Science.gov

Sample records for photosynthates

  1. Photosynthate Partitioning into Starch in Soybean Leaves

    PubMed Central

    Chatterton, N. Jerry; Silvius, John E.

    1979-01-01

    Photosynthesis, photosynthate partitioning into foliar starch, and translocation were investigated in soybean plants (Glycine max (L.) Merr. cv. Amsoy 71), grown under different photoperiods and photosynthetic periods to determine the controls of leaf starch accumulation. Starch accumulation rates in soybean leaves were inversely related to the length of the daily photosynthetic period under which the plants were grown. Photosynthetic period and not photoperiod per se appears to be the important factor. Plants grown in a 14-hour photosynthetic period partitioned approximately 60% of the daily foliar accumulation into starch whereas 7-hour plants partitioned about 90% of their daily foliar accumulation into starch. The difference in starch accumulation resulted from a change in photosynthate partitioning between starch and leaf residual dry weight. Residual dry weight is defined as leaf dry weight minus the weight of total nonstructural carbohydrates. Differences in photosynthate partitioning into starch were also associated with changes in photosynthetic and translocation rates, as well as with leaf and whole plant morphology. It is concluded that leaf starch accumulation is a programmed process and not simply the result of a limitation in translocation. PMID:16661047

  2. Photosynthate partitioning during flowering in relation to senescence of spinach

    SciTech Connect

    Sklensky, D.; Davies, P.J. )

    1990-05-01

    Male spinach plants are frequently cited as a counter-example to the nutrient drain hypothesis. Photosynthate partitioning in both male and female plants was examined. Leaves just below the inflorescences in plants at various stages of flowering were labelled with {sup 14}CO{sub 2} and the photosynthate allowed to partition for three hours. The leaves, flowers and stems of the inflorescence, and the other above ground vegetative tissue were harvested. These parts were combusted in a sample oxidizer for the collection of the {sup 14}CO{sub 2}. Allocation to the male and female flowers at very early stages are similar. As the flowers develop further, male flowers receive more photosynthate than do female flowers in early fruit production. Thus it is possible that nutrient drain to the flowers in male spinach plants is sufficient to account for senescence.

  3. Photosynthate allocations patterns and mode of postfire reproduction in two shrub species from the California chaparral

    SciTech Connect

    Sparks, S.R.

    1989-01-01

    Age-specific patterns of photosynthate allocation in leaves were investigated for two chaparral shrubs, Adenostoma fasciculatum and Ceanothus greggii, in five stands of various ages. Branches of shrubs were labeled with {sup 14}CO{sub 2}, and seasonal allocation of {sup 14}C-labeled photosynthate to storage, defense, metabolic, and structural compounds was followed. Age-specific allocation patterns were found only in the spring, when older shrubs showed a reduced allocation of photosynthate within leaves to storage compounds. Older shrubs may be less able than younger shrubs to allocate photosynthate to storage compounds when demands on photosynthate for growth are high. The influence of senescence on postfire sprouting was investigated by quantifying the proportion of standing dead biomass in A. fasciculatum, as well as other shrub structural characteristics, before an experimental burn. After the burn, sprout production during the first postfire season was determined and correlated with prefire structural characteristics. Photosynthate allocation to shoots and roots was investigated for seedlings of both species.

  4. Utilization of net photosynthate for nitrogen fixation and protein production in an annual legume.

    PubMed

    Herridge, D F; Pate, J S

    1977-11-01

    The economy of C and N in nodulated cowpea (Vigna unguiculata [L.] Walp.) was described in terms of fixation of CO(2) and N(2), respiratory losses of C, and the production of dry matter and protein.Net daytime gain of C by the shoot (net photosynthesis) rose to a maximum at flowering and then declined sharply due to abscission of leaves. Maximum N fixation occurred 10 days prior to maximum net photosynthesis. Shedding of nodules reduced fixation to zero by midfruiting. Fifty per cent of the plant's N and 37% of its net photosynthate were assimilated before flowering; 39% of plant N was incorporated into seed dry matter.Respiration of nodules and roots utilized 24% of the C from net photosynthate assimilated over the growth cycle; night respiration of shoots, 20%; dry matter production in seeds, 17%; and dry matter production in other plant parts, 39%. The proportion of net photosynthate translocated to the nodulated root decreased from 41 to 14% during growth. Developing fruits were major competitors for translocate. Nodules consumed 9% of the C from the plant's total net photosynthate, 43% of which was respired, 6% made into dry matter, and 51% returned to the shoot with N fixation products.For every 1 g N fixed, net photosynthate equivalent to 6.8 g carbohydrate was consumed by nodules, 25.7 g carbohydrate by the nodulated root. Translocate was used most efficiently for N fixation in late vegetative growth when nodules were most active and their carbohydrate supply still adequate.During vegetative growth and early flowering (0 to 78 days after sowing) cowpea consumed 17.2 g net photosynthate (as carbohydrate) for every gram of protein synthesized in its shoot. The comparable conversion in seed production was 32.5 g net photosynthate/g seed protein or 6.6 g/g seed dry matter.

  5. Utilization of Net Photosynthate for Nitrogen Fixation and Protein Production in an Annual Legume 1

    PubMed Central

    Herridge, David F.; Pate, John S.

    1977-01-01

    The economy of C and N in nodulated cowpea (Vigna unguiculata [L.] Walp.) was described in terms of fixation of CO2 and N2, respiratory losses of C, and the production of dry matter and protein. Net daytime gain of C by the shoot (net photosynthesis) rose to a maximum at flowering and then declined sharply due to abscission of leaves. Maximum N fixation occurred 10 days prior to maximum net photosynthesis. Shedding of nodules reduced fixation to zero by midfruiting. Fifty per cent of the plant's N and 37% of its net photosynthate were assimilated before flowering; 39% of plant N was incorporated into seed dry matter. Respiration of nodules and roots utilized 24% of the C from net photosynthate assimilated over the growth cycle; night respiration of shoots, 20%; dry matter production in seeds, 17%; and dry matter production in other plant parts, 39%. The proportion of net photosynthate translocated to the nodulated root decreased from 41 to 14% during growth. Developing fruits were major competitors for translocate. Nodules consumed 9% of the C from the plant's total net photosynthate, 43% of which was respired, 6% made into dry matter, and 51% returned to the shoot with N fixation products. For every 1 g N fixed, net photosynthate equivalent to 6.8 g carbohydrate was consumed by nodules, 25.7 g carbohydrate by the nodulated root. Translocate was used most efficiently for N fixation in late vegetative growth when nodules were most active and their carbohydrate supply still adequate. During vegetative growth and early flowering (0 to 78 days after sowing) cowpea consumed 17.2 g net photosynthate (as carbohydrate) for every gram of protein synthesized in its shoot. The comparable conversion in seed production was 32.5 g net photosynthate/g seed protein or 6.6 g/g seed dry matter. PMID:16660179

  6. Optimizing rice plant photosynthate allocation reduces N2O emissions from paddy fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yu; Huang, Xiaomin; Zhang, Xin; Zhang, Xingyue; Zhang, Yi; Zheng, Chengyan; Deng, Aixing; Zhang, Jun; Wu, Lianhai; Hu, Shuijin; Zhang, Weijian

    2016-07-01

    Rice paddies are a major source of anthropogenic nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions, especially under alternate wetting-drying irrigation and high N input. Increasing photosynthate allocation to the grain in rice (Oryza sativa L.) has been identified as an effective strategy of genetic and agronomic innovation for yield enhancement; however, its impacts on N2O emissions are still unknown. We conducted three independent but complementary experiments (variety, mutant study, and spikelet clipping) to examine the impacts of rice plant photosynthate allocation on paddy N2O emissions. The three experiments showed that N2O fluxes were significantly and negatively correlated with the ratio of grain yield to total aboveground biomass, known as the harvest index (HI) in agronomy (P < 0.01). Biomass accumulation and N uptake after anthesis were significantly and positively correlated with HI (P < 0.05). Reducing photosynthate allocation to the grain by spikelet clipping significantly increased white root biomass and soil dissolved organic C and reduced plant N uptake, resulting in high soil denitrification potential (P < 0.05). Our findings demonstrate that optimizing photosynthate allocation to the grain can reduce paddy N2O emissions through decreasing belowground C input and increasing plant N uptake, suggesting the potential for genetic and agronomic efforts to produce more rice with less N2O emissions.

  7. Optimizing rice plant photosynthate allocation reduces N2O emissions from paddy fields

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yu; Huang, Xiaomin; Zhang, Xin; Zhang, Xingyue; Zhang, Yi; Zheng, Chengyan; Deng, Aixing; Zhang, Jun; Wu, Lianhai; Hu, Shuijin; Zhang, Weijian

    2016-01-01

    Rice paddies are a major source of anthropogenic nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions, especially under alternate wetting-drying irrigation and high N input. Increasing photosynthate allocation to the grain in rice (Oryza sativa L.) has been identified as an effective strategy of genetic and agronomic innovation for yield enhancement; however, its impacts on N2O emissions are still unknown. We conducted three independent but complementary experiments (variety, mutant study, and spikelet clipping) to examine the impacts of rice plant photosynthate allocation on paddy N2O emissions. The three experiments showed that N2O fluxes were significantly and negatively correlated with the ratio of grain yield to total aboveground biomass, known as the harvest index (HI) in agronomy (P < 0.01). Biomass accumulation and N uptake after anthesis were significantly and positively correlated with HI (P < 0.05). Reducing photosynthate allocation to the grain by spikelet clipping significantly increased white root biomass and soil dissolved organic C and reduced plant N uptake, resulting in high soil denitrification potential (P < 0.05). Our findings demonstrate that optimizing photosynthate allocation to the grain can reduce paddy N2O emissions through decreasing belowground C input and increasing plant N uptake, suggesting the potential for genetic and agronomic efforts to produce more rice with less N2O emissions. PMID:27378420

  8. Optimizing rice plant photosynthate allocation reduces N2O emissions from paddy fields.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yu; Huang, Xiaomin; Zhang, Xin; Zhang, Xingyue; Zhang, Yi; Zheng, Chengyan; Deng, Aixing; Zhang, Jun; Wu, Lianhai; Hu, Shuijin; Zhang, Weijian

    2016-01-01

    Rice paddies are a major source of anthropogenic nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions, especially under alternate wetting-drying irrigation and high N input. Increasing photosynthate allocation to the grain in rice (Oryza sativa L.) has been identified as an effective strategy of genetic and agronomic innovation for yield enhancement; however, its impacts on N2O emissions are still unknown. We conducted three independent but complementary experiments (variety, mutant study, and spikelet clipping) to examine the impacts of rice plant photosynthate allocation on paddy N2O emissions. The three experiments showed that N2O fluxes were significantly and negatively correlated with the ratio of grain yield to total aboveground biomass, known as the harvest index (HI) in agronomy (P < 0.01). Biomass accumulation and N uptake after anthesis were significantly and positively correlated with HI (P < 0.05). Reducing photosynthate allocation to the grain by spikelet clipping significantly increased white root biomass and soil dissolved organic C and reduced plant N uptake, resulting in high soil denitrification potential (P < 0.05). Our findings demonstrate that optimizing photosynthate allocation to the grain can reduce paddy N2O emissions through decreasing belowground C input and increasing plant N uptake, suggesting the potential for genetic and agronomic efforts to produce more rice with less N2O emissions. PMID:27378420

  9. Optimizing rice plant photosynthate allocation reduces N2O emissions from paddy fields.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yu; Huang, Xiaomin; Zhang, Xin; Zhang, Xingyue; Zhang, Yi; Zheng, Chengyan; Deng, Aixing; Zhang, Jun; Wu, Lianhai; Hu, Shuijin; Zhang, Weijian

    2016-01-01

    Rice paddies are a major source of anthropogenic nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions, especially under alternate wetting-drying irrigation and high N input. Increasing photosynthate allocation to the grain in rice (Oryza sativa L.) has been identified as an effective strategy of genetic and agronomic innovation for yield enhancement; however, its impacts on N2O emissions are still unknown. We conducted three independent but complementary experiments (variety, mutant study, and spikelet clipping) to examine the impacts of rice plant photosynthate allocation on paddy N2O emissions. The three experiments showed that N2O fluxes were significantly and negatively correlated with the ratio of grain yield to total aboveground biomass, known as the harvest index (HI) in agronomy (P < 0.01). Biomass accumulation and N uptake after anthesis were significantly and positively correlated with HI (P < 0.05). Reducing photosynthate allocation to the grain by spikelet clipping significantly increased white root biomass and soil dissolved organic C and reduced plant N uptake, resulting in high soil denitrification potential (P < 0.05). Our findings demonstrate that optimizing photosynthate allocation to the grain can reduce paddy N2O emissions through decreasing belowground C input and increasing plant N uptake, suggesting the potential for genetic and agronomic efforts to produce more rice with less N2O emissions.

  10. Temperature and Oxygen Effects on 14C-Photosynthate Unloading and Accumulation in Developing Soybean Seeds

    PubMed Central

    Thorne, John H.

    1982-01-01

    The environmental sensitivity of the processes associated with the import of photosynthate by developing soybean seeds was investigated within intact fruit and with excised, immature embryos. Intact pods of field-grown (Glycine max [L.] Merr.) Amsoy 71 soybeans were subjected to localized regimes of 0, 21, or 100% O2 and 15, 25, or 35°C during pulsechase translocation experiments and, 2.5 hours later, the uptake and distribution of 14C-photosynthate among dissected fruit tissues determined. In other experiments, excised embryos were incubated in [14C]sucrose solutions under various experimental conditions to separate the effects of these treatments on accumulation by the embryos from those which may operate on phloem unloading in the maternal seedcoat. Import of 14C-photosynthate by intact soybean fruit was both temperature- and O2-dependent. This dependency was shown to occur only within the seeds; import by the pod walls was essentially insensitive to fruit temperature or O2 treatments. The embryos of anaerobic fruit were completely unlabeled, regardless of fruit temperature. But under anaerobic in vitro incubation conditions, uptake of [14C]sucrose in excised embryos was only 30% less than that in aerobic in vitro conditions. The data suggest that, within intact fruit, anoxia prevented sucrose efflux from the seed coat phloem and any subsequent uptake by the embryo. The demonstrated energy dependence of phloem unloading may reflect requirements for membrane integrity or energy metabolism in the companion cell-sieve element complex, consistent with a facilitated unloading process. Collectively, these data characterize the environmental sensitivity of photosynthate import in developing soybean fruit. They imply that environmental regulation of import may occur at both the embryo level and at the phloem terminals within the seed coat. PMID:16662182

  11. Extraction of /sup 14/C-labeled photosynthate from aquatic plants with dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO)

    SciTech Connect

    Filbin, G.J.; Hough, R.A.

    1984-03-01

    DMSO was tested as a solvent to extract /sup 14/C-labeled photosynthate from three species of aquatic plants in photosynthesis measurements and compared with the dry oxidation method for plant radioassay. Extraction efficiency was in the range of 96-99% of fixed /sup 14/C, and precision was comparable to, or better than, that obtained with dry oxidation. The method is simple and inexpensive, and for fresh tissue the same sample extracts can be used for chlorophyll analyses.

  12. Measuring chlorophyll. cap alpha. and /sup 14/C-labeled photosynthate in aquatic angiosperms by the use of a tissue solubilizer. [/sup 14/C-labelled photosynthate

    SciTech Connect

    Beer, S.; Stewart, A.J.; Wetzel, R.G.

    1982-01-01

    A compound that quantitatively correlated with chlorophyll ..cap alpha.. could be measured fluorometrically in the extracts of leaves of three aquatic angiosperms (Myriophyllum heterophyllum Michx., Potamogeton crispus L., Elodea canadensis Michx.) treated with the tissue solubilizer BTS-450. Fluorescent characteristics of the solubilized plant tissues were stable for several weeks in the dark at temperatures up to 60/sup 0/C but rapidly degraded in sunlight or when acidified. /sup 14/C-Labeled photosynthate, which had been fixed by leaf discs during 1- to 10-hour exposure to H/sup 14/CO/sub 3/, was also readily extracted by the tissue solubilizer. Solubilizer extraction can, therefore, be used to determine both chlorophyll ..cap alpha.. content and /sup 14/C incorporation rates in the same leaf sample. The method is practical, because no grinding is required, the fluorescent characteristics of the extracts are stable, and analyses can be performed with very little plant material (about 3 milligrams).

  13. Exploring the transfer of recent plant photosynthates to soil microbes: mycorrhizal pathway vs direct root exudation

    PubMed Central

    Kaiser, Christina; Kilburn, Matt R; Clode, Peta L; Fuchslueger, Lucia; Koranda, Marianne; Cliff, John B; Solaiman, Zakaria M; Murphy, Daniel V

    2015-01-01

    Plants rapidly release photoassimilated carbon (C) to the soil via direct root exudation and associated mycorrhizal fungi, with both pathways promoting plant nutrient availability. This study aimed to explore these pathways from the root's vascular bundle to soil microbial communities. Using nanoscale secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS) imaging and 13C-phospho- and neutral lipid fatty acids, we traced in-situ flows of recently photoassimilated C of 13CO2-exposed wheat (Triticum aestivum) through arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) into root- and hyphae-associated soil microbial communities. Intraradical hyphae of AM fungi were significantly 13C-enriched compared to other root-cortex areas after 8 h of labelling. Immature fine root areas close to the root tip, where AM features were absent, showed signs of passive C loss and co-location of photoassimilates with nitrogen taken up from the soil solution. A significant and exclusively fresh proportion of 13C-photosynthates was delivered through the AM pathway and was utilised by different microbial groups compared to C directly released by roots. Our results indicate that a major release of recent photosynthates into soil leave plant roots via AM intraradical hyphae already upstream of passive root exudations. AM fungi may act as a rapid hub for translocating fresh plant C to soil microbes. PMID:25382456

  14. Exploring the transfer of recent plant photosynthates to soil microbes: mycorrhizal pathway vs direct root exudation.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Christina; Kilburn, Matt R; Clode, Peta L; Fuchslueger, Lucia; Koranda, Marianne; Cliff, John B; Solaiman, Zakaria M; Murphy, Daniel V

    2015-03-01

    Plants rapidly release photoassimilated carbon (C) to the soil via direct root exudation and associated mycorrhizal fungi, with both pathways promoting plant nutrient availability. This study aimed to explore these pathways from the root's vascular bundle to soil microbial communities. Using nanoscale secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS) imaging and (13) C-phospho- and neutral lipid fatty acids, we traced in-situ flows of recently photoassimilated C of (13) CO2 -exposed wheat (Triticum aestivum) through arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) into root- and hyphae-associated soil microbial communities. Intraradical hyphae of AM fungi were significantly (13) C-enriched compared to other root-cortex areas after 8 h of labelling. Immature fine root areas close to the root tip, where AM features were absent, showed signs of passive C loss and co-location of photoassimilates with nitrogen taken up from the soil solution. A significant and exclusively fresh proportion of (13) C-photosynthates was delivered through the AM pathway and was utilised by different microbial groups compared to C directly released by roots. Our results indicate that a major release of recent photosynthates into soil leave plant roots via AM intraradical hyphae already upstream of passive root exudations. AM fungi may act as a rapid hub for translocating fresh plant C to soil microbes.

  15. Photosynthate distribution by microplankton in permanently ice-covered Antarctic desert lakes

    SciTech Connect

    Priscu, J.C.; Priscu, L.R.; Vincent, W.F.; Howard-Williams, C.

    1987-01-01

    The distribution of /sup 14/C-labeled photosynthate by microplankton in Lakes Vanda and Fryxell, Antarctica, was measured during the 1984-1985 austral summer. Both lakes had conspicuous deep chlorophyll maxima near the bottom of the oxygenated zone. DCMU sensitivity experiments revealed that photosynthesis below the chlorophyll maximum in Lake Fryxell was partially due to photosynthetic bacteria. These bacteria had notably higher protein and lower lipid labeling than overlying oxic microalgae. Protein labeling in the oxic microalgae had lower I/sub k/ and higher ..cap alpha.. values than for other photosynthetic end products, indicating that protein is synthesized more efficiently at low photosynthetic photon flux density than the other metabolites. The I/sub k/ values for complete photosynthesis are among the lowest yet recorded for phytoplankton.

  16. Effects of SO(2) and O(3) on Allocation of C-Labeled Photosynthate in Phaseolus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, S B; McConathy, R K

    1983-11-01

    A series of laboratory exposures of two varieties of bush bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L., var 274 and var 290) was conducted to determine the sensitivity of [(14)C]photosynthate allocation patterns to alteration by SO(2) and O(3). Experiments with the pollution-resistant 274 variety demonstrated short-term changes in both (14)C and biomass allocation to roots of (14)CO(2)-labeled plants but no significant effect on yield by up to 40 hours of exposure to SO(2) at 0.50 microliters per liter or 4 hours of O(3) at 0.40 microliters per liter. Subsequent experiments with the more sensitive 290 variety demonstrated significant alteration of photosynthesis, translocation, and partitioning of photosynthate between plant parts including developing pods. Significant increases in foliar retention of photosynthate (+40%) occurred after 8 hours of exposure to SO(2) at 0.75 microliters per liter (6.0 microliters per liter-hour) and 11 hours of exposure to O(3) at 0.30 microliters per liter-hour (3.3 microliters-hours). Time series sampling of labeled tissues after (14)CO(2) uptake showed that the disruption of translocation patterns was persistent for at least 1 week after exposures ceased. Subsequent longer-term exposures at lower concentrations of both O(3) (0.0, 0.10, 0.15, and 0.20 microliters per liter) and SO(2) (0.0, 0.20, and 0.40 microliters per liter) demonstrated that O(3) more effectively altered allocation than SO(2), that primary leaves were generally more sensitive than trifoliates, and that responses of trifoliate leaves varied with plant growth stage. Altered rates of allocation of photosynthate by leaves were generally associated with alterations of similar magnitude and opposite direction in developing pods. Collectively, these experiments suggest that allocation patterns can provide sensitive indices of incipient growth responses of pollution-stressed vegetation.

  17. Reduced translocation of current photosynthate precedes changes in gas exchange for Quercus rubra seedlings under flooding stress.

    PubMed

    Sloan, Joshua L; Islam, M Anisul; Jacobs, Douglass F

    2016-01-01

    Northern red oak (Quercus rubra L.) seedlings are frequently planted on suboptimal sites in their native range in North America, subjecting them to environmental stresses, such as flooding, for which they may not be well adapted. Members of the genus Quercus exhibit a wide range of responses to flooding, and responses of northern red oak to flooding remain inadequately described. To better understand the physiological effects of root system inundation in post-transplant northern red oak seedlings and the effects of flooding on endogenous patterns of resource allocation within the plant, we observed the effects of short-term flooding initiated at the linear shoot growth stage on net photosynthetic rates, dark respiration, chlorophyll fluorescence (Fv/Fm) and translocation of (13)C-labeled current photosynthate. Downward translocation of current photosynthate declined after 4 days of flooding and was the first measured physiological response to flooding; net photosynthetic rates decreased and dark respiration rates increased after 7 days of flooding. Short-term flooding did not affect maximal potential efficiency of photosystem II (Fv/Fm). The finding that decreased downward translocation of (13)C-labeled current photosynthate preceded reduced net photosynthesis and increased dark respiration during flooding suggests the occurrence of sink-limited photosynthesis under these conditions.

  18. Photosynthate Regulation of the Root System Architecture Mediated by the Heterotrimeric G Protein Complex in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Mudgil, Yashwanti; Karve, Abhijit; Teixeira, Paulo J P L; Jiang, Kun; Tunc-Ozdemir, Meral; Jones, Alan M

    2016-01-01

    Assimilate partitioning to the root system is a desirable developmental trait to control but little is known of the signaling pathway underlying partitioning. A null mutation in the gene encoding the Gβ subunit of the heterotrimeric G protein complex, a nexus for a variety of signaling pathways, confers altered sugar partitioning in roots. While fixed carbon rapidly reached the roots of wild type and agb1-2 mutant seedlings, agb1 roots had more of this fixed carbon in the form of glucose, fructose, and sucrose which manifested as a higher lateral root density. Upon glucose treatment, the agb1-2 mutant had abnormal gene expression in the root tip validated by transcriptome analysis. In addition, PIN2 membrane localization was altered in the agb1-2 mutant. The heterotrimeric G protein complex integrates photosynthesis-derived sugar signaling incorporating both membrane-and transcriptional-based mechanisms. The time constants for these signaling mechanisms are in the same range as photosynthate delivery to the root, raising the possibility that root cells are able to use changes in carbon fixation in real time to adjust growth behavior. PMID:27610112

  19. How General is the Current Photosynthate Controls on the soil CO2 Flux Paradigm?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mortazavi, B.; O'Brien, J.; Mitchell, R.

    2008-12-01

    A variety of methods including girdling experiments and isotope labeling approaches have provided some evidence for a tight link between current C assimilation and soil CO2 flux. The results of these investigations have lead to the conclusion that autotrophs control soil CO2 flux. If the results from these investigations are general then our understanding of patterns and regulation of below ground C dynamics and the means by which ecosystem controls are studied and modeled must be reconsidered. While evidence for a coupling between current photosynthate and soil carbon dynamics has been conspicuous, data that may challenge this relationship have not been thoroughly considered. Results from foliar scorching treatments in longleaf pine (Pinus palustris) ecosystem that removed 95% of the foliage demonstrate that (i) mycorrhizal fungi production was not significantly reduced as a result of scorching, (ii) root mortality was not significantly affected because of disturbance of the carbon source, and (iii) total root non-structural carbohydrates were not significantly reduced after scorching. These results together with findings from other regions suggest that in some systems soil CO2 fluxes are less tightly linked to variations in C assimilation because stored C acts as a buffer. This stored C is a critical resource for rebuilding damaged foliage in many frequently burned ecosystems. We propose that plant adaptations to disturbance and recovery from disturbance may explain why some systems may be buffered from variation in C source strength and the link between above and belowground carbon dynamics is more diffuse.

  20. Photosynthate Regulation of the Root System Architecture Mediated by the Heterotrimeric G Protein Complex in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Mudgil, Yashwanti; Karve, Abhijit; Teixeira, Paulo J. P. L.; Jiang, Kun; Tunc-Ozdemir, Meral; Jones, Alan M.

    2016-01-01

    Assimilate partitioning to the root system is a desirable developmental trait to control but little is known of the signaling pathway underlying partitioning. A null mutation in the gene encoding the Gβ subunit of the heterotrimeric G protein complex, a nexus for a variety of signaling pathways, confers altered sugar partitioning in roots. While fixed carbon rapidly reached the roots of wild type and agb1-2 mutant seedlings, agb1 roots had more of this fixed carbon in the form of glucose, fructose, and sucrose which manifested as a higher lateral root density. Upon glucose treatment, the agb1-2 mutant had abnormal gene expression in the root tip validated by transcriptome analysis. In addition, PIN2 membrane localization was altered in the agb1-2 mutant. The heterotrimeric G protein complex integrates photosynthesis-derived sugar signaling incorporating both membrane-and transcriptional-based mechanisms. The time constants for these signaling mechanisms are in the same range as photosynthate delivery to the root, raising the possibility that root cells are able to use changes in carbon fixation in real time to adjust growth behavior. PMID:27610112

  1. Photosynthate Regulation of the Root System Architecture Mediated by the Heterotrimeric G Protein Complex in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Mudgil, Yashwanti; Karve, Abhijit; Teixeira, Paulo J. P. L.; Jiang, Kun; Tunc-Ozdemir, Meral; Jones, Alan M.

    2016-01-01

    Assimilate partitioning to the root system is a desirable developmental trait to control but little is known of the signaling pathway underlying partitioning. A null mutation in the gene encoding the Gβ subunit of the heterotrimeric G protein complex, a nexus for a variety of signaling pathways, confers altered sugar partitioning in roots. While fixed carbon rapidly reached the roots of wild type and agb1-2 mutant seedlings, agb1 roots had more of this fixed carbon in the form of glucose, fructose, and sucrose which manifested as a higher lateral root density. Upon glucose treatment, the agb1-2 mutant had abnormal gene expression in the root tip validated by transcriptome analysis. In addition, PIN2 membrane localization was altered in the agb1-2 mutant. The heterotrimeric G protein complex integrates photosynthesis-derived sugar signaling incorporating both membrane-and transcriptional-based mechanisms. The time constants for these signaling mechanisms are in the same range as photosynthate delivery to the root, raising the possibility that root cells are able to use changes in carbon fixation in real time to adjust growth behavior.

  2. Multi-scale Geological Outcrop Visualisation: Using Gigapan and Photosynth in Fieldwork-related Geology Teaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stimpson, Ian; Gertisser, Ralf; Montenari, Michael; O'Driscoll, Brian

    2010-05-01

    An increasing proportion of geology (and other fieldwork-related discipline) students are mobility impaired. This is partially due to the widening access agenda and the acceptance of increased numbers of students with severe medical disabilities. In the UK, the expectation of "The Special Educational Needs and Disabilities Act (2001)" (SENDA) and "The Higher Education Quality Assurance Agency" (QAA) is that institutions should, wherever possible, provide alternative experiences where comparable opportunities are available which satisfy the learning outcomes. In order to provide this alternative experience, the ways in which students observe and learn from geology in the field need to be resembled closely by, for example, viewing outcrops at different scales and from different perspectives. Whilst a series of still images at different distances could be taken, students need to be able to decide where to look in detail and 'move around' the outcrop. The Gigapan project is a website and supporting software that allows high-resolution megapixel photographic images to be combined to make gigapixel panoramas which can then be explored at many scales by zooming and panning. Photosynth is a similar project where a number of different digital photographs are combined into a 3D model in which the user can move around. Here, we show examples of both projects, which have been successfully implemented in geology teaching related to a residential undergraduate field course to classic geological areas in Pembrokeshire, South Wales. In addition to providing an alternative learning experience for mobility-impaired students on the fieldtrip, these resources could also be used for non-impaired students where circumstances such as bad weather prevents the whole cohort from visiting a key exposure on a field course. They would also allow a 'virtual' visit of exposures that are inaccessible and may be a useful learning tool for preparing students for a forthcoming field course.

  3. Soil sheaths, photosynthate distribution to roots, and rhizosphere water relations for Opuntia ficus-indica

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, B.; North, G.B.; Nobel, P.S. )

    1993-09-01

    Soil sheaths incorporating aggregated soil particles surround young roots of many species, but the effects of such sheaths on water movement between roots and the soil are largely unknown. The quantity and location of root exudates associated with soil sheath along the entire length of its young roots, except within 1.4 cm of the tip. The soil sheaths, which average 0.7 mm in thickness, were composed of soil particles and root hairs, both of which were covered with exuded mucilaginous material. As determined with a [sup 14]C pulse-labeling technique, 2% of newly fixed [sup 14]C-photosynthate was translocated into the roots at 3d, 6% at 9 d, and 8% at 15 d after labeling. The fraction of insoluble [sup 14]C in the roots increased twofold from 3 d to 15 d. Over the same time period, 6%-9% of the [sup 14]C translocated to the roots was exuded into the soil. The soluble [sup 14]C compounds exuded into the soil were greater in the 3-cm segment at the root tip than elsewhere along the root, whereas mucilage was exuded relatively uniformly along roots 15 cm in length. The volumetric efflux of water increase for both sheathed and unsheathed roots as the soil water potential decreased form -0.1 MPa to -1.0 MPa. The efflux rate was greater for unsheathed roots than for sheathed roots, which were more turgid and had a higher water potential, especially at lower soil water potentials. During drying, soil particles in the sheaths aggregate more tightly, making the sheaths less permeable to water and possibly creating air gaps. The soil sheaths of O. ficus-indica thus reduce water loss from the roots to a drying soil. 34 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Ocean acidification increases photosynthate translocation in a coral-dinoflagellates symbiosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremblay, P.; Fine, M.; Maguer, J. F.; Grover, R.; Ferrier-Pagès, C.

    2013-01-01

    This study has examined the effect of an increased seawater pCO2 on the rates of photosynthesis and carbon translocation in the scleractinian coral species Stylophora pistillata using a new model based on 13C-labelling of the photosynthetic products. Symbiont photosynthesis contributes for a large part of the carbon acquisition in tropical coral species and is therefore an important process that may determine their survival under climate change scenarios. Nubbins of S. pistillata were maintained for six months under two pHs (8.1 and 7.2). Rates of photosynthesis and respiration of the symbiotic association and of isolated symbionts were assessed at each pH. The fate of 13C-photosynthates was then followed in the symbionts and the coral host for 48 h. Nubbins maintained at pH 7.2 presented a lower areal symbiont concentration, lower areal rates of gross photosynthesis, and lower carbon incorporation rates compared to nubbins maintained at pH 8.1, therefore suggesting that the total carbon acquisition was lower in this first set of nubbins. However, the total percentage of carbon translocated to the host, as well as the amount of carbon translocated per symbiont cell was significantly higher under pH 7.2 than under pH 8.1 (70% at pH 7.2 versus 60% at pH 8.1), so that the total amount of photosynthetic carbon received by the coral host was equivalent under both pHs (5.5 to 6.1 μg C cm-2 h-1). Although the carbon budget of the host was unchanged, symbionts acquired less carbon for their own needs (0.6 against 1.8 μg C cm-2 h-1), explaining the overall decrease in symbiont concentration at low pH. In the long-term, this decrease might have important consequences for the survival of corals under an acidification stress.

  5. Multienvironment quantitative trait Loci analysis for photosynthate acquisition, accumulation, and remobilization traits in common bean under drought stress.

    PubMed

    Asfaw, Asrat; Blair, Matthew W; Struik, Paul C

    2012-05-01

    Many of the world's common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) growing regions are prone to either intermittent or terminal drought stress, making drought the primary cause of yield loss under farmers' field conditions. Improved photosynthate acquisition, accumulation, and then remobilization have been observed as important mechanisms for adaptation to drought stress. The objective of this study was to tag quantitative trait loci (QTL) for photosynthate acquisition, accumulation, and remobilization to grain by using a recombinant inbred line population developed from the Mesoamerican intragenepool cross of drought-susceptible DOR364 and drought-tolerant BAT477 grown under eight environments differing in drought stress across two continents: Africa and South America. The recombinant inbred line population expressed quantitative variation and transgressive segregation for 11 traits associated with drought tolerance. QTL were detected by both a mixed multienvironment model and by composite interval mapping for each environment using a linkage map constructed with 165 genetic markers that covered 11 linkage groups of the common bean genome. In the multienvironment, mixed model, nine QTL were detected for 10 drought stress tolerance mechanism traits found on six of the 11 linkage groups. Significant QTL × environment interaction was observed for six of the nine QTL. QTL × environment interaction was of the cross-over type for three of the six significant QTL with contrasting effect of the parental alleles across different environments. In the composite interval mapping, we found 69 QTL in total. The majority of these were found for Palmira (47) or Awassa (18), with fewer in Malawi (4). Phenotypic variation explained by QTL in single environments ranged up to 37%, and the most consistent QTL were for Soil Plant Analysis Development (SPAD) leaf chlorophyll reading and pod partitioning traits. QTL alignment between the two detection methods showed that yield QTL on b08 and stem

  6. Measuring chlorophyll a and /sup 14/C-labeled photosynthate in aquatic angiosperms by the use of a tissue solubilizer

    SciTech Connect

    Beer, S.; Stewart, A.J.; Wetzel, R.G.

    1982-01-01

    A compound that quantitatively correlated with chlorophyll a could be measured fluorometrically in the extracts of leaves of three aquatic angiosperms (Myriophyllum heterophyllum Michx., Potamogeton crispus L., Elodea canadensis Michx.) treated with the tissue solubilizer BTS-450. Fluorescent characteristics of the solubilized plant tissues were stable for several weeks in the dark at temperatures up to 60/sup 0/C but rapidly degraded in sunlight or when acidified. /sup 14/C-Labeled photosynthate, which had been fixed by leaf discs during 1- to 10-hour exposure to H/sup 14/CO/sub 3/, was also readily extracted by the tissue solubilizer. Solubilizer extraction can, therefore, be use to determine both chlorophyll a content and /sup 14/C incorporation rates in the same leaf sample. The method is practical, because no grinding is required, the fluorescent characteristics of the extracts are stable, and analyses can be performed with very little plant material (about 3 milligrams).

  7. Powerful fermentative hydrogen evolution of photosynthate in the cyanobacterium Lyngbya aestuarii BL J mediated by a bidirectional hydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Kothari, Ankita; Parameswaran, Prathap; Garcia-Pichel, Ferran

    2014-01-01

    Cyanobacteria are considered good models for biohydrogen production because they are relatively simple organisms with a demonstrable ability to generate H2 under certain physiological conditions. However, most produce only little H2, revert readily to H2 consumption, and suffer from hydrogenase sensitivity to O2. Strains of the cyanobacteria Lyngbya aestuarii and Microcoleus chthonoplastes obtained from marine intertidal cyanobacterial mats were recently found to display much better H2 production potential. Because of their ecological origin in environments that become quickly anoxic in the dark, we hypothesized that this differential ability may have evolved to serve a role in the fermentation of the photosynthate. Here we show that, when forced to ferment internal substrate, these cyanobacteria display desirable characteristics of physiological H2 production. Among them, the strain L. aestuarii BL J had the fastest specific rates and attained the highest H2 concentrations during fermentation of photosynthate, which proceeded via a mixed acid fermentation pathway to yield acetate, ethanol, lactate, H2, CO2, and pyruvate. Contrary to expectations, the H2 yield per mole of glucose was only average compared to that of other cyanobacteria. Thermodynamic analyses point to the use of electron donors more electronegative than NAD(P)H in Lyngbya hydrogenases as the basis for its strong H2 production ability. In any event, the high specific rates and H2 concentrations coupled with the lack of reversibility of the enzyme, at the expense of internal, photosynthetically generated reductants, makes L. aestuarii BL J and/or its enzymes, a potentially feasible platform for large-scale H2 production. PMID:25540642

  8. Metabolism of 14C-Labeled Photosynthate and Distribution of Enzymes of Glucose Metabolism in Soybean Nodules 1

    PubMed Central

    Reibach, Paul H.; Streeter, John G.

    1983-01-01

    The metabolism of translocated photosynthate by soybean (Glycine max L. Merr.) nodules was investigated by 14CO2-labeling studies and analysis of nodule enzymes. Plants were exposed to 14CO2 for 30 minutes, followed by 12CO2 for up to 5 hours. The largest amount of radioactivity in nodules was recovered in neutral sugars at all sampling times. The organic acid fraction of the cytosol was labeled rapidly. Although cyclitols and malonate were found in high concentrations in the nodules, they accumulated less than 10% of the radioactivity in the neutral and acidic fractions, respectively. Phosphate esters were found to contain very low levels of total label, which prohibited analysis of the radioactivity in individual compounds. The whole nodule-labeling patterns suggested the utilization of photosynthate for the generation of organic acids (principally malate) and amino acids (principally glutamate). The radioactivity in bacteroids as a percentage of total nodule label increased slightly with time, while the percentage in the cytosol fraction declined. The labeling patterns for the cytosol were essentially the same as whole nodule-labeling patterns, and they suggest a degradation of carbohydrates for the production of organic acids and amino acids. When it was found that most of the radioactivity in bacteroids was in sugars, the enzymes of glucose metabolism were surveyed. Bacteroids from nodules formed by Rhizobium japonicum strain 110 or strain 138 lacked activity for phosphofructokinase and NADP-dependent 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase, key enzymes of glycolysis and the oxidative pentose-phosphate pathways. Enzymes of the glycolytic and pentose phosphate pathways were found in the cytosol fraction. In three experiments, bacteroids contained about 10 to 30% of the total radioactivity in nodules 2 to 5 hours after pulse-labeling of plants, and 60 to 65% of the radioactivity in bacteroids was in the neutral sugar fraction at all sampling times. This strongly

  9. Visualization of Uptake of Mineral Elements and the Dynamics of Photosynthates in Arabidopsis by a Newly Developed Real-Time Radioisotope Imaging System (RRIS).

    PubMed

    Sugita, Ryohei; Kobayashi, Natsuko I; Hirose, Atsushi; Saito, Takayuki; Iwata, Ren; Tanoi, Keitaro; Nakanishi, Tomoko M

    2016-04-01

    Minerals and photosynthates are essential for many plant processes, but their imaging in live plants is difficult. We have developed a method for their live imaging in Arabidopsis using a real-time radioisotope imaging system. When each radioisotope,(22)Na,(28)Mg,(32)P-phosphate,(35)S-sulfate,(42)K,(45)Ca,(54)Mn and(137)Cs, was employed as an ion tracer, ion movement from root to shoot over 24 h was clearly observed. The movements of(22)Na,(42)K,(32)P,(35)S and(137)Cs were fast so that they spread to the tip of stems. In contrast, high accumulation of(28)Mg,(45)Ca and(54)Mn was found in the basal part of the main stem. Based on this time-course analysis, the velocity of ion movement in the main stem was calculated, and found to be fastest for S and K among the ions we tested in this study. Furthermore, application of a heat-girdling treatment allowed determination of individual ion movement via xylem flow alone, excluding phloem flow, within the main stem of 43-day-old Arabidopsis inflorescences. We also successfully developed a new system for visualizing photosynthates using labeled carbon dioxide,(14)CO2 Using this system, the switching of source/sink organs and phloem flow direction could be monitored in parts of whole shoots and over time. In roots,(14)C photosynthates accumulated intensively in the growing root tip area, 200-800 µm behind the meristem. These results show that this real-time radioisotope imaging system allows visualization of many nuclides over a long time-course and thus constitutes a powerful tool for the analysis of various physiological phenomena.

  10. Visualization of Uptake of Mineral Elements and the Dynamics of Photosynthates in Arabidopsis by a Newly Developed Real-Time Radioisotope Imaging System (RRIS)

    PubMed Central

    Sugita, Ryohei; Kobayashi, Natsuko I.; Hirose, Atsushi; Saito, Takayuki; Iwata, Ren; Tanoi, Keitaro; Nakanishi, Tomoko M.

    2016-01-01

    Minerals and photosynthates are essential for many plant processes, but their imaging in live plants is difficult. We have developed a method for their live imaging in Arabidopsis using a real-time radioisotope imaging system. When each radioisotope, 22Na, 28Mg, 32P-phosphate, 35S-sulfate, 42K, 45Ca, 54Mn and 137Cs, was employed as an ion tracer, ion movement from root to shoot over 24 h was clearly observed. The movements of 22Na, 42K, 32P, 35S and 137Cs were fast so that they spread to the tip of stems. In contrast, high accumulation of 28Mg, 45Ca and 54Mn was found in the basal part of the main stem. Based on this time-course analysis, the velocity of ion movement in the main stem was calculated, and found to be fastest for S and K among the ions we tested in this study. Furthermore, application of a heat-girdling treatment allowed determination of individual ion movement via xylem flow alone, excluding phloem flow, within the main stem of 43-day-old Arabidopsis inflorescences. We also successfully developed a new system for visualizing photosynthates using labeled carbon dioxide, 14CO2. Using this system, the switching of source/sink organs and phloem flow direction could be monitored in parts of whole shoots and over time. In roots, 14C photosynthates accumulated intensively in the growing root tip area, 200–800 µm behind the meristem. These results show that this real-time radioisotope imaging system allows visualization of many nuclides over a long time-course and thus constitutes a powerful tool for the analysis of various physiological phenomena. PMID:27016100

  11. Photosynthate translocation increases in response to low seawater pH in a coral-dinoflagellate symbiosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremblay, P.; Fine, M.; Maguer, J. F.; Grover, R.; Ferrier-Pagès, C.

    2013-06-01

    This study has examined the effect of low seawater pH values (induced by an increased CO2 partial pressure) on the rates of photosynthesis, as well as on the carbon budget and carbon translocation in the scleractinian coral species Stylophora pistillata, using a new model based on 13C labelling of the photosynthetic products. Symbiont photosynthesis contributes to a large part of the carbon acquisition in tropical coral species, and it is thus important to know how environmental changes affect this carbon acquisition and allocation. For this purpose, nubbins of S. pistillata were maintained for six months at two pHTs (8.1 and 7.2, by bubbling seawater with CO2). The lowest pH value was used to tackle how seawater pH impacts the carbon budget of a scleractinian coral. Rates of photosynthesis and respiration of the symbiotic association and of isolated symbionts were assessed at each pH. The fate of 13C photosynthates was then followed in the symbionts and the coral host for 48 h. Nubbins maintained at pHT 7.2 presented a lower areal symbiont concentration, and lower areal rates of gross photosynthesis and carbon incorporation compared to nubbins maintained at pHT 8.1. The total carbon acquisition was thus lower under low pH. However, the total percentage of carbon translocated to the host as well as the amount of carbon translocated per symbiont cell were significantly higher under pHT 7.2 than under pHT 8.1 (70% at pHT 7.2 vs. 60% at pHT 8.1), such that the total amount of photosynthetic carbon received by the coral host was equivalent under both pHs (5.5 to 6.1 μg C cm-2 h-1). Although the carbon budget of the host was unchanged, symbionts acquired less carbon for their own needs (0.6 compared to 1.8 μg C cm-2 h-1), explaining the overall decrease in symbiont concentration at low pH. In the long term, such decrease in symbiont concentration might severely affect the carbon budget of the symbiotic association.

  12. Testing a new Method of Estimating the δ13C of Photosynthate in Trees: Stem CO2 Equilibration}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ubierna Lopez, N.; Kavanagh, K.; Marshall, J. D.

    2006-12-01

    material for these species. Conversely, soil respiration CO2 values poorly reflected the species differences observed in stems. Soil δ13C values for L. occidentalis, A. Grandis, P. menziessi and T. plicata were -26.72‰ (SE = 0.10), -26.71 ‰ (SE = 0.14), - 25.72‰ (SE = 0.21), and -26.11 ‰ (SE = 0.04) respectively. Interestingly, the observed species differences were superimposed on landscape effects such that the stem δ13C signatures varied with wind direction around a tower. Our protocol has several advantages over other commonly used techniques: 1) it provides good temporal resolution (relative to leaf bulk material, which changes little over the course of time); 2) the signature of the individual tree is not confounded with that of adjacent trees (this is not the case for soil or ecosystem respiration); 3) it is easy to implement (unlike phloem collection); and 4) it integrates the activity of the entire crown. We conclude that stem gas may provide an accurate estimate of the δ13C of canopy photosynthate.

  13. Net assimilation and photosynthate allocation of Populus clones grown under short-rotation intensive culture: Physiological and genetic responses regulating yield

    SciTech Connect

    Dickmann, D.I.; Pregitzer, K.S.; Nguyen, P.V.

    1996-08-01

    The overall objective of this project was to determine the differential responses of poplar clones from sections Tacamahaca and Aigeiros of the genus Populus to varying levels of applied water and nitrogen. Above- and below-ground phenology and morphology, photosynthate allocation, and physiological processes were examined. By manipulating the availability of soil resources, we have been able to separate inherent clonal differences from plastic responses, and to determine genotype-environment interactions. We also have been able to make some contrasts between trees grown from hardwood cuttings and coppice sprouts. Our overall hypothesis was that carbon allocation during growth is greatly influenced by interactions among moisture, nitrogen, and genotype, and that these interactions greatly influence yield in short-rotation plantations. As is true of any project, some of our original expectations were not realized, whereas other initially unforeseen results were obtained. The reduced funding from the Biofuels Feedstock Development Program (BFDP) during the last few years of the project slowed us down to some extent, so progress was not been as rapid as we might have hoped. The major problem associated with this funding shortfall was the inability to employ skilled and unskilled student labor. Nonetheless, we were able to accomplish most of our original goals. All of the principal investigators on this project feel that we have made progress in advancing the scientific underpinning of short-rotation woody biomass production.

  14. The structural and photosynthetic characteristics of the exposed peduncle of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.): an important photosynthate source for grain-filling

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In wheat (Triticum aestivum L), the flag leaf has been thought of as the main source of assimilates for grain growth, whereas the peduncle has commonly been thought of as a transporting organ. The photosynthetic characteristics of the exposed peduncle have therefore been neglected. In this study, we investigated the anatomical traits of the exposed peduncle during wheat grain ontogenesis, and we compared the exposed peduncle to the flag leaf with respect to chloroplast ultrastructure, photosystem II (PSII) quantum yield, and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPCase; EC 4.1.1.31) activity. Results Transmission electron microscope observations showed well-developed chloroplasts with numerous granum stacks at grain-filling stages 1, 2 and 3 in both the flag leaf and the exposed peduncle. In the exposed peduncle, the membranes constituting the thylakoids were very distinct and plentiful, but in the flag leaf, there was a sharp breakdown at stage 4 and complete disintegration of the thylakoid membranes at stage 5. PSII quantum yield assays revealed that the photosynthetic efficiency remained constant at stages 1, 2 and 3 and then declined in both organs. However, the decline occurred more dramatically in the flag leaf than in the exposed peduncle. An enzyme assay showed that at stages 1 and 2 the PEPCase activity was lower in the exposed peduncle than in the flag leaf; but at stages 3, 4 and 5 the value was higher in the exposed peduncle, with a particularly significant difference observed at stage 5. Subjecting the exposed part of the peduncle to darkness following anthesis reduced the rate of grain growth. Conclusion Our results suggest that the exposed peduncle is a photosynthetically active organ that produces photosynthates and thereby makes a crucial contribution to grain growth, particularly during the late stages of grain-filling. PMID:20618993

  15. Economy of Photosynthate Use in Nitrogen-fixing Legume Nodules

    PubMed Central

    Layzell, David B.; Rainbird, Ross M.; Atkins, Craig A.; Pate, John S.

    1979-01-01

    The economy of C use by root nodules was examined in two symbioses, Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp. (cv. Caloona):Rhizobium CB756 and Lupinus albus L. (cv. Ultra):Rhizobium WU425 over a 2-week period in early vegetative growth. Plants were grown in minus N water culture with cuvettes attached to the nodulated zone of their primary roots for collection of evolved CO2 and H2. Increments in total plant N and in C and N of nodules, and C:N weight ratios of xylem and phloem exudates were studied by periodic sampling from the plant populations. Itemized budgets were constructed for the partitioning and utilization of C in the two species. For each milligram N fixed and assimilated by the cowpea association, 1.54 ± 0.26 (standard error) milligrams C as CO2 and negligible H2 were evolved and 3.11 milligrams of translocated C utilized by the nodules. Comparable values for nodules of the lupin association were 3.64 ± 0.28 milligrams C as CO2, 0.22 ± 0.05 milligrams H2, and 6.58 milligrams C. More efficient use of C by cowpea nodules was due to a lesser requirement of C for synthesis of exported N compounds, a smaller allocation of C to nodule dry matter, and a lower evolution of CO2. The activity of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase in nodule extracts and the rate of 14CO2 fixation by detached nodules were greater for the cowpea symbiosis (0.56 ± 0.06 and 0.22 milligrams C as CO2 fixed per gram fresh weight per hour, respectively) than for the lupin 0.06 ± 0.02 and 0.01 milligrams C as CO2 fixed per gram fresh weight per hour. The significance of the data was discussed in relation to current information on theoretical costs of nitrogenase functioning and associated nodule processes. PMID:16661076

  16. Nodule Activity and Allocation of Photosynthate of Soybean during Recovery from Water Stress 1

    PubMed Central

    Fellows, Robert J.; Patterson, Robert P.; Raper, C. David; Harris, Dorothy

    1987-01-01

    Nodulated soybean plants (Glycine max [L.] Merr. cv Ransom) in a growth-chamber study were subjected to a leaf water potential (Ψw) of −2.0 megapascal during vegetative growth. Changes in nonstructural carbohydrate contents of leaves, stems, roots, and nodules, allocation of dry matter among plant parts, in situ specific nodule activity, and in situ canopy apparent photosynthetic rate were measured in stressed and nonstressed plants during a 7-day period following rewatering. Leaf and nodule Ψw also were determined. At the time of maximum stress, concentration of nonstructural carbohydrates had declined in leaves of stressed, relative to nonstressed, plants, and the concentration of nonstructural carbohydrates had increased in stems, roots, and nodules. Sucrose concentrations in roots and nodules of stressed plants were 1.5 and 3 times greater, respectively, than those of nonstressed plants. Within 12 hours after rewatering, leaf and nodule Ψw of stressed plants had returned to values of nonstressed plants. Canopy apparent photosynthesis and specific nodule activity of stressed plants recovered to levels for nonstressed plants within 2 days after rewatering. The elevated sucrose concentrations in roots and nodules of stressed plants also declined rapidly upon rehydration. The increase in sucrose concentration in nodules, as well as the increase of carbohydrates in roots and stems, during water stress and the rapid disappearance upon rewatering indicates that inhibition of carbohydrate utilization within the nodule may be associated with loss of nodule activity. Availability of carbohydrates within the nodules and from photosynthetic activity following rehydration of nodules may mediate the rate of recovery of N2-fixation activity. PMID:11539766

  17. [Effects of simulated acid rain on leaf photosynthate, growth, and yield of wheat].

    PubMed

    Mai, Bo-Rui; Zheng, You-Fei; Liang, Jun; Liu, Xia; Li, Lu; Zhong, Yan-Chuan

    2008-10-01

    With winter wheat variety Yamgmai 12 as test object, a field experiment was conducted to study the stress of simulated acid rain on its growth and development. The results showed that simulated acid rain had considerable effect on wheat growth and yield. When the pH of acid rain was < or = 3.5, the growth of leaf area as well as the mass of fresh leaf per unit area declined greatly, and the yield was significantly lower than CK. When pH was < or = 2.5, the plant height was obviously lowered, and the visible injury on leaf surface was observed. Under acid rain stress, the contents of leaf chlorophyll a, chlorophyll b, and carotenoid, especially chlorophyll a, decreased obviously. Acid rain also suppressed the synthesis of soluble sugar and reduced sugar, and the suppression was stronger at pH < or = 3.5, and became much stronger with increasing acidity. The total free amino acid and soluble protein contents in leaves decreased with increasing acidity, and were significantly lower than CK when the pH was < or = 3.5 and < or = 4.5, respectively.

  18. Nodule activity and allocation of photosynthate of soybean during recovery from water stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fellows, R. J.; Patterson, R. P.; Raper, C. D. Jr; Harris, D.; Raper CD, J. r. (Principal Investigator)

    1987-01-01

    Nodulated soybean plants (Glycine max [L.] Merr. cv Ransom) in a growth-chamber study were subjected to a leaf water potential (psi w) of -2.0 megapascal during vegetative growth. Changes in nonstructural carbohydrate contents of leaves, stems, roots, and nodules, allocation of dry matter among plant parts, in situ specific nodule activity, and in situ canopy apparent photosynthetic rate were measured in stressed and nonstressed plants during a 7-day period following rewatering. Leaf and nodule psi w also were determined. At the time of maximum stress, concentration of nonstructural carbohydrates had declined in leaves of stressed, relative to nonstressed, plants, and the concentration of nonstructural carbohydrates had increased in stems, roots, and nodules. Sucrose concentrations in roots and nodules of stressed plants were 1.5 and 3 times greater, respectively, than those of nonstressed plants. Within 12 hours after rewatering, leaf and nodule psi w of stressed plants had returned to values of nonstressed plants. Canopy apparent photosynthesis and specific nodule activity of stressed plants recovered to levels for nonstressed plants within 2 days after rewatering. The elevated sucrose concentrations in roots and nodules of stressed plants also declined rapidly upon rehydration. The increase in sucrose concentration in nodules, as well as the increase of carbohydrates in roots and stems, during water stress and the rapid disappearance upon rewatering indicates that inhibition of carbohydrate utilization within the nodule may be associated with loss of nodule activity. Availability of carbohydrates within the nodules and from photosynthetic activity following rehydration of nodules may mediate the rate of recovery of N2-fixation activity.

  19. Nodule activity and allocation of photosynthate of soybean during recovery from water stress.

    PubMed

    Fellows, R J; Patterson, R P; Raper, C D; Harris, D

    1987-05-01

    Nodulated soybean plants (Glycine max [L.] Merr. cv Ransom) in a growth-chamber study were subjected to a leaf water potential (psi w) of -2.0 megapascal during vegetative growth. Changes in nonstructural carbohydrate contents of leaves, stems, roots, and nodules, allocation of dry matter among plant parts, in situ specific nodule activity, and in situ canopy apparent photosynthetic rate were measured in stressed and nonstressed plants during a 7-day period following rewatering. Leaf and nodule psi w also were determined. At the time of maximum stress, concentration of nonstructural carbohydrates had declined in leaves of stressed, relative to nonstressed, plants, and the concentration of nonstructural carbohydrates had increased in stems, roots, and nodules. Sucrose concentrations in roots and nodules of stressed plants were 1.5 and 3 times greater, respectively, than those of nonstressed plants. Within 12 hours after rewatering, leaf and nodule psi w of stressed plants had returned to values of nonstressed plants. Canopy apparent photosynthesis and specific nodule activity of stressed plants recovered to levels for nonstressed plants within 2 days after rewatering. The elevated sucrose concentrations in roots and nodules of stressed plants also declined rapidly upon rehydration. The increase in sucrose concentration in nodules, as well as the increase of carbohydrates in roots and stems, during water stress and the rapid disappearance upon rewatering indicates that inhibition of carbohydrate utilization within the nodule may be associated with loss of nodule activity. Availability of carbohydrates within the nodules and from photosynthetic activity following rehydration of nodules may mediate the rate of recovery of N2-fixation activity.

  20. Respiration of the external mycelium in the arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis shows strong dependence on recent photosynthates and acclimation to temperature.

    PubMed

    Heinemeyer, A; Ineson, P; Ostle, N; Fitter, A H

    2006-01-01

    * Although arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi are a major pathway in the global carbon cycle, their basic biology and, in particular, their respiratory response to temperature remain obscure. * A pulse label of the stable isotope (13)C was applied to Plantago lanceolata, either uninoculated or inoculated with the AM fungus Glomus mosseae. The extra-radical mycelium (ERM) of the fungus was allowed to grow into a separate hyphal compartment excluding roots. We determined the carbon costs of the ERM and tested for a direct temperature effect on its respiration by measuring total carbon and the (13)C:(12)C ratio of respired CO(2). With a second pulse we tested for acclimation of ERM respiration after 2 wk of soil warming. * Root colonization remained unchanged between the two pulses but warming the hyphal compartment increased ERM length. delta(13)C signals peaked within the first 10 h and were higher in mycorrhizal treatments. The concentration of CO(2) in the gas samples fluctuated diurnally and was highest in the mycorrhizal treatments but was unaffected by temperature. Heating increased ERM respiration only after the first pulse and reduced specific ERM respiration rates after the second pulse; however, both pulses strongly depended on radiation flux. * The results indicate a fast ERM acclimation to temperature, and that light is the key factor controlling carbon allocation to the fungus.

  1. Changes in the concentrations of phenolics and photosynthates in Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) seedlings exposed to nickel and copper.

    PubMed

    Roitto, M; Rautio, P; Julkunen-Tiitto, R; Kukkola, E; Huttunen, S

    2005-10-01

    Studies were done on the effects of elevated soil concentrations of copper (Cu) and (Ni) on foliar carbohydrates and phenolics in Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.). Four year-old seedlings were planted in pots filled with metal-treated mineral forest soil in early June. The experimental design included all combinations of four levels of Cu (0, 25, 40 and 50 mg kg(-1) soil dw) and Ni (0, 5, 15 and 25 mg kg(-1) soil dw). Current year needles were sampled for soluble sugar, starch and phenolics at the end of September. Ni increased sucrose concentration in the needles, indicating disturbances in carbohydrate metabolism. Trees exposed to Ni had higher concentrations of condensed tannins compared with controls. In contrast, concentrations of several other phenolic compounds decreased when seedlings were exposed to high levels of Cu or to a combination of Ni and Cu. The results suggest that concentrations of phenolics in Scots pine needles vary in their responses to Ni and Cu in the forest soil.

  2. Arabidopsis has a cytosolic fumarase required for the massive allocation of photosynthate into fumaric acid and for rapid plant growth on high nitrogen.

    PubMed

    Pracharoenwattana, Itsara; Zhou, Wenxu; Keech, Olivier; Francisco, Perigio B; Udomchalothorn, Thanikan; Tschoep, Hendrik; Stitt, Mark; Gibon, Yves; Smith, Steven M

    2010-06-01

    The Arabidopsis genome has two fumarase genes, one of which encodes a protein with mitochondrial targeting information (FUM1) while the other (FUM2) does not. We show that a FUM1-green fluorescent protein fusion is directed to mitochondria while FUM2-red fluorescent protein remains in the cytosol. While mitochondrial FUM1 is an essential gene, cytosolic FUM2 is not required for plant growth. However FUM2 is required for the massive accumulation of carbon into fumarate that occurs in Arabidopsis leaves during the day. In fum2 knock-out mutants, fumarate levels remain low while malate increases, and these changes can be reversed with a FUM2 transgene. The fum2 mutant has lower levels of many amino acids in leaves during the day compared with the wild type, but higher levels at night, consistent with a link between fumarate and amino acid metabolism. To further test this relationship we grew plants in the absence or presence of nitrogen fertilizer. The amount of fumarate in leaves increased several fold in response to nitrogen in wild-type plants, but not in fum2. Malate increased to a small extent in the wild type but to a greater extent in fum2. Growth of fum2 plants was similar to that of the wild type in low nitrogen but much slower in the presence of high nitrogen. Activities of key enzymes of nitrogen assimilation were similar in both genotypes. We conclude that FUM2 is required for the accumulation of fumarate in leaves, which is in turn required for rapid nitrogen assimilation and growth on high nitrogen.

  3. Arabidopsis Type I Proton-Pumping Pyrophosphatase Expresses Strongly in Phloem, Where It Is Required for Pyrophosphate Metabolism and Photosynthate Partitioning1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Pizzio, Gaston A.; Paez-Valencia, Julio; Khadilkar, Aswad S.; Regmi, Kamesh; Patron-Soberano, Araceli; Zhang, Shangji; Sanchez-Lares, Jonathan; Furstenau, Tara; Li, Jisheng; Sanchez-Gomez, Concepcion; Valencia-Mayoral, Pedro; Yadav, Umesh P.; Ayre, Brian G.; Gaxiola, Roberto A.

    2015-01-01

    Phloem loading is a critical process in plant physiology. The potential of regulating the translocation of photoassimilates from source to sink tissues represents an opportunity to increase crop yield. Pyrophosphate homeostasis is crucial for normal phloem function in apoplasmic loaders. The involvement of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) type I proton-pumping pyrophosphatase (AVP1) in phloem loading was analyzed at genetic, histochemical, and physiological levels. A transcriptional AVP1 promoter::GUS fusion revealed phloem activity in source leaves. Ubiquitous AVP1 overexpression (35S::AVP1 cassette) enhanced shoot biomass, photoassimilate production and transport, rhizosphere acidification, and expression of sugar-induced root ion transporter genes (POTASSIUM TRANSPORTER2 [KUP2], NITRATE TRANSPORTER2.1 [NRT2.1], NRT2.4, and PHOSPHATE TRANSPORTER1.4 [PHT1.4]). Phloem-specific AVP1 overexpression (Commelina Yellow Mottle Virus promoter [pCOYMV]::AVP1) elicited similar phenotypes. By contrast, phloem-specific AVP1 knockdown (pCoYMV::RNAiAVP1) resulted in stunted seedlings in sucrose-deprived medium. We also present a promoter mutant avp1-2 (SALK046492) with a 70% reduction of expression that did not show severe growth impairment. Interestingly, AVP1 protein in this mutant is prominent in the phloem. Moreover, expression of an Escherichia coli-soluble pyrophosphatase in the phloem (pCoYMV::pyrophosphatase) of avp1-2 plants resulted in severe dwarf phenotype and abnormal leaf morphology. We conclude that the Proton-Pumping Pyrophosphatase AVP1 localized at the plasma membrane of the sieve element-companion cell complexes functions as a synthase, and that this activity is critical for the maintenance of pyrophosphate homeostasis required for phloem function. PMID:25681328

  4. Arabidopsis type I proton-pumping pyrophosphatase expresses strongly in phloem, where it is required for pyrophosphate metabolism and photosynthate partitioning.

    PubMed

    Pizzio, Gaston A; Paez-Valencia, Julio; Khadilkar, Aswad S; Regmi, Kamesh; Patron-Soberano, Araceli; Zhang, Shangji; Sanchez-Lares, Jonathan; Furstenau, Tara; Li, Jisheng; Sanchez-Gomez, Concepcion; Valencia-Mayoral, Pedro; Yadav, Umesh P; Ayre, Brian G; Gaxiola, Roberto A

    2015-04-01

    Phloem loading is a critical process in plant physiology. The potential of regulating the translocation of photoassimilates from source to sink tissues represents an opportunity to increase crop yield. Pyrophosphate homeostasis is crucial for normal phloem function in apoplasmic loaders. The involvement of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) type I proton-pumping pyrophosphatase (AVP1) in phloem loading was analyzed at genetic, histochemical, and physiological levels. A transcriptional AVP1 promoter::GUS fusion revealed phloem activity in source leaves. Ubiquitous AVP1 overexpression (35S::AVP1 cassette) enhanced shoot biomass, photoassimilate production and transport, rhizosphere acidification, and expression of sugar-induced root ion transporter genes (POTASSIUM TRANSPORTER2 [KUP2], NITRATE TRANSPORTER2.1 [NRT2.1], NRT2.4, and PHOSPHATE TRANSPORTER1.4 [PHT1.4]). Phloem-specific AVP1 overexpression (Commelina Yellow Mottle Virus promoter [pCOYMV]::AVP1) elicited similar phenotypes. By contrast, phloem-specific AVP1 knockdown (pCoYMV::RNAiAVP1) resulted in stunted seedlings in sucrose-deprived medium. We also present a promoter mutant avp1-2 (SALK046492) with a 70% reduction of expression that did not show severe growth impairment. Interestingly, AVP1 protein in this mutant is prominent in the phloem. Moreover, expression of an Escherichia coli-soluble pyrophosphatase in the phloem (pCoYMV::pyrophosphatase) of avp1-2 plants resulted in severe dwarf phenotype and abnormal leaf morphology. We conclude that the Proton-Pumping Pyrophosphatase AVP1 localized at the plasma membrane of the sieve element-companion cell complexes functions as a synthase, and that this activity is critical for the maintenance of pyrophosphate homeostasis required for phloem function. PMID:25681328

  5. Short-term natural δ13C and δ18O variations in pools and fluxes in a beech forest: the transfer of isotopic signal from recent photosynthates to soil respired CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrichkova, O.; Proietti, S.; Moscatello, S.; Portarena, S.; Battistelli, A.; Matteucci, G.; Brugnoli, E.

    2011-10-01

    The fate of photosynthetic products within the plant-soil continuum determines how long the reduced carbon resides within the ecosystem and when it returns back to the atmosphere in the form of respiratory CO2. We have tested the possibility of measuring natural variation in δ13C and δ18O to disentangle the potential times needed to transfer carbohydrates produced by photosynthesis down to trunk, roots and, in general, to belowground up to its further release in the form of soil respiration into the atmosphere in a beech (Fagus sylvatica) forest. We have measured the variation in stable carbon and oxygen isotope compositions in plant material and in soil respired CO2 every three hours for three consecutive days. Possible steps and different signs of post-photosynthetic fractionation during carbon translocation were also identified. A 12 h-periodicity was observed for variation in δ13C in soluble sugars in the top crown leaves and it can be explained by starch day/night dynamics in synthesis and breakdown and by stomatal limitations under elevated vapour pressure deficits. Photosynthetic products were transported down the trunk and mixed with older carbon pools, therefore causing the dampening of the δ13C signal variation. The strongest periodicity of 24 h was found in δ13C in soil respiration indicating changes in root contribution to the total CO2 efflux. Other non-biological causes like diffusion fractionation and advection induced by gas withdrawn from the measurement chamber complicate data interpretation on this step of C transfer path. Nevertheless, it was possible to identify the speed of carbohydrates' translocation from the point of assimilation to the trunk breast height because leaf-imprinted enrichment of δ18O in soluble sugars was less modified along the downward transport and was well related to environmental parameters potentially linked to stomatal conductance. The speed of carbohydrates translocation from the site of assimilation to the trunk at breast height was estimated to be in the range of 0.3-0.4 m h-1.

  6. Short-term natural δ13C variations in pools and fluxes in a beech forest: the transfer of isotopic signal from recent photosynthates to soil respired CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrichkova, O.; Proietti, S.; Moscatello, S.; Portarena, S.; Battistelli, A.; Matteucci, G.; Brugnoli, E.

    2011-03-01

    The fate of photosynthetic products within the plant-soil continuum determines how long the reduced carbon resides within the ecosystem and when it returns back to the atmosphere in the form of respiratory CO2. We have tested the possibility of measuring natural variation in δ13C to disentangle potential times needed to transfer carbohydrates produced by photosynthesis down to roots and, in general, to belowground up to its further release in the form of soil respiration into the atmosphere in a beech (Fagus sylvatica) forest. For these purposes we have measured the variation in stable carbon and oxygen isotope compositions in plant material and in soil respired CO2 every three hours for three consequent days. Possible steps and different signs of post-photosynthetic fractionation during carbon translocation were also identified. A 12 h-periodicity was observed for variation in δ13C in soluble sugars in the top crown leaves and it can be explained by starch day/night dynamics in synthesis and breakdown and by stomatal limitations under elevated vapour pressure deficits. Photosynthetic products were transported down the trunk and mixed with older carbon pools, therefore causing the dampening of the δ13C signal variation. The strongest periodicity of 24 h was found in δ13C in soil respiration indicating changes in root contribution to the total CO2 efflux. Nevertheless, it was possible to identify the speed of carbon translocation through the plant-soil continuum. A period of 24 h was needed to transfer the C assimilated by photosynthesis from the top crown leaves to the tree trunk at breast height and additional 3 h for further respiration of that C by roots and soil microorganisms and its to subsequent diffusion back to the atmosphere.

  7. Effect of mineral nutritional status on shoot-root partitioning of photoassimilates and cycling of mineral nutrients.

    PubMed

    Marschner, H; Kirkby, E A; Cakmak, I

    1996-08-01

    Mineral nutrients taken up by the roots are, as a rule, transported in the xylem to the shoot, and photoassimilates transported in the phloem to the roots. According to the Thornley model of photosynthate partitioning, nutrient deficiencies should favour photosynthate partitioning to the roots. Examples are cited to show that this preferential partitioning is dependent on phloem mobility and hence on nutrient cycling from shoot to roots. Thus, root growth is enhanced under nitrogen and phosphorus deficiencies, but not under deficiencies of nutrients of low mobility in the phloem, such as calcium and boron. Enhanced root growth under nutrient deficiency relies on the import of both photosynthates and mineral nutrients. Cycling of mineral nutrients serves a number of other functions. These include the root supply of nutrients assimilated in the shoot (nitrate and sulphate reduction), maintenance of cation-anion balance in the shoot, providing an additional driving force for solute volume flow in the phloem and xylem, and acting as a shoot signal to convey nutrient demand to the root. Cycling of certain mineral nutrients through source leaves has a considerable impact on photosynthate export as demonstrated in impaired export under magnesium, potassium, or zinc deficiencies. Mineral nutrient deficiency can, therefore, affect photosynthate partitioning either directly via phloem loading and transport or indirectly by depressing sink demand. PMID:21245257

  8. Increasing tomato fruit quality by enhancing fruit chloroplast function. A double-edged sword?

    PubMed

    Cocaliadis, Maria Florencia; Fernández-Muñoz, Rafael; Pons, Clara; Orzaez, Diego; Granell, Antonio

    2014-08-01

    Fruits are generally regarded as photosynthate sinks as they rely on energy provided by sugars transported from leaves to carry out the highly demanding processes of development and ripening; eventually these imported photosynthates also contribute to the fruit organoleptic properties. Three recent reports have revealed, however, that transcriptional factors enhancing chloroplast development in fruit may result in higher contents not only of tomato fruit-specialized metabolites but also of sugars. In addition to suggesting new ways to improve fruit quality by fortifying fruit chloroplasts and plastids, these results prompted us to re-evaluate the importance of the contribution of chloroplasts/photosynthesis to fruit development and ripening.

  9. 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP)-induced alteration in leaf photosynthetic rate, chlorophyll fluorescence, respiration and membrane damage in rice (Oryza sativa L.) under high night temperature

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    High night temperature (HNT) can induce ethylene-triggered reactive oxygen species production, which can cause premature leaf senescence and membrane damage, thereby affecting production, consumption and transfer of photosynthates, and yield. The 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP) can competitively bind w...

  10. How Do Fruits Ripen?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sargent, Steven A.

    2005-01-01

    A fruit is alive, and for it to ripen normally, many biochemical reactions must occur in a proper order. After pollination, proper nutrition, growing conditions, and certain plant hormones cause the fruit to develop and grow to proper size. During this time, fruits store energy in the form of starch and sugars, called photosynthates because they…

  11. Unraveling the complex trait of harvest index with association mapping in rice (Oryza sativa L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Harvest index is a measure of success in partitioning assimilated photosynthate. An improvement of harvest index means an increase of economic portion of the plants. Our objective was to identify the markers associated with harvest index and its correlated traits using 203 O. sativa accessions. The ...

  12. Effects of defoliation and shading on the physiological cost of reproduction in silky locoweed Oxytropis sericea

    PubMed Central

    Ida, Takashi Y.; Harder, Lawrence D.; Kudo, Gaku

    2012-01-01

    Background The production of flowers, fruits and seeds demands considerable energy and nutrients, which can limit the allocation of these resources to other plant functions and, thereby, influence survival and future reproduction. The magnitude of the physiological costs of reproduction depends on both the factors limiting seed production (pollen, ovules or resources) and the capacity of plants to compensate for high resource demand. Methods To assess the magnitude and consequences of reproductive costs, we used shading and defoliation to reduce photosynthate production by fully pollinated plants of a perennial legume, Oxytropis sericea (Fabaceae), and examined the resulting impact on photosynthate allocation, and nectar, fruit and seed production. Key Results Although these leaf manipulations reduced photosynthesis and nectar production, they did not alter photosynthate allocation, as revealed by 13C tracing, or fruit or seed production. That photosynthate allocation to reproductive organs increased >190 % and taproot mass declined by 29 % between flowering and fruiting indicates that reproduction was physiologically costly. Conclusions The insensitivity of fruit and seed production to leaf manipulation is consistent with either compensatory mobilization of stored resources or ovule limitation. Seed production differed considerably between the two years of the study in association with contrasting precipitation prior to flowering, perhaps reflecting contrasting limits on reproductive performance. PMID:22021817

  13. Seasonal patterns in above ground growth and nut abortion in young eastern black walnut trees in Midwestern United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Eastern black walnut (EBW) is an excellent choice for agroforestry practices in the eastern United States because of its value for nuts and timber. There appears to be competing sinks for photosynthate in young trees early in the growing season; however growth data to support such a hypothesis are l...

  14. Seasonal patterns in above ground growth and nut abortion in seedling trees of eastern black walnut (Juglans nigra, L.) in Midwestern United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Eastern black walnut (EBW) is an excellent choice for agroforestry practices in the eastern United States, because of its value for nuts and timber. There appears to be competing sinks for photosynthate in young trees early in the growing season; however growth data to support such a hypothesis are ...

  15. Discoveries in oxygenic photosynthesis (1727-2003): a perspective.

    PubMed

    Govindjee; Krogmann, David

    2004-01-01

    We present historic discoveries and important observations, related to oxygenic photosynthesis, from 1727 to 2003. The decision to include certain discoveries while omitting others has been difficult. We are aware that ours is an incomplete timeline. In part, this is because the function of this list is to complement, not duplicate, the listing of discoveries in the other papers in these history issues of Photosynthesis Research. In addition, no one can know everything that is in the extensive literature in the field. Furthermore, any judgement about significance presupposes a point of view. This history begins with the observation of the English clergyman Stephen Hales (1677-1761) that plants derive nourishment from the air; it includes the definitive experiments in the 1960-1965 period establishing the two-photosystem and two-light reaction scheme of oxygenic photosynthesis; and includes the near-atomic resolution of the structures of the reaction centers of these two Photosystems, I and II, obtained in 2001-2002 by a team in Berlin, Germany, coordinated by Horst Witt and Wolfgang Saenger. Readers are directed to historical papers in Govindjee and Gest [(2002a) Photosynth Res 73: 1-308], in Govindjee, J. Thomas Beatty and Howard Gest [(2003a) Photosynth Res 76: 1-462], and to other papers in this issue for a more complete picture. Several photographs are provided here. Their selection is based partly on their availability to the authors (see Figures 1-15). Readers may view other photographs in Part 1 (Volume 73, Photosynth Res, 2002), Part 2 (Volume 76, Photosynth Res, 2003) and Part 3 (Volume 80 Photosynth Res, 2004) of the history issues of Photosynthesis Research. Photographs of most of the Nobel-laureates are included in Govindjee, Thomas Beatty and John Allen, this issue. For a complementary time line of anoxygenic photosynthesis, see H. Gest and R. Blankenship (this issue). PMID:16328809

  16. Discoveries in oxygenic photosynthesis (1727-2003): a perspective.

    PubMed

    Govindjee; Krogmann, David

    2004-01-01

    We present historic discoveries and important observations, related to oxygenic photosynthesis, from 1727 to 2003. The decision to include certain discoveries while omitting others has been difficult. We are aware that ours is an incomplete timeline. In part, this is because the function of this list is to complement, not duplicate, the listing of discoveries in the other papers in these history issues of Photosynthesis Research. In addition, no one can know everything that is in the extensive literature in the field. Furthermore, any judgement about significance presupposes a point of view. This history begins with the observation of the English clergyman Stephen Hales (1677-1761) that plants derive nourishment from the air; it includes the definitive experiments in the 1960-1965 period establishing the two-photosystem and two-light reaction scheme of oxygenic photosynthesis; and includes the near-atomic resolution of the structures of the reaction centers of these two Photosystems, I and II, obtained in 2001-2002 by a team in Berlin, Germany, coordinated by Horst Witt and Wolfgang Saenger. Readers are directed to historical papers in Govindjee and Gest [(2002a) Photosynth Res 73: 1-308], in Govindjee, J. Thomas Beatty and Howard Gest [(2003a) Photosynth Res 76: 1-462], and to other papers in this issue for a more complete picture. Several photographs are provided here. Their selection is based partly on their availability to the authors (see Figures 1-15). Readers may view other photographs in Part 1 (Volume 73, Photosynth Res, 2002), Part 2 (Volume 76, Photosynth Res, 2003) and Part 3 (Volume 80 Photosynth Res, 2004) of the history issues of Photosynthesis Research. Photographs of most of the Nobel-laureates are included in Govindjee, Thomas Beatty and John Allen, this issue. For a complementary time line of anoxygenic photosynthesis, see H. Gest and R. Blankenship (this issue).

  17. Nitrogen Fixation in Peanut Nodules during Dark Periods and Detopped Conditions with Special Reference to Lipid Bodies 1

    PubMed Central

    Siddique, Abu-baker M.; Bal, Arya K.

    1991-01-01

    The peanut plant (Arachis hypogaea L.), unlike other known legumes, can sustain nitrogen fixation when prolonged periods of darkness or detopping curtail the supply of photosynthate to the nodule. This ability to withstand photosynthate stress is attributed to the presence of lipid bodies in infected nodule cells. In both dark-treated and detopped plants, the lipid bodies show a gradual decrease in numbers, suggesting their utilization as a source of energy and carbon for nitrogen fixation. Lipolytic activity can be localized in the lipid bodies, and the existence of β-oxidation pathway and, glyoxylate cycle is shown by the release of 14CO2 from 14C lineoleoyl coenzyme A by the nodule homogenate. Images Figure 2 Figure 4 PMID:16668069

  18. Anoxic carbon flux in photosynthetic microbial mats as revealed by metatranscriptomics

    PubMed Central

    Burow, Luke C; Woebken, Dagmar; Marshall, Ian PG; Lindquist, Erika A; Bebout, Brad M; Prufert-Bebout, Leslie; Hoehler, Tori M; Tringe, Susannah G; Pett-Ridge, Jennifer; Weber, Peter K; Spormann, Alfred M; Singer, Steven W

    2013-01-01

    Photosynthetic microbial mats possess extraordinary phylogenetic and functional diversity that makes linking specific pathways with individual microbial populations a daunting task. Close metabolic and spatial relationships between Cyanobacteria and Chloroflexi have previously been observed in diverse microbial mats. Here, we report that an expressed metabolic pathway for the anoxic catabolism of photosynthate involving Cyanobacteria and Chloroflexi in microbial mats can be reconstructed through metatranscriptomic sequencing of mats collected at Elkhorn Slough, Monterey Bay, CA, USA. In this reconstruction, Microcoleus spp., the most abundant cyanobacterial group in the mats, ferment photosynthate to organic acids, CO2 and H2 through multiple pathways, and an uncultivated lineage of the Chloroflexi take up these organic acids to store carbon as polyhydroxyalkanoates. The metabolic reconstruction is consistent with metabolite measurements and single cell microbial imaging with fluorescence in situ hybridization and NanoSIMS. PMID:23190731

  19. Nitrogen fixation in peanut nodules during dark periods and detopped conditions with special reference to lipid bodies

    SciTech Connect

    Siddique, A.M.; Bal, A.K. )

    1991-03-01

    The peanut plant (Arachis hypogaea L.), unlike other known legumes, can sustain nitrogen fixation when prolonged periods of darkness or detopping curtail the supply of photosynthate to the nodule. This ability to withstand photosynthate stress is attributed to the presence of lipid bodies in infected nodule cells. In both dark-treated and detopped plants, the lipid bodies show a gradual decrease in numbers, suggesting their utilization as a source of energy and carbon for nitrogen fixation. Lipolytic activity can be localized in the lipid bodies, and the existence of {beta}-oxidation pathway and glyoxylate cycle is shown by the release of {sup 14}CO{sub 2} from {sup 14}C lineoleoyl coenzyme A by the nodule homogenate.

