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Sample records for photooxidation-induced transcriptome reprogramming

  1. Chloroplast photooxidation-induced transcriptome reprogramming in Arabidopsis immutans white leaf sectors.

    PubMed

    Aluru, Maneesha R; Zola, Jaroslaw; Foudree, Andrew; Rodermel, Steven R

    2009-06-01

    Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) immutans (im) has green and white sectoring due to the action of a nuclear recessive gene, IMMUTANS. The green sectors contain normal-appearing chloroplasts, whereas the white sectors contain abnormal chloroplasts that lack colored carotenoids due to a defect in phytoene desaturase activity. Previous biochemical and molecular characterizations of the green leaf sectors revealed alterations suggestive of a source-sink relationship between the green and white sectors of im. In this study, we use an Affymetrix ATH1 oligoarray to further explore the nature of sink metabolism in im white tissues. We show that lack of colored carotenoids in the im white tissues elicits a differential response from a large number of genes involved in various cellular processes and stress responses. Gene expression patterns correlate with the repression of photosynthesis and photosynthesis-related processes in im white tissues, with an induction of Suc catabolism and transport, and with mitochondrial electron transport and fermentation. These results suggest that energy is derived via aerobic and anaerobic metabolism of imported sugar in im white tissues for growth and development. We also show that oxidative stress responses are largely induced in im white tissues; however, im green sectors develop additional energy-dissipating mechanisms that perhaps allow for the formation of green sectors. Furthermore, a comparison of the transcriptomes of im white and norflurazon-treated white leaf tissues reveals global as well as tissue-specific responses to photooxidation. We conclude that the differences in the mechanism of phytoene desaturase inhibition play an important role in differentiating these two white tissues.

  2. Single-cell transcriptome analysis reveals dynamic changes in lncRNA expression during reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Kim, Daniel H; Marinov, Georgi K; Pepke, Shirley; Singer, Zakary S; He, Peng; Williams, Brian; Schroth, Gary P; Elowitz, Michael B; Wold, Barbara J

    2015-01-01

    Cellular reprogramming highlights the epigenetic plasticity of the somatic cell state. Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have emerging roles in epigenetic regulation, but their potential functions in reprogramming cell fate have been largely unexplored. We used single-cell RNA sequencing to characterize the expression patterns of over 16,000 genes, including 437 lncRNAs, during defined stages of reprogramming to pluripotency. Self-organizing maps (SOMs) were used as an intuitive way to structure and interrogate transcriptome data at the single-cell level. Early molecular events during reprogramming involved the activation of Ras signaling pathways, along with hundreds of lncRNAs. Loss-of-function studies showed that activated lncRNAs can repress lineage-specific genes, while lncRNAs activated in multiple reprogramming cell types can regulate metabolic gene expression. Our findings demonstrate that reprogramming cells activate defined sets of functionally relevant lncRNAs and provide a resource to further investigate how dynamic changes in the transcriptome reprogram cell state.

  3. Single-cell transcriptome and epigenomic reprogramming of cardiomyocyte-derived cardiac progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xin; Chakravarty, Tushar; Zhang, Yiqiang; Li, Xiaojin; Zhong, Jiang F.; Wang, Charles

    2016-01-01

    The molecular basis underlying the dedifferentiation of mammalian adult cardiomyocytes (ACMs) into myocyte-derived cardiac progenitor cells (mCPCs) during cardiac tissue regeneration is poorly understood. We present data integrating single-cell transcriptome and whole-genome DNA methylome analyses of mouse mCPCs to understand the epigenomic reprogramming governing their intrinsic cellular plasticity. Compared to parental cardiomyocytes, mCPCs display epigenomic reprogramming with many differentially-methylated regions, both hypermethylated and hypomethylated, across the entire genome. Correlating well with the methylome, our single-cell transcriptomic data show that the genes encoding cardiac structure and function proteins are remarkably down-regulated in mCPCs, while those for cell cycle, proliferation, and stemness are significantly up-regulated. In addition, implanting mCPCs into infarcted mouse myocardium improves cardiac function with augmented left ventricular ejection fraction. This dataset suggests that the cellular plasticity of mammalian cardiomyocytes is the result of a well-orchestrated epigenomic reprogramming and a subsequent global transcriptomic alteration. Understanding cardiomyocyte epigenomic reprogramming may enable the design of future clinical therapies that induce cardiac regeneration, and prevent heart failure. PMID:27622691

  4. Single-cell transcriptome and epigenomic reprogramming of cardiomyocyte-derived cardiac progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xin; Chakravarty, Tushar; Zhang, Yiqiang; Li, Xiaojin; Zhong, Jiang F; Wang, Charles

    2016-01-01

    The molecular basis underlying the dedifferentiation of mammalian adult cardiomyocytes (ACMs) into myocyte-derived cardiac progenitor cells (mCPCs) during cardiac tissue regeneration is poorly understood. We present data integrating single-cell transcriptome and whole-genome DNA methylome analyses of mouse mCPCs to understand the epigenomic reprogramming governing their intrinsic cellular plasticity. Compared to parental cardiomyocytes, mCPCs display epigenomic reprogramming with many differentially-methylated regions, both hypermethylated and hypomethylated, across the entire genome. Correlating well with the methylome, our single-cell transcriptomic data show that the genes encoding cardiac structure and function proteins are remarkably down-regulated in mCPCs, while those for cell cycle, proliferation, and stemness are significantly up-regulated. In addition, implanting mCPCs into infarcted mouse myocardium improves cardiac function with augmented left ventricular ejection fraction. This dataset suggests that the cellular plasticity of mammalian cardiomyocytes is the result of a well-orchestrated epigenomic reprogramming and a subsequent global transcriptomic alteration. Understanding cardiomyocyte epigenomic reprogramming may enable the design of future clinical therapies that induce cardiac regeneration, and prevent heart failure.

  5. Single-cell transcriptome and epigenomic reprogramming of cardiomyocyte-derived cardiac progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xin; Chakravarty, Tushar; Zhang, Yiqiang; Li, Xiaojin; Zhong, Jiang F; Wang, Charles

    2016-01-01

    The molecular basis underlying the dedifferentiation of mammalian adult cardiomyocytes (ACMs) into myocyte-derived cardiac progenitor cells (mCPCs) during cardiac tissue regeneration is poorly understood. We present data integrating single-cell transcriptome and whole-genome DNA methylome analyses of mouse mCPCs to understand the epigenomic reprogramming governing their intrinsic cellular plasticity. Compared to parental cardiomyocytes, mCPCs display epigenomic reprogramming with many differentially-methylated regions, both hypermethylated and hypomethylated, across the entire genome. Correlating well with the methylome, our single-cell transcriptomic data show that the genes encoding cardiac structure and function proteins are remarkably down-regulated in mCPCs, while those for cell cycle, proliferation, and stemness are significantly up-regulated. In addition, implanting mCPCs into infarcted mouse myocardium improves cardiac function with augmented left ventricular ejection fraction. This dataset suggests that the cellular plasticity of mammalian cardiomyocytes is the result of a well-orchestrated epigenomic reprogramming and a subsequent global transcriptomic alteration. Understanding cardiomyocyte epigenomic reprogramming may enable the design of future clinical therapies that induce cardiac regeneration, and prevent heart failure. PMID:27622691

  6. The transcriptomic architecture of mouse Sertoli cell clone embryos reveals temporal–spatial-specific reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Cao, Feng; Fukuda, Atsushi; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Kono, Tomohiro

    2013-03-01

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer, a technique used to generate clone embryos by transferring the nucleus of a somatic cell into an enucleated oocyte, is an excellent approach to study the reprogramming of the nuclei of differentiated cells. Here, we conducted a transcriptomic study by performing microarray analysis on single Sertoli cell nuclear transfer (SeCNT) embryos throughout preimplantation development. The extensive data collected from the oocyte to the blastocyst stage helped to identify specific genes that were incorrectly reprogrammed at each stage, thereby providing a novel perspective for understanding reprogramming progression in SeCNT embryos.This attempt provided an opportunity to discuss the possibility that ectopic gene expression could be involved in the developmental failure of SeCNT embryos. Network analysis at each stage suggested that in total, 127 networks were involved in developmental and functional disorders in SeCNT embryos. Furthermore, chromosome mapping using our time-lapse expression data highlighted temporal–spatial changes of the abnormal expression, showing the characteristic distribution of the genes on each chromosome.Thus, the present study revealed that the preimplantation development of SeCNT embryos appears normal; however, the progression of incorrect reprogramming is concealed throughout development.

  7. Dual Transcriptome Profiling of Leishmania-Infected Human Macrophages Reveals Distinct Reprogramming Signatures

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Maria Cecilia; Dillon, Laura A. L.; Belew, Ashton Trey; Bravo, Hector Corrada; Mosser, David M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Macrophages are mononuclear phagocytes that constitute a first line of defense against pathogens. While lethal to many microbes, they are the primary host cells of Leishmania spp. parasites, the obligate intracellular pathogens that cause leishmaniasis. We conducted transcriptomic profiling of two Leishmania species and the human macrophage over the course of intracellular infection by using high-throughput RNA sequencing to characterize the global gene expression changes and reprogramming events that underlie the interactions between the pathogen and its host. A systematic exclusion of the generic effects of large-particle phagocytosis revealed a vigorous, parasite-specific response of the human macrophage early in the infection that was greatly tempered at later time points. An analogous temporal expression pattern was observed with the parasite, suggesting that much of the reprogramming that occurs as parasites transform into intracellular forms generally stabilizes shortly after entry. Following that, the parasite establishes an intracellular niche within macrophages, with minimal communication between the parasite and the host cell later during the infection. No significant difference was observed between parasite species transcriptomes or in the transcriptional response of macrophages infected with each species. Our comparative analysis of gene expression changes that occur as mouse and human macrophages are infected by Leishmania spp. points toward a general signature of the Leishmania-macrophage infectome. PMID:27165796

  8. Reprogrammed Transcriptome in Rhesus-Bovine Interspecies Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kai; Otu, Hasan H.; Chen, Ying; Lee, Young; Latham, Keith; Cibelli, Jose B.

    2011-01-01

    Background Global activation of the embryonic genome (EGA), one of the most critical steps in early mammalian embryo development, is recognized as the time when interspecies somatic cell nuclear transfer (iSCNT) embryos fail to thrive. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, we analyzed the EGA-related transcriptome of rhesus-bovine iSCNT 8- to 16-cell embryos and dissected the reprogramming process in terms of embryonic gene activation, somatic gene silencing, and maternal RNA degradation. Compared with fibroblast donor cells, two thousand and seven genes were activated in iSCNT embryos, one quarter of them reaching expression levels comparable to those found in in vitro fertilized (IVF) rhesus embryos. This suggested that EGA in iSCNT embryos had partially recapitulated rhesus embryonic development. Eight hundred and sixty somatic genes were not silenced properly and continued to be expressed in iSCNT embryos, which indicated incomplete nuclear reprogramming. We compared maternal RNA degradation in bovine oocytes between bovine-bovine SCNT and iSCNT embryos. While maternal RNA degradation occurred in both SCNT and iSCNT embryos, we saw more limited overall degradation of maternal RNA in iSCNT embryos than in SCNT embryos. Several important maternal RNAs, like GPF9, were not properly processed in SCNT embryos. Conclusions/Significance Our data suggested that iSCNT embryos are capable of triggering EGA, while a portion of somatic cell-associated genes maintain their expression. Maternal RNA degradation seems to be impaired in iSCNT embryos. Further understanding of the biological roles of these genes, networks, and pathways revealed by iSCNT may expand our knowledge about cell reprogramming, pluripotency, and differentiation. PMID:21799794

  9. Transcriptome Sequencing Reveals Wide Expression Reprogramming of Basal and Unknown Genes in Leptospira biflexa Biofilms.

    PubMed

    Iraola, Gregorio; Spangenberg, Lucía; Lopes Bastos, Bruno; Graña, Martín; Vasconcelos, Larissa; Almeida, Áurea; Greif, Gonzalo; Robello, Carlos; Ristow, Paula; Naya, Hugo

    2016-01-01

    The genus Leptospira is composed of pathogenic and saprophytic spirochetes. Pathogenic Leptospira is the etiological agent of leptospirosis, a globally spread neglected disease. A key ecological feature of some pathogenic species is their ability to survive both within and outside the host. For most leptospires, the ability to persist outside the host is associated with biofilm formation, a most important bacterial strategy to face and overcome hostile environmental conditions. The architecture and biochemistry of leptospiral biofilms are rather well understood; however, the genetic program underpinning biofilm formation remains mostly unknown. In this work, we used the saprophyte Leptospira biflexa as a model organism to assess over- and underrepresented transcripts during the biofilm state, using transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) technology. Our results showed that some basal biological processes like DNA replication and cell division are downregulated in the mature biofilm. Additionally, we identified significant expression reprogramming for genes involved in motility, sugar/lipid metabolism, and iron scavenging, as well as for outer membrane-encoding genes. A careful manual annotation process allowed us to assign molecular functions to many previously uncharacterized genes that are probably involved in biofilm metabolism. We also provided evidence for the presence of small regulatory RNAs in this species. Finally, coexpression networks were reconstructed to pinpoint functionally related gene clusters that may explain how biofilm maintenance is regulated. Beyond elucidating some genetic aspects of biofilm formation, this work reveals a number of pathways whose functional dissection may impact our understanding of leptospiral biology, in particular how these organisms adapt to environmental changes. IMPORTANCE In this work, we describe the first transcriptome based on RNA-seq technology focused on studying transcriptional changes associated with biofilm growth

  10. Transcriptome Sequencing Reveals Wide Expression Reprogramming of Basal and Unknown Genes in Leptospira biflexa Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Spangenberg, Lucía; Lopes Bastos, Bruno; Graña, Martín; Vasconcelos, Larissa; Almeida, Áurea; Greif, Gonzalo; Robello, Carlos; Ristow, Paula

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The genus Leptospira is composed of pathogenic and saprophytic spirochetes. Pathogenic Leptospira is the etiological agent of leptospirosis, a globally spread neglected disease. A key ecological feature of some pathogenic species is their ability to survive both within and outside the host. For most leptospires, the ability to persist outside the host is associated with biofilm formation, a most important bacterial strategy to face and overcome hostile environmental conditions. The architecture and biochemistry of leptospiral biofilms are rather well understood; however, the genetic program underpinning biofilm formation remains mostly unknown. In this work, we used the saprophyte Leptospira biflexa as a model organism to assess over- and underrepresented transcripts during the biofilm state, using transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) technology. Our results showed that some basal biological processes like DNA replication and cell division are downregulated in the mature biofilm. Additionally, we identified significant expression reprogramming for genes involved in motility, sugar/lipid metabolism, and iron scavenging, as well as for outer membrane-encoding genes. A careful manual annotation process allowed us to assign molecular functions to many previously uncharacterized genes that are probably involved in biofilm metabolism. We also provided evidence for the presence of small regulatory RNAs in this species. Finally, coexpression networks were reconstructed to pinpoint functionally related gene clusters that may explain how biofilm maintenance is regulated. Beyond elucidating some genetic aspects of biofilm formation, this work reveals a number of pathways whose functional dissection may impact our understanding of leptospiral biology, in particular how these organisms adapt to environmental changes. IMPORTANCE In this work, we describe the first transcriptome based on RNA-seq technology focused on studying transcriptional changes associated with biofilm

  11. Transcriptome Sequencing Reveals Wide Expression Reprogramming of Basal and Unknown Genes in Leptospira biflexa Biofilms.

    PubMed

    Iraola, Gregorio; Spangenberg, Lucía; Lopes Bastos, Bruno; Graña, Martín; Vasconcelos, Larissa; Almeida, Áurea; Greif, Gonzalo; Robello, Carlos; Ristow, Paula; Naya, Hugo

    2016-01-01

    The genus Leptospira is composed of pathogenic and saprophytic spirochetes. Pathogenic Leptospira is the etiological agent of leptospirosis, a globally spread neglected disease. A key ecological feature of some pathogenic species is their ability to survive both within and outside the host. For most leptospires, the ability to persist outside the host is associated with biofilm formation, a most important bacterial strategy to face and overcome hostile environmental conditions. The architecture and biochemistry of leptospiral biofilms are rather well understood; however, the genetic program underpinning biofilm formation remains mostly unknown. In this work, we used the saprophyte Leptospira biflexa as a model organism to assess over- and underrepresented transcripts during the biofilm state, using transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) technology. Our results showed that some basal biological processes like DNA replication and cell division are downregulated in the mature biofilm. Additionally, we identified significant expression reprogramming for genes involved in motility, sugar/lipid metabolism, and iron scavenging, as well as for outer membrane-encoding genes. A careful manual annotation process allowed us to assign molecular functions to many previously uncharacterized genes that are probably involved in biofilm metabolism. We also provided evidence for the presence of small regulatory RNAs in this species. Finally, coexpression networks were reconstructed to pinpoint functionally related gene clusters that may explain how biofilm maintenance is regulated. Beyond elucidating some genetic aspects of biofilm formation, this work reveals a number of pathways whose functional dissection may impact our understanding of leptospiral biology, in particular how these organisms adapt to environmental changes. IMPORTANCE In this work, we describe the first transcriptome based on RNA-seq technology focused on studying transcriptional changes associated with biofilm growth

  12. Reprogramming of Strawberry (Fragaria vesca) Root Transcriptome in Response to Phytophthora cactorum.

    PubMed

    Toljamo, Anna; Blande, Daniel; Kärenlampi, Sirpa; Kokko, Harri

    2016-01-01

    Crown rot (Phytophthora cactorum) causes significant economic losses in strawberry production. The best control strategy would be to use resistant cultivars, but polygenically inherited resistance makes the breeding of the garden strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa) challenging. The diploid wild strawberry Fragaria vesca Hawaii 4 genotype was shown previously to have resistance against crown rot. To explore the resistance mechanisms, we inoculated the roots of Hawaii 4 with P. cactorum in a novel in vitro hydroponic system to minimize interference caused by other microbes. Major reprogramming of the root transcriptome occurred, involving 30% of the genes. The surveillance system of the plant shifted from the development mode to the defense mode. Furthermore, the immune responses as well as many genes involved in the biosynthesis of the defense hormones jasmonic acid, ethylene and salicylic acid were up-regulated. Several major allergen-like genes encoding PR-10 proteins were highly expressed in the inoculated plants, suggesting that they also have a crucial role in the defense responses against P. cactorum. Additionally, flavonoids and terpenoids may be of vital importance, as several genes involved in their biosynthesis were up-regulated. The cell wall biosynthesis and developmental processes were down-regulated, possibly as a result of the down-regulation of the key genes involved in the biosynthesis of growth-promoting hormones brassinosteroids and auxin. Of particular interest was the expression of potential resistance genes in the recently identified P. cactorum resistance locus RPc-1. These new findings help to target the breeding efforts aiming at more resistant strawberry cultivars. PMID:27518577

  13. Reprogramming of Strawberry (Fragaria vesca) Root Transcriptome in Response to Phytophthora cactorum.

    PubMed

    Toljamo, Anna; Blande, Daniel; Kärenlampi, Sirpa; Kokko, Harri

    2016-01-01

    Crown rot (Phytophthora cactorum) causes significant economic losses in strawberry production. The best control strategy would be to use resistant cultivars, but polygenically inherited resistance makes the breeding of the garden strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa) challenging. The diploid wild strawberry Fragaria vesca Hawaii 4 genotype was shown previously to have resistance against crown rot. To explore the resistance mechanisms, we inoculated the roots of Hawaii 4 with P. cactorum in a novel in vitro hydroponic system to minimize interference caused by other microbes. Major reprogramming of the root transcriptome occurred, involving 30% of the genes. The surveillance system of the plant shifted from the development mode to the defense mode. Furthermore, the immune responses as well as many genes involved in the biosynthesis of the defense hormones jasmonic acid, ethylene and salicylic acid were up-regulated. Several major allergen-like genes encoding PR-10 proteins were highly expressed in the inoculated plants, suggesting that they also have a crucial role in the defense responses against P. cactorum. Additionally, flavonoids and terpenoids may be of vital importance, as several genes involved in their biosynthesis were up-regulated. The cell wall biosynthesis and developmental processes were down-regulated, possibly as a result of the down-regulation of the key genes involved in the biosynthesis of growth-promoting hormones brassinosteroids and auxin. Of particular interest was the expression of potential resistance genes in the recently identified P. cactorum resistance locus RPc-1. These new findings help to target the breeding efforts aiming at more resistant strawberry cultivars.

  14. Transcriptome and metabolome reprogramming in Vitis vinifera cv. Trincadeira berries upon infection with Botrytis cinerea

    PubMed Central

    Agudelo-Romero, Patricia; Erban, Alexander; Rego, Cecília; Carbonell-Bejerano, Pablo; Nascimento, Teresa; Sousa, Lisete; Martínez-Zapater, José M.; Kopka, Joachim; Fortes, Ana Margarida

    2015-01-01

    Vitis vinifera berries are sensitive towards infection by the necrotrophic pathogen Botrytis cinerea, leading to important economic losses worldwide. The combined analysis of the transcriptome and metabolome associated with fungal infection has not been performed previously in grapes or in another fleshy fruit. In an attempt to identify the molecular and metabolic mechanisms associated with the infection, peppercorn-sized fruits were infected in the field. Green and veraison berries were collected following infection for microarray analysis complemented with metabolic profiling of primary and other soluble metabolites and of volatile emissions. The results provided evidence of a reprogramming of carbohydrate and lipid metabolisms towards increased synthesis of secondary metabolites involved in plant defence, such as trans-resveratrol and gallic acid. This response was already activated in infected green berries with the putative involvement of jasmonic acid, ethylene, polyamines, and auxins, whereas salicylic acid did not seem to be involved. Genes encoding WRKY transcription factors, pathogenesis-related proteins, glutathione S-transferase, stilbene synthase, and phenylalanine ammonia-lyase were upregulated in infected berries. However, salicylic acid signalling was activated in healthy ripening berries along with the expression of proteins of the NBS-LRR superfamily and protein kinases, suggesting that the pathogen is able to shut down defences existing in healthy ripening berries. Furthermore, this study provided metabolic biomarkers of infection such as azelaic acid, a substance known to prime plant defence responses, arabitol, ribitol, 4-amino butanoic acid, 1-O-methyl- glucopyranoside, and several fatty acids that alone or in combination can be used to monitor Botrytis infection early in the vineyard. PMID:25675955

  15. Reprogramming of Strawberry (Fragaria vesca) Root Transcriptome in Response to Phytophthora cactorum

    PubMed Central

    Blande, Daniel; Kärenlampi, Sirpa; Kokko, Harri

    2016-01-01

    Crown rot (Phytophthora cactorum) causes significant economic losses in strawberry production. The best control strategy would be to use resistant cultivars, but polygenically inherited resistance makes the breeding of the garden strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa) challenging. The diploid wild strawberry Fragaria vesca Hawaii 4 genotype was shown previously to have resistance against crown rot. To explore the resistance mechanisms, we inoculated the roots of Hawaii 4 with P. cactorum in a novel in vitro hydroponic system to minimize interference caused by other microbes. Major reprogramming of the root transcriptome occurred, involving 30% of the genes. The surveillance system of the plant shifted from the development mode to the defense mode. Furthermore, the immune responses as well as many genes involved in the biosynthesis of the defense hormones jasmonic acid, ethylene and salicylic acid were up-regulated. Several major allergen-like genes encoding PR-10 proteins were highly expressed in the inoculated plants, suggesting that they also have a crucial role in the defense responses against P. cactorum. Additionally, flavonoids and terpenoids may be of vital importance, as several genes involved in their biosynthesis were up-regulated. The cell wall biosynthesis and developmental processes were down-regulated, possibly as a result of the down-regulation of the key genes involved in the biosynthesis of growth-promoting hormones brassinosteroids and auxin. Of particular interest was the expression of potential resistance genes in the recently identified P. cactorum resistance locus RPc-1. These new findings help to target the breeding efforts aiming at more resistant strawberry cultivars. PMID:27518577

  16. Nuclear transcriptome profiling of induced pluripotent stem cells and embryonic stem cells identify non-coding loci resistant to reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Fort, Alexandre; Yamada, Daisuke; Hashimoto, Kosuke; Koseki, Haruhiko; Carninci, Piero

    2015-01-01

    Identification of functionally relevant differences between induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) and reference embryonic stem cells (ESC) remains a central question for therapeutic applications. Differences in gene expression between iPSC and ESC have been examined by microarray and more recently with RNA-SEQ technologies. We here report an in depth analyses of nuclear and cytoplasmic transcriptomes, using the CAGE (cap analysis of gene expression) technology, for 5 iPSC clones derived from mouse lymphocytes B and 3 ESC lines. This approach reveals nuclear transcriptomes significantly more complex in ESC than in iPSC. Hundreds of yet not annotated putative non-coding RNAs and enhancer-associated transcripts specifically transcribed in ESC have been detected and supported with epigenetic and chromatin-chromatin interactions data. We identified super-enhancers transcriptionally active specifically in ESC and associated with genes implicated in the maintenance of pluripotency. Similarly, we detected non-coding transcripts of yet unknown function being regulated by ESC specific super-enhancers. Taken together, these results demonstrate that current protocols of iPSC reprogramming do not trigger activation of numerous cis-regulatory regions. It thus reinforces the need for already suggested deeper monitoring of the non-coding transcriptome when characterizing iPSC clones. Such differences in regulatory transcript expression may indeed impact their potential for clinical applications. PMID:25664506

  17. 5mC oxidation by Tet2 modulates enhancer activity and timing of transcriptome reprogramming during differentiation.

    PubMed

    Hon, Gary C; Song, Chun-Xiao; Du, Tingting; Jin, Fulai; Selvaraj, Siddarth; Lee, Ah Young; Yen, Chia-An; Ye, Zhen; Mao, Shi-Qing; Wang, Bang-An; Kuan, Samantha; Edsall, Lee E; Zhao, Boxuan Simen; Xu, Guo-Liang; He, Chuan; Ren, Bing

    2014-10-23

    In mammals, cytosine methylation (5mC) is widely distributed throughout the genome but is notably depleted from active promoters and enhancers. While the role of DNA methylation in promoter silencing has been well documented, the function of this epigenetic mark at enhancers remains unclear. Recent experiments have demonstrated that enhancers are enriched for 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC), an oxidization product of the Tet family of 5mC dioxygenases and an intermediate of DNA demethylation. These results support the involvement of Tet proteins in the regulation of dynamic DNA methylation at enhancers. By mapping DNA methylation and hydroxymethylation at base resolution, we find that deletion of Tet2 causes extensive loss of 5hmC at enhancers, accompanied by enhancer hypermethylation, reduction of enhancer activity, and delayed gene induction in the early steps of differentiation. Our results reveal that DNA demethylation modulates enhancer activity, and its disruption influences the timing of transcriptome reprogramming during cellular differentiation.

  18. System-Wide Hypersensitive Response-Associated Transcriptome and Metabolome Reprogramming in Tomato1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Etalo, Desalegn W.; Stulemeijer, Iris J.E.; Peter van Esse, H.; de Vos, Ric C.H.; Bouwmeester, Harro J.; Joosten, Matthieu H.A.J.

    2013-01-01

    The hypersensitive response (HR) is considered to be the hallmark of the resistance response of plants to pathogens. To study HR-associated transcriptome and metabolome reprogramming in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), we used plants that express both a resistance gene to Cladosporium fulvum and the matching avirulence gene of this pathogen. In these plants, massive reprogramming occurred, and we found that the HR and associated processes are highly energy demanding. Ubiquitin-dependent protein degradation, hydrolysis of sugars, and lipid catabolism are used as alternative sources of amino acids, energy, and carbon skeletons, respectively. We observed strong accumulation of secondary metabolites, such as hydroxycinnamic acid amides. Coregulated expression of WRKY transcription factors and genes known to be involved in the HR, in addition to a strong enrichment of the W-box WRKY-binding motif in the promoter sequences of the coregulated genes, point to WRKYs as the most prominent orchestrators of the HR. Our study has revealed several novel HR-related genes, and reverse genetics tools will allow us to understand the role of each individual component in the HR. PMID:23719893

  19. Carbon Deprivation-Driven Transcriptome Reprogramming in Detached Developmentally Arresting Arabidopsis Inflorescences1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Trivellini, Alice; Jibran, Rubina; Watson, Lyn M.; O’Donoghue, Erin M.; Ferrante, Antonio; Sullivan, Kerry L.; Dijkwel, Paul P.; Hunter, Donald A.

    2012-01-01

    Senescence is genetically controlled and activated in mature tissues during aging. However, immature plant tissues also display senescence-like symptoms when continuously exposed to adverse energy-depleting conditions. We used detached dark-held immature inflorescences of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) to understand the metabolic reprogramming occurring in immature tissues transitioning from rapid growth to precocious senescence. Macroscopic growth of the detached inflorescences rapidly ceased upon placement in water in the dark at 21°C. Inflorescences were completely degreened by 120 h of dark incubation and by 24 h had already lost 24% of their chlorophyll and 34% of their protein content. Comparative transcriptome profiling at 24 h revealed that inflorescence response at 24 h had a large carbon-deprivation component. Genes that positively regulate developmental senescence (ARABIDOPSIS NAC DOMAIN CONTAINING PROTEIN92) and shade-avoidance syndrome (PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTOR4 [PIF4] and PIF5) were up-regulated within 24 h. Mutations in these genes delayed degreening of the inflorescences. Their up-regulation was suppressed in dark-held inflorescences by glucose treatment, which promoted macroscopic growth and development and inhibited degreening of the inflorescences. Detached inflorescences held in the dark for 4 d were still able to reinitiate development to produce siliques upon being brought out to the light, indicating that the transcriptional reprogramming at 24 h was adaptive and reversible. Our results suggest that the response of detached immature tissues to dark storage involves interactions between carbohydrate status sensing and light deprivation signaling and that the dark-adaptive response of the tissues appears to utilize some of the same key regulators as developmental senescence. PMID:22930749

  20. Systems biology approach to identify transcriptome reprogramming and candidate microRNA targets during the progression of polycystic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is characterized by cyst formation throughout the kidney parenchyma. It is caused by mutations in either of two genes, PKD1 and PKD2. Mice that lack functional Pkd1 (Pkd1-/-), develop rapidly progressive cystic disease during embryogenesis, and serve as a model to study human ADPKD. Genome wide transcriptome reprogramming and the possible roles of micro-RNAs (miRNAs) that affect the initiation and progression of cyst formation in the Pkd1-/- have yet to be studied. miRNAs are small, regulatory non-coding RNAs, implicated in a wide spectrum of biological processes. Their expression levels are altered in several diseases including kidney cancer, diabetic nephropathy and PKD. Results We examined the molecular pathways that modulate renal cyst formation and growth in the Pkd1-/- model by performing global gene-expression profiling in embryonic kidneys at days 14.5 and 17.5. Gene Ontology and gene set enrichment analysis were used to identify overrepresented signaling pathways in Pkd1-/- kidneys. We found dysregulation of developmental, metabolic, and signaling pathways (e.g. Wnt, calcium, TGF-β and MAPK) in Pkd1-/- kidneys. Using a comparative transcriptomics approach, we determined similarities and differences with human ADPKD: ~50% overlap at the pathway level among the mis-regulated pathways was observed. By using computational approaches (TargetScan, miRanda, microT and miRDB), we then predicted miRNAs that were suggested to target the differentially expressed mRNAs. Differential expressions of 9 candidate miRNAs, miRs-10a, -30a-5p, -96, -126-5p, -182, -200a, -204, -429 and -488, and 16 genes were confirmed by qPCR. In addition, 14 candidate miRNA:mRNA reciprocal interactions were predicted. Several of the highly regulated genes and pathways were predicted as targets of miRNAs. Conclusions We have described global transcriptional reprogramming during the progression of PKD in the Pkd1-/- model. We

  1. Major transcriptome reprogramming underlies floral mimicry induced by the rust fungus Puccinia monoica in Boechera stricta.

    PubMed

    Cano, Liliana M; Raffaele, Sylvain; Haugen, Riston H; Saunders, Diane G O; Leonelli, Lauriebeth; MacLean, Dan; Hogenhout, Saskia A; Kamoun, Sophien

    2013-01-01

    Pucciniamonoica is a spectacular plant parasitic rust fungus that triggers the formation of flower-like structures (pseudoflowers) in its Brassicaceae host plant Boecherastricta. Pseudoflowers mimic in shape, color, nectar and scent co-occurring and unrelated flowers such as buttercups. They act to attract insects thereby aiding spore dispersal and sexual reproduction of the rust fungus. Although much ecological research has been performed on P. monoica-induced pseudoflowers, this system has yet to be investigated at the molecular or genomic level. To date, the molecular alterations underlying the development of pseudoflowers and the genes involved have not been described. To address this, we performed gene expression profiling to reveal 256 plant biological processes that are significantly altered in pseudoflowers. Among these biological processes, plant genes involved in cell fate specification, regulation of transcription, reproduction, floral organ development, anthocyanin (major floral pigments) and terpenoid biosynthesis (major floral volatile compounds) were down-regulated in pseudoflowers. In contrast, plant genes involved in shoot, cotyledon and leaf development, carbohydrate transport, wax biosynthesis, cutin transport and L-phenylalanine metabolism (pathway that results in phenylethanol and phenylacetaldehyde volatile production) were up-regulated. These findings point to an extensive reprogramming of host genes by the rust pathogen to induce floral mimicry. We also highlight 31 differentially regulated plant genes that are enriched in the biological processes mentioned above, and are potentially involved in the formation of pseudoflowers. This work illustrates the complex perturbations induced by rust pathogens in their host plants, and provides a starting point for understanding the molecular mechanisms of pathogen-induced floral mimicry.

  2. Major transcriptome reprogramming underlies floral mimicry induced by the rust fungus Puccinia monoica in Boechera stricta.

    PubMed

    Cano, Liliana M; Raffaele, Sylvain; Haugen, Riston H; Saunders, Diane G O; Leonelli, Lauriebeth; MacLean, Dan; Hogenhout, Saskia A; Kamoun, Sophien

    2013-01-01

    Pucciniamonoica is a spectacular plant parasitic rust fungus that triggers the formation of flower-like structures (pseudoflowers) in its Brassicaceae host plant Boecherastricta. Pseudoflowers mimic in shape, color, nectar and scent co-occurring and unrelated flowers such as buttercups. They act to attract insects thereby aiding spore dispersal and sexual reproduction of the rust fungus. Although much ecological research has been performed on P. monoica-induced pseudoflowers, this system has yet to be investigated at the molecular or genomic level. To date, the molecular alterations underlying the development of pseudoflowers and the genes involved have not been described. To address this, we performed gene expression profiling to reveal 256 plant biological processes that are significantly altered in pseudoflowers. Among these biological processes, plant genes involved in cell fate specification, regulation of transcription, reproduction, floral organ development, anthocyanin (major floral pigments) and terpenoid biosynthesis (major floral volatile compounds) were down-regulated in pseudoflowers. In contrast, plant genes involved in shoot, cotyledon and leaf development, carbohydrate transport, wax biosynthesis, cutin transport and L-phenylalanine metabolism (pathway that results in phenylethanol and phenylacetaldehyde volatile production) were up-regulated. These findings point to an extensive reprogramming of host genes by the rust pathogen to induce floral mimicry. We also highlight 31 differentially regulated plant genes that are enriched in the biological processes mentioned above, and are potentially involved in the formation of pseudoflowers. This work illustrates the complex perturbations induced by rust pathogens in their host plants, and provides a starting point for understanding the molecular mechanisms of pathogen-induced floral mimicry. PMID:24069397

  3. Candidatus Liberibacter americanus induces significant reprogramming of the transcriptome of the susceptible citrus genotype

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Citrus huanglongbing (HLB) disease is caused by endogenous, phloem-restricted, Gram negative, uncultured bacteria named Candidatus Liberibacter africanus (CaLaf), Ca. L. asiaticus (CaLas), and Ca. L. americanus (CaLam), depending on the continent where the bacteria were first detected. The Asian citrus psyllid vector, Diaphorina citri, transmits CaLas and CaLam and both Liberibacter species are present in Brazil. Several studies of the transcriptional response of citrus plants manifesting HLB symptoms have been reported, but only for CaLas infection. This study evaluated the transcriptional reprogramming of a susceptible genotype of sweet orange challenged with CaLam, using a customized 385K microarray containing approximately 32,000 unigene transcripts. We analyzed global changes in gene expression of CaLam-infected leaves of sweet orange during the symptomatic stage of infection and compared the results with previously published microarray studies that used CaLas-infected plants. Twenty candidate genes were selected to validate the expression profiles in symptomatic and asymptomatic PCR-positive leaves infected with CaLas or CaLam. Results The microarray analysis identified 633 differentially expressed genes during the symptomatic stage of CaLam infection. Among them, 418 (66%) were upregulated and 215 (34%) were down regulated. Five hundred and fourteen genes (81%) were orthologs of genes from Arabidopsis thaliana. Gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) revealed that several of the transcripts encoded transporters associated with the endomembrane system, especially zinc transport. Among the most biologically relevant gene transcripts in GSEA were those related to signaling, metabolism and/or stimulus to hormones, genes responding to stress and pathogenesis, biosynthesis of secondary metabolites, oxidative stress and transcription factors belonging to different families. Real time PCR of 20 candidate genes validated the expression pattern of some genes in

  4. Global expression analysis of the brown alga Ectocarpus siliculosus (Phaeophyceae) reveals large-scale reprogramming of the transcriptome in response to abiotic stress

    PubMed Central

    Dittami, Simon M; Scornet, Delphine; Petit, Jean-Louis; Ségurens, Béatrice; Da Silva, Corinne; Corre, Erwan; Dondrup, Michael; Glatting, Karl-Heinz; König, Rainer; Sterck, Lieven; Rouzé, Pierre; Van de Peer, Yves; Cock, J Mark; Boyen, Catherine; Tonon, Thierry

    2009-01-01

    Background Brown algae (Phaeophyceae) are phylogenetically distant from red and green algae and an important component of the coastal ecosystem. They have developed unique mechanisms that allow them to inhabit the intertidal zone, an environment with high levels of abiotic stress. Ectocarpus siliculosus is being established as a genetic and genomic model for the brown algal lineage, but little is known about its response to abiotic stress. Results Here we examine the transcriptomic changes that occur during the short-term acclimation of E. siliculosus to three different abiotic stress conditions (hyposaline, hypersaline and oxidative stress). Our results show that almost 70% of the expressed genes are regulated in response to at least one of these stressors. Although there are several common elements with terrestrial plants, such as repression of growth-related genes, switching from primary production to protein and nutrient recycling processes, and induction of genes involved in vesicular trafficking, many of the stress-regulated genes are either not known to respond to stress in other organisms or are have been found exclusively in E. siliculosus. Conclusions This first large-scale transcriptomic study of a brown alga demonstrates that, unlike terrestrial plants, E. siliculosus undergoes extensive reprogramming of its transcriptome during the acclimation to mild abiotic stress. We identify several new genes and pathways with a putative function in the stress response and thus pave the way for more detailed investigations of the mechanisms underlying the stress tolerance ofbrown algae. PMID:19531237

  5. Transcriptomic profiling of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis reveals reprogramming of the Crp regulon by temperature and uncovers Crp as a master regulator of small RNAs.

    PubMed

    Nuss, Aaron M; Heroven, Ann Kathrin; Waldmann, Barbara; Reinkensmeier, Jan; Jarek, Michael; Beckstette, Michael; Dersch, Petra

    2015-03-01

    One hallmark of pathogenic yersiniae is their ability to rapidly adjust their life-style and pathogenesis upon host entry. In order to capture the range, magnitude and complexity of the underlying gene control mechanisms we used comparative RNA-seq-based transcriptomic profiling of the enteric pathogen Y. pseudotuberculosis under environmental and infection-relevant conditions. We identified 1151 individual transcription start sites, multiple riboswitch-like RNA elements, and a global set of antisense RNAs and previously unrecognized trans-acting RNAs. Taking advantage of these data, we revealed a temperature-induced and growth phase-dependent reprogramming of a large set of catabolic/energy production genes and uncovered the existence of a thermo-regulated 'acetate switch', which appear to prime the bacteria for growth in the digestive tract. To elucidate the regulatory architecture linking nutritional status to virulence we also refined the CRP regulon. We identified a massive remodelling of the CRP-controlled network in response to temperature and discovered CRP as a transcriptional master regulator of numerous conserved and newly identified non-coding RNAs which participate in this process. This finding highlights a novel level of complexity of the regulatory network in which the concerted action of transcriptional regulators and multiple non-coding RNAs under control of CRP adjusts the control of Yersinia fitness and virulence to the requirements of their environmental and virulent life-styles.

  6. Transcriptional profiling of an Fd-GOGAT1/GLU1 mutant in Arabidopsis thaliana reveals a multiple stress response and extensive reprogramming of the transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Glutamate plays a central position in the synthesis of a variety of organic molecules in plants and is synthesised from nitrate through a series of enzymatic reactions. Glutamate synthases catalyse the last step in this pathway and two types are present in plants: NADH- or ferredoxin-dependent. Here we report a genome wide microarray analysis of the transcriptional reprogramming that occurs in leaves and roots of the A. thaliana mutant glu1-2 knocked-down in the expression of Fd-GOGAT1 (GLU1; At5g04140), one of the two genes of A. thaliana encoding ferredoxin-dependent glutamate synthase. Results Transcriptional profiling of glu1-2 revealed extensive changes with the expression of more than 5500 genes significantly affected in leaves and nearly 700 in roots. Both genes involved in glutamate biosynthesis and transformation are affected, leading to changes in amino acid compositions as revealed by NMR metabolome analysis. An elevated glutamine level in the glu1-2 mutant was the most prominent of these changes. An unbiased analysis of the gene expression datasets allowed us to identify the pathways that constitute the secondary response of an FdGOGAT1/GLU1 knock-down. Among the most significantly affected pathways, photosynthesis, photorespiratory cycle and chlorophyll biosynthesis show an overall downregulation in glu1-2 leaves. This is in accordance with their slight chlorotic phenotype. Another characteristic of the glu1-2 transcriptional profile is the activation of multiple stress responses, mimicking cold, heat, drought and oxidative stress. The change in expression of genes involved in flavonoid biosynthesis is also revealed. The expression of a substantial number of genes encoding stress-related transcription factors, cytochrome P450 monooxygenases, glutathione S-transferases and UDP-glycosyltransferases is affected in the glu1-2 mutant. This may indicate an induction of the detoxification of secondary metabolites in the mutant. Conclusions Analysis

  7. Deep sequencing reveals transcriptome re-programming of Polygonum multiflorum thunb. roots to the elicitation with methyl jasmonate.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongchang; Wu, Wei; Hou, Kai; Chen, Junwen; Zhao, Zhi

    2016-02-01

    The phytohormone methyl jasmonate (MeJA) has been successfully used as an effective elicitor to enhance production of stilbenoid which is induced in plants as a secondary metabolite possibly in defense against herbivores and pathogens. However, the mechanism of MeJA-mediated stilbenoid biosynthesis remains unclear. Genomic information for Polygonum multiflorum Thunb. (P. multiflorum) is currently unavailable. To obtain insight into the global regulation mechanism of MeJA in the steady state of stilbene glucoside production (26 h after MeJA elicitation), especially on stilbene glucoside biosynthesis, we sequenced the transcriptomes of MeJA-treated and untreated P. multiflorum roots and obtained more than 51 million clean reads, from which 79,565 unigenes were obtained by de novo assembly. 56,972 unigenes were annotated against databases including Nr, Nt, Swiss-Prot, KEGG and COG. 18,677 genes expressed differentially between untreated and treated roots. Expression level analysis indicated that a large number of genes were associated with plant-pathogen interaction, plant hormone signal transduction, stilbenoid backbone biosynthesis, and phenylpropanoid biosynthesis. 15 known genes involved in the biosynthesis of stilbenoid backbone were found with 7 genes showing increased transcript abundance following elicitation of MeJA. The significantly up (down)-regulated changes of 70 genes in stilbenoid biosynthesis were validated by qRT-PCR assays and PCR product sequencing. According to the expression changes and the previously proposed enzyme functions, multiple candidates for the unknown steps in stilbene glucoside biosynthesis were identified. We also found some genes putatively involved in the transcription factors. This comprehensive description of gene expression information could greatly facilitate our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of MeJA-mediated stilbenoid biosynthesis in P. multiflorum roots. Our results shed new light on the global regulation

  8. Acquired resistance to metformin in breast cancer cells triggers transcriptome reprogramming toward a degradome-related metastatic stem-like profile

    PubMed Central

    Oliveras-Ferraros, Cristina; Vazquez-Martin, Alejandro; Cuyàs, Elisabet; Corominas-Faja, Bruna; Rodríguez-Gallego, Esther; Fernández-Arroyo, Salvador; Martin-Castillo, Begoña; Joven, Jorge; Menendez, Javier A

    2014-01-01

    Therapeutic interventions based on metabolic inhibitor-based therapies are expected to be less prone to acquired resistance. However, there has not been any study assessing the possibility that the targeting of the tumor cell metabolism may result in unforeseeable resistance. We recently established a pre-clinical model of estrogen-dependent MCF-7 breast cancer cells that were chronically adapted to grow (> 10 months) in the presence of graded, millimolar concentrations of the anti-diabetic biguanide metformin, an AMPK agonist/mTOR inhibitor that has been evaluated in multiple in vitro and in vivo cancer studies and is now being tested in clinical trials. To assess what impact the phenomenon of resistance might have on the metformin-like “dirty” drugs that are able to simultaneously hit several metabolic pathways, we employed the ingenuity pathway analysis (IPA) software to functionally interpret the data from Agilent whole-human genome arrays in the context of biological processes, networks, and pathways. Our findings establish, for the first time, that a “global” targeting of metabolic reprogramming using metformin certainly imposes a great selective pressure for the emergence of new breast cancer cellular states. Intriguingly, acquired resistance to metformin appears to trigger a transcriptome reprogramming toward a metastatic stem-like profile, as many genes encoding the components of the degradome (KLK11, CTSF, FREM1, BACE-2, CASP, TMPRSS4, MMP16, HTRA1), cancer cell migration and invasion factors (TP63, WISP2, GAS3, DKK1, BCAR3, PABPC1, MUC1, SPARCL1, SEMA3B, SEMA6A), stem cell markers (DCLK1, FAK), and key pro-metastatic lipases (MAGL and Cpla2) were included in the signature. Because this convergent activation of pathways underlying tumor microenvironment interactions occurred in low-proliferative cancer cells exhibiting a notable downregulation of the G2/M DNA damage checkpoint regulators that maintain genome stability (CCNB1, CCNB2, CDC20, CDC25C

  9. Acquired resistance to metformin in breast cancer cells triggers transcriptome reprogramming toward a degradome-related metastatic stem-like profile.

    PubMed

    Oliveras-Ferraros, Cristina; Vazquez-Martin, Alejandro; Cuyàs, Elisabet; Corominas-Faja, Bruna; Rodríguez-Gallego, Esther; Fernández-Arroyo, Salvador; Martin-Castillo, Begoña; Joven, Jorge; Menendez, Javier A

    2014-01-01

    Therapeutic interventions based on metabolic inhibitor-based therapies are expected to be less prone to acquired resistance. However, there has not been any study assessing the possibility that the targeting of the tumor cell metabolism may result in unforeseeable resistance. We recently established a pre-clinical model of estrogen-dependent MCF-7 breast cancer cells that were chronically adapted to grow (> 10 months) in the presence of graded, millimolar concentrations of the anti-diabetic biguanide metformin, an AMPK agonist/mTOR inhibitor that has been evaluated in multiple in vitro and in vivo cancer studies and is now being tested in clinical trials. To assess what impact the phenomenon of resistance might have on the metformin-like "dirty" drugs that are able to simultaneously hit several metabolic pathways, we employed the ingenuity pathway analysis (IPA) software to functionally interpret the data from Agilent whole-human genome arrays in the context of biological processes, networks, and pathways. Our findings establish, for the first time, that a "global" targeting of metabolic reprogramming using metformin certainly imposes a great selective pressure for the emergence of new breast cancer cellular states. Intriguingly, acquired resistance to metformin appears to trigger a transcriptome reprogramming toward a metastatic stem-like profile, as many genes encoding the components of the degradome (KLK11, CTSF, FREM1, BACE-2, CASP, TMPRSS4, MMP16, HTRA1), cancer cell migration and invasion factors (TP63, WISP2, GAS3, DKK1, BCAR3, PABPC1, MUC1, SPARCL1, SEMA3B, SEMA6A), stem cell markers (DCLK1, FAK), and key pro-metastatic lipases (MAGL and Cpla2) were included in the signature. Because this convergent activation of pathways underlying tumor microenvironment interactions occurred in low-proliferative cancer cells exhibiting a notable downregulation of the G 2/M DNA damage checkpoint regulators that maintain genome stability (CCNB1, CCNB2, CDC20, CDC25C, AURKA

  10. Cellular Reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Kazutoshi

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear reprogramming technology was first established more than 50 years ago. It can rejuvenate somatic cells by erasing the epigenetic memories and reconstructing a new pluripotent order. The recent discovery reviewed here that induced pluripotency can be achieved by a small set of transcription factors has opened up unprecedented opportunities in the pharmaceutical industry, the clinic, and laboratories. This technology allows us to access pathological studies by using patient-specific induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. In addition, iPS cells are also expected to be a rising star for regenerative medicine, as sources of transplantation therapy. PMID:24492711

  11. Integrated network analysis identifies fight-club nodes as a class of hubs encompassing key putative switch genes that induce major transcriptome reprogramming during grapevine development.

    PubMed

    Palumbo, Maria Concetta; Zenoni, Sara; Fasoli, Marianna; Massonnet, Mélanie; Farina, Lorenzo; Castiglione, Filippo; Pezzotti, Mario; Paci, Paola

    2014-12-01

    We developed an approach that integrates different network-based methods to analyze the correlation network arising from large-scale gene expression data. By studying grapevine (Vitis vinifera) and tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) gene expression atlases and a grapevine berry transcriptomic data set during the transition from immature to mature growth, we identified a category named "fight-club hubs" characterized by a marked negative correlation with the expression profiles of neighboring genes in the network. A special subset named "switch genes" was identified, with the additional property of many significant negative correlations outside their own group in the network. Switch genes are involved in multiple processes and include transcription factors that may be considered master regulators of the previously reported transcriptome remodeling that marks the developmental shift from immature to mature growth. All switch genes, expressed at low levels in vegetative/green tissues, showed a significant increase in mature/woody organs, suggesting a potential regulatory role during the developmental transition. Finally, our analysis of tomato gene expression data sets showed that wild-type switch genes are downregulated in ripening-deficient mutants. The identification of known master regulators of tomato fruit maturation suggests our method is suitable for the detection of key regulators of organ development in different fleshy fruit crops.

  12. Leaf-mining by Phyllonorycter blancardella reprograms the host-leaf transcriptome to modulate phytohormones associated with nutrient mobilization and plant defense.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Dugé de Bernonville, Thomas; Body, Mélanie; Glevarec, Gaëlle; Reichelt, Michael; Unsicker, Sybille; Bruneau, Maryline; Renou, Jean-Pierre; Huguet, Elisabeth; Dubreuil, Géraldine; Giron, David

    2016-01-01

    Phytohormones have long been hypothesized to play a key role in the interactions between plant-manipulating organisms and their host-plants such as insect-plant interactions that lead to gall or 'green-islands' induction. However, mechanistic understanding of how phytohormones operate in these plant reconfigurations is lacking due to limited information on the molecular and biochemical phytohormonal modulation following attack by plant-manipulating insects. In an attempt to fill this gap, the present study provides an extensive characterization of how the leaf-miner Phyllonorycter blancardella modulates the major phytohormones and the transcriptional activity of plant cells in leaves of Malus domestica. We show here, that cytokinins strongly accumulate in mined tissues despite a weak expression of plant cytokinin-related genes. Leaf-mining is also associated with enhanced biosynthesis of jasmonic acid precursors but not the active form, a weak alteration of the salicylic acid pathway and a clear inhibition of the abscisic acid pathway. Our study consolidates previous results suggesting that insects may produce and deliver cytokinins to the plant as a strategy to manipulate the physiology of the leaf to create a favorable nutritional environment. We also demonstrate that leaf-mining by P. blancardella leads to a strong reprogramming of the plant phytohormonal balance associated with increased nutrient mobilization, inhibition of leaf senescence and mitigation of plant direct and indirect defense.

  13. Advanced Technologies Lead iNto New Reprogramming Routes.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yang; Qian, Li

    2016-09-01

    Two recent papers provide new insights on transcriptional dynamics and epigenetic remodeling during reprogramming of induced neurons (iNs). Treutlein et al. (2016) applied single-cell transcriptomics to identify routes and detours during early iN induction, while in this issue of Cell Stem Cell, Black et al. (2016) employed gene editing to activate endogenous loci of the reprogramming factors. PMID:27588744

  14. Dissecting direct reprogramming from fibroblast to neuron using single-cell RNA-seq.

    PubMed

    Treutlein, Barbara; Lee, Qian Yi; Camp, J Gray; Mall, Moritz; Koh, Winston; Shariati, Seyed Ali Mohammad; Sim, Sopheak; Neff, Norma F; Skotheim, Jan M; Wernig, Marius; Quake, Stephen R

    2016-06-16

    Direct lineage reprogramming represents a remarkable conversion of cellular and transcriptome states. However, the intermediate stages through which individual cells progress during reprogramming are largely undefined. Here we use single-cell RNA sequencing at multiple time points to dissect direct reprogramming from mouse embryonic fibroblasts to induced neuronal cells. By deconstructing heterogeneity at each time point and ordering cells by transcriptome similarity, we find that the molecular reprogramming path is remarkably continuous. Overexpression of the proneural pioneer factor Ascl1 results in a well-defined initialization, causing cells to exit the cell cycle and re-focus gene expression through distinct neural transcription factors. The initial transcriptional response is relatively homogeneous among fibroblasts, suggesting that the early steps are not limiting for productive reprogramming. Instead, the later emergence of a competing myogenic program and variable transgene dynamics over time appear to be the major efficiency limits of direct reprogramming. Moreover, a transcriptional state, distinct from donor and target cell programs, is transiently induced in cells undergoing productive reprogramming. Our data provide a high-resolution approach for understanding transcriptome states during lineage differentiation. PMID:27281220

  15. Reprogramming Roadblocks Are System Dependent

    PubMed Central

    Chantzoura, Eleni; Skylaki, Stavroula; Menendez, Sergio; Kim, Shin-Il; Johnsson, Anna; Linnarsson, Sten; Woltjen, Knut; Chambers, Ian; Kaji, Keisuke

    2015-01-01

    Summary Since the first generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), several reprogramming systems have been used to study its molecular mechanisms. However, the system of choice largely affects the reprogramming efficiency, influencing our view on the mechanisms. Here, we demonstrate that reprogramming triggered by less efficient polycistronic reprogramming cassettes not only highlights mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition (MET) as a roadblock but also faces more severe difficulties to attain a pluripotent state even post-MET. In contrast, more efficient cassettes can reprogram both wild-type and Nanog−/− fibroblasts with comparable efficiencies, routes, and kinetics, unlike the less efficient reprogramming systems. Moreover, we attribute a previously reported variation in the N terminus of KLF4 as a dominant factor underlying these critical differences. Our data establish that some reprogramming roadblocks are system dependent, highlighting the need to pursue mechanistic studies with close attention to the systems to better understand reprogramming. PMID:26278041

  16. Repressors of reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Popowski, Melissa; Tucker, Haley

    2015-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have been the focal point of ever increasing interest and scrutiny as they hold the promise of personalized regenerative medicine. However, creation of iPSCs is an inefficient process that requires forced expression of potentially oncogenic proteins. In order to unlock the full potential of iPSCs, both for basic and clinical research, we must broaden our search for more reliable ways of inducing pluripotency in somatic cells. This review surveys an area of reprogramming that does not receive as much focus, barriers to reprogramming, in the hope of stimulating new ideas and approaches towards developing safer and more efficient methods of reprogramming. Better methods of iPSC creation will allow for more reliable disease modeling, better basic research into the pluripotent state and safer iPSCs that can be used in a clinical setting. PMID:25914761

  17. Integrated Network Analysis Identifies Fight-Club Nodes as a Class of Hubs Encompassing Key Putative Switch Genes That Induce Major Transcriptome Reprogramming during Grapevine Development[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Palumbo, Maria Concetta; Zenoni, Sara; Fasoli, Marianna; Massonnet, Mélanie; Farina, Lorenzo; Castiglione, Filippo; Pezzotti, Mario; Paci, Paola

    2014-01-01

    We developed an approach that integrates different network-based methods to analyze the correlation network arising from large-scale gene expression data. By studying grapevine (Vitis vinifera) and tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) gene expression atlases and a grapevine berry transcriptomic data set during the transition from immature to mature growth, we identified a category named “fight-club hubs” characterized by a marked negative correlation with the expression profiles of neighboring genes in the network. A special subset named “switch genes” was identified, with the additional property of many significant negative correlations outside their own group in the network. Switch genes are involved in multiple processes and include transcription factors that may be considered master regulators of the previously reported transcriptome remodeling that marks the developmental shift from immature to mature growth. All switch genes, expressed at low levels in vegetative/green tissues, showed a significant increase in mature/woody organs, suggesting a potential regulatory role during the developmental transition. Finally, our analysis of tomato gene expression data sets showed that wild-type switch genes are downregulated in ripening-deficient mutants. The identification of known master regulators of tomato fruit maturation suggests our method is suitable for the detection of key regulators of organ development in different fleshy fruit crops. PMID:25490918

  18. Mice produced by mitotic reprogramming of sperm injected into haploid parthenogenotes

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Toru; Asami, Maki; Hoffmann, Martin; Lu, Xin; Gužvić, Miodrag; Klein, Christoph A.; Perry, Anthony C. F.

    2016-01-01

    Sperm are highly differentiated and the activities that reprogram them for embryonic development during fertilization have historically been considered unique to the oocyte. We here challenge this view and demonstrate that mouse embryos in the mitotic cell cycle can also directly reprogram sperm for full-term development. Developmentally incompetent haploid embryos (parthenogenotes) injected with sperm developed to produce healthy offspring at up to 24% of control rates, depending when in the embryonic cell cycle injection took place. This implies that most of the first embryonic cell cycle can be bypassed in sperm genome reprogramming for full development. Remodelling of histones and genomic 5′-methylcytosine and 5′-hydroxymethylcytosine following embryo injection were distinct from remodelling in fertilization and the resulting 2-cell embryos consistently possessed abnormal transcriptomes. These studies demonstrate plasticity in the reprogramming of terminally differentiated sperm nuclei and suggest that different epigenetic pathways or kinetics can establish totipotency. PMID:27623537

  19. Mice produced by mitotic reprogramming of sperm injected into haploid parthenogenotes.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Toru; Asami, Maki; Hoffmann, Martin; Lu, Xin; Gužvić, Miodrag; Klein, Christoph A; Perry, Anthony C F

    2016-01-01

    Sperm are highly differentiated and the activities that reprogram them for embryonic development during fertilization have historically been considered unique to the oocyte. We here challenge this view and demonstrate that mouse embryos in the mitotic cell cycle can also directly reprogram sperm for full-term development. Developmentally incompetent haploid embryos (parthenogenotes) injected with sperm developed to produce healthy offspring at up to 24% of control rates, depending when in the embryonic cell cycle injection took place. This implies that most of the first embryonic cell cycle can be bypassed in sperm genome reprogramming for full development. Remodelling of histones and genomic 5'-methylcytosine and 5'-hydroxymethylcytosine following embryo injection were distinct from remodelling in fertilization and the resulting 2-cell embryos consistently possessed abnormal transcriptomes. These studies demonstrate plasticity in the reprogramming of terminally differentiated sperm nuclei and suggest that different epigenetic pathways or kinetics can establish totipotency. PMID:27623537

  20. An integrated systems biology approach identifies positive cofactor 4 as a factor that increases reprogramming efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Junghyun; Hwang, Sohyun; Kim, Hyung Joon; Hong, Soomin; Lee, Jeoung Eun; Lee, Sung-Geum; Baek, Ahmi; Han, Heonjong; Lee, Jin Il; Lee, Insuk; Lee, Dong Ryul

    2016-01-01

    Spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) can spontaneously dedifferentiate into embryonic stem cell (ESC)-like cells, which are designated as multipotent SSCs (mSSCs), without ectopic expression of reprogramming factors. Interestingly, SSCs express key pluripotency genes such as Oct4, Sox2, Klf4 and Myc. Therefore, molecular dissection of mSSC reprogramming may provide clues about novel endogenous reprogramming or pluripotency regulatory factors. Our comparative transcriptome analysis of mSSCs and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) suggests that they have similar pluripotency states but are reprogrammed via different transcriptional pathways. We identified 53 genes as putative pluripotency regulatory factors using an integrated systems biology approach. We demonstrated a selected candidate, Positive cofactor 4 (Pc4), can enhance the efficiency of somatic cell reprogramming by promoting and maintaining transcriptional activity of the key reprograming factors. These results suggest that Pc4 has an important role in inducing spontaneous somatic cell reprogramming via up-regulation of key pluripotency genes. PMID:26740582

  1. Reprogramming in vivo produces teratomas and iPS cells with totipotency features.

    PubMed

    Abad, María; Mosteiro, Lluc; Pantoja, Cristina; Cañamero, Marta; Rayon, Teresa; Ors, Inmaculada; Graña, Osvaldo; Megías, Diego; Domínguez, Orlando; Martínez, Dolores; Manzanares, Miguel; Ortega, Sagrario; Serrano, Manuel

    2013-10-17

    Reprogramming of adult cells to generate induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS cells) has opened new therapeutic opportunities; however, little is known about the possibility of in vivo reprogramming within tissues. Here we show that transitory induction of the four factors Oct4, Sox2, Klf4 and c-Myc in mice results in teratomas emerging from multiple organs, implying that full reprogramming can occur in vivo. Analyses of the stomach, intestine, pancreas and kidney reveal groups of dedifferentiated cells that express the pluripotency marker NANOG, indicative of in situ reprogramming. By bone marrow transplantation, we demonstrate that haematopoietic cells can also be reprogrammed in vivo. Notably, reprogrammable mice present circulating iPS cells in the blood and, at the transcriptome level, these in vivo generated iPS cells are closer to embryonic stem cells (ES cells) than standard in vitro generated iPS cells. Moreover, in vivo iPS cells efficiently contribute to the trophectoderm lineage, suggesting that they achieve a more plastic or primitive state than ES cells. Finally, intraperitoneal injection of in vivo iPS cells generates embryo-like structures that express embryonic and extraembryonic markers. We conclude that reprogramming in vivo is feasible and confers totipotency features absent in standard iPS or ES cells. These discoveries could be relevant for future applications of reprogramming in regenerative medicine. PMID:24025773

  2. Reprogramming in vivo produces teratomas and iPS cells with totipotency features.

    PubMed

    Abad, María; Mosteiro, Lluc; Pantoja, Cristina; Cañamero, Marta; Rayon, Teresa; Ors, Inmaculada; Graña, Osvaldo; Megías, Diego; Domínguez, Orlando; Martínez, Dolores; Manzanares, Miguel; Ortega, Sagrario; Serrano, Manuel

    2013-10-17

    Reprogramming of adult cells to generate induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS cells) has opened new therapeutic opportunities; however, little is known about the possibility of in vivo reprogramming within tissues. Here we show that transitory induction of the four factors Oct4, Sox2, Klf4 and c-Myc in mice results in teratomas emerging from multiple organs, implying that full reprogramming can occur in vivo. Analyses of the stomach, intestine, pancreas and kidney reveal groups of dedifferentiated cells that express the pluripotency marker NANOG, indicative of in situ reprogramming. By bone marrow transplantation, we demonstrate that haematopoietic cells can also be reprogrammed in vivo. Notably, reprogrammable mice present circulating iPS cells in the blood and, at the transcriptome level, these in vivo generated iPS cells are closer to embryonic stem cells (ES cells) than standard in vitro generated iPS cells. Moreover, in vivo iPS cells efficiently contribute to the trophectoderm lineage, suggesting that they achieve a more plastic or primitive state than ES cells. Finally, intraperitoneal injection of in vivo iPS cells generates embryo-like structures that express embryonic and extraembryonic markers. We conclude that reprogramming in vivo is feasible and confers totipotency features absent in standard iPS or ES cells. These discoveries could be relevant for future applications of reprogramming in regenerative medicine.

  3. Epigenomic Reprogramming of Adult Cardiomyocyte-Derived Cardiac Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yiqiang; Zhong, Jiang F; Qiu, Hongyu; Robb MacLellan, W.; Marbán, Eduardo; Wang, Charles

    2015-01-01

    It has been believed that mammalian adult cardiomyocytes (ACMs) are terminally-differentiated and are unable to proliferate. Recently, using a bi-transgenic ACM fate mapping mouse model and an in vitro culture system, we demonstrated that adult mouse cardiomyocytes were able to dedifferentiate into cardiac progenitor-like cells (CPCs). However, little is known about the molecular basis of their intrinsic cellular plasticity. Here we integrate single-cell transcriptome and whole-genome DNA methylation analyses to unravel the molecular mechanisms underlying the dedifferentiation and cell cycle reentry of mouse ACMs. Compared to parental cardiomyocytes, dedifferentiated mouse cardiomyocyte-derived CPCs (mCPCs) display epigenomic reprogramming with many differentially-methylated regions, both hypermethylated and hypomethylated, across the entire genome. Correlated well with the methylome, our transcriptomic data showed that the genes encoding cardiac structure and function proteins are remarkably down-regulated in mCPCs, while those for cell cycle, proliferation, and stemness are significantly up-regulated. In addition, implantation of mCPCs into infarcted mouse myocardium improves cardiac function with augmented left ventricular ejection fraction. Our study demonstrates that the cellular plasticity of mammalian cardiomyocytes is the result of a well-orchestrated epigenomic reprogramming and a subsequent global transcriptomic alteration. PMID:26657817

  4. Chemical Approaches to Cell Reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in cell reprogramming via employing different sets of factors, which allows generation of various cell types that are beyond the downstream developmental lineages from the starting cell type, provide significant opportunities to study fundamental biology and hold enormous promise in regenerative medicine. Small molecules have been identified to enhance and enable reprogramming by regulating various mechanisms, and provide a highly temporal and tunable approach to modulate cellular fate and functions. Here, we review the latest development in cell reprogramming from the perspective of small molecule modulation. PMID:25461450

  5. Reprogramming of somatic cells.

    PubMed

    Rajasingh, Johnson

    2012-01-01

    Reprogramming of adult somatic cells into pluripotent stem cells may provide an attractive source of stem cells for regenerative medicine. It has emerged as an invaluable method for generating patient-specific stem cells of any cell lineage without the use of embryonic stem cells. A revolutionary study in 2006 showed that it is possible to convert adult somatic cells directly into pluripotent stem cells by using a limited number of pluripotent transcription factors and is called as iPS cells. Currently, both genomic integrating viral and nonintegrating nonviral methods are used to generate iPS cells. However, the viral-based technology poses increased risk of safety, and more studies are now focused on nonviral-based technology to obtain autologous stem cells for clinical therapy. In this review, the pros and cons of the present iPS cell technology and the future direction for the successful translation of this technology into the clinic are discussed.

  6. Increasing Notch signaling antagonizes PRC2-mediated silencing to promote reprograming of germ cells into neurons

    PubMed Central

    Seelk, Stefanie; Adrian-Kalchhauser, Irene; Hargitai, Balázs; Hajduskova, Martina; Gutnik, Silvia; Tursun, Baris; Ciosk, Rafal

    2016-01-01

    Cell-fate reprograming is at the heart of development, yet very little is known about the molecular mechanisms promoting or inhibiting reprograming in intact organisms. In the C. elegans germline, reprograming germ cells into somatic cells requires chromatin perturbation. Here, we describe that such reprograming is facilitated by GLP-1/Notch signaling pathway. This is surprising, since this pathway is best known for maintaining undifferentiated germline stem cells/progenitors. Through a combination of genetics, tissue-specific transcriptome analysis, and functional studies of candidate genes, we uncovered a possible explanation for this unexpected role of GLP-1/Notch. We propose that GLP-1/Notch promotes reprograming by activating specific genes, silenced by the Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2), and identify the conserved histone demethylase UTX-1 as a crucial GLP-1/Notch target facilitating reprograming. These findings have wide implications, ranging from development to diseases associated with abnormal Notch signaling. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15477.001 PMID:27602485

  7. Totipotency, Pluripotency and Nuclear Reprogramming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitalipov, Shoukhrat; Wolf, Don

    Mammalian development commences with the totipotent zygote which is capable of developing into all the specialized cells that make up the adult animal. As development unfolds, cells of the early embryo proliferate and differentiate into the first two lineages, the pluripotent inner cell mass and the trophectoderm. Pluripotent cells can be isolated, adapted and propagated indefinitely in vitro in an undifferentiated state as embryonic stem cells (ESCs). ESCs retain their ability to differentiate into cells representing the three major germ layers: endoderm, mesoderm or ectoderm or any of the 200+ cell types present in the adult body. Since many human diseases result from defects in a single cell type, pluripotent human ESCs represent an unlimited source of any cell or tissue type for replacement therapy thus providing a possible cure for many devastating conditions. Pluripotent cells resembling ESCs can also be derived experimentally by the nuclear reprogramming of somatic cells. Reprogrammed somatic cells may have an even more important role in cell replacement therapies since the patient's own somatic cells can be used for reprogramming thereby eliminating immune based rejection of transplanted cells. In this review, we summarize two major approaches to reprogramming: (1) somatic cell nuclear transfer and (2) direct reprogramming using genetic manipulations.

  8. Epigenetic reprogramming in plant sexual reproduction.

    PubMed

    Kawashima, Tomokazu; Berger, Frédéric

    2014-09-01

    Epigenetic reprogramming consists of global changes in DNA methylation and histone modifications. In mammals, epigenetic reprogramming is primarily associated with sexual reproduction and occurs during both gametogenesis and early embryonic development. Such reprogramming is crucial not only to maintain genomic integrity through silencing transposable elements but also to reset the silenced status of imprinted genes. In plants, observations of stable transgenerational inheritance of epialleles have argued against reprogramming. However, emerging evidence supports that epigenetic reprogramming indeed occurs during sexual reproduction in plants and that it has a major role in maintaining genome integrity and a potential contribution to epiallelic variation.

  9. Reprogramming Cells for Brain Repair

    PubMed Central

    Guarino, Alyx T.; McKinnon, Randall D.

    2013-01-01

    At present there are no clinical therapies that can repair traumatic brain injury, spinal cord injury or degenerative brain disease. While redundancy and rewiring of surviving circuits can recover some lost function, the brain and spinal column lack sufficient endogenous stem cells to replace lost neurons or their supporting glia. In contrast, pre-clinical studies have demonstrated that exogenous transplants can have remarkable efficacy for brain repair in animal models. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) can provide paracrine factors that repair damage caused by ischemic injury, and oligodendrocyte progenitor cell (OPC) grafts give dramatic functional recovery from spinal cord injury. These studies have progressed to clinical trials, including human embryonic stem cell (hESC)-derived OPCs for spinal cord repair. However, ESC-derived allografts are less than optimal, and we need to identify a more appropriate donor graft population. The cell reprogramming field has developed the ability to trans-differentiate somatic cells into distinct cell types, a technology that has the potential to generate autologous neurons and glia which address the histocompatibility concerns of allografts and the tumorigenicity concerns of ESC-derived grafts. Further clarifying how cell reprogramming works may lead to more efficient direct reprogram approaches, and possibly in vivo reprogramming, in order to promote brain and spinal cord repair. PMID:24961526

  10. Reprogramming of two somatic nuclei in the same ooplasm leads to pluripotent embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, Martin J; Esteves, Telma C; Balbach, Sebastian T; Araúzo-Bravo, Marcos J; Stehling, Martin; Jauch, Anna; Houghton, Franchesca D; Schwarzer, Caroline; Boiani, Michele

    2013-11-01

    The conversion of the nuclear program of a somatic cell from a differentiated to an undifferentiated state can be accomplished by transplanting its nucleus to an enucleated oocyte (somatic cell nuclear transfer [SCNT]) in a process termed "reprogramming." This process achieves pluripotency and occasionally also totipotency. Exploiting the obstacle of tetraploidy to full development in mammals, we show that mouse ooplasts transplanted with two somatic nuclei simultaneously (double SCNT) support preimplantation development and derivation of novel tetraploid SCNT embryonic stem cells (tNT-ESCs). Although the double SCNT embryos do not recapitulate the expression pattern of the pluripotency-associated gene Oct4 in fertilized embryos, derivative tNT-ESCs have characteristics of genuine pluripotency: in vitro they differentiate into neurons, cardiomyocytes, and endodermal cells; in vivo, tNT-ESCs form teratomas, albeit at reduced rates compared to diploid counterparts. Global transcriptome analysis revealed only few specific alterations, for example, in the quantitative expression of gastrulation-associated genes. In conclusion, we have shown that the oocyte's reprogramming capacity is in excess of a single nucleus and that double nucleus-transplanted embryos and derivative ESCs are very similar to their diploid counterparts. These results have key implications for reprogramming studies based on pluripotency: while reprogramming in the tetraploid state was known from fusion-mediated reprogramming and from fetal and adult hepatocyte-derived induced pluripotent stem cells, we have now accomplished it with enucleated oocytes.

  11. The cellular memory disc of reprogrammed cells.

    PubMed

    Anjamrooz, Seyed Hadi

    2013-04-01

    The crucial facts underlying the low efficiency of cellular reprogramming are poorly understood. Cellular reprogramming occurs in nuclear transfer, induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) formation, cell fusion, and lineage-switching experiments. Despite these advances, there are three fundamental problems to be addressed: (1) the majority of cells cannot be reprogrammed, (2) the efficiency of reprogramming cells is usually low, and (3) the reprogrammed cells developed from a patient's own cells activate immune responses. These shortcomings present major obstacles for using reprogramming approaches in customised cell therapy. In this Perspective, the author synthesises past and present observations in the field of cellular reprogramming to propose a theoretical picture of the cellular memory disc. The current hypothesis is that all cells undergo an endogenous and exogenous holographic memorisation such that parts of the cellular memory dramatically decrease the efficiency of reprogramming cells, act like a barrier against reprogramming in the majority of cells, and activate immune responses. Accordingly, the focus of this review is mainly to describe the cellular memory disc (CMD). Based on the present theory, cellular memory includes three parts: a reprogramming-resistance memory (RRM), a switch-promoting memory (SPM) and a culture-induced memory (CIM). The cellular memory arises genetically, epigenetically and non-genetically and affects cellular behaviours. [corrected].

  12. Cellular reprogramming and hepatocellular carcinoma development.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yun-Wen; Nie, Yun-Zhong; Taniguchi, Hideki

    2013-12-21

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common cancers, and is also the leading cause of death worldwide. Studies have shown that cellular reprogramming contributes to chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy resistance and the recurrence of cancers. In this article, we summarize and discuss the latest findings in the area of cellular reprogramming in HCC. The aberrant expression of transcription factors OCT4, KLF4, SOX2, c-MYC, NANOG, and LIN28 have been also observed, and the expression of these transcription factors is associated with unfavorable clinical outcomes in HCC. Studies indicate that cellular reprogramming may play a critical role in the occurrence and recurrence of HCC. Recent reports have shown that DNA methylation, miRNAs, tumor microenvironment, and signaling pathways can induce the expression of stemness transcription factors, which leads to cellular reprogramming in HCC. Furthermore, studies indicate that therapies based on cellular reprogramming could revolutionize HCC treatment. Finally, a novel therapeutic concept is discussed: reprogramming control therapy. A potential reprogramming control therapy method could be developed based on the reprogramming demonstrated in HCC studies and applied at two opposing levels: differentiation and reprogramming. Our increasing understanding and control of cellular programming should facilitate the exploitation of this novel therapeutic concept and its application in clinical HCC treatment, which may represent a promising strategy in the future that is not restricted to liver cancer. PMID:24379607

  13. Cellular reprogramming and hepatocellular carcinoma development

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yun-Wen; Nie, Yun-Zhong; Taniguchi, Hideki

    2013-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common cancers, and is also the leading cause of death worldwide. Studies have shown that cellular reprogramming contributes to chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy resistance and the recurrence of cancers. In this article, we summarize and discuss the latest findings in the area of cellular reprogramming in HCC. The aberrant expression of transcription factors OCT4, KLF4, SOX2, c-MYC, NANOG, and LIN28 have been also observed, and the expression of these transcription factors is associated with unfavorable clinical outcomes in HCC. Studies indicate that cellular reprogramming may play a critical role in the occurrence and recurrence of HCC. Recent reports have shown that DNA methylation, miRNAs, tumor microenvironment, and signaling pathways can induce the expression of stemness transcription factors, which leads to cellular reprogramming in HCC. Furthermore, studies indicate that therapies based on cellular reprogramming could revolutionize HCC treatment. Finally, a novel therapeutic concept is discussed: reprogramming control therapy. A potential reprogramming control therapy method could be developed based on the reprogramming demonstrated in HCC studies and applied at two opposing levels: differentiation and reprogramming. Our increasing understanding and control of cellular programming should facilitate the exploitation of this novel therapeutic concept and its application in clinical HCC treatment, which may represent a promising strategy in the future that is not restricted to liver cancer. PMID:24379607

  14. Actin stress in cell reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jun; Wang, Yuexiu; Sachs, Frederick; Meng, Fanjie

    2014-01-01

    Cell mechanics plays a role in stem cell reprogramming and differentiation. To understand this process better, we created a genetically encoded optical probe, named actin–cpstFRET–actin (AcpA), to report forces in actin in living cells in real time. We showed that stemness was associated with increased force in actin. We reprogrammed HEK-293 cells into stem-like cells using no transcription factors but simply by softening the substrate. However, Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cell reprogramming required, in addition to a soft substrate, Harvey rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog expression. Replating the stem-like cells on glass led to redifferentiation and reduced force in actin. The actin force probe was a FRET sensor, called cpstFRET (circularly permuted stretch sensitive FRET), flanked by g-actin subunits. The labeled actin expressed efficiently in HEK, MDCK, 3T3, and bovine aortic endothelial cells and in multiple stable cell lines created from those cells. The viability of the cell lines demonstrated that labeled actin did not significantly affect cell physiology. The labeled actin distribution was similar to that observed with GFP-tagged actin. We also examined the stress in the actin cross-linker actinin. Actinin force was not always correlated with actin force, emphasizing the need for addressing protein specificity when discussing forces. Because actin is a primary structural protein in animal cells, understanding its force distribution is central to understanding animal cell physiology and the many linked reactions such as stress-induced gene expression. This new probe permits measuring actin forces in a wide range of experiments on preparations ranging from isolated proteins to transgenic animals. PMID:25422450

  15. Five classic articles in somatic cell reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Park, In-Hyun

    2010-09-01

    Research on somatic cell reprogramming has progressed significantly over the past few decades, from nuclear transfer into frogs' eggs in 1952 to the derivation of human-induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells in the present day. In this article, I review five landmark papers that have laid the foundation for current efforts to apply somatic cell reprogramming in the clinic. PMID:20885901

  16. Dynamic culture improves cell reprogramming efficiency.

    PubMed

    Sia, Junren; Sun, Raymond; Chu, Julia; Li, Song

    2016-06-01

    Cell reprogramming to pluripotency is an inefficient process and various approaches have been devised to improve the yield of induced pluripotent stem cells. However, the effect of biophysical factors on cell reprogramming is not well understood. Here we showed that, for the first time, dynamic culture with orbital shaking significantly improved the reprogramming efficiency in adherent cells. Manipulating the viscosity of the culture medium suggested that the improved efficiency is mainly attributed to convective mixing rather than hydrodynamic shear stress. Temporal studies demonstrated that the enhancement of reprogramming efficiency required the dynamic culture in the middle but not early phase. In the early phase, fibroblasts had a high proliferation rate, but as the culture became over-confluent in the middle phase, expression of p57 was upregulated to inhibit cell proliferation and consequently, cell reprogramming. Subjecting the over confluent culture to orbital shaking prevented the upregulation of p57, thus improving reprogramming efficiency. Seeding cells at low densities to avoid over-confluency resulted in a lower efficiency, and optimal reprogramming efficiency was attained at a high seeding density with dynamic culture. Our findings provide insight into the underlying mechanisms of how dynamic culture condition regulate cell reprogramming, and will have broad impact on cell engineering for regenerative medicine and disease modeling.

