Science.gov

Sample records for photon-counting microchannel plate

  1. High Speed Large Format Photon Counting Microchannel Plate Imaging Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegmund, O.; Ertley, C.; Vallerga, J.; Craven, C.; Popecki, M.; O'Mahony, A.; Minot, M.

    The development of a new class of microchannel plate technology, using atomic layer deposition (ALD) techniques applied to a borosilicate microcapillary array is enabling the implementation of larger, more stable detectors for Astronomy and remote sensing. Sealed tubes with MCPs with SuperGenII, bialkali, GaAs and GaN photocathodes have been developed to cover a wide range of optical/UV sensing applications. Formats of 18mm and 25mm circular, and 50mm (Planacon) and 20cm square have been constructed for uses from night time remote reconnaissance and biological single-molecule fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy, to large area focal plane imagers for Astronomy, neutron detection and ring imaging Cherenkov detection. The large focal plane areas were previously unattainable, but the new developments in construction of ALD microchannel plates allow implementation of formats of 20cm or more. Continuing developments in ALD microchannel plates offer improved overall sealed tube lifetime and gain stability, and furthermore show reduced levels of radiation induced background. High time resolution astronomical and remote sensing applications can be addressed with microchannel plate based imaging, photon time tagging detector sealed tube schemes. Photon counting imaging readouts for these devices vary from cross strip (XS), cross delay line (XDL), to stripline anodes, and pad arrays depending on the intended application. The XS and XDL readouts have been implemented in formats from 22mm, and 50mm to 20cm. Both use MCP charge signals detected on two orthogonal layers of conductive fingers to encode event X-Y positions. XDL readout uses signal propagation delay to encode positions while XS readout uses charge cloud centroiding. Spatial resolution readout of XS detectors can be better than 20 microns FWHM, with good image linearity while using low gain (<10^6), allowing high local counting rates and longer overall tube lifetime. XS tubes with electronics can encode event

  2. Calibration of photon counting imaging microchannel plate detectors for EUV astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegmund, O. H. W.; Vallerga, J.; Jelinsky, P.

    1986-01-01

    The calibration of photon counting imaging detectors for satellite based EUV astronomy is a complex process designed to ensure the validity of the data received 'in orbit'. The methods developed to accomplish calibration of microchannel plate detectors for the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer are described and illustrated. The characterization of these detectors can be subdivided into three categories: stabilization, performance tests, and environmental tests.

  3. Development and test of photon-counting microchannel plate detector arrays for use on space telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Timothy, J. G.

    1976-01-01

    The full sensitivity, dynamic range, and photometric stability of microchannel array plates(MCP) are incorporated into a photon-counting detection system for space operations. Components of the system include feedback-free MCP's for high gain and saturated output pulse-height distribution with a stable response; multi-anode readout arrays mounted in proximity focus with the output face of the MCP; and multi-layer ceramic headers to provide electrical interface between the anode array in a sealed detector tube and the associated electronics.

  4. Single photon counting with a microchannel plate intensified integrated diode array.

    PubMed

    Parkinson, M

    1989-06-01

    A multichannel photoelectron counting system employing a Reticon 1024-element linear silicon photodiode array with fiber optic window has been developed. The primary esign philosophy was to produce a 1-D electronic camera optimized for high dispersion astronomical spectrophotometry of faint sources by intense fying the photodiode array with a microchannel plate. With an intensification factor of approximately 10(8), single photon incidences will be amplified beyond system noise, becoming readily discriminable by low resolution pulse counting electronics. The system will approach the ideal of a truly noiseless amplifier with shot-limited performance. Funds not being available for the purchase of a microchannel plate, operation of the system in the rapid scanning intensified mode was illustrated by using the photodiode array as a line scanner imaging bright sources, and operation in the slow chilled Reticon mode was illustrated by installation in an automated 3-m Czerny-Turner double monochromator. PMID:20555472

  5. Improving the performance of ultrafast microchannel-plate photomultipliers in time-correlated photon counting by pulse pre-shaping

    SciTech Connect

    Cova, S.; Ripamonti, G. )

    1990-03-01

    With ultrafast microchannel-plate (MCP) photomultipliers that produce subnanosecond pulses, the commercially available circuit modules do not provide a correct constant-fraction trigger (CFT) operation. This has a detrimental effect on the resolution obtained in time-correlated photon counting experiments. In order to circumvent this CFT limitation and better exploit the ultrafast MCP performance, a simple pulse-shaping filter has been devised and experimented with. The filter can be interposed between the MCP output and the input of any commercial CFT module, without modifying the latter. The benefit of the filter is confirmed by the experimental results. With MCP samples that produced awkward resolution curves with satellite peaks and other irregular features, the introduction of the filter regularized and narrowed the curve. Also with a setup having fairly good performance, the introduction of the filter was advantageous: the full width at half maximum (FWHM) resolution improved from 75 to 55 ps.

  6. Development of a single-photon-counting camera with use of a triple-stacked micro-channel plate.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Naruomi; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Katafuchi, Tetsuro

    2016-01-01

    At the quantum-mechanical level, all substances (not merely electromagnetic waves such as light and X-rays) exhibit wave–particle duality. Whereas students of radiation science can easily understand the wave nature of electromagnetic waves, the particle (photon) nature may elude them. Therefore, to assist students in understanding the wave–particle duality of electromagnetic waves, we have developed a photon-counting camera that captures single photons in two-dimensional images. As an image intensifier, this camera has a triple-stacked micro-channel plate (MCP) with an amplification factor of 10(6). The ultra-low light of a single photon entering the camera is first converted to an electron through the photoelectric effect on the photocathode. The electron is intensified by the triple-stacked MCP and then converted to a visible light distribution, which is measured by a high-sensitivity complementary metal oxide semiconductor image sensor. Because it detects individual photons, the photon-counting camera is expected to provide students with a complete understanding of the particle nature of electromagnetic waves. Moreover, it measures ultra-weak light that cannot be detected by ordinary low-sensitivity cameras. Therefore, it is suitable for experimental research on scintillator luminescence, biophoton detection, and similar topics.

  7. Development of a single-photon-counting camera with use of a triple-stacked micro-channel plate.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Naruomi; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Katafuchi, Tetsuro

    2016-01-01

    At the quantum-mechanical level, all substances (not merely electromagnetic waves such as light and X-rays) exhibit wave–particle duality. Whereas students of radiation science can easily understand the wave nature of electromagnetic waves, the particle (photon) nature may elude them. Therefore, to assist students in understanding the wave–particle duality of electromagnetic waves, we have developed a photon-counting camera that captures single photons in two-dimensional images. As an image intensifier, this camera has a triple-stacked micro-channel plate (MCP) with an amplification factor of 10(6). The ultra-low light of a single photon entering the camera is first converted to an electron through the photoelectric effect on the photocathode. The electron is intensified by the triple-stacked MCP and then converted to a visible light distribution, which is measured by a high-sensitivity complementary metal oxide semiconductor image sensor. Because it detects individual photons, the photon-counting camera is expected to provide students with a complete understanding of the particle nature of electromagnetic waves. Moreover, it measures ultra-weak light that cannot be detected by ordinary low-sensitivity cameras. Therefore, it is suitable for experimental research on scintillator luminescence, biophoton detection, and similar topics. PMID:26486629

  8. A High-Speed, Event-Driven, Active Pixel Sensor Readout for Photon-Counting Microchannel Plate Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimble, Randy A.; Pain, Bedabrata; Norton, Timothy J.; Haas, J. Patrick; Oegerle, William R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Silicon array readouts for microchannel plate intensifiers offer several attractive features. In this class of detector, the electron cloud output of the MCP intensifier is converted to visible light by a phosphor; that light is then fiber-optically coupled to the silicon array. In photon-counting mode, the resulting light splashes on the silicon array are recognized and centroided to fractional pixel accuracy by off-chip electronics. This process can result in very high (MCP-limited) spatial resolution while operating at a modest MCP gain (desirable for dynamic range and long term stability). The principal limitation of intensified CCD systems of this type is their severely limited local dynamic range, as accurate photon counting is achieved only if there are not overlapping event splashes within the frame time of the device. This problem can be ameliorated somewhat by processing events only in pre-selected windows of interest of by using an addressable charge injection device (CID) for the readout array. We are currently pursuing the development of an intriguing alternative readout concept based on using an event-driven CMOS Active Pixel Sensor. APS technology permits the incorporation of discriminator circuitry within each pixel. When coupled with suitable CMOS logic outside the array area, the discriminator circuitry can be used to trigger the readout of small sub-array windows only when and where an event splash has been detected, completely eliminating the local dynamic range problem, while achieving a high global count rate capability and maintaining high spatial resolution. We elaborate on this concept and present our progress toward implementing an event-driven APS readout.

  9. A High-Speed, Event-Driven, Active Pixel Sensor Readout for Photon-Counting Microchannel Plate Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimble, Randy A.; Pain, B.; Norton, T. J.; Haas, P.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Silicon array readouts for microchannel plate intensifiers offer several attractive features. In this class of detector, the electron cloud output of the MCP intensifier is converted to visible light by a phosphor; that light is then fiber-optically coupled to the silicon array. In photon-counting mode, the resulting light splashes on the silicon array are recognized and centroided to fractional pixel accuracy by off-chip electronics. This process can result in very high (MCP-limited) spatial resolution for the readout while operating at a modest MCP gain (desirable for dynamic range and long term stability). The principal limitation of intensified CCD systems of this type is their severely limited local dynamic range, as accurate photon counting is achieved only if there are not overlapping event splashes within the frame time of the device. This problem can be ameliorated somewhat by processing events only in pre-selected windows of interest or by using an addressable charge injection device (CID) for the readout array. We are currently pursuing the development of an intriguing alternative readout concept based on using an event-driven CMOS Active Pixel Sensor. APS technology permits the incorporation of discriminator circuitry within each pixel. When coupled with suitable CMOS logic outside the array area, the discriminator circuitry can be used to trigger the readout of small sub-array windows only when and where an event splash has been detected, completely eliminating the local dynamic range problem, while achieving a high global count rate capability and maintaining high spatial resolution. We elaborate on this concept and present our progress toward implementing an event-driven APS readout.

  10. Evaluation of a photon-counting x-ray imaging detector based on microchannel plates for mammography applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shikhaliev, Polad M.; Xu, Tong; Molloi, Sabee

    2004-05-01

    Experimental prototype of a photon counting scanning slit X-ray imaging system is being evaluated for potential application in digital mammography. This system is based on a recently developed and tested "edge-on" illuminated Microchannel Plate (MCP) detector. The MCP detectors are well known for providing a combination of capabilities such as direct conversion, physical charge amplification, pulse counting, high spatial and temporal resolution, and very low noise. However, their application for medical imaging was hampered by their low detection efficiency. This limitation was addressed using an "edge-on" illumination mode for MCP. The current experimental prototype was developed to investigate the imaging performance of this detector concept for digital mammography. The current prototype provides a 60 mm field of view, 200 kHz count rate with 20% non-paralysable dead time and >7 lp/mm limiting resolution. A 0.3 mm focal spot W target X-ray tube was used for image acquisition. The detector noise is 0.3 count/pixel for 50x50 micron pixels. The count rate of the current prototype is limited by the delay line readout electronics, which causes long scanning times (minutes) and high tube loading. This problem will be addressed using multichannel ASIC electronics for clinical implementation. However, the current readout architecture is adequate for evaluation of the performance parameters of the new detector concept. It is very simple and provides a maximum intrinsic resolution of 28 micron FWHM. The prototype was evaluated using resolution, contrast detail and breast Phantoms. The MTF and DQE of the system are being evaluated at different tube voltages. The design parameters of a scanning multiple slit mammography system are being evaluated. It is concluded that a photon counting, quantum limited and virtually scatter free digital mammography system can be developed based on the proposed detector.

  11. High Speed Optical Imaging Photon Counting Microchannel Plate Detectors for Astronomical and Space Sensing Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegmund, O.; Vallerga, J.; Welsh, B.; McPhate, J.; Rogers, D.

    In recent years we have implemented a variety of high-resolution, photon-counting MCP detectors in space instrumentation for satellite FUSE, GALEX, IMAGE, SOHO, SSULI, HST-COS, rocket, and shuttle payloads as well as sensors for ground based Astronomy, reconnaissance and biology. These detectors can meet many of the challenging imaging and timing demands of applications including astronomy of transient and time-variable sources, Earth atmospheric imaging and spectroscopy for real time space weather monitoring, biological single-molecule fluorescence lifetime microscopy, airborne and space situational awareness, and optical night-time/reconnaissance. Our recent work on high performance photon counting imaging readouts enables significant advancements over previous detector systems used for these applications. We have developed novel Cross-Strip and Cross-Delay-Line anode structures that can, in combination with small pore MCP's in sealed tube detectors, can achieve high spatial resolution (better than 10 um FWHM) with self triggered ~1 ns timing accuracy at up to 10 MHz event rates. Sealed tubes with formats, of 18mm, and 25mm with efficient S25 photocathodes have been built and are being used in several applications. The detectors and their properties will be discussed in this paper. Our installation and astronomical commissioning of one of these detectors at the South African Astronomical Observatory, South African Large Telescope (SALT) 10m telescope will be described. Our photometer is positioned in an auxiliary instrument port of the SALT. This is a stand-alone instrument that includes our detector system with two filter wheels (neutral density and U, B, V), an iris, and all the control modules necessary to operate the system. This instrument gives us access to the southern sky with significant sensitivity and unprecedented time resolution (microsec). High time resolution astronomy is still in its infancy, such that high cadence observations of the variable

  12. Cross strip anode readouts for large format, photon counting microchannel plate detectors: developing flight qualified prototypes of the detector and electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallerga, John; Raffanti, Rick; Cooney, Michael; Cumming, Harley; Varner, Gary; Seljak, Andrej

    2014-07-01

    Photon counting microchannel plate (MCP) imagers have been the detector of choice for most UV astronomical missions over the last two decades (e.g. EUVE, FUSE, COS on Hubble etc.). Over this duration, improvements in the MCP laboratory readout technology have resulted in better spatial resolution (x10), temporal resolution (x1000) and output event rate (x100), all the while operating at lower gain (x 10) resulting in lower high voltage requirements and longer MCP lifetimes. One such technology is the parallel cross strip (PXS) readout. Laboratory versions of PXS electronics have demonstrated < 20 μm FWHM spatial resolution, count rates on the order of 2 MHz, and temporal resolution of ~ 1ns. In 2012 our group at U.C. Berkeley, along with our partners at the U. Hawaii, received a Strategic Astrophysics Technology grant to raise the TRL of the PXS detector and electronics from 4 to 6 by replacing most of the high powered electronics with application specific integrated circuits (ASICs) which will lower the power, mass and volume requirements of the PXS detector. We were also tasked to design and fabricate a "standard" 50mm square active area MCP detector incorporating these electronics that can be environmentally qualified for flight (temperature, vacuum, vibration). The first ASICs designed for this program have been fabricated and are undergoing testing. We present the latest progress on these ASIC designs and performance and show imaging results from the new 50 x 50 mm XS detector.

  13. Fractal multifiber microchannel plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Lee M.; Feller, W. B.; Kenter, Almus T.; Chappell, Jon H.

    1992-01-01

    The construction and performance of microchannel plates (MCPs) made using fractal tiling mehtods are reviewed. MCPs with 40 mm active areas having near-perfect channel ordering were produced. These plates demonstrated electrical performance characteristics equivalent to conventionally constructed MCPs. These apparently are the first MCPs which have a sufficiently high degree of order to permit single channel addressability. Potential applications for these devices and the prospects for further development are discussed.

  14. Microchannel plate streak camera

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Ching L.

    1989-01-01

    An improved streak camera in which a microchannel plate electron multiplier is used in place of or in combination with the photocathode used in prior streak cameras. The improved streak camera is far more sensitive to photons (UV to gamma-rays) than the conventional x-ray streak camera which uses a photocathode. The improved streak camera offers gamma-ray detection with high temporal resolution. It also offers low-energy x-ray detection without attenuation inside the cathode. Using the microchannel plate in the improved camera has resulted in a time resolution of about 150 ps, and has provided a sensitivity sufficient for 1000 KeV x-rays.

  15. Microchannel plate streak camera

    DOEpatents

    Wang, C.L.

    1984-09-28

    An improved streak camera in which a microchannel plate electron multiplier is used in place of or in combination with the photocathode used in prior streak cameras. The improved streak camera is far more sensitive to photons (uv to gamma-rays) than the conventional x-ray streak camera which uses a photocathode. The improved streak camera offers gamma-ray detection with high temporal resolution. It also offers low-energy x-ray detection without attenuation inside the cathode. Using the microchannel plate in the improved camera has resulted in a time resolution of about 150 ps, and has provided a sensitivity sufficient for 1000 keV x-rays.

  16. Microchannel plate streak camera

    DOEpatents

    Wang, C.L.

    1989-03-21

    An improved streak camera in which a microchannel plate electron multiplier is used in place of or in combination with the photocathode used in prior streak cameras is disclosed. The improved streak camera is far more sensitive to photons (UV to gamma-rays) than the conventional x-ray streak camera which uses a photocathode. The improved streak camera offers gamma-ray detection with high temporal resolution. It also offers low-energy x-ray detection without attenuation inside the cathode. Using the microchannel plate in the improved camera has resulted in a time resolution of about 150 ps, and has provided a sensitivity sufficient for 1,000 KeV x-rays. 3 figs.

  17. Micro-channel plate detector

    SciTech Connect

    Elam, Jeffrey W.; Lee, Seon W.; Wang, Hsien -Hau; Pellin, Michael J.; Byrum, Karen; Frisch, Henry J.

    2015-09-22

    A method and system for providing a micro-channel plate detector. An anodized aluminum oxide membrane is provided and includes a plurality of nanopores which have an Al coating and a thin layer of an emissive oxide material responsive to incident radiation, thereby providing a plurality of radiation sensitive channels for the micro-channel plate detector.

  18. Large-format photon-counting arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Rodgers, A.W.; Van Harmelen, J.; King, D.; Conroy, P.; Harding, P.

    1988-07-01

    Recently-constructed large-format photon-counting arrays used as spectroscopic and imaging detectors are described. The photon-counting imaging systems use microchannel plate intensifiers which are optically coupled to multiple CCDs through fiber-optic conduits. S-20 quartz substrate cathodes are used in the blue and NEA Ga-As cathodes for wavelengths greater than 580 nm. Event centering results in detector resolution of 42 lp/mm at 50 pct modulation, being fundamentally limited by the microchannel plate pore diameter of 12 microns. The current systems have 1460 x 960 pixels format. The dead space between module CCDs is 30 microns. There is, in principle, no limit to this format. 6 references.

  19. Single-molecule localization software applied to photon counting imaging.

    PubMed

    Hirvonen, Liisa M; Kilfeather, Tiffany; Suhling, Klaus

    2015-06-01

    Centroiding in photon counting imaging has traditionally been accomplished by a single-step, noniterative algorithm, often implemented in hardware. Single-molecule localization techniques in superresolution fluorescence microscopy are conceptually similar, but use more sophisticated iterative software-based fitting algorithms to localize the fluorophore. Here, we discuss common features and differences between single-molecule localization and photon counting imaging and investigate the suitability of single-molecule localization software for photon event localization. We find that single-molecule localization software packages designed for superresolution microscopy-QuickPALM, rapidSTORM, and ThunderSTORM-can work well when applied to photon counting imaging with a microchannel-plate-based intensified camera system: photon event recognition can be excellent, fixed pattern noise can be low, and the microchannel plate pores can easily be resolved. PMID:26192667

  20. Single-molecule localization software applied to photon counting imaging.

    PubMed

    Hirvonen, Liisa M; Kilfeather, Tiffany; Suhling, Klaus

    2015-06-01

    Centroiding in photon counting imaging has traditionally been accomplished by a single-step, noniterative algorithm, often implemented in hardware. Single-molecule localization techniques in superresolution fluorescence microscopy are conceptually similar, but use more sophisticated iterative software-based fitting algorithms to localize the fluorophore. Here, we discuss common features and differences between single-molecule localization and photon counting imaging and investigate the suitability of single-molecule localization software for photon event localization. We find that single-molecule localization software packages designed for superresolution microscopy-QuickPALM, rapidSTORM, and ThunderSTORM-can work well when applied to photon counting imaging with a microchannel-plate-based intensified camera system: photon event recognition can be excellent, fixed pattern noise can be low, and the microchannel plate pores can easily be resolved.

  1. Time-correlated single photon counting: an advancing technique in a plate reader for assay development and high throughput screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Näther, Dirk U.; Fenske, Roger; Hurteaux, Reynald; Majno, Sandra; Smith, S. Desmond

    2006-10-01

    A new plate reader (Nanotaurus) has been developed by Edinburgh Instruments that has the principle design features of a confocal microscope and utilises the technique of Time Correlated Single Photon Counting for data acquisition. The advantages of Fluorescence Lifetime Measurements in the nanosecond time scale and analysis methods to recover lifetime parameters are discussed based on experimental data. First working assays using changes of lifetime parameters are presented that clearly demonstrate the advantages of the new instrument for biochemical assays and show strong promise for cell-based assays, by utilising the independence of lifetime parameters from sample volume and concentration.

  2. Atomic layer deposited borosilicate glass microchannel plates for large area event counting detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegmund, O. H. W.; McPhate, J. B.; Tremsin, A. S.; Jelinsky, S. R.; Hemphill, R.; Frisch, H. J.; Elam, J.; Mane, A.; Lappd Collaboration

    2012-12-01

    Borosilicate glass micro-capillary array substrates with 20 μm and 40 μm pores have been deposited with resistive, and secondary electron emissive, layers by atomic layer deposition to produce functional microchannel plates. Device formats of 32.7 mm and 20 cm square have been fabricated and tested in analog and photon counting modes. The tests show amplification, imaging, background rate, pulse shape and lifetime characteristics that are comparable to standard glass microchannel plates. Large area microchannel plates of this type facilitate the construction of 20 cm format sealed tube sensors with strip-line readouts that are being developed for Cherenkov light detection. Complementary work has resulted in Na2KSb bialkali photocathodes with peak quantum efficiency of 25% being made on borosilicate glass. Additionally GaN (Mg) opaque photocathodes have been successfully made on borosilicate microchannel plates.

  3. [Theoretical analysis and experimental measurement for secondary electron yield of microchannel plate in extreme ultraviolet region].

    PubMed

    Li, Min; Ni, Qi-liang; Dong, Ning-ning; Chen, Bo

    2010-08-01

    Photon counting detectors based on microchannel plate have widespread applications in astronomy. The present paper deeply studies secondary electron of microchannel plate in extreme ultraviolet. A theoretical model describing extreme ultraviolet-excited secondary electron yield is presented, and the factor affecting on the secondary electron yields of both electrode and lead glass which consist of microchannel plate is analyzed according to theoretical formula derived from the model. The result shows that the higher secondary electron yield is obtained under appropriate condition that the thickness of material is more than 20 nm and the grazing incidence angle is larger than the critical angle. Except for several wavelengths, the secondary electron yields of both electrode and lead glass decrease along with the increase in the wavelength And also the quantum efficiency of microchannel plate is measured using quantum efficiency test set-up with laser-produced plasmas source as an extreme ultraviolet radiation source, and the result of experiment agrees with theoretical analysis.

  4. X-ray imaging with ``edge-on'' microchannel plate detector: first experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shikhaliev, Polad M.; Molloi, Sabee

    2003-09-01

    A novel scanning slit X-ray imaging system based on an "edge-on" microchannel plate detector was developed and tested. Images were acquired at 50 kV(p) X-ray tube voltage with a limiting spatial resolution of 7 lp/mm. The pixel noise was measured to be 0.3 count/pixel/s for a 50×70 μm 2 pixel size. This photon counting detector can be considered to be virtually noise free.

  5. Micro-channel plates and vacuum detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gys, T.

    2015-07-01

    A micro-channel plate is an array of miniature electron multipliers that are each acting as a continuous dynode chain. The compact channel structure results in high spatial and time resolutions and robustness to magnetic fields. Micro-channel plates have been originally developed for night vision applications and integrated as an amplification element in image intensifiers. These devices show single-photon sensitivity with very low noise and have been used as such for scintillating fiber tracker readout in high-energy physics experiments. Given their very short transit time spread, micro-channel plate photomultiplier tubes are also being used in time-of-flight and particle identification detectors. The present paper will cover the history of the micro-channel plate development, basic features, and some of their applications. Emphasis will be put on various new manufacturing processes that have been developed over the last few years, and that result in a significant improvement in terms of efficiency, noise, and lifetime performance.

  6. Imaging characteristics of the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer microchannel plate detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vallerga, J. V.; Kaplan, G. C.; Siegmund, O. H. W.; Lampton, M.; Malina, R. F.

    1989-01-01

    The Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer (EUVE) satellite will conduct an all-sky survey over the wavelength range from 70 A to 760 A using four grazing-incidence telescopes and seven microchannel-plate (MCP) detectors. The imaging photon-counting MCP detectors have active areas of 19.6 cm2. Photon arrival position is determined using a wedge-and-strip anode and associated pulse-encoding electronics. The imaging characteristics of the EUVE flight detectors are presented including image distortion, flat-field response, and spatial differential nonlinearity. Also included is a detailed discussion of image distortions due to the detector mechanical assembly, the wedge-and-strip anode, and the electronics. Model predictions of these distortions are compared to preflight calibration images which show distortions less than 1.3 percent rms of the detector diameter of 50 mm before correction. The plans for correcting these residual detector image distortions to less than 0.1 percent rms are also presented.

  7. New Developments in the Position Sensitive Detectors Based on Microchannel Plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremsin, A. S.; Siegmund, O. H. W.

    2002-11-01

    We report on the latest developments in position sensitive photon counting detectors based on microchannel plates. Substantial improvement of the spatial resolution was achieved with introduction of new readout technology, namely crossed strip (XS) anode, and corresponding processing electronics. The spatial resolution of XS readout appeared to be as small as ~3-4 μm FWHM. Reduction of the total detector gain (down to 106 and potentially lower) without compromising the spatial accuracy allows detector operation at much higher local and global counting rates since the microchannel recharge time becomes smaller. Recent developments of novel microchannel plate technologies provide basis for substantial increase of the spectral sensitivity and quantum efficiency of MCP detectors. We have tested a number of new Silicon micromachined MCPs The new MCP technologies should allow deposition of completely new photocathode materials directly on the front surface of microchannel plates (opaque photocathodes). Opposite to standard glass MCPs new Silicon MCPs can sustain high temperatures (-800 C°) required for the photocathode deposition and activation processes.

  8. Performance of low resistance microchannel plate stacks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegmund, O. H. W.; Stock, J.

    1991-01-01

    Results are presented from an evaluation of three sets of low resistance microchannel plate (MCP) stacks; the tests encompassed gain, pulse-height distribution, background rate, event rate capacity as a function of illuminated area, and performance changes due to high temperature bakeout and high flux UV scrub. The MCPs are found to heat up, requiring from minutes to hours to reach stabilization. The event rate is strongly dependent on the size of the area being illuminated, with larger areas experiencing a gain drop onset at lower rates than smaller areas.

  9. Microporous microchannel plates and method of manufacturing same

    SciTech Connect

    Beetz, C.P. Jr.; Boerstler, R.W.; Steinbeck, J.; Winn, D.R.

    2000-04-04

    A microchannel plate and method of manufacturing same is provided. The microchannel plate includes a plate consisting of an anodized material and a plurality of channels which are formed during the anodization of the material and extend between the two sides of the plate. Electrodes are also disposed on each side of the plate for generating an electrical field within the channels. Preferably, the material is alumina and the channels are activated such that the channel walls are conductive and highly secondary emissive.

  10. Thermal neutron imaging using microchannel plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraser, George W.; Pearson, James F.; Al-Horayess, O. S.; Feller, W. Bruce; Cook, Lee M.

    1993-02-01

    Microchannel plates (MCPs) are compact electron multipliers of high gain, widely used for the high resolution imaging of charged particles and photons. In this paper, we consider the use of lead glass MCPs for the imaging of thermal neutrons. Two contrasting techniques are described. The first method involves direct neutron detection within a special channel plate structure containing lithium and/or boron. We review the constraints of glass chemistry on the attainable lithium oxide and boron oxide fractions and, hence, on the maximum neutron detection efficiency. The second method involves the detection, using MCPs of standard glass composition, of the internal conversion electrons from a thin gadolinium foil. We present the first measurements of the detection efficiency, pulse height resolution and imaging properties of a pulse-counting MCP/Gd detector system.

  11. Amorphous silicon-based microchannel plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franco, Andrea; Riesen, Yannick; Wyrsch, Nicolas; Dunand, Sylvain; Powolny, François; Jarron, Pierre; Ballif, Christophe

    2012-12-01

    Microchannel plates (MCP) based on hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) were recently introduced to overcome some of the limitations of crystalline silicon and glass MCP. The typical thickness of a-Si:H based MCPs (AMCP) ranges between 80 and 100 μm and the micromachining of the channels is realized by deep reactive ion etching (DRIE). Advantages and issues regarding the fabrication process are presented and discussed. Electron amplification is demonstrated and analyzed using Electron Beam Induced Current (EBIC) technique. The gain increases as a function of the bias voltage, limited to -340 V on account of high leakage currents across the structure. EBIC maps on 10° tilted samples confirm that the device active area extend to the entire channel opening. AMCP characterization with the electron beam shows gain saturation and signal quenching which depends on the effectiveness of the charge replenishment in the channel walls.

  12. One hundred anode microchannel plate ion detector

    SciTech Connect

    He Yi; Poehlman, John F.; Alexander, Andrew W.; Boraas, Kirk; Reilly, James P.

    2011-08-15

    A one-hundred-anode microchannel plate detector is constructed on a 10 cm x 15 cm printed circuit board and attached to a homebuilt matrix assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Ringing and cross talk between anodes have been successfully eliminated and preliminary mass spectra of peptide ions recorded. With one hundred anodes on the printed circuit board, spatial information about the ion beam can also be readily determined with this detector. During operation, the detector anode assembly loses sensitivity after ions strike it for a considerable period of time due to charging of the non-conductive regions between anodes. However, this effect can be minimized by deflecting matrix ions away from the detector.

  13. Photon-counting image sensors for the ultraviolet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, E. B.

    1985-01-01

    An investigation on specific performance details of photon counting, ultraviolet image sensors having 2-dimensional formats is reviewed. In one study, controlled experiments were performed which compare the quantum efficiencies, in pulse counting mode, of CsI photocathodes deposited on: (1) the front surface of a microchannel plate (MCP), (2) a solid surface in front of an MCP, and (3) an intensified CCD image sensor (ICCD) where a CCD is directly bombarded by accelerated photoelectrons. Tests indicated that the detection efficiency of the CsI-coated MCP at 1026 A is lower by a factor of 2.5 than that of the MCP with a separate, opaque CsI photocathode, and the detection efficiency ratio increases substantially at longer wavelengths (ratio is 5 at 1216 A and 20 at 1608 A).

  14. All-digital full waveform recording photon counting flash lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grund, Christian J.; Harwit, Alex

    2010-08-01

    Current generation analog and photon counting flash lidar approaches suffer from limitation in waveform depth, dynamic range, sensitivity, false alarm rates, optical acceptance angle (f/#), optical and electronic cross talk, and pixel density. To address these issues Ball Aerospace is developing a new approach to flash lidar that employs direct coupling of a photocathode and microchannel plate front end to a high-speed, pipelined, all-digital Read Out Integrated Circuit (ROIC) to achieve photon-counting temporal waveform capture in each pixel on each laser return pulse. A unique characteristic is the absence of performance-limiting analog or mixed signal components. When implemented in 65nm CMOS technology, the Ball Intensified Imaging Photon Counting (I2PC) flash lidar FPA technology can record up to 300 photon arrivals in each pixel with 100 ps resolution on each photon return, with up to 6000 range bins in each pixel. The architecture supports near 100% fill factor and fast optical system designs (f/#<1), and array sizes to 3000×3000 pixels. Compared to existing technologies, >60 dB ultimate dynamic range improvement, and >104 reductions in false alarm rates are anticipated, while achieving single photon range precision better than 1cm. I2PC significantly extends long-range and low-power hard target imaging capabilities useful for autonomous hazard avoidance (ALHAT), navigation, imaging vibrometry, and inspection applications, and enables scannerless 3D imaging for distributed target applications such as range-resolved atmospheric remote sensing, vegetation canopies, and camouflage penetration from terrestrial, airborne, GEO, and LEO platforms. We discuss the I2PC architecture, development status, anticipated performance advantages, and limitations.

  15. Hybrid analog/digital, large format, photon counting detectors for astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crocker, J.; Rafal, M.; Denman, B.; Paresce, F.; Hiltner, A.

    1986-01-01

    The development of a new microchannel plate photon-counting detector with an analog readout method based on a resistive anode is reported. This detector exhibits extremely high, stable electron gains of 10 to the 8th. At this gain, the spatial resolution is no longer primarily limited by the noise of the resistive anode, so that digital methods of readout, such as discrete conductors, lose their advantage. These detectors can be readily scaled to 40 mm and 70 mm formats to match plate scales of 2-m (and larger) telescopes. New, high speed digital electronics fully exploit the high spatial and time resolution made possible by gains of this level. Analysis of the theoretical performance of this detector shows that the major limitation to the spatial resolution is the proximity focus of the photocathode and the first microchannel plate. The detector has been mated to an echelle spectrograph developed.

  16. Photon counting digital holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demoli, Nazif; Skenderović, Hrvoje; Stipčević, Mario; Pavičić, Mladen

    2016-05-01

    Digital holography uses electronic sensors for hologram recording and numerical method for hologram reconstruction enabling thus the development of advanced holography applications. However, in some cases, the useful information is concealed in a very wide dynamic range of illumination intensities and successful recording requires an appropriate dynamic range of the sensor. An effective solution to this problem is the use of a photon-counting detector. Such detectors possess counting rates of the order of tens to hundreds of millions counts per second, but conditions of recording holograms have to be investigated in greater detail. Here, we summarize our main findings on this problem. First, conditions for optimum recording of digital holograms for detecting a signal significantly below detector's noise are analyzed in terms of the most important holographic measures. Second, for time-averaged digital holograms, optimum recordings were investigated for exposures shorter than the vibration cycle. In both cases, these conditions are studied by simulations and experiments.

  17. Spatial charge cloud size of microchannel plates.

    PubMed

    Saito, M; Saito, Y; Asamura, K; Mukai, T

    2007-02-01

    We examine the spatial evolution of charge clouds emitted by microchannel plates (MCPs). A model of this evolution is presented, along with a comparison to experimental results. We also present an experimental method to measure the charge cloud radius in which the radial charge cloud distribution is assumed to be Gaussian. When a charge cloud is released from the MCP, its initial size is determined by the number and distribution of excited channels. The size of the charge cloud is examined as a function acceleration voltage, distance between MCP and anode, and MCP bias voltage. Since electrons released from the MCP have various initial energies and angular divergence, the charge cloud size increases as it travels away from the MCP. Space charge effects also contribute to the growth of the charge cloud. The experimental results are in close agreement with our model, which includes these effects. From experiment, we also derive an approximate expression for charge cloud radius as a function of acceleration voltage and distance between MCP and anode. This expression can be used for the practical design and optimization of a position sensing system comprised of multiple anodes.

  18. Performance of Small Pore Microchannel Plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegmund, O. H. W.; Gummin, M. A.; Ravinett, T.; Jelinsky, S. R.; Edgar, M.

    1995-01-01

    Small pore size microchannel plates (MCP's) are needed to satisfy the requirements for future high resolution small and large format detectors for astronomy. MCP's with pore sizes in the range 5 micron to 8 micron are now being manufactured, but they are of limited availability and are of small size. We have obtained sets of Galileo 8 micron and 6.5 micron MCP's, and Philips 6 micron and 7 micron pore MCP's, and compared them to our larger pore MCP Z stacks. We have tested back to back MCP stacks of four of these MCP's and achieved gains greater than 2 x 1O(exp 7) with pulse height distributions of less than 40% FWHM, and background rates of less than 0.3 events sec(exp -1) cm(exp -2). Local counting rates up to approx. 100 events/pore/sec have been attained with little drop of the MCP gain. The bare MCP quantum efficiencies are somewhat lower than those expected, however. Flat field images are characterized by an absence of MCP fixed pattern noise.

  19. Photon-counting H33D detector for biological fluorescence imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michalet, X.; Siegmund, O. H. W.; Vallerga, J. V.; Jelinsky, P.; Millaud, J. E.; Weiss, S.

    2006-11-01

    We have developed a photon-counting High-temporal and High-spatial resolution, High-throughput 3-Dimensional detector (H33D) for biological imaging of fluorescent samples. The design is based on a 25 mm diameter S20 photocathode followed by a 3-microchannel plate stack, and a cross-delay line anode. We describe the bench performance of the H33D detector, as well as preliminary imaging results obtained with fluorescent beads, quantum dots and live cells and discuss applications of future generation detectors for single-molecule imaging and high-throughput study of biomolecular interactions.

  20. Photon-Counting H33D Detector for Biological Fluorescence Imaging.

    PubMed

    Michalet, X; Siegmund, O H W; Vallerga, J V; Jelinsky, P; Millaud, J E; Weiss, S

    2006-11-01

    We have developed a photon-counting High-temporal and High-spatial resolution, High-throughput 3-Dimensional detector (H33D) for biological imaging of fluorescent samples. The design is based on a 25 mm diameter S20 photocathode followed by a 3-microchannel plate stack, and a cross delay line anode. We describe the bench performance of the H33D detector, as well as preliminary imaging results obtained with fluorescent beads, quantum dots and live cells and discuss applications of future generation detectors for single-molecule imaging and high-throughput study of biomolecular interactions. PMID:20151021

  1. Performance comparison of high speed microchannel plate photomultiplier tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varghese, Thomas; Selden, Michael; Oldham, Thomas

    1993-01-01

    The transit time spread characteristics of high speed microchannel photomultipliers has improved since the upgrade of the NASA CDSLR network to MCP-PMT's in the mid-1980's. The improvement comes from the incorporation of 6 micron (pore size) microchannels and offers significant improvement to the satellite ranging precision. To examine the impact on ranging precision, two microchannel plate photomultiplier tubes (MCP-PMT) were evaluated for output pulse characteristics and temporal jitter. These were a Hamamatsu R 2566 U-7 MCP-PMT (6 micron) and an ITT 4129f MCP-PMT (12 micron).

  2. Fundamental and practical limitations of FUV/EUV photon-counting image detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lampton, M.

    1991-01-01

    In EUV and FUV space-astronomy applications, the best contemporary detector designs are based on the use of microchannel plates due to their ability to deliver photon-counting performance with high efficiency. The major unresolved issue is the choice of position-readout system for the individual photoevents. Electrical event-readout systems are divided into two classes: the discrete wire anodes that perform coordinate digitization by wire-group selection, and the continuous centroid-position encoders for which coordinates are digitized in the associated electronics. The centroid-position encoder techniques are discussed in terms of how they overcome the four chief limitations of the discrete-wire readouts - their limited format size, their flat focal surface, their fundamental hex-channel vs squared-pixel moire pattern, and their image undersampling. With these limitations overcome, microchannel based image systems can deliver the performance demanded by the forthcoming generation of applications in space astronomy.

  3. Imaging by photon counting with 256x256 pixel matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tlustos, Lukas; Campbell, Michael; Heijne, Erik H. M.; Llopart, Xavier

    2004-09-01

    Using 0.25µm standard CMOS we have developed 2-D semiconductor matrix detectors with sophisticated functionality integrated inside each pixel of a hybrid sensor module. One of these sensor modules is a matrix of 256x256 square 55µm pixels intended for X-ray imaging. This device is called 'Medipix2' and features a fast amplifier and two-level discrimination for signals between 1000 and 100000 equivalent electrons, with overall signal noise ~150 e- rms. Signal polarity and comparator thresholds are programmable. A maximum count rate of nearly 1 MHz per pixel can be achieved, which corresponds to an average flux of 3x10exp10 photons per cm2. The selected signals can be accumulated in each pixel in a 13-bit register. The serial readout takes 5-10 ms. A parallel readout of ~300 µs could also be used. Housekeeping functions such as local dark current compensation, test pulse generation, silencing of noisy pixels and threshold tuning in each pixel contribute to the homogeneous response over a large sensor area. The sensor material can be adapted to the energy of the X-rays. Best results have been obtained with high-resistivity silicon detectors, but also CdTe and GaAs detectors have been used. The lowest detectable X-ray energy was about 4 keV. Background measurements have been made, as well as measurements of the uniformity of imaging by photon counting. Very low photon count rates are feasible and noise-free at room temperature. The readout matrix can be used also with visible photons if an energy or charge intensifier structure is interposed such as a gaseous amplification layer or a microchannel plate or acceleration field in vacuum.

  4. High Spatial Resolution Investigations of Microchannel Plate Imaging Properties for UV Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegmund, Oswald

    1996-01-01

    Microchannel plate (MCP) photon counting detectors are currently being used with great success on many of the recent NASA/ESA ultraviolet (UV) astrophysics missions that make observations in the 1OO A - 1600 A range. These include HUT, the Wide Field Camera on ROSAT, EUVE, ALEXIS, ORFEUS, and SOHO. These devices have also been chosen to fly on future UV astrophysics missions such as FUSE, FUVITA, IMAGE, and both the HST STIS and Advanced Camera instruments. During the period of this award we have fabricated a dual-chamber vacuum test facility to carry out laboratory testing of detector resolution, image stability and linearity, and flat field performance to enable us to characterize the performance of MCPs and their associated read-out architectures. We have also fabricated and tested a laboratory 'test-bed' delay line detector, which can accommodate MCP's with a wide range of formats and run at high data rates, to continue our studies of MCP image fixed pattern noise, and particularly for new small pore MCP's which have recently come onto the market. These tests were mainly focussed on the assessment of cross delay-line (XDL) and double delay line (DDL) anode read-out schemes, with particular attention being focussed on flat-field and spatial resolution performance.

  5. Improved lifetime of microchannel-plate PMTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmann, A.; Britting, A.; Eyrich, W.; Uhlig, F.; Dzhygadlo, R.; Gerhardt, A.; Götzen, K.; Höhler, R.; Kalicy, G.; Kumawat, H.; Lehmann, D.; Lewandowski, B.; Patsyuk, M.; Peters, K.; Schepers, G.; Schmitt, L.; Schwarz, C.; Schwiening, J.; Traxler, M.; Zühlsdorf, M.; Dodokhov, V. Kh.; Düren, M.; Föhl, K.; Hayrapetyan, A.; Kröck, B.; Merle, O.; Rieke, J.; Cowie, E.; Keri, T.; Montgomery, R.; Rosner, G.; Achenbach, P.; Cardinali, M.; Hoek, M.; Lauth, W.; Sfienti, C.; Thiel, M.; Bühler, P.; Gruber, L.; Marton, J.; Suzuki, K.

    2014-12-01

    The charged particle identification at the PANDA experiment will be mainly performed with DIRC detectors. Because of their advantageous properties the preferred photon sensors are MCP-PMTs. However, until recently these devices showed serious aging problems which resulted in a diminishing quantum efficiency (QE) of the photo cathode. By applying innovative countermeasures against the aging causes, the manufacturers recently succeeded in drastically improving the lifetime of MCP-PMTs. Especially the application of an ALD coating technique to seal the material of the micro-channels proves very powerful and results in a lifetime of ≈ 6 C /cm2 integrated anode charge without a substantial QE degradation for the latest PHOTONIS XP85112. This paper will present a comparative measurement of the lifetime of several older and recent MCP-PMTs demonstrating this progress.

  6. WITHDRAWN--Performance Evaluation of Square Pore Microchannel Plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visco, A.

    2005-10-01

    Microchannel Plates (MCP) are used in a variety of imaging systems as a means of amplifying the incident radiation. Using a microchannel plate mount, developed at the University of Michigan, we compare square and round pore MCPs. Using a characterized x-ray source, we investigate the differences in the pulse height distribution, modular transfer function, and Quantum efficiency of these two types. Using a metal grid, we create a potential difference above the MCP that forces ejected electrons back into the pores, which may prove to increase the quantum efficiency of the system. Measurements of the effect of the reflecting grid on the quantum efficiency are presented. Work supported by the Naval Research Laboratory, National Nuclear Security Administration under the Stewardship Science Academic Alliances program through DOE Research Grant DE-FG52-03NA00064, and through DE FG53 2005 NA26014, and Livermore National Laboratory.

  7. A new approach to large area microchannel plate manufacture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Methods of manufacture of twisted single elements as the base for producing microchannel plates (MCP) are discussed. Initial evaluations validated the off-axis channel concept and no technological roadblocks were identified which would prevent fabrication of high gain, high spatial resolution, large format MCP's using this technique. The first MP's have operated at stable gains of 3 million with pulse height resolution superior to results obtained by standard chevron MCP's.

  8. Characterization of a photon-counting ICCD prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergamini, Paolo; Bonelli, Giuseppe; Poletto, Luca; Tanzi, Enrico G.; Uslenghi, Michela; Tondello, Giuseppe

    1998-11-01

    The result obtained in the course of the characterization of a photon-counting ICCD prototype. The detector consists of a 40 mm diameter, Z stack, high gain microchannel plate intensifier, endowed with a RbTe photocathode. The intensifier electron cascade is transduced, via a phosphor screen and a 1:3.6 fiber optics reducer, into a 3 by 3 pixel, quasi-gaussian charge distribution on a 512 by 512 pixel format CCD matrix with square pixels of 15 micrometers . The CCD is read out, in the frame-transfer mode, through a single output amplifier at a frequency of 20 MHz. The data flow is acquired serially and fed to a virtual shift- register system, as to generate a 3 by 3 pixel even sash that sweeps dynamically the CCD matrix at the 50 ns clock pace. Each and every events has is searched for the presence of events whose integral charge distribution lie within set threshold levels, and satisfy given morphological rules, i.e. a single-peaked charge profile. The centroid coordinates of identified events are then determined with sub-pixel accuracy and subsequently stored in an external, high resolution memory. Detective quantum efficiency, spatial resolution and dynamic range obtained for the prototype system in the 150-600 nm spectral domain, are given and discussed, together with the up-graded performance expected for a second-generation prototype, presently being assembled.

  9. Photon Counting - One More Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanton, Richard H.

    2012-05-01

    Photon counting has been around for more than 60 years, and has been available to amateurs for most of that time. In most cases single photons are detected using photomultiplier tubes, "old technology" that became available after the Second World War. But over the last couple of decades the perfection of CCD devices has given amateurs the ability to perform accurate photometry with modest telescopes. Is there any reason to still count photons? This paper discusses some of the strengths of current photon counting technology, particularly relating to the search for fast optical transients. Technology advances in counters and photomultiplier modules are briefly mentioned. Illustrative data are presented including FFT analysis of bright star photometry and a technique for finding optical pulses in a large file of noisy data. This latter technique is shown to enable the discovery of a possible optical flare on the polar variable AM Her.

  10. Low noise and high resolution microchannel plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shulin; Pan, Jingsheng; Deng, Guangxu; Su, Detan; Xu, Zhiqing; Zhang, Yanyun

    2008-02-01

    To improve the Figure of Merit (FOM) and reduce the Equivalent Background Input (EBI) and Fixed-Pattern-Noise (FPN) in image intensifier, NVT (North Night Vision Technology Co., Ltd) has been researching and developing a low noise and high resolution Micro Channel Plate (MCP). The density of dark current of this new MCP is less than 0.5PA/cm2 (when MCP voltage at 1000V). The FPN and scintillation noise are reduced remarkably. Channel diameter is 6 μm and open area ratio is 60%~70%. The vacuum bakeout temperature could be as high as 500°C. This new kind of MCP will be extensively used in the supper generation and the third generation image intensifiers.

  11. The capacitive division image readout: a novel imaging device for microchannel plate detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapington, J. S.; Conneely, T. M.; Leach, S. A.; Moore, L.

    2013-09-01

    The Capacitive Division Image Readout (C-DIR) is a simple and novel image readout for photon counting detectors offering major performance advantages. C-DIR is a charge centroiding device comprising three elements; (i) a resistive anode providing event charge localization, event current return path and electrical isolation from detector high voltage, (ii) a dielectric substrate which capacitively couples the event transient signal to the third element, (iii) the readout device; an array of capacitively coupled electrodes which divides the signal among the readout charge measurement nodes. The resistive anode and dielectric substrate constitute the rear interface of the detector and capacitively couple the signal to the external C-DIR readout device. The C-DIR device is a passive, multilayer printed circuit board type device comprising a matrix of isolated electrodes whose geometries define the capacitive network. C-DIR is manufactured using conventional PCB geometries and is straightforward and economical to construct. C-DIR's robustness and simplicity belie its performance advantages. Its capacitive nature avoids partition noise, the Poisson noise associated with collection of discrete charges. The dominant noise limiting position resolution is electronic noise. However C-DIR also presents a low input capacitance to the readout electronics, minimising this noise component thus maximising spatial resolution. Optimisation of the C-DIR pattern-edge geometry can provide ~90% linear dynamic range. We present data showing image resolution and linearity of the C-DIR device in a microchannel plate detector and describe various electronic charge measurement scheme designed to exploit the full performance potential of the C-DIR device.

  12. Thermal dependence of electrical characteristics of micromachined silica microchannel plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremsin, Anton S.; Vallerga, John V.; Siegmund, Oswald H. W.; Beetz, Charles P.; Boerstler, Robert W.

    2004-04-01

    Micromachined silica microchannel plates (MCPs) under development have a number of advantages over standard glass MCPs and open completely new possibilities in detector technologies. In this article we present the results of our studies on the thermal properties of silica microchannel plates (sMCPs). Similar to standard glass microchanel plates the resistance of silica MCPs was measured to change exponentially with temperature with a negative thermal coefficient of -0.036 per °C, somewhat larger than that of standard glass MCPs. The resistance also decreases linearly with the applied voltage, with the voltage coefficient of -3.1×10-4 V-1. With the knowledge of these two coefficients, our thermal model allows the calculation of the maximum voltage, which can be applied to a given MCP without inducing a thermal runaway. A typical 25 mm diam, 240 μm thick sMCP with 6 μm pores has to have the resistance larger than ˜30 MΩ to operate safely at voltages up to 800 V. With this model we can also calculate the time required for a given silica MCP to reach the point of thermal equilibrium after a voltage increase. We hope that the ongoing efforts on a proper modification of the sMCP semiconducting layer will lead to the production of new MCPs with a small negative or even a positive thermal coefficient, reducing the possibility of thermal runaways of low-resistance MCPs required for high count rate applications.

  13. Dead-time effects in microchannel-plate imaging detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zombeck, Martin V.; Fraser, George W.

    1991-01-01

    The observed counting rates of microchannel plate (MCP) based detectors for high resolution observations of celestial EUV and X-ray sources vary over many orders of magnitude; the counting capability of an individual channel, however, is not high, and is associated with dead-times ranging from 0.1 msec to 1 sec. The dead-time increases with the area illuminated; attention is presently given to laboratory determinations of the count rate characteristics of a MCP detector as a function of illuminated area, and a model is developed for these results' use in the interpretation of space observations.

  14. Persistence of phosphor glow in microchannel plate image intensifiers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torr, M. R.

    1985-01-01

    Image intensifier tubes using microchannel plate amplification stages and phosphor output stages are being increasingly used in various detection applications. In this paper, measurements of the decay times of what are attributed to be the P20 phosphors in various image intensifiers are reported. It is found that the long tail on the decay curve of the phosphor following illumination can be a limitation for certain observations. In addition, the background level of phosphor glow (which is seen by the subsequent detection system as a light signal) continues to build with continuing illumination.

  15. Angular sensitivity of gated microchannel plate framing cameras

    SciTech Connect

    Landen, O. L.; Lobban, A.; Tutt, T.; Bell, P. M.; Costa, R.; Hargrove, D. R.; Ze, F.

    2001-01-01

    Gated, microchannel-plate-based (MCP) framing cameras have been deployed worldwide for 0.2--9 keV x-ray imaging and spectroscopy of transient plasma phenomena. For a variety of spectroscopic and imaging applications, the angular sensitivity of MCPs must be known for correctly interpreting the data. We present systematic measurements of angular sensitivity at discrete relevant photon energies and arbitrary MCP gain. The results can been accurately predicted by using a simple two-dimensional approximation to the three-dimensional MCP geometry and by averaging over all possible photon ray paths.

  16. Angular Sensitivity of Gated Micro-Channel Plate Framing Cameras

    SciTech Connect

    Landen, O L; Lobban, A; Tutt, T; Bell, P M; Costa, R; Ze, F

    2000-07-24

    Gated, microchannel-plate-based (MCP) framing cameras have been deployed worldwide for 0.2 - 9 keV x-ray imaging and spectroscopy of transient plasma phenomena. For a variety of spectroscopic and imaging applications, the angular sensitivity of MCPs must be known for correctly interpreting the data. We present systematic measurements of angular sensitivity at discrete relevant photon energies and arbitrary MCP gain. The results can been accurately predicted by using a simple 2D approximation to the 3D MCP geometry and by averaging over all possible photon ray paths.

  17. Using induced signals to sense position from a microchannel plate detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    deSouza, R. T.; Gosser, Z. Q.; Hudan, S.

    2012-05-01

    We demonstrate a novel concept for a position sensitive microchannel plate detector. This detector provides sub-millimeter spatial resolution by examining the signal induced on a wire harp by the electron cloud from a microchannel plate detector. Wires in the harp are efficiently read out by coupling them to a delay line.

  18. Application of atomic layer deposited microchannel plates to imaging photodetectors with high time resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegmund, O. H. W.; McPhate, J. B.; Tremsin, A. S.; Vallerga, J. V.; Ertley, C. D.; Richner, N. J.; Gerard, T. M.; Frisch, H. J.; Elam, J. W.; Mane, A. U.; Wagner, R. G.; Minot, M. J.; O`Mahony, A.; Craven, C. A.

    2015-07-01

    Novel microchannel plates have been constructed using borosilicate glass micro-capillary array substrates with 20 μm and 10 μm pores and coated with resistive, and secondary electron emissive, layers by atomic layer deposition. Microchannel plates in 33 mm, 50 mm and 20 cm square formats have been made and tested. Although their amplification, imaging, and timing properties are comparable to standard glass microchannel plates, the background rates and lifetime characteristics are considerably improved. Sealed tube detectors based on the Planacon tube, and a 25 mm cross delay line readout tube with a GaN(Mg) opaque photocathode deposited on borosilicate microchannel plates have been fabricated. Considerable progress has also been made with 20 cm microchannel plates for a 20 cm format sealed tube sensor with strip-line readout that is being developed for Cherenkov light detection.

  19. Photon counting compressive depth mapping.

    PubMed

    Howland, Gregory A; Lum, Daniel J; Ware, Matthew R; Howell, John C

    2013-10-01

    We demonstrate a compressed sensing, photon counting lidar system based on the single-pixel camera. Our technique recovers both depth and intensity maps from a single under-sampled set of incoherent, linear projections of a scene of interest at ultra-low light levels around 0.5 picowatts. Only two-dimensional reconstructions are required to image a three-dimensional scene. We demonstrate intensity imaging and depth mapping at 256 × 256 pixel transverse resolution with acquisition times as short as 3 seconds. We also show novelty filtering, reconstructing only the difference between two instances of a scene. Finally, we acquire 32 × 32 pixel real-time video for three-dimensional object tracking at 14 frames-per-second. PMID:24104293

  20. Performance evaluation of a photon-counting intensified CCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergamini, Paolo; Bonelli, Giuseppe; D'Angelo, Sergio; Latorre, Stefano; Poletto, Luca; Sechi, Giacomo; Tanzi, Enrico G.; Tondello, Giuseppe; Uslenghi, Michela

    1997-10-01

    The performance of a prototype photon counting imaging detector, being developed for the international UV space mission spectrum-UV, is presented. The detector is based on a 4-cm diameter, Z stack, high gain microchannel plate (MCP) intensifier endowed with a RbTe photocathode. The electron cascade generated by the MCP intensifier is transduced, via a phosphor screen and a 1:3.6 fiber optics reducer, into a 5 by 5 pixel(superscript 2), quasi-Gaussian charge distribution on a 15 micrometer, 512 by 512 pixel(superscript 2) format CCD matrix read out in the frame-transfer mode at 20 MHz, corresponding to 60 frame sec(superscript -1) in the full frame mode and to 220 frame sec(superscript -1) in the window (128 by 512 pixel(superscript 2)) mode. The data flow is acquired serially as to generate a 5 by 5 pixel(superscript 2) event sash that sweeps dynamically the CCD matrix at the 50 ns place of the readout clock. Each and every event sash is searched for the presence of events whose charge distribution lie within set thresholds and satisfy given morphological rules, i.e. a peaked charge profile. The centroid coordinates of identified events are subsequently determined with sub-pixel accuracy and stored in an external, high resolution memory. The data acquisition and processing system, based on field programmable gate array technology, is well able to resolve the front MCP pore geometry (10 micrometer diameter pores at 12 micrometer pitch).

  1. Photon-counting-intensified CID detector for space astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrissey, Patrick F.; Norton, Timothy J.; Kimble, Randy A.

    1998-08-01

    We are developing a novel solar blind, high resolution, photon counting detector for applications in space UV astronomy. Our concept is to utilize a charge injection device (CID) as the readout stage behind a microchannel plate (MCP) intensifier. This detector will take advantage of the flexible readout options afforded by the addressable CID architecture to provide high local frame rates around bright features in an image. In this concept, the detector bandwidth can be used most efficiently, reading pixels around a bright star more frequently than those in a nearby dim cloud of gas, for example. The demonstration apparatus described in this paper incorporates a 25 mm diameter intensifier tube fiber optically coupled to a commercially available 30 frame-s(superscript -1), 512 X 512 pixel, progressive-scan CID2250 camera. The 10 MHz analog video from this camera is digitized and processed by a centroider module that calculates the position of each event in real time with subpixel precision, thus providing high spatial resolution limited by the MCPs. The pore-resolved images presented in this paper validate the intensified CID concept. We plan to incorporates custom driving electronics and an experimental CID with on-chip address decoders for high speed random access of detector subarrays of arbitrary size and location. Our goal is to demonstrate a solar-blind UV photon counter with 200-300 counts-s(superscript -1) point source and 3 X 10(superscript 5) counts-s(superscript -1) global rate capability with up to 4000 by 4000 elements.

  2. High event rate ROICs (HEROICs) for astronomical UV photon counting detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harwit, Alex; France, Kevin; Argabright, Vic; Franka, Steve; Freymiller, Ed; Ebbets, Dennis

    2014-07-01

    The next generation of astronomical photocathode / microchannel plate based UV photon counting detectors will overcome existing count rate limitations by replacing the anode arrays and external cabled electronics with anode arrays integrated into imaging Read Out Integrated Circuits (ROICs). We have fabricated a High Event Rate ROIC (HEROIC) consisting of a 32 by 32 array of 55 μm square pixels on a 60 μm pitch. The pixel sensitivity (threshold) has been designed to be globally programmable between 1 × 103 and 1 × 106 electrons. To achieve the sensitivity of 1 × 103 electrons, parasitic capacitances had to be minimized and this was achieved by fabricating the ROIC in a 65 nm CMOS process. The ROIC has been designed to support pixel counts up to 4096 events per integration period at rates up to 1 MHz per pixel. Integration time periods can be controlled via an external signal with a time resolution of less than 1 microsecond enabling temporally resolved imaging and spectroscopy of astronomical sources. An electrical injection port is provided to verify functionality and performance of each ROIC prior to vacuum integration with a photocathode and microchannel plate amplifier. Test results on the first ROICs using the electrical injection port demonstrate sensitivities between 3 × 103 and 4 × 105 electrons are achieved. A number of fixes are identified for a re-spin of this ROIC.

  3. Note: Non-gain microchannel plate gated framing camera

    SciTech Connect

    Cai Houzhi; Peng Xiang; Liu Jinyuan; Niu Lihong; Peng Wenda; Niu Hanben; Long Jinghua

    2011-05-15

    An x-ray framing camera using a non-gain microchannel plate (MCP) is reported in this article. The advantage of the non-gain MCP is the less transit time spread. The non-gain MCP gated framing camera has four microstrip line cathodes with 6 mm in width. The time domain reflectometry curves of the four microstrip lines are measured, which show that the characteristic impedance of each microstrip line is about 17 {Omega}. While the photocathode is driven by the gating electrical pulse with width of 125 ps and amplitude of -1.48 kV with -400 V bias, the measured exposure time of this camera is about 72 ps.

  4. Measurement device for noise factor of microchannel plate.

    PubMed

    Lei, Liu; Zhijian, Huang; Tao, Pan; Yunsheng, Qian

    2012-03-01

    A new method for noise power factor determination of microchannel plates (MCPs) is described in this paper. The new measuring condition and specific measuring instrument are reported. The system consists of a vacuum chamber, an electron gun, a high-voltage supply, an imaging luminance meter, control units, a signal processing circuit, an A/D converter, a D/A converter, a communication unit, an industrial computer, and measurement software. This measuring method fills a void in measuring technology for the noise factor of MCPs, and it can make a scientific assessment of MCP noise characteristics and provide theoretical direction and technology support for the research and development of high-performance low light level (LLL) devices.

  5. Note: Non-gain microchannel plate gated framing camera.

    PubMed

    Cai, Houzhi; Liu, Jinyuan; Peng, Xiang; Niu, Lihong; Peng, Wenda; Niu, Hanben; Long, Jinghua

    2011-05-01

    An x-ray framing camera using a non-gain microchannel plate (MCP) is reported in this article. The advantage of the non-gain MCP is the less transit time spread. The non-gain MCP gated framing camera has four microstrip line cathodes with 6 mm in width. The time domain reflectometry curves of the four microstrip lines are measured, which show that the characteristic impedance of each microstrip line is about 17 Ω. While the photocathode is driven by the gating electrical pulse with width of 125 ps and amplitude of -1.48 kV with -400 V bias, the measured exposure time of this camera is about 72 ps.

  6. High-resolution imaging microchannel plate detector for EUV spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bannister, Nigel P.; Lapington, Jonathan S.; Barstow, Martin A.; Fraser, George W.; Sanderson, B. S.; Tandy, J. A.; Pearson, James F.; Spragg, J. E.

    2000-12-01

    We describe the development of an imaging microchannel plate detector for a new class of high resolution EUV spectrometer. The detector incorporates a front MCP coated with a CsI photocathode to enhance quantum efficiency, while the rear MCP, supplied by Photonis SAS for a European Space Agency Technology Research Program, represents one of the first uses of a 6 micron pore device in astronomy. The detector uses a unique design of charge division anode, the Vernier readout, enabling it to deliver a spatial resolution better than 15 microns FWHM. The detector forms an integral component of J- PEX, a sounding rocket EUV spectrometer operating at near- normal incidence, using multilayer coated gratings to deliver a resolution and effective area 10 times that of EUVE in the 225 - 245 angstrom band.

  7. Noise factor of microchannel plate with ion barrier film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shu-lin; Shi, Feng; Li, Zhou-kui; Zhu, Yu-feng; Zhang, Ni; Gu, Yan; Sun, Jian-ning; Cong, Xiao-qing; Zhao, Hui-min; Pan, Jing-sheng; Qian, Yun-sheng; Zheng, Shao-cheng; Chang, Ben-kang

    2012-10-01

    According to definition of noise factor of microchannel plate and the test principle, the authors set up a test installation, and measured the numerical values of MCPs which were made of different materials and channel pore including no / with ion barrier film in input of MCP. In order to seek the technical approach to reduce noise factor of MCP at the same time, we tested and analyzed the relation between noise factor and MCP voltage, combined relation between signal-to-noise ratio of GEN Ⅲ image intensifier and MCP voltage, open out relation between signal-to-noise ratio of GEN Ⅲ image intensifier and noise factor of MCP with ion barrier film.

  8. Collimator application for microchannel plate image intensifier resolution improvement

    DOEpatents

    Thomas, Stanley W.

    1996-02-27

    A collimator is included in a microchannel plate image intensifier (MCPI). Collimators can be useful in improving resolution of MCPIs by eliminating the scattered electron problem and by limiting the transverse energy of electrons reaching the screen. Due to its optical absorption, a collimator will also increase the extinction ratio of an intensifier by approximately an order of magnitude. Additionally, the smooth surface of the collimator will permit a higher focusing field to be employed in the MCP-to-collimator region than is currently permitted in the MCP-to-screen region by the relatively rough and fragile aluminum layer covering the screen. Coating the MCP and collimator surfaces with aluminum oxide appears to permit additional significant increases in the field strength, resulting in better resolution.

  9. Collimator application for microchannel plate image intensifier resolution improvement

    DOEpatents

    Thomas, S.W.

    1996-02-27

    A collimator is included in a microchannel plate image intensifier (MCPI). Collimators can be useful in improving resolution of MCPIs by eliminating the scattered electron problem and by limiting the transverse energy of electrons reaching the screen. Due to its optical absorption, a collimator will also increase the extinction ratio of an intensifier by approximately an order of magnitude. Additionally, the smooth surface of the collimator will permit a higher focusing field to be employed in the MCP-to-collimator region than is currently permitted in the MCP-to-screen region by the relatively rough and fragile aluminum layer covering the screen. Coating the MCP and collimator surfaces with aluminum oxide appears to permit additional significant increases in the field strength, resulting in better resolution. 2 figs.

  10. Applications of the Microchannel Plate for Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Getaneh, M.; Grabowski, K. S.; Knies, D. L.; Cetina, C.; Hubler, G. K.; Tumey, S. J.

    2008-03-13

    A microchannel plate (MCP) detector with active area of 10x2 cm{sup 2} is used as a position detector for mass spectrometry applications. The MCP detects electrons scattered by an MeV ion beam that goes through a thin Carbon foil which is placed at a 45 deg. angle with respect to the beam direction. The scattered electrons' transverse motion is constrained by application of uniform electric and magnetic fields parallel to the axis of the MCP. The charge is then amplified by the MCP and deposited on a double-delay line anode. Differential timing and charge partitioning are used to determine the horizontal and vertical positions, respectively, of the ion in a plane normal to the MCP axis. Results for a sample of Neodymium are discussed.

  11. Gated Microchannel Plate Photomultiplier For Longitudinal BeamDiagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Byrd, John M.; De Santis, Stefano; Thurman-Keup, Randy

    2006-05-03

    A gated microchannel plate photomultiplier can be used as aneffective tool for measuring the longitudinal distribution of particlesaround most electron and high-energy proton rings. The broad availablewavelength range,low noise, and high sensitivity allow using such adevice for measuring the emitted synchrotron radiation and to extract thebeam intensity. The fast gate rise time can be used to reject strongsignals coming from filled RF buckets and avoid saturation of thephotocathode so that it is possible to monitor, with a high degree ofresolution, gaps in the machine fill and growth of parasitic bunches. Therugged characteristics of the device and its simplicity of use make itideal for all those applications where more complex and expensiveinstrumentation is not absolutely necessary. We present the experimentalresults obtained at the Advanced Light Source and on the Tevatron usingan Hamamatsu R5916U-50 series model.

  12. Note: Non-gain microchannel plate gated framing camera.

    PubMed

    Cai, Houzhi; Liu, Jinyuan; Peng, Xiang; Niu, Lihong; Peng, Wenda; Niu, Hanben; Long, Jinghua

    2011-05-01

    An x-ray framing camera using a non-gain microchannel plate (MCP) is reported in this article. The advantage of the non-gain MCP is the less transit time spread. The non-gain MCP gated framing camera has four microstrip line cathodes with 6 mm in width. The time domain reflectometry curves of the four microstrip lines are measured, which show that the characteristic impedance of each microstrip line is about 17 Ω. While the photocathode is driven by the gating electrical pulse with width of 125 ps and amplitude of -1.48 kV with -400 V bias, the measured exposure time of this camera is about 72 ps. PMID:21639550

  13. The simulation for the temporal characteristic of the microchannel plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Houzhi; Long, Jinghua; Liu, Jinyuan; Xie, Weixin; Bai, Yanli; Lei, Yunfei; Liao, Yubo; Li, Pengfei

    2016-01-01

    Framing cameras based on the gated microchannel plate (MCP) are versatile diagnostic tools for fast Z-pinch and inertial confinement fusion experiments. In order to understand the temporal characteristic of the MCP used in such camera, the MCP is simulated using the Monte Carlo method. By simulating the electron cascade in the MCP, the relationship between the MCP temporal resolution and the ratio of its thickness to the channel diameter (L/D ratio) is obtained. The variation of the temporal resolution with the voltage applied on the MCP is also provided. The transit time and the transit time spread (TTS) simulations of the MCP are presented. The simulated results show that the transit time and TTS of the MCP are increased with L/D ratio increasing while the channel diameter of the MCP is 10 um.

  14. High Throughput, High Yield Fabrication of High Quantum Efficiency Back-Illuminated Photon Counting, Far UV, UV, and Visible Detector Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nikzad, Shouleh; Hoenk, M. E.; Carver, A. G.; Jones, T. J.; Greer, F.; Hamden, E.; Goodsall, T.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the high throughput end-to-end post fabrication processing of high performance delta-doped and superlattice-doped silicon imagers for UV, visible, and NIR applications. As an example, we present our results on far ultraviolet and ultraviolet quantum efficiency (QE) in a photon counting, detector array. We have improved the QE by nearly an order of magnitude over microchannel plates (MCPs) that are the state-of-the-art UV detectors for many NASA space missions as well as defense applications. These achievements are made possible by precision interface band engineering of Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE) and Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD).

  15. Cross strip anode readouts for microchannel plate detectors: developing flight qualified prototypes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallerga, John; Cooney, M.; Raffanti, R.; Varner, G.; Siegmund, O.; McPhate, J. B.; Tremsin, A.

    2014-01-01

    Photon counting microchannel plate (MCP) imagers have been the detector of choice for most UV astronomical missions over the last two decades (eg. EUVE, FUSE, COS on Hubble etc.). Over this duration, improvements in the MCP laboratory readout technology have resulted in better spatial resolution (x10), temporal resolution (x 1000) and output event rate (x100), all the while operating at lower gain (x 10) resulting in lower high voltage requirements and longer MCP lifetimes. One such technology is the parallel cross strip (PXS) readout. The PXS anode is a set of orthogonal conducting strips (80 x 80), typically spaced at a 635 micron pitch onto which charge clouds from MCP amplified events land. Each strip has its own charge sensitive amplifier that is sampled continuously by a dedicated analog to digital (ADC) converter at 50MHz. All of the 160 ADC digital output lines are fed into a field programmable gate array (FGPA) which can detect charge events landing on the strips, measure the peak amplitudes of those charge events and calculate their spatial centroid along with their time of arrival (X,Y,T). Laboratory versions of these electronics have demonstrated < 20 microns FWHM spatial resolution, count rates on the order of 2 MHz, and temporal resolution of ~ 1ns. In 2012 the our group at U.C. Berkeley, along with our partners at the U. Hawaii, received a Strategic Astrophysics Technology grant to raise the TRL of the PXS detector from 4 to 6 by replacing most of the 19" rack mounted, high powered electronics with application specific integrated circuits (ASICs) which will lower the power, mass and volume requirements of the PXS detector. We were also tasked to design and fabricate a "standard" 50mm square active area MCP detector incorporating these electronics that can be environmentally qualified for flight (temperature, vacuum, vibration). This detector design could then be modified for individual flight opportunities with a higher level of confidence than

  16. Monte Carlo simulations of microchannel plate detectors I: steady-state voltage bias results

    SciTech Connect

    Ming Wu, Craig Kruschwitz, Dane Morgan, Jiaming Morgan

    2008-07-01

    X-ray detectors based on straight-channel microchannel plates (MCPs) are a powerful diagnostic tool for two-dimensional, time-resolved imaging and timeresolved x-ray spectroscopy in the fields of laser-driven inertial confinement fusion and fast z-pinch experiments. Understanding the behavior of microchannel plates as used in such detectors is critical to understanding the data obtained. The subject of this paper is a Monte Carlo computer code we have developed to simulate the electron cascade in a microchannel plate under a static applied voltage. Also included in the simulation is elastic reflection of low-energy electrons from the channel wall, which is important at lower voltages. When model results were compared to measured microchannel plate sensitivities, good agreement was found. Spatial resolution simulations of MCP-based detectors were also presented and found to agree with experimental measurements.

  17. Analysis and modeling on noise factor of microchannel plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yanhong; Chen, Xiaomei; Ni, Guoqiang

    2013-12-01

    The Microchannel plate (MCP) is the main noise source of low-level light (LLL) image intensifier. Material and the whole manufacturing process of MCP have great impact on the noises of MCP. In this paper, based on the physical mechanisms of MCP, noises of MCP are classified scientifically. By using the data obtained from the actual production and the process test, the regression equation of the noise figure of MCP is derived, and the theoretical model of MCP noise figure is established, including the background noise figure model caused by the dark current of the MCP primarily about the time of the alkali corrosion technic, the ion feedback induced noise figure model caused by the patterns of the MCP channel wall primarily about the time and temperature of the hydrogen reduction technic, and the electronic scattering noise figure model caused by the open area ratio of the MCP primarily about the time of the alkali corrosion technic. Guided by the theoretical model of noise figure, the methods of suppressing noises of MCP are obtained and the technics are optimized. Taking advantage of the new techniques, the noise figure of the third generation MCP has been reduced to below 1.8.

  18. Application research on microchannel plate in new fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yanhong; Chen, Xiaomei; Ni, Guoqiang

    2015-08-01

    Microchannel plate (MCP) is a photoelectron multiplier as the core component of low-level light (LLL) image intensifier. MCP has two-dimensional space, time, and energy resolution, fast response time, low background noise, wide dynamic range and high gain characteristics, as well as electrons, ions, UV and soft X-ray photon detection capability directly. In recent years, with the publication of foreign advanced technology and Chinese research staff in-depth understanding of MCP's unique characteristics, the applications of MCP have extended into many new fields accordingly in China. In addition to the image intensifier, the MCP can be used in deep space exploration and scientific experiments, detecting kinds of trace rays and particles, such as pulsars navigation, nuclear simulation diagnostics, UV, EUV, neutron, neutrino detection and imaging. North Night Vision Technology Co. Ltd (NVT) as the only unit possessing MCP production capacity in China is constantly working on improving, innovation and application research on MCP technology. In this paper, based on the researches on MCP in some new fields the NVT Company has undertaken and ongoing, the technological breakthroughs and application research progresses achieved are described.

  19. Development of microchannel plates in advanced wind-tunnel instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feller, W. Bruce

    1990-01-01

    Microchannel plate (MCP) electron multiplier dynamic range has been increased 3 to 4 orders of magnitude at ambient temperatures, through enhanced input count rate capability and reduced background or 'dark' noise. The previous upper limit of roughly 10(exp 7) - 10(exp 8) cm(exp -2)s(exp -1) at ambient has been extended to levels approach 10(exp 10) cm(exp -2)s(exp -1) under continuous dc operation. The lower limit, previously set by an irreducible background component (approximately 0.6 cm(exp -2)s(exp -1)), has been lowered to the cosmic ray limit of .01 cm(exp -2)s(exp -1). The high end improvement was achieved by conductively cooling a very low resistance MCP by bonding it to a heat sink, while maintaining pulse-counting operation with multianode readouts. The low-end improvement was achieved by removing all radioisotopes from the MCP matrix glass. The detectors will benefit optical and mass spectrometry, flow visualization, plasma diagnostics, magnetometry, and other high signal flux applications. Very low MCP background noise will benefit X-ray and UV astronomy, medical imaging, trace isotope mass spectrometry, and other applications where the signal flux is often extremely low.

  20. Development of a novel position-sensitive microchannel plate detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiggins, Blake; Siwal, Davinder; Desouza, Romualdo

    2015-10-01

    Position sensitive microchannel plate (MCP) detectors which measure the position of an incident electron, ion, or photon, are useful in imaging applications. Recently, a novel detector, which utilizes an induced approach to provide position sensitivity, has been developed. In the prototype detector, using only the zero-crossing point of the inherently bipolar signals, a position resolution of 466 μm (FWHM) has been achieved. Implementing a differential readout may improve on this resolution. To realize this differential approach, a better understanding of the dependence of the induced signal shape on the position of the electron cloud is required. To characterize the dependence of the induced signal shape on position a resistive anode (RA) has been incorporated into the detector. The RA will allow determination of the centroid of the electron cloud. Factors impacting the position resolution obtained with the RA will be discussed and the achieved position resolution of 157 μm (FWHM) will be presented. Supported by the US DOE NNSA under Award No. DE-NA0002012.

  1. SIS Detectors for Terahertz Photon Counting System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezawa, Hajime; Matsuo, Hiroshi; Ukibe, Masahiro; Fujii, Go; Shiki, Shigetomo

    2016-07-01

    An Intensity interferometer with photon counting detector is a candidate to realize a THz interferometer for astronomical observations. We have demonstrated that synthesis imaging is possible even with intensity interferometers. An SIS junction (or STJ) with low leakage current of 1 pA is a suitable device for photon counting detectors. Readout circuit utilizing FETs with low gate leakage, low gate capacitance, and fast response is discussed.

  2. Picosecond wide-field time-correlated single photon counting fluorescence microscopy with a delay line anode detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirvonen, Liisa M.; Becker, Wolfgang; Milnes, James; Conneely, Thomas; Smietana, Stefan; Le Marois, Alix; Jagutzki, Ottmar; Suhling, Klaus

    2016-08-01

    We perform wide-field time-correlated single photon counting-based fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) with a crossed delay line anode image intensifier, where the pulse propagation time yields the photon position. This microchannel plate-based detector was read out with conventional fast timing electronics and mounted on a fluorescence microscope with total internal reflection (TIR) illumination. The picosecond time resolution of this detection system combines low illumination intensity of microwatts with wide-field data collection. This is ideal for fluorescence lifetime imaging of cell membranes using TIR. We show that fluorescence lifetime images of living HeLa cells stained with membrane dye di-4-ANEPPDHQ exhibit a reduced lifetime near the coverslip in TIR compared to epifluorescence FLIM.

  3. Microchannel plates as detectors and amplifiers of x-ray images

    SciTech Connect

    Wiedwald, J.D.

    1992-08-01

    Two decades of development driven largely by military night vision applications has led to the availability of a wide selection of microchannel plates for use by the scientific community. Microchannel plates (MCPs) are electron multipliers which retain a high degree of spatial resolution making it possible to amplify electron images by factors of 1,000 or more. Plates having 40 mm diameter and intrinsic spatial resolution of 8 [mu]m are readily available. By coating the front surface of a microchannel plate with an x-ray sensitive photocathode material, x-ray images can be detected and amplified. While the detective quantum efficiency is relatively low, the low noise of the MCP (including the ability to construct images by single photon detection) and its high dynamic range make it suitable for some x-ray microscopy applications. The principles of MCP operation and typical performance are discussed. Examples of related applications and commercial capabilities are also presented.

  4. A space- and time-resolved single photon counting detector for fluorescence microscopy and spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michalet, X.; Siegmund, O. H. W.; Vallerga, J. V.; Jelinsky, P.; Millaud, J. E.; Weiss, S.

    2006-02-01

    We have recently developed a wide-field photon-counting detector having high-temporal and high-spatial resolutions and capable of high-throughput (the H33D detector). Its design is based on a 25 mm diameter multi-alkali photocathode producing one photo electron per detected photon, which are then multiplied up to 10 7 times by a 3-microchannel plate stack. The resulting electron cloud is proximity focused on a cross delay line anode, which allows determining the incident photon position with high accuracy. The imaging and fluorescence lifetime measurement performances of the H33D detector installed on a standard epifluorescence microscope will be presented. We compare them to those of standard single-molecule detectors such as single-photon avalanche photodiode (SPAD) or electron-multiplying camera using model samples (fluorescent beads, quantum dots and live cells). Finally, we discuss the design and applications of future generation of H33D detectors for single-molecule imaging and high-throughput study of biomolecular interactions.

  5. CLARO-CMOS, a very low power ASIC for fast photon counting with pixellated photodetectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carniti, P.; De Matteis, M.; Giachero, A.; Gotti, C.; Maino, M.; Pessina, G.

    2012-11-01

    The CLARO-CMOS is an application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) designed for fast photon counting with pixellated photodetectors such as multi-anode photomultiplier tubes (Ma-PMT), micro-channel plates (MCP), and silicon photomultipliers (SiPM). The first prototype has four channels, each with a charge sensitive amplifier with settable gain and a discriminator with settable threshold, providing fast hit information for each channel independently. The design was realized in a long-established, stable and inexpensive 0.35 μm CMOS technology, and provides outstanding performance in terms of speed and power dissipation. The prototype consumes less than 1 mW per channel at low rate, and less than 2 mW at an event rate of 10 MHz per channel. The recovery time after each pulse is less than 25 ns for input signals within a factor of 10 above threshold. Input referred RMS noise is about 7.7 ke- (1.2 fC) with an input capacitance of 3.3 pF. With this value of input capacitance a timing resolution down to 10 ps RMS was measured for pulser signals of a few million electrons, corresponding to the single photon response for these detectors.

  6. Flare star monitoring with a new photon-counting imaging detector

    SciTech Connect

    Casperson, D.

    1997-12-31

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). A search for faint time-varying optical signals from the nighttime sky has been conducted in parallel with the programmatic development of a new type of imaging detector. This detector combines high spatial and high temporal resolution with single-photon-counting sensitivity over a 40-mm diameter large-area format. It is called a microchannel plate with crossed delay line readout, or MCP/CDL, and is placed in the focal plane of a telescope to collect time-resolved images from objects such as flaring stars and other astrophysical transient sources. A short-lived prototype MCP/CDL was used to provide the initial stellar images for this project, but the author could not generate any extended database with which to characterize flare star populations. Consequently, a supplementary experimental search for optical transients was begun, utilizing the NASA 3-meter-aperture Liquid Mirror Telescope (LMT) facility in Cloudcroft, NM.

  7. Study on the strain in a silicon microchannel plate by micro-Raman analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shaohui; Fang, Jiabing; Wu, Dajun; Zhang, Chi; Zhu, Yiping; Xiong, Dayuan; Wang, Lianwei; Yang, Pingxiong; Chu, Paul K.

    2016-05-01

    Micro-Raman analysis was used to identify the oxidation of a silicon microchannel plate (SiMCP) and it indicated that the bend phenomenon of the SiMCP was related to the release of stress and the volume expending of the silicon wall during the oxidation process.

  8. Photon counting ladar work at FOI, Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinvall, Ove; Sjöqvist, Lars; Henriksson, Markus

    2012-06-01

    Photon counting techniques using direct detection has recently gained considerable interest within the laser radar community. The high sensitivity is of special importance to achieve high area coverage in surveillance and mapping applications and long range with compact systems for imaging, profiling and ranging. New short pulse lasers including the super continuum laser is of interest for active spectral imaging. A special technique in photon counting is the "time correlated single photon counting" (TCSPC). This can be utilized together with short pulse (ps) lasers to achieve very high range resolution and accuracy (mm level). Low average power lasers in the mW range enables covert operation with respect to present laser warning technology. By analyzing the return waveform range and shape information from the target can be extracted. By scanning the beam high resolution 3D images are obtained. At FOI we have studied the TCSPC with respect to range profiling and imaging. Limitations due to low SNR and dwell times are studied in conjunction with varying daylight background and atmospheric turbulence. Examples of measurements will be presented and discussed with respect to some system applications.

  9. Flat field response of the microchannel plate detectors used on the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vallerga, J. V.; Gibson, J. L.; Siegmund, O. H. W.; Vedder, P. W.

    1989-01-01

    The results of the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) flat field calibrations of two of the flight detectors to be flown on the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer Satellite (EUVE) are presented. Images of about 40 million detected events binned 512 by 512 are sufficient to show microchannel plate fixed pattern noise such as hexagonal microchannel multifiber bundle interfaces, 'dead' spots, edge distortion, and differential nonlinearity. Differences due to photocathode material and dependencies on EUV wavelength are also described. Over large spatial scales, the detector response is flat to better than 10 percent of the mean response, but, at spatial scales less than 1 mm, the variations from the mean can be as large as 20 percent.

  10. Advances in Performance of Microchannel Plate Detectors for HEDP Diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Ming Wu, Craig Kruschwitz, Ken Moy, Greg Rochau

    2009-10-01

    In recent years, a team from NSTec and SNL has built a unique capability to develop microchannel plate (MCP)?based framing x-ray cameras for HEDP diagnostics. At the SNL Z facility, multistrip MCP detectors to record up to eight channels are employed in 2-D, sub-nanosecond time-resolved imaging and time- and space-resolved spectroscopy diagnostics. Progressively more stringent technical temporal resolution and response uniformity requirements have necessitated a systematic design approach based on iterative modeling of the MCP using inputs from electrical circuit characterization. An inherently large exponential dependence in MCP gain, V{sup 11.5}, has mandated a firm understanding of the applied voltage pulse shape propagating across the strip. We pioneered direct measurements of the propagating waveform using a Picoprobe{reg_sign} and developed a Monte Carlo code to simulate MCP response to compare against test measurements. This scheme is shown in Figure 1. The simulation detailed a physical model of the cascade and amplification process of the MCP that includes energy conservation for the secondary electrons, the effects of elastic scattering of low-energy electrons from the channel wall, and gain saturation mechanisms from wall charging and space charge. Our model can simulate MCP response for both static and pulsed voltage waveforms. Using this design approach, we began to characterize the newly developed second-generation detector (H-CA-65) by using a Manson x-ray source to evaluate the following DC characteristics: MCP sensitivity as a function of bias voltage, flat-field uniformity and spatial resolution, and variation of spatial resolution and sensitivity as a function of phosphor bias voltage. Dynamic performance and temporal response were obtained by using an NSTec short-pulse laser to measure optical gate profiles, saturation, and dynamic range. These data were processed and combined to obtain the gain variation and gate profiles for any position along

  11. Micro-channel plate photon detector studies for the TORCH detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo García, L.; Brook, N.; Cowie, E. N.; Cussans, D.; Forty, R.; Frei, C.; Gao, R.; Gys, T.; Harnew, N.; Piedigrossi, D.; Van Dijk, M.

    2015-07-01

    The Time Of internally Reflected Cherenkov light (TORCH) detector is under development. Charged particle tracks passing through a 1 cm plate of quartz will generate the Cherenkov photons, and their arrival will be timed by an array of micro-channel plate photon detectors. As part of the TORCH R&D studies, commercial and custom-made micro-channel plate detectors are being characterized. The final photon detectors for this application are being produced in a three-phase program in collaboration with industry. Custom-made single-channel devices with extended lifetime have been manufactured and their performance is being systematically investigated in the laboratory. Optical studies for the preparation of beam and laboratory tests of a TORCH prototype are also underway.

  12. Optimizing the position resolution of a Z-stack microchannel plate resistive anode detector for low intensity signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiggins, B. B.; Richardson, E.; Siwal, D.; Hudan, S.; deSouza, R. T.

    2015-08-01

    A method for achieving good position resolution of low-intensity electron signals using a microchannel plate resistive anode detector is demonstrated. Electron events at a rate of 7 counts s-1 are detected using a Z-stack microchannel plate. The dependence of position resolution on both the distance and the potential difference between the microchannel plate and resistive anode is investigated. Using standard commercial electronics, a measured position resolution of 170 μm (FWHM) is obtained, which corresponds to an intrinsic resolution of 157 μm (FWHM).

  13. Optimizing the position resolution of a Z-stack microchannel plate resistive anode detector for low intensity signals

    SciTech Connect

    Wiggins, B. B.; Richardson, E.; Siwal, D.; Hudan, S.; Souza, R. T. de

    2015-08-15

    A method for achieving good position resolution of low-intensity electron signals using a microchannel plate resistive anode detector is demonstrated. Electron events at a rate of 7 counts s{sup −1} are detected using a Z-stack microchannel plate. The dependence of position resolution on both the distance and the potential difference between the microchannel plate and resistive anode is investigated. Using standard commercial electronics, a measured position resolution of 170 μm (FWHM) is obtained, which corresponds to an intrinsic resolution of 157 μm (FWHM)

  14. High resolution decoding techniques and single-chip decoders for multi-anode microchannel arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kasle, David B.

    1989-01-01

    While the pixel size in a standard multianode microchannel array (MAMA) photon-counting detector is determined by the spacing of the anode array, the factor most fundamentally limiting pixel resolution is the spacing of the channels in the microchannel plate. Detector resolution can be improved by means of digitization followed by a centroiding procedure. The decoding hardware and the techniques for enhanced pixel resolution are presently discussed with a view to the factors of speed and complexity. A single-chip CMOS gate-array implementation of the decoder is devised and compared with existing multichip decoders' performance.

  15. Performance Evaluation of a Microchannel Plate based X-ray Camera with a Reflecting Grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visco, A.; Drake, R. P.; Harding, E. C.; Rathore, G. K.

    2006-10-01

    Microchannel Plates (MCPs) are used in a variety of imaging systems as a means of amplifying the incident radiation. Using a microchannel plate mount recently developed at the University of Michigan, the effects of a metal reflecting grid are explored. Employing the reflecting grid, we create a potential difference above the MCP input surface that forces ejected electrons back into the pores, which may prove to increase the quantum efficiency of the camera. We investigate the changes in the pulse height distribution, modular transfer function, and Quantum efficiency of MCPs caused by the introduction of the reflecting grid. Work supported by the Naval Research Laboratory, National Nuclear Security Administration under the Stewardship Science Academic Alliances program through DOE Research Grant DE-FG52-03NA00064, and through DE FG53 2005 NA26014, and Livermore National Laboratory.

  16. Photon Counts Statistics in Leukocyte Cell Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Wijk, Eduard; van der Greef, Jan; van Wijk, Roeland

    2011-12-01

    In the present experiment ultra-weak photon emission/ chemiluminescence from isolated neutrophils was recorded. It is associated with the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the "respiratory burst" process which can be activated by PMA (Phorbol 12-Myristate 13-Acetate). Commonly, the reaction is demonstrated utilizing the enhancer luminol. However, with the use of highly sensitive photomultiplier equipment it is also recorded without enhancer. In that case, it can be hypothesized that photon count statistics may assist in understanding the underlying metabolic activity and cooperation of these cells. To study this hypothesis leukocytes were stimulated with PMA and increased photon signals were recorded in the quasi stable period utilizing Fano factor analysis at different window sizes. The Fano factor is defined by the variance over the mean of the number of photon within the observation time. The analysis demonstrated that the Fano factor of true signal and not of the surrogate signals obtained by random shuffling increases when the window size increased. It is concluded that photon count statistics, in particular Fano factor analysis, provides information regarding leukocyte interactions. It opens the perspective to utilize this analytical procedure in (in vivo) inflammation research. However, this needs further validation.

  17. Note: A timing micro-channel plate detector with backside fast preamplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Wei; Yu, Deyang Lu, Rongchun; Liu, Junliang; Cai, Xiaohong

    2014-03-15

    A timing micro-channel plate detector with a backside double-channel fast preamplifier was developed to avoid distortion during signal propagation from the anode to the preamplifier. The mechanical and electronic structure is described. The detector including its backside preamplifier is tested by a {sup 241}Am α-source and a rise time of ∼2 ns with an output background noise of 4 mV{sub rms} was achieved.

  18. Antiproton, positron, and electron imaging with a microchannel plate/phosphor detector.

    PubMed

    Andresen, G B; Bertsche, W; Bowe, P D; Bray, C C; Butler, E; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Fajans, J; Fujiwara, M C; Gill, D R; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayano, R S; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A J; Hydomako, R; Jørgensen, L V; Kerrigan, S J; Kurchaninov, L; Lambo, R; Madsen, N; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Povilus, A P; Pusa, P; Sarid, E; Seif El Nasr, S; Silveira, D M; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Yamazaki, Y

    2009-12-01

    A microchannel plate (MCP)/phosphor screen assembly has been used to destructively measure the radial profile of cold, confined antiprotons, electrons, and positrons in the ALPHA experiment, with the goal of using these trapped particles for antihydrogen creation and confinement. The response of the MCP to low energy (10-200 eV, <1 eV spread) antiproton extractions is compared to that of electrons and positrons.

  19. Antiproton, positron, and electron imaging with a microchannel plate/phosphor detector

    SciTech Connect

    Andresen, G. B.; Bowe, P. D.; Hangst, J. S.; Bertsche, W.; Butler, E.; Charlton, M.; Humphries, A. J.; Joergensen, L. V.; Kerrigan, S. J.; Madsen, N.; Werf, D. P. van der; Bray, C. C.; Chapman, S.; Fajans, J.; Povilus, A. P.; Cesar, C. L.; Lambo, R.; Fujiwara, M. C.; Gill, D. R.; Collaboration: ALPHA Collaboration; and others

    2009-12-15

    A microchannel plate (MCP)/phosphor screen assembly has been used to destructively measure the radial profile of cold, confined antiprotons, electrons, and positrons in the ALPHA experiment, with the goal of using these trapped particles for antihydrogen creation and confinement. The response of the MCP to low energy (10-200 eV, <1 eV spread) antiproton extractions is compared to that of electrons and positrons.

  20. Radiation hardness tests and characterization of the CLARO-CMOS, a low power and fast single-photon counting ASIC in 0.35 micron CMOS technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiorini, M.; Andreotti, M.; Baldini, W.; Calabrese, R.; Carniti, P.; Cassina, L.; Cotta Ramusino, A.; Giachero, A.; Gotti, C.; Luppi, E.; Maino, M.; Malaguti, R.; Pessina, G.; Tomassetti, L.

    2014-12-01

    The CLARO-CMOS is a prototype ASIC that allows fast photon counting with 5 ns peaking time, a recovery time to baseline smaller than 25 ns, and a power consumption of less than 1 mW per channel. This chip is capable of single-photon counting with multi-anode photomultipliers and finds applications also in the read-out of silicon photomultipliers and microchannel plates. The prototype is realized in AMS 0.35 micron CMOS technology. In the LHCb RICH environment, assuming 10 years of operation at the nominal luminosity expected after the upgrade in Long Shutdown 2 (LS2), the ASIC must withstand a total fluence of about 6×1012 1 MeV neq /cm2 and a total ionizing dose of 400 krad. A systematic evaluation of the radiation effects on the CLARO-CMOS performance is therefore crucial to ensure long term stability of the electronics front-end. The results of multi-step irradiation tests with neutrons and X-rays up to the fluence of 1014 cm-2 and a dose of 4 Mrad, respectively, are presented, including measurement of single event effects during irradiation and chip performance evaluation before and after each irradiation step.

  1. Fabrication and characterization of monolithically integrated microchannel plates based on amorphous silicon

    PubMed Central

    Franco, Andrea; Geissbühler, Jonas; Wyrsch, Nicolas; Ballif, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    Microchannel plates are vacuum-based electron multipliers for particle—in particular, photon— detection, with applications ranging from image intensifiers to single-photon detectors. Their key strengths are large signal amplification, large active area, micrometric spatial resolution and picosecond temporal resolution. Here, we present the first microchannel plate made of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) instead of lead glass. The breakthrough lies in the possibility of realizing amorphous silicon-based microchannel plates (AMCPs) on any kind of substrate. This achievement is based on mastering the deposition of an ultra-thick (80–120 μm) stress-controlled a-Si:H layer from the gas phase at temperatures of about 200°C and micromachining the channels by dry etching. We fabricated AMCPs that are vertically integrated on metallic anodes of test structures, proving the feasibility of monolithic integration of, for instance, AMCPs on application-specific integrated circuits for signal processing. We show an electron multiplication factor exceeding 30 for an aspect ratio, namely channel length over aperture, of 12.5:1. This result was achieved for input photoelectron currents up to 100 pA, in the continuous illumination regime, which provides a first evidence of the a-Si:H effectiveness in replenishing the electrons dispensed in the multiplication process. PMID:24698955

  2. Performance of a compact position-sensitive photon counting detector with image charge coupling to an air-side anode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagutzki, O.; Czasch, A.; Schössler, S.

    2013-05-01

    We discuss a novel micro-channel plate (MCP) photomultiplier with resistive screen (RS-PMT) as a detection device for space- and time-correlated single photon counting, illustrated by several applications. The photomultiplier tube resembles a standard image intensifier device. However, the rear phosphor screen is replaced by a ceramic "window" with resistive coating. The MCP output is transferred through the ceramic plate to the read-out electrode (on the air side) via capacity-coupling of the image charge. This design allows for an easy reconfiguration of the read-out electrode (e.g. pixel, charge-sharing, cross-strip, delay-line) without breaking the vacuum for optimizing the detector performance towards a certain task. It also eases the design and manufacturing process of such a multi-purpose photomultiplier tube. Temporal and spatial resolutions well below 100 ps and 100 microns, respectively, have been reported at event rates as high as 1 MHz, for up to 40 mm effective detection diameter. In this paper we will discuss several applications like wide-field fluorescence microscopy and dual γ/fast-neutron radiography for air cargo screening and conclude with an outlook on large-area detectors for thermal neutrons based on MCPs.

  3. Photon Counting Using Edge-Detection Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gin, Jonathan W.; Nguyen, Danh H.; Farr, William H.

    2010-01-01

    New applications such as high-datarate, photon-starved, free-space optical communications require photon counting at flux rates into gigaphoton-per-second regimes coupled with subnanosecond timing accuracy. Current single-photon detectors that are capable of handling such operating conditions are designed in an array format and produce output pulses that span multiple sample times. In order to discern one pulse from another and not to overcount the number of incoming photons, a detection algorithm must be applied to the sampled detector output pulses. As flux rates increase, the ability to implement such a detection algorithm becomes difficult within a digital processor that may reside within a field-programmable gate array (FPGA). Systems have been developed and implemented to both characterize gigahertz bandwidth single-photon detectors, as well as process photon count signals at rates into gigaphotons per second in order to implement communications links at SCPPM (serial concatenated pulse position modulation) encoded data rates exceeding 100 megabits per second with efficiencies greater than two bits per detected photon. A hardware edge-detection algorithm and corresponding signal combining and deserialization hardware were developed to meet these requirements at sample rates up to 10 GHz. The photon discriminator deserializer hardware board accepts four inputs, which allows for the ability to take inputs from a quadphoton counting detector, to support requirements for optical tracking with a reduced number of hardware components. The four inputs are hardware leading-edge detected independently. After leading-edge detection, the resultant samples are ORed together prior to deserialization. The deserialization is performed to reduce the rate at which data is passed to a digital signal processor, perhaps residing within an FPGA. The hardware implements four separate analog inputs that are connected through RF connectors. Each analog input is fed to a high-speed 1

  4. Detecting small debris using a ground-based photon counting detector

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, C.; Priedhorsky, W.C.; Baron, M.H.

    1993-05-01

    We describe a sensitive technique for detecting small space debris that exploits a fast photon-counting imager. Microchannel plate detectors using crossed delay-line readout can achieve a resolution of 2048 {times} 2048 spatial pixels and a maximum count rate of about 10{sup 6} photons per second. A baseline debris-tracking system might couple this detector to a 16-cm aperture telescope. The detector yields x, y, and time information for each detected photon. When visualized in (x, y, t) space, photons from a fast-moving orbital object appear on a straight line. They can be distinguished from diffuse background photons, randomly scattered in the space, and star photons, which fall on a line with sidereal velocity. By searching for this unique signature, we can detect and track small debris objects. At dawn and dusk, a spherical object of 1.3 cm diameter at 400 km will reflect sunlight for an apparent magnitude of V {approx} 16. The baseline system would detect about 16 photons from this object as it crosses a 1 degree field of view in about 1 second. The Ene in (x, y, t) space will be significant in a diffuse background of {approximately} 10{sup 6} photons. We discuss the data processing scheme and line detection algorithm. The advantages of this technique are that one can (1) detect cm-size debris objects with a small telescope, and (2) detect debris moving with any direction and velocity. In this paper, we describe the progress in the development of detector and data acquisition system, the preparation for a field test for such a system, and the development and optimization of the data analysis algorithm. Detection sensitivity would currently be constrained by the capability of the data acquisition and the data processing systems, but further improvements could alleviate these bottlenecks.

  5. Detecting small debris using a ground-based photon counting detector

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, C.; Priedhorsky, W.C.; Baron, M.H.

    1993-01-01

    We describe a sensitive technique for detecting small space debris that exploits a fast photon-counting imager. Microchannel plate detectors using crossed delay-line readout can achieve a resolution of 2048 [times] 2048 spatial pixels and a maximum count rate of about 10[sup 6] photons per second. A baseline debris-tracking system might couple this detector to a 16-cm aperture telescope. The detector yields x, y, and time information for each detected photon. When visualized in (x, y, t) space, photons from a fast-moving orbital object appear on a straight line. They can be distinguished from diffuse background photons, randomly scattered in the space, and star photons, which fall on a line with sidereal velocity. By searching for this unique signature, we can detect and track small debris objects. At dawn and dusk, a spherical object of 1.3 cm diameter at 400 km will reflect sunlight for an apparent magnitude of V [approx] 16. The baseline system would detect about 16 photons from this object as it crosses a 1 degree field of view in about 1 second. The Ene in (x, y, t) space will be significant in a diffuse background of [approximately] 10[sup 6] photons. We discuss the data processing scheme and line detection algorithm. The advantages of this technique are that one can (1) detect cm-size debris objects with a small telescope, and (2) detect debris moving with any direction and velocity. In this paper, we describe the progress in the development of detector and data acquisition system, the preparation for a field test for such a system, and the development and optimization of the data analysis algorithm. Detection sensitivity would currently be constrained by the capability of the data acquisition and the data processing systems, but further improvements could alleviate these bottlenecks.

  6. A fast readout and processing electronics for photon counting intensified charge-coupled device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergamini, P.; Bonelli, G.; Tanzi, E. G.; Uslenghi, M.; Poletto, L.; Tondello, G.

    2000-04-01

    The design features and the performances of a prototype photon counting imaging detector, being developed for the international ultraviolet (UV) space mission Spectrum UV, are presented. The photon counter is an intensified charge coupled device (ICCD) in which photon events, generating an electron cascade through a high gain microchannel plate (MCP) stack, are transduced, via a phosphor screen and a fiber optics reducer, into a 3×3 pixel2, quasi-Gaussian charge distributions on a 15×15 μm2,512×512 pixel2 format CCD matrix. The CCD is read out in the frame-transfer mode at a pixel rate of 19.75 MHz, and its output data flow is acquired serially as to generate a 3×3 pixel2 event sash that sweeps dynamically the CCD matrix at the 50.6 ns rate of the readout clock. Each and every event sash is searched for the presence of events whose charge content lie within proper limits and satisfy a given set of morphological rules, i.e., a single peak charge profile. The centroid coordinates of identified events are determined with subpixel accuracy (up to a 210 bin/pixel) and subsequently stored as photon list coordinate pairs. The data acquisition and processing system is based on field programmable gate array technology and is capable of satisfying the requirements of real-time operation. The modular construction of the data acquisition and processing electronics provides a great deal of flexibility for supporting advancements in CCD readout techniques (multiple output and higher clocking speed) and of MCPs (larger formats, smaller pore, and higher dynamic range). The results of the performance verification of the data acquisition and processing system integrated with a laboratory ICCD prototype are presented and discussed.

  7. Method and apparatus for enhancing microchannel plate data

    DOEpatents

    Thoe, R.S.

    1983-10-24

    A method and apparatus for determining centroid channel locations are disclosed for use in a system activated by one or more multichannel plates and including a linear diode array providing channels of information 1, 2, ...,n, ..., N containing signal amplitudes A/sub n/. A source of analog A/sub n/ signals, and a source of digital clock signals n, are provided. Non-zero A/sub n/ values are detected in a discriminator. A digital signal representing p, the value of n immediately preceding that whereat A/sub n/ takes its first non-zero value, is generated in a scaler. The analog A/sub n/ signals are converted to digital in an analog to digital converter. The digital A/sub n/ signals are added to produce a digital ..sigma..A/sub n/ signal in a full adder. Digital 1, 2, ..., m signals representing the number of non-zero A/sub n/ are produced by a discriminator pulse counter. Digital signals representing 1 A/sub p+1/, 2 A/sub p+2/, ..., m A/sub p+m/ are produced by pairwise multiplication in multiplier. These signal are added in multiplier summer to produce a digital ..sigma..nA/sub n/ - p..sigma..A/sub n/ signal. This signal is divided by the digital ..sigma..A/sub n/ signal in divider to provide a digital (..sigma..nA/sub n//..sigma..A/sub n/) -p signal. Finally, this last signal is added to the digital p signal in an offset summer to provide ..sigma..nA/sub n//..sigma..A/sub n/, the centroid channel locations.

  8. Method and apparatus for enhancing microchannel plate data

    DOEpatents

    Thoe, Robert S.

    1987-01-01

    A method and apparatus for determining centroid channel locations is disclosed for use in a system activated by one or more multichannel plates (16,18) and including a linear diode array (24) providing channels of information 1, 2, . . . , n, . . . , N containing signal amplitudes A.sub.n. A source of analog A.sub.n signals (40), and a source of digital clock signals n (48), are provided. Non-zero A.sub.n values are detected in a discriminator (42). A digital signal representing p, the value of n immediately preceding that whereat A.sub.n takes its first non-zero value, is generated in a scaler (50). The analog A.sub.n signals are converted to digital in an analog to digital converter (44). The digital A.sub.n signals are added to produce a digital .SIGMA.A.sub.n signal in a full adder (46). Digital 1, 2, . . . , m signals representing the number of non-zero A.sub.n are produced by a discriminator pulse counter (52). Digital signals representing 1 A.sub.p+ 1, 2 A.sub.p+2, . . . , m A.sub.p+m are produced by pairwise multiplication in multiplier (54). These signals are added in multiplier summer (56) to produce a digital .SIGMA.nA.sub.n -p.SIGMA.A.sub.n signal. This signal is divided by the digital .SIGMA.A.sub.n signal in divider (58) to provide a digital (.SIGMA.nA.sub.n /.SIGMA.A.sub.n) -p signal. Finally, this last signal is added to the digital p signal in an offset summer (60) to provide .SIGMA.nA.sub.n /.SIGMA.A.sub.n, the centroid channel locations.

  9. Photon counting arrays for AO wavefront sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallerga, John; Tremsin, Anton; McPhate, Jason; Mikulec, Bettina; Clark, Allan; Siegmund, Oswald

    2005-08-01

    Future wavefront sensors for AO on large telescopes will require a large number of pixels and must operate at high frame rates. Unfortunately for CCDs, there is a readout noise penalty for operating faster, and this noise can add up rather quickly when considering the number of pixels required for the extended shape of a sodium laser guide star observed with a large telescope. Imaging photon counting detectors have zero readout noise and many pixels, but have suffered in the past with low QE at the longer wavelengths (> 500 nm). Recent developments in GaAs photocathode technology, CMOS ASIC readouts and FPGA processing electronics have resulted in noiseless WFS detector designs that are competitive with silicon array detectors, though at ~ 40% the QE of CCDs. We review noiseless array detectors and compare their centroiding performance with CCDs using the best available characteristics of each. We show that for sub-aperture binning of 6x6 and greater that noiseless detectors have a smaller centroid error at fluences of 60 photons or less, though the specific number is dependent on seeing conditions and the centroid algorithm used. We then present the status of a 256x256 noiseless MCP/Medipix2 hybrid detector being developed for AO.

  10. Multidimensional time-correlated single photon counting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Wolfgang; Bergmann, Axel

    2006-10-01

    Time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) is based on the detection of single photons of a periodic light signal, measurement of the detection time of the photons, and the build-up of the photon distribution versus the time in the signal period. TCSPC achieves a near ideal counting efficiency and transit-time-spread-limited time resolution for a given detector. The drawback of traditional TCSPC is the low count rate, long acquisition time, and the fact that the technique is one-dimensional, i.e. limited to the recording of the pulse shape of light signals. We present an advanced TCSPC technique featuring multi-dimensional photon acquisition and a count rate close to the capability of currently available detectors. The technique is able to acquire photon distributions versus wavelength, spatial coordinates, and the time on the ps scale, and to record fast changes in the fluorescence lifetime and fluorescence intensity of a sample. Biomedical applications of advanced TCSPC techniques are time-domain optical tomography, recording of transient phenomena in biological systems, spectrally resolved fluorescence lifetime imaging, FRET experiments in living cells, and the investigation of dye-protein complexes by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. We demonstrate the potential of the technique for selected applications.

  11. Note: Determining the detection efficiency of excited neutral atoms by a microchannel plate detector

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, Ben; Zohrabi, M.; Hayes, D.; Ablikim, U.; Jochim, Bethany; Severt, T.; Carnes, K. D.; Ben-Itzhak, I.

    2015-04-15

    We present a method for determining the detection efficiency of neutral atoms relative to keV ions. Excited D* atoms are produced by D{sub 2} fragmentation in a strong laser field. The fragments are detected by a micro-channel plate detector either directly as neutrals or as keV ions following field ionization and acceleration by a static electric field. Moreover, we propose a new mechanism by which neutrals are detected. We show that the ratio of the yield of neutrals and ions can be related to the relative detection efficiency of these species.

  12. Microchannel plate pinhole camera for 20 to 100 keV x-ray imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.L.; Leipelt, G.R.; Nilson, D.G.

    1984-10-03

    We present the design and construction of a sensitive pinhole camera for imaging suprathermal x-rays. Our device is a pinhole camera consisting of four filtered pinholes and microchannel plate electron multiplier for x-ray detection and signal amplification. We report successful imaging of 20, 45, 70, and 100 keV x-ray emissions from the fusion targets at our Novette laser facility. Such imaging reveals features of the transport of hot electrons and provides views deep inside the target.

  13. Development of a low-cost fast-timing microchannel plate photodetector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Junqi; Byrum, Karen; Demarteau, Marcel; May, Edward; Wagner, Robert; Walters, Dean; Wang, Jingbo; Xia, Lei; Zhao, Huyue

    2016-07-01

    We report on the design, fabrication and characterization of a prototype 6 × 6cm2 microchannel plate photodetector with precise fast-timing measurement capability. The whole assembly is made of low cost glass materials with a bialkali photocathode top window. All components are hermetically sealed in vacuum. The prototype photodetector exhibits time resolution of 65 ps and 16 ps at single-photoelectron and multi-photoelectron levels, respectively. The spatial resolution reaches 0.54 mm for multi-photoelectron measurements. The bialkali photocathode exhibits a maximum quantum efficiency exceeding 20% with a uniformity of ± 40 %.

  14. Optimizing the input and output transmission lines that gate the microchannel plate in a high-speed framing camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lugten, John B.; Brown, Charles G.; Piston, Kenneth W.; Beeman, Bart V.; Allen, Fred V.; Boyle, Dustin T.; Brown, Christopher G.; Cruz, Jason G.; Kittle, Douglas R.; Lumbard, Alexander A.; Torres, Peter; Hargrove, Dana R.; Benedetti, Laura R.; Bell, Perry M.

    2015-08-01

    We present new designs for the launch and receiver boards used in a high speed x-ray framing camera at the National Ignition Facility. The new launch board uses a Klopfenstein taper to match the 50 ohm input impedance to the ~10 ohm microchannel plate. The new receiver board incorporates design changes resulting in an output monitor pulse shape that more accurately represents the pulse shape at the input and across the microchannel plate; this is valuable for assessing and monitoring the electrical performance of the assembled framing camera head. The launch and receiver boards maximize power coupling to the microchannel plate, minimize cross talk between channels, and minimize reflections. We discuss some of the design tradeoffs we explored, and present modeling results and measured performance. We also present our methods for dealing with the non-ideal behavior of coupling capacitors and terminating resistors. We compare the performance of these new designs to that of some earlier designs.

  15. Urea separation in flat-plate microchannel hemodialyzer; experiment and modeling.

    PubMed

    Tuhy, Alana R; Anderson, Eric K; Jovanovic, Goran N

    2012-06-01

    Two flat-plate microchannel hemodialyzers were constructed consisting of two identical laminae separated by a 20[μm] thick ultrafiltration membrane (Gambro AN69). Each lamina contains a parallel array of microchannels 100[μm] deep, 200[μm] wide, and 5.6[cm] or 9.9[cm] in length respectively. Urea was removed from the aqueous stream containing 1.0[g] urea per liter de-ionized water in the blood side, by countercurrent contact with pure de-ionized water in the dialysate side of the flat-plate hemodialyzer. In all cases volumetric flow rate of water in the dialysate side was equal or less than the volumetric flow rate in the blood side, which is in large contrast to commercial applications of hollow-fiber hemodialyzers where dialysate flow is severalfold larger than blood flow rate. A three-dimensional finite volume mass transport model, built entirely from the first principles with no adjustable parameters, was written in FORTRAN. The results of the mathematical model excellently predict experimental results. The fractional removals of urea predicted by the model are within 2.7%-11% of experimentally obtained values for different blood and dialysate velocities/flow rates in microchannels, and for different transmembrane pressures. The overall mass transfer coefficient was calculated using the urea outlet concentrations obtained at various average velocities (1.0-5.0[cm/s]) in the blood and dialysate, and two nominal transmembrane pressures (∆P(tm) = 0 and 10,000.[Pa]). Overall mass transfer coefficients obtained experimentally ranged from 0.068 to 0.14 [cm/min]. The numerical model predicted an average overall mass transfer coefficient of 0.08 [cm/min]. This value is 60% higher than those found in commercial dialyzers (~0.05[cm/min]). PMID:22374475

  16. Microchannel Plates for the UVCS and SUMER Instruments on the SOHO Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegmund, O. H. W.; Gummin, M. A.; Sasseen, T.; Jelinsky, P.; Gaines, G. A.; Hull, J.; Stock, J. M.; Edgar, M.; Welsh, B.; Jelinsky, S.; Vallerga, J.

    1995-01-01

    The microchannel plates for the detectors in the SUMER (Solar Ultraviolet Measurements of Emitted Radiation) and UVCS (Ultraviolet Coronograph Spectrometer) instruments aboard the Solar Orbiting Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) mission to be launched in late 1995 are described. A low resistance Z stack of microchannel plates (MCP's) is employed in a detector format of 27 mm x 10 mm using a multilayer cross delay line anode (XDL) with 1024 x 360 digitized pixels. The MCP stacks provide gains of greater than 2 x 10(exp 7) with good pulse height distributions (as low as 25% FWHM) under uniform flood illumination. Background rates of approx. 0.6 event cm(exp -2) sec(exp -1) are obtained for this configuration. Local counting rates up to about 800 events/pixel/sec have been achieved with little drop of the MCP gain. MCP preconditioning results are discussed, showing that some MCP stacks fail to have gain decreases when subjected to a high flux UV scrub. Also, although the bare MCP quantum efficiencies are close to those expected (10%), we found that the long wavelength response of KBr photocathodes could be substantially enhanced by the MCP scrubbing process. Flat field images are characterized by a low level of MCP fixed pattern noise and are stable. Preliminary calibration results for the instruments are shown.

  17. Calculating and optimizing inter-electrode capacitances of charge division microchannel plate detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Yan; Chen, Bo; Zhang, Hong-Ji; Wang, Hai-Feng; He, Ling-Ping; Jin, Fang-Yuan

    2016-04-01

    Based on the principle of charge division microchannel plate detectors, the inter-electrode capacitances of charge division anodes which are related to electronic noise of the charge sensitive amplifier and crosstalk effect of the anode are presented. Under all the requirements of charge division microchannel plate detectors such as the imaging linearity and spatial resolution, decreasing the inter-electrode capacitances is one way to improve the imaging performance. In this paper, we illustrate the simulation process of calculating the inter-electrode capacitances. Moreover, a Wedge and Strip (WSZ) anode is fabricated with the picosecond laser micromachining process. Comparing the simulated capacitances and measured capacitances, the three-dimensional finite element method is proved to be valid. Furthermore, by adjusting the design parameters of the anode, the effects of the substrate permittivity, insulation width and the size of pitch on the inter-electrode capacitances have been analysed. The structure of the charge division anode has been optimized based on the simulation data.

  18. A new miniature microchannel plate X-ray detector for synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosemeier, Ronald G.; Green, Robert E.

    A state-of-the-art microchannel plate detector has been developed which allows real time X-ray imagin of X-ray diffraction as well as a radiographic phenomenon. Advantages of the device include a 50 mm X-ray input, length less than 4″, and a weight of less than 1 lb. Since the use of synchrotron radiation is greatly facilitated by the capability of remote viewing of X-ray diffraction or radiographic images in real time, a prototype electro-optical system has been designed which couples the X-ray microchannel plate detector with a solid state television camera. Advantages of the miniature, lightweight, X-ray synchroton camera include a large 50 mm X-ray input window, an output signal that is available in both analog format for display on a television monitor and in digital format for computer processing, and a completely modular design which allows all the components to be exchanged for other components optimally suited for the desired applications.

  19. Measuring the Effect of a Transmission Photocathode on Microchannel Plate Quantum Efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blankenship, Britney; Marion, Donna; Lowenstern, Mariano; Gamboa, Eliseo; Harding, Eric; Kuranz, Carolyn; Drake, R. P.

    2011-10-01

    Microchannel plates (MCPs) are a vital component in imaging for a variety of high-energy-density experiments. To ensure the highest quality images, particularly in low-photon environments, it is desirable to maximize the quantum efficiency (QE) of the MCP. When secondary electrons are released from the MCP as a result of photons colliding with the inter-pore regions, these electrons do not contribute to the signal. One way to increase the QE is by redirecting these secondary electrons back toward the MCP. By applying a voltage to a 50nm titanium transmission photocathode (TPC) in front of the MCP, theoretically we will create an electric field that will accelerate the electrons back toward the MCP. This is a continuation of similar work done with a nickel mesh grid in place of a TPC. The results presented are the effect of the Ti TPC on the QE of the microchannel plate. This work is funded by the NNSA-DS and SC-OFES Joint Program in High-Energy-Density Laboratory Plasmas, grant number DE-FG52-09NA29548, and by the National Laser User Facility Program, grant number DE-NA0000850.

  20. Three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation on gain saturation effect of microchannel plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiangqiang; Yuan, Zheng; Cao, Zhurong; Deng, Bo; Chen, Tao; Deng, Keli

    2016-07-01

    We present here the results of the simulation work, using the three-dimensional particle-in-cell method, on the performance of the lead glass microchannel plate under saturated state. We calculated the electron cascade process with different DC bias voltages under both self-consistent condition and non-self-consistent condition. The comparative results have demonstrated that the strong self-consistent field can suppress the cascade process and make the microchannel plate saturated. The simulation results were also compared to the experimental data and good agreement was obtained. The simulation results also show that the electron multiplication process in the channel is accompanied by the buildup process of positive charges in the channel wall. Though the interactions among the secondary electron cloud in the channel, the positive charges in the channel wall, and the external acceleration field can make the electron-surface collision more frequent, the collision energy will be inevitably reduced, thus the electron gain will also be reduced.

  1. High resolution, two-dimensional imaging, microchannel plate detector for use on a sounding rocket experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bush, Brett C.; Cotton, Daniel M.; Siegmund, Oswald H.; Chakrabarti, Supriya; Harris, Walter; Clarke, John

    1991-01-01

    We discuss a high resolution microchannel plate (MCP) imaging detector to be used in measurements of Doppler-shifted hydrogen Lyman-alpha line emission from Jupiter and the interplanetary medium. The detector is housed in a vacuum-tight stainless steel cylinder (to provide shielding from magnetic fields) with a MgF2 window. Operating at nominal voltage, the four plate configuration provides a gain of 1.2 x 10 exp 7 electrons per incident photon. The wedge-and-strip anode has two-dimensional imaging capabilities, with a resolution of 40 microns FWHM over a one centimeter diameter area. The detector has a high quantum efficiency while retaining a low background rate. A KBr photocathode is used to enhance the quantum efficiency of the bare MCPs to a value of 35 percent at Lyman-alpha.

  2. Multiple-Event, Single-Photon Counting Imaging Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zheng, Xinyu; Cunningham, Thomas J.; Sun, Chao; Wang, Kang L.

    2011-01-01

    The single-photon counting imaging sensor is typically an array of silicon Geiger-mode avalanche photodiodes that are monolithically integrated with CMOS (complementary metal oxide semiconductor) readout, signal processing, and addressing circuits located in each pixel and the peripheral area of the chip. The major problem is its single-event method for photon count number registration. A single-event single-photon counting imaging array only allows registration of up to one photon count in each of its pixels during a frame time, i.e., the interval between two successive pixel reset operations. Since the frame time can t be too short, this will lead to very low dynamic range and make the sensor merely useful for very low flux environments. The second problem of the prior technique is a limited fill factor resulting from consumption of chip area by the monolithically integrated CMOS readout in pixels. The resulting low photon collection efficiency will substantially ruin any benefit gained from the very sensitive single-photon counting detection. The single-photon counting imaging sensor developed in this work has a novel multiple-event architecture, which allows each of its pixels to register as more than one million (or more) photon-counting events during a frame time. Because of a consequently boosted dynamic range, the imaging array of the invention is capable of performing single-photon counting under ultra-low light through high-flux environments. On the other hand, since the multiple-event architecture is implemented in a hybrid structure, back-illumination and close-to-unity fill factor can be realized, and maximized quantum efficiency can also be achieved in the detector array.

  3. Microchannel plate as a novel bipolar electrode for high-performance enrichment of anions.

    PubMed

    Cao, Zhen; Yobas, Levent

    2013-07-01

    Microchannel plate (MCP), a high-porosity glass membrane used as an electron multiplier in analytical/scientific instruments for the detection of energetic photons and charged particles is demonstrated here as a highly effective bipolar electrode (BPE) for electrokinetic focusing of anions. Assembled between a pair of microfluidic channels filled with an electrolyte buffer and subjected to a sufficient bias potential, MCP supports faradaic reactions, owing to its semiconducting characteristics. Thousands of microcapillary tubes fused together define MCP and act in unison such that each microcapillary serves as a tiny BPE surrounding an infinitesimal element of bulk electrolyte with a large surface-area-to-volume ratio and hence performs highly effective as compared to a planar electrode inlaid into a microchannel. This performance has been validated here where concentration enrichment of a fluorescent tracer has been demonstrated at a remarkable rate of up to 175-fold/s exceeding those reported for planar BPEs. We attribute such high performance to the rapid onset of ion-depletion zone and subsequent steep field gradient, signifying the high-porosity structure of MCP as an effective BPE. PMID:24024243

  4. Direct tests of a pixelated microchannel plate as the active element of a shower maximum detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apresyan, A.; Los, S.; Pena, C.; Presutti, F.; Ronzhin, A.; Spiropulu, M.; Xie, S.

    2016-08-01

    One possibility to make a fast and radiation resistant shower maximum detector is to use a secondary emitter as an active element. We report our studies of microchannel plate photomultipliers (MCPs) as the active element of a shower-maximum detector. We present test beam results obtained using Photonis XP85011 to detect secondary particles of an electromagnetic shower. We focus on the use of the multiple pixels on the Photonis MCP in order to find a transverse two-dimensional shower distribution. A spatial resolution of 0.8 mm was obtained with an 8 GeV electron beam. A method for measuring the arrival time resolution for electromagnetic showers is presented, and we show that time resolution better than 40 ps can be achieved.

  5. Nanosecond Gating of Microstripline Microchannel Plate Framing Cameras: Characterization and Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Holder, J; Hargrove, D; Sibernagel, C; Perry, T; Bradley, D; Bell, P

    2004-04-09

    The soft x-ray microstripline microchannel plate (MCP) framing camera has become one of the workhorses of ICF diagnostics. Much progress has been made in making these diagnostics work well with gate times of 100 ps and below. Often weak input signal or source timing uncertainties dictate a requirement for longer gate times, preferably in the same instrument that also has fast gating capability. The large power-law dependence of MCP gain on applied voltage is useful in shortening the gating time of the microstripline camera. However, this sensitivity leads to tight constraints on the shape of the long duration electrical pulses that are needed to drive the MCP to produce experimentally desirable optical gating profiles. Simple modeling and measurements are used to better understand the character of the voltage pulses needed to achieve optical gate widths between 500 ps and {approx}2 ns.

  6. Observation of Ultra-Slow Antiprotons using Micro-channel Plate

    SciTech Connect

    Imao, H.; Toyoda, H.; Shimoyama, T.; Kanai, Y.; Mohri, A.; Yamazaki, Y.; Torii, H. A.; Nagata, Y.; Enomoto, Y.; Higaki, H.

    2008-08-08

    Our group ASACUSA-MUSASHI has succeeded in accumulating several million antiprotons and extracting them as monochromatic ultra-slow antiproton beams (10 eV-1 keV) at CERN AD. We have observed ultra-slow antiprotons using micro-channel plates (MCP). The integrated pulse area of the output signals generated when the MCP was irradiated by ultra-slow antiprotons was 6 times higher than that by electrons. As a long-term effect, we also observed an increase in the background rate presumably due to the radioactivation of the MCP surface. Irradiating the antiproton beams on the MCP induces antiproton-nuclear annihilations only on the first layer of the surface. Low-energy and short-range secondary particles like charged nuclear fragments caused by the 'surface nuclear reactions' would be the origin of our observed phenomena.

  7. Improved time response for large area microchannel plate photomultiplier tubes in fusion diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Milnes, J. S. Conneely, T. M.; Howorth, J.; Horsfield, C. J.

    2014-11-15

    Fusion diagnostics that utilise high speed scintillators often need to capture a large area of light with a high degree of time accuracy. Microchannel plate (MCP) photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) are recognised as the leading device for capturing fast optical signals. However, when manufactured in their traditional proximity focused construction, the time response performance is reduced as the active area increases. This is due to two main factors: the capacitance of a large anode and the difficulty of obtaining small pore MCPs with a large area. Collaboration between Photek and AWE has produced prototype devices that combine the excellent time response of small area MCP-PMTs with a large active area by replacing the traditional proximity-gap front section with an electro-optically focused photocathode to MCP. We present results from both single and double MCP devices with a 40 mm diameter active area and show simulations for the 100 mm device being built this year.

  8. Microchannel plate fabrication using glass capillary arrays with Atomic Layer Deposition films for resistance and gain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popecki, M. A.; Adams, B.; Craven, C. A.; Cremer, T.; Foley, M. R.; Lyashenko, A.; O'Mahony, A.; Minot, M. J.; Aviles, M.; Bond, J. L.; Stochaj, M. E.; Worstell, W.; Elam, J. W.; Mane, A. U.; Siegmund, O. H. W.; Ertley, C.; Kistler, L. M.; Granoff, M. S.

    2016-08-01

    Microchannel plates (MCPs) have been used for many years in space flight instrumentation as fast, lightweight electron multipliers. A new MCP fabrication method combines a glass substrate composed of hollow glass capillary arrays with thin film coatings to provide the resistive and secondary electron emissive properties. Using this technique, the gain, resistance, and glass properties may be chosen independently. Large-area MCPs are available at moderate cost. Secondary emission films of Al2O3 and MgO provide sustained high gain as charge is extracted from the MCP. Long lifetimes are possible, and a total extracted charge of 7 C/cm2 has been demonstrated. Background rates are low because the glass substrate has little radioactive potassium 40. Curved MCPs are easily fabricated with this technique to suit instrument symmetries, simplifying secondary electron steering and smoothing azimuthal efficiency.

  9. An Application of Micro-channel Plate Photomultiplier Tube to Positron Emission Tomography.

    PubMed

    Kim, H; Chen, C-T; Frisch, H; Tang, F; Kao, C-M

    2012-01-01

    We are developing a Time-of-Flight Positron Emission Tomography detector using flat panel micro-channel plate photomultiplier tubes (MCP PMT). The high-speed waveform sampling data acquisition is adopted to exploit the fast time response of MCP PMT efficiently by using transmission-line readout scheme. To demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed detector, prototype detector modules were built using Photonis XP85022 MCP PMT, transmission-line board (TL), and high-speed waveform sampling electronics equipped with DRS4 chips. The MCP/TL module was coupled to single LYSO crystal, and experimental tests have been conducted in a coincidence setup to measure the responses to 511 keV annihilation photon. The details of the prototype module, experimental setup, and the preliminary results are presented and discussed.

  10. An Application of Micro-channel Plate Photomultiplier Tube to Positron Emission Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Kim, H.; Chen, C.-T.; Frisch, H.; Tang, F.; Kao, C.-M.

    2012-01-01

    We are developing a Time-of-Flight Positron Emission Tomography detector using flat panel micro-channel plate photomultiplier tubes (MCP PMT). The high-speed waveform sampling data acquisition is adopted to exploit the fast time response of MCP PMT efficiently by using transmission-line readout scheme. To demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed detector, prototype detector modules were built using Photonis XP85022 MCP PMT, transmission-line board (TL), and high-speed waveform sampling electronics equipped with DRS4 chips. The MCP/TL module was coupled to single LYSO crystal, and experimental tests have been conducted in a coincidence setup to measure the responses to 511 keV annihilation photon. The details of the prototype module, experimental setup, and the preliminary results are presented and discussed. PMID:23227135

  11. High accuracy position response calibration method for a micro-channel plate ion detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, R.; Leredde, A.; Bagdasarova, Y.; Fléchard, X.; García, A.; Müller, P.; Knecht, A.; Liénard, E.; Kossin, M.; Sternberg, M. G.; Swanson, H. E.; Zumwalt, D. W.

    2016-11-01

    We have developed a position response calibration method for a micro-channel plate (MCP) detector with a delay-line anode position readout scheme. Using an in situ calibration mask, an accuracy of 8 μm and a resolution of 85 μm (FWHM) have been achieved for MeV-scale α particles and ions with energies of ∼10 keV. At this level of accuracy, the difference between the MCP position responses to high-energy α particles and low-energy ions is significant. The improved performance of the MCP detector can find applications in many fields of AMO and nuclear physics. In our case, it helps reducing systematic uncertainties in a high-precision nuclear β-decay experiment.

  12. Direct tests of a pixelated microchannel plate as the active element of a shower maximum detector

    DOE PAGES

    Apresyan, A.; Los, S.; Pena, C.; Presutti, F.; Ronzhin, A.; Spiropulu, M.; Xie, S.

    2016-05-07

    One possibility to make a fast and radiation resistant shower maximum detector is to use a secondary emitter as an active element. We report our studies of microchannel plate photomultipliers (MCPs) as the active element of a shower-maximum detector. We present test beam results obtained using Photonis XP85011 to detect secondary particles of an electromagnetic shower. We focus on the use of the multiple pixels on the Photonis MCP in order to find a transverse two-dimensional shower distribution. A spatial resolution of 0.8 mm was obtained with an 8 GeV electron beam. As a result, a method for measuring themore » arrival time resolution for electromagnetic showers is presented, and we show that time resolution better than 40 ps can be achieved.« less

  13. Ultraviolet quantum detection efficiency of potassium bromide as an opaque photocathode applied to microchannel plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegmund, Oswald H. W.; Everman, E.; Vallerga, J. V.; Sokolowski, J.; Lampton, M.

    1987-01-01

    The quantum detection efficiency (QDE) of potassium bromide as a photocathode applied directly to the surface of a microchannel plate over the 250-1600 A wavelength range has been measured. The contributions of the photocathode material in the channels and on the interchannel web to the QDE have been determined. Two broad peaks in the QDE centered at about 450 and about 1050 A are apparent, the former with about 50 percent peak QDE and the latter with about 40 percent peak QDE. The photoelectric threshold is observed at about 1600 A, and there is a narrow QDE minimum at about 750 A which correlates with 2X the band gap energy for KBr. The angular variation of the QDE from 0 to 40 deg to the channnel axis has also been examined. The stability of Kbr with time is shown to be good with no significant degradation of QDE at wavelengths below 1216 A over a 15-day period in air.

  14. Simulating the growth of an charge cloud for a microchannel plate detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siwal, Davinder; Wiggins, Blake; Desouza, Romualdo

    2015-10-01

    Position sensitive microchannel plate (MCP) detectors have a variety of applications in the fields of astronomy, medical imaging, neutron imaging, and ion beam tracking. Recently, a novel approach has been implemented to detect the position of an incident particle. The charge cloud produced by the MCP induces a signal on a wire harp placed between the MCP and an anode. On qualitative grounds it is clear that in this detector the induced signal shape depends on the size of the electron cloud. A detailed study has therefore been performed to investigate the size of the charge cloud within the MCP and its growth as it propagates from the MCP to the anode. A simple model has been developed to calculate the impact of charge repulsion on the growth of the electron cloud. Both the details of the model and its predictions will be presented. Supported by the US DOE NNSA under Award No. DE-NA0002012.

  15. Multiple-photon disambiguation on stripline-anode Micro-Channel Plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jocher, Glenn R.; Wetstein, Matthew J.; Adams, Bernhard; Nishimura, Kurtis; Usman, Shawn M.

    2016-06-01

    Large-Area Picosecond Photo-Detectors (LAPPDs) show great potential for expanding the performance envelope of Micro-Channel Plates (MCPs) to areas of up to 20×20 cm and larger. Such scaling introduces new challenges, including how to meet the electronics readout burden of ever larger area MCPs. One solution is to replace the traditional grid anode used for readout with a microwave stripline anode, thus allowing the channel count to scale with MCP width rather than area. However, stripline anodes introduce new issues not commonly dealt with in grid-anodes, especially as their length increases. One of these issues is the near simultaneous arrival of multiple photons on the detector, creating possible confusion about how to reconstruct their arrival times and positions. We propose a maximum a posteriori solution to the problem and verify its performance in simulated scintillator and water-Cherenkov detectors.

  16. Detection efficiency evaluation for a large area neutron sensitive microchannel plate detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yi-ming; Tian, Yang; Yang, Yi-gang; Liu, Ren; Pan, Jing-sheng; Wang, Xue-wu; Zhang, Zhi

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, the detection efficiency of a large area neutron sensitive microchannel plate detector has been evaluated. A 6LiF/ZnS scintillator detector 65 mm in diameter and 0.32 mm in thickness, with product code, EJ426HD2, produced by Eljen Technology, was employed as the benchmark detector. The TOF spectra of these two detectors were simultaneously measured and the energy spectra were then deduced to calculate the detection efficiency curve of the nMCP detector. Tests show the detection efficiency@25.3 meV thermal neutrons is 34% for this nMCP detector. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11375095, 11175098)

  17. Physical Vapor Deposition Chamber for Coating Microchannel Plates in X-Ray Radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, S. L.; Drake, R. P.; Swain, A. D.; Cornwall, N. C.; Forsyth, M. A.; Harding, E. C.; Huntington, C. M.

    2010-11-01

    Experiments to characterize microchannel plates (MCPs) at the University of Michigan aim to maximize the quantum efficiency of our detector by coating the layers of a photocathode directly on a bare MCP. These experiments can be improved with more control over the processing of coating MCPs, parts often used in diagnosing high-energy-density laser experiments. Process control will allow us to alter factors that influence photocathode quantum efficiency, such as film thickness, coating angle, and substrate baking. This should ultimately reduce costs of characterizing MCPs and improve our x-ray radiography data. A thin film deposition chamber was designed and built, achieving high vacuum pressures of 1E-7 torr and temperatures of 1800 C to vaporize coating materials. A rotating substrate platform and a quartz crystal microbalance help achieve precise, even coatings. A design overview of this system is presented, with a discussion of most recent coating results.

  18. Super capacitance properties of SnO2 coated nickel/silicon microchannel plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui, Keshuang; Zhu, Yiping; Xu, Shaohui; Wang, Lianwei; Chu, Paul K.

    2013-12-01

    Supercapacitor is achieved by combining tin oxide with three dimensional silicon microchannel plates (Si-MCPs) deposited with nickel film. Electro deposition is applied to deposit the tin oxide on the Ni/Si-MCPs structure followed by sintering at 450°C. The structure and morphology of the samples are characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The electrochemical properties are investigated in 1 M Na2SO4 solution by cyclic voltammetry, galvanostatic charging-discharging, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The highest specific capacitance of 0.814 F/cm2 (171.37 F/g) is achieved from the sample deposited for 2 h followed by sintering for 2 h.

  19. Two-dimensional ultraviolet imagery with a microchannel-plate/resistive-anode detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Opal, C. B.; Feldman, P. D.; Weaver, H. A.; Mcclintock, J. A.

    1979-01-01

    An imaging ultraviolet detector has been designed for use with a precision pointed telescope flown on a sounding rocket. Resolution of better than 80 microns over a field of 5 mm has been achieved. The ultraviolet image is converted to electrons at the front surface of a CsI coated chevron microchannel-plate electron multiplier. For each photoelectron, the multiplier produces a burst of about 3,000,000 electrons, which impinges on a tellurium-coated resistive anode with four evaporated hyperbolic readout electrodes. The sizes of the four resulting output pulses are digitized to 10 bit accuracy and telemetered to the ground, where they are divided in pairs to give the x and y coordinates of the photoelectron event. The coordinates are used to generate a picture in real time, and are recorded for computer processing later. The detector was successfully flown in December 1978. Good images of Jupiter and Capella in hydrogen Lyman alpha emission were obtained.

  20. Using pulse shape analysis to improve the position resolution of a resistive anode microchannel plate detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siwal, Davinder; Wiggins, B. B.; deSouza, R. T.

    2015-12-01

    Digital signal processing techniques were employed to investigate the joint use of charge division and risetime analyses for the resistive anode (RA) coupled to a microchannel plate detector (MCP). In contrast to the typical approach of using the relative charge at each corner of the RA, this joint approach results in a significantly improved position resolution. A conventional charge division analysis utilizing analog signal processing provides a measured position resolution of 170 μm (FWHM). By using the correlation between risetime and position we were able to obtain a measured resolution of 92 μm (FWHM), corresponding to an intrinsic resolution of 64 μm (FWHM) for a single Z-stack MCP detector.

  1. Comparison between two time-resolved approaches for prostate cancer diagnosis: high rate imager vs. photon counting system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutet, J.; Debourdeau, M.; Laidevant, A.; Hervé, L.; Dinten, J.-M.

    2010-02-01

    Finding a way to combine ultrasound and fluorescence optical imaging on an endorectal probe may improve early detection of prostate cancer. A trans-rectal probe adapted to fluorescence diffuse optical tomography measurements was developed by our team. This probe is based on a pulsed NIR laser source, an optical fiber network and a time-resolved detection system. A reconstruction algorithm was used to help locate and quantify fluorescent prostate tumors. In this study, two different kinds of time-resolved detectors are compared: High Rate Imaging system (HRI) and a photon counting system. The HRI is based on an intensified multichannel plate and a CCD Camera. The temporal resolution is obtained through a gating of the HRI. Despite a low temporal resolution (300ps), this system allows a simultaneous acquisition of the signal from a large number of detection fibers. In the photon counting setup, 4 photomultipliers are connected to a Time Correlated Single Photon Counting (TCSPC) board, providing a better temporal resolution (0.1 ps) at the expense of a limited number of detection fibers (4). At last, we show that the limited number of detection fibers of the photon counting setup is enough for a good localization and dramatically improves the overall acquisition time. The photon counting approach is then validated through the localization of fluorescent inclusions in a prostate-mimicking phantom.

  2. Advanced Photon Counting Imaging Detectors with 100ps Timing for Astronomical and Space Sensing Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegmund, O.; Vallerga, J.; Welsh, B.; Rabin, M.; Bloch, J.

    In recent years EAG has implemented a variety of high-resolution, large format, photon-counting MCP detectors in space instrumentation for satellite FUSE, GALEX, IMAGE, SOHO, HST-COS, rocket, and shuttle payloads. Our scheme of choice has been delay line readouts encoding photon event position centroids, by determination of the difference in arrival time of the event charge at the two ends of a distributed resistive-capacitive (RC) delay line. Our most commonly used delay line configuration is the cross delay line (XDL). In its simplest form the delay-line encoding electronics consists of a fast amplifier for each end of the delay line, followed by time-to-digital converters (TDC's). We have achieved resolutions of < 25 μm in tests over 65 mm x 65 mm (3k x3k resolution elements) with excellent linearity. Using high speed TDC's, we have been able to encode event positions for random photon rates of ~1 MHz, while time tagging events using the MCP output signal to better than 100 ps. The unique ability to record photon X,Y,T high fidelity information has advantages over "frame driven" recording devices for some important applications. For example we have built open face and sealed tube cross delay line detectors used for biological fluorescence lifetime imaging, observation of flare stars, orbital satellites and space debris with the GALEX satellite, and time resolved imaging of the Crab Pulsar with a telescope as small as 1m. Although microchannel plate delay line detectors meet many of the imaging and timing demands of various applications, they have limitations. The relatively high gain (107) reduces lifetime and local counting rate, and the fixed delay (10's of ns) makes multiple simultaneous event recording problematic. To overcome these limitations we have begun development of cross strip readout anodes for microchannel plate detectors. The cross strip (XS) anode is a coarse (~0.5 mm) multi-layer metal and ceramic pattern of crossed fingers on an alumina

  3. Imaging and quantitative analysis of tritium-labelled cells in lymphocyte proliferation assays using microchannel plate detectors originally developed for X-ray astronomy.

    PubMed

    Lees, J E; Hales, J M

    2001-01-01

    Microchannel plate detectors have been used in many astronomical X-ray telescopes. Recently we have begun to use similar detectors to image electron emission from radiolabelled biological assays. Here we show how a microchannel plate (MCP) detector can be used to image tritium uptake in T lymphocyte proliferation assays. Quantitative analysis using the MCP detector has the same sensitivity and speed as conventional liquid scintillation counter (LSC) analysis whilst obviating the need for scintillation fluid. In addition the system permits the imaging of whole plate harvests from a range of plate sizes. Here we present data obtained with 96-well plates and Terasaki plates.

  4. Imaging and quantitative analysis of tritium-labelled cells in lymphocyte proliferation assays using microchannel plate detectors originally developed for X-ray astronomy.

    PubMed

    Lees, J E; Hales, J M

    2001-01-01

    Microchannel plate detectors have been used in many astronomical X-ray telescopes. Recently we have begun to use similar detectors to image electron emission from radiolabelled biological assays. Here we show how a microchannel plate (MCP) detector can be used to image tritium uptake in T lymphocyte proliferation assays. Quantitative analysis using the MCP detector has the same sensitivity and speed as conventional liquid scintillation counter (LSC) analysis whilst obviating the need for scintillation fluid. In addition the system permits the imaging of whole plate harvests from a range of plate sizes. Here we present data obtained with 96-well plates and Terasaki plates. PMID:11150540

  5. Advantages of Photon Counting Detectors for Terahertz Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuo, Hiroshi; Ezawa, Hajime

    2016-08-01

    For astronomical observation at terahertz frequencies, a variety of cryogenic detector technologies are being developed to achieve background-limited observation from space, where a noise equivalent power (NEP) of less than 10^{-18} W/Hz^{0.5} is often required. When each photon signal is resolved in time, the requirements on NEP are reduced and 1 ns time resolution corresponds to an NEP of approximately 10^{-17} W/Hz^{0.5} at THz frequencies. Furthermore, fast photon counting detectors have a high dynamic range to observe bright terahertz sources such as stars and active galactic nuclei. Applications of photon counting detector are discussed for cosmic microwave background and photon counting terahertz interferometry.

  6. Photon counting detector array algorithms for deep space optical communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, Meera; Andrews, Kenneth S.; Farr, William H.; Wong, Andre

    2016-03-01

    For deep-space optical communications systems utilizing an uplink optical beacon, a single-photon-counting detector array on the flight terminal can be used to simultaneously perform uplink tracking and communications as well as accurate downlink pointing at photon-starved (pW=m2) power levels. In this paper, we discuss concepts and algorithms for uplink signal acquisition, tracking, and parameter estimation using a photon-counting camera. Statistical models of detector output data and signal processing algorithms are presented, incorporating realistic effects such as Earth background and detector/readout blocking. Analysis and simulation results are validated against measured laboratory data using state-of-the-art commercial photon-counting detector arrays, demonstrating sub-microradian tracking errors under channel conditions representative of deep space optical links.

  7. Pulsed X-ray Characterization of Stripline Micro-Channel Plate Gated Imager

    SciTech Connect

    F. J. Goldin, D. V. Morgan, K. J. Moy

    2011-03-30

    We report on characterization of x-ray imaging arrays developed by National Security Technologies, LLC. These devices are based on a microchannel plate (MCP) with a conventional glass microchannel structure, but the top and bottom conductive coatings, rather than covering the entire area, are configured into several (4 to 8) parallel strips. Since the bias voltage is a pulse launched from one end, these operate as striplines; relative delays between these pulses give different active exposure times. Unlike the case of a static bias voltage, non-uniformities in impedance along a stripline will produce spatial fluctuations in the bias voltage. These are expected to be slight, but the very sensitive dependence of gain on voltage - approximately like Vl/4d, where l and d are the length and diameter of the channel - means there may be very significant spatial non-uniformities in gain. Flat-field calibrations are therefore required so that such effects can be unfolded from the raw images if quantitative data is required. Such flat-field and other characterization measurements, e.g. responsivity and linearity, have therefore been done with a flash X-ray radiographic system. The maximum endpoint energy is 500 keV. The duration is {approx}40 ns, and so is essentially flat (temporally) during the MCP stripline transit time, which is a maximum of 600 ps. Spatial variations are significant, but the data are corrected using independent flat-field measurements. A monochromator selects a particular X-ray transition line (typically K{alpha}) of the anode material, so that characterizations can be done for various well-defined input photon energies.

  8. Influence and analysis on ion barrier film to the noise factor of micro-channel plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yu-feng; Zhang, Fan; Zhang, Ni; Nie, Jing; Li, Dan; Zhang, Tai-min; Wang, Shu-fei; Liu, Xiao-jian; Liu, Zhao-lu

    2015-03-01

    The noise factor, which is the main factor affecting the noise performance of image intensifier and can accurately reflect the noise characteristics of the micro-channel plate(MCP), is the ratio of the input signal to noise ratio (SNR) and the output SNR. According to definition of noise factor of micro channel plate, noise mechanism and test principle, noise factor of filmed MCP test system is established in order to study the technical way to reduce noise factor of MCP. Because the input surface of the MCP is covered with ion barrier film to block the feedback ions, which have a great impact on the noise factor of the MCP. Hence, noise factor of filmed MCP and un-filmed MCP is measured respectively, and noise factors with different materials and different filmed thickness are measured too. Relationships between noise factor and filmed thickness, noise factor and output SNR of image intensifier have been obtained. That is valuable to reduce the noise of filmed MCP.

  9. Negative Avalanche Feedback Detectors for Photon-Counting Optical Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farr, William H.

    2009-01-01

    Negative Avalanche Feedback photon counting detectors with near-infrared spectral sensitivity offer an alternative to conventional Geiger mode avalanche photodiode or phototube detectors for free space communications links at 1 and 1.55 microns. These devices demonstrate linear mode photon counting without requiring any external reset circuitry and may even be operated at room temperature. We have now characterized the detection efficiency, dark count rate, after-pulsing, and single photon jitter for three variants of this new detector class, as well as operated these uniquely simple to use devices in actual photon starved free space optical communications links.

  10. Photon counting modules using RCA silicon avalanche photodiodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lightstone, Alexander W.; Macgregor, Andrew D.; Macsween, Darlene E.; Mcintyre, Robert J.; Trottier, Claude; Webb, Paul P.

    1989-01-01

    Avalanche photodiodes (APD) are excellent small area, solid state detectors for photon counting. Performance possibilities include: photon detection efficiency in excess of 50 percent; wavelength response from 400 to 1000 nm; count rate to 10 (exp 7) counts per sec; afterpulsing at negligible levels; timing resolution better than 1 ns. Unfortunately, these performance levels are not simultaneously available in a single detector amplifier configuration. By considering theoretical performance predictions and previous and new measurements of APD performance, the anticipated performance of a range of proposed APD-based photon counting modules is derived.

  11. Synthesis of Rh/Macro-Porous Alumina Over Micro-Channel Plate and Its Catalytic Activity Tests for Diesel Reforming.

    PubMed

    Seong, Yeon Baek; Kim, Yong Sul; Park, No-Kuk; Lee, Tae Jin

    2015-11-01

    Macro-porous Al2O3 as the catalytic support material was synthesized using colloidal polystyrene spheres over a micro-channel plate. The colloidal polystyrene spheres were used as a template for the production of an ordered macro porous material using an alumina nitrate solution as the precursor for Al2O3. The close-packed colloidal crystal array template method was applied to the formulation of ordered macro-porous Al2O3 used as a catalytic support material over a micro-channel plate. The solvent in the mixture solution, which also contained the colloidal polystyrene solution, aluminum nitrate solution and the precursor of the catalytic active materials (Rh), was evaporated in a vacuum oven at 50 degrees C. The ordered polystyrene spheres and aluminum salt of the solid state were deposited over a micro channel plate, and macro-porous Al2O3 was formed after calcination at 600 degrees C to remove the polystyrene spheres. The catalytic activity of the Rh/macro-porous alumina supported over the micro-channel plate was tested for diesel reforming. PMID:26726602

  12. Synthesis of Rh/Macro-Porous Alumina Over Micro-Channel Plate and Its Catalytic Activity Tests for Diesel Reforming.

    PubMed

    Seong, Yeon Baek; Kim, Yong Sul; Park, No-Kuk; Lee, Tae Jin

    2015-11-01

    Macro-porous Al2O3 as the catalytic support material was synthesized using colloidal polystyrene spheres over a micro-channel plate. The colloidal polystyrene spheres were used as a template for the production of an ordered macro porous material using an alumina nitrate solution as the precursor for Al2O3. The close-packed colloidal crystal array template method was applied to the formulation of ordered macro-porous Al2O3 used as a catalytic support material over a micro-channel plate. The solvent in the mixture solution, which also contained the colloidal polystyrene solution, aluminum nitrate solution and the precursor of the catalytic active materials (Rh), was evaporated in a vacuum oven at 50 degrees C. The ordered polystyrene spheres and aluminum salt of the solid state were deposited over a micro channel plate, and macro-porous Al2O3 was formed after calcination at 600 degrees C to remove the polystyrene spheres. The catalytic activity of the Rh/macro-porous alumina supported over the micro-channel plate was tested for diesel reforming.

  13. Quantum efficiencies of imaging detectors with alkali halide photocathodes. I - Microchannel plates with separate and integral CsI photocathodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carruthers, George R.

    1987-01-01

    Measurements and comparisons have been made of the quantum efficiencies of microchannel plate (MCP) detectors in the far-UV (below 2000-A) wavelength range using CsI photocathodes (a) deposited on the front surfaces of microchannel plates and (b) deposited on solid substrates as opaque photocathodes with the resulting photoelectrons input to microchannel plates. The efficiences were measured in both pulse-counting and photodiode modes of operation. Typical efficiencies are about 15 percent at 1216 A for a CsI-coated MCP compared with 65 percent for an opaque CsI photocathode MCP detector. Special processing has yielded an efficiency as high as 20 percent for a CsI-coated MCP. This may possibly be further improved by optimization of the tilt angle of the MCP channels relative to the front face of the MCP and incident radiation. However, at present there still remains a factor of at least 3 quantum efficiency advantage in the separate opaque CsI photocathode configuration.

  14. Development of atomic layer deposition-activated microchannel plates for single particle detection at cryogenic temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Gorelikov, Dmitry Sullivan, Neal; Rouffignac, Philippe de; Li, Huazhi; Narayanamoorthy, Jayasri; Tremsin, Anton S.

    2014-03-15

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) technology is used to nanoengineer functional films inside the pores of microchannel plate (MCP) electron multipliers, enabling a novel MCP manufacturing technology that substantially improves performance and opens novel applications. The authors have developed custom tools and recipes for the growth of conformal films, with optimized conductance and secondary electron emission inside very long channels (∼6–20 μm diameter and >600 μm length, with tens of millions of channels per single MCP) by ALD. The unique ability to tune the characteristics of these ALD films enables their optimization to applications where time-resolved single particle imaging can be performed in extreme conditions, such as high counting rates at cryogenic temperatures. Adhesion of the conductive and emissive nanofilms to the 20 μm pore MCP glass substrates and their mechanical stability over a very wide range of temperatures (10–700 K) were confirmed experimentally. Resistance of ALD MCPs was reproducible during multiple cool-down cycles with no film degradation observed. Optimizing resistance of novel MCPs for operation at cryogenic temperature should enable high count rate event detection at temperatures below 20 K.

  15. Nano-oxide thin films deposited via atomic layer deposition on microchannel plates.

    PubMed

    Yan, Baojun; Liu, Shulin; Heng, Yuekun

    2015-01-01

    Microchannel plate (MCP) as a key part is a kind of electron multiplied device applied in many scientific fields. Oxide thin films such as zinc oxide doped with aluminum oxide (ZnO:Al2O3) as conductive layer and pure aluminum oxide (Al2O3) as secondary electron emission (SEE) layer were prepared in the pores of MCP via atomic layer deposition (ALD) which is a method that can precisely control thin film thickness on a substrate with a high aspect ratio structure. In this paper, nano-oxide thin films ZnO:Al2O3 and Al2O3 were prepared onto varied kinds of substrates by ALD technique, and the morphology, element distribution, structure, and surface chemical states of samples were systematically investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS), respectively. Finally, electrical properties of an MCP device as a function of nano-oxide thin film thickness were firstly studied, and the electrical measurement results showed that the average gain of MCP was greater than 2,000 at DC 800 V with nano-oxide thin film thickness approximately 122 nm. During electrical measurement, current jitter was observed, and possible reasons were preliminarily proposed to explain the observed experimental phenomenon.

  16. Cross strip microchannel plate imaging photon counters with high time resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Stonehill, Laura C; Shirey, Robert; Rabin, Michael W; Thompson, David C; Siegmund, Oswald H W; Vallerga, John V; Tremsin, Anton S

    2010-01-01

    We have implemented cross strip readout microchannel plate detectors in 18 mm active area format including open face (UV/particle) and sealed tube (optical) configurations. These have been tested with a field programmable gate array based parallel channel electronics for event encoding which can process high input event rates (> 5 MHz) with high spatial resolution. Using small pore MCPs (6 {micro}m) operated in a pair, we achieve gains of >5 x 10{sup 5} which is sufficient to provide spatial resolution of <35 {micro}m FHWM, with self triggered event timing accuracy of {approx}2 ns for sealed tube optical sensors. A peak quantum efficiency of {approx}19% at 500 nm has been achieved with SuperGenII photocathodes that have response over the 400 nm to 900 nm range. Local area counting rates of up to >200 events/mcp pore sec{sup -1} have been attained, along with image linearity and stability to better than 50 {micro}m.

  17. Nano-oxide thin films deposited via atomic layer deposition on microchannel plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Baojun; Liu, Shulin; Heng, Yuekun

    2015-04-01

    Microchannel plate (MCP) as a key part is a kind of electron multiplied device applied in many scientific fields. Oxide thin films such as zinc oxide doped with aluminum oxide (ZnO:Al2O3) as conductive layer and pure aluminum oxide (Al2O3) as secondary electron emission (SEE) layer were prepared in the pores of MCP via atomic layer deposition (ALD) which is a method that can precisely control thin film thickness on a substrate with a high aspect ratio structure. In this paper, nano-oxide thin films ZnO:Al2O3 and Al2O3 were prepared onto varied kinds of substrates by ALD technique, and the morphology, element distribution, structure, and surface chemical states of samples were systematically investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS), respectively. Finally, electrical properties of an MCP device as a function of nano-oxide thin film thickness were firstly studied, and the electrical measurement results showed that the average gain of MCP was greater than 2,000 at DC 800 V with nano-oxide thin film thickness approximately 122 nm. During electrical measurement, current jitter was observed, and possible reasons were preliminarily proposed to explain the observed experimental phenomenon.

  18. Applicability of micro-channel plate followed by phosphor screen to charged particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Himura, H.; Nakata, S.; Sanpei, A.

    2016-06-01

    This paper experimentally investigates the applicability of a micro-channel plate (MCP) followed by a phosphor screen to charged particles along with a calibration method for estimating the acceptable limit of input particle flux and appropriate operation parameters of a particular MCP. For the first time, plasmas consisting of only lithium ions are injected into the MCP. Despite large ion numbers (Ni) on the order of ≃107, no deterioration in the effective gain (αG) of the MCP owing to an excess amount of the extracted charge occurs in a certain range of the amplifier voltage (ΔUM) applied to the MCP. The measured αG nearly agrees with the expected value. However, once ΔUM exceeds a limit value, αG eventually begins to saturate. This is also verified in experiments using pure electron plasmas. An appropriate range of ΔUM is presented to avoid saturation and, finally, derive Ni directly from the secondary electron current outputted from the MCP only after the indispensable calibration.

  19. Monte Carlo Simulations of Microchannel Plate Detectors II: Pulsed Voltage Results

    SciTech Connect

    Kruschwitz, Craig A.; Wu, Ming; Rochau, Greg A.

    2011-02-11

    This paper is part of a continuing study of straight-channel microchannel plate (MCP)–based x-ray detectors. Such detectors are a useful diagnostic tool for two-dimensional, time-resolved imaging and time-resolved x-ray spectroscopy. To interpret the data from such detectors, it is critical to develop a better understanding of the behavior of MCPs biased with subnanosecond voltage pulses. The subject of this paper is a Monte Carlo computer code that simulates the electron cascade in a MCP channel under an arbitrary pulsed voltage, particularly those pulses with widths comparable to the transit time of the electron cascade in the MCP under DC voltage bias. We use this code to study the gain as a function of time (also called the gate profile or optical gate) for various voltage pulse shapes, including pulses measured along the MCP. In addition, experimental data of MCP behavior in pulsed mode are obtained with a short-pulse UV laser. Comparisons between the simulations and experimental data show excellent agreement for both the gate profile and the peak relative sensitivity along the MCP strips. We report that the dependence of relative gain on peak voltage increases in sensitivity in pulsed mode when the width of the high-voltage waveform is smaller than the transit time of cascading electrons in the MCP.

  20. High-speed position readout for microchannel plate-based space plasma instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kataria, D. O.; Chaudery, Rahil; Rees, Kerrin

    2007-04-01

    Position sensitive micro-channel plate (MPC) detectors are attractive for space plasma instruments but have a number of limitations. Most of the techniques have limited global rate handling and require the MCP to run at high gain with MCP lifetime implications. In addition, available mass and power resources limit the number of channels of readout electronics. A fast position sensing technique was developed that is well suited for MCP-based space plasma applications. The output charge from the MCP falling on an anode pixel is capacitively split into two separate channels of readout electronics. Choosing an appropriate readout pattern, the charge is forced to split unequally, introducing a time walk between the signals from the following leading edge discriminator. Identifying the active channels and the order of their arrival time provides unique identification of the position of the incoming event. The pixels are interleaved so that each readout channel can be connected to several pixels, reducing the total number of readout channels. The timing logic and signal processing is carried out within an FPGA with additional processor/spacecraft interfaces also built in. The system dead time within the FPGA has been simulated and found to be less than 100 ns. The performance of the system can be optimised depending on the resolution, rate handling and lifetime requirements of the instrument. Details of the readout technique and its implementation in a space plasma analyser are presented.

  1. Development of output signal-to-noise ratio tester for microchannel plate and fluorescent screen component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xinglin; Qiu, Yafeng; Zhou, Jin; Qian, Yunsheng

    The core components of Image intensifier is microchannel plate (MCP) and fluorescent screen component. The present paper deeply studies output signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) characteristics of MCP and fluorescent screen component. A tester system using to the evaluation of characteristics of the output SNR of MCP and fluorescent screen component, consists of a vacuum system, a surface electron source, mechanical mechanism components ,a high-voltage power supply system, a signal processing system, communication interfaces, a data acquisition and control system, computer system, and testing software. a hot cathode used as an electron source, generates a surface electron flow to provide the input signal. A photomultiplier tube is used to detection faceplate output brightness of the light spot. Then, the output SNR of MCP and fluorescent screen component is processed with a combination of methods of the hardware filter and digital filtering software. The output SNR of MCP and fluorescent screen component is measured under different conditions, and the results are analyzed. This test system Provide a technical to promote the image intensifier research, and experience to testing other parameters or in other areas of research.

  2. Analogue saturation limit of single and double 10 mm microchannel plate photomultiplier tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milnes, J. S.; Conneely, T. M.; Horsfield, C. J.

    2016-11-01

    Photek are a well-established supplier of microchannel plate (MCP) photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) to the inertial confinement fusion community. The analogue signals produced at the major inertial confinement fusion facilities cover many orders of magnitude, therefore understanding the upper saturation limit of MCP-PMTs to large low rate signals takes on a high importance. Here we present a study of a single and a double MCP-PMT with 10 mm diameter active area. The saturation was studied for a range of optical pulse widths from 4 ns to 100 ns and at a range of electron gain values: 103 to 104 for the single and 104 to 106 for the double. We have shown that the saturation level of ˜1.2 nC depends only on the integrated charge of the pulse and is independent of pulse width and gain over this range, but that the level of charge available in deep saturation is proportional to the operating gain.

  3. Comparative Response of Microchannel Plate and Channel Electron Multiplier Detectors to Penetrating Radiation in Space

    SciTech Connect

    Funsten, Herbert O.; Harper, Ronnie W.; Dors, Eric E.; Janzen, Paul A.; Larsen, Brian A.; MacDonald, Elizabeth A.; Poston, David I.; Ritzau, Stephen M.; Skoug, Ruth M.; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.

    2015-10-02

    Channel electron multiplier (CEM) and microchannel plate (MCP) detectors are routinely used in space instrumentation for measurement of space plasmas. Here, our goal is to understand the relative sensitivities of these detectors to penetrating radiation in space, which can generate background counts and shorten detector lifetime. We use 662 keV γ-rays as a proxy for penetrating radiation such as γ-rays, cosmic rays, and high-energy electrons and protons that are ubiquitous in the space environment. We find that MCP detectors are ~20 times more sensitive to 662 keV γ-rays than CEM detectors. This is attributed to the larger total area of multiplication channels in an MCP detector that is sensitive to electronic excitation and ionization resulting from the interaction of penetrating radiation with the detector material. In contrast to the CEM detector, whose quantum efficiency εγ for 662 keVγ -rays is found to be 0.00175 and largely independent of detector bias, the quantum efficiency of the MCP detector is strongly dependent on the detector bias, with a power law index of 5.5. Lastly, background counts in MCP detectors from penetrating radiation can be reduced using MCP geometries with higher pitch and smaller channel diameter.

  4. Comparative Response of Microchannel Plate and Channel Electron Multiplier Detectors to Penetrating Radiation in Space

    DOE PAGES

    Funsten, Herbert O.; Harper, Ronnie W.; Dors, Eric E.; Janzen, Paul A.; Larsen, Brian A.; MacDonald, Elizabeth A.; Poston, David I.; Ritzau, Stephen M.; Skoug, Ruth M.; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.

    2015-10-02

    Channel electron multiplier (CEM) and microchannel plate (MCP) detectors are routinely used in space instrumentation for measurement of space plasmas. Here, our goal is to understand the relative sensitivities of these detectors to penetrating radiation in space, which can generate background counts and shorten detector lifetime. We use 662 keV γ-rays as a proxy for penetrating radiation such as γ-rays, cosmic rays, and high-energy electrons and protons that are ubiquitous in the space environment. We find that MCP detectors are ~20 times more sensitive to 662 keV γ-rays than CEM detectors. This is attributed to the larger total area ofmore » multiplication channels in an MCP detector that is sensitive to electronic excitation and ionization resulting from the interaction of penetrating radiation with the detector material. In contrast to the CEM detector, whose quantum efficiency εγ for 662 keVγ -rays is found to be 0.00175 and largely independent of detector bias, the quantum efficiency of the MCP detector is strongly dependent on the detector bias, with a power law index of 5.5. Lastly, background counts in MCP detectors from penetrating radiation can be reduced using MCP geometries with higher pitch and smaller channel diameter.« less

  5. Opaque gallium nitride photocathodes in UV imaging detectors with microchannel plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremsin, Anton S.; Hull, Jeffrey S.; Siegmund, Oswald H. W.; McPhate, Jason B.; Vallerga, John V.; Dabiran, Amir M.; Mane, Anil; Elam, Jeff

    2013-09-01

    The optimization and performance of opaque Galium Nitride (GaN) photocathodes deposited directly on novel Microchannel Plates (MCPs) are presented in this paper. The novel borosilicate glass MCPs, which are manufactured with the help of Atomic Layer Deposition, can withstand higher temperatures enabling direct deposition of GaN films on their surfaces. The quantum efficiency of MBE-grown GaN photocathodes of various thickness and buffer layers was studied in the spectral range of ~200-400 nm for the films grown on different surface layers (such as Al2O3 or buffer AlN layer) in order to determine the optimal opaque photocathode configuration. The MCPs with the GaN photocathodes were activated with surface cesiation in order to achieve the negative Electron Affinity for the efficient photon detection. The opaque photocathodes enable substantial broadening of the spectral sensitivity range compared to the semitransparent configuration when the photocathodes are deposited on the input window. The design of currently processed sealed tube event counting detector with an opaque GaN photocathode are also described in this paper. Our experiments demonstrate that although there is still development work required the detection quantum efficiencies exceeding 20% level should be achievable in 200-400 nm range and <50% in 100-200 nm range for the event counting MCP detectors with high spatial resolution (better than 50 μm) and timing resolution of <100 ps and very low background levels of only few events cm-2 s-1.

  6. Nano-oxide thin films deposited via atomic layer deposition on microchannel plates.

    PubMed

    Yan, Baojun; Liu, Shulin; Heng, Yuekun

    2015-01-01

    Microchannel plate (MCP) as a key part is a kind of electron multiplied device applied in many scientific fields. Oxide thin films such as zinc oxide doped with aluminum oxide (ZnO:Al2O3) as conductive layer and pure aluminum oxide (Al2O3) as secondary electron emission (SEE) layer were prepared in the pores of MCP via atomic layer deposition (ALD) which is a method that can precisely control thin film thickness on a substrate with a high aspect ratio structure. In this paper, nano-oxide thin films ZnO:Al2O3 and Al2O3 were prepared onto varied kinds of substrates by ALD technique, and the morphology, element distribution, structure, and surface chemical states of samples were systematically investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS), respectively. Finally, electrical properties of an MCP device as a function of nano-oxide thin film thickness were firstly studied, and the electrical measurement results showed that the average gain of MCP was greater than 2,000 at DC 800 V with nano-oxide thin film thickness approximately 122 nm. During electrical measurement, current jitter was observed, and possible reasons were preliminarily proposed to explain the observed experimental phenomenon. PMID:25883544

  7. Exploring the spatial resolution of position-sensitive microchannel plate detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiggins, Blake; Siwal, Davinder; Desouza, Romualdo

    2016-03-01

    High amplification and excellent timing make microchannel plate (MCP) detectors excellent devices for detection of photons, electrons, and ions. In addition to providing sub-nanosecond time resolution MCP detectors can also provide spatial resolution, thus making them useful in imaging applications. Use of a resistive anode (RA) is a routinely used approach to make an MCP position-sensitive. The spatial resolution of the RA associated with detection of a single incident electron was determined. Factors impacting the spatial resolution obtained with the RA will be discussed and the achieved spatial resolution of 64 μm (FWHM) will be presented. Recently, a novel approach has been developed to provide position-sensitivity for an MCP detector. In this approach, namely the induced signal approach, the position of the incident particle is determined by sensing the electron cloud emanating from a MCP stack. By utilizing the zero-crossing point of the inherently bipolar signals, a spatial resolution of 466 μm (FWHM) has been achieved. Work to improve the spatial resolution of the induced signal approach further will be presented. Supported by the US DOE NNSA under Award No. DE-NA0002012.

  8. Time-resolved non-contact fluorescence diffuse optical tomography measurements with ultra-fast time-correlated single photon counting avalanche photodiodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bérubé-Lauzière, Yves; Robichaud, Vincent; Lapointe, Éric

    2007-07-01

    The design and fabrication of time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) avalanche photodiodes (APDs) and associated quenching circuits have made significant progresses in recent years. APDs with temporal resolutions comparable to microchannel plate photomultiplier tubes (MCP-PMTs) are now available. MCP-PMTs were until these progresses the best TCSPC detectors with timing resolutions down to 30ps. APDs can now achieve these resolutions at a fraction of the cost. Work is under way to make the manufacturing of TCSPC APDs compatible with standard electronics fabrication practices. This should allow to further reduce their cost and render them easier to integrate in complex multi-channel TCSPC electronics, as needed in diffuse optical tomography (DOT) systems. Even if their sensitive area is much smaller than that of the ubiquitous PMT used in TCSPC, we show that with appropriate selection of optical components, TCSPC APDs can be used in time-domain DOT. To support this, we present experimental data and calculations clearly demonstrating that comparable measurements can be obtained with APDs and PMTs. We are, to our knowledge, the first group using APDs in TD DOT, in particular in non-contact TD fluorescence DOT.

  9. Ultra-fast time-correlated single photon counting avalanche photodiodes for time-domain non-contact fluorescence diffuse optical tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robichaud, Vincent; Lapointe, Éric; Bérubé-Lauzière, Yves

    2007-06-01

    Recent advances in the design and fabrication of avalanche photodiodes (APDs) and quenching circuits for timecorrelated single photon counting (TCSPC) have made available detectors with timing resolutions comparable to microchannel plate photomultiplier tubes (MCP-PMTs). The latter, were until recently the best TCSPC detectors in terms of temporal resolution (<=30ps). Comparable resolutions can now be obtained with TCSPC APDs at a much lower cost. It should also be possible to manufacture APDs with standard electronics fabrication processes in a near future. This will contribute to further decrease their price and ease their integration in complex multi-channel detection systems, as required in diuse optical imaging (DOI) and tomography (DOT). We present, to our knowledge for the first time, results which demonstrate that, despite their small sensitive area, TCSPC APDs can be used in time-domain (TD) DOT and more generally in TD DOI. With appropriate optical design of the detection channel, our experiments show that it is possible to obtain comparable measurements with APDs as with PMTs.

  10. Comprehensive Analysis of Convective Heat Transfer in Parallel Plate Microchannel with Viscous Dissipation and Constant Heat Flux Boundary Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushwaha, Hari Mohan; Sahu, Santosh Kumar

    2016-06-01

    This paper reports the hydrodynamically and thermally fully developed, laminar, incompressible, forced convective heat transfer characteristics of gaseous flows through a parallel plate microchannel with different constant heat flux boundary conditions. The first order velocity slip and viscous dissipation effects are considered in the analysis. Here, three different thermal boundary conditions such as: both plates kept at different constant heat fluxes, both plates kept at equal constant heat fluxes and one plate kept at constant heat flux and other one insulated are considered for the analysis. The deviation in Nusselt number between the model that considers both first order velocity slip and temperature jump and the one that considers only velocity slip is reported. Also, the effect of various heat flux ratios on the Nusselt number is reported in this analysis. In addition, the deviation in Nusselt number between first and second order slip model is discussed in this study.

  11. Three-Dimensional Photon Counting Imaging with Axially Distributed Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Myungjin; Javidi, Bahram

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we review three-dimensional (3D) photon counting imaging with axially distributed sensing. Under severely photon-starved conditions, we have proposed various imaging and algorithmic approaches to reconstruct a scene in 3D, which are not possible by using conventional imaging system due to lack of sufficient number of photons. In this paper, we present an overview of optical sensing and imaging system along with dedicated algorithms for reconstructing 3D scenes by photon counting axially distributed sensing, which may be implemented by moving a single image sensor along its optical axis. To visualize the 3D image, statistical estimation methods and computational reconstruction of axially distributed sensing is applied. PMID:27483262

  12. Photon-counting multifactor optical encryption and authentication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Cabré, E.; Mohammed, E. A.; Millán, M. S.; Saadon, H. L.

    2015-02-01

    The multifactor optical encryption authentication method [Opt. Lett., 31 721-3 (2006)] reinforces optical security by allowing the simultaneous authentication of up to four factors. In this work, the photon-counting imaging technique is applied to the multifactor encrypted function so that a sparse phase-only distribution is generated for the encrypted data. The integration of both techniques permits an increased capacity for signal hiding with simultaneous data reduction for better fulfilling the general requirements of protection, storage and transmission. Cryptanalysis of the proposed method is carried out in terms of chosen-plaintext and chosen-ciphertext attacks. Although the multifactor authentication process is not substantially altered by those attacks, its integration with the photon-counting imaging technique prevents from possible partial disclosure of any encrypted factor, thus increasing the security level of the overall process. Numerical experiments and results are provided and discussed.

  13. Towards a Graphene-Based Low Intensity Photon Counting Photodetector.

    PubMed

    Williams, Jamie O D; Alexander-Webber, Jack A; Lapington, Jon S; Roy, Mervyn; Hutchinson, Ian B; Sagade, Abhay A; Martin, Marie-Blandine; Braeuninger-Weimer, Philipp; Cabrero-Vilatela, Andrea; Wang, Ruizhi; De Luca, Andrea; Udrea, Florin; Hofmann, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    Graphene is a highly promising material in the development of new photodetector technologies, in particular due its tunable optoelectronic properties, high mobilities and fast relaxation times coupled to its atomic thinness and other unique electrical, thermal and mechanical properties. Optoelectronic applications and graphene-based photodetector technology are still in their infancy, but with a range of device integration and manufacturing approaches emerging this field is progressing quickly. In this review we explore the potential of graphene in the context of existing single photon counting technologies by comparing their performance to simulations of graphene-based single photon counting and low photon intensity photodetection technologies operating in the visible, terahertz and X-ray energy regimes. We highlight the theoretical predictions and current graphene manufacturing processes for these detectors. We show initial experimental implementations and discuss the key challenges and next steps in the development of these technologies. PMID:27563903

  14. Towards a Graphene-Based Low Intensity Photon Counting Photodetector

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Jamie O. D.; Alexander-Webber, Jack A.; Lapington, Jon S.; Roy, Mervyn; Hutchinson, Ian B.; Sagade, Abhay A.; Martin, Marie-Blandine; Braeuninger-Weimer, Philipp; Cabrero-Vilatela, Andrea; Wang, Ruizhi; De Luca, Andrea; Udrea, Florin; Hofmann, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    Graphene is a highly promising material in the development of new photodetector technologies, in particular due its tunable optoelectronic properties, high mobilities and fast relaxation times coupled to its atomic thinness and other unique electrical, thermal and mechanical properties. Optoelectronic applications and graphene-based photodetector technology are still in their infancy, but with a range of device integration and manufacturing approaches emerging this field is progressing quickly. In this review we explore the potential of graphene in the context of existing single photon counting technologies by comparing their performance to simulations of graphene-based single photon counting and low photon intensity photodetection technologies operating in the visible, terahertz and X-ray energy regimes. We highlight the theoretical predictions and current graphene manufacturing processes for these detectors. We show initial experimental implementations and discuss the key challenges and next steps in the development of these technologies. PMID:27563903

  15. Towards a Graphene-Based Low Intensity Photon Counting Photodetector.

    PubMed

    Williams, Jamie O D; Alexander-Webber, Jack A; Lapington, Jon S; Roy, Mervyn; Hutchinson, Ian B; Sagade, Abhay A; Martin, Marie-Blandine; Braeuninger-Weimer, Philipp; Cabrero-Vilatela, Andrea; Wang, Ruizhi; De Luca, Andrea; Udrea, Florin; Hofmann, Stephan

    2016-08-23

    Graphene is a highly promising material in the development of new photodetector technologies, in particular due its tunable optoelectronic properties, high mobilities and fast relaxation times coupled to its atomic thinness and other unique electrical, thermal and mechanical properties. Optoelectronic applications and graphene-based photodetector technology are still in their infancy, but with a range of device integration and manufacturing approaches emerging this field is progressing quickly. In this review we explore the potential of graphene in the context of existing single photon counting technologies by comparing their performance to simulations of graphene-based single photon counting and low photon intensity photodetection technologies operating in the visible, terahertz and X-ray energy regimes. We highlight the theoretical predictions and current graphene manufacturing processes for these detectors. We show initial experimental implementations and discuss the key challenges and next steps in the development of these technologies.

  16. A 4-GHz frequency-domain fluorometer with internal microchannel plate photomultiplier cross-correlation.

    PubMed

    Berndt, K W; Gryczynski, I; Lakowicz, J R

    1991-01-01

    We have developed and tested a multifrequency phase/modulation fluorometer based on the Hamamatsu Model R2024U gatable microchannel plate photomultiplier (MCP-PMT), using internal MCP-PMT cross-correlation. This internal mixing is accomplished by biasing and modulating the gating mesh which is located 0.2 mm behind the photocathode. Near the photocathode center, no high-frequency photocurrent modulation was achieved. Within a circular area near the photocathode edge, however, the R2024U allows accurate phase shift and demodulation measurements up to at least 4.5 GHz, the frequency limit of our PMT-modulation amplifier. By mixing immediately after the photocathode, there is no decrease in the time resolution due to transit time spread, and the MCP has to process only low-frequency signals. This means no low-level high-frequency signal voltages have to be handled in this fluorometer, and the problems of RF shielding become much less critical. Also, the effective output impedance of the PMT has been increased, resulting in a 43-dB increase in the PMT output signal power. In principle, more MCPs could be built into the PMT, allowing an improved fluorescence detection limit. We have used the method of reference fluorophores in order to compensate for pronounced PMT color effects, a wavelength-dependent modulation, and a wavelength-dependent time shift. No color correction is required in the case of time-dependent depolarization. The performance of the instrument was verified by measurements of the intensity decay of perylene, which showed a single-exponential decay, and by measurements of the decay of tryptophan in water, which showed a double-exponential decay, as expected.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2048714

  17. Avalanche photodiode photon counting receivers for space-borne lidars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Xiaoli; Davidson, Frederic M.

    1991-01-01

    Avalanche photodiodes (APD) are studied for uses as photon counting detectors in spaceborne lidars. Non-breakdown APD photon counters, in which the APD's are biased below the breakdown point, are shown to outperform: (1) conventional APD photon counters biased above the breakdown point; (2) conventional APD photon counters biased above the breakdown point; and (3) APD's in analog mode when the received optical signal is extremely weak. Non-breakdown APD photon counters were shown experimentally to achieve an effective photon counting quantum efficiency of 5.0 percent at lambda = 820 nm with a dead time of 15 ns and a dark count rate of 7000/s which agreed with the theoretically predicted values. The interarrival times of the counts followed an exponential distribution and the counting statistics appeared to follow a Poisson distribution with no after pulsing. It is predicted that the effective photon counting quantum efficiency can be improved to 18.7 percent at lambda = 820 nm and 1.46 percent at lambda = 1060 nm with a dead time of a few nanoseconds by using more advanced commercially available electronic components.

  18. The high-resolution microchannel plate detector for FUV spectroscopy in the BepiColombo mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, Go; Ezawa, Fukuhiro; Yoshioka, Kazuo; Yoshikawa, Ichiro; Chassefiere, Eric; Maria, Jean-Luc

    Mariner-10 UV measurements and telescopic spectroscopy from the Earth identified six elements (Ca, Na, K, H, He, and O) in the Mercury's exosphere. Other species are expected, e.g. H2 , OH, and some noble gasses (Ar, Ne, and Xe). All species representative of the surface composition, directly produced by impact vaporization driven by micrometeoroids, physical sputtering, photo-stimulated desorption, and thermal desorption from the regolith, should also be present. To determine the composition of the Mercury's exosphere, the PHEBUS (Probing of Hermean Exosphere By Ultraviolet Spectroscopy) instrument on Mercury Planetary Orbiter (MPO) will measure the emission lines of the exosphere. PHEBUS is a dual FUV-EUV spectrometer working in the wavelength range from 55 to 315 nm. We are now developing the compact detector system sensitive to FUV airglow emissions of the Mercury. The FUV detector is required to have high spatial resolution (80 µm) so that the wavelength resolution of the PHEBUS instrument should be 2 nm at the FUV range. The FUV detector consists of a Cs2 Te photocathode, microchannel plates (MCPs), and a resistive anode encoder (RAE). In a position-sensitive system with an RAE, the spatial resolution is determined by the signal-to-noise ratios at the anode terminals. Therefore, a high and stable electron gain of MCPs allows the position determination of each photoelectron event with high spatial resolution. We studied a method for achieving a high and stable electron gain. We fabricated a test model of the FUV detector incorporating a clamped pair of MCPs (V-stack) followed by a gap and a clamped triplet of MCPs (Z-stack) in cascade. We have investigated the effect of the negative potential applied across the inter-stack (V-Z) gap on the PHD and the spatial resolution by means of calculation and experiments. The calculation with a simple ballistic model showed that the negative inter-stack potential reduced the size of the electron cloud by 70%. The result

  19. Noise filtering techniques for photon-counting ladar data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magruder, Lori A.; Wharton, Michael E., III; Stout, Kevin D.; Neuenschwander, Amy L.

    2012-06-01

    Many of the recent small, low power ladar systems provide detection sensitivities on the photon(s) level for altimetry applications. These "photon-counting" instruments, many times, are the operational solution to high altitude or space based platforms where low signal strength and size limitations must be accommodated. Despite the many existing algorithms for lidar data product generation, there remains a void in techniques available for handling the increased noise level in the photon-counting measurements as the larger analog systems do not exhibit such low SNR. Solar background noise poses a significant challenge to accurately extract surface features from the data. Thus, filtering is required prior to implementation of other post-processing efforts. This paper presents several methodologies for noise filtering photoncounting data. Techniques include modified Canny Edge Detection, PDF-based signal extraction, and localized statistical analysis. The Canny Edge detection identifies features in a rasterized data product using a Gaussian filter and gradient calculation to extract signal photons. PDF-based analysis matches local probability density functions with the aggregate, thereby extracting probable signal points. The localized statistical method assigns thresholding values based on a weighted local mean of angular variances. These approaches have demonstrated the ability to remove noise and subsequently provide accurate surface (ground/canopy) determination. The results presented here are based on analysis of multiple data sets acquired with the high altitude NASA MABEL system and photon-counting data supplied by Sigma Space Inc. configured to simulate the NASA upcoming ICESat-2 mission instrument expected data product.

  20. Photon-counting detectors for space-based laser receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krainak, Michael A.; Yu, Anthony W.; Yang, Guangning; Li, Steven X.; Sun, Xiaoli

    2010-01-01

    Photon-counting detectors are required for numerous NASA future space-based laser receivers including science instruments and free-space optical communication terminals. Silicon avalanche photodiode (APD) single photon counting modules (SPCMs) are used in the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) on Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite (ICESat) launched in 2003, currently in orbit measuring the Earth surface elevation and atmosphere backscattering. To measure cloud and aerosol backscattering, the SPCMs detect the GLAS laser light at 532-nm wavelength, with quantum efficiencies of 60 to 70% and maximum count rates greater than 13 million per second. The performance of the SPCMs has been monitored since ICESat launch on January 12, 2003. There has been no measurable change in the quantum efficiency, linearity or after-pulsing. The detector dark counts rates monitored while the spacecraft was in the dark side of the Earth have increased linearly at about 60 counts/s per day due to space radiation damage. As the ICESat mission nears completion, we have proposed ground-to-space optical and quantum communication experiments to utilize the on-orbit 1-meter optical receiver telescope with multiple SPCMs in the focal plane. NASA is preparing a follow-on mission to ICESat, called ICESat-2, with a launch date of late 2014. The major candidate photon-counting detectors under evaluation for ICESat-2 include 532 nm and 1064 nm wavelength-sensitive photomultiplier tubes and Geiger-mode avalanche photodiode arrays. Key specifications are high maximum count rate, detection efficiency, photon number resolution, radiation tolerance, power consumption, operating temperature and reliability. Future NASA science instruments and free-space laser communication terminals share a number of these requirements.

  1. Time-of-flight resolution of scintillating counters with Burle 85001 microchannel plate photomultipliers in comparison with Hamamatsu R2083

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baturin, V.; Burkert, V.; Kim, W.; Majewsky, S.; Park, K.; Popov, V.; Smith, E. S.; Son, D.; Stepanyan, S. S.; Zorn, C.

    2006-06-01

    Improvements in the time resolution of the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) below ≈50 ps will be required for experiments using the planned upgraded accelerator facility at Jefferson Lab. The improved time resolution will allow particle identification using time-of-flight techniques to be used effectively up to the proposed operating energy of 12 GeV. The challenge of achieving this time resolution over a relatively large area is compounded because the photomultipliers (PM) in the CLAS "time-zero" scintillating counters must operate in very high magnetic fields. Therefore, we have studied the resolution of "time-zero" prototypes with microchannel plate PMs 85001-501 from Burle. For reference and comparison, measurements were also made using the standard PMs R2083 from Hamamatsu using two timing methods. The cosmic ray method, which utilizes three identical scintillating counters (Bicron BC-408, 2×3×50 cm3) with PMs at the ends, yields σ=59.1±0.7 ps. The location method of particles from a radiative source with known coordinates has been used to compare timing resolutions of R2083 and 85001-501. This method yields σ=59.5±0.7 ps and it also provides an estimate of the number of primary photoelectrons. For the microchannel plate PM from Burle the method yields σ85001=130±4 ps due to lower number of primary photoelectrons.

  2. Dark-Field Scanning Transmission Ion Microscopy via Detection of Forward-Scattered Helium Ions with a Microchannel Plate.

    PubMed

    Woehl, Taylor J; White, Ryan M; Keller, Robert R

    2016-06-01

    A microchannel plate was used as an ion sensitive detector in a commercial helium ion microscope (HIM) for dark-field transmission imaging of nanomaterials, i.e. scanning transmission ion microscopy (STIM). In contrast to previous transmission HIM approaches that used secondary electron conversion holders, our new approach detects forward-scattered helium ions on a dedicated annular shaped ion sensitive detector. Minimum collection angles between 125 mrad and 325 mrad were obtained by varying the distance of the sample from the microchannel plate detector during imaging. Monte Carlo simulations were used to predict detector angular ranges at which dark-field images with atomic number contrast could be obtained. We demonstrate atomic number contrast imaging via scanning transmission ion imaging of silica-coated gold nanoparticles and magnetite nanoparticles. Although the resolution of STIM is known to be degraded by beam broadening in the substrate, we imaged magnetite nanoparticles with high contrast on a relatively thick silicon nitride substrate. We expect this new approach to annular dark-field STIM will open avenues for more quantitative ion imaging techniques and advance fundamental understanding of underlying ion scattering mechanisms leading to image formation.

  3. Dark-Field Scanning Transmission Ion Microscopy via Detection of Forward-Scattered Helium Ions with a Microchannel Plate.

    PubMed

    Woehl, Taylor J; White, Ryan M; Keller, Robert R

    2016-06-01

    A microchannel plate was used as an ion sensitive detector in a commercial helium ion microscope (HIM) for dark-field transmission imaging of nanomaterials, i.e. scanning transmission ion microscopy (STIM). In contrast to previous transmission HIM approaches that used secondary electron conversion holders, our new approach detects forward-scattered helium ions on a dedicated annular shaped ion sensitive detector. Minimum collection angles between 125 mrad and 325 mrad were obtained by varying the distance of the sample from the microchannel plate detector during imaging. Monte Carlo simulations were used to predict detector angular ranges at which dark-field images with atomic number contrast could be obtained. We demonstrate atomic number contrast imaging via scanning transmission ion imaging of silica-coated gold nanoparticles and magnetite nanoparticles. Although the resolution of STIM is known to be degraded by beam broadening in the substrate, we imaged magnetite nanoparticles with high contrast on a relatively thick silicon nitride substrate. We expect this new approach to annular dark-field STIM will open avenues for more quantitative ion imaging techniques and advance fundamental understanding of underlying ion scattering mechanisms leading to image formation. PMID:27153003

  4. Time resolution of Burle 85001 micro-channel plate photo-multipliers in comparison with Hamamatsu R2083

    SciTech Connect

    V. Baturin; V. Burkert; W. Kim; S. Majewsky; D. Nekrasov; K. Park; V. Popov; E. S. Smith; D. Son; S. S. Stepanyan; C. Zorn

    2005-06-01

    The CLAS detector will require improvements in its particle identification system to take advantage of the higher energies provided by the Jefferson Laboratory accelerator upgrade to 12 GeV. To this end, we have studied the timing characteristics of the micro-channel plate photo-multiplier 85001 from Burle, which can be operated in a high magnetic field environment. For reference and comparison, measurements were also made using the standard PMT R2083 from Hamamatsu using two timing methods. The cosmic ray method, which utilizes three identical scintillating counters 2cm x 3cm x 50cm with PMs at the ends, yields 59.1(0.7)ps. The location method of particles from radiative source with known coordinates has been used to compare timing resolutions of R2083 and Burle-85001. This ''coordinate method'' requires only one counter instrumented with two PMs and it yields 59.5(0.7)ps. For the micro-channel plate photomultiplier from Burle with an external amplification of 10 to the signals, the co ordinate method yields 130(4)ps. This method also makes it possible to estimate the number of primary photo-electrons.

  5. Improved photon counting efficiency calibration using superconducting single photon detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Haiyong; Xu, Nan; Li, Jianwei; Sun, Ruoduan; Feng, Guojin; Wang, Yanfei; Ma, Chong; Lin, Yandong; Zhang, Labao; Kang, Lin; Chen, Jian; Wu, Peiheng

    2015-10-01

    The quantum efficiency of photon counters can be measured with standard uncertainty below 1% level using correlated photon pairs generated through spontaneous parametric down-conversion process. Normally a laser in UV, blue or green wavelength range with sufficient photon energy is applied to produce energy and momentum conserved photon pairs in two channels with desired wavelengths for calibration. One channel is used as the heralding trigger, and the other is used for the calibration of the detector under test. A superconducting nanowire single photon detector with advantages such as high photon counting speed (<20 MHz), low dark count rate (<50 counts per second), and wideband responsivity (UV to near infrared) is used as the trigger detector, enabling correlated photons calibration capabilities into shortwave visible range. For a 355nm single longitudinal mode pump laser, when a superconducting nanowire single photon detector is used as the trigger detector at 1064nm and 1560nm in the near infrared range, the photon counting efficiency calibration capabilities can be realized at 532nm and 460nm. The quantum efficiency measurement on photon counters such as photomultiplier tubes and avalanche photodiodes can be then further extended in a wide wavelength range (e.g. 400-1000nm) using a flat spectral photon flux source to meet the calibration demands in cutting edge low light applications such as time resolved fluorescence and nonlinear optical spectroscopy, super resolution microscopy, deep space observation, and so on.

  6. Energy dispersive photon counting detectors for breast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barber, William C.; Wessel, Jan C.; Malakhov, Nail; Wawrzyniak, Gregor; Hartsough, Neal E.; Gandhi, Thulasidharan; Nygard, Einar; Iwanczyk, Jan S.

    2013-09-01

    We report on our efforts toward the development of silicon (Si) strip detectors for energy-resolved clinical breast imaging. Typically, x-ray integrating detectors based on scintillating cesium iodide CsI(Tl) or amorphous selenium (a- Se) are used in most commercial systems. Recently, mammography instrumentation has been introduced based on photon counting silicon Si strip detectors. Mammography requires high flux from the x-ray generator, therefore, in order to achieve energy resolved single photon counting, a high output count rate (OCR) for the detector must be achieved at the required spatial resolution and across the required dynamic range for the application. The required performance in terms of the OCR, spatial resolution, and dynamic range must be obtained with sufficient field of view (FOV) for the application thus requiring the tiling of pixel arrays and scanning techniques. Room temperature semiconductors, operating as direct conversion x-ray sensors, can provide the required speed when connected to application specific integrated circuits (ASICs) operating at fast peaking times with multiple fixed thresholds per pixel, provided that the sensors are designed for rapid signal formation across the x-ray energy ranges of the application at the required energy and spatial resolutions. We present our methods and results from the optimization of prototype detectors based on Si strip structures. We describe the detector optimization and the development of ASIC readout electronics that provide the required spatial resolution, low noise, high count rate capabilities and minimal power consumption.

  7. Novel photon-counting detectors for free-space communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krainak, M. A.; Yang, G.; Sun, X.; Lu, W.; Merritt, S.; Beck, J.

    2016-03-01

    We present performance data for novel photon-counting detectors for free space optical communication. NASA GSFC is testing the performance of three types of novel photon-counting detectors 1) a 2x8 mercury cadmium telluride (HgCdTe) avalanche array made by DRS Inc., and a 2) a commercial 2880-element silicon avalanche photodiode (APD) array. We present and compare dark count, photon-detection efficiency, wavelength response and communication performance data for these detectors. We discuss system wavelength trades and architectures for optimizing overall communication link sensitivity, data rate and cost performance. The HgCdTe APD array routinely demonstrated photon detection efficiencies of greater than 50% across 5 arrays, with one array reaching a maximum PDE of 70%. We performed high-resolution pixel-surface spot scans and measured the junction diameters of its diodes. We found that decreasing the junction diameter from 31 μm to 25 μm doubled the e- APD gain from 470 for an array produced in the year 2010 to a gain of 1100 on an array delivered to NASA GSFC recently. The mean single-photon SNR was over 12 and the excess noise factors measurements were 1.2-1.3. The commercial silicon APD array exhibited a fast output with rise times of 300 ps and pulse widths of 600 ps. On-chip individually filtered signals from the entire array were multiplexed onto a single fast output.

  8. Eiger: a single-photon counting x-ray detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, I.; Bergamaschi, A.; Billich, H.; Cartier, S.; Dinapoli, R.; Greiffenberg, D.; Guizar-Sicairos, M.; Henrich, B.; Jungmann, J.; Mezza, D.; Mozzanica, A.; Schmitt, B.; Shi, X.; Tinti, G.

    2014-05-01

    Eiger is a single-photon counting x-ray pixel detector being developed at the Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI) for applications at synchrotron light sources. It follows the widely utilized and successful Pilatus detector. The main features of Eiger are a pixel size of 75 × 75 μm2, high frame rate capability of 22 kHz and negligible dead time between frames of 4 μs. This article contains a detailed description of Eiger detector systems, from the 500 kpixel single-module detector to large-area multi-modules systems. The calibration and performance of the first 500 kpixel system that is in routine user operation are also presented. Furthermore, a method of calibrating the energy of single-photon counting detectors along the detector gain axis is introduced. This approach has the advantage that the detector settings can be optimized at all energies for count rate capabilities. Rate capabilities of the system are reported for energies between 6 and 16 keV.

  9. Novel Photon-Counting Detectors for Free-Space Communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krainak, Michael A.; Yang, Guan; Sun, Xiaoli; Lu, Wei; Merritt, Scott; Beck, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    We present performance data for novel photon counting detectors for free space optical communication. NASA GSFC is testing the performance of three novel photon counting detectors 1) a 2x8 mercury cadmium telluride avalanche array made by DRS Inc. 2) a commercial 2880 silicon avalanche photodiode array and 3) a prototype resonant cavity silicon avalanche photodiode array. We will present and compare dark count, photon detection efficiency, wavelength response and communication performance data for these detectors. We discuss system wavelength trades and architectures for optimizing overall communication link sensitivity, data rate and cost performance. The HgCdTe APD array has photon detection efficiencies of greater than 50 were routinely demonstrated across 5 arrays, with one array reaching a maximum PDE of 70. High resolution pixel-surface spot scans were performed and the junction diameters of the diodes were measured. The junction diameter was decreased from 31 m to 25 m resulting in a 2x increase in e-APD gain from 470 on the 2010 array to 1100 on the array delivered to NASA GSFC. Mean single photon SNRs of over 12 were demonstrated at excess noise factors of 1.2-1.3.The commercial silicon APD array has a fast output with rise times of 300ps and pulse widths of 600ps. Received and filtered signals from the entire array are multiplexed onto this single fast output. The prototype resonant cavity silicon APD array is being developed for use at 1 micron wavelength.

  10. Ultrafast Photon Counting Applied to Resonant Scanning STED Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xundong; Toro, Ligia; Stefani, Enrico; Wu, Yong

    2014-01-01

    Summary To take full advantage of fast resonant scanning in super-resolution STimulated Emission Depletion (STED) microscopy, we have developed an ultrafast photon counting system based on a multi-giga-sample per second analog-to-digital conversion (ADC) chip that delivers an unprecedented 450 MHz pixel clock (2.2 ns pixel dwell time in each scan). The system achieves a large field of view (~50 × 50 μm) with fast scanning that reduces photobleaching, and advances the time-gated continuous wave (CW) STED technology to the usage of resonant scanning with hardware based time-gating. The assembled system provides superb signal-to-noise ratio and highly linear quantification of light that result in superior image quality. Also, the system design allows great flexibility in processing photon signals to further improve the dynamic range. In conclusion, we have constructed a frontier photon counting image acquisition system with ultrafast readout rate, excellent counting linearity, and with the capacity of realizing resonant-scanning CW-STED microscopy with on-line time-gated detection. PMID:25227160

  11. A photon-counting detector for exoplanet missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figer, D. F.; Lee, J.; Hanold, B. J.; Aull, B. F.; Gregory, J. A.; Schuette, D. R.

    2011-10-01

    This paper summarizes progress of a project to develop and advance the maturity of photon-counting detectors for NASA exoplanet missions. The project, funded by NASA ROSES TDEM program, uses a 256×256 pixel silicon Geigermode avalanche photodiode (GM-APD) array, bump-bonded to a silicon readout circuit. Each pixel independently registers the arrival of a photon and can be reset and ready for another photon within 100 ns. The pixel has built-in circuitry for counting photo-generated events. The readout circuit is multiplexed to read out the photon arrival events. The signal chain is inherently digital, allowing for noiseless transmission over long distances. The detector always operates in photon counting mode and is thus not susceptible to excess noise factor that afflicts other technologies. The architecture should be able to operate with shot-noise-limited performance up to extremely high flux levels, >106 photons/second/pixel, and deliver maximum signal-to-noise ratios on the order of thousands for higher fluxes. Its performance is expected to be maintained at a high level throughout mission lifetime in the presence of the expected radiation dose.

  12. Optical and UV Sensing Sealed Tube Microchannel Plate Imaging Detectors with High Time Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegmund, O.; Vallerga, J.; Tremsin, A.; Hull, J.; Elam, J.; Mane, A.

    2014-09-01

    Microchannel plate (MCP) based imaging, photon time tagging detector sealed tube schemes have a unique set of operational features that enable high time resolution astronomical and remote sensing applications to be addressed. New detectors using the cross strip (XS), cross delay line (XDL), or stripline anode readouts, a wide range of photocathode types, and advanced MCP technologies have been implemented to improve many performance characteristics. A variety of sealed tubes have been developed including 18mm XS readout devices with GaAs and SuperGenII photocathodes, 25mm XDL readout devices with SuperGenII and GaN photocathodes, and 20 x 20 cm sealed tubes with bialkali photocathodes and strip line readout. One key technology that has just become viable is the ability to make MCPs using atomic layer deposition (ALD) techniques. This employs nanofabrication of the active layers of an MCP on a microcapillary array. This technique opens new performance opportunities, including, very large MCP areas (>20cm), very low intrinsic background, lower radiation induced background, much longer overall lifetime and gain stability, and markedly lower outgassing which can improve the sealed tube lifetime and ease of fabrication. The XS readout has been implemented in formats of 22mm, 50mm and 100mm, and uses MCP charge signals detected on two orthogonal layers of conductive fingers to encode event X-Y positions. We have achieved spatial resolution XS detectors better than 25 microns FWHM, with good image linearity while at low gain (<10^6), substantially increasing local counting rate capabilities and the overall tube lifetime. XS tubes with updated electronics can encode event rates of >5 MHz with ~12% dead time and event timing accuracy of ~100ps. XDL sealed tubes in 25mm format demonstrate ~40 micron spatial resolution at up to ~2 MHz event rates, and have been developed with SupergenII visible regime photocathodes. The XDL tubes also achieve ~100 ps time resolution. Most

  13. Soft tissue imaging with photon counting spectroscopic CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shikhaliev, Polad M.

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this work was experimental investigation of photon counting spectroscopic CT (PCS-CT) imaging of anatomical soft tissue with clinically relevant size. The imaging experiments were performed using a spectroscopic CT system based on CdZnTe photon counting detector with two rows of pixels, 256 pixels in each row, 1  ×  1 mm2 pixel size, and 25.6 cm detector length. The detector could split the x-ray energy spectrum to 5 regions (energy bins), and acquire 5 multi-energy (spectroscopic) CT images in a single CT scan. A sample of round shaped anatomical soft tissue of 14 cm diameter including lean and fat was used for imaging. To avoid the negative effect of anatomical noise on quantitative analysis, a spectroscopic CT phantom with tissue equivalent solid materials was used. The images were acquired at 60, 90, and 120 kVp tube voltages, and spectroscopic image series were acquired with 3 and 5 energy bins. Spectroscopic CT numbers were introduced and used to evaluate an energy selective image series. The anatomical soft tissue with 14 cm diameter was visualized with good quality and without substantial artifacts by the photon counting spectroscopic CT system. The effects of the energy bin crosstalk on spectroscopic CT numbers were quantified and analyzed. The single and double slice PCS-CT images were acquired and compared. Several new findings were observed, including the effect of soft tissue non-uniformity on image artifacts, unique status of highest energy bin, and material dependent visualization in spectroscopic image series. Fat-lean decomposition was performed using dual energy subtraction and threshold segmentation methods, and compared. Using K-edge filtered x-rays improved fat-lean decomposition as compared to conventional x-rays. Several new and important aspects of the PCS-CT were investigated. These include imaging soft tissue with clinically relevant size, single- and double-slice PCS-CT imaging, using spectroscopic CT

  14. Single Photon Counting Detectors for Low Light Level Imaging Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolb, Kimberly

    2015-10-01

    This dissertation presents the current state-of-the-art of semiconductor-based photon counting detector technologies. HgCdTe linear-mode avalanche photodiodes (LM-APDs), silicon Geiger-mode avalanche photodiodes (GM-APDs), and electron-multiplying CCDs (EMCCDs) are compared via their present and future performance in various astronomy applications. LM-APDs are studied in theory, based on work done at the University of Hawaii. EMCCDs are studied in theory and experimentally, with a device at NASA's Jet Propulsion Lab. The emphasis of the research is on GM-APD imaging arrays, developed at MIT Lincoln Laboratory and tested at the RIT Center for Detectors. The GM-APD research includes a theoretical analysis of SNR and various performance metrics, including dark count rate, afterpulsing, photon detection efficiency, and intrapixel sensitivity. The effects of radiation damage on the GM-APD were also characterized by introducing a cumulative dose of 50 krad(Si) via 60 MeV protons. Extensive development of Monte Carlo simulations and practical observation simulations was completed, including simulated astronomical imaging and adaptive optics wavefront sensing. Based on theoretical models and experimental testing, both the current state-of-the-art performance and projected future performance of each detector are compared for various applications. LM-APD performance is currently not competitive with other photon counting technologies, and are left out of the application-based comparisons. In the current state-of-the-art, EMCCDs in photon counting mode out-perform GM-APDs for long exposure scenarios, though GM-APDs are better for short exposure scenarios (fast readout) due to clock-induced-charge (CIC) in EMCCDs. In the long term, small improvements in GM-APD dark current will make them superior in both long and short exposure scenarios for extremely low flux. The efficiency of GM-APDs will likely always be less than EMCCDs, however, which is particularly disadvantageous for

  15. Bayesian Blocks: A New Method to Analyze Photon Counting Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scargle, Jeffrey D.; Bloom, Elliott D.; Young, Richard E. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    A Bayesian analysis of photon-counting data leads to a new time-domain algorithm for detecting localized structures (bursts), revealing pulse shapes, and generally characterizing intensity variations. The raw counting data -- time-tag events (TTE), time-to-spill (TTS) data, or binned counts -- is converted to a maximum likelihood segmentation of the observation into time intervals during which the photon arrival rate is perceptibly constant -- i.e. has a fixed intensity without statistically significant variations. The resulting structures, Bayesian Blocks, can be thought of as bins with arbitrary spacing determined by the data. The method itself sets no lower limit to the time scale on which variability can be detected. We have applied the method to RXTE data on Cyg X-1, yielding information on this source's short-time-scale variability.

  16. Multimode model for projective photon-counting measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Tualle-Brouri, Rosa; Ourjoumtsev, Alexei; Dantan, Aurelien; Grangier, Philippe; Wubs, Martijn; Soerensen, Anders S.

    2009-07-15

    We present a general model to account for the multimode nature of the quantum electromagnetic field in projective photon-counting measurements. We focus on photon-subtraction experiments, where non-Gaussian states are produced conditionally. These are useful states for continuous-variable quantum-information processing. We present a general method called mode reduction that reduces the multimode model to an effective two-mode problem. We apply this method to a multimode model describing broadband parametric down-conversion, thereby improving the analysis of existing experimental results. The main improvement is that spatial and frequency filters before the photon detector are taken into account explicitly. We find excellent agreement with previously published experimental results, using fewer free parameters than before, and discuss the implications of our analysis for the optimized production of states with negative Wigner functions.

  17. Design and construction of a photon counting system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez, F. R.; Del Valle, C.; Reyes, L.; Tobón, J.; Barrero, C.; Velásquez, A.

    2007-03-01

    This article describes the design and implementation of a photon counting system, which is made using low cost electronic devices. The system is connected to a spectrometer in order to study events related to low levels of luminance intensity. It uses a photo-multiplier tube (PMT) for photon detection. The counting photon system is conformed by 5 stages, which are: the detector, a pre-amplifier, a pulse comparator, a pulses counter and a communications interface in a PC. Data acquisition is done through the serial port. The system allows the detection of radiation coming from signals whose counting rates are several thousands pulses per second. As an application of the system, the Raman Stokes spectrum of the polystyrene as well as the fluorescence band of an organic pigment on a poly-vinyl matrix is showed.

  18. Time-averaged photon-counting digital holography.

    PubMed

    Demoli, Nazif; Skenderović, Hrvoje; Stipčević, Mario

    2015-09-15

    Time-averaged holography has been using photo-emulsions (early stage) and digital photo-sensitive arrays (later) to record holograms. We extend the recording possibilities by utilizing a photon-counting camera, and we further investigate the possibility of obtaining accurate hologram reconstructions in rather severe experimental conditions. To achieve this, we derived an expression for fringe function comprising the main parameters affecting the hologram recording. Influence of the main parameters, namely the exposure time and the number of averaged holograms, is analyzed by simulations and experiments. It is demonstrated that taking long exposure times can be avoided by averaging over many holograms with the exposure times much shorter than the vibration cycle. Conditions in which signal-to-noise ratio in reconstructed holograms can be substantially increased are provided. PMID:26371907

  19. Investigation of a photon counting avalanche photodiode from Hamamatsu photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Britvitch, I.; Musienko, Y.; Renker, D.

    2006-11-01

    Multi-cell avalanche photodiodes (APDs) operating in Geiger mode have been shown to be a very promising alternative to photomultiplier tubes for the detection of single photons at room temperature. Like a photomultiplier they have high gain and a fast rise time and they are insensitive to pickup. Beyond it they operate in high magnetic fields, are compact and need a relatively low bias voltage. It is expected that the MOS production technique makes them cheap. Recently PSI and Hamamatsu Photonics worked together for the development of a radiation-hard APD for CMS ECAL and had very good success. The development continued based on a similar design for a photon counting multielement Geiger-mode APD with an area of 1×1 mm 2. The properties of this device have been measured and will be reported.

  20. Photon counting photodiode array detector for far ultraviolet (FUV) astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartig, G. F.; Moos, H. W.; Pembroke, R.; Bowers, C.

    1982-01-01

    A compact, stable, single-stage intensified photodiode array detector designed for photon-counting, far ultraviolet astronomy applications employs a saturable, 'C'-type MCP (Galileo S. MCP 25-25) to produce high gain pulses with a narrowly peaked pulse height distribution. The P-20 output phosphor exhibits a very short decay time, due to the high current density of the electron pulses. This intensifier is being coupled to a self-scanning linear photodiode array which has a fiber optic input window which allows direct, rigid mechanical coupling with minimal light loss. The array was scanned at a 250 KHz pixel rate. The detector exhibits more than adequate signal-to-noise ratio for pulse counting and event location. Previously announced in STAR as N82-19118

  1. Single photon counting pixel detectors for synchrotron radiation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyokawa, H.; Broennimann, Ch.; Eikenberry, E. F.; Henrich, B.; Kawase, M.; Kobas, M.; Kraft, P.; Sato, M.; Schmitt, B.; Suzuki, M.; Tanida, H.; Uruga, T.

    2010-11-01

    At the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI an X-ray single photon counting pixel detector (PILATUS) based on the hybrid-pixel detector technology was developed in collaboration with SPring-8. The detection element is a 320 or 450 μm thick silicon sensor forming pixelated pn-diodes with a pitch of 172 μm×172 μm. An array of 2×8 custom CMOS readout chips are indium bump-bonded to the sensor, which leads to 33.5 mm×83.8 mm detective area. Each pixel contains a charge-sensitive amplifier, a single level discriminator and a 20 bit counter. This design realizes a high dynamic range, short readout time of less than 3 ms, a high framing rate of over 200 images per second and an excellent point-spread function. The maximum counting rate achieves more than 2×10 6 X-rays/s/pixel.

  2. Performance of single-photon-counting PILATUS detector modules

    PubMed Central

    Kraft, P.; Bergamaschi, A.; Broennimann, Ch.; Dinapoli, R.; Eikenberry, E. F.; Henrich, B.; Johnson, I.; Mozzanica, A.; Schlepütz, C. M.; Willmott, P. R.; Schmitt, B.

    2009-01-01

    PILATUS is a silicon hybrid pixel detector system, operating in single-photon-counting mode, that has been developed at the Paul Scherrer Institut for the needs of macromolecular crystallography at the Swiss Light Source (SLS). A calibrated PILATUS module has been characterized with monochromatic synchrotron radiation. The influence of charge sharing on the count rate and the overall energy resolution of the detector were investigated. The dead-time of the system was determined using the attenuated direct synchrotron beam. A single module detector was also tested in surface diffraction experiments at the SLS, whereby its performance regarding fluorescence suppression and saturation tolerance were evaluated, and have shown to greatly improve the sensitivity, reliability and speed of surface diffraction data acquisition. PMID:19395800

  3. Novel Photon-Counting Detectors for Free-Space Communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krainak, M. A.; Yang, G.; Sun, X.; Lu, W.; Merritt, S.; Beck, J.

    2016-01-01

    We present performance data for novel photon-counting detectors for free space optical communication. NASA GSFC is testing the performance of two types of novel photon-counting detectors 1) a 2x8 mercury cadmium telluride (HgCdTe) avalanche array made by DRS Inc., and a 2) a commercial 2880-element silicon avalanche photodiode (APD) array. We present and compare dark count, photon-detection efficiency, wavelength response and communication performance data for these detectors. We successfully measured real-time communication performance using both the 2 detected-photon threshold and AND-gate coincidence methods. Use of these methods allows mitigation of dark count, after-pulsing and background noise effects. The HgCdTe APD array routinely demonstrated photon detection efficiencies of greater than 50% across 5 arrays, with one array reaching a maximum PDE of 70%. We performed high-resolution pixel-surface spot scans and measured the junction diameters of its diodes. We found that decreasing the junction diameter from 31 micrometers to 25 micrometers doubled the e- APD gain from 470 for an array produced in the year 2010 to a gain of 1100 on an array delivered to NASA GSFC recently. The mean single-photon SNR was over 12 and the excess noise factors measurements were 1.2-1.3. The commercial silicon APD array exhibited a fast output with rise times of 300 ps and pulse widths of 600 ps. On-chip individually filtered signals from the entire array were multiplexed onto a single fast output.

  4. Thomson spectrometer-microchannel plate assembly calibration for MeV-range positive and negative ions, and neutral atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, R.; Abicht, F.; Borghesi, M.; Braenzel, J.; Nickles, P. V.; Priebe, G.; Schnürer, M.; Ter-Avetisyan, S.

    2013-05-01

    We report on the absolute calibration of a microchannel plate (MCP) detector, used in conjunction with a Thomson parabola spectrometer. The calibration delivers the relation between a registered count numbers in the CCD camera (on which the MCP phosphor screen is imaged) and the number of ions incident on MCP. The particle response of the MCP is evaluated for positive, negative, and neutral particles at energies below 1 MeV. As the response of MCP depends on the energy and the species of the ions, the calibration is fundamental for the correct interpretation of the experimental results. The calibration method and arrangement exploits the unique emission symmetry of a specific source of fast ions and atoms driven by a high power laser.

  5. Characterization Studies and Performance of Half-strip High-speed X-ray Microchannel Plate Imager

    SciTech Connect

    Kenneth Moy; Ming Wu

    2008-03-01

    High-speed microchannel plate (MCP)–based imagers are critical detectors for x-ray diagnostics employed on Z-experiments at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) to measure time-resolved x-ray spectra and to image dynamic hohlraums. A design using eight half-strip x-ray photocathodes in one imager permits recordings of radiation events in discrete temporal snapshots to yield a time-evolved movie. We present data using various facilities to characterize the performance of this design. These characterization studies include DC and pulsed-voltage biased measurements in both saturated and linear operational regimes using an intense, short-pulsed UV laser and Manson source. Surface voltage profile measurements using a picoprobe help to determine the gain variation across the strips. Test data from a recent SNL ZR-experiment demonstrates the flexibility and high-quality images obtained by this MCP imager.

  6. Quantitative extraction of spectral line intensities and widths from x-ray spectra recorded with gated microchannel plate detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Dunham, Greg; Bailey, J. E.; Rochau, G. A.; Lake, P. W.; Nielsen-Weber, L. B.

    2007-06-15

    Plasma spectroscopy requires determination of spectral line intensities and widths. At Sandia National Laboratories Z facility we use elliptical crystal spectrometers equipped with gated microchannel plate detectors to record time and space resolved spectra. We collect a large volume of data typically consisting of five to six snapshots in time and five to ten spectral lines with 30 spatial elements per frame, totaling to more than 900 measurements per experiment. This large volume of data requires efficiency in processing. We have addressed this challenge by using a line fitting routine to automatically fit each spectrum using assumed line profiles and taking into account photoelectron statistics to efficiently extract line intensities and widths with uncertainties. We verified that the random data noise obeys Poisson statistics. Rescale factors for converting film exposure to effective counts required for understanding the photoelectron statistics are presented. An example of the application of these results to the analysis of spectra recorded in Z experiments is presented.

  7. Development of a New Fast Shower Maximum Detector Based on Microchannel Plates Photomultipliers (MCP-PMT) as an Active Element

    SciTech Connect

    Ronzhin, A.; Los, S.; Ramberg, E.; Spiropulu, M.; Apresyan, A.; Xie, S.; Kim, H.; Zatserklyaniy, A.

    2014-09-21

    One possibility to make a fast and radiation resistant shower maximum (SM) detector is to use a secondary emitter as an active element. We present below test beam results, obtained with different types of photodetectors based on microchannel plates (MCPs) as the secondary emitter. We performed the measurements at the Fermilab Test Beam Facility with 120GeV proton beam and 12GeV and 32GeV secondary beams. The goal of the measurement with 120GeV protons was to determine time resolution for minimum ionizing particles (MIPs). The SM time resolution we obtained for this new type of detector is at the level of 20-30ps. We estimate that a significant contribution to the detector response originates from secondary emission of the MCP. This work can be considered as the first step in building a new type of calorimeter based on this principle.

  8. Maximizing the quantum efficiency of microchannel plate detectors - The collection of photoelectrons from the interchannel web using an electric field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, R. C.; Hettrick, M. C.; Malina, R. F.

    1983-01-01

    High quantum efficiency and two-dimensional imaging capabilities make the microchannel plate (MCP) a suitable detector for a sky survey instrument. The Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer satellite, to be launched in 1987, will use MCP detectors. A feature which limits MCP efficiency is related to the walls of individual channels. The walls are of finite thickness and thus form an interchannel web. Under normal circumstances, this web does not contribute to the detector's quantum efficiency. Panitz and Foesch (1976) have found that in the case of a bombardment with ions, electrons were ejected from the electrode material coating the web. By applying a small electric field, the electrons were returned to the MCP surface where they were detected. The present investigation is concerned with the enhancement of quantum efficiencies in the case of extreme UV wavelengths. Attention is given to a model and a computer simulation which quantitatively reproduce the experimental results.

  9. A low noise front end electronics for micro-channel plate detector with wedge and strip anode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, K.; Li, F.; Liang, F.; Chen, L.; Jin, G.

    2016-03-01

    A low noise Front End Electronics (FEE) for two-dimensional position sensitive Micro-Channel Plate (MCP) detector has been developed. The MCP detector is based on Wedge and Strip Anode (WSA) with induction readout mode. The WSA has three electrodes, the wedge electrode, the strip electrode, and the zigzag electrode. Then, three readout channels are designed in the Printed Circuit Board (PCB). The FEE is calibrated by a pulse generator from Agilent. We also give an analysis of the charge loss from the CSA. The noise levels of the three channels are less than 1 fC RMS at the shaping time of 200 ns. The experimental result shows that the position resolution of the MCP detector coupled with the designed PCB can reach up to 110 μm.

  10. Dynamic Characterizations of an 8-frame Half-Strip High-speed X-ray Microchannel Plate Imager

    SciTech Connect

    Ken Moy, Ming Wu, Craig Kruschwitz, Aric Tibbits, Matt Griffin, Greg Rochau

    2008-09-05

    High-speed microchannel plate (MCP)–based imagers are critical detectors for x-ray diagnostics employed on Z-experiments at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) to measure time-resolved x-ray spectra and to image dynamic hohlraums. A multiframe design using eight half strips in one imager permits recordings of radiation events in discrete temporal snapshots to yield a time-evolved movie. We present data using various facilities to characterize the performance of this design. These characterization studies include DC and pulsed-voltage biased measurements in both saturated and linear operational regimes using an intense, short-pulsed UV laser. Electrical probe measurements taken to characterize the shape of the HV pulse propagating across the strips help to corroborate the spatial gain dependence.

  11. Thomson spectrometer-microchannel plate assembly calibration for MeV-range positive and negative ions, and neutral atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, R.; Abicht, F.; Braenzel, J.; Priebe, G.; Schnuerer, M.; Borghesi, M.; Ter-Avetisyan, S.; Nickles, P. V.

    2013-05-15

    We report on the absolute calibration of a microchannel plate (MCP) detector, used in conjunction with a Thomson parabola spectrometer. The calibration delivers the relation between a registered count numbers in the CCD camera (on which the MCP phosphor screen is imaged) and the number of ions incident on MCP. The particle response of the MCP is evaluated for positive, negative, and neutral particles at energies below 1 MeV. As the response of MCP depends on the energy and the species of the ions, the calibration is fundamental for the correct interpretation of the experimental results. The calibration method and arrangement exploits the unique emission symmetry of a specific source of fast ions and atoms driven by a high power laser.

  12. Evaluation of a microchannel-plate PMT as a potential timing detector suitable for positron lifetime measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosev, K.; Butterling, M.; Anwand, W.; Cowan, T.; Hartmann, A.; Heidel, K.; Jungmann, M.; Krause-Rehberg, R.; Massarczyk, R.; Schilling, K. D.; Schwengner, R.; Wagner, A.

    2010-12-01

    This paper focuses on the evaluation of a microchannel-plate photomultiplier tube (MCP-PMT) as a candidate detector, suitable for positron lifetime studies. Several properties of MCP-PMTs, such as their fast time response, compact size, low susceptibility to magnetic fields, relatively high gain and the low power consumption make them attractive for positron lifetime spectroscopy. The preliminary tests were performed with a 85001-501 Burle Planacon TM photomultiplier tube assembly. Initial measurements were conducted with a pulsed Picosecond Injection Laser (PiLas) system. The engineering sample of the 85001 exhibits a transit-time-spread (TTS) of 110 ps (FWHM). Further timing experiments showing the suitability of the device as Cherenkov detector are presented. For the first time, a conventional positron lifetime spectrum of a Cz-Si probe measured with a spectrometer, where an MCP-PMT detector is included, has been demonstrated.

  13. Position and time resolution measurements with a microchannel plate image intensifier: A comparison of monolithic and pixelated CeBr3 scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackermann, Ulrich; Eschbaumer, Stephan; Bergmaier, Andreas; Egger, Werner; Sperr, Peter; Greubel, Christoph; Löwe, Benjamin; Schotanus, Paul; Dollinger, Günther

    2016-07-01

    To perform Four Dimensional Age Momentum Correlation measurements in the near future, where one obtains the positron lifetime in coincidence with the three dimensional momentum of the electron annihilating with the positron, we have investigated the time and position resolution of two CeBr3 scintillators (monolithic and an array of pixels) using a Photek IPD340/Q/BI/RS microchannel plate image intensifier. The microchannel plate image intensifier has an active diameter of 40 mm and a stack of two microchannel plates in chevron configuration. The monolithic CeBr3 scintillator was cylindrically shaped with a diameter of 40 mm and a height of 5 mm. The pixelated scintillator array covered the whole active area of the microchannel plate image intensifier and the shape of each pixel was 2.5·2.5·8 mm3 with a pixel pitch of 3.3 mm. For the monolithic setup the measured mean single time resolution was 330 ps (FWHM) at a gamma energy of 511 keV. No significant dependence on the position was detected. The position resolution at the center of the monolithic scintillator was about 2.5 mm (FWHM) at a gamma energy of 662 keV. The single time resolution of the pixelated crystal setup reached 320 ps (FWHM) in the region of the center of the active area of the microchannel plate image intensifier. The position resolution was limited by the cross-section of the pixels. The gamma energy for the pixel setup measurements was 511 keV.

  14. Prospects of photon counting lidar for savanna ecosystem structural studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gwenzi, D.; Lefsky, M. A.

    2014-11-01

    Discrete return and waveform lidar have demonstrated a capability to measure vegetation height and the associated structural attributes such as aboveground biomass and carbon storage. Since discrete return lidar (DRL) is mainly suitable for small scale studies and the only existing spaceborne lidar sensor (ICESat-GLAS) has been decommissioned, the current question is what the future holds in terms of large scale lidar remote sensing studies. The earliest planned future spaceborne lidar mission is ICESat-2, which will use a photon counting technique. To pre-validate the capability of this mission for studying three dimensional vegetation structure in savannas, we assessed the potential of the measurement approach to estimate canopy height in a typical savanna landscape. We used data from the Multiple Altimeter Beam Experimental Lidar (MABEL), an airborne photon counting lidar sensor developed by NASA Goddard. MABEL fires laser pulses in the green (532 nm) and near infrared (1064 nm) bands at a nominal repetition rate of 10 kHz and records the travel time of individual photons that are reflected back to the sensor. The photons' time of arrival and the instrument's GPS positions and Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) orientation are used to calculate the distance the light travelled and hence the elevation of the surface below. A few transects flown over the Tejon ranch conservancy in Kern County, California, USA were used for this work. For each transect we extracted the data from one near infrared channel that had the highest number of photons. We segmented each transect into 50 m, 25 m and 10 m long blocks and aggregated the photons in each block into a histogram based on their elevation values. We then used an expansion window algorithm to identify cut off points where the cumulative density of photons from the highest elevation resembles the canopy top and likewise where such cumulative density from the lowest elevation resembles mean ground elevation. These cut off

  15. Development of a Photon Counting System for Differential Lidar Signal Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elsayed-Ali, Hani

    1997-01-01

    Photon counting has been chosen as a means to extend the detection range of current airborne DIAL ozone measurements. Lidar backscattered return signals from the on and off-line lasers experience a significant exponential decay. To extract further data from the decaying ozone return signals, photon counting will be used to measure the low light levels, thus extending the detection range. In this application, photon counting will extend signal measurement where the analog return signal is too weak. The current analog measurement range is limited to approximately 25 kilometers from an aircraft flying at 12 kilometers. Photon counting will be able to exceed the current measurement range so as to follow the mid-latitude model of ozone density as a function of height. This report describes the development of a photon counting system. The initial development phase begins with detailed evaluation of individual photomultiplier tubes. The PMT qualities investigated are noise count rates, single electron response peaks, voltage versus gain values, saturation effects, and output signal linearity. These evaluations are followed by analysis of two distinctive tube base gating schemes. The next phase is to construct and operate a photon counting system in a laboratory environment. The laboratory counting simulations are used to determine optimum discriminator setpoints and to continue further evaluations of PMT properties. The final step in the photon counting system evaluation process is the compiling of photon counting measurements on the existing ozone DIAL laser system.

  16. Pseudo-random single photon counting: a high-speed implementation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qiang; Chen, Ling; Chen, Nanguang

    2010-01-01

    Pseudo-random single photon counting (PRSPC) is a new time-resolved optical measurement method which combines the spread spectrum time-resolved method with single photon counting. A pseudo-random bit sequence is used to modulate a continuous wave laser diode, while single photon counting is used to build up the optical signal in response to the modulated excitation. Periodic cross-correlation is performed to obtain the temporal profile of the subject of interest. Compared with conventional time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC), PRSPC enjoys many advantages such as low cost and high count rate without compromising the sensitivity and time-resolution. In this paper, we report a PRSPC system that can be used for high-speed acquisition of the temporal point spread function of diffuse photons. It can reach a photon count rate as high as 3 Mcps (counts per second). Phantom experiments have been conducted to demonstrate the system performance. PMID:21258444

  17. X-ray tests of a microchannel plate detector and amorphous silicon pixel array readout for neutron radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambrosi, R. M.; Street, R.; Feller, B.; Fraser, G. W.; Watterson, J. I. W.; Lanza, R. C.; Dowson, J.; Ross, D.; Martindale, A.; Abbey, A. F.; Vernon, D.

    2007-03-01

    High-performance large area imaging detectors for fast neutrons in the 5-14 MeV energy range do not exist at present. The aim of this project is to combine microchannel plates or MCPs (or similar electron multiplication structures) traditionally used in image intensifiers and X-ray detectors with amorphous silicon (a-Si) pixel arrays to produce a composite converter and intensifier position sensitive imaging system. This detector will provide an order of magnitude improvement in image resolution when compared with current millimetre resolution limits obtained using phosphor or scintillator-based hydrogen rich converters. In this study we present the results of the initial experimental evaluation of the prototype system. This study was carried out using a medical X-ray source for the proof of concept tests, the next phase will involve neutron imaging tests. The hybrid detector described in this study is a unique development and paves the way for large area position sensitive detectors consisting of MCP or microsphere plate detectors and a-Si or polysilicon pixel arrays. Applications include neutron and X-ray imaging for terrestrial applications. The technology could be extended to space instrumentation for X-ray astronomy.

  18. Preparation and characterization of novel nickel-palladium electrodes supported by silicon microchannel plates for direct methanol fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Fengjuan; Tao, Bairui; Sun, Li; Liu, Tao; You, Jinchuan; Wang, Lianwei; Chu, Paul K.

    A novel anode structure based on the three-dimensional silicon microchannel plates (Si-MCP) is proposed for direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs). Ni-Pd nanoparticles produced by electroless plating onto the Si-MCP inner sidewalls and followed by annealing at 300 °C under argon serve as the catalyst. In order to evaluate the electroactivity of the nanocomposites, Ni-Pd/silicon composites synthesized by the same method are compared. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), and electrochemical methods are employed to investigate the Ni-Pd/Si-MCP anode materials. As a result of the synergetic effects rendered by the MCP and Ni-Pd nanoparticles, the Ni-Pd/Si-MCP nanocomposites exhibit superior electrocatalytic properties towards methanol electro-oxidation in alkaline solutions, as manifested by the negative onset potential and strong current response to methanol even during long-term cyclical oxidation of methanol. This new structure possesses unique and significant advantages such as low cost and integratability with silicon-based devices.

  19. Photon-counting spectral phase-contrast mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fredenberg, E.; Roessl, E.; Koehler, T.; van Stevendaal, U.; Schulze-Wenck, I.; Wieberneit, N.; Stampanoni, M.; Wang, Z.; Kubik-Huch, R. A.; Hauser, N.; Lundqvist, M.; Danielsson, M.; Åslund, M.

    2012-03-01

    Phase-contrast imaging is an emerging technology that may increase the signal-difference-to-noise ratio in medical imaging. One of the most promising phase-contrast techniques is Talbot interferometry, which, combined with energy-sensitive photon-counting detectors, enables spectral differential phase-contrast mammography. We have evaluated a realistic system based on this technique by cascaded-systems analysis and with a task-dependent ideal-observer detectability index as a figure-of-merit. Beam-propagation simulations were used for validation and illustration of the analytical framework. Differential phase contrast improved detectability compared to absorption contrast, in particular for fine tumor structures. This result was supported by images of human mastectomy samples that were acquired with a conventional detector. The optimal incident energy was higher in differential phase contrast than in absorption contrast when disregarding the setup design energy. Further, optimal weighting of the transmitted spectrum was found to have a weaker energy dependence than for absorption contrast. Taking the design energy into account yielded a superimposed maximum on both detectability as a function of incident energy, and on optimal weighting. Spectral material decomposition was not facilitated by phase contrast, but phase information may be used instead of spectral information.

  20. Algol - CPNG: photon counting cameras for interferometry in visible wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blazit, A.; Thiébaut, E.; Vakili, F.; Abe, L.; Spang, A.; Clausse, J.-M.; Mourard, D.; Foy, R.; Rondeau, X.

    Images in visible interferometry are characterised by their low coherence time, and except for brightest stars, the flux on the detector is much less than one photon per pixel per image. Algol and Comptage de Photons Nouvelle Génération (CPNG) are new photon counting cameras developed for high angular resolution in the visible. They are intensified CCDs built to benefit from improvements in photonic commercial components, and personal computer processing power. We present how we achieve optimal performances (sensitivity and spatiotemporal resolution) by the combination of proper optical and electronics design, and real-time elaborated data processing. The number of pixels is 532× 516 and 768× 640 read at a frame rate of 262 Hz and 50 Hz for CPNG and Algol respectively. The dark current is very low: 5×10-4 electron.pixel-1.s-1. Quantum efficiencies reach up to 36% in the visible with the GaAsP photocathodes and and 26% in the red with the GaAs ones, thanks to the sensitivity of the photocathodes and to the photon centroiding algorithm; they are likely the highest values reported for ICCDs.

  1. On the Use of Shot Noise for Photon Counting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zmuidzinas, Jonas

    2015-11-01

    Lieu et al. have recently claimed that it is possible to substantially improve the sensitivity of radio-astronomical observations. In essence, their proposal is to make use of the intensity of the photon shot noise as a measure of the photon arrival rate. Lieu et al. provide a detailed quantum-mechanical calculation of a proposed measurement scheme that uses two detectors and conclude that this scheme avoids the sensitivity degradation that is associated with photon bunching. If correct, this result could have a profound impact on radio astronomy. Here I present a detailed analysis of the sensitivity attainable using shot-noise measurement schemes that use either one or two detectors, and demonstrate that neither scheme can avoid the photon bunching penalty. I perform both semiclassical and fully quantum calculations of the sensitivity, obtaining consistent results, and provide a formal proof of the equivalence of these two approaches. These direct calculations are furthermore shown to be consistent with an indirect argument based on a correlation method that establishes an independent limit to the sensitivity of shot-noise measurement schemes. Furthermore, these calculations are directly applicable to the regime of interest identified by Lieu et al. Collectively, these results conclusively demonstrate that the photon-bunching sensitivity penalty applies to shot-noise measurement schemes just as it does to ordinary photon counting, in contradiction to the fundamental claim made by Lieu et al. The source of this contradiction is traced to a logical fallacy in their argument.

  2. Mean and variance of single photon counting with deadtime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Daniel F.; Fessler, Jeffrey A.

    2000-07-01

    The statistics of photon counting by systems affected by deadtime are potentially important for statistical image reconstruction methods. We present a new way of analysing the moments of the counting process for a counter system affected by various models of deadtime related to PET and SPECT imaging. We derive simple and exact expressions for the first and second moments of the number of recorded events under various models. From our mean expression for a SPECT deadtime model, we derive a simple estimator for the actual intensity of the underlying Poisson process; simulations show that our estimator is unbiased even for extremely high count rates. From this analysis, we study the suitability of the Poisson statistical model assumed in most statistical image reconstruction algorithms. For systems containing `modules' with several detector elements, where each element can cause deadtime losses for the entire module, such as block PET detectors or Anger cameras, the Poisson statistical model appears to be adequate even in the presence of deadtime losses.

  3. Monitoring cellular mechanosensing using time-correlated single photon counting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabouillot, Tristan; Gullapalli, Ramachandra; Butler, Peter J.

    2006-10-01

    Endothelial cells (ECs) convert mechanical stimuli into chemical signaling pathways to regulate their functions and properties. It is hypothesized that perturbation of cellular structures by force is accompanied by changes in molecular dynamics. In order to address these fundamental issues in mechanosensation and transduction, we have developed a hybrid multimodal microscopy - time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) spectroscopy system intended to determine time- and position dependent mechanically-induced changes in the dynamics of molecules in live cells as determined from fluorescence lifetimes and autocorrelation analysis (fluorescence correlation spectroscopy). Colocalization of cell-structures and mechanically-induced changes in molecular dynamics can be done in post-processing by comparing TCSPC data with 3-D models generated from total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF), differential interference contrast (DIC), epifluorescence, and deconvolution. We present control experiments in which the precise location of the apical cell membrane with respect to a confocal probe is assessed using information obtainable only from TCSPC. Such positional accuracy of TCSPC measurements is essential to understanding the role of the membrane in mechanotransduction. We predict that TCSPC will become a useful method to obtain high temporal and spatial resolution information on localized mechanical phenomena in living endothelial cells. Such insight into mechanotransduction phenomenon may uncover the origins of mechanically-related diseases such as atherosclerosis.

  4. ON THE USE OF SHOT NOISE FOR PHOTON COUNTING

    SciTech Connect

    Zmuidzinas, Jonas

    2015-11-01

    Lieu et al. have recently claimed that it is possible to substantially improve the sensitivity of radio-astronomical observations. In essence, their proposal is to make use of the intensity of the photon shot noise as a measure of the photon arrival rate. Lieu et al. provide a detailed quantum-mechanical calculation of a proposed measurement scheme that uses two detectors and conclude that this scheme avoids the sensitivity degradation that is associated with photon bunching. If correct, this result could have a profound impact on radio astronomy. Here I present a detailed analysis of the sensitivity attainable using shot-noise measurement schemes that use either one or two detectors, and demonstrate that neither scheme can avoid the photon bunching penalty. I perform both semiclassical and fully quantum calculations of the sensitivity, obtaining consistent results, and provide a formal proof of the equivalence of these two approaches. These direct calculations are furthermore shown to be consistent with an indirect argument based on a correlation method that establishes an independent limit to the sensitivity of shot-noise measurement schemes. Furthermore, these calculations are directly applicable to the regime of interest identified by Lieu et al. Collectively, these results conclusively demonstrate that the photon-bunching sensitivity penalty applies to shot-noise measurement schemes just as it does to ordinary photon counting, in contradiction to the fundamental claim made by Lieu et al. The source of this contradiction is traced to a logical fallacy in their argument.

  5. Providing reference standards and metrology for the few photon-photon counting community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaumont, Andrew R.; Cheung, Jessica Y.; Chunnilall, Christopher J.; Ireland, Jane; White, Malcolm G.

    2009-10-01

    The main drivers for developing few-photon metrological techniques are the rapidly progressing field of quantum information processing, which requires the development of high-efficiency photon-counting detectors, and the wider use of photon-counting technology in biology, medical physics and nuclear physics. This paper will focus on the provision of standards for the few photon community and the development of techniques for the characterisation of photon-counting detectors. At the high-power end, microwatts, we are developing a low-power absolute radiometer as a primary standard that will be used to provide traceability over a much broader spectral range. At the few photon-photon-counting level we are developing a conventional calibration technique, which is traceable to the primary standard through a reference trap detector. This method can be used in both analogue and photon-counting modes and provides a convenient route for providing customer calibration at few-photon levels across the optical spectrum. At the photon-counting/single-photon level we are developing a technique based on correlated photons. These are produced via parametric downconversion and can be used to measure directly the detection efficiency of photon-counting detectors. A cross-validation of the correlated photon and conventional technique is reported. Finally we discuss this work in the context of an EU project, that is aimed at establishing the route towards the re-definition of the candela, the SI unit for optical radiation.

  6. Linear operating region in the ozone dial photon counting system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrawis, Madeleine

    1995-01-01

    Ozone is a relatively unstable molecule found in Earth's atmosphere. An ozone molecule is made up of three atoms of oxygen. Depending on where ozone resides, it can protect or harm life on Earth. High in the atmosphere, about 15 miles up, ozone acts as a shield to protect Earth's surface from the sun's harmful ultraviolet radiation. Without this shield, we would be more susceptible to skin cancer, cataracts, and impaired immune systems. Closer to Earth, in the air we breathe, ozone is a harmful pollutant that causes damage to lung tissue and plants. Since the early 1980's, airborne lidar systems have been used for making measurements of ozone. The differential absorption lidar (DIAL) technique is used in the remote measurement of O3. This system allows the O3 to be measured as function of the range in the atmosphere. Two frequency-doubled Nd:YAG lasers are used to pump tunable dye lasers. The lasers are operating at 289 nm for the DIAL on-line wavelength of O3, and the other one is operated at 300 nm for the off-line wavelength. The DIAL wavelengths are produced in sequential laser pulses with a time separation of 300 micro s. The backscattered laser energy is collected by telescopes and measured using photon counting systems. The photon counting system measures the light signal by making use of the photon nature of light. The output pulse from the Photo-Multiplier Tube (PE), caused by a photon striking the PMT photo-cathode, is amplified and passed to a pulse height discriminator. The peak value of the pulse is compared to a reference voltage (discrimination level). If the pulse amplitude exceeds the discrimination level, the discriminator generates a standard pulse which is counted by the digital counter. Non-linearity in the system is caused by the overlapping of pulses and the finite response time of the electronics. At low count rates one expects the system to register one event for each output pulse from the PMT corresponding to a photon incident upon the

  7. Underwater depth imaging using time-correlated single photon counting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maccarone, Aurora; McCarthy, Aongus; Ren, Ximing; Warburton, Ryan E.; Wallace, Andy M.; Moffat, James; Petillot, Yvan; Buller, Gerald S.

    2015-05-01

    We investigate the potential of a depth imaging system for underwater environments. This system is based on the timeof- flight approach and the time correlated single-photon counting (TCSPC) technique. We report laboratory-based measurements and explore the potential of achieving sub-centimeter xyz resolution at 10's meters stand-off distances. Initial laboratory-based experiments demonstrate depth imaging performed over distances of up to 1.8 meters and under a variety of scattering conditions. The system comprised a monostatic transceiver unit, a fiber-coupled supercontinuum laser with a wavelength tunable acousto-optic filter, and a fiber-coupled individual silicon single-photon avalanche diode (SPAD). The scanning in xy was performed using a pair of galvonometer mirrors directing both illumination and scattered returns via a coaxial optical configuration. Target objects were placed in a 110 liter capacity tank and depth images were acquired through approximately 1.7 meters of water containing different concentrations of scattering agent. Depth images were acquired in clear and highly scattering water using per-pixel acquisition times in the range 0.5-100 ms at average optical powers in the range 0.8 nW to 120 μW. Based on the laboratory measurements, estimations of potential performance, including maximum range possible, were performed with a model based on the LIDAR equation. These predictions will be presented for different levels of scattering agent concentration, optical powers, wavelengths and comparisons made with naturally occurring environments. The experimental and theoretical results indicate that the TCSPC technique has potential for highresolution underwater depth profile measurements.

  8. Performance of the EIGER single photon counting detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinti, G.; Bergamaschi, A.; Cartier, S.; Dinapoli, R.; Greiffenberg, D.; Johnson, I.; Jungmann-Smith, J. H.; Mezza, D.; Mozzanica, A.; Schmitt, B.; Shi, X.

    2015-03-01

    EIGER is a single photon counting hybrid pixel detector being developed at Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), Switzerland, for applications at synchrotron light sources in an energy range from a few to 25 keV. EIGER is characterized by a small pixel size (75 × 75 μm2), a frame rate up to 22 kHz and a small dead time between frames (4 μs). An EIGER module is a hybrid detector composed of a ≈ 8 × 4 cm2 monolithic silicon sensor bump bonded to 4 × 2 readout chips, for a total of 500 kpixels. Each pixel has a configurable depth (up to 12 bits) counter and records the number of photons impinging. Custom designed module electronics reads out the bits in the pixel counter and processes the data in the module before transferring them to a PC. A large dynamic range (32 bits) for the pixel counter can be obtained through on-board image summation. Rate corrections can be applied on-board to compensate for inefficiencies when the pixel counting rates approach pile-up levels around a million counts per second. The EIGER modules are the building blocks of large area detectors: a 1.5 and a 9 Mpixel systems are under development for the cSAXS beamline at the Swiss Light Source (SLS) at PSI. The very high frame rate capabilities are equally fast for multi-module systems due to the fully parallel data processing.The module calibration will be discussed, with emphasis on the choice of the optimal operation settings as a function of photon energy. The performance regarding threshold dispersion and minimum achievable threshold will be presented. In addition, the progress towards the production of larger multi-module systems will be discussed.

  9. New techniques for imaging photon-counting and particle detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapington, Jonathan Stephen

    continue to excel where characteristics such as true photon-counting ability, high spatial resolution, format flexibility, and high temporal resolution are required.

  10. Reduction of CMOS Image Sensor Read Noise to Enable Photon Counting

    PubMed Central

    Guidash, Michael; Ma, Jiaju; Vogelsang, Thomas; Endsley, Jay

    2016-01-01

    Recent activity in photon counting CMOS image sensors (CIS) has been directed to reduction of read noise. Many approaches and methods have been reported. This work is focused on providing sub 1 e− read noise by design and operation of the binary and small signal readout of photon counting CIS. Compensation of transfer gate feed-through was used to provide substantially reduced CDS time and source follower (SF) bandwidth. SF read noise was reduced by a factor of 3 with this method. This method can be applied broadly to CIS devices to reduce the read noise for small signals to enable use as a photon counting sensor. PMID:27070625

  11. Fast imaging readout and electronics—a novel high-speed imaging system for micro-channel plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapington, J. S.; Rees, K.

    2002-01-01

    The band-width of charge division readout anodes used with micro-channel plates (MCP) is usually limited by the speed of the acquisition electronics. We present a novel charge division anode that does not require analogue to digital conversion. The Fast Imaging Readout and Electronics is a new concept in high-speed imaging using an MCP detector. The imaging system described comprises an MCP intensifier coupled to a charge division image readout using high-speed, multichannel electronics. It has a projected spatial resolution of up to 128×128 pixels, though the image format is inherently flexible, and the potential for rates up to 100 million events per second with nanosecond timing resolution. The readout pattern has a planar electrode structure and the collected charge from each event is shared amongst all electrodes, grouped in pairs. The unique design of the readout obviates the need for charge measurement, usually the dominant process determining the event-processing deadtime. Instead, high-speed signal comparators, each of which act on the signals from an electrode pair, are used to define a binary code from which the position co-ordinate is directly mapped. We describe a proof of the concept of prototype anode and associated electronics using a novel application of very high-speed digital circuitry. We present preliminary results showing signal waveforms measured using a one-dimensional 16-pixel anode pattern.

  12. Soft X-ray and extreme utraviolet quantum detection efficiency of potassium chloride photocathode layers on microchannel plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegmund, Oswald H. W.; Everman, Elaine; Hull, Jeff; Vallerga, John V.; Lampton, Michael

    1988-01-01

    The quantum detection efficiency (QDE) of KCl photocathodes in the 44-1460 A range was investigated. An opaque layer of KCl, about 15,000-A-thick, was evaporated and applied the surface of a microchannel plate (MCP), and the contribution of the photocathode material in the channels (and on the interchannel web) to the QDE was measured using a Z stack MCP detector. It is shown that KCl is a relatively stable photocathode material, with the QDE equal to 30-40 percent in the EUV. At wavelengths above 200 A, the QDE is slightly better than the QDE of CsI, as reported by Siegmund et al. (1986). While the shape of the QDE curve as a function of wavelength is similar to those reported for CsI and KBr, KCl was found to lack the high QDE peak found in the curves of CsI and KBr at about 100 A. A simple QDE model is described, the predictions of which were found to agree with the measurements on the KCl photocathode.

  13. Position information by signal analysis in real time from resistive anode microchannel plate detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, K.; Benmaimon, R.; Prabhakaran, A.; Rappaport, M. L.; Heber, O.; Schwalm, D.; Zajfman, D.

    2016-07-01

    Resistive anode multichannel plate detectors are extensively used for imaging photons, electrons and ions. We present a method to acquire position information from such detector systems by considering simple parameters of the signals produced from the resistive anode encoder. Our technique is easy to implement and computes position in real time during experiments. Position information can be obtained using our method without the need for dedicated position analyser units.

  14. Gluing Lidar Signals Detected in Analog-to-Digital and Photon Counting Modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Chang-Zhong; Liu, Bing-Yi; Liu, Jin-Tao; Wu, Song-Hua

    2016-06-01

    Lidar is one of the most effective tools for atmospheric remote sensing. For a ground-based lidar system, the backscattered light usually has large dynamic range. Photon-counting mode has the capability to measure weak signal from high altitude, while Analog-to-Digital mode with better linearity is good at measuring strong signal at low altitude. In some lidar systems, atmospheric return signal is measured in both Analog-to-Digital and Photon Counting modes and combined into an entire profile by using a gluing algorithm. A method for gluing atmospheric return signal is developed and tested. For the Photon Counting signal, the saturation characteristics are analyzed to calculate the coefficients for correction. Then the Analog-to-Digital and Photon Counting signals are glued by a weighted average process. Results show the glued signal is reliable at both low and high altitudes.

  15. Droplet-based magnetic bead immunoassay using microchannel-connected multiwell plates (μCHAMPs) for the detection of amyloid beta oligomers.

    PubMed

    Park, Min Cheol; Kim, Moojong; Lim, Gun Taek; Kang, Sung Min; An, Seong Soo A; Kim, Tae Song; Kang, Ji Yoon

    2016-06-21

    Multiwell plates are regularly used in analytical research and clinical diagnosis but often require laborious washing steps and large sample or reagent volumes (typically, 100 μL per well). To overcome such drawbacks in the conventional multiwell plate, we present a novel microchannel-connected multiwell plate (μCHAMP) that can be used for automated disease biomarker detection in a small sample volume by performing droplet-based magnetic bead immunoassay inside the plate. In this μCHAMP-based immunoassay platform, small volumes (30-50 μL) of aqueous-phase working droplets are stably confined within each well by the simple microchannel structure (200-300 μm in height and 0.5-1 mm in width), and magnetic beads are exclusively transported into an adjacent droplet through the oil-filled microchannels assisted by a magnet array aligned beneath and controlled by a XY-motorized stage. Using this μCHAMP-based platform, we were able to perform parallel detection of synthetic amyloid beta (Aβ) oligomers as a model analyte for the early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). This platform easily simplified the laborious and consumptive immunoassay procedure by achieving automated parallel immunoassay (32 assays per operation in 3-well connected 96-well plate) within 1 hour and at low sample consumption (less than 10 μL per assay) with no cumbersome manual washing step. Moreover, it could detect synthetic Aβ oligomers even below 10 pg mL(-1) concentration with a calculated detection limit of ∼3 pg mL(-1). Therefore, the μCHAMP and droplet-based magnetic bead immunoassay, with the combination of XY-motorized magnet array, would be a useful platform in the diagnosis of human disease, including AD, which requires low consumption of the patient's body fluid sample and automation of the entire immunoassay procedure for high processing capacity. PMID:27185215

  16. Evaluation of Flat Microchannel Plate Photomultipliers for Use in a Portable Air Fluorescence Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benzvi, S.; Martin, J.

    2003-07-01

    Future applications of the air fluorescence technique will require robust, portable detectors, versatile enough to be deployed in remote areas with little infrastructure. One such experiment is the Gamma Ray and Neutron Decay Scan of the Galaxy (GRaNDScan), which proposes to survey the EeV sky by observation of γ and cosmic ray air showers in the southern hemisphere. To view a 30° field at or exceeding a resolution of 1° , GRaNDScan will employ a lensless Schmidt optical system, with the light-sensitive element in each detector consisting of a spherical surface of tiled photomultipliers. Currently, the BURLE 85001 micro channel plate photomultiplier (MCP PMT), a low profile device appropriate for tiling, is the primary candidate for these cameras. In this paper, we discuss the preliminary design of the GRaNDScan optics, the basic characteristics of the 85001 photomultiplier, and the suitability of this device for use in a portable air fluorescence detector.

  17. Electronic Microchannel Plate Particle Detector Design for a CubeSat Time-of-Flight Reflectron Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyle, M. L.; Davidson, R.; Swenson, C.; Syrstad, E. A.

    2015-12-01

    Variations of gas density and composition in Earth's thermosphere and ionosphere are key indicators of interactions between different layers of Earth's atmosphere. The nature of interactions between neutral and ion species in the upper atmosphere is an active area of study in Heliophysics and there is much to learn about the dynamic relationship between the ionosphere and neutral thermosphere. Mass Spectrometers are among an array of instruments used to explore Earth's upper atmosphere and other space environments. Normally, these instruments are substantial in size and deployed on larger satellites. Data from these larger instruments generally provides information from a specific point in time at a single location. Studies of atmospheric density and composition with multiple locations for each time point could be performed by CubeSat swarms if proper instrumentation were available to fit CubeSat payload restrictions. The proposed miniaturized time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometer (MS) will have a mass resolution and range sufficient for measuring the composition of Earth's thermosphere and ionosphere while operating within the power and space constraints of a CubeSat. The capabilities of this instrument would potentially dramatically reduce the cost of future missions while simultaneously enhancing the science return. The design employs miniaturization of TOF-MS technology, including resolution refinement techniques used for larger instruments and standard concepts for TOF-MS components such as acceleration grids, a Bradbury-Nielsen wire gate, a gridless ion mirror, and microchannel plate detector (MCP). The quality of particle detection is known to have a significant impact on the instrument performance. A signal collector for an MCP detector is being designed to maximize the detection performance and enable the transmission of density and composition data back to Earth.

  18. A performance study of the micro-channel plate photomultiplier tube (MCP-PMT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixon, Kahlil; Chiu, Mickey

    2013-10-01

    PHENIX, the Pioneering High Energy Nuclear Interaction Experiment at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), is developing particle detectors of exceptional time resolution. These world-class detectors will serve as upgrade options for future modifications to the Phenix detector, a part of BNL's Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC). This summer, we worked to optimize the timing resolution of the prototypes to ten picoseconds. The completed detectors will supply researchers with valuable data in the runs following installation, data that is currently in kinematically inaccessible regions. We setup the detectors in a cosmic ray test. The prototype detector I worked with is a Photonics 85012xp micro-channel-plate photomultiplier tube (MCP-PMT). Our testing setup makes use of two scintillator paddles, to trigger on the muons, and two MCP-PMT prototypes, to determine the time resolution. Currently, we are in the process of carefully analyzing the data acquired during experimentation. It will take just a little more time to study the correlations in detections between the top and bottom detectors; however, we are confident that this will be excellent option for serious consideration for installation in the Phenix detector. This project was supported in part by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Workforce Development for Teachers and Scientists (WDTS) under the Visiting Faculty Program (VFP).

  19. HgCdTe APD-based linear-mode photon counting components and ladar receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jack, Michael; Wehner, Justin; Edwards, John; Chapman, George; Hall, Donald N. B.; Jacobson, Shane M.

    2011-05-01

    Linear mode photon counting (LMPC) provides significant advantages in comparison with Geiger Mode (GM) Photon Counting including absence of after-pulsing, nanosecond pulse to pulse temporal resolution and robust operation in the present of high density obscurants or variable reflectivity objects. For this reason Raytheon has developed and previously reported on unique linear mode photon counting components and modules based on combining advanced APDs and advanced high gain circuits. By using HgCdTe APDs we enable Poisson number preserving photon counting. A metric of photon counting technology is dark count rate and detection probability. In this paper we report on a performance breakthrough resulting from improvement in design, process and readout operation enabling >10x reduction in dark counts rate to ~10,000 cps and >104x reduction in surface dark current enabling long 10 ms integration times. Our analysis of key dark current contributors suggest that substantial further reduction in DCR to ~ 1/sec or less can be achieved by optimizing wavelength, operating voltage and temperature.

  20. Low-distortion resistive anodes for two-dimensional position-sensitive MCP systems. [Microchannel Plates for ion, electron and photon image sensing and conversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lampton, M.; Carlson, C. W.

    1979-01-01

    Microchannel plates (MCPs) are frequently used with resistive anodes to detect charged particles or photons and yield analog signals from which event positions can be decoded. The paper discusses a four-corner concave circular arc terminated resistive anode that permits theoretically distortionless encoding of Cartesian event positions into pulse charge ratios. The theory of the circular arc terminated anode is discussed along with anode design and performance. Electron beam images obtained by using such an anode are presented to confirm the usefulness of the approach.

  1. Reconfigurable Computing As an Enabling Technology for Single-Photon-Counting Laser Altimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, Wesley; Hicks, Edward; Pinchinat, Maxime; Dabney, Philip; McGarry, Jan; Murray, Paul

    2003-01-01

    Single-photon-counting laser altimetry is a new measurement technique offering significant advantages in vertical resolution, reducing instrument size, mass, and power, and reducing laser complexity as compared to analog or threshold detection laser altimetry techniques. However, these improvements come at the cost of a dramatically increased requirement for onboard real-time data processing. Reconfigurable computing has been shown to offer considerable performance advantages in performing this processing. These advantages have been demonstrated on the Multi-KiloHertz Micro-Laser Altimeter (MMLA), an aircraft based single-photon-counting laser altimeter developed by NASA Goddard Space Flight Center with several potential spaceflight applications. This paper describes how reconfigurable computing technology was employed to perform MMLA data processing in real-time under realistic operating constraints, along with the results observed. This paper also expands on these prior results to identify concepts for using reconfigurable computing to enable spaceflight single-photon-counting laser altimeter instruments.

  2. Single Photon Counting UV Solar-Blind Detectors Using Silicon and III-Nitride Materials.

    PubMed

    Nikzad, Shouleh; Hoenk, Michael; Jewell, April D; Hennessy, John J; Carver, Alexander G; Jones, Todd J; Goodsall, Timothy M; Hamden, Erika T; Suvarna, Puneet; Bulmer, J; Shahedipour-Sandvik, F; Charbon, Edoardo; Padmanabhan, Preethi; Hancock, Bruce; Bell, L Douglas

    2016-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) studies in astronomy, cosmology, planetary studies, biological and medical applications often require precision detection of faint objects and in many cases require photon-counting detection. We present an overview of two approaches for achieving photon counting in the UV. The first approach involves UV enhancement of photon-counting silicon detectors, including electron multiplying charge-coupled devices and avalanche photodiodes. The approach used here employs molecular beam epitaxy for delta doping and superlattice doping for surface passivation and high UV quantum efficiency. Additional UV enhancements include antireflection (AR) and solar-blind UV bandpass coatings prepared by atomic layer deposition. Quantum efficiency (QE) measurements show QE > 50% in the 100-300 nm range for detectors with simple AR coatings, and QE ≅ 80% at ~206 nm has been shown when more complex AR coatings are used. The second approach is based on avalanche photodiodes in III-nitride materials with high QE and intrinsic solar blindness. PMID:27338399

  3. Single Photon Counting UV Solar-Blind Detectors Using Silicon and III-Nitride Materials

    PubMed Central

    Nikzad, Shouleh; Hoenk, Michael; Jewell, April D.; Hennessy, John J.; Carver, Alexander G.; Jones, Todd J.; Goodsall, Timothy M.; Hamden, Erika T.; Suvarna, Puneet; Bulmer, J.; Shahedipour-Sandvik, F.; Charbon, Edoardo; Padmanabhan, Preethi; Hancock, Bruce; Bell, L. Douglas

    2016-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) studies in astronomy, cosmology, planetary studies, biological and medical applications often require precision detection of faint objects and in many cases require photon-counting detection. We present an overview of two approaches for achieving photon counting in the UV. The first approach involves UV enhancement of photon-counting silicon detectors, including electron multiplying charge-coupled devices and avalanche photodiodes. The approach used here employs molecular beam epitaxy for delta doping and superlattice doping for surface passivation and high UV quantum efficiency. Additional UV enhancements include antireflection (AR) and solar-blind UV bandpass coatings prepared by atomic layer deposition. Quantum efficiency (QE) measurements show QE > 50% in the 100–300 nm range for detectors with simple AR coatings, and QE ≅ 80% at ~206 nm has been shown when more complex AR coatings are used. The second approach is based on avalanche photodiodes in III-nitride materials with high QE and intrinsic solar blindness. PMID:27338399

  4. Single Photon Counting UV Solar-Blind Detectors Using Silicon and III-Nitride Materials.

    PubMed

    Nikzad, Shouleh; Hoenk, Michael; Jewell, April D; Hennessy, John J; Carver, Alexander G; Jones, Todd J; Goodsall, Timothy M; Hamden, Erika T; Suvarna, Puneet; Bulmer, J; Shahedipour-Sandvik, F; Charbon, Edoardo; Padmanabhan, Preethi; Hancock, Bruce; Bell, L Douglas

    2016-06-21

    Ultraviolet (UV) studies in astronomy, cosmology, planetary studies, biological and medical applications often require precision detection of faint objects and in many cases require photon-counting detection. We present an overview of two approaches for achieving photon counting in the UV. The first approach involves UV enhancement of photon-counting silicon detectors, including electron multiplying charge-coupled devices and avalanche photodiodes. The approach used here employs molecular beam epitaxy for delta doping and superlattice doping for surface passivation and high UV quantum efficiency. Additional UV enhancements include antireflection (AR) and solar-blind UV bandpass coatings prepared by atomic layer deposition. Quantum efficiency (QE) measurements show QE > 50% in the 100-300 nm range for detectors with simple AR coatings, and QE ≅ 80% at ~206 nm has been shown when more complex AR coatings are used. The second approach is based on avalanche photodiodes in III-nitride materials with high QE and intrinsic solar blindness.

  5. Spectroscopic micro-tomography of metallic-organic composites by means of photon-counting detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pichotka, M.; Jakubek, J.; Vavrik, D.

    2015-12-01

    The presumed capabilities of photon counting detectors have aroused major expectations in several fields of research. In the field of nuclear imaging ample benefits over standard detectors are to be expected from photon counting devices. First of all a very high contrast, as has by now been verified in numerous experiments. The spectroscopic capabilities of photon counting detectors further allow material decomposition in computed tomography and therefore inherently adequate beam hardening correction. For these reasons measurement setups featuring standard X-ray tubes combined with photon counting detectors constitute a possible replacement of the much more cost intensive tomographic setups at synchrotron light-sources. The actual application of photon counting detectors in radiographic setups in recent years has been impeded by a number of practical issues, above all by restrictions in the detectors size. Currently two tomographic setups in Czech Republic feature photon counting large-area detectors (LAD) fabricated in Prague. The employed large area hybrid pixel-detector assemblies [1] consisting of 10×10/10×5 Timepix devices have a surface area of 143×143 mm2 / 143×71,5 mm2 respectively, suitable for micro-tomographic applications. In the near future LAD devices featuring the Medipix3 readout chip as well as heavy sensors (CdTe, GaAs) will become available. Data analysis is obtained by a number of in house software tools including iterative multi-energy volume reconstruction.In this paper tomographic analysis of of metallic-organic composites is employed to illustrate the capabilities of our technology. Other than successful material decomposition by spectroscopic tomography we present a method to suppress metal artefacts under certain conditions.

  6. Energy response calibration of photon-counting detectors using X-ray fluorescence: a feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Cho, H-M; Ding, H; Ziemer, BP; Molloi, S

    2014-01-01

    Accurate energy calibration is critical for the application of energy-resolved photon-counting detectors in spectral imaging. The aim of this study is to investigate the feasibility of energy response calibration and characterization of a photon-counting detector using X-ray fluorescence. A comprehensive Monte Carlo simulation study was performed using Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission (GATE) to investigate the optimal technique for X-ray fluorescence calibration. Simulations were conducted using a 100 kVp tungsten-anode spectra with 2.7 mm Al filter for a single pixel cadmium telluride (CdTe) detector with 3 × 3 mm2 in detection area. The angular dependence of X-ray fluorescence and scatter background was investigated by varying the detection angle from 20° to 170° with respect to the beam direction. The effects of the detector material, shape, and size on the recorded X-ray fluorescence were investigated. The fluorescent material size effect was considered with and without the container for the fluorescent material. In order to provide validation for the simulation result, the angular dependence of X-ray fluorescence from five fluorescent materials was experimentally measured using a spectrometer. Finally, eleven of the fluorescent materials were used for energy calibration of a CZT-based photon-counting detector. The optimal detection angle was determined to be approximately at 120° with respect to the beam direction, which showed the highest fluorescence to scatter ratio (FSR) with a weak dependence on the fluorescent material size. The feasibility of X-ray fluorescence for energy calibration of photon-counting detectors in the diagnostic X-ray energy range was verified by successfully calibrating the energy response of a CZT-based photon-counting detector. The results of this study can be used as a guideline to implement the X-ray fluorescence calibration method for photon-counting detectors in a typical imaging laboratory. PMID:25369288

  7. Energy response calibration of photon-counting detectors using x-ray fluorescence: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Cho, H-M; Ding, H; Ziemer, B P; Molloi, S

    2014-12-01

    Accurate energy calibration is critical for the application of energy-resolved photon-counting detectors in spectral imaging. The aim of this study is to investigate the feasibility of energy response calibration and characterization of a photon-counting detector using x-ray fluorescence. A comprehensive Monte Carlo simulation study was performed using Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission (GATE) to investigate the optimal technique for x-ray fluorescence calibration. Simulations were conducted using a 100 kVp tungsten-anode spectra with 2.7 mm Al filter for a single pixel cadmium telluride (CdTe) detector with 3 × 3 mm(2) in detection area. The angular dependence of x-ray fluorescence and scatter background was investigated by varying the detection angle from 20° to 170° with respect to the beam direction. The effects of the detector material, shape, and size on the recorded x-ray fluorescence were investigated. The fluorescent material size effect was considered with and without the container for the fluorescent material. In order to provide validation for the simulation result, the angular dependence of x-ray fluorescence from five fluorescent materials was experimentally measured using a spectrometer. Finally, eleven of the fluorescent materials were used for energy calibration of a CZT-based photon-counting detector. The optimal detection angle was determined to be approximately at 120° with respect to the beam direction, which showed the highest fluorescence to scatter ratio (FSR) with a weak dependence on the fluorescent material size. The feasibility of x-ray fluorescence for energy calibration of photon-counting detectors in the diagnostic x-ray energy range was verified by successfully calibrating the energy response of a CZT-based photon-counting detector. The results of this study can be used as a guideline to implement the x-ray fluorescence calibration method for photon-counting detectors in a typical imaging laboratory.

  8. Single Photon Counting Performance and Noise Analysis of CMOS SPAD-Based Image Sensors.

    PubMed

    Dutton, Neale A W; Gyongy, Istvan; Parmesan, Luca; Henderson, Robert K

    2016-01-01

    SPAD-based solid state CMOS image sensors utilising analogue integrators have attained deep sub-electron read noise (DSERN) permitting single photon counting (SPC) imaging. A new method is proposed to determine the read noise in DSERN image sensors by evaluating the peak separation and width (PSW) of single photon peaks in a photon counting histogram (PCH). The technique is used to identify and analyse cumulative noise in analogue integrating SPC SPAD-based pixels. The DSERN of our SPAD image sensor is exploited to confirm recent multi-photon threshold quanta image sensor (QIS) theory. Finally, various single and multiple photon spatio-temporal oversampling techniques are reviewed. PMID:27447643

  9. Single Photon Counting Performance and Noise Analysis of CMOS SPAD-Based Image Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Dutton, Neale A. W.; Gyongy, Istvan; Parmesan, Luca; Henderson, Robert K.

    2016-01-01

    SPAD-based solid state CMOS image sensors utilising analogue integrators have attained deep sub-electron read noise (DSERN) permitting single photon counting (SPC) imaging. A new method is proposed to determine the read noise in DSERN image sensors by evaluating the peak separation and width (PSW) of single photon peaks in a photon counting histogram (PCH). The technique is used to identify and analyse cumulative noise in analogue integrating SPC SPAD-based pixels. The DSERN of our SPAD image sensor is exploited to confirm recent multi-photon threshold quanta image sensor (QIS) theory. Finally, various single and multiple photon spatio-temporal oversampling techniques are reviewed. PMID:27447643

  10. Color image authentication scheme via multispectral photon-counting double random phase encoding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Inkyu

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, we present an overview of a color image authentication scheme via multispectral photon-counting (MPCI) double random phase encoding (DRPE). The MPCI makes image sparse distributed and DRPE lets image be stationary white noise which make intruder attacks difficult. In this method, the original RGB image is down-sampled into Bayer image and then be encrypted with DRPE. The encrypted image is photon-counted and transmitted on internet channel. For image authentication, the decrypted Bayer image is interpolated into RBC image with demosaicing algorithm. Experimental results show that the decrypted image is not visually recognized under low light level but can be verified with nonlinear correlation algorithm.

  11. Single-photon-counting detector for increased sensitivity in two-photon laser scanning microscopy.

    PubMed

    Benninger, Richard K P; Ashby, William J; Ring, Elisabeth A; Piston, David W

    2008-12-15

    We present the use and characterization of a photon-counting detector for increased sensitivity at low signal levels in fluorescence laser scanning microscopy (LSM). Conventional LSM photomultiplier tube detectors utilize analog current integration and thus suffer from excessive noise at low signal levels, introduced during current measurement. In this Letter we describe the implementation of a fast single-photon-counting (SPC) detector on a conventional two-photon laser scanning microscope and detail its use in imaging low fluorescence intensities. We show that for a low photon flux, the SPC detector is shot-noise limited and thus provides increased detection sensitivity compared with analog current integration. PMID:19079484

  12. Investigation of linear-mode photon-counting HgCdTe APDs for astronomical observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryan, Marta L.; Chapman, George; Hall, Donald N. B.; Jack, Michael D.; Jacobson, Shane M.; Wehner, Justin

    2012-07-01

    The unique linear avalanche properties of HgCdTe preserve the Poisson statistics of the incoming photons, opening up new opportunities for GHz bandwidth LADAR and space communications applications. Raytheon has developed and previously reported (1) unique linear mode photon counting arrays based on combining advanced HgCdTe linear mode APDs with their high gain SB415B readout. Their use of HgCdTe APDs preserves the Poisson statistics of the incoming photons, enabling (noiseless) photon counting. This technology is of great potential interest to infrared astronomy but requires extension of noiseless linear HgCdTe avalanching down to much lower bandwidths (100 to 0.001 Hz) with corresponding reductions in dark count rate. We have hybridized the SB415B readout to SWIR HgCdTe APDs optimized for low dark count rate and have characterized their photon counting properties at bandwidths down to 1 KHz. As bandwidth is reduced, the performance becomes limited by the intrinsic properties of the SB415B readout, particularly readout glow, stability and 1/f noise. We report the results of these measurements and the status of hybrid arrays utilizing a newly developed readout which draws on Raytheon’s astronomical readout heritage, specifically the Virgo charge integrating source follower, as a path to much lower dark count rate photon counting operation.

  13. Photon Counting Detectors for the 1.0 - 2.0 Micron Wavelength Range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krainak, Michael A.

    2004-01-01

    We describe results on the development of greater than 200 micron diameter, single-element photon-counting detectors for the 1-2 micron wavelength range. The technical goals include quantum efficiency in the range 10-70%; detector diameter greater than 200 microns; dark count rate below 100 kilo counts-per-second (cps), and maximum count rate above 10 Mcps.

  14. Photoionization of Trapped Carriers in Avalanche Photodiodes to Reduce Afterpulsing During Geiger-Mode Photon Counting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krainak, Michael A.

    2005-01-01

    We reduced the afterpulsing probability by a factor of five in a Geiger-mode photon-counting InGaAs avalanche photodiode by using sub-band-gap (lambda = 1.95 micron) laser diode illumination, which we believe photoionizes the trapped carriers.

  15. Near-infrared Single-photon-counting Detectors for Free-space Laser Receivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krainak, Michael A.; Sun, Xiaoli; Hasselbrack, William; Wu, Stewart; Waczynski, Augustyn; Miko, Laddawan

    2007-01-01

    We compare several photon-counting detector technologies for use as near-infrared timeresolved laser receivers in science instrument, communication and navigation systems. The key technologies are InGaAs(P) photocathode hybrid photomultiplier tubes and InGaAs(P) and HgCdTe avalanche photodiodes. We discuss recent experimental results and application.

  16. Range walk error correction using prior modeling in photon counting 3D imaging lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Weiji; Chen, Yunfei; Miao, Zhuang; Chen, Qian; Gu, Guohua; Dai, Huidong

    2013-09-01

    A real-time correction method for range walk error in photon counting 3D imaging Lidar is proposed in this paper. We establish the photon detection model and pulse output delay model for GmAPD, which indicates that range walk error in photon counting 3D imaging Lidar is mainly effected by the number of photons during laser echo pulse. A measurable variable - laser pulse response rate is defined as a substitute of the number of photons during laser echo pulse, and the expression of the range walk error with respect to the laser pulse response rate is obtained using priori calibration. By recording photon arrival time distribution, the measurement error of unknown targets is predicted using established range walk error function and the range walk error compensated image is got. Thus real-time correction of the measurement error in photon counting 3D imaging Lidar is implemented. The experimental results show that the range walks error caused by the difference in reflected energy of the target can be effectively avoided without increasing the complexity of photon counting 3D imaging Lidar system.

  17. High efficiency photon counting detectors for the FAUST Spacelab far ultraviolet astronomy payload

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegmund, O. H. W.; Lampton, M.; Bixler, J.; Vallerga, J.; Bowyer, S.

    1987-01-01

    The performances of sealed tube microchannel-plate position sensitive detectors having transmission CsI photocathodes or opaque CsI photocathodes are compared. These devices were developed for the FAUST Spacelab payload to accomplish imaging surveys in the band between 1300 A and 1800 A. It is demonstrated that photocathode quantum efficiencies in excess of 40 percent at 1216 A have been achieved with the transmission and the opaque CsI photocathodes. The effect of the photoelectron trajectory on the spatial resolution is assessed. Spatial resolution of less than 70 microns FWHM has been obtained and is maintained up to event rates of 50,000/sec. Background rates of 0.55 events sq cm per sec have been achieved and low distortion (less than 1 percent) imaging has been demonstrated.

  18. Hybrid slab-microchannel gel electrophoresis system

    DOEpatents

    Balch, Joseph W.; Carrano, Anthony V.; Davidson, James C.; Koo, Jackson C.

    1998-01-01

    A hybrid slab-microchannel gel electrophoresis system. The hybrid system permits the fabrication of isolated microchannels for biomolecule separations without imposing the constraint of a totally sealed system. The hybrid system is reusable and ultimately much simpler and less costly to manufacture than a closed channel plate system. The hybrid system incorporates a microslab portion of the separation medium above the microchannels, thus at least substantially reducing the possibility of non-uniform field distribution and breakdown due to uncontrollable leakage. A microslab of the sieving matrix is built into the system by using plastic spacer materials and is used to uniformly couple the top plate with the bottom microchannel plate.

  19. Investigation of energy weighting using an energy discriminating photon counting detector for breast CT

    SciTech Connect

    Kalluri, Kesava S.; Mahd, Mufeed; Glick, Stephen J.

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: Breast CT is an emerging imaging technique that can portray the breast in 3D and improve visualization of important diagnostic features. Early clinical studies have suggested that breast CT has sufficient spatial and contrast resolution for accurate detection of masses and microcalcifications in the breast, reducing structural overlap that is often a limiting factor in reading mammographic images. For a number of reasons, image quality in breast CT may be improved by use of an energy resolving photon counting detector. In this study, the authors investigate the improvements in image quality obtained when using energy weighting with an energy resolving photon counting detector as compared to that with a conventional energy integrating detector.Methods: Using computer simulation, realistic CT images of multiple breast phantoms were generated. The simulation modeled a prototype breast CT system using an amorphous silicon (a-Si), CsI based energy integrating detector with different x-ray spectra, and a hypothetical, ideal CZT based photon counting detector with capability of energy discrimination. Three biological signals of interest were modeled as spherical lesions and inserted into breast phantoms; hydroxyapatite (HA) to represent microcalcification, infiltrating ductal carcinoma (IDC), and iodine enhanced infiltrating ductal carcinoma (IIDC). Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of these three lesions was measured from the CT reconstructions. In addition, a psychophysical study was conducted to evaluate observer performance in detecting microcalcifications embedded into a realistic anthropomorphic breast phantom.Results: In the energy range tested, improvements in SNR with a photon counting detector using energy weighting was higher (than the energy integrating detector method) by 30%–63% and 4%–34%, for HA and IDC lesions and 12%–30% (with Al filtration) and 32%–38% (with Ce filtration) for the IIDC lesion, respectively. The average area under the receiver

  20. Investigation of energy weighting using an energy discriminating photon counting detector for breast CT

    PubMed Central

    Kalluri, Kesava S.; Mahd, Mufeed; Glick, Stephen J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Breast CT is an emerging imaging technique that can portray the breast in 3D and improve visualization of important diagnostic features. Early clinical studies have suggested that breast CT has sufficient spatial and contrast resolution for accurate detection of masses and microcalcifications in the breast, reducing structural overlap that is often a limiting factor in reading mammographic images. For a number of reasons, image quality in breast CT may be improved by use of an energy resolving photon counting detector. In this study, the authors investigate the improvements in image quality obtained when using energy weighting with an energy resolving photon counting detector as compared to that with a conventional energy integrating detector. Methods: Using computer simulation, realistic CT images of multiple breast phantoms were generated. The simulation modeled a prototype breast CT system using an amorphous silicon (a-Si), CsI based energy integrating detector with different x-ray spectra, and a hypothetical, ideal CZT based photon counting detector with capability of energy discrimination. Three biological signals of interest were modeled as spherical lesions and inserted into breast phantoms; hydroxyapatite (HA) to represent microcalcification, infiltrating ductal carcinoma (IDC), and iodine enhanced infiltrating ductal carcinoma (IIDC). Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of these three lesions was measured from the CT reconstructions. In addition, a psychophysical study was conducted to evaluate observer performance in detecting microcalcifications embedded into a realistic anthropomorphic breast phantom. Results: In the energy range tested, improvements in SNR with a photon counting detector using energy weighting was higher (than the energy integrating detector method) by 30%–63% and 4%–34%, for HA and IDC lesions and 12%–30% (with Al filtration) and 32%–38% (with Ce filtration) for the IIDC lesion, respectively. The average area under the

  1. Gamma-ray detection efficiency of the microchannel plate installed as an ion detector in the low energy particle instrument onboard the GEOTAIL satellite

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Y. T.; Yoshikawa, I.; Yoshioka, K.; Terasawa, T.; Saito, Y.; Mukai, T.

    2007-03-15

    A microchannel plate (MCP) assembly has been used as an ion detector in the low energy particle (LEP) instrument onboard the magnetospheric satellite GEOTAIL. Recently the MCP assembly has detected gamma rays emitted from an astronomical object and has been shown to provide unique information of gamma rays if they are intense enough. However, the detection efficiency for gamma rays was not measured before launch, and therefore we could not analyze the LEP data quantitatively. In this article, we report the gamma-ray detection efficiency of the MCP assembly. The measured efficiencies are 1.29%{+-}0.71% and 0.21%{+-}0.14% for normal incidence 60 and 662 keV gamma rays, respectively. The incident angle dependence is also presented. Our calibration is crucial to study high energy astrophysical phenomena by using the LEP.

  2. Gamma-ray detection efficiency of the microchannel plate installed as an ion detector in the low energy particle instrument onboard the GEOTAIL satellite.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Y T; Yoshikawa, I; Yoshioka, K; Terasawa, T; Saito, Y; Mukai, T

    2007-03-01

    A microchannel plate (MCP) assembly has been used as an ion detector in the low energy particle (LEP) instrument onboard the magnetospheric satellite GEOTAIL. Recently the MCP assembly has detected gamma rays emitted from an astronomical object and has been shown to provide unique information of gamma rays if they are intense enough. However, the detection efficiency for gamma rays was not measured before launch, and therefore we could not analyze the LEP data quantitatively. In this article, we report the gamma-ray detection efficiency of the MCP assembly. The measured efficiencies are 1.29%+/-0.71% and 0.21%+/-0.14% for normal incidence 60 and 662 keV gamma rays, respectively. The incident angle dependence is also presented. Our calibration is crucial to study high energy astrophysical phenomena by using the LEP.

  3. Simulations of Microchannel Plate Sensitivity to <20 keV X-rays as a Function of Energy and Incident Angle

    SciTech Connect

    Kruschwitz, Craig; Wu, M.; Rochau, G. A.

    2013-06-13

    We present results of Monte Carlo simulations of microchannel plate (MCP) response to x-rays in the 250 eV to 20 keV energy range as a function of both x-ray energy and impact angle. The model is based on the model presented in Rochau et al. (2006). However, while the Rochau et al. (2006) model was two-dimensional, and their results only went to 5 keV, our results have been expanded to 20 keV, and our model has been incorporated into a three-dimensional Monte Carlo MCP model that we have developed over the past several years (Kruschwitz et al. 2011). X-ray penetration through multiple MCP pore walls is increasingly important above 5 keV. The effect of x-ray penetration through multiple pores on MCP performance was studied and is presented.

  4. Development of two-channel prototype ITER vacuum ultraviolet spectrometer with back-illuminated charge-coupled device and microchannel plate detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Seon, C. R.; Choi, S. H.; Cheon, M. S.; Pak, S.; Lee, H. G.; Biel, W.; Barnsley, R.

    2010-10-15

    A vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) spectrometer of a five-channel spectral system is designed for ITER main plasma impurity measurement. To develop and verify the system design, a two-channel prototype system is fabricated with No. 3 (14.4-31.8 nm) and No. 4 (29.0-60.0 nm) among the five channels. The optical system consists of a collimating mirror to collect the light from source to slit, two holographic diffraction gratings with toroidal geometry, and two different electronic detectors. For the test of the prototype system, a hollow cathode lamp is used as a light source. To find the appropriate detector for ITER VUV system, two kinds of detectors of the back-illuminated charge-coupled device and the microchannel plate electron multiplier are tested, and their performance has been investigated.

  5. Development of two-channel prototype ITER vacuum ultraviolet spectrometer with back-illuminated charge-coupled device and microchannel plate detectors.

    PubMed

    Seon, C R; Choi, S H; Cheon, M S; Pak, S; Lee, H G; Biel, W; Barnsley, R

    2010-10-01

    A vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) spectrometer of a five-channel spectral system is designed for ITER main plasma impurity measurement. To develop and verify the system design, a two-channel prototype system is fabricated with No. 3 (14.4-31.8 nm) and No. 4 (29.0-60.0 nm) among the five channels. The optical system consists of a collimating mirror to collect the light from source to slit, two holographic diffraction gratings with toroidal geometry, and two different electronic detectors. For the test of the prototype system, a hollow cathode lamp is used as a light source. To find the appropriate detector for ITER VUV system, two kinds of detectors of the back-illuminated charge-coupled device and the microchannel plate electron multiplier are tested, and their performance has been investigated.

  6. Investigating possible improvements in image quality with energy-weighting photon-counting breast CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glick, Stephen J.; Kalluri, Kesava

    2011-03-01

    In an effort to improve the early stage detection and diagnosis of breast cancer, a number of research groups have been investigating the use of x-ray computerized tomography (CT) systems dedicated for use in imaging the breast. For a number of reasons, the performance of energy integrating detectors are sub-optimal for use in CT imaging of the breast. It is expected that the next generation of x-ray detectors for digital radiography and CT will have the capability of counting individually measured photons and recording their energy. In this paper, we used computer simulations to evaluate improvements in image quality that can be attained using energy weighting photon counting detectors for breast CT and a lower kVp settings. Results from this study suggest that improvements in SNR performance can be attained with photon counting detectors as compared to energy integrating detectors.

  7. MABEL photon-counting laser altimetry data in Alaska for ICESat-2 simulations and development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunt, K. M.; Markus, T.; Neumann, T.; Amundson, J. M.; Kavanaugh, J. L.; Cook, W. B.

    2014-12-01

    Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite-2 (ICESat-2) is scheduled to launch in 2017 and will carry the Advanced Topographic Laser Altimeter System (ATLAS), which is a photon-counting laser altimeter and represents a new approach to space-borne determination of surface elevation. Given the new technology of ATLAS, an airborne instrument, the Multiple Altimeter Beam Experimental Lidar (MABEL), has been deployed to both Greenland (April 2012) and Alaska (July 2014) to provide data needed for: 1) satellite algorithm development; 2) to simulate key elements of this photon-counting sampling strategy; and 3) to assess elements of this sampling strategy that may vary seasonally. Here, we compare seasonal aspects of the two datasets, with a focus on results from the latter campaign, where in situ observations in southeastern Alaska help to assess instrument performance in summer conditions and in the presence of glacier melt ponds.

  8. Photon Counting System for High-Sensitivity Detection of Bioluminescence at Optical Fiber End.

    PubMed

    Iinuma, Masataka; Kadoya, Yutaka; Kuroda, Akio

    2016-01-01

    The technique of photon counting is widely used for various fields and also applicable to a high-sensitivity detection of luminescence. Thanks to recent development of single photon detectors with avalanche photodiodes (APDs), the photon counting system with an optical fiber has become powerful for a detection of bioluminescence at an optical fiber end, because it allows us to fully use the merits of compactness, simple operation, highly quantum efficiency of the APD detectors. This optical fiber-based system also has a possibility of improving the sensitivity to a local detection of Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) by high-sensitivity detection of the bioluminescence. In this chapter, we are introducing a basic concept of the optical fiber-based system and explaining how to construct and use this system. PMID:27424915

  9. Photon Counting System for High-Sensitivity Detection of Bioluminescence at Optical Fiber End.

    PubMed

    Iinuma, Masataka; Kadoya, Yutaka; Kuroda, Akio

    2016-01-01

    The technique of photon counting is widely used for various fields and also applicable to a high-sensitivity detection of luminescence. Thanks to recent development of single photon detectors with avalanche photodiodes (APDs), the photon counting system with an optical fiber has become powerful for a detection of bioluminescence at an optical fiber end, because it allows us to fully use the merits of compactness, simple operation, highly quantum efficiency of the APD detectors. This optical fiber-based system also has a possibility of improving the sensitivity to a local detection of Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) by high-sensitivity detection of the bioluminescence. In this chapter, we are introducing a basic concept of the optical fiber-based system and explaining how to construct and use this system.

  10. Resonant-scanning dual-color STED microscopy with ultrafast photon counting: a concise guide

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yong; Wu, Xundong; Toro, Ligia; Stefani, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    STED (stimulated emission depletion) is a popular super-resolution fluorescence microscopy technique. In this paper, we present a concise guide to building a resonant-scanning STED microscope with ultrafast photon-counting acquisition. The STED microscope has two channels, using a pulsed laser and a continuous-wave (CW) laser as the depletion laser source, respectively. The CW STED channel preforms time-gated detection to enhance optical resolution in this channel. We use a resonant mirror to attain high scanning speed and ultrafast photon counting acquisition to scan a large field of view, which help reduce photobleaching. We discuss some practical issues in building a STED microscope, including creating a hollow depletion beam profile, manipulating polarization, and monitoring optical aberration. We also demonstrate a STED image enhancement method using stationary wavelet expansion and image analysis methods to register objects and to quantify colocalization in STED microscopy. PMID:26123183

  11. Slope characterization in combining analog and photon count data from atmospheric lidar measurements.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yunpeng; Yi, Fan; Kong, Wei; Yi, Yang

    2014-11-01

    A transient digitizer (Licel) connecting to a photomultiplier tube (PMT) can obtain lidar backscatter profiles in both photon count and analog signal. A lidar can detect higher atmospheric regions by combining (gluing) simultaneous analog and photon count data via the slope coefficient. In this work, the output of a PMT has been measured with a transient digitizer based on an intensity-stable light source. The slope value and dynamic range of the lidar profile have been characterized. The slope value is determined only by the gain of the PMT as it works in a linear range with a fixed pulse height discrimination threshold. The dynamic range of a glued lidar profile is settled by the slope value. The fitted slope has a more exact value when the selection criterion is given in terms of the independent variable for fitting. For practical lidar data, the fitted slope is more stable and reliable when the lower limit of the data range for fitting rises.

  12. Photon counting system based on intensified CMOS-APS: PC-IAPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonanno, Giovanni; Belluso, Massimiliano; Cali, Antonio; Timpanaro, Maria C.; Uslenghi, Michela C.; Fiorini, Mauro; Modica, Angelo

    2001-12-01

    A progress report on the work, started ten months ago, aimed to evaluate the use of a new type of position sensor (Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor Active Pixel Sensor or CMOS-APS) as readout system in MCP-based intensified photon counting systems, is presented in this paper. The main differences respect to the more classical Photon Counting Intensified CCDs (PC-ICCD), the advantages and the disadvantages of their use as image photon counters, the adopted solutions to acquire the images and compute the photon event center, are described. The adopted optics and the designed mechanical assembly are also shown. The selected CMOS-APS, heart of the system, is treated in detail, as well as the electronics designed to drive the detector, to compute the center of the luminous spot on the MCP phosphor screen, and to send and receive data from a host computer. Finally we present preliminary results and achieved performances.

  13. Material separation in x-ray CT with energy resolved photon-counting detectors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaolan; Meier, Dirk; Taguchi, Katsuyuki; Wagenaar, Douglas J.; Patt, Bradley E.; Frey, Eric C.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The objective of the study was to demonstrate that, in x-ray computed tomography (CT), more than two types of materials can be effectively separated with the use of an energy resolved photon-counting detector and classification methodology. Specifically, this applies to the case when contrast agents that contain K-absorption edges in the energy range of interest are present in the object. This separation is enabled via the use of recently developed energy resolved photon-counting detectors with multiple thresholds, which allow simultaneous measurements of the x-ray attenuation at multiple energies. Methods: To demonstrate this capability, we performed simulations and physical experiments using a six-threshold energy resolved photon-counting detector. We imaged mouse-sized cylindrical phantoms filled with several soft-tissue-like and bone-like materials and with iodine-based and gadolinium-based contrast agents. The linear attenuation coefficients were reconstructed for each material in each energy window and were visualized as scatter plots between pairs of energy windows. For comparison, a dual-kVp CT was also simulated using the same phantom materials. In this case, the linear attenuation coefficients at the lower kVp were plotted against those at the higher kVp. Results: In both the simulations and the physical experiments, the contrast agents were easily separable from other soft-tissue-like and bone-like materials, thanks to the availability of the attenuation coefficient measurements at more than two energies provided by the energy resolved photon-counting detector. In the simulations, the amount of separation was observed to be proportional to the concentration of the contrast agents; however, this was not observed in the physical experiments due to limitations of the real detector system. We used the angle between pairs of attenuation coefficient vectors in either the 5-D space (for non-contrast-agent materials using energy resolved photon-counting

  14. Optical phase estimation via the coherent state and displaced-photon counting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izumi, Shuro; Takeoka, Masahiro; Wakui, Kentaro; Fujiwara, Mikio; Ema, Kazuhiro; Sasaki, Masahide

    2016-09-01

    We consider the phase sensing via a weak optical coherent state at quantum limit precision. A detection scheme for the phase estimation is proposed, which is inspired by the suboptimal quantum measurement in coherent optical communication. We theoretically analyze a performance of our detection scheme, which we call the displaced-photon counting, for phase sensing in terms of the Fisher information and show that the displaced-photon counting outperforms the static homodyne and heterodyne detections in a wide range of the target phase. The proof-of-principle experiment is performed with linear optics and a superconducting nanowire single-photon detector. The result shows that our scheme overcomes the limit of the ideal homodyne measurement, even under practical imperfections.

  15. Extending single-photon optimized superconducting transition edge sensors beyond the single-photon counting regime.

    PubMed

    Gerrits, Thomas; Calkins, Brice; Tomlin, Nathan; Lita, Adriana E; Migdall, Alan; Mirin, Richard; Nam, Sae Woo

    2012-10-01

    Typically, transition edge sensors resolve photon number of up to 10 or 20 photons, depending on the wavelength and TES design. We extend that dynamic range up to 1000 photons, while maintaining sub-shot noise detection process uncertainty of the number of detected photons and beyond that show a monotonic response up to ≈ 6 · 10(6) photons in a single light pulse. This mode of operation, which heats the sensor far beyond its transition edge into the normal conductive regime, offers a technique for connecting single-photon-counting measurements to radiant-power measurements at picowatt levels. Connecting these two usually incompatible operating regimes in a single detector offers significant potential for directly tying photon counting measurements to conventional cryogenic radiometric standards. In addition, our measurements highlight the advantages of a photon-number state source over a coherent pulse source as a tool for characterizing such a detector.

  16. Time-Correlated Photon Counting (TCPC) technique based on a photon-number-resolving photodetector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Baicheng; Miao, Quanlong; Wang, Shenyuan; Hui, Debin; Zhao, Tianqi; Liang, Kun; Yang, Ru; Han, Dejun

    2016-05-01

    In this report, we present Time-Correlated Photon Counting (TCPC) technique and its applications in time-correlated Raman spectroscopy. The main difference between TCPC and existing Time-Correlated Single Photon Counting (TCSPC) is that the TCPC employs a photon-number-resolving photodetector (SiPM, silicon photomultiplier) and measures exact photon number rather than counting single photon by reducing pulse light intensity, thus high measurement speed and efficiency can be expected. A home-made Raman spectrometer has demonstrated an Instrument Response Function (IRF) ~100ps (FWHM) based on TCPC with a strip SiPM (1mm×0.05mm, containing 500 micro cells), fast and weak Raman signals was separated from slow and strong fluorescence background of bulk trinitrotoluene TNT sample. The original Raman spectrum of bulk TNT, measured by TCPC technique, is compared with the result obtained by a commercial Micro-Raman Spectrometer.

  17. Comparison of contrast enhancement methods using photon counting detector in spectral mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyemi; Park, Su-Jin; Jo, Byungdu; Kim, Dohyeon; Kim, Hee-Joung

    2016-03-01

    The photon counting detector with energy discrimination capabilities provides the spectral information and energy of each photon with single exposure. The energy-resolved photon counting detector makes it possible to improve the visualization of contrast agent by selecting the appropriate energy window. In this study, we simulated the photon counting spectral mammography system using a Monte Carlo method and compared three contrast enhancement methods (K-edge imaging, projection-based energy weighting imaging, and dual energy subtraction imaging). For the quantitative comparison, we used the homogeneous cylindrical breast phantom as a reference and the heterogeneous XCAT breast phantom. To evaluate the K-edge imaging methods, we obtained images by increasing the energy window width based on K-edge absorption energy of iodine. The iodine which has the K-edge discontinuity in the attenuation coefficient curve can be separated from the background. The projection-based energy weighting factor was defined as the difference in the transmissions between the contrast agent and the background. Each weighting factor as a function of photon energy was calculated and applied to the each energy bin. For the dual energy subtraction imaging, we acquired two images with below and above the iodine K-edge energy using single exposure. To suppress the breast tissue in high energy images, the weighting factor was applied as the ratio of the linear attenuation coefficients of the breast tissue at high and low energies. Our results demonstrated the CNR improvement of the K-edge imaging was the highest among the three methods. These imaging techniques based on the energy-resolved photon counting detector improved image quality with the spectral information.

  18. Beam hardening artefacts in computed tomography with photon counting, charge integrating and energy weighting detectors: a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Shikhaliev, Polad M

    2005-12-21

    Photon counting x-ray imaging provides efficient rejection of the electronics noise, no pulse height (Swank) noise, less noise due to optimal photon energy weighting and the possibility of energy resolved image acquisition. These advantages apply also to CT when projection data are acquired using a photon counting detector. However, photon counting detectors assign a weighting factor of 1 to all detected photons whereas the weighting factor of a charge integrating detector is proportional to the energy of the detected photon. Therefore, data collected by photon counting and charge integrating detectors represent the 'hardening' of the photon beam passed through the object differently. This affects the beam hardening artefacts in the reconstructed CT images. This work represents the first comparative evaluation of the effect of photon counting, charge integrating and energy weighting photon detectors on beam hardening artefacts in CT. Beam hardening artefacts in CT images were evaluated for 20 cm and 14 cm diameter water cylinders with bone and low contrast inserts, at 120 kVp and 90 kVp x-ray tube voltages, respectively. It was shown that charge integrating results in 1.8% less beam hardening artefacts from bone inserts (i.e., CT numbers in the 'shadow' of the bone are less by 1.8% as compared to CT numbers over the periphery of the image), as compared to photon counting. However, optimal photon energy weighting, which provides highest SNR, results in 7.7% higher beam hardening artefacts from bone inserts as compared to photon counting. The magnitude of the 'cupping' artefacts was lower by 1% for charge integrating and higher by 6.1% for energy weighting acquisitions as compared to photon counting. Only the photon counting systems provide an accurate representation of the beam hardening effect due to its flat energy weighting. Because of their energy dependent weighting factors, the charge integrating and energy weighting systems do not provide accurate

  19. Beam hardening artefacts in computed tomography with photon counting, charge integrating and energy weighting detectors: a simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shikhaliev, Polad M.

    2005-12-01

    Photon counting x-ray imaging provides efficient rejection of the electronics noise, no pulse height (Swank) noise, less noise due to optimal photon energy weighting and the possibility of energy resolved image acquisition. These advantages apply also to CT when projection data are acquired using a photon counting detector. However, photon counting detectors assign a weighting factor of 1 to all detected photons whereas the weighting factor of a charge integrating detector is proportional to the energy of the detected photon. Therefore, data collected by photon counting and charge integrating detectors represent the 'hardening' of the photon beam passed through the object differently. This affects the beam hardening artefacts in the reconstructed CT images. This work represents the first comparative evaluation of the effect of photon counting, charge integrating and energy weighting photon detectors on beam hardening artefacts in CT. Beam hardening artefacts in CT images were evaluated for 20 cm and 14 cm diameter water cylinders with bone and low contrast inserts, at 120 kVp and 90 kVp x-ray tube voltages, respectively. It was shown that charge integrating results in 1.8% less beam hardening artefacts from bone inserts (i.e., CT numbers in the 'shadow' of the bone are less by 1.8% as compared to CT numbers over the periphery of the image), as compared to photon counting. However, optimal photon energy weighting, which provides highest SNR, results in 7.7% higher beam hardening artefacts from bone inserts as compared to photon counting. The magnitude of the 'cupping' artefacts was lower by 1% for charge integrating and higher by 6.1% for energy weighting acquisitions as compared to photon counting. Only the photon counting systems provide an accurate representation of the beam hardening effect due to its flat energy weighting. Because of their energy dependent weighting factors, the charge integrating and energy weighting systems do not provide accurate

  20. System and method for optically locating microchannel positions

    DOEpatents

    Brewer, Laurence R.; Kimbrough, Joseph; Balch, Joseph; Davidson, J. Courtney

    2001-01-01

    A system and method is disclosed for optically locating a microchannel position. A laser source generates a primary laser beam which is directed at a microchannel plate. The microchannel plates include microchannels at various locations. A back-reflectance beam detector receives a back-reflected beam from the plate. The back-reflected beam is generated when the primary beam reflects off of the plate. A photodiode circuit generates a trigger signal when the back-reflected beam exceeds a predetermined threshold, indicating a presence of the microchannel. The method of the present invention includes the steps of generating a primary beam, directing the primary beam to a plate containing a microchannel, receiving from the plate a back-reflected beam generated in response to the primary beam, and generating a trigger signal when the back-reflected beam exceeds a predetermined threshold which corresponds to a presence of the microchannel.

  1. A Multispectral Photon-Counting Double Random Phase Encoding Scheme for Image Authentication

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Faliu; Moon, Inkyu; Lee, Yeon H.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a new method for color image-based authentication that combines multispectral photon-counting imaging (MPCI) and double random phase encoding (DRPE) schemes. The sparsely distributed information from MPCI and the stationary white noise signal from DRPE make intruder attacks difficult. In this authentication method, the original multispectral RGB color image is down-sampled into a Bayer image. The three types of color samples (red, green and blue color) in the Bayer image are encrypted with DRPE and the amplitude part of the resulting image is photon counted. The corresponding phase information that has nonzero amplitude after photon counting is then kept for decryption. Experimental results show that the retrieved images from the proposed method do not visually resemble their original counterparts. Nevertheless, the original color image can be efficiently verified with statistical nonlinear correlations. Our experimental results also show that different interpolation algorithms applied to Bayer images result in different verification effects for multispectral RGB color images. PMID:24854208

  2. Mcps-range photon-counting x-ray computed tomography system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Eiichi; Oda, Yasuyuki; Abudurexiti, Abulajiang; Hagiwara, Osahiko; Enomoto, Toshiyuki; Sugimura, Shigeaki; Endo, Haruyuki; Sato, Shigehiro; Ogawa, Akira; Onagawa, Jun

    2011-10-01

    10 Mcps photon counting was carried out using a detector consisting of a 2.0 mm-thick ZnO (zinc oxide) single-crystal scintillator and an MPPC (multipixel photon counter) module in an X-ray computed tomography (CT) system. The maximum count rate was 10 Mcps (mega counts per second) at a tube voltage of 70 kV and a tube current of 2.0 mA. Next, a photon-counting X-ray CT system consists of an X-ray generator, a turntable, a scan stage, a two-stage controller, the ZnO-MPPC detector, a counter card (CC), and a personal computer (PC). Tomography is accomplished by repeated linear scans and rotations of an object, and projection curves of the object are obtained by the linear scan with a scan velocity of 25 mm/s. The pulses of the event signal from the module are counted by the CC in conjunction with the PC. The exposure time for obtaining a tomogram was 600 s at a scan step of 0.5 mm and a rotation step of 1.0°, and photon-counting CT was accomplished using iodine-based contrast media.

  3. Update on Linear Mode Photon Counting with the HgCdTe Linear Mode Avalanche Photodiode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, Jeffrey D.; Kinch, Mike; Sun, Xiaoli

    2014-01-01

    The behavior of the gain-voltage characteristic of the mid-wavelength infrared cutoff HgCdTe linear mode avalanche photodiode (e-APD) is discussed both experimentally and theoretically as a function of the width of the multiplication region. Data are shown that demonstrate a strong dependence of the gain at a given bias voltage on the width of the n- gain region. Geometrical and fundamental theoretical models are examined to explain this behavior. The geometrical model takes into account the gain-dependent optical fill factor of the cylindrical APD. The theoretical model is based on the ballistic ionization model being developed for the HgCdTe APD. It is concluded that the fundamental theoretical explanation is the dominant effect. A model is developed that combines both the geometrical and fundamental effects. The model also takes into account the effect of the varying multiplication width in the low bias region of the gain-voltage curve. It is concluded that the lower than expected gain seen in the first 2 × 8 HgCdTe linear mode photon counting APD arrays, and higher excess noise factor, was very likely due to the larger than typical multiplication region length in the photon counting APD pixel design. The implications of these effects on device photon counting performance are discussed.

  4. Development of new photon-counting detectors for single-molecule fluorescence microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Michalet, X.; Colyer, R. A.; Scalia, G.; Ingargiola, A.; Lin, R.; Millaud, J. E.; Weiss, S.; Siegmund, Oswald H. W.; Tremsin, Anton S.; Vallerga, John V.; Cheng, A.; Levi, M.; Aharoni, D.; Arisaka, K.; Villa, F.; Guerrieri, F.; Panzeri, F.; Rech, I.; Gulinatti, A.; Zappa, F.; Ghioni, M.; Cova, S.

    2013-01-01

    Two optical configurations are commonly used in single-molecule fluorescence microscopy: point-like excitation and detection to study freely diffusing molecules, and wide field illumination and detection to study surface immobilized or slowly diffusing molecules. Both approaches have common features, but also differ in significant aspects. In particular, they use different detectors, which share some requirements but also have major technical differences. Currently, two types of detectors best fulfil the needs of each approach: single-photon-counting avalanche diodes (SPADs) for point-like detection, and electron-multiplying charge-coupled devices (EMCCDs) for wide field detection. However, there is room for improvements in both cases. The first configuration suffers from low throughput owing to the analysis of data from a single location. The second, on the other hand, is limited to relatively low frame rates and loses the benefit of single-photon-counting approaches. During the past few years, new developments in point-like and wide field detectors have started addressing some of these issues. Here, we describe our recent progresses towards increasing the throughput of single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy in solution using parallel arrays of SPADs. We also discuss our development of large area photon-counting cameras achieving subnanosecond resolution for fluorescence lifetime imaging applications at the single-molecule level. PMID:23267185

  5. MicroCT with energy-resolved photon-counting detectors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, X; Meier, D; Mikkelsen, S; Maehlum, G E; Wagenaar, D J; Tsui, BMW; Patt, B E; Frey, E C

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this paper was to investigate the benefits that could be realistically achieved on a microCT imaging system with an energy-resolved photon-counting x-ray detector. To this end, we built and evaluated a prototype microCT system based on such a detector. The detector is based on cadmium telluride (CdTe) radiation sensors and application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) readouts. Each detector pixel can simultaneously count x-ray photons above six energy thresholds, providing the capability for energy-selective x-ray imaging. We tested the spectroscopic performance of the system using polychromatic x-ray radiation and various filtering materials with Kabsorption edges. Tomographic images were then acquired of a cylindrical PMMA phantom containing holes filled with various materials. Results were also compared with those acquired using an intensity-integrating x-ray detector and single-energy (i.e. non-energy-selective) CT. This paper describes the functionality and performance of the system, and presents preliminary spectroscopic and tomographic results. The spectroscopic experiments showed that the energy-resolved photon-counting detector was capable of measuring energy spectra from polychromatic sources like a standard x-ray tube, and resolving absorption edges present in the energy range used for imaging. However, the spectral quality was degraded by spectral distortions resulting from degrading factors, including finite energy resolution and charge sharing. We developed a simple charge-sharing model to reproduce these distortions. The tomographic experiments showed that the availability of multiple energy thresholds in the photon-counting detector allowed us to simultaneously measure target-to-background contrasts in different energy ranges. Compared with single-energy CT with an integrating detector, this feature was especially useful to improve differentiation of materials with different attenuation coefficient energy dependences. PMID:21464527

  6. X-ray Photon Counting and Two-Color X-ray Imaging Using Indirect Detection

    PubMed Central

    Dierickx, Bart; Yao, Qiang; Witvrouwen, Nick; Uwaerts, Dirk; Vandewiele, Stijn; Gao, Peng

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we report on the design and performance of a 1 cm2, 90 × 92-pixel image sensor. It is made X-ray sensitive by the use of a scintillator. Its pixels have a charge packet counting circuit topology with two channels, each realizing a different charge packet size threshold and analog domain event counting. Here, the sensor’s performance was measured in setups representative of a medical X-ray environment. Further, two-energy-level photon counting performance is demonstrated, and its capabilities and limitations are documented. We then provide an outlook on future improvements. PMID:27240362

  7. Longitudinal Bunch Pattern Measurements through Single Photon Counting at SPEAR3

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hongyi; /UC, San Diego

    2012-09-07

    The Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL), a division of SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, is a synchrotron light source that provides x-rays for experimental use. As electrons are bent in the storage ring, they emit electromagnetic radiation. There are 372 different buckets which electrons can be loaded into. Different filling patterns produce different types of x-rays. What is the bunch pattern at a given time? Which filling pattern is better? Are there any flaws to the current injection system? These questions can be answered with this single photon counting experiment.

  8. Dear-Mama: A photon counting X-ray imaging project for medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanchot, G.; Chmeissani, M.; Díaz, A.; Díaz, F.; Fernández, J.; García, E.; García, J.; Kainberger, F.; Lozano, M.; Maiorino, M.; Martínez, R.; Montagne, J. P.; Moreno, I.; Pellegrini, G.; Puigdengoles, C.; Sentís, M.; Teres, L.; Tortajada, M.; Ullán, M.

    2006-12-01

    Dear-Mama ( Detection of Early Markers in Mammography) is an EU funded project devoted to develop an X-ray Medical imaging device based on room temperature solid-state pixel detector coupled to photon counting readout electronics via bump bonding. The technology being used leads to signal-to-noise ratio enhancement and thus the ability to detect low contrast anomalies such as micro-calcifications. The Dear-Mama machine is currently being evaluated and preliminary results show an excellent MTF response. Dear-Mama consortium is made up from six European institutions, the project runs from December 2001 to March 2006.

  9. Lightweight Raman spectroscope using time-correlated photon-counting detection.

    PubMed

    Meng, Zhaokai; Petrov, Georgi I; Cheng, Shuna; Jo, Javier A; Lehmann, Kevin K; Yakovlev, Vladislav V; Scully, Marlan O

    2015-10-01

    Raman spectroscopy is an important tool in understanding chemical components of various materials. However, the excessive weight and energy consumption of a conventional CCD-based Raman spectrometer forbids its applications under extreme conditions, including unmanned aircraft vehicles (UAVs) and Mars/Moon rovers. In this article, we present a highly sensitive, shot-noise-limited, and ruggedized Raman signal acquisition using a time-correlated photon-counting system. Compared with conventional Raman spectrometers, over 95% weight, 65% energy consumption, and 70% cost could be removed through this design. This technique allows space- and UAV-based Raman spectrometers to robustly perform hyperspectral Raman acquisitions without excessive energy consumption.

  10. Lightweight Raman spectroscope using time-correlated photon-counting detection.

    PubMed

    Meng, Zhaokai; Petrov, Georgi I; Cheng, Shuna; Jo, Javier A; Lehmann, Kevin K; Yakovlev, Vladislav V; Scully, Marlan O

    2015-10-01

    Raman spectroscopy is an important tool in understanding chemical components of various materials. However, the excessive weight and energy consumption of a conventional CCD-based Raman spectrometer forbids its applications under extreme conditions, including unmanned aircraft vehicles (UAVs) and Mars/Moon rovers. In this article, we present a highly sensitive, shot-noise-limited, and ruggedized Raman signal acquisition using a time-correlated photon-counting system. Compared with conventional Raman spectrometers, over 95% weight, 65% energy consumption, and 70% cost could be removed through this design. This technique allows space- and UAV-based Raman spectrometers to robustly perform hyperspectral Raman acquisitions without excessive energy consumption. PMID:26392538

  11. Characterization of energy response for photon-counting detectors using x-ray fluorescence

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Huanjun; Cho, Hyo-Min; Barber, William C.; Iwanczyk, Jan S.; Molloi, Sabee

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of characterizing a Si strip photon-counting detector using x-ray fluorescence. Methods: X-ray fluorescence was generated by using a pencil beam from a tungsten anode x-ray tube with 2 mm Al filtration. Spectra were acquired at 90° from the primary beam direction with an energy-resolved photon-counting detector based on an edge illuminated Si strip detector. The distances from the source to target and the target to detector were approximately 19 and 11 cm, respectively. Four different materials, containing silver (Ag), iodine (I), barium (Ba), and gadolinium (Gd), were placed in small plastic containers with a diameter of approximately 0.7 cm for x-ray fluorescence measurements. Linear regression analysis was performed to derive the gain and offset values for the correlation between the measured fluorescence peak center and the known fluorescence energies. The energy resolutions and charge-sharing fractions were also obtained from analytical fittings of the recorded fluorescence spectra. An analytical model, which employed four parameters that can be determined from the fluorescence calibration, was used to estimate the detector response function. Results: Strong fluorescence signals of all four target materials were recorded with the investigated geometry for the Si strip detector. The average gain and offset of all pixels for detector energy calibration were determined to be 6.95 mV/keV and −66.33 mV, respectively. The detector’s energy resolution remained at approximately 2.7 keV for low energies, and increased slightly at 45 keV. The average charge-sharing fraction was estimated to be 36% within the investigated energy range of 20–45 keV. The simulated detector output based on the proposed response function agreed well with the experimental measurement. Conclusions: The performance of a spectral imaging system using energy-resolved photon-counting detectors is very dependent on the energy calibration of the

  12. Photon counting spectral CT component analysis of coronary artery atherosclerotic plaque samples

    PubMed Central

    Coulon, P; Thran, A; Roessl, E; Martens, G; Sigovan, M; Douek, P

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the capabilities of photon counting spectral CT to differentiate components of coronary atherosclerotic plaque based on differences in spectral attenuation and iodine-based contrast agent concentration. Methods: 10 calcified and 13 lipid-rich non-calcified histologically demonstrated atheromatous plaques from post-mortem human coronary arteries were scanned with a photon counting spectral CT scanner. Individual photons were counted and classified in one of six energy bins from 25 to 70 keV. Based on a maximum likelihood approach, maps of photoelectric absorption (PA), Compton scattering (CS) and iodine concentration (IC) were reconstructed. Intensity measurements were performed on each map in the vessel wall, the surrounding perivascular fat and the lipid-rich and the calcified plaques. PA and CS values are expressed relative to pure water values. A comparison between these different elements was performed using Kruskal–Wallis tests with pairwise post hoc Mann–Whitney U-tests and Sidak p-value adjustments. Results: Results for vessel wall, surrounding perivascular fat and lipid-rich and calcified plaques were, respectively, 1.19 ± 0.09, 0.73 ± 0.05, 1.08 ± 0.14 and 17.79 ± 6.70 for PA; 0.96 ± 0.02, 0.83 ± 0.02, 0.91 ± 0.03 and 2.53 ± 0.63 for CS; and 83.3 ± 10.1, 37.6 ± 8.1, 55.2 ± 14.0 and 4.9 ± 20.0 mmol l−1 for IC, with a significant difference between all tissues for PA, CS and IC (p < 0.012). Conclusion: This study demonstrates the capability of energy-sensitive photon counting spectral CT to differentiate between calcifications and iodine-infused regions of human coronary artery atherosclerotic plaque samples by analysing differences in spectral attenuation and iodine-based contrast agent concentration. Advances in knowledge: Photon counting spectral CT is a promising technique to identify plaque components by analysing differences in iodine-based contrast agent

  13. Characterization of energy response for photon-counting detectors using x-ray fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Huanjun; Cho, Hyo-Min; Molloi, Sabee; Barber, William C.; Iwanczyk, Jan S.

    2014-12-15

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of characterizing a Si strip photon-counting detector using x-ray fluorescence. Methods: X-ray fluorescence was generated by using a pencil beam from a tungsten anode x-ray tube with 2 mm Al filtration. Spectra were acquired at 90° from the primary beam direction with an energy-resolved photon-counting detector based on an edge illuminated Si strip detector. The distances from the source to target and the target to detector were approximately 19 and 11 cm, respectively. Four different materials, containing silver (Ag), iodine (I), barium (Ba), and gadolinium (Gd), were placed in small plastic containers with a diameter of approximately 0.7 cm for x-ray fluorescence measurements. Linear regression analysis was performed to derive the gain and offset values for the correlation between the measured fluorescence peak center and the known fluorescence energies. The energy resolutions and charge-sharing fractions were also obtained from analytical fittings of the recorded fluorescence spectra. An analytical model, which employed four parameters that can be determined from the fluorescence calibration, was used to estimate the detector response function. Results: Strong fluorescence signals of all four target materials were recorded with the investigated geometry for the Si strip detector. The average gain and offset of all pixels for detector energy calibration were determined to be 6.95 mV/keV and −66.33 mV, respectively. The detector’s energy resolution remained at approximately 2.7 keV for low energies, and increased slightly at 45 keV. The average charge-sharing fraction was estimated to be 36% within the investigated energy range of 20–45 keV. The simulated detector output based on the proposed response function agreed well with the experimental measurement. Conclusions: The performance of a spectral imaging system using energy-resolved photon-counting detectors is very dependent on the energy calibration of the

  14. Photon-counting multikilohertz microlaser altimeters for airborne and spaceborne topographic measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degnan, John J.

    2002-11-01

    We consider the optimum design of photon-counting microlaser altimeters operating from airborne and spaceborne platforms under both day and night conditions. Extremely compact, passively Q-switched microlaser transmitters produce trains of low energy pulses at multi-kHz rates and can easily generate subnanosecond pulsewidths for precise ranging. To guide the design, we have modeled the solar noise background and developed simple algorithms, based on post-detection Poisson filtering (PDPF), to optimally extract the weak altimeter signal from a high noise background during daytime operations. The advantages of photon-counting detector arrays followed by multichannel timing receivers for high resolution topographic mapping are discussed. Practical technology issues, such as detector and/or receiver dead times and their impact on signal detection and ranging accuracy and resolution, have also been considered in the analysis. The theoretical results are reinforced by data from an airborne microlaser altimeter, developed under NASA's Instrument Incubator Program. The latter instrument has operated at several kHz rates from aircraft cruise altitudes up to 6.7 km with laser pulse energies on the order of a few microjoules. The instrument has successfully recorded decimeter accuracy or better single photon returns from man-made structures, tree canopies and underlying terrain and has demonstrated shallow water bathymetry at depths to a few meters. We conclude the discussion by analyzing a photon counting instrument designed to produce, over a mission life of 3 years, a globally contiguous map of the Martian surface, with 5 m horizontal resolution and decimeter vertical accuracy, from an altitude of 300 km. The transmitter power-receive aperture product required is comparable to the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) but the number of individual range measurements to the surface is increased by three to four orders of magnitude. For more modest scientific goals, on a

  15. Fluorescence lifetime microscopy with a time- and space-resolved single-photon counting detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michalet, X.; Siegmund, O. H. W.; Vallerga, J. V.; Jelinsky, P.; Pinaud, F. F.; Millaud, J. E.; Weiss, S.

    2006-10-01

    We have recently developed a wide-field photon-counting detector (the H33D detector) having high-temporal and highspatial resolutions and capable of recording up to 500,000 photons per sec. Its temporal performance has been previously characterized using solutions of fluorescent materials with different lifetimes, and its spatial resolution using sub-diffraction objects (beads and quantum dots). Here we show its application to fluorescence lifetime imaging of live cells and compare its performance to a scanning confocal TCSPC approach. With the expected improvements in photocathode sensitivity and increase in detector throughput, this technology appears as a promising alternative to the current lifetime imaging solutions.

  16. CCDs and photon counting devices: Applications in space and from the ground

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delamere, W. A.; Blouke, M. M.; Flores, J. S.; Frame, W. W.

    1992-01-01

    The development of the 2048 by 2048 CCD (Charge Coupled Device) for a second generation space telescope instrument has resulted in devices with very few defects, dark currents of less than 12 electrons/pixel/hour at -80 deg, readout noise levels of less than 4 electrons rms, and excellent charge transfer efficiency at signal levels of less than 10 electrons. A second generation of devices that capitalize on these characteristics have been produced and are currently in test. Faster frame transfer devices that preserve these characteristics have been designed that include tridirectional taps in the serial register. The state of the art in CCD's as photon counting detectors is reviewed.

  17. Lightweight Raman spectroscope using time-correlated photon-counting detection

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Zhaokai; Petrov, Georgi I.; Cheng, Shuna; Jo, Javier A.; Lehmann, Kevin K.; Yakovlev, Vladislav V.; Scully, Marlan O.

    2015-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy is an important tool in understanding chemical components of various materials. However, the excessive weight and energy consumption of a conventional CCD-based Raman spectrometer forbids its applications under extreme conditions, including unmanned aircraft vehicles (UAVs) and Mars/Moon rovers. In this article, we present a highly sensitive, shot-noise–limited, and ruggedized Raman signal acquisition using a time-correlated photon-counting system. Compared with conventional Raman spectrometers, over 95% weight, 65% energy consumption, and 70% cost could be removed through this design. This technique allows space- and UAV-based Raman spectrometers to robustly perform hyperspectral Raman acquisitions without excessive energy consumption. PMID:26392538

  18. Experimental evaluation of the response of micro-channel plate detector to ions with 10s of MeV energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Tae Won; Singh, P. K.; Scullion, C.; Ahmed, H.; Kakolee, K. F.; Hadjisolomou, P.; Alejo, A.; Kar, S.; Borghesi, M.; Ter-Avetisyan, S.

    2016-08-01

    The absolute calibration of a microchannel plate (MCP) assembly using a Thomson spectrometer for laser-driven ion beams is described. In order to obtain the response of the whole detection system to the particles' impact, a slotted solid state nuclear track detector (CR-39) was installed in front of the MCP to record the ions simultaneously on both detectors. The response of the MCP (counts/particles) was measured for 5-58 MeV carbon ions and for protons in the energy range 2-17.3 MeV. The response of the MCP detector is non-trivial when the stopping range of particles becomes larger than the thickness of the detector. Protons with energies E ≳ 10 MeV are energetic enough that they can pass through the MCP detector. Quantitative analysis of the pits formed in CR-39 and the signal generated in the MCP allowed to determine the MCP response to particles in this energy range. Moreover, a theoretical model allows to predict the response of MCP at even higher proton energies. This suggests that in this regime the MCP response is a slowly decreasing function of energy, consistently with the decrease of the deposited energy. These calibration data will enable particle spectra to be obtained in absolute terms over a broad energy range.

  19. Operating a triple stack microchannel plate-phosphor assembly for single particle counting in the 12-300 K temperature range.

    PubMed

    Rosén, Stefan; Schmidt, Henning T; Reinhed, Peter; Fischer, Daniel; Thomas, Richard D; Cederquist, Henrik; Liljeby, Leif; Bagge, Lars; Leontein, Sven; Blom, Mikael

    2007-11-01

    An assembly consisting of a stack of three microchannel plates (MCPs) and a phosphor screen anode has been operated over the temperature range from 300 to 12 K. We report on measurements at 6.4 kHz (using an alpha source) and with dark counts only (15 Hz). Without any particle source, the MCP bias current decreased by a factor of 2.1 x 10(3) when the temperature was lowered from 300 to 12 K. Using the alpha source, and a photomultiplier tube (PMT) to monitor the phosphor screen anode, we first observed an increase in the decay time of the phosphor from 12 to 45 mus when the temperature was decreased from 300 to 100 K while the decay time then decreased and reached a value of 5 mus at 12 K. The pulse height distribution from the PMT was measured between 300 and 12 K and shows a spectrum typical for a MCP phosphor setup at 300 K and 12 K but is strongly degraded for intermediate temperatures. We conclude that the present MCP-phosphor detector assembly is well suited for position-sensitive particle counting operation at temperatures down to at least 12 K even for count rates beyond 6 kHz. This result is crucial and an important part of ongoing developments of new instrumentation for investigations of, e.g., interactions involving complex molecular ions with internal quantum state control.

  20. Experimental Setup and Commissioning of a Test Facility for Gain Evaluation of Microchannel-Plate Photomultipliers in High Magnetic Field at Jefferson Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bringley, Eric; Cao, Tongtong; Ilieva, Yordonka; Nadel-Turonski, Pawel; Park, Kijun; Zorn, Carl

    2014-09-01

    At the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) a research and development project for a Detector of Internally-Reflected Cherenkov light for the upcoming Electron Ion Collider is underway. One goal is the development of a compact readout camera that can operate in high magnetic fields. Small-size photon sensors, such as Microchannel-Plate Photomultipliers (MCP-PMT), are key components of the readout. Here we present our work to set up and commission a dedicated test facility at JLab where MCP-PMT gain is evaluated in magnetic fields of up to 5 T, and to develop a test procedure and analysis software to determine the gain. We operate the setup in a single-photon mode, where a light-emitting diode delivers photons to the sensor's photocathode. The PMT spectrum is measured with a flash Analog-to-Digital converter (fADC). We model the spectrum as a sum of an exponential background and a convolution of Poisson and Gaussian distributions of the pedestal and multiple photoelectron peaks, respectively. We determine the PMT's gain from the position of the single-photoelectron peak obtained by fitting the fADC spectrum to the model. Our gain uncertainty is <10%. The facility is now established and will have a long-lasting value for sensor tests and beyond-nuclear-physics applications.

  1. Experimental evaluation of the response of micro-channel plate detector to ions with 10s of MeV energies.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Tae Won; Singh, P K; Scullion, C; Ahmed, H; Kakolee, K F; Hadjisolomou, P; Alejo, A; Kar, S; Borghesi, M; Ter-Avetisyan, S

    2016-08-01

    The absolute calibration of a microchannel plate (MCP) assembly using a Thomson spectrometer for laser-driven ion beams is described. In order to obtain the response of the whole detection system to the particles' impact, a slotted solid state nuclear track detector (CR-39) was installed in front of the MCP to record the ions simultaneously on both detectors. The response of the MCP (counts/particles) was measured for 5-58 MeV carbon ions and for protons in the energy range 2-17.3 MeV. The response of the MCP detector is non-trivial when the stopping range of particles becomes larger than the thickness of the detector. Protons with energies E ≳ 10 MeV are energetic enough that they can pass through the MCP detector. Quantitative analysis of the pits formed in CR-39 and the signal generated in the MCP allowed to determine the MCP response to particles in this energy range. Moreover, a theoretical model allows to predict the response of MCP at even higher proton energies. This suggests that in this regime the MCP response is a slowly decreasing function of energy, consistently with the decrease of the deposited energy. These calibration data will enable particle spectra to be obtained in absolute terms over a broad energy range.

  2. Experimental evaluation of the response of micro-channel plate detector to ions with 10s of MeV energies.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Tae Won; Singh, P K; Scullion, C; Ahmed, H; Kakolee, K F; Hadjisolomou, P; Alejo, A; Kar, S; Borghesi, M; Ter-Avetisyan, S

    2016-08-01

    The absolute calibration of a microchannel plate (MCP) assembly using a Thomson spectrometer for laser-driven ion beams is described. In order to obtain the response of the whole detection system to the particles' impact, a slotted solid state nuclear track detector (CR-39) was installed in front of the MCP to record the ions simultaneously on both detectors. The response of the MCP (counts/particles) was measured for 5-58 MeV carbon ions and for protons in the energy range 2-17.3 MeV. The response of the MCP detector is non-trivial when the stopping range of particles becomes larger than the thickness of the detector. Protons with energies E ≳ 10 MeV are energetic enough that they can pass through the MCP detector. Quantitative analysis of the pits formed in CR-39 and the signal generated in the MCP allowed to determine the MCP response to particles in this energy range. Moreover, a theoretical model allows to predict the response of MCP at even higher proton energies. This suggests that in this regime the MCP response is a slowly decreasing function of energy, consistently with the decrease of the deposited energy. These calibration data will enable particle spectra to be obtained in absolute terms over a broad energy range. PMID:27587107

  3. Detection of large ions in time-of-flight mass spectrometry: effects of ion mass and acceleration voltage on microchannel plate detector response.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ranran; Li, Qiyao; Smith, Lloyd M

    2014-08-01

    In time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOF-MS), ion detection is typically accomplished by the generation and amplification of secondary electrons produced by ions colliding with a microchannel plate (MCP) detector. Here, the response of an MCP detector as a function of ion mass and acceleration voltage is characterized, for singly charged peptide/protein ions ranging from 1 to 290 kDa in mass, and for acceleration voltages from 5 to 25 kV. A nondestructive inductive charge detector (ICD) employed in parallel with MCP detection provides a reliable reference signal to allow accurate calibration of the MCP response. MCP detection efficiencies were very close to unity for smaller ions at high acceleration voltages (e.g., angiotensin, 1046.5 Da, at 25 kV acceleration voltage), but decreased to ~11% for the largest ions examined (immunoglobulin G (IgG) dimer, 290 kDa) even at the highest acceleration voltage employed (25 kV). The secondary electron yield γ (average number of electrons produced per ion collision) is found to be proportional to mv(3.1) (m: ion mass, v: ion velocity) over the entire mass range examined, and inversely proportional to the square root of m in TOF-MS analysis. The results indicate that although MCP detectors indeed offer superlative performance in the detection of smaller peptide/protein species, their performance does fall off substantially for larger proteins, particularly under conditions of low acceleration voltage.

  4. Development and calibration of a Thomson parabola with microchannel plate for the detection of laser-accelerated MeV ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harres, K.; Schollmeier, M.; Brambrink, E.; Audebert, P.; Blažević, A.; Flippo, K.; Gautier, D. C.; Geißel, M.; Hegelich, B. M.; Nürnberg, F.; Schreiber, J.; Wahl, H.; Roth, M.

    2008-09-01

    This article reports on the development and application of a Thomson parabola (TP) equipped with a (90×70) mm2 microchannel-plate (MCP) for the analysis of laser-accelerated ions, produced by a high-energy, high-intensity laser system. The MCP allows an online measurement of the produced ions in every single laser shot. An electromagnet instead of permanent magnets is used that allows the tuning of the magnetic field to adapt the field strength to the analyzed ion species and energy. We describe recent experiments at the 100 TW laser facility at the Laboratoire d'Utilization des Lasers Intenses (LULI) in Palaiseau, France, where we have observed multiple ion species and charge states with ions accelerated up to 5 MeV/u (O+6), emitted from the rear surface of a laser-irradiated 50 μm Au foil. Within the experiment the TP was calibrated for protons and for the first time conversion efficiencies of MeV protons (2-13 MeV) to primary electrons (electrons immediately generated by an ion impact onto a surface) in the MCP are presented.

  5. Development and calibration of a Thomson parabola with microchannel plate for the detection of laser-accelerated MeV ions.

    PubMed

    Harres, K; Schollmeier, M; Brambrink, E; Audebert, P; Blazević, A; Flippo, K; Gautier, D C; Geissel, M; Hegelich, B M; Nürnberg, F; Schreiber, J; Wahl, H; Roth, M

    2008-09-01

    This article reports on the development and application of a Thomson parabola (TP) equipped with a (90x70) mm(2) microchannel-plate (MCP) for the analysis of laser-accelerated ions, produced by a high-energy, high-intensity laser system. The MCP allows an online measurement of the produced ions in every single laser shot. An electromagnet instead of permanent magnets is used that allows the tuning of the magnetic field to adapt the field strength to the analyzed ion species and energy. We describe recent experiments at the 100 TW laser facility at the Laboratoire d'Utilization des Lasers Intenses (LULI) in Palaiseau, France, where we have observed multiple ion species and charge states with ions accelerated up to 5 MeV/u (O(+6)), emitted from the rear surface of a laser-irradiated 50 microm Au foil. Within the experiment the TP was calibrated for protons and for the first time conversion efficiencies of MeV protons (2-13 MeV) to primary electrons (electrons immediately generated by an ion impact onto a surface) in the MCP are presented. PMID:19044406

  6. Development and calibration of a Thomson parabola with microchannel plate for the detection of laser-accelerated MeV ions

    SciTech Connect

    Harres, K.; Schollmeier, M.; Nuernberg, F.; Roth, M.; Brambrink, E.; Audebert, P.; Blazevic, A.; Wahl, H.; Flippo, K.; Gautier, D. C.; Hegelich, B. M.; Geissel, M.; Schreiber, J.

    2008-09-15

    This article reports on the development and application of a Thomson parabola (TP) equipped with a (90x70) mm{sup 2} microchannel-plate (MCP) for the analysis of laser-accelerated ions, produced by a high-energy, high-intensity laser system. The MCP allows an online measurement of the produced ions in every single laser shot. An electromagnet instead of permanent magnets is used that allows the tuning of the magnetic field to adapt the field strength to the analyzed ion species and energy. We describe recent experiments at the 100 TW laser facility at the Laboratoire d'Utilization des Lasers Intenses (LULI) in Palaiseau, France, where we have observed multiple ion species and charge states with ions accelerated up to 5 MeV/u (O{sup +6}), emitted from the rear surface of a laser-irradiated 50 {mu}m Au foil. Within the experiment the TP was calibrated for protons and for the first time conversion efficiencies of MeV protons (2-13 MeV) to primary electrons (electrons immediately generated by an ion impact onto a surface) in the MCP are presented.

  7. Simulations of Small-Pore Microchannel Plates for Fast Gated X-ray Imaging and Spectroscopy of High-Energy Density Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Craig A. Kruschwitz, Ming Wu, Greg Rochau

    2010-06-21

    This poster describes work done at National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) over the past several years on the design and characterization of microchannel plate (MCP)-based fast-gated x-ray imagers for use on the SNL Z machine. These cameras use 10-micron-pore MCPs similar to the type used for spectroscopy and imaging applications at other facilities. To aid in the understanding of MCP behavior, we have developed a Monte Carlo simulation model for prediction of MCP response. The code contains a detailed physical model of the electron cascade and amplification process of the MCP that includes energy conservation for the secondary electrons, the effects of elastic scattering of low-energy electrons from the channel wall, and gain saturation mechanisms from wall charging and space charge. Our model can simulate MCP response for both static and pulsed voltage waveforms. Excellent agreement between the Monte Carlo simulations and laboratory measurements has been achieved. Here, we apply our simulation model to 2-micron-pore MCPs, which, while readily available from a variety of vendors, are not used in imaging applications. We investigated the DC and pulsed gain characteristics of such an MCP, with particular emphasis on dynamic range, temporal response, and spatial resolution. The results are compared to the predicted and measured characteristics of 10-micron-pore MCPs.

  8. Sequential data assimilation for single-molecule FRET photon-counting data

    SciTech Connect

    Matsunaga, Yasuhiro; Kidera, Akinori; Sugita, Yuji

    2015-06-07

    Data assimilation is a statistical method designed to improve the quality of numerical simulations in combination with real observations. Here, we develop a sequential data assimilation method that incorporates one-dimensional time-series data of smFRET (single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer) photon-counting into conformational ensembles of biomolecules derived from “replicated” molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. A particle filter using a large number of “replicated” MD simulations with a likelihood function for smFRET photon-counting data is employed to screen the conformational ensembles that match the experimental data. We examine the performance of the method using emulated smFRET data and coarse-grained (CG) MD simulations of a dye-labeled polyproline-20. The method estimates the dynamics of the end-to-end distance from smFRET data as well as revealing that of latent conformational variables. The particle filter is also able to correct model parameter dependence in CG MD simulations. We discuss the applicability of the method to real experimental data for conformational dynamics of biomolecules.

  9. Sequential data assimilation for single-molecule FRET photon-counting data.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, Yasuhiro; Kidera, Akinori; Sugita, Yuji

    2015-06-01

    Data assimilation is a statistical method designed to improve the quality of numerical simulations in combination with real observations. Here, we develop a sequential data assimilation method that incorporates one-dimensional time-series data of smFRET (single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer) photon-counting into conformational ensembles of biomolecules derived from "replicated" molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. A particle filter using a large number of "replicated" MD simulations with a likelihood function for smFRET photon-counting data is employed to screen the conformational ensembles that match the experimental data. We examine the performance of the method using emulated smFRET data and coarse-grained (CG) MD simulations of a dye-labeled polyproline-20. The method estimates the dynamics of the end-to-end distance from smFRET data as well as revealing that of latent conformational variables. The particle filter is also able to correct model parameter dependence in CG MD simulations. We discuss the applicability of the method to real experimental data for conformational dynamics of biomolecules.

  10. High-security communication by coherence modulation at the photon-counting level.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, William T; Boughanmi, Abdellatif; Moreno, Yezid Torres

    2016-05-20

    We show that key-specified interferometer path-length difference modulation (often referred to as coherence modulation), operating in the photon-counting regime with a broadband source, can provide a quantifiably high level of physics-guaranteed security for binary signal transmission. Each signal bit is associated with many photocounts, perhaps numbering in the thousands. Of great importance, the presence of an eavesdropper can be quickly detected. We first review the operation of key-specified coherence modulation at high light levels, illustrating by means of an example its lack of security against attack. We then show, using the same example, that, through the reduction of light intensities to photon-counting levels, a high level of security can be attained. A particular attack on the system is analyzed to demonstrate the quantifiability of the scheme's security, and various remaining research issues are discussed. A potential weakness of the scheme lies in a possible vulnerability to light amplification by an attacker. PMID:27411120

  11. MABEL photon-counting laser altimetry data in Alaska for ICESat-2 simulations and development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunt, Kelly M.; Neumann, Thomas A.; Amundson, Jason M.; Kavanaugh, Jeffrey L.; Moussavi, Mahsa S.; Walsh, Kaitlin M.; Cook, William B.; Markus, Thorsten

    2016-08-01

    Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite-2 (ICESat-2) is scheduled to launch in late 2017 and will carry the Advanced Topographic Laser Altimeter System (ATLAS), which is a photon-counting laser altimeter and represents a new approach to satellite determination of surface elevation. Given the new technology of ATLAS, an airborne instrument, the Multiple Altimeter Beam Experimental Lidar (MABEL), was developed to provide data needed for satellite-algorithm development and ICESat-2 error analysis. MABEL was deployed out of Fairbanks, Alaska, in July 2014 to provide a test dataset for algorithm development in summer conditions with water-saturated snow and ice surfaces. Here we compare MABEL lidar data to in situ observations in Southeast Alaska to assess instrument performance in summer conditions and in the presence of glacier surface melt ponds and a wet snowpack. Results indicate the following: (1) based on MABEL and in situ data comparisons, the ATLAS 90 m beam-spacing strategy will provide a valid assessment of across-track slope that is consistent with shallow slopes (< 1°) of an ice-sheet interior over 50 to 150 m length scales; (2) the dense along-track sampling strategy of photon counting systems can provide crevasse detail; and (3) MABEL 532 nm wavelength light may sample both the surface and subsurface of shallow (approximately 2 m deep) supraglacial melt ponds. The data associated with crevasses and melt ponds indicate the potential ICESat-2 will have for the study of mountain and other small glaciers.

  12. Comparing human observer performance in detecting microcalcifications with energy weighting and photon counting breast CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalluri, Kesava; Mahd, Mufeed; Glick, Stephen J.

    2012-03-01

    Breast CT (BCT) using a photon counting detector (PCD) has a number of advantages that can potentially improve clinical performance. Previous computer simulation studies showed that the signal to noise ratio (SNR) for microcalcifications is higher with energy weighted photon counting BCT as compared to cesium iodide energy integrating detector (CsI-EID) based BCT. CsI-EID inherently weighs the incident x-ray photons in direct proportion to the energy (contradicting the information content) which is not an optimal approach. PCD do not inherently weigh the incident photons. By choosing optimal energy weights, higher SNR can be achieved for microcalcifications and hence better detectability. In this simulation study, forward projection data of a numerical breast phantom with microcalcifications inserted were acquired using CsI-EID and PCD. The PCD projections were optimally weighed, and reconstructed using filtered back-projection. We compared observer performance in identifying microcalcifications in the reconstructed images using ROC analysis. ROC based results show that the average area(s) under curve(s) (AUC) for AUCPCD based methods are higher than the average AUCCsI-EID method.

  13. The Dosepix detector—an energy-resolving photon-counting pixel detector for spectrometric measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zang, A.; Anton, G.; Ballabriga, R.; Bisello, F.; Campbell, M.; Celi, J. C.; Fauler, A.; Fiederle, M.; Jensch, M.; Kochanski, N.; Llopart, X.; Michel, N.; Mollenhauer, U.; Ritter, I.; Tennert, F.; Wölfel, S.; Wong, W.; Michel, T.

    2015-04-01

    The Dosepix detector is a hybrid photon-counting pixel detector based on ideas of the Medipix and Timepix detector family. 1 mm thick cadmium telluride and 300 μm thick silicon were used as sensor material. The pixel matrix of the Dosepix consists of 16 x 16 square pixels with 12 rows of (200 μm)2 and 4 rows of (55 μm)2 sensitive area for the silicon sensor layer and 16 rows of pixels with 220 μm pixel pitch for CdTe. Besides digital energy integration and photon-counting mode, a novel concept of energy binning is included in the pixel electronics, allowing energy-resolved measurements in 16 energy bins within one acquisition. The possibilities of this detector concept range from applications in personal dosimetry and energy-resolved imaging to quality assurance of medical X-ray sources by analysis of the emitted photon spectrum. In this contribution the Dosepix detector, its response to X-rays as well as spectrum measurements with Si and CdTe sensor layer are presented. Furthermore, a first evaluation was carried out to use the Dosepix detector as a kVp-meter, that means to determine the applied acceleration voltage from measured X-ray tubes spectra.

  14. Sequential data assimilation for single-molecule FRET photon-counting data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsunaga, Yasuhiro; Kidera, Akinori; Sugita, Yuji

    2015-06-01

    Data assimilation is a statistical method designed to improve the quality of numerical simulations in combination with real observations. Here, we develop a sequential data assimilation method that incorporates one-dimensional time-series data of smFRET (single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer) photon-counting into conformational ensembles of biomolecules derived from "replicated" molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. A particle filter using a large number of "replicated" MD simulations with a likelihood function for smFRET photon-counting data is employed to screen the conformational ensembles that match the experimental data. We examine the performance of the method using emulated smFRET data and coarse-grained (CG) MD simulations of a dye-labeled polyproline-20. The method estimates the dynamics of the end-to-end distance from smFRET data as well as revealing that of latent conformational variables. The particle filter is also able to correct model parameter dependence in CG MD simulations. We discuss the applicability of the method to real experimental data for conformational dynamics of biomolecules.

  15. Polychromatic Iterative Statistical Material Image Reconstruction for Photon-Counting Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Weidinger, Thomas; Buzug, Thorsten M.; Flohr, Thomas; Kappler, Steffen; Stierstorfer, Karl

    2016-01-01

    This work proposes a dedicated statistical algorithm to perform a direct reconstruction of material-decomposed images from data acquired with photon-counting detectors (PCDs) in computed tomography. It is based on local approximations (surrogates) of the negative logarithmic Poisson probability function. Exploiting the convexity of this function allows for parallel updates of all image pixels. Parallel updates can compensate for the rather slow convergence that is intrinsic to statistical algorithms. We investigate the accuracy of the algorithm for ideal photon-counting detectors. Complementarily, we apply the algorithm to simulation data of a realistic PCD with its spectral resolution limited by K-escape, charge sharing, and pulse-pileup. For data from both an ideal and realistic PCD, the proposed algorithm is able to correct beam-hardening artifacts and quantitatively determine the material fractions of the chosen basis materials. Via regularization we were able to achieve a reduction of image noise for the realistic PCD that is up to 90% lower compared to material images form a linear, image-based material decomposition using FBP images. Additionally, we find a dependence of the algorithms convergence speed on the threshold selection within the PCD. PMID:27195003

  16. Polarimetric, Two-Color, Photon-Counting Laser Altimeter Measurements of Forest Canopy Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, David J.; Dabney, Philip W.; Valett, Susan

    2011-01-01

    Laser altimeter measurements of forest stands with distinct structures and compositions have been acquired at 532 nm (green) and 1064 nm (near-infrared) wavelengths and parallel and perpendicular polarization states using the Slope Imaging Multi-polarization Photon Counting Lidar (SIMPL). The micropulse, single photon ranging measurement approach employed by SIMPL provides canopy structure measurements with high vertical and spatial resolution. Using a height distribution analysis method adapted from conventional, 1064 nm, full-waveform lidar remote sensing, the sensitivity of two parameters commonly used for above-ground biomass estimation are compared as a function of wavelength. The results for the height of median energy (HOME) and canopy cover are for the most part very similar, indicating biomass estimations using lidars operating at green and near-infrared wavelengths will yield comparable estimates. The expected detection of increasing depolarization with depth into the canopies due to volume multiple-scattering was not observed, possibly due to the small laser footprint and the small detector field of view used in the SIMPL instrument. The results of this work provide pathfinder information for NASA's ICESat-2 mission that will employ a 532 nm, micropulse, photon counting laser altimeter.

  17. Software-based photon counting telemetry receiver for an infrared communications satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arora, Ashish; Edwards, Paul J.

    2004-01-01

    Single photon per bit optical communication between ground stations and low earth orbit satellites will enable the secure global distribution of cryptographic keys. The communications satellite AO-40 contains an experimental infra-red payload consisting of a low power 835 nm laser diode transmitter coupled to a small fixed orientation telescope transmitting 400 baud Manchester encoded data [1]. The received signal levels are of the order of 10 photons/bit for an effective telescope aperture of diameter 100 mm [2]. They therefore offer a means of validating models of low photon number OOK signal propagation and detection in the presence of atmospheric turbulence, an issue relevant to free-space quantum communications. This paper describes the design, testing and implementation of a photon counting receiver for AO-40 signals using a Labview software platform to display received data, error statistics, detection and correction (using cyclic redundancy check code CRCC 32), and clock synchronization [3]. Signals are acquired with a 300 mm f/6.3 Schmidt-Cassegrain tracking telescope coupled by 100 micron multimode fibre to a silicon APD photon counting module. References 1. R. Purvinskis, Use of the fixed orientation optical transmitter on AO-40, Internal Report, Centre for Advanced Telecommunications and Quantum Electronics, University of Canberra, 2001. 2. A. Arora, Oscar 40: A Complete Link Analysis, University of Canberra BE (Hons) Report, November 2001. 3. A. Arora, Optical Modulator and Demodulator for the Oscar-40 Satellite, University of Canberra BE Project Report , November 2001.

  18. A technology review of time-of-flight photon counting for advanced remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamb, Robert A.

    2010-04-01

    Time correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) has made tremendous progress during the past ten years enabling improved performance in precision time-of-flight (TOF) rangefinding and lidar. In this review the development and performance of several ranging systems is presented that use TCSPC for accurate ranging and range profiling over distances up to 17km. A range resolution of a few millimetres is routinely achieved over distances of several kilometres. These systems include single wavelength devices operating in the visible; multi-wavelength systems covering the visible and near infra-red; the use of electronic gating to reduce in-band solar background and, most recently, operation at high repetition rates without range aliasing- typically 10MHz over several kilometres. These systems operate at very low optical power (<100μW). The technique therefore has potential for eye-safe lidar monitoring of the environment and obvious military, security and surveillance sensing applications. The review will highlight the theoretical principles of photon counting and progress made in developing absolute ranging techniques that enable high repetition rate data acquisition that avoids range aliasing. Technology trends in TCSPC rangefinding are merging with those of quantum cryptography and its future application to revolutionary quantum imaging provides diverse and exciting research into secure covert sensing, ultra-low power active imaging and quantum rangefinding.

  19. The Slope Imaging Multi-Polarization Photon-Counting Lidar: Development and Performance Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dabney, Phillip

    2010-01-01

    The Slope Imaging Multi-polarization Photon-counting Lidar is an airborne instrument developed to demonstrate laser altimetry measurement methods that will enable more efficient observations of topography and surface properties from space. The instrument was developed through the NASA Earth Science Technology Office Instrument Incubator Program with a focus on cryosphere remote sensing. The SIMPL transmitter is an 11 KHz, 1064 nm, plane-polarized micropulse laser transmitter that is frequency doubled to 532 nm and split into four push-broom beams. The receiver employs single-photon, polarimetric ranging at 532 and 1064 nm using Single Photon Counting Modules in order to achieve simultaneous sampling of surface elevation, slope, roughness and depolarizing scattering properties, the latter used to differentiate surface types. Data acquired over ice-covered Lake Erie in February, 2009 are documenting SIMPL s measurement performance and capabilities, demonstrating differentiation of open water and several ice cover types. ICESat-2 will employ several of the technologies advanced by SIMPL, including micropulse, single photon ranging in a multi-beam, push-broom configuration operating at 532 nm.

  20. Optical image encryption via photon-counting imaging and compressive sensing based ptychography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawat, Nitin; Hwang, In-Chul; Shi, Yishi; Lee, Byung-Geun

    2015-06-01

    In this study, we investigate the integration of compressive sensing (CS) and photon-counting imaging (PCI) techniques with a ptychography-based optical image encryption system. Primarily, the plaintext real-valued image is optically encrypted and recorded via a classical ptychography technique. Further, the sparse-based representations of the original encrypted complex data can be produced by combining CS and PCI techniques with the primary encrypted image. Such a combination takes an advantage of reduced encrypted samples (i.e., linearly projected random compressive complex samples and photon-counted complex samples) that can be exploited to realize optical decryption, which inherently serves as a secret key (i.e., independent to encryption phase keys) and makes an intruder attack futile. In addition to this, recording fewer encrypted samples provides a substantial bandwidth reduction in online transmission. We demonstrate that the fewer sparse-based complex samples have adequate information to realize decryption. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on integrating CS and PCI with conventional ptychography-based optical image encryption.

  1. Energy-resolved CT imaging with a photon-counting silicon-strip detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persson, Mats; Huber, Ben; Karlsson, Staffan; Liu, Xuejin; Chen, Han; Xu, Cheng; Yveborg, Moa; Bornefalk, Hans; Danielsson, Mats

    2014-11-01

    Photon-counting detectors are promising candidates for use in the next generation of x-ray computed tomography (CT) scanners. Among the foreseen benefits are higher spatial resolution, better trade-off between noise and dose and energy discriminating capabilities. Silicon is an attractive detector material because of its low cost, mature manufacturing process and high hole mobility. However, it is sometimes overlooked for CT applications because of its low absorption efficiency and high fraction of Compton scatter. The purpose of this work is to demonstrate that silicon is a feasible material for CT detectors by showing energy-resolved CT images acquired with an 80 kVp x-ray tube spectrum using a photon-counting silicon-strip detector with eight energy thresholds developed in our group. We use a single detector module, consisting of a linear array of 50 0.5 × 0.4 mm detector elements, to image a phantom in a table-top lab setup. The phantom consists of a plastic cylinder with circular inserts containing water, fat and aqueous solutions of calcium, iodine and gadolinium, in different concentrations. By using basis material decomposition we obtain water, calcium, iodine and gadolinium basis images and demonstrate that these basis images can be used to separate the different materials in the inserts. We also show results showing that the detector has potential for quantitative measurements of substance concentrations.

  2. Photon-counting 1.0 GHz-phase-modulation fluorometer

    SciTech Connect

    Mizuno, T.; Nakao, S.; Mizutani, Y.; Iwata, T.

    2015-04-15

    We have constructed an improved version of a photon-counting phase-modulation fluorometer (PC-PMF) with a maximum modulation frequency of 1.0 GHz, where a phase domain measurement is conducted with a time-correlated single-photon-counting electronics. While the basic concept of the PC-PMF has been reported previously by one of the authors, little attention has been paid to its significance, other than its weak fluorescence measurement capability. Recently, we have recognized the importance of the PC-PMF and its potential for fluorescence lifetime measurements. One important aspect of the PC-PMF is that it enables us to perform high-speed measurements that exceed the frequency bandwidths of the photomultiplier tubes that are commonly used as fluorescence detectors. We describe the advantages of the PC-PMF and demonstrate its usefulness based on fundamental performance tests. In our new version of the PC-PMF, we have used a laser diode (LD) as an excitation light source rather than the light-emitting diode that was used in the primary version. We have also designed a simple and stable LD driver to modulate the device. Additionally, we have obtained a sinusoidal histogram waveform that has multiple cycles within a time span to be measured, which is indispensable for precise phase measurements. With focus on the fluorescence intensity and the resolution time, we have compared the performance of the PC-PMF with that of a conventional PMF using the analogue light detection method.

  3. Polychromatic Iterative Statistical Material Image Reconstruction for Photon-Counting Computed Tomography.

    PubMed

    Weidinger, Thomas; Buzug, Thorsten M; Flohr, Thomas; Kappler, Steffen; Stierstorfer, Karl

    2016-01-01

    This work proposes a dedicated statistical algorithm to perform a direct reconstruction of material-decomposed images from data acquired with photon-counting detectors (PCDs) in computed tomography. It is based on local approximations (surrogates) of the negative logarithmic Poisson probability function. Exploiting the convexity of this function allows for parallel updates of all image pixels. Parallel updates can compensate for the rather slow convergence that is intrinsic to statistical algorithms. We investigate the accuracy of the algorithm for ideal photon-counting detectors. Complementarily, we apply the algorithm to simulation data of a realistic PCD with its spectral resolution limited by K-escape, charge sharing, and pulse-pileup. For data from both an ideal and realistic PCD, the proposed algorithm is able to correct beam-hardening artifacts and quantitatively determine the material fractions of the chosen basis materials. Via regularization we were able to achieve a reduction of image noise for the realistic PCD that is up to 90% lower compared to material images form a linear, image-based material decomposition using FBP images. Additionally, we find a dependence of the algorithms convergence speed on the threshold selection within the PCD. PMID:27195003

  4. Small-angle scatter tomography with a photon-counting detector array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Shuo; Zhu, Zheyuan; Wang, Ge; Cong, Wenxiang

    2016-05-01

    Small-angle x-ray scatter imaging has a high intrinsic contrast in cancer research and other applications, and provides information on molecular composition and micro-structure of the tissue. In general, the implementations of small-angle coherent scatter imaging can be divided into two main categories: direct tomography and angular dispersive computerized tomography. Based on the recent development of energy-discriminative photon-counting detector array, here we propose a computerized tomography setup based on energy-dispersive measurement with a photon-counting detector array. To show merits of the energy-dispersive approach, we have performed numerical tests with a phantom containing various tissue types, in comparison with the existing imaging approaches. The results show that with an energy resolution of ~6 keV, the energy dispersive tomography system with a broadband tabletop x-ray would outperform the angular dispersive system, which makes the x-ray small-angle scatter tomography promising for high-specificity tissue imaging.

  5. Sea-Ice Freeboard Retrieval Using Digital Photon-Counting Laser Altimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrell, Sinead L.; Brunt, Kelly M.; Ruth, Julia M.; Kuhn, John M.; Connor, Laurence N.; Walsh, Kaitlin M.

    2015-01-01

    Airborne and spaceborne altimeters provide measurements of sea-ice elevation, from which sea-ice freeboard and thickness may be derived. Observations of the Arctic ice pack by satellite altimeters indicate a significant decline in ice thickness, and volume, over the last decade. NASA's Ice, Cloud and land Elevation Satellite-2 (ICESat-2) is a next-generation laser altimeter designed to continue key sea-ice observations through the end of this decade. An airborne simulator for ICESat-2, the Multiple Altimeter Beam Experimental Lidar (MABEL), has been deployed to gather pre-launch data for mission development. We present an analysis of MABEL data gathered over sea ice in the Greenland Sea and assess the capabilities of photon-counting techniques for sea-ice freeboard retrieval. We compare freeboard estimates in the marginal ice zone derived from MABEL photon-counting data with coincident data collected by a conventional airborne laser altimeter. We find that freeboard estimates agree to within 0.03m in the areas where sea-ice floes were interspersed with wide leads, and to within 0.07m elsewhere. MABEL data may also be used to infer sea-ice thickness, and when compared with coincident but independent ice thickness estimates, MABEL ice thicknesses agreed to within 0.65m or better.

  6. Polarimetric, two-color, photon-counting laser altimeter measurements of forest canopy structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harding, David J.; Dabney, Philip W.; Valett, Susan

    2011-10-01

    Laser altimeter measurements of forest stands with distinct structures and compositions have been acquired at 532 nm (green) and 1064 nm (near-infrared) wavelengths and parallel and perpendicular polarization states using the Slope Imaging Multi-polarization Photon Counting Lidar (SIMPL). The micropulse, single photon ranging measurement approach employed by SIMPL provides canopy structure measurements with high vertical and spatial resolution. Using a height distribution analysis method adapted from conventional, 1064 nm, full-waveform lidar remote sensing, the sensitivity of two parameters commonly used for above-ground biomass estimation are compared as a function of wavelength. The results for the height of median energy (HOME) and canopy cover are for the most part very similar, indicating biomass estimations using lidars operating at green and near-infrared wavelengths will yield comparable estimates. The expected detection of increasing depolarization with depth into the canopies due to volume multiplescattering was not observed, possibly due to the small laser footprint and the small detector field of view used in the SIMPL instrument. The results of this work provide pathfinder information for NASA's ICESat-2 mission that will employ a 532 nm, micropulse, photon counting laser altimeter.

  7. Linear Mode Photon Counting LADAR Camera Development for the Ultra-Sensitive Detector Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jack, M.; Bailey, S.; Edwards, J.; Burkholder, R.; Liu, K.; Asbrock, J.; Randall, V.; Chapman, G.; Riker, J.

    Advanced LADAR receivers enable high accuracy identification of targets at ranges beyond standard EOIR sensors. Increased sensitivity of these receivers will enable reductions in laser power, hence more affordable, smaller sensors as well as much longer range of detection. Raytheon has made a recent breakthrough in LADAR architecture by combining very low noise ~ 30 electron front end amplifiers with moderate gain >60 Avalanche Photodiodes. The combination of these enables detection of laser pulse returns containing as few as one photon up to 1000s of photons. Because a lower APD gain is utilized the sensor operation differs dramatically from traditional "geiger mode APD" LADARs. Linear mode photon counting LADAR offers advantages including: determination of intensity as well as time of arrival, nanosecond recovery times and discrimination between radiation events and signals. In our talk we will review the basic amplifier and APD component performance, the front end architecture, the demonstration of single photon detection using a simple 4 x 4 SCA and the design of a fully integrated photon counting camera under development in support of the Ultra-Sensitive Detector (USD) program sponsored by the Air Force Research Laboratory at Kirtland AFB, NM. Work Supported in Part by AFRL - Contract # FA8632-05-C-2454 Dr. Jim Riker Program Manager.

  8. Experimental study of beam hardening artifacts in photon counting breast computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisogni, M. G.; Del Guerra, A.; Lanconelli, N.; Lauria, A.; Mettivier, G.; Montesi, M. C.; Panetta, D.; Pani, R.; Quattrocchi, M. G.; Randaccio, P.; Rosso, V.; Russo, P.

    2007-10-01

    We are implementing an X-ray breast Computed Tomography (CT) system on the gantry of a dedicated single photon emission tomography system for breast Tc-99 imaging. For the breast CT system we investigated the relevance of the beam hardening artifact. We studied the use of a single photon counting silicon pixel detector (0.3 mm thick, 256×256 pixel, 55μm pitch, bump-bonded to the Medipix2 photon counting readout chip) as detector unit in our X-ray CT system. We evaluated the beam hardening "cupping" artifact using homogeneous PMMA slabs and phantoms up to 14 cm in diameter, used as uncompressed breast tissue phantoms, imaged with a tungsten anode tube at 80 kVp with 4.2 mm Al filtration. For beam hardening evaluation we used a bimodal energy model. The CT data show a "cupping" artifact going from 4% (4-cm thick material) to 18% (14-cm thick material). This huge artifacts is influenced by the low detection efficiency and the charge sharing effect of the silicon pixel detector.

  9. Dual energy CT with photon counting and dual source systems: comparative evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atak, Haluk; Shikhaliev, Polad M.

    2015-12-01

    Recently, new dual energy (DE) computed tomography (CT) systems—dual source CT (DSCT) and photon counting CT (PCCT) have been introduced. Although these systems have the same clinical targets, they have major differences as they use dual and single kVp acquisitions and different x-ray detection and energy resolution concepts. The purpose of this study was theoretical and experimental comparisons of DSCT and PCCT. The DSCT Siemens Somatom Flash was modeled for simulation study. The PCCT had the same configuration as DSCT except it used a photon counting detector. The soft tissue phantoms with 20, 30, and 38 cm diameters included iodine, CaCO3, adipose, and water samples. The dose (air kerma) was 14 mGy for all studies. The low and high energy CT data were simulated at 80 kVp and 140 kVp for DSCT, and in 20-58 keV and 59-120 keV energy ranges for PCCT, respectively. The experiments used Somatom Flash DSCT system and PCCT system based on photon counting CdZnTe detector with 2  ×  256 pixel configuration and 1  ×  1 mm2 pixels size. In simulated general CT images, PCCT provided higher contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) than DSCT with 0.4/0.8 mm Sn filters. The PCCT with K-edge filter provided higher CNR than the PCCT with a Cu filter, and DSCT with 0.4 mm Sn filter provided higher CNR than the DSCT with a 0.8 mm Sn filter. In simulated DE subtracted images, CNR of the DSCT was comparable to the PCCT with a Cu filter. However, DE PCCT with Ho a K-edge filter provided 30-40% higher CNR than the DE DSCT with 0.4/0.8 mm Sn filters. The experimental PCCT provided higher CNR in general imaging compared to the DSCT. In experimental DE subtracted images, the DSCT provided higher CNR than the PCCT with a Cu filter. However, experimental CNR with DE PCCT with K-edge filter was 15% higher than in DE DSCT, which is less than 30-40% increase predicted by the simulation study. It is concluded that ideal PCCT can provide substantial advantages over ideal

  10. Dual energy CT with photon counting and dual source systems: comparative evaluation.

    PubMed

    Atak, Haluk; Shikhaliev, Polad M

    2015-12-01

    Recently, new dual energy (DE) computed tomography (CT) systems-dual source CT (DSCT) and photon counting CT (PCCT) have been introduced. Although these systems have the same clinical targets, they have major differences as they use dual and single kVp acquisitions and different x-ray detection and energy resolution concepts. The purpose of this study was theoretical and experimental comparisons of DSCT and PCCT. The DSCT Siemens Somatom Flash was modeled for simulation study. The PCCT had the same configuration as DSCT except it used a photon counting detector. The soft tissue phantoms with 20, 30, and 38 cm diameters included iodine, CaCO3, adipose, and water samples. The dose (air kerma) was 14 mGy for all studies. The low and high energy CT data were simulated at 80 kVp and 140 kVp for DSCT, and in 20-58 keV and 59-120 keV energy ranges for PCCT, respectively. The experiments used Somatom Flash DSCT system and PCCT system based on photon counting CdZnTe detector with 2  ×  256 pixel configuration and 1  ×  1 mm(2) pixels size. In simulated general CT images, PCCT provided higher contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) than DSCT with 0.4/0.8 mm Sn filters. The PCCT with K-edge filter provided higher CNR than the PCCT with a Cu filter, and DSCT with 0.4 mm Sn filter provided higher CNR than the DSCT with a 0.8 mm Sn filter. In simulated DE subtracted images, CNR of the DSCT was comparable to the PCCT with a Cu filter. However, DE PCCT with Ho a K-edge filter provided 30-40% higher CNR than the DE DSCT with 0.4/0.8 mm Sn filters. The experimental PCCT provided higher CNR in general imaging compared to the DSCT. In experimental DE subtracted images, the DSCT provided higher CNR than the PCCT with a Cu filter. However, experimental CNR with DE PCCT with K-edge filter was 15% higher than in DE DSCT, which is less than 30-40% increase predicted by the simulation study. It is concluded that ideal PCCT can provide substantial advantages over ideal

  11. Dual energy CT with photon counting and dual source systems: comparative evaluation.

    PubMed

    Atak, Haluk; Shikhaliev, Polad M

    2015-12-01

    Recently, new dual energy (DE) computed tomography (CT) systems-dual source CT (DSCT) and photon counting CT (PCCT) have been introduced. Although these systems have the same clinical targets, they have major differences as they use dual and single kVp acquisitions and different x-ray detection and energy resolution concepts. The purpose of this study was theoretical and experimental comparisons of DSCT and PCCT. The DSCT Siemens Somatom Flash was modeled for simulation study. The PCCT had the same configuration as DSCT except it used a photon counting detector. The soft tissue phantoms with 20, 30, and 38 cm diameters included iodine, CaCO3, adipose, and water samples. The dose (air kerma) was 14 mGy for all studies. The low and high energy CT data were simulated at 80 kVp and 140 kVp for DSCT, and in 20-58 keV and 59-120 keV energy ranges for PCCT, respectively. The experiments used Somatom Flash DSCT system and PCCT system based on photon counting CdZnTe detector with 2  ×  256 pixel configuration and 1  ×  1 mm(2) pixels size. In simulated general CT images, PCCT provided higher contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) than DSCT with 0.4/0.8 mm Sn filters. The PCCT with K-edge filter provided higher CNR than the PCCT with a Cu filter, and DSCT with 0.4 mm Sn filter provided higher CNR than the DSCT with a 0.8 mm Sn filter. In simulated DE subtracted images, CNR of the DSCT was comparable to the PCCT with a Cu filter. However, DE PCCT with Ho a K-edge filter provided 30-40% higher CNR than the DE DSCT with 0.4/0.8 mm Sn filters. The experimental PCCT provided higher CNR in general imaging compared to the DSCT. In experimental DE subtracted images, the DSCT provided higher CNR than the PCCT with a Cu filter. However, experimental CNR with DE PCCT with K-edge filter was 15% higher than in DE DSCT, which is less than 30-40% increase predicted by the simulation study. It is concluded that ideal PCCT can provide substantial advantages over ideal

  12. Photon-Counting Multikilohertz Microlaser Altimeters for Airborne and Spaceborne Topographic Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degnan, John J.; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We consider the optimum design of photon-counting microlaser altimeters operating from airborne and spaceborne platforms under both day and night conditions. Extremely compact Q-switched microlaser transmitters produce trains of low energy pulses at multi-kHz rates and can easily generate subnanosecond pulse-widths for precise ranging. To guide the design, we have modeled the solar noise background and developed simple algorithms, based on Post-Detection Poisson Filtering (PDPF), to optimally extract the weak altimeter signal from a high noise background during daytime operations. Practical technology issues, such as detector and/or receiver dead times, have also been considered in the analysis. We describe an airborne prototype, being developed under NASA's instrument Incubator Program, which is designed to operate at a 10 kHz rate from aircraft cruise altitudes up to 12 km with laser pulse energies on the order of a few microjoules. We also analyze a compact and power efficient system designed to operate from Mars orbit at an altitude of 300 km and sample the Martian surface at rates up to 4.3 kHz using a 1 watt laser transmitter and an 18 cm telescope. This yields a Power-Aperture Product of 0.24 W-square meter, corresponding to a value almost 4 times smaller than the Mars Orbiting Laser Altimeter (0. 88W-square meter), yet the sampling rate is roughly 400 times greater (4 kHz vs 10 Hz) Relative to conventional high power laser altimeters, advantages of photon-counting laser altimeters include: (1) a more efficient use of available laser photons providing up to two orders of magnitude greater surface sampling rates for a given laser power-telescope aperture product; (2) a simultaneous two order of magnitude reduction in the volume, cost and weight of the telescope system; (3) the unique ability to spatially resolve the source of the surface return in a photon counting mode through the use of pixellated or imaging detectors; and (4) improved vertical and

  13. In situ detection of warfarin using time-correlated single-photon counting

    SciTech Connect

    Rosengren, Annika M.; Karlsson, Bjoern C.G.; Naeslund, Inga; Andersson, Per Ola; Nicholls, Ian A.

    2011-04-01

    Highlights: {yields} Direct in situ measurement of specific isomeric forms of the anticoagulant warfarin. {yields} TCSPC spectroscopy in conjunction with synthetic Sudlow I binding site receptors. {yields} Development of sensor principle for use in clinical and environmental monitoring. -- Abstract: Here we report on a novel method for the direct in situ measurement of specific isomeric forms of the anticoagulant warfarin using time correlated single-photon counting (TCSPC) spectroscopy in conjunction with synthetic Sudlow I binding site receptors. The method is highly robust over the clinically significant concentration range, and demonstrates the potential of the binding site mimics in conjunction with the spectroscopic strategy employed here for the determination of this important pharmaceutical in clinical or even environmental samples.

  14. Mu-Spec - A High Performance Ultra-Compact Photon Counting spectrometer for Space Submillimeter Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moseley, H.; Hsieh, W.-T.; Stevenson, T.; Wollack, E.; Brown, A.; Benford, D.; Sadleir; U-Yen, I.; Ehsan, N.; Zmuidzinas, J.; Bradford, M.

    2011-01-01

    We have designed and are testing elements of a fully integrated submillimeter spectrometer based on superconducting microstrip technology. The instrument can offer resolving power R approximately 1500, and its high frequency cutoff is set by the gap of available high performance superconductors. All functions of the spectrometer are integrated - light is coupled to the microstrip circuit with a planar antenna, the spectra discrimination is achieved using a synthetic grating, orders are separated using planar filter, and detected using photon counting MKID detector. This spectrometer promises to revolutionize submillimeter spectroscopy from space. It replaces instruments with the scale of 1m with a spectrometer on a 10 cm Si wafer. The reduction in mass and volume promises a much higher performance system within available resource in a space mission. We will describe the system and the performance of the components that have been fabricated and tested.

  15. Information-theoretical analysis of time-correlated single-photon counting measurements of single molecules.

    PubMed

    Talaga, David S

    2009-04-30

    Time-correlated single photon counting allows luminescence lifetime information to be determined on a single molecule level. This paper develops a formalism to allow information theory analysis of the ability of luminescence lifetime measurements to resolve states in a single molecule. It analyzes the information content of the photon stream and the fraction of that information that is relevant to the state determination problem. Experimental losses of information due to instrument response, digitization, and different types of background are calculated and a procedure to determine the optimal value of experimental parameters is demonstrated. This paper shows how to use the information theoretical formalism to evaluate the number of photons required to distinguish dyes that differ only by lifetime. It extends this idea to include distinguishing molecular states that differ in the electron transfer quenching or resonant energy transfer and shows how the differences between the lifetime of signal and background can help distinguish the dye position in an excitation beam. PMID:19385684

  16. On the Single-Photon-Counting (SPC) modes of imaging using an XFEL source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhehui

    2015-12-01

    The requirements to achieve high detection efficiency (above 50%) and gigahertz (GHz) frame rate for the proposed 42-keV X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) at Los Alamos are summarized. Direct detection scenarios using C (diamond), Si, Ge and GaAs semiconductor sensors are analyzed. Single-photon counting (SPC) mode and weak SPC mode using Si can potentially meet the efficiency and frame rate requirements and be useful to both photoelectric absorption and Compton physics as the photon energy increases. Multilayer three-dimensional (3D) detector architecture, as a possible means to realize SPC modes, is compared with the widely used two-dimensional (2D) hybrid planar electrode structure and 3D deeply entrenched electrode architecture. Demonstration of thin film cameras less than 100-μm thick with onboard thin ASICs could be an initial step to realize multilayer 3D detectors and SPC modes for XFELs.

  17. Spectral X-Ray Diffraction using a 6 Megapixel Photon Counting Array Detector

    PubMed Central

    Muir, Ryan D.; Pogranichniy, Nicholas R.; Muir, J. Lewis; Sullivan, Shane Z.; Battaile, Kevin P.; Mulichak, Anne M.; Toth, Scott J.; Keefe, Lisa J.; Simpson, Garth J.

    2016-01-01

    Pixel-array array detectors allow single-photon counting to be performed on a massively parallel scale, with several million counting circuits and detectors in the array. Because the number of photoelectrons produced at the detector surface depends on the photon energy, these detectors offer the possibility of spectral imaging. In this work, a statistical model of the instrument response is used to calibrate the detector on a per-pixel basis. In turn, the calibrated sensor was used to perform separation of dual-energy diffraction measurements into two monochromatic images. Targeting applications include multi-wavelength diffraction to aid in protein structure determination and X-ray diffraction imaging. PMID:27041789

  18. Time-Correlated Single-Photon Counting Range Profiling of Moving Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedborg, Julia; Jonsson, Per; Henriksson, Markus; Sjöqvist, Lars

    2016-06-01

    Time-correlated single-photon counting (TCSPC) is a laser radar technique that can provide range profiling with very high resolution. Range profiles of multiple surface objects and geometrical shapes are revealed using multiple laser pulses with very low pulse energy. The method relies on accurate time measurements between a laser pulse sync signal and the registration of a single-photon event of reflected photons from a target. TCSPC is a statistic method that requires an acquisition time and therefore the range profile of a non-stationary object (target) may be corrupted. Here, we present results showing that it is possible to reconstruct the range profile of a moving target and calculate the velocity of the target.

  19. Combination of current-integrating/photon-counting detector modules for spectral CT.

    PubMed

    Chu, Jiyang; Cong, Wenxiang; Li, Liang; Wang, Ge

    2013-10-01

    Inspired by compressive sensing theory and spectral detection technology, here we propose a novel design of a CT detector array that uses current-integrating/photon-counting modules in an interlacing fashion so that strengths of each detector type can be synergistically combined. For geometrical symmetry, an evenly alternating pattern is initially assumed for these detector modules to form a hybrid detector array. While grayscale detector modules acquire regular raw data in a large dynamic range cost-effectively, spectral detector modules simultaneously sense energy-discriminative data in multiple energy bins. A split Bregman iterative algorithm is developed for spectral CT reconstruction from projection data of an object collected with the hybrid detector array. With mathematical phantoms, an optimal ratio of the number of the spectral elements over the number of grayscale elements is determined based on classic image quality evaluation. This hybrid detector array is capable of delivering a performance comparable with that of a full spectral detector array.

  20. Characterization of a photon-counting intensified active pixel sensor (PC-IAPS): preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uslenghi, Michela C.; Bonanno, Giovanni; Belluso, Massimiliano; Modica, Angelo; Bergamini, Paolo

    2001-12-01

    We report about preliminary results of the characterization of a new kind of MCP-based detector: a Photon Counting Intensified Active Pixel Sensor (APS). PC-IAPS appears as the natural evolution of the Intensified CCD, maintaining the basic characteristics, but with improved performance in terms of dynamic range, along with some other appealing properties: higher radiation hardness, more compact design, lower requirements on the external electronics, low power consumption. The prototype we realized is currently in an early stage of development. Nevertheless, it allows us to demonstrate the feasibility of the photon counter and to measure some of the basic parameters. Some of the characteristics of the APS, relevant to the use in intensified systems, are analyzed and compared with the CCD ones, demonstrating the potentiality of the new device and allowing us to set the basis of future development.

  1. Irradiation of the CLARO-CMOS chip, a fast ASIC for single-photon counting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreotti, M.; Baldini, W.; Calabrese, R.; Carniti, P.; Cassina, L.; Cotta Ramusino, A.; Fiorini, M.; Giachero, A.; Gotti, C.; Luppi, E.; Maino, M.; Malaguti, R.; Pessina, G.; Tomassetti, L.

    2015-07-01

    The CLARO-CMOS is a prototype ASIC that allows fast photon counting with low power consumption, built in AMS 0.35 μm CMOS technology. It is intended to be used as a front-end readout for the upgraded LHCb RICH detectors. In this environment, assuming 10 years of operation at the nominal luminosity expected after the upgrade, the ASIC must withstand a total fluence of about 6×1012 1 MeV neq/cm2 and a total ionising dose of 400 krad. Long term stability of the electronics front-end is essential and the effects of radiation damage on the CLARO-CMOS performance must be carefully studied. This paper describes results of multi-step irradiation tests with protons up to the dose of ~8 Mrad, including measurement of single event effects during irradiation and chip performance evaluation before and after each irradiation step.

  2. Image-based spectral distortion correction for photon-counting x-ray detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Ding Huanjun; Molloi, Sabee

    2012-04-15

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of using an image-based method to correct for distortions induced by various artifacts in the x-ray spectrum recorded with photon-counting detectors for their application in breast computed tomography (CT). Methods: The polyenergetic incident spectrum was simulated with the tungsten anode spectral model using the interpolating polynomials (TASMIP) code and carefully calibrated to match the x-ray tube in this study. Experiments were performed on a Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride (CZT) photon-counting detector with five energy thresholds. Energy bins were adjusted to evenly distribute the recorded counts above the noise floor. BR12 phantoms of various thicknesses were used for calibration. A nonlinear function was selected to fit the count correlation between the simulated and the measured spectra in the calibration process. To evaluate the proposed spectral distortion correction method, an empirical fitting derived from the calibration process was applied on the raw images recorded for polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) phantoms of 8.7, 48.8, and 100.0 mm. Both the corrected counts and the effective attenuation coefficient were compared to the simulated values for each of the five energy bins. The feasibility of applying the proposed method to quantitative material decomposition was tested using a dual-energy imaging technique with a three-material phantom that consisted of water, lipid, and protein. The performance of the spectral distortion correction method was quantified using the relative root-mean-square (RMS) error with respect to the expected values from simulations or areal analysis of the decomposition phantom. Results: The implementation of the proposed method reduced the relative RMS error of the output counts in the five energy bins with respect to the simulated incident counts from 23.0%, 33.0%, and 54.0% to 1.2%, 1.8%, and 7.7% for 8.7, 48.8, and 100.0 mm PMMA phantoms, respectively. The accuracy of the effective attenuation

  3. On the single-photon-counting (SPC) modes of imaging using an XFEL source

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhehui

    2015-12-14

    In this study, the requirements to achieve high detection efficiency (above 50%) and gigahertz (GHz) frame rate for the proposed 42-keV X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) at Los Alamos are summarized. Direct detection scenarios using C (diamond), Si, Ge and GaAs semiconductor sensors are analyzed. Single-photon counting (SPC) mode and weak SPC mode using Si can potentially meet the efficiency and frame rate requirements and be useful to both photoelectric absorption and Compton physics as the photon energy increases. Multilayer three-dimensional (3D) detector architecture, as a possible means to realize SPC modes, is compared with the widely used two-dimensional (2D) hybrid planar electrode structure and 3D deeply entrenched electrode architecture. Demonstration of thin film cameras less than 100-μm thick with onboard thin ASICs could be an initial step to realize multilayer 3D detectors and SPC modes for XFELs.

  4. Linear Mode HgCdTe Avalanche Photodiodes for Photon Counting Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, William, III; Beck, Jeffrey; Scritchfield, Richard; Skokan, Mark; Mitra, Pradip; Sun, Xiaoli; Abshire, James; Carpenter, Darren; Lane, Barry

    2015-01-01

    An overview of recent improvements in the understanding and maturity of linear mode photon counting with HgCdTe electron-initiated avalanche photodiodes is presented. The first HgCdTe LMPC 2x8 format array fabricated in 2011 with 64 micron pitch was a remarkable success in terms of demonstrating a high single photon signal to noise ratio of 13.7 with an excess noise factor of 1.3-1.4, a 7 ns minimum time between events, and a broad spectral response extending from 0.4 micron to 4.2 micron. The main limitations were a greater than 10x higher false event rate than expected of greater than 1 MHz, a 5-7x lower than expected APD gain, and a photon detection efficiency of only 50% when greater than 60% was expected. This paper discusses the reasons behind these limitations and the implementation of their mitigations with new results.

  5. Photon counting imaging and centroiding with an electron-bombarded CCD using single molecule localisation software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirvonen, Liisa M.; Barber, Matthew J.; Suhling, Klaus

    2016-06-01

    Photon event centroiding in photon counting imaging and single-molecule localisation in super-resolution fluorescence microscopy share many traits. Although photon event centroiding has traditionally been performed with simple single-iteration algorithms, we recently reported that iterative fitting algorithms originally developed for single-molecule localisation fluorescence microscopy work very well when applied to centroiding photon events imaged with an MCP-intensified CMOS camera. Here, we have applied these algorithms for centroiding of photon events from an electron-bombarded CCD (EBCCD). We find that centroiding algorithms based on iterative fitting of the photon events yield excellent results and allow fitting of overlapping photon events, a feature not reported before and an important aspect to facilitate an increased count rate and shorter acquisition times.

  6. Vision 20/20: Single photon counting x-ray detectors in medical imaging

    PubMed Central

    Taguchi, Katsuyuki; Iwanczyk, Jan S.

    2013-01-01

    Photon counting detectors (PCDs) with energy discrimination capabilities have been developed for medical x-ray computed tomography (CT) and x-ray (XR) imaging. Using detection mechanisms that are completely different from the current energy integrating detectors and measuring the material information of the object to be imaged, these PCDs have the potential not only to improve the current CT and XR images, such as dose reduction, but also to open revolutionary novel applications such as molecular CT and XR imaging. The performance of PCDs is not flawless, however, and it seems extremely challenging to develop PCDs with close to ideal characteristics. In this paper, the authors offer our vision for the future of PCD-CT and PCD-XR with the review of the current status and the prediction of (1) detector technologies, (2) imaging technologies, (3) system technologies, and (4) potential clinical benefits with PCDs. PMID:24089889

  7. High energy X-ray photon counting imaging using linear accelerator and silicon strip detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Y.; Shimazoe, K.; Yan, X.; Ueda, O.; Ishikura, T.; Fujiwara, T.; Uesaka, M.; Ohno, M.; Tomita, H.; Yoshihara, Y.; Takahashi, H.

    2016-09-01

    A photon counting imaging detector system for high energy X-rays is developed for on-site non-destructive testing of thick objects. One-dimensional silicon strip (1 mm pitch) detectors are stacked to form a two-dimensional edge-on module. Each detector is connected to a 48-channel application specific integrated circuit (ASIC). The threshold-triggered events are recorded by a field programmable gate array based counter in each channel. The detector prototype is tested using 950 kV linear accelerator X-rays. The fast CR shaper (300 ns pulse width) of the ASIC makes it possible to deal with the high instant count rate during the 2 μs beam pulse. The preliminary imaging results of several metal and concrete samples are demonstrated.

  8. Performance and capacity analysis of Poisson photon-counting based Iter-PIC OCDMA systems.

    PubMed

    Li, Lingbin; Zhou, Xiaolin; Zhang, Rong; Zhang, Dingchen; Hanzo, Lajos

    2013-11-01

    In this paper, an iterative parallel interference cancellation (Iter-PIC) technique is developed for optical code-division multiple-access (OCDMA) systems relying on shot-noise limited Poisson photon-counting reception. The novel semi-analytical tool of extrinsic information transfer (EXIT) charts is used for analysing both the bit error rate (BER) performance as well as the channel capacity of these systems and the results are verified by Monte Carlo simulations. The proposed Iter-PIC OCDMA system is capable of achieving two orders of magnitude BER improvements and a 0.1 nats of capacity improvement over the conventional chip-level OCDMA systems at a coding rate of 1/10.

  9. Four-dimensional multiphoton microscopy with time-correlated single-photon counting.

    PubMed

    Schönle, A; Glatz, M; Hell, S W

    2000-12-01

    We report on the implementation of fluorescence-lifetime imaging in multiphoton excitation microscopy that uses PC-compatible modules for time-correlated single-photon counting. Four-dimensional data stacks are produced with each pixel featuring fluorescence-decay curves that consist of as many as 4096 bins. Fluorescence lifetime(s) and their amplitude(s) are extracted by statistical methods at each pixel or in arbitrarily defined regions of interest. When employing an avalanche photodiode the width of the temporal response function is 420 ps. Although this response confines the temporal resolution to values greater than several hundreds of picoseconds, the lifetime precision is determined by the signal-to-noise ratio and can be in the range of tens of picosconds. Lifetime changes are visualized in pulsed-laser-deposited fluorescent layers as well as in cyan fluorescent proteins that transfer energy to yellow fluorescent proteins in live mammalian cells. PMID:18354639

  10. Development of low read noise high conversion gain CMOS image sensor for photon counting level imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Min-Woong; Kawahito, Shoji; Kagawa, Keiichiro; Yasutomi, Keita

    2016-05-01

    A CMOS image sensor with deep sub-electron read noise and high pixel conversion gain has been developed. Its performance is recognized through image outputs from an area image sensor, confirming the capability of photoelectroncounting- level imaging. To achieve high conversion gain, the proposed pixel has special structures to reduce the parasitic capacitances around FD node. As a result, the pixel conversion gain is increased due to the optimized FD node capacitance, and the noise performance is also improved by removing two noise sources from power supply. For the first time, high contrast images from the reset-gate-less CMOS image sensor, with less than 0.3e- rms noise level, have been generated at an extremely low light level of a few electrons per pixel. In addition, the photon-counting capability of the developed CMOS imager is demonstrated by a measurement, photoelectron-counting histogram (PCH).

  11. A photon-counting photodiode array detector for far ultraviolet (FUV) astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartig, G. F.; Moos, H. W.; Pembroke, R.; Bowers, C.

    1982-01-01

    A compact, stable, single-stage intensified photodiode array detector designed for photon-counting, far ultraviolet astronomy applications employs a saturable, 'C'-type MCP (Galileo S. MCP 25-25) to produce high gain pulses with a narrowly peaked pulse height distribution. The P-20 output phosphor exhibits a very short decay time, due to the high current density of the electron pulses. This intensifier is being coupled to a self-scanning linear photodiode array which has a fiber optic input window which allows direct, rigid mechanical coupling with minimal light loss. The array was scanned at a 250 KHz pixel rate. The detector exhibits more than adequate signal-to-noise ratio for pulse counting and event location.

  12. Underwater depth imaging using time-correlated single-photon counting.

    PubMed

    Maccarone, Aurora; McCarthy, Aongus; Ren, Ximing; Warburton, Ryan E; Wallace, Andy M; Moffat, James; Petillot, Yvan; Buller, Gerald S

    2015-12-28

    A depth imaging system, based on the time-of-flight approach and the time-correlated single-photon counting (TCSPC) technique, was investigated for use in highly scattering underwater environments. The system comprised a pulsed supercontinuum laser source, a monostatic scanning transceiver, with a silicon single-photon avalanche diode (SPAD) used for detection of the returned optical signal. Depth images were acquired in the laboratory at stand-off distances of up to 8 attenuation lengths, using per-pixel acquisition times in the range 0.5 to 100 ms, at average optical powers in the range 0.8 nW to 950 μW. In parallel, a LiDAR model was developed and validated using experimental data. The model can be used to estimate the performance of the system under a variety of scattering conditions and system parameters. PMID:26832050

  13. A photon-counting optical communication system for underwater data transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiskett, Philip A.; Struthers, Robert; Tatton, Roy; Lamb, Robert

    2012-09-01

    We report on the performance of a photon-counting optical communication system which was used to transmit optical data at clock rates (not detection rates) of 40Mb/s at a wavelength of 450nm. The transmitted test data patterns comprised of one page of ASCII text preceded by a pseudo-random sequence used as a timing reference pattern by the receiver. The optical data patterns were transmitted through an aquarium tank containing ~110 litres of water and were detected at the receiver by a shallow junction silicon single photon avalanche diode detector. An antacid, brand name Maalox, was introduced into the tank to increase the scattering of the optical pulses. The bit error rate and bit rate of the transmitted data were investigated for a range of Maalox concentrations. The optical attenuation and pulse distortion caused by the introduction of Maalox was also investigated.

  14. A correction method for range walk error in photon counting 3D imaging LIDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Weiji; Sima, Boyu; Chen, Yunfei; Dai, Huidong; Chen, Qian; Gu, Guohua

    2013-11-01

    A correction method for the range walk error is presented in this paper, which is based on a priori modeling and suitable for the GmAPD photon counting three-dimensional(3D) imaging LIDAR. The range walk error is mainly brought in by the fluctuation in number of photons in the laser echo pulse. In this paper, the priori model of range walk error was established, and the function relationship between the range walk error and the laser pulse response rate was determined using the numerical fitting. With this function, the range walk error of original 3D range image was forecasted and the corresponding compensated image of range walk error was obtained to correct the original 3D range image. The experimental results showed that the correction method could reduce the range walk error effectively, and it is particularly suitable for the case that there are significant differences of material properties or reflection characteristics in the scene.

  15. Photon counting imaging and centroiding with an electron-bombarded CCD using single molecule localisation software

    PubMed Central

    Hirvonen, Liisa M.; Barber, Matthew J.; Suhling, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Photon event centroiding in photon counting imaging and single-molecule localisation in super-resolution fluorescence microscopy share many traits. Although photon event centroiding has traditionally been performed with simple single-iteration algorithms, we recently reported that iterative fitting algorithms originally developed for single-molecule localisation fluorescence microscopy work very well when applied to centroiding photon events imaged with an MCP-intensified CMOS camera. Here, we have applied these algorithms for centroiding of photon events from an electron-bombarded CCD (EBCCD). We find that centroiding algorithms based on iterative fitting of the photon events yield excellent results and allow fitting of overlapping photon events, a feature not reported before and an important aspect to facilitate an increased count rate and shorter acquisition times. PMID:27274604

  16. Multifocal multiphoton excitation and time correlated single photon counting detection for 3-D fluorescence lifetime imaging.

    PubMed

    Kumar, S; Dunsby, C; De Beule, P A A; Owen, D M; Anand, U; Lanigan, P M P; Benninger, R K P; Davis, D M; Neil, M A A; Anand, P; Benham, C; Naylor, A; French, P M W

    2007-10-01

    We report a multifocal multiphoton time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) microscope system that uses a 16 channel multi-anode PMT detector. Multiphoton excitation minimizes out-of-focus photobleaching, multifocal excitation reduces non-linear in-plane photobleaching effects and TCSPC electronics provide photon-efficient detection of the fluorescence decay profile. TCSPC detection is less prone to bleaching- and movement-induced artefacts compared to wide-field time-gated or frequency-domain FLIM. This microscope is therefore capable of acquiring 3-D FLIM images at significantly increased speeds compared to single beam multiphoton microscopy and we demonstrate this with live cells expressing a GFP tagged protein. We also apply this system to time-lapse FLIM of NAD(P)H autofluorescence in single live cells and report measurements on the change in the fluorescence decay profile following the application of a known metabolic inhibitor. PMID:19550524

  17. Usefulness of an energy-binned photon-counting x-ray detector for dental panoramic radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukui, Tatsumasa; Katsumata, Akitoshi; Ogawa, Koichi; Fujiwara, Shuu

    2015-03-01

    A newly developed dental panoramic radiography system is equipped with a photon-counting semiconductor detector. This photon-counting detector acquires transparent X-ray beams by dividing them into several energy bands. We developed a method to identify dental materials in the patient's teeth by means of the X-ray energy analysis of panoramic radiographs. We tested various dental materials including gold alloy, dental amalgam, dental cement, and titanium. The results of this study suggest that X-ray energy scattergram analysis could be used to identify a range of dental materials in a patient's panoramic radiograph.

  18. A photon counting and a squeezing measurement method by the exact absorption and dispersion spectrum of Λ-type Atoms.

    PubMed

    Naeimi, Ghasem; Alipour, Samira; Khademi, Siamak

    2016-01-01

    Recently, the master equations for the interaction of two-mode photons with a three-level Λ-type atom are exactly solved for the coherence terms. In this paper the exact absorption spectrum is applied for the presentation of a non-demolition photon counting method, for a few number of coupling photons, and its benefits are discussed. The exact scheme is also applied where the coupling photons are squeezed and the photon counting method is also developed for the measurement of the squeezing parameter of the coupling photons. PMID:27610321

  19. The role of charged particles in the positive corona-generated photon count in a rod to plane air gap

    SciTech Connect

    Bian, X. M.; Wang, Y. J.; MacAlpine, J. M. K.; Chen, L.; Wang, L. M.; Guan, Z. C.; Wan, S. W.; Liu, L.

    2013-08-26

    The relationship between the calculated charged-particle densities in positive corona, the rate of streamer production, and the photon count from the corona were investigated and found to be closely related. Both the densities of electrons and positive ions peaked at 11.8 kV, near the corona inception voltage; they then fell rapidly before slowly rising again. This behavior was exactly matched by the measured photon count. The calculation of the charged-particle density in a positive corona was achieved by means of a fluid model.

  20. Cascaded-systems analyses of photon-counting x-ray detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanguay, Jesse; Yun, Seungman; Kim, Ho Kyung; Cunningham, Ian A.

    2013-03-01

    Single-photon counting (SPC) x-ray imaging has the potential to improve image quality and enable new advanced energy-dependent methods. Recently, cascaded systems analysis (CSA) has been extended to the description of the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) of SPC detectors. In this article we apply the new CSA approach to the description of the DQE of hypothetical direct-conversion selenium (Sc) and cadmium zinc telluride (CdZnTc) detectors including the effects of poly-energetic x-ray spectra, stochastic conversion of x-ray energy to electron­ hole (c-h) pairs, depth-dependent collection of e-h pairs using the Hecht relation, additive electronic noise, and thresholding. Comparisons arc made to an energy-integrating model. For this simple model, with the exception of thick (1- 10 mm) Sc-bascd convertors, we found that the SPC DQE was 5-20 %greater than that of the energy­ integrating model. This trend was tnw even when additive noise was included in the SPC model and excluded from the energy-integrating model. However, the DQE of SPC detectors with poor collection efficiency (such as thick (<1 mm) Sc detectors) and high levels of additive noise can be degraded by 40-90 % for all energies and x-ray spectra considered. vVhile photon-counting approaches arc not yet ready for routine diagnostic imaging, the available DQE is equal to or higher than that of conventional energy-integrating detectors under a wide range of x-ray energies and convertor thickness. However, like energy-integrating detectors, the DQE of SPC detectors will be degraded by the combination of poor collection efficiency and high levels of additive noise.

  1. Breast Tissue Characterization with Photon-counting Spectral CT Imaging: A Postmortem Breast Study

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Huanjun; Klopfer, Michael J.; Ducote, Justin L.; Masaki, Fumitaro

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the feasibility of breast tissue characterization in terms of water, lipid, and protein contents with a spectral computed tomographic (CT) system based on a cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) photon-counting detector by using postmortem breasts. Materials and Methods Nineteen pairs of postmortem breasts were imaged with a CZT-based photon-counting spectral CT system with beam energy of 100 kVp. The mean glandular dose was estimated to be in the range of 1.8–2.2 mGy. The images were corrected for pulse pile-up and other artifacts by using spectral distortion corrections. Dual-energy decomposition was then applied to characterize each breast into water, lipid, and protein contents. The precision of the three-compartment characterization was evaluated by comparing the composition of right and left breasts, where the standard error of the estimations was determined. The results of dual-energy decomposition were compared by using averaged root mean square to chemical analysis, which was used as the reference standard. Results The standard errors of the estimations of the right-left correlations obtained from spectral CT were 7.4%, 6.7%, and 3.2% for water, lipid, and protein contents, respectively. Compared with the reference standard, the average root mean square error in breast tissue composition was 2.8%. Conclusion Spectral CT can be used to accurately quantify the water, lipid, and protein contents in breast tissue in a laboratory study by using postmortem specimens. © RSNA, 2014 PMID:24814180

  2. A burst-mode photon counting receiver with automatic channel estimation and bit rate detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Hemonth G.; DeVoe, Catherine E.; Fletcher, Andrew S.; Gaschits, Igor D.; Hakimi, Farhad; Hamilton, Scott A.; Hardy, Nicholas D.; Ingwersen, John G.; Kaminsky, Richard D.; Moores, John D.; Scheinbart, Marvin S.; Yarnall, Timothy M.

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate a multi-rate burst-mode photon-counting receiver for undersea communication at data rates up to 10.416 Mb/s over a 30-foot water channel. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of burst-mode photon-counting communication. With added attenuation, the maximum link loss is 97.1 dB at λ=517 nm. In clear ocean water, this equates to link distances up to 148 meters. For λ=470 nm, the achievable link distance in clear ocean water is 450 meters. The receiver incorporates soft-decision forward error correction (FEC) based on a product code of an inner LDPC code and an outer BCH code. The FEC supports multiple code rates to achieve error-free performance. We have selected a burst-mode receiver architecture to provide robust performance with respect to unpredictable channel obstructions. The receiver is capable of on-the-fly data rate detection and adapts to changing levels of signal and background light. The receiver updates its phase alignment and channel estimates every 1.6 ms, allowing for rapid changes in water quality as well as motion between transmitter and receiver. We demonstrate on-the-fly rate detection, channel BER within 0.2 dB of theory across all data rates, and error-free performance within 1.82 dB of soft-decision capacity across all tested code rates. All signal processing is done in FPGAs and runs continuously in real time.

  3. SWAD: inherent photon counting performance of amorphous selenium multi-well avalanche detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stavro, Jann; Goldan, Amir H.; Zhao, Wei

    2016-03-01

    Photon counting detectors (PCDs) have the potential to improve x-ray imaging, however they are still hindered by several performance limitations and high production cost. By using amorphous Selenium (a-Se) the cost of PCDs can be significantly reduced compared to crystalline materials and enable large area detector fabrication. To overcome the problem of low carrier mobility and low charge conversion gain in a-Se, we are developing a novel direct conversion a- Se field-Shaping multi-Well Avalanche Detector (SWAD). SWAD circumvents the charge transport limitation by using a Frisch grid built within the readout circuit, reducing charge collection time to ~200 ns. Field shaping permits depth independent avalanche gain in wells, resulting in total conversion gain that is comparable to Si and CdTe. In the present work we investigate the effects of charge sharing and energy loss to understand the inherent photon counting performance for SWAD at x-ray energies used in breast imaging applications (20-50keV). The energy deposition profile for each interacting x-ray was determined with Monte Carlo simulation. For the energy ranges we are interested in, photoelectric interaction dominates, with a k-fluorescence yield of approximately 60%. Using a monoenergetic 45 keV beam incident on a target pixel in 400um of a-Se, our results show that only 20.42 % and 22.4 % of primary interacting photons have kfluorescence emissions which escape the target pixel for 100um and 85um pixel sizes respectively, demonstrating SWAD's potential for high spatial resolution applications.

  4. Photon-counting 1.0 GHz-phase-modulation fluorometer.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, T; Nakao, S; Mizutani, Y; Iwata, T

    2015-04-01

    We have constructed an improved version of a photon-counting phase-modulation fluorometer (PC-PMF) with a maximum modulation frequency of 1.0 GHz, where a phase domain measurement is conducted with a time-correlated single-photon-counting electronics. While the basic concept of the PC-PMF has been reported previously by one of the authors, little attention has been paid to its significance, other than its weak fluorescence measurement capability. Recently, we have recognized the importance of the PC-PMF and its potential for fluorescence lifetime measurements. One important aspect of the PC-PMF is that it enables us to perform high-speed measurements that exceed the frequency bandwidths of the photomultiplier tubes that are commonly used as fluorescence detectors. We describe the advantages of the PC-PMF and demonstrate its usefulness based on fundamental performance tests. In our new version of the PC-PMF, we have used a laser diode (LD) as an excitation light source rather than the light-emitting diode that was used in the primary version. We have also designed a simple and stable LD driver to modulate the device. Additionally, we have obtained a sinusoidal histogram waveform that has multiple cycles within a time span to be measured, which is indispensable for precise phase measurements. With focus on the fluorescence intensity and the resolution time, we have compared the performance of the PC-PMF with that of a conventional PMF using the analogue light detection method. PMID:25933844

  5. Direct measurement by single photon counting of lipid hydroperoxides in human plasma and lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Zamburlini, A; Maiorino, M; Barbera, P; Roveri, A; Ursini, F

    1995-11-20

    A single photon counting procedure for measuring lipid hydroperoxides in human plasma or LDL-VLDL, escaping from extraction and chromatography, is described. This appears to be a relevant procedure because the recovery of phospholipid hydroperoxides from plasma is a critical point which, in our hands, was limited and poorly reproducible. The sample is added to a reaction mixture containing luminol, hemin, and Triton X-100 in an alkaline buffer, the photon emission is recorded, and the data are processed using the monoexponential decay of the photon emission rate. The measurement is applied to (a) plasma passed through a "desalting" cartridge to eliminate the small water-soluble antioxidants which inhibit the chemiluminescent process or (b) apo-B-containing lipoproteins (LDL-VLDL) isolated by heparin-Sepharose affinity chromatography. The content of lipid hydroperoxides is calculated using an internal calibration with palmitoyllinoleoylphosphatidylcholine hydroperoxide. This procedure, based on a single photon counting technology, was adopted to produce reliable results using samples from which inhibitors of the photon emission process have not been completely eliminated. The specificity of the signal for lipid hydroperoxides was validated by its complete disappearance following incubation of the sample with glutathione and phospholipid-hydroperoxide glutathione peroxidase (EC 1.11.1.12), the sole enzyme specific for all classes of lipid hydroperoxides in lipoproteins. The interassay variability was < 10%. The results indicated that the concentration of lipid hydroperoxides in the plasma of 20 healthy subjects was 353 +/- 78 nM. In different subjects, LDL-VLDL accounted for 40-80% of the lipid hydroperoxides in plasma. PMID:8600817

  6. Task-based weights for photon counting spectral x-ray imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Bornefalk, Hans

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To develop a framework for taking the spatial frequency composition of an imaging task into account when determining optimal bin weight factors for photon counting energy sensitive x-ray systems. A second purpose of the investigation is to evaluate the possible improvement compared to using pixel based weights. Methods: The Fourier based approach of imaging performance and detectability index d' is applied to pulse height discriminating photon counting systems. The dependency of d' on the bin weight factors is made explicit, taking into account both differences in signal and noise transfer characteristics across bins and the spatial frequency dependency of interbin correlations from reabsorbed scatter. Using a simplified model of a specific silicon detector, d' values for a high and a low frequency imaging task are determined for optimal weights and compared to pixel based weights. Results: The method successfully identifies bins where a large point spread function degrades detection of high spatial frequency targets. The method is also successful in determining how to downweigh highly correlated bins. Quantitative predictions for the simplified silicon detector model indicate that improvements in the detectability index when applying task-based weights instead of pixel based weights are small for high frequency targets, but could be in excess of 10% for low frequency tasks where scatter-induced correlation otherwise degrade detectability. Conclusions: The proposed method makes the spatial frequency dependency of complex correlation structures between bins and their effect on the system detective quantum efficiency easier to analyze and allows optimizing bin weights for given imaging tasks. A potential increase in detectability of double digit percents in silicon detector systems operated at typical CT energies (100 kVp) merits further evaluation on a real system. The method is noted to be of higher relevance for silicon detectors than for cadmium (zink

  7. Spectral response model for a multibin photon-counting spectral computed tomography detector and its applications.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xuejin; Persson, Mats; Bornefalk, Hans; Karlsson, Staffan; Xu, Cheng; Danielsson, Mats; Huber, Ben

    2015-07-01

    Variations among detector channels in computed tomography can lead to ring artifacts in the reconstructed images and biased estimates in projection-based material decomposition. Typically, the ring artifacts are corrected by compensation methods based on flat fielding, where transmission measurements are required for a number of material-thickness combinations. Phantoms used in these methods can be rather complex and require an extensive number of transmission measurements. Moreover, material decomposition needs knowledge of the individual response of each detector channel to account for the detector inhomogeneities. For this purpose, we have developed a spectral response model that binwise predicts the response of a multibin photon-counting detector individually for each detector channel. The spectral response model is performed in two steps. The first step employs a forward model to predict the expected numbers of photon counts, taking into account parameters such as the incident x-ray spectrum, absorption efficiency, and energy response of the detector. The second step utilizes a limited number of transmission measurements with a set of flat slabs of two absorber materials to fine-tune the model predictions, resulting in a good correspondence with the physical measurements. To verify the response model, we apply the model in two cases. First, the model is used in combination with a compensation method which requires an extensive number of transmission measurements to determine the necessary parameters. Our spectral response model successfully replaces these measurements by simulations, saving a significant amount of measurement time. Second, the spectral response model is used as the basis of the maximum likelihood approach for projection-based material decomposition. The reconstructed basis images show a good separation between the calcium-like material and the contrast agents, iodine and gadolinium. The contrast agent concentrations are reconstructed with more

  8. Spectral response model for a multibin photon-counting spectral computed tomography detector and its applications

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xuejin; Persson, Mats; Bornefalk, Hans; Karlsson, Staffan; Xu, Cheng; Danielsson, Mats; Huber, Ben

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Variations among detector channels in computed tomography can lead to ring artifacts in the reconstructed images and biased estimates in projection-based material decomposition. Typically, the ring artifacts are corrected by compensation methods based on flat fielding, where transmission measurements are required for a number of material-thickness combinations. Phantoms used in these methods can be rather complex and require an extensive number of transmission measurements. Moreover, material decomposition needs knowledge of the individual response of each detector channel to account for the detector inhomogeneities. For this purpose, we have developed a spectral response model that binwise predicts the response of a multibin photon-counting detector individually for each detector channel. The spectral response model is performed in two steps. The first step employs a forward model to predict the expected numbers of photon counts, taking into account parameters such as the incident x-ray spectrum, absorption efficiency, and energy response of the detector. The second step utilizes a limited number of transmission measurements with a set of flat slabs of two absorber materials to fine-tune the model predictions, resulting in a good correspondence with the physical measurements. To verify the response model, we apply the model in two cases. First, the model is used in combination with a compensation method which requires an extensive number of transmission measurements to determine the necessary parameters. Our spectral response model successfully replaces these measurements by simulations, saving a significant amount of measurement time. Second, the spectral response model is used as the basis of the maximum likelihood approach for projection-based material decomposition. The reconstructed basis images show a good separation between the calcium-like material and the contrast agents, iodine and gadolinium. The contrast agent concentrations are reconstructed

  9. Size distribution of linear and helical polymers in actin solution analyzed by photon counting histogram.

    PubMed

    Terada, Naofumi; Shimozawa, Togo; Ishiwata, Shin'ichi; Funatsu, Takashi

    2007-03-15

    Actin is a ubiquitous protein that is a major component of the cytoskeleton, playing an important role in muscle contraction and cell motility. At steady state, actin monomers and filaments (F-actin) coexist, and actin subunits continuously attach and detach at the filament ends. However, the size distribution of actin oligomers in F-actin solution has never been clarified. In this study, we investigated the size distribution of actin oligomers using photon-counting histograms. For this purpose, actin was labeled with a fluorescent dye, and the emitted photons were detected by confocal optics (the detection volume was of femtoliter (fL) order). Photon-counting histograms were analyzed to obtain the number distribution of actin oligomers in the detection area from their brightness, assuming that the brightness of an oligomer was proportional to the number of protomers. We found that the major populations at physiological ionic strength were 1-5mers. For data analysis, we successfully applied the theory of linear and helical aggregations of macromolecules. The model postulates three states of actin, i.e., monomers, linear polymers, and helical polymers. Here we obtained three parameters: the equilibrium constants for polymerization of linear polymers, K(l)=(5.2 +/- 1.1) x 10(6) M(-1), and helical polymers, K(h)=(1.6 +/- 0.5) x 10(7) M(-1); and the ratio of helical to linear trimers, gamma = (3.6 +/- 2.3) x 10(-2). The excess free energy of transforming a linear trimer to a helical trimer, which is assumed to be a nucleus for helical polymers, was calculated to be 2.0 kcal/mol. These analyses demonstrate that the oligomeric phase at steady state is predominantly composed of linear 1-5mers, and the transition from linear to helical polymers occurs on the level of 5-7mers. PMID:17172301

  10. Study of Static Microchannel Plate Saturation Effects for the Fast Plasma Investigation Dual Electron Spectrometers on NASA's Magnetospheric MultiScale Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avanov, L. A.; Gliese, U.; Pollock, C. J.; Moore, T. E.; Chornay, D. J.; Barrie, A. C.; Kujawski, J. T.; Gershman, D. J.; Tucker, C. J.; Mariano, A.; Smith, D. L.; Jacques, A. D.

    2015-01-01

    Imaging detecting systems based on microchannel plates (MCPs) are the most common for low energy plasma measurements for both space borne and ground applications. One of the key parameters of these detection systems is the dynamic range of the MCP's response to the input fluxes of charged particles. For most applications the dynamic range of the linear response should be as wide as possible. This is especially true for the Dual Electron Spectrometers (DESs) of the Fast Plasma Investigation (FPI) on NASA's Magnetospheric MultiScale (MMS) mission because a wide range of input fluxes are expected. To make use of the full available dynamic range, it is important to understand the MCP response behavior beyond the linear regime where the MCPs start to saturate. We have performed extensive studies of this during the characterization and calibration of the DES instruments and have identified several saturation effects of the detection system. The MCP itself exhibits saturation when the channels lack the ability to replenish charge sufficiently rapidly. It is found and will be shown that the ground system can significantly impact the correct measurement of this effect. As the MCP starts to saturate, the resulting pulse height distribution (PHD) changes shape and location (with less pulse height values), which leads to truncation of the PHD by the threshold set on the detection system discriminator. Finally, the detection system pulse amplifier exhibits saturation as the input flux drives pulse rates greater than its linear response speed. All of these effects effectively change the dead time of the overall detection system and as a result can affect the quality and interpretation of the flight data. We present results of detection system saturation effects and their interaction with special emphasis on the MCP related effects.

  11. SU-F-18C-05: Characterization of a Silicon Strip Photon-Counting Detector in the Presence of Compton Scatter: A Simulation Study

    SciTech Connect

    Ziemer, B; Ding, H; Cho, H

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of Compton scatter on detection efficiency and charge-sharing for a Si strip photon-counting detector as a function of pixel pitch, slice thickness and total pixel length. Methods: A CT imaging system employing a silicon photon-counting detector was implemented using the GATE Monte Carlo package. A focal spot size of 300 µm, magnification of 1.33, and pixel pitches of 0.1 and 0.5mm were initially investigated. A 60 kVp spectrum with 3 mm Al filter was used and energy spectral degradation based on a prototype detector was simulated. To study charge-sharing, a single pixel was illuminated, and the detector response in neighboring pixels was investigated. A longitudinally semiinfinite detector was simulated to optimize the quantum detection efficiency of the imaging system as a function of pixel pitch, slice thickness and depth of interaction. A 2.5 mm thick tungsten plate with a 0.01 mm by 1.5 mm slit was implemented to calculate the modulation transfer function (MTF) from projection-based images. A threshold of 15 keV was implemented in the detector simulation. The preliminary charge sharing investigation results considered only scattering effects and the detector electronics related factors were neglected. Results: Using a 15 keV threshold, 1% of the pixel charge migrated into neighboring pixels with a pixel size of 0.1×0.1 mm{sup 2}. The quantum detection efficiency was 77%, 84%, 87% and 89% for 15 mm, 22.5 mm, 30 mm, and 45 mm length silicon detector pixels, respectively. For a pixel pitch of 0.1 mm, the spatial frequency at 10% of the maximum MTF was found to be 5.2 lp/mm. This agreed with an experimental MTF measurement of 5.3 lp/mm with a similar detector configuration. Conclusion: Using optimized design parameters, Si strip photon-counting detectors can offer high detection efficiency and spatial resolution even in the presence of Compton scatter.

  12. Hybrid slab-microchannel gel electrophoresis system

    DOEpatents

    Balch, J.W.; Carrano, A.V.; Davidson, J.C.; Koo, J.C.

    1998-05-05

    A hybrid slab-microchannel gel electrophoresis system is described. The hybrid system permits the fabrication of isolated microchannels for biomolecule separations without imposing the constraint of a totally sealed system. The hybrid system is reusable and ultimately much simpler and less costly to manufacture than a closed channel plate system. The hybrid system incorporates a microslab portion of the separation medium above the microchannels, thus at least substantially reducing the possibility of non-uniform field distribution and breakdown due to uncontrollable leakage. A microslab of the sieving matrix is built into the system by using plastic spacer materials and is used to uniformly couple the top plate with the bottom microchannel plate. 4 figs.

  13. T-load microchannel array and fabrication method

    DOEpatents

    Swierkowski, Stefan P.

    2000-01-01

    A three-dimensional (3-D) T-load for planar microchannel arrays for electrophoresis, for example, which enables sample injection directly onto a plane perpendicular to the microchannels' axis, at their ends. This is accomplished by forming input wells that extend beyond the ends of the microchannel thereby eliminating the right angle connection from the input well into the end of the microchannel. In addition, the T-load input well eases the placement of electrode in or adjacent the well and thus enables very efficient reproducible electrokinetic (ek) injection. The T-load input well eliminates the prior input well/microchannel alignment concerns, since the input well can be drilled after the top and bottom microchannel plates are bonded together. The T-load input well may extend partially or entirely through the bottom microchannel plate which enables more efficient gel and solution flushing, and also enables placement of multiple electrodes to assist in the ek sample injection.

  14. Quantitative material decomposition using spectral computed tomography with an energy-resolved photon-counting detector.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seungwan; Choi, Yu-Na; Kim, Hee-Joung

    2014-09-21

    Dual-energy computed tomography (CT) techniques have been used to decompose materials and characterize tissues according to their physical and chemical compositions. However, these techniques are hampered by the limitations of conventional x-ray detectors operated in charge integrating mode. Energy-resolved photon-counting detectors provide spectral information from polychromatic x-rays using multiple energy thresholds. These detectors allow simultaneous acquisition of data in different energy ranges without spectral overlap, resulting in more efficient material decomposition and quantification for dual-energy CT. In this study, a pre-reconstruction dual-energy CT technique based on volume conservation was proposed for three-material decomposition. The technique was combined with iterative reconstruction algorithms by using a ray-driven projector in order to improve the quality of decomposition images and reduce radiation dose. A spectral CT system equipped with a CZT-based photon-counting detector was used to implement the proposed dual-energy CT technique. We obtained dual-energy images of calibration and three-material phantoms consisting of low atomic number materials from the optimal energy bins determined by Monte Carlo simulations. The material decomposition process was accomplished by both the proposed and post-reconstruction dual-energy CT techniques. Linear regression and normalized root-mean-square error (NRMSE) analyses were performed to evaluate the quantitative accuracy of decomposition images. The calibration accuracy of the proposed dual-energy CT technique was higher than that of the post-reconstruction dual-energy CT technique, with fitted slopes of 0.97-1.01 and NRMSEs of 0.20-4.50% for all basis materials. In the three-material phantom study, the proposed dual-energy CT technique decreased the NRMSEs of measured volume fractions by factors of 0.17-0.28 compared to the post-reconstruction dual-energy CT technique. It was concluded that the

  15. A photon counting CdTe gamma- and X-ray camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spartiotis, Konstantinos; Leppänen, Anssi; Pantsar, Tuomas; Pyyhtiä, Jouni; Laukka, Pasi; Muukkonen, Kari; Männistö, Olli; Kinnari, Jussi; Schulman, Tom

    2005-09-01

    A photon counting CdTe imaging camera suitable for gamma- and X-ray detection has been developed and tested. The current full active imaging area of the gamma/X-ray camera covers 44×44 mm 2. The camera is built of eight individual detector hybrids each consisting of a pixelated CdTe detector with dimensions of 22×11 mm 2 and solder bump-bonded to a photon counting custom-designed application specific integrated circuit (ASIC). The ASICs are realized in a mixed signal, 0.35 μm 4 metal 2 poly CMOS process. The effective pixel size (image pixel pitch) is 0.5 mm. To enable higher count rate imaging and to achieve better position resolution in X-ray CT scanning each pixel is divided both on the CdTe detector and on the ASIC into two sub-pixels with dimensions 0.25×0.5 mm 2. Every pixel circuit has two preamps each connected to one sub-pixel and feeding signal to a separate comparator. The digital pulses of the two distinct comparators are recorded by one common 8-bit counter. The amplifier offsets can be adjusted individually with 3-bit accuracy to compensate for process mismatch. A similar 3-bit gain tuning common to the two amplifiers in one pixel circuit is also implemented. A globally tuneable threshold voltage generated externally with high accuracy is used for energy discrimination. The camera can be operated both in the real time imaging mode with a maximum speed of 100 frames/s and in the accumulation mode with user adjustable counting time. Experimental data collected from a fully operational eight hybrid gamma/X-ray camera is presented and compared to simulated data. The camera exhibits excellent sensitivity and a dynamic range of 1:14,000,000. A sharp line spread function indicates the spatial resolution to be limited only by the pixel size (0.5 mm). A single pixel energy resolution of FWHM 4.7 keV at 122 keV (3.9%) was determined from measured 57Co spectra. The peak width of the spectrum combined from all pixels was somewhat larger due to calibration

  16. New Method for Accurate Calibration of Micro-Channel Plate based Detection Systems and its use in the Fast Plasma Investigation of NASA's Magnetospheric MultiScale Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gliese, U.; Avanov, L. A.; Barrie, A.; Kujawski, J. T.; Mariano, A. J.; Tucker, C. J.; Chornay, D. J.; Cao, N. T.; Zeuch, M.; Pollock, C. J.; Jacques, A. D.

    2013-12-01

    The Fast Plasma Investigation (FPI) of the NASA Magnetospheric MultiScale (MMS) mission employs 16 Dual Electron Spectrometers (DESs) and 16 Dual Ion Spectrometers (DISs) with 4 of each type on each of 4 spacecraft to enable fast (30ms for electrons; 150ms for ions) and spatially differentiated measurements of full the 3D particle velocity distributions. This approach presents a new and challenging aspect to the calibration and operation of these instruments on ground and in flight. The response uniformity and reliability of their calibration and the approach to handling any temporal evolution of these calibrated characteristics all assume enhanced importance in this application, where we attempt to understand the meaning of particle distributions within the ion and electron diffusion regions. Traditionally, the micro-channel plate (MCP) based detection systems for electrostatic particle spectrometers have been calibrated by setting a fixed detection threshold and, subsequently, measuring a detection system count rate plateau curve to determine the MCP voltage that ensures the count rate has reached a constant value independent of further variation in the MCP voltage. This is achieved when most of the MCP pulse height distribution (PHD) is located at higher values (larger pulses) than the detection amplifier threshold. This method is adequate in single-channel detection systems and in multi-channel detection systems with very low crosstalk between channels. However, in dense multi-channel systems, it can be inadequate. Furthermore, it fails to fully and individually characterize each of the fundamental parameters of the detection system. We present a new detection system calibration method that enables accurate and repeatable measurement and calibration of MCP gain, MCP efficiency, signal loss due to variation in gain and efficiency, crosstalk from effects both above and below the MCP, noise margin, and stability margin in one single measurement. The fundamental

  17. Photon Counting Imaging with an Electron-Bombarded Pixel Image Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Hirvonen, Liisa M.; Suhling, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Electron-bombarded pixel image sensors, where a single photoelectron is accelerated directly into a CCD or CMOS sensor, allow wide-field imaging at extremely low light levels as they are sensitive enough to detect single photons. This technology allows the detection of up to hundreds or thousands of photon events per frame, depending on the sensor size, and photon event centroiding can be employed to recover resolution lost in the detection process. Unlike photon events from electron-multiplying sensors, the photon events from electron-bombarded sensors have a narrow, acceleration-voltage-dependent pulse height distribution. Thus a gain voltage sweep during exposure in an electron-bombarded sensor could allow photon arrival time determination from the pulse height with sub-frame exposure time resolution. We give a brief overview of our work with electron-bombarded pixel image sensor technology and recent developments in this field for single photon counting imaging, and examples of some applications. PMID:27136556

  18. First results of a cryogenic optical photon-counting imaging spectrometer using a DROID array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hijmering, R. A.; Verhoeve, P.; Martin, D. D. E.; Venn, R.; van Dordrecht, A.; Groot, P. J.

    2010-02-01

    Context. We present the first system test in which we demonstrate the concept of using an array of Distributed Read Out Imaging Devices (DROIDs) for optical photon detection. Aims: After the successful S-Cam 3 detector, the next step in the development of a cryogenic optical photon counting imaging spectrometer under the S-Cam project is to increase the field of view using DROIDs. With this modification the field of view of the camera has been increased by a factor of five in a given area while keeping the number of readout channels the same. Methods: The test has been performed using the flexible S-Cam 3 system and exchanging the 10 × 12 Superconducting Tunnel Junction array for a 3 × 20 DROID array. The extra data reduction needed with DROIDs is performed offline. Results: We show that, although the responsivity (number of tunnelled quasiparticles per unit of absorbed photon energy, e-/eV) of the current array is too low for direct astronomical applications, the imaging quality is already good enough for pattern detection and will improve further with increasing responsivity. Conclusions: The obtained knowledge can be used to optimise the system for the use of DROIDs.

  19. The LAMBDA photon-counting pixel detector and high-Z sensor development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pennicard, D.; Smoljanin, S.; Struth, B.; Hirsemann, H.; Fauler, A.; Fiederle, M.; Tolbanov, O.; Zarubin, A.; Tyazhev, A.; Shelkov, G.; Graafsma, H.

    2014-12-01

    Many X-ray experiments at third-generation synchrotrons benefit from using single-photon-counting detectors, due to their high signal-to-noise ratio and potential for high-speed measurements. LAMBDA (Large Area Medipix3-Based Detector Array) is a pixel detector system based on the Medipix3 readout chip. It combines the features of Medipix3, such as a small pixel size of 55 μm and flexible functionality, with a large tileable module design consisting of 12 chips (1536 × 512 pixels) and a high-speed readout system capable of running at 2000 frames per second. To enable high-speed experiments with hard X-rays, the LAMBDA system has been combined with different high-Z sensor materials. Room-temperature systems using GaAs and CdTe systems have been produced and tested with X-ray tubes and at synchrotron beamlines. Both detector materials show nonuniformities in their raw image response, but the pixel yield is high and the uniformity can be improved by flat-field correction, particularly in the case of GaAs. High-frame-rate experiments show that useful information can be gained on millisecond timescales in synchrotron experiments with these sensors.

  20. Maximum Likelihood Time-of-Arrival Estimation of Optical Pulses via Photon-Counting Photodetectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erkmen, Baris I.; Moision, Bruce E.

    2010-01-01

    Many optical imaging, ranging, and communications systems rely on the estimation of the arrival time of an optical pulse. Recently, such systems have been increasingly employing photon-counting photodetector technology, which changes the statistics of the observed photocurrent. This requires time-of-arrival estimators to be developed and their performances characterized. The statistics of the output of an ideal photodetector, which are well modeled as a Poisson point process, were considered. An analytical model was developed for the mean-square error of the maximum likelihood (ML) estimator, demonstrating two phenomena that cause deviations from the minimum achievable error at low signal power. An approximation was derived to the threshold at which the ML estimator essentially fails to provide better than a random guess of the pulse arrival time. Comparing the analytic model performance predictions to those obtained via simulations, it was verified that the model accurately predicts the ML performance over all regimes considered. There is little prior art that attempts to understand the fundamental limitations to time-of-arrival estimation from Poisson statistics. This work establishes both a simple mathematical description of the error behavior, and the associated physical processes that yield this behavior. Previous work on mean-square error characterization for ML estimators has predominantly focused on additive Gaussian noise. This work demonstrates that the discrete nature of the Poisson noise process leads to a distinctly different error behavior.

  1. Spectral prior image constrained compressed sensing (spectral PICCS) for photon-counting computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zhicong; Leng, Shuai; Li, Zhoubo; McCollough, Cynthia H.

    2016-09-01

    Photon-counting computed tomography (PCCT) is an emerging imaging technique that enables multi-energy imaging with only a single scan acquisition. To enable multi-energy imaging, the detected photons corresponding to the full x-ray spectrum are divided into several subgroups of bin data that correspond to narrower energy windows. Consequently, noise in each energy bin increases compared to the full-spectrum data. This work proposes an iterative reconstruction algorithm for noise suppression in the narrower energy bins used in PCCT imaging. The algorithm is based on the framework of prior image constrained compressed sensing (PICCS) and is called spectral PICCS; it uses the full-spectrum image reconstructed using conventional filtered back-projection as the prior image. The spectral PICCS algorithm is implemented using a constrained optimization scheme with adaptive iterative step sizes such that only two tuning parameters are required in most cases. The algorithm was first evaluated using computer simulations, and then validated by both physical phantoms and in vivo swine studies using a research PCCT system. Results from both computer-simulation and experimental studies showed substantial image noise reduction in narrow energy bins (43-73%) without sacrificing CT number accuracy or spatial resolution.

  2. Si-strip photon counting detectors for contrast-enhanced spectral mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Buxin; Reiser, Ingrid; Wessel, Jan C.; Malakhov, Nail; Wawrzyniak, Gregor; Hartsough, Neal E.; Gandhi, Thulasi; Chen, Chin-Tu; Iwanczyk, Jan S.; Barber, William C.

    2015-08-01

    We report on the development of silicon strip detectors for energy-resolved clinical mammography. Typically, X-ray integrating detectors based on scintillating cesium iodide CsI(Tl) or amorphous selenium (a-Se) are used in most commercial systems. Recently, mammography instrumentation has been introduced based on photon counting Si strip detectors. The required performance for mammography in terms of the output count rate, spatial resolution, and dynamic range must be obtained with sufficient field of view for the application, thus requiring the tiling of pixel arrays and particular scanning techniques. Room temperature Si strip detector, operating as direct conversion x-ray sensors, can provide the required speed when connected to application specific integrated circuits (ASICs) operating at fast peaking times with multiple fixed thresholds per pixel, provided that the sensors are designed for rapid signal formation across the X-ray energy ranges of the application. We present our methods and results from the optimization of Si-strip detectors for contrast enhanced spectral mammography. We describe the method being developed for quantifying iodine contrast using the energy-resolved detector with fixed thresholds. We demonstrate the feasibility of the method by scanning an iodine phantom with clinically relevant contrast levels.

  3. Time-to-digital converter card for multichannel time-resolved single-photon counting applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamborini, Davide; Portaluppi, Davide; Tisa, Simone; Tosi, Alberto

    2015-03-01

    We present a high performance Time-to-Digital Converter (TDC) card that provides 10 ps timing resolution and 20 ps (rms) timing precision with a programmable full-scale-range from 160 ns to 10 μs. Differential Non-Linearity (DNL) is better than 1.3% LSB (rms) and Integral Non-Linearity (INL) is 5 ps rms. Thanks to the low power consumption (400 mW) and the compact size (78 mm x 28 mm x 10 mm), this card is the building block for developing compact multichannel time-resolved instrumentation for Time-Correlated Single-Photon Counting (TCSPC). The TDC-card outputs the time measurement results together with the rates of START and STOP signals and the number of valid TDC conversions. These additional information are needed by many TCSPC-based applications, such as: Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging (FLIM), Time-of-Flight (TOF) ranging measurements, time-resolved Positron Emission Tomography (PET), single-molecule spectroscopy, Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS), Diffuse Optical Tomography (DOT), Optical Time-Domain Reflectometry (OTDR), quantum optics, etc.

  4. Note: Space qualified photon counting detector for laser time transfer with picosecond precision and stability.

    PubMed

    Prochazka, Ivan; Kodet, Jan; Blazej, Josef

    2016-05-01

    The laser time transfer link is under construction for the European Space Agency in the frame of Atomic Clock Ensemble in Space. We have developed and tested the flying unit of the photon counting detector optimized for this space mission. The results are summarized in this Note. An extreme challenge was to build a detector package, which is rugged, small and which provides long term detection delay stability on picosecond level. The device passed successfully all the tests required for space missions on the low Earth orbits. The detector is extremely rugged and compact. Its long term detection delay stability is excellent, it is better than ±1 ps/day, in a sense of time deviation it is better than 0.5 ps for averaging times of 2000 s to several hours. The device is capable to operate in a temperature range of -55 °C up to +60 °C, the change of the detection delay with temperature is +0.5 ps/K. The device is ready for integration into the space structure now.

  5. Initial results from a prototype whole-body photon-counting computed tomography system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Z.; Leng, S.; Jorgensen, S. M.; Li, Z.; Gutjahr, R.; Chen, B.; Duan, X.; Halaweish, A. F.; Yu, L.; Ritman, E. L.; McCollough, C. H.

    2015-03-01

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) with energy-discriminating capabilities presents exciting opportunities for increased dose efficiency and improved material decomposition analyses. However, due to constraints imposed by the inability of photon-counting detectors (PCD) to respond accurately at high photon flux, to date there has been no clinical application of PCD-CT. Recently, our lab installed a research prototype system consisting of two x-ray sources and two corresponding detectors, one using an energy-integrating detector (EID) and the other using a PCD. In this work, we report the first third-party evaluation of this prototype CT system using both phantoms and a cadaver head. The phantom studies demonstrated several promising characteristics of the PCD sub-system, including improved longitudinal spatial resolution and reduced beam hardening artifacts, relative to the EID sub-system. More importantly, we found that the PCD sub-system offers excellent pulse pileup control in cases of x-ray flux up to 550 mA at 140 kV, which corresponds to approximately 2.5×1011 photons per cm2 per second. In an anthropomorphic phantom and a cadaver head, the PCD sub-system provided image quality comparable to the EID sub-system for the same dose level. Our results demonstrate the potential of the prototype system to produce clinically-acceptable images in vivo.

  6. On Approaching the Ultimate Limits of Communication Using a Photon-Counting Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erkmen, Baris I.; Moision, Bruce E.; Dolinar, Samuel J.; Birnbaum, Kevin M.; Divsalar, Dariush

    2012-01-01

    Coherent states achieve the Holevo capacity of a pure-loss channel when paired with an optimal measurement, but a physical realization of this measurement scheme is as of yet unknown, and it is also likely to be of high complexity. In this paper, we focus on the photon-counting measurement and study the photon and dimensional efficiencies attainable with modulations over classical- and nonclassical-state alphabets. We analyze two binary modulation architectures that improve upon the dimensional versus photon efficiency tradeoff achievable with the state-of-the-art coherent-state on-off keying modulation. We show that at high photon efficiency these architectures achieve an efficiency tradeoff that differs from the best possible tradeoff--determined by the Holevo capacity--by only a constant factor. The first architecture we analyze is a coherent-state transmitter that relies on feedback from the receiver to control the transmitted energy. The second architecture uses a single-photon number-state source.

  7. Note: Space qualified photon counting detector for laser time transfer with picosecond precision and stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prochazka, Ivan; Kodet, Jan; Blazej, Josef

    2016-05-01

    The laser time transfer link is under construction for the European Space Agency in the frame of Atomic Clock Ensemble in Space. We have developed and tested the flying unit of the photon counting detector optimized for this space mission. The results are summarized in this Note. An extreme challenge was to build a detector package, which is rugged, small and which provides long term detection delay stability on picosecond level. The device passed successfully all the tests required for space missions on the low Earth orbits. The detector is extremely rugged and compact. Its long term detection delay stability is excellent, it is better than ±1 ps/day, in a sense of time deviation it is better than 0.5 ps for averaging times of 2000 s to several hours. The device is capable to operate in a temperature range of -55 °C up to +60 °C, the change of the detection delay with temperature is +0.5 ps/K. The device is ready for integration into the space structure now.

  8. Spectral prior image constrained compressed sensing (spectral PICCS) for photon-counting computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zhicong; Leng, Shuai; Li, Zhoubo; McCollough, Cynthia H.

    2016-09-01

    Photon-counting computed tomography (PCCT) is an emerging imaging technique that enables multi-energy imaging with only a single scan acquisition. To enable multi-energy imaging, the detected photons corresponding to the full x-ray spectrum are divided into several subgroups of bin data that correspond to narrower energy windows. Consequently, noise in each energy bin increases compared to the full-spectrum data. This work proposes an iterative reconstruction algorithm for noise suppression in the narrower energy bins used in PCCT imaging. The algorithm is based on the framework of prior image constrained compressed sensing (PICCS) and is called spectral PICCS; it uses the full-spectrum image reconstructed using conventional filtered back-projection as the prior image. The spectral PICCS algorithm is implemented using a constrained optimization scheme with adaptive iterative step sizes such that only two tuning parameters are required in most cases. The algorithm was first evaluated using computer simulations, and then validated by both physical phantoms and in vivo swine studies using a research PCCT system. Results from both computer-simulation and experimental studies showed substantial image noise reduction in narrow energy bins (43–73%) without sacrificing CT number accuracy or spatial resolution.

  9. Low noise, free running, high rate photon counting for space communication and ranging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Wei; Krainak, Michael A.; Yang, Guangning; Sun, Xiaoli; Merritt, Scott

    2016-05-01

    communication and ranging. NASA GSFC is testing the performance of two types of novel photon-counting detectors 1) a 2x8 mercury cadmium telluride (HgCdTe) avalanche array made by DRS Inc., and a 2) a commercial 2880-element silicon avalanche photodiode (APD) array. We successfully measured real-time communication performance using both the 2 detected-photon threshold and logic AND-gate coincidence methods. Use of these methods allows mitigation of dark count, after-pulsing and background noise effects without using other method of Time Gating The HgCdTe APD array routinely demonstrated very high photon detection efficiencies (>50%) at near infrared wavelength. The commercial silicon APD array exhibited a fast output with rise times of 300 ps and pulse widths of 600 ps. On-chip individually filtered signals from the entire array were multiplexed onto a single fast output. NASA GSFC has tested both detectors for their potential application for space communications and ranging. We developed and compare their space communication and ranging performances using both the 2 detected photon threshold and coincidence methods.

  10. High-speed readout solution for single-photon counting ASICs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kmon, P.; Szczygiel, R.; Maj, P.; Grybos, P.; Kleczek, R.

    2016-02-01

    We report on the analysis, simulations and measurements of both noise and high-count rate performance of a single photon counting integrated circuit called UFXC32k designed for hybrid pixel detectors for various applications in X-ray imaging. The dimensions of the UFCX32k designed in CMOS 130 nm technology are 9.63 mm × 20.15 mm. The integrated circuit core is a matrix of 128 × 256 squared readout pixels with a pitch of 75 μm. Each readout pixel contains a charge sensitive amplifier (CSA), a shaper, two discriminators and two 14-bit ripple counters. The UFXC32k was bump-bonded to a silicon pixel detector with the thickness of 320 μm and characterized with the X-ray radiation source. The CSA feedback based on the Krummenacher circuit determines both the count rate performance and the noise of the readout front-end electronics. For the default setting of the CSA feedback, the measured front-end electronics dead time is 232 ns (paralyzable model) and the equivalent noise charge (ENC) is equal to 123 el. rms. For the high count rate setting of the CSA feedback, the dead time is only 101 ns and the ENC is equal to 163 el. rms.

  11. Count rate performance of a silicon-strip detector for photon-counting spectral CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X.; Grönberg, F.; Sjölin, M.; Karlsson, S.; Danielsson, M.

    2016-08-01

    A silicon-strip detector is developed for spectral computed tomography. The detector operates in photon-counting mode and allows pulse-height discrimination with 8 adjustable energy bins. In this work, we evaluate the count-rate performance of the detector in a clinical CT environment. The output counts of the detector are measured for x-ray tube currents up to 500 mA at 120 kV tube voltage, which produces a maximum photon flux of 485 Mphotons/s/mm2 for the unattenuated beam. The corresponding maximum count-rate loss of the detector is around 30% and there are no saturation effects. A near linear relationship between the input and output count rates can be observed up to 90 Mcps/mm2, at which point only 3% of the input counts are lost. This means that the loss in the diagnostically relevant count-rate region is negligible. A semi-nonparalyzable dead-time model is used to describe the count-rate performance of the detector, which shows a good agreement with the measured data. The nonparalyzable dead time τn for 150 evaluated detector elements is estimated to be 20.2±5.2 ns.

  12. Metabolic imaging in microregions of tumors and normal tissues with bioluminescence and photon counting

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller-Klieser, W.; Walenta, S.; Paschen, W.; Kallinowski, F.; Vaupel, P.

    1988-08-03

    A method has been developed for metabolic imaging on a microscopic level in tumors, tumor spheroids, and normal tissues. The technique makes it possible to determine the spatial distribution of glucose, lactate, and ATP in absolute terms at similar locations within tissues or cell aggregates. The substrate distributions are registered in serial cryostat sections from tissue cryobiopsies or from frozen spheroids with the use of bioluminescence reactions. The light emission is measured directly by a special imaging photon counting system enabling on-line image analysis. The technique has been applied to human breast cancer xenografts, to spheroids originating from a human colon adenocarcinoma, and to skeletal rat muscle. Preliminary data obtained indicate that heterogeneities in the substrate distributions measured are much more pronounced in tumors than in normal tissue. There was no obvious correlation among the three quantities measured at similar locations within the tissues. The distribution of ATP corresponded well with the histological structure of larger spheroids; values were low in the necrotic center and high in the viable rim of these cell aggregates.

  13. Photon-counting chirped amplitude modulation lidar using a smart premixing method.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zijing; Zhang, Jianlong; Wu, Long; Zhang, Yong; Zhao, Yuan; Su, Jianzhong

    2013-11-01

    We proposed a new premixing method for photon-counting chirped amplitude modulation lidar (PCCAML). Earlier studies used the counting results of the returned signal detected by a Geiger mode avalanche photodiode detector (Gm-APD) to mix with the reference signal, called the postmixing method. We use an alternative method known as the premixing method, in which the reference signal is used to directly modulate the sampling gate width of the Gm-APD, and the mixing of the returned signal and the reference signal is completed before the Gm-APD. This premixing method is more flexible and may perform better than the postmixing method in terms of signal-to-noise ratio by cutting down a separated mixer commonly used in the postmixing lidar system. Furthermore, this premixing method lowers the demand for the sampling frequency of the Gm-APD. It allows the use of a much wider modulation bandwidth to improve the range accuracy and resolution. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report to use the premixing method in the PCCAML system, which will benefit future lidar applications.

  14. Note: Space qualified photon counting detector for laser time transfer with picosecond precision and stability.

    PubMed

    Prochazka, Ivan; Kodet, Jan; Blazej, Josef

    2016-05-01

    The laser time transfer link is under construction for the European Space Agency in the frame of Atomic Clock Ensemble in Space. We have developed and tested the flying unit of the photon counting detector optimized for this space mission. The results are summarized in this Note. An extreme challenge was to build a detector package, which is rugged, small and which provides long term detection delay stability on picosecond level. The device passed successfully all the tests required for space missions on the low Earth orbits. The detector is extremely rugged and compact. Its long term detection delay stability is excellent, it is better than ±1 ps/day, in a sense of time deviation it is better than 0.5 ps for averaging times of 2000 s to several hours. The device is capable to operate in a temperature range of -55 °C up to +60 °C, the change of the detection delay with temperature is +0.5 ps/K. The device is ready for integration into the space structure now. PMID:27250477

  15. Approaching the Ultimate Limits of Communication Efficiency with a Photon-Counting Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erkmen, Baris; Moision, Bruce; Dolinar, Samuel J.; Birnbaum, Kevin M.; Divsalar, Dariush

    2012-01-01

    Coherent states achieve the Holevo capacity of a pure-loss channel when paired with an optimal measurement, but a physical realization of this measurement is as of yet unknown, and it is also likely to be of high complexity. In this paper, we focus on the photon-counting measurement and study the photon and dimensional efficiencies attainable with modulations over classical- and nonclassical-state alphabets. We first review the state-of-the-art coherent on-off-keying (OOK) with a photoncounting measurement, illustrating its asymptotic inefficiency relative to the Holevo limit. We show that a commonly made Poisson approximation in thermal noise leads to unbounded photon information efficiencies, violating the conjectured Holevo limit. We analyze two binary-modulation architectures that improve upon the dimensional versus photon efficiency tradeoff achievable with conventional OOK. We show that at high photon efficiency these architectures achieve an efficiency tradeoff that differs from the best possible tradeoff--determined by the Holevo capacity--by only a constant factor. The first architecture we analyze is a coherent-state transmitter that relies on feedback from the receiver to control the transmitted energy. The second architecture uses a single-photon number-state source.

  16. Material decomposition and virtual non-contrast imaging in photon counting computed tomography: an animal study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutjahr, R.; Polster, C.; Kappler, S.; Pietsch, H.; Jost, G.; Hahn, K.; Schöck, F.; Sedlmair, M.; Allmendinger, T.; Schmidt, B.; Krauss, B.; Flohr, T. G.

    2016-03-01

    The energy resolving capabilities of Photon Counting Detectors (PCD) in Computed Tomography (CT) facilitate energy-sensitive measurements. The provided image-information can be processed with Dual Energy and Multi Energy algorithms. A research PCD-CT firstly allows acquiring images with a close to clinical configuration of both the X-ray tube and the CT-detector. In this study, two algorithms (Material Decomposition and Virtual Non-Contrast-imaging (VNC)) are applied on a data set acquired from an anesthetized rabbit scanned using the PCD-CT system. Two contrast agents (CA) are applied: A gadolinium (Gd) based CA used to enhance contrasts for vascular imaging, and xenon (Xe) and air as a CA used to evaluate local ventilation of the animal's lung. Four different images are generated: a) A VNC image, suppressing any traces of the injected Gd imitating a native scan, b) a VNC image with a Gd-image as an overlay, where contrast enhancements in the vascular system are highlighted using colored labels, c) another VNC image with a Xe-image as an overlay, and d) a 3D rendered image of the animal's lung, filled with Xe, indicating local ventilation characteristics. All images are generated from two images based on energy bin information. It is shown that a modified version of a commercially available dual energy software framework is capable of providing images with diagnostic value obtained from the research PCD-CT system.

  17. On the single-photon-counting (SPC) modes of imaging using an XFEL source

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Zhehui

    2015-12-14

    In this study, the requirements to achieve high detection efficiency (above 50%) and gigahertz (GHz) frame rate for the proposed 42-keV X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) at Los Alamos are summarized. Direct detection scenarios using C (diamond), Si, Ge and GaAs semiconductor sensors are analyzed. Single-photon counting (SPC) mode and weak SPC mode using Si can potentially meet the efficiency and frame rate requirements and be useful to both photoelectric absorption and Compton physics as the photon energy increases. Multilayer three-dimensional (3D) detector architecture, as a possible means to realize SPC modes, is compared with the widely used two-dimensional (2D) hybridmore » planar electrode structure and 3D deeply entrenched electrode architecture. Demonstration of thin film cameras less than 100-μm thick with onboard thin ASICs could be an initial step to realize multilayer 3D detectors and SPC modes for XFELs.« less

  18. Evaluation of models of spectral distortions in photon-counting detectors for computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Cammin, Jochen; Kappler, Steffen; Weidinger, Thomas; Taguchi, Katsuyuki

    2016-04-01

    A semi-analytical model describing spectral distortions in photon-counting detectors (PCDs) for clinical computed tomography was evaluated using simulated data. The distortions were due to count rate-independent spectral response effects and count rate-dependent pulse-pileup effects and the model predicted both the mean count rates and the spectral shape. The model parameters were calculated using calibration data. The model was evaluated by comparing the predicted x-ray spectra to Monte Carlo simulations of a PCD at various count rates. The data-model agreement expressed as weighted coefficient of variation [Formula: see text] was better than [Formula: see text] for dead time losses up to 28% and [Formula: see text] or smaller for dead time losses up to 69%. The accuracy of the model was also tested for the purpose of material decomposition by estimating material thicknesses from simulated projection data. The estimated attenuator thicknesses generally agreed with the true values within one standard deviation of the statistical uncertainty obtained from multiple noise realizations. PMID:27213165

  19. Solid-state image sensor with focal-plane digital photon-counting pixel array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fossum, Eric R. (Inventor); Pain, Bedabrata (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A photosensitive layer such as a-Si for a UV/visible wavelength band is provided for low light level imaging with at least a separate CMOS amplifier directly connected to each PIN photodetector diode to provide a focal-plane array of NxN pixels, and preferably a separate photon-counting CMOS circuit directly connected to each CMOS amplifier, although one row of counters may be time shared for reading out the photon flux rate of each diode in the array, together with a buffer memory for storing all rows of the NxN image frame before transfer to suitable storage. All CMOS circuitry is preferably fabricated in the same silicon layer as the PIN photodetector diode for a monolithic structure, but when the wavelength band of interest requires photosensitive material different from silicon, the focal-plane array may be fabricated separately on a different semiconductor layer bump-bonded or otherwise bonded for a virtually monolithic structure with one free terminal of each diode directly connected to the input terminal of its CMOS amplifier and digital counter for integration of the photon flux rate at each photodetector of the array.

  20. XPAD3: A new photon counting chip for X-ray CT-scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pangaud, Patrick; Basolo, Stephanie; Boudet, Nathalie; Berar, Jean-François; Chantepie, Benoît; Delpierre, Pierre; Dinkespiler, Bernard; Hustache, Stephanie; Menouni, Mohsine; Morel, Christian

    2007-02-01

    The X-ray pixel chip with adaptable dynamics (XPAD3) circuit is the next generation of 2D X-ray photon counting imaging chip to be connected to a pixel sensor using the bump and flip-chip technologies. This circuit, designed in IBM 0.25 μm technology, contains 9600 pixels (130 μm×130 μm) distributed into 80 columns of 120 elements each. Its features have been improved to provide high-counting rate over 10 9 ph/pixel/mm 2, high-dynamic range over 60 keV, very low-noise detection level of 100e - rms, energy window selection and fast image readout less than 2 ms/frame. An innovative architecture has been designed in order to prevent the digital circuits from bothering the very sensitive analogue parts placed in their neighbourhood. This allows to read the chip during acquisition while conserving the precise setting of the thresholds over the pixel array. Finally, the aim of this development is to combine several XPAD3 to form the PIXSCAN detector.

  1. Evaluation of models of spectral distortions in photon-counting detectors for computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Cammin, Jochen; Kappler, Steffen; Weidinger, Thomas; Taguchi, Katsuyuki

    2016-04-01

    A semi-analytical model describing spectral distortions in photon-counting detectors (PCDs) for clinical computed tomography was evaluated using simulated data. The distortions were due to count rate-independent spectral response effects and count rate-dependent pulse-pileup effects and the model predicted both the mean count rates and the spectral shape. The model parameters were calculated using calibration data. The model was evaluated by comparing the predicted x-ray spectra to Monte Carlo simulations of a PCD at various count rates. The data-model agreement expressed as weighted coefficient of variation [Formula: see text] was better than [Formula: see text] for dead time losses up to 28% and [Formula: see text] or smaller for dead time losses up to 69%. The accuracy of the model was also tested for the purpose of material decomposition by estimating material thicknesses from simulated projection data. The estimated attenuator thicknesses generally agreed with the true values within one standard deviation of the statistical uncertainty obtained from multiple noise realizations.

  2. Progress on the Use of Combined Analog and Photon Counting Detection for Raman Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newsom, Rob; Turner, Dave; Clayton, Marian; Ferrare, Richard

    2008-01-01

    The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program Raman Lidar (CARL) was upgraded in 2004 with a new data system that provides simultaneous measurements of both the photomultiplier analog output voltage and photon counts. The so-called merge value added procedure (VAP) was developed to combine the analog and count-rate signals into a single signal with improved dynamic range. Earlier versions of this VAP tended to cause unacceptably large biases in the water vapor mixing ratio during the daytime as a result of improper matching between the analog and count-rate signals in the presence of elevated solar background levels. We recently identified several problems and tested a modified version of the merge VAP by comparing profiles of water vapor mixing ratio derived from CARL with simultaneous sonde data over a six month period. We show that the modified merge VAP significantly reduces the daytime bias, and results in mean differences that are within approximately 1% for both nighttime and daytime measurements.

  3. Estimation of signal and noise for a whole-body photon counting research CT system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhoubo; Leng, Shuai; Yu, Zhicong; Kappler, Steffen; McCollough, Cynthia H.

    2016-03-01

    Photon-counting CT (PCCT) may yield potential value for many clinical applications due to its relative immunity to electronic noise, increased geometric efficiency relative to current scintillating detectors, and the ability to resolve energy information about the detected photons. However, there are a large number of parameters that require optimization, particularly the energy thresholds configuration. Fast and accurate estimation of signal and noise in PCCT can benefit the optimization of acquisition parameters for specific diagnostic tasks. Based on the acquisition parameters and detector response of our research PCCT system, we derived mathematical models for both signal and noise. The signal model took the tube spectrum, beam filtration, object attenuation, water beam hardening, and detector response into account. The noise model considered the relationship between noise and radiation dose, as well as the propagation of noise as threshold data are subtracted to yield energy bin data. To determine the absolute noise value, a noise look-up table (LUT) was acquired using a limited number of calibration scans. The noise estimation algorithm then used the noise LUT to estimate noise for scans with a variety of combination of energy thresholds, dose levels, and object attenuation. Validation of the estimation algorithms was performed on our whole-body research PCCT system using semianthropomorphic water phantoms and solutions of calcium and iodine. The algorithms achieved accurate estimation of signal and noise for a variety of scanning parameter combinations. The proposed method can be used to optimize energy thresholds configuration for many clinical applications of PCCT.

  4. A 2.8 K cryogen-free cryostat with compact optical geometry for multiple photon counting

    SciTech Connect

    Verdier, M.-A.; Di Stefano, P. C. F.; De Jesus, M.; Vanzetto, S.

    2009-04-15

    Interest in solid scintillators down to liquid helium temperature and below has grown recently, fuelled by searches for exotic processes in particle physics. We describe a closed-cycle optical cryostat with a 2.8 K base temperature and a compact optical geometry for multiple photon counting. The large numerical aperture achieved, of the order of 0.79 from the optical center to each of the two windows and amounting to 40% of the total solid angle, allows a significant gain in the efficiency of photon collection. This and the relatively big sample size that can be used facilitate the study of scintillators under {gamma} irradiation. These features should be an asset for multiple photon counting techniques at low temperatures.

  5. Superconducting single-photon counting system for optical experiments requiring time-resolution in the picosecond range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toussaint, Julia; Grüner, Roman; Schubert, Marco; May, Torsten; Meyer, Hans-Georg; Dietzek, Benjamin; Popp, Jürgen; Hofherr, Matthias; Arndt, Matthias; Henrich, Dagmar; Il'in, Konstantin; Siegel, Michael

    2012-12-01

    We have developed a cryogenic measurement system for single-photon counting, which can be used in optical experiments requiring high time resolution in the picosecond range. The system utilizes niobium nitride superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors which are integrated in a time-correlated single-photon counting (TCSPC) setup. In this work, we describe details of the mechanical design, the electrical setup, and the cryogenic optical components. The performance of the complete system in TCSPC mode is tentatively benchmarked using 140 fs long laser pulses at a repetition frequency of 75 MHz. Due to the high temporal stability of these pulses, the measured time resolution of 35 ps (FWHM) is limited by the timing jitter of the measurement system. The result was cross-checked in a Coherent Anti-stokes Raman Scattering (CARS) setup, where scattered pulses from a β-barium borate crystal have been detected with the same time resolution.

  6. Spectral X-Ray CT Image Reconstruction with a Combination of Energy-Integrating and Photon-Counting Detectors

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Qingsong; Cong, Wenxiang; Xi, Yan; Wang, Ge

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to develop an algorithm for hybrid spectral computed tomography (CT) which combines energy-integrating and photon-counting detectors. While the energy-integrating scan is global, the photon-counting scan can have a local field of view (FOV). The algorithm synthesizes both spectral data and energy-integrating data. Low rank and sparsity prior is used for spectral CT reconstruction. An initial estimation is obtained from the projection data based on physical principles of x-ray interaction with the matter, which provides a more accurate Taylor expansion than previous work and can guarantee the convergence of the algorithm. Numerical simulation with clinical CT images are performed. The proposed algorithm produces very good spectral features outside the FOV when no K-edge material exists. Exterior reconstruction of K-edge material can be partially achieved. PMID:27171153

  7. Optimization of beam quality for photon-counting spectral computed tomography in head imaging: simulation study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Han; Xu, Cheng; Persson, Mats; Danielsson, Mats

    2015-10-01

    Head computed tomography (CT) plays an important role in the comprehensive evaluation of acute stroke. Photon-counting spectral detectors, as promising candidates for use in the next generation of x-ray CT systems, allow for assigning more weight to low-energy x-rays that generally contain more contrast information. Most importantly, the spectral information can be utilized to decompose the original set of energy-selective images into several basis function images that are inherently free of beam-hardening artifacts, a potential advantage for further improving the diagnosis accuracy. We are developing a photon-counting spectral detector for CT applications. The purpose of this work is to determine the optimal beam quality for material decomposition in two head imaging cases: nonenhanced imaging and K-edge imaging. A cylindrical brain tissue of 16-cm diameter, coated by a 6-mm-thick bone layer and 2-mm-thick skin layer, was used as a head phantom. The imaging target was a 5-mm-thick blood vessel centered in the head phantom. In K-edge imaging, two contrast agents, iodine and gadolinium, with the same concentration ([Formula: see text]) were studied. Three parameters that affect beam quality were evaluated: kVp settings (50 to 130 kVp), filter materials ([Formula: see text] to 83), and filter thicknesses [0 to 2 half-value layer (HVL)]. The image qualities resulting from the varying x-ray beams were compared in terms of two figures of merit (FOMs): squared signal-difference-to-noise ratio normalized by brain dose ([Formula: see text]) and that normalized by skin dose ([Formula: see text]). For nonenhanced imaging, the results show that the use of the 120-kVp spectrum filtered by 2 HVL copper ([Formula: see text]) provides the best performance in both FOMs. When iodine is used in K-edge imaging, the optimal filter is 2 HVL iodine ([Formula: see text]) and the optimal kVps are 60 kVp in terms of [Formula: see text] and 75 kVp in terms of [Formula: see text]. A

  8. Optimization of beam quality for photon-counting spectral computed tomography in head imaging: simulation study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Han; Xu, Cheng; Persson, Mats; Danielsson, Mats

    2015-10-01

    Head computed tomography (CT) plays an important role in the comprehensive evaluation of acute stroke. Photon-counting spectral detectors, as promising candidates for use in the next generation of x-ray CT systems, allow for assigning more weight to low-energy x-rays that generally contain more contrast information. Most importantly, the spectral information can be utilized to decompose the original set of energy-selective images into several basis function images that are inherently free of beam-hardening artifacts, a potential advantage for further improving the diagnosis accuracy. We are developing a photon-counting spectral detector for CT applications. The purpose of this work is to determine the optimal beam quality for material decomposition in two head imaging cases: nonenhanced imaging and K-edge imaging. A cylindrical brain tissue of 16-cm diameter, coated by a 6-mm-thick bone layer and 2-mm-thick skin layer, was used as a head phantom. The imaging target was a 5-mm-thick blood vessel centered in the head phantom. In K-edge imaging, two contrast agents, iodine and gadolinium, with the same concentration ([Formula: see text]) were studied. Three parameters that affect beam quality were evaluated: kVp settings (50 to 130 kVp), filter materials ([Formula: see text] to 83), and filter thicknesses [0 to 2 half-value layer (HVL)]. The image qualities resulting from the varying x-ray beams were compared in terms of two figures of merit (FOMs): squared signal-difference-to-noise ratio normalized by brain dose ([Formula: see text]) and that normalized by skin dose ([Formula: see text]). For nonenhanced imaging, the results show that the use of the 120-kVp spectrum filtered by 2 HVL copper ([Formula: see text]) provides the best performance in both FOMs. When iodine is used in K-edge imaging, the optimal filter is 2 HVL iodine ([Formula: see text]) and the optimal kVps are 60 kVp in terms of [Formula: see text] and 75 kVp in terms of [Formula: see text]. A

  9. Photon counting CT of the liver with dual-contrast enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muenzel, Daniela; Proksa, Roland; Daerr, Heiner; Fingerle, Alexander A.; Pfeiffer, Franz; Rummeny, Ernst J.; Noël, Peter B.

    2016-03-01

    The diagnostic quality of photon counting computed tomography (PCCT) is one the unexplored areas in medical imaging; at the same time, it seems to offer the opportunity as a fast and highly sensitive diagnostic tool. Today, conventional computed tomography (CT) is the standard imaging technique for diagnostic evaluation of the parenchyma of the liver. However, considerations on radiation dose are still an important factor in CT liver imaging, especially with regard to multi-phase contrast enhanced CT. In this work we report on a feasibility study for multi-contrast PCCT for simultaneous liver imaging at different contrast phases. PCCT images of the liver were simulated for a contrast-enhanced examination performed with two different contrast agents (CA), iodine (CA 1) and gadolinium (CA 2). PCCT image acquisition was performed at the time point with portal venous contrast distribution of CA 1 and arterial contrast phase for CA 2. Therefore, a contrast injection protocol was planned with sequential injection of CA 1 and CA 2 to provide a time dependent difference in contrast distribution of both CAs in the vessels and parenchyma of the liver. Native, arterial, and portal venous contrast enhanced images have been calculated based on the spectral separation of PCCT. In simulated PCCT images, we were able to differentiate between the tissue enhancement of CA 1 and CA 2. The distribution of both CA within the parenchyma of the liver was illustrated with perfusion maps for CA 1 and CA 2. In addition, virtual noncontrast enhanced image were calculated. In conclusion, multi-phase PCCT imaging of the liver based on a single scan is a novel approach for spectral PCCT imaging, offering detailed contrast information in a single scan volume and a significant reduction of radiation dose.

  10. Contrast-enhanced spectral mammography with a photon-counting detector

    SciTech Connect

    Fredenberg, Erik; Hemmendorff, Magnus; Cederstroem, Bjoern; Aaslund, Magnus; Danielsson, Mats

    2010-05-15

    Purpose: Spectral imaging is a method in medical x-ray imaging to extract information about the object constituents by the material-specific energy dependence of x-ray attenuation. The authors have investigated a photon-counting spectral imaging system with two energy bins for contrast-enhanced mammography. System optimization and the potential benefit compared to conventional non-energy-resolved absorption imaging was studied. Methods: A framework for system characterization was set up that included quantum and anatomical noise and a theoretical model of the system was benchmarked to phantom measurements. Results: Optimal combination of the energy-resolved images corresponded approximately to minimization of the anatomical noise, which is commonly referred to as energy subtraction. In that case, an ideal-observer detectability index could be improved close to 50% compared to absorption imaging in the phantom study. Optimization with respect to the signal-to-quantum-noise ratio, commonly referred to as energy weighting, yielded only a minute improvement. In a simulation of a clinically more realistic case, spectral imaging was predicted to perform approximately 30% better than absorption imaging for an average glandularity breast with an average level of anatomical noise. For dense breast tissue and a high level of anatomical noise, however, a rise in detectability by a factor of 6 was predicted. Another {approx}70%-90% improvement was found to be within reach for an optimized system. Conclusions: Contrast-enhanced spectral mammography is feasible and beneficial with the current system, and there is room for additional improvements. Inclusion of anatomical noise is essential for optimizing spectral imaging systems.

  11. Performance of in-pixel circuits for photon counting arrays (PCAs) based on polycrystalline silicon TFTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Albert K.; Koniczek, Martin; Antonuk, Larry E.; El-Mohri, Youcef; Zhao, Qihua; Street, Robert A.; Lu, Jeng Ping

    2016-03-01

    Photon counting arrays (PCAs), defined as pixelated imagers which measure the absorbed energy of x-ray photons individually and record this information digitally, are of increasing clinical interest. A number of PCA prototypes with a 1 mm pixel-to-pixel pitch have recently been fabricated with polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si)—a thin-film technology capable of creating monolithic imagers of a size commensurate with human anatomy. In this study, analog and digital simulation frameworks were developed to provide insight into the influence of individual poly-Si transistors on pixel circuit performance—information that is not readily available through empirical means. The simulation frameworks were used to characterize the circuit designs employed in the prototypes. The analog framework, which determines the noise produced by individual transistors, was used to estimate energy resolution, as well as to identify which transistors contribute the most noise. The digital framework, which analyzes how well circuits function in the presence of significant variations in transistor properties, was used to estimate how fast a circuit can produce an output (referred to as output count rate). In addition, an algorithm was developed and used to estimate the minimum pixel pitch that could be achieved for the pixel circuits of the current prototypes. The simulation frameworks predict that the analog component of the PCA prototypes could have energy resolution as low as 8.9% full width at half maximum (FWHM) at 70 keV; and the digital components should work well even in the presence of significant thin-film transistor (TFT) variations, with the fastest component having output count rates as high as 3 MHz. Finally, based on conceivable improvements in the underlying fabrication process, the algorithm predicts that the 1 mm pitch of the current PCA prototypes could be reduced significantly, potentially to between ~240 and 290 μm.

  12. Arterial Wall Perfusion Measured with Photon Counting Spectral X-ray CT

    PubMed Central

    Jorgensen, Steven M.; Korinek, Mark J.; Vercnocke, Andrew J.; Anderson, Jill L.; Halaweish, Ahmed; Leng, Shuai; McCollough, Cynthia H.; Ritman, Erik L.

    2016-01-01

    Early atherosclerosis changes perfusion of the arterial wall due to localized proliferation of the vasa vasorum. When contrast agent passes through the artery, some enters the vasa vasorum and increases radiopacity of the arterial wall. Technical challenges to detecting changes in vasa vasorum density include the thin arterial wall, partial volume averaging at the arterial lumen/wall interface and calcification within the wall. We used a photon-counting spectral CT scanner to study carotid arteries of anesthetized pigs and micro-CT of these arteries to quantify vasa vasorum density. The left carotid artery wall was injected with autologous blood to stimulate vasa vasorum angiogenesis. The scans were performed at 25–120 keV; the tube-current-time product was 550 mAs. A 60 mL bolus of iodine contrast agent was injected into the femoral vein at 5mL/s. Two seconds post injection, an axial scan was acquired at every 3 s over 60 s (i.e., 20 time points). Each time point acquired 28 contiguous transaxial slices with reconstructed voxels 0.16 × 0.16 × 1 mm3. Regions-of-interest in the outer 2/3 of the arterial wall and in the middle 2/3 of the lumen were drawn and their enhancements plotted versus time. Lumenal CT values peaked several seconds after injection and then returned towards baseline. Arterial wall CT values peaked concurrent to the lumen. The peak arterial wall enhancement in the left carotid arterial wall correlated with increased vasa vasorum density observed in micro-CT images of the isolated arteries. PMID:27807391

  13. Analysis of Energy Spectrum with Low Photon Counts via Bayesian Posterior Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Dyk, David A.; Protassov, Rostislav; Kashyap, Vinay L.; Siemiginowska, Aneta; Connors, Alanna

    1999-04-01

    Recently Bayesian methods have grown rapidly in popularity in many scientific disciplines as several computationally intensive statistical algorithms have become feasible with modern computer power. In this paper, we demonstrate how we have employed these state-of-the-art techniques (e.g., Gibbs sampler and Metropolis-Hastings) to fit today's high-quality, high resolution astrophysical spectral data. These algorithms are very flexible and can be used to fit models that account for the highly hierarchical structure in the collection of high-quality spectra and thus can keep pace with the accelerating progress of new telescope designs. We explicitly model photon arrivals as a Poisson process and, thus, have no difficulty with high resolution low count X-ray and gamma-ray data. These methods will be useful not only for the soon-to-be-launched Chandra X-ray observatory but also such new generation telescopes as XMM, Constellation X, and GLAST. We also explicitly incorporate the instrument response (e.g. via a response matrix and effective area vector), plus background contamination of the data. In particular, we appropriately model the background as the realization of a second Poisson process, thereby eliminating the need to directly subtract off the background counts and the rather embarrassing problem of negative photon counts. The source energy spectrum is modeled as a mixture of a Generalized Linear Model which accounts for the continuum plus absorption and several (Gaussian) line profiles. Generalized Linear Models are the standard method for incorporating covariate information (as in regression) into non-Gaussian models and are thus an obvious but innovative choice in this setting. Using several examples, we illustrate how Bayesian posterior sampling can be used to compute point (i.e., ``best'') estimates of the various model parameters as well as compute error bars on these estimates and construct statistical tests.

  14. Detective quantum efficiency of photon-counting x-ray detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Tanguay, Jesse; Yun, Seungman; Kim, Ho Kyung; Cunningham, Ian A.

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: Single-photon-counting (SPC) x-ray imaging has the potential to improve image quality and enable novel energy-dependent imaging methods. Similar to conventional detectors, optimizing image SPC quality will require systems that produce the highest possible detective quantum efficiency (DQE). This paper builds on the cascaded-systems analysis (CSA) framework to develop a comprehensive description of the DQE of SPC detectors that implement adaptive binning. Methods: The DQE of SPC systems can be described using the CSA approach by propagating the probability density function (PDF) of the number of image-forming quanta through simple quantum processes. New relationships are developed to describe PDF transfer through serial and parallel cascades to accommodate scatter reabsorption. Results are applied to hypothetical silicon and selenium-based flat-panel SPC detectors including the effects of reabsorption of characteristic/scatter photons from photoelectric and Compton interactions, stochastic conversion of x-ray energy to secondary quanta, depth-dependent charge collection, and electronic noise. Results are compared with a Monte Carlo study. Results: Depth-dependent collection efficiency can result in substantial broadening of photopeaks that in turn may result in reduced DQE at lower x-ray energies (20–45 keV). Double-counting interaction events caused by reabsorption of characteristic/scatter photons may result in falsely inflated image signal-to-noise ratio and potential overestimation of the DQE. Conclusions: The CSA approach is extended to describe signal and noise propagation through photoelectric and Compton interactions in SPC detectors, including the effects of escape and reabsorption of emission/scatter photons. High-performance SPC systems can be achieved but only for certain combinations of secondary conversion gain, depth-dependent collection efficiency, electronic noise, and reabsorption characteristics.

  15. A unified statistical framework for material decomposition using multienergy photon counting x-ray detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Jiyoung; Kang, Dong-Goo; Kang, Sunghoon; Sung, Younghun; Ye, Jong Chul

    2013-09-15

    Purpose: Material decomposition using multienergy photon counting x-ray detectors (PCXD) has been an active research area over the past few years. Even with some success, the problem of optimal energy selection and three material decomposition including malignant tissue is still on going research topic, and more systematic studies are required. This paper aims to address this in a unified statistical framework in a mammographic environment.Methods: A unified statistical framework for energy level optimization and decomposition of three materials is proposed. In particular, an energy level optimization algorithm is derived using the theory of the minimum variance unbiased estimator, and an iterative algorithm is proposed for material composition as well as system parameter estimation under the unified statistical estimation framework. To verify the performance of the proposed algorithm, the authors performed simulation studies as well as real experiments using physical breast phantom and ex vivo breast specimen. Quantitative comparisons using various performance measures were conducted, and qualitative performance evaluations for ex vivo breast specimen were also performed by comparing the ground-truth malignant tissue areas identified by radiologists.Results: Both simulation and real experiments confirmed that the optimized energy bins by the proposed method allow better material decomposition quality. Moreover, for the specimen thickness estimation errors up to 2 mm, the proposed method provides good reconstruction results in both simulation and real ex vivo breast phantom experiments compared to existing methods.Conclusions: The proposed statistical framework of PCXD has been successfully applied for the energy optimization and decomposition of three material in a mammographic environment. Experimental results using the physical breast phantom and ex vivo specimen support the practicality of the proposed algorithm.

  16. Indirect-detection single-photon-counting x-ray detector for breast tomosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Hao; Kaercher, Joerg; Durst, Roger

    2016-03-01

    X-ray mammography is a crucial screening tool for early identification of breast cancer. However, the overlap of anatomical features present in projection images often complicates the task of correctly identifying suspicious masses. As a result, there has been increasing interest in acquisition of volumetric information through digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) which, compared to mammography, offers the advantage of depth information. Since DBT requires acquisition of many projection images, it is desirable that the noise in each projection image be dominated by the statistical noise of the incident x-ray quanta and not by the additive noise of the imaging system (referred to as quantum-limited imaging) and that the cumulative dose be as low as possible (e.g., no more than for a mammogram). Unfortunately, the electronic noise (~2000 electrons) present in current DBT systems based on active matrix, flat-panel imagers (AMFPIs) is still relatively high compared with modest x-ray gain of the a-Se and CsI:Tl x-ray converters often used. To overcome the modest signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) limitations of current DBT systems, we have developed a large-area x-ray imaging detector with the combination of an extremely low noise (~20 electrons) active-pixel CMOS and a specially designed high resolution scintillator. The high sensitivity and low noise of such system provides better SNR by at least an order of magnitude than current state-of-art AMFPI systems and enables x-ray indirect-detection single photon counting (SPC) at mammographic energies with the potential of dose reduction.

  17. Performance of in-pixel circuits for photon counting arrays (PCAs) based on polycrystalline silicon TFTs.

    PubMed

    Liang, Albert K; Koniczek, Martin; Antonuk, Larry E; El-Mohri, Youcef; Zhao, Qihua; Street, Robert A; Lu, Jeng Ping

    2016-03-01

    Photon counting arrays (PCAs), defined as pixelated imagers which measure the absorbed energy of x-ray photons individually and record this information digitally, are of increasing clinical interest. A number of PCA prototypes with a 1 mm pixel-to-pixel pitch have recently been fabricated with polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si)-a thin-film technology capable of creating monolithic imagers of a size commensurate with human anatomy. In this study, analog and digital simulation frameworks were developed to provide insight into the influence of individual poly-Si transistors on pixel circuit performance-information that is not readily available through empirical means. The simulation frameworks were used to characterize the circuit designs employed in the prototypes. The analog framework, which determines the noise produced by individual transistors, was used to estimate energy resolution, as well as to identify which transistors contribute the most noise. The digital framework, which analyzes how well circuits function in the presence of significant variations in transistor properties, was used to estimate how fast a circuit can produce an output (referred to as output count rate). In addition, an algorithm was developed and used to estimate the minimum pixel pitch that could be achieved for the pixel circuits of the current prototypes. The simulation frameworks predict that the analog component of the PCA prototypes could have energy resolution as low as 8.9% full width at half maximum (FWHM) at 70 keV; and the digital components should work well even in the presence of significant thin-film transistor (TFT) variations, with the fastest component having output count rates as high as 3 MHz. Finally, based on conceivable improvements in the underlying fabrication process, the algorithm predicts that the 1 mm pitch of the current PCA prototypes could be reduced significantly, potentially to between ~240 and 290 μm.

  18. Scalable time-correlated photon counting system with multiple independent input channels.

    PubMed

    Wahl, Michael; Rahn, Hans-Jürgen; Röhlicke, Tino; Kell, Gerald; Nettels, Daniel; Hillger, Frank; Schuler, Ben; Erdmann, Rainer

    2008-12-01

    Time-correlated single photon counting continues to gain importance in a wide range of applications. Most prominently, it is used for time-resolved fluorescence measurements with sensitivity down to the single molecule level. While the primary goal of the method used to be the determination of fluorescence lifetimes upon optical excitation by short light pulses, recent modifications and refinements of instrumentation and methodology allow for the recovery of much more information from the detected photons, and enable entirely new applications. This is achieved most successfully by continuously recording individually detected photons with their arrival time and detection channel information (time tagging), thus avoiding premature data reduction and concomitant loss of information. An important property of the instrumentation used is the number of detection channels and the way they interrelate. Here we present a new instrument architecture that allows scalability in terms of the number of input channels while all channels are synchronized to picoseconds of relative timing and yet operate independent of each other. This is achieved by means of a modular design with independent crystal-locked time digitizers and a central processing unit for sorting and processing of the timing data. The modules communicate through high speed serial links supporting the full throughput rate of the time digitizers. Event processing is implemented in programmable logic, permitting classical histogramming, as well as time tagging of individual photons and their temporally ordered streaming to the host computer. Based on the time-ordered event data, any algorithms and methods for the analysis of fluorescence dynamics can be implemented not only in postprocessing but also in real time. Results from recently emerging single molecule applications are presented to demonstrate the capabilities of the instrument.

  19. Spectral CT of the extremities with a silicon strip photon counting detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sisniega, A.; Zbijewski, W.; Stayman, J. W.; Xu, J.; Taguchi, K.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: Photon counting x-ray detectors (PCXDs) are an important emerging technology for spectral imaging and material differentiation with numerous potential applications in diagnostic imaging. We report development of a Si-strip PCXD system originally developed for mammography with potential application to spectral CT of musculoskeletal extremities, including challenges associated with sparse sampling, spectral calibration, and optimization for higher energy x-ray beams. Methods: A bench-top CT system was developed incorporating a Si-strip PCXD, fixed anode x-ray source, and rotational and translational motions to execute complex acquisition trajectories. Trajectories involving rotation and translation combined with iterative reconstruction were investigated, including single and multiple axial scans and longitudinal helical scans. The system was calibrated to provide accurate spectral separation in dual-energy three-material decomposition of soft-tissue, bone, and iodine. Image quality and decomposition accuracy were assessed in experiments using a phantom with pairs of bone and iodine inserts (3, 5, 15 and 20 mm) and an anthropomorphic wrist. Results: The designed trajectories improved the sampling distribution from 56% minimum sampling of voxels to 75%. Use of iterative reconstruction (viz., penalized likelihood with edge preserving regularization) in combination with such trajectories resulted in a very low level of artifacts in images of the wrist. For large bone or iodine inserts (>5 mm diameter), the error in the estimated material concentration was <16% for (50 mg/mL) bone and <8% for (5 mg/mL) iodine with strong regularization. For smaller inserts, errors of 20-40% were observed and motivate improved methods for spectral calibration and optimization of the edge-preserving regularizer. Conclusion: Use of PCXDs for three-material decomposition in joint imaging proved feasible through a combination of rotation-translation acquisition trajectories and

  20. The role of x-ray Swank factor in energy-resolving photon-counting imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Tanguay, Jesse; Kim, Ho Kyung; Cunningham, Ian. A.

    2010-12-15

    Purpose: Energy-resolved x-ray imaging has the potential to improve contrast-to-noise ratio by measuring the energy of each interacting photon and applying optimal weighting factors. The success of energy-resolving photon-counting (EPC) detectors relies on the ability of an x-ray detector to accurately measure the energy of each interacting photon. However, the escape of characteristic emissions and Compton scatter degrades spectral information. This article makes the theoretical connection between accuracy and imprecision in energy measurements with the x-ray Swank factor for a-Se, Si, CdZnTe, and HgI{sub 2}-based detectors. Methods: For a detector that implements adaptive binning to sum all elements in which x-ray energy is deposited for a single interaction, energy imprecision is shown to depend on the Swank factor for a large element with x rays incident at the center. The response function for each converter material is determined using Monte Carlo methods and used to determine energy accuracy, Swank factor, and relative energy imprecision in photon-energy measurements. Results: For each material, at energies below the respective K edges, accuracy is close to unity and imprecision is only a few percent. Above the K-edge energies, characteristic emission results in a drop in accuracy and precision that depends on escape probability. In Si, and to some extent a-Se, Compton-scatter escape also degrades energy precision with increasing energy. The influence of converter thickness on energy accuracy and imprecision is modest for low-Z materials but becomes important when using high-Z materials at energies greater than the K-edge energies. Conclusions: Accuracy and precision in energy measurements by EPC detectors are determined largely by the energy-dependent x-ray Swank factor. Modest decreases in the Swank factor (5%-15%) result in large increases in relative imprecision (30%-40%).

  1. Development of mammography system using CdTe photon counting detector for the exposure dose reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruyama, Sho; Niwa, Naoko; Yamazaki, Misaki; Yamakawa, Tsutomu; Nagano, Tatsuya; Kodera, Yoshie

    2014-03-01

    We propose a new mammography system using a cadmium telluride (CdTe) photon-counting detector for exposure dose reduction. In contrast to conventional mammography, this system uses high-energy X-rays. This study evaluates the usefulness of this system in terms of the absorbed dose distribution and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) at acrylic step using a Monte Carlo simulation. In addition, we created a prototype system that uses a CdTe detector and automatic movement stage. For various conditions, we measured the properties and evaluated the quality of images produced by the system. The simulation result for a tube voltage of 40 kV and tungsten/barium (W/Ba) as a target/filter shows that the surface dose was reduced more than 60% compared to that under conventional conditions. The CNR of our proposal system also became higher than that under conventional conditions. The point at which the CNRs coincide for 4 cm polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) at the 2-mm-thick step corresponds to a dose reduction of 30%, and these differences increased with increasing phantom thickness. To improve the image quality, we determined the problematic aspects of the scanning system. The results of this study indicate that, by using a higher X-ray energy than in conventional mammography, it is possible to obtain a significant exposure dose reduction without loss of image quality. Further, the image quality of the prototype system can be improved by optimizing the balance between the shift-and-add operation and the output of the X-ray tube. In future work, we will further examine these improvement points.

  2. Fluorescence measurement by a streak camera in a single-photon-counting mode.

    PubMed

    Komura, Masayuki; Itoh, Shigeru

    2009-01-01

    We describe here a recently developed fluorescence measurement system that uses a streak camera to detect fluorescence decay in a single photon-counting mode. This system allows for easy measurements of various samples and provides 2D images of fluorescence in the wavelength and time domains. The great advantage of the system is that the data can be handled with ease; furthermore, the data are amenable to detailed analysis. We describe the picosecond kinetics of fluorescence in spinach Photosystem (PS) II particles at 4-77 K as a typical experimental example. Through the global analysis of the data, we have identified a new fluorescence band (F689) in addition to the already established F680, F685, and F695 emission bands. The blue shift of the steady-state fluorescence spectrum upon cooling below 77 K can be interpreted as an increase of the shorter-wavelength fluorescence, especially F689, due to the slowdown of the excitation energy transfer process. The F685 and F695 bands seem to be thermally equilibrated at 77 K but not at 4 K. The simple and efficient photon accumulation feature of the system allows us to measure fluorescence from leaves, solutions, single colonies, and even single cells. The 2D fluorescence images obtained by this system are presented for isolated spinach PS II particles, intact leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana, the PS I super-complex of a marine centric diatom, Chaetoceros gracilis, isolated membranes of a purple photosynthetic bacterium, Acidiphilium rubrum, which contains Zn-BChl a, and a coral that contains a green fluorescent protein and an algal endosymbiont, Zooxanthella. PMID:19568951

  3. Elemental analysis with a full-field X-ray fluorescence microscope and a CCD photon-counting system.

    PubMed

    Ohigashi, Takuji; Watanabe, Norio; Yokosuka, Hiroki; Aota, Tatsuya; Takano, Hidekazu; Takeuchi, Akihisa; Aoki, Sadao

    2002-05-01

    The first result is presented of an X-ray fluorescence microscope with a Wolter mirror in combination with a CCD camera used as an energy-resolved two-dimensional detector in photon-counting mode. Two-dimensional elemental maps of metallic wires, such as Fe, Co, Ni and Cu, and inclusions of a synthesized diamond could be obtained with an energy resolution of 350 eV. PMID:11972365

  4. SU-E-I-77: A Noise Reduction Technique for Energy-Resolved Photon-Counting Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Lam Ng, A; Ding, H; Cho, H; Molloi, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Finding the optimal energy threshold setting for an energy-resolved photon-counting detector has an important impact on the maximization of contrast-to-noise-ratio (CNR). We introduce a noise reduction method to enhance CNR by reducing the noise in each energy bin without altering the average gray levels in the projection and image domains. Methods: We simulated a four bin energy-resolved photon-counting detector based on Si with a 10 mm depth of interaction. TASMIP algorithm was used to simulate a spectrum of 65 kVp with 2.7 mm Al filter. A 13 mm PMMA phantom with hydroxyapatite and iodine at different concentrations (100, 200 and 300 mg/ml for HA, and 2, 4, and 8 mg/ml for Iodine) was used. Projection-based and Image-based energy weighting methods were used to generate weighted images. A reference low noise image was used for noise reduction purposes. A Gaussian-like weighting function which computes the similarity between pixels of interest was calculated from the reference image and implemented on a pixel by pixel basis for the noisy images. Results: CNR improvement compared to different methods (Charge-Integrated, Photon-Counting and Energy-Weighting) and after noise reduction was highly task-dependent. The CNR improvement with respect to the Charge-Integrated CNR for hydroxyapatite and iodine were 1.8 and 1.5, respectively. In each of the energy bins, the noise was reduced by approximately factor of two without altering their respective average gray levels. Conclusion: The proposed noise reduction technique for energy-resolved photon-counting detectors can significantly reduce image noise. This technique can be used as a compliment to the current energy-weighting methods in CNR optimization.

  5. High resolution micro-CT of low attenuating organic materials using large area photon-counting detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumpová, I.; Vavřík, D.; Fíla, T.; Koudelka, P.; Jandejsek, I.; Jakůbek, J.; Kytýř, D.; Zlámal, P.; Vopálenský, M.; Gantar, A.

    2016-02-01

    To overcome certain limitations of contemporary materials used for bone tissue engineering, such as inflammatory response after implantation, a whole new class of materials based on polysaccharide compounds is being developed. Here, nanoparticulate bioactive glass reinforced gelan-gum (GG-BAG) has recently been proposed for the production of bone scaffolds. This material offers promising biocompatibility properties, including bioactivity and biodegradability, with the possibility of producing scaffolds with directly controlled microgeometry. However, to utilize such a scaffold with application-optimized properties, large sets of complex numerical simulations using the real microgeometry of the material have to be carried out during the development process. Because the GG-BAG is a material with intrinsically very low attenuation to X-rays, its radiographical imaging, including tomographical scanning and reconstructions, with resolution required by numerical simulations might be a very challenging task. In this paper, we present a study on X-ray imaging of GG-BAG samples. High-resolution volumetric images of investigated specimens were generated on the basis of micro-CT measurements using a large area flat-panel detector and a large area photon-counting detector. The photon-counting detector was composed of a 010× 1 matrix of Timepix edgeless silicon pixelated detectors with tiling based on overlaying rows (i.e. assembled so that no gap is present between individual rows of detectors). We compare the results from both detectors with the scanning electron microscopy on selected slices in transversal plane. It has been shown that the photon counting detector can provide approx. 3× better resolution of the details in low-attenuating materials than the integrating flat panel detectors. We demonstrate that employment of a large area photon counting detector is a good choice for imaging of low attenuating materials with the resolution sufficient for numerical simulations.

  6. A hybrid Monte Carlo model for the energy response functions of X-ray photon counting detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Dufan; Xu, Xiaofei; Zhang, Li; Wang, Sen

    2016-09-01

    In photon counting computed tomography (CT), it is vital to know the energy response functions of the detector for noise estimation and system optimization. Empirical methods lack flexibility and Monte Carlo simulations require too much knowledge of the detector. In this paper, we proposed a hybrid Monte Carlo model for the energy response functions of photon counting detectors in X-ray medical applications. GEANT4 was used to model the energy deposition of X-rays in the detector. Then numerical models were used to describe the process of charge sharing, anti-charge sharing and spectral broadening, which were too complicated to be included in the Monte Carlo model. Several free parameters were introduced in the numerical models, and they could be calibrated from experimental measurements such as X-ray fluorescence from metal elements. The method was used to model the energy response function of an XCounter Flite X1 photon counting detector. The parameters of the model were calibrated with fluorescence measurements. The model was further tested against measured spectrums of a VJ X-ray source to validate its feasibility and accuracy.

  7. Evaluation of a photon-counting hybrid pixel detector array with a synchrotron X-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponchut, C.; Visschers, J. L.; Fornaini, A.; Graafsma, H.; Maiorino, M.; Mettivier, G.; Calvet, D.

    2002-05-01

    A photon-counting hybrid pixel detector (Medipix-1) has been characterized using a synchrotron X-ray source. The detector consists of a readout ASIC with 64×64 independent photon-counting cells of 170×170 μm 2 pitch, bump-bonded to a 300 μm thick silicon sensor, read out by a PCIbus-based electronics, and a graphical user interface (GUI) software. The intensity and the energy tunability of the X-ray source allow characterization of the detector in the time, space, and energy domains. The system can be read out on external trigger at a frame rate of 100 Hz with 3 ms exposure time per frame. The detector response is tested up to more than 7×10 5 detected events/pixel/s. The point-spread response shows <2% crosstalk between neighboring pixels. Fine scanning of the detector surface with a 10 μm beam reveals no loss in sensitivity between adjacent pixels as could result from charge sharing in the silicon sensor. Photons down to 6 keV can be detected after equalization of the thresholds of individual pixels. The obtained results demonstrate the advantages of photon-counting hybrid pixel detectors and particularly of the Medipix-1 chip for a wide range of X-ray imaging applications, including those using synchrotron X-ray beams.

  8. 18k Channels single photon counting readout circuit for hybrid pixel detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maj, P.; Grybos, P.; Szczygiel, R.; Zoladz, M.; Sakumura, T.; Tsuji, Y.

    2013-01-01

    We have performed measurements of an integrated circuit named PXD18k designed for hybrid pixel semiconductor detectors used in X-ray imaging applications. The PXD18k integrated circuit, fabricated in CMOS 180 nm technology, has dimensions of 9.64 mm×20 mm and contains approximately 26 million transistors. The core of the IC is a matrix of 96×192 pixels with 100 μm×100 μm pixel size. Each pixel works in a single photon counting mode. A single pixel contains two charge sensitive amplifiers with Krummenacher feedback scheme, two shapers, two discriminators (with independent thresholds A and B) and two 16-bit ripple counters. The data are read out via eight low voltage differential signaling (LVDS) outputs with 100 Mbps rate. The power consumption is dominated by analog blocks and it is about 23 μW/pixel. The effective peaking time at the discriminator input is 30 ns and is mainly determined by the time constants of the charge sensitive amplifier (CSA). The gain is equal to 42.5 μV/e- and the equivalent noise charge is 168 e- rms (with bump-bonded silicon pixel detector). Thanks to the use of trim DACs in each pixel, the effective threshold spread at the discriminator input is only 1.79 mV. The dead time of the front end electronics for a standard setting is 172 ns (paralyzable model). In the standard readout mode (when the data collection time is separated from the time necessary to readout data from the chip) the PXD18k IC works with two energy thresholds per pixel. The PXD18k can also be operated in the continuous readout mode (with a zero dead time) where one can select the number of bits readout from each pixel to optimize the PXD18k frame rate. For example, for reading out 16 bits/pixel the frame rate is 2.7 kHz and for 4 bits/pixel it rises to 7.1 kHz.

  9. ChromAIX: Fast photon-counting ASIC for Spectral Computed Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steadman, Roger; Herrmann, Christoph; Mülhens, Oliver; Maeding, Dale G.

    2011-08-01

    X-ray attenuation properties of matter (i.e. human body in medical Computed Tomography) are energy and material dependent. This dependency is largely neglected in conventional CT techniques, which require the introduction of correction algorithms in order to prevent image artefacts. The exploitation of the inherent energy information contained in the X-ray spectrum allows distinguishing the two main physical causes of energy-dependent attenuation (photo-electric effect and Compton effect). Currently a number of methods exist that allow assessing the energy-dependent attenuation in conventional systems. These methods consist of using two distinct spectra (kVp switching or dual source) or of discriminating low and high energy photons by means of stacking two detectors. Further improvements can be achieved by transitioning to direct-conversion technologies and counting-mode detection, which inherently exhibits a better signal-to-noise ratio. Further including energy discrimination enables new applications, which are not feasible with dual-energy techniques, e.g. the possibility to discriminate K-edge features (contrast agents, e.g. gadolinium) from other contributions to the X-ray attenuation of a human body. The capability of providing energy-resolved information with two or more independent measurements is referred to as Spectral CT.A new proprietary photon-counting ASIC (ChromAIX) has been developed to provide high count-rate capabilities while offering energy discrimination. ChromAIX consists of a pixel array with an isotropic pitch of 300 μm. Each pixel contains independent discriminators that enable the possibility to discretize the incoming photons into a number of energy levels. Extensive electrical characterization has been carried out to assess the performance in terms of count-rate performance and noise. Observed rates exceed 10 Mcps/pixel (Poissonian, mean incoming rates >27 Mcps). The energy resolution is better than 4.1 keV FWHM and has been shown to be

  10. Evaluation of conventional imaging performance in a research whole-body CT system with a photon-counting detector array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zhicong; Leng, Shuai; Jorgensen, Steven M.; Li, Zhoubo; Gutjahr, Ralf; Chen, Baiyu; Halaweish, Ahmed F.; Kappler, Steffen; Yu, Lifeng; Ritman, Erik L.; McCollough, Cynthia H.

    2016-02-01

    This study evaluated the conventional imaging performance of a research whole-body photon-counting CT system and investigated its feasibility for imaging using clinically realistic levels of x-ray photon flux. This research system was built on the platform of a 2nd generation dual-source CT system: one source coupled to an energy integrating detector (EID) and the other coupled to a photon-counting detector (PCD). Phantom studies were conducted to measure CT number accuracy and uniformity for water, CT number energy dependency for high-Z materials, spatial resolution, noise, and contrast-to-noise ratio. The results from the EID and PCD subsystems were compared. The impact of high photon flux, such as pulse pile-up, was assessed by studying the noise-to-tube-current relationship using a neonate water phantom and high x-ray photon flux. Finally, clinical feasibility of the PCD subsystem was investigated using anthropomorphic phantoms, a cadaveric head, and a whole-body cadaver, which were scanned at dose levels equivalent to or higher than those used clinically. Phantom measurements demonstrated that the PCD subsystem provided comparable image quality to the EID subsystem, except that the PCD subsystem provided slightly better longitudinal spatial resolution and about 25% improvement in contrast-to-noise ratio for iodine. The impact of high photon flux was found to be negligible for the PCD subsystem: only subtle high-flux effects were noticed for tube currents higher than 300 mA in images of the neonate water phantom. Results of the anthropomorphic phantom and cadaver scans demonstrated comparable image quality between the EID and PCD subsystems. There were no noticeable ring, streaking, or cupping/capping artifacts in the PCD images. In addition, the PCD subsystem provided spectral information. Our experiments demonstrated that the research whole-body photon-counting CT system is capable of providing clinical image quality at clinically realistic levels of x

  11. Evaluation of conventional imaging performance in a research whole-body CT system with a photon-counting detector array

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Zhicong; Leng, Shuai; Jorgensen, Steven M; Li, Zhoubo; Gutjahr, Ralf; Chen, Baiyu; Halaweish, Ahmed F; Kappler, Steffen; Yu, Lifeng; Ritman, Erik L; McCollough, Cynthia H

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the conventional imaging performance of a research whole-body photon-counting CT system and investigated its feasibility for imaging using clinically realistic levels of x-ray photon flux. This research system was built on the platform of a 2nd generation dual-source CT system: one source coupled to an energy integrating detector (EID) and the other coupled to a photon-counting detector (PCD). Phantom studies were conducted to measure CT number accuracy and uniformity for water, CT number energy dependency for high-Z materials, spatial resolution, noise, and contrast-to-noise ratio. The results from the EID and PCD subsystems were compared. The impact of high photon flux, such as pulse pile-up, was assessed by studying the noise-to-tube-current relationship using a neonate water phantom and high x-ray photon flux. Finally, clinical feasibility of the PCD subsystem was investigated using anthropomorphic phantoms, a cadaveric head, and a whole-body cadaver, which were scanned at dose levels equivalent to or higher than those used clinically. Phantom measurements demonstrated that the PCD subsystem provided comparable image quality to the EID subsystem, except that the PCD subsystem provided slightly better longitudinal spatial resolution and about 25% improvement in contrast-to-noise ratio for iodine. The impact of high photon flux was found to be negligible for the PCD subsystem: only subtle high-flux effects were noticed for tube currents higher than 300 mA in images of the neonate water phantom. Results of the anthropomorphic phantom and cadaver scans demonstrated comparable image quality between the EID and PCD subsystems. There were no noticeable ring, streaking, or cupping/capping artifacts in the PCD images. In addition, the PCD subsystem provided spectral information. Our experiments demonstrated that the research whole-body photon-counting CT system is capable of providing clinical image quality at clinically realistic levels of x

  12. Evaluation of conventional imaging performance in a research whole-body CT system with a photon-counting detector array.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhicong; Leng, Shuai; Jorgensen, Steven M; Li, Zhoubo; Gutjahr, Ralf; Chen, Baiyu; Halaweish, Ahmed F; Kappler, Steffen; Yu, Lifeng; Ritman, Erik L; McCollough, Cynthia H

    2016-02-21

    This study evaluated the conventional imaging performance of a research whole-body photon-counting CT system and investigated its feasibility for imaging using clinically realistic levels of x-ray photon flux. This research system was built on the platform of a 2nd generation dual-source CT system: one source coupled to an energy integrating detector (EID) and the other coupled to a photon-counting detector (PCD). Phantom studies were conducted to measure CT number accuracy and uniformity for water, CT number energy dependency for high-Z materials, spatial resolution, noise, and contrast-to-noise ratio. The results from the EID and PCD subsystems were compared. The impact of high photon flux, such as pulse pile-up, was assessed by studying the noise-to-tube-current relationship using a neonate water phantom and high x-ray photon flux. Finally, clinical feasibility of the PCD subsystem was investigated using anthropomorphic phantoms, a cadaveric head, and a whole-body cadaver, which were scanned at dose levels equivalent to or higher than those used clinically. Phantom measurements demonstrated that the PCD subsystem provided comparable image quality to the EID subsystem, except that the PCD subsystem provided slightly better longitudinal spatial resolution and about 25% improvement in contrast-to-noise ratio for iodine. The impact of high photon flux was found to be negligible for the PCD subsystem: only subtle high-flux effects were noticed for tube currents higher than 300 mA in images of the neonate water phantom. Results of the anthropomorphic phantom and cadaver scans demonstrated comparable image quality between the EID and PCD subsystems. There were no noticeable ring, streaking, or cupping/capping artifacts in the PCD images. In addition, the PCD subsystem provided spectral information. Our experiments demonstrated that the research whole-body photon-counting CT system is capable of providing clinical image quality at clinically realistic levels of x

  13. Evaluation of conventional imaging performance in a research whole-body CT system with a photon-counting detector array.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhicong; Leng, Shuai; Jorgensen, Steven M; Li, Zhoubo; Gutjahr, Ralf; Chen, Baiyu; Halaweish, Ahmed F; Kappler, Steffen; Yu, Lifeng; Ritman, Erik L; McCollough, Cynthia H

    2016-02-21

    This study evaluated the conventional imaging performance of a research whole-body photon-counting CT system and investigated its feasibility for imaging using clinically realistic levels of x-ray photon flux. This research system was built on the platform of a 2nd generation dual-source CT system: one source coupled to an energy integrating detector (EID) and the other coupled to a photon-counting detector (PCD). Phantom studies were conducted to measure CT number accuracy and uniformity for water, CT number energy dependency for high-Z materials, spatial resolution, noise, and contrast-to-noise ratio. The results from the EID and PCD subsystems were compared. The impact of high photon flux, such as pulse pile-up, was assessed by studying the noise-to-tube-current relationship using a neonate water phantom and high x-ray photon flux. Finally, clinical feasibility of the PCD subsystem was investigated using anthropomorphic phantoms, a cadaveric head, and a whole-body cadaver, which were scanned at dose levels equivalent to or higher than those used clinically. Phantom measurements demonstrated that the PCD subsystem provided comparable image quality to the EID subsystem, except that the PCD subsystem provided slightly better longitudinal spatial resolution and about 25% improvement in contrast-to-noise ratio for iodine. The impact of high photon flux was found to be negligible for the PCD subsystem: only subtle high-flux effects were noticed for tube currents higher than 300 mA in images of the neonate water phantom. Results of the anthropomorphic phantom and cadaver scans demonstrated comparable image quality between the EID and PCD subsystems. There were no noticeable ring, streaking, or cupping/capping artifacts in the PCD images. In addition, the PCD subsystem provided spectral information. Our experiments demonstrated that the research whole-body photon-counting CT system is capable of providing clinical image quality at clinically realistic levels of x

  14. Photon counting spectral CT: improved material decomposition with K-edge-filtered x-rays.

    PubMed

    Shikhaliev, Polad M

    2012-03-21

    Photon counting spectral computed tomography (PCSCT) provides material selective CT imaging at a single CT scan and fixed tube voltage. The PCSCT data are acquired in several energy ranges (bins) arranged over the x-ray spectrum. The quasi-monoenergetic CT images are acquired in these energy bins and are used for material decomposition. The PCSCT exhibits inherent limitations when material decomposition is performed using energy bins. For effective material decomposition, the energy bins used for material decomposition should be sufficiently narrow and well separated. However, when narrow bins are used, a large fraction of the detected x-ray counts is lost and statistical noise is increased. Alternatively, the x-ray spectrum can be split into a few larger bins with no gap in between and all detected x-ray photons can be used for material decomposition. However, in this case the energy bins are too wide and not well separated, which results in suboptimal material decomposition. The above contradictory requirements can be resolved if the x-ray photons are physically removed from the regions of the energy spectrum between the energy bins. Such a selective removal can be performed using filtration of the x-ray beam by high-Z filter materials with appropriate positions of K-edge energies. The K-edge filtration of x-rays can, therefore, provide necessary gaps between the energy bins with no dose penalty to the patient. In the current work, we proposed using selective K-edge filtration of x-rays in PCSCT and performed the first experimental investigation of this approach. The PCSCT system included a cadmium zinc telluride semiconductor detector with 2 × 256 pixels and 1 × 1 mm(2) pixel size, and five energy bins. The CT phantom had 14 cm diameter and included contrast elements of iodine, gold and calcifications with clinically relevant concentrations. The tube voltages of 60, 90 and 120 kVp were used. K-edge filters based on Ba (E(k) = 37.44 keV) were used for a 60 k

  15. Design of a control system for ultrafast x-ray camera working in a single photon counting mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoladz, Miroslaw; Rauza, Jacek; Kasinski, Krzysztof; Maj, Piotr; Grybos, Pawel

    2015-09-01

    Prototype of Ultra-Fast X-Ray Camera Controller working in a single photon counting mode and based on ASIC has been presented in this paper. An ASIC architecture has been discussed with special attention to digital part. We present the Custom Soft Processor as an ASIC control sequences generator. The Processor allows for dynamic program downloading and generating control sequences with up to 80MHz clock rate (preliminary results). Assembler with a very simple syntax has been defined to speed up Processor programs development. Discriminators threshold dispersion correction has been performed to confirm proper Camera Controller operation.

  16. Fluorescence detection of single molecules using pulsed near-field optical excitation and time correlated photon counting

    SciTech Connect

    Ambrose, W.P.; Goodwin, P.M.; Martin, J.C.; Keller, R.A.

    1994-03-01

    Pulsed excitation, time correlated single photon counting and time gated detection are used in near-field optical microscopy to enhance fluorescence images and measure the fluorescence lifetimes of single molecules of Rhodamine 6G on silica surfaces. Time gated detection is used to reject prompt scattered background and to improve the image signal to noise ratio. The excited state lifetime of a single Rhodamine 6G molecule is found to depend on the position of the near-field probe. We attribute the lifetime variations to spontaneous emission rate alterations by the fluorescence reflected from and quenching by the aluminum coated probe.

  17. Fluorescence depolarization of rhodamine 6G in glycerol: a photon-counting test of three-dimensional excitation transport theory

    SciTech Connect

    Anfinrud, P.A.; Hart, D.E.; Hedstrom, J.F.; Struve, W.S.

    1986-05-22

    Time-correlated photon counting has been used to measure fluorescence concentration depolarization for rhodamine 6G in glycerol. The excitation transport theory developed by Gochanour, Andersen, and Fayer yields good approximations to the experimental decay profiles over the concentration range 1.7 x 10/sup -4/ to 2.4 x 10/sup -3/ M. Although the differences between optimized theoretical and experimental profiles are fractionally small, they are readily characterized under present counting statistics. They prove to be dominated by experimental artifacts, arising from excitation trapping by rhodamine 6G aggregates and from self-absorption in solution cells thicker than approx. 10 ..mu..m.

  18. Photon counting imaging with an electron-bombarded CCD: towards a parallel-processing photoelectronic time-to-amplitude converter.

    PubMed

    Hirvonen, Liisa M; Jiggins, Stephen; Sergent, Nicolas; Zanda, Gianmarco; Suhling, Klaus

    2014-12-01

    We have used an electron-bombarded CCD for optical photon counting imaging. The photon event pulse height distribution was found to be linearly dependent on the gain voltage. We propose on this basis that a gain voltage sweep during exposure in an electron-bombarded sensor would allow photon arrival time determination with sub-frame exposure time resolution. This effectively uses an electron-bombarded sensor as a parallel-processing photoelectronic time-to-amplitude converter, or a two-dimensional photon counting streak camera. Several applications that require timing of photon arrival, including Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy, may benefit from such an approach. A simulation of a voltage sweep performed with experimental data collected with different acceleration voltages validates the principle of this approach. Moreover, photon event centroiding was performed and a hybrid 50% Gaussian/Centre of Gravity + 50% Hyperbolic cosine centroiding algorithm was found to yield the lowest fixed pattern noise. Finally, the camera was mounted on a fluorescence microscope to image F-actin filaments stained with the fluorescent dye Alexa 488 in fixed cells.

  19. Optimized acquisition time for x-ray fluorescence imaging of gold nanoparticles: a preliminary study using photon counting detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Liqiang; Wu, Di; Li, Yuhua; Chen, Wei R.; Zheng, Bin; Liu, Hong

    2016-03-01

    X-ray fluorescence (XRF) is a promising spectroscopic technique to characterize imaging contrast agents with high atomic numbers (Z) such as gold nanoparticles (GNPs) inside small objects. Its utilization for biomedical applications, however, is greatly limited to experimental research due to longer data acquisition time. The objectives of this study are to apply a photon counting detector array for XRF imaging and to determine an optimized XRF data acquisition time, at which the acquired XRF image is of acceptable quality to allow the maximum level of radiation dose reduction. A prototype laboratory XRF imaging configuration consisting of a pencil-beam X-ray and a photon counting detector array (1 × 64 pixels) is employed to acquire the XRF image through exciting the prepared GNP/water solutions. In order to analyze the signal to noise ratio (SNR) improvement versus the increased exposure time, all the XRF photons within the energy range of 63 - 76KeV that include two Kα gold fluorescence peaks are collected for 1s, 2s, 3s, and so on all the way up to 200s. The optimized XRF data acquisition time for imaging different GNP solutions is determined as the moment when the acquired XRF image just reaches a quality with a SNR of 20dB which corresponds to an acceptable image quality.

  20. Projection-based energy weighting on photon-counting X-ray images in digital subtraction mammography: a feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Sung-Hoon; Lee, Seung-Wan; Choi, Yu-Na; Lee, Young-Jin; Kim, Hee-Joung

    2014-03-01

    In digital subtraction mammography where subtracts the one image (with contrast medium) from the other (anatomical background) for observing the tumor structure, tumors which include more blood vessels than normal tissue could be distinguished through the enhancement of contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). In order to improve CNR, we adopted projection-based energy weighting for iodine solutions with four different concentrations embedded in a breast phantom (50% adipose and 50% glandular tissues). In this study, a Monte Carlo simulation was used to simulate a 40 mm thickness breast phantom, which has 15 and 30 mg/cm3 iodine solutions with two different thicknesses, and an energy resolving photon-counting system. The input energy spectrum was simulated in a range of 20 to 45 keV in order to reject electronic noise and include k-edge energy of iodine (33.2 keV). The results showed that the projection-based energy weighting improved the CNR by factors of 1.05-1.86 compared to the conventional integrating images. Consequently, the CNR of images from the digital subtraction mammography could be improved by the projection-based energy weighting with photon-counting detectors.

  1. Low-Noise Free-Running High-Rate Photon-Counting for Space Communication and Ranging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Wei; Krainak, Michael A.; Yang, Guangning; Sun, Xiaoli; Merritt, Scott

    2016-01-01

    We present performance data for low-noise free-running high-rate photon counting method for space optical communication and ranging. NASA GSFC is testing the performance of two types of novel photon-counting detectors 1) a 2x8 mercury cadmium telluride (HgCdTe) avalanche array made by DRS Inc., and a 2) a commercial 2880-element silicon avalanche photodiode (APD) array. We successfully measured real-time communication performance using both the 2 detected-photon threshold and logic AND-gate coincidence methods. Use of these methods allows mitigation of dark count, after-pulsing and background noise effects without using other method of Time Gating The HgCdTe APD array routinely demonstrated very high photon detection efficiencies ((is) greater than 50%) at near infrared wavelength. The commercial silicon APD array exhibited a fast output with rise times of 300 ps and pulse widths of 600 ps. On-chip individually filtered signals from the entire array were multiplexed onto a single fast output. NASA GSFC has tested both detectors for their potential application for space communications and ranging. We developed and compare their performances using both the 2 detected photon threshold and coincidence methods.

  2. Low-Noise Free-Running High-Rate Photon-Counting for Space Communication and Ranging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Wei; Krainak, Michael A.; Yang, Guan; Sun, Xiaoli; Merritt, Scott

    2016-01-01

    We present performance data for low-noise free-running high-rate photon counting method for space optical communication and ranging. NASA GSFC is testing the performance of two types of novel photon-counting detectors 1) a 2x8 mercury cadmium telluride (HgCdTe) avalanche array made by DRS Inc., and a 2) a commercial 2880-element silicon avalanche photodiode (APD) array. We successfully measured real-time communication performance using both the 2 detected-photon threshold and logic AND-gate coincidence methods. Use of these methods allows mitigation of dark count, after-pulsing and background noise effects without using other method of Time Gating The HgCdTe APD array routinely demonstrated very high photon detection efficiencies (50) at near infrared wavelength. The commercial silicon APD array exhibited a fast output with rise times of 300 ps and pulse widths of 600 ps. On-chip individually filtered signals from the entire array were multiplexed onto a single fast output. NASA GSFC has tested both detectors for their potential application for space communications and ranging. We developed and compare their performances using both the 2 detected photon threshold and coincidence methods.

  3. High-speed photon-counting x-ray computed tomography system utilizing a multipixel photon counter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Eiichi; Enomoto, Toshiyuki; Watanabe, Manabu; Hitomi, Keitaro; Takahashi, Kiyomi; Sato, Shigehiro; Ogawa, Akiro; Onagawa, Jun

    2009-07-01

    High-speed photon counting is useful for discriminating photon energy and for decreasing absorbed dose for patients in medical radiography, and the counting is usable for constructing an x-ray computed tomography (CT) system. A photon-counting x-ray CT system is of the first generation type and consists of an x-ray generator, a turn table, a translation stage, a two-stage controller, a multipixel photon counter (MPPC) module, a 1.0-mm-thick LSO crystal (scintillator), a counter card (CC), and a personal computer (PC). Tomography is accomplished by repeating the linear scanning and the rotation of an object, and projection curves of the object are obtained by the linear scanning using the detector consisting of a MPPC module and the LSO. The pulses of the event signal from the module are counted by the CC in conjunction with the PC. The lower level of the photon energy is roughly determined by a comparator circuit in the module, and the unit of the level is the photon equivalent (pe). Thus, the average photon energy of the x-ray spectra increases with increasing the lower-level voltage of the comparator. The maximum count rate was approximately 20 Mcps, and energy-discriminated CT was roughly carried out.

  4. Photon counting imaging with an electron-bombarded CCD: Towards a parallel-processing photoelectronic time-to-amplitude converter

    SciTech Connect

    Hirvonen, Liisa M.; Jiggins, Stephen; Sergent, Nicolas; Zanda, Gianmarco; Suhling, Klaus

    2014-12-15

    We have used an electron-bombarded CCD for optical photon counting imaging. The photon event pulse height distribution was found to be linearly dependent on the gain voltage. We propose on this basis that a gain voltage sweep during exposure in an electron-bombarded sensor would allow photon arrival time determination with sub-frame exposure time resolution. This effectively uses an electron-bombarded sensor as a parallel-processing photoelectronic time-to-amplitude converter, or a two-dimensional photon counting streak camera. Several applications that require timing of photon arrival, including Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy, may benefit from such an approach. A simulation of a voltage sweep performed with experimental data collected with different acceleration voltages validates the principle of this approach. Moreover, photon event centroiding was performed and a hybrid 50% Gaussian/Centre of Gravity + 50% Hyperbolic cosine centroiding algorithm was found to yield the lowest fixed pattern noise. Finally, the camera was mounted on a fluorescence microscope to image F-actin filaments stained with the fluorescent dye Alexa 488 in fixed cells.

  5. A comparative analysis of OTF, NPS, and DQE in energy integrating and photon counting digital x-ray detectors

    PubMed Central

    Acciavatti, Raymond J.; Maidment, Andrew D. A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: One of the benefits of photon counting (PC) detectors over energy integrating (EI) detectors is the absence of many additive noise sources, such as electronic noise and secondary quantum noise. The purpose of this work is to demonstrate that thresholding voltage gains to detect individual x rays actually generates an unexpected source of white noise in photon counters. Methods: To distinguish the two detector types, their point spread function (PSF) is interpreted differently. The PSF of the energy integrating detector is treated as a weighting function for counting x rays, while the PSF of the photon counting detector is interpreted as a probability. Although this model ignores some subtleties of real imaging systems, such as scatter and the energy-dependent amplification of secondary quanta in indirect-converting detectors, it is useful for demonstrating fundamental differences between the two detector types. From first principles, the optical transfer function (OTF) is calculated as the continuous Fourier transform of the PSF, the noise power spectra (NPS) is determined by the discrete space Fourier transform (DSFT) of the autocovariance of signal intensity, and the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) is found from combined knowledge of the OTF and NPS. To illustrate the calculation of the transfer functions, the PSF is modeled as the convolution of a Gaussian with the product of rect functions. The Gaussian reflects the blurring of the x-ray converter, while the rect functions model the sampling of the detector. Results: The transfer functions are first calculated assuming outside noise sources such as electronic noise and secondary quantum noise are negligible. It is demonstrated that while OTF is the same for two detector types possessing an equivalent PSF, a frequency-independent (i.e., “white”) difference in their NPS exists such that NPSPC≥NPSEI and hence DQEPC≤DQEEI. The necessary and sufficient condition for equality is that the PSF is a

  6. Heat transfer and fluid flow in microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mala, Ghulam Mohiuddin

    Fluid flow and heat transfer characteristics in microchannels of different cross-sections; parallel plate, cylindrical and trapezoidal microchannels were studied. The trapezoidal microchannels were etched in silicon and glass by photolithographic techniques. The cylindrical microchannels of fused silica and stainless steel were readily available. Channels with depths of 18 μm to 300 μm were studied. The study was divided into three parts viz. theoretical modeling, numerical simulation and experimentation. Electrokinetic effects such as the effects of electrical double layer (EDL) at the solid-liquid interface and surface roughness effects were considered. An experimental apparatus was constructed and a procedure devised to measure the flow rate, pressure drop, temperatures and electrokinetic parameters like streaming potential, streaming current, and conductivity of the working fluid. Great care was taken so that the measurements were accurate and repeatable. For steady state laminar flow and heat transfer in microchannels, mathematical models were developed that consider the effects of electrical double layer and surface roughness at the microchannel walls. The non- linear, 2-D, Poisson-Boltzmann equation that describes the potential distribution at the solid liquid interface was solved numerically and results were compared with a linear approximate solution that overestimates the potential distribution for higher values of zeta potential. Effects of the EDL field at the solid-liquid interface, surface roughness at the microchannel walls and the channel size, on the velocity distribution, streaming potential, apparent viscosity, temperature distribution and heat transfer characteristics are discussed. The experimental results indicate significant departure in flow characteristics from the predictions of the Navier-Stokes equations, referred to as conventional theory. The difference between the experimental results and theoretical predictions decreases as the

  7. Lock-in-photon-counting-based highly-sensitive and large-dynamic imaging system for continuous-wave diffuse optical tomography.

    PubMed

    Chen, Weiting; Wang, Xin; Wang, Bingyuan; Wang, Yihan; Zhang, Yanqi; Zhao, Huijuan; Gao, Feng

    2016-02-01

    We implemented a novel lock-in photon-counting detection architecture that combines the ultra-high sensitivity of the photon-counting detection and the measurement parallelism of the lock-in technique. Based on this technique, a dual-wavelength simultaneous measurement continuous wave diffuse optical tomography system was developed with a configuration of 16 sources and 16 detectors that works in a tandem serial-to-parallel fashion. Methodology validation and performance assessment of the system were conducted using phantom experiments that demonstrate excellent measurement linearity, moderate-term system stability, robustness to noise and negligible inter-wavelength crosstalk. 2-D imaging experiments further validate high sensitivity of the lock-in photon-counting methodology as well as high reliability of the proposed system. The advanced detection principle can be adapted to achieving a fully parallelized instrumentation for the extended applications. PMID:26977358

  8. Lock-in-photon-counting-based highly-sensitive and large-dynamic imaging system for continuous-wave diffuse optical tomography

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Weiting; Wang, Xin; Wang, Bingyuan; Wang, Yihan; Zhang, Yanqi; Zhao, Huijuan; Gao, Feng

    2016-01-01

    We implemented a novel lock-in photon-counting detection architecture that combines the ultra-high sensitivity of the photon-counting detection and the measurement parallelism of the lock-in technique. Based on this technique, a dual-wavelength simultaneous measurement continuous wave diffuse optical tomography system was developed with a configuration of 16 sources and 16 detectors that works in a tandem serial-to-parallel fashion. Methodology validation and performance assessment of the system were conducted using phantom experiments that demonstrate excellent measurement linearity, moderate-term system stability, robustness to noise and negligible inter-wavelength crosstalk. 2-D imaging experiments further validate high sensitivity of the lock-in photon-counting methodology as well as high reliability of the proposed system. The advanced detection principle can be adapted to achieving a fully parallelized instrumentation for the extended applications. PMID:26977358

  9. Efficient asymmetric image authentication schemes based on photon counting-double random phase encoding and RSA algorithms.

    PubMed

    Moon, Inkyu; Yi, Faliu; Han, Mingu; Lee, Jieun

    2016-06-01

    Recently, double random phase encoding (DRPE) has been integrated with the photon counting (PC) imaging technique for the purpose of secure image authentication. In this scheme, the same key should be securely distributed and shared between the sender and receiver, but this is one of the most vexing problems of symmetric cryptosystems. In this study, we propose an efficient asymmetric image authentication scheme by combining the PC-DRPE and RSA algorithms, which solves key management and distribution problems. The retrieved image from the proposed authentication method contains photon-limited encrypted data obtained by means of PC-DRPE. Therefore, the original image can be protected while the retrieved image can be efficiently verified using a statistical nonlinear correlation approach. Experimental results demonstrate the feasibility of our proposed asymmetric image authentication method.

  10. Third-order correlation function and ghost imaging of chaotic thermal light in the photon counting regime

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Yu; Simon, Jason; Liu Jianbin; Shih, Yanhua

    2010-04-15

    In a near-field three-photon correlation measurement, we observed the third-order temporal and spatial correlation functions of chaotic thermal light in the single-photon counting regime. In the study, we found that the probability of jointly detecting three randomly radiated photons from a chaotic thermal source by three individual detectors is 6 times greater if the photodetection events fall in the coherence time and coherence area of the radiation field than if they do not. From the viewpoint of quantum mechanics, the observed phenomenon is the result of three-photon interference. By making use of this property, we measured the three-photon thermal light lensless ghost image of a double spot and achieved higher visibility compared with the two-photon thermal light ghost image.

  11. CLARO-CMOS, an ASIC for single photon counting with Ma-PMTs, MCPs and SiPMs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carniti, P.; Cibinetto, G.; Cotta Ramusino, A.; Giachero, A.; Gotti, C.; Maino, M.; Malaguti, R.; Pessina, G.

    2013-01-01

    An ASIC named CLARO-CMOS was designed for fast photon counting with MaPMTs, MCPs and SiPMs. The prototype was realized in a .35 μm CMOS technology and has four channels, each with a fast amplifier and a discriminator. The main features of the design are the high speed of operation and the low power dissipation, below 1 mW per channel. This paper focuses on the use of the CLARO for SiPM readout. The ASIC was tested with several SiPMs of various sizes, connected to the input of the chip both directly and through a coaxial cable about one meter long. In the latter case the ASIC is still fully functional although the speed of response is affected by the cable capacitance. The threshold could be set just above the single photoelectron level, and with 1 ×1 mm2 SiPMs the discrete photoelectron peaks could be well resolved.

  12. HEPS-BPIX, a single photon counting pixel detector with a high frame rate for the HEPS project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Wei; Zhang, Jie; Ning, Zhe; Lu, Yunpeng; Fan, Lei; Li, Huaishen; Jiang, Xiaoshan; Lan, Allan K.; Ouyang, Qun; Wang, Zheng; Zhu, Kejun; Chen, Yuanbo; Liu, Peng

    2016-11-01

    China's next generation light source, named the High Energy Photon Source (HEPS), is currently under construction. HEPS-BPIX (HEPS-Beijing PIXel) is a dedicated pixel readout chip that operates in single photon counting mode for X-ray applications in HEPS. Designed using CMOS 0.13 μm technology, the chip contains a matrix of 104×72 pixels. Each pixel measures 150 μm×150 μm and has a counting depth of 20 bits. A bump-bonded prototyping detector module with a 300-μm thick silicon sensor was tested in the beamline of Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility. A fast stream of X-ray images was demonstrated, and a frame rate of 1.2 kHz was proven, with a negligible dead time. The test results showed an equivalent noise charge of 115 e- rms after bump bonding and a threshold dispersion of 55 e- rms after calibration.

  13. Statistical connection of binomial photon counting and photon averaging in high dynamic range beam-scanning microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Muir, Ryan D.; Kissick, David J.; Simpson, Garth J.

    2012-01-01

    Data from photomultiplier tubes are typically analyzed using either counting or averaging techniques, which are most accurate in the dim and bright signal limits, respectively. A statistical means of adjoining these two techniques is presented by recovering the Poisson parameter from averaged data and relating it to the statistics of binomial counting from Kissick et al. [Anal. Chem. 82, 10129 (2010)]. The point at which binomial photon counting and averaging have equal signal to noise ratios is derived. Adjoining these two techniques generates signal to noise ratios at 87% to approaching 100% of theoretical maximum across the full dynamic range of the photomultiplier tube used. The technique is demonstrated in a second harmonic generation microscope. PMID:22535131

  14. High-speed single photon counting read out electronics for a digital detection system for clinical synchrotron radiation mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergamaschi, A.; Arfelli, F.; Dreossi, D.; Longo, R.; Olivo, A.; Pani, S.; Rigon, L.; Vallazza, E.; Venanzi, C.; Castelli, E.

    2004-02-01

    The SYRMEP beam line is currently in the upgrading phase for mammographic examinations on patients at Elettra in Trieste. At the same time, a digital detection system, suitable for in -vivo breast imaging, is under development; it consists of a silicon laminar detector array operating in single photon counting mode. The duration of a clinical examination should not exceed a few seconds. Fast read out electronics is therefore necessary with the aim of avoiding losses in image contrast in presence of high counting rates. A custom ASIC working with 100% efficiency for rates up to 100 kHz per pixel has been designed and tested, and other solutions based on commercially available ASICs are currently under test. Several detector prototypes have been assembled, and images of mammographic test objects have been acquired. Image quality, efficiency and contrast losses have been evaluated in all cases as a function of the counting rate.

  15. Efficient asymmetric image authentication schemes based on photon counting-double random phase encoding and RSA algorithms.

    PubMed

    Moon, Inkyu; Yi, Faliu; Han, Mingu; Lee, Jieun

    2016-06-01

    Recently, double random phase encoding (DRPE) has been integrated with the photon counting (PC) imaging technique for the purpose of secure image authentication. In this scheme, the same key should be securely distributed and shared between the sender and receiver, but this is one of the most vexing problems of symmetric cryptosystems. In this study, we propose an efficient asymmetric image authentication scheme by combining the PC-DRPE and RSA algorithms, which solves key management and distribution problems. The retrieved image from the proposed authentication method contains photon-limited encrypted data obtained by means of PC-DRPE. Therefore, the original image can be protected while the retrieved image can be efficiently verified using a statistical nonlinear correlation approach. Experimental results demonstrate the feasibility of our proposed asymmetric image authentication method. PMID:27411183

  16. Integral imaging acquisition and processing for visualization of photon counting images in the mid-wave infrared range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latorre-Carmona, P.; Pla, F.; Javidi, B.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we present an overview of our previously published work on the application of the maximum likelihood (ML) reconstruction method to integral images acquired with a mid-wave infrared detector on two different types of scenes: one of them consisting of a road, a group of trees and a vehicle just behind one of the trees (being the car at a distance of more than 200m from the camera), and another one consisting of a view of the Wright Air Force Base airfield, with several hangars and different other types of installations (including warehouses) at distances ranging from 600m to more than 2km. Dark current noise is considered taking into account the particular features this type of sensors have. Results show that this methodology allows to improve visualization in the photon counting domain.

  17. Studying the optical second-order interference pattern formation process with classical light in the photon counting regime.

    PubMed

    He, Yuchen; Liu, Jianbin; Zhang, Songlin; Wang, Wentao; Bai, Bin; Le, Mingnan; Xu, Zhuo

    2015-12-01

    The formation process of the second-order interference pattern is studied experimentally in the photon counting regime by superposing two independent single-mode continuous-wave lasers. Two-photon interference based on the superposition principle in Feynman's path integral theory is employed to interpret the experimental results. The second-order interference pattern of classical light can be formulated when, with high probability, there are only two photons in the interferometer at one time. The studies are helpful in understanding the second-order interference of classical light in the language of photons. The method and conclusions can be generalized to the third- and higher-order interference of light and interference of massive particles.

  18. Laser transmitter design and performance for the slope imaging multi-polarization photon-counting lidar (SIMPL) instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Anthony W.; Harding, David J.; Dabney, Philip W.

    2016-03-01

    The Slope Imaging Multi-polarization Photon-counting Lidar (SIMPL) is a polarimetric, two-color, multi-beam push broom laser altimeter developed through the NASA Earth Science Technology Office Instrument Incubator Program. It has flown successfully on multiple airborne platforms beginning in 2008.1 It was developed to demonstrate new altimetry capabilities that combine height measurements and information about surface composition and properties. In this talk we will discuss the laser transmitter design and performance and present recent science data collected over the Greenland ice sheet and arctic sea ice in support of the second NASA Ice Cloud and land Elevation Satellite (ICESat-2) mission to be launched in 2017.2

  19. Chip-interleaved optical code division multiple access relying on a photon-counting iterative successive interference canceller for free-space optical channels.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaolin; Zheng, Xiaowei; Zhang, Rong; Hanzo, Lajos

    2013-07-01

    In this paper, we design a novel Poisson photon-counting based iterative successive interference cancellation (SIC) scheme for transmission over free-space optical (FSO) channels in the presence of both multiple access interference (MAI) as well as Gamma-Gamma atmospheric turbulence fading, shot-noise and background light. Our simulation results demonstrate that the proposed scheme exhibits a strong MAI suppression capability. Importantly, an order of magnitude of BER improvements may be achieved compared to the conventional chip-level optical code-division multiple-access (OCDMA) photon-counting detector.

  20. Estimation of mammary gland composition using CdTe series detector developed for photon-counting mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ihori, Akiko; Okamoto, Chizuru; Yamakawa, Tsutomu; Yamamoto, Shuichiro; Okada, Masahiro; Nakajima, Ai; Kato, Misa; Kodera, Yoshie

    2016-03-01

    Energy resolved photon-counting mammography is a new technology, which counts the number of photons that passes through an object, and presents it as a pixel value in an image of the object. Silicon semiconductor detectors are currently used in commercial mammography. However, the disadvantage of silicon is the low absorption efficiency for high X-ray energies. A cadmium telluride (CdTe) series detector has a high absorption efficiency over a wide energy range. In this study, we proposed a method to estimate the composition of the mammary gland using a CdTe series detector as a photon-counting detector. The fact that the detection rate of breast cancer in mammography is affected by mammary gland composition is now widely accepted. Assessment of composition of the mammary gland has important implications. An important advantage of our proposed technique is its ability to discriminate photons using three energy bins. We designed the CdTe series detector system using the MATLAB simulation software. The phantom contains nine regions with the ratio of glandular tissue and adipose varying in increments of 10%. The attenuation coefficient for each bin's energy was calculated from the number of input and output photons possessed by each. The evaluation results obtained by plotting the attenuation coefficient μ in a three-dimensional (3D) scatter plot show that the plots had a regular composition order congruent with that of the mammary gland. Consequently, we believe that our proposed method can be used to estimate the composition of the mammary gland.

  1. Fluorescence and laser photon counting: measurements of epithelial [Ca2+]i or [Na+]i with ciliary beat frequency.

    PubMed

    Mao, H; Wong, L B

    1998-01-01

    We describe a system we developed that enabled simultaneous measurements of either epithelial calcium ion concentration ([Ca2+]i) or sodium ion concentration ([Na+]i) with the ciliary beat frequency (CBF) in native ciliated epithelia using either Fura-2 (AM) or SBFI (AM) ratiometric fluorescence photon counting along with nonstationary laser light scattering. Studies were performed using native epithelial tissues obtained from ovine tracheae. The dynamic range of the laser light-scattering system was determined by a simulated light "beating" experiment. The nonstationary CBF was demonstrated by the time-frequency analysis of the raw photon count sequences of backscattered heterodyne photons from cultured and native epithelia. Calibrations of calcium and sodium ion concentrations were performed using the respective Fura-2 and SBFI impermanent salts as well as in native epithelia. The cumulative responses of 10(-6), 10(-5), and 10(-4) M nifedipine on [Ca2+]i together with the CBF as well as the cumulative responses of 10(-5), 10(-4), and 10(-3) M amiloride on [Na+]i together with the CBF were also determined. Nifedipine decreased [Ca2+]i but had no effect on CBF. Amiloride decreased [Na+]i and CBF. Stimulation of CBF corresponded with either an increase of [Na+]i or an increase of [Ca2+]i. Decreases of [Na+]i or substantial decreases of [Ca2+]i were associated with decreases in the CBF. These data demonstrate the utility of this system for investigating the regulatory mechanisms of intracellular ions dynamics and the CBF in native epithelia. PMID:9662158

  2. Discrimination between normal breast tissue and tumor tissue using CdTe series detector developed for photon-counting mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Chizuru; Ihori, Akiko; Yamakawa, Tsutomu; Yamamoto, Shuichiro; Okada, Masahiro; Kato, Misa; Nakajima, Ai; Kodera, Yoshie

    2016-03-01

    We propose a new mammography system using a cadmium telluride (CdTe) series photon-counting detector, having high absorption efficiency over a wide energy range. In a previous study, we showed that the use of high X-ray energy in digital mammography is useful from the viewpoint of exposure dose and image quality. In addition, the CdTe series detector can acquire X-ray spectrum information following transmission through a subject. This study focused on the tissue composition identified using spectral information obtained by a new photon-counting detector. Normal breast tissue consists entirely of adipose and glandular tissues. However, it is very difficult to find tumor tissue in the region of glandular tissue via a conventional mammogram, especially in dense breast because the attenuation coefficients of glandular tissue and tumor tissue are very close. As a fundamental examination, we considered a simulation phantom and showed the difference between normal breast tissue and tumor tissue of various thicknesses in a three-dimensional (3D) scatter plot. We were able to discriminate between both types of tissues. In addition, there was a tendency for the distribution to depend on the thickness of the tumor tissue. Thinner tumor tissues were shown to be closer in appearance to normal breast tissue. This study also demonstrated that the difference between these tissues could be made obvious by using a CdTe series detector. We believe that this differentiation is important, and therefore, expect this technology to be applied to new tumor detection systems in the future.

  3. In Orbit Performance of Si Avalanche Photodiode Single Photon Counting Modules in the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System on ICESat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, X.; Jester, P. L.; Palm, S. P.; Abshire, J. B.; Spinhime, J. D.; Krainak, M. A.

    2006-01-01

    Si avalanche photodiode (APD) single photon counting modules (SPCMs) are used in the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) on Ice, Cloud, anti land Elevation Satellite (ICESat), currently in orbit measuring Earth surface elevation and atmosphere backscattering. These SPCMs are used to measure cloud and aerosol backscatterings to the GLAS laser light at 532-nm wavelength with 60-70% quantum efficiencies and up to 15 millions/s maximum count rates. The performance of the SPCMs has been closely monitored since ICESat launch on January 12, 2003. There has been no measurable change in the quantum efficiency, as indicated by the average photon count rates in response to the background light from the sunlit earth. The linearity and the afterpulsing seen from the cloud and surface backscatterings profiles have been the same as those during ground testing. The detector dark count rates monitored while the spacecraft was in the dark side of the globe have increased almost linearly at about 60 counts/s per day due to space radiation damage. The radiation damage appeared to be independent of the device temperature and power states. There was also an abrupt increase in radiation damage during the solar storm in 28-30 October 2003. The observed radiation damage is a factor of two to three lower than the expected and sufficiently low to provide useful atmosphere backscattering measurements through the end of the ICESat mission. To date, these SPCMs have been in orbit for more than three years. The accumulated operating time to date has reached 290 days (7000 hours). These SPCMs have provided unprecedented receiver sensitivity and dynamic range in ICESat atmosphere backscattering measurements.

  4. Flux characteristics of cell culture medium in rectangular microchannels.

    PubMed

    Feng, Zhonggang; Fukuda, Shuhei; Yokoyama, Michio; Kitajima, Tatsuo; Nakamura, Takao; Umezu, Mitsuo

    2011-09-01

    Rectangular microchannels 50 μm high and 30, 40, 50, 60, or 70 μm wide were fabricated by adjusting the width of a gap cut in a polyethylene sheet 50 μm thick and sandwiching the sheet between an acrylic plate and a glass plate. Flux in the microchannels was measured under three different inner surface conditions: uncoated, albumin-coated, and confluent growth of rat fibroblasts on the bottom of the microchannels. The normalized flux in microchannels with cultured fibroblasts or albumin coating was significantly larger than that in the uncoated channels. The experimental data for all microchannels deviated from that predicted by classical hydrodynamic theory. At small aspect ratio the flux in the microchannels was larger than that predicted theoretically, whereas it became smaller at large aspect ratio. The aspect ratio rather than Reynolds number is the correct property for predicting the variation of the normalized friction factor. We postulate that two counteracting effects, rotation of large molecules and slip velocity at the corners of the microchannels, are responsible for the deviation. From these results we conclude that albumin coating should be carried out in the same way as when fabricating our integrating cell-culture system. The outcomes of this study are not only important for the design of our culture system, but also quite informative for general microfluidics.

  5. On the analogy between pulse-pile-up in energy-sensitive, photon-counting detectors and level-crossing of shot noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roessl, Ewald; Bartels, Matthias; Daerr, Heiner; Proksa, Roland

    2016-03-01

    Shot noise processes are omnipresent in physics and many of their properties have been extensively studied in the past, including the particular problem of level crossing of shot noise. Energy-sensitive, photon-counting detectors using comparators to discriminate pulse-heights are currently heavily investigated for medical applications, e.g. for x-ray computed tomography and x-ray mammography. Surprisingly, no mention of the close relation between the two topics can be found in the literature on photon-counting detectors. In this paper, we point out the close analogy between level crossing of shot noise and the problem of determining count rates of photon- counting detectors subject to pulse pile-up. The latter is very relevant for obtaining precise forward models for photon-counting detectors operated under conditions of very high x-ray flux employed in clinical x-ray computed tomography. Although several attempts have been made to provide reasonably accurate, approximative models for the registered number of counts in x-ray detectors under conditions of high flux and arbitrary x-ray spectra, see, e.g., no exact, analytic solution is given in the literature for general continuous pulse shapes. In this paper we present such a solution for arbitrary response functions, x-ray spectra and continuous pulse shapes based on a result from the theory of level crossing. We briefly outline the theory of level crossing including the famous Rice theorem and translate from the language of level crossing to the language of photon-counting detection.

  6. Dual adaptive statistical approach for quantitative noise reduction in photon-counting medical imaging: application to nuclear medicine images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannequin, Pascal Paul

    2015-06-01

    Noise reduction in photon-counting images remains challenging, especially at low count levels. We have developed an original procedure which associates two complementary filters using a Wiener-derived approach. This approach combines two statistically adaptive filters into a dual-weighted (DW) filter. The first one, a statistically weighted adaptive (SWA) filter, replaces the central pixel of a sliding window with a statistically weighted sum of its neighbors. The second one, a statistical and heuristic noise extraction (extended) (SHINE-Ext) filter, performs a discrete cosine transformation (DCT) using sliding blocks. Each block is reconstructed using its significant components which are selected using tests derived from multiple linear regression (MLR). The two filters are weighted according to Wiener theory. This approach has been validated using a numerical phantom and a real planar Jaszczak phantom. It has also been illustrated using planar bone scintigraphy and myocardial single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) data. Performances of filters have been tested using mean normalized absolute error (MNAE) between the filtered images and the reference noiseless or high-count images. Results show that the proposed filters quantitatively decrease the MNAE in the images and then increase the signal-to-noise Ratio (SNR). This allows one to work with lower count images. The SHINE-Ext filter is well suited to high-size images and low-variance areas. DW filtering is efficient for low-size images and in high-variance areas. The relative proportion of eliminated noise generally decreases when count level increases. In practice, SHINE filtering alone is recommended when pixel spacing is less than one-quarter of the effective resolution of the system and/or the size of the objects of interest. It can also be used when the practical interest of high frequencies is low. In any case, DW filtering will be preferable. The proposed filters have been applied to nuclear

  7. Acousto-optic multiphoton laser scanning microscopy and multiphoton photon counting spectroscopy: Applications and implications for optical neurobiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyer, Vijay

    Multiphoton excitation of molecular probes has become an important tool in experimental neurobiology owing to the intrinsic optical sectioning and low light scattering it affords. Using molecular functional indicators, multiphoton excitation allows physiological signals within single neurons to be observed from within living brain tissue. Ideally, it would be possible to record from multiple sites located throughout the elaborately branching dendritic arbors, in order to study the correlations of structure and function both within and across experiments. However, existing multiphoton microscope systems based on scanning mirrors do not allow optical recordings to be obtained from more than a handful of sites simultaneously at the high rates required to capture the fast physiological signals of interest (>100Hz for Ca2+ signals, >1kHz for membrane potential transients). In order to overcome this limitation, two-dimensional acousto-optic deflection was employed, to allow an ultrafast laser beam suited for multiphoton excitation to be rapidly repositioned with low latency (˜15mus). This supports a random-access scanning mode in which the beam can repeatedly visit a succession of user-selected sites of interest within the microscope's field-of-view at high rates, with minimal sacrifice of pixel dwell time. This technique of acousto-optic multiphoton laser scanning microscope (AO-MPLSM) was demonstrated to allow the spatial profile of signals arising in response to physiological stimulation to be rapidly mapped. Means to compensate or avoid problems of dispersion which have hampered AO-MPLSM in the past are presented, with the latter being implemented. Separately, the combination of photon counting detection with multiphoton excitation, termed generally multiphoton photon counting spectroscopy (MP-PCS), was also considered, with particular emphasis on the technique of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). MP-PCS was shown to allow information about molecular

  8. Energy calibration of energy-resolved photon-counting pixel detectors using laboratory polychromatic x-ray beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youn, Hanbean; Han, Jong Chul; Kam, Soohwa; Yun, Seungman; Kim, Ho Kyung

    2014-10-01

    Recently, photon-counting detectors capable of resolving incident x-ray photon energies have been considered for use in spectral x-ray imaging applications. For reliable use of energy-resolved photon-counting detectors (ERPCDs), energy calibration is an essential procedure prior to their use because variations in responses from each pixel of the ERPCD for incident photons, even at the same energy, are inevitable. Energy calibration can be performed using a variety of methods. In all of these methods, the photon spectra with well-defined peak energies are recorded. Every pixel should be calibrated on its own. In this study, we suggest the use of a conventional polychromatic x-ray source (that is typically used in laboratories) for energy calibration. The energy calibration procedure mainly includes the determination of the peak energies in the spectra, flood-field irradiation, determination of peak channels, and determination of calibration curves (i.e., the slopes and intercepts of linear polynomials). We applied a calibration algorithm to a CdTe ERPCD comprised of 128×128 pixels with a pitch of 0.35 mm using highly attenuated polychromatic x-ray beams to reduce the pulse pile-up effect, and to obtain a narrow-shaped spectrum due to beam hardening. The averaged relative error in calibration curves obtained from 16,384 pixels was about 0.56% for 59.6 keV photons from an Americium radioisotope. This pixel-by-pixel energy calibration enhanced the signal- and contrast-to-noise ratios in images, respectively, by a factor of ~5 and 3 due to improvement in image homogeneity, compared to those obtained without energy calibration. One secondary finding of this study was that the x-ray photon spectra obtained using a common algorithm for computing x-ray spectra reasonably described the peaks in the measured spectra, which implies easier peak detection without the direct measurement of spectra using a separate spectrometer. The proposed method will be a useful alternative to

  9. Improving the counting efficiency in time-correlated single photon counting experiments by dead-time optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Peronio, P.; Acconcia, G.; Rech, I.; Ghioni, M.

    2015-11-15

    Time-Correlated Single Photon Counting (TCSPC) has been long recognized as the most sensitive method for fluorescence lifetime measurements, but often requiring “long” data acquisition times. This drawback is related to the limited counting capability of the TCSPC technique, due to pile-up and counting loss effects. In recent years, multi-module TCSPC systems have been introduced to overcome this issue. Splitting the light into several detectors connected to independent TCSPC modules proportionally increases the counting capability. Of course, multi-module operation also increases the system cost and can cause space and power supply problems. In this paper, we propose an alternative approach based on a new detector and processing electronics designed to reduce the overall system dead time, thus enabling efficient photon collection at high excitation rate. We present a fast active quenching circuit for single-photon avalanche diodes which features a minimum dead time of 12.4 ns. We also introduce a new Time-to-Amplitude Converter (TAC) able to attain extra-short dead time thanks to the combination of a scalable array of monolithically integrated TACs and a sequential router. The fast TAC (F-TAC) makes it possible to operate the system towards the upper limit of detector count rate capability (∼80 Mcps) with reduced pile-up losses, addressing one of the historic criticisms of TCSPC. Preliminary measurements on the F-TAC are presented and discussed.

  10. Fast and precise algorithms for calculating offset correction in single photon counting ASICs built in deep sub-micron technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maj, P.

    2014-07-01

    An important trend in the design of readout electronics working in the single photon counting mode for hybrid pixel detectors is to minimize the single pixel area without sacrificing its functionality. This is the reason why many digital and analog blocks are made with the smallest, or next to smallest, transistors possible. This causes a problem with matching among the whole pixel matrix which is acceptable by designers and, of course, it should be corrected with the use of dedicated circuitry, which, by the same rule of minimizing devices, suffers from the mismatch. Therefore, the output of such a correction circuit, controlled by an ultra-small area DAC, is not only a non-linear function, but it is also often non-monotonic. As long as it can be used for proper correction of the DC operation points inside each pixel, it is acceptable, but the time required for correction plays an important role for both chip verification and the design of a big, multi-chip system. Therefore, we present two algorithms: a precise one and a fast one. The first algorithm is based on the noise hits profiles obtained during so called threshold scan procedures. The fast correction procedure is based on the trim DACs scan and it takes less than a minute in a SPC detector systems consisting of several thousands of pixels.

  11. Improving the counting efficiency in time-correlated single photon counting experiments by dead-time optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peronio, P.; Acconcia, G.; Rech, I.; Ghioni, M.

    2015-11-01

    Time-Correlated Single Photon Counting (TCSPC) has been long recognized as the most sensitive method for fluorescence lifetime measurements, but often requiring "long" data acquisition times. This drawback is related to the limited counting capability of the TCSPC technique, due to pile-up and counting loss effects. In recent years, multi-module TCSPC systems have been introduced to overcome this issue. Splitting the light into several detectors connected to independent TCSPC modules proportionally increases the counting capability. Of course, multi-module operation also increases the system cost and can cause space and power supply problems. In this paper, we propose an alternative approach based on a new detector and processing electronics designed to reduce the overall system dead time, thus enabling efficient photon collection at high excitation rate. We present a fast active quenching circuit for single-photon avalanche diodes which features a minimum dead time of 12.4 ns. We also introduce a new Time-to-Amplitude Converter (TAC) able to attain extra-short dead time thanks to the combination of a scalable array of monolithically integrated TACs and a sequential router. The fast TAC (F-TAC) makes it possible to operate the system towards the upper limit of detector count rate capability (˜80 Mcps) with reduced pile-up losses, addressing one of the historic criticisms of TCSPC. Preliminary measurements on the F-TAC are presented and discussed.

  12. Atmospheric CO2 remote sensing system based on high brightness semiconductor lasers and single photon counting detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Serrano, Antonio; Vilera, Maria Fernanda; Esquivias, Ignacio; Faugeron, Mickael; Krakowski, Michel; van Dijk, Frédéric; Kochem, Gerd; Traub, Martin; Adamiec, Pawel; Barbero, Juan; Ai, Xiao; Rarity, John G.; Quatrevalet, Mathieu; Ehret, Gerhard

    2015-10-01

    We propose an integrated path differential absorption lidar system based on all-semiconductor laser sources and single photon counting detection for column-averaged measurements of atmospheric CO2. The Random Modulated Continuous Wave (RM-CW) approach has been selected as the best suited to semiconductor lasers. In a RM-CW lidar, a pseudo random sequence is sent to the atmosphere and the received signal reflected from the target is correlated with the original sequence in order to retrieve the path length. The transmitter design is based on two monolithic Master Oscillator Power Amplifiers (MOPAs), providing the on-line and off-line wavelengths close to the selected absorption line around 1.57 µm. Each MOPA consists of a frequency stabilized distributed feedback master oscillator, a bent modulator section, and a tapered amplifier. This design allows the emitters to deliver high power and high quality laser beams with good spectral properties. An output power above 400 mW with a SMSR higher than 45 dB and modulation capability have been demonstrated. On the side of the receiver, our theoretical and experimental results indicate that the major noise contribution comes from the ambient light and detector noise. For this reason narrow band optical filters are required in the envisioned space-borne applications. In this contribution, we present the latest progresses regarding the design, modeling and characterization of the transmitter, the receiver, the frequency stabilization unit and the complete system.

  13. UVSiPM: A light detector instrument based on a SiPM sensor working in single photon counting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sottile, G.; Russo, F.; Agnetta, G.; Belluso, M.; Billotta, S.; Biondo, B.; Bonanno, G.; Catalano, O.; Giarrusso, S.; Grillo, A.; Impiombato, D.; La Rosa, G.; Maccarone, M. C.; Mangano, A.; Marano, D.; Mineo, T.; Segreto, A.; Strazzeri, E.; Timpanaro, M. C.

    2013-06-01

    UVSiPM is a light detector designed to measure the intensity of electromagnetic radiation in the 320-900 nm wavelength range. It has been developed in the framework of the ASTRI project whose main goal is the design and construction of an end-to-end Small Size class Telescope prototype for the Cherenkov Telescope Array. The UVSiPM instrument is composed by a multipixel Silicon Photo-Multiplier detector unit coupled to an electronic chain working in single photon counting mode with 10 nanosecond double pulse resolution, and by a disk emulator interface card for computer connection. The detector unit of UVSiPM is of the same kind as the ones forming the camera at the focal plane of the ASTRI prototype. Eventually, the UVSiPM instrument can be equipped with a collimator to regulate its angular aperture. UVSiPM, with its peculiar characteristics, will permit to perform several measurements both in lab and on field, allowing the absolute calibration of the ASTRI prototype.

  14. Monochromatic X-ray photon counting using an energy-selecting device and its application to iodine imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oda, Yasuyuki; Sato, Eiichi; Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Hagiwara, Osahiko; Matsukiyo, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Manabu; Kusachi, Shinya

    2015-08-01

    Quasi-monochromatic photon counting was performed using a cadmium telluride detector and an energy-selecting device, consisting of two comparators and a microcomputer (MC). The two threshold energies are determined using low and high-energy comparators, respectively. The MC produces a single logical pulse when only a logical pulse from a low-energy comparator is input to the MC. Next, the MC never produces the pulse when two pulses from low and high-energy comparators are input to the MC, simultaneously. The logical pulses from the MC are input to a frequency-voltage converter (FVC) to convert count rates into voltages; the rate is proportional to the voltage. The output voltage from the FVC is sent to a personal computer through an analog-digital converter to reconstruct tomograms. The X-ray projection curves for tomography are obtained by repeated linear scans and rotations of the object at a tube voltage of 70 kV and a current of 12 μA. Iodine (I) K-edge CT was performed using contrast media and X-ray photons with a count rate of 2.2 kilocounts per second and energies ranging from 34 to 50 keV, since these photons with energies beyond I-K-edge energy 33.2 keV are absorbed effectively by I atoms.

  15. A high-resolution imaging technique using a whole-body, research photon counting detector CT system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leng, S.; Yu, Z.; Halaweish, A.; Kappler, S.; Hahn, K.; Henning, A.; Li, Z.; Lane, J.; Levin, D. L.; Jorgensen, S.; Ritman, E.; McCollough, C.

    2016-03-01

    A high-resolution (HR) data collection mode has been introduced to a whole-body, research photon-counting-detector CT system installed in our laboratory. In this mode, 64 rows of 0.45 mm x 0.45 mm detector pixels were used, which corresponded to a pixel size of 0.25 mm x 0.25 mm at the iso-center. Spatial resolution of this HR mode was quantified by measuring the MTF from a scan of a 50 micron wire phantom. An anthropomorphic lung phantom, cadaveric swine lung, temporal bone and heart specimens were scanned using the HR mode, and image quality was subjectively assessed by two experienced radiologists. High spatial resolution of the HR mode was evidenced by the MTF measurement, with 15 lp/cm and 20 lp/cm at 10% and 2% modulation. Images from anthropomorphic phantom and cadaveric specimens showed clear delineation of small structures, such as lung vessels, lung nodules, temporal bone structures, and coronary arteries. Temporal bone images showed critical anatomy (i.e. stapes superstructure) that was clearly visible in the PCD system. These results demonstrated the potential application of this imaging mode in lung, temporal bone, and vascular imaging. Other clinical applications that require high spatial resolution, such as musculoskeletal imaging, may also benefit from this high resolution mode.

  16. Solid-state photon-counting hybrid detector array for high-resolution multi-energy X-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sia, R.; Kleinfelder, S.; Nagarkar, V. V.

    2011-10-01

    We present in this article the development of a photon-counting, energy-discriminating modular detector based on a pixelated CdZnTe sensor coupled pixel-by-pixel to a novel Digital Pixel Sensor (DPS) readout. The detector is designed for munitions inspection, breast X-ray CT and SPECT/MRI. The current DPS design can also be used to read out other solid-state sensors. The prototype detector is 5.5 mm×5.5 mm in size, and consists of 19×19 pixels on a 250 μm pitch. The DPS is designed in a 0.35 μm process, and every pixel includes a preamplifier, a leakage-current subtraction circuit, an auto-zeroed programmable-gain stage, five comparators, a variable-delay reset circuit and five 16 bit counters. The module is expected to operate at high X-ray fluence exceeding 80 MHz/mm 2, and to improve resolution and contrast in images, while significantly enhancing their signal-to-noise ratio, and assist in identifying material composition via dual-energy imaging. The detector design, fabrication and anticipated performance are discussed.

  17. Improving the counting efficiency in time-correlated single photon counting experiments by dead-time optimization

    PubMed Central

    Peronio, P.; Acconcia, G.; Rech, I.; Ghioni, M.

    2015-01-01

    Time-Correlated Single Photon Counting (TCSPC) has been long recognized as the most sensitive method for fluorescence lifetime measurements, but often requiring “long” data acquisition times. This drawback is related to the limited counting capability of the TCSPC technique, due to pile-up and counting loss effects. In recent years, multi-module TCSPC systems have been introduced to overcome this issue. Splitting the light into several detectors connected to independent TCSPC modules proportionally increases the counting capability. Of course, multi-module operation also increases the system cost and can cause space and power supply problems. In this paper, we propose an alternative approach based on a new detector and processing electronics designed to reduce the overall system dead time, thus enabling efficient photon collection at high excitation rate. We present a fast active quenching circuit for single-photon avalanche diodes which features a minimum dead time of 12.4 ns. We also introduce a new Time-to-Amplitude Converter (TAC) able to attain extra-short dead time thanks to the combination of a scalable array of monolithically integrated TACs and a sequential router. The fast TAC (F-TAC) makes it possible to operate the system towards the upper limit of detector count rate capability (∼80 Mcps) with reduced pile-up losses, addressing one of the historic criticisms of TCSPC. Preliminary measurements on the F-TAC are presented and discussed. PMID:26628115

  18. Soft X-ray detection and photon counting spectroscopy with commercial 4H-SiC Schottky photodiodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, S.; Gohil, T.; Lioliou, G.; Barnett, A. M.

    2016-09-01

    The results of electrical characterisation and X-ray detection measurements of two different active area (0.06 mm2 and 0.5 mm2) commercial 4H-SiC Schottky photodiodes at room temperature are reported. The devices exhibited low dark currents (less than 10 pA) even at a high electric field strengths (403 kV/cm for 0.06 mm2 diodes; 227 kV/cm for 0.5 mm2 diodes). The results of the X-ray measurements indicate that the diodes can be used as photon counting spectroscopic X-ray detectors with modest energy resolutions: FWHM at 5.9 keV of 1.8 keV and 3.3 keV, for the 0.06 mm2 and 0.5 mm2 devices, respectively. Noise analysis of the photodiodes coupled to a custom low noise charge sensitive preamplifier is also presented.

  19. Improving the counting efficiency in time-correlated single photon counting experiments by dead-time optimization.

    PubMed

    Peronio, P; Acconcia, G; Rech, I; Ghioni, M

    2015-11-01

    Time-Correlated Single Photon Counting (TCSPC) has been long recognized as the most sensitive method for fluorescence lifetime measurements, but often requiring "long" data acquisition times. This drawback is related to the limited counting capability of the TCSPC technique, due to pile-up and counting loss effects. In recent years, multi-module TCSPC systems have been introduced to overcome this issue. Splitting the light into several detectors connected to independent TCSPC modules proportionally increases the counting capability. Of course, multi-module operation also increases the system cost and can cause space and power supply problems. In this paper, we propose an alternative approach based on a new detector and processing electronics designed to reduce the overall system dead time, thus enabling efficient photon collection at high excitation rate. We present a fast active quenching circuit for single-photon avalanche diodes which features a minimum dead time of 12.4 ns. We also introduce a new Time-to-Amplitude Converter (TAC) able to attain extra-short dead time thanks to the combination of a scalable array of monolithically integrated TACs and a sequential router. The fast TAC (F-TAC) makes it possible to operate the system towards the upper limit of detector count rate capability (∼80 Mcps) with reduced pile-up losses, addressing one of the historic criticisms of TCSPC. Preliminary measurements on the F-TAC are presented and discussed. PMID:26628115

  20. Spectrally resolved time-correlated single photon counting: a novel approach for characterization of endogenous fluorescence in isolated cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed

    Chorvat, D; Chorvatova, A

    2006-12-01

    A new setup for time-resolved fluorescence micro-spectroscopy of cells, based on multi-dimensional time-correlated single photon counting, was designed and tested. Here we demonstrate that the spectrometer allows fast and reproducible measurements of endogenous flavin fluorescence measured directly in living cardiac cells after excitation with visible picosecond laser diodes. Two complementary approaches for the analysis of spectrally- and time-resolved autofluorescence data are presented, comprising the fluorescence decay fitting by exponential series and the time-resolved emission spectroscopy analysis. In isolated cardiac myocytes, we observed three distinct lifetime pools with characteristic lifetime values spanning from picosecond to nanosecond range and the time-dependent red shift of the autofluorescence emission spectra. We compared obtained results to in vitro recordings of free flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) and FAD in lipoamide dehydrogenase (LipDH). The developed setup combines the strength of both spectral and fluorescence lifetime analysis and provides a solid base for the study of complex systems with intrinsic fluorescence, such as identification of the individual flavinoprotein components in living cardiac cells. This approach therefore constitutes an important instrumental advancement towards redox fluorimetry of living cardiomyocytes, with the perspective of its applications in the investigation of oxidative metabolic state under pathophysiological conditions, such as ischemia and/or metabolic disorders. PMID:17033778

  1. Photon counting X-ray imaging with CdTe pixel detectors based on XPAD2 circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franchi, Romain; Glasser, Francis; Gasse, Adrien; Clemens, Jean-Claude

    2006-07-01

    A semiconductor hybrid pixel detector for photon counting X-ray imaging has been developed and tested under radiation. The sensor is based on recent uniform CdTe single crystal associated with XPAD 2 counting chip via innovative processes of interconnection. The building detector is 1 mm thick, with an area of 1 cm 2 and consists of 600 square pixels cells 330 μm side. The readout chip working in electron collection mode is capable of setting homogeneous threshold with only a dispersion of 730 e -. Maximum noise level has been evaluated around 15 keV. First experiments under X-rays demonstrate a very good efficiency of detection. Moreover, imaging system allows excellent linearity over a large-scale achieving count rate of 3×10 6 photons/s/mm 2. Spectrometric measurements point up the system potential in multi-energies applications by locating and resolving X-rays lines of 241Am and 57Co sources.

  2. AURORA on MEGSAT 1: a photon counting observatory for the Earth UV night-sky background and Aurora emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monfardini, A.; Trampus, P.; Stalio, R.; Mahne, N.; Battiston, R.; Menichelli, M.; Mazzinghi, P.

    2001-08-01

    A low-mass, low-cost photon-counting scientific payload has been developed and launched on a commercial microsatellite in order to study the near-UV night-sky background emission with a telescope nicknamed ``Notte'' and the Aurora emission with ``Alba''. AURORA, this is the name of the experiment, will determine, with the ``Notte'' channel, the overall night-side photon background in the 300-400nm spectral range, together with a particular 2+N2 line (λc=337nm). The ``Alba'' channel, on the other hand, will study the Aurora emissions in four different spectral bands (FWHM=8.4-9.6nm) centered on: 367nm (continuum evaluation), 391nm (1-N+2), 535nm (continuum evaluation), 560nm (OI). The instrument has been launched on the 26 September, 2000 from the Baikonur cosmodrome on a modified SS18 Dnepr-1 ``Satan'' rocket. The satellite orbit is nearly circular (hapogee=648km, /e=0.0022), and the inclination of the orbital plane is 64.56°. An overview of the techniques adopted is given in this paper.

  3. Photon counting statistics for blinking CdSe-ZnS quantum dots: a Lévy walk process.

    PubMed

    Margolin, G; Protasenko, V; Kuno, M; Barkai, E

    2006-09-28

    We analyze photon statistics of blinking CdSe-ZnS nanocrystals interacting with a continuous wave laser field, showing that the process is described by a ballistic Lévy walk. In particular, we show that Mandel's Q parameter, describing the fluctuations of the photon counts, is increasing with time even in the limit of long time. This behavior is in agreement with the theory of Silbey and co-workers (Jung et al. Chem. Phys. 2002, 284, 181), and in contrast to all existing examples where Q approaches a constant, independent of time in the long time limit. We then analyze the distribution of the time averaged intensities, showing that they exhibit a nonergodic behavior, namely, the time averages remain random even in the limit of a long measurement time. In particular, the distribution of occupation times in the on-state compares favorably to a theory of weak ergodicity breaking of blinking nanocrystals. We show how our data analysis yields information on the amplitudes of power-law decaying on and off time distributions, information not available using standard data analysis of on and off time histograms. Photon statistics reveals fluctuations in the intensity of the bright state indicating that it is composed of several states. Photon statistics exhibits a Lévy walk behavior also when an ensemble of 100 dots is investigated, indicating that the strange kinetics can be observed already at the level of small ensembles. PMID:16986903

  4. Towards whole-body ultra-weak photon counting and imaging with a focus on human beings: a review.

    PubMed

    Van Wijk, Roeland; Van Wijk, Eduard P A; van Wietmarschen, Herman A; van der Greef, Jan

    2014-10-01

    For decades, the relationship between ultra-weak photon emission (UPE) and the health state of the body is being studied. With the advent of systems biology, attention shifted from the association between UPE and reactive oxygen species towards UPE as a reflection of changed metabolic networks. Essential for this shift in thinking is the development of novel photon count statistical methods that more reflect the dynamics of the systems organization. Additionally, efforts to combine and correlate UPE data with other types of measurements such as metabolomics be key to understand the complexity of the human body. This review describes the history and developments in the area of human UPE research from a technical - methodological perspective, an experimental perspective and a theoretical perspective. There is ample evidence that human UPE research will allow a better understanding of the body as a complex dynamical system. The future lies in the further development of an integrated UPE and metabolomics platform for a personalized monitoring of changes of the system towards health or disease.

  5. The detective quantum efficiency of photon-counting x-ray detectors using cascaded-systems analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Tanguay, Jesse; Yun, Seungman; Kim, Ho Kyung; Cunningham, Ian A.

    2013-04-15

    Purpose: Single-photon counting (SPC) x-ray imaging has the potential to improve image quality and enable new advanced energy-dependent methods. The purpose of this study is to extend cascaded-systems analyses (CSA) to the description of image quality and the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) of SPC systems. Methods: Point-process theory is used to develop a method of propagating the mean signal and Wiener noise-power spectrum through a thresholding stage (required to identify x-ray interaction events). The new transfer relationships are used to describe the zero-frequency DQE of a hypothetical SPC detector including the effects of stochastic conversion of incident photons to secondary quanta, secondary quantum sinks, additive noise, and threshold level. Theoretical results are compared with Monte Carlo calculations assuming the same detector model. Results: Under certain conditions, the CSA approach can be applied to SPC systems with the additional requirement of propagating the probability density function describing the total number of image-forming quanta through each stage of a cascaded model. Theoretical results including DQE show excellent agreement with Monte Carlo calculations under all conditions considered. Conclusions: Application of the CSA method shows that false counts due to additive electronic noise results in both a nonlinear image signal and increased image noise. There is a window of allowable threshold values to achieve a high DQE that depends on conversion gain, secondary quantum sinks, and additive noise.

  6. Novel CMOS time-delay integration using single-photon counting for high-speed industrial and aerospace applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Desouki, Munir M.; Al-Azem, Badeea

    2014-03-01

    Time-delay integration (TDI) is a popular imaging technique that is used in many applications such as machine vision, dental scanning and satellite earth observation. One of the main advantages of using TDI imagers is the increased effective integration time that is achieved while maintaining high frame-rates. Another use for TDI imagers is with moving objects, such as the earth's surface or industrial machine vision applications, where integration time is limited in order to avoid motion blurs. Such technique may even find its way in mobile and consumer based imaging applications where the reduction in pixel size can limit the performance during low-light and high speed applications. Until recently, TDI was only used with charge-coupled devices (CCDs) mainly due to their charge transfer characteristics. CCDs however, are power consuming and slow when compared to CMOS technology and are no longer favorable for mobile applications. In this work, we report on novel single-photon counting based TDI technique that is implemented in standard CMOS technology allowing for complete camera-on-a-chip solution. The imager was fabricated in a standard CMOS 150 nm 5-metal digital process from LFoundry.

  7. The Parameterization of Top-Hat Particle Sensors with Microchannel-Plate-Based Detection Systems and its Application to the Fast Plasma Investigation on NASA's Magnetospheric MultiScale Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gershman, Daniel J.; Gliese, Ulrik; Dorelli, John C.; Avanov, Levon A.; Barrie, Alexander C.; Chornay, Dennis J.; MacDonald, Elizabeth A.; Holland, Matthew P.; Pollock, Craig J.

    2015-01-01

    The most common instrument for low energy plasmas consists of a top-hat electrostatic analyzer geometry coupled with a microchannel-plate (MCP)-based detection system. While the electrostatic optics for such sensors are readily simulated and parameterized during the laboratory calibration process, the detection system is often less well characterized. Furthermore, due to finite resources, for large sensor suites such as the Fast Plasma Investigation (FPI) on NASA's Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission, calibration data are increasingly sparse. Measurements must be interpolated and extrapolated to understand instrument behavior for untestable operating modes and yet sensor inter-calibration is critical to mission success. To characterize instruments from a minimal set of parameters we have developed the first comprehensive mathematical description of both sensor electrostatic optics and particle detection systems. We include effects of MCP efficiency, gain, scattering, capacitive crosstalk, and charge cloud spreading at the detector output. Our parameterization enables the interpolation and extrapolation of instrument response to all relevant particle energies, detector high voltage settings, and polar angles from a small set of calibration data. We apply this model to the 32 sensor heads in the Dual Electron Sensor (DES) and 32 sensor heads in the Dual Ion Sensor (DIS) instruments on the 4 MMS observatories and use least squares fitting of calibration data to extract all key instrument parameters. Parameters that will evolve in flight, namely MCP gain, will be determined daily through application of this model to specifically tailored in-flight calibration activities, providing a robust characterization of sensor suite performance throughout mission lifetime. Beyond FPI, our model provides a valuable framework for the simulation and evaluation of future detection system designs and can be used to maximize instrument understanding with minimal calibration

  8. Detection efficiency of microchannel plates for e(-) and π(-) in the momentum range from 17.5 to 345 MeV/c.

    PubMed

    Tulej, M; Meyer, S; Lüthi, M; Lasi, D; Galli, A; Desorgher, L; Hajdas, W; Karlsson, S; Kalla, L; Wurz, P

    2015-08-01

    High-energy e(-) and π(-) were measured by the multichannel plate (MCP) detector at the PiM1 beam line of the High Intensity Proton Accelerator Facilities located at the Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen, Switzerland. The measurements provide the absolute detection efficiencies for these particles: 5.8% ± 0.5% for electrons in the beam momenta range 17.5-300 MeV/c and 6.0% ± 1.3% for pions in the beam momenta range 172-345 MeV/c. The pulse height distribution determined from the measurements is close to an exponential function with negative exponent, indicating that the particles penetrated the MCP material before producing the signal somewhere inside the channel. Low charge extraction and nominal gains of the MCP detector observed in this study are consistent with the proposed mechanism of the signal formation by penetrating radiation. A very similar MCP ion detector will be used in the Neutral Ion Mass (NIM) spectrometer designed for the JUICE mission of European Space Agency (ESA) to the Jupiter system, to perform measurements of the chemical composition of the Galilean moon exospheres. The detection efficiency for penetrating radiation determined in the present studies is important for the optimisation of the radiation shielding of the NIM detector against the high-rate and high-energy electrons trapped in Jupiter's magnetic field. Furthermore, the current studies indicate that MCP detectors can be useful to measure high-energy particle beams at high temporal resolution. PMID:26329184

  9. Scanning Microscopes Using X Rays and Microchannels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Yu

    2003-01-01

    Scanning microscopes that would be based on microchannel filters and advanced electronic image sensors and that utilize x-ray illumination have been proposed. Because the finest resolution attainable in a microscope is determined by the wavelength of the illumination, the xray illumination in the proposed microscopes would make it possible, in principle, to achieve resolutions of the order of nanometers about a thousand times as fine as the resolution of a visible-light microscope. Heretofore, it has been necessary to use scanning electron microscopes to obtain such fine resolution. In comparison with scanning electron microscopes, the proposed microscopes would likely be smaller, less massive, and less expensive. Moreover, unlike in scanning electron microscopes, it would not be necessary to place specimens under vacuum. The proposed microscopes are closely related to the ones described in several prior NASA Tech Briefs articles; namely, Miniature Microscope Without Lenses (NPO-20218), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 22, No. 8 (August 1998), page 43; and Reflective Variants of Miniature Microscope Without Lenses (NPO-20610), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 26, No. 9 (September 2002) page 6a. In all of these microscopes, the basic principle of design and operation is the same: The focusing optics of a conventional visible-light microscope are replaced by a combination of a microchannel filter and a charge-coupled-device (CCD) image detector. A microchannel plate containing parallel, microscopic-cross-section holes much longer than they are wide is placed between a specimen and an image sensor, which is typically the CCD. The microchannel plate must be made of a material that absorbs the illuminating radiation reflected or scattered from the specimen. The microchannels must be positioned and dimensioned so that each one is registered with a pixel on the image sensor. Because most of the radiation incident on the microchannel walls becomes absorbed, the radiation that reaches the

  10. Characteristic performance evaluation of a photon counting Si strip detector for low dose spectral breast CT imaging

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hyo-Min; Barber, William C.; Ding, Huanjun; Iwanczyk, Jan S.; Molloi, Sabee

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The possible clinical applications which can be performed using a newly developed detector depend on the detector's characteristic performance in a number of metrics including the dynamic range, resolution, uniformity, and stability. The authors have evaluated a prototype energy resolved fast photon counting x-ray detector based on a silicon (Si) strip sensor used in an edge-on geometry with an application specific integrated circuit to record the number of x-rays and their energies at high flux and fast frame rates. The investigated detector was integrated with a dedicated breast spectral computed tomography (CT) system to make use of the detector's high spatial and energy resolution and low noise performance under conditions suitable for clinical breast imaging. The aim of this article is to investigate the intrinsic characteristics of the detector, in terms of maximum output count rate, spatial and energy resolution, and noise performance of the imaging system. Methods: The maximum output count rate was obtained with a 50 W x-ray tube with a maximum continuous output of 50 kVp at 1.0 mA. A109Cd source, with a characteristic x-ray peak at 22 keV from Ag, was used to measure the energy resolution of the detector. The axial plane modulation transfer function (MTF) was measured using a 67 μm diameter tungsten wire. The two-dimensional (2D) noise power spectrum (NPS) was measured using flat field images and noise equivalent quanta (NEQ) were calculated using the MTF and NPS results. The image quality parameters were studied as a function of various radiation doses and reconstruction filters. The one-dimensional (1D) NPS was used to investigate the effect of electronic noise elimination by varying the minimum energy threshold. Results: A maximum output count rate of 100 million counts per second per square millimeter (cps/mm2) has been obtained (1 million cps per 100 × 100 μm pixel). The electrical noise floor was less than 4 keV. The energy resolution

  11. Photon counting: Avalanche inspiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milburn, Gerard

    2008-07-01

    The ability of a customized avalanche-photodiode detector to distinguish the exact number of photons that it receives will simplify the tools required to perform reliable experiments in quantum optics.

  12. The piecewise-linear dynamic attenuator reduces the impact of count rate loss with photon-counting detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Scott S.; Pelc, Norbert J.

    2014-06-01

    Photon counting x-ray detectors (PCXDs) offer several advantages compared to standard energy-integrating x-ray detectors, but also face significant challenges. One key challenge is the high count rates required in CT. At high count rates, PCXDs exhibit count rate loss and show reduced detective quantum efficiency in signal-rich (or high flux) measurements. In order to reduce count rate requirements, a dynamic beam-shaping filter can be used to redistribute flux incident on the patient. We study the piecewise-linear attenuator in conjunction with PCXDs without energy discrimination capabilities. We examined three detector models: the classic nonparalyzable and paralyzable detector models, and a ‘hybrid’ detector model which is a weighted average of the two which approximates an existing, real detector (Taguchi et al 2011 Med. Phys. 38 1089-102 ). We derive analytic expressions for the variance of the CT measurements for these detectors. These expressions are used with raw data estimated from DICOM image files of an abdomen and a thorax to estimate variance in reconstructed images for both the dynamic attenuator and a static beam-shaping (‘bowtie’) filter. By redistributing flux, the dynamic attenuator reduces dose by 40% without increasing peak variance for the ideal detector. For non-ideal PCXDs, the impact of count rate loss is also reduced. The nonparalyzable detector shows little impact from count rate loss, but with the paralyzable model, count rate loss leads to noise streaks that can be controlled with the dynamic attenuator. With the hybrid model, the characteristic count rates required before noise streaks dominate the reconstruction are reduced by a factor of 2 to 3. We conclude that the piecewise-linear attenuator can reduce the count rate requirements of the PCXD in addition to improving dose efficiency. The magnitude of this reduction depends on the detector, with paralyzable detectors showing much greater benefit than nonparalyzable detectors.

  13. The piecewise-linear dynamic attenuator reduces the impact of count rate loss with photon-counting detectors

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Scott S.; Pelc, Norbert J.

    2014-01-01

    Photon counting x-ray detectors (PCXDs) offer several advantages compared to standard, energy-integrating x-ray detectors but also face significant challenges. One key challenge is the high count rates required in CT. At high count rates, PCXDs exhibit count rate loss and show reduced detective quantum efficiency in signal-rich (or high flux) measurements. In order to reduce count rate requirements, a dynamic beam-shaping filter can be used to redistribute flux incident on the patient. We study the piecewise-linear attenuator in conjunction with PCXDs without energy discrimination capabilities. We examined three detector models: the classic nonparalyzable and paralyzable detector models, and a “hybrid” detector model which is a weighted average of the two which approximates an existing, real detector (Taguchi et al, Med Phys 2011). We derive analytic expressions for the variance of the CT measurements for these detectors. These expressions are used with raw data estimated from DICOM image files of an abdomen and a thorax to estimate variance in reconstructed images for both the dynamic attenuator and a static beam-shaping (“bowtie”) filter. By redistributing flux, the dynamic attenuator reduces dose by 40% without increasing peak variance for the ideal detector. For non-ideal PCXDs, the impact of count rate loss is also reduced. The nonparalyzable detector shows little impact from count rate loss, but with the paralyzable model, count rate loss leads to noise streaks that can be controlled with the dynamic attenuator. With the hybrid model, the characteristic count rates required before noise streaks dominate the reconstruction are reduced by a factor of two to three. We conclude that the piecewise-linear attenuator can reduce the count rate requirements of the PCXD in addition to improving dose efficiency. The magnitude of this reduction depends on the detector, with paralyzable detectors showing much greater benefit than nonparalyzable detectors. PMID

  14. Spatio-energetic cross-talks in photon counting detectors: detector model and correlated Poisson data generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taguchi, Katsuyuki; Polster, Christoph; Lee, Okkyun; Kappler, Steffen

    2016-03-01

    An x-ray photon interacts with photon counting detectors (PCDs) and generates an electron charge cloud or multiple clouds. The clouds (thus, the photon energy) may be split between two adjacent PCD pixels when the interaction occurs near pixel boundaries, producing a count at both of the two pixels. This is called double-counting with charge sharing. The output of individual PCD pixel is Poisson distributed integer counts; however, the outputs of adjacent pixels are correlated due to double-counting. Major problems are the lack of detector noise model for the spatio-energetic crosstalk and the lack of an efficient simulation tool. Monte Carlo simulation can accurately simulate these phenomena and produce noisy data; however, it is not computationally efficient. In this study, we developed a new detector model and implemented into an efficient software simulator which uses a Poisson random number generator to produce correlated noisy integer counts. The detector model takes the following effects into account effects: (1) detection efficiency and incomplete charge collection; (2) photoelectric effect with total absorption; (3) photoelectric effect with fluorescence x-ray emission and re-absorption; (4) photoelectric effect with fluorescence x-ray emission which leaves PCD completely; and (5) electric noise. The model produced total detector spectrum similar to previous MC simulation data. The model can be used to predict spectrum and correlation with various different settings. The simulated noisy data demonstrated the expected performance: (a) data were integers; (b) the mean and covariance matrix was close to the target values; (c) noisy data generation was very efficient

  15. Testing multistage gain and offset trimming in a single photon counting IC with a charge sharing elimination algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krzyżanowska, A.; Gryboś, P.; Szczygieł, R.; Maj, P.

    2015-12-01

    Designing a hybrid pixel detector readout electronics operating in a single photon counting mode is a very challenging process, where many main parameters are optimized in parallel (e.g. gain, noise, and threshold dispersion). Additional requirements for a smaller pixel size with extended functionality push designers to use new deep sub-micron technologies. Minimizing the channel size is possible, however, with a decreased pixel size, the charge sharing effect becomes a more important issue. To overcome this problem, we designed an integrated circuit prototype produced in CMOS 40 nm technology, which has an extended functionality of a single pixel. A C8P1 algorithm for the charge sharing effect compensation was implemented. In the algorithm's first stage the charge is rebuilt in a signal rebuilt hub fed by the CSA (charge sensitive amplifier) outputs from four neighbouring pixels. Then, the pixel with the biggest amount of charge is chosen, after a comparison with all the adjacent ones. In order to process the data in such a complicated way, a certain architecture of a single channel was proposed, which allows for: ṡ processing the signal with the possibility of total charge reconstruction (by connecting with the adjacent pixels), ṡ a comparison of certain pixel amplitude to its 8 neighbours, ṡ the extended testability of each block inside the channel to measure CSA gain dispersion, shaper gain dispersion, threshold dispersion (including the simultaneous generation of different pulse amplitudes from different pixels), ṡ trimming all the necessary blocks for proper operation. We present a solution for multistage gain and offset trimming implemented in the IC prototype. It allows for minimization of the total charge extraction errors, minimization of threshold dispersion in the pixel matrix and minimization of errors of comparison of certain pixel pulse amplitudes with all its neighbours. The detailed architecture of a single channel is presented together

  16. Novel approaches to address spectral distortions in photon counting x-ray CT using artificial neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Touch, M.; Clark, D. P.; Barber, W.; Badea, C. T.

    2016-04-01

    Spectral CT using a photon-counting x-ray detector (PCXD) can potentially increase accuracy of measuring tissue composition. However, PCXD spectral measurements suffer from distortion due to charge sharing, pulse pileup, and Kescape energy loss. This study proposes two novel artificial neural network (ANN)-based algorithms: one to model and compensate for the distortion, and another one to directly correct for the distortion. The ANN-based distortion model was obtained by training to learn the distortion from a set of projections with a calibration scan. The ANN distortion was then applied in the forward statistical model to compensate for distortion in the projection decomposition. ANN was also used to learn to correct distortions directly in projections. The resulting corrected projections were used for reconstructing the image, denoising via joint bilateral filtration, and decomposition into three-material basis functions: Compton scattering, the photoelectric effect, and iodine. The ANN-based distortion model proved to be more robust to noise and worked better compared to using an imperfect parametric distortion model. In the presence of noise, the mean relative errors in iodine concentration estimation were 11.82% (ANN distortion model) and 16.72% (parametric model). With distortion correction, the mean relative error in iodine concentration estimation was improved by 50% over direct decomposition from distorted data. With our joint bilateral filtration, the resulting material image quality and iodine detectability as defined by the contrast-to-noise ratio were greatly enhanced allowing iodine concentrations as low as 2 mg/ml to be detected. Future work will be dedicated to experimental evaluation of our ANN-based methods using 3D-printed phantoms.

  17. The effects of extending the spectral information acquired by a photon-counting detector for spectral CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilat Schmidt, Taly; Zimmerman, Kevin C.; Sidky, Emil Y.

    2015-02-01

    Photon-counting x-ray detectors with pulse-height analysis provide spectral information that may improve material decomposition and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) in CT images. The number of energy measurements that can be acquired simultaneously on a detector pixel is equal to the number of comparator channels. Some spectral CT designs have a limited number of comparator channels, due to the complexity of readout electronics. The spectral information could be extended by changing the comparator threshold levels over time, sub pixels, or view angle. However, acquiring more energy measurements than comparator channels increases the noise and/or dose, due to differences in noise correlations across energy measurements and decreased dose utilisation. This study experimentally quantified the effects of acquiring more energy measurements than comparator channels using a bench-top spectral CT system. An analytical and simulation study modeling an ideal detector investigated whether there was a net benefit for material decomposition or optimal energy weighting when acquiring more energy measurements than comparator channels. Experimental results demonstrated that in a two-threshold acquisition, acquiring the high-energy measurement independently from the low-energy measurement increased noise standard deviation in material-decomposition basis images by factors of 1.5-1.7 due to changes in covariance between energy measurements. CNR in energy-weighted images decreased by factors of 0.92-0.71. Noise standard deviation increased by an additional factor of \\sqrt{2} due to reduced dose utilisation. The results demonstrated no benefit for two-material decomposition noise or energy-weighted CNR when acquiring more energy measurements than comparator channels. Understanding the noise penalty of acquiring more energy measurements than comparator channels is important for designing spectral detectors and for designing experiments and interpreting data from prototype systems with a

  18. The effects of extending the spectral information acquired by a photon-counting detector for spectral CT.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Taly Gilat; Zimmerman, Kevin C; Sidky, Emil Y

    2015-02-21

    Photon-counting x-ray detectors with pulse-height analysis provide spectral information that may improve material decomposition and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) in CT images. The number of energy measurements that can be acquired simultaneously on a detector pixel is equal to the number of comparator channels. Some spectral CT designs have a limited number of comparator channels, due to the complexity of readout electronics. The spectral information could be extended by changing the comparator threshold levels over time, sub pixels, or view angle. However, acquiring more energy measurements than comparator channels increases the noise and/or dose, due to differences in noise correlations across energy measurements and decreased dose utilisation. This study experimentally quantified the effects of acquiring more energy measurements than comparator channels using a bench-top spectral CT system. An analytical and simulation study modeling an ideal detector investigated whether there was a net benefit for material decomposition or optimal energy weighting when acquiring more energy measurements than comparator channels. Experimental results demonstrated that in a two-threshold acquisition, acquiring the high-energy measurement independently from the low-energy measurement increased noise standard deviation in material-decomposition basis images by factors of 1.5-1.7 due to changes in covariance between energy measurements. CNR in energy-weighted images decreased by factors of 0.92-0.71. Noise standard deviation increased by an additional factor of [Formula: see text] due to reduced dose utilisation. The results demonstrated no benefit for two-material decomposition noise or energy-weighted CNR when acquiring more energy measurements than comparator channels. Understanding the noise penalty of acquiring more energy measurements than comparator channels is important for designing spectral detectors and for designing experiments and interpreting data from prototype

  19. Feasibility study of sparse-angular sampling and sinogram interpolation in material decomposition with a photon-counting detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dohyeon; Jo, Byungdu; Park, Su-Jin; Kim, Hyemi; Kim, Hee-Joung

    2016-03-01

    Spectral computed tomography (SCT) is a promising technique for obtaining enhanced image with contrast agent and distinguishing different materials. We focused on developing the analytic reconstruction algorithm in material decomposition technique with lower radiation exposure and shorter acquisition time. Sparse-angular sampling can reduce patient dose and scanning time for obtaining the reconstruction images. In this study, the sinogram interpolation method was used to improve the quality of material decomposed images in sparse angular sampling. A prototype of spectral CT system with 64 pixels CZT-based photon counting detector was used. The source-to-detector distance and the source-tocenter of rotation distance were 1200 and 1015 mm, respectively. The x-ray spectrum at 90 kVp with a tube current of 110 μA was used. Two energy bins (23-33 keV and 34-44 keV) were set to obtain the two images for decomposed iodine and calcification. We used PMMA phantom and its height and radius were 50 mm and 17.5 mm, respectively. The phantom contained 4 materials including iodine, gadolinium, calcification, and liquid state lipid. We evaluated the signal to noise ratio (SNR) of materials to examine the significance of sinogram interpolation method. The decomposed iodine and calcification images were obtained by projection based subtraction method using two energy bins with 36 projection data. The SNR in decomposed images were improved by using sinogram interpolation method. And these results indicated that the signal of decomposed material was increased and the noise of decomposed material was reduced. In conclusion, the sinogram interpolation method can be used in material decomposition method with sparse-angular sampling.

  20. ChromAIX: a high-rate energy-resolving photon-counting ASIC for spectal computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steadman, Roger; Herrmann, Christoph; Mülhens, Oliver; Maeding, Dale G.; Colley, James; Firlit, Ted; Luhta, Randy; Chappo, Marc; Harwood, Brian; Kosty, Doug

    2010-04-01

    In Computed Tomography applications a major opportunity has been identified in the exploitation of the spectral information inherently available due to the polychromatic emission of the X-ray tube. Current CT technology based on indirect-conversion and integrating-mode detection can be used to some extent to distinguish the two predominant physical causes of energy-dependent attenuation (photo-electric effect and Compton effect) by using dual-energy techniques, e.g. kVp switching, dual-source or detector stacking. Further improvements can be achieved by transitioning to direct-conversion technologies and counting-mode detection, which inherently exhibits a better signal-to-noise ratio. Further including energy discrimination, enables new applications, which are not feasible with dual-energy techniques, e.g. the possibility to discriminate K-edge features (contrast agents, e.g. Gadolinium) from the other contributions to the x-ray attenuation of a human body. The capability of providing energy-resolved information with more than two different measurements is referred to as Spectral CT. To study the feasibility of Spectral CT, an energy-resolving proprietary photon counting ASIC (ChromAIX) has been designed to provide high count-rate capabilities while offering energy discrimination. The ChromAIX ASIC consists of an arrangement of 4 by 16 pixels with an isotropic pitch of 300 μm. Each pixel contains a number of independent energy discriminators with their corresponding 12-bit counters with continuous read-out capability. Observed Poissonian count-rates exceeding 10 Mcps (corresponding to approximately 27 Mcps incident mean Poisson rate) have been experimentally validated through electrical characterization. The measured noise of 2.6 mVRMS (4 keV FWHM) adheres to specifications. The ChromAIX ASIC has been specifically designed to support direct-converting materials CdZnTe and CdTe.