  20. Phloem unloading in tomato fruit

    SciTech Connect

    Damon, S.; Hewitt, J.; Bennett, A.B.

    1986-04-01

    To begin to identify those processes that contribute to the regulation of photosynthate partitioning in tomato fruit the path of phloem unloading in this tissue has been characterized. Assymetrically labelled sucrose (/sup 3/H-fructosyl sucrose) was applied to source leaves. Following translocation to the fruit the apoplast was sampled. The appearance of assymetric sucrose and /sup 3/H-fructose in the apoplast indicates that phloem unloading is apoplastic and that extracellular invertase is active. Estimation of sucrose, glucose, and fructose concentrations in the apoplast were 1 mM, 40 mM, and 40 mM, respectively. Rates of uptake of sucrose, 1-fluorosucrose, glucose, and fructose across the plasma membrane were similar and non-saturating at physiological concentrations. These results suggest that, although extracellular invertase is present, sucrose hydrolysis is not required for uptake into tomato fruit pericarp cells. 1-fluorosucrose is used to investigate the role of sucrose synthase in hydrolysis of imported photosynthate.

  1. Anoxic carbon flux in photosynthetic microbial mats as revealed by metatranscriptomics.

    PubMed

    Burow, Luke C; Woebken, Dagmar; Marshall, Ian P G; Lindquist, Erika A; Bebout, Brad M; Prufert-Bebout, Leslie; Hoehler, Tori M; Tringe, Susannah G; Pett-Ridge, Jennifer; Weber, Peter K; Spormann, Alfred M; Singer, Steven W

    2013-04-01

    Photosynthetic microbial mats possess extraordinary phylogenetic and functional diversity that makes linking specific pathways with individual microbial populations a daunting task. Close metabolic and spatial relationships between Cyanobacteria and Chloroflexi have previously been observed in diverse microbial mats. Here, we report that an expressed metabolic pathway for the anoxic catabolism of photosynthate involving Cyanobacteria and Chloroflexi in microbial mats can be reconstructed through metatranscriptomic sequencing of mats collected at Elkhorn Slough, Monterey Bay, CA, USA. In this reconstruction, Microcoleus spp., the most abundant cyanobacterial group in the mats, ferment photosynthate to organic acids, CO2 and H2 through multiple pathways, and an uncultivated lineage of the Chloroflexi take up these organic acids to store carbon as polyhydroxyalkanoates. The metabolic reconstruction is consistent with metabolite measurements and single cell microbial imaging with fluorescence in situ hybridization and NanoSIMS. PMID:23190731

  2. Atmospheric phenanthrene pollution modulates carbon allocation in red clover (Trifolium pratense L.).

    PubMed

    Desalme, Dorine; Binet, Philippe; Epron, Daniel; Bernard, Nadine; Gilbert, Daniel; Toussaint, Marie-Laure; Plain, Caroline; Chiapusio, Geneviève

    2011-10-01

    The influence of atmospheric phenanthrene (PHE) exposure (160 μg m(-3)) during one month on carbon allocation in clover was investigated by integrative (plant growth analysis) and instantaneous (13)CO(2) pulse-labelling approaches. PHE exposure diminished plant growth parameters (relative growth rate and net assimilation rate) and disturbed photosynthesis (carbon assimilation rate and chlorophyll content), leading to a 25% decrease in clover biomass. The root-shoot ratio was significantly enhanced (from 0.32 to 0.44). Photosynthates were identically allocated to leaves while less allocated to stems and roots. PHE exposure had a significant overall effect on the (13)C partitioning among clover organs as more carbon was retained in leaves at the expense of roots and stems. The findings indicate that PHE decreases root exudation or transfer to symbionts and in leaves, retains carbon in a non-structural form diverting photosynthates away from growth and respiration (emergence of an additional C loss process).

  3. Resource partitioning to male and female flowers of Spinacia oleracea L. in relation to whole-plant monocarpic senescence.

    PubMed

    Sklensky, Diane E; Davies, Peter J

    2011-08-01

    Male plants of spinach (Spinacea oleracea L.) senesce following flowering. It has been suggested that nutrient drain by male flowers is insufficient to trigger senescence. The partitioning of radiolabelled photosynthate between vegetative and reproductive tissue was compared in male (staminate) versus female (pistillate) plants. After the start of flowering staminate plants senesce 3 weeks earlier than pistillate plants. Soon after the start of flowering, staminate plants allocated several times as much photosynthate to flowering structures as did pistillate plants. The buds of staminate flowers with developing pollen had the greatest draw of photosynthate. When the staminate plants begin to show senescence 68% of fixed C was allocated to the staminate reproductive structures. In the pistillate plants, export to the developing fruits and young flowers remained near 10% until mid-reproductive development, when it increased to 40%, declining to 27% as the plants started to senesce. These differences were also present on a sink-mass corrected basis. Flowers on staminate spinach plants develop faster than pistillate flowers and have a greater draw of photosynthate than do pistillate flowers and fruits, although for a shorter period. Pistillate plants also produce more leaf area within the inflorescence to sustain the developing fruits. The (14)C in the staminate flowers declined due to respiration, especially during pollen maturation; no such loss occurred in pistillate reproductive structures. The partitioning to the reproductive structures correlates with the greater production of floral versus vegetative tissue in staminate plants and their more rapid senescence. As at senescence the leaves still had adequate carbohydrate, the resources are clearly phloem-transported compounds other than carbohydrates. The extent of the resource redistribution to reproductive structures and away from the development of new vegetative sinks, starting very early in the reproductive

  4. The continuous incorporation of carbon into existing Sassafras albidum fine roots and its implications for estimating root turnover.

    PubMed

    Adams, Thomas S; Eissenstat, David M

    2014-01-01

    Although understanding the timing of the deposition of recent photosynthate into fine roots is critical for determining root lifespan and turnover using isotopic techniques, few studies have directly examined the deposition and subsequent age of root carbon. To gain a better understanding of the timing of the deposition of root carbon, we labeled four individual Sassafras albidum trees with 99% 13C CO2. We then tracked whether the label appeared in roots that were at least two weeks old and no longer elongating, at the time of labeling. We found that not only were the non-structural carbon pools (soluble sugars and starch) of existing first-order tree roots incorporating carbon from current photosynthate, but so were the structural components of the roots, even in roots that were more than one year old at the time of labeling.Our findings imply that carbon used in root structural and nonstructural pools is not derived solely from photosynthate at root initiation and have implications regarding the determination of root age and turnover using isotopic techniques.

  5. The Continuous Incorporation of Carbon into Existing Sassafras albidum Fine Roots and Its Implications for Estimating Root Turnover

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Thomas S.; Eissenstat, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Although understanding the timing of the deposition of recent photosynthate into fine roots is critical for determining root lifespan and turnover using isotopic techniques, few studies have directly examined the deposition and subsequent age of root carbon. To gain a better understanding of the timing of the deposition of root carbon, we labeled four individual Sassafras albidum trees with 99% 13C CO2. We then tracked whether the label appeared in roots that were at least two weeks old and no longer elongating, at the time of labeling. We found that not only were the non-structural carbon pools (soluble sugars and starch) of existing first-order tree roots incorporating carbon from current photosynthate, but so were the structural components of the roots, even in roots that were more than one year old at the time of labeling.Our findings imply that carbon used in root structural and nonstructural pools is not derived solely from photosynthate at root initiation and have implications regarding the determination of root age and turnover using isotopic techniques. PMID:24788762

  6. Carbon cost of the fungal symbiont relative to net leaf P accumulation in a split-root VA mycorrhizal symbiosis. [Poncirus trifoliata L. Raf. x Citrus sinensis L. Osbeck; Glomus intraradices Schenk and Smith

    SciTech Connect

    Douds, D.D. Jr.; Johnson, C.R.; Koch, K.E. )

    1988-02-01

    Translocation of {sup 14}C-photosynthates to mycorrhizal (++), half mycorrhizal (0+), and nonmycorrhizal (00) split-root systems was compared to P accumulation in leaves of the host plant. Carrizo citrange seedlings (Poncirus trifoliata (L.) Raf. {times} Citrus sinensis (L.) Osbeck) were inoculated with the vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Glomus intraradices Schenck and Smith. Plants were exposed to {sup 14}CO{sub 2} for 10 minutes and ambient air for 2 hours. Three to 4% of recently labeled photosynthate was allocated to metabolism of the mycorrhiza in each inoculated root half independent of shoot P concentration, growth response, and whether one or both root halves were colonized. Nonmycorrhizal roots respired more of the label translocated to them than did mycorrhizal roots. Label recovered in the potting medium due to exudation or transport into extraradical hyphae was 5 to 6 times greater for (++) versus (00) plants. In low nutrient media, roots of (0+) and (++) plants transported more P to leaves per root weight than roots of (00) plants. However, when C translocated to roots utilized for respiration, exudation, etc., as well as growth is considered, (00) plant roots were at least as efficient at P uptake (benefit) per C utilized (cost) as (0+) and (++) plants. Root systems of (++) plants did not supply more P to leaves than (0+) plants in higher nutrient media, yet they still allocated twice the {sup 14}C-photosynthate to the mycorrhiza as did (0+) root systems.

  7. Stored carbon partly fuels fine-root respiration but is not used for production of new fine roots

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, Douglas J; Matamala-Paradeda, Roser; Iversen, Colleen M; Norby, Richard J; Gonzalez-Meler, Miguel A

    2013-01-01

    The relative use of new photosynthate compared to stored C for the production and maintenance of fine roots, and the rate of C turnover in heterogeneous fine-root populations, are poorly understood. We followed the relaxation of a 13C tracer in fine roots in a Liquidambar styraciflua plantation at the conclusion of a free-air CO2 enrichment experiment. Goals included quantifying the relative fractions of new photosynthate versus stored C used in root growth and root respiration, as well as the turnover rate of fine-root C fixed during [CO2] fumigation. New fine-root growth was largely from recent photosynthate, while nearly one-quarter of respired C was from a storage pool. Changes in the isotopic composition of the fine-root population over two full growing seasons indicated heterogeneous C pools; less than 10% of root C had a residence time < 3 months, while a majority of root C had a residence time > 2 years. Compared to a 1-pool model, a 2-pool model for C turnover in fine roots (with 5 and 0.37 yr-1 turnover times) doubles the fine-root contribution to forest NPP (9-13%) and supports the 50% root-to-soil transfer rate often used in models.

  8. Decoupling of light intensity effects on the growth and development of C3 and C4 weed species through sucrose supplementation.

    PubMed

    Begna, Sultan H; Dwyer, Lianne M; Cloutier, Daniel; Assemat, Louis; DiTommaso, Antonio; Zhou, Xiaomin; Prithiviraj, B; Smith, Donald L

    2002-09-01

    Light availability has a profound effect on plant growth and development. One of the ways to study the effects of light intensity on plant growth and development without the confounding problem of photosynthate availability is sucrose injection/supplementation. A greenhouse experiment was conducted to evaluate the effects of light levels (0% and 75% shade) and sucrose injection (distilled water or 150 g sucrose l(-1)) on three weed species: redroot pigweed (Amaranthus retroflexus L., C4), lambsquarters (Chenopodium album L., C3) and velvetleaf (Abutilon theophrasti Medic., C3). The average total sucrose uptake was 7.6 and 5.9 g per plant for 0% and 75% shading, respectively, representing 47% of the average total weed dry weight. Plants injected with sucrose had greater dry weights and shoot-to-root ratios under both light levels. In spite of sucrose supplementation the reduction in dry matter due to shading was greater for roots and reproductive structures than vegetative shoot tissues, indicating light level regulation of morphological changes resulting in changed C allocation that are independent of photosynthate availability. Dry weights of plants injected with sucrose under 75% shading were not different from distilled water-injected unshaded plants. However, both sucrose-injected and control plants, regardless of their photosynthetic pathways, underwent similar changes in allocation of dry matter and morphology due to shading, suggesting that these effects are strictly due to light intensity and not related to photosynthate availability.

  9. Juvenile corals can acquire more carbon from high-performance algal symbionts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantin, N. E.; van Oppen, M. J. H.; Willis, B. L.; Mieog, J. C.; Negri, A. P.

    2009-06-01

    Algal endosymbionts of the genus Symbiodinium play a key role in the nutrition of reef building corals and strongly affect the thermal tolerance and growth rate of the animal host. This study reports that 14C photosynthate incorporation into juvenile coral tissues was doubled in Acropora millepora harbouring Symbiodinium C1 compared with juveniles from common parentage harbouring Symbiodinium D in a laboratory experiment. Rapid light curves performed on the same corals revealed that the relative electron transport rate of photosystem II (rETRMAX) was 87% greater in Symbiodinium C1 than in Symbiodinium D in hospite. The greater relative electron transport through photosystem II of Symbiodinium C1 is positively correlated with increased carbon delivery to the host under the applied experimental conditions ( r 2 = 0.91). This may translate into a competitive advantage for juveniles harbouring Symbiodinium C1 under certain field conditions, since rapid early growth typically limits mortality. Both symbiont types exhibited severe reductions in 14C incorporation during a 10-h exposure to the electron transport blocking herbicide diuron (DCMU), confirming the link between electron transport through PSII and photosynthate incorporation within the host tissue. These findings advance the current understanding of symbiotic relationships between corals and their symbionts, providing evidence that enhanced growth rates of juvenile corals may result from greater translocation of photosynthates from Symbiodinium C1.

  10. Photosynthesis, respiration and translocation in green fruit of normal and mutant grapefruit. [Citrus paradisi Macf

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, K.E.; Yen, C.R.; Avigne, W.T.

    1986-04-01

    Gas exchange, /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ fixation/and subsequent photosynthate translocation were followed during a 24h light/dark period in green grapefruit (Citrus paradisi Macf.) detached after 2.5 mo. growth. Fruit photosynthesis could account for net fixation of less than 1% of the daily dry weight increase recorded for fruit at this stage of development, but a comparison of light/dark CO/sub 2/ exchange indicated that as much as 27% of this daily gain was maintained by refixation of respiratory CO/sub 2/ during daylight hours. Approximately 10% of photosynthates labeled in the outer peel (flavedo) were translocated to segment epidermis and juice vesicles of normal fruit during 1 + 23h pulse-chase experiments. This process typically continues for 4 to 5 days and refixation products would presumably follow the same path. In a low-acid mutant believed to differ only in acid/sugar ratio of juice vesicles, however, inward translocation of /sup 14/C-photosynthates from flavedo was restricted primarily to the inner peel (albedo).

  11. Interactive effects of belowground organic matter input, increased precipitation and clipping on soil carbon and nitrogen mineralization in a temperate steppe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, L. N.; Guo, C. Y.; Xin, X. P.; Yuan, S.; Wang, R. Z.

    2013-06-01

    Soil organic matter (SOM) inputs, increased precipitation and clipping (reducing belowground photosynthates allocation) are predicted to affect soil C and N cycling in temperate grassland ecosystems. However, the interactive effects between SOM inputs (or increased precipitation) and clipping on soil C and N mineralization in temperate steppes are still poorly understood. A field manipulation experiment was conducted to quantify the effects of SOM inputs, increased precipitation, clipping and their interactions on soil C and N mineralization in a temperate steppe of northeastern China from 2010 to 2011. The results showed that SOM inputs significantly increased soil C mineralization rate (CMR) and net N mineralization rate (NMR). Increased precipitation-induced enhancement of soil CMR essentially ceased after the first year, stimulation of soil NMR and NNR continued into the second year. However, clipping only marginally decreased soil CMR and NMR during the two years. There were significant synergistic interactions between SOM inputs (or increased precipitation) and clipping on soil CMR and NMR, as SOM inputs (or increased precipitation) showed greater effects on soil CMR and NMR under clipped plots than under unclipped plots, which could be explained by the relative shifts in soil microbial community structure because of bacterial biomass increases, and by the relative decreases in arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi biomass due to the reduction of belowground photosynthates allocation. These results highlight the importance of plants in mediating the responses of soil C and N mineralization to potentially increased SOM and precipitation by controlling belowground photosynthates allocation in the temperate steppe. Thus, the findings have important implications for improving prediction of C and N sequestration potential and its feedbacks to climate change in temperate steppe ecosystems.

  12. Distribution of photosynthetically fixed /sup 14/C in perennial plant species of the northern Mojave Desert

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, A.; Cha, J.W.; Romney, E.M.

    1980-01-01

    The distribution of photosynthate among plant parts subsequent to its production is needed to fully understand behavior of vegetation in any ecosystem. The present study, undertaken primarily to obtain information on transport of assimilates into roots of desert vegetation, was conducted in the northern Mojave Desert, where the mean annual rainfall is about 10 cm. Shoots of Ambrosia dumosa (A. Gray) Payne plants were exposed to /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ in 1971, and the distribution of /sup 14/C in roots, stems, and leaves was subsequently measured at 1 week, 2 months, and 5 months. Only about 12 percent of the /sup 14/C photosynthate was stored in the root. Much of that stored in stems was available for new leaf growth. Photosynthate was labeled with /sup 14/C for 24 plants representing eight species in 1972. Results showed that after 127 days the mean percentage of /sup 14/C in roots as compared with the estimate of that originally fixed was 11.8; the percentage in stems was 43.8. To check the validity of the /sup 14/C data, root growth of eight perennial desert plants grown in the glasshouse was followed as plants increased in size. The mean percent of the whole plant that was root for eight species was 17.7 percent. The mean proportion of the increase in plant weights that went below ground for the eight species was 19.5 percent. This value is higher than the fraction of /sup 14/C found below ground, and therefore the /sup 14/C technique underestimates the movement of C to roots. Results of an experiment designed to test the value of the /sup 14/C-pulse technique for determining current root growth for some perennial species from the desert indicated that the transition part of roots where root growth continued after exposure to /sup 14/C was highly labeled. Old growth contained less /sup 14/C than new growth.

  13. Energy flow in an arctic aquatic ecosystem

    SciTech Connect

    Schell, D.M.

    1983-01-01

    This component of the terrestrial-aquatic interaction group seeks to use the natural stable carbon isotope ratios and radiocarbon abundances to trace the movement of photosynthate from the terrestrial environment to the stream system at MS-117. In addition to estimating the total flux, we will also attempt to describe the relative fractions derived from modern primary production and that derived from delayed inputs of eroded peat. We will also seek to determine the coupling efficiency of these energy sources to the invertebrate faunal populations in the tundra soils and streams.

  14. Energy flow in an arctic aquatic ecosystem

    SciTech Connect

    Schell, D.M.

    1983-12-31

    This component of the terrestrial-aquatic interaction group seeks to use the natural stable carbon isotope ratios and radiocarbon abundances to trace the movement of photosynthate from the terrestrial environment to the stream system at MS-117. In addition to estimating the total flux, we will also attempt to describe the relative fractions derived from modern primary production and that derived from delayed inputs of eroded peat. We will also seek to determine the coupling efficiency of these energy sources to the invertebrate faunal populations in the tundra soils and streams.

  15. Isolation of monomeric photosystem II that retains the subunit PsbS.

    PubMed

    Haniewicz, Patrycja; De Sanctis, Daniele; Büchel, Claudia; Schröder, Wolfgang P; Loi, Maria Cecilia; Kieselbach, Thomas; Bochtler, Matthias; Piano, Dario

    2013-12-01

    Photosystem II has been purified from a transplastomic strain of Nicotiana tabacum according to two different protocols. Using the procedure described in Piano et al. (Photosynth Res 106:221-226, 2010) it was possible to isolate highly active PSII composed of monomers and dimers but depleted in their PsbS protein content. A "milder" procedure than the protocol reported by Fey et al. (Biochim Biophys Acta 1777:1501-1509, 2008) led to almost exclusively monomeric PSII complexes which in part still bind the PsbS protein. This finding might support a role for PSII monomers in higher plants.

  16. Phloem loading in Coleus blumei in the absence of carrier-mediated uptake of export sugar from the apoplast. [Coleus blumei Benth

    SciTech Connect

    Turgeon, R.; Gowan, E. )

    1990-11-01

    Phloem loading in Coleus blumei Benth. leaves cannot be explained by carrier-mediated transport of export sugar from the apoplast into the sieve element-companion cell complex, the mechanism by which sucrose is thought to load in other species that have been studied in detail. Uptake profiles of the export sugars sucrose, raffinose, and stachyose into leaf discs were composed of two components, one saturable and other other not. Saturable (carrier-mediated) uptake of all three sugars was almost completely eliminated by the inhibitor p-chloromercuribenzenesulfonic acid (PCMBS). However, when PCMBS was introduced by transpiration into mature leaves it did not prevent accumulation of {sup 14}C-photosynthate in minor veins or translocation of labeled photosynthate from green to nonchlorophyllous regions of the leaf following exposure to {sup 14}CO{sub 2}. The efficacy of introducing inhibitor solutions in the transpiration stream was proven by observing saffranin O and calcofluor white movement in the minor veins and leaf apoplast. PCMBS introduced by transpiration completely inhibited phloem loading in tobacco leaves. Phloem loading in C. blumei was also studied in plasmolysis experiments. The carbohydrate content of leaves was lowered by keeping plants in the dark and then increased by exposing them to light. The solute level of intermediary cells increased in the light (phloem loading) in both PCMBS-treated and control tissues. A mechanism of symplastic phloem loading is proposed for species that translocate the raffinose series of oligosaccharides.

  17. Ectomycorrhizal fungi and past high CO2 atmospheres enhance mineral weathering through increased below-ground carbon-energy fluxes.

    PubMed

    Quirk, Joe; Andrews, Megan Y; Leake, Jonathan R; Banwart, Steve A; Beerling, David J

    2014-07-01

    Field studies indicate an intensification of mineral weathering with advancement from arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) to later-evolving ectomycorrhizal (EM) fungal partners of gymnosperm and angiosperm trees. We test the hypothesis that this intensification is driven by increasing photosynthate carbon allocation to mycorrhizal mycelial networks using 14CO2-tracer experiments with representative tree–fungus mycorrhizal partnerships. Trees were grown in either a simulated past CO2 atmosphere (1500 ppm)—under which EM fungi evolved—or near-current CO2 (450 ppm). We report a direct linkage between photosynthate-energy fluxes from trees to EM and AM mycorrhizal mycelium and rates of calcium silicate weathering. Calcium dissolution rates halved for both AM and EM trees as CO2 fell from 1500 to 450 ppm, but silicate weathering by AM trees at high CO2 approached rates for EM trees at near-current CO2. Our findings provide mechanistic insights into the involvement of EM-associating forest trees in strengthening biological feedbacks on the geochemical carbon cycle that regulate atmospheric CO2 over millions of years.

  18. Recently fixed carbon allocation in strawberry plants and concurrent inorganic nitrogen uptake through arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi.

    PubMed

    Tomè, Elisabetta; Tagliavini, Massimo; Scandellari, Francesca

    2015-05-01

    Most crop species form a symbiotic association with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi, receiving plant photosynthate and exchanging nutrients from the soil. The plant carbon (C) allocation to AM fungi and the nitrogen feedback are rarely studied together. In this study, a dual (13)CO2 and (15)NH4(15)NO3 pulse labeling experiment was carried out to determine the allocation of recent photosynthates to mycorrhizal hyphae and the translocation of N absorbed by hyphae to strawberry plants. Plants were grown in pots in which a 50 μm mesh net allowed the physical separation of the mycorrhizal hyphae from the roots in one portion of the pot. An inorganic source of (15)N was added to the hyphal compartment at the same time of the (13)CO2 pulse labeling. One and seven days after pulse labeling, the plants were destructively harvested and the amount of the recently fixed carbon (C) and of the absorbed N was determined. (13)C allocated to belowground organs such as roots and mycorrhizal hyphae accounted for an average of 10%, with 4.3% allocated to mycorrhizal hyphae within the first 24h after the pulse labeling. Mycorrhizae absorbed labeled inorganic nitrogen, of which almost 23% was retained in the fungal mycelium. The N uptake was linearly correlated with the (13)C fixed by the plants suggesting a positive correlation between a plant photosynthetic rate and the hyphal absorption capacity. PMID:25841208

  19. Adaptation to endosymbiosis in the green Hydra, Hydra viridissima

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, K.W.

    1986-01-01

    Previous work has shown that the growth advantage conferred by algae on green hydra disappears when they are amply fed. From this observation an hypothesis has been advanced that the association may have evolved such that the rate of algal photosynthate translocation is adjusted according to the host's nutritional need. Evidence presented here contradicts this hypothesis. In controlled feeding studies, green hydra grow more rapidly than do aposymbionts at all feeding levels in a way that suggests that the per capita algal contribution to host growth is independent of host feeding rate. The rate of /sup 14/C translocation appears to vary in response to the algae's needs for photosynthate to support their own growth and within a range that suggests that dramatic differences in the algal effect on hydra growth are not likely to be caused by variation in algal carbon translocation. A correspondence in the timing of host and algal mitotic activity has been interpreted to suggest that algal density in hydra is accomplished through closely coordinated host and algal cell division. Similar rates of algal mitosis in growing and in shrinking endosymbiont populations show that some additional mechanism is required. Finally, host digestion of endosymbionts is considered to be rare except in unnatural associations. The absence of algal digestion in the hydra symbiosis has been considered to reflect coevolution between the symbionts, and yet the hydra in this study routinely lost significant numbers of endosymbionts apparently to intracellular digestion.

  20. Seasonal Course of Photosynthesis, Respiration, and Distribution of 14C in Young Pinus resinosa Trees as Related to Wood Formation

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, John C.; Larson, Philip R.

    1968-01-01

    Rates of net photosynthesis and dark respiration, and distribution of 14C were determined for new (current season's) and old (previous season's) needles at 10 times during the seasonal development of young Pinus resinosa Ait. trees. The seasonal changes in these factors associated with the development of the new shoot were related to known seasonal patterns of wood formation. Net photosynthesis per gram of needle dry weight (photosynthetic efficiency) was maximum in the old needles at the time of first new needle elongation; at the same time translocation of 14C from old to new needles was greatest. Photosynthetic efficiency of new needles was maximum at the end of the period of rapid new needle elongation, when the new needles also began exporting much greater quantities of 14C to other plant parts. In particular, the amount translocated from the new needles to the stem was greatly increased. At this time thick-walled xylem cells were first observed in the stem. These results, together with those of previous studies, indicate that the production of thick-walled xylem tracheids normally associated with latewood is physiologically correlated with maturation of the current season's needles. Because there is a lesser demand for photosynthate in the new shoot and a high rate of photosynthesis in the whole plant at the time of new needle maturity, a sharply increased amount of photosynthate becomes available for wall synthesis by cambial derivatives. PMID:16656946

  1. Subcellular Investigation of Photosynthesis-Driven Carbon Assimilation in the Symbiotic Reef Coral Pocillopora damicornis

    PubMed Central

    Domart-Coulon, Isabelle; Escrig, Stephane; Humbel, Bruno M.; Hignette, Michel

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT  Reef-building corals form essential, mutualistic endosymbiotic associations with photosynthetic Symbiodinium dinoflagellates, providing their animal host partner with photosynthetically derived nutrients that allow the coral to thrive in oligotrophic waters. However, little is known about the dynamics of these nutritional interactions at the (sub)cellular level. Here, we visualize with submicrometer spatial resolution the carbon and nitrogen fluxes in the intact coral-dinoflagellate association from the reef coral Pocillopora damicornis by combining nanoscale secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS) and transmission electron microscopy with pulse-chase isotopic labeling using [13C]bicarbonate and [15N]nitrate. This allows us to observe that (i) through light-driven photosynthesis, dinoflagellates rapidly assimilate inorganic bicarbonate and nitrate, temporarily storing carbon within lipid droplets and starch granules for remobilization in nighttime, along with carbon and nitrogen incorporation into other subcellular compartments for dinoflagellate growth and maintenance, (ii) carbon-containing photosynthates are translocated to all four coral tissue layers, where they accumulate after only 15 min in coral lipid droplets from the oral gastroderm and within 6 h in glycogen granules from the oral epiderm, and (iii) the translocation of nitrogen-containing photosynthates is delayed by 3 h. PMID:25670779

  2. Phloem Loading in Coleus blumei in the Absence of Carrier-Mediated Uptake of Export Sugar from the Apoplast 1

    PubMed Central

    Turgeon, Robert; Gowan, Esther

    1990-01-01

    Phloem loading in Coleus blumei Benth. leaves cannot be explained by carrier-mediated transport of export sugar from the apoplast into the sieve element-companion cell complex, the mechanism by which sucrose is thought to load in other species that have been studied in detail. Uptake profiles of the export sugars sucrose, raffinose, and stachyose into leaf discs were composed of two components, one saturable and the other not. Saturable (carrier-mediated) uptake of all three sugars was almost completely eliminated by the inhibitor p-chloromercuribenzenesulfonic acid (PCMBS). However, when PCMBS was introduced by transpiration into mature leaves it did not prevent accumulation of 14C-photosynthate in minor veins or translocation of labeled photosynthate from green to nonchlorophyllous regions of the leaf following exposure to 14CO2. The efficacy of introducing inhibitor solutions in the transpiration stream was proven by observing saffranin O and calcofluor white movement in the minor veins and leaf apoplast. PCMBS introduced by transpiration completely inhibited phloem loading in tobacco leaves. Phloem loading in C. blumei was also studied in plasmolysis experiments. The carbohydrate content of leaves was lowered by keeping plants in the dark and then increased by exposing them to light. The solute level of intermediary cells increased in the light (phloem loading) in both PCMBS-treated and control tissues. A mechanism of symplastic phloem loading is proposed for species that translocate the raffinose series of oligosaccharides. Images Figure 2 Figure 4 PMID:16667824

  3. Apoplastic infusion of sucrose into stem internodes during female flowering does not increase grain yield in maize plants grown under nitrogen-limiting conditions.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yunfeng; Li, Chunjian; Fritschi, Felix B

    2013-08-01

    Nitrogen (N) limitation reduces leaf growth and photosynthetic rates of maize (Zea mays), and constrains photosynthate translocation to developing ears. Additionally, the period from about 1 week before to 2 weeks after silking is critical for establishing the reproductive sink capacity necessary to attain maximum yield. To investigate the influence of carbohydrate availability in plants of differing N status, a greenhouse study was performed in which exogenous sucrose (Suc) was infused around the time of silking into maize stems grown under different N regimes. N deficiency significantly reduced leaf area, leaf longevity, leaf chlorophyll content and photosynthetic rate. High N-delayed leaf senescence, particularly of the six uppermost leaves, compared to the other two N treatments. While N application increased ear leaf soluble protein concentration, it did not influence glucose and suc concentrations. Interestingly, ear leaf starch concentration decreased with increasing N application. Infusion of exogenous suc tended to increase non-structural carbohydrate concentrations in the developing ears of all N treatments at silking and 6 days after silking. However, leaf photosynthetic rates were not affected by suc infusion, and suc infusion failed to increase grain yield in any N treatment. The lack of an effect of suc infusion on ear growth and the high ear leaf starch concentration of N-deficient maize, suggest that yield reduction under N deficiency may not be due to insufficient photosynthate availability to the developing ear during silking, and that yield reduction under N deficiency may be determined at an earlier growth stage.

  4. Tomato GOLDEN2-LIKE transcription factors reveal molecular gradients that function during fruit development and ripening.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Cuong V; Vrebalov, Julia T; Gapper, Nigel E; Zheng, Yi; Zhong, Silin; Fei, Zhangjun; Giovannoni, James J

    2014-02-01

    Fruit ripening is the summation of changes rendering fleshy fruit tissues attractive and palatable to seed dispersing organisms. For example, sugar content is influenced by plastid numbers and photosynthetic activity in unripe fruit and later by starch and sugar catabolism during ripening. Tomato fruit are sinks of photosynthate, yet unripe green fruit contribute significantly to the sugars that ultimately accumulate in the ripe fruit. Plastid numbers and chlorophyll content are influenced by numerous environmental and genetic factors and are positively correlated with photosynthesis and photosynthate accumulation. GOLDEN2-LIKE (GLK) transcription factors regulate plastid and chlorophyll levels. Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), like most plants, contains two GLKs (i.e., GLK1 and GLK2/UNIFORM). Mutant and transgene analysis demonstrated that these genes encode functionally similar peptides, though differential expression renders GLK1 more important in leaves, while GLK2 is predominant in fruit. A latitudinal gradient of GLK2 expression influences the typical uneven coloration of green and ripe wild-type fruit. Transcriptome profiling revealed a broader fruit gene expression gradient throughout development. The gradient influenced general ripening activities beyond plastid development and was consistent with the easily observed yet poorly studied ripening gradient present in tomato and many fleshy fruits.

  5. Ecological role of algobacterial cenosis links (chlorella - associated microflora or associated bacteria)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pechurkin, N. S.

    The problems of interrelation of microalgae and bacteria in the "autotroph - heterotroph" aquatic biotic cycle are discussed. The cause and mechanisms of algobacterial cenosis formation still have been explained contradictorily. This work views the results of experimental and theoretical study of algobacterial cenosis functioning by the example of microalga Chlorella vulgaris and associated microflora. The representatives of Pseudomonas mainly predominate in the Chlorella microbial complex. The experiment at non-sterile batch cultivation of Chlorella on Tamya medium showed that the biomass of microorganisms increases simultaneously with the increase of microalgal biomass. Microflora of Chlorella can use organic materials evolved by Chlorella after photosynthesis for reproduction. Moreover, microorganisms can use dying cells of Chlorella, i.e. form the "producer - reducer" biocycle. To understand the cenosis-forming role of microalgae the mathematical model of the "autotroph - heterotroph" aquatic biotic cycle was constructed taking into consideration the opportunities for microorganisms of using Chlorella photosynthates, dying cells and contribution of links to the nitrogen cycle. The theoretical investigation showed that the biomass of associated bacteria growing on glucose and detritus exceeds the biomass of bacteria using only microalgal photosynthates, which is comparable with experimental data.

  6. Population dynamics of an algal bacterial cenosis in closed ecological system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisman, T. I.; Galayda, Ya. V.; Loginova, N. S.

    The paper deals with microalgae-bacteria interrelationships in the "autotroph-heterotroph" aquatic biotic cycle. Explanations of why and how algal-bacterial ecosystems are formed still remain controversial. The paper presents results of experimental and theoretical investigations of the functioning of the algal-bacterial cenosis (the microalga Chlorella vulgaris and concomitant microflora). The Chlorella microbial community is dominated by representatives of the genus Pseudomonas. Experiments with non-sterile batch cultures of Chlorella on Tamiya medium showed that the biomass of microorganisms increases simultaneously with the increase in microalgal biomass. The microflora of Chlorella can grow on organic substances released by photosynthesizing Chlorella. Microorganisms can also use dying Chlorella cells, i.e. form a "producer-reducer" biocycle. To get a better insight into the cenosis-forming role of microalgae, a mathematical model of the "autotroph-heterotroph" aquatic biotic cycle has been constructed, taking into account the utilization of Chlorella photosynthates and dead cells by microorganisms and the contribution of the components to the nitrogen cycle. A theoretical study showed that the biomass of concomitant bacteria grown on glucose and detritus is larger than the biomass of bacteria utilizing only microalgal photosynthates, which agrees well with the experimental data.

  7. Population dynamics of an algal-bacterial cenosis in closed ecological system.

    PubMed

    Pisman, T I; Galayda, Ya V; Loginova, N S

    2005-01-01

    The paper deals with microalgae-bacteria interrelationships in the "autotroph-heterotroph" aquatic biotic cycle. Explanations of why and how algal-bacterial ecosystems are formed still remain controversial. The paper presents results of experimental and theoretical investigations of the functioning of the algal-bacterial cenosis (the microalga Chlorella vulgaris and concomitant microflora). The Chlorella microbial community is dominated by representatives of the genus Pseudomonas. Experiments with non-sterile batch cultures of Chlorella on Tamiya medium showed that the biomass of microorganisms increases simultaneously with the increase in microalgal biomass. The microflora of Chlorella can grow on organic substances released by photosynthesizing Chlorella. Microorganisms can also use dying Chlorella cells, i.e. form a "producer-reducer" biocycle. To get a better insight into the cenosis-forming role of microalgae, a mathematical model of the "autotroph-heterotroph" aquatic biotic cycle has been constructed, taking into account the utilization of Chlorella photosynthates and dead cells by microorganisms and the contribution of the components to the nitrogen cycle. A theoretical study showed that the biomass of concomitant bacteria grown on glucose and detritus is larger than the biomass of bacteria utilizing only microalgal photosynthates, which agrees well with the experimental data. PMID:16175685

  8. Functional Relationship between a Dinoflagellate Host and Its Diatom Endosymbiont.

    PubMed

    Hehenberger, Elisabeth; Burki, Fabien; Kolisko, Martin; Keeling, Patrick J

    2016-09-01

    While we know much about the evolutionary patterns of endosymbiotic organelle origins, we know less about how the actual process unfolded within each system. This is partly due to the massive changes endosymbiosis appears to trigger, and partly because most organelles evolved in the distant past. The dinotoms are dinoflagellates with diatom endosymbionts, and they represent a relatively recent but nevertheless obligate endosymbiotic association. We have carried out deep sequencing of both the host and endosymbiont transcriptomes from two dinotoms, Durinskia baltica and Glenodinium foliaceum, to examine how the nucleocytosolic compartments have functionally integrated. This analysis showed little or no functional reduction in either the endosymbiont or host, and no evidence for genetic integration. Rather, host and endosymbiont seem to be bound to each other via metabolites, such as photosynthate exported from the endosymbiont to the host as indicated by the presence of plastidic phosphate translocators in the host transcriptome. The host is able to synthesize starch, using plant-specific starch synthases, as a way to store imported photosynthate. PMID:27297471

  9. Plasmadesmatal frequency, apoplast-symplast ratio, and photosynthetic transfer in grapefruit juice vesicles. [Citrus paradisi Macf

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, K.E.; Lowell, C.A.; Avigne, W.T.

    1986-04-01

    Structure and function were examined in phloem-free vesicles and vesicle stalks of grapefruit (Citrus paradisi Macf.) by light and electron microscopy and /sup 14/C-photosynthate transport in intact and dissected tissues. Plasmodesmatal frequencies were approximately 0.3 to 0.5 ..mu..m/sup -1/ cell wall interface (3 to 5 ..mu..m/sup -2/), less than that of known secretory structures but similar to root parenchyma. Cell wall or apoplast comprised 18 to 24% of the total cross-sectional area of the vesicle stalk. The mass of total photosynthate transfer through individual vesicle stalks was ca. 0.5 ..mu..g C h/sup -1/ and rate of /sup 14/C-movement 0.1 to 0.4 mm h/sup -1/. Transport continued in rows of vesicles dissected in association with a vascular bundle. If isolated from fully-expanded fruit, translocation was similar for systems with frozen vs. non-frozen vesicle stalks. Similar freezing treatment decreased transport in vesicles from younger fruit. Symplastic and apoplastic pathways may therefore both operate in this system.

  10. Diurnal and seasonal variation in the carbon isotope composition of leaf dark-respired CO(2) in velvet mesquite (Prosopis velutina).

    PubMed

    Sun, Wei; Resco, Víctor; Williams, David G

    2009-10-01

    We evaluated diurnal and seasonal patterns of carbon isotope composition of leaf dark-respired CO(2) (delta(13)C(l)) in the C(3) perennial shrub velvet mesquite (Prosopis velutina) across flood plain and upland savanna ecosystems in the south-western USA. delta(13)C(l) of darkened leaves increased to maximum values late during daytime periods and declined gradually over night-time periods to minimum values at pre-dawn. The magnitude of the diurnal shift in delta(13)C(l) was strongly influenced by seasonal and habitat-related differences in soil water availability and leaf surface vapour pressure deficit. delta(13)C(l) and the cumulative flux-weighted delta(13)C value of photosynthates were positively correlated, suggesting that progressive (13)C enrichment of the CO(2) evolved by darkened leaves during the daytime mainly resulted from short-term changes in photosynthetic (13)C discrimination and associated shifts in the delta(13)C signature of primary respiratory substrates. The (13)C enrichment of dark-respired CO(2) relative to photosynthates across habitats and seasons was 4 to 6 per thousand at the end of the daytime period (1800 h), but progressively declined to 0 per thousand by pre-dawn (0300 h). The origin of night-time and daytime variations in delta(13)C(l) is discussed in terms of the carbon source(s) feeding respiration and the drought-induced changes in carbon metabolism.

  11. Mineral nutrition and elevated [CO(2)] interact to modify δ(13)C, an index of gas exchange, in Norway spruce.

    PubMed

    Marshall, John D; Linder, Sune

    2013-11-01

    The effects of the past century's increase in atmospheric CO2 concentration ([CO2]) have been recorded in the stable carbon isotope composition (δ(13)C) of the annual growth rings of trees. The isotope record frequently shows increases in photosynthetic CO2 uptake relative to stomatal conductance, which estimates the CO2 concentration gradient across the stomata (ca - ci). This variable, which is one control over the net photosynthetic rate, has been suggested as a homeostatic gas-exchange set point that is easy to estimate from δ(13)C and [CO2]. However, in high-latitude conifer forests, the literature is mixed; some studies show increases in (ca - ci) and others show homeostasis. Here we present leaf and tree-ring δ(13)C data from a controlled experiment that tested factorial combinations of elevated [CO2] (365 and 700 ∝mol mol(-1)) and fertilization on mature Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) trees in northern Sweden. We found first that the leaf carbon pool was contaminated by the current photosynthate in the older leaf cohorts. This is the reverse of the common observation that older photosynthate reserves can be used to produce new tissue; here the older tissue contains recent photosynthate. We found that the tree-ring data lack such contamination and in any case they better integrate over the canopy and the growing season than do leaves. In the second and third years of treatment, elevated [CO2] alone increased (ca - ci) by 38%; when combined with fertilization, it increased (ca - ci) by 60%. The results of this study support the idea that annual rings provide a clearer isotopic signal than do foliage age-classes. The tree-ring data show that inferred (ca - ci) depends not only on [CO2], but also on mineral-nutrient status. The differences in (ca - ci) are sufficiently large to account for the treatment-induced increase in wood-volume production in these stands.

  12. Assimilation of ammonium and nitrate nitrogen by bean plants

    SciTech Connect

    Volk, R.J. ); Chaillou, S.; Morot-Gaudry, J.F. ); Mariotti, A. )

    1989-04-01

    Enhanced growth is often observed in plants growing on combined ammonium and nitrate nutrition. The physiological basis for such enhancement was examined by exposing non-nodulated bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) plants to {sup 15}N-labeled, 1.0 mM N solutions containing 0, 33, 67 or 100% of the N as ammonium, the balance being nitrate. Maximal total N uptake and biomass production were attained by plants receiving 33% ammonium. A higher proportion of incoming ammonium than nitrate was incorporated into root protein. This was accompanied by increased partitioning of plant biomass to roots. It was concluded that as a consequence of greater N metabolism in the root under mixed ammonium and nitrate nutrition, the root became a more active sink for photosynthate. Concurrently, the augmented supply of N to the shoot enhanced net photosynthesis as reflected in increased plant biomass.

  13. SOYCHMBR.I - A model designed for the study of plant growth in a closed chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinhold, C.

    1982-01-01

    The analytical model SOYCHMBER.I, an update and alteration of the SOYMOD/OARDC model, for describing the total processes experienced by a plant in a controlled mass environment is outlined. The model is intended for use with growth chambers for examining plant growth in a completely controlled environment, leading toward a data base for the design of spacecraft food supply systems. SOYCHMBER.I accounts for the assimilation, respiration, and partitioning of photosynthate and nitrogen compounds among leaves, stems, roots, and potentially, flowers of the soybean plant. The derivation of the governing equations is traced, and the results of the prediction of CO2 dynamics for a seven day experiment with rice in a closed chamber are reported, together with data from three model runs for soybean. It is concluded that the model needs expansion to account for factors such as relative humidity.

  14. An Experimental Comparison of Two Methods on Photosynthesis Driving Soil Respiration: Girdling and Defoliation

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Yanli; Guan, Dexin; Wu, Jiabing; Wang, Anzhi; Jin, Changjie; Yuan, Fenghui

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies with different experimental methods have demonstrated that photosynthesis significantly influences soil respiration (RS). To compare the experimental results of different methods, RS after girdling and defoliation was measured in five-year-old seedlings of Fraxinus mandshurica from June to September. Girdling and defoliation significantly reduced RS by 33% and 25% within 4 days, and 40% and 32% within the entire treatment period, respectively. The differential response of RS to girdling and defoliation was a result of the over-compensation for RS after girdling and redistribution of stored carbon after defoliation. No significant effect on RS was observed between girdling and defoliation treatment, while the soluble sugar content in fine roots was higher in defoliation than in girdling treatment, indicating that defoliation had less compensation effect for RS after interrupting photosynthates supply. We confirm the close coupling of RS with photosynthesis and recommend defoliation for further studies to estimate the effect of photosynthesis on RS. PMID:26177498

  15. Translocation of Sugars Into Infected Cabbage Tissues During Clubroot Development 1

    PubMed Central

    Keen, N. T.; Williams, P. H.

    1969-01-01

    Sucrose, glucose, and inositol were the major sugars in cabbage hypocotyls infected by Plasmodiophora brassicae and in noninfected hypocotyls, based on paper, thin-layer, and gas-liquid chromatography. Small amounts of trehalose were tentatively identified in extracts from noninfected hypocotyls, whereas up to 20× this level occurred in extracts from infected hypocotyls. Inositol declined in the infected hypocotyls while glucose increased to about 4× the level in noninfected hypocotyls. Fructose and mannose concentrations increased about 2-fold in the diseased hypocotyls, whereas the galactose concentration was about one-third that of noninfected hypocotyls. Translocation of 14CO2 sugar photosynthates into infected hypocotyls was more rapid than that into noninfected hypocotyls. The infected tissues also exported less sugar than the non-infected tissues. Sucrose was the major sugar translocated into the hypocotyls of both infected and noninfected plants. Images PMID:16657127

  16. Vascular Sap Proteomics: Providing Insight into Long-Distance Signaling during Stress

    PubMed Central

    Carella, Philip; Wilson, Daniel C.; Kempthorne, Christine J.; Cameron, Robin K.

    2016-01-01

    The plant vascular system, composed of the xylem and phloem, is important for the transport of water, mineral nutrients, and photosynthate throughout the plant body. The vasculature is also the primary means by which developmental and stress signals move from one organ to another. Due to practical and technological limitations, proteomics analysis of xylem and phloem sap has been understudied in comparison to accessible sample types such as leaves and roots. However, recent advances in sample collection techniques and mass spectrometry technology are making it possible to comprehensively analyze vascular sap proteomes. In this mini-review, we discuss the emerging field of vascular sap proteomics, with a focus on recent comparative studies to identify vascular proteins that may play roles in long-distance signaling and other processes during stress responses in plants. PMID:27242852

  17. Plant-mediated 'apparent effects' between mycorrhiza and insect herbivores.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Lucy; Johnson, David

    2015-08-01

    Plants mediate indirect 'apparent' effects between above-ground herbivores and below-ground mutualistic mycorrhizal fungi. The herbivore-plant-mycorrhiza continuum is further complicated because signals produced by plants in response to herbivores can be transmitted to other plants via shared fungal networks below ground. Insect herbivores, such as aphids, probably affect the functioning of mycorrhizal fungi by changing the supply of recent photosynthate from plants to mycorrhizas, whereas there is evidence that mycorrhizas affect aphid fitness by changing plant signalling pathways, rather than only through improved nutrition. New knowledge of the transfer of signals through fungal networks between plant species means we now need a better understanding of how this process occurs in relation to the feeding preferences of herbivores to shape plant community composition and herbivore behaviour in nature.

  18. Etude des relations entre photosynthese respiration, transpiration et nutrition minerale chez le ble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    André, M.; Ducloux, H.; Richaud, C.; Massimino, D.; Daguenet, A.; Massimino, J.; Gerbaud, A.

    La croissance du Blé Triticum aestivum a été étudiée en environnement contrôlé et fermé pendant une période de 70 jours. Les échanges gazeux (Photosynthèse, Respiration) hydriques (Transpiration) et la consommation en éléments minéraux (Azote, Phosphore, Potassium) ont été mesurés en continu. On présentera les relations dynamiques observées entre les différentes fonctions physiologiques, d'une part sous l'influence de la croissance et d'autre part en réponse à des modifications de l'environnement. L'influence de la teneur en CO2 pendant la croissance (teneur normale ou doublée) sera mise en évidence.

  19. Vascular Sap Proteomics: Providing Insight into Long-Distance Signaling during Stress.

    PubMed

    Carella, Philip; Wilson, Daniel C; Kempthorne, Christine J; Cameron, Robin K

    2016-01-01

    The plant vascular system, composed of the xylem and phloem, is important for the transport of water, mineral nutrients, and photosynthate throughout the plant body. The vasculature is also the primary means by which developmental and stress signals move from one organ to another. Due to practical and technological limitations, proteomics analysis of xylem and phloem sap has been understudied in comparison to accessible sample types such as leaves and roots. However, recent advances in sample collection techniques and mass spectrometry technology are making it possible to comprehensively analyze vascular sap proteomes. In this mini-review, we discuss the emerging field of vascular sap proteomics, with a focus on recent comparative studies to identify vascular proteins that may play roles in long-distance signaling and other processes during stress responses in plants.

  20. Universal foliage-stem scaling across environments and species in dicot trees: plasticity, biomechanics and Corner's Rules.

    PubMed

    Olson, Mark E; Aguirre-Hernández, Rebeca; Rosell, Julieta A

    2009-03-01

    Trees range from small-leaved, intricately branched species with slender stems to large-leaved, coarsely branched ones with thick stems. We suggest a mechanism for this pattern, known as Corner's Rules, based on universal scaling. We show similar crown area-stem diameter scaling between trunks and branches, environments, and species spanning a wide range of leaf size and stem biomechanics. If crown and stem maintain metabolically driven proportionality, but similar amounts of photosynthates are produced per unit crown area, then the greater leaf spacing in large-leaved species requires lower density stem tissue and, meeting mechanical needs, thicker stems. Congruent with this scenario, we show a negative relationship between leaf size and stem Young's modulus. Corner's Rules emerge from these mutual adjustments, which suggest that adaptive studies cannot consider any of these features independently. The constancy of scaling despite environmental challenges identifies this trait constellation as a crucial axis of plant diversification.

  1. Slow-growth phenotype of transgenic tomato expressing apoplastic invertase

    SciTech Connect

    Dickinson, C.D.; Altabella, T.; Chrispeels, M.J. )

    1991-02-01

    The growth of transgenic tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) plants that express in their apoplast yeast invertase under the control of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter is severely inhibited. The higher the level of invertase, the greater the inhibition of growth. A second phenotypic characteristic of these transgenic plants is the development of yellow and necrotic spots on the leaves, and leaf curling. Again the severity of the symptoms is correlated with the level of invertase. These symptoms do not develop in shaded leaves indicating the need for photosynthesis. Keeping the plants in the dark for a prolonged period (24 hours) results in the disappearance of leaf starch from the control plants, but not from the plants with apoplastic invertase. These results are consistent with the interpretation that apoplastic invertase prevents photosynthate export from source leaves and that phloem loading includes an apoplastic step.

  2. Louis Nico Marie Duysens (March 15, 1921-September 8, 2015): a leading biophysicist of the 20th century.

    PubMed

    Govindjee; Pulles, M P J

    2016-06-01

    Louis Nico Marie (L. N. M.) Duijsens (Duysens) was one of the giants in the biophysics of photosynthesis. His PhD thesis "Transfer of Excitation Energy in Photosynthesis" (Duysens, 1952) is a classic; he introduced light-induced absorption difference spectroscopy to photosynthesis research and proved the existence of reaction centers, introducing advanced methods from physics to understand biological processes. Further, it is his 1959-1961 seminal work, with Jan Amesz, that provided evidence for the existence of the series scheme for the two light reactions in oxygenic photosynthesis. In one word, he was one of the master biophysicists of the 20th century-who provided direct measurements on many key intermediates, and made us understand the intricacies of photosynthesis with a simplicity that no one else ever did. We present here our personal perspective of the scientist that Lou Duysens was. For an earlier perspective, see van Grondelle and van Gorkom (Photosynth Res 120: 3-7, 2014).

  3. Prokaryotic carbonic anhydrases of Earth's environment.

    PubMed

    Kumar, R Siva Sai; Ferry, James G

    2014-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrase is a metalloenzyme catalyzing the reversible hydration of carbon dioxide to bicarbonate. Five independently evolved classes have been described for which one or more are found in nearly every cell type underscoring the general importance of this ubiquitous enzyme in Nature. The bulk of research to date has centered on the enzymes from mammals and plants with less emphasis on prokaryotes. Prokaryotic carbonic anhydrases play important roles in the ecology of Earth's biosphere including acquisition of CO2 for photosynthesis and the physiology of aerobic and anaerobic prokaryotes decomposing the photosynthate back to CO2 thereby closing the global carbon cycle. This review focuses on the physiology and biochemistry of carbonic anhydrases from prokaryotes belonging to the domains Bacteria and Archaea that play key roles in the ecology of Earth's biosphere.

  4. Nutrient partitioning and seedling development in the genus Leucaena

    SciTech Connect

    Dovel, R.L.

    1987-01-01

    Slow establishment of the genus Leucaena from seed has been attributed to law seedling vigor and late nodulation. Observation of early seedling growth indicated that partitioning of a large proportion of resources to the root of young Leucaena seedlings could account, in part, for the slow initial shoot growth observed in this genus. Therefore, a series of experiments were conducted to examine the partitioning of stored seed reserves, photosynthate, and nitrogen in developing Leucaena seedlings. The effects of nodulation and nitrogen fertilization on partitioning of nutrients in the seedling were also examined. Seed reserves were initially used for radicle growth in dark grown seedlings; however, partitioning soon shifted to the hypocotyl. By four days after imbibition, hypocotyl weight exceeded radicle weight in both species tested (L. leucocephala and L. retusa), at all temperatures above 20/sup 0/C. Two experiments were conducted examining the carbon partitioning of L. leucocephala cultivar K-8 using /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ pulse labeling techniques.

  5. The post-Paleozoic chronology and mechanism of 13C depletion in primary marine organic matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Popp, B. N.; Takigiku, R.; Hayes, J. M.; Louda, J. W.; Baker, E. W.

    1989-01-01

    Carbon-isotopic compositions of geoporphyrins have been measured from marine sediments of Mesozoic and Cenozoic age in order to elucidate the timing and extent of depletion of 13C in marine primary producers. These results indicate that the difference in isotopic composition of coeval marine carbonates and marine primary photosynthate was approximately 5 to 7 permil greater during the Mesozoic and early Cenozoic than at present. In contrast to the isotopic record of marine primary producers, isotopic compositions of terrestrial organic materials have remained approximately constant for this same interval of time. This difference in the isotopic records of marine and terrestrial organic matter is considered in terms of the mechanisms controlling the isotopic fractionation associated with photosynthetic fixation of carbon. We show that the decreased isotopic fractionation between marine carbonates and organic matter from the Early to mid-Cenozoic may record variations in the abundance of atmospheric CO2.

  6. Tight coupling of root-associated nitrogen fixation and plant photosynthesis in the salt marsh Spartina alterniflora and carbon dioxide enhancement of Nitrogenase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Whiting, G.J.; Gandy, E.L.; Yoch, D.C.

    1986-07-01

    The coupling of root-associated nitrogen fixation and plant photosynthesis was examined in the salt marsh grass Spartina alterniflora. In both field experiments and hydroponic assay chambers, nitrogen fixation associated with the roots was rapidly enhanced by stimulating plant photosynthesis. A kinetic analysis of acetylene reduction activity (ARA) showed that a five-to-sixfold stimulation occurred within 10 to 60 min after the plant leaves were exposed to light or increase CO/sub 2/ concentrations (with the light held constant). In field experiments, CO/sub 2/ enrichment increased plant-associated ARA by 27%. Further evidence of the dependence of ARA on plant photosynthate was obtained when activity in excised roots was shown to decrease after young greenhouse plants were placed in the dark. Seasonal variation in the ARA of excised plant roots from field cores appears to be related to the annual cycle of net photosynthesis in S. alterniflora.

  7. Long-term nitrogen addition causes the evolution of less-cooperative mutualists.

    PubMed

    Weese, Dylan J; Heath, Katy D; Dentinger, Bryn T M; Lau, Jennifer A

    2015-03-01

    Human activities have altered the global nitrogen (N) cycle, and as a result, elevated N inputs are causing profound ecological changes in diverse ecosystems. The evolutionary consequences of this global change have been largely ignored even though elevated N inputs are predicted to cause mutualism breakdown and the evolution of decreased cooperation between resource mutualists. Using a long-term (22 years) N-addition experiment, we find that elevated N inputs have altered the legume-rhizobium mutualism (where rhizobial bacteria trade N in exchange for photosynthates from legumes), causing the evolution of less-mutualistic rhizobia. Plants inoculated with rhizobium strains isolated from N-fertilized treatments produced 17-30% less biomass and had reduced chlorophyll content compared to plants inoculated with strains from unfertilized control plots. Because the legume-rhizobium mutualism is the major contributor of naturally fixed N to terrestrial ecosystems, the evolution of less-cooperative rhizobia may have important environmental consequences.

  8. Carbohydrate accumulation may be the proximate trigger of anthocyanin biosynthesis under autumn conditions in Begonia semperflorens.

    PubMed

    Zhang, K M; Li, Z; Li, Y; Li, Y H; Kong, D Z; Wu, R H

    2013-11-01

    Many plant leaves appear red in the autumn, and many papers have focused on the environmental factors and role of anthocyanin in this process. However few papers have examined the substances that are induced during this process. We hypothesised that excess sugar accumulation directly induces anthocyanin accumulation under autumn conditions. Using two methods (restricting phloem movement and exogenous sucrose feeding), we found that both surplus photosynthate and exogenous sucrose could induce anthocyanin biosynthesis, corresponding to up-regulation of several enzymes involved in anthocyanin biosynthesis (phenylalanine ammonia lyase, chalcone isomerase, dihydroflavonol 4-reductase and flavonoid 3-O-glucosyl transferase) and in transport (glutathione S-transferase). Our results suggest that excess carbohydrate may be the proximate trigger for induction of anthocyanin biosynthesis in autumn, but only when carbohydrates are accumulated for storage.

  9. Enhancement of photoassimilate utilization by manipulation of the ADPglucose pyrophosphorylase genes. Progress report, [April 15, 1990--April 14, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Okita, T.W.

    1990-12-31

    The long term goal of this project is to assess the feasibility of increasing the conversion of photosynthate a key regulatory enzyme in starch biosynthesis. In developing storage tissues such as cereal seeds and tubers, starch biosynthesis is primarily regulated by the gene activation, expression, and allosteric regulation of ADPglucose pyrophosphorylase, as well as starch synthase, and branching enzyme. During the last year we have elucidated the structure of both subunits which compose this tetrameric enzyme and determined the temporal and spatial expression of the genes encoding each subunit as well as their correlation to starch biosynthesis. Genomic clones to both subunits have also been isolated and the gene structure of the small subunit determined. Transgenic potato plants have been produced containing deletions of the small subunit promoter. Currently, cis acting elements and their involvement in spatial and temporal expression are under investigation.

  10. Arabidopsis thaliana—Aphid Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Louis, Joe; Singh, Vijay; Shah, Jyoti

    2012-01-01

    Aphids are important pests of plants that use their stylets to tap into the sieve elements to consume phloem sap. Besides the removal of photosynthates, aphid infestation also alters source-sink patterns. Most aphids also vector viral diseases. In this chapter, we will summarize on recent significant findings in plant-aphid interaction, and how studies involving Arabidopsis thaliana and Myzus persicae (Sülzer), more commonly known as the green peach aphid (GPA), are beginning to provide important insights into the molecular basis of plant defense and susceptibility to aphids. The recent demonstration that expression of dsRNA in Arabidopsis can be used to silence expression of genes in GPA has further expanded the utility of Arabidopsis for evaluating the contribution of the aphid genome-encoded proteins to this interaction. PMID:22666177

  11. Application of ethylene diurea (EDU) in assessing the response of a tropical soybean cultivar to ambient O₃: nitrogen metabolism, antioxidants, reproductive development and yield.

    PubMed

    Rai, Richa; Agrawal, Madhoolika; Kumar Choudhary, Krishna; Agrawal, S B; Emberson, Lisa; Büker, Patrick

    2015-02-01

    The present study deals with assessment of response of a tropical soybean cultivar to O3 in relation to photosynthetic pigments, chlorophyll fluorescence kinetics, antioxidative capacity, N assimilation enzymes, metabolites, growth and yield using ethylene diurea (EDU) given as a soil drench (400) ppm at an interval of 10 days after germination up to maturity. Mean O3 concentration was 42 ppb and accumulated threshold above 40 ppb (AOT 40) was 9.07 ppm h. Lipid peroxidation and total phenolics reduced, while increases in activities of antioxidative and nitrogen assimilation enzymes, ascorbic acid, protein, photosynthetic pigments, Fv/Fm ratio, number of leaves, flowers, pods, branches and yield attributes were found in EDU treated plants. EDU alleviated the negative effects of O3 by enhancing the first line of defense against ROS and protecting N assimilation enzymes at flowering and maintaining adequate supply of photosynthates to developing pods during pod filling stage. EDU provided maximum protection between flowering to pod filling stage.

  12. [Some aspects of underground organs of spotleaf orchis growth and phenolic compound accumulation at the generative stage of ontogenesis].

    PubMed

    Marakaev, O A; Tselebrovskiĭ, M V; Nikolaeva, T N; Zagoskina, N V

    2013-01-01

    For the first time, the time courses of the growth and accumulation of phenolic compounds (PHCs) in different parts of the organs of the underground organs of the tuberoid orchid Dactilorhyza maculata during vegetation and the winter dormancy period were studied. It was shown that the replacement of old tuberoids and adventitious roots by new ones is accompanied by active growth, photosynthate redistribution, and PHC accumulation. It was found that the tuberoid performing the function of a storage organ possessed a low PHC content, which increased at the end of vegetation and was stably high during the winter dormancy period; in spring the content decreased, most likely as a result of PHC catabolism and utilization for growth processes. It was proposed that the higher PHC content in adventitious roots and tuberoid terminal parts is determined by mycotrophy of the organs.

  13. Diel patterns of autotrophic and heterotrophic respiration among phenological stages

    SciTech Connect

    Savage, Kathleen; Davidson, Eric; Tang, Jianwu

    2013-01-01

    Improved understanding of the links between aboveground production and allocation of photosynthate to belowground processes and the temporal variation in those links is needed to interpret observations of belowground carbon cycling processes. Here, we show that combining a trenching manipulation with high-frequency soil respiration measurements in a temperate hardwood forest permitted identification of the temporally variable influence of roots on diel and seasonal patterns of soil respiration. The presence of roots in an untrenched plot caused larger daily amplitude and a 2–3 h delay in peak soil CO2 efflux relative to a root-free trenched plot. These effects cannot be explained by differences in soil temperature, and they were significant only when a canopy was present during the growing season. This experiment demonstrated that canopy processes affect soil CO2 efflux rates and patterns at hourly and seasonal time scales, and it provides evidence that root and microbial processes respond differently to environmental factors.

  14. Hands-on metabolism analysis of complex biochemical networks using elementary flux modes.

    PubMed

    Schäuble, Sascha; Schuster, Stefan; Kaleta, Christoph

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this chapter is to discuss the basic principles and reasoning behind elementary flux mode analysis (EFM analysis)--an important tool for the analysis of metabolic networks. We begin with a short introduction into metabolic pathway analysis and subsequently outline in detail fundamentals of EFM analysis by way of a small example network. We discuss issues arising in the reconstruction of metabolic networks required for EFM analysis and how they can be circumvented. Subsequently, we analyze a more elaborate example network representing photosynthate metabolism. Finally, we give an overview of applications of EFM analysis in biotechnology and other fields and discuss issues arising when applying methods from metabolic pathway analysis to genome-scale metabolic networks.

  15. [Enhancement of photoassimilate utilization by manipulation of the ADPglucose pyrophosphorylase gene]. Progress report, [March 15, 1989--April 14, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Okita, T.W.

    1990-12-31

    The long term aim of this project is to assess the feasibility of increasing the conversion of photosynthate into starch via manipulation of the gene that encodes for ADPglucose pyrophosphorylase, a key regulatory enzyme of starch biosynthesis. In developing storage tissues such as cereal seeds and tubers, starch biosynthesis is regulated by the gene activation and expression of ADPglucose pyrophosphorylase, starch synthase, branching enzyme and other ancillary starch modifying enzymes, as well as the allosteric-controlled behavior of ADPglucose pyrophosphorylase activity. During the last two years we have obtained information on the structure of this enzyme from both potato tuber and rice endosperm, using a combination of biochemical and molecular biological approaches. Moreover, we present evidence that this enzyme may be localized at discrete regions of the starch grain within the amyloplast, and plays a role in controlling overall starch biosynthesis in potato tubers.

  16. Origin and evolution of plastids and photosynthesis in eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    McFadden, Geoffrey I

    2014-04-01

    Recent progress in understanding the origins of plastids from endosymbiotic cyanobacteria is reviewed. Establishing when during geological time the endosymbiosis occurred remains elusive, but progress has been made in defining the cyanobacterial lineage most closely related to plastids, and some mechanistic insight into the possible existence of cryptic endosymbioses perhaps involving Chlamydia-like infections of the host have also been presented. The phylogenetic affinities of the host remain obscure. The existence of a second lineage of primary plastids in euglyphid amoebae has now been confirmed, but the quasipermanent acquisition of plastids by animals has been shown to be more ephemeral than initially suspected. A new understanding of how plastids have been integrated into their hosts by transfer of photosynthate, by endosymbiotic gene transfer and repatriation of gene products back to the endosymbiont, and by regulation of endosymbiont division is presented in context.

  17. Sucrose synthesizing enzymes and /sup 14/C-assimilation in the chlorophyllous layer of developing grapefruit. [Citrus paradisi Macf

    SciTech Connect

    Tomlinson, P.T.; Lowell, C.A.; Koch, K.E.

    1986-04-01

    Fixation of /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ and activities of sucrose-synthesizing enzymes, sucrose phosphate synthetase (SPS) and sucrose synthase (SS), were assayed in tissues of developing fruit and source leaves from Citrus paradisi Macf. SPS activity of both the outer, chlorophyllous layer of the fruit (flavedo) and source leaves was 10-fold greater than that of the inner, largely non-chlorophyllous layer of the fruit peel (albedo). In contrast, SS activity of the flavedo was 2-fold greater than that of the albedo and 10-fold greater than that of leaves. Fixation of /sup 14/C-photosynthates in isolated tissues (flavedo 2x > albedo) and their redistribution in intact fruit indicated that flavedo functions as both source and sink. Activities of sucrose-synthesizing enzymes were consistent with this dual function.

  18. Leaf photosynthetic and water-relations responses for 'Valencia' orange trees exposed to oxidant air pollution

    SciTech Connect

    Olszyk, D.M.; Takemoto, B.K.; Poe, M.

    1991-01-01

    Leaf responses were measured to test a hypothesis that reduced photosynthetic capacity and/or altered water relations were associated with reductions in yield for 'Valencia' orange trees (Citrus sinensis (L.), Osbeck) exposed to ambient oxidant air pollution. Exposures were continuous for 4 years to three levels of oxidants (in charcoal-filtered, half-filtered, and non-filtered air). Oxidants had no effect on net leaf photosynthetic rates or on photosynthetic pigment concentrations. A single set of measurements indicated that oxidants increased leaf starch concentrations (24%) prior to flowering, suggesting a change in photosynthate allocation. Leaves exposed to oxidants had small, but consistent, changes in water relations over the summer growing season, compared to trees growing in filtered air. Other changes included decreased stomatal conductance (12%) and transpiration (9%) rates, and increased water pressure potentials (5%). While all responses were subtle, their cumulative impact over 4 years indicated that 'Valencia' orange trees were subject to increased ambient oxidant stress.

  19. Origin and Evolution of Plastids and Photosynthesis in Eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    McFadden, Geoffrey I.

    2014-01-01

    Recent progress in understanding the origins of plastids from endosymbiotic cyanobacteria is reviewed. Establishing when during geological time the endosymbiosis occurred remains elusive, but progress has been made in defining the cyanobacterial lineage most closely related to plastids, and some mechanistic insight into the possible existence of cryptic endosymbioses perhaps involving Chlamydia-like infections of the host have also been presented. The phylogenetic affinities of the host remain obscure. The existence of a second lineage of primary plastids in euglyphid amoebae has now been confirmed, but the quasipermanent acquisition of plastids by animals has been shown to be more ephemeral than initially suspected. A new understanding of how plastids have been integrated into their hosts by transfer of photosynthate, by endosymbiotic gene transfer and repatriation of gene products back to the endosymbiont, and by regulation of endosymbiont division is presented in context. PMID:24691960

  20. Point cloud generation from aerial image data acquired by a quadrocopter type micro unmanned aerial vehicle and a digital still camera.

    PubMed

    Rosnell, Tomi; Honkavaara, Eija

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this investigation was to develop and investigate methods for point cloud generation by image matching using aerial image data collected by quadrocopter type micro unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) imaging systems. Automatic generation of high-quality, dense point clouds from digital images by image matching is a recent, cutting-edge step forward in digital photogrammetric technology. The major components of the system for point cloud generation are a UAV imaging system, an image data collection process using high image overlaps, and post-processing with image orientation and point cloud generation. Two post-processing approaches were developed: one of the methods is based on Bae Systems' SOCET SET classical commercial photogrammetric software and another is built using Microsoft(®)'s Photosynth™ service available in the Internet. Empirical testing was carried out in two test areas. Photosynth processing showed that it is possible to orient the images and generate point clouds fully automatically without any a priori orientation information or interactive work. The photogrammetric processing line provided dense and accurate point clouds that followed the theoretical principles of photogrammetry, but also some artifacts were detected. The point clouds from the Photosynth processing were sparser and noisier, which is to a large extent due to the fact that the method is not optimized for dense point cloud generation. Careful photogrammetric processing with self-calibration is required to achieve the highest accuracy. Our results demonstrate the high performance potential of the approach and that with rigorous processing it is possible to reach results that are consistent with theory. We also point out several further research topics. Based on theoretical and empirical results, we give recommendations for properties of imaging sensor, data collection and processing of UAV image data to ensure accurate point cloud generation.

  1. Biophysical controls on rhizospheric and heterotrophic components of soil respiration in a boreal black spruce stand.

    PubMed

    Gaumont-Guay, David; Black, T Andrew; Barr, Alan G; Jassal, Rachhpal S; Nesic, Zoran

    2008-02-01

    We conducted a root-exclusion experiment in a 125-year-old boreal black spruce (Picea mariana (Mill.) BSP) stand in 2004 to quantify the physical and biological controls on temporal dynamics of the rhizospheric (R(r)) and heterotrophic (R(h)) components of soil respiration (R(s)). Annual R(r), R(h) and estimated moss respiration were 285, 269 and 57 g C m(-2) year(-1), respectively, which accounted for 47, 44 and 9% of R(s) (611 g C m(-2) year(-1)), respectively. A gradual transition from R(h)-dominated (winter, spring and fall) to R(r)-dominated (summer) respiration was observed during the year. Soil thawing in spring and the subsequent increase in soil water content (theta) induced a small and sustained increase in R(h) but had no effect on R(r). During the remainder of the growing season, no effect of theta was observed on either component of R(s). Both components increased exponentially with soil temperature (T(s)) during the growing season, but R(r) showed greater temperature sensitivity than R(h) (Q(10) of 4.0 and 3.0, respectively). Temperature-normalized variations in R(r) were highly correlated with eddy covariance estimates of gross ecosystem photosynthesis, and the correlation was greatest when R(r) was lagged by 24 days. Within diurnal cycles, variations in T(s) were highly coupled to variations in R(h) but were significantly decoupled from R(r). The patterns observed at both time scales strongly suggest that the flow of photosynthates to the rhizosphere is a key driver of belowground respiration processes but that photosynthate supply may control these processes in several ways. PMID:18055427

  2. Clonal integration ameliorates the carbon accumulation capacity of a stoloniferous herb, Glechoma longituba, growing in heterogenous light conditions by facilitating nitrogen assimilation in the rhizosphere

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jin-Song; Li, Jun; Zhang, Yun; Zong, Hao; Lei, Ning-Fei

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Enhanced availability of photosynthates increases nitrogen (N) mineralization and nitrification in the rhizosphere via rhizodeposition from plant roots. Under heterogeneous light conditions, photosynthates supplied by exposed ramets may promote N assimilation in the rhizosphere of shaded, connected ramets. This study was conducted to test this hypothesis. Methods Clonal fragments of the stoloniferous herb Glechoma longituba with two successive ramets were selected. Mother ramets were subjected to full sunlight and offspring ramets were subjected to 80 % shading, and the stolon between the two successive ramets was either severed or left intact. Measurements were taken of photosynthetic and growth parameters. The turnover of available soil N was determined together with the compostion of the rhizosphere microbial community. Key Results The microbial community composition in the rhizosphere of shaded offspring ramets was significantly altered by clonal integration. Positive effects of clonal integration were observed on NAGase activity, net soil N mineralization rate and net soil N nitrification rate. Increased leaf N and chlorophyll content as well as leaf N allocation to the photosynthetic machinery improved the photosynthetic capability of shaded offspring ramets when the stolon was left intact. Clonal integration improved the growth performance of shaded, connected offspring ramets and whole clonal fragments without any cost to the exposed mother ramets. Conclusions Considerable differences in microbial community composition caused by clonal integration may facilitate N assimilation in the rhizosphere of shaded offspring ramets. Increased N content in the photosynthetic machinery may allow pre-acclimation to high light conditions for shaded offspring ramets, thus promoting opportunistic light capture. In accordance with the theory of the division of labour, it is suggested that clonal integration may ameliorate the carbon assimilation

  3. Plant-driven weathering of apatite--the role of an ectomycorrhizal fungus.

    PubMed

    Smits, M M; Bonneville, S; Benning, L G; Banwart, S A; Leake, J R

    2012-09-01

    Ectomycorrhizal (EcM) fungi are increasingly recognized as important agents of mineral weathering and soil development, with far-reaching impacts on biogeochemical cycles. Because EcM fungi live in a symbiotic relationship with trees and in close contact with bacteria and archaea, it is difficult to distinguish between the weathering effects of the fungus, host tree and other micro-organisms. Here, we quantified mineral weathering by the fungus Paxillus involutus, growing in symbiosis with Pinus sylvestris under sterile conditions. The mycorrhizal trees were grown in specially designed sterile microcosms in which the supply of soluble phosphorus (P) in the bulk media was varied and grains of the calcium phosphate mineral apatite mixed with quartz, or quartz alone, were provided in plastic wells that were only accessed by their fungal partner. Under P limitation, pulse labelling of plants with (14)CO(2) revealed plant-to-fungus allocation of photosynthates, with 17 times more (14)C transferred into the apatite wells compared with wells with only quartz. Fungal colonization increased the release of P from apatite by almost a factor of three, from 7.5 (±1.1) × 10(-10) mol m(-2) s(-1) to 2.2 (±0.52) × 10(-9) mol m(-2) s(-1). On increasing the P supply in the microcosms from no added P, through apatite alone, to both apatite and orthophosphate, the proportion of biomass in roots progressively increased at the expense of the fungus. These three observations, (i) proportionately more plant energy investment in the fungal partner under P limitation, (ii) preferential fungal transport of photosynthate-derived carbon towards patches of apatite grains and (iii) fungal enhancement of weathering rate, reveal the tightly coupled plant-fungal interactions underpinning enhanced EcM weathering of apatite and its utilization as P source.

  4. Dynamic Balancing of Isoprene Carbon Sources Reflects Photosynthetic and Photorespiratory Responses to Temperature Stress1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Chambers, Jeffrey; Alves, Eliane G.; Teixeira, Andrea; Garcia, Sabrina; Holm, Jennifer; Higuchi, Niro; Manzi, Antonio; Abrell, Leif; Fuentes, Jose D.; Nielsen, Lars K.; Torn, Margaret S.; Vickers, Claudia E.

    2014-01-01

    The volatile gas isoprene is emitted in teragrams per annum quantities from the terrestrial biosphere and exerts a large effect on atmospheric chemistry. Isoprene is made primarily from recently fixed photosynthate; however, alternate carbon sources play an important role, particularly when photosynthate is limiting. We examined the relative contribution of these alternate carbon sources under changes in light and temperature, the two environmental conditions that have the strongest influence over isoprene emission. Using a novel real-time analytical approach that allowed us to examine dynamic changes in carbon sources, we observed that relative contributions do not change as a function of light intensity. We found that the classical uncoupling of isoprene emission from net photosynthesis at elevated leaf temperatures is associated with an increased contribution of alternate carbon. We also observed a rapid compensatory response where alternate carbon sources compensated for transient decreases in recently fixed carbon during thermal ramping, thereby maintaining overall increases in isoprene production rates at high temperatures. Photorespiration is known to contribute to the decline in net photosynthesis at high leaf temperatures. A reduction in the temperature at which the contribution of alternate carbon sources increased was observed under photorespiratory conditions, while photosynthetic conditions increased this temperature. Feeding [2-13C]glycine (a photorespiratory intermediate) stimulated emissions of [13C1–5]isoprene and 13CO2, supporting the possibility that photorespiration can provide an alternate source of carbon for isoprene synthesis. Our observations have important implications for establishing improved mechanistic predictions of isoprene emissions and primary carbon metabolism, particularly under the predicted increases in future global temperatures. PMID:25318937

  5. Stable isotopes in tree rings: towards a mechanistic understanding of isotope fractionation and mixing processes from the leaves to the wood.

    PubMed

    Gessler, Arthur; Ferrio, Juan Pedro; Hommel, Robert; Treydte, Kerstin; Werner, Roland A; Monson, Russell K

    2014-08-01

    The mechanistic understanding of isotope fractionation processes is increasing but we still lack detailed knowledge of the processes that determine the isotopic composition of the tree-ring archive over the long term. Especially with regard to the path from leaf photosynthate production to wood formation, post-assimilation fractionations/processes might cause at least a partial decoupling between the leaf isotope signals that record processes such as stomatal conductance, transpiration and photosynthesis, and the wood or cellulose signals that are stored in the paleophysiological record. In this review, we start from the rather well understood processes at the leaf level such as photosynthetic carbon isotope fractionation, leaf water evaporative isotope enrichment and the issue of the isotopic composition of inorganic sources (CO2 and H2O), though we focus on the less explored 'downstream' processes related to metabolism and transport. We further summarize the roles of cellulose and lignin as important chemical constituents of wood, and the processes that determine the transfer of photosynthate (sucrose) and associated isotopic signals to wood production. We cover the broad topics of post-carboxylation carbon isotope fractionation and of the exchange of organic oxygen with water within the tree. In two case studies, we assess the transfer of carbon and oxygen isotopic signals from leaves to tree rings. Finally we address the issue of different temporal scales and link isotope fractionation at the shorter time scale for processes in the leaf to the isotopic ratio as recorded across longer time scales of the tree-ring archive.

  6. Physiological optimization underlies growth rate-independent chlorophyll-specific gross and net primary production.

    PubMed

    Halsey, Kimberly H; Milligan, Allen J; Behrenfeld, Michael J

    2010-02-01

    Characterization of physiological variability in phytoplankton photosynthetic efficiencies is one of the greatest challenges in assessing ocean net primary production (NPP) from remote sensing of surface chlorophyll (Chl). Nutrient limitation strongly influences phytoplankton intracellular pigmentation, but its impact on Chl-specific NPP (NPP(*)) is debated. We monitored six indices of photosynthetic activity in steady-state Dunaliella tertiolecta cultures over a range of nitrate-limited growth rates (μ), including photosynthetic efficiency of PSII (F(v)/F(m)), O(2)-based gross and net production, 20 min and 24 h carbon assimilation, and carbon- and μ-based NPP. Across all growth rates, O(2)-based Chl-specific gross primary production (GPP(*)(O(2))), NPP(*), and F(v)/F(m) were constant. GPP(*)(O(2)) was 3.3 times greater than NPP(*). In stark contrast, Chl-specific short-term C fixation showed clear linear dependence on μ, reflecting differential allocation of photosynthate between short-lived C products and longer-term storage products. Indeed, (14)C incorporation into carbohydrates was five times greater in cells growing at 1.2 day(-1) than 0.12 day(-1). These storage products are catabolized for ATP and reductant generation within the period of a cell cycle. The relationship between Chl-specific gross and net O(2) production, short-term (14)C-uptake, NPP(*), and growth rate reflects cellular-level regulation of fundamental metabolic pathways in response to nutrient limitation. We conclude that growth rate-dependent photosynthate metabolism bridges the gap between gross and net production and resolves a controversial question regarding nutrient limitation effects on primary production measures.