  17. Somatic Cell Reprogramming into Cardiovascular Lineages

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jenny X.; Plonowska, Karolina; Wu, Sean M.

    2015-01-01

    Ischemic cardiac disease is the leading cause of death in the developed world. The inability of the adult mammalian heart to adequately repair itself has motivated stem cell researchers to explore various strategies to regenerate cardiomyocytes after myocardial infarction. Over the past century, progressive gains in our knowledge about the cellular mechanisms governing fate determination have led to recent advances in cellular reprogramming. The identification of specific factors capable of inducing pluripotent phenotype in somatic cells as well as factors that can directly reprogram somatic cells into cardiomyocytes suggests the potential for these approaches to translate into clinical therapies in the future. While conceptually appealing, the field of cell lineage reprogramming is in its infancy and further research will be needed to improve the efficiency of the reprogramming process and the fidelity of the reprogrammed cells to their in vivo counterpart. PMID:24764131

  18. Toward directed reprogramming through exogenous factors

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Changsheng; Yu, Chen; Ding, Sheng

    2013-01-01

    Direct reprogramming of one cell type into another provides unprecedented opportunities to study fundamental biology, model disease, and develop regenerative medicine. Different paradigms of reprogramming strategies with different sets of factors have been developed to generate various cell types, including induced pluripotent stem cells, neuronal or neural precursor cells, cardiomyocyte-like cells, endothelial cells, and hepatocyte-like cells. Various exogenous factors, especially small molecules modulating signaling, cellular state, and transcription, have been identified to enhance and enable reprogramming. With an increased understanding of reprogramming mechanisms and discovery of new molecules, it is conceivable that reprogramming can be achieved in a more directed and deterministic manner under entirely chemically defined conditions. PMID:23932127

  19. Chinese Herbs Interfering with Cancer Reprogramming Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Zhangfeng; Qiang, William W.; Tan, Wen; Zhang, Haotian; Wang, Shengpeng; Wang, Chunming; Qiang, Wenan; Wang, Yitao

    2016-01-01

    Emerging evidence promotes a reassessment of metabolic reprogramming regulation in cancer research. Although there exists a long history of Chinese herbs applied in cancer treatment, few reports have addressed the effects of Chinese herbal components on metabolic reprogramming, which is a central cancer hallmark involved in the slowing or prevention of chemoresistance in cancer cells. In this review, we have focused on four core elements altered by metabolic reprogramming in cancer cells. These include glucose transport, glycolysis, mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, and fatty acid synthesis. With this focus, we have summarized recent advances in metabolic reprogramming of cancer cells in response to specific Chinese herbal components. We propose that exploring Chinese herbal interference in cancer metabolic reprogramming might identify new therapeutic targets for cancer and more ways in which to approach metabolism-related diseases. PMID:27242914

  20. Mechanisms and models of somatic cell reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Buganim, Yosef; Faddah, Dina A.; Jaenisch, Rudolf

    2014-01-01

    Conversion of somatic cells to pluripotency by defined factors is a long and complex process that yields embryonic stem cell-like cells that vary in their developmental potential. To improve the quality of resulting induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), which is important for potential therapeutic applications, and to address fundamental questions about control of cell identity, molecular mechanisms of the reprogramming process must be understood. Here we discuss recent discoveries regarding the role of reprogramming factors in remodeling the genome, including new insights into the function of c-Myc, and describe the different phases, markers and emerging models of reprogramming. PMID:23681063

  1. Restoring totipotency through epigenetic reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Wasson, Jadiel A.; Ruppersburg, Chelsey C.

    2013-01-01

    Epigenetic modifications are implicated in the maintenance and regulation of transcriptional memory by marking genes that were previously transcribed to facilitate transmission of these expression patterns through cell division. During germline specification and maintenance, extensive epigenetic modifications are acquired. Yet somehow at fertilization, the fusion of the highly differentiated sperm and egg results in formation of the totipotent zygote. This massive change in cell fate implies that the selective erasure and maintenance of epigenetic modifications at fertilization may be critical for the re-establishment of totipotency. In this review, we discuss recent studies that provide insight into the extensive epigenetic reprogramming that occurs around fertilization and the mechanisms that may be involved in the re-establishment of totipotency in the embryo. PMID:23117862

  2. Transcriptomic Features of Bovine Blastocysts Derived by Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer.

    PubMed

    Min, Byungkuk; Cho, Sunwha; Park, Jung Sun; Lee, Yun-Gyeong; Kim, Namshin; Kang, Yong-Kook

    2015-09-03

    Reprogramming incompletely occurs in most somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) embryos, which results in misregulation of developmentally important genes and subsequent embryonic malfunction and lethality. Here we examined transcriptome profiles in single bovine blastocysts derived by in vitro fertilization (IVF) and SCNT. Different types of donor cells, cumulus cell and ear-skin fibroblast, were used to derive cSCNT and fSCNT blastocysts, respectively. SCNT blastocysts expressed 13,606 genes on average, similar to IVF (13,542). Correlation analysis found that both cSCNT and fSCNT blastocyst groups had transcriptomic features distinctive from the IVF group, with the cSCNT transcriptomes closer to the IVF ones than the fSCNT. Gene expression analysis identified 56 underrepresented and 78 overrepresented differentially expressed genes in both SCNT groups. A 400-kb locus harboring zinc-finger protein family genes in chromosome 18 were found coordinately down-regulated in fSCNT blastocysts, showing a feature of reprogramming-resistant regions. Probing into different categories of genes important for blastocyst development revealed that genes involved in trophectoderm development frequently were underrepresented, and those encoding epigenetic modifiers tended to be overrepresented in SCNT blastocysts. Our effort to identify reprogramming-resistant, differentially expressed genes can help map reprogramming error-prone loci onto the genome and elucidate how to handle the stochastic events of reprogramming to improve cloning efficiency.

  3. Transcriptomic Features of Bovine Blastocysts Derived by Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Min, Byungkuk; Cho, Sunwha; Park, Jung Sun; Lee, Yun-Gyeong; Kim, Namshin; Kang, Yong-Kook

    2015-01-01

    Reprogramming incompletely occurs in most somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) embryos, which results in misregulation of developmentally important genes and subsequent embryonic malfunction and lethality. Here we examined transcriptome profiles in single bovine blastocysts derived by in vitro fertilization (IVF) and SCNT. Different types of donor cells, cumulus cell and ear-skin fibroblast, were used to derive cSCNT and fSCNT blastocysts, respectively. SCNT blastocysts expressed 13,606 genes on average, similar to IVF (13,542). Correlation analysis found that both cSCNT and fSCNT blastocyst groups had transcriptomic features distinctive from the IVF group, with the cSCNT transcriptomes closer to the IVF ones than the fSCNT. Gene expression analysis identified 56 underrepresented and 78 overrepresented differentially expressed genes in both SCNT groups. A 400-kb locus harboring zinc-finger protein family genes in chromosome 18 were found coordinately down-regulated in fSCNT blastocysts, showing a feature of reprogramming-resistant regions. Probing into different categories of genes important for blastocyst development revealed that genes involved in trophectoderm development frequently were underrepresented, and those encoding epigenetic modifiers tended to be overrepresented in SCNT blastocysts. Our effort to identify reprogramming-resistant, differentially expressed genes can help map reprogramming error-prone loci onto the genome and elucidate how to handle the stochastic events of reprogramming to improve cloning efficiency. PMID:26342001

  4. Stem cell reprogramming: A 3D boost

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abilez, Oscar J.; Wu, Joseph C.

    2016-03-01

    Biophysical factors in an optimized three-dimensional microenvironment enhance the reprogramming efficiency of human somatic cells into pluripotent stem cells when compared to traditional cell-culture substrates.

  5. Cellular reprogramming: a small molecule perspective

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Baoming; Wang, Haixia; Laurent, Timothy; Ding, Sheng

    2013-01-01

    The discovery that somatic cells can be reprogrammed to induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) by the expression of a few transcription factors has attracted enormous interest in biomedical research and the field of regenerative medicine. iPSCs nearly identically resemble embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and can give rise to all cell types in the body, and thus have opened new opportunities for personalized regenerative medicine and new ways of modeling human diseases. Although some studies have raised concerns about genomic stability and epigenetic memory in the resulting cells, better understanding and control of the reprogramming process should enable enhanced efficiency and higher fidelity in reprogramming. Therefore, small molecules regulating reprogramming mechanisms are valuable tools to probe the process of reprogremming and harness cell fate transitions for various applications. PMID:22959962

  6. Epigenetic landscapes explain partially reprogrammed cells and identify key reprogramming gene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Alex; Li, Hu; Collins, James; Mehta, Pankaj

    2013-03-01

    A common metaphor for describing development is a rugged epigenetic landscape where cell fates are represented as attracting valleys resulting from a complex regulatory network. Here, we introduce a framework for explicitly constructing epigenetic landscapes that combines genomic data with techniques from physics, specifically Hopfield neural networks. Each cell fate is a dynamic attractor, yet cells can change fate in response to external signals. Our model suggests that partially reprogrammed cells (cells found in reprogramming experiments but not in vivo) are a natural consequence of high-dimensional landscapes and predicts that partially reprogrammed cells should be hybrids that coexpress genes from multiple cell fates. We verify this prediction by reanalyzing existing data sets. Our model reproduces known reprogramming protocols and identifies candidate transcription factors for reprogramming to novel cell fates, suggesting epigenetic landscapes are a powerful paradigm for understanding cellular identity.

  7. Conversion of Prostate Adenocarcinoma to Small Cell Carcinoma-Like by Reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Borges, Gisely T; Vêncio, Eneida F; Quek, Sue-Ing; Chen, Adeline; Salvanha, Diego M; Vêncio, Ricardo Z N; Nguyen, Holly M; Vessella, Robert L; Cavanaugh, Christopher; Ware, Carol B; Troisch, Pamela; Liu, Alvin Y

    2016-09-01

    The lineage relationship between prostate adenocarcinoma and small cell carcinoma was studied by using the LuCaP family of xenografts established from primary neoplasm to metastasis. Expression of four stem cell transcription factor (TF) genes, LIN28A, NANOG, POU5F1, SOX2, were analyzed in the LuCaP lines. These genes, when force expressed in differentiated cells, can reprogram the recipients into stem-like induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. Most LuCaP lines expressed POU5F1, while LuCaP 145.1, representative of small cell carcinoma, expressed all four. Through transcriptome database query, many small cell carcinoma genes were also found in stem cells. To test the hypothesis that prostate cancer progression from "differentiated" adenocarcinoma to "undifferentiated" small cell carcinoma could involve re-expression of stem cell genes, the four TF genes were transduced via lentiviral vectors into five adenocarcinoma LuCaP lines-70CR, 73CR, 86.2, 92, 105CR-as done in iPS cell reprogramming. The resultant cells from these five transductions displayed a morphology of small size and dark appearing unlike the parentals. Transcriptome analysis of LuCaP 70CR* ("*" to denote transfected progeny) revealed a unique gene expression close to that of LuCaP 145.1. In a prostate principal components analysis space based on cell-type transcriptomes, the different LuCaP transcriptome datapoints were aligned to suggest a possible ordered sequence of expression changes from the differentiated luminal-like adenocarcinoma cell types to the less differentiated, more stem-like small cell carcinoma types, and LuCaP 70CR*. Prostate cancer progression can thus be molecularly characterized by loss of differentiation with re-expression of stem cell genes. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2040-2047, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Oncometabolic Nuclear Reprogramming of Cancer Stemness

    PubMed Central

    Menendez, Javier A.; Corominas-Faja, Bruna; Cuyàs, Elisabet; García, María G.; Fernández-Arroyo, Salvador; Fernández, Agustín F.; Joven, Jorge; Fraga, Mario F.; Alarcón, Tomás

    2016-01-01

    Summary By impairing histone demethylation and locking cells into a reprogramming-prone state, oncometabolites can partially mimic the process of induced pluripotent stem cell generation. Using a systems biology approach, combining mathematical modeling, computation, and proof-of-concept studies with live cells, we found that an oncometabolite-driven pathological version of nuclear reprogramming increases the speed and efficiency of dedifferentiating committed epithelial cells into stem-like states with only a minimal core of stemness transcription factors. Our biomathematical model, which introduces nucleosome modification and epigenetic regulation of cell differentiation genes to account for the direct effects of oncometabolites on nuclear reprogramming, demonstrates that oncometabolites markedly lower the “energy barriers” separating non-stem and stem cell attractors, diminishes the average time of nuclear reprogramming, and increases the size of the basin of attraction of the macrostate occupied by stem cells. These findings establish the concept of oncometabolic nuclear reprogramming of stemness as a bona fide metabolo-epigenetic mechanism for generation of cancer stem-like cells. PMID:26876667

  9. An integrative analysis of reprogramming in human isogenic system identified a clone selection criterion.

    PubMed

    Shutova, Maria V; Surdina, Anastasia V; Ischenko, Dmitry S; Naumov, Vladimir A; Bogomazova, Alexandra N; Vassina, Ekaterina M; Alekseev, Dmitry G; Lagarkova, Maria A; Kiselev, Sergey L

    2016-01-01

    The pluripotency of newly developed human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) is usually characterized by physiological parameters; i.e., by their ability to maintain the undifferentiated state and to differentiate into derivatives of the 3 germ layers. Nevertheless, a molecular comparison of physiologically normal iPSCs to the "gold standard" of pluripotency, embryonic stem cells (ESCs), often reveals a set of genes with different expression and/or methylation patterns in iPSCs and ESCs. To evaluate the contribution of the reprogramming process, parental cell type, and fortuity in the signature of human iPSCs, we developed a complete isogenic reprogramming system. We performed a genome-wide comparison of the transcriptome and the methylome of human isogenic ESCs, 3 types of ESC-derived somatic cells (fibroblasts, retinal pigment epithelium and neural cells), and 3 pairs of iPSC lines derived from these somatic cells. Our analysis revealed a high input of stochasticity in the iPSC signature that does not retain specific traces of the parental cell type and reprogramming process. We showed that 5 iPSC clones are sufficient to find with 95% confidence at least one iPSC clone indistinguishable from their hypothetical isogenic ESC line. Additionally, on the basis of a small set of genes that are characteristic of all iPSC lines and isogenic ESCs, we formulated an approach of "the best iPSC line" selection and confirmed it on an independent dataset.

  10. Quantitative-Proteomic Comparison of Alpha and Beta Cells to Uncover Novel Targets for Lineage Reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Mertins, Philipp; Udeshi, Namrata D.; Dančík, Vlado; Fomina-Yadlin, Dina; Kubicek, Stefan; Clemons, Paul A.; Schreiber, Stuart L.; Carr, Steven A.; Wagner, Bridget K.

    2014-01-01

    Type-1 diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disease in which insulin-secreting pancreatic beta cells are destroyed by the immune system. An emerging strategy to regenerate beta-cell mass is through transdifferentiation of pancreatic alpha cells to beta cells. We previously reported two small molecules, BRD7389 and GW8510, that induce insulin expression in a mouse alpha cell line and provide a glimpse into potential intermediate cell states in beta-cell reprogramming from alpha cells. These small-molecule studies suggested that inhibition of kinases in particular may induce the expression of several beta-cell markers in alpha cells. To identify potential lineage reprogramming protein targets, we compared the transcriptome, proteome, and phosphoproteome of alpha cells, beta cells, and compound-treated alpha cells. Our phosphoproteomic analysis indicated that two kinases, BRSK1 and CAMKK2, exhibit decreased phosphorylation in beta cells compared to alpha cells, and in compound-treated alpha cells compared to DMSO-treated alpha cells. Knock-down of these kinases in alpha cells resulted in expression of key beta-cell markers. These results provide evidence that perturbation of the kinome may be important for lineage reprogramming of alpha cells to beta cells. PMID:24759943

  11. Hot Transcriptomics

    PubMed Central

    Walther, Jasper; Sierocinski, Pawel; van der Oost, John

    2010-01-01

    DNA microarray technology allows for a quick and easy comparison of complete transcriptomes, resulting in improved molecular insight in fluctuations of gene expression. After emergence of the microarray technology about a decade ago, the technique has now matured and has become routine in many molecular biology laboratories. Numerous studies have been performed that have provided global transcription patterns of many organisms under a wide range of conditions. Initially, implementation of this high-throughput technology has lead to high expectations for ground breaking discoveries. Here an evaluation is performed of the insight that transcriptome analysis has brought about in the field of hyperthermophilic archaea. The examples that will be discussed have been selected on the basis of their impact, in terms of either biological insight or technological progress. PMID:21350598

  12. X chromosome reactivation dynamics reveal stages of reprogramming to pluripotency.

    PubMed

    Pasque, Vincent; Tchieu, Jason; Karnik, Rahul; Uyeda, Molly; Sadhu Dimashkie, Anupama; Case, Dana; Papp, Bernadett; Bonora, Giancarlo; Patel, Sanjeet; Ho, Ritchie; Schmidt, Ryan; McKee, Robin; Sado, Takashi; Tada, Takashi; Meissner, Alexander; Plath, Kathrin

    2014-12-18

    Reprogramming to iPSCs resets the epigenome of somatic cells, including the reversal of X chromosome inactivation. We sought to gain insight into the steps underlying the reprogramming process by examining the means by which reprogramming leads to X chromosome reactivation (XCR). Analyzing single cells in situ, we found that hallmarks of the inactive X (Xi) change sequentially, providing a direct readout of reprogramming progression. Several epigenetic changes on the Xi occur in the inverse order of developmental X inactivation, whereas others are uncoupled from this sequence. Among the latter, DNA methylation has an extraordinary long persistence on the Xi during reprogramming, and, like Xist expression, is erased only after pluripotency genes are activated. Mechanistically, XCR requires both DNA demethylation and Xist silencing, ensuring that only cells undergoing faithful reprogramming initiate XCR. Our study defines the epigenetic state of multiple sequential reprogramming intermediates and establishes a paradigm for studying cell fate transitions during reprogramming.

  13. Platelet microparticles reprogram macrophage gene expression and function.

    PubMed

    Laffont, Benoit; Corduan, Aurélie; Rousseau, Matthieu; Duchez, Anne-Claire; Lee, Chan Ho C; Boilard, Eric; Provost, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Platelet microparticles (MPs) represent the most abundant MPs subtype in the circulation, and can mediate intercellular communication through delivery of bioactives molecules, such as cytokines, proteins, lipids and RNAs. Here, we show that platelet MPs can be internalised by primary human macrophages and deliver functional miR-126-3p. The increase in macrophage miR-126-3p levels was not prevented by actinomycin D, suggesting that it was not due to de novo gene transcription. Platelet MPs dose-dependently downregulated expression of four predicted mRNA targets of miR-126-3p, two of which were confirmed also at the protein level. The mRNA downregulatory effects of platelet MPs were abrogated by expression of a neutralising miR-126-3p sponge, implying the involvement of miR-126-3p. Transcriptome-wide, microarray analyses revealed that as many as 66 microRNAs and 653 additional RNAs were significantly and differentially expressed in macrophages upon exposure to platelet MPs. More specifically, platelet MPs induced an upregulation of 34 microRNAs and a concomitant downregulation of 367 RNAs, including mRNAs encoding for cytokines/chemokines CCL4, CSF1 and TNF. These changes were associated with reduced CCL4, CSF1 and TNF cytokine/chemokine release by macrophages, and accompanied by a marked increase in their phagocytic capacity. These findings demonstrate that platelet MPs can modify the transcriptome of macrophages, and reprogram their function towards a phagocytic phenotype. PMID:26333874

  14. Environmentally induced transgenerational epigenetic reprogramming of primordial germ cells and the subsequent germ line.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Michael K; Guerrero-Bosagna, Carlos; Haque, M; Nilsson, Eric; Bhandari, Ramji; McCarrey, John R

    2013-01-01

    A number of environmental factors (e.g. toxicants) have been shown to promote the epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of disease and phenotypic variation. Transgenerational inheritance requires the germline transmission of altered epigenetic information between generations in the absence of direct environmental exposures. The primary periods for epigenetic programming of the germ line are those associated with primordial germ cell development and subsequent fetal germline development. The current study examined the actions of an agricultural fungicide vinclozolin on gestating female (F0 generation) progeny in regards to the primordial germ cell (PGC) epigenetic reprogramming of the F3 generation (i.e. great-grandchildren). The F3 generation germline transcriptome and epigenome (DNA methylation) were altered transgenerationally. Interestingly, disruptions in DNA methylation patterns and altered transcriptomes were distinct between germ cells at the onset of gonadal sex determination at embryonic day 13 (E13) and after cord formation in the testis at embryonic day 16 (E16). A larger number of DNA methylation abnormalities (epimutations) and transcriptional alterations were observed in the E13 germ cells than in the E16 germ cells. These observations indicate that altered transgenerational epigenetic reprogramming and function of the male germline is a component of vinclozolin induced epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of disease. Insights into the molecular control of germline transmitted epigenetic inheritance are provided.

  15. Global transcriptional analysis of nuclear reprogramming in the transition from MEFs to iPSCs.

    PubMed

    Dong, Fulu; Song, Zhenwei; Zhang, Jinping; Lu, Youde; Song, Chunlei; Jiang, BaoChun; Zhang, Baole; Cong, Peiqing; Sun, Hongyan; Shi, Fangxiong; Liu, Honglin

    2013-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are flourishing in the investigation of cell reprogramming. However, we still know little about the sequential molecular mechanism during somatic cell reprogramming (SCR). Here, we first observed rapid generation of colonies whereas mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) were induced by OCT4, SOX2, KLF4 (OSK), and vitamin C for 7 days. The colony's global transcriptional profiles were analyzed using Affymetrix microarray. Microarray data confirmed that SCR was a process in which transcriptome got reversed and pluripotent genes expressed de novo. There were many changes, especially substantial growth expression of epigenetic factors, on transcriptome during the transition from Day 7 to iPSCs indicating that this period may provide 'flexibility' genome structure, chromatin remodeling, and epigenetic modifications to rebind to the transcriptional factors. Several biological processes such as viral immune response, apoptosis, cell fate specification, and cell communication were mainly involved before Day 7 whereas cell cycle, DNA methylation, and histone modification were mainly involved after Day 7. Furthermore, it was suggested that p53 signaling contributed to the transition 'hyperdynamic plastic' cell state and assembled cell niche for SCR, and small molecular compounds useful for chromatin remodeling can enhance iPSCs by exciting epigenetic modification rather than the exogenous expression of more TFs vectors. PMID:23231677

  16. Environmentally Induced Transgenerational Epigenetic Reprogramming of Primordial Germ Cells and the Subsequent Germ Line

    PubMed Central

    Skinner, Michael K.; Haque, Carlos Guerrero-Bosagna M.; Nilsson, Eric; Bhandari, Ramji; McCarrey, John R.

    2013-01-01

    A number of environmental factors (e.g. toxicants) have been shown to promote the epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of disease and phenotypic variation. Transgenerational inheritance requires the germline transmission of altered epigenetic information between generations in the absence of direct environmental exposures. The primary periods for epigenetic programming of the germ line are those associated with primordial germ cell development and subsequent fetal germline development. The current study examined the actions of an agricultural fungicide vinclozolin on gestating female (F0 generation) progeny in regards to the primordial germ cell (PGC) epigenetic reprogramming of the F3 generation (i.e. great-grandchildren). The F3 generation germline transcriptome and epigenome (DNA methylation) were altered transgenerationally. Interestingly, disruptions in DNA methylation patterns and altered transcriptomes were distinct between germ cells at the onset of gonadal sex determination at embryonic day 13 (E13) and after cord formation in the testis at embryonic day 16 (E16). A larger number of DNA methylation abnormalities (epimutations) and transcriptional alterations were observed in the E13 germ cells than in the E16 germ cells. These observations indicate that altered transgenerational epigenetic reprogramming and function of the male germline is a component of vinclozolin induced epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of disease. Insights into the molecular control of germline transmitted epigenetic inheritance are provided. PMID:23869203

  17. Optical reprogramming with ultrashort femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchugonova, Aisada; Breunig, Hans G.; Batista, Ana; König, Karsten

    2015-03-01

    The use of sub-15 femtosecond laser pulses in stem cell research is explored with particular emphasis on the optical reprogramming of somatic cells. The reprogramming of somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells can be evoked through the ectopic expression of defined transcription factors. Conventional approaches utilize retro/lenti-viruses to deliver genes/transcription factors as well as to facilitate the integration of transcription factors into that of the host genome. However, the use of viruses may result in insertional mutations caused by the random integration of genes and as a result, this may limit the use within clinical applications due to the risk of the formation of cancer. In this study, a new approach is demonstrated in realizing non-viral reprogramming through the use of ultrashort laser pulses, to introduce transcription factors into the cell so as to generate iPS cells.

  18. Cellular Reprogramming of Human Peripheral Blood Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiao-Bing

    2013-01-01

    Breakthroughs in cell fate conversion have made it possible to generate large quantities of patient-specific cells for regenerative medicine. Due to multiple advantages of peripheral blood cells over fibroblasts from skin biopsy, the use of blood mononuclear cells (MNCs) instead of skin fibroblasts will expedite reprogramming research and broaden the application of reprogramming technology. This review discusses current progress and challenges of generating induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from peripheral blood MNCs and of in vitro and in vivo conversion of blood cells into cells of therapeutic value, such as mesenchymal stem cells, neural cells and hepatocytes. An optimized design of lentiviral vectors is necessary to achieve high reprogramming efficiency of peripheral blood cells. More recently, non-integrating vectors such as Sendai virus and episomal vectors have been successfully employed in generating integration-free iPSCs and somatic stem cells. PMID:24060839

  19. In vivo reprogramming for tissue repair.

    PubMed

    Heinrich, Christophe; Spagnoli, Francesca M; Berninger, Benedikt

    2015-03-01

    Vital organs such as the pancreas and the brain lack the capacity for effective regeneration. To overcome this limitation, an emerging strategy consists of converting resident tissue-specific cells into the cell types that are lost due to disease by a process called in vivo lineage reprogramming. Here we discuss recent breakthroughs in regenerating pancreatic β-cells and neurons from various cell types, and highlight fundamental challenges that need to be overcome for the translation of in vivo lineage reprogramming into therapy.

  20. Incomplete methylation reprogramming in SCNT embryos.

    PubMed

    Peat, Julian R; Reik, Wolf

    2012-09-01

    The cloning of Dolly the sheep was a remarkable demonstration of the oocyte's ability to reprogram a specialized nucleus. However, embryos derived from such somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) very rarely result in live births-a fate that may be linked to observed epigenetic defects. A new genome-wide study shows that epigenetic reprogramming in SCNT embryos does not fully recapitulate the natural DNA demethylation events occurring at fertilization, resulting in aberrant methylation at some promoters and repetitive elements that may contribute to developmental failure. PMID:22932499

  1. The cytotoxic and immunogenic hurdles associated with non-viral mRNA-mediated reprogramming of human fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Drews, Katharina; Tavernier, Geertrui; Demeester, Joseph; Lehrach, Hans; De Smedt, Stefaan C; Rejman, Joanna; Adjaye, James

    2012-06-01

    Delivery of reprogramming factor-encoding mRNAs by means of lipofection in somatic cells is a desirable method for deriving integration-free iPSCs. However, the lack of reproducibility implies there are major hurdles to overcome before this protocol becomes universally accepted. This study demonstrates the functionality of our in-house synthesized mRNAs expressing the reprogramming factors (OCT4, SOX2, KLF4, c-MYC) within the nucleus of human fibroblasts. However, upon repeated transfections, the mRNAs induced severe loss of cell viability as demonstrated by MTT cytotoxicity assays. Microarray-derived transcriptome data revealed that the poor cell survival was mainly due to the innate immune response triggered by the exogenous mRNAs. We validated the influence of mRNA transfection on key immune response-associated transcript levels, including IFNB1, RIG-I, PKR, IL12A, IRF7 and CCL5, by quantitative real-time PCR and directly compared these with the levels induced by other methods previously published to mediate reprogramming in somatic cells. Finally, we evaluated chemical compounds (B18R, chloroquine, TSA, Pepinh-TRIF, Pepinh-MYD), known for their ability to suppress cellular innate immune responses. However, none of these had the desired effect. The data presented here should provide the basis for further investigations into other immunosuppressing strategies that might facilitate efficient mRNA-mediated cellular reprogramming in human cells.

  2. The cytotoxic and immunogenic hurdles associated with non-viral mRNA-mediated reprogramming of human fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Drews, Katharina; Tavernier, Geertrui; Demeester, Joseph; Lehrach, Hans; De Smedt, Stefaan C; Rejman, Joanna; Adjaye, James

    2012-06-01

    Delivery of reprogramming factor-encoding mRNAs by means of lipofection in somatic cells is a desirable method for deriving integration-free iPSCs. However, the lack of reproducibility implies there are major hurdles to overcome before this protocol becomes universally accepted. This study demonstrates the functionality of our in-house synthesized mRNAs expressing the reprogramming factors (OCT4, SOX2, KLF4, c-MYC) within the nucleus of human fibroblasts. However, upon repeated transfections, the mRNAs induced severe loss of cell viability as demonstrated by MTT cytotoxicity assays. Microarray-derived transcriptome data revealed that the poor cell survival was mainly due to the innate immune response triggered by the exogenous mRNAs. We validated the influence of mRNA transfection on key immune response-associated transcript levels, including IFNB1, RIG-I, PKR, IL12A, IRF7 and CCL5, by quantitative real-time PCR and directly compared these with the levels induced by other methods previously published to mediate reprogramming in somatic cells. Finally, we evaluated chemical compounds (B18R, chloroquine, TSA, Pepinh-TRIF, Pepinh-MYD), known for their ability to suppress cellular innate immune responses. However, none of these had the desired effect. The data presented here should provide the basis for further investigations into other immunosuppressing strategies that might facilitate efficient mRNA-mediated cellular reprogramming in human cells. PMID:22381475

  3. Generation of Partially Reprogrammed Cells and Fully Reprogrammed iPS Cells by Plasmid Transfection.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong Soo; Choi, Hyun Woo; Hong, Yean Ju; Do, Jeong Tae

    2016-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells can be directly generated from somatic cells by overexpression of defined transcription factors. iPS cells can perpetually self-renew and differentiate into all cell types of an organism. iPS cells were first generated through infection with retroviruses that contain reprogramming factors. However, development of an exogene-free iPS cell generation method is crucial for future therapeutic applications, because integrated exogenes result in the formation of tumors in chimeras and regain pluripotency after differentiation in vitro. Here, we describe a method to generate iPS cells by transfection of plasmid vectors and to convert partially reprogrammed cells into fully reprogrammed iPS cells by switching from mouse ESC culture conditions to KOSR-based media with bFGF. We also describe basic methods used to characterize fully reprogrammed iPS cells.

  4. Pluripotent reprogramming and lineage reprogramming: promises and challenges in cardiovascular regeneration.

    PubMed

    He, Wen-Jun; Hou, Qian; Han, Qing-Wang; Han, Wei-Dong; Fu, Xiao-Bing

    2014-08-01

    Cardiovascular disease is a leading cause of death in industrialized countries. Scientists are trying to generate cardiomyocytes in vitro and in vivo to repair damaged heart tissue. Pluripotent reprogramming brings an alternative source of embryonic-like stem cells, and the possibility of regenerating mammalian tissues by first reverting somatic cells to induced pluripotent stem cells, followed by redifferentiating these cells into cardiomyocytes. More recently, lineage reprogramming of fibroblasts directly into functional cardiomyocytes has been reported. The procedure does not involve reverting cells back to a pluripotent stage, and, thus, would presumably reduce tumorigenic potential. Interestingly, lineage reprogramming could be used for in situ conversion of cell fate. Moreover, zebrafish-like regenerative mechanism in mammalian heart tissue, which was observed in mice within the first week of postpartum, should be further addressed. Here, we review the landmark progresses of the two major reprogramming strategies, compare their pros and cons in cardiovascular regeneration, and forecast the future directions of cardiac repair.

  5. Epigenetic Landscapes Explain Partially Reprogrammed Cells and Identify Key Reprogramming Genes

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Alex H.; Li, Hu; Collins, James J.; Mehta, Pankaj

    2014-01-01

    A common metaphor for describing development is a rugged “epigenetic landscape” where cell fates are represented as attracting valleys resulting from a complex regulatory network. Here, we introduce a framework for explicitly constructing epigenetic landscapes that combines genomic data with techniques from spin-glass physics. Each cell fate is a dynamic attractor, yet cells can change fate in response to external signals. Our model suggests that partially reprogrammed cells are a natural consequence of high-dimensional landscapes, and predicts that partially reprogrammed cells should be hybrids that co-express genes from multiple cell fates. We verify this prediction by reanalyzing existing datasets. Our model reproduces known reprogramming protocols and identifies candidate transcription factors for reprogramming to novel cell fates, suggesting epigenetic landscapes are a powerful paradigm for understanding cellular identity. PMID:25122086

  6. Direct Cardiomyocyte Reprogramming: A New Direction for Cardiovascular Regenerative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Yi, B. Alexander; Mummery, Christine L.; Chien, Kenneth R.

    2013-01-01

    The past few years have seen unexpected new developments in direct cardiomyocyte reprogramming. Direct cardiomyocyte reprogramming potentially offers an entirely novel approach to cardiovascular regenerative medicine by converting cardiac fibroblasts into functional cardiomyocytes in situ. There is much to be learned, however, about the mechanisms of direct reprogramming in order that the process can be made more efficient. Early efforts have suggested that this new technology can be technically challenging. Moreover, new methods of inducing heart reprogramming will need to be developed before this approach can be translated to the bedside. Despite this, direct cardiomyocyte reprogramming may lead to new therapeutic options for sufferers of heart disease. PMID:24003244

  7. MicroRNA-mediated somatic cell reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Chih-Hao; Ying, Shao-Yao

    2013-02-01

    Since the first report of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) using somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT), much focus has been placed on iPSCs due to their great therapeutic potential for diseases such as abnormal development, degenerative disorders, and even cancers. Subsequently, Takahashi and Yamanaka took a novel approach by using four defined transcription factors to generate iPSCs in mice and human fibroblast cells. Scientists have since been trying to refine or develop better approaches to reprogramming, either by using different combinations of transcription factors or delivery methods. However, recent reports showed that the microRNA expression pattern plays a crucial role in somatic cell reprogramming and ectopic introduction of embryonic stem cell-specific microRNAs revert cells back to an ESC-like state, although, the exact mechanism underlying this effect remains unclear. This review describes recent work that has focused on microRNA-mediated approaches to somatic cell reprogramming as well as some of the pros and cons to these approaches and a possible mechanism of action. Based on the pivotal role of microRNAs in embryogenesis and somatic cell reprogramming, studies in this area must continue in order to gain a better understanding of the role of microRNAs in stem cells regulation and activity. PMID:22961769

  8. The microenvironment reprograms circuits in tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Qingchun; Xu, Yan

    2015-01-01

    In the course of multistep oncogenesis, initially normal cells acquire several new functions that render them malignant. We have recently demonstrated that the peritoneal microenvironment promotes resistance to anoikis in ovarian cancer cells by reprogramming SRC/AKT/ERK signaling and metabolism. These findings have prognostic and therapeutic implications. PMID:27308400

  9. In Vivo Cellular Reprogramming: The Next Generation.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Deepak; DeWitt, Natalie

    2016-09-01

    Cellular reprogramming technology has created new opportunities in understanding human disease, drug discovery, and regenerative medicine. While a combinatorial code was initially found to reprogram somatic cells to pluripotency, a "second generation" of cellular reprogramming involves lineage-restricted transcription factors and microRNAs that directly reprogram one somatic cell to another. This technology was enabled by gene networks active during development, which induce global shifts in the epigenetic landscape driving cell fate decisions. A major utility of direct reprogramming is the potential of harnessing resident support cells within damaged organs to regenerate lost tissue by converting them into the desired cell type in situ. Here, we review the progress in direct cellular reprogramming, with a focus on the paradigm of in vivo reprogramming for regenerative medicine, while pointing to hurdles that must be overcome to translate this technology into future therapeutics. PMID:27610565

  10. The plasticity of the grapevine berry transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Phenotypic plasticity refers to the range of phenotypes a single genotype can express as a function of its environment. These phenotypic variations are attributable to the effect of the environment on the expression and function of genes influencing plastic traits. We investigated phenotypic plasticity in grapevine by comparing the berry transcriptome in a single clone of the vegetatively-propagated common grapevine species Vitis vinifera cultivar Corvina through 3 consecutive growth years cultivated in 11 different vineyards in the Verona area of Italy. Results Most of the berry transcriptome clustered by year of growth rather than common environmental conditions or viticulture practices, and transcripts related to secondary metabolism showed high sensitivity towards different climates, as confirmed also by metabolomic data obtained from the same samples. When analyzed in 11 vineyards during 1 growth year, the environmentally-sensitive berry transcriptome comprised 5% of protein-coding genes and 18% of the transcripts modulated during berry development. Plastic genes were particularly enriched in ontology categories such as transcription factors, translation, transport, and secondary metabolism. Specific plastic transcripts were associated with groups of vineyards sharing common viticulture practices or environmental conditions, and plastic transcriptome reprogramming was more intense in the year characterized by extreme weather conditions. We also identified a set of genes that lacked plasticity, showing either constitutive expression or similar modulation in all berries. Conclusions Our data reveal candidate genes potentially responsible for the phenotypic plasticity of grapevine and provide the first step towards the characterization of grapevine transcriptome plasticity under different agricultural systems. PMID:23759170

  11. Reprogramming of germ cells into pluripotency

    PubMed Central

    Sekita, Yoichi; Nakamura, Toshinobu; Kimura, Tohru

    2016-01-01

    Primordial germ cells (PGCs) are precursors of all gametes, and represent the founder cells of the germline. Although developmental potency is restricted to germ-lineage cells, PGCs can be reprogrammed into a pluripotent state. Specifically, PGCs give rise to germ cell tumors, such as testicular teratomas, in vivo, and to pluripotent stem cells known as embryonic germ cells in vitro. In this review, we highlight the current knowledge on signaling pathways, transcriptional controls, and post-transcriptional controls that govern germ cell differentiation and de-differentiation. These regulatory processes are common in the reprogramming of germ cells and somatic cells, and play a role in the pathogenesis of human germ cell tumors.

  12. Reprogramming of germ cells into pluripotency.

    PubMed

    Sekita, Yoichi; Nakamura, Toshinobu; Kimura, Tohru

    2016-08-26

    Primordial germ cells (PGCs) are precursors of all gametes, and represent the founder cells of the germline. Although developmental potency is restricted to germ-lineage cells, PGCs can be reprogrammed into a pluripotent state. Specifically, PGCs give rise to germ cell tumors, such as testicular teratomas, in vivo, and to pluripotent stem cells known as embryonic germ cells in vitro. In this review, we highlight the current knowledge on signaling pathways, transcriptional controls, and post-transcriptional controls that govern germ cell differentiation and de-differentiation. These regulatory processes are common in the reprogramming of germ cells and somatic cells, and play a role in the pathogenesis of human germ cell tumors. PMID:27621759

  13. Reprogramming of germ cells into pluripotency

    PubMed Central

    Sekita, Yoichi; Nakamura, Toshinobu; Kimura, Tohru

    2016-01-01

    Primordial germ cells (PGCs) are precursors of all gametes, and represent the founder cells of the germline. Although developmental potency is restricted to germ-lineage cells, PGCs can be reprogrammed into a pluripotent state. Specifically, PGCs give rise to germ cell tumors, such as testicular teratomas, in vivo, and to pluripotent stem cells known as embryonic germ cells in vitro. In this review, we highlight the current knowledge on signaling pathways, transcriptional controls, and post-transcriptional controls that govern germ cell differentiation and de-differentiation. These regulatory processes are common in the reprogramming of germ cells and somatic cells, and play a role in the pathogenesis of human germ cell tumors. PMID:27621759

  14. Nuclear cloning, epigenetic reprogramming and cellular differentiation.

    PubMed

    Jaenisch, Rudolf; Hochedlinger, Konrad; Eggan, Kevin

    2005-01-01

    The full-term development of sheep, cows, goats, pigs and mice has been achieved through the transfer of somatic cell nuclei into enucleated oocytes. Despite these successes, mammalian cloning remains an inefficient process, with a preponderance of reconstructed embryos failing at early- to mid-gestation stages of development. The small percentage of conceptuses that survive to term are characterized by a high mortality rate and frequently display grossly increased placental and birth weights. It is likely that inappropriate expression of key developmental genes may contribute to lethality of cloned embryos. One of the most interesting issues of nuclear cloning is the question of genomic reprogramming, i.e. whether successful cloning requires the resetting of epigenetic modifications which are characteristic of the adult donor nucleus. Processes such as X-inactivation and genomic imprinting are known to depend on epigenetic modifications of the genome. The classical nuclear transfer experiments with frogs have suggested that the source of the donor nucleus affects the phenotype of the clone. We have, using expression profiling, compared gene expression in clones derived from embryonic stem (ES) cells and from somatic donor cell nuclei and find substantial gene dysregulation. Our results suggest that faulty reprogramming is caused by the nuclear cloning procedure itself. In addition, the type of donor nucleus contributes to the abnormal expression pattern seen in cloned animals. One of the major unresolved issues has been whether nuclei of terminally differentiated cells can be reprogrammed by transfer into the oocyte. To address this question we have derived monoclonal mice from B and T cells and used the genetic rearrangements of the immunoglobulin and T cell receptor genes to retrospectively verify the differentiation state of the donor nucleus. Finally, we discuss our recent studies on the reprogramming of nuclei from terminally differentiated neurons and from

  15. Progress in the reprogramming of somatic cells.

    PubMed

    Ma, Tianhua; Xie, Min; Laurent, Timothy; Ding, Sheng

    2013-02-01

    Pluripotent stem cells can differentiate into nearly all types of cells in the body. This unique potential provides significant promise for cell-based therapies to restore tissues or organs destroyed by injuries, degenerative diseases, aging, or cancer. The discovery of induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology offers a possible strategy to generate patient-specific pluripotent stem cells. However, because of concerns about the specificity, efficiency, kinetics, and safety of iPSC reprogramming, improvements or fundamental changes in this process are required before their effective clinical use. A chemical approach is regarded as a promising strategy to improve and change the iPSC process. Dozens of small molecules have been identified that can functionally replace reprogramming factors and significantly improve iPSC reprogramming. In addition to the prospect of deriving patient-specific tissues and organs from iPSCs, another attractive strategy for regenerative medicine is transdifferentiation-the direct conversion of one somatic cell type to another. Recent studies revealed a new paradigm of transdifferentiation: using transcription factors used in iPSC generation to induce transdifferentiation or called iPSC transcription factor-based transdifferentiation. This type of transdifferentiation not only reveals and uses the developmentally plastic intermediates generated during iPSC reprogramming but also produces a wide range of cells, including expandable tissue-specific precursor cells. Here, we review recent progress of small molecule approaches in the generation of iPSCs. In addition, we summarize the new concept of iPSC transcription factor-based transdifferentiation and discuss its application in generating various lineage-specific cells, especially cardiovascular cells.

  16. Matrix identity and tractional forces influence indirect cardiac reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Yen P.; Carrion, Bita; Singh, Rahul K.; Putnam, Andrew J.

    2013-01-01

    Heart regeneration through in vivo cardiac reprogramming has been demonstrated as a possible regenerative strategy. While it has been reported that cardiac reprogramming in vivo is more efficient than in vitro, the influence of the extracellular microenvironment on cardiac reprogramming remains incompletely understood. This understanding is necessary to improve the efficiency of cardiac reprogramming in order to implement this strategy successfully. Here we have identified matrix identity and cell-generated tractional forces as key determinants of the dedifferentiation and differentiation stages during reprogramming. Cell proliferation, matrix mechanics, and matrix microstructure are also important, but play lesser roles. Our results suggest that the extracellular microenvironment can be optimized to enhance cardiac reprogramming. PMID:24326998

  17. Reprogramming stem cells is a microenvironmental task

    SciTech Connect

    Bissell, Mina J; Inman, Jamie

    2008-10-14

    That tumor cells for all practical purposes are unstable and plastic could be expected. However, the astonishing ability of the nuclei from cells of normal adult tissues to be reprogrammed - given the right embryonic context - found its final truth even for mammals in the experiments that allowed engineering Dolly (1). The landmark experiments showed that nuclei originating from cells of frozen mammary tissues were capable of being reprogrammed by the embryonic cytoplasm and its microenvironment to produce a normal sheep. The rest is history. However, whether microenvironments other than those of the embryos can also reprogram adult cells of different tissue origins still containing their cytoplasm is of obvious interest. In this issue of PNAS, the laboratory of Gilbert Smith (2) reports on how the mammary gland microenvironment can reprogram both embryonic and adult stem neuronal cells. The work is a follow-up to their previous report on testis stem cells that were reprogrammed by the mammary microenvironment (3). They demonstrated that cells isolated from the seminiferous tubules of the mature testis, mixed with normal mammary epithelial cells, contributed a sizable number of epithelial progeny to normal mammary outgrowths in transplanted mammary fat pads. However, in those experiments they were unable to distinguish which subpopulation of the testis cells contributed progeny to the mammary epithelial tree. The current work adds new, compelling, and provocative information to our understanding of stem cell plasticity. Booth et al. (2) use neuronal stem cells (NSCs) isolated from WAP-cre/R26R mice combined with unlabeled mammary epithelial cells that subsequently are implanted in cleared mammary fat pads. In this new microenvironment, the NSCs that are incorporated into the branching mammary tree make chimeric glands (Fig. 1) that remarkably can also express the milk protein {beta}-casein, progesterone receptor, and estrogen receptor {alpha}. Remarkably, the

  18. Kinetic Measurement and Real Time Visualization of Somatic Reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Quintanilla, Rene H; Asprer, Joanna; Sylakowski, Kyle; Lakshmipathy, Uma

    2016-07-30

    Somatic reprogramming has enabled the conversion of adult cells to induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) from diverse genetic backgrounds and disease phenotypes. Recent advances have identified more efficient and safe methods for introduction of reprogramming factors. However, there are few tools to monitor and track the progression of reprogramming. Current methods for monitoring reprogramming rely on the qualitative inspection of morphology or staining with stem cell-specific dyes and antibodies. Tools to dissect the progression of iPSC generation can help better understand the process under different conditions from diverse cell sources. This study presents key approaches for kinetic measurement of reprogramming progression using flow cytometry as well as real-time monitoring via imaging. To measure the kinetics of reprogramming, flow analysis was performed at discrete time points using antibodies against positive and negative pluripotent stem cell markers. The combination of real-time visualization and flow analysis enables the quantitative study of reprogramming at different stages and provides a more accurate comparison of different systems and methods. Real-time, image-based analysis was used for the continuous monitoring of fibroblasts as they are reprogrammed in a feeder-free medium system. The kinetics of colony formation was measured based on confluence in the phase contrast or fluorescence channels after staining with live alkaline phosphatase dye or antibodies against SSEA4 or TRA-1-60. The results indicated that measurement of confluence provides semi-quantitative metrics to monitor the progression of reprogramming.

  19. Kinetic Measurement and Real Time Visualization of Somatic Reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Quintanilla, Rene H; Asprer, Joanna; Sylakowski, Kyle; Lakshmipathy, Uma

    2016-01-01

    Somatic reprogramming has enabled the conversion of adult cells to induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) from diverse genetic backgrounds and disease phenotypes. Recent advances have identified more efficient and safe methods for introduction of reprogramming factors. However, there are few tools to monitor and track the progression of reprogramming. Current methods for monitoring reprogramming rely on the qualitative inspection of morphology or staining with stem cell-specific dyes and antibodies. Tools to dissect the progression of iPSC generation can help better understand the process under different conditions from diverse cell sources. This study presents key approaches for kinetic measurement of reprogramming progression using flow cytometry as well as real-time monitoring via imaging. To measure the kinetics of reprogramming, flow analysis was performed at discrete time points using antibodies against positive and negative pluripotent stem cell markers. The combination of real-time visualization and flow analysis enables the quantitative study of reprogramming at different stages and provides a more accurate comparison of different systems and methods. Real-time, image-based analysis was used for the continuous monitoring of fibroblasts as they are reprogrammed in a feeder-free medium system. The kinetics of colony formation was measured based on confluence in the phase contrast or fluorescence channels after staining with live alkaline phosphatase dye or antibodies against SSEA4 or TRA-1-60. The results indicated that measurement of confluence provides semi-quantitative metrics to monitor the progression of reprogramming. PMID:27500543

  20. Reprogramming the genome to totipotency in mouse embryos.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Li-quan; Dean, Jurrien

    2015-02-01

    Despite investigative interest, the artificial derivation of pluripotent stem cells remains inefficient and incomplete reprogramming hinders its potential as a reliable tool in regenerative medicine. By contrast, fusion of terminally differentiated gametes at fertilization activates efficient epigenetic reprogramming to ensure totipotency of early embryos. Understanding the epigenetic mechanisms required for the transition from the fertilized egg to the embryo can improve efforts to reprogram differentiated cells to pluripotent/totipotent cells for therapeutic use. We review recent discoveries that are providing insight into the molecular mechanisms required for epigenetic reprogramming to totipotency in vivo. PMID:25448353

  1. Effect of biophysical cues on reprogramming to cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Sia, Junren; Yu, Pengzhi; Srivastava, Deepak; Li, Song

    2016-10-01

    Reprogramming of fibroblasts to cardiomyocytes offers exciting potential in cell therapy and regenerative medicine, but has low efficiency. We hypothesize that physical cues may positively affect the reprogramming process, and studied the effects of periodic mechanical stretch, substrate stiffness and microgrooved substrate on reprogramming yield. Subjecting reprogramming fibroblasts to periodic mechanical stretch and different substrate stiffness did not improve reprogramming yield. On the other hand, culturing the cells on microgrooved substrate enhanced the expression of cardiomyocyte genes by day 2 and improved the yield of partially reprogrammed cells at day 10. By combining microgrooved substrate with an existing optimized culture protocol, yield of reprogrammed cardiomyocytes with striated cardiac troponin T staining and spontaneous contractile activity was increased. We identified the regulation of Mkl1 activity as a new mechanism by which microgroove can affect reprogramming. Biochemical approach could only partially recapitulate the effect of microgroove. Microgroove demonstrated an additional effect of enhancing organization of sarcomeric structure, which could not be recapitulated by biochemical approach. This study provides insights into new mechanisms by which topographical cues can affect cellular reprogramming.

  2. Rad51 Regulates Reprogramming Efficiency through DNA Repair Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae-Young; Kim, Dae-Kwan; Ko, Jeong-Jae; Kim, Keun Pil; Park, Kyung-Soon

    2016-01-01

    Rad51 is a key component of homologous recombination (HR) to repair DNA double-strand breaks and it forms Rad51 recombinase filaments of broken single-stranded DNA to promote HR. In addition to its role in DNA repair and cell cycle progression, Rad51 contributes to the reprogramming process during the generation of induced pluripotent stem cells. In light of this, we performed reprogramming experiments to examine the effect of co-expression of Rad51 and four reprogramming factors, Oct4, Sox2, Klf4, and c-Myc, on the reprogramming efficiency. Co-expression of Rad51 significantly increased the numbers of alkaline phosphatase-positive colonies and embryonic stem cell-like colonies during the process of reprogramming. Co-expression ofRad51 significantly increased the expression of epithelial markers at an early stage of reprogramming compared with control cells. Phosphorylated histone H2AX (γH2AX), which initiates the DNA double-strand break repair system, was highly accumulated in reprogramming intermediates upon co-expression of Rad51. This study identified a novel role of Rad51 in enhancing the reprogramming efficiency, possibly by facilitating mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition and by regulating a DNA damage repair pathway during the early phase of the reprogramming process. PMID:27660832

  3. Rad51 Regulates Reprogramming Efficiency through DNA Repair Pathway.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae-Young; Kim, Dae-Kwan; Ko, Jeong-Jae; Kim, Keun Pil; Park, Kyung-Soon

    2016-06-01

    Rad51 is a key component of homologous recombination (HR) to repair DNA double-strand breaks and it forms Rad51 recombinase filaments of broken single-stranded DNA to promote HR. In addition to its role in DNA repair and cell cycle progression, Rad51 contributes to the reprogramming process during the generation of induced pluripotent stem cells. In light of this, we performed reprogramming experiments to examine the effect of co-expression of Rad51 and four reprogramming factors, Oct4, Sox2, Klf4, and c-Myc, on the reprogramming efficiency. Co-expression of Rad51 significantly increased the numbers of alkaline phosphatase-positive colonies and embryonic stem cell-like colonies during the process of reprogramming. Co-expression ofRad51 significantly increased the expression of epithelial markers at an early stage of reprogramming compared with control cells. Phosphorylated histone H2AX (γH2AX), which initiates the DNA double-strand break repair system, was highly accumulated in reprogramming intermediates upon co-expression of Rad51. This study identified a novel role of Rad51 in enhancing the reprogramming efficiency, possibly by facilitating mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition and by regulating a DNA damage repair pathway during the early phase of the reprogramming process. PMID:27660832

  4. Novel Approaches for Fungal Transcriptomics from Host Samples

    PubMed Central

    Amorim-Vaz, Sara; Sanglard, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    Candida albicans adaptation to the host requires a profound reprogramming of the fungal transcriptome as compared to in vitro laboratory conditions. A detailed knowledge of the C. albicans transcriptome during the infection process is necessary in order to understand which of the fungal genes are important for host adaptation. Such genes could be thought of as potential targets for antifungal therapy. The acquisition of the C. albicans transcriptome is, however, technically challenging due to the low proportion of fungal RNA in host tissues. Two emerging technologies were used recently to circumvent this problem. One consists of the detection of low abundance fungal RNA using capture and reporter gene probes which is followed by emission and quantification of resulting fluorescent signals (nanoString). The other is based first on the capture of fungal RNA by short biotinylated oligonucleotide baits covering the C. albicans ORFome permitting fungal RNA purification. Next, the enriched fungal RNA is amplified and subjected to RNA sequencing (RNA-seq). Here we detail these two transcriptome approaches and discuss their advantages and limitations and future perspectives in microbial transcriptomics from host material. PMID:26834721

  5. Deletion of the mitochondrial chaperone TRAP-1 uncovers global reprogramming of metabolic networks.

    PubMed

    Lisanti, Sofia; Tavecchio, Michele; Chae, Young Chan; Liu, Qin; Brice, Angela K; Thakur, Madhukar L; Languino, Lucia R; Altieri, Dario C

    2014-08-01

    Reprogramming of metabolic pathways contributes to human disease, especially cancer, but the regulators of this process are unknown. Here, we have generated a mouse knockout for the mitochondrial chaperone TRAP-1, a regulator of bioenergetics in tumors. TRAP-1(-/-) mice are viable and showed reduced incidence of age-associated pathologies, including obesity, inflammatory tissue degeneration, dysplasia, and spontaneous tumor formation. This was accompanied by global upregulation of oxidative phosphorylation and glycolysis transcriptomes, causing deregulated mitochondrial respiration, oxidative stress, impaired cell proliferation, and a switch to glycolytic metabolism in vivo. These data identify TRAP-1 as a central regulator of mitochondrial bioenergetics, and this pathway could contribute to metabolic rewiring in tumors.

  6. Chromatin-modifying enzymes as modulators of reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Onder, Tamer T; Kara, Nergis; Cherry, Anne; Sinha, Amit U; Zhu, Nan; Bernt, Kathrin M; Cahan, Patrick; Marcarci, B Ogan; Unternaehrer, Juli; Gupta, Piyush B; Lander, Eric S; Armstrong, Scott A; Daley, George Q

    2012-03-29

    Generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) by somatic cell reprogramming involves global epigenetic remodelling. Whereas several proteins are known to regulate chromatin marks associated with the distinct epigenetic states of cells before and after reprogramming, the role of specific chromatin-modifying enzymes in reprogramming remains to be determined. To address how chromatin-modifying proteins influence reprogramming, we used short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) to target genes in DNA and histone methylation pathways, and identified positive and negative modulators of iPSC generation. Whereas inhibition of the core components of the polycomb repressive complex 1 and 2, including the histone 3 lysine 27 methyltransferase EZH2, reduced reprogramming efficiency, suppression of SUV39H1, YY1 and DOT1L enhanced reprogramming. Specifically, inhibition of the H3K79 histone methyltransferase DOT1L by shRNA or a small molecule accelerated reprogramming, significantly increased the yield of iPSC colonies, and substituted for KLF4 and c-Myc (also known as MYC). Inhibition of DOT1L early in the reprogramming process is associated with a marked increase in two alternative factors, NANOG and LIN28, which play essential functional roles in the enhancement of reprogramming. Genome-wide analysis of H3K79me2 distribution revealed that fibroblast-specific genes associated with the epithelial to mesenchymal transition lose H3K79me2 in the initial phases of reprogramming. DOT1L inhibition facilitates the loss of this mark from genes that are fated to be repressed in the pluripotent state. These findings implicate specific chromatin-modifying enzymes as barriers to or facilitators of reprogramming, and demonstrate how modulation of chromatin-modifying enzymes can be exploited to more efficiently generate iPSCs with fewer exogenous transcription factors. PMID:22388813

  7. Early reprogramming regulators identified by prospective isolation and mass cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Lujan, Ernesto; Zunder, Eli R.; Ng, Yi Han; Goronzy, Isabel N.; Nolan, Garry P.; Wernig, Marius

    2015-01-01

    In the context of most induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell reprogramming methods, heterogeneous populations of nonproductive and staggered productive intermediates arise at different reprogramming time points1–11. Despite recent reports claiming substantially increased reprogramming efficiencies using genetically modified donor cells12,13 prospectively isolating distinct reprogramming intermediates remains an important goal to decipher reprogramming mechanisms. Previous attempts to identify surface markers of intermediate cell populations were based on the assumption that during reprogramming cells progressively lose donor cell identity and gradually acquire iPS cell properties1,2,7,8,10. Here, we report that iPS cell and epithelial markers, such as SSEA1 and EpCAM, respectively, are not predictive of reprogramming during early phases. Instead, in a systematic functional surface marker screen we find that early reprogramming-prone cells express a unique set of surface markers, including CD73, CD49d and CD200 that are absent in fibroblasts and iPS cells. Single cell mass cytometry and prospective isolation show that these distinct intermediates are transient and bridge the gap between donor cell silencing and pluripotency marker acquisition during the early, presumably stochastic reprogramming phase2. Expression profiling revealed early upregulation of the transcriptional regulators Nr0b1 and Etv5 in this reprogramming state, preceding activation of key pluripotency regulators such as Rex1, Dppa2, Nanog and Sox2. Both factors are required for the generation of the early intermediate state and fully reprogrammed iPS cells, and thus mark some of the earliest known regulators of iPS cell induction. Our study deconvolutes the first steps in a hierarchical series of events that lead to pluripotency acquisition. PMID:25830878

  8. Staged miRNA re-regulation patterns during reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background MiRNAs often operate in feedback loops with transcription factors and represent a key mechanism for fine-tuning gene expression. In transcription factor-induced reprogramming, miRNAs play a critical role; however, detailed analyses of miRNA expression changes during reprogramming at the level of deep sequencing have not been previously reported. Results We use four factor reprogramming to induce pluripotent stem cells from mouse fibroblasts and isolate FACS-sorted Thy1- and SSEA1+ intermediates and Oct4-GFP+ induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). Small RNAs from these cells, and two partial-iPSC lines, another iPSC line, and mouse embryonic stem cells (mES cells) were deep sequenced. A comprehensive resetting of the miRNA profile occurs during reprogramming; however, analysis of miRNA co-expression patterns yields only a few patterns of change. Dlk1-Dio3 region miRNAs dominate the large pool of miRNAs experiencing small but significant fold changes early in reprogramming. Overexpression of Dlk1-Dio3 miRNAs early in reprogramming reduces reprogramming efficiency, suggesting the observed downregulation of these miRNAs may contribute to reprogramming. As reprogramming progresses, fewer miRNAs show changes in expression, but those changes are generally of greater magnitude. Conclusions The broad resetting of the miRNA profile during reprogramming that we observe is due to small changes in gene expression in many miRNAs early in the process, and large changes in only a few miRNAs late in reprogramming. This corresponds with a previously observed transition from a stochastic to a more deterministic signal. PMID:24380417

  9. Early reprogramming regulators identified by prospective isolation and mass cytometry.

    PubMed

    Lujan, Ernesto; Zunder, Eli R; Ng, Yi Han; Goronzy, Isabel N; Nolan, Garry P; Wernig, Marius

    2015-05-21

    In the context of most induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell reprogramming methods, heterogeneous populations of non-productive and staggered productive intermediates arise at different reprogramming time points. Despite recent reports claiming substantially increased reprogramming efficiencies using genetically modified donor cells, prospectively isolating distinct reprogramming intermediates remains an important goal to decipher reprogramming mechanisms. Previous attempts to identify surface markers of intermediate cell populations were based on the assumption that, during reprogramming, cells progressively lose donor cell identity and gradually acquire iPS cell properties. Here we report that iPS cell and epithelial markers, such as SSEA1 and EpCAM, respectively, are not predictive of reprogramming during early phases. Instead, in a systematic functional surface marker screen, we find that early reprogramming-prone cells express a unique set of surface markers, including CD73, CD49d and CD200, that are absent in both fibroblasts and iPS cells. Single-cell mass cytometry and prospective isolation show that these distinct intermediates are transient and bridge the gap between donor cell silencing and pluripotency marker acquisition during the early, presumably stochastic, reprogramming phase. Expression profiling reveals early upregulation of the transcriptional regulators Nr0b1 and Etv5 in this reprogramming state, preceding activation of key pluripotency regulators such as Rex1 (also known as Zfp42), Dppa2, Nanog and Sox2. Both factors are required for the generation of the early intermediate state and fully reprogrammed iPS cells, and thus represent some of the earliest known regulators of iPS cell induction. Our study deconvolutes the first steps in a hierarchical series of events that lead to pluripotency acquisition. PMID:25830878

  10. Reprogramming cells to study vacuolar development

    PubMed Central

    Feeney, Mistianne; Frigerio, Lorenzo; Kohalmi, Susanne E.; Cui, Yuhai; Menassa, Rima

    2013-01-01

    During vegetative and embryonic developmental transitions, plant cells are massively reorganized to support the activities that will take place during the subsequent developmental phase. Studying cellular and subcellular changes that occur during these short transitional periods can sometimes present challenges, especially when dealing with Arabidopsis thaliana embryo and seed tissues. As a complementary approach, cellular reprogramming can be used as a tool to study these cellular changes in another, more easily accessible, tissue type. To reprogram cells, genetic manipulation of particular regulatory factors that play critical roles in establishing or repressing the seed developmental program can be used to bring about a change of cell fate. During different developmental phases, vacuoles assume different functions and morphologies to respond to the changing needs of the cell. Lytic vacuoles (LVs) and protein storage vacuoles (PSVs) are the two main vacuole types found in flowering plants such as Arabidopsis. Although both are morphologically distinct and carry out unique functions, they also share some similar activities. As the co-existence of the two vacuole types is short-lived in plant cells, how they replace each other has been a long-standing curiosity. To study the LV to PSV transition, LEAFY COTYLEDON2, a key transcriptional regulator of seed development, was overexpressed in vegetative cells to activate the seed developmental program. At the cellular level, Arabidopsis leaf LVs were observed to convert to PSV-like organelles. This presents the opportunity for further research to elucidate the mechanism of LV to PSV transitions. Overall, this example demonstrates the potential usefulness of cellular reprogramming as a method to study cellular processes that occur during developmental transitions. PMID:24348496

  11. Sir John Gurdon: Father of nuclear reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Blau, Helen M.

    2015-01-01

    Sir John Gurdon founded the field of nuclear reprogramming. His work set the stage for the ever burgeoning area of stem cell biology and regenerative medicine. Here I provide personal reflections on times I shared with John Gurdon and professional reflections of the impact of his ground-breaking research on my own development as a scientist and on the field in general. His paradigm-shifting experiments will continue to provoke scientists to think outside the box for many years to come. PMID:24954777

  12. Identification of Oct4-activating compounds that enhance reprogramming efficiency.

    PubMed

    Li, Wendong; Tian, E; Chen, Zhao-Xia; Sun, Guoqiang; Ye, Peng; Yang, Su; Lu, Dave; Xie, Jun; Ho, Thach-Vu; Tsark, Walter M; Wang, Charles; Horne, David A; Riggs, Arthur D; Yip, M L Richard; Shi, Yanhong

    2012-12-18

    One of the hurdles for practical application of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) is the low efficiency and slow process of reprogramming. Octamer-binding transcription factor 4 (Oct4) has been shown to be an essential regulator of embryonic stem cell (ESC) pluripotency and key to the reprogramming process. To identify small molecules that enhance reprogramming efficiency, we performed a cell-based high-throughput screening of chemical libraries. One of the compounds, termed Oct4-activating compound 1 (OAC1), was found to activate both Oct4 and Nanog promoter-driven luciferase reporter genes. Furthermore, when added to the reprogramming mixture along with the quartet reprogramming factors (Oct4, Sox2, c-Myc, and Klf4), OAC1 enhanced the iPSC reprogramming efficiency and accelerated the reprogramming process. Two structural analogs of OAC1 also activated Oct4 and Nanog promoters and enhanced iPSC formation. The iPSC colonies derived using the Oct4-activating compounds along with the quartet factors exhibited typical ESC morphology, gene-expression pattern, and developmental potential. OAC1 seems to enhance reprogramming efficiency in a unique manner, independent of either inhibition of the p53-p21 pathway or activation of the Wnt-β-catenin signaling. OAC1 increases transcription of the Oct4-Nanog-Sox2 triad and Tet1, a gene known to be involved in DNA demethylation. PMID:23213213

  13. Advances in cellular reprogramming: moving toward a reprieve from immunogenicity.

    PubMed

    Gallegos, Thomas F; Sancho-Martinez, Ignacio; Izpisua Belmonte, Juan Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Somatic cell nuclear reprogramming is opening new doors for the modeling of human disease phenotypes in vitro, the identification of novel therapeutic compounds and diagnostic factors as well as future autologous cell replacement therapies. Despite the potential that reprogramming technologies bring, there are remaining concerns preventing their broad application in the short-term. One of them is the safety concern associated with the use of stem cell derivatives, those generated by reprogramming or even when embryonic stem cells are employed. Here we summarize the current knowledge in the field of stem cells and reprogramming with a particular focus on the pitfalls preventing rapid translation of stem cell technologies into the clinic. We discuss the most recent findings on immunogenicity and tumorigenicity of reprogrammed cells. We additionally provide an overview on the potential applications that reprogramming approaches might bring to the immunological field and elaborate on the use of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) with pre-arranged immune receptors for the development of future immunotherapeutic approaches. The use of reprogramming approaches can represent and provide groundbreaking strategies previously unachievable for stem cell engineering aimed at modulating immune responses. In summary, we provide an overview on the different topics related to the use of stem cells and highlight the most provocative, yet perhaps currently underappreciated, aspect of combining immunological and reprogramming strategies for the treatment of human disease.

  14. Aberrant DNA methylation reprogramming in bovine SCNT preimplantation embryos

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Sheng; Chen, Xin; Wang, Fang; An, Xinglan; Tang, Bo; Zhang, Xueming; Sun, Liguang; Li, Ziyi

    2016-01-01

    DNA methylation reprogramming plays important roles in mammalian embryogenesis. Mammalian somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) embryos with reprogramming defects fail to develop. Thus, we compared DNA methylation reprogramming in preimplantation embryos from bovine SCNT and in vitro fertilization (IVF) and analyzed the influence of vitamin C (VC) on the reprogramming of DNA methylation. The results showed that global DNA methylation followed a typical pattern of demethylation and remethylation in IVF preimplantation embryos; however, the global genome remained hypermethylated in SCNT preimplantation embryos. Compared with the IVF group, locus DNA methylation reprogramming showed three patterns in the SCNT group. First, some pluripotency genes (POU5F1 and NANOG) and repeated elements (satellite I and α-satellite) showed insufficient demethylation and hypermethylation in the SCNT group. Second, a differentially methylated region (DMR) of an imprint control region (ICR) in H19 exhibited excessive demethylation and hypomethylation. Third, some pluripotency genes (CDX2 and SOX2) were hypomethylated in both the IVF and SCNT groups. Additionally, VC improved the DNA methylation reprogramming of satellite I, α-satellite and H19 but not that of POU5F1 and NANOG in SCNT preimplantation embryos. These results indicate that DNA methylation reprogramming was aberrant and that VC influenced DNA methylation reprogramming in SCNT embryos in a locus-specific manner. PMID:27456302

  15. Identification of Oct4-activating compounds that enhance reprogramming efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wendong; Tian, E; Chen, Zhao-Xia; Sun, GuoQiang; Ye, Peng; Yang, Su; Lu, Dave; Xie, Jun; Ho, Thach-Vu; Tsark, Walter M.; Wang, Charles; Horne, David A.; Riggs, Arthur D.; Yip, M. L. Richard; Shi, Yanhong

    2012-01-01

    One of the hurdles for practical application of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) is the low efficiency and slow process of reprogramming. Octamer-binding transcription factor 4 (Oct4) has been shown to be an essential regulator of embryonic stem cell (ESC) pluripotency and key to the reprogramming process. To identify small molecules that enhance reprogramming efficiency, we performed a cell-based high-throughput screening of chemical libraries. One of the compounds, termed Oct4-activating compound 1 (OAC1), was found to activate both Oct4 and Nanog promoter-driven luciferase reporter genes. Furthermore, when added to the reprogramming mixture along with the quartet reprogramming factors (Oct4, Sox2, c-Myc, and Klf4), OAC1 enhanced the iPSC reprogramming efficiency and accelerated the reprogramming process. Two structural analogs of OAC1 also activated Oct4 and Nanog promoters and enhanced iPSC formation. The iPSC colonies derived using the Oct4-activating compounds along with the quartet factors exhibited typical ESC morphology, gene-expression pattern, and developmental potential. OAC1 seems to enhance reprogramming efficiency in a unique manner, independent of either inhibition of the p53-p21 pathway or activation of the Wnt-β-catenin signaling. OAC1 increases transcription of the Oct4-Nanog-Sox2 triad and Tet1, a gene known to be involved in DNA demethylation. PMID:23213213

  16. Changes in Parthenogenetic Imprinting Patterns during Reprogramming by Cell Fusion.

    PubMed

    Jang, Hyun Sik; Hong, Yean Ju; Choi, Hyun Woo; Song, Hyuk; Byun, Sung June; Uhm, Sang Jun; Seo, Han Geuk; Do, Jeong Tae

    2016-01-01

    Differentiated somatic cells can be reprogrammed into the pluripotent state by cell-cell fusion. In the pluripotent state, reprogrammed cells may then self-renew and differentiate into all three germ layers. Fusion-induced reprogramming also epigenetically modifies the somatic cell genome through DNA demethylation, X chromosome reactivation, and histone modification. In this study, we investigated whether fusion with embryonic stem cells (ESCs) also reprograms genomic imprinting patterns in somatic cells. In particular, we examined imprinting changes in parthenogenetic neural stem cells fused with biparental ESCs, as well as in biparental neural stem cells fused with parthenogenetic ESCs. The resulting hybrid cells expressed the pluripotency markers Oct4 and Nanog. In addition, methylation of several imprinted genes except Peg3 was comparable between hybrid cells and ESCs. This finding indicates that reprogramming by cell fusion does not necessarily reverse the status of all imprinted genes to the state of pluripotent fusion partner. PMID:27232503

  17. Changes in Parthenogenetic Imprinting Patterns during Reprogramming by Cell Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Hyun Sik; Hong, Yean Ju; Choi, Hyun Woo; Song, Hyuk; Byun, Sung June; Uhm, Sang Jun; Seo, Han Geuk; Do, Jeong Tae

    2016-01-01

    Differentiated somatic cells can be reprogrammed into the pluripotent state by cell-cell fusion. In the pluripotent state, reprogrammed cells may then self-renew and differentiate into all three germ layers. Fusion-induced reprogramming also epigenetically modifies the somatic cell genome through DNA demethylation, X chromosome reactivation, and histone modification. In this study, we investigated whether fusion with embryonic stem cells (ESCs) also reprograms genomic imprinting patterns in somatic cells. In particular, we examined imprinting changes in parthenogenetic neural stem cells fused with biparental ESCs, as well as in biparental neural stem cells fused with parthenogenetic ESCs. The resulting hybrid cells expressed the pluripotency markers Oct4 and Nanog. In addition, methylation of several imprinted genes except Peg3 was comparable between hybrid cells and ESCs. This finding indicates that reprogramming by cell fusion does not necessarily reverse the status of all imprinted genes to the state of pluripotent fusion partner. PMID:27232503

  18. Vectorology and Factor Delivery in Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) reprogramming requires sustained expression of multiple reprogramming factors for a limited period of time (10–30 days). Conventional iPSC reprogramming was achieved using lentiviral or simple retroviral vectors. Retroviral reprogramming has flaws of insertional mutagenesis, uncontrolled silencing, residual expression and re-activation of transgenes, and immunogenicity. To overcome these issues, various technologies were explored, including adenoviral vectors, protein transduction, RNA transfection, minicircle DNA, excisable PiggyBac (PB) transposon, Cre-lox excision system, negative-sense RNA replicon, positive-sense RNA replicon, Epstein-Barr virus-based episomal plasmids, and repeated transfections of plasmids. This review provides summaries of the main vectorologies and factor delivery systems used in current reprogramming protocols. PMID:24625220

  19. Direct Cardiac Reprogramming: Advances in Cardiac Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Olivia; Qian, Li

    2015-01-01

    Heart disease is one of the lead causes of death worldwide. Many forms of heart disease, including myocardial infarction and pressure-loading cardiomyopathies, result in irreversible cardiomyocyte death. Activated fibroblasts respond to cardiac injury by forming scar tissue, but ultimately this response fails to restore cardiac function. Unfortunately, the human heart has little regenerative ability and long-term outcomes following acute coronary events often include chronic and end-stage heart failure. Building upon years of research aimed at restoring functional cardiomyocytes, recent advances have been made in the direct reprogramming of fibroblasts toward a cardiomyocyte cell fate both in vitro and in vivo. Several experiments show functional improvements in mouse models of myocardial infarction following in situ generation of cardiomyocyte-like cells from endogenous fibroblasts. Though many of these studies are in an early stage, this nascent technology holds promise for future applications in regenerative medicine. In this review, we discuss the history, progress, methods, challenges, and future directions of direct cardiac reprogramming. PMID:26176012

  20. Reconstructed Metabolic Network Models Predict Flux-Level Metabolic Reprogramming in Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Özcan, Emrah; Çakır, Tunahan

    2016-01-01

    Developments in genome scale metabolic modeling techniques and omics technologies have enabled the reconstruction of context-specific metabolic models. In this study, glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), one of the most common and aggressive malignant brain tumors, is investigated by mapping GBM gene expression data on the growth-implemented brain specific genome-scale metabolic network, and GBM-specific models are generated. The models are used to calculate metabolic flux distributions in the tumor cells. Metabolic phenotypes predicted by the GBM-specific metabolic models reconstructed in this work reflect the general metabolic reprogramming of GBM, reported both in in-vitro and in-vivo experiments. The computed flux profiles quantitatively predict that major sources of the acetyl-CoA and oxaloacetic acid pool used in TCA cycle are pyruvate dehydrogenase from glycolysis and anaplerotic flux from glutaminolysis, respectively. Also, our results, in accordance with recent studies, predict a contribution of oxidative phosphorylation to ATP pool via a slightly active TCA cycle in addition to the major contributor aerobic glycolysis. We verified our results by using different computational methods that incorporate transcriptome data with genome-scale models and by using different transcriptome datasets. Correct predictions of flux distributions in glycolysis, glutaminolysis, TCA cycle and lipid precursor metabolism validate the reconstructed models for further use in future to simulate more specific metabolic patterns for GBM. PMID:27147948

  1. Transgenerational Epigenetic Programming of the Embryonic Testis Transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    Anway, Matthew D.; Rekow, Stephen S.; Skinner, Michael K.

    2008-01-01

    Embryonic exposure to the endocrine disruptor vinclozolin during gonadal sex determination appears to promote an epigenetic reprogramming of the male germ-line that is associated with transgenerational adult onset disease states. Transgenerational effects on the embryonic day 16 (E16) testis demonstrated reproducible changes in the testis transcriptome for multiple generations (F1-F3). The expression of 196 genes were found to be influenced, with the majority of gene expression being decreased or silenced. Dramatic changes in the gene expression of methyltransferases during gonadal sex determination were observed in the F1 and F2 vinclozolin generation (E16) embryonic testis, but the majority returned to control generation levels by the F3 generation. The most dramatic effects were on the germ-line associated Dnmt3A and Dnmt3L isoforms. Observations demonstrate that an embryonic exposure to vinclozolin appears to promote an epigenetic reprogramming of the male germ-line that correlates with transgenerational alterations in the testis transcriptome in subsequent generations. PMID:18042343

  2. Advances in Reprogramming Somatic Cells to Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Minal; Yang, Shuying

    2010-01-01

    Traditionally, nuclear reprogramming of cells has been performed by transferring somatic cell nuclei into oocytes, by combining somatic and pluripotent cells together through cell fusion and through genetic integration of factors through somatic cell chromatin. All of these techniques changes gene expression which further leads to a change in cell fate. Here we discuss recent advances in generating induced pluripotent stem cells, different reprogramming methods and clinical applications of iPS cells. Viral vectors have been used to transfer transcription factors (Oct4, Sox2, c-myc, Klf4, and nanog) to induce reprogramming of mouse fibroblasts, neural stem cells, neural progenitor cells, keratinocytes, B lymphocytes and meningeal membrane cells towards pluripotency. Human fibroblasts, neural cells, blood and keratinocytes have also been reprogrammed towards pluripotency. In this review we have discussed the use of viral vectors for reprogramming both animal and human stem cells. Currently, many studies are also involved in finding alternatives to using viral vectors carrying transcription factors for reprogramming cells. These include using plasmid transfection, piggyback transposon system and piggyback transposon system combined with a non viral vector system. Applications of these techniques have been discussed in detail including its advantages and disadvantages. Finally, current clinical applications of induced pluripotent stem cells and its limitations have also been reviewed. Thus, this review is a summary of current research advances in reprogramming cells into induced pluripotent stem cells. PMID:20336395

  3. Deterministic direct reprogramming of somatic cells to pluripotency.

    PubMed

    Rais, Yoach; Zviran, Asaf; Geula, Shay; Gafni, Ohad; Chomsky, Elad; Viukov, Sergey; Mansour, Abed AlFatah; Caspi, Inbal; Krupalnik, Vladislav; Zerbib, Mirie; Maza, Itay; Mor, Nofar; Baran, Dror; Weinberger, Leehee; Jaitin, Diego A; Lara-Astiaso, David; Blecher-Gonen, Ronnie; Shipony, Zohar; Mukamel, Zohar; Hagai, Tzachi; Gilad, Shlomit; Amann-Zalcenstein, Daniela; Tanay, Amos; Amit, Ido; Novershtern, Noa; Hanna, Jacob H

    2013-10-01

    Somatic cells can be inefficiently and stochastically reprogrammed into induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells by exogenous expression of Oct4 (also called Pou5f1), Sox2, Klf4 and Myc (hereafter referred to as OSKM). The nature of the predominant rate-limiting barrier(s) preventing the majority of cells to successfully and synchronously reprogram remains to be defined. Here we show that depleting Mbd3, a core member of the Mbd3/NuRD (nucleosome remodelling and deacetylation) repressor complex, together with OSKM transduction and reprogramming in naive pluripotency promoting conditions, result in deterministic and synchronized iPS cell reprogramming (near 100% efficiency within seven days from mouse and human cells). Our findings uncover a dichotomous molecular function for the reprogramming factors, serving to reactivate endogenous pluripotency networks while simultaneously directly recruiting the Mbd3/NuRD repressor complex that potently restrains the reactivation of OSKM downstream target genes. Subsequently, the latter interactions, which are largely depleted during early pre-implantation development in vivo, lead to a stochastic and protracted reprogramming trajectory towards pluripotency in vitro. The deterministic reprogramming approach devised here offers a novel platform for the dissection of molecular dynamics leading to establishing pluripotency at unprecedented flexibility and resolution.

