of 32 techniques. Given the existing equivalences, it makes sense to try to extend the NIST techniques to cover more of the ISO Narrow Spectrum and High Air-Kerma Rate Series. These extensions will also allow the possibility for use of ISO beam techniques in future revisions of the DOELAP standard, which has been suggested by DOE. To this end, NIST was funded by DOE to procure material and make adaptations to the existing NIST x-ray calibration ranges to allow NIST to have the capability of producing all the ISO bremsstrahlung techniques. The following sections describe the steps that were taken to achieve this.

  4. Effects of energy spectrum on dose distribution calculations for high energy electron beams.

    PubMed

    Toutaoui, Abdelkader; Khelassi-Toutaoui, Nadia; Brahimi, Zakia; Chami, Ahmed Chafik

    2009-01-01

    In an early work we have demonstrated the possibility of using Monte Carlo generated pencil beams for 3D electron beam dose calculations. However, in this model the electron beam was considered as monoenergetic and the effects of the energy spectrum were taken into account by correction factors, derived from measuring central-axis depth dose curves. In the present model, the electron beam is considered as polyenergetic and the pencil beam distribution of a clinical electron beam, of a given nominal energy, is represented as a linear combination of Monte Carlo monoenergetic pencil beams. The coefficients of the linear combination describe the energy spectrum of the clinical electron beam, and are chosen to provide the best-fit between the calculated and measured central axis depth dose, in water. The energy spectrum is determined by the constrained least square method. The angular distribution of the clinical electron beam is determined by in-air penumbra measurements. The predictions of this algorithm agree very well with the measurements in the region near the surface, and the discrepancies between the measured and calculated dose distributions, behind 3D heterogeneities, are reduced to less than 10%. We have demonstrated a new algorithm for 3D electron beam dose calculations, which takes into account the energy spectra. Results indicate that the use of this algorithm leads to a better modeling of dose distributions downstream, from complex heterogeneities.

  5. Effects of energy spectrum on dose distribution calculations for high energy electron beams

    PubMed Central

    Toutaoui, Abdelkader; Khelassi-Toutaoui, Nadia; Brahimi, Zakia; Chami, Ahmed Chafik

    2009-01-01

    In an early work we have demonstrated the possibility of using Monte Carlo generated pencil beams for 3D electron beam dose calculations. However, in this model the electron beam was considered as monoenergetic and the effects of the energy spectrum were taken into account by correction factors, derived from measuring central-axis depth dose curves. In the present model, the electron beam is considered as polyenergetic and the pencil beam distribution of a clinical electron beam, of a given nominal energy, is represented as a linear combination of Monte Carlo monoenergetic pencil beams. The coefficients of the linear combination describe the energy spectrum of the clinical electron beam, and are chosen to provide the best-fit between the calculated and measured central axis depth dose, in water. The energy spectrum is determined by the constrained least square method. The angular distribution of the clinical electron beam is determined by in-air penumbra measurements. The predictions of this algorithm agree very well with the measurements in the region near the surface, and the discrepancies between the measured and calculated dose distributions, behind 3D heterogeneities, are reduced to less than 10%. We have demonstrated a new algorithm for 3D electron beam dose calculations, which takes into account the energy spectra. Results indicate that the use of this algorithm leads to a better modeling of dose distributions downstream, from complex heterogeneities. PMID:20126560

  6. Modeling the performance of a photon counting x-ray detector for CT: Energy response and pulse pileup effects

    PubMed Central

    Taguchi, Katsuyuki; Zhang, Mengxi; Frey, Eric C.; Wang, Xiaolan; Iwanczyk, Jan S.; Nygard, Einar; Hartsough, Neal E.; Tsui, Benjamin M. W.; Barber, William C.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Recently, photon counting x-ray detectors (PCXDs) with energy discrimination capabilities have been developed for potential use in clinical computed tomography (CT) scanners. These PCXDs have great potential to improve the quality of CT images due to the absence of electronic noise and weights applied to the counts and the additional spectral information. With high count rates encountered in clinical CT, however, coincident photons are recorded as one event with a higher or lower energy due to the finite speed of the PCXD. This phenomenon is called a “pulse pileup event” and results in both a loss of counts (called “deadtime losses”) and distortion of the recorded energy spectrum. Even though the performance of PCXDs is being improved, it is essential to develop algorithmic methods based on accurate models of the properties of detectors to compensate for these effects. To date, only one PCXD (model DXMCT-1, DxRay, Inc., Northridge, CA) has been used for clinical CT studies. The aim of that study was to evaluate the agreement between data measured by DXMCT-1 and those predicted by analytical models for the energy response, the deadtime losses, and the distorted recorded spectrum caused by pulse pileup effects. Methods: An energy calibration was performed using 99mTc (140 keV), 57Co (122 keV), and an x-ray beam obtained with four x-ray tube voltages (35, 50, 65, and 80 kVp). The DXMCT-1 was placed 150 mm from the x-ray focal spot; the count rates and the spectra were recorded at various tube current values from 10 to 500 μA for a tube voltage of 80 kVp. Using these measurements, for each pulse height comparator we estimated three parameters describing the photon energy-pulse height curve, the detector deadtime τ, a coefficient k that relates the x-ray tube current I to an incident count rate a by a=k×I, and the incident spectrum. The mean pulse shape of all comparators was acquired in a separate study and was used in the model to estimate the

  7. UV DRIVEN EVAPORATION OF CLOSE-IN PLANETS: ENERGY-LIMITED, RECOMBINATION-LIMITED, AND PHOTON-LIMITED FLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, James E.; Alvarez, Marcelo A.

    2016-01-01

    We have investigated the evaporation of close-in exoplanets irradiated by ionizing photons. We find that the properties of the flow are controlled by the ratio of the recombination time to the flow timescale. When the recombination timescale is short compared to the flow timescale, the flow is in approximate local ionization equilibrium with a thin ionization front where the photon mean free path is short compared to the flow scale. In this “recombination-limited” flow the mass-loss scales roughly with the square root of the incident flux. When the recombination time is long compared to the flow timescale the ionization front becomes thick and encompasses the entire flow with the mass-loss rate scaling linearly with flux. If the planet's potential is deep, then the flow is approximately “energy-limited”; however, if the planet's potential is shallow, then we identify a new limiting mass-loss regime, which we term “photon-limited.” In this scenario, the mass-loss rate is purely limited by the incoming flux of ionizing photons. We have developed a new numerical approach that takes into account the frequency dependence of the incoming ionizing spectrum and performed a large suite of 1D simulations to characterize UV driven mass-loss around low-mass planets. We find that the flow is “recombination-limited” at high fluxes but becomes “energy-limited” at low fluxes; however, the transition is broad occurring over several orders of magnitude in flux. Finally, we point out that the transitions between the different flow types do not occur at a single flux value but depend on the planet's properties, with higher-mass planets becoming “energy-limited” at lower fluxes.

  8. Energy transfer from Rhodamine-B to Oxazine-170 in the presence of photonic stop band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kedia, Sunita; Sinha, Sucharita

    2015-03-01

    Photonic crystals can effectively suppress spontaneous emission of embedded emitter in the direction were photonic stop band overlaps emission band of emitter. This property of PhC has been successfully exploited to enhance energy transfer from a donor Rhodamine-B dye to an acceptor Oxazine-170 dye by inhibiting the fluorescence emission of donor in a controlled manner. Self-assembled PhC were synthesized using RhB dye doped polystyrene microspheres subsequently infiltrated with O-170 dye molecules dissolved in ethanol. An angle dependent enhancement of emission intensity of acceptor via energy transfer in photonic crystal environment was observed. These results were compared with observations made on a dye mixture solution of the same two dyes. Restricted number of available modes in photonic crystal inhibited de-excitation of donor thereby enabling efficient transfer of energy from excited donor to acceptor dye molecules.

  9. Upgrades of DARWIN, a dose and spectrum monitoring system applicable to various types of radiation over wide energy ranges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Tatsuhiko; Satoh, Daiki; Endo, Akira; Shigyo, Nobuhiro; Watanabe, Fusao; Sakurai, Hiroki; Arai, Yoichi

    2011-05-01

    A dose and spectrum monitoring system applicable to neutrons, photons and muons over wide ranges of energy, designated as DARWIN, has been developed for radiological protection in high-energy accelerator facilities. DARWIN consists of a phoswitch-type scintillation detector, a data-acquisition (DAQ) module for digital waveform analysis, and a personal computer equipped with a graphical-user-interface (GUI) program for controlling the system. The system was recently upgraded by introducing an original DAQ module based on a field programmable gate array, FPGA, and also by adding a function for estimating neutron and photon spectra based on an unfolding technique without requiring any specific scientific background of the user. The performance of the upgraded DARWIN was examined in various radiation fields, including an operational field in J-PARC. The experiments revealed that the dose rates and spectra measured by the upgraded DARWIN are quite reasonable, even in radiation fields with peak structures in terms of both spectrum and time variation. These results clearly demonstrate the usefulness of DARWIN for improving radiation safety in high-energy accelerator facilities.

  10. Ultra high energy events in ECHOS series and primary energy spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Capdevielle, J. N.; Iwai, J.; Ogata, T.

    1985-01-01

    The compilation of ultra high energy jets suggests at present the existence of a bump in primary energy spectrum (with the standard concept of high energy collisions). The pseudo-rapidity distribution exhibits some typical anomalies, more than the (P sub t) behavior, which are (may be) the fingerprints of quark gluon plasma transition. The next results of Emulsion Chamber on Supersonic (ECHOS) will be in both cases determinant to confirm those tendancies, as well as an important effort of the cosmic ray community to develop in that sense a flying emulsion chamber experiment.

  11. Simultaneous multi-impairment monitoring of 640 Gb/s signals using photonic chip based RF spectrum analyzer.

    PubMed

    Vo, T D; Pelusi, M D; Schröder, J; Luan, F; Madden, S J; Choi, D-Y; Bulla, D A P; Luther-Davies, B; Eggleton, B J

    2010-02-15

    We report the first demonstration of simultaneous multi-impairment monitoring at ultrahigh bitrates using a THz bandwidth photonic-chip-based radio-frequency (RF) spectrum analyzer. Our approach employs a 7 cm long, highly nonlinear (gamma approximately 9900 /W/km), dispersion engineered chalcogenide planar waveguide to capture the RF spectrum of an ultrafast 640 Gb/s signal, based on cross-phase modulation, from which we numerically retrieve the autocorrelation waveform. The relationship between the retrieved autocorrelation trace and signal impairments is exploited to simultaneously monitor dispersion, in-band optical signal to noise ratio (OSNR) and timing jitter from a single measurement. This novel approach also offers very high OSNR measurement dynamic range (> 30 dB) and is scalable to terabit data rates.

  12. 77 FR 24192 - Energy Spectrum, Inc. and Riverbay Corporation v. New York Independent System Operator; Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Energy Spectrum, Inc. and Riverbay Corporation v. New York Independent... Commission (Commission), 18 CFR 385.206, Energy Spectrum, Inc. and Riverbay Corporation...

  13. On the photon production in nucleus-nucleus collisions at high energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasov, Y. A.; Antonenko, V. G.

    1995-03-01

    A modified Landau hydrodynamical model is applied to study hard thermal photon production in central heavy-ion collisions at LHC, RHIC and SPS energies. It is shown that the phase transition from quark-gluon plasma into hadrons in consequence of the thermodynamical expansion is close to the second order phase transition if a resonance production is taken into account. Hard direct photon emission is also investigated with consideration of nuclear shadowing effect on structure function of quarks and gluons. Also ππ photon background is investigated. It is demonstrated that at the LHC energy photon yield from the quark-gluon plasma in the photon transversal momentum k ⊥ range from 5 to 25 GeV/c exceeds both the background and the direct photon yield. This conclusion may be important for the quark-gluon plasma diagnostic aims. It is also shown that for the LHC energy the thermal photon yield in the present model essentially exceeds this yield obtained in the Bjorken scaling model.

  14. An all-particle primary energy spectrum in the 3 200 PeV energy range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garyaka, A. P.; Martirosov, R. M.; Ter-Antonyan, S. V.; Erlykin, A. D.; Nikolskaya, N. M.; Gallant, Y. A.; Jones, L. W.; Procureur, J.

    2008-11-01

    We present an all-particle primary cosmic-ray energy spectrum in the 3 × 106-2 × 108 GeV energy range obtained by a multi-parametric event-by-event evaluation of the primary energy. The results are obtained on the basis of an expanded EAS data set detected at mountain level (700 g cm-2) by the GAMMA experiment. The energy evaluation method has been developed using the EAS simulation with the SIBYLL interaction model taking into account the response of GAMMA detectors and reconstruction uncertainties of EAS parameters. Nearly unbiased (<5%) energy estimations regardless of a primary nuclear mass with an accuracy of about 15-10% in the 3 × 106-2 × 108 GeV energy range respectively are attained. An irregularity ('bump') in the spectrum is observed at primary energies of ~7.4 × 107 GeV. This bump exceeds a smooth power-law fit to the data by about 4 standard deviations. By not rejecting the stochastic nature of the bump completely, we examined the systematic uncertainties of our methods and conclude that they cannot be responsible for the observed feature.

  15. Chandra High-Energy Transmission Grating Spectrum of AE Aquarii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauche, Christopher W.

    2009-11-01

    The nova-like cataclysmic binary AE Aqr, which is currently understood to be a former supersoft X-ray binary and current magnetic propeller, was observed for over two binary orbits (78 ks) in 2005 August with the High-Energy Transmission Grating (HETG) on board the Chandra X-ray Observatory. The long, uninterrupted Chandra observation provides a wealth of details concerning the X-ray emission of AE Aqr, many of which are new and unique to the HETG. First, the X-ray spectrum is that of an optically thin multi-temperature thermal plasma; the X-ray emission lines are broad, with widths that increase with the line energy from σ ≈ 1 eV (510 km s-1) for O VIII to σ ≈ 5.5 eV (820 km s-1) for Si XIV; the X-ray spectrum is reasonably well fit by a plasma model with a Gaussian emission measure distribution that peaks at log T(K) = 7.16, has a width σ = 0.48, an Fe abundance equal to 0.44 times solar, and other metal (primarily Ne, Mg, and Si) abundances equal to 0.76 times solar; and for a distance d = 100 pc, the total emission measure EM = 8.0 × 1053 cm-3 and the 0.5-10 keV luminosity L X = 1.1 × 1031 erg s-1. Second, based on the f/(i + r) flux ratios of the forbidden (f), intercombination (i), and recombination (r) lines of the Heα triplets of N VI, O VII, and Ne IX measured by Itoh et al. in the XMM-Newton Reflection Grating Spectrometer spectrum and those of O VII, Ne IX, Mg XI, and Si XIII in the Chandra HETG spectrum, either the electron density of the plasma increases with temperature by over three orders of magnitude, from n e ≈ 6 × 1010 cm-3 for N VI [log T(K) ≈ 6] to n e ≈ 1 × 1014 cm-3 for Si XIII [log T(K) ≈ 7], and/or the plasma is significantly affected by photoexcitation. Third, the radial velocity of the X-ray emission lines varies on the white dwarf spin phase, with two oscillations per spin cycle and an amplitude K ≈ 160 km s-1. These results appear to be inconsistent with the recent models of Itoh et al., Ikhsanov, and Venter

  16. Measurements of high energy photons in Z-pinch experiments on primary test stand

    SciTech Connect

    Si, Fenni Zhang, Chuanfei; Xu, Rongkun; Yuan, Xi; Huang, Zhanchang; Xu, Zeping; Ye, Fan; Yang, Jianlun; Ning, Jiamin; Hu, Qingyuan; Zhu, Xuebin

    2015-08-15

    High energy photons are measured for the first time in wire-array Z-pinch experiments on the Primary Test Stand (PTS) which delivers a current up to 8 MA with a rise time of 70 ns. A special designed detecting system composed of three types of detectors is used to measure the average energy, intensity, and pulse waveform of high energy photons. Results from Pb-TLD (thermoluminescence dosimeter) detector indicate that the average energy is 480 keV (±15%). Pulse shape of high energy photons is measured by the photodiode detector consisted of scintillator coupled with a photodiode, and it is correlated with soft x-ray power by the same timing signal. Intensity is measured by both TLD and the photodiode detector, showing good accordance with each other, and it is 10{sup 10} cm{sup −2} (±20%) at 2 m in the horizontal direction. Measurement results show that high energy photons are mainly produced in pinch regions due to accelerated electrons. PTS itself also produces high energy photons due to power flow electrons, which is one order smaller in amplitude than those from pinch region.

  17. Measurements of high energy photons in Z-pinch experiments on primary test stand.

    PubMed

    Si, Fenni; Zhang, Chuanfei; Xu, Rongkun; Yuan, Xi; Huang, Zhanchang; Xu, Zeping; Ye, Fan; Yang, Jianlun; Ning, Jiamin; Hu, Qingyuan; Zhu, Xuebin

    2015-08-01

    High energy photons are measured for the first time in wire-array Z-pinch experiments on the Primary Test Stand (PTS) which delivers a current up to 8 MA with a rise time of 70 ns. A special designed detecting system composed of three types of detectors is used to measure the average energy, intensity, and pulse waveform of high energy photons. Results from Pb-TLD (thermoluminescence dosimeter) detector indicate that the average energy is 480 keV (±15%). Pulse shape of high energy photons is measured by the photodiode detector consisted of scintillator coupled with a photodiode, and it is correlated with soft x-ray power by the same timing signal. Intensity is measured by both TLD and the photodiode detector, showing good accordance with each other, and it is 10(10) cm(-2) (±20%) at 2 m in the horizontal direction. Measurement results show that high energy photons are mainly produced in pinch regions due to accelerated electrons. PTS itself also produces high energy photons due to power flow electrons, which is one order smaller in amplitude than those from pinch region.

  18. The role of x-ray Swank factor in energy-resolving photon-counting imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Tanguay, Jesse; Kim, Ho Kyung; Cunningham, Ian. A.

    2010-12-15

    Purpose: Energy-resolved x-ray imaging has the potential to improve contrast-to-noise ratio by measuring the energy of each interacting photon and applying optimal weighting factors. The success of energy-resolving photon-counting (EPC) detectors relies on the ability of an x-ray detector to accurately measure the energy of each interacting photon. However, the escape of characteristic emissions and Compton scatter degrades spectral information. This article makes the theoretical connection between accuracy and imprecision in energy measurements with the x-ray Swank factor for a-Se, Si, CdZnTe, and HgI{sub 2}-based detectors. Methods: For a detector that implements adaptive binning to sum all elements in which x-ray energy is deposited for a single interaction, energy imprecision is shown to depend on the Swank factor for a large element with x rays incident at the center. The response function for each converter material is determined using Monte Carlo methods and used to determine energy accuracy, Swank factor, and relative energy imprecision in photon-energy measurements. Results: For each material, at energies below the respective K edges, accuracy is close to unity and imprecision is only a few percent. Above the K-edge energies, characteristic emission results in a drop in accuracy and precision that depends on escape probability. In Si, and to some extent a-Se, Compton-scatter escape also degrades energy precision with increasing energy. The influence of converter thickness on energy accuracy and imprecision is modest for low-Z materials but becomes important when using high-Z materials at energies greater than the K-edge energies. Conclusions: Accuracy and precision in energy measurements by EPC detectors are determined largely by the energy-dependent x-ray Swank factor. Modest decreases in the Swank factor (5%-15%) result in large increases in relative imprecision (30%-40%).

  19. The role of x-ray Swank factor in energy-resolving photon-counting imaging.

    PubMed

    Tanguay, Jesse; Kim, Ho Kyung; Cunningham, Ian A

    2010-12-01

    Energy-resolved x-ray imaging has the potential to improve contrast-to-noise ratio by measuring the energy of each interacting photon and applying optimal weighting factors. The success of energy-resolving photon-counting (EPC) detectors relies on the ability of an x-ray detector to accurately measure the energy of each interacting photon. However, the escape of characteristic emissions and Compton scatter degrades spectral information. This article makes the theoretical connection between accuracy and imprecision in energy measurements with the x-ray Swank factor for a-Se, Si, CdZnTe, and HgI2-based detectors. For a detector that implements adaptive binning to sum all elements in which x-ray energy is deposited for a single interaction, energy imprecision is shown to depend on the Swank factor for a large element with x rays incident at the center. The response function for each converter material is determined using Monte Carlo methods and used to determine energy accuracy, Swank factor, and relative energy imprecision in photon-energy measurements. For each material, at energies below the respective K edges, accuracy is close to unity and imprecision is only a few percent. Above the K-edge energies, characteristic emission results in a drop in accuracy and precision that depends on escape probability. In Si, and to some extent a-Se, Compton-scatter escape also degrades energy precision with increasing energy. The influence of converter thickness on energy accuracy and imprecision is modest for low-Z materials but becomes important when using high-Z materials at energies greater than the K-edge energies. Accuracy and precision in energy measurements by EPC detectors are determined largely by the energy-dependent x-ray Swank factor. Modest decreases in the Swank factor (5%-15%) result in large increases in relative imprecision (30%-40%).

  20. Generation of High-Energy Photons with Large Orbital Angular Momentum by Compton Backscattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jentschura, U. D.; Serbo, V. G.

    2011-01-01

    Usually, photons are described by plane waves with a definite 4-momentum. In addition to plane-wave photons, “twisted photons” have recently entered the field of modern laser optics; these are coherent superpositions of plane waves with a defined projection ℏm of the orbital angular momentum onto the propagation axis, where m is an integer. In this Letter, we show that it is possible to produce high-energy twisted photons by Compton backscattering of twisted laser photons off ultrarelativistic electrons. Such photons may be of interest for experiments related to the excitation and disintegration of atoms and nuclei, and for studying the photoeffect and pair production off nuclei in previously unexplored experimental regimes.

  1. Determination of neutron energy spectrum at KAMINI shielding experiment location.

    PubMed

    Sen, Sujoy; Bagchi, Subhrojit; Prasad, R R; Venkatasubramanian, D; Mohanakrishnan, P; Keshavamurty, R S; Haridas, Adish; Arul, A John; Puthiyavinayagam, P

    2016-09-01

    The neutron spectrum at KAMINI reactor south beam tube end has been determined using multifoil activation method. This beam tube is being used for characterizing neutron attenuation of novel shield materials. Starting from a computed guess spectrum, the spectrum adjustment/unfolding procedure makes use of minimization of a modified constraint function representing (a) least squared deviations between the measured and calculated reaction rates, (b) a measure of sharp fluctuations in the adjusted spectrum and (c) the square of the deviation of adjusted spectrum from the guess spectrum. The adjusted/unfolded spectrum predicts the reaction rates accurately. The results of this new procedure are compared with those of widely used SAND-II code.

  2. Photonic sensing of organic solvents through geometric study of dynamic reflection spectrum

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuqi; Fu, Qianqian; Ge, Jianping

    2015-01-01

    Traditional photonic sensing based on the change of balanced reflection of photonic structures can hardly distinguish chemical species with similar refractive indices. Here a sensing method based on the dynamic reflection spectra (DRS) of photonic crystal gel has been developed to distinguish even homologues, isomers and solvents with similar structures and physical properties. There are inherent relationships between solvent properties, diffusion behaviour and evolution of reflection signals, so that the geometric characteristics of DRS pattern including ascending/descending, colour changes, splitting/merging and curvature of reflection band can be utilized to recognize different organic solvents. With adequate solvents being tested, a database of DRS patterns can be established, which provide a standard to identify an unknown solvent. PMID:26082186

  3. Beam hardening artefacts in computed tomography with photon counting, charge integrating and energy weighting detectors: a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Shikhaliev, Polad M

    2005-12-21

    Photon counting x-ray imaging provides efficient rejection of the electronics noise, no pulse height (Swank) noise, less noise due to optimal photon energy weighting and the possibility of energy resolved image acquisition. These advantages apply also to CT when projection data are acquired using a photon counting detector. However, photon counting detectors assign a weighting factor of 1 to all detected photons whereas the weighting factor of a charge integrating detector is proportional to the energy of the detected photon. Therefore, data collected by photon counting and charge integrating detectors represent the 'hardening' of the photon beam passed through the object differently. This affects the beam hardening artefacts in the reconstructed CT images. This work represents the first comparative evaluation of the effect of photon counting, charge integrating and energy weighting photon detectors on beam hardening artefacts in CT. Beam hardening artefacts in CT images were evaluated for 20 cm and 14 cm diameter water cylinders with bone and low contrast inserts, at 120 kVp and 90 kVp x-ray tube voltages, respectively. It was shown that charge integrating results in 1.8% less beam hardening artefacts from bone inserts (i.e., CT numbers in the 'shadow' of the bone are less by 1.8% as compared to CT numbers over the periphery of the image), as compared to photon counting. However, optimal photon energy weighting, which provides highest SNR, results in 7.7% higher beam hardening artefacts from bone inserts as compared to photon counting. The magnitude of the 'cupping' artefacts was lower by 1% for charge integrating and higher by 6.1% for energy weighting acquisitions as compared to photon counting. Only the photon counting systems provide an accurate representation of the beam hardening effect due to its flat energy weighting. Because of their energy dependent weighting factors, the charge integrating and energy weighting systems do not provide accurate

  4. Dosimetric properties of radiophotoluminescent glass detector in low-energy photon beams.

    PubMed

    Kadoya, Noriyuki; Shimomura, Kouhei; Kitou, Satoshi; Shiota, Yasuo; Fujita, Yukio; Dobashi, Suguru; Takeda, Ken; Jingu, Keiichi; Matsushita, Haruo; Namito, Yoshihito; Ban, Syuichi; Koyama, Syuji; Tabushi, Katsuyoshi

    2012-10-01

    A radiophotoluminescent glass rod dosimeter (RGD) has recently become commercially available. It is being increasingly used for dosimetry in radiotherapy to measure the absorbed dose including scattered low-energy photons on the body surface of a patient and for postal dosimetry audit. In this article, the dosimetric properties of the RGD, including energy dependence of the dose response, reproducibly, variation in data obtained by the RGD for each energy, and angular dependence in low-energy photons, are discussed. An RGD (GD-301, Asahi Techno Glass Corporation, Shizuoka, Japan) was irradiated with monochromatic low-energy photon beams generated by synchrotron radiation at Photon Factory, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK). The size of GD-301 was 1.5 mm in diameter and 8.5 mm in length and the active dose readout volume being 1 mm diameter and 0.6 mm depth located 0.7 mm from the end of the detector. The energy dependence of the dose response and reproducibility and variation were investigated for RGDs irradiated with a plastic holder and those irradiated without the plastic holder. Response of the RGD was obtained by not only conventional single field irradiation but also bilateral irradiation. Angular dependence of the RGD was measured in the range of 0°-90° for 13, 17, 40, and 80 keV photon beams by conventional single field irradiation. The dose responses had a peak at around 40 keV. For the energy range of less than 25 keV, all dose response curves steeply decreased in comparison with the ratio of mass energy absorption coefficient of the RGD to that of air. As for the reproducibility and variation in data obtained by the RGD, the coefficient of variance increased with decrease in photon energy. Furthermore, the variation for bilateral irradiation was less than that for single field irradiation. Regarding angular dependence of the RGD, for energies of 13 and 17 keV, the response decreased with increase in the irradiation angle, and the

  5. Subpicosecond Photon-Energy-Dependent Hole Transfer from PbS Quantum Dots to Conjugated Polymers.

    PubMed

    Colbert, Adam E; Jedlicka, Erin; Wu, Wenbi; Ginger, David S

    2016-12-15

    We use transient absorption (TA) spectroscopy to study the origin of photon-energy dependent hole transfer yields in blends of PbS quantum dots with the conjugated polymer poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl) (P3HT). We selectively excite only the quantum dots at two different wavelengths and measure the polymer ground state bleach resulting from the transfer of photoexcited holes. The higher photon-energy pump shows a greater prompt yield of hole transfer compared to the lower photon-energy excitation, on time scales sufficient to out-compete hot carrier cooling in lead chalcogenide quantum dots. We interpret the results as evidence that the excess energy of nonthermalized, or "hot," excitons resulting from higher photon-energy excitation allows more efficient charge transfer to the polymer in these systems. The data also demonstrate slow charge transfer rates, up to ∼1 ns, of the relaxed excitations on the PbS dots. These findings help to clarify the role of excess photon energy and carrier relaxation dynamics on free carrier generation in donor/acceptor solar cells.

  6. Electron energy loss and Smith-Purcell radiation in two- and three-dimensional photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochiai, Tetsuyuki; Ohtaka, Kazuo

    2005-09-01

    A theoretical description of the electron energy loss and the Smith-Purcell radiation is presented for an electron moving near a two-dimensional photonic crystal slab and a three-dimensional woodpile photonic crystal. The electron energy loss and the Smith-Purcell radiation spectra are well correlated with the photonic band structures of these crystals and thus can be used as a probe of them. In particular, there is a selection rule concerning the symmetries of the photonic band modes to be excited when the electron moves in a mirror plane of the crystals. In the woodpile, a highly directional Smith-Purcell radiation is realized by using the planar defect mode inside the complete band gap.

  7. Electron energy loss and Smith-Purcell radiation in two- and three-dimensional photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Ochiai, Tetsuyuki; Ohtaka, Kazuo

    2005-09-19

    A theoretical description of the electron energy loss and the Smith-Purcell radiation is presented for an electron moving near a two-dimensional photonic crystal slab and a three-dimensional woodpile photonic crystal. The electron energy loss and the Smith-Purcell radiation spectra are well correlated with the photonic band structures of these crystals and thus can be used as a probe of them. In particular, there is a selection rule concerning the symmetries of the photonic band modes to be excited when the electron moves in a mirror plane of the crystals. In the woodpile, a highly directional Smith-Purcell radiation is realized by using the planar defect mode inside the complete band gap.

  8. Controlling the spectrum of photons generated on a silicon nanophotonic chip

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ranjeet; Ong, Jun Rong; Savanier, Marc; Mookherjea, Shayan

    2014-01-01

    Directly modulated semiconductor lasers are widely used, compact light sources in optical communications. Semiconductors can also be used to generate nonclassical light; in fact, CMOS-compatible silicon chips can be used to generate pairs of single photons at room temperature. Unlike the classical laser, the photon-pair source requires control over a two-dimensional joint spectral intensity (JSI) and it is not possible to process the photons separately, as this could destroy the entanglement. Here we design a photon-pair source, consisting of planar lightwave components fabricated using CMOS-compatible lithography in silicon, which has the capability to vary the JSI. By controlling either the optical pump wavelength, or the temperature of the chip, we demonstrate the ability to select different JSIs, with a large variation in the Schmidt number. Such control can benefit high-dimensional communications where detector-timing constraints can be relaxed by realizing a large Schmidt number in a small frequency range. PMID:25410792

  9. ENERGY-DEPENDENT GAMMA-RAY BURST PULSE WIDTH DUE TO THE CURVATURE EFFECT AND INTRINSIC BAND SPECTRUM

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Z. Y.; Ma, L.; Zhao, X. H.; Yin, Y.; Bao, Y. Y.

    2012-06-20

    Previous studies have found that the width of the gamma-ray burst (GRB) pulse is energy dependent and that it decreases as a power-law function with increasing photon energy. In this work we have investigated the relation between the energy dependence of the pulse and the so-called Band spectrum by using a sample including 51 well-separated fast rise and exponential decay long-duration GRB pulses observed by BATSE (Burst and Transient Source Experiment on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory). We first decompose these pulses into rise and decay phases and find that the rise widths and the decay widths also behave as a power-law function with photon energy. Then we investigate statistically the relations between the three power-law indices of the rise, decay, and total width of the pulse (denoted as {delta}{sub r}, {delta}{sub d}, and {delta}{sub w}, respectively) and the three Band spectral parameters, high-energy index ({alpha}), low-energy index ({beta}), and peak energy (E{sub p} ). It is found that (1) {alpha} is strongly correlated with {delta}{sub w} and {delta}{sub d} but seems uncorrelated with {delta}{sub r}; (2) {beta} is weakly correlated with the three power-law indices, and (3) E{sub p} does not show evident correlations with the three power-law indices. We further investigate the origin of {delta}{sub d}-{alpha} and {delta}{sub w}-{alpha}. We show that the curvature effect and the intrinsic Band spectrum could naturally lead to the energy dependence of the GRB pulse width and also the {delta}{sub d}-{alpha} and {delta}{sub w}-{alpha} correlations. Our results hold so long as the shell emitting gamma rays has a curved surface and the intrinsic spectrum is a Band spectrum or broken power law. The strong {delta}{sub d}-{alpha} correlation and inapparent correlations between {delta}{sub r} and the three Band spectral parameters also suggest that the rise and decay phases of the GRB pulses have different origins.

  10. Photon energy dependent circular dichroism in angle-resolved photoemission from Au(111) surface states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Hanyoung; Song, Inkyung; Kim, Beomyoung; Cho, Soohyun; Soltani, Shoresh; Kim, Timur; Hoesch, Moritz; Kim, Choong H.; Kim, Changyoung

    2017-03-01

    We performed angle-resolved photoemission experiments on Au(111) surface with circularly polarized light. Data were taken with photon energies in the range between 20 and 100 eV in order to investigate the photon energy dependent behavior in the circular dichroism (CD). While the magnitude of the normalized CD value varies with a maximum value of about 70%, the sign of CD does not change for the photon energy within the range, inconsistent with the prediction based on the density-functional theory (DFT) calculation. Our calculation of the CD using DFT initial state and free electron final state shows a better consistency with experimental results than an earlier study using the inverse low-energy electron diffraction state as the final state. We briefly discuss the dominating factor that determines the CD from Au(111) states.

  11. Response of BGO detectors to photons of 3-50 MeV energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matulewicz, T.; Henning, W.; Emling, H.; Freifelder, R.; Grein, H.; Grosse, E.; Herrmann, N.; Holzmann, R.; Kulessa, R.; Simon, R. S.; Wollersheim, H. J.; Schoch, B.; Vogt, J.; Wilhelm, M.; Kratz, J. V.; Schmidt, R.; Janssens, R. V. F.

    1993-02-01

    The response of an array of 7 hexagonal BGO detectors each 7.5 cm long (6.7 radiation lengths) with 3.6 cm side-to-side distance was measured using monochromatic photons from the tagged-photon facility at the electron accelerator MAMI A at Mainz. The experimental spectra of the deposited energy for a single detector and for the array of seven modules compare very well with the predictions of Monte Carlo shower simulations using the code GEANT3. Significant improvement of the energy resolution is observed for the summed energy spectra compared to the resolution of a single module. This improvement deteriorates at higher photon energies because the length of the detector is not sufficient to absorb the forward component of the electromagnetic shower.

  12. Computation of the mass attenuation coefficient of polymeric materials at specific gamma photon energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirji, Rajeshwari; Lobo, Blaise

    2017-06-01

    The gamma ray mass attenuation coefficients of ten synthetic polymeric materials, namely, polyethylene (PE), polystyrene (PS), polycarbonate (PC), polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), polyvinyl chloride (PVC), Polyethylene terephthalate (PET), Polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP), Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), Polypropylene (PP) and Polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) have been calculated using second order polynomial equation and logarithmic interpolation formula at selected gamma photon energies, in the energy range starting from 14.4 keV up to 1332 keV. It is important to note that second order polynomial equation fits very well with NIST data for all the polymeric materials considered here, for gamma photon energies ranging from 300 keV up to 2000 keV. Third order polynomial fitting is best suited for lower gamma photon energies (from 10 keV up to 200 keV).

  13. Electron escape depth variation in thin SiO2 films measured with variable photon energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hecht, M. H.; Grunthaner, F. J.; Pianetta, P.; Johansson, L. I.; Lindau, I.

    1984-01-01

    A double crystal monochromator at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory is used to study the Si/SiO2 interface, using photon energies of hv = 1950-3700 eV. This photon energy range allows interfaces to be observed through oxide layers 50 A thick or more. Variations in electron escape depth and/or oxide density as a function of distance from the interface are observed over the entire kinetic energy range (100-3600 eV). These differences are attributed to a strained oxide layer near the interface.

  14. Cherenkov detectors for spatial imaging applications using discrete-energy photons

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, Paul B.; Erickson, Anna S.

    2016-08-14

    Cherenkov detectors can offer a significant advantage in spatial imaging applications when excellent timing response, low noise and cross talk, large area coverage, and the ability to operate in magnetic fields are required. We show that an array of Cherenkov detectors with crude energy resolution coupled with monochromatic photons resulting from a low-energy nuclear reaction can be used to produce a sharp image of material while providing large and inexpensive detector coverage. The analysis of the detector response to relative transmission of photons with various energies allows for reconstruction of material's effective atomic number further aiding in high-Z material identification.

  15. Electron escape depth variation in thin SiO2 films measured with variable photon energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hecht, M. H.; Grunthaner, F. J.; Pianetta, P.; Johansson, L. I.; Lindau, I.

    1984-01-01

    A double crystal monochromator at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory is used to study the Si/SiO2 interface, using photon energies of hv = 1950-3700 eV. This photon energy range allows interfaces to be observed through oxide layers 50 A thick or more. Variations in electron escape depth and/or oxide density as a function of distance from the interface are observed over the entire kinetic energy range (100-3600 eV). These differences are attributed to a strained oxide layer near the interface.

  16. Soft-photon emission effects and radiative corrections for electromagnetic processes at very high energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gould, R. J.

    1979-01-01

    Higher-order electromagnetic processes involving particles at ultrahigh energies are discussed, with particular attention given to Compton scattering with the emission of an additional photon (double Compton scattering). Double Compton scattering may have significance in the interaction of a high-energy electron with the cosmic blackbody photon gas. At high energies the cross section for double Compton scattering is large, though this effect is largely canceled by the effects of radiative corrections to ordinary Compton scattering. A similar cancellation takes place for radiative pair production and the associated radiative corrections to the radiationless process. This cancellation is related to the well-known cancellation of the infrared divergence in electrodynamics.

  17. Energy spectrum measured by the telescope array surface detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Dmitri

    2012-05-01

    Two conflicting measurements of the ultra high energy cosmic ray (UHECR) flux have been reported by the Akeno Giant Air Shower Array (AGASA) and the High Resolution Fly's Eye (HiRes) experiments. HiRes observes a ˜5sigma suppression at E = 1019.75 eV, which is in agreement with the prediction of Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuz'min (GZK) theory. AGASA, in contrast, sees the flux extended well beyond E = 1020 eV with no visible break, suggesting that the flux is limited only by the rate at which the sources can produce the UHECR and not by interaction of energetic particles with the cosmic microwave background, thus challenging the relativistic invariance principle. In response to this discrepancy, a new experiment named the Telescope Array (TA) has been deployed, which combines the detection elements used separately by HiRes and AGASA. We describe the TA surface detector (SD) analysis using a technique new to the field, which consists of a detailed Monte-Carlo (MC) simulation of the SD response to the natural cosmic rays, validating the MC by comparing its distributions with the data, and calculation of the SD aperture from the MC. We will also describe our reconstruction procedure, based solely upon the data, and its application to both data and the MC. Finally, we will describe the energy spectrum resulting from this analysis, which is found to be in excellent agreement with the HiRes result, and as such, is the first confirmation of the GZK effect by a ground array of scintillation counters.

  18. Charging energy spectrum of black phosphorus quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lino, M. A.; de Sousa, J. S.; da Costa, D. R.; Chaves, A.; Pereira, J. M.; Farias, G. A.

    2017-08-01

    We present a theoretical study of the charging effects in single and double layer black phosphorus quantum dots (BPQDs) with lateral sizes of 2 nm and 3 nm. We demonstrate that the charging of BPQDs are able to store up to an N max electron (that depends on the lateral size and number of layers in the QD), after which structural instabilities arises. For example, 3 nm wide hydrogen-passivated single layer BPQDs can hold a maximum of 16 electrons, and an additional electron causes the expelling of hydrogen atoms from the QD borders. We also calculated the addition energy (E A ) spectrum. For single-layer QDs with 2 and 3 nm lateral sizes, the average E A is around 0.4 eV and 0.3 eV, respectively. For double layer QDs with the same sizes, the average E A is around 0.25 eV and 0.2 eV, respectively.

  19. Visualization of deep ultraviolet photons based on Förster resonance energy transfer and cascade photon reabsorption in diphenylalanine-carbon nitrides composite film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Zhixing; Zhou, Weiping; Chen, Zhihui; Wang, Huan; Di, Yunsong; Huang, Shisong

    2016-11-01

    A diphenylalanine (L-Phe-L-Phe, FF)-carbon nitride composite film is designed and fabricated to visualize the deep ultraviolet (DUV, 245-290 nm) photons. The FF film, composed of diphenylalanine molecules, doped with carbon nitrides shows blue emission under excitation of DUV light, which makes the DUV beam observable. Both Förster resonance energy transfer and cascade photon reabsorption contribute to the conversion of photon energy. First, the FF is excited by the DUV photons. On one hand, the energy transfers to the embedded carbon nitrides through nonradiative dipole-dipole couplings. On the other hand, the 284 nm photons emitted from the FF would further excite the carbon nitrides, which will finally convert to blue fluorescence. Herein, the experimental demonstration of a simple device for the visualization of high DUV fluxes is reported.

  20. LIMITS TO THE FRACTION OF HIGH-ENERGY PHOTON EMITTING GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Akerlof, Carl W.; Zheng, WeiKang

    2013-02-20

    After almost four years of operation, the two instruments on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope have shown that the number of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with high-energy photon emission above 100 MeV cannot exceed roughly 9% of the total number of all such events, at least at the present detection limits. In a recent paper, we found that GRBs with photons detected in the Large Area Telescope have a surprisingly broad distribution with respect to the observed event photon number. Extrapolation of our empirical fit to numbers of photons below our previous detection limit suggests that the overall rate of such low flux events could be estimated by standard image co-adding techniques. In this case, we have taken advantage of the excellent angular resolution of the Swift mission to provide accurate reference points for 79 GRB events which have eluded any previous correlations with high-energy photons. We find a small but significant signal in the co-added field. Guided by the extrapolated power-law fit previously obtained for the number distribution of GRBs with higher fluxes, the data suggest that only a small fraction of GRBs are sources of high-energy photons.

  1. Cosmological effects of scalar-photon couplings: dark energy and varying-α Models

    SciTech Connect

    Avgoustidis, A.; Martins, C.J.A.P.; Monteiro, A.M.R.V.L.; Vielzeuf, P.E.; Luzzi, G. E-mail: Carlos.Martins@astro.up.pt E-mail: up110370652@alunos.fc.up.pt

    2014-06-01

    We study cosmological models involving scalar fields coupled to radiation and discuss their effect on the redshift evolution of the cosmic microwave background temperature, focusing on links with varying fundamental constants and dynamical dark energy. We quantify how allowing for the coupling of scalar fields to photons, and its important effect on luminosity distances, weakens current and future constraints on cosmological parameters. In particular, for evolving dark energy models, joint constraints on the dark energy equation of state combining BAO radial distance and SN luminosity distance determinations, will be strongly dominated by BAO. Thus, to fully exploit future SN data one must also independently constrain photon number non-conservation arising from the possible coupling of SN photons to the dark energy scalar field. We discuss how observational determinations of the background temperature at different redshifts can, in combination with distance measures data, set tight constraints on interactions between scalar fields and photons, thus breaking this degeneracy. We also discuss prospects for future improvements, particularly in the context of Euclid and the E-ELT and show that Euclid can, even on its own, provide useful dark energy constraints while allowing for photon number non-conservation.

  2. Investigation of the Electronic Structure of Transition Metal Compounds by Photoelectron Spectroscopy with Variable Photon Energy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaltsoyannis, Nikolas

    1992-01-01

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. Relative partial photoionisation cross section (RPPICS) data have been obtained for a variety of transition metal compounds using synchrotron radiation in the incident photon energy range 17-115 eV. Cross section features such as p to d giant resonances, delayed maxima, Cooper minima and molecular shape resonances have been identified and interpreted in terms of the localisation properties of the ionising electrons. The RPPICS behaviour of the photoelectron (PE) band corresponding to ionisation of the 1a_ {rm 1g} highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) of (rm Mo(eta -rm C_6H_5Me)_2) indicates that it is essentially metal-localised. The p to d giant resonant absorption enhancement of the cross section is found to be almost coincident in photon energy with a molecular shape resonance. Similar features in the 1e_{rm 2g} ^{-1} and 1e_{ rm 1g}^{-1} bands provide strong evidence for metal-ligand covalency in the associated MOs. In contrast, the monotonic fall off with increasing photon energy of the RPPICS of the 1e_{ rm 1u}^{-1} band is typical of ligand-localised MOs. Studies of the closely related (rm M(eta- rm C_7H_7)(eta- rm C_5H_4R)) (M = Ti, Nb, Mo; R = H: M = Ta; R = Me) reveal a significant degree of both metal and ligand character to the 1e_2 MOs, suggesting that neither the +1 nor the -3 formalism for the charge on the cycloheptatrienyl ring in its complexes is a good one, as they imply a metal- and ligand-localised 1e_2<=vel respectively. The 5e MOs of PF_3, traditionally regarded as fluorine 2p lone pair MOs, have been shown to possess significant phosphorus 3p atomic orbital (AO) character. Comparison of the data obtained on PF _3 with those of (Ni(PF_3 )_4) indicates that the pi back donation from the nickel 3d orbitals to the 7e lowest unoccupied MO of PF_3 also affects the composition of the 5e derived orbitals. A combined experimental and theoretical study has resulted in

  3. TU-F-18A-08: Effect of Quantum Detection Efficiency and Energy Bin Selection On Contrast-To-Noise-Ratio for Energy-Resolved Photon-Counting Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Lam Ng, A; Ding, H; Cho, H; Molloi, S

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Energy-resolved photon-counting detectors have the capability to discriminate photons according to their energies. By using optimal energy weighting factors, the contrast-to-noise-ratio (CNR) of the reconstructed image can be improved. In this work, we investigate how quantum detection efficiency (QDE) affects the determination of the optimal energy threshold bins, and therefore the CNR improvement of photon-counting detectors. Methods: In this simulation study a photon-counting detector, based on Silicon (Si), was investigated. A task-oriented algorithm was used to determine the optimal energy bin setting in order to maximize CNR. Projection-based and Image-based energy weighting techniques were implemented. A 13 mm PMMA phantom with two contrast materials, hydroxyapatite (HA) and iodine (I), at different concentrations (100, 200, and 300 mg/mL for HA and 2, 4, and 8 mg/mL for I) was used. TASMIP algorithm was used to generate the spectrum with 2.7 mm Al filter. Different tube voltages, number of energy bins, and bin widths were investigated. Different thicknesses of Si were also investigated to determine the QDE effect on CNR. Results: CNR increased as the detector material thickness increased until it reached 30 mm for Si thickness such that the CNR value was near to the value predicted by an ideal detector. Also, the results indicated that the improvement of CNR due to the QDE is task-dependent when comparing weighted images to photon-counting images. For hydroxyapatite the improvement is approximately 20%, whereas for iodine it is less than 10%. Conclusion: The results showed that the improvement of CNR for an energy-resolved photon-counting detector is highly task-dependent when QDE is taken into account.

  4. Energy response calibration of photon-counting detectors using X-ray fluorescence: a feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Cho, H-M; Ding, H; Ziemer, BP; Molloi, S

    2014-01-01

    Accurate energy calibration is critical for the application of energy-resolved photon-counting detectors in spectral imaging. The aim of this study is to investigate the feasibility of energy response calibration and characterization of a photon-counting detector using X-ray fluorescence. A comprehensive Monte Carlo simulation study was performed using Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission (GATE) to investigate the optimal technique for X-ray fluorescence calibration. Simulations were conducted using a 100 kVp tungsten-anode spectra with 2.7 mm Al filter for a single pixel cadmium telluride (CdTe) detector with 3 × 3 mm2 in detection area. The angular dependence of X-ray fluorescence and scatter background was investigated by varying the detection angle from 20° to 170° with respect to the beam direction. The effects of the detector material, shape, and size on the recorded X-ray fluorescence were investigated. The fluorescent material size effect was considered with and without the container for the fluorescent material. In order to provide validation for the simulation result, the angular dependence of X-ray fluorescence from five fluorescent materials was experimentally measured using a spectrometer. Finally, eleven of the fluorescent materials were used for energy calibration of a CZT-based photon-counting detector. The optimal detection angle was determined to be approximately at 120° with respect to the beam direction, which showed the highest fluorescence to scatter ratio (FSR) with a weak dependence on the fluorescent material size. The feasibility of X-ray fluorescence for energy calibration of photon-counting detectors in the diagnostic X-ray energy range was verified by successfully calibrating the energy response of a CZT-based photon-counting detector. The results of this study can be used as a guideline to implement the X-ray fluorescence calibration method for photon-counting detectors in a typical imaging laboratory. PMID:25369288

  5. Energy response calibration of photon-counting detectors using x-ray fluorescence: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Cho, H-M; Ding, H; Ziemer, B P; Molloi, S

    2014-12-07

    Accurate energy calibration is critical for the application of energy-resolved photon-counting detectors in spectral imaging. The aim of this study is to investigate the feasibility of energy response calibration and characterization of a photon-counting detector using x-ray fluorescence. A comprehensive Monte Carlo simulation study was performed using Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission (GATE) to investigate the optimal technique for x-ray fluorescence calibration. Simulations were conducted using a 100 kVp tungsten-anode spectra with 2.7 mm Al filter for a single pixel cadmium telluride (CdTe) detector with 3 × 3 mm(2) in detection area. The angular dependence of x-ray fluorescence and scatter background was investigated by varying the detection angle from 20° to 170° with respect to the beam direction. The effects of the detector material, shape, and size on the recorded x-ray fluorescence were investigated. The fluorescent material size effect was considered with and without the container for the fluorescent material. In order to provide validation for the simulation result, the angular dependence of x-ray fluorescence from five fluorescent materials was experimentally measured using a spectrometer. Finally, eleven of the fluorescent materials were used for energy calibration of a CZT-based photon-counting detector. The optimal detection angle was determined to be approximately at 120° with respect to the beam direction, which showed the highest fluorescence to scatter ratio (FSR) with a weak dependence on the fluorescent material size. The feasibility of x-ray fluorescence for energy calibration of photon-counting detectors in the diagnostic x-ray energy range was verified by successfully calibrating the energy response of a CZT-based photon-counting detector. The results of this study can be used as a guideline to implement the x-ray fluorescence calibration method for photon-counting detectors in a typical imaging laboratory.

  6. Material separation in x-ray CT with energy resolved photon-counting detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Meier, D.; Taguchi, K.; Wagenaar, D. J.; Patt, B. E.; Frey, E. C.

    2011-03-01

    The objective of the study was to demonstrate that more than two types of materials can be effectively separated with x-ray CT using a recently developed energy resolved photon-counting detector. We performed simulations and physical experiments using an energy resolved photon-counting detector with six energy thresholds. For comparison, dual-kVp CT with an integrating detector was also simulated. Iodine- and gadolinium-based contrast agents, as well as several soft-tissue- and bone-like materials were imaged. We plotted the attenuation coefficients for the various materials in a scatter plot for pairs of energy windows. In both simulations and physical experiments, the contrast agents were easily separable from other non-contrast-agent materials in the scatter plot between two properly chosen energy windows. This separation was due to discontinuities in the attenuation coefficient around their unique K-edges. The availability of more than two energy thresholds in a photon-counting detector allowed the separation with one or more contrast agents present. Compared with dual-kVp methods, CT with an energy resolved photon-counting detector provided a larger separation and the freedom to use different energy window pairs to specify the desired target material. We concluded that an energy resolved photon-counting detector with more than two thresholds allowed the separation of more than two types of materials, e.g., soft-tissue-like, bone-like, and one or more materials with K-edges in the energy range of interest. They provided advantages over dual-kVp CT in terms of the degree of separation and the number of materials that can be separated simultaneously.

  7. Repackaging photon energy using exciton fission and fusion in molecular crystals (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardeen, Christopher J.

    2016-09-01

    The ability to downconvert (1 photon to 2 photons) and upconvert (2 photons to 1 photon) energy can boost solar energy conversion efficiencies by 30% or more. Downconversion can be accomplished through exciton fission, in which an initially created high energy singlet exciton spontaneously splits into a pair of lower energy triplet excitons. In organic semiconductors like tetracene and rubrene, the Frenkel character of the excitons leads to energetically separate singlet and triplet bands, providing an ideal set of energy levels for both processes to take place. In this talk, our efforts to understand the basic photophysics of singlet fission using time-resolved transient absorption, photoluminescence and magnetic field effects will be described. The role of molecular packing in controlling the fission rate will be emphasized. Upconversion occurs via the reverse process, where a pair of triplet excitons fuse into a high-energy singlet state. While most approaches to upconversion require a sensitizer to populate the dark triplet states, an alternate approach is to take advantage of low-energy intermolecular states in organic crystals to sensitize triplet states. We show that this process can be surprisingly efficient in certain molecular crystals, even in the absence of sensitizers. The exciton interactions responsible for this process are investigated using steady-state and time-resolved spectroscopy.

  8. Calculation of the characteristics of clinical high-energy photon beams with EGS5-MPI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, M.; Morishita, Y.; Kato, M.; Kurosawa, T.; Tanaka, T.; Takata, N.; Saito, N.

    2014-03-01

    A graphite calorimeter has been developed as a Japanese primary standard of absorbed dose to water in the high-energy photon beams from a clinical linac. To obtain conversion factors for the graphite calorimeter, the beam characteristics of the high-energy photon beams from the clinical linac at National Metrology Institute of Japan were calculated with the EGS5 Monte Carlo simulation code. To run the EGS5 code on High Performance Computing machines that have more than 1000 CPU cores, we developed the EGS5 parallelisation package "EGS5-MPI" by implementing a message-passing interface. We calculated the photon energy spectra, which are in good agreement with those previously calculated by D. Sheikh-Bagheri and D. W. O. Rogers (Med. Phys. 29 3). We also estimated the percentage-depth-dose distributions of photon beams from the linac using the calculated photon energy spectra. These calculated percentage-depth-dose distributions were compared with our measured distributions and were found they are in good agreement as well. We will calculate conversion factors for the graphite calorimeter using our results.

  9. Inclusive photon production at forward rapidities in pp collisions at LHC energies with the ALICE experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudipan Dethe ALICE Collaboration

    2016-04-01

    Measurements of multiplicity and pseudorapidity distributions of particles produced in pp collisions are important for the study of particle production mechanisms and to obtain baseline distributions to be compared with those from heavy-ion collisions. The inclusive photon measurements (dominated by π0 decays) are complementary to the charged particle measurements. The present work focuses on the forward rapidity region with comparisons to different models such as PYTHIA and PHOJET. We report the measurements of multiplicity and pseudorapidity distributions of inclusive photons using the ALICE Photon Multiplicity Detector (PMD) at forward rapidities (2.3 < η < 3.9) in pp collisions at = 0.9, 2.76 and 7 TeV. It is observed that the photon multiplicity distributions are well described by negative binomial distributions (NBD). Multiplicity distributions are studied in terms of KNO variables for each energy. It is shown that the increase in the average photon multiplicity as a function of beam energy is compatible with both a logarithmic and power law dependence. The results are compared to different model predictions. These models reproduce experimental results at lower energy while they are not accurate at higher energies.

  10. An ultra-fast thermoelectric sensor for single-photon detection in a wide range of the electromagnetic spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzanyan, Astghik A.; Nikoghosyan, Vahan R.; Kuzanyan, Armen S.

    2017-05-01

    The results of computer simulation of heat distribution processes taking place after the absorption of single photons of 1-1000 eV energy in the three-layer detection pixel of the thermoelectric detector are presented. We considered different geometries of the detection pixel in which (La,Ce)B6 hexaboride is used as a thermoelectric layer and superconducting absorber and heat sink layers are of Nb, Pb and YBCO. The calculations are based on the heat conduction equation and are carried out by the matrix method for differential equations. It is shown, that by changing materials and sizes of the detection pixel's layers it is possible to obtain transducers for the registration of photons within the given spectral range with the required energy resolution and count rate. It is demonstrated that such detector has a number of advantages, as well as improved characteristics, which give ground to consider the thermoelectric detector as a real alternative to superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors.

  11. MicroCT with energy-resolved photon-counting detectors.

    PubMed

    Wang, X; Meier, D; Mikkelsen, S; Maehlum, G E; Wagenaar, D J; Tsui, B M W; Patt, B E; Frey, E C

    2011-05-07

    The goal of this paper was to investigate the benefits that could be realistically achieved on a microCT imaging system with an energy-resolved photon-counting x-ray detector. To this end, we built and evaluated a prototype microCT system based on such a detector. The detector is based on cadmium telluride (CdTe) radiation sensors and application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) readouts. Each detector pixel can simultaneously count x-ray photons above six energy thresholds, providing the capability for energy-selective x-ray imaging. We tested the spectroscopic performance of the system using polychromatic x-ray radiation and various filtering materials with K-absorption edges. Tomographic images were then acquired of a cylindrical PMMA phantom containing holes filled with various materials. Results were also compared with those acquired using an intensity-integrating x-ray detector and single-energy (i.e. non-energy-selective) CT. This paper describes the functionality and performance of the system, and presents preliminary spectroscopic and tomographic results. The spectroscopic experiments showed that the energy-resolved photon-counting detector was capable of measuring energy spectra from polychromatic sources like a standard x-ray tube, and resolving absorption edges present in the energy range used for imaging. However, the spectral quality was degraded by spectral distortions resulting from degrading factors, including finite energy resolution and charge sharing. We developed a simple charge-sharing model to reproduce these distortions. The tomographic experiments showed that the availability of multiple energy thresholds in the photon-counting detector allowed us to simultaneously measure target-to-background contrasts in different energy ranges. Compared with single-energy CT with an integrating detector, this feature was especially useful to improve differentiation of materials with different attenuation coefficient energy dependences.

  12. MicroCT with energy-resolved photon-counting detectors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, X; Meier, D; Mikkelsen, S; Maehlum, G E; Wagenaar, D J; Tsui, BMW; Patt, B E; Frey, E C

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this paper was to investigate the benefits that could be realistically achieved on a microCT imaging system with an energy-resolved photon-counting x-ray detector. To this end, we built and evaluated a prototype microCT system based on such a detector. The detector is based on cadmium telluride (CdTe) radiation sensors and application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) readouts. Each detector pixel can simultaneously count x-ray photons above six energy thresholds, providing the capability for energy-selective x-ray imaging. We tested the spectroscopic performance of the system using polychromatic x-ray radiation and various filtering materials with Kabsorption edges. Tomographic images were then acquired of a cylindrical PMMA phantom containing holes filled with various materials. Results were also compared with those acquired using an intensity-integrating x-ray detector and single-energy (i.e. non-energy-selective) CT. This paper describes the functionality and performance of the system, and presents preliminary spectroscopic and tomographic results. The spectroscopic experiments showed that the energy-resolved photon-counting detector was capable of measuring energy spectra from polychromatic sources like a standard x-ray tube, and resolving absorption edges present in the energy range used for imaging. However, the spectral quality was degraded by spectral distortions resulting from degrading factors, including finite energy resolution and charge sharing. We developed a simple charge-sharing model to reproduce these distortions. The tomographic experiments showed that the availability of multiple energy thresholds in the photon-counting detector allowed us to simultaneously measure target-to-background contrasts in different energy ranges. Compared with single-energy CT with an integrating detector, this feature was especially useful to improve differentiation of materials with different attenuation coefficient energy dependences. PMID:21464527

  13. The effect of optical bleaching at selected photon energies on the thermoluminescence of LiF:Mg,Ti

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reshes, G.; Druzhyna, S.; Biderman, S.; Eliyahu, I.; Oster, L.; Horowitz, Y. S.

    2017-02-01

    A new interpretation of the optical absorption energy spectrum of LiF:Mg,Ti (TLD-100) is presented in which the 4.0 eV band is composed of two-sub-bands at 3.8 eV and 4.3 eV. The new interpretation is of central importance in the understanding of the geminate recombination mechanisms giving rise to composite glow peak 5 in the thermoluminescence (TL) of TLD-100. Photon bleaches at energies of 3.6 eV and 4.3 eV on samples of gamma irradiated TLD-100 were carried out in order to investigate the correlation of the 4.3 eV absorption band with the electron-hole configuration giving rise to glow peak 5a and the 3.8 eV absorption band with the e-only configuration giving rise to glow peak 5. The 4.3 eV bleach decreases peak 5a dramatically and increases peak 4 (a hole-only configuration). No such effect is observed following the 3.6 eV bleach. The results strongly support the suggested structures giving rise to the 4.3 eV and 3.8 eV bands observed in the optical absorption energy spectrum.

  14. Calculation of energy deposition, photon and neutron production in proton therapy of thyroid gland using MCNPX.

    PubMed

    Mowlavi, Ali Asghar; Fornasie, Maria Rosa; de Denaro, Mario

    2011-01-01

    In this study, the MCNPX code has been used to simulate a proton therapy in thyroid gland, in order to calculate the proton energy deposition in the target region. As well as, we have calculated the photon and neutron production spectra due to proton interactions with the tissue. We have considered all the layers of tissue, from the skin to the thyroid gland, and an incident high energy pencil proton beam. The results of the simulation show that the best proton energy interval, to cover completely the thyroid tissue, is from 42 to 54 MeV, assuming that the thyroid gland has a 14 mm thickness and is located 11.2mm under the skin surface. The most percentage of deposited energy (78%) is related to the 54 MeV proton energy beam. Total photon and neutron production are linear and polynomial second order functions of the proton energy, respectively.

  15. Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrum of AE Aquarii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauche, Christopher W.

    2010-03-01

    The nova-like cataclysmic binary AE Aqr was observed for over two binary orbits in 2005 August with the High-Energy Transmission Grating onboard the Chandra X-ray Observatory. The resulting spectrum is reasonably well fit by an optically thin multi-temperature thermal plasma model with a Gaussian emission measure distribution that peaks at log T (K)=7.16, has a width sigma=0.4, an Fe abundance equal to 0.44 times solar, other metal abundances equal to 0.76 times solar, an emission measure EM=8.0x1053 cm-3, and a 0.5-10 keV X-ray luminosity LX=1.1x1031 erg s-1. Based on the f/(i+r) flux ratios of the He alpha triplets of N VI, O VII, Ne IX, Mg XI, and Si XIII in the XMM-Newton RGS and Chandra HETG spectra, we find that either the electron density of the plasma increases with temperature by over three orders of magnitude, from ne 6x1010 cm-3 for N VI to ne 1x1014 cm-3 for Si XIII, and/or the plasma is significantly affected by photoexcitation. The radial velocity of the X-ray emission lines varies on the white dwarf spin phase, with two oscillations per spin cycle and an amplitude K 160 km s-1 . These results appear to be inconsistent with the recent models of Itoh et al., Ikhsanov, and Venter & Meintjes of an extended, low-density source of X-rays in AE Aqr, but instead support earlier models in which the dominant source of X-rays is of high density and/or in close proximity to the white dwarf. Support for this work was provided by NASA through Chandra Award Number GO5-6020X issued by the Chandra X-ray Observatory Center, which is operated by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory for and on behalf of NASA under contract NAS8-03060. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  16. On the low energy end of the QCD spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leutwyler, H.

    2009-01-01

    The experimental results on the K and K3π decays, those on pionic atoms and recent work on the lattice confirm the predictions obtained on the basis of χPT. As a result, the energy gap of QCD is now understood very well and there is no doubt that the expansion in powers of the two lightest quark masses does represent a very useful tool for the analysis of the low energy structure. Concerning the expansion in powers of m, however, the current situation leaves much to be desired. While some of the lattice results indicate, for instance, that the violations of the Okubo-Iizuka-Zweig rule in the quark condensate and in the decay constants are rather modest, others point in the opposite direction. In view of the remarkable progress being made with the numerical simulation of light quarks, I am confident that the dust will settle soon, so that the effective coupling constants that govern the dependence of the various quantities of physical interest on m can reliably be determined, to next-to-next-to-leading order of the chiral expansion. The range of validity of χPT can be extended by means of dispersive methods. The properties of the physical states occurring in the spectrum of QCD below KK¯ threshold can reliably be investigated on this basis. In particular, as shown only rather recently, general principles of quantum field theory lead to an exact formula that expresses the mass and width of resonances in terms of observable quantities. The formula removes the ambiguities inherent in the analytic continuation from the real axis into the complex plane, which plagued previous determinations of the pole positions of broad resonances. The application to the ππ partial wave amplitude with I=ℓ=0 shows that there is a resonance in this channel, at M-i/2Γ≃441-i272 MeV: the lowest resonance of QCD carries the quantum numbers of the vacuum.

  17. Photonic simulation of topological superconductor edge state and zero-energy mode at a vortex.

    PubMed

    Tan, Wei; Chen, Liang; Ji, Xia; Lin, Hai-Qing

    2014-12-09

    Photonic simulations of quantum Hall edge states and topological insulators have inspired considerable interest in recent years. Interestingly, there are theoretical predictions for another type of topological states in topological superconductors, but debates over their experimental observations still remain. Here we investigate the photonic analogue of the p(x) + ip(y) model of topological superconductor. Two essential characteristics of topological superconductor, particle-hole symmetry and p(x) + ip(y) pairing potentials, are well emulated in photonic systems. Its topological features are presented by chiral edge state and zero-energy mode at a vortex. This work may fertilize the study of photonic topological states, and open up the possibility for emulating wave behaviors in superconductors.

  18. Photonic simulation of topological superconductor edge state and zero-energy mode at a vortex

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Wei; Chen, Liang; Ji, Xia; Lin, Hai-Qing

    2014-01-01

    Photonic simulations of quantum Hall edge states and topological insulators have inspired considerable interest in recent years. Interestingly, there are theoretical predictions for another type of topological states in topological superconductors, but debates over their experimental observations still remain. Here we investigate the photonic analogue of the px + ipy model of topological superconductor. Two essential characteristics of topological superconductor, particle-hole symmetry and px + ipy pairing potentials, are well emulated in photonic systems. Its topological features are presented by chiral edge state and zero-energy mode at a vortex. This work may fertilize the study of photonic topological states, and open up the possibility for emulating wave behaviors in superconductors. PMID:25488408

  19. A New Formula for Energy Spectrum of Sputtered Atoms Due to Low-Energy Light Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenmotsu, Takahiro; Yamamura, Yasunori; Ono, Tadayoshi; Kawamura, Takaichi

    A new formula has been derived to describe the energy spectrum of sputtered atoms from a target material bombarded by light ions. We assume that sputtered atoms bombarded by low-energy light ions are mainly primary knock-on atoms which are created by large-angle backscattered light ions. The escape processes of recoil atoms are estimated on the basis of the Falcone-Sigmund model. The new formula has the dependence on the incident energy of a projectile. We have compared the new formula with simulation results calculated with ACAT code for a Fe target material bombarded by 50eV, 100eV and 500eV D+ ions. Good agreements are found for 50eV and 100eV D+ ions.

  20. Electron, photons, and molecules: Storing energy from light

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.R.

    1996-09-01

    Molecular charge separation has important potential for photochemical energy storage. Its efficiency can be enhanced by principals which maximize the rates of the electron transfer steps which separate charge and minimize those which recombine high-energy charge pairs to lose stored energy. Dramatic scientific progress in understanding these principals has occurred since the founding of DOE and its predecessor agency ERDA. While additional knowledge in needed in broad areas of molecular electron transfer, some key areas of knowledge hold particular promise for the possibility of moving this area from science toward technology capable of contributing to the nation`s energy economy.

  1. In vivo imaging of cerebral energy metabolism with two-photon fluorescence lifetime microscopy of NADH

    PubMed Central

    Yaseen, Mohammad A.; Sakadžić, Sava; Wu, Weicheng; Becker, Wolfgang; Kasischke, Karl A.; Boas, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Minimally invasive, specific measurement of cellular energy metabolism is crucial for understanding cerebral pathophysiology. Here, we present high-resolution, in vivo observations of autofluorescence lifetime as a biomarker of cerebral energy metabolism in exposed rat cortices. We describe a customized two-photon imaging system with time correlated single photon counting detection and specialized software for modeling multiple-component fits of fluorescence decay and monitoring their transient behaviors. In vivo cerebral NADH fluorescence suggests the presence of four distinct components, which respond differently to brief periods of anoxia and likely indicate different enzymatic formulations. Individual components show potential as indicators of specific molecular pathways involved in oxidative metabolism. PMID:23412419

  2. In vivo imaging of cerebral energy metabolism with two-photon fluorescence lifetime microscopy of NADH.

    PubMed

    Yaseen, Mohammad A; Sakadžić, Sava; Wu, Weicheng; Becker, Wolfgang; Kasischke, Karl A; Boas, David A

    2013-02-01

    Minimally invasive, specific measurement of cellular energy metabolism is crucial for understanding cerebral pathophysiology. Here, we present high-resolution, in vivo observations of autofluorescence lifetime as a biomarker of cerebral energy metabolism in exposed rat cortices. We describe a customized two-photon imaging system with time correlated single photon counting detection and specialized software for modeling multiple-component fits of fluorescence decay and monitoring their transient behaviors. In vivo cerebral NADH fluorescence suggests the presence of four distinct components, which respond differently to brief periods of anoxia and likely indicate different enzymatic formulations. Individual components show potential as indicators of specific molecular pathways involved in oxidative metabolism.

  3. Measurement of the efficiency of gold transmission gratings in the 100 to 5000 eV photon energy range

    SciTech Connect

    Ruggles, L. E.; Cuneo, M. E.; Porter, J. L.; Wenger, D. F.; Simpson, W. W.

    2001-01-01

    Three x-ray spectrometers, each with a transmission grating dispersion element, are routinely used at the Z soft x-ray facility to measure the spectrum and temporal history of the absolute soft x-ray power emitted from z-pinch and hohlraum radiation sources. Our goal is to make these measurements within an accuracy of {+-}10%. We periodically characterize the efficiency of the gratings used in the spectrometers by using an electron-impact soft x-ray source, a monochromator, grazing-incidence mirrors, thin filters, and an x-ray charge-coupled device (CCD) detector. We measure the transmission efficiency of the gratings at many photon energies for several grating orders. For each grating, we calculate efficiency as a function of photon energy using published optical constants of gold and multiple-slit Fraunhofer diffraction theory and fit the calculation to the measurements using the physical parameters of the grating as variables. This article describes the measurement apparatus and calibration techniques, discusses the grating efficiency calculation and fitting procedure, and presents recent results.

  4. Fast x-ray detector system with simultaneous measurement of timing and energy for a single photon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuda, T.; Okubo, S.; Hara, H.; Hiraki, T.; Kitao, S.; Miyamoto, Y.; Okai, K.; Ozaki, R.; Sasao, N.; Seto, M.; Uetake, S.; Yamaguchi, A.; Yoda, Y.; Yoshimi, A.; Yoshimura, K.

    2017-06-01

    We developed a fast X-ray detector system for nuclear resonant scattering (NRS) experiments. Our system employs silicon avalanche photo-diode (Si-APD) as a fast X-ray sensor. The system is able to acquire both timing and energy of a single X-ray photon simultaneously in a high rate condition, 106 counts per second for one Si-APD. The performance of the system was investigated in SPring-8, a synchrotron radiation facility in Japan. Good time resolution of 120 ps (FWHM) was achieved with a slight tail distribution in the time spectrum by a level of 10-9 at 1 ns apart from the peak. Using this system, we successfully observed the NRS from the 26.27-keV level of mercury-201, which has a half-life of 630(50) ps. We also demonstrated the reduction of background events caused by radioactive decays in a radioactive sample by discriminating photon energy.

  5. Revisiting the hardening of the cosmic ray energy spectrum at TeV energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thoudam, Satyendra; Hörandel, Jörg R.

    2013-11-01

    Measurements of cosmic rays by experiments such as ATIC, CREAM and PAMELA indicate a hardening of the cosmic ray energy spectrum at TeV energies. In our recent work, we showed that the hardening can be due to the effect of nearby supernova remnants. We showed it for the case of protons and helium nuclei. In this paper, we present an improved and more detailed version of our previous work, and extend our study to heavier cosmic ray species such as boron, carbon, oxygen and iron nuclei. Unlike our previous study, the present work involves a detailed calculation of the background cosmic rays and follows a consistent treatment of cosmic ray source parameters between the background and the nearby components. Moreover, we also present a detailed comparison of our results on the secondary-to-primary ratios, secondary spectra and the diffuse gamma-ray spectrum with the results expected from other existing models, which can be checked by future measurements at high energies.

  6. Very heavy solar cosmic rays: energy spectrum and implications for lunar erosion.

    PubMed

    Fleischer, R L; Hart, H R; Comstock, G M

    1971-03-26

    The energy spectrum of solar cosmic-ray particles of the iron group has been determined for the first time over the energy range from 1 to 100 million electron volts per nucleon by the use of glass removed from the Surveyor 3 spacecraft. The difference between the observed (energy)(-3) spectrum and the limiting spectrum derived previously from tracks in lunar rocks gives an erosion rate of 0 to 2 angstroms per year. High-energy fission of lead, induced by galactic cosmicray protons and alpha particles, has also been observed.

  7. Neutron-photon discrimination and spectrum unfolding with a stilbene detector.

    PubMed

    Mertens, C; De Lellis, C; Tondeur, F

    2010-01-01

    As a first step into the development of a neutron dose monitor, a stilbene detector is used to test a procedure applicable to other organic scintillators allowing for neutron-photon discrimination. The pulses are measured by numerical acquisition and their amplitude and decay time are calculated by software. The discrimination is performed in an amplitude-decay time plot, and separate amplitude spectra are built. These spectra are unfolded MAXED, using the detector response matrices calculated with MCNPX. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Simultaneous suppression of time and energy uncertainties in a single-photon frequency-comb state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Changliang; Hofmann, Holger F.

    2014-05-01

    A single photon prepared in a time-energy state described by a frequency comb combines the extreme precision of energy defined by a single tooth of the comb with a high sensitivity to small shifts in time defined by the narrowness of a single pulse in the long sequence of pulses that describe the frequency-comb state in the time domain. We show how this simultaneous suppression of time and energy uncertainties can be described by a separation of scales, and we compare this with the suppression of uncertainties in the two-particle correlations of an entangled state. To illustrate the sensitivity of the frequency-comb states to small shifts in time and frequency, we consider the Hong-Ou-Mandel dips observed in two-photon interference when both time and frequency shifts between the input photons are varied. It is shown that the interference of two photons in equivalent frequency-comb states results in a two-dimensional Hong-Ou-Mandel dip that is narrow in both time and frequency, while the corresponding entangled photon pairs are only sensitive to temporal shifts. Frequency-comb states thus represent an alternative approach to quantum operations beyond the uncertainty limit.

  9. Effective atomic numbers, electron densities and kinetic energy released in matter of vitamins for photon interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shantappa, A.; Hanagodimath, S. M.

    2014-01-01

    Effective atomic numbers, electron densities of some vitamins (Retinol, Riboflavin, Niacin, Biotin, Folic acid, Cobalamin, Phylloquinone and Flavonoids) composed of C, H, O, N, Co, P and S have been calculated for total and partial photon interactions by the direct method for energy range 1 keV-100 GeV by using WinXCOM and kinetic energy released in matter (Kerma) relative to air is calculated in energy range of 1 keV-20 MeV. Change in effective atomic number and electron density with energy is calculated for all photon interactions. Variation of photon mass attenuation coefficients with energy are shown graphically only for total photon interaction. It is observed that change in mass attenuation coefficient with composition of different chemicals is very large below 100 keV and moderate between 100 keV and 10 MeV and negligible above 10 MeV. Behaviour of vitamins is almost indistinguishable except biotin and cobalamin because of large range of atomic numbers from 1(H) to 16 (S) and 1(H) to 27(Co) respectively. K a value shows a peak due to the photoelectric effect around K-absorption edge of high- Z constituent of compound for biotin and cobalamin.

  10. Energy spectrum of interplanetary magnetic flux ropes and its connection with solar activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, D. J.; Feng, H. Q.; Chao, J. K.

    2008-03-01

    Context: Recent observations of the solar wind show that interplanetary magnetic flux ropes (IMFRs) have a continuous scale-distribution from small-scale flux ropes to large-scale magnetic clouds. Aims: In this work, we investigate the energy spectrum of IMFRs and its possible connection with solar activity. Methods: In consideration of the detectable probability of an IMFR to be proportional to its diameter, the actual energy spectrum of IMFRs can be obtained from the observed spectrum based on spacecraft observations in the solar wind. Results: It is found that IMFRs have a negative power-law spectrum with an index α = 1.36±0.03, which is similar to that of solar flares, and is probably representative of interplanetary energy spectrum of coronal mass ejections (CMEs), that is, the energy spectrum of interplanetary CMEs (ICMEs). This indicates that the energy distribution of CMEs has a similar negative power-law spectrum. In particular, there are numerous small-scale CMEs in the solar corona, and their interplanetary consequences may be directly detected in situ by spacecraft in the solar wind as small-scale IMFRs, although they are too weak to appear clearly in current coronagraph observations. Conclusions: The presence of small-scale CMEs, especially the energy spectrum of CMEs is potentially important for understanding both the solar magneto-atmosphere and CMEs.

  11. Recent emergence of photon upconversion based on triplet energy migration in molecular assemblies.

    PubMed

    Yanai, Nobuhiro; Kimizuka, Nobuo

    2016-04-07

    An emerging field of triplet energy migration-based photon upconversion (TEM-UC) is reviewed. Highly efficient photon upconversion has been realized in a wide range of chromophore assemblies, such as non-solvent liquids, ionic liquids, amorphous solids, gels, supramolecular assemblies, molecular crystals, and metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). The control over their assembly structures allows for unexpected air-stability and maximum upconversion quantum yield at weak solar irradiance that has never been achieved by the conventional molecular diffusion-based mechanism. The introduction of the "self-assembly" concept offers a new perspective in photon upconversion research and triplet exciton science, which show promise for numerous applications ranging from solar energy conversion to chemical biology.

  12. Reconstruction of the energy spectrum of electrons accelerated in the April 15, 2002 solar flare based on IRIS X-ray spectrometer measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motorina, G. G.; Kudryavtsev, I. V.; Lazutkov, V. P.; Savchenko, M. I.; Skorodumov, D. V.; Charikov, Yu. E.

    2016-04-01

    We reconstruct the energy distribution of electrons accelerated in the April 15, 2002 solar flare on the basis of the data from the IRIS X-ray spectrometer onboard the CORONAS-F satellite. We obtain the solution to the integral equations describing the transformation of the spectrum of X-ray photons during the recording and reconstruction of the spectrum of accelerated electrons in the bremsstrahlung source using the random search method and the Tikhonov regularization method. In this event, we detected a singularity in the electron spectrum associated with the existence of a local minimum in the energy range 40-60 keV, which cannot be detected by a direct method.

  13. Current dependence of the hot-spot response spectrum of superconducting single-photon detectors with different layouts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charaev, I.; Semenov, A.; Doerner, S.; Gomard, G.; Ilin, K.; Siegel, M.

    2017-02-01

    We show that avoiding bends in a current-carrying superconducting nanowire enhances the probability for low energy photons to be detected and that this enhancement is entirely due to the increase in the experimentally achievable critical current. We studied nanowires shaped as either meander or spiral. The spirals had different layouts, a double-spiral layout with an S-turn in the middle and a single-spiral layout without such a turn. Nanowires were prepared from films of niobium nitride with a thickness of 5 nm. For specimens with each layout we measured the spectra of the single-photon response in the wavelength range from 400 nm to 1600 nm and defined the cut-off wavelength (λ c) beyond which the response rolls off. The largest and the smallest λ c were found for the single-spiral layout and for the meander, respectively. For all three layouts the relationship between λ c and the relative bias current falls onto a universal curve which has been predicted earlier in the framework of the modified hot-spot model. For the single-spiral layout, the efficiency of photon detection at wavelengths smaller than λ c reaches the expected absorbance of the spiral structure and the timing jitter per unit length of the nanowire has the smallest value.

  14. Electron contamination in clinical high energy photon beams.

    PubMed

    Sjögren, R; Karlsson, M

    1996-11-01

    The electron contamination in photon beams has been investigated by means of contaminating lepton depth doses and dose profiles in different geometries with two 20 MV beams. Different components of this contamination have been investigated separately by systematically adding contamination to a "clean" reference field. At 20 MV, the air generated electrons were found to be almost negligible compared to the electrons originating from the accelerator head when measurements were performed in standard fields at SSDs between 80 and 120 cm. The total electron part of the depth dose curve was then almost the same, i.e., independent of SSD, when the collimator opening was held fixed. However, when different accessories such as a shaping block and different attenuating plates were located in the beam path below the collimators, a large SSD dependence of the electron contamination was noticed. A comparison was also made between two machines, one equipped with a multileaf collimator, with similar beam qualities at 20 MV. These measurements indicate that the interior view of the treatment head seen by the detector (mainly the flattening filter, monitor chamber, or other electron generating material) influences the magnitude of the electron contamination. When the collimator opening is decreased the electron contamination will also decrease as parts of the electron source will be shielded by the collimator blocks.

  15. Understanding the two-photon absorption spectrum of PE2 platinum acetylide complex.

    PubMed

    Vivas, Marcelo G; De Boni, Leonardo; Cooper, Thomas M; Mendonca, Cleber R

    2014-07-31

    Herein, we report on the two-absorption cross-section spectrum of trans-Pt(PBu3)2 (C≡C-C6H4-C≡C-C6H5)2 (PE2) platinum acetylide complex employing the femtosecond wavelength-tunable Z-scan technique. The PE2 complex can be visualized as two branches containing two phenylacetylene units, each one linked by a platinum center, completely transparent in the visible region. Because of this structure, large delocalization of π-electrons allied to the strong intramolecular interaction between the branches is expected. The 2PA absorption spectrum was measured using the femtosecond wavelength-tunable Z-scan technique with low repetition rate (1 kHz), in order to obtain the 2PA spectrum without excited-state contributions. Our results reveal that PE2 in dichloromethane solution presents two 2PA allowed bands located at 570 and 710 nm, with cross section of about 320 and 45 GM, respectively. The first one is related to the strong intramolecular interaction between the molecule's branches due to the presence of platinum atom, while the second one is associated with the breaking of symmetry of the chromophore in solution due, most probably to a large twisting angle of the ligand's phenyl rings relative to the Pt core.

  16. Hydrogen-like atom in a superstrong magnetic field: Photon emission and relativistic energy level shift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skobelev, V. V.

    2017-06-01

    Following our previous work, additional arguments are presented that in superstrong magnetic fields B ≫ (Zα)2 B 0, B 0 = m 2 c 3/ eħ ≈ 4.41 × 1013 G, the Dirac equation and the Schrödinger equation for an electron in the nucleus field following from it become spatially one-dimensional with the only z coordinate along the magnetic field, "Dirac" spinors become two-component, while the 2 × 2 matrices operate in the {0; 3} subspace. Based on the obtained solution of the Dirac equation and the known solution of the "onedimensional" Schrödinger equation by ordinary QED methods extrapolated to the {0; 3} subspace, the probability of photon emission by a "one-dimensional" hydrogen-like atom is calculated, which, for example, for the Lyman-alpha line differs almost twice from the probability in the "three-dimensional" case. Similarly, despite the coincidence of nonrelativistic energy levels, the calculated relativistic corrections of the order of (Zα)4 substantially differ from corrections in the absence of a magnetic field. A conclusion is made that, by analyzing the hydrogen emission spectrum and emission spectra at all, we can judge in principle about the presence or absence of superstrong magnetic fields in the vicinity of magnetars (neutron stars and probably brown dwarfs). Possible prospects of applying the proposed method for calculations of multielectron atoms are pointed out and the possibility of a more reliable determination of the presence of superstrong magnetic fields in magnetars by this method is considered.

  17. The difference of scoring dose to water or tissues in Monte Carlo dose calculations for low energy brachytherapy photon sources.

    PubMed

    Landry, Guillaume; Reniers, Brigitte; Pignol, Jean-Philippe; Beaulieu, Luc; Verhaegen, Frank

    2011-03-01

    the small variation with distance, using conversion factors based on the emitted photon spectrum (or its mean energy) of a given source introduces minimal error. The large differences observed between scoring schemes underline the need for guidelines on choice of media for dose reporting. Providing such guidelines is beyond the scope of this work.

  18. The difference of scoring dose to water or tissues in Monte Carlo dose calculations for low energy brachytherapy photon sources

    SciTech Connect

    Landry, Guillaume; Reniers, Brigitte; Pignol, Jean-Philippe; Beaulieu, Luc; Verhaegen, Frank

    2011-03-15

    ,m)} over D{sub 90(m,m)} for clinical implants matches D{sub w,m}/D{sub m,m} at 1 cm from the single point sources. Conclusions: Given the small variation with distance, using conversion factors based on the emitted photon spectrum (or its mean energy) of a given source introduces minimal error. The large differences observed between scoring schemes underline the need for guidelines on choice of media for dose reporting. Providing such guidelines is beyond the scope of this work.

  19. Breast Radiotherapy with Mixed Energy Photons; a Model for Optimal Beam Weighting.

    PubMed

    Birgani, Mohammadjavad Tahmasebi; Fatahiasl, Jafar; Hosseini, Seyed Mohammad; Bagheri, Ali; Behrooz, Mohammad Ali; Zabiehzadeh, Mansour; Meskani, Reza; Gomari, Maryam Talaei

    2015-01-01

    Utilization of high energy photons (>10 MV) with an optimal weight using a mixed energy technique is a practical way to generate a homogenous dose distribution while maintaining adequate target coverage in intact breast radiotherapy. This study represents a model for estimation of this optimal weight for day to day clinical usage. For this purpose, treatment planning computed tomography scans of thirty-three consecutive early stage breast cancer patients following breast conservation surgery were analyzed. After delineation of the breast clinical target volume (CTV) and placing opposed wedge paired isocenteric tangential portals, dosimeteric calculations were conducted and dose volume histograms (DVHs) were generated, first with pure 6 MV photons and then these calculations were repeated ten times with incorporating 18 MV photons (ten percent increase in weight per step) in each individual patient. For each calculation two indexes including maximum dose in the breast CTV (Dmax) and the volume of CTV which covered with 95% Isodose line (VCTV, 95%IDL) were measured according to the DVH data and then normalized values were plotted in a graph. The optimal weight of 18 MV photons was defined as the intersection point of Dmax and VCTV, 95%IDL graphs. For creating a model to predict this optimal weight multiple linear regression analysis was used based on some of the breast and tangential field parameters. The best fitting model for prediction of 18 MV photons optimal weight in breast radiotherapy using mixed energy technique, incorporated chest wall separation plus central lung distance (Adjusted R2=0.776). In conclusion, this study represents a model for the estimation of optimal beam weighting in breast radiotherapy using mixed photon energy technique for routine day to day clinical usage.

  20. Energy transfer and energy absorption in photon interactions with matter revisited: A step-by-step illustrated approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Rahman, W.; Podgorsak, E. B.

    2010-05-01

    A clear understanding of energy transfer and energy absorption in photon interactions with matter is essential for the understanding of radiation dosimetry and development of new dosimetry techniques. The concepts behind the two quantities have been enunciated many years ago and described in many scientific papers, review articles, and textbooks. Data dealing with energy transfer and energy absorption as well as the associated mass energy transfer coefficient and the mass energy absorption coefficient are readily available in web-based tabular forms. However, tables, even when available in detailed and easy to access form, do not lend themselves to serve as visual aid to promote better understanding of the dosimetric quantities related to energy transfer and energy absorption as well as their relationship to the photon energy and absorber atomic number. This paper uses graphs and illustrations, in addition to well-known mathematical relationships, to guide the reader in a systematic manner through the various stages involved in the derivation of energy absorbed in medium and its associated quantity, the mass energy absorption coefficient, from the mass attenuation coefficient.

  1. Spectrum and ionization rate of low-energy Galactic cosmic rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath, Biman B.; Gupta, Nayantara; Biermann, Peter L.

    2012-09-01

    We consider the rate of ionization of diffuse and molecular clouds in the interstellar medium by Galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) in order to constrain its low-energy spectrum. We extrapolate the GCR spectrum obtained from PAMELA at high energies (≥200 GeV nucleon-1) and a recently derived GCR proton flux at 1-200 GeV from observations of gamma-rays from molecular clouds, and find that the observed average Galactic ionization rate can be reconciled with this GCR spectrum if there is a low-energy cut-off for protons at 10-100 MeV. We also identify the flattening below a few GeV as being due to (a) decrease of the diffusion coefficient and dominance of convective loss at low energy and (b) the expected break in energy spectrum for a constant spectral index in momentum. We show that the inferred CR proton spectrum of ? for Ekin≤ few GeV is consistent with a power-law spectrum in momentum p-2.45± 0.4, which we identify as the spectrum at source. Diffusion loss at higher energies then introduces a steepening by E-α with α˜ 1/3, making it consistent with high-energy measurements.

  2. Energy Spectrum of Ultra High Energy Cosmic Ray Showers Using Hybrid Analysis from Telescope Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Monica; Abu-Zayyad, Tareq; Stokes, Benjamin

    2011-10-01

    The Telescope Array studies ultra high energy cosmic rays using a hybrid detector. Fluorescence telescopes measure the longitudinal development of the extensive air shower generated by a primary cosmic ray particle, while scintillator detectors measure the lateral distribution of secondary particles that hit the ground. The Middle Drum (MD) fluorescence telescope consists of 14 refurbished telescopes from the High Resolution Fly's Eye experiment (HiRes), providing a direct link back to the HiRes experiment and data. Using the scintillator detector data in conjunction with the MD data improves the geometrical reconstruction of the showers significantly, and hence, provides a more accurate reconstruction of the energy of the primary particle. The method for determining the spectrum will be described. The event selection and reconstruction process, along with the Monte Carlo simulation used for calculating the detector aperture and exposure will also be discussed. Detector resolutions and comparisons between Monte Carlo and data distributions of key variables that contribute to the aperture will be shown to validate the simulation. Finally, the resulting hybrid spectrum obtained from the Middle Drum fluorescence detector will be presented.

  3. Material separation in x-ray CT with energy resolved photon-counting detectors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaolan; Meier, Dirk; Taguchi, Katsuyuki; Wagenaar, Douglas J; Patt, Bradley E; Frey, Eric C

    2011-03-01

    The objective of the study was to demonstrate that, in x-ray computed tomography (CT), more than two types of materials can be effectively separated with the use of an energy resolved photon-counting detector and classification methodology. Specifically, this applies to the case when contrast agents that contain K-absorption edges in the energy range of interest are present in the object. This separation is enabled via the use of recently developed energy resolved photon-counting detectors with multiple thresholds, which allow simultaneous measurements of the x-ray attenuation at multiple energies. To demonstrate this capability, we performed simulations and physical experiments using a six-threshold energy resolved photon-counting detector. We imaged mouse-sized cylindrical phantoms filled with several soft-tissue-like and bone-like materials and with iodine-based and gadolinium-based contrast agents. The linear attenuation coefficients were reconstructed for each material in each energy window and were visualized as scatter plots between pairs of energy windows. For comparison, a dual-kVp CT was also simulated using the same phantom materials. In this case, the linear attenuation coefficients at the lower kVp were plotted against those at the higher kVp. In both the simulations and the physical experiments, the contrast agents were easily separable from other soft-tissue-like and bone-like materials, thanks to the availability of the attenuation coefficient measurements at more than two energies provided by the energy resolved photon-counting detector. In the simulations, the amount of separation was observed to be proportional to the concentration of the contrast agents; however, this was not observed in the physical experiments due to limitations of the real detector system. We used the angle between pairs of attenuation coefficient vectors in either the 5-D space (for non-contrast-agent materials using energy resolved photon-counting acquisition) or a 2-D

  4. Material separation in x-ray CT with energy resolved photon-counting detectors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaolan; Meier, Dirk; Taguchi, Katsuyuki; Wagenaar, Douglas J.; Patt, Bradley E.; Frey, Eric C.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The objective of the study was to demonstrate that, in x-ray computed tomography (CT), more than two types of materials can be effectively separated with the use of an energy resolved photon-counting detector and classification methodology. Specifically, this applies to the case when contrast agents that contain K-absorption edges in the energy range of interest are present in the object. This separation is enabled via the use of recently developed energy resolved photon-counting detectors with multiple thresholds, which allow simultaneous measurements of the x-ray attenuation at multiple energies. Methods: To demonstrate this capability, we performed simulations and physical experiments using a six-threshold energy resolved photon-counting detector. We imaged mouse-sized cylindrical phantoms filled with several soft-tissue-like and bone-like materials and with iodine-based and gadolinium-based contrast agents. The linear attenuation coefficients were reconstructed for each material in each energy window and were visualized as scatter plots between pairs of energy windows. For comparison, a dual-kVp CT was also simulated using the same phantom materials. In this case, the linear attenuation coefficients at the lower kVp were plotted against those at the higher kVp. Results: In both the simulations and the physical experiments, the contrast agents were easily separable from other soft-tissue-like and bone-like materials, thanks to the availability of the attenuation coefficient measurements at more than two energies provided by the energy resolved photon-counting detector. In the simulations, the amount of separation was observed to be proportional to the concentration of the contrast agents; however, this was not observed in the physical experiments due to limitations of the real detector system. We used the angle between pairs of attenuation coefficient vectors in either the 5-D space (for non-contrast-agent materials using energy resolved photon

  5. Material separation in x-ray CT with energy resolved photon-counting detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Xiaolan; Meier, Dirk; Taguchi, Katsuyuki; Wagenaar, Douglas J.; Patt, Bradley E.; Frey, Eric C.

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: The objective of the study was to demonstrate that, in x-ray computed tomography (CT), more than two types of materials can be effectively separated with the use of an energy resolved photon-counting detector and classification methodology. Specifically, this applies to the case when contrast agents that contain K-absorption edges in the energy range of interest are present in the object. This separation is enabled via the use of recently developed energy resolved photon-counting detectors with multiple thresholds, which allow simultaneous measurements of the x-ray attenuation at multiple energies. Methods: To demonstrate this capability, we performed simulations and physical experiments using a six-threshold energy resolved photon-counting detector. We imaged mouse-sized cylindrical phantoms filled with several soft-tissue-like and bone-like materials and with iodine-based and gadolinium-based contrast agents. The linear attenuation coefficients were reconstructed for each material in each energy window and were visualized as scatter plots between pairs of energy windows. For comparison, a dual-kVp CT was also simulated using the same phantom materials. In this case, the linear attenuation coefficients at the lower kVp were plotted against those at the higher kVp. Results: In both the simulations and the physical experiments, the contrast agents were easily separable from other soft-tissue-like and bone-like materials, thanks to the availability of the attenuation coefficient measurements at more than two energies provided by the energy resolved photon-counting detector. In the simulations, the amount of separation was observed to be proportional to the concentration of the contrast agents; however, this was not observed in the physical experiments due to limitations of the real detector system. We used the angle between pairs of attenuation coefficient vectors in either the 5-D space (for non-contrast-agent materials using energy resolved photon

  6. Single photoionization of the Zn ii ion in the photon energy range 17.5-90.0 eV: experiment and theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinojosa, G.; Davis, V. T.; Covington, A. M.; Thompson, J. S.; Kilcoyne, A. L. D.; Antillón, A.; Hernández, E. M.; Calabrese, D.; Morales-Mori, A.; Juárez, A. M.; Windelius, O.; McLaughlin, B. M.

    2017-10-01

    Measurements of the single-photoionization cross-section of Cu-like Zn+ ions are reported in the energy (wavelength) range 17.5 eV (708 Å) to 90 eV (138 Å). The measurements on this trans-Fe element were performed at the Advanced Light Source synchrotron radiation facility in Berkeley, California at a photon energy resolution of 17 meV using the photon-ion merged-beams end-station. Below 30 eV, the spectrum is dominated by excitation autoionizing resonance states. The experimental results are compared with large-scale photoionization cross-section calculations performed using a Dirac Coulomb R-matrix approximation. Comparisons are made with previous experimental studies, resonance states are identified and contributions from metastable states of Zn+ are determined.

  7. Cryogenic detectors based on superconducting transition-edge sensors for time-energy-resolved single-photon counters and for dark matter searches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabrera, B.; Clarke, R.; Miller, A.; Nam, S. W.; Romani, R.; Saab, T.; Young, B.

    2000-05-01

    We present the recent progress using transition-edge sensors (TES) for cryogenic particle detectors. First, by directly absorbing photons in tungsten TES devices, an instrument has been made which time stamps (0.1μs) and energy resolves (0.15 eV FWHM) each photon at rates up to 10 kHz. Observations of the Crab pulsar are the first broad spectrum infrared through full optical and time resolved on any astronomical object. Second, in the CDMS (cryogenic dark matter search) experiment looking for WIMPs, large crystals of silicon and germanium are instrumented with QET (quasiparticle-trap-assisted electrothermal-feedback transition-edge sensors) phonon sensors which provide the recoil energy and location in /x,y and /z for each event. Together with an ionization readout, these detectors provide powerful discrimination capabilities against known backgrounds and they are now probing new regions for WIMP dark matter.

  8. Extending the photon energy coverage of an x-ray self-seeding FEL via the reverse taper enhanced harmonic generation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kaiqing; Qi, Zheng; Feng, Chao; Deng, Haixiao; Wang, Dong; Zhao, Zhentang

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, a simple method is proposed to extend the photon energy range of a soft x-ray self-seeding free-electron laser (FEL). A normal monochromator is first applied to purify the FEL spectrum and provide a coherent seeding signal. This coherent signal then interacts with the electron beam in the following reverse tapered undulator section to generate strong coherent microbunchings while maintain the good quality of the electron beam. After that, the pre-bunched electron beam is sent into the third undulator section which resonates at a target high harmonic of the seed to amplify the coherent radiation at shorter wavelength. Three dimensional simulations have been performed and the results demonstrate that the photon energy gap between 1.5 keV and 4.5 keV of the self-seeding scheme can be fully covered and 100 GW-level peak power can be achieved by using the proposed technique.

  9. Historical review of lung counting efficiencies for low energy photon emitters

    DOE PAGES

    Jeffers, Karen L.; Hickman, David P.

    2014-03-01

    This publication reviews the measured efficiency and variability over time of a high purity planar germanium in vivo lung count system for multiple photon energies using increasingly thick overlays with the Lawrence Livermore Torso Phantom. Furthermore, the measured variations in efficiency are compared with the current requirement for in vivo bioassay performance as defined by the American National Standards Institute Standard.

  10. Comparing human observer performance in detecting microcalcifications with energy weighting and photon counting breast CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalluri, Kesava; Mahd, Mufeed; Glick, Stephen J.

    2012-03-01

    Breast CT (BCT) using a photon counting detector (PCD) has a number of advantages that can potentially improve clinical performance. Previous computer simulation studies showed that the signal to noise ratio (SNR) for microcalcifications is higher with energy weighted photon counting BCT as compared to cesium iodide energy integrating detector (CsI-EID) based BCT. CsI-EID inherently weighs the incident x-ray photons in direct proportion to the energy (contradicting the information content) which is not an optimal approach. PCD do not inherently weigh the incident photons. By choosing optimal energy weights, higher SNR can be achieved for microcalcifications and hence better detectability. In this simulation study, forward projection data of a numerical breast phantom with microcalcifications inserted were acquired using CsI-EID and PCD. The PCD projections were optimally weighed, and reconstructed using filtered back-projection. We compared observer performance in identifying microcalcifications in the reconstructed images using ROC analysis. ROC based results show that the average area(s) under curve(s) (AUC) for AUCPCD based methods are higher than the average AUCCsI-EID method.

  11. Estimating photon interaction coefficients from single energy x-ray CT.

    PubMed

    Midgley, S M

    2012-12-07

    Single energy x-ray analysis is explored in the context of computed tomography (CT), whereby Hounsfield numbers (HN) are used to estimate electron density N(e) and parameters that describe composition. We examine measurements with tissue substitute materials and theoretical HN for a broad range of tissues. Results are combined with parametric models for the x-ray linear attenuation coefficient μ and energy absorption coefficient μ(en) to predict values at energies 10 keV to 20 MeV. At photon energies employed for CT, the fractional contribution to μ from composition is 0.1-0.4 for soft tissues to bone respectively, and is responsible for strong correlations between HN and N(e). The atomic density of tissues excluding lung is near constant allowing the models to be re-expressed as a function of N(e) alone. The transformed model is subjected to propagation of error analysis and results are presented as the ratio of uncertainties for μ or μ(en) to those for N(e). For soft tissues to bone the ratios are as follows: at photon energies 20-100 keV the ratio is 5.0-2.0, at intermediate energies it is unity and increases above 4 MeV to reach 1.5-2.0 at 20 MeV. Results are discussed in the context of attenuation correction and dosimetry calculations for the same range of photon energies.

  12. Experimental characterization of APS undulator A at high photon energies (50-200 keV).

    PubMed

    Shastri, S D; Dejus, R J; Haeffner, D R

    1998-03-01

    The considerable intensity of Advanced Photon Source (APS) undulator A as a source of high-energy X-rays permits the performance of numerous types of experiments that require such photon energies. Measured and calculated properties, in the 50-200 keV range, of the X-ray beam from undulator A, installed in sector 1 of the APS, are presented. The flux spectra observed at various gaps agree well with calculations that incorporate the actual magnetic field within the device and the emittance and energy spread of the stored positrons. The field errors and energy spread cause the X-ray beam to lose undulator radiation properties at high energies, as seen in the smeared-out spectral harmonics and increased beam divergence, giving resemblance to a low-K wiggler source. Owing to the wiggler-like behavior in this photon-energy range, the optimal operating condition for undulator A is in the vicinity of the closed-gap setting, corresponding to a maximum critical energy.

  13. Estimating photon interaction coefficients from single energy x-ray CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Midgley, S. M.

    2012-12-01

    Single energy x-ray analysis is explored in the context of computed tomography (CT), whereby Hounsfield numbers (HN) are used to estimate electron density Ne and parameters that describe composition. We examine measurements with tissue substitute materials and theoretical HN for a broad range of tissues. Results are combined with parametric models for the x-ray linear attenuation coefficient μ and energy absorption coefficient μen to predict values at energies 10 keV to 20 MeV. At photon energies employed for CT, the fractional contribution to μ from composition is 0.1-0.4 for soft tissues to bone respectively, and is responsible for strong correlations between HN and Ne. The atomic density of tissues excluding lung is near constant allowing the models to be re-expressed as a function of Ne alone. The transformed model is subjected to propagation of error analysis and results are presented as the ratio of uncertainties for μ or μen to those for Ne. For soft tissues to bone the ratios are as follows: at photon energies 20-100 keV the ratio is 5.0-2.0, at intermediate energies it is unity and increases above 4 MeV to reach 1.5-2.0 at 20 MeV. Results are discussed in the context of attenuation correction and dosimetry calculations for the same range of photon energies.

  14. Accelerator Technology and High Energy Physics Experiments, Photonics Applications and Web Engineering, Wilga, May 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romaniuk, Ryszard S.

    2012-05-01

    The paper is the second part (out of five) of the research survey of WILGA Symposium work, May 2012 Edition, concerned with accelerator technology and high energy physics experiments. It presents a digest of chosen technical work results shown by young researchers from different technical universities from this country during the XXXth Jubilee SPIE-IEEE Wilga 2012, May Edition, symposium on Photonics and Web Engineering. Topical tracks of the symposium embraced, among others, nanomaterials and nanotechnologies for photonics, sensory and nonlinear optical fibers, object oriented design of hardware, photonic metrology, optoelectronics and photonics applications, photonicselectronics co-design, optoelectronic and electronic systems for astronomy and high energy physics experiments, JET and pi-of-the sky experiments development. The symposium is an annual summary in the development of numerable Ph.D. theses carried out in this country in the area of advanced electronic and photonic systems. It is also a great occasion for SPIE, IEEE, OSA and PSP students to meet together in a large group spanning the whole country with guests from this part of Europe. A digest of Wilga references is presented [1-275].

  15. Response of lithium formate EPR dosimeters at photon energies relevant to the dosimetry of brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Adolfsson, Emelie; Alm Carlsson, Gudrun; Grindborg, Jan-Erik; Gustafsson, Haakan; Lund, Eva; Carlsson Tedgren, Aasa

    2010-09-15

    Purpose: To investigate experimentally the energy dependence of the detector response of lithium formate EPR dosimeters for photon energies below 1 MeV relative to that at {sup 60}Co energies. High energy photon beams are used in calibrating dosimeters for use in brachytherapy since the absorbed dose to water can be determined with high accuracy in such beams using calibrated ion chambers and standard dosimetry protocols. In addition to any differences in mass-energy absorption properties between water and detector, variations in radiation yield (detector response) with radiation quality, caused by differences in the density of ionization in the energy imparted (LET), may exist. Knowledge of an eventual deviation in detector response with photon energy is important for attaining high accuracy in measured brachytherapy dose distributions. Methods: Lithium formate EPR dosimeters were irradiated to known levels of air kerma in 25-250 kV x-ray beams and in {sup 137}Cs and {sup 60}Co beams at the Swedish Secondary Standards Dosimetry Laboratory. Conversions from air kerma free in air into values of mean absorbed dose to the detectors were made using EGSnrc MC simulations and x-ray energy spectra measured or calculated for the actual beams. The signals from the detectors were measured using EPR spectrometry. Detector response (the EPR signal per mean absorbed dose to the detector) relative to that for {sup 60}Co was determined for each beam quality. Results: Significant decreases in the relative response ranging from 5% to 6% were seen for x-ray beams at tube voltages {<=}180 kV. No significant reduction in the relative response was seen for {sup 137}Cs and 250 kV x rays. Conclusions: When calibrated in {sup 60}Co or MV photon beams, corrections for the photon energy dependence of detector response are needed to achieve the highest accuracy when using lithium formate EPR dosimeters for measuring absorbed doses around brachytherapy sources emitting photons in the energy

  16. Signature-based search for delayed photons in exclusive photon plus missing transverse energy events from pp¯ collisions with s=1.96TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaltonen, T.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Bae, T.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bedeschi, F.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Bland, K. R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Butti, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calamba, A.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Cremonesi, M.; Cruz, D.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; d'Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; De Barbaro, P.; Demortier, L.; Deninno, M.; d'Errico, M.; Devoto, F.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; D'Onofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dorigo, M.; Driutti, A.; Ebina, K.; Edgar, R.; Elagin, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, S.; Esham, B.; Eusebi, R.; Farrington, S.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Frisch, H.; Funakoshi, Y.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González López, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gramellini, E.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Hahn, S. R.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Harrington-Taber, T.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hocker, A.; Hong, Z.; Hopkins, W.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R. E.; Husemann, U.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jindariani, S.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Junk, T. R.; Kambeitz, M.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kasmi, A.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. J.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Knoepfel, K.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Kruse, M.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lannon, K.; Latino, G.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Limosani, A.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Liu, H.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Lucà, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maestro, P.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, P.; Martínez, M.; Matera, K.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzacane, A.; Mazzanti, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Nigmanov, T.; Nodulman, L.; Noh, S. Y.; Norniella, O.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Palni, P.; Papadimitriou, V.; Parker, W.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poprocki, S.; Potamianos, K.; Pranko, A.; Prokoshin, F.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo Fernández, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodriguez, T.; Rolli, S.; Ronzani, M.; Roser, R.; Rosner, J. L.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Sakurai, Y.; Santi, L.; Sato, K.; Saveliev, V.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scuri, F.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sforza, F.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shochet, M.; Shreyber-Tecker, I.; Simonenko, A.; Sinervo, P.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Song, H.; Sorin, V.; Stancari, M.; Denis, R. St.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Sudo, Y.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Takemasa, K.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tang, J.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Thom, J.; Thomson, E.; Thukral, V.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Trovato, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Vernieri, C.; Vidal, M.; Vilar, R.; Vizán, J.; Vogel, M.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S. M.; Warburton, A.; Waters, D.; Wester, W. C., III; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wilbur, S.; Williams, H. H.; Wilson, J. S.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, H.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Wu, Z.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamato, D.; Yang, T.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W.-M.; Yeh, G. P.; Yi, K.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Zanetti, A. M.; Zeng, Y.; Zhou, C.; Zucchelli, S.

    2013-08-01

    We present the first signature-based search for delayed photons using an exclusive photon plus missing transverse energy final state. Events are reconstructed in a data sample from the CDF II detector corresponding to 6.3fb-1 of integrated luminosity from s=1.96TeV proton-antiproton collisions. Candidate events are selected if they contain a photon with an arrival time in the detector larger than expected from a promptly produced photon. The mean number of events from standard model sources predicted by the data-driven background model based on the photon timing distribution is 286±24. A total of 322 events are observed. A p value of 12% is obtained, showing consistency of the data with standard model predictions.

  17. Energy deposition in ultrathin extreme ultraviolet resist films: extreme ultraviolet photons and keV electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyser, David F.; Eib, Nicholas K.; Ritchie, Nicholas W. M.

    2016-07-01

    The absorbed energy density (eV/cm3) deposited by extreme ultraviolet (EUV) photons and electron beam (EB) high-keV electrons is proposed as a metric for characterizing the sensitivity of EUV resist films. Simulations of energy deposition are used to calculate the energy density as a function of the incident aerial flux (EUV: mJ/cm2, EB: μC/cm2). Monte Carlo calculations for electron exposure are utilized, and a Lambert-Beer model for EUV absorption. The ratio of electron flux to photon flux which results in equivalent energy density is calculated for a typical organic chemically amplified resist film and a typical inorganic metal-oxide film. This ratio can be used to screen EUV resist materials with EB measurements and accelerate advances in EUV resist systems.

  18. Development of a Source of Quasi-Monochromatic MeV Energy Photons

    SciTech Connect

    Umstadter, Donald; Banerjee, Sudeep; Ramanathan, Vidya; Powers, Nathan; Cunningham, Nathaniel; Chandler-Smith, Nate

    2009-03-10

    We report current progress on a project to develop an all-optically-driven x-ray photon source. A laser pulse with 40-50 TW of peak power is focused on a supersonic helium nozzle to drive a relativistic plasma wave. Electron beams with energies of 320 MeV (+/-28 MeV) are accelerated by means of laser wakefield acceleration. Remarkably, the acceleration region is only 3 mm in length. This accelerator is currently being employed to demonstrate the generation of MeV-energy x-ray by means of all-optical Thomson scattering. By this mechanism, a lower power, laser pulse (from the same laser system) is focused onto the above laser-driven electron beam, 1-eV energy photons are Doppler-shifted in energy to >1 MeV.

  19. Low-energy break in the spectrum of Galactic cosmic rays.

    PubMed

    Neronov, A; Semikoz, D V; Taylor, A M

    2012-02-03

    Measurements of the low-energy spectrum of Galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) by detectors on or near Earth are affected by solar modulation. To overcome this difficulty, we consider nearby molecular clouds as GCR detectors outside the Solar System. Using γ-ray observations of the clouds by the Fermi telescope, we derive the spectrum of GCRs in the clouds from the observed γ-ray emission spectrum. We find that the GCR spectrum has a low-energy break with the spectral slope hardening by ΔΓ=1.1±0.3 at an energy of E=9±3  GeV. Detection of a low-energy break enables a measurement of GCR energy density in the interstellar space U=0.9±0.3  eV/cm{3}.

  20. Measuring the Cosmic Ray Energy Spectrum and Composition with IceCube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruzybayev, B.

    We report a measurement of the all-particle cosmic ray energy spectrum with IceCube. The results of two different techniques are discussed. The first result is a measurement of the all-particle cosmic ray energy spectrum in the energy range from 1.58 PeV to 1.26 EeV using the IceTop air shower array, which is the surface component of the IceCube Neutrino Observatory at the South Pole. The second result is a measurement of both cosmic ray energy spectrum and composition using neural network techniques and the full IceCube as a 3-dimensional cosmic ray detector. The measured energy spectrum exhibits clear deviations from a single power law above the knee around 4 PeV and below 1 EeV.

  1. Energy spectrum of cascades generated by muons in Baksan underground scintillation telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bakatanov, V. N.; Chudakov, A. E.; Novoseltsev, Y. F.; Novoseltseva, M. V.; Achkasov, V. M.; Semenov, A. M.; Stenkin, Y. V.

    1985-01-01

    Spectrum of cascades generated by cosmic ray muons underground is presented. The mean zenith angle of the muon arrival is theta=35 deg the depth approx. 1000 hg/sq cm. In cascades energy range 700 GeV the measured spectrum is in agreement with the sea-level integral muon spectrum index gamma=3.0. Some decrease of this exponent has been found in the range 4000 Gev.

  2. SU-E-T-221: Investigation of Lower Energy (< 6 MV) Photon Beams for Cancer Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y; Ming, X; Feng, Y; Zhou, L; Ahmad, M; Deng, J; Nguyen, K; Griffin, M

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To study the potential applications of the lower energy (< 6MV) photon beams in the radiotherapeutic management of pediatric cancer and lung cancer patients. Methods: Photon beams of 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6MV were first simulated with EGS4/BEAM and then used for Monte-Carlo dose calculations. For four pediatric patients with abdominal and brain lesions, six 3D-conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) plans were generated using single photon energy (2 to 6MV) or mixed energies (3 and 6MV). Furthermore, a virtual machine of 3 and 6MV was commissioned in a treatment planning system (TPS) based on Monte-Carlo simulated data. Three IMRT plans of a lung cancer patient were generated on this virtual machine. All plans were normalized to D95% of target dose for 6MV plan and then compared in terms of integral dose and OAR sparing. Results: For the four pediatric patients, the integral dose for the 2, 3, 4 and 5MV plans increased by 9%, 5%, 3.5%, 1.7%, respectively as compared to 6MV. Almost all OARs in the 2MV plan received more than 10% more doses than 6MV. Mixed energy 3DCRT plans were of the same quality as 6MV plans. For the lung IMRT plans, both the 3MV plan and the mixed beam plan showed better OAR sparing in comparison to 6MV plan. Specifically, the maximum and mean doses to the spinal cord in the mixed energy plan were lower by 21% and 16%, respectively. Conclusion: Single lower energy photon beam was found to be inferior to 6MV in the radiotherapy of pediatric patients and lung cancer patients when the integral doses and the doses to the OARs were considered. However, mixed energy plans combining low with high energy beams showed significant OAR sparing while maintaining the same PTV coverage. Investigation with more patient data is ongoing for further confirmation.

  3. A diamond detector in the dosimetry of high-energy electron and photon beams.

    PubMed

    Laub, W U; Kaulich, T W; Nüsslin, F

    1999-09-01

    A diamond detector type 60003 (PTW Freiburg) was examined for the purpose of dosimetry with 4-20 MeV electron beams and 4-25 MV photon beams. Results were compared with those obtained by using a Markus chamber for electron beams and an ionization chamber for photon beams. Dose distributions were measured in a water phantom with the detector connected to a Unidos electrometer (PTW Freiburg). After a pre-irradiation of about 5 Gy the diamond detector shows a stability in response which is better than that of an ionization chamber. The current of the diamond detector was measured under variation of photon beam dose rate between 0.1 and 7 Gy min(-1). Different FSDs were chosen. Furthermore the pulse repetition frequency and the depth of the detector were changed. The electron beam dose rate was varied between 0.23 and 4.6 Gy min(-1) by changing the pulse-repetition frequency. The response shows no energy dependence within the covered photon-beam energy range. Between 4 MeV and 18 MeV electron beam energy it shows only a small energy dependence of about 2%, as expected from theory. For smaller electron energies the response increases significantly and an influence of the contact material used for the diamond detector can be surmised. A slight sublinearity of the current and dose rate was found. Detector current and dose rate are related by the expression i alpha Ddelta, where i is the detector current, D is the dose rate and delta is a correction factor of approximately 0.963. Depth-dose curves of photon beams, measured with the diamond detector, show a slight overestimation compared with measurements with the ionization chamber. This overestimation is compensated for by the above correction term. The superior spatial resolution of the diamond detector leads to minor deviations between depth-dose curves of electron beams measured with a Markus chamber and a diamond detector.

  4. Spectral, energy, and time parameters of two-photon fluorescence of 2,5-diphenyloxazole polycrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Agal`tsov, A.M.; Gorelik, V.S.; Rakhmatullaev, I.A.

    1995-12-01

    Two-photon fluorescence (TPF) spectra of 2,5-diphenyloxazole polycrystals (known in the literature as PPO) were obtained and studied as a function of the pump power and time delay. The fluorescence spectrum shape observed upon two-photon excitation is shown to be distinctly different from that observed upon electron-beam excitation. It is shown that high pump powers result in stimulated fluorescence. PPO exhibits a high TPF quantum yield, the integrated conversion efficiency of exciting radiation to TPF being 40%. The TPF decay time is measured to be 20 ns. The spectral data obtained for PPO polycrystals can be used in the development of new TPF light sources tunable in the UV region. 10 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Ultra High Energy Cosmic Ray, Neutrino, and Photon Propagation and the Multi-Messenger Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Andrew; De Castro, Alexandra; Castillo-Ruiz, Edith

    2009-04-30

    The propagation of UHECR nuclei for A = 1(protons) to A = 56(iron) from cosmological sources through extragalactic space is discussed in the first lecture. This is followed in the second and third lectures by a consideration of the generation and propagation of secondary particles produced via the UHECR loss interactions. In the second lecture we focus on the generation of the diffuse cosmogenic UHE-neutrino flux. In the third lecture we investigate the arriving flux of UHE-photon flux at Earth. In the final lecture the results of the previous lectures are put together in order to provide new insights into UHECR sources. The first of these providing a means with which to investigate the local population of UHECR sources through the measurement of the UHECR spectrum and their photon fraction at Earth. The second of these providing contraints on the UHECR source radiation fields through the possible observation at Earth of UHECR nuclei.

  6. Photon energy upconversion through thermal radiation with the power efficiency reaching 16%.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junxin; Ming, Tian; Jin, Zhao; Wang, Jianfang; Sun, Ling-Dong; Yan, Chun-Hua

    2014-11-28

    The efficiency of many solar energy conversion technologies is limited by their poor response to low-energy solar photons. One way for overcoming this limitation is to develop materials and methods that can efficiently convert low-energy photons into high-energy ones. Here we show that thermal radiation is an attractive route for photon energy upconversion, with efficiencies higher than those of state-of-the-art energy transfer upconversion under continuous wave laser excitation. A maximal power upconversion efficiency of 16% is achieved on Yb(3+)-doped ZrO2. By examining various oxide samples doped with lanthanide or transition metal ions, we draw guidelines that materials with high melting points, low thermal conductivities and strong absorption to infrared light deliver high upconversion efficiencies. The feasibility of our upconversion approach is further demonstrated under concentrated sunlight excitation and continuous wave 976-nm laser excitation, where the upconverted white light is absorbed by Si solar cells to generate electricity and drive optical and electrical devices.

  7. Bio-Inspired Photon Absorption and Energy Transfer for Next Generation Photovoltaic Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magsi, Komal

    Nature's solar energy harvesting system, photosynthesis, serves as a model for photon absorption, spectra broadening, and energy transfer. Photosynthesis harvests light far differently than photovoltaic cells. These differences offer both engineering opportunity and scientific challenges since not all of the natural photon absorption mechanisms have been understood. In return, solar cells can be a very sensitive probe for the absorption characteristics of molecules capable of transferring charge to a conductive interface. The objective of this scientific work is the advancement of next generation photovoltaics through the development and application of natural photo-energy transfer processes. Two scientific methods were used in the development and application of enhancing photon absorption and transfer. First, a detailed analysis of photovoltaic front surface fluorescent spectral modification and light scattering by hetero-structure was conducted. Phosphor based spectral down-conversion is a well-known laser technology. The theoretical calculations presented here indicate that parasitic losses and light scattering within the spectral range are large enough to offset any expected gains. The second approach for enhancing photon absorption is based on bio-inspired mechanisms. Key to the utilization of these natural processes is the development of a detailed scientific understanding and the application of these processes to cost effective systems and devices. In this work both aspects are investigated. Dye type solar cells were prepared and tested as a function of Chlorophyll (or Sodium-Copper Chlorophyllin) and accessory dyes. Forster has shown that the fluorescence ratio of Chlorophyll is modified and broadened by separate photon absorption (sensitized absorption) through interaction with nearby accessory pigments. This work used the dye type solar cell as a diagnostic tool by which to investigate photon absorption and photon energy transfer. These experiments shed

  8. Variation of photon interaction parameters with energy for some Cu-Pb alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Tejbir Kaur, Sarpreet; Kaur, Parminder; Kaur, Harvinder; Singh, Parjit S.

    2015-08-28

    Various photon interaction parameters (mass attenuation coefficients, effective atomic numbers and effective electron numbers) have been computed for different compositions of Cu-Pb alloys in the wide energy regime of 1 keV to 100 GeV. The mass attenuation coefficients have been computed using mixture rule with the help of WinXCom (mass attenuation coefficient database for elements). The variation of mass attenuation coefficients, effective atomic numbers and electron density has been analysed and discussed in terms of dominance of different photon interaction processes viz. Compton scattering, photoelectric effect and pair production.

  9. Nonlinear photonic diode behavior in energy-graded core-shell quantum well semiconductor rod.

    PubMed

    Ko, Suk-Min; Gong, Su-Hyun; Cho, Yong-Hoon

    2014-09-10

    Future technologies require faster data transfer and processing with lower loss. A photonic diode could be an attractive alternative to the present Si-based electronic diode for rapid optical signal processing and communication. Here, we report highly asymmetric photonic diode behavior with low scattering loss, from tapered core-shell quantum well semiconductor rods that were fabricated to have a large gradient in their bandgap energy along their growth direction. Local laser illumination of the core-shell quantum well rods yielded a huge contrast in light output intensities from opposite ends of the rod.

  10. HEPS-BPIX, a hybrid pixel detector system for the High Energy Photon Source in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.; Wei, W.; Gu, J.; Shen, W.; Li, Z.; Ning, Z.; Fan, L.; Chen, M.; Lu, Y.; Ma, X.; Jiang, X.; Lan, A. K.; Zhu, K.; Ouyang, Q.; Liu, P.; Wang, Z.

    2017-01-01

    A hybrid pixel detector with single photon counting mode has been designed for the High Energy Photon Source in China. It features a pixel size of 150 μm × 150 μm and a frame rate up to 1.2 kHz with 20-bit dynamic range. Six modules were assembled as the first prototype system, covering an area of 9 cm × 10 cm with 360k pixels. Images have been taken using X-ray and synchrotron radiation light, and the preliminary detector performance is presented.

  11. Measurement of anisotropic angular distributions of photon energy spectra for I-125 brachytherapy sources.

    PubMed

    Unno, Yasuhiro; Yunoki, Akira; Kurosawa, Tadahiro; Yamada, Takahiro; Sato, Yasushi; Hino, Yoshio

    2012-09-01

    The angular distribution of photon energy spectra emitted from an I-125 brachytherapy source was measured using a specially designed jig in the range of ±70° in the plane of the long axis of the source. It is important to investigate the angular dependence of photon emissions from these sources for the calibration of the air kerma rate. The results show that the influence of the distributions between 0° and ±8° is small enough to allow a calibration using current primary instruments which have a large entrance window.

  12. Dual-energy X-ray photon counting using an LSO-MPPC spectrometer and an energy-selecting device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Eiichi; Oda, Yasuyuki; Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Hagiwara, Osahiko; Matsukiyo, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Manabu; Kusachi, Shinya

    2015-08-01

    Dual-energy photon counting was performed using an energy-selecting device (ESD) and a detector, consisting of a Lu2(SiO4)O [LSO)] crystal and a multipixel photon counter (MPPC). The ESD is used to determine a low-energychannel range for CT and consists of two comparators and a microcomputer (MC). The two threshold channels in proportion to energies are determined using low and high-energy comparators, respectively. The MC in the ESD produces a single logical pulse when only a logical pulse from the low-energy comparator is input to the MC. To determine the high-energy-channel range for CT, logical pulses from the high-energy comparator are input to the MC outside the ESD. Logical pulses from the two MCs are input to frequency-voltage converters (FVCs) to convert count rates into voltages. The output voltages from the two FVCs are sent to a personal computer through an analog-digital converter to reconstruct tomograms. Dual-energy computed tomography was accomplished at a tube voltage of 70 kV and a maximum count rate of 14.3 kilocounts per second, and two-different-energy tomograms were obtained simultaneously.

  13. Numerical analysis of the supercontinuum spectrum generation in a couple of photonic crystal fibers with different structure by using the RK4IP method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauterio-Cruz, J. P.; Hernández-García, J. C.; Estudillo-Ayala, J. M.; Pottiez, O.; Rojas-Laguna, R.; Filoteo-Razo, J. D.; Samano-Aguilar, L. F.; Jauregui-Vazquez, D.

    2016-03-01

    In this work, we performed a numerical analysis of the supercontinuum spectrum generation in a couple of photonic crystal fibers with different structure. The proposed configuration initially has an input pulse with hyperbolic secant profile to generate noise-like pulses as output signal, by the Runge-Kutta method (RK4IP). By using the same configuration, now these noise-like pulses are used as pump for supercontinuum generation obtaining a broad and good flatness spectrum. The numerical analysis presented here demonstrates the potential of noise-like pulses from a passively mode-locked fiber laser for broadband spectrum generation combining two different photonic crystal fibers. Besides this paper helps to understand the phenomena of supercontinuum generation which is mainly related to Raman self-frequency shift.

  14. The high energy X-ray spectrum of the Crab Nebula observed from OSO 8

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolan, J. F.; Crannell, L. J.; Dennis, B. R.; Orwig, L. E.; Maurer, G. S.; Frost, K. J.

    1977-01-01

    The X-ray spectrum of the Crab Nebula was measured with the scintillation spectrometer on board the OSO-8 satellite. The total emission of the X-ray source shows no long term variability. The spectrum itself can be described by a single power law out to energies of at least 500 keV.

  15. Characterizing invisible electroweak particles through single-photon processes at high energy e+e- colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Seong Youl; Han, Tao; Kalinowski, Jan; Rolbiecki, Krzysztof; Wang, Xing

    2015-11-01

    We explore the scenarios where the only accessible new states at the electroweak scale consist of a pair of color-singlet electroweak particles, the masses of which are degenerate at the tree level and split only by electroweak symmetry breaking at the loop level. For the sake of illustration, we consider a supersymmetric model and study the following three representative cases with the lower-lying states as (a) two spin-1 /2 Higgsino SU(2 ) L doublets, (b) a spin-1 /2 wino SU(2 ) L triplet and (c) a spin-0 left-handed slepton SU(2 ) L doublet. Due to the mass degeneracy, those lower-lying electroweak states are difficult to observe at the LHC and rather challenging to detect at the e+e- collider as well. We exploit the pair production in association with a hard photon radiation in high energy e+e- collisions. If kinematically accessible, such single-photon processes at e+e- colliders with polarized beams enable us to characterize each scenario by measuring the energy of the associated hard photon and to determine the spin of the nearly invisible particles unambiguously through the threshold behavior in the photon energy distribution.

  16. Energy spectrum analysis of blast waves based on an improved Hilbert-Huang transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, L.; Wang, F.; Shang, F.; Jia, Y.; Zhao, C.; Kong, D.

    2017-05-01

    Using the improved Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT), this paper investigates the problems of analysis and interpretation of the energy spectrum of a blast wave. It has been previously established that the energy spectrum is an effective feature by which to characterize a blast wave. In fact, the higher the energy spectra in a frequency band of a blast wave, the greater the damage to a target in the same frequency band. However, most current research focuses on analyzing wave signals in the time domain or frequency domain rather than considering the energy spectrum. We propose here an improved HHT method combined with a wavelet packet to extract the energy spectrum feature of a blast wave. When applying the HHT, the signal is first roughly decomposed into a series of intrinsic mode functions (IMFs) by empirical mode decomposition. The wavelet packet method is then performed on each IMF to eliminate noise on the energy spectrum. Second, a coefficient is introduced to remove unrelated IMFs. The energy of each instantaneous frequency can be derived through the Hilbert transform. The energy spectrum can then be obtained by adding up all the components after the wavelet packet filters and screens them through a coefficient to obtain the effective IMFs. The effectiveness of the proposed method is demonstrated by 12 groups of experimental data, and an energy attenuation model is established based on the experimental data. The improved HHT is a precise method for blast wave signal analysis. For other shock wave signals from blasting experiments, an energy frequency time distribution and energy spectrum can also be obtained through this method, allowing for more practical applications.

  17. Fermi LAT Search for Dark Matter in Gamma-Ray Lines and the Inclusive Photon Spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Albert, A.; Baldini, L.; Barbiellini, G.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A. W.; Brigida, M.; Buehler, R.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caraveo, P. A.; Casandjian, J. M.; Cecchi, C.; Charles, E.; Chekhtman, A.; Chiang, J.; Ciprini, S.; Moiseev, Alexander A.

    2012-01-01

    Dark matter particle annihilation or decay can produce monochromatic gamma-ray lines and contribute to the diffuse gamma-ray background. Flux upper limits are presented for gamma-ray spectral lines from 7 to 200 GeV and for the diffuse gamma-ray background from 4.8 GeV to 264 GeV obtained from two years of Fermi Large Area Telescope data integrated over most of the sky. We give cross section upper limits and decay lifetime lower limits for dark matter models that produce gamma-ray lines or contribute to the diffuse spectrum, including models proposed as explanations of the PAMELA and Fermi cosmic-ray data.

  18. Fermi LAT search for dark matter in gamma-ray lines and the inclusive photon spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Ackermann, M.

    2012-07-05

    Dark matter particle annihilation or decay can produce monochromatic gamma-ray lines and contribute to the diffuse gamma-ray background. Furthermore, we present the flux upper limits for gamma-ray spectral lines from 7 to 200 GeV and for the diffuse gamma-ray background from 4.8 GeV to 264 GeV obtained from two years of Fermi Large Area Telescope data integrated over most of the sky. Here, we give cross-section upper limits and decay lifetime lower limits for dark matter models that produce gamma-ray lines or contribute to the diffuse spectrum, including models proposed as explanations of the PAMELA and Fermi cosmic-ray data.

  19. Physical origin of the high energy optical response of three dimensional photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Dorado, Luis A; Depine, Ricardo A; Lozano, Gabriel; Míguez, Hernán

    2007-12-24

    The physical origin of the optical response observed in three-dimensional photonic crystals when the photon wavelength is equal or lower than the lattice parameter still remains unsatisfactorily explained and is the subject of an intense and interesting debate. Herein we demonstrate for the first time that all optical spectra features in this high energy region of photonic crystals arise from electromagnetic resonances within the ordered array, modified by the interplay between these resonances with the opening of diffraction channels, the presence of imperfections and finite size effects. All these four phenomena are taken into account in our theoretical approach to the problem, which allows us to provide a full description of the observed optical response based on fundamental phenomena as well as to attain fair fittings of experimental results.

  20. Soft photon theorem for high energy amplitudes in Yukawa and scalar theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gervais, Hualong

    2017-06-01

    We study the emission of soft photons coupling to high energy fixed angle scattering processes at first order in the electromagnetic coupling but to all loop orders in a class of theories without soft divergences, including massive and massless Yukawa and scalar theories. We adapt a method introduced by del Duca for quantum electrodynamics to show that subleading corrections to the soft photon theorem are sensitive to the structure of nonleading external jets of collinear lines. Our techniques are based on a power counting analysis of loop integrals and an application of jet Ward identities. We also apply Grammer and Yennie's decomposition to isolate separately gauge invariant contributions to the soft photon expansion. These are interpreted as infrared sensitive matrix elements coupling to a field strength tensor.

  1. FAINT HIGH-ENERGY GAMMA-RAY PHOTON EMISSION OF GRB 081006A FROM FERMI OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng Weikang; Akerlof, Carl W.; Pandey, Shashi B.; McKay, Timothy A.; Zhang Binbin; Zhang Bing

    2012-01-20

    Since the launch of the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope on 2008 June 11, the Large Area Telescope (LAT) instrument has firmly detected more than 20 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with high-energy photon emission above 100 MeV. Using the matched filter technique, three more GRBs have also shown evidence of correlation with high-energy photon emission as demonstrated by Akerlof et al. In this paper, we present another GRB, GRB 081006A, unambiguously detected by the matched filter technique. This event is associated with more than 13 high-energy photons above 100 MeV. The likelihood analysis code provided by the Fermi Science Support Center generated an independent verification of this detection using a comparison of the test statistics value with similar calculations for random LAT data fields. We have performed detailed temporal and spectral analysis of photons from 8 keV up to 0.8 GeV from the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor and the LAT. The properties of GRB 081006A can be compared to those of the other two long-duration GRBs detected at similar significance, GRB 080825C and GRB 090217A. We find that GRB 081006A is more similar to GRB 080825C with comparable appearances of late high-energy photon emission. As demonstrated previously, there appears to be a surprising dearth of faint LAT GRBs, with only one additional GRB identified in a sample of 74. In this unique period when both Swift and Fermi are operational, there is some urgency to explore this aspect of GRBs as fully as possible.

  2. Photon mass energy transfer coefficients for elements z=1 to 92 and 48 additional substances of dosimetric interest.

    PubMed

    Kato, Hideki

    2014-07-01

    Photon mass energy transfer coefficient is an essential factor when converting photon energy fluence into kinetic energy released per unit mass (kerma). Although mass attenuation coefficient and mass energy absorption coefficients can be looked up in databases, the mass energy transfer coefficient values are still controversial. In this paper, the photon mass energy transfer coefficients for elements Z=1-92 were calculated based on cross-sectional data for each photon interaction type. Mass energy transfer coefficients for 48 compounds and/or mixtures of dosimetric interest were calculated from coefficient data for elements using Bragg's additivity rule. We additionally developed software that can search these coefficient data for any element or substance of dosimetric interest. The database and software created in this paper should prove useful for radiation measurements and/or dose calculations.

  3. Physics of reflective optics for the soft gamma-ray photon energy range

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez-Perea, Monica; Descalle, Marie -Anne; Soufli, Regina; Ziock, Klaus P.; Alameda, Jennifer; Baker, Sherry L.; McCarville, Tom J.; Honkimaki, Veijo; Ziegler, Eric; Jakobsen, Anders C.; Christensen, Finn E.; Pivovaroff, Michael J.

    2013-07-12

    Traditional multilayer reflective optics that have been used in the past for imaging at x-ray photon energies as high as 200 keV are governed by classical wave phenomena. However, their behavior at higher energies is unknown, because of the increasing effect of incoherent scattering and the disagreement between experimental and theoretical optical properties of materials in the hard x-ray and gamma-ray regimes. Here, we demonstrate that multilayer reflective optics can operate efficiently and according to classical wave physics up to photon energies of at least 384 keV. We also use particle transport simulations to quantitatively determine that incoherent scattering takes place in the mirrors but it does not affect the performance at the Bragg angles of operation. Furthermore, our results open up new possibilities of reflective optical designs in a spectral range where only diffractive optics (crystals and lenses) and crystal monochromators have been available until now.

  4. Physics of Reflective Optics for the Soft Gamma-Ray Photon Energy Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Perea, Mónica; Descalle, Marie-Anne; Soufli, Regina; Ziock, Klaus P.; Alameda, Jennifer; Baker, Sherry L.; McCarville, Tom J.; Honkimäki, Veijo; Ziegler, Eric; Jakobsen, Anders C.; Christensen, Finn E.; Pivovaroff, Michael J.

    2013-07-01

    Traditional multilayer reflective optics that have been used in the past for imaging at x-ray photon energies as high as 200 keV are governed by classical wave phenomena. However, their behavior at higher energies is unknown, because of the increasing effect of incoherent scattering and the disagreement between experimental and theoretical optical properties of materials in the hard x-ray and gamma-ray regimes. Here, we demonstrate that multilayer reflective optics can operate efficiently and according to classical wave physics up to photon energies of at least 384 keV. We also use particle transport simulations to quantitatively determine that incoherent scattering takes place in the mirrors but it does not affect the performance at the Bragg angles of operation. Our results open up new possibilities of reflective optical designs in a spectral range where only diffractive optics (crystals and lenses) and crystal monochromators have been available until now.

  5. Physics of reflective optics for the soft gamma-ray photon energy range.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Perea, Mónica; Descalle, Marie-Anne; Soufli, Regina; Ziock, Klaus P; Alameda, Jennifer; Baker, Sherry L; McCarville, Tom J; Honkimäki, Veijo; Ziegler, Eric; Jakobsen, Anders C; Christensen, Finn E; Pivovaroff, Michael J

    2013-07-12

    Traditional multilayer reflective optics that have been used in the past for imaging at x-ray photon energies as high as 200 keV are governed by classical wave phenomena. However, their behavior at higher energies is unknown, because of the increasing effect of incoherent scattering and the disagreement between experimental and theoretical optical properties of materials in the hard x-ray and gamma-ray regimes. Here, we demonstrate that multilayer reflective optics can operate efficiently and according to classical wave physics up to photon energies of at least 384 keV. We also use particle transport simulations to quantitatively determine that incoherent scattering takes place in the mirrors but it does not affect the performance at the Bragg angles of operation. Our results open up new possibilities of reflective optical designs in a spectral range where only diffractive optics (crystals and lenses) and crystal monochromators have been available until now.

  6. Nonlinear effects in photoionization over a broad photon-energy range within the TDCIS scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karamatskou, Antonia

    2017-01-01

    The present tutorial provides an overview of the time-dependent configuration interaction singles scheme applied to nonlinear ionization over a broad photon-energy range. The efficient propagation of the wave function and the calculation of photoelectron spectra within this approach are described and demonstrated in various applications. Above-threshold ionization of argon and xenon in the extreme ultraviolet energy range is investigated as an example. A particular focus is put on the xenon 4d giant dipole resonance and the information that nonlinear ionization can provide about resonance substructure. Furthermore, above-threshold ionization is studied in the x-ray regime and the intensity regime, at which multiphoton ionization starts to play a role at hard x-ray photon energies, is identified.

  7. The duration-photon energy relation in gamma-ray bursts and its interpretations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazanas, Demosthenes; Titarchuk, Lev G.; Hua, Xin-Min

    1997-01-01

    A correlation between the spectral and temporal structure in gamma ray bursts was presented elsewhere, where it was discovered that the duration of the constituent subpulses of the time profile of a given gamma ray burst have a well-defined power law dependence, of approximately index 0.45, on the energy of the observed photons. Two models are presented which account for the observed correlation. These models involve: the impulsive injection of a population of relativistic electrons; their subsequent cooling by synchrotron radiation; the impulsive injection of mono-energetic high energy photons in a medium of a Thomson depth of approximately 5, and their subsequent downgrading in energy due to electron scattering. Arguments are presented for distinguishing between these two models from the existing data.

  8. Energy response calibration of photon-counting detectors using x-ray fluorescence: a feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, H.-M.; Ding, H.; Ziemer, BP; Molloi, S.

    2014-12-01

    Accurate energy calibration is critical for the application of energy-resolved photon-counting detectors in spectral imaging. The aim of this study is to investigate the feasibility of energy response calibration and characterization of a photon-counting detector using x-ray fluorescence. A comprehensive Monte Carlo simulation study was performed using Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission (GATE) to investigate the optimal technique for x-ray fluorescence calibration. Simulations were conducted using a 100 kVp tungsten-anode spectra with 2.7 mm Al filter for a single pixel cadmium telluride (CdTe) detector with 3  ×  3 mm2 in detection area. The angular dependence of x-ray fluorescence and scatter background was investigated by varying the detection angle from 20° to 170° with respect to the beam direction. The effects of the detector material, shape, and size on the recorded x-ray fluorescence were investigated. The fluorescent material size effect was considered with and without the container for the fluorescent material. In order to provide validation for the simulation result, the angular dependence of x-ray fluorescence from five fluorescent materials was experimentally measured using a spectrometer. Finally, eleven of the fluorescent materials were used for energy calibration of a CZT-based photon-counting detector. The optimal detection angle was determined to be approximately at 120° with respect to the beam direction, which showed the highest fluorescence to scatter ratio (FSR) with a weak dependence on the fluorescent material size. The feasibility of x-ray fluorescence for energy calibration of photon-counting detectors in the diagnostic x-ray energy range was verified by successfully calibrating the energy response of a CZT-based photon-counting detector. The results of this study can be used as a guideline to implement the x-ray fluorescence calibration method for photon-counting detectors in a typical imaging laboratory.

  9. Response of BaF 2 detectors to photons of 3-50 MeV energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matulewicz, T.; Grosse, E.; Emling, H.; Freifelder, R.; Grein, H.; Henning, W.; Herrmann, N.; Holzmann, R.; Kulessa, R.; Simon, R. S.; Wollersheim, H. J.; Schoch, B.; Vogt, J.; Wilhelm, M.; Kratz, J. V.; Schmidt, R.; Janssens, R. V. F.

    1990-04-01

    BaF 2 detectors of 20 cm length (10 radiation lengths) and hexagonal cross section (diameter 5.2 cm) were tested using monochromatic photons from the tagged-photon facility at the electron accelerator MAMIA at Mainz. The experimental spectra the deposited energy for a single detector and for an array of seven modules compare very well with the predictions of Monte Carlo shower simulations using the code GEANT3. At high photon energies a significant improvement (more than a factor 2) of the energy resolution is observed for the summed energy spectra as compared to the resolution of one single module.

  10. Enhancement of high-energy cosmic-ray spectrum by type-II supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takahashi, Y.; Miyaji, S.; Parnell, T. A.; Weisskopf, M. C.; Hayashi, T.

    1986-01-01

    The cosmic-ray spectrum has an intensity enhancement in the energy range 10 to the 14th to 10 to the 16th eV per nucleus. Recent observations of heavy cosmic rays in this energy range indicate that the Ca/Fe ratio may be as large as 10 times the solar value. It is suggested that pulsars in type-II supernova remnants are the origin of this component of the cosmic-ray spectrum.

  11. Energy spectrum of isomer no. 3 of C82 fullerene of C 2 symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kareev, I. E.; Bubnov, V. P.; Kotov, A. I.; Lobanov, B. V.; Murzashev, A. I.; Rumyantsev, I. A.

    2017-01-01

    The energy spectrum of C82 fullerene (isomer no. 3 of C 2 symmetry) is calculated within the Hubbard model in the approximation of static fluctuations. Based on the energy spectrum, optical absorption spectra of this isomer in neutral and anionic states with one, two, three, and four additional electrons are simulated. The calculated optical spectra in neutral and monoanionic states are compared with known experimental spectra.

  12. Energy spectrum and transport in narrow HgTe quantum wells

    SciTech Connect

    Germanenko, A. V.; Minkov, G. M.; Rut, O. E.; Sherstobitov, A. A.; Dvoretsky, S. A.; Mikhailov, N. N.

    2015-01-15

    The results of an experimental study of the transport phenomena and the hole energy spectrum of two-dimensional systems in the quantum well of HgTe zero-gap semiconductor with normal arrangement of quantum-confinement subbands are presented. An analysis of the experimental data allows us to reconstruct the carrier energy spectrum near the hole subband extrema. The results are interpreted using the standard kP model.

  13. Dose to tissue medium or water cavities as surrogate for the dose to cell nuclei at brachytherapy photon energies.

    PubMed

    Enger, Shirin A; Ahnesjö, Anders; Verhaegen, Frank; Beaulieu, Luc

    2012-07-21

    for most energies in brachytherapy, while LCT-D(w,m) should only be considered for source spectra well below 50 keV, since contributions to the absorbed dose inside the nucleus to a large degree stem from electrons released in the surrounding medium. MC-D(m,m) is not an appropriate substitute for MC-D(n,m) for the lowest photon energies for adipose and breast tissues. The ratio of MC-D(m,m) to MC-D(n,m) for adipose and breast tissue deviates from unity by 34% and 15% respectively for the lowest photon energy (20 keV), whereas the ratio is close to unity for higher energies. For prostate and muscle tissue MC-D(m,m) is a good substitute for MC-D(n,m). However, for all photon energies and tissue types the nucleus composition with the highest hydrogen content behaves differently than other compositions. Elemental compositions of the tissue and nuclei affect considerably the absorbed dose to the cell nuclei for brachytherapy sources, in particular those at the low-energy end of the spectrum. Thus, there is a need for more accurate data for the elemental compositions of tumours and healthy cells. For the nucleus compositions and tissue types investigated, MC-D(w,m) is a good substitute to MC-D(n,m) for all simulated photon energies. Whether other studied surrogates are good approximations to MC-D(n,m) depends on the target size, target composition, composition of the surrounding tissue and photon energy.

  14. Intergalactic Photon Spectra from the Far-IR to the UV Lyman Limit for 0 < z < 6 and the Optical Depth of the Universe to High-Energy Gamma Rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.; Malkan, M. A.; Scully, S. T.

    2006-01-01

    We calculate the intergalactic photon density as a function of both energy and redshift for 0photon energies from.003 eV to the Lyman limit cutoff at 13.6 eV in a (Omega)CDM universe with (Omega)(Lambda)=0.7 and (Omega)m=0.3. The basic features of our backward-evolution model for galaxies were developed in earlier papers by Malkan & Stecker. With a few improvements, we find that this evolutionary model gives predictions of new deep number counts from Spitzer, as well as a calculation of the spectral energy distribution of the diffuse infrared background, which are in good agreement with the data. We then use our calculated intergalactic photon densities to extend previous work on the absorption of high-energy Gamma-rays in intergalactic space owing to interactions with low-energy photons and the 2.7 K cosmic microwave background radiation. We calculate the optical depth of the universe, Tau , for Gamma-rays having energies from 4 GeV to 100 TeV emitted by sources at redshifts from 0 to 5. We also give an analytic fit with numerical coefficients for approximating (E(Gamma), z). As an example of the application of our results, we calculate the absorbed spectrum of the blazar PKS 2155-304 at z=0.117 and compare it with the spectrum observed by the HESS air Cerenkov Gamma-ray telescope array.

  15. Manifestation of Strong Coupling Between Microwave Photons and Spins in the epr Spectrum of Anthracite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedaruk, R.; Adashkevich, S. V.

    2014-07-01

    The change of the anthracite EPR signal shape that was caused by increasing the sample size was observed by continuous-wave EPR with automatic frequency control locked to the measuring cavity. For large samples (>10 mm3), hysteresis (a difference in the resonant magnetic flux densities when the magnetic field was scanned upwards or downwards) and a bistability (a sharp amplitude change) were observed. A two-peak spectrum for a strongly coupled system formed by an electron-spin ensemble and the cavity microwave field was found by changing the frequency of the microwave oscillator during recording of the EPR signals. The difference in the frequencies of these peaks (Rabi splitting) was a measure of the coupling strength between the spins and the microwave field and increased with increasing sample size. The simultaneous increase of the hysteresis and bistability of the EPR signals provided evidence that these peculiarities were caused by the Rabi splitting. Use of the Rabi splitting to determine the number of electron spins in a sample was proposed.

  16. Improving energy transfer in QD-DNA photonic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckhout-White, Susan; Spillmann, Christopher; Ancona, Mario; Algar, W. Russ; Stewart, Michael H.; Susumu, Kimihiro; Huston, Alan; Goldman, Ellen R.; Medintz, Igor L.

    2013-10-01

    There is considerable research in the area of manipulating light below the diffraction limit, with potential applications ranging from information processing to light-harvesting. In such work, a common problem is a lack of efficiency associated with non-radiative losses, e.g., ohmic loss in plasmonic structures. From this point of view, one attractive method for sub-wavelength light manipulation is to use Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) between chromophores. Although most current work does not show high efficiency, biology suggests that this approach could achieve very high efficiency. In order to achieve this goal, the geometry and spacing of the chromophores must be optimized. For this, DNA provides an easy means for the self-assembly of these complex structures. With well established ligation chemistries, it is possible to create facile hierarchical assemblies of quantum dots (QDs) and organic dyes using DNA as the platform. These nanostructures range from simple linear wires to complex 3-dimensional structures all of which can be self-assembled around a central QD. The efficiency of the system can then be tuned by changing the spacing between chromophores, changing the DNA geometry such that the donor to acceptor ratio changes, or changing the number of DNA structures that are self-assembled around the central QD. By exploring these variables we have developed a flexible optical system for which the efficiency can be both controlled and optimized.

  17. Photonic nanomanufacturing of high performance energy device on flexible substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yongchao; Wang, Shutong; Li, Ruozhou; Hou, Tingxiu; Chen, Min; Hu, Anming

    2017-02-01

    With the developing of wearable electronics and information society, integrated energy storage devices are urgently demanded to be integrated on flexible substrates. We successfully demonstrated using direct laser-reduction of the hydrated GO and chloroauric acid (HAuCl4) nanocomposite to fabricate in-plane micro-supercapacitors (MSCs) with fast ion diffusion on paper. The electrode conductivity of these flexible nanocomposites reaches up to 1.1 x 106 S m-1, which enhances superior rate capability of micro-supercapacitors, and large specific capacitances of 0.77 mF cm-2 (17.2 F cm-3 for volumetric capacitance) at 1 V s-1, and 0.46 mF cm-2 (10.2 F cm-3) at 100 V s-1. We also have demonstrated that pulsed laser irradiation rapidly converts the polyimide (PI) sheets into an electrically conductive porous carbon structure in ambient conditions. The specific capacitance of single layer surface supercapacitors can reach 20.4 mF/cm2 at 0.1 mA/cm2 discharge current density. Furthermore, we successfully fabricate the multi-layer supercapacitor with the PI substrate using 3D femtosecond laser direct writing, and the specific capacitances of three layers supercapacitors is 37.5 mF/cm2.

  18. Perturbation correction for alanine dosimeters in different phantom materials in high-energy photon beams.

    PubMed

    von Voigts-Rhetz, P; Anton, M; Vorwerk, H; Zink, K

    2016-02-07

    In modern radiotherapy the verification of complex treatments plans is often performed in inhomogeneous or even anthropomorphic phantoms. For dose verification small detectors are necessary and therefore alanine detectors are most suitable. Though the response of alanine for a wide range of clinical photon energies in water is well know, the knowledge about the influence of the surrounding phantom material on the response of alanine is sparse. Therefore we investigated the influence of twenty different surrounding/phantom materials for alanine dosimeters in clinical photon fields via Monte Carlo simulations. The relative electron density of the used materials was in the range [Formula: see text] up to 1.69, covering almost all materials appearing in inhomogeneous or anthropomorphic phantoms used in radiotherapy. The investigations were performed for three different clinical photon spectra ranging from 6 to 25 MV-X and Co-60 and as a result a perturbation correction [Formula: see text] depending on the environmental material was established. The Monte Carlo simulation show, that there is only a small dependence of [Formula: see text] on the phantom material and the photon energy, which is below  ±0.6%. The results confirm the good suitability of alanine detectors for in-vivo dosimetry.

  19. Mixed high energy photon and electron radiation fields for calibrating radiation protection dosemeters.

    PubMed

    Büermann, L; Gargioni, E; Kramer, H M

    2001-01-01

    According to ISO 4037-3, calibrations of radiation protection dosemeters with photon radiation of energies above 3 MeV are performed under conditions of charged particle equilibrium. No information is provided concerning how to determine the response of dosemeters to radiation fields in the more general case when these conditions are not fulfilled. This paper deals with the production of mixed high energy photon and electron fields characterised by a lack or an excess of charged particles relative to conditions of equilibrium and describes a new procedure for the dosimetry in such fields. Through variation of the charged particle fluence fraction with respect to a nearly constant photon fluence, Hp(10) and H'(10) values varied by up to a factor of 1.74. The above mentioned basic study was utilised in the recent IAEA intercomparison (Co-ordinated Research Project 1996-1998) and EURADOS 'trial performance test' (1996-1998) for individual monitoring of photon radiation in testing response characteristics of individual dosemeters in non-charged particle equilibrium conditions.

  20. Perturbation correction for alanine dosimeters in different phantom materials in high-energy photon beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Voigts-Rhetz, P.; Anton, M.; Vorwerk, H.; Zink, K.

    2016-02-01

    In modern radiotherapy the verification of complex treatments plans is often performed in inhomogeneous or even anthropomorphic phantoms. For dose verification small detectors are necessary and therefore alanine detectors are most suitable. Though the response of alanine for a wide range of clinical photon energies in water is well know, the knowledge about the influence of the surrounding phantom material on the response of alanine is sparse. Therefore we investigated the influence of twenty different surrounding/phantom materials for alanine dosimeters in clinical photon fields via Monte Carlo simulations. The relative electron density of the used materials was in the range {{n}e}/{{n}e,\\text{w}}=0.20 up to 1.69, covering almost all materials appearing in inhomogeneous or anthropomorphic phantoms used in radiotherapy. The investigations were performed for three different clinical photon spectra ranging from 6 to 25 MV-X and Co-60 and as a result a perturbation correction {{k}\\text{env}} depending on the environmental material was established. The Monte Carlo simulation show, that there is only a small dependence of {{k}\\text{env}} on the phantom material and the photon energy, which is below  ±0.6%. The results confirm the good suitability of alanine detectors for in-vivo dosimetry.

  1. Photonic color filters integrated with organic solar cells for energy harvesting.

    PubMed

    Park, Hui Joon; Xu, Ting; Lee, Jae Yong; Ledbetter, Abram; Guo, L Jay

    2011-09-27

    Color filters are indispensable in most color display applications. In most cases, they are chemical pigment-based filters, which produce a particular color by absorbing its complementary color, and the absorbed energy is totally wasted. If the absorbed and wasted energy can be utilized, e.g., to generate electricity, innovative energy-efficient electronic media could be envisioned. Here we show photonic nanostructures incorporated with photovoltaics capable of producing desirable colors in the visible band and utilize the absorbed light to simultaneously generate electrical powers. In contrast to the traditional colorant-based filters, these devices offer great advantages for electro-optic applications.

  2. Simple optical parametric oscillator-amplifier in unitary crystal, tunable over the visible range of spectrum and its application for two-photon spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimentov, Sergei M.; Garnov, Serge V.; Epifanov, Alexander S.; Manenkov, Alexander A.

    1994-06-01

    For application of optical parametric oscillator (OPO) to investigation of nonlinear interaction of laser radiation with matter the factor of importance is stability of light spatial distribution and spotsize position on a target through a tuning range. Collinear temperature tunable schemes show an advantage for these purposes, in particular, for small pump beam diameters. A simple and efficient visible range parametric converter can be realized using two-pass configuration, where parametric luminescence is excited on the first pass through a nonlinear crystal and amplified on the second pass after spatial filtering. Lack of resonator simplifies high power UV pumping and getting of relatively narrow emission spectrum. Using such an approach, we have made the oscillator-amplifier system temperature tunable in the range of 440 to 670 nm employing 4-cm-length ADP crystal pumped by 266 nm radiation from the single-mode YAG:Nd laser. The output energy of 3 mJ in about 1-ns pulsewidth has been achieved with total conversion efficiency of 10%. A spatial profile of the output beam kept its shape within the branch of the tuning curve. This allowed us to use the device as a proper tool for investigation of two-photon excitation in undoped CsI and KI single crystals. The OPO signal output was used to record photoconductivity spectra in these materials.

  3. Characterization and shaping of the time-frequency Schmidt mode spectrum of bright twin beams generated in gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finger, M. A.; Joly, N. Y.; Russell, P. St. J.; Chekhova, M. V.

    2017-05-01

    We vary the time-frequency mode structure of ultrafast pulse-pumped modulational instability (MI) twin beams in an argon-filled hollow-core kagome-style photonic crystal fiber by adjusting the pressure, pump pulse chirp, fiber length, and parametric gain. Compared to solid-core systems, the pressure-dependent dispersion landscape brings increased flexibility to the tailoring of frequency correlations, and we demonstrate that the pump pulse chirp can be used to tune the joint spectrum of femtosecond-pumped χ(3 ) sources. We also characterize the resulting mode content, not only by measuring the multimode second-order correlation function g(2 ), but also by directly reconstructing the shapes and weights of time-frequency Schmidt (TFS) modes. We show that the number of modes directly influences the shot-to-shot pulse-energy and spectral-shape fluctuations in MI. Using this approach we control and monitor the number of TFS modes within the range from 1.3 to 4 using only a single fiber.

  4. Energy spectrum transfer equations of solar wind turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tu, C.-Y.

    1995-01-01

    The recent studies of transfer equations for solar wind magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence are reviewed with emphasis on the comparison with the statistical observational results. Helios and Voyager missions provide an opportunity to study the the radial evolution of the power spectrum. the cross-helicity the Alfven ratio and the minimum variance direction. Spectrum transfer equations are considered as a tool to explore the nature of this radial evolution of the fluctuations. The transfer equations are derived from incompressible MHD equations. Generally one needs to make assumptions about the nature of the fluctuations and the nature of the turbulent non-linear interactions to obtain numerical results which can be compared with the observations. Some special model results for several simple cases SUCH as for structures or strong mixing. for Alfven waves with weak turbulent interactions. and for a superposition of structures and Alfven waves. are discussed. The difference between the various approaches to derive and handle the transfer equations are also addressed. Finally some theoretical description of the compressible fluctuations are also briefly reviewed.

  5. Energy spectrum transfer equations of solar wind turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tu, C.-Y.

    1995-01-01

    The recent studies of transfer equations for solar wind magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence are reviewed with emphasis on the comparison with the statistical observational results. Helios and Voyager missions provide an opportunity to study the the radial evolution of the power spectrum. the cross-helicity the Alfven ratio and the minimum variance direction. Spectrum transfer equations are considered as a tool to explore the nature of this radial evolution of the fluctuations. The transfer equations are derived from incompressible MHD equations. Generally one needs to make assumptions about the nature of the fluctuations and the nature of the turbulent non-linear interactions to obtain numerical results which can be compared with the observations. Some special model results for several simple cases SUCH as for structures or strong mixing. for Alfven waves with weak turbulent interactions. and for a superposition of structures and Alfven waves. are discussed. The difference between the various approaches to derive and handle the transfer equations are also addressed. Finally some theoretical description of the compressible fluctuations are also briefly reviewed.

  6. Energy spectrum of ultra-high energy cosmic rays observed with the Telescope Array using a hybrid technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu-Zayyad, T.; Aida, R.; Allen, M.; Anderson, R.; Azuma, R.; Barcikowski, E.; Belz, J. W.; Bergman, D. R.; Blake, S. A.; Cady, R.; Cheon, B. G.; Chiba, J.; Chikawa, M.; Cho, E. J.; Cho, W. R.; Fujii, H.; Fujii, T.; Fukuda, T.; Fukushima, M.; Hanlon, W.; Hayashi, K.; Hayashi, Y.; Hayashida, N.; Hibino, K.; Hiyama, K.; Honda, K.; Iguchi, T.; Ikeda, D.; Ikuta, K.; Inoue, N.; Ishii, T.; Ishimori, R.; Ito, H.; Ivanov, D.; Iwamoto, S.; Jui, C. C. H.; Kadota, K.; Kakimoto, F.; Kalashev, O.; Kanbe, T.; Kasahara, K.; Kawai, H.; Kawakami, S.; Kawana, S.; Kido, E.; Kim, H. B.; Kim, H. K.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, J. H.; Kitamoto, K.; Kitamura, S.; Kitamura, Y.; Kobayashi, K.; Kobayashi, Y.; Kondo, Y.; Kuramoto, K.; Kuzmin, V.; Kwon, Y. J.; Lan, J.; Lim, S. I.; Lundquist, J. P.; Machida, S.; Martens, K.; Matsuda, T.; Matsuura, T.; Matsuyama, T.; Matthews, J. N.; Minamino, M.; Miyata, K.; Murano, Y.; Myers, I.; Nagasawa, K.; Nagataki, S.; Nakamura, T.; Nam, S. W.; Nonaka, T.; Ogio, S.; Ohnishi, M.; Ohoka, H.; Oki, K.; Oku, D.; Okuda, T.; Ono, M.; Oshima, A.; Ozawa, S.; Park, I. H.; Pshirkov, M. S.; Rodriguez, D. C.; Roh, S. Y.; Rubtsov, G.; Ryu, D.; Sagawa, H.; Sakurai, N.; Sampson, A. L.; Scott, L. M.; Shah, P. D.; Shibata, F.; Shibata, T.; Shimodaira, H.; Shin, B. K.; Shin, J. I.; Shirahama, T.; Smith, J. D.; Sokolsky, P.; Springer, R. W.; Stokes, B. T.; Stratton, S. R.; Stroman, T.; Suzuki, S.; Takahashi, Y.; Takeda, M.; Taketa, A.; Takita, M.; Tameda, Y.; Tanaka, H.; Tanaka, K.; Tanaka, M.; Thomas, S. B.; Thomson, G. B.; Tinyakov, P.; Tkachev, I.; Tokuno, H.; Tomida, T.; Troitsky, S.; Tsunesada, Y.; Tsutsumi, K.; Tsuyuguchi, Y.; Uchihori, Y.; Udo, S.; Ukai, H.; Urban, F.; Vasiloff, G.; Wada, Y.; Wong, T.; Yamakawa, Y.; Yamane, R.; Yamaoka, H.; Yamazaki, K.; Yang, J.; Yoneda, Y.; Yoshida, S.; Yoshii, H.; Zhou, X.; Zollinger, R.; Zundel, Z.

    2015-02-01

    We measure the spectrum of cosmic rays with energies greater than 1018.2 eV with the fluorescence detectors (FDs) and the surface detectors (SDs) of the Telescope Array Experiment using the data taken in our first 2.3-year observation from May 27, 2008 to September 7, 2010. A hybrid air shower reconstruction technique is employed to improve accuracies in determination of arrival directions and primary energies of cosmic rays using both FD and SD data. The energy spectrum presented here is in agreement with our previously published spectra and the HiRes results.

  7. Optimal energy for cell radiosensitivity enhancement by gold nanoparticles using synchrotron-based monoenergetic photon beams.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Wan Nordiana; Corde, Stéphanie; Yagi, Naoto; Abdul Aziz, Siti Aishah; Annabell, Nathan; Geso, Moshi

    2014-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles have been shown to enhance radiation doses delivered to biological targets due to the high absorption coefficient of gold atoms, stemming from their high atomic number (Z) and physical density. These properties significantly increase the likelihood of photoelectric effects and Com