  7. Photophysiology and cellular composition of sea ice algae

    SciTech Connect

    Lizotte, M.P.

    1989-01-01

    The productivity of sea ice algae depends on their physiological capabilities and the environmental conditions within various microhabitats. Pack ice is the dominant form of sea ice, but the photosynthetic activity of associated algae has rarely been studied. Biomass and photosynthetic rates of ice algae of the Weddell-Scotia Sea were investigated during autumn and winter, the period when ice cover grows from its minimum to maximum. Biomass-specific photosynthetic rates typically ranged from 0.3 to 3.0 {mu}g C {center dot} {mu}g chl{sup {minus}1} {center dot} h{sup {minus}1} higher than land-fast ice algae but similar to Antarctic phytoplankton. Primary production in the pack ice during winter may be minor compared to annual phytoplankton production, but could represent a vital seasonal contribution to the Antarctic ecosystem. Nutrient supply may limit the productivity of ice algae. In McMurdo Sound, congelation ice algae appeared to be more nutrient deficient than underlying platelet ice algae based on: lower nitrogen:carbon, chlorophyll:carbon, and protein:carbohydrate; and {sup 14}C-photosynthate distribution to proteins and phospholipids was lower, while distribution to polysaccharides and neutral lipids was higher. Depletion of nitrate led to decreased nitrogen:carbon, chlorophyll:carbon, protein:carbohydrate, and {sup 14}C-photosynthate to proteins. Studied were conducted during the spring bloom; therefore, nutrient limitation may only apply to dense ice algal communities. Growth limiting conditions may be alleviated when algae are released into seawater during the seasonal recession of the ice cover. To continue growth, algae must adapt to the variable light field encountered in a mixed water column. Photoadaptation was studied in surface ice communities and in bottom ice communities.

  8. 13CO2 pulse labelling of plants in tandem with stable isotope probing: methodological considerations for examining microbial function in the rhizosphere.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Robert I; Manefield, Mike; Ostle, Nick; McNamara, Niall; O'Donnell, Anthony G; Bailey, Mark J; Whiteley, Andrew S

    2004-07-01

    Recently developed 13CO2 pulse labelling and stable isotope probing (SIP) methods offer the potential to track 13C-labelled plant photosynthate into phylogenetic groups of microbial taxa in the rhizosphere, permitting an examination of the link between soil microbial diversity and carbon flow in situ. We tested the feasibility of this approach to detect functional differences in microbial communities utilising recently fixed plant photosynthate in moisture perturbed grassland turfs. Specifically, we addressed two questions: (1) How does moisture perturbation (three treatments; continual wetting, drying, and drying followed by rewetting) affect the assimilation of 13C-labelled exudates carbon into the soil microbial community?; (2) Can 13C deposited in soil from pulse-labelled plants be used to identify microbes utilising plant exudates using SIP methodologies? Net CO2 fluxes showed that prior to 13CO2 pulse labelling, all treatments were photosynthetically active, but differences were observed in night time respiration, indicating moisture treatments had impacted on net CO2 efflux. Measurements of pulse-derived 13C incorporated into soil RNA over 2 months showed that there was only evidence of 13C enrichment in the continuously wetted treatments. However, isotopic values represented only a 0.1-0.2 13C at.% increase over natural abundance levels and were found to be insufficient for the application of RNA-SIP. These findings reveal that in this experimental system, the microbial uptake of labelled carbon from plant exudates is low, and further optimisation of methodologies may be required for application of SIP to natural plant-soil systems where 13C tracer dilution is a consideration. PMID:15177910

  9. Point Cloud Generation from Aerial Image Data Acquired by a Quadrocopter Type Micro Unmanned Aerial Vehicle and a Digital Still Camera

    PubMed Central

    Rosnell, Tomi; Honkavaara, Eija

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this investigation was to develop and investigate methods for point cloud generation by image matching using aerial image data collected by quadrocopter type micro unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) imaging systems. Automatic generation of high-quality, dense point clouds from digital images by image matching is a recent, cutting-edge step forward in digital photogrammetric technology. The major components of the system for point cloud generation are a UAV imaging system, an image data collection process using high image overlaps, and post-processing with image orientation and point cloud generation. Two post-processing approaches were developed: one of the methods is based on Bae Systems’ SOCET SET classical commercial photogrammetric software and another is built using Microsoft®’s Photosynth™ service available in the Internet. Empirical testing was carried out in two test areas. Photosynth processing showed that it is possible to orient the images and generate point clouds fully automatically without any a priori orientation information or interactive work. The photogrammetric processing line provided dense and accurate point clouds that followed the theoretical principles of photogrammetry, but also some artifacts were detected. The point clouds from the Photosynth processing were sparser and noisier, which is to a large extent due to the fact that the method is not optimized for dense point cloud generation. Careful photogrammetric processing with self-calibration is required to achieve the highest accuracy. Our results demonstrate the high performance potential of the approach and that with rigorous processing it is possible to reach results that are consistent with theory. We also point out several further research topics. Based on theoretical and empirical results, we give recommendations for properties of imaging sensor, data collection and processing of UAV image data to ensure accurate point cloud generation. PMID:22368479

  10. Point cloud generation from aerial image data acquired by a quadrocopter type micro unmanned aerial vehicle and a digital still camera.

    PubMed

    Rosnell, Tomi; Honkavaara, Eija

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this investigation was to develop and investigate methods for point cloud generation by image matching using aerial image data collected by quadrocopter type micro unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) imaging systems. Automatic generation of high-quality, dense point clouds from digital images by image matching is a recent, cutting-edge step forward in digital photogrammetric technology. The major components of the system for point cloud generation are a UAV imaging system, an image data collection process using high image overlaps, and post-processing with image orientation and point cloud generation. Two post-processing approaches were developed: one of the methods is based on Bae Systems' SOCET SET classical commercial photogrammetric software and another is built using Microsoft(®)'s Photosynth™ service available in the Internet. Empirical testing was carried out in two test areas. Photosynth processing showed that it is possible to orient the images and generate point clouds fully automatically without any a priori orientation information or interactive work. The photogrammetric processing line provided dense and accurate point clouds that followed the theoretical principles of photogrammetry, but also some artifacts were detected. The point clouds from the Photosynth processing were sparser and noisier, which is to a large extent due to the fact that the method is not optimized for dense point cloud generation. Careful photogrammetric processing with self-calibration is required to achieve the highest accuracy. Our results demonstrate the high performance potential of the approach and that with rigorous processing it is possible to reach results that are consistent with theory. We also point out several further research topics. Based on theoretical and empirical results, we give recommendations for properties of imaging sensor, data collection and processing of UAV image data to ensure accurate point cloud generation. PMID:22368479

  11. Effect of CO sub 2 enriched air on the kinetics of leaf expansion. [Pisum sativa; Glycine max

    SciTech Connect

    Potter, J.R. )

    1991-05-01

    Vegetative plants of Pisum sativum (pea) and Glycine max (soybean) were transferred from 350 to 1,200 ppm CO{sub 2} when they had one (pea) or two (soybean) mature leaves and several developing leaves. Controls were kept at 350 ppm. For pea, high CO{sub 2} for 8 days increased dry mass of root, stem, and leaf fractions by 30-50%. Leaf dry mass increase was due primarily to carbohydrate, particularly starch. Dawn levels of starch increased 10-fold within 1 day at high CO{sub 2} and 20-fold at 2 days. At 2 days after transfer leaf starch levels were 1.0 mg cm{sup {minus}2} of leaf area or nearly 30% of leaf dry weight. Soybean data are less complete, but 10 days at high CO{sub 2} increased leaf + stem dry mass by 50% and leaf weight per unit area increased by 14 and 48% at dawn within 1 and 2 days, respectively, at high CO{sub 2}. However 8-10 days at high CO{sub 2} increased total leaf area only slightly (about 15%) for both species, with all the leaf area increase occurring at nodes that were nearly microscopic at the time of transfer. For soybean, most of the increased leaf area due to high CO{sub 2} was from lateral bud break despite a high CO{sub 2} did not stimulated more leaves per plant. Apparently, extra photosynthate had a delayed effect on leaf expansion and did not increase nodes along the main axis. Leaf expansion under high CO{sub 2} was not limited by photosynthate.

  12. Dynamic balancing of isoprene carbon sources reflects photosynthetic and photorespiratory responses to temperature stress.

    PubMed

    Jardine, Kolby; Chambers, Jeffrey; Alves, Eliane G; Teixeira, Andrea; Garcia, Sabrina; Holm, Jennifer; Higuchi, Niro; Manzi, Antonio; Abrell, Leif; Fuentes, Jose D; Nielsen, Lars K; Torn, Margaret S; Vickers, Claudia E

    2014-12-01

    The volatile gas isoprene is emitted in teragrams per annum quantities from the terrestrial biosphere and exerts a large effect on atmospheric chemistry. Isoprene is made primarily from recently fixed photosynthate; however, alternate carbon sources play an important role, particularly when photosynthate is limiting. We examined the relative contribution of these alternate carbon sources under changes in light and temperature, the two environmental conditions that have the strongest influence over isoprene emission. Using a novel real-time analytical approach that allowed us to examine dynamic changes in carbon sources, we observed that relative contributions do not change as a function of light intensity. We found that the classical uncoupling of isoprene emission from net photosynthesis at elevated leaf temperatures is associated with an increased contribution of alternate carbon. We also observed a rapid compensatory response where alternate carbon sources compensated for transient decreases in recently fixed carbon during thermal ramping, thereby maintaining overall increases in isoprene production rates at high temperatures. Photorespiration is known to contribute to the decline in net photosynthesis at high leaf temperatures. A reduction in the temperature at which the contribution of alternate carbon sources increased was observed under photorespiratory conditions, while photosynthetic conditions increased this temperature. Feeding [2-(13)C]glycine (a photorespiratory intermediate) stimulated emissions of [(13)C1-5]isoprene and (13)CO2, supporting the possibility that photorespiration can provide an alternate source of carbon for isoprene synthesis. Our observations have important implications for establishing improved mechanistic predictions of isoprene emissions and primary carbon metabolism, particularly under the predicted increases in future global temperatures.

  13. Carbon isotope composition of latex does not reflect temporal variations of photosynthetic carbon isotope discrimination in rubber trees (Hevea brasiliensis).

    PubMed

    Kanpanon, Nicha; Kasemsap, Poonpipope; Thaler, Philippe; Kositsup, Boonthida; Gay, Frédéric; Lacote, Régis; Epron, Daniel

    2015-11-01

    Latex, the cytoplasm of laticiferous cells localized in the inner bark of rubber trees (Hevea brasiliensis Müll. Arg.), is collected by tapping the bark. Following tapping, latex flows out of the trunk and is regenerated, whereas in untapped trees, there is no natural exudation. It is still unknown whether the carbohydrates used for latex regeneration in tapped trees is coming from recent photosynthates or from stored carbohydrates, and in the former case, it is expected that latex carbon isotope composition of tapped trees will vary seasonally, whereas latex isotope composition of untapped trees will be more stable. Temporal variations of carbon isotope composition of trunk latex (δ(13)C-L), leaf soluble compounds (δ(13)C-S) and bulk leaf material (δ(13)C-B) collected from tapped and untapped 20-year-old trees were compared. A marked difference in δ(13)C-L was observed between tapped and untapped trees whatever the season. Trunk latex from tapped trees was more depleted (1.6‰ on average) with more variable δ(13)C values than those of untapped trees. δ(13)C-L was higher and more stable across seasons than δ(13)C-S and δ(13)C-B, with a maximum seasonal difference of 0.7‰ for tapped trees and 0.3‰ for untapped trees. δ(13)C-B was lower in tapped than in untapped trees, increasing from August (middle of the rainy season) to April (end of the dry season). Differences in δ(13)C-L and δ(13)C-B between tapped and untapped trees indicated that tapping affects the metabolism of both laticiferous cells and leaves. The lack of correlation between δ(13)C-L and δ(13)C-S suggests that recent photosynthates are mixed in the large pool of stored carbohydrates that are involved in latex regeneration after tapping. PMID:26358051

  14. Carbon isotope composition of latex does not reflect temporal variations of photosynthetic carbon isotope discrimination in rubber trees (Hevea brasiliensis).

    PubMed

    Kanpanon, Nicha; Kasemsap, Poonpipope; Thaler, Philippe; Kositsup, Boonthida; Gay, Frédéric; Lacote, Régis; Epron, Daniel

    2015-11-01

    Latex, the cytoplasm of laticiferous cells localized in the inner bark of rubber trees (Hevea brasiliensis Müll. Arg.), is collected by tapping the bark. Following tapping, latex flows out of the trunk and is regenerated, whereas in untapped trees, there is no natural exudation. It is still unknown whether the carbohydrates used for latex regeneration in tapped trees is coming from recent photosynthates or from stored carbohydrates, and in the former case, it is expected that latex carbon isotope composition of tapped trees will vary seasonally, whereas latex isotope composition of untapped trees will be more stable. Temporal variations of carbon isotope composition of trunk latex (δ(13)C-L), leaf soluble compounds (δ(13)C-S) and bulk leaf material (δ(13)C-B) collected from tapped and untapped 20-year-old trees were compared. A marked difference in δ(13)C-L was observed between tapped and untapped trees whatever the season. Trunk latex from tapped trees was more depleted (1.6‰ on average) with more variable δ(13)C values than those of untapped trees. δ(13)C-L was higher and more stable across seasons than δ(13)C-S and δ(13)C-B, with a maximum seasonal difference of 0.7‰ for tapped trees and 0.3‰ for untapped trees. δ(13)C-B was lower in tapped than in untapped trees, increasing from August (middle of the rainy season) to April (end of the dry season). Differences in δ(13)C-L and δ(13)C-B between tapped and untapped trees indicated that tapping affects the metabolism of both laticiferous cells and leaves. The lack of correlation between δ(13)C-L and δ(13)C-S suggests that recent photosynthates are mixed in the large pool of stored carbohydrates that are involved in latex regeneration after tapping.

  15. Stable isotopes reveal the contribution of corticular photosynthesis to growth in branches of Eucalyptus miniata.

    PubMed

    Cernusak, Lucas A; Hutley, Lindsay B

    2011-01-01

    The deciduous bark habit is widespread in the woody plant genus Eucalyptus. Species with deciduous bark seasonally shed a layer of dead bark, thereby maintaining smooth-bark surfaces on branches and stems as they age and increase in diameter. This has a significant cost in terms of fire protection, because smooth-barked species have thinner bark than rough-barked species that accumulate successive layers of dead bark. Eucalypts are closely associated with fire, suggesting that the smooth-bark habit must also provide a significant benefit. We suggest that this benefit is corticular photosynthesis. To test this, we quantified the contribution of corticular photosynthesis to wood production in smooth-barked branches of Eucalyptus miniata growing in tropical savanna in northern Australia. We covered branch sections with aluminum foil for 4 years to block corticular photosynthesis and then compared the oxygen and carbon stable isotope composition of foil-covered and uncovered branch sections. We developed theory to calculate the proportion of wood constructed from corticular photosynthate and the mean proportional refixation rate during corticular photosynthesis from the observed isotopic differences. Coverage with aluminum foil for 4 years increased wood δ(13)C by 0.5‰ (P = 0.002, n = 6) and wood δ(18)O by 0.5‰ (P = 0.02, n = 6). Based on these data, we estimated that 11% ± 3% of wood in the uncovered branch sections was constructed from corticular photosynthate, with a mean δ(13)C of -34.8‰, and that the mean proportional refixation rate during corticular photosynthesis was 0.71 ± 0.15. This demonstrates that corticular photosynthesis makes a significant contribution to the carbon economy of smooth-barked eucalypts.

  16. Regulatory properties of ADP glucose pyrophosphorylase are required for adjustment of leaf starch synthesis in different photoperiods.

    PubMed

    Mugford, Sam T; Fernandez, Olivier; Brinton, Jemima; Flis, Anna; Krohn, Nicole; Encke, Beatrice; Feil, Regina; Sulpice, Ronan; Lunn, John E; Stitt, Mark; Smith, Alison M

    2014-12-01

    Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) leaves synthesize starch faster in short days than in long days, but the mechanism that adjusts the rate of starch synthesis to daylength is unknown. To understand this mechanism, we first investigated whether adjustment occurs in mutants lacking components of the circadian clock or clock output pathways. Most mutants adjusted starch synthesis to daylength, but adjustment was compromised in plants lacking the GIGANTEA or FLAVIN-BINDING, KELCH REPEAT, F BOX1 components of the photoperiod-signaling pathway involved in flowering. We then examined whether the properties of the starch synthesis enzyme adenosine 5'-diphosphate-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase) are important for adjustment of starch synthesis to daylength. Modulation of AGPase activity is known to bring about short-term adjustments of photosynthate partitioning between starch and sucrose (Suc) synthesis. We found that adjustment of starch synthesis to daylength was compromised in plants expressing a deregulated bacterial AGPase in place of the endogenous AGPase and in plants containing mutant forms of the endogenous AGPase with altered allosteric regulatory properties. We suggest that the rate of starch synthesis is in part determined by growth rate at the end of the preceding night. If growth at night is low, as in short days, there is a delay before growth recovers during the next day, leading to accumulation of Suc and stimulation of starch synthesis via activation of AGPase. If growth at night is fast, photosynthate is used for growth at the start of the day, Suc does not accumulate, and starch synthesis is not up-regulated.

  17. Regulatory Properties of ADP Glucose Pyrophosphorylase Are Required for Adjustment of Leaf Starch Synthesis in Different Photoperiods1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Mugford, Sam T.; Fernandez, Olivier; Brinton, Jemima; Flis, Anna; Krohn, Nicole; Encke, Beatrice; Feil, Regina; Sulpice, Ronan; Lunn, John E.; Stitt, Mark; Smith, Alison M.

    2014-01-01

    Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) leaves synthesize starch faster in short days than in long days, but the mechanism that adjusts the rate of starch synthesis to daylength is unknown. To understand this mechanism, we first investigated whether adjustment occurs in mutants lacking components of the circadian clock or clock output pathways. Most mutants adjusted starch synthesis to daylength, but adjustment was compromised in plants lacking the GIGANTEA or FLAVIN-BINDING, KELCH REPEAT, F BOX1 components of the photoperiod-signaling pathway involved in flowering. We then examined whether the properties of the starch synthesis enzyme adenosine 5′-diphosphate-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase) are important for adjustment of starch synthesis to daylength. Modulation of AGPase activity is known to bring about short-term adjustments of photosynthate partitioning between starch and sucrose (Suc) synthesis. We found that adjustment of starch synthesis to daylength was compromised in plants expressing a deregulated bacterial AGPase in place of the endogenous AGPase and in plants containing mutant forms of the endogenous AGPase with altered allosteric regulatory properties. We suggest that the rate of starch synthesis is in part determined by growth rate at the end of the preceding night. If growth at night is low, as in short days, there is a delay before growth recovers during the next day, leading to accumulation of Suc and stimulation of starch synthesis via activation of AGPase. If growth at night is fast, photosynthate is used for growth at the start of the day, Suc does not accumulate, and starch synthesis is not up-regulated. PMID:25293961

  18. Expanding leaves of mature deciduous forest trees rapidly become autotrophic.

    PubMed

    Keel, Sonja G; Schädel, Christina

    2010-10-01

    Emerging leaves in evergreen tree species are supplied with carbon (C) from the previous year's foliage. In deciduous trees, no older leaves are present, and the early phase of leaf development must rely on C reserves from other tissues. How soon developing leaves become autotrophic and switch from being C sinks to sources has rarely been studied in mature forest trees, and simultaneous comparisons of species are scarce. Using a canopy crane and a simple (13)CO(2)-pulse-labelling technique, we demonstrate that young leaves of mature trees in three European deciduous species (Fagus sylvatica L., Quercus petraea (Matt.) Liebl., Tilia platyphyllos Scop.) start assimilating CO(2) at a very early stage of development (10-50% expanded). One month after labelling, all leaves were still strongly (13)C enriched, suggesting that recent photosynthates had been incorporated into slow turnover pools such as cellulose or lignin and thus had contributed to leaf growth. In line with previous studies performed at the same site, we found stronger incorporation of recent photosynthates into growing tissues of T. platyphyllos compared with F. sylvatica and Q. petraea. Non-structural carbohydrate (NSC) concentrations analysed for one of the three study species (F. sylvatica) showed that sugar and starch pools rapidly increased during leaf development, suggesting that newly developed leaves soon produce more NSC than can be used for growth. In conclusion, our findings indicate that expanding leaves of mature deciduous trees become C autonomous at an early stage of development despite the presence of vast amounts of mobile carbohydrate reserves.

  19. Sources of Below-Ground Respired Carbon in a Northern Minnesota Ombrotrophic Spruce Bog and the Influence of Heating Manipulations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guilderson, T. P.; McFarlane, K. J.; McNicol, G.; Hanson, P. J.; Chanton, J.; Wilson, R.; Bosworth, R.; Singleton, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    A significant uncertainty in future land-surface carbon budgets is the response of wetlands to climate change. A related question is the future net climate (radiative) forcing impact due to ecosystem and environmental change in wetlands. Active wetlands emit both CO2 and CH4 to the atmosphere. CH4 is, over a few decades, a much more potent greenhouse gas than CO2 whereas as a consequence of a much longer atmospheric lifetime, CO2 has a longer 'tail' to its influence. Whether wetlands are a net source or sink of atmospheric carbon under future climate change will depend on the response of the ecosystem to rising temperatures and elevated CO2. The largest uncertainty in future wetland budgets, and its climate forcing, is the stability of the large belowground carbon stocks, often in the form of peat, and the partitioning of CO2 and CH4released via ecosystem respiration. We have characterized the isotopic signatures (14,13C of CO2 and CH4, D-CH4) of the respired carbon used for the production of CO2 and CH4 from the DOE Spruce and Peatland Responses Under Climatic and Environmental Change (SPRUCE) site in the Marcell Experimental Forest, which contains replicated mesocosm manipulations including above/below ground warming and elevated CO2. Deep warming (1-2 m) was initiated in July of 2014 and above ground heating will be initiated in July 2015. Comparison of the respired CO2 and CH4with recently fixed photosynthate, below-ground peat (up to 11,000 years old), and dissolved organic carbon allow us to determine the primary substrates used by the microbial community. Control and pre-perturbed plots are characterized by the consumption and respiration of recently fixed photosynthate and recent (few years to 15 yr) carbon. Although CH4 fluxes have begun to respond to deep-heating, the source of carbon remains similar in the control and perturbed plots. Respired CO2 remains consistent with being sourced from carbon only a few years old. We will present additional data

  20. Biologically-Mediated Weathering of Minerals From Nanometre Scale to Environmental Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, D. J.; Banwart, S. A.; Smits, M. M.; Leake, J. R.; Bonneville, S.; Benning, L. G.; Haward, S. J.; Ragnarsdottir, K.

    2007-12-01

    The Weathering Science Consortium is a multi-disciplinary project that aims to create a step change in understanding how biota control mineral weathering and soil formation (http://www.wun.ac.uk/wsc). Our hypothesis is that rates of biotic weathering are driven by the energy supply from plants to the organisms, controlling their biomass, surface area of contact with minerals and their capacity to interact chemically with minerals. Symbiotic fungal mycorrhiza of 90% of plant species are empowered with an available carbohydrate supply from plants that is unparalleled amongst soil microbes. They develop extensive mycelial networks that intimately contact minerals, which they weather aggressively. We hypothesise that mycorrhiza play a critical role through their focussing of photosynthate energy from plants into sub-surface weathering environments. Our work identifies how these fungal cells, and their secretions, interact with mineral surfaces and affect the rates of nutrient transfer from minerals to the organism. Investigating these living systems allows us to create new concepts and mathematical models that can describe biological weathering and be used in computer simulations of soil weathering dynamics. We are studying these biochemical interactions at 3 levels of observation: 1. At the molecular scale to understand interactions between living cells and minerals and to quantify the chemistry that breaks down the mineral structure; 2. At the soil grain scale to quantify the activity and spatial distribution of the fungi, roots and other organisms (e.g. bacteria) and their effects on the rates at which minerals are dissolved to release nutrients; 3. At soil profile scale to test models for the spatial distribution of active fungi and carbon energy and their seasonal variability and impact on mineral dissolution rates. Here we present early results from molecular and soil grain scale experiments. We have grown pure culture (Suillus bovinus, Paxillus involutus

  1. Different sources of soil CO2 respiration from a drained spruce forest and their dependence on environmental factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nousratpour, A.

    2011-12-01

    The annual CO2 emission from soils corresponds to a large portion of the global carbon cycle and equals 10 percent of the total atmospheric carbon pool. The total forest soil CO2 loss equals the sum of contribution from autotrophic and heterotrophic organisms. The autotrophic respiration is derived from recent photosynthates from the forest canopy and exudates via the roots. The heterotrophic respiration is less directly dependent on root presence and recently assimilated photosynthates, which points to the possibility of separate mechanisms governing the CO2 emissions. The variation of the CO2 flux from these some-what overlapping sources in the soil i.e. rhizospheric and non-rhizosperically is still not fully understood. Soil temperature and water availability in particular have often been used to explain the variation of soil CO2 efflux by using regression methods. In this experiment around 1000 hours of soil CO2-emission rates from a drained spruce forest was collected from 6 plots, among which 3 were previously root excluded. The emission rates were collected during 5 campaigns throughout the growing season along with continuous above ground and below ground temperature and water properties such as precipitation and VPD (vapor pressure deficit). The resulting matrix was analyzed using multivariate statistical model PLSr (Partial Least Squares regression). This operation reduces the dimensionality of large datasets with probable multicollinearity and helps clarify the dependence of a response factor on x- variables. In addition a time series analysis is applied to the dataset to address the time lag between below ground temperature and water properties to the above ground weather conditions such as VPD and air temperature. Mean carbon emission from the control plots (428 mg Carbon m-2 hr-1) was significantly larger than that from the root excluded plots (136 mg Carbon m-2 hr-1). During the growing season more than 2/3 of the total CO2 release was estimated to

  2. Coupling aboveground and belowground activities using short term fluctuations in 13C composition of soil respiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epron, D.; Parent, F.; Grossiord, C.; Plain, C.; Longdoz, B.; Granier, A.

    2011-12-01

    There is a growing amount of evidence that belowground processes in forest ecosystems are tightly coupled to aboveground activities. Soil CO2 efflux, the largest flux of CO2 to the atmosphere, is dominated by root respiration and by respiration of microorganisms that find the carbohydrates required to fulfil their energetic costs in the rhizosphere. A close coupling between aboveground photosynthetic activity and soil CO2 efflux is therefore expected. The isotopic signature of photosynthates varies with time because photosynthetic carbon isotope discrimination is dynamically controlled by environmental factors. This temporal variation of δ13C of photosynthate is thought to be transferred along the tree-soil continuum and it will be retrieved in soil CO2 efflux after a time lag that reflects the velocity of carbon transport from canopy to belowground. However, isotopic signature of soil CO2 efflux is not solely affected by photosynthetic carbon discrimination, bur also by post photosynthetic fractionation, and especially by fractionation processes affecting CO2 during the transport from soil layers to surface. Tunable diode laser spectrometry is a useful tool to quantify short-term variation in δ13C of soil CO2 efflux and of CO2 in the soil atmosphere. We set up hydrophobic tubes to measure the vertical profile of soil CO2 concentration and its δ13C composition in a temperate beech forest, and we monitored simultaneously δ13C of trunk and soil CO2 efflux, δ13C of phloem exudate and δ13C of leaf sugars. We evidenced that temporal changes in δ13C of soil CO2 and soil CO2 efflux reflected changes in environmental conditions that affect photosynthetic discrimination and that soil CO2 was 4.4% enriched compared to soil CO2 efflux according to diffusion fractionation. However, this close coupling can be disrupted when advective transport of CO2 took place. We also reported evidences that temporal variations in the isotopic composition of soil CO2 efflux reflect

  3. Photosynthesis, N(2) fixation and taproot reserves during the cutting regrowth cycle of alfalfa under elevated CO(2) and temperature.

    PubMed

    Erice, G; Sanz-Sáez, A; Aranjuelo, I; Irigoyen, J J; Aguirreolea, J; Avice, J-C; Sánchez-Díaz, M

    2011-11-15

    Future climatic conditions, including rising atmospheric CO(2) and temperature may increase photosynthesis and, consequently, plant production. A larger knowledge of legume performance under the predicted growth conditions will be crucial for safeguarding crop management and extending the area under cultivation with these plants in the near future. N(2) fixation is a key process conditioning plant responsiveness to varying growth conditions. Moreover, it is likely to increase under future environments, due to the higher photosynthate availability, as a consequence of the higher growth rate under elevated CO(2). However, as described in the literature, photosynthesis performance is frequently down-regulated (acclimated) under long-term exposure to CO(2), especially when affected by stressful temperature and water availability conditions. As growth responses to elevated CO(2) are dependent on sink-source status, it is generally accepted that down-regulation occurs in situations with insufficient plant C sink capacity. Alfalfa management involves the cutting of shoots, which alters the source-sink relationship and thus the photosynthetic behaviour. As the growth rate decreases at the end of the pre-cut vegetative growth period, nodulated alfalfa plants show photosynthetic down-regulation, but during regrowth following defoliation, acclimation to elevated CO(2) disappears. The shoot harvest also leads to a drop in mineral N uptake and C translocation to the roots, resulting in a reduction in N(2) fixation due to the dependence on photosynthate supply to support nodule function. Therefore, the production of new shoots during the first days following cutting requires the utilization of reduced C and N compounds that have been stored previously in reserve organs. The stored reserves are mediated by phytohormones such as methyl jasmonate and abscisic acid and in situations where water stress reduces shoot production this potentially enables the enhancement of taproot

  4. The age of root and soil respired CO2 in a Pacific Northwest old-growth forest: Implications of seasonality and drought effects on carbon source use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, A.; Hopkins, F. M.; Lai, C.; Xu, X.; Randerson, J. T.; Bush, S.; Ehleringer, J. R.

    2013-12-01

    Abstract Climate change has the potential to impact the carbon (C) cycle in unknown ways. Factors such as temperature, light, and moisture can strongly influence whether forest ecosystems are net sources or sinks of CO2. In this study, we used radiocarbon (14C) to determine the age and source of soil- and root-respired CO2 using a combination of soil chamber and biomass incubation measurements in an old-growth forest at the Wind River Field Station, WA. We had two main goals for this study. The first was to determine if the contribution of recent photosynthate to root respiration changed between spring and summer seasons. 14C measurements were used to determine the average age of respired CO2, since respired CO2 fueled by recent photosynthates have Δ14C values similar to that of the current atmosphere (~ 25‰ in 2012), whereas C stored by trees from prior years would be 30‰ or higher. This study occurred over two growing seasons, examining the effects of seasonality and water stress on root/soil respiration. Because of the summer drought conditions consistently experienced by this old-growth forest, this study provides a new dataset to test the hypothesis that plants allocate their C resources in response to stress. Initial results showed soil organic matter components had Δ14C values 80-120‰ greater than that of the background atmosphere, suggesting turnover times on the order of years to decades. In contrast, root respiration was much lower in Δ14C (~40‰), but still elevated with respect to current atmospheric Δ14C values, suggesting that root respiration was at least partially composed of C stored for > 1 year. The second goal was to partition the contribution of autotrophic to heterotrophic respiration and to determine how this ratio differs on diurnal and seasonal timescales. We used the difference between autotrophic and heterotrophic Δ14C values to partition total soil respiration. Preliminary results for April 2013 showed that ~1/3 of soil

  5. Defence strategies adopted by the medicinal plant Coleus forskohlii against supplemental ultraviolet-B radiation: Augmentation of secondary metabolites and antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Takshak, Swabha; Agrawal, S B

    2015-12-01

    Supplementary ultraviolet-B (ambient+3.6  kJ m(-2) day(-1)) induced changes on morphological, physiological, and biochemical characteristics (specifically the defence strategies: UV-B protective compounds and antioxidants) of Coleus forskohlii were investigated under field conditions at 30, 60, and 90 days after transplantation. Levels of secondary metabolites increased under s-UV-B stress; flavonoids and phenolics (primary UV-B screening agents) were recorded to be higher in leaves which are directly exposed to s-UV-B. This was also verified by enhanced activities of phenylpropanoid pathway enzymes: phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL), cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD), 4-coumarate-CoA ligase (4CL), chalcone-flavanone isomerase (CHI), and dihydroflavonol reductase (DFR). Antioxidants, both enzymatic (ascorbate peroxidase, catalase, glutathione reductase, peroxidase, polyphenol oxidase, and superoxide dismutase) and non-enzymatic (ascorbic acid and α-tocopherol) also increased in the treated organs of the test plant, higher contents being recorded in roots except for ascorbic acid. On the contrary, protein and chlorophyll content (directly implicated in regulating plant growth and development) declined under s-UV-B. These alterations in plant biochemistry led the plant to compromise on its photosynthate allocation towards growth and biomass production as evidenced by a reduction in its height and biomass. The study concludes that s-UV-B is a potent stimulating factor in increasing the concentrations of defense compounds and antioxidants in C. forskohlii to optimize its performance under stress.

  6. Methane Production by Microbial Mats Under Low Sulfate Concentrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bebout, Brad M.; Hoehler, Tori M.; Thamdrup, Bo; Albert, Dan; Carpenter, Steven P.; Hogan, Mary; Turk, Kendra; DesMarais, David J.

    2003-01-01

    Cyanobacterial mats collected in hypersaline salterns were incubated in a greenhouse under low sulfate concentrations ([SO4]) and examined for their primary productivity and emissions of methane and other major carbon species. Atmospheric greenhouse warming by gases such as carbon dioxide and methane must have been greater during the Archean than today in order to account for a record of moderate to warm paleoclemates, despite a less luminous early sun. It has been suggested that decreased levels of oxygen and sulfate in Archean oceans could have significantly stimulated microbial methanogenesis relative to present marine rates, with a resultant increase in the relative importance of methane in maintaining the early greenhouse. We maintained modern microbial mats, models of ancient coastal marine communities, in artificial brine mixtures containing both modern [SO4=] (ca. 70 mM) and "Archean" [SO4] (less than 0.2 mM). At low [SO4], primary production in the mats was essentially unaffected, while rates of sulfate reduction decreased by a factor of three, and methane fluxes increased by up to ten-fold. However, remineralization by methanogenesis still amounted to less than 0.4 % of the total carbon released by the mats. The relatively low efficiency of conversion of photosynthate to methane is suggested to reflect the particular geometry and chemical microenvironment of hypersaline cyanobacterial mats. Therefore, such mats w-ere probably relatively weak net sources of methane throughout their 3.5 Ga history, even during periods of low- environmental levels oxygen and sulfate.

  7. Plant growth, phosphorus nutrition, and root morphological responses to arbuscular mycorrhizas, phosphorus fertilization, and intraspecific density.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, M S; Janos, D P

    2005-05-01

    We examined the effects of arbuscular mycorrhizas (AM), phosphorus fertilization, intraspecific density, and their interaction, on the growth, phosphorus uptake, and root morphology of three facultative mycotrophic crops (Capsicum annuum, Zea mays, and Cucurbita pepo). Plants were grown in pots with or without AM at three densities and four phosphorus availabilities for 10 weeks. AM colonization, plant weight, and shoot phosphorus concentration were measured at harvest. Root morphology was assessed for C. annuum and Z. mays. Phosphorus fertilization reduced but did not eliminate AM colonization of all species. AM, phosphorus, and density interacted significantly to modify growth of C. annuum and C. pepo such that increased density and phosphorus diminished beneficial effects of AM. Increased density reduced positive effects of AM on C. annuum and C. pepo shoot phosphorus concentrations. AM altered both Z. mays and C. annuum root morphology in ways that complemented potential phosphorus uptake by mycorrhizas, but increased density and phosphorus diminished these effects. We infer that increased density predominantly influenced plant responses by affecting whether or not carbon (photosynthate) or phosphorus limited plant growth. By exacerbating carbon limitation, high density reduced the benefit/cost ratio of mycorrhizas and minimized their effects.

  8. Functional significance of genetically different symbiotic algae Symbiodinium in a coral reef symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Loram, J E; Trapido-Rosenthal, H G; Douglas, A E

    2007-11-01

    The giant sea anemone Condylactis gigantea associates with members of two clades of the dinoflagellate alga Symbiodinium, either singly or in mixed infection, as revealed by clade-specific quantitative polymerase chain reaction of large subunit ribosomal DNA. To explore the functional significance of this molecular variation, the fate of photosynthetically fixed carbon was investigated by (14)C radiotracer experiments. Symbioses with algae of clades A and B released ca. 30-40% of fixed carbon to the animal tissues. Incorporation into the lipid fraction and the low molecular weight fraction dominated by amino acids was significantly higher in symbioses with algae of clade A than of clade B, suggesting that the genetically different algae in C. gigantea are not functionally equivalent. Symbioses with mixed infections yielded intermediate values, such that this functional trait of the symbiosis can be predicted from the traits of the contributing algae. Coral and sea anemone symbioses with Symbiodinium break down at elevated temperature, a process known as 'coral bleaching'. The functional response of the C. gigantea symbiosis to heat stress varied between the algae of clades A and B, with particularly depressed incorporation of photosynthetic carbon into lipid of the clade B algae, which are more susceptible to high temperature than the algae of clade A. This study provides a first exploration of how the core symbiotic function of photosynthate transfer to the host varies with the genotype of Symbiodinium, an algal symbiont which underpins corals and, hence, coral reef ecosystems. PMID:17868294

  9. Bark thickness across the angiosperms: more than just fire.

    PubMed

    Rosell, Julieta A

    2016-07-01

    Global variation in total bark thickness (TBT) is traditionally attributed to fire. However, bark is multifunctional, as reflected by its inner living and outer dead regions, meaning that, in addition to fire protection, other factors probably contribute to TBT variation. To address how fire, climate, and plant size contribute to variation in TBT, inner bark thickness (IBT) and outer bark thickness (OBT), I sampled 640 species spanning all major angiosperm clades and 18 sites with contrasting precipitation, temperature, and fire regime. Stem size was by far the main driver of variation in thickness, with environment being less important. IBT was closely correlated with stem diameter, probably for metabolic reasons, and, controlling for size, was thicker in drier and hotter environments, even fire-free ones, probably reflecting its water and photosynthate storage role. OBT was less closely correlated with size, and was thicker in drier, seasonal sites experiencing frequent fires. IBT and OBT covaried loosely and both contributed to overall TBT variation. Thickness variation was higher within than across sites and was evolutionarily labile. Given high within-site diversity and the multiple selective factors acting on TBT, continued study of the different drivers of variation in bark thickness is crucial to understand bark ecology. PMID:26890029

  10. Effect of Removing Superior Spikelets on Grain Filling of Inferior Spikelets in Rice

    PubMed Central

    You, Cuicui; Zhu, Honglei; Xu, Beibei; Huang, Wenxiao; Wang, Shaohua; Ding, Yanfeng; Liu, Zhenghui; Li, Ganghua; Chen, Lin; Ding, Chengqiang; Tang, She

    2016-01-01

    Large-panicle rice cultivars often fail to reach their yield potential due to the poor grain filling of inferior spikelets (IS). Thus, it is important to determine the causes of poor IS grain filling. In this study, we attempted to identify whether inferior grain filling of large panicles is restricted by superior spikelets (SS) and their physiological mechanism. SS were removed from two homozygous japonica rice strains (W1844 and WJ165) during flowering in an attempt to force photosynthate transport to the IS. We measured the effects of SS removal on seed setting rate, grain weight, grain filling rate, sucrose content, as well as hormone levels, activities of key enzymes, and expression of genes involved in sucrose to starch metabolism in rice IS during grain filling. The results showed that SS removal improved IS grain filling by increasing the seed setting rate, grain weight, sucrose content, and hormone levels. SS removal also enhanced the activities of key enzymes and the expression levels of genes involved in sucrose to starch metabolism. These results suggest that sucrose and several hormones act as signal substances and play a vital role in grain filling by regulating enzyme activities and gene expression. Therefore, IS grain filling is restricted by SS, which limit assimilate supply and plant hormones, leading to poor grain filling of IS. PMID:27547210

  11. Oxalate secretion by ectomycorrhizal Paxillus involutus is mineral-specific and controls calcium weathering from minerals.

    PubMed

    Schmalenberger, A; Duran, A L; Bray, A W; Bridge, J; Bonneville, S; Benning, L G; Romero-Gonzalez, M E; Leake, J R; Banwart, S A

    2015-01-01

    Trees and their associated rhizosphere organisms play a major role in mineral weathering driving calcium fluxes from the continents to the oceans that ultimately control long-term atmospheric CO2 and climate through the geochemical carbon cycle. Photosynthate allocation to tree roots and their mycorrhizal fungi is hypothesized to fuel the active secretion of protons and organic chelators that enhance calcium dissolution at fungal-mineral interfaces. This was tested using (14)CO2 supplied to shoots of Pinus sylvestris ectomycorrhizal with the widespread fungus Paxillus involutus in monoxenic microcosms, revealing preferential allocation by the fungus of plant photoassimilate to weather grains of limestone and silicates each with a combined calcium and magnesium content of over 10 wt.%. Hyphae had acidic surfaces and linear accumulation of weathered calcium with secreted oxalate, increasing significantly in sequence: quartz, granite < basalt, olivine, limestone < gabbro. These findings confirmed the role of mineral-specific oxalate exudation in ectomycorrhizal weathering to dissolve calcium bearing minerals, thus contributing to the geochemical carbon cycle. PMID:26197714

  12. Nitrogen-fixing Rhizobium-legume symbiosis: are polyploidy and host peptide-governed symbiont differentiation general principles of endosymbiosis?

    PubMed Central

    Maróti, Gergely; Kondorosi, Éva

    2014-01-01

    The symbiosis between rhizobia soil bacteria and legumes is facultative and initiated by nitrogen starvation of the host plant. Exchange of signal molecules between the partners leads to the formation of root nodules where bacteria are converted to nitrogen-fixing bacteroids. In this mutualistic symbiosis, the bacteria provide nitrogen sources for plant growth in return for photosynthates from the host. Depending on the host plant the symbiotic fate of bacteria can either be reversible or irreversible. In Medicago plants the bacteria undergo a host-directed multistep differentiation process culminating in the formation of elongated and branched polyploid bacteria with definitive loss of cell division ability. The plant factors are nodule-specific symbiotic peptides. About 500 of them are cysteine-rich NCR peptides produced in the infected plant cells. NCRs are targeted to the endosymbionts and the concerted action of different sets of peptides governs different stages of endosymbiont maturation. This review focuses on symbiotic plant cell development and terminal bacteroid differentiation and demonstrates the crucial roles of symbiotic peptides by showing an example of multi-target mechanism exerted by one of these symbiotic peptides. PMID:25071739

  13. Roots, cycles and leaves. Expression of the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase kinase gene family in soybean.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Stuart; Jenkins, Gareth I; Nimmo, Hugh G

    2004-08-01

    Phosphorylation of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPc; EC 4.1.1.31) plays an important role in the control of central metabolism of higher plants. This phosphorylation is controlled largely at the level of expression of PEPc kinase (PPCK) genes. We have analyzed the expression of both PPCK genes and the PEPC genes that encode PEPc in soybean (Glycine max). Soybean contains at least four PPCK genes. We report the genomic and cDNA sequences of these genes and demonstrate the function of the gene products by in vitro expression and enzyme assays. For two of these genes, GmPPCK2 and GmPPCK3, transcript abundance is highest in nodules and is markedly influenced by supply of photosynthate from the shoots. One gene, GmPPCK4, is under robust circadian control in leaves but not in roots. Its transcript abundance peaks in the latter stages of subjective day, and its promoter contains a sequence very similar to the evening element found in Arabidopsis genes expressed at this time. We report the expression patterns of five PEPC genes, including one encoding a bacterial-type PEPc lacking the phosphorylation site of the plant-type PEPcs. The PEPc expression patterns do not match those of any of the PPCK genes, arguing against the existence of specific PEPc-PPCK expression partners. The PEPC and PPCK gene families in soybean are significantly more complex than previously understood.

  14. Growth and development during the establishment year of two Populus clones with contrasting morphology and phenology.

    PubMed

    Michael, D A; Isebrands, J G; Dickmann, D I; Nelson, N D

    1988-06-01

    Weekly morphological measurements of trees in permanent growth plots and periodic destructive sampling were used to monitor growth and development of two Populus clones with contrasting morphology and phenology during the establishment year in a short-rotation, intensive-culture system. Tristis (P. tristis Fisch. x P. balsamifera L.) grew rapidly for 48 days before setting bud in July. By contrast, Eugenei (P. x euramericana (Dode) Guinier) grew at a slower rate than Tristis, but maintained this rate for 75 days before setting bud in September. By early October, the total leaf area and dry weight of Eugenei exceeded that of Tristis by 39 and 11%, respectively. In addition, Eugenei had a greater harvest index than Tristis throughout most of the growing season because a larger proportion of photosynthate produced was directed to shoot growth; however, a high shoot/root ratio in Eugenei predisposed it to water stress. Differences in aboveground biomass between clones were largely attributable to clonal differences in seasonal leaf area development.

  15. Summer drought alters carbon allocation to roots and root respiration in mountain grassland.

    PubMed

    Hasibeder, Roland; Fuchslueger, Lucia; Richter, Andreas; Bahn, Michael

    2015-02-01

    Drought affects the carbon (C) source and sink activities of plant organs, with potential consequences for belowground C allocation, a key process of the terrestrial C cycle. The responses of belowground C allocation dynamics to drought are so far poorly understood. We combined experimental rain exclusion with (13)C pulse labelling in a mountain meadow to analyse the effects of summer drought on the dynamics of belowground allocation of recently assimilated C and how it is partitioned among different carbohydrate pools and root respiration. Severe soil moisture deficit decreased the ecosystem C uptake and the amounts and velocity of C allocated from shoots to roots. However, the proportion of recently assimilated C translocated belowground remained unaffected by drought. Reduced root respiration, reflecting reduced C demand under drought, was increasingly sustained by C reserves, whilst recent assimilates were preferentially allocated to root storage and an enlarged pool of osmotically active compounds. Our results indicate that under drought conditions the usage of recent photosynthates is shifted from metabolic activity to osmotic adjustment and storage compounds.

  16. Microbial activity in forest soil reflects the changes in ecosystem properties between summer and winter.

    PubMed

    Žifčáková, Lucia; Větrovský, Tomáš; Howe, Adina; Baldrian, Petr

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the ecology of coniferous forests is very important because these environments represent globally largest carbon sinks. Metatranscriptomics, microbial community and enzyme analyses were combined to describe the detailed role of microbial taxa in the functioning of the Picea abies-dominated coniferous forest soil in two contrasting seasons. These seasons were the summer, representing the peak of plant photosynthetic activity, and late winter, after an extended period with no photosynthate input. The results show that microbial communities were characterized by a high activity of fungi especially in litter where their contribution to microbial transcription was over 50%. Differences in abundance between summer and winter were recorded for 26-33% of bacterial genera and < 15% of fungal genera, but the transcript profiles of fungi, archaea and most bacterial phyla were significantly different among seasons. Further, the seasonal differences were larger in soil than in litter. Most importantly, fungal contribution to total microbial transcription in soil decreased from 33% in summer to 16% in winter. In particular, the activity of the abundant ectomycorrhizal fungi was reduced in winter, which indicates that plant photosynthetic production was likely one of the major drivers of changes in the functioning of microbial communities in this coniferous forest.

  17. Biology and control of swamp dodder (Cuscuta gronovii)

    SciTech Connect

    Bewick, T.A.

    1987-01-01

    A simple model predicting swamp dodder (Cuscuta gronovii Willd.) emergence was developed. The model states that 0.1% of the cranberry seedlings will emerge after 150 to 170 GDD have accumulated after the winter ice has melted on the cranberry beds, using 0 C as the low temperature threshold. Experiments in cranberry showed that pronamide (3,5-dichloro-(N-1,1-dimethyl-2-propynyl)benzamide) was effective in controlling swamp dodder when applied preemergence. Rates below 2.4 kg ai/ha appeared to be safe for cranberry plants and fruit. Experiments with /sup 14/C glyphosate showed that the herbicide moved out of carrot leaves to the physiological sinks in the plant. In carrots parasitized by swamp dodder the dodder acted as one of the strongest sinks for photosynthates from the host. In cranberry glyphosate moved out of the leaves, but most remained in the stem to which the treated leaves were attached. The only physiological sinks that accumulated significant amounts of label were the stem apices. The concentration of the herbicide in this sink decreased with time. Swamp dodder stems were able to absorb glyphosate directly from solution.

  18. Effects of Heavy Metals and Arbuscular Mycorrhiza on the Leaf Proteome of a Selected Poplar Clone: A Time Course Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lingua, Guido; Bona, Elisa; Todeschini, Valeria; Cattaneo, Chiara; Marsano, Francesco; Berta, Graziella; Cavaletto, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi establish a mutualistic symbiosis with the roots of most plant species. While receiving photosynthates, they improve the mineral nutrition of the plant and can also increase its tolerance towards some pollutants, like heavy metals. Although the fungal symbionts exclusively colonize the plant roots, some plant responses can be systemic. Therefore, in this work a clone of Populus alba L., previously selected for its tolerance to copper and zinc, was used to investigate the effects of the symbiosis with the AM fungus Glomus intraradices on the leaf protein expression. Poplar leaf samples were collected from plants maintained in a glasshouse on polluted (copper and zinc contaminated) or unpolluted soil, after four, six and sixteen months of growth. For each harvest, about 450 proteins were reproducibly separated on 2DE maps. At the first harvest the most relevant effect on protein modulation was exerted by the AM fungi, at the second one by the metals, and at the last one by both treatments. This work demonstrates how importantly the time of sampling affects the proteome responses in perennial plants. In addition, it underlines the ability of a proteomic approach, targeted on protein identification, to depict changes in a specific pattern of protein expression, while being still far from elucidating the biological function of each protein. PMID:22761694

  19. Concentrative nitrogen allocation to sun-lit branches and the effects on whole-plant growth under heterogeneous light environments.

    PubMed

    Sugiura, D; Tateno, M

    2013-08-01

    We investigated the nitrogen and carbohydrate allocation patterns of trees under heterogeneous light environments using saplings of the devil maple tree (Acer diabolicum) with Y-shaped branches. Different branch groups were created: all branches of a sapling exposed to full light (L-branches), all branches exposed to full shade (S-branches), and half of the branches of a sapling exposed to light (HL-branches) and the other half exposed to shade (HS-branches). Throughout the growth period, nitrogen was preferentially allocated to HL-branches, whereas nitrogen allocation to HS-branches was suppressed compared to L- and S-branches. HL-branches with the highest leaf nitrogen content (N(area)) also had the highest rates of growth, and HS-branches with the lowest N(area) had the lowest observed growth rates. In addition, net nitrogen assimilation, estimated using a photosynthesis model, was strongly correlated with branch growth and whole-plant growth. In contrast, patterns of photosynthate allocation to branches and roots were not affected by the light conditions of the other branch. These observations suggest that tree canopies develop as a result of resource allocation patterns, where the growth of sun-lit branches is favoured over shaded branches, which leads to enhanced whole-plant growth in heterogeneous light environments. Our results indicate that whole-plant growth is enhanced by the resource allocation patterns created for saplings in heterogeneous light environments.

  20. Carbon and phosphorus exchange may enable cooperation between an arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus and a phosphate-solubilizing bacterium.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lin; Xu, Minggang; Liu, Yu; Zhang, Fusuo; Hodge, Angela; Feng, Gu

    2016-05-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) transfer plant photosynthate underground which can stimulate soil microbial growth. In this study, we examined whether there was a potential link between carbon (C) release from an AMF and phosphorus (P) availability via a phosphate-solubilizing bacterium (PSB). We investigated the outcome of the interaction between the AMF and the PSB by conducting a microcosm and two Petri plate experiments. An in vitro culture experiment was also conducted to determine the direct impact of AMF hyphal exudates on growth of the PSB. The AMF released substantial C to the environment, triggering PSB growth and activity. In return, the PSB enhanced mineralization of organic P, increasing P availability for the AMF. When soil available P was low, the PSB competed with the AMF for P, and its activity was not stimulated by the fungus. When additional P was added to increase soil available P, the PSB enhanced AMF hyphal growth, and PSB activity was also stimulated by the fungus. Our results suggest that an AMF and a free-living PSB interacted to the benefit of each other by providing the C or P that the other microorganism required, but these interactions depended upon background P availability.

  1. A big-microsite framework for soil carbon modeling.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Eric A; Savage, Kathleen E; Finzi, Adrien C

    2014-12-01

    Soil carbon cycling processes potentially play a large role in biotic feedbacks to climate change, but little agreement exists at present on what the core of numerical soil C cycling models should look like. In contrast, most canopy models of photosynthesis and leaf gas exchange share a common 'Farquhaur-model' core structure. Here, we explore why a similar core model structure for heterotrophic soil respiration remains elusive and how a pathway to that goal might be envisioned. The spatial and temporal variation in soil microsite conditions greatly complicates modeling efforts, but we believe it is possible to develop a tractable number of parameterizable equations that are organized into a coherent, modular, numerical model structure. First, we show parallels in insights gleaned from linking Arrhenius and Michaelis-Menten kinetics for both photosynthesis and soil respiration. Additional equations and layers of complexity are then added to simulate substrate supply. For soils, model modules that simulate carbon stabilization processes will be key to estimating the fraction of soil C that is accessible to enzymes. Potential modules for dynamic photosynthate input, wetting-event inputs, freeze-thaw impacts on substrate diffusion, aggregate turnover, soluble-C sorption, gas transport, methane respiration, and microbial dynamics are described for conceptually and numerically linking our understanding of fast-response processes of soil gas exchange with longer-term dynamics of soil carbon and nitrogen stocks.

  2. Acclimation of mechanical and hydraulic functions in trees: impact of the thigmomorphogenetic process

    PubMed Central

    Badel, Eric; Ewers, Frank W.; Cochard, Hervé; Telewski, Frank W.

    2015-01-01

    The secondary xylem (wood) of trees mediates several functions including water transport and storage, mechanical support and storage of photosynthates. The optimal structures for each of these functions will most likely differ. The complex structure and function of xylem could lead to trade-offs between conductive efficiency, resistance to embolism, and mechanical strength needed to count for mechanical loading due to gravity and wind. This has been referred to as the trade-off triangle, with the different optimal solutions to the structure/function problems depending on the environmental constraints as well as taxonomic histories. Thus, the optimisation of each function will lead to drastically different anatomical structures. Trees are able to acclimate the internal structure of their trunk and branches according to the stress they experience. These acclimations lead to specific structures that favor the efficiency or the safety of one function but can be antagonistic with other functions. Currently, there are no means to predict the way a tree will acclimate or optimize its internal structure in support of its various functions under differing environmental conditions. In this review, we will focus on the acclimation of xylem anatomy and its resulting mechanical and hydraulic functions to recurrent mechanical strain that usually result from wind-induced thigmomorphogenesis with a special focus on the construction cost and the possible trade-off between wood functions. PMID:25954292

  3. A Versatile Monosaccharide Transporter That Operates in the Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungus Glomus sp Is Crucial for the Symbiotic Relationship with Plants[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Helber, Nicole; Wippel, Kathrin; Sauer, Norbert; Schaarschmidt, Sara; Hause, Bettina; Requena, Natalia

    2011-01-01

    For more than 400 million years, plants have maintained a mutualistic symbiosis with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi. This evolutionary success can be traced to the role of these fungi in providing plants with mineral nutrients, particularly phosphate. In return, photosynthates are given to the fungus, which support its obligate biotrophic lifestyle. Although the mechanisms involved in phosphate transfer have been extensively studied, less is known about the reciprocal transfer of carbon. Here, we present the high-affinity Monosaccharide Transporter2 (MST2) from Glomus sp with a broad substrate spectrum that functions at several symbiotic root locations. Plant cell wall sugars can efficiently outcompete the Glc uptake capacity of MST2, suggesting they can serve as alternative carbon sources. MST2 expression closely correlates with that of the mycorrhiza-specific Phosphate Transporter4 (PT4). Furthermore, reduction of MST2 expression using host-induced gene silencing resulted in impaired mycorrhiza formation, malformed arbuscules, and reduced PT4 expression. These findings highlight the symbiotic role of MST2 and support the hypothesis that the exchange of carbon for phosphate is tightly linked. Unexpectedly, we found that the external mycelium of AM fungi is able to take up sugars in a proton-dependent manner. These results imply that the sugar uptake system operating in this symbiosis is more complex than previously anticipated. PMID:21972259

  4. Qualitative Distinction of Autotrophic and Heterotrophic Processes at the Leaf Level by Means of Triple Stable Isotope (C-O-H) Patterns.

    PubMed

    Kimak, Adam; Kern, Zoltan; Leuenberger, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Foliar samples were harvested from two oaks, a beech, and a yew at the same site in order to trace the development of the leaves over an entire vegetation season. Cellulose yield and stable isotopic compositions (δ(13)C, δ(18)O, and δD) were analyzed on leaf cellulose. All parameters unequivocally define a juvenile and a mature period in the foliar expansion of each species. The accompanying shifts of the δ(13)C-values are in agreement with the transition from remobilized carbohydrates (juvenile period), to current photosynthates (mature phase). While the opponent seasonal trends of δ(18)O of blade and vein cellulose are in perfect agreement with the state-of-art mechanistic understanding, the lack of this discrepancy for δD, documented for the first time, is unexpected. For example, the offset range of 18 permil (oak veins) to 57 permil (oak blades) in δD may represent a process driven shift from autotrophic to heterotrophic processes. The shared pattern between blade and vein found for both oak and beech suggests an overwhelming metabolic isotope effect on δD that might be accompanied by proton transfer linked to the Calvin-cycle. These results provide strong evidence that hydrogen and oxygen are under different biochemical controls even at the leaf level. PMID:26635835

  5. Strategy of nitrogen acquisition and utilization by carnivorous Dionaea muscipula.

    PubMed

    Kruse, Jörg; Gao, Peng; Honsel, Anne; Kreuzwieser, Jürgen; Burzlaff, Tim; Alfarraj, Saleh; Hedrich, Rainer; Rennenberg, Heinz

    2014-03-01

    Plant carnivory represents an exceptional means to acquire N. Snap traps of Dionaea muscipula serve two functions, and provide both N and photosynthate. Using (13)C/(15)N-labelled insect powder, we performed feeding experiments with Dionaea plants that differed in physiological state and N status (spring vs. autumn plants). We measured the effects of (15)N uptake on light-saturated photosynthesis (A(max)), dark respiration (R(D)) and growth. Depending on N status, insect capture briefly altered the dynamics of R(D)/A(max), reflecting high energy demand during insect digestion and nutrient uptake, followed by enhanced photosynthesis and growth. Organic N acquired from insect prey was immediately redistributed, in order to support swift renewal of traps and thereby enhance probability of prey capture. Respiratory costs associated with permanent maintenance of the photosynthetic machinery were thereby minimized. Dionaea's strategy of N utilization is commensurate with the random capture of large prey, occasionally transferring a high load of organic nutrients to the plant. Our results suggest that physiological adaptations to unpredictable resource availability are essential for Dionaea's success with regards to a carnivorous life style.

  6. Soluble carbohydrates and relative growth rates in chloro-, cyano- and cephalolichens: effects of temperature and nocturnal hydration.

    PubMed

    Alam, Md Azharul; Gauslaa, Yngvar; Solhaug, Knut Asbjørn

    2015-11-01

    This growth chamber experiment evaluates how temperature and humidity regimes shape soluble carbohydrate pools and growth rates in lichens with different photobionts. We assessed soluble carbohydrates, relative growth rates (RGRs) and relative thallus area growth rates (RTA GRs) in Parmelia sulcata (chlorolichen), Peltigera canina (cyanolichen) and Peltigera aphthosa (cephalolichen) cultivated for 14 d (150 μmol m(-2) s(-1) ; 12-h photoperiod) at four day : night temperatures (28 : 23°C, 20 : 15°C, 13 : 8°C, 6 : 1°C) and two hydration regimes (hydration during the day, dry at night; hydration day : night). The major carbohydrates were mannitol (cephalolichen), glucose (cyanolichen) and arabitol (chlorolichen). Mannitol occurred in all species. During cultivation, total carbohydrate pools decreased in cephalo-/cyanolichens, but increased in the chlorolichen. Carbohydrates varied less than growth with temperature and humidity. All lichens grew rapidly, particularly at 13 : 8°C. RGRs and RTA GRs were significantly higher in lichens hydrated for 24 h than for 12 h. Strong photoinhibition occurred in cephalo- and cyanolichens kept in cool dry nights, resulting in positive relationships between RGR and dark-adapted photosystem II (PSII) efficiency (Fv /Fm ). RGR increased significantly with the photobiont-specific carbohydrate pools within all species. Average RGR peaked in the chlorolichen lowest in total and photobiont carbohydrates. Nocturnal hydration improved recovery from photoinhibition and/or enhanced conversion rates of photosynthates into growth. PMID:26017819

  7. Strategy of nitrogen acquisition and utilization by carnivorous Dionaea muscipula.

    PubMed

    Kruse, Jörg; Gao, Peng; Honsel, Anne; Kreuzwieser, Jürgen; Burzlaff, Tim; Alfarraj, Saleh; Hedrich, Rainer; Rennenberg, Heinz

    2014-03-01

    Plant carnivory represents an exceptional means to acquire N. Snap traps of Dionaea muscipula serve two functions, and provide both N and photosynthate. Using (13)C/(15)N-labelled insect powder, we performed feeding experiments with Dionaea plants that differed in physiological state and N status (spring vs. autumn plants). We measured the effects of (15)N uptake on light-saturated photosynthesis (A(max)), dark respiration (R(D)) and growth. Depending on N status, insect capture briefly altered the dynamics of R(D)/A(max), reflecting high energy demand during insect digestion and nutrient uptake, followed by enhanced photosynthesis and growth. Organic N acquired from insect prey was immediately redistributed, in order to support swift renewal of traps and thereby enhance probability of prey capture. Respiratory costs associated with permanent maintenance of the photosynthetic machinery were thereby minimized. Dionaea's strategy of N utilization is commensurate with the random capture of large prey, occasionally transferring a high load of organic nutrients to the plant. Our results suggest that physiological adaptations to unpredictable resource availability are essential for Dionaea's success with regards to a carnivorous life style. PMID:24141381

  8. Direct exchange of vitamin B12 is demonstrated by modelling the growth dynamics of algal–bacterial cocultures

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Matthew AA; Kazamia, Elena; Cicuta, Pietro; Smith, Alison G

    2014-01-01

    The growth dynamics of populations of interacting species in the aquatic environment is of great importance, both for understanding natural ecosystems and in efforts to cultivate these organisms for industrial purposes. Here we consider a simple two-species system wherein the bacterium Mesorhizobium loti supplies vitamin B12 (cobalamin) to the freshwater green alga Lobomonas rostrata, which requires this organic micronutrient for growth. In return, the bacterium receives photosynthate from the alga. Mathematical models are developed that describe minimally the interdependence between the two organisms, and that fit the experimental observations of the consortium. These models enable us to distinguish between different mechanisms of nutrient exchange between the organisms, and provide strong evidence that, rather than undergoing simple lysis and release of nutrients into the medium, M. loti regulates the levels of cobalamin it produces, resulting in a true mutualism with L. rostrata. Over half of all microalgae are dependent on an exogenous source of cobalamin for growth, and this vitamin is synthesised only by bacteria; it is very likely that similar symbiotic interactions underpin algal productivity more generally. PMID:24522262

  9. Endosymbiotic copepods may feed on zooxanthellae from their coral host, Pocillopora damicornis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Y.-R.; Dai, C.-F.

    2010-03-01

    The Xarifiidae is one of the most common families of endosymbiotic copepods that live in close association with scleractinian corals. Previous studies on xarifiids primarily focused on their taxonomy and morphology, while their influence on corals is still unknown. In this study, we collected a total of 1,579 individuals belonging to 6 species of xarifiids from 360 colonies of Pocillopora damicornis at Nanwan Bay, southern Taiwan from July 2007 to May 2008. Furthermore, using optical and electron microscopic observations, we examined the gut contents of Xarifia fissilis, the most abundant species of the Xarifiidae that we collected. We found that the gut of X. fissilis was characterized by a reddish-brown color due to the presence of numerous unicellular algae with diameters of 5-10 μm. TEM observations indicated that the unicellular algae possessed typical characteristics of Symbiodinium including a peripheral chloroplast, stalked pyrenoids, starch sheaths, mesokaryotic nuclei, amphiesmas, an accumulation body, and mitochondria. After starving the isolated X. fissilis in the light and dark (light intensity: 140 μmol photon m-2 s-1; photoperiod: 12 h light/12 h dark) for 2 weeks, fluorescence was clearly visible in its gut and fecal pellets under fluorescent microscopic observations. The cultivation experiment supports the hypothesis that the unicellular algae were beneficial to the survival of X. fissilis under light conditions, possibly through transferring photosynthates to the hosts. These results suggest that X. fissilis may consume and retain unicellular algae for further photosynthesis.

  10. Fungi with multifunctional lifestyles: endophytic insect pathogenic fungi.

    PubMed

    Barelli, Larissa; Moonjely, Soumya; Behie, Scott W; Bidochka, Michael J

    2016-04-01

    This review examines the symbiotic, evolutionary, proteomic and genetic basis for a group of fungi that occupy a specialized niche as insect pathogens as well as endophytes. We focus primarily on species in the genera Metarhizium and Beauveria, traditionally recognized as insect pathogenic fungi but are also found as plant symbionts. Phylogenetic evidence suggests that these fungi are more closely related to grass endophytes and diverged from that lineage ca. 100 MYA. We explore how the dual life cycles of these fungi as insect pathogens and endophytes are coupled. We discuss the evolution of insect pathogenesis while maintaining an endophytic lifestyle and provide examples of genes that may be involved in the transition toward insect pathogenicity. That is, some genes for insect pathogenesis may have been co-opted from genes involved in endophytic colonization. Other genes may be multifunctional and serve in both lifestyle capacities. We suggest that their evolution as insect pathogens allowed them to effectively barter a specialized nitrogen source (i.e. insects) with host plants for photosynthate. These ubiquitous fungi may play an important role as plant growth promoters and have a potential reservoir of secondary metabolites.

  11. Experimental geobiology links evolutionary intensification of rooting systems and weathering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quirk, Joe; Beerling, David; Leake, Jonathan

    2016-04-01

    The evolution of mycorrhizal fungi in partnership with early land plants over 440 million years ago led to the greening of the continents by plants of increasing biomass, rooting depth, nutrient demand and capacity to alter soil minerals, culminating in modern forested ecosystems. The later co-evolution of trees and rooting systems with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi, together driving the biogeochemical cycling of elements and weathering of minerals in soil to meet subsequent increased phosphorus demands is thought to constitute one the most important biotic feedbacks on the geochemical carbon cycle to emerge during the Phanerozoic, and fundamentally rests on the intensifying effect of trees and their root-associating mycorrhizal fungal partners on mineral weathering. Here I present experimental and field evidence linking these evolutionary events to a mechanistic framework whereby: (1) as plants evolved in stature, biomass, and rooting depth, their mycorrhizal fungal partnerships received increasing amounts of plant photosynthate; (2) this enabled intensification of plant-driven fungal weathering of rocks to release growth-limiting nutrients; (3) in turn, this increased land-to-ocean export of Ca and P and enhanced ocean carbonate precipitation impacting the global carbon cycle and biosphere-geosphere-ocean-atmosphere interactions over the past 410 Ma. Our findings support an over-arching hypothesis that evolution has selected plant and mycorrhizal partnerships that have intensified mineral weathering and altered global biogeochemical cycles.

  12. Plants Can Benefit from Herbivory: Stimulatory Effects of Sheep Saliva on Growth of Leymus chinensis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jushan; Wang, Ling; Wang, Deli; Bonser, Stephen P.; Sun, Fang; Zhou, Yifa; Gao, Ying; Teng, Xing

    2012-01-01

    Background Plants and herbivores can evolve beneficial interactions. Growth factors found in animal saliva are probably key factors underlying plant compensatory responses to herbivory. However, there is still a lack of knowledge about how animal saliva interacts with herbivory intensities and how saliva can mobilize photosynthate reserves in damaged plants. Methodology/Principal Findings The study examined compensatory responses to herbivory and sheep saliva addition for the grass species Leymus chinensis in three experiments over three years. The first two experiments were conducted in a factorial design with clipping (four levels in 2006 and five in 2007) and two saliva treatment levels. The third experiment examined the mobilization and allocation of stored carbohydrates following clipping and saliva addition treatments. Animal saliva significantly increased tiller number, number of buds, and biomass, however, there was no effect on height. Furthermore, saliva effects were dependent on herbivory intensities, associated with meristem distribution within perennial grass. Animal saliva was found to accelerate hydrolyzation of fructans and accumulation of glucose and fructose. Conclusions/Significance The results demonstrated a link between saliva and the mobilization of carbohydrates following herbivory, which is an important advance in our understanding of the evolution of plant responses to herbivory. Herbivory intensity dependence of the effects of saliva stresses the significance of optimal grazing management. PMID:22235277

  13. Shoot versus Root Signal Involvement in Nodulation and Vegetative Growth in Wild-Type and Hypernodulating Soybean Genotypes.

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, C.; Harper, J. E.

    1997-01-01

    Grafting studies involving Williams 82 (normally nodulating) and NOD1-3 (hypernodulating) soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr.) lines and Lablab purpureus were used to evaluate the effect of shoot and root on nodulation control and plant growth. A single- or double-wedge graft technique, with superimposed partial defoliation, was used to separate signal control from a photosynthate supply effect. Grafting of hypernodulated soybean shoots to roots of Williams 82 or L. purpureus resulted in increased nodule numbers. Grafting of two shoots to one root enhanced root growth in both soybean genotypes, whereas the nodule number was a function of shoot genotype but not of the photosynthetic area. In double-shoot, single-root-grafted plants, removing trifoliolate leaves from either Williams 82 or NOD1-3 shoots decreased root and shoot dry matter, attributable to decreased photosynthetic source. Concurrently, Williams 82 shoot defoliation increased the nodule number, whereas NOD1-3 shoot defoliation decreased the nodule number on both soybean and L. purpureus roots. It was concluded that (a) soybean leaves are the dominant site of autoregulatory signal production, which controls the nodule number; (b) soybean and L. purpureus have a common, translocatable, autoregulatory control signal; (c) seedling vegetative growth and nodule number are independently controlled; and (d) two signals, inhibitor and promoter, may be involved in controlling legume nodule numbers. PMID:12223646

  14. Contrasting wetland CH4 emission responses to simulated glacial atmospheric CO2 in temperate bogs and fens.

    PubMed

    Boardman, Carl P; Gauci, Vincent; Watson, Jonathan S; Blake, Stephen; Beerling, David J

    2011-12-01

    Wetlands were the largest source of atmospheric methane (CH(4) ) during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), but the sensitivity of this source to exceptionally low atmospheric CO(2) concentration ([CO(2) ]) at the time has not been examined experimentally. We tested the hypothesis that LGM atmospheric [CO(2) ] reduced CH(4) emissions as a consequence of decreased photosynthate allocation to the rhizosphere. We exposed minerotrophic fen and ombrotrophic bog peatland mesocosms to simulated LGM (c. 200 ppm) or ambient (c. 400 ppm) [CO(2) ] over 21 months (n = 8 per treatment) and measured gaseous CH(4) flux, pore water dissolved CH(4) and volatile fatty acid (VFA; an indicator of plant carbon supply to the rhizosphere) concentrations. Cumulative CH(4) flux from fen mesocosms was suppressed by 29% (P < 0.05) and rhizosphere pore water [CH(4) ] by c. 50% (P < 0.01) in the LGM [CO(2) ], variables that remained unaffected in bog mesocosms. VFA analysis indicated that changes in plant root exudates were not the driving mechanism behind these results. Our data suggest that the LGM [CO(2) ] suppression of wetland CH(4) emissions is contingent on trophic status. The heterogeneous response may be attributable to differences in species assemblage that influence the dominant CH(4) production pathway, rhizosphere supplemented photosynthesis and CH(4) oxidation.

  15. Exciton dynamics in the chlorosomal antennae of the green bacteria Chloroflexus aurantiacus and Chlorobium tepidum.

    PubMed Central

    Prokhorenko, V I; Steensgaard, D B; Holzwarth, A R

    2000-01-01

    The energy transfer processes in isolated chlorosomes from green bacteria Chlorobium tepidum and Chloroflexus aurantiacus have been studied at low temperatures (1.27 K) by two-pulse photon echo and one-color transient absorption techniques with approximately 100 fs resolution. The decay of the coherence in both types of chlorosomes is characterized by four different dephasing times stretching from approximately 100 fs up to 300 ps. The fastest component reflects dephasing that is due to interaction of bacteriochlorophylls with the phonon bath, whereas the other components correspond to dephasing due to different energy transfer processes such as distribution of excitation along the rod-like aggregates, energy exchange between different rods in the chlorosome, and energy transfer to the base plate. As a basis for the interpretation of the excitation dephasing and energy transfer pathways, a superlattice-like structural model is proposed based on recent experimental data and computer modeling of the Bchl c aggregates (1994. Photosynth. Res. 41:225-233.) This model predicts a fine structure of the Q(y) absorption band that is fully supported by the present photon echo data. PMID:11023914

  16. Effect of increased CO sub 2 and decreased O sub 2 on photosynthesis, and carbon allocation in source leaves

    SciTech Connect

    Fondy, B.R. ); Geiger, D.R.; Shieh, W.-J. )

    1990-05-01

    The effect of raising the rate of photosynthesis on the allocation of carbon between sucrose and starch was studied by means of steady-state radiolabeling. Sugar beet source leaves on intact plants were exposed to ambient levels of CO{sub 2} and O{sub 2} for 3 hrs. Next CO{sub 2} was raised to 600 {mu}LL{sup {minus}3} for 3 hrs then O{sub 2} was decreased to 2% for 3 hrs. Rates of net carbon exchange (NCE), export, and starch and sucrose synthesis were measured. NCER increased by 30% under the combined treatments and the proportion of photosynthate allocated to starch and to sucrose did not change. When O{sub 2} concentration was lowered, NCER increased but export did not and sucrose accumulated. This observation, and our earlier conclusion that export rate usually equals sucrose synthesis rate, lead us to conclude that low O{sub 2} directly inhibited export. Low O{sub 2} treatment causes sucrose to accumulate in a sugar beet leaf which usually accumulates little sucrose.

  17. In Metabolic Engineering of Eukaryotic Microalgae: Potential and Challenges Come with Great Diversity.

    PubMed

    Gimpel, Javier A; Henríquez, Vitalia; Mayfield, Stephen P

    2015-01-01

    The great phylogenetic diversity of microalgae is corresponded by a wide arrange of interesting and useful metabolites. Nonetheless metabolic engineering in microalgae has been limited, since specific transformation tools must be developed for each species for either the nuclear or chloroplast genomes. Microalgae as production platforms for metabolites offer several advantages over plants and other microorganisms, like the ability of GMO containment and reduced costs in culture media, respectively. Currently, microalgae have proved particularly well suited for the commercial production of omega-3 fatty acids and carotenoids. Therefore most metabolic engineering strategies have been developed for these metabolites. Microalgal biofuels have also drawn great attention recently, resulting in efforts for improving the production of hydrogen and photosynthates, particularly triacylglycerides. Metabolic pathways of microalgae have also been manipulated in order to improve photosynthetic growth under specific conditions and for achieving trophic conversion. Although these pathways are not strictly related to secondary metabolites, the synthetic biology approaches could potentially be translated to this field and will also be discussed. PMID:26696985

  18. The paraveinal mesophyll of soybean leaves in relation to assimilate transfer and compartmentation : I. Ultrastructure and histochemistry during vegetative development.

    PubMed

    Franceschi, V R; Giaquinta, R T

    1983-04-01

    The paraveinal mesophyll (PVM) is a unique and specialized, one-cell-thick tissue spanning the vascular bundles at the level of the phloem in soybean (Glycine max) (L.) Merr.) leaves. Its position within the leaf dictates that all photosynthate produced in the palisade and spongy mesophyll must pass through this specialized layer enroute to the phloem. Symplastic continuity, via plasmodesmata, exists between the PVM and bundle sheath, palisade parenchyma and spongy mesophyll. During leaf ontogeny the PVM is the first tissue to differentiate and at maturity these cells are six to eight times larger than other mesophyll cells, are highly vacuolate, and are interconnected by tubular arms. The PVM undergoes several unique structural and metabolic modifications during leaf development. The PVM cytoplasm, in vegetative plants, is dense, enriched in rough endoplasmic reticulum and dictyosomes, but contains few, small starch-free chloroplasts and few microbodies. Unlike the tonoplast of mesophyll cells, the tonoplast of the PVM is unusually thick and dense-staining. During leaf development the vacuoles of PVM cells accumulate a glycoprotein derived from the dictyosomes which reacts with the protein staining reagents, mercuric bromophenol blue and sulfaflavine, and is degraded by Pronase. Both the vacuolar material and tonoplast are also stained by phosphotungstic acid, which at low pH is relatively selective for glycoprotein. A unique role of the PVM in the transport and compartmentation of nitrogen reserves in soybeans is discussed.

  19. Low Water Potential Disrupts Carbohydrate Metabolism in Maize (Zea mays L.) Ovaries.

    PubMed Central

    Zinselmeier, C.; Westgate, M. E.; Schussler, J. R.; Jones, R. J.

    1995-01-01

    Water deficit during pollination increases the frequency of kernel abortion in maize (Zea mays L.). Much of the kernel loss is attributable to lack of current photosynthate, but a large number of kernels fail to develop on water-deficient plants even when assimilate supply is increased. We examined the possibility that assimilate utilization by developing ovaries might be impaired at low water potential ([Psi]w). Plants were grown in the greenhouse in 20-L pots containing 22 kg of amended soil. Water was withheld on the first day silks emerged, and plants were hand-pollinated 4 d later when leaf [Psi]w decreased to approximately - 1.8 MPa and silk [Psi]w was approximately -1.0 MPa. Plants were rehydrated 2 d after pollination. The brief water deficit inhibited ovary growth (dry matter accumulation) and decreased kernel number per ear by 60%, compared to controls. Inhibition of ovary growth was associated with a decrease in the level of reducing sugars, depletion of starch, a 75-fold increase in sucrose concentration (dry weight basis), and inhibition of acid invertase (EC 3.2.1.26) activity. These results indicate that water deficits during pollination disrupt carbohydrate metabolism in maize ovaries. They suggest that acid invertase activity is important for establishing and maintaining reproductive sink strength during pollination and early kernel development. PMID:12228365

  20. Methane emission from Yangtze estuarine wetland, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dongqi; Chen, Zhenlou; Xu, Shiyuan

    2009-06-01

    Yangtze estuary, lying in the subtropical monsoon region of China, is characterized by a unique environmental setting and endemic wetland plant species (Scirpus mariqueter). Methane (CH4) emission fluxes were measured at the Yangtze estuarine wetland, Chongming Dongtan (CD), by a static closed chamber technique from May 2004 to April 2005. The results showed that CD is the source of atmospheric CH4, and emission fluxes had significant diurnal and seasonal variation. The annual average CH4 emission flux was 2.06 mg m-2 h-1 at the CD marsh site and 0.04 mg m-2 h-1 at the CD bare tidal flat (nonvegetated). Wetland plant species (S. mariqueter) and temperature were the primary factors controlling the CH4 emission. The results of the light and dark chamber comparison and plant shoot clipping experiment suggest that molecular diffusion and convective gas flow methods were the two main mechanisms of CH4 transported via S. mariqueter plants in July. However, molecular diffusion was believed to be the primary transport mechanism from August to October, with leaf resistance as one of the factors regulating CH4 diffusion. There was significant correlation between CH4 fluxes and temperature, especially the 10 cm depth ground temperature (R2 = 0.7784). Although sediment organic carbon content did not determine CH4 fluxes, net ecosystem production was significantly correlated with CH4 fluxes, suggesting that the photosynthates of S. mariqueter effectively provided the substrate for methanogenic bacteria.

  1. Algal biomass and primary production within a temperate zone sandstone

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, R.A.; Sommerfeld, M.R. )

    1987-02-01

    The use of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) to extract chlorophyll a and {sup 14}C-labelled photosynthate from endolithic algae of sparsely vegetated, cold temperate grasslands on the Colorado Plateau in Arizona has yielded the first estimates of biomass and photosynthesis for this unusual community. These subsurface microorganisms are found widespread in exposed Coconino Sandstone, a predominant formation in this cold temperate region. The endolithic community in Coconino Sandstone, composed primarily of coccoid blue-green and coccoid/sarcinoid green algae, yielded a biomass value (as chlorophyll a content) of 87 mg m{sup {minus}2} rock surface area and a photosynthetic rate of 0.37 mg CO{sub 2} dm{sup {minus}2} hr{sup {minus}1} or 0.48 mg CO{sub 2} mg{sup {minus}1} chl a hr{sup {minus}1}. The endolithic algal community contributes moderate biomass (5-10%) and substantial photosynthesis (20-80%) to the sparse grassland ecosystem.

  2. Growth and carbohydrate status of coppice shoots of hybrid poplar following shoot pruning.

    PubMed

    Tschaplinski, T J; Blake, T J

    1995-05-01

    Fifteen, 1-year-old Populus maximowiczii Henry x P. nigra L. 'MN9' trees were decapitated and allowed to sprout. After 8 weeks, all had 6 to 10 coppice shoots. All shoots, except the tallest (dominant) shoot, were removed from five of the trees (pruned treatment), and shoot growth, gas exchange and carbohydrate status were compared in the pruned and unpruned trees. Although photosynthetic rate of recently mature leaves of pruned trees was approximately 50% greater than that of leaves on the dominant shoot of unpruned trees, and the dry weight of leaves of pruned trees was 37% greater than that of the leaves on the dominant shoot of unpruned trees, the shoot dry matter relative growth rate did not differ between treatments. Concentrations of water-soluble carbohydrates and starch in the uppper stem and leaves of the dominant shoot were similar in pruned and unpruned trees. However, relative to that of the dominant shoot in unpruned trees, the lower stem in pruned trees was depleted in both soluble carbohydrates and starch. Starch deposition, assessed as the quantity of (14)C-starch in tissues 24 h after a fully expanded source leaf was labeled with (14)CO(2), was 3.9 times greater in roots of pruned trees than in roots of unpruned trees. We conclude that early removal of all but the dominant shoot reduces the carbohydrate status of the roots and the lower portion of the stem by eliminating the excised shoots as a source of photosynthate.

  3. Minimal genomes of mycoplasma-related endobacteria are plastic and contain host-derived genes for sustained life within Glomeromycota.

    PubMed

    Naito, Mizue; Morton, Joseph B; Pawlowska, Teresa E

    2015-06-23

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF, Glomeromycota) colonize roots of the majority of terrestrial plants. They provide essential minerals to their plant hosts and receive photosynthates in return. All major lineages of AMF harbor endobacteria classified as Mollicutes, and known as mycoplasma-related endobacteria (MRE). Except for their substantial intrahost genetic diversity and ability to transmit vertically, virtually nothing is known about the life history of these endobacteria. To understand MRE biology, we sequenced metagenomes of three MRE populations, each associated with divergent AMF hosts. We found that each AMF species harbored a genetically distinct group of MRE. Despite vertical transmission, all MRE populations showed extensive chromosomal rearrangements, which we attributed to genetic recombination, activity of mobile elements, and a history of plectroviral invasion. The MRE genomes are characterized by a highly reduced gene content, indicating metabolic dependence on the fungal host, with the mechanism of energy production remaining unclear. Several MRE genes encode proteins with domains involved in protein-protein interactions with eukaryotic hosts. In addition, the MRE genomes harbor genes horizontally acquired from AMF. Some of these genes encode small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) proteases specific to the SUMOylation systems of eukaryotes, which MRE likely use to manipulate their fungal host. The extent of MRE genome plasticity and reduction, along with the large number of horizontally acquired host genes, suggests a high degree of adaptation to the fungal host. These features, together with the ubiquity of the MRE-Glomeromycota associations, emphasize the significance of MRE in the biology of Glomeromycota.

  4. A Polypeptide with Similarity to Phycocyanin α-Subunit Phycocyanobilin Lyase Involved in Degradation of Phycobilisomes†‡

    PubMed Central

    Dolganov, Nadia; Grossman, Arthur R.

    1999-01-01

    To optimize the utilization of photosynthate and avoid damage that can result from the absorption of excess excitation energy, photosynthetic organisms must rapidly modify the synthesis and activities of components of the photosynthetic apparatus in response to environmental cues. During nutrient-limited growth, cyanobacteria degrade their light-harvesting complex, the phycobilisome, and dramatically reduce the rate of photosynthetic electron transport. In this report, we describe the isolation and characterization of a cyanobacterial mutant that does not degrade its phycobilisomes during either sulfur or nitrogen limitation and exhibits an increased ratio of phycocyanin to chlorophyll during nutrient-replete growth. The mutant phenotype was complemented by a gene encoding a polypeptide with similarities to polypeptides that catalyze covalent bond formation between linear tetrapyrrole chromophores and subunits of apophycobiliproteins. The complementing gene, designated nblB, is expressed at approximately the same level in cells grown in nutrient-replete medium and medium devoid of either sulfur or nitrogen. These results suggest that the NblB polypeptide may be a constitutive part of the machinery that coordinates phycobilisome degradation with environmental conditions. PMID:9882677

  5. Photosynthesis and carbohydrate partitioning for the C{sub 3} desert shrub encelia farinosa under current and doubled CO{sub 2} concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Hehui; Nobel, P.S.

    1996-04-01

    Changes in photosynthesis (A) and carbohydrate partitioning were studied for Encelia farinosa, a common C{sub 3} desert shrub in the southwestern United States, after a 3-month exposure to the current or a doubled CO{sub 2} concentration (750 {mu}L L{sup -1}). A remained unchanged under the current CO{sub 2} concentration but decreased during the day under the doubled CO{sub 2} concentration, resulting in a 46% enhancement in the early morning 26% at midday, and 15% in the late afternoon by the elevated CO{sub 2}. The decrease during the day under the doubled CO{sub 2} concentration may represent end-product inhibition, because the sucrose and the starch contents increased during the day proportionally more than under the current CO{sub 2} concentration. The {sup 14}CO{sub 2} activity in sink leaves was maximal 3 h after labeling under the doubled and at 5 h under the current CO{sub 2} concentration, indicating faster movement of photosynthate out of source leaves and into sink tissues under the doubled CO{sub 2} concentration, which may have been responsible for the sustained enhancement in A under the doubled CO{sub 2} concentration. 32 refs., 5 figs.

  6. Differential CO2 effect on primary carbon metabolism of flag leaves in durum wheat (Triticum durum Desf.).

    PubMed

    Aranjuelo, Iker; Erice, Gorka; Sanz-Sáez, Alvaro; Abadie, Cyril; Gilard, Françoise; Gil-Quintana, Erena; Avice, Jean-Christophe; Staudinger, Christiana; Wienkoop, Stefanie; Araus, Jose L; Bourguignon, Jacques; Irigoyen, Juan J; Tcherkez, Guillaume

    2015-12-01

    C sink/source balance and N assimilation have been identified as target processes conditioning crop responsiveness to elevated CO2 . However, little is known about phenology-driven modifications of C and N primary metabolism at elevated CO2 in cereals such as wheat. Here, we examined the differential effect of elevated CO2 at two development stages (onset of flowering, onset of grain filling) in durum wheat (Triticum durum, var. Sula) using physiological measurements (photosynthesis, isotopes), metabolomics, proteomics and (15) N labelling. Our results show that growth at elevated CO2 was accompanied by photosynthetic acclimation through a lower internal (mesophyll) conductance but no significant effect on Rubisco content, maximal carboxylation or electron transfer. Growth at elevated CO2 altered photosynthate export and tended to accelerate leaf N remobilization, which was visible for several proteins and amino acids, as well as lysine degradation metabolism. However, grain biomass produced at elevated CO2 was larger and less N rich, suggesting that nitrogen use efficiency rather than photosynthesis is an important target for improvement, even in good CO2 -responsive cultivars. PMID:26081746

  7. Masting in oaks: Disentangling the effect of flowering phenology, airborne pollen load and drought

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Martínez, Marcos; Belmonte, Jordina; Maria Espelta, Josep

    2012-08-01

    Quercus species exhibit an extreme inter-annual variability in seed production often synchronized over large geographical areas (masting). Since this reproductive behavior is mostly observed in anemophilous plants, pollination efficiency is suggested as one hypothesis to explain it, although resource-based hypotheses are also suggested as alternatives. We analyzed the effect of flowering phenology, airborne pollen presence and meteorological conditions in the pattern of acorn production in mixed evergreen-deciduous oak forests (Quercus ilex and Quercus pubescens) in NE Spain for twelve years (1998-2009). In both oaks, higher temperatures advanced the onset of flowering and increased the amount of airborne pollen. Nevertheless, inter-annual differences in pollen production did not influence acorn crop size. Acorn production was enhanced by a delay in flowering onset in Q. ilex but not in Q. pubescens. This suggests that in perennial oaks a larger number of photosynthates produced before flowering could benefit reproduction while the lack of effects on deciduous oaks could be because these species flush new leaves and flowers at the same time. Notwithstanding this effect, spring water deficit was the most relevant factor in explaining inter-annual variability in acorn production in both species. Considering that future climate scenarios predict progressive warmer and dryer spring seasons in the Mediterranean Basin, this might result in earlier onsets of flowering and higher water deficits that would constrain acorn production.

  8. How succulent leaves of Aizoaceae avoid mesophyll conductance limitations of photosynthesis and survive drought.

    PubMed

    Ripley, Brad S; Abraham, Trevor; Klak, Cornelia; Cramer, Michael D

    2013-12-01

    In several taxa, increasing leaf succulence has been associated with decreasing mesophyll conductance (g M) and an increasing dependence on Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM). However, in succulent Aizoaceae, the photosynthetic tissues are adjacent to the leaf surfaces with an internal achlorophyllous hydrenchyma. It was hypothesized that this arrangement increases g M, obviating a strong dependence on CAM, while the hydrenchyma stores water and nutrients, both of which would only be sporadically available in highly episodic environments. These predictions were tested with species from the Aizoaceae with a 5-fold variation in leaf succulence. It was shown that g M values, derived from the response of photosynthesis to intercellular CO2 concentration (A:C i), were independent of succulence, and that foliar photosynthate δ(13)C values were typical of C3, but not CAM photosynthesis. Under water stress, the degree of leaf succulence was positively correlated with an increasing ability to buffer photosynthetic capacity over several hours and to maintain light reaction integrity over several days. This was associated with decreased rates of water loss, rather than tolerance of lower leaf water contents. Additionally, the hydrenchyma contained ~26% of the leaf nitrogen content, possibly providing a nutrient reservoir. Thus the intermittent use of C3 photosynthesis interspersed with periods of no positive carbon assimilation is an alternative strategy to CAM for succulent taxa (Crassulaceae and Aizoaceae) which occur sympatrically in the Cape Floristic Region of South Africa.

  9. Regulation of assimilate partitioning by daylength and spectral quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britz, Steve J.

    1994-01-01

    The effects of daylength and spectral quality on assimilate partitioning and leaf carbohydrate content should be considered when conducting controlled environment experiments or comparing results between studies obtained under different lighting conditions. Changes in partitioning may indicate alterations to photoregulatory processes within the source leaf rather than disruptions in sink strength. Moreover, it may be possible to use photoregulatory responses of assimilate partitioning to probe mechanisms of growth and development involving translocation of carbon or adaptation to environmental factors such as elevated CO2. It may also be possible to steer assimilate partitioning for the benefit of controlled environment agriculture using energy-efficient manipulations such as daylength extensions with dim irradiances, end-of-day alterations in light quality, or shifting plants between different spectral qualities as a part of phasic control of growth and development. Note that high starch levels measured on a one-time basis provide little information, since it is the proportion of photosynthate stored as starch that is meaningful. Large differences in starch content can result from small changes in partitioning integrated over several days. Rate information is required.

  10. Coral reef invertebrate microbiomes correlate with the presence of photosymbionts.

    PubMed

    Bourne, David G; Dennis, Paul G; Uthicke, Sven; Soo, Rochelle M; Tyson, Gene W; Webster, Nicole

    2013-07-01

    Coral reefs provide habitat for an array of marine invertebrates that host symbiotic microbiomes. Photosynthetic symbionts including Symbiodinium dinoflagellates and diatoms potentially influence the diversity of their host-associated microbiomes by releasing carbon-containing photosynthates and other organic compounds that fuel microbial metabolism. Here we used 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene amplicon pyrosequencing to characterise the microbiomes of 11 common Great Barrier Reef marine invertebrate species that host photosynthetic symbionts and five taxa in which they are absent. The presence of photosynthetic symbionts influenced the composition but not the species richness, evenness and phylogenetic diversity of invertebrate-associated microbiomes. Invertebrates without photosynthetic symbionts were dominated by Alphaproteobacteria, whereas those hosting photosynthetic symbionts were dominated by Gammaproteobacteria. Interestingly, many microbial species from photosymbiont-bearing invertebrates, including Oceanospirillales spp., Alteromonas spp., Pseudomonas spp., Halomonas spp., are implicated in the metabolism of dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP). DMSP is produced in high concentrations by photosynthetic dinoflagellates and is involved in climate regulation by facilitating cloud formation. Microbiomes correlated with host taxa and replicate individuals from most sampled species grouped in distance-based redundancy analysis of retrieved 16S rRNA gene sequences. This study highlights the complex nature of invertebrate holobionts and confirms the importance of photosynthetic symbionts in structuring marine invertebrate bacterial communities.

  11. Effects of fludioxonil and pyrimethanil, two fungicides used against Botrytis cinerea, on carbohydrate physiology in Vitis vinifera L.

    PubMed

    Saladin, Gaëlle; Magné, Christian; Clément, Christophe

    2003-10-01

    In Vitis vinifera L, photosynthesis and photosynthate partitioning are affected in the presence of fludioxonil and pyrimethanil, two fungicides commonly used in vineyards against Botrytis cinerea Pers. However, the effects were found to be different according to the model studied: plantlets (cv Chardonnay) grown in vitro, fruiting cuttings (cv Chardonnay) and plants grown in vineyards (cvs Chardonnay, Pinot noir and Pinot Meunier). In the plantlets grown in vitro, both fungicides decreased gas exchanges, photosynthetic pigment and starch concentrations in the leaves, whereas soluble carbohydrates transiently accumulated, suggesting that plantlets mobilised starch in response to photosynthesis inhibition caused by fungicides. In the fruiting cuttings, the fungicides did not affect photosynthesis, although fludioxonil caused starch decrease in parallel with sucrose accumulation, suggesting that the fungicide effects were of lower intensity than in vitro. Conversely, in vineyard, the two fungicides stimulated photosynthesis and increased pigment concentrations in the three vine cultivars tested. In the meantime, glucose, fructose and starch levels of the leaves declined after fungicide exposure, whereas sucrose accumulated, indicating that sucrose synthesis increased in the leaves following the fungicide treatment. Among the three varieties, Chardonnay was the most sensitive to the fungicides as revealed by the intensity of the responses and the longer period for recovery. In vineyard, the results suggested that the two fungicides, in addition to inhibiting B cinerea development, had a beneficial effect on vine physiology through the stimulation of leaf carbon nutrition, which may further enable the plant to rapidly make use of its defence reactions.

  12. Lake secondary production fueled by rapid transfer of low molecular weight organic carbon from terrestrial sources to aquatic consumers.

    PubMed

    Berggren, M; Ström, L; Laudon, H; Karlsson, J; Jonsson, A; Giesler, R; Bergström, A-K; Jansson, M

    2010-07-01

    Carbon of terrestrial origin often makes up a significant share of consumer biomass in unproductive lake ecosystems. However, the mechanisms for terrestrial support of lake secondary production are largely unclear. By using a modelling approach, we show that terrestrial export of dissolved labile low molecular weight carbon (LMWC) compounds supported 80% (34-95%), 54% (19-90%) and 23% (7-45%) of the secondary production by bacteria, protozoa and metazoa, respectively, in a 7-km(2) boreal lake (conservative to liberal estimates in brackets). Bacterial growth on LMWC was of similar magnitude as that of primary production (PP), and grazing on bacteria effectively channelled the LMWC carbon to higher trophic levels. We suggest that rapid turnover of forest LMWC pools enables continuous export of fresh photosynthates and other labile metabolites to aquatic systems, and that substantial transfer of LMWC from terrestrial sources to lake consumers can occur within a few days. Sequestration of LMWC of terrestrial origin, thus, helps explain high shares of terrestrial carbon in lake organisms and implies that lake food webs can be closely dependent on recent terrestrial PP.

  13. Rapid Degradation of the Tetrameric Mn Cluster in Illuminated, PsbO-Depleted Photosystem II Preparations

    SciTech Connect

    Semin, B. K.; Davletshina, L. N.; Ivanov, I. I.; Seibert, M.; Rubin, A. B.

    2012-01-01

    A 'decoupling effect' (light-induced electron transport without O{sub 2} evolution) was observed in Ca-depleted photosystem II (PSII(-Ca)) membranes, which lack PsbP and PsbQ (Semin et al. (2008) Photosynth. Res., 98, 235-249). Here PsbO-depleted PSII (PSII(-PsbO)) membranes (which also lack PsbP and PsbQ) were used to examine effects of PsbO on the decoupling. PSII(-PsbO) membranes do not reduce the acceptor 2,6-dichlorophenolindophenol (DCIP), in contrast to PSII(-Ca) membranes. To understand why DCIP reduction is lost, we studied light effects on the Mn content of PSII(-PsbO) samples and found that when they are first illuminated, Mn cations are rapidly released from the Mn cluster. Addition of an electron acceptor to PSII(-PsbO) samples accelerates the process. No effect of light was found on the Mn cluster in PSII(-Ca) membranes. Our results demonstrate that: (a) the oxidant, which directly oxidizes an as yet undefined substrate in PSII(-Ca) membranes, is the Mn cluster (not the Y{sub Z} radical or P680{sup +}); (b) light causes rapid release of Mn cations from the Mn cluster in PSII(-PsbO) membranes, and the mechanism is discussed; and (c) rapid degradation of the Mn cluster under illumination is significant for understanding the lack of functional activity in some PSII(-PsbO) samples reported by others.

  14. Alr5068, a Low-Molecular-Weight protein tyrosine phosphatase, is involved in formation of the heterocysts polysaccharide layer in the cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120.

    PubMed

    Tan, Hui; Wan, Shuang; Liu, Pi-Qiong; Wang, Li; Zhang, Cheng-Cai; Chen, Wen-Li

    2013-10-01

    The filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 forms nitrogen-fixing heterocysts after deprivation of combined nitrogen. Under such conditions, vegetative cells provide heterocysts with photosynthate and receive fixed nitrogen from the latter. Heterocyst envelope contains a glycolipid layer and a polysaccharide layer to restrict the diffusion of oxygen into heterocysts. Low-Molecular-Weight protein tyrosine phosphatases (LMW-PTPs) are involved in the biosynthesis of exopolysaccharides in bacteria. Alr5068, a protein from Anabaena sp. PCC 7120, shows significant sequence similarity with LMW-PTPs. In this study we characterized the enzymatic properties of Alr5068 and showed that it can dephosphorylate several autophosphorylated tyrosine kinases (Alr2856, Alr3059 and All4432) of Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 in vitro. Several conserved residues among LMW-PTPs are shown to be essential for the phosphatase activity of Alr5068. Overexpression of alr5068 results in a strain unable to survive under diazotrophic conditions, with the formation of morphologically mature heterocysts detached from the filaments. Overexpression of an alr5068 allele that lost phosphatase activity led to the formation of heterocyst with an impaired polysaccharide layer. The alr5068 gene was upregulated after nitrogen step-down and its mutation affected the expression of hepA and hepC, two genes necessary for the formation of the heterocyst envelope polysaccharide (HEP) layer. Our results suggest that Alr5068 is associated with the production of HEP in Anabaena sp. PCC 7120.

  15. The LysR-type transcription factor PacR is a global regulator of photosynthetic carbon assimilation in Anabaena.

    PubMed

    Picossi, Silvia; Flores, Enrique; Herrero, Antonia

    2015-09-01

    Cyanobacteria perform water-splitting photosynthesis and are important primary producers impacting the carbon and nitrogen cycles at global scale. They fix CO2 through ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCo) and have evolved a distinct CO2 concentrating mechanism (CCM) that builds high CO2 concentrations in the vicinity of RuBisCo favouring its carboxylase activity. Filamentous cyanobacteria such as Anabaena fix CO2 in photosynthetic vegetative cells, which donate photosynthate to heterocysts that rely on a heterotrophic metabolism to fix N2 . CCM elements are induced in response to inorganic carbon limitation, a cue that exposes the photosynthetic apparatus to photodamage by over-reduction. An Anabaena mutant lacking the LysR-type transcription factor All3953 grew poorly and dies under high light. The rbcL operon encoding RuBisCo was induced upon carbon limitation in the wild type but not in the mutant. ChIP-Seq analysis was used to globally identify All3953 targets under carbon limitation. Targets include, besides rbcL, genes encoding CCM elements, photorespiratory pathway- photosystem- and electron transport-related components, and factors, including flavodiiron proteins, with a demonstrated or putative function in photoprotection. Quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis of selected All3953 targets showed regulation in the wild type but not in the mutant. All3953 (PacR) is a global regulator of carbon assimilation in an oxygenic photoautotroph.

  16. The angiosperm phloem sieve tube system: a role in mediating traits important to modern agriculture.

    PubMed

    Ham, Byung-Kook; Lucas, William J

    2014-04-01

    The plant vascular system serves a vital function by distributing water, nutrients and hormones essential for growth and development to the various organs of the plant. In this review, attention is focused on the role played by the phloem as the conduit for delivery of both photosynthate and information macromolecules, especially from the context of its mediation in traits that are important to modern agriculture. Resource allocation of sugars and amino acids, by the phloem, to specific sink tissues is of importance to crop yield and global food security. Current findings are discussed in the context of a hierarchical control network that operates to integrate resource allocation to competing sinks. The role of plasmodesmata that connect companion cells to neighbouring sieve elements and phloem parenchyma cells is evaluated in terms of their function as valves, connecting the sieve tube pressure manifold system to the various plant tissues. Recent studies have also revealed that plasmodesmata and the phloem sieve tube system function cooperatively to mediate the long-distance delivery of proteins and a diverse array of RNA species. Delivery of these information macromolecules is discussed in terms of their roles in control over the vegetative-to-floral transition, tuberization in potato, stress-related signalling involving miRNAs, and genetic reprogramming through the delivery of 24-nucleotide small RNAs that function in transcriptional gene silencing in recipient sink organs. Finally, we discuss important future research areas that could contribute to developing agricultural crops with engineered performance characteristics for enhance yield potential.

  17. Molecular assessment of the effect of light and heterotrophy in the scleractinian coral Stylophora pistillata.

    PubMed

    Levy, Oren; Karako-Lampert, Sarit; Waldman Ben-Asher, Hiba; Zoccola, Didier; Pagès, Gilles; Ferrier-Pagès, Christine

    2016-04-27

    Corals acquire nutrients via the transfer of photosynthates by their endosymbionts (autotrophy), or via zooplankton predation by the animal (heterotrophy). During stress events, corals lose their endosymbionts, and undergo starvation, unless they increase their heterotrophic capacities. Molecular mechanisms by which heterotrophy sustains metabolism in stressed corals remain elusive. Here for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, we identified specific genes expressed in heterotrophically fed and unfed colonies of the scleractinian coral Stylophora pistillata, maintained under normal and light-stress conditions. Physiological parameters and gene expression profiling demonstrated that fed corals better resisted stress than unfed ones by exhibiting less oxidative damage and protein degradation. Processes affected in light-stressed unfed corals (HLU), were related to energy and metabolite supply, carbohydrate biosynthesis, ion and nutrient transport, oxidative stress, Ca(2+) homeostasis, metabolism and calcification (carbonic anhydrases, calcium-transporting ATPase, bone morphogenetic proteins). Two genes (cp2u1 and cp1a2), which belong to the cytochrome P450 superfamily, were also upregulated 249 and 10 times, respectively, in HLU corals. In contrast, few of these processes were affected in light-stressed fed corals (HLF) because feeding supplied antioxidants and energetic molecules, which help repair oxidative damage. Altogether, these results show that heterotrophy helps prevent the cascade of metabolic problems downstream of oxidative stress. PMID:27122555

  18. Seasonal dynamics and age of stemwood nonstructural carbohydrates in temperate forest trees.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Andrew D; Carbone, Mariah S; Keenan, Trevor F; Czimczik, Claudia I; Hollinger, David Y; Murakami, Paula; Schaberg, Paul G; Xu, Xiaomei

    2013-02-01

    Nonstructural carbohydrate reserves support tree metabolism and growth when current photosynthates are insufficient, offering resilience in times of stress. We monitored stemwood nonstructural carbohydrate (starch and sugars) concentrations of the dominant tree species at three sites in the northeastern United States. We estimated the mean age of the starch and sugars in a subset of trees using the radiocarbon ((14) C) bomb spike. With these data, we then tested different carbon (C) allocation schemes in a process-based model of forest C cycling. We found that the nonstructural carbohydrates are both highly dynamic and about a decade old. Seasonal dynamics in starch (two to four times higher in the growing season, lower in the dormant season) mirrored those of sugars. Radiocarbon-based estimates indicated that the mean age of the starch and sugars in red maple (Acer rubrum) was 7-14 yr. A two-pool (fast and slow cycling reserves) model structure gave reasonable estimates of the size and mean residence time of the total NSC pool, and greatly improved model predictions of interannual variability in woody biomass increment, compared with zero- or one-pool structures used in the majority of existing models. This highlights the importance of nonstructural carbohydrates in the context of forest ecosystem carbon cycling. PMID:23190200

  19. Depression of belowground respiration rates at simulated high moose population densities in boreal forests.

    PubMed

    Persson, Inga-Lill; Nilsson, Mats B; Pastor, John; Eriksson, Tobias; Bergström, Roger; Danell, Kjell

    2009-10-01

    Large herbivores can affect the carbon cycle in boreal forests by changing productivity and plant species composition, which in turn could ultimately alter litter production, nutrient cycling, and the partitioning between aboveground and belowground allocation of carbon. Here we experimentally tested how moose (Alces alces) at different simulated population densities affected belowground respiration rates (estimated as CO2 flux) in young boreal forest stands situated along a site productivity gradient. At high simulated population density, moose browsing considerably depressed belowground respiration rates (24-56% below that of no-moose controls) except during June, where the difference only was 10%. Moose browsing depressed belowground respiration the most on low-productivity sites. Soil moisture and temperature did not affect respiration rates. Impact of moose on belowground respiration was closely linked to litter production and followed Michaelis-Menten dynamics. The main mechanism by which moose decrease belowground respiration rates is likely their effect on photosynthetic biomass (especially decreased productivity of deciduous trees) and total litter production. An increased productivity of deciduous trees along the site productivity gradient causes an unequal effect of moose along the same gradient. The rapid growth of deciduous trees may offer higher resilience against negative effects of moose browsing on litter production and photosynthate allocation to roots.

  20. Effect of high CO/sub 2/ on growth and carbohydrate partitioning in pea (Pisum sativum L. ) plants

    SciTech Connect

    Potter, J.R.

    1986-04-01

    Beginning at 10 days of age, pea plants were exposed to air with normal (350 ppm) or high (1200 ppm) CO/sub 2/ levels until the plants were 20 days old. Growth was exponential between 10 and 20 days regardless of CO/sub 2/ treatment, and relative growth rates (RGR) under normal and high CO/sub 2/ were 0.20 and 0.24 g x g/sup -1/ x day/sup -1/ respectively. Also high CO/sub 2/ stimulated net assimilation rates (NAR) about 34%. While high CO/sub 2/ did not affect partitioning of dry matter into root, stem, or leaf mass, it decreased the partitioning of new dry matter into new leaf area by 12%, hence the failure of high CO/sub 2/ to stimulate RGR as much as it stimulated NAR. This decrease in partitioning into new leaf area elicited by high CO/sub 2/ was due mainly to the continuous accumulation of leaf starch which reached nearly 3.0 mg x cm/sup -2/. However, this accumulation of starch was not associated with a decline in NAR or photosynthesis. Even for high CO/sub 2/ treatments, transport of photosynthate during photoperiods greatly exceeded the rate necessary to deplete leaf starch during the dark period, indicating that there is unused transport capacity.

  1. Modelling photo-modulated internode elongation in growing glasshouse cucumber canopies.

    PubMed

    Kahlen, Katrin; Stützel, Hartmut

    2011-05-01

    • Growing glasshouse plant canopies are exposed to natural fluctuations in light quantity, and the dynamically changing canopy architecture induces local variations in light quality. This modelling study aimed to analyse the importance of both light signals for an accurate prediction of individual internode lengths. • We conceptualized two model approaches for estimating final internode lengths (FILs). The first one is only photosynthetically active radiation (PAR)-sensitive and ignores canopy architecture, whereas the second approach uses a functional-structural growth model for considering variations in both PAR and red : far-red (R : FR) ratio (L-Cucumber). Internode lengths measured in three experiments were used for model parameterization and evaluation. • The overall trends for the simulated FILs using the exclusively PAR-sensitive model approach were already in line with the measured FILs, but they underestimated FILs at higher ranks. L-Cucumber provided considerably better FIL predictions under various light conditions and canopy architectures. • Both light signals are needed for an accurate estimation of the FILs, and only L-Cucumber is able to consider R : FR signals from the growing canopy. Yet this study highlights the significance of the PAR signal for predicting FILs as neighbour effects increase, which indicates a potential role of photosynthate signalling in internode elongation.

  2. [Enhancement of photoassimilate utilization by manipulation of the ADPglucose pyrophosphorylase gene]. Summary of progress, [April 15, 1991--April 14, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Okita, T.W.

    1992-12-31

    The long term aim of this project is to assess the feasibility of increasing the conversion of photosynthate into starch via manipulation of genes encoding enzymes that may be rate-limiting in starch biosynthesis. In developing storage tissues such as tubers, starch biosynthesis is regulated by the gene activation and expression of ADPglucose pyrophosphorylase, starch synthase, branching enzyme and other ancillary starch modifying enzymes, as well as the allosteric-controlled behavior of ADPglucose pyrophosphorylase activity. In view of the regulatory role of ADPglucose pyrophosphorylase in starch biosynthesis at both the genetic and biochemical level, we have focused our attention on the genes that encode for this enzyme in potato tubers. The proposed objectives of the grant were to (1) analyze the structure of the tuber enzyme, (2) isolate and characterize the structure of its genes, and (3) identify the regulatory elements controlling ADPglucose pyrophosphorylase during plant development. During the last two and 1/2 years we have met or have made considerable progress in achieving these objectives as discussed in more detail below.

  3. Mechanism of inhibition and decoupling of oxygen evolution from electron transfer in photosystem II by fluoride, ammonia and acetate.

    PubMed

    Lovyagina, E R; Semin, B K

    2016-05-01

    Ca(2+) extraction from oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) of photosystem II (PSII) is accompanied by decoupling of oxygen evolution/electron transfer processes [Semin et al. Photosynth. Res. 98 (2008) 235] and appearance of a broad EPR signal at g=2 (split "S3" signal) what can imply the relationship between these effects. Split signal have been observed not only in Ca-depleted PSII but also in PSII membranes treated by fluoride anions, sodium acetate, and NH4Cl. Here we investigated the question: can such compounds induce the decoupling effect during treatment of PSII like Ca(2+) extraction does? We found that F(-), sodium acetate, and NH4Cl inhibit O2 evolution in PSII membranes more effectively than the reduction of artificial electron acceptor 2,6-dichlorophenolindophenol, i.e. the action of these compounds is accompanied by decoupling of these processes in OEC. Similarity of effects observed after Ca(2+) extraction and F(-), CH3COO(-) or NH4Cl treatments suggests that these compounds can inactivate function of Ca(2+). Such inactivation could originate from disturbance of the network of functionally active hydrogen bonds around OEC formed with participation of Ca(2+). This inhibition effect is observed in the region of low concentration of inhibitors. Increasing of inhibitor concentration is accompanied by appearance of other sites of inhibition. PMID:26971280

  4. Photoperiodic flowering regulation in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Golembeski, Greg S.; Kinmonth-Schultz, Hannah A.; Song, Young Hun; Imaizumi, Takato

    2015-01-01

    Photoperiod, or the duration of light in a given day, is a critical cue that flowering plants utilize to effectively assess seasonal information and coordinate their reproductive development in synchrony with the external environment. The use of the model plant, Arabidopsis thaliana, has greatly improved our understanding of the molecular mechanisms that determine how plants process and utilize photoperiodic information to coordinate a flowering response. This mechanism is typified by the transcriptional activation of FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) gene by the transcription factor CONSTANS (CO) under inductive long-day conditions in Arabidopsis. FT protein then moves from the leaves to the shoot apex, where floral meristem development can be initiated. As a point of integration from a variety of environmental factors in the context of a larger system of regulatory pathways that affect flowering, the importance of photoreceptors and the circadian clock in CO regulation throughout the day has been a key feature of the photoperiodic flowering pathway. In addition to these established mechanisms, the recent discovery of a photosynthate derivative trehalose-6-phosphate as an activator of FT in leaves has interesting implications for the involvement of photosynthesis in the photoperiodic flowering response that were suggested from previous physiological experiments in flowering induction. PMID:25684830

  5. Carbon and phosphorus exchange may enable cooperation between an arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus and a phosphate-solubilizing bacterium.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lin; Xu, Minggang; Liu, Yu; Zhang, Fusuo; Hodge, Angela; Feng, Gu

    2016-05-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) transfer plant photosynthate underground which can stimulate soil microbial growth. In this study, we examined whether there was a potential link between carbon (C) release from an AMF and phosphorus (P) availability via a phosphate-solubilizing bacterium (PSB). We investigated the outcome of the interaction between the AMF and the PSB by conducting a microcosm and two Petri plate experiments. An in vitro culture experiment was also conducted to determine the direct impact of AMF hyphal exudates on growth of the PSB. The AMF released substantial C to the environment, triggering PSB growth and activity. In return, the PSB enhanced mineralization of organic P, increasing P availability for the AMF. When soil available P was low, the PSB competed with the AMF for P, and its activity was not stimulated by the fungus. When additional P was added to increase soil available P, the PSB enhanced AMF hyphal growth, and PSB activity was also stimulated by the fungus. Our results suggest that an AMF and a free-living PSB interacted to the benefit of each other by providing the C or P that the other microorganism required, but these interactions depended upon background P availability. PMID:27074400

  6. Reduced enzyme activity and starch level in an induced mutant of chloroplast phosphoglucose isomerase

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, T.W.; Gottlieb, L.D.; Pichersky, E.

    1986-06-01

    Ethyl methane sulfonate treatment was used to induce a mutation in the nuclear gene encoding the chloroplast isozyme of phosphoglucose isomerase in Clarkia xantiana. The mutation, which proved allelic to wild type activity, was backcrossed to wild type for five generations so that the two could be compared in a near isogenic background. An immunological analysis showed that the mutant, when homozygous, reduced the activity of the isozyme by about 50%. In contrast to wild type, the mutant showed little change in leaf starch level over a diurnal period or following a 72-hour continuous light treatment. By the end of the diurnal light period, the mutant accumulated only about 60% as much starch as wild type. However, mutant leaves had an increased sucrose level presumably because photosynthate was directly exported from the chloroplasts. The mutant also exhibited reduced leaf weight. These changes in metabolism and growth suggest that the wild type level of plastid phosphoglucose isomerase activity is necessary to achieve wild type carbohydrate status.

  7. Acclimation of two tomato species to high atmospheric CO sub 2 : I. Sugar and starch concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Yelle, S.; Beeson, R.C. Jr.; Trudel, M.J.; Gosselin, A. )

    1989-08-01

    Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. cv Vedettos and Lycopersicon chmielewskii Rick, LA1028, were exposed to two CO{sub 2} concentrations for 10 weeks. Tomato plants grown at 900 microliters per liter contained more starch and more sugars than the control. However, we found no significant accumulation of starch and sugars in the young leaves of L. esculentum exposed to high CO{sub 2}. Carbon exchange rates were significantly higher in CO{sub 2}-enriched plants for the first few weeks of treatment but thereafter decreased as tomato plants acclimated to high atmospheric CO{sub 2}. This indicates that the long-term decline of photosynthetic efficiency of leaf 5 cannot be attributed to an accumulation of sugar and/or starch. The average concentration of starch in leaves 5 and 9 was always higher in L. esculentum than in L. chmielewskii (151.7% higher). A higher proportion of photosynthates was directed into starch for L. esculentum than for L. chmielewskii. However, these characteristics did not improve the long-term photosynthetic efficiency of L. chmielewskii grown at high CO{sub 2} when compared with L. esculentum. The chloroplasts of tomato plants exposed to the higher CO{sub 2} concentration exhibited a marked accumulation of starch. The results reported here suggest that starch and/or sugar accumulation under high CO{sub 2} cannot entirely explain the loss of photosynthetic efficiency of high CO{sub 2}-grown plants.

  8. In situ stable isotope probing of phosphate-solubilizing bacteria in the hyphosphere

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fei; Shi, Ning; Jiang, Rongfeng; Zhang, Fusuo; Feng, Gu

    2016-01-01

    This study used a [13C]DNA stable isotope probing (SIP) technique to elucidate a direct pathway for the translocation of 13C-labeled photoassimilate from maize plants to extraradical mycelium-associated phosphate-solubilizing bacteria (PSB) that mediate the mineralization and turnover of soil organic phosphorus (P) in the hyphosphere. Inoculation with PSB alone did not provide any benefit to maize plants but utilized the added phytate-P to their own advantage, while inoculation with Rhizophagus irregularis alone significantly promoted shoot biomass and P content compared with the control. However, compared with both sole inoculation treatments, combined inoculation with PSB and R. irregularis in the hyphosphere enhanced organic P mineralization and increased microbial biomass P in the soil. There was no extra benefit to plant P uptake but the hyphal growth of R. irregularis was reduced, suggesting that PSB benefited from the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungal mycelium and competed for soil P with the fungus. The combination of T-RFLP (terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism) analysis with a clone library revealed that one of the bacteria that actively assimilated carbon derived from pulse-labeled maize plants was Pseudomonas alcaligenes (Pseudomonadaceae) that was initially inoculated into the hyphosphere soil. These results provide the first in situ demonstration of the pathway underlying the carbon flux from plants to the AM mycelium-associated PSB, and the PSB assimilated the photosynthates exuded by the fungus and promoted mineralization and turnover of organic P in the soil. PMID:26802172

  9. Isotopic evidence indicates saprotrophy in post-fire Morchella in Oregon and Alaska.

    PubMed

    Hobbie, Erik A; Rice, Samuel F; Weber, Nancy S; Smith, Jane E

    2016-01-01

    We assessed the nutritional strategy of true morels (genus Morchella) collected in 2003 and 2004 in Oregon and Alaska, 1 or 2 y after forest fires. We hypothesized that the patterns of stable isotopes (δ(13)C and δ(15)N) in the sporocarps would match those of saprotrophic fungi and that radiocarbon (Δ(14)C) analyses would indicate that Morchella was assimilating old carbon not current-year photosynthate. We compared radiocarbon and stable isotopes in Morchella with values from concurrently collected foliage, the ectomycorrhizal Geopyxis carbonaria (Alb. & Schwein.) Sacc., the saprotrophic Plicaria endocarpoides (Berk.) Rifai, and with literature to determine isotopic values for ectomycorrhizal or saprotrophic fungi. Geopyxis, Plicaria and Morchella, respectively, were 3‰, 5‰ and 6‰ higher in 13C than foliage and 5‰, 7‰ and 7‰ higher in (15)N. High (15)N enrichment in Morchella indicated that recent litter was not the primary source for Morchella nitrogen, and similar (13)C and (15)N enrichments to Plicaria suggest that Morchella assimilates its carbon and nitrogen from the same source pool as this saprotrophic fungus. From radiocarbon analyses Morchella averaged 11 ± 6 y old (n = 19), Plicaria averaged 17 ± 5 y old (n = 3), foliage averaged 1 ± 2 y old (n = 8) and Geopyxis (n = 1) resembled foliage in Δ(14)C. We conclude that morels fruiting in post-fire environments in our study assimilated old carbon and were saprotrophic.

  10. Alr5068, a Low-Molecular-Weight protein tyrosine phosphatase, is involved in formation of the heterocysts polysaccharide layer in the cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120.

    PubMed

    Tan, Hui; Wan, Shuang; Liu, Pi-Qiong; Wang, Li; Zhang, Cheng-Cai; Chen, Wen-Li

    2013-10-01

    The filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 forms nitrogen-fixing heterocysts after deprivation of combined nitrogen. Under such conditions, vegetative cells provide heterocysts with photosynthate and receive fixed nitrogen from the latter. Heterocyst envelope contains a glycolipid layer and a polysaccharide layer to restrict the diffusion of oxygen into heterocysts. Low-Molecular-Weight protein tyrosine phosphatases (LMW-PTPs) are involved in the biosynthesis of exopolysaccharides in bacteria. Alr5068, a protein from Anabaena sp. PCC 7120, shows significant sequence similarity with LMW-PTPs. In this study we characterized the enzymatic properties of Alr5068 and showed that it can dephosphorylate several autophosphorylated tyrosine kinases (Alr2856, Alr3059 and All4432) of Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 in vitro. Several conserved residues among LMW-PTPs are shown to be essential for the phosphatase activity of Alr5068. Overexpression of alr5068 results in a strain unable to survive under diazotrophic conditions, with the formation of morphologically mature heterocysts detached from the filaments. Overexpression of an alr5068 allele that lost phosphatase activity led to the formation of heterocyst with an impaired polysaccharide layer. The alr5068 gene was upregulated after nitrogen step-down and its mutation affected the expression of hepA and hepC, two genes necessary for the formation of the heterocyst envelope polysaccharide (HEP) layer. Our results suggest that Alr5068 is associated with the production of HEP in Anabaena sp. PCC 7120. PMID:23827083

  11. The Frankia alni symbiotic transcriptome.

    PubMed

    Alloisio, Nicole; Queiroux, Clothilde; Fournier, Pascale; Pujic, Petar; Normand, Philippe; Vallenet, David; Médigue, Claudine; Yamaura, Masatoshi; Kakoi, Kentaro; Kucho, Ken-ichi

    2010-05-01

    The actinobacteria Frankia spp. are able to induce the formation of nodules on the roots of a large spectrum of actinorhizal plants, where they convert dinitrogen to ammonia in exchange for plant photosynthates. In the present study, transcriptional analyses were performed on nitrogen-replete free-living Frankia alni cells and on Alnus glutinosa nodule bacteria, using whole-genome microarrays. Distribution of nodule-induced genes on the genome was found to be mostly over regions with high synteny between three Frankia spp. genomes, while nodule-repressed genes, which were mostly hypothetical and not conserved, were spread around the genome. Genes known to be related to nitrogen fixation were highly induced, nif (nitrogenase), hup2 (hydrogenase uptake), suf (sulfur-iron cluster), and shc (hopanoids synthesis). The expression of genes involved in ammonium assimilation and transport was strongly modified, suggesting that bacteria ammonium assimilation was limited. Genes involved in particular in transcriptional regulation, signaling processes, protein drug export, protein secretion, lipopolysaccharide, and peptidoglycan biosynthesis that may play a role in symbiosis were also identified. We also showed that this Frankia symbiotic transcriptome was highly similar among phylogenetically distant plant families Betulaceae and Myricaceae. Finally, comparison with rhizobia transcriptome suggested that F. alni is metabolically more active in symbiosis than rhizobia. PMID:20367468

  12. A dynamic model of plant growth with interactions between development and functional mechanisms to study plant structural plasticity related to trophic competition

    PubMed Central

    Mathieu, A.; Cournède, P. H.; Letort, V.; Barthélémy, D.; de Reffye, P.

    2009-01-01

    Background and Aims The strong influence of environment and functioning on plant organogenesis has been well documented by botanists but is poorly reproduced in most functional–structural models. In this context, a model of interactions is proposed between plant organogenesis and plant functional mechanisms. Methods The GreenLab model derived from AMAP models was used. Organogenetic rules give the plant architecture, which defines an interconnected network of organs. The plant is considered as a collection of interacting ‘sinks’ that compete for the allocation of photosynthates coming from ‘sources’. A single variable characteristic of the balance between sources and sinks during plant growth controls different events in plant development, such as the number of branches or the fruit load. Key Results Variations in the environmental parameters related to light and density induce changes in plant morphogenesis. Architecture appears as the dynamic result of this balance, and plant plasticity expresses itself very simply at different levels: appearance of branches and reiteration, number of organs, fructification and adaptation of ecophysiological characteristics. Conclusions The modelling framework serves as a tool for theoretical botany to explore the emergence of specific morphological and architectural patterns and can help to understand plant phenotypic plasticity and its strategy in response to environmental changes. PMID:19297366

  13. Sucrose transport into stalk tissue of sugarcane

    SciTech Connect

    Thom, M.; Maretzki, A. )

    1990-05-01

    The productivity of higher plants is, in part, dependent on transport of photosynthate from source to sink (in sugarcane, stalk) and upon its assimilation in cells of the sink tissue. In sugarcane, sucrose has been reported to undergo hydrolysis in the apoplast before uptake into the storage parenchyma, whereas recently, sucrose was reported to be taken up intact. This work was based on lack of randomization of ({sup 14}C)fructosyl sucrose accumulated after feeding tissue slices with this sugar. In this report, we present evidence from slices of stalk tissue that sucrose is taken up intact via a carrier-mediated, energy-dependent process. The evidence includes: (1) uptake of fluorosucrose, an analog of sucrose not subject to hydrolysis by invertase; (2) little or no randomization of ({sup 14}C) fructosyl sucrose taken up; (3) the presence of a saturable as well as a linear component of sucrose uptake; and (4) inhibition of both the saturable and linear components of sucrose uptake by protonophore and sulhydryl agents. Hexoses can also be taken up, and at a greater efficiency than sucrose. It is probable that both hexose and sucrose can be transported across the plasma membrane, depending on the physiological status of the plant.

  14. Stimulating natural defenses in poplar clones (OP-367) increases plant metabolism of carbon tetrachloride.

    PubMed

    Ferrieri, Abigail P; Thorpe, Michael R; Ferrieri, Richard A

    2006-01-01

    Groundwater contamination by carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) presents a health risk as a potential carcinogen and pollutant that is capable of depleting the ozone layer. Although use of poplar trees in a phytoremediation capacity has proven to be cost effective for cleaning contaminated sites, minimizing leaf emission of volatile contaminants remains a pressing issue. We hypothesized that recently fixed carbon plays a key role in CCl4 metabolism in planta yielding nonvolatile trichloroacetic acid (TCA) and that the extent of this metabolism can be altered by heightening plant defenses. Labeling intact leaves with (11)CO2 (t 1/2 20.4 m) can test this hypothesis, because the extremely short half-life of the tracer reflects only those processes involving recently fixed carbon. Using radio-HPLC analysis, we observed [(11)C]TCA from leaf extract from poplar clones (OP-367) whose roots were exposed to a saturated solution of CCl4 (520 ppm). Autoradiography of [(11)C]photosynthate showed increased leaf export and partitioning to the apex within 24 h of CCl4 exposure, suggesting that changes in plant metabolism and partitioning of recently fixed carbon occur rapidly. Additionally, leaf CCl4 emissions were highest in the morning, when carbon pools are low, suggesting a link between contaminant metabolism and leaf carbon utilization. Further, treatment with methyljasmonate, a plant hormone implicated in defense signal transduction, reduced leaf CCl4 emissions two-fold due to the increased formation of TCA.

  15. Oxalate secretion by ectomycorrhizal Paxillus involutus is mineral-specific and controls calcium weathering from minerals

    PubMed Central

    Schmalenberger, A.; Duran, A. L.; Bray, A. W.; Bridge, J.; Bonneville, S.; Benning, L. G.; Romero-Gonzalez, M. E.; Leake, J. R.; Banwart, S. A.

    2015-01-01

    Trees and their associated rhizosphere organisms play a major role in mineral weathering driving calcium fluxes from the continents to the oceans that ultimately control long-term atmospheric CO2 and climate through the geochemical carbon cycle. Photosynthate allocation to tree roots and their mycorrhizal fungi is hypothesized to fuel the active secretion of protons and organic chelators that enhance calcium dissolution at fungal-mineral interfaces. This was tested using 14CO2 supplied to shoots of Pinus sylvestris ectomycorrhizal with the widespread fungus Paxillus involutus in monoxenic microcosms, revealing preferential allocation by the fungus of plant photoassimilate to weather grains of limestone and silicates each with a combined calcium and magnesium content of over 10 wt.%. Hyphae had acidic surfaces and linear accumulation of weathered calcium with secreted oxalate, increasing significantly in sequence: quartz, granite < basalt, olivine, limestone < gabbro. These findings confirmed the role of mineral-specific oxalate exudation in ectomycorrhizal weathering to dissolve calcium bearing minerals, thus contributing to the geochemical carbon cycle. PMID:26197714

  16. Oxalate secretion by ectomycorrhizal Paxillus involutus is mineral-specific and controls calcium weathering from minerals.

    PubMed

    Schmalenberger, A; Duran, A L; Bray, A W; Bridge, J; Bonneville, S; Benning, L G; Romero-Gonzalez, M E; Leake, J R; Banwart, S A

    2015-07-22

    Trees and their associated rhizosphere organisms play a major role in mineral weathering driving calcium fluxes from the continents to the oceans that ultimately control long-term atmospheric CO2 and climate through the geochemical carbon cycle. Photosynthate allocation to tree roots and their mycorrhizal fungi is hypothesized to fuel the active secretion of protons and organic chelators that enhance calcium dissolution at fungal-mineral interfaces. This was tested using (14)CO2 supplied to shoots of Pinus sylvestris ectomycorrhizal with the widespread fungus Paxillus involutus in monoxenic microcosms, revealing preferential allocation by the fungus of plant photoassimilate to weather grains of limestone and silicates each with a combined calcium and magnesium content of over 10 wt.%. Hyphae had acidic surfaces and linear accumulation of weathered calcium with secreted oxalate, increasing significantly in sequence: quartz, granite < basalt, olivine, limestone < gabbro. These findings confirmed the role of mineral-specific oxalate exudation in ectomycorrhizal weathering to dissolve calcium bearing minerals, thus contributing to the geochemical carbon cycle.

  17. Synthesis and Turnover of Cell-Wall Polysaccharides and Starch in Photosynthetic Soybean Suspension Cultures.

    PubMed Central

    Lozovaya, V. V.; Zabotina, O. A.; Widholm, J. M.

    1996-01-01

    Soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr.) suspension cultures grown under photoautotrophic and photomixotrophic (1% sucrose) culture conditions were used in 14CO2 pulse-chase experiments to follow cell-wall polysaccharide and starch biosynthesis and turnover. Following a 30-min pulse with 14CO2, about one-fourth of the 14C of the photoautotrophic cells was incorporated into the cell wall; this increased to about 80% during a 96-h chase in unlabeled CO2. Cells early in the cell culture cycle (3 d) incorporated more 14C per sample and also exhibited greater turnover of the pectin and hemicellulose fractions as shown by loss of 14C during the 96-h chase than did 10- and 16-d cells. When the chase occurred in the dark, less 14C was incorporated into the cell wall because of the cessation of growth and higher respiratory loss. The dark effect was much less pronounced with the photomixotrophic cells. Even though the cell starch levels were much lower than in leaves, high 14C incorporation was found during the pulse, especially in older cells. The label was largely lost during the chase, indicating that starch is involved in the short-term storage of photosynthate. Thus, these easily labeled and manipulated photosynthetic cells demonstrated extensive turnover of the cell-wall pectin and hemicellulose fractions and starch during the normal growth process. PMID:12226338

  18. Coral reef invertebrate microbiomes correlate with the presence of photosymbionts

    PubMed Central

    Bourne, David G; Dennis, Paul G; Uthicke, Sven; Soo, Rochelle M; Tyson, Gene W; Webster, Nicole

    2013-01-01

    Coral reefs provide habitat for an array of marine invertebrates that host symbiotic microbiomes. Photosynthetic symbionts including Symbiodinium dinoflagellates and diatoms potentially influence the diversity of their host-associated microbiomes by releasing carbon-containing photosynthates and other organic compounds that fuel microbial metabolism. Here we used 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene amplicon pyrosequencing to characterise the microbiomes of 11 common Great Barrier Reef marine invertebrate species that host photosynthetic symbionts and five taxa in which they are absent. The presence of photosynthetic symbionts influenced the composition but not the species richness, evenness and phylogenetic diversity of invertebrate-associated microbiomes. Invertebrates without photosynthetic symbionts were dominated by Alphaproteobacteria, whereas those hosting photosynthetic symbionts were dominated by Gammaproteobacteria. Interestingly, many microbial species from photosymbiont-bearing invertebrates, including Oceanospirillales spp., Alteromonas spp., Pseudomonas spp., Halomonas spp., are implicated in the metabolism of dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP). DMSP is produced in high concentrations by photosynthetic dinoflagellates and is involved in climate regulation by facilitating cloud formation. Microbiomes correlated with host taxa and replicate individuals from most sampled species grouped in distance-based redundancy analysis of retrieved 16S rRNA gene sequences. This study highlights the complex nature of invertebrate holobionts and confirms the importance of photosynthetic symbionts in structuring marine invertebrate bacterial communities. PMID:23303372

  19. Stem tilting in the inter-tropical cactus Echinocactus platyacanthus: an adaptive solution to the trade-off between radiation acquisition and temperature control.

    PubMed

    Herce, M F; Martorell, C; Alonso-Fernandez, C; Boullosa, L F V V; Meave, J A

    2014-05-01

    While plants require radiation for photosynthesis, radiation in warm deserts can have detrimental effects from high temperatures. This dilemma may be solved through plant morphological attributes. In cold deserts, stem tilting keeps reproductive organs warm by increasing radiation interception at the cost of decreased annual light interception. Conversely, little is known about stem tilting in warm deserts. We hypothesised that stem tilting in Echinocactus platyacanthus prevents high temperatures near the apex, where reproduction occurs. The study was conducted in the warm, inter-tropical portion of the Chihuahuan Desert, Mexico. We found that cacti preferentially tilted towards the south, which reduced temperatures of reproductive organs during the hot season, but increased total annual near-apex PAR interception. Tilting also maximised reproduction, a likely consequence of temperature control but perhaps also of the difficulty in translocating photosynthates in cacti; therefore, annual energy acquisition near floral meristems may be largely allocated to reproduction. Unlike plants of higher latitudes, in inter-tropical deserts sunlight at noon comes either from the north or the south, depending on the season, and thus stem tilting may more strongly affect total annual radiation received in different portions of the stem. Inter-tropical cacti can synchronise reproduction with irradiance peaks if flowering occurs in a specific (north or south) portion of the stem; also, they effectively solve the conflict between maximising annual PAR interception and minimising temperature at the hottest time of day. Notably, the two inter-tropical cacti in which stem tilting has been studied successfully solve this conflict.

  20. Modeling the effects of ozone on soybean growth and yield.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, K; Miller, J E; Flagler, R B; Heck, W W

    1990-01-01

    A simple mechanistic model was developed based on an existing growth model in order to address the mechanisms of the effects of ozone on growth and yield of soybean [Glycine max. (L.) Merr. 'Davis'] and interacting effects of other environmental stresses. The model simulates daily growth of soybean plants using environmental data including shortwave radiation, temperature, precipitation, irrigation and ozone concentration. Leaf growth, dry matter accumulation, water budget, nitrogen input and seed growth linked to senescence and abscission of leaves are described in the model. The effects of ozone are modeled as reduced photosynthate production and accelerated senescence. The model was applied to the open-top chamber experiments in which soybean plants were exposed to ozone under two levels of soil moisture regimes. After calibrating the model to the growth data and seed yield, goodness-of-fit of the model was tested. The model fitted well for top dry weight in the vegetative growth phase and also at maturity. The effect of ozone on seen yield was also described satisfactorily by the model. The simulation showed apparent interaction between the effect of ozone and soil moisture stress on the seed yield. The model revealed that further work is needed concerning the effect of ozone on the senescence process and the consequences of alteration of canopy microclimate by the open-top chambers.

  1. Caterpillar mimicry by plant galls as a visual defense against herbivores.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Kazuo

    2016-09-01

    Plant galls, induced by arthropods and various other organisms have an intimate relationship with host plants, and gall-inducers have limited mobility. In addition to their own photosynthesis, galls are resource sinks rich with nutrients, with neighboring plant organs commonly serving as external photosynthate sources. Galls, if not well defended, may therefore be attractive food sources for herbivores. Galls produced by some aphids, jumping plant lice, thrips, and gall midges in Japan, Palearctic region and in the Middle East visually resemble lepidopteran caterpillars. I propose that such visual resemblance may reduce herbivory of galls and surrounding plant tissues, resulting in an increase in galler survival due to reduced gall damage and in enhanced galler growth due to improved nutrient inflow to the galls, when herbivores avoid colonizing or consuming plant parts that look as if they have been occupied by other herbivores. Potential predators and parasitoids of caterpillars may be attracted to the caterpillar-like galls and then attack real caterpillars and other invertebrate herbivores, which would also be beneficial for both gallers and their hosts. PMID:27220745

  2. Photoadaptations of photosynthesis and carbon metabolism by phytoplankton from McMurdo Sound, Antarctica. I. Species-specific and community responses to reduced irradiances

    SciTech Connect

    Rivkin, R.B.; Voytek, M.A.

    1987-01-01

    Irradiance-dependent rates of photosynthesis and photosynthate labeling patterns were measured for phytoplankton in McMurdo Sound, Antarctica. Species-specific and traditional whole-water techniques were used to compare the physiological responses of algae collected in a high light environment at the ice edge and from a low light environment under the annual sea ice. There were differences among species within the same sample, for the same species isolated from high and low light environments, and when species-specific responses were compared with that of the natural assemblage. For algae collected beneath the sea ice, photosynthesis generally saturated at a lower irradiance, and the light-limited region of the P vs. I relationship had a steeper slope than for the same species collected at the ice edge. Low-light-adapted algae incorporated significantly less /sup 14/C into proteins and more into low molecular weight compounds and lipids than the same species isolated from a high light environment. Under conditions where reduced rates of protein synthesis were coupled with high rates of carbon uptake, the measurement of photosynthesis may not accurately reflect the physiological condition of the phytoplankton.

  3. Seasonal and spatial variation in carbon based secondary compounds in green algal and cyanobacterial members of the epiphytic lichen genus Lobaria.

    PubMed

    Gauslaa, Yngvar; Bidussi, Massimo; Solhaug, Knut Asbjørn; Asplund, Johan; Larsson, Per

    2013-10-01

    Acetone-extractable carbon based secondary compounds (CBSCs) were quantified in two epiphytic lichens to study possible effects of external factors (season and aspect) on secondary chemistry and to relate defense investments to biomass growth and changes in specific thallus mass (STM). At the end of four separate annual cycles starting in each of the four seasons, the cyanolichen Lobaria scrobiculata and the cephalolichen Lobaria pulmonaria (green algae as the primary photobiont and with localized Nostoc in internal cephalodia) were monitored in their natural forest habitats and after being transplanted at three contrasting aspects in open sites. Season strongly influenced most CBSCs. Medullary CBSCs in both species were twice as high in summer as in winter. Aspect hardly affected major CBSCs, whereas transplantation from forest to clear-cut slightly reduced these compounds. No major CBSCs in any species showed a trade-off with growth rate. Dry matter- as well as thallus area-based medullary CBSC contents increased with STM. The cortical usnic acid strongly increased with growth rate and followed spatial, but not seasonal variations in light exposure. Maximal CBSC levels during seasons with most herbivores is consistent with the hypothesis inferring that herbivory is a major selective force for CBSCs. Lack of trade-off between growth and defence investments suggests that these two processes do not compete for photosynthates. PMID:23664176

  4. Subcellular localization and vacuolar targeting of sorbitol dehydrogenase in apple seed.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiu-Ling; Hu, Zi-Ying; You, Chun-Xiang; Kong, Xiu-Zhen; Shi, Xiao-Pu

    2013-09-01

    Sorbitol is the primary photosynthate and translocated carbohydrate in fruit trees of the Rosaceae family. NAD(+)-dependent sorbitol dehydrogenase (NAD-SDH, EC 1.1.1.14), which mainly catalyzes the oxidation of sorbitol to fructose, plays a key role in regulating sink strength in apple. In this study, we found that apple NAD-SDH was ubiquitously distributed in epidermis, parenchyma, and vascular bundle in developing cotyledon. NAD-SDH was localized in the cytosol, the membranes of endoplasmic reticulum and vesicles, and the vacuolar lumen in the cotyledon at the middle stage of seed development. In contrast, NAD-SDH was mainly distributed in the protein storage vacuoles in cotyledon at the late stage of seed development. Sequence analysis revealed there is a putative signal peptide (SP), also being predicated to be a transmembrane domain, in the middle of proteins of apple NAD-SDH isoforms. To investigate whether the putative internal SP functions in the vacuolar targeting of NAD-SDH, we analyzed the localization of the SP-deletion mutants of MdSDH5 and MdSDH6 (two NAD-SDH isoforms in apple) by the transient expression system in Arabidopsis protoplasts. MdSDH5 and MdSDH6 were not localized in the vacuoles after their SPs were deleted, suggesting the internal SP functions in the vacuolar targeting of apple NAD-SDH.

  5. In Metabolic Engineering of Eukaryotic Microalgae: Potential and Challenges Come with Great Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Gimpel, Javier A.; Henríquez, Vitalia; Mayfield, Stephen P.

    2015-01-01

    The great phylogenetic diversity of microalgae is corresponded by a wide arrange of interesting and useful metabolites. Nonetheless metabolic engineering in microalgae has been limited, since specific transformation tools must be developed for each species for either the nuclear or chloroplast genomes. Microalgae as production platforms for metabolites offer several advantages over plants and other microorganisms, like the ability of GMO containment and reduced costs in culture media, respectively. Currently, microalgae have proved particularly well suited for the commercial production of omega-3 fatty acids and carotenoids. Therefore most metabolic engineering strategies have been developed for these metabolites. Microalgal biofuels have also drawn great attention recently, resulting in efforts for improving the production of hydrogen and photosynthates, particularly triacylglycerides. Metabolic pathways of microalgae have also been manipulated in order to improve photosynthetic growth under specific conditions and for achieving trophic conversion. Although these pathways are not strictly related to secondary metabolites, the synthetic biology approaches could potentially be translated to this field and will also be discussed. PMID:26696985

  6. Mycorrhizal Controls on Nitrogen Uptake Drive Carbon Cycling at the Global Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, M.; Fisher, J. B.; Brzostek, E. R.; Phillips, R.

    2015-12-01

    Nearly all plants form symbiotic relationships with one of two types of mycorrhizal fungi—arbuscular mycorrhizae (AM) and ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungi, which are essential to global biogeochemical cycling of nutrient elements. In soils with higher rates of nitrogen and phosphorus mineralization from organic matter, AM-associated plants can be better adapted than ECM-associated plants. Importantly, the photosynthate costs of nutrient uptake for AM-associated plants are usually lower than that for ECM-associated plants. Thus, the global carbon cycle is closely coupled with mycorrhizal controls on N uptake. To investigate the potential climate dependence of terrestrial environments from AM- and ECM-associated plants, this study uses the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM) with a plant productivity-optimized N acquisition model—the Fixation and Uptake of Nitrogen (FUN) model—integrated into its land model—the Community Land Model (CLM). This latest version of CLM coupled with FUN allows for the assessment of mycorrhizal controls on global biogeochemical cycling. Here, we show how the historical evolution of AM- and ECM-associations altered regional and global biogeochemical cycling and climate, and future projections over the next century.

  7. Fungi with multifunctional lifestyles: endophytic insect pathogenic fungi.

    PubMed

    Barelli, Larissa; Moonjely, Soumya; Behie, Scott W; Bidochka, Michael J

    2016-04-01

    This review examines the symbiotic, evolutionary, proteomic and genetic basis for a group of fungi that occupy a specialized niche as insect pathogens as well as endophytes. We focus primarily on species in the genera Metarhizium and Beauveria, traditionally recognized as insect pathogenic fungi but are also found as plant symbionts. Phylogenetic evidence suggests that these fungi are more closely related to grass endophytes and diverged from that lineage ca. 100 MYA. We explore how the dual life cycles of these fungi as insect pathogens and endophytes are coupled. We discuss the evolution of insect pathogenesis while maintaining an endophytic lifestyle and provide examples of genes that may be involved in the transition toward insect pathogenicity. That is, some genes for insect pathogenesis may have been co-opted from genes involved in endophytic colonization. Other genes may be multifunctional and serve in both lifestyle capacities. We suggest that their evolution as insect pathogens allowed them to effectively barter a specialized nitrogen source (i.e. insects) with host plants for photosynthate. These ubiquitous fungi may play an important role as plant growth promoters and have a potential reservoir of secondary metabolites. PMID:26644135

  8. Mapping grape berry photosynthesis by chlorophyll fluorescence imaging: the effect of saturating pulse intensity in different tissues.

    PubMed

    Breia, Richard; Vieira, Sónia; da Silva, Jorge Marques; Gerós, Hernâni; Cunha, Ana

    2013-01-01

    Grape berry development and ripening depends mainly on imported photosynthates from leaves, however, fruit photosynthesis may also contribute to the carbon economy of the fruit. In this study pulse amplitude modulated chlorophyll fluorescence imaging (imaging-PAM) was used to assess photosynthetic properties of tissues of green grape berries. In particular, the effect of the saturation pulse (SP) intensity was investigated. A clear tissue-specific distribution pattern of photosynthetic competence was observed. The exocarp revealed the highest photosynthetic capacity and the lowest susceptibility to photoinhibition, and the mesocarp exhibited very low fluorescence signals and photochemical competence. Remarkably, the seed outer integument revealed a photosynthetic ability similar to that of the exocarp. At a SP intensity of 5000 μmol m(-2) s(-1) several photochemical parameters were decreased, including maximum fluorescence in dark-adapted (F(m)) and light-adapted (F'(m)) samples and effective quantum yield of PSII (Φ(II)), but the inner tissues were susceptible to a SP intensity as low as 3200 μmol m(-2) s(-1) under light-adapted conditions, indicating a photoinhibitory interaction between SP and actinic light intensities and repetitive exposure to SP. These results open the way to further studies concerning the involvement of tissue-specific photosynthesis in the highly compartmentalized production and accumulation of organic compounds during grape berry development.

  9. Air pollution induced alterations in assimilate partitioning in Anagallis arvensis L

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, F.A.; Iqbal, M.; Ahmad, Z.; Saquib, M.; Ghouse, A.K.M. )

    1989-04-01

    The Thermal Power Plant Complex of Kasimpur (Aligarh, UP, India) emits enormous amounts of oxides of sulfur, nitrogen, and carbon as well as particulate matters on consuming 3192 MT of coal/day. These effluents induce significant alterations in carbon allocation in Anagallis arvensis populations. Monthly samples of 10 plants each were collected on random basis at seedling to mature stage from 0.5, 2, 6, 12 and 20 km leeward from the power plant. In oven dried samples, assimilate partitioning was noted to be more severely altered by the air pollutants in the seedling stage. In 2 and 3 months old populations, photosynthate allocation to root and shoot was not altered noticeably. Considerable changes in carbon allocation were noted in 4 mo old mature stage. The carbon allocation to fruit was 3 fold and to seed was about 4 fold greater in the population thriving 20 km away from the source than in those growing in the vicinity of the source. Assimilate partitioning was linearly related to the distance from power plant and the productivity of the populations.

  10. Qualitative Distinction of Autotrophic and Heterotrophic Processes at the Leaf Level by Means of Triple Stable Isotope (C–O–H) Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Kimak, Adam; Kern, Zoltan; Leuenberger, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Foliar samples were harvested from two oaks, a beech, and a yew at the same site in order to trace the development of the leaves over an entire vegetation season. Cellulose yield and stable isotopic compositions (δ13C, δ18O, and δD) were analyzed on leaf cellulose. All parameters unequivocally define a juvenile and a mature period in the foliar expansion of each species. The accompanying shifts of the δ13C-values are in agreement with the transition from remobilized carbohydrates (juvenile period), to current photosynthates (mature phase). While the opponent seasonal trends of δ18O of blade and vein cellulose are in perfect agreement with the state-of-art mechanistic understanding, the lack of this discrepancy for δD, documented for the first time, is unexpected. For example, the offset range of 18 permil (oak veins) to 57 permil (oak blades) in δD may represent a process driven shift from autotrophic to heterotrophic processes. The shared pattern between blade and vein found for both oak and beech suggests an overwhelming metabolic isotope effect on δD that might be accompanied by proton transfer linked to the Calvin-cycle. These results provide strong evidence that hydrogen and oxygen are under different biochemical controls even at the leaf level. PMID:26635835

  11. Functional Characterization of a Hexose Transporter from Root Endophyte Piriformospora indica.

    PubMed

    Rani, Mamta; Raj, Sumit; Dayaman, Vikram; Kumar, Manoj; Dua, Meenakshi; Johri, Atul K

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the mechanism of photosynthate transfer at symbiotic interface by fungal monosaccharide transporter is of substantial importance. The carbohydrate uptake at the apoplast by the fungus is facilitated by PiHXT5 hexose transporter in root endophytic fungus Piriformospora indica. The putative PiHXT5 belongs to MFS superfamily with 12 predicted transmembrane helices. It possess sugar transporter PFAM motif (PF0083) and MFS superfamily domain (PS50850). It contains the signature tags related to glucose transporter GLUT1 of human erythrocyte. PiHXT5 is regulated in response to mutualism as well as glucose concentration. We have functionally characterized PiHXT5 by complementation of hxt-null mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae EBY.VW4000. It is involved in transport of multiple sugars ranging from D-glucose, D-fructose, D-xylose, D-mannose, D-galactose with decreasing affinity. The uncoupling experiments indicate that it functions as H(+)/glucose co-transporter. Further, pH dependence analysis suggests that it functions maximum between pH 5 and 6. The expression of PiHXT5 is dependent on glucose concentration and was found to be expressed at low glucose levels (1 mM) which indicate its role as a high affinity glucose transporter. Our study on this sugar transporter will help in better understanding of carbon metabolism and flow in this agro-friendly fungus. PMID:27499747

  12. Regulation of cell-specific inositol metabolism and transport in plant salinity tolerance.

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, D E; Rammesmayer, G; Bohnert, H J

    1998-01-01

    myo-Inositol and its derivatives are commonly studied with respect to cell signaling and membrane biogenesis, but they also participate in responses to salinity in animals and plants. In this study, we focused on L-myo-inositol 1-phosphate synthase (INPS), which commits carbon to de novo synthesis, and myo-inositol O-methyltransferase (IMT), which uses myo-inositol for stress-induced accumulation of a methylinositol, D-ononitol. The Imt and Inps promoters are transcriptionally controlled. We determined that the transcription rates, transcript levels, and protein abundance are correlated. During normal growth, INPS is present in all cells, but IMT is repressed. After salinity stress, the amount of INPS was enhanced in leaves but repressed in roots. IMT was induced in all cell types. The absence of myo-inositol synthesis in roots is compensated by inositol/ononitol transport in the phloem. The mobilization of photosynthate through myo-inositol translocation links root metabolism to photosynthesis. Our model integrates the transcriptional control of a specialized metabolic pathway with physiological reactions in different tissues. The tissue-specific differential regulation of INPS, which leads to a gradient of myo-inositol synthesis, supports root growth and sodium uptake. By inducing expression of IMT and increasing myo-inositol synthesis, metabolic end products accumulate, facilitating sodium sequestration and protecting photosynthesis. PMID:9596634

  13. Summer drought alters carbon allocation to roots and root respiration in mountain grassland

    PubMed Central

    Hasibeder, Roland; Fuchslueger, Lucia; Richter, Andreas; Bahn, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Drought affects the carbon (C) source and sink activities of plant organs, with potential consequences for belowground C allocation, a key process of the terrestrial C cycle. The responses of belowground C allocation dynamics to drought are so far poorly understood. We combined experimental rain exclusion with 13C pulse labelling in a mountain meadow to analyse the effects of summer drought on the dynamics of belowground allocation of recently assimilated C and how it is partitioned among different carbohydrate pools and root respiration. Severe soil moisture deficit decreased the ecosystem C uptake and the amounts and velocity of C allocated from shoots to roots. However, the proportion of recently assimilated C translocated belowground remained unaffected by drought. Reduced root respiration, reflecting reduced C demand under drought, was increasingly sustained by C reserves, whilst recent assimilates were preferentially allocated to root storage and an enlarged pool of osmotically active compounds. Our results indicate that under drought conditions the usage of recent photosynthates is shifted from metabolic activity to osmotic adjustment and storage compounds. PMID:25385284

  14. Bacterial quorum sensing and nitrogen cycling in rhizosphere soil

    SciTech Connect

    DeAngelis, K.M.; Lindow, S.E.; Firestone, M.K.

    2008-10-01

    Plant photosynthate fuels carbon-limited microbial growth and activity, resulting in increased rhizosphere nitrogen (N)-mineralization. Most soil organic N is macromolecular (chitin, protein, nucleotides); enzymatic depolymerization is likely rate-limiting for plant N accumulation. Analyzing Avena (wild oat) planted in microcosms containing sieved field soil, we observed increased rhizosphere chitinase and protease specific activities, bacterial cell densities, and dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) compared to bulk soil. Low-molecular weight DON (<3000 Da) was undetectable in bulk soil but comprised 15% of rhizosphere DON. Extracellular enzyme production in many bacteria requires quorum sensing (QS), cell-density dependent group behavior. Because proteobacteria are considered major rhizosphere colonizers, we assayed the proteobacterial QS signals acyl-homoserine lactones (AHLs), which were significantly increased in the rhizosphere. To investigate the linkage between soil signaling and N cycling, we characterized 533 bacterial isolates from Avena rhizosphere: 24% had chitinase or protease activity and AHL production; disruption of QS in 7 of 8 eight isolates disrupted enzyme activity. Many {alpha}-Proteobacteria were newly found with QS-controlled extracellular enzyme activity. Enhanced specific activities of N-cycling enzymes accompanied by bacterial density-dependent behaviors in rhizosphere soil gives rise to the hypothesis that QS could be a control point in the complex process of rhizosphere N-mineralization.

  15. Translocation and Accumulation of Translocate in the Sugar Beet Petiole 1

    PubMed Central

    Geiger, D. R.; Saunders, M. A.; Cataldo, D. A.

    1969-01-01

    Accumulation of translocate during steady-state labeling of photosynthate was measured in the source leaf petioles of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L. monogerm hybrid). During an 8-hr period, 2.7% of the translocate or 0.38 μg carbon/min was accumulated per cm petiole. Material was stored mainly as sucrose and as compounds insoluble in 80% ethanol. The minimum peak velocity of translocation approached an average of 54 cm/hr as the specific activity of the 14CO2 pulse was progressively increased. The ratio of cross sectional area required for translocation to actual sieve tube area in the petiole was 1.2. A regression analysis of translocation rate versus sieve tube cross sectional area yielded a coefficient of 0.76. The specific mass transfer rate in the petiole was 1.4 g/hr cm2 phloem or 4.8 g/hr cm2 sieve tube. Histoautoradiographic studies indicated that translocation occurs through the area of phloem occupied by sieve tubes and companion cells while storage occurs in these cells plus cambium and phloem parenchyma cells. The ability of the petiole to act as a sink for translocate is consistent with the concept that storage along path tissue serves to buffer sucrose concentration in the translocate during periods of fluctuating assimilation. Images PMID:16657254

  16. Seasonal dynamics of fungal communities in a temperate oak forest soil.

    PubMed

    Voříšková, Jana; Brabcová, Vendula; Cajthaml, Tomáš; Baldrian, Petr

    2014-01-01

    Fungi are the agents primarily responsible for the transformation of plant-derived carbon in terrestrial ecosystems. However, little is known of their responses to the seasonal changes in resource availability in deciduous forests, including photosynthate allocation below ground and seasonal inputs of fresh litter. Vertical stratification of and seasonal changes in fungal abundance, activity and community composition were investigated in the litter, organic and upper mineral soils of a temperate Quercus petraea forest using ergosterol and extracellular enzyme assays and amplicon 454-pyrosequencing of the rDNA-ITS region. Fungal activity, biomass and diversity decreased substantially with soil depth. The highest enzyme activities were detected in winter, especially in litter, where these activities were followed by a peak in fungal biomass during spring. The litter community exhibited more profound seasonal changes than did the community in the deeper horizons. In the litter, saprotrophic genera reached their seasonal maxima in autumn, but summer typically saw the highest abundance of ectomycorrhizal taxa. Although the composition of the litter community changes over the course of the year, the mineral soil shows changes in biomass. The fungal community is affected by season. Litter decomposition and phytosynthate allocation represent important factors contributing to the observed variations. PMID:24010995

  17. Low Carbon Costs of Nitrogen Fixation in Tropical Dry Forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gei, M. G.; Powers, J. S.

    2015-12-01

    Legume tree species with the ability to fix nitrogen (N) are highly diverse and widespread across tropical forests but in particular in the dry tropics. Their ecological success in lower latitudes has been called a "paradox": soil N in the tropics is thought to be high, while acquiring N through fixation incurs high energetic costs. However, the long held assumptions that N fixation is limited by photosynthate and that N fixation penalizes plant productivity have rarely been tested, particularly in legume tree species. We show results from three different experiments where we grew eleven species of tropical dry forest legumes. We quantified plant biomass and N fixation using nodulation and the 15N natural isotope abundance (Ndfa or nitrogen derived from fixation). These data show little evidence for costs of N fixation in seedlings grown under different soil fertility, light regimes, and with different microbial communities. Seedling productivity did not incur major costs because of N fixation: indeed, the average slope between Ndfa and biomass was positive (range in slopes: -0.03 to 0.3). Moreover, foliar N, which varied among species, was tightly constrained and not correlated with Ndfa. This finding implies that legume species have a target N that does not change depending on N acquisition strategies. The process of N fixation in tropical legumes may be more carbon efficient than previously thought. This view is more consistent with the hyperabundance of members of this family in tropical ecosystems.

  18. Response of different-aged black cherry trees to ambient ozone exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Fredericksen, T.S.; Joyce, B.J.; Kouterick, K.B.; Kolb, T.E.; Skelly, J.M.; Steiner, K.C.; Savage, J.E.; Snyder, K.R. )

    1994-06-01

    Black cherry (Prunus serotina Ehrh.) is a valuable commercial timber species which is also highly sensitive to ozone relative to other eastern deciduous tree species. Studies of ozone effects on forest trees have been restricted mostly to experiments using small seedlings under controlled conditions. Yet, mature trees may differ from seedlings in physiology, morphology, and exposure to air pollutants. An experiment was conducted in 1993 to determine differences in ozone uptake and foliar injury symptoms between open-ground seedlings, forest saplings, and mature forest trees of black cherry in northcentral Pennsylvania. Seedlings grew under the highest ozone concentrations and also had greater seasonal ozone uptake due to higher rates of stomatal conductance. However, because of their indeterminate growth habit, seedlings had lower cumulative ozone uptake per leaf lifespan than saplings or mature trees, both of which had determinate shoot growth. Although greater initially for seedlings, foliar injury was nearly identical between size classes by the end of the growing season. Leaves in the lower crown of larger trees had lower ozone uptake than leaves in the upper crown, but exhibited more foliar injury symptoms. Lower crown leaves received more effective exposure to ozone because of their thinner leaves and had less available photosynthate for repair or replacement of damaged tissue.

  19. Annual Growth Bands in Hymenaea courbaril

    SciTech Connect

    Westbrook, J A; Guilderson, T P; Colinvaux, P A

    2004-02-09

    One significant source of annual temperature and precipitation data arises from the regular annual secondary growth rings of trees. Several tropical tree species are observed to form regular growth bands that may or may not form annually. Such growth was observed in one stem disk of the tropical legume Hymenaea courbaril near the area of David, Panama. In comparison to annual reference {Delta}{sup 14}C values from wood and air, the {Delta}{sup 14}C values from the secondary growth rings formed by H. courbaril were determined to be annual in nature in this one stem disk specimen. During this study, H. courbaril was also observed to translocate recently produced photosynthate into older growth rings as sapwood is converted to heartwood. This process alters the overall {Delta}{sup 14}C values of these transitional growth rings as cellulose with a higher {Delta}{sup 14}C content is translocated into growth rings with a relatively lower {Delta}{sup 14}C content. Once the annual nature of these growth rings is established, further stable isotope analyses on H. courbaril material in other studies may help to complete gaps in the understanding of short and of long term global climate patterns.

  20. Modeling the effects of ozone on soybean growth and yield.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, K; Miller, J E; Flagler, R B; Heck, W W

    1990-01-01

    A simple mechanistic model was developed based on an existing growth model in order to address the mechanisms of the effects of ozone on growth and yield of soybean [Glycine max. (L.) Merr. 'Davis'] and interacting effects of other environmental stresses. The model simulates daily growth of soybean plants using environmental data including shortwave radiation, temperature, precipitation, irrigation and ozone concentration. Leaf growth, dry matter accumulation, water budget, nitrogen input and seed growth linked to senescence and abscission of leaves are described in the model. The effects of ozone are modeled as reduced photosynthate production and accelerated senescence. The model was applied to the open-top chamber experiments in which soybean plants were exposed to ozone under two levels of soil moisture regimes. After calibrating the model to the growth data and seed yield, goodness-of-fit of the model was tested. The model fitted well for top dry weight in the vegetative growth phase and also at maturity. The effect of ozone on seen yield was also described satisfactorily by the model. The simulation showed apparent interaction between the effect of ozone and soil moisture stress on the seed yield. The model revealed that further work is needed concerning the effect of ozone on the senescence process and the consequences of alteration of canopy microclimate by the open-top chambers. PMID:15092277

  1. Differential CO2 effect on primary carbon metabolism of flag leaves in durum wheat (Triticum durum Desf.).

    PubMed

    Aranjuelo, Iker; Erice, Gorka; Sanz-Sáez, Alvaro; Abadie, Cyril; Gilard, Françoise; Gil-Quintana, Erena; Avice, Jean-Christophe; Staudinger, Christiana; Wienkoop, Stefanie; Araus, Jose L; Bourguignon, Jacques; Irigoyen, Juan J; Tcherkez, Guillaume

    2015-12-01

    C sink/source balance and N assimilation have been identified as target processes conditioning crop responsiveness to elevated CO2 . However, little is known about phenology-driven modifications of C and N primary metabolism at elevated CO2 in cereals such as wheat. Here, we examined the differential effect of elevated CO2 at two development stages (onset of flowering, onset of grain filling) in durum wheat (Triticum durum, var. Sula) using physiological measurements (photosynthesis, isotopes), metabolomics, proteomics and (15) N labelling. Our results show that growth at elevated CO2 was accompanied by photosynthetic acclimation through a lower internal (mesophyll) conductance but no significant effect on Rubisco content, maximal carboxylation or electron transfer. Growth at elevated CO2 altered photosynthate export and tended to accelerate leaf N remobilization, which was visible for several proteins and amino acids, as well as lysine degradation metabolism. However, grain biomass produced at elevated CO2 was larger and less N rich, suggesting that nitrogen use efficiency rather than photosynthesis is an important target for improvement, even in good CO2 -responsive cultivars.

  2. Nitrogen control of chloroplast differentiation. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, G.W.

    1998-05-01

    This project was directed toward understanding at the physiological, biochemical and molecular levels of how photosynthetic organisms adapt to long-term nitrogen-deficiency conditions is quite incomplete even though limitation of this nutrient is the most commonly restricts plant growth and development. For our work on this problem, the unicellular green alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, was grown in continuous cultures in which steady-state levels of nitrogen can be precisely controlled. N-limited cells exhibit the classical symptoms of deficiency of this nutrient, chlorosis and slow growth rates, and respond to nitrogen provision by rapid greening and chloroplast differentiation. We have addressed three aspects of this problem: (1) the regulation of pigment synthesis; (2) control of expression of nuclear genes encoding photosynthetic proteins; (3) changes in metabolic and electron transport pathways that enable sustained CO{sub 2} fixation even though they cannot be readily converted into amino and nucleic acids. For the last, principle components are: (a) enhanced mitochondrial respiratory activity intimately associated with photosynthates, and (b) the occurrence in thylakoids of a supplemental electron transport pathway that facilitates reduction of the plastoquinone pool. Together, these distinguishing features of N-limited cells are likely to enable cell survival, especially under conditions of high irradiance stress.

  3. Nanoscale channels on ectomycorrhizal-colonized chlorite: Evidence for plant-driven fungal dissolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gazzè, Salvatore A.; Saccone, Loredana; Vala Ragnarsdottir, K.; Smits, Mark M.; Duran, Adele L.; Leake, Jonathan R.; Banwart, Steven A.; McMaster, Terence J.

    2012-09-01

    The roots of many trees in temperate and boreal forests are sheathed with ectomycorrhizal fungi (EMF) that extend into the soil, forming intimate contact with soil minerals, from which they absorb nutrient elements required by the plants and, in return, are supported by the organic carbon photosynthesized by the trees. While EMF are strongly implicated in mineral weathering, their effects on mineral surfaces at the nanoscale are less documented. In the present study, we investigated the effects of symbiotic EMF on the topography of a chlorite mineral using atomic force microscopy. A cleaning protocol was successfully applied to remove fungal hyphae without altering the underlying mineral structure and topography. Examination of the exposed chlorite surface showed the presence of primary channels, of the order of a micron in width and up to 50 nm in depth, the morphology of which strongly indicates a fungal-induced origin. Smaller secondary channels were observed extending from the primary channels and would appear to be involved in their enlargement. The presence of channels is the first nanoscale demonstration of the effects of fungal interaction, fuelled by plant photosynthate, on the topography of a chlorite mineral, and it provides clear evidence of the ability of EMF to enhance mineral dissolution.

  4. Winter wheat: A model for the simulation of growth and yield in winter wheat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, D. N.; Smika, D. E.; Black, A. L.; Willis, W. O.; Bauer, A. (Principal Investigator)

    1981-01-01

    The basic ideas and constructs for a general physical/physiological process level winter wheat simulation model are documented. It is a materials balance model which calculates daily increments of photosynthate production and respiratory losses in the crop canopy. The partitioning of the resulting dry matter to the active growing tissues in the plant each day, transpiration and the uptake of nitrogen from the soil profile are simulated. It incorporates the RHIZOS model which simulates, in two dimensions, the movement of water, roots, and soluble nutrients through the soil profile. It records the time of initiation of each of the plant organs. These phenological events are calculated from temperature functions with delays resulting from physiological stress. Stress is defined mathematically as an imbalance in the metabolite supply; demand ratio. Physiological stress is also the basis for the calculation of rates of tiller and floret abortion. Thus, tillering and head differentiation are modeled as the resulants of the two processes, morphogenesis and abortion, which may be occurring simulaneously.

  5. Functional Characterization of a Hexose Transporter from Root Endophyte Piriformospora indica

    PubMed Central

    Rani, Mamta; Raj, Sumit; Dayaman, Vikram; Kumar, Manoj; Dua, Meenakshi; Johri, Atul K.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the mechanism of photosynthate transfer at symbiotic interface by fungal monosaccharide transporter is of substantial importance. The carbohydrate uptake at the apoplast by the fungus is facilitated by PiHXT5 hexose transporter in root endophytic fungus Piriformospora indica. The putative PiHXT5 belongs to MFS superfamily with 12 predicted transmembrane helices. It possess sugar transporter PFAM motif (PF0083) and MFS superfamily domain (PS50850). It contains the signature tags related to glucose transporter GLUT1 of human erythrocyte. PiHXT5 is regulated in response to mutualism as well as glucose concentration. We have functionally characterized PiHXT5 by complementation of hxt-null mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae EBY.VW4000. It is involved in transport of multiple sugars ranging from D-glucose, D-fructose, D-xylose, D-mannose, D-galactose with decreasing affinity. The uncoupling experiments indicate that it functions as H+/glucose co-transporter. Further, pH dependence analysis suggests that it functions maximum between pH 5 and 6. The expression of PiHXT5 is dependent on glucose concentration and was found to be expressed at low glucose levels (1 mM) which indicate its role as a high affinity glucose transporter. Our study on this sugar transporter will help in better understanding of carbon metabolism and flow in this agro-friendly fungus. PMID:27499747

  6. Association between photosynthesis and contrasting features of minor veins in leaves of summer annuals loading phloem via symplastic versus apoplastic routes.

    PubMed

    Muller, Onno; Cohu, Christopher M; Stewart, Jared J; Protheroe, Johanna A; Demmig-Adams, Barbara; Adams, William W

    2014-09-01

    Foliar vascular anatomy and photosynthesis were evaluated for a number of summer annual species that either load sugars into the phloem via a symplastic route (Cucumis sativus L. cv. Straight Eight; Cucurbita pepo L. cv. Italian Zucchini Romanesco; Citrullus lanatus L. cv. Faerie Hybrid; Cucurbita pepo L. cv. Autumn Gold) or an apoplastic route (Nicotiana tabacum L.; Solanum lycopersicum L. cv. Brandywine; Gossypium hirsutum L.; Helianthus annuus L. cv. Soraya), as well as winter annual apoplastic loaders (Spinacia oleracea L. cv. Giant Nobel; Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynhold Col-0, Swedish and Italian ecotypes). For all summer annuals, minor vein cross-sectional xylem area and tracheid number as well as the ratio of phloem loading cells to phloem sieve elements, each when normalized for foliar vein density (VD), was correlated with photosynthesis. These links presumably reflect (1) the xylem's role in providing water to meet foliar transpirational demand supporting photosynthesis and (2) the importance of the driving force of phloem loading as well as the cross-sectional area for phloem sap flux to match foliar photosynthate production. While photosynthesis correlated with the product of VD and cross-sectional phloem cell area among symplastic loaders, photosynthesis correlated with the product of VD and phloem cell number per vein among summer annual apoplastic loaders. Phloem cell size has thus apparently been a target of selection among symplastic loaders (where loading depends on enzyme concentration within loading cells) versus phloem cell number among apoplastic loaders (where loading depends on membrane transporter numbers).

  7. Seasonal dynamics of fungal communities in a temperate oak forest soil.

    PubMed

    Voříšková, Jana; Brabcová, Vendula; Cajthaml, Tomáš; Baldrian, Petr

    2014-01-01

    Fungi are the agents primarily responsible for the transformation of plant-derived carbon in terrestrial ecosystems. However, little is known of their responses to the seasonal changes in resource availability in deciduous forests, including photosynthate allocation below ground and seasonal inputs of fresh litter. Vertical stratification of and seasonal changes in fungal abundance, activity and community composition were investigated in the litter, organic and upper mineral soils of a temperate Quercus petraea forest using ergosterol and extracellular enzyme assays and amplicon 454-pyrosequencing of the rDNA-ITS region. Fungal activity, biomass and diversity decreased substantially with soil depth. The highest enzyme activities were detected in winter, especially in litter, where these activities were followed by a peak in fungal biomass during spring. The litter community exhibited more profound seasonal changes than did the community in the deeper horizons. In the litter, saprotrophic genera reached their seasonal maxima in autumn, but summer typically saw the highest abundance of ectomycorrhizal taxa. Although the composition of the litter community changes over the course of the year, the mineral soil shows changes in biomass. The fungal community is affected by season. Litter decomposition and phytosynthate allocation represent important factors contributing to the observed variations.

  8. Seasonal dynamics in the stable carbon isotope composition δ¹³C from non-leafy branch, trunk and coarse root CO₂ efflux of adult deciduous (Fagus sylvatica) and evergreen (Picea abies) trees.

    PubMed

    Kuptz, Daniel; Matyssek, Rainer; Grams, Thorsten E E

    2011-03-01

    Respiration is a substantial driver of carbon (C) flux in forest ecosystems and stable C isotopes provide an excellent tool for its investigation. We studied seasonal dynamics in δ¹³C of CO₂ efflux (δ¹³C(E)) from non-leafy branches, upper and lower trunks and coarse roots of adult trees, comparing deciduous Fagus sylvatica (European beech) with evergreen Picea abies (Norway spruce). In both species, we observed strong and similar seasonal dynamics in the δ¹³C(E) of above-ground plant components, whereas δ¹³C(E) of coarse roots was rather stable. During summer, δ¹³C(E) of trunks was about -28.2‰ (Beech) and -26.8‰ (Spruce). During winter dormancy, δ¹³C(E) increased by 5.6-9.1‰. The observed dynamics are likely related to a switch from growth to starch accumulation during fall and remobilization of starch, low TCA cycle activity and accumulation of malate by PEPc during winter. The seasonal δ¹³C(E) pattern of branches of Beech and upper trunks of Spruce was less variable, probably because these organs were additionally supplied by winter photosynthesis. In view of our results and pervious studies, we conclude that the pronounced increases in δ¹³C(E) of trunks during the winter results from interrupted access to recent photosynthates.

  9. How succulent leaves of Aizoaceae avoid mesophyll conductance limitations of photosynthesis and survive drought

    PubMed Central

    Ripley, Brad S.

    2013-01-01

    In several taxa, increasing leaf succulence has been associated with decreasing mesophyll conductance (g M) and an increasing dependence on Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM). However, in succulent Aizoaceae, the photosynthetic tissues are adjacent to the leaf surfaces with an internal achlorophyllous hydrenchyma. It was hypothesized that this arrangement increases g M, obviating a strong dependence on CAM, while the hydrenchyma stores water and nutrients, both of which would only be sporadically available in highly episodic environments. These predictions were tested with species from the Aizoaceae with a 5-fold variation in leaf succulence. It was shown that g M values, derived from the response of photosynthesis to intercellular CO2 concentration (A:C i), were independent of succulence, and that foliar photosynthate δ13C values were typical of C3, but not CAM photosynthesis. Under water stress, the degree of leaf succulence was positively correlated with an increasing ability to buffer photosynthetic capacity over several hours and to maintain light reaction integrity over several days. This was associated with decreased rates of water loss, rather than tolerance of lower leaf water contents. Additionally, the hydrenchyma contained ~26% of the leaf nitrogen content, possibly providing a nutrient reservoir. Thus the intermittent use of C3 photosynthesis interspersed with periods of no positive carbon assimilation is an alternative strategy to CAM for succulent taxa (Crassulaceae and Aizoaceae) which occur sympatrically in the Cape Floristic Region of South Africa. PMID:24127513

  10. Co[sub 2] exchange, environmental productivity indices, and productivity of opuntia ficus-indica under current and elevated CO[sub 2] concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Nobel, P.S.

    1992-01-01

    This project involved placing mature cladodes (flattened stem segments) of Opuntia ficus-indica in growth chambers containing 360 or 720 ppM CO[sub 2]. After nine weeks, the new daughter cladodes initiated on the planted cladodes averaged 7% higher in biomass but 8% less is area, leading to a specific stem mass for this Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) species that was 16% higher under the elevated CO[sub 2] condition. This is similar to be less dramatic than the increase in specific leaf mass for C[sub 3] and C[sub 4] plants under elevated CO[sub 2], which generally ranges from 28% to 40%. Another contrast with C[sub 3] and C[sub 4] Plants was the reliance of the new organs of the CAM plant on biomass translocated from existing organs instead of derived directly from current photosynthate. In this regard, 18% less dry weight was translocated from basal cladodes into daughter cladodes of Q. ficus-indica at 720 ppM CO[sub 2] compared with 360 ppM.

  11. Co{sub 2} exchange, environmental productivity indices, and productivity of opuntia ficus-indica under current and elevated CO{sub 2} concentrations. Carbon Dioxide Research Program

    SciTech Connect

    Nobel, P.S.

    1992-12-31

    This project involved placing mature cladodes (flattened stem segments) of Opuntia ficus-indica in growth chambers containing 360 or 720 ppM CO{sub 2}. After nine weeks, the new daughter cladodes initiated on the planted cladodes averaged 7% higher in biomass but 8% less is area, leading to a specific stem mass for this Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) species that was 16% higher under the elevated CO{sub 2} condition. This is similar to be less dramatic than the increase in specific leaf mass for C{sub 3} and C{sub 4} plants under elevated CO{sub 2}, which generally ranges from 28% to 40%. Another contrast with C{sub 3} and C{sub 4} Plants was the reliance of the new organs of the CAM plant on biomass translocated from existing organs instead of derived directly from current photosynthate. In this regard, 18% less dry weight was translocated from basal cladodes into daughter cladodes of Q. ficus-indica at 720 ppM CO{sub 2} compared with 360 ppM.

  12. How plants manage food reserves at night: quantitative models and open questions

    PubMed Central

    Scialdone, Antonio; Howard, Martin

    2015-01-01

    In order to cope with night-time darkness, plants during the day allocate part of their photosynthate for storage, often as starch. This stored reserve is then degraded at night to sustain metabolism and growth. However, night-time starch degradation must be tightly controlled, as over-rapid turnover results in premature depletion of starch before dawn, leading to starvation. Recent experiments in Arabidopsis have shown that starch degradation proceeds at a constant rate during the night and is set such that starch reserves are exhausted almost precisely at dawn. Intriguingly, this pattern is robust with the degradation rate being adjusted to compensate for unexpected changes in the time of darkness onset. While a fundamental role for the circadian clock is well-established, the underlying mechanisms controlling starch degradation remain poorly characterized. Here, we discuss recent quantitative models that have been proposed to explain how plants can compute the appropriate starch degradation rate, a process that requires an effective arithmetic division calculation. We review experimental confirmation of the models, and describe aspects that require further investigation. Overall, the process of night-time starch degradation necessitates a fundamental metabolic role for the circadian clock and, more generally, highlights how cells process information in order to optimally manage their resources. PMID:25873925

  13. Plastid RNA polymerases: orchestration of enzymes with different evolutionary origins controls chloroplast biogenesis during the plant life cycle.

    PubMed

    Pfannschmidt, Thomas; Blanvillain, Robert; Merendino, Livia; Courtois, Florence; Chevalier, Fabien; Liebers, Monique; Grübler, Björn; Hommel, Elisabeth; Lerbs-Mache, Silva

    2015-12-01

    Chloroplasts are the sunlight-collecting organelles of photosynthetic eukaryotes that energetically drive the biosphere of our planet. They are the base for all major food webs by providing essential photosynthates to all heterotrophic organisms including humans. Recent research has focused largely on an understanding of the function of these organelles, but knowledge about the biogenesis of chloroplasts is rather limited. It is known that chloroplasts develop from undifferentiated precursor plastids, the proplastids, in meristematic cells. This review focuses on the activation and action of plastid RNA polymerases, which play a key role in the development of new chloroplasts from proplastids. Evolutionarily, plastids emerged from the endosymbiosis of a cyanobacterium-like ancestor into a heterotrophic eukaryote. As an evolutionary remnant of this process, they possess their own genome, which is expressed by two types of plastid RNA polymerase, phage-type and prokaryotic-type RNA polymerase. The protein subunits of these polymerases are encoded in both the nuclear and plastid genomes. Their activation and action therefore require a highly sophisticated regulation that controls and coordinates the expression of the components encoded in the plastid and nucleus. Stoichiometric expression and correct assembly of RNA polymerase complexes is achieved by a combination of developmental and environmentally induced programmes. This review highlights the current knowledge about the functional coordination between the different types of plastid RNA polymerases and provides working models of their sequential expression and function for future investigations. PMID:26355147

  14. Louis Nico Marie Duysens (March 15, 1921-September 8, 2015): a leading biophysicist of the 20th century.

    PubMed

    Govindjee; Pulles, M P J

    2016-06-01

    Louis Nico Marie (L. N. M.) Duijsens (Duysens) was one of the giants in the biophysics of photosynthesis. His PhD thesis "Transfer of Excitation Energy in Photosynthesis" (Duysens, 1952) is a classic; he introduced light-induced absorption difference spectroscopy to photosynthesis research and proved the existence of reaction centers, introducing advanced methods from physics to understand biological processes. Further, it is his 1959-1961 seminal work, with Jan Amesz, that provided evidence for the existence of the series scheme for the two light reactions in oxygenic photosynthesis. In one word, he was one of the master biophysicists of the 20th century-who provided direct measurements on many key intermediates, and made us understand the intricacies of photosynthesis with a simplicity that no one else ever did. We present here our personal perspective of the scientist that Lou Duysens was. For an earlier perspective, see van Grondelle and van Gorkom (Photosynth Res 120: 3-7, 2014). PMID:27039907

  15. Insights into secondary growth in perennial plants: its unequal spatial and temporal dynamics in the apple (Malus domestica) is driven by architectural position and fruit load

    PubMed Central

    Lauri, P. É.; Kelner, J. J.; Trottier, C.; Costes, E.

    2010-01-01

    Background and Aims Secondary growth is a main physiological sink. However, the hierarchy between the processes which compete with secondary growth is still a matter of debate, especially on fruit trees where fruit weight dramatically increases with time. It was hypothesized that tree architecture, here mediated by branch age, is likely to have a major effect on the dynamics of secondary growth within a growing season. Methods Three variables were monitored on 6-year-old ‘Golden Delicious’ apple trees from flowering time to harvest: primary shoot growth, fruit volume, and cross-section area of branch portions of consecutive ages. Analyses were done through an ANOVA-type analysis in a linear mixed model framework. Key Results Secondary growth exhibited three consecutive phases characterized by unequal relative area increment over the season. The age of the branch had the strongest effect, with the highest and lowest relative area increment for the current-year shoots and the trunk, respectively. The growth phase had a lower effect, with a shift of secondary growth through the season from leafy shoots towards older branch portions. Eventually, fruit load had an effect on secondary growth mainly after primary growth had ceased. Conclusions The results support the idea that relationships between production of photosynthates and allocation depend on both primary growth and branch architectural position. Fruit load mainly interacted with secondary growth later in the season, especially on old branch portions. PMID:20228088

  16. The LysR-type transcription factor PacR is a global regulator of photosynthetic carbon assimilation in Anabaena.

    PubMed

    Picossi, Silvia; Flores, Enrique; Herrero, Antonia

    2015-09-01

    Cyanobacteria perform water-splitting photosynthesis and are important primary producers impacting the carbon and nitrogen cycles at global scale. They fix CO2 through ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCo) and have evolved a distinct CO2 concentrating mechanism (CCM) that builds high CO2 concentrations in the vicinity of RuBisCo favouring its carboxylase activity. Filamentous cyanobacteria such as Anabaena fix CO2 in photosynthetic vegetative cells, which donate photosynthate to heterocysts that rely on a heterotrophic metabolism to fix N2 . CCM elements are induced in response to inorganic carbon limitation, a cue that exposes the photosynthetic apparatus to photodamage by over-reduction. An Anabaena mutant lacking the LysR-type transcription factor All3953 grew poorly and dies under high light. The rbcL operon encoding RuBisCo was induced upon carbon limitation in the wild type but not in the mutant. ChIP-Seq analysis was used to globally identify All3953 targets under carbon limitation. Targets include, besides rbcL, genes encoding CCM elements, photorespiratory pathway- photosystem- and electron transport-related components, and factors, including flavodiiron proteins, with a demonstrated or putative function in photoprotection. Quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis of selected All3953 targets showed regulation in the wild type but not in the mutant. All3953 (PacR) is a global regulator of carbon assimilation in an oxygenic photoautotroph. PMID:25684321

  17. Effect of Removing Superior Spikelets on Grain Filling of Inferior Spikelets in Rice.

    PubMed

    You, Cuicui; Zhu, Honglei; Xu, Beibei; Huang, Wenxiao; Wang, Shaohua; Ding, Yanfeng; Liu, Zhenghui; Li, Ganghua; Chen, Lin; Ding, Chengqiang; Tang, She

    2016-01-01

    Large-panicle rice cultivars often fail to reach their yield potential due to the poor grain filling of inferior spikelets (IS). Thus, it is important to determine the causes of poor IS grain filling. In this study, we attempted to identify whether inferior grain filling of large panicles is restricted by superior spikelets (SS) and their physiological mechanism. SS were removed from two homozygous japonica rice strains (W1844 and WJ165) during flowering in an attempt to force photosynthate transport to the IS. We measured the effects of SS removal on seed setting rate, grain weight, grain filling rate, sucrose content, as well as hormone levels, activities of key enzymes, and expression of genes involved in sucrose to starch metabolism in rice IS during grain filling. The results showed that SS removal improved IS grain filling by increasing the seed setting rate, grain weight, sucrose content, and hormone levels. SS removal also enhanced the activities of key enzymes and the expression levels of genes involved in sucrose to starch metabolism. These results suggest that sucrose and several hormones act as signal substances and play a vital role in grain filling by regulating enzyme activities and gene expression. Therefore, IS grain filling is restricted by SS, which limit assimilate supply and plant hormones, leading to poor grain filling of IS. PMID:27547210

  18. Screening three cultivars of Vigna mungo L. against ozone by application of ethylenediurea (EDU).

    PubMed

    Singh, Shalini; Agrawal, S B; Singh, Poonam; Agrawal, M

    2010-10-01

    Three Indian black gram cultivars (Vigna mungo L. cv. Barkha, Shekhar and TU-94-2) were grown at a tropical suburban site in Varanasi, India to evaluate the varietal differences in response to ambient O(3) under field conditions using ethylenediurea (EDU). EDU (400 ppm) was given as soil drench at 10-day intervals during the growth period of the cultivars. O(3) monitoring data clearly showed high concentrations with a mean value ranging between 41.3 and 59.9 ppb. EDU treatment caused significant increases in various growth parameters and total biomass accumulation in Barkha and Shekhar. EDU caused retention of more biomass in leaves during vegetative period and translocated more photosynthates towards reproductive parts, which resulted into yield enhancement. Weight of seeds plant(-1) was higher by 36.4% and 35.6% in Barkha and Shekhar, respectively, treated with EDU compared to non-EDU-treated plants. However, TU-94-2 did not exhibit any significant difference in weight of seeds plant(-1). Starch, total sugar, amino acids and K contents increased in seeds of EDU-treated plants leading to improvement in quality response index (QRI) of seeds. EDU helped in identifying the cultivar susceptibility to O(3) stress and therefore is very useful as a monitoring tool to assess the impact of ambient O(3) on plants under natural field conditions particularly in areas experiencing moderate concentrations of O(3).

  19. Divergent metabolome and proteome suggest functional independence of dual phloem transport systems in cucurbits

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Baichen; Tolstikov, Vladimir; Turnbull, Colin; Hicks, Leslie M.; Fiehn, Oliver

    2010-01-01

    Cucurbitaceous plants (cucurbits) have long been preferred models for studying phloem physiology. However, these species are unusual in that they possess two different phloem systems, one within the main vascular bundles [fascicular phloem (FP)] and another peripheral to the vascular bundles and scattered through stem and petiole cortex tissues [extrafascicular phloem (EFP)]. We have revisited the assumption that the sap released after shoot incision originates from the FP, and also investigated the long-standing question of why the sugar content of this sap is ~30-fold less than predicted for requirements of photosynthate delivery. Video microscopy and phloem labeling experiments unexpectedly reveal that FP very quickly becomes blocked upon cutting, whereas the extrafascicular phloem bleeds for extended periods. Thus, all cucurbit phloem sap studies to date have reported metabolite, protein, and RNA composition and transport in the relatively minor extrafascicular sieve tubes. Using tissue dissection and direct sampling of sieve tube contents, we show that FP in fact does contain up to 1 M sugars, in contrast to low-millimolar levels in the EFP. Moreover, major phloem proteins in sieve tubes of FP differ from those that predominate in the extrafascicular sap, and include several previously uncharacterized proteins with little or no homology to databases. The overall compositional differences of the two phloem systems strongly indicate functional isolation. On this basis, we propose that the fascicular phloem is largely responsible for sugar transport, whereas the extrafascicular phloem may function in signaling, defense, and transport of other metabolites. PMID:20566864

  20. Defence strategies adopted by the medicinal plant Coleus forskohlii against supplemental ultraviolet-B radiation: Augmentation of secondary metabolites and antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Takshak, Swabha; Agrawal, S B

    2015-12-01

    Supplementary ultraviolet-B (ambient+3.6  kJ m(-2) day(-1)) induced changes on morphological, physiological, and biochemical characteristics (specifically the defence strategies: UV-B protective compounds and antioxidants) of Coleus forskohlii were investigated under field conditions at 30, 60, and 90 days after transplantation. Levels of secondary metabolites increased under s-UV-B stress; flavonoids and phenolics (primary UV-B screening agents) were recorded to be higher in leaves which are directly exposed to s-UV-B. This was also verified by enhanced activities of phenylpropanoid pathway enzymes: phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL), cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD), 4-coumarate-CoA ligase (4CL), chalcone-flavanone isomerase (CHI), and dihydroflavonol reductase (DFR). Antioxidants, both enzymatic (ascorbate peroxidase, catalase, glutathione reductase, peroxidase, polyphenol oxidase, and superoxide dismutase) and non-enzymatic (ascorbic acid and α-tocopherol) also increased in the treated organs of the test plant, higher contents being recorded in roots except for ascorbic acid. On the contrary, protein and chlorophyll content (directly implicated in regulating plant growth and development) declined under s-UV-B. These alterations in plant biochemistry led the plant to compromise on its photosynthate allocation towards growth and biomass production as evidenced by a reduction in its height and biomass. The study concludes that s-UV-B is a potent stimulating factor in increasing the concentrations of defense compounds and antioxidants in C. forskohlii to optimize its performance under stress. PMID:26461242

  1. Two-dimensional mapping of photopigment distribution and activity of Chloroflexus-like bacteria in a hypersaline microbial mat.

    PubMed

    Bachar, Ami; Polerecky, Lubos; Fischer, Jan P; Vamvakopoulos, Kyriakos; de Beer, Dirk; Jonkers, Henk M

    2008-09-01

    Pigment analysis in an intact hypersaline microbial mat by hyperspectral imaging revealed very patchy and spatially uncorrelated distributions of photopigments Chl a and BChl a/c, which are characteristic photopigments for oxygenic (diatoms and cyanobacteria) and anoxygenic phototrophs (Chloroflexaceae). This finding is in contrast to the expectation that these biomarker pigments should be spatially correlated, as oxygenic phototrophs are thought to supply the Chloroflexaceae members with organic substrates for growth. We suggest that the heterogeneous occurrence is possibly due to sulfide, whose production by sulfate-reducing bacteria may be spatially heterogeneous in the partially oxic photic zone of the mat. We furthermore mapped the near-infra-red-light controlled respiration of Chloroflexaceae under light and dark conditions and found that Chloroflexaceae are responsible for a major part of oxygen consumption at the lower part of the oxic zone in the mat. The presence of Chloroflexaceae was further confirmed by FISH probe and 16S rRNA gene clone library analysis. We assume that species related to the genera Oscillochloris and 'Candidatus Chlorothrix', in contrast to those related to Chloroflexus and Roseiflexus, depend less on excreted photosynthates but more on the presence of free sulfide, which may explain their presence in deeper parts of the mat. PMID:18616583

  2. Effects of CO(2) enrichment on photosynthesis, growth, and biochemical composition of seagrass Thalassia hemprichii (Ehrenb.) Aschers.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zhi Jian; Huang, Xiao-Pin; Zhang, Jing-Ping

    2010-10-01

    The effects of CO₂ enrichment on various ecophysiological parameters of tropical seagrass Thalassia hemprichii (Ehrenb.) Aschers were tested. T. hemprichii, collected from a seagrass bed in Xincun Bay, Hainan island of Southern China, was cultured at 4 CO₂ (aq) concentrations in flow-through seawater aquaria bubbled with CO₂ . CO₂ enrichment considerably enhanced the relative maximum electron transport rate (RETR(max) ) and minimum saturating irradiance (E(k) ) of T. hemprichii. Leaf growth rate of CO₂ -enriched plants was significantly higher than that in unenriched treatment. Nonstructural carbohydrates (NSC) of T. hemprichii, especially in belowground tissues, increased strongly with elevated CO₂ (aq), suggesting a translocation of photosynthate from aboveground to belowground tissues. Carbon content in belowground tissues showed a similar response with NSC, while in aboveground tissues, carbon content was not affected by CO₂ treatments. In contrast, with increasing CO₂ (aq), nitrogen content in aboveground tissues markedly decreased, but nitrogen content in belowground was nearly constant. Carbon: nitrogen ratio in both tissues were obviously enhanced by increasing CO₂ (aq). Thus, these results indicate that T. hemprichii may respond positively to CO₂ -induced acidification of the coastal ocean. Moreover, the CO₂ -stimulated improvement of photosynthesis and NSC content may partially offset negative effects of severe environmental disturbance such as underwater light reduction.

  3. Rapid mixing between old and new C pools in the canopy of mature forest trees.

    PubMed

    Keel, Sonja G; Siegwolf, Rolf T W; Jäggi, Maya; Körner, Christian

    2007-08-01

    Stable C isotope signals in plant tissues became a key tool in explaining growth responses to the environment. The technique is based on the fundamental assumption that the isotopic composition of a given unit of tissue (e.g. a tree ring) reflects the specific C uptake conditions in the leaf at a given time. Beyond the methodological implications of any deviation from this assumption, it is of physiological interest whether new C is transferred directly from sources (a photosynthesizing leaf) to structural sinks (e.g. adjacent stem tissue), or inherently passes through existing (mobile) C pools, which may be of variable (older) age. Here, we explore the fate of (13)C-labelled photosynthates in the crowns of a 30-35 m tall, mixed forest using a canopy crane. In all nine study species labelled C reached woody tissue within 2-9 h after labelling. Four months later, very small signals were left in branch wood of Tilia suggesting that low mixing of new, labelled C with old C had taken place. In contrast, signals in Fagus and Quercus had increased, indicating more intense mixing. This species-specific mixing of new with old C pools is likely to mask year- or season-specific linkages between tree ring formation and climate and has considerable implications for climate reconstruction using stable isotopes as proxies for past climatic conditions.

  4. In Metabolic Engineering of Eukaryotic Microalgae: Potential and Challenges Come with Great Diversity.

    PubMed

    Gimpel, Javier A; Henríquez, Vitalia; Mayfield, Stephen P

    2015-01-01

    The great phylogenetic diversity of microalgae is corresponded by a wide arrange of interesting and useful metabolites. Nonetheless metabolic engineering in microalgae has been limited, since specific transformation tools must be developed for each species for either the nuclear or chloroplast genomes. Microalgae as production platforms for metabolites offer several advantages over plants and other microorganisms, like the ability of GMO containment and reduced costs in culture media, respectively. Currently, microalgae have proved particularly well suited for the commercial production of omega-3 fatty acids and carotenoids. Therefore most metabolic engineering strategies have been developed for these metabolites. Microalgal biofuels have also drawn great attention recently, resulting in efforts for improving the production of hydrogen and photosynthates, particularly triacylglycerides. Metabolic pathways of microalgae have also been manipulated in order to improve photosynthetic growth under specific conditions and for achieving trophic conversion. Although these pathways are not strictly related to secondary metabolites, the synthetic biology approaches could potentially be translated to this field and will also be discussed.

  5. Nodule-enhanced expression of a sucrose phosphate synthase gene member (MsSPSA) has a role in carbon and nitrogen metabolism in the nodules of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Aleman, Lorenzo; Ortega, Jose Luis; Martinez-Grimes, Martha; Seger, Mark; Holguin, Francisco Omar; Uribe, Diana J; Garcia-Ibilcieta, David; Sengupta-Gopalan, Champa

    2010-01-01

    Sucrose phosphate synthase (SPS) catalyzes the first step in the synthesis of sucrose in photosynthetic tissues. We characterized the expression of three different isoforms of SPS belonging to two different SPS gene families in alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.), a previously identified SPS (MsSPSA) and two novel isoforms belonging to class B (MsSPSB and MsSPSB3). While MsSPSA showed nodule-enhanced expression, both MsSPSB genes exhibited leaf-enhanced expression. Alfalfa leaf and nodule SPS enzymes showed differences in chromatographic and electrophoretic migration and differences in V (max) and allosteric regulation. The root nodules in legume plants are a strong sink for photosynthates with its need for ATP, reducing power and carbon skeletons for dinitrogen fixation and ammonia assimilation. The expression of genes encoding SPS and other key enzymes in sucrose metabolism, sucrose phosphate phosphatase and sucrose synthase, was analyzed in the leaves and nodules of plants inoculated with Sinorhizobium meliloti. Based on the expression pattern of these genes, the properties of the SPS isoforms and the concentration of starch and soluble sugars in nodules induced by a wild type and a nitrogen fixation deficient strain, we propose that SPS has an important role in the control of carbon flux into different metabolic pathways in the symbiotic nodules.

  6. Pollen coupling of forest trees: forming synchronized and periodic reproduction out of chaos.

    PubMed

    Satake, A; Iwasa, Y

    2000-03-21

    Many of the tree species in mature forests show masting; their reproductive activity has a large variance between years and is often synchronized between different individuals. In this paper, we analyse a globally coupled map model in which trees accumulate photosynthate every year, produce flowers when the energy reserve level exceeds a threshold, and set seeds and fruits at a rate limited by pollen availability. Without pollen limitation, the trees in the forest show independent chaotic fluctuation. Coupling of trees via pollen exchange results in reproduction being synchronized partially or completely over the forest. The whole forest shows diverse dynamical behaviors determined by the values of two essential parameters; the depletion coefficient k and the coupling strength beta. We find perfectly synchronized periodic reproduction, synchronized reproduction with a chaotic time series, clustering phenomena, and chaotic reproduction of trees without synchronization over individuals. There are many parameter windows in which synchronized reproduction of trees shows a stable periodic fluctuation. For perfectly synchronized forests, we can calculate all the Lyapunov exponents analytically. They show that synchronized reproduction of all the trees in the forest can only occur when trees flower at low (but positive) levels in a significant fraction of years, resulting in small fruit sets due to outcrossed pollen limitation. This is consistent with the observation that the distinction between mast years and non-mast years is often not clear cut.

  7. Measurement of Bremsstrahlung radiation for in vivo monitoring of 14C tracer distribution between fruit and roots of kiwifruit (Actinidia arguta) cuttings.

    PubMed

    Black, Marykate Z; Minchin, Peter E H; Gould, Nick; Patterson, Kevin J; Clearwater, Michael J

    2012-10-01

    In vivo measurements of (14)C tracer distribution have usually involved monitoring the β(-) particles produced as (14)C decays. These particles are only detectable over short distances, limiting the use of this technique to thin plant material. In the present experiments, X-ray detectors were used to monitor the Bremsstrahlung radiation emitted since β(-) particles were absorbed in plant tissues. Bremsstrahlung radiation is detectable through larger tissue depths. The aim of these experiments was to demonstrate the Bremsstrahlung method by monitoring in vivo tracer-labelled photosynthate partitioning in small kiwifruit (Actinidia arguta (Siebold & Zucc.) Planch. ex Miq.) plants in response to root pruning. A source shoot, consisting of four leaves, was pulse labelled with (14)CO(2). Detectors monitored import into a fruit and the root system, and export from a source leaf. Repeat pulse labelling enabled the comparison of pre- and post-treatment observations within an individual plant. Diurnal trends were observed in the distribution of tracer, with leaf export reduced at night. Tracer accumulated in the roots declined after approximately 48 h, which may have resulted from export of (14)C from the roots in carbon skeletons. Cutting off half the roots did not affect tracer distribution to the remaining half. Tracer distribution to the fruit was increased after root pruning, demonstrating the higher competitive strength of the fruit than the roots for carbohydrate supply. Increased partitioning to the fruit following root pruning has also been demonstrated in kiwifruit field trials.

  8. Changing partners in the dark: isotopic and molecular evidence of ectomycorrhizal liaisons between forest orchids and trees.

    PubMed Central

    Bidartondo, Martin I.; Burghardt, Bastian; Gebauer, Gerhard; Bruns, Thomas D.; Read, David J.

    2004-01-01

    In the mycorrhizal symbiosis, plants exchange photosynthates for mineral nutrients acquired by fungi from the soil. This mutualistic arrangement has been subverted by hundreds of mycorrhizal plant species that lack the ability to photosynthesize. The most numerous examples of this behaviour are found in the largest plant family, the Orchidaceae. Although these non-photosynthetic orchid species are known to be highly specialized exploiters of the ectomycorrhizal symbiosis, photosynthetic orchids are thought to use free-living saprophytic, or pathogenic, fungal lineages. However, we present evidence that putatively photosynthetic orchids from five species which grow in the understorey of forests: (i) form mycorrhizas with ectomycorrhizal fungi of forest trees; and (ii) have stable isotope signatures indicating distinctive pathways for nitrogen and carbon acquisition approaching those of non-photosynthetic orchids that associate with ectomycorrhizal fungi of forest trees. These findings represent a major shift in our understanding of both orchid ecology and evolution because they explain how orchids can thrive in low-irradiance niches and they show that a shift to exploiting ectomycorrhizal fungi precedes viable losses of photosynthetic ability in orchid lineages. PMID:15315895

  9. An isotopomer strategy to detect plant acclimation to increasing atmospheric CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Augusti, A.; Betson, T. R.; Schleucher, J.

    2009-04-01

    Abundances of deuterium (D) and 18O in precipitation carry climate signals. Both isotopes are incorporated into leaf photosynthate, and in a second step into tree rings. Strikingly, while D and 18O climate signals in precipitation are related, tree-ring records of both isotopes do not generally go in parallel. This contribution investigates this discrepancy, based on a comparison of the fractionation mechanisms for both isotopes. We present a strategy to detect plant acclimation on time scales of centuries from intramolecular deuterium distributions (D isotopomers). We showed recently that specific C-H groups of glucose units exchange with water during cellulose synthesis in tree trunks, in agreement with the biochemistry of cellulose formation. Most importantly, this result allows separating influences of source water and of D fractionations in the plant, and hence to isolate climate signals and physiological signals. NMR measurements of intramolecular D distributions of glucose demonstrate that each C-H group has a distinct abundance (each D isotopomer), corresponding to its unique biochemical history, and can serve as independent information channel. Therefore, isotopomers increase the information content of isotopes several-fold. Thus, using D isotopomers, a situation may be achieved where experimental quantities overdetermine the number of variables to be reconstructed. This increased information content can be retrieved along the following strategies. Similar to C-O groups that exchange during cellulose synthesis, D isotopomers of C-H groups which heavily exchange should adopt the D abundance of source water and associated climate signals. We will present tree-ring results that support the feasibility of this approach. C-H groups that are not affected by isotope exchange are passed from leaves to the trunk, and can therefore transmit leaf-level information to tree rings. On the leaf level, overall D abundance of photosynthate is influenced by transpiration

  10. Efficiency of Nitrogen Assimilation by N(2)-Fixing and Nitrate-Grown Soybean Plants (Glycine max [L.] Merr.).

    PubMed

    Finke, R L; Harper, J E; Hageman, R H

    1982-10-01

    Nodulated and non-nodulated (not inoculated) soybeans (Glycine max [L.] Merr. cv Wells) were grown in controlled environments with N(2) or nonlimiting levels of NO(3) (-), respectively, serving as sole source of nitrogen. The efficiency of the N(2)-fixing plants was compared with that of the nitrate-supplied plants on the basis of both plant age and plant size. Efficiency evaluations of the plants were expressed as the ratio of moles of carbon respired by the whole plant to the moles of nitrogen incorporated into plant material.Continuous 24-hour CO(2) exchange measurements on shoot and root systems made at the beginning of flowering (28 days after planting) indicated that N(2)-fixing plants respired 8.28 moles of carbon per mole of N, fixed from dinitrogen, while nitrate-supplied plants respired only 4.99 moles of carbon per mole of nitrate reduced. Twenty-one-day-old nitrate-supplied plants were even more efficient, respiring only 3.18 moles of carbon per mole of nitrate reduced. The decreased efficiency of the N(2)-fixing plants was not due to plant size since, on a dry weight basis, the 28-day-old N(2)-fixing plants were intermediate between the 28- and 21-day-old nitrate-supplied plants.The calculated efficiencies were predominantly a reflection of root-system respiration. N(2)-fixing plants lost 25% of their daily net photosynthetic input of carbon through root-system respiration, compared with 16% for 28-day-old nitrate-supplied plants and 12% for 21-day-old nitrate-supplied plants. Shoot dark respiration was similar for all three plant groups, varying between 7.9% and 9.0% of the apparent photosynthate.The increased respiratory loss by the roots of the N(2)-fixing plants was not compensated for by increased net photosynthetic effectiveness. Canopy photosynthesis expressed on a leaf area basis was similar for 28-day-old N(2)-fixing plants (15.5 milligrams CO(2) square decimeter per hour) and 21-day-old nitrate-supplied plants (14.5 milligrams CO(2) square

  11. Mapping nutrient resorption efficiencies of subarctic cryptogams and seed plants onto the Tree of Life

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Simone I; Aerts, Rien; van Logtestijn, Richard S P; Schweikert, Wenka; Klahn, Thorsten; Quested, Helen M; van Hal, Jurgen R; Cornelissen, Johannes H C

    2014-01-01

    Nutrient resorption from senescing photosynthetic organs is a powerful mechanism for conserving nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) in infertile environments. Evolution has resulted in enhanced differentiation of conducting tissues to facilitate transport of photosynthate to other plant parts, ultimately leading to phloem. Such tissues may also serve to translocate N and P to other plant parts upon their senescence. Therefore, we hypothesize that nutrient resorption efficiency (RE, % of nutrient pool exported) should correspond with the degree of specialization of these conducting tissues across the autotrophic branches of the Tree of Life. To test this hypothesis, we had to compare members of different plant clades and lichens within a climatic region, to minimize confounding effects of climatic drivers on nutrient resorption. Thus, we compared RE among wide-ranging basal clades from the principally N-limited subarctic region, employing a novel method to correct for mass loss during senescence. Even with the limited numbers of species available for certain clades in this region, we found some consistent patterns. Mosses, lichens, and lycophytes generally showed low REN (<20%), liverworts and conifers intermediate (40%) and monilophytes, eudicots, and monocots high (>70%). REP appeared higher in eudicots and liverworts than in mosses. Within mosses, taxa with more efficient conductance also showed higher REN. The differences in REN among clades broadly matched the degree of specialization of conducting tissues. This novel mapping of a physiological process onto the Tree of Life broadly supports the idea that the evolution of conducting tissues toward specialized phloem has aided land plants to optimize their internal nitrogen recycling. The generality of evolutionary lines in conducting tissues and nutrient resorption efficiency needs to be tested across different floras in different climatic regions with different levels of N versus P availability. PMID:25360262

  12. Root and Shoot Phenology May Respond Differently to Warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radville, L.; Eissenstat, D. M.; Post, E.

    2015-12-01

    Climate change is increasing temperatures and extending the growing season for many organisms. Shifts in phenology have been widely reported in response to global warming and have strong effects on ecosystem processes and greenhouse gas emissions. It is well understood that warming generally advances aboveground plant phenology, but the influence of temperature on root phenology is unclear. Most terrestrial biosphere models assume that root and shoot growth occur at the same time and are influenced by warming in the same way, but recent studies suggest that this may not be the case. Testing this assumption is particularly important in the Arctic where over 70% of plant biomass can be belowground and warming is happening faster than in other ecosystems. In 2013 and 2014 we examined the timing of root growth in the Arctic in plots that had been warmed or unwarmed for 10 years. We found that peak root growth occurred about one month before leaf growth, suggesting that spring root phenology is not controlled by carbon produced during spring photosynthesis. If root phenology is not controlled by photosynthate early in the season, earlier spring leaf growth may not cause earlier spring root growth. In support of this, we found that warming advanced spring leaf cover but did not significantly affect root phenology. Root growth was not significantly correlated with soil temperature and did not appear to be limited by near-freezing temperatures above the permafrost. These results suggest that although shoots are influenced by temperature, roots in this system may be more influenced by photosynthesis and carbon storage. Aboveground phenology, one of the most widely measured aspects of climate change, may not represent whole-plant phenology and may be a poor indicator of the timing of whole-plant carbon fluxes. Additionally, climate model assumptions that roots and shoots grow at the same time may need to be revised.

  13. Expression of barley SUSIBA2 transcription factor yields high-starch low-methane rice.

    PubMed

    Su, J; Hu, C; Yan, X; Jin, Y; Chen, Z; Guan, Q; Wang, Y; Zhong, D; Jansson, C; Wang, F; Schnürer, A; Sun, C

    2015-07-30

    Atmospheric methane is the second most important greenhouse gas after carbon dioxide, and is responsible for about 20% of the global warming effect since pre-industrial times. Rice paddies are the largest anthropogenic methane source and produce 7-17% of atmospheric methane. Warm waterlogged soil and exuded nutrients from rice roots provide ideal conditions for methanogenesis in paddies with annual methane emissions of 25-100-million tonnes. This scenario will be exacerbated by an expansion in rice cultivation needed to meet the escalating demand for food in the coming decades. There is an urgent need to establish sustainable technologies for increasing rice production while reducing methane fluxes from rice paddies. However, ongoing efforts for methane mitigation in rice paddies are mainly based on farming practices and measures that are difficult to implement. Despite proposed strategies to increase rice productivity and reduce methane emissions, no high-starch low-methane-emission rice has been developed. Here we show that the addition of a single transcription factor gene, barley SUSIBA2 (refs 7, 8), conferred a shift of carbon flux to SUSIBA2 rice, favouring the allocation of photosynthates to aboveground biomass over allocation to roots. The altered allocation resulted in an increased biomass and starch content in the seeds and stems, and suppressed methanogenesis, possibly through a reduction in root exudates. Three-year field trials in China demonstrated that the cultivation of SUSIBA2 rice was associated with a significant reduction in methane emissions and a decrease in rhizospheric methanogen levels. SUSIBA2 rice offers a sustainable means of providing increased starch content for food production while reducing greenhouse gas emissions from rice cultivation. Approaches to increase rice productivity and reduce methane emissions as seen in SUSIBA2 rice may be particularly beneficial in a future climate with rising temperatures resulting in increased

  14. Effect of carbohydrates and night temperature on night respiration in rice.

    PubMed

    Peraudeau, Sébastien; Lafarge, Tanguy; Roques, Sandrine; Quiñones, Cherryl O; Clement-Vidal, Anne; Ouwerkerk, Pieter B F; Van Rie, Jeroen; Fabre, Denis; Jagadish, Krishna S V; Dingkuhn, Michael

    2015-07-01

    Global warming causes night temperature (NT) to increase faster than day temperature in the tropics. According to crop growth models, respiration incurs a loss of 40-60% of photosynthate. The thermal sensitivity of night respiration (R(n)) will thus reduce biomass. Instantaneous and acclimated effects of NT on R(n) of leaves and seedlings of two rice cultivars having a variable level of carbohydrates, induced by exposure to different light intensity on the previous day, were investigated. Experiments were conducted in a greenhouse and growth chambers, with R(n) measured on the youngest fully expanded leaves or whole seedlings. Dry weight-based R(n) was 2.6-fold greater for seedlings than for leaves. Leaf R(n) was linearly related to starch (positive intercept) and soluble sugar concentration (zero intercept). Increased NT caused higher R(n) at a given carbohydrate concentration. The change of R(n) at NT increasing from 21 °C to 31 °C was 2.4-fold for the instantaneous response but 1.2- to 1.7-fold after acclimation. The maintenance component of R(n) (R(m)'), estimated by assimilate starvation, averaged 28% in seedlings and 34% in leaves, with no significant thermal effect on this ratio. The acclimated effect of increased NT on R(m)' across experiments was 1.5-fold for a 10 °C increase in NT. No cultivar differences were observed in R(n) or R(m)' responses. The results suggest that the commonly used Q10=2 rule overestimates thermal response of respiration, and R(n) largely depends on assimilate resources. PMID:25954047

  15. Do High Dynamic Range threatments improve the results of Structure from Motion approaches in Geomorphology?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-Gutiérrez, Álvaro; Juan de Sanjosé-Blasco, José; Schnabel, Susanne; de Matías-Bejarano, Javier; Pulido-Fernández, Manuel; Berenguer-Sempere, Fernando

    2015-04-01

    In this work, the hypothesis of improving 3D models obtained with Structure from Motion (SfM) approaches using images pre-processed by High Dynamic Range (HDR) techniques is tested. Photographs of the Veleta Rock Glacier in Spain were captured with different exposure values (EV0, EV+1 and EV-1), two focal lengths (35 and 100 mm) and under different weather conditions for the years 2008, 2009, 2011, 2012 and 2014. HDR images were produced using the different EV steps within Fusion F.1 software. Point clouds were generated using commercial and free available SfM software: Agisoft Photoscan and 123D Catch. Models Obtained using pre-processed images and non-preprocessed images were compared in a 3D environment with a benchmark 3D model obtained by means of a Terrestrial Laser Scanner (TLS). A total of 40 point clouds were produced, georeferenced and compared. Results indicated that for Agisoft Photoscan software differences in the accuracy between models obtained with pre-processed and non-preprocessed images were not significant from a statistical viewpoint. However, in the case of the free available software 123D Catch, models obtained using images pre-processed by HDR techniques presented a higher point density and were more accurate. This tendency was observed along the 5 studied years and under different capture conditions. More work should be done in the near future to corroborate whether the results of similar software packages can be improved by HDR techniques (e.g. ARC3D, Bundler and PMVS2, CMP SfM, Photosynth and VisualSFM).

  16. Light enables a very high efficiency of carbon storage in developing embryos of rapeseed.

    PubMed

    Goffman, Fernando D; Alonso, Ana P; Schwender, Jörg; Shachar-Hill, Yair; Ohlrogge, John B

    2005-08-01

    The conversion of photosynthate to seed storage reserves is crucial to plant fitness and agricultural production, yet quantitative information about the efficiency of this process is lacking. To measure metabolic efficiency in developing seeds, rapeseed (Brassica napus) embryos were cultured in media in which all carbon sources were [U-14C]-labeled and their conversion into CO2, oil, protein, and other biomass was determined. The conversion efficiency of the supplied carbon into seed storage reserves was very high. When provided with 0, 50, or 150 micromol m(-2) s(-1) light, the proportion of carbon taken up by embryos that was recovered in biomass was 60% to 64%, 77% to 86%, and 85% to 95%, respectively. Light not only improved the efficiency of carbon storage, but also increased the growth rate, the proportion of 14C recovered in oil relative to protein, and the fixation of external 14CO2 into biomass. Embryos grown at 50 micromol m(-2) s(-1) in the presence of 5 microM 1,1-dimethyl-3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl) urea (an inhibitor of photosystem II) were reduced in total biomass and oil synthesis by 3.2-fold and 2.8-fold, respectively, to the levels observed in the dark. To explore if the reduced growth and carbon conversion efficiency in dark were related to oxygen supplied by photosystem II, embryos and siliques were cultured with increased oxygen. The carbon conversion efficiency of embryos remained unchanged when oxygen levels were increased 3-fold. Increasing the O2 levels surrounding siliques from 21% to 60% did not increase oil synthesis rates either at 1,000 micromol m(-2) s(-1) or in the dark. We conclude that light increases the growth, efficiency of carbon storage, and oil synthesis in developing rapeseed embryos primarily by providing reductant and/or ATP.

  17. Purification of the photosynthetic reaction center from Heliobacterium modesticaldum.

    PubMed

    Sarrou, Iosifina; Khan, Zahid; Cowgill, John; Lin, Su; Brune, Daniel; Romberger, Steven; Golbeck, John H; Redding, Kevin E

    2012-03-01

    We have developed a purification protocol for photoactive reaction centers (HbRC) from Heliobacterium modesticaldum. HbRCs were purified from solubilized membranes in two sequential chromatographic steps, resulting in the isolation of a fraction containing a single polypeptide, which was identified as PshA by LC-MS/MS of tryptic peptides. All polypeptides reported earlier as unknown proteins (in Heinnickel et al., Biochemistry 45:6756-6764, 2006; Romberger et al., Photosynth Res 104:293-303, 2010) are now identified by mass spectrometry to be the membrane-bound cytochrome c (553) and four different ABC-type transporters. The purified PshA homodimer binds the following pigments: 20 bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) g, two BChl g', two 8(1)-OH-Chl a (F), and one 4,4'-diaponeurosporene. It lacks the PshB polypeptide binding the F(A) and F(B) [4Fe-4S] clusters. It is active in charge separation and exhibits a trapping time of 23 ps, as judged by time-resolved fluorescence studies. The charge recombination rate of the P(800) (+)F(X)(-) state is 10-15 ms, as seen before. The purified HbRC core was able to reduce cyanobacterial flavodoxin in the light, exhibiting a K (M) of 10 μM and a k (cat) of 9.5 s(-1) under near-saturating light. There are ~1.6 menaquinones per HbRC in the purified complex. Illumination of frozen HbRC in the presence of dithionite can cause creation of a radical at g = 2.0046, but this is not a semiquinone. Furthermore, we show that high-purity HbRCs are very stable in anoxic conditions and even remain active in the presence of oxygen under low light. PMID:22383054

  18. Composition and mean residence time of soil organic matter eroded from temperate, forested catchments: implications for erosion-induced carbon sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berhe, A. A.; McCorkle, E. P.; Stacy, E.; Hart, S. C.; Hunsaker, C. T.; Johnson, D. W.

    2014-12-01

    Topsoil and associated soil organic matter are continuously laterally distributed on the landscape by the process of soil erosion. The role of soil erosion on terrestrial carbon sequestration has been gaining a lot of attention over the last two decades. Soil erosion has been shown to lead to a sink of atmospheric carbon dioxide in soil if at least some of the eroded carbon is replaced by production of new photosynthate and/or some of the eroded carbon is stabilized in downslope depositional landform positions. However, until recently most of the work in this area has been focused on agricultural or grassland systems. Here, we present results from temperate forested catchments in the southern part of the Sierra Nevada Mountains. We found that most of the soil organic matter eroded from low-order catchments in the western slope of the Sierra Nevada Mountains is composed of forest floor material that has high concentrations of carbon. The steep slopes of these catchments also contribute to export of large proportion of the eroded forest floor material out of the catchments. Our radiocarbon analyses showed that the soil organic matter in the eroded material is composed of modern (post-1950) carbon with fraction modern values at or above 1. We also found that neither elevation, nor climate (across six years that we investigated) leads to significant changes in the composition and mean residence times of the eroded material, despite considerable differences in mean residence time of soil organic mater in soil profiles of the contributing hillslopes in the high vs. low elevation (low elevation: 1800 m, high elevation: 2300 m) catchments we studied. Our findings show that soil organic matter eroded from upland forested catchments is a lot more susceptible to decomposition, compared to organic matter eroded from agricultural or grassland systems likely leading to a less significant role of soil erosion on terrestrial carbon sequestration in forested catchments.

  19. Nitrogen control of 13C enrichment in heterotrophic organs relative to leaves in a landscape-building desert plant species

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhang, J.; Gu, L.; Bao, F.; Cao, Y.; Hao, Y.; He, J.; Li, J.; Li, Y.; Ren, Y.; Wang, F.; et al

    2014-09-10

    A longstanding puzzle in isotope studies of C3 plant species is that heterotrophic plant organs (e.g., stems, roots, seeds, and fruits) tend to be enriched in 13C compared to the autotrophic organ (leaves) that provides them with photosynthate. Our inability to explain this puzzle suggests key deficiencies in understanding post-photosynthetic metabolic processes. It also limits the effectiveness of applications of stable carbon isotope analyses in a variety of scientific disciplines ranging from plant physiology to global carbon cycle studies. To gain insight into this puzzle, we excavated whole plant architectures of Nitraria tangutorum Bobrov, a C3 species that has anmore » exceptional capability of fixing sands and building sand dunes, in two deserts in northwestern China. We systematically and simultaneously measured carbon isotope ratios and nitrogen and phosphorous contents of different parts of the excavated plants. We also determined the seasonal variations in leaf carbon isotope ratios on nearby intact plants of N. tangutorum. We found, for the first time, that higher nitrogen contents in heterotrophic organs were significantly correlated with increased heterotrophic 13C enrichment compared to leaves. However, phosphorous contents had no effect on the enrichment. In addition, new leaves had carbon isotope ratios similar to roots but were progressively depleted in 13C as they matured. We concluded that a nitrogen-mediated process, probably the refixation of respiratory CO2 by phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) carboxylase, was responsible for the differences in 13C enrichment among different heterotrophic organs while processes within leaves or during phloem loading may contribute to the overall autotrophic – heterotrophic difference in carbon isotope compositions.« less

  20. Seasonality and lunar periodicity in the sexual reproduction of the coral-killing sponge, Terpios hoshinota

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nozawa, Yoko; Huang, Yu-Sin; Hirose, Euichi

    2016-09-01

    Sexual reproduction of the cyanobacteriosponge, Terpios hoshinota, was studied at Lyudao (Green Island), Taiwan, from 2011 to 2013 through histological examinations, electron microscopy, and in situ observations of larval release. Histological examinations identified five reproductive structures: oocytes, sperm cysts, cell masses, early-stage embryos, and mature embryos. These reproductive structures were often observed in the same specimens, indicating that T. hoshinota is a hermaphroditic brooder. No cyanobacteria were seen in the gametes, and transmission of symbiotic cyanobacteria from parental tissues to larvae likely occurred during embryogenesis. The cell mass, a loose aggregate of numerous symbiotic cyanobacteria and maternal sponge cells, appeared to be eventually incorporated and constitutes the inner part of pre-hatching larvae, suggesting that the larval type is pseudoblastula instead of parenchymella as previously suggested. A clear lunar periodicity was seen in the reproductive cycle; larvae were released mostly around the full moon and occasionally around the new moon. Reproductive activity declined during months with low temperatures (January-April). The larvae were characterized by negative buoyancy and limited mobility, suggesting a larval dispersal distance on a scale of meters under calm weather. However, long-distance dispersal of larvae could still be possible through occasional strong currents during bad weather, such as typhoons, if the larvae survived during the dispersal period by accessing extra energy from the symbiotic cyanobacteria through their photosynthates and/or consuming the cyanobacteria as a source of nutrients. This study showed that T. hoshinota has high fecundity, with a monthly release of numerous larvae over a long reproductive season. This high fecundity, along with local larval dispersal and rapid post-settlement growth, enables rapid population expansion of T. hoshinota.

  1. In Vivo Regulatory Phosphorylation of Novel Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase Isoforms in Endosperm of Developing Castor Oil Seeds1

    PubMed Central

    Tripodi, Karina E.; Turner, William L.; Gennidakis, Sam; Plaxton, William C.

    2005-01-01

    Our previous research characterized two phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) carboxylase (PEPC) isoforms (PEPC1 and PEPC2) from developing castor oil seeds (COS). The association of a shared 107-kD subunit (p107) with an immunologically unrelated bacterial PEPC-type 64-kD polypeptide (p64) leads to marked physical and kinetic differences between the PEPC1 p107 homotetramer and PEPC2 p107/p64 heterooctamer. Here, we describe the production of antiphosphorylation site-specific antibodies to the conserved p107 N-terminal serine-6 phosphorylation site. Immunoblotting established that the serine-6 of p107 is phosphorylated in COS PEPC1 and PEPC2. This phosphorylation was reversed in vitro following incubation of clarified COS extracts or purified PEPC1 or PEPC2 with mammalian protein phosphatase type 2A and is not involved in a potential PEPC1 and PEPC2 interconversion. Similar to other plant PEPCs examined to date, p107 phosphorylation increased PEPC1 activity at pH 7.3 by decreasing its Km(PEP) and sensitivity to l-malate inhibition, while enhancing glucose-6-P activation. By contrast, p107 phosphorylation increased PEPC2's Km(PEP) and sensitivity to malate, glutamic acid, and aspartic acid inhibition. Phosphorylation of p107 was promoted during COS development (coincident with a >5-fold increase in the I50 [malate] value for total PEPC activity in desalted extracts) but disappeared during COS desiccation. The p107 of stage VII COS became fully dephosphorylated in planta 48 h following excision of COS pods or following 72 h of dark treatment of intact plants. The in vivo phosphorylation status of p107 appears to be modulated by photosynthate recently translocated from source leaves into developing COS. PMID:16169958

  2. Expression of barley SUSIBA2 transcription factor yields high-starch low-methane rice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, J.; Hu, C.; Yan, X.; Jin, Y.; Chen, Z.; Guan, Q.; Wang, Y.; Zhong, D.; Jansson, C.; Wang, F.; Schnürer, A.; Sun, C.

    2015-07-01

    Atmospheric methane is the second most important greenhouse gas after carbon dioxide, and is responsible for about 20% of the global warming effect since pre-industrial times. Rice paddies are the largest anthropogenic methane source and produce 7-17% of atmospheric methane. Warm waterlogged soil and exuded nutrients from rice roots provide ideal conditions for methanogenesis in paddies with annual methane emissions of 25-100-million tonnes. This scenario will be exacerbated by an expansion in rice cultivation needed to meet the escalating demand for food in the coming decades. There is an urgent need to establish sustainable technologies for increasing rice production while reducing methane fluxes from rice paddies. However, ongoing efforts for methane mitigation in rice paddies are mainly based on farming practices and measures that are difficult to implement. Despite proposed strategies to increase rice productivity and reduce methane emissions, no high-starch low-methane-emission rice has been developed. Here we show that the addition of a single transcription factor gene, barley SUSIBA2 (refs 7, 8), conferred a shift of carbon flux to SUSIBA2 rice, favouring the allocation of photosynthates to aboveground biomass over allocation to roots. The altered allocation resulted in an increased biomass and starch content in the seeds and stems, and suppressed methanogenesis, possibly through a reduction in root exudates. Three-year field trials in China demonstrated that the cultivation of SUSIBA2 rice was associated with a significant reduction in methane emissions and a decrease in rhizospheric methanogen levels. SUSIBA2 rice offers a sustainable means of providing increased starch content for food production while reducing greenhouse gas emissions from rice cultivation. Approaches to increase rice productivity and reduce methane emissions as seen in SUSIBA2 rice may be particularly beneficial in a future climate with rising temperatures resulting in increased

  3. Expression of barley SUSIBA2 transcription factor yields high-starch low-methane rice

    SciTech Connect

    Su, J.; Hu, C.; Yan, X.; Jin, Y.; Chen, Z.; Guan, Q.; Wang, Y.; Zhong, D.; Jansson, Georg C.; Wang, F.; Schnrer, Anna; Sun, Chuanxin

    2015-07-22

    Atmospheric methane is the second most important greenhouse gas after carbon dioxide, and is responsible for about 20% of the global warming effect since pre-industrial times. Rice paddies are the largest anthropogenic methane source and produce 7–17% of atmospheric methane. Warm waterlogged soil and exuded nutrients from rice roots provide ideal conditions for methanogenesis in paddies with annual methane emissions of 25–100-million tonnes. This scenario will be exacerbated by an expansion in rice cultivation needed to meet the escalating demand for food in the coming decades4. There is an urgent need to establish sustainable technologies for increasing rice production while reducing methane fluxes from rice paddies. However, ongoing efforts for methane mitigation in rice paddies are mainly based on farming practices and measures that are difficult to implement5. Despite proposed strategies to increase rice productivity and reduce methane emissions4,6, no high-starch low-methane-emission rice has been developed. Here we show that the addition of a single transcription factor gene, barley SUSIBA2, conferred a shift of carbon flux to SUSIBA2 rice, favouring the allocation of photosynthates to aboveground biomass over allocation to roots. The altered allocation resulted in an increased biomass and starch content in the seeds and stems, and suppressed methanogenesis, possibly through a reduction in root exudates. Three-year field trials in China demonstrated that the cultivation of SUSIBA2 rice was associated with a significant reduction in methane emissions and a decrease in rhizospheric methanogen levels. SUSIBA2 rice offers a sustainable means of providing increased starch content for food production while reducing greenhouse gas emissions from rice cultivation. Approaches to increase rice productivity and reduce methane emissions as seen in SUSIBA2 rice may be particularly beneficial in a future climate with rising temperatures resulting in increased methane

  4. Mineral nutrition and plant responses to elevated levels of atmospheric CO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Ahluwalia, A.

    1996-08-01

    The atmospheric concentration of CO{sub 2}, a radiatively-active ({open_quotes}green-house{close_quotes}) gas, is increasing. This increase is considered a post-industrial phenomenon attributable to increasing rates of fossil fuel combustion and changing land use practices, particularly deforestation. Climate changes resulting from such elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2} levels, in addition to the direct effects of increased CO{sub 2}, are expected to modify the productivity of forests and alter species distributions. Elevated levels of CO{sub 2} have been shown, in some cases, to lead to enhanced growth rates in plants, particularly those with C{sub 3} metabolism - indicating that plant growth is CO{sub 2}-limited in these situations. Since the major process underlying growth is CO{sub 2} assimilation via photosynthesis in leaves, plant growth represents a potential for sequestering atmospheric carbon into biomass, but this potential could be hampered by plant carbon sink size. Carbon sinks are utilization sites for assimilated carbon, enabling carbon assimilation to proceed without potential inhibition from the accumulation of assimilate (photosynthate). Plant growth provides new sinks for assimilated carbon which permits greater uptake of atmospheric carbon dioxide. However, sinks are, on the whole, reduced in size by stress events due to the adverse effects of stress on photosynthetic rates and therefore growth. This document reviews some of the literature on plant responses to increasing levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide and to inadequate nutrient supply rates, and with this background, the potential for nutrient-limited plants to respond to increasing carbon dioxide is addressed. Conclusions from the literature review are then tested experimentally by means of a case study exploring carbon-nitrogen interactions in seedlings of loblolly pine.

  5. Impact of feeding and short-term temperature stress on the content and isotopic signature of fatty acids, sterols, and alcohols in the scleractinian coral Turbinaria reniformis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolosa, I.; Treignier, C.; Grover, R.; Ferrier-Pagès, C.

    2011-09-01

    This study assesses the combined effect of feeding and short-term thermal stress on various physiological parameters and on the fatty acid, sterol, and alcohol composition of the scleractinian coral Turbinaria reniformis. The compound-specific carbon isotope composition of the lipids was also measured. Under control conditions (26°C), feeding with Artemia salina significantly increased the symbiont density and chlorophyll content and the growth rates of the corals. It also doubled the concentrations of almost all fatty acid (FA) compounds and increased the n-alcohol and sterol contents. δ13C results showed that the feeding enhancement of FA concentrations occurred either via a direct pathway, for one of the major polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) compounds of the food (18:3n-3 FA), or via an enhancement of photosynthate transfer (indirect pathway), for the other coral FAs. Cholesterol (C27Δ5) was also directly acquired from the food. Thermal stress (31°C) affected corals, but differently according to their feeding status. Chlorophyll, protein content, and maximal photosynthetic efficiency of photosystem II (PSII) decreased to a greater extent in starved corals. In such corals, FA concentrations were reduced by 33%, (especially C16, C18 FAs, and n-3 PUFA) and the sterol content by 27% (especially the C28∆5,22 and C28∆5). The enrichment in the δ13C signature of the storage and structural FAs suggests that they were the main compounds respired during the stress to maintain the coral metabolism. Thermal stress had less effect on the lipid concentrations of fed corals, as only FA levels were reduced by 13%, with no major changes in their isotope carbon signatures. In conclusion, feeding plays an essential role in sustaining T. reniformis metabolism during the thermal stress.

  6. The Metabolite Transporters of the Plastid Envelope: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Facchinelli, Fabio; Weber, Andreas P. M.

    2011-01-01

    The engulfment of a photoautotrophic cyanobacterium by a primitive mitochondria-bearing eukaryote traces back to more than 1.2 billion years ago. This single endosymbiotic event not only provided the early petroalgae with the metabolic capacity to perform oxygenic photosynthesis, but also introduced a plethora of other metabolic routes ranging from fatty acids and amino acids biosynthesis, nitrogen and sulfur assimilation to secondary compounds synthesis. This implicated the integration and coordination of the newly acquired metabolic entity with the host metabolism. The interface between the host cytosol and the plastidic stroma became of crucial importance in sorting precursors and products between the plastid and other cellular compartments. The plastid envelope membranes fulfill different tasks: they perform important metabolic functions, as they are involved in the synthesis of carotenoids, chlorophylls, and galactolipids. In addition, since most genes of cyanobacterial origin have been transferred to the nucleus, plastidial proteins encoded by nuclear genes are post-translationally transported across the envelopes through the TIC–TOC import machinery. Most importantly, chloroplasts supply the photoautotrophic cell with photosynthates in form of reduced carbon. The innermost bilayer of the plastidic envelope represents the permeability barrier for the metabolites involved in the carbon cycle and is literally stuffed with transporter proteins facilitating their transfer. The intracellular metabolite transporters consist of polytopic proteins containing membrane spans usually in the number of four or more α-helices. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that connecting the plastid with the host metabolism was mainly a process driven by the host cell. In Arabidopsis, 58% of the metabolite transporters are of host origin, whereas only 12% are attributable to the cyanobacterial endosymbiont. This review focuses on the metabolite transporters of the inner envelope

  7. Transfer from long to short photoperiods affects production efficiency of day-neutral rice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldman, K. R.; Mitchell, C. A.

    1999-01-01

    The day-neutral, semidwarf rice (Oryza sativa L.) cultivar Ai-Nan-Tsao was grown in a greenhouse under summer conditions using high-pressure sodium lamps to extend the natural photoperiod. After allowing 2 weeks for germination, stand establishment, and thinning to a consistent planting density of 212 plants/m2, stands were maintained under continuous lighting for 35 or 49 days before shifting to 8- or 12-h photoperiods until harvest 76 days after planting. Non-shifted control treatments consisting of 8-, 12-, or 24-h photoperiods also were maintained throughout production. Tiller number increased as duration of exposure to continuous light increased before shifting to shorter photoperiods. However, shoot harvest index and yield efficiency rate were lower for all plants receiving continuous light than for those under the 8- or 12-h photoperiods. Stands receiving 12-h photoperiods throughout production had the highest grain yield per plant and equaled the 8-h-photoperiod control plants for the lowest tiller number per plant. As long as stands were exposed to continuous light, tiller formation continued. Shifting to shorter photoperiods late in the cropping cycle resulted in newly formed tillers that were either sterile or unable to mature grain before harvest. Late-forming tillers also suppressed yield of grain in early-forming tillers, presumably by competing for photosynthate or for remobilized assimilate during senescence. Stands receiving 12-h photoperiods throughout production not only produced the highest grain yield at harvest but had the highest shoot harvest index, which is important for resource-recovery strategies in advanced life-support systems proposed for space.

  8. Expression of barley SUSIBA2 transcription factor yields high-starch low-methane rice.

    PubMed

    Su, J; Hu, C; Yan, X; Jin, Y; Chen, Z; Guan, Q; Wang, Y; Zhong, D; Jansson, C; Wang, F; Schnürer, A; Sun, C

    2015-07-30

    Atmospheric methane is the second most important greenhouse gas after carbon dioxide, and is responsible for about 20% of the global warming effect since pre-industrial times. Rice paddies are the largest anthropogenic methane source and produce 7-17% of atmospheric methane. Warm waterlogged soil and exuded nutrients from rice roots provide ideal conditions for methanogenesis in paddies with annual methane emissions of 25-100-million tonnes. This scenario will be exacerbated by an expansion in rice cultivation needed to meet the escalating demand for food in the coming decades. There is an urgent need to establish sustainable technologies for increasing rice production while reducing methane fluxes from rice paddies. However, ongoing efforts for methane mitigation in rice paddies are mainly based on farming practices and measures that are difficult to implement. Despite proposed strategies to increase rice productivity and reduce methane emissions, no high-starch low-methane-emission rice has been developed. Here we show that the addition of a single transcription factor gene, barley SUSIBA2 (refs 7, 8), conferred a shift of carbon flux to SUSIBA2 rice, favouring the allocation of photosynthates to aboveground biomass over allocation to roots. The altered allocation resulted in an increased biomass and starch content in the seeds and stems, and suppressed methanogenesis, possibly through a reduction in root exudates. Three-year field trials in China demonstrated that the cultivation of SUSIBA2 rice was associated with a significant reduction in methane emissions and a decrease in rhizospheric methanogen levels. SUSIBA2 rice offers a sustainable means of providing increased starch content for food production while reducing greenhouse gas emissions from rice cultivation. Approaches to increase rice productivity and reduce methane emissions as seen in SUSIBA2 rice may be particularly beneficial in a future climate with rising temperatures resulting in increased

  9. The relationship between needle sugar carbon isotope ratios and tree rings of larch in Siberia.

    PubMed

    Rinne, K T; Saurer, M; Kirdyanov, A V; Loader, N J; Bryukhanova, M V; Werner, R A; Siegwolf, R T W

    2015-11-01

    Significant gaps still exist in our knowledge about post-photosynthetic leaf level and downstream metabolic processes and isotopic fractionations. This includes their impact on the isotopic climate signal stored in the carbon isotope composition (δ(13)C) of leaf assimilates and tree rings. For the first time, we compared the seasonal δ(13)C variability of leaf sucrose with intra-annual, high-resolution δ(13)C signature of tree rings from larch (Larix gmelinii Rupr.). The trees were growing at two sites in the continuous permafrost zone of Siberia with different growth conditions. Our results indicate very similar low-frequency intra-seasonal trends of the sucrose and tree ring δ(13)C records with little or no indication for the use of 'old' photosynthates formed during the previous year(s). The comparison of leaf sucrose δ(13)C values with that in other leaf sugars and in tree rings elucidates the cause for the reported (13)C-enrichment of sink organs compared with leaves. We observed that while the average δ(13)C of all needle sugars was 1.2‰ more negative than δ(13)C value of wood, the δ(13)C value of the transport sugar sucrose was on an average 1.0‰ more positive than that of wood. Our study shows a high potential of the combined use of compound-specific isotope analysis of sugars (leaf and phloem) with intra-annual tree ring δ(13)C measurements for deepening our understanding about the mechanisms controlling the isotope variability in tree rings under different environmental conditions.

  10. Exploitation or cooperation? Evolution of a host (ciliate)-benefiting alga in a long-term experimental microcosm culture.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Toshiyuki; Matsubara, Toshiyuki; Ohta, Yuko; Miyake, Daisuke

    2013-09-01

    Controversy persists as to whether the acquisition of beneficial metabolic functions via endosymbiosis can occur suddenly on an evolutionary time scale. In this study, an early stage of endosymbiotic associations, which evolved from previously unassociated auto (photo)- and heterotrophic unicellular organisms was analyzed using an experimental ecosystem model, called CET microcosm. This ecosystem model was composed of a green alga (Micractinium sp.; formerly described as Chlorella vulgaris), a bacterium (Escherichia coli), and a ciliate (Tetrahymena thermophila). Our previous study using a CET microcosm that was cultured 3-5 years revealed that fitness of the ciliate increased by harboring algal cells within its own cells. This fact suggested three possibilities: (i) the ciliate evolved the ability to exploit intracellular algal cells ("exploiter ciliate hypothesis"), (ii) the alga evolved the ability to benefit the host ciliate by providing photosynthates ("cooperator alga hypothesis"), and (iii) a combination of (i) and (ii). To test these hypotheses, two-by-two co-cultures were conducted between the ancestral or derived ciliate and the ancestral or derived alga. The experimental results demonstrated that a cooperative alga evolved in the microcosm, although the possibility remains that an exploitative genotype of the ciliate might also exist in the population as a polymorphism. Remarkably, an algal isolate prolonged the longevity of not only the isolated ciliate, but also the ancestral ciliate. This result suggests that once a cooperative algal genotype evolves in a local population, it can then be transmitted to other individuals of the prospective host species and spread rapidly beyond the local range due to its positive effect on the host fitness. Such transmission suggests the possibility of a sudden acquisition of beneficial autotrophic function by the pre-associated host.

  11. Evidence for a Role for NAD(P)H Dehydrogenase in Concentration of CO2 in the Bundle Sheath Cell of Zea mays1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Schultes, Neil P.; McHale, Neil A.; Zelitch, Israel

    2016-01-01

    Prior studies with Nicotiana and Arabidopsis described failed assembly of the chloroplastic NDH [NAD(P)H dehydrogenase] supercomplex by serial mutation of several subunit genes. We examined the properties of Zea mays leaves containing Mu and Ds insertions into nuclear gene exons encoding the critical o- and n-subunits of NDH, respectively. In vivo reduction of plastoquinone in the dark was sharply diminished in maize homozygous mutant compared to normal leaves but not to the extreme degree observed for the corresponding lesions in Arabidopsis. The net carbon assimilation rate (A) at high irradiance and saturating CO2 levels was reduced by one-half due to NDH mutation in maize although no genotypic effect was evident at very low CO2 levels. Simultaneous assessment of chlorophyll fluorescence and A in maize at low (2% by volume) and high (21%) O2 levels indicated the presence of a small, yet detectable, O2-dependent component of total linear photosynthetic electron transport in 21% O2. This O2-dependent component decreased with increasing CO2 level indicative of photorespiration. Photorespiration was generally elevated in maize mutant compared to normal leaves. Quantification of the proportion of total electron transport supporting photorespiration enabled estimation of the bundle sheath cell CO2 concentration (Cb) using a simple kinetic model of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase function. The A versus Cb relationships overlapped for normal and mutant lines consistent with occurrence of strictly CO2-limited photosynthesis in the mutant bundle sheath cell. The results are discussed in terms of a previously reported CO2 concentration model [Laisk A, Edwards GE (2000) Photosynth Res 66: 199–224]. PMID:27002061

  12. Seed coat-associated invertases of fava bean control both unloading and storage functions: cloning of cDNAs and cell type-specific expression.

    PubMed

    Weber, H; Borisjuk, L; Heim, U; Buchner, P; Wobus, U

    1995-11-01

    We have studied the molecular physiology of photosynthate unloading and partitioning during seed development of fava bean (Vicia faba). During the prestorage phase, high levels of hexoses in the cotyledons and the apoplastic endospermal space are correlated with activity of cell wall-bound invertase in the seed coat. Three cDNAs were cloned. Sequence comparison revealed genes putatively encoding one soluble and two cell wall-bound isoforms of invertase. Expression was studied in different organs and tissues of developing seeds by RNA gel analysis, in situ hybridization, enzyme assay, and enzyme activity staining. One extracellular invertase gene is expressed during the prestorage phase in the thin-walled parenchyma of the seed coat, a region known to be the site of photoassimilate unloading. We propose a model for an invertase-mediated unloading process during early seed development and the regulation of cotyledonary sucrose metabolism. After unloading from the seed coat, sucrose is hydrolyzed by cell wall-bound invertases. Thus, invertase contributes to establish sink strength in young seeds. The resultant hexoses are loaded into the cotyledons and control carbohydrate partitioning via an influence on the sucrose synthase/sucrose-phosphate synthase pathway. The developmentally regulated degradation of the thin-walled parenchyma expressing the invertase apparently initiates the storage phase. This is characterized by a switch to a low sucrose/hexoses ratio. Feeding hexoses to storage-phase cotyledons in vitro increases the sucrose-phosphate synthase/sucrose synthase ratio and changes carbohydrate partitioning in favor of sucrose. Concomitantly, the transcript level of the major storage product legumin B is downregulated.

  13. Verbesina alternifolia Tolerance to the Holoparasite Cuscuta gronovii and the Impact of Drought

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Bethany; Borowicz, Victoria

    2013-01-01

    Holoparasites are nonphotosynthetic plants that acquire all resources from hosts. The holoparasite Cuscuta gronovii is native to much of the US with a broad host range including Verbesina alternifolia, an understory perennial. Both species grow in moderate to moist soils and occur in habitats that may experience prolonged or episodic drought. We applied the Wise-Abrahamson Limiting Resource Model (LRM) developed for plant-herbivore relations to examine the effects of pattern of drought stress on tolerance of V. alternifolia to parasitism by C. gronovii. Individual plants were assigned one of six treatments that were combinations of parasite (none or addition of parasite) and drought stress (well-watered, continuously-stressed, or pulse-stressed). After pulse-stressed plants had experienced two wet-dry cycles all plants were harvested. Parasitism strongly reduced both shoot and root mass and well-watered hosts exhibited the greatest decline, indicating reduced tolerance to parasitism when water was readily available. This is consistent with the LRM if parasitism limits photosynthates available to the host. However, parasitism increased allocation to shoot and this effect did not differ between well-watered and drought-stressed plants, indicating equal tolerance. This outcome is in accord with an alternative prediction of the LRM if hosts are not carbon limited. Total pot productivity was reduced by parasitism and drought stress, and this effect was greater for pulse-stressed than for continuously-stressed hosts. We discuss the applicability of the LRM for understanding the effects of drought on tolerance to parasitism. PMID:27137396

  14. Warming and Nitrogen Addition Alter Photosynthetic Pigments, Sugars and Nutrients in a Temperate Meadow Ecosystem

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tao; Yang, Shaobo; Guo, Rui; Guo, Jixun

    2016-01-01

    Global warming and nitrogen (N) deposition have an important influence on terrestrial ecosystems; however, the influence of warming and N deposition on plant photosynthetic products and nutrient cycling in plants is not well understood. We examined the effects of 3 years of warming and N addition on the plant photosynthetic products, foliar chemistry and stoichiometric ratios of two dominant species, i.e., Leymus chinensis and Phragmites communis, in a temperate meadow in northeastern China. Warming significantly increased the chlorophyll content and soluble sugars in L. chinensis but had no impact on the carotenoid and fructose contents. N addition caused a significant increase in the carotenoid and fructose contents. Warming and N addition had little impact on the photosynthetic products of P. communis. Warming caused significant decreases in the N and phosphorus (P) concentrations and significantly increased the carbon (C):P and N:P ratios of L. chinensis, but not the C concentration or the C:N ratio. N addition significantly increased the N concentration, C:P and N:P ratios, but significantly reduced the C:N ratio of L. chinensis. Warming significantly increased P. communis C and P concentrations, and the C:N and C:P ratios, whereas N addition increased the C, N and P concentrations but had no impact on the stoichiometric variables. This study suggests that both warming and N addition have direct impacts on plant photosynthates and elemental stoichiometry, which may play a vital role in plant-mediated biogeochemical cycling in temperate meadow ecosystems. PMID:27171176

  15. Potassium deficiency affects water status and photosynthetic rate of the vegetative sink in green house tomato prior to its effects on source activity.

    PubMed

    Kanai, Synsuke; Moghaieb, Reda E; El-Shemy, Hany A; Panigrahi, R; Mohapatra, Pravat K; Ito, J; Nguyen, Nguyen T; Saneoka, Hirofumi; Fujita, Kounosuke

    2011-02-01

    The potassium requirement of green house tomatoes is very high for vegetative growth and fruit production. Potassium deficiency in plants takes long time for expression of visible symptoms. The objective of this study is to detect the deficiency early during the vegetative growth and define the roles of aquaporin and K-channel transporters in the process of regulation of water status and source-sink relationship. The tomato plants were grown hydroponically inside green house of Hiroshima University, Japan and subjected to different levels of K in the rooting medium. Potassium deficiency stress decreased photosynthesis, expansion and transport of ¹⁴C assimilates of the source leaf, but the effects became evident only after diameter expansion of the growing stem (sink) was down-regulated. The depression of stem diameter expansion is assumed to be associated with the suppression of water supply more than photosynthate supply to the organ. The stem diameter expansion is parameterized by root water uptake and leaf transpiration rates. The application of aquaporin inhibitor (AgNO₃) decreased leaf water potential, stem expansion and root hydraulic conductance within minutes of application. Similar results were obtained for application of the K-channel inhibitors. These observations suggested a close relationship between stem diameter expansion and activities of aquaporins and K-channel transporters in roots. The deficiency of potassium might have reduced aquaporin activity, consequently suppressing root hydraulic conductance and water supply to the growing stem for diameter expansion and leaf for transpiration. We conclude that close coupling between aquaporins and K-channel transporters in water uptake of roots is responsible for regulation of stem diameter dynamics of green house tomato plants. PMID:21421382

  16. Potassium in agriculture--status and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Zörb, Christian; Senbayram, Mehmet; Peiter, Edgar

    2014-05-15

    In this review we summarize factors determining the plant availability of soil potassium (K), the role of K in crop yield formation and product quality, and the dependence of crop stress resistance on K nutrition. Average soil reserves of K are generally large, but most of it is not plant-available. Therefore, crops need to be supplied with soluble K fertilizers, the demand of which is expected to increase significantly, particularly in developing regions of the world. Recent investigations have shown that organic exudates of some bacteria and plant roots play a key role in releasing otherwise unavailable K from K-bearing minerals. Thus, breeding for genotypes that have improved mechanisms to gain access to this fixed K will contribute toward more sustainable agriculture, particularly in cropping systems that do not have access to fertilizer K. In K-deficient crops, the supply of sink organs with photosynthates is impaired, and sugars accumulate in source leaves. This not only affects yield formation, but also quality parameters, for example in wheat, potato and grape. As K has beneficial effects on human health, its concentration in the harvest product is a quality parameter in itself. Owing to its fundamental roles in turgor generation, primary metabolism, and long-distance transport, K plays a prominent role in crop resistance to drought, salinity, high light, or cold as well as resistance to pests and pathogens. Despite the abundance of vital roles of K in crop production, an improvement of K uptake and use efficiency has not been a major focus of conventional or transgenic breeding in the past. In addition, current soil analysis methods for K are insufficient for some common soils, posing the risk of imbalanced fertilization. A stronger prioritization of these areas of research is needed to counter declines in soil fertility and to improve food security. PMID:24140002

  17. Whole-tree dynamics of non-structural carbohydrate and nitrogen pools across different seasons and in response to girdling in two temperate trees.

    PubMed

    Mei, Li; Xiong, Yanmei; Gu, Jiacun; Wang, Zhengquan; Guo, Dali

    2015-02-01

    Despite extensive research on the seasonal dynamics of non-structural carbohydrate (NSC) and nitrogen (N) concentrations, the size and relative contributions of NSC and N pools across different tree organs are not well understood. We have measured the changes in NSC and N concentrations in leaves, branches, stems and all root branch orders at monthly intervals in control and girdled trees of larch (Larix gmelinii) and ash (Fraxinus mandshurica). The biomass of each plant compartment was also determined to calculate the size of the NSC and N pools. In both species, 13-37% of the NSC and N pools were mobilized at the beginning of the growing season. Among the mobilized pools, stems and non-absorptive roots (branch orders 4-9) acted as the largest NSC sources in larch and ash, respectively, while branches served as the largest N source in both species. After stem girdling, 22 and 50% of the root NSC stores in larch and ash, respectively, were mobilized to maintain root activities during the growing season. Tree mortality was observed 1 year after girdling, at which time there was still an abundant NSC pool in the roots. We conclude that (1) different storage organs differ in their contribution to new tissue growth at the beginning of the growing season and that those storage organs holding higher fractions of the NSC or N pool are not necessarily those which mobilize more NSC or N; (2) tree growth may not be limited by carbon (C) availability; (3) C storage in non-absorptive roots plays an important role in maintaining tree survival after the termination of photosynthate flow from aboveground sources.

  18. Nutrient availability affects pigment production but not growth in lichens of biological soil crusts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bowker, M.A.; Koch, G.W.; Belnap, J.; Johnson, N.C.

    2008-01-01

    Recent research suggests that micronutrients such as Mn may limit growth of slow-growing biological soil crusts (BSCs) in some of the drylands of the world. These soil surface communities contribute strongly to arid ecosystem function and are easily degraded, creating a need for new restoration tools. The possibility that Mn fertilization could be used as a restoration tool for BSCs has not been tested previously. We used microcosms in a controlled greenhouse setting to investigate the hypothesis that Mn may limit photosynthesis and consequently growth in Collema tenax, a dominant N-fixing lichen found in BSCs worldwide. We found no evidence to support our hypothesis; furthermore, addition of other nutrients (primarily P, K, and Zn) had a suppressive effect on gross photosynthesis (P = 0.05). We also monitored the growth and physiological status of our microcosms and found that other nutrients increased the production of scytonemin, an important sunscreen pigment, but only when not added with Mn (P = 0.01). A structural equation model indicated that this effect was independent of any photosynthesis-related variable. We propose two alternative hypotheses to account for this pattern: (1) Mn suppresses processes needed to produce scytonemin; and (2) Mn is required to suppress scytonemin production at low light, when it is an unnecessary photosynthate sink. Although Mn fertilization does not appear likely to increase photosynthesis or growth of Collema, it could have a role in survivorship during environmentally stressful periods due to modification of scytonemin production. Thus, Mn enrichment should be studied further for its potential to facilitate BSC rehabilitation. ?? 2008 Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Light, temperature and nutrients as factors in photosynthetic adjustment to elevated carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Bunce, J.; Lee, D. )

    1991-05-01

    It has been noted many times that the short-term stimulation of photosynthesis by elevated carbon dioxide usually observed in C3 plants may not persist in the long-term. Experiments were designed to test the hypotheses that photosynthetic adjustment to elevated carbon dioxide is due to (a) feedback inhibition resulting from excess photosynthate production relative to use, and (b) nutrient deficiency resulting from more rapid growth. Soybeans and sugarbeets were grown in controlled environment chambers at 350 and 700 ppm carbon dioxide, at two temperatures, two levels of photosynthetically active radiation, and with three nutrient regimes in a factorial design. Net carbon dioxide uptake rates of individual leaves from all growth conditions were measured at both 350 and 700 ppm carbon dioxide to assay photosynthetic adjustment to the elevated carbon dioxide. Growth at elevated carbon dioxide reduced rates of photosynthesis measured at standard carbon dioxide levels in both species. Photosynthetic rates measured at 350 ppm were lower on average by 33% in sugarbeet and 23% in soybean after growth at elevated carbon dioxide. Photosynthetic adjustment to elevated carbon dioxide was not greater after growth at 1.0 than 0.5 mmol m{sup {minus}2}s{sup {minus}1} PPFD, was not greater at 20 than 25C growth temperature, and could not be overcome by high rates of nutrient application. These results do not support either the feedback inhibition nor nutrient deficiency hypotheses of photosynthetic adjustment to elevated carbon dioxide. In soybeans, complete photosynthetic adjustment could be induced by a single night at elevated carbon dioxide.

  20. Nitrogen control of 13C enrichment in heterotrophic organs relative to leaves in a landscape-building desert plant species

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, J.; Gu, L.; Bao, F.; Cao, Y.; Hao, Y.; He, J.; Li, J.; Li, Y.; Ren, Y.; Wang, F.; Wu, R.; Yao, B.; Zhao, Y.; Lin, G.; Wu, B.; Lu, Q.; Meng, P.

    2014-09-10

    A longstanding puzzle in isotope studies of C3 plant species is that heterotrophic plant organs (e.g., stems, roots, seeds, and fruits) tend to be enriched in 13C compared to the autotrophic organ (leaves) that provides them with photosynthate. Our inability to explain this puzzle suggests key deficiencies in understanding post-photosynthetic metabolic processes. It also limits the effectiveness of applications of stable carbon isotope analyses in a variety of scientific disciplines ranging from plant physiology to global carbon cycle studies. To gain insight into this puzzle, we excavated whole plant architectures of Nitraria tangutorum Bobrov, a C3 species that has an exceptional capability of fixing sands and building sand dunes, in two deserts in northwestern China. We systematically and simultaneously measured carbon isotope ratios and nitrogen and phosphorous contents of different parts of the excavated plants. We also determined the seasonal variations in leaf carbon isotope ratios on nearby intact plants of N. tangutorum. We found, for the first time, that higher nitrogen contents in heterotrophic organs were significantly correlated with increased heterotrophic 13C enrichment compared to leaves. However, phosphorous contents had no effect on the enrichment. In addition, new leaves had carbon isotope ratios similar to roots but were progressively depleted in 13C as they matured. We concluded that a nitrogen-mediated process, probably the refixation of respiratory CO2 by phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) carboxylase, was responsible for the differences in 13C enrichment among different heterotrophic organs while processes within leaves or during phloem loading may contribute to the overall autotrophic – heterotrophic difference in carbon isotope compositions.

  1. Production of reactive oxygen species in decoupled, Ca(2+)-depleted PSII and their use in assigning a function to chloride on both sides of PSII.

    PubMed

    Semin, Boris K; Davletshina, Lira N; Timofeev, Kirill N; Ivanov, Il'ya I; Rubin, Andrei B; Seibert, Michael

    2013-11-01

    Extraction of Ca(2+) from the oxygen-evolving complex of photosystem II (PSII) in the absence of a chelator inhibits O2 evolution without significant inhibition of the light-dependent reduction of the exogenous electron acceptor, 2,6-dichlorophenolindophenol (DCPIP) on the reducing side of PSII. The phenomenon is known as "the decoupling effect" (Semin et al. Photosynth Res 98:235-249, 2008). Extraction of Cl(-) from Ca(2+)-depleted membranes (PSII[-Ca]) suppresses the reduction of DCPIP. In the current study we investigated the nature of the oxidized substrate and the nature of the product(s) of the substrate oxidation. After elimination of all other possible donors, water was identified as the substrate. Generation of reactive oxygen species HO, H2O2, and O 2 (·-) , as possible products of water oxidation in PSII(-Ca) membranes was examined. During the investigation of O 2 (·-) production in PSII(-Ca) samples, we found that (i) O 2 (·-) is formed on the acceptor side of PSII due to the reduction of O2; (ii) depletion of Cl(-) does not inhibit water oxidation, but (iii) Cl(-) depletion does decrease the efficiency of the reduction of exogenous electron acceptors. In the absence of Cl(-) under aerobic conditions, electron transport is diverted from reducing exogenous acceptors to reducing O2, thereby increasing the rate of O 2 (·-) generation. From these observations we conclude that the product of water oxidation is H2O2 and that Cl(-) anions are not involved in the oxidation of water to H2O2 in decoupled PSII(-Ca) membranes. These results also indicate that Cl(-) anions are not directly involved in water oxidation by the Mn cluster in the native PSII membranes, but possibly provide access for H2O molecules to the Mn4CaO5 cluster and/or facilitate the release of H(+) ions into the lumenal space.

  2. Tissue-specific expression and post-translational modifications of plant- and bacterial-type phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase isozymes of the castor oil plant, Ricinus communis L.

    PubMed

    O'Leary, Brendan; Fedosejevs, Eric T; Hill, Allyson T; Bettridge, James; Park, Joonho; Rao, Srinath K; Leach, Craig A; Plaxton, William C

    2011-11-01

    This study employs transcript profiling together with immunoblotting and co-immunopurification to assess the tissue-specific expression, protein:protein interactions, and post-translational modifications (PTMs) of plant- and bacterial-type phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) isozymes (PTPC and BTPC, respectively) in the castor plant, Ricinus communis. Previous studies established that the Class-1 PEPC (PTPC homotetramer) of castor oil seeds (COS) is activated by phosphorylation at Ser-11 and inhibited by monoubiquitination at Lys-628 during endosperm development and germination, respectively. Elimination of photosynthate supply to developing COS by depodding caused the PTPC of the endosperm and cotyledon to be dephosphorylated, and then subsequently monoubiquitinated in vivo. PTPC monoubiquitination rather than phosphorylation is widespread throughout the castor plant and appears to be the predominant PTM of Class-1 PEPC that occurs in planta. The distinctive developmental patterns of PTPC phosphorylation versus monoubiquitination indicates that these two PTMs are mutually exclusive. By contrast, the BTPC: (i) is abundant in the inner integument, cotyledon, and endosperm of developing COS, but occurs at low levels in roots and cotyledons of germinated COS, (ii) shows a unique developmental pattern in leaves such that it is present in leaf buds and young expanding leaves, but undetectable in fully expanded leaves, and (iii) tightly interacts with co-expressed PTPC to form the novel and allosterically-desensitized Class-2 PEPC heteromeric complex. BTPC and thus Class-2 PEPC up-regulation appears to be a distinctive feature of rapidly growing and/or biosynthetically active tissues that require a large anaplerotic flux from phosphoenolpyruvate to replenish tricarboxylic acid cycle C-skeletons being withdrawn for anabolism.

  3. Action spectra of photosystems II and I and quantum yield of photosynthesis in leaves in State 1.

    PubMed

    Laisk, Agu; Oja, Vello; Eichelmann, Hillar; Dall'Osto, Luca

    2014-02-01

    The spectral global quantum yield (YII, electrons/photons absorbed) of photosystem II (PSII) was measured in sunflower leaves in State 1 using monochromatic light. The global quantum yield of PSI (YI) was measured using low-intensity monochromatic light flashes and the associated transmittance change at 810nm. The 810-nm signal change was calibrated based on the number of electrons generated by PSII during the flash (4·O2 evolution) which arrived at the PSI donor side after a delay of 2ms. The intrinsic quantum yield of PSI (yI, electrons per photon absorbed by PSI) was measured at 712nm, where photon absorption by PSII was small. The results were used to resolve the individual spectra of the excitation partitioning coefficients between PSI (aI) and PSII (aII) in leaves. For comparison, pigment-protein complexes for PSII and PSI were isolated, separated by sucrose density ultracentrifugation, and their optical density was measured. A good correlation was obtained for the spectral excitation partitioning coefficients measured by these different methods. The intrinsic yield of PSI was high (yI=0.88), but it absorbed only about 1/3 of quanta; consequently, about 2/3 of quanta were absorbed by PSII, but processed with the low intrinsic yield yII=0.63. In PSII, the quantum yield of charge separation was 0.89 as detected by variable fluorescence Fv/Fm, but 29% of separated charges recombined (Laisk A, Eichelmann H and Oja V, Photosynth. Res. 113, 145-155). At wavelengths less than 580nm about 30% of excitation is absorbed by pigments poorly connected to either photosystem, most likely carotenoids bound in pigment-protein complexes.

  4. Autotrophy of green non-sulphur bacteria in hot spring microbial mats: biological explanations for isotopically heavy organic carbon in the geological record

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    van der Meer, M. T.; Schouten, S.; de Leeuw, J. W.; Ward, D. M.

    2000-01-01

    Inferences about the evidence of life recorded in organic compounds within the Earth's ancient rocks have depended on 13C contents low enough to be characteristic of biological debris produced by the well-known CO2 fixation pathway, the Calvin cycle. 'Atypically' high values have been attributed to isotopic alteration of sedimentary organic carbon by thermal metamorphism. We examined the possibility that organic carbon characterized by a relatively high 13C content could have arisen biologically from recently discovered autotrophic pathways. We focused on the green non-sulphur bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus that uses the 3-hydroxypropionate pathway for inorganic carbon fixation and is geologically significant as it forms modern mat communities analogous to stromatolites. Organic matter in mats constructed by Chloroflexus spp. alone had relatively high 13C contents (-14.9%) and lipids diagnostic of Chloroflexus that were also isotopically heavy (-8.9% to -18.5%). Organic matter in mats constructed by Chloroflexus in conjunction with cyanobacteria had a more typical Calvin cycle signature (-23.5%). However, lipids diagnostic of Chloroflexus were isotopically enriched (-15.1% to -24.1%) relative to lipids typical of cyanobacteria (-33.9% to -36.3%). This suggests that, in mats formed by both cyanobacteria and Chloroflexus, autotrophy must have a greater effect on Chloroflexus carbon metabolism than the photoheterotrophic consumption of cyanobacterial photosynthate. Chloroflexus cell components were also selectively preserved. Hence, Chloroflexus autotrophy and selective preservation of its products constitute one purely biological mechanism by which isotopically heavy organic carbon could have been introduced into important Precambrian geological features.

  5. Hybrid mimics and hybrid vigor in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Li; Greaves, Ian K.; Groszmann, Michael; Wu, Li Min; Dennis, Elizabeth S.; Peacock, W. James

    2015-01-01

    F1 hybrids can outperform their parents in yield and vegetative biomass, features of hybrid vigor that form the basis of the hybrid seed industry. The yield advantage of the F1 is lost in the F2 and subsequent generations. In Arabidopsis, from F2 plants that have a F1-like phenotype, we have by recurrent selection produced pure breeding F5/F6 lines, hybrid mimics, in which the characteristics of the F1 hybrid are stabilized. These hybrid mimic lines, like the F1 hybrid, have larger leaves than the parent plant, and the leaves have increased photosynthetic cell numbers, and in some lines, increased size of cells, suggesting an increased supply of photosynthate. A comparison of the differentially expressed genes in the F1 hybrid with those of eight hybrid mimic lines identified metabolic pathways altered in both; these pathways include down-regulation of defense response pathways and altered abiotic response pathways. F6 hybrid mimic lines are mostly homozygous at each locus in the genome and yet retain the large F1-like phenotype. Many alleles in the F6 plants, when they are homozygous, have expression levels different to the level in the parent. We consider this altered expression to be a consequence of transregulation of genes from one parent by genes from the other parent. Transregulation could also arise from epigenetic modifications in the F1. The pure breeding hybrid mimics have been valuable in probing the mechanisms of hybrid vigor and may also prove to be useful hybrid vigor equivalents in agriculture. PMID:26283378

  6. The impact of extreme summer drought on the short-term carbon coupling of photosynthesis to soil CO2 efflux in a temperate grassland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burri, S.; Sturm, P.; Prechsl, U. E.; Knohl, A.; Buchmann, N.

    2014-02-01

    Along with predicted climate change, increased risks for summer drought are projected for Central Europe. However, large knowledge gaps exist in terms of how drought events influence the short-term ecosystem carbon cycle. Here, we present results from 13CO2 pulse labeling experiments at an intensively managed lowland grassland in Switzerland. We investigated the effect of extreme summer drought on the short-term coupling of freshly assimilated photosynthates in shoots to roots as well as to soil CO2 efflux. Summer drought was simulated using rainout shelters during two field seasons (2010 and 2011). Soil CO2 efflux and its isotopic composition were measured with custom-built chambers coupled to a quantum cascade laser spectrometer (QCLAS-ISO, Aerodyne Research Inc., MA, USA). During the 90 min pulse labeling experiments, we added 99.9 atom % 13CO2 to the grass sward. In addition to the isotopic analysis of soil CO2 efflux, this label was traced over 31 days into bulk shoots, roots and soil. Drought reduced the incorporation of recently fixed carbon into the shoots, but increased the relative allocation of fresh assimilates below ground compared to the control grasslands. Contrary to our hypothesis, we did not find a change of allocation speed in response to drought. Although drought clearly reduced soil CO2 efflux rates, about 75% of total tracer uptake in control plots was lost via soil CO2 efflux during 19 days after pulse labeling, compared to only about 60% under drought conditions. Thus, the short-term coupling of above- and below-ground processes was reduced in response to summer drought. The occurrence of a natural spring drought in 2011 lead to comparable albeit weaker drought responses increasing the confidence in the generalizability of our findings.

  7. The impact of extreme summer drought on the short-term carbon coupling of photosynthesis to soil CO2 efflux in a temperate grassland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burri, S.; Sturm, P.; Prechsl, U. E.; Knohl, A.; Buchmann, N.

    2013-07-01

    Along with predicted climate change, increased risks for summer drought are projected for Central Europe. However, large knowledge gaps exist in terms of how drought events influence the short-term ecosystem carbon cycle. Here, we present results from 13CO2 pulse labeling experiments at an intensively managed lowland grassland in Switzerland. We investigated the effect of extreme summer drought on the short-term coupling of freshly assimilated photosynthates in shoots to roots as well as to soil CO2 efflux. Summer drought was simulated using rainout shelters during two field seasons (2010 and 2011). Soil CO2 efflux and its isotopic composition were measured with custom-built chambers coupled to a quantum cascade laser spectrometer (QCLAS-ISO, Aerodyne Research Inc., MA, USA). During the 90 min pulse labeling experiments, we added 99.9 atom % 13CO2 to the grass sward. In addition to the isotopic analysis of soil CO2 efflux, this label was traced over 31 days into bulk shoots, roots and soil. Drought reduced the incorporation of recently fixed carbon into shoots and increased carbon allocation below-ground relative to total tracer uptake. Contrary to our hypothesis, we did not find a change in allocation speed in response to drought, although drought clearly reduced soil CO2 efflux rates. 19 days after pulse labeling, only about 60% of total tracer uptake was lost via soil CO2 efflux under drought compared to about 75% under control conditions. Predisposition of grassland by spring drought lead to different responses to summer drought in 2011 compared to 2010, suggesting increased sensitivity of grassland to consecutive drought events as predicted under future climate change.

  8. Stover Composition in Maize and Sorghum Reveals Remarkable Genetic Variation and Plasticity for Carbohydrate Accumulation.

    PubMed

    Sekhon, Rajandeep S; Breitzman, Matthew W; Silva, Renato R; Santoro, Nicholas; Rooney, William L; de Leon, Natalia; Kaeppler, Shawn M

    2016-01-01

    Carbohydrates stored in vegetative organs, particularly stems, of grasses are a very important source of energy. We examined carbohydrate accumulation in adult sorghum and maize hybrids with distinct phenology and different end uses (grain, silage, sucrose or sweetness in stalk juice, and biomass). Remarkable variation was observed for non-structural carbohydrates and structural polysaccharides during three key developmental stages both between and within hybrids developed for distinct end use in both species. At the onset of the reproductive phase (average 65 days after planting, DAP), a wide range for accumulation of non-structural carbohydrates (free glucose and sucrose combined), was observed in internodes of maize (11-24%) and sorghum (7-36%) indicating substantial variation for transient storage of excess photosynthate during periods of low grain or vegetative sink strength. Remobilization of these reserves for supporting grain fill or vegetative growth was evident from lower amounts in maize (8-19%) and sorghum (9-27%) near the end of the reproductive period (average 95 DAP). At physiological maturity of grain hybrids (average 120 DAP), amounts of these carbohydrates were generally unchanged in maize (9-21%) and sorghum (16-27%) suggesting a loss of photosynthetic assimilation due to weakening sink demand. Nonetheless, high amounts of non-structural carbohydrates at maturity even in grain maize and sorghum (15-18%) highlight the potential for developing dual-purpose (grain/stover) crops. For both species, the amounts of structural polysaccharides in the cell wall, measured as monomeric components (glucose and pentose), decreased during grain fill but remained unchanged thereafter with maize biomass possessing slightly higher amounts than sorghum. Availability of carbohydrates in maize and sorghum highlights the potential for developing energy-rich dedicated biofuel or dual-purpose (grain/stover) crops. PMID:27375668

  9. How drought severity constrains GPP and its partitioning among carbon pools in a Quercus ilex coppice?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rambal, S.; Lempereur, M.; Limousin, J. M.; Martin-StPaul, N. K.; Ourcival, J. M.; Rodríguez-Calcerrada, J.

    2014-06-01

    The partitioning of photosynthates toward biomass compartments has a crucial role in the carbon sink function of forests. Few studies have examined how carbon is allocated toward plant compartments in drought prone forests. We analyzed the fate of GPP in relation to yearly water deficit in an old evergreen Mediterranean Quercus ilex coppice severely affected by water limitations. Gross and net carbon fluxes between the ecosystem and the atmosphere were measured with an eddy-covariance flux tower running continuously since 2001. Discrete measurements of litterfall, stem growth and fAPAR allowed us to derive annual productions of leaves, wood, flowers and acorns and an isometric relationship between stem and belowground biomass has been used to estimate perennial belowground growth. By combining eddy-covariance fluxes with annual productions we managed to close a C budget and derive values of autotrophic and heterotrophic respirations, NPP and carbon use efficiency (CUE, the ratio between NPP and GPP). Average values of yearly NEP, GPP and Reco were 282, 1259 and 977 g C m-2. The corresponding ANPP components were 142.5, 26.4 and 69.6 g C m-2 for leaves, reproductive effort (flowers and fruits) and stems. Gross and net carbon exchange between the ecosystem and the atmosphere were affected by annual water deficit. Partitioning to the different plant compartments was also impacted by drought, with a hierarchy of responses going from the most affected, the stem growth, to the least affected, the leaf production. The average CUE was 0.40, which is well in the range for Mediterranean-type forest ecosystems. CUE tended to decrease more slightly in response to drought than GPP and NPP, probably due to drought-acclimation of autotrophic respiration. Overall, our results provide a baseline for modeling the inter-annual variations of carbon fluxes and allocation in this widespread Mediterranean ecosystem and highlight the value of maintaining continuous experimental

  10. How drought severity constrains gross primary production(GPP) and its partitioning among carbon pools in a Quercus ilex coppice?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rambal, S.; Lempereur, M.; Limousin, J. M.; Martin-StPaul, N. K.; Ourcival, J. M.; Rodríguez-Calcerrada, J.

    2014-12-01

    The partitioning of photosynthates toward biomass compartments plays a crucial role in the carbon (C) sink function of forests. Few studies have examined how carbon is allocated toward plant compartments in drought-prone forests. We analyzed the fate of gross primary production (GPP) in relation to yearly water deficit in an old evergreen Mediterranean Quercus ilex coppice severely affected by water limitations. Carbon fluxes between the ecosystem and the atmosphere were measured with an eddy covariance flux tower running continuously since 2001. Discrete measurements of litterfall, stem growth and fAPAR allowed us to derive annual productions of leaves, wood, flowers and acorns, and an isometric relationship between stem and belowground biomass has been used to estimate perennial belowground growth. By combining eddy covariance fluxes with annual net primary productions (NPP), we managed to close a C budget and derive values of autotrophic, heterotrophic respirations and carbon-use efficiency (CUE; the ratio between NPP and GPP). Average values of yearly net ecosystem production (NEP), GPP and Reco were 282, 1259 and 977 g C m-2. The corresponding aboveground net primary production (ANPP) components were 142.5, 26.4 and 69.6 g C m-2 for leaves, reproductive effort (flowers and fruits) and stems, respectively. NEP, GPP and Reco were affected by annual water deficit. Partitioning to the different plant compartments was also impacted by drought, with a hierarchy of responses going from the most affected - the stem growth - to the least affected - the leaf production. The average CUE was 0.40, which is well in the range for Mediterranean-type forest ecosystems. CUE tended to decrease less drastically in response to drought than GPP and NPP did, probably due to drought acclimation of autotrophic respiration. Overall, our results provide a baseline for modeling the inter-annual variations of carbon fluxes and allocation in this widespread Mediterranean ecosystem, and

  11. Impact of eastern dwarf mistletoe (Arceuthobium pusillum) infection on the needles of red spruce (Picea rubens) and white spruce (Picea glauca): oxygen exchange, morphology and composition.

    PubMed

    Reblin, Jaret S; Logan, Barry A; Tissue, David T

    2006-10-01

    Eastern dwarf mistletoe (Arceuthobium pusillum Peck) is a hemiparasitic angiosperm that infects white spruce (Picea glauca (Moench) Voss) and red spruce (P. rubens Sarg.) in northeastern North America. The effects of mistletoe infection differ substantially between white and red spruce, with white spruce suffering greater infection-induced mortality. In the present study, we sought to determine the role that species-specific differences in needle-scale responses to parasitism may play in the observed differences in the effect of infection on host tree health. Based on the measurements made, the most apparent effect of parasitism was a reduction in needle size distal to infections. The magnitude of this reduction was greater in white spruce than in red spruce. Eastern dwarf mistletoe was a sink for host photosynthate in red spruce and white spruce; however, there were no adjustments in needle photosynthetic capacities in either host to accommodate the added sink demands of the parasite. Needle total nonstructural carbohydrate concentrations (TNC) were also unaltered by infection. Red spruce needles had higher TNC concentrations despite having lower overall photosynthetic capacities, suggesting that red spruce may be more sink limited and therefore better able to satisfy the added sink demands of parasitic infection. However, if carbon availability limits the growth of the mistletoe, one may expect that the extent of the parasitic infection would be greater in red spruce. Yet in the field, the extent of infection is generally greater in white spruce. Taken together, these results suggest that dwarf mistletoe may not substantially perturb the carbon balance of either host spruce species and that species-specific differences in needle-scale responses to the parasite cannot explain the contrasting effects of infection on white spruce and red spruce.

  12. [Quantifying rice (Oryza sativa L.) photo-assimilated carbon input into soil organic carbon pools following continuous 14C labeling].

    PubMed

    Nie, San-An; Zhou, Ping; Ge, Ti-Da; Tong, Cheng-Li; Xiao, He-Ai; Wu, Jin-Shui; Zhang, Yang-Zhu

    2012-04-01

    The microcosm experiment was carried out to quantify the input and distribution of photo-assimilated C into soil C pools by using a 14C continuous labeling technique. Destructive samplings of rice (Oryza sativa) were conducted after labeling for 80 days. The allocation of 14C-labeled photosynthates in plants and soil C pools such as dissolved organic C (DOC) and microbial biomass C (MBC) in rice-planted soil were examined over the 14C labeling span. The amounts of rice shoot and root biomass C was ranged from 1.86 to 5.60 g x pot(-1), 0.46 to 0.78 g x pot(-1) in different tested paddy soils after labeling for 80 days, respectively. The amount of 14C in the soil organic C (14C-SOC) was also dependent on the soils, ranged from 114.3 to 348.2 mg x kg(-1), accounting for 5.09% to 6.62% of the rice biomass 14C, respectively. The amounts of 14C in the dissolved organic C (14C-DOC) and in the microbial biomass C(14C-MBC), as proportions of 14C-SOC, were 2.21%-3.54% and 9.72% -17.2%, respectively. The 14C-DOC, 14C-MBC, and 14C-SOC as proportions of total DOC, MBC, and SOC, respectively, were 6.72% -14.64%, 1.70% -7.67%, and 0.73% -1.99%, respectively. Moreover, the distribution and transformation of root-derived C had a greater influence on the dynamics of DOC and MBC than on the dynamics of SOC. Further studies are required to ascertain the functional significance of soil microorganisms (such as C-sequestering bacteria and photosynthetic bacteria) in the paddy system. PMID:22720588

  13. Light intensity alters the extent of arsenic toxicity in Helianthus annuus L. seedlings.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Geeta; Srivastava, Prabhat Kumar; Singh, Vijay Pratap; Prasad, Sheo Mohan

    2014-06-01

    The present study is aimed at assessing the extent of arsenic (As) toxicity under three different light intensities-optimum (400 μmole photon m(-2) s(-1)), sub-optimum (225 μmole photon m(-2) s(-1)), and low (75 μmole photon m(-2) s(-1))-exposed to Helianthus annuus L. var. DRSF-113 seedlings by examining various physiological and biochemical parameters. Irrespective of the light intensities under which H. annuus L. seedlings were grown, there was an As dose (low, i.e., 6 mg kg(-1) soil, As1; and high, i.e., 12 mg kg(-1) soil, As2)-dependent decrease in all the growth parameters, viz., fresh mass, shoot length, and root length. Optimum light-grown seedlings exhibited better growth performance than the sub-optimum and low light-grown seedlings; however, low light-grown plants had maximum root and shoot lengths. Accumulation of As in the plant tissues depended upon its concentration used, proximity of the plant tissue, and intensity of the light. Greater intensity of light allowed greater assimilation of photosynthates accompanied by more uptake of nutrients along with As from the medium. The levels of chlorophyll a, b, and carotenoids declined with increasing concentrations of As. Seedlings acquired maximum Chl a and b under optimum light which were more compatible to face As1 and As2 doses of As, also evident from the overall status of enzymatic (SOD, POD, CAT, and GST) and non-enzymatic antioxidant (Pro).

  14. Glycolytic enzymatic activities in developing seeds involved in the differences between standard and low oil content sunflowers (Helianthus annuus L.).

    PubMed

    Troncoso-Ponce, M Adrián; Garcés, Rafael; Martínez-Force, Enrique

    2010-12-01

    As opposed to other oilseeds, developing sunflower seeds do not accumulate starch initially. They rely on the sucrose that comes from the mother plant to synthesise lipid precursors. Glycolysis is the principal source of carbon skeletons and reducing power for lipid biosynthesis. In this work, glycolytic initial metabolites and enzyme activities from developing seed of two different sunflower lines, of high and low oil content, were compared during storage lipid synthesis. These two lines showed different kinetic lipid accumulation in the developing embryos. Fatty acids levels during the initial and final stage of lipid synthesis were higher in CAS-6 than in ZEN-8. The analysis of the photosynthate and sugars content suggests that, although the hexoses levels were quite similar in both lines, the amount of sucrose produced by the mother plant and available for lipid synthesis was higher in CAS-6. Although, a smaller amount of sucrose is available in the ZEN-8 line, its seeds maintain the levels of intermediate sugars in the initial steps of glycolysis due to an increase in the levels of the invertase, hexokinase and phosphoglucose isomerase activities in ZEN-8, with respect to CAS-6. Also, a readjustment in the final part of this metabolic route took place, with the activities of phosphoglycerate kinase and enolase in CAS-6 being higher, allowing increased synthesis of phosphoenolpiruvate, the intermediate carbon donor for fatty acid synthesis. In addition, recently, it has been shown that Arabidopsis mutants with a lower fat content in their seeds have a higher amount of sucrose. These data together point to these last two enzymatic activities, phosphoglycerate kinase and enolase, as being responsible for the lower fat content in the ZEN-8 line.

  15. SEORious business: structural proteins in sieve tubes and their involvement in sieve element occlusion.

    PubMed

    Knoblauch, Michael; Froelich, Daniel R; Pickard, William F; Peters, Winfried S

    2014-04-01

    The phloem provides a network of sieve tubes for long-distance translocation of photosynthates. For over a century, structural proteins in sieve tubes have presented a conundrum since they presumably increase the hydraulic resistance of the tubes while no potential function other than sieve tube or wound sealing in the case of injury has been suggested. Here we summarize and critically evaluate current speculations regarding the roles of these proteins. Our understanding suffers from the suggestive power of images; what looks like a sieve tube plug on micrographs may not actually impede translocation very much. Recent reports of an involvement of SEOR (sieve element occlusion-related) proteins, a class of P-proteins, in the sealing of injured sieve tubes are inconclusive; various lines of evidence suggest that, in neither intact nor injured plants, are SEORs determinative of translocation stoppage. Similarly, the popular notion that P-proteins serve in the defence against phloem sap-feeding insects is unsupported by empirical facts; it is conceivable that in functional sieve tubes, aphids actually could benefit from inducing a plug. The idea that rising cytosolic Ca(2+) generally triggers sieve tube blockage by P-proteins appears widely accepted, despite lacking experimental support. Even in forisomes, P-protein assemblages restricted to one single plant family and the only Ca(2+)-responsive P-proteins known, the available evidence does not unequivocally suggest that plug formation is the cause rather than a consequence of translocation stoppage. We conclude that the physiological roles of structural P-proteins remain elusive, and that in vivo studies of their dynamics in continuous sieve tube networks combined with flow velocity measurements will be required to (hopefully) resolve this scientific roadblock. PMID:24591057

  16. Effects of photoperiod on wheat growth, development and yield in CELSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yunze, Shen; Shuangsheng, Guo

    2014-12-01

    A Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS) is a sealed system used in spaceflight in order to provide astronauts with food and O2 by plants. It is of great significance to increase the energy-using efficiency because energy is extremely deficient in the space. Therefore, the objective of this research was to increase the energy-using efficiency of wheat by regulating the photoperiod. Sixteen treatments were set in total: four photoperiods before flowering (PBF) combined with four photoperiods after flowering (PAF) of 12 h, 16 h, 20 h and 24 h. The light source was red-blue LED (90% red+10% blue). As a result, the growth period of wheat was largely extended by shorter PBF, particularly the number of days from tillering to jointing and from jointing to heading. The period from flowering to maturity was extended by shorter PAF. Shorter PBF and longer PAF could increase not only the yield but also the energy-using efficiency of wheat. As for the nutritional quality, longer photoperiod (both PBF and PAF) increased starch concentration as well as decreased protein concentration of seeds. The effects of PBF and PAF were interactional. The lighting strategy with PBF of 12 h and PAF of 24 h was proved to be the optimum photoperiod for wheat cultivation in CELSS. The mechanisms of photoperiod effect contain two aspects. Firstly, photoperiod is a signal for many processes in plant growth, particularly the process of ear differentiation. Shorter PBF promoted the ear differentiation of wheat, increasing the spikelet number, floret number and seed number and thus enhancing the yield. Secondly, longer photoperiod leads to more light energy input and longer time of photosynthesis, so that longer PAF provided more photosynthate and increased seed yield.

  17. Nitrous oxide emission and mitigation from wheat agriculture: association of physiological and anatomical characteristics of wheat genotypes.

    PubMed

    Borah, Leena; Baruah, Kushal Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Agriculture is an important source of emission of the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N2O). The observed differences in N2O emission among different varieties of agricultural crops can be a key factor for developing N2O emission reduction strategies. N2O emissions were estimated from three varieties of wheat viz. Sonalika, DBW 39, and K 0307 during 2010-2011 in an attempt to identify plant physiological and anatomical factors contributing to differences in gas emissions within the varieties. Sonalika was identified as a low N2O emitting variety and DBW 39 as high emitting when grown in a uniform field condition. The experiment was repeated in 2011-2012 selecting low emitting Sonalika and high emitting variety DBW 39 for further confirmation of the results obtained during the first year of experimentation. Important plant factors namely rate of photosynthesis and transpiration in flag leaf, stomatal frequency of adaxial flag leaf surface, and size of the xylem vessels (mean vessel size of node, stem, and root) were studied, and their relationship with N2O flux was worked out. A good correlation between transpiration and N2O flux was observed in this study. Scanning electron microscopic investigation revealed strong association of flag leaf stomatal frequency and xylem size with N2O emission. Sonalika, identified as low N2O emitting variety during both the years of study, also recorded higher grain yield due to its higher efficiency of photosynthate allocation toward the developing grains. The observed differences in N2O emission are considered to be due largely to genetic differences in the wheat genotypes. PMID:26335526

  18. Metabolomics and the Legacy of Previous Ecosystems: a Case Study from the Brine of Lake Vida (Antarctica)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, L.; Kenig, F. P. H.; Murray, A. E.; Doran, P. T.; Fritsen, C. H.

    2015-12-01

    The McMurdo Dry Valleys of Antarctica are regarded as one of the best Earth analogs for astrobiological investigations of icy worlds. In the dry valleys, Lake Vida contains an anoxic and aphotic ice-sealed brine that has been isolated for millennia and yet is hosting a population of active microbes at -13˚ C. The biogeochemical processes used by these slow-growing microbes are still unclear. We attempt to elucidate the microbial processes responsible for the survivability of these organisms using metabolomics. Preliminary investigations of organic compounds of Lake Vida Brine (LVBr) was performed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and solid-phase micro-extraction (SPME) GC-MS. LVBr contains a vast variety of lipids and is dominated by low molecular weight compounds. Many of these compounds are biomarkers of processes that took place in Lake Vida prior to evaporation and its cryo-encapsulation. These compounds include dimethylsulfide that is derived from the photosynthate dimethylsulfoniopropionate, dihydroactinidiolide that is derived from a diatom pigment, and 2-methyl-3-ethyl-maleimide that is derived from chlorophyll. These compounds, which dominate the lipid reservoir, represent a legacy from an ecosystem that is different from the current bacterial ecosystem of the brine. The abundance of the legacy compounds in the brine is most likely a reflection of the very slow metabolism of the bacterial community in the cold brine. It is important, thus, to be able to distinguish the legacy metabolites and their diagenetic products from the metabolites of the current ecosystem. This legacy issue is specific to a slow growing microbial ecosystem that cannot process the legacy carbon completely. It applies not only to Lake Vida brine, but other slow growing ecosystems such as other subglacial Antarctic lakes, the Arctic regions, and the deep biosphere.

  19. Environmental productivity indices for a Chihuahuan desert cam plant, Agave lechuguilla

    SciTech Connect

    Nobel, P.S.; Quero, E.

    1986-02-01

    Productivity of Agave lechuguilla, a commercially harvested plant that occurs over vast areas of the Chihuahuan Desert, was measured using conventional dry mass changes in the field and was predicted based on physiological responses to environmental variables in the laboratory. An environmental productivity index (EPI) was constructed as the product of indices for water status, leaf temperature, and photosynthetically active radiation (PAR). Each of these component indices was assigned a maximum value of unity when that variable was not limiting net CO/sub 2/ uptake over a 24-h period. Soil water potential, daily air and leaf temperatures, and PAR in the planes of the leaves at the field site in Coahuila, Mexico, could thus be quantitatively described in terms of their effect on net CO/sub 2/ uptake. Seasonal changes in PAR proportionally affected both the modest daytime net CO/sub 2/ uptake and the predominant nighttime net CO/sub 2/ uptake for this crassulacean acid metabolism plant, while seasonal variations in temperature had relatively small effects on net CO/sub 2/ uptake over a 24-h period. EPI was highly correlated with the number of new leaves unfolding each month in the field (r/sup 2/ = 0.83); counting unfolding leaves is a nondestructive method of estimating productivity. For the 1-yr study period EPI averaged 0.28, which led to a predicted annual dry mass gain per unit leaf area of 0.68 kg/m/sup 2/. Field measurements indicated that the actual dry mass gain was about half this value, the difference representing photosynthate needed for constructing and maintaining folded leaves, stem, and roots. The productivity of A. lechuguilla per unit ground area explored by its roots was 0.38 kg x m/sup -2/ x yr/sup -1/, which, although much less than for agricultural crops, is still much greater than the average productivity for desert ecosystems.

  20. High Latitude Forest Dynamics - CO2 EXCHANGE Measurements and Forest Growth at the Altitudinal Forest Line in High Subarctic Finnish Lapland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dengel, S.; Siivola, E.; Aakala, T.; Kolari, P.; Hari, P.; Back, J. K.; Grace, J.; Vesala, T.

    2015-12-01

    Forests in high subarctic fell regions of Fennoscandia belong to the most northern forests in the world, a dynamic ecosystem vulnerable under a changing climate with treelines moving further north and also higher up slopes. An ecosystem is characterised by the interaction between micrometeorology, macroecology and the underlying terrain and topography. The current study is carried out at 68° North (Värriö strict nature reserve), the most sensitive zone of the high subarctic in Finnish Lapland. As the treeline is climbing up the slopes trees and eventually forests establish along the slopes leading to a greening of the area ("Greening of the Arctic" effect) and to an increase in CO2 uptake, also as a result of rising air temperatures and Nitrogen fertilization effects. Such developments and the little grazing (in this area) are leading to an increase in photosynthesising biomass. In order to fully understand the atmosphere - forest interaction in the fell region of Finnish Lapland, several important aspects are taken in consideration: its high latitudinal location, on-going climate change, polar day, its topographic characteristic and the dynamic of the progressing tree line. All these physiognomies cumulate in the capacity and efficiency of high latitude biomes in converting energy into photosynthate and contributing to removal of CO2 from the atmosphere. Carrying out CO2 and energy exchange measurements at ecosystem level in such extreme environments are challenging in particular when trying to follow and fulfil established assumptions set out by the application of the eddy covariance technique. Results from the first four consecutive snow free growing seasons show this site to act as a sink for atmospheric CO2. We are investigating the orographic effect on the observed fluxes and evaluate the performance of the flux setup determining if the topography has any systematic effects on fluxes or whether its external properties bias the carbon balance.

  1. Isolate Identity Determines Plant Tolerance to Pathogen Attack in Assembled Mycorrhizal Communities

    PubMed Central

    Lewandowski, Thaddeus J.; Dunfield, Kari E.; Antunes, Pedro M.

    2013-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) are widespread soil microorganisms that associate mutualistically with plant hosts. AMF receive photosynthates from the host in return for various benefits. One of such benefits is in the form of enhanced pathogen tolerance. However, this aspect of the symbiosis has been understudied compared to effects on plant growth and its ability to acquire nutrients. While it is known that increased AMF species richness positively correlates with plant productivity, the relationship between AMF diversity and host responses to pathogen attack remains obscure. The objective of this study was to test whether AMF isolates can differentially attenuate the deleterious effects of a root pathogen on plant growth, whether the richest assemblage of AMF isolates provides the most tolerance against the pathogen, and whether AMF-induced changes to root architecture serve as a mechanism for improved plant disease tolerance. In a growth chamber study, we exposed the plant oxeye daisy (Leucanthemum vulgare) to all combinations of three AMF isolates and to the plant root pathogen Rhizoctonia solani. We found that the pathogen caused an 81% reduction in shoot and a 70% reduction in root biomass. AMF significantly reduced the highly deleterious effect of the pathogen. Mycorrhizal plants infected with the pathogen produced 91% more dry shoot biomass and 72% more dry root biomass relative to plants solely infected with R. solani. AMF isolate identity was a better predictor of AMF-mediated host tolerance to the pathogen than AMF richness. However, the enhanced tolerance response did not result from AMF-mediated changes to root architecture. Our data indicate that AMF communities can play a major role in alleviating host pathogen attack but this depends primarily on the capacity of individual AMF isolates to provide this benefit. PMID:23620744

  2. Impact of Heterobasidion root-rot on fine root morphology and associated fungi in Picea abies stands on peat soils.

    PubMed

    Gaitnieks, Talis; Klavina, Darta; Muiznieks, Indrikis; Pennanen, Taina; Velmala, Sannakajsa; Vasaitis, Rimvydas; Menkis, Audrius

    2016-07-01

    We examined differences in fine root morphology, mycorrhizal colonisation and root-inhabiting fungal communities between Picea abies individuals infected by Heterobasidion root-rot compared with healthy individuals in four stands on peat soils in Latvia. We hypothesised that decreased tree vitality and alteration in supply of photosynthates belowground due to root-rot infection might lead to changes in fungal communities of tree roots. Plots were established in places where trees were infected and in places where they were healthy. Within each stand, five replicate soil cores with roots were taken to 20 cm depth in each root-rot infected and uninfected plot. Root morphological parameters, mycorrhizal colonisation and associated fungal communities, and soil chemical properties were analysed. In three stands root morphological parameters and in all stands root mycorrhizal colonisation were similar between root-rot infected and uninfected plots. In one stand, there were significant differences in root morphological parameters between root-rot infected versus uninfected plots, but these were likely due to significant differences in soil chemical properties between the plots. Sequencing of the internal transcribed spacer of fungal nuclear rDNA from ectomycorrhizal (ECM) root morphotypes of P. abies revealed the presence of 42 fungal species, among which ECM basidiomycetes Tylospora asterophora (24.6 % of fine roots examined), Amphinema byssoides (14.5 %) and Russula sapinea (9.7 %) were most common. Within each stand, the richness of fungal species and the composition of fungal communities in root-rot infected versus uninfected plots were similar. In conclusion, Heterobasidion root-rot had little or no effect on fine root morphology, mycorrhizal colonisation and composition of fungal communities in fine roots of P. abies growing on peat soils.

  3. Potassium deficiency affects water status and photosynthetic rate of the vegetative sink in green house tomato prior to its effects on source activity.

    PubMed

    Kanai, Synsuke; Moghaieb, Reda E; El-Shemy, Hany A; Panigrahi, R; Mohapatra, Pravat K; Ito, J; Nguyen, Nguyen T; Saneoka, Hirofumi; Fujita, Kounosuke

    2011-02-01

    The potassium requirement of green house tomatoes is very high for vegetative growth and fruit production. Potassium deficiency in plants takes long time for expression of visible symptoms. The objective of this study is to detect the deficiency early during the vegetative growth and define the roles of aquaporin and K-channel transporters in the process of regulation of water status and source-sink relationship. The tomato plants were grown hydroponically inside green house of Hiroshima University, Japan and subjected to different levels of K in the rooting medium. Potassium deficiency stress decreased photosynthesis, expansion and transport of ¹⁴C assimilates of the source leaf, but the effects became evident only after diameter expansion of the growing stem (sink) was down-regulated. The depression of stem diameter expansion is assumed to be associated with the suppression of water supply more than photosynthate supply to the organ. The stem diameter expansion is parameterized by root water uptake and leaf transpiration rates. The application of aquaporin inhibitor (AgNO₃) decreased leaf water potential, stem expansion and root hydraulic conductance within minutes of application. Similar results were obtained for application of the K-channel inhibitors. These observations suggested a close relationship between stem diameter expansion and activities of aquaporins and K-channel transporters in roots. The deficiency of potassium might have reduced aquaporin activity, consequently suppressing root hydraulic conductance and water supply to the growing stem for diameter expansion and leaf for transpiration. We conclude that close coupling between aquaporins and K-channel transporters in water uptake of roots is responsible for regulation of stem diameter dynamics of green house tomato plants.

  4. Nitrogen Fertilization Modifies the Phenology of Ground CO2 Efflux in a Boreal Scots Pine Forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, J. D.; Näsholm, T.; Linder, S.; Tarvainen, L.; Peichl, M.; Lundmark, T.

    2015-12-01

    Problems with the extraction of ecosystem respiration rates from eddy covariance data have led to renewed interest in chamber-based estimates of CO2 efflux from near the ground surface. However, chamber measurements frequently have their own issues. Here we describe the results of a study using large (≈2 m radius), transparent chambers over intact ground vegetation to describe the net efflux of CO2 and its environmental controls during the growing season at Rosinedal, a research site in northern Sweden. Measurements were made at thirty-minute intervals over the course of three growing seasons in a heavily fertilized and an unfertilized Scots pine stand. Ammonium nitrate was added at rates of 100 kg N ha-1 for the first five years, after which the rate was halved but the additions continued. The CO2 efflux results were simultaneously fitted to a nonlinear model describing the exponential increase in dark efflux with temperature, the Michaelis-Menten saturation of light-driven CO2 uptake in photosynthesis, the reduction in efflux due to soil drying, and a residual term that we ascribe to weekly shifts in the photosynthate partitioning of canopy trees to belowground processes. We found the expected exponential increase in dark efflux with temperature, however the net efflux in daytime was often negative, reflecting the high GPP of the ground vegetation, especially in dense canopies of bilberry (Vaccinium myrtillus L.). There was a clear reduction in dark efflux under dry conditions. The empirical phenology parameters increased sharply in early July, around the time that leaf expansion and rapid cambial growth were completed. This increase was more pronounced on the control plot than on the fertilized plot, consistent with expectations based on the notion that N fertilization should favor aboveground partitioning. The empirical "partitioning coefficient" shifted net efflux by nearly as much as the seasonal temperature range. Dark efflux of CO2 was nearly halved as a

  5. Modification of carbon partitioning, photosynthetic capacity, and O{sub 2} sensitivity in Arabidopsis plants with low ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, J.; Okita, T.W.; Edwards, G.E.

    1999-01-01

    Wild-type Arabidopsis plants, the starch-deficient mutant TL46, and the near-starchless mutant TL25 were evaluated by noninvasive in situ methods for their capacity for net CO{sub 2} assimilation, true rates of photosynthetic O{sub 2} evolution (determined from chlorophyll fluorescence measurements of photosystem II), partitioning of photosynthate into sucrose and starch, and plant growth. Compared with wild-type plants, the starch mutants showed reduced photosynthetic capacity, with the largest reduction occurring in mutant TL25 subjected to high light and increased CO{sub 2} partial pressure. The extent of stimulation of CO{sub 2} assimilation by increasing CO{sub 2} or by reducing O{sub 2} partial pressure was significantly less for the starch mutants than for wild-type plants. Under high light and moderate to high levels of CO{sub 2}, the rates of CO{sub 2} assimilation and O{sub 2} evolution and the percentage inhibition of photosynthesis by low O{sub 2} were higher for the wild type than for the mutants. The relative rates of {sup 14}CO{sub 2} incorporation into starch under high light and high CO{sub 2} followed the patterns of photosynthetic capacity, with TL46 showing 31% to 40% of the starch-labeling rates of the wild type and TL25 showing less than 14% incorporation. Overall, there were significant correlations between the rates of starch synthesis and CO{sub 2} assimilation and between the rates of starch synthesis and cumulative leaf area. These results indicate that leaf starch plays an important role as a transient reserve, the synthesis of which can ameliorate any potential reduction in photosynthesis caused by feedback regulation.

  6. Warming and Nitrogen Addition Alter Photosynthetic Pigments, Sugars and Nutrients in a Temperate Meadow Ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tao; Yang, Shaobo; Guo, Rui; Guo, Jixun

    2016-01-01

    Global warming and nitrogen (N) deposition have an important influence on terrestrial ecosystems; however, the influence of warming and N deposition on plant photosynthetic products and nutrient cycling in plants is not well understood. We examined the effects of 3 years of warming and N addition on the plant photosynthetic products, foliar chemistry and stoichiometric ratios of two dominant species, i.e., Leymus chinensis and Phragmites communis, in a temperate meadow in northeastern China. Warming significantly increased the chlorophyll content and soluble sugars in L. chinensis but had no impact on the carotenoid and fructose contents. N addition caused a significant increase in the carotenoid and fructose contents. Warming and N addition had little impact on the photosynthetic products of P. communis. Warming caused significant decreases in the N and phosphorus (P) concentrations and significantly increased the carbon (C):P and N:P ratios of L. chinensis, but not the C concentration or the C:N ratio. N addition significantly increased the N concentration, C:P and N:P ratios, but significantly reduced the C:N ratio of L. chinensis. Warming significantly increased P. communis C and P concentrations, and the C:N and C:P ratios, whereas N addition increased the C, N and P concentrations but had no impact on the stoichiometric variables. This study suggests that both warming and N addition have direct impacts on plant photosynthates and elemental stoichiometry, which may play a vital role in plant-mediated biogeochemical cycling in temperate meadow ecosystems.

  7. Production possibility frontiers in phototroph:heterotroph symbioses: trade-offs in allocating fixed carbon pools and the challenges these alternatives present for understanding the acquisition of intracellular habitats

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Malcolm S.

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular habitats have been invaded by a remarkable diversity of organisms, and strategies employed to successfully reside in another species' cellular space are varied. Common selective pressures may be experienced in symbioses involving phototrophic symbionts and heterotrophic hosts. Here I refine and elaborate the Arrested Phagosome Hypothesis that proposes a mechanism that phototrophs use to gain access to their host's intracellular habitat. I employ the economic concept of production possibility frontiers (PPF) as a useful heuristic to clearly define the trade-offs that an intracellular phototroph is likely to face as it allocates photosynthetically-derived pools of energy. Fixed carbon can fuel basic metabolism/respiration, it can support mitotic division, or it can be translocated to the host. Excess photosynthate can be stored for future use. Thus, gross photosynthetic productivity can be divided among these four general categories, and natural selection will favor phenotypes that best match the demands presented to the symbiont by the host cellular habitat. The PPF highlights trade-offs that exist between investment in growth (i.e., mitosis) or residency (i.e., translocating material to the host). Insights gained from this perspective might help explain phenomena such as coral bleaching because deficits in photosynthetic production are likely to diminish a symbiont's ability to “afford” the costs of intracellular residency. I highlight deficits in our current understanding of host:symbiont interactions at the molecular, genetic, and cellular level, and I also discuss how semantic differences among scientists working with different symbiont systems may diminish the rate of increase in our understanding of phototrophic-based associations. I argue that adopting interdisciplinary (in this case, inter-symbiont-system) perspectives will lead to advances in our general understanding of the phototrophic symbiont's intracellular niche. PMID:25101064

  8. Short-term carbon cycling responses of a mature eucalypt woodland to gradual stepwise enrichment of atmospheric CO2 concentration.

    PubMed

    Drake, John E; Macdonald, Catriona A; Tjoelker, Mark G; Crous, Kristine Y; Gimeno, Teresa E; Singh, Brajesh K; Reich, Peter B; Anderson, Ian C; Ellsworth, David S

    2016-01-01

    Projections of future climate are highly sensitive to uncertainties regarding carbon (C) uptake and storage by terrestrial ecosystems. The Eucalyptus Free-Air CO2 Enrichment (EucFACE) experiment was established to study the effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations (eCO2 ) on a native mature eucalypt woodland with low fertility soils in southeast Australia. In contrast to other FACE experiments, the concentration of CO2 at EucFACE was increased gradually in steps above ambient (+0, 30, 60, 90, 120, and 150 ppm CO2 above ambient of ~400 ppm), with each step lasting approximately 5 weeks. This provided a unique opportunity to study the short-term (weeks to months) response of C cycle flux components to eCO2 across a range of CO2 concentrations in an intact ecosystem. Soil CO2 efflux (i.e., soil respiration or Rsoil ) increased in response to initial enrichment (e.g., +30 and +60 ppm CO2 ) but did not continue to increase as the CO2 enrichment was stepped up to higher concentrations. Light-saturated photosynthesis of canopy leaves (Asat ) also showed similar stimulation by elevated CO2 at +60 ppm as at +150 ppm CO2 . The lack of significant effects of eCO2 on soil moisture, microbial biomass, or activity suggests that the increase in Rsoil likely reflected increased root and rhizosphere respiration rather than increased microbial decomposition of soil organic matter. This rapid increase in Rsoil suggests that under eCO2, additional photosynthate was produced, transported belowground, and respired. The consequences of this increased belowground activity and whether it is sustained through time in mature ecosystems under eCO2 are a priority for future research. PMID:26426394

  9. Stover composition in maize and sorghum reveals remarkable genetic variation and plasticity for carbohydrate accumulation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sekhon, Rajandeep S.; Breitzman, Matthew W.; Silva, Renato R.; Santoro, Nicholas; Rooney, William L.; de Leon, Natalia; Kaeppler, Shawn M.

    2016-06-08

    Carbohydrates stored in vegetative organs, particularly stems, of grasses are a very important source of energy. We examined carbohydrate accumulation in adult sorghum and maize hybrids with distinct phenology and different end uses (grain, silage, sucrose or sweetness in stalk juice, and biomass). Remarkable variation was observed for nonstructural carbohydrates and structural polysaccharides during three key developmental stages both between and within hybrids developed for distinct end use in both species. At the onset of the reproductive phase (average 65 days after planting, DAP), a wide range for accumulation of non-structural carbohydrates (free glucose and sucrose combined), was observed inmore » internodes of maize (11-24%) and sorghum (7-36%) indicating substantial variation for transient storage of excess photosynthate during periods of low grain or vegetative sink strength. Remobilization of these reserves for supporting grain fill or vegetative growth was evident from lower amounts in maize (8-19%) and sorghum (9-27%) near the end of the reproductive period (average 95 DAP). At physiological maturity of grain hybrids (average 120 DAP), amounts of these carbohydrates were generally unchanged in maize (9-21%) and sorghum (16-27%) suggesting a loss of photosynthetic assimilation due to weakening sink demand. Nonetheless, high amounts of non-structural carbohydrates at maturity even in grain maize and sorghum (15-18%) highlight the potential for developing dual-purpose (grain/stover) crops. For both species, the amounts of structural polysaccharides in the cell wall, measured as monomeric components (glucose and pentose), decreased during grain fill but remained unchanged thereafter with maize biomass possessing slightly higher amounts than sorghum. In conclusion, availability of carbohydrates in maize and sorghum highlights the potential for developing energy-rich dedicated biofuel or dual-purpose (grain/stover) crops.« less

  10. Flexible resource allocation during plant defense responses

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, Jack C.; Appel, Heidi M.; Ferrieri, Abigail P.; Arnold, Thomas M.

    2013-01-01

    Plants are organisms composed of modules connected by xylem and phloem transport streams. Attack by both insects and pathogens elicits sometimes rapid defense responses in the attacked module. We have also known for some time that proteins are often reallocated away from pathogen-infected tissues, while the same infection sites may draw carbohydrates to them. This has been interpreted as a tug of war in which the plant withdraws critical resources to block microbial growth while the microbes attempt to acquire more resources. Sink-source regulated transport among modules of critical resources, particularly carbon and nitrogen, is also altered in response to attack. Insects and jasmonate can increase local sink strength, drawing carbohydrates that support defense production. Shortly after attack, carbohydrates may also be drawn to the root. The rate and direction of movement of photosynthate or signals in phloem in response to attack is subject to constraints that include branching, degree of connection among tissues, distance between sources and sinks, proximity, strength, and number of competing sinks, and phloem loading/unloading regulators. Movement of materials (e.g., amino acids, signals) to or from attack sites in xylem is less well understood but is partly driven by transpiration. The root is an influential sink and may regulate sink-source interactions and transport above and below ground as well as between the plant and the rhizosphere and nearby, connected plants. Research on resource translocation in response to pathogens or herbivores has focused on biochemical mechanisms; whole-plant research is needed to determine which, if any, of these plant behaviors actually influence plant fitness. PMID:23986767

  11. Impact of Heterobasidion root-rot on fine root morphology and associated fungi in Picea abies stands on peat soils.

    PubMed

    Gaitnieks, Talis; Klavina, Darta; Muiznieks, Indrikis; Pennanen, Taina; Velmala, Sannakajsa; Vasaitis, Rimvydas; Menkis, Audrius

    2016-07-01

    We examined differences in fine root morphology, mycorrhizal colonisation and root-inhabiting fungal communities between Picea abies individuals infected by Heterobasidion root-rot compared with healthy individuals in four stands on peat soils in Latvia. We hypothesised that decreased tree vitality and alteration in supply of photosynthates belowground due to root-rot infection might lead to changes in fungal communities of tree roots. Plots were established in places where trees were infected and in places where they were healthy. Within each stand, five replicate soil cores with roots were taken to 20 cm depth in each root-rot infected and uninfected plot. Root morphological parameters, mycorrhizal colonisation and associated fungal communities, and soil chemical properties were analysed. In three stands root morphological parameters and in all stands root mycorrhizal colonisation were similar between root-rot infected and uninfected plots. In one stand, there were significant differences in root morphological parameters between root-rot infected versus uninfected plots, but these were likely due to significant differences in soil chemical properties between the plots. Sequencing of the internal transcribed spacer of fungal nuclear rDNA from ectomycorrhizal (ECM) root morphotypes of P. abies revealed the presence of 42 fungal species, among which ECM basidiomycetes Tylospora asterophora (24.6 % of fine roots examined), Amphinema byssoides (14.5 %) and Russula sapinea (9.7 %) were most common. Within each stand, the richness of fungal species and the composition of fungal communities in root-rot infected versus uninfected plots were similar. In conclusion, Heterobasidion root-rot had little or no effect on fine root morphology, mycorrhizal colonisation and composition of fungal communities in fine roots of P. abies growing on peat soils. PMID:26861482

  12. Phytoplankton excretion revisited: Healthy cells may not do it, but how many cells are healthy?. Continuation progress report, May 1, 1993--April 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, A.M.

    1994-05-01

    The primary purpose of the proposed research is to develop molecular tools for determining the health of marine phytoplankton on an individual cell basis. Since the definition of {open_quotes}healthy{close_quotes} in phytoplankton cells is elusive, we propose to develop markers for several different metabolic processes indicative of physiological state: photosynthetic activity, esterase activity, membrane permeability, and mitochondrial activity. One underlying motivation is to develop methods which will allow us to evaluate the hypothesis that, while healthy cells release very little DOC, many phytoplankton communities are comprised of {open_quotes}unhealthy{close_quotes} or physiologically stressed cells which release a large proportion of total photosynthate directly into the pool of labile DOC. This is proposed to be especially true in continental shelf and coastal environments where zones of productivity are patchy and phytoplankton populations adapted to one regime can be easily transported into waters which differ in salinity, nutrient supply, and/or turbidity. The significance of the work, however, extends beyond this immediate goal since there are presently relatively few methods which allow us to estimate the physiological state of phytoplankton cells. When we evaluate population sizes of phytoplankton in the water column or examine fecal pellets, particulate aggregates, or other material, we generally work in ignorance of the activity of the cells except as the average cell-specific activity is estimated from bulk measurements. This approach effectively hides any differences in the relative contribution of different taxa or individuals to overall productivity even though most flux processes are sensitive to physiological and taxonomically determined differences among members of the community.

  13. The Floral Nectary of Hymenaea stigonocarpa (Fabaceae, Caesalpinioideae): Structural Aspects During Floral Development

    PubMed Central

    Paiva, Elder Antonio Sousa; Machado, Silvia Rodrigues

    2008-01-01

    Background and Aims Considering that few studies on nectary anatomy and ultrastructure are available for chiropterophilous flowers and the importance of Hymenaea stigonocarpa in natural ‘cerrado’ communities, the present study sought to analyse the structure and cellular modifications that take place within its nectaries during the different stages of floral development, with special emphasis on plastid dynamics. Methods For the structural and ultrastructural studies the nectary was processed as per usual techniques and studied under light, scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Histochemical tests were employed to identify the main metabolites on nectary tissue and secretion samples. Key Results The floral nectary consists of the inner epidermis of the hypanthium and vascularized parenchyma. Some evidence indicates that the nectar release occurs via the stomata. The high populations of mitochondria, and their juxtaposition with amyloplasts, seem to be related to energy needs for starch hydrolysis. Among the alterations observed during the secretory phase, the reduction in the plastid stromatic density and starch grain size are highlighted. When the secretory stage begins, the plastid envelope disappears and a new membrane is formed, enclosing this region and giving rise to new vacuoles. After the secretory stage, cellular structures named ‘extrastomatic bodies’ were observed and seem to be related to the nectar resorption. Conclusions Starch hydrolysis contributes to nectar formation, in addition to the photosynthates derived directly from the phloem. In these nectaries, the secretion is an energy-requiring process. During the secretion stage, some plastids show starch grain hydrolysis and membrane rupture, and it was observed that the region previously occupied by this organelle continued to be reasonably well defined, and gave rise to new vacuoles. The extrastomatic bodies appear to be related to the resorption of uncollected nectar. PMID

  14. Relationship between Shoot-rooting and Root-sprouting Abilities and the Carbohydrate and Nitrogen Reserves of Mediterranean Dwarf Shrubs

    PubMed Central

    Palacio, Sara; Maestro, Melchor; Montserrat-Martí, Gabriel

    2007-01-01

    Background and Aims This study analysed the differences in nitrogen (N), non-structural carbohydrates (NSC) and biomass allocation to the roots and shoots of 18 species of Mediterranean dwarf shrubs with different shoot-rooting and resprouting abilities. Root N and NSC concentrations of strict root-sprouters and species resprouting from the base of the stems were also compared. Methods Soluble sugars (SS), starch and N concentrations were assessed in roots and shoots. The root : shoot ratio of each species was obtained by thorough root excavations. Cross-species analyses were complemented by phylogenetically independent contrasts (PICs). Key Results Shoot-rooting species showed a preferential allocation of starch to shoots rather than roots as compared with non-shoot-rooting species. Resprouters displayed greater starch concentrations than non-sprouters in both shoots and roots. Trends were maintained after PICs analyses, but differences became weak when root-sprouters versus non-root-sprouters were compared. Within resprouters, strict root-sprouters showed greater root concentrations and a preferential allocation of starch to the roots than stem-sprouters. No differences were found in the root : shoot ratio of species with different rooting and resprouting abilities. Conclusions The shoot-rooting ability of Mediterranean dwarf shrubs seems to depend on the preferential allocation of starch and SS to shoots, though alternative C-sources such as current photosynthates may also be involved. In contrast to plants from other mediterranean areas of the world, the resprouting ability of Mediterranean dwarf shrubs is not related to a preferential allocation of N, NSC and biomass to roots. PMID:17728338

  15. Not just who, but how many: the importance of partner abundance in reef coral symbioses

    PubMed Central

    Cunning, Ross; Baker, Andrew C.

    2014-01-01

    The performance and function of reef corals depends on the genetic identity of their symbiotic algal partners, with some symbionts providing greater benefits (e.g., photosynthate, thermotolerance) than others. However, these interaction outcomes may also depend on partner abundance, with differences in the total number of symbionts changing the net benefit to the coral host, depending on the particular environmental conditions. We suggest that symbiont abundance is a fundamental aspect of the dynamic interface between reef corals and the abiotic environment that ultimately determines the benefits, costs, and functional responses of these symbioses. This density-dependent framework suggests that corals may regulate the size of their symbiont pool to match microhabitat-specific optima, which may contribute to the high spatiotemporal variability in symbiont abundance observed within and among colonies and reefs. Differences in symbiont standing stock may subsequently explain variation in energetics, growth, reproduction, and stress susceptibility, and may mediate the impacts of environmental change on these outcomes. However, the importance of symbiont abundance has received relatively little recognition, possibly because commonly-used metrics based on surface area (e.g., symbiont cells cm-2) may be only weakly linked to biological phenomena and are difficult to compare across studies. We suggest that normalizing symbionts to biological host parameters, such as units of protein or numbers of host cells, will more clearly elucidate the functional role of symbiont abundance in reef coral symbioses. In this article, we generate testable hypotheses regarding the importance of symbiont abundance by first discussing different metrics and their potential links to symbiosis performance and breakdown, and then describing how natural variability and dynamics of symbiont communities may help explain ecological patterns on coral reefs and predict responses to environmental change

  16. Mapping nutrient resorption efficiencies of subarctic cryptogams and seed plants onto the Tree of Life.

    PubMed

    Lang, Simone I; Aerts, Rien; van Logtestijn, Richard S P; Schweikert, Wenka; Klahn, Thorsten; Quested, Helen M; van Hal, Jurgen R; Cornelissen, Johannes H C

    2014-06-01

    Nutrient resorption from senescing photosynthetic organs is a powerful mechanism for conserving nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) in infertile environments. Evolution has resulted in enhanced differentiation of conducting tissues to facilitate transport of photosynthate to other plant parts, ultimately leading to phloem. Such tissues may also serve to translocate N and P to other plant parts upon their senescence. Therefore, we hypothesize that nutrient resorption efficiency (RE, % of nutrient pool exported) should correspond with the degree of specialization of these conducting tissues across the autotrophic branches of the Tree of Life. To test this hypothesis, we had to compare members of different plant clades and lichens within a climatic region, to minimize confounding effects of climatic drivers on nutrient resorption. Thus, we compared RE among wide-ranging basal clades from the principally N-limited subarctic region, employing a novel method to correct for mass loss during senescence. Even with the limited numbers of species available for certain clades in this region, we found some consistent patterns. Mosses, lichens, and lycophytes generally showed low REN (<20%), liverworts and conifers intermediate (40%) and monilophytes, eudicots, and monocots high (>70%). REP appeared higher in eudicots and liverworts than in mosses. Within mosses, taxa with more efficient conductance also showed higher REN. The differences in REN among clades broadly matched the degree of specialization of conducting tissues. This novel mapping of a physiological process onto the Tree of Life broadly supports the idea that the evolution of conducting tissues toward specialized phloem has aided land plants to optimize their internal nitrogen recycling. The generality of evolutionary lines in conducting tissues and nutrient resorption efficiency needs to be tested across different floras in different climatic regions with different levels of N versus P availability. PMID:25360262

  17. Seed coat-associated invertases of fava bean control both unloading and storage functions: cloning of cDNAs and cell type-specific expression.

    PubMed Central

    Weber, H; Borisjuk, L; Heim, U; Buchner, P; Wobus, U

    1995-01-01

    We have studied the molecular physiology of photosynthate unloading and partitioning during seed development of fava bean (Vicia faba). During the prestorage phase, high levels of hexoses in the cotyledons and the apoplastic endospermal space are correlated with activity of cell wall-bound invertase in the seed coat. Three cDNAs were cloned. Sequence comparison revealed genes putatively encoding one soluble and two cell wall-bound isoforms of invertase. Expression was studied in different organs and tissues of developing seeds by RNA gel analysis, in situ hybridization, enzyme assay, and enzyme activity staining. One extracellular invertase gene is expressed during the prestorage phase in the thin-walled parenchyma of the seed coat, a region known to be the site of photoassimilate unloading. We propose a model for an invertase-mediated unloading process during early seed development and the regulation of cotyledonary sucrose metabolism. After unloading from the seed coat, sucrose is hydrolyzed by cell wall-bound invertases. Thus, invertase contributes to establish sink strength in young seeds. The resultant hexoses are loaded into the cotyledons and control carbohydrate partitioning via an influence on the sucrose synthase/sucrose-phosphate synthase pathway. The developmentally regulated degradation of the thin-walled parenchyma expressing the invertase apparently initiates the storage phase. This is characterized by a switch to a low sucrose/hexoses ratio. Feeding hexoses to storage-phase cotyledons in vitro increases the sucrose-phosphate synthase/sucrose synthase ratio and changes carbohydrate partitioning in favor of sucrose. Concomitantly, the transcript level of the major storage product legumin B is downregulated. PMID:8535137

  18. Interactions of linker proteins with the phycobiliproteins in the phycobilisome substructures of Gloeobacter violaceus.

    PubMed

    Mendoza-Hernández, Guillermo; Pérez-Gómez, Bertha; Krogmann, David W; Gutiérrez-Cirlos, Emma Berta; Gómez-Lojero, Carlos

    2010-12-01

    Gloeobacter violaceus PCC 7421 is a unicellular oxygenic photosynthetic organism, which precedes the diversification of cyanobacteria in the phylogenetic tree. It is the only cyanobacterium that does not contain internal membranes. The unique structure of the rods of the phycobilisome (PBS), grouped as one bundle of six parallel rods, distinguishes G. violaceus from the other PBS-containing cyanobacteria. It has been proposed that unique multidomain rod-linkers are responsible for this peculiarly organized shape. However, the localization of the multidomain linkers Glr1262 and Glr2806 in the PBS-rods remains controversial (Koyama et al. 2006, FEBS Lett 580:3457-3461; Krogmann et al. 2007, Photosynth Res 93:27-43). To further increase our understanding of the structure of the G. violaceus PBS, the identification of the proteins present in fractions obtained from sucrose gradient centrifugation and from native electrophoresis of partially dissociated PBS was conducted. The identification of the proteins, after electrophoresis, was done by spectrophotometry and mass spectrometry. The results support the localization of the multidomain linkers as previously proposed by us. The Glr1262 (92 kDa) linker protein was found to be the rod-core linker L(RC) (92), and Glr2806 (81 kDa), a special rod linker L(R) (81) that joins six disks of hexameric PC. Consequently, we propose to designate glr1262 as gene cpcGm (encoding L(RC) (92)) and glr2806 as gene cpcJm (encoding L(R) (81)). We also propose that the cpeC (glr1263) gene encoding L(R) (31.8) forms the interface that binds PC to PE.

  19. Coral photobiology: new light on old views.

    PubMed

    Iluz, David; Dubinsky, Zvy

    2015-04-01

    The relationship between reef-building corals and light-harvesting pigments of zooxanthellae (Symbiodinium sp.) has been acknowledged for decades. The photosynthetic activity of the algal endocellular symbionts may provide up to 90% of the energy needed for the coral holobiont. This relationship limits the bathymetric distribution of coral reefs to the upper 100 m of tropical shorelines. However, even corals growing under high light intensities have to supplement the photosynthates translocated from the algae by predation on nutrient-rich zooplankton. New information has revealed how the fate of carbon acquired through photosynthesis differs from that secured by predation, whose rates are controlled by light-induced tentacular extension. The Goreau paradigm of "light-enhanced calcification" is being reevaluated, based on evidence that blue light stimulates coral calcification independently from photosynthesis rates. Furthermore, under dim light, calcification rates were stoichiometrically uncoupled from photosynthesis. The rates of photosynthesis of the zooxanthellae exhibit a clear endogenous rhythmicity maintained by light patterns. This daily pattern is concomitant with a periodicity of all the antioxidant protective mechanisms that wax and wane to meet the concomitant fluctuation in oxygen evolution. The phases of the moon are involved in the triggering of coral reproduction and control the spectacular annual mass-spawning events taking place in several reefs. The intensity and directionality of the underwater light field affect the architecture of coral colonies, leading to an optimization of the exposure of the zooxanthellae to light. We present a summary of major gaps in our understanding of the relationship between light and corals as a roadmap for future research.

  20. Environmental effects on photorespiration of C sub 3 -C sub 4 species. I. Influence of CO sub 2 and O sub 2 during growth on photorespiratory characteristics and leaf anatomy. [Flaveria pringlei; Flaveria flroidana; Flaveria trinervia; Panicum milloides; Panicum laxum

    SciTech Connect

    Byrd, G.T.; Brown, R.H. )

    1989-07-01

    The possibility of altering CO{sub 2} exchange of C{sub 3}-C{sub 4} species by growing them under various CO{sub 2} and O{sub 2} concentrations was examined. Growth under CO{sub 2} concentrations of 100, 350, and 750 micromoles per mole had no significant effect on CO{sub 2} exchange characteristics or leaf anatomy of Flaveria pringlei (C{sub 3}), Flaveria floridana (C{sub 3}-C{sub 4}), or Flaveria trinervia (C{sub 4}). Carboxylation efficiency and CO{sub 2} compensation concentrations in leaves of F. floridana developed under the different CO{sub 2} concentrations were intermediate to F. pringlei and F. trinervia. When grown for 12 days at an O{sub 2} concentration of 20 millimoles per mole, apparent photosynthesis was strongly inhibited in Panicum milioides (C{sub 3}-C{sub 4}) and to a lesser degree in Panicum laxum (C{sub 3}). In P. milioides, acute starch buildup was observed microscopically in both mesophyll and bundle sheath cells. Even after only 4 days exposure to 20 millimoles per mole O{sub 2}, the presence of starch was more pronounced in leaf cross-sections of P. milioides compared to those at 100 and 210 millimoles per mole. Even though this observation suggests that P. milioides has a different response to low O{sub 2} with respect to translocation of photosynthate or sink activity than C{sub 3} species, the concentration of total available carbohydrate increased in shoots of all species by 33% or more when grown at low O{sub 2}. This accumulation occurred even though relative growth rates of Festuca arundinacea (C{sub 3}) and P. milioides grown for 4 days at 210 millimoles per mole O{sub 2}, were inhibited 83 and 37%, respectively, when compared to plants grown at 20 millimoles per mole O{sub 2}.

  1. Disentangling drought-induced variation in ecosystem and soil respiration using stable carbon isotopes.

    PubMed

    Unger, Stephan; Máguas, Cristina; Pereira, João S; Aires, Luis M; David, Teresa S; Werner, Christiane

    2010-08-01

    Combining C flux measurements with information on their isotopic composition can yield a process-based understanding of ecosystem C dynamics. We studied the variations in both respiratory fluxes and their stable C isotopic compositions (delta(13)C) for all major components (trees, understory, roots and soil microorganisms) in a Mediterranean oak savannah during a period with increasing drought. We found large drought-induced and diurnal dynamics in isotopic compositions of soil, root and foliage respiration (delta(13)C(res)). Soil respiration was the largest contributor to ecosystem respiration (R (eco)), exhibiting a depleted isotopic signature and no marked variations with increasing drought, similar to ecosystem respired delta(13)CO(2), providing evidence for a stable C-source and minor influence of recent photosynthate from plants. Short-term and diurnal variations in delta(13)C(res) of foliage and roots (up to 8 and 4 per thousand, respectively) were in agreement with: (1) recent hypotheses on post-photosynthetic fractionation processes, (2) substrate changes with decreasing assimilation rates in combination with increased respiratory demand, and (3) decreased phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase activity in drying roots, while altered photosynthetic discrimination was not responsible for the observed changes in delta(13)C(res). We applied a flux-based and an isotopic flux-based mass balance, yielding good agreement at the soil scale, while the isotopic mass balance at the ecosystem scale was not conserved. This was mainly caused by uncertainties in Keeling plot intercepts at the ecosystem scale due to small CO(2) gradients and large differences in delta(13)C(res) of the different component fluxes. Overall, stable isotopes provided valuable new insights into the drought-related variations of ecosystem C dynamics, encouraging future studies but also highlighting the need of improved methodology to disentangle short-term dynamics of isotopic composition of R (eco).

  2. Unraveling the Complex Trait of Harvest Index with Association Mapping in Rice (Oryza sativa L.)

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaobai; Yan, Wengui; Agrama, Hesham; Jia, Limeng; Jackson, Aaron; Moldenhauer, Karen; Yeater, Kathleen; McClung, Anna; Wu, Dianxing

    2012-01-01

    Harvest index is a measure of success in partitioning assimilated photosynthate. An improvement of harvest index means an increase in the economic portion of the plant. Our objective was to identify genetic markers associated with harvest index traits using 203 O. sativa accessions. The phenotyping for 14 traits was conducted in both temperate (Arkansas) and subtropical (Texas) climates and the genotyping used 154 SSRs and an indel marker. Heading, plant height and weight, and panicle length had negative correlations, while seed set and grain weight/panicle had positive correlations with harvest index across both locations. Subsequent genetic diversity and population structure analyses identified five groups in this collection, which corresponded to their geographic origins. Model comparisons revealed that different dimensions of principal components analysis (PCA) affected harvest index traits for mapping accuracy, and kinship did not help. In total, 36 markers in Arkansas and 28 markers in Texas were identified to be significantly associated with harvest index traits. Seven and two markers were consistently associated with two or more harvest index correlated traits in Arkansas and Texas, respectively. Additionally, four markers were constitutively identified at both locations, while 32 and 24 markers were identified specifically in Arkansas and Texas, respectively. Allelic analysis of four constitutive markers demonstrated that allele 253 bp of RM431 had significantly greater effect on decreasing plant height, and 390 bp of RM24011 had the greatest effect on decreasing panicle length across both locations. Many of these identified markers are located either nearby or flanking the regions where the QTLs for harvest index have been reported. Thus, the results from this association mapping study complement and enrich the information from linkage-based QTL studies and will be the basis for improving harvest index directly and indirectly in rice. PMID:22291889

  3. Molecular mapping across three populations reveals a QTL hotspot region on chromosome 3 for secondary traits associated with drought tolerance in tropical maize.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Gustavo Dias; Nair, Sudha; Borém, Aluízio; Cairns, Jill; Trachsel, Samuel; Ribaut, Jean-Marcel; Bänziger, Marianne; Prasanna, Boddupalli M; Crossa, Jose; Babu, Raman

    2014-01-01

    Identifying quantitative trait loci (QTL) of sizeable effects that are expressed in diverse genetic backgrounds across contrasting water regimes particularly for secondary traits can significantly complement the conventional drought tolerance breeding efforts. We evaluated three tropical maize biparental populations under water-stressed and well-watered regimes for drought-related morpho-physiological traits, such as anthesis-silking interval (ASI), ears per plant (EPP), stay-green (SG) and plant-to-ear height ratio (PEH). In general, drought stress reduced the genetic variance of grain yield (GY), while that of morpho-physiological traits remained stable or even increased under drought conditions. We detected consistent genomic regions across different genetic backgrounds that could be target regions for marker-assisted introgression for drought tolerance in maize. A total of 203 QTL for ASI, EPP, SG and PEH were identified under both the water regimes. Meta-QTL analysis across the three populations identified six constitutive genomic regions with a minimum of two overlapping traits. Clusters of QTL were observed on chromosomes 1.06, 3.06, 4.09, 5.05, 7.03 and 10.04/06. Interestingly, a ~8-Mb region delimited in 3.06 harboured QTL for most of the morpho-physiological traits considered in the current study. This region contained two important candidate genes viz., zmm16 (MADS-domain transcription factor) and psbs1 (photosystem II unit) that are responsible for reproductive organ development and photosynthate accumulation, respectively. The genomic regions identified in this study partially explained the association of secondary traits with GY. Flanking single nucleotide polymorphism markers reported herein may be useful in marker-assisted introgression of drought tolerance in tropical maize.

  4. Seed coat-associated invertases of fava bean control both unloading and storage functions: cloning of cDNAs and cell type-specific expression.

    PubMed

    Weber, H; Borisjuk, L; Heim, U; Buchner, P; Wobus, U

    1995-11-01

    We have studied the molecular physiology of photosynthate unloading and partitioning during seed development of fava bean (Vicia faba). During the prestorage phase, high levels of hexoses in the cotyledons and the apoplastic endospermal space are correlated with activity of cell wall-bound invertase in the seed coat. Three cDNAs were cloned. Sequence comparison revealed genes putatively encoding one soluble and two cell wall-bound isoforms of invertase. Expression was studied in different organs and tissues of developing seeds by RNA gel analysis, in situ hybridization, enzyme assay, and enzyme activity staining. One extracellular invertase gene is expressed during the prestorage phase in the thin-walled parenchyma of the seed coat, a region known to be the site of photoassimilate unloading. We propose a model for an invertase-mediated unloading process during early seed development and the regulation of cotyledonary sucrose metabolism. After unloading from the seed coat, sucrose is hydrolyzed by cell wall-bound invertases. Thus, invertase contributes to establish sink strength in young seeds. The resultant hexoses are loaded into the cotyledons and control carbohydrate partitioning via an influence on the sucrose synthase/sucrose-phosphate synthase pathway. The developmentally regulated degradation of the thin-walled parenchyma expressing the invertase apparently initiates the storage phase. This is characterized by a switch to a low sucrose/hexoses ratio. Feeding hexoses to storage-phase cotyledons in vitro increases the sucrose-phosphate synthase/sucrose synthase ratio and changes carbohydrate partitioning in favor of sucrose. Concomitantly, the transcript level of the major storage product legumin B is downregulated. PMID:8535137

  5. Stover Composition in Maize and Sorghum Reveals Remarkable Genetic Variation and Plasticity for Carbohydrate Accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Sekhon, Rajandeep S.; Breitzman, Matthew W.; Silva, Renato R.; Santoro, Nicholas; Rooney, William L.; de Leon, Natalia; Kaeppler, Shawn M.

    2016-01-01

    Carbohydrates stored in vegetative organs, particularly stems, of grasses are a very important source of energy. We examined carbohydrate accumulation in adult sorghum and maize hybrids with distinct phenology and different end uses (grain, silage, sucrose or sweetness in stalk juice, and biomass). Remarkable variation was observed for non-structural carbohydrates and structural polysaccharides during three key developmental stages both between and within hybrids developed for distinct end use in both species. At the onset of the reproductive phase (average 65 days after planting, DAP), a wide range for accumulation of non-structural carbohydrates (free glucose and sucrose combined), was observed in internodes of maize (11–24%) and sorghum (7–36%) indicating substantial variation for transient storage of excess photosynthate during periods of low grain or vegetative sink strength. Remobilization of these reserves for supporting grain fill or vegetative growth was evident from lower amounts in maize (8–19%) and sorghum (9–27%) near the end of the reproductive period (average 95 DAP). At physiological maturity of grain hybrids (average 120 DAP), amounts of these carbohydrates were generally unchanged in maize (9–21%) and sorghum (16–27%) suggesting a loss of photosynthetic assimilation due to weakening sink demand. Nonetheless, high amounts of non-structural carbohydrates at maturity even in grain maize and sorghum (15–18%) highlight the potential for developing dual-purpose (grain/stover) crops. For both species, the amounts of structural polysaccharides in the cell wall, measured as monomeric components (glucose and pentose), decreased during grain fill but remained unchanged thereafter with maize biomass possessing slightly higher amounts than sorghum. Availability of carbohydrates in maize and sorghum highlights the potential for developing energy-rich dedicated biofuel or dual-purpose (grain/stover) crops. PMID:27375668

  6. Short-term carbon cycling responses of a mature eucalypt woodland to gradual stepwise enrichment of atmospheric CO2 concentration.

    PubMed

    Drake, John E; Macdonald, Catriona A; Tjoelker, Mark G; Crous, Kristine Y; Gimeno, Teresa E; Singh, Brajesh K; Reich, Peter B; Anderson, Ian C; Ellsworth, David S

    2016-01-01

    Projections of future climate are highly sensitive to uncertainties regarding carbon (C) uptake and storage by terrestrial ecosystems. The Eucalyptus Free-Air CO2 Enrichment (EucFACE) experiment was established to study the effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations (eCO2 ) on a native mature eucalypt woodland with low fertility soils in southeast Australia. In contrast to other FACE experiments, the concentration of CO2 at EucFACE was increased gradually in steps above ambient (+0, 30, 60, 90, 120, and 150 ppm CO2 above ambient of ~400 ppm), with each step lasting approximately 5 weeks. This provided a unique opportunity to study the short-term (weeks to months) response of C cycle flux components to eCO2 across a range of CO2 concentrations in an intact ecosystem. Soil CO2 efflux (i.e., soil respiration or Rsoil ) increased in response to initial enrichment (e.g., +30 and +60 ppm CO2 ) but did not continue to increase as the CO2 enrichment was stepped up to higher concentrations. Light-saturated photosynthesis of canopy leaves (Asat ) also showed similar stimulation by elevated CO2 at +60 ppm as at +150 ppm CO2 . The lack of significant effects of eCO2 on soil moisture, microbial biomass, or activity suggests that the increase in Rsoil likely reflected increased root and rhizosphere respiration rather than increased microbial decomposition of soil organic matter. This rapid increase in Rsoil suggests that under eCO2, additional photosynthate was produced, transported belowground, and respired. The consequences of this increased belowground activity and whether it is sustained through time in mature ecosystems under eCO2 are a priority for future research.

  7. Cloning and expression analysis of a UDP-galactose/glucose pyrophosphorylase from melon fruit provides evidence for the major metabolic pathway of galactose metabolism in raffinose oligosaccharide metabolizing plants.

    PubMed

    Dai, Nir; Petreikov, Marina; Portnoy, Vitaly; Katzir, Nurit; Pharr, David M; Schaffer, Arthur A

    2006-09-01

    The Cucurbitaceae translocate a significant portion of their photosynthate as raffinose and stachyose, which are galactosyl derivatives of sucrose. These are initially hydrolyzed by alpha-galactosidase to yield free galactose (Gal) and, accordingly, Gal metabolism is an important pathway in Cucurbitaceae sink tissue. We report here on a novel plant-specific enzyme responsible for the nucleotide activation of phosphorylated Gal and the subsequent entry of Gal into sink metabolism. The enzyme was antibody purified, sequenced, and the gene cloned and functionally expressed in Escherichia coli. The heterologous protein showed the characteristics of a dual substrate UDP-hexose pyrophosphorylase (PPase) with activity toward both Gal-1-P and glucose (Glc)-1-P in the uridinylation direction and their respective UDP-sugars in the reverse direction. The two other enzymes involved in Glc-P and Gal-P uridinylation are UDP-Glc PPase and uridyltransferase, and these were also cloned, heterologously expressed, and characterized. The gene expression and enzyme activities of all three enzymes in melon (Cucumis melo) fruit were measured. The UDP-Glc PPase was expressed in melon fruit to a similar extent as the novel enzyme, but the expressed protein was specific for Glc-1-P in the UDP-Glc synthesis direction and did not catalyze the nucleotide activation of Gal-1-P. The uridyltransferase gene was only weakly expressed in melon fruit, and activity was not observed in crude extracts. The results indicate that this novel enzyme carries out both the synthesis of UDP-Gal from Gal-1-P as well as the subsequent synthesis of Glc-1-P from the epimerase product, UDP-Glc, and thus plays a key role in melon fruit sink metabolism.

  8. Expression of major photosynthetic and salt-resistance genes in invasive reed lineages grown under elevated CO2 and temperature

    PubMed Central

    Eller, Franziska; Lambertini, Carla; Nielsen, Mette W; Radutoiu, Simona; Brix, Hans

    2014-01-01

    It is important to investigate the molecular causes of the variation in ecologically important traits to fully understand phenotypic responses to climate change. In the Mississippi River Delta, two distinct, sympatric invasive lineages of common reed (Phragmites australis) are known to differ in several ecophysiological characteristics and are expected to become more salt resistant due to increasing atmospheric CO2 and temperature. We investigated whether different patterns of gene expression can explain their ecophysiological differences and increased vigor under future climatic conditions. We compared the transcript abundance of photosynthetic genes of the Calvin cycle (Rubisco small subunit, RbcS; Phosphoglycerate kinase, PGK; Phosphoribulokinase, PRK), genes related with salt transport (Na+/H+ antiporter, PhaNHA) and oxidative stress response genes (Manganese Superoxide dismutase, MnSOD; Glutathione peroxidase, GPX), and the total aboveground biomass production between two genotypes representing the two lineages. The two genotypes (Delta-type, Mediterranean lineage, and EU-type, Eurasian lineage) were grown under an ambient and a future climate scenario with simultaneously elevated CO2 and temperature, and under two different soil salinities (0‰ or 20‰). We found neither differences in the aboveground biomass production nor the transcript abundances of the two genotypes, but soil salinity significantly affected all the investigated parameters, often interacting with the climatic conditions. At 20‰ salinity, most genes were higher expressed in the future than in the ambient climatic conditions. Higher transcription of the genes suggests higher abundance of the protein they code for, and consequently increased photosynthate production, improved stress responses, and salt exclusion. Therefore, the higher expression of these genes most likely contributed to the significantly ameliorated salinity impact on the aboveground biomass production of both P

  9. Photoinhibition affects the non-heme iron center in photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Gleiter, H M; Nugent, J H; Haag, E; Renger, G

    1992-11-16

    Effects on the PS II acceptor side caused by exposure to strong white light (180 W/m2) of PS II membrane fragments (spinach) at pH 6.5 and 0 degrees C were analyzed by measuring low temperature EPR signals and flash-induced transient changes of the fluorescence quantum yield. The following results were obtained: (a) the extent of the light induced g = 1.9 EPR signal as a measure of photochemical Fe2+QA- formation declines with progressing photoinhibition. The half-life of this effect is independent of the absence or presence of an exogenous electron acceptor during the photoinhibitory treatment; (b) in samples photoinhibited in the absence of an electron acceptor and subsequently incubated with K3[Fe(CN)6] in the dark, the extent of the g = 8 EPR signal (reflecting the oxidized Fe3+ form of the endogenous non-heme iron center) and of the flash-induced change of the fluorescence yield (as a measure of fast electron transfer from QA- to Fe3+ after the first flash; [see (1992) Photosynth. Res. 31, 113-126] exhibits the same dependence on photoinhibition time as the g = 1.9 EPR signal; (c) in samples photoinhibited in the presence of an exogenous electron acceptor, the signals reflecting Fe(3+)-formation and fast electron transfer from QA- to Fe3+ decline faster than the g = 1.9 EPR signal. These results provide for the first time direct evidence that the endogenous non-heme iron center located between QA and QB is susceptible to modifications by light stress. The implications of this finding will be discussed.

  10. Transcriptome Phase Distribution Analysis Reveals Diurnal Regulated Biological Processes and Key Pathways in Rice Flag Leaves and Seedling Leaves

    PubMed Central

    Li, Meina; Xing, Zhuo; Yang, Wenqiang; Chen, Guang; Guo, Han; Gong, Xiaojie; Du, Zhou; Zhang, Zhenhai; Hu, Xingming; Wang, Dong; Qian, Qian; Wang, Tai; Su, Zhen; Xue, Yongbiao

    2011-01-01

    Plant diurnal oscillation is a 24-hour period based variation. The correlation between diurnal genes and biological pathways was widely revealed by microarray analysis in different species. Rice (Oryza sativa) is the major food staple for about half of the world's population. The rice flag leaf is essential in providing photosynthates to the grain filling. However, there is still no comprehensive view about the diurnal transcriptome for rice leaves. In this study, we applied rice microarray to monitor the rhythmically expressed genes in rice seedling and flag leaves. We developed a new computational analysis approach and identified 6,266 (10.96%) diurnal probe sets in seedling leaves, 13,773 (24.08%) diurnal probe sets in flag leaves. About 65% of overall transcription factors were identified as flag leaf preferred. In seedling leaves, the peak of phase distribution was from 2:00am to 4:00am, whereas in flag leaves, the peak was from 8:00pm to 2:00am. The diurnal phase distribution analysis of gene ontology (GO) and cis-element enrichment indicated that, some important processes were waken by the light, such as photosynthesis and abiotic stimulus, while some genes related to the nuclear and ribosome involved processes were active mostly during the switch time of light to dark. The starch and sucrose metabolism pathway genes also showed diurnal phase. We conducted comparison analysis between Arabidopsis and rice leaf transcriptome throughout the diurnal cycle. In summary, our analysis approach is feasible for relatively unbiased identification of diurnal transcripts, efficiently detecting some special periodic patterns with non-sinusoidal periodic patterns. Compared to the rice flag leaves, the gene transcription levels of seedling leaves were relatively limited to the diurnal rhythm. Our comprehensive microarray analysis of seedling and flag leaves of rice provided an overview of the rice diurnal transcriptome and indicated some diurnal regulated biological

  11. Mutagenesis of cysteine 81 prevents dimerization of the APS1 subunit of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase and alters diurnal starch turnover in Arabidopsis thaliana leaves.

    PubMed

    Hädrich, Nadja; Hendriks, Janneke H M; Kötting, Oliver; Arrivault, Stéphanie; Feil, Regina; Zeeman, Samuel C; Gibon, Yves; Schulze, Waltraud X; Stitt, Mark; Lunn, John E

    2012-04-01

    Many plants, including Arabidopsis thaliana, retain a substantial portion of their photosynthate in leaves in the form of starch, which is remobilized to support metabolism and growth at night. ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase) catalyses the first committed step in the pathway of starch synthesis, the production of ADP-glucose. The enzyme is redox-activated in the light and in response to sucrose accumulation, via reversible breakage of an intermolecular cysteine bridge between the two small (APS1) subunits. The biological function of this regulatory mechanism was investigated by complementing an aps1 null mutant (adg1) with a series of constructs containing a full-length APS1 gene encoding either the wild-type APS1 protein or mutated forms in which one of the five cysteine residues was replaced by serine. Substitution of Cys81 by serine prevented APS1 dimerization, whereas mutation of the other cysteines had no effect. Thus, Cys81 is both necessary and sufficient for dimerization of APS1. Compared to control plants, the adg1/APS1(C81S) lines had higher levels of ADP-glucose and maltose, and either increased rates of starch synthesis or a starch-excess phenotype, depending on the daylength. APS1 protein levels were five- to tenfold lower in adg1/APS1(C81S) lines than in control plants. These results show that redox modulation of AGPase contributes to the diurnal regulation of starch turnover, with inappropriate regulation of the enzyme having an unexpected impact on starch breakdown, and that Cys81 may play an important role in the regulation of AGPase turnover.

  12. Zooxanthellae Harvested by Ciliates Associated with Brown Band Syndrome of Corals Remain Photosynthetically Competent▿

    PubMed Central

    Ulstrup, Karin E.; Kühl, Michael; Bourne, David G.

    2007-01-01

    Brown band syndrome is a new coral affliction characterized by a local accumulation of yet-unidentified ciliates migrating as a band along the branches of coral colonies. In the current study, morphologically intact zooxanthellae (= Symbiodinium) were observed in great numbers inside the ciliates (>50 dinoflagellates per ciliate). Microscale oxygen measurements and variable chlorophyll a fluorescence analysis along with microscopic observations demonstrated that zooxanthellae within the ciliates are photosynthetically competent and do not become compromised during the progression of the brown band zone. Zooxanthellae showed similar trends in light acclimation in a comparison of rapid light curve and steady-state light curve measures of variable chlorophyll a fluorescence. Extended light exposure of steady-state light curves resulted in higher quantum yields of photosystem II. The brown band tissue exhibited higher photosynthetically active radiation absorptivity, indicating more efficient light absorption due to a higher density of zooxanthellae in the ciliate-dominated zone. This caused relatively higher gross photosynthesis rates in the zone with zooxanthella-containing ciliates compared to healthy coral tissue. The observation of photosynthetically active intracellular zooxanthellae in the ciliates suggests that the latter can benefit from photosynthates produced by ingested zooxanthellae and from photosynthetic oxygen production that alleviates diffusion limitation of oxic respiration in the densely populated brown band tissue. It remains to be shown whether the zooxanthellae form a stable symbiotic association with the ciliate or are engulfed incidentally during grazing on coral tissue and then maintained as active inside the ciliate for a period before being digested and replaced by new zooxanthellae. PMID:17259357

  13. Autotrophy of green non-sulphur bacteria in hot spring microbial mats: biological explanations for isotopically heavy organic carbon in the geological record.

    PubMed

    van der Meer, M T; Schouten, S; de Leeuw, J W; Ward, D M

    2000-08-01

    Inferences about the evidence of life recorded in organic compounds within the Earth's ancient rocks have depended on 13C contents low enough to be characteristic of biological debris produced by the well-known CO2 fixation pathway, the Calvin cycle. 'Atypically' high values have been attributed to isotopic alteration of sedimentary organic carbon by thermal metamorphism. We examined the possibility that organic carbon characterized by a relatively high 13C content could have arisen biologically from recently discovered autotrophic pathways. We focused on the green non-sulphur bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus that uses the 3-hydroxypropionate pathway for inorganic carbon fixation and is geologically significant as it forms modern mat communities analogous to stromatolites. Organic matter in mats constructed by Chloroflexus spp. alone had relatively high 13C contents (-14.9%) and lipids diagnostic of Chloroflexus that were also isotopically heavy (-8.9% to -18.5%). Organic matter in mats constructed by Chloroflexus in conjunction with cyanobacteria had a more typical Calvin cycle signature (-23.5%). However, lipids diagnostic of Chloroflexus were isotopically enriched (-15.1% to -24.1%) relative to lipids typical of cyanobacteria (-33.9% to -36.3%). This suggests that, in mats formed by both cyanobacteria and Chloroflexus, autotrophy must have a greater effect on Chloroflexus carbon metabolism than the photoheterotrophic consumption of cyanobacterial photosynthate. Chloroflexus cell components were also selectively preserved. Hence, Chloroflexus autotrophy and selective preservation of its products constitute one purely biological mechanism by which isotopically heavy organic carbon could have been introduced into important Precambrian geological features.

  14. [Tools for determining health of phytoplankton cells

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    The primary purpose of the proposed research is to develop molecular tools for determining the health of marine phytoplankton on an individual cell basis. Since the definition of healthy in phytoplankton cells is elusive, we propose to develop markers for several different metabolic processes indicative of physiological state: photosynthetic activity, esterase activity, membrane permeability, and mitochondrial activity. One underlying motivation is to develop methods which will allow us to evaluate the hypothesis that, while healthy cells release very little dissolved organic carbon (DOC), many phytoplankton communities are comprised of unhealthy or physiologically stressed cells which release a large proportion of total photosynthate directly into the pool of labile DOC. This is proposed to be especially true in continental shelf and coastal environments where zones of productivity are patchy and phytoplankton populations adapted to one regime can be easily transported into waters which differ in salinity, nutrient supply, and/or turbidity. The significance of the work, however, extends beyond this immediate goal since there are presently relatively few methods which allow us to estimate the physiological state of phytoplankton cells.When we evaluate population sizes of phytoplankton in the water column or examine fecal pellets, particulate aggregates, or other material, we generally work in ignorance of the activity of the cells except as the average cell-specific activity is estimated from bulk measurements. This approach effectively hides any differences in the relative contribution of different taxa or individuals to overall productivity eventhough most flux processes are sensitive to physiological and taxonomically determined differences among members of the community.

  15. [Tools for determining health of phytoplankton cells

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-31

    The primary purpose of the proposed research is to develop molecular tools for determining the health of marine phytoplankton on an individual cell basis. Since the definition of healthy in phytoplankton cells is elusive, we propose to develop markers for several different metabolic processes indicative of physiological state: photosynthetic activity, esterase activity, membrane permeability, and mitochondrial activity. One underlying motivation is to develop methods which will allow us to evaluate the hypothesis that, while healthy cells release very little dissolved organic carbon (DOC), many phytoplankton communities are comprised of unhealthy or physiologically stressed cells which release a large proportion of total photosynthate directly into the pool of labile DOC. This is proposed to be especially true in continental shelf and coastal environments where zones of productivity are patchy and phytoplankton populations adapted to one regime can be easily transported into waters which differ in salinity, nutrient supply, and/or turbidity. The significance of the work, however, extends beyond this immediate goal since there are presently relatively few methods which allow us to estimate the physiological state of phytoplankton cells.When we evaluate population sizes of phytoplankton in the water column or examine fecal pellets, particulate aggregates, or other material, we generally work in ignorance of the activity of the cells except as the average cell-specific activity is estimated from bulk measurements. This approach effectively hides any differences in the relative contribution of different taxa or individuals to overall productivity eventhough most flux processes are sensitive to physiological and taxonomically determined differences among members of the community.

  16. Not just who, but how many: the importance of partner abundance in reef coral symbioses.

    PubMed

    Cunning, Ross; Baker, Andrew C

    2014-01-01

    The performance and function of reef corals depends on the genetic identity of their symbiotic algal partners, with some symbionts providing greater benefits (e.g., photosynthate, thermotolerance) than others. However, these interaction outcomes may also depend on partner abundance, with differences in the total number of symbionts changing the net benefit to the coral host, depending on the particular environmental conditions. We suggest that symbiont abundance is a fundamental aspect of the dynamic interface between reef corals and the abiotic environment that ultimately determines the benefits, costs, and functional responses of these symbioses. This density-dependent framework suggests that corals may regulate the size of their symbiont pool to match microhabitat-specific optima, which may contribute to the high spatiotemporal variability in symbiont abundance observed within and among colonies and reefs. Differences in symbiont standing stock may subsequently explain variation in energetics, growth, reproduction, and stress susceptibility, and may mediate the impacts of environmental change on these outcomes. However, the importance of symbiont abundance has received relatively little recognition, possibly because commonly-used metrics based on surface area (e.g., symbiont cells cm(-2)) may be only weakly linked to biological phenomena and are difficult to compare across studies. We suggest that normalizing symbionts to biological host parameters, such as units of protein or numbers of host cells, will more clearly elucidate the functional role of symbiont abundance in reef coral symbioses. In this article, we generate testable hypotheses regarding the importance of symbiont abundance by first discussing different metrics and their potential links to symbiosis performance and breakdown, and then describing how natural variability and dynamics of symbiont communities may help explain ecological patterns on coral reefs and predict responses to environmental

  17. SEORious business: structural proteins in sieve tubes and their involvement in sieve element occlusion.

    PubMed

    Knoblauch, Michael; Froelich, Daniel R; Pickard, William F; Peters, Winfried S

    2014-04-01

    The phloem provides a network of sieve tubes for long-distance translocation of photosynthates. For over a century, structural proteins in sieve tubes have presented a conundrum since they presumably increase the hydraulic resistance of the tubes while no potential function other than sieve tube or wound sealing in the case of injury has been suggested. Here we summarize and critically evaluate current speculations regarding the roles of these proteins. Our understanding suffers from the suggestive power of images; what looks like a sieve tube plug on micrographs may not actually impede translocation very much. Recent reports of an involvement of SEOR (sieve element occlusion-related) proteins, a class of P-proteins, in the sealing of injured sieve tubes are inconclusive; various lines of evidence suggest that, in neither intact nor injured plants, are SEORs determinative of translocation stoppage. Similarly, the popular notion that P-proteins serve in the defence against phloem sap-feeding insects is unsupported by empirical facts; it is conceivable that in functional sieve tubes, aphids actually could benefit from inducing a plug. The idea that rising cytosolic Ca(2+) generally triggers sieve tube blockage by P-proteins appears widely accepted, despite lacking experimental support. Even in forisomes, P-protein assemblages restricted to one single plant family and the only Ca(2+)-responsive P-proteins known, the available evidence does not unequivocally suggest that plug formation is the cause rather than a consequence of translocation stoppage. We conclude that the physiological roles of structural P-proteins remain elusive, and that in vivo studies of their dynamics in continuous sieve tube networks combined with flow velocity measurements will be required to (hopefully) resolve this scientific roadblock.

  18. Carbon dynamics in trees: feast or famine?

    PubMed

    Sala, Anna; Woodruff, David R; Meinzer, Frederick C

    2012-06-01

    Research on the degree to which carbon (C) availability limits growth in trees, as well as recent trends in climate change and concurrent increases in drought-related tree mortality, have led to a renewed focus on the physiological mechanisms associated with tree growth responses to current and future climate. This has led to some dispute over the role of stored non-structural C compounds as indicators of a tree's current demands for photosynthate. Much of the uncertainty surrounding this issue could be resolved by developing a better understanding of the potential functions of non-structural C stored within trees. In addition to functioning as a buffer to reconcile temporal asynchrony between C demand and supply, the storage of non-structural C compounds may be under greater regulation than commonly recognized. We propose that in the face of environmental stochasticity, large, long-lived trees may require larger C investments in storage pools as safety margins than previously recognized, and that an important function of these pools may be to maintain hydraulic transport, particularly during episodes of severe stress. If so, survival and long-term growth in trees remain a function of C availability. Given that drought, freeze-thaw events and increasing tree height all impose additional constraints on vascular transport, the common trend of an increase in non-structural carbohydrate concentrations with tree size, drought or cold is consistent with our hypothesis. If the regulated maintenance of relatively large constitutive stored C pools in trees serves to maintain hydraulic integrity, then the minimum thresholds are expected to vary depending on the specific tissues, species, environment, growth form and habit. Much research is needed to elucidate the extent to which allocation of C to storage in trees is a passive vs. an active process, the specific functions of stored C pools, and the factors that drive active C allocation to storage. PMID:22302370

  19. Evaluation of salt tolerance in ectoine-transgenic tomato plants (Lycopersicon esculentum) in terms of photosynthesis, osmotic adjustment, and carbon partitioning.

    PubMed

    Moghaieb, Reda E A; Nakamura, Akiko; Saneoka, Hirofumi; Fujita, Kounosuke

    2011-01-01

    Ectoine is a common compatible solute in halophilic bacteria. Its biosynthesis originates from L-aspartate β-semialdehyde and requires three enzymes: L-2, 4-diaminobutyric acid aminotransferase (gene: ect B), L-2,4-diaminobutyric acid acetyl transferase (gene: ect A) and L-ectoine synthase (gene: ect C). Genetically engineered tomato plants expressing the three H. elongata genes (ectA, ectB, and ectC) generated showed no phenotypic abnormality. Expression of the ectoine biosynthetic genes was detected in the T3 transgenic plants by Northern blot analysis. The ectoine accumulating T3 plants were evaluated for salt tolerance by examining their photosynthestic activity, osmotic adjustment and carbon partitioning. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) detected the accumulation of ectoine. The concentration of ectoine increased with increasing salinity. The transgenic lines showed higher activities of peroxidase, while the malondialdehyde (MDA) concentration was decreased under salinity stress condition. In addition, preservation of higher rates of photosynthesis and turgor values as compared to control was evident. Within a week of ( 13) CO 2 feeding, salt application led to increases in the partitioning of ( 13) C into roots at the expense of ( 13) C in the other plant parts. These results suggest that under saline conditions ectoine synthesis is promoted in the roots of transgenic plants, leading to an acceleration of sink activity for photosynthate in the roots. Subsequently, root function such as water uptake is improved, compared with wild-type plants. In this way, the photosynthetic rate is increased through enhancement of cell membrane stability in oxidative conditions under salt stress.

  20. Multi-Scale Characean Experimental System: From Electrophysiology of Membrane Transporters to Cell-to-Cell Connectivity, Cytoplasmic Streaming and Auxin Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Beilby, Mary J

    2016-01-01

    The morphology of characean algae could be mistaken for a higher plant: stem-like axes with leaf-like branchlets anchored in the soil by root-like rhizoids. However, all of these structures are made up of giant multinucleate cells separated by multicellular nodal complexes. The excised internodal cells survive long enough for the nodes to give rise to new thallus. The size of the internodes and their thick cytoplasmic layer minimize impalement injury and allow specific micro-electrode placement. The cell structure can be manipulated by centrifugation, perfusion of cell contents or creation of cytoplasmic droplets, allowing access to both vacuolar and cytoplasmic compartments and both sides of the cell membranes. Thousands of electrical measurements on intact or altered cells and cytoplasmic droplets laid down basis to modern plant electrophysiology. Furthermore, the giant internodal cells and whole thalli facilitate research into many other plant properties. As nutrients have to be transported from rhizoids to growing parts of the thallus and hormonal signals need to pass from cell to cell, Characeae possess very fast cytoplasmic streaming. The mechanism was resolved in the characean model. Plasmodesmata between the internodal cells and nodal complexes facilitate transport of ions, nutrients and photosynthates across the nodes. The internal structure was found to be similar to those of higher plants. Recent experiments suggest a strong circadian influence on metabolic pathways producing indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and serotonin/melatonin. The review will discuss the impact of the characean models arising from fragments of cells, single cells, cell-to-cell transport or whole thalli on understanding of plant evolution and physiology. PMID:27504112

  1. Mistletoes and mutant albino shoots on woody plants as mineral nutrient traps

    PubMed Central

    Lo Gullo, M. A.; Glatzel, G.; Devkota, M.; Raimondo, F.; Trifilò, P.; Richter, H.

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims Potassium, sulphur and zinc contents of mistletoe leaves are generally higher than in their hosts. This is attributed to the fact that chemical elements which are cycled between xylem and phloem in the process of phloem loading of sugars are trapped in the mistletoe, because these parasites do not feed their hosts. Here it is hypothesized that mutant albino shoots on otherwise green plants should behave similarly, because they lack photosynthesis and thus cannot recycle elements involved in sugar loading. Methods The mineral nutrition of the mistletoe Scurrula elata was compared with that of albino shoots on Citrus sinensis and Nerium oleander. The potential for selective nutrient uptake by the mistletoe was studied by comparing element contents of host leaves on infected and uninfected branches and by manipulation of the haustorium–shoot ratio in mistletoes. Phloem anatomy of albino leaves was compared with that of green leaves. Key Results Both mistletoes and albino leaves had higher contents of potassium, sulphur and zinc than hosts or green leaves, respectively. Hypothetical discrimination of nutrient elements during the uptake by the haustorium is not supported by our data. Anatomical studies of albino leaves showed characteristics of release phloem. Conclusions Both albino shoots and mistletoes are traps for elements normally recycled between xylem and phloem, because retranslocation of phloem mobile elements into the mother plant or the host is low or absent. It can be assumed that the lack of photosynthetic activity in albino shoots and thus of sugars needed in phloem loading is responsible for the accumulation of elements. The absence of phloem loading is reflected in phloem anatomy of these abnormal shoots. In mistletoes the evolution of a parasitic lifestyle has obviously eliminated substantial feeding of the host with photosynthates produced by the mistletoe. PMID:22442343

  2. Prolonging the hydration and active metabolism from light periods into nights substantially enhances lichen growth.

    PubMed

    Bidussi, Massimo; Gauslaa, Yngvar; Solhaug, Knut Asbjørn

    2013-05-01

    This study investigates how hydration during light and dark periods influences growth in two epiphytic old forest lichens, the green algal Lobaria pulmonaria and the cyanobacterial L. scrobiculata. The lichens were cultivated in growth chambers for 14 days (200 μmol m(-1) s(-2); 12 h photoperiod) at four temperature regimes (25/20 °C, 21/16 °C, 13/8 °C, and 6/1 °C; day/night temperatures) and two hydration regimes (12 h day-time hydration; 12 h day-time + 12 h night-time hydration). Growth was highly dynamic, showing that short-term growth experiments in growth cabinets have a high, but largely unexplored potential in functional lichen studies. The highest measured growth rates were not far from the maximal dry matter gain estimated from published net photosynthetic CO2 uptake data. For the entire data set, photobiont type, temperature, hydration regime and specific thallus mass accounted for 46.6 % of the variation in relative growth rate (RGR). Both species showed substantially higher relative growth rates based on both biomass (RGR) and thallus area (RTAGR) when they were hydrated day and night compared to hydration in light only. Chronic photoinhibition was substantial in thalli hydrated only during the day time and kept at the highest and lowest temperature regimes, resulting in exponential increases in RGR with increasing maximal PSII efficiency (F v/F m) in both species. However, the depression in F v/F m was stronger for the cyanolichen than for the cephalolichen at extreme temperatures. The growth-stimulating effect of night-time hydration suggests that nocturnal metabolic activity improves recovery of photoinhibition and/or enhances the conversion rate of photosynthates into thallus extension.

  3. Nitrogen control of 13C enrichment in heterotrophic organs relative to leaves in a landscape-building desert plant species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.; Gu, L.; Bao, F.; Cao, Y.; Hao, Y.; He, J.; Li, J.; Li, Y.; Ren, Y.; Wang, F.; Wu, R.; Yao, B.; Zhao, Y.; Lin, G.; Wu, B.; Lu, Q.; Meng, P.

    2015-01-01

    A longstanding puzzle in isotope studies of C3 plant species is that heterotrophic plant organs (e.g., stems, roots, seeds, and fruits) tend to be enriched in 13C compared to the autotrophic organ (leaves) that provides them with photosynthate. Our inability to explain this puzzle suggests key deficiencies in understanding post-photosynthetic metabolic processes. It also limits the effectiveness of applications of stable carbon isotope analyses in a variety of scientific disciplines ranging from plant physiology to global carbon cycle studies. To gain insight into this puzzle, we excavated whole plant architectures of Nitraria tangutorum Bobrov, a C3 species that has an exceptional capability of fixing sands and building sand dunes, in two deserts in northwestern China. We systematically and simultaneously measured carbon isotope ratios and nitrogen and phosphorous contents of different parts of the excavated plants. We also determined the seasonal variations in leaf carbon isotope ratios on nearby intact plants of N. tangutorum. We found, for the first time, that higher nitrogen contents in heterotrophic organs were significantly correlated with increased heterotrophic 13C enrichment compared to leaves. However, phosphorous contents had no effect on the enrichment. In addition, new leaves had carbon isotope ratios similar to roots but were progressively depleted in 13C as they matured. We concluded that a nitrogen-mediated process, hypothesized to be the refixation of respiratory CO2 by phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) carboxylase, was responsible for the differences in 13C enrichment among different heterotrophic organs, while processes such as fractionating foliar metabolism and preferentially loading into phloem of 13C-enriched sugars may contribute to the overall autotrophic-heterotrophic difference in carbon isotope compositions.

  4. Coral photobiology: new light on old views.

    PubMed

    Iluz, David; Dubinsky, Zvy

    2015-04-01

    The relationship between reef-building corals and light-harvesting pigments of zooxanthellae (Symbiodinium sp.) has been acknowledged for decades. The photosynthetic activity of the algal endocellular symbionts may provide up to 90% of the energy needed for the coral holobiont. This relationship limits the bathymetric distribution of coral reefs to the upper 100 m of tropical shorelines. However, even corals growing under high light intensities have to supplement the photosynthates translocated from the algae by predation on nutrient-rich zooplankton. New information has revealed how the fate of carbon acquired through photosynthesis differs from that secured by predation, whose rates are controlled by light-induced tentacular extension. The Goreau paradigm of "light-enhanced calcification" is being reevaluated, based on evidence that blue light stimulates coral calcification independently from photosynthesis rates. Furthermore, under dim light, calcification rates were stoichiometrically uncoupled from photosynthesis. The rates of photosynthesis of the zooxanthellae exhibit a clear endogenous rhythmicity maintained by light patterns. This daily pattern is concomitant with a periodicity of all the antioxidant protective mechanisms that wax and wane to meet the concomitant fluctuation in oxygen evolution. The phases of the moon are involved in the triggering of coral reproduction and control the spectacular annual mass-spawning events taking place in several reefs. The intensity and directionality of the underwater light field affect the architecture of coral colonies, leading to an optimization of the exposure of the zooxanthellae to light. We present a summary of major gaps in our understanding of the relationship between light and corals as a roadmap for future research. PMID:25467066

  5. The ectomycorrhizal fungus Paxillus involutus converts organic matter in plant litter using a trimmed brown-rot mechanism involving Fenton chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Rineau, Francois; Roth, Doris; Shah, Firoz; Smits, Mark; Johansson, Tomas; Canbäck, Björn; Olsen, Peter Bjarke; Persson, Per; Grell, Morten Nedergaard; Lindquist, Erika; Grigoriev, Igor V; Lange, Lene; Tunlid, Anders

    2012-01-01

    Soils in boreal forests contain large stocks of carbon. Plants are the main source of this carbon through tissue residues and root exudates. A major part of the exudates are allocated to symbiotic ectomycorrhizal fungi. In return, the plant receives nutrients, in particular nitrogen from the mycorrhizal fungi. To capture the nitrogen, the fungi must at least partly disrupt the recalcitrant organic matter–protein complexes within which the nitrogen is embedded. This disruption process is poorly characterized. We used spectroscopic analyses and transcriptome profiling to examine the mechanism by which the ectomycorrhizal fungus Paxillus involutus degrades organic matter when acquiring nitrogen from plant litter. The fungus partially degraded polysaccharides and modified the structure of polyphenols. The observed chemical changes were consistent with a hydroxyl radical attack, involving Fenton chemistry similar to that of brown-rot fungi. The set of enzymes expressed by Pa. involutus during the degradation of the organic matter was similar to the set of enzymes involved in the oxidative degradation of wood by brown-rot fungi. However, Pa. involutus lacked transcripts encoding extracellular enzymes needed for metabolizing the released carbon. The saprotrophic activity has been reduced to a radical-based biodegradation system that can efficiently disrupt the organic matter–protein complexes and thereby mobilize the entrapped nutrients. We suggest that the released carbon then becomes available for further degradation and assimilation by commensal microbes, and that these activities have been lost in ectomycorrhizal fungi as an adaptation to symbiotic growth on host photosynthate. The interdependence of ectomycorrhizal symbionts and saprophytic microbes would provide a key link in the turnover of nutrients and carbon in forest ecosystems. PMID:22469289

  6. Multi-Scale Characean Experimental System: From Electrophysiology of Membrane Transporters to Cell-to-Cell Connectivity, Cytoplasmic Streaming and Auxin Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Beilby, Mary J.

    2016-01-01

    The morphology of characean algae could be mistaken for a higher plant: stem-like axes with leaf-like branchlets anchored in the soil by root-like rhizoids. However, all of these structures are made up of giant multinucleate cells separated by multicellular nodal complexes. The excised internodal cells survive long enough for the nodes to give rise to new thallus. The size of the internodes and their thick cytoplasmic layer minimize impalement injury and allow specific micro-electrode placement. The cell structure can be manipulated by centrifugation, perfusion of cell contents or creation of cytoplasmic droplets, allowing access to both vacuolar and cytoplasmic compartments and both sides of the cell membranes. Thousands of electrical measurements on intact or altered cells and cytoplasmic droplets laid down basis to modern plant electrophysiology. Furthermore, the giant internodal cells and whole thalli facilitate research into many other plant properties. As nutrients have to be transported from rhizoids to growing parts of the thallus and hormonal signals need to pass from cell to cell, Characeae possess very fast cytoplasmic streaming. The mechanism was resolved in the characean model. Plasmodesmata between the internodal cells and nodal complexes facilitate transport of ions, nutrients and photosynthates across the nodes. The internal structure was found to be similar to those of higher plants. Recent experiments suggest a strong circadian influence on metabolic pathways producing indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and serotonin/melatonin. The review will discuss the impact of the characean models arising from fragments of cells, single cells, cell-to-cell transport or whole thalli on understanding of plant evolution and physiology. PMID:27504112

  7. Revisiting "You are what you eat, +1‰": Bacterial Trophic Structure and the Sedimentary Record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, A.; Tang, T.; Mohr, W.; Sattin, S.

    2015-12-01

    "You are what you eat, +1‰" is a central principle of carbon stable isotope (δ13C) distributions and is widely applied to understand the structure and ordering of macrobiotic ecosystems. Although based on observations from multicellular organisms that are able to ingest "food", this idea also has been applied to Precambrian ecosystems dominated by unicellular, microbial life, with the suggestion that such systems could sustain ordered trophic structures observable in their isotopes. However, using a new approach to community profiling known as protein stable isotope fingerprinting (P-SIF), we find that the carbon isotope ratios of whole proteins separated from environmental samples show differences only between metabolically-distinct autotrophs; heterotrophs are not 13C-enriched. In parallel, a survey of the relative distribution of 13C between biochemical classes - specifically acetogenic lipids, isoprenoid lipids, amino acids, and nucleic acids/sugars - across a variety of bacterial species appears to be a function of the main carbon metabolite, not an indicator of heterotrophy vs. autotrophy. Indeed, autotrophy, heterotrophy, and mixotrophy all are indistinguishable when the primary food source is fresh photosynthate, i.e., sugar. Significant assimilation of acetate is diagnosed by acetogenic lipids that are relatively 13C-enriched vs. isoprenoid lipids. Mixed-substrate heterotrophy, in contrast, satisfies the classic "…+1‰" rule for bulk biomass, yet simultaneously it collapses the biochemical patterns of 13C almost completely. Together these observations point to a paradigm shift for understanding the preservation of bulk organic and lipid δ13C signatures in the rock record, suggesting that patterns of δ13Corg must primarily reflect changing carbon inputs, not the extent or intensity of heterotrophy.

  8. Terrestrial orchids in a tropical forest: best sites for abundance differ from those for reproduction.

    PubMed

    Whitman, Melissa; Ackerman, James D

    2015-03-01

    Suitable habitat for a species is often modeled by linking its distribution patterns with landscape characteristics. However, modeling the relationship between fitness and landscape characteristics is less common. In this study we take a novel approach towards species distribution modeling (SDM) by investigating factors important not only for species occurrence, but also abundance and physical size, as well as fitness measures. We used the Neotropical terrestrial orchid Prescottia stachyodes as our focal species, and compiled geospatial information on habitat and neighboring plants for use in a two-part conditional SDM that accounted for zero inflation and reduced spatial autocorrelation bias. First, we modeled orchid occurrence, and then within suitable sites we contrasted habitat characteristics important for orchid abundance as compared to plant size. We then tested possible fitness implications, informed by analyses of allometric scaling of reproductive effort and lamina area, as well as size-density relationships in areas of P. stachyodes co-occurrence. We determined that orchid presence was based on a combination of biotic and abiotic factors (indicator species, diffuse solar radiation). Within these sites, P. stachyodes abundance was higher on flat terrain, with fine, moderately well-drained soil, and areas without other native orchids, whereas plant size was greater in less rocky areas. In turn, plant size determined reproductive effort, with floral display height proportionate to lamina area (more photosynthates); however, allometric scaling of flower quantity suggests a higher energy cost for production, or maintenance, of flowers. Overall, habitat factors most important for abundance differed from those for size (and thus reproductive effort), suggesting that sites optimal for either recruitment or survival may not be the primary source of seeds. For plots with multiple P. stachyodes plants, size-density relationships differed depending on the size class

  9. Evaluating the Community Land Model in a pine stand with shading manipulations and 13CO2 labeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, J.; Ricciuto, D. M.; Thornton, P. E.; Warren, J. M.; King, A. W.; Shi, X.; Iversen, C. M.; Norby, R. J.

    2016-02-01

    Carbon allocation and flow through ecosystems regulates land surface-atmosphere CO2 exchange and thus is a key, albeit uncertain, component of mechanistic models. The Partitioning in Trees and Soil (PiTS) experiment-model project tracked carbon allocation through a young Pinus taeda stand following pulse labeling with 13CO2 and two levels of shading. The field component of this project provided process-oriented data that were used to evaluate terrestrial biosphere model simulations of rapid shifts in carbon allocation and hydrological dynamics under varying environmental conditions. Here we tested the performance of the Community Land Model version 4 (CLM4) in capturing short-term carbon and water dynamics in relation to manipulative shading treatments and the timing and magnitude of carbon fluxes through various compartments of the ecosystem. When calibrated with pretreatment observations, CLM4 was capable of closely simulating stand-level biomass, transpiration, leaf-level photosynthesis, and pre-labeling 13C values. Over the 3-week treatment period, CLM4 generally reproduced the impacts of shading on soil moisture changes, relative change in stem carbon, and soil CO2 efflux rate. Transpiration under moderate shading was also simulated well by the model, but even with optimization we were not able to simulate the high levels of transpiration observed in the heavy shading treatment, suggesting that the Ball-Berry conductance model is inadequate for these conditions. The calibrated version of CLM4 gave reasonable estimates of label concentration in phloem and in soil surface CO2 after 3 weeks of shade treatment, but it lacks the mechanisms needed to track the labeling pulse through plant tissues on shorter timescales. We developed a conceptual model for photosynthate transport based on the experimental observations, and we discussed conditions under which the hypothesized mechanisms could have an important influence on model behavior in larger-scale applications

  10. Feeding by emerald ash borer larvae induces systemic changes in black ash foliar chemistry.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yigen; Whitehill, Justin G A; Bonello, Pierluigi; Poland, Therese M

    2011-11-01

    The exotic wood-boring pest, emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), has been threatening North American ash (Fraxinus spp.) resources, this being recognized since its first detection in Michigan, USA and Ontario, Canada in 2002. Ash trees are killed by larval feeding in the cambial region, which results in disruption of photosynthate and nutrient translocation. In this study, changes in volatile and non-volatile foliar phytochemicals of potted 2-yr-old black ash, Fraxinus nigra Marshall, seedlings were observed in response to EAB larval feeding in the main stem. EAB larval feeding affected levels of six compounds [hexanal, (E)-2-hexenal, (Z)-3-hexenyl acetate, (E)-β-ocimene, methyl salicylate, and (Z,E)-α-farnesene] with patterns of interaction depending upon compounds of interest and time of observation. Increased methyl salicylate emission suggests similarity in responses induced by EAB larval feeding and other phloem-feeding herbivores. Overall, EAB larval feeding suppressed (Z)-3-hexenyl acetate emission, elevated (E)-β-ocimene emission in the first 30days, but emissions leveled off thereafter, and generally increased the emission of (Z,E)-α-farnesene. Levels of carbohydrates and phenolics increased overall, while levels of proteins and most amino acids decreased in response to larval feeding. Twenty-three amino acids were consistently detected in the foliage of black ash. The three most abundant amino acids were aspartic acid, glutamic acid, glutamine, while the four least abundant were α-aminobutyric acid, β-aminoisobutyric acid, methionine, and sarcosine. Most (16) foliar free amino acids and 6 of the 9 detected essential amino acids decreased with EAB larval feeding. The ecological consequences of these dynamic phytochemical changes on herbivores harbored by ash trees and potential natural enemies of these herbivores are discussed.

  11. Specific arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi associated with non-photosynthetic Petrosavia sakuraii (Petrosaviaceae).

    PubMed

    Yamato, Masahide; Yagame, Takahiro; Shimomura, Norihiro; Iwase, Koji; Takahashi, Hiroshi; Ogura-Tsujita, Yuki; Yukawa, Tomohisa

    2011-10-01

    Mycorrhizal fungi in roots of the achlorophyllous Petrosavia sakuraii (Petrosaviaceae) were identified by molecular methods. Habitats examined were plantations of the Japanese cypress Chamaecyparis obtusa in Honshu, an evergreen broad-leaved forest in Amami Island in Japan and a mixed deciduous and evergreen forest in China. Aseptate hyphal coils were observed in root cortical cells of P. sakuraii, suggesting Paris-type arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM). Furthermore, hyphal coils that had degenerated to amorphous clumps were found in various layers of the root cortex. Despite extensive sampling of P. sakuraii from various sites in Japan and China, most of the obtained AM fungal sequences of the nuclear small subunit ribosomal RNA gene were nearly identical and phylogenetic analysis revealed that they formed a single clade in the Glomus group A lineage. This suggests that the symbiotic relationship is highly specific. AM fungi of P. sakuraii were phylogenetically different from those previously detected in the roots of some mycoheterotrophic plants. In a habitat in C. obtusa plantation, approximately half of the AM fungi detected in roots of C. obtusa surrounding P. sakuraii belonged to the same clade as that of P. sakuraii. This indicates that particular AM fungi are selected by P. sakuraii from diverse indigenous AM fungi. The same AM fungi can colonize both plant species, and photosynthates of C. obtusa may be supplied to P. sakuraii through a shared AM fungal mycelial network. Although C. obtusa plantations are widely distributed throughout Japan, P. petrosavia is a rare plant species, probably because of its high specificity towards particular AM fungi.

  12. Physiological responses of three deciduous conifers (Metasequoia glyptostroboides, Taxodium distichum and Larix laricina) to continuous light: adaptive implications for the early Tertiary polar summer.

    PubMed

    Equiza, M Alejandra; Day, Michael E; Jagels, Richard

    2006-03-01

    Polar regions were covered with extensive forests during the Cretaceous and early Tertiary, and supported trees comparable in size and productivity to those of present-day temperate forests. With a winter of total or near darkness and a summer of continuous, low-angle illumination, these temperate, high-latitude forests were characterized by a light regime without a contemporary counterpart. Although maximum irradiances were much lower than at mid-latitudes, the 24-h photoperiod provided similar integrated light flux. Taxodium, Larix and Metasequoia, three genera of deciduous conifers that occurred in paleoarctic wet forests, have extant, closely related descendents. However, the contemporary relative abundance of these genera differs greatly from that in the paleoarctic. To provide insight into attributes that favor competitive success in a continuous-light environment, we subjected saplings of these genera to a natural photoperiod or a 24-h photoperiod and measured gas exchange, chlorophyll fluorescence, non-structural carbohydrate concentrations, biomass production and carbon allocation. Exposure to continuous light significantly decreased photosynthetic capacity and quantum efficiency of photosystem II in Taxodium and Larix, but had minimal influence in Metasequoia. In midsummer, foliar starch concentration substantially increased in both Taxodium and Larix saplings grown in continuous light, which may have contributed to end-product down-regulation of photosynthetic capacity. In contrast, Metasequoia allocated photosynthate to continuous production of new foliar biomass. This difference in carbon allocation may have provided Metasequoia with a two fold advantage in the paleoarctic by minimizing depression of photosynthetic capacity and increasing photosynthetic surface.

  13. Multi-Scale Characean Experimental System: From Electrophysiology of Membrane Transporters to Cell-to-Cell Connectivity, Cytoplasmic Streaming and Auxin Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Beilby, Mary J

    2016-01-01

    The morphology of characean algae could be mistaken for a higher plant: stem-like axes with leaf-like branchlets anchored in the soil by root-like rhizoids. However, all of these structures are made up of giant multinucleate cells separated by multicellular nodal complexes. The excised internodal cells survive long enough for the nodes to give rise to new thallus. The size of the internodes and their thick cytoplasmic layer minimize impalement injury and allow specific micro-electrode placement. The cell structure can be manipulated by centrifugation, perfusion of cell contents or creation of cytoplasmic droplets, allowing access to both vacuolar and cytoplasmic compartments and both sides of the cell membranes. Thousands of electrical measurements on intact or altered cells and cytoplasmic droplets laid down basis to modern plant electrophysiology. Furthermore, the giant internodal cells and whole thalli facilitate research into many other plant properties. As nutrients have to be transported from rhizoids to growing parts of the thallus and hormonal signals need to pass from cell to cell, Characeae possess very fast cytoplasmic streaming. The mechanism was resolved in the characean model. Plasmodesmata between the internodal cells and nodal complexes facilitate transport of ions, nutrients and photosynthates across the nodes. The internal structure was found to be similar to those of higher plants. Recent experiments suggest a strong circadian influence on metabolic pathways producing indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and serotonin/melatonin. The review will discuss the impact of the characean models arising from fragments of cells, single cells, cell-to-cell transport or whole thalli on understanding of plant evolution and physiology.

  14. Adaptation of carbon allocation under light and nutrient reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wegener, Frederik; Werner, Christiane

    2015-04-01

    The allocation of recently assimilated carbon (C) by plants depends on developmental stage and on environmental factors, but the underlying mechanisms are still a matter of debate. Whereas shifts in the allocation of photosynthates induced by reduced water availability, enhanced temperature and CO2 concentration were recently investigated in various studies, less is known about the response to light and nutrient reduction. We induced different allocation patterns in the Mediterranean shrub Halimium halimifolium L. by a reduction of light (Low L treatment) and nutrient availability (Low N treatment) and analysed allocation parameters as well as morphological and physiological traits for 15 months. Finally, we conducted a 13CO2 pulse-labelling and followed the fate of recently assimilated carbon to eight different classes of plant tissues and respiration for 13 days. The results revealed a high intraspecific variability in C distribution to tissues and in respiration. Allocation changes even varied within leaf and stem tissue classes (e.g. more C in main stems, less in lateral stems). These results show that the common separation of plant tissues in only three classes, i.e. root, shoot and leaf tissues, can result in missing information about allocation changes. The nutrient reduction enhanced the transport of recently assimilated C from leaves to roots in terms of quantity (c. 200%) and velocity compared to control plants. Interestingly, a 57% light reduction enhanced photosynthetic capacity and caused no change in final biomass after 15 months. Therefore, our results support the recently discussed sink regulation of photosynthesis. Finally, our results indicate that growing heterotrophic tissues strongly reduce the C loss from storage and structural C pools and therefore enhance the fraction of recent assimilates used for respiration. We propose that this interruption of the C reflux from storage and structural C pools could be a control mechanism for C

  15. Impact of drought on C forms and fluxes in the soil - plant continuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumpel, Cornelia; Sanaullah, Muhammad; Chabbi, Abad

    2016-04-01

    Global change is likely to increase the drought periods, which may have significant consequences for the turnover of SOM, in particular through their effect on plants. The aim of the study was to assess different compartments of the soil - plant continuum for their response to drought stress by combining field and laboratory experiments. We focused on three common grassland species (Lolium perenne, Festuca arundinacea and Dactylis glomerata) found to constitute grasslands of the temperate climate. We investigated drought impact on (1) plant biochemistry and potential mineralization of this material in soil, (2) decomposition of aboveground plant leaf litter of different quality, (3) plant-mediated soil C fluxes including (4) soil microbial biomass and their enzyme activities in the rhizosphere. Plant elemental and biochemical composition showed contrasting changes depending on the species in response to drought stress. The changes in elemental and biochemical composition of leaf litter, ultimately influenced its mineralization in soil. Drought stress highly modified the decomposition dynamics of litter from the three grassland species as a function of litter quality. Moreover, drought stress resulted in significant decrease in both shoot and root biomass in monocultures, while root biomass did not change when they were grown in mixture. Under drought stress, we observed higher belowground allocation of photosynthates and the drought had reduced root-derived respiration. This resulted in significant changes of soil enzyme activities. Our results suggested that plant species and community composition strongly influenced the drought effects in the rhizosphere. Thus, plant community composition and in particular the introduction of legumes might be used as a tool to attenuate drought stress not only because of different water use efficiency by plants, but also by their indirect effects on soil microbial activities affecting C and N cycles.

  16. Carbon dynamics in trees: feast or famine?

    PubMed

    Sala, Anna; Woodruff, David R; Meinzer, Frederick C

    2012-06-01

    Research on the degree to which carbon (C) availability limits growth in trees, as well as recent trends in climate change and concurrent increases in drought-related tree mortality, have led to a renewed focus on the physiological mechanisms associated with tree growth responses to current and future climate. This has led to some dispute over the role of stored non-structural C compounds as indicators of a tree's current demands for photosynthate. Much of the uncertainty surrounding this issue could be resolved by developing a better understanding of the potential functions of non-structural C stored within trees. In addition to functioning as a buffer to reconcile temporal asynchrony between C demand and supply, the storage of non-structural C compounds may be under greater regulation than commonly recognized. We propose that in the face of environmental stochasticity, large, long-lived trees may require larger C investments in storage pools as safety margins than previously recognized, and that an important function of these pools may be to maintain hydraulic transport, particularly during episodes of severe stress. If so, survival and long-term growth in trees remain a function of C availability. Given that drought, freeze-thaw events and increasing tree height all impose additional constraints on vascular transport, the common trend of an increase in non-structural carbohydrate concentrations with tree size, drought or cold is consistent with our hypothesis. If the regulated maintenance of relatively large constitutive stored C pools in trees serves to maintain hydraulic integrity, then the minimum thresholds are expected to vary depending on the specific tissues, species, environment, growth form and habit. Much research is needed to elucidate the extent to which allocation of C to storage in trees is a passive vs. an active process, the specific functions of stored C pools, and the factors that drive active C allocation to storage.

  17. Belowground fungal associations and water interact to influence the compensatory response of Ipomopsis aggregata.

    PubMed

    Allsup, Cassandra M; Paige, Ken N

    2016-02-01

    Although the concept that some plants benefit from being eaten is counterintuitive, there is now considerable evidence demonstrating enhanced fitness following herbivory. It has been assumed that plants growing in high resource conditions are the ones best able to compensate for herbivory. However, just the opposite has been found for dicotyledonous plants exhibiting patterns of overcompensation, with most occurring in resource-poor conditions. Long-term studies of the monocarpic biennial, scarlet gilia, Ipomopsis aggregata growing in resource-poor conditions have shown that ungulate herbivory by mule deer and elk can result in a threefold increase in plant fitness over uneaten controls. These observations led us to hypothesize that fungal associations would facilitate the compensatory response most commonly observed in this Arizona population of scarlet gilia; perhaps mutualistic associations with fungi, such as arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, would explain the phenomenon of overcompensation altogether. Fungal removal experiments, using Captan®, a commercially available fungicide, showed that a reduction in fungal abundance altered the compensatory response following ungulate herbivory, particularly in years in which water was limited, increasing fitness compensation from equal compensation to overcompensation. A multifactorial experiment revealed that the interactive effects of water and fungicide maximized fruit production following herbivory. Our results are counter to the “modification of tolerance hypothesis” in which plants associating with mycorrhizal fungi will have higher tolerance to herbivory. It is likely that arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and dark septate endophytes compete with plants for photosynthates following herbivory, thereby limiting the magnitude of compensation. Thus, fungi appear to be parasitic on scarlet gilia following ungulate herbivory. PMID:26497124

  18. Autotrophy of green non-sulphur bacteria in hot spring microbial mats: biological explanations for isotopically heavy organic carbon in the geological record.

    PubMed

    van der Meer, M T; Schouten, S; de Leeuw, J W; Ward, D M

    2000-08-01

    Inferences about the evidence of life recorded in organic compounds within the Earth's ancient rocks have depended on 13C contents low enough to be characteristic of biological debris produced by the well-known CO2 fixation pathway, the Calvin cycle. 'Atypically' high values have been attributed to isotopic alteration of sedimentary organic carbon by thermal metamorphism. We examined the possibility that organic carbon characterized by a relatively high 13C content could have arisen biologically from recently discovered autotrophic pathways. We focused on the green non-sulphur bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus that uses the 3-hydroxypropionate pathway for inorganic carbon fixation and is geologically significant as it forms modern mat communities analogous to stromatolites. Organic matter in mats constructed by Chloroflexus spp. alone had relatively high 13C contents (-14.9%) and lipids diagnostic of Chloroflexus that were also isotopically heavy (-8.9% to -18.5%). Organic matter in mats constructed by Chloroflexus in conjunction with cyanobacteria had a more typical Calvin cycle signature (-23.5%). However, lipids diagnostic of Chloroflexus were isotopically enriched (-15.1% to -24.1%) relative to lipids typical of cyanobacteria (-33.9% to -36.3%). This suggests that, in mats formed by both cyanobacteria and Chloroflexus, autotrophy must have a greater effect on Chloroflexus carbon metabolism than the photoheterotrophic consumption of cyanobacterial photosynthate. Chloroflexus cell components were also selectively preserved. Hence, Chloroflexus autotrophy and selective preservation of its products constitute one purely biological mechanism by which isotopically heavy organic carbon could have been introduced into important Precambrian geological features. PMID:11234931

  19. Effect of carbohydrates and night temperature on night respiration in rice.

    PubMed

    Peraudeau, Sébastien; Lafarge, Tanguy; Roques, Sandrine; Quiñones, Cherryl O; Clement-Vidal, Anne; Ouwerkerk, Pieter B F; Van Rie, Jeroen; Fabre, Denis; Jagadish, Krishna S V; Dingkuhn, Michael

    2015-07-01

    Global warming causes night temperature (NT) to increase faster than day temperature in the tropics. According to crop growth models, respiration incurs a loss of 40-60% of photosynthate. The thermal sensitivity of night respiration (R(n)) will thus reduce biomass. Instantaneous and acclimated effects of NT on R(n) of leaves and seedlings of two rice cultivars having a variable level of carbohydrates, induced by exposure to different light intensity on the previous day, were investigated. Experiments were conducted in a greenhouse and growth chambers, with R(n) measured on the youngest fully expanded leaves or whole seedlings. Dry weight-based R(n) was 2.6-fold greater for seedlings than for leaves. Leaf R(n) was linearly related to starch (positive intercept) and soluble sugar concentration (zero intercept). Increased NT caused higher R(n) at a given carbohydrate concentration. The change of R(n) at NT increasing from 21 °C to 31 °C was 2.4-fold for the instantaneous response but 1.2- to 1.7-fold after acclimation. The maintenance component of R(n) (R(m)'), estimated by assimilate starvation, averaged 28% in seedlings and 34% in leaves, with no significant thermal effect on this ratio. The acclimated effect of increased NT on R(m)' across experiments was 1.5-fold for a 10 °C increase in NT. No cultivar differences were observed in R(n) or R(m)' responses. The results suggest that the commonly used Q10=2 rule overestimates thermal response of respiration, and R(n) largely depends on assimilate resources.

  20. Photosynthetic carbon isotope discrimination and its relationship to the carbon isotope signals of stem, soil and ecosystem respiration (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wingate, L.; Ogée, J.; Burlett, R.; Bosc, A.; Devaux, M.; Grace, J.; Loustau, D.; Gessler, A.

    2010-12-01

    Photosynthetic carbon (C) isotope discrimination labels photosynthates (δA) and atmospheric CO2 (δa) with variable C isotope compositions during fluctuating environmental conditions. In this context, the C isotope composition of respired CO2 within ecosystems is often hypothesized to vary temporally with photosynthetic discrimination. We investigated the relationship between photosynthetic discrimination and the C isotope signals from stem (δW), soil (δS) and ecosystem (δE) respired CO2 to environmental fluctuations, using novel tuneable diode laser absorption spectrometer instrumentation in a mature maritime pine forest. Broad seasonal changes in photosynthetic discrimination were reflected in δW, δS and δE. However, respired CO2 signals had smaller short-term variations than photosynthetic discrimination and were offset and delayed by 2-10 d, indicating fractionation and isotopic mixing in a large C pool. Variations in δS did not follow photosynthetic discrimination at all times, especially during rainy periods and when there is a strong demand for C allocation above ground. It is likely that future isotope-enabled vegetation models will need to develop transfer functions that can account for these phenomena in order to interpret and predict the isotopic impact of biosphere gas exchange on the C isotope composition of atmospheric CO2. L. Wingate, J. Ogée, R. Burlett, A. Bosc, M. Devaux, J. Grace, D. Loustau and A. Gessler. Photosynthetic carbon isotope discrimination and its relationship to the carbon isotope signals of stem, soil and ecosystem respiration. New Phytologist, doi: 10.1111/j.1469-8137.2010.03384.x

  1. VFK1, a Vicia faba K(+) channel involved in phloem unloading.

    PubMed

    Ache, P; Becker, D; Deeken, R; Dreyer, I; Weber, H; Fromm, J; Hedrich, R

    2001-09-01

    In search of a K(+) channel involved in phloem transport we screened a Vicia faba cotyledon cDNA library taking advantage of a set of degenerated primers, flanking regions conserved among K(+) uptake channels. We cloned VFK1 (for Vicia faba K(+) channel 1) characterised by a structure known from the Shaker family of plant K(+) channels. When co-expressed with a KAT1 mutant in Xenopus oocytes, heteromers revealed the biophysical properties of a K(+) selective, proton-blocked channel. Northern blot analyses showed high levels of expression in cotyledons, flowers, stem and leaves. Using in situ PCR techniques we could localise the K(+) channel mRNA in the phloem. In the stem VFK1 expression levels were higher in the lower internodes. There channel transcripts increased in the light and thus under conditions of increased photosynthate allocation. VFK1 transcripts are elevated in sink leaves, and rise in source leaves during the experimental transition into sinks. Fructose- rather than sucrose- or glucose-feeding via the petiole induced VFK1 gene activity. We therefore monitored the fructose sensitivity of the sieve tube potential through cut aphid stylets. In response to an 1 h fructose treatment the sieve tube potential shift increased from 19 mV to 53 mV per 10-fold change in K(+) concentration. Under these conditions K(+) channels dominated the electrical properties of the plasma membrane. Based on the phloem localisation and expression patterns of VFK1 we conclude that this K(+) channel is involved in sugar unloading and K(+) retrieval.

  2. Spatial patterning and floral synchrony among trillium populations with contrasting histories of herbivory.

    PubMed

    Webster, Christopher R; Jenkins, Michael A; Poznanovic, Aaron J

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the spatial patterning and floral synchrony within and among populations of a non-clonal, forest understory herb, Trillium catesbaei. Two populations of T. catesbaei within Great Smoky Mountains National Park were monitored for five years: Cades Cove (high deer abundance) and Whiteoak Sink (low deer abundance). All individuals within each population were mapped during year one and five. Only flowering and single-leaf juveniles were mapped during intervening years. Greater distances between flowering plants (plants currently in flower) and substantially lower population densities and smaller patch sizes were observed at Cades Cove versus Whiteoak Sink. However, with the exception of flowering plants, contrasting histories of herbivory did not appear to fundamentally alter the spatial patterning of the T. catesbaei population at Cades Cove, an area with a long and well-documented history of deer overabundance. Regardless of browse history, non-flowering life stages were significantly clustered at all spatial scales examined. Flowering plants were clustered in all years at Whiteoak Sink, but more often randomly distributed at Cades Cove, possibly as a result of their lower abundance. Between years, however, there was a positive spatial association between the locations of flowering plants at both sites. Flowering rate was synchronous between sites, but lagged a year behind favorable spring growing conditions, which likely allowed plants to allocate photosynthate from a favorable year towards flowering the subsequent year. Collectively, our results suggest that chronically high levels of herbivory may be associated with spatial patterning of flowering within populations of a non-clonal plant. They also highlight the persistence of underlying spatial patterns, as evidenced by high levels of spatial clustering among non-flowering individuals, and the pervasive, although muted in a population subjected to chronic herbivory, influence of precipitation and

  3. Loquat fruit ripening is associated with root depletion. Nutritional and hormonal control.

    PubMed

    Reig, Carmina; Mesejo, Carlos; Martínez-Fuentes, Amparo; Martínez-Alcántara, Belén; Agustí, Manuel

    2015-04-01

    In woody species, it is known that there is a competition for nutrients, water and carbohydrates between root and fruit-shoot systems, however the influence of root development on fruit quality has received little attention. This research aims to identify the network of mechanisms involved in loquat (Eriobotrya japonica Lindl.) fruit ripening in connection with root activity. The study includes root growth rate measurements paralleling the ongoing fruit developmental stages, photosynthate translocation to the root by using (13)CO2 tracing, and nitrogen fractions (N-NH4(+), N-NO3(-), and N-proteinaceous) as well as their upward translocation to the fruit. The role of hormones (IAA, zeatin and ABA) in regulating the responses is also addressed. The experiment was conducted during two consecutive years on adult and 3-year-old loquat trees from early fruit developmental stage (10% of final size, 701 BBCH scale) to fully developed fruit colour (809 BBCH scale). This approach revealed that root development depends on the growing fruit sink strength, which reduces carbohydrates translocation to the roots and prevents them for further elongation. A nitrate accumulation in roots during the active fruit growth period takes place, which also contributes to slowing elongation and paralleled reduced ammonium and proteinaceous nitrogen concentrations. Concomitantly, the concentration of IAA and zeatin were lowest while that of ABA was highest when root exhibited minimum elongation. The depletion in zeatin and nitrogen supply by the roots paralleling the high ABA transport to the fruit allowed for colour break. These results suggest that loquat fruit changes colour by reducing root growth, as fruit increases sugars and ABA concentrations and reduces nitrogen and zeatin concentrations.

  4. Recovery of soil base saturation following termination of N deposition: Increased biological weathering?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucas, R. W.; Högberg, P.

    2012-12-01

    have been an increase in the weathering rate of base cations following the termination of N addition. Such an increase may be biologically mediated by the soil microbial community receiving increased allocation of recent photosynthate below ground following the termination of N addition and is not accounted for in current biogeochemical models.

  5. Modeling of the redox state dynamics in photosystem II of Chlorella pyrenoidosa Chick cells and leaves of spinach and Arabidopsis thaliana from single flash-induced fluorescence quantum yield changes on the 100 ns-10 s time scale.

    PubMed

    Belyaeva, N E; Schmitt, F-J; Paschenko, V Z; Riznichenko, G Yu; Rubin, A B

    2015-08-01

    The time courses of the photosystem II (PSII) redox states were analyzed with a model scheme supposing a fraction of 11-25 % semiquinone (with reduced [Formula: see text]) RCs in the dark. Patterns of single flash-induced transient fluorescence yield (SFITFY) measured for leaves (spinach and Arabidopsis (A.) thaliana) and the thermophilic alga Chlorella (C.) pyrenoidosa Chick (Steffen et al. Biochemistry 44:3123-3132, 2005; Belyaeva et al. Photosynth Res 98:105-119, 2008, Plant Physiol Biochem 77:49-59, 2014) were fitted with the PSII model. The simulations show that at high-light conditions the flash generated triplet carotenoid (3)Car(t) population is the main NPQ regulator decaying in the time interval of 6-8 μs. So the SFITFY increase up to the maximum level [Formula: see text]/F 0 (at ~50 μs) depends mainly on the flash energy. Transient electron redistributions on the RC redox cofactors were displayed to explain the SFITFY measured by weak light pulses during the PSII relaxation by electron transfer (ET) steps and coupled proton transfer on both the donor and the acceptor side of the PSII. The contribution of non-radiative charge recombination was taken into account. Analytical expressions for the laser flash, the (3)Car(t) decay and the work of the water-oxidizing complex (WOC) were used to improve the modeled P680(+) reduction by YZ in the state S 1 of the WOC. All parameter values were compared between spinach, A. thaliana leaves and C. pyrenoidosa alga cells and at different laser flash energies. ET from [Formula: see text] slower in alga as compared to leaf samples was elucidated by the dynamics of [Formula: see text] fractions to fit SFITFY data. Low membrane energization after the 10 ns single turnover flash was modeled: the ∆Ψ(t) amplitude (20 mV) is found to be about 5-fold smaller than under the continuous light induction; the time-independent lumen pHL, stroma pHS are fitted close to dark estimates. Depending on the flash energy used at 1

  6. Temperature-driven seasonal and diel variation in soil respiration in a moist subtropical forest in Puerto Rico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutiérrez del Arroyo, O.; Wood, T. E.; Lugo, A. E.

    2013-12-01

    Tropical forest soils are the largest natural source of carbon dioxide (CO2) to the atmosphere and have the highest soil respiration rates, globally. Currently, we have little understanding of how this large carbon (C) flux will respond to ongoing changes in climate. Identifying climatic controls and natural variability of soil respiration (Rs) in these ecosystems could improve our ability to predict feedbacks to future climate change. We measured hourly Rs in a secondary, moist subtropical forest in Puerto Rico for a 2-year period using an automated soil respiration system (LI-COR 8100) to determine at what time-scale Rs varies and whether this variability can be explained by abiotic factors such as temperature and moisture. Soil respiration varied significantly at both seasonal and diel time-scales. Mean monthly Rs ranged from 4 to 12 μmol CO2 m-2 s-1 and the seasonal variation was positively correlated with air temperature (p<0.0001, R2=0.69). In addition, Rs was notably reduced immediately following large precipitation events, possibly due to reduced diffusion rates out of the soil or low oxygen availability; however, precipitation was not related to Rs on a seasonal time-scale. Soil respiration also demonstrated significant diel variation, changing from 1.5 to 3.5 μmol CO2 m-2 s-1 throughout the day. As with seasonal variation, Rs was positively correlated to soil temperature (p<0.0001, R2=0.61) on a diel time-scale. Diel Rs was decoupled with soil temperature at midday possibly responding to a depression in photosynthesis, which may pause the transport of photosynthate to the roots. The shape of the temperature-Rs hysteresis effect changed seasonally in concert with air temperature. The significant positive effect of temperature on Rs in this forest, despite low intra-annual variability (<4°C), suggests that soil C loss from moist subtropical forests could increase as global temperatures rise. Diel hysteresis effects of Rs suggest that temperature has both

  7. Seasonal variations of belowground carbon transfer assessed by in situ 13CO2 pulse labelling of trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epron, D.; Ngao, J.; Dannoura, M.; Bakker, M. R.; Zeller, B.; Bazot, S.; Bosc, A.; Plain, C.; Lata, J. C.; Priault, P.; Barthes, L.; Loustau, D.

    2011-05-01

    Soil CO2 efflux is the main source of CO2 from forest ecosystems and it is tightly coupled to the transfer of recent photosynthetic assimilates belowground and their metabolism in roots, mycorrhiza and rhizosphere microorganisms feeding on root-derived exudates. The objective of our study was to assess patterns of belowground carbon allocation among tree species and along seasons. Pure 13CO2 pulse labelling of the entire crown of three different tree species (beech, oak and pine) was carried out at distinct phenological stages. Excess 13C in soil CO2 efflux was tracked using tuneable diode laser absorption spectrometry to determine time lags between the start of the labelling and the appearance of 13C in soil CO2 efflux and the amount of 13C allocated to soil CO2 efflux. Isotope composition (δ13C) of CO2 respired by fine roots and soil microbes was measured at several occasions after labelling, together with δ13C of bulk root tissue and microbial carbon. Time lags ranged from 0.5 to 1.3 days in beech and oak and were longer in pine (1.6-2.7 days during the active growing season, more than 4 days during the resting season), and the transfer of C to the microbial biomass was as fast as to the fine roots. The amount of 13C allocated to soil CO2 efflux was estimated from a compartment model. It varied between 1 and 21 % of the amount of 13CO2 taken up by the crown, depending on the species and the season. While rainfall exclusion that moderately decreased soil water content did not affect the pattern of carbon allocation to soil CO2 efflux in beech, seasonal patterns of carbon allocation belowground differed markedly between species, with pronounced seasonal variations in pine and beech. In beech, it may reflect competition with the strength of other sinks (aboveground growth in late spring and storage in late summer) that were not observed in oak. We report a fast transfer of recent photosynthates to the mycorhizosphere and we conclude that the patterns of carbon

  8. Induced leaf intercellular CO₂, photosynthesis, potassium and nitrate retention and strawberry early fruit formation under macronutrient limitation.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong; Li, Tingxian; Fu, Gang; Katulanda, Panchali

    2013-07-01

    Relationships between induced high leaf intercellular CO₂ concentrations, leaf K⁺ and NO₃⁻ ion movement and early fruit formation under macronutrient limitation are not well understood. We examined the effects and interactions of reduced K/N input treatments on leaf intercellular CO₂, photosynthesis rate, carboxylation and water use efficiency, berry formation as well as leaf/fruit K⁺, NO₃⁻ and photosynthate retention of strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa Duch.) to enhance low-input agriculture. The field study was conducted in Nova Scotia, eastern Canada during 2009-2010. The experimental treatments consisted of five K₂O rates (0, 6, 12, 18, and 24 kg ha(-1)) and five N rates (0, 5, 10, 15, and 20 kg ha(-1)), representing respectively, 0, 25, 50, 75, and 100 % of regular macronutrient recommendations based on the soil testing. The treatments were arranged in a split-plot design with three blocks in the field. The cultivar was 'Mira', a June-bearing crop. The results showed that strawberry plants treated with 25 %-reduced inputs could induce significantly higher leaf intercellular CO₂ concentrations to improve plant photosynthesis, carboxylation and water use efficiency and translocation of leaf/fruit K⁺ and dissolved solids, which could advance berry formation by 6 days and produce significantly higher marketable yields (P < 0.05). Higher leaf intercellular CO₂ inhibited leaf/fruit NO₃⁻ ion retention, but this inhibition did not occur in leaf/fruit K⁺ retention. Linear interactions of the K/N treatments were significant on fruit marketable yields, intercellular CO₂, net photosynthesis, leaf transpiration rates, and leaf temperatures (P < 0.05). It was concluded that higher leaf CO₂ could enhance plant photosynthesis, promote plant carboxylation and water use efficiency, and advance berry formation, but it could inhibit leaf NO₃⁻ retention. This inhibition did not find in leaf K⁺ ion and dissolved solid retention. Overlay co

  9. Secretions from the ventral eversible gland of Spodoptera exigua caterpillars activate defense-related genes and induce emission of volatile organic compounds in tomato, Solanum lycopersicum

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Plant induced defense against herbivory are generally associated with metabolic costs that result in the allocation of photosynthates from growth and reproduction to the synthesis of defense compounds. Therefore, it is essential that plants are capable of sensing and differentiating mechanical injury from herbivore injury. Studies have shown that oral secretions (OS) from caterpillars contain elicitors of induced plant responses. However, studies that shows whether these elicitors originated from salivary glands or from other organs associated with feeding, such as the ventral eversible gland (VEG) are limited. Here, we tested the hypothesis that the secretions from the VEG gland of Spodoptera exigua caterpillars contain elicitors that induce plant defenses by regulating the expression of genes involved in the biosynthesis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and other defense-related genes. To test this hypothesis, we quantified and compared the activity of defense-related enzymes, transcript levels of defense-related genes and VOC emission in tomato plants damaged by S. exigua caterpillars with the VEG intact (VEGI) versus plants damaged by caterpillars with the VEG ablated (VEGA). Results The quantified defense-related enzymes (i.e. peroxidase, polyphenol oxidase, and lipoxigenase) were expressed in significantly higher amounts in plants damaged by VEGI caterpillars than in plants damaged by VEGA caterpillars. Similarly, the genes that encode for the key enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of jasmonic acid and terpene synthase genes that regulate production of terpene VOCs, were up-regulated in plants damaged by VEGI caterpillars. Moreover, the OS of VEGA caterpillars were less active in inducing the expression of defense genes in tomato plants. Increased emissions of VOCs were detected in the headspace of plants damaged by VEGI caterpillars compared to plants damaged by VEGA caterpillars. Conclusion These results suggest that the VEG of S. exigua

  10. Modeling of the redox state dynamics in photosystem II of Chlorella pyrenoidosa Chick cells and leaves of spinach and Arabidopsis thaliana from single flash-induced fluorescence quantum yield changes on the 100 ns-10 s time scale.

    PubMed

    Belyaeva, N E; Schmitt, F-J; Paschenko, V Z; Riznichenko, G Yu; Rubin, A B

    2015-08-01

    The time courses of the photosystem II (PSII) redox states were analyzed with a model scheme supposing a fraction of 11-25 % semiquinone (with reduced [Formula: see text]) RCs in the dark. Patterns of single flash-induced transient fluorescence yield (SFITFY) measured for leaves (spinach and Arabidopsis (A.) thaliana) and the thermophilic alga Chlorella (C.) pyrenoidosa Chick (Steffen et al. Biochemistry 44:3123-3132, 2005; Belyaeva et al. Photosynth Res 98:105-119, 2008, Plant Physiol Biochem 77:49-59, 2014) were fitted with the PSII model. The simulations show that at high-light conditions the flash generated triplet carotenoid (3)Car(t) population is the main NPQ regulator decaying in the time interval of 6-8 μs. So the SFITFY increase up to the maximum level [Formula: see text]/F 0 (at ~50 μs) depends mainly on the flash energy. Transient electron redistributions on the RC redox cofactors were displayed to explain the SFITFY measured by weak light pulses during the PSII relaxation by electron transfer (ET) steps and coupled proton transfer on both the donor and the acceptor side of the PSII. The contribution of non-radiative charge recombination was taken into account. Analytical expressions for the laser flash, the (3)Car(t) decay and the work of the water-oxidizing complex (WOC) were used to improve the modeled P680(+) reduction by YZ in the state S 1 of the WOC. All parameter values were compared between spinach, A. thaliana leaves and C. pyrenoidosa alga cells and at different laser flash energies. ET from [Formula: see text] slower in alga as compared to leaf samples was elucidated by the dynamics of [Formula: see text] fractions to fit SFITFY data. Low membrane energization after the 10 ns single turnover flash was modeled: the ∆Ψ(t) amplitude (20 mV) is found to be about 5-fold smaller than under the continuous light induction; the time-independent lumen pHL, stroma pHS are fitted close to dark estimates. Depending on the flash energy used at 1

  11. Ethylene, a Hormone at the Center-Stage of Nodulation

    PubMed Central

    Guinel, Frédérique C.

    2015-01-01

    Nodulation is the result of a beneficial interaction between legumes and rhizobia. It is a sophisticated process leading to nutrient exchange between the two types of symbionts. In this association, within a nodule, the rhizobia, using energy provided as photosynthates, fix atmospheric nitrogen and convert it to ammonium which is available to the plant. Nodulation is recognized as an essential process in nitrogen cycling and legume crops are known to enrich agricultural soils in nitrogenous compounds. Furthermore, as they are rich in nitrogen, legumes are considered important as staple foods for humans and fodder for animals. To tightly control this association and keep it mutualistic, the plant uses several means, including hormones. The hormone ethylene has been known as a negative regulator of nodulation for almost four decades. Since then, much progress has been made in the understanding of both the ethylene signaling pathway and the nodulation process. Here I have taken a large view, using recently obtained knowledge, to describe in some detail the major stages of the process. I have not only reviewed the steps most commonly covered (the common signaling transduction pathway, and the epidermal and cortical programs), but I have also looked into steps less understood (the pre-infection step with the plant defense response, the bacterial release and the formation of the symbiosome, and nodule functioning and senescence). After a succinct review of the ethylene signaling pathway, I have used the knowledge obtained from nodulation- and ethylene-related mutants to paint a more complete picture of the role played by the hormone in nodule organogenesis, functioning, and senescence. It transpires that ethylene is at the center of this effective symbiosis. It has not only been involved in most of the steps leading to a mature nodule, but it has also been implicated in host immunity and nodule senescence. It is likely responsible for the activation of other hormonal

  12. Reactions to cadmium stress in a cadmium-tolerant variety of cabbage (Brassica oleracea L.): is cadmium tolerance necessarily desirable in food crops?

    PubMed

    Jinadasa, Neel; Collins, Damian; Holford, Paul; Milham, Paul J; Conroy, Jann P

    2016-03-01

    Cadmium is a cumulative, chronic toxicant in humans for which the main exposure pathway is via plant foods. Cadmium-tolerant plants may be used to create healthier food products, provided that the tolerance is associated with the exclusion of Cd from the edible portion of the plant. An earlier study identified the cabbage (Brassica oleracea L.) variety, Pluto, as relatively Cd tolerant. We exposed the roots of intact, 4-week-old seedlings of Pluto to Cd (control ∼1 mg L(-1) treatment 500 μg L(-1)) for 4 weeks in flowing nutrient solutions and observed plant responses. Exposure began when leaf 3 started to emerge, plants were harvested after 4 weeks of Cd exposure and the high Cd treatment affected all measured parameters. The elongation rate of leaves 4-8, but not the duration of elongation was reduced; consequently, individual leaf area was also reduced (P < 0.001) and total leaf area and dry weight were approximately halved. A/C i curves immediately before harvest showed that Cd depressed the photosynthetic capacity of the last fully expanded leaf (leaf 5). Despite such large impairments of the source and sink capacities, specific leaf weight and the partitioning of photosynthate between roots, stems and leaves were unaffected (P > 0.1). Phytochelatins (PCs) and glutathione (GSH) were present in the roots even at the lowest Cd concentration in the nutrient medium, i.e. ∼1 μg Cd L(-1), which would not be considered contaminated if it were a soil solution. The Cd concentration in these roots was unexpectedly high (5 mg kg(-1) DW) and the molar ratio of -SH (in PCs plus GSH) to Cd was large (>100:1). In these control plants, the Cd concentration in the leaves was 1.1 mg kg(-1) DW, and PCs were undetectable. For the high Cd treatment, the concentration of Cd in roots exceeded 680 mg kg(-1) DW and the molar -SH to Cd ratio fell to ∼1.5:1. For these plants, Cd flooded into the leaves (107 mg kg(-1) DW) where it probably induced synthesis of PCs, and the

  13. Physical and biological controls over patterns of methane flux from wetland soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owens, S. M.; von Fischer, J. C.

    2006-12-01

    While methane (CH4) production and plant-facilitated gas transport both contribute to patterns of CH4 emissions from wetlands, the relative importance of each mechanism is uncertain. In flooded wetland soils, CH4 is produced by anaerobic methanogenic bacteria. In the absence of competing oxidizers (i.e. SO42-, NO3-, O2), CH4 production is limited by the availability of labile carbon, which is supplied from recent plant primary production (e.g. as root exudates) and converted by anaerobic fermenting bacteria into methanogenic substrate (e.g. acetate). Because diffusion of gases through saturated soils is extremely slow, the aerenchymous tissues of wetland plants provide the primary pathway for CH4 emissions in systems dominated by emergent vascular vegetation. Aerenchyma also function to shuttle atmospheric oxygen to belowground plant tissues for respiration. Consequentially, root radial oxygen loss results in an oxidized rhizosphere, which limits CH4 production and provides habitat for aerobic methanotrophic bacteria, potentially reducing CH4 emissions. To test the contribution of recent photosynthates on CH4 emissions, a shading experiment was conducted in a Juncus-dominated wetland in the Colorado Front Range. Shade treatments significantly reduced net ecosystem production (NEE) and gross primary production (GPP) compared to control plots (p=0.0194 and p=0.0551, respectively). While CH4 emissions did not significantly differ between treatments, CH4 flux rates were strongly correlated with NEE (p=0.0063) and GPP (p=0.0020), in support of the hypothesis that labile carbon from recent photosynthesis controls patterns of CH4 emissions. The relative importance of plant gas transport and methane consumption rates on CH4 emissions is not known. Methane flux is more tightly correlated with NEE than GPP, which may be explained by increased CH4 consumption or decreased CH4 production as a result of rhizospheric oxidation. The ability to predict future emissions of this

  14. Rice Cluster I, an Important Group of Archaea Producing Methane in Rice Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conrad, R.

    2006-12-01

    Rice fields are an important source for the greenhouse gas methane. Methane is a major degradation product of organic matter in the anoxic soil, is partially oxidized in the rhizosphere and is emitted into the atmosphere through the aerenchyma system of the plants. Anaerobic degradation of organic matter by fermenting bacteria eventually results in the production of acetate and hydrogen, the two major substrates for microbial methanogenesis. The community of methanogenic archaea consists of several major orders or families including hydrogen-utilizing Rice Cluster-I (RC-I). Environmental conditions affect the methanogenic degradation process and the community structure of the methanogenic archaea in soil and rhizosphere. For example, populations of acetoclastic Methanosaetaceae and Methanosarcinaceae are enhanced by low and high acetate concentrations, respectively. Stable isotope probing of 16S rRNA showed that RC-I methanogens are mainly active on rice roots and at low H2 concentrations. Growth and population size is largely consistent with energetic conditions. RC-I methanogens on roots seem to be responsible for methane production from plant photosynthates that account for a major part of the emitted methane. Populations of RC-I methanogens in rice field soil are also enhanced at elevated temperatures (40-50°C). Moderately thermophilic members of RC-I methanogens or other methanogenic families were found to be ubiquitously present in soils from rice fields and river marshes. The genome of a RC-I methanogen was completely sequenced out of an enrichment culture using a metagenome approach. Genes found are consistent with life in the rhizosphere and in temporarily drained, oxic soil. We found that the methanogenic community structure on the rice roots is mainly determined by the respective community structure of the soil, but is in addition affected by the rice cultivar. Rice microcosms in which soil and rice roots are mainly colonized by RC-I methanogens produce

  15. The carbon isotopic composition of soil respiration in the decade following disturbance by bark beetle or stem girdling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, A.; Maurer, G. E.; Bowling, D. R.

    2013-12-01

    Recent outbreaks of mountain pine beetle have caused large-scale tree mortality in western North America, which can lead to fundamental changes in carbon cycling. When a tree is infested, the flow of photosynthate is disrupted. This causes the roots and their symbionts to die, eliminating the autotrophic component of soil respiration. Mycorrhizal fungi are enriched in 13C compared to plant tissues. As the dead fungal biomass is consumed by soil heterotrophs, the δ13C of CO2 in heterotrophic soil respiration may become more enriched as the fungal biomass is consumed. We investigated this response by measuring soil respiration in chronosequences of stem-girdled plots at the Niwot Ridge AmeriFlux site, and beetle-killed plots at the Fraser Experimental Forest, both in Colorado. Stem girdling was used to simulate beetle attack because it kills trees by a similar mechanism. Plots at Niwot Ridge included live trees and 7 years of girdled plots extending back to 2002. Plots at Fraser included live trees and three age classes of beetle-killed trees, within a similar chronosequence. We used manual soil-gas sampling at three depths, during the summers of 2011 and 2012, to determine if there is an isotopic effect associated with disturbance. Consistent with our expectations, in 2011, we found an enrichment in δ13C of approximately 1‰ in the two years following girdling which was absent in subsequent years. Although this pattern was also evident in 2012, the enrichment in δ13C during the same time period was about half that in 2011. At both Niwot and Fraser, in 2011, seasonal mean δ13C decreased by about 1‰ at all depths 3-4 years after disturbance, but returned to values close to control plots in the following 4-6 years. While we found a similar pattern at Fraser in 2012, we measured an enrichment of 1-1.5‰ at the OA interface at Niwot 8-10 years after disturbance, which was not found in 2011. It is possible this is due to the decomposition of woody biomass. At both

  16. In situ 13CO2 pulse labelling of field-grown eucalypt trees revealed the effects of potassium nutrition and throughfall exclusion on phloem transport of photosynthetic carbon.

    PubMed

    Epron, Daniel; Cabral, Osvaldo Machado Rodrigues; Laclau, Jean-Paul; Dannoura, Masako; Packer, Ana Paula; Plain, Caroline; Battie-Laclau, Patricia; Moreira, Marcelo Zacharias; Trivelin, Paulo Cesar Ocheuze; Bouillet, Jean-Pierre; Gérant, Dominique; Nouvellon, Yann

    2016-01-01

    Potassium (K) is an important limiting factor of tree growth, but little is known of the effects of K supply on the long-distance transport of photosynthetic carbon (C) in the phloem and of the interaction between K fertilization and drought. We pulse-labelled 2-year-old Eucalyptus grandis L. trees grown in a field trial combining K fertilization (+K and -K) and throughfall exclusion (+W and -W), and we estimated the velocity of C transfer by comparing time lags between the uptake of (13)CO2 and its recovery in trunk CO2 efflux recorded at different heights. We also analysed the dynamics of the labelled photosynthates recovered in the foliage and in the phloem sap (inner bark extract). The mean residence time of labelled C in the foliage was short (21-31 h). The time series of (13)C in excess in the foliage was affected by the level of fertilization, whereas the effect of throughfall exclusion was not significant. The velocity of C transfer in the trunk (0.20-0.82 m h(-1)) was twice as high in +K trees than in -K trees, with no significant effect of throughfall exclusion except for one +K -W tree labelled in the middle of the drought season that was exposed to a more pronounced water stress (midday leaf water potential of -2.2 MPa). Our results suggest that besides reductions in photosynthetic C supply and in C demand by sink organs, the lower velocity under K deficiency is due to a lower cross-sectional area of the sieve tubes, whereas an increase in phloem sap viscosity is more likely limiting phloem transport under drought. In all treatments, 10 times less (13)C was recovered in inner bark extracts at the bottom of the trunk when compared with the base of the crown, suggesting that a large part of the labelled assimilates has been exported out of the phloem and replaced by unlabelled C. This supports the 'leakage-retrieval mechanism' that may play a role in maintaining the pressure gradient between source and sink organs required to sustain high

  17. Carbon allocation belowground in Pinus pinaster using stable carbon isotope pulse labeling technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dannoura, M.; Bosc, A.; Chipeaux, C.; Sartore, M.; Lambrot, C.; Trichet, P.; Bakker, M.; Loustau, D.; Epron, D.

    2010-12-01

    Carbon allocation belowground competes with aboveground growth and biomass production. In the other hand, it contributes to resource acquisition such as nutrient, water and carbon sequestration in soil. Thus, a better characterization of carbon flow from plant to soil and its residence time within each compartment is an important issue for understanding and modeling forest ecosystem carbon budget. 13C pulse labeling of whole crown was conducted at 4 seasons to study the fate of assimilated carbon by photosynthesis into the root on 12 year old Pinus pinaster planted in the INRA domain of Pierroton. Maritime pine is the most widely planted species in South-West Europe. Stem, root and soil CO2 effluxes and their isotope composition were measured continuously by tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy with a trace gas analyzer (TGA 100A; Campbell Scientific) coupled to flow-through chambers. 13CO2 recovery and peak were observed in respiration of each compartment after labeling. It appeared sequentially from top of stem to bottom, and to coarse root. The maximum velocity of carbon transfer was calculated as the difference in time lag of recovery between two positions on the trunk or on the root. It ranged between 0.08-0.2 m h-1 in stem and between 0.04-0.12 m h-1 in coarse root. This velocity was higher in warmer season, and the difference between time lag of recovery and peak increased after first frost. Photosynthates arrived underground 1.5 to 5 days after labeling, at similar time in soil CO2 effluxes and coarse root respiration. 0.08-1.4 g of carbon was respired per tree during first 20 days following labeling. It presented 0.6 -10% of 13C used for labeling and it is strongly related to seasons. The isotope signal was detected in fine root organs and microbial biomass by periodical core sampling. The peak was observed 6 days after labeling in early summer while it was delayed more than 10 days in autumn and winter with less amount of carbon allocated

  18. Plants control the seasonal dynamics of microbial N cycling in a beech forest soil by belowground C allocation.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Christina; Fuchslueger, Lucia; Koranda, Marianne; Gorfer, Markus; Stange, Claus F; Kitzler, Barbara; Rasche, Frank; Strauss, Joseph; Sessitsch, Angela; Zechmeister-Boltenstern, Sophie; Richter, Andreas

    2011-05-01

    Soil microbes in temperate forest ecosystems are able to cycle several hundreds of kilograms of N per hectare per year and are therefore of paramount importance for N retention. Belowground C allocation by trees is an important driver of seasonal microbial dynamics and may thus directly affect N transformation processes over the course of the year. Our study aimed at unraveling plant controls on soil N cycling in a temperate beech forest at a high temporal resolution over a time period of two years, by investigating the effects of tree girdling on microbial N turnover. In both years of the experiment, we discovered (1) a summer N mineralization phase (between July and August) and (2) a winter N immobilization phase (November-February). The summer mineralization phase was characterized by a high N mineralization activity, low microbial N uptake, and a subsequent high N availability in the soil. During the autumn/winter N immobilization phase, gross N mineralization rates were low, and microbial N uptake exceeded microbial N mineralization, which led to high levels of N in the microbial biomass and low N availability in the soil. The observed immobilization phase during the winter may play a crucial role for ecosystem functioning, since it could protect dissolved N that is produced by autumn litter degradation from being lost from the ecosystem during the phase when plants are mostly inactive. The difference between microbial biomass N levels in winter and spring equals 38 kg N/ha and may thus account for almost one-third of the annual plant N demand. Tree girdling strongly affected annual N cycling: the winter N immobilization phase disappeared in girdled plots (microbial N uptake and microbial biomass N were significantly reduced, while the amount of available N in the soil solution was enhanced). This was correlated to a reduced fungal abundance in autumn in girdled plots. By releasing recently fixed photosynthates to the soil, plants may thus actively control the

  19. Effects of Drought Stress and Ozone Exposure on Isoprene Emissions from Oak Seedlings in Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madronich, M. B.; Harte, A.; Schade, G. W.

    2014-12-01

    Isoprene is the dominant hydrocarbon emitted by plants to the atmosphere with an approximate global emission of 550 Tg C yr-1. Isoprene emission studies have elucidated plants' isoprene production capacity, and the controlling factors of instantaneous emissions. However, it is not yet well understood how long-term climatic factors such as drought and increasing ozone concentrations affect isoprene emission rates. Drought reduces photosynthetic activity and is thus expected to reduce isoprene emission rate, since isoprene production relies on photosynthates. On the other hand, ozone is also known to negatively affect photosynthesis rates, but can instead increase isoprene emissions. These apparent inconsistencies and a lack of experimental data make it difficult to accurately parameterize isoprene emission responses to changing environmental conditions. The objective of this work is to reduce some of these uncertainties, using oak seedlings as a study system. Our project focuses on isoprene emission responses of oak trees to typical summer drought and high ozone conditions in Texas. We report on experiments conducted using a laboratory whole-plant chamber and leaf-level data obtained from greenhouse-grown seedlings. The chamber experiment studied the effects of ozone and drought on isoprene emissions from >3 year old oak seedlings under controlled conditions of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR), temperature, soil-moisture and the chamber's air composition. Stress in plants was induced by manipulating potted soil-moisture and ozone concentration in the chamber. The greenhouse study focused on understanding the effects of drought under Texas climatic conditions. For this study we used two year old seedlings of water oak (Quercus nigra) and post oak (Quercus stellata). Temperature, humidity and light in the greenhouse followed local conditions. Leaf-level conductance, photosynthesis measurements and isoprene sampling were carried out under controlled leaf

  20. Tree ring isotopes of beech and spruce in response to short-term climate variability across Central European sites: Common and contrasting physiological mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weigt, Rosemarie; Klesse, Stefan; Treydte, Kerstin; Frank, David; Saurer, Matthias; Siegwolf, Rolf T. W.

    2016-04-01

    The combined study of tree-ring width and stable C and O isotopes provides insight in the coherences between carbon allocation during stem growth and the preceding conditions of gas exchange and formation of photosynthates as all influenced by environmental variation. In this large-scale study comprising 10 sites across a range of climate gradients (temperature, precipitation) throughout Central Europe, we investigated tree-rings in European beech (Fagus sylvatica) and Norway spruce (Picea abies) trees. The sampling design included larger and smaller trees. The short-term, i.e. year-to-year, variability in the isotope time series over 100 yrs was analyzed in relation to tree-ring growth and climate variation. The generally strong correlation between the year-to-year differences in δ13C (corrected for the atmospheric shift due to 13C-depleted CO2 from fossil combustion) and δ18O across most sites emphasized the role of stomatal conductance in controlling leaf gas exchange. However, the correlation between both isotopes decreased during some periods. At several sites this reduction in correlation was particularly pronounced during recent decades. This suggests a decoupling between stomatal and photosynthetic responses to environmental conditions on the one hand, and carbon allocation to stem tissue on the other hand. Variability in the isotopic ratio largely responded to summer climate, but was weakly correlated to annual stem growth. In contrast, climate sensitivity of radial growth in both species was rather site-dependent, and was strongest at the driest (in terms of soil water capacity) site. We will also present results of isotope responses with respect to extreme climate events. Understanding the underlying physiological mechanisms controlling the short-term variation in tree-ring signals will help to assess and more precisely constrain the possible range of growth performance of these ecologically and economically important tree species under future climate

  1. Belowground Carbon Allocation to Ectomycorrhizal Fungi Links Biogeochemical Cycles of Boron and Nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucas, R. W.; Högberg, P.; Ingri, J. N.

    2011-12-01

    Boron (B) is an essential micronutrient to most trees and represents an important limiting resource in some regions, deficient trees experiencing the loss of apical dominance, altered stem growth, and even tree death in extreme cases. Similar to the acquisition of most soil nutrients, B is likely supplied to host trees by mycorrhizal symbionts in exchange for recently fixed carbohydrates. In this way, belowground allocation of photosynthate, which drives the majority of biological processes belowground, links the biogeochemical cycles of B and nitrogen (N). Using a long-term N addition experiment in a Pinus sylvestris forest that has been ongoing for 41 years, we examined how the availability of inorganic N mediates the response of B isotopes in the tree needles, organic soil, and fungal pools in a boreal forest in northern Sweden. Using archived needle samples collected annually from the current year's needle crop, we observed δ11B to increase from 30.8 (0.5 se) to 41.8 (0.7 se)% in N fertilized plots from 1970 to 1979, a period of increasing B deficiency stress induced by N fertilization; the concentration of B in tree needles during 1979 dropping as low as 3.0 μg g-2. During the same period, B concentrations in tree needles from control plots remained relatively unchanged and δ11B remained at a steady state value of 34.1 (1.0 se)%. Following a distinct, large-scale, pulse labeling event in 1980 in which 2.5 kg ha-1 of isotopically distinct B was applied to all treatment and control plots to alleviate the N-induced B deficiency, concentrations of B in current needles increased immediately in all treatments, the magnitude of the response being dependent upon the N treatment. But unlike other pool dilution studies, δ11B of current tree needles did not return to pre-addition, steady-state levels. Instead, δ11B continued to decrease over time in both N addition and control treatments. This unexpected pattern has not been previously described but can be explained

  2. Soil CO2, N2O and Nox Flux Responses to Biofuel Crop Plantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, L.; Eberwein, J.; Allsman, L.; Grantz, D. A.; Jenerette, D.

    2014-12-01

    Biofuel crops in high temperature environments, e.g, sorghum in southern California, USA, have a high capacity to assimilate atmospheric CO2. Photosynthates from the canopy may provide extra labile carbon source to feed soil microorganisms and influence trace gas fluxes, including CO2, N2O and NOx. Understanding how soil microorganisms balance the carbon (energy) and nitrogen (nutrients) allocation between growing microbial biomass and respiration is critical for evaluating the GHG emissions and emissions of regional air quality pollutants. We conducted experiments in a high temperature agroecosystem both in fallow and sorghum production fields with an experimental nitrogen gradient (0,50 and 100 kg/ha, marked as control, low and high with triplicate repeat) to investigate the CO2, N2O and NOx flux responses. All gas fluxes were measured simultaneously from three replicate locations for each treatment in the field biweekly. Measurements were performed 2-5 days after irrigation. We found that planting sorghum has significant effects on soil CO2 (p<0.0001), N2O (p<0.0001) and NOx (p=0.04) fluxes, but nitrogen amendments only have marginally significant effects on CO2 flux (p=0.07). Surprisingly, no significant response of N2O (p=0.27) and NOx (p=0.61) were observed in responses to N amendments. Compared to the fallow field, the CO2 flux in sorghum field increased 77%, 134% and 202% in control, low and high N level amendments, respectively. N2O flux from the sorghum field are consistently higher than from fallow field, with 207%, 174% and 1064% increase in control, low and high N level amendments, respectively. For the NOx flux, no significant difference was found between fallow and sorghum field. Although nitrogen amendments did not show significant effects on CO2, N2O and NOx flux, the high N treatment in sorghum field continuously gains the highest flux rates. Our results suggested additional C inputs may be an important factor regulating CO2, N2O and NOx fluxes in

  3. Clod-o-meter: A New Method for the Calculation of Shrinkage/Swelling Curves for Soil Clods by Integrating an Open Source Software Solution and Digital Imagery Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abou Najm, M. R.; Stewart, R. D.; Rupp, D. E.; Selker, J. S.

    2010-12-01

    Characterizing the shrinkage and swelling dynamics of swelling soils is fundamental to the understanding of soil cracking and moisture movement within the vadose zone. The shrinkage and swelling curves relate the change in the soil’s specific volume (volume of soil/mass of solids) to the change in the soil’s moisture content. Current methods determine clod volume by dipping saran-coated clods in water or by relying on expensive equipment and proprietary software (such as using laser scanners to measure the sample in three dimensions). We propose an alternative method for determining the volume of a soil clod, which is both low-cost and utilizes completely free and open-source software. To measure the volume, the clod is placed on a stand and imaged from multiple angles using a digital camera. The images are then combined using the free Microsoft program, Photosynth, to create a 3-dimensional point cloud (a three-dimensional set of vertices, representing the outer surface of the object). This point cloud is then edited using the open source program Meshlab to remove outliers and create a Poisson surface mesh. Finally, an Octave code is used to calculate the relative volume of the 3-dimensional surface. To obtain the actual volume of the clod, the relative volume needs to be calibrated using an object within the same 3D image with known dimensions and volume. For this analysis we used the soil clod holder (a cylinder painted with bright, random patterns) as the calibration object to be able to calculate the real volume of the clod from the relative volume obtained by Octave. The clods were kept at room temperature under small temperature and humidity fluctuations to ensure slow and uniform shrinkage. This procedure was repeated at multiple moisture contents (clod weight was recorded immediately prior to each image session). To verify the final volume calculation from the image processing, the clod was dipped in saran resin and placed into a water-filled graduated

  4. Probing the effect of the binding site on the electrostatic behavior of a series of carotenoids reconstituted into the light-harvesting 1 complex from purple photosynthetic bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum detected by stark spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Katsunori; Suzuki, Satoru; Fujii, Ritsuko; Gardiner, Alastair T; Cogdell, Richard J; Nango, Mamoru; Hashimoto, Hideki

    2008-08-01

    Reconstitutions of the LH1 complexes from the purple photosynthetic bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum S1 were performed with a range of carotenoid molecules having different numbers of C=C conjugated double bonds. Since, as we showed previously, some of the added carotenoids tended to aggregate and then to remain with the reconstituted LH1 complexes (Nakagawa, K.; Suzuki, S.; Fujii, R.; Gardiner, A.T.; Cogdell, R.J.; Nango, M.; Hashimoto, H. Photosynth. Res. 2008, 95, 339-344), a further purification step using a sucrose density gradient centrifugation was introduced to improve purity of the final reconstituted sample. The measured absorption, fluorescence-excitation, and Stark spectra of the LH1 complex reconstituted with spirilloxanthin were identical with those obtained with the native, spirilloxanthin-containing, LH1 complex of Rs. rubrum S1. This shows that the electrostatic environments surrounding the carotenoid and bacteriochlorophyll a (BChl a) molecules in both of these LH1 complexes were essentially the same. In the LH1 complexes reconstituted with either rhodopin or spheroidene, however, the wavelength maximum at the BChl a Qy absorption band was slightly different to that of the native LH1 complexes. These differences in the transition energy of the BChl a Qy absorption band can be explained using the values of the nonlinear optical parameters of this absorption band, i.e., the polarizability change Tr(Deltaalpha) and the static dipole-moment change |Deltamu| upon photoexcitation, as determined using Stark spectroscopy. The local electric field around the BChl a in the native LH1 complex (ES) was determined to be approximately 3.0x10(6) V/cm. Furthermore, on the basis of the values of the nonlinear optical parameters of the carotenoids in the reconstituted LH1 complexes, it is possible to suggest that the conformations of carotenoids, anhydrorhodovibrin and spheroidene, in the LH1 complex were similar to that of rhodopin glucoside in crystal structure of

  5. Effects of the 100-year most severe El Niño driven drought on above and below ground CO2 exchanges in a seasonal tropical forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detto, M.; Muller-Landau, H. C.; Davies, S. J.; Rubio Ramos, V. E.

    2015-12-01

    The role of environmental drivers in regulating carbon exchanges, such as the combined effects of different meteorological and hydrological factors, are still poorly understood in many tropical forests. For example, Central American tropical forests are characterized by a distinct dry season with large atmospheric evaporative demand, driven by solar radiations and sustained winds. In contrast, during the wet seasons, cloudiness results in lower radiation inputs but higher diffuse fraction, and higher water availability. Our site, Barro Colorado Island, located in Gatun Lake, Central Panama, averages 2800 mm of annual precipitation, with a pronounced dry season in Jan-Apr. Forest age varies between 100 and >400 yr. In July 2012, an eddy covariance system was installed on a 41 m tower on the top plateau of the island. In the current year (2015) the island is experiencing the most severe El Niño driven drought on record (precipitation is measured since 1921). The eddy covariance measurements show that carbon and water fluxes are strongly influenced by hydrological conditions. Prolonged dry spells during the dry season limit both above ground fluxes (ET and GPP) and below ground processes (root and microbial activities). Light use efficiency is about 30% lower during the dry season and evapotranspiration can be as 40% below potential. These decreases in ecosystem functions are driven primarily by a combination of structural (reduction in leaf area) and physiological (stomata regulation) adaptation. Similarly, soil effluxes respond strongly to hydrological conditions. In the dry season, lower soil respiration rates are spaced out by rare rain events generating large pulses. In contrast, during the wet season, frequent rain events suppress soil CO2effluxes, because of reduced diffusivity and oxygen depletion. Diurnal variation of soil respiration also suggested a potential translocation of photosynthates from leaf to roots to increase nutrient uptake during the dry

  6. Assessment of growth and yield losses in two Zea mays L. cultivars (quality protein maize and nonquality protein maize) under projected levels of ozone.

    PubMed

    Singh, Aditya Abha; Agrawal, S B; Shahi, J P; Agrawal, Madhoolika

    2014-02-01

    Rapid industrialization and economic developments have increased the tropospheric ozone (O3) budget since preindustrial times, and presently, it is supposed to be a major threat to crop productivity. Maize (Zea mays L.), a C4 plant is the third most important staple crop at global level with a great deal of economic importance. The present study was conducted to evaluate the performance of two maize cultivars [HQPM1: quality protein maize (QPM)] and [DHM117: nonquality protein maize (NQPM)] to variable O3 doses. Experimental setup included filtered chambers, nonfiltered chambers (NFC), and two elevated doses of O3 viz. NFC+15 ppb O3 (NFC+15) and NFC+30 ppb O3 (NFC+30). During initial growth period, both QPM and NQPM plants showed hormetic effect that is beneficial due to exposure of low doses of a toxicant (NFC and NFC+15 ppb O3), but at later stages, growth attributes were negatively affected by O3. Growth indices showed the variable pattern of photosynthate translocation under O3 stress. Foliar injury in the form of interveinal chlorosis and reddening of leaves due to increased production of anthocyanin pigments was observed at higher concentrations of O3. One-dimensional gel electrophoresis of leaves taken from NFC+30 showed reductions of major photosynthetic proteins, and differential response was observed between the two test cultivars. Decline in the number of male flowers at elevated O3 doses suggested damaging effect of O3 on reproductive structures which might be a cause of productivity losses. Variable carbon allocation pattern particularly to husk leaves, foliar injury, and damage of photosynthetic proteins led to significant reductions in economic yield at higher O3 doses. PCA showed that both the cultivars responded more or less similarly to O3 stress in their respective groupings of growth and yield parameters, but magnitude of their response was variable. It is further supported by difference in the significance of correlations between variables of

  7. Thallus morphology and optical characteristics affect growth and DNA damage by UV radiation in juvenile Arctic Laminaria sporophytes.

    PubMed

    Roleda, Michael Y; Wiencke, Christian; Hanelt, Dieter

    2006-02-01

    Growth of young sporophytes of the brown algae Laminaria digitata, L. saccharina and L. solidungula from Spitsbergen were measured in the laboratory after being exposed for 21 days to either photosynthetically active radiation (PAR = P) or to full light spectrum (PAR + UV-A + UV-B = PAB) using of cutoff glass filters. The plants were grown at 8+/-2 degrees C and 16 h light : 8 h dark cycles with 6 h additional ultraviolet radiation (UVR) exposure in the middle of the light period. Growth was measured every 10 min using growth chambers with online video measuring technique. Tissue morphology and absorption spectra were measured in untreated young sporophytes while chlorophyll (Chl) a content and DNA damage were measured in treated thalli at the end of the experiment. In all species, growth rates were significantly higher in sporophytes exposed to P alone compared to sporophytes exposed to PAB. Tissue DNA damage is dependent on thallus thickness and absorption spectra characteristics of pigments and UV-absorbing compounds. In sporophytes exposed to UVR, energy demands for repair of DNA damage and synthesis of UV-absorbing compounds for protection effectively diverts photosynthate at the expense of growth. Photosynthetic pigment was not significantly different between treatments suggesting a capacity for acclimation to moderate UVR fluence. The general growth pattern in sporophytes exposed to P alone showed an increasing growth rate from the onset of light (0500-0900 hours) to a peak at the middle of the light phase (0900-1500 hours), a decline towards the end of the light phase (1500-2100 hours) and a minimum "low" growth in the dark (2100-0500 hours) relative to growth during the entire light phase. Under PAB, different growth patterns were observed such as growth compensation at night in L. digitata, delayed growth recovery in L. saccharina and minimal but continuous growth in L. solidungula. Growth as an integrative parameter of all physiological processes showed

  8. Reactions to cadmium stress in a cadmium-tolerant variety of cabbage (Brassica oleracea L.): is cadmium tolerance necessarily desirable in food crops?

    PubMed

    Jinadasa, Neel; Collins, Damian; Holford, Paul; Milham, Paul J; Conroy, Jann P

    2016-03-01

    Cadmium is a cumulative, chronic toxicant in humans for which the main exposure pathway is via plant foods. Cadmium-tolerant plants may be used to create healthier food products, provided that the tolerance is associated with the exclusion of Cd from the edible portion of the plant. An earlier study identified the cabbage (Brassica oleracea L.) variety, Pluto, as relatively Cd tolerant. We exposed the roots of intact, 4-week-old seedlings of Pluto to Cd (control ∼1 mg L(-1) treatment 500 μg L(-1)) for 4 weeks in flowing nutrient solutions and observed plant responses. Exposure began when leaf 3 started to emerge, plants were harvested after 4 weeks of Cd exposure and the high Cd treatment affected all measured parameters. The elongation rate of leaves 4-8, but not the duration of elongation was reduced; consequently, individual leaf area was also reduced (P < 0.001) and total leaf area and dry weight were approximately halved. A/C i curves immediately before harvest showed that Cd depressed the photosynthetic capacity of the last fully expanded leaf (leaf 5). Despite such large impairments of the source and sink capacities, specific leaf weight and the partitioning of photosynthate between roots, stems and leaves were unaffected (P > 0.1). Phytochelatins (PCs) and glutathione (GSH) were present in the roots even at the lowest Cd concentration in the nutrient medium, i.e. ∼1 μg Cd L(-1), which would not be considered contaminated if it were a soil solution. The Cd concentration in these roots was unexpectedly high (5 mg kg(-1) DW) and the molar ratio of -SH (in PCs plus GSH) to Cd was large (>100:1). In these control plants, the Cd concentration in the leaves was 1.1 mg kg(-1) DW, and PCs were undetectable. For the high Cd treatment, the concentration of Cd in roots exceeded 680 mg kg(-1) DW and the molar -SH to Cd ratio fell to ∼1.5:1. For these plants, Cd flooded into the leaves (107 mg kg(-1) DW) where it probably induced synthesis of PCs, and the

  9. Assessment of growth and yield losses in two Zea mays L. cultivars (quality protein maize and nonquality protein maize) under projected levels of ozone.

    PubMed

    Singh, Aditya Abha; Agrawal, S B; Shahi, J P; Agrawal, Madhoolika

    2014-02-01

    Rapid industrialization and economic developments have increased the tropospheric ozone (O3) budget since preindustrial times, and presently, it is supposed to be a major threat to crop productivity. Maize (Zea mays L.), a C4 plant is the third most important staple crop at global level with a great deal of economic importance. The present study was conducted to evaluate the performance of two maize cultivars [HQPM1: quality protein maize (QPM)] and [DHM117: nonquality protein maize (NQPM)] to variable O3 doses. Experimental setup included filtered chambers, nonfiltered chambers (NFC), and two elevated doses of O3 viz. NFC+15 ppb O3 (NFC+15) and NFC+30 ppb O3 (NFC+30). During initial growth period, both QPM and NQPM plants showed hormetic effect that is beneficial due to exposure of low doses of a toxicant (NFC and NFC+15 ppb O3), but at later stages, growth attributes were negatively affected by O3. Growth indices showed the variable pattern of photosynthate translocation under O3 stress. Foliar injury in the form of interveinal chlorosis and reddening of leaves due to increased production of anthocyanin pigments was observed at higher concentrations of O3. One-dimensional gel electrophoresis of leaves taken from NFC+30 showed reductions of major photosynthetic proteins, and differential response was observed between the two test cultivars. Decline in the number of male flowers at elevated O3 doses suggested damaging effect of O3 on reproductive structures which might be a cause of productivity losses. Variable carbon allocation pattern particularly to husk leaves, foliar injury, and damage of photosynthetic proteins led to significant reductions in economic yield at higher O3 doses. PCA showed that both the cultivars responded more or less similarly to O3 stress in their respective groupings of growth and yield parameters, but magnitude of their response was variable. It is further supported by difference in the significance of correlations between variables of

  10. Mesocosm-Scale Experimental Quantification of Plant-Fungi Associations on Carbon Fluxes and Mineral Weathering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, M. Y.; Palmer, B.; Leake, J. R.; Banwart, S. A.; Beerling, D. J.

    2009-12-01

    H, conductivity, and geochemistry) are very different from each other, and from the plant-free controls. 14C labelling of the above-ground shoots indicates preferential allocation of photosynthate to fungal partners associated with basalt as compared to granite. Ongoing measurements will characterize the effects of fungal colonization on basalt and granite weathering in these systems. The novel ability to simultaneously measure biological and geochemical processes with depth allows us to better understand the role of plant and fungal evolution in the shaping Earth’s CO2 history.

  11. Seasonal Variations in the Biochemical Fractionation of Hydrogen Isotopes by Spartina alterniflora.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sessions, A. L.

    2005-12-01

    biosynthesis during the spring and fall, whereas 'fresh' photosynthate is utilized during periods of maximal growth. Storage carbohydrates are strongly enriched in D as a result of isotopic exchange with water. Paleoclimate calibrations of D/H ratios in lipids from terrestrial plants will thus need to take the seasonality of lipid production and export into account, in addition to other environmental factors.

  12. Plant communities as drivers of soil respiration: pathways, mechanisms, and significance for global change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metcalfe, D. B.; Fisher, R. A.; Wardle, D. A.

    2011-03-01

    Understanding the impacts of plant community characteristics on soil carbon dioxide efflux (R) is a key prerequisite for accurate prediction of the future carbon balance of terrestrial ecosystems under climate change. In this review, we synthesize relevant information from a wide spectrum of sources to evaluate the current state of knowledge about plant community effects on R, examine how this information is incorporated into global climate models, and highlight priorities for future research. Plant species consistently exhibit cohesive suites of traits, linked to contrasting life history strategies, which exert a variety of impacts on R. As such, we propose that plant community shifts towards dominance by fast growing plants with nutrient rich litter could provide a major, though often neglected, positive feedback to climate change. Within vegetation types, belowground carbon flux will mainly be controlled by photosynthesis, while amongst vegetation types this flux will be more dependent upon the specific characteristics of the plant life form. We also make the case that community composition, rather than diversity, is usually the dominant control on ecosystem processes in natural systems. Individual species impacts on R may be largest where the species accounts for most of the biomass in the ecosystem, has very distinct traits to the rest of the community, or modulates the occurrence of major natural disturbances. We show that climate-vegetation models incorporate a number of pathways whereby plants can affect R, but that simplifications regarding allocation schemes and drivers of litter decomposition may limit model accuracy. This situation could, however, be relatively easily improved with targeted experimental and field studies. Finally, we identify key gaps in knowledge and recommend them as priorities for future work. These include the patterns of photosynthate partitioning amongst belowground components, ecosystem level effects of individual plant traits

  13. Whole-plant allocation to storage and defense in juveniles of related evergreen and deciduous shrub species.

    PubMed

    Wyka, T P; Karolewski, P; Żytkowiak, R; Chmielarz, P; Oleksyn, J

    2016-05-01

    In evergreen plants, old leaves may contribute photosynthate to initiation of shoot growth in the spring. They might also function as storage sites for carbohydrates and nitrogen (N). We hence hypothesized that whole-plant allocation of carbohydrates and N to storage in stems and roots may be lower in evergreen than in deciduous species. We selected three species pairs consisting of an evergreen and a related deciduous species: Mahonia aquifolium (Pursh) Nutt. and Berberis vulgaris L. (Berberidaceae), Prunus laurocerasus L. and Prunus serotina Ehrh. (Rosaceae), and Viburnum rhytidophyllum Hemsl. and Viburnum lantana L. (Adoxaceae). Seedlings were grown outdoors in pots and harvested on two dates during the growing season for the determination of biomass, carbohydrate and N allocation ratios. Plant size-adjusted pools of nonstructural carbohydrates in stems and roots were lower in the evergreen species of Berberidaceae and Adoxaceae, and the slope of the carbohydrate pool vs plant biomass relationship was lower in the evergreen species of Rosaceae compared with the respective deciduous species, consistent with the leading hypothesis. Pools of N in stems and roots, however, did not vary with leaf habit. In all species, foliage contained more than half of the plant's nonstructural carbohydrate pool and, in late summer, also more than half of the plant's N pool, suggesting that in juvenile individuals of evergreen species, leaves may be a major storage site. Additionally, we hypothesized that concentration of defensive phenolic compounds in leaves should be higher in evergreen than in deciduous species, because the lower carbohydrate pool in stems and roots of the former restricts their capacity for regrowth following herbivory and also because of the need to protect their longer-living foliage. Our results did not support this hypothesis, suggesting that evergreen plants may rely predominantly on structural defenses. In summary, our study indicates that leaf habit has

  14. Forest soil respiration rate and delta13C is regulated by recent above ground weather conditions.

    PubMed

    Ekblad, Alf; Boström, Björn; Holm, Anders; Comstedt, Daniel

    2005-03-01

    Soil respiration, a key component of the global carbon cycle, is a major source of uncertainty when estimating terrestrial carbon budgets at ecosystem and higher levels. Rates of soil and root respiration are assumed to be dependent on soil temperature and soil moisture yet these factors often barely explain half the seasonal variation in soil respiration. We here found that soil moisture (range 16.5-27.6% of dry weight) and soil temperature (range 8-17.5 degrees C) together explained 55% of the variance (cross-validated explained variance; Q2) in soil respiration rate (range 1.0-3.4 micromol C m(-2) s(-1)) in a Norway spruce (Picea abies) forest. We hypothesised that this was due to that the two components of soil respiration, root respiration and decomposition, are governed by different factors. We therefore applied PLS (partial least squares regression) multivariate modelling in which we, together with below ground temperature and soil moisture, used the recent above ground air temperature and air humidity (vapour pressure deficit, VPD) conditions as x-variables. We found that air temperature and VPD data collected 1-4 days before respiration measurements explained 86% of the seasonal variation in the rate of soil respiration. The addition of soil moisture and soil temperature to the PLS-models increased the Q2 to 93%. delta13C analysis of soil respiration supported the hypotheses that there was a fast flux of photosynthates to root respiration and a dependence on recent above ground weather conditions. Taken together, our results suggest that shoot activities the preceding 1-6 days influence, to a large degree, the rate of root and soil respiration. We propose this above ground influence on soil respiration to be proportionally largest in the middle of the growing season and in situations when there is large day-to-day shifts in the above ground weather conditions. During such conditions soil temperature may not exert the major control on root respiration. PMID

  15. Topographic Structure from Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonstad, M. A.; Dietrich, J. T.; Courville, B. C.; Jensen, J.; Carbonneau, P.

    2011-12-01

    The production of high-resolution topographic datasets is of increasing concern and application throughout the geomorphic sciences, and river science is no exception. Consequently, a wide range of topographic measurement methods have evolved. Despite the range of available methods, the production of high resolution, high quality digital elevation models (DEMs) generally requires a significant investment in personnel time, hardware and/or software. However, image-based methods such as digital photogrammetry have steadily been decreasing in costs. Initially developed for the purpose of rapid, inexpensive and easy three dimensional surveys of buildings or small objects, the "structure from motion" photogrammetric approach (SfM) is a purely image based method which could deliver a step-change if transferred to river remote sensing, and requires very little training and is extremely inexpensive. Using the online SfM program Microsoft Photosynth, we have created high-resolution digital elevation models (DEM) of rivers from ordinary photographs produced from a multi-step workflow that takes advantage of free and open source software. This process reconstructs real world scenes from SfM algorithms based on the derived positions of the photographs in three-dimensional space. One of the products of the SfM process is a three-dimensional point cloud of features present in the input photographs. This point cloud can be georeferenced from a small number of ground control points collected via GPS in the field. The georeferenced point cloud can then be used to create a variety of digital elevation model products. Among several study sites, we examine the applicability of SfM in the Pedernales River in Texas (USA), where several hundred images taken from a hand-held helikite are used to produce DEMs of the fluvial topographic environment. This test shows that SfM and low-altitude platforms can produce point clouds with point densities considerably better than airborne LiDAR, with

  16. Effect of Obstructed Translocation on Leaf Abscisic Acid, and Associated Stomatal Closure and Photosynthesis Decline 1

    PubMed Central

    Setter, Tim L.; Brun, William A.; Brenner, Mark L.

    1980-01-01

    Pod removal or petiole girdling, which causes obstruction of translocation, was found in our previous study to cause reduced rates of photosynthesis in soybean leaves due to stomatal closure. The purpose of this research was to determine the involvement of photoassimilate accumulation and leaf abscisic acid (ABA) levels in the mechanism of stomatal closure induced by such treatments. Leaf glucose and sucrose levels increased during the initial 12-hour period after depodding or petiole girdling. Starch, which represents a much larger pool of leaf carbohydrate, was not perceptibly increased above control levels during the 12-hour posttreatment period. When leaflets were exposed to nonphotosynthetic environments (shading or CO2-free air) for a 24-hour period after the translocation-obstructing treatments were applied and then returned to normal light or CO2 concentration, stomatal diffusive conductivity was reduced 65% and 85% with depodding and girdling, respectively. These reductions were comparable to those previously observed without an intervening nonphotosynthetic exposure, thus indicating that photosynthate accumulations were not necessary for the observed response. Free and bound ABA (released on alkaline hydrolysis) were determined by gas liquid chromatography with electron capture detection following preparative high performance liquid chromatography. Free ABA in monitored leaves increased almost 10-fold 48 hours after complete depodding and 25-fold 24 hours after petiole girdling of such leaves. By 3 hours after treatment, in a time course study, free ABA had increased 2-fold above control values in depodded and 5-fold in girdled leaves. Leaf concentrations of bound ABA did not appear to be related to the treatment effects on stomata. Thus, the translocation-obstructing treatments cause an increased level of ABA by a mechanism not involving accumulation of photoassimilate. Increased leaf ABA levels, which were independent of water stress or leaf water

  17. Potassium nutrition and water availability affect phloem transport of photosynthetic carbon in eucalypt trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epron, Daniel; Cabral, Osvaldo; Laclau, Jean-Paul; Dannoura, Masako; Packer, Ana Paula; Plain, Caroline; Battie-Laclau, Patricia; Moreira, Marcelo; Trivelin, Paulo; Bouillet, Jean-Pierre; Gérant, Dominique; Nouvellon, Yann

    2015-04-01

    Potassium fertilisation strongly affects growth and carbon partitioning of eucalypt on tropical soil that are strongly weathered. In addition, potassium fertilization could be of great interest in mitigating the adverse consequences of drought in planted forests, as foliar K concentrations influence osmotic adjustment, stomatal regulation and phloem loading. Phloem is the main pathway for transferring photosynthate from source leaves to sink organs, thus controlling growth partitioning among the different tree compartments. But little is known about the effect of potassium nutrition on phloem transport of photosynthetic carbon and on the interaction between K nutrition and water availability. In situ 13C pulse labelling was conducted on tropical eucalypt trees (Eucalyptus grandis L.) grown in a trial plantation with plots in which 37% of throughfall were excluded (about 500 mm/yr) using home-made transparent gutters (-W) or not (+W) and plots that received 0.45 mol K m-2 applied as KCl three months after planting (+K) or not (-K). Three trees were labelled in each of the four treatments (+K+W, +K-W, -K+W and -K-W). Trees were labelled for one hour by injecting pure 13CO2 in a 27 m3 whole crown chamber. We estimated the velocity of carbon transfer in the trunk by comparing time lags between the uptake of 13CO2 and its recovery in trunk CO2 efflux recorded by off axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy (Los Gatos Research) in two chambers per tree, one just under the crown and one at the base of the trunk. We analyzed the dynamics of the label recovered in the foliage and in the phloem sap by analysing carbon isotope composition of bulk leaf organic matter and phloem extracts using an isotope ratio mass spectrometer. The velocity of carbon transfer in the trunk and the initial rate 13C disappearance from the foliage were much higher in +K trees than in -K trees with no significant effect of rainfall. The volumetric flow of phloem, roughly estimated by multiplying

  18. Allocation of atmospheric CO2 into labile sub-surface carbon pools: a stable isotope labelling approach in a tundra wetland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rüggen, Norman; Knoblauch, Christian; Pfeiffer, Eva-Maria

    2015-04-01

    Greenhouse gas emissions from permafrost-affected wetlands are intensively studied due to their important role in the global carbon cycle. There are concerns of increasing methane and carbon dioxide fluxes from tundra wetlands due to permafrost degradation and hydrology changes in a warming Arctic. Understanding the sub-surface carbon pool interactions will improve the prediction on how trace gas fluxes from these ecosystems will respond to changing environmental conditions. Partitioning the sources of greenhouse gas fluxes will help to evaluate the quantitative role of recently produced plant photosynthates. Furthermore, partitioning allows separating respiration of long-term stored organic matter and freshly produced plant products. This knowledge is crucial for understanding the response of greenhouse gas fluxes in such wetlands to environmental changes. An in situ 13CO2 pulse-labelling experiment has been conducted in the northeast Siberian tundra (Samoylov island, Lena river delta) in August 2013 to quantify interactions among sub-surface carbon pools (DIC, DOC, CH4) in three depths (6, 16 and 36 cm) of the active layer. The experimental site was a low-centred polygon centre in a polygonal tundra landscape, with a sedge-moss (Carex-Scorpidium) plant association. The water table was at the soils' surface and the permafrost table in a depth of 50 cm. After the system has been 13CO2 pulse labelled, all three studied subsurface carbon pools (CH4, DIC and DOC) were clearly 13C-enriched, which accounts for atmospheric C incorporated into these pools. One day after the labelling, in 6 cm depth 1.5 percent of DIC and 0.1 percent of CH4were replaced by label C, which then steadily declined over a ten days period. The label C content of DOC increased gradually over the same period. In 16 cm depth, the label C increased gradually after labelling in both DIC and CH4. Label C was found in DIC and CH4 even in a depth of 36 cm, although in less pronounced concentrations

  19. In situ 13CO2 pulse labelling of field-grown eucalypt trees revealed the effects of potassium nutrition and throughfall exclusion on phloem transport of photosynthetic carbon.

    PubMed

    Epron, Daniel; Cabral, Osvaldo Machado Rodrigues; Laclau, Jean-Paul; Dannoura, Masako; Packer, Ana Paula; Plain, Caroline; Battie-Laclau, Patricia; Moreira, Marcelo Zacharias; Trivelin, Paulo Cesar Ocheuze; Bouillet, Jean-Pierre; Gérant, Dominique; Nouvellon, Yann

    2016-01-01

    Potassium (K) is an important limiting factor of tree growth, but little is known of the effects of K supply on the long-distance transport of photosynthetic carbon (C) in the phloem and of the interaction between K fertilization and drought. We pulse-labelled 2-year-old Eucalyptus grandis L. trees grown in a field trial combining K fertilization (+K and -K) and throughfall exclusion (+W and -W), and we estimated the velocity of C transfer by comparing time lags between the uptake of (13)CO2 and its recovery in trunk CO2 efflux recorded at different heights. We also analysed the dynamics of the labelled photosynthates recovered in the foliage and in the phloem sap (inner bark extract). The mean residence time of labelled C in the foliage was short (21-31 h). The time series of (13)C in excess in the foliage was affected by the level of fertilization, whereas the effect of throughfall exclusion was not significant. The velocity of C transfer in the trunk (0.20-0.82 m h(-1)) was twice as high in +K trees than in -K trees, with no significant effect of throughfall exclusion except for one +K -W tree labelled in the middle of the drought season that was exposed to a more pronounced water stress (midday leaf water potential of -2.2 MPa). Our results suggest that besides reductions in photosynthetic C supply and in C demand by sink organs, the lower velocity under K deficiency is due to a lower cross-sectional area of the sieve tubes, whereas an increase in phloem sap viscosity is more likely limiting phloem transport under drought. In all treatments, 10 times less (13)C was recovered in inner bark extracts at the bottom of the trunk when compared with the base of the crown, suggesting that a large part of the labelled assimilates has been exported out of the phloem and replaced by unlabelled C. This supports the 'leakage-retrieval mechanism' that may play a role in maintaining the pressure gradient between source and sink organs required to sustain high

  20. Functional feedbacks by dwarf mistletoe of pine into global climate change in a Yellowstone forest ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cullings, K.; Hanely, J.

    2009-12-01

    Dwarf mistletoe is a defoliating, carbon-sink pathogen that significantly affects host physiology, and nutrient and water relations. This pathogen is forecast to increase in range and severity in response to global climate change due to effects on host tree physiology. Via impacts on host tree photosynthetic capacity, dwarf mistletoe could directly influence soil processes that that are responsible for the release one of the world’s greatest sources of atmospheric CO2. Despite the obvious ramifications for global climate change (GCC) and potential for feedbacks into the process, no studies have been put forth measuring effects on terrestrial ecology and carbon relations. In this study we investigated effects of dwarf mistletoe infection of pines in Yellowstone on soil fungal species and functional diversity, activities of soil enzymes actively involved in woody breakdown (hence having direct impact on carbon sequestration), and soil CO2 efflux. Despite the wealth of knowledge regarding primary effects of dwarf mistletoe on host physiological process, there is virtually no information regarding secondary effects, for example on the organisms that rely upon host photosynthate, and that in turn play pivotal roles in carbon cycling and terrestrial ecology. In this study we provide the first look at these impacts. Results: 1) direct genetic tests indicate significant decreases in soil fungal species diversity and richness; 2) culture-based methods (Fungilogs) indicate a significant increase in the number of carbon substrates utilized by soil fungi (see table); 3) direct measures of soil enzyme activity indicate significant increases in woody substrate breakdown (see table); 4) direct in situ measures of soil CO2 efflux indicate a doubling of CO2 flux from soils (P<0.02) in infected blocks. Together, these results indicate that there are tertiary and quaternary-level feedbacks into the GCC process that result from primary and secondary effects on disease distribution

  1. Influence of plant productivity over variability of soil respiration: a multi-scale approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curiel Yuste, J.

    2009-04-01

    To investigate the role of plant photosynthetic activity on the variations in soil respiration (SR), SR data obtained from manual sampling and automatic soil respiration chambers placed on eddy flux towers sites were used. Plant photosynthetic activity was represented as Gross Primary Production (GPP), calculated from the half hourly continuous measurements of Net Ecosystem Exchange (NEE). The role of plant photosynthetic activity over the variation in SR was investigated at different time-scales: data averaged hourly, daily and weekly were used to study the photosynthetic effect on SR dial variations (Hourly data), 15 days variations (Daily averages), monthly variations (daily and weekly averages) and seasonal variations (weekly data). Our results confirm the important role of plant photosynthetic activity on the variations of SR at each of the mentioned time-scales. The effect of photosynthetic activity on SR was high on hourly time-scale (dial variations of SR). At half of the studied ecosystems GPP was the best single predictor of dial variations of SR. However at most of the studied sites the combination of soil temperature and GPP was the best predictor of dial variations in SR. The effect of aboveground productivity over dial variations of SR lagged on the range of 5 to 15 hours, depending on the ecosystem. At daily to monthly time scale variations of SR were in general better explained with the combination of temperature and moisture variations. However, ‘jumps' in average weekly SR during the growing season yielded anomaly high values of Q10, in some cases above 1000, which probably reflects synoptic changes in photosynthates translocation from plant activity. Finally, although seasonal changes of SR were in general very well explained by temperature and soil moisture, seasonality of SR was better correlated to seasonality of GPP than to seasonality of soil temperature and/or soil moisture. Therefore the magnitude of the seasonal variation in SR was in

  2. Seasonal variations in bulk tissue, fatty acid and monosaccharide delta(13)C values of leaves from mesotrophic grassland plant communities under different grazing managements.

    PubMed

    Dungait, Jennifer A J; Docherty, Gordon; Straker, Vanessa; Evershed, Richard P

    2010-03-01

    lower than those of bulk leaf tissues; average values of -37.4 per thousand (C(16:0)), -37.0 per thousand (C(18:2)) and -36.5 per thousand (C(18:3)) were determined. There was significant interspecific variation in the delta(13)C values of all individual fatty acids during October and July, but only for C(18:2) in May (P=<0.05). This indicated that seasonal trends observed in the delta(13)C values of individual fatty acids were inherited from the isotopic composition of primary photosynthate. However, although wide diversity in delta(13)C values of grassland plants ascribed to grazing management, interspecific and spatiotemporal influences was revealed, significant trends (P=<0.0001) for fatty acid and monosaccharide delta(13)C values: delta(13)C(16:0)delta(13)C(xylose)>delta(13)C(glucose)>delta(13)C(galactose), respectively, previously described, appear consistent across a wide range of species at different times of the year in fields under different grazing regimes. PMID:20079504

  3. Visualizing carbon and nitrogen transfer in the tripartite symbiosis of Fagus sylvatica, ectomycorrhizal fungi and soil microorganisms using NanoSIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayerhofer, Werner; Dietrich, Marlies; Schintlmeister, Arno; Gabriel, Raphael; Gorka, Stefan; Wiesenbauer, Julia; Martin, Victoria; Schweiger, Peter; Reipert, Siegfried; Weidinger, Marieluise; Richter, Andreas; Woebken, Dagmar; Kaiser, Christina

    2016-04-01

    Translocation of recently photoassimilated plant carbon (C) into soil via root exudates or mycorrhizal fungi is key to understand global carbon cycling. Plants support symbiotic fungi and soil microorganisms with recent photosynthates to get access to essential elements, such as nitrogen (N) and phosphorus. While a 'reciprocal reward strategy' (plants trade C in exchange for nutrients from the fungus) has been shown for certain types of mycorrhizal associations, only little is known about the mechanisms of C and N exchange between mycorrhizal fungal hyphae and soil bacteria. Our understanding of the underlying mechanisms is hampered by the fact that C and N transfer between plants, mycorrhizal fungi and soil bacteria takes place at the micrometer scale, which makes it difficult to explore at the macro scale. In this project we intended to analyse carbon and nitrogen flows between roots of beech trees (Fagus sylvatica), their associated ectomycorrhizal fungi and bacterial community. In order to visualize this nutrient flow at a single cell level, we used a stable isotope double labelling (13C and 15N) approach. Young mycorrhizal beech trees were transferred from a forest to split-root boxes, consisting of two compartments separated by a membrane (35 μm mesh size) which was penetrable for hyphae but not for plant roots. After trees and mycorrhizal fungi were allowed to grow for one year in these boxes, 15N-labelled nitrogen solution was added only to the root-free compartment to allow labelled nitrogen supply only through the fungal network. 13C- labelled carbon was applied by exposing the plants to a 13CO2 gas atmosphere for 8 hours. Spatial distribution of the isotopic label was visualised at the microscale in cross sections of mycorrhizal root-tips (the plant/mycorrhizal fungi interface) and within and on the surface of external mycorrhizal hyphae (the fungi/soil bacteria interface) using nanoscale secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS). Corresponding

  4. Estimating national forest carbon stocks and dynamics: combining models and remotely sensed information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smallman, Luke; Williams, Mathew

    2016-04-01

    expectations. Moreover, the retrieved LCA is positively correlated with leaf-life span and negatively correlated with allocation of photosynthate to foliage, supported by field observations. This emergence of key plant traits and correlations between traits increases our confidence in the robustness of this analysis. Furthermore, this framework also allows us to search for additional emergent properties from the analysis such as spatial variation of retrieved drought tolerance. Finally our analysis is able to identify components of the carbon cycle with the largest uncertainty providing targets for future observations (e.g. remotely sensed biomass). Our Bayesian analysis system is ideally suited for assimilation of multiple biomass estimates and their associated uncertainties to reduce both uncertainty in the state of the system but also process parameters (e.g. wood residence time).

  5. Variation in the concentration and age of nonstructural carbon stored in different tree tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Andrew; Carbone, Mariah; Huggett, Brett; Furze, Morgan; Czimczik, Claudia I.; Xu, Xiaomei

    2014-05-01

    depth profile. In oak, fine root concentrations of sugar and starch were similar (40 mg/g), and coarse roots had very high concentrations of starch (140 mg/g) compared to sugar (50 mg/g). In pine, fine root concentrations of both sugar and starch (60 mg/g) were higher than in coarse roots (10 mg/g). Coarse root NSC concentrations did not vary substantially along a radial gradient into the root. Even assuming a 1:5 root:shoot ratio, these data indicate that a large portion of the whole-tree NSC budget is stored belowground. For both sugars and starch, the 14C data indicated substantial mixing of new and older carbon across the youngest stemwood rings (up to 5 y), beyond which NSC age increased linearly with ring age. Coarse root NSC age also increased with radial depth and wood tissue age, and root NSC was consistently younger in pine than oak. The fact that NSC age is not constant with radial depth in the aboveground samples demonstrates that NSC reserves cannot be treated as a single, well-mixed pool. Rather, these results are consistent with previous observation suggesting last-in/first-out dynamics. From a modeling standpoint, these results support a simple two-pool structure where new photosynthate not used for current growth or metabolism enters a well-mixed and young "fast" pool, but over time storage in older rings is transferred to a distinct and older "slow" pool with which mixing no longer occurs.

  6. Autotrophic and Heterotrophic Controls over Winter Soil Carbon Cycling in a Subalpine Forest Ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monson, R. K.; Scott-Denton, L. E.; Lipson, D. A.; Weintrub, M. N.; Rosenstiel, T. N.; Schmidt, S. K.; Williams, M. W.; Burns, S. P.; Delany, A. E.; Turnipseed, A. A.

    2005-12-01

    Studies were conducted at the Niwot Ridge Ameriflux site to understand wintertime soil carbon cycling and its control over ecosystem respiration. Wintertime respiration in this ecosystem results in the loss of 60-90% of the carbon assimilated the previous growing season. Thus, an understanding of the controls over winter carbon cycling is required to understand controls over the annual carbon budget. Trees were girdled to prevent the transport of photosynthates to the rhizosphere. In plots with non-girdled trees a large mid-winter pulse of sucrose was observed to enter the soil. In plots with girdled trees, no sucrose pulse was observed. Trees of this ecosystem are not photosynthetically active during the winter, leading us to conclude that the sucrose pulse is due to the death of fine roots that had accumulated sucrose the previous autumn. The sucrose pulse is potentially utilized by a novel winter community of microbes. Using DNA fingerprinting we discovered that the dominant isolates from the winter soils were from Jathinobacter, whereas the summer isolates were from Burkholderia. The winter community was capable of high rates of respiration and exponential growth at low temperatures, whereas the summer community was not. Our winter observations also indicated high activity of N-acetyl-C-glucosaminidase, one of the principal enzymes involved in chitin degradation. The presence of such high chitinase activities implicates decomposing fungal biomass as a principle source of CO2 beneath the snow pack. Using a novel in situ, beneath-snow CO2 measurement system, we observed unprecedented Q10 values for winter respiration, being 98 and 8.44 x 104 for the soil next to tree boles or within the open spaces between trees, respectively. These high Q10 values are likely the result of fractional changes in the availability of liquid water below 0°C and responses of microbial biomass to changes in the liquid water fraction. Using six-years of eddy covariance data, we showed

  7. Dynamique spatio-temporelle de la forêt tropicale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chave, J.

    Spatio-temporal dynamics of the tropical rain forest Mechanisms which drive the dynamics of forest ecosystems are complex, from seedling establishment to pollination, and seed dispersal by animals, running water or wind. These processes are more complex when the ecosystem shelters a large number of species and of vegetative forms, as it is the case in the tropical rainforest. To take them into account, we must develop and use models. I present a review of the fundamental mechanisms for the of a natural forest dynamics — photosynthesis, tree growth, recruitment and mortality — as well as a description of the past and of the present of tropical rainforests. This information is used to develop a spatially-explicit and individual-based forest model. Simplified models are deduced from it, and they serve to address more specific issues, such as the resilience of the forest to climate disturbances, or savanna-forest dynamics. The last topic is related to the spatio-temporal description of tropical plant biodiversity. A detailed introduction to the problem is provided, and models accounting for the maintenance of diversity are compared. These models include non spatial as well a spatial approaches (branching anihilating random walks and voter model with mutation). Les mécanismes régissant la dynamique des écosystèmes forestiers sont complexes, de l'établissement des plantules à la pollinisation et la dispersion des graines, transportées par les animaux, l'eau ou le vent. Ces processus sont d'autant plus divers que l'écosystème abrite un large nombre d'espèces et de formes végétatives, comme c'est le cas dans les forêts tropicales humides. Leur prise en compte et la compréhension de leur importance relative doit passer par la définition de modèles. Je présente une revue des différents mécanismes fondamentaux dans la dynamique d'une forêt—photosynthèse, croissance des arbres, reproduction, mortalité—ainsi qu'une description du passé et de l

  8. Use of Rhizosphere Metabolomics to Investigate Exudation of Phenolics by Arabidopsis Roots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yong Jian; Rai, Amit; Reuben, Sheela; Nesati, Victor; Almeida, Reinaldo; Swarup, Sanjay

    2013-04-01

    The rhizosphere is a specialised micro-niche for bacteria that have an active exchange of signals and nutrients with the host plant. Nearly 20% of photosynthates are released as root exudates, which consist of primary metabolites and products of secondary metabolism which are largely phenolic in nature. Previously, using rhizosphere metabolomics, we showed that nearly 50% of organic carbon in the exudates is in the form of phenolic compounds, of which the largest fraction is from the phenylpropanoid synthesis pathway. Using Arabidopsis as a model, we have demonstrated that a biased rhizosphere can be created using plants with varying levels of phenylpropanoids due to mutations in the biosynthetic or regulatory genes. These phenylpropanoids levels are reflected in the exudates, and exudates from lines with regulatory gene mutations, tt8 and ttg, have higher levels of phenylpropanoids, whereas biosynthetic mutant line, tt4, has very low and undetectable levels of phenylpropanoids. The biased rhizosphere of tt8 and ttg lines provides a nutritional advantage to rhizobacteria that can utilize these phenylpropanoids such as quercetin. With such a strategy to increase the competitiveness of plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) such as Pseudomonas putida, this system can be applied to improve plant performance. In order to better understand the metabolic basis of the nutritional advantage behind the competitiveness of the favoured P. putida, we elucidated its quercetin utilization pathway. We have recently cloned the gene for quercetin oxidoreductase (QuoA) and expressed it in transgenic Arabidopsis lines to alter the plant phenylpropanoid metabolism, using a gain of function approach. Since phenylpropanoid biosynthesis in plants involve formation of quercetin from naringenin, we envisaged that QuoA expression in plants will provide us with a genetic tool to "reverse" this biosynthetic step. This perturbation led to a decrease in flavonoids and an increase in lignin

  9. A millennial hydrogen isotope chronology from tree-ring cellulose contradicts the mechanistic model describing the incorporation of stable water isotopes into cellulose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hangartner, Sarah; Kress, Anne; Saurer, Matthias; Leuenberger, Markus

    2010-05-01

    In the present study we investigated deuterium (δD) isotopes on a millennial larch (Larix decidua) tree-ring chronology from alpine sites in Valais, Switzerland. Cellulose in annual tree rings is formed from atmospheric CO2 and soil water which is eventually derived from meteoric water. Due to fractionation processes in the atmosphere, meteoric water contains a temperature signal. Climate induced signals such as the isotopic composition of cellulose is stored in annual increments of trees: source water is assimilated by the roots without any isotopic fractionation and further on transported to the leafs where isotopic ratios of the leaf water are changed by evapotranspirative enrichment and further biochemical fractionations. Finally, cellulose is synthesized from photosynthates and medium water. δD and stable oxygen isotopes (δ18O) in tree-ring cellulose are therefore expected to reflect ancient humidity and temperature in annual resolution. We applied a conventional isotope ratio mass spectrometry technique to analyse δD in α-cellulose (Filot, 2006). The investigated δD series cover the period 1000-2004 AD in three cohorts (each consisting of five trees) with a 50-year gap around 1200 AD. This required the development of methods to merge these tree-ring isotope series to assess the common signal within the different cohorts. A comparison of the δD series with the corresponding δ18O chronology revealed a common variance of around 20% in the different cohorts, which is lower than expected from the mechanistic model (Roden, 2000) - the model assumes similar pathways and fractionation processes of δD and δ18O from source water uptake to cellulose synthesis. Assessing the sensitivity of δD to changing climate variables leads to conflicting results: while temperature, sunshine duration and precipitation signals in δ18O are clearly visible, climate signals in δD are hardly detectable. Note that isotopic signals in tree-ring cellulose are not controlled by

  10. Why Seedlings Die: Linking Carbon and Water Limitations to Mechanisms of Mortality During Establishment in Conifer Seedlings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinhardt, K.; Germino, M. J.; Kueppers, L. M.; Mitton, J.; Castanha, C.

    2012-12-01

    BACKGROUND Recent ecophysiological studies aimed at explaining adult tree mortality during drought have examined the carbon (C)-exhaustion compared to the hydraulic-failure hypotheses for death. Prolonged drought leads to durations of stomatal closure (and thus limited C gain), which could result in long periods of negative C balance and fatal reductions in whole-plant C reserves (i.e., available non-structural carbohydrates ["NSC"]). Alternatively, C reserves may not decrease much but could become increasingly inaccessible to sink tissues in long dry-periods due to impediments to translocation of photosynthate (e.g., through disruption of hydrostatic pressure flow in phloem). As C reserves decline or become inaccessible, continued maintenance respiration has been hypothesized to lead to exhaustion of NSC after extended durations of drought, especially in isohydric plant species. On the other hand, hydraulic failure (e.g., catastrophic xylem embolisms) during drought may be the proximate cause of death, occurring before true C starvation occurs. Few studies have investigated specifically the mechanism(s) of tree death, and no published studies that we know of have quantified changes in NSC during mortality. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN AND HYPOTHESES We conducted two studies that investigated whole-tree and tissue-specific C relations (photosynthetic C gain, respiration, dry-mass gain, and NSC pools) in Pinus flexilis seedlings during the initial establishment phase, which is characterized by progressive drought during summer. We measured survival, growth and biomass allocation, and C-balance physiology (photosynthetic C-gain and chlorophyll fluorescence, respiration C-use, and NSC concentrations) from germination to mortality. We hypothesized that 1) stomatal and biochemical limitations to C gain would constrain seedling survival (through inadequate seasonal C-balance), as has been shown for conifer seedlings near alpine treeline; 2) hydraulic constraints (embolisms and

  11. Carbon Isotopes and the Diverging Growth Response of Treeline Trees to Changing Climate in Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barber, V. A.; Wilmking, M.; Juday, G. P.

    2007-12-01

    ) trees in the Alaska Range at a site which contains all three responder types. Ring width was measured to confirm to which responder type each tree belongs. Carbon-13 isotopic content of the annual wood of the rings of these 3 response types (for the past 100 years) is being measured to determine if drought stress can explain the differences. Results are still in the preliminary stage but show promise. The premise is that stomatal conductance is reduced under low moisture conditions as leaf pores shut down to conserve water, resulting in a more limited pool of intercellular carbon dioxide for photosynthesis. The hypothesis is that the resulting photosynthate should therefore be heavier as less discrimination of heavier carbon-13 occurs, resulting in a higher ratio of 13C/12C (del13C) incorporated into the wood. While the stomates are open, the energetically more efficient carbon-12 is preferentially incorporated and this ratio is lower. We hope to begin to identify the processes controlling treeline growth, as no intra-site differences (soil moisture and temperature, depth of the A horizon, tree density, slope, aspect, elevation) were documented on any scale which could explain the 3 different growth responses. Isotopes could provide some of the answers.

  12. Detecting plant-climate interactions over decades-millennia using NMR isotopomer analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehlers, Ina; Augusti, Angela; Köhler, Iris; Wieloch, Thomas; Zuidema, Pieter; Robertson, Iain; Nilsson, Mats; Marshall, John; Schleucher, Jürgen

    2016-04-01

    Increasing CO2 and climate change affect photosynthesis, which creates a critical influence on the global C cycle and on the future productivity of crops and forests. Manipulative experiments (e.g. FACE) impose step increases in [CO2], and are limited to few locations and to time spans of years, while responses over decades and centuries are critical for Earth system models. To overcome these limitations, we have developed a new method - isotopomer analysis - that allows deducing plant C metabolism by analysis of primary plant photosynthates (Ehlers et al., PNAS 2015, 15585) or tree rings. We apply the method to material from manipulation (CO2, T) experiments, and to remnant - including subfossil - plant material. Thus, metabolic responses can be identified in FACE experiments, and it can be tested to what degree these responses are maintained during gradual environmental changes over decades-millennia. Isotopomer proxies developed using FACE experiments can then be used to reconstruct physiological and climatic changes by retrospective analysis, thus bridging a gap between experimental plant sciences and paleo research. In experiments on annual plants, we have found that specific deuterium isotopomers in photosynthetic glucose reflect the ratio of oxygenation to carboxylation at Rubisco, a central metabolic branching that is the origin of the photorespiration flux in all C3 plants. We found that increasing atmospheric [CO2] over the 20th century has reduced the photorespiration / photosynthesis ratio in all investigated C3 species, with no evidence for acclimatory reactions by the plants. Results on the peat moss Spagnum fuscum suggest a mechanism for increasing peat accumulation rates, a major global C sink. For 12 tree species from five continents, we observe that the CO2 increase since industrialization has reduced the photorespiration / photosynthesis ratio. However, the observed reduction is ca. 50 % smaller than expected from CO2 manipulation experiments

  13. Genomic reduction and evolution of novel genetic membranes and protein-targeting machinery in eukaryote-eukaryote chimaeras (meta-algae).

    PubMed Central

    Cavalier-Smith, T

    2003-01-01

    Chloroplasts originated just once, from cyanobacteria enslaved by a biciliate protozoan to form the plant kingdom (green plants, red and glaucophyte algae), but subsequently, were laterally transferred to other lineages to form eukaryote-eukaryote chimaeras or meta-algae. This process of secondary symbiogenesis (permanent merger of two phylogenetