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Sample records for photon-counting microchannel plate

  1. High Speed Large Format Photon Counting Microchannel Plate Imaging Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegmund, O.; Ertley, C.; Vallerga, J.; Craven, C.; Popecki, M.; O'Mahony, A.; Minot, M.

    The development of a new class of microchannel plate technology, using atomic layer deposition (ALD) techniques applied to a borosilicate microcapillary array is enabling the implementation of larger, more stable detectors for Astronomy and remote sensing. Sealed tubes with MCPs with SuperGenII, bialkali, GaAs and GaN photocathodes have been developed to cover a wide range of optical/UV sensing applications. Formats of 18mm and 25mm circular, and 50mm (Planacon) and 20cm square have been constructed for uses from night time remote reconnaissance and biological single-molecule fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy, to large area focal plane imagers for Astronomy, neutron detection and ring imaging Cherenkov detection. The large focal plane areas were previously unattainable, but the new developments in construction of ALD microchannel plates allow implementation of formats of 20cm or more. Continuing developments in ALD microchannel plates offer improved overall sealed tube lifetime and gain stability, and furthermore show reduced levels of radiation induced background. High time resolution astronomical and remote sensing applications can be addressed with microchannel plate based imaging, photon time tagging detector sealed tube schemes. Photon counting imaging readouts for these devices vary from cross strip (XS), cross delay line (XDL), to stripline anodes, and pad arrays depending on the intended application. The XS and XDL readouts have been implemented in formats from 22mm, and 50mm to 20cm. Both use MCP charge signals detected on two orthogonal layers of conductive fingers to encode event X-Y positions. XDL readout uses signal propagation delay to encode positions while XS readout uses charge cloud centroiding. Spatial resolution readout of XS detectors can be better than 20 microns FWHM, with good image linearity while using low gain (<10^6), allowing high local counting rates and longer overall tube lifetime. XS tubes with electronics can encode event

  2. Calibration of photon counting imaging microchannel plate detectors for EUV astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegmund, O. H. W.; Vallerga, J.; Jelinsky, P.

    1986-01-01

    The calibration of photon counting imaging detectors for satellite based EUV astronomy is a complex process designed to ensure the validity of the data received 'in orbit'. The methods developed to accomplish calibration of microchannel plate detectors for the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer are described and illustrated. The characterization of these detectors can be subdivided into three categories: stabilization, performance tests, and environmental tests.

  3. Calibration of photon counting imaging microchannel plate detectors for EUV astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegmund, O. H. W.; Vallerga, J.; Jelinsky, P.

    1986-01-01

    The calibration of photon counting imaging detectors for satellite based EUV astronomy is a complex process designed to ensure the validity of the data received 'in orbit'. The methods developed to accomplish calibration of microchannel plate detectors for the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer are described and illustrated. The characterization of these detectors can be subdivided into three categories: stabilization, performance tests, and environmental tests.

  4. Photon-counting detector arrays based on microchannel array plates. [for image enhancement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Timothy, J. G.

    1975-01-01

    The recent development of the channel electron multiplier (CEM) and its miniaturization into the microchannel array plate (MCP) offers the possibility of fully combining the advantages of the photographic and photoelectric detection systems. The MCP has an image-intensifying capability and the potential of being developed to yield signal outputs superior to those of conventional photomultipliers. In particular, the MCP has a photon-counting capability with a negligible dark-count rate. Furthermore, the MCP can operate stably and efficiently at extreme-ultraviolet and soft X-ray wavelengths in a windowless configuration or can be integrated with a photo-cathode in a sealed tube for use at ultraviolet and visible wavelengths. The operation of one- and two-dimensional photon-counting detector arrays based on the MCP at extreme-ultraviolet wavelengths is described, and the design of sealed arrays for use at ultraviolet and visible wavelengths is briefly discussed.

  5. Development and test of photon-counting microchannel plate detector arrays for use on space telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Timothy, J. G.

    1976-01-01

    The full sensitivity, dynamic range, and photometric stability of microchannel array plates(MCP) are incorporated into a photon-counting detection system for space operations. Components of the system include feedback-free MCP's for high gain and saturated output pulse-height distribution with a stable response; multi-anode readout arrays mounted in proximity focus with the output face of the MCP; and multi-layer ceramic headers to provide electrical interface between the anode array in a sealed detector tube and the associated electronics.

  6. Scanning-slit photon counting x-ray imaging system using a microchannel plate detector.

    PubMed

    Shikhaliev, Polad M; Xu, Tong; Le, Huy; Molloi, Sabee

    2004-05-01

    An experimental prototype of a novel photon counting x-ray imaging system was evaluated. This system is based on an "edge-on" microchannel plate (MCP) detector and utilizes scanning slit imaging configuration. The detector is capable of photon counting, direct conversion, high spatial resolution, controllable physical charge amplification, quantum limited and scatter free operation. The detector provides a 60 mm wide field of view (FOV) and its count rate is 200 kHz for the entire FOV. The count rate of the current system is limited by the position encoding electronics, which has a single input for all events from the entire detector, and incorporates a single channel ADC with 1 micros conversion time. It is shown that the count rate can potentially be improved to clinically acceptable levels using multichannel application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) electronics and multi-slit image acquisition geometry. For a typical acquisition time used in this study, the image noise was measured to be less than the typically acceptable noise level for medical x-ray imaging. It is anticipated that the noise level will be also low after the implementation of the ASIC electronics. The quantum efficiency of the detector was measured to be 40%-56% for an energy range of 50-90 kVp for MCPs used in this study and can be improved to > 80% using MCPs with the optimized parameters. Images of resolution and anthropomorphic phantoms were acquired at an x-ray tube voltage of 50 kVp. The value of contrast transfer function for the detector was measured to be 0.5 at a spatial frequency of 5 lp/mm. The intrinsic spatial resolution of the system is 28 microm FWHM and was limited by the accuracy of the time-to-digital conversion of the position encoding electronics. Given the advantages of the edge-on MCP detector such as direct conversion and physical charge amplification, it can potentially be applied to mammography and chest radiography.

  7. Improving the performance of ultrafast microchannel-plate photomultipliers in time-correlated photon counting by pulse pre-shaping

    SciTech Connect

    Cova, S.; Ripamonti, G. )

    1990-03-01

    With ultrafast microchannel-plate (MCP) photomultipliers that produce subnanosecond pulses, the commercially available circuit modules do not provide a correct constant-fraction trigger (CFT) operation. This has a detrimental effect on the resolution obtained in time-correlated photon counting experiments. In order to circumvent this CFT limitation and better exploit the ultrafast MCP performance, a simple pulse-shaping filter has been devised and experimented with. The filter can be interposed between the MCP output and the input of any commercial CFT module, without modifying the latter. The benefit of the filter is confirmed by the experimental results. With MCP samples that produced awkward resolution curves with satellite peaks and other irregular features, the introduction of the filter regularized and narrowed the curve. Also with a setup having fairly good performance, the introduction of the filter was advantageous: the full width at half maximum (FWHM) resolution improved from 75 to 55 ps.

  8. Development of a single-photon-counting camera with use of a triple-stacked micro-channel plate.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Naruomi; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Katafuchi, Tetsuro

    2016-01-01

    At the quantum-mechanical level, all substances (not merely electromagnetic waves such as light and X-rays) exhibit wave–particle duality. Whereas students of radiation science can easily understand the wave nature of electromagnetic waves, the particle (photon) nature may elude them. Therefore, to assist students in understanding the wave–particle duality of electromagnetic waves, we have developed a photon-counting camera that captures single photons in two-dimensional images. As an image intensifier, this camera has a triple-stacked micro-channel plate (MCP) with an amplification factor of 10(6). The ultra-low light of a single photon entering the camera is first converted to an electron through the photoelectric effect on the photocathode. The electron is intensified by the triple-stacked MCP and then converted to a visible light distribution, which is measured by a high-sensitivity complementary metal oxide semiconductor image sensor. Because it detects individual photons, the photon-counting camera is expected to provide students with a complete understanding of the particle nature of electromagnetic waves. Moreover, it measures ultra-weak light that cannot be detected by ordinary low-sensitivity cameras. Therefore, it is suitable for experimental research on scintillator luminescence, biophoton detection, and similar topics.

  9. A High-Speed, Event-Driven, Active Pixel Sensor Readout for Photon-Counting Microchannel Plate Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimble, Randy A.; Pain, Bedabrata; Norton, Timothy J.; Haas, J. Patrick; Oegerle, William R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Silicon array readouts for microchannel plate intensifiers offer several attractive features. In this class of detector, the electron cloud output of the MCP intensifier is converted to visible light by a phosphor; that light is then fiber-optically coupled to the silicon array. In photon-counting mode, the resulting light splashes on the silicon array are recognized and centroided to fractional pixel accuracy by off-chip electronics. This process can result in very high (MCP-limited) spatial resolution while operating at a modest MCP gain (desirable for dynamic range and long term stability). The principal limitation of intensified CCD systems of this type is their severely limited local dynamic range, as accurate photon counting is achieved only if there are not overlapping event splashes within the frame time of the device. This problem can be ameliorated somewhat by processing events only in pre-selected windows of interest of by using an addressable charge injection device (CID) for the readout array. We are currently pursuing the development of an intriguing alternative readout concept based on using an event-driven CMOS Active Pixel Sensor. APS technology permits the incorporation of discriminator circuitry within each pixel. When coupled with suitable CMOS logic outside the array area, the discriminator circuitry can be used to trigger the readout of small sub-array windows only when and where an event splash has been detected, completely eliminating the local dynamic range problem, while achieving a high global count rate capability and maintaining high spatial resolution. We elaborate on this concept and present our progress toward implementing an event-driven APS readout.

  10. A High-Speed, Event-Driven, Active Pixel Sensor Readout for Photon-Counting Microchannel Plate Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimble, Randy A.; Pain, B.; Norton, T. J.; Haas, P.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Silicon array readouts for microchannel plate intensifiers offer several attractive features. In this class of detector, the electron cloud output of the MCP intensifier is converted to visible light by a phosphor; that light is then fiber-optically coupled to the silicon array. In photon-counting mode, the resulting light splashes on the silicon array are recognized and centroided to fractional pixel accuracy by off-chip electronics. This process can result in very high (MCP-limited) spatial resolution for the readout while operating at a modest MCP gain (desirable for dynamic range and long term stability). The principal limitation of intensified CCD systems of this type is their severely limited local dynamic range, as accurate photon counting is achieved only if there are not overlapping event splashes within the frame time of the device. This problem can be ameliorated somewhat by processing events only in pre-selected windows of interest or by using an addressable charge injection device (CID) for the readout array. We are currently pursuing the development of an intriguing alternative readout concept based on using an event-driven CMOS Active Pixel Sensor. APS technology permits the incorporation of discriminator circuitry within each pixel. When coupled with suitable CMOS logic outside the array area, the discriminator circuitry can be used to trigger the readout of small sub-array windows only when and where an event splash has been detected, completely eliminating the local dynamic range problem, while achieving a high global count rate capability and maintaining high spatial resolution. We elaborate on this concept and present our progress toward implementing an event-driven APS readout.

  11. Cross strip anode readouts for large format, photon counting microchannel plate detectors: developing flight qualified prototypes of the detector and electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallerga, John; Raffanti, Rick; Cooney, Michael; Cumming, Harley; Varner, Gary; Seljak, Andrej

    2014-07-01

    Photon counting microchannel plate (MCP) imagers have been the detector of choice for most UV astronomical missions over the last two decades (e.g. EUVE, FUSE, COS on Hubble etc.). Over this duration, improvements in the MCP laboratory readout technology have resulted in better spatial resolution (x10), temporal resolution (x1000) and output event rate (x100), all the while operating at lower gain (x 10) resulting in lower high voltage requirements and longer MCP lifetimes. One such technology is the parallel cross strip (PXS) readout. Laboratory versions of PXS electronics have demonstrated < 20 μm FWHM spatial resolution, count rates on the order of 2 MHz, and temporal resolution of ~ 1ns. In 2012 our group at U.C. Berkeley, along with our partners at the U. Hawaii, received a Strategic Astrophysics Technology grant to raise the TRL of the PXS detector and electronics from 4 to 6 by replacing most of the high powered electronics with application specific integrated circuits (ASICs) which will lower the power, mass and volume requirements of the PXS detector. We were also tasked to design and fabricate a "standard" 50mm square active area MCP detector incorporating these electronics that can be environmentally qualified for flight (temperature, vacuum, vibration). The first ASICs designed for this program have been fabricated and are undergoing testing. We present the latest progress on these ASIC designs and performance and show imaging results from the new 50 x 50 mm XS detector.

  12. Readout techniques for photon-counting microchannel image systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lampton, Michael

    1988-01-01

    A comparative evaluation is made of such readout methods for the microchannel plates that are commonly used in EUV, FUV, and X-ray low light level image systems as the (1) phosphor-video, (2) phosphor and binary-mask encoder, (3) direct discrete-position encoder, (4) direct analog amplitude position-encoder systems, and (5) delay-line encoders. Relative advantages and limitations are discussed in the context of low light level space-based astronomy applications. The delay-line technique offers great promise for high-resolution applications where oversampling is mandatory, as in spectroscopy.

  13. Delay-Line Anode For Microchannel-Plate Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lampton, M.

    1989-01-01

    Photon-counting read-out system for microchannel-plate spectrometer includes delay line and timing circuit to measure wavelength coordinate and wedge/wedge charge-division system to measure orthogonal spatial coordinate. System proves advantageous for portable two-dimensional spectrometers having large image planes and for which design requirements include simplicity, reliability, low power consumption, and low mass.

  14. Fractal multifiber microchannel plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Lee M.; Feller, W. B.; Kenter, Almus T.; Chappell, Jon H.

    1992-01-01

    The construction and performance of microchannel plates (MCPs) made using fractal tiling mehtods are reviewed. MCPs with 40 mm active areas having near-perfect channel ordering were produced. These plates demonstrated electrical performance characteristics equivalent to conventionally constructed MCPs. These apparently are the first MCPs which have a sufficiently high degree of order to permit single channel addressability. Potential applications for these devices and the prospects for further development are discussed.

  15. Microchannel plate streak camera

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Ching L.

    1989-01-01

    An improved streak camera in which a microchannel plate electron multiplier is used in place of or in combination with the photocathode used in prior streak cameras. The improved streak camera is far more sensitive to photons (UV to gamma-rays) than the conventional x-ray streak camera which uses a photocathode. The improved streak camera offers gamma-ray detection with high temporal resolution. It also offers low-energy x-ray detection without attenuation inside the cathode. Using the microchannel plate in the improved camera has resulted in a time resolution of about 150 ps, and has provided a sensitivity sufficient for 1000 KeV x-rays.

  16. Microchannel plate streak camera

    DOEpatents

    Wang, C.L.

    1984-09-28

    An improved streak camera in which a microchannel plate electron multiplier is used in place of or in combination with the photocathode used in prior streak cameras. The improved streak camera is far more sensitive to photons (uv to gamma-rays) than the conventional x-ray streak camera which uses a photocathode. The improved streak camera offers gamma-ray detection with high temporal resolution. It also offers low-energy x-ray detection without attenuation inside the cathode. Using the microchannel plate in the improved camera has resulted in a time resolution of about 150 ps, and has provided a sensitivity sufficient for 1000 keV x-rays.

  17. Microchannel plate streak camera

    DOEpatents

    Wang, C.L.

    1989-03-21

    An improved streak camera in which a microchannel plate electron multiplier is used in place of or in combination with the photocathode used in prior streak cameras is disclosed. The improved streak camera is far more sensitive to photons (UV to gamma-rays) than the conventional x-ray streak camera which uses a photocathode. The improved streak camera offers gamma-ray detection with high temporal resolution. It also offers low-energy x-ray detection without attenuation inside the cathode. Using the microchannel plate in the improved camera has resulted in a time resolution of about 150 ps, and has provided a sensitivity sufficient for 1,000 KeV x-rays. 3 figs.

  18. Micro-channel plate detector

    DOEpatents

    Elam, Jeffrey W.; Lee, Seon W.; Wang, Hsien -Hau; Pellin, Michael J.; Byrum, Karen; Frisch, Henry J.

    2015-09-22

    A method and system for providing a micro-channel plate detector. An anodized aluminum oxide membrane is provided and includes a plurality of nanopores which have an Al coating and a thin layer of an emissive oxide material responsive to incident radiation, thereby providing a plurality of radiation sensitive channels for the micro-channel plate detector.

  19. Multiple-Dynode-Layer Microchannel Plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodgate, Bruce E.

    1990-01-01

    Improved microchannel-plate electron image amplifier made of stack of discrete microchannel-plate layers. New plates easier to manufacture because no need to etch long, narrow holes, to draw and bundle thin glass tubes, or to shear plates to give microchannels curvatures necessary for reduction of undesired emission of ions. Discrete dynode layers stacked with slight offset from layer to layer to form microchannel plate with curved channels. Provides for relatively fast recharging of microchannel dynodes, with consequent enhancement of performance.

  20. Highly curved microchannel plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegmund, O. H. W.; Cully, S.; Warren, J.; Gaines, G. A.; Priedhorsky, W.; Bloch, J.

    1990-01-01

    Several spherically curved microchannel plate (MCP) stack configurations were studied as part of an ongoing astrophysical detector development program, and as part of the development of the ALEXIS satellite payload. MCP pairs with surface radii of curvature as small as 7 cm, and diameters up to 46 mm have been evaluated. The experiments show that the gain (greater than 1.5 x 10 exp 7) and background characteristics (about 0.5 events/sq cm per sec) of highly curved MCP stacks are in general equivalent to the performance achieved with flat MCP stacks of similar configuration. However, gain variations across the curved MCP's due to variations in the channel length to diameter ratio are observed. The overall pulse height distribution of a highly curved surface MCP stack (greater than 50 percent FWHM) is thus broader than its flat counterpart (less than 30 percent). Preconditioning of curved MCP stacks gives comparable results to flat MCP stacks, but it also decreases the overall gain variations. Flat fields of curved MCP stacks have the same general characteristics as flat MCP stacks.

  1. Highly curved microchannel plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegmund, O. H. W.; Cully, S.; Warren, J.; Gaines, G. A.; Priedhorsky, W.; Bloch, J.

    1990-01-01

    Several spherically curved microchannel plate (MCP) stack configurations were studied as part of an ongoing astrophysical detector development program, and as part of the development of the ALEXIS satellite payload. MCP pairs with surface radii of curvature as small as 7 cm, and diameters up to 46 mm have been evaluated. The experiments show that the gain (greater than 1.5 x 10 exp 7) and background characteristics (about 0.5 events/sq cm per sec) of highly curved MCP stacks are in general equivalent to the performance achieved with flat MCP stacks of similar configuration. However, gain variations across the curved MCP's due to variations in the channel length to diameter ratio are observed. The overall pulse height distribution of a highly curved surface MCP stack (greater than 50 percent FWHM) is thus broader than its flat counterpart (less than 30 percent). Preconditioning of curved MCP stacks gives comparable results to flat MCP stacks, but it also decreases the overall gain variations. Flat fields of curved MCP stacks have the same general characteristics as flat MCP stacks.

  2. Single-molecule localization software applied to photon counting imaging.

    PubMed

    Hirvonen, Liisa M; Kilfeather, Tiffany; Suhling, Klaus

    2015-06-01

    Centroiding in photon counting imaging has traditionally been accomplished by a single-step, noniterative algorithm, often implemented in hardware. Single-molecule localization techniques in superresolution fluorescence microscopy are conceptually similar, but use more sophisticated iterative software-based fitting algorithms to localize the fluorophore. Here, we discuss common features and differences between single-molecule localization and photon counting imaging and investigate the suitability of single-molecule localization software for photon event localization. We find that single-molecule localization software packages designed for superresolution microscopy-QuickPALM, rapidSTORM, and ThunderSTORM-can work well when applied to photon counting imaging with a microchannel-plate-based intensified camera system: photon event recognition can be excellent, fixed pattern noise can be low, and the microchannel plate pores can easily be resolved.

  3. Multi-channel picosecond photon timing with microchannel plate detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapington, J. S.; Conneely, T.

    2011-08-01

    Microchannel plate-based detectors have the capability to photon-count at time resolutions which outperform solid-state devices such as the APD or SiPM, and have a geometry that lends itself to pixelated readouts. We describe a multi-channel, photon-counting microchannel plate detector optimised for photon timing in the picosecond regime. The detector was originally developed for application to time-resolved spectroscopy in the life sciences, however its performance characteristics make it suitable for applications where high time resolution and multi-channel photon-counting are required including Cherenkov light detection in nuclear physics, particle physics, and astroparticle astronomy.We describe the prototype detector, a sealed tube device comprising an optical photocathode proximity focussed to a small pore microchannel plate stack. Event charge is collected on a multi-channel readout comprising an 8×8 pixel array, manufactured on a multilayer ceramic, which provides vacuum integrity for the detector enclosure and a multi-way electrical feedthrough for the readout array. Each pixel addresses one channel of a NINO ASIC, a multi-channel preamplifier-discriminator device. The discriminator outputs are timed to 25 ps by the HPTDC time-to-digital converter ASIC, which uses a time-over-threshold technique for amplitude walk correction. We present performance measurements using a pulsed laser of the 64 channel prototype system comprising a 25 mm detector, NINO front-end, and a CAEN V1290A VME module utilising HPTDC. We discuss the next phase in the project—design and manufacture of a 40 mm detector with a 16×16 pixel2 readout coupled to custom NINO/HPTDC electronics constructed as a series of 64 channel modules, expandable to even larger channel densities.

  4. The MIC photon counting detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fordham, J. L. A.; Bone, D. A.; Oldfield, M. K.; Bellis, J. G.; Norton, T. J.

    1992-12-01

    The MIC (Microchannel plate Intensified CCD (Charge Coupled Device)) detector is an advanced performance Micro Channel Plate (MCP) intensified CCD photon counting detector developed for high resolution, high dynamic range, astronomical applications. The heart of the detector is an MCP intensifier developed specifically for photon counting applications. The maximum detector format is 3072 by 2304 pixels. The measured resolution of the detector system is 18 micrometers FWHM at 490 nm. The detector is linear to approximately 1,000,000 events/detector area/sec on a flat field and linear to count rates up to 200 events/object/s on star images. Two versions of the system have been developed. The first for ground based astronomical applications based around a 40 mm diameter intensifier, was proven in trials at a number of large optical telescopes. The second, specifically for the ESA X-Ray Multi Mirror Mission (XMM), where the MIC has been accepted as the blue detector for the incorporated Optical Monitor (OM). For the XMM-OM, the system is based around a 25 mm diameter intensifier. At present, under development, is a 75 mm diameter version of the detector which will have a maximum format of 6144 by 4608 pixels. Details of the MIC detector and its performance are presented.

  5. [Theoretical analysis and experimental measurement for secondary electron yield of microchannel plate in extreme ultraviolet region].

    PubMed

    Li, Min; Ni, Qi-liang; Dong, Ning-ning; Chen, Bo

    2010-08-01

    Photon counting detectors based on microchannel plate have widespread applications in astronomy. The present paper deeply studies secondary electron of microchannel plate in extreme ultraviolet. A theoretical model describing extreme ultraviolet-excited secondary electron yield is presented, and the factor affecting on the secondary electron yields of both electrode and lead glass which consist of microchannel plate is analyzed according to theoretical formula derived from the model. The result shows that the higher secondary electron yield is obtained under appropriate condition that the thickness of material is more than 20 nm and the grazing incidence angle is larger than the critical angle. Except for several wavelengths, the secondary electron yields of both electrode and lead glass decrease along with the increase in the wavelength And also the quantum efficiency of microchannel plate is measured using quantum efficiency test set-up with laser-produced plasmas source as an extreme ultraviolet radiation source, and the result of experiment agrees with theoretical analysis.

  6. Silicon-micromachined microchannel plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beetz, Charles P.; Boerstler, Robert; Steinbeck, John; Lemieux, Bryan; Winn, David R.

    2000-03-01

    Microchannel plates (MCP) fabricated from standard silicon wafer substrates using a novel silicon micromachining process, together with standard silicon photolithographic process steps, are described. The resulting SiMCP microchannels have dimensions of ˜0.5 to ˜25 μm, with aspect ratios up to 300, and have the dimensional precision and absence of interstitial defects characteristic of photolithographic processing, compatible with positional matching to silicon electronics readouts. The open channel areal fraction and detection efficiency may exceed 90% on plates up to 300 mm in diameter. The resulting silicon substrates can be converted entirely to amorphous quartz (qMCP). The strip resistance and secondary emission are developed by controlled depositions of thin films, at temperatures up to 1200°C, also compatible with high-temperture brazing, and can be essentially hydrogen, water and radionuclide-free. Novel secondary emitters and cesiated photocathodes can be high-temperature deposited or nucleated in the channels or the first strike surface. Results on resistivity, secondary emission and gain are presented.

  7. Advances in microchannel plate detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraser, G. W.; Pearson, J. F.; Lees, J. E.; Feller, W. B.

    1988-01-01

    New laboratory measurements and theoretical calculations concerning four areas of microchannel plate (MCP) detector operation are described. The first measurements of MCPs manufactured from lead glasses containing no bulk potassium or rubidium oxides are presented. It is shown that the Macor ceramic commonly used in detector bodies is a significant source of background, and various contributions to the count rates measured with the low-noise MCPs mounted in a low-activity detector body are evaluated. How the observed improvements in sea level noise performance might translate to an orbital environment is discussed. The 'gain droop' of the new MCPs is described, and the inevitable thermal consequences of low channel plate resistance is investigated. Measurements of gain stability under prolonged illumination are presented. Predictions of saturated gain, transit time, and transit time spread of MCPs with channel diameters between 2 and 12.5 microns are reported.

  8. Background events in microchannel plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegmund, O. H. W.; Vallerga, J.; Wargelin, B.

    1988-01-01

    Measurements have been made to assess the characteristics and origins of background events in microchannel plates (MCPs). An overall background rate of about 0.4 events/sq cm persec has been achieved consistently for MCPs that have been baked and scrubbed. The temperature and gain of the MCPs are found to have no significant effect on the background rate. Detection of 1.46-MeV gamma rays from the MCP glass confirms the presence of K-40, with a concentration of 0.0007 percent, in MCP glass. It is shown that beta decay from K-40 is sufficient to cause the background rate and spectrum observed. Anticoincidence measurements indicate the the background rate caused by cosmic ray interactions is small (less than 0.016 events/sq cm per sec).

  9. Background events in microchannel plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegmund, O. H. W.; Vallerga, J.; Wargelin, B.

    1988-01-01

    Measurements have been made to assess the characteristics and origins of background events in microchannel plates (MCPs). An overall background rate of about 0.4 events/sq cm persec has been achieved consistently for MCPs that have been baked and scrubbed. The temperature and gain of the MCPs are found to have no significant effect on the background rate. Detection of 1.46-MeV gamma rays from the MCP glass confirms the presence of K-40, with a concentration of 0.0007 percent, in MCP glass. It is shown that beta decay from K-40 is sufficient to cause the background rate and spectrum observed. Anticoincidence measurements indicate the the background rate caused by cosmic ray interactions is small (less than 0.016 events/sq cm per sec).

  10. Microchannel Plate Imaging Detectors for the Ultraviolet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegmund, O. H. W.; Gummin, M. A.; Stock, J.; Marsh, D.

    1992-01-01

    There has been significant progress over the last few years in the development of technologies for microchannel plate imaging detectors in the Ultraviolet (UV). Areas where significant developments have occurred include enhancements of quantum detection efficiency through improved photocathodes, advances in microchannel plate performance characteristics, and development of high performance image readout techniques. The current developments in these areas are summarized, with their applications in astrophysical instrumentation.

  11. Microchannel Plate Imaging Detectors for the Ultraviolet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegmund, O. H. W.; Gummin, M. A.; Stock, J.; Marsh, D.

    1992-01-01

    There has been significant progress over the last few years in the development of technologies for microchannel plate imaging detectors in the Ultraviolet (UV). Areas where significant developments have occurred include enhancements of quantum detection efficiency through improved photocathodes, advances in microchannel plate performance characteristics, and development of high performance image readout techniques. The current developments in these areas are summarized, with their applications in astrophysical instrumentation.

  12. Rocket-borne instrument with a high-resolution microchannel plate detector for planetary UV spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcclintock, W. E.; Barth, C. A.; Steele, R. E.; Lawrence, G. M.; Timothy, J. G.

    1982-01-01

    A telescope-spectrograph employing a photon-counting microchannel plate (MCP)-CODACON detector has been built, tested, and flown on a sounding rocket. The detector uses a curved-channel MCP proximity focused onto a coded anode array of 1024 channels spaced 25.4-mm center to center. High quantum efficiency is obtained by depositing a cesium iodide photocathode on the front surface of the MCP. The instrument has obtained an ultraviolet spectrum of Jupiter with a spectral resolution of 8 A, which is higher than that of any previously reported observation in this wavelength range.

  13. High Time Resolution Photon Counting 3D Imaging Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegmund, O.; Ertley, C.; Vallerga, J.

    2016-09-01

    Novel sealed tube microchannel plate (MCP) detectors using next generation cross strip (XS) anode readouts and high performance electronics have been developed to provide photon counting imaging sensors for Astronomy and high time resolution 3D remote sensing. 18 mm aperture sealed tubes with MCPs and high efficiency Super-GenII or GaAs photocathodes have been implemented to access the visible/NIR regimes for ground based research, astronomical and space sensing applications. The cross strip anode readouts in combination with PXS-II high speed event processing electronics can process high single photon counting event rates at >5 MHz ( 80 ns dead-time per event), and time stamp events to better than 25 ps. Furthermore, we are developing a high speed ASIC version of the electronics for low power/low mass spaceflight applications. For a GaAs tube the peak quantum efficiency has degraded from 30% (at 560 - 850 nm) to 25% over 4 years, but for Super-GenII tubes the peak quantum efficiency of 17% (peak at 550 nm) has remained unchanged for over 7 years. The Super-GenII tubes have a uniform spatial resolution of <30 μm FWHM ( 1 x106 gain) and single event timing resolution of 100 ps (FWHM). The relatively low MCP gain photon counting operation also permits longer overall sensor lifetimes and high local counting rates. Using the high timing resolution, we have demonstrated 3D object imaging with laser pulse (630 nm 45 ps jitter Pilas laser) reflections in single photon counting mode with spatial and depth sensitivity of the order of a few millimeters. A 50 mm Planacon sealed tube was also constructed, using atomic layer deposited microchannel plates which potentially offer better overall sealed tube lifetime, quantum efficiency and gain stability. This tube achieves standard bialkali quantum efficiency levels, is stable, and has been coupled to the PXS-II electronics and used to detect and image fast laser pulse signals.

  14. High resolution cross strip anodes for photon counting detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegmund, O. H. W.; Tremsin, A. S.; Vallerga, J. V.; Abiad, R.; Hull, J.

    2003-05-01

    A new photon counting, imaging readout for microchannel plate sensors, the cross strip (XS) anode, has been investigated. Charge centroiding of signals detected on two orthogonal layers of sense strip sets are used to derive photon locations. The XS anode spatial resolution (<3 μm FWHM) exceeds the spatial resolution of most direct charge sensing anodes, and does so at low gain (<2×10 6). The image linearity and fidelity are high enough to resolve and map 7 μm MCP pores, offering new possibilities for astronomical and other applications.

  15. Imaging characteristics of the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer microchannel plate detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vallerga, J. V.; Kaplan, G. C.; Siegmund, O. H. W.; Lampton, M.; Malina, R. F.

    1989-01-01

    The Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer (EUVE) satellite will conduct an all-sky survey over the wavelength range from 70 A to 760 A using four grazing-incidence telescopes and seven microchannel-plate (MCP) detectors. The imaging photon-counting MCP detectors have active areas of 19.6 cm2. Photon arrival position is determined using a wedge-and-strip anode and associated pulse-encoding electronics. The imaging characteristics of the EUVE flight detectors are presented including image distortion, flat-field response, and spatial differential nonlinearity. Also included is a detailed discussion of image distortions due to the detector mechanical assembly, the wedge-and-strip anode, and the electronics. Model predictions of these distortions are compared to preflight calibration images which show distortions less than 1.3 percent rms of the detector diameter of 50 mm before correction. The plans for correcting these residual detector image distortions to less than 0.1 percent rms are also presented.

  16. Delay line anodes for microchannel-plate spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lampton, M.; Siegmund, O.; Raffanti, R.

    1987-01-01

    A photon-counting readout system for microchannel-plate spectrometers is described that uses a delay line and timing circuit for the wavelength coordinate and a wedge-wedge charge division system for the orthogonal spatial coordinate. A novel zigzag layout allows these two anode patterns to coexist on a common planar substrate and share the charge from each photoevent, thereby simultaneously localizing the photon in each of its two dimensions. Unlike wedge-and-strip or resistive anode encoders, the delay line offers a spatial resolution that is relatively independent of the format length. Unlike discrete anode systems, the delay line readout system's complexity is also independent of the field of view size. These facts make the delay line readout system advantageous in large format detectors. A testbed detector having a delay line propagation speed of 2.2 mm/ns and a time resolution of 33 ps FWHM has been assembled. Ultraviolet testing shows a Gaussian event distribution having a 70-micron FWHM width; the readout system blur contribution is less than 50-micron FWHM.

  17. Delay line anodes for microchannel-plate spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lampton, M.; Siegmund, O.; Raffanti, R.

    1987-01-01

    A photon-counting readout system for microchannel-plate spectrometers is described that uses a delay line and timing circuit for the wavelength coordinate and a wedge-wedge charge division system for the orthogonal spatial coordinate. A novel zigzag layout allows these two anode patterns to coexist on a common planar substrate and share the charge from each photoevent, thereby simultaneously localizing the photon in each of its two dimensions. Unlike wedge-and-strip or resistive anode encoders, the delay line offers a spatial resolution that is relatively independent of the format length. Unlike discrete anode systems, the delay line readout system's complexity is also independent of the field of view size. These facts make the delay line readout system advantageous in large format detectors. A testbed detector having a delay line propagation speed of 2.2 mm/ns and a time resolution of 33 ps FWHM has been assembled. Ultraviolet testing shows a Gaussian event distribution having a 70-micron FWHM width; the readout system blur contribution is less than 50-micron FWHM.

  18. Imaging characteristics of the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer microchannel plate detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vallerga, J. V.; Kaplan, G. C.; Siegmund, O. H. W.; Lampton, M.; Malina, R. F.

    1989-01-01

    The Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer (EUVE) satellite will conduct an all-sky survey over the wavelength range from 70 A to 760 A using four grazing-incidence telescopes and seven microchannel-plate (MCP) detectors. The imaging photon-counting MCP detectors have active areas of 19.6 cm2. Photon arrival position is determined using a wedge-and-strip anode and associated pulse-encoding electronics. The imaging characteristics of the EUVE flight detectors are presented including image distortion, flat-field response, and spatial differential nonlinearity. Also included is a detailed discussion of image distortions due to the detector mechanical assembly, the wedge-and-strip anode, and the electronics. Model predictions of these distortions are compared to preflight calibration images which show distortions less than 1.3 percent rms of the detector diameter of 50 mm before correction. The plans for correcting these residual detector image distortions to less than 0.1 percent rms are also presented.

  19. Direct beta autoradiography using microchannel plate (MCP) detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lees, J. E.; Fraser, G. W.; Dinsdale, D.

    1997-02-01

    We describe a new form of detector for digital autoradiography which combines high sensitivity and good spatial resolution (< 100 μm). The detector is based on proximity registration of betas by radioisotope-free "low noise" microchannel plates (MCPs) developed for photon counting X-ray astronomy. Low dark count rates (<0.1 cm -2s -1) are combined with the high (>50%) electron detection efficiency of small pore MCPs for common beta emitting isotopes ( 3H, 14C, 35S…). In particular, the MCP detector is highly sensitive to the biologically important but previously difficult to detect low energy (average 6 keV, endpoint 18.6 keV) beta emission from tritium. We report 3H sensitivities and linearity derived from images of a 3H standard, together with images of 3H-Putrescine doped semi-thin-tissue sections of rat lung and isolated single cells from rabbit lung. We compare these results with those of previous attempts to digitally image tritium.

  20. Electronic readout systems for microchannel plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Timothy, J. G.

    1985-01-01

    The modes of operation of position-sensitive electronic readout systems which use high-gain microchannel plate (MCP) electron multipliers are described, and their performance characteristics, along with those of the MCP, are compared. Among the structures presented are the wedge-and-strip, Codacon, and multilayer coincidence-anode MAMA (Multimode Microchannel Array) arrays. Spatial resolution of 25 x 25 sq microns (coincidence anode arrays) is achieved with an array format of 256 x 1024 pixels. On the basis of the performance data it is concluded that the readout systems using only conducting electrodes offer the best performance characteristics.

  1. Photon counting spectroscopy as done with a Thomson scattering diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Den Hartog, D.J.; Ruppert, D.E.

    1993-11-01

    The measurement and reduction of photon counting spectral data is demonstrated within the context of a Thomson scattering diagnostic. This diagnostic contains a microchannel plate (MCP) photomultiplier tube (PMT) as the photon sensing device. The MCP PMT is not an ideal photon sensor, the loss of photoelectrons at the MCP input and the broad charge pulse distribution at the output add to the uncertainty in recorded data. Computer simulations are used to demonstrate an approach to quantification of this added uncertainty and to develop an understanding of its source; the methodology may be applicable to the development of an understanding of photon detectors other than an MCP PMT. Emphasis is placed on the Poisson statistical character of the data, because the assumption that a Gaussian probability distribution is a reasonable statistical description of photon counting data is often questionable. When the count rate is low, the product the possible number of photon counts and the probability of measurement of a single photon is usually not sufficiently large to justify Gaussian statistics. Rather, because probabilities of measurement are so low, the Poisson probability distribution best quantifies the inherent statistical fluctuations in such counting measurements. The method of maximum likelihood is applied to derive the Poisson statistics equivalent of {sub X}{sup 2}. A Poisson statistics based data fitting code is implemented using the Newton-Raphson method of multi-dimensional root finding; we also demonstrate an algorithm to estimate the uncertainties in derived quantities.

  2. A neutron detector based on microchannel plates

    SciTech Connect

    MacArthur, D.W.

    1987-06-01

    We propose a large-area neutron detector design based on microchannel plates (MCPs). Two characteristics of the MCP make it ideal as a high-rate neutron detector: (1) its signals can have a very fast rise time, and (2) it can count at a high rate. The MCP-based detector could use both the high-voltage power supplies and the readout electronics designed for a neutron detector based on the multiwire proportional chamber (MWPC).

  3. Characteristics of a microchannel plate intensifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandie, W. G.; Mende, S. B.

    1982-01-01

    A telephoto optical system has been designed for imaging applications involving a use of the spectral region from 2000 to 7500 A. The optics images onto the photocathode of a multichannel plate photomultiplier (PMT). Interference filters are employed to provide spectral selectivity. The PMT consists of three microchannel plate intensifiers (MCP), arranged in a 'Z' configuration. MCP photomultiplier pulse height distributions are discussed along with aspects of spatial distribution, the electron gain pulse height distribution, and the charge loss due to edge effects. Attention is given to the electron gain pulse height distribution obtained from four anodes connected in parallel, taking into account a uniform illumination of the photocathode.

  4. Photon counting computed tomography: concept and initial results.

    PubMed

    Shikhaliev, Polad M; Xu, Tong; Molloi, Sabee

    2005-02-01

    A concept of a photon counting cone beam CT is proposed. The system uses a new Multi Slit Multi Slice (MSMS) cone beam acquisition geometry utilizing a linear array photon counting detectors. The MSMS cone beam acquisition is a direct analogy of the scanning multislit acquisition used in projection x-ray imaging. This geometry provides a CT imaging with dose efficient scatter rejection and allows for using available photon counting detectors. The microchannel plate (MCP) detector is proposed as a linear array photon counting detector for MSMS cone beam CT system. Initial testing of the MCP detector for CT application was performed. The field of view of the prototype MCP detector is 60 mm. A delay line position encoding electronics was used. The electronics has a single channel input for evaluation of events from the entire detector field of view. This limits the system count rate at 2 x 10(5) count/s. The spatial resolution of this detector is 80 microm FWHM at 40 kVp and 200 microm FWHM at 90 kVp tube voltages. The detector noise in CT projections is less than 1 count/pixel for the 80 microm pixel size. The CT projections contain quantum-limited and scatter free signal. Images of a contrast phantom and a small animal were acquired at 50 kVp and 80 kVp tube voltages. The CT numbers for different contrast elements were calculated for a given x-ray spectrum and compared with experimental values. The quantum efficiency of the current detector is 56% at 90 kVp, which is suboptimal because of the large channel diameter (25 microm) of these MCPs. The MCPs with smaller channels and higher efficiencies are being tested. The quantum efficiency was measured to be 70% for a new MCP with 5 microm channel diameter. Design parameters of a clinically applicable photon counting MSMS cone beam CT for breast imaging was evaluated. System uses 20 cm field of view MCP detectors based on 5 microm channel MCPs and high count rate ASIC electronics. It was concluded that the MSMS cone

  5. Microporous microchannel plates and method of manufacturing same

    DOEpatents

    Beetz, Jr., Charles P.; Boerstler, Robert W.; Steinbeck, John; Winn, David R.

    2000-01-01

    A microchannel plate and method of manufacturing same is provided. The microchannel plate includes a plate consisting of an anodized material and a plurality of channels which are formed during the anodization of the material and extend between the two sides of the plate. Electrodes are also disposed on each side of the plate for generating an electrical field within the channels. Preferably, the material is alumina and the channels are activated such that the channel walls are conductive and highly secondary emissive.

  6. Performance of low resistance microchannel plate stacks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegmund, O. H. W.; Stock, J.

    1991-01-01

    Results are presented from an evaluation of three sets of low resistance microchannel plate (MCP) stacks; the tests encompassed gain, pulse-height distribution, background rate, event rate capacity as a function of illuminated area, and performance changes due to high temperature bakeout and high flux UV scrub. The MCPs are found to heat up, requiring from minutes to hours to reach stabilization. The event rate is strongly dependent on the size of the area being illuminated, with larger areas experiencing a gain drop onset at lower rates than smaller areas.

  7. Performance of low resistance microchannel plate stacks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegmund, O. H. W.; Stock, J.

    1991-01-01

    Results are presented from an evaluation of three sets of low resistance microchannel plate (MCP) stacks; the tests encompassed gain, pulse-height distribution, background rate, event rate capacity as a function of illuminated area, and performance changes due to high temperature bakeout and high flux UV scrub. The MCPs are found to heat up, requiring from minutes to hours to reach stabilization. The event rate is strongly dependent on the size of the area being illuminated, with larger areas experiencing a gain drop onset at lower rates than smaller areas.

  8. Microchannel plates phototubes in high magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnyakov, A. Yu.; Barnyakov, M. Yu.; Karpov, S. V.; Katcin, A. A.; Prisekin, V. G.

    2017-09-01

    Microchannel plate photomultiplier tubes (MCP PMT) can work in a high magnetic field and have an excellent time resolution. The influence of the magnetic fields up to 4 T on the parameters of several MCP PMTs of different designs was investigated. PMTs with two, three and four MCPs were tested in magnetic fields. The tested samples have different diameters of MCP pores: 3.5, 6, 8 and 10 microns. Dependencies of the time resolution, the gain and the photoelectron collection efficiency on the magnetic field are presented below.

  9. Making bulk-conductive glass microchannel plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Jay J. L.; Niu, Lihong

    2008-02-01

    The fabrication of microchannel plate (MCP) with bulk-conductive characteristics has been studied. Semiconducting clad glass and leachable core glass were used for drawing fibers and making MCP. Co-axial single fiber was drawn from a platinum double-crucible in an automatic fiberizing system, and the fibers were stacked and redrawn into multifiber by a special gripping mechanism. The multifibers were stacked again and the boule was made and sliced into discs. New MCPs were made after chemically leaching process without the traditional hydrogen firing. It was shown that bulk-conductive glass MCP can operate at higher voltage with lower noise.

  10. Development and characterisation of a visible light photon counting imaging detector system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnstedt, J.; Grewing, M.

    2002-01-01

    We report on the development of a visible light photon counting imaging detector system. The detector concept is based on standard 25 mm diameter microchannel plate image intensifiers made by Proxitronic in Bensheim (Germany). Modifications applied to these image intensifiers are the use of three microchannel plates instead of two and a high resistance ceramics plate used instead of the standard phosphor output screen. A wedge and strip anode mounted directly behind the high resistance ceramics plate was used as a read out device. This wedge and strip anode picks up the image charge of electron clouds emerging from the microchannel plates. The charge pulses are fed into four charge amplifiers and subsequently into a digital position decoding electronics, achieving a position resolution of up to 1024×1024 pixels. Mounting the anode outside the detector tube is a new approach and has the great advantage of avoiding electrical feedthroughs from the anode so that the standard image intensifier fabrication process can be applied to produce these photon counting detector tubes. First results of the characterization of gain, homogeneity, dark current and imaging linearity are presented.

  11. Unique microchannel plate process doubles MCPI resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, S.; Power, G.

    1994-08-22

    Applying a dielectric layer to the output of a microchannel plate (MCP) has allowed the screen voltage of a sealed microchannel-plate intensifier tube (MCPI) to be raised to over 10 kV, producing a field strength of 36 kV/mm without any detectable field emission or breakdown of the MCP/screen gap. Tube resolution exceeded 16 lp/mm at 50% modulation. Breakdown is higher in a dielectric than in a vacuum. In a concept being patented by Gary Power, a few-{mu}m-thick layer of a dielectric was sputtered onto the output surface of an 18-mm MCP, which was incorporated into a tube under a contract for four tube starts. This process is applicable to any device incorporating a proximity-focused MCP and screen, including streak tubes and gated MCP x-ray imagers. Other improvements discussed include a patented use of a collimator for eliminating the electrons that are elastically scattered from the screen. This method also provides for further improvements in screen gap limited resolution to any desired degree by eliminating electrons with high transverse energy. This occurs at the expense of output brightness, which can be recovered through an appropriate increase in screen voltage.

  12. Progress towards a 256 channel multi-anode microchannel plate photomultiplier system with picosecond timing

    PubMed Central

    Lapington, J.S.; Ashton, T.J.R.; Ross, D.; Conneely, T.

    2012-01-01

    Despite the rapid advances in solid state technologies such as the silicon photomultiplier (SiPM), microchannel plate (MCP) photomultipliers still offer a proven and practical technological solution for high channel count pixellated photon-counting systems with very high time resolution. We describe progress towards a 256 channel optical photon-counting system using CERN-developed NINO and HTDC ASICs, and designed primarily for time resolved spectroscopy in life science applications. Having previously built and demonstrated a 18 mm diameter prototype tube with an 8×8 channel readout configuration and <43 ps rms single photon timing resolution, we are currently developing a 40 mm device with a 32×32 channel readout. Initially this will be populated with a 256 channel electronics system comprising four sets of modular 64 channel preamplifier/discriminator, and time-to-digital converter units, arranged in a compact three dimensional configuration. We describe the detector and electronics design and operation, and present performance measurements from the 256 channel development system. We discuss enhancements to the system including higher channel count and the use of application specific on-board signal processing capabilities. PMID:25843997

  13. Progress towards a 256 channel multi-anode microchannel plate photomultiplier system with picosecond timing.

    PubMed

    Lapington, J S; Ashton, T J R; Ross, D; Conneely, T

    2012-12-11

    Despite the rapid advances in solid state technologies such as the silicon photomultiplier (SiPM), microchannel plate (MCP) photomultipliers still offer a proven and practical technological solution for high channel count pixellated photon-counting systems with very high time resolution. We describe progress towards a 256 channel optical photon-counting system using CERN-developed NINO and HTDC ASICs, and designed primarily for time resolved spectroscopy in life science applications. Having previously built and demonstrated a 18 mm diameter prototype tube with an 8×8 channel readout configuration and <43 ps rms single photon timing resolution, we are currently developing a 40 mm device with a 32×32 channel readout. Initially this will be populated with a 256 channel electronics system comprising four sets of modular 64 channel preamplifier/discriminator, and time-to-digital converter units, arranged in a compact three dimensional configuration. We describe the detector and electronics design and operation, and present performance measurements from the 256 channel development system. We discuss enhancements to the system including higher channel count and the use of application specific on-board signal processing capabilities.

  14. Photon-counting image sensors for the ultraviolet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, E. B.

    1985-01-01

    An investigation on specific performance details of photon counting, ultraviolet image sensors having 2-dimensional formats is reviewed. In one study, controlled experiments were performed which compare the quantum efficiencies, in pulse counting mode, of CsI photocathodes deposited on: (1) the front surface of a microchannel plate (MCP), (2) a solid surface in front of an MCP, and (3) an intensified CCD image sensor (ICCD) where a CCD is directly bombarded by accelerated photoelectrons. Tests indicated that the detection efficiency of the CsI-coated MCP at 1026 A is lower by a factor of 2.5 than that of the MCP with a separate, opaque CsI photocathode, and the detection efficiency ratio increases substantially at longer wavelengths (ratio is 5 at 1216 A and 20 at 1608 A).

  15. One hundred anode microchannel plate ion detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yi; Poehlman, John F.; Alexander, Andrew W.; Boraas, Kirk; Reilly, James P.

    2011-08-01

    A one-hundred-anode microchannel plate detector is constructed on a 10 cm × 15 cm printed circuit board and attached to a homebuilt matrix assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Ringing and cross talk between anodes have been successfully eliminated and preliminary mass spectra of peptide ions recorded. With one hundred anodes on the printed circuit board, spatial information about the ion beam can also be readily determined with this detector. During operation, the detector anode assembly loses sensitivity after ions strike it for a considerable period of time due to charging of the non-conductive regions between anodes. However, this effect can be minimized by deflecting matrix ions away from the detector.

  16. One hundred anode microchannel plate ion detector.

    PubMed

    He, Yi; Poehlman, John F; Alexander, Andrew W; Boraas, Kirk; Reilly, James P

    2011-08-01

    A one-hundred-anode microchannel plate detector is constructed on a 10 cm × 15 cm printed circuit board and attached to a homebuilt matrix assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Ringing and cross talk between anodes have been successfully eliminated and preliminary mass spectra of peptide ions recorded. With one hundred anodes on the printed circuit board, spatial information about the ion beam can also be readily determined with this detector. During operation, the detector anode assembly loses sensitivity after ions strike it for a considerable period of time due to charging of the non-conductive regions between anodes. However, this effect can be minimized by deflecting matrix ions away from the detector.

  17. Microchannel plate modal gain variations with temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, David C.; Timothy, J. G.

    1993-01-01

    Measurements of the modal gain of two high-gain curved-channel microchannel plates (MCPs) at various operating temperatures are presented. Both MCPs were fabricated from the Long Life glass with 12-micron diam channels on 15-micron centers. The modal gain was found to decrease with increasing temperature at a rate of -0.1 percent C. This reduction of gain with temperature is attributed primarily to an axial temperature gradient along each MCP channel creating a nonuniform electric field within the channel that lowers the effective output gain. A lowering of the secondary electron yield resulting from increased phonon scattering of secondary electrons released within the walls of the MCP channels was assessed, but was found to have a negligible contribution to the drop in gain with temperature.

  18. One hundred anode microchannel plate ion detector

    SciTech Connect

    He Yi; Poehlman, John F.; Alexander, Andrew W.; Boraas, Kirk; Reilly, James P.

    2011-08-15

    A one-hundred-anode microchannel plate detector is constructed on a 10 cm x 15 cm printed circuit board and attached to a homebuilt matrix assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Ringing and cross talk between anodes have been successfully eliminated and preliminary mass spectra of peptide ions recorded. With one hundred anodes on the printed circuit board, spatial information about the ion beam can also be readily determined with this detector. During operation, the detector anode assembly loses sensitivity after ions strike it for a considerable period of time due to charging of the non-conductive regions between anodes. However, this effect can be minimized by deflecting matrix ions away from the detector.

  19. Low noise and conductively cooled microchannel plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feller, W. B.

    1990-01-01

    Microchannel plate (MCP) dynamic range has recently been enhanced for both very low and very high input flux conditions. Improvements in MCP manufacturing technology reported earlier have led to MCPs with substantially reduced radioisotope levels, giving dramatically lower internal background-counting rates. An update is given on the Galileo low noise MCP. Also, new results in increasing the MCP linear counting range for high input flux densities are presented. By bonding the active face of a very low resistance MCP (less than 1 megaohm) to a substrate providing a conductive path for heat transport, the bias current limit (hence, MCP output count rate limit) can be increased up to two orders of magnitude. Normal pulse-counting MCP operation was observed at bias currents of several mA when a curved-channel MCP (80:1) was bonded to a ceramic multianode substrate; the MCP temperature rise above ambient was less than 40 C.

  20. X-ray focusing using microchannel plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaaret, P.; Geissbuehler, P.; Chen, A.; Glavinas, E.

    1992-01-01

    We present measurements of the X-ray focusing properties of square-pore microchannel plates (MCP's). Square-pore MCP's contain large numbers of closely packed optical surfaces, as required for grazing incidence X-ray optics. The surface of individual MCP channels has been measured and found to have high microroughness transverse to the channel axis and low microroughness parallel to the axis. The high frequency transverse roughness, on length scales greater than 400 nm, has a rms value of 5.9 nm and a Gaussian autocorrelation function with correlation length of 1.41 micron. We find that the geometric misalignments of the surfaces of different channels limit the angular resolution obtainable with current samples of MCP's to 7.1 arcmin.

  1. Low noise and conductively cooled microchannel plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feller, W. B.

    1990-01-01

    Microchannel plate (MCP) dynamic range has recently been enhanced for both very low and very high input flux conditions. Improvements in MCP manufacturing technology reported earlier have led to MCPs with substantially reduced radioisotope levels, giving dramatically lower internal background-counting rates. An update is given on the Galileo low noise MCP. Also, new results in increasing the MCP linear counting range for high input flux densities are presented. By bonding the active face of a very low resistance MCP (less than 1 megaohm) to a substrate providing a conductive path for heat transport, the bias current limit (hence, MCP output count rate limit) can be increased up to two orders of magnitude. Normal pulse-counting MCP operation was observed at bias currents of several mA when a curved-channel MCP (80:1) was bonded to a ceramic multianode substrate; the MCP temperature rise above ambient was less than 40 C.

  2. Low noise and conductively cooled microchannel plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feller, W. B.

    1990-07-01

    Microchannel plate (MCP) dynamic range has recently been enhanced for both very low and very high input flux conditions. Improvements in MCP manufacturing technology reported earlier have led to MCPs with substantially reduced radioisotope levels, giving dramatically lower internal background-counting rates. An update is given on the Galileo low noise MCP. Also, new results in increasing the MCP linear counting range for high input flux densities are presented. By bonding the active face of a very low resistance MCP (less than 1 megaohm) to a substrate providing a conductive path for heat transport, the bias current limit (hence, MCP output count rate limit) can be increased up to two orders of magnitude. Normal pulse-counting MCP operation was observed at bias currents of several mA when a curved-channel MCP (80:1) was bonded to a ceramic multianode substrate; the MCP temperature rise above ambient was less than 40 C.

  3. Amorphous silicon-based microchannel plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franco, Andrea; Riesen, Yannick; Wyrsch, Nicolas; Dunand, Sylvain; Powolny, François; Jarron, Pierre; Ballif, Christophe

    2012-12-01

    Microchannel plates (MCP) based on hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) were recently introduced to overcome some of the limitations of crystalline silicon and glass MCP. The typical thickness of a-Si:H based MCPs (AMCP) ranges between 80 and 100 μm and the micromachining of the channels is realized by deep reactive ion etching (DRIE). Advantages and issues regarding the fabrication process are presented and discussed. Electron amplification is demonstrated and analyzed using Electron Beam Induced Current (EBIC) technique. The gain increases as a function of the bias voltage, limited to -340 V on account of high leakage currents across the structure. EBIC maps on 10° tilted samples confirm that the device active area extend to the entire channel opening. AMCP characterization with the electron beam shows gain saturation and signal quenching which depends on the effectiveness of the charge replenishment in the channel walls.

  4. Si microchannel plates for image intensification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Arlynn W.; Beetz, Charles P., Jr.; Boerstler, Robert W.; Winn, D. R.; Steinbeck, John W.

    2000-11-01

    Glass microchannel plates (MCPs) have been in use by numerous manufactuers in a variety of electron multiplication applications. Conventional fabrication of MCPs follow the lines of glass drawing and etching technology. Core and clad glass are drawn together, stacked, drawn again, and finally stacked in the desired pattern. The soluble core is removed with wet chemical processing. These techniques are beginning to run into their feasible limits in terms of channel size, open area ratio, uniformity, and material issues. A strong desire exists to fabricate MCPs with accepted lithographic techniques using Si as the base material to improve uniformity and throughput. Open area ratios of as high as 95% have been achieved using lithography. However, attempts to meet other channel plate characteristics met with little success due to thermal runaway or arcing during operation, high voltage is required for electron gain. Processing improvements have lead to the complete oxidation of the Si matrix eliminating the conducting Si in the channel walls of the Si MCPs allowing high voltages to be supported. Complete oxidation of the Si to silica allows processing temperatures high than conventional glass matrices can withstand. This fact allows for high temperature growth of conductive and secondary emissive materials on the channel walls of the structure. Si MCPs with gain have now been fabricated and tested with voltages comparable to conventional glass MCPs. Channel plate characteristics such as operating voltage, strip current, and gain for Si MCPs will be presented and compared to glass MCPs.

  5. Hybrid analog/digital, large format, photon counting detectors for astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crocker, J.; Rafal, M.; Denman, B.; Paresce, F.; Hiltner, A.

    1986-01-01

    The development of a new microchannel plate photon-counting detector with an analog readout method based on a resistive anode is reported. This detector exhibits extremely high, stable electron gains of 10 to the 8th. At this gain, the spatial resolution is no longer primarily limited by the noise of the resistive anode, so that digital methods of readout, such as discrete conductors, lose their advantage. These detectors can be readily scaled to 40 mm and 70 mm formats to match plate scales of 2-m (and larger) telescopes. New, high speed digital electronics fully exploit the high spatial and time resolution made possible by gains of this level. Analysis of the theoretical performance of this detector shows that the major limitation to the spatial resolution is the proximity focus of the photocathode and the first microchannel plate. The detector has been mated to an echelle spectrograph developed.

  6. Study of the electric field inside microchannel plate multipliers

    SciTech Connect

    Gatti, E.; Oba, K.; Rehak, P.

    1982-01-01

    Electric field inside high gain microchannel plate multipliers was studied. The calculations were based directly on the solution of the Maxwell equations applied to the microchannel plate (MCP) rather than on the conventional lumped RC model. The results are important to explain the performance of MCP's, (1) under a pulsed bias tension and, (2) at high rate conditions. The results were tested experimentally and a new method of MCP operation free from the positive ion feedback was demonstrated.

  7. Characteristics and applications of advanced technology microchannel plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horton, J. R.; Tasker, G. W.; Fijol, J. J.

    1990-09-01

    A method for fabrication of novel thin-film continuous dynode electron multipliers is described. The feasibility of crucial manufacturing steps, including anisotropic dry etching of substrates into photolithographically-defined arrays of high-aspect-ratio channels, and the formation of thin-film continuous dynodes by CVD is shown. Potential performance and design advantages of this advanced technology-microchannel plate over the conventional reduced lead silicate glass microchannel plate and implications for new applications are discussed.

  8. Wedge and strip image readout systems for photon-counting detectors in space astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegmund, O. H. W.; Lampton, M.; Bixler, J.; Chakrabarti, S.; Vallerga, J.

    1986-01-01

    EUV and far UV applications of wedge and strip anodes in photon-counting microchannel plate detector systems are discussed in light of performance data obtained as a result of EUV Explorer spacecraft open face detector and FAUST-Spacelab far UV sealed tube sensor calibrations. CsI quantum detection efficiencies of about 80 percent at 114 A and about 40 percent at 600 and 1300 A have been achieved; a position sensitivity of less than 10 microns is demonstrated, and the position resolution, image linearity, background rate, and flat-field characteristics are discussed.

  9. A Simple Model for Microchannel Plate Output

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harding, E. C.; Weaver, J. L.

    2005-10-01

    Microchannel plates (MCPs) are an essential component in an imaging diagnostic known as an x-ray framing camera, which is currently used by NIF, Omega, Nike, and Z to image radiation imploded targets. An MCP is used to convert incident x-ray photons into electrons with gains of 10^2 to 10^4. These electrons are accelerated into a phosphor and the subsequent visible light is captured with a CCD. A variety of parameters, such as photocathode material type (Au, Ni, CsI), photocathode coating depth, and MCP bias angle, affect the gain and gain variations in the MCP electron output. This poster presents initial results of a simple 3D MCP computer model along with an experimental comparison. Several ideas for increasing MCP imaging performance by reducing gain variations and increasing MCP quantum efficiency are presented. Work supported by the Naval Research Laboratory, National Nuclear Security Administration under the Stewardship Science Academic Alliances program through DOE Research Grant DE-FG52-03NA00064, and through DE FG53 2005 NA26014, and Livermore National Laboratory.

  10. Performance of Small Pore Microchannel Plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegmund, O. H. W.; Gummin, M. A.; Ravinett, T.; Jelinsky, S. R.; Edgar, M.

    1995-01-01

    Small pore size microchannel plates (MCP's) are needed to satisfy the requirements for future high resolution small and large format detectors for astronomy. MCP's with pore sizes in the range 5 micron to 8 micron are now being manufactured, but they are of limited availability and are of small size. We have obtained sets of Galileo 8 micron and 6.5 micron MCP's, and Philips 6 micron and 7 micron pore MCP's, and compared them to our larger pore MCP Z stacks. We have tested back to back MCP stacks of four of these MCP's and achieved gains greater than 2 x 1O(exp 7) with pulse height distributions of less than 40% FWHM, and background rates of less than 0.3 events sec(exp -1) cm(exp -2). Local counting rates up to approx. 100 events/pore/sec have been attained with little drop of the MCP gain. The bare MCP quantum efficiencies are somewhat lower than those expected, however. Flat field images are characterized by an absence of MCP fixed pattern noise.

  11. Peltier effect in doped silicon microchannel plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pengliang, Ci; Jing, Shi; Fei, Wang; Shaohui, Xu; Zhenya, Yang; Pingxiong, Yang; Lianwei, Wang; Chen, Gao; Chu, Paul K.

    2011-12-01

    The Seebeck coefficient is determined from silicon microchannel plates (Si MCPs) prepared by photo-assisted electrochemical etching at room temperature (25 °C). The coefficient of the sample with a pore size of 5 × 5 μm2, spacing of 1 μm and thickness of about 150 μm is -852 μV/K along the edge of the square pore. After doping with boron and phosphorus, the Seebeck coefficient diminishes to 256 μV/K and -117 μV/K along the edge of the square pore, whereas the electrical resistivity values are 7.5 × 10-3 Ω·cm and 1.9 × 10-3 Ω·cm, respectively. Our data imply that the Seebeck coefficient of the Si MCPs is related to the electrical resistivity and is consistent with that of bulk silicon. Based on the boron and phosphorus doped samples, a simple device is fabricated to connect the two type Si MCPs to evaluate the Peltier effect. When a proper current passes through the device, the Peltier effect is evidently observed. Based on the experimental data and the theoretical calculation, the estimated intrinsic figure of merit ZT of the unicouple device and thermal conductivity of the Si MCPs are 0.007 and 50 W/(m·K), respectively.

  12. Spatial charge cloud size of microchannel plates.

    PubMed

    Saito, M; Saito, Y; Asamura, K; Mukai, T

    2007-02-01

    We examine the spatial evolution of charge clouds emitted by microchannel plates (MCPs). A model of this evolution is presented, along with a comparison to experimental results. We also present an experimental method to measure the charge cloud radius in which the radial charge cloud distribution is assumed to be Gaussian. When a charge cloud is released from the MCP, its initial size is determined by the number and distribution of excited channels. The size of the charge cloud is examined as a function acceleration voltage, distance between MCP and anode, and MCP bias voltage. Since electrons released from the MCP have various initial energies and angular divergence, the charge cloud size increases as it travels away from the MCP. Space charge effects also contribute to the growth of the charge cloud. The experimental results are in close agreement with our model, which includes these effects. From experiment, we also derive an approximate expression for charge cloud radius as a function of acceleration voltage and distance between MCP and anode. This expression can be used for the practical design and optimization of a position sensing system comprised of multiple anodes.

  13. Electronic measurement of microchannel plate pulse height distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Gamboa, E. J.; Huntington, C. M.; Harding, E. C.; Drake, R. P.

    2010-10-15

    Microchannel plates are a central component of the x-ray framing cameras used as analog imagers in many plasma experiment diagnostic systems. The microchannel plate serves as an amplifying element, increasing the electronic signal from incident radiation by factors of 10{sup 3}-10{sup 5}, with a broad pulse-height distribution. Seeking to optimize the photon-to-electron conversion efficiency and noise distribution of x-ray cameras, we will characterize the pulse-height distribution of the electron output from a single microchannel plate. Replacing the framing camera's phosphor-coated fiber optic screen with a charge-collection plate and coupling to a low-noise multichannel analyzer, we quantified the distribution in the total charge generated per photon event. The electronically measured pulse height distribution is used to estimate the signal-to-noise ratio of radiographic images from framing cameras.

  14. Performance comparison of high speed microchannel plate photomultiplier tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varghese, Thomas; Selden, Michael; Oldham, Thomas

    1993-01-01

    The transit time spread characteristics of high speed microchannel photomultipliers has improved since the upgrade of the NASA CDSLR network to MCP-PMT's in the mid-1980's. The improvement comes from the incorporation of 6 micron (pore size) microchannels and offers significant improvement to the satellite ranging precision. To examine the impact on ranging precision, two microchannel plate photomultiplier tubes (MCP-PMT) were evaluated for output pulse characteristics and temporal jitter. These were a Hamamatsu R 2566 U-7 MCP-PMT (6 micron) and an ITT 4129f MCP-PMT (12 micron).

  15. Development efforts to improve curved-channel microchannel plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corbett, M. B.; Feller, W. B.; Laprade, B. N.; Cochran, R.; Bybee, R.; Danks, A.; Joseph, C.

    1993-01-01

    Curved-channel microchannel plate (C-plate) improvements resulting from an ongoing NASA STIS microchannel plate (MCP) development program are described. Performance limitations of previous C-plates led to a development program in support of the STIS MAMA UV photon counter, a second generation instrument on the Hubble Space Telescope. C-plate gain, quantum detection efficiency, dark noise, and imaging distortion, which are influenced by channel curvature non-uniformities, have all been improved through use of a new centrifuge fabrication technique. This technique will be described, along with efforts to improve older, more conventional shearing methods. Process optimization methods used to attain targeted C-plate performance goals will be briefly characterized. Newly developed diagnostic measurement techniques to study image distortion, gain uniformity, input bias angle, channel curvature, and ion feedback, will be described. Performance characteristics and initial test results of the improved C-plates will be reported. Future work and applications will also be discussed.

  16. Development efforts to improve curved-channel microchannel plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corbett, M. B.; Feller, W. B.; Laprade, B. N.; Cochran, R.; Bybee, R.; Danks, A.; Joseph, C.

    1993-01-01

    Curved-channel microchannel plate (C-plate) improvements resulting from an ongoing NASA STIS microchannel plate (MCP) development program are described. Performance limitations of previous C-plates led to a development program in support of the STIS MAMA UV photon counter, a second generation instrument on the Hubble Space Telescope. C-plate gain, quantum detection efficiency, dark noise, and imaging distortion, which are influenced by channel curvature non-uniformities, have all been improved through use of a new centrifuge fabrication technique. This technique will be described, along with efforts to improve older, more conventional shearing methods. Process optimization methods used to attain targeted C-plate performance goals will be briefly characterized. Newly developed diagnostic measurement techniques to study image distortion, gain uniformity, input bias angle, channel curvature, and ion feedback, will be described. Performance characteristics and initial test results of the improved C-plates will be reported. Future work and applications will also be discussed.

  17. Photon counting micrometer and video CCD.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tie, Qiongxian; Li, Chennfei

    The structure and observational method of the photon counting slotted micrometer are proposed. The micrometer is made up of a piece of slotted plate and a photomultiplier. The photon counting micrometer is replaced by a video CCD for regular trial observation and as a test for the equipment of one scientific CCD, because the micrometer transmission in the instrumental vertical angle transmission mechanism is dull, and the telescope is not able to observe regularly since the optical axis changes greatly as the telescope points to different vertical distance. The video CCD is fixed in the course of observation, recording a picture every forty milliseconds, or one hundred pictures within four seconds, resulting in simultaneously after smoothing treatment the moment and stellar zenith distance when a star passes through the meridian or prime vertical.

  18. Gain saturation model of microchannel plate devices: recent advances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giudicotti, Leonardo; Bassan, Michele; Pasqualotto, Roberto; Sardella, Andrea

    1997-12-01

    A previous model of microchannel plate (MCP) devices operating in conditions of gain saturation has been extended to include charge diffusion along the microchannel during the gain recovery process. To this purpose the set of independent recharging circuits previously associated to each MCP dynode has been replaced by a distributed parameter electrical network that represents the entire microchannel consistently with the structure of the microchannel wall as described in the literature. The model obtained in this way, unlike the previous one, takes into account the interaction between dynodes during the gain recovery and is also consistent with the operation of MCP devices in conditions of very fast gating. As for the previous model the gain and voltage along the channel are described by a pair of coupled, nonlinear differential equations whose numerical solutions are computed in conditions of a steady-state input current. Simplified analytical solutions for short pulse operations are also derived and discussed.

  19. Microfabrication of Microchannels for Fuel Cell Plates

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Ho Su; Park, Dong Sam

    2010-01-01

    Portable electronic devices such as notebook computers, PDAs, cellular phones, etc., are being widely used, and they increasingly need cheap, efficient, and lightweight power sources. Fuel cells have been proposed as possible power sources to address issues that involve energy production and the environment. In particular, a small type of fuel-cell system is known to be suitable for portable electronic devices. The development of micro fuel cell systems can be achieved by the application of microchannel technology. In this study, the conventional method of chemical etching and the mechanical machining method of micro end milling were used for the microfabrication of microchannel for fuel cell separators. The two methods were compared in terms of their performance in the fabrication with regards to dimensional errors, flatness, straightness, and surface roughness. Following microchannel fabrication, the powder blasting technique is introduced to improve the coating performance of the catalyst on the surface of the microchannel. Experimental results show that end milling can remarkably increase the fabrication performance and that surface treatment by powder blasting can improve the performance of catalyst coating. PMID:22315533

  20. Microfabrication of microchannels for fuel cell plates.

    PubMed

    Jang, Ho Su; Park, Dong Sam

    2010-01-01

    Portable electronic devices such as notebook computers, PDAs, cellular phones, etc., are being widely used, and they increasingly need cheap, efficient, and lightweight power sources. Fuel cells have been proposed as possible power sources to address issues that involve energy production and the environment. In particular, a small type of fuel-cell system is known to be suitable for portable electronic devices. The development of micro fuel cell systems can be achieved by the application of microchannel technology. In this study, the conventional method of chemical etching and the mechanical machining method of micro end milling were used for the microfabrication of microchannel for fuel cell separators. The two methods were compared in terms of their performance in the fabrication with regards to dimensional errors, flatness, straightness, and surface roughness. Following microchannel fabrication, the powder blasting technique is introduced to improve the coating performance of the catalyst on the surface of the microchannel. Experimental results show that end milling can remarkably increase the fabrication performance and that surface treatment by powder blasting can improve the performance of catalyst coating.

  1. Imaging by photon counting with 256x256 pixel matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tlustos, Lukas; Campbell, Michael; Heijne, Erik H. M.; Llopart, Xavier

    2004-09-01

    Using 0.25µm standard CMOS we have developed 2-D semiconductor matrix detectors with sophisticated functionality integrated inside each pixel of a hybrid sensor module. One of these sensor modules is a matrix of 256x256 square 55µm pixels intended for X-ray imaging. This device is called 'Medipix2' and features a fast amplifier and two-level discrimination for signals between 1000 and 100000 equivalent electrons, with overall signal noise ~150 e- rms. Signal polarity and comparator thresholds are programmable. A maximum count rate of nearly 1 MHz per pixel can be achieved, which corresponds to an average flux of 3x10exp10 photons per cm2. The selected signals can be accumulated in each pixel in a 13-bit register. The serial readout takes 5-10 ms. A parallel readout of ~300 µs could also be used. Housekeeping functions such as local dark current compensation, test pulse generation, silencing of noisy pixels and threshold tuning in each pixel contribute to the homogeneous response over a large sensor area. The sensor material can be adapted to the energy of the X-rays. Best results have been obtained with high-resistivity silicon detectors, but also CdTe and GaAs detectors have been used. The lowest detectable X-ray energy was about 4 keV. Background measurements have been made, as well as measurements of the uniformity of imaging by photon counting. Very low photon count rates are feasible and noise-free at room temperature. The readout matrix can be used also with visible photons if an energy or charge intensifier structure is interposed such as a gaseous amplification layer or a microchannel plate or acceleration field in vacuum.

  2. High Spatial Resolution Investigations of Microchannel Plate Imaging Properties for UV Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegmund, Oswald

    1996-01-01

    Microchannel plate (MCP) photon counting detectors are currently being used with great success on many of the recent NASA/ESA ultraviolet (UV) astrophysics missions that make observations in the 1OO A - 1600 A range. These include HUT, the Wide Field Camera on ROSAT, EUVE, ALEXIS, ORFEUS, and SOHO. These devices have also been chosen to fly on future UV astrophysics missions such as FUSE, FUVITA, IMAGE, and both the HST STIS and Advanced Camera instruments. During the period of this award we have fabricated a dual-chamber vacuum test facility to carry out laboratory testing of detector resolution, image stability and linearity, and flat field performance to enable us to characterize the performance of MCPs and their associated read-out architectures. We have also fabricated and tested a laboratory 'test-bed' delay line detector, which can accommodate MCP's with a wide range of formats and run at high data rates, to continue our studies of MCP image fixed pattern noise, and particularly for new small pore MCP's which have recently come onto the market. These tests were mainly focussed on the assessment of cross delay-line (XDL) and double delay line (DDL) anode read-out schemes, with particular attention being focussed on flat-field and spatial resolution performance.

  3. Improved lifetime of microchannel-plate PMTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmann, A.; Britting, A.; Eyrich, W.; Uhlig, F.; Dzhygadlo, R.; Gerhardt, A.; Götzen, K.; Höhler, R.; Kalicy, G.; Kumawat, H.; Lehmann, D.; Lewandowski, B.; Patsyuk, M.; Peters, K.; Schepers, G.; Schmitt, L.; Schwarz, C.; Schwiening, J.; Traxler, M.; Zühlsdorf, M.; Dodokhov, V. Kh.; Düren, M.; Föhl, K.; Hayrapetyan, A.; Kröck, B.; Merle, O.; Rieke, J.; Cowie, E.; Keri, T.; Montgomery, R.; Rosner, G.; Achenbach, P.; Cardinali, M.; Hoek, M.; Lauth, W.; Sfienti, C.; Thiel, M.; Bühler, P.; Gruber, L.; Marton, J.; Suzuki, K.

    2014-12-01

    The charged particle identification at the PANDA experiment will be mainly performed with DIRC detectors. Because of their advantageous properties the preferred photon sensors are MCP-PMTs. However, until recently these devices showed serious aging problems which resulted in a diminishing quantum efficiency (QE) of the photo cathode. By applying innovative countermeasures against the aging causes, the manufacturers recently succeeded in drastically improving the lifetime of MCP-PMTs. Especially the application of an ALD coating technique to seal the material of the micro-channels proves very powerful and results in a lifetime of ≈ 6 C /cm2 integrated anode charge without a substantial QE degradation for the latest PHOTONIS XP85112. This paper will present a comparative measurement of the lifetime of several older and recent MCP-PMTs demonstrating this progress.

  4. Laser ranging and mapping with a photon-counting detector.

    PubMed

    Priedhorsky, W C; Smith, R C; Ho, C

    1996-01-20

    We propose a new technique for remote sensing: photon-counting laser mapping. MicroChannel plate detectors with a crossed delay-line (MCP/CDL) readout combine high position accuracy and subnanosecond photon timing, at event rates of 10(6) detected photons per second and more. A mapping system would combine an MCP/CDL detector with a fast-pulse, high-repetition-rate laser illuminator. The system would map solid targets with exceptional in-range and cross-range resolution. The resulting images would be intrinsically three dimensional, without resorting to multiple viewing angles, so that objects of identical albedo could be discriminated. For a detector time resolution and pulse width of the order of 10(-10) s, the in-range resolution would be a few centimeters, permitting the discrimination of surfaces by their textures. Images could be taken at night, at illumination levels up to full moonlight, from ground, airborne, or space platforms. We discuss signal to noise as a function of laser flux and background level and present simulated images.

  5. Characterization of an ultrasmall-pore microchannel plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laprade, Bruce N.; Cochran, Raymond C.; Langevin, Francis; Dykstra, Mark W.

    1997-12-01

    Microchannel plates (MCPs) are solid state electron multipliers consisting of millions (10E5 - 10E7 channels/cm2) of microscopic (typically 10 - 25 microns) continuous dynode electron multipliers all fused together in a solid array. Fabricated from an alkali doped, reduced lead silicate glass, microchannel plates are known as excellent high gain, low noise, two dimensional detectors of charged particles and electromagnetic radiation. The microchannel plate manufacturing process begins with a series of glass fiber draws in which an acid soluble core glass is combined with an alkali soluble clad tube and drawn to form a mono fiber. Mono fibers (typically 2,000 - 4,000) are then assembled into a hexagonal preform called a multi wrap. The preform is again drawn to form a multifiber producing an overall feature size reduction of typically 2000:1. The multi fibers then become the basic building blocks. Hundreds of multi fibers are next arranged to form the active area of the MCP. High temperature vacuum fusion is then used to fuse the multi fibers together with the solid glass border (if used) to form a billet or boule. Standard semiconductor slicing, lapping and polishing techniques are used to prepare the wafers for chemical processing. Chemical processing consists of etching open the microchannels, adjusting the open area ratio (OAR) and preparing the silica rich emissive layer. A hydrogen firing produced is used to reduce the lead glass making it electrically conductive. Finally a thin (typically 2,000 to 3,000 angstroms) film of metallization is vacuum deposited on both sides of the microchannel plate to electrically connect each of the channels in parallel, therefore ensuring the same potential is applied to each channel. Microchannel plates operate on the principle of secondary electron emission. In operation, primary events enter the input side of the MCP and collide with the channel wall. If the primary event has sufficient energy, secondary electrons will

  6. Tracking rare-isotope beams with microchannel plates

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, A. M.; Sanetullaev, A.; Lynch, W. G.; Tsang, M. B.; Lee, J.; Bazin, D.; Coupland, D.; Henzl, V.; Henzlova, D.; Kilburn, M.; Wallace, M. S.; Youngs, M.; Delaunay, F.; Shapira, Dan; Jones, K. L.; Schmitt, K. T.; Sun, Z. Y.

    2015-06-06

    A system of two microchannel-plate detectors has been successfully implemented for tracking projectile-fragmentation beams. The detectors provide interaction positions, angles, and arrival Limes of ions at the reaction target. Furthermore, the current design is an adaptation of an assembly used for low-energy beams (~1.4 MeV/nucleon). In order to improve resolution in tracking high-energy heavy-ion beams, the magnetic field strength between the secondary-electron accelerating foil and the microchannel plate had to be increased substantially. Results from an experiment using a 37-MeV/nucleon 56Ni beam show that the tracking system can achieve sub-nanosecond timing resolution and a position resolution of ~1 mm for beam intensities up to 5 x 105 pps.

  7. Tracking rare-isotope beams with microchannel plates

    DOE PAGES

    Rogers, A. M.; Sanetullaev, A.; Lynch, W. G.; ...

    2015-06-06

    A system of two microchannel-plate detectors has been successfully implemented for tracking projectile-fragmentation beams. The detectors provide interaction positions, angles, and arrival Limes of ions at the reaction target. Furthermore, the current design is an adaptation of an assembly used for low-energy beams (~1.4 MeV/nucleon). In order to improve resolution in tracking high-energy heavy-ion beams, the magnetic field strength between the secondary-electron accelerating foil and the microchannel plate had to be increased substantially. Results from an experiment using a 37-MeV/nucleon 56Ni beam show that the tracking system can achieve sub-nanosecond timing resolution and a position resolution of ~1 mm formore » beam intensities up to 5 x 105 pps.« less

  8. Photon Counting - One More Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanton, Richard H.

    2012-05-01

    Photon counting has been around for more than 60 years, and has been available to amateurs for most of that time. In most cases single photons are detected using photomultiplier tubes, "old technology" that became available after the Second World War. But over the last couple of decades the perfection of CCD devices has given amateurs the ability to perform accurate photometry with modest telescopes. Is there any reason to still count photons? This paper discusses some of the strengths of current photon counting technology, particularly relating to the search for fast optical transients. Technology advances in counters and photomultiplier modules are briefly mentioned. Illustrative data are presented including FFT analysis of bright star photometry and a technique for finding optical pulses in a large file of noisy data. This latter technique is shown to enable the discovery of a possible optical flare on the polar variable AM Her.

  9. A new approach to large area microchannel plate manufacture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Methods of manufacture of twisted single elements as the base for producing microchannel plates (MCP) are discussed. Initial evaluations validated the off-axis channel concept and no technological roadblocks were identified which would prevent fabrication of high gain, high spatial resolution, large format MCP's using this technique. The first MP's have operated at stable gains of 3 million with pulse height resolution superior to results obtained by standard chevron MCP's.

  10. The operation of microchannel plates at high count rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraser, G. W.; Pain, M. T.; Lees, J. E.; Pearson, J. F.

    1991-08-01

    The measured count rate characteristics of a large number of microchannel plate electron multipliers are compared with the predictions of a universal, paralysable-counter model. Individual plate resistances for the experimental study lie in the range 27-2450 MΩ. The gain behaviour of single channel plates is shown to differ from that of multi-stage MCP detectors. The measured dependence of multi-stage multiplier recovery time on illuminated area is interpreted in terms of inter-channel coupling and of changes in conduction current during plate operation. Our findings have significance for the calibration of particle and photon spectrometers and for the development of future channel plate detectors with extended dynamic range.

  11. Characteristics and applications of advanced technology microchannel plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horton, Jerry R.; Tasker, G. William; Fijol, John J.

    1990-10-01

    A method for fabrication of novel thin-filrn continuous dynode electron multipliers is described. We have shown the feasibility of crucial manufacturing steps, including anisotropic dry etching of substrates into photolithographically-defined arrays of high-aspect-ratio channels, and the formation of thin-film continuous dynodes by chemical vapor deposition. We discuss potential performance and design advantages of this advanced technology microchannel plate (AT-MCP) over the conven tional reduced lead silicate glass inicrochannel plate (RLSG-'MCP) and implications for new applications.

  12. Microchannel plate EUV detectors for the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegmund, O. H. W.; Malina, R. F.; Coburn, K.; Werthimer, D.

    1984-01-01

    The design and operating characteristics of the prototype imaging microchannel plate (MCP) detector for the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer (EUVE) Satellite are discussed. It is shown that this detector has achieved high position resolution performance (greater than 512 x 512 pixels) and has low (less than one percent) image distortion. In addition, the channel plate scheme used has tight pulse height distributions (less than 40 percent FWHM) for UV radiation and displays low (less than 0.2 cnt/sq cm-s) dark background counting rates. Work that has been done on EUV filters in relation to the envisaged filter and photocathode complement is also described.

  13. High gain micro-channel plate multipliers for particle tracking or single photo-electron counting

    SciTech Connect

    Oba, K.; Rehak, P.; Smith, S.D.

    1980-01-01

    Micro-channel plate multipliers have been used to detect the passage of relativistic charged particles. Measurements of the detection efficiency and pulse height response versus micro-channel plate gain are presented for one, two and three micro-channel plate arrays. Values describing temporal response and transit time jitter are also given. In a separate measurement, the response of a single micro-channel plate to individual slow electrons (less than or equal to 1 keV) was studied. By using a special technique output bunches as small as three electrons may be seen for low average micro-channel plate gain. The results of attempts to improve the micro-channel plate response are also presented.

  14. Modeling of a microchannel plate working in pulsed mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Secroun, Aurelia; Mens, Alain; Segre, Jacques; Assous, Franck; Piault, Emmanuel; Rebuffie, Jean-Claude

    1997-05-01

    MicroChannel Plates (MCPs) are used in high speed cinematography systems such as MCP framing cameras and streak camera readouts. In order to know the dynamic range or the signal to noise ratio that are available in these devices, a good knowledge of the performances of the MCP is essential. The point of interest of our simulation is the working mode of the microchannel plate--that is light pulsed mode--, in which the signal level is relatively high and its duration can be shorter than the time needed to replenish the wall of the channel, when other papers mainly studied night vision applications with weak continuous and nearly single electron input signal. Also our method allows the simulation of saturation phenomena due to the large number of electrons involved, whereas the discrete models previously used for simulating pulsed mode might not be properly adapted. Here are presented the choices made in modeling the microchannel, more specifically as for the physics laws, the secondary emission parameters and the 3D- geometry. In a last part first results are shown.

  15. Hex-square moire patterns in imagers using microchannel plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawrence, George M.

    1989-01-01

    In electronic imaging detectors using microchannel plates, the mismatch between the pixels on a square mesh and the microchannels on a hexagonal mesh produces moire image defects. Theoretical statistical estimates of the sizes of the microposition offsets and the flat field intensity errors are calculated, showing the trade-off between resolution and position accuracy. A distinction is made between moments of spot images and moments of the single-pixel-response functions. As the resolution between the hex and square meshes is improved, the detector resolution is improved, but at the expense of an about 10 percent moire pattern. These moire patterns will not be properly corrected by dividing by the flat field image.

  16. Low-Noise, Long-Life, High-Gain Microchannel-Plate Glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feller, W. Bruce; Cook, Lee M.

    1990-01-01

    Dark noise reduced substantially without degrading other properties. Glass suitable for use as active material for microchannel plates (MCP's) free of constituents including significant amounts of radioactive isotopes.

  17. Three-dimensional model of x-ray induced microchannel plate output

    SciTech Connect

    Harding, E. C.; Drake, R. P.

    2006-10-15

    Microchannel plates are an important component in a type of imaging diagnostic known as an x-ray framing camera, used in x-ray radiography of high-energy-density physics experiments. A microchannel plate is responsible for detecting x rays and then converting them into amplified bursts of electrons, which are then imaged onto a phosphor-coated fiber optic screen. We present the preliminary development of a three-dimensional model of a single microchannel plate channel in attempt to simulate the pulse height distribution of the microchannel plate electron output. Using a novel technique, initial simulations are compared with experimental data from an ungated x-ray framing camera.

  18. The capacitive division image readout: a novel imaging device for microchannel plate detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapington, J. S.; Conneely, T. M.; Leach, S. A.; Moore, L.

    2013-09-01

    The Capacitive Division Image Readout (C-DIR) is a simple and novel image readout for photon counting detectors offering major performance advantages. C-DIR is a charge centroiding device comprising three elements; (i) a resistive anode providing event charge localization, event current return path and electrical isolation from detector high voltage, (ii) a dielectric substrate which capacitively couples the event transient signal to the third element, (iii) the readout device; an array of capacitively coupled electrodes which divides the signal among the readout charge measurement nodes. The resistive anode and dielectric substrate constitute the rear interface of the detector and capacitively couple the signal to the external C-DIR readout device. The C-DIR device is a passive, multilayer printed circuit board type device comprising a matrix of isolated electrodes whose geometries define the capacitive network. C-DIR is manufactured using conventional PCB geometries and is straightforward and economical to construct. C-DIR's robustness and simplicity belie its performance advantages. Its capacitive nature avoids partition noise, the Poisson noise associated with collection of discrete charges. The dominant noise limiting position resolution is electronic noise. However C-DIR also presents a low input capacitance to the readout electronics, minimising this noise component thus maximising spatial resolution. Optimisation of the C-DIR pattern-edge geometry can provide ~90% linear dynamic range. We present data showing image resolution and linearity of the C-DIR device in a microchannel plate detector and describe various electronic charge measurement scheme designed to exploit the full performance potential of the C-DIR device.

  19. Plasma wakefield diagnostics using probe electron beam and microchannel plates

    SciTech Connect

    Fainberg, Ya.B.; Balakirev, V.A.; Berezin, A.K.

    1996-12-31

    The analytical and numerical investigations of trajectories of the probe beam electrons in the two dimensional wakefield, excited in plasma by a dense bunch of relativistic electrons with Gauss longitudinal and transverse distribution of density is carried out. On basis of calculations of probe beam deviations the diagnostic instruments is developed for parameters of experiments conducted in NSC KIPT. The diagnostic instruments consist of an electron gun forming the electron beam with energy 10KeV, current 10{mu}A and diameter 2mm which passes through the chamber of interaction and falls on collector of diameter 10mm. Collector (screen) is placed in front of the first plate of microchannel amplifier which consists of three microchannel plates (MCP) with sizes 20 - 30mm, The voltage 3kV was applied to the each plate. Total amplification of MCP amplifier is 10{sup 4} - 10{sup 5} in dependence on quantity of particles, falling on the first plate. As a result the deviations of probe beam by excited wakefield the electrons fall on first plate of amplifier and are registered by anode of amplifier, located behind the third plates. Calculated probe beam deviations and obtained amplification of MCP amplifier permit to find out and to investigate the electrical wakefields, excited by the sequence of relativistic bunches (number of particles in bunch is 2x10{sup 9}, energy is 14MeV) in plasma of density 10{sup 11} - 10{sup 13} cm{sup {minus}3}. The maximal value of the fields registered by such technique is not less 2kv/cm.

  20. Investigations of bonded and curved microchannel plate stacks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegmund, O. H. W.

    1988-01-01

    The technique of fusing, or bonding, individual microchannel plate (MCP) stacks together offers the possibility of improving the uniformity of MCP stack operating characteristics and provides a convenient monolithic format. Here, the effectiveness of bonded MCP stacks and stacks of MCPs with curved surfaces is investigated to determine if MCP requirements for future astrophysical detectors can be achieved. The results show that both configurations give superior MCP performance characteristics. However, some problems remain with regard to the fabrication of bonded MCP stacks resulting in poor flat field characteristics and increased background.

  1. Dead-time effects in microchannel-plate imaging detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zombeck, Martin V.; Fraser, George W.

    1991-01-01

    The observed counting rates of microchannel plate (MCP) based detectors for high resolution observations of celestial EUV and X-ray sources vary over many orders of magnitude; the counting capability of an individual channel, however, is not high, and is associated with dead-times ranging from 0.1 msec to 1 sec. The dead-time increases with the area illuminated; attention is presently given to laboratory determinations of the count rate characteristics of a MCP detector as a function of illuminated area, and a model is developed for these results' use in the interpretation of space observations.

  2. Performance characteristics of a new helical-channel microchannel plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, David C.; Timothy, J. Gethyn; Graves, Peter W.; Loretz, Thomas J.; Roy, Raymond L.

    1988-01-01

    An advanced version of the 'helical-channel' microchannel plate (MCP) is presented. This MCP is composed of four channels per fiber with each channel having a diameter of 50 microns. The dynamic range, pulse-height distribution, and gain characteristics of this MCP are discussed. It is found that increasing the twist density of the channels makes it possible to increase the detection efficiency and further improve the suppression of ion-feedback providing a tighter saturated pulse-height distribution and improved high-voltage characteristics.

  3. Investigations of bonded and curved microchannel plate stacks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegmund, O. H. W.

    1988-01-01

    The technique of fusing, or bonding, individual microchannel plate (MCP) stacks together offers the possibility of improving the uniformity of MCP stack operating characteristics and provides a convenient monolithic format. Here, the effectiveness of bonded MCP stacks and stacks of MCPs with curved surfaces is investigated to determine if MCP requirements for future astrophysical detectors can be achieved. The results show that both configurations give superior MCP performance characteristics. However, some problems remain with regard to the fabrication of bonded MCP stacks resulting in poor flat field characteristics and increased background.

  4. Angular Sensitivity of Gated Micro-Channel Plate Framing Cameras

    SciTech Connect

    Landen, O L; Lobban, A; Tutt, T; Bell, P M; Costa, R; Ze, F

    2000-07-24

    Gated, microchannel-plate-based (MCP) framing cameras have been deployed worldwide for 0.2 - 9 keV x-ray imaging and spectroscopy of transient plasma phenomena. For a variety of spectroscopic and imaging applications, the angular sensitivity of MCPs must be known for correctly interpreting the data. We present systematic measurements of angular sensitivity at discrete relevant photon energies and arbitrary MCP gain. The results can been accurately predicted by using a simple 2D approximation to the 3D MCP geometry and by averaging over all possible photon ray paths.

  5. Persistence of phosphor glow in microchannel plate image intensifiers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torr, M. R.

    1985-01-01

    Image intensifier tubes using microchannel plate amplification stages and phosphor output stages are being increasingly used in various detection applications. In this paper, measurements of the decay times of what are attributed to be the P20 phosphors in various image intensifiers are reported. It is found that the long tail on the decay curve of the phosphor following illumination can be a limitation for certain observations. In addition, the background level of phosphor glow (which is seen by the subsequent detection system as a light signal) continues to build with continuing illumination.

  6. Photon counting compressive depth mapping.

    PubMed

    Howland, Gregory A; Lum, Daniel J; Ware, Matthew R; Howell, John C

    2013-10-07

    We demonstrate a compressed sensing, photon counting lidar system based on the single-pixel camera. Our technique recovers both depth and intensity maps from a single under-sampled set of incoherent, linear projections of a scene of interest at ultra-low light levels around 0.5 picowatts. Only two-dimensional reconstructions are required to image a three-dimensional scene. We demonstrate intensity imaging and depth mapping at 256 × 256 pixel transverse resolution with acquisition times as short as 3 seconds. We also show novelty filtering, reconstructing only the difference between two instances of a scene. Finally, we acquire 32 × 32 pixel real-time video for three-dimensional object tracking at 14 frames-per-second.

  7. Using induced signals to sense position from a microchannel plate detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    deSouza, R. T.; Gosser, Z. Q.; Hudan, S.

    2012-05-01

    We demonstrate a novel concept for a position sensitive microchannel plate detector. This detector provides sub-millimeter spatial resolution by examining the signal induced on a wire harp by the electron cloud from a microchannel plate detector. Wires in the harp are efficiently read out by coupling them to a delay line.

  8. Curved-channel microchannel array plates. [photoelectric detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Timothy, J. G.

    1981-01-01

    The microchannel array plate (MCP) is a photoelectric detector with an imaging capability comparable to that of a photographic plate. Recently MCPs in which the channels are curved to inhibit ion feedback have become available. These devices represent a major advance in MCP technology, since a single curved-channel MCP can be operated stably at high gain in the pulse-counting mode without any of the problems of stability of response or short lifetime reported for 'chevron' MCP detectors. Attention is given to the mode of operation of channel electron multipliers (CEM) and MCP, curved-channel MCP, test procedures, and performance characteristics. The accumulated test data show that the fundamental operating characteristics of the curved-channel MCP are directly related to those for the CEM.

  9. Application of atomic layer deposited microchannel plates to imaging photodetectors with high time resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Siegmund, O; McPhate, J; Tremsin, Anton S; Vallerga, J V; Ertley, C D; Richner, N J; Gerard, T M; Frisch, H.; Elam, Jeffrey W.; Mane, Anil U.; Wagner, Robert G.; Minot, Michael J.; O'Mahony, Aileen O; Craven, C A

    2015-07-01

    Novel microchannel plates have been constructed using borosilicate glass micro-capillary array substrates with 20 mu m and 10 mu m pores and coated with resistive, and secondary electron emissive, layers by atomic layer deposition. Microchannel plates in 33 mm, 50 mm and 20 cm square formats have been made and tested. Although their amplification, imaging, and timing properties are comparable to standard glass microchannel plates, the background rates and lifetime characteristics are considerably improved. Sealed tube detectors based on the Planacon tube, and a 25 mm cross delay line readout tube with a GaN(Mg) opaque photocathode deposited on borosilicate microchannel plates have been fabricated. Considerable progress has also been made with 20 cm microchannel plates for a 20 cm format sealed tube sensor with strip-line readout that is being developed for Cherenkov light detection.

  10. High event rate ROICs (HEROICs) for astronomical UV photon counting detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harwit, Alex; France, Kevin; Argabright, Vic; Franka, Steve; Freymiller, Ed; Ebbets, Dennis

    2014-07-01

    The next generation of astronomical photocathode / microchannel plate based UV photon counting detectors will overcome existing count rate limitations by replacing the anode arrays and external cabled electronics with anode arrays integrated into imaging Read Out Integrated Circuits (ROICs). We have fabricated a High Event Rate ROIC (HEROIC) consisting of a 32 by 32 array of 55 μm square pixels on a 60 μm pitch. The pixel sensitivity (threshold) has been designed to be globally programmable between 1 × 103 and 1 × 106 electrons. To achieve the sensitivity of 1 × 103 electrons, parasitic capacitances had to be minimized and this was achieved by fabricating the ROIC in a 65 nm CMOS process. The ROIC has been designed to support pixel counts up to 4096 events per integration period at rates up to 1 MHz per pixel. Integration time periods can be controlled via an external signal with a time resolution of less than 1 microsecond enabling temporally resolved imaging and spectroscopy of astronomical sources. An electrical injection port is provided to verify functionality and performance of each ROIC prior to vacuum integration with a photocathode and microchannel plate amplifier. Test results on the first ROICs using the electrical injection port demonstrate sensitivities between 3 × 103 and 4 × 105 electrons are achieved. A number of fixes are identified for a re-spin of this ROIC.

  11. High Throughput, High Yield Fabrication of High Quantum Efficiency Back-Illuminated Photon Counting, Far UV, UV, and Visible Detector Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nikzad, Shouleh; Hoenk, M. E.; Carver, A. G.; Jones, T. J.; Greer, F.; Hamden, E.; Goodsall, T.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the high throughput end-to-end post fabrication processing of high performance delta-doped and superlattice-doped silicon imagers for UV, visible, and NIR applications. As an example, we present our results on far ultraviolet and ultraviolet quantum efficiency (QE) in a photon counting, detector array. We have improved the QE by nearly an order of magnitude over microchannel plates (MCPs) that are the state-of-the-art UV detectors for many NASA space missions as well as defense applications. These achievements are made possible by precision interface band engineering of Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE) and Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD).

  12. High Throughput, High Yield Fabrication of High Quantum Efficiency Back-Illuminated Photon Counting, Far UV, UV, and Visible Detector Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nikzad, Shouleh; Hoenk, M. E.; Carver, A. G.; Jones, T. J.; Greer, F.; Hamden, E.; Goodsall, T.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the high throughput end-to-end post fabrication processing of high performance delta-doped and superlattice-doped silicon imagers for UV, visible, and NIR applications. As an example, we present our results on far ultraviolet and ultraviolet quantum efficiency (QE) in a photon counting, detector array. We have improved the QE by nearly an order of magnitude over microchannel plates (MCPs) that are the state-of-the-art UV detectors for many NASA space missions as well as defense applications. These achievements are made possible by precision interface band engineering of Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE) and Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD).

  13. Photon counts from stellar occultation sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buglia, James J.

    1987-01-01

    The feasibility of using stars as radiation sources for Earth atmospheric occultation experiments is investigated. Exoatmospheric photon counts of the order of 10 to the 6th power photons/sq cm/sec are realized for the 15 visually brightest stars. Most photon counts appear to be marginally detectable unless photomultiplier or cascade detection devices can be used.

  14. A high resolution delay line readout for microchannel plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegmund, O. S. W.; Lampton, M. L.; Raffanti, R.

    1989-01-01

    Investigations are reported of delay line configurations used to encode photon event locations in microchannel plate (MCP) detectors. Several delay line schemes of planar and multilayer structure are discussed. The importance of the delay line substrate material is examined, and it is shown that the raw signals from delay lines are narrow (about 3-4 ns FWHM). The factors determining the delay line resolution are evaluated, and it is demonstrated that these are in agreement with measurements. Resolutions of about 18-micron FWHM have been achieved. Measurements of the linearity of the delay line readout show that event centroid locations deviate from perfect linearity by less than 50 microns, even with the very simple anode fabrication methods employed. The image stability has also been evaluated and it is shown that image shifts are less than one resolution element over a period of two months.

  15. Microchannel plate response to high-energy neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Persing, R.; Medley, S.S.

    1981-07-01

    The response of a chevron microchannel plate (MCP) to high energy neutrons was measured. The large area (4.6 cm x 13 cm) multi-anode MCP performance characteristics in the saturated pulse counting mode of operation were examined prior to neutron testing. This established a linear operating regime in which the neutron detection efficiency was measured to be 0.17% for 2.5 MeV-DD neutrons and 0.64% for 14 MeV-DT neutrons. The higher response measured for the 14 MeV-DT neutrons is attributed to gamma ray contamination induced by neutron collisions with materials located between the neutron source and the MCP detector. Due to their lower energy, the 2.5 MeV-DD response measurements are expected to be relatively free of gamma contamination and, hence, indicative of actual response of the MCP detector to neutrons in the 1 to 10 MeV energy range.

  16. A high resolution delay line readout for microchannel plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegmund, O. S. W.; Lampton, M. L.; Raffanti, R.

    1989-01-01

    Investigations are reported of delay line configurations used to encode photon event locations in microchannel plate (MCP) detectors. Several delay line schemes of planar and multilayer structure are discussed. The importance of the delay line substrate material is examined, and it is shown that the raw signals from delay lines are narrow (about 3-4 ns FWHM). The factors determining the delay line resolution are evaluated, and it is demonstrated that these are in agreement with measurements. Resolutions of about 18-micron FWHM have been achieved. Measurements of the linearity of the delay line readout show that event centroid locations deviate from perfect linearity by less than 50 microns, even with the very simple anode fabrication methods employed. The image stability has also been evaluated and it is shown that image shifts are less than one resolution element over a period of two months.

  17. Noise factor of microchannel plate with ion barrier film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shu-lin; Shi, Feng; Li, Zhou-kui; Zhu, Yu-feng; Zhang, Ni; Gu, Yan; Sun, Jian-ning; Cong, Xiao-qing; Zhao, Hui-min; Pan, Jing-sheng; Qian, Yun-sheng; Zheng, Shao-cheng; Chang, Ben-kang

    2012-10-01

    According to definition of noise factor of microchannel plate and the test principle, the authors set up a test installation, and measured the numerical values of MCPs which were made of different materials and channel pore including no / with ion barrier film in input of MCP. In order to seek the technical approach to reduce noise factor of MCP at the same time, we tested and analyzed the relation between noise factor and MCP voltage, combined relation between signal-to-noise ratio of GEN Ⅲ image intensifier and MCP voltage, open out relation between signal-to-noise ratio of GEN Ⅲ image intensifier and noise factor of MCP with ion barrier film.

  18. Measurement device for noise factor of microchannel plate.

    PubMed

    Lei, Liu; Zhijian, Huang; Tao, Pan; Yunsheng, Qian

    2012-03-01

    A new method for noise power factor determination of microchannel plates (MCPs) is described in this paper. The new measuring condition and specific measuring instrument are reported. The system consists of a vacuum chamber, an electron gun, a high-voltage supply, an imaging luminance meter, control units, a signal processing circuit, an A/D converter, a D/A converter, a communication unit, an industrial computer, and measurement software. This measuring method fills a void in measuring technology for the noise factor of MCPs, and it can make a scientific assessment of MCP noise characteristics and provide theoretical direction and technology support for the research and development of high-performance low light level (LLL) devices. © 2012 Optical Society of America

  19. Note: Non-gain microchannel plate gated framing camera

    SciTech Connect

    Cai Houzhi; Peng Xiang; Liu Jinyuan; Niu Lihong; Peng Wenda; Niu Hanben; Long Jinghua

    2011-05-15

    An x-ray framing camera using a non-gain microchannel plate (MCP) is reported in this article. The advantage of the non-gain MCP is the less transit time spread. The non-gain MCP gated framing camera has four microstrip line cathodes with 6 mm in width. The time domain reflectometry curves of the four microstrip lines are measured, which show that the characteristic impedance of each microstrip line is about 17 {Omega}. While the photocathode is driven by the gating electrical pulse with width of 125 ps and amplitude of -1.48 kV with -400 V bias, the measured exposure time of this camera is about 72 ps.

  20. Note: Non-gain microchannel plate gated framing camera.

    PubMed

    Cai, Houzhi; Liu, Jinyuan; Peng, Xiang; Niu, Lihong; Peng, Wenda; Niu, Hanben; Long, Jinghua

    2011-05-01

    An x-ray framing camera using a non-gain microchannel plate (MCP) is reported in this article. The advantage of the non-gain MCP is the less transit time spread. The non-gain MCP gated framing camera has four microstrip line cathodes with 6 mm in width. The time domain reflectometry curves of the four microstrip lines are measured, which show that the characteristic impedance of each microstrip line is about 17 Ω. While the photocathode is driven by the gating electrical pulse with width of 125 ps and amplitude of -1.48 kV with -400 V bias, the measured exposure time of this camera is about 72 ps.

  1. Gated Microchannel Plate Photomultiplier For Longitudinal BeamDiagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Byrd, John M.; De Santis, Stefano; Thurman-Keup, Randy

    2006-05-03

    A gated microchannel plate photomultiplier can be used as aneffective tool for measuring the longitudinal distribution of particlesaround most electron and high-energy proton rings. The broad availablewavelength range,low noise, and high sensitivity allow using such adevice for measuring the emitted synchrotron radiation and to extract thebeam intensity. The fast gate rise time can be used to reject strongsignals coming from filled RF buckets and avoid saturation of thephotocathode so that it is possible to monitor, with a high degree ofresolution, gaps in the machine fill and growth of parasitic bunches. Therugged characteristics of the device and its simplicity of use make itideal for all those applications where more complex and expensiveinstrumentation is not absolutely necessary. We present the experimentalresults obtained at the Advanced Light Source and on the Tevatron usingan Hamamatsu R5916U-50 series model.

  2. Collimator application for microchannel plate image intensifier resolution improvement

    DOEpatents

    Thomas, Stanley W.

    1996-02-27

    A collimator is included in a microchannel plate image intensifier (MCPI). Collimators can be useful in improving resolution of MCPIs by eliminating the scattered electron problem and by limiting the transverse energy of electrons reaching the screen. Due to its optical absorption, a collimator will also increase the extinction ratio of an intensifier by approximately an order of magnitude. Additionally, the smooth surface of the collimator will permit a higher focusing field to be employed in the MCP-to-collimator region than is currently permitted in the MCP-to-screen region by the relatively rough and fragile aluminum layer covering the screen. Coating the MCP and collimator surfaces with aluminum oxide appears to permit additional significant increases in the field strength, resulting in better resolution.

  3. Collimator application for microchannel plate image intensifier resolution improvement

    DOEpatents

    Thomas, S.W.

    1996-02-27

    A collimator is included in a microchannel plate image intensifier (MCPI). Collimators can be useful in improving resolution of MCPIs by eliminating the scattered electron problem and by limiting the transverse energy of electrons reaching the screen. Due to its optical absorption, a collimator will also increase the extinction ratio of an intensifier by approximately an order of magnitude. Additionally, the smooth surface of the collimator will permit a higher focusing field to be employed in the MCP-to-collimator region than is currently permitted in the MCP-to-screen region by the relatively rough and fragile aluminum layer covering the screen. Coating the MCP and collimator surfaces with aluminum oxide appears to permit additional significant increases in the field strength, resulting in better resolution. 2 figs.

  4. Optimization of microchannel plate multipliers for tracking minimum-ionizing particles

    SciTech Connect

    Oba, K.; Rehak, P.; Potter, D.

    1981-01-01

    The progress in development of special Microchannel Plates for particle tracking is reported. The requirements of (1) high spatial resolution; (2) high density of information; and (3) rate capability were found to be satisfied in a thick Microchannel Plate with a CsI coating operating in a focusing magnetic field. The measurements of the Microchannel Plate detection efficiency, gain and noise are presented for several detectors. The pictures of the passage and interaction of the high energy charged particles inside the detector are shown.

  5. Photon counting detectors for Fabry-Perot interferometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Darlington, E. H.; Haviland, J. R.

    1989-01-01

    Sealed channel plate photomultipliers with multiple discrete anodes for use as photon counting detectors in the image plane of Fabry-Perot interferometers are described. The influence of design and construction on performance of completed devices is discussed. Effects on spatial resolution, lifetime, and counting efficiency are described. It is shown that devices can be optimized for particular applications. The results should be generally applicable to resistive anode and wedge and strip anode types of sealed detectors.

  6. Cross strip anode readouts for microchannel plate detectors: developing flight qualified prototypes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallerga, John; Cooney, M.; Raffanti, R.; Varner, G.; Siegmund, O.; McPhate, J. B.; Tremsin, A.

    2014-01-01

    Photon counting microchannel plate (MCP) imagers have been the detector of choice for most UV astronomical missions over the last two decades (eg. EUVE, FUSE, COS on Hubble etc.). Over this duration, improvements in the MCP laboratory readout technology have resulted in better spatial resolution (x10), temporal resolution (x 1000) and output event rate (x100), all the while operating at lower gain (x 10) resulting in lower high voltage requirements and longer MCP lifetimes. One such technology is the parallel cross strip (PXS) readout. The PXS anode is a set of orthogonal conducting strips (80 x 80), typically spaced at a 635 micron pitch onto which charge clouds from MCP amplified events land. Each strip has its own charge sensitive amplifier that is sampled continuously by a dedicated analog to digital (ADC) converter at 50MHz. All of the 160 ADC digital output lines are fed into a field programmable gate array (FGPA) which can detect charge events landing on the strips, measure the peak amplitudes of those charge events and calculate their spatial centroid along with their time of arrival (X,Y,T). Laboratory versions of these electronics have demonstrated < 20 microns FWHM spatial resolution, count rates on the order of 2 MHz, and temporal resolution of ~ 1ns. In 2012 the our group at U.C. Berkeley, along with our partners at the U. Hawaii, received a Strategic Astrophysics Technology grant to raise the TRL of the PXS detector from 4 to 6 by replacing most of the 19" rack mounted, high powered electronics with application specific integrated circuits (ASICs) which will lower the power, mass and volume requirements of the PXS detector. We were also tasked to design and fabricate a "standard" 50mm square active area MCP detector incorporating these electronics that can be environmentally qualified for flight (temperature, vacuum, vibration). This detector design could then be modified for individual flight opportunities with a higher level of confidence than

  7. Monte Carlo simulations of microchannel plate detectors I: steady-state voltage bias results

    SciTech Connect

    Ming Wu, Craig Kruschwitz, Dane Morgan, Jiaming Morgan

    2008-07-01

    X-ray detectors based on straight-channel microchannel plates (MCPs) are a powerful diagnostic tool for two-dimensional, time-resolved imaging and timeresolved x-ray spectroscopy in the fields of laser-driven inertial confinement fusion and fast z-pinch experiments. Understanding the behavior of microchannel plates as used in such detectors is critical to understanding the data obtained. The subject of this paper is a Monte Carlo computer code we have developed to simulate the electron cascade in a microchannel plate under a static applied voltage. Also included in the simulation is elastic reflection of low-energy electrons from the channel wall, which is important at lower voltages. When model results were compared to measured microchannel plate sensitivities, good agreement was found. Spatial resolution simulations of MCP-based detectors were also presented and found to agree with experimental measurements.

  8. Pilot Production of Large Area Microchannel Plates and Picosecond Photodetectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minot, M.; Adams, B.; Abiles, M.; Bond, J.; Craven, C.; Cremer, T.; Foley, M.; Lyashenko, A.; Popecki, M.; Stochaj, M.; Worstell, W.; Elam, J.; Mane, A.; Siegmund, O.; Ertley, C.

    2016-09-01

    Pilot production performance is reported for large area atomic layer deposition (ALD) coated microchannel plates (ALD-GCA-MCPs) and for Large Area Picosecond Photodetectors (LAPPD™) which incorporate them. "Hollowcore" glass capillary array (GCA) substrates are coated with ALD resistive and emissive layers to form the ALDGCA- MCPs, an approach that facilitates independent selection of glass substrates that are mechanically stronger and that have lower levels of radioactive alkali elements compared to conventional MCP lead glass, reducing background noise[1,2,3,4]. ALD-GCA-MCPs have competitive gain ( 104 each or 107 for a chevron pair ), enhanced lifetime and gain stability (7 C cm-2 of charge extraction), reduced background levels (0.028 events cm-2 sec-1) and low gamma-ray detection efficiency. They can be fabricated in large area (20cm X 20 cm) planar and curved formats suitable for use in high radiation environment applications, including astronomy, space instrumentation, and remote night time sensing. The LAPPD™ photodetector incorporates these ALD-GCA-MCPs in an all-glass hermetic package with top and bottom plates and sidewalls made of borosilicate float glass. Signals are generated by a bi-alkali Na2KSb photocathode, amplified with a stacked chevron pair of ALD-GCA-MCPs. Signals are collected on RF strip-line anodes integrated into to the bottom plates which exit the detector via pin-free hermetic seals under the side walls [5]. Tests show that LAPPDTMs have electron gains greater than 107, submillimeter spatial resolution for large (multiphoton) pulses and several mm for single photons, time resolution less than 50 picoseconds for single photons, predicted resolution less than 5 picoseconds for large pulses, high stability versus charge extraction[6], and good uniformity for applications including astrophysics, neutron detection, high energy physics Cherenkov light detection, and quantum-optical photon-correlation experiments.

  9. Picosecond wide-field time-correlated single photon counting fluorescence microscopy with a delay line anode detector

    SciTech Connect

    Hirvonen, Liisa M.; Le Marois, Alix; Suhling, Klaus; Becker, Wolfgang; Smietana, Stefan; Milnes, James; Conneely, Thomas; Jagutzki, Ottmar

    2016-08-15

    We perform wide-field time-correlated single photon counting-based fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) with a crossed delay line anode image intensifier, where the pulse propagation time yields the photon position. This microchannel plate-based detector was read out with conventional fast timing electronics and mounted on a fluorescence microscope with total internal reflection (TIR) illumination. The picosecond time resolution of this detection system combines low illumination intensity of microwatts with wide-field data collection. This is ideal for fluorescence lifetime imaging of cell membranes using TIR. We show that fluorescence lifetime images of living HeLa cells stained with membrane dye di-4-ANEPPDHQ exhibit a reduced lifetime near the coverslip in TIR compared to epifluorescence FLIM.

  10. Picosecond wide-field time-correlated single photon counting fluorescence microscopy with a delay line anode detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirvonen, Liisa M.; Becker, Wolfgang; Milnes, James; Conneely, Thomas; Smietana, Stefan; Le Marois, Alix; Jagutzki, Ottmar; Suhling, Klaus

    2016-08-01

    We perform wide-field time-correlated single photon counting-based fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) with a crossed delay line anode image intensifier, where the pulse propagation time yields the photon position. This microchannel plate-based detector was read out with conventional fast timing electronics and mounted on a fluorescence microscope with total internal reflection (TIR) illumination. The picosecond time resolution of this detection system combines low illumination intensity of microwatts with wide-field data collection. This is ideal for fluorescence lifetime imaging of cell membranes using TIR. We show that fluorescence lifetime images of living HeLa cells stained with membrane dye di-4-ANEPPDHQ exhibit a reduced lifetime near the coverslip in TIR compared to epifluorescence FLIM.

  11. Readout for a large area neutron sensitive microchannel plate detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yiming; Yang, Yigang; Wang, Xuewu; Li, Yuanjing

    2015-06-01

    A neutron sensitive microchannel plate (MCP) detector was developed for neutron imaging on the beamline of a compact pulsed hadron source (CPHS). The detector was set up with a Wedge-and-Strip Anode (WSA) and a delay line anode readout to compare the spatial resolution and throughput with these two anodes. Tests show that the WSA readout is suitable for small area imaging with a spatial resolution of 200 μm with low energy X-rays in a 50 mm diameter MCP-WSA assembly. However, the spatial resolution deteriorated to 2 mm in a 106 mm diameter MCP-WSA assembly because the noise caused by the parasitic capacitance is 10 times larger in the larger assembly than in the 50 mm diameter assembly. A 120 mm by 120 mm delay line anode was then used for the 106 mm MCP readout. The spatial resolution was evaluated for various voltages applied to the MCP V-stack, various readout voltages and various distances between the MCP V-stack rear face and the delay line. The delay line readout had resolutions of 65.6 μm in the x direction and 63.7 μm in the y direction and the throughput was greater than 600 kcps. The MCP was then used to acquire a neutron image of an USAF1951 Gd-mask.

  12. Atomic layer deposition of alternative glass microchannel plates

    SciTech Connect

    O'Mahony, Aileen Craven, Christopher A.; Minot, Michael J.; Popecki, Mark A.; Renaud, Joseph M.; Bennis, Daniel C.; Bond, Justin L.; Stochaj, Michael E.; Foley, Michael R.; Adams, Bernhard W.; Mane, Anil U.; Elam, Jeffrey W.; Ertley, Camden; Siegmund, Oswald H. W.

    2016-01-15

    The technique of atomic layer deposition (ALD) has enabled the development of alternative glass microchannel plates (MCPs) with independently tunable resistive and emissive layers, resulting in excellent thickness uniformity across the large area (20 × 20 cm), high aspect ratio (60:1 L/d) glass substrates. Furthermore, the use of ALD to deposit functional layers allows the optimal substrate material to be selected, such as borosilicate glass, which has many benefits compared to the lead-oxide glass used in conventional MCPs, including increased stability and lifetime, low background noise, mechanical robustness, and larger area (at present up to 400 cm{sup 2}). Resistively stable, high gain MCPs are demonstrated due to the deposition of uniform ALD resistive and emissive layers on alternative glass microcapillary substrates. The MCP performance characteristics reported include increased stability and lifetime, low background noise (0.04 events cm{sup −2} s{sup −1}), and low gain variation (±5%)

  13. The parameterization of microchannel-plate-based detection systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gershman, Daniel J.; Gliese, Ulrik; Dorelli, John C.; Avanov, Levon A.; Barrie, Alexander C.; Chornay, Dennis J.; MacDonald, Elizabeth A.; Holland, Matthew P.; Giles, Barbara L.; Pollock, Craig J.

    2016-10-01

    The most common instrument for low-energy plasmas consists of a top-hat electrostatic analyzer (ESA) geometry coupled with a microchannel-plate-based (MCP-based) detection system. While the electrostatic optics for such sensors are readily simulated and parameterized during the laboratory calibration process, the detection system is often less well characterized. Here we develop a comprehensive mathematical description of particle detection systems. As a function of instrument azimuthal angle, we parameterize (1) particle scattering within the ESA and at the surface of the MCP, (2) the probability distribution of MCP gain for an incident particle, (3) electron charge cloud spreading between the MCP and anode board, and (4) capacitive coupling between adjacent discrete anodes. Using the Dual Electron Spectrometers on the Fast Plasma Investigation on NASA's Magnetospheric Multiscale mission as an example, we demonstrate a method for extracting these fundamental detection system parameters from laboratory calibration. We further show that parameters that will evolve in flight, namely, MCP gain, can be determined through application of this model to specifically tailored in-flight calibration activities. This methodology provides a robust characterization of sensor suite performance throughout mission lifetime. The model developed in this work is not only applicable to existing sensors but also can be used as an analytical design tool for future particle instrumentation.

  14. Development of microchannel plates in advanced wind-tunnel instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feller, W. Bruce

    1990-01-01

    Microchannel plate (MCP) electron multiplier dynamic range has been increased 3 to 4 orders of magnitude at ambient temperatures, through enhanced input count rate capability and reduced background or 'dark' noise. The previous upper limit of roughly 10(exp 7) - 10(exp 8) cm(exp -2)s(exp -1) at ambient has been extended to levels approach 10(exp 10) cm(exp -2)s(exp -1) under continuous dc operation. The lower limit, previously set by an irreducible background component (approximately 0.6 cm(exp -2)s(exp -1)), has been lowered to the cosmic ray limit of .01 cm(exp -2)s(exp -1). The high end improvement was achieved by conductively cooling a very low resistance MCP by bonding it to a heat sink, while maintaining pulse-counting operation with multianode readouts. The low-end improvement was achieved by removing all radioisotopes from the MCP matrix glass. The detectors will benefit optical and mass spectrometry, flow visualization, plasma diagnostics, magnetometry, and other high signal flux applications. Very low MCP background noise will benefit X-ray and UV astronomy, medical imaging, trace isotope mass spectrometry, and other applications where the signal flux is often extremely low.

  15. Measurement and modeling of pulsed microchannel plate operation (invited).

    PubMed

    Rochau, G A; Wu, M; Kruschwitz, C; Joseph, N; Moy, K; Bailey, J; Krane, M; Thomas, R; Nielsen, D; Tibbitts, A

    2008-10-01

    Microchannel plates (MCPs) are a standard detector for fast-framing x-ray imaging and spectroscopy of high-temperature plasmas. The MCP is coated with conductive striplines that carry short duration voltage pulses to control the timing and amplitude of the signal gain. This gain depends on the voltage to a large exponent so that small reflections or impedance losses along the striplines can have a significant impact on the position-dependent amplitude and pulse width of the gain. Understanding the pulsed gain response therefore requires careful measurements of the position- and time-dependent surface voltage coupled with detailed modeling of the resulting electron cascade. We present measurements and modeling of the time- and space-dependent gain response of MCP detectors designed for use at Sandia National Laboratories' Z facility. The pulsed gain response is understood through measurements using a high impedence probe to determine the voltage pulse propagating along the stripline surface. Coupling the surface voltage measurements with Monte Carlo calculations of the electron cascade in the MCP provides a prediction of the time- and position-dependent gain that agrees with measurements made on a subpicosecond UV laser source to within the 25% uncertainty in the simulations.

  16. Performance of Au transmission photocathode on a microchannel plate detector.

    PubMed

    Lowenstern, M E; Harding, E C; Huntington, C M; Visco, A J; Rathore, G; Drake, R P

    2008-10-01

    X-ray framing cameras, employing microchannel plates (MCPs) for detection and signal amplification, play a key role in research in high-energy-density physics. These instruments convert radiographic x-rays into electrons produced by plasma during such experiments into electrons that are amplified in the channels and then detected by a phosphor material. The separation of detection from signal amplification offers potential improvements in sensitivity and noise properties. We have implemented a suspended Au transmission photocathode (160 A thick) on a MCP and are evaluating it using a 1.5 keV Al K alpha x-ray source. We find an approximately twofold increase in the ratio of detected events to incident photons when the photocathode-to-MCP voltage difference is sufficiently large. Our calculations indicate that this increase is probably caused by a combination of signal produced by the photocathode and an increase in the efficiency of detection of x-rays that reach the MCP surface through modification of the local electric field.

  17. Application research on microchannel plate in new fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yanhong; Chen, Xiaomei; Ni, Guoqiang

    2015-08-01

    Microchannel plate (MCP) is a photoelectron multiplier as the core component of low-level light (LLL) image intensifier. MCP has two-dimensional space, time, and energy resolution, fast response time, low background noise, wide dynamic range and high gain characteristics, as well as electrons, ions, UV and soft X-ray photon detection capability directly. In recent years, with the publication of foreign advanced technology and Chinese research staff in-depth understanding of MCP's unique characteristics, the applications of MCP have extended into many new fields accordingly in China. In addition to the image intensifier, the MCP can be used in deep space exploration and scientific experiments, detecting kinds of trace rays and particles, such as pulsars navigation, nuclear simulation diagnostics, UV, EUV, neutron, neutrino detection and imaging. North Night Vision Technology Co. Ltd (NVT) as the only unit possessing MCP production capacity in China is constantly working on improving, innovation and application research on MCP technology. In this paper, based on the researches on MCP in some new fields the NVT Company has undertaken and ongoing, the technological breakthroughs and application research progresses achieved are described.

  18. Second generation large area microchannel plate flat panel phototubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ertley, C. D.; Siegmund, O. H. W.; Jelinsky, S. R.; Tedesco, J.; Minot, M. J.; O'Mahony, A.; Craven, C. A.; Popecki, M.; Lyashenko, A. V.; Foley, M. R.

    2016-07-01

    Very large (20 cm × 20 cm) flat panel phototubes are being developed which employ novel microchannel plates (MCPs). The MCPs are manufactured using borosilicate microcapillary arrays which are functionalized by the application of resistive and secondary emissive layers using atomic layer deposition (ALD). This allows the operational parameters to be set by tailoring sequential ALD deposition processes. The borosilicate substrates are robust, including the ability to be produced in large formats (20 cm square). ALD MCPs have performance characteristics (gain, pulse amplitude distributions, and imaging) that are equivalent or better than conventional MCPs. They have low intrinsic background (0.045 events cm-2 sec-1)., high open area ratios (74% for the latest generation of borosilicate substrates), and stable gain during >7 C cm-2 charge extraction after preconditioning (vacuum bake and burn-in). The tube assemblies use a pair of 20 cm × 20 cm ALD MCPs comprised of a borosilicate entrance window, a proximity focused bialkali photocathode, and a strip-line readout anode. The second generation design employs an all glass body with a hot indium seal and a transfer photocathode. We have achieved >20% quantum efficiency and good gain uniformity over the 400 cm2 field of view, spatial resolution of <1 cm and obtained event timing accuracy of close to 100 ps FWHM.

  19. Breakthrough in the lifetime of microchannel plate photomultipliers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhlig, F.; Britting, A.; Eyrich, W.; Lehmann, A.; Dzhygadlo, R.; Gerhardt, A.; Götzen, K.; Kalicy, G.; Krebs, M.; Kumawat, H.; Lehmann, D.; Patsyuk, M.; Peters, K.; Schepers, G.; Schmitt, L.; Schwarz, C.; Schwiening, J.; Traxler, M.; Zühlsdorf, M.; Dodokhov, V. Kh.; Düren, M.; Etzelmüller, E.; Föhl, K.; Hayrapetyan, A.; Kröck, B.; Merle, O.; Rieke, J.; Cowie, E.; Keri, T.; Montgomery, R.; Achenbach, P.; Cardinali, M.; Hoek, M.; Lauth, W.; Schlimme, S.; Sfienti, C.; Thiel, M.; Bühler, P.; Gruber, L.; Marton, J.; Suzuki, K.

    2015-07-01

    Cherenkov detectors using the DIRC (Detection of Internally Reflected Cherenkov Light) principle are foreseen for particle identification in the P bar ANDA experiment at FAIR. Promising sensors for the detection of the Cherenkov light are the so-called micro-channel plate (MCP) photomultipliers (PMT). They have an excellent time resolution, can be operated at high gain for single photon detection and have a high resistivity against magnetic fields. The disadvantage of these devices was their limited lifetime, due to damage by feedback ions on the photocathode. The lifetime of various types of MCP-PMTs from different manufactures has been tested under conditions similar to that in the P bar ANDA experiment. The sensors are assembled in one setup, to ensure the same illumination conditions. The measurement procedure requires permanent monitoring of the illumination and interruptions after about 2-3 weeks to measure dark count rate, gain and spectral quantum efficiency of all sensors. Furthermore surface scans of the whole photocathode are done every 2-4 months to determine faster aging areas. The latest results show very good lifetime performance for MCP-PMTs, where the MCPs have been treated with the atomic layer deposition (ALD) technique.

  20. Progress of NUV and FUV MCP-based photon-counting imaging detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yong'an; Zhao, Bao-sheng; Wei, Yong-lin; Sai, Xiao-feng; Yan, Qiu-rong; Sheng, Li-zhi

    2011-08-01

    In the World Space Observatory-Ultraviolet (WSO-UV) mission, the Long Slit Spectrograph (LSS) instrument will provide low resolution spectra in the range 102-320nm. Both the NUV (160-320nm) and the FUV (102-170nm) channels of LSS use microchannel plates (MCP) working in photon-counting modes as detectors. In this paper, the progress and parameters of NUV and FUV photon-counting imaging detectors were described. For the NUV detector, we developed the detector based on a sealed MCP-image intensifier which comprises input window, photocathode, MCP stack, Ge-layer and its ceramic substrate. To maximize the quantum efficiency, we adopted a Caesium Telluride (Cs2Te) photocathode, which was deposited on input window and mounted close to the MCP. For the FUV detector, because of the lower cut-off wavelength, there are no suitable window materials in this band and the open-faced design should be used to meet the requirements of the detection. Therefore, a Caesium Iodide (CsI) photocathode deposited on the input surface of the MCP was used to optimize detector efficiency. By using an existing wedge and strip anode (WSA), the imaging performance of the NUV and FUV detectors was tested respectively. Experimental results show that the quantum efficiency of Cs2Te is 12.1% (at 230nm), the spatial resolution of NUV and FUV detectors is better than 110μm, the dark count rate of NUV and FUV detectors is about 10.5- and 2.3-counts/s*cm2 respectively.

  1. Photon-counting spaceborne altimeter simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blazej, Josef

    2004-11-01

    We are presenting of a photon counting laser altimeter simulator. The simulator is designed to be a theoretical and numerical complement for a Technology Demonstrator of the space born laser altimeter for planetary studies built on our university. The European Space Agency has nominated the photon counting altimeter as one of the attractive devices for planetary research. The device should provide altimetry in the range 400 to 1400 km with one meter range resolution under rough conditions - Sun illumination, radiation, etc. The general altimeter concept expects the photon counting principle laser radar. According to this concept, the simulator is based on photon counting radar simulation, which has been enhanced to handle planetary surface roughness, vertical terrain profile and its reflectivity. The simulator is useful complement for any photon counting altimeter both for altimeter design and for measured data analysis. Our simulator enables to model the orbital motion, range, terrain profile, reflectivity, and their influence on the over all energy budget and the ultimate signal to noise ratio acceptable for the altimetry. The simulator can be adopted for various air or space born application.

  2. Sub electron readout noise & photon counting devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gach, J.-L.; Balard, Ph.; Daigle, O.; Destefanis, G.; Feautrier, Ph.; Guillaume, Ch.; Rothman, J.

    We present recent advances on ultra low noise visible detectors at Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille, photon counting and EMCCD developments in collaboration with Observatoire de haute provence, Laboratoire d'astrophysique de l'observatoire de Grenoble and Laboratoire d'Astrophysique Experimentale (Montreal). After a review of the progress with third generation Image Photon Counting Systems (IPCS), we present the OCAM camera, based on the E2V CCD220 EMCCD, part of the Opticon JRA2 programme, and the CCCP controller, a new controller for the 3DNTT instrument that reduces the clock induced charge of an EMCCD by a factor 10, making it competitive with IPCS detectors for very faint fluxes. We will finally present the RAPID project and the concept of photon counting avalanche photodiode CMOS device (in collaboration with CEA-LETI) which is foreseen to be the ultimate detector for the visible-IR range providing no readout noise, high QE and extremely fast readout.

  3. Plastic microchannel plates with nano-engineered films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaulieu, D. R.; Gorelikov, D.; Klotzsch, H.; de Rouffignac, P.; Saadatmand, K.; Stenton, K.; Sullivan, N.; Tremsin, A. S.

    2011-05-01

    Since their invention decades ago, microchannel plate (MCP) performance has been defined by the properties of the substrate material, which defines both mechanical structure and electron amplification within the device. Specific glass compositions have been developed to provide the conduction and electron emission layer at the surface of the pores. Alternative technologies using quartz and alumina substrates have not matured enough to become a viable substitute to lead-glass-based MCPs.In this paper we report on the development of new MCP devices from plastic substrates. The plastic substrate serves only as a mechanical structure: the electron amplification properties are provided by nano-engineered conduction and emission layers. The film deposition procedures were optimized for low temperatures compatible with the polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) plastic chosen for this work.The gain of the PMMA MCP with aspect ratio of ˜27:1 and pore diameter ˜50 μm spaced on 70 μm hexagonal grid exceeded 200 at 470 V accelerating bias.Development of hydrogen-rich plastic MCPs should enable direct detection of fast neutrons through proton recoil reaction. Recoil protons with escape ranges comparable to the wall thickness will initiate an electron avalanche upon collision with the pore walls. The electron signal is then amplified within the MCP pore allowing high spatial and temporal resolution for each detected fast neutron. We expect to achieve ˜1% detection efficiency for 1-15 MeV neutrons with temporal resolution <10 ns, spatial resolution of <200 μm and very low background noise.

  4. Characterisation of low power readout electronics for a UV microchannel plate detector with cross-strip readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeifer, M.; Barnstedt, J.; Diebold, S.; Hermanutz, S.; Kalkuhl, C.; Kappelmann, N.; Schanz, T.; Schütze, B.; Werner, K.

    2014-07-01

    Astronomical observations in the ultraviolet (UV) wavelength range between 91 and 300nm are fundamental for the progress in astrophysics. Scientific success of future UV observatories raises the need for technology development in the areas of detectors, optical components, and their coatings. We develop solar blind and photon counting microchannel plate (MCP) UV detectors as a contribution to the progress in UV observation technology. New combinations of materials for the photocathode (see paper No. 9144-111, this volume, for details) as well as a cross-strip (XS) anode, having 64 strips on each layer, are used. Pre-amplification of the charge deposited onto the anode is performed by the Beetle chip designed at the Max-Planck-Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg for LHCb at CERN. It features 128 pre-amplifiers on one die and provides the analogue output in a four-fold serial stream. This stream is digitised by only four ADCs and is processed in an FPGA. This concept results in a reduced power consumption well below 10W as well as a reduced volume, weight and complexity of the readout electronics compared to existing cross-strip readouts. We developed an electronics prototype assembly and a setup in a vacuum chamber that is similar to the configuration in the final detector. The setup in the chamber is used for the burn-in of the MCPs as well as for tests of the readout electronics prototype assembly incorporating realistic signals. In this paper, information on the XS anodes as well as on the hybrid PCB carrying the Beetle pre-amplifier chip is shown. Details on the readout electronics design as well as details of the setup in the vacuum chamber are presented. An outlook to the next steps in the development process is given.

  5. Novel large format sealed tube microchannel plate detectors for Cherenkov timing and imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegmund, O. H. W.; McPhate, J. B.; Vallerga, J. V.; Tremsin, A. S.; Jelinsky, S. R.; Frisch, H. J.; Lappd Collaboration

    2011-05-01

    Large area (20×20 cm 2) sealed tube detectors using novel borosilicate glass microchannel plates, with bialkali photocathodes and strip-line readouts are being developed for Cherenkov light detection. Designs based on conventional sealed tubes with alumina brazed body construction and hot indium seals have been developed. Borosilicate glass substrates with 20 and 40 μm holes have been processed using atomic layer deposition to produce functional microchannel plates. Initial results for these in a 33 mm format show gain, imaging performance, pulse shape and lifetime characteristics that are similar to standard glass microchannel plates. Large area (20×20 cm 2) borosilicate glass substrates with 20 μm pores have also been made.

  6. Preliminary results with saturable microchannel array plates. [featuring positive ion feedback elimination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Timothy, J. G.

    1974-01-01

    Microchannel array plates with a performance comparable to that of a conventional channel electron multiplier have been obtained for the first time. These array plates employ an angled electrostatic field to inhibit the feedback of positive ions within the microchannels. Saturated output pulse height distributions with modal gain values in excess of 10 million have been obtained and stable operation demonstrated over a range of ambient pressures from 0.0000001 to 0.00008 torr. However, a time-dependent reduction in the gain has been observed with these experimental plates because of the accumulation of charge on the insulating strips which are inserted in the wall of the microchannel to establish the angled electrostatic field.

  7. Flare star monitoring with a new photon-counting imaging detector

    SciTech Connect

    Casperson, D.

    1997-12-31

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). A search for faint time-varying optical signals from the nighttime sky has been conducted in parallel with the programmatic development of a new type of imaging detector. This detector combines high spatial and high temporal resolution with single-photon-counting sensitivity over a 40-mm diameter large-area format. It is called a microchannel plate with crossed delay line readout, or MCP/CDL, and is placed in the focal plane of a telescope to collect time-resolved images from objects such as flaring stars and other astrophysical transient sources. A short-lived prototype MCP/CDL was used to provide the initial stellar images for this project, but the author could not generate any extended database with which to characterize flare star populations. Consequently, a supplementary experimental search for optical transients was begun, utilizing the NASA 3-meter-aperture Liquid Mirror Telescope (LMT) facility in Cloudcroft, NM.

  8. Airborne UV photon-counting radiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Marc C.; Wilcher, George; Banks, Calvin R.; Wood, Ronald L.

    2000-11-01

    The radiometric measurements group at the Arnold Engineering Development Center (AEDC) has developed new solar-blind radiometers for the SENSOR TALON flight test. These radiometers will be flown in an instrument pod by the 46th Test Wing at Eglin AFB. The radiometers are required to fit into a single quadrant of a 22-in.-diam sphere turret of the instrument pod. Because of minimal space requirements and photon-counting sensitivity needs, the radiometric measurements group used image intensifiers instead of the standard photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). The new design concept improved the photon-counting sensitivity, dynamic range, and uniformity of the field of view as compared to standard PMTs. A custom data acquisition system was required to miniaturize the electronics and generate a pulse code-modulated (PCM) data stream to the standard tape recording system.

  9. Photon Counting Chirped Amplitude Modulation Ladar

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-01

    135 S. Taylor Ave., Room 103, Louisville, CO 80027-3025 14. ABSTRACT This work developed a method using Geiger - mode avalanche photodiode (GM-APD...effort to develop a method using Geiger - mode avalanche photodiode (GM-APD) photon counting detectors in the U.S. Army Research Laboratory’s chirped...architecture are discussed. 15. SUBJECT TERMS laser radar, ladar, avalanche photo-detectors, Geiger mode detectors, chirped amplitude modulation

  10. Study on the strain in a silicon microchannel plate by micro-Raman analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shaohui; Fang, Jiabing; Wu, Dajun; Zhang, Chi; Zhu, Yiping; Xiong, Dayuan; Wang, Lianwei; Yang, Pingxiong; Chu, Paul K.

    2016-05-01

    Micro-Raman analysis was used to identify the oxidation of a silicon microchannel plate (SiMCP) and it indicated that the bend phenomenon of the SiMCP was related to the release of stress and the volume expending of the silicon wall during the oxidation process.

  11. Flat field response of the microchannel plate detectors used on the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vallerga, J. V.; Gibson, J. L.; Siegmund, O. H. W.; Vedder, P. W.

    1989-01-01

    The results of the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) flat field calibrations of two of the flight detectors to be flown on the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer Satellite (EUVE) are presented. Images of about 40 million detected events binned 512 by 512 are sufficient to show microchannel plate fixed pattern noise such as hexagonal microchannel multifiber bundle interfaces, 'dead' spots, edge distortion, and differential nonlinearity. Differences due to photocathode material and dependencies on EUV wavelength are also described. Over large spatial scales, the detector response is flat to better than 10 percent of the mean response, but, at spatial scales less than 1 mm, the variations from the mean can be as large as 20 percent.

  12. Flat field response of the microchannel plate detectors used on the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vallerga, J. V.; Gibson, J. L.; Siegmund, O. H. W.; Vedder, P. W.

    1989-01-01

    The results of the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) flat field calibrations of two of the flight detectors to be flown on the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer Satellite (EUVE) are presented. Images of about 40 million detected events binned 512 by 512 are sufficient to show microchannel plate fixed pattern noise such as hexagonal microchannel multifiber bundle interfaces, 'dead' spots, edge distortion, and differential nonlinearity. Differences due to photocathode material and dependencies on EUV wavelength are also described. Over large spatial scales, the detector response is flat to better than 10 percent of the mean response, but, at spatial scales less than 1 mm, the variations from the mean can be as large as 20 percent.

  13. Advances in Performance of Microchannel Plate Detectors for HEDP Diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Ming Wu, Craig Kruschwitz, Ken Moy, Greg Rochau

    2009-10-01

    In recent years, a team from NSTec and SNL has built a unique capability to develop microchannel plate (MCP)?based framing x-ray cameras for HEDP diagnostics. At the SNL Z facility, multistrip MCP detectors to record up to eight channels are employed in 2-D, sub-nanosecond time-resolved imaging and time- and space-resolved spectroscopy diagnostics. Progressively more stringent technical temporal resolution and response uniformity requirements have necessitated a systematic design approach based on iterative modeling of the MCP using inputs from electrical circuit characterization. An inherently large exponential dependence in MCP gain, V{sup 11.5}, has mandated a firm understanding of the applied voltage pulse shape propagating across the strip. We pioneered direct measurements of the propagating waveform using a Picoprobe{reg_sign} and developed a Monte Carlo code to simulate MCP response to compare against test measurements. This scheme is shown in Figure 1. The simulation detailed a physical model of the cascade and amplification process of the MCP that includes energy conservation for the secondary electrons, the effects of elastic scattering of low-energy electrons from the channel wall, and gain saturation mechanisms from wall charging and space charge. Our model can simulate MCP response for both static and pulsed voltage waveforms. Using this design approach, we began to characterize the newly developed second-generation detector (H-CA-65) by using a Manson x-ray source to evaluate the following DC characteristics: MCP sensitivity as a function of bias voltage, flat-field uniformity and spatial resolution, and variation of spatial resolution and sensitivity as a function of phosphor bias voltage. Dynamic performance and temporal response were obtained by using an NSTec short-pulse laser to measure optical gate profiles, saturation, and dynamic range. These data were processed and combined to obtain the gain variation and gate profiles for any position along

  14. Advances in photon counting for bioluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingle, Martin B.; Powell, Ralph

    1998-11-01

    Photon counting systems were originally developed for astronomy, initially by the astronomical community. However, a major application area is in the study of luminescent probes in living plants, fishes and cell cultures. For these applications, it has been necessary to develop camera system capability at very low light levels -- a few photons occasionally -- and also at reasonably high light levels to enable the systems to be focused and to collect quality images of the object under study. The paper presents new data on MTF at extremely low photon flux and conventional ICCD illumination, counting efficiency and dark noise as a function of temperature.

  15. Optimizing the position resolution of a Z-stack microchannel plate resistive anode detector for low intensity signals.

    PubMed

    Wiggins, B B; Richardson, E; Siwal, D; Hudan, S; deSouza, R T

    2015-08-01

    A method for achieving good position resolution of low-intensity electron signals using a microchannel plate resistive anode detector is demonstrated. Electron events at a rate of 7 counts s(-1) are detected using a Z-stack microchannel plate. The dependence of position resolution on both the distance and the potential difference between the microchannel plate and resistive anode is investigated. Using standard commercial electronics, a measured position resolution of 170 μm (FWHM) is obtained, which corresponds to an intrinsic resolution of 157 μm (FWHM).

  16. Optimizing the position resolution of a Z-stack microchannel plate resistive anode detector for low intensity signals

    SciTech Connect

    Wiggins, B. B.; Richardson, E.; Siwal, D.; Hudan, S.; Souza, R. T. de

    2015-08-15

    A method for achieving good position resolution of low-intensity electron signals using a microchannel plate resistive anode detector is demonstrated. Electron events at a rate of 7 counts s{sup −1} are detected using a Z-stack microchannel plate. The dependence of position resolution on both the distance and the potential difference between the microchannel plate and resistive anode is investigated. Using standard commercial electronics, a measured position resolution of 170 μm (FWHM) is obtained, which corresponds to an intrinsic resolution of 157 μm (FWHM)

  17. Oscillatory electroosmotic flow in a parallel-plate microchannel under asymmetric zeta potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peralta, M.; Arcos, J.; Méndez, F.; Bautista, O.

    2017-06-01

    In this work, we conduct a theoretical analysis of the start-up of an oscillatory electroosmotic flow (EOF) in a parallel-plate microchannel under asymmetric zeta potentials. It is found that the transient evolution of the flow field is controlled by the parameters {R}ω , {R}\\zeta , and \\bar{κ }, which represent the dimensionless frequency, the ratio of the zeta potentials of the microchannel walls, and the electrokinetic parameter, which is defined as the ratio of the microchannel height to the Debye length. The analysis is performed for both low and high zeta potentials; in the former case, an analytical solution is derived, whereas in the latter, a numerical solution is obtained. These solutions provide the fundamental characteristics of the oscillatory EOFs for which, with suitable adjustment of the zeta potential and the dimensionless frequency, the velocity profiles of the fluid flow exhibit symmetric or asymmetric shapes.

  18. High resolution decoding techniques and single-chip decoders for multi-anode microchannel arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kasle, David B.

    1989-01-01

    While the pixel size in a standard multianode microchannel array (MAMA) photon-counting detector is determined by the spacing of the anode array, the factor most fundamentally limiting pixel resolution is the spacing of the channels in the microchannel plate. Detector resolution can be improved by means of digitization followed by a centroiding procedure. The decoding hardware and the techniques for enhanced pixel resolution are presently discussed with a view to the factors of speed and complexity. A single-chip CMOS gate-array implementation of the decoder is devised and compared with existing multichip decoders' performance.

  19. High resolution decoding techniques and single-chip decoders for multi-anode microchannel arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kasle, David B.

    1989-01-01

    While the pixel size in a standard multianode microchannel array (MAMA) photon-counting detector is determined by the spacing of the anode array, the factor most fundamentally limiting pixel resolution is the spacing of the channels in the microchannel plate. Detector resolution can be improved by means of digitization followed by a centroiding procedure. The decoding hardware and the techniques for enhanced pixel resolution are presently discussed with a view to the factors of speed and complexity. A single-chip CMOS gate-array implementation of the decoder is devised and compared with existing multichip decoders' performance.

  20. Photon Counts Statistics in Leukocyte Cell Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Wijk, Eduard; van der Greef, Jan; van Wijk, Roeland

    2011-12-01

    In the present experiment ultra-weak photon emission/ chemiluminescence from isolated neutrophils was recorded. It is associated with the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the "respiratory burst" process which can be activated by PMA (Phorbol 12-Myristate 13-Acetate). Commonly, the reaction is demonstrated utilizing the enhancer luminol. However, with the use of highly sensitive photomultiplier equipment it is also recorded without enhancer. In that case, it can be hypothesized that photon count statistics may assist in understanding the underlying metabolic activity and cooperation of these cells. To study this hypothesis leukocytes were stimulated with PMA and increased photon signals were recorded in the quasi stable period utilizing Fano factor analysis at different window sizes. The Fano factor is defined by the variance over the mean of the number of photon within the observation time. The analysis demonstrated that the Fano factor of true signal and not of the surrogate signals obtained by random shuffling increases when the window size increased. It is concluded that photon count statistics, in particular Fano factor analysis, provides information regarding leukocyte interactions. It opens the perspective to utilize this analytical procedure in (in vivo) inflammation research. However, this needs further validation.

  1. Development of an ultrasmall-pore microchannel plate for space sciences applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laprade, Bruce N.; Dykstra, Mark W.; Langevin, Francis

    1996-10-01

    Microchannel plates (MCPs) are solid state electron multipliers consisting of millions (10E5 - 10E7 channels/cm(superscript 2)) of microscopic (typically 10 - 25 microns) continuous dynode electron multipliers all fused together in a solid array. Fabricated from an alkali doped, reduced lead silicate glass, microchannel plates are known as excellent high gain, low noise, two dimensional detectors of charged particles and electromagnetic radiation. The microchannel plate manufacturing process begins with a series of glass fiber draws in which an acid soluble core glass is combined with an alkali soluble clad tube and drawn to form a mono fiber. Mono fibers (typically 2,000 to 4,000) are then assembled into a hexagonal preform called a multi wrap. The preform is again drawn to form a multifiber producing an overall feature size reduction of typically 2000:1. The multi fibers then become the basic building blocks. Hundreds of multi fibers are next arranged to form the active area of the MCP. High temperature vacuum fusion is then used to fuse the multi fibers together with the solid glass border (if used) to form a billet or boule. Standard semiconductor slicing, lapping and polishing techniques are used to prepare the wafers for chemical processing. Chemical processing consists of etching open the microchannels, adjusting the open area ratio (OAR) and preparing the silica rich emissive layer. A hydrogen firing is used to reduce the lead glass making it electrically conductive. Finally a thin (typically 2,000 to 3,000 angstroms) film of metalization is vacuum deposited on both sides of the microchannel plate to electrically connect each of the channels in parallel, therefore ensuring the same potential is applied to each channel. Microchannel plates operate on the principle of secondary electron emission. In operation primary events enter the input side of the MCP and collide with the channel wall. If the primary event has sufficient energy, secondary electrons will

  2. Nanosecond gating properties of proximity focused microchannel plate image intensifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, N. S. P.; King, N. S. P.; Yates, G. J.; Jaramillo, S. A.; Noel, B. W.; Detch, J. L., Jr.; Ogle, J. W.

    The optical gating properties of Multichannel plate image intensifiers were characterized. Emphasis was placed on parameters relevant to gating speed and correlations between the applied electrical and resultant optical gates.

  3. Performance of a compact position-sensitive photon counting detector with image charge coupling to an air-side anode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagutzki, O.; Czasch, A.; Schössler, S.

    2013-05-01

    We discuss a novel micro-channel plate (MCP) photomultiplier with resistive screen (RS-PMT) as a detection device for space- and time-correlated single photon counting, illustrated by several applications. The photomultiplier tube resembles a standard image intensifier device. However, the rear phosphor screen is replaced by a ceramic "window" with resistive coating. The MCP output is transferred through the ceramic plate to the read-out electrode (on the air side) via capacity-coupling of the image charge. This design allows for an easy reconfiguration of the read-out electrode (e.g. pixel, charge-sharing, cross-strip, delay-line) without breaking the vacuum for optimizing the detector performance towards a certain task. It also eases the design and manufacturing process of such a multi-purpose photomultiplier tube. Temporal and spatial resolutions well below 100 ps and 100 microns, respectively, have been reported at event rates as high as 1 MHz, for up to 40 mm effective detection diameter. In this paper we will discuss several applications like wide-field fluorescence microscopy and dual γ/fast-neutron radiography for air cargo screening and conclude with an outlook on large-area detectors for thermal neutrons based on MCPs.

  4. 3D photon counting integral imaging with unknown sensor positions.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xiao; Javidi, Bahram

    2012-05-01

    Photon counting techniques have been introduced with integral imaging for three-dimensional (3D) imaging applications. The previous reports in this area assumed a priori knowledge of exact sensor positions for 3D image reconstruction, which may be difficult to satisfy in certain applications. In this paper, we extend the photon counting 3D imaging system to situations where sensor positions are unknown. To estimate sensor positions in photon counting integral imaging, scene details of photon counting images are needed for image correspondences matching. Therefore, an iterative method based on the total variation maximum a posteriori expectation maximization (MAP-EM) algorithm is used to restore photon counting images. Experimental results are presented to show the feasibility of the method. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on 3D photon counting integral imaging with unknown sensor positions. © 2012 Optical Society of America

  5. Photon-counting-based dust monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamal, Karel; Prochazka, Ivan; Blazej, Josef; Eslerova, Iva; Sopko, Bruno; Pasta, Armin

    1999-05-01

    Most of the dust monitors are based on optical principle: the scattered light intensity is registered. The classical approach is using the multiple photon optical signal intensity and processing. Single photon detection -- photon counting is exploited in Satellite Laser Ranging and was implemented in space born application for Mars Surveyor Program 98, as well. The main advantage of single photon detection is an extreme sensitivity, the entire digital approach, no analog signal is treated. All the light intensity information is acquired on the basis of statistical data treatment. The dust detector consists of the LED diode based transmitter, single photon solid state diode detector and the digital data processing unit. The light beam from the LED diode passing the dust column is detected in a photo detector. The detector employs the avalanche Silicon photodiode 40 micrometers diameter active area and is operated in a passive gating and active quenching mode above its breakdown voltage. The detector provides uniform digital pulses, one for each photon detected. The light intensity measurement is converted into the photon flux counting -- frequency or event counting. The microcomputer controlled data processing electronics counts the detector output pulses, accounts for detector dark count rate, calibration constants, and computes the corresponding dust concentration averaged over desired period. The second LED located close to the detector is used as a reference light source to eliminate the temperature, aging and sensor contamination influence. The laboratory measurements show the long term and temperature stability of the scale within 1%. The setup was tested at the cement plant smoke stack and compared to the commercial optical dust concentration monitor operating on analog multiphoton principle. Due to an extreme optical sensitivity of the photon counting detector, the energy balance is favorable to realize lightweight equipment by a factor of ten in comparison

  6. Sensitive far uv spectrograph with a multispectral element microchannel plate detector for rocket-borne astronomy.

    PubMed

    Weiser, H; Vitz, R C; Moos, H W; Weinstein, A

    1976-12-01

    An evacuated high transmission prism spectrograph using a microchannel plate detection system with resistive strip readout was flown behind a precision pointing telescope on a sounding rocket. The construction, preparation, flight performance, and calibration stability of the system are discussed. Despite the adverse environmental conditions associated with sounding rocket flights, the microchannel detector system performed well. Far uv spectra (1160-1750 A) of stellar and planetary objects were obtained; spectral features with fluxes as low as 0.06 photons cm(-2) sec(-1) were detectable. This was achieved by operating the plates at lower than normal gains, using sensitive pulse counting electronics with both upper and lower limit discriminators, and maintaining the spectrograph and detector at a pressure of ~10(-6) Torr until reaching altitude.

  7. Monte Carlo simulations of microchannel plate detectors. I. Steady-state voltage bias results

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Ming; Kruschwitz, Craig A.; Morgan, Dane V.; Morgan, Jiaming

    2008-07-15

    X-ray detectors based on straight-channel microchannel plates (MCPs) are a powerful diagnostic tool for two-dimensional, time-resolved imaging and time-resolved x-ray spectroscopy in the fields of laser-driven inertial confinement fusion and fast Z-pinch experiments. Understanding the behavior of microchannel plates as used in such detectors is critical to understanding the data obtained. The subject of this paper is a Monte Carlo computer code we have developed to simulate the electron cascade in a MCP under a static applied voltage. Also included in the simulation is elastic reflection of low-energy electrons from the channel wall, which is important at lower voltages. When model results were compared to measured MCP sensitivities, good agreement was found. Spatial resolution simulations of MCP-based detectors were also presented and found to agree with experimental measurements.

  8. Calibration of a microchannel plate based extreme ultraviolet grazing incident spectrometer at the Advanced Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Bakeman, M. S.; Tilborg, J. van; Sokollik, T.; Baum, D.; Ybarrolaza, N.; Duarte, R.; Toth, C.; Leemans, W. P.

    2010-10-15

    We present the design and calibration of a microchannel plate based extreme ultraviolet spectrometer. Calibration was performed at the Advance Light Source (ALS) at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). This spectrometer will be used to record the single shot spectrum of radiation emitted by the tapered hybrid undulator (THUNDER) undulator installed at the LOASIS GeV-class laser-plasma-accelerator. The spectrometer uses an aberration-corrected concave grating with 1200 lines/mm covering 11-62 nm and a microchannel plate detector with a CsI coated photocathode for increased quantum efficiency in the extreme ultraviolet. A touch screen interface controls the grating angle, aperture size, and placement of the detector in vacuum, allowing for high-resolution measurements over the entire spectral range.

  9. Calibration of a microchannel plate based extreme ultraviolet grazing incident spectrometer at the Advanced Light Source.

    PubMed

    Bakeman, M S; van Tilborg, J; Sokollik, T; Baum, D; Ybarrolaza, N; Duarte, R; Toth, C; Leemans, W P

    2010-10-01

    We present the design and calibration of a microchannel plate based extreme ultraviolet spectrometer. Calibration was performed at the Advance Light Source (ALS) at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). This spectrometer will be used to record the single shot spectrum of radiation emitted by the tapered hybrid undulator (THUNDER) undulator installed at the LOASIS GeV-class laser-plasma-accelerator. The spectrometer uses an aberration-corrected concave grating with 1200 lines/mm covering 11-62 nm and a microchannel plate detector with a CsI coated photocathode for increased quantum efficiency in the extreme ultraviolet. A touch screen interface controls the grating angle, aperture size, and placement of the detector in vacuum, allowing for high-resolution measurements over the entire spectral range.

  10. Microchannel plate life tests. [UV detector in Mariner Jupiter/Saturn spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandel, B. R.; Broadfoot, A. L.; Shemansky, D. E.

    1977-01-01

    The behavior of the gain of a microchannel plate (MCP) during operation of the latter at moderate output currents was investigated. The total charge per unit area, Q, extracted from the MCP is shown to be the relevant quantity for evaluating MCP performance. The shape of the gain versus Q curve provides information on the gain decay process. Long periods of stable gain, frequently exhibited by channeltrons, were not observed in the present experiment.

  11. Characteristics of square pore and low noise microchannel plate stacks. [for x-ray astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegmund, Oswald H. W.; Marsh, Daniel; Stock, Joseph; Gaines, Geoffrey

    1992-01-01

    An evaluation is conducted of several square-pore microchannel plates (MCPs) with either 25- or 85-micron diameter pores and 80:1 or 50:1 channel length/diameter ratio. Flat field measurements show that the 25-micron-pored MCPs, unlike those with 85-micron pores, exhibit periodic modulation; this may be due to the MCP stacking configurations. Attention is given to the relative quantum detection efficiency advantages of the two MCPs.

  12. Characteristics of square pore and low noise microchannel plate stacks. [for x-ray astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegmund, Oswald H. W.; Marsh, Daniel; Stock, Joseph; Gaines, Geoffrey

    1992-01-01

    An evaluation is conducted of several square-pore microchannel plates (MCPs) with either 25- or 85-micron diameter pores and 80:1 or 50:1 channel length/diameter ratio. Flat field measurements show that the 25-micron-pored MCPs, unlike those with 85-micron pores, exhibit periodic modulation; this may be due to the MCP stacking configurations. Attention is given to the relative quantum detection efficiency advantages of the two MCPs.

  13. Antiproton, positron, and electron imaging with a microchannel plate/phosphor detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andresen, G. B.; Bertsche, W.; Bowe, P. D.; Bray, C. C.; Butler, E.; Cesar, C. L.; Chapman, S.; Charlton, M.; El Nasr, S. Seif; Fajans, J.; Fujiwara, M. C.; Gill, D. R.; Hangst, J. S.; Hardy, W. N.; Hayano, R. S.; Hayden, M. E.; Humphries, A. J.; Hydomako, R.; Jørgensen, L. V.; Kerrigan, S. J.; Kurchaninov, L.; Lambo, R.; Madsen, N.; Nolan, P.; Olchanski, K.; Olin, A.; Povilus, A. P.; Pusa, P.; Sarid, E.; Silveira, D. M.; Storey, J. W.; Thompson, R. I.; van der Werf, D. P.; Yamazaki, Y.; Alpha Collaboration

    2009-12-01

    A microchannel plate (MCP)/phosphor screen assembly has been used to destructively measure the radial profile of cold, confined antiprotons, electrons, and positrons in the ALPHA experiment, with the goal of using these trapped particles for antihydrogen creation and confinement. The response of the MCP to low energy (10-200 eV, <1 eV spread) antiproton extractions is compared to that of electrons and positrons.

  14. Antiproton, positron, and electron imaging with a microchannel plate/phosphor detector

    SciTech Connect

    Andresen, G. B.; Bowe, P. D.; Hangst, J. S.; Bertsche, W.; Butler, E.; Charlton, M.; Humphries, A. J.; Joergensen, L. V.; Kerrigan, S. J.; Madsen, N.; Werf, D. P. van der; Bray, C. C.; Chapman, S.; Fajans, J.; Povilus, A. P.; Cesar, C. L.; Lambo, R.; Fujiwara, M. C.; Gill, D. R.; Collaboration: ALPHA Collaboration; and others

    2009-12-15

    A microchannel plate (MCP)/phosphor screen assembly has been used to destructively measure the radial profile of cold, confined antiprotons, electrons, and positrons in the ALPHA experiment, with the goal of using these trapped particles for antihydrogen creation and confinement. The response of the MCP to low energy (10-200 eV, <1 eV spread) antiproton extractions is compared to that of electrons and positrons.

  15. Suppression of driving laser in high harmonic generation with a microchannel plate.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qi; Zhao, Kun; Li, Jie; Chini, Michael; Cheng, Yan; Wu, Yi; Cunningham, Eric; Chang, Zenghu

    2014-06-15

    Separating the infrared driving laser from the extreme ultraviolet (XUV) pulses after high-order harmonic generation has been a long-standing difficulty. In this Letter, we propose and demonstrate that the driving laser can be blocked by simply installing a microchannel plate (MCP) into the beam line. In addition to its high damage threshold, the MCP filter also transmits photons over the entire XUV region. This paves the way for attosecond pulse generation with unprecedented bandwidth.

  16. Note: A timing micro-channel plate detector with backside fast preamplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Wei; Yu, Deyang Lu, Rongchun; Liu, Junliang; Cai, Xiaohong

    2014-03-15

    A timing micro-channel plate detector with a backside double-channel fast preamplifier was developed to avoid distortion during signal propagation from the anode to the preamplifier. The mechanical and electronic structure is described. The detector including its backside preamplifier is tested by a {sup 241}Am α-source and a rise time of ∼2 ns with an output background noise of 4 mV{sub rms} was achieved.

  17. Test of microchannel plates in magnetic fields up to 4.5 T

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnyakov, A. Yu; Barnyakov, M. Yu; Prisekin, V. G.; Karpov, S. V.; Katcin, A. A.

    2017-02-01

    Detectors based on microchannel plates (MCP) can provide high time resolution and are able to operate in high magnetic field. An experimental setup based on a superconductive solenoid with 120 mm bore was created in BINP. The influence of magnetic field up to 4.5 T on the MCP photomultiplier parameters was studied. Several types of photodetectors produced in Novosibirsk were tested. Results of time resolution measurements, dependencies of gain and photon detection efficiency on magnetic field are presented.

  18. Photon Counting Using Edge-Detection Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gin, Jonathan W.; Nguyen, Danh H.; Farr, William H.

    2010-01-01

    New applications such as high-datarate, photon-starved, free-space optical communications require photon counting at flux rates into gigaphoton-per-second regimes coupled with subnanosecond timing accuracy. Current single-photon detectors that are capable of handling such operating conditions are designed in an array format and produce output pulses that span multiple sample times. In order to discern one pulse from another and not to overcount the number of incoming photons, a detection algorithm must be applied to the sampled detector output pulses. As flux rates increase, the ability to implement such a detection algorithm becomes difficult within a digital processor that may reside within a field-programmable gate array (FPGA). Systems have been developed and implemented to both characterize gigahertz bandwidth single-photon detectors, as well as process photon count signals at rates into gigaphotons per second in order to implement communications links at SCPPM (serial concatenated pulse position modulation) encoded data rates exceeding 100 megabits per second with efficiencies greater than two bits per detected photon. A hardware edge-detection algorithm and corresponding signal combining and deserialization hardware were developed to meet these requirements at sample rates up to 10 GHz. The photon discriminator deserializer hardware board accepts four inputs, which allows for the ability to take inputs from a quadphoton counting detector, to support requirements for optical tracking with a reduced number of hardware components. The four inputs are hardware leading-edge detected independently. After leading-edge detection, the resultant samples are ORed together prior to deserialization. The deserialization is performed to reduce the rate at which data is passed to a digital signal processor, perhaps residing within an FPGA. The hardware implements four separate analog inputs that are connected through RF connectors. Each analog input is fed to a high-speed 1

  19. Photon counting techniques with silicon avalanche photodiodes.

    PubMed

    Dautet, H; Deschamps, P; Dion, B; Macgregor, A D; Macsween, D; McIntyre, R J; Trottier, C; Webb, P P

    1993-07-20

    The properties of avalanche photodiodes and associated electronics required for photon counting in the Geiger and the sub-Geiger modes are reviewed. When the Geiger mode is used, there are significant improvements reported in overall photon detection efficiencies (approaching 70% at 633 nm), and a timing jitter (under 200 ps) is achieved with passive quenching at high overvoltages (20-30 V). The results obtained by using an active-mode fast quench circuit capable of switching overvoltages as high as 15 V (giving photon detection efficiencies in the 50% range) with a dead time of less than 50 ns are reported. Larger diodes (up to 1 mm in diameter) that are usable in the Geiger mode and that have quantum efficiencies over 80% in the 500-800-nm range are also reported.

  20. Systems and methods for forming microchannel plate (MCP) photodetector assemblies

    DOEpatents

    Xia, Lei; Zhao, Huyue; Wagner, Robert G.; Gregar, Joseph S.; Xie, Junqi; Wang, Jingbo

    2017-07-11

    A MCP photodetector assembly includes an anode plate including a plurality of electrical traces positioned thereon, a plurality of MCPs and a plurality of grid spacers. The MCPs are positioned between the grid spacers. The grid spacers have a grid spacer shape defining at least one aperture. A plurality of shims are positioned between the grid spacers and the MCPs so as to form a stack positioned on the anode plate. Each of the plurality of shims have a shim shape which is the same as the grid spacer shape such that each of the plurality of shims and each of the plurality of grid spacers overlap so as to define at least one MCP aperture. At least a portion of the plurality of MCPs are positioned within the MCP aperture. The shims are structured to electrically couple the MCPs to the anode plate.

  1. Fabrication and characterization of monolithically integrated microchannel plates based on amorphous silicon.

    PubMed

    Franco, Andrea; Geissbühler, Jonas; Wyrsch, Nicolas; Ballif, Christophe

    2014-04-04

    Microchannel plates are vacuum-based electron multipliers for particle--in particular, photon--detection, with applications ranging from image intensifiers to single-photon detectors. Their key strengths are large signal amplification, large active area, micrometric spatial resolution and picosecond temporal resolution. Here, we present the first microchannel plate made of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) instead of lead glass. The breakthrough lies in the possibility of realizing amorphous silicon-based microchannel plates (AMCPs) on any kind of substrate. This achievement is based on mastering the deposition of an ultra-thick (80-120 μm) stress-controlled a-Si:H layer from the gas phase at temperatures of about 200 °C and micromachining the channels by dry etching. We fabricated AMCPs that are vertically integrated on metallic anodes of test structures, proving the feasibility of monolithic integration of, for instance, AMCPs on application-specific integrated circuits for signal processing. We show an electron multiplication factor exceeding 30 for an aspect ratio, namely channel length over aperture, of 12.5:1. This result was achieved for input photoelectron currents up to 100 pA, in the continuous illumination regime, which provides a first evidence of the a-Si:H effectiveness in replenishing the electrons dispensed in the multiplication process.

  2. Fabrication and characterization of monolithically integrated microchannel plates based on amorphous silicon

    PubMed Central

    Franco, Andrea; Geissbühler, Jonas; Wyrsch, Nicolas; Ballif, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    Microchannel plates are vacuum-based electron multipliers for particle—in particular, photon— detection, with applications ranging from image intensifiers to single-photon detectors. Their key strengths are large signal amplification, large active area, micrometric spatial resolution and picosecond temporal resolution. Here, we present the first microchannel plate made of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) instead of lead glass. The breakthrough lies in the possibility of realizing amorphous silicon-based microchannel plates (AMCPs) on any kind of substrate. This achievement is based on mastering the deposition of an ultra-thick (80–120 μm) stress-controlled a-Si:H layer from the gas phase at temperatures of about 200°C and micromachining the channels by dry etching. We fabricated AMCPs that are vertically integrated on metallic anodes of test structures, proving the feasibility of monolithic integration of, for instance, AMCPs on application-specific integrated circuits for signal processing. We show an electron multiplication factor exceeding 30 for an aspect ratio, namely channel length over aperture, of 12.5:1. This result was achieved for input photoelectron currents up to 100 pA, in the continuous illumination regime, which provides a first evidence of the a-Si:H effectiveness in replenishing the electrons dispensed in the multiplication process. PMID:24698955

  3. Detecting small debris using a ground-based photon counting detector

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, C.; Priedhorsky, W.C.; Baron, M.H.

    1993-05-01

    We describe a sensitive technique for detecting small space debris that exploits a fast photon-counting imager. Microchannel plate detectors using crossed delay-line readout can achieve a resolution of 2048 {times} 2048 spatial pixels and a maximum count rate of about 10{sup 6} photons per second. A baseline debris-tracking system might couple this detector to a 16-cm aperture telescope. The detector yields x, y, and time information for each detected photon. When visualized in (x, y, t) space, photons from a fast-moving orbital object appear on a straight line. They can be distinguished from diffuse background photons, randomly scattered in the space, and star photons, which fall on a line with sidereal velocity. By searching for this unique signature, we can detect and track small debris objects. At dawn and dusk, a spherical object of 1.3 cm diameter at 400 km will reflect sunlight for an apparent magnitude of V {approx} 16. The baseline system would detect about 16 photons from this object as it crosses a 1 degree field of view in about 1 second. The Ene in (x, y, t) space will be significant in a diffuse background of {approximately} 10{sup 6} photons. We discuss the data processing scheme and line detection algorithm. The advantages of this technique are that one can (1) detect cm-size debris objects with a small telescope, and (2) detect debris moving with any direction and velocity. In this paper, we describe the progress in the development of detector and data acquisition system, the preparation for a field test for such a system, and the development and optimization of the data analysis algorithm. Detection sensitivity would currently be constrained by the capability of the data acquisition and the data processing systems, but further improvements could alleviate these bottlenecks.

  4. Detecting small debris using a ground-based photon counting detector

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, C.; Priedhorsky, W.C.; Baron, M.H.

    1993-01-01

    We describe a sensitive technique for detecting small space debris that exploits a fast photon-counting imager. Microchannel plate detectors using crossed delay-line readout can achieve a resolution of 2048 [times] 2048 spatial pixels and a maximum count rate of about 10[sup 6] photons per second. A baseline debris-tracking system might couple this detector to a 16-cm aperture telescope. The detector yields x, y, and time information for each detected photon. When visualized in (x, y, t) space, photons from a fast-moving orbital object appear on a straight line. They can be distinguished from diffuse background photons, randomly scattered in the space, and star photons, which fall on a line with sidereal velocity. By searching for this unique signature, we can detect and track small debris objects. At dawn and dusk, a spherical object of 1.3 cm diameter at 400 km will reflect sunlight for an apparent magnitude of V [approx] 16. The baseline system would detect about 16 photons from this object as it crosses a 1 degree field of view in about 1 second. The Ene in (x, y, t) space will be significant in a diffuse background of [approximately] 10[sup 6] photons. We discuss the data processing scheme and line detection algorithm. The advantages of this technique are that one can (1) detect cm-size debris objects with a small telescope, and (2) detect debris moving with any direction and velocity. In this paper, we describe the progress in the development of detector and data acquisition system, the preparation for a field test for such a system, and the development and optimization of the data analysis algorithm. Detection sensitivity would currently be constrained by the capability of the data acquisition and the data processing systems, but further improvements could alleviate these bottlenecks.

  5. a Photon-Counting Imaging Detector Using Mcps with Delay Line Readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Mark Bennett

    1990-01-01

    This dissertation describes work done toward the development of a large area (124 mm diameter) photon counting x-ray detector for protein crystallography. The detector is to be composed of a thin scintillator coupled to an imaging phototube containing a photocathode, microchannel plates (MCPs), and an electronic readout. A delay line anode has been developed consisting of an orthogonal pair of flat, bifilar helices upon which the MCP charge is collected. Results are presented on the performance of a 140 mm times 140 mm delay line anode in reading out MCPs directly excited by UV light. The readout spatial resolution is evaluated and compared with the theoretical resolution due to electronic noise. Integral positional nonlinearity, and x-y correlations are measured and described. An investigation is made into the ultimate resolution achievable with the readout. Two prototype phototubes with a 40 mm diameter active areas have been constructed. The tubes include a bialkali photocathode, a chevron pair of MCPs and a 134 mm times 134 mm delay line anode. Problems associated with a high internal pressure in the first tube are documented and their effects on imaging performance and tube component degradation are described. For the second phototube, measurements are made of photocathode spectral response and spatial uniformity. Photoelectron transmission through the MCP oxide film is investigated and the film thickness is determined. The MCP pulse height distribution is characterized as a function of position across the detector surface. Preliminary results are presented on the detector counting efficiency for 6 keV x-rays. The origins, magnitudes, and character of the phototube dark count are described. Contributions to the measured phototube spatial resolution are enumerated and quantified. The geometric linearity is evaluated over the phototube active area.

  6. Second generation airborne 3D imaging lidars based on photon counting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degnan, John J.; Wells, David; Machan, Roman; Leventhal, Edward

    2007-09-01

    The first successful photon-counting airborne laser altimeter was demonstrated in 2001 under NASA's Instrument Incubator Program (IIP). This "micro-altimeter" flew at altitudes up to 22,000 ft (6.7 km) and, using single photon returns in daylight, successfully recorded high resolution images of the underlying topography including soil, low-lying vegetation, tree canopies, water surfaces, man-made structures, ocean waves, and moving vehicles. The lidar, which operated at a wavelength of 532 nm near the peak of the solar irradiance curve, was also able to see the underlying terrain through trees and thick atmospheric haze and performed shallow water bathymetry to depths of a few meters over the Atlantic Ocean and Assawoman Bay off the Virginia coast. Sigma Space Corporation has recently developed second generation systems suitable for use in a small aircraft or mini UAV. A frequency-doubled Nd:YAG microchip laser generates few microjoule, subnanosecond pulses at fire rates up to 22 kHz. A Diffractive Optical Element (DOE) breaks the transmit beam into a 10x10 array of quasi-uniform spots which are imaged by the receive optics onto individual anodes of a high efficiency 10x10 GaAsP segmented anode microchannel plate photomultiplier. Each anode is input to one channel of a 100 channel, multistop timer demonstrated to have a 100 picosecond timing (1.5 cm range) resolution and an event recovery time less than 2 nsec. The pattern and frequency of a dual wedge optical scanner, synchronized to the laser fire rate, are tailored to provide contiguous coverage of a ground scene in a single overflight.

  7. Performance studies of high gain photomultiplier having Z-configuration of microchannel plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, C. C.; Leskovar, B.

    1980-11-01

    The characteristics of a high gain type ITT F4129 photomultiplier having three microchannel plates in cascade for electron multiplications were investigated. These plates are in the Z-configuration. Measurements are given of the gain dark current, cathode quantum efficiency, anode pulse linearity, electron transit time, single and multiphoton time spreads, fatigue, and pulse height resolution. The gain as a function of transverse magnetic field was measured and discussed. Photomultiplier characteristics as a function of the input pulse repetition frequency were also investigated and discussed.

  8. Research on resistance properties of conductive layer materials of microchannel plate film dynode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Ling-ling; Duanmu, Qingduo; Yang, Ji-kai; Wang, Guo-zheng

    2015-03-01

    Silicon Microchannel Plate - MCP - is a new image multiplier devices based semiconductor process technology. Compared with the traditional glass MCP, Silicon MCP has an advantage in technology that the dynode materials and the substrate materials are separate. At the same time, the dynode preparation process and the microchannel arrays are also separate. Two different dynode conductive layer films are prepared: polysilicon conductive films prepared by low pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) and AZO thin films coated by atomic layer deposition (ALD). The conductive films coated by ALD are superior to dynode conductive films prepared by LPCVD. By comparing the resistivity of conductive polysilicon thin film and AZO thin film of different Al concentrations doped, AZO thin film of different Al concentrations doped is a more suitable conductive layer dynode material to satisfy the MCP conductive layer resistivity requirements.

  9. Enabling photon counting detectors with dynamic attenuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Scott S.; Pelc, Norbert J.

    2014-03-01

    Photon-counting x-ray detectors (PCXDs) are being investigated as a replacement for conventional x-ray detectors because they promise several advantages, including better dose efficiency, higher resolution and spectral imaging. However, many of these advantages disappear when the x-ray flux incident on the detector is too high. We recently proposed a dynamic, piecewise-linear attenuator (or beam shaping filter) that can control the flux incident on the detector. This can restrict the operating range of the PCXD to keep the incident count rate below a given limit. We simulated a system with the piecewise-linear attenuator and a PCXD using raw data generated from forward projected DICOM files. We investigated the classic paralyzable and nonparalyzable PCXD as well as a weighted average of the two, with the weights chosen to mimic an existing PCXD (Taguchi et al, Med Phys 2011). The dynamic attenuator has small synergistic benefits with the nonparalyzable detector and large synergistic benefits with the paralyzable detector. Real PCXDs operate somewhere between these models, and the weighted average model still shows large benefits from the dynamic attenuator. We conclude that dynamic attenuators can reduce the count rate performance necessary for adopting PCXDs.

  10. Method and apparatus for enhancing microchannel plate data

    DOEpatents

    Thoe, Robert S.

    1987-01-01

    A method and apparatus for determining centroid channel locations is disclosed for use in a system activated by one or more multichannel plates (16,18) and including a linear diode array (24) providing channels of information 1, 2, . . . , n, . . . , N containing signal amplitudes A.sub.n. A source of analog A.sub.n signals (40), and a source of digital clock signals n (48), are provided. Non-zero A.sub.n values are detected in a discriminator (42). A digital signal representing p, the value of n immediately preceding that whereat A.sub.n takes its first non-zero value, is generated in a scaler (50). The analog A.sub.n signals are converted to digital in an analog to digital converter (44). The digital A.sub.n signals are added to produce a digital .SIGMA.A.sub.n signal in a full adder (46). Digital 1, 2, . . . , m signals representing the number of non-zero A.sub.n are produced by a discriminator pulse counter (52). Digital signals representing 1 A.sub.p+ 1, 2 A.sub.p+2, . . . , m A.sub.p+m are produced by pairwise multiplication in multiplier (54). These signals are added in multiplier summer (56) to produce a digital .SIGMA.nA.sub.n -p.SIGMA.A.sub.n signal. This signal is divided by the digital .SIGMA.A.sub.n signal in divider (58) to provide a digital (.SIGMA.nA.sub.n /.SIGMA.A.sub.n) -p signal. Finally, this last signal is added to the digital p signal in an offset summer (60) to provide .SIGMA.nA.sub.n /.SIGMA.A.sub.n, the centroid channel locations.

  11. Method and apparatus for enhancing microchannel plate data

    DOEpatents

    Thoe, R.S.

    1983-10-24

    A method and apparatus for determining centroid channel locations are disclosed for use in a system activated by one or more multichannel plates and including a linear diode array providing channels of information 1, 2, ...,n, ..., N containing signal amplitudes A/sub n/. A source of analog A/sub n/ signals, and a source of digital clock signals n, are provided. Non-zero A/sub n/ values are detected in a discriminator. A digital signal representing p, the value of n immediately preceding that whereat A/sub n/ takes its first non-zero value, is generated in a scaler. The analog A/sub n/ signals are converted to digital in an analog to digital converter. The digital A/sub n/ signals are added to produce a digital ..sigma..A/sub n/ signal in a full adder. Digital 1, 2, ..., m signals representing the number of non-zero A/sub n/ are produced by a discriminator pulse counter. Digital signals representing 1 A/sub p+1/, 2 A/sub p+2/, ..., m A/sub p+m/ are produced by pairwise multiplication in multiplier. These signal are added in multiplier summer to produce a digital ..sigma..nA/sub n/ - p..sigma..A/sub n/ signal. This signal is divided by the digital ..sigma..A/sub n/ signal in divider to provide a digital (..sigma..nA/sub n//..sigma..A/sub n/) -p signal. Finally, this last signal is added to the digital p signal in an offset summer to provide ..sigma..nA/sub n//..sigma..A/sub n/, the centroid channel locations.

  12. Chemotaxis of bacteria in glass capillary arrays. Escherichia coli, motility, microchannel plate, and light scattering.

    PubMed

    Berg, H C; Turner, L

    1990-10-01

    Random and directed motility of bacterial populations were assayed by monitoring the flux of bacteria through a microchannel plate (a porous glass plate comprising a fused array of capillary tubes) separating two identical stirred chambers. Cells, washed free of growth medium by a new filtration method, were added to one chamber at a low density. Their number in the other chamber was determined from the amount of light scattered from a beam of a laser diode and recorded on a strip chart. Diffusion coefficients were computed from fluxes observed in the absence of chemical gradients, and chemotaxis drift velocities were computed from fluxes observed in their presence. Cells migrated through tubes of diam 10 microns more rapidly than through tubes of diam 50 microns, suggesting that the straight segments of their tracks were aligned with the axes of the smaller tubes. Mutants that are motile but nonchemotactic could be selected because they move through the microchannel plate in the face of an adverse gradient. Weak chemotactic responses were assessed from ratios of fluxes observed in paired experiments in which the sign of the gradient of attractant was reversed. Studies were made of wild-type Escherichia coli and mutants that are nonmotile, tumblely, smooth-swimming, aspartate-blind, or defective in methylation and demethylation. Chemotaxis drift velocities for the latter mutants (cheRcheB) were quite small.

  13. Microchannel plate pinhole camera for 20 to 100 keV x-ray imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.L.; Leipelt, G.R.; Nilson, D.G.

    1984-10-03

    We present the design and construction of a sensitive pinhole camera for imaging suprathermal x-rays. Our device is a pinhole camera consisting of four filtered pinholes and microchannel plate electron multiplier for x-ray detection and signal amplification. We report successful imaging of 20, 45, 70, and 100 keV x-ray emissions from the fusion targets at our Novette laser facility. Such imaging reveals features of the transport of hot electrons and provides views deep inside the target.

  14. Planar double delay-line readout technique for microchannel plate detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lampton, M.; Siegmund, O. H. W.; Raffanti, R.

    1990-01-01

    A two-dimensional position-sensitive electrical readout system for microchannel plate detectors in spectroscopic applications has been devised. Two adjacent parallel coplanar delay lines are used. The difference in time of arrival of the electron event signal between the ends of the delay lines gives one coordinate of the centroid of each event pulse. The ratio of the event amplitudes on the two delay lines gives the orthogonal coordinate by means of charge partitioning. The performance characteristics of operational double delay lines for systems of this type are presented.

  15. Extreme ultraviolet quantum efficiency of opaque alkali halide photocathodes on microchannel plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegmund, O. H. W.; Everman, E.; Vallerga, J. V.; Lampton, M.

    1988-01-01

    Comprehensive measurements are presented for the quantum detection efficiency (QDE) of the microchannel plate materials CsI, KBr, KCl, and MgF2, over the 44-1800 A wavelength range. QDEs in excess of 40 percent are achieved by several materials in specific wavelength regions of the EUV. Structure is noted in the wavelength dependence of the QDE that is directly related to the valence-band/conduction-band gap energy and the onset of atomic-like resonant transitions. A simple photocathode model allows interpretation of these features, together with the QDE efficiency variation, as a function of illumination angle.

  16. A Neutron Sensitive Microchannel Plate Detector with Cross Delay Line Readout

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, Kevin D.; Bilheux, Hassina Z.; Crow, Lowell; Diawara, Yacouba; Feller, W. Bruce; Iverson, Erik B.; Martin, Adrian; Robertson, J. Lee

    2012-01-01

    Microchannel plates containing neutron absorbing elements such as boron and gadolinium in the bulk glass are used as the sensing element in high spatial resolution, high rate neutron imaging systems. In this paper we describe one such device, using both 10B and natural Gd, which employs cross delay line signal readout, with time-of-flight capability. This detector has a measured spatial resolution under 40 m FWHM, thermal neutron efficiency of 19%, and has recorded rates in excess of 500 kHz. A physical and functional description is presented, followed by a discussion of measurements of detector performance and a brief survey of some practical applications.

  17. Planar double delay-line readout technique for microchannel plate detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lampton, M.; Siegmund, O. H. W.; Raffanti, R.

    1990-01-01

    A two-dimensional position-sensitive electrical readout system for microchannel plate detectors in spectroscopic applications has been devised. Two adjacent parallel coplanar delay lines are used. The difference in time of arrival of the electron event signal between the ends of the delay lines gives one coordinate of the centroid of each event pulse. The ratio of the event amplitudes on the two delay lines gives the orthogonal coordinate by means of charge partitioning. The performance characteristics of operational double delay lines for systems of this type are presented.

  18. Response of a chevron microchannel plate to 2.5 and 14 MeV neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medley, S. S.; Persing, R.

    1981-10-01

    The response of a large area (4.6×13 cm) multianode channel electron multiplier array (CEMA) detector to energetic neutrons was investigated. The measured neutron detection efficiencies of the chevron microchannel plate (MCP) were 1.7×10-3 and 6.4×10-3 counts/neutron, respectively, for 2.5 MeV-DD and 14 MeV-DT neutrons. The apparently higher efficiency observed for the 14 MeV neutrons is attributed to neutron-induced background gamma radiation.

  19. Note: Determining the detection efficiency of excited neutral atoms by a microchannel plate detector

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, Ben; Zohrabi, M.; Hayes, D.; Ablikim, U.; Jochim, Bethany; Severt, T.; Carnes, K. D.; Ben-Itzhak, I.

    2015-04-15

    We present a method for determining the detection efficiency of neutral atoms relative to keV ions. Excited D* atoms are produced by D{sub 2} fragmentation in a strong laser field. The fragments are detected by a micro-channel plate detector either directly as neutrals or as keV ions following field ionization and acceleration by a static electric field. Moreover, we propose a new mechanism by which neutrals are detected. We show that the ratio of the yield of neutrals and ions can be related to the relative detection efficiency of these species.

  20. Determining time resolution of microchannel plate detectors for electron time-of-flight spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Qi; Zhao Kun; Chang Zenghu

    2010-07-15

    The temporal resolution of a 40 mm diameter chevron microchannel plate (MCP) detector followed by a constant fraction discriminator and a time-to-digital converter was determined by using the third order harmonic of 25 fs Ti:sapphire laser pulses. The resolution was found to deteriorate from 200 to 300 ps as the total voltage applied on the two MCPs increased from 1600 to 2000 V. This was likely due to a partial saturation of the MCP and/or the constant fraction discriminator working with signals beyond its optimum range of pulse width and shape.

  1. Extreme ultraviolet quantum efficiency of opaque alkali halide photocathodes on microchannel plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegmund, O. H. W.; Everman, E.; Vallerga, J. V.; Lampton, M.

    1988-01-01

    Comprehensive measurements are presented for the quantum detection efficiency (QDE) of the microchannel plate materials CsI, KBr, KCl, and MgF2, over the 44-1800 A wavelength range. QDEs in excess of 40 percent are achieved by several materials in specific wavelength regions of the EUV. Structure is noted in the wavelength dependence of the QDE that is directly related to the valence-band/conduction-band gap energy and the onset of atomic-like resonant transitions. A simple photocathode model allows interpretation of these features, together with the QDE efficiency variation, as a function of illumination angle.

  2. Photon Counting Airborne Laser Swath Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, W. E.; Shrestha, R. L.; Slatton, K. C.

    2004-05-01

    During the past decade airborne laser swath mapping (ALSM) has brought topographic mapping to the forefront of geodesy. ALSM has made it possible, for the first time, to study natural geo-surficial processes on spatial scales extending from meters to hundreds of kilometers, all in a consistent geodetic frame of reference. The conventional approach to ALSM has been to use lasers with enough energy per pulse, and optics with large enough collecting areas, to obtain returns of thousands of photons per shot. This approach minimizes the impact of spurious range values caused by noise, such as background solar radiation and sensor thermal noise, but also constrains the minimum size, weight and power consumption of the hardware. Current systems typically operate at rates approaching 100,000 pulses per second, and another order of magnitude increase would be needed to provide contiguous coverage with a spatial resolution of 30 cm or better. This high signal-to-noise ratio approach affords little scalability for significantly downsizing the hardware, or reducing the costs. University of Florida (UF) researchers are developing an ALSM unit based on a different paradigm, which we refer to as photon counting ALSM, or simply PC-ALSM. The approach is to transmit relatively low energy laser pulses, and to illuminate a surface `patch' about an order of magnitude larger than the typical footprint of a conventional ALSM system. The returning signal will have far fewer photons per unit area of the receive optics, making it more difficult to discriminate between return signal and noise. If a single channel detector were used, the spatial resolution would also be degraded. However, by using a multi-channel photomultiplier tube to detect the returns, the surface patch can be divided into an array of groundals, and by using a multi-stop timing system false ranges can be filtered out of the data during post flight processing. Researchers at NASA GSFC have already tested a first generation

  3. Cascaded systems analysis of photon counting detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, J.; Zbijewski, W.; Gang, G.; Stayman, J. W.; Taguchi, K.; Carrino, J. A.; Lundqvist, M.; Fredenberg, E.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2014-10-15

    Purpose: Photon counting detectors (PCDs) are an emerging technology with applications in spectral and low-dose radiographic and tomographic imaging. This paper develops an analytical model of PCD imaging performance, including the system gain, modulation transfer function (MTF), noise-power spectrum (NPS), and detective quantum efficiency (DQE). Methods: A cascaded systems analysis model describing the propagation of quanta through the imaging chain was developed. The model was validated in comparison to the physical performance of a silicon-strip PCD implemented on an experimental imaging bench. The signal response, MTF, and NPS were measured and compared to theory as a function of exposure conditions (70 kVp, 1–7 mA), detector threshold, and readout mode (i.e., the option for coincidence detection). The model sheds new light on the dependence of spatial resolution, charge sharing, and additive noise effects on threshold selection and was used to investigate the factors governing PCD performance, including the fundamental advantages and limitations of PCDs in comparison to energy-integrating detectors (EIDs) in the linear regime for which pulse pileup can be ignored. Results: The detector exhibited highly linear mean signal response across the system operating range and agreed well with theoretical prediction, as did the system MTF and NPS. The DQE analyzed as a function of kilovolt (peak), exposure, detector threshold, and readout mode revealed important considerations for system optimization. The model also demonstrated the important implications of false counts from both additive electronic noise and charge sharing and highlighted the system design and operational parameters that most affect detector performance in the presence of such factors: for example, increasing the detector threshold from 0 to 100 (arbitrary units of pulse height threshold roughly equivalent to 0.5 and 6 keV energy threshold, respectively), increased the f{sub 50} (spatial

  4. Cascaded systems analysis of photon counting detectors

    PubMed Central

    Xu, J.; Zbijewski, W.; Gang, G.; Stayman, J. W.; Taguchi, K.; Lundqvist, M.; Fredenberg, E.; Carrino, J. A.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Photon counting detectors (PCDs) are an emerging technology with applications in spectral and low-dose radiographic and tomographic imaging. This paper develops an analytical model of PCD imaging performance, including the system gain, modulation transfer function (MTF), noise-power spectrum (NPS), and detective quantum efficiency (DQE). Methods: A cascaded systems analysis model describing the propagation of quanta through the imaging chain was developed. The model was validated in comparison to the physical performance of a silicon-strip PCD implemented on an experimental imaging bench. The signal response, MTF, and NPS were measured and compared to theory as a function of exposure conditions (70 kVp, 1–7 mA), detector threshold, and readout mode (i.e., the option for coincidence detection). The model sheds new light on the dependence of spatial resolution, charge sharing, and additive noise effects on threshold selection and was used to investigate the factors governing PCD performance, including the fundamental advantages and limitations of PCDs in comparison to energy-integrating detectors (EIDs) in the linear regime for which pulse pileup can be ignored. Results: The detector exhibited highly linear mean signal response across the system operating range and agreed well with theoretical prediction, as did the system MTF and NPS. The DQE analyzed as a function of kilovolt (peak), exposure, detector threshold, and readout mode revealed important considerations for system optimization. The model also demonstrated the important implications of false counts from both additive electronic noise and charge sharing and highlighted the system design and operational parameters that most affect detector performance in the presence of such factors: for example, increasing the detector threshold from 0 to 100 (arbitrary units of pulse height threshold roughly equivalent to 0.5 and 6 keV energy threshold, respectively), increased the f50 (spatial-frequency at

  5. Microchannel Plates for the UVCS and SUMER Instruments on the SOHO Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegmund, O. H. W.; Gummin, M. A.; Sasseen, T.; Jelinsky, P.; Gaines, G. A.; Hull, J.; Stock, J. M.; Edgar, M.; Welsh, B.; Jelinsky, S.; hide

    1995-01-01

    The microchannel plates for the detectors in the SUMER (Solar Ultraviolet Measurements of Emitted Radiation) and UVCS (Ultraviolet Coronograph Spectrometer) instruments aboard the Solar Orbiting Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) mission to be launched in late 1995 are described. A low resistance Z stack of microchannel plates (MCP's) is employed in a detector format of 27 mm x 10 mm using a multilayer cross delay line anode (XDL) with 1024 x 360 digitized pixels. The MCP stacks provide gains of greater than 2 x 10(exp 7) with good pulse height distributions (as low as 25% FWHM) under uniform flood illumination. Background rates of approx. 0.6 event cm(exp -2) sec(exp -1) are obtained for this configuration. Local counting rates up to about 800 events/pixel/sec have been achieved with little drop of the MCP gain. MCP preconditioning results are discussed, showing that some MCP stacks fail to have gain decreases when subjected to a high flux UV scrub. Also, although the bare MCP quantum efficiencies are close to those expected (10%), we found that the long wavelength response of KBr photocathodes could be substantially enhanced by the MCP scrubbing process. Flat field images are characterized by a low level of MCP fixed pattern noise and are stable. Preliminary calibration results for the instruments are shown.

  6. Micro-channel plates in ionization mode as a fast timing device for future hadron colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnyakov, A. Yu.; Barnyakov, M. Yu.; Brianza, L.; Cavallari, F.; Ciriolo, V.; Del Re, D.; Gelli, S.; Ghezzi, A.; Gotti, C.; Govoni, P.; Katcin, A. A.; Malberti, M.; Martelli, A.; Marzocchi, B.; Meridiani, P.; Organtini, G.; Paramatti, R.; Pigazzini, S.; Prisekin, V. G.; Rahatlou, S.; Rovelli, C.; Santanastasio, F.; Tabarelli de Fatis, T.

    2017-08-01

    At the high luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) about 200 concurrent interactions are expected, with a spread between the interaction vertices of few centimeters in the beam direction and 200 ps in the collision time. A time of flight resolution of the order of 30 ps would be able to reduce neutral particles pile-up contamination at the calorimeter level of about one order of magnitude, restoring pile-up conditions similar to what is routinely sustained in the current run of the LHC . Micro-channel plates have been used in PMT configuration as fast charged particles detector (resolution of better than 20 ps have been achieved with commercial devices), however they are not particularly radiation tolerant, mostly due to the ion feedback on the photocathode. The possibility of using micro-channel plates without a photocathode (i-MCP) has been studied in several test beams. Different MCP geometries are compared with the goal to identify the optimal configuration. Efficiency of more then 70% with a time resolution of better than 40 ps are achieved for single charged particles, leading to an efficiency close to 100% for EM shower after few radiation lengths. This open the possibility to use i-MCPs as a timing layer in a sampling calorimeter or to use it in a pre-shower device independent from the calorimeter technology.

  7. Three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation on gain saturation effect of microchannel plate.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiangqiang; Yuan, Zheng; Cao, Zhurong; Deng, Bo; Chen, Tao; Deng, Keli

    2016-07-01

    We present here the results of the simulation work, using the three-dimensional particle-in-cell method, on the performance of the lead glass microchannel plate under saturated state. We calculated the electron cascade process with different DC bias voltages under both self-consistent condition and non-self-consistent condition. The comparative results have demonstrated that the strong self-consistent field can suppress the cascade process and make the microchannel plate saturated. The simulation results were also compared to the experimental data and good agreement was obtained. The simulation results also show that the electron multiplication process in the channel is accompanied by the buildup process of positive charges in the channel wall. Though the interactions among the secondary electron cloud in the channel, the positive charges in the channel wall, and the external acceleration field can make the electron-surface collision more frequent, the collision energy will be inevitably reduced, thus the electron gain will also be reduced.

  8. Three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation on gain saturation effect of microchannel plate

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Qiangqiang; Yuan, Zheng; Cao, Zhurong Deng, Bo; Chen, Tao; Deng, Keli

    2016-07-15

    We present here the results of the simulation work, using the three-dimensional particle-in-cell method, on the performance of the lead glass microchannel plate under saturated state. We calculated the electron cascade process with different DC bias voltages under both self-consistent condition and non-self-consistent condition. The comparative results have demonstrated that the strong self-consistent field can suppress the cascade process and make the microchannel plate saturated. The simulation results were also compared to the experimental data and good agreement was obtained. The simulation results also show that the electron multiplication process in the channel is accompanied by the buildup process of positive charges in the channel wall. Though the interactions among the secondary electron cloud in the channel, the positive charges in the channel wall, and the external acceleration field can make the electron-surface collision more frequent, the collision energy will be inevitably reduced, thus the electron gain will also be reduced.

  9. A novel ZVS high voltage power supply for micro-channel plate photomultiplier tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Chengquan; Tian, Jinshou; Liu, Zhen; Qin, Hong; Wu, Shengli

    2017-04-01

    A novel resonant high voltage power supply (HVPS) with zero voltage switching (ZVS), to reduce the voltage stress on switching devices and improve conversion efficiency, is proposed. The proposed HVPS includes a drive circuit, a transformer, several voltage multiplying circuits, and a regulator circuit. The HVPS contains several secondary windings that can be precisely regulated. The proposed HVPS performed better than the traditional resistor voltage divider, which requires replacing matching resistors resulting in resistor dispersibility in the Micro-Channel Plate (MCP). The equivalent circuit of the proposed HVPS was established and the operational principle analyzed. The entire switching element can achieve ZVS, which was validated by a simulation and experiments. The properties of this HVPS were tested including minimum power loss (240 mW), maximum power loss (1 W) and conversion efficiency (85%). The results of this research are that the proposed HVPS was suitable for driving the micro-channel plate photomultiplier tube (MCP-PMT). It was therefore adopted to test the MCP-PMT, which will be used in Daya Bay reactor neutrino experiment II in China.

  10. Three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation on gain saturation effect of microchannel plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiangqiang; Yuan, Zheng; Cao, Zhurong; Deng, Bo; Chen, Tao; Deng, Keli

    2016-07-01

    We present here the results of the simulation work, using the three-dimensional particle-in-cell method, on the performance of the lead glass microchannel plate under saturated state. We calculated the electron cascade process with different DC bias voltages under both self-consistent condition and non-self-consistent condition. The comparative results have demonstrated that the strong self-consistent field can suppress the cascade process and make the microchannel plate saturated. The simulation results were also compared to the experimental data and good agreement was obtained. The simulation results also show that the electron multiplication process in the channel is accompanied by the buildup process of positive charges in the channel wall. Though the interactions among the secondary electron cloud in the channel, the positive charges in the channel wall, and the external acceleration field can make the electron-surface collision more frequent, the collision energy will be inevitably reduced, thus the electron gain will also be reduced.

  11. Multiple-Event, Single-Photon Counting Imaging Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zheng, Xinyu; Cunningham, Thomas J.; Sun, Chao; Wang, Kang L.

    2011-01-01

    The single-photon counting imaging sensor is typically an array of silicon Geiger-mode avalanche photodiodes that are monolithically integrated with CMOS (complementary metal oxide semiconductor) readout, signal processing, and addressing circuits located in each pixel and the peripheral area of the chip. The major problem is its single-event method for photon count number registration. A single-event single-photon counting imaging array only allows registration of up to one photon count in each of its pixels during a frame time, i.e., the interval between two successive pixel reset operations. Since the frame time can t be too short, this will lead to very low dynamic range and make the sensor merely useful for very low flux environments. The second problem of the prior technique is a limited fill factor resulting from consumption of chip area by the monolithically integrated CMOS readout in pixels. The resulting low photon collection efficiency will substantially ruin any benefit gained from the very sensitive single-photon counting detection. The single-photon counting imaging sensor developed in this work has a novel multiple-event architecture, which allows each of its pixels to register as more than one million (or more) photon-counting events during a frame time. Because of a consequently boosted dynamic range, the imaging array of the invention is capable of performing single-photon counting under ultra-low light through high-flux environments. On the other hand, since the multiple-event architecture is implemented in a hybrid structure, back-illumination and close-to-unity fill factor can be realized, and maximized quantum efficiency can also be achieved in the detector array.

  12. High resolution, two-dimensional imaging, microchannel plate detector for use on a sounding rocket experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bush, Brett C.; Cotton, Daniel M.; Siegmund, Oswald H.; Chakrabarti, Supriya; Harris, Walter; Clarke, John

    1991-01-01

    We discuss a high resolution microchannel plate (MCP) imaging detector to be used in measurements of Doppler-shifted hydrogen Lyman-alpha line emission from Jupiter and the interplanetary medium. The detector is housed in a vacuum-tight stainless steel cylinder (to provide shielding from magnetic fields) with a MgF2 window. Operating at nominal voltage, the four plate configuration provides a gain of 1.2 x 10 exp 7 electrons per incident photon. The wedge-and-strip anode has two-dimensional imaging capabilities, with a resolution of 40 microns FWHM over a one centimeter diameter area. The detector has a high quantum efficiency while retaining a low background rate. A KBr photocathode is used to enhance the quantum efficiency of the bare MCPs to a value of 35 percent at Lyman-alpha.

  13. High resolution, two-dimensional imaging, microchannel plate detector for use on a sounding rocket experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bush, Brett C.; Cotton, Daniel M.; Siegmund, Oswald H.; Chakrabarti, Supriya; Harris, Walter; Clarke, John

    1991-01-01

    We discuss a high resolution microchannel plate (MCP) imaging detector to be used in measurements of Doppler-shifted hydrogen Lyman-alpha line emission from Jupiter and the interplanetary medium. The detector is housed in a vacuum-tight stainless steel cylinder (to provide shielding from magnetic fields) with a MgF2 window. Operating at nominal voltage, the four plate configuration provides a gain of 1.2 x 10 exp 7 electrons per incident photon. The wedge-and-strip anode has two-dimensional imaging capabilities, with a resolution of 40 microns FWHM over a one centimeter diameter area. The detector has a high quantum efficiency while retaining a low background rate. A KBr photocathode is used to enhance the quantum efficiency of the bare MCPs to a value of 35 percent at Lyman-alpha.

  14. The photon counting histogram in fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Y; Müller, J D; So, P T; Gratton, E

    1999-01-01

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) is generally used to obtain information about the number of fluorescent particles in a small volume and the diffusion coefficient from the autocorrelation function of the fluorescence signal. Here we demonstrate that photon counting histogram (PCH) analysis constitutes a novel tool for extracting quantities from fluorescence fluctuation data, i.e., the measured photon counts per molecule and the average number of molecules within the observation volume. The photon counting histogram of fluorescence fluctuation experiments, in which few molecules are present in the excitation volume, exhibits a super-Poissonian behavior. The additional broadening of the PCH compared to a Poisson distribution is due to fluorescence intensity fluctuations. For diffusing particles these intensity fluctuations are caused by an inhomogeneous excitation profile and the fluctuations in the number of particles in the observation volume. The quantitative relationship between the detected photon counts and the fluorescence intensity reaching the detector is given by Mandel's formula. Based on this equation and considering the fluorescence intensity distribution in the two-photon excitation volume, a theoretical expression for the PCH as a function of the number of molecules in the excitation volume is derived. For a single molecular species two parameters are sufficient to characterize the histogram completely, namely the average number of molecules within the observation volume and the detected photon counts per molecule per sampling time epsilon. The PCH for multiple molecular species, on the other hand, is generated by successively convoluting the photon counting distribution of each species with the others. The influence of the excitation profile upon the photon counting statistics for two relevant point spread functions (PSFs), the three-dimensional Gaussian PSF conventionally employed in confocal detection and the square of the Gaussian

  15. Stable Li Metal Anodes via Regulating Lithium Plating/Stripping in Vertically Aligned Microchannels.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shu-Hua; Yin, Ya-Xia; Zuo, Tong-Tong; Dong, Wei; Li, Jin-Yi; Shi, Ji-Lei; Zhang, Chang-Huan; Li, Nian-Wu; Li, Cong-Ju; Guo, Yu-Guo

    2017-09-11

    Li anodes have been rapidly developed in recent years owing to the rising demand for higher-energy-density batteries. However, the safety issues induced by dendrites hinder the practical applications of Li anodes. Here, Li metal anodes stabilized by regulating lithium plating/stripping in vertically aligned microchannels are reported. The current density distribution and morphology evolution of the Li deposits on porous Cu current collectors are systematically analyzed. Based on simulations in COMSOL Multiphysics, the tip effect leads to preferential deposition on the microchannel walls, thus taking full advantage of the lightening rod theory of classical electromagnetism for restraining growth of Li dendrites. The Li anode with a porous Cu current collector achieves an enhanced cycle stability and a higher average Coulombic efficiency of 98.5% within 200 cycles. In addition, the resultant LiFePO4 /Li full battery demonstrates excellent rate capability and stable cycling performance, thus demonstrating promise as a current collector for high-energy-density, safe rechargeable Li batteries. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Advanced Photon Counting Imaging Detectors with 100ps Timing for Astronomical and Space Sensing Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegmund, O.; Vallerga, J.; Welsh, B.; Rabin, M.; Bloch, J.

    In recent years EAG has implemented a variety of high-resolution, large format, photon-counting MCP detectors in space instrumentation for satellite FUSE, GALEX, IMAGE, SOHO, HST-COS, rocket, and shuttle payloads. Our scheme of choice has been delay line readouts encoding photon event position centroids, by determination of the difference in arrival time of the event charge at the two ends of a distributed resistive-capacitive (RC) delay line. Our most commonly used delay line configuration is the cross delay line (XDL). In its simplest form the delay-line encoding electronics consists of a fast amplifier for each end of the delay line, followed by time-to-digital converters (TDC's). We have achieved resolutions of < 25 μm in tests over 65 mm x 65 mm (3k x3k resolution elements) with excellent linearity. Using high speed TDC's, we have been able to encode event positions for random photon rates of ~1 MHz, while time tagging events using the MCP output signal to better than 100 ps. The unique ability to record photon X,Y,T high fidelity information has advantages over "frame driven" recording devices for some important applications. For example we have built open face and sealed tube cross delay line detectors used for biological fluorescence lifetime imaging, observation of flare stars, orbital satellites and space debris with the GALEX satellite, and time resolved imaging of the Crab Pulsar with a telescope as small as 1m. Although microchannel plate delay line detectors meet many of the imaging and timing demands of various applications, they have limitations. The relatively high gain (107) reduces lifetime and local counting rate, and the fixed delay (10's of ns) makes multiple simultaneous event recording problematic. To overcome these limitations we have begun development of cross strip readout anodes for microchannel plate detectors. The cross strip (XS) anode is a coarse (~0.5 mm) multi-layer metal and ceramic pattern of crossed fingers on an alumina

  17. Ultraviolet quantum detection efficiency of potassium bromide as an opaque photocathode applied to microchannel plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegmund, Oswald H. W.; Everman, E.; Vallerga, J. V.; Sokolowski, J.; Lampton, M.

    1987-01-01

    The quantum detection efficiency (QDE) of potassium bromide as a photocathode applied directly to the surface of a microchannel plate over the 250-1600 A wavelength range has been measured. The contributions of the photocathode material in the channels and on the interchannel web to the QDE have been determined. Two broad peaks in the QDE centered at about 450 and about 1050 A are apparent, the former with about 50 percent peak QDE and the latter with about 40 percent peak QDE. The photoelectric threshold is observed at about 1600 A, and there is a narrow QDE minimum at about 750 A which correlates with 2X the band gap energy for KBr. The angular variation of the QDE from 0 to 40 deg to the channnel axis has also been examined. The stability of Kbr with time is shown to be good with no significant degradation of QDE at wavelengths below 1216 A over a 15-day period in air.

  18. Direct tests of a pixelated microchannel plate as the active element of a shower maximum detector

    SciTech Connect

    Apresyan, A.; Los, S.; Pena, C.; Presutti, F.; Ronzhin, A.; Spiropulu, M.; Xie, S.

    2016-05-07

    One possibility to make a fast and radiation resistant shower maximum detector is to use a secondary emitter as an active element. We report our studies of microchannel plate photomultipliers (MCPs) as the active element of a shower-maximum detector. We present test beam results obtained using Photonis XP85011 to detect secondary particles of an electromagnetic shower. We focus on the use of the multiple pixels on the Photonis MCP in order to find a transverse two-dimensional shower distribution. A spatial resolution of 0.8 mm was obtained with an 8 GeV electron beam. As a result, a method for measuring the arrival time resolution for electromagnetic showers is presented, and we show that time resolution better than 40 ps can be achieved.

  19. Direct tests of a pixelated microchannel plate as the active element of a shower maximum detector

    DOE PAGES

    Apresyan, A.; Los, S.; Pena, C.; ...

    2016-05-07

    One possibility to make a fast and radiation resistant shower maximum detector is to use a secondary emitter as an active element. We report our studies of microchannel plate photomultipliers (MCPs) as the active element of a shower-maximum detector. We present test beam results obtained using Photonis XP85011 to detect secondary particles of an electromagnetic shower. We focus on the use of the multiple pixels on the Photonis MCP in order to find a transverse two-dimensional shower distribution. A spatial resolution of 0.8 mm was obtained with an 8 GeV electron beam. As a result, a method for measuring themore » arrival time resolution for electromagnetic showers is presented, and we show that time resolution better than 40 ps can be achieved.« less

  20. Observation of Ultra-Slow Antiprotons using Micro-channel Plate

    SciTech Connect

    Imao, H.; Toyoda, H.; Shimoyama, T.; Kanai, Y.; Mohri, A.; Yamazaki, Y.; Torii, H. A.; Nagata, Y.; Enomoto, Y.; Higaki, H.

    2008-08-08

    Our group ASACUSA-MUSASHI has succeeded in accumulating several million antiprotons and extracting them as monochromatic ultra-slow antiproton beams (10 eV-1 keV) at CERN AD. We have observed ultra-slow antiprotons using micro-channel plates (MCP). The integrated pulse area of the output signals generated when the MCP was irradiated by ultra-slow antiprotons was 6 times higher than that by electrons. As a long-term effect, we also observed an increase in the background rate presumably due to the radioactivation of the MCP surface. Irradiating the antiproton beams on the MCP induces antiproton-nuclear annihilations only on the first layer of the surface. Low-energy and short-range secondary particles like charged nuclear fragments caused by the 'surface nuclear reactions' would be the origin of our observed phenomena.

  1. Beam test results on the detection of single particles and electromagnetic showers with microchannel plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnyakov, A.; Barnyakov, M.; Brianza, L.; Cavallari, F.; Ciriolo, V.; Del Re, D.; Gelli, S.; Ghezzi, A.; Gotti, C.; Govoni, P.; Martelli, A.; Marzocchi, B.; Meridiani, P.; Organtini, G.; Paramatti, R.; Pigazzini, S.; Rahatlou, S.; Rovelli, C.; Santanastasio, F.; Tabarelli de Fatis, T.

    2017-02-01

    I-MCP is an R&D project aimed at the exploitation of secondary emission of electrons from the surface of micro-channel plates (MCP) for single ionizing particles and fast timing of showers in high rate environments. Results from tests with electrons with energies up to 50 GeV of MCP devices with different characteristics are presented. In particular detection efficiency and time resolution are measured for a range of MCP prototypes: different MCP channel diameter and layers configuration are studied. Devices operated in I-MCP configuration, where the particle detection proceed through direct ionization of the MCP layers, are studied in comparison with the more usual PMT-MCP configuration. The results show efficiencies up to 70% for single charge particle detection for I-MCP devices with a time resolution of about 40 ps. The efficiency raise to 100% in response to high energy electromagnetic showers.

  2. Mosaic wedge-and-strip arrays for large format microchannel plate detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Christopher; Rasmussen, Andrew

    1989-01-01

    The authors present a novel method for joining wedge-and-strip patterns on single anodes in a mosaic array. With only a modest increase in complexity over three-conductor anodes currently in use, the ultimate detector position resolution can be significantly improved, and large-format microchannel plate detectors with pore-size-limited resolution are made possible. The problem of the transition from one anode to the next has been solved with a novel linear encoding scheme, which exhibits essentially distortionless behavior at boundaries parallel to the conducting elements and only slight distortion at the orthogonal boundaries. The ultimate resolution for two anode designs, one designed for large-format imaging and the other for high-resolution spectroscopy, is also predicted.

  3. High accuracy position response calibration method for a micro-channel plate ion detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, R.; Leredde, A.; Bagdasarova, Y.; Fléchard, X.; García, A.; Müller, P.; Knecht, A.; Liénard, E.; Kossin, M.; Sternberg, M. G.; Swanson, H. E.; Zumwalt, D. W.

    2016-11-01

    We have developed a position response calibration method for a micro-channel plate (MCP) detector with a delay-line anode position readout scheme. Using an in situ calibration mask, an accuracy of 8 μm and a resolution of 85 μm (FWHM) have been achieved for MeV-scale α particles and ions with energies of ∼10 keV. At this level of accuracy, the difference between the MCP position responses to high-energy α particles and low-energy ions is significant. The improved performance of the MCP detector can find applications in many fields of AMO and nuclear physics. In our case, it helps reducing systematic uncertainties in a high-precision nuclear β-decay experiment.

  4. Further investigation of CsI-coated microchannel plate quantum efficiencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carruthers, George R.

    1988-01-01

    Previously, pulse-counting detection efficiencies measured for CsI-coated microchannel plate (MCP) detectors (two-stage chevron configuration with a single collecting anode) have been reported to be 15-20 percent near Lyman-alpha (1216 A), compared to typical 65 percent quantum yields of opaque CsI photocathodes. To investigate the possibility that an improvement in quantum yield could result from use of MCPs with a bias angle of about 25 deg instead of 8 deg as used previously, the previous measurements were reported with new MCPs having the larger bias angle. No significant improvement in detection efficiency was achieved; the new detector tests still yielded maximum efficiencies of the order of 20 percent near 1216 A.

  5. A fast microchannel plate-scintillator detector for velocity map imaging and imaging mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Winter, B.; King, S. J.; Vallance, C.; Brouard, M.

    2014-02-15

    The time resolution achievable using standard position-sensitive ion detectors, consisting of a chevron pair of microchannel plates coupled to a phosphor screen, is primarily limited by the emission lifetime of the phosphor, around 70 ns for the most commonly used P47 phosphor. We demonstrate that poly-para-phenylene laser dyes may be employed extremely effectively as scintillators, exhibiting higher brightness and much shorter decay lifetimes than P47. We provide an extensive characterisation of the properties of such scintillators, with a particular emphasis on applications in velocity-map imaging and microscope-mode imaging mass spectrometry. The most promising of the new scintillators exhibits an electron-to-photon conversion efficiency double that of P47, with an emission lifetime an order of magnitude shorter. The new scintillator screens are vacuum stable and show no signs of signal degradation even over longer periods of operation.

  6. Improved time response for large area microchannel plate photomultiplier tubes in fusion diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Milnes, J. S. Conneely, T. M.; Howorth, J.; Horsfield, C. J.

    2014-11-15

    Fusion diagnostics that utilise high speed scintillators often need to capture a large area of light with a high degree of time accuracy. Microchannel plate (MCP) photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) are recognised as the leading device for capturing fast optical signals. However, when manufactured in their traditional proximity focused construction, the time response performance is reduced as the active area increases. This is due to two main factors: the capacitance of a large anode and the difficulty of obtaining small pore MCPs with a large area. Collaboration between Photek and AWE has produced prototype devices that combine the excellent time response of small area MCP-PMTs with a large active area by replacing the traditional proximity-gap front section with an electro-optically focused photocathode to MCP. We present results from both single and double MCP devices with a 40 mm diameter active area and show simulations for the 100 mm device being built this year.

  7. Enhanced soft X-ray detection efficiencies for imaging microchannel plate detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraser, G. W.; Barstow, M. A.; Whiteley, M. J.; Wells, A.

    1982-12-01

    Although the microchannel plate (MCP) electron multipliers used in X-ray astronomy facilitate X-ray imaging with high spatial resolution, their intrinsic soft X-ray detection efficiencies of 1-10 percent are much lower than the near-unity values available with competing gas proportional counters. A high photoelectric yield material may be deposited on the MCP front surface and channel walls in order to enhance X-ray sensitivity at energies below a few keV. High 0.18-1.5 keV X-ray detection efficiencies are reported for MCPs bearing CsI deposition photocathodes, by which efficiency enhancement factors of up to 15 have been obtained. These results are especially pertinent to the sensitivity of such future X-ray astronomy experiments as the Roentgensatellit (Rosat) Wide Field Camera.

  8. A fast microchannel plate-scintillator detector for velocity map imaging and imaging mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Winter, B; King, S J; Brouard, M; Vallance, C

    2014-02-01

    The time resolution achievable using standard position-sensitive ion detectors, consisting of a chevron pair of microchannel plates coupled to a phosphor screen, is primarily limited by the emission lifetime of the phosphor, around 70 ns for the most commonly used P47 phosphor. We demonstrate that poly-para-phenylene laser dyes may be employed extremely effectively as scintillators, exhibiting higher brightness and much shorter decay lifetimes than P47. We provide an extensive characterisation of the properties of such scintillators, with a particular emphasis on applications in velocity-map imaging and microscope-mode imaging mass spectrometry. The most promising of the new scintillators exhibits an electron-to-photon conversion efficiency double that of P47, with an emission lifetime an order of magnitude shorter. The new scintillator screens are vacuum stable and show no signs of signal degradation even over longer periods of operation.

  9. Nanosecond Gating of Microstripline Microchannel Plate Framing Cameras: Characterization and Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Holder, J; Hargrove, D; Sibernagel, C; Perry, T; Bradley, D; Bell, P

    2004-04-09

    The soft x-ray microstripline microchannel plate (MCP) framing camera has become one of the workhorses of ICF diagnostics. Much progress has been made in making these diagnostics work well with gate times of 100 ps and below. Often weak input signal or source timing uncertainties dictate a requirement for longer gate times, preferably in the same instrument that also has fast gating capability. The large power-law dependence of MCP gain on applied voltage is useful in shortening the gating time of the microstripline camera. However, this sensitivity leads to tight constraints on the shape of the long duration electrical pulses that are needed to drive the MCP to produce experimentally desirable optical gating profiles. Simple modeling and measurements are used to better understand the character of the voltage pulses needed to achieve optical gate widths between 500 ps and {approx}2 ns.

  10. Ultraviolet quantum detection efficiency of potassium bromide as an opaque photocathode applied to microchannel plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegmund, Oswald H. W.; Everman, E.; Vallerga, J. V.; Sokolowski, J.; Lampton, M.

    1987-01-01

    The quantum detection efficiency (QDE) of potassium bromide as a photocathode applied directly to the surface of a microchannel plate over the 250-1600 A wavelength range has been measured. The contributions of the photocathode material in the channels and on the interchannel web to the QDE have been determined. Two broad peaks in the QDE centered at about 450 and about 1050 A are apparent, the former with about 50 percent peak QDE and the latter with about 40 percent peak QDE. The photoelectric threshold is observed at about 1600 A, and there is a narrow QDE minimum at about 750 A which correlates with 2X the band gap energy for KBr. The angular variation of the QDE from 0 to 40 deg to the channnel axis has also been examined. The stability of Kbr with time is shown to be good with no significant degradation of QDE at wavelengths below 1216 A over a 15-day period in air.

  11. Stacked orthogonal serpentine delay lines with vias for two-dimensional microchannel plate readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lampton, M.; Marckwordt, M.

    2000-12-01

    We demonstrate a multilayer circuit board that has two orthogonal serpentine delay lines on different layers to read out event positions from a microchannel plate (MCP). The top serpentine is directly bombarded by the MCP. The orthogonal buried serpentine receives its charge through thousands of vias that connect to the top surface. Event X and Y positions are decoded with a timing circuit for each axis. The spatial resolution is much finer than the via spacing because every event's charge footprint spans several vias, and because the timing circuit senses the centroid of the event's position on each delay line. This construction method eliminates fabrication problems encountered in previous multilayer designs and eliminates the need for crossed conducting fingers with their concomitant degradation of the otherwise excellent phase delay characteristic of serpentine delay lines. Performance data are presented for an anode of this new type. Formulas and graphs are given to assist in creating a variety of anodes of this type.

  12. Simulating the growth of an charge cloud for a microchannel plate detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siwal, Davinder; Wiggins, Blake; Desouza, Romualdo

    2015-10-01

    Position sensitive microchannel plate (MCP) detectors have a variety of applications in the fields of astronomy, medical imaging, neutron imaging, and ion beam tracking. Recently, a novel approach has been implemented to detect the position of an incident particle. The charge cloud produced by the MCP induces a signal on a wire harp placed between the MCP and an anode. On qualitative grounds it is clear that in this detector the induced signal shape depends on the size of the electron cloud. A detailed study has therefore been performed to investigate the size of the charge cloud within the MCP and its growth as it propagates from the MCP to the anode. A simple model has been developed to calculate the impact of charge repulsion on the growth of the electron cloud. Both the details of the model and its predictions will be presented. Supported by the US DOE NNSA under Award No. DE-NA0002012.

  13. Improved time response for large area microchannel plate photomultiplier tubes in fusion diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Milnes, J S; Horsfield, C J; Conneely, T M; Howorth, J

    2014-11-01

    Fusion diagnostics that utilise high speed scintillators often need to capture a large area of light with a high degree of time accuracy. Microchannel plate (MCP) photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) are recognised as the leading device for capturing fast optical signals. However, when manufactured in their traditional proximity focused construction, the time response performance is reduced as the active area increases. This is due to two main factors: the capacitance of a large anode and the difficulty of obtaining small pore MCPs with a large area. Collaboration between Photek and AWE has produced prototype devices that combine the excellent time response of small area MCP-PMTs with a large active area by replacing the traditional proximity-gap front section with an electro-optically focused photocathode to MCP. We present results from both single and double MCP devices with a 40 mm diameter active area and show simulations for the 100 mm device being built this year.

  14. Mosaic wedge-and-strip arrays for large format microchannel plate detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Christopher; Rasmussen, Andrew

    1989-01-01

    The authors present a novel method for joining wedge-and-strip patterns on single anodes in a mosaic array. With only a modest increase in complexity over three-conductor anodes currently in use, the ultimate detector position resolution can be significantly improved, and large-format microchannel plate detectors with pore-size-limited resolution are made possible. The problem of the transition from one anode to the next has been solved with a novel linear encoding scheme, which exhibits essentially distortionless behavior at boundaries parallel to the conducting elements and only slight distortion at the orthogonal boundaries. The ultimate resolution for two anode designs, one designed for large-format imaging and the other for high-resolution spectroscopy, is also predicted.

  15. Dual microchannel plate module for a gated monochromatic x-ray imager

    SciTech Connect

    Oertel, J.A.; Archuleta, T.; Peterson, C.G.

    1996-06-01

    Development and testing of a dual microchannel plate (MCP) module to be used in the national Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) program has recently been completed. The MCP module is a key component of a new monochromatic x-ray imaging diagnostic which is designed around a 4 channel Kirkpatrick-Baez microscope and diffraction crystals which is located at University of Rochester`s Omega laser system. The MCP module has two separate MCP regions with centers spaced 53 mm apart. Each region contains a 25 mm MCP proximity focused to a P-11 phosphor coated fiberoptic faceplate. The two L/D = 40, MCPs have a 10.2 mm wide, 8 ohm stripline constructed of 500 nm Copper overcoated with 100 nm Gold. A 4 kV, 150 ps electrical pulse provides an optical gatewidth of 80 ps and spatial resolution has been measured at 20 1p/mm.

  16. Reduction of signal reflections for fast-pulse recording with microchannel plate detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, L.Q.; Conzemius, R.J.; Holland, G.E.; Houk, R.S.

    1988-08-01

    The performance of a recently developed, movable, homemade microchannel plate detector (MCPD) assembly is comparable to that of a commercial design mounted onto a special flange. A 50-Omega cable with good vacuum characteristics coupled to a 50-Omega vacuum feedthrough allows flexibility in research studies while preserving signal pulse integrity in the special ion optical configurations where the MCPD cannot be positioned close to a vacuum port. This flexibility becomes important as more studies in TOF-MS are performed. For example, placing the detector at various locations along the ion path is especially useful when an ion reflector (13) is being installed and tested. Some experimental apparatus may require impedances other than 50 Omega, but similar techniques can be applied.

  17. Direct tests of a pixelated microchannel plate as the active element of a shower maximum detector

    SciTech Connect

    Apresyan, A.; Los, S.; Pena, C.; Presutti, F.; Ronzhin, A.; Spiropulu, M.; Xie, S.

    2016-05-07

    One possibility to make a fast and radiation resistant shower maximum detector is to use a secondary emitter as an active element. We report our studies of microchannel plate photomultipliers (MCPs) as the active element of a shower-maximum detector. We present test beam results obtained using Photonis XP85011 to detect secondary particles of an electromagnetic shower. We focus on the use of the multiple pixels on the Photonis MCP in order to find a transverse two-dimensional shower distribution. A spatial resolution of 0.8 mm was obtained with an 8 GeV electron beam. As a result, a method for measuring the arrival time resolution for electromagnetic showers is presented, and we show that time resolution better than 40 ps can be achieved.

  18. Two-dimensional ultraviolet imagery with a microchannel-plate/resistive-anode detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Opal, C. B.; Feldman, P. D.; Weaver, H. A.; Mcclintock, J. A.

    1979-01-01

    An imaging ultraviolet detector has been designed for use with a precision pointed telescope flown on a sounding rocket. Resolution of better than 80 microns over a field of 5 mm has been achieved. The ultraviolet image is converted to electrons at the front surface of a CsI coated chevron microchannel-plate electron multiplier. For each photoelectron, the multiplier produces a burst of about 3,000,000 electrons, which impinges on a tellurium-coated resistive anode with four evaporated hyperbolic readout electrodes. The sizes of the four resulting output pulses are digitized to 10 bit accuracy and telemetered to the ground, where they are divided in pairs to give the x and y coordinates of the photoelectron event. The coordinates are used to generate a picture in real time, and are recorded for computer processing later. The detector was successfully flown in December 1978. Good images of Jupiter and Capella in hydrogen Lyman alpha emission were obtained.

  19. Development of a compact E × B microchannel plate detector for beam imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiggins, B. B.; Singh, Varinderjit; Vadas, J.; Huston, J.; Steinbach, T. K.; Hudan, S.; deSouza, R. T.

    2017-09-01

    A beam imaging detector was developed by coupling a multi-strip anode with delay line readout to an E × B microchannel plate (MCP) detector. This detector is capable of measuring the incident position of the beam particles in one-dimension. To assess the spatial resolution, the detector was illuminated by an α-source with an intervening mask that consists of a series of precisely-machined slits. The measured spatial resolution was 520 μm FWHM, which was improved to 413 μm FWHM by performing an FFT of the signals, rejecting spurious signals on the delay line, and requiring a minimum signal amplitude. This measured spatial resolution of 413 μm FWHM corresponds to an intrinsic resolution of 334 μm FWHM when the effect of the finite slit width is de-convoluted. To understand the measured resolution, the performance of the detector is simulated with the ion-trajectory code SIMION.

  20. Nanosecond-gating properties of proximity-focused microchannel-plate image intensifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, N. S. P.; Yates, G. J.; Jaramillo, S. A.; Ogle, J. W.

    Some fundamental properties of 18 mm-diam gated proximity focussed microchannel plate (MCP) image intensifiers used as fast image shutters in the 1 to 10 ns range were identified and studied. Light pulses from a modelocked dye laser optically sample the gated MCP. Shuttering is achieved by applying a forward biasing electrical gate pulse to the quiescently reverse-biased photocathode MCP interface. Variable delay between the gate pulse and the laser pulse permits tracing the MCP's optical response. Gating speeds, turn-on and turn-off patterns, the asymmetric spatial depedence of the MCP optical response, and resolution effects as functions of gate pulse width and photocathode-MCP bias were characterized. Variations in the intensity profiles of the phosphor's spatial response for uniform photocathode illumination are measured with a calibrated silicon intensified target focus projection, scan television camera and a high speed video digitizer while photomultipliers monitor the laser pulse and the phosphor's spatially integrated output intensities.

  1. Microchannel plates and image detection at soft X-ray wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Timothy, J. G.

    1986-01-01

    Detector systems based on the high-gain microchannel plate (MCP) electron multiplier have been used extensively for imaging at soft X-ray wavelengths both on the ground and in space. The latest pulse-counting electronic readout systems provide zero readout-noise, spatial resolutions (FWM) of 25 microns or better and can determine the arrival times of detected photons to an accuracy of the order of 100 ns. These systems can br developed to produce detectors with active areas of 100 mm in diameter or greater. The use of CsI photocathodes produces very high detective quantum efficiencies to wavelengths between about 100 and 1A (0.1 to 10 keV) with moderate energy resolution. The operating characteristics of the different types of soft X-ray MCP detector systems are described, and the prospects for future developments are discussed.

  2. Development of a compact E?B microchannel plate detector for beam imaging

    DOE PAGES

    Wiggins, B. B.; Singh, Varinderjit; Vadas, J.; ...

    2017-06-17

    A beam imaging detector was developed by coupling a multi-strip anode with delay line readout to an E×B microchannel plate (MCP) detector. This detector is capable of measuring the incident position of the beam particles in one-dimension. To assess the spatial resolution, the detector was illuminated by an α-source with an intervening mask that consists of a series of precisely-machined slits. The measured spatial resolution was 520 um source FWHM, which was improved to 413 um FWHM by performing an FFT of the signals, rejecting spurious signals on the delay line, and requiring a minimum signal amplitude. This measured spatialmore » resolution of 413 um FWHM corresponds to an intrinsic resolution of 334 um FWHM when the effect of the finite slit width is de-convoluted. To understand the measured resolution, the performance of the detector is simulated with the ion-trajectory code SIMION.« less

  3. A fast timing calorimetric layer using micro-channel plates in ionisation mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnyakov, A.; Barnyakov, M.; Brianza, L.; Cavallari, F.; Ciriolo, V.; Del Re, D.; Gelli, S.; Ghezzi, A.; Gotti, C.; Martelli, A.; Marzocchi, B.; Meridiani, P.; Organtini, G.; Pigazzini, S.; Paramatti, R.; Rahatlou, S.; Rovelli, C.; Santanastasio, F.; Tabarelli De Fatis, T.

    2017-03-01

    Future high rate hadron colliders are expected to have hundreds of concurrent proton-proton interactions in the same bunch crossing, deteriorating the energy resolution and identification capabilities of calorimeters. The possibility to distinguish neutral particles coming from different interaction vertices is being pursued as a tool to reduce pile-up contamination in calorimeters, and restore optimal performance. A time of flight resolution of the order of 20 ps will be able to reduce neutral particles pile-up contamination at the calorimeter level by about one order of magnitude, restoring pile-up conditions similar to what is routinely sustained in the current run of the LHC . Micro-channel plates (MCP) can be used in PMT configuration as fast charged particles detector (resolution of better then 30 ps can be achieved with commercial devices). However they are not particularly radiation tolerant, mostly due to the ion feedback on the photocathode. The possibility of using micro-channel plates without a photocathode (i-MCP) has been studied in several test beams. Different MCP geometries are compared with the goal to identify the optimal configuration. Efficiency of more than 70% with a time resolution of better than 40 ps are achieved for single charged particles, leading to an efficiency close to 100% for EM shower after few radiation lengths. This opens the possibility to use i-MCPs as a timing layer in a sampling calorimeter or to use it in a pre-shower device independent from the calorimeter technology. Preliminary results on the radiation hardness of the i-MCP configuration will be also presented.

  4. Performance characteristics of a curved-channel microchannel plate with a curved input face and a plane output face

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, David C.; Morgan, Jeffrey S.; Timothy, J. Gethyn

    1989-01-01

    The presently performance-evaluated format, in which a high-gain curved-channel microchannel plate (M2MCP) has a spherical concave input face and a plane output face, allows the input face of the MCP (1) to match such curved focal surfaces as that of a Rowland-circle spectrometer mounting, while (2) having a high-resolution plane readout array in proximity focus with the output face. This MCP has been evaluated in a discrete-anode multicathode microchannel array detector system. The saturated modal gain was found to be inversely proportional to the length/diameter ratio of the channels and directly proportional to the applied MCP voltage.

  5. Photon counting detector array algorithms for deep space optical communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, Meera; Andrews, Kenneth S.; Farr, William H.; Wong, Andre

    2016-03-01

    For deep-space optical communications systems utilizing an uplink optical beacon, a single-photon-counting detector array on the flight terminal can be used to simultaneously perform uplink tracking and communications as well as accurate downlink pointing at photon-starved (pW=m2) power levels. In this paper, we discuss concepts and algorithms for uplink signal acquisition, tracking, and parameter estimation using a photon-counting camera. Statistical models of detector output data and signal processing algorithms are presented, incorporating realistic effects such as Earth background and detector/readout blocking. Analysis and simulation results are validated against measured laboratory data using state-of-the-art commercial photon-counting detector arrays, demonstrating sub-microradian tracking errors under channel conditions representative of deep space optical links.

  6. Imaging and quantitative analysis of tritium-labelled cells in lymphocyte proliferation assays using microchannel plate detectors originally developed for X-ray astronomy.

    PubMed

    Lees, J E; Hales, J M

    2001-01-01

    Microchannel plate detectors have been used in many astronomical X-ray telescopes. Recently we have begun to use similar detectors to image electron emission from radiolabelled biological assays. Here we show how a microchannel plate (MCP) detector can be used to image tritium uptake in T lymphocyte proliferation assays. Quantitative analysis using the MCP detector has the same sensitivity and speed as conventional liquid scintillation counter (LSC) analysis whilst obviating the need for scintillation fluid. In addition the system permits the imaging of whole plate harvests from a range of plate sizes. Here we present data obtained with 96-well plates and Terasaki plates.

  7. Negative avalanche feedback detectors for photon-counting optical communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farr, William H.

    2009-02-01

    Negative Avalanche Feedback photon counting detectors with near-infrared spectral sensitivity offer an alternative to conventional Geiger mode avalanche photodiode or phototube detectors for free space communications links at 1 and 1.55 microns. These devices demonstrate linear mode photon counting without requiring any external reset circuitry and may even be operated at room temperature. We have now characterized the detection efficiency, dark count rate, after-pulsing, and single photon jitter for three variants of this new detector class, as well as operated these uniquely simple to use devices in actual photon starved free space optical communications links.

  8. Negative Avalanche Feedback Detectors for Photon-Counting Optical Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farr, William H.

    2009-01-01

    Negative Avalanche Feedback photon counting detectors with near-infrared spectral sensitivity offer an alternative to conventional Geiger mode avalanche photodiode or phototube detectors for free space communications links at 1 and 1.55 microns. These devices demonstrate linear mode photon counting without requiring any external reset circuitry and may even be operated at room temperature. We have now characterized the detection efficiency, dark count rate, after-pulsing, and single photon jitter for three variants of this new detector class, as well as operated these uniquely simple to use devices in actual photon starved free space optical communications links.

  9. Photon counting modules using RCA silicon avalanche photodiodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lightstone, Alexander W.; Macgregor, Andrew D.; Macsween, Darlene E.; Mcintyre, Robert J.; Trottier, Claude; Webb, Paul P.

    1989-01-01

    Avalanche photodiodes (APD) are excellent small area, solid state detectors for photon counting. Performance possibilities include: photon detection efficiency in excess of 50 percent; wavelength response from 400 to 1000 nm; count rate to 10 (exp 7) counts per sec; afterpulsing at negligible levels; timing resolution better than 1 ns. Unfortunately, these performance levels are not simultaneously available in a single detector amplifier configuration. By considering theoretical performance predictions and previous and new measurements of APD performance, the anticipated performance of a range of proposed APD-based photon counting modules is derived.

  10. Photon counting modules using RCA silicon avalanche photodiodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lightstone, Alexander W.; Macgregor, Andrew D.; Macsween, Darlene E.; Mcintyre, Robert J.; Trottier, Claude; Webb, Paul P.

    1989-01-01

    Avalanche photodiodes (APD) are excellent small area, solid state detectors for photon counting. Performance possibilities include: photon detection efficiency in excess of 50 percent; wavelength response from 400 to 1000 nm; count rate to 10 (exp 7) counts per sec; afterpulsing at negligible levels; timing resolution better than 1 ns. Unfortunately, these performance levels are not simultaneously available in a single detector amplifier configuration. By considering theoretical performance predictions and previous and new measurements of APD performance, the anticipated performance of a range of proposed APD-based photon counting modules is derived.

  11. Progress towards photon-counting infrared arrays for interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buscher, David F.; Seneta, Eugene B.; Sun, Xiaowei; Young, John S.; Finger, Gert

    2016-08-01

    The advent of low-dark-current eAPD arrays in the near infrared ushers in the possibility for photon-counting, high quantum efficiency detectors at these wavelengths. Such detectors would revolutionise the sensitivity of interferometry because near-infrared wavelengths are at the "sweet spot" between the corrupting effects of atmospheric seeing at shorter wavelengths and thermal noise at longer wavelengths. We report on laboratory experiments with cooled Selex Saphira detectors aimed at demonstrating photon-counting performance with these devices by exploiting enhanced avalanche gain and multiple non-destructive readouts. We explain the optimum modes for employing these detectors in interferometry.

  12. Coherent state statistics from time-resolved photon counting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravi, Harish; Prabhakar, Anil

    2011-01-01

    Time resolved photon counting was used to separate the different photon states emitted from a strongly attenuated laser source. We first describe a method to quantify the efficiency of our gated avalanche photo-detector, by relying on known Poissonian statistics. The detector was then optimized under different temperature and bias voltage conditions using the noise equivalent power as a metric. Finally, coherent pulses are sent into a ring cavity, such that the tapped output from the cavity forms a series of time multiplexed pulses, which then yield the photon counting statistics. We observed good agreement between theoretical estimates and experimental observations, to as low as 0.01% probability of detection.

  13. Negative Avalanche Feedback Detectors for Photon-Counting Optical Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farr, William H.

    2009-01-01

    Negative Avalanche Feedback photon counting detectors with near-infrared spectral sensitivity offer an alternative to conventional Geiger mode avalanche photodiode or phototube detectors for free space communications links at 1 and 1.55 microns. These devices demonstrate linear mode photon counting without requiring any external reset circuitry and may even be operated at room temperature. We have now characterized the detection efficiency, dark count rate, after-pulsing, and single photon jitter for three variants of this new detector class, as well as operated these uniquely simple to use devices in actual photon starved free space optical communications links.

  14. Pulsed X-ray Characterization of Stripline Micro-Channel Plate Gated Imager

    SciTech Connect

    F. J. Goldin, D. V. Morgan, K. J. Moy

    2011-03-30

    We report on characterization of x-ray imaging arrays developed by National Security Technologies, LLC. These devices are based on a microchannel plate (MCP) with a conventional glass microchannel structure, but the top and bottom conductive coatings, rather than covering the entire area, are configured into several (4 to 8) parallel strips. Since the bias voltage is a pulse launched from one end, these operate as striplines; relative delays between these pulses give different active exposure times. Unlike the case of a static bias voltage, non-uniformities in impedance along a stripline will produce spatial fluctuations in the bias voltage. These are expected to be slight, but the very sensitive dependence of gain on voltage - approximately like Vl/4d, where l and d are the length and diameter of the channel - means there may be very significant spatial non-uniformities in gain. Flat-field calibrations are therefore required so that such effects can be unfolded from the raw images if quantitative data is required. Such flat-field and other characterization measurements, e.g. responsivity and linearity, have therefore been done with a flash X-ray radiographic system. The maximum endpoint energy is 500 keV. The duration is {approx}40 ns, and so is essentially flat (temporally) during the MCP stripline transit time, which is a maximum of 600 ps. Spatial variations are significant, but the data are corrected using independent flat-field measurements. A monochromator selects a particular X-ray transition line (typically K{alpha}) of the anode material, so that characterizations can be done for various well-defined input photon energies.

  15. Response of Microchannel Plate (MCP) Detectors to MeV Electrons: Beamline tests in support of Juno, JUICE, and Europa Mission UVS instrument investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Retherford, Kurt D.; Davis, Michael W.; Greathouse, Thomas K.; Gladstone, G. Randall; Steffl, Andrew J.; Grodent, Denis; Siegmund, Oswald H.W.

    2014-11-01

    The response of Microchannel Plate (MCP) detectors to far-UV photons is excellent. MCPs provide a photon-counting capability that is especially useful for high-quality stellar and solar occultation measurements. However, use of MCPs within the Jovian magnetosphere for UV measurements is hampered by their ~30% detection efficiency to energetic electrons and ~1% efficiency to γ-rays. High-Z shielding stops energetic electrons, but creates numerous secondary particles; γ-rays are the most important of these for MCPs. These detected particles are a noise background to the measured far-UV photon signal, and at particularly intense times their combination can approach detector global count rates of ~500 kHz when operating at nominal HV levels. To address the challenges presented by the intense radiation environment experienced during Europa encounters we performed electron beam radiation testing of the Juno-UVS flight spare cross-delay line (XDL) MCP in June 2012 at MIT’s High Voltage Research Laboratory (HVRL), and again in Nov. 2013 adding an atomic-layer deposition (ALD) coated test-MCP, to measure the detection efficiency and pulse height distribution characteristics for energetic electrons and γ-rays. A key result from this UVS-dedicated SwRI IR&D project is a detailed characterization of our XDL’s response to both particles (electrons and γ-rays) and photons as a function of HV level. These results provide confidence that good science data quality is achievable when operating at Europa closest approach and/or in orbit. Comparisons with in-flight data obtained with New Horizons Pluto-Alice MeV electron response measurements at Jupiter (Steffl et al., JGR, 2012), LRO-LAMP electron and proton event data, and Juno-UVS Earth proton-belt flyby data, and recent bench tests with radioactive sources at Sensor Sciences increase this confidence. We present a description of the test setup, quantitative results, and several lessons learned to help inform future beamline

  16. Ultraviolet detector with CMOS-coupled microchannel plates for future space missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, Go; Kuwabara, Masaki; Yoshioka, Kazuo; Hikida, Reina; Suzuki, Fumiharu; Yoshikawa, Ichiro

    2016-07-01

    The extreme ultraviolet (EUV) telescopes and spectrometers have been used as powerful tools in a variety of space applications, especially in planetary science. Many EUV instruments adopted microchannel plate (MCP) detection systems with resistive anode encoders (RAEs). An RAE is one of the position sensitive anodes suitable for space-based applications because of its low power, mass, and volume coupled with very high reliability. However, this detection system with RAE has limitations of resolution (up to 512 x 512 pixels) and incident count rate (up to 104 count/sec). Concerning the future space and planetary missions, a new detector with different position sensitive system is required in order to a higher resolution and dynamic range of incident photons. One of the solutions of this issue is using a CMOS imaging sensor. The CMOS imaging sensor with high resolution and high radiation tolerance has been widely used. Here we developed a new CMOS-coupled MCP detector for future UV space and planetary missions. It consists of MCPs followed by a phosphor screen, fiber optic plate, and a windowless CMOS. We manufactured a test model of this detector and performed vibration, thermal cycle, and performance tests. The test sample of FOP-coupled CMOS image sensor achieved the resolving limit of 32 lp/mm and the PSF of 28 um, corresponds to the spatial resolution of 1024 x 1024 pixels. Our results indicate that this new type of UV detector can be widely used for future space applications.

  17. Synthesis of Rh/Macro-Porous Alumina Over Micro-Channel Plate and Its Catalytic Activity Tests for Diesel Reforming.

    PubMed

    Seong, Yeon Baek; Kim, Yong Sul; Park, No-Kuk; Lee, Tae Jin

    2015-11-01

    Macro-porous Al2O3 as the catalytic support material was synthesized using colloidal polystyrene spheres over a micro-channel plate. The colloidal polystyrene spheres were used as a template for the production of an ordered macro porous material using an alumina nitrate solution as the precursor for Al2O3. The close-packed colloidal crystal array template method was applied to the formulation of ordered macro-porous Al2O3 used as a catalytic support material over a micro-channel plate. The solvent in the mixture solution, which also contained the colloidal polystyrene solution, aluminum nitrate solution and the precursor of the catalytic active materials (Rh), was evaporated in a vacuum oven at 50 degrees C. The ordered polystyrene spheres and aluminum salt of the solid state were deposited over a micro channel plate, and macro-porous Al2O3 was formed after calcination at 600 degrees C to remove the polystyrene spheres. The catalytic activity of the Rh/macro-porous alumina supported over the micro-channel plate was tested for diesel reforming.

  18. Detailed measurements and shaping of gate profiles for microchannel-plate-based X-ray framing cameras

    SciTech Connect

    Landen, O.L.; Hammel, B.A.; Bell, P.M.; Abare, A. |; Bradley, D.K. |

    1994-10-03

    Gated, microchannel-plate-based (MCP) framing cameras are increasingly used worldwide for x-ray imaging of subnanosecond laser-plasma phenomena. Large dynamic range (> 1,000) measurements of gain profiles for gated microchannel plates (MCP) are presented. Temporal profiles are reconstructed for any point on the microstrip transmission line from data acquired over many shots with variable delay. No evidence for significant pulse distortion by voltage reflections at the ends of the microstrip is observed. The measured profiles compare well to predictions by a time-dependent discrete dynode model down to the 1% level. The calculations do overestimate the contrast further into the temporal wings. The role of electron transit time dispersion in limiting the minimum achievable gate duration is then investigated by using variable duration flattop gating pulses. A minimum gate duration of 50 ps is achieved with flattop gating, consistent with a fractional transit time spread of {approx} 15%.

  19. Ultra-fast time-correlated single photon counting avalanche photodiodes for time-domain non-contact fluorescence diffuse optical tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robichaud, Vincent; Lapointe, Éric; Bérubé-Lauzière, Yves

    2007-06-01

    Recent advances in the design and fabrication of avalanche photodiodes (APDs) and quenching circuits for timecorrelated single photon counting (TCSPC) have made available detectors with timing resolutions comparable to microchannel plate photomultiplier tubes (MCP-PMTs). The latter, were until recently the best TCSPC detectors in terms of temporal resolution (<=30ps). Comparable resolutions can now be obtained with TCSPC APDs at a much lower cost. It should also be possible to manufacture APDs with standard electronics fabrication processes in a near future. This will contribute to further decrease their price and ease their integration in complex multi-channel detection systems, as required in diuse optical imaging (DOI) and tomography (DOT). We present, to our knowledge for the first time, results which demonstrate that, despite their small sensitive area, TCSPC APDs can be used in time-domain (TD) DOT and more generally in TD DOI. With appropriate optical design of the detection channel, our experiments show that it is possible to obtain comparable measurements with APDs as with PMTs.

  20. Quantum efficiencies of imaging detectors with alkali halide photocathodes. I - Microchannel plates with separate and integral CsI photocathodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carruthers, George R.

    1987-01-01

    Measurements and comparisons have been made of the quantum efficiencies of microchannel plate (MCP) detectors in the far-UV (below 2000-A) wavelength range using CsI photocathodes (a) deposited on the front surfaces of microchannel plates and (b) deposited on solid substrates as opaque photocathodes with the resulting photoelectrons input to microchannel plates. The efficiences were measured in both pulse-counting and photodiode modes of operation. Typical efficiencies are about 15 percent at 1216 A for a CsI-coated MCP compared with 65 percent for an opaque CsI photocathode MCP detector. Special processing has yielded an efficiency as high as 20 percent for a CsI-coated MCP. This may possibly be further improved by optimization of the tilt angle of the MCP channels relative to the front face of the MCP and incident radiation. However, at present there still remains a factor of at least 3 quantum efficiency advantage in the separate opaque CsI photocathode configuration.

  1. Quantum efficiencies of imaging detectors with alkali halide photocathodes. I - Microchannel plates with separate and integral CsI photocathodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carruthers, George R.

    1987-01-01

    Measurements and comparisons have been made of the quantum efficiencies of microchannel plate (MCP) detectors in the far-UV (below 2000-A) wavelength range using CsI photocathodes (a) deposited on the front surfaces of microchannel plates and (b) deposited on solid substrates as opaque photocathodes with the resulting photoelectrons input to microchannel plates. The efficiences were measured in both pulse-counting and photodiode modes of operation. Typical efficiencies are about 15 percent at 1216 A for a CsI-coated MCP compared with 65 percent for an opaque CsI photocathode MCP detector. Special processing has yielded an efficiency as high as 20 percent for a CsI-coated MCP. This may possibly be further improved by optimization of the tilt angle of the MCP channels relative to the front face of the MCP and incident radiation. However, at present there still remains a factor of at least 3 quantum efficiency advantage in the separate opaque CsI photocathode configuration.

  2. Measuring position in 2-dimensions using induced signals in a microchannel plate detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiggins, Blake; Desouza, Romualdo

    2017-01-01

    Position-sensitive microchannel plate (MCP) detectors play an important role in the detection of photons, electrons, ions, and neutrons. Recently, a novel approach has been developed to provide position-sensitivity for an MCP detector. In this approach, namely the induced signal approach, the position of the incident particle is determined by sensing the electron cloud emanating from a MCP stack. The induced signals are inherently bipolar, where the negative lobe of the induced signal corresponds to the approach of the electron cloud to the sense wires and the positive lobe corresponds to the recession of the electron cloud from the sense wires. The zero-crossing point is the time at which the centroid of the charge cloud passes the wire plane. For a single incident electron, a spatial resolution of 103 μm (FWHM) has been achieved by utilizing the zero-crossing point of the induced signals. General considerations suggest that this spatial resolution can be improved by using the entire pulse shape information. The fundamentals of the induced signal approach as well as its implementation in slow neutron radiography will be presented. Supported by the US DOE NNSA under Award No. DE-NA0002012.

  3. Analogue saturation limit of single and double 10 mm microchannel plate photomultiplier tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Milnes, J. S. Conneely, T. M.; Horsfield, C. J.

    2016-11-15

    Photek are a well-established supplier of microchannel plate (MCP) photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) to the inertial confinement fusion community. The analogue signals produced at the major inertial confinement fusion facilities cover many orders of magnitude, therefore understanding the upper saturation limit of MCP-PMTs to large low rate signals takes on a high importance. Here we present a study of a single and a double MCP-PMT with 10 mm diameter active area. The saturation was studied for a range of optical pulse widths from 4 ns to 100 ns and at a range of electron gain values: 10{sup 3} to 10{sup 4} for the single and 10{sup 4} to 10{sup 6} for the double. We have shown that the saturation level of ∼1.2 nC depends only on the integrated charge of the pulse and is independent of pulse width and gain over this range, but that the level of charge available in deep saturation is proportional to the operating gain.

  4. Analogue saturation limit of single and double 10 mm microchannel plate photomultiplier tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milnes, J. S.; Conneely, T. M.; Horsfield, C. J.

    2016-11-01

    Photek are a well-established supplier of microchannel plate (MCP) photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) to the inertial confinement fusion community. The analogue signals produced at the major inertial confinement fusion facilities cover many orders of magnitude, therefore understanding the upper saturation limit of MCP-PMTs to large low rate signals takes on a high importance. Here we present a study of a single and a double MCP-PMT with 10 mm diameter active area. The saturation was studied for a range of optical pulse widths from 4 ns to 100 ns and at a range of electron gain values: 103 to 104 for the single and 104 to 106 for the double. We have shown that the saturation level of ˜1.2 nC depends only on the integrated charge of the pulse and is independent of pulse width and gain over this range, but that the level of charge available in deep saturation is proportional to the operating gain.

  5. Monte Carlo Simulations of Microchannel Plate Detectors II: Pulsed Voltage Results

    SciTech Connect

    Kruschwitz, Craig A.; Wu, Ming; Rochau, Greg A.

    2011-02-11

    This paper is part of a continuing study of straight-channel microchannel plate (MCP)–based x-ray detectors. Such detectors are a useful diagnostic tool for two-dimensional, time-resolved imaging and time-resolved x-ray spectroscopy. To interpret the data from such detectors, it is critical to develop a better understanding of the behavior of MCPs biased with subnanosecond voltage pulses. The subject of this paper is a Monte Carlo computer code that simulates the electron cascade in a MCP channel under an arbitrary pulsed voltage, particularly those pulses with widths comparable to the transit time of the electron cascade in the MCP under DC voltage bias. We use this code to study the gain as a function of time (also called the gate profile or optical gate) for various voltage pulse shapes, including pulses measured along the MCP. In addition, experimental data of MCP behavior in pulsed mode are obtained with a short-pulse UV laser. Comparisons between the simulations and experimental data show excellent agreement for both the gate profile and the peak relative sensitivity along the MCP strips. We report that the dependence of relative gain on peak voltage increases in sensitivity in pulsed mode when the width of the high-voltage waveform is smaller than the transit time of cascading electrons in the MCP.

  6. Nano-oxide thin films deposited via atomic layer deposition on microchannel plates.

    PubMed

    Yan, Baojun; Liu, Shulin; Heng, Yuekun

    2015-01-01

    Microchannel plate (MCP) as a key part is a kind of electron multiplied device applied in many scientific fields. Oxide thin films such as zinc oxide doped with aluminum oxide (ZnO:Al2O3) as conductive layer and pure aluminum oxide (Al2O3) as secondary electron emission (SEE) layer were prepared in the pores of MCP via atomic layer deposition (ALD) which is a method that can precisely control thin film thickness on a substrate with a high aspect ratio structure. In this paper, nano-oxide thin films ZnO:Al2O3 and Al2O3 were prepared onto varied kinds of substrates by ALD technique, and the morphology, element distribution, structure, and surface chemical states of samples were systematically investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS), respectively. Finally, electrical properties of an MCP device as a function of nano-oxide thin film thickness were firstly studied, and the electrical measurement results showed that the average gain of MCP was greater than 2,000 at DC 800 V with nano-oxide thin film thickness approximately 122 nm. During electrical measurement, current jitter was observed, and possible reasons were preliminarily proposed to explain the observed experimental phenomenon.

  7. Saturation and Dynamic Range of Microchannel Plate-Based X-Ray Imagers

    SciTech Connect

    ,

    2012-05-04

    This paper describes recent advances in Monte Carlo simulations of microchannel plate (MCP)–based x-ray detectors, a continuation of ongoing work in this area. A Monte Carlo simulation model has been developed over the past several years by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec). The model simulates the secondary electron emission process in an MCP pore and includes the effects of gain saturation. In this work we focus on MCP gain saturation and dynamic range. We have performed modeling and experimental characterizations of L/D = 46, 10-micron diameter, MCP-based detectors. The detectors are typically operated by applying a subnanosecond voltage pulse, which gates the detector on. Agreement between the simulations and experiment is very good for a variety of voltage pulse waveforms ranging in width from 150 to 300 ps. The results indicate that such an MCP begins to show nonlinear gain around 5 × 10^4 electrons per pore and hard saturation around 105 electrons per pore. The simulations show a difference in MCP sensitivity vs voltage for high flux of photons producing large numbers of photoelectrons on a subpicosecond timescale. Simulations and experiments both indicate an MCP dynamic range of 1 to 10,000, and the dynamic range depends on how the voltage is applied.

  8. Electronic and optical moi? Interference with microchannel plates: artifacts and benefits.

    PubMed

    Tremsin, A S; Siegmund, O H; Gummin, M A; Jelinsky, P N; Stock, J M

    1999-04-10

    The spatial resolution of position-sensitive detectors that use stacks of microchannel plates (MCP's) with high-resolution anodes can be better than 20-microm FWHM [Proc. SPIE 3114, 283-294 (1997)]. At this level of accuracy, channel misalignments of the MCP's in the stack can cause observable moiré interference patterns. We show that the flat-field detector response can have moiré beat pattern modulations of as great as approximately 27% with periods from as small as a few channel diameters to as great as the size of a MCP multifiber. These modulations, however, may be essentially eliminated by rotation of the MCP's or by a mismatch of the channel sizes. We also discuss how the modulation phenomena can be a useful tool for mapping the metric nonlinearities of MCP detector readout systems. Employing the optical moiré effect, we demonstrate a simple, but effective, technique for evaluation of geometrical deformations simultaneously over a large MCP area. For a typical MCP, with a 60-channel-wide multifiber, we can obtain accuracies of 1.2 mrad for multifiber rotations and twists and 35/(L/p) mrad for channel-long axis distortions (where L/p is MCP thickness to interchannel distance ratio). This technique may be used for the development of MCP x-ray optics, which impose tight limitations on geometrical distortions, which in turn are not otherwise easily measurable with high accuracy.

  9. Development of atomic layer deposition-activated microchannel plates for single particle detection at cryogenic temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Gorelikov, Dmitry Sullivan, Neal; Rouffignac, Philippe de; Li, Huazhi; Narayanamoorthy, Jayasri; Tremsin, Anton S.

    2014-03-15

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) technology is used to nanoengineer functional films inside the pores of microchannel plate (MCP) electron multipliers, enabling a novel MCP manufacturing technology that substantially improves performance and opens novel applications. The authors have developed custom tools and recipes for the growth of conformal films, with optimized conductance and secondary electron emission inside very long channels (∼6–20 μm diameter and >600 μm length, with tens of millions of channels per single MCP) by ALD. The unique ability to tune the characteristics of these ALD films enables their optimization to applications where time-resolved single particle imaging can be performed in extreme conditions, such as high counting rates at cryogenic temperatures. Adhesion of the conductive and emissive nanofilms to the 20 μm pore MCP glass substrates and their mechanical stability over a very wide range of temperatures (10–700 K) were confirmed experimentally. Resistance of ALD MCPs was reproducible during multiple cool-down cycles with no film degradation observed. Optimizing resistance of novel MCPs for operation at cryogenic temperature should enable high count rate event detection at temperatures below 20 K.

  10. Comparative Response of Microchannel Plate and Channel Electron Multiplier Detectors to Penetrating Radiation in Space

    SciTech Connect

    Funsten, Herbert O.; Harper, Ronnie W.; Dors, Eric E.; Janzen, Paul A.; Larsen, Brian A.; MacDonald, Elizabeth A.; Poston, David I.; Ritzau, Stephen M.; Skoug, Ruth M.; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.

    2015-10-02

    Channel electron multiplier (CEM) and microchannel plate (MCP) detectors are routinely used in space instrumentation for measurement of space plasmas. Here, our goal is to understand the relative sensitivities of these detectors to penetrating radiation in space, which can generate background counts and shorten detector lifetime. We use 662 keV γ-rays as a proxy for penetrating radiation such as γ-rays, cosmic rays, and high-energy electrons and protons that are ubiquitous in the space environment. We find that MCP detectors are ~20 times more sensitive to 662 keV γ-rays than CEM detectors. This is attributed to the larger total area of multiplication channels in an MCP detector that is sensitive to electronic excitation and ionization resulting from the interaction of penetrating radiation with the detector material. In contrast to the CEM detector, whose quantum efficiency εγ for 662 keVγ -rays is found to be 0.00175 and largely independent of detector bias, the quantum efficiency of the MCP detector is strongly dependent on the detector bias, with a power law index of 5.5. Lastly, background counts in MCP detectors from penetrating radiation can be reduced using MCP geometries with higher pitch and smaller channel diameter.

  11. Development of the microchannel plate detector for FUV spectroscopy in the BepiColombo mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, Go; Yoshioka, Kazuo; Sakai, Kouichi; Honma, Tatsuro; Yoshikawa, Ichiro; Maria, Jean-Luc; Quemerais, E.

    PHEBUS (Probing of Hermean Exosphere By Ultraviolet Spectroscopy) is a double ultraviolet spectrometer for the MPO spacecraft of the BepiColombo mission, which is dedicated to the study of the Mercury. The purpose of this instrument is to reveal the composition and the distribution of the Mercury's exosphere by detecting emission lines in the wavelength range from 55 to 315 nm. The instrument is basically composed of two ultraviolet spectrometers and one scanning mirror with a single axis of rotation. Each detector has a specific range of wavelengths: the Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) channel from 55 to 155 nm, and the Far Ultraviolet (FUV) channel from 145 to 315 nm. The FUV detector consists of a MgF2 input window, a Cs2 Te photocathode, microchannel plates (MCPs), and a resistive anode encoder (RAE). We have manufactured and tested the optical prototype of the FUV detector. In a position-sensitive system with an RAE, the spatial resolution depends on the bias voltage applied to each part of the detector. We optimized the bias voltage and achieved a high spatial resolution of 45 m, corresponding to 480480 pixels. In addition, the long-term aging of the detector against incidence of photon flux was tested. Based on the result of our laboratory measurement, both gain and quantum efficiency of the MCPs will decrease by about 40% during the BepiColombo mission. In our presentation we report the specific performance of the optical prototype of the FUV detector.

  12. Applicability of micro-channel plate followed by phosphor screen to charged particles

    SciTech Connect

    Himura, H. Nakata, S.; Sanpei, A.

    2016-06-15

    This paper experimentally investigates the applicability of a micro-channel plate (MCP) followed by a phosphor screen to charged particles along with a calibration method for estimating the acceptable limit of input particle flux and appropriate operation parameters of a particular MCP. For the first time, plasmas consisting of only lithium ions are injected into the MCP. Despite large ion numbers (N{sub i}) on the order of ≃10{sup 7}, no deterioration in the effective gain (αG) of the MCP owing to an excess amount of the extracted charge occurs in a certain range of the amplifier voltage (ΔU{sub M}) applied to the MCP. The measured αG nearly agrees with the expected value. However, once ΔU{sub M} exceeds a limit value, αG eventually begins to saturate. This is also verified in experiments using pure electron plasmas. An appropriate range of ΔU{sub M} is presented to avoid saturation and, finally, derive N{sub i} directly from the secondary electron current outputted from the MCP only after the indispensable calibration.

  13. Comparative Response of Microchannel Plate and Channel Electron Multiplier Detectors to Penetrating Radiation in Space

    DOE PAGES

    Funsten, Herbert O.; Harper, Ronnie W.; Dors, Eric E.; ...

    2015-10-02

    Channel electron multiplier (CEM) and microchannel plate (MCP) detectors are routinely used in space instrumentation for measurement of space plasmas. Here, our goal is to understand the relative sensitivities of these detectors to penetrating radiation in space, which can generate background counts and shorten detector lifetime. We use 662 keV γ-rays as a proxy for penetrating radiation such as γ-rays, cosmic rays, and high-energy electrons and protons that are ubiquitous in the space environment. We find that MCP detectors are ~20 times more sensitive to 662 keV γ-rays than CEM detectors. This is attributed to the larger total area ofmore » multiplication channels in an MCP detector that is sensitive to electronic excitation and ionization resulting from the interaction of penetrating radiation with the detector material. In contrast to the CEM detector, whose quantum efficiency εγ for 662 keVγ -rays is found to be 0.00175 and largely independent of detector bias, the quantum efficiency of the MCP detector is strongly dependent on the detector bias, with a power law index of 5.5. Lastly, background counts in MCP detectors from penetrating radiation can be reduced using MCP geometries with higher pitch and smaller channel diameter.« less

  14. Exploring the spatial resolution of position-sensitive microchannel plate detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiggins, Blake; Siwal, Davinder; Desouza, Romualdo

    2016-03-01

    High amplification and excellent timing make microchannel plate (MCP) detectors excellent devices for detection of photons, electrons, and ions. In addition to providing sub-nanosecond time resolution MCP detectors can also provide spatial resolution, thus making them useful in imaging applications. Use of a resistive anode (RA) is a routinely used approach to make an MCP position-sensitive. The spatial resolution of the RA associated with detection of a single incident electron was determined. Factors impacting the spatial resolution obtained with the RA will be discussed and the achieved spatial resolution of 64 μm (FWHM) will be presented. Recently, a novel approach has been developed to provide position-sensitivity for an MCP detector. In this approach, namely the induced signal approach, the position of the incident particle is determined by sensing the electron cloud emanating from a MCP stack. By utilizing the zero-crossing point of the inherently bipolar signals, a spatial resolution of 466 μm (FWHM) has been achieved. Work to improve the spatial resolution of the induced signal approach further will be presented. Supported by the US DOE NNSA under Award No. DE-NA0002012.

  15. Cross strip microchannel plate imaging photon counters with high time resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Stonehill, Laura C; Shirey, Robert; Rabin, Michael W; Thompson, David C; Siegmund, Oswald H W; Vallerga, John V; Tremsin, Anton S

    2010-01-01

    We have implemented cross strip readout microchannel plate detectors in 18 mm active area format including open face (UV/particle) and sealed tube (optical) configurations. These have been tested with a field programmable gate array based parallel channel electronics for event encoding which can process high input event rates (> 5 MHz) with high spatial resolution. Using small pore MCPs (6 {micro}m) operated in a pair, we achieve gains of >5 x 10{sup 5} which is sufficient to provide spatial resolution of <35 {micro}m FHWM, with self triggered event timing accuracy of {approx}2 ns for sealed tube optical sensors. A peak quantum efficiency of {approx}19% at 500 nm has been achieved with SuperGenII photocathodes that have response over the 400 nm to 900 nm range. Local area counting rates of up to >200 events/mcp pore sec{sup -1} have been attained, along with image linearity and stability to better than 50 {micro}m.

  16. Applicability of micro-channel plate followed by phosphor screen to charged particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Himura, H.; Nakata, S.; Sanpei, A.

    2016-06-01

    This paper experimentally investigates the applicability of a micro-channel plate (MCP) followed by a phosphor screen to charged particles along with a calibration method for estimating the acceptable limit of input particle flux and appropriate operation parameters of a particular MCP. For the first time, plasmas consisting of only lithium ions are injected into the MCP. Despite large ion numbers (Ni) on the order of ≃107, no deterioration in the effective gain (αG) of the MCP owing to an excess amount of the extracted charge occurs in a certain range of the amplifier voltage (ΔUM) applied to the MCP. The measured αG nearly agrees with the expected value. However, once ΔUM exceeds a limit value, αG eventually begins to saturate. This is also verified in experiments using pure electron plasmas. An appropriate range of ΔUM is presented to avoid saturation and, finally, derive Ni directly from the secondary electron current outputted from the MCP only after the indispensable calibration.

  17. High-resolution neutron radiography with microchannel plates: Proof-of-principle experiments at PSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremsin, A. S.; McPhate, J. B.; Vallerga, J. V.; Siegmund, O. H. W.; Hull, J. S.; Feller, W. B.; Lehmann, E.

    2009-06-01

    With the appearance of highly collimated and intense neutron beamlines, the resolution of radiographic experiments is often limited by the parameters of the neutron imaging detector. Neutron-sensitive microchannel plates (MCPs) proved to be very efficient for conversion of a thermal or cold neutron into an electron pulse of up to 10 6 electrons preserving location of the neutron absorption within ˜15 μm. In this paper, we present the results of preliminary measurements performed with neutron-sensitive MCPs coupled with a Medipix2/Timepix active pixel sensor. A set of test objects was imaged at both thermal and cold neutron imaging beamlines of Paul Scherrer Institute. The spatial resolution of the detector operating at high counting rate mode was confirmed to be limited by the 55 μm pixel size of the Medipix2 readout. At the same time, event centroiding applied to the charge values measured with Timepix readout allowed individual neutron counting with spatial resolution on the scale of MCP pore spacing (11 μm in the present measurements). The ongoing improvement of the speed of the readout electronics should eliminate the low counting rate limitation of the latter high-resolution imaging.

  18. Comparative lifetesting results for microchannel plates in windowless EUV photon detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malina, R. F.; Coburn, K. R.

    1984-01-01

    Microchannel plates (MCPs) from seven manufacturers were subjected to a series of tests to determine their suitability for the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer satellite. Comparative data are presented for sixteen MCP tandem pairs with channel length to diameter ratios (l/d) ranging from 40:1 to 60:1 and for two saturable (curved channel) MCPs with l/d's of 80:1. Results for MCPs with funnelled channel throats are also discussed. Properties of the MCPs which were monitored include: background count rate, output charge pulse height distribution (PHD), modal gain, PHD full width half maximum (FWHM), and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) photon quantum efficiency. Five detectors were chosen for further lifetime testing consisting of a mild bake to 100 C, and charge extraction to 0.01 coulombs, repeated high voltage cycling and reexposure to one atmosphere conditions. The results of these tests and their implications for the flight detectors are discussed. Erratic events in the detector background were recorded, probably due to field emission from high voltage surfaces or the absorption of water vapor into the electrode following exposure to air. The steps taken to control the detector background are discussed.

  19. Nanosecond Gating Properties Of Proximity-Focused Microchannel-Plate Image Intensifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, N. S.; Yates, G. J.; Jaramillo, S. A.; Ogle, J. W.; Detch, J. L.

    1981-12-01

    Some fundamental properties of 18-mm-diam gated proximity-focussed microchannel-plate (MCP) image intensifiers used as fast image shutters in the 1 to 10 ns range have been identified and studied. Light pulses (≍ 5-ps-wide) from a modelocked dye laser optically sample the gated MCP. Shuttering is achieved by applying a forward-biasing electrical gate pulse to the quiescently reverse-biased photocathode-MCP interface. Variable delay (≍ 30-ps jitter) between the gate pulse and the laser pulse permit tracing the MCP's optical response. Gating speeds, turn-on and turn-off patterns, the asymmetric spatial dependence of the MCP optical response, and resolution effects as functions of gate pulse width and photocathode-MCP bias have been characterized. Shutter times of >= 750 ps and <= 5 1p/mm resolution with the MCP fully on were observed. Variations in the intensity profiles of the phosphorl.s spatial response for uniform photocathode illumination are measured with a calibrated silicon-intensified-target (SIT) focus projection, scan (FPS) television camera and a high-speed video digitizer while photomultipliers (PMTs) monitor the laser pulse and the phosphor's spatially integrated output intensities. The characterization system, gating and biasing circuits, and experimental results will be presented.

  20. Photon-counting spatial light modulator technology development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, Richard B.; Hunt, Jeffrey H.

    1994-10-01

    The goal of this program is to measure and improve the performance of photon-counting spatial light modulators operating in an optically-addressed reflection mode. Experimental results are obtained for silicon devices. These device consists of an avalanche photodiode (APD) operated in the Geiger mode with the front and back surface of the diode forming an asymmetric Fabry-Perot cavity. The phase delay within the cavity is modified directly by the avalanche via the free-carrier refractive index or by Joule heating. Experiments were conducted first with the write laser beam at 1064 nm and the read beam at the same wavelength and second with the write beam at 850 nm and the read beam at 1300 nm. The device differs qualitatively from other approaches such as smart pixels by virtue of its photon-counting sensitivity its low cost and its ability to form a spatially-coherent read-out wavefront.

  1. Photon-counting techniques with silicon avalanche photodiodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dautet, Henri; Deschamps, P.; Dion, Bruno; MacGregor, Andrew D.; MacSween, D.; McIntyre, Robert J.; Trottier, C.; Webb, Paul P.

    1993-05-01

    Silicon avalanche photodiodes (APD) have been used for photon counting for a number of years. This paper reviews their properties and the associated electronics required for photon counting in the Geiger mode. Significant improvements are reported in overall photon detection efficiencies (approaching 75% at 633 nm), and timing jitter (under 200 ps) achieved at high over-voltages (20 - 30 V). Results obtained using an active-mode fast quench circuit capable of switching over-voltages as high as 20 V (giving photon detection efficiencies in the 50% range), are reported with a dead-time of less than 50 ns. Larger diodes (up to 1 mm diameter), usable in the Geiger mode, which have quantum efficiencies over 80% in the 500 - 800 nm range also are reported.

  2. Three-Dimensional Photon Counting Imaging with Axially Distributed Sensing.

    PubMed

    Cho, Myungjin; Javidi, Bahram

    2016-07-28

    In this paper, we review three-dimensional (3D) photon counting imaging with axially distributed sensing. Under severely photon-starved conditions, we have proposed various imaging and algorithmic approaches to reconstruct a scene in 3D, which are not possible by using conventional imaging system due to lack of sufficient number of photons. In this paper, we present an overview of optical sensing and imaging system along with dedicated algorithms for reconstructing 3D scenes by photon counting axially distributed sensing, which may be implemented by moving a single image sensor along its optical axis. To visualize the 3D image, statistical estimation methods and computational reconstruction of axially distributed sensing is applied.

  3. Optical encryption using photon-counting polarimetric imaging.

    PubMed

    Maluenda, David; Carnicer, Artur; Martínez-Herrero, Rosario; Juvells, Ignasi; Javidi, Bahram

    2015-01-26

    We present a polarimetric-based optical encoder for image encryption and verification. A system for generating random polarized vector keys based on a Mach-Zehnder configuration combined with translucent liquid crystal displays in each path of the interferometer is developed. Polarization information of the encrypted signal is retrieved by taking advantage of the information provided by the Stokes parameters. Moreover, photon-counting model is used in the encryption process which provides data sparseness and nonlinear transformation to enhance security. An authorized user with access to the polarization keys and the optical design variables can retrieve and validate the photon-counting plain-text. Optical experimental results demonstrate the feasibility of the encryption method.

  4. Towards a Graphene-Based Low Intensity Photon Counting Photodetector.

    PubMed

    Williams, Jamie O D; Alexander-Webber, Jack A; Lapington, Jon S; Roy, Mervyn; Hutchinson, Ian B; Sagade, Abhay A; Martin, Marie-Blandine; Braeuninger-Weimer, Philipp; Cabrero-Vilatela, Andrea; Wang, Ruizhi; De Luca, Andrea; Udrea, Florin; Hofmann, Stephan

    2016-08-23

    Graphene is a highly promising material in the development of new photodetector technologies, in particular due its tunable optoelectronic properties, high mobilities and fast relaxation times coupled to its atomic thinness and other unique electrical, thermal and mechanical properties. Optoelectronic applications and graphene-based photodetector technology are still in their infancy, but with a range of device integration and manufacturing approaches emerging this field is progressing quickly. In this review we explore the potential of graphene in the context of existing single photon counting technologies by comparing their performance to simulations of graphene-based single photon counting and low photon intensity photodetection technologies operating in the visible, terahertz and X-ray energy regimes. We highlight the theoretical predictions and current graphene manufacturing processes for these detectors. We show initial experimental implementations and discuss the key challenges and next steps in the development of these technologies.

  5. Towards a Graphene-Based Low Intensity Photon Counting Photodetector

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Jamie O. D.; Alexander-Webber, Jack A.; Lapington, Jon S.; Roy, Mervyn; Hutchinson, Ian B.; Sagade, Abhay A.; Martin, Marie-Blandine; Braeuninger-Weimer, Philipp; Cabrero-Vilatela, Andrea; Wang, Ruizhi; De Luca, Andrea; Udrea, Florin; Hofmann, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    Graphene is a highly promising material in the development of new photodetector technologies, in particular due its tunable optoelectronic properties, high mobilities and fast relaxation times coupled to its atomic thinness and other unique electrical, thermal and mechanical properties. Optoelectronic applications and graphene-based photodetector technology are still in their infancy, but with a range of device integration and manufacturing approaches emerging this field is progressing quickly. In this review we explore the potential of graphene in the context of existing single photon counting technologies by comparing their performance to simulations of graphene-based single photon counting and low photon intensity photodetection technologies operating in the visible, terahertz and X-ray energy regimes. We highlight the theoretical predictions and current graphene manufacturing processes for these detectors. We show initial experimental implementations and discuss the key challenges and next steps in the development of these technologies. PMID:27563903

  6. Deep UV photon-counting detectors and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Gary A.; Siegel, Andrew M.; Model, Joshua; Geboff, Adam; Soloviev, Stanislav; Vert, Alexey; Sandvik, Peter

    2009-05-01

    Photon counting detectors are used in many diverse applications and are well-suited to situations in which a weak signal is present in a relatively benign background. Examples of successful system applications of photon-counting detectors include ladar, bio-aerosol detection, communication, and low-light imaging. A variety of practical photon-counting detectors have been developed employing materials and technologies that cover the waveband from deep ultraviolet (UV) to the near-infrared. However, until recently, photoemissive detectors (photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) and their variants) were the only viable technology for photon-counting in the deep UV region of the spectrum. While PMTs exhibit extremely low dark count rates and large active area, they have other characteristics which make them unsuitable for certain applications. The characteristics and performance limitations of PMTs that prevent their use in some applications include bandwidth limitations, high bias voltages, sensitivity to magnetic fields, low quantum efficiency, large volume and high cost. Recently, DARPA has initiated a program called Deep UV Avalanche Photodiode (DUVAP) to develop semiconductor alternatives to PMTs for use in the deep UV. The higher quantum efficiency of Geiger-mode avalanche photodiode (GM-APD) detectors and the ability to fabricate arrays of individually-addressable detectors will open up new applications in the deep UV. In this paper, we discuss the system design trades that must be considered in order to successfully replace low-dark count, large-area PMTs with high-dark count, small-area GM-APD detectors. We also discuss applications that will be enabled by the successful development of deep UV GM-APD arrays, and we present preliminary performance data for recently fabricated silicon carbide GM-APD arrays.

  7. Experimental reconstruction of photon statistics without photon counting.

    PubMed

    Zambra, Guido; Andreoni, Alessandra; Bondani, Maria; Gramegna, Marco; Genovese, Marco; Brida, Giorgio; Rossi, Andrea; Paris, Matteo G A

    2005-08-05

    Experimental reconstructions of photon number distributions of both continuous-wave and pulsed light beams are reported. Our scheme is based on on/off avalanche photo-detection assisted by maximum-likelihood estimation and does not involve photon counting. Reconstructions of the distribution for both semiclassical and quantum states of light are reported for single-mode as well as for multi-mode beams.

  8. Photon Counting Chirped AM Ladar: Concept, Simulation, and Experimental Results

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-11-01

    sensitivity. This noise is well above the signal shot noise limit. We are developing a method using Geiger - mode avalanche photodiode (Gm-APD) photon counting...shifted chirp waveform. The range to the target is recovered in the same way as for the chirped AM ladar with linear response mode detectors. In...output pulse from signal generator 1 also triggers the start of signal generator 2, which operates in burst mode to output trigger pulses to the

  9. Avalanche photodiode photon counting receivers for space-borne lidars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Xiaoli; Davidson, Frederic M.

    1991-01-01

    Avalanche photodiodes (APD) are studied for uses as photon counting detectors in spaceborne lidars. Non-breakdown APD photon counters, in which the APD's are biased below the breakdown point, are shown to outperform: (1) conventional APD photon counters biased above the breakdown point; (2) conventional APD photon counters biased above the breakdown point; and (3) APD's in analog mode when the received optical signal is extremely weak. Non-breakdown APD photon counters were shown experimentally to achieve an effective photon counting quantum efficiency of 5.0 percent at lambda = 820 nm with a dead time of 15 ns and a dark count rate of 7000/s which agreed with the theoretically predicted values. The interarrival times of the counts followed an exponential distribution and the counting statistics appeared to follow a Poisson distribution with no after pulsing. It is predicted that the effective photon counting quantum efficiency can be improved to 18.7 percent at lambda = 820 nm and 1.46 percent at lambda = 1060 nm with a dead time of a few nanoseconds by using more advanced commercially available electronic components.

  10. Correction for nonlinear photon counting effects in lidar systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donovan, D. P.; Whiteway, J. A.; Carswell, A. I.

    1992-01-01

    Photomultiplier tubes (PMT's) employed in the photon counting (PC) mode of operation are widely used as detectors in lidar systems. In our laboratory, we have developed a versatile Nd:YAG lidar which is used for measurement of both the middle atmosphere and the troposphere. With this system, we encounter a very wide range of signal levels ranging from the extremely weak signals from the top of the mesosphere to the very strong returns from low level clouds. Although the system is capable of operating the PMT's in either the analog detection or photon counting mode, we find that often when we use photon counting we have portions of our lidar return which contain very useful information but are not within the linear operating regime of the PC system. We report the results of our efforts to explore the extent to which such high intensity PC signals can be quantitatively analyzed. In particular, a useful model relating the mean 'true' count rate and the observed count rate is presented and it's application to our system demonstrated. This model takes into account the variation in height of the PMT output pulses and the effect of the pulse height discrimination threshold.

  11. Musculoskeletal imaging with a prototype photon-counting detector.

    PubMed

    Gruber, M; Homolka, P; Chmeissani, M; Uffmann, M; Pretterklieber, M; Kainberger, F

    2012-01-01

    To test a digital imaging X-ray device based on the direct capture of X-ray photons with pixel detectors, which are coupled with photon-counting readout electronics. The chip consists of a matrix of 256 × 256 pixels with a pixel pitch of 55 μm. A monolithic image of 11.2 cm × 7 cm was obtained by the consecutive displacement approach. Images of embalmed anatomical specimens of eight human hands were obtained at four different dose levels (skin dose 2.4, 6, 12, 25 μGy) with the new detector, as well as with a flat-panel detector. The overall rating scores for the evaluated anatomical regions ranged from 5.23 at the lowest dose level, 6.32 at approximately 6 μGy, 6.70 at 12 μGy, to 6.99 at the highest dose level with the photon-counting system. The corresponding rating scores for the flat-panel detector were 3.84, 5.39, 6.64, and 7.34. When images obtained at the same dose were compared, the new system outperformed the conventional DR system at the two lowest dose levels. At the higher dose levels, there were no significant differences between the two systems. The photon-counting detector has great potential to obtain musculoskeletal images of excellent quality at very low dose levels.

  12. Performance limits of a single photon counting pixel system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chmeissani, M.; Mikulec, B.

    2001-03-01

    X-ray imaging using hybrid pixel detectors in single photon counting mode is a relatively recent and exciting development. The photon counting mode implies that each pixel has a threshold in energy above which a hit is recorded. Sharing of charge between adjacent pixels would therefore lead to a loss of registered hits and for medical imaging applications to a higher patient dose. This explains why the demand for high spatial resolution and consequently small pixel sizes (<100 μm) motivates the Medipix2 collaboration to study the effects of charge sharing between pixels on system performance. Two different simulation codes are used to simulate the energy loss inside the detector and the charge transport towards the pixel electrodes. The largest contribution to the lateral spreading of charge comes from diffusion and can result in a considerable loss of detection efficiency in photon counting systems for small pixel sizes. The Medipix2 collaboration consists of groups from Barcelona, Cagliari, CEA/Leti DEIN, CERN, Freiburg, Glasgow, Mitthögskolan, Napoli, NIKHEF, MRC lab Cambridge, Pisa, Prague and Sassari.

  13. Comprehensive Analysis of Convective Heat Transfer in Parallel Plate Microchannel with Viscous Dissipation and Constant Heat Flux Boundary Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushwaha, Hari Mohan; Sahu, Santosh Kumar

    2017-10-01

    This paper reports the hydrodynamically and thermally fully developed, laminar, incompressible, forced convective heat transfer characteristics of gaseous flows through a parallel plate microchannel with different constant heat flux boundary conditions. The first order velocity slip and viscous dissipation effects are considered in the analysis. Here, three different thermal boundary conditions such as: both plates kept at different constant heat fluxes, both plates kept at equal constant heat fluxes and one plate kept at constant heat flux and other one insulated are considered for the analysis. The deviation in Nusselt number between the model that considers both first order velocity slip and temperature jump and the one that considers only velocity slip is reported. Also, the effect of various heat flux ratios on the Nusselt number is reported in this analysis. In addition, the deviation in Nusselt number between first and second order slip model is discussed in this study.

  14. A 4-GHz frequency-domain fluorometer with internal microchannel plate photomultiplier cross-correlation.

    PubMed

    Berndt, K W; Gryczynski, I; Lakowicz, J R

    1991-01-01

    We have developed and tested a multifrequency phase/modulation fluorometer based on the Hamamatsu Model R2024U gatable microchannel plate photomultiplier (MCP-PMT), using internal MCP-PMT cross-correlation. This internal mixing is accomplished by biasing and modulating the gating mesh which is located 0.2 mm behind the photocathode. Near the photocathode center, no high-frequency photocurrent modulation was achieved. Within a circular area near the photocathode edge, however, the R2024U allows accurate phase shift and demodulation measurements up to at least 4.5 GHz, the frequency limit of our PMT-modulation amplifier. By mixing immediately after the photocathode, there is no decrease in the time resolution due to transit time spread, and the MCP has to process only low-frequency signals. This means no low-level high-frequency signal voltages have to be handled in this fluorometer, and the problems of RF shielding become much less critical. Also, the effective output impedance of the PMT has been increased, resulting in a 43-dB increase in the PMT output signal power. In principle, more MCPs could be built into the PMT, allowing an improved fluorescence detection limit. We have used the method of reference fluorophores in order to compensate for pronounced PMT color effects, a wavelength-dependent modulation, and a wavelength-dependent time shift. No color correction is required in the case of time-dependent depolarization. The performance of the instrument was verified by measurements of the intensity decay of perylene, which showed a single-exponential decay, and by measurements of the decay of tryptophan in water, which showed a double-exponential decay, as expected.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. Microchannel plate detector detection efficiency to monoenergetic electrons between 3 and 28 keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blase, Ryan C.; Benke, Roland R.; Miller, Gregory P.; Pickens, Keith S.; Waite, J. Hunter

    2017-05-01

    An unshielded microchannel plate (MCP) detector with an ultrafine pore diameter of 2 μm was irradiated by an electron beam to determine the detection efficiency of electrons for creating detector signals, or counts. Tested electron energies spanned a range of 3 kiloelectron volts (keV) to 28 keV. Higher detection efficiencies were measured at the lower end of this energy range, 0.376 counts per incident electron at 3 keV down to 0.155 at 15 keV with an increase to 0.217 at 18 keV and then another decrease down to 0.15 counts per incident electron at 28 keV. The increase at 18 keV is attributed to primary electron interaction with the L shell electrons of lead (Pb), leading to an increase in secondary electron and X-ray generation within the MCP and thus an increase in detection efficiency. For the electron beam directed normal to the MCP surface, the lowest efficiency of 0.15 counts per incident electron was observed at 28 keV. Detection efficiency was also tested as a function of incident angle with angular steps of 5°. Detection efficiency was more sensitive to the angle of incidence as the incident electron energy decreased. The detection efficiency at 3 keV decreased from 0.376 counts per electron at the zero degree angle (normal incidence to MCP surface) to 0.027 counts per electron at an incident angle of 50° (average in both orientations). At 28 keV, the decrease in detection efficiency as a function of increasing angle was less pronounced, ranging from 0.15 counts per electron at zero degrees to 0.08 counts per electron at 50° (average in both orientations). Experimental data showed lower detection efficiencies compared with previously published data.

  16. Ghosting phenomena in single photon counting imagers with Vernier anode.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hao; Zhao, Baosheng; Qiurong, Yan; Liu, Yong'an; Hu, Huijun

    2011-02-01

    We provide the ghosting theory of two-dimensional Vernier anode based imagers. The single photon counting detection system based on Vernier anode is constructed. The ghosting, which occurs during the decoding of two-dimensional Vernier anode, and its possible solutions are described in detail. On the basis of the discussion of the decoding algorithm, the ghosting theoretical model is established. Phase conditions on which imaging ghosting can be avoided and the probability distribution function are proposed; the root causes of ghosting of two-dimensional Vernier anode are also discussed.

  17. Charge coupled devices vs. microchannel plates in the extreme and far ultraviolet - A comparison based on the latest laboratory measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vallerga, J.; Lampton, M.

    1988-01-01

    While microchannel plates (MCPs) have been established as imaging photon counters in the EUV and FUV for some years, CCDs are associated with low light level sensing at visible and near-IR wavelengths. Attention is presently given to recent proposals for CCDs' use as EUV and FUV detectors with quantum efficiencies sometimes exceeding those of MCPs; quantum resolution, format size, dynamic range, and long-term stability are also used as bases of comparison, for the cases of both space-based astronomical and spectroscopic applications.

  18. Synchrotron measurements of the absolute x-ray quantum efficiency of CsI-coated microchannel plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rideout, Rob M.; Pearson, James F.; Fraser, George W.; Lees, John E.; Brunton, Adam N.; Bannister, N. P.; Kenter, Almus T.; Kraft, Ralph P.

    1998-11-01

    Two identical CsI-coated, low noise microchannel plate (MCP) detectors were taken to the Daresbury Synchrotron Radiation Source (SRS) to measure their quantum efficiencies over two different energy ranges - 450 eV to 1200 eV and 4.5 eV to 9.5 eV. The SRS was run in low ring current with the beam flux monitored using single wire gas proportional counters. We present accurate measurements of edge-related absolute quantum efficiency features due to the CsI photocathodes. This data will be incorporated into the calibration program of the Advanced X-ray Astrophysical Facility High Resolution Camera.

  19. Charge coupled devices vs. microchannel plates in the extreme and far ultraviolet - A comparison based on the latest laboratory measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vallerga, J.; Lampton, M.

    1988-01-01

    While microchannel plates (MCPs) have been established as imaging photon counters in the EUV and FUV for some years, CCDs are associated with low light level sensing at visible and near-IR wavelengths. Attention is presently given to recent proposals for CCDs' use as EUV and FUV detectors with quantum efficiencies sometimes exceeding those of MCPs; quantum resolution, format size, dynamic range, and long-term stability are also used as bases of comparison, for the cases of both space-based astronomical and spectroscopic applications.

  20. Investigation of a Multi-Anode Microchannel Plate PMT for Time-of-Flight PET.

    PubMed

    Choong, Woon-Seng

    2010-09-13

    We report on an investigation of a mulit-anode microchannel plate PMT for time-of-flight PET detector modules. The primary advantages of an MCP lie in its excellent timing properties (fast rise time and low transit time spread), compact size, and reasonably large active area, thus making it a good candidate for TOF applications. In addition, the anode can be segmented into an array of collection electrodes with fine pitch to attain good position sensitivity. In this paper, we investigate using the Photonis Planacon MCP-PMT with a pore size of 10 µm to construct a PET detector module, specifically for time-of-flight applications. We measure the single electron response by exciting the Planacon with pulsed laser diode. We also measure the performance of the Planacon as a PET detector by coupling a 4 mm × 4 mm × 10 mm LSO crystal to individual pixel to study its gain uniformity, energy resolution, and timing resolution. The rise time of the Planacon is 440 ps with pulse duration of about 1 ns. A transit time spread of 120 ps FWHM is achieved. The gain is fairly uniform across the central region of the Planacon, but drops off by as much as a factor of 2.5 around the edges. The energy resolution is fairly uniform across the Planacon with an average value of 18.6±0.7% FWHM. While the average timing resolution of 252±7 ps FWHM is achieved in the central region of the Planacon, it degrades to 280±9 ps FWHM for edge pixels and 316±15 ps FWHM for corner pixels. We compare the results with measurements performed with a fast timing conventional PMT (Hamamatsu R-9800). We find that the R9800, which has significantly higher PDE, has a better timing resolution than the Planacon. Furthermore, we perform detector simulations to calculate the improvement that can be achieved with a higher PDE Planacon. The calculation shows that the Planacon can achieve significantly better timing resolution if it can attain the same PDE as the R-9800, while only a 30% improvement is needed

  1. Eiger: a single-photon counting x-ray detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, I.; Bergamaschi, A.; Billich, H.; Cartier, S.; Dinapoli, R.; Greiffenberg, D.; Guizar-Sicairos, M.; Henrich, B.; Jungmann, J.; Mezza, D.; Mozzanica, A.; Schmitt, B.; Shi, X.; Tinti, G.

    2014-05-01

    Eiger is a single-photon counting x-ray pixel detector being developed at the Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI) for applications at synchrotron light sources. It follows the widely utilized and successful Pilatus detector. The main features of Eiger are a pixel size of 75 × 75 μm2, high frame rate capability of 22 kHz and negligible dead time between frames of 4 μs. This article contains a detailed description of Eiger detector systems, from the 500 kpixel single-module detector to large-area multi-modules systems. The calibration and performance of the first 500 kpixel system that is in routine user operation are also presented. Furthermore, a method of calibrating the energy of single-photon counting detectors along the detector gain axis is introduced. This approach has the advantage that the detector settings can be optimized at all energies for count rate capabilities. Rate capabilities of the system are reported for energies between 6 and 16 keV.

  2. Novel Photon-Counting Detectors for Free-Space Communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krainak, Michael A.; Yang, Guan; Sun, Xiaoli; Lu, Wei; Merritt, Scott; Beck, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    We present performance data for novel photon counting detectors for free space optical communication. NASA GSFC is testing the performance of three novel photon counting detectors 1) a 2x8 mercury cadmium telluride avalanche array made by DRS Inc. 2) a commercial 2880 silicon avalanche photodiode array and 3) a prototype resonant cavity silicon avalanche photodiode array. We will present and compare dark count, photon detection efficiency, wavelength response and communication performance data for these detectors. We discuss system wavelength trades and architectures for optimizing overall communication link sensitivity, data rate and cost performance. The HgCdTe APD array has photon detection efficiencies of greater than 50 were routinely demonstrated across 5 arrays, with one array reaching a maximum PDE of 70. High resolution pixel-surface spot scans were performed and the junction diameters of the diodes were measured. The junction diameter was decreased from 31 m to 25 m resulting in a 2x increase in e-APD gain from 470 on the 2010 array to 1100 on the array delivered to NASA GSFC. Mean single photon SNRs of over 12 were demonstrated at excess noise factors of 1.2-1.3.The commercial silicon APD array has a fast output with rise times of 300ps and pulse widths of 600ps. Received and filtered signals from the entire array are multiplexed onto this single fast output. The prototype resonant cavity silicon APD array is being developed for use at 1 micron wavelength.

  3. Improved photon counting efficiency calibration using superconducting single photon detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Haiyong; Xu, Nan; Li, Jianwei; Sun, Ruoduan; Feng, Guojin; Wang, Yanfei; Ma, Chong; Lin, Yandong; Zhang, Labao; Kang, Lin; Chen, Jian; Wu, Peiheng

    2015-10-01

    The quantum efficiency of photon counters can be measured with standard uncertainty below 1% level using correlated photon pairs generated through spontaneous parametric down-conversion process. Normally a laser in UV, blue or green wavelength range with sufficient photon energy is applied to produce energy and momentum conserved photon pairs in two channels with desired wavelengths for calibration. One channel is used as the heralding trigger, and the other is used for the calibration of the detector under test. A superconducting nanowire single photon detector with advantages such as high photon counting speed (<20 MHz), low dark count rate (<50 counts per second), and wideband responsivity (UV to near infrared) is used as the trigger detector, enabling correlated photons calibration capabilities into shortwave visible range. For a 355nm single longitudinal mode pump laser, when a superconducting nanowire single photon detector is used as the trigger detector at 1064nm and 1560nm in the near infrared range, the photon counting efficiency calibration capabilities can be realized at 532nm and 460nm. The quantum efficiency measurement on photon counters such as photomultiplier tubes and avalanche photodiodes can be then further extended in a wide wavelength range (e.g. 400-1000nm) using a flat spectral photon flux source to meet the calibration demands in cutting edge low light applications such as time resolved fluorescence and nonlinear optical spectroscopy, super resolution microscopy, deep space observation, and so on.

  4. Photon counting detector for the personal radiography inspection system "SIBSCAN"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babichev, E. A.; Baru, S. E.; Grigoriev, D. N.; Leonov, V. V.; Oleynikov, V. P.; Porosev, V. V.; Savinov, G. A.

    2017-02-01

    X-ray detectors operating in the energy integrating mode are successfully used in many different applications. Nevertheless the direct photon counting detectors, having the superior parameters in comparison with the integrating ones, are rarely used yet. One of the reasons for this is the low value of the electrical signal generated by a detected photon. Silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) based scintillation counters have a high detection efficiency, high electronic gain and compact dimensions. This makes them a very attractive candidate to replace routinely used detectors in many fields. More than 10 years ago the digital scanning radiography system based on multistrip ionization chamber (MIC) was suggested at Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics. The detector demonstrates excellent radiation resistance and parameter stability after 5 year operations and an imaging of up to 1000 persons per day. Currently, the installations operate at several Russian airports and at subway stations in some cities. At the present time we design a new detector operating in the photon counting mode, having superior parameters than the gas one, based on scintillator - SiPM assemblies. This detector has close to zero noise, higher quantum efficiency and a count rate capability of more than 5 MHz per channel (20% losses), which leads to better image quality and improved detection capability. The suggested detector technology could be expanded to medical applications.

  5. Phasor imaging with a widefield photon-counting detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colyer, Ryan A.; Siegmund, Oswald H. W.; Tremsin, Anton S.; Vallerga, John V.; Weiss, Shimon; Michalet, Xavier

    2012-01-01

    Fluorescence lifetime can be used as a contrast mechanism to distinguish fluorophores for localization or tracking, for studying molecular interactions, binding, assembly, and aggregation, or for observing conformational changes via Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) between donor and acceptor molecules. Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) is thus a powerful technique but its widespread use has been hampered by demanding hardware and software requirements. FLIM data is often analyzed in terms of multicomponent fluorescence lifetime decays, which requires large signals for a good signal-to-noise ratio. This confines the approach to very low frame rates and limits the number of frames which can be acquired before bleaching the sample. Recently, a computationally efficient and intuitive graphical representation, the phasor approach, has been proposed as an alternative method for FLIM data analysis at the ensemble and single-molecule level. In this article, we illustrate the advantages of combining phasor analysis with a widefield time-resolved single photon-counting detector (the H33D detector) for FLIM applications. In particular we show that phasor analysis allows real-time subsecond identification of species by their lifetimes and rapid representation of their spatial distribution, thanks to the parallel acquisition of FLIM information over a wide field of view by the H33D detector. We also discuss possible improvements of the H33D detector's performance made possible by the simplicity of phasor analysis and its relaxed timing accuracy requirements compared to standard time-correlated single-photon counting (TCSPC) methods.

  6. Energy dispersive photon counting detectors for breast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barber, William C.; Wessel, Jan C.; Malakhov, Nail; Wawrzyniak, Gregor; Hartsough, Neal E.; Gandhi, Thulasidharan; Nygard, Einar; Iwanczyk, Jan S.

    2013-09-01

    We report on our efforts toward the development of silicon (Si) strip detectors for energy-resolved clinical breast imaging. Typically, x-ray integrating detectors based on scintillating cesium iodide CsI(Tl) or amorphous selenium (a- Se) are used in most commercial systems. Recently, mammography instrumentation has been introduced based on photon counting silicon Si strip detectors. Mammography requires high flux from the x-ray generator, therefore, in order to achieve energy resolved single photon counting, a high output count rate (OCR) for the detector must be achieved at the required spatial resolution and across the required dynamic range for the application. The required performance in terms of the OCR, spatial resolution, and dynamic range must be obtained with sufficient field of view (FOV) for the application thus requiring the tiling of pixel arrays and scanning techniques. Room temperature semiconductors, operating as direct conversion x-ray sensors, can provide the required speed when connected to application specific integrated circuits (ASICs) operating at fast peaking times with multiple fixed thresholds per pixel, provided that the sensors are designed for rapid signal formation across the x-ray energy ranges of the application at the required energy and spatial resolutions. We present our methods and results from the optimization of prototype detectors based on Si strip structures. We describe the detector optimization and the development of ASIC readout electronics that provide the required spatial resolution, low noise, high count rate capabilities and minimal power consumption.

  7. Ultrafast Photon Counting Applied to Resonant Scanning STED Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xundong; Toro, Ligia; Stefani, Enrico; Wu, Yong

    2014-01-01

    Summary To take full advantage of fast resonant scanning in super-resolution STimulated Emission Depletion (STED) microscopy, we have developed an ultrafast photon counting system based on a multi-giga-sample per second analog-to-digital conversion (ADC) chip that delivers an unprecedented 450 MHz pixel clock (2.2 ns pixel dwell time in each scan). The system achieves a large field of view (~50 × 50 μm) with fast scanning that reduces photobleaching, and advances the time-gated continuous wave (CW) STED technology to the usage of resonant scanning with hardware based time-gating. The assembled system provides superb signal-to-noise ratio and highly linear quantification of light that result in superior image quality. Also, the system design allows great flexibility in processing photon signals to further improve the dynamic range. In conclusion, we have constructed a frontier photon counting image acquisition system with ultrafast readout rate, excellent counting linearity, and with the capacity of realizing resonant-scanning CW-STED microscopy with on-line time-gated detection. PMID:25227160

  8. High-resolution imaging X-ray detector. [using microchannel plates and electronic readout for spaceborne telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kellogg, E.; Henry, P.; Murray, S.; Van Speybroeck, L.; Bjorkholm, P.

    1976-01-01

    The paper describes an X-ray detector using microchannel plates as a photocathode surface and imaging photoelectron multiplier, and a crossed wire grid as a two-dimensional position-sensitive detector. The position resolution is 10 microns. The crossed wire grid consists of 100-micron-diam wires on 200-micron centers. Position sensing is accomplished by electronic interpolation to 1/20 of the wire spacing. The quantum efficiency of the microchannel plates varies from 29% at 0.28 keV to 5% at 3 keV. This detector will provide second-of-arc X-ray imaging in the focal plane of the 342.9-cm focal length grazing-incidence telescope being prepared for the HEAO-B observatory. By addition of suitable photocathodes, it can be used for single-photon imaging light detection in the UV, visible, and near-IR-ranges. In all cases, it gives a very low dark counting rate, allows timing of individual events to 1 microsec or less, and can handle counting rates up to 10,000 per sec.

  9. High-resolution imaging X-ray detector. [using microchannel plates and electronic readout for spaceborne telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kellogg, E.; Henry, P.; Murray, S.; Van Speybroeck, L.; Bjorkholm, P.

    1976-01-01

    The paper describes an X-ray detector using microchannel plates as a photocathode surface and imaging photoelectron multiplier, and a crossed wire grid as a two-dimensional position-sensitive detector. The position resolution is 10 microns. The crossed wire grid consists of 100-micron-diam wires on 200-micron centers. Position sensing is accomplished by electronic interpolation to 1/20 of the wire spacing. The quantum efficiency of the microchannel plates varies from 29% at 0.28 keV to 5% at 3 keV. This detector will provide second-of-arc X-ray imaging in the focal plane of the 342.9-cm focal length grazing-incidence telescope being prepared for the HEAO-B observatory. By addition of suitable photocathodes, it can be used for single-photon imaging light detection in the UV, visible, and near-IR-ranges. In all cases, it gives a very low dark counting rate, allows timing of individual events to 1 microsec or less, and can handle counting rates up to 10,000 per sec.

  10. Dark-Field Scanning Transmission Ion Microscopy via Detection of Forward-Scattered Helium Ions with a Microchannel Plate.

    PubMed

    Woehl, Taylor J; White, Ryan M; Keller, Robert R

    2016-06-01

    A microchannel plate was used as an ion sensitive detector in a commercial helium ion microscope (HIM) for dark-field transmission imaging of nanomaterials, i.e. scanning transmission ion microscopy (STIM). In contrast to previous transmission HIM approaches that used secondary electron conversion holders, our new approach detects forward-scattered helium ions on a dedicated annular shaped ion sensitive detector. Minimum collection angles between 125 mrad and 325 mrad were obtained by varying the distance of the sample from the microchannel plate detector during imaging. Monte Carlo simulations were used to predict detector angular ranges at which dark-field images with atomic number contrast could be obtained. We demonstrate atomic number contrast imaging via scanning transmission ion imaging of silica-coated gold nanoparticles and magnetite nanoparticles. Although the resolution of STIM is known to be degraded by beam broadening in the substrate, we imaged magnetite nanoparticles with high contrast on a relatively thick silicon nitride substrate. We expect this new approach to annular dark-field STIM will open avenues for more quantitative ion imaging techniques and advance fundamental understanding of underlying ion scattering mechanisms leading to image formation.

  11. MeV-level electron and gamma ray sensitivites of modern far ultraviolet sensitive microchannel plate detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Michael W.; Greathouse, Thomas K.; Cooke, Chathan M.; Blase, Ryan C.; Gladstone, G. Randall; Retherford, Kurt D.

    2016-07-01

    The Jovian system is the focus of multiple current and future NASA and ESA missions, but dangerously high radiation levels surrounding the planet make operations of instruments sensitive to high energy electrons or gamma rays problematic. Microchannel plate (MCP) detectors have been the detectors of choice in planetary ultraviolet spectrographs for decades. However, the same properties that give these detectors high response to vacuum ultraviolet photons also make them sensitive to high energy electrons and gamma rays. The success of ultraviolet investigations in the Jovian system depends on effectively shielding these MCP detectors to protect them as much as possible from this withering radiation. The design of such shielding hinges on our understanding of the response of MCP detectors to the high energy electrons and gamma rays found there. To this end, Southwest Research Institute and Massachusetts Institute of Technology collaborated in 2012-13 to measure the response of a flight-spare microchannel plate detector to a beam of high energy electrons. The detector response was measured at multiple beam energies ranging from 0.5-2.5 MeV and multiple currents. This response was then checked with MCNP6, a radiation transport simulation tool, to determine the secondary gamma rays produced by the primary electrons striking the detector window. We report on the measurement approach and the inferred electron and gamma sensitivities.

  12. Single Photon Counting Detectors for Low Light Level Imaging Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolb, Kimberly

    2015-10-01

    This dissertation presents the current state-of-the-art of semiconductor-based photon counting detector technologies. HgCdTe linear-mode avalanche photodiodes (LM-APDs), silicon Geiger-mode avalanche photodiodes (GM-APDs), and electron-multiplying CCDs (EMCCDs) are compared via their present and future performance in various astronomy applications. LM-APDs are studied in theory, based on work done at the University of Hawaii. EMCCDs are studied in theory and experimentally, with a device at NASA's Jet Propulsion Lab. The emphasis of the research is on GM-APD imaging arrays, developed at MIT Lincoln Laboratory and tested at the RIT Center for Detectors. The GM-APD research includes a theoretical analysis of SNR and various performance metrics, including dark count rate, afterpulsing, photon detection efficiency, and intrapixel sensitivity. The effects of radiation damage on the GM-APD were also characterized by introducing a cumulative dose of 50 krad(Si) via 60 MeV protons. Extensive development of Monte Carlo simulations and practical observation simulations was completed, including simulated astronomical imaging and adaptive optics wavefront sensing. Based on theoretical models and experimental testing, both the current state-of-the-art performance and projected future performance of each detector are compared for various applications. LM-APD performance is currently not competitive with other photon counting technologies, and are left out of the application-based comparisons. In the current state-of-the-art, EMCCDs in photon counting mode out-perform GM-APDs for long exposure scenarios, though GM-APDs are better for short exposure scenarios (fast readout) due to clock-induced-charge (CIC) in EMCCDs. In the long term, small improvements in GM-APD dark current will make them superior in both long and short exposure scenarios for extremely low flux. The efficiency of GM-APDs will likely always be less than EMCCDs, however, which is particularly disadvantageous for

  13. Soft tissue imaging with photon counting spectroscopic CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shikhaliev, Polad M.

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this work was experimental investigation of photon counting spectroscopic CT (PCS-CT) imaging of anatomical soft tissue with clinically relevant size. The imaging experiments were performed using a spectroscopic CT system based on CdZnTe photon counting detector with two rows of pixels, 256 pixels in each row, 1  ×  1 mm2 pixel size, and 25.6 cm detector length. The detector could split the x-ray energy spectrum to 5 regions (energy bins), and acquire 5 multi-energy (spectroscopic) CT images in a single CT scan. A sample of round shaped anatomical soft tissue of 14 cm diameter including lean and fat was used for imaging. To avoid the negative effect of anatomical noise on quantitative analysis, a spectroscopic CT phantom with tissue equivalent solid materials was used. The images were acquired at 60, 90, and 120 kVp tube voltages, and spectroscopic image series were acquired with 3 and 5 energy bins. Spectroscopic CT numbers were introduced and used to evaluate an energy selective image series. The anatomical soft tissue with 14 cm diameter was visualized with good quality and without substantial artifacts by the photon counting spectroscopic CT system. The effects of the energy bin crosstalk on spectroscopic CT numbers were quantified and analyzed. The single and double slice PCS-CT images were acquired and compared. Several new findings were observed, including the effect of soft tissue non-uniformity on image artifacts, unique status of highest energy bin, and material dependent visualization in spectroscopic image series. Fat-lean decomposition was performed using dual energy subtraction and threshold segmentation methods, and compared. Using K-edge filtered x-rays improved fat-lean decomposition as compared to conventional x-rays. Several new and important aspects of the PCS-CT were investigated. These include imaging soft tissue with clinically relevant size, single- and double-slice PCS-CT imaging, using spectroscopic CT

  14. Soft tissue imaging with photon counting spectroscopic CT.

    PubMed

    Shikhaliev, Polad M

    2015-03-21

    The purpose of this work was experimental investigation of photon counting spectroscopic CT (PCS-CT) imaging of anatomical soft tissue with clinically relevant size. The imaging experiments were performed using a spectroscopic CT system based on CdZnTe photon counting detector with two rows of pixels, 256 pixels in each row, 1  ×  1 mm(2) pixel size, and 25.6 cm detector length. The detector could split the x-ray energy spectrum to 5 regions (energy bins), and acquire 5 multi-energy (spectroscopic) CT images in a single CT scan. A sample of round shaped anatomical soft tissue of 14 cm diameter including lean and fat was used for imaging. To avoid the negative effect of anatomical noise on quantitative analysis, a spectroscopic CT phantom with tissue equivalent solid materials was used. The images were acquired at 60, 90, and 120 kVp tube voltages, and spectroscopic image series were acquired with 3 and 5 energy bins. Spectroscopic CT numbers were introduced and used to evaluate an energy selective image series. The anatomical soft tissue with 14 cm diameter was visualized with good quality and without substantial artifacts by the photon counting spectroscopic CT system. The effects of the energy bin crosstalk on spectroscopic CT numbers were quantified and analyzed. The single and double slice PCS-CT images were acquired and compared. Several new findings were observed, including the effect of soft tissue non-uniformity on image artifacts, unique status of highest energy bin, and material dependent visualization in spectroscopic image series. Fat-lean decomposition was performed using dual energy subtraction and threshold segmentation methods, and compared. Using K-edge filtered x-rays improved fat-lean decomposition as compared to conventional x-rays. Several new and important aspects of the PCS-CT were investigated. These include imaging soft tissue with clinically relevant size, single- and double-slice PCS-CT imaging, using spectroscopic CT

  15. Photon-counting array detectors for space and ground-based studies at ultraviolet and vacuum ultraviolet /VUV/ wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Timothy, J. G.; Bybee, R. L.

    1981-01-01

    The Multi-Anode Microchannel Arrays (MAMAs) are a family of photoelectric photon-counting array detectors, with formats as large as (256 x 1024)-pixels that can be operated in a windowless configuration at vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) and soft X-ray wavelengths or in a sealed configuration at ultraviolet and visible wavelengths. This paper describes the construction and modes of operation of (1 x 1024)-pixel and (24 x 1024)-pixel MAMA detector systems that are being built and qualified for use in sounding-rocket spectrometers for solar and stellar observations at wavelengths below 1300 A. The performance characteristics of the MAMA detectors at ultraviolet and VUV wavelengths are also described.

  16. Maturing CCD photon-counting technology for space flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallik, Udayan; Lyon, Richard; Petrone, Peter; McElwain, Michael; Benford, Dominic; Clampin, Mark; HIcks, Brian

    2015-09-01

    This paper discusses charge blooming and starlight saturation - two potential technical problems - when using an Electron Multiplying Charge Coupled Device (EMCCD) type detector in a high-contrast instrument for imaging exoplanets. These problems especially affect an interferometric type coronagraph - coronagraphs that do not use a mask to physically block starlight in the science channel of the instrument. These problems are presented using images taken with a commercial Princeton Instrument EMCCD camera in the Goddard Space Flight Center's (GSFC), Interferometric Coronagraph facility. In addition, this paper discusses techniques to overcome such problems. This paper also discusses the development and architecture of a Field Programmable Gate Array and Digital-to-Analog Converter based shaped clock controller for a photon-counting EMCCD camera. The discussion contained here will inform high-contrast imaging groups in their work with EMCCD detectors.

  17. Bayesian Blocks: A New Method to Analyze Photon Counting Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scargle, Jeffrey D.; Bloom, Elliott D.; Young, Richard E. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    A Bayesian analysis of photon-counting data leads to a new time-domain algorithm for detecting localized structures (bursts), revealing pulse shapes, and generally characterizing intensity variations. The raw counting data -- time-tag events (TTE), time-to-spill (TTS) data, or binned counts -- is converted to a maximum likelihood segmentation of the observation into time intervals during which the photon arrival rate is perceptibly constant -- i.e. has a fixed intensity without statistically significant variations. The resulting structures, Bayesian Blocks, can be thought of as bins with arbitrary spacing determined by the data. The method itself sets no lower limit to the time scale on which variability can be detected. We have applied the method to RXTE data on Cyg X-1, yielding information on this source's short-time-scale variability.

  18. Single-quantum dot imaging with a photon counting camera

    PubMed Central

    Michalet, X.; Colyer, R. A.; Antelman, J.; Siegmund, O.H.W.; Tremsin, A.; Vallerga, J.V.; Weiss, S.

    2010-01-01

    The expanding spectrum of applications of single-molecule fluorescence imaging ranges from fundamental in vitro studies of biomolecular activity to tracking of receptors in live cells. The success of these assays has relied on progresses in organic and non-organic fluorescent probe developments as well as improvements in the sensitivity of light detectors. We describe a new type of detector developed with the specific goal of ultra-sensitive single-molecule imaging. It is a wide-field, photon-counting detector providing high temporal and high spatial resolution information for each incoming photon. It can be used as a standard low-light level camera, but also allows access to a lot more information, such as fluorescence lifetime and spatio-temporal correlations. We illustrate the single-molecule imaging performance of our current prototype using quantum dots and discuss on-going and future developments of this detector. PMID:19689323

  19. Avalanche photodiodes for near-infrared photon counting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cova, Sergio D.; Lacaita, Andrea L.; Zappa, Franco; Lovati, Piergiorgio G.

    1995-05-01

    We report the photon-counting and timing performance of various Single-Photon Avalanche Diodes (SPADs) employed to detect single photons in the near-infrared wavelength range. Suitable Silicon structures achieve high quantum efficiency (70% at 800 nm) and can work up to 1.1 micrometers . Ge SPADs and InGaAs devices are sensitive up to 1.4 micrometers and 1.6 micrometers , respectively, wit ha few percent-quantum efficiencies. We compare these results with the performance of state-of-the-art photomultiplier tubes with extended near-infrared sensitivity. We also report the first results obtained with a germanium quad-cell sensor, which may be considered the first step towards the development of SPAD arrays.

  20. Maturing CCD Photon-Counting Technology for Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mallik, Udayan; Lyon, Richard; Petrone, Peter; McElwain, Michael; Benford, Dominic; Clampin, Mark; Hicks, Brian

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses charge blooming and starlight saturation - two potential technical problems - when using an Electron Multiplying Charge Coupled Device (EMCCD) type detector in a high-contrast instrument for imaging exoplanets. These problems especially affect an interferometric type coronagraph - coronagraphs that do not use a mask to physically block starlight in the science channel of the instrument. These problems are presented using images taken with a commercial Princeton Instrument EMCCD camera in the Goddard Space Flight Center's (GSFC), Interferometric Coronagraph facility. In addition, this paper discusses techniques to overcome such problems. This paper also discusses the development and architecture of a Field Programmable Gate Array and Digital-to-Analog Converter based shaped clock controller for a photon-counting EMCCD camera. The discussion contained here will inform high-contrast imaging groups in their work with EMCCD detectors.

  1. Multimode model for projective photon-counting measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Tualle-Brouri, Rosa; Ourjoumtsev, Alexei; Dantan, Aurelien; Grangier, Philippe; Wubs, Martijn; Soerensen, Anders S.

    2009-07-15

    We present a general model to account for the multimode nature of the quantum electromagnetic field in projective photon-counting measurements. We focus on photon-subtraction experiments, where non-Gaussian states are produced conditionally. These are useful states for continuous-variable quantum-information processing. We present a general method called mode reduction that reduces the multimode model to an effective two-mode problem. We apply this method to a multimode model describing broadband parametric down-conversion, thereby improving the analysis of existing experimental results. The main improvement is that spatial and frequency filters before the photon detector are taken into account explicitly. We find excellent agreement with previously published experimental results, using fewer free parameters than before, and discuss the implications of our analysis for the optimized production of states with negative Wigner functions.

  2. Low photon count based digital holography for quadratic phase cryptography.

    PubMed

    Muniraj, Inbarasan; Guo, Changliang; Malallah, Ra'ed; Ryle, James P; Healy, John J; Lee, Byung-Geun; Sheridan, John T

    2017-07-15

    Recently, the vulnerability of the linear canonical transform-based double random phase encryption system to attack has been demonstrated. To alleviate this, we present for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, a method for securing a two-dimensional scene using a quadratic phase encoding system operating in the photon-counted imaging (PCI) regime. Position-phase-shifting digital holography is applied to record the photon-limited encrypted complex samples. The reconstruction of the complex wavefront involves four sparse (undersampled) dataset intensity measurements (interferograms) at two different positions. Computer simulations validate that the photon-limited sparse-encrypted data has adequate information to authenticate the original data set. Finally, security analysis, employing iterative phase retrieval attacks, has been performed.

  3. Photon counting phosphorescence lifetime imaging with TimepixCam

    DOE PAGES

    Hirvonen, Liisa M.; Fisher-Levine, Merlin; Suhling, Klaus; ...

    2017-01-12

    TimepixCam is a novel fast optical imager based on an optimized silicon pixel sensor with a thin entrance window, and read out by a Timepix ASIC. The 256 x 256 pixel sensor has a time resolution of 15 ns at a sustained frame rate of 10 Hz. We used this sensor in combination with an image intensifier for wide-field time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) imaging. We have characterised the photon detection capabilities of this detector system, and employed it on a wide-field epifluorescence microscope to map phosphorescence decays of various iridium complexes with lifetimes of about 1 μs in 200more » μm diameter polystyrene beads.« less

  4. Bayesian Blocks: A New Method to Analyze Photon Counting Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scargle, Jeffrey D.; Bloom, Elliott D.; Young, Richard E. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    A Bayesian analysis of photon-counting data leads to a new time-domain algorithm for detecting localized structures (bursts), revealing pulse shapes, and generally characterizing intensity variations. The raw counting data -- time-tag events (TTE), time-to-spill (TTS) data, or binned counts -- is converted to a maximum likelihood segmentation of the observation into time intervals during which the photon arrival rate is perceptibly constant -- i.e. has a fixed intensity without statistically significant variations. The resulting structures, Bayesian Blocks, can be thought of as bins with arbitrary spacing determined by the data. The method itself sets no lower limit to the time scale on which variability can be detected. We have applied the method to RXTE data on Cyg X-1, yielding information on this source's short-time-scale variability.

  5. Photon counting photodiode array detector for far ultraviolet (FUV) astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartig, G. F.; Moos, H. W.; Pembroke, R.; Bowers, C.

    1982-01-01

    A compact, stable, single-stage intensified photodiode array detector designed for photon-counting, far ultraviolet astronomy applications employs a saturable, 'C'-type MCP (Galileo S. MCP 25-25) to produce high gain pulses with a narrowly peaked pulse height distribution. The P-20 output phosphor exhibits a very short decay time, due to the high current density of the electron pulses. This intensifier is being coupled to a self-scanning linear photodiode array which has a fiber optic input window which allows direct, rigid mechanical coupling with minimal light loss. The array was scanned at a 250 KHz pixel rate. The detector exhibits more than adequate signal-to-noise ratio for pulse counting and event location. Previously announced in STAR as N82-19118

  6. Single photon counting pixel detectors for synchrotron radiation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyokawa, H.; Broennimann, Ch.; Eikenberry, E. F.; Henrich, B.; Kawase, M.; Kobas, M.; Kraft, P.; Sato, M.; Schmitt, B.; Suzuki, M.; Tanida, H.; Uruga, T.

    2010-11-01

    At the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI an X-ray single photon counting pixel detector (PILATUS) based on the hybrid-pixel detector technology was developed in collaboration with SPring-8. The detection element is a 320 or 450 μm thick silicon sensor forming pixelated pn-diodes with a pitch of 172 μm×172 μm. An array of 2×8 custom CMOS readout chips are indium bump-bonded to the sensor, which leads to 33.5 mm×83.8 mm detective area. Each pixel contains a charge-sensitive amplifier, a single level discriminator and a 20 bit counter. This design realizes a high dynamic range, short readout time of less than 3 ms, a high framing rate of over 200 images per second and an excellent point-spread function. The maximum counting rate achieves more than 2×106 X-rays/s/pixel.

  7. Quantum-enhanced microscopy with binary-outcome photon counting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, G. R.; Yang, W.; Sun, C. P.

    2017-01-01

    Polarized light microscopy using path-entangled N -photon states (i.e., the N00N states) has been demonstrated to surpass the shot-noise limit at very low light illumination. However, the microscopy images suffer from divergence of phase sensitivity, which inevitably reduces the image quality. Here we show that due to experimental imperfections, such a singularity also takes place in the microscopy that uses twin-Fock states of light for illumination. We propose two schemes to completely eliminate this singularity: (i) locking the phase shift sensed by the beams at the optimal working point using a spatially dependent offset phase; (ii) a combination of two binary-outcome photon counting measurements, one with a fixed offset phase and the other without any offset phase. Our observations remain valid for any kind of binary-outcome measurement and may open the way for quantum-enhanced microscopy with high N photon states.

  8. Performance of single-photon-counting PILATUS detector modules

    PubMed Central

    Kraft, P.; Bergamaschi, A.; Broennimann, Ch.; Dinapoli, R.; Eikenberry, E. F.; Henrich, B.; Johnson, I.; Mozzanica, A.; Schlepütz, C. M.; Willmott, P. R.; Schmitt, B.

    2009-01-01

    PILATUS is a silicon hybrid pixel detector system, operating in single-photon-counting mode, that has been developed at the Paul Scherrer Institut for the needs of macromolecular crystallography at the Swiss Light Source (SLS). A calibrated PILATUS module has been characterized with monochromatic synchrotron radiation. The influence of charge sharing on the count rate and the overall energy resolution of the detector were investigated. The dead-time of the system was determined using the attenuated direct synchrotron beam. A single module detector was also tested in surface diffraction experiments at the SLS, whereby its performance regarding fluorescence suppression and saturation tolerance were evaluated, and have shown to greatly improve the sensitivity, reliability and speed of surface diffraction data acquisition. PMID:19395800

  9. Photon counting photodiode array detector for far ultraviolet (FUV) astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartig, G. F.; Moos, H. W.; Pembroke, R.; Bowers, C.

    1982-01-01

    A compact, stable, single-stage intensified photodiode array detector designed for photon-counting, far ultraviolet astronomy applications employs a saturable, 'C'-type MCP (Galileo S. MCP 25-25) to produce high gain pulses with a narrowly peaked pulse height distribution. The P-20 output phosphor exhibits a very short decay time, due to the high current density of the electron pulses. This intensifier is being coupled to a self-scanning linear photodiode array which has a fiber optic input window which allows direct, rigid mechanical coupling with minimal light loss. The array was scanned at a 250 KHz pixel rate. The detector exhibits more than adequate signal-to-noise ratio for pulse counting and event location. Previously announced in STAR as N82-19118

  10. OPTIMA: A Photon Counting High-Speed Photometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straubmeier, C.; Kanbach, G.; Schrey, F.

    OPTIMA is a small, versatile high-speed photometer which is primarily intended for time resolved observations of young high energy pulsars at optical wavelengths. The detector system consists of eight fiber fed photon counters based on avalanche photodiodes, a GPS timing receiver, an integrating CCD camera to ensure the correct pointing of the telescope and a computerized control unit. Since January 1999 OPTIMA proves its scientific potential by measuring a very detailed lightcurve of the Crab Pulsar as well as by observing cataclysmic variable stars on very short timescales. In this article we describe the design of the detector system focussing on the photon counting units and the software control which correlates the detected photons with the GPS timing signal.

  11. Maturing CCD Photon-Counting Technology for Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mallik, Udayan; Lyon, Richard; Petrone, Peter; McElwain, Michael; Benford, Dominic; Clampin, Mark; Hicks, Brian

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses charge blooming and starlight saturation - two potential technical problems - when using an Electron Multiplying Charge Coupled Device (EMCCD) type detector in a high-contrast instrument for imaging exoplanets. These problems especially affect an interferometric type coronagraph - coronagraphs that do not use a mask to physically block starlight in the science channel of the instrument. These problems are presented using images taken with a commercial Princeton Instrument EMCCD camera in the Goddard Space Flight Center's (GSFC), Interferometric Coronagraph facility. In addition, this paper discusses techniques to overcome such problems. This paper also discusses the development and architecture of a Field Programmable Gate Array and Digital-to-Analog Converter based shaped clock controller for a photon-counting EMCCD camera. The discussion contained here will inform high-contrast imaging groups in their work with EMCCD detectors.

  12. Performance of single-photon-counting PILATUS detector modules.

    PubMed

    Kraft, P; Bergamaschi, A; Broennimann, Ch; Dinapoli, R; Eikenberry, E F; Henrich, B; Johnson, I; Mozzanica, A; Schlepütz, C M; Willmott, P R; Schmitt, B

    2009-05-01

    PILATUS is a silicon hybrid pixel detector system, operating in single-photon-counting mode, that has been developed at the Paul Scherrer Institut for the needs of macromolecular crystallography at the Swiss Light Source (SLS). A calibrated PILATUS module has been characterized with monochromatic synchrotron radiation. The influence of charge sharing on the count rate and the overall energy resolution of the detector were investigated. The dead-time of the system was determined using the attenuated direct synchrotron beam. A single module detector was also tested in surface diffraction experiments at the SLS, whereby its performance regarding fluorescence suppression and saturation tolerance were evaluated, and have shown to greatly improve the sensitivity, reliability and speed of surface diffraction data acquisition.

  13. The Hybrid Pixel Single Photon Counting Detector XPAD

    SciTech Connect

    Hustache-Ottini, S.; Bordessoule, M.; Medjoubi, K.; Berar, J.-F.; Boudet, N.; Caillot, B.

    2007-01-19

    The XPAD detector is a 2D X-ray imager based on hybrid pixel technology, gathering 38400 pixels on a surface of 68*68 mm2. It is a photon counting detector, with low noise, wide dynamic range and high speed read out, which make it particularly suitable for third generation synchrotron applications, such as diffraction, small angle X-ray scattering or macro-molecular crystallography, but also for small animal imaging. High resolution powder diffraction data and in situ scattering data of crystallization of liquid oxides are presented to illustrate the properties of this detector, resulting in a significant gain in data acquisition time and a capability to follow fast kinetics in real time experiments. The characteristics of the future generation of XPAD detector, which will be available in 2007, are also presented.

  14. Photon counting phosphorescence lifetime imaging with TimepixCam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirvonen, Liisa M.; Fisher-Levine, Merlin; Suhling, Klaus; Nomerotski, Andrei

    2017-01-01

    TimepixCam is a novel fast optical imager based on an optimized silicon pixel sensor with a thin entrance window and read out by a Timepix Application Specific Integrated Circuit. The 256 × 256 pixel sensor has a time resolution of 15 ns at a sustained frame rate of 10 Hz. We used this sensor in combination with an image intensifier for wide-field time-correlated single photon counting imaging. We have characterised the photon detection capabilities of this detector system and employed it on a wide-field epifluorescence microscope to map phosphorescence decays of various iridium complexes with lifetimes of about 1 μs in 200 μm diameter polystyrene beads.

  15. Novel Photon-Counting Detectors for Free-Space Communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krainak, M. A.; Yang, G.; Sun, X.; Lu, W.; Merritt, S.; Beck, J.

    2016-01-01

    We present performance data for novel photon-counting detectors for free space optical communication. NASA GSFC is testing the performance of two types of novel photon-counting detectors 1) a 2x8 mercury cadmium telluride (HgCdTe) avalanche array made by DRS Inc., and a 2) a commercial 2880-element silicon avalanche photodiode (APD) array. We present and compare dark count, photon-detection efficiency, wavelength response and communication performance data for these detectors. We successfully measured real-time communication performance using both the 2 detected-photon threshold and AND-gate coincidence methods. Use of these methods allows mitigation of dark count, after-pulsing and background noise effects. The HgCdTe APD array routinely demonstrated photon detection efficiencies of greater than 50% across 5 arrays, with one array reaching a maximum PDE of 70%. We performed high-resolution pixel-surface spot scans and measured the junction diameters of its diodes. We found that decreasing the junction diameter from 31 micrometers to 25 micrometers doubled the e- APD gain from 470 for an array produced in the year 2010 to a gain of 1100 on an array delivered to NASA GSFC recently. The mean single-photon SNR was over 12 and the excess noise factors measurements were 1.2-1.3. The commercial silicon APD array exhibited a fast output with rise times of 300 ps and pulse widths of 600 ps. On-chip individually filtered signals from the entire array were multiplexed onto a single fast output.

  16. Phasor imaging with a widefield photon-counting detector

    PubMed Central

    Siegmund, Oswald H. W.; Tremsin, Anton S.; Vallerga, John V.; Weiss, Shimon

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. Fluorescence lifetime can be used as a contrast mechanism to distinguish fluorophores for localization or tracking, for studying molecular interactions, binding, assembly, and aggregation, or for observing conformational changes via Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) between donor and acceptor molecules. Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) is thus a powerful technique but its widespread use has been hampered by demanding hardware and software requirements. FLIM data is often analyzed in terms of multicomponent fluorescence lifetime decays, which requires large signals for a good signal-to-noise ratio. This confines the approach to very low frame rates and limits the number of frames which can be acquired before bleaching the sample. Recently, a computationally efficient and intuitive graphical representation, the phasor approach, has been proposed as an alternative method for FLIM data analysis at the ensemble and single-molecule level. In this article, we illustrate the advantages of combining phasor analysis with a widefield time-resolved single photon-counting detector (the H33D detector) for FLIM applications. In particular we show that phasor analysis allows real-time subsecond identification of species by their lifetimes and rapid representation of their spatial distribution, thanks to the parallel acquisition of FLIM information over a wide field of view by the H33D detector. We also discuss possible improvements of the H33D detector’s performance made possible by the simplicity of phasor analysis and its relaxed timing accuracy requirements compared to standard time-correlated single-photon counting (TCSPC) methods. PMID:22352658

  17. Lossless compression of projection data from photon counting detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shunhavanich, Picha; Pelc, Norbert J.

    2016-03-01

    With many attractive attributes, photon counting detectors with many energy bins are being considered for clinical CT systems. In practice, a large amount of projection data acquired for multiple energy bins must be transferred in real time through slip rings and data storage subsystems, causing a bandwidth bottleneck problem. The higher resolution of these detectors and the need for faster acquisition additionally contribute to this issue. In this work, we introduce a new approach to lossless compression, specifically for projection data from photon counting detectors, by utilizing the dependencies in the multi-energy data. The proposed predictor estimates the value of a projection data sample as a weighted average of its neighboring samples and an approximation from other energy bins, and the prediction residuals are then encoded. Context modeling using three or four quantized local gradients is also employed to detect edge characteristics of the data. Using three simulated phantoms including a head phantom, compression of 2.3:1-2.4:1 was achieved. The proposed predictor using zero, three, and four gradient contexts was compared to JPEG-LS and the ideal predictor (noiseless projection data). Among our proposed predictors, three-gradient context is preferred with a compression ratio from Golomb coding 7% higher than JPEG-LS and only 3% lower than the ideal predictor. In encoder efficiency, the Golomb code with the proposed three-gradient contexts has higher compression than block floating point. We also propose a lossy compression scheme, which quantizes the prediction residuals with scalar uniform quantization using quantization boundaries that limit the ratio of quantization error variance to quantum noise variance. Applying our proposed predictor with three-gradient context, the lossy compression achieved a compression ratio of 3.3:1 but inserted a 2.1% standard deviation of error compared to that of quantum noise in reconstructed images. From the initial

  18. Optical and UV Sensing Sealed Tube Microchannel Plate Imaging Detectors with High Time Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegmund, O.; Vallerga, J.; Tremsin, A.; Hull, J.; Elam, J.; Mane, A.

    2014-09-01

    Microchannel plate (MCP) based imaging, photon time tagging detector sealed tube schemes have a unique set of operational features that enable high time resolution astronomical and remote sensing applications to be addressed. New detectors using the cross strip (XS), cross delay line (XDL), or stripline anode readouts, a wide range of photocathode types, and advanced MCP technologies have been implemented to improve many performance characteristics. A variety of sealed tubes have been developed including 18mm XS readout devices with GaAs and SuperGenII photocathodes, 25mm XDL readout devices with SuperGenII and GaN photocathodes, and 20 x 20 cm sealed tubes with bialkali photocathodes and strip line readout. One key technology that has just become viable is the ability to make MCPs using atomic layer deposition (ALD) techniques. This employs nanofabrication of the active layers of an MCP on a microcapillary array. This technique opens new performance opportunities, including, very large MCP areas (>20cm), very low intrinsic background, lower radiation induced background, much longer overall lifetime and gain stability, and markedly lower outgassing which can improve the sealed tube lifetime and ease of fabrication. The XS readout has been implemented in formats of 22mm, 50mm and 100mm, and uses MCP charge signals detected on two orthogonal layers of conductive fingers to encode event X-Y positions. We have achieved spatial resolution XS detectors better than 25 microns FWHM, with good image linearity while at low gain (<10^6), substantially increasing local counting rate capabilities and the overall tube lifetime. XS tubes with updated electronics can encode event rates of >5 MHz with ~12% dead time and event timing accuracy of ~100ps. XDL sealed tubes in 25mm format demonstrate ~40 micron spatial resolution at up to ~2 MHz event rates, and have been developed with SupergenII visible regime photocathodes. The XDL tubes also achieve ~100 ps time resolution. Most

  19. Photon counting imaging with an electron-bombarded CCD: Towards wide-field time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirvonen, Liisa M.; Jiggins, Stephen; Sergent, Nicolas; Zanda, Gianmarco; Suhling, Klaus

    2015-07-01

    Single photon detecting capabilities of an electron-bombarded CCD (EBCCD), where a photon is converted into a photoelectron that is accelerated through a high voltage before hitting the CCD chip, were characterised. The photon event pulse height distribution was found to be linearly dependent on the gain voltage. Based on these results, we propose that a gain voltage sweep during exposure in an EBCCD or EBCMOS camera would allow photon arrival time determination from the photon event pulse height with sub-frame exposure time resolution. This effectively uses an electron-bombarded sensor as a parallel-processing photoelectronic time-to-amplitude converter (TAC), or a 2-dimensional streak camera. Several applications that require timing of photon arrival, including fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM), may benefit from this approach. Moreover, the EBCCD was used on a fluorescence microscope to image fluorescently labelled cells in single photon counting mode.

  20. Position and time resolution measurements with a microchannel plate image intensifier: A comparison of monolithic and pixelated CeBr3 scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackermann, Ulrich; Eschbaumer, Stephan; Bergmaier, Andreas; Egger, Werner; Sperr, Peter; Greubel, Christoph; Löwe, Benjamin; Schotanus, Paul; Dollinger, Günther

    2016-07-01

    To perform Four Dimensional Age Momentum Correlation measurements in the near future, where one obtains the positron lifetime in coincidence with the three dimensional momentum of the electron annihilating with the positron, we have investigated the time and position resolution of two CeBr3 scintillators (monolithic and an array of pixels) using a Photek IPD340/Q/BI/RS microchannel plate image intensifier. The microchannel plate image intensifier has an active diameter of 40 mm and a stack of two microchannel plates in chevron configuration. The monolithic CeBr3 scintillator was cylindrically shaped with a diameter of 40 mm and a height of 5 mm. The pixelated scintillator array covered the whole active area of the microchannel plate image intensifier and the shape of each pixel was 2.5·2.5·8 mm3 with a pixel pitch of 3.3 mm. For the monolithic setup the measured mean single time resolution was 330 ps (FWHM) at a gamma energy of 511 keV. No significant dependence on the position was detected. The position resolution at the center of the monolithic scintillator was about 2.5 mm (FWHM) at a gamma energy of 662 keV. The single time resolution of the pixelated crystal setup reached 320 ps (FWHM) in the region of the center of the active area of the microchannel plate image intensifier. The position resolution was limited by the cross-section of the pixels. The gamma energy for the pixel setup measurements was 511 keV.

  1. Development of a New Fast Shower Maximum Detector Based on Microchannel Plates Photomultipliers (MCP-PMT) as an Active Element

    SciTech Connect

    Ronzhin, A.; Los, S.; Ramberg, E.; Spiropulu, M.; Apresyan, A.; Xie, S.; Kim, H.; Zatserklyaniy, A.

    2014-09-21

    One possibility to make a fast and radiation resistant shower maximum (SM) detector is to use a secondary emitter as an active element. We present below test beam results, obtained with different types of photodetectors based on microchannel plates (MCPs) as the secondary emitter. We performed the measurements at the Fermilab Test Beam Facility with 120GeV proton beam and 12GeV and 32GeV secondary beams. The goal of the measurement with 120GeV protons was to determine time resolution for minimum ionizing particles (MIPs). The SM time resolution we obtained for this new type of detector is at the level of 20-30ps. We estimate that a significant contribution to the detector response originates from secondary emission of the MCP. This work can be considered as the first step in building a new type of calorimeter based on this principle.

  2. Maximizing the quantum efficiency of microchannel plate detectors - The collection of photoelectrons from the interchannel web using an electric field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, R. C.; Hettrick, M. C.; Malina, R. F.

    1983-01-01

    High quantum efficiency and two-dimensional imaging capabilities make the microchannel plate (MCP) a suitable detector for a sky survey instrument. The Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer satellite, to be launched in 1987, will use MCP detectors. A feature which limits MCP efficiency is related to the walls of individual channels. The walls are of finite thickness and thus form an interchannel web. Under normal circumstances, this web does not contribute to the detector's quantum efficiency. Panitz and Foesch (1976) have found that in the case of a bombardment with ions, electrons were ejected from the electrode material coating the web. By applying a small electric field, the electrons were returned to the MCP surface where they were detected. The present investigation is concerned with the enhancement of quantum efficiencies in the case of extreme UV wavelengths. Attention is given to a model and a computer simulation which quantitatively reproduce the experimental results.

  3. Evaluation of a microchannel-plate PMT as a potential timing detector suitable for positron lifetime measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosev, K.; Butterling, M.; Anwand, W.; Cowan, T.; Hartmann, A.; Heidel, K.; Jungmann, M.; Krause-Rehberg, R.; Massarczyk, R.; Schilling, K. D.; Schwengner, R.; Wagner, A.

    2010-12-01

    This paper focuses on the evaluation of a microchannel-plate photomultiplier tube (MCP-PMT) as a candidate detector, suitable for positron lifetime studies. Several properties of MCP-PMTs, such as their fast time response, compact size, low susceptibility to magnetic fields, relatively high gain and the low power consumption make them attractive for positron lifetime spectroscopy. The preliminary tests were performed with a 85001-501 Burle Planacon TM photomultiplier tube assembly. Initial measurements were conducted with a pulsed Picosecond Injection Laser (PiLas) system. The engineering sample of the 85001 exhibits a transit-time-spread (TTS) of 110 ps (FWHM). Further timing experiments showing the suitability of the device as Cherenkov detector are presented. For the first time, a conventional positron lifetime spectrum of a Cz-Si probe measured with a spectrometer, where an MCP-PMT detector is included, has been demonstrated.

  4. Thomson spectrometer-microchannel plate assembly calibration for MeV-range positive and negative ions, and neutral atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, R.; Abicht, F.; Braenzel, J.; Priebe, G.; Schnuerer, M.; Borghesi, M.; Ter-Avetisyan, S.; Nickles, P. V.

    2013-05-15

    We report on the absolute calibration of a microchannel plate (MCP) detector, used in conjunction with a Thomson parabola spectrometer. The calibration delivers the relation between a registered count numbers in the CCD camera (on which the MCP phosphor screen is imaged) and the number of ions incident on MCP. The particle response of the MCP is evaluated for positive, negative, and neutral particles at energies below 1 MeV. As the response of MCP depends on the energy and the species of the ions, the calibration is fundamental for the correct interpretation of the experimental results. The calibration method and arrangement exploits the unique emission symmetry of a specific source of fast ions and atoms driven by a high power laser.

  5. Thomson spectrometer-microchannel plate assembly calibration for MeV-range positive and negative ions, and neutral atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, R.; Abicht, F.; Borghesi, M.; Braenzel, J.; Nickles, P. V.; Priebe, G.; Schnürer, M.; Ter-Avetisyan, S.

    2013-05-01

    We report on the absolute calibration of a microchannel plate (MCP) detector, used in conjunction with a Thomson parabola spectrometer. The calibration delivers the relation between a registered count numbers in the CCD camera (on which the MCP phosphor screen is imaged) and the number of ions incident on MCP. The particle response of the MCP is evaluated for positive, negative, and neutral particles at energies below 1 MeV. As the response of MCP depends on the energy and the species of the ions, the calibration is fundamental for the correct interpretation of the experimental results. The calibration method and arrangement exploits the unique emission symmetry of a specific source of fast ions and atoms driven by a high power laser.

  6. A low noise front end electronics for micro-channel plate detector with wedge and strip anode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, K.; Li, F.; Liang, F.; Chen, L.; Jin, G.

    2016-03-01

    A low noise Front End Electronics (FEE) for two-dimensional position sensitive Micro-Channel Plate (MCP) detector has been developed. The MCP detector is based on Wedge and Strip Anode (WSA) with induction readout mode. The WSA has three electrodes, the wedge electrode, the strip electrode, and the zigzag electrode. Then, three readout channels are designed in the Printed Circuit Board (PCB). The FEE is calibrated by a pulse generator from Agilent. We also give an analysis of the charge loss from the CSA. The noise levels of the three channels are less than 1 fC RMS at the shaping time of 200 ns. The experimental result shows that the position resolution of the MCP detector coupled with the designed PCB can reach up to 110 μm.

  7. Quantitative extraction of spectral line intensities and widths from x-ray spectra recorded with gated microchannel plate detectors.

    PubMed

    Dunham, Greg; Bailey, J E; Rochau, G A; Lake, P W; Nielsen-Weber, L B

    2007-06-01

    Plasma spectroscopy requires determination of spectral line intensities and widths. At Sandia National Laboratories Z facility we use elliptical crystal spectrometers equipped with gated microchannel plate detectors to record time and space resolved spectra. We collect a large volume of data typically consisting of five to six snapshots in time and five to ten spectral lines with 30 spatial elements per frame, totaling to more than 900 measurements per experiment. This large volume of data requires efficiency in processing. We have addressed this challenge by using a line fitting routine to automatically fit each spectrum using assumed line profiles and taking into account photoelectron statistics to efficiently extract line intensities and widths with uncertainties. We verified that the random data noise obeys Poisson statistics. Rescale factors for converting film exposure to effective counts required for understanding the photoelectron statistics are presented. An example of the application of these results to the analysis of spectra recorded in Z experiments is presented.

  8. Maximizing the quantum efficiency of microchannel plate detectors - The collection of photoelectrons from the interchannel web using an electric field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, R. C.; Hettrick, M. C.; Malina, R. F.

    1983-01-01

    High quantum efficiency and two-dimensional imaging capabilities make the microchannel plate (MCP) a suitable detector for a sky survey instrument. The Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer satellite, to be launched in 1987, will use MCP detectors. A feature which limits MCP efficiency is related to the walls of individual channels. The walls are of finite thickness and thus form an interchannel web. Under normal circumstances, this web does not contribute to the detector's quantum efficiency. Panitz and Foesch (1976) have found that in the case of a bombardment with ions, electrons were ejected from the electrode material coating the web. By applying a small electric field, the electrons were returned to the MCP surface where they were detected. The present investigation is concerned with the enhancement of quantum efficiencies in the case of extreme UV wavelengths. Attention is given to a model and a computer simulation which quantitatively reproduce the experimental results.

  9. Characterization Studies and Performance of Half-strip High-speed X-ray Microchannel Plate Imager

    SciTech Connect

    Kenneth Moy; Ming Wu

    2008-03-01

    High-speed microchannel plate (MCP)–based imagers are critical detectors for x-ray diagnostics employed on Z-experiments at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) to measure time-resolved x-ray spectra and to image dynamic hohlraums. A design using eight half-strip x-ray photocathodes in one imager permits recordings of radiation events in discrete temporal snapshots to yield a time-evolved movie. We present data using various facilities to characterize the performance of this design. These characterization studies include DC and pulsed-voltage biased measurements in both saturated and linear operational regimes using an intense, short-pulsed UV laser and Manson source. Surface voltage profile measurements using a picoprobe help to determine the gain variation across the strips. Test data from a recent SNL ZR-experiment demonstrates the flexibility and high-quality images obtained by this MCP imager.

  10. Design and Fabrication of Prototype 6 cm x 6 cm Microchannel Plate Photodetector with Bialkali Photocathode for Fast Timing Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Junqi; Byrum, Karen; Demarteau, Marcel; Gregar, Joseph; May, Edward; Virgo, Mathew; Wagner, Robert; Walters, Dean; Wang, Jingbo; Xia, Lei; Zhao, Huyue

    2015-06-01

    Planar microchannel plate-based photodetector with bialkali photocathode is capable of fast and accurate time and position resolutions. A new 6 cm x 6 cm photodetector production facility was designed and built at Argonne National Laboratory. Small form-factor MCP-based photodetectors completely constructed of glass were designed and prototypes were successfully fabricated. Knudsen effusion cells were incorporated in the photocathode growth chamber to achieve uniform and high quantum efficiency hotocathodes. The thin film uniformity distribution was simulated and measured for an antimony film deposition, showing uniformity of better than 10%. Several prototype devices with bialkali photocathodes have been fabricated with the described system and their characteristics were evaluated in the large signal (multi-PE) limit. A typical prototype device exhibits time-of-flight resolution of ~ 27 psec and differential time resolution of ~ 9 psec, corresponding to spatial resolution of ~ 0.65 mm.

  11. Dynamic Characterizations of an 8-frame Half-Strip High-speed X-ray Microchannel Plate Imager

    SciTech Connect

    Ken Moy, Ming Wu, Craig Kruschwitz, Aric Tibbits, Matt Griffin, Greg Rochau

    2008-09-05

    High-speed microchannel plate (MCP)–based imagers are critical detectors for x-ray diagnostics employed on Z-experiments at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) to measure time-resolved x-ray spectra and to image dynamic hohlraums. A multiframe design using eight half strips in one imager permits recordings of radiation events in discrete temporal snapshots to yield a time-evolved movie. We present data using various facilities to characterize the performance of this design. These characterization studies include DC and pulsed-voltage biased measurements in both saturated and linear operational regimes using an intense, short-pulsed UV laser. Electrical probe measurements taken to characterize the shape of the HV pulse propagating across the strips help to corroborate the spatial gain dependence.

  12. Prospects of photon counting lidar for savanna ecosystem structural studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gwenzi, D.; Lefsky, M. A.

    2014-11-01

    Discrete return and waveform lidar have demonstrated a capability to measure vegetation height and the associated structural attributes such as aboveground biomass and carbon storage. Since discrete return lidar (DRL) is mainly suitable for small scale studies and the only existing spaceborne lidar sensor (ICESat-GLAS) has been decommissioned, the current question is what the future holds in terms of large scale lidar remote sensing studies. The earliest planned future spaceborne lidar mission is ICESat-2, which will use a photon counting technique. To pre-validate the capability of this mission for studying three dimensional vegetation structure in savannas, we assessed the potential of the measurement approach to estimate canopy height in a typical savanna landscape. We used data from the Multiple Altimeter Beam Experimental Lidar (MABEL), an airborne photon counting lidar sensor developed by NASA Goddard. MABEL fires laser pulses in the green (532 nm) and near infrared (1064 nm) bands at a nominal repetition rate of 10 kHz and records the travel time of individual photons that are reflected back to the sensor. The photons' time of arrival and the instrument's GPS positions and Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) orientation are used to calculate the distance the light travelled and hence the elevation of the surface below. A few transects flown over the Tejon ranch conservancy in Kern County, California, USA were used for this work. For each transect we extracted the data from one near infrared channel that had the highest number of photons. We segmented each transect into 50 m, 25 m and 10 m long blocks and aggregated the photons in each block into a histogram based on their elevation values. We then used an expansion window algorithm to identify cut off points where the cumulative density of photons from the highest elevation resembles the canopy top and likewise where such cumulative density from the lowest elevation resembles mean ground elevation. These cut off

  13. Development of a Photon Counting System for Differential Lidar Signal Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elsayed-Ali, Hani

    1997-01-01

    Photon counting has been chosen as a means to extend the detection range of current airborne DIAL ozone measurements. Lidar backscattered return signals from the on and off-line lasers experience a significant exponential decay. To extract further data from the decaying ozone return signals, photon counting will be used to measure the low light levels, thus extending the detection range. In this application, photon counting will extend signal measurement where the analog return signal is too weak. The current analog measurement range is limited to approximately 25 kilometers from an aircraft flying at 12 kilometers. Photon counting will be able to exceed the current measurement range so as to follow the mid-latitude model of ozone density as a function of height. This report describes the development of a photon counting system. The initial development phase begins with detailed evaluation of individual photomultiplier tubes. The PMT qualities investigated are noise count rates, single electron response peaks, voltage versus gain values, saturation effects, and output signal linearity. These evaluations are followed by analysis of two distinctive tube base gating schemes. The next phase is to construct and operate a photon counting system in a laboratory environment. The laboratory counting simulations are used to determine optimum discriminator setpoints and to continue further evaluations of PMT properties. The final step in the photon counting system evaluation process is the compiling of photon counting measurements on the existing ozone DIAL laser system.

  14. Pseudo-random single photon counting: a high-speed implementation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qiang; Chen, Ling; Chen, Nanguang

    2010-01-01

    Pseudo-random single photon counting (PRSPC) is a new time-resolved optical measurement method which combines the spread spectrum time-resolved method with single photon counting. A pseudo-random bit sequence is used to modulate a continuous wave laser diode, while single photon counting is used to build up the optical signal in response to the modulated excitation. Periodic cross-correlation is performed to obtain the temporal profile of the subject of interest. Compared with conventional time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC), PRSPC enjoys many advantages such as low cost and high count rate without compromising the sensitivity and time-resolution. In this paper, we report a PRSPC system that can be used for high-speed acquisition of the temporal point spread function of diffuse photons. It can reach a photon count rate as high as 3 Mcps (counts per second). Phantom experiments have been conducted to demonstrate the system performance. PMID:21258444

  15. Spectroscopic and imaging capabilities of a pixellated photon counting system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amendolia, S. R.; Bisogni, M. G.; Bottigli, U.; Delogu, P.; Dipasquale, G.; Fantacci, M. E.; Marchi, A.; Marzulli, V. M.; Oliva, P.; Palmiero, R.; Rosso, V.; Stefanini, A.; Stumbo, S.; Zucca, S.

    2001-06-01

    We are studying the performance of various thickness GaAs pixel detectors bump-bonded to a dedicated photon counting chip (PCC) for medical imaging applications in different energy ranges. In this work we present the experimental results obtained with a 600 μm thick pixel matrix (64×64 square pixels, 170 μm side) in the 60-140 keV energy range to evaluate the possible use of such a system in the nuclear medicine field. In particular, we have measured the spectroscopic properties of the detector (charge collection efficiency, energy resolution and detection efficiency) and evaluated the discrimination capability of the electronics. Then we have measured the imaging properties of the whole system in terms of Point Spread Function and using a home made thyroid phantom. We present also a comparison with a traditional gamma camera and an evaluation, made by both experimental measurements and software simulations, of the imaging characteristics related to the use of a collimation system.

  16. New generation photon-counting cameras: algol and CPNG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blazit, Alain; Rondeau, Xavier; Thiébaut, Éric; Abe, Lyu; Bernengo, Jean-Claude; Chevassut, Jean-Louis; Clausse, Jean-Michel; Dubois, Jean-Pierre; Foy, Renaud; Mourard, Denis; Patru, Fabien; Spang, Alain; Tallon-Bosc, Isabelle; Tallon, Michel; Tourneur, Yves; Vakili, Farrokh

    2008-03-01

    Algol and Comptage de Photons Nouvelle Génération (CPNG) are new generation photon counting cameras developed for high angular resolution in the visible by means of optical aperture synthesis and speckle interferometry and for photon noise limited fast imaging of biological targets. They are intensified CCDs. They have been built to benefit from improvements in photonic commercial components, sensitivity, and personal computer workstations processing power. We present how we achieve optimal performances (sensitivity and spatiotemporal resolution) by the combination of proper optical and electronics design, and real-time elaborated data processing. The number of pixels is 532×516 and 10242 read at a frame rate of 262 and 100 Hz for CPNG and Algol, respectively. The dark current is very low: 5.5×10-4 e- .pixel-1. s-1. The saturation flux is ≈7 photon events /pixel/s. Quantum efficiencies reach up to 36% and 26% in the visible with the GaAsP photocathodes and in the red with the GaAs ones, respectively, thanks to the sensitivity of the photocathodes and to the photon centroiding algorithm; they are likely the highest values reported for intensified CCDs.

  17. Algol - CPNG: photon counting cameras for interferometry in visible wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blazit, A.; Thiébaut, E.; Vakili, F.; Abe, L.; Spang, A.; Clausse, J.-M.; Mourard, D.; Foy, R.; Rondeau, X.

    Images in visible interferometry are characterised by their low coherence time, and except for brightest stars, the flux on the detector is much less than one photon per pixel per image. Algol and Comptage de Photons Nouvelle Génération (CPNG) are new photon counting cameras developed for high angular resolution in the visible. They are intensified CCDs built to benefit from improvements in photonic commercial components, and personal computer processing power. We present how we achieve optimal performances (sensitivity and spatiotemporal resolution) by the combination of proper optical and electronics design, and real-time elaborated data processing. The number of pixels is 532× 516 and 768× 640 read at a frame rate of 262 Hz and 50 Hz for CPNG and Algol respectively. The dark current is very low: 5×10-4 electron.pixel-1.s-1. Quantum efficiencies reach up to 36% in the visible with the GaAsP photocathodes and and 26% in the red with the GaAs ones, thanks to the sensitivity of the photocathodes and to the photon centroiding algorithm; they are likely the highest values reported for ICCDs.

  18. Photon-counting spectral phase-contrast mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fredenberg, E.; Roessl, E.; Koehler, T.; van Stevendaal, U.; Schulze-Wenck, I.; Wieberneit, N.; Stampanoni, M.; Wang, Z.; Kubik-Huch, R. A.; Hauser, N.; Lundqvist, M.; Danielsson, M.; Åslund, M.

    2012-03-01

    Phase-contrast imaging is an emerging technology that may increase the signal-difference-to-noise ratio in medical imaging. One of the most promising phase-contrast techniques is Talbot interferometry, which, combined with energy-sensitive photon-counting detectors, enables spectral differential phase-contrast mammography. We have evaluated a realistic system based on this technique by cascaded-systems analysis and with a task-dependent ideal-observer detectability index as a figure-of-merit. Beam-propagation simulations were used for validation and illustration of the analytical framework. Differential phase contrast improved detectability compared to absorption contrast, in particular for fine tumor structures. This result was supported by images of human mastectomy samples that were acquired with a conventional detector. The optimal incident energy was higher in differential phase contrast than in absorption contrast when disregarding the setup design energy. Further, optimal weighting of the transmitted spectrum was found to have a weaker energy dependence than for absorption contrast. Taking the design energy into account yielded a superimposed maximum on both detectability as a function of incident energy, and on optimal weighting. Spectral material decomposition was not facilitated by phase contrast, but phase information may be used instead of spectral information.

  19. Monitoring cellular mechanosensing using time-correlated single photon counting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabouillot, Tristan; Gullapalli, Ramachandra; Butler, Peter J.

    2006-10-01

    Endothelial cells (ECs) convert mechanical stimuli into chemical signaling pathways to regulate their functions and properties. It is hypothesized that perturbation of cellular structures by force is accompanied by changes in molecular dynamics. In order to address these fundamental issues in mechanosensation and transduction, we have developed a hybrid multimodal microscopy - time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) spectroscopy system intended to determine time- and position dependent mechanically-induced changes in the dynamics of molecules in live cells as determined from fluorescence lifetimes and autocorrelation analysis (fluorescence correlation spectroscopy). Colocalization of cell-structures and mechanically-induced changes in molecular dynamics can be done in post-processing by comparing TCSPC data with 3-D models generated from total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF), differential interference contrast (DIC), epifluorescence, and deconvolution. We present control experiments in which the precise location of the apical cell membrane with respect to a confocal probe is assessed using information obtainable only from TCSPC. Such positional accuracy of TCSPC measurements is essential to understanding the role of the membrane in mechanotransduction. We predict that TCSPC will become a useful method to obtain high temporal and spatial resolution information on localized mechanical phenomena in living endothelial cells. Such insight into mechanotransduction phenomenon may uncover the origins of mechanically-related diseases such as atherosclerosis.

  20. ON THE USE OF SHOT NOISE FOR PHOTON COUNTING

    SciTech Connect

    Zmuidzinas, Jonas

    2015-11-01

    Lieu et al. have recently claimed that it is possible to substantially improve the sensitivity of radio-astronomical observations. In essence, their proposal is to make use of the intensity of the photon shot noise as a measure of the photon arrival rate. Lieu et al. provide a detailed quantum-mechanical calculation of a proposed measurement scheme that uses two detectors and conclude that this scheme avoids the sensitivity degradation that is associated with photon bunching. If correct, this result could have a profound impact on radio astronomy. Here I present a detailed analysis of the sensitivity attainable using shot-noise measurement schemes that use either one or two detectors, and demonstrate that neither scheme can avoid the photon bunching penalty. I perform both semiclassical and fully quantum calculations of the sensitivity, obtaining consistent results, and provide a formal proof of the equivalence of these two approaches. These direct calculations are furthermore shown to be consistent with an indirect argument based on a correlation method that establishes an independent limit to the sensitivity of shot-noise measurement schemes. Furthermore, these calculations are directly applicable to the regime of interest identified by Lieu et al. Collectively, these results conclusively demonstrate that the photon-bunching sensitivity penalty applies to shot-noise measurement schemes just as it does to ordinary photon counting, in contradiction to the fundamental claim made by Lieu et al. The source of this contradiction is traced to a logical fallacy in their argument.

  1. Photon counting altimeter and lidar for air and spaceborne applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vacek, Michael; Michalek, Vojtech; Peca, Marek; Prochazka, Ivan; Blazej, Josef; Kodet, Jan

    2011-06-01

    We are presenting the concept and preliminary design of modular multipurpose device for space segment: single photon counting laser altimeter, atmospheric lidar, laser transponder and one way laser ranging receiver. For all the mentioned purposes, the same compact configuration of the device is appropriate. Overall estimated device weight should not exceed 5 kg with the power consumption below 10 W. The device will consists of three main parts, namely, receiver, transmitter and control and processing unit. As a transmitter a commercial solid state laser at 532 nm wavelength with 10 mW power will be used. The transmitter optics will have a diameter at most of 50 mm. The laser pulse width will be of hundreds of picoseconds order. For the laser altimeter and atmospheric lidar application, the repetition rate of 10 kHz is planned in order to obtain sufficient number of data for a distance value computing. The receiver device will be composed of active quenched Single Photon Avalanche Diode module, tiny optics, and narrow-band optical filter. The core part of the control and processing unit including high precision timing unit is implemented using single FPGA chip. The preliminary device concept includes considerations on energy balance, and statistical algorithms to meet all the mentioned purposes. Recently, the bread board version of the device is under construction in our labs. The concept, construction, and timing results will be presented.

  2. A simulator for airborne laser swath mapping via photon counting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slatton, K. C.; Carter, W. E.; Shrestha, R.

    2005-06-01

    Commercially marketed airborne laser swath mapping (ALSM) instruments currently use laser rangers with sufficient energy per pulse to work with return signals of thousands of photons per shot. The resulting high signal to noise level virtually eliminates spurious range values caused by noise, such as background solar radiation and sensor thermal noise. However, the high signal level approach requires laser repetition rates of hundreds of thousands of pulses per second to obtain contiguous coverage of the terrain at sub-meter spatial resolution, and with currently available technology, affords little scalability for significantly downsizing the hardware, or reducing the costs. A photon-counting ALSM sensor has been designed by the University of Florida and Sigma Space, Inc. for improved topographic mapping with lower power requirements and weight than traditional ALSM sensors. Major elements of the sensor design are presented along with preliminary simulation results. The simulator is being developed so that data phenomenology and target detection potential can be investigated before the system is completed. Early simulations suggest that precise estimates of terrain elevation and target detection will be possible with the sensor design.

  3. On the Use of Shot Noise for Photon Counting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zmuidzinas, Jonas

    2015-11-01

    Lieu et al. have recently claimed that it is possible to substantially improve the sensitivity of radio-astronomical observations. In essence, their proposal is to make use of the intensity of the photon shot noise as a measure of the photon arrival rate. Lieu et al. provide a detailed quantum-mechanical calculation of a proposed measurement scheme that uses two detectors and conclude that this scheme avoids the sensitivity degradation that is associated with photon bunching. If correct, this result could have a profound impact on radio astronomy. Here I present a detailed analysis of the sensitivity attainable using shot-noise measurement schemes that use either one or two detectors, and demonstrate that neither scheme can avoid the photon bunching penalty. I perform both semiclassical and fully quantum calculations of the sensitivity, obtaining consistent results, and provide a formal proof of the equivalence of these two approaches. These direct calculations are furthermore shown to be consistent with an indirect argument based on a correlation method that establishes an independent limit to the sensitivity of shot-noise measurement schemes. Furthermore, these calculations are directly applicable to the regime of interest identified by Lieu et al. Collectively, these results conclusively demonstrate that the photon-bunching sensitivity penalty applies to shot-noise measurement schemes just as it does to ordinary photon counting, in contradiction to the fundamental claim made by Lieu et al. The source of this contradiction is traced to a logical fallacy in their argument.

  4. Multibeam multifocal multiphoton photon counting imaging in scattering media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoover, Erich E.

    Multiphoton microscopy is an invaluable technique for the neurological community, allowing for deep explorations within highly scattering tissues such as the brain. However, prior to this research multiphoton microscopy was limited in its ability to rapidly construct volumetric images deep within scattering specimens. This work establishes a technique that permits such exploration through the application of multiple beams separated in both space and time, where signal photons corresponding to those beams are demultiplexed through the use of a field programmable gate array. With this system a number of improvements are provided to research in scattering media, including the coveted ability to perform photon-counting imaging with multiple beams. The ability to perform these measurements with multiple beams permits unique quantitative measurements of fluorophores within living specimens, allowing new research into dynamic three-dimensional behavior occurring within the brain. Additionally, the ability to perform multimodal measurements without filtering allows for unique avenues of research where the harmonic generation is indistinguishable from the two-photon excited fluorescence. These improvements provide neuroscience researchers with a large assortment of technological tools that will permit them to perform numerous novel experiments within the brain and other highly-scattering specimens, which should one day lead to significant advances in our understanding of complex neuronal activity.

  5. Single photon counting linear mode avalanche photodiode technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, George M.; Huntington, Andrew S.

    2011-10-01

    The false count rate of a single-photon-sensitive photoreceiver consisting of a high-gain, low-excess-noise linear-mode InGaAs avalanche photodiode (APD) and a high-bandwidth transimpedance amplifier (TIA) is fit to a statistical model. The peak height distribution of the APD's multiplied dark current is approximated by the weighted sum of McIntyre distributions, each characterizing dark current generated at a different location within the APD's junction. The peak height distribution approximated in this way is convolved with a Gaussian distribution representing the input-referred noise of the TIA to generate the statistical distribution of the uncorrelated sum. The cumulative distribution function (CDF) representing count probability as a function of detection threshold is computed, and the CDF model fit to empirical false count data. It is found that only k=0 McIntyre distributions fit the empirically measured CDF at high detection threshold, and that false count rate drops faster than photon count rate as detection threshold is raised. Once fit to empirical false count data, the model predicts the improvement of the false count rate to be expected from reductions in TIA noise and APD dark current. Improvement by at least three orders of magnitude is thought feasible with further manufacturing development and a capacitive-feedback TIA (CTIA).

  6. Single photon counting fluorescence lifetime detection of pericellular oxygen concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosny, Neveen A.; Lee, David A.; Knight, Martin M.

    2012-01-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy offers a non-invasive method for quantifying local oxygen concentrations. However, existing methods are either invasive, require custom-made systems, or show limited spatial resolution. Therefore, these methods are unsuitable for investigation of pericellular oxygen concentrations. This study describes an adaptation of commercially available equipment which has been optimized for quantitative extracellular oxygen detection with high lifetime accuracy and spatial resolution while avoiding systematic photon pile-up. The oxygen sensitive fluorescent dye, tris(2,2'-bipyridyl)ruthenium(II) chloride hexahydrate [Ru(bipy)3]2+, was excited using a two-photon excitation laser. Lifetime was measured using a Becker & Hickl time-correlated single photon counting, which will be referred to as a TCSPC card. [Ru(bipy)3]2+ characterization studies quantified the influences of temperature, pH, cellular culture media and oxygen on the fluorescence lifetime measurements. This provided a precisely calibrated and accurate system for quantification of pericellular oxygen concentration based on measured lifetimes. Using this technique, quantification of oxygen concentrations around isolated viable chondrocytes, seeded in three-dimensional agarose gel, revealed a subpopulation of cells that exhibited significant spatial oxygen gradients such that oxygen concentration reduced with increasing proximity to the cell. This technique provides a powerful tool for quantifying spatial oxygen gradients within three-dimensional cellular models.

  7. Determination of the laser intensity applied to a Ta witness plate from the measured X-ray signal using a pulsed micro-channel plate detector

    DOE PAGES

    Pickworth, L. A.; Rosen, M. D.; Schneider, M. B.; ...

    2017-04-14

    The laser intensity distribution at the surface of a high-Z material, such as Ta, can be deduced from imaging the self-emission of the produced x-ray spot using suitable calibration data. This paper presents a calibration method which uses the measured x-ray emissions from laser spots of di erent intensities hitting a Ta witness plate. The x-ray emission is measured with a micro-channel plate (MCP) based x-ray framing camera plus filters. Data from di erent positions on one MCP strip or from di erent MCP assemblies are normalized to each other using a standard candle laser beam spot at 1x1014 W/cm2more » intensity. The distribution of the resulting dataset agrees with results from a pseudo spectroscopic model for laser intensities between 4 and 15x1013 W/cm2. The model is then used to determine the absolute scaling factor between the experimental results from assemblies using two di erent x-ray filters. The data and model method also allows unique calibration factors for each MCP system and each MCP gain to be compared. We also present simulation results investigating alternate witness plate materials (Ag, Eu and Au).« less

  8. Determination of the laser intensity applied to a Ta witness plate from the measured x-ray signal using a pulsed micro-channel plate detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickworth, L. A.; Rosen, M. D.; Schneider, M. B.; Hinkel, D. E.; Benedetti, L. R.; Kauffman, R. L.; Wu, S. S.

    2017-06-01

    The laser intensity distribution at the surface of a high-Z material, such as Ta, can be deduced from imaging the self-emission of the produced x-ray spot using suitable calibration data. This paper presents a calibration method which uses the measured x-ray emissions from laser spots of different intensities hitting a Ta witness plate. The x-ray emission is measured with a micro-channel plate (MCP) based x-ray framing camera plus filters. Data from different positions on one MCP strip or from different MCP assemblies are normalized to each other using a standard candle laser beam spot at ∼1 × 1014 W/cm2 intensity. The distribution of the resulting dataset agrees with results from a pseudo spectroscopic model for laser intensities between 4 and 15 × 1013 W/cm2 . The model is then used to determine the absolute scaling factor between the experimental results from assemblies using two different x-ray filters. The data and model method also allows unique calibration factors for each MCP system and each MCP gain to be compared. We also present simulation results investigating alternate witness plate materials (Ag, Eu and Au).

  9. First inductively coupled plasma-distance-of-flight mass spectrometer: instrument performance with a microchannel plate/phosphor imaging detector

    SciTech Connect

    Gundlach-Graham, Alexander W.; Dennis, Elise; Ray, Steven J.; Enke, Christie G.; Barinaga, Charles J.; Koppenaal, David W.; Hieftje, Gary M.

    2013-09-01

    Here we describe the first combination of a Distance-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (DOFMS) instrument and an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) ion source. DOFMS is a velocity-based MS technique in which ions of a range of mass-to-charge (m/z) values are detected simultaneously along the length of a spatially selective detector. As a relative of time-of-flight (TOF) MS, DOFMS leverages benefits fromboth TOFMS and spatially dispersive MS. The simultaneous detection of groups of m/z values improves dynamic range by spreading ion signal across many detector elements and reduces correlated noise by signal ratioing. To ascertain the performance characteristics of the ICP-DOFMS instrument, we have employed a microchannel-plate/phosphor detection assembly with a scientific CCD to capture images of the phosphor plate. With this simple (and commercially available) detection scheme, elemental detection limits from 2–30 ng L*1 and a linear dynamic range of 5 orders of magnitude (10–106 ng L1) have been demonstrated. Additionally, a competitive isotope-ratio precision of 0.1% RSD has been achieved with only a 6 s signal integration period. In addition to first figures of merit, this paper outlines technical considerations for the design of the ICP-DOFMS.

  10. Providing reference standards and metrology for the few photon-photon counting community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaumont, Andrew R.; Cheung, Jessica Y.; Chunnilall, Christopher J.; Ireland, Jane; White, Malcolm G.

    2009-10-01

    The main drivers for developing few-photon metrological techniques are the rapidly progressing field of quantum information processing, which requires the development of high-efficiency photon-counting detectors, and the wider use of photon-counting technology in biology, medical physics and nuclear physics. This paper will focus on the provision of standards for the few photon community and the development of techniques for the characterisation of photon-counting detectors. At the high-power end, microwatts, we are developing a low-power absolute radiometer as a primary standard that will be used to provide traceability over a much broader spectral range. At the few photon-photon-counting level we are developing a conventional calibration technique, which is traceable to the primary standard through a reference trap detector. This method can be used in both analogue and photon-counting modes and provides a convenient route for providing customer calibration at few-photon levels across the optical spectrum. At the photon-counting/single-photon level we are developing a technique based on correlated photons. These are produced via parametric downconversion and can be used to measure directly the detection efficiency of photon-counting detectors. A cross-validation of the correlated photon and conventional technique is reported. Finally we discuss this work in the context of an EU project, that is aimed at establishing the route towards the re-definition of the candela, the SI unit for optical radiation.

  11. Linear operating region in the ozone dial photon counting system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrawis, Madeleine

    1995-01-01

    Ozone is a relatively unstable molecule found in Earth's atmosphere. An ozone molecule is made up of three atoms of oxygen. Depending on where ozone resides, it can protect or harm life on Earth. High in the atmosphere, about 15 miles up, ozone acts as a shield to protect Earth's surface from the sun's harmful ultraviolet radiation. Without this shield, we would be more susceptible to skin cancer, cataracts, and impaired immune systems. Closer to Earth, in the air we breathe, ozone is a harmful pollutant that causes damage to lung tissue and plants. Since the early 1980's, airborne lidar systems have been used for making measurements of ozone. The differential absorption lidar (DIAL) technique is used in the remote measurement of O3. This system allows the O3 to be measured as function of the range in the atmosphere. Two frequency-doubled Nd:YAG lasers are used to pump tunable dye lasers. The lasers are operating at 289 nm for the DIAL on-line wavelength of O3, and the other one is operated at 300 nm for the off-line wavelength. The DIAL wavelengths are produced in sequential laser pulses with a time separation of 300 micro s. The backscattered laser energy is collected by telescopes and measured using photon counting systems. The photon counting system measures the light signal by making use of the photon nature of light. The output pulse from the Photo-Multiplier Tube (PE), caused by a photon striking the PMT photo-cathode, is amplified and passed to a pulse height discriminator. The peak value of the pulse is compared to a reference voltage (discrimination level). If the pulse amplitude exceeds the discrimination level, the discriminator generates a standard pulse which is counted by the digital counter. Non-linearity in the system is caused by the overlapping of pulses and the finite response time of the electronics. At low count rates one expects the system to register one event for each output pulse from the PMT corresponding to a photon incident upon the

  12. Linear operating region in the ozone dial photon counting system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrawis, Madeleine

    1995-01-01

    Ozone is a relatively unstable molecule found in Earth's atmosphere. An ozone molecule is made up of three atoms of oxygen. Depending on where ozone resides, it can protect or harm life on Earth. High in the atmosphere, about 15 miles up, ozone acts as a shield to protect Earth's surface from the sun's harmful ultraviolet radiation. Without this shield, we would be more susceptible to skin cancer, cataracts, and impaired immune systems. Closer to Earth, in the air we breathe, ozone is a harmful pollutant that causes damage to lung tissue and plants. Since the early 1980's, airborne lidar systems have been used for making measurements of ozone. The differential absorption lidar (DIAL) technique is used in the remote measurement of O3. This system allows the O3 to be measured as function of the range in the atmosphere. Two frequency-doubled Nd:YAG lasers are used to pump tunable dye lasers. The lasers are operating at 289 nm for the DIAL on-line wavelength of O3, and the other one is operated at 300 nm for the off-line wavelength. The DIAL wavelengths are produced in sequential laser pulses with a time separation of 300 micro s. The backscattered laser energy is collected by telescopes and measured using photon counting systems. The photon counting system measures the light signal by making use of the photon nature of light. The output pulse from the Photo-Multiplier Tube (PE), caused by a photon striking the PMT photo-cathode, is amplified and passed to a pulse height discriminator. The peak value of the pulse is compared to a reference voltage (discrimination level). If the pulse amplitude exceeds the discrimination level, the discriminator generates a standard pulse which is counted by the digital counter. Non-linearity in the system is caused by the overlapping of pulses and the finite response time of the electronics. At low count rates one expects the system to register one event for each output pulse from the PMT corresponding to a photon incident upon the

  13. Quantitative material characterization from multi-energy photon counting CT.

    PubMed

    Alessio, Adam M; MacDonald, Lawrence R

    2013-03-01

    To quantify the concentration of soft-tissue components of water, fat, and calcium through the decomposition of the x-ray spectral signatures in multi-energy CT images. Decomposition of dual-energy and multi-energy x-ray data into basis materials can be performed in the projection domain, image domain, or during image reconstruction. In this work, the authors present methodology for the decomposition of multi-energy x-ray data in the image domain for the application of soft-tissue characterization. To demonstrate proof-of-principle, the authors apply several previously proposed methods and a novel content-aware method to multi-energy images acquired with a prototype photon counting CT system. Data from phantom and ex vivo specimens are evaluated. The number and type of materials in a region can be limited based on a priori knowledge or classification strategies. The proposed difference classifier successfully classified the image into air only, water+fat, water+fat+iodine, and water+calcium regions. Then, the content-aware material decomposition based on weighted least-square optimization generated quantitative maps of concentration. Bias in the estimation of the concentration of water and oil components in a phantom study was <0.10 ± 0.15 g/cc on average. Decomposition of ex vivo carotid endarterectomy specimens suggests the presence of water, lipid, and calcium deposits in the plaque walls. Initial application of the proposed methodology suggests that it can decompose multi-energy CT images into quantitative maps of water, adipose, iodine, and calcium concentrations.

  14. Per-pixel energy calibration of photon counting detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atharifard, A.; Healy, J. L.; Goulter, B. P.; Ramyar, M.; Vanden Broeke, L.; Walsh, M. F.; Onyema, C. C.; Panta, R. K.; Aamir, R.; Smithies, D. J.; Doesburg, R.; Anjomrouz, M.; Shamshad, M.; Bheesette, S.; Rajendran, K.; de Ruiter, N. J. A.; Knight, D.; Chernoglazov, A.; Mandalika, H.; Bell, S. T.; Bateman, C. J.; Butler, A. P. H.; Butler, P. H.

    2017-03-01

    Energy resolving performance of spectral CT systems is influenced by the accuracy of the detector's energy calibration. Global energy calibration maps a given threshold to the average energy response of all pixels of the detector. Variations arising from CMOS manufacturing processes and properties of the sensor cause different pixels to respond differently to photons of the same energy. Threshold dispersion adversely affects spectral imaging by degrading energy resolution, which contributes to blurring of the energy information. In this paper, we present a technique for per-pixel energy calibration of photon-counting x-ray detectors (PCXDs) that quantifies the energy response of individual pixels relative to the average response. This technique takes advantage of the measurements made by an equalized chip. It uses a known global energy map to quantify the effect of threshold dispersion on the energy response of the detector pixels across an energy range of interest. The proposed technique was assessed using a MARS scanner with an equalized Medipix3RX chip flip-bonded to 2 mm thick CdTe semiconductor crystal at a pitch of 110 μ m. Measurements were made of characteristic x-rays of a molybdenum foil. Results were compared between the case that the global calibration was used on its own and the case of using it in conjunction with our per-pixel calibration technique. The proposed technique quantified up to 1.87 keV error in energy response of 100 pixels of a selected region of interest (ROI). It made an improvement of 28.3% in average FWHM. The additional information provided by this per-pixel calibration technique can be used to improve spectral reconstruction.

  15. Performance of the EIGER single photon counting detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinti, G.; Bergamaschi, A.; Cartier, S.; Dinapoli, R.; Greiffenberg, D.; Johnson, I.; Jungmann-Smith, J. H.; Mezza, D.; Mozzanica, A.; Schmitt, B.; Shi, X.

    2015-03-01

    EIGER is a single photon counting hybrid pixel detector being developed at Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), Switzerland, for applications at synchrotron light sources in an energy range from a few to 25 keV. EIGER is characterized by a small pixel size (75 × 75 μm2), a frame rate up to 22 kHz and a small dead time between frames (4 μs). An EIGER module is a hybrid detector composed of a ≈ 8 × 4 cm2 monolithic silicon sensor bump bonded to 4 × 2 readout chips, for a total of 500 kpixels. Each pixel has a configurable depth (up to 12 bits) counter and records the number of photons impinging. Custom designed module electronics reads out the bits in the pixel counter and processes the data in the module before transferring them to a PC. A large dynamic range (32 bits) for the pixel counter can be obtained through on-board image summation. Rate corrections can be applied on-board to compensate for inefficiencies when the pixel counting rates approach pile-up levels around a million counts per second. The EIGER modules are the building blocks of large area detectors: a 1.5 and a 9 Mpixel systems are under development for the cSAXS beamline at the Swiss Light Source (SLS) at PSI. The very high frame rate capabilities are equally fast for multi-module systems due to the fully parallel data processing.The module calibration will be discussed, with emphasis on the choice of the optimal operation settings as a function of photon energy. The performance regarding threshold dispersion and minimum achievable threshold will be presented. In addition, the progress towards the production of larger multi-module systems will be discussed.

  16. Improvement in the energy resolving capabilities of photon counting detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, D.; Lim, K. T.; Park, K.; Cho, G.

    2016-12-01

    Patterned pixel array was proposed to increase the number of energy bins in a single pixel of photon counting detectors without adding more comparators and counters. The pixels were grouped into four different types and each pixel has a common threshold and a specific threshold assigned to each pixel type. The common threshold in every pixel records the total number of incident photons regardless of its pixel type and the specific thresholds classify incident photon energies. The patterned pixel array was evaluated with the pinhole gamma camera system based on the XRI-UNO detector flip-chip bonded with a 1mm thick CdTe sensor. The experimental data was acquired with time-over-threshold mode to avoid the charge sharing problem. The shared total charges created by one photon can be found by summing all pixels within the cluster. To correct the different response to the same energy of photon, the energy calibration of the time-over-threshold value was perfomed independently depending on the cluster size. The time-over-threshold values were separated into two energy bins since we assumed that each pixel has two thresholds. Although each pixel has only two thresholds, five images from different energy windows were obtained by sharing the spectal information from four adjacent pixels. Thus, degradation of the spatial resolution in the image occured in each energy window. The image of the entire energy, however, was not degraded since all four different types of pixels have a common threshold just above the noise level. In addition, the number of steps for the threshold scan method can be drastically reduced with the increased number of effective thresholds in a single pixel.

  17. Fully integrated sub 100ps photon counting platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckley, S. J.; Bellis, S. J.; Rosinger, P.; Jackson, J. C.

    2007-02-01

    Current state of the art high resolution counting modules, specifically designed for high timing resolution applications, are largely based on a computer card format. This has tended to result in a costly solution that is restricted to the computer it resides in. We describe a four channel timing module that interfaces to a computer via a USB port and operates with a resolution of less than 100 picoseconds. The core design of the system is an advanced field programmable gate array (FPGA) interfacing to a precision time interval measurement module, mass memory block and a high speed USB 2.0 serial data port. The FPGA design allows the module to operate in a number of modes allowing both continuous recording of photon events (time-tagging) and repetitive time binning. In time-tag mode the system reports, for each photon event, the high resolution time along with the chronological time (macro time) and the channel ID. The time-tags are uploaded in real time to a host computer via a high speed USB port allowing continuous storage to computer memory of up to 4 millions photons per second. In time-bin mode, binning is carried out with count rates up to 10 million photons per second. Each curve resides in a block of 128,000 time-bins each with a resolution programmable down to less than 100 picoseconds. Each bin has a limit of 65535 hits allowing autonomous curve recording until a bin reaches the maximum count or the system is commanded to halt. Due to the large memory storage, several curves/experiments can be stored in the system prior to uploading to the host computer for analysis. This makes this module ideal for integration into high timing resolution specific applications such as laser ranging and fluorescence lifetime imaging using techniques such as time correlated single photon counting (TCSPC).

  18. Reduction of CMOS Image Sensor Read Noise to Enable Photon Counting

    PubMed Central

    Guidash, Michael; Ma, Jiaju; Vogelsang, Thomas; Endsley, Jay

    2016-01-01

    Recent activity in photon counting CMOS image sensors (CIS) has been directed to reduction of read noise. Many approaches and methods have been reported. This work is focused on providing sub 1 e− read noise by design and operation of the binary and small signal readout of photon counting CIS. Compensation of transfer gate feed-through was used to provide substantially reduced CDS time and source follower (SF) bandwidth. SF read noise was reduced by a factor of 3 with this method. This method can be applied broadly to CIS devices to reduce the read noise for small signals to enable use as a photon counting sensor. PMID:27070625

  19. Absolute optical responsivity down to the photon counting level with a photomultiplier tube.

    PubMed

    Tanabe, M; Niwa, K; Kinoshita, K

    2017-04-01

    A novel method is presented for evaluation of the absolute optical responsivity of a photomultiplier tube (PMT) at optical powers down to the photon counting level under visible light. This method is based on a combination of the calibrated responsivity and nonlinearity corrections using a silicon photodiode and a PMT. The evaluation results with the PMT enable accurate determination of the absolute optical responsivity over a wide power range of 10(-11) W to 10(-16) W under visible light. This method provides validation of both the photon counting efficiency of a PMT and of accurate optical measurement with attenuators at the photon counting level.

  20. Absolute optical responsivity down to the photon counting level with a photomultiplier tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanabe, M.; Niwa, K.; Kinoshita, K.

    2017-04-01

    A novel method is presented for evaluation of the absolute optical responsivity of a photomultiplier tube (PMT) at optical powers down to the photon counting level under visible light. This method is based on a combination of the calibrated responsivity and nonlinearity corrections using a silicon photodiode and a PMT. The evaluation results with the PMT enable accurate determination of the absolute optical responsivity over a wide power range of 10-11 W to 10-16 W under visible light. This method provides validation of both the photon counting efficiency of a PMT and of accurate optical measurement with attenuators at the photon counting level.

  1. Information authentication using photon-counting double-random-phase encrypted images.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Cabré, Elisabet; Cho, Myungjin; Javidi, Bahram

    2011-01-01

    Photon-counting imaging is integrated with optical encryption for information authentication. An image is double-random-phase encrypted, and a photon-limited encrypted image is obtained. The photon-counting encrypted image is generated with few photons and appears sparse; however, we show that it has sufficient information for decryption and authentication. The decrypted image cannot be easily visualized so that an additional layer of information protection is achieved. The authentication is carried out by recognition algorithms. This approach may make the verification process more robust against attacks. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on integrating photon-counting imaging and encryption for authentication.

  2. Reduction of CMOS Image Sensor Read Noise to Enable Photon Counting.

    PubMed

    Guidash, Michael; Ma, Jiaju; Vogelsang, Thomas; Endsley, Jay

    2016-04-09

    Recent activity in photon counting CMOS image sensors (CIS) has been directed to reduction of read noise. Many approaches and methods have been reported. This work is focused on providing sub 1 e(-) read noise by design and operation of the binary and small signal readout of photon counting CIS. Compensation of transfer gate feed-through was used to provide substantially reduced CDS time and source follower (SF) bandwidth. SF read noise was reduced by a factor of 3 with this method. This method can be applied broadly to CIS devices to reduce the read noise for small signals to enable use as a photon counting sensor.

  3. High resolution decoding of Multi-Anode Microchannel Array detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kasle, David B.; Morgan, Jeffrey S.

    1991-01-01

    The Multi-Anode Microchannel Array (MAMA) is a photon counting detector which utilizes a photocathode for photon to electron conversion, a microchannel plate (MCP) for signal amplification and a proximity focused anode array for position sensitivity. The detector electronics decode the position of an event through coincidence discrimination. The decoding algorithm which associates a given event with the appropriate pixel is determined by the geometry of the array. A new algorithm incorporated into a CMOS Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) decoder which improves the pixel spatial resolution is described. The new algorithm does not degrade the detector throughput and does not require any modifications to the detector tube. The standard MAMA detector has a pixel size of 25 x 25 square microns, but with the new decoder circuit the pixel size is reduced to 12.5 x 12.5 square microns. We have built the first set of decode electronics utilizing the new ASIC chips and report here on the first imaging tests of this system.

  4. High resolution decoding of Multi-Anode Microchannel Array detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kasle, David B.; Morgan, Jeffrey S.

    1991-01-01

    The Multi-Anode Microchannel Array (MAMA) is a photon counting detector which utilizes a photocathode for photon to electron conversion, a microchannel plate (MCP) for signal amplification and a proximity focused anode array for position sensitivity. The detector electronics decode the position of an event through coincidence discrimination. The decoding algorithm which associates a given event with the appropriate pixel is determined by the geometry of the array. A new algorithm incorporated into a CMOS Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) decoder which improves the pixel spatial resolution is described. The new algorithm does not degrade the detector throughput and does not require any modifications to the detector tube. The standard MAMA detector has a pixel size of 25 x 25 square microns, but with the new decoder circuit the pixel size is reduced to 12.5 x 12.5 square microns. We have built the first set of decode electronics utilizing the new ASIC chips and report here on the first imaging tests of this system.

  5. Imaging at soft X-ray wavelengths with high-gain microchannel plate detector systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Timothy, J. Gethyn

    1986-01-01

    Multianode microchannel array (MAMA) detector systems with formats of 256 x 1024 pixels and active areas of 6 x 26 mm are now under evaluation at visible, UV and soft X-ray wavelengths. Very-large-format versions of the MAMA detectors with formats of 2048 x 2048 pixels and active areas of 52 x 52 mm are under development for use in the NASA Goddard Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS). Open-structure versions of these detectors with Cs I photocathodes can provide a high-resolution imaging capability at EUV and soft X-ray wavelengths and can deliver a maximum count rate from each array in excess of 10 to the 6th counts/s. In addition, these detector systems have the unique capability to determine the arrival time of a detected photon to an accuracy of 100 ns or better. The construction, mode of operation, and performance characteristics of the MAMA detectors are described, and the program for the development of the very-large-format detectors is outlined.

  6. Imaging at soft X-ray wavelengths with high-gain microchannel plate detector systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Timothy, J. Gethyn

    1986-01-01

    Multianode microchannel array (MAMA) detector systems with formats of 256 x 1024 pixels and active areas of 6 x 26 mm are now under evaluation at visible, UV and soft X-ray wavelengths. Very-large-format versions of the MAMA detectors with formats of 2048 x 2048 pixels and active areas of 52 x 52 mm are under development for use in the NASA Goddard Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS). Open-structure versions of these detectors with Cs I photocathodes can provide a high-resolution imaging capability at EUV and soft X-ray wavelengths and can deliver a maximum count rate from each array in excess of 10 to the 6th counts/s. In addition, these detector systems have the unique capability to determine the arrival time of a detected photon to an accuracy of 100 ns or better. The construction, mode of operation, and performance characteristics of the MAMA detectors are described, and the program for the development of the very-large-format detectors is outlined.

  7. The performance of photon counting imaging with a Geiger mode silicon avalanche photodiode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Hui-Ming; Zhang, Yi-Fan; Ji, Zhong-Jie; Chen, Qian

    2013-10-01

    In principle, photon counting imaging can detect a photon. With the development of low-level-light image intensifier techniques and low-level-light detection devices, photon counting imaging can now detect photon images under extremely low illumination. Based on a Geiger mode silicon avalanche photodiode single photon counter, an experimental system for photon counting imaging was built through two-dimensional scanning of a SPAD (single photon avalanche diode) detector. The feasibility of the imaging platform was validated experimentally. Two images with different characteristics, namely, the USAF 1951 resolution test panel and the image of Lena, were chosen to evaluate the imaging performance of the experimental system. The results were compared and analysed. The imaging properties under various illumination and scanning steps were studied. The lowest illumination limit of the SPAD photon counting imaging was determined.

  8. Merged analog and photon counting profiles used as input for other RLPROF VAPs

    DOE Data Explorer

    Newsom, Rob

    1998-03-01

    The rlprof_merge VAP "merges" the photon counting and analog signals appropriately for each channel, creating an output data file that is very similar to the original raw data file format that the Raman lidar initially had.

  9. Merged analog and photon counting profiles used as input for other RLPROF VAPs

    DOE Data Explorer

    Newsom, Rob

    2014-10-03

    The rlprof_merge VAP "merges" the photon counting and analog signals appropriately for each channel, creating an output data file that is very similar to the original raw data file format that the Raman lidar initially had.

  10. A CCD based approach to collimated photon counting imaging for micro-SPECT/CT.

    PubMed

    Eaker, Diane R; Dzyubak, Bogdan; Jorgensen, Steven M; Ritman, Erik L

    2009-01-01

    Analog summation methods of x-ray imaging have nonlinearity in signal readout and dynamic range limitations. To minimize these limitations, a photon counting CCD-based gamma camera imaging system has been developed and evaluated.

  11. A comparison of photon counting and current measuring techniques in spectrophotometry of faint sources.

    PubMed

    Tull, R G

    1968-10-01

    The component of dark noise produced by Cerenkov pulses in photomultipliers due to cosmic ray mu mesons is discussed. It is shown by integration of pulse height spectra that this source of noise can be the limiting factor in de measuring spectrophotometry of faint astronomical sources. Direct current methods of photometry are compared with photon counting, and the advantage of photon counting is demonstrated under various operating conditions.

  12. 3D passive photon counting automatic target recognition using advanced correlation filters.

    PubMed

    Cho, Myungjin; Mahalanobis, Abhijit; Javidi, Bahram

    2011-03-15

    In this Letter, we present results for detecting and recognizing 3D objects in photon counting images using integral imaging with maximum average correlation height filters. We show that even under photon starved conditions objects may be automatically recognized in passively sensed 3D images using advanced correlation filters. We show that the proposed filter synthesized with ideal training images can detect and recognize a 3D object in photon counting images, even in the presence of occlusions and obscuration.

  13. Soft X-ray and extreme utraviolet quantum detection efficiency of potassium chloride photocathode layers on microchannel plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegmund, Oswald H. W.; Everman, Elaine; Hull, Jeff; Vallerga, John V.; Lampton, Michael

    1988-01-01

    The quantum detection efficiency (QDE) of KCl photocathodes in the 44-1460 A range was investigated. An opaque layer of KCl, about 15,000-A-thick, was evaporated and applied the surface of a microchannel plate (MCP), and the contribution of the photocathode material in the channels (and on the interchannel web) to the QDE was measured using a Z stack MCP detector. It is shown that KCl is a relatively stable photocathode material, with the QDE equal to 30-40 percent in the EUV. At wavelengths above 200 A, the QDE is slightly better than the QDE of CsI, as reported by Siegmund et al. (1986). While the shape of the QDE curve as a function of wavelength is similar to those reported for CsI and KBr, KCl was found to lack the high QDE peak found in the curves of CsI and KBr at about 100 A. A simple QDE model is described, the predictions of which were found to agree with the measurements on the KCl photocathode.

  14. Soft X-ray and extreme utraviolet quantum detection efficiency of potassium chloride photocathode layers on microchannel plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegmund, Oswald H. W.; Everman, Elaine; Hull, Jeff; Vallerga, John V.; Lampton, Michael

    1988-10-01

    The quantum detection efficiency (QDE) of KCl photocathodes in the 44-1460 A range was investigated. An opaque layer of KCl, about 15,000-A-thick, was evaporated and applied the surface of a microchannel plate (MCP), and the contribution of the photocathode material in the channels (and on the interchannel web) to the QDE was measured using a Z stack MCP detector. It is shown that KCl is a relatively stable photocathode material, with the QDE equal to 30-40 percent in the EUV. At wavelengths above 200 A, the QDE is slightly better than the QDE of CsI, as reported by Siegmund et al. (1986). While the shape of the QDE curve as a function of wavelength is similar to those reported for CsI and KBr, KCl was found to lack the high QDE peak found in the curves of CsI and KBr at about 100 A. A simple QDE model is described, the predictions of which were found to agree with the measurements on the KCl photocathode.

  15. Soft X-ray and extreme utraviolet quantum detection efficiency of potassium chloride photocathode layers on microchannel plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegmund, Oswald H. W.; Everman, Elaine; Hull, Jeff; Vallerga, John V.; Lampton, Michael

    1988-01-01

    The quantum detection efficiency (QDE) of KCl photocathodes in the 44-1460 A range was investigated. An opaque layer of KCl, about 15,000-A-thick, was evaporated and applied the surface of a microchannel plate (MCP), and the contribution of the photocathode material in the channels (and on the interchannel web) to the QDE was measured using a Z stack MCP detector. It is shown that KCl is a relatively stable photocathode material, with the QDE equal to 30-40 percent in the EUV. At wavelengths above 200 A, the QDE is slightly better than the QDE of CsI, as reported by Siegmund et al. (1986). While the shape of the QDE curve as a function of wavelength is similar to those reported for CsI and KBr, KCl was found to lack the high QDE peak found in the curves of CsI and KBr at about 100 A. A simple QDE model is described, the predictions of which were found to agree with the measurements on the KCl photocathode.

  16. Image Shutters: Gated Proximity-Focused Microchannel-Plate (MCP) Wafer Tubes Versus Gated Silicon Intensified Target (SIT) Vidicons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yates, G. J.; King, N. S. P.; Jaramillo, S. A.; Ogle, J. W.; Noel, B. W.; Thayer, N. N.

    1983-03-01

    The imaging characteristics of two fast image shutters used for recording the spatial and temporal evolution of transient optical events in the nanosecond range have been studied. Emphasis is on the comparative performances of each shutter type under similar conditions. Response data, including gating speed, gain, dynamic range, shuttering efficiency, and resolution for 18 and 25-mm-diam proximity-focused microchannel-plate (MCP) intensifiers are com-pared with similar data for a prototype electrostatically-focused 25-mm-diam gated silicon-intensified-target (SIT) vidicon currently under development for Los Alamos National Laboratory. Several key parameters critical to optical gating speed have been varied in both tube types in order to determine the optimum performance attainable from each design. These include conductive substrate material and thickness used to reduce photocathode resistivity, spacing between gating electrodes to minimize interelectrode capacitance, the use of con-ductive grids on the photocathode substrate to permit rapid propagation of the electrical gate pulse to all areas of the photocathode, and different package geometries to provide a more effective interface with external biasing and gating circuitry. For comparable spatial resolution, most 18-mm-diam MCPs require gate times > 2.5 ns while the fastest SIT has demonstrated sub-nanosecond optical gates as short as r 400 ± 50 ps for full shuttering of the 25-mm-diam input window.

  17. Image shutters: Gated proximity-focused Microchannel Plate (MCP) wafer tubes versus gated Silicon Intensified Target (SIT) vidicons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yates, G. J.; King, N. S. P.; Jaramillo, S. A.; Ogle, J. W.; Noel, B. W.; Thayer, N. N.

    Response data, including gating speed, gain, dynamic range, shuttering efficiency, and resolution for 18- and 25-mm-diam proximity-focused microchannel-plate (MCP) intensifiers are compared with similar data for a prototype electrostatically-focused 25-mm-diam gated silicon-intensified-target (SIT) vidicon. Conductive substrate material and thickness used to reduce photocathode resistivity, spacing between gating electrodes to minimize inter-electrode capacitance, the use of conductive grids on the photocathode substrate to permit rapid propagation of the electrical gate pulse to all areas of the photocathode, and different package geometries to provide a more effective interface with external biasing and gating circuitry were varied in both tube types to determine optimal performance from each design. For comparable spatial resolution, most 18-mm-diam MCPs require gate times 2.5 ns while the fastest SIT has demonstrated sub-nanosecond optical gates as short as approximately 400 + or - 50 ps for full shuttering of the 25-mm-diam input window.

  18. Rapid detection and counting of viable bacteria in vegetables and environmental water using a photon-counting TV camera.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, T; Kuramitsu, Y; Ookuma, A; Trevanich, S; Honjoh, K; Hatano, S

    1998-10-01

    A bioluminescence assay carried out with a photon-counting TV camera was evaluated for rapid enumeration of viable bacterial counts. The test sample was filtered through a membrane filter, and the membrane filter retaining bacteria was incubated at 37 degrees C for 6 h on a filter paper soaked with nutrient broth supplemented with 0.5% NaCl. The membrane filter was then subjected to a bioluminescence reaction, and the intensity of light and numbers of light emission points on the filter were measured with a photon-counting TV camera. The light intensity measured on seven different bacteria correlated with initial viable counts; the correlation coefficient was calculated to be 0.89. The number of light emission points measured on Escherichia coli also correlated with the initial viable counts (r = 0.81) in a range from 1 to 100 CFU. Presumptive bacterial counts by the present bioluminescence assay determined on 79 samples of vegetables and 122 samples of environmental water correlated well with the viable counts obtained by the conventional plating method, with correlation coefficients of 0.87 and 0.82, respectively.

  19. Pulse pileup statistics for energy discriminating photon counting x-ray detectors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Adam S; Harrison, Daniel; Lobastov, Vladimir; Tkaczyk, J Eric

    2011-07-01

    Energy discriminating photon counting x-ray detectors can be subject to a wide range of flux rates if applied in clinical settings. Even when the incident rate is a small fraction of the detector's maximum periodic rate No, pulse pileup leads to count rate losses and spectral distortion. Although the deterministic effects can be corrected, the detrimental effect of pileup on image noise is not well understood and may limit the performance of photon counting systems. Therefore, the authors devise a method to determine the detector count statistics and imaging performance. The detector count statistics are derived analytically for an idealized pileup model with delta pulses of a nonparalyzable detector. These statistics are then used to compute the performance (e.g., contrast-to-noise ratio) for both single material and material decomposition contrast detection tasks via the Cramdr-Rao lower bound (CRLB) as a function of the detector input count rate. With more realistic unipolar and bipolar pulse pileup models of a nonparalyzable detector, the imaging task performance is determined by Monte Carlo simulations and also approximated by a multinomial method based solely on the mean detected output spectrum. Photon counting performance at different count rates is compared with ideal energy integration, which is unaffected by count rate. The authors found that an ideal photon counting detector with perfect energy resolution outperforms energy integration for our contrast detection tasks, but when the input count rate exceeds 20% N0, many of these benefits disappear. The benefit with iodine contrast falls rapidly with increased count rate while water contrast is not as sensitive to count rates. The performance with a delta pulse model is overoptimistic when compared to the more realistic bipolar pulse model. The multinomial approximation predicts imaging performance very close to the prediction from Monte Carlo simulations. The monoenergetic image with maximum contrast

  20. Droplet-based magnetic bead immunoassay using microchannel-connected multiwell plates (μCHAMPs) for the detection of amyloid beta oligomers.

    PubMed

    Park, Min Cheol; Kim, Moojong; Lim, Gun Taek; Kang, Sung Min; An, Seong Soo A; Kim, Tae Song; Kang, Ji Yoon

    2016-06-21

    Multiwell plates are regularly used in analytical research and clinical diagnosis but often require laborious washing steps and large sample or reagent volumes (typically, 100 μL per well). To overcome such drawbacks in the conventional multiwell plate, we present a novel microchannel-connected multiwell plate (μCHAMP) that can be used for automated disease biomarker detection in a small sample volume by performing droplet-based magnetic bead immunoassay inside the plate. In this μCHAMP-based immunoassay platform, small volumes (30-50 μL) of aqueous-phase working droplets are stably confined within each well by the simple microchannel structure (200-300 μm in height and 0.5-1 mm in width), and magnetic beads are exclusively transported into an adjacent droplet through the oil-filled microchannels assisted by a magnet array aligned beneath and controlled by a XY-motorized stage. Using this μCHAMP-based platform, we were able to perform parallel detection of synthetic amyloid beta (Aβ) oligomers as a model analyte for the early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). This platform easily simplified the laborious and consumptive immunoassay procedure by achieving automated parallel immunoassay (32 assays per operation in 3-well connected 96-well plate) within 1 hour and at low sample consumption (less than 10 μL per assay) with no cumbersome manual washing step. Moreover, it could detect synthetic Aβ oligomers even below 10 pg mL(-1) concentration with a calculated detection limit of ∼3 pg mL(-1). Therefore, the μCHAMP and droplet-based magnetic bead immunoassay, with the combination of XY-motorized magnet array, would be a useful platform in the diagnosis of human disease, including AD, which requires low consumption of the patient's body fluid sample and automation of the entire immunoassay procedure for high processing capacity.

  1. Electronic Microchannel Plate Particle Detector Design for a CubeSat Time-of-Flight Reflectron Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyle, M. L.; Davidson, R.; Swenson, C.; Syrstad, E. A.

    2015-12-01

    Variations of gas density and composition in Earth's thermosphere and ionosphere are key indicators of interactions between different layers of Earth's atmosphere. The nature of interactions between neutral and ion species in the upper atmosphere is an active area of study in Heliophysics and there is much to learn about the dynamic relationship between the ionosphere and neutral thermosphere. Mass Spectrometers are among an array of instruments used to explore Earth's upper atmosphere and other space environments. Normally, these instruments are substantial in size and deployed on larger satellites. Data from these larger instruments generally provides information from a specific point in time at a single location. Studies of atmospheric density and composition with multiple locations for each time point could be performed by CubeSat swarms if proper instrumentation were available to fit CubeSat payload restrictions. The proposed miniaturized time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometer (MS) will have a mass resolution and range sufficient for measuring the composition of Earth's thermosphere and ionosphere while operating within the power and space constraints of a CubeSat. The capabilities of this instrument would potentially dramatically reduce the cost of future missions while simultaneously enhancing the science return. The design employs miniaturization of TOF-MS technology, including resolution refinement techniques used for larger instruments and standard concepts for TOF-MS components such as acceleration grids, a Bradbury-Nielsen wire gate, a gridless ion mirror, and microchannel plate detector (MCP). The quality of particle detection is known to have a significant impact on the instrument performance. A signal collector for an MCP detector is being designed to maximize the detection performance and enable the transmission of density and composition data back to Earth.

  2. Feasibility of Amorphous Selenium Based Photon Counting Detectors for Digital Breast Tomosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.; O'Connor, P.; Lehnert, J., De Geronimo, G., Dolazza, E., Tousignant, O., Laperriere, L., Greenspan, J., Zhao, W.

    2009-02-27

    Amorphous selenium (a-Se) has been incorporated successfully in direct conversion flat panel x-ray detectors, and has demonstrated superior image quality in screening mammography and digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) under energy integration mode. The present work explores the potential of a-Se for photon counting detectors in DBT. We investigated major factors contributing to the variation in the charge collected by a pixel upon absorption of each x-ray photon. These factors included x-ray photon interaction, detector geometry, charge transport, and the pulse shaping and noise properties of the photon counting readout circuit. Experimental measurements were performed on a linear array test structure constructed by evaporating an a-Se layer onto an array of 100 {mu}m pitch strip electrodes, which are connected to a 32 channel low noise photon counting integrated circuit. The measured pulse height spectrum (PHS) under polychromatic xray exposure was interpreted quantitatively using the factors identified. Based on the understanding of a-Se photon counting performance, design parameters were proposed for a 2D detector with high quantum efficiency and count rate that could meet the requirements of photon counting detector for DBT.

  3. A performance study of the micro-channel plate photomultiplier tube (MCP-PMT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixon, Kahlil; Chiu, Mickey

    2013-10-01

    PHENIX, the Pioneering High Energy Nuclear Interaction Experiment at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), is developing particle detectors of exceptional time resolution. These world-class detectors will serve as upgrade options for future modifications to the Phenix detector, a part of BNL's Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC). This summer, we worked to optimize the timing resolution of the prototypes to ten picoseconds. The completed detectors will supply researchers with valuable data in the runs following installation, data that is currently in kinematically inaccessible regions. We setup the detectors in a cosmic ray test. The prototype detector I worked with is a Photonics 85012xp micro-channel-plate photomultiplier tube (MCP-PMT). Our testing setup makes use of two scintillator paddles, to trigger on the muons, and two MCP-PMT prototypes, to determine the time resolution. Currently, we are in the process of carefully analyzing the data acquired during experimentation. It will take just a little more time to study the correlations in detections between the top and bottom detectors; however, we are confident that this will be excellent option for serious consideration for installation in the Phenix detector. This project was supported in part by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Workforce Development for Teachers and Scientists (WDTS) under the Visiting Faculty Program (VFP).

  4. Reconfigurable Computing As an Enabling Technology for Single-Photon-Counting Laser Altimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, Wesley; Hicks, Edward; Pinchinat, Maxime; Dabney, Philip; McGarry, Jan; Murray, Paul

    2003-01-01

    Single-photon-counting laser altimetry is a new measurement technique offering significant advantages in vertical resolution, reducing instrument size, mass, and power, and reducing laser complexity as compared to analog or threshold detection laser altimetry techniques. However, these improvements come at the cost of a dramatically increased requirement for onboard real-time data processing. Reconfigurable computing has been shown to offer considerable performance advantages in performing this processing. These advantages have been demonstrated on the Multi-KiloHertz Micro-Laser Altimeter (MMLA), an aircraft based single-photon-counting laser altimeter developed by NASA Goddard Space Flight Center with several potential spaceflight applications. This paper describes how reconfigurable computing technology was employed to perform MMLA data processing in real-time under realistic operating constraints, along with the results observed. This paper also expands on these prior results to identify concepts for using reconfigurable computing to enable spaceflight single-photon-counting laser altimeter instruments.

  5. Single Photon Counting UV Solar-Blind Detectors Using Silicon and III-Nitride Materials.

    PubMed

    Nikzad, Shouleh; Hoenk, Michael; Jewell, April D; Hennessy, John J; Carver, Alexander G; Jones, Todd J; Goodsall, Timothy M; Hamden, Erika T; Suvarna, Puneet; Bulmer, J; Shahedipour-Sandvik, F; Charbon, Edoardo; Padmanabhan, Preethi; Hancock, Bruce; Bell, L Douglas

    2016-06-21

    Ultraviolet (UV) studies in astronomy, cosmology, planetary studies, biological and medical applications often require precision detection of faint objects and in many cases require photon-counting detection. We present an overview of two approaches for achieving photon counting in the UV. The first approach involves UV enhancement of photon-counting silicon detectors, including electron multiplying charge-coupled devices and avalanche photodiodes. The approach used here employs molecular beam epitaxy for delta doping and superlattice doping for surface passivation and high UV quantum efficiency. Additional UV enhancements include antireflection (AR) and solar-blind UV bandpass coatings prepared by atomic layer deposition. Quantum efficiency (QE) measurements show QE > 50% in the 100-300 nm range for detectors with simple AR coatings, and QE ≅ 80% at ~206 nm has been shown when more complex AR coatings are used. The second approach is based on avalanche photodiodes in III-nitride materials with high QE and intrinsic solar blindness.

  6. Single Photon Counting UV Solar-Blind Detectors Using Silicon and III-Nitride Materials

    PubMed Central

    Nikzad, Shouleh; Hoenk, Michael; Jewell, April D.; Hennessy, John J.; Carver, Alexander G.; Jones, Todd J.; Goodsall, Timothy M.; Hamden, Erika T.; Suvarna, Puneet; Bulmer, J.; Shahedipour-Sandvik, F.; Charbon, Edoardo; Padmanabhan, Preethi; Hancock, Bruce; Bell, L. Douglas

    2016-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) studies in astronomy, cosmology, planetary studies, biological and medical applications often require precision detection of faint objects and in many cases require photon-counting detection. We present an overview of two approaches for achieving photon counting in the UV. The first approach involves UV enhancement of photon-counting silicon detectors, including electron multiplying charge-coupled devices and avalanche photodiodes. The approach used here employs molecular beam epitaxy for delta doping and superlattice doping for surface passivation and high UV quantum efficiency. Additional UV enhancements include antireflection (AR) and solar-blind UV bandpass coatings prepared by atomic layer deposition. Quantum efficiency (QE) measurements show QE > 50% in the 100–300 nm range for detectors with simple AR coatings, and QE ≅ 80% at ~206 nm has been shown when more complex AR coatings are used. The second approach is based on avalanche photodiodes in III-nitride materials with high QE and intrinsic solar blindness. PMID:27338399

  7. Impact of Compton scatter on material decomposition using a photon counting spectral detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Cale; Park, Chan-Soo; Fredette, Nathaniel R.; Das, Mini

    2017-03-01

    Photon counting spectral detectors are being investigated to allow better discrimination of multiple materials by collecting spectral data for every detector pixel. The process of material decomposition or discrimination starts with an accurate estimation of energy dependent attenuation of the composite object. Photoelectric effect and Compton scattering are two important constituents of the attenuation. Compton scattering while results in a loss of primary photon, also results in an increase in photon counts in the lower ene1rgy bins via multiple orders of scatter. This contribution to each energy bin may change with material properties, thickness and x-ray energies. There has been little investigation into the effect of this increase in counts at lower energies due to presence of these Compton scattered photons using photon counting detectors. Our investigations show that it is important to account for this effect in spectral decomposition problems.

  8. Energy response calibration of photon-counting detectors using X-ray fluorescence: a feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Cho, H-M; Ding, H; Ziemer, BP; Molloi, S

    2014-01-01

    Accurate energy calibration is critical for the application of energy-resolved photon-counting detectors in spectral imaging. The aim of this study is to investigate the feasibility of energy response calibration and characterization of a photon-counting detector using X-ray fluorescence. A comprehensive Monte Carlo simulation study was performed using Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission (GATE) to investigate the optimal technique for X-ray fluorescence calibration. Simulations were conducted using a 100 kVp tungsten-anode spectra with 2.7 mm Al filter for a single pixel cadmium telluride (CdTe) detector with 3 × 3 mm2 in detection area. The angular dependence of X-ray fluorescence and scatter background was investigated by varying the detection angle from 20° to 170° with respect to the beam direction. The effects of the detector material, shape, and size on the recorded X-ray fluorescence were investigated. The fluorescent material size effect was considered with and without the container for the fluorescent material. In order to provide validation for the simulation result, the angular dependence of X-ray fluorescence from five fluorescent materials was experimentally measured using a spectrometer. Finally, eleven of the fluorescent materials were used for energy calibration of a CZT-based photon-counting detector. The optimal detection angle was determined to be approximately at 120° with respect to the beam direction, which showed the highest fluorescence to scatter ratio (FSR) with a weak dependence on the fluorescent material size. The feasibility of X-ray fluorescence for energy calibration of photon-counting detectors in the diagnostic X-ray energy range was verified by successfully calibrating the energy response of a CZT-based photon-counting detector. The results of this study can be used as a guideline to implement the X-ray fluorescence calibration method for photon-counting detectors in a typical imaging laboratory. PMID:25369288

  9. Spectroscopic micro-tomography of metallic-organic composites by means of photon-counting detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pichotka, M.; Jakubek, J.; Vavrik, D.

    2015-12-01

    The presumed capabilities of photon counting detectors have aroused major expectations in several fields of research. In the field of nuclear imaging ample benefits over standard detectors are to be expected from photon counting devices. First of all a very high contrast, as has by now been verified in numerous experiments. The spectroscopic capabilities of photon counting detectors further allow material decomposition in computed tomography and therefore inherently adequate beam hardening correction. For these reasons measurement setups featuring standard X-ray tubes combined with photon counting detectors constitute a possible replacement of the much more cost intensive tomographic setups at synchrotron light-sources. The actual application of photon counting detectors in radiographic setups in recent years has been impeded by a number of practical issues, above all by restrictions in the detectors size. Currently two tomographic setups in Czech Republic feature photon counting large-area detectors (LAD) fabricated in Prague. The employed large area hybrid pixel-detector assemblies [1] consisting of 10×10/10×5 Timepix devices have a surface area of 143×143 mm2 / 143×71,5 mm2 respectively, suitable for micro-tomographic applications. In the near future LAD devices featuring the Medipix3 readout chip as well as heavy sensors (CdTe, GaAs) will become available. Data analysis is obtained by a number of in house software tools including iterative multi-energy volume reconstruction.In this paper tomographic analysis of of metallic-organic composites is employed to illustrate the capabilities of our technology. Other than successful material decomposition by spectroscopic tomography we present a method to suppress metal artefacts under certain conditions.

  10. Energy response calibration of photon-counting detectors using x-ray fluorescence: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Cho, H-M; Ding, H; Ziemer, B P; Molloi, S

    2014-12-07

    Accurate energy calibration is critical for the application of energy-resolved photon-counting detectors in spectral imaging. The aim of this study is to investigate the feasibility of energy response calibration and characterization of a photon-counting detector using x-ray fluorescence. A comprehensive Monte Carlo simulation study was performed using Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission (GATE) to investigate the optimal technique for x-ray fluorescence calibration. Simulations were conducted using a 100 kVp tungsten-anode spectra with 2.7 mm Al filter for a single pixel cadmium telluride (CdTe) detector with 3 × 3 mm(2) in detection area. The angular dependence of x-ray fluorescence and scatter background was investigated by varying the detection angle from 20° to 170° with respect to the beam direction. The effects of the detector material, shape, and size on the recorded x-ray fluorescence were investigated. The fluorescent material size effect was considered with and without the container for the fluorescent material. In order to provide validation for the simulation result, the angular dependence of x-ray fluorescence from five fluorescent materials was experimentally measured using a spectrometer. Finally, eleven of the fluorescent materials were used for energy calibration of a CZT-based photon-counting detector. The optimal detection angle was determined to be approximately at 120° with respect to the beam direction, which showed the highest fluorescence to scatter ratio (FSR) with a weak dependence on the fluorescent material size. The feasibility of x-ray fluorescence for energy calibration of photon-counting detectors in the diagnostic x-ray energy range was verified by successfully calibrating the energy response of a CZT-based photon-counting detector. The results of this study can be used as a guideline to implement the x-ray fluorescence calibration method for photon-counting detectors in a typical imaging laboratory.

  11. Note: A two-dimensional position-sensitive micro-channel plate detector with a cross-connected-pixels resistive anode and integrated spectroscopy amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Yang, Liping; Liu, Junliang; Zhang, Yuezhao; Wang, Wei; Yu, Deyang; Li, Xiaoxiao; Li, Xin; Zheng, Min; Ding, Baowei; Cai, Xiaohong

    2017-08-01

    Based on the charge-division method, a compact detector system for charged particles is constructed. The system consists of a pair of micro-channel plates, a novel two-dimensional position-sensitive cross-connected-pixels resistive anode, and specially designed front-end electronics that can directly drive analog-to-digital converters. The detector is tested with an (241)Am α-source. A position resolution of better than 0.3 mm and a maximum distortion within 0.5 mm in the active dimensions of 100 mm diameter are achieved.

  12. Photon counting passive 3D image sensing for automatic target recognition.

    PubMed

    Yeom, Seokwon; Javidi, Bahram; Watson, Edward

    2005-11-14

    In this paper, we propose photon counting three-dimensional (3D) passive sensing and object recognition using integral imaging. The application of this approach to 3D automatic target recognition (ATR) is investigated using both linear and nonlinear matched filters. We find there is significant potential of the proposed system for 3D sensing and recognition with a low number of photons. The discrimination capability of the proposed system is quantified in terms of discrimination ratio, Fisher ratio, and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on photon counting 3D passive sensing and ATR with integral imaging.

  13. The Los Alamos Photon Counting Detector Debris Detection Project: An update

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Cheng; Priedhorsky, W.; Baron, M.; Casperson, D.

    1995-03-01

    At Los Alamos, the authors have been pursuing a project for space debris detection using a photon counting detector with high spatial and time resolution. By exploiting the three dimensionality of the high quality data, they expect to be able to detect an orbiting object of size below 2 cm, using a moderate size telescope and state-of-the-art photon counting detector. A working tube has been used to collect skyward looking data during dusk. In this paper, they discuss the progress in the development of detector and data acquisition system. They also report on analysis and results of these data sets.

  14. A single-photon counting detector for increased sensitivity in two-photon laser scanning microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Benninger, Richard K.P.; Ashby, William J.; Ring, Elisabeth A.; Piston, David W.

    2009-01-01

    We present the use and characterization of a photon counting detector for increased sensitivity at low signal levels in fluorescence laser scanning microscopy (LSM). Conventional LSM PMT detectors utilize analog current integration and thus suffer from excessive noise at low signal levels, introduced during current measurement. In this letter we describe the implementation of a fast single-photon counting (SPC) detector on a conventional two-photon laser scanning microscope and detail its use in imaging low fluorescence intensities. We show that for a low photon flux, the SPC detector is shot-noise limited and thus provides increased detection sensitivity compared to analog current integration. PMID:19079484

  15. Color image authentication scheme via multispectral photon-counting double random phase encoding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Inkyu

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, we present an overview of a color image authentication scheme via multispectral photon-counting (MPCI) double random phase encoding (DRPE). The MPCI makes image sparse distributed and DRPE lets image be stationary white noise which make intruder attacks difficult. In this method, the original RGB image is down-sampled into Bayer image and then be encrypted with DRPE. The encrypted image is photon-counted and transmitted on internet channel. For image authentication, the decrypted Bayer image is interpolated into RBC image with demosaicing algorithm. Experimental results show that the decrypted image is not visually recognized under low light level but can be verified with nonlinear correlation algorithm.

  16. Subpicosecond hard x-ray streak camera using single-photon counting.

    PubMed

    Enquist, Henrik; Navirian, Hengameh; Nüske, Ralf; von Korff Schmising, Clemens; Jurgilaitis, Andrius; Herzog, Marc; Bargheer, Matias; Sondhauss, Peter; Larsson, Jörgen

    2010-10-01

    We have developed and characterized a hard x-ray accumulating streak camera that achieves subpicosecond time resolution by using single-photon counting. A high repetition rate of 2 kHz was achieved by use of a readout camera with built-in image processing capabilities. The effects of sweep jitter were removed by using a UV timing reference. The use of single-photon counting allows the camera to reach a high quantum efficiency by not limiting the divergence of the photoelectrons.

  17. Single Photon Counting Performance and Noise Analysis of CMOS SPAD-Based Image Sensors.

    PubMed

    Dutton, Neale A W; Gyongy, Istvan; Parmesan, Luca; Henderson, Robert K

    2016-07-20

    SPAD-based solid state CMOS image sensors utilising analogue integrators have attained deep sub-electron read noise (DSERN) permitting single photon counting (SPC) imaging. A new method is proposed to determine the read noise in DSERN image sensors by evaluating the peak separation and width (PSW) of single photon peaks in a photon counting histogram (PCH). The technique is used to identify and analyse cumulative noise in analogue integrating SPC SPAD-based pixels. The DSERN of our SPAD image sensor is exploited to confirm recent multi-photon threshold quanta image sensor (QIS) theory. Finally, various single and multiple photon spatio-temporal oversampling techniques are reviewed.

  18. Single Photon Counting Performance and Noise Analysis of CMOS SPAD-Based Image Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Dutton, Neale A. W.; Gyongy, Istvan; Parmesan, Luca; Henderson, Robert K.

    2016-01-01

    SPAD-based solid state CMOS image sensors utilising analogue integrators have attained deep sub-electron read noise (DSERN) permitting single photon counting (SPC) imaging. A new method is proposed to determine the read noise in DSERN image sensors by evaluating the peak separation and width (PSW) of single photon peaks in a photon counting histogram (PCH). The technique is used to identify and analyse cumulative noise in analogue integrating SPC SPAD-based pixels. The DSERN of our SPAD image sensor is exploited to confirm recent multi-photon threshold quanta image sensor (QIS) theory. Finally, various single and multiple photon spatio-temporal oversampling techniques are reviewed. PMID:27447643

  19. A Fourier approach to pulse pile-up in photon-counting x-ray detectors.

    PubMed

    Roessl, Ewald; Daerr, Heiner; Proksa, Roland

    2016-03-01

    An analytic Fourier approach to predict the expected number of counts registered in a photon-counting detector subject to pulse pile-up for arbitrary photon flux, detector response function, and pulse-shape is presented. The analysis provides a complete forward model for energy-sensitive, photon-counting x-ray detectors for spectral computed tomography. The formalism of the stochastic theory of the expected frequency of level crossings of shot noise processes is applied to the pulse pile-up effect and build on a recently published analytic Fourier representation of the level crossing frequency of shot noise processes with piece-wise continuous kernels with jumps. The general analytic result is validated by a Monte Carlo simulation for pulses of the form g(t) = e(-t/τ) (t > 0) and a Gaussian detector response function. The Monte Carlo simulations are in excellent agreement with the analytic predictions of photon counts within the numerical accuracy of the calculations. The phenomenon of pulse pile-up is identified with the level-crossing problem of shot noise processes and an exact, analytic formula for the expected number of counts in energy-sensitive, photon-counting x-ray detectors for arbitrary photon flux, response function, and pulse-shapes is derived. The framework serves as a theoretical foundation for future works on pulse pile-up.

  20. Implementing a Multiplexed System of Detectors for Higher Photon Counting Rates

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    Schettini, Sergey V. Polyakov, Ivo Pietro Degiovanni, Giorgio Brida , Stefania Castelletto, and Alan Migdall Abstract—Photon counting applications are...addition to the absolute limits imposed by these effects, in practice Giorgio Brida , Stefania Castelletto, Ivo Pietro Degiovanni, and Valentina...secure quantum communication) and foundations of quantum mechanics. Giorgio Brida Giorgio Brida was born in Aosta, Italy, in 1965. He received the

  1. Statistical evaluation of photon count rate data for nanoscale particle measurement in wastewaters.

    PubMed

    Smeraldi, Josh; Ganesh, Rajagopalan; Safarik, Jana; Rosso, Diego

    2012-01-01

    The dynamic light scattering (DLS) technique can detect the concentration and size distribution of nanoscale particles in aqueous solutions by analyzing photon interactions. This study evaluated the applicability of using photon count rate data from DLS analyses for measuring levels of biogenic and manufactured nanoscale particles in wastewater. Statistical evaluations were performed using secondary wastewater effluent and a Malvern Zetasizer. Dynamic light scattering analyses were performed equally by two analysts over a period of two days using five dilutions and twelve replicates for each dilution. Linearity evaluation using the sixty sample analysis yielded a regression coefficient R(2) = 0.959. The accuracy analysis for various dilutions indicated a recovery of 100 ± 6%. Precision analyses indicated low variance coefficients for the impact of analysts, days, and within sample error. The variation by analysts was apparent only in the most diluted sample (intermediate precision ~12%), where the photon count rate was close to the instrument detection limit. The variation for different days was apparent in the two most concentrated samples, which indicated that wastewater samples must be analyzed for nanoscale particle measurement within the same day of collection. Upon addition of 10 mg l(-1) of nanosilica to wastewater effluent samples, the measured photon count rates were within 5% of the estimated values. The results indicated that photon count rate data can effectively complement various techniques currently available to detect nanoscale particles in wastewaters.

  2. Near-infrared Single-photon-counting Detectors for Free-space Laser Receivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krainak, Michael A.; Sun, Xiaoli; Hasselbrack, William; Wu, Stewart; Waczynski, Augustyn; Miko, Laddawan

    2007-01-01

    We compare several photon-counting detector technologies for use as near-infrared timeresolved laser receivers in science instrument, communication and navigation systems. The key technologies are InGaAs(P) photocathode hybrid photomultiplier tubes and InGaAs(P) and HgCdTe avalanche photodiodes. We discuss recent experimental results and application.

  3. Photon Counting Detectors for the 1.0 - 2.0 Micron Wavelength Range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krainak, Michael A.

    2004-01-01

    We describe results on the development of greater than 200 micron diameter, single-element photon-counting detectors for the 1-2 micron wavelength range. The technical goals include quantum efficiency in the range 10-70%; detector diameter greater than 200 microns; dark count rate below 100 kilo counts-per-second (cps), and maximum count rate above 10 Mcps.

  4. Multiple wavelength time-of-flight sensor based on time-correlated single-photon counting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buller, Gerald S.; Harkins, Ross D.; McCarthy, Aongus; Hiskett, Philip A.; MacKinnon, Gordon R.; Smith, George R.; Sung, Raymond; Wallace, Andrew M.; Lamb, Robert A.; Ridley, Kevin D.; Rarity, John G.

    2005-08-01

    This article describes a time-of-flight sensor based on multiple pulsed laser sources which utilizes time-correlated single-photon counting. The sensor has demonstrated good performance at ranges of up to 17 km in daylight conditions. Analysis techniques were developed to examine the returns from targets containing more than one scattering surface.

  5. Photoionization of Trapped Carriers in Avalanche Photodiodes to Reduce Afterpulsing During Geiger-Mode Photon Counting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krainak, Michael A.

    2005-01-01

    We reduced the afterpulsing probability by a factor of five in a Geiger-mode photon-counting InGaAs avalanche photodiode by using sub-band-gap (lambda = 1.95 micron) laser diode illumination, which we believe photoionizes the trapped carriers.

  6. Appearance potential spectroscopy with a photon counting detector and multiple scattering spectral interpretation

    SciTech Connect

    Amidani, L.; Pasquini, L.; Boscherini, F.

    2012-08-15

    We describe a soft x-ray appearance potential spectroscopy apparatus, which uses a windowless hyperpure Ge detector operated in the photon counting mode. Direct comparisons of recorded spectra with the self-convolution of x-ray absorption spectra and with ab initio simulations in the multiple scattering framework are reported and discussed.

  7. An optical receiver for the Lunar Laser Communication Demonstration based on photon-counting superconducting nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grein, Matthew E.; Kerman, Andrew J.; Dauler, Eric A.; Willis, Matthew M.; Romkey, Barry; Molnar, Richard J.; Robinson, Bryan S.; Murphy, Daniel V.; Boroson, Don M.

    2015-05-01

    The Lunar Laser Communication Demonstration (LLCD) successfully demonstrated for the first time duplex laser communications between a lunar-orbiting satellite and ground stations on Earth with error-free downlink data rates up to 622 Mb/s utilizing an optical receiver based on photon-counting superconducting nanowires and operating near 1550 nm.

  8. High efficiency photon counting detectors for the FAUST Spacelab far ultraviolet astronomy payload

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegmund, O. H. W.; Lampton, M.; Bixler, J.; Vallerga, J.; Bowyer, S.

    1987-01-01

    The performances of sealed tube microchannel-plate position sensitive detectors having transmission CsI photocathodes or opaque CsI photocathodes are compared. These devices were developed for the FAUST Spacelab payload to accomplish imaging surveys in the band between 1300 A and 1800 A. It is demonstrated that photocathode quantum efficiencies in excess of 40 percent at 1216 A have been achieved with the transmission and the opaque CsI photocathodes. The effect of the photoelectron trajectory on the spatial resolution is assessed. Spatial resolution of less than 70 microns FWHM has been obtained and is maintained up to event rates of 50,000/sec. Background rates of 0.55 events sq cm per sec have been achieved and low distortion (less than 1 percent) imaging has been demonstrated.

  9. High efficiency photon counting detectors for the FAUST Spacelab far ultraviolet astronomy payload

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegmund, O. H. W.; Lampton, M.; Bixler, J.; Vallerga, J.; Bowyer, S.

    1987-01-01

    The performances of sealed tube microchannel-plate position sensitive detectors having transmission CsI photocathodes or opaque CsI photocathodes are compared. These devices were developed for the FAUST Spacelab payload to accomplish imaging surveys in the band between 1300 A and 1800 A. It is demonstrated that photocathode quantum efficiencies in excess of 40 percent at 1216 A have been achieved with the transmission and the opaque CsI photocathodes. The effect of the photoelectron trajectory on the spatial resolution is assessed. Spatial resolution of less than 70 microns FWHM has been obtained and is maintained up to event rates of 50,000/sec. Background rates of 0.55 events sq cm per sec have been achieved and low distortion (less than 1 percent) imaging has been demonstrated.

  10. Pulse pileup statistics for energy discriminating photon counting x-ray detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Adam S.; Harrison, Daniel; Lobastov, Vladimir; Tkaczyk, J. Eric

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: Energy discriminating photon counting x-ray detectors can be subject to a wide range of flux rates if applied in clinical settings. Even when the incident rate is a small fraction of the detector's maximum periodic rate N{sub 0}, pulse pileup leads to count rate losses and spectral distortion. Although the deterministic effects can be corrected, the detrimental effect of pileup on image noise is not well understood and may limit the performance of photon counting systems. Therefore, the authors devise a method to determine the detector count statistics and imaging performance. Methods: The detector count statistics are derived analytically for an idealized pileup model with delta pulses of a nonparalyzable detector. These statistics are then used to compute the performance (e.g., contrast-to-noise ratio) for both single material and material decomposition contrast detection tasks via the Cramer-Rao lower bound (CRLB) as a function of the detector input count rate. With more realistic unipolar and bipolar pulse pileup models of a nonparalyzable detector, the imaging task performance is determined by Monte Carlo simulations and also approximated by a multinomial method based solely on the mean detected output spectrum. Photon counting performance at different count rates is compared with ideal energy integration, which is unaffected by count rate. Results: The authors found that an ideal photon counting detector with perfect energy resolution outperforms energy integration for our contrast detection tasks, but when the input count rate exceeds 20%N{sub 0}, many of these benefits disappear. The benefit with iodine contrast falls rapidly with increased count rate while water contrast is not as sensitive to count rates. The performance with a delta pulse model is overoptimistic when compared to the more realistic bipolar pulse model. The multinomial approximation predicts imaging performance very close to the prediction from Monte Carlo simulations. The

  11. Material separation in x-ray CT with energy resolved photon-counting detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Meier, D.; Taguchi, K.; Wagenaar, D. J.; Patt, B. E.; Frey, E. C.

    2011-03-01

    The objective of the study was to demonstrate that more than two types of materials can be effectively separated with x-ray CT using a recently developed energy resolved photon-counting detector. We performed simulations and physical experiments using an energy resolved photon-counting detector with six energy thresholds. For comparison, dual-kVp CT with an integrating detector was also simulated. Iodine- and gadolinium-based contrast agents, as well as several soft-tissue- and bone-like materials were imaged. We plotted the attenuation coefficients for the various materials in a scatter plot for pairs of energy windows. In both simulations and physical experiments, the contrast agents were easily separable from other non-contrast-agent materials in the scatter plot between two properly chosen energy windows. This separation was due to discontinuities in the attenuation coefficient around their unique K-edges. The availability of more than two energy thresholds in a photon-counting detector allowed the separation with one or more contrast agents present. Compared with dual-kVp methods, CT with an energy resolved photon-counting detector provided a larger separation and the freedom to use different energy window pairs to specify the desired target material. We concluded that an energy resolved photon-counting detector with more than two thresholds allowed the separation of more than two types of materials, e.g., soft-tissue-like, bone-like, and one or more materials with K-edges in the energy range of interest. They provided advantages over dual-kVp CT in terms of the degree of separation and the number of materials that can be separated simultaneously.

  12. Performance of high resolution decoding with Multi-Anode Microchannel Array detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kasle, David B.; Horch, Elliott P.

    1993-01-01

    The Multi-Anode Microchannel Array (MAMA) is a microchannel plate based photon counting detector with applications in ground-based and space-based astronomy. The detector electronics decode the position of each photon event, and the decoding algorithm that associates a given event with the appropriate pixel is determined by the geometry of the anode array. The standard MAMA detector has a spatial resolution set by the anode array of 25 microns, but the MCP pore resolution exceeds this. The performance of a new algorithm that halves the pixel spacing and improves the pixel spatial resolution is described. The new algorithm does not degrade the pulse-pair resolution of the detector and does not require any modifications to the detector tube. Measurements of the detector's response demonstrate that high resolution decoding yields a 60 percent enhancement in spatial resolution. Measurements of the performance of the high resolution algorithm with a 14 micron MAMA detector are also described. The parameters that control high resolution performance are discussed. Results of the application of high resolution decoding to speckle interferometry are presented.

  13. Performance of high resolution decoding with Multi-Anode Microchannel Array detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kasle, David B.; Horch, Elliott P.

    1993-01-01

    The Multi-Anode Microchannel Array (MAMA) is a microchannel plate based photon counting detector with applications in ground-based and space-based astronomy. The detector electronics decode the position of each photon event, and the decoding algorithm that associates a given event with the appropriate pixel is determined by the geometry of the anode array. The standard MAMA detector has a spatial resolution set by the anode array of 25 microns, but the MCP pore resolution exceeds this. The performance of a new algorithm that halves the pixel spacing and improves the pixel spatial resolution is described. The new algorithm does not degrade the pulse-pair resolution of the detector and does not require any modifications to the detector tube. Measurements of the detector's response demonstrate that high resolution decoding yields a 60 percent enhancement in spatial resolution. Measurements of the performance of the high resolution algorithm with a 14 micron MAMA detector are also described. The parameters that control high resolution performance are discussed. Results of the application of high resolution decoding to speckle interferometry are presented.

  14. Noise performance of low-dose CT: comparison between an energy integrating detector and a photon counting detector using a whole-body research photon counting CT scanner.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhicong; Leng, Shuai; Kappler, Steffen; Hahn, Katharina; Li, Zhoubo; Halaweish, Ahmed F; Henning, Andre; McCollough, Cynthia H

    2016-10-01

    Photon counting detector (PCD)-based computed tomography (CT) is an emerging imaging technique. Compared to conventional energy integrating detector (EID)-based CT, PCD-CT is able to exclude electronic noise that may severely impair image quality at low photon counts. This work focused on comparing the noise performance at low doses between the PCD and EID subsystems of a whole-body research PCD-CT scanner, both qualitatively and quantitatively. An anthropomorphic thorax phantom was scanned, and images of the shoulder portion were reconstructed. The images were visually and quantitatively compared between the two subsystems in terms of streak artifacts, an indicator of the impact of electronic noise. Furthermore, a torso-shaped water phantom was scanned using a range of tube currents. The product of the noise and the square root of the tube current was calculated, normalized, and compared between the EID and PCD subsystems. Visual assessment of the thorax phantom showed that electronic noise had a noticeably stronger degrading impact in the EID images than in the PCD images. The quantitative results indicated that in low-dose situations, electronic noise had a noticeable impact (up to a 5.8% increase in magnitude relative to quantum noise) on the EID images, but negligible impact on the PCD images.

  15. Investigation of energy weighting using an energy discriminating photon counting detector for breast CT

    PubMed Central

    Kalluri, Kesava S.; Mahd, Mufeed; Glick, Stephen J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Breast CT is an emerging imaging technique that can portray the breast in 3D and improve visualization of important diagnostic features. Early clinical studies have suggested that breast CT has sufficient spatial and contrast resolution for accurate detection of masses and microcalcifications in the breast, reducing structural overlap that is often a limiting factor in reading mammographic images. For a number of reasons, image quality in breast CT may be improved by use of an energy resolving photon counting detector. In this study, the authors investigate the improvements in image quality obtained when using energy weighting with an energy resolving photon counting detector as compared to that with a conventional energy integrating detector. Methods: Using computer simulation, realistic CT images of multiple breast phantoms were generated. The simulation modeled a prototype breast CT system using an amorphous silicon (a-Si), CsI based energy integrating detector with different x-ray spectra, and a hypothetical, ideal CZT based photon counting detector with capability of energy discrimination. Three biological signals of interest were modeled as spherical lesions and inserted into breast phantoms; hydroxyapatite (HA) to represent microcalcification, infiltrating ductal carcinoma (IDC), and iodine enhanced infiltrating ductal carcinoma (IIDC). Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of these three lesions was measured from the CT reconstructions. In addition, a psychophysical study was conducted to evaluate observer performance in detecting microcalcifications embedded into a realistic anthropomorphic breast phantom. Results: In the energy range tested, improvements in SNR with a photon counting detector using energy weighting was higher (than the energy integrating detector method) by 30%–63% and 4%–34%, for HA and IDC lesions and 12%–30% (with Al filtration) and 32%–38% (with Ce filtration) for the IIDC lesion, respectively. The average area under the

  16. Investigation of energy weighting using an energy discriminating photon counting detector for breast CT.

    PubMed

    Kalluri, Kesava S; Mahd, Mufeed; Glick, Stephen J

    2013-08-01

    Breast CT is an emerging imaging technique that can portray the breast in 3D and improve visualization of important diagnostic features. Early clinical studies have suggested that breast CT has sufficient spatial and contrast resolution for accurate detection of masses and microcalcifications in the breast, reducing structural overlap that is often a limiting factor in reading mammographic images. For a number of reasons, image quality in breast CT may be improved by use of an energy resolving photon counting detector. In this study, the authors investigate the improvements in image quality obtained when using energy weighting with an energy resolving photon counting detector as compared to that with a conventional energy integrating detector. Using computer simulation, realistic CT images of multiple breast phantoms were generated. The simulation modeled a prototype breast CT system using an amorphous silicon (a-Si), CsI based energy integrating detector with different x-ray spectra, and a hypothetical, ideal CZT based photon counting detector with capability of energy discrimination. Three biological signals of interest were modeled as spherical lesions and inserted into breast phantoms; hydroxyapatite (HA) to represent microcalcification, infiltrating ductal carcinoma (IDC), and iodine enhanced infiltrating ductal carcinoma (IIDC). Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of these three lesions was measured from the CT reconstructions. In addition, a psychophysical study was conducted to evaluate observer performance in detecting microcalcifications embedded into a realistic anthropomorphic breast phantom. In the energy range tested, improvements in SNR with a photon counting detector using energy weighting was higher (than the energy integrating detector method) by 30%-63% and 4%-34%, for HA and IDC lesions and 12%-30% (with Al filtration) and 32%-38% (with Ce filtration) for the IIDC lesion, respectively. The average area under the receiver operating characteristic curve

  17. Energy response calibration of photon-counting detectors using x-ray fluorescence: a feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, H.-M.; Ding, H.; Ziemer, BP; Molloi, S.

    2014-12-01

    Accurate energy calibration is critical for the application of energy-resolved photon-counting detectors in spectral imaging. The aim of this study is to investigate the feasibility of energy response calibration and characterization of a photon-counting detector using x-ray fluorescence. A comprehensive Monte Carlo simulation study was performed using Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission (GATE) to investigate the optimal technique for x-ray fluorescence calibration. Simulations were conducted using a 100 kVp tungsten-anode spectra with 2.7 mm Al filter for a single pixel cadmium telluride (CdTe) detector with 3  ×  3 mm2 in detection area. The angular dependence of x-ray fluorescence and scatter background was investigated by varying the detection angle from 20° to 170° with respect to the beam direction. The effects of the detector material, shape, and size on the recorded x-ray fluorescence were investigated. The fluorescent material size effect was considered with and without the container for the fluorescent material. In order to provide validation for the simulation result, the angular dependence of x-ray fluorescence from five fluorescent materials was experimentally measured using a spectrometer. Finally, eleven of the fluorescent materials were used for energy calibration of a CZT-based photon-counting detector. The optimal detection angle was determined to be approximately at 120° with respect to the beam direction, which showed the highest fluorescence to scatter ratio (FSR) with a weak dependence on the fluorescent material size. The feasibility of x-ray fluorescence for energy calibration of photon-counting detectors in the diagnostic x-ray energy range was verified by successfully calibrating the energy response of a CZT-based photon-counting detector. The results of this study can be used as a guideline to implement the x-ray fluorescence calibration method for photon-counting detectors in a typical imaging laboratory.

  18. Investigation of energy weighting using an energy discriminating photon counting detector for breast CT

    SciTech Connect

    Kalluri, Kesava S.; Mahd, Mufeed; Glick, Stephen J.

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: Breast CT is an emerging imaging technique that can portray the breast in 3D and improve visualization of important diagnostic features. Early clinical studies have suggested that breast CT has sufficient spatial and contrast resolution for accurate detection of masses and microcalcifications in the breast, reducing structural overlap that is often a limiting factor in reading mammographic images. For a number of reasons, image quality in breast CT may be improved by use of an energy resolving photon counting detector. In this study, the authors investigate the improvements in image quality obtained when using energy weighting with an energy resolving photon counting detector as compared to that with a conventional energy integrating detector.Methods: Using computer simulation, realistic CT images of multiple breast phantoms were generated. The simulation modeled a prototype breast CT system using an amorphous silicon (a-Si), CsI based energy integrating detector with different x-ray spectra, and a hypothetical, ideal CZT based photon counting detector with capability of energy discrimination. Three biological signals of interest were modeled as spherical lesions and inserted into breast phantoms; hydroxyapatite (HA) to represent microcalcification, infiltrating ductal carcinoma (IDC), and iodine enhanced infiltrating ductal carcinoma (IIDC). Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of these three lesions was measured from the CT reconstructions. In addition, a psychophysical study was conducted to evaluate observer performance in detecting microcalcifications embedded into a realistic anthropomorphic breast phantom.Results: In the energy range tested, improvements in SNR with a photon counting detector using energy weighting was higher (than the energy integrating detector method) by 30%–63% and 4%–34%, for HA and IDC lesions and 12%–30% (with Al filtration) and 32%–38% (with Ce filtration) for the IIDC lesion, respectively. The average area under the receiver

  19. Hybrid slab-microchannel gel electrophoresis system

    DOEpatents

    Balch, Joseph W.; Carrano, Anthony V.; Davidson, James C.; Koo, Jackson C.

    1998-01-01

    A hybrid slab-microchannel gel electrophoresis system. The hybrid system permits the fabrication of isolated microchannels for biomolecule separations without imposing the constraint of a totally sealed system. The hybrid system is reusable and ultimately much simpler and less costly to manufacture than a closed channel plate system. The hybrid system incorporates a microslab portion of the separation medium above the microchannels, thus at least substantially reducing the possibility of non-uniform field distribution and breakdown due to uncontrollable leakage. A microslab of the sieving matrix is built into the system by using plastic spacer materials and is used to uniformly couple the top plate with the bottom microchannel plate.

  20. Resonant-scanning dual-color STED microscopy with ultrafast photon counting: a concise guide

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yong; Wu, Xundong; Toro, Ligia; Stefani, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    STED (stimulated emission depletion) is a popular super-resolution fluorescence microscopy technique. In this paper, we present a concise guide to building a resonant-scanning STED microscope with ultrafast photon-counting acquisition. The STED microscope has two channels, using a pulsed laser and a continuous-wave (CW) laser as the depletion laser source, respectively. The CW STED channel preforms time-gated detection to enhance optical resolution in this channel. We use a resonant mirror to attain high scanning speed and ultrafast photon counting acquisition to scan a large field of view, which help reduce photobleaching. We discuss some practical issues in building a STED microscope, including creating a hollow depletion beam profile, manipulating polarization, and monitoring optical aberration. We also demonstrate a STED image enhancement method using stationary wavelet expansion and image analysis methods to register objects and to quantify colocalization in STED microscopy. PMID:26123183

  1. Extending single-photon optimized superconducting transition edge sensors beyond the single-photon counting regime.

    PubMed

    Gerrits, Thomas; Calkins, Brice; Tomlin, Nathan; Lita, Adriana E; Migdall, Alan; Mirin, Richard; Nam, Sae Woo

    2012-10-08

    Typically, transition edge sensors resolve photon number of up to 10 or 20 photons, depending on the wavelength and TES design. We extend that dynamic range up to 1000 photons, while maintaining sub-shot noise detection process uncertainty of the number of detected photons and beyond that show a monotonic response up to ≈ 6 · 10(6) photons in a single light pulse. This mode of operation, which heats the sensor far beyond its transition edge into the normal conductive regime, offers a technique for connecting single-photon-counting measurements to radiant-power measurements at picowatt levels. Connecting these two usually incompatible operating regimes in a single detector offers significant potential for directly tying photon counting measurements to conventional cryogenic radiometric standards. In addition, our measurements highlight the advantages of a photon-number state source over a coherent pulse source as a tool for characterizing such a detector.

  2. Ultrafast time measurements by time-correlated single photon counting coupled with superconducting single photon detector

    SciTech Connect

    Shcheslavskiy, V. Becker, W.; Morozov, P.; Divochiy, A.

    2016-05-15

    Time resolution is one of the main characteristics of the single photon detectors besides quantum efficiency and dark count rate. We demonstrate here an ultrafast time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) setup consisting of a newly developed single photon counting board SPC-150NX and a superconducting NbN single photon detector with a sensitive area of 7 × 7 μm. The combination delivers a record instrument response function with a full width at half maximum of 17.8 ps and system quantum efficiency ∼15% at wavelength of 1560 nm. A calculation of the root mean square value of the timing jitter for channels with counts more than 1% of the peak value yielded about 7.6 ps. The setup has also good timing stability of the detector–TCSPC board.

  3. Photon Counting System for High-Sensitivity Detection of Bioluminescence at Optical Fiber End.

    PubMed

    Iinuma, Masataka; Kadoya, Yutaka; Kuroda, Akio

    2016-01-01

    The technique of photon counting is widely used for various fields and also applicable to a high-sensitivity detection of luminescence. Thanks to recent development of single photon detectors with avalanche photodiodes (APDs), the photon counting system with an optical fiber has become powerful for a detection of bioluminescence at an optical fiber end, because it allows us to fully use the merits of compactness, simple operation, highly quantum efficiency of the APD detectors. This optical fiber-based system also has a possibility of improving the sensitivity to a local detection of Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) by high-sensitivity detection of the bioluminescence. In this chapter, we are introducing a basic concept of the optical fiber-based system and explaining how to construct and use this system.

  4. Material separation in x-ray CT with energy resolved photon-counting detectors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaolan; Meier, Dirk; Taguchi, Katsuyuki; Wagenaar, Douglas J; Patt, Bradley E; Frey, Eric C

    2011-03-01

    The objective of the study was to demonstrate that, in x-ray computed tomography (CT), more than two types of materials can be effectively separated with the use of an energy resolved photon-counting detector and classification methodology. Specifically, this applies to the case when contrast agents that contain K-absorption edges in the energy range of interest are present in the object. This separation is enabled via the use of recently developed energy resolved photon-counting detectors with multiple thresholds, which allow simultaneous measurements of the x-ray attenuation at multiple energies. To demonstrate this capability, we performed simulations and physical experiments using a six-threshold energy resolved photon-counting detector. We imaged mouse-sized cylindrical phantoms filled with several soft-tissue-like and bone-like materials and with iodine-based and gadolinium-based contrast agents. The linear attenuation coefficients were reconstructed for each material in each energy window and were visualized as scatter plots between pairs of energy windows. For comparison, a dual-kVp CT was also simulated using the same phantom materials. In this case, the linear attenuation coefficients at the lower kVp were plotted against those at the higher kVp. In both the simulations and the physical experiments, the contrast agents were easily separable from other soft-tissue-like and bone-like materials, thanks to the availability of the attenuation coefficient measurements at more than two energies provided by the energy resolved photon-counting detector. In the simulations, the amount of separation was observed to be proportional to the concentration of the contrast agents; however, this was not observed in the physical experiments due to limitations of the real detector system. We used the angle between pairs of attenuation coefficient vectors in either the 5-D space (for non-contrast-agent materials using energy resolved photon-counting acquisition) or a 2-D

  5. Material separation in x-ray CT with energy resolved photon-counting detectors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaolan; Meier, Dirk; Taguchi, Katsuyuki; Wagenaar, Douglas J.; Patt, Bradley E.; Frey, Eric C.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The objective of the study was to demonstrate that, in x-ray computed tomography (CT), more than two types of materials can be effectively separated with the use of an energy resolved photon-counting detector and classification methodology. Specifically, this applies to the case when contrast agents that contain K-absorption edges in the energy range of interest are present in the object. This separation is enabled via the use of recently developed energy resolved photon-counting detectors with multiple thresholds, which allow simultaneous measurements of the x-ray attenuation at multiple energies. Methods: To demonstrate this capability, we performed simulations and physical experiments using a six-threshold energy resolved photon-counting detector. We imaged mouse-sized cylindrical phantoms filled with several soft-tissue-like and bone-like materials and with iodine-based and gadolinium-based contrast agents. The linear attenuation coefficients were reconstructed for each material in each energy window and were visualized as scatter plots between pairs of energy windows. For comparison, a dual-kVp CT was also simulated using the same phantom materials. In this case, the linear attenuation coefficients at the lower kVp were plotted against those at the higher kVp. Results: In both the simulations and the physical experiments, the contrast agents were easily separable from other soft-tissue-like and bone-like materials, thanks to the availability of the attenuation coefficient measurements at more than two energies provided by the energy resolved photon-counting detector. In the simulations, the amount of separation was observed to be proportional to the concentration of the contrast agents; however, this was not observed in the physical experiments due to limitations of the real detector system. We used the angle between pairs of attenuation coefficient vectors in either the 5-D space (for non-contrast-agent materials using energy resolved photon-counting

  6. High-speed, FPGA-based photon-counting fluorometer with high data-gathering efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwata, Tetsuo; Mizuno, Takahiko

    2017-07-01

    We have developed a low-cost, high-efficiency fluorometer using a field-programmable gate array and simultaneous detection of photoelectron pulse trains. The fluorometer covers a time span of 64 ns with a resolution of 1.0 ns/channel. Depending on the number of channels, the signal-gathering efficiency was improved by a factor of 100 relative to that of conventional time-correlated single-photon counting. This assumes that the fluorescence intensity is moderately high but still requires photon counting. The dead time for building a histogram has been reduced to zero, which means that the upper limit of the repetitive excitation frequency could exceed that determined by the time span. We describe instrumental details and demonstrate the basic performance.

  7. Material separation in x-ray CT with energy resolved photon-counting detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Xiaolan; Meier, Dirk; Taguchi, Katsuyuki; Wagenaar, Douglas J.; Patt, Bradley E.; Frey, Eric C.

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: The objective of the study was to demonstrate that, in x-ray computed tomography (CT), more than two types of materials can be effectively separated with the use of an energy resolved photon-counting detector and classification methodology. Specifically, this applies to the case when contrast agents that contain K-absorption edges in the energy range of interest are present in the object. This separation is enabled via the use of recently developed energy resolved photon-counting detectors with multiple thresholds, which allow simultaneous measurements of the x-ray attenuation at multiple energies. Methods: To demonstrate this capability, we performed simulations and physical experiments using a six-threshold energy resolved photon-counting detector. We imaged mouse-sized cylindrical phantoms filled with several soft-tissue-like and bone-like materials and with iodine-based and gadolinium-based contrast agents. The linear attenuation coefficients were reconstructed for each material in each energy window and were visualized as scatter plots between pairs of energy windows. For comparison, a dual-kVp CT was also simulated using the same phantom materials. In this case, the linear attenuation coefficients at the lower kVp were plotted against those at the higher kVp. Results: In both the simulations and the physical experiments, the contrast agents were easily separable from other soft-tissue-like and bone-like materials, thanks to the availability of the attenuation coefficient measurements at more than two energies provided by the energy resolved photon-counting detector. In the simulations, the amount of separation was observed to be proportional to the concentration of the contrast agents; however, this was not observed in the physical experiments due to limitations of the real detector system. We used the angle between pairs of attenuation coefficient vectors in either the 5-D space (for non-contrast-agent materials using energy resolved photon-counting

  8. Time-Correlated Photon Counting (TCPC) technique based on a photon-number-resolving photodetector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Baicheng; Miao, Quanlong; Wang, Shenyuan; Hui, Debin; Zhao, Tianqi; Liang, Kun; Yang, Ru; Han, Dejun

    2016-05-01

    In this report, we present Time-Correlated Photon Counting (TCPC) technique and its applications in time-correlated Raman spectroscopy. The main difference between TCPC and existing Time-Correlated Single Photon Counting (TCSPC) is that the TCPC employs a photon-number-resolving photodetector (SiPM, silicon photomultiplier) and measures exact photon number rather than counting single photon by reducing pulse light intensity, thus high measurement speed and efficiency can be expected. A home-made Raman spectrometer has demonstrated an Instrument Response Function (IRF) ~100ps (FWHM) based on TCPC with a strip SiPM (1mm×0.05mm, containing 500 micro cells), fast and weak Raman signals was separated from slow and strong fluorescence background of bulk trinitrotoluene TNT sample. The original Raman spectrum of bulk TNT, measured by TCPC technique, is compared with the result obtained by a commercial Micro-Raman Spectrometer.

  9. Experiment and modeling of scintillation photon-counting and current measurement for PMT gain stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, Jürgen; Kreuels, Achim; Kong, Yong; Lentering, Ralf; Ruhnau, Kai; Scherwinski, Falko; Wolf, Andreas

    2015-05-01

    Scintillation detectors with light readout are used for gamma, x-ray and particle detection. Where applicable, photon counting is principally superior to charge integration with regard to accuracy. Most scintillation detectors, however, generate a large number of photons per microsecond for a typical scintillation pulse resulting in significant amounts of pileup. This precludes the separation, and thus direct counting of single photoelectron charges. The algorithm developed and presented in this paper quantifies the coarseness of fast digitized current tracks to construct a photon count dependent, however, electron gain independent charge calculation function. Underlying photoelectrons are interpreted as noise components and retrieved by a modified statistical variance calculation. This method is verified for modeled scintillation pulses and scintillation detector data. It provides a new means for PMT gain stabilization in digital multi-channel analyzers by pulse current analysis.

  10. Discrimination Between Calcium Hydroxyapatite and Calcium Oxalate Using Multienergy Spectral Photon-Counting CT.

    PubMed

    Kirkbride, Tracy E; Raja, Aamir Y; Müller, Kristin; Bateman, Christopher J; Becce, Fabio; Anderson, Nigel G

    2017-08-23

    We aimed to determine whether multienergy spectral photon-counting CT could distinguish between clinically relevant calcium crystals at clinical x-ray energy ranges. Energy thresholds of 15, 22, 29, and 36 keV and tube voltages of 50, 80, and 110 kVp were selected. Images were analyzed to assess differences in linear attenuation coefficients between various concentrations of calcium hydroxyapatite (54.3, 211.7, 808.5, and 1169.3 mg/cm(3)) and calcium oxalate (2000 mg/cm(3)). The two lower concentrations of hydroxyapatite were distinguishable from oxalate at all energy thresholds and tube voltages, whereas discrimination at higher concentrations depended primarily on the energy thresholds used. Multienergy spectral photon-counting CT shows promise for distinguishing these calcium crystals.

  11. Slope characterization in combining analog and photon count data from atmospheric lidar measurements.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yunpeng; Yi, Fan; Kong, Wei; Yi, Yang

    2014-11-01

    A transient digitizer (Licel) connecting to a photomultiplier tube (PMT) can obtain lidar backscatter profiles in both photon count and analog signal. A lidar can detect higher atmospheric regions by combining (gluing) simultaneous analog and photon count data via the slope coefficient. In this work, the output of a PMT has been measured with a transient digitizer based on an intensity-stable light source. The slope value and dynamic range of the lidar profile have been characterized. The slope value is determined only by the gain of the PMT as it works in a linear range with a fixed pulse height discrimination threshold. The dynamic range of a glued lidar profile is settled by the slope value. The fitted slope has a more exact value when the selection criterion is given in terms of the independent variable for fitting. For practical lidar data, the fitted slope is more stable and reliable when the lower limit of the data range for fitting rises.

  12. Simultaneous x-ray fluorescence and K-edge CT imaging with photon-counting detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Liang; Li, Ruizhe; Zhang, Siyuan; Chen, Zhiqiang

    2016-10-01

    Rapid development of the X-ray phonon-counting detection technology brings tremendous research and application opportunities. In addition to improvements in conventional X-ray imaging performance such as radiation dose utilization and beam hardening correction, photon-counting detectors allows significantly more efficient X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and K-edge imaging, and promises a great potential of X-ray functional, cellular and molecular imaging. XRF is the characteristic emission of secondary X-ray photons from a material excited by initial X-rays. The phenomenon is widely used for chemical and elemental analysis. K-edge imaging identifies a material based on its chemically-specific absorption discontinuity over X-ray photon energy. In this paper, we try to combine XRF and K-edge signals from the contrast agents (e.g., iodine, gadolinium, gold nanoparticles) to simultaneously realize XFCT and K-edge CT imaging for superior image performance. As a prerequisite for this dual-modality imaging, the accurate energy calibration of multi-energy-bin photon-counting detectors is critically important. With the measured XRF data of different materials, we characterize the energy response function of a CZT detector for energy calibration and spectrum reconstruction, which can effectively improve the energy resolution and decrease the inconsistence of the photon counting detectors. Then, a simultaneous K-edge and X-ray fluorescence CT imaging (SKYFI) experimental setup is designed which includes a cone-beam X-ray tube, two separate photon counting detector arrays, a pin-hole collimator and a rotation stage. With a phantom containing gold nanoparticles the two types of XFCT and K-edge CT datasets are collected simultaneously. Then, XFCT and K-edge CT images are synergistically reconstructed in a same framework. Simulation results are presented and quantitative analyzed and compared with the separate XFCT and K-edge CT results.

  13. Development of photodetectors for recording lidar signals in the photon counting and analog modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slesar, A. S.; Chaikovskii, A. P.; Denisov, S. V.; Korol, M. M.; Osipenko, F. P.; Balin, Yu. S.; Kokhanenko, G. P.; Penner, I. E.; Novoselov, M. M.

    2015-11-01

    A number of unified photodetector modules providing for recording lidar signals in the wavelength range from 0.26 to 1.6 μm in the modes of analog signals and photon counting are developed on the basis of photomultiplier tubes and avalanche photodiodes. The software is created for control of the photodetector modules, as well as the test bench for measuring their characteristics is designed.

  14. Single-shot x-ray phase imaging with grating interferometry and photon-counting detectors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhili; Gao, Kun; Wang, Dajiang; Wu, Zhao; Chen, Heng; Wang, Shenghao; Wu, Ziyu

    2014-02-15

    In this Letter, we present a single-shot approach to quantitatively retrieve x-ray absorption and phase shift in grating interferometry. The proposed approach makes use of the energy-resolving capability of x-ray photon-counting detectors. The retrieval method is derived and presented and is tested based on numerical simulations, including photon shot noise. The good agreement between retrieval results and theoretical values confirms the feasibility of the presented approach.

  15. Beam hardening artefacts in computed tomography with photon counting, charge integrating and energy weighting detectors: a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Shikhaliev, Polad M

    2005-12-21

    Photon counting x-ray imaging provides efficient rejection of the electronics noise, no pulse height (Swank) noise, less noise due to optimal photon energy weighting and the possibility of energy resolved image acquisition. These advantages apply also to CT when projection data are acquired using a photon counting detector. However, photon counting detectors assign a weighting factor of 1 to all detected photons whereas the weighting factor of a charge integrating detector is proportional to the energy of the detected photon. Therefore, data collected by photon counting and charge integrating detectors represent the 'hardening' of the photon beam passed through the object differently. This affects the beam hardening artefacts in the reconstructed CT images. This work represents the first comparative evaluation of the effect of photon counting, charge integrating and energy weighting photon detectors on beam hardening artefacts in CT. Beam hardening artefacts in CT images were evaluated for 20 cm and 14 cm diameter water cylinders with bone and low contrast inserts, at 120 kVp and 90 kVp x-ray tube voltages, respectively. It was shown that charge integrating results in 1.8% less beam hardening artefacts from bone inserts (i.e., CT numbers in the 'shadow' of the bone are less by 1.8% as compared to CT numbers over the periphery of the image), as compared to photon counting. However, optimal photon energy weighting, which provides highest SNR, results in 7.7% higher beam hardening artefacts from bone inserts as compared to photon counting. The magnitude of the 'cupping' artefacts was lower by 1% for charge integrating and higher by 6.1% for energy weighting acquisitions as compared to photon counting. Only the photon counting systems provide an accurate representation of the beam hardening effect due to its flat energy weighting. Because of their energy dependent weighting factors, the charge integrating and energy weighting systems do not provide accurate

  16. Calibration methods influence quantitative material decomposition in photon-counting spectral CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curtis, Tyler E.; Roeder, Ryan K.

    2017-03-01

    Photon-counting detectors and nanoparticle contrast agents can potentially enable molecular imaging and material decomposition in computed tomography (CT). Material decomposition has been investigated using both simulated and acquired data sets. However, the effect of calibration methods on material decomposition has not been systematically investigated. Therefore, the objective of this study was to investigate the influence of the range and number of contrast agent concentrations within a modular calibration phantom on quantitative material decomposition. A commerciallyavailable photon-counting spectral micro-CT (MARS Bioimaging) was used to acquire images with five energy bins selected to normalize photon counts and leverage the contrast agent k-edge. Material basis matrix values were determined using multiple linear regression models and material decomposition was performed using a maximum a posteriori estimator. The accuracy of quantitative material decomposition was evaluated by the root mean squared error (RMSE), specificity, sensitivity, and area under the curve (AUC). An increased maximum concentration (range) in the calibration significantly improved RMSE, specificity and AUC. The effects of an increased number of concentrations in the calibration were not statistically significant for the conditions in this study. The overall results demonstrated that the accuracy of quantitative material decomposition in spectral CT is significantly influenced by calibration methods, which must therefore be carefully considered for the intended diagnostic imaging application.

  17. A multispectral photon-counting double random phase encoding scheme for image authentication.

    PubMed

    Yi, Faliu; Moon, Inkyu; Lee, Yeon H

    2014-05-20

    In this paper, we propose a new method for color image-based authentication that combines multispectral photon-counting imaging (MPCI) and double random phase encoding (DRPE) schemes. The sparsely distributed information from MPCI and the stationary white noise signal from DRPE make intruder attacks difficult. In this authentication method, the original multispectral RGB color image is down-sampled into a Bayer image. The three types of color samples (red, green and blue color) in the Bayer image are encrypted with DRPE and the amplitude part of the resulting image is photon counted. The corresponding phase information that has nonzero amplitude after photon counting is then kept for decryption. Experimental results show that the retrieved images from the proposed method do not visually resemble their original counterparts. Nevertheless, the original color image can be efficiently verified with statistical nonlinear correlations. Our experimental results also show that different interpolation algorithms applied to Bayer images result in different verification effects for multispectral RGB color images.

  18. Update on Linear Mode Photon Counting with the HgCdTe Linear Mode Avalanche Photodiode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, Jeffrey D.; Kinch, Mike; Sun, Xiaoli

    2014-01-01

    The behavior of the gain-voltage characteristic of the mid-wavelength infrared cutoff HgCdTe linear mode avalanche photodiode (e-APD) is discussed both experimentally and theoretically as a function of the width of the multiplication region. Data are shown that demonstrate a strong dependence of the gain at a given bias voltage on the width of the n- gain region. Geometrical and fundamental theoretical models are examined to explain this behavior. The geometrical model takes into account the gain-dependent optical fill factor of the cylindrical APD. The theoretical model is based on the ballistic ionization model being developed for the HgCdTe APD. It is concluded that the fundamental theoretical explanation is the dominant effect. A model is developed that combines both the geometrical and fundamental effects. The model also takes into account the effect of the varying multiplication width in the low bias region of the gain-voltage curve. It is concluded that the lower than expected gain seen in the first 2 × 8 HgCdTe linear mode photon counting APD arrays, and higher excess noise factor, was very likely due to the larger than typical multiplication region length in the photon counting APD pixel design. The implications of these effects on device photon counting performance are discussed.

  19. Development of new photon-counting detectors for single-molecule fluorescence microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Michalet, X.; Colyer, R. A.; Scalia, G.; Ingargiola, A.; Lin, R.; Millaud, J. E.; Weiss, S.; Siegmund, Oswald H. W.; Tremsin, Anton S.; Vallerga, John V.; Cheng, A.; Levi, M.; Aharoni, D.; Arisaka, K.; Villa, F.; Guerrieri, F.; Panzeri, F.; Rech, I.; Gulinatti, A.; Zappa, F.; Ghioni, M.; Cova, S.

    2013-01-01

    Two optical configurations are commonly used in single-molecule fluorescence microscopy: point-like excitation and detection to study freely diffusing molecules, and wide field illumination and detection to study surface immobilized or slowly diffusing molecules. Both approaches have common features, but also differ in significant aspects. In particular, they use different detectors, which share some requirements but also have major technical differences. Currently, two types of detectors best fulfil the needs of each approach: single-photon-counting avalanche diodes (SPADs) for point-like detection, and electron-multiplying charge-coupled devices (EMCCDs) for wide field detection. However, there is room for improvements in both cases. The first configuration suffers from low throughput owing to the analysis of data from a single location. The second, on the other hand, is limited to relatively low frame rates and loses the benefit of single-photon-counting approaches. During the past few years, new developments in point-like and wide field detectors have started addressing some of these issues. Here, we describe our recent progresses towards increasing the throughput of single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy in solution using parallel arrays of SPADs. We also discuss our development of large area photon-counting cameras achieving subnanosecond resolution for fluorescence lifetime imaging applications at the single-molecule level. PMID:23267185

  20. Mcps-range photon-counting x-ray computed tomography system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Eiichi; Oda, Yasuyuki; Abudurexiti, Abulajiang; Hagiwara, Osahiko; Enomoto, Toshiyuki; Sugimura, Shigeaki; Endo, Haruyuki; Sato, Shigehiro; Ogawa, Akira; Onagawa, Jun

    2011-10-01

    10 Mcps photon counting was carried out using a detector consisting of a 2.0 mm-thick ZnO (zinc oxide) single-crystal scintillator and an MPPC (multipixel photon counter) module in an X-ray computed tomography (CT) system. The maximum count rate was 10 Mcps (mega counts per second) at a tube voltage of 70 kV and a tube current of 2.0 mA. Next, a photon-counting X-ray CT system consists of an X-ray generator, a turntable, a scan stage, a two-stage controller, the ZnO-MPPC detector, a counter card (CC), and a personal computer (PC). Tomography is accomplished by repeated linear scans and rotations of an object, and projection curves of the object are obtained by the linear scan with a scan velocity of 25 mm/s. The pulses of the event signal from the module are counted by the CC in conjunction with the PC. The exposure time for obtaining a tomogram was 600 s at a scan step of 0.5 mm and a rotation step of 1.0°, and photon-counting CT was accomplished using iodine-based contrast media.

  1. Microtomography with photon counting detectors: improving the quality of tomographic reconstruction by voxel-space oversampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudak, J.; Zemlicka, J.; Karch, J.; Hermanova, Z.; Kvacek, J.; Krejci, F.

    2017-01-01

    Photon counting detectors Timepix are known for their unique properties enabling X-ray imaging with extremely high contrast-to-noise ratio. Their applicability has been recently further improved since a dedicated technique for assembling large area Timepix detector arrays was introduced. Despite the fact that the sensitive area of Timepix detectors has been significantly increased, the pixel pitch is kept unchanged (55 microns). This value is much larger compared to widely used and popular X-ray imaging cameras utilizing scintillation crystals and CCD-based read-out. On the other hand, photon counting detectors provide steeper point-spread function. Therefore, with given effective pixel size of an acquired radiography, Timepix detectors provide higher spatial resolution than X-ray cameras with scintillation-based devices unless the image is affected by penumbral blur. In this paper we take an advance of steep PSF of photon counting detectors and test the possibility to improve the quality of computed tomography reconstruction using finer sampling of reconstructed voxel space. The achieved results are presented in comparison with data acquired under the same conditions using a commercially available state-of-the-art CCD X-ray camera.

  2. Detector motion method to increase spatial resolution in photon-counting detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Daehee; Park, Kyeongjin; Lim, Kyung Taek; Cho, Gyuseong

    2017-03-01

    Medical imaging requires high spatial resolution of an image to identify fine lesions. Photon-counting detectors in medical imaging have recently been rapidly replacing energy-integrating detectors due to the former`s high spatial resolution, high efficiency and low noise. Spatial resolution in a photon counting image is determined by the pixel size. Therefore, the smaller the pixel size, the higher the spatial resolution that can be obtained in an image. However, detector redesigning is required to reduce pixel size, and an expensive fine process is required to integrate a signal processing unit with reduced pixel size. Furthermore, as the pixel size decreases, charge sharing severely deteriorates spatial resolution. To increase spatial resolution, we propose a detector motion method using a large pixel detector that is less affected by charge sharing. To verify the proposed method, we utilized a UNO-XRI photon-counting detector (1-mm CdTe, Timepix chip) at the maximum X-ray tube voltage of 80 kVp. A similar spatial resolution of a 55- μm-pixel image was achieved by application of the proposed method to a 110- μm-pixel detector with a higher signal-to-noise ratio. The proposed method could be a way to increase spatial resolution without a pixel redesign when pixels severely suffer from charge sharing as pixel size is reduced.

  3. Study of high speed quenching circuits in photon counting imaging lidar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Xiangyang; Ding, Yuxing; Huang, Genghua; Shu, Rong

    2015-10-01

    Detection theory of single photon avalanche diodes(SPADs),which are applied in photon counting imaging light detection and ranging(LIDAR)system, is analyzed in detail in this paper. Four types of common quenching circuits based on SPADs, namely passive quenching, active quenching, gate-control quenching, and hybrid quenching circuits are studied. Furthermore,operational principle and performance characteristics of each of these four types of quenching circuits are fully discussed. Besides, an improved hybrid quenching circuit prone to be integrated with ASIC technology is brought up. Analysis shows that this new circuit can quench and reset SPADs with high speed, meeting the demands for qualities of quenching circuits in photon counting imaging LIDAR system. Also, results of theoretical study indicate that some performance indexes like response rate, quenching speed and dead time are satisfactory. Above all, this quenching circuit is simpler in structure and its cost is much smaller compared with common quenching circuits known to us in papers published so far. As a result, the prospect of this new circuit is probably good after more efforts are taken to integrate it with photon counting imaging LIDAR.

  4. A Multispectral Photon-Counting Double Random Phase Encoding Scheme for Image Authentication

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Faliu; Moon, Inkyu; Lee, Yeon H.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a new method for color image-based authentication that combines multispectral photon-counting imaging (MPCI) and double random phase encoding (DRPE) schemes. The sparsely distributed information from MPCI and the stationary white noise signal from DRPE make intruder attacks difficult. In this authentication method, the original multispectral RGB color image is down-sampled into a Bayer image. The three types of color samples (red, green and blue color) in the Bayer image are encrypted with DRPE and the amplitude part of the resulting image is photon counted. The corresponding phase information that has nonzero amplitude after photon counting is then kept for decryption. Experimental results show that the retrieved images from the proposed method do not visually resemble their original counterparts. Nevertheless, the original color image can be efficiently verified with statistical nonlinear correlations. Our experimental results also show that different interpolation algorithms applied to Bayer images result in different verification effects for multispectral RGB color images. PMID:24854208

  5. Information content per photon versus image fidelity in three-dimensional photon-counting integral imaging.

    PubMed

    Hayat, Majeed M; Narravula, Srikanth; Pepin, Matthew; Javidi, Bahram

    2012-10-01

    Photon-counting integral imaging has been introduced recently, and its applications in three-dimensional (3D) object sensing, visualization, recognition, and classification under photon-starved conditions have been demonstrated. This paper sheds light on the underlying information-theoretic foundation behind the ability of photon-counting integral imaging in performing complex tasks with far fewer photons than conventional imaging systems. A metric for photon-information content is formulated in the context of 3D photon-counting imaging, and its properties are investigated. It is shown that there is an inherent trade-off between imaging fidelity, measured by the entropy-normalized mutual information associated with a given imaging system, and the amount of information in each photon used in the imaging process, as represented by the photon-number-normalized mutual information. The dependence of this trade-off on photon statistics, correlation in the 3D image, and the signal-to-noise ratio of the photon-detection system is also investigated.

  6. Direct charge sharing observation in single-photon-counting pixel detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellegrini, G.; Maiorino, M.; Blanchot, G.; Chmeissani, M.; Garcia, J.; Lozano, M.; Martinez, R.; Puigdengoles, C.; Ullan, M.

    2007-04-01

    In photon-counting imaging devices, charge sharing can limit the detector spatial resolution and contrast, as multiple counts can be induced in adjacent pixels as a result of the spread of the charge cloud generated from a single X-ray photon of high energy in the detector bulk. Although debated for a long time, the full impact of charge sharing has not been completely assessed. In this work, the importance of charge sharing in pixellated CdTe and silicon detectors is studied by exposing imaging devices to different low activity sources. These devices are made of Si and CdTe pixel detector bump-bonded to Medipix2 single-photon-counting chips with a 55 μm pixel pitch. We will show how charge sharing affects the spatial detector resolution depending on incident particle type (alpha, beta and gamma), detector bias voltage and read-out chip threshold. This study will give an insight on the impact on the design and operation of pixel detectors coupled to photon-counting devices for imaging applications.

  7. Update on Linear Mode Photon Counting with the HgCdTe Linear Mode Avalanche Photodiode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, Jeffrey D.; Kinch, Mike; Sun, Xiaoli

    2014-01-01

    The behavior of the gain-voltage characteristic of the mid-wavelength infrared cutoff HgCdTe linear mode avalanche photodiode (e-APD) is discussed both experimentally and theoretically as a function of the width of the multiplication region. Data are shown that demonstrate a strong dependence of the gain at a given bias voltage on the width of the n- gain region. Geometrical and fundamental theoretical models are examined to explain this behavior. The geometrical model takes into account the gain-dependent optical fill factor of the cylindrical APD. The theoretical model is based on the ballistic ionization model being developed for the HgCdTe APD. It is concluded that the fundamental theoretical explanation is the dominant effect. A model is developed that combines both the geometrical and fundamental effects. The model also takes into account the effect of the varying multiplication width in the low bias region of the gain-voltage curve. It is concluded that the lower than expected gain seen in the first 2 × 8 HgCdTe linear mode photon counting APD arrays, and higher excess noise factor, was very likely due to the larger than typical multiplication region length in the photon counting APD pixel design. The implications of these effects on device photon counting performance are discussed.

  8. Production of 6cm x 6cm Micro-channel Plate Based Picosecond Photodetectors with the Argonne Small Tile Processing System (STPS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Lei; Byrum, Karen; Demarteau, Marcel; Wagner, Robert; Walters, Dean; Wang, Jingbo; Xie, Junqi; Zhao, Huyue

    2015-04-01

    Microchannel plate (MCP) based photodetectors feature fast timing, good position resolution and compact form factor. However, traditional MCP photodetectors suffer from limited charge lifetime and high cost. The LAPPD collaboration, over the years, developed Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) coated new generation MCP's and low cost glass packaging technology. Recently, the Argonne group commissioned its small form factor tile processing system and produced the first fully processed sealed photodetectors with glass packaging, using the ALD coated MCP's. We report the design, construction and commissioning of the system, and production of the first devices. Supported by the U. S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences and Office of High Energy Physics under Contract DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  9. Development of two-channel prototype ITER vacuum ultraviolet spectrometer with back-illuminated charge-coupled device and microchannel plate detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Seon, C. R.; Choi, S. H.; Cheon, M. S.; Pak, S.; Lee, H. G.; Biel, W.; Barnsley, R.

    2010-10-15

    A vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) spectrometer of a five-channel spectral system is designed for ITER main plasma impurity measurement. To develop and verify the system design, a two-channel prototype system is fabricated with No. 3 (14.4-31.8 nm) and No. 4 (29.0-60.0 nm) among the five channels. The optical system consists of a collimating mirror to collect the light from source to slit, two holographic diffraction gratings with toroidal geometry, and two different electronic detectors. For the test of the prototype system, a hollow cathode lamp is used as a light source. To find the appropriate detector for ITER VUV system, two kinds of detectors of the back-illuminated charge-coupled device and the microchannel plate electron multiplier are tested, and their performance has been investigated.

  10. Note: A two-dimensional position-sensitive micro-channel plate detector with a cross-connected-pixels resistive anode and integrated spectroscopy amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Liping; Liu, Junliang; Zhang, Yuezhao; Wang, Wei; Yu, Deyang; Li, Xiaoxiao; Li, Xin; Zheng, Min; Ding, Baowei; Cai, Xiaohong

    2017-08-01

    Based on the charge-division method, a compact detector system for charged particles is constructed. The system consists of a pair of micro-channel plates, a novel two-dimensional position-sensitive cross-connected-pixels resistive anode, and specially designed front-end electronics that can directly drive analog-to-digital converters. The detector is tested with an 241Am α-source. A position resolution of better than 0.3 mm and a maximum distortion within 0.5 mm in the active dimensions of 100 mm diameter are achieved.

  11. Gamma-ray detection efficiency of the microchannel plate installed as an ion detector in the low energy particle instrument onboard the GEOTAIL satellite.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Y T; Yoshikawa, I; Yoshioka, K; Terasawa, T; Saito, Y; Mukai, T

    2007-03-01

    A microchannel plate (MCP) assembly has been used as an ion detector in the low energy particle (LEP) instrument onboard the magnetospheric satellite GEOTAIL. Recently the MCP assembly has detected gamma rays emitted from an astronomical object and has been shown to provide unique information of gamma rays if they are intense enough. However, the detection efficiency for gamma rays was not measured before launch, and therefore we could not analyze the LEP data quantitatively. In this article, we report the gamma-ray detection efficiency of the MCP assembly. The measured efficiencies are 1.29%+/-0.71% and 0.21%+/-0.14% for normal incidence 60 and 662 keV gamma rays, respectively. The incident angle dependence is also presented. Our calibration is crucial to study high energy astrophysical phenomena by using the LEP.

  12. Simulations of Microchannel Plate Sensitivity to <20 keV X-rays as a Function of Energy and Incident Angle

    SciTech Connect

    Kruschwitz, Craig; Wu, M.; Rochau, G. A.

    2013-06-13

    We present results of Monte Carlo simulations of microchannel plate (MCP) response to x-rays in the 250 eV to 20 keV energy range as a function of both x-ray energy and impact angle. The model is based on the model presented in Rochau et al. (2006). However, while the Rochau et al. (2006) model was two-dimensional, and their results only went to 5 keV, our results have been expanded to 20 keV, and our model has been incorporated into a three-dimensional Monte Carlo MCP model that we have developed over the past several years (Kruschwitz et al. 2011). X-ray penetration through multiple MCP pore walls is increasingly important above 5 keV. The effect of x-ray penetration through multiple pores on MCP performance was studied and is presented.

  13. System and method for optically locating microchannel positions

    SciTech Connect

    Brewer, Laurence R.; Kimbrough, Joseph; Balch, Joseph; Davidson, J. Courtney

    2001-01-01

    A system and method is disclosed for optically locating a microchannel position. A laser source generates a primary laser beam which is directed at a microchannel plate. The microchannel plates include microchannels at various locations. A back-reflectance beam detector receives a back-reflected beam from the plate. The back-reflected beam is generated when the primary beam reflects off of the plate. A photodiode circuit generates a trigger signal when the back-reflected beam exceeds a predetermined threshold, indicating a presence of the microchannel. The method of the present invention includes the steps of generating a primary beam, directing the primary beam to a plate containing a microchannel, receiving from the plate a back-reflected beam generated in response to the primary beam, and generating a trigger signal when the back-reflected beam exceeds a predetermined threshold which corresponds to a presence of the microchannel.

  14. Tilted angle CZT detector for photon counting/energy weighting x-ray and CT imaging.

    PubMed

    Shikhaliev, Polad M

    2006-09-07

    X-ray imaging with a photon counting/energy weighting detector can provide the highest signal to noise ratio (SNR). Scanning slit/multi-slit x-ray image acquisition can provide a dose-efficient scatter rejection, which increases SNR. Use of a photon counting/energy weighting detector in a scanning slit/multi-slit acquisition geometry could provide highest possible dose efficiency in x-ray and CT imaging. Currently, the most advanced photon counting detector is the cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detector, which, however, is suboptimal for energy resolved x-ray imaging. A tilted angle CZT detector is proposed in this work for applications in photon counting/energy weighting x-ray and CT imaging. In tilted angle configuration, the x-ray beam hits the surface of the linear array of CZT crystals at a small angle. This allows the use of CZT crystals of a small thickness while maintaining the high photon absorption. Small thickness CZT detectors allow for a significant decrease in the polarization effect in the CZT volume and an increase in count rate. The tilted angle CZT with a small thickness also provides higher spatial and energy resolution, and shorter charge collection time, which potentially enables fast energy resolving x-ray image acquisition. In this work, the major performance parameters of the tilted angle CZT detector, including its count rate, spatial resolution and energy resolution, were evaluated. It was shown that for a CZT detector with a 0.7 mm thickness and 13 degrees tilting angle, the maximum count rate can be increased by 10.7 times, while photon absorption remains >90% at photon energies up to 120 keV. Photon counting/energy weighting x-ray imaging using a tilted angle CZT detector was simulated. SNR improvement due to optimal photon energy weighting was 23% and 14% when adipose contrast element, inserted in soft tissue with 10 cm and 20 cm thickness, respectively, was imaged using 5 energy bins and weighting factors optimized for the adipose. SNR

  15. Tilted angle CZT detector for photon counting/energy weighting x-ray and CT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shikhaliev, Polad M.

    2006-09-01

    X-ray imaging with a photon counting/energy weighting detector can provide the highest signal to noise ratio (SNR). Scanning slit/multi-slit x-ray image acquisition can provide a dose-efficient scatter rejection, which increases SNR. Use of a photon counting/energy weighting detector in a scanning slit/multi-slit acquisition geometry could provide highest possible dose efficiency in x-ray and CT imaging. Currently, the most advanced photon counting detector is the cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detector, which, however, is suboptimal for energy resolved x-ray imaging. A tilted angle CZT detector is proposed in this work for applications in photon counting/energy weighting x-ray and CT imaging. In tilted angle configuration, the x-ray beam hits the surface of the linear array of CZT crystals at a small angle. This allows the use of CZT crystals of a small thickness while maintaining the high photon absorption. Small thickness CZT detectors allow for a significant decrease in the polarization effect in the CZT volume and an increase in count rate. The tilted angle CZT with a small thickness also provides higher spatial and energy resolution, and shorter charge collection time, which potentially enables fast energy resolving x-ray image acquisition. In this work, the major performance parameters of the tilted angle CZT detector, including its count rate, spatial resolution and energy resolution, were evaluated. It was shown that for a CZT detector with a 0.7 mm thickness and 13° tilting angle, the maximum count rate can be increased by 10.7 times, while photon absorption remains >90% at photon energies up to 120 keV. Photon counting/energy weighting x-ray imaging using a tilted angle CZT detector was simulated. SNR improvement due to optimal photon energy weighting was 23% and 14% when adipose contrast element, inserted in soft tissue with 10 cm and 20 cm thickness, respectively, was imaged using 5 energy bins and weighting factors optimized for the adipose. SNR

  16. Centroiding algorithms and spatial resolution of photon counting detectors with cross-strip anodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremsin, Anton S.; Vallerga, John V.; Siegmund, Oswald H. W.; Hull, Jeff S.

    2003-12-01

    Significant advances in readout elements of microchannel plate based sensors have led to the development of detectors with less than 10 µm spatial resolution. We have shown that cross strip (XS) anodes have spatial resolution as small as 5 µm FWHM when a simple and fast center of gravity centroiding technique is used. In this paper we investigate the variation of XS anode spatial resolution for several types of centroiding algorithms (N-finger center of gravity, Gaussian, Lorentzian, parabolic and hyperbolic cosine centroiding) and determine the optimum algorithm in terms of spatial resolution and image linearity. We found that for existing 32x32 mm2 cross strip anodes and associated electronics, the best resolution and linearity is achieved with center of gravity centroiding with properly chosen thresholds on the data set. The images of USAF resolution test target obtained with MCP's with 6 µm pores on 7.5 µm centers resolve 71.8 line pairs per mm (Group 6 element 2, with line width of only ~7 µm). Thus the ~7 µm spatial resolution of the detector with cross strip anode is indeed limited now by the size of the MCP pores, while the resolution of XS readout is on the order of only few micrometers FWHM.

  17. Development of a near-infrared photon-counting system using an InGaAs avalanche photodiode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruyama, Tomoyuki; Narusawa, Fumio; Kudo, Makoto; Tanaka, Mitsuyoshi; Saito, Yasunori; Nomura, Akio

    2002-02-01

    We have successfully developed a near-infrared photon-counting system using an InGaAs avalanche photodiode. By investigating the characteristics of the InGaAs avalanche photodiode in the analog detection mode and the photon-counting mode, we have optimized its operating condition as a photon-counting detector. The multiplication factor shows a maximum at 193 K, and the detection efficiency shows a maximum at 173 K. However, the signal-to-noise ratio shows a maximum at 153 K. On the optimum operating condition, the wide dynamic range of about 50 dB (1.0 MUL10-16 W to 1.0 X 10-11 W) and the minimum detectable power of 100 aW (1.0 X 10-16 W) are achieved at 1.5 micrometers . The detection efficiency depends on the incident optical power, and 15% for 1 pW is achieved at 1.5 micrometers . In the near-infrared range between 0.9 and 1.55 micrometers , moderate detection efficiency is obtained. Finally, we have demonstrated a 1.54-micrometers eye-safe photon-counting lidar using a Raman shifted Nd:YAG laser and the photon-counting system. Some light signals backscattered from clouds and the atmosphere are obtained. The experimental results show that the photon-counting system is very practical and attractive.

  18. MicroCT with energy-resolved photon-counting detectors.

    PubMed

    Wang, X; Meier, D; Mikkelsen, S; Maehlum, G E; Wagenaar, D J; Tsui, B M W; Patt, B E; Frey, E C

    2011-05-07

    The goal of this paper was to investigate the benefits that could be realistically achieved on a microCT imaging system with an energy-resolved photon-counting x-ray detector. To this end, we built and evaluated a prototype microCT system based on such a detector. The detector is based on cadmium telluride (CdTe) radiation sensors and application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) readouts. Each detector pixel can simultaneously count x-ray photons above six energy thresholds, providing the capability for energy-selective x-ray imaging. We tested the spectroscopic performance of the system using polychromatic x-ray radiation and various filtering materials with K-absorption edges. Tomographic images were then acquired of a cylindrical PMMA phantom containing holes filled with various materials. Results were also compared with those acquired using an intensity-integrating x-ray detector and single-energy (i.e. non-energy-selective) CT. This paper describes the functionality and performance of the system, and presents preliminary spectroscopic and tomographic results. The spectroscopic experiments showed that the energy-resolved photon-counting detector was capable of measuring energy spectra from polychromatic sources like a standard x-ray tube, and resolving absorption edges present in the energy range used for imaging. However, the spectral quality was degraded by spectral distortions resulting from degrading factors, including finite energy resolution and charge sharing. We developed a simple charge-sharing model to reproduce these distortions. The tomographic experiments showed that the availability of multiple energy thresholds in the photon-counting detector allowed us to simultaneously measure target-to-background contrasts in different energy ranges. Compared with single-energy CT with an integrating detector, this feature was especially useful to improve differentiation of materials with different attenuation coefficient energy dependences.

  19. A comparison of simulation tools for photon-counting spectral CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasirudin, Radin A.; Penchev, Petar; Mei, Kai; Rummeny, Ernst J.; Fiebich, Martin; Noël, Peter B.

    2014-03-01

    Photon-counting detectors (PCD) not only have the advantage of providing spectral information but also offer high quantum efficiencies, producing high image quality in combination with a minimal amount of radiation dose. Due to the clinical unavailability of photon-counting CT, the need to evaluate different CT simulation tools for researching different applications for photon-counting systems is essential. In this work, we investigate two different methods to simulate PCD data: Monte-Carlo based simulation (MCS) and analytical based simulation (AS). The MCS is a general-purpose photon transport simulation based on EGSnrc C++ class library. The AS uses analytical forward-projection in combination with additional acquisition parameters. MCS takes into account all physical effects, but is computationally expensive (several days per CT acquisition). AS is fast (several minutes), but lacks the accurateness of MCS with regard to physical interactions. To evaluate both techniques an entrance spectra of 100kvp, a modified CTP515 module of the CatPhan 600 phantom, and a detector system with six thresholds was simulated. For evaluation the simulated projection data are decomposed via a maximum likelihood technique, and reconstructed via standard filtered-back projection (FBP). Image quality from both methods is subjectively and objectively assessed. Visually, the difference in the image quality was not significant. When further evaluated, the relative difference was below 4%. As a conclusion, both techniques offer different advantages, while at different stages of development the accelerated calculations via AS can make a significant difference. For the future one could foresee a combined method to join accuracy and speed.

  20. MicroCT with energy-resolved photon-counting detectors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, X; Meier, D; Mikkelsen, S; Maehlum, G E; Wagenaar, D J; Tsui, BMW; Patt, B E; Frey, E C

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this paper was to investigate the benefits that could be realistically achieved on a microCT imaging system with an energy-resolved photon-counting x-ray detector. To this end, we built and evaluated a prototype microCT system based on such a detector. The detector is based on cadmium telluride (CdTe) radiation sensors and application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) readouts. Each detector pixel can simultaneously count x-ray photons above six energy thresholds, providing the capability for energy-selective x-ray imaging. We tested the spectroscopic performance of the system using polychromatic x-ray radiation and various filtering materials with Kabsorption edges. Tomographic images were then acquired of a cylindrical PMMA phantom containing holes filled with various materials. Results were also compared with those acquired using an intensity-integrating x-ray detector and single-energy (i.e. non-energy-selective) CT. This paper describes the functionality and performance of the system, and presents preliminary spectroscopic and tomographic results. The spectroscopic experiments showed that the energy-resolved photon-counting detector was capable of measuring energy spectra from polychromatic sources like a standard x-ray tube, and resolving absorption edges present in the energy range used for imaging. However, the spectral quality was degraded by spectral distortions resulting from degrading factors, including finite energy resolution and charge sharing. We developed a simple charge-sharing model to reproduce these distortions. The tomographic experiments showed that the availability of multiple energy thresholds in the photon-counting detector allowed us to simultaneously measure target-to-background contrasts in different energy ranges. Compared with single-energy CT with an integrating detector, this feature was especially useful to improve differentiation of materials with different attenuation coefficient energy dependences. PMID:21464527

  1. Photon-counting lidars for contiguous high resolution topographic mapping of planets and moons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degnan, John J.

    2007-08-01

    Planetary scientists have long expressed interest in obtaining globally contiguous, high resolution (few meter horizontal, decimeter vertical) 3D topographic maps of planets and moons. For example, the goal of NASA's LIST mission, scheduled for launch in the 2016-2020 time frame, is a globally contiguous, 5 meter resolution, topographic map of the Earth. Unfortunately, achieving such a capability through a simple scaling of the laser power and/or telescope aperture from prior art NASA laser altimeters (e.g. MOLA, GLAS, and MLA) is not practical. This is especially true of laser altimeters destined for orbit about distant planets or moons where instrument mass and prime power usage is severely constrained. Photon counting receivers permit each range measurement to be made with a single received photon, even in daylight, and the surface sampling rate of an orbiting altimeter can be increased by three to four orders of magnitude by emitting the available laser photons in a high frequency train of low energy pulses instead of a low frequency train of high energy pulses typical of past spaceborne lidars. The feasibility of the photon-counting approach in the presence of a strong solar background was first successfully demonstrated from a high altitude aircraft under NASA's Instrument Incubator Program in 2001. Sigma Space Corporation has subsequently developed a second generation of scanning 3D imaging and polarimetric lidars for use in small aircraft and Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV's). Future space applications include: (1) decimeter vertical resolution topographic mapping of extraterrestrial terrain from orbiters, balloons, or other aerial vehicles for determining safe landing sites; (2) monitoring the terrain in real time and increasingly higher resolution during spacecraft descent; or (3) for truly contiguous few meter resolution imaging of planetary terrain on a global scale from orbit. Targets of particular interest to NASA are the Earth, Moon, Mars, the Jovian

  2. Time-gating scheme based on a photodiode for single-photon counting

    PubMed Central

    Kumavor, Patrick D.; Tavakoli, Behnoosh; Donkor, Eric; Zhu, Quing

    2012-01-01

    A fast, simple, and low-cost optical time-gating scheme for counting single photons is presented. Its construction consists of a silicon photodiode connected in series with a 50 Ω resistor and that operates in the photoconductive mode. The temporal resolution at the FWHM of the photon counting system was measured to be 62 ps. The profile of a single-photon pulse measured with the counting system agreed well with analytical results. The system was also used to successfully resolve a pair of targets with 4 mm separation inside a highly scattering medium by the use of time-gated early-arriving photons. PMID:21725458

  3. An efficient computational approach to model statistical correlations in photon counting x-ray detectors.

    PubMed

    Faby, Sebastian; Maier, Joscha; Sawall, Stefan; Simons, David; Schlemmer, Heinz-Peter; Lell, Michael; Kachelrieß, Marc

    2016-07-01

    To introduce and evaluate an increment matrix approach (IMA) describing the signal statistics of energy-selective photon counting detectors including spatial-spectral correlations between energy bins of neighboring detector pixels. The importance of the occurring correlations for image-based material decomposition is studied. An IMA describing the counter increase patterns in a photon counting detector is proposed. This IMA has the potential to decrease the number of required random numbers compared to Monte Carlo simulations by pursuing an approach based on convolutions. To validate and demonstrate the IMA, an approximate semirealistic detector model is provided, simulating a photon counting detector in a simplified manner, e.g., by neglecting count rate-dependent effects. In this way, the spatial-spectral correlations on the detector level are obtained and fed into the IMA. The importance of these correlations in reconstructed energy bin images and the corresponding detector performance in image-based material decomposition is evaluated using a statistically optimal decomposition algorithm. The results of IMA together with the semirealistic detector model were compared to other models and measurements using the spectral response and the energy bin sensitivity, finding a good agreement. Correlations between the different reconstructed energy bin images could be observed, and turned out to be of weak nature. These correlations were found to be not relevant in image-based material decomposition. An even simpler simulation procedure based on the energy bin sensitivity was tested instead and yielded similar results for the image-based material decomposition task, as long as the fact that one incident photon can increase multiple counters across neighboring detector pixels is taken into account. The IMA is computationally efficient as it required about 10(2) random numbers per ray incident on a detector pixel instead of an estimated 10(8) random numbers per ray as

  4. Lightweight Raman spectroscope using time-correlated photon-counting detection

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Zhaokai; Petrov, Georgi I.; Cheng, Shuna; Jo, Javier A.; Lehmann, Kevin K.; Yakovlev, Vladislav V.; Scully, Marlan O.

    2015-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy is an important tool in understanding chemical components of various materials. However, the excessive weight and energy consumption of a conventional CCD-based Raman spectrometer forbids its applications under extreme conditions, including unmanned aircraft vehicles (UAVs) and Mars/Moon rovers. In this article, we present a highly sensitive, shot-noise–limited, and ruggedized Raman signal acquisition using a time-correlated photon-counting system. Compared with conventional Raman spectrometers, over 95% weight, 65% energy consumption, and 70% cost could be removed through this design. This technique allows space- and UAV-based Raman spectrometers to robustly perform hyperspectral Raman acquisitions without excessive energy consumption. PMID:26392538

  5. Photon counting spectral CT versus conventional CT: comparative evaluation for breast imaging application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shikhaliev, Polad M.; Fritz, Shannon G.

    2011-04-01

    Spectral CT systems with photon counting detectors have more advantages compared to conventional CT systems. However, clinical applications have been hampered for a long time due to the high demands of clinical systems and limitations of spectroscopic x-ray detectors. Photon counting detector technology has gained considerable improvements in the past decade, and spectral CT has become a hot topic. Several experimental spectral CT systems are under investigation. The purpose of this work was to perform the first direct, side-by-side comparison of existing spectral CT technology with a mature clinical CT system based on a conventional energy integrating detector. We have built an experimental spectral CT system whose main parameters are similar to the parameters of a clinical CT system. The system uses a spectroscopic cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detector. The detector includes two rows of CZT pixels with 256 pixels in each row. The pixel size is 1 × 1 mm2, and the maximum count rate is 2 Mcounts/pixel/s. The spectral CT system has a magnification factor of 1.62 and the source to detector and source to image distances of 85 and 53 cm, respectively. The above parameters are similar to those of the clinical CT system, Siemens Sensation 16, used for comparison. The two systems were compared by imaging spatial resolution and contrast resolution phantoms made from acrylic cylinders with 14 cm diameters. The resolution phantom included Al wires with 0.3, 0.6, and 1 mm diameters, and 0.25 g cc-1 CaCO3 contrast. The contrast phantom included contrast elements with 1.7, 5, and 15 mg cc-1 iodine, and 1.1, 3.3, and 10 mg cc-1 gadolinium. The phantoms were imaged with the two systems using 120 kVp tube voltage and 470 mR total skin exposure. The spectral CT showed CT numbers, image noise, and spatial and contrast resolutions to be similar within 10% compared to the Siemens 16 system, and provided an average of 10% higher CNR. However, the spectral CT system had a major

  6. Detection probabilities for photon-counting avalanche photodiodes applied to a laser radar system.

    PubMed

    Henriksson, Markus

    2005-08-20

    Arrays of photon-counting avalanche photodiodes with time-resolved readout can improve the performance of three-dimensional laser radars. A comparison of the detection and false-alarm probabilities for detectors in linear mode and in Geiger mode is shown. With low background radiation their performance is comparable. It is shown that in both cases it will be necessary to process several laser shots of the same scene to improve detection and reduce the false-alarm rate. Additional calculations show that the linear mode detector is much better at detecting targets behind semitransparent obscurations such as vegetation and camouflage nets.

  7. Evaluation of parallel phase-shifting digital holography by photon-counting method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Lin; Nitta, Kouichi; Matoba, Osamu; Awatsuji, Yasuhiro

    2012-11-01

    Minimum optical energy required for parallel four-step phase-shifting digital holography is evaluated numerically by using photon-counting method. One of the attractive features of parallel phase-shifting digital holography is the instantaneous recording of fast 3D events where only the complex amplitude distribution of an object wave is obtained. The reconstruction is executed by numerical wave propagation such as angular spectrum propagation or Fresnel propagation. Numerical results indicate that required optical energy of an input image with 512 × 512 pixels is about 11 pJ. Under the criteria used in the evaluation, the required optical energy is independent of the image size.

  8. Methodological Study of a Single Photon Counting Pixel Detector at SPring-8

    SciTech Connect

    Toyokawa, H.; Suzuki, M.; Broennimann, Ch.; Eikenberry, E. F.; Henrich, B.; Huelsen, G.; Kraft, P.

    2007-01-19

    PILATUS (Pixel Apparatus for the SLS) is a challenging project to develop a large area single photon counting pixel detector for synchrotron radiation experiments. SPring-8 examined the PLATUS single module detectors in collaboration with the Paul Scherrer Institute. The PILATUS-II single module detector has a desired performance with almost zero defective pixels and a fast frame rate up to 100 Hz using a newly developed PCI readout system on a Linux-PC. The maximum counting rate achieves more than 2 x 106 X-rays/s/pixel.

  9. Methodological Study of a Single Photon Counting Pixel Detector at SPring-8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyokawa, H.; Suzuki, M.; Brönnimann, Ch.; Eikenberry, E. F.; Henrich, B.; Hülsen, G.; Kraft, P.

    2007-01-01

    PILATUS (Pixel Apparatus for the SLS) is a challenging project to develop a large area single photon counting pixel detector for synchrotron radiation experiments. SPring-8 examined the PLATUS single module detectors in collaboration with the Paul Scherrer Institute. The PILATUS-II single module detector has a desired performance with almost zero defective pixels and a fast frame rate up to 100 Hz using a newly developed PCI readout system on a Linux-PC. The maximum counting rate achieves more than 2 × 106 X-rays/s/pixel.

  10. Longitudinal Bunch Pattern Measurements through Single Photon Counting at SPEAR3

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hongyi; /UC, San Diego

    2012-09-07

    The Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL), a division of SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, is a synchrotron light source that provides x-rays for experimental use. As electrons are bent in the storage ring, they emit electromagnetic radiation. There are 372 different buckets which electrons can be loaded into. Different filling patterns produce different types of x-rays. What is the bunch pattern at a given time? Which filling pattern is better? Are there any flaws to the current injection system? These questions can be answered with this single photon counting experiment.

  11. Lightweight Raman spectroscope using time-correlated photon-counting detection.

    PubMed

    Meng, Zhaokai; Petrov, Georgi I; Cheng, Shuna; Jo, Javier A; Lehmann, Kevin K; Yakovlev, Vladislav V; Scully, Marlan O

    2015-10-06

    Raman spectroscopy is an important tool in understanding chemical components of various materials. However, the excessive weight and energy consumption of a conventional CCD-based Raman spectrometer forbids its applications under extreme conditions, including unmanned aircraft vehicles (UAVs) and Mars/Moon rovers. In this article, we present a highly sensitive, shot-noise-limited, and ruggedized Raman signal acquisition using a time-correlated photon-counting system. Compared with conventional Raman spectrometers, over 95% weight, 65% energy consumption, and 70% cost could be removed through this design. This technique allows space- and UAV-based Raman spectrometers to robustly perform hyperspectral Raman acquisitions without excessive energy consumption.

  12. Homodyne versus photon-counting quantum trajectories for dissipative Kerr resonators with two-photon driving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartolo, Nicola; Minganti, Fabrizio; Lolli, Jared; Ciuti, Cristiano

    2017-07-01

    We investigate two different kinds of quantum trajectories for a nonlinear photon resonator subject to two-photon pumping, a configuration recently studied for the generation of photonic Schrödinger cat states. In the absence of feedback control and in the strong-driving limit, the steady-state density matrix is a statistical mixture of two states with equal weight. While along a single photon-counting trajectory the systems intermittently switches between an odd and an even cat state, we show that upon homodyne detection the situation is different. Indeed, homodyne quantum trajectories reveal switches between coherent states of opposite phase.

  13. Characterization of energy response for photon-counting detectors using x-ray fluorescence

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Huanjun; Cho, Hyo-Min; Barber, William C.; Iwanczyk, Jan S.; Molloi, Sabee

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of characterizing a Si strip photon-counting detector using x-ray fluorescence. Methods: X-ray fluorescence was generated by using a pencil beam from a tungsten anode x-ray tube with 2 mm Al filtration. Spectra were acquired at 90° from the primary beam direction with an energy-resolved photon-counting detector based on an edge illuminated Si strip detector. The distances from the source to target and the target to detector were approximately 19 and 11 cm, respectively. Four different materials, containing silver (Ag), iodine (I), barium (Ba), and gadolinium (Gd), were placed in small plastic containers with a diameter of approximately 0.7 cm for x-ray fluorescence measurements. Linear regression analysis was performed to derive the gain and offset values for the correlation between the measured fluorescence peak center and the known fluorescence energies. The energy resolutions and charge-sharing fractions were also obtained from analytical fittings of the recorded fluorescence spectra. An analytical model, which employed four parameters that can be determined from the fluorescence calibration, was used to estimate the detector response function. Results: Strong fluorescence signals of all four target materials were recorded with the investigated geometry for the Si strip detector. The average gain and offset of all pixels for detector energy calibration were determined to be 6.95 mV/keV and −66.33 mV, respectively. The detector’s energy resolution remained at approximately 2.7 keV for low energies, and increased slightly at 45 keV. The average charge-sharing fraction was estimated to be 36% within the investigated energy range of 20–45 keV. The simulated detector output based on the proposed response function agreed well with the experimental measurement. Conclusions: The performance of a spectral imaging system using energy-resolved photon-counting detectors is very dependent on the energy calibration of the

  14. Photon counting spectral CT versus conventional CT: comparative evaluation for breast imaging application.

    PubMed

    Shikhaliev, Polad M; Fritz, Shannon G

    2011-04-07

    Spectral CT systems with photon counting detectors have more advantages compared to conventional CT systems. However, clinical applications have been hampered for a long time due to the high demands of clinical systems and limitations of spectroscopic x-ray detectors. Photon counting detector technology has gained considerable improvements in the past decade, and spectral CT has become a hot topic. Several experimental spectral CT systems are under investigation. The purpose of this work was to perform the first direct, side-by-side comparison of existing spectral CT technology with a mature clinical CT system based on a conventional energy integrating detector. We have built an experimental spectral CT system whose main parameters are similar to the parameters of a clinical CT system. The system uses a spectroscopic cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detector. The detector includes two rows of CZT pixels with 256 pixels in each row. The pixel size is 1 × 1 mm(2), and the maximum count rate is 2 Mcounts/pixel/s. The spectral CT system has a magnification factor of 1.62 and the source to detector and source to image distances of 85 and 53 cm, respectively. The above parameters are similar to those of the clinical CT system, Siemens Sensation 16, used for comparison. The two systems were compared by imaging spatial resolution and contrast resolution phantoms made from acrylic cylinders with 14 cm diameters. The resolution phantom included Al wires with 0.3, 0.6, and 1 mm diameters, and 0.25 g cc(-1) CaCO(3) contrast. The contrast phantom included contrast elements with 1.7, 5, and 15 mg cc(-1) iodine, and 1.1, 3.3, and 10 mg cc(-1) gadolinium. The phantoms were imaged with the two systems using 120 kVp tube voltage and 470 mR total skin exposure. The spectral CT showed CT numbers, image noise, and spatial and contrast resolutions to be similar within 10% compared to the Siemens 16 system, and provided an average of 10% higher CNR. However, the spectral CT system had a

  15. Dear-Mama: A photon counting X-ray imaging project for medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanchot, G.; Chmeissani, M.; Díaz, A.; Díaz, F.; Fernández, J.; García, E.; García, J.; Kainberger, F.; Lozano, M.; Maiorino, M.; Martínez, R.; Montagne, J. P.; Moreno, I.; Pellegrini, G.; Puigdengoles, C.; Sentís, M.; Teres, L.; Tortajada, M.; Ullán, M.

    2006-12-01

    Dear-Mama ( Detection of Early Markers in Mammography) is an EU funded project devoted to develop an X-ray Medical imaging device based on room temperature solid-state pixel detector coupled to photon counting readout electronics via bump bonding. The technology being used leads to signal-to-noise ratio enhancement and thus the ability to detect low contrast anomalies such as micro-calcifications. The Dear-Mama machine is currently being evaluated and preliminary results show an excellent MTF response. Dear-Mama consortium is made up from six European institutions, the project runs from December 2001 to March 2006.

  16. Picosecond fluorescence spectroscopy of purple membrane in Halobacterium halobium with a photon-counting streak camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohtani, Hiroyuki; Ishikawa, Mitsuru; Itoh, Hiroyasu; Takiguchi, Yoshihiro; Urakami, Tsuneyuki; Tsuchiya, Yutaka

    1990-05-01

    Fluorescence lifetimes and spectra of native and deionized purple membranes of Halobacterium halobium at 22°C were measured to be <3 and 12±4 ps, respectively, with a photon-counting streak camera system. The results confirmed that the blue-shifted transient previously found by absorption spectroscopy is attributed to bacteriorhodopsin in the lowest excited-singlet state. Ultraweak fluorescence of the light-adapted purple membrane with 2.5 × 10 -4 quantum yield could be detected even though the excitation pulse energy at 570 nm was reduced to 0.88 pJ (72 μW average power).

  17. Spectral x-ray diffraction using a 6 megapixel photon counting array detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muir, Ryan D.; Pogranichniy, Nicholas R.; Muir, J. Lewis; Sullivan, Shane Z.; Battaile, Kevin P.; Mulichak, Anne M.; Toth, Scott J.; Keefe, Lisa J.; Simpson, Garth J.

    2015-03-01

    Pixel-array array detectors allow single-photon counting to be performed on a massively parallel scale, with several million counting circuits and detectors in the array. Because the number of photoelectrons produced at the detector surface depends on the photon energy, these detectors offer the possibility of spectral imaging. In this work, a statistical model of the instrument response is used to calibrate the detector on a per-pixel basis. In turn, the calibrated sensor was used to perform separation of dual-energy diffraction measurements into two monochromatic images. Targeting applications include multi-wavelength diffraction to aid in protein structure determination and X-ray diffraction imaging.

  18. Ultrafast, jitter-free x-ray streak camera that uses single-photon counting.

    PubMed

    Larsson, J

    2001-03-01

    A novel method developed to increase the temporal resolution of x-ray streak cameras is described. The method is analogous to the time-correlated single-photon-counting technique, which is commonly used in atomic physics. By use of short-pulse x-ray radiation from a laser-produced plasma, generated by an ultrafast laser, it is shown that a standard x-ray streak camera with a nominal temporal resolution of >5ps can yield a temporal response of 1.6 ps. The readout technique also removes temporal jitter with respect to the triggering laser. Capabilities and limitations of the technology are discussed.

  19. Photon counting spectral CT component analysis of coronary artery atherosclerotic plaque samples

    PubMed Central

    Coulon, P; Thran, A; Roessl, E; Martens, G; Sigovan, M; Douek, P

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the capabilities of photon counting spectral CT to differentiate components of coronary atherosclerotic plaque based on differences in spectral attenuation and iodine-based contrast agent concentration. Methods: 10 calcified and 13 lipid-rich non-calcified histologically demonstrated atheromatous plaques from post-mortem human coronary arteries were scanned with a photon counting spectral CT scanner. Individual photons were counted and classified in one of six energy bins from 25 to 70 keV. Based on a maximum likelihood approach, maps of photoelectric absorption (PA), Compton scattering (CS) and iodine concentration (IC) were reconstructed. Intensity measurements were performed on each map in the vessel wall, the surrounding perivascular fat and the lipid-rich and the calcified plaques. PA and CS values are expressed relative to pure water values. A comparison between these different elements was performed using Kruskal–Wallis tests with pairwise post hoc Mann–Whitney U-tests and Sidak p-value adjustments. Results: Results for vessel wall, surrounding perivascular fat and lipid-rich and calcified plaques were, respectively, 1.19 ± 0.09, 0.73 ± 0.05, 1.08 ± 0.14 and 17.79 ± 6.70 for PA; 0.96 ± 0.02, 0.83 ± 0.02, 0.91 ± 0.03 and 2.53 ± 0.63 for CS; and 83.3 ± 10.1, 37.6 ± 8.1, 55.2 ± 14.0 and 4.9 ± 20.0 mmol l−1 for IC, with a significant difference between all tissues for PA, CS and IC (p < 0.012). Conclusion: This study demonstrates the capability of energy-sensitive photon counting spectral CT to differentiate between calcifications and iodine-infused regions of human coronary artery atherosclerotic plaque samples by analysing differences in spectral attenuation and iodine-based contrast agent concentration. Advances in knowledge: Photon counting spectral CT is a promising technique to identify plaque components by analysing differences in iodine-based contrast agent

  20. Spectral X-Ray Diffraction using a 6 Megapixel Photon Counting Array Detector.

    PubMed

    Muir, Ryan D; Pogranichniy, Nicholas R; Muir, J Lewis; Sullivan, Shane Z; Battaile, Kevin P; Mulichak, Anne M; Toth, Scott J; Keefe, Lisa J; Simpson, Garth J

    2015-03-12

    Pixel-array array detectors allow single-photon counting to be performed on a massively parallel scale, with several million counting circuits and detectors in the array. Because the number of photoelectrons produced at the detector surface depends on the photon energy, these detectors offer the possibility of spectral imaging. In this work, a statistical model of the instrument response is used to calibrate the detector on a per-pixel basis. In turn, the calibrated sensor was used to perform separation of dual-energy diffraction measurements into two monochromatic images. Targeting applications include multi-wavelength diffraction to aid in protein structure determination and X-ray diffraction imaging.