  4. Comparison of American mink embryonic stem and induced pluripotent stem cell transcriptomes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Recently fibroblasts of many mammalian species have been reprogrammed to pluripotent state using overexpression of several transcription factors. This technology allows production of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells with properties similar to embryonic stem (ES) cells. The completeness of reprogramming process is well studied in such species as mouse and human but there is not enough data on other species. We produced American mink (Neovison vison) ES and iPS cells and compared these cells using transcriptome analysis. Results We report the generation of 10 mink ES and 22 iPS cell lines. The majority of the analyzed cell lines had normal diploid chromosome number. The only ES cell line with XX chromosome set had both X-chromosomes in active state that is characteristic of pluripotent cells. The pluripotency of ES and iPS cell lines was confirmed by formation of teratomas with cell types representing all three germ layers. Transcriptome analysis of mink embryonic fibroblasts (EF), two ES and two iPS cell lines allowed us to identify 11831 assembled contigs which were annotated. These led to a number of 6891 unique genes. Of these 3201 were differentially expressed between mink EF and ES cells. We analyzed expression levels of these genes in iPS cell lines. This allowed us to show that 80% of genes were correctly reprogrammed in iPS cells, whereas approximately 6% had an intermediate expression pattern, about 7% were not reprogrammed and about 5% had a "novel" expression pattern. We observed expression of pluripotency marker genes such as Oct4, Sox2 and Rex1 in ES and iPS cell lines with notable exception of Nanog. Conclusions We had produced and characterized American mink ES and iPS cells. These cells were pluripotent by a number of criteria and iPS cells exhibited effective reprogramming. Interestingly, we had showed lack of Nanog expression and consider it as a species-specific feature. PMID:26694224

  5. Programming and reprogramming a human heart cell.

    PubMed

    Sahara, Makoto; Santoro, Federica; Chien, Kenneth R

    2015-03-12

    The latest discoveries and advanced knowledge in the fields of stem cell biology and developmental cardiology hold great promise for cardiac regenerative medicine, enabling researchers to design novel therapeutic tools and approaches to regenerate cardiac muscle for diseased hearts. However, progress in this arena has been hampered by a lack of reproducible and convincing evidence, which at best has yielded modest outcomes and is still far from clinical practice. To address current controversies and move cardiac regenerative therapeutics forward, it is crucial to gain a deeper understanding of the key cellular and molecular programs involved in human cardiogenesis and cardiac regeneration. In this review, we consider the fundamental principles that govern the "programming" and "reprogramming" of a human heart cell and discuss updated therapeutic strategies to regenerate a damaged heart.

  6. Wound signaling of regenerative cell reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Lup, Samuel Daniel; Tian, Xin; Xu, Jian; Pérez-Pérez, José Manuel

    2016-09-01

    Plants are sessile organisms that must deal with various threats resulting in tissue damage, such as herbivore feeding, and physical wounding by wind, snow or crushing by animals. During wound healing, phytohormone crosstalk orchestrates cellular regeneration through the establishment of tissue-specific asymmetries. In turn, hormone-regulated transcription factors and their downstream targets coordinate cellular responses, including dedifferentiation, cell cycle reactivation and vascular regeneration. By comparing different examples of wound-induced tissue regeneration in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, a number of key regulators of developmental plasticity of plant cells have been identified. We present the relevance of these findings and of the dynamic establishment of differential auxin gradients for cell reprogramming after wounding. PMID:27457994

  7. Anti-Aging Strategies Based on Cellular Reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Ocampo, Alejandro; Reddy, Pradeep; Izpisua Belmonte, Juan Carlos

    2016-08-01

    Aging can be defined as the progressive decline in the ability of a cell or organism to resist stress and disease. Recent advances in cellular reprogramming technologies have enabled detailed analyses of the aging process, often involving cell types derived from aged individuals, or patients with premature aging syndromes. In this review we discuss how cellular reprogramming allows the recapitulation of aging in a dish, describing novel experimental approaches to investigate the aging process. Finally, we explore the role of epigenetic dysregulation as a driver of aging, discussing how epigenetic reprogramming may be harnessed to ameliorate aging hallmarks, both in vitro and in vivo. A better understanding of the reprogramming process may indeed assist the development of novel therapeutic strategies to extend a healthy lifespan. PMID:27426043

  8. Genetic background affects susceptibility to tumoral stem cell reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    García-Ramírez, Idoia; Ruiz-Roca, Lucía; Martín-Lorenzo, Alberto; Blanco, Óscar; García-Cenador, María Begoña; García-Criado, Francisco Javier; Vicente-Dueñas, Carolina; Sánchez-García, Isidro

    2013-01-01

    The latest studies of the interactions between oncogenes and its target cell have shown that certain oncogenes may act as passengers to reprogram tissue-specific stem/progenitor cell into a malignant cancer stem cell state. In this study, we show that the genetic background influences this tumoral stem cell reprogramming capacity of the oncogenes using as a model the Sca1-BCRABLp210 mice, where the type of tumor they develop, chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), is a function of tumoral stem cell reprogramming. Sca1-BCRABLp210 mice containing FVB genetic components were significantly more resistant to CML. However, pure Sca1-BCRABLp210 FVB mice developed thymomas that were not seen in the Sca1-BCRABLp210 mice into the B6 background. Collectively, our results demonstrate for the first time that tumoral stem cell reprogramming fate is subject to polymorphic genetic control. PMID:23839033

  9. Spin glass model for dynamics of cell reprogramming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pusuluri, Sai Teja; Lang, Alex H.; Mehta, Pankaj; Castillo, Horacio E.

    2015-03-01

    Recent experiments show that differentiated cells can be reprogrammed to become pluripotent stem cells. The possible cell fates can be modeled as attractors in a dynamical system, the ``epigenetic landscape.'' Both cellular differentiation and reprogramming can be described in the landscape picture as motion from one attractor to another attractor. We perform Monte Carlo simulations in a simple model of the landscape. This model is based on spin glass theory and it can be used to construct a simulated epigenetic landscape starting from the experimental genomic data. We re-analyse data from several cell reprogramming experiments and compare with our simulation results. We find that the model can reproduce some of the main features of the dynamics of cell reprogramming.

  10. In Vivo Reprogramming for Brain and Spinal Cord Repair.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gong; Wernig, Marius; Berninger, Benedikt; Nakafuku, Masato; Parmar, Malin; Zhang, Chun-Li

    2015-01-01

    Cell reprogramming technologies have enabled the generation of various specific cell types including neurons from readily accessible patient cells, such as skin fibroblasts, providing an intriguing novel cell source for autologous cell transplantation. However, cell transplantation faces several difficult hurdles such as cell production and purification, long-term survival, and functional integration after transplantation. Recently, in vivo reprogramming, which makes use of endogenous cells for regeneration purpose, emerged as a new approach to circumvent cell transplantation. There has been evidence for in vivo reprogramming in the mouse pancreas, heart, and brain and spinal cord with various degrees of success. This mini review summarizes the latest developments presented in the first symposium on in vivo reprogramming glial cells into functional neurons in the brain and spinal cord, held at the 2014 annual meeting of the Society for Neuroscience in Washington, DC. PMID:26730402

  11. The Effect of Fetal Bovine Serum (FBS) on Efficacy of Cellular Reprogramming for Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell (iPSC) Generation.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Daekee; Kim, Jin-Su; Cha, Byung-Hyun; Park, Kwang-Sook; Han, Inbo; Park, Kyung-Soon; Bae, Hojae; Han, Myung-Kwan; Kim, Kwang-Soo; Lee, Soo-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are pivotal to the advancement of regenerative medicine. However, the low efficacy of iPSC generation and insufficient knowledge about the reprogramming mechanisms involved in somatic cell/adult stem cell reversion to a pluripotent phenotype remain critical hurdles to the therapeutic application of iPSCs. The present study investigated whether the concentration of fetal bovine serum (FBS), a widely employed cell culture additive, can influence the cellular reprogramming efficacy (RE) of human adipose-derived stem cells (hADSCs) to generate iPSCs. Compared with the typically employed concentration of FBS (10%), high concentrations (20% and 30%) increased the RE of hADSCs by approximately twofold, whereas a low concentration (5%) decreased the RE by the same extent. Furthermore, cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8), bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation, and fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) assays showed that hADSC proliferation during reprogramming was significantly enhanced by FBS at 20% and 30%, whereas quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and Western blotting assays revealed a concomitant decrease in p53, p51, and p21 expression. In addition, the efficacy of retrovirus-mediated transduction into hADSCs was increased by approximately 10% at high concentrations of FBS. It was confirmed that platelet-derived growth factor in the FBS enhanced proliferation and reprogramming efficacy. Finally, the generated iPSCs showed a normal karyotype, the same fingerprinting pattern as parental hADSCs, a genome-wide transcriptome pattern similar to that of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), and in vivo pluripotency. In conclusion, the current investigation demonstrated that high concentrations of FBS can modulate molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying the reprogramming process in hADSCs, thereby augmenting the cellular RE for iPSC generation. PMID:26450367

  12. Signaling involved in stem cell reprogramming and differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Tanabe, Shihori

    2015-01-01

    Stem cell differentiation is regulated by multiple signaling events. Recent technical advances have revealed that differentiated cells can be reprogrammed into stem cells. The signals involved in stem cell programming are of major interest in stem cell research. The signaling mechanisms involved in regulating stem cell reprogramming and differentiation are the subject of intense study in the field of life sciences. In this review, the molecular interactions and signaling pathways related to stem cell differentiation are discussed. PMID:26328015

  13. Conversion of genomic imprinting by reprogramming and redifferentiation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min Jung; Choi, Hyun Woo; Jang, Hyo Jin; Chung, Hyung Min; Arauzo-Bravo, Marcos J; Schöler, Hans R; Do, Jeong Tae

    2013-06-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), generated from somatic cells by overexpression of transcription factors Oct4, Sox2, Klf4 and c-Myc have the same characteristics as pluripotent embryonic stem cells (ESCs). iPSCs reprogrammed from differentiated cells undergo epigenetic modification during reprogramming, and ultimately acquire a similar epigenetic state to that of ESCs. In this study, these epigenetic changes were observed in reprogramming of uniparental parthenogenetic somatic cells. The parthenogenetic pattern of imprinted genes changes during the generation of parthenogenetic maternal iPSCs (miPSCs), a process referred to as pluripotent reprogramming. We determined whether altered imprinted genes are maintained or revert to the parthenogenetic state when the reprogrammed cells are redifferentiated into specialized cell types. To address this question, we redifferentiated miPSCs into neural stem cells (miPS-NSCs) and compared them with biparental female NSCs (fNSCs) and parthenogenetic NSCs (pNSCs). We found that pluripotent reprogramming of parthenogenetic somatic cells could reset parthenogenetic DNA methylation patterns in imprinted genes, and that alterations in DNA methylation were maintained even after miPSCs were redifferentiated into miPS-NSCs. Notably, maternally methylated imprinted genes (Peg1, Peg3, Igf2r, Snrpn and Ndn), whose differentially methylated regions were fully methylated in pNSCs, were demethylated and their expression levels were found to be close to the levels in normal biparental fNSCs after reprogramming and redifferentiation. Our findings suggest that pluripotent reprogramming of parthenogenetic somatic cells followed by redifferentiation leads to changes in DNA methylation of imprinted genes and the reestablishment of gene expression levels to those of normal biparental cells. PMID:23525019

  14. Reprogramming of Xist against the pluripotent state in fusion hybrids.

    PubMed

    Do, Jeong Tae; Han, Dong Wook; Gentile, Luca; Sobek-Klocke, Ingeborg; Wutz, Anton; Schöler, Hans R

    2009-11-15

    The fusion of somatic cells with pluripotent cells results in the generation of pluripotent hybrid cells. Because the ;memory' of somatic cells seems to be erased during fusion-induced reprogramming, genetic reprogramming is thought to be a largely unidirectional process. Here we show that fusion-induced reprogramming, which brings about the formation of pluripotent hybrids, does not always follow a unidirectional route. Xist is a unique gene in that it is reprogrammed to the state of somatic cells in fusion-induced pluripotent hybrids. In hybrids formed from the cell fusion of embryonal carcinoma cells (ECCs) with male neural stem cells (mNSCs), the Xist gene was found to be reprogrammed to the somatic cell state, whereas the pluripotency-related and tissue-specific marker genes were reprogrammed to the pluripotent cell state. Specifically, Xist is not expressed in hybrids, because the ;memory' of the somatic cell has been retained (i.e. mNSCs do not exhibit Xist expression) and that of the pluripotent cell erased (i.e. inactivation of the partially active Xist gene of ECCs, complete methylation of the Xist region). The latter phenomenon is induced by male, but not by female, NSCs.

  15. Advances in reprogramming-based study of neurologic disorders.

    PubMed

    Nityanandam, Anjana; Baldwin, Kristin K

    2015-06-01

    The technology to convert adult human non-neural cells into neural lineages, through induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), somatic cell nuclear transfer, and direct lineage reprogramming or transdifferentiation has progressed tremendously in recent years. Reprogramming-based approaches aimed at manipulating cellular identity have enormous potential for disease modeling, high-throughput drug screening, cell therapy, and personalized medicine. Human iPSC (hiPSC)-based cellular disease models have provided proof of principle evidence of the validity of this system. However, several challenges remain before patient-specific neurons produced by reprogramming can provide reliable insights into disease mechanisms or be efficiently applied to drug discovery and transplantation therapy. This review will first discuss limitations of currently available reprogramming-based methods in faithfully and reproducibly recapitulating disease pathology. Specifically, we will address issues such as culture heterogeneity, interline and inter-individual variability, and limitations of two-dimensional differentiation paradigms. Second, we will assess recent progress and the future prospects of reprogramming-based neurologic disease modeling. This includes three-dimensional disease modeling, advances in reprogramming technology, prescreening of hiPSCs and creating isogenic disease models using gene editing. PMID:25749371

  16. Advances in Reprogramming-Based Study of Neurologic Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Baldwin, Kristin K.

    2015-01-01

    The technology to convert adult human non-neural cells into neural lineages, through induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), somatic cell nuclear transfer, and direct lineage reprogramming or transdifferentiation has progressed tremendously in recent years. Reprogramming-based approaches aimed at manipulating cellular identity have enormous potential for disease modeling, high-throughput drug screening, cell therapy, and personalized medicine. Human iPSC (hiPSC)-based cellular disease models have provided proof of principle evidence of the validity of this system. However, several challenges remain before patient-specific neurons produced by reprogramming can provide reliable insights into disease mechanisms or be efficiently applied to drug discovery and transplantation therapy. This review will first discuss limitations of currently available reprogramming-based methods in faithfully and reproducibly recapitulating disease pathology. Specifically, we will address issues such as culture heterogeneity, interline and inter-individual variability, and limitations of two-dimensional differentiation paradigms. Second, we will assess recent progress and the future prospects of reprogramming-based neurologic disease modeling. This includes three-dimensional disease modeling, advances in reprogramming technology, prescreening of hiPSCs and creating isogenic disease models using gene editing. PMID:25749371

  17. Calcineurin-NFAT Signaling Controls Somatic Cell Reprogramming in a Stage-Dependent Manner.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ming; Liao, Bing; Tao, Yu; Chen, Hao; Xiao, Feng; Gu, Junjie; Gao, Shaorong; Jin, Ying

    2016-05-01

    Calcineurin-NFAT signaling is critical for early lineage specification of mouse embryonic stem cells and early embryos. However, its roles in somatic cell reprogramming remain unknown. Here, we report that calcineurin-NFAT signaling has a dynamic activity and plays diverse roles at different stages of reprogramming. At the early stage, calcineurin-NFAT signaling is transiently activated and its activation is required for successful reprogramming. However, at the late stage of reprogramming, activation of calcineurin-NFAT signaling becomes a barrier for reprogramming and its inactivation is critical for successful induction of pluripotency. Mechanistically, calcineurin-NFAT signaling contributes to the reprogramming through regulating multiple early events during reprogramming, including mesenchymal to epithelial transition (MET), cell adhesion and emergence of SSEA1(+) intermediate cells. Collectively, this study reveals for the first time the important roles of calcineurin-NFAT signaling during somatic cell reprogramming and provides new insights into the molecular regulation of reprogramming.

  18. Cyclodextrin promotes atherosclerosis regression via macrophage reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Zimmer, Sebastian; Grebe, Alena; Bakke, Siril S.; Bode, Niklas; Halvorsen, Bente; Ulas, Thomas; Skjelland, Mona; De Nardo, Dominic; Labzin, Larisa I.; Kerksiek, Anja; Hempel, Chris; Heneka, Michael T.; Hawxhurst, Victoria; Fitzgerald, Michael L; Trebicka, Jonel; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke; Westerterp, Marit; Tall, Alan R.; Wright, Samuel D.; Espevik, Terje; Schultze, Joachim L.; Nickenig, Georg; Lütjohann, Dieter; Latz, Eicke

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is an inflammatory disease linked to elevated blood cholesterol levels. Despite ongoing advances in the prevention and treatment of atherosclerosis, cardiovascular disease remains the leading cause of death worldwide. Continuous retention of apolipoprotein B-containing lipoproteins in the subendothelial space causes a local overabundance of free cholesterol. Since cholesterol accumulation and deposition of cholesterol crystals (CCs) triggers a complex inflammatory response, we tested the efficacy of the cyclic oligosaccharide 2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (CD), a compound that increases cholesterol solubility, in preventing and reversing atherosclerosis. Here we show that CD treatment of murine atherosclerosis reduced atherosclerotic plaque size and CC load, and promoted plaque regression even with a continued cholesterol-rich diet. Mechanistically, CD increased oxysterol production in both macrophages and human atherosclerotic plaques, and promoted liver X receptor (LXR)-mediated transcriptional reprogramming to improve cholesterol efflux and exert anti-inflammatory effects. In vivo, this CD-mediated LXR agonism was required for the anti-atherosclerotic and anti-inflammatory effects of CD as well as for augmented reverse cholesterol transport. Since CD treatment in humans is safe and CD beneficially affects key mechanisms of atherogenesis, it may therefore be used clinically to prevent or treat human atherosclerosis. PMID:27053774

  19. Reprogrammed cell delivery for personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Wieland, Markus; Fussenegger, Martin

    2012-10-01

    In most approaches, personalized medicine requires time- and cost-intensive characterization of an individual's genetic background in order to achieve the best-adapted therapy. For this purpose, cell-based drug delivery offers a promising alternative. In particular, synthetic biology has introduced the vision of cells being programmable therapeutic production facilities that can be introduced into patients. This review highlights the progress made in synthetic biology-based cell engineering toward advanced drug delivery entities. Starting from basic one-input responsive transcriptional or post-transcriptional gene control systems, the field has reached a level on which cells can be engineered to detect cancer cells, to obtain control over T-cell proliferation, and to restore blood glucose homeostasis upon blue light illumination. Furthermore, a cellular implant was developed that detects blood urate level disorders and acts accordingly to restore homeostasis while another cellular implant was engineered as an artificial insemination device that releases bull sperm into bovine ovarian only during ovulation time by recording endogenous luteinizing hormone levels. Soon, the field will reach a stage at which cells can be reprogrammed to detect multiple metabolic parameters and self-sufficiently treat any disorder connected to them. PMID:22721864

  20. Cyclodextrin promotes atherosclerosis regression via macrophage reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Zimmer, Sebastian; Grebe, Alena; Bakke, Siril S; Bode, Niklas; Halvorsen, Bente; Ulas, Thomas; Skjelland, Mona; De Nardo, Dominic; Labzin, Larisa I; Kerksiek, Anja; Hempel, Chris; Heneka, Michael T; Hawxhurst, Victoria; Fitzgerald, Michael L; Trebicka, Jonel; Björkhem, Ingemar; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke; Westerterp, Marit; Tall, Alan R; Wright, Samuel D; Espevik, Terje; Schultze, Joachim L; Nickenig, Georg; Lütjohann, Dieter; Latz, Eicke

    2016-04-01

    Atherosclerosis is an inflammatory disease linked to elevated blood cholesterol concentrations. Despite ongoing advances in the prevention and treatment of atherosclerosis, cardiovascular disease remains the leading cause of death worldwide. Continuous retention of apolipoprotein B-containing lipoproteins in the subendothelial space causes a local overabundance of free cholesterol. Because cholesterol accumulation and deposition of cholesterol crystals (CCs) trigger a complex inflammatory response, we tested the efficacy of the cyclic oligosaccharide 2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (CD), a compound that increases cholesterol solubility in preventing and reversing atherosclerosis. We showed that CD treatment of murine atherosclerosis reduced atherosclerotic plaque size and CC load and promoted plaque regression even with a continued cholesterol-rich diet. Mechanistically, CD increased oxysterol production in both macrophages and human atherosclerotic plaques and promoted liver X receptor (LXR)-mediated transcriptional reprogramming to improve cholesterol efflux and exert anti-inflammatory effects. In vivo, this CD-mediated LXR agonism was required for the antiatherosclerotic and anti-inflammatory effects of CD as well as for augmented reverse cholesterol transport. Because CD treatment in humans is safe and CD beneficially affects key mechanisms of atherogenesis, it may therefore be used clinically to prevent or treat human atherosclerosis. PMID:27053774

  1. Reprogramming: A Preventive Strategy in Hypertension Focusing on the Kidney

    PubMed Central

    Tain, You-Lin; Joles, Jaap A.

    2015-01-01

    Adulthood hypertension can be programmed in response to a suboptimal environment in early life. However, developmental plasticity also implies that one can prevent hypertension in adult life by administrating appropriate compounds during early development. We have termed this reprogramming. While the risk of hypertension has been assessed in many mother-child cohorts of human developmental programming, interventions necessary to prove causation and provide a reprogramming strategy are lacking. Since the developing kidney is particularly vulnerable to environmental insults and blood pressure is determined by kidney function, renal programming is considered key in developmental programming of hypertension. Common pathways, whereby both genetic and acquired developmental programming converge into the same phenotype, have been recognized. For instance, the same reprogramming interventions aimed at shifting nitric oxide (NO)-reactive oxygen species (ROS) balance, such as perinatal citrulline or melatonin supplements, can be protective in both genetic and developmentally programmed hypertension. Furthermore, a significantly increased expression of gene Ephx2 (soluble epoxide hydrolase) was noted in both genetic and acquired animal models of hypertension. Since a suboptimal environment is often multifactorial, such common reprogramming pathways are a practical finding for translation to the clinic. This review provides an overview of potential clinical applications of reprogramming strategies to prevent programmed hypertension. We emphasize the kidney in the following areas: mechanistic insights from human studies and animal models to interpret programmed hypertension; identified risk factors of human programmed hypertension from mother-child cohorts; and the impact of reprogramming strategies on programmed hypertension from animal models. It is critical that the observed effects on developmental reprogramming in animal models are replicated in human studies. PMID

  2. Transcriptome 2002 Conference

    SciTech Connect

    Quackenbush, John

    2002-01-01

    The Transcriptome 2002 meeting was held March 11-13, 2002 in Seattle, Washington with attendance by more than 300 scientists representing the international community. The scientific program was developed by an international organizing committee. In association with the main meeting, an Image Consortium invitational meeting was organized by Charles Auffray of CNRS and held with approximately 40 participants immediately following the conclusion of the Transcriptome meeting.

  3. Crosstalk between Two bZIP Signaling Pathways Orchestrates Salt-Induced Metabolic Reprogramming in Arabidopsis Roots

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, Laura; Pedrotti, Lorenzo; Weiste, Christoph; Fekete, Agnes; Schierstaedt, Jasper; Göttler, Jasmin; Kempa, Stefan; Krischke, Markus; Dietrich, Katrin; Mueller, Martin J.; Vicente-Carbajosa, Jesus; Hanson, Johannes; Dröge-Laser, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Soil salinity increasingly causes crop losses worldwide. Although roots are the primary targets of salt stress, the signaling networks that facilitate metabolic reprogramming to induce stress tolerance are less understood than those in leaves. Here, a combination of transcriptomic and metabolic approaches was performed in salt-treated Arabidopsis thaliana roots, which revealed that the group S1 basic leucine zipper transcription factors bZIP1 and bZIP53 reprogram primary C- and N-metabolism. In particular, gluconeogenesis and amino acid catabolism are affected by these transcription factors. Importantly, bZIP1 expression reflects cellular stress and energy status in roots. In addition to the well-described abiotic stress response pathway initiated by the hormone abscisic acid (ABA) and executed by SnRK2 (Snf1-RELATED-PROTEIN-KINASE2) and AREB-like bZIP factors, we identify a structurally related ABA-independent signaling module consisting of SnRK1s and S1 bZIPs. Crosstalk between these signaling pathways recruits particular bZIP factor combinations to establish at least four distinct gene expression patterns. Understanding this signaling network provides a framework for securing future crop productivity. PMID:26276836

  4. Crosstalk between Two bZIP Signaling Pathways Orchestrates Salt-Induced Metabolic Reprogramming in Arabidopsis Roots.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Laura; Pedrotti, Lorenzo; Weiste, Christoph; Fekete, Agnes; Schierstaedt, Jasper; Göttler, Jasmin; Kempa, Stefan; Krischke, Markus; Dietrich, Katrin; Mueller, Martin J; Vicente-Carbajosa, Jesus; Hanson, Johannes; Dröge-Laser, Wolfgang

    2015-08-01

    Soil salinity increasingly causes crop losses worldwide. Although roots are the primary targets of salt stress, the signaling networks that facilitate metabolic reprogramming to induce stress tolerance are less understood than those in leaves. Here, a combination of transcriptomic and metabolic approaches was performed in salt-treated Arabidopsis thaliana roots, which revealed that the group S1 basic leucine zipper transcription factors bZIP1 and bZIP53 reprogram primary C- and N-metabolism. In particular, gluconeogenesis and amino acid catabolism are affected by these transcription factors. Importantly, bZIP1 expression reflects cellular stress and energy status in roots. In addition to the well-described abiotic stress response pathway initiated by the hormone abscisic acid (ABA) and executed by SnRK2 (Snf1-RELATED-PROTEIN-KINASE2) and AREB-like bZIP factors, we identify a structurally related ABA-independent signaling module consisting of SnRK1s and S1 bZIPs. Crosstalk between these signaling pathways recruits particular bZIP factor combinations to establish at least four distinct gene expression patterns. Understanding this signaling network provides a framework for securing future crop productivity. PMID:26276836

  5. Gene-For-Gene-Mediated Transcriptome Reprogramming in Barley-Powdery Mildew Interactions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Barley has a complex interaction with powdery mildew [Blumeria graminis f. sp. hordei (Bgh)] that begins with early recognition of microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs) from the pathogen. During Bgh invasion of the epidermis, the fate of cells is decided by the presence of resistance (R) gen...

  6. Epigenetic reprogramming in mammalian species after SCNT-based cloning.

    PubMed

    Niemann, Heiner

    2016-07-01

    The birth of "Dolly," the first mammal cloned from an adult mammary epithelial cell, abolished the decades-old scientific dogma implying that a terminally differentiated cell cannot be reprogrammed into a pluripotent embryonic state. The most dramatic epigenetic reprogramming occurs in SCNT when the expression profile of a differentiated cell is abolished and a new embryo-specific expression profile, involving 10,000 to 12,000 genes, and thus, most genes of the entire genome is established, which drives embryonic and fetal development. The initial release from somatic cell epigenetic constraints is followed by establishment of post-zygotic expression patterns, X-chromosome inactivation, and adjustment of telomere length. Somatic cell nuclear transfer may be associated with a variety of pathologic changes of the fetal and placental phenotype in a proportion of cloned offspring, specifically in ruminants, that are thought to be caused by aberrant epigenetic reprogramming. Improvements in our understanding of this dramatic epigenetic reprogramming event will be instrumental in realizing the great potential of SCNT for basic research and for important agricultural and biomedical applications. Here, current knowledge on epigenetic reprogramming after use of SCNT in livestock is reviewed, with emphasis on gene-specific and global DNA methylation, imprinting, X-chromosome inactivation, and telomere length restoration in early development. PMID:27160443

  7. Reprogramming fibroblasts into induced pluripotent stem cells with Bmi1

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Jai-Hee; Heo, June Seok; Kim, Jun Sung; Jun, Eun Kyoung; Lee, Jung Han; Kim, Aeree; Kim, Jonggun; Whang, Kwang Youn; Kang, Yong-Kook; Yeo, Seungeun; Lim, Hee-Joung; Han, Dong Wook; Kim, Dong-Wook; Oh, Sejong; Yoon, Byung Sun; Schöler, Hans R; You, Seungkwon

    2011-01-01

    Somatic cells can be reprogrammed into induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells by the transcription factors Oct4, Sox2, and Klf4 in combination with c-Myc. Recently, Sox2 plus Oct4 was shown to reprogram fibroblasts and Oct4 alone was able to reprogram mouse and human neural stem cells (NSCs) into iPS cells. Here, we report that Bmi1 leads to the transdifferentiation of mouse fibroblasts into NSC-like cells, and, in combination with Oct4, can replace Sox2, Klf4 and c-Myc during the reprogramming of fibroblasts into iPS cells. Furthermore, activation of sonic hedgehog signaling (by Shh, purmorphamine, or oxysterol) compensates for the effects of Bmi1, and, in combination with Oct4, reprograms mouse embryonic and adult fibroblasts into iPS cells. One- and two-factor iPS cells are similar to mouse embryonic stem cells in their global gene expression profile, epigenetic status, and in vitro and in vivo differentiation into all three germ layers, as well as teratoma formation and germline transmission in vivo. These data support that converting fibroblasts with Bmi1 or activation of the sonic hedgehog pathway to an intermediate cell type that expresses Sox2, Klf4, and N-Myc allows iPS generation via the addition of Oct4. PMID:21709693

  8. Epigenetic reprogramming in mammalian species after SCNT-based cloning.

    PubMed

    Niemann, Heiner

    2016-07-01

    The birth of "Dolly," the first mammal cloned from an adult mammary epithelial cell, abolished the decades-old scientific dogma implying that a terminally differentiated cell cannot be reprogrammed into a pluripotent embryonic state. The most dramatic epigenetic reprogramming occurs in SCNT when the expression profile of a differentiated cell is abolished and a new embryo-specific expression profile, involving 10,000 to 12,000 genes, and thus, most genes of the entire genome is established, which drives embryonic and fetal development. The initial release from somatic cell epigenetic constraints is followed by establishment of post-zygotic expression patterns, X-chromosome inactivation, and adjustment of telomere length. Somatic cell nuclear transfer may be associated with a variety of pathologic changes of the fetal and placental phenotype in a proportion of cloned offspring, specifically in ruminants, that are thought to be caused by aberrant epigenetic reprogramming. Improvements in our understanding of this dramatic epigenetic reprogramming event will be instrumental in realizing the great potential of SCNT for basic research and for important agricultural and biomedical applications. Here, current knowledge on epigenetic reprogramming after use of SCNT in livestock is reviewed, with emphasis on gene-specific and global DNA methylation, imprinting, X-chromosome inactivation, and telomere length restoration in early development.

  9. Netrin-1 regulates somatic cell reprogramming and pluripotency maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Ozmadenci, Duygu; Féraud, Olivier; Markossian, Suzy; Kress, Elsa; Ducarouge, Benjamin; Gibert, Benjamin; Ge, Jian; Durand, Isabelle; Gadot, Nicolas; Plateroti, Michela; Bennaceur-Griscelli, Annelise; Scoazec, Jean-Yves; Gil, Jesus; Deng, Hongkui; Bernet, Agnes; Mehlen, Patrick; Lavial, Fabrice

    2015-01-01

    The generation of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells holds great promise in regenerative medicine. The use of the transcription factors Oct4, Sox2, Klf4 and c-Myc for reprogramming is extensively documented, but comparatively little is known about soluble molecules promoting reprogramming. Here we identify the secreted cue Netrin-1 and its receptor DCC, described for their respective survival/death functions in normal and oncogenic contexts, as reprogramming modulators. In various somatic cells, we found that reprogramming is accompanied by a transient transcriptional repression of Netrin-1 mediated by an Mbd3/Mta1/Chd4-containing NuRD complex. Mechanistically, Netrin-1 imbalance induces apoptosis mediated by the receptor DCC in a p53-independent manner. Correction of the Netrin-1/DCC equilibrium constrains apoptosis and improves reprogramming efficiency. Our work also sheds light on Netrin-1's function in protecting embryonic stem cells from apoptosis mediated by its receptor UNC5b, and shows that the treatment with recombinant Netrin-1 improves the generation of mouse and human iPS cells. PMID:26154507

  10. Next-generation transcriptome assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Jeffrey A.; Wang, Zhong

    2011-09-01

    Transcriptomics studies often rely on partial reference transcriptomes that fail to capture the full catalog of transcripts and their variations. Recent advances in sequencing technologies and assembly algorithms have facilitated the reconstruction of the entire transcriptome by deep RNA sequencing (RNA-seq), even without a reference genome. However, transcriptome assembly from billions of RNA-seq reads, which are often very short, poses a significant informatics challenge. This Review summarizes the recent developments in transcriptome assembly approaches - reference-based, de novo and combined strategies-along with some perspectives on transcriptome assembly in the near future.

  11. The acetyllysine reader BRD3R promotes human nuclear reprogramming and regulates mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Zhicheng; Zhang, Ruowen; Khodadadi-Jamayran, Alireza; Chen, Bo; Crowley, Michael R.; Festok, Muhamad A.; Crossman, David K.; Townes, Tim M.; Hu, Kejin

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that both recipient cells and donor nuclei demonstrate a mitotic advantage as observed in the traditional reprogramming with somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). However, it is not known whether a specific mitotic factor plays a critical role in reprogramming. Here we identify an isoform of human bromodomain-containing 3 (BRD3), BRD3R (BRD3 with Reprogramming activity), as a reprogramming factor. BRD3R positively regulates mitosis during reprogramming, upregulates a large set of mitotic genes at early stages of reprogramming, and associates with mitotic chromatin. Interestingly, a set of the mitotic genes upregulated by BRD3R constitutes a pluripotent molecular signature. The two BRD3 isoforms display differential binding to acetylated histones. Our results suggest a molecular interpretation for the mitotic advantage in reprogramming and show that mitosis may be a driving force of reprogramming. PMID:26947130

  12. The acetyllysine reader BRD3R promotes human nuclear reprogramming and regulates mitosis.

    PubMed

    Shao, Zhicheng; Zhang, Ruowen; Khodadadi-Jamayran, Alireza; Chen, Bo; Crowley, Michael R; Festok, Muhamad A; Crossman, David K; Townes, Tim M; Hu, Kejin

    2016-03-07

    It is well known that both recipient cells and donor nuclei demonstrate a mitotic advantage as observed in the traditional reprogramming with somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). However, it is not known whether a specific mitotic factor plays a critical role in reprogramming. Here we identify an isoform of human bromodomain-containing 3 (BRD3), BRD3R (BRD3 with Reprogramming activity), as a reprogramming factor. BRD3R positively regulates mitosis during reprogramming, upregulates a large set of mitotic genes at early stages of reprogramming, and associates with mitotic chromatin. Interestingly, a set of the mitotic genes upregulated by BRD3R constitutes a pluripotent molecular signature. The two BRD3 isoforms display differential binding to acetylated histones. Our results suggest a molecular interpretation for the mitotic advantage in reprogramming and show that mitosis may be a driving force of reprogramming.

  13. Reactivation of the inactive X chromosome in development and reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Ohhata, Tatsuya; Wutz, Anton

    2013-07-01

    In mammals, one of the two X chromosomes of female cells is inactivated for dosage compensation between the sexes. X chromosome inactivation is initiated in early embryos by the noncoding Xist RNA. Subsequent chromatin modifications on the inactive X chromosome (Xi) lead to a remarkable stability of gene repression in somatic cell lineages. In mice, reactivation of genes on the Xi accompanies the establishment of pluripotent cells of the female blastocyst and the development of primordial germ cells. Xi reactivation also occurs when pluripotency is established during the reprogramming of somatic cells to induced pluripotent stem cells. The mechanism of Xi reactivation has attracted increasing interest for studying changes in epigenetic patterns and for improving methods of cell reprogramming. Here, we review recent advances in the understanding of Xi reactivation during development and reprogramming and illustrate potential clinical applications.

  14. Transcriptional and epigenetic mechanisms of cellular reprogramming to induced pluripotency.

    PubMed

    van den Hurk, Mark; Kenis, Gunter; Bardy, Cedric; van den Hove, Daniel L; Gage, Fred H; Steinbusch, Harry W; Rutten, Bart P

    2016-08-01

    Enforced ectopic expression of a cocktail of pluripotency-associated genes such as Oct4, Sox2, Klf4 and c-Myc can reprogram somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). The remarkable proliferation ability of iPSCs and their aptitude to redifferentiate into any cell lineage makes these cells a promising tool for generating a variety of human tissue in vitro. Yet, pluripotency induction is an inefficient process, as cells undergoing reprogramming need to overcome developmentally imposed epigenetic barriers. Recent work has shed new light on the molecular mechanisms that drive the reprogramming of somatic cells to iPSCs. Here, we present current knowledge on the transcriptional and epigenetic regulation of pluripotency induction and discuss how variability in epigenetic states impacts iPSCs' inherent biological properties. PMID:27419933

  15. ATM couples replication stress and metabolic reprogramming during cellular senescence

    PubMed Central

    Aird, Katherine M.; Worth, Andrew J.; Snyder, Nathaniel W.; Lee, Joyce V.; Sivanand, Sharanya; Liu, Qin; Blair, Ian A.; Wellen, Kathryn E.; Zhang, Rugang

    2015-01-01

    Summary Replication stress induced by nucleotide deficiency plays an important role in cancer initiation. Replication stress in primary cells typically activates the cellular senescence tumor suppression mechanism. Senescence bypass correlates with development of cancer, a disease characterized by metabolic reprogramming. However, the role of metabolic reprogramming in cellular response to replication stress is unknown. Here we report that ATM plays a central role in regulating cellular response to replication stress by shifting cellular metabolism. ATM inactivation bypasses senescence induced by replication stress triggered by nucleotide deficiency. This was due to restoration of dNTP levels through both upregulation of the pentose phosphate pathway via increased G6PD activity and enhanced glucose and glutamine consumption. These phenotypes were mediated by a coordinated suppression of p53 and upregulation of c-MYC downstream of ATM inactivation. Our data indicate that ATM status couples replication stress and metabolic reprogramming during senescence. PMID:25937285

  16. Reprogramming of Somatic Cells Towards Pluripotency by Cell Fusion.

    PubMed

    Malinowski, Andrzej R; Fisher, Amanda G

    2016-01-01

    Pluripotent reprogramming can be dominantly induced in a somatic nucleus upon fusion with a pluripotent cell such as embryonic stem (ES) cell. Cell fusion between ES cells and somatic cells results in the formation of heterokaryons, in which the somatic nuclei begin to acquire features of the pluripotent partner. The generation of interspecies heterokaryons between mouse ES- and human somatic cells allows an experimenter to distinguish the nuclear events occurring specifically within the reprogrammed nucleus. Therefore, cell fusion provides a simple and rapid approach to look at the early nuclear events underlying pluripotent reprogramming. Here, we describe a polyethylene glycol (PEG)-mediated cell fusion protocol to generate interspecies heterokaryons and intraspecies hybrids between ES cells and B lymphocytes or fibroblasts. PMID:27659994

  17. Direct reprogramming of fibroblasts into cardiomyocytes for cardiac regenerative medicine.

    PubMed

    Fu, Ji-Dong; Srivastava, Deepak

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac fibroblasts play critical roles in maintaining normal cardiac function and in cardiac remodeling during pathological conditions such as myocardial infarction (MI). Adult cardiomyocytes (CMs) have little to no regenerative capacity; damaged CMs in the heart after MI are replaced by cardiac fibroblasts that become activated and transform into myofibroblasts, which preserves the structural integrity. Unfortunately, this process typically causes fibrosis and reduces cardiac function. Directly reprogramming adult cardiac fibroblasts into induced CM-like cells (iCMs) holds great promise for restoring heart function. Direct cardiac reprogramming also provides a new research model to investigate which transcription factors and microRNAs control the molecular network that guides cardiac cell fate. We review the approaches and characterization of in vitro and in vivo reprogrammed iCMs from different laboratories, and outline the future directions needed to translate this new approach into a practical therapy for damaged hearts.

  18. Reprogramming of Somatic Cells Towards Pluripotency by Cell Fusion.

    PubMed

    Malinowski, Andrzej R; Fisher, Amanda G

    2016-01-01

    Pluripotent reprogramming can be dominantly induced in a somatic nucleus upon fusion with a pluripotent cell such as embryonic stem (ES) cell. Cell fusion between ES cells and somatic cells results in the formation of heterokaryons, in which the somatic nuclei begin to acquire features of the pluripotent partner. The generation of interspecies heterokaryons between mouse ES- and human somatic cells allows an experimenter to distinguish the nuclear events occurring specifically within the reprogrammed nucleus. Therefore, cell fusion provides a simple and rapid approach to look at the early nuclear events underlying pluripotent reprogramming. Here, we describe a polyethylene glycol (PEG)-mediated cell fusion protocol to generate interspecies heterokaryons and intraspecies hybrids between ES cells and B lymphocytes or fibroblasts.

  19. Electromagnetic fields mediate efficient cell reprogramming into a pluripotent state.

    PubMed

    Baek, Soonbong; Quan, Xiaoyuan; Kim, Soochan; Lengner, Christopher; Park, Jung-Keug; Kim, Jongpil

    2014-10-28

    Life on Earth is constantly exposed to natural electromagnetic fields (EMFs), and it is generally accepted that EMFs may exert a variety of effects on biological systems. Particularly, extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields (EL-EMFs) affect biological processes such as cell development and differentiation; however, the fundamental mechanisms by which EMFs influence these processes remain unclear. Here we show that EMF exposure induces epigenetic changes that promote efficient somatic cell reprogramming to pluripotency. These epigenetic changes resulted from EMF-induced activation of the histone lysine methyltransferase Mll2. Remarkably, an EMF-free system that eliminates Earth's naturally occurring magnetic field abrogates these epigenetic changes, resulting in a failure to undergo reprogramming. Therefore, our results reveal that EMF directly regulates dynamic epigenetic changes through Mll2, providing an efficient tool for epigenetic reprogramming including the acquisition of pluripotency. PMID:25248035

  20. Toward reprogramming bacteria with small molecules and RNA.

    PubMed

    Gallivan, Justin P

    2007-12-01

    A major goal of synthetic biology is to reprogram bacteria to carry out complex tasks, such as synthesizing and delivering drugs, and seeking and destroying environmental pollutants. Advances in molecular biology and bacterial genetics have made it straightforward to modify, insert, or delete genes in many bacterial strains, and advances in gene synthesis have opened the door to replacing entire genomes. However, rewriting the underlying genetic code is only part of the challenge of reprogramming cellular behavior. A remaining challenge is to control how and when the modified genes are expressed. Several recent studies have highlighted how synthetic riboswitches, which are RNA sequences that undergo a ligand-induced conformational change to alter gene expression, can be used to reprogram how bacteria respond to small molecules. PMID:17967431

  1. Cell Reprogramming, IPS Limitations, and Overcoming Strategies in Dental Bioengineering

    PubMed Central

    Ibarretxe, Gaskon; Alvarez, Antonia; Cañavate, Maria-Luz; Hilario, Enrique; Aurrekoetxea, Maitane; Unda, Fernando

    2012-01-01

    The procurement of induced pluripotent stem cells, or IPS cells, from adult differentiated animal cells has the potential to revolutionize future medicine, where reprogrammed IPS cells may be used to repair disease-affected tissues on demand. The potential of IPS cell technology is tremendous, but it will be essential to improve the methodologies for IPS cell generation and to precisely evaluate each clone and subclone of IPS cells for their safety and efficacy. Additionally, the current state of knowledge on IPS cells advises that research on their regenerative properties is carried out in appropriate tissue and organ systems that permit a safe assessment of the long-term behavior of these reprogrammed cells. In the present paper, we discuss the mechanisms of cell reprogramming, current technical limitations of IPS cells for their use in human tissue engineering, and possibilities to overcome them in the particular case of dental regeneration. PMID:22690226

  2. Cellular reprogramming for understanding and treating human disease.

    PubMed

    Kanherkar, Riya R; Bhatia-Dey, Naina; Makarev, Evgeny; Csoka, Antonei B

    2014-01-01

    In the last two decades we have witnessed a paradigm shift in our understanding of cells so radical that it has rewritten the rules of biology. The study of cellular reprogramming has gone from little more than a hypothesis, to applied bioengineering, with the creation of a variety of important cell types. By way of metaphor, we can compare the discovery of reprogramming with the archeological discovery of the Rosetta stone. This stone slab made possible the initial decipherment of Egyptian hieroglyphics because it allowed us to see this language in a way that was previously impossible. We propose that cellular reprogramming will have an equally profound impact on understanding and curing human disease, because it allows us to perceive and study molecular biological processes such as differentiation, epigenetics, and chromatin in ways that were likewise previously impossible. Stem cells could be called "cellular Rosetta stones" because they allow also us to perceive the connections between development, disease, cancer, aging, and regeneration in novel ways. Here we present a comprehensive historical review of stem cells and cellular reprogramming, and illustrate the developing synergy between many previously unconnected fields. We show how stem cells can be used to create in vitro models of human disease and provide examples of how reprogramming is being used to study and treat such diverse diseases as cancer, aging, and accelerated aging syndromes, infectious diseases such as AIDS, and epigenetic diseases such as polycystic ovary syndrome. While the technology of reprogramming is being developed and refined there have also been significant ongoing developments in other complementary technologies such as gene editing, progenitor cell production, and tissue engineering. These technologies are the foundations of what is becoming a fully-functional field of regenerative medicine and are converging to a point that will allow us to treat almost any disease. PMID

  3. Cellular reprogramming for understanding and treating human disease

    PubMed Central

    Kanherkar, Riya R.; Bhatia-Dey, Naina; Makarev, Evgeny; Csoka, Antonei B.

    2014-01-01

    In the last two decades we have witnessed a paradigm shift in our understanding of cells so radical that it has rewritten the rules of biology. The study of cellular reprogramming has gone from little more than a hypothesis, to applied bioengineering, with the creation of a variety of important cell types. By way of metaphor, we can compare the discovery of reprogramming with the archeological discovery of the Rosetta stone. This stone slab made possible the initial decipherment of Egyptian hieroglyphics because it allowed us to see this language in a way that was previously impossible. We propose that cellular reprogramming will have an equally profound impact on understanding and curing human disease, because it allows us to perceive and study molecular biological processes such as differentiation, epigenetics, and chromatin in ways that were likewise previously impossible. Stem cells could be called “cellular Rosetta stones” because they allow also us to perceive the connections between development, disease, cancer, aging, and regeneration in novel ways. Here we present a comprehensive historical review of stem cells and cellular reprogramming, and illustrate the developing synergy between many previously unconnected fields. We show how stem cells can be used to create in vitro models of human disease and provide examples of how reprogramming is being used to study and treat such diverse diseases as cancer, aging, and accelerated aging syndromes, infectious diseases such as AIDS, and epigenetic diseases such as polycystic ovary syndrome. While the technology of reprogramming is being developed and refined there have also been significant ongoing developments in other complementary technologies such as gene editing, progenitor cell production, and tissue engineering. These technologies are the foundations of what is becoming a fully-functional field of regenerative medicine and are converging to a point that will allow us to treat almost any disease. PMID

  4. Nuclear Reprogramming and Mitosis--how does mitosis enhance changes in gene expression?

    PubMed

    Halley-Stott, Richard P

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear reprogramming changes the identity of cells by changing gene expression programmes. Two recent pieces of work have highlighted the role that mitosis plays in enhancing the success of nuclear reprogramming. This Point of View article examines this work in the context of nuclear reprogramming.

  5. Defining the Diversity of Phenotypic Respecification Using Multiple Cell Lines and Reprogramming Regimens

    PubMed Central

    Alicea, Bradly; Murthy, Shashanka; Keaton, Sarah A.; Cobbett, Peter; Cibelli, Jose B.

    2013-01-01

    To better understand the basis of variation in cellular reprogramming, we performed experiments with two primary objectives: first, to determine the degree of difference, if any, in reprogramming efficiency among cells lines of a similar type after accounting for technical variables, and second, to compare the efficiency of conversion of multiple similar cell lines to two separate reprogramming regimens–induced neurons and induced skeletal muscle. Using two reprogramming regimens, it could be determined whether converted cells are likely derived from a distinct subpopulation that is generally susceptible to reprogramming or are derived from cells with an independent capacity for respecification to a given phenotype. Our results indicated that when technical components of the reprogramming regimen were accounted for, reprogramming efficiency was reproducible within a given primary fibroblast line but varied dramatically between lines. The disparity in reprogramming efficiency between lines was of sufficient magnitude to account for some discrepancies in published results. We also found that the efficiency of conversion to one phenotype was not predictive of reprogramming to the alternate phenotype, suggesting that the capacity for reprogramming does not arise from a specific subpopulation with a generally “weak grip” on cellular identity. Our findings suggest that parallel testing of multiple cell lines from several sources may be needed to accurately assess the efficiency of direct reprogramming procedures, and that testing a larger number of fibroblast lines—even lines with similar origins—is likely the most direct means of improving reprogramming efficiency. PMID:23672680

  6. RNA-binding proteins in pluripotency, differentiation, and reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    GUALLAR, Diana; WANG, Jianlong

    2014-01-01

    Embryonic stem cell maintenance, differentiation, and somatic cell reprogramming require the interplay of multiple pluripotency factors, epigenetic remodelers, and extracellular signaling pathways. RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) are involved in a wide range of regulatory pathways, from RNA metabolism to epigenetic modifications. In recent years we have witnessed more and more studies on the discovery of new RBPs and the assessment of their functions in a variety of biological systems, including stem cells. We review the current studies on RBPs and focus on those that have functional implications in pluripotency, differentiation, and/or reprogramming in both the human and mouse systems. PMID:25554730

  7. Comparative evolutionary and developmental dynamics of the cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) fiber transcriptome.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Mi-Jeong; Wendel, Jonathan F

    2014-01-01

    The single-celled cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) fiber provides an excellent model to investigate how human selection affects phenotypic evolution. To gain insight into the evolutionary genomics of cotton domestication, we conducted comparative transcriptome profiling of developing cotton fibers using RNA-Seq. Analysis of single-celled fiber transcriptomes from four wild and five domesticated accessions from two developmental time points revealed that at least one-third and likely one-half of the genes in the genome are expressed at any one stage during cotton fiber development. Among these, ~5,000 genes are differentially expressed during primary and secondary cell wall synthesis between wild and domesticated cottons, with a biased distribution among chromosomes. Transcriptome data implicate a number of biological processes affected by human selection, and suggest that the domestication process has prolonged the duration of fiber elongation in modern cultivated forms. Functional analysis suggested that wild cottons allocate greater resources to stress response pathways, while domestication led to reprogrammed resource allocation toward increased fiber growth, possibly through modulating stress-response networks. This first global transcriptomic analysis using multiple accessions of wild and domesticated cottons is an important step toward a more comprehensive systems perspective on cotton fiber evolution. The understanding that human selection over the past 5,000+ years has dramatically re-wired the cotton fiber transcriptome sets the stage for a deeper understanding of the genetic architecture underlying cotton fiber synthesis and phenotypic evolution.

  8. Characterization of Functional Reprogramming during Osteoclast Development Using Quantitative Proteomics and mRNA Profiling*

    PubMed Central

    An, Eunkyung; Narayanan, Manikandan; Manes, Nathan P.; Nita-Lazar, Aleksandra

    2014-01-01

    In addition to forming macrophages and dendritic cells, monocytes in adult peripheral blood retain the ability to develop into osteoclasts, mature bone-resorbing cells. The extensive morphological and functional transformations that occur during osteoclast differentiation require substantial reprogramming of gene and protein expression. Here we employ -omic-scale technologies to examine in detail the molecular changes at discrete developmental stages in this process (precursor cells, intermediate osteoclasts, and multinuclear osteoclasts), quantitatively comparing their transcriptomes and proteomes. The data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD000471. Our analysis identified mitochondrial changes, along with several alterations in signaling pathways, as central to the development of mature osteoclasts, while also confirming changes in pathways previously implicated in osteoclast biology. In particular, changes in the expression of proteins involved in metabolism and redirection of energy flow from basic cellular function toward bone resorption appeared to play a key role in the switch from monocytic immune system function to specialized bone-turnover function. These findings provide new insight into the differentiation program involved in the generation of functional osteoclasts. PMID:25044017

  9. Isonitrosoacetophenone Drives Transcriptional Reprogramming in Nicotiana tabacum Cells in Support of Innate Immunity and Defense

    PubMed Central

    Djami-Tchatchou, Arnaud T.; Maake, Mmapula P.; Piater, Lizelle A.; Dubery, Ian A.

    2015-01-01

    Plants respond to various stress stimuli by activating broad-spectrum defense responses both locally as well as systemically. As such, identification of expressed genes represents an important step towards understanding inducible defense responses and assists in designing appropriate intervention strategies for disease management. Genes differentially expressed in tobacco cell suspensions following elicitation with isonitrosoacetophenone (INAP) were identified using mRNA differential display and pyro-sequencing. Sequencing data produced 14579 reads, which resulted in 198 contigs and 1758 singletons. Following BLAST analyses, several inducible plant defense genes of interest were identified and classified into functional categories including signal transduction, transcription activation, transcription and protein synthesis, protein degradation and ubiquitination, stress-responsive, defense-related, metabolism and energy, regulation, transportation, cytoskeleton and cell wall-related. Quantitative PCR was used to investigate the expression of 17 selected target genes within these categories. Results indicate that INAP has a sensitising or priming effect through activation of salicylic acid-, jasmonic acid- and ethylene pathways that result in an altered transcriptome, with the expression of genes involved in perception of pathogens and associated cellular re-programming in support of defense. Furthermore, infection assays with the pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci confirmed the establishment of a functional anti-microbial environment in planta. PMID:25658943

  10. RNA-Seq Profiling of Intact and Enucleated Oocyte SCNT Embryos Reveals the Role of Pig Oocyte Nucleus in Somatic Reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Lin; Li, Mengqi; Sun, Junli; Yang, Xiaogan; Lu, Yangqing; Lu, Shengsheng; Lu, Kehuan

    2016-01-01

    The specific molecular mechanisms involved in somatic reprogramming remain unidentified. Removal of the oocyte genome is one of the primary causes of developmental failure in cloned embryos, whereas intact oocyte shows stronger reprogramming capability than enucleated oocyte. To identify the reason for the low efficiency of cloning and elucidate the mechanisms involved in somatic reprogramming by the oocyte nucleus, we injected pig cumulus cells into 539 intact MII oocytes and 461 enucleated MII oocytes. Following activation, 260 polyploidy embryos developed to the blastocyst stage whereas only 93 traditionally cloned embryos (48.2% vs. 20.2%, P < 0.01) reached blastocyst stage. Blastocysts generated from intact oocytes also had more cells than those generated from enucleated oocytes (60.70 vs. 46.65, P < 0.01). To identify the genes that contribute to this phenomenon, two early embryos in 2-cell and 4-cell stages were collected for single-cell RNA sequencing. The two kinds of embryos were found to have dramatically different transcriptome profiles. Intact oocyte nuclear transfer embryos showed 1,738 transcripts that were up-regulated relative to enucleated cloned embryos at the 2-cell stage and 728 transcripts that were down-regulated (|log2Ratio| ≥ 5). They showed 2,941 transcripts that were up-regulated during the 4-cell stage and 1,682 that were down-regulated (|log2Ratio| ≥ 5). The most significantly enriched gene ontology categories were those involved in the regulation of binding, catalytic activity, and molecular transducer activity. Other genes that were notably up-regulated and expressed in intact oocyte nuclear transfer embryos were metabolic process. This study provides a comprehensive profile of the differences in gene expression between intact oocyte nuclear transfer embryos and traditional nuclear transfer embryos. This work thus paves the way for further research on the mechanisms underlying somatic reprogramming by oocytes. PMID:27070804

  11. RNA-Seq Profiling of Intact and Enucleated Oocyte SCNT Embryos Reveals the Role of Pig Oocyte Nucleus in Somatic Reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Bai, Lin; Li, Mengqi; Sun, Junli; Yang, Xiaogan; Lu, Yangqing; Lu, Shengsheng; Lu, Kehuan

    2016-01-01

    The specific molecular mechanisms involved in somatic reprogramming remain unidentified. Removal of the oocyte genome is one of the primary causes of developmental failure in cloned embryos, whereas intact oocyte shows stronger reprogramming capability than enucleated oocyte. To identify the reason for the low efficiency of cloning and elucidate the mechanisms involved in somatic reprogramming by the oocyte nucleus, we injected pig cumulus cells into 539 intact MII oocytes and 461 enucleated MII oocytes. Following activation, 260 polyploidy embryos developed to the blastocyst stage whereas only 93 traditionally cloned embryos (48.2% vs. 20.2%, P < 0.01) reached blastocyst stage. Blastocysts generated from intact oocytes also had more cells than those generated from enucleated oocytes (60.70 vs. 46.65, P < 0.01). To identify the genes that contribute to this phenomenon, two early embryos in 2-cell and 4-cell stages were collected for single-cell RNA sequencing. The two kinds of embryos were found to have dramatically different transcriptome profiles. Intact oocyte nuclear transfer embryos showed 1,738 transcripts that were up-regulated relative to enucleated cloned embryos at the 2-cell stage and 728 transcripts that were down-regulated (|log2Ratio| ≥ 5). They showed 2,941 transcripts that were up-regulated during the 4-cell stage and 1,682 that were down-regulated (|log2Ratio| ≥ 5). The most significantly enriched gene ontology categories were those involved in the regulation of binding, catalytic activity, and molecular transducer activity. Other genes that were notably up-regulated and expressed in intact oocyte nuclear transfer embryos were metabolic process. This study provides a comprehensive profile of the differences in gene expression between intact oocyte nuclear transfer embryos and traditional nuclear transfer embryos. This work thus paves the way for further research on the mechanisms underlying somatic reprogramming by oocytes. PMID:27070804

  12. Transcriptomics in ecotoxicology.

    PubMed

    Schirmer, Kristin; Fischer, Beat B; Madureira, Danielle J; Pillai, Smitha

    2010-06-01

    The emergence of analytical tools for high-throughput screening of biomolecules has revolutionized the way in which toxicologists explore the impact of chemicals or other stressors on organisms. One of the most developed and routinely applied high-throughput analysis approaches is transcriptomics, also often referred to as gene expression profiling. The transcriptome represents all RNA molecules, including the messenger RNA (mRNA), which constitutes the building blocks for translating DNA into amino acids to form proteins. The entirety of mRNA is a mirror of the genes that are actively expressed in a cell or an organism at a given time. This in turn allows one to deduce how organisms respond to changes in the external environment. In this article we explore how transcriptomics is currently applied in ecotoxicology and highlight challenges and trends.

  13. Metabolic Reprogramming and Dependencies Associated with Epithelial Cancer Stem Cells Independent of the Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition Program.

    PubMed

    Aguilar, Esther; Marin de Mas, Igor; Zodda, Erika; Marin, Silvia; Morrish, Fionnuala; Selivanov, Vitaly; Meca-Cortés, Óscar; Delowar, Hossain; Pons, Mònica; Izquierdo, Inés; Celià-Terrassa, Toni; de Atauri, Pedro; Centelles, Josep J; Hockenbery, David; Thomson, Timothy M; Cascante, Marta

    2016-05-01

    In solid tumors, cancer stem cells (CSCs) can arise independently of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). In spite of recent efforts, the metabolic reprogramming associated with CSC phenotypes uncoupled from EMT is poorly understood. Here, by using metabolomic and fluxomic approaches, we identify major metabolic profiles that differentiate metastatic prostate epithelial CSCs (e-CSCs) from non-CSCs expressing a stable EMT. We have found that the e-CSC program in our cellular model is characterized by a high plasticity in energy substrate metabolism, including an enhanced Warburg effect, a greater carbon and energy source flexibility driven by fatty acids and amino acid metabolism and an essential reliance on the proton buffering capacity conferred by glutamine metabolism. An analysis of transcriptomic data yielded a metabolic gene signature for our e-CSCs consistent with the metabolomics and fluxomics analyses that correlated with tumor progression and metastasis in prostate cancer and in 11 additional cancer types. Interestingly, an integrated metabolomics, fluxomics, and transcriptomics analysis allowed us to identify key metabolic players regulated at the post-transcriptional level, suggesting potential biomarkers and therapeutic targets to effectively forestall metastasis. Stem Cells 2016;34:1163-1176. PMID:27146024

  14. Cellular Reprogramming Using Defined Factors and MicroRNAs.

    PubMed

    Eguchi, Takanori; Kuboki, Takuo

    2016-01-01

    Development of human bodies, organs, and tissues contains numerous steps of cellular differentiation including an initial zygote, embryonic stem (ES) cells, three germ layers, and multiple expertized lineages of cells. Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells have been recently developed using defined reprogramming factors such as Nanog, Klf5, Oct3/4 (Pou5f1), Sox2, and Myc. This outstanding innovation is largely changing life science and medicine. Methods of direct reprogramming of cells into myocytes, neurons, chondrocytes, and osteoblasts have been further developed using modified combination of factors such as N-myc, L-myc, Sox9, and microRNAs in defined cell/tissue culture conditions. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) are also emerging multipotent stem cells with particular microRNA expression signatures. It was shown that miRNA-720 had a role in cellular reprogramming through targeting the pluripotency factor Nanog and induction of DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs). This review reports histories, topics, and idea of cellular reprogramming.

  15. Metabolic reprogramming by viruses in the sunlit and dark ocean

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Marine ecosystem function is largely determined by matter and energy transformations mediated by microbial community interaction networks. Viral infection modulates network properties through mortality, gene transfer and metabolic reprogramming. Results Here we explore the nature and extent of viral metabolic reprogramming throughout the Pacific Ocean depth continuum. We describe 35 marine viral gene families with potential to reprogram metabolic flux through central metabolic pathways recovered from Pacific Ocean waters. Four of these families have been previously reported but 31 are novel. These known and new carbon pathway auxiliary metabolic genes were recovered from a total of 22 viral metagenomes in which viral auxiliary metabolic genes were differentiated from low-level cellular DNA inputs based on small subunit ribosomal RNA gene content, taxonomy, fragment recruitment and genomic context information. Auxiliary metabolic gene distribution patterns reveal that marine viruses target overlapping, but relatively distinct pathways in sunlit and dark ocean waters to redirect host carbon flux towards energy production and viral genome replication under low nutrient, niche-differentiated conditions throughout the depth continuum. Conclusions Given half of ocean microbes are infected by viruses at any given time, these findings of broad viral metabolic reprogramming suggest the need for renewed consideration of viruses in global ocean carbon models. PMID:24200126

  16. New balance in pluripotency: reprogramming with lineage specifiers.

    PubMed

    Ben-David, Uri; Nissenbaum, Jonathan; Benvenisty, Nissim

    2013-05-23

    Induction of pluripotency in somatic cells has been achieved by myriad combinations of transcription factors that belong to the core pluripotency circuitry. In this issue, Shu et al. report reprogramming with lineage specifiers, lending support to the view of the pluripotent state as a fine balance between competing differentiation forces.

  17. Vitamin C modulates TET1 function during somatic cell reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiekai; Guo, Lin; Zhang, Lei; Wu, Haoyu; Yang, Jiaqi; Liu, He; Wang, Xiaoshan; Hu, Xiao; Gu, Tianpeng; Zhou, Zhiwei; Liu, Jing; Liu, Jiadong; Wu, Hongling; Mao, Shi-Qing; Mo, Kunlun; Li, Yingying; Lai, Keyu; Qi, Jing; Yao, Hongjie; Pan, Guangjin; Xu, Guo-Liang; Pei, Duanqing

    2013-12-01

    Vitamin C, a micronutrient known for its anti-scurvy activity in humans, promotes the generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) through the activity of histone demethylating dioxygenases. TET hydroxylases are also dioxygenases implicated in active DNA demethylation. Here we report that TET1 either positively or negatively regulates somatic cell reprogramming depending on the absence or presence of vitamin C. TET1 deficiency enhances reprogramming, and its overexpression impairs reprogramming in the context of vitamin C by modulating the obligatory mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition (MET). In the absence of vitamin C, TET1 promotes somatic cell reprogramming independent of MET. Consistently, TET1 regulates 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) formation at loci critical for MET in a vitamin C-dependent fashion. Our findings suggest that vitamin C has a vital role in determining the biological outcome of TET1 function at the cellular level. Given its benefit to human health, vitamin C should be investigated further for its role in epigenetic regulation. PMID:24162740

  18. Direct transcriptional reprogramming of adult cells to embryonic nephron progenitors.

    PubMed

    Hendry, Caroline E; Vanslambrouck, Jessica M; Ineson, Jessica; Suhaimi, Norseha; Takasato, Minoru; Rae, Fiona; Little, Melissa H

    2013-09-01

    Direct reprogramming involves the enforced re-expression of key transcription factors to redefine a cellular state. The nephron progenitor population of the embryonic kidney gives rise to all cells within the nephron other than the collecting duct through a mesenchyme-to-epithelial transition, but this population is exhausted around the time of birth. Here, we sought to identify the conditions under which adult proximal tubule cells could be directly transcriptionally reprogrammed to nephron progenitors. Using a combinatorial screen for lineage-instructive transcription factors, we identified a pool of six genes (SIX1, SIX2, OSR1, EYA1, HOXA11, and SNAI2) that activated a network of genes consistent with a cap mesenchyme/nephron progenitor phenotype in the adult proximal tubule (HK2) cell line. Consistent with these reprogrammed cells being nephron progenitors, we observed differential contribution of the reprogrammed population into the Six2(+) nephron progenitor fields of an embryonic kidney explant. Dereplication of the pool suggested that SNAI2 can suppress E-CADHERIN, presumably assisting in the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) required to form nephron progenitors. However, neither TGFβ-induced EMT nor SNAI2 overexpression alone was sufficient to create this phenotype, suggesting that additional factors are required. In conclusion, these results suggest that reinitiation of kidney development from a population of adult cells by generating embryonic progenitors may be feasible, opening the way for additional cellular and bioengineering approaches to renal repair and regeneration.

  19. Renal stem cell reprogramming: Prospects in regenerative medicine

    PubMed Central

    Morales, Elvin E; Wingert, Rebecca A

    2014-01-01

    Stem cell therapy is a promising future enterprise for renal replacement in patients with acute and chronic kidney disease, conditions which affect millions worldwide and currently require patients to undergo lifelong medical treatments through dialysis and/or organ transplant. Reprogramming differentiated renal cells harvested from the patient back into a pluripotent state would decrease the risk of tissue rejection and provide a virtually unlimited supply of cells for regenerative medicine treatments, making it an exciting area of current research in nephrology. Among the major hurdles that need to be overcome before stem cell therapy for the kidney can be applied in a clinical setting are ensuring the fidelity and relative safety of the reprogrammed cells, as well as achieving feasible efficiency in the reprogramming processes that are utilized. Further, improved knowledge about the genetic control of renal lineage development is vital to identifying predictable and efficient reprogramming approaches, such as the expression of key modulators or the regulation of gene activity through small molecule mimetics. Here, we discuss several recent advances in induced pluripotent stem cell technologies. We also explore strategies that have been successful in renal progenitor generation, and explore what these methods might mean for the development of cell-based regenerative therapies for kidney disease. PMID:25258667

  20. Cellular Reprogramming Using Defined Factors and MicroRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Eguchi, Takanori; Kuboki, Takuo

    2016-01-01

    Development of human bodies, organs, and tissues contains numerous steps of cellular differentiation including an initial zygote, embryonic stem (ES) cells, three germ layers, and multiple expertized lineages of cells. Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells have been recently developed using defined reprogramming factors such as Nanog, Klf5, Oct3/4 (Pou5f1), Sox2, and Myc. This outstanding innovation is largely changing life science and medicine. Methods of direct reprogramming of cells into myocytes, neurons, chondrocytes, and osteoblasts have been further developed using modified combination of factors such as N-myc, L-myc, Sox9, and microRNAs in defined cell/tissue culture conditions. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) are also emerging multipotent stem cells with particular microRNA expression signatures. It was shown that miRNA-720 had a role in cellular reprogramming through targeting the pluripotency factor Nanog and induction of DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs). This review reports histories, topics, and idea of cellular reprogramming. PMID:27382371

  1. How microRNAs facilitate reprogramming to pluripotency

    PubMed Central

    Anokye-Danso, Frederick; Snitow, Melinda; Morrisey, Edward E.

    2012-01-01

    Summary The ability to generate pluripotent stem cells from a variety of cell and tissue sources through the ectopic expression of a specific set of transcription factors has revolutionized regenerative biology. The development of this reprogramming technology not only makes it possible to perform basic research on human stem cells that do not have to be derived from embryos, but also allows patient-specific cells and tissues to be generated for therapeutic use. Optimizing this process will probably lead to a better and more efficient means of generating pluripotent stem cells. Here, we discuss recent findings that show that, in addition to transcription factors, microRNAs can promote pluripotent reprogramming and can even substitute for these pluripotency transcription factors in some cases. Taking into consideration that microRNAs have the potential to be used as small-molecule therapeutics, such findings open new possibilities for both pluripotent stem cell reprogramming and the reprogramming of cells into other cell lineages. PMID:23077173

  2. Molecular Imaging of Metabolic Reprograming in Mutant IDH Cells

    PubMed Central

    Viswanath, Pavithra; Chaumeil, Myriam M.; Ronen, Sabrina M.

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the metabolic enzyme isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) have recently been identified as drivers in the development of several tumor types. Most notably, cytosolic IDH1 is mutated in 70–90% of low-grade gliomas and upgraded glioblastomas, and mitochondrial IDH2 is mutated in ~20% of acute myeloid leukemia cases. Wild-type IDH catalyzes the interconversion of isocitrate to α-ketoglutarate (α-KG). Mutations in the enzyme lead to loss of wild-type enzymatic activity and a neomorphic activity that converts α-KG to 2-hydroxyglutarate (2-HG). In turn, 2-HG, which has been termed an “oncometabolite,” inhibits key α-KG-dependent enzymes, resulting in alterations of the cellular epigenetic profile and, subsequently, inhibition of differentiation and initiation of tumorigenesis. In addition, it is now clear that the IDH mutation also induces a broad metabolic reprograming that extends beyond 2-HG production, and this reprograming often differs from what has been previously reported in other cancer types. In this review, we will discuss in detail what is known to date about the metabolic reprograming of mutant IDH cells, and how this reprograming has been investigated using molecular metabolic imaging. We will describe how metabolic imaging has helped shed light on the basic biology of mutant IDH cells, and how this information can be leveraged to identify new therapeutic targets and to develop new clinically translatable imaging methods to detect and monitor mutant IDH tumors in vivo. PMID:27014635

  3. Heterogeneity of Osteosarcoma Cell Lines Led to Variable Responses in Reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Choong, Pei Feng; Teh, Hui Xin; Teoh, Hoon Koon; Ong, Han Kiat; Choo, Kong Bung; Sugii, Shigeki; Cheong, Soon Keng; Kamarul, Tunku

    2014-01-01

    Four osteosarcoma cell lines, Saos-2, MG-63, G-292 and U-2 OS, were reprogrammed to pluripotent state using Yamanaka factors retroviral transduction method. Embryonic stem cell (ESC)-like clusters started to appear between 15 to 20 days post transduction. Morphology of the colonies resembled that of ESC colonies with defined border and tightly-packed cells. The reprogrammed sarcomas expressed alkaline phosphatase and pluripotency markers, OCT4, SSEA4, TRA-1-60 and TRA-1-81, as in ESC up to Passage 15. All reprogrammed sarcomas could form embryoid body-like spheres when cultured in suspension in a low attachment dish for up to 10 days. Further testing on the directed differentiation capacity of the reprogrammed sarcomas showed all four reprogrammed sarcoma lines could differentiate into adipocytes while reprogrammed Saos-2-REP, MG-63-REP and G-292-REP could differentiate into osteocytes. Among the 4 osteosarcoma cell lines, U-2 OS reported the highest transduction efficiency but recorded the lowest reprogramming stability under long term culture. Thus, there may be intrinsic differences governing the variable responses of osteosarcoma cell lines towards reprogramming and long term culture effect of the reprogrammed cells. This is a first report to associate intrinsic factors in different osteosarcoma cell lines with variable reprogramming responses and effects on the reprogrammed cells after prolonged culture. PMID:25170299

  4. Heterogeneity of osteosarcoma cell lines led to variable responses in reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Choong, Pei Feng; Teh, Hui Xin; Teoh, Hoon Koon; Ong, Han Kiat; Choo, Kong Bung; Sugii, Shigeki; Cheong, Soon Keng; Kamarul, Tunku

    2014-01-01

    Four osteosarcoma cell lines, Saos-2, MG-63, G-292 and U-2 OS, were reprogrammed to pluripotent state using Yamanaka factors retroviral transduction method. Embryonic stem cell (ESC)-like clusters started to appear between 15 to 20 days post transduction. Morphology of the colonies resembled that of ESC colonies with defined border and tightly-packed cells. The reprogrammed sarcomas expressed alkaline phosphatase and pluripotency markers, OCT4, SSEA4, TRA-1-60 and TRA-1-81, as in ESC up to Passage 15. All reprogrammed sarcomas could form embryoid body-like spheres when cultured in suspension in a low attachment dish for up to 10 days. Further testing on the directed differentiation capacity of the reprogrammed sarcomas showed all four reprogrammed sarcoma lines could differentiate into adipocytes while reprogrammed Saos-2-REP, MG-63-REP and G-292-REP could differentiate into osteocytes. Among the 4 osteosarcoma cell lines, U-2 OS reported the highest transduction efficiency but recorded the lowest reprogramming stability under long term culture. Thus, there may be intrinsic differences governing the variable responses of osteosarcoma cell lines towards reprogramming and long term culture effect of the reprogrammed cells. This is a first report to associate intrinsic factors in different osteosarcoma cell lines with variable reprogramming responses and effects on the reprogrammed cells after prolonged culture. PMID:25170299

  5. Protein Kinase A Signaling Is Inhibitory for Reprogramming into Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong Soo; Hong, Yean Ju; Choi, Hyun Woo; Choi, Sol; Do, Jeong Tae

    2016-03-01

    Somatic cells may be reprogrammed into pluripotent cells by the ectopic expression of defined transcription factors. However, some of the hurdles that affect the generation of induced pluripotent stem cells include extremely low efficiency and slow reprogramming. In the present study, we examined the effects of small molecules on cellular reprogramming and found that 8-Bromoadenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (8-Br-cAMP), an analog of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), improves the reprogramming efficiency of reprogrammable mouse fibroblasts induced with dox in serum replacement (SR) medium. Interestingly, treatment with 8-Br-cAMP in mouse embryonic stem cell culture conditions does not affect reprogramming into the pluripotent state; however, reprogramming efficiency is significantly enhanced by inhibition of protein kinase A (PKA) in SR medium. Therefore, our results suggest that PKA signaling is unnecessary and may in fact act as a barrier to reprogramming into pluripotent stem cells. PMID:26728702

  6. A XEN-like State Bridges Somatic Cells to Pluripotency during Chemical Reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yang; Zhao, Ting; Guan, Jingyang; Zhang, Xu; Fu, Yao; Ye, Junqing; Zhu, Jialiang; Meng, Gaofan; Ge, Jian; Yang, Susu; Cheng, Lin; Du, Yaqin; Zhao, Chaoran; Wang, Ting; Su, Linlin; Yang, Weifeng; Deng, Hongkui

    2015-12-17

    Somatic cells can be reprogrammed into pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) by using pure chemicals, providing a different paradigm to study somatic reprogramming. However, the cell fate dynamics and molecular events that occur during the chemical reprogramming process remain unclear. We now show that the chemical reprogramming process requires the early formation of extra-embryonic endoderm (XEN)-like cells and a late transition from XEN-like cells to chemically-induced (Ci)PSCs, a unique route that fundamentally differs from the pathway of transcription factor-induced reprogramming. Moreover, precise manipulation of the cell fate transition in a step-wise manner through the XEN-like state allows us to identify small-molecule boosters and establish a robust chemical reprogramming system with a yield up to 1,000-fold greater than that of the previously reported protocol. These findings demonstrate that chemical reprogramming is a promising approach to manipulate cell fates.

  7. Aberrant DNA methylation reprogramming during induced pluripotent stem cell generation is dependent on the choice of reprogramming factors.

    PubMed

    Planello, Aline C; Ji, Junfeng; Sharma, Vivek; Singhania, Rajat; Mbabaali, Faridah; Müller, Fabian; Alfaro, Javier A; Bock, Christoph; De Carvalho, Daniel D; Batada, Nizar N

    2014-01-01

    The conversion of somatic cells into pluripotent stem cells via overexpression of reprogramming factors involves epigenetic remodeling. DNA methylation at a significant proportion of CpG sites in induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) differs from that of embryonic stem cells (ESCs). Whether different sets of reprogramming factors influence the type and extent of aberrant DNA methylation in iPSCs differently remains unknown. In order to help resolve this critical question, we generated human iPSCs from a common fibroblast cell source using either the Yamanaka factors (OCT4, SOX2, KLF4 and cMYC) or the Thomson factors (OCT4, SOX2, NANOG and LIN28), and determined their genome-wide DNA methylation profiles. In addition to shared DNA methylation aberrations present in all our iPSCs, we identified Yamanaka-iPSC (Y-iPSC)-specific and Thomson-iPSC (T-iPSC)-specific recurrent aberrations. Strikingly, not only were the genomic locations of the aberrations different but also their types: reprogramming with Yamanaka factors mainly resulted in failure to demethylate CpGs, whereas reprogramming with Thomson factors mainly resulted in failure to methylate CpGs. Differences in the level of transcripts encoding DNMT3b and TET3 between Y-iPSCs and T-iPSCs may contribute partially to the distinct types of aberrations. Finally, de novo aberrantly methylated genes in Y-iPSCs were enriched for NANOG targets that are also aberrantly methylated in some cancers. Our study thus reveals that the choice of reprogramming factors influences the amount, location, and class of DNA methylation aberrations in iPSCs. These findings may provide clues into how to produce human iPSCs with fewer DNA methylation abnormalities. PMID:25408883

  8. Somatic cell reprogramming-free generation of genetically modified pigs.

    PubMed

    Tanihara, Fuminori; Takemoto, Tatsuya; Kitagawa, Eri; Rao, Shengbin; Do, Lanh Thi Kim; Onishi, Akira; Yamashita, Yukiko; Kosugi, Chisato; Suzuki, Hitomi; Sembon, Shoichiro; Suzuki, Shunichi; Nakai, Michiko; Hashimoto, Masakazu; Yasue, Akihiro; Matsuhisa, Munehide; Noji, Sumihare; Fujimura, Tatsuya; Fuchimoto, Dai-Ichiro; Otoi, Takeshige

    2016-09-01

    Genetically modified pigs for biomedical applications have been mainly generated using the somatic cell nuclear transfer technique; however, this approach requires complex micromanipulation techniques and sometimes increases the risks of both prenatal and postnatal death by faulty epigenetic reprogramming of a donor somatic cell nucleus. As a result, the production of genetically modified pigs has not been widely applied. We provide a simple method for CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats)/Cas9 gene editing in pigs that involves the introduction of Cas9 protein and single-guide RNA into in vitro fertilized zygotes by electroporation. The use of gene editing by electroporation of Cas9 protein (GEEP) resulted in highly efficient targeted gene disruption and was validated by the efficient production of Myostatin mutant pigs. Because GEEP does not require the complex methods associated with micromanipulation for somatic reprogramming, it has the potential for facilitating the genetic modification of pigs.

  9. Dedifferentiation and reprogramming: origins of cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Friedmann-Morvinski, Dinorah; Verma, Inder M

    2014-03-01

    Regenerative medicine aims to replace the lost or damaged cells in the human body through a new source of healthy transplanted cells or by endogenous repair. Although human embryonic stem cells were first thought to be the ideal source for cell therapy and tissue repair in humans, the discovery by Yamanaka and colleagues revolutionized the field. Almost any differentiated cell can be sent back in time to a pluripotency state by expressing the appropriate transcription factors. The process of somatic reprogramming using Yamanaka factors, many of which are oncogenes, offers a glimpse into how cancer stem cells may originate. In this review we discuss the similarities between tumor dedifferentiation and somatic cell reprogramming and how this may pose a risk to the application of this new technology in regenerative medicine.

  10. Somatic cell reprogramming-free generation of genetically modified pigs.

    PubMed

    Tanihara, Fuminori; Takemoto, Tatsuya; Kitagawa, Eri; Rao, Shengbin; Do, Lanh Thi Kim; Onishi, Akira; Yamashita, Yukiko; Kosugi, Chisato; Suzuki, Hitomi; Sembon, Shoichiro; Suzuki, Shunichi; Nakai, Michiko; Hashimoto, Masakazu; Yasue, Akihiro; Matsuhisa, Munehide; Noji, Sumihare; Fujimura, Tatsuya; Fuchimoto, Dai-Ichiro; Otoi, Takeshige

    2016-09-01

    Genetically modified pigs for biomedical applications have been mainly generated using the somatic cell nuclear transfer technique; however, this approach requires complex micromanipulation techniques and sometimes increases the risks of both prenatal and postnatal death by faulty epigenetic reprogramming of a donor somatic cell nucleus. As a result, the production of genetically modified pigs has not been widely applied. We provide a simple method for CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats)/Cas9 gene editing in pigs that involves the introduction of Cas9 protein and single-guide RNA into in vitro fertilized zygotes by electroporation. The use of gene editing by electroporation of Cas9 protein (GEEP) resulted in highly efficient targeted gene disruption and was validated by the efficient production of Myostatin mutant pigs. Because GEEP does not require the complex methods associated with micromanipulation for somatic reprogramming, it has the potential for facilitating the genetic modification of pigs. PMID:27652340

  11. Metabolic reprogramming in macrophages and dendritic cells in innate immunity

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Beth; O'Neill, Luke AJ

    2015-01-01

    Activation of macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs) by pro-inflammatory stimuli causes them to undergo a metabolic switch towards glycolysis and away from oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), similar to the Warburg effect in tumors. However, it is only recently that the mechanisms responsible for this metabolic reprogramming have been elucidated in more detail. The transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) plays an important role under conditions of both hypoxia and normoxia. The withdrawal of citrate from the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle has been shown to be critical for lipid biosynthesis in both macrophages and DCs. Interference with this process actually abolishes the ability of DCs to activate T cells. Another TCA cycle intermediate, succinate, activates HIF-1α and promotes inflammatory gene expression. These new insights are providing us with a deeper understanding of the role of metabolic reprogramming in innate immunity. PMID:26045163

  12. Direct Cardiac Reprogramming: From Developmental Biology to Cardiac Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Li; Srivastava, Deepak

    2013-01-01

    Heart disease affects millions worldwide and is a progressive condition involving loss of cardiomyocytes. The human heart has limited endogenous regenerative capacity and is thus an important target for novel regenerative medicine approaches. While cell-based regenerative therapies hold promise, cellular reprogramming of endogenous cardiac fibroblasts, which represent more than half of the cells in the mammalian heart, may be an attractive alternative strategy for regenerating cardiac muscle. Recent advances leveraging years of developmental biology point to the feasibility of generating de novo cardiomyocyte-like cells from terminally differentiated non-myocytes in the heart in situ after ischemic damage. Here, we review the progress in cardiac reprogramming methods and consider the opportunities and challenges that lie ahead in refining this technology for regenerative medicine. PMID:24030021

  13. Development-Inspired Reprogramming of the Mammalian Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Amamoto, Ryoji; Arlotta, Paola

    2014-01-01

    In 2012, John Gurdon and Shinya Yamanaka shared the Nobel Prize for the exciting demonstration that the identity of differentiated cells is not irreversibly determined but can be changed back to a pluripotent state under appropriate instructive signals. The principle that differentiated cells can revert to an embryonic state and even be converted directly from one cell-type into another not only turns fundamental principles of development on their head but also has profound implications for regenerative medicine. Replacement of diseased tissue with newly reprogrammed cells and modeling of human disease are concrete opportunities. Here, we focus on the central nervous system to consider whether and how reprogramming of cell identity may impact regeneration and modeling of a system historically considered immutable and hardwired. PMID:24482482

  14. Somatic cell reprogramming-free generation of genetically modified pigs

    PubMed Central

    Tanihara, Fuminori; Takemoto, Tatsuya; Kitagawa, Eri; Rao, Shengbin; Do, Lanh Thi Kim; Onishi, Akira; Yamashita, Yukiko; Kosugi, Chisato; Suzuki, Hitomi; Sembon, Shoichiro; Suzuki, Shunichi; Nakai, Michiko; Hashimoto, Masakazu; Yasue, Akihiro; Matsuhisa, Munehide; Noji, Sumihare; Fujimura, Tatsuya; Fuchimoto, Dai-ichiro; Otoi, Takeshige

    2016-01-01

    Genetically modified pigs for biomedical applications have been mainly generated using the somatic cell nuclear transfer technique; however, this approach requires complex micromanipulation techniques and sometimes increases the risks of both prenatal and postnatal death by faulty epigenetic reprogramming of a donor somatic cell nucleus. As a result, the production of genetically modified pigs has not been widely applied. We provide a simple method for CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats)/Cas9 gene editing in pigs that involves the introduction of Cas9 protein and single-guide RNA into in vitro fertilized zygotes by electroporation. The use of gene editing by electroporation of Cas9 protein (GEEP) resulted in highly efficient targeted gene disruption and was validated by the efficient production of Myostatin mutant pigs. Because GEEP does not require the complex methods associated with micromanipulation for somatic reprogramming, it has the potential for facilitating the genetic modification of pigs.

  15. Somatic cell reprogramming-free generation of genetically modified pigs

    PubMed Central

    Tanihara, Fuminori; Takemoto, Tatsuya; Kitagawa, Eri; Rao, Shengbin; Do, Lanh Thi Kim; Onishi, Akira; Yamashita, Yukiko; Kosugi, Chisato; Suzuki, Hitomi; Sembon, Shoichiro; Suzuki, Shunichi; Nakai, Michiko; Hashimoto, Masakazu; Yasue, Akihiro; Matsuhisa, Munehide; Noji, Sumihare; Fujimura, Tatsuya; Fuchimoto, Dai-ichiro; Otoi, Takeshige

    2016-01-01

    Genetically modified pigs for biomedical applications have been mainly generated using the somatic cell nuclear transfer technique; however, this approach requires complex micromanipulation techniques and sometimes increases the risks of both prenatal and postnatal death by faulty epigenetic reprogramming of a donor somatic cell nucleus. As a result, the production of genetically modified pigs has not been widely applied. We provide a simple method for CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats)/Cas9 gene editing in pigs that involves the introduction of Cas9 protein and single-guide RNA into in vitro fertilized zygotes by electroporation. The use of gene editing by electroporation of Cas9 protein (GEEP) resulted in highly efficient targeted gene disruption and was validated by the efficient production of Myostatin mutant pigs. Because GEEP does not require the complex methods associated with micromanipulation for somatic reprogramming, it has the potential for facilitating the genetic modification of pigs. PMID:27652340

  16. Modifiers of epigenetic reprogramming show paternal effects in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Suyinn; Vickaryous, Nicola; Ashe, Alyson; Zamudio, Natasha; Youngson, Neil; Hemley, Sarah; Stopka, Tomas; Skoultchi, Arthur; Matthews, Jacqui; Scott, Hamish S; de Kretser, David; O’Bryan, Moira; Blewitt, Marnie; Whitelaw, Emma

    2011-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that epigenetic information can be inherited across generations in mammals, despite extensive reprogramming both in the gametes and in the early developing embryo. One corollary to this is that disrupting the establishment of epigenetic state in the gametes of a parent, as a result of heterozygosity for mutations in genes involved in reprogramming, could affect the phenotype of offspring that do not inherit the mutant allele. Here we show that such effects do occur following paternal inheritance in the mouse. We detected changes to transcription and chromosome ploidy in adult animals. Paternal effects of this type have not been reported previously in mammals and suggest that the untransmitted genotype of male parents can influence the phenotype of their offspring. PMID:17450140

  17. Weighted enrichment method for prediction of transcription regulators from transcriptome and global chromatin immunoprecipitation data

    PubMed Central

    Kawakami, Eiryo; Nakaoka, Shinji; Ohta, Tazro; Kitano, Hiroaki

    2016-01-01

    Predicting responsible transcription regulators on the basis of transcriptome data is one of the most promising computational approaches to understanding cellular processes and characteristics. Here, we present a novel method employing vast amounts of chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) experimental data to address this issue. Global high-throughput ChIP data was collected to construct a comprehensive database, containing 8 578 738 binding interactions of 454 transcription regulators. To incorporate information about heterogeneous frequencies of transcription factor (TF)-binding events, we developed a flexible framework for gene set analysis employing the weighted t-test procedure, namely weighted parametric gene set analysis (wPGSA). Using transcriptome data as an input, wPGSA predicts the activities of transcription regulators responsible for observed gene expression. Validation of wPGSA with published transcriptome data, including that from over-expressed TFs, showed that the method can predict activities of various TFs, regardless of cell type and conditions, with results totally consistent with biological observations. We also applied wPGSA to other published transcriptome data and identified potential key regulators of cell reprogramming and influenza virus pathogenesis, generating compelling hypotheses regarding underlying regulatory mechanisms. This flexible framework will contribute to uncovering the dynamic and robust architectures of biological regulation, by incorporating high-throughput experimental data in the form of weights. PMID:27131787

  18. Oncogenic KRAS and BRAF Drive Metabolic Reprogramming in Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Hutton, Josiah E; Wang, Xiaojing; Zimmerman, Lisa J; Slebos, Robbert J C; Trenary, Irina A; Young, Jamey D; Li, Ming; Liebler, Daniel C

    2016-09-01

    Metabolic reprogramming, in which altered utilization of glucose and glutamine supports rapid growth, is a hallmark of most cancers. Mutations in the oncogenes KRAS and BRAF drive metabolic reprogramming through enhanced glucose uptake, but the broader impact of these mutations on pathways of carbon metabolism is unknown. Global shotgun proteomic analysis of isogenic DLD-1 and RKO colon cancer cell lines expressing mutant and wild type KRAS or BRAF, respectively, failed to identify significant differences (at least 2-fold) in metabolic protein abundance. However, a multiplexed parallel reaction monitoring (PRM) strategy targeting 73 metabolic proteins identified significant protein abundance increases of 1.25-twofold in glycolysis, the nonoxidative pentose phosphate pathway, glutamine metabolism, and the phosphoserine biosynthetic pathway in cells with KRAS G13D mutations or BRAF V600E mutations. These alterations corresponded to mutant KRAS and BRAF-dependent increases in glucose uptake and lactate production. Metabolic reprogramming and glucose conversion to lactate in RKO cells were proportional to levels of BRAF V600E protein. In DLD-1 cells, these effects were independent of the ratio of KRAS G13D to KRAS wild type protein. A study of 8 KRAS wild type and 8 KRAS mutant human colon tumors confirmed the association of increased expression of glycolytic and glutamine metabolic proteins with KRAS mutant status. Metabolic reprogramming is driven largely by modest (<2-fold) alterations in protein expression, which are not readily detected by the global profiling methods most commonly employed in proteomic studies. The results indicate the superiority of more precise, multiplexed, pathway-targeted analyses to study functional proteome systems. Data are available through MassIVE Accession MSV000079486 at ftp://MSV000079486@massive.ucsd.edu. PMID:27340238

  19. Oxamflatin Treatment Enhances Cloned Porcine Embryo Development and Nuclear Reprogramming*

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Jiude; Zhao, Ming-Tao; Whitworth, Kristin M.; Spate, Lee D.; Walters, Eric M.; O'Gorman, Chad; Lee, Kiho; Samuel, Melissa S.; Murphy, Clifton N.; Wells, Kevin; Rivera, Rocio M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Faulty epigenetic reprogramming of somatic nuclei is thought to be the main reason for low cloning efficiency by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi), such as Scriptaid, improve developmental competence of SCNT embryos in several species. Another HDACi, Oxamflatin, is about 100 times more potent than Scriptaid in the ability to inhibit nuclear-specific HDACs. The present study determined the effects of Oxamflatin treatment on embryo development, DNA methylation, and gene expression. Oxamflatin treatment enhanced blastocyst formation of SCNT embryos in vitro. Embryo transfer produced more pigs born and fewer mummies from the Oxamflatin-treated group compared to the Scriptaid-treated positive control. Oxamflatin also decreased DNA methylation of POU5F1 regulatory elements and centromeric repeat elements in day-7 blastocysts. When compared to in vitro–fertilized (IVF) embryos, the methylation status of POU5F1, NANOG, and centromeric repeat was similar in the cloned embryos, indicating these genes were successfully reprogrammed. However, compared to the lack of methylation of XIST in day-7 IVF embryos, a higher methylation level in day-7 cloned embryos was observed, implying that X chromosomes were activated in day-7 IVF blastocysts, but were not fully activated in cloned embryos, i.e., reprogramming of XIST was delayed. A time-course analysis of XIST DNA methylation on day-13, -15, -17, and -19 in vivo embryos revealed that XIST methylation initiated at about day 13 and was not completed by day 19. The methylation of the XIST gene in day-19 control cloned embryos was delayed again when compared to in vivo embryos. However, methylation of XIST in Oxamflatin-treated embryos was comparable with in vivo embryos, which further demonstrated that Oxamflatin could accelerate the delayed reprogramming of XIST gene and thus might improve cloning efficiency. PMID:25548976

  20. Reprogramming of cassava (Manihot esculenta) microspores towards sporophytic development.

    PubMed

    Perera, P I P; Ordoñez, C A; Dedicova, B; Ortega, P E M

    2014-05-21

    Gametes have the unique potential to enter the sporophytic pathway, called androgenesis. The plants produced are usually haploid and recombinant due to the preceding meiosis and they can double their chromosome number to form doubled haploids, which are completely homozygous. Availability of the doubled haploids facilitates mapping the genes of agronomically important traits, shortening the time of the breeding process required to produce new hybrids and homozygous varieties, and saving the time and cost for inbreeding. This study aimed to test the feasibility of using isolated and in vitro cultured immature cassava (Manihot esculenta) microspores to reprogramme and initiate sporophytic development. Different culture media and different concentrations of two ion components (Cu(2+) and Fe(2+)) were tested in two genotypes of cassava. External structural changes, nuclear divisions and cellular changes during reprogramming were analysed by scanning electron microscopy, by staining with 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole, and through classical histology and transmission electron microscopy. In two cassava genotypes, different developmental stages of microspores were found to initiate sporophytic cell divisions, that is, with tetrads of TMS 60444 and with mid or late uni-nucleate microspores of SM 1219-9. In the modified NLN medium (NLNS), microspore enlargements were observed. The medium supplemented with either sodium ferrous ethylene-diamine-tetraacetic acid (NaFeEDTA) or CuSO4·5H2O induced sporophytic cell division in both genotypes. A low frequency of the reprogramming and the presence of non-responsive microspores among the responsive ones in tetrads were found to be related to the viability and exine formation of the microspores. The present study clearly demonstrated that reprogramming occurs much faster in isolated microspore culture than in anther culture. This paves the way for the development of an efficient technique for the production of homozygous lines in

  1. Exploring the Mechanisms of Differentiation, Dedifferentiation, Reprogramming and Transdifferentiation

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Li; Zhang, Kun; Wang, Jin

    2014-01-01

    We explored the underlying mechanisms of differentiation, dedifferentiation, reprogramming and transdifferentiation (cell type switchings) from landscape and flux perspectives. Lineage reprogramming is a new regenerative method to convert a matured cell into another cell including direct transdifferentiation without undergoing a pluripotent cell state and indirect transdifferentiation with an initial dedifferentiation-reversion (reprogramming) to a pluripotent cell state. Each cell type is quantified by a distinct valley on the potential landscape with higher probability. We investigated three driving forces for cell fate decision making: stochastic fluctuations, gene regulation and induction, which can lead to cell type switchings. We showed that under the driving forces the direct transdifferentiation process proceeds from a differentiated cell valley to another differentiated cell valley through either a distinct stable intermediate state or a certain series of unstable indeterminate states. The dedifferentiation process proceeds through a pluripotent cell state. Barrier height and the corresponding escape time from the valley on the landscape can be used to quantify the stability and efficiency of cell type switchings. We also uncovered the mechanisms of the underlying processes by quantifying the dominant biological paths of cell type switchings on the potential landscape. The dynamics of cell type switchings are determined by both landscape gradient and flux. The flux can lead to the deviations of the dominant biological paths for cell type switchings from the naively expected landscape gradient path. As a result, the corresponding dominant paths of cell type switchings are irreversible. We also classified the mechanisms of cell fate development from our landscape theory: super-critical pitchfork bifurcation, sub-critical pitchfork bifurcation, sub-critical pitchfork with two saddle-node bifurcation, and saddle-node bifurcation. Our model showed good

  2. Reprogramming therapeutics: iPS cell prospects for neurodegenerative disease.

    PubMed

    Abeliovich, Asa; Doege, Claudia A

    2009-02-12

    The recent description of somatic cell reprogramming to an embryonic stem (ES) cell-like phenotype, termed induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell technology, presents an exciting potential venue toward cell-based therapeutics and disease models for neurodegenerative disorders. Two recent studies (Dimos et al. and Ebert et al.) describe the initial characterization of neurodegenerative disease patient-derived iPS cell cultures as proof of concept for the utility of this technology.

  3. A transcriptome for the study of early processes of retinal regeneration in the adult newt, Cynops pyrrhogaster.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Kenta; Islam, Md Rafiqul; Takayanagi, Miyako; Yasumuro, Hirofumi; Inami, Wataru; Kunahong, Ailidana; Casco-Robles, Roman M; Toyama, Fubito; Chiba, Chikafumi

    2014-01-01

    Retinal regeneration in the adult newt is a useful system to uncover essential mechanisms underlying the regeneration of body parts of this animal as well as to find clues to treat retinal disorders such as proliferative vitreoretinopathy. Here, to facilitate the study of early processes of retinal regeneration, we provide a de novo assembly transcriptome and inferred proteome of the Japanese fire bellied newt (Cynops pyrrhogaster), which was obtained from eyeball samples of day 0-14 after surgical removal of the lens and neural retina. This transcriptome (237,120 in silico transcripts) contains most information of cDNAs/ESTs which has been reported in newts (C. pyrrhogaster, Pleurodeles waltl and Notophthalmus viridescence) thus far. On the other hand, de novo assembly transcriptomes reported lately for N. viridescence only covered 16-31% of this transcriptome, suggesting that most constituents of this transcriptome are specific to the regenerating eye tissues of C. pyrrhogaster. A total of 87,102 in silico transcripts of this transcriptome were functionally annotated. Coding sequence prediction in combination with functional annotation revealed that 76,968 in silico transcripts encode protein/peptides recorded in public databases so far, whereas 17,316 might be unique. qPCR and Sanger sequencing demonstrated that this transcriptome contains much information pertaining to genes that are regulated in association with cell reprogramming, cell-cycle re-entry/proliferation, and tissue patterning in an early phase of retinal regeneration. This data also provides important insight for further investigations addressing cellular mechanisms and molecular networks underlying retinal regeneration as well as differences between retinal regeneration and disorders. This transcriptome can be applied to ensuing comprehensive gene screening steps, providing candidate genes, regardless of whether annotated or unique, to uncover essential mechanisms underlying early processes of

  4. Transcriptomics using axolotls.

    PubMed

    Voss, S Randal; Athippozhy, Antony; Woodcock, M Ryan

    2015-01-01

    Microarray and RNA-sequencing technology now exists for the characterization of the Ambystoma mexicanum transcriptome. With sufficient replication, these tools give the opportunity to truly investigate gene expression in a variety of experimental paradigms. Analysis of data from the Amby002 array and RNA-sequencing technology can identify genes that change expression levels in concert with each other, which in turn may reveal mechanisms associated with biological processes and molecular functions. PMID:25740496

  5. Stress Response and Perinatal Reprogramming: Unraveling (Mal)adaptive Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Musazzi, Laura; Marrocco, Jordan

    2016-01-01

    Environmental stressors induce coping strategies in the majority of individuals. The stress response, involving the activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical axis and the consequent release of corticosteroid hormones, is indeed aimed at promoting metabolic, functional, and behavioral adaptations. However, behavioral stress is also associated with fast and long-lasting neurochemical, structural, and behavioral changes, leading to long-term remodeling of glutamate transmission, and increased susceptibility to neuropsychiatric disorders. Of note, early-life events, both in utero and during the early postnatal life, trigger reprogramming of the stress response, which is often associated with loss of stress resilience and ensuing neurobehavioral (mal)adaptations. Indeed, adverse experiences in early life are known to induce long-term stress-related neuropsychiatric disorders in vulnerable individuals. Here, we discuss recent findings about stress remodeling of excitatory neurotransmission and brain morphology in animal models of behavioral stress. These changes are likely driven by epigenetic factors that lie at the core of the stress-response reprogramming in individuals with a history of perinatal stress. We propose that reprogramming mechanisms may underlie the reorganization of excitatory neurotransmission in the short- and long-term response to stressful stimuli. PMID:27057367

  6. Biophysical regulation of epigenetic state and cell reprogramming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Downing, Timothy L.; Soto, Jennifer; Morez, Constant; Houssin, Timothee; Fritz, Ashley; Yuan, Falei; Chu, Julia; Patel, Shyam; Schaffer, David V.; Li, Song

    2013-12-01

    Biochemical factors can help reprogram somatic cells into pluripotent stem cells, yet the role of biophysical factors during reprogramming is unknown. Here, we show that biophysical cues, in the form of parallel microgrooves on the surface of cell-adhesive substrates, can replace the effects of small-molecule epigenetic modifiers and significantly improve reprogramming efficiency. The mechanism relies on the mechanomodulation of the cells’ epigenetic state. Specifically, decreased histone deacetylase activity and upregulation of the expression of WD repeat domain 5 (WDR5)—a subunit of H3 methyltranferase—by microgrooved surfaces lead to increased histone H3 acetylation and methylation. We also show that microtopography promotes a mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition in adult fibroblasts. Nanofibrous scaffolds with aligned fibre orientation produce effects similar to those produced by microgrooves, suggesting that changes in cell morphology may be responsible for modulation of the epigenetic state. These findings have important implications in cell biology and in the optimization of biomaterials for cell-engineering applications.

  7. Direct reprogramming of human neural stem cells by OCT4.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeong Beom; Greber, Boris; Araúzo-Bravo, Marcos J; Meyer, Johann; Park, Kook In; Zaehres, Holm; Schöler, Hans R

    2009-10-01

    Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells have been generated from mouse and human somatic cells by ectopic expression of four transcription factors (OCT4 (also called POU5F1), SOX2, c-Myc and KLF4). We previously reported that Oct4 alone is sufficient to reprogram directly adult mouse neural stem cells to iPS cells. Here we report the generation of one-factor human iPS cells from human fetal neural stem cells (one-factor (1F) human NiPS cells) by ectopic expression of OCT4 alone. One-factor human NiPS cells resemble human embryonic stem cells in global gene expression profiles, epigenetic status, as well as pluripotency in vitro and in vivo. These findings demonstrate that the transcription factor OCT4 is sufficient to reprogram human neural stem cells to pluripotency. One-factor iPS cell generation will advance the field further towards understanding reprogramming and generating patient-specific pluripotent stem cells. PMID:19718018

  8. Polycomb Repressed Genes have Permissive Enhancers that Initiate Reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Taberlay, Phillippa C.; Kelly, Theresa K.; Liu, Chun-Chi; You, Jueng Soo; de Carvalho, Daniel D.; Miranda, Tina B.; Zhou, Xianghong J.; Liang, Gangning; Jones, Peter A.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Key regulatory genes, suppressed by Polycomb and H3K27me3, become active during normal differentiation and induced reprogramming. Using the well-characterized enhancer/promoter pair of MYOD1 as a model, we have identified a critical role for enhancers in reprogramming. We observed an unexpected nucleosome depleted region (NDR) at the H3K4me1-enriched enhancer at which transcriptional regulators initially bind, leading to subsequent changes in the chromatin at the cognate promoter. Exogenous Myod1 activates its own transcription by binding first at the enhancer leading to an NDR and transcription-permissive chromatin at the associated MYOD1 promoter. Exogenous OCT4 also binds first to the permissive MYOD1 enhancer, but has a different effect on the cognate promoter, where the monovalent H3K27me3-marks are converted to the bivalent state characteristic of stem cells. Genome-wide, a high percentage of Polycomb targets are associated with putative enhancers in permissive states, suggesting they may provide a widespread avenue for the initiation of cell-fate reprogramming. PMID:22153073

  9. Sphere formation permits Oct4 reprogramming of ciliary body epithelial cells into induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ni, Aiguo; Wu, Ming Jing; Chavala, Sai H

    2014-12-15

    Somatic cells can be reprogrammed to induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells by defined sets of transcription factors. We previously described reprogramming of monolayer-cultured adult mouse ciliary body epithelial (CE) cells by Oct4 and Klf4, but not with Oct4 alone. In this study, we report that Oct4 alone is sufficient to reprogram CE cells to iPS cells through sphere formation. Furthermore, we demonstrate that sphere formation induces a partial reprogramming state characterized by expression of retinal progenitor markers, upregulation of reprogramming transcription factors, such as Sall4 and Nanog, demethylation in the promoter regions of pluripotency associated genes, and mesenchymal to epithelial transition. The Oct4-iPS cells maintained normal karyotypes, expressed markers for pluripotent stem cells, and were capable of differentiating into derivatives of all three embryonic germ layers in vivo and in vitro. These findings suggest that sphere formation may render somatic cells more susceptible to reprogramming.

  10. Myc and SAGA rewire an alternative splicing network during early somatic cell reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Hirsch, Calley L.; Coban Akdemir, Zeynep; Wang, Li; Jayakumaran, Gowtham; Trcka, Dan; Weiss, Alexander; Hernandez, J. Javier; Pan, Qun; Han, Hong; Xu, Xueping; Xia, Zheng; Salinger, Andrew P.; Wilson, Marenda; Vizeacoumar, Frederick; Datti, Alessandro; Li, Wei; Cooney, Austin J.; Barton, Michelle C.; Blencowe, Benjamin J.

    2015-01-01

    Embryonic stem cells are maintained in a self-renewing and pluripotent state by multiple regulatory pathways. Pluripotent-specific transcriptional networks are sequentially reactivated as somatic cells reprogram to achieve pluripotency. How epigenetic regulators modulate this process and contribute to somatic cell reprogramming is not clear. Here we performed a functional RNAi screen to identify the earliest epigenetic regulators required for reprogramming. We identified components of the SAGA histone acetyltransferase complex, in particular Gcn5, as critical regulators of reprogramming initiation. Furthermore, we showed in mouse pluripotent stem cells that Gcn5 strongly associates with Myc and that, upon initiation of somatic reprogramming, Gcn5 and Myc form a positive feed-forward loop that activates a distinct alternative splicing network and the early acquisition of pluripotency-associated splicing events. These studies expose a Myc–SAGA pathway that drives expression of an essential alternative splicing regulatory network during somatic cell reprogramming. PMID:25877919

  11. A case of cellular alchemy: lineage reprogramming and its potential in regenerative medicine.

    PubMed

    Asuelime, Grace E; Shi, Yanhong

    2012-08-01

    The field of regenerative medicine is rapidly gaining momentum as an increasing number of reports emerge concerning the induced conversions observed in cellular fate reprogramming. While in recent years, much attention has been focused on the conversion of fate-committed somatic cells to an embryonic-like or pluripotent state, there are still many limitations associated with the applications of induced pluripotent stem cell reprogramming, including relatively low reprogramming efficiency, the times required for the reprogramming event to take place, the epigenetic instability, and the tumorigenicity associated with the pluripotent state. On the other hand, lineage reprogramming involves the conversion from one mature cell type to another without undergoing conversion to an unstable intermediate. It provides an alternative approach in regenerative medicine that has a relatively lower risk of tumorigenesis and increased efficiency within specific cellular contexts. While lineage reprogramming provides exciting potential, there is still much to be assessed before this technology is ready to be applied in a clinical setting.

  12. MiR-31/SDHA Axis Regulates Reprogramming Efficiency through Mitochondrial Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Lee, Man Ryul; Mantel, Charlie; Lee, Sang A; Moon, Sung-Hwan; Broxmeyer, Hal E

    2016-07-12

    Metabolism is remodeled when somatic cells are reprogrammed into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), but the majority of iPSCs are not fully reprogrammed. In a shift essential for reprogramming, iPSCs use less mitochondrial respiration but increased anaerobic glycolysis for bioenergetics. We found that microRNA 31 (miR-31) suppressed succinate dehydrogenase complex subunit A (SDHA) expression, vital for mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) complex II. MiR-31 overexpression in partially reprogrammed iPSCs lowered SDHA expression levels and oxygen consumption rates to that of fully reprogrammed iPSCs, but did not increase the proportion of fully reprogrammed TRA1-60(+) cells in colonies unless miR-31 was co-transduced with Yamanaka factors, which resulted in a 2.7-fold increase in full reprogramming. Thus switching from mitochondrial respiration to glycolytic metabolism through regulation of the miR-31/SDHA axis is critical for lowering the reprogramming threshold. This is supportive of multi-stage reprogramming whereby metabolic remodeling is fundamental. PMID:27346679

  13. Leaf-galling phylloxera on grapes reprograms host metabolism and morphology

    PubMed Central

    Nabity, Paul D.; Haus, Miranda J.; Berenbaum, May R.; DeLucia, Evan H.

    2013-01-01

    Endoparasitism by gall-forming insects dramatically alters the plant phenotype by altering growth patterns and modifying plant organs in ways that appear to directly benefit the gall former. Because these morphological and physiological changes are linked to the presence of the insect, the induced phenotype is said to function as an extension of the parasite, albeit by unknown mechanisms. Here we report the gall-forming aphid-like parasite phylloxera, Daktulosphaira vitifoliae, induces stomata on the adaxial surface of grape leaves where stomata typically do not occur. We characterized the function of the phylloxera-induced stomata by tracing transport of assimilated carbon. Because induction of stomata suggests a significant manipulation of primary metabolism, we also characterized the gall transcriptome to infer the level of global reconfiguration of primary metabolism and the subsequent changes in downstream secondary metabolism. Phylloxera feeding induced stomata formation in proximity to the insect and promoted the assimilation and importation of carbon into the gall. Gene expression related to water, nutrient, and mineral transport; glycolysis; and fermentation increased in leaf-gall tissues. This shift from an autotrophic to a heterotrophic profile occurred concurrently with decreased gene expression for nonmevalonate and terpenoid synthesis and increased gene expression in shikimate and phenylpropanoid biosynthesis, secondary metabolite systems that alter defense status in grapes. These functional insect-induced stomata thus comprise part of an extended phenotype, whereby D. vitifoliae globally reprograms grape leaf development to alter patterns of primary metabolism, nutrient mobilization, and defense investment in favor of the galling habit. PMID:24067657

  14. Zfp296 is a novel, pluripotent-specific reprogramming factor.

    PubMed

    Fischedick, Gerrit; Klein, Diana C; Wu, Guangming; Esch, Daniel; Höing, Susanne; Han, Dong Wook; Reinhardt, Peter; Hergarten, Kerstin; Tapia, Natalia; Schöler, Hans R; Sterneckert, Jared L

    2012-01-01

    Expression of the four transcription factors Oct4, Sox2, Klf4, and c-Myc (OSKM) is sufficient to reprogram somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem (iPSCs). However, this process is slow and inefficient compared with the fusion of somatic cells with embryonic stem cells (ESCs), indicating that ESCs express additional factors that can enhance the efficiency of reprogramming. We had previously developed a method to detect and isolate early neural induction intermediates during the differentiation of mouse ESCs. Using the gene expression profiles of these intermediates, we identified 23 ESC-specific transcripts and tested each for the ability to enhance iPSC formation. Of the tested factors, zinc finger protein 296 (Zfp296) led to the largest increase in mouse iPSC formation. We confirmed that Zfp296 was specifically expressed in pluripotent stem cells and germ cells. Zfp296 in combination with OSKM induced iPSC formation earlier and more efficiently than OSKM alone. Through mouse chimera and teratoma formation, we demonstrated that the resultant iPSCs were pluripotent. We showed that Zfp296 activates transcription of the Oct4 gene via the germ cell-specific conserved region 4 (CR4), and when overexpressed in mouse ESCs leads to upregulation of Nanog expression and downregulation of the expression of differentiation markers, including Sox17, Eomes, and T, which is consistent with the observation that Zfp296 enhances the efficiency of reprogramming. In contrast, knockdown of Zfp296 in ESCs leads to the expression of differentiation markers. Finally, we demonstrated that expression of Zfp296 in ESCs inhibits, but does not block, differentiation into neural cells. PMID:22485183

  15. Reprogramming RPE to differentiate towards retinal neurons with Sox2

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Wenxin; Yan, Run-Tao; Li, Xiumei; Wang, Shu-Zhen

    2009-01-01

    Guiding non-neural, retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) to produce retinal neurons may offer a source of developing neurons for cell-replacement. Sox2 plays important roles in maintaining neural progenitor/stem cell properties and in converting fibroblasts into pluripotent stem cells. This study tests the possibility of using Sox2 to reprogram RPE to differentiate towards retinal neurons in vivo and in vitro. Expression of Sox2 in the chick retina was detected in progenitor cells, in cells at a discrete location in the layers of amacrine and ganglion cells, and in Műller glia. Overexpression of Sox2 in the developing eye resulted in hypo-pigmentation of the RPE. In the affected regions, expression of retinal ganglion cell markers became apparent in the RPE layer. In RPE cell culture, Sox2 promoted the expression of retinal ganglion and amacrine markers and suppressed the expression of genes associate with RPE properties. Mechanistic investigation using the developing retina revealed a co-expression of Sox2 and bFGF, a growth factor commonly used in stem cell culture and capable of inducing RPE-to-retina transdifferentiation (or reprogramming) during early development. Similar patterns of changes in Sox2 expression and in bFGF expression were observed in atrophic retina and in injured retina. In RPE cell culture, Sox2 and bFGF mutually enhanced one another's expression. Up-regulation of bFGF expression by Sox2 also occurred in the retina. These results suggest that Sox2 can initiate a reprogramming of RPE cells to differentiate towards retinal neurons and may engage bFGF during the process. PMID:19489100

  16. Cellular reprogramming through mitogen-activated protein kinases

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Justin; Eschen-Lippold, Lennart; Lassowskat, Ines; Böttcher, Christoph; Scheel, Dierk

    2015-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades are conserved eukaryote signaling modules where MAPKs, as the final kinases in the cascade, phosphorylate protein substrates to regulate cellular processes. While some progress in the identification of MAPK substrates has been made in plants, the knowledge on the spectrum of substrates and their mechanistic action is still fragmentary. In this focused review, we discuss the biological implications of the data in our original paper (Sustained mitogen-activated protein kinase activation reprograms defense metabolism and phosphoprotein profile in Arabidopsis thaliana; Frontiers in Plant Science 5: 554) in the context of related research. In our work, we mimicked in vivo activation of two stress-activated MAPKs, MPK3 and MPK6, through transgenic manipulation of Arabidopsis thaliana and used phosphoproteomics analysis to identify potential novel MAPK substrates. Here, we plotted the identified putative MAPK substrates (and downstream phosphoproteins) as a global protein clustering network. Based on a highly stringent selection confidence level, the core networks highlighted a MAPK-induced cellular reprogramming at multiple levels of gene and protein expression—including transcriptional, post-transcriptional, translational, post-translational (such as protein modification, folding, and degradation) steps, and also protein re-compartmentalization. Additionally, the increase in putative substrates/phosphoproteins of energy metabolism and various secondary metabolite biosynthesis pathways coincides with the observed accumulation of defense antimicrobial substances as detected by metabolome analysis. Furthermore, detection of protein networks in phospholipid or redox elements suggests activation of downstream signaling events. Taken in context with other studies, MAPKs are key regulators that reprogram cellular events to orchestrate defense signaling in eukaryotes. PMID:26579181

  17. Zfp296 Is a Novel, Pluripotent-Specific Reprogramming Factor

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Guangming; Esch, Daniel; Höing, Susanne; Han, Dong Wook; Reinhardt, Peter; Hergarten, Kerstin; Tapia, Natalia; Schöler, Hans R.; Sterneckert, Jared L.

    2012-01-01

    Expression of the four transcription factors Oct4, Sox2, Klf4, and c-Myc (OSKM) is sufficient to reprogram somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem (iPSCs). However, this process is slow and inefficient compared with the fusion of somatic cells with embryonic stem cells (ESCs), indicating that ESCs express additional factors that can enhance the efficiency of reprogramming. We had previously developed a method to detect and isolate early neural induction intermediates during the differentiation of mouse ESCs. Using the gene expression profiles of these intermediates, we identified 23 ESC-specific transcripts and tested each for the ability to enhance iPSC formation. Of the tested factors, zinc finger protein 296 (Zfp296) led to the largest increase in mouse iPSC formation. We confirmed that Zfp296 was specifically expressed in pluripotent stem cells and germ cells. Zfp296 in combination with OSKM induced iPSC formation earlier and more efficiently than OSKM alone. Through mouse chimera and teratoma formation, we demonstrated that the resultant iPSCs were pluripotent. We showed that Zfp296 activates transcription of the Oct4 gene via the germ cell–specific conserved region 4 (CR4), and when overexpressed in mouse ESCs leads to upregulation of Nanog expression and downregulation of the expression of differentiation markers, including Sox17, Eomes, and T, which is consistent with the observation that Zfp296 enhances the efficiency of reprogramming. In contrast, knockdown of Zfp296 in ESCs leads to the expression of differentiation markers. Finally, we demonstrated that expression of Zfp296 in ESCs inhibits, but does not block, differentiation into neural cells. PMID:22485183

  18. Hacker within! Ehrlichia chaffeensis Effector Driven Phagocyte Reprogramming Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Lina, Taslima T.; Farris, Tierra; Luo, Tian; Mitra, Shubhajit; Zhu, Bing; McBride, Jere W.

    2016-01-01

    Ehrlichia chaffeensis is a small, gram negative, obligately intracellular bacterium that preferentially infects mononuclear phagocytes. It is the etiologic agent of human monocytotropic ehrlichiosis (HME), an emerging life-threatening tick-borne zoonosis. Mechanisms by which E. chaffeensis establishes intracellular infection, and avoids host defenses are not well understood, but involve functionally relevant host-pathogen interactions associated with tandem and ankyrin repeat effector proteins. In this review, we discuss the recent advances in our understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms that underlie Ehrlichia host cellular reprogramming strategies that enable intracellular survival. PMID:27303657

  19. Metabostemness: Metaboloepigenetic reprogramming of cancer stem-cell functions

    PubMed Central

    Menendez, Javier A.; Corominas-Faja, Bruna; Cuyàs, Elisabet; Alarcón, Tomás

    2014-01-01

    Cancer researchers are currently embarking on one of their field's biggest challenges, namely the understanding of how cellular metabolism or certain classes of elite metabolites (e.g., oncometabolites) can directly influence chromatin structure and the functioning of epi-transcriptional circuits to causally drive tumour formation. We here propose that refining the inherent cell attractor nature of nuclear reprogramming phenomena by adding the under-appreciated capacity of metabolism to naturally reshape the Waddingtonian landscape's topography provides a new integrative metabolo-epigenetic model of the cancer stem cell (CSC) theory. PMID:25621295

  20. Hacker within! Ehrlichia chaffeensis Effector Driven Phagocyte Reprogramming Strategy.

    PubMed

    Lina, Taslima T; Farris, Tierra; Luo, Tian; Mitra, Shubhajit; Zhu, Bing; McBride, Jere W

    2016-01-01

    Ehrlichia chaffeensis is a small, gram negative, obligately intracellular bacterium that preferentially infects mononuclear phagocytes. It is the etiologic agent of human monocytotropic ehrlichiosis (HME), an emerging life-threatening tick-borne zoonosis. Mechanisms by which E. chaffeensis establishes intracellular infection, and avoids host defenses are not well understood, but involve functionally relevant host-pathogen interactions associated with tandem and ankyrin repeat effector proteins. In this review, we discuss the recent advances in our understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms that underlie Ehrlichia host cellular reprogramming strategies that enable intracellular survival. PMID:27303657

  1. Hacker within! Ehrlichia chaffeensis Effector Driven Phagocyte Reprogramming Strategy.

    PubMed

    Lina, Taslima T; Farris, Tierra; Luo, Tian; Mitra, Shubhajit; Zhu, Bing; McBride, Jere W

    2016-01-01

    Ehrlichia chaffeensis is a small, gram negative, obligately intracellular bacterium that preferentially infects mononuclear phagocytes. It is the etiologic agent of human monocytotropic ehrlichiosis (HME), an emerging life-threatening tick-borne zoonosis. Mechanisms by which E. chaffeensis establishes intracellular infection, and avoids host defenses are not well understood, but involve functionally relevant host-pathogen interactions associated with tandem and ankyrin repeat effector proteins. In this review, we discuss the recent advances in our understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms that underlie Ehrlichia host cellular reprogramming strategies that enable intracellular survival.

  2. Reprogramming for Cardiac Regeneration-Strategies for Innovation.

    PubMed

    Sanchis-Gomar, Fabian; Galera, Teresa; Lucia, Alejandro; Gallardo, María Esther

    2016-09-01

    It is well-known that the human myocardium has a low capacity for self-regeneration. This fact is especially important after acute myocardial infarction with subsequent heart failure and adverse tissue remodeling. New potential strategies have recently emerged for treating heart diseases, such as the possibility of generating large quantities of cardiomyocytes through genetic iPSC reprogramming, transdifferentiation for in vitro disease modeling, in vivo therapies or telomerase gene reactivation. Approaches based on these techniques may represent the new horizon in cardiology with an appropriate 180-degree turn perspective. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 1849-1851, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27128961

  3. Reprogramming of cassava (Manihot esculenta) microspores towards sporophytic development

    PubMed Central

    Perera, P. I. P.; Ordoñez, C. A.; Dedicova, B.; Ortega, P. E. M.

    2014-01-01

    Gametes have the unique potential to enter the sporophytic pathway, called androgenesis. The plants produced are usually haploid and recombinant due to the preceding meiosis and they can double their chromosome number to form doubled haploids, which are completely homozygous. Availability of the doubled haploids facilitates mapping the genes of agronomically important traits, shortening the time of the breeding process required to produce new hybrids and homozygous varieties, and saving the time and cost for inbreeding. This study aimed to test the feasibility of using isolated and in vitro cultured immature cassava (Manihot esculenta) microspores to reprogramme and initiate sporophytic development. Different culture media and different concentrations of two ion components (Cu2+ and Fe2+) were tested in two genotypes of cassava. External structural changes, nuclear divisions and cellular changes during reprogramming were analysed by scanning electron microscopy, by staining with 4′,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole, and through classical histology and transmission electron microscopy. In two cassava genotypes, different developmental stages of microspores were found to initiate sporophytic cell divisions, that is, with tetrads of TMS 60444 and with mid or late uni-nucleate microspores of SM 1219-9. In the modified NLN medium (NLNS), microspore enlargements were observed. The medium supplemented with either sodium ferrous ethylene-diamine-tetraacetic acid (NaFeEDTA) or CuSO4·5H2O induced sporophytic cell division in both genotypes. A low frequency of the reprogramming and the presence of non-responsive microspores among the responsive ones in tetrads were found to be related to the viability and exine formation of the microspores. The present study clearly demonstrated that reprogramming occurs much faster in isolated microspore culture than in anther culture. This paves the way for the development of an efficient technique for the production of homozygous lines in

  4. Aging, rejuvenation, and epigenetic reprogramming: resetting the aging clock.

    PubMed

    Rando, Thomas A; Chang, Howard Y

    2012-01-20

    The underlying cause of aging remains one of the central mysteries of biology. Recent studies in several different systems suggest that not only may the rate of aging be modified by environmental and genetic factors, but also that the aging clock can be reversed, restoring characteristics of youthfulness to aged cells and tissues. This Review focuses on the emerging biology of rejuvenation through the lens of epigenetic reprogramming. By defining youthfulness and senescence as epigenetic states, a framework for asking new questions about the aging process emerges. PMID:22265401

  5. Quantitative Proteomics of Intracellular Campylobacter jejuni Reveals Metabolic Reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaoyun; Gao, Beile; Novik, Veronica; Galán, Jorge E.

    2012-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is the major cause of bacterial food-borne illness in the USA and Europe. An important virulence attribute of this bacterial pathogen is its ability to enter and survive within host cells. Here we show through a quantitative proteomic analysis that upon entry into host cells, C. jejuni undergoes a significant metabolic downshift. Furthermore, our results indicate that intracellular C. jejuni reprograms its respiration, favoring the respiration of fumarate. These results explain the poor ability of C. jejuni obtained from infected cells to grow under standard laboratory conditions and provide the bases for the development of novel anti microbial strategies that would target relevant metabolic pathways. PMID:22412372

  6. Telomere Length Reprogramming in Embryos and Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, LeRoy G.; Wang, Fang; Liu, Lin; Keefe, David

    2014-01-01

    Telomeres protect and cap linear chromosome ends, yet these genomic buffers erode over an organism's lifespan. Short telomeres have been associated with many age-related conditions in humans, and genetic mutations resulting in short telomeres in humans manifest as syndromes of precocious aging. In women, telomere length limits a fertilized egg's capacity to develop into a healthy embryo. Thus, telomere length must be reset with each subsequent generation. Although telomerase is purportedly responsible for restoring telomere DNA, recent studies have elucidated the role of alternative telomeres lengthening mechanisms in the reprogramming of early embryos and stem cells, which we review here. PMID:24719895

  7. Facile and efficient reprogramming of ciliary body epithelial cells into induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ni, Aiguo; Wu, Ming Jing; Nakanishi, Yuka; Chavala, Sai H

    2013-09-15

    Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells are attractive for cell replacement therapy, because they overcome ethical and immune rejection issues that are associated with embryonic stem cells. iPS cells have been derived from autonomous fibroblasts at low efficiency using multiple ectopic transcription factors. Recent evidence suggests that the epigenome of donor cell sources plays an important role in the reprogramming and differentiation characteristics of iPS cells. Thus, identification of somatic cell types that are easily accessible and are more amenable for cellular reprogramming is critical for regenerative medicine applications. Here, we identify ciliary body epithelial cells (CECs) as a new cell type for iPS cell generation that has higher reprogramming efficiency compared with fibroblasts. The ciliary body is composed of epithelial cells that are located in the anterior portion of the eye at the level of the lens and is readily surgically accessible. CECs also have a reduced reprogramming requirement, as we demonstrate that ectopic Sox2 and c-Myc are dispensable. Enhanced reprogramming efficiency may be due to increased basal levels of Sox2 in CECs. In addition, we are the first to report a cellular reprogramming haploinsufficiency observed when reprogramming with fewer factors (Oct4 and Klf4) in Sox2 hemizygous cells. Taken together, endogenous Sox2 levels are critical for the enhanced efficiency and reduced exogenous requirement that permit facile cellular reprogramming of CECs.

  8. Direct cardiac reprogramming: progress and challenges in basic biology and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Sadahiro, Taketaro; Yamanaka, Shinya; Ieda, Masaki

    2015-04-10

    The discovery of induced pluripotent stem cells changed the field of regenerative medicine and inspired the technological development of direct reprogramming or the process by which one cell type is directly converted into another without reverting a stem cell state by overexpressing lineage-specific factors. Indeed, direct reprogramming has proven sufficient in yielding a diverse range of cell types from fibroblasts, including neurons, cardiomyocytes, endothelial cells, hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells, and hepatocytes. These studies revealed that somatic cells are more plastic than anticipated, and that transcription factors, microRNAs, epigenetic factors, secreted molecules, as well as the cellular microenvironment are all important for cell fate specification. With respect to the field of cardiology, the cardiac reprogramming presents as a novel method to regenerate damaged myocardium by directly converting endogenous cardiac fibroblasts into induced cardiomyocyte-like cells in situ. The first in vivo cardiac reprogramming reports were promising to repair infarcted hearts; however, the low induction efficiency of fully reprogrammed, functional induced cardiomyocyte-like cells has become a major challenge and hampered our understanding of the reprogramming process. Nevertheless, recent studies have identified several critical factors that may affect the efficiency and quality of cardiac induction and have provided new insights into the mechanisms of cardiac reprogramming. Here, we review the progress in direct reprogramming research and discuss the perspectives and challenges of this nascent technology in basic biology and clinical applications.

  9. p18 inhibits reprogramming through inactivation of Cdk4/6

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Shaohua; Cao, Jiani; Sun, Hongyan; Liu, Kun; Li, Yaqiong; Zhao, Tongbiao

    2016-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs), including embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), show atypical cell cycle regulation characterized by a high proliferation rate and a shorter G1 phase compared with somatic cells. The mechanisms by which somatic cells remodel their cell cycle to achieve the high proliferation rate of PSCs during reprogramming are unclear. Here we identify that the Ink4 protein p18, which is expressed at high levels in somatic cells but at low levels in PSCs, is a roadblock to successful reprogramming. Mild inhibition of p18 expression enhances reprogramming efficiency, while ectopic expression of p18 completely blocks reprogramming. Mechanistic studies show that expression of wild-type p18, but not a p18D68N mutant which cannot inhibit Cdk4/6, down-regulates expression of Cdk4/6 target genes involved in DNA synthesis (TK, TS, DHFR, PCNA) and cell cycle regulation (CDK1 and CCNA2) and thus inhibits reprogramming. These results indicate that p18 blocks reprogramming by targeting Cdk4/6-mediated cell cycle regulation. Taken together, our results define a novel pathway that inhibits somatic cell reprogramming, and provide a new target to enhance reprogramming efficiency. PMID:27484146

  10. Study of mitochondrial respiratory defects on reprogramming to human induced pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Sandy S.C.; Van Bergen, Nicole J.; Jackson, Stacey; Liang, Helena; Mackey, David A.; Hernández, Damián; Lim, Shiang Y.; Hewitt, Alex W.; Trounce, Ian; Pébay, Alice; Wong, Raymond C.B.

    2016-01-01

    Reprogramming of somatic cells into a pluripotent state is known to be accompanied by extensive restructuring of mitochondria and switch in metabolic requirements. Here we utilized Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) as a mitochondrial disease model to study the effects of homoplasmic mtDNA mutations and subsequent oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) defects in reprogramming. We obtained fibroblasts from a total of 6 LHON patients and control subjects, and showed a significant defect in complex I respiration in LHON fibroblasts by high-resolution respiratory analysis. Using episomal vector reprogramming, our results indicated that human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC) generation is feasible in LHON fibroblasts. In particular, LHON-specific OXPHOS defects in fibroblasts only caused a mild reduction and did not significantly affect reprogramming efficiency, suggesting that hiPSC reprogramming can tolerate a certain degree of OXPHOS defects. Our results highlighted the induction of genes involved in mitochondrial biogenesis (TFAM, NRF1), mitochondrial fusion (MFN1, MFN2) and glycine production (GCAT) during reprogramming. However, LHON-associated OXPHOS defects did not alter the kinetics or expression levels of these genes during reprogramming. Together, our study provides new insights into the effects of mtDNA mutation and OXPHOS defects in reprogramming and genes associated with various aspects of mitochondrial biology. PMID:27127184

  11. Single transcription factor reprogramming of hair follicle dermal papilla cells to induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Su-Yi; Bouwman, Britta Am; Ang, Yen-Sin; Kim, Soo Jeong; Lee, Dung-Fang; Lemischka, Ihor R; Rendl, Michael

    2011-06-01

    Reprogramming patient-specific somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells has great potential to develop feasible regenerative therapies. However, several issues need to be resolved such as ease, efficiency, and safety of generation of iPS cells. Many different cell types have been reprogrammed, most conveniently even peripheral blood mononuclear cells. However, they typically require the enforced expression of several transcription factors, posing mutagenesis risks as exogenous genetic material. To reduce this risk, iPS cells were previously generated with Oct4 alone from rather inaccessible neural stem cells that endogenously express the remaining reprogramming factors and very recently from fibroblasts with Oct4 alone in combination with additional small molecules. Here, we exploit that dermal papilla (DP) cells from hair follicles in the skin express all but one reprogramming factors to show that these accessible cells can be reprogrammed into iPS cells with the single transcription factor Oct4 and without further manipulation. Reprogramming was already achieved after 3 weeks and with efficiencies similar to other cell types reprogrammed with four factors. Dermal papilla-derived iPS cells are comparable to embryonic stem cells with respect to morphology, gene expression, and pluripotency. We conclude that DP cells may represent a preferred cell type for reprogramming accessible cells with less manipulation and for ultimately establishing safe conditions in the future by replacing Oct4 with small molecules.

  12. Reprogramming by De-bookmarking the Somatic Transcriptional Program through Targeting of BET Bromodomains.

    PubMed

    Shao, Zhicheng; Yao, Chunping; Khodadadi-Jamayran, Alireza; Xu, Weihua; Townes, Tim M; Crowley, Michael R; Hu, Kejin

    2016-09-20

    One critical event in reprogramming to pluripotency is erasure of the somatic transcriptional program of starting cells. Here, we present the proof of principle of a strategy for reprogramming to pluripotency facilitated by small molecules that interfere with the somatic transcriptional memory. We show that mild chemical targeting of the acetyllysine-binding pockets of the BET bromodomains, the transcriptional bookmarking domains, robustly enhances reprogramming. Furthermore, we show that chemical targeting of the transcriptional bookmarking BET bromodomains downregulates or turns off the expression of somatic genes in both naive and reprogramming fibroblasts. Chemical blocking of the BET bromodomains also results in loss of fibroblast morphology early in reprogramming. We therefore experimentally demonstrate that cell fate conversion can be achieved by chemically targeting the transcriptional bookmarking BET bromodomains responsible for transcriptional memory. PMID:27653680

  13. [Effect of different choices and treatments with donor cells on reprogramming].

    PubMed

    Yao, Ya-Xin; Li, Xiang-Chen; Zhang, Yong; Qiao, Li-Min; Guan, Wei-Jun; Ma, Yue-Hui

    2008-11-01

    The donor nucleus must experienced the epigenetic modification of the process reprogramming and went back to the initial state after the donor cell was injected into the oocytes. If the reprogramming is not completed, the efficiency of cloning will be reduced. However, reprogramming of nucleus muct was not only embodied in its ability after it was transferred into the oocytes. It was different in the potential if the cell type was not identical. In addition, different treatment to the donor cells resulted in different ability and the level of reprogramming. This paper described different effects of the type, algebra, cycles, age, and species of the donor cells after nuclear transplantation on the reprogramming. An overview of the exposition and analysis through the donor cell cryopreservation, serum starvation, and different reagent treatments were discussed. PMID:19073545

  14. High-fat diet reprograms the epigenome of rat spermatozoa and transgenerationally affects metabolism of the offspring

    PubMed Central

    de Castro Barbosa, Thais; Ingerslev, Lars R.; Alm, Petter S.; Versteyhe, Soetkin; Massart, Julie; Rasmussen, Morten; Donkin, Ida; Sjögren, Rasmus; Mudry, Jonathan M.; Vetterli, Laurène; Gupta, Shashank; Krook, Anna; Zierath, Juleen R.; Barrès, Romain

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Chronic and high consumption of fat constitutes an environmental stress that leads to metabolic diseases. We hypothesized that high-fat diet (HFD) transgenerationally remodels the epigenome of spermatozoa and metabolism of the offspring. Methods F0-male rats fed either HFD or chow diet for 12 weeks were mated with chow-fed dams to generate F1 and F2 offspring. Motile spermatozoa were isolated from F0 and F1 breeders to determine DNA methylation and small non-coding RNA (sncRNA) expression pattern by deep sequencing. Results Newborn offspring of HFD-fed fathers had reduced body weight and pancreatic beta-cell mass. Adult female, but not male, offspring of HFD-fed fathers were glucose intolerant and resistant to HFD-induced weight gain. This phenotype was perpetuated in the F2 progeny, indicating transgenerational epigenetic inheritance. The epigenome of spermatozoa from HFD-fed F0 and their F1 male offspring showed common DNA methylation and small non-coding RNA expression signatures. Altered expression of sperm miRNA let-7c was passed down to metabolic tissues of the offspring, inducing a transcriptomic shift of the let-7c predicted targets. Conclusion Our results provide insight into mechanisms by which HFD transgenerationally reprograms the epigenome of sperm cells, thereby affecting metabolic tissues of offspring throughout two generations. PMID:26977389

  15. Therapeutic potential of targeting acinar cell reprogramming in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Wong, Chi-Hin; Li, You-Jia; Chen, Yang-Chao

    2016-08-21

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a common pancreatic cancer and the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the United States. Treating this life-threatening disease remains challenging due to the lack of effective prognosis, diagnosis and therapy. Apart from pancreatic duct cells, acinar cells may also be the origin of PDAC. During pancreatitis or combined with activating KRas(G12D) mutation, acinar cells lose their cellular identity and undergo a transdifferentiation process called acinar-to-ductal-metaplasia (ADM), forming duct cells which may then transform into pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) and eventually PDAC. During ADM, the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases, Wnt, Notch and phosphatidylinositide 3-kinases/Akt signaling inhibits the transcription of acinar-specific genes, including Mist and amylase, but promotes the expression of ductal genes, such as cytokeratin-19. Inhibition of this transdifferentiation process hinders the development of PanIN and PDAC. In addition, the transdifferentiated cells regain acinar identity, indicating ADM may be a reversible process. This provides a new therapeutic direction in treating PDAC through cancer reprogramming. Many studies have already demonstrated the success of switching PanIN/PDAC back to normal cells through the use of PD325901, the expression of E47, and the knockdown of Dickkopf-3. In this review, we discuss the signaling pathways involved in ADM and the therapeutic potential of targeting reprogramming in order to treat PDAC. PMID:27610015

  16. Therapeutic potential of targeting acinar cell reprogramming in pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Chi-Hin; Li, You-Jia; Chen, Yang-Chao

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a common pancreatic cancer and the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the United States. Treating this life-threatening disease remains challenging due to the lack of effective prognosis, diagnosis and therapy. Apart from pancreatic duct cells, acinar cells may also be the origin of PDAC. During pancreatitis or combined with activating KRasG12D mutation, acinar cells lose their cellular identity and undergo a transdifferentiation process called acinar-to-ductal-metaplasia (ADM), forming duct cells which may then transform into pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) and eventually PDAC. During ADM, the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases, Wnt, Notch and phosphatidylinositide 3-kinases/Akt signaling inhibits the transcription of acinar-specific genes, including Mist and amylase, but promotes the expression of ductal genes, such as cytokeratin-19. Inhibition of this transdifferentiation process hinders the development of PanIN and PDAC. In addition, the transdifferentiated cells regain acinar identity, indicating ADM may be a reversible process. This provides a new therapeutic direction in treating PDAC through cancer reprogramming. Many studies have already demonstrated the success of switching PanIN/PDAC back to normal cells through the use of PD325901, the expression of E47, and the knockdown of Dickkopf-3. In this review, we discuss the signaling pathways involved in ADM and the therapeutic potential of targeting reprogramming in order to treat PDAC.

  17. Epigenomic plasticity enables human pancreatic α to β cell reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Bramswig, Nuria C.; Everett, Logan J.; Schug, Jonathan; Dorrell, Craig; Liu, Chengyang; Luo, Yanping; Streeter, Philip R.; Naji, Ali; Grompe, Markus; Kaestner, Klaus H.

    2013-01-01

    Insulin-secreting β cells and glucagon-secreting α cells maintain physiological blood glucose levels, and their malfunction drives diabetes development. Using ChIP sequencing and RNA sequencing analysis, we determined the epigenetic and transcriptional landscape of human pancreatic α, β, and exocrine cells. We found that, compared with exocrine and β cells, differentiated α cells exhibited many more genes bivalently marked by the activating H3K4me3 and repressing H3K27me3 histone modifications. This was particularly true for β cell signature genes involved in transcriptional regulation. Remarkably, thousands of these genes were in a monovalent state in β cells, carrying only the activating or repressing mark. Our epigenomic findings suggested that α to β cell reprogramming could be promoted by manipulating the histone methylation signature of human pancreatic islets. Indeed, we show that treatment of cultured pancreatic islets with a histone methyltransferase inhibitor leads to colocalization of both glucagon and insulin and glucagon and insulin promoter factor 1 (PDX1) in human islets and colocalization of both glucagon and insulin in mouse islets. Thus, mammalian pancreatic islet cells display cell-type–specific epigenomic plasticity, suggesting that epigenomic manipulation could provide a path to cell reprogramming and novel cell replacement-based therapies for diabetes. PMID:23434589

  18. NOTCH reprograms mitochondrial metabolism for proinflammatory macrophage activation

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jun; Chi, Feng; Guo, Tongsheng; Punj, Vasu; Lee, W.N. Paul; French, Samuel W.; Tsukamoto, Hidekazu

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic reprogramming is implicated in macrophage activation, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that the NOTCH1 pathway dictates activation of M1 phenotypes in isolated mouse hepatic macrophages (HMacs) and in a murine macrophage cell line by coupling transcriptional upregulation of M1 genes with metabolic upregulation of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and ROS (mtROS) to augment induction of M1 genes. Enhanced mitochondrial glucose oxidation was achieved by increased recruitment of the NOTCH1 intracellular domain (NICD1) to nuclear and mitochondrial genes that encode respiratory chain components and by NOTCH-dependent induction of pyruvate dehydrogenase phosphatase 1 (Pdp1) expression, pyruvate dehydrogenase activity, and glucose flux to the TCA cycle. As such, inhibition of the NOTCH pathway or Pdp1 knockdown abrogated glucose oxidation, mtROS, and M1 gene expression. Conditional NOTCH1 deficiency in the myeloid lineage attenuated HMac M1 activation and inflammation in a murine model of alcoholic steatohepatitis and markedly reduced lethality following endotoxin-mediated fulminant hepatitis in mice. In vivo monocyte tracking further demonstrated the requirement of NOTCH1 for the migration of blood monocytes into the liver and subsequent M1 differentiation. Together, these results reveal that NOTCH1 promotes reprogramming of mitochondrial metabolism for M1 macrophage activation. PMID:25798621

  19. Targeted gene therapy and cell reprogramming in Fanconi anemia

    PubMed Central

    Rio, Paula; Baños, Rocio; Lombardo, Angelo; Quintana-Bustamante, Oscar; Alvarez, Lara; Garate, Zita; Genovese, Pietro; Almarza, Elena; Valeri, Antonio; Díez, Begoña; Navarro, Susana; Torres, Yaima; Trujillo, Juan P; Murillas, Rodolfo; Segovia, Jose C; Samper, Enrique; Surralles, Jordi; Gregory, Philip D; Holmes, Michael C; Naldini, Luigi; Bueren, Juan A

    2014-01-01

    Gene targeting is progressively becoming a realistic therapeutic alternative in clinics. It is unknown, however, whether this technology will be suitable for the treatment of DNA repair deficiency syndromes such as Fanconi anemia (FA), with defects in homology-directed DNA repair. In this study, we used zinc finger nucleases and integrase-defective lentiviral vectors to demonstrate for the first time that FANCA can be efficiently and specifically targeted into the AAVS1 safe harbor locus in fibroblasts from FA-A patients. Strikingly, up to 40% of FA fibroblasts showed gene targeting 42 days after gene editing. Given the low number of hematopoietic precursors in the bone marrow of FA patients, gene-edited FA fibroblasts were then reprogrammed and re-differentiated toward the hematopoietic lineage. Analyses of gene-edited FA-iPSCs confirmed the specific integration of FANCA in the AAVS1 locus in all tested clones. Moreover, the hematopoietic differentiation of these iPSCs efficiently generated disease-free hematopoietic progenitors. Taken together, our results demonstrate for the first time the feasibility of correcting the phenotype of a DNA repair deficiency syndrome using gene-targeting and cell reprogramming strategies. PMID:24859981

  20. Cell fate reprogramming by control of intracellular network dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanudo, Jorge G. T.; Albert, Reka

    Identifying control strategies for biological networks is paramount for practical applications that involve reprogramming a cell's fate, such as disease therapeutics and stem cell reprogramming. Although the topic of controlling the dynamics of a system has a long history in control theory, most of this work is not directly applicable to intracellular networks. Here we present a network control method that integrates the structural and functional information available for intracellular networks to predict control targets. Formulated in a logical dynamic scheme, our control method takes advantage of certain function-dependent network components and their relation to steady states in order to identify control targets, which are guaranteed to drive any initial state to the target state with 100% effectiveness and need to be applied only transiently for the system to reach and stay in the desired state. We illustrate our method's potential to find intervention targets for cancer treatment and cell differentiation by applying it to a leukemia signaling network and to the network controlling the differentiation of T cells. We find that the predicted control targets are effective in a broad dynamic framework. Moreover, several of the predicted interventions are supported by experiments. This work was supported by NSF Grant PHY 1205840.

  1. Therapeutic potential of targeting acinar cell reprogramming in pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Chi-Hin; Li, You-Jia; Chen, Yang-Chao

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a common pancreatic cancer and the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the United States. Treating this life-threatening disease remains challenging due to the lack of effective prognosis, diagnosis and therapy. Apart from pancreatic duct cells, acinar cells may also be the origin of PDAC. During pancreatitis or combined with activating KRasG12D mutation, acinar cells lose their cellular identity and undergo a transdifferentiation process called acinar-to-ductal-metaplasia (ADM), forming duct cells which may then transform into pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) and eventually PDAC. During ADM, the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases, Wnt, Notch and phosphatidylinositide 3-kinases/Akt signaling inhibits the transcription of acinar-specific genes, including Mist and amylase, but promotes the expression of ductal genes, such as cytokeratin-19. Inhibition of this transdifferentiation process hinders the development of PanIN and PDAC. In addition, the transdifferentiated cells regain acinar identity, indicating ADM may be a reversible process. This provides a new therapeutic direction in treating PDAC through cancer reprogramming. Many studies have already demonstrated the success of switching PanIN/PDAC back to normal cells through the use of PD325901, the expression of E47, and the knockdown of Dickkopf-3. In this review, we discuss the signaling pathways involved in ADM and the therapeutic potential of targeting reprogramming in order to treat PDAC. PMID:27610015

  2. Reprogramming eukaryotic translation with ligand-responsive synthetic RNA switches.

    PubMed

    Anzalone, Andrew V; Lin, Annie J; Zairis, Sakellarios; Rabadan, Raul; Cornish, Virginia W

    2016-05-01

    Protein synthesis in eukaryotes is regulated by diverse reprogramming mechanisms that expand the coding capacity of individual genes. Here, we exploit one such mechanism, termed -1 programmed ribosomal frameshifting (-1 PRF), to engineer ligand-responsive RNA switches that regulate protein expression. First, efficient -1 PRF stimulatory RNA elements were discovered by in vitro selection; then, ligand-responsive switches were constructed by coupling -1 PRF stimulatory elements to RNA aptamers using rational design and directed evolution in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We demonstrate that -1 PRF switches tightly control the relative stoichiometry of two distinct protein outputs from a single mRNA, exhibiting consistent ligand response across whole populations of cells. Furthermore, -1 PRF switches were applied to build single-mRNA logic gates and an apoptosis module in yeast. Together, these results showcase the potential for harnessing translation-reprogramming mechanisms for synthetic biology, and they establish -1 PRF switches as powerful RNA tools for controlling protein synthesis in eukaryotes. PMID:26999002

  3. Three-dimensional culture may promote cell reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Han, Jin; Chen, Lei; Luo, Guanzheng; Dai, Bin; Wang, Xiujie; Dai, Jianwu

    2013-01-01

    Stem cells reside in stem cells niches, which maintain the balance of self-renewal and differentiation of stem cells. In stem cell niches, cell-cell, cell-extracellular matrix interactions and diffusible signals are important elements. However, another pivotal element is that localized and diffusible signals are all organized as three-dimensional (3-D) structures, which is easily neglected by in vitro cell biology research. Under 3-D culture conditions, the morphology of cells exhibited differently from cultured in traditional two-dimensional (2-D) conditions. Under 3-D culture conditions, the self-renewal and pluripotency of neural stem cells (NSCs) and bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) were enhanced compared with culturing under 2-D conditions. 3-D cultures could change the transcriptional profile of NSCs compared with 2-D cultures. We hypothesized that 3-D cultures could reprogram mature cells such as fibroblasts to an immature state, like the pluripotent stem cells. The primary results indicated that several ES marker genes were upregulated by 3-D cultures. Though further experiments are needed, this work may provide a method of reprogramming mature cells without gene modifications. PMID:23820263

  4. The Importance of Ubiquitination and Deubiquitination in Cellular Reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Suresh, Bharathi; Lee, Junwon; Kim, Kye-Seong; Ramakrishna, Suresh

    2016-01-01

    Ubiquitination of core stem cell transcription factors can directly affect stem cell maintenance and differentiation. Ubiquitination and deubiquitination must occur in a timely and well-coordinated manner to regulate the protein turnover of several stemness related proteins, resulting in optimal embryonic stem cell maintenance and differentiation. There are two switches: an E3 ubiquitin ligase enzyme that tags ubiquitin molecules to the target proteins for proteolysis and a second enzyme, the deubiquitinating enzyme (DUBs), that performs the opposite action, thereby preventing proteolysis. In order to maintain stemness and to allow for efficient differentiation, both ubiquitination and deubiquitination molecular switches must operate properly in a balanced manner. In this review, we have summarized the importance of the ubiquitination of core stem cell transcription factors, such as Oct3/4, c-Myc, Sox2, Klf4, Nanog, and LIN28, during cellular reprogramming. Furthermore, we emphasize the role of DUBs in regulating core stem cell transcriptional factors and their function in stem cell maintenance and differentiation. We also discuss the possibility of using DUBs, along with core transcription factors, to efficiently generate induced pluripotent stem cells. Our review provides a relatively new understanding regarding the importance of ubiquitination/deubiquitination of stem cell transcription factors for efficient cellular reprogramming. PMID:26880980

  5. Early Trypanosoma cruzi Infection Reprograms Human Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chiribao, María Laura; Libisch, Gabriela; Parodi-Talice, Adriana; Robello, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease, has the peculiarity, when compared with other intracellular parasites, that it is able to invade almost any type of cell. This property makes Chagas a complex parasitic disease in terms of prophylaxis and therapeutics. The identification of key host cellular factors that play a role in the T. cruzi invasion is important for the understanding of disease pathogenesis. In Chagas disease, most of the focus is on the response of macrophages and cardiomyocytes, since they are responsible for host defenses and cardiac lesions, respectively. In the present work, we studied the early response to infection of T. cruzi in human epithelial cells, which constitute the first barrier for establishment of infection. These studies identified up to 1700 significantly altered genes regulated by the immediate infection. The global analysis indicates that cells are literally reprogrammed by T. cruzi, which affects cellular stress responses (neutrophil chemotaxis, DNA damage response), a great number of transcription factors (including the majority of NFκB family members), and host metabolism (cholesterol, fatty acids, and phospholipids). These results raise the possibility that early host cell reprogramming is exploited by the parasite to establish the initial infection and posterior systemic dissemination. PMID:24812617

  6. Contribution of Metabolic Reprogramming to Macrophage Plasticity and Function

    PubMed Central

    El Kasmi, Karim C.; Stenmark, Kurt R.

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages display a spectrum of functional activation phenotypes depending on the composition of the microenvironment they reside in, including type of tissue/organ and character of injurious challenge they are exposed to. Our understanding of how macrophage plasticity is regulated by the local microenvironment is still limited. Here we review and discuss the recent literature regarding the contribution of cellular metabolic pathways to the ability of the macrophage to sense the microenvironment and to alter its function. We propose that distinct alterations in the microenvironment induce a spectrum of inducible and reversible metabolic programs that might form the basis of the inducible and reversible spectrum of functional macrophage activation/polarization phenotypes. We highlight that metabolic pathways in the bidirectional communication between macrophages and stromals cells are an important component of chronic inflammatory conditions. Recent work demonstrates that inflammatory macrophage activation is tightly associated with metabolic reprogramming to aerobic glycolysis, an altered TCA cycle, and reduced mitochondrial respiration. We review cytosolic and mitochondrial mechanisms that promote initiation and maintenance of macrophage activation as they relate to increased aerobic glycolysis and highlight potential pathways through which anti-inflammatory IL-10 could promote macrophage deactivation. Finally, we propose that in addition to their role in energy generation and regulation of apoptosis, mitochondria reprogram their metabolism to also participate regulating macrophage activation and plasticity. PMID:26454572

  7. Reprogramming Eukaryotic Translation with Ligand-Responsive Synthetic RNA Switches

    PubMed Central

    Anzalone, Andrew V.; Lin, Annie J.; Zairis, Sakellarios; Rabadan, Raul; Cornish, Virginia W.

    2016-01-01

    Protein synthesis in eukaryotes is regulated by diverse reprogramming mechanisms that expand the coding capacity of individual genes. Here, we exploit one such mechanism termed −1 programmed ribosomal frameshifting (−1 PRF) to engineer ligand-responsive RNA switches that regulate protein expression. First, efficient −1 PRF stimulatory RNA elements were discovered by in vitro selection; then, ligand-responsive switches were constructed by coupling −1 PRF stimulatory elements to RNA aptamers using rational design and in vivo directed evolution. We demonstrate that −1 PRF switches tightly control the relative stoichiometry of two distinct protein outputs from a single mRNA, exhibiting consistent ligand response across whole populations of cells. Furthermore, −1 PRF switches were applied to build single-mRNA logic gates and an apoptosis module in yeast. Together, these results showcase the potential for harnessing translation-reprogramming mechanisms for synthetic biology, and establish −1 PRF switches as powerful RNA tools for controlling protein synthesis in eukaryotes. PMID:26999002

  8. Stem cells and somatic cells: reprogramming and plasticity.

    PubMed

    Estrov, Zeev

    2009-01-01

    Recent seminal discoveries have significantly advanced the field of stem cell research and received worldwide attention. Improvements in somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) technology, enabling the cloning of Dolly the sheep, and the derivation and differentiation of human embryonic stem cells raised hopes that normal cells could be generated to replace diseased or injured tissue. At the same time, in vitro and in vivo studies demonstrated that somatic cells of one tissue are capable of generating cells of another tissue. It was theorized that any cell might be reprogrammed, by exposure to a new environment, to become another cell type. This concept contradicts two established hypotheses: (1) that only specific tissues are generated from the endoderm, mesoderm, and ectoderm and (2) that tissue cells arise from a rare population of tissue-specific stem cells in a hierarchical fashion. SCNT, cell fusion experiments, and most recent gene transfer studies also contradict these hypotheses, as they demonstrate that mature somatic cells can be reprogrammed to regain pluripotent (or even totipotent) stem cell capacity. On the basis of the stem cell theory, hierarchical cancer stem cell differentiation models have been proposed. Cancer cell plasticity is an established phenomenon that supports the notion that cellular phenotype and function might be altered. Therefore, mechanisms of cellular plasticity should be exploited and the clinical significance of the cancer stem cell theory cautiously assessed. PMID:19778860

  9. Phylogenomics Using Transcriptome Data.

    PubMed

    Cannon, Johanna Taylor; Kocot, Kevin Michael

    2016-01-01

    This chapter presents a generalized protocol for conducting phylogenetic analyses using large-scale molecular datasets, specifically using transcriptome data from the Illumina sequencing platform. The general molecular lab bench protocol consists of RNA extraction, cDNA synthesis, and sequencing, in this case via Illumina. After sequences have been obtained, bioinformatics methods are used to assemble raw reads, identify coding regions, and categorize sequences from different species into groups of orthologous genes (OGs). The specific OGs to be used for phylogenetic inference are selected using a custom shell script. Finally, the selected orthologous groups are concatenated into a supermatrix. Generalized methods for phylogenomic inference using maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference software are presented. PMID:27460370

  10. Chondrocyte channel transcriptomics

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Rebecca; May, Hannah; Mobasheri, Ali; Barrett-Jolley, Richard

    2013-01-01

    To date, a range of ion channels have been identified in chondrocytes using a number of different techniques, predominantly electrophysiological and/or biomolecular; each of these has its advantages and disadvantages. Here we aim to compare and contrast the data available from biophysical and microarray experiments. This letter analyses recent transcriptomics datasets from chondrocytes, accessible from the European Bioinformatics Institute (EBI). We discuss whether such bioinformatic analysis of microarray datasets can potentially accelerate identification and discovery of ion channels in chondrocytes. The ion channels which appear most frequently across these microarray datasets are discussed, along with their possible functions. We discuss whether functional or protein data exist which support the microarray data. A microarray experiment comparing gene expression in osteoarthritis and healthy cartilage is also discussed and we verify the differential expression of 2 of these genes, namely the genes encoding large calcium-activated potassium (BK) and aquaporin channels. PMID:23995703

  11. Establishing Substantial Equivalence: Transcriptomics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baudo, María Marcela; Powers, Stephen J.; Mitchell, Rowan A. C.; Shewry, Peter R.

    Regulatory authorities in Western Europe require transgenic crops to be substantially equivalent to conventionally bred forms if they are to be approved for commercial production. One way to establish substantial equivalence is to compare the transcript profiles of developing grain and other tissues of transgenic and conventionally bred lines, in order to identify any unintended effects of the transformation process. We present detailed protocols for transcriptomic comparisons of developing wheat grain and leaf material, and illustrate their use by reference to our own studies of lines transformed to express additional gluten protein genes controlled by their own endosperm-specific promoters. The results show that the transgenes present in these lines (which included those encoding marker genes) did not have any significant unpredicted effects on the expression of endogenous genes and that the transgenic plants were therefore substantially equivalent to the corresponding parental lines.

  12. Elucidation of the molecular responses to waterlogging in Jatropha roots by transcriptome profiling

    PubMed Central

    Juntawong, Piyada; Sirikhachornkit, Anchalee; Pimjan, Rachaneeporn; Sonthirod, Chutima; Sangsrakru, Duangjai; Yoocha, Thippawan; Tangphatsornruang, Sithichoke; Srinives, Peerasak

    2014-01-01

    Jatropha (Jatropha curcas) is a promising oil-seed crop for biodiesel production. However, the species is highly sensitive to waterlogging, which can result in stunted growth and yield loss. To date, the molecular mechanisms underlying the responses to waterlogging in Jatropha remain elusive. Here, the transcriptome adjustment of Jatropha roots to waterlogging was examined by high-throughput RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq). The results indicated that 24 h of waterlogging caused significant changes in mRNA abundance of 1968 genes. Comprehensive gene ontology and functional enrichment analysis of root transcriptome revealed that waterlogging promoted responses to hypoxia and anaerobic respiration. On the other hand, the stress inhibited carbohydrate synthesis, cell wall biogenesis, and growth. The results also highlighted the roles of ethylene, nitrate, and nitric oxide in waterlogging acclimation. In addition, transcriptome profiling identified 85 waterlogging-induced transcription factors including members of AP2/ERF, MYB, and WRKY families implying that reprogramming of gene expression is a vital mechanism for waterlogging acclimation. Comparative analysis of differentially regulated transcripts in response to waterlogging among Arabidopsis, gray poplar, Jatropha, and rice further revealed not only conserved but species-specific regulation. Our findings unraveled the molecular responses to waterlogging in Jatropha and provided new perspectives for developing a waterlogging tolerant cultivar in the future. PMID:25520726

  13. Elucidation of the molecular responses to waterlogging in Jatropha roots by transcriptome profiling.

    PubMed

    Juntawong, Piyada; Sirikhachornkit, Anchalee; Pimjan, Rachaneeporn; Sonthirod, Chutima; Sangsrakru, Duangjai; Yoocha, Thippawan; Tangphatsornruang, Sithichoke; Srinives, Peerasak

    2014-01-01

    Jatropha (Jatropha curcas) is a promising oil-seed crop for biodiesel production. However, the species is highly sensitive to waterlogging, which can result in stunted growth and yield loss. To date, the molecular mechanisms underlying the responses to waterlogging in Jatropha remain elusive. Here, the transcriptome adjustment of Jatropha roots to waterlogging was examined by high-throughput RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq). The results indicated that 24 h of waterlogging caused significant changes in mRNA abundance of 1968 genes. Comprehensive gene ontology and functional enrichment analysis of root transcriptome revealed that waterlogging promoted responses to hypoxia and anaerobic respiration. On the other hand, the stress inhibited carbohydrate synthesis, cell wall biogenesis, and growth. The results also highlighted the roles of ethylene, nitrate, and nitric oxide in waterlogging acclimation. In addition, transcriptome profiling identified 85 waterlogging-induced transcription factors including members of AP2/ERF, MYB, and WRKY families implying that reprogramming of gene expression is a vital mechanism for waterlogging acclimation. Comparative analysis of differentially regulated transcripts in response to waterlogging among Arabidopsis, gray poplar, Jatropha, and rice further revealed not only conserved but species-specific regulation. Our findings unraveled the molecular responses to waterlogging in Jatropha and provided new perspectives for developing a waterlogging tolerant cultivar in the future.

  14. Anguillid herpesvirus 1 transcriptome.

    PubMed

    van Beurden, Steven J; Gatherer, Derek; Kerr, Karen; Galbraith, Julie; Herzyk, Pawel; Peeters, Ben P H; Rottier, Peter J M; Engelsma, Marc Y; Davison, Andrew J

    2012-09-01

    We used deep sequencing of poly(A) RNA to characterize the transcriptome of an economically important eel virus, anguillid herpesvirus 1 (AngHV1), at a stage during the lytic life cycle when infectious virus was being produced. In contrast to the transcription of mammalian herpesviruses, the overall level of antisense transcription from the 248,526-bp genome was low, amounting to only 1.5% of transcription in predicted protein-coding regions, and no abundant, nonoverlapping, noncoding RNAs were identified. RNA splicing was found to be more common than had been anticipated previously. Counting the 10,634-bp terminal direct repeat once, 100 splice junctions were identified, of which 58 were considered likely to be involved in the expression of functional proteins because they represent splicing between protein-coding exons or between 5' untranslated regions and protein-coding exons. Each of the 30 most highly represented of these 58 splice junctions was confirmed by RT-PCR. We also used deep sequencing to identify numerous putative 5' and 3' ends of AngHV1 transcripts, confirming some and adding others by rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE). The findings prompted a revision of the AngHV1 genome map to include a total of 129 protein-coding genes, 5 of which are duplicated in the terminal direct repeat. Not counting duplicates, 11 genes contain integral, spliced protein-coding exons, and 9 contain 5' untranslated exons or, because of alternative splicing, 5' untranslated and 5' translated exons. The results of this study sharpen our understanding of AngHV1 genomics and provide the first detailed view of a fish herpesvirus transcriptome. PMID:22787220

  15. Advances in Swine Transcriptomics

    PubMed Central

    Tuggle, Christopher K.; Wang, Yanfang; Couture, Oliver

    2007-01-01

    The past five years have seen a tremendous rise in porcine transcriptomic data. Available porcine Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs) have expanded greatly, with over 623,000 ESTs deposited in Genbank. ESTs have been used to expand the pig-human comparative maps, but such data has also been used in many ways to understand pig gene expression. Several methods have been used to identify genes differentially expressed (DE) in specific tissues or cell types under different treatments. These include open screening methods such as suppression subtractive hybridization, differential display, serial analysis of gene expression, and EST sequence frequency, as well as closed methods that measure expression of a defined set of sequences such as hybridization to membrane arrays and microarrays. The use of microarrays to begin large-scale transcriptome analysis has been recently reported, using either specialized or broad-coverage arrays. This review covers published results using the above techniques in the pig, as well as unpublished data provided by the research community, and reports on unpublished Affymetrix data from our group. Published and unpublished bioinformatics efforts are discussed, including recent work by our group to integrate two broad-coverage microarray platforms. We conclude by predicting experiments that will become possible with new anticipated tools and data, including the porcine genome sequence. We emphasize that the need for bioinformatics infrastructure to efficiently store and analyze the expanding amounts of gene expression data is critical, and that this deficit has emerged as a limiting factor for acceleration of genomic understanding in the pig. PMID:17384733

  16. Global poplar root and leaf transcriptomes reveal links between growth and stress responses under nitrogen starvation and excess.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jie; Zhou, Jing; Li, Hong; Shi, Wenguang; Polle, Andrea; Lu, Mengzhu; Sun, Xiaomei; Luo, Zhi-Bin

    2015-12-01

    Nitrogen (N) starvation and excess have distinct effects on N uptake and metabolism in poplars, but the global transcriptomic changes underlying morphological and physiological acclimation to altered N availability are unknown. We found that N starvation stimulated the fine root length and surface area by 54 and 49%, respectively, decreased the net photosynthetic rate by 15% and reduced the concentrations of NH4+, NO3(-) and total free amino acids in the roots and leaves of Populus simonii Carr. in comparison with normal N supply, whereas N excess had the opposite effect in most cases. Global transcriptome analysis of roots and leaves elucidated the specific molecular responses to N starvation and excess. Under N starvation and excess, gene ontology (GO) terms related to ion transport and response to auxin stimulus were enriched in roots, whereas the GO term for response to abscisic acid stimulus was overrepresented in leaves. Common GO terms for all N treatments in roots and leaves were related to development, N metabolism, response to stress and hormone stimulus. Approximately 30-40% of the differentially expressed genes formed a transcriptomic regulatory network under each condition. These results suggest that global transcriptomic reprogramming plays a key role in the morphological and physiological acclimation of poplar roots and leaves to N starvation and excess.

  17. Limitations of In Vivo Reprogramming to Dopaminergic Neurons via a Tricistronic Strategy.

    PubMed

    Theodorou, Marina; Rauser, Benedict; Zhang, Jingzhong; Prakash, Nilima; Wurst, Wolfgang; Schick, Joel A

    2015-08-01

    Parkinson's disease is one of the most common neurodegenerative disorders characterized by cell death of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. Recent research has focused on cellular replacement through lineage reprogramming as a potential therapeutic strategy. This study sought to use genetics to define somatic cell types in vivo amenable to reprogramming. To stimulate in vivo reprogramming to dopaminergic neurons, we generated a Rosa26 knock-in mouse line conditionally overexpressing Mash1, Lmx1a, and Nurr1. These proteins are characterized by their role in neuronal commitment and development of midbrain dopaminergic neurons and have previously been shown to convert fibroblasts to dopaminergic neurons in vitro. We show that a tricistronic construct containing these transcription factors can reprogram astrocytes and fibroblasts in vitro. However, cassette overexpression triggered cell death in vivo, in part through endoplasmic reticulum stress, while we also detected "uncleaved" forms of the polyprotein, suggesting poor "cleavage" efficiency of the 2A peptides. Based on our results, the cassette overexpression induced apoptosis and precluded reprogramming in our mouse model. Therefore, we suggest that alternatives must be explored to balance construct design with efficacious reprogramming. It is evident that there are still biological obstacles to overcome for in vivo reprogramming to dopaminergic neurons.

  18. Early ERK1/2 activation promotes DRP1-dependent mitochondrial fission necessary for cell reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Prieto, Javier; León, Marian; Ponsoda, Xavier; Sendra, Ramón; Bort, Roque; Ferrer-Lorente, Raquel; Raya, Angel; López-García, Carlos; Torres, Josema

    2016-01-01

    During the process of reprogramming to induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells, somatic cells switch from oxidative to glycolytic metabolism, a transition associated with profound mitochondrial reorganization. Neither the importance of mitochondrial remodelling for cell reprogramming, nor the molecular mechanisms controlling this process are well understood. Here, we show that an early wave of mitochondrial fragmentation occurs upon expression of reprogramming factors. Reprogramming-induced mitochondrial fission is associated with a minor decrease in mitochondrial mass but not with mitophagy. The pro-fission factor Drp1 is phosphorylated early in reprogramming, and its knockdown and inhibition impairs both mitochondrial fragmentation and generation of iPS cell colonies. Drp1 phosphorylation depends on Erk activation in early reprogramming, which occurs, at least in part, due to downregulation of the MAP kinase phosphatase Dusp6. Taken together, our data indicate that mitochondrial fission controlled by an Erk-Drp1 axis constitutes an early and necessary step in the reprogramming process to pluripotency. PMID:27030341

  19. Early ERK1/2 activation promotes DRP1-dependent mitochondrial fission necessary for cell reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Prieto, Javier; León, Marian; Ponsoda, Xavier; Sendra, Ramón; Bort, Roque; Ferrer-Lorente, Raquel; Raya, Angel; López-García, Carlos; Torres, Josema

    2016-01-01

    During the process of reprogramming to induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells, somatic cells switch from oxidative to glycolytic metabolism, a transition associated with profound mitochondrial reorganization. Neither the importance of mitochondrial remodelling for cell reprogramming, nor the molecular mechanisms controlling this process are well understood. Here, we show that an early wave of mitochondrial fragmentation occurs upon expression of reprogramming factors. Reprogramming-induced mitochondrial fission is associated with a minor decrease in mitochondrial mass but not with mitophagy. The pro-fission factor Drp1 is phosphorylated early in reprogramming, and its knockdown and inhibition impairs both mitochondrial fragmentation and generation of iPS cell colonies. Drp1 phosphorylation depends on Erk activation in early reprogramming, which occurs, at least in part, due to downregulation of the MAP kinase phosphatase Dusp6. Taken together, our data indicate that mitochondrial fission controlled by an Erk-Drp1 axis constitutes an early and necessary step in the reprogramming process to pluripotency. PMID:27030341

  20. Generation of a Drug-inducible Reporter System to Study Cell Reprogramming in Human Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, Sergio; Panopoulos, Athanasia D.; Montserrat, Nuria; Multon, Marie-Christine; Daury, Aurélie; Rocher, Corinne; Spanakis, Emmanuel; Batchelder, Erika M.; Orsini, Cécile; Deleuze, Jean-François; Izpisua Belmonte, Juan Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Reprogramming of somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem cells is achieved by the expression of defined transcription factors. In the last few years, reprogramming strategies on the basis of doxycycline-inducible lentiviruses in mouse cells became highly powerful for screening purposes when the expression of a GFP gene, driven by the reactivation of endogenous stem cell specific promoters, was used as a reprogramming reporter signal. However, similar reporter systems in human cells have not been generated. Here, we describe the derivation of drug-inducible human fibroblast-like cell lines that express different subsets of reprogramming factors containing a GFP gene under the expression of the endogenous OCT4 promoter. These cell lines can be used to screen functional substitutes for reprogramming factors or modifiers of reprogramming efficiency. As a proof of principle of this system, we performed a screening of a library of pluripotent-enriched microRNAs and identified hsa-miR-519a as a novel inducer of reprogramming efficiency. PMID:23019325

  1. Transcriptional analysis of pluripotency reveals the Hippo pathway as a barrier to reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Han; Blaschke, Kathryn; Wei, Grace; Ohi, Yuki; Blouin, Laure; Qi, Zhongxia; Yu, Jingwei; Yeh, Ru-Fang; Hebrok, Matthias; Ramalho-Santos, Miguel

    2012-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells are derived from culture of early embryos or the germline and can be induced by reprogramming of somatic cells. Barriers to reprogramming that stabilize the differentiated state and have tumor suppression functions are expected to exist. However, we have a limited understanding of what such barriers might be. To find novel barriers to reprogramming to pluripotency, we compared the transcriptional profiles of the mouse germline with pluripotent and somatic cells, in vivo and in vitro. There is a remarkable global expression of the transcriptional program for pluripotency in primordial germ cells (PGCs). We identify parallels between PGC reprogramming to pluripotency and human germ cell tumorigenesis, including the loss of LATS2, a tumor suppressor kinase of the Hippo pathway. We show that knockdown of LATS2 increases the efficiency of induction of pluripotency in human cells. LATS2 RNAi, unlike p53 RNAi, specifically enhances the generation of fully reprogrammed iPS cells without accelerating cell proliferation. We further show that LATS2 represses reprogramming in human cells by post-transcriptionally antagonizing TAZ but not YAP, two downstream effectors of the Hippo pathway. These results reveal transcriptional parallels between germ cell transformation and the generation of iPS cells and indicate that the Hippo pathway constitutes a barrier to cellular reprogramming. PMID:22286172

  2. Reprogramming T cell Lymphocytes to Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bared, Kalia

    The discovery of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) provided a novel technology for the study of development and pharmacology and complement embryonic stem cells (ES) for cell therapy applications. Though iPSC are derived from adult tissue they are comparable to ES cells in their behavior; multi-lineage differentiation and self-renewal. This makes iPSC research appealing because they can be studied in great detail and expanded in culture broadly. Fibroblasts were the first cell type reprogrammed to an iPSC using a retrovirus vector, since then alternative cell types including lymphocytes have been used to generate iPSC. Different types of vectors have also been developed to enhance iPSC formation and quality. However, specific T lymphocyte subsets have not been shown to reprogram to a pluripotent state to date. Here, we proposed to derive iPSC from peripheral blood effector and central memory T cells, reasoning that the resultant iPSC will maintain the epigenetic memory of a T lymphocyte, including the T cell receptor (TCR) gene rearrangement. This epigenetic memory will enable the differentiation and expansion of T cell iPSC into professional T cells containing a specific TCR. These could then be used for cell therapy to target specific antigens, as well as to improve culture techniques to expand T cells in vitro. We studied different gene delivery methods to derive iPSC from different types of T lymphocytes. We assessed the viability of viral transduction using flow cytometry to detect green fluorescent marker contained in the viral construct and quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) to detect Oct4, Klf4, Sox2, and c-Myc gene expression. Our results demonstrate that the Sendai virus construct is the most feasible platform to reprogram T lymphocytes. We anticipate that this platform will provide an efficient and safe approach to derive iPSC from different T cell subsets, including memory T cells.

  3. Lineage-specific reprogramming as a strategy for cell therapy.

    PubMed

    Darabi, Radbod; Perlingeiro, Rita C R

    2008-06-15

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells are endowed with extensive ability for self renewal and differentiation. These features make them a promising candidate for cell therapy. However, despite the enthusiasm and hype surrounding the potential therapeutic use of human ES cells and more recently induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells, to date few reports have documented successful therapeutic outcome with ES-derived cell populations. This is probably due to two main caveats associated with ES cells, their capacity to form teratomas and the challenge of isolating the appropriate therapeutic cell population from differentiating ES cells. We have focused our efforts on the derivation of skeletal muscle progenitors from ES cells and here we will discuss the strategy of reprogramming lineage choices by overexpression of a master regulator, which has proven successful for the generation of the skeletal myogenic lineage from mouse ES cells.

  4. The extended pluripotency protein interactome and its links to reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xin; Wang, Jianlong

    2014-01-01

    A pluripotent state of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) is maintained through the combinatorial activity of core transcriptional factors (TFs) such as Oct4, Sox2, and Nanog in conjunction with many other factors including epigenetic regulators. Proteins rarely act alone, and knowledge of protein-protein interaction network (interactome) provides an extraordinary resource about how pluripotency TFs collaborate and crosstalk with epigenetic regulators in ESCs. Recent advances in affinity purification coupled with mass spectrometry (AP-MS) allow for efficient, high-throughput identification of hundreds of interacting protein partners, which can be used to map the pluripotency landscape. Here we review recent publications employing AP-MS to investigate protein interaction networks in ESCs, discuss how protein-protein connections reveal novel pluripotency regulatory circuits and new factors for efficient reprogramming of somatic cells. PMID:25173149

  5. Reprogramming of avian neural crest axial identity and cell fate.

    PubMed

    Simoes-Costa, Marcos; Bronner, Marianne E

    2016-06-24

    Neural crest populations along the embryonic body axis of vertebrates differ in developmental potential and fate, so that only the cranial neural crest can contribute to the craniofacial skeleton in vivo. We explored the regulatory program that imbues the cranial crest with its specialized features. Using axial-level specific enhancers to isolate and perform genome-wide profiling of the cranial versus trunk neural crest in chick embryos, we identified and characterized regulatory relationships between a set of cranial-specific transcription factors. Introducing components of this circuit into neural crest cells of the trunk alters their identity and endows these cells with the ability to give rise to chondroblasts in vivo. Our results demonstrate that gene regulatory circuits that support the formation of particular neural crest derivatives may be used to reprogram specific neural crest-derived cell types. PMID:27339986

  6. Noncoding RNAs in Regulation of Cancer Metabolic Reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dongdong; Sun, Linchong; Li, Zhaoyong; Gao, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Since the description of the Warburg effect 90 years ago, metabolic reprogramming has been gradually recognized as a major hallmark of cancer cells. Mounting evidence now indicates that cancer is a kind of metabolic disease, quite distinct from conventional perception. While metabolic alterations in cancer cells have been extensively observed in glucose, lipid, and amino acid metabolisms, its underlying regulatory mechanisms are still poorly understood. Noncoding RNA, also known as the "dark matter in life," functions through various mechanisms at RNA level regulating different biological pathways. The last two decades have witnessed the booming of noncoding RNA study on microRNA (miRNA), long noncoding RNA (lncRNA), circular RNA (circRNA), PIWI-interacting RNA (piRNA), etc. In this chapter, we will discuss the regulatory roles of noncoding RNAs on cancer metabolism. PMID:27376736

  7. Reprogramming of energy metabolism as a driver of aging.

    PubMed

    Feng, Zhaoyang; Hanson, Richard W; Berger, Nathan A; Trubitsyn, Alexander

    2016-03-29

    Aging is characterized by progressive loss of cellular function and integrity. It has been thought to be driven by stochastic molecular damage. However, genetic and environmental maneuvers enhancing mitochondrial function or inhibiting glycolysis extend lifespan and promote healthy aging in many species. In post-fertile Caenorhabditis elegans, a progressive decline in phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase with age, and a reciprocal increase in pyruvate kinase shunt energy metabolism from oxidative metabolism to anaerobic glycolysis. This reduces the efficiency and total of energy generation. As a result, energy-dependent physical activity and other cellular functions decrease due to unmatched energy demand and supply. In return, decrease in physical activity accelerates this metabolic shift, forming a vicious cycle. This metabolic event is a determinant of aging, and is retarded by caloric restriction to counteract aging. In this review, we summarize these and other evidence supporting the idea that metabolic reprogramming is a driver of aging. We also suggest strategies to test this hypothesis. PMID:26919253

  8. Cellular reprogramming: a novel tool for investigating autism spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kun-Yong; Jung, Yong Wook; Sullivan, Gareth J; Chung, Leeyup; Park, In-Hyun

    2012-08-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by impairment in reciprocal social interaction and communication, as well as the manifestation of stereotyped behaviors. Despite much effort, ASDs are not yet fully understood. Advanced genetics and genomics technologies have recently identified novel ASD genes, and approaches using genetically engineered murine models or postmortem human brain have facilitated understanding ASD. Reprogramming somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) provides unprecedented opportunities in generating human disease models. Here, we present an overview of applying iPSCs in developing cellular models for understanding ASD. We also discuss future perspectives in the use of iPSCs as a source of cell therapy and as a screening platform for identifying small molecules with efficacy for alleviating ASD. PMID:22771169

  9. Recent Progress in Cell Reprogramming Technology for Cell Transplantation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    YAMASHITA, Toru; ABE, Koji

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells opened the gate for reprogramming technology with which we can change the cell fate through overexpression of master transcriptional factors. Now we can prepare various kinds of neuronal cells directly induced from somatic cells. It has been reported that overexpression of a neuron-specific transcriptional factors might change the cell fate of endogenous astroglia to neuronal cells in vivo. In addition, some research groups demonstrated that chemical compound can induce chemical-induced neuronal cells, without transcriptional factors overexpression. In this review, we briefly review recent progress in the induced neuronal (iN) cells, and discuss the possibility of application for cell transplantation therapy. PMID:26876902

  10. Reprogramming homing endonuclease specificity through computational design and directed evolution.

    PubMed

    Thyme, Summer B; Boissel, Sandrine J S; Arshiya Quadri, S; Nolan, Tony; Baker, Dean A; Park, Rachel U; Kusak, Lara; Ashworth, Justin; Baker, David

    2014-02-01

    Homing endonucleases (HEs) can be used to induce targeted genome modification to reduce the fitness of pathogen vectors such as the malaria-transmitting Anopheles gambiae and to correct deleterious mutations in genetic diseases. We describe the creation of an extensive set of HE variants with novel DNA cleavage specificities using an integrated experimental and computational approach. Using computational modeling and an improved selection strategy, which optimizes specificity in addition to activity, we engineered an endonuclease to cleave in a gene associated with Anopheles sterility and another to cleave near a mutation that causes pyruvate kinase deficiency. In the course of this work we observed unanticipated context-dependence between bases which will need to be mechanistically understood for reprogramming of specificity to succeed more generally. PMID:24270794

  11. Akt-dependent metabolic reprogramming regulates tumor cell histone acetylation

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Nathaniel W.; Wei, Shuanzeng; Venneti, Sriram; Worth, Andrew J.; Yuan, Zuo-Fei; Lim, Hee-Woong; Liu, Shichong; Jackson, Ellen; Aiello, Nicole M.; Haas, Naomi B.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Judkins, Alexander; Won, Kyoung-Jae; Chodosh, Lewis A.; Garcia, Benjamin A.; Stanger, Ben Z.; Feldman, Michael D.; Blair, Ian A.; Wellen, Kathryn E.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Histone acetylation plays important roles in gene regulation, DNA replication, and the response to DNA damage, and it is frequently deregulated in tumors. We postulated that tumor cell histone acetylation levels are determined in part by changes in acetyl-CoA availability mediated by oncogenic metabolic reprogramming. Here, we demonstrate that acetyl-CoA is dynamically regulated by glucose availability in cancer cells and that the ratio of acetyl-CoA: coenzyme A within the nucleus modulates global histone acetylation levels. In vivo, expression of oncogenic Kras or Akt stimulates histone acetylation changes that precede tumor development. Furthermore, we show that Akt's effects on histone acetylation are mediated through the metabolic enzyme ATP-citrate lyase (ACLY), and that pAkt(Ser473) levels correlate significantly with histone acetylation marks in human gliomas and prostate tumors. The data implicate acetyl-CoA metabolism as a key determinant of histone acetylation levels in cancer cells. PMID:24998913

  12. Reprogramming adult cells during organ regeneration in forest species

    PubMed Central

    Abarca, Dolores

    2009-01-01

    The possibility of regenerating whole plants from somatic differentiated cells emphasizes the plasticity of plant development. Cell-type respecification during regeneration can be induced in adult tissues as a consequence of injuries, changes in external or internal stimuli or changes in positional information. However, in many plant species, switching the developmental program of adult cells prior to organ regeneration is difficult, especially in forest species. Besides its impact on forest productivity, basic information on the flexibility of cell differentiation is necessary for a comprehensive understanding of the epigenetic control of cell differentiation and plant development. Studies of reprogramming adult cells in terms of regulative expression changes of selected genes will be of great interest to unveil basic mechanisms regulating cellular plasticity. PMID:19820297

  13. Brain repair and reprogramming: the route to clinical translation.

    PubMed

    Grealish, S; Drouin-Ouellet, J; Parmar, M

    2016-09-01

    The adult brain has a very limited capacity for generation of new neurons, and neurogenesis only takes place in restricted regions. Some evidence for neurogenesis after injury has been reported, but few, if any, neurons are replaced after brain injury or degeneration, and the permanent loss of neurons leads to long-term disability and loss of brain function. For decades, researchers have been developing cell transplantation using exogenous cell sources for brain repair, and this method has now been shown to successfully restore lost function in experimental and clinical trials. Here, we review the development of cell-replacement strategies for brain repair in Parkinson's disease using the example of human foetal brain cells being successfully translated from preclinical findings to clinical trials. These trials demonstrate that cell-replacement therapy is a viable option for patients with Parkinson's disease, but more importantly also show how the limited availability of foetal cells calls for development of novel cell sources and methods for generating new neurons for brain repair. We focus on new stem cell sources that are on the threshold of clinical application for brain repair and discuss emerging cellular reprogramming technologies. Reviewing the current status of direct neural conversion, both in vitro and in vivo, where somatic cells are directly reprogrammed into functional neurons without passing through a stem cell intermediate, we conclude that both methods result in the successful replacement of new neurons that mature and integrate into the host brain. Thus, this new field shows great promise for future brain repair, although much work is still needed in preclinical animal models before it can be seriously considered for clinical applications. PMID:27539906

  14. Lifestyle transitions in plant pathogenic Colletotrichum fungi deciphered by genome and transcriptome analyses.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, Richard J; Thon, Michael R; Hacquard, Stéphane; Amyotte, Stefan G; Kleemann, Jochen; Torres, Maria F; Damm, Ulrike; Buiate, Ester A; Epstein, Lynn; Alkan, Noam; Altmüller, Janine; Alvarado-Balderrama, Lucia; Bauser, Christopher A; Becker, Christian; Birren, Bruce W; Chen, Zehua; Choi, Jaeyoung; Crouch, Jo Anne; Duvick, Jonathan P; Farman, Mark A; Gan, Pamela; Heiman, David; Henrissat, Bernard; Howard, Richard J; Kabbage, Mehdi; Koch, Christian; Kracher, Barbara; Kubo, Yasuyuki; Law, Audrey D; Lebrun, Marc-Henri; Lee, Yong-Hwan; Miyara, Itay; Moore, Neil; Neumann, Ulla; Nordström, Karl; Panaccione, Daniel G; Panstruga, Ralph; Place, Michael; Proctor, Robert H; Prusky, Dov; Rech, Gabriel; Reinhardt, Richard; Rollins, Jeffrey A; Rounsley, Steve; Schardl, Christopher L; Schwartz, David C; Shenoy, Narmada; Shirasu, Ken; Sikhakolli, Usha R; Stüber, Kurt; Sukno, Serenella A; Sweigard, James A; Takano, Yoshitaka; Takahara, Hiroyuki; Trail, Frances; van der Does, H Charlotte; Voll, Lars M; Will, Isa; Young, Sarah; Zeng, Qiandong; Zhang, Jingze; Zhou, Shiguo; Dickman, Martin B; Schulze-Lefert, Paul; Ver Loren van Themaat, Emiel; Ma, Li-Jun; Vaillancourt, Lisa J

    2012-09-01

    Colletotrichum species are fungal pathogens that devastate crop plants worldwide. Host infection involves the differentiation of specialized cell types that are associated with penetration, growth inside living host cells (biotrophy) and tissue destruction (necrotrophy). We report here genome and transcriptome analyses of Colletotrichum higginsianum infecting Arabidopsis thaliana and Colletotrichum graminicola infecting maize. Comparative genomics showed that both fungi have large sets of pathogenicity-related genes, but families of genes encoding secreted effectors, pectin-degrading enzymes, secondary metabolism enzymes, transporters and peptidases are expanded in C. higginsianum. Genome-wide expression profiling revealed that these genes are transcribed in successive waves that are linked to pathogenic transitions: effectors and secondary metabolism enzymes are induced before penetration and during biotrophy, whereas most hydrolases and transporters are upregulated later, at the switch to necrotrophy. Our findings show that preinvasion perception of plant-derived signals substantially reprograms fungal gene expression and indicate previously unknown functions for particular fungal cell types.

  15. Valuable lessons-learned in transcriptomics experimentation

    PubMed Central

    Bruning, Oskar; Rauwerda, Han; Dekker, Rob J; de Leeuw, Wim C; Wackers, Paul F K; Ensink, Wim A; Jonker, Martijs J; Breit, Timo M

    2015-01-01

    We have collected several valuable lessons that will help improve transcriptomics experimentation. These lessons relate to experiment design, execution, and analysis. The cautions, but also the pointers, may help biologists avoid common pitfalls in transcriptomics experimentation and achieve better results with their transcriptome studies. PMID:26098945

  16. Valuable lessons-learned in transcriptomics experimentation.

    PubMed

    Bruning, Oskar; Rauwerda, Han; Dekker, Rob J; de Leeuw, Wim C; Wackers, Paul F K; Ensink, Wim A; Jonker, Martijs J; Breit, Timo M

    2015-01-01

    We have collected several valuable lessons that will help improve transcriptomics experimentation. These lessons relate to experiment design, execution, and analysis. The cautions, but also the pointers, may help biologists avoid common pitfalls in transcriptomics experimentation and achieve better results with their transcriptome studies.

  17. Choices for Induction of Pluripotency: Recent Developments in Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Reprogramming Strategies.

    PubMed

    Brouwer, Marinka; Zhou, Huiqing; Nadif Kasri, Nael

    2016-02-01

    The ability to generate human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from somatic cells provides tremendous promises for regenerative medicine and its use has widely increased over recent years. However, reprogramming efficiencies remain low and chromosomal instability and tumorigenic potential are concerns in the use of iPSCs, especially in clinical settings. Therefore, reprogramming methods have been under development to generate safer iPSCs with higher efficiency and better quality. Developments have mainly focused on the somatic cell source, the cocktail of reprogramming factors, the delivery method used to introduce reprogramming factors and culture conditions to maintain the generated iPSCs. This review discusses the developments on these topics and briefly discusses pros and cons of iPSCs in comparison with human embryonic stem cells generated from somatic cell nuclear transfer. PMID:26424535

  18. Stress-triggered atavistic reprogramming (STAR) addiction: driving force behind head and neck cancer?

    PubMed

    Masuda, Muneyuki; Wakasaki, Takahiro; Toh, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    Recent results of the Cancer Genome Atlas on head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) revealed that HNSCC lacked predominant gain-of-function mutations in oncogenes, whereas an essential role for epigenetics in oncogenesis has become apparent. In parallel, it has gained general acceptance that cancer is considered as complex adaptive system, which evolves responding environmental selective pressures. This somatic evolution appears to proceed concurrently with the acquisition of an atavistic pluripotent state (i.e., "stemness"), which is inducible by intrinsic epigenetic reprogramming program as demonstrated by induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. This Nobel prize-winning discovery has markedly accelerated and expanded cancer stem cell research from the point of epigenetic reprogramming. Taken together, we hypothesize that stress-triggered atavistic reprogramming (STAR) may be the major driving force of HNSCC evolution. In this perspective, we discuss the possible mechanisms of STAR in HNSCC, focusing on recent topics of epigenetic reprogramming in developmental and cancer cell biology.

  19. Chemically Induced Reprogramming of Somatic Cells to Pluripotent Stem Cells and Neural Cells

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Dhruba; Jiang, Peng

    2016-01-01

    The ability to generate transplantable neural cells in a large quantity in the laboratory is a critical step in the field of developing stem cell regenerative medicine for neural repair. During the last few years, groundbreaking studies have shown that cell fate of adult somatic cells can be reprogrammed through lineage specific expression of transcription factors (TFs)-and defined culture conditions. This key concept has been used to identify a number of potent small molecules that could enhance the efficiency of reprogramming with TFs. Recently, a growing number of studies have shown that small molecules targeting specific epigenetic and signaling pathways can replace all of the reprogramming TFs. Here, we provide a detailed review of the studies reporting the generation of chemically induced pluripotent stem cells (ciPSCs), neural stem cells (ciNSCs), and neurons (ciN). We also discuss the main mechanisms of actions and the pathways that the small molecules regulate during chemical reprogramming. PMID:26861316

  20. Environmental Impact on Direct Neuronal Reprogramming In Vivo in the Adult Brain

    PubMed Central

    López-Juárez, Alejandro; Howard, Jennifer; Sakthivel, Bhuvaneswari; Aronow, Bruce; Campbell, Kenneth; Nakafuku, Masato

    2013-01-01

    Direct reprogramming of non-neuronal cells to generate new neurons is a promising approach to repair damaged brains. Impact of the in vivo environment on neuronal reprogramming, however, is poorly understood. Here we show that regional differences and injury conditions have significant influence on the efficacy of reprogramming and subsequent survival of newly generated neurons in the adult rodent brain. A combination of local exposure to growth factors and retrovirus-mediated overexpression of the neurogenic transcription factor Neurogenin2 (Neurog2) can induce new neurons from non-neuronal cells in the adult neocortex and striatum where neuronal turnover is otherwise very limited. These two regions respond to growth factors and Neurog2 differently and instruct new neurons to exhibit distinct molecular phenotypes. Moreover, ischemic insult differentially affects differentiation of new neurons in these regions. These results demonstrate strong environmental impact on direct neuronal reprogramming in vivo. PMID:23974433

  1. Environmental impact on direct neuronal reprogramming in vivo in the adult brain.

    PubMed

    Grande, Andrew; Sumiyoshi, Kyoko; López-Juárez, Alejandro; Howard, Jennifer; Sakthivel, Bhuvaneswari; Aronow, Bruce; Campbell, Kenneth; Nakafuku, Masato

    2013-01-01

    Direct reprogramming of non-neuronal cells to generate new neurons is a promising approach to repair damaged brains. Impact of the in vivo environment on neuronal reprogramming, however, is poorly understood. Here we show that regional differences and injury conditions have significant influence on the efficacy of reprogramming and subsequent survival of the newly generated neurons in the adult rodent brain. A combination of local exposure to growth factors and retrovirus-mediated overexpression of the neurogenic transcription factor Neurogenin2 can induce new neurons from non-neuronal cells in the adult neocortex and striatum where neuronal turnover is otherwise very limited. These two regions respond to growth factors and Neurogenin2 differently and instruct new neurons to exhibit distinct molecular phenotypes. Moreover, ischaemic insult differentially affects differentiation of new neurons in these regions. These results demonstrate strong environmental impact on direct neuronal reprogramming in vivo.

  2. Limiting replication stress during somatic cell reprogramming reduces genomic instability in induced pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, Sergio; Lopez-Contreras, Andres J.; Gabut, Mathieu; Marion, Rosa M.; Gutierrez-Martinez, Paula; Bua, Sabela; Ramirez, Oscar; Olalde, Iñigo; Rodrigo-Perez, Sara; Li, Han; Marques-Bonet, Tomas; Serrano, Manuel; Blasco, Maria A.; Batada, Nizar N.; Fernandez-Capetillo, Oscar

    2015-01-01

    The generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) from adult somatic cells is one of the most remarkable discoveries in recent decades. However, several works have reported evidence of genomic instability in iPSC, raising concerns on their biomedical use. The reasons behind the genomic instability observed in iPSC remain mostly unknown. Here we show that, similar to the phenomenon of oncogene-induced replication stress, the expression of reprogramming factors induces replication stress. Increasing the levels of the checkpoint kinase 1 (CHK1) reduces reprogramming-induced replication stress and increases the efficiency of iPSC generation. Similarly, nucleoside supplementation during reprogramming reduces the load of DNA damage and genomic rearrangements on iPSC. Our data reveal that lowering replication stress during reprogramming, genetically or chemically, provides a simple strategy to reduce genomic instability on mouse and human iPSC. PMID:26292731

  3. Alternative Routes to Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Revealed by Reprogramming of the Neural Lineage.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Steven A; Olufs, Zachariah P G; Tran, Khoa A; Zaidan, Nur Zafirah; Sridharan, Rupa

    2016-03-01

    During the reprogramming of mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) to induced pluripotent stem cells, the activation of pluripotency genes such as NANOG occurs after the mesenchymal to epithelial transition. Here we report that both adult stem cells (neural stem cells) and differentiated cells (astrocytes) of the neural lineage can activate NANOG in the absence of cadherin expression during reprogramming. Gene expression analysis revealed that only the NANOG+E-cadherin+ populations expressed stabilization markers, had upregulated several cell cycle genes; and were transgene independent. Inhibition of DOT1L activity enhanced both the numbers of NANOG+ and NANOG+E-cadherin+ colonies in neural stem cells. Expressing SOX2 in MEFs prior to reprogramming did not alter the ratio of NANOG colonies that express E-cadherin. Taken together these results provide a unique pathway for reprogramming taken by cells of the neural lineage. PMID:26905202

  4. Small molecules enable cardiac reprogramming of mouse fibroblasts with a single factor, Oct4.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haixia; Cao, Nan; Spencer, C Ian; Nie, Baoming; Ma, Tianhua; Xu, Tao; Zhang, Yu; Wang, Xiaojing; Srivastava, Deepak; Ding, Sheng

    2014-03-13

    It was recently shown that mouse fibroblasts could be reprogrammed into cells of a cardiac fate by forced expression of multiple transcription factors and microRNAs. For ultimate application of such a reprogramming strategy for cell-based therapy or in vivo cardiac regeneration, reducing or eliminating the genetic manipulations by small molecules would be highly desirable. Here, we report the identification of a defined small-molecule cocktail that enables the highly efficient conversion of mouse fibroblasts into cardiac cells with only one transcription factor, Oct4, without any evidence of entrance into the pluripotent state. Small-molecule-induced cardiomyocytes spontaneously contract and exhibit a ventricular phenotype. Furthermore, these induced cardiomyocytes pass through a cardiac progenitor stage. This study lays the foundation for future pharmacological reprogramming approaches and provides a small-molecule condition for investigation of the mechanisms underlying the cardiac reprogramming process. PMID:24561253

  5. From Stealing Fire to Cellular Reprogramming: A Scientific History Leading to the 2012 Nobel Prize

    PubMed Central

    Lensch, M. William; Mummery, Christine L.

    2013-01-01

    Cellular reprogramming was recently “crowned” with the award of the Nobel Prize to two of its groundbreaking researchers, Sir John Gurdon and Shinya Yamanaka. The recent link between reprogramming and stem cells makes this appear almost a new field of research, but its historical roots have actually spanned more than a century. Here, the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 2012 is placed in its historical context. PMID:24052937

  6. A case of cellular alchemy: lineage reprogramming and its potential in regenerative medicine.

    PubMed

    Asuelime, Grace E; Shi, Yanhong

    2012-08-01

    The field of regenerative medicine is rapidly gaining momentum as an increasing number of reports emerge concerning the induced conversions observed in cellular fate reprogramming. While in recent years, much attention has been focused on the conversion of fate-committed somatic cells to an embryonic-like or pluripotent state, there are still many limitations associated with the applications of induced pluripotent stem cell reprogramming, including relatively low reprogramming efficiency, the times required for the reprogramming event to take place, the epigenetic instability, and the tumorigenicity associated with the pluripotent state. On the other hand, lineage reprogramming involves the conversion from one mature cell type to another without undergoing conversion to an unstable intermediate. It provides an alternative approach in regenerative medicine that has a relatively lower risk of tumorigenesis and increased efficiency within specific cellular contexts. While lineage reprogramming provides exciting potential, there is still much to be assessed before this technology is ready to be applied in a clinical setting. PMID:22371436

  7. [Mammalian DNA methylation and its roles during the induced re-programming of somatic cells].

    PubMed

    Hongwei, Song; Tiezhu, An; Shanhua, Piao; Chunsheng, Wang

    2014-05-01

    The technology of induced pluripotent stem cell (iPS) provides the possibility to reverse the terminal differentiated cells to pluripotent stem cells, and is therefore of great importance in both the theoretical research of stem cells and regenerative medicine. However, the efficiency of current induced reprogramming methods is extremely low, and the incomplete reprogramming often happens. It has been reported that some epigenetic memory of the somatic cells exists in these incomplete reprogrammed iPS cells, and DNA methylation, as a relative long-term and stable epigenetic modification, is one of the important factors that influence the efficiency of reprogramming and differentiative capacity of iPS cells. Mammalian DNA methylation, which normally appears on the CpG sites, occurs on the fifth carbon atom of the cytosine ring. DNA methylation can modulate the expression of somatic cell specific genes, and pluripotent genes; hence, it plays important roles in the processes of mammalian gene regulation, embryonic development and cell reprogramming. In addition, it has also been found that abnormal DNA methylation may lead to the disorder of genetic imprinting and the inactivation of X chromosome in iPS cells. Therefore, in order to provide a concise guidance of DNA methylation studies in iPS, we mainly review the mechanism, the distribution features of DNA methylation, and its roles in induced reprogramming of somatic cells. PMID:24846992

  8. A highly optimized protocol for reprogramming cancer cells to pluripotency using nonviral plasmid vectors.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hongzhi; Davies, Timothy J; Ning, Jiaolin; Chang, Yanxu; Sachamitr, Patty; Sattler, Susanne; Fairchild, Paul J; Huang, Fang-Ping

    2015-02-01

    In spite of considerable interest in the field, reprogramming induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) directly from cancer cells has encountered considerable challenges, including the extremely low reprogramming efficiency and instability of cancer-derived iPSCs (C-iPSCs). In this study, we aimed to identify the main obstacles that limit cancer cell reprogramming. Through a detailed multidimensional kinetic optimization, a highly optimized protocol is established for reprogramming C-iPSCs using nonviral plasmid vectors. We demonstrated how the initial cancer cell density seeded could be the most critical factor ultimately affecting C-iPSCs reprogramming. We have consistently achieved an unprecedented high C-iPSC reprogramming efficiency, establishing stable colonies with typical iPSC morphology, up to 50% of which express the iPSC phenotypic (Oct3/4, Sox2, Nanog) and enzymatic (alkaline phosphatase) markers. Furthermore, established C-iPSC lines were shown to be capable of forming teratomas in vivo, containing cell types and tissues from each of the embryonic germ layers, fully consistent with their acquisition of pluripotency. This protocol was tested and confirmed in two completely unrelated human lung adenocarcinoma (A549) and mouse melanoma (B16f10) cancer cell lines and thus offers a potentially valuable method for generating effectively virus-free C-iPSCs for future applications.

  9. Facilitators and Impediments of the Pluripotency Reprogramming Factors’ Initial Engagement with the Genome

    PubMed Central

    Soufi, Abdenour; Donahue, Greg; Zaret, Kenneth S.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY The ectopic expression of transcription factors can reprogram cell fate, yet it is unknown how the initial binding of factors to the genome relates functionally to the binding seen in the minority of cells that become reprogrammed. We report a map of Oct4, Sox2, Klf4, and c-Myc (O, S, K, and M) on the human genome during the first 48 hours of reprogramming fibroblasts to pluripotency. Three striking aspects of the initial chromatin binding events include: An unexpected role for c-Myc in facilitating OSK chromatin engagement, the primacy of O, S, and K as pioneer factors at enhancers of genes that promote reprogramming, and megabase-scale chromatin domains spanned by H3K9me3, including many genes required for pluripotency, that prevent initial OSKM binding and impede the efficiency of reprogramming. We find diverse aspects of initial factor binding that must be overcome in the minority of cells that become reprogrammed. PMID:23159369

  10. Rat retinal transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    Kozhevnikova, Oyuna S.; Korbolina, Elena E.; Ershov, Nikita I.; Kolosova, Natalia G.

    2013-01-01

    Pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the leading cause of vision loss in the elderly, remains poorly understood due to the paucity of animal models that fully replicate the human disease. Recently, we showed that senescence-accelerated OXYS rats develop a retinopathy similar to human AMD. To identify alterations in response to normal aging and progression of AMD-like retinopathy, we compared gene expression profiles of retina from 3- and 18-mo-old OXYS and control Wistar rats by means of high-throughput RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq). We identified 160 and 146 age-regulated genes in Wistar and OXYS retinas, respectively. The majority of them are related to the immune system and extracellular matrix turnover. Only 24 age-regulated genes were common for the two strains, suggestive of different rates and mechanisms of aging. Over 600 genes showed significant differences in expression between the two strains. These genes are involved in disease-associated pathways such as immune response, inflammation, apoptosis, Ca2+ homeostasis and oxidative stress. The altered expression for selected genes was confirmed by qRT-PCR analysis. To our knowledge, this study represents the first analysis of retinal transcriptome from young and old rats with biologic replicates generated by RNA-Seq technology. We can conclude that the development of AMD-like retinopathy in OXYS rats is associated with an imbalance in immune and inflammatory responses. Aging alters the expression profile of numerous genes in the retina, and the genetic background of OXYS rats has a profound impact on the development of AMD-like retinopathy. PMID:23656783

  11. Generation of Patient-Specific induced Pluripotent Stem Cell from Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells by Sendai Reprogramming Vectors.

    PubMed

    Quintana-Bustamante, Oscar; Segovia, Jose C

    2016-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) technology has changed preclinical research since their generation was described by Shinya Yamanaka in 2006. iPSCs are derived from somatic cells after being reprogrammed back to an embryonic state by specific combination of reprogramming factors. These reprogrammed cells resemble all the characteristic of embryonic stem cells (ESC). The reprogramming technology is even more valuable to research diseases biology and treatment by opening gene and cell therapies in own patient's iPSC. Patient-specific iPSC can be generated from a large variety of patient cells by any of the myriad of reprogramming platforms described. Here, we describe the generation of patient-specific iPSC from patient peripheral blood mononuclear cells by Sendai Reprogramming vectors.

  12. Adaptive Mitochondrial Reprogramming and Resistance to PI3K Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Jagadish C.; Siegelin, Markus D.; Vaira, Valentina; Faversani, Alice; Tavecchio, Michele; Chae, Young Chan; Lisanti, Sofia; Rampini, Paolo; Giroda, Massimo; Caino, M. Cecilia; Seo, Jae Ho; Kossenkov, Andrew V.; Michalek, Ryan D.; Schultz, David C.; Bosari, Silvano; Languino, Lucia R.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Small molecule inhibitors of phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K) have been developed as molecular therapy for cancer, but their efficacy in the clinic is modest, hampered by resistance mechanisms. Methods: We studied the effect of PI3K therapy in patient-derived tumor organotypic cultures (from five patient samples), three glioblastoma (GBM) tumor cell lines, and an intracranial model of glioblastoma in immunocompromised mice (n = 4–5 mice per group). Mechanisms of therapy-induced tumor reprogramming were investigated in a global metabolomics screening, analysis of mitochondrial bioenergetics and cell death, and modulation of protein phosphorylation. A high-throughput drug screening was used to identify novel preclinical combination therapies with PI3K inhibitors, and combination synergy experiments were performed. All statistical methods were two-sided. Results: PI3K therapy induces global metabolic reprogramming in tumors and promotes the recruitment of an active pool of the Ser/Thr kinase, Akt2 to mitochondria. In turn, mitochondrial Akt2 phosphorylates Ser31 in cyclophilin D (CypD), a regulator of organelle functions. Akt2-phosphorylated CypD supports mitochondrial bioenergetics and opposes tumor cell death, conferring resistance to PI3K therapy. The combination of a small-molecule antagonist of CypD protein folding currently in preclinical development, Gamitrinib, plus PI3K inhibitors (PI3Ki) reverses this adaptive response, produces synergistic anticancer activity by inducing mitochondrial apoptosis, and extends animal survival in a GBM model (vehicle: median survival = 28.5 days; Gamitrinib+PI3Ki: median survival = 40 days, P = .003), compared with single-agent treatment (PI3Ki: median survival = 32 days, P = .02; Gamitrinib: median survival = 35 days, P = .008 by two-sided unpaired t test). Conclusions: Small-molecule PI3K antagonists promote drug resistance by repurposing mitochondrial functions in bioenergetics and cell survival. Novel

  13. Transcriptomics and disease vector control.

    PubMed

    Vontas, John; Ranson, Hilary; Alphey, Luke

    2010-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing can be used to compare transcriptomes under different conditions. A study in BMC Genomics applies this approach to investigating the effects of exposure to a range of xenobiotics on changes in gene expression in the larvae of Aedes aegypti, the mosquito vector of dengue fever.

  14. Molecular or Metabolic Reprograming: What Triggers Tumor Subtypes?

    PubMed

    Eason, Katherine; Sadanandam, Anguraj

    2016-09-15

    Tumor heterogeneity is reflected and influenced by genetic, epigenetic, and metabolic differences in cancer cells and their interactions with a complex microenvironment. This heterogeneity has resulted in the stratification of tumors into subtypes, mainly based on cancer-specific genomic or transcriptomic profiles. Subtyping can lead to biomarker identification for personalized diagnosis and therapy, but stratification alone does not explain the origins of tumor heterogeneity. Heterogeneity has traditionally been thought to arise from distinct mutations/aberrations in "driver" oncogenes. However, certain subtypes appear to be the result of adaptation to the disrupted microenvironment caused by abnormal tumor vasculature triggering metabolic switches. Moreover, heterogeneity persists despite the predominance of single oncogenic driver mutations, perhaps due to second metabolic or genetic "hits." In certain cancer types, existing subtypes have metabolic and transcriptomic phenotypes that are reminiscent of normal differentiated cells, whereas others reflect the phenotypes of stem or mesenchymal cells. The cell-of-origin may, therefore, play a role in tumor heterogeneity. In this review, we focus on how cancer cell-specific heterogeneity is driven by different genetic or metabolic factors alone or in combination using specific cancers to illustrate these concepts. Cancer Res; 76(18); 5195-200. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27635042

  15. Reactivation of the inactive X chromosome and post-transcriptional reprogramming of Xist in iPSCs.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong Soo; Choi, Hyun Woo; Araúzo-Bravo, Marcos J; Schöler, Hans R; Do, Jeong Tae

    2015-01-01

    Direct reprogramming of somatic cells to pluripotent stem cells entails the obliteration of somatic cell memory and the reestablishment of epigenetic events. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have been created by reprogramming somatic cells through the transduction of reprogramming factors. During cell reprogramming, female somatic cells must overcome at least one more barrier than male somatic cells in order to enter a pluripotent state, as they must reactivate an inactive X chromosome (Xi). In this study, we investigated whether the sex of somatic cells affects reprogramming efficiency, differentiation potential and the post-transcriptional processing of Xist RNA after reprogramming. There were no differences between male and female iPSCs with respect to reprogramming efficiency or their differentiation potential in vivo. However, reactivating Xi took longer than reactivating pluripotency-related genes. We also found that direct reprogramming leads to gender-appropriate post-transcriptional reprogramming - like male embryonic stem cells (ESCs), male iPSCs expressed only the long Xist isoform, whereas female iPSCs, like female ESCs, expressed both the long and short isoforms.

  16. Thyroid Transcription Factor 1 Reprograms Angiogenic Activities of Secretome

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Lauren W.; Cox, Nicole I.; Phelps, Cody A.; Lai, Shao-Chiang; Poddar, Arjun; Talbot, Conover; Mu, David

    2016-01-01

    Through both gain- and loss-of-TTF-1 expression strategies, we show that TTF-1 positively regulates vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and that the VEGF promoter element contains multiple TTF-1-responsive sequences. The major signaling receptor for VEGF, i.e VEGFR2, also appears to be under a direct and positive regulation of TTF-1. The TTF-1-dependent upregulation of VEGF was moderately sensitive to rapamycin, implicating a partial involvement of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). However, hypoxia did not further increase the secreted VEGF level of the TTF-1+ lung cancer cells. The TTF-1-induced VEGF upregulation occurs in both compartments (exosomes and exosome-depleted media (EDM)) of the conditioned media. Surprisingly, the EDM of TTF-1+ lung cancer cells (designated EDM-TTF-1+) displayed an anti-angiogenic activity in the endothelial cell tube formation assay. Mechanistic studies suggest that the increased granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) level in the EDM-TTF-1+ conferred the antiangiogenic activities. In human lung cancer, the expression of TTF-1 and GM-CSF exhibits a statistically significant and positive correlation. In summary, this study provides evidence that TTF-1 may reprogram lung cancer secreted proteome into an antiangiogenic state, offering a novel basis to account for the long-standing observation of favorable prognosis associated with TTF-1+ lung adenocarcinomas. PMID:26912193

  17. Thyroid Transcription Factor 1 Reprograms Angiogenic Activities of Secretome.

    PubMed

    Wood, Lauren W; Cox, Nicole I; Phelps, Cody A; Lai, Shao-Chiang; Poddar, Arjun; Talbot, Conover; Mu, David

    2016-02-25

    Through both gain- and loss-of-TTF-1 expression strategies, we show that TTF-1 positively regulates vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and that the VEGF promoter element contains multiple TTF-1-responsive sequences. The major signaling receptor for VEGF, i.e VEGFR2, also appears to be under a direct and positive regulation of TTF-1. The TTF-1-dependent upregulation of VEGF was moderately sensitive to rapamycin, implicating a partial involvement of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). However, hypoxia did not further increase the secreted VEGF level of the TTF-1(+) lung cancer cells. The TTF-1-induced VEGF upregulation occurs in both compartments (exosomes and exosome-depleted media (EDM)) of the conditioned media. Surprisingly, the EDM of TTF-1(+) lung cancer cells (designated EDM-TTF-1(+)) displayed an anti-angiogenic activity in the endothelial cell tube formation assay. Mechanistic studies suggest that the increased granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) level in the EDM-TTF-1(+) conferred the antiangiogenic activities. In human lung cancer, the expression of TTF-1 and GM-CSF exhibits a statistically significant and positive correlation. In summary, this study provides evidence that TTF-1 may reprogram lung cancer secreted proteome into an antiangiogenic state, offering a novel basis to account for the long-standing observation of favorable prognosis associated with TTF-1(+) lung adenocarcinomas.

  18. Mouse cloning and somatic cell reprogramming using electrofused blastomeres.

    PubMed

    Riaz, Amjad; Zhao, Xiaoyang; Dai, Xiangpeng; Li, Wei; Liu, Lei; Wan, Haifeng; Yu, Yang; Wang, Liu; Zhou, Qi

    2011-05-01

    Mouse cloning from fertilized eggs can assist development of approaches for the production of "genetically tailored" human embryonic stem (ES) cell lines that are not constrained by the limitations of oocyte availability. However, to date only zygotes have been successfully used as recipients of nuclei from terminally differentiated somatic cell donors leading to ES cell lines. In fertility clinics, embryos of advanced embryonic stages are usually stored for future use, but their ability to support the derivation of ES cell lines via somatic nuclear transfer has not yet been proved. Here, we report that two-cell stage electrofused mouse embryos, arrested in mitosis, can support developmental reprogramming of nuclei from donor cells ranging from blastomeres to somatic cells. Live, full-term cloned pups from embryonic donors, as well as pluripotent ES cell lines from embryonic or somatic donors, were successfully generated from these reconstructed embryos. Advanced stage pre-implantation embryos were unable to develop normally to term after electrofusion and transfer of a somatic cell nucleus, indicating that discarded pre-implantation human embryos could be an important resource for research that minimizes the ethical concerns for human therapeutic cloning. Our approach provides an attractive and practical alternative to therapeutic cloning using donated oocytes for the generation of patient-specific human ES cell lines.

  19. Reprogramming the assembly of unmodified DNA with a small molecule.

    PubMed

    Avakyan, Nicole; Greschner, Andrea A; Aldaye, Faisal; Serpell, Christopher J; Toader, Violeta; Petitjean, Anne; Sleiman, Hanadi F

    2016-04-01

    The ability of DNA to store and encode information arises from base pairing of the four-letter nucleobase code to form a double helix. Expanding this DNA 'alphabet' by synthetic incorporation of new bases can introduce new functionalities and enable the formation of novel nucleic acid structures. However, reprogramming the self-assembly of existing nucleobases presents an alternative route to expand the structural space and functionality of nucleic acids. Here we report the discovery that a small molecule, cyanuric acid, with three thymine-like faces, reprogrammes the assembly of unmodified poly(adenine) (poly(A)) into stable, long and abundant fibres with a unique internal structure. Poly(A) DNA, RNA and peptide nucleic acid (PNA) all form these assemblies. Our studies are consistent with the association of adenine and cyanuric acid units into a hexameric rosette, which brings together poly(A) triplexes with a subsequent cooperative polymerization. Fundamentally, this study shows that small hydrogen-bonding molecules can be used to induce the assembly of nucleic acids in water, which leads to new structures from inexpensive and readily available materials. PMID:27001733

  20. Reprogramming the assembly of unmodified DNA with a small molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avakyan, Nicole; Greschner, Andrea A.; Aldaye, Faisal; Serpell, Christopher J.; Toader, Violeta; Petitjean, Anne; Sleiman, Hanadi F.

    2016-04-01

    The ability of DNA to store and encode information arises from base pairing of the four-letter nucleobase code to form a double helix. Expanding this DNA ‘alphabet’ by synthetic incorporation of new bases can introduce new functionalities and enable the formation of novel nucleic acid structures. However, reprogramming the self-assembly of existing nucleobases presents an alternative route to expand the structural space and functionality of nucleic acids. Here we report the discovery that a small molecule, cyanuric acid, with three thymine-like faces, reprogrammes the assembly of unmodified poly(adenine) (poly(A)) into stable, long and abundant fibres with a unique internal structure. Poly(A) DNA, RNA and peptide nucleic acid (PNA) all form these assemblies. Our studies are consistent with the association of adenine and cyanuric acid units into a hexameric rosette, which brings together poly(A) triplexes with a subsequent cooperative polymerization. Fundamentally, this study shows that small hydrogen-bonding molecules can be used to induce the assembly of nucleic acids in water, which leads to new structures from inexpensive and readily available materials.

  1. Oligodendrocyte progenitor programming and reprogramming: Toward myelin regeneration.

    PubMed

    Lopez Juarez, Alejandro; He, Danyang; Richard Lu, Q

    2016-05-01

    Demyelinating diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS) are among the most disabling and cost-intensive neurological disorders. The loss of myelin in the central nervous system, produced by oligodendrocytes (OLs), impairs saltatory nerve conduction, leading to motor and cognitive deficits. Immunosuppression therapy has a limited efficacy in MS patients, arguing for a paradigm shift to strategies that target OL lineage cells to achieve myelin repair. The inhibitory microenvironment in MS lesions abrogates the expansion and differentiation of resident OL precursor cells (OPCs) into mature myelin-forming OLs. Recent studies indicate that OPCs display a highly plastic ability to differentiate into alternative cell lineages under certain circumstances. Thus, understanding the mechanisms that maintain and control OPC fate and differentiation into mature OLs in a hostile, non-permissive lesion environment may open new opportunities for regenerative therapies. In this review, we will focus on 1) the plasticity of OPCs in terms of their developmental origins, distribution, and differentiation potentials in the normal and injured brain; 2) recent discoveries of extrinsic and intrinsic factors and small molecule compounds that control OPC specification and differentiation; and 3) therapeutic potential for motivation of neural progenitor cells and reprogramming of differentiated cells into OPCs and their likely impacts on remyelination. OL-based therapies through activating regenerative potentials of OPCs or cell replacement offer exciting opportunities for innovative strategies to promote remyelination and neuroprotection in devastating demyelinating diseases like MS. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI:NG2-glia(Invited only). PMID:26546966

  2. Metabolic Reprograming of Mononuclear Phagocytes in Progressive Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Tannahill, Gillian Margaret; Iraci, Nunzio; Gaude, Edoardo; Frezza, Christian; Pluchino, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory and demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS). Accumulation of brain damage in progressive MS is partly the result of mononuclear phagocytes (MPs) attacking myelin sheaths in the CNS. Although there is no cure yet for MS, significant advances have been made in the development of disease modifying agents. Unfortunately, most of these drugs fail to reverse established neurological deficits and can have adverse effects. Recent evidence suggests that MPs polarization is accompanied by profound metabolic changes, whereby pro-inflammatory MPs (M1) switch toward glycolysis, whereas anti-inflammatory MPs (M2) become more oxidative. It is therefore possible that reprograming MPs metabolism could affect their function and repress immune cell activation. This mini review describes the metabolic changes underpinning macrophages polarization and anticipates how metabolic re-education of MPs could be used for the treatment of MS. Key points: Inflammation in progressive MS is mediated primarily by MPs.Cell metabolism regulates the function of MPs.DMAs can re-educate the metabolism of MPs to promote healing. PMID:25814990

  3. Quantitative Phosphoproteomics Reveals Extensive Cellular Reprogramming During HIV-1 Entry

    PubMed Central

    Wojcechowskyj, Jason A.; Didigu, Chuka A.; Lee, Jessica Y.; Parrish, Nicholas F.; Sinha, Rohini; Hahn, Beatrice H.; Bushman, Frederic D.; Jensen, Shane T.; Seeholzer, Steven H.; Doms, Robert W.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Receptor engagement by HIV-1 during host cell entry activates signaling pathways that can reprogram the cell for optimal viral replication. To obtain a global view of the signaling events induced during HIV-1 entry, we conducted a quantitative phosphoproteomics screen of primary human CD4+ T cell after infection with an HIV-1 strain that engages the receptors CD4 and CXCR4. We quantified 1,757 phosphorylation sites with high stringency. The abundance of 239 phosphorylation sites from 175 genes, including several proteins in pathways known to be impacted by HIV-receptor binding, changed significantly within a minute after HIV-1 exposure. Several previously uncharacterized HIV-1 host factors were also identified and confirmed through RNAi depletion studies. Surprisingly, 5 serine/arginine-rich (SR)-proteins involved in mRNA splicing, including the splicing factor SRm300 (SRRM2) were differentially phosophorylated. Mechanistic studies with SRRM2 suggest that HIV-1 modulates host cell alternative splicing machinery during entry in order to facilitate virus replication and release. PMID:23684312

  4. Metabolic reprogramming: a new relevant pathway in adult adrenocortical tumors

    PubMed Central

    Longatto-Filho, Adhemar; Faria, André M.; Fragoso, Maria C. B. V.; Lovisolo, Silvana M.; Lerário, Antonio M.; Almeida, Madson Q.

    2015-01-01

    Adrenocortical carcinomas (ACCs) are complex neoplasias that may present unexpected clinical behavior, being imperative to identify new biological markers that can predict patient prognosis and provide new therapeutic options. The main aim of the present study was to evaluate the prognostic value of metabolism-related key proteins in adrenocortical carcinoma. The immunohistochemical expression of MCT1, MCT2, MCT4, CD147, CD44, GLUT1 and CAIX was evaluated in a series of 154 adult patients with adrenocortical neoplasia and associated with patients' clinicopathological parameters. A significant increase in was found for membranous expression of MCT4, GLUT1 and CAIX in carcinomas, when compared to adenomas. Importantly MCT1, GLUT1 and CAIX expressions were significantly associated with poor prognostic variables, including high nuclear grade, high mitotic index, advanced tumor staging, presence of metastasis, as well as shorter overall and disease free survival. In opposition, MCT2 membranous expression was associated with favorable prognostic parameters. Importantly, cytoplasmic expression of CD147 was identified as an independent predictor of longer overall survival and cytoplasmic expression of CAIX as an independent predictor of longer disease-free survival. We provide evidence for a metabolic reprogramming in adrenocortical malignant tumors towards the hyperglycolytic and acid-resistant phenotype, which was associated with poor prognosis. PMID:26587828

  5. Reprogramming cellular events by poly(ADP-ribose)-binding proteins

    PubMed Central

    Pic, Émilie; Ethier, Chantal; Dawson, Ted M.; Dawson, Valina L.; Masson, Jean-Yves; Poirier, Guy G.; Gagné, Jean-Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation is a posttranslational modification catalyzed by the poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs). These enzymes covalently modify glutamic, aspartic and lysine amino acid side chains of acceptor proteins by the sequential addition of ADP-ribose (ADPr) units. The poly(ADP-ribose) (pADPr) polymers formed alter the physico-chemical characteristics of the substrate with functional consequences on its biological activities. Recently, non-covalent binding to pADPr has emerged as a key mechanism to modulate and coordinate several intracellular pathways including the DNA damage response, protein stability and cell death. In this review, we describe the basis of non-covalent binding to pADPr that has led to the emerging concept of pADPr-responsive signaling pathways. This review emphasizes the structural elements and the modular strategies developed by pADPr-binding proteins to exert a fine-tuned control of a variety of pathways. Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation reactions are highly regulated processes, both spatially and temporally, for which at least four specialized pADPr-binding modules accommodate different pADPr structures and reprogram protein functions. In this review, we highlight the role of well-characterized and newly discovered pADPr-binding modules in a diverse set of physiological functions. PMID:23268355

  6. Niche adaptation by expansion and reprogramming of general transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Turkarslan, Serdar; Reiss, David J; Gibbins, Goodwin; Su, Wan Lin; Pan, Min; Bare, J Christopher; Plaisier, Christopher L; Baliga, Nitin S

    2011-01-01

    Numerous lineage-specific expansions of the transcription factor B (TFB) family in archaea suggests an important role for expanded TFBs in encoding environment-specific gene regulatory programs. Given the characteristics of hypersaline lakes, the unusually large numbers of TFBs in halophilic archaea further suggests that they might be especially important in rapid adaptation to the challenges of a dynamically changing environment. Motivated by these observations, we have investigated the implications of TFB expansions by correlating sequence variations, regulation, and physical interactions of all seven TFBs in Halobacterium salinarum NRC-1 to their fitness landscapes, functional hierarchies, and genetic interactions across 2488 experiments covering combinatorial variations in salt, pH, temperature, and Cu stress. This systems analysis has revealed an elegant scheme in which completely novel fitness landscapes are generated by gene conversion events that introduce subtle changes to the regulation or physical interactions of duplicated TFBs. Based on these insights, we have introduced a synthetically redesigned TFB and altered the regulation of existing TFBs to illustrate how archaea can rapidly generate novel phenotypes by simply reprogramming their TFB regulatory network. PMID:22108796

  7. Oligodendrocyte progenitor programming and reprogramming: Toward myelin regeneration.

    PubMed

    Lopez Juarez, Alejandro; He, Danyang; Richard Lu, Q

    2016-05-01

    Demyelinating diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS) are among the most disabling and cost-intensive neurological disorders. The loss of myelin in the central nervous system, produced by oligodendrocytes (OLs), impairs saltatory nerve conduction, leading to motor and cognitive deficits. Immunosuppression therapy has a limited efficacy in MS patients, arguing for a paradigm shift to strategies that target OL lineage cells to achieve myelin repair. The inhibitory microenvironment in MS lesions abrogates the expansion and differentiation of resident OL precursor cells (OPCs) into mature myelin-forming OLs. Recent studies indicate that OPCs display a highly plastic ability to differentiate into alternative cell lineages under certain circumstances. Thus, understanding the mechanisms that maintain and control OPC fate and differentiation into mature OLs in a hostile, non-permissive lesion environment may open new opportunities for regenerative therapies. In this review, we will focus on 1) the plasticity of OPCs in terms of their developmental origins, distribution, and differentiation potentials in the normal and injured brain; 2) recent discoveries of extrinsic and intrinsic factors and small molecule compounds that control OPC specification and differentiation; and 3) therapeutic potential for motivation of neural progenitor cells and reprogramming of differentiated cells into OPCs and their likely impacts on remyelination. OL-based therapies through activating regenerative potentials of OPCs or cell replacement offer exciting opportunities for innovative strategies to promote remyelination and neuroprotection in devastating demyelinating diseases like MS. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI:NG2-glia(Invited only).

  8. Resetting Epigenetic Memory by Reprogramming of Histone Modifications in Mammals.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Hui; Huang, Bo; Zhang, Bingjie; Xiang, Yunlong; Du, Zhenhai; Xu, Qianhua; Li, Yuanyuan; Wang, Qiujun; Ma, Jing; Peng, Xu; Xu, Feng; Xie, Wei

    2016-09-15

    Polycomb group proteins and the related histone modification H3K27me3 can maintain the silencing of key developmental regulators and provide cellular memory. However, how such an epigenetic state is reprogrammed and inherited between generations is poorly understood. Using an ultra-sensitive approach, STAR ChIP-seq, we investigated H3K27me3 across 14 developmental stages along mouse gametogenesis and early development. Interestingly, highly pervasive H3K27me3 is found in regions depleted of transcription and DNA methylation in oocytes. Unexpectedly, we observed extensive loss of promoter H3K27me3 at Hox and other developmental genes upon fertilization. This is accompanied by global erasure of sperm H3K27me3 but inheritance of distal H3K27me3 from oocytes. The resulting allele-specific H3K27me3 patterns persist to blastocysts before being converted to canonical forms in postimplantation embryos, where both H3K4me3/H3K27me3 bivalent promoter marks are restored at developmental genes. Together, these data revealed widespread resetting of epigenetic memory and striking plasticity of epigenome during gametogenesis and early development. PMID:27635762

  9. Lin28 enhances tissue repair by reprogramming cellular metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Shyh-Chang, Ng; Zhu, Hao; de Soysa, T. Yvanka; Shinoda, Gen; Seligson, Marc T.; Tsanov, Kaloyan M.; Nguyen, Liem; Asara, John M.; Cantley, Lewis C.; Daley, George Q.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Regeneration capacity declines with age, but why juvenile organisms show enhanced tissue repair remains unexplained. Lin28a, a highly-conserved RNA binding protein expressed during embryogenesis, plays roles in development, pluripotency and metabolism. To determine if Lin28a might influence tissue repair in adults, we engineered the reactivation of Lin28a expression in several models of tissue injury. Lin28a reactivation improved hair regrowth by promoting anagen in hair follicles, and accelerated regrowth of cartilage, bone and mesenchyme after ear and digit injuries. Lin28a inhibits let-7 microRNA biogenesis; however let-7 repression was necessary but insufficient to enhance repair. Lin28a bound to and enhanced the translation of mRNAs for several metabolic enzymes, thereby increasing glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation (OxPhos). Lin28a-mediated enhancement of tissue repair was negated by OxPhos inhibition, whereas a pharmacologically-induced increase in OxPhos enhanced repair. Thus, Lin28a enhances tissue repair in some adult tissues by reprogramming cellular bioenergetics. PMID:24209617

  10. TRAF3 deficiency promotes metabolic reprogramming in B cells

    PubMed Central

    Mambetsariev, Nurbek; Lin, Wai W.; Wallis, Alicia M.; Stunz, Laura L.; Bishop, Gail A.

    2016-01-01

    The adaptor protein TNF receptor-associated factor 3 (TRAF3) is a critical regulator of B lymphocyte survival. B cell-specific TRAF3 deficiency results in enhanced viability and is associated with development of lymphoma and multiple myeloma. We show that TRAF3 deficiency led to induction of two proteins important for glucose metabolism, Glut1 and Hexokinase 2 (HXK2). This was associated with increased glucose uptake. In the absence of TRAF3, anaerobic glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation were increased in B cells without changes in mitochondrial mass or reactive oxygen species. Chemical inhibition of glucose metabolism or glucose deprivation substantially attenuated the enhanced survival of TRAF3-deficient B cells, with a decrease in the pro-survival protein Mcl-1. Changes in Glut1 and Mcl-1 levels, glucose uptake and B cell number in the absence of TRAF3 were all dependent upon NF-κB inducing kinase (NIK). These results indicate that TRAF3 deficiency suffices to metabolically reprogram B cells, a finding that improves our understanding of the role of TRAF3 as a tumor suppressor, and suggests potential therapeutic strategies. PMID:27752131

  11. Epigenetic reprogramming in mammalian reproduction: contribution from histone variants.

    PubMed

    Santenard, Angèle; Torres-Padilla, Maria-Elena

    2009-02-16

    Development of the mammalian embryo is, by definition, epigenetic. At the level of the nucleosome, the building block of the chromatin, changes in chromatin structure can be regulated through histone content. Apart from the canonical histones whose synthesis is restricted to S-phase, different histone variants have been identified. Histone variants can help to establish specialised chromatin regions and to regulate developmental and cell differentiation processes. While the role of histone variants has been extensively explored in differentiated cells, less is known in germ cells and embryos. Increasing lines of evidence suggest that the functions and/or properties of histone variants in embryos might be different to those in somatic cells. During reprogramming, histone variants such as H3.3 or H2A.Z are candidates to play potential important roles. We suggest that H3.3 has an important role in setting up a 'transition' signature, and provides the possibility to infer changes in chromatin architecture independent of DNA replication. This should confer flexibility during important developmental processes. The specific pathways through which H3.3 could regulate different chromatin conformations at different loci and the identification of specific proteins responsible for this deposition are an important challenge for future investigation. Lastly, the set of variants incorporated within the nucleosome can have important consequences in the regulation of epigenetic mechanisms during development. PMID:19242119

  12. Resetting Epigenetic Memory by Reprogramming of Histone Modifications in Mammals.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Hui; Huang, Bo; Zhang, Bingjie; Xiang, Yunlong; Du, Zhenhai; Xu, Qianhua; Li, Yuanyuan; Wang, Qiujun; Ma, Jing; Peng, Xu; Xu, Feng; Xie, Wei

    2016-09-15

    Polycomb group proteins and the related histone modification H3K27me3 can maintain the silencing of key developmental regulators and provide cellular memory. However, how such an epigenetic state is reprogrammed and inherited between generations is poorly understood. Using an ultra-sensitive approach, STAR ChIP-seq, we investigated H3K27me3 across 14 developmental stages along mouse gametogenesis and early development. Interestingly, highly pervasive H3K27me3 is found in regions depleted of transcription and DNA methylation in oocytes. Unexpectedly, we observed extensive loss of promoter H3K27me3 at Hox and other developmental genes upon fertilization. This is accompanied by global erasure of sperm H3K27me3 but inheritance of distal H3K27me3 from oocytes. The resulting allele-specific H3K27me3 patterns persist to blastocysts before being converted to canonical forms in postimplantation embryos, where both H3K4me3/H3K27me3 bivalent promoter marks are restored at developmental genes. Together, these data revealed widespread resetting of epigenetic memory and striking plasticity of epigenome during gametogenesis and early development.

  13. Engineering a synthetic cell panel to identify signalling components reprogrammed by the cell growth regulator anterior gradient-2.

    PubMed

    Gray, Terry A; Alsamman, Khaldoon; Murray, Euan; Sims, Andrew H; Hupp, Ted R

    2014-06-01

    AGR2 forms an ER-resident signalling axis in cell development, limb regeneration, and in human diseases like asthma and cancer, yet molecular mechanisms underlying its effects remain largely undefined. A single integrated Flippase recombination target (FRT) site was engineered within the AGR2-non expressing A375 cell line to allow integration of a constitutively expressed AGR2 alleles. This allows an analysis of how AGR2 protein expression reprogrammes intracellular signalling. The engineered expression of AGR2 had marginal impact on global transcription signalling, compared to its paralogue AGR3. However, expression of AGR2 had a significant impact on remodelling the cellular proteome using a triple-labelled SILAC protocol. 29 045 peptides were detected for the identification and relative quantitation of 3003 proteins across the experimental conditions. Ingenuity Pathway annotation highlighted the dominant pathway suppressed by wt-AGR2 was the p53-signalling axis. DNA damage induced p53 stabilization and p21 induction by cisplatin treatment confirmed that wt-AGR2 expression suppressed the p53 pathway. The furthest outlying SILAC protein expression change induced by AGR2 was the anti-viral and cell cycle regulator tumour susceptibility gene 101 (TSG101), confirmed by immunoblotting. Transfection of TSG101 into MCF7 (AGR2+, oestrogen dependent), A549 (AGR2+, oestrogen independent) or A375 (AGR2-) cells confirmed that TSG101 attenuates p53 signalling. These systems wide screens suggest that the most dominant landscape reprogrammed by low levels of AGR2 protein is the cellular proteome, rather than the transcriptome, and provide focus for evaluating its role in proteostasis.

  14. Dynamic transcriptome analysis and volatile profiling of Gossypium hirsutum in response to the cotton bollworm Helicoverpa armigera

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xin-Zheng; Chen, Jie-Yin; Xiao, Hai-Jun; Xiao, Yu-Tao; Wu, Juan; Wu, Jun-Xiang; Zhou, Jing-Jiang; Zhang, Yong-Jun; Guo, Yu-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    In response to insect herbivory, plants emit elevated levels of volatile organic compounds for direct and indirect resistance. However, little is known about the molecular and genomic basis of defense response that insect herbivory trigger in cotton plants and how defense mechanisms are orchestrated in the context of other biological processes. Here we monitored the transcriptome changes and volatile characteristics of cotton plants in response to cotton bollworm (CBW; Helicoverpa armigera) larvae infestation. Analysis of samples revealed that 1,969 transcripts were differentially expressed (log2|Ratio| ≥ 2; q ≤ 0.05) after CBW infestation. Cluster analysis identified several distinct temporal patterns of transcriptome changes. Among CBW-induced genes, those associated with indirect defense and jasmonic acid pathway were clearly over-represented, indicating that these genes play important roles in CBW-induced defenses. The gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analyses revealed that CBW infestation could induce cotton plants to release volatile compounds comprised lipoxygenase-derived green leaf volatiles and a number of terpenoid volatiles. Responding to CBW larvae infestation, cotton plants undergo drastic reprogramming of the transcriptome and the volatile profile. The present results increase our knowledge about insect herbivory-induced metabolic and biochemical processes in plants, which may help improve future studies on genes governing processes. PMID:26148847

  15. Dynamic transcriptome analysis and volatile profiling of Gossypium hirsutum in response to the cotton bollworm Helicoverpa armigera.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xin-Zheng; Chen, Jie-Yin; Xiao, Hai-Jun; Xiao, Yu-Tao; Wu, Juan; Wu, Jun-Xiang; Zhou, Jing-Jiang; Zhang, Yong-Jun; Guo, Yu-Yuan

    2015-07-07

    In response to insect herbivory, plants emit elevated levels of volatile organic compounds for direct and indirect resistance. However, little is known about the molecular and genomic basis of defense response that insect herbivory trigger in cotton plants and how defense mechanisms are orchestrated in the context of other biological processes. Here we monitored the transcriptome changes and volatile characteristics of cotton plants in response to cotton bollworm (CBW; Helicoverpa armigera) larvae infestation. Analysis of samples revealed that 1,969 transcripts were differentially expressed (log2|Ratio| ≥ 2; q ≤ 0.05) after CBW infestation. Cluster analysis identified several distinct temporal patterns of transcriptome changes. Among CBW-induced genes, those associated with indirect defense and jasmonic acid pathway were clearly over-represented, indicating that these genes play important roles in CBW-induced defenses. The gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analyses revealed that CBW infestation could induce cotton plants to release volatile compounds comprised lipoxygenase-derived green leaf volatiles and a number of terpenoid volatiles. Responding to CBW larvae infestation, cotton plants undergo drastic reprogramming of the transcriptome and the volatile profile. The present results increase our knowledge about insect herbivory-induced metabolic and biochemical processes in plants, which may help improve future studies on genes governing processes.

  16. Transcriptome landscape of perennial wild Cicer microphyllum uncovers functionally relevant molecular tags regulating agronomic traits in chickpea

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Rishi; Bajaj, Deepak; Malik, Ayushi; Singh, Mohar; Parida, Swarup K.

    2016-01-01

    The RNA-sequencing followed by de-novo transcriptome assembly identified 11621 genes differentially xpressed in roots vs. shoots of a wild perennial Cicer microphyllum. Comparative analysis of transcriptomes between microphyllum and cultivated desi cv. ICC4958 detected 12772 including 3242 root- and 1639 shoot-specific microphyllum genes with 85% expression validation success rate. Transcriptional reprogramming of microphyllum root-specific genes implicates their possible role in regulating differential natural adaptive characteristics between wild and cultivated chickpea. The transcript-derived 5698 including 282 in-silico polymorphic SSR and 127038 SNP markers annotated at a genome-wide scale exhibited high amplification and polymorphic potential among cultivated (desi and kabuli) and wild accessions suggesting their utility in chickpea genomics-assisted breeding applications. The functional significance of markers was assessed based on their localization in non-synonymous coding and regulatory regions of microphyllum root-specific genes differentially expressed predominantly in ICC 4958 roots under drought stress. A high-density 490 genic SSR- and SNP markers-anchored genetic linkage map identified six major QTLs regulating drought tolerance-related traits, yield per plant and harvest-index in chickpea. The integration of high-resolution QTL mapping with comparative transcriptome profiling delineated five microphyllum root-specific genes with non-synonymous and regulatory SNPs governing drought-responsive yield traits. Multiple potential key regulators and functionally relevant molecular tags delineated can drive translational research and drought tolerance-mediated chickpea genetic enhancement. PMID:27680662

  17. Nitrate sensing by the maize root apex transition zone: a merged transcriptomic and proteomic survey.

    PubMed

    Trevisan, Sara; Manoli, Alessandro; Ravazzolo, Laura; Botton, Alessandro; Pivato, Micaela; Masi, Antonio; Quaggiotti, Silvia

    2015-07-01

    Nitrate is an essential nutrient for plants, and crops depend on its availability for growth and development, but its presence in agricultural soils is far from stable. In order to overcome nitrate fluctuations in soil, plants have developed adaptive mechanisms allowing them to grow despite changes in external nitrate availability. Nitrate can act as both nutrient and signal, regulating global gene expression in plants, and the root tip has been proposed as the sensory organ. A set of genome-wide studies has demonstrated several nitrate-regulated genes in the roots of many plants, although only a few studies have been carried out on distinct root zones. To unravel new details of the transcriptomic and proteomic responses to nitrate availability in a major food crop, a double untargeted approach was conducted on a transition zone-enriched root portion of maize seedlings subjected to differing nitrate supplies. The results highlighted a complex transcriptomic and proteomic reprogramming that occurs in response to nitrate, emphasizing the role of this root zone in sensing and transducing nitrate signal. Our findings indicated a relationship of nitrate with biosynthesis and signalling of several phytohormones, such as auxin, strigolactones, and brassinosteroids. Moreover, the already hypothesized involvement of nitric oxide in the early response to nitrate was confirmed with the use of nitric oxide inhibitors. Our results also suggested that cytoskeleton activation and cell wall modification occurred in response to nitrate provision in the transition zone.

  18. Extensive tissue-specific transcriptomic plasticity in maize primary roots upon water deficit

    PubMed Central

    Opitz, Nina; Marcon, Caroline; Paschold, Anja; Malik, Waqas Ahmed; Lithio, Andrew; Brandt, Ronny; Piepho, Hans-Peter; Nettleton, Dan; Hochholdinger, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Water deficit is the most important environmental constraint severely limiting global crop growth and productivity. This study investigated early transcriptome changes in maize (Zea mays L.) primary root tissues in response to moderate water deficit conditions by RNA-Sequencing. Differential gene expression analyses revealed a high degree of plasticity of the water deficit response. The activity status of genes (active/inactive) was determined by a Bayesian hierarchical model. In total, 70% of expressed genes were constitutively active in all tissues. In contrast, <3% (50 genes) of water deficit-responsive genes (1915) were consistently regulated in all tissues, while >75% (1501 genes) were specifically regulated in a single root tissue. Water deficit-responsive genes were most numerous in the cortex of the mature root zone and in the elongation zone. The most prominent functional categories among differentially expressed genes in all tissues were ‘transcriptional regulation’ and ‘hormone metabolism’, indicating global reprogramming of cellular metabolism as an adaptation to water deficit. Additionally, the most significant transcriptomic changes in the root tip were associated with cell wall reorganization, leading to continued root growth despite water deficit conditions. This study provides insight into tissue-specific water deficit responses and will be a resource for future genetic analyses and breeding strategies to develop more drought-tolerant maize cultivars. PMID:26463995

  19. Nitrate sensing by the maize root apex transition zone: a merged transcriptomic and proteomic survey

    PubMed Central

    Trevisan, Sara; Manoli, Alessandro; Ravazzolo, Laura; Botton, Alessandro; Pivato, Micaela; Masi, Antonio; Quaggiotti, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Nitrate is an essential nutrient for plants, and crops depend on its availability for growth and development, but its presence in agricultural soils is far from stable. In order to overcome nitrate fluctuations in soil, plants have developed adaptive mechanisms allowing them to grow despite changes in external nitrate availability. Nitrate can act as both nutrient and signal, regulating global gene expression in plants, and the root tip has been proposed as the sensory organ. A set of genome-wide studies has demonstrated several nitrate-regulated genes in the roots of many plants, although only a few studies have been carried out on distinct root zones. To unravel new details of the transcriptomic and proteomic responses to nitrate availability in a major food crop, a double untargeted approach was conducted on a transition zone-enriched root portion of maize seedlings subjected to differing nitrate supplies. The results highlighted a complex transcriptomic and proteomic reprogramming that occurs in response to nitrate, emphasizing the role of this root zone in sensing and transducing nitrate signal. Our findings indicated a relationship of nitrate with biosynthesis and signalling of several phytohormones, such as auxin, strigolactones, and brassinosteroids. Moreover, the already hypothesized involvement of nitric oxide in the early response to nitrate was confirmed with the use of nitric oxide inhibitors. Our results also suggested that cytoskeleton activation and cell wall modification occurred in response to nitrate provision in the transition zone. PMID:25911739

  20. Transcriptional Mechanisms of Proneural Factors and REST in Regulating Neuronal Reprogramming of Astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Masserdotti, Giacomo; Gillotin, Sébastien; Sutor, Bernd; Drechsel, Daniela; Irmler, Martin; Jørgensen, Helle F.; Sass, Steffen; Theis, Fabian J.; Beckers, Johannes; Berninger, Benedikt; Guillemot, François; Götz, Magdalena

    2015-01-01

    Summary Direct lineage reprogramming induces dramatic shifts in cellular identity, employing poorly understood mechanisms. Recently, we demonstrated that expression of Neurog2 or Ascl1 in postnatal mouse astrocytes generates glutamatergic or GABAergic neurons. Here, we take advantage of this model to study dynamics of neuronal cell fate acquisition at the transcriptional level. We found that Neurog2 and Ascl1 rapidly elicited distinct neurogenic programs with only a small subset of shared target genes. Within this subset, only NeuroD4 could by itself induce neuronal reprogramming in both mouse and human astrocytes, while co-expression with Insm1 was required for glutamatergic maturation. Cultured astrocytes gradually became refractory to reprogramming, in part by the repressor REST preventing Neurog2 from binding to the NeuroD4 promoter. Notably, in astrocytes refractory to Neurog2 activation, the underlying neurogenic program remained amenable to reprogramming by exogenous NeuroD4. Our findings support a model of temporal hierarchy for cell fate change during neuronal reprogramming. PMID:26119235

  1. Cellular reprogramming for pancreatic β-cell regeneration: clinical potential of small molecule control.

    PubMed

    Pandian, Ganesh N; Taniguchi, Junichi; Sugiyama, Hiroshi

    2014-03-27

    Recent scientific breakthroughs in stem cell biology suggest that a sustainable treatment approach to cure diabetes mellitus (DM) can be achieved in the near future. However, the transplantation complexities and the difficulty in obtaining the stem cells from adult cells of pancreas, liver, bone morrow and other cells is a major concern. The epoch-making strategy of transcription-factor based cellular reprogramming suggest that these barriers could be overcome, and it is possible to reprogram any cells into functional β cells. Contemporary biological and analytical techniques help us to predict the key transcription factors needed for β-cell regeneration. These β cell-specific transcription factors could be modulated with diverse reprogramming protocols. Among cellular reprogramming strategies, small molecule approach gets proclaimed to have better clinical prospects because it does not involve genetic manipulation. Several small molecules targeting certain epigenetic enzymes and/or signaling pathways have been successful in helping to induce pancreatic β-cell specification. Recently, a synthetic DNA-based small molecule triggered targeted transcriptional activation of pancreas-related genes to suggest the possibility of achieving desired cellular phenotype in a precise mode. Here, we give a brief overview of treating DM by regenerating pancreatic β-cells from various cell sources. Through a comprehensive overview of the available transcription factors, small molecules and reprogramming strategies available for pancreatic β-cell regeneration, this review compiles the current progress made towards the generation of clinically relevant insulin-producing β-cells.

  2. Epigenetic reprogramming in embryonic and foetal development upon somatic cell nuclear transfer cloning.

    PubMed

    Niemann, Heiner; Tian, X Cindy; King, W Allan; Lee, Rita S F

    2008-02-01

    The birth of 'Dolly', the first mammal cloned from an adult donor cell, has sparked a flurry of research activities to improve cloning technology and to understand the underlying mechanism of epigenetic reprogramming of the transferred somatic cell nucleus. Especially in ruminants, somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) is frequently associated with pathological changes in the foetal and placental phenotype and has significant consequences for development both before and after birth. The most critical factor is epigenetic reprogramming of the transferred somatic cell nucleus from its differentiated status into the totipotent state of the early embryo. This involves an erasure of the gene expression program of the respective donor cell and the establishment of the well-orchestrated sequence of expression of an estimated number of 10 000-12 000 genes regulating embryonic and foetal development. The following article reviews the present knowledge on the epigenetic reprogramming of the transferred somatic cell nucleus, with emphasis on DNA methylation, imprinting, X-chromosome inactivation and telomere length restoration in bovine development. Additionally, we briefly discuss other approaches towards epigenetic nuclear reprogramming, including the fusion of somatic and embryonic stem cells and the overexpression of genes crucial in the formation and maintenance of the pluripotent status. Improvements in our understanding of this dramatic epigenetic reprogramming event will be instrumental in realising the great potential of SCNT for basic biological research and for various agricultural and biomedical applications.

  3. Effects of Collective Histone State Dynamics on Epigenetic Landscape and Kinetics of Cell Reprogramming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashwin, S. S.; Sasai, Masaki

    2015-11-01

    Cell reprogramming is a process of transitions from differentiated to pluripotent cell states via transient intermediate states. Within the epigenetic landscape framework, such a process is regarded as a sequence of transitions among basins on the landscape; therefore, theoretical construction of a model landscape which exhibits experimentally consistent dynamics can provide clues to understanding epigenetic mechanism of reprogramming. We propose a minimal gene-network model of the landscape, in which each gene is regulated by an integrated mechanism of transcription-factor binding/unbinding and the collective chemical modification of histones. We show that the slow collective variation of many histones around each gene locus alters topology of the landscape and significantly affects transition dynamics between basins. Differentiation and reprogramming follow different transition pathways on the calculated landscape, which should be verified experimentally via single-cell pursuit of the reprogramming process. Effects of modulation in collective histone state kinetics on transition dynamics and pathway are examined in search for an efficient protocol of reprogramming.

  4. Effects of Collective Histone State Dynamics on Epigenetic Landscape and Kinetics of Cell Reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Ashwin, S. S.; Sasai, Masaki

    2015-01-01

    Cell reprogramming is a process of transitions from differentiated to pluripotent cell states via transient intermediate states. Within the epigenetic landscape framework, such a process is regarded as a sequence of transitions among basins on the landscape; therefore, theoretical construction of a model landscape which exhibits experimentally consistent dynamics can provide clues to understanding epigenetic mechanism of reprogramming. We propose a minimal gene-network model of the landscape, in which each gene is regulated by an integrated mechanism of transcription-factor binding/unbinding and the collective chemical modification of histones. We show that the slow collective variation of many histones around each gene locus alters topology of the landscape and significantly affects transition dynamics between basins. Differentiation and reprogramming follow different transition pathways on the calculated landscape, which should be verified experimentally via single-cell pursuit of the reprogramming process. Effects of modulation in collective histone state kinetics on transition dynamics and pathway are examined in search for an efficient protocol of reprogramming. PMID:26581803

  5. Germline-derived DNA methylation and early embryo epigenetic reprogramming: The selected survival of imprints.

    PubMed

    Monk, David

    2015-10-01

    DNA methylation is an essential epigenetic mechanism involved in many essential cellular processes. During development epigenetic reprograming takes place during gametogenesis and then again in the pre-implantation embryo. These two reprograming windows ensure genome-wide removal of methylation in the primordial germ cells so that sex-specific signatures can be acquired in the sperm and oocyte. Following fertilization the majority of this epigenetic information is erased to give the developing embryo an epigenetic profile coherent with pluripotency. It is estimated that ∼65% of the genome is differentially methylated between the gametes, however following embryonic reprogramming only parent-of-origin methylation at known imprinted loci remains. This suggests that trans-acting factors such as Zfp57 can discriminate imprinted differentially methylated regions (DMRs) from the thousands of CpG rich regions that are differentially marked in the gametes. Recently transient imprinted DMRs have been identified suggesting that these loci are also protected from pre-implantation reprograming but succumb to de novo remethylation at the implantation stage. This highlights that "ubiquitous" imprinted loci are also resilient to gaining methylation by protecting their unmethylated alleles. In this review I examine the processes involved in epigenetic reprograming and the mechanisms that ensure allelic methylation at imprinted loci is retained throughout the life of the organism, discussing the critical differences between mouse and humans. This article is part of a Directed Issue entitled: Epigenetics Dynamics in development and disease.

  6. Selenium Augments microRNA Directed Reprogramming of Fibroblasts to Cardiomyocytes via Nanog

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaowen; Hodgkinson, Conrad P; Lu, Kefeng; Payne, Alan J; Pratt, Richard E; Dzau, Victor J

    2016-01-01

    We have recently shown that a combination of microRNAs, miR combo, can directly reprogram cardiac fibroblasts into functional cardiomyocytes in vitro and in vivo. However, direct reprogramming strategies are inefficient and slow. Moving towards the eventual goal of clinical application it is necessary to develop new methodologies to overcome these limitations. Here, we report the identification of a specific media composition, reprogramming media (RM), which augmented the effect of miR combo by 5–15-fold depending upon the cardiac marker tested. RM alone was sufficient to strongly induce cardiac gene and protein expression in neonatal tail-tip as well as cardiac fibroblasts. Expression of pluripotency markers Nanog, Oct4, Sox2, and Klf4 was significantly enhanced by RM, with miR combo augmenting the effect further. Knockdown of Nanog by siRNA inhibited the effect of RM on cardiac gene expression. Removal of insulin-transferrin-selenium completely inhibited the effect of reprogramming media upon cardiac gene expression and the addition of selenium to standard culture media recapitulated the effects of RM. Moreover, selenium enhanced the reprogramming efficiency of miR combo. PMID:26975336

  7. Interpretation of reprogramming to predict the success of somatic cell cloning.

    PubMed

    Eckardt, Sigrid; McLaughlin, K John

    2004-07-01

    In the context of mammalian somatic cell cloning, the term reprogramming refers to the processes that enable a somatic cell nucleus to adopt the role of a zygotic nucleus. Gene re-expression is one measure of reprogramming if correlated with subsequent developmental potential. This paper describes several experiments utilizing pre-implantation gene expression to evaluate reprogramming and clone viability. We have established a direct correlation between Oct4 expression in mouse clones at the blastocyst stage and their potential to maintain pluripotent embryonic cells essential for post-implantation development. Furthermore, the quality of gene expression in clones dramatically improves when genetically identical clones are combined in clone-clone aggregate chimeras. Clone--clone aggregates exhibit a higher developmental potential than single clones both in vitro and in vivo. This could be mediated by complementation between blastomeres from epigenetically different clones within the aggregate rather than by the increase in cell number resulting from aggregation. We also discuss the use of tetraploid embryos as a model to evaluate reprogramming using gene expression and demonstrate that somatic cell nuclei can be reprogrammed by blastomeres to re-express embryonic specific genes but not to contribute to post-implantation development.

  8. Generation of islet-like cells from mouse gall bladder by direct ex vivo reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Hickey, Raymond D; Galivo, Feorillo; Schug, Jonathan; Brehm, Michael A; Haft, Annelise; Wang, Yuhan; Benedetti, Eric; Gu, Guoqiang; Magnuson, Mark A; Shultz, Leonard D; Lagasse, Eric; Greiner, Dale L; Kaestner, Klaus H; Grompe, Markus

    2013-01-01

    Cell replacement is an emerging therapy for type 1 diabetes. Pluripotent stem cells have received a lot of attention as a potential source of transplantable β-cells, but their ability to form teratomas poses significant risks. Here, we evaluated the potential of primary mouse gall bladder epithelial cells (GBCs) as targets for ex vivo genetic reprogramming to the β-cell fate. Conditions for robust expansion and genetic transduction of primary GBCs by adenoviral vectors were developed. Using a GFP reporter for insulin, conditions for reprogramming were then optimized. Global expression analysis by RNA-sequencing was used to quantitatively compare reprogrammed GBCs (rGBCs) to true β-cells, revealing both similarities and differences. Adenoviral-mediated expression of NEUROG3, Pdx1, and MafA in GBCs resulted in robust induction of pancreatic endocrine genes, including Ins1, Ins2, Neurod1, Nkx2-2 and Isl1. Furthermore, expression of GBC-specific genes was repressed, including Sox17 and Hes1. Reprogramming was also enhanced by addition of retinoic acid and inhibition of Notch signaling. Importantly, rGBCs were able to engraft long term in vivo and remained insulin-positive for 15 weeks. We conclude that GBCs are a viable source for autologous cell replacement in diabetes, but that complete reprogramming will require further manipulations. PMID:23562832

  9. Akt1/protein kinase B enhances transcriptional reprogramming of fibroblasts to functional cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Huanyu; Dickson, Matthew E.; Kim, Min Soo; Bassel-Duby, Rhonda; Olson, Eric N.

    2015-01-01

    Conversion of fibroblasts to functional cardiomyocytes represents a potential approach for restoring cardiac function after myocardial injury, but the technique thus far has been slow and inefficient. To improve the efficiency of reprogramming fibroblasts to cardiac-like myocytes (iCMs) by cardiac transcription factors [Gata4, Hand2, Mef2c, and Tbx5 (GHMT)], we screened 192 protein kinases and discovered that Akt/protein kinase B dramatically accelerates and amplifies this process in three different types of fibroblasts (mouse embryo, adult cardiac, and tail tip). Approximately 50% of reprogrammed mouse embryo fibroblasts displayed spontaneous beating after 3 wk of induction by Akt plus GHMT. Furthermore, addition of Akt1 to GHMT evoked a more mature cardiac phenotype for iCMs, as seen by enhanced polynucleation, cellular hypertrophy, gene expression, and metabolic reprogramming. Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) and phosphoinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) acted upstream of Akt whereas the mitochondrial target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) and forkhead box o3 (Foxo3a) acted downstream of Akt to influence fibroblast-to-cardiomyocyte reprogramming. These findings provide insights into the molecular basis of cardiac reprogramming and represent an important step toward further application of this technique. PMID:26354121

  10. Reprogramming Müller glia via in vivo cell fusion regenerates murine photoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Sanges, Daniela; Simonte, Giacoma; Di Vicino, Umberto; Romo, Neus; Pinilla, Isabel; Nicolás, Marta; Cosma, Maria Pia

    2016-08-01

    Vision impairments and blindness caused by retinitis pigmentosa result from severe neurodegeneration that leads to a loss of photoreceptors, the specialized light-sensitive neurons that enable vision. Although the mammalian nervous system is unable to replace neurons lost due to degeneration, therapeutic approaches to reprogram resident glial cells to replace retinal neurons have been proposed. Here, we demonstrate that retinal Müller glia can be reprogrammed in vivo into retinal precursors that then differentiate into photoreceptors. We transplanted hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) into retinas affected by photoreceptor degeneration and observed spontaneous cell fusion events between Müller glia and the transplanted cells. Activation of Wnt signaling in the transplanted HSPCs enhanced survival and proliferation of Müller-HSPC hybrids as well as their reprogramming into intermediate photoreceptor precursors. This suggests that Wnt signaling drives the reprogrammed cells toward a photoreceptor progenitor fate. Finally, Müller-HSPC hybrids differentiated into photoreceptors. Transplantation of HSPCs with activated Wnt functionally rescued the retinal degeneration phenotype in rd10 mice, a model for inherited retinitis pigmentosa. Together, these results suggest that photoreceptors can be generated by reprogramming Müller glia and that this approach may have potential as a strategy for reversing retinal degeneration. PMID:27427986

  11. Epigenetic Aberrations Are Not Specific to Transcription Factor-Mediated Reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Tiemann, Ulf; Wu, Guangming; Marthaler, Adele Gabriele; Schöler, Hans Robert; Tapia, Natalia

    2016-01-12

    Somatic cells can be reprogrammed to pluripotency using different methods. In comparison with pluripotent cells obtained through somatic nuclear transfer, induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) exhibit a higher number of epigenetic errors. Furthermore, most of these abnormalities have been described to be intrinsic to the iPSC technology. Here, we investigate whether the aberrant epigenetic patterns detected in iPSCs are specific to transcription factor-mediated reprogramming. We used germline stem cells (GSCs), which are the only adult cell type that can be converted into pluripotent cells (gPSCs) under defined culture conditions, and compared GSC-derived iPSCs and gPSCs at the transcriptional and epigenetic level. Our results show that both reprogramming methods generate indistinguishable states of pluripotency. GSC-derived iPSCs and gPSCs retained similar levels of donor cell-type memory and exhibited comparable numbers of reprogramming errors. Therefore, our study demonstrates that the epigenetic abnormalities detected in iPSCs are not specific to transcription factor-mediated reprogramming. PMID:26711876

  12. RNAi Reveals Phase-Specific Global Regulators of Human Somatic Cell Reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Toh, Cheng-Xu Delon; Chan, Jun-Wei; Chong, Zheng-Shan; Wang, Hao Fei; Guo, Hong Chao; Satapathy, Sandeep; Ma, Dongrui; Goh, Germaine Yen Lin; Khattar, Ekta; Yang, Lin; Tergaonkar, Vinay; Chang, Young-Tae; Collins, James J; Daley, George Q; Wee, Keng Boon; Farran, Chadi A El; Li, Hu; Lim, Yoon-Pin; Bard, Frederic A; Loh, Yuin-Han

    2016-06-21

    Incomplete knowledge of the mechanisms at work continues to hamper efforts to maximize reprogramming efficiency. Here, we present a systematic genome-wide RNAi screen to determine the global regulators during the early stages of human reprogramming. Our screen identifies functional repressors and effectors that act to impede or promote the reprogramming process. Repressors and effectors form close interacting networks in pathways, including RNA processing, G protein signaling, protein ubiquitination, and chromatin modification. Combinatorial knockdown of five repressors (SMAD3, ZMYM2, SFRS11, SAE1, and ESET) synergistically resulted in ∼85% TRA-1-60-positive cells. Removal of the novel splicing factor SFRS11 during reprogramming is accompanied by rapid acquisition of pluripotency-specific spliced forms. Mechanistically, SFRS11 regulates exon skipping and mutually exclusive splicing of transcripts in genes involved in cell differentiation, mRNA splicing, and chromatin modification. Our study provides insights into the reprogramming process, which comprises comprehensive and multi-layered transcriptional, splicing, and epigenetic machineries. PMID:27292646

  13. Critical POU domain residues confer Oct4 uniqueness in somatic cell reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Jin, Wensong; Wang, Lei; Zhu, Fei; Tan, Weiqi; Lin, Wei; Chen, Dahua; Sun, Qinmiao; Xia, Zongping

    2016-01-01

    The POU domain transcription factor Oct4 plays critical roles in self-renewal and pluripotency of embryonic stem cells (ESCs). Together with Sox2, Klf4 and c-Myc, Oct4 can reprogram any other cell types to pluripotency, in which Oct4 is the only factor that cannot be functionally replaced by other POU family members. To investigate the determinant elements of Oct4 uniqueness, we performed Ala scan on all Ser, Thr, Tyr, Lys and Arg of murine Oct4 by testing their capability in somatic cell reprogramming. We uncovered a series of residues that are important for Oct4 functionality, in which almost all of these key residues are within the POU domains making direct interaction with DNA. The Oct4 N- and C-terminal transactivation domains (TADs) are not unique and could be replaced by the Yes-associated protein (YAP) TAD domain to support reprogramming. More importantly, we uncovered two important residues that confer Oct4 uniqueness in somatic cell reprogramming. Our systematic structure-function analyses bring novel mechanistic insight into the molecular basis of how critical residues function together to confer Oct4 uniqueness among POU family for somatic cell reprogramming. PMID:26877091

  14. Overcoming the hurdles for a reproducible generation of human functionally mature reprogrammed neurons

    PubMed Central

    Rubio, Alicia; Taverna, Stefano; Yekhlef, Latefa

    2015-01-01

    The advent of cell reprogramming technologies has widely disclosed the possibility to have direct access to human neurons for experimental and biomedical applications. Human pluripotent stem cells can be instructed in vitro to generate specific neuronal cell types as well as different glial cells. Moreover, new approaches of direct neuronal cell reprogramming can strongly accelerate the generation of different neuronal lineages. However, genetic heterogeneity, reprogramming fidelity, and time in culture of the starting cells can still significantly bias their differentiation efficiency and quality of the neuronal progenies. In addition, reprogrammed human neurons exhibit a very slow pace in gaining a full spectrum of functional properties including physiological levels of membrane excitability, sustained and prolonged action potential firing, mature synaptic currents and synaptic plasticity. This delay poses serious limitations for their significance as biological experimental model and screening platform. We will discuss new approaches of neuronal cell differentiation and reprogramming as well as methods to accelerate the maturation and functional activity of the converted human neurons. PMID:25790823

  15. Effects of Collective Histone State Dynamics on Epigenetic Landscape and Kinetics of Cell Reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Ashwin, S S; Sasai, Masaki

    2015-01-01

    Cell reprogramming is a process of transitions from differentiated to pluripotent cell states via transient intermediate states. Within the epigenetic landscape framework, such a process is regarded as a sequence of transitions among basins on the landscape; therefore, theoretical construction of a model landscape which exhibits experimentally consistent dynamics can provide clues to understanding epigenetic mechanism of reprogramming. We propose a minimal gene-network model of the landscape, in which each gene is regulated by an integrated mechanism of transcription-factor binding/unbinding and the collective chemical modification of histones. We show that the slow collective variation of many histones around each gene locus alters topology of the landscape and significantly affects transition dynamics between basins. Differentiation and reprogramming follow different transition pathways on the calculated landscape, which should be verified experimentally via single-cell pursuit of the reprogramming process. Effects of modulation in collective histone state kinetics on transition dynamics and pathway are examined in search for an efficient protocol of reprogramming. PMID:26581803

  16. Reprogramming of ovine adult fibroblasts to pluripotency via drug-inducible expression of defined factors.

    PubMed

    Bao, Lei; He, Lixiazi; Chen, Jijun; Wu, Zhao; Liao, Jing; Rao, Lingjun; Ren, Jiangtao; Li, Hui; Zhu, Hui; Qian, Lei; Gu, Yijun; Dai, Huimin; Xu, Xun; Zhou, Jinqiu; Wang, Wen; Cui, Chun; Xiao, Lei

    2011-04-01

    Reprogramming of somatic cells in the enucleated egg made Dolly, the sheep, the first successfully cloned mammal in 1996. However, the mechanism of sheep somatic cell reprogramming has not yet been addressed. Moreover, sheep embryonic stem (ES) cells are still not available, which limits the generation of precise gene-modified sheep. In this study, we report that sheep somatic cells can be directly reprogrammed to induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells using defined factors (Oct4, Sox2, c-Myc, Klf4, Nanog, Lin28, SV40 large T and hTERT). Our observations indicated that somatic cells from sheep are more difficult to reprogram than somatic cells from other species, in which iPS cells have been reported. We demonstrated that sheep iPS cells express ES cell markers, including alkaline phosphatase, Oct4, Nanog, Sox2, Rex1, stage-specific embryonic antigen-1, TRA-1-60, TRA-1-81 and E-cadherin. Sheep iPS cells exhibited normal karyotypes and were able to differentiate into all three germ layers both in vitro and in teratomas. Our study may help to reveal the mechanism of somatic cell reprogramming in sheep and provide a platform to explore the culture conditions for sheep ES cells. Moreover, sheep iPS cells may be directly used to generate precise gene-modified sheep. PMID:21221129

  17. Transcriptomics of the human endometrium.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Gimeno, Patricia; Ruíz-Alonso, Maria; Blesa, David; Simón, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    During the mid-secretory phase, the endometrium acquires the receptive phenotype, which corresponds to the only period throughout the endometrial cycle in which embryo implantation is viable. Endometrial receptivity is a crucial process and even more important in Assisted Reproductive Technologies (ART) where embryo-endometrial synchronization is coordinated through embryo transfer timing. Over the last decade, transcriptomic analyses performed on the human endometrium have shown that specific genomic signatures can be used to successfully phenotype different phases of the menstrual cycle including the receptive stage, independently of the histological appereance of the endometrial tissue. In this paper, we review current evidence demonstrating that endometrial transcriptomics objectively identifies the implantation window in a personalized manner, opening the field for the diagnosis of the endometrial factor in ART and moving to stratified medicine at this level, using microarray technology and soon high-throughput next generation sequencing coupled with functional and systems genomics approach. PMID:25023678

  18. Human Saliva Proteome and Transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    Hu, S.; Li, Y.; Wang, J.; Xie, Y.; Tjon, K.; Wolinsky, L.; Loo, R.R.O.; Loo, J.A.; Wong, D.T.

    2007-01-01

    This paper tests the hypothesis that salivary proteins and their counterpart mRNAs co-exist in human whole saliva. Global profiling of human saliva proteomes and transcriptomes by mass spectrometry (MS) and expression microarray technologies, respectively, revealed many similarities between saliva proteins and mRNAs. Of the function-known proteins identified in saliva, from 61 to 70% were also found present as mRNA transcripts. For genes not detected at both protein and mRNA levels, we made further efforts to determine if the counterpart is present. Of 19 selected genes detected only at the protein level, the mRNAs of 13 (68%) genes were found in saliva by RT-PCR. In contrast, of many mRNAs detected only by microarrays, their protein products were found in saliva, as reported previously by other investigators. The saliva transcriptome may provide preliminary insights into the boundary of the saliva proteome. PMID:17122167

  19. Hypothesis: Activation of Rapid Signaling by Environmental Estrogens and Epigenetic Reprogramming in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Treviño, Lindsey S.; Wang, Quan; Walker, Cheryl L.

    2015-01-01

    Environmental and lifestyle factors are considered significant components of the increasing breast cancer risk in the last 50 years. Specifically, exposure to environmental endocrine disrupting compounds is correlated with cancer susceptibility in a variety of tissues. In both human and rodent models, the exposure to ubiquitous environmental estrogens during early life has been shown to disrupt normal mammary development and cause permanent adverse effects. Recent studies indicate that environmental estrogens not only have the ability to disrupt estrogen receptor (ER) signaling, but can also reprogram the epigenome by altering DNA and histone methylation through rapid, nongenomic ER actions. We have observed xenoestrogen-mediated activation of several nongenomic signaling pathways and have identified a target for epigenetic reprogramming in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. These observations, in addition to data from the literature, support the hypothesis that activation of rapid signaling by environmental estrogens can lead to epigenetic reprogramming and contribute to the progression of breast cancer. PMID:25554384

  20. Global gene expression profiles reveal significant nuclear reprogramming by the blastocyst stage after cloning.

    PubMed

    Smith, Sadie L; Everts, Robin E; Tian, X Cindy; Du, Fuliang; Sung, Li-Ying; Rodriguez-Zas, Sandra L; Jeong, Byeong-Seon; Renard, Jean-Paul; Lewin, Harris A; Yang, Xiangzhong

    2005-12-01

    Nuclear transfer (NT) has potential applications in agriculture and biomedicine, but the technology is hindered by low efficiency. Global gene expression analysis of clones is important for the comprehensive study of nuclear reprogramming. Here, we compared global gene expression profiles of individual bovine NT blastocysts with their somatic donor cells and fertilized control embryos using cDNA microarray technology. The NT embryos' gene expression profiles were drastically different from those of their donor cells and closely resembled those of the naturally fertilized embryos. Our findings demonstrate that the NT embryos have undergone significant nuclear reprogramming by the blastocyst stage; however, problems may occur during redifferentiation for tissue genesis and organogenesis, and small reprogramming errors may be magnified downstream in development.

  1. Transient acquisition of pluripotency during somatic cell transdifferentiation with iPSC reprogramming factors.

    PubMed

    Maza, Itay; Caspi, Inbal; Zviran, Asaf; Chomsky, Elad; Rais, Yoach; Viukov, Sergey; Geula, Shay; Buenrostro, Jason D; Weinberger, Leehee; Krupalnik, Vladislav; Hanna, Suhair; Zerbib, Mirie; Dutton, James R; Greenleaf, William J; Massarwa, Rada; Novershtern, Noa; Hanna, Jacob H

    2015-07-01

    Somatic cells can be transdifferentiated to other cell types without passing through a pluripotent state by ectopic expression of appropriate transcription factors. Recent reports have proposed an alternative transdifferentiation method in which fibroblasts are directly converted to various mature somatic cell types by brief expression of the induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) reprogramming factors Oct4, Sox2, Klf4 and c-Myc (OSKM) followed by cell expansion in media that promote lineage differentiation. Here we test this method using genetic lineage tracing for expression of endogenous Nanog and Oct4 and for X chromosome reactivation, as these events mark acquisition of pluripotency. We show that the vast majority of reprogrammed cardiomyocytes or neural stem cells obtained from mouse fibroblasts by OSKM-induced 'transdifferentiation' pass through a transient pluripotent state, and that their derivation is molecularly coupled to iPSC formation mechanisms. Our findings underscore the importance of defining trajectories during cell reprogramming by various methods.

  2. Murine somatic cell nuclear transfer using reprogrammed donor cells expressing male germ cell-specific genes.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hoin; Park, Jong Im; Roh, Sangho

    2016-01-01

    In vivo-matured mouse oocytes were enucleated, and a single murine embryonic fibroblast (control or reprogrammed by introducing extracts from murine testis tissue, which showed expression of male germ cell-specific genes) was injected into the cytoplasm of the oocytes. The rate of blastocyst development and expression levels of Oct-4, Eomes and Cdx-2 were not significantly different in both experimental groups. However, the expression levels of Nanog, Sox9 and Glut-1 were significantly increased when reprogrammed cells were used as donor nuclei. Increased expression of Nanog can be supportive of complete reprogramming of somatic cell nuclear transfer murine embryos. The present study suggested that donor cells expressing male germ cell-specific genes can be reconstructed and can develop into embryos with normal high expression of developmentally essential genes. PMID:26369430

  3. In Vivo Reprogramming for CNS Repair: Regenerating Neurons from Endogenous Glial Cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Hedong; Chen, Gong

    2016-08-17

    Neuroregeneration in the CNS has proven to be difficult despite decades of research. The old dogma that CNS neurons cannot be regenerated in the adult mammalian brain has been overturned; however, endogenous adult neurogenesis appears to be insufficient for brain repair. Stem cell therapy once held promise for generating large quantities of neurons in the CNS, but immunorejection and long-term functional integration remain major hurdles. In this Perspective, we discuss the use of in vivo reprogramming as an emerging technology to regenerate functional neurons from endogenous glial cells inside the brain and spinal cord. Besides the CNS, in vivo reprogramming has been demonstrated successfully in the pancreas, heart, and liver and may be adopted in other organs. Although challenges remain for translating this technology into clinical therapies, we anticipate that in vivo reprogramming may revolutionize regenerative medicine by using a patient's own internal cells for tissue repair. PMID:27537482

  4. Direct reprogramming of human fibroblasts into dopaminergic neuron-like cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinjian; Li, Fang; Stubblefield, Elizabeth A; Blanchard, Barbara; Richards, Toni L; Larson, Gaynor A; He, Yujun; Huang, Qian; Tan, Aik-Choon; Zhang, Dabing; Benke, Timothy A; Sladek, John R; Zahniser, Nancy R; Li, Chuan-Yuan

    2012-02-01

    Transplantation of exogenous dopaminergic neuron (DA neurons) is a promising approach for treating Parkinson's disease (PD). However, a major stumbling block has been the lack of a reliable source of donor DA neurons. Here we show that a combination of five transcriptional factors Mash1, Ngn2, Sox2, Nurr1, and Pitx3 can directly and effectively reprogram human fibroblasts into DA neuron-like cells. The reprogrammed cells stained positive for various markers for DA neurons. They also showed characteristic DA uptake and production properties. Moreover, they exhibited DA neuron-specific electrophysiological profiles. Finally, they provided symptomatic relief in a rat PD model. Therefore, our directly reprogrammed DA neuron-like cells are a promising source of cell-replacement therapy for PD. PMID:22105488

  5. Evidence for conserved DNA and histone H3 methylation reprogramming in mouse, bovine and rabbit zygotes

    PubMed Central

    Lepikhov, Konstantin; Zakhartchenko, Valeri; Hao, Ru; Yang, Feikun; Wrenzycki, Christine; Niemann, Heiner; Wolf, Eckhard; Walter, Joern

    2008-01-01

    Background In mammals the parental genomes are epigenetically reprogrammed after fertilization. This reprogramming includes a rapid demethylation of the paternal (sperm-derived) chromosomes prior to DNA replication in zygotes. Such active DNA demethylation in the zygote has been documented for several mammalian species, including mouse, rat, pig, human and cow, but questioned to occur in rabbit. Results When comparing immunohistochemical patterns of antibodies against 5-methyl-cytosine, H3K4me3 and H3K9me2 modifications we observe similar pronuclear distribution and dynamics in mouse, bovine and rabbit zygotes. In rabbit DNA demethylation of the paternal chromosomes occurs at slightly advanced pronuclear stages. We also show that the rabbit oocyte rapidly demethylates DNA of donor fibroblast after nuclear transfer. Conclusion Our data reveal that major events of epigenetic reprogramming during pronuclear maturation, including mechanisms of active DNA demethylation, are apparently conserved among mammalian species. PMID:19014417

  6. Physiological, pathological, and engineered cell identity reprogramming in the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Smith, Derek K; Wang, Lei-Lei; Zhang, Chun-Li

    2016-07-01

    Multipotent neural stem cells persist in restricted regions of the adult mammalian central nervous system. These proliferative cells differentiate into diverse neuron subtypes to maintain neural homeostasis. This endogenous process can be reprogrammed as a compensatory response to physiological cues, traumatic injury, and neurodegeneration. In addition to innate neurogenesis, recent research has demonstrated that new neurons can be engineered via cell identity reprogramming in non-neurogenic regions of the adult central nervous system. A comprehensive understanding of these reprogramming mechanisms will be essential to the development of therapeutic neural regeneration strategies that aim to improve functional recovery after injury and neurodegeneration. WIREs Dev Biol 2016, 5:499-517. doi: 10.1002/wdev.234 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:27258392

  7. Reprogramming within hours following nuclear transfer into mouse but not human zygotes.

    PubMed

    Egli, Dieter; Chen, Alice E; Saphier, Genevieve; Ichida, Justin; Fitzgerald, Claire; Go, Kathryn J; Acevedo, Nicole; Patel, Jay; Baetscher, Manfred; Kearns, William G; Goland, Robin; Leibel, Rudolph L; Melton, Douglas A; Eggan, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    Fertilized mouse zygotes can reprogram somatic cells to a pluripotent state. Human zygotes might therefore be useful for producing patient-derived pluripotent stem cells. However, logistical, legal and social considerations have limited the availability of human eggs for research. Here we show that a significant number of normal fertilized eggs (zygotes) can be obtained for reprogramming studies. Using these zygotes, we found that when the zygotic genome was replaced with that of a somatic cell, development progressed normally throughout the cleavage stages, but then arrested before the morula stage. This arrest was associated with a failure to activate transcription in the transferred somatic genome. In contrast to human zygotes, mouse zygotes reprogrammed the somatic cell genome to a pluripotent state within hours after transfer. Our results suggest that there may be a previously unappreciated barrier to successful human nuclear transfer, and that future studies could focus on the requirements for genome activation. PMID:21971503

  8. Loss of GLUT4 induces metabolic reprogramming and impairs viability of breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Garrido, Pablo; Osorio, Fernando G; Morán, Javier; Cabello, Estefanía; Alonso, Ana; Freije, José M P; González, Celestino

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic reprogramming strategies focus on the normalization of metabolism of cancer cells and constitute promising targets for cancer treatment. Here, we demonstrate that the glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) has a prominent role in basal glucose uptake in MCF7 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. We show that shRNA-mediated down-regulation of GLUT4 diminishes glucose uptake and induces metabolic reprogramming by reallocating metabolic flux to oxidative phosphorylation. This reallocation is reflected on an increased activity of the mitochondrial oxidation of pyruvate and lower lactate release. Altogether, GLUT4 inhibition compromises cell proliferation and critically affects cell viability under hypoxic conditions, providing proof-of-principle for the feasibility of using pharmacological approaches to inhibit GLUT4 in order to induce metabolic reprogramming in vivo in breast cancer models.

  9. Cell-of-Origin-Specific 3D Genome Structure Acquired during Somatic Cell Reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Krijger, Peter Hugo Lodewijk; Di Stefano, Bruno; de Wit, Elzo; Limone, Francesco; van Oevelen, Chris; de Laat, Wouter; Graf, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Summary Forced expression of reprogramming factors can convert somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). Here we studied genome topology dynamics during reprogramming of different somatic cell types with highly distinct genome conformations. We find large-scale topologically associated domain (TAD) repositioning and alterations of tissue-restricted genomic neighborhoods and chromatin loops, effectively erasing the somatic-cell-specific genome structures while establishing an embryonic stem-cell-like 3D genome. Yet, early passage iPSCs carry topological hallmarks that enable recognition of their cell of origin. These hallmarks are not remnants of somatic chromosome topologies. Instead, the distinguishing topological features are acquired during reprogramming, as we also find for cell-of-origin-dependent gene expression patterns. PMID:26971819

  10. Cell-of-Origin-Specific 3D Genome Structure Acquired during Somatic Cell Reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Krijger, Peter Hugo Lodewijk; Di Stefano, Bruno; de Wit, Elzo; Limone, Francesco; van Oevelen, Chris; de Laat, Wouter; Graf, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    Forced expression of reprogramming factors can convert somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). Here we studied genome topology dynamics during reprogramming of different somatic cell types with highly distinct genome conformations. We find large-scale topologically associated domain (TAD) repositioning and alterations of tissue-restricted genomic neighborhoods and chromatin loops, effectively erasing the somatic-cell-specific genome structures while establishing an embryonic stem-cell-like 3D genome. Yet, early passage iPSCs carry topological hallmarks that enable recognition of their cell of origin. These hallmarks are not remnants of somatic chromosome topologies. Instead, the distinguishing topological features are acquired during reprogramming, as we also find for cell-of-origin-dependent gene expression patterns.

  11. A p53-mediated DNA damage response limits reprogramming to ensure iPS cell genomic integrity

    PubMed Central

    Marión, Rosa M.; Strati, Katerina; Li, Han; Murga, Matilde; Blanco, Raquel; Ortega, Sagrario; Fernandez-Capetillo, Oscar; Serrano, Manuel; Blasco, Maria A.

    2013-01-01

    The reprogramming of differentiated cells to pluripotent cells (induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells) is known to be an inefficient process. We recently reported that cells with short telomeres cannot be reprogrammed to iPS cells despite their normal proliferation rates1, 2, probably reflecting the existence of ‘reprogramming barriers’ that abort the reprogramming of cells with uncapped telomeres. Here we show that p53 (also known as Trp53 in mice and TP53 in humans) is critically involved in preventing the reprogramming of cells carrying various types of DNA damage, including short telomeres, DNA repair deficiencies, or exogenously inflicted DNA damage. Reprogramming in the presence of pre-existing, but tolerated, DNA damage is aborted by the activation of a DNA damage response and p53-dependent apoptosis. Abrogation of p53 allows efficient reprogramming in the face of DNA damage and the generation of iPS cells carrying persistent DNA damage and chromosomal aberrations. These observations indicate that during reprogramming cells increase their intolerance to different types of DNA damage and that p53 is critical in preventing the generation of human and mouse pluripotent cells from suboptimal parental cells. PMID:19668189

  12. Inducing pluripotency in vitro: recent advances and highlights in induced pluripotent stem cells generation and pluripotency reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Rony, I K; Baten, A; Bloomfield, J A; Islam, M E; Billah, M M; Islam, K D

    2015-04-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are considered patient-specific counterparts of embryonic stem cells as they originate from somatic cells after forced expression of pluripotency reprogramming factors Oct4, Sox2, Klf4 and c-Myc. iPSCs offer unprecedented opportunity for personalized cell therapies in regenerative medicine. In recent years, iPSC technology has undergone substantial improvement to overcome slow and inefficient reprogramming protocols, and to ensure clinical-grade iPSCs and their functional derivatives. Recent developments in iPSC technology include better reprogramming methods employing novel delivery systems such as non-integrating viral and non-viral vectors, and characterization of alternative reprogramming factors. Concurrently, small chemical molecules (inhibitors of specific signalling or epigenetic regulators) have become crucial to iPSC reprogramming; they have the ability to replace putative reprogramming factors and boost reprogramming processes. Moreover, common dietary supplements, such as vitamin C and antioxidants, when introduced into reprogramming media, have been found to improve genomic and epigenomic profiles of iPSCs. In this article, we review the most recent advances in the iPSC field and potent application of iPSCs, in terms of cell therapy and tissue engineering.

  13. MicroRNAs Induce Epigenetic Reprogramming and Suppress Malignant Phenotypes of Human Colon Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Hisataka; Wu, Xin; Kawamoto, Koichi; Nishida, Naohiro; Konno, Masamitsu; Koseki, Jun; Matsui, Hidetoshi; Noguchi, Kozou; Gotoh, Noriko; Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi; Miyata, Kanjiro; Nishiyama, Nobuhiro; Nagano, Hiroaki; Yamamoto, Hirofumi; Obika, Satoshi; Kataoka, Kazunori; Doki, Yuichiro; Mori, Masaki; Ishii, Hideshi

    2015-01-01

    Although cancer is a genetic disease, epigenetic alterations are involved in its initiation and progression. Previous studies have shown that reprogramming of colon cancer cells using Oct3/4, Sox2, Klf4, and cMyc reduces cancer malignancy. Therefore, cancer reprogramming may be a useful treatment for chemo- or radiotherapy-resistant cancer cells. It was also reported that the introduction of endogenous small-sized, non-coding ribonucleotides such as microRNA (miR) 302s and miR-369-3p or -5p resulted in the induction of cellular reprogramming. miRs are smaller than the genes of transcription factors, making them possibly suitable for use in clinical strategies. Therefore, we reprogrammed colon cancer cells using miR-302s and miR-369-3p or -5p. This resulted in inhibition of cell proliferation and invasion and the stimulation of the mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition phenotype in colon cancer cells. Importantly, the introduction of the ribonucleotides resulted in epigenetic reprogramming of DNA demethylation and histone modification events. Furthermore, in vivo administration of the ribonucleotides in mice elicited the induction of cancer cell apoptosis, which involves the mitochondrial Bcl2 protein family. The present study shows that the introduction of miR-302s and miR-369s could induce cellular reprogramming and modulate malignant phenotypes of human colorectal cancer, suggesting that the appropriate delivery of functional small-sized ribonucleotides may open a new avenue for therapy against human malignant tumors. PMID:25970424

  14. Early-stage epigenetic modification during somatic cell reprogramming by Parp1 and Tet2.

    PubMed

    Doege, Claudia A; Inoue, Keiichi; Yamashita, Toru; Rhee, David B; Travis, Skylar; Fujita, Ryousuke; Guarnieri, Paolo; Bhagat, Govind; Vanti, William B; Shih, Alan; Levine, Ross L; Nik, Sara; Chen, Emily I; Abeliovich, Asa

    2012-08-30

    Somatic cells can be reprogrammed into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) by using the pluripotency factors Oct4, Sox2, Klf4 and c-Myc (together referred to as OSKM). iPSC reprogramming erases somatic epigenetic signatures—as typified by DNA methylation or histone modification at silent pluripotency loci—and establishes alternative epigenetic marks of embryonic stem cells (ESCs). Here we describe an early and essential stage of somatic cell reprogramming, preceding the induction of transcription at endogenous pluripotency loci such as Nanog and Esrrb. By day 4 after transduction with OSKM, two epigenetic modification factors necessary for iPSC generation, namely poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (Parp1) and ten-eleven translocation-2 (Tet2), are recruited to the Nanog and Esrrb loci. These epigenetic modification factors seem to have complementary roles in the establishment of early epigenetic marks during somatic cell reprogramming: Parp1 functions in the regulation of 5-methylcytosine (5mC) modification, whereas Tet2 is essential for the early generation of 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) by the oxidation of 5mC (refs 3,4). Although 5hmC has been proposed to serve primarily as an intermediate in 5mC demethylation to cytosine in certain contexts, our data, and also studies of Tet2-mutant human tumour cells, argue in favour of a role for 5hmC as an epigenetic mark distinct from 5mC. Consistent with this, Parp1 and Tet2 are each needed for the early establishment of histone modifications that typify an activated chromatin state at pluripotency loci, whereas Parp1 induction further promotes accessibility to the Oct4 reprogramming factor. These findings suggest that Parp1 and Tet2 contribute to an epigenetic program that directs subsequent transcriptional induction at pluripotency loci during somatic cell reprogramming. PMID:22902501

  15. Human amniotic epithelial cells are reprogrammed more efficiently by induced pluripotency than adult fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Easley, Charles A; Miki, Toshio; Castro, Carlos A; Ozolek, John A; Minervini, Crescenzio F; Ben-Yehudah, Ahmi; Schatten, Gerald P

    2012-06-01

    Cellular reprogramming from adult somatic cells into an embryonic cell-like state, termed induced pluripotency, has been achieved in several cell types. However, the ability to reprogram human amniotic epithelial cells (hAECs), an abundant cell source derived from discarded placental tissue, has only recently been investigated. Here we show that not only are hAECs easily reprogrammed into induced pluripotent stem cells (AE-iPSCs), but hAECs reprogram faster and more efficiently than adult and neonatal somatic dermal fibroblasts. Furthermore, AE-iPSCs express higher levels of NANOG and OCT4 compared to human foreskin fibroblast iPSCs (HFF1-iPSCs) and express decreased levels of genes associated with differentiation, including NEUROD1 and SOX17, markers of neuronal differentiation. To elucidate the mechanism behind the higher reprogramming efficiency of hAECs, we analyzed global DNA methylation, global histone acetylation, and the mitochondrial DNA A3243G point mutation. Whereas hAECs show no differences in global histone acetylation or mitochondrial point mutation accumulation compared to adult and neonatal dermal fibroblasts, hAECs demonstrate a decreased global DNA methylation compared to dermal fibroblasts. Likewise, quantitative gene expression analyses show that hAECs endogenously express OCT4, SOX2, KLF4, and c-MYC, all four factors used in cellular reprogramming. Thus, hAECs represent an ideal cell type for testing novel approaches for generating clinically viable iPSCs and offer significant advantages over postnatal cells that more likely may be contaminated by environmental exposures and infectious agents. PMID:22686477

  16. Reprogramming of Human Fibroblasts to Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells with Sleeping Beauty Transposon-Based Stable Gene Delivery.

    PubMed

    Sebe, Attila; Ivics, Zoltán

    2016-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells are a source of patient-specific pluripotent stem cells and resemble human embryonic stem (ES) cells in gene expression profiles, morphology, pluripotency, and in vitro differentiation potential. iPS cells are applied in disease modeling, drug screenings, toxicology screenings, and autologous cell therapy. In this protocol, we describe how to derive human iPS cells from fibroblasts by Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon-mediated gene transfer of reprogramming factors. First, the components of the non-viral Sleeping Beauty transposon system, namely a transposon vector encoding reprogramming transcription factors and a helper plasmid expressing the SB transposase, are electroporated into human fibroblasts. The reprogramming cassette undergoes transposition from the transfected plasmids into the fibroblast genome, thereby resulting in stable delivery of the reprogramming factors. Reprogramming by using this protocol takes ~4 weeks, after which the iPS cells are isolated and clonally propagated.

  17. Reprogramming of Human Fibroblasts to Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells with Sleeping Beauty Transposon-Based Stable Gene Delivery.

    PubMed

    Sebe, Attila; Ivics, Zoltán

    2016-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells are a source of patient-specific pluripotent stem cells and resemble human embryonic stem (ES) cells in gene expression profiles, morphology, pluripotency, and in vitro differentiation potential. iPS cells are applied in disease modeling, drug screenings, toxicology screenings, and autologous cell therapy. In this protocol, we describe how to derive human iPS cells from fibroblasts by Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon-mediated gene transfer of reprogramming factors. First, the components of the non-viral Sleeping Beauty transposon system, namely a transposon vector encoding reprogramming transcription factors and a helper plasmid expressing the SB transposase, are electroporated into human fibroblasts. The reprogramming cassette undergoes transposition from the transfected plasmids into the fibroblast genome, thereby resulting in stable delivery of the reprogramming factors. Reprogramming by using this protocol takes ~4 weeks, after which the iPS cells are isolated and clonally propagated. PMID:26895068

  18. TGFβ signaling regulates the choice between pluripotent and neural fates during reprogramming of human urine derived cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lihui; Li, Xirui; Huang, Wenhao; Zhou, Tiancheng; Wang, Haitao; Lin, Aiping; Hutchins, Andrew Paul; Su, Zhenghui; Chen, Qianyu; Pei, Duanqing; Pan, Guangjin

    2016-01-01

    Human urine cells (HUCs) can be reprogrammed into neural progenitor cells (NPCs) or induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) with defined factors and a small molecule cocktail, but the underlying fate choice remains unresolved. Here, through sequential removal of individual compound from small molecule cocktail, we showed that A8301, a TGFβ signaling inhibitor, is sufficient to switch the cell fate from iPSCs into NPCs in OSKM-mediated HUCs reprogramming. However, TGFβ exposure at early stage inhibits HUCs reprogramming by promoting EMT. Base on these data, we developed an optimized approach for generation of NPCs or iPSCs from HUCs with significantly improved efficiency by regulating TGFβ activity at different reprogramming stages. This approach provides a simplified and improved way for HUCs reprogramming, thus would be valuable for banking human iPSCs or NPCs from people with different genetic background. PMID:26935433

  19. MicroRNA in Metabolic Re-Programming and Their Role in Tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Tomasetti, Marco; Amati, Monica; Santarelli, Lory; Neuzil, Jiri

    2016-01-01

    The process of metabolic re-programing is linked to the activation of oncogenes and/or suppression of tumour suppressor genes, which are regulated by microRNAs (miRNAs). The interplay between oncogenic transformation-driven metabolic re-programming and modulation of aberrant miRNAs further established their critical role in the initiation, promotion and progression of cancer by creating a tumorigenesis-prone microenvironment, thus orchestrating processes of evasion to apoptosis, angiogenesis and invasion/migration, as well metastasis. Given the involvement of miRNAs in tumour development and their global deregulation, they may be perceived as biomarkers in cancer of therapeutic relevance.

  20. MicroRNA in Metabolic Re-Programming and Their Role in Tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Tomasetti, Marco; Amati, Monica; Santarelli, Lory; Neuzil, Jiri

    2016-01-01

    The process of metabolic re-programing is linked to the activation of oncogenes and/or suppression of tumour suppressor genes, which are regulated by microRNAs (miRNAs). The interplay between oncogenic transformation-driven metabolic re-programming and modulation of aberrant miRNAs further established their critical role in the initiation, promotion and progression of cancer by creating a tumorigenesis-prone microenvironment, thus orchestrating processes of evasion to apoptosis, angiogenesis and invasion/migration, as well metastasis. Given the involvement of miRNAs in tumour development and their global deregulation, they may be perceived as biomarkers in cancer of therapeutic relevance. PMID:27213336

  1. The Role of Fatty Acid Oxidation in the Metabolic Reprograming of Activated T-Cells

    PubMed Central

    Byersdorfer, Craig Alan

    2014-01-01

    Activation represents a significant bioenergetic challenge for T-cells, which must undergo metabolic reprogramming to keep pace with increased energetic demands. This review focuses on the role of fatty acid metabolism, both in vitro and in vivo, following T-cell activation. Based upon previous studies in the literature, as well as accumulating evidence in allogeneic cells, I propose a multi-step model of in vivo metabolic reprogramming. In this model, a primary determinant of metabolic phenotype is the ubiquity and duration of antigen exposure. The implications of this model, as well as the future challenges and opportunities in studying T-cell metabolism, will be discussed. PMID:25566254

  2. A "Hit and Run" Approach to Inducible Direct Reprogramming of Astrocytes to Neural Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Poulou, Maria; Mandalos, Nikolaos P; Karnavas, Theodoros; Saridaki, Marannia; McKay, Ronald D G; Remboutsika, Eumorphia

    2016-01-01

    Temporal and spatial control of gene expression can be achieved using an inducible system as a fundamental tool for regulated transcription in basic, applied and eventually in clinical research. We describe a novel "hit and run" inducible direct reprogramming approach. In a single step, 2 days post-transfection, transiently transfected Sox2(FLAG) under the Leu3p-αIPM inducible control (iSox2) triggers the activation of endogenous Sox2, redirecting primary astrocytes into abundant distinct nestin-positive radial glia cells. This technique introduces a unique novel tool for safe, rapid and efficient reprogramming amendable to regenerative medicine. PMID:27148066

  3. Perspective for special Gurdon issue for differentiation: can cell fusion inform nuclear reprogramming?

    PubMed

    Burns, David; Blau, Helen M

    2014-07-01

    Nuclear reprogramming was first shown to be possible by Sir John Gurdon over a half century ago. The process has been revolutionized by the production of induced pluripotent cells by overexpression of the four transcription factors discovered by Shinya Yamanaka, which now enables mammalian applications. Yet, reprogramming by a few transcription factors remains incomplete and inefficient, whether to pluripotent or differentiated cells. We propose that a better understanding of mechanistic insights based on developmental principles gained from heterokaryon studies may inform the process of directing cell fate, fundamentally and clinically.

  4. The Ink4/Arf locus is a barrier for iPS reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Li, Han; Collado, Manuel; Villasante, Aranzazu; Strati, Katerina; Ortega, Sagrario; Cañamero, Marta; Blasco, Maria A.; Serrano, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms involved in the reprogramming of differentiated cells into induced Pluripotent Stem (iPS) cells by Oct4, Klf4 and Sox2 (3F) remain poorly understood 1. The Ink4/Arf tumour suppressor locus encodes three potent inhibitors of proliferation, namely p16Ink4a, p15Ink4b and Arf, which are basally expressed in differentiated cells and upregulated by aberrant mitogenic signals 2-4. We show here that the locus is completely silenced in iPS cells, as well as in embryonic stem (ES) cells, acquiring the epigenetic marks of a bivalent chromatin domain, and retaining the ability to be reactivated upon differentiation. Cell culture conditions during reprogramming enhance the expression of the Ink4/Arf locus, further highlighting the importance of silencing the locus to allow proliferation and reprogramming. Indeed, the 3F together repress the Ink4/Arf locus soon after their expression and concomitant with the appearance of the first molecular markers of stemness. This downregulation also occurs in cells carrying the oncoprotein large-T, which functionally inactivates the pathways regulated by the Ink4/Arf locus, thus implying that the silencing of the locus is intrinsic to reprogramming and not the result of a selective process. Genetic inhibition of the Ink4/Arf locus has a profound positive impact on the efficiency of iPS generation, increasing both the kinetics of reprogramming and the number of emerging iPS colonies. In murine cells, Arf, rather than Ink4a, is the main barrier to reprogramming through activation of p53 and p21; whereas, in human fibroblasts, INK4a is more important than ARF. Finally, organismal aging upregulates the Ink4/Arf locus 2,5 and, accordingly, reprogramming is less efficient in cells from old organisms, but this defect can be rescued by inhibiting the locus with an shRNA. All together, we conclude that the silencing of Ink4/Arf locus is rate limiting for reprogramming, and its transient inhibition may significantly improve the

  5. MicroRNA in Metabolic Re-Programming and Their Role in Tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Tomasetti, Marco; Amati, Monica; Santarelli, Lory; Neuzil, Jiri

    2016-01-01

    The process of metabolic re-programing is linked to the activation of oncogenes and/or suppression of tumour suppressor genes, which are regulated by microRNAs (miRNAs). The interplay between oncogenic transformation-driven metabolic re-programming and modulation of aberrant miRNAs further established their critical role in the initiation, promotion and progression of cancer by creating a tumorigenesis-prone microenvironment, thus orchestrating processes of evasion to apoptosis, angiogenesis and invasion/migration, as well metastasis. Given the involvement of miRNAs in tumour development and their global deregulation, they may be perceived as biomarkers in cancer of therapeutic relevance. PMID:27213336

  6. PROGRAMMING AND REPROGRAMMING CELLULAR AGE IN THE ERA OF INDUCED PLURIPOTENCY

    PubMed Central

    Studer, Lorenz; Vera, Elsa; Cornacchia, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    The ability to reprogram adult somatic cells back to pluripotency presents a powerful tool to study cell fate identity and model human disease. However the reversal of cellular age during reprogramming results in an embryonic-like state of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and their derivatives, which presents specific challenges for modeling late onset disease. This age reset requires novel methods to mimic age-related changes, but also offers opportunities to study cellular rejuvenation in real time. Here, we discuss how iPSC research may transform studies of aging and enable the precise programming of cellular age in parallel to cell fate specification. PMID:26046759

  7. JNK/SAPK Signaling Is Essential for Efficient Reprogramming of Human Fibroblasts to Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Neganova, Irina; Shmeleva, Evgenija; Munkley, Jennifer; Chichagova, Valeria; Anyfantis, George; Anderson, Rhys; Passos, Joao; Elliott, David J; Armstrong, Lyle; Lako, Majlinda

    2016-05-01

    Reprogramming of somatic cells to the phenotypic state termed "induced pluripotency" is thought to occur through three consecutive stages: initiation, maturation, and stabilisation. The initiation phase is stochastic but nevertheless very important as it sets the gene expression pattern that permits completion of reprogramming; hence a better understanding of this phase and how this is regulated may provide the molecular cues for improving the reprogramming process. c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)/stress-activated protein kinase (SAPKs) are stress activated MAPK kinases that play an essential role in several processes known to be important for successful completion of the initiation phase such as cellular proliferation, mesenchymal to epithelial transition (MET) and cell cycle regulation. In view of this, we postulated that manipulation of this pathway would have significant impacts on reprogramming of human fibroblasts to induced pluripotent stem cells. Accordingly, we found that key components of the JNK/SAPK signaling pathway increase expression as early as day 3 of the reprogramming process and continue to rise in reprogrammed cells throughout the initiation and maturation stages. Using both chemical inhibitors and RNA interference of MKK4, MKK7 and JNK1, we tested the role of JNK/SAPK signaling during the initiation stage of neonatal and adult fibroblast reprogramming. These resulted in complete abrogation of fully reprogrammed colonies and the emergence of partially reprogrammed colonies which disaggregated and were lost from culture during the maturation stage. Inhibition of JNK/SAPK signaling resulted in reduced cell proliferation, disruption of MET and loss of the pluripotent phenotype, which either singly or in combination prevented establishment of pluripotent colonies. Together these data provide new evidence for an indispensable role for JNK/SAPK signaling to overcome the well-established molecular barriers in human somatic cell induced

  8. Acidosis induces reprogramming of cellular metabolism to mitigate oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    redirected away from several other critical metabolic processes, including ribose and glutathione synthesis. These alterations lead to both a decrease in cellular proliferation and increased sensitivity to ROS. Collectively, these data reveal a role for p53 in cellular metabolic reprogramming under acidosis, in order to permit increased bioenergetic capacity and ROS neutralization. Understanding the metabolic adaptations that cancer cells make under acidosis may present opportunities to generate anti-tumor therapeutic agents that are more tumor-specific. PMID:24359630

  9. Hepatic miRNA expression reprogrammed by Plasmodium chabaudi malaria.

    PubMed

    Delić, Denis; Dkhil, Mohamed; Al-Quraishy, Saleh; Wunderlich, Frank

    2011-05-01

    Evidence is accumulating that miRNAs are critically implicated in the outcome of diseases, but little information is available for infectious diseases. This study investigates the hepatic miRNA signature in female C57BL/6 mice infected with self-healing Plasmodium chabaudi malaria. Primary infections result in approximately 50% peak parasitemia on day 8 p.i., approximately 80% survival, and development of protective immunity. The latter is evidenced as 100% survival and 1.5% peak parasitemia upon homolog re-infections of those mice which are still alive on day 56 after primary infection. Such immune mice exhibit increased levels of IgG2a and IgG2b isotypes and still contain P. chabaudi-infected erythrocytes in their livers as revealed by light microscopy and PCR analysis. Primary infections, but not secondary infections, induce an upregulation of hepatic mRNAs encoding IL-1β, TNFα, IFNγ, NF-κB, and iNOS, and a downregulation of mRNAs for CYP7A1 and SULT2A2, respectively. Using miRXplore microarrays containing 634 mouse miRNAs in combination with quantitative RT-PCR, the liver is found to respond to primary infections with an upregulation of the three miRNA species miR-26b, MCMV-miR-M23-1-5p, and miR-1274a, and a downregulation of the 16 miRNA species miR-101b, let-7a, let-7g, miR-193a-3p, miR-192, miR-142-5p, miR-465d, miR-677, miR-98, miR-694, miR-374(*), miR-450b-5p, miR-464, miR-377, miR-20a(*), and miR-466d-3p, respectively. Surprisingly, about the same pattern of miRNA expression is revealed in immune mice, and this pattern is even sustained upon homolog re-infections of immune mice. These data suggest that development of protective immunity against malarial blood stages of P. chabaudi is associated with a reprogramming of the expression of distinct miRNA species in the female mouse liver.

  10. Ustilago maydis reprograms cell proliferation in maize anthers.

    PubMed

    Gao, Li; Kelliher, Timothy; Nguyen, Linda; Walbot, Virginia

    2013-09-01

    The basidiomycete Ustilago maydis is a ubiquitous pathogen of maize (Zea mays), one of the world's most important cereal crops. Infection by this smut fungus triggers tumor formation in aerial plant parts within which the fungus sporulates. Using confocal microscopy to track U. maydis infection on corn anthers for 7 days post-injection, we found that U. maydis is located on the epidermis during the first 2 days, and has reached all anther lobe cell types by 3 days post-injection. Fungal infection alters cell-fate specification events, cell division patterns, host cell expansion and host cell senescence, depending on the developmental stage and cell type. Fungal effects on tassel and plant growth were also quantified. Transcriptome profiling using a dual organism microarray identified thousands of anther genes affected by fungal infection at 3 days post-injection during the cell-fate specification and rapid cell proliferation phases of anther development. In total, 4147 (17%) of anther-expressed genes were altered by infection, 2018 fungal genes were expressed in anthers, and 206 fungal secretome genes may be anther-specific. The results confirm that U. maydis deploys distinct genes to cause disease in specific maize organs, and suggest mechanisms by which the host plant is manipulated to generate a tumor.

  11. Ustilago maydis reprograms cell proliferation in maize anthers

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Li; Kelliher, Timothy; Nguyen, Linda; Walbot, Virginia

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY The basidiomycete Ustilago maydis is a ubiquitous pathogen of maize (Zea mays), one of the world’s most important cereal crops. Infection by this smut fungus triggers tumor formation in aerial plant parts within which the fungus sporulates. Using confocal microscopy to track U. maydis infection on corn anthers through 7 dpi (days post-injection), we found that U. maydis is located on the epidermis on the first two days and by 3 dpi has reached all anther lobe cell types. Fungal infection can alter cell fate specification events, cell division patterns, host cell expansion, and host cell senescence depending on the developmental stage and cell type. Fungal impacts on tassel and plant growth were also quantified. Transcriptome profiling using a dual organism microarray identified thousands of anther genes affected by fungal infection 3 dpi during the cell fate specification and rapid cell proliferation phases of anther development. 4147 (17%) of anther-expressed genes were altered by infection, 2018 fungal genes were expressed in anthers, and 206 fungal secretome genes may be anther-specific. The results confirm that U. maydis deploys distinctive genes to cause disease in specific maize organs and begins to chart the mechanisms by which the host plant is manipulated to generate a tumor. PMID:23795972

  12. Enhanced reprogramming of Xist by induced upregulation of Tsix and Dnmt3a.

    PubMed

    Do, Jeong Tae; Han, Dong Wook; Gentile, Luca; Sobek-Klocke, Inge; Stehling, Martin; Schöler, Hans R

    2008-11-01

    Reactivation of Oct4 gene expression occurs within 2 days of fusion of somatic cells with pluripotent stem cells and within 9 days of postinfection of four transcription factors. We sought to determine whether somatic genome reprogramming is completed by the onset of Oct4 reactivation. The complex regulation of the reactivation of inactive X chromosome (Xi) serves as a model for studying reprogramming of chromatin domains. A time-course analysis of the DNA methylation, gene expression, and X inactivation-specific transcript (Xist)/Tsix RNA fluorescence in situ hybridization revealed that expression of pluripotency- and tissue-specific marker genes was reset to the level of pluripotent stem cells within 2 days of fusion, whereas reprogramming of Xist/reactivation of Xi took at least 9 days. We found that trichostatin A, which normally activates gene expression, results in downregulation of Xist. This is due to activation of Dnmt3a and Tsix, two negative regulators of Xist. Moreover, delayed reprogramming of Xist/reactivation of inactive X chromosome after cell fusion was accelerated by DNA methylation and histone deacetylation of Xist, which follow upregulation of Dnmt3a and Tsix. Disclosure of potential conflicts of interest is found at the end of this article.

  13. X Chromosome of female cells shows dynamic changes in status during human somatic cell reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kun-Yong; Hysolli, Eriona; Tanaka, Yoshiaki; Wang, Brandon; Jung, Yong-Wook; Pan, Xinghua; Weissman, Sherman Morton; Park, In-Hyun

    2014-06-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) acquire embryonic stem cell (ESC)-like epigenetic states, including the X chromosome. Previous studies reported that human iPSCs retain the inactive X chromosome of parental cells, or acquire two active X chromosomes through reprogramming. Most studies investigated the X chromosome states in established human iPSC clones after completion of reprogramming. Thus, it is still not fully understood when and how the X chromosome reactivation occurs during reprogramming. Here, we report a dynamic change in the X chromosome state throughout reprogramming, with an initial robust reactivation of the inactive X chromosome followed by an inactivation upon generation of nascent iPSC clones. iPSCs with two active X chromosomes or an eroded X chromosome arise in passaging iPSCs. These data provide important insights into the plasticity of the X chromosome of human female iPSCs and will be crucial for the future application of such cells in cell therapy and X-linked disease modeling. PMID:24936474

  14. X Chromosome of Female Cells Shows Dynamic Changes in Status during Human Somatic Cell Reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kun-Yong; Hysolli, Eriona; Tanaka, Yoshiaki; Wang, Brandon; Jung, Yong-Wook; Pan, Xinghua; Weissman, Sherman Morton; Park, In-Hyun

    2014-01-01

    Summary Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) acquire embryonic stem cell (ESC)-like epigenetic states, including the X chromosome. Previous studies reported that human iPSCs retain the inactive X chromosome of parental cells, or acquire two active X chromosomes through reprogramming. Most studies investigated the X chromosome states in established human iPSC clones after completion of reprogramming. Thus, it is still not fully understood when and how the X chromosome reactivation occurs during reprogramming. Here, we report a dynamic change in the X chromosome state throughout reprogramming, with an initial robust reactivation of the inactive X chromosome followed by an inactivation upon generation of nascent iPSC clones. iPSCs with two active X chromosomes or an eroded X chromosome arise in passaging iPSCs. These data provide important insights into the plasticity of the X chromosome of human female iPSCs and will be crucial for the future application of such cells in cell therapy and X-linked disease modeling. PMID:24936474

  15. Metabolic reprogramming of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) in cancer.

    PubMed

    Al-Khami, Amir A; Rodriguez, Paulo C; Ochoa, Augusto C

    2016-08-01

    MDSC undergo metabolic reprogramming in the tumor resulting in an increased fatty acid β oxidation that supports their immunosuppressive functions. Fatty acid oxidation inhibitors, used to treat coronary disease, significantly delayed tumor growth and had a significantly increased antitumor effect when combined with adoptive cell therapy or low dose chemotherapy. PMID:27622069

  16. Reprogramming of cell fate: epigenetic memory and the erasure of memories past

    PubMed Central

    Nashun, Buhe; Hill, Peter WS; Hajkova, Petra

    2015-01-01

    Cell identity is a reflection of a cell type-specific gene expression profile, and consequently, cell type-specific transcription factor networks are considered to be at the heart of a given cellular phenotype. Although generally stable, cell identity can be reprogrammed in vitro by forced changes to the transcriptional network, the most dramatic example of which was shown by the induction of pluripotency in somatic cells by the ectopic expression of defined transcription factors alone. Although changes to cell fate can be achieved in this way, the efficiency of such conversion remains very low, in large part due to specific chromatin signatures constituting an epigenetic barrier to the transcription factor-mediated reprogramming processes. Here we discuss the two-way relationship between transcription factor binding and chromatin structure during cell fate reprogramming. We additionally explore the potential roles and mechanisms by which histone variants, chromatin remodelling enzymes, and histone and DNA modifications contribute to the stability of cell identity and/or provide a permissive environment for cell fate change during cellular reprogramming. PMID:25820261

  17. Ordered chromatin changes and human X chromosome reactivation by cell fusion-mediated pluripotent reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Cantone, Irene; Bagci, Hakan; Dormann, Dirk; Dharmalingam, Gopuraja; Nesterova, Tatyana; Brockdorff, Neil; Rougeulle, Claire; Vallot, Celine; Heard, Edith; Chaligne, Ronan; Merkenschlager, Matthias; Fisher, Amanda G.

    2016-01-01

    Erasure of epigenetic memory is required to convert somatic cells towards pluripotency. Reactivation of the inactive X chromosome (Xi) has been used to model epigenetic reprogramming in mouse, but human studies are hampered by Xi epigenetic instability and difficulties in tracking partially reprogrammed iPSCs. Here we use cell fusion to examine the earliest events in the reprogramming-induced Xi reactivation of human female fibroblasts. We show that a rapid and widespread loss of Xi-associated H3K27me3 and XIST occurs in fused cells and precedes the bi-allelic expression of selected Xi-genes by many heterokaryons (30–50%). After cell division, RNA-FISH and RNA-seq analyses confirm that Xi reactivation remains partial and that induction of human pluripotency-specific XACT transcripts is rare (1%). These data effectively separate pre- and post-mitotic events in reprogramming-induced Xi reactivation and reveal a complex hierarchy of epigenetic changes that are required to reactivate the genes on the human Xi chromosome. PMID:27507283

  18. Small molecule proteostasis regulators that reprogram the ER to reduce extracellular protein aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Plate, Lars; Cooley, Christina B; Chen, John J; Paxman, Ryan J; Gallagher, Ciara M; Madoux, Franck; Genereux, Joseph C; Dobbs, Wesley; Garza, Dan; Spicer, Timothy P; Scampavia, Louis; Brown, Steven J; Rosen, Hugh; Powers, Evan T; Walter, Peter; Hodder, Peter; Wiseman, R Luke; Kelly, Jeffery W

    2016-01-01

    Imbalances in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) proteostasis are associated with etiologically-diverse degenerative diseases linked to excessive extracellular protein misfolding and aggregation. Reprogramming of the ER proteostasis environment through genetic activation of the Unfolded Protein Response (UPR)-associated transcription factor ATF6 attenuates secretion and extracellular aggregation of amyloidogenic proteins. Here, we employed a screening approach that included complementary arm-specific UPR reporters and medium-throughput transcriptional profiling to identify non-toxic small molecules that phenocopy the ATF6-mediated reprogramming of the ER proteostasis environment. The ER reprogramming afforded by our molecules requires activation of endogenous ATF6 and occurs independent of global ER stress. Furthermore, our molecules phenocopy the ability of genetic ATF6 activation to selectively reduce secretion and extracellular aggregation of amyloidogenic proteins. These results show that small molecule-dependent ER reprogramming, achieved through preferential activation of the ATF6 transcriptional program, is a promising strategy to ameliorate imbalances in ER function associated with degenerative protein aggregation diseases. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15550.001 PMID:27435961

  19. Molecular Insights into Reprogramming-Initiation Events Mediated by the OSKM Gene Regulatory Network

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Mei-Chih; Prigione, Alessandro; Jozefczuk, Justyna; Lichtner, Björn; Wolfrum, Katharina; Haltmeier, Manuela; Flöttmann, Max; Schaefer, Martin; Hahn, Alexander; Mrowka, Ralf; Klipp, Edda; Andrade-Navarro, Miguel A.; Adjaye, James

    2011-01-01

    Somatic cells can be reprogrammed to induced pluripotent stem cells by over-expression of OCT4, SOX2, KLF4 and c-MYC (OSKM). With the aim of unveiling the early mechanisms underlying the induction of pluripotency, we have analyzed transcriptional profiles at 24, 48 and 72 hours post-transduction of OSKM into human foreskin fibroblasts. Experiments confirmed that upon viral transduction, the immediate response is innate immunity, which induces free radical generation, oxidative DNA damage, p53 activation, senescence, and apoptosis, ultimately leading to a reduction in the reprogramming efficiency. Conversely, nucleofection of OSKM plasmids does not elicit the same cellular stress, suggesting viral response as an early reprogramming roadblock. Additional initiation events include the activation of surface markers associated with pluripotency and the suppression of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. Furthermore, reconstruction of an OSKM interaction network highlights intermediate path nodes as candidates for improvement intervention. Overall, the results suggest three strategies to improve reprogramming efficiency employing: 1) anti-inflammatory modulation of innate immune response, 2) pre-selection of cells expressing pluripotency-associated surface antigens, 3) activation of specific interaction paths that amplify the pluripotency signal. PMID:21909390

  20. A molecular roadmap of reprogramming somatic cells into iPS cells.

    PubMed

    Polo, Jose M; Anderssen, Endre; Walsh, Ryan M; Schwarz, Benjamin A; Nefzger, Christian M; Lim, Sue Mei; Borkent, Marti; Apostolou, Effie; Alaei, Sara; Cloutier, Jennifer; Bar-Nur, Ori; Cheloufi, Sihem; Stadtfeld, Matthias; Figueroa, Maria Eugenia; Robinton, Daisy; Natesan, Sridaran; Melnick, Ari; Zhu, Jinfang; Ramaswamy, Sridhar; Hochedlinger, Konrad

    2012-12-21

    Factor-induced reprogramming of somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) is inefficient, complicating mechanistic studies. Here, we examined defined intermediate cell populations poised to becoming iPSCs by genome-wide analyses. We show that induced pluripotency elicits two transcriptional waves, which are driven by c-Myc/Klf4 (first wave) and Oct4/Sox2/Klf4 (second wave). Cells that become refractory to reprogramming activate the first but fail to initiate the second transcriptional wave and can be rescued by elevated expression of all four factors. The establishment of bivalent domains occurs gradually after the first wave, whereas changes in DNA methylation take place after the second wave when cells acquire stable pluripotency. This integrative analysis allowed us to identify genes that act as roadblocks during reprogramming and surface markers that further enrich for cells prone to forming iPSCs. Collectively, our data offer new mechanistic insights into the nature and sequence of molecular events inherent to cellular reprogramming. PMID:23260147

  1. Fast-ball sports experts depend on an inhibitory strategy to reprogram their movement timing.

    PubMed

    Nakamoto, Hiroki; Ikudome, Sachi; Yotani, Kengo; Maruyama, Atsuo; Mori, Shiro

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of our study was to clarify whether an inhibitory strategy is used for reprogramming of movement timing by experts in fast-ball sports when they correct their movement timing due to unexpected environmental changes. We evaluated the influence of disruption of inhibitory function of the right inferior frontal gyrus (rIFG) on reprogramming of movement timing of experts and non-experts in fast-ball sports. The task was to manually press a button to coincide with the arrival of a moving target. The target moved at a constant velocity, and its velocity was suddenly either increased or decreased in some trials. The task was performed either with or without transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), which was delivered to the region of the rIFG. Under velocity change conditions without TMS, the experts showed significantly smaller timing errors and a higher rate of reprogramming of movement timing than the non-experts. Moreover, TMS application during the task significantly diminished the expert group's performance, but not the control group, particularly in the condition where the target velocity decreases. These results suggest that experts use an inhibitory strategy for reprogramming of movement timing. In addition, the rIFG inhibitory function contributes to the superior movement correction of experts in fast-ball sports. PMID:23660742

  2. And Then There Were None: No Need for Pluripotency Factors to Induce Reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Bin-Kuan; Cheng, Linzhao

    2015-01-01

    While most factors used as reprogramming transgenes can be replaced by other means, Oct4 has remained essential until now. Three recent papers have now broken this barrier through the use of opposing lineage specifying transgenes and chemical modulation, thus signifying a milestone in advancing our understanding of pluripotency induction. PMID:24012365

  3. Cellular extract facilitates nuclear reprogramming by altering DNA methylation and pluripotency gene expression.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Xian-Rong; Lan, Dao-Liang; Li, Jian; Zi, Xiang-Dong; Ma, Li; Wang, Yong

    2014-06-01

    The functional reprogramming of a differentiated cell to a pluripotent state presents potential beneficial applications in disease mechanisms and regenerative medicine. Epigenetic modifications enable differentiated cells to perpetuate molecular memory to retain their identity. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the reprogramming modification of yak fibroblast cells that were permeabilized and incubated in the extracts of mesenchymal stem cells derived from mice adipose tissue [adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs)]. According to the results, the treatment of ADSC extracts promoted colony formation. Moreover, pluripotent gene expression was associated with the loss of repressive histone modifications and increased global demethylation. The genes Col1a1 and Col1a2, which are typically found in differentiated cells only, demonstrated decreased expression and increased methylation in the 5'-flanking regulatory regions. Moreover, yak fibroblast cells that were exposed to ADSC extracts resulted in significantly different eight-cell and blastocyst formation rates of cloned embryos compared with their untreated counterparts. This investigation provides the first evidence that nuclear reprogramming of yak fibroblast cells is modified after the ADSC extract treatment. This research also presents a methodology for studying the dedifferentiation of somatic cells that can potentially lead to an efficient way of reprogramming somatic cells toward a pluripotent state without genetic alteration. PMID:24738992

  4. Transient in vitro epigenetic reprogramming of skin fibroblasts into multipotent cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiang-Qing; Pan, Xing-Hua; Wang, Weibo; Chen, Qiang; Pang, Rong-Qing; Cai, Xue-Min; Hoffman, Andrew R.; Hu, Ji-Fan

    2009-01-01

    Multipotent stem cells have the potential to establish a new field of promising regenerative medicine to treat tissue damage, genetic disorders, and degenerative diseases. However, limited resource of stem cells has turned to be an evitable obstacle in clinical applications. We utilized a simple in vitro epigenetic reprogramming approach to convert skin fibroblasts into multipotent cells. After transient reprogramming, stem cell markers, including Oct4 and Nanog, became activated in the treated cells. The reprogrammed cells were multipotent as demonstrated by their ability to differentiate into a variety of cells and to form teratomas. Genomic imprinting of insulin-like growth factor II (Igf2) and H19 was not affected by this short period of cell reprogramming. This study may provide an alternative strategy to efficiently generate patient-specific stem cells for basic and clinical research, solving major hurdles of virally-induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells that entail the potential risks of mutation, gene instability, and malignancy. PMID:20044135

  5. Small molecule proteostasis regulators that reprogram the ER to reduce extracellular protein aggregation.

    PubMed

    Plate, Lars; Cooley, Christina B; Chen, John J; Paxman, Ryan J; Gallagher, Ciara M; Madoux, Franck; Genereux, Joseph C; Dobbs, Wesley; Garza, Dan; Spicer, Timothy P; Scampavia, Louis; Brown, Steven J; Rosen, Hugh; Powers, Evan T; Walter, Peter; Hodder, Peter; Wiseman, R Luke; Kelly, Jeffery W

    2016-01-01

    Imbalances in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) proteostasis are associated with etiologically-diverse degenerative diseases linked to excessive extracellular protein misfolding and aggregation. Reprogramming of the ER proteostasis environment through genetic activation of the Unfolded Protein Response (UPR)-associated transcription factor ATF6 attenuates secretion and extracellular aggregation of amyloidogenic proteins. Here, we employed a screening approach that included complementary arm-specific UPR reporters and medium-throughput transcriptional profiling to identify non-toxic small molecules that phenocopy the ATF6-mediated reprogramming of the ER proteostasis environment. The ER reprogramming afforded by our molecules requires activation of endogenous ATF6 and occurs independent of global ER stress. Furthermore, our molecules phenocopy the ability of genetic ATF6 activation to selectively reduce secretion and extracellular aggregation of amyloidogenic proteins. These results show that small molecule-dependent ER reprogramming, achieved through preferential activation of the ATF6 transcriptional program, is a promising strategy to ameliorate imbalances in ER function associated with degenerative protein aggregation diseases. PMID:27435961

  6. Neurogenin1 effectively reprograms cultured chick RPE cells to differentiate towards photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Run-Tao; Liang, Lina; Ma, Wenxin; Li, Xiumei; Xie, Wenlian; Wang, Shu-Zhen

    2009-01-01

    Photoreceptors are highly specialized sensory neurons in the retina, and their degeneration results in blindness. Replacement with developing photoreceptor cells promises to be an effective therapy, but it requires a supply of new photoreceptors, because the neural retina in human eyes lacks regeneration capability. We report efficient generation of differentiating, photoreceptor-like neurons from chick retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells propagated in culture through reprogramming with neurogenin1 (ngn1). In reprogrammed culture, a large number of the cells (85.0 ± 5.9%) began to differentiate towards photoreceptors. Reprogrammed cells expressed transcription factors that set in motion photoreceptor differentiation, including Crx, Nr2E3, NeuroD, and RXRγ, and phototransduction pathway components, including transducin, cGMP-gated channel, and red opsin of cone photoreceptors (equivalent to rhodopsin of rod photoreceptors). They developed inner segments rich in mitochondria. Furthermore, they responded to light by decreasing their cellular free calcium (Ca2+) levels and responded to 9-cis-retinal by increasing their Ca2+ levels after photobleaching, hallmarks of photoreceptor physiology. The high efficiency and the advanced photoreceptor differentiation indicate ngn1 as a gene of choice to reprogram RPE progeny cells to differentiate into photoreceptor neurons in future cell replacement studies. PMID:20029995

  7. Fast-ball sports experts depend on an inhibitory strategy to reprogram their movement timing.

    PubMed

    Nakamoto, Hiroki; Ikudome, Sachi; Yotani, Kengo; Maruyama, Atsuo; Mori, Shiro

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of our study was to clarify whether an inhibitory strategy is used for reprogramming of movement timing by experts in fast-ball sports when they correct their movement timing due to unexpected environmental changes. We evaluated the influence of disruption of inhibitory function of the right inferior frontal gyrus (rIFG) on reprogramming of movement timing of experts and non-experts in fast-ball sports. The task was to manually press a button to coincide with the arrival of a moving target. The target moved at a constant velocity, and its velocity was suddenly either increased or decreased in some trials. The task was performed either with or without transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), which was delivered to the region of the rIFG. Under velocity change conditions without TMS, the experts showed significantly smaller timing errors and a higher rate of reprogramming of movement timing than the non-experts. Moreover, TMS application during the task significantly diminished the expert group's performance, but not the control group, particularly in the condition where the target velocity decreases. These results suggest that experts use an inhibitory strategy for reprogramming of movement timing. In addition, the rIFG inhibitory function contributes to the superior movement correction of experts in fast-ball sports.

  8. Stress-triggered atavistic reprogramming (STAR) addiction: driving force behind head and neck cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Masuda, Muneyuki; Wakasaki, Takahiro; Toh, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    Recent results of the Cancer Genome Atlas on head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) revealed that HNSCC lacked predominant gain-of-function mutations in oncogenes, whereas an essential role for epigenetics in oncogenesis has become apparent. In parallel, it has gained general acceptance that cancer is considered as complex adaptive system, which evolves responding environmental selective pressures. This somatic evolution appears to proceed concurrently with the acquisition of an atavistic pluripotent state (i.e., “stemness”), which is inducible by intrinsic epigenetic reprogramming program as demonstrated by induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. This Nobel prize-winning discovery has markedly accelerated and expanded cancer stem cell research from the point of epigenetic reprogramming. Taken together, we hypothesize that stress-triggered atavistic reprogramming (STAR) may be the major driving force of HNSCC evolution. In this perspective, we discuss the possible mechanisms of STAR in HNSCC, focusing on recent topics of epigenetic reprogramming in developmental and cancer cell biology. PMID:27429838

  9. Reprogramming Human Retinal Pigmented Epithelial Cells to Neurons Using Recombinant Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Qirui; Chen, Renwei; Teesalu, Tambet; Ruoslahti, Erkki

    2014-01-01

    Somatic cells can be reprogrammed to an altered lineage by overexpressing specific transcription factors. To avoid introducing exogenous genetic material into the genome of host cells, cell-penetrating peptides can be used to deliver transcription factors into cells for reprogramming. Position-dependent C-end rule (CendR) cell- and tissue-penetrating peptides provide an alternative to the conventional cell-penetrating peptides, such as polyarginine. In this study, we used a prototypic, already active CendR peptide, RPARPAR, to deliver the transcription factor SOX2 to retinal pigmented epithelial (RPE) cells. We demonstrated that RPE cells can be directly reprogrammed to a neuronal fate by introduction of SOX2. Resulting neuronal cells expressed neuronal marker mRNAs and proteins and downregulated expression of RPE markers. Cells produced extensive neurites and developed synaptic machinery capable of dye uptake after depolarization with potassium. The RPARPAR-mediated delivery of SOX2 alone was sufficient to allow cell lineage reprogramming of both fetal and stem cell-derived RPE cells to become functional neurons. PMID:25298373

  10. Histone deacetylase inhibitor valproic acid promotes the induction of pluripotency in mouse fibroblasts by suppressing reprogramming-induced senescence stress

    SciTech Connect

    Zhai, Yingying; Chen, Xi; Yu, Dehai; Li, Tao; Cui, Jiuwei; Wang, Guanjun; Hu, Ji-Fan; Li, Wei

    2015-09-10

    Histone deacetylase inhibitor valproic acid (VPA) has been used to increase the reprogramming efficiency of induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) from somatic cells, yet the specific molecular mechanisms underlying this effect is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that reprogramming with lentiviruses carrying the iPSC-inducing factors (Oct4-Sox2-Klf4-cMyc, OSKM) caused senescence in mouse fibroblasts, establishing a stress barrier for cell reprogramming. Administration of VPA protected cells from reprogramming-induced senescent stress. Using an in vitro pre-mature senescence model, we found that VPA treatment increased cell proliferation and inhibited apoptosis through the suppression of the p16/p21 pathway. In addition, VPA also inhibited the G2/M phase blockage derived from the senescence stress. These findings highlight the role of VPA in breaking the cell senescence barrier required for the induction of pluripotency. - Highlights: • Histone deacetylase inhibitor valproic acid enhances iPSC induction. • Valproic acid suppresses reprogramming-induced senescence stress. • Valproic acid downregulates the p16/p21 pathway in reprogramming. • This study demonstrates a new mechanistic role of valproic acid in enhancing reprogramming.

  11. Tet-mediated imprinting erasure in H19 locus following reprogramming of spermatogonial stem cells to induced pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Bermejo-Álvarez, P.; Ramos-Ibeas, P.; Park, K.E.; Powell, A. P.; Vansandt, L.; Derek, Bickhart; Ramirez, M. A.; Gutiérrez-Adán, A.; Telugu, B. P.

    2015-01-01

    Selective methylation of CpG islands at imprinting control regions (ICR) determines the monoparental expression of a subset of genes. Currently, it is unclear whether artificial reprogramming induced by the expression of Yamanaka factors disrupts these marks and whether cell type of origin affects the dynamics of reprogramming. In this study, spermatogonial stem cells (SSC) that harbor paternalized imprinting marks, and fibroblasts were reprogrammed to iPSC (SSCiPSC and fiPSC). The SSCiPSC were able to form teratomas and generated chimeras with a higher skin chimerism than those derived from fiPSC. RNA-seq revealed extensive reprogramming at the transcriptional level with 8124 genes differentially expressed between SSC and SSCiPSC and only 490 between SSCiPSC and fiPSC. Likewise, reprogramming of SSC affected 26 of 41 imprinting gene clusters known in the mouse genome. A closer look at H19 ICR revealed complete erasure in SSCiPSC in contrast to fiPSC. Imprinting erasure in SSCiPSC was maintained even after in vivo differentiation into teratomas. Reprogramming of SSC from Tet1 and Tet2 double knockout mice however lacked demethylation of H19 ICR. These results suggest that imprinting erasure during reprogramming depends on the epigenetic landscape of the precursor cell and is mediated by TETs at the H19 locus. PMID:26328763

  12. Tet-mediated imprinting erasure in H19 locus following reprogramming of spermatogonial stem cells to induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Bermejo-Álvarez, P; Ramos-Ibeas, P; Park, K E; Powell, A P; Vansandt, L; Derek, Bickhart; Ramirez, M A; Gutiérrez-Adán, A; Telugu, B P

    2015-09-02

    Selective methylation of CpG islands at imprinting control regions (ICR) determines the monoparental expression of a subset of genes. Currently, it is unclear whether artificial reprogramming induced by the expression of Yamanaka factors disrupts these marks and whether cell type of origin affects the dynamics of reprogramming. In this study, spermatogonial stem cells (SSC) that harbor paternalized imprinting marks, and fibroblasts were reprogrammed to iPSC (SSCiPSC and fiPSC). The SSCiPSC were able to form teratomas and generated chimeras with a higher skin chimerism than those derived from fiPSC. RNA-seq revealed extensive reprogramming at the transcriptional level with 8124 genes differentially expressed between SSC and SSCiPSC and only 490 between SSCiPSC and fiPSC. Likewise, reprogramming of SSC affected 26 of 41 imprinting gene clusters known in the mouse genome. A closer look at H19 ICR revealed complete erasure in SSCiPSC in contrast to fiPSC. Imprinting erasure in SSCiPSC was maintained even after in vivo differentiation into teratomas. Reprogramming of SSC from Tet1 and Tet2 double knockout mice however lacked demethylation of H19 ICR. These results suggest that imprinting erasure during reprogramming depends on the epigenetic landscape of the precursor cell and is mediated by TETs at the H19 locus.

  13. Rationale and Methodology of Reprogramming for Generation of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells and Induced Neural Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Zuojun; Guo, Fuzheng; Biswas, Sangita; Deng, Wenbin

    2016-01-01

    Great progress has been made regarding the capabilities to modify somatic cell fate ever since the technology for generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) was discovered in 2006. Later, induced neural progenitor cells (iNPCs) were generated from mouse and human cells, bypassing some of the concerns and risks of using iPSCs in neuroscience applications. To overcome the limitation of viral vector induced reprogramming, bioactive small molecules (SM) have been explored to enhance the efficiency of reprogramming or even replace transcription factors (TFs), making the reprogrammed cells more amenable to clinical application. The chemical induced reprogramming process is a simple process from a technical perspective, but the choice of SM at each step is vital during the procedure. The mechanisms underlying cell transdifferentiation are still poorly understood, although, several experimental data and insights have indicated the rationale of cell reprogramming. The process begins with the forced expression of specific TFs or activation/inhibition of cell signaling pathways by bioactive chemicals in defined culture condition, which initiates the further reactivation of endogenous gene program and an optimal stoichiometric expression of the endogenous pluri- or multi-potency genes, and finally leads to the birth of reprogrammed cells such as iPSCs and iNPCs. In this review, we first outline the rationale and discuss the methodology of iPSCs and iNPCs in a stepwise manner; and then we also discuss the chemical-based reprogramming of iPSCs and iNPCs. PMID:27104529

  14. Involvement of Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 in Maturation of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells during Reprogramming of Mouse and Human Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Khazaie, Niusha; Massumi, Mohammad; Wee, Ping; Salimi, Mahdieh; Mohammadnia, Abdulshakour; Yaqubi, Moein

    2016-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) provide a reliable source for the study of regenerative medicine, drug discovery, and developmental biology. Despite extensive studies on the reprogramming of mouse and human fibroblasts into iPSCs, the efficiency of reprogramming is still low. Here, we used a bioinformatics and systems biology approach to study the two gene regulatory waves governing the reprogramming of mouse and human fibroblasts into iPSCs. Our results revealed that the maturation phase of reprogramming was regulated by a more complex regulatory network of transcription factors compared to the initiation phase. Interestingly, in addition to pluripotency factors, the polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) members Ezh2, Eed, Jarid2, Mtf2, and Suz12 are crucially recruited during the maturation phase of reprogramming. Moreover, we found that during the maturation phase of reprogramming, pluripotency factors, via the expression and induction of PRC2 complex members, could silence the lineage-specific gene expression program and maintain a ground state of pluripotency in human and mouse naïve iPSCs. The findings obtained here provide us a better understanding of the gene regulatory network (GRN) that governs reprogramming, and the maintenance of the naïve state of iPSCs.

  15. Involvement of Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 in Maturation of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells during Reprogramming of Mouse and Human Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Khazaie, Niusha; Massumi, Mohammad; Wee, Ping; Salimi, Mahdieh; Mohammadnia, Abdulshakour; Yaqubi, Moein

    2016-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) provide a reliable source for the study of regenerative medicine, drug discovery, and developmental biology. Despite extensive studies on the reprogramming of mouse and human fibroblasts into iPSCs, the efficiency of reprogramming is still low. Here, we used a bioinformatics and systems biology approach to study the two gene regulatory waves governing the reprogramming of mouse and human fibroblasts into iPSCs. Our results revealed that the maturation phase of reprogramming was regulated by a more complex regulatory network of transcription factors compared to the initiation phase. Interestingly, in addition to pluripotency factors, the polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) members Ezh2, Eed, Jarid2, Mtf2, and Suz12 are crucially recruited during the maturation phase of reprogramming. Moreover, we found that during the maturation phase of reprogramming, pluripotency factors, via the expression and induction of PRC2 complex members, could silence the lineage-specific gene expression program and maintain a ground state of pluripotency in human and mouse naïve iPSCs. The findings obtained here provide us a better understanding of the gene regulatory network (GRN) that governs reprogramming, and the maintenance of the naïve state of iPSCs. PMID:26938987

  16. Reserve stem cells: Reprogramming of differentiated cells fuels repair, metaplasia, and neoplasia in the adult gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Jason C.; Sansom, Owen J.

    2016-01-01

    It has long been known that differentiated cells can switch fates, especially in vitro, but only recently has there been a critical mass of publications describing the mechanisms adult, post-mitotic cells use in vivo to reverse their differentiation state. We propose that this sort of cellular reprogramming is a fundamental cellular process akin to apoptosis or mitosis. Because reprogramming can invoke regenerative cells from mature cells, it is critical to the longterm maintenance of tissues like the pancreas, which encounter large insults during adulthood but lack constitutively active adult stem cells to repair the damage. However, even in tissues with adult stem cells, like stomach and intestine, reprogramming may allow mature cells to serve as reserve (“quiescent”) stem cells when normal stem cells are compromised. We propose that the potential downside to reprogramming is that it increases risk for cancers that occur late in adulthood. Mature, long-lived cells may have years of exposure to mutagens. Mutations that affect the physiological function of differentiated, post-mitotic cells may lead to apoptosis, but mutations in genes that govern proliferation might not be selected against. Hence, reprogramming with reentry into the cell cycle might unmask those mutations, causing an irreversible progenitor-like, proliferative state. We review recent evidence showing that reprogramming fuels irreversible metaplastic and precancerous proliferations in stomach and pancreas. Finally, we illustrate how we think reprogrammed differentiated cells are likely candidates as cells of origin for cancers of the intestine. PMID:26175494

  17. Human Ocular Epithelial Cells Endogenously Expressing SOX2 and OCT4 Yield High Efficiency of Pluripotency Reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Poon, Ming-Wai; He, Jia; Fang, Xiaowei; Zhang, Zhao; Wang, Weixin; Wang, Junwen; Qiu, Fangfang; Tse, Hung-Fat; Li, Wei; Liu, Zuguo; Lian, Qizhou

    2015-01-01

    A variety of pluripotency reprogramming frequencies from different somatic cells has been observed, indicating cell origin is a critical contributor for efficiency of pluripotency reprogramming. Identifying the cell sources for efficient induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) generation, and defining its advantages or disadvantages on reprogramming, is therefore important. Human ocular tissue-derived conjunctival epithelial cells (OECs) exhibited endogenous expression of reprogramming factors OCT4A (the specific OCT 4 isoform on pluripotency reprogramming) and SOX2. We therefore determined whether OECs could be used for high efficiency of iPSCs generation. We compared the endogenous expression levels of four pluripotency factors and the pluripotency reprograming efficiency of human OECs with that of ocular stromal cells (OSCs). Real-time PCR, microarray analysis, Western blotting and immunostaining assays were employed to compare OECiPSCs with OSCiPSCs on molecular bases of reprogramming efficiency and preferred lineage-differentiation potential. Using the traditional KMOS (KLF4, C-MYC, OCT4 and SOX2) reprogramming protocol, we confirmed that OECs, endogenously expressing reprogramming factors OCT4A and SOX2, yield very high efficiency of iPSCs generation (~1.5%). Furthermore, higher efficiency of retinal pigmented epithelial differentiation (RPE cells) was observed in OECiPSCs compared to OSCiPSCs or skin fibroblast iMR90iPSCs. The findings in this study suggest that conjunctival-derived epithelial (OECs) cells can be easier converted to iPSCs than conjunctival-derived stromal cells (OSCs). This cell type may also have advantages in retinal pigmented epithelial differentiation.

  18. Factor-Reduced Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Efficiently Differentiate into Neurons Independent of the Number of Reprogramming Factors.

    PubMed

    Hermann, Andreas; Kim, Jeong Beom; Srimasorn, Sumitra; Zaehres, Holm; Reinhardt, Peter; Schöler, Hans R; Storch, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Reprogramming of somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) by overexpression of the transcription factors OCT4, SOX2, KLF4, and c-Myc holds great promise for the development of personalized cell replacement therapies. In an attempt to minimize the risk of chromosomal disruption and to simplify reprogramming, several studies demonstrated that a reduced set of reprogramming factors is sufficient to generate iPSC. We recently showed that a reduction of reprogramming factors in murine cells not only reduces reprogramming efficiency but also may worsen subsequent differentiation. To prove whether this is also true for human cells, we compared the efficiency of neuronal differentiation of iPSC generated from fetal human neural stem cells with either one (OCT4; hiPSC1F-NSC) or two (OCT4, KLF4; hiPSC2F-NSC) reprogramming factors with iPSC produced from human fibroblasts using three (hiPSC3F-FIB) or four reprogramming factors (hiPSC4F-FIB). After four weeks of coculture with PA6 stromal cells, neuronal differentiation of hiPSC1F-NSC and hiPSC2F-NSC was as efficient as iPSC3F-FIB or iPSC4F-FIB. We conclude that a reduction of reprogramming factors in human cells does reduce reprogramming efficiency but does not alter subsequent differentiation into neural lineages. This is of importance for the development of future application of iPSC in cell replacement therapies.

  19. Human Ocular Epithelial Cells Endogenously Expressing SOX2 and OCT4 Yield High Efficiency of Pluripotency Reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Xiaowei; Zhang, Zhao; Wang, Weixin; Wang, Junwen; Qiu, Fangfang; Tse, Hung-Fat; Li, Wei; Liu, Zuguo; Lian, Qizhou

    2015-01-01

    A variety of pluripotency reprogramming frequencies from different somatic cells has been observed, indicating cell origin is a critical contributor for efficiency of pluripotency reprogramming. Identifying the cell sources for efficient induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) generation, and defining its advantages or disadvantages on reprogramming, is therefore important. Human ocular tissue-derived conjunctival epithelial cells (OECs) exhibited endogenous expression of reprogramming factors OCT4A (the specific OCT 4 isoform on pluripotency reprogramming) and SOX2. We therefore determined whether OECs could be used for high efficiency of iPSCs generation. We compared the endogenous expression levels of four pluripotency factors and the pluripotency reprograming efficiency of human OECs with that of ocular stromal cells (OSCs). Real-time PCR, microarray analysis, Western blotting and immunostaining assays were employed to compare OECiPSCs with OSCiPSCs on molecular bases of reprogramming efficiency and preferred lineage-differentiation potential. Using the traditional KMOS (KLF4, C-MYC, OCT4 and SOX2) reprogramming protocol, we confirmed that OECs, endogenously expressing reprogramming factors OCT4A and SOX2, yield very high efficiency of iPSCs generation (~1.5%). Furthermore, higher efficiency of retinal pigmented epithelial differentiation (RPE cells) was observed in OECiPSCs compared to OSCiPSCs or skin fibroblast iMR90iPSCs. The findings in this study suggest that conjunctival-derived epithelial (OECs) cells can be easier converted to iPSCs than conjunctival-derived stromal cells (OSCs). This cell type may also have advantages in retinal pigmented epithelial differentiation. PMID:26131692

  20. Dynamic regulation of human endogenous retroviruses mediates factor-induced reprogramming and differentiation potential.

    PubMed

    Ohnuki, Mari; Tanabe, Koji; Sutou, Kenta; Teramoto, Ito; Sawamura, Yuka; Narita, Megumi; Nakamura, Michiko; Tokunaga, Yumie; Nakamura, Masahiro; Watanabe, Akira; Yamanaka, Shinya; Takahashi, Kazutoshi

    2014-08-26

    Pluripotency can be induced in somatic cells by overexpressing transcription factors, including POU class 5 homeobox 1 (OCT3/4), sex determining region Y-box 2 (SOX2), Krüppel-like factor 4 (KLF4), and myelocytomatosis oncogene (c-MYC). However, some induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) exhibit defective differentiation and inappropriate maintenance of pluripotency features. Here we show that dynamic regulation of human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs) is important in the reprogramming process toward iPSCs, and in re-establishment of differentiation potential. During reprogramming, OCT3/4, SOX2, and KLF4 transiently hyperactivated LTR7s--the long-terminal repeats of HERV type-H (HERV-H)--to levels much higher than in embryonic stem cells by direct occupation of LTR7 sites genome-wide. Knocking down LTR7s or long intergenic non-protein coding RNA, regulator of reprogramming (lincRNA-RoR), a HERV-H-driven long noncoding RNA, early in reprogramming markedly reduced the efficiency of iPSC generation. KLF4 and LTR7 expression decreased to levels comparable with embryonic stem cells once reprogramming was complete, but failure to resuppress KLF4 and LTR7s resulted in defective differentiation. We also observed defective differentiation and LTR7 activation when iPSCs had forced expression of KLF4. However, when aberrantly expressed KLF4 or LTR7s were suppressed in defective iPSCs, normal differentiation was restored. Thus, a major mechanism by which OCT3/4, SOX2, and KLF4 promote human iPSC generation and reestablish potential for differentiation is by dynamically regulating HERV-H LTR7s.

  1. Biological computational approaches: new hopes to improve (re)programming robustness, regenerative medicine and cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Ebrahimi, Behnam

    2016-01-01

    Hundreds of transcription factors (TFs) are expressed and work in each cell type, but the identity of the cells is defined and maintained through the activity of a small number of core TFs. Existing reprogramming strategies predominantly focus on the ectopic expression of core TFs of an intended fate in a given cell type regardless of the state of native/somatic gene regulatory networks (GRNs) of the starting cells. Interestingly, an important point is that how much products of the reprogramming, transdifferentiation and differentiation (programming) are identical to their in vivo counterparts. There is evidence that shows that direct fate conversions of somatic cells are not complete, with target cell identity not fully achieved. Manipulation of core TFs provides a powerful tool for engineering cell fate in terms of extinguishment of native GRNs, the establishment of a new GRN, and preventing installation of aberrant GRNs. Conventionally, core TFs are selected to convert one cell type into another mostly based on literature and the experimental identification of genes that are differentially expressed in one cell type compared to the specific cell types. Currently, there is not a universal standard strategy for identifying candidate core TFs. Remarkably, several biological computational platforms are developed, which are capable of evaluating the fidelity of reprogramming methods and refining existing protocols. The current review discusses some deficiencies of reprogramming technologies in the production of a pure population of authentic target cells. Furthermore, it reviews the role of computational approaches (e.g. CellNet, KeyGenes, Mogrify, etc.) in improving (re)programming methods and consequently in regenerative medicine and cancer therapeutics.

  2. The Power and the Promise of Cell Reprogramming: Personalized Autologous Body Organ and Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Palomo, Ana Belen Alvarez; Lucas, Michaela; Dilley, Rodney J; McLenachan, Samuel; Chen, Fred Kuanfu; Requena, Jordi; Sal, Marti Farrera; Lucas, Andrew; Alvarez, Inaki; Jaraquemada, Dolores; Edel, Michael J

    2014-04-04

    Reprogramming somatic cells to induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) or direct reprogramming to desired cell types are powerful and new in vitro methods for the study of human disease, cell replacement therapy, and drug development. Both methods to reprogram cells are unconstrained by the ethical and social questions raised by embryonic stem cells. iPSC technology promises to enable personalized autologous cell therapy and has the potential to revolutionize cell replacement therapy and regenerative medicine. Potential applications of iPSC technology are rapidly increasing in ambition from discrete cell replacement applications to the iPSC assisted bioengineering of body organs for personalized autologous body organ transplant. Recent work has demonstrated that the generation of organs from iPSCs is a future possibility. The development of embryonic-like organ structures bioengineered from iPSCs has been achieved, such as an early brain structure (cerebral organoids), bone, optic vesicle-like structures (eye), cardiac muscle tissue (heart), primitive pancreas islet cells, a tooth-like structure (teeth), and functional liver buds (liver). Thus, iPSC technology offers, in the future, the powerful and unique possibility to make body organs for transplantation removing the need for organ donation and immune suppressing drugs. Whilst it is clear that iPSCs are rapidly becoming the lead cell type for research into cell replacement therapy and body organ transplantation strategies in humans, it is not known whether (1) such transplants will stimulate host immune responses; and (2) whether this technology will be capable of the bioengineering of a complete and fully functional human organ. This review will not focus on reprogramming to iPSCs, of which a plethora of reviews can be found, but instead focus on the latest developments in direct reprogramming of cells, the bioengineering of body organs from iPSCs, and an analysis of the immune response induced by i

  3. Biological computational approaches: new hopes to improve (re)programming robustness, regenerative medicine and cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Ebrahimi, Behnam

    2016-01-01

    Hundreds of transcription factors (TFs) are expressed and work in each cell type, but the identity of the cells is defined and maintained through the activity of a small number of core TFs. Existing reprogramming strategies predominantly focus on the ectopic expression of core TFs of an intended fate in a given cell type regardless of the state of native/somatic gene regulatory networks (GRNs) of the starting cells. Interestingly, an important point is that how much products of the reprogramming, transdifferentiation and differentiation (programming) are identical to their in vivo counterparts. There is evidence that shows that direct fate conversions of somatic cells are not complete, with target cell identity not fully achieved. Manipulation of core TFs provides a powerful tool for engineering cell fate in terms of extinguishment of native GRNs, the establishment of a new GRN, and preventing installation of aberrant GRNs. Conventionally, core TFs are selected to convert one cell type into another mostly based on literature and the experimental identification of genes that are differentially expressed in one cell type compared to the specific cell types. Currently, there is not a universal standard strategy for identifying candidate core TFs. Remarkably, several biological computational platforms are developed, which are capable of evaluating the fidelity of reprogramming methods and refining existing protocols. The current review discusses some deficiencies of reprogramming technologies in the production of a pure population of authentic target cells. Furthermore, it reviews the role of computational approaches (e.g. CellNet, KeyGenes, Mogrify, etc.) in improving (re)programming methods and consequently in regenerative medicine and cancer therapeutics. PMID:27056282

  4. C/EBPα poises B cells for rapid reprogramming into induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Di Stefano, Bruno; Sardina, Jose Luis; van Oevelen, Chris; Collombet, Samuel; Kallin, Eric M; Vicent, Guillermo P; Lu, Jun; Thieffry, Denis; Beato, Miguel; Graf, Thomas

    2014-02-13

    CCAAT/enhancer binding protein-α (C/EBPα) induces transdifferentiation of B cells into macrophages at high efficiencies and enhances reprogramming into induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells when co-expressed with the transcription factors Oct4 (Pou5f1), Sox2, Klf4 and Myc (hereafter called OSKM). However, how C/EBPα accomplishes these effects is unclear. Here we find that in mouse primary B cells transient C/EBPα expression followed by OSKM activation induces a 100-fold increase in iPS cell reprogramming efficiency, involving 95% of the population. During this conversion, pluripotency and epithelial-mesenchymal transition genes become markedly upregulated, and 60% of the cells express Oct4 within 2 days. C/EBPα acts as a 'path-breaker' as it transiently makes the chromatin of pluripotency genes more accessible to DNase I. C/EBPα also induces the expression of the dioxygenase Tet2 and promotes its translocation to the nucleus where it binds to regulatory regions of pluripotency genes that become demethylated after OSKM induction. In line with these findings, overexpression of Tet2 enhances OSKM-induced B-cell reprogramming. Because the enzyme is also required for efficient C/EBPα-induced immune cell conversion, our data indicate that Tet2 provides a mechanistic link between iPS cell reprogramming and B-cell transdifferentiation. The rapid iPS reprogramming approach described here should help to fully elucidate the process and has potential clinical applications. PMID:24336202

  5. Unstable genomes elevate transcriptome dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Joshua B.; Liu, Guo; Abdallah, Batoul Y.; Horne, Steven D.; Ye, Karen J.; Bremer, Steven W.; Ye, Christine J.; Krawetz, Stephen A.; Heng, Henry H.

    2015-01-01

    The challenge of identifying common expression signatures in cancer is well known, however the reason behind this is largely unclear. Traditionally variation in expression signatures has been attributed to technological problems, however recent evidence suggests that chromosome instability (CIN) and resultant karyotypic heterogeneity may be a large contributing factor. Using a well-defined model of immortalization, we systematically compared the pattern of genome alteration and expression dynamics during somatic evolution. Co-measurement of global gene expression and karyotypic alteration throughout the immortalization process reveals that karyotype changes influence gene expression as major structural and numerical karyotypic alterations result in large gene expression deviation. Replicate samples from stages with stable genomes are more similar to each other than are replicate samples with karyotypic heterogeneity. Karyotypic and gene expression change during immortalization is dynamic as each stage of progression has a unique expression pattern. This was further verified by comparing global expression in two replicates grown in one flask with known karyotypes. Replicates with higher karyotypic instability were found to be less similar than replicates with stable karyotypes. This data illustrates the karyotype, transcriptome, and transcriptome determined pathways are in constant flux during somatic cellular evolution (particularly during the macroevolutionary phase) and this flux is an inextricable feature of CIN and essential for cancer formation. The findings presented here underscore the importance of understanding the evolutionary process of cancer in order to design improved treatment modalities. PMID:24122714

  6. The Frankia alni symbiotic transcriptome.

    PubMed

    Alloisio, Nicole; Queiroux, Clothilde; Fournier, Pascale; Pujic, Petar; Normand, Philippe; Vallenet, David; Médigue, Claudine; Yamaura, Masatoshi; Kakoi, Kentaro; Kucho, Ken-ichi

    2010-05-01

    The actinobacteria Frankia spp. are able to induce the formation of nodules on the roots of a large spectrum of actinorhizal plants, where they convert dinitrogen to ammonia in exchange for plant photosynthates. In the present study, transcriptional analyses were performed on nitrogen-replete free-living Frankia alni cells and on Alnus glutinosa nodule bacteria, using whole-genome microarrays. Distribution of nodule-induced genes on the genome was found to be mostly over regions with high synteny between three Frankia spp. genomes, while nodule-repressed genes, which were mostly hypothetical and not conserved, were spread around the genome. Genes known to be related to nitrogen fixation were highly induced, nif (nitrogenase), hup2 (hydrogenase uptake), suf (sulfur-iron cluster), and shc (hopanoids synthesis). The expression of genes involved in ammonium assimilation and transport was strongly modified, suggesting that bacteria ammonium assimilation was limited. Genes involved in particular in transcriptional regulation, signaling processes, protein drug export, protein secretion, lipopolysaccharide, and peptidoglycan biosynthesis that may play a role in symbiosis were also identified. We also showed that this Frankia symbiotic transcriptome was highly similar among phylogenetically distant plant families Betulaceae and Myricaceae. Finally, comparison with rhizobia transcriptome suggested that F. alni is metabolically more active in symbiosis than rhizobia. PMID:20367468

  7. Developmental Transcriptome of Aplysia californica

    PubMed Central

    HEYLAND, ANDREAS; VUE, ZER; VOOLSTRA, CHRISTIAN R.; MEDINA, MÓNICA; MOROZ, LEONID L.

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide transcriptional changes in development provide important insight into mechanisms underlying growth, differentiation, and patterning. However, such large-scale developmental studies have been limited to a few representatives of Ecdysozoans and Chordates. Here, we characterize transcriptomes of embryonic, larval, and metamorphic development in the marine mollusc Aplysia californica and reveal novel molecular components associated with life history transitions. Specifically, we identify more than 20 signal peptides, putative hormones, and transcription factors in association with early development and metamorphic stages—many of which seem to be evolutionarily conserved elements of signal transduction pathways. We also characterize genes related to biomineralization—a critical process of molluscan development. In summary, our experiment provides the first large-scale survey of gene expression in mollusc development, and complements previous studies on the regulatory mechanisms underlying body plan patterning and the formation of larval and juvenile structures. This study serves as a resource for further functional annotation of transcripts and genes in Aplysia, specifically and molluscs in general. A comparison of the Aplysia developmental transcriptome with similar studies in the zebra fish Danio rerio, the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, and other studies on molluscs suggests an overall highly divergent pattern of gene regulatory mechanisms that are likely a consequence of the different developmental modes of these organisms. PMID:21328528

  8. Characterization of the Asian Citrus Psyllid Transcriptome.

    PubMed

    Reese, Justin; Christenson, Matthew K; Leng, Nan; Saha, Surya; Cantarel, Brandi; Lindeberg, Magdalen; Tamborindeguy, Cecilia; Maccarthy, Justin; Weaver, Daniel; Trease, Andrew J; Steven V, Ready; Davis, Vincent M; McCormick, Courtney; Haudenschild, Christian; Han, Shunsheng; Johnson, Shannon L; Shelby, Kent S; Huang, Hong; Bextine, Blake R; Shatters, Robert G; Hall, David G; Davis, Paul H; Hunter, Wayne B

    2014-01-01

    The Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Psyllidae) is a vector for the causative agents of Huanglongbing, which threatens citrus production worldwide. This study reports and discusses the first D. citri transcriptomes, encompassing the three main life stages of D. citri, egg, nymph and adult. The transcriptomes were annotated using Gene Ontology (GO) and insecticide-related genes within each life stage were identified to aid the development of future D. citri insecticides. Transcriptome assemblies and other sequence data are available for download at the International Asian Citrus Psyllid Genome Consortium website [http://psyllid.org/download] and at NCBI [http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/bioproject/29447].

  9. Characterization of the Asian Citrus Psyllid Transcriptome.

    PubMed

    Reese, Justin; Christenson, Matthew K; Leng, Nan; Saha, Surya; Cantarel, Brandi; Lindeberg, Magdalen; Tamborindeguy, Cecilia; Maccarthy, Justin; Weaver, Daniel; Trease, Andrew J; Steven V, Ready; Davis, Vincent M; McCormick, Courtney; Haudenschild, Christian; Han, Shunsheng; Johnson, Shannon L; Shelby, Kent S; Huang, Hong; Bextine, Blake R; Shatters, Robert G; Hall, David G; Davis, Paul H; Hunter, Wayne B

    2014-01-01

    The Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Psyllidae) is a vector for the causative agents of Huanglongbing, which threatens citrus production worldwide. This study reports and discusses the first D. citri transcriptomes, encompassing the three main life stages of D. citri, egg, nymph and adult. The transcriptomes were annotated using Gene Ontology (GO) and insecticide-related genes within each life stage were identified to aid the development of future D. citri insecticides. Transcriptome assemblies and other sequence data are available for download at the International Asian Citrus Psyllid Genome Consortium website [http://psyllid.org/download] and at NCBI [http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/bioproject/29447]. PMID:24511328

  10. Characterization of the Asian Citrus Psyllid Transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    Reese, Justin; Christenson, Matthew K.; Leng, Nan; Saha, Surya; Cantarel, Brandi; Lindeberg, Magdalen; Tamborindeguy, Cecilia; MacCarthy, Justin; Weaver, Daniel; Trease, Andrew J.; Ready, Steven V.; Davis, Vincent M.; McCormick, Courtney; Haudenschild, Christian; Han, Shunsheng; Johnson, Shannon L.; Shelby, Kent S.; Huang, Hong; Bextine, Blake R.; Shatters, Robert G.; Hall, David G.; Davis, Paul H.; Hunter, Wayne B.

    2014-01-01

    The Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Psyllidae) is a vector for the causative agents of Huanglongbing, which threatens citrus production worldwide. This study reports and discusses the first D. citri transcriptomes, encompassing the three main life stages of D. citri, egg, nymph and adult. The transcriptomes were annotated using Gene Ontology (GO) and insecticide-related genes within each life stage were identified to aid the development of future D. citri insecticides. Transcriptome assemblies and other sequence data are available for download at the International Asian Citrus Psyllid Genome Consortium website [http://psyllid.org/download] and at NCBI [http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/bioproject/29447]. PMID:24511328

  11. Fortunella margarita Transcriptional Reprogramming Triggered by Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    -related metabolism as well as a number of resistant response-specific genes in the kumquat transcriptome in response to Xcc inoculation. Gene expression profile(s) were analyzed to assemble a comprehensive and inclusive image of the molecular interaction in the kumquat/Xcc system. This was done in order to elucidate molecular mechanisms associated with the development of the hypersensitive response phenotype in kumquat leaves. These data will be used to perform comparisons among citrus species to evaluate means to enhance the host immune responses against bacterial diseases. PMID:22078099

  12. Postnatal epigenetic reprogramming in the germline of a marsupial, the tammar wallaby

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Epigenetic reprogramming is essential to restore totipotency and to reset genomic imprints during mammalian germ cell development and gamete formation. The dynamic DNA methylation change at DMRs (differentially methylated regions) within imprinted domains and of retrotransposons is characteristic of this process. Both marsupials and eutherian mammals have genomic imprinting but these two subgroups have been evolving separately for up to 160 million years. Marsupials have a unique reproductive strategy and deliver tiny, altricial young that complete their development within their mother's pouch. Germ cell proliferation in the genital ridge continues after birth in the tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii), and it is only after 25 days postpartum that female germ cells begin to enter meiosis and male germ cells begin to enter mitotic arrest. At least two marsupial imprinted loci (PEG10 and H19) also have DMRs. To investigate the evolution of epigenetic reprogramming in the marsupial germline, here we collected germ cells from male pouch young of the tammar wallaby and analysed the methylation status of PEG10 and H19 DMR, an LTR (long terminal repeat) and a non-LTR retrotransposons. Results Demethylation of the H19 DMR was almost completed by 14 days postpartum and de-novo methylation started from 34 days postpartum. These stages correspond to 14 days after the completion of primordial germ cell migration into genital ridge (demethylation) and 9 days after the first detection of mitotic arrest (re-methylation) in the male germ cells. Interestingly, the PEG10 DMR was already unmethylated at 7 days postpartum, suggesting that the timing of epigenetic reprogramming is not the same at all genomic loci. Retrotransposon methylation was not completely removed after the demethylation event in the germ cells, similar to the situation in the mouse. Conclusions Thus, despite the postnatal occurrence of epigenetic reprogramming and the persistence of genome

  13. Reprogramming Bacteria to Seek and Destroy Small Molecules (JGI Seventh Annual User Meeting 2012: Genomics of Energy and Environment)

    SciTech Connect

    Gallivan, Justin

    2012-03-21

    Justin Gallivan, of Emory University presents a talk titled "Reprogramming Bacteria to Seek and Destroy Small Molecules" at the JGI User 7th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 21, 2012 in Walnut Creek, Calif

  14. Reprogramming Bacteria to Seek and Destroy Small Molecules (JGI Seventh Annual User Meeting 2012: Genomics of Energy and Environment)

    ScienceCinema

    Gallivan, Justin [Emory University

    2016-07-12

    Justin Gallivan, of Emory University presents a talk titled "Reprogramming Bacteria to Seek and Destroy Small Molecules" at the JGI User 7th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 21, 2012 in Walnut Creek, Calif

  15. Zfp281 mediates Nanog autorepression through recruitment of the NuRD complex and inhibits somatic cell reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Fidalgo, Miguel; Faiola, Francesco; Pereira, Carlos-Filipe; Ding, Junjun; Saunders, Arven; Gingold, Julian; Schaniel, Christoph; Lemischka, Ihor R.; Silva, José C. R.; Wang, Jianlong

    2012-01-01

    The homeodomain transcription factor Nanog plays an important role in embryonic stem cell (ESC) self-renewal and is essential for acquiring ground-state pluripotency during reprogramming. Understanding how Nanog is transcriptionally regulated is important for further dissecting mechanisms of ESC pluripotency and somatic cell reprogramming. Here, we report that Nanog is subjected to a negative autoregulatory mechanism, i.e., autorepression, in ESCs, and that such autorepression requires the coordinated action of the Nanog partner and transcriptional repressor Zfp281. Mechanistically, Zfp281 recruits the NuRD repressor complex onto the Nanog locus and maintains its integrity to mediate Nanog autorepression and, functionally, Zfp281-mediated Nanog autorepression presents a roadblock to efficient somatic cell reprogramming. Our results identify a unique transcriptional regulatory mode of Nanog gene expression and shed light into the mechanistic understanding of Nanog function in pluripotency and reprogramming. PMID:22988117

  16. Transcriptome-Wide Mapping of Pea Seed Ageing Reveals a Pivotal Role for Genes Related to Oxidative Stress and Programmed Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Colville, Louise; Lorenzo, Oscar; Graeber, Kai; Küster, Helge; Leubner-Metzger, Gerhard; Kranner, Ilse

    2013-01-01

    Understanding of seed ageing, which leads to viability loss during storage, is vital for ex situ plant conservation and agriculture alike. Yet the potential for regulation at the transcriptional level has not been fully investigated. Here, we studied the relationship between seed viability, gene expression and glutathione redox status during artificial ageing of pea (Pisum sativum) seeds. Transcriptome-wide analysis using microarrays was complemented with qRT-PCR analysis of selected genes and a multilevel analysis of the antioxidant glutathione. Partial degradation of DNA and RNA occurred from the onset of artificial ageing at 60% RH and 50°C, and transcriptome profiling showed that the expression of genes associated with programmed cell death, oxidative stress and protein ubiquitination were altered prior to any sign of viability loss. After 25 days of ageing viability started to decline in conjunction with progressively oxidising cellular conditions, as indicated by a shift of the glutathione redox state towards more positive values (>−190 mV). The unravelling of the molecular basis of seed ageing revealed that transcriptome reprogramming is a key component of the ageing process, which influences the progression of programmed cell death and decline in antioxidant capacity that ultimately lead to seed viability loss. PMID:24205239

  17. Transcriptome profiling of patient-specific human iPSC-cardiomyocytes predicts individual drug safety and efficacy responses in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Matsa, Elena; Burridge, Paul W.; Yu, Kun-Hsing; Ahrens, John H.; Termglinchan, Vittavat; Wu, Haodi; Liu, Chun; Shukla, Praveen; Sayed, Nazish; Churko, Jared M.; Shao, Ningyi; Woo, Nicole A.; Chao, Alexander S.; Gold, Joseph D.; Karakikes, Ioannis; Snyder, Michael P.; Wu, Joseph C.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Understanding individual susceptibility to drug-induced cardiotoxicity is key to improving patient safety and preventing drug attrition. Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) enable the study of pharmacological and toxicological responses in patient-specific cardiomyocytes (CMs), and may serve as preclinical platforms for precision medicine. Transcriptome profiling in hiPSC-CMs from seven individuals lacking known cardiovascular disease-associated mutations, and in three isogenic human heart tissue and hiPSC-CM pairs, showed greater inter-patient variation than intra-patient variation, verifying that reprogramming and differentiation preserve patient-specific gene expression, particularly in metabolic and stress-response genes. Transcriptome-based toxicology analysis predicted and risk-stratified patient-specific susceptibility to cardiotoxicity, and functional assays in hiPSC-CMs using tacrolimus and rosiglitazone, drugs targeting pathways predicted to produce cardiotoxicity, validated inter-patient differential responses. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated pathway correction prevented drug-induced cardiotoxicity. Our data suggest that hiPSC-CMs can be used in vitro to predict and validate patient-specific drug safety and efficacy, potentially enabling future clinical approaches to precision medicine. PMID:27545504

  18. Altered gut transcriptome in spondyloarthropathy

    PubMed Central

    Laukens, D; Peeters, H; Cruyssen, B V; Boonefaes, T; Elewaut, D; De Keyser, F; Mielants, H; Cuvelier, C; Veys, E M; Knecht, K; Van Hummelen, P; Remaut, E; Steidler, L; De Vos, M; Rottiers, P

    2006-01-01

    Background Intestinal inflammation is a common feature of spondyloarthropathy (SpA) and Crohn's disease. Inflammation is manifested clinically in Crohn's disease and subclinically in SpA. However, a fraction of patients with SpA develops overt Crohn's disease. Aims To investigate whether subclinical gut lesions in patients with SpA are associated with transcriptome changes comparable to those seen in Crohn's disease and to examine global gene expression in non‐inflamed colon biopsy specimens and screen patients for differentially expressed genes. Methods Macroarray analysis was used as an initial genomewide screen for selecting a comprehensive set of genes relevant to Crohn's disease and SpA. This led to the identification of 2625 expressed sequence tags that are differentially expressed in the colon of patients with Crohn's disease or SpA. These clones, with appropriate controls (6779 in total), were used to construct a glass‐based microarray, which was then used to analyse colon biopsy specimens from 15 patients with SpA, 11 patients with Crohn's disease and 10 controls. Results 95 genes were identified as differentially expressed in patients with SpA having a history of subclinical chronic gut inflammation and also in patients with Crohn's disease. Principal component analysis of this filtered set of genes successfully distinguished colon biopsy specimens from the three groups studied. Patients with SpA having subclinical chronic gut inflammation cluster together and are more related to those with Crohn's disease. Conclusion The transcriptome in the intestine of patients with SpA differs from that of controls. Moreover, these gene changes are comparable to those seen in patients with Crohn's disease, confirming initial clinical observations. On the basis of these findings, new (genetic) markers for detection of early Crohn's disease in patients with SpA can be considered. PMID:16476712

  19. Modeling skewness in human transcriptomes.

    PubMed

    Casellas, Joaquim; Varona, Luis

    2012-01-01

    Gene expression data are influenced by multiple biological and technological factors leading to a wide range of dispersion scenarios, although skewed patterns are not commonly addressed in microarray analyses. In this study, the distribution pattern of several human transcriptomes has been studied on free-access microarray gene expression data. Our results showed that, even in previously normalized gene expression data, probe and differential expression within probe effects suffer from substantial departures from the commonly assumed symmetric gaussian distribution. We developed a flexible mixed model for non-competitive microarray data analysis that accounted for asymmetric and heavy-tailed (Student's t distribution) dispersion processes. Random effects for gene expression data were modeled under asymmetric Student's t distributions where the asymmetry parameter (λ) took values from perfect symmetry (λ = 0) to right- (λ>0) or left-side (λ>0) over-expression patterns. This approach was applied to four free-access human data sets and revealed clearly better model performance when comparing with standard approaches accounting for traditional symmetric gaussian distribution patterns. Our analyses on human gene expression data revealed a substantial degree of right-hand asymmetry for probe effects, whereas differential gene expression addressed both symmetric and left-hand asymmetric patterns. Although these results cannot be extrapolated to all microarray experiments, they highlighted the incidence of skew dispersion patterns in human transcriptome; moreover, we provided a new analytical approach to appropriately address this biological phenomenon. The source code of the program accommodating these analytical developments and additional information about practical aspects on running the program are freely available by request to the corresponding author of this article. PMID:22701729

  20. Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) deficiency decreases reprogramming efficiency and leads to genomic instability in iPS cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kinoshita, Taisuke; Nagamatsu, Go; Kosaka, Takeo; Takubo, Keiyo; Hotta, Akitsu; Ellis, James; Suda, Toshio

    2011-04-08

    Highlights: {yields} iPS cells were induced with a fluorescence monitoring system. {yields} ATM-deficient tail-tip fibroblasts exhibited quite a low reprogramming efficiency. {yields} iPS cells obtained from ATM-deficient cells had pluripotent cell characteristics. {yields} ATM-deficient iPS cells had abnormal chromosomes, which were accumulated in culture. -- Abstract: During cell division, one of the major features of somatic cell reprogramming by defined factors, cells are potentially exposed to DNA damage. Inactivation of the tumor suppressor gene p53 raised reprogramming efficiency but resulted in an increased number of abnormal chromosomes in established iPS cells. Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM), which is critical in the cellular response to DNA double-strand breaks, may also play an important role during reprogramming. To clarify the function of ATM in somatic cell reprogramming, we investigated reprogramming in ATM-deficient (ATM-KO) tail-tip fibroblasts (TTFs). Although reprogramming efficiency was greatly reduced in ATM-KO TTFs, ATM-KO iPS cells were successfully generated and showed the same proliferation activity as WT iPS cells. ATM-KO iPS cells had a gene expression profile similar to ES cells and WT iPS cells, and had the capacity to differentiate into all three germ layers. On the other hand, ATM-KO iPS cells accumulated abnormal genome structures upon continuous passages. Even with the abnormal karyotype, ATM-KO iPS cells retained pluripotent cell characteristics for at least 20 passages. These data indicate that ATM does participate in the reprogramming process, although its role is not essential.

  1. Physical Interactions and Functional Coordination between the Core Subunits of Set1/Mll Complexes and the Reprogramming Factors.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhenhua; Augustin, Jonathan; Hu, Jing; Jiang, Hao

    2015-01-01

    Differentiated cells can be reprogrammed to the pluripotent state by overexpression of defined factors, and this process is profoundly influenced by epigenetic mechanisms including dynamic histone modifications. Changes in H3K4 methylation have been shown to be the predominant activating response in the early stage of cellular reprogramming. Mechanisms underlying such epigenetic priming, however, are not well understood. Here we show that the expression of the reprogramming factors (Yamanaka factors, Oct4, Sox2, Klf4 and Myc), especially Myc, directly promotes the expression of certain core subunits of the Set1/Mll family of H3K4 methyltransferase complexes. A dynamic recruitment of the Set1/Mll complexes largely, though not sufficiently in its own, explains the dynamics of the H3K4 methylation during cellular reprogramming. We then demonstrate that the core subunits of the Set1/Mll complexes physically interact with mainly Sox2 and Myc among the Yamanaka factors. We further show that Sox2 directly binds the Ash2l subunit in the Set1/Mll complexes and this binding is mediated by the HMG domain of Sox2. Functionally, we show that the Set1/Mll complex core subunits are required for efficient cellular reprogramming. We also show that Dpy30, one of the core subunits in the complexes, is required for the efficient target binding of the reprogramming factors. Interestingly, such requirement is not necessarily dependent on locus-specific H3K4 methylation. Our work provides a better understanding of how the reprogramming factors physically interact and functionally coordinate with a key group of epigenetic modulators to mediate transitions of the chromatin state involved in cellular reprogramming. PMID:26691508

  2. Physical Interactions and Functional Coordination between the Core Subunits of Set1/Mll Complexes and the Reprogramming Factors

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhenhua; Augustin, Jonathan; Hu, Jing; Jiang, Hao

    2015-01-01

    Differentiated cells can be reprogrammed to the pluripotent state by overexpression of defined factors, and this process is profoundly influenced by epigenetic mechanisms including dynamic histone modifications. Changes in H3K4 methylation have been shown to be the predominant activating response in the early stage of cellular reprogramming. Mechanisms underlying such epigenetic priming, however, are not well understood. Here we show that the expression of the reprogramming factors (Yamanaka factors, Oct4, Sox2, Klf4 and Myc), especially Myc, directly promotes the expression of certain core subunits of the Set1/Mll family of H3K4 methyltransferase complexes. A dynamic recruitment of the Set1/Mll complexes largely, though not sufficiently in its own, explains the dynamics of the H3K4 methylation during cellular reprogramming. We then demonstrate that the core subunits of the Set1/Mll complexes physically interact with mainly Sox2 and Myc among the Yamanaka factors. We further show that Sox2 directly binds the Ash2l subunit in the Set1/Mll complexes and this binding is mediated by the HMG domain of Sox2. Functionally, we show that the Set1/Mll complex core subunits are required for efficient cellular reprogramming. We also show that Dpy30, one of the core subunits in the complexes, is required for the efficient target binding of the reprogramming factors. Interestingly, such requirement is not necessarily dependent on locus-specific H3K4 methylation. Our work provides a better understanding of how the reprogramming factors physically interact and functionally coordinate with a key group of epigenetic modulators to mediate transitions of the chromatin state involved in cellular reprogramming. PMID:26691508

  3. Single-cell expression analyses during cellular reprogramming reveal an early stochastic and a late hierarchic phase.

    PubMed

    Buganim, Yosef; Faddah, Dina A; Cheng, Albert W; Itskovich, Elena; Markoulaki, Styliani; Ganz, Kibibi; Klemm, Sandy L; van Oudenaarden, Alexander; Jaenisch, Rudolf

    2012-09-14

    During cellular reprogramming, only a small fraction of cells become induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). Previous analyses of gene expression during reprogramming were based on populations of cells, impeding single-cell level identification of reprogramming events. We utilized two gene expression technologies to profile 48 genes in single cells at various stages during the reprogramming process. Analysis of early stages revealed considerable variation in gene expression between cells in contrast to late stages. Expression of Esrrb, Utf1, Lin28, and Dppa2 is a better predictor for cells to progress into iPSCs than expression of the previously suggested reprogramming markers Fbxo15, Fgf4, and Oct4. Stochastic gene expression early in reprogramming is followed by a late hierarchical phase with Sox2 being the upstream factor in a gene expression hierarchy. Finally, downstream factors derived from the late phase, which do not include Oct4, Sox2, Klf4, c-Myc, and Nanog, can activate the pluripotency circuitry. PMID:22980981

  4. Single-cell gene expression analyses of cellular reprogramming reveal a stochastic early and hierarchic late phase

    PubMed Central

    Buganim, Yosef; Faddah, Dina A.; Cheng, Albert W.; Itskovich, Elena; Markoulaki, Styliani; Ganz, Kibibi; Klemm, Sandy L.; van Oudenaarden, Alexander; Jaenisch, Rudolf

    2012-01-01

    During cellular reprogramming only a small fraction of cells become induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). Previous analyses of gene expression during reprogramming were based on populations of cells, impeding single-cell level identification of reprogramming events. We utilized two gene expression technologies to profile 48 genes in single cells at various stages during the reprogramming process. Analysis of early stages revealed considerable variation in gene expression between cells in contrast to late stages. Expression of Esrrb, Utf1, Lin28, and Dppa2 is a better predictor for cells to progress into iPSCs than expression of Fbxo15, Fgf4, and Oct4 previously suggested to be reprogramming markers. Stochastic gene expression early in reprogramming is followed by a late hierarchical phase with Sox2 being the upstream factor in a gene expression hierarchy. Finally, downstream factors derived from the late phase, which do not include Oct4, Sox2, Klf4, c-Myc and Nanog, can activate the pluripotency circuitry. PMID:22980981

  5. Local Genome Topology Can Exhibit an Incompletely Rewired 3D-Folding State during Somatic Cell Reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Beagan, Jonathan A; Gilgenast, Thomas G; Kim, Jesi; Plona, Zachary; Norton, Heidi K; Hu, Gui; Hsu, Sarah C; Shields, Emily J; Lyu, Xiaowen; Apostolou, Effie; Hochedlinger, Konrad; Corces, Victor G; Dekker, Job; Phillips-Cremins, Jennifer E

    2016-05-01

    Pluripotent genomes are folded in a topological hierarchy that reorganizes during differentiation. The extent to which chromatin architecture is reconfigured during somatic cell reprogramming is poorly understood. Here we integrate fine-resolution architecture maps with epigenetic marks and gene expression in embryonic stem cells (ESCs), neural progenitor cells (NPCs), and NPC-derived induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). We find that most pluripotency genes reconnect to target enhancers during reprogramming. Unexpectedly, some NPC interactions around pluripotency genes persist in our iPSC clone. Pluripotency genes engaged in both "fully-reprogrammed" and "persistent-NPC" interactions exhibit over/undershooting of target expression levels in iPSCs. Additionally, we identify a subset of "poorly reprogrammed" interactions that do not reconnect in iPSCs and display only partially recovered, ESC-specific CTCF occupancy. 2i/LIF can abrogate persistent-NPC interactions, recover poorly reprogrammed interactions, reinstate CTCF occupancy, and restore expression levels. Our results demonstrate that iPSC genomes can exhibit imperfectly rewired 3D-folding linked to inaccurately reprogrammed gene expression. PMID:27152443

  6. Combined negative effect of donor age and time in culture on the reprogramming efficiency into induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Trokovic, Ras; Weltner, Jere; Noisa, Parinya; Raivio, Taneli; Otonkoski, Timo

    2015-07-01

    Somatic cells can be reprogrammed into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) by the forced expression of the transcription factors OCT4, SOX2, KLF4 and c-MYC. Pluripotent reprogramming appears as a slow and inefficient process because of genetic and epigenetic barriers of somatic cells. In this report, we have extended previous observations concerning donor age and passage number of human fibroblasts as critical determinants of the efficiency of iPSC induction. Human fibroblasts from 11 different donors of variable age were reprogrammed by ectopic expression of reprogramming factors. Although all fibroblasts gave rise to iPSC colonies, the reprogramming efficiency correlated negatively and declined rapidly with increasing donor age. In addition, the late passage fibroblasts gave less reprogrammed colonies than the early passage cell counterparts, a finding associated with the cellular senescence-induced upregulation of p21. Knockdown of p21 restored iPSC generation even in long-term passaged fibroblasts of an old donor, highlighting the central role of the p53/p21 pathway in cellular senescence induced by both donor age and culture time.

  7. A Continuous Molecular Roadmap to iPSC Reprogramming through Progression Analysis of Single-Cell Mass Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Zunder, Eli R.; Lujan, Ernesto; Goltsev, Yury; Wernig, Marius; Nolan, Garry P.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY To analyze cellular reprogramming at the single-cell level, mass cytometry was used to simultaneously measure markers of pluripotency, differentiation, cell-cycle status, and cellular signaling throughout the reprogramming process. Time-resolved progression analysis of the resulting data sets was used to construct a continuous molecular roadmap for three independent reprogramming systems. Although these systems varied substantially in Oct4, Sox2, Klf4, and c-Myc stoichiometry, they presented a common set of reprogramming landmarks. Early in the reprogramming process, Oct4highKlf4high cells transitioned to a CD73highCD104highCD54low partially reprogrammed state. Ki67low cells from this intermediate population reverted to a MEF-like phenotype, but Ki67high cells advanced through the M-E-T and then bifurcated into two distinct populations: an ESC-like NanoghighSox2highCD54high population and a mesendoderm-like NanoglowSox2lowLin28high CD24highPDGFR-αhigh population. The methods developed here for time-resolved, single-cell progression analysis may be used for the study of additional complex and dynamic systems, such as cancer progression and embryonic development. PMID:25748935

  8. Quantifying Cell Fate Decisions for Differentiation and Reprogramming of a Human Stem Cell Network: Landscape and Biological Paths

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chunhe; Wang, Jin

    2013-01-01

    Cellular reprogramming has been recently intensively studied experimentally. We developed a global potential landscape and kinetic path framework to explore a human stem cell developmental network composed of 52 genes. We uncovered the underlying landscape for the stem cell network with two basins of attractions representing stem and differentiated cell states, quantified and exhibited the high dimensional biological paths for the differentiation and reprogramming process, connecting the stem cell state and differentiated cell state. Both the landscape and non-equilibrium curl flux determine the dynamics of cell differentiation jointly. Flux leads the kinetic paths to be deviated from the steepest descent gradient path, and the corresponding differentiation and reprogramming paths are irreversible. Quantification of paths allows us to find out how the differentiation and reprogramming occur and which important states they go through. We show the developmental process proceeds as moving from the stem cell basin of attraction to the differentiation basin of attraction. The landscape topography characterized by the barrier heights and transition rates quantitatively determine the global stability and kinetic speed of cell fate decision process for development. Through the global sensitivity analysis, we provided some specific predictions for the effects of key genes and regulation connections on the cellular differentiation or reprogramming process. Key links from sensitivity analysis and biological paths can be used to guide the differentiation designs or reprogramming tactics. PMID:23935477

  9. Brief Report: Inhibition of miR-145 Enhances Reprogramming of Human Dermal Fibroblasts to Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Barta, Tomas; Peskova, Lucie; Collin, Joseph; Montaner, David; Neganova, Irina; Armstrong, Lyle; Lako, Majlinda

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNA (miRNAs) are short noncoding RNA molecules involved in many cellular processes and shown to play a key role in somatic cell induced reprogramming. We performed an array based screening to identify candidates that are differentially expressed between dermal skin fibroblasts (DFs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). We focused our investigations on miR-145 and showed that this candidate is highly expressed in DFs relative to iPSCs and significantly downregulated during reprogramming process. Inhibition of miR-145 in DFs led to the induction of "cellular plasticity" demonstrated by: (a) alteration of cell morphology associated with downregulation of mesenchymal and upregulation of epithelial markers; (b) upregulation of pluripotency-associated genes including SOX2, KLF4, C-MYC; (c) downregulation of miRNA let-7b known to inhibit reprogramming; and (iv) increased efficiency of reprogramming to iPSCs in the presence of reprogramming factors. Together, our results indicate a direct functional link between miR-145 and molecular pathways underlying reprogramming of somatic cells to iPSCs.

  10. Reprogramming metabolic pathways in vivo with CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing to treat hereditary tyrosinaemia.

    PubMed

    Pankowicz, Francis P; Barzi, Mercedes; Legras, Xavier; Hubert, Leroy; Mi, Tian; Tomolonis, Julie A; Ravishankar, Milan; Sun, Qin; Yang, Diane; Borowiak, Malgorzata; Sumazin, Pavel; Elsea, Sarah H; Bissig-Choisat, Beatrice; Bissig, Karl-Dimiter

    2016-01-01

    Many metabolic liver disorders are refractory to drug therapy and require orthotopic liver transplantation. Here we demonstrate a new strategy, which we call metabolic pathway reprogramming, to treat hereditary tyrosinaemia type I in mice; rather than edit the disease-causing gene, we delete a gene in a disease-associated pathway to render the phenotype benign. Using CRISPR/Cas9 in vivo, we convert hepatocytes from tyrosinaemia type I into the benign tyrosinaemia type III by deleting Hpd (hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxigenase). Edited hepatocytes (Fah(-/-)/Hpd(-/-)) display a growth advantage over non-edited hepatocytes (Fah(-/-)/Hpd(+/+)) and, in some mice, almost completely replace them within 8 weeks. Hpd excision successfully reroutes tyrosine catabolism, leaving treated mice healthy and asymptomatic. Metabolic pathway reprogramming sidesteps potential difficulties associated with editing a critical disease-causing gene and can be explored as an option for treating other diseases. PMID:27572891

  11. Tsix RNA and the germline factor, PRDM14, link X reactivation and stem cell reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Payer, Bernhard; Rosenberg, Michael; Yamaji, Masashi; Yabuta, Yukihiro; Koyanagi-Aoi, Michiyo; Hayashi, Katsuhiko; Yamanaka, Shinya; Saitou, Mitinori; Lee, Jeannie T

    2013-12-26

    Transitions between pluripotent and differentiated states are marked by dramatic epigenetic changes. Cellular differentiation is tightly linked to X chromosome inactivation (XCI), whereas reprogramming to induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) is associated with X chromosome reactivation (XCR). XCR reverses the silent state of the inactive X, occurring in mouse blastocysts and germ cells. In spite of its importance, little is known about underlying mechanisms. Here, we examine the role of the long noncoding Tsix RNA and the germline factor, PRDM14. In blastocysts, XCR is perturbed by mutation of either Tsix or Prdm14. In iPSCs, XCR is disrupted only by PRDM14 deficiency, which also affects iPSC derivation and maintenance. We show that Tsix and PRDM14 directly link XCR to pluripotency: first, PRDM14 represses Rnf12 by recruiting polycomb repressive complex 2; second, Tsix enables PRDM14 to bind Xist. Thus, our study provides functional and mechanistic links between cellular and X chromosome reprogramming.

  12. Direct exposure of chromosomes to nonactivated ovum cytoplasm is effective for bovine somatic cell nucleus reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Tani, T; Kato, Y; Tsunoda, Y

    2001-01-01

    We examined the in vitro developmental potential of nonactivated and activated enucleated ova receiving cumulus cells at various stages of the cell cycle. Eleven to 29% of activated ova receiving donor cells stopped developing at the 8-cell stage but 21% to 50% of nonactivated ova receiving donor cells at either the G(0), G(1), G(2), or M phase, or cycling cells developed into blastocysts. One normal calf was born after transferring five blastocysts that had developed from ova receiving donor cells at the M phase. The present study demonstrated that direct exposure of donor chromosomes to nonactivated ovum cytoplasm is effective for somatic cell nucleus reprogramming, and activated ovum cytoplasm does not reprogram the nucleus.

  13. Reprogramming metabolic pathways in vivo with CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing to treat hereditary tyrosinaemia

    PubMed Central

    Pankowicz, Francis P.; Barzi, Mercedes; Legras, Xavier; Hubert, Leroy; Mi, Tian; Tomolonis, Julie A.; Ravishankar, Milan; Sun, Qin; Yang, Diane; Borowiak, Malgorzata; Sumazin, Pavel; Elsea, Sarah H.; Bissig-Choisat, Beatrice; Bissig, Karl-Dimiter

    2016-01-01

    Many metabolic liver disorders are refractory to drug therapy and require orthotopic liver transplantation. Here we demonstrate a new strategy, which we call metabolic pathway reprogramming, to treat hereditary tyrosinaemia type I in mice; rather than edit the disease-causing gene, we delete a gene in a disease-associated pathway to render the phenotype benign. Using CRISPR/Cas9 in vivo, we convert hepatocytes from tyrosinaemia type I into the benign tyrosinaemia type III by deleting Hpd (hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxigenase). Edited hepatocytes (Fah−/−/Hpd−/−) display a growth advantage over non-edited hepatocytes (Fah−/−/Hpd+/+) and, in some mice, almost completely replace them within 8 weeks. Hpd excision successfully reroutes tyrosine catabolism, leaving treated mice healthy and asymptomatic. Metabolic pathway reprogramming sidesteps potential difficulties associated with editing a critical disease-causing gene and can be explored as an option for treating other diseases. PMID:27572891

  14. mTORC1-Dependent Metabolic Reprogramming Underlies Escape from Glycolysis Addiction in Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Pusapati, Raju V; Daemen, Anneleen; Wilson, Catherine; Sandoval, Wendy; Gao, Min; Haley, Benjamin; Baudy, Andreas R; Hatzivassiliou, Georgia; Evangelista, Marie; Settleman, Jeff

    2016-04-11

    Although glycolysis is substantially elevated in many tumors, therapeutic targeting of glycolysis in cancer patients has not yet been successful, potentially reflecting the metabolic plasticity of tumor cells. In various cancer cells exposed to a continuous glycolytic block, we identified a recurrent reprogramming mechanism involving sustained mTORC1 signaling that underlies escape from glycolytic addiction. Active mTORC1 directs increased glucose flux via the pentose phosphate pathway back into glycolysis, thereby circumventing a glycolysis block and ensuring adequate ATP and biomass production. Combined inhibition of glycolysis and mTORC1 signaling disrupted metabolic reprogramming in tumor cells and inhibited their growth in vitro and in vivo. These findings reveal novel combinatorial therapeutic strategies to realize the potential benefit from targeting the Warburg effect. PMID:27052953

  15. Positional information is reprogrammed in blastema cells of the regenerating limb of the axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum).

    PubMed

    McCusker, Catherine D; Gardiner, David M

    2013-01-01

    The regenerating region of an amputated salamander limb, known as the blastema, has the amazing capacity to replace exactly the missing structures. By grafting cells from different stages and regions of blastemas induced to form on donor animals expressing Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP), to non-GFP host animals, we have determined that the cells from early stage blastemas, as well as cells at the tip of late stage blastemas are developmentally labile such that their positional identity is reprogrammed by interactions with more proximal cells with stable positional information. In contrast, cells from the adjacent, more proximal stump tissues as well as the basal region of late bud blastemas are positionally stable, and thus form ectopic limb structures when grafted. Finally, we have found that a nerve is required to maintain the blastema cells in a positionally labile state, thus indicating a role for reprogramming cues in the blastema microenvironment.

  16. Selective transformations between nanoparticle superlattices via the reprogramming of DNA-mediated interactions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yugang; Pal, Suchetan; Srinivasan, Babji; Vo, Thi; Kumar, Sanat; Gang, Oleg

    2015-08-01

    The rapid development of self-assembly approaches has enabled the creation of materials with desired organization of nanoscale components. However, achieving dynamic control, wherein the system can be transformed on demand into multiple entirely different states, is typically absent in atomic and molecular systems and has remained elusive in designed nanoparticle systems. Here, we demonstrate with in situ small-angle X-ray scattering that, by using DNA strands as inputs, the structure of a three-dimensional lattice of DNA-coated nanoparticles can be switched from an initial 'mother' phase into one of multiple 'daughter' phases. The introduction of different types of reprogramming DNA strands modifies the DNA shells of the nanoparticles within the superlattice, thereby shifting interparticle interactions to drive the transformation into a particular daughter phase. Moreover, we mapped quantitatively with free-energy calculations the selective reprogramming of interactions onto the observed daughter phases.

  17. Cell reprogramming: a new chemical approach to stem cell biology and tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Anastasia, L; Piccoli, M; Garatti, A; Conforti, E; Scaringi, R; Bergante, S; Castelvecchio, S; Venerando, B; Menicanti, L; Tettamanti, G

    2011-02-01

    Generation of pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from adult fibroblasts starts a "new era" in stem cell biology, as it overcomes several key issues associated with previous approaches, including the ethical concerns associated with human embryonic stem cells. However, as the genetic approach for cell reprogramming has already shown potential safety issues, a chemical approach may be a safer and easier alternative. Moreover, a chemical approach could be advantageous not only for the de-differentiation phase, but also for inducing reprogrammed cells into the desired cell type with higher efficiency than current methodologies. Finally, a chemical approach may be envisioned to activate resident adult stem cells to proliferate and regenerate damaged tissues in situ, without the need for exogenous cell injections.

  18. PKM2: The Thread Linking Energy Metabolism Reprogramming with Epigenetics in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ling; Shi, Ying; Liu, Shuang; Cao, Ya; Wang, Xiang; Tao, Yongguang

    2014-01-01

    Cancer metabolism reprogramming or alterations in epigenetics are linked to an incidence of cancer. It is apparent that epigenetic changes have been found in tumors, therefore, the complete epigenome and entire pathways relevant to cell metabolism are subject to epigenetic dysregulation. Here, we review the pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2) isoform, a glycolytic enzyme involved in ATP generation and pyruvate production, which plays an essential role in tumor metabolism and growth, and also functions as a protein kinase that phosphorylates histones during genes transcription and chromatin remodeling. We also discuss the potential role of PKM2 in the dynamic integration between metabolic reprogramming and alterations in epigenetics during carcinogenesis and cancer progression. PMID:24972138

  19. Reprogramming metabolic pathways in vivo with CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing to treat hereditary tyrosinaemia.

    PubMed

    Pankowicz, Francis P; Barzi, Mercedes; Legras, Xavier; Hubert, Leroy; Mi, Tian; Tomolonis, Julie A; Ravishankar, Milan; Sun, Qin; Yang, Diane; Borowiak, Malgorzata; Sumazin, Pavel; Elsea, Sarah H; Bissig-Choisat, Beatrice; Bissig, Karl-Dimiter

    2016-08-30

    Many metabolic liver disorders are refractory to drug therapy and require orthotopic liver transplantation. Here we demonstrate a new strategy, which we call metabolic pathway reprogramming, to treat hereditary tyrosinaemia type I in mice; rather than edit the disease-causing gene, we delete a gene in a disease-associated pathway to render the phenotype benign. Using CRISPR/Cas9 in vivo, we convert hepatocytes from tyrosinaemia type I into the benign tyrosinaemia type III by deleting Hpd (hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxigenase). Edited hepatocytes (Fah(-/-)/Hpd(-/-)) display a growth advantage over non-edited hepatocytes (Fah(-/-)/Hpd(+/+)) and, in some mice, almost completely replace them within 8 weeks. Hpd excision successfully reroutes tyrosine catabolism, leaving treated mice healthy and asymptomatic. Metabolic pathway reprogramming sidesteps potential difficulties associated with editing a critical disease-causing gene and can be explored as an option for treating other diseases.

  20. Selective transformations between nanoparticle superlattices via the reprogramming of DNA-mediated interactions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhang, Yugang; Pal, Suchetan; Srinivasan, Babji; Vo, Thi; Kumar, Sanat; Gang, Oleg

    2015-05-25

    The rapid development of self-assembly approaches has enabled the creation of materials with desired organization of nanoscale components. However, achieving dynamic control, wherein the system can be transformed on demand into multiple entirely different states, is typically absent in atomic and molecular systems and has remained elusive in designed nanoparticle systems. Here, we demonstrate with in situ small-angle x-ray scattering that, by using DNA strands as inputs, the structure of a three-dimensional lattice of DNA-coated nanoparticles can be switched from an initial 'mother' phase into one of multiple 'daughter' phases. The introduction of different types of re-programming DNA strands modifiesmore » the DNA shells of the nanoparticles within the superlattice, thereby shifting interparticle interactions to drive the transformation into a particular daughter phase. We mapped quantitatively with free-energy calculations the selective re-programming of interactions onto the observed daughter phases.« less

  1. Selective transformations between nanoparticle superlattices via the reprogramming of DNA-mediated interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yugang; Pal, Suchetan; Srinivasan, Babji; Vo, Thi; Kumar, Sanat; Gang, Oleg

    2015-05-25

    The rapid development of self-assembly approaches has enabled the creation of materials with desired organization of nanoscale components. However, achieving dynamic control, wherein the system can be transformed on demand into multiple entirely different states, is typically absent in atomic and molecular systems and has remained elusive in designed nanoparticle systems. Here, we demonstrate with in situ small-angle x-ray scattering that, by using DNA strands as inputs, the structure of a three-dimensional lattice of DNA-coated nanoparticles can be switched from an initial 'mother' phase into one of multiple 'daughter' phases. The introduction of different types of re-programming DNA strands modifies the DNA shells of the nanoparticles within the superlattice, thereby shifting interparticle interactions to drive the transformation into a particular daughter phase. We mapped quantitatively with free-energy calculations the selective re-programming of interactions onto the observed daughter phases.

  2. Second generation codon optimized minicircle (CoMiC) for nonviral reprogramming of human adult fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Diecke, Sebastian; Lisowski, Leszek; Kooreman, Nigel G; Wu, Joseph C

    2014-01-01

    The ability to induce pluripotency in somatic cells is one of the most important scientific achievements in the fields of stem cell research and regenerative medicine. This technique allows researchers to obtain pluripotent stem cells without the controversial use of embryos, providing a novel and powerful tool for disease modeling and drug screening approaches. However, using viruses for the delivery of reprogramming genes and transcription factors may result in integration into the host genome and cause random mutations within the target cell, thus limiting the use of these cells for downstream applications. To overcome this limitation, various non-integrating techniques, including Sendai virus, mRNA, minicircle, and plasmid-based methods, have recently been developed. Utilizing a newly developed codon optimized 4-in-1 minicircle (CoMiC), we were able to reprogram human adult fibroblasts using chemically defined media and without the need for feeder cells.

  3. Positional Information Is Reprogrammed in Blastema Cells of the Regenerating Limb of the Axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum)

    PubMed Central

    McCusker, Catherine D.; Gardiner, David M.

    2013-01-01

    The regenerating region of an amputated salamander limb, known as the blastema, has the amazing capacity to replace exactly the missing structures. By grafting cells from different stages and regions of blastemas induced to form on donor animals expressing Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP), to non-GFP host animals, we have determined that the cells from early stage blastemas, as well as cells at the tip of late stage blastemas are developmentally labile such that their positional identity is reprogrammed by interactions with more proximal cells with stable positional information. In contrast, cells from the adjacent, more proximal stump tissues as well as the basal region of late bud blastemas are positionally stable, and thus form ectopic limb structures when grafted. Finally, we have found that a nerve is required to maintain the blastema cells in a positionally labile state, thus indicating a role for reprogramming cues in the blastema microenvironment. PMID:24086768

  4. Reprogramming and transdifferentiation for cardiovascular development and regenerative medicine: where do we stand?

    PubMed Central

    Ebert, Antje D; Diecke, Sebastian; Chen, Ian Y; Wu, Joseph C

    2015-01-01

    Heart disease remains a leading cause of mortality and a major worldwide healthcare burden. Recent advances in stem cell biology have made it feasible to derive large quantities of cardiomyocytes for disease modeling, drug development, and regenerative medicine. The discoveries of reprogramming and transdifferentiation as novel biological processes have significantly contributed to this paradigm. This review surveys the means by which reprogramming and transdifferentiation can be employed to generate induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (iPSC-CMs) and induced cardiomyocytes (iCMs). The application of these patient-specific cardiomyocytes for both in vitro disease modeling and in vivo therapies for various cardiovascular diseases will also be discussed. We propose that, with additional refinement, human disease-specific cardiomyocytes will allow us to significantly advance the understanding of cardiovascular disease mechanisms and accelerate the development of novel therapeutic options. PMID:26183451

  5. Positional information is reprogrammed in blastema cells of the regenerating limb of the axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum).

    PubMed

    McCusker, Catherine D; Gardiner, David M

    2013-01-01

    The regenerating region of an amputated salamander limb, known as the blastema, has the amazing capacity to replace exactly the missing structures. By grafting cells from different stages and regions of blastemas induced to form on donor animals expressing Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP), to non-GFP host animals, we have determined that the cells from early stage blastemas, as well as cells at the tip of late stage blastemas are developmentally labile such that their positional identity is reprogrammed by interactions with more proximal cells with stable positional information. In contrast, cells from the adjacent, more proximal stump tissues as well as the basal region of late bud blastemas are positionally stable, and thus form ectopic limb structures when grafted. Finally, we have found that a nerve is required to maintain the blastema cells in a positionally labile state, thus indicating a role for reprogramming cues in the blastema microenvironment. PMID:24086768

  6. Gut microbiota directs PPARγ-driven reprogramming of the liver circadian clock by nutritional challenge.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Mari; Tognini, Paola; Liu, Yu; Eckel-Mahan, Kristin L; Baldi, Pierre; Sassone-Corsi, Paolo

    2016-09-01

    The liver circadian clock is reprogrammed by nutritional challenge through the rewiring of specific transcriptional pathways. As the gut microbiota is tightly connected to host metabolism, whose coordination is governed by the circadian clock, we explored whether gut microbes influence circadian homeostasis and how they distally control the peripheral clock in the liver. Using fecal transplant procedures we reveal that, in response to high-fat diet, the gut microbiota drives PPARγ-mediated activation of newly oscillatory transcriptional programs in the liver. Moreover, antibiotics treatment prevents PPARγ-driven transcription in the liver, underscoring the essential role of gut microbes in clock reprogramming and hepatic circadian homeostasis. Thus, a specific molecular signature characterizes the influence of the gut microbiome in the liver, leading to the transcriptional rewiring of hepatic metabolism. PMID:27418314

  7. The Transcriptomic Evolution of Mammalian Pregnancy: Gene Expression Innovations in Endometrial Stromal Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Kin, Koryu; Maziarz, Jamie; Chavan, Arun R.; Kamat, Manasi; Vasudevan, Sreelakshmi; Birt, Alyssa; Emera, Deena; Lynch, Vincent J.; Ott, Troy L.; Pavlicev, Mihaela; Wagner, Günter P.

    2016-01-01

    The endometrial stromal fibroblast (ESF) is a cell type present in the uterine lining of therian mammals. In the stem lineage of eutherian mammals, ESF acquired the ability to differentiate into decidual cells in order to allow embryo implantation. We call the latter cell type “neo-ESF” in contrast to “paleo-ESF” which is homologous to eutherian ESF but is not able to decidualize. In this study, we compare the transcriptomes of ESF from six therian species: Opossum (Monodelphis domestica; paleo-ESF), mink, rat, rabbit, human (all neo-ESF), and cow (secondarily nondecidualizing neo-ESF). We find evidence for strong stabilizing selection on transcriptome composition suggesting that the expression of approximately 5,600 genes is maintained by natural selection. The evolution of neo-ESF from paleo-ESF involved the following gene expression changes: Loss of expression of genes related to inflammation and immune response, lower expression of genes opposing tissue invasion, increased markers for proliferation as well as the recruitment of FOXM1, a key gene transiently expressed during decidualization. Signaling pathways also evolve rapidly and continue to evolve within eutherian lineages. In the bovine lineage, where invasiveness and decidualization were secondarily lost, we see a re-expression of genes found in opossum, most prominently WISP2, and a loss of gene expression related to angiogenesis. The data from this and previous studies support a scenario, where the proinflammatory paleo-ESF was reprogrammed to express anti-inflammatory genes in response to the inflammatory stimulus coming from the implanting conceptus and thus paving the way for extended, trans-cyclic gestation. PMID:27401177

  8. Transcriptome Characteristics and X-Chromosome Inactivation Status in Cultured Rat Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Vaskova, Evgeniya A; Medvedev, Sergey P; Sorokina, Anastasiya E; Nemudryy, Artem A; Elisaphenko, Evgeniy A; Zakharova, Irina S; Shevchenko, Alexander I; Kizilova, Elena A; Zhelezova, Antonina I; Evshin, Ivan S; Sharipov, Ruslan N; Minina, Julia M; Zhdanova, Natalia S; Khegay, Igor I; Kolpakov, Fedor A; Sukhikh, Gennadiy T; Pokushalov, Evgeniy A; Karaskov, Alexander M; Vlasov, Valentin V; Ivanova, Ludmila N; Zakian, Suren M

    2015-12-15

    Rat pluripotent stem cells, embryonic stem cells (ESCs), and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) as mouse and human ones have a great potential for studying mammalian early development, disease modeling, and evaluation of regenerative medicine approaches. However, data on pluripotency realization and self-renewal maintenance in rat cells are still very limited, and differentiation protocols of rat ESCs (rESCs) and iPSCs to study development and obtain specific cell types for biomedical applications are poorly developed. In this study, the RNA-Seq technique was first used for detailed transcriptome characterization in rat pluripotent cells. The rESC and iPSC transcriptomes demonstrated a high similarity and were significantly different from those in differentiated cells. Additionally, we have shown that reprogramming of rat somatic cells to a pluripotent state was accompanied by X-chromosome reactivation. There were two active X chromosomes in XX rESCs and iPSCs, which is one of the key attributes of the pluripotent state. Differentiation of both rESCs and iPSCs led to X-chromosome inactivation (XCI). The dynamics of XCI in differentiating rat cells was very similar to that in mice. Two types of facultative heterochromatin described in various mammalian species were revealed on the rat inactive X chromosome. To explore XCI dynamics, we established a new monolayer differentiation protocol for rESCs and iPSCs that may be applied to study different biological processes and optimized for directed derivation of specific cell types. PMID:26418521

  9. The Transcriptomic Evolution of Mammalian Pregnancy: Gene Expression Innovations in Endometrial Stromal Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Kin, Koryu; Maziarz, Jamie; Chavan, Arun R; Kamat, Manasi; Vasudevan, Sreelakshmi; Birt, Alyssa; Emera, Deena; Lynch, Vincent J; Ott, Troy L; Pavlicev, Mihaela; Wagner, Günter P

    2016-01-01

    The endometrial stromal fibroblast (ESF) is a cell type present in the uterine lining of therian mammals. In the stem lineage of eutherian mammals, ESF acquired the ability to differentiate into decidual cells in order to allow embryo implantation. We call the latter cell type "neo-ESF" in contrast to "paleo-ESF" which is homologous to eutherian ESF but is not able to decidualize. In this study, we compare the transcriptomes of ESF from six therian species: Opossum (Monodelphis domestica; paleo-ESF), mink, rat, rabbit, human (all neo-ESF), and cow (secondarily nondecidualizing neo-ESF). We find evidence for strong stabilizing selection on transcriptome composition suggesting that the expression of approximately 5,600 genes is maintained by natural selection. The evolution of neo-ESF from paleo-ESF involved the following gene expression changes: Loss of expression of genes related to inflammation and immune response, lower expression of genes opposing tissue invasion, increased markers for proliferation as well as the recruitment of FOXM1, a key gene transiently expressed during decidualization. Signaling pathways also evolve rapidly and continue to evolve within eutherian lineages. In the bovine lineage, where invasiveness and decidualization were secondarily lost, we see a re-expression of genes found in opossum, most prominently WISP2, and a loss of gene expression related to angiogenesis. The data from this and previous studies support a scenario, where the proinflammatory paleo-ESF was reprogrammed to express anti-inflammatory genes in response to the inflammatory stimulus coming from the implanting conceptus and thus paving the way for extended, trans-cyclic gestation. PMID:27401177

  10. Effects of bacteria‑mediated reprogramming and antibiotic pretreatment on the course of colitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Gardlik, Roman; Wagnerova, Alexandra; Celec, Peter

    2014-08-01

    Since the original study by Takahashi and Yamanaka in 2006, there have been significant advances in the field of induced pluripotent stem cells. However, to the best of our knowledge, all of the studies published to date are based on ex vivo gene delivery and subsequent reimplantation of the cells. By contrast, in vivo reprogramming allows the direct administration of DNA encoding the reprogramming factors into the target tissue. In our previous study we demonstrated the beneficial effects of Salmonella‑mediated oral delivery of genes into colonic mucosa as a therapy for colitis. In the present study, the effect of the bacterial vector Salmonella typhimurium SL7207, carrying a plasmid encoding the reprogramming factors Sox2, Oct3/4 and Klf4, on colitis in mice was investigated. Therapeutic intervention, consisting of repeated gavaging following the induction of colitis, did not exhibit beneficial effects. However, preventive oral administration of the therapeutic bacterial strain resulted in improvements in weight loss, colon length and stool consistency. Recently it has been shown that antibiotic pretreatment may alleviate chemically induced colitis in mice. Therefore, in the present study it was investigated whether antibiotic pretreatment of mice was able to enhance colonization of the administered bacterial strain in the colon, and therefore improve therapeutic outcome. C57BL/6 mice were administered streptomycin and metronidazole for four days, prior to multiple oral administrations of therapeutic bacteria every other day. Following three gavages, mice were administered dextran sulfate sodium in their drinking water to induce colitis. Disease activity parameters, including stool consistency, weight loss and colon length, were improved in the group receiving antibiotics and bacterial vectors. These results indicate that antibiotic pretreatment may enhance bacterial gene delivery into the colon. Furthermore, the anticipated in vivo reprogramming of colon

  11. Exogenous expression of OCT4 facilitates oocyte-mediated reprogramming in cloned porcine embryos.

    PubMed

    Ji, Qianqian; Cong, Peiqing; Zhao, Haijing; Song, Zhenwei; Zhao, Guangyin; Gao, Jintao; Nie, Yu; Chen, Yaosheng

    2014-09-01

    OCT4 is a well-established regulator of pluripotency and nuclear reprogramming. To determine if improving OCT4 abundance can facilitate oocyte-mediated reprogramming in cloned porcine embryos, we artificially increased OCT4 levels by co-incubating donor cells with 50 ng/µl OCT4 plasmid. We observed higher rates of blastocyst formation (P < 0.05) and lower levels of blastocyst apoptosis in nuclear-transfer-derived embryos carrying OCT4-incubated donor nuclei (OCT4-SCNT). The beneficial effect caused by exogenous expression of OCT4 involves epigenetic changes, wherein increased histone acetylation (AcH3K9) appeared in OCT4-SCNT embryos at the one-cell and blastocyst stages and reduced histone methylation (H3K9me2) was observed at the one-cell stage (P < 0.05). There was a transient increase in exogenous OCT4 and an up-regulation of endogenous OCT4 level in OCT4-SCNT embryos (P < 0.05), while the expression pattern of epigenetic enzymes was changed. These modifications were accompanied by an up-regulation of CDX2, whose interaction with OCT4 is instrumental for implantation, and a down-regulation of XIST, a negative indicator of reprogramming (P < 0.05). Taken together, our results support a role for exogenous expression of OCT4 in improving the efficiency of nuclear reprogramming while establishing a convenient and timesaving method to improve nuclear-transfer outcomes.

  12. MicroRNAs and oncogenic transcriptional regulatory networks controlling metabolic reprogramming in cancers.

    PubMed

    Pinweha, Pannapa; Rattanapornsompong, Khanti; Charoensawan, Varodom; Jitrapakdee, Sarawut

    2016-01-01

    Altered cellular metabolism is a fundamental adaptation of cancer during rapid proliferation as a result of growth factor overstimulation. We review different pathways involving metabolic alterations in cancers including aerobic glycolysis, pentose phosphate pathway, de novo fatty acid synthesis, and serine and glycine metabolism. Although oncoproteins, c-MYC, HIF1α and p53 are the major drivers of this metabolic reprogramming, post-transcriptional regulation by microRNAs (miR) also plays an important role in finely adjusting the requirement of the key metabolic enzymes underlying this metabolic reprogramming. We also combine the literature data on the miRNAs that potentially regulate 40 metabolic enzymes responsible for metabolic reprogramming in cancers, with additional miRs from computational prediction. Our analyses show that: (1) a metabolic enzyme is frequently regulated by multiple miRs, (2) confidence scores from prediction algorithms might be useful to help narrow down functional miR-mRNA interaction, which might be worth further experimental validation. By combining known and predicted interactions of oncogenic transcription factors (TFs) (c-MYC, HIF1α and p53), sterol regulatory element binding protein 1 (SREBP1), 40 metabolic enzymes, and regulatory miRs we have established one of the first reference maps for miRs and oncogenic TFs that regulate metabolic reprogramming in cancers. The combined network shows that glycolytic enzymes are linked to miRs via p53, c-MYC, HIF1α, whereas the genes in serine, glycine and one carbon metabolism are regulated via the c-MYC, as well as other regulatory organization that cannot be observed by investigating individual miRs, TFs, and target genes. PMID:27358718

  13. Self-renewal and pluripotency acquired through somatic reprogramming to human cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Nagata, Shogo; Hirano, Kunio; Kanemori, Michele; Sun, Liang-Tso; Tada, Takashi

    2012-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are reprogrammed by transient expression of transcription factors in somatic cells. Approximately 1% of somatic cells can be reprogrammed into iPSCs, while the remaining somatic cells are differentially reprogrammed. Here, we established induced pluripotent cancer stem-like cells (iCSCs) as self-renewing pluripotent cell clones. Stable iCSC lines were established from unstable induced epithelial stem cell (iESC) lines through re-plating followed by embryoid body formation and serial transplantation. iCSCs shared the expression of pluripotent marker genes with iPSCs, except for REX1 and LIN28, while exhibited the expression of somatic marker genes EMP1 and PPARγ. iESCs and iCSCs could generate teratomas with high efficiency by implantation into immunodeficient mice. The second iCSCs isolated from dissociated cells of teratoma from the first iCSCs were stably maintained, showing a gene expression profile similar to the first iCSCs. In the first and second iCSCs, transgene-derived Oct4, Sox2, Klf4, and c-Myc were expressed. Comparative global gene expression analyses demonstrated that the first iCSCs were similar to iESCs, and clearly different from human iPSCs and somatic cells. In iCSCs, gene expression kinetics of the core pluripotency factor and the Myc-related factor were pluripotent type, whereas the polycomb complex factor was somatic type. These findings indicate that pluripotent tumorigenicity can be conferred on somatic cells through up-regulation of the core pluripotency and Myc-related factors, prior to establishment of the iPSC molecular network by full reprogramming through down-regulation of the polycomb complex factor.

  14. Epigenetically Reprogramming of Human Embryonic Stem Cells by 3-Deazaneplanocin A and Sodium Butyrate

    PubMed Central

    Azghadi, Soheila; Clark, Amander T.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: Infertility affects about 6.1 million women aged 15-44 in the United States. The leading cause of infertility in women is quantitative and qualitative defects in human germ-cell development (these sentences are not mentioned in introduction so it is not correct to mention in abstract, you can omit). Human embryonic stem cell (hESC) lines are derived from the inner cell mass (ICM) of developing blastocysts and have a broad clinical potential. hESCs have been classified into three classes based on their epigenetic state. The goal of this study was to epigenetically reprogram Class II and Class III cell lines to Class I (naïve state), and to in vitro differentiation of potent hESCs to primordial germ cells (PGCs). Methods: Recent evidence suggests that 3-deazaneplanocin A (DZNep) is a global histone methylation inhibitor which selectively inhibits trimethylation of lysine 27 on histone H3K27, and it is an epigenetic therapeutic for cancer. The characteristics of DZNep lead us to hypothesize that it is a good candidate to epigenetically reprogram hESCs to the Class I. Additionally, we used sodium butyrate (NaBu) shown in previous studies to up-regulate the expression of germ cell specific markers (these sentences should be come in introduction). Results: We used these two drugs to produce epigenetically stable hESC lines. hESC lines are an appropriate system for disease modeling and understanding developmental stages, therefore producing stable stem cell lines may have an outstanding impact in different research fields such as preventive medicine. Conclusions: X-Chromosome inactivation has been used as a tool to follow the reprogramming process. We have used immunostaining and western blot as methods to follow this reprogramming qualitatively and quantitatively. PMID:21603011

  15. Pluripotent Conversion of Muscle Stem Cells Without Reprogramming Factors or Small Molecules.

    PubMed

    Bose, Bipasha; Shenoy P, Sudheer

    2016-02-01

    Muscle derived stem cells (MDSCs) are multipotent stem cells that can differentiate into several lineages including skeletal muscle precursor cells. Here, we show that MDSCs from myostatin null mice (Mstn (-/-) ) can be readily induced into pluripotent stem cells without using reprogramming factors. Microarray studies revealed a strong upregulation of markers like Leukemia Inhibitory factor (LIF) and Leukemia Inhibitory factor receptor (LIFR) in Mstn (-/-) MDSCs as compared to wild type MDSCs (WT-MDSCs). Furthermore when cultured in mouse embryonic stem cell media with LIF for 95 days, Mstn (-/-) MDSCs formed embryonic stem cell (ES) like colonies. We termed such ES like cells as the culture-induced pluripotent stem cells (CiPSC). CiPSCs from Mstn (-/-) MDSCs were phenotypically similar to ESCs, expressed high levels of Oct4, Nanog, Sox2 and SSEA-1, maintained a normal karyotype. Furthermore, CiPSCs formed embryoid bodies and teratomas when injected into immunocompromised mice. In addition, CiPSCs differentiated into somatic cells of all three lineages. We further show that culturing in ES cell media, resulted in hypermethylation and downregulation of BMP2 in Mstn(-/-) MDSCs. Western blot further confirmed a down regulation of BMP2 signaling in Mstn (-/-) MDSCs in supportive of pluripotent reprogramming. Given that down regulation of BMP2 has been shown to induce pluripotency in cells, we propose that lack of myostatin epigenetically reprograms the MDSCs to become pluripotent stem cells. Thus, here we report the successful establishment of ES-like cells from adult stem cells of the non-germline origin under culture-induced conditions without introducing reprogramming genes.

  16. Aberrant epigenetic reprogramming of imprinted microRNA-127 and Rtl1 in cloned mouse embryos

    SciTech Connect

    Cui Xiangshun; Zhang Dingxiao; Ko, Yoeung-Gyu; Kim, Nam-Hyung

    2009-02-06

    The microRNA (miRNA) genes mir-127 and mir-136 are located near two CpG islands in the imprinted mouse retrotransposon-like gene Rtl1, a key gene involved in placenta formation. These miRNAs appear to be involved in regulating the imprinting of Rtl1. To obtain insights into the epigenetic reprogramming of cloned embryos, we compared the expression levels of mir-127 and mir-136 in fertilized mouse embryos, parthenotes, androgenotes and cloned embryos developing in vitro. We also examined the DNA methylation status of the promoter regions of Rtl1 and mir-127 in these embryos. Our data showed that mir-127 and mir-136 were highly expressed in parthenotes, but rarely expressed in androgenotes. Interestingly, the expression levels of mir-127 and mir-136 in parthenotes were almost twice that seen in the fertilized embryos, but were much lower in the cloned embryos. The Rtl1 promoter region was hyper-methylated in blastocyst stage parthenotes (75.0%), moderately methylated (32.4%) in the fertilized embryos and methylated to a much lower extent ({approx}10%) in the cloned embryos. Conversely, the promoter region of mir-127 was hypo-methylated in parthenogenetically activated embryos (0.4%), moderately methylated (30.0%) in fertilized embryos and heavily methylated in cloned blastocysts (63-70%). These data support a role for mir-127 and mir-136 in the epigenetic reprogramming of the Rtl1 imprinting process. Analysis of the aberrant epigenetic reprogramming of mir-127 and Rtl1 in cloned embryos may help to explain the nuclear reprogramming procedures that occur in donor cells following somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT)

  17. Reprogramming committed murine blood cells to induced hematopoietic stem cells with defined factors

    PubMed Central

    Riddell, Jonah; Gazit, Roi; Garrison, Brian S.; Guo, Guoji; Saadatpour, Assieh; Mandal, Pankaj K.; Ebina, Wataru; Volchkov, Pavel; Yuan, Guo-Cheng; Orkin, Stuart H.; Rossi, Derrick J.

    2014-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) sustain blood formation throughout life and are the functional units of bone marrow transplantation. We show that transient expression of six transcription factors RUNX1T1, HLF, LMO2, PRDM5, PBX1, and ZFP37 imparts multi-lineage transplantation potential onto otherwise committed lymphoid and myeloid progenitors, and myeloid effector cells. Inclusion of MYC-N and MEIS1, and use of polycistronic viruses increase reprogramming efficacy. The reprogrammed cells, designated induced-HSCs (iHSCs), possess clonal multi-lineage differentiation potential, reconstitute stem/progenitor compartments, and are serially transplantable. Single-cell analysis revealed that iHSCs derived under optimal conditions exhibit a gene expression profile that is highly similar to endogenous HSCs. These findings demonstrate that expression of a set of defined factors is sufficient to activate the gene networks governing HSC functional identity in committed blood cells. Our results raise the prospect that blood cell reprogramming may be a strategy for derivation of transplantable stem cells for clinical application. PMID:24766805

  18. Targeted alternative splicing of TAF4: a new strategy for cell reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Kazantseva, Jekaterina; Sadam, Helle; Neuman, Toomas; Palm, Kaia

    2016-01-01

    Reprogramming of somatic cells has become a versatile tool for biomedical research and for regenerative medicine. In the current study, we show that manipulating alternative splicing (AS) is a highly potent strategy to produce cells for therapeutic applications. We demonstrate that silencing of hTAF4-TAFH activity of TAF4 converts human facial dermal fibroblasts to melanocyte-like (iMel) cells. iMel cells produce melanin and express microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) and its target genes at levels comparable to normal melanocytes. Reprogramming of melanoma cells by manipulation with hTAF4-TAFH activity upon TAFH RNAi enforces cell differentiation towards chondrogenic pathway, whereas ectoptic expression of TAF4 results in enhanced multipotency and neural crest-like features in melanoma cells. In both cell states, iMels and cancer cells, hTAF4-TAFH activity controls migration by supporting E- to N-cadherin switches. From our data, we conclude that targeted splicing of hTAF4-TAFH coordinates AS of other TFIID subunits, underscoring the role of TAF4 in synchronised changes of Pol II complex composition essential for efficient cellular reprogramming. Taken together, targeted AS of TAF4 provides a unique strategy for generation of iMels and recapitulating stages of melanoma progression. PMID:27499390

  19. NRF2 Orchestrates the Metabolic Shift during Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Hawkins, Kate E.; Joy, Shona; Delhove, Juliette M.K.M.; Kotiadis, Vassilios N.; Fernandez, Emilio; Fitzpatrick, Lorna M.; Whiteford, James R.; King, Peter J.; Bolanos, Juan P.; Duchen, Michael R.; Waddington, Simon N.; McKay, Tristan R.

    2016-01-01

    Summary The potential of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) in disease modeling and regenerative medicine is vast, but current methodologies remain inefficient. Understanding the cellular mechanisms underlying iPSC reprogramming, such as the metabolic shift from oxidative to glycolytic energy production, is key to improving its efficiency. We have developed a lentiviral reporter system to assay longitudinal changes in cell signaling and transcription factor activity in living cells throughout iPSC reprogramming of human dermal fibroblasts. We reveal early NF-κB, AP-1, and NRF2 transcription factor activation prior to a temporal peak in hypoxia inducible factor α (HIFα) activity. Mechanistically, we show that an early burst in oxidative phosphorylation and elevated reactive oxygen species generation mediates increased NRF2 activity, which in turn initiates the HIFα-mediated glycolytic shift and may modulate glucose redistribution to the pentose phosphate pathway. Critically, inhibition of NRF2 by KEAP1 overexpression compromises metabolic reprogramming and results in reduced efficiency of iPSC colony formation. PMID:26904936

  20. Reprogramming of human fibroblasts to pluripotent stem cells using mRNA of four transcription factors

    SciTech Connect

    Yakubov, Eduard; Rechavi, Gidi; Rozenblatt, Shmuel; Givol, David

    2010-03-26

    Reprogramming of differentiated cells into induced pluripotent cells (iPS) was accomplished in 2006 by expressing four, or less, embryonic stem cell (ESC)-specific transcription factors. Due to the possible danger of DNA damage and the potential tumorigenicity associated with such DNA damage, attempts were made to minimize DNA integration by the vectors involved in this process without complete success. Here we present a method of using RNA transfection as a tool for reprogramming human fibroblasts to iPS. We used RNA synthesized in vitro from cDNA of the same reprogramming four transcription factors. After transfection of the RNA, we show intracellular expression and nuclear localization of the respective proteins in at least 70% of the cells. We used five consecutive transfections to support continuous protein expression resulting in the formation of iPS colonies that express alkaline phosphatase and several ESC markers and that can be expanded. This method completely avoids DNA integration and may be developed to replace the use of DNA vectors in the formation of iPS.

  1. The cell cycle regulator 14-3-3σ opposes and reverses cancer metabolic reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Phan, Liem; Chou, Ping-Chieh; Velazquez-Torres, Guermarie; Samudio, Ismael; Parreno, Kenneth; Huang, Yaling; Tseng, Chieh; Vu, Thuy; Gully, Chris; Su, Chun-Hui; Wang, Edward; Chen, Jian; Choi, Hyun-Ho; Fuentes-Mattei, Enrique; Shin, Ji-Hyun; Shiang, Christine; Grabiner, Brian; Blonska, Marzenna; Skerl, Stephen; Shao, Yiping; Cody, Dianna; Delacerda, Jorge; Kingsley, Charles; Webb, Douglas; Carlock, Colin; Zhou, Zhongguo; Hsieh, Yun-Chih; Lee, Jaehyuk; Elliott, Andrew; Ramirez, Marc; Bankson, Jim; Hazle, John; Wang, Yongxing; Li, Lei; Weng, Shaofan; Rizk, Nibal; Wen, Yu Ye; Lin, Xin; Wang, Hua; Wang, Huamin; Zhang, Aijun; Xia, Xuefeng; Wu, Yun; Habra, Mouhammed; Yang, Wei; Pusztai, Lajos; Yeung, Sai-Ching; Lee, Mong-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Extensive reprogramming of cellular energy metabolism is a hallmark of cancer. Despite its importance, the molecular mechanism controlling this tumour metabolic shift remains not fully understood. Here we show that 14-3-3σ regulates cancer metabolic reprogramming and protects cells from tumorigenic transformation. 14-3-3σ opposes tumour-promoting metabolic programmes by enhancing c-Myc poly-ubiquitination and subsequent degradation. 14-3-3σ demonstrates the suppressive impact on cancer glycolysis, glutaminolysis, mitochondrial biogenesis and other major metabolic processes of tumours. Importantly, 14-3-3σ expression levels predict overall and recurrence-free survival rates, tumour glucose uptake and metabolic gene expression in breast cancer patients. Thus, these results highlight that 14-3-3σ is an important regulator of tumour metabolism, and loss of 14-3-3σ expression is critical for cancer metabolic reprogramming. We anticipate that pharmacologically elevating the function of 14-3-3σ in tumours could be a promising direction for targeted anticancer metabolism therapy development in future. PMID:26179207

  2. Autophagy regulates cytoplasmic remodeling during cell reprogramming in a zebrafish model of muscle regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Saera-Vila, Alfonso; Kish, Phillip E.; Louie, Ke'ale W.; Grzegorski, Steven J.; Klionsky, Daniel J.; Kahana, Alon

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cell identity involves both selective gene activity and specialization of cytoplasmic architecture and protein machinery. Similarly, reprogramming differentiated cells requires both genetic program alterations and remodeling of the cellular architecture. While changes in genetic and epigenetic programs have been well documented in dedifferentiating cells, the pathways responsible for remodeling the cellular architecture and eliminating specialized protein complexes are not as well understood. Here, we utilize a zebrafish model of adult muscle regeneration to study cytoplasmic remodeling during cell dedifferentiation. We describe activation of autophagy early in the regenerative response to muscle injury, while blocking autophagy using chloroquine or Atg5 and Becn1 knockdown reduced the rate of regeneration with accumulation of sarcomeric and nuclear debris. We further identify Casp3/caspase 3 as a candidate mediator of cellular reprogramming and Fgf signaling as an important activator of autophagy in dedifferentiating myocytes. We conclude that autophagy plays a critical role in cell reprogramming by regulating cytoplasmic remodeling, facilitating the transition to a less differentiated cell identity. PMID:27467399

  3. Turning the fate of reprogramming cells from retinal disorder to regeneration by Pax6 in newts.

    PubMed

    Casco-Robles, Martin Miguel; Islam, Md Rafiqul; Inami, Wataru; Tanaka, Hibiki Vincent; Kunahong, Ailidana; Yasumuro, Hirofumi; Hanzawa, Shiori; Casco-Robles, Roman Martin; Toyama, Fubito; Maruo, Fumiaki; Chiba, Chikafumi

    2016-01-01

    The newt, a urodele amphibian, has an outstanding ability- even as an adult -to regenerate a functional retina through reprogramming and proliferation of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells, even though the neural retina is completely removed from the eye by surgery. It remains unknown how the newt invented such a superior mechanism. Here we show that disability of RPE cells to regenerate the retina brings about a symptom of proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR), even in the newt. When Pax6, a transcription factor that is re-expressed in reprogramming RPE cells, is knocked down in transgenic juvenile newts, these cells proliferate but eventually give rise to cell aggregates that uniformly express alpha smooth muscle actin, Vimentin and N-cadherin, the markers of myofibroblasts which are a major component of the sub-/epi-retinal membranes in PVR. Our current study demonstrates that Pax6 is an essential factor that directs the fate of reprogramming RPE cells toward the retinal regeneration. The newt may have evolved the ability of retinal regeneration by modifying a mechanism that underlies the RPE-mediated retinal disorders. PMID:27640672

  4. Transient Acquisition of Pluripotency During Somatic Cell Transdifferentiation with iPSC Reprogramming Factors

    PubMed Central

    Maza, Itay; Caspi, Inbal; Zviran, Asaf; Chomsky, Elad; Rais, Yoach; Viukov, Sergey; Geula, Shay; Buenrostro, Jason D.; Weinberger, Leehee; Krupalnik, Vladislav; Hanna, Suhair; Zerbib, Mirie; Dutton, James R.; Greenleaf, William J.; Massarwa, Rada; Novershtern, Noa; Hanna, Jacob H.

    2015-01-01

    Somatic cells can be transdifferentiated to other cell types without passing through a pluripotent state by ectopic expression of appropriate transcription factors1,2. Recent reports have proposed an alternative transdifferentiation method in which fibroblasts are directly converted to various mature somatic cell types by brief expression of the induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) reprogramming factors Oct4, Sox2, Klf4 and c-Myc (OSKM) followed by cell expansion in media that promote lineage differentiation3–6. Here we test this method using genetic lineage tracing for expression of endogenous Nanog and Oct4 and for X chromosome reactivation, as these events mark acquisition of pluripotency. We show that the vast majority of reprogrammed cardiomyocytes or neural stem cells obtained from mouse fibroblasts by OSKM-induced transdifferentiation pass through a transient pluripotent state, and that their derivation is molecularly coupled to iPSC formation mechanisms. Our findings underscore the importance of defining trajectories during cell reprogramming by different methods. PMID:26098448

  5. Dynamically reorganized chromatin is the key for the reprogramming of somatic cells to pluripotent cells

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Kaimeng; Zhang, Xiaobai; Shi, Jiejun; Yao, Mingze; Lin, Jiannan; Li, Jiao; Liu, He; Li, Huanhuan; Shi, Guang; Wang, Zhibin; Zhang, Biliang; Chen, Jiekai; Pan, Guangjin; Jiang, Cizhong; Pei, Duanqing; Yao, Hongjie

    2015-01-01

    Nucleosome positioning and histone modification play a critical role in gene regulation, but their role during reprogramming has not been fully elucidated. Here, we determined the genome-wide nucleosome coverage and histone methylation occupancy in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs), induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and pre-iPSCs. We found that nucleosome occupancy increases in promoter regions and decreases in intergenic regions in pre-iPSCs, then recovers to an intermediate level in iPSCs. We also found that nucleosomes in pre-iPSCs are much more phased than those in MEFs and iPSCs. During reprogramming, nucleosome reorganization and histone methylation around transcription start sites (TSSs) are highly coordinated with distinctively transcriptional activities. Bivalent promoters gradually increase, while repressive promoters gradually decrease. High CpG (HCG) promoters of active genes are characterized by nucleosome depletion at TSSs, while low CpG (LCG) promoters exhibit the opposite characteristics. In addition, we show that vitamin C (VC) promotes reorganizations of canonical, H3K4me3- and H3K27me3-modified nucleosomes on specific genes during transition from pre-iPSCs to iPSCs. These data demonstrate that pre-iPSCs have a more open and phased chromatin architecture than that of MEFs and iPSCs. Finally, this study reveals the dynamics and critical roles of nucleosome positioning and chromatin organization in gene regulation during reprogramming. PMID:26639176

  6. Characterization of the Epigenetic Changes During Human Gonadal Primordial Germ Cells Reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Eguizabal, C; Herrera, L; De Oñate, L; Montserrat, N; Hajkova, P; Izpisua Belmonte, J C

    2016-09-01

    Epigenetic reprogramming is a central process during mammalian germline development. Genome-wide DNA demethylation in primordial germ cells (PGCs) is a prerequisite for the erasure of epigenetic memory, preventing the transmission of epimutations to the next generation. Apart from DNA demethylation, germline reprogramming has been shown to entail reprogramming of histone marks and chromatin remodelling. Contrary to other animal models, there is limited information about the epigenetic dynamics during early germ cell development in humans. Here, we provide further characterization of the epigenetic configuration of the early human gonadal PGCs. We show that early gonadal human PGCs are DNA hypomethylated and their chromatin is characterized by low H3K9me2 and high H3K27me3 marks. Similarly to previous observations in mice, human gonadal PGCs undergo dynamic chromatin changes concomitant with the erasure of genomic imprints. Interestingly, and contrary to mouse early germ cells, expression of BLIMP1/PRDM1 persists in through all gestational stages in human gonadal PGCs and is associated with nuclear lysine-specific demethylase-1. Our work provides important additional information regarding the chromatin changes associated with human PGCs development between 6 and 13 weeks of gestation in male and female gonads. Stem Cells 2016;34:2418-2428. PMID:27300161

  7. Nucleosomal occupancy changes locally over key regulatory regions during cell differentiation and reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    West, Jason A.; Cook, April; Alver, Burak H.; Stadtfeld, Matthias; Deaton, Aimee M.; Hochedlinger, Konrad; Park, Peter J.; Tolstorukov, Michael Y.; Kingston, Robert E.

    2014-01-01

    Chromatin structure determines DNA accessibility. We compare nucleosome occupancy in mouse and human embryonic stem cells (ESCs), induced-pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and differentiated cell types using MNase-seq. To address variability inherent in this technique, we developed a bioinformatic approach to identify regions of difference (RoD) in nucleosome occupancy between pluripotent and somatic cells. Surprisingly, most chromatin remains unchanged; a majority of rearrangements appear to affect a single nucleosome. RoDs are enriched at genes and regulatory elements, including enhancers associated with pluripotency and differentiation. RoDs co-localize with binding sites of key developmental regulators, including the reprogramming factors Klf4, Oct4/Sox2 and c-Myc. Nucleosomal landscapes in ESC enhancers are extensively altered, exhibiting lower nucleosome occupancy in pluripotent cells than in somatic cells. Most changes are reset during reprogramming. We conclude that changes in nucleosome occupancy are a hallmark of cell differentiation and reprogramming and likely identify regulatory regions essential for these processes. PMID:25158628

  8. Targeted alternative splicing of TAF4: a new strategy for cell reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Kazantseva, Jekaterina; Sadam, Helle; Neuman, Toomas; Palm, Kaia

    2016-01-01

    Reprogramming of somatic cells has become a versatile tool for biomedical research and for regenerative medicine. In the current study, we show that manipulating alternative splicing (AS) is a highly potent strategy to produce cells for therapeutic applications. We demonstrate that silencing of hTAF4-TAFH activity of TAF4 converts human facial dermal fibroblasts to melanocyte-like (iMel) cells. iMel cells produce melanin and express microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) and its target genes at levels comparable to normal melanocytes. Reprogramming of melanoma cells by manipulation with hTAF4-TAFH activity upon TAFH RNAi enforces cell differentiation towards chondrogenic pathway, whereas ectoptic expression of TAF4 results in enhanced multipotency and neural crest-like features in melanoma cells. In both cell states, iMels and cancer cells, hTAF4-TAFH activity controls migration by supporting E- to N-cadherin switches. From our data, we conclude that targeted splicing of hTAF4-TAFH coordinates AS of other TFIID subunits, underscoring the role of TAF4 in synchronised changes of Pol II complex composition essential for efficient cellular reprogramming. Taken together, targeted AS of TAF4 provides a unique strategy for generation of iMels and recapitulating stages of melanoma progression. PMID:27499390

  9. Turning the fate of reprogramming cells from retinal disorder to regeneration by Pax6 in newts

    PubMed Central

    Casco-Robles, Martin Miguel; Islam, Md Rafiqul; Inami, Wataru; Tanaka, Hibiki Vincent; Kunahong, Ailidana; Yasumuro, Hirofumi; Hanzawa, Shiori; Casco-Robles, Roman Martin; Toyama, Fubito; Maruo, Fumiaki; Chiba, Chikafumi

    2016-01-01

    The newt, a urodele amphibian, has an outstanding ability– even as an adult –to regenerate a functional retina through reprogramming and proliferation of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells, even though the neural retina is completely removed from the eye by surgery. It remains unknown how the newt invented such a superior mechanism. Here we show that disability of RPE cells to regenerate the retina brings about a symptom of proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR), even in the newt. When Pax6, a transcription factor that is re-expressed in reprogramming RPE cells, is knocked down in transgenic juvenile newts, these cells proliferate but eventually give rise to cell aggregates that uniformly express alpha smooth muscle actin, Vimentin and N-cadherin, the markers of myofibroblasts which are a major component of the sub-/epi-retinal membranes in PVR. Our current study demonstrates that Pax6 is an essential factor that directs the fate of reprogramming RPE cells toward the retinal regeneration. The newt may have evolved the ability of retinal regeneration by modifying a mechanism that underlies the RPE-mediated retinal disorders. PMID:27640672

  10. Generation and transplantation of reprogrammed human neurons in the brain using 3D microtopographic scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Aaron L; Bennett, Neal K; Francis, Nicola L; Halikere, Apoorva; Clarke, Stephen; Moore, Jennifer C; Hart, Ronald P; Paradiso, Kenneth; Wernig, Marius; Kohn, Joachim; Pang, Zhiping P; Moghe, Prabhas V

    2016-01-01

    Cell replacement therapy with human pluripotent stem cell-derived neurons has the potential to ameliorate neurodegenerative dysfunction and central nervous system injuries, but reprogrammed neurons are dissociated and spatially disorganized during transplantation, rendering poor cell survival, functionality and engraftment in vivo. Here, we present the design of three-dimensional (3D) microtopographic scaffolds, using tunable electrospun microfibrous polymeric substrates that promote in situ stem cell neuronal reprogramming, neural network establishment and support neuronal engraftment into the brain. Scaffold-supported, reprogrammed neuronal networks were successfully grafted into organotypic hippocampal brain slices, showing an ∼ 3.5-fold improvement in neurite outgrowth and increased action potential firing relative to injected isolated cells. Transplantation of scaffold-supported neuronal networks into mouse brain striatum improved survival ∼ 38-fold at the injection site relative to injected isolated cells, and allowed delivery of multiple neuronal subtypes. Thus, 3D microscale biomaterials represent a promising platform for the transplantation of therapeutic human neurons with broad neuro-regenerative relevance. PMID:26983594

  11. [Genetic Cell Reprogramming: A New Technology for Basic Research and Applied Usage].

    PubMed

    Bogomazova, A N; Vassina, E M; Kiselev, S I; Lagarkova, M A; Lebedeva, O S; Nekrasov, E D; Panova, A V; Philonenko, E S; Khomyakova, E A; Tskhovrebova, L V; Chestkov, I V; Shutova, M V

    2015-04-01

    Gene function disclosure and the development of modern technologies of genetic manipulations offered the possibility of genetic reprogramming application to alter cell specialization. With the involvement of a gene set that encodes the transcription factors responsible for the pluripotent state, any cell of an adult body could be reprogrammed into the embryonal.state and pluripotency could be induced in this cell. Such reprogrammed cells were called induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), and they are capable of again passing through all developmental stages. This provides new possibilities for studies of the basic mechanisms of developmental biology, the formation of specific cell types, and the whole body. In culture, iPSCs could be maintained permanently in a nontransformed state and permit genetic manipulations while maintaining their pluripotent properties. Such a unique combination of their properties makes them an attractive tool for studies of various pathologies and for the delineation of treatment approaches. This review discusses the basic and applied aspects of iPSCs biology.

  12. Controlling Endogenous Retroviruses and Their Chimeric Transcripts During Natural Reprogramming in the Oocyte.

    PubMed

    Lim, Ai Khim; Knowles, Barbara B

    2015-07-15

    Complete genomic reprogramming happens twice during the life of a genome, once during the formation of gametes in their parents and once after their union at fertilization. For that matter complete genomic reprogramming happens twice in the same parental cell, the oocyte, when it is forming and after it matures and receives the paternal gamete. Control of these processes in this unique single cell is epigenetic, and our understanding of it is based on information gleaned from imprinting, X chromosome inactivation, and activation and silencing of endogenous retroviruses (ERV). Activation of ERVs is attributed to demethylation of chromatin and DNA, whereas silencing requires methylation, attributed to the nuage proteins, which engage the Piwi-interacting RNA pathway and other posttranscriptional mechanisms. This reprogramming process has evolved throughout speciation because in mammals, but not fish, flies and worms, nuage-component muations affect male and female gametogenesis differentially. Transcription of ERVs is derepressed in both sexes in nuage-mutant mice, but whereas males are sterile, females are fertile. Using a proteomic approach we now report molecular interactions between nuage proteins and components of the oocyte cytoplasmic lattice and speculate how this interaction could preserve ERV/host chimeric gene products affecting female fertility. PMID:26116732

  13. Tex10 Coordinates Epigenetic Control of Super-Enhancer Activity in Pluripotency and Reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Junjun; Huang, Xin; Shao, Ningyi; Zhou, Hongwei; Lee, Dung-Fang; Faiola, Francesco; Fidalgo, Miguel; Guallar, Diana; Saunders, Arven; Shliaha, Pavel V.; Wang, Hailong; Waghray, Avinash; Papatsenko, Dmitri; Sánchez-Priego, Carlos; Li, Dan; Yuan, Ye; Lemischka, Ihor R.; Shen, Li; Kelley, Kevin; Deng, Haiteng; Shen, Xiaohua; Wang, Jianlong

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Super-enhancers (SEs) are large clusters of transcriptional enhancers that are co-occupied by multiple lineage specific transcription factors driving expression of genes that define cell identity. In embryonic stem cells (ESCs), SEs are highly enriched for the core pluripotency factors Oct4, Sox2, and Nanog. In this study, we sought to dissect the molecular control mechanism of SE activity in pluripotency and reprogramming. Starting from a protein interaction network surrounding Sox2, we identified Tex10 as a key pluripotency factor that plays a functionally significant role in ESC self-renewal, early embryo development, and reprogramming. Tex10 is enriched at SEs in a Sox2-dependent manner and coordinates histone acetylation and DNA demethylation at SEs. Tex10 activity is also important for pluripotency and reprogramming in human cells. Our study therefore highlights Tex10 as a core component of the pluripotency network and sheds light on its role in epigenetic control of SE activity for cell fate determination. PMID:25936917

  14. Generation and transplantation of reprogrammed human neurons in the brain using 3D microtopographic scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Aaron L.; Bennett, Neal K.; Francis, Nicola L.; Halikere, Apoorva; Clarke, Stephen; Moore, Jennifer C.; Hart, Ronald P.; Paradiso, Kenneth; Wernig, Marius; Kohn, Joachim; Pang, Zhiping P.; Moghe, Prabhas V.

    2016-01-01

    Cell replacement therapy with human pluripotent stem cell-derived neurons has the potential to ameliorate neurodegenerative dysfunction and central nervous system injuries, but reprogrammed neurons are dissociated and spatially disorganized during transplantation, rendering poor cell survival, functionality and engraftment in vivo. Here, we present the design of three-dimensional (3D) microtopographic scaffolds, using tunable electrospun microfibrous polymeric substrates that promote in situ stem cell neuronal reprogramming, neural network establishment and support neuronal engraftment into the brain. Scaffold-supported, reprogrammed neuronal networks were successfully grafted into organotypic hippocampal brain slices, showing an ∼3.5-fold improvement in neurite outgrowth and increased action potential firing relative to injected isolated cells. Transplantation of scaffold-supported neuronal networks into mouse brain striatum improved survival ∼38-fold at the injection site relative to injected isolated cells, and allowed delivery of multiple neuronal subtypes. Thus, 3D microscale biomaterials represent a promising platform for the transplantation of therapeutic human neurons with broad neuro-regenerative relevance. PMID:26983594

  15. Gata6 potently initiates reprograming of pluripotent and differentiated cells to extraembryonic endoderm stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Wamaitha, Sissy E.; del Valle, Ignacio; Cho, Lily T.Y.; Wei, Yingying; Fogarty, Norah M.E.; Blakeley, Paul; Sherwood, Richard I.; Ji, Hongkai; Niakan, Kathy K.

    2015-01-01

    Transcription factor-mediated reprograming is a powerful method to study cell fate changes. In this study, we demonstrate that the transcription factor Gata6 can initiate reprograming of multiple cell types to induced extraembryonic endoderm stem (iXEN) cells. Intriguingly, Gata6 is sufficient to drive iXEN cells from mouse pluripotent cells and differentiated neural cells. Furthermore, GATA6 induction in human embryonic stem (hES) cells also down-regulates pluripotency gene expression and up-regulates extraembryonic endoderm (ExEn) genes, revealing a conserved function in mediating this cell fate switch. Profiling transcriptional changes following Gata6 induction in mES cells reveals step-wise pluripotency factor disengagement, with initial repression of Nanog and Esrrb, then Sox2, and finally Oct4, alongside step-wise activation of ExEn genes. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and subsequent high-throughput sequencing analysis shows Gata6 enrichment near pluripotency and endoderm genes, suggesting that Gata6 functions as both a direct repressor and activator. Together, this demonstrates that Gata6 is a versatile and potent reprograming factor that can act alone to drive a cell fate switch from diverse cell types. PMID:26109048

  16. NRF2 Orchestrates the Metabolic Shift during Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Kate E; Joy, Shona; Delhove, Juliette M K M; Kotiadis, Vassilios N; Fernandez, Emilio; Fitzpatrick, Lorna M; Whiteford, James R; King, Peter J; Bolanos, Juan P; Duchen, Michael R; Waddington, Simon N; McKay, Tristan R

    2016-03-01

    The potential of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) in disease modeling and regenerative medicine is vast, but current methodologies remain inefficient. Understanding the cellular mechanisms underlying iPSC reprogramming, such as the metabolic shift from oxidative to glycolytic energy production, is key to improving its efficiency. We have developed a lentiviral reporter system to assay longitudinal changes in cell signaling and transcription factor activity in living cells throughout iPSC reprogramming of human dermal fibroblasts. We reveal early NF-κB, AP-1, and NRF2 transcription factor activation prior to a temporal peak in hypoxia inducible factor α (HIFα) activity. Mechanistically, we show that an early burst in oxidative phosphorylation and elevated reactive oxygen species generation mediates increased NRF2 activity, which in turn initiates the HIFα-mediated glycolytic shift and may modulate glucose redistribution to the pentose phosphate pathway. Critically, inhibition of NRF2 by KEAP1 overexpression compromises metabolic reprogramming and results in reduced efficiency of iPSC colony formation. PMID:26904936

  17. Experimental Advances Towards Neural Regeneration from Induced Stem Cells to Direct In Vivo Reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Dametti, Sara; Faravelli, Irene; Ruggieri, Margherita; Ramirez, Agnese; Nizzardo, Monica; Corti, Stefania

    2016-05-01

    Neuronal loss is a common substrate of many neurological diseases that still lack effective treatments and highly burden lives of affected individuals. The discovery of self-renewing stem cells within the central nervous system (CNS) has opened the doors to the possibility of using the plasticity of CNS as a potential strategy for the development of regenerative therapies after injuries. The role of neural progenitor cells appears to be crucial, but insufficient in reparative processes after damage. In addition, the mechanisms that regulate these events are still largely unknown. Stem cell-based therapeutic approaches have primarily focused on the use of either induced pluripotent stem cells or induced neural stem cells as sources for cell transplantation. More recently, in vivo direct reprogramming of endogenous CNS cells into multipotent neural stem/progenitor cells has been proposed as an alternative strategy that could overcome the limits connected with both the invasiveness of exogenous cell transplantation and the technical issues of in vitro reprogramming (i.e., the time requested and the limited available amount of directly induced neuronal cells). In this review, we aim to highlight the recent studies on in vivo direct reprogramming, focusing on astrocytes conversion to neurons or to neural stem/precursors cells, in the perspective of future therapeutic purposes for neurological disorders.

  18. NRF2 Orchestrates the Metabolic Shift during Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Kate E; Joy, Shona; Delhove, Juliette M K M; Kotiadis, Vassilios N; Fernandez, Emilio; Fitzpatrick, Lorna M; Whiteford, James R; King, Peter J; Bolanos, Juan P; Duchen, Michael R; Waddington, Simon N; McKay, Tristan R

    2016-03-01

    The potential of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) in disease modeling and regenerative medicine is vast, but current methodologies remain inefficient. Understanding the cellular mechanisms underlying iPSC reprogramming, such as the metabolic shift from oxidative to glycolytic energy production, is key to improving its efficiency. We have developed a lentiviral reporter system to assay longitudinal changes in cell signaling and transcription factor activity in living cells throughout iPSC reprogramming of human dermal fibroblasts. We reveal early NF-κB, AP-1, and NRF2 transcription factor activation prior to a temporal peak in hypoxia inducible factor α (HIFα) activity. Mechanistically, we show that an early burst in oxidative phosphorylation and elevated reactive oxygen species generation mediates increased NRF2 activity, which in turn initiates the HIFα-mediated glycolytic shift and may modulate glucose redistribution to the pentose phosphate pathway. Critically, inhibition of NRF2 by KEAP1 overexpression compromises metabolic reprogramming and results in reduced efficiency of iPSC colony formation.

  19. The cell cycle regulator 14-3-3σ opposes and reverses cancer metabolic reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Phan, Liem; Chou, Ping-Chieh; Velazquez-Torres, Guermarie; Samudio, Ismael; Parreno, Kenneth; Huang, Yaling; Tseng, Chieh; Vu, Thuy; Gully, Chris; Su, Chun-Hui; Wang, Edward; Chen, Jian; Choi, Hyun-Ho; Fuentes-Mattei, Enrique; Shin, Ji-Hyun; Shiang, Christine; Grabiner, Brian; Blonska, Marzenna; Skerl, Stephen; Shao, Yiping; Cody, Dianna; Delacerda, Jorge; Kingsley, Charles; Webb, Douglas; Carlock, Colin; Zhou, Zhongguo; Hsieh, Yun-Chih; Lee, Jaehyuk; Elliott, Andrew; Ramirez, Marc; Bankson, Jim; Hazle, John; Wang, Yongxing; Li, Lei; Weng, Shaofan; Rizk, Nibal; Wen, Yu Ye; Lin, Xin; Wang, Hua; Wang, Huamin; Zhang, Aijun; Xia, Xuefeng; Wu, Yun; Habra, Mouhammed; Yang, Wei; Pusztai, Lajos; Yeung, Sai-Ching; Lee, Mong-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Summary Extensive reprogramming of cellular energy metabolism is a hallmark of cancer. Despite its importance, the molecular mechanism controlling this tumour metabolic shift remains not fully understood. Here we show that 14-3-3σ regulates cancer metabolic reprogramming and protects cells from tumourigenic transformation. 14-3-3σ opposes tumour-promoting metabolic programs by enhancing c-Myc poly-ubiquitination and subsequent degradation. 14-3-3σ demonstrates the suppressive impact on cancer glycolysis, glutaminolysis, mitochondrial biogenesis and other major metabolic processes of tumours. Importantly, 14-3-3σ expression levels predict overall and recurrence-free survival rates, tumour glucose uptake and metabolic gene expression in breast cancer patients. Thus, these results highlight that 14-3-3σ is an important regulator of tumour metabolism, and loss of 14-3-3σ expression is critical for cancer metabolic reprogramming. We anticipate that pharmacologically elevating the function of 14-3-3σ in tumours could be a promising direction for targeted anti-cancer metabolism therapy development in future. PMID:26179207

  20. Uncoupling protein 2 regulates metabolic reprogramming and fate of antigen-stimulated CD8+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Chaudhuri, Leena; Srivastava, Rupesh K; Kos, Ferdynand; Shrikant, Protul A

    2016-07-01

    Adoptive cell therapy (ACT) employing ex vivo-generated tumor antigen-specific CD8+ T cells shows tumor efficacy when the transferred cells possess both effector and memory functions. New strategies based on understanding of mechanisms that balance CD8+ T cell differentiation toward effector and memory responses are highly desirable. Emerging information confirms a central role for antigen-induced metabolic reprogramming in CD8+ T cell differentiation and clonal expansion. The mitochondrial protein uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2) is induced by antigen stimulation of CD8+ T cells; however, its role in metabolic reprogramming underlying differentiation and clonal expansion has not been reported. Employing genetic (siRNA) and pharmacologic (Genipin) approaches, we note that antigen-induced UCP2 expression reduces glycolysis, fatty acid synthesis and production of reactive oxygen species to balance differentiation with survival of effector CD8+ T cells. Inhibition of UCP2 promotes CD8+ T cell terminal differentiation into short-lived effector cells (CD62L(lo)KLRG1(Hi)IFNγ(Hi)) that undergo clonal contraction. These findings are the first to reveal a role for antigen-induced UCP2 expression in balancing CD8+ T cell differentiation and survival. Targeting UCP2 to regulate metabolic reprogramming of CD8+ T cells is an attractive new approach to augment efficacy of tumor therapy by ACT. PMID:27271549

  1. Induced pluripotency and direct reprogramming: a new window for treatment of neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Li, Rui; Bai, Ye; Liu, Tongtong; Wang, Xiaoqun; Wu, Qian

    2013-06-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) are pluripotent cells that have the ability of unlimited self-renewal and can be differentiated into different cell lineages, including neural stem (NS) cells. Diverse regulatory signaling pathways of neural stem cells differentiation have been discovered, and this will be of great benefit to uncover the mechanisms of neuronal differentiation in vivo and in vitro. However, the limitations of hESCs resource along with the religious and ethical concerns impede the progress of ESCs application. Therefore, the induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) via somatic cell reprogramming have opened up another new territory for regenerative medicine. iPSCs now can be derived from a number of lineages of cells, and are able to differentiate into certain cell types, including neurons. Patient-specifi c iPSCs are being used in human neurodegenerative disease modeling and drug screening. Furthermore, with the development of somatic direct reprogramming or lineage reprogramming technique, a more effective approach for regenerative medicine could become a complement for iPSCs.

  2. Reprogramming committed murine blood cells to induced hematopoietic stem cells with defined factors.

    PubMed

    Riddell, Jonah; Gazit, Roi; Garrison, Brian S; Guo, Guoji; Saadatpour, Assieh; Mandal, Pankaj K; Ebina, Wataru; Volchkov, Pavel; Yuan, Guo-Cheng; Orkin, Stuart H; Rossi, Derrick J

    2014-04-24

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) sustain blood formation throughout life and are the functional units of bone marrow transplantation. We show that transient expression of six transcription factors Run1t1, Hlf, Lmo2, Prdm5, Pbx1, and Zfp37 imparts multilineage transplantation potential onto otherwise committed lymphoid and myeloid progenitors and myeloid effector cells. Inclusion of Mycn and Meis1 and use of polycistronic viruses increase reprogramming efficacy. The reprogrammed cells, designated induced-HSCs (iHSCs), possess clonal multilineage differentiation potential, reconstitute stem/progenitor compartments, and are serially transplantable. Single-cell analysis revealed that iHSCs derived under optimal conditions exhibit a gene expression profile that is highly similar to endogenous HSCs. These findings demonstrate that expression of a set of defined factors is sufficient to activate the gene networks governing HSC functional identity in committed blood cells. Our results raise the prospect that blood cell reprogramming may be a strategy for derivation of transplantable stem cells for clinical application.

  3. Turning the fate of reprogramming cells from retinal disorder to regeneration by Pax6 in newts.

    PubMed

    Casco-Robles, Martin Miguel; Islam, Md Rafiqul; Inami, Wataru; Tanaka, Hibiki Vincent; Kunahong, Ailidana; Yasumuro, Hirofumi; Hanzawa, Shiori; Casco-Robles, Roman Martin; Toyama, Fubito; Maruo, Fumiaki; Chiba, Chikafumi

    2016-09-19

    The newt, a urodele amphibian, has an outstanding ability- even as an adult -to regenerate a functional retina through reprogramming and proliferation of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells, even though the neural retina is completely removed from the eye by surgery. It remains unknown how the newt invented such a superior mechanism. Here we show that disability of RPE cells to regenerate the retina brings about a symptom of proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR), even in the newt. When Pax6, a transcription factor that is re-expressed in reprogramming RPE cells, is knocked down in transgenic juvenile newts, these cells proliferate but eventually give rise to cell aggregates that uniformly express alpha smooth muscle actin, Vimentin and N-cadherin, the markers of myofibroblasts which are a major component of the sub-/epi-retinal membranes in PVR. Our current study demonstrates that Pax6 is an essential factor that directs the fate of reprogramming RPE cells toward the retinal regeneration. The newt may have evolved the ability of retinal regeneration by modifying a mechanism that underlies the RPE-mediated retinal disorders.

  4. A rare human syndrome provides genetic evidence that WNT signaling is required for reprogramming of fibroblasts to induced pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Jason; Busch, Julia; Mintz, Ellen; Ng, Damian; Stanley, Alexandra; Brafman, David; Sutton, V. Reid; Van den Veyver, Ignatia; Willert, Karl

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY WNT signaling promotes the reprogramming of somatic cells to an induced pluripotent state. We provide genetic evidence that WNT signaling is a requisite step during the induction of pluripotency. Fibroblasts from individuals with Focal Dermal Hypoplasia (FDH), a rare genetic syndrome caused by mutations in the essential WNT processing enzyme PORCN, fail to reprogram using standard methods. This blockade in reprogramming is overcome by ectopic WNT signaling and by PORCN overexpression, thus demonstrating that WNT signaling is essential for reprogramming. The rescue of reprogramming is critically dependent on the level of WNT signaling: steady baseline activation of the WNT pathway yields karyotypically normal iPS cells, whereas daily stimulation with Wnt3a produces FDH-iPS cells with severely abnormal karyotypes. Therefore, although WNT signaling is required for cellular reprogramming, inappropriate activation of WNT signaling induces chromosomal instability, highlighting the precarious nature of ectopic WNT activation, and its tight relationship with oncogenic transformation. PMID:25464842

  5. Transcriptomic response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for its adaptation to sulphuric acid-induced stress.

    PubMed

    de Lucena, Rodrigo Mendonça; Elsztein, Carolina; de Barros Pita, Will; de Souza, Rafael Barros; de Sá Leitão Paiva Júnior, Sérgio; de Morais Junior, Marcos Antonio

    2015-11-01

    In bioethanol production plants, yeast cells are generally recycled between fermentation batches by using a treatment with sulphuric acid at a pH ranging from 2.0 to 2.5. We have previously shown that Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells exposed to sulphuric acid treatment induce the general stress response pathway, fail to activate the protein kinase A signalling cascade and requires the mechanisms of cell wall integrity and high osmolarity glycerol pathways in order to survive in this stressful condition. In the present work, we used transcriptome-wide analysis as well as physiological assays to identify the transient metabolic responses of S. cerevisiae under sulphuric acid treatment. The results presented herein indicate that survival depends on a metabolic reprogramming of the yeast cells in order to assure the yeast cell viability by preventing cell growth under this harmful condition. It involves the differential expression of a subset of genes related to cell wall composition and integrity, oxidation-reduction processes, carbohydrate metabolism, ATP synthesis and iron uptake. These results open prospects for application of this knowledge in the improvement of industrial processes based on metabolic engineering to select yeasts resistant to acid treatment. PMID:26362331

  6. RNA-Seq Analysis of the Arabidopsis Transcriptome in Pluripotent Calli

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyounghee; Park, Ok-Sun; Seo, Pil Joon

    2016-01-01

    Plant cells have a remarkable ability to induce pluripotent cell masses and regenerate whole plant organs under the appropriate culture conditions. Although the in vitro regeneration system is widely applied to manipulate agronomic traits, an understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying callus formation is starting to emerge. Here, we performed genome-wide transcriptome profiling of wild-type leaves and leaf explant-derived calli for comparison and identified 10,405 differentially expressed genes (> two-fold change). In addition to the well-defined signaling pathways involved in callus formation, we uncovered additional biological processes that may contribute to robust cellular dedifferentiation. Particular emphasis is placed on molecular components involved in leaf development, circadian clock, stress and hormone signaling, carbohydrate metabolism, and chromatin organization. Genetic and pharmacological analyses further supported that homeostasis of clock activity and stress signaling is crucial for proper callus induction. In addition, gibberellic acid (GA) and brassinosteroid (BR) signaling also participates in intricate cellular reprogramming. Collectively, our findings indicate that multiple signaling pathways are intertwined to allow reversible transition of cellular differentiation and dedifferentiation. PMID:27215197

  7. Comparative Transcriptome Analysis of Four Prymnesiophyte Algae

    PubMed Central

    Koid, Amy E.; Liu, Zhenfeng; Terrado, Ramon; Jones, Adriane C.; Caron, David A.; Heidelberg, Karla B.

    2014-01-01

    Genomic studies of bacteria, archaea and viruses have provided insights into the microbial world by unveiling potential functional capabilities and molecular pathways. However, the rate of discovery has been slower among microbial eukaryotes, whose genomes are larger and more complex. Transcriptomic approaches provide a cost-effective alternative for examining genetic potential and physiological responses of microbial eukaryotes to environmental stimuli. In this study, we generated and compared the transcriptomes of four globally-distributed, bloom-forming prymnesiophyte algae: Prymnesium parvum, Chrysochromulina brevifilum, Chrysochromulina ericina and Phaeocystis antarctica. Our results revealed that the four transcriptomes possess a set of core genes that are similar in number and shared across all four organisms. The functional classifications of these core genes using the euKaryotic Orthologous Genes (KOG) database were also similar among the four study organisms. More broadly, when the frequencies of different cellular and physiological functions were compared with other protists, the species clustered by both phylogeny and nutritional modes. Thus, these clustering patterns provide insight into genomic factors relating to both evolutionary relationships as well as trophic ecology. This paper provides a novel comparative analysis of the transcriptomes of ecologically important and closely related prymnesiophyte protists and advances an emerging field of study that uses transcriptomics to reveal ecology and function in protists. PMID:24926657

  8. Single-cell transcriptomics for microbial eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Kolisko, Martin; Boscaro, Vittorio; Burki, Fabien; Lynn, Denis H; Keeling, Patrick J

    2014-11-17

    One of the greatest hindrances to a comprehensive understanding of microbial genomics, cell biology, ecology, and evolution is that most microbial life is not in culture. Solutions to this problem have mainly focused on whole-community surveys like metagenomics, but these analyses inevitably loose information and present particular challenges for eukaryotes, which are relatively rare and possess large, gene-sparse genomes. Single-cell analyses present an alternative solution that allows for specific species to be targeted, while retaining information on cellular identity, morphology, and partitioning of activities within microbial communities. Single-cell transcriptomics, pioneered in medical research, offers particular potential advantages for uncultivated eukaryotes, but the efficiency and biases have not been tested. Here we describe a simple and reproducible method for single-cell transcriptomics using manually isolated cells from five model ciliate species; we examine impacts of amplification bias and contamination, and compare the efficacy of gene discovery to traditional culture-based transcriptomics. Gene discovery using single-cell transcriptomes was found to be comparable to mass-culture methods, suggesting single-cell transcriptomics is an efficient entry point into genomic data from the vast majority of eukaryotic biodiversity.

  9. Comparative transcriptome analysis of four prymnesiophyte algae.

    PubMed

    Koid, Amy E; Liu, Zhenfeng; Terrado, Ramon; Jones, Adriane C; Caron, David A; Heidelberg, Karla B

    2014-01-01

    Genomic studies of bacteria, archaea and viruses have provided insights into the microbial world by unveiling potential functional capabilities and molecular pathways. However, the rate of discovery has been slower among microbial eukaryotes, whose genomes are larger and more complex. Transcriptomic approaches provide a cost-effective alternative for examining genetic potential and physiological responses of microbial eukaryotes to environmental stimuli. In this study, we generated and compared the transcriptomes of four globally-distributed, bloom-forming prymnesiophyte algae: Prymnesium parvum, Chrysochromulina brevifilum, Chrysochromulina ericina and Phaeocystis antarctica. Our results revealed that the four transcriptomes possess a set of core genes that are similar in number and shared across all four organisms. The functional classifications of these core genes using the euKaryotic Orthologous Genes (KOG) database were also similar among the four study organisms. More broadly, when the frequencies of different cellular and physiological functions were compared with other protists, the species clustered by both phylogeny and nutritional modes. Thus, these clustering patterns provide insight into genomic factors relating to both evolutionary relationships as well as trophic ecology. This paper provides a novel comparative analysis of the transcriptomes of ecologically important and closely related prymnesiophyte protists and advances an emerging field of study that uses transcriptomics to reveal ecology and function in protists.

  10. Transcriptome-wide analysis of basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors in Isatis indigotica and their methyl jasmonate responsive expression profiling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Chen, Junfeng; Li, Qing; Chen, Wansheng

    2016-01-15

    Jasmonates (JAs) act as conserved elicitors of plant secondary metabolism. JAs perception triggers extensive transcriptional reprogramming leading to activation of the entire metabolic pathways. The family of basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors (TFs) has essential roles in JA signaling; however, little is known about their roles in regulation of secondary metabolites in Isatis indigotica. In this study, we identified 78 putative IibHLH sequences using the annotation of I. indigotica transcriptome. The identified proteins were characterized based on phylogenetic and conserved motif analyses. Using RNA sequencing, 16 IibHLHs showed significant positive response to MeJA (methyl jasmonate) at 1h, indicating their roles as early signaling events of JA-mediated transcriptional reprogramming. Ten IibHLHs presented co-expression pattern with biosynthetic pathway genes, suggesting their regulating role in secondary metabolite synthesis. These gene expression profiling data indicate that bHLHs can be used as candidate genes in molecular breeding programs to improve metabolite production in I. indigotica.

  11. Integrated Analysis of Transcriptomic and Proteomic Data

    PubMed Central

    Haider, Saad; Pal, Ranadip

    2013-01-01

    Until recently, understanding the regulatory behavior of cells has been pursued through independent analysis of the transcriptome or the proteome. Based on the central dogma, it was generally assumed that there exist a direct correspondence between mRNA transcripts and generated protein expressions. However, recent studies have shown that the correlation between mRNA and Protein expressions can be low due to various factors such as different half lives and post transcription machinery. Thus, a joint analysis of the transcriptomic and proteomic data can provide useful insights that may not be deciphered from individual analysis of mRNA or protein expressions. This article reviews the existing major approaches for joint analysis of transcriptomic and proteomic data. We categorize the different approaches into eight main categories based on the initial algorithm and final analysis goal. We further present analogies with other domains and discuss the existing research problems in this area. PMID:24082820

  12. Bioinformatics Pipeline for Transcriptome Sequencing Analysis.

    PubMed

    Djebali, Sarah; Wucher, Valentin; Foissac, Sylvain; Hitte, Christophe; Corre, Evan; Derrien, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    The development of High Throughput Sequencing (HTS) for RNA profiling (RNA-seq) has shed light on the diversity of transcriptomes. While RNA-seq is becoming a de facto standard for monitoring the population of expressed transcripts in a given condition at a specific time, processing the huge amount of data it generates requires dedicated bioinformatics programs. Here, we describe a standard bioinformatics protocol using state-of-the-art tools, the STAR mapper to align reads onto a reference genome, Cufflinks to reconstruct the transcriptome, and RSEM to quantify expression levels of genes and transcripts. We present the workflow using human transcriptome sequencing data from two biological replicates of the K562 cell line produced as part of the ENCODE3 project. PMID:27662878

  13. Reprogramming of mouse somatic cells into pluripotent stem-like cells using a combination of small molecules.

    PubMed

    Kang, Phil Jun; Moon, Jai-Hee; Yoon, Byung Sun; Hyeon, Solji; Jun, Eun Kyoung; Park, Gyuman; Yun, Wonjin; Park, Jiyong; Park, Minji; Kim, Aeree; Whang, Kwang Youn; Koh, Gou Young; Oh, Sejong; You, Seungkwon

    2014-08-01

    Somatic cells can be reprogrammed to generate induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) by overexpression of four transcription factors, Oct4, Klf4, Sox2, and c-Myc. However, exogenous expression of pluripotency factors raised concerns for clinical applications. Here, we show that iPS-like cells (iPSLCs) were generated from mouse somatic cells in two steps with small molecule compounds. In the first step, stable intermediate cells were generated from mouse astrocytes by Bmi1. These cells called induced epiblast stem cell (EpiSC)-like cells (iEpiSCLCs) are similar to EpiSCs in terms of expression of specific markers, epigenetic state, and ability to differentiate into three germ layers. In the second step, treatment with MEK/ERK and GSK3 pathway inhibitors in the presence of leukemia inhibitory factor resulted in conversion of iEpiSCLCs into iPSLCs that were similar to mESCs, suggesting that Bmi1 is sufficient to reprogram astrocytes to partially reprogrammed pluripotency. Next, Bmi1 function was replaced with Shh activators (oxysterol and purmorphamine), which demonstrating that combinations of small molecules can compensate for reprogramming factors and are sufficient to directly reprogram mouse somatic cells into iPSLCs. The chemically induced pluripotent stem cell-like cells (ciPSLCs) showed similar gene expression profiles, epigenetic status, and differentiation potentials to mESCs.

  14. Lysine-specific histone demethylase 1 inhibition promotes reprogramming by facilitating the expression of exogenous transcriptional factors and metabolic switch

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Hao; Liang, Lining; Li, Yuan; Feng, Chengqian; Li, Lingyu; Zhang, Yixin; He, Songwei; Pei, Duanqing; Guo, Yunqian; Zheng, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Lysine-specific histone demethylase 1 (LSD1) regulates histone methylation and influences the epigenetic state of cells during the generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). Here we reported that LSD1 inhibition via shRNA or specific inhibitor, tranylcypromine, promoted reprogramming at early stage via two mechanisms. At early stage of reprogramming, LSD1 inhibition increased the retrovirus-mediated exogenous expression of Oct4, Klf4, and Sox2 by blocking related H3K4 demethylation. Since LSD1 inhibition still promoted reprogramming even when iPSCs were induced with small-molecule compounds in a virus-free system, additional mechanisms should be involved. When RNA-seq was used for analysis, it was found that LSD1 inhibition reversed some gene expression changes induced by OKS, which subsequently promoted reprogramming. For example, by partially rescuing the decreased expression of Hif1α, LSD1 inhibition reversed the up-regulation of genes in oxidative phosphorylation pathway and the down-regulation of genes in glycolysis pathway. Such effects facilitated the metabolic switch from oxidative phosphorylation to glycolysis and subsequently promoted iPSCs induction. In addition, LSD1 inhibition also promoted the conversion from pre-iPSCs to iPSCs by facilitating the similar metabolic switch. Therefore, LSD1 inhibition promotes reprogramming by facilitating the expression of exogenous transcriptional factors and metabolic switch. PMID:27481483

  15. Atypical RNAs in the coelacanth transcriptome.

    PubMed

    Nitsche, Anne; Doose, Gero; Tafer, Hakim; Robinson, Mark; Saha, Nil Ratan; Gerdol, Marco; Canapa, Adriana; Hoffmann, Steve; Amemiya, Chris T; Stadler, Peter F

    2014-09-01

    Circular and apparently trans-spliced RNAs have recently been reported as abundant types of transcripts in mammalian transcriptome data. Both types of non-colinear RNAs are also abundant in RNA-seq of different tissue from both the African and the Indonesian coelacanth. We observe more than 8,000 lincRNAs with normal gene structure and several thousands of circularized and trans-spliced products, showing that such atypical RNAs form a substantial contribution to the transcriptome. Surprisingly, the majority of the circularizing and trans-connecting splice junctions are unique to atypical forms, that is, are not used in normal isoforms.

  16. Developmental exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals alters the epigenome: Identification of reprogrammed targets

    PubMed Central

    Prusinski, Lauren; Al-Hendy, Ayman; Yang, Qiwei

    2016-01-01

    Endocrine disruptions induced by environmental toxicants have placed an immense burden on society to properly diagnose, treat and attempt to alleviate symptoms and disease. Environmental exposures during critical periods of development can permanently reprogram normal physiological responses, thereby increasing susceptibility to disease later in life - a process known as developmental reprogramming. During development, organogenesis and tissue differentiation occur through a continuous series of tightly-regulated and precisely-timed molecular, biochemical and cellular events. Humans may encounter endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) daily and during all stages of life, from conception and fetal development through adulthood and senescence. Though puberty and perimenopausal periods may be affected by endocrine disruption due to hormonal effects, prenatal and early postnatal windows are most critical for proper development due to rapid changes in system growth. Developmental reprogramming is shown to be caused by alterations in the epigenome. Development is the time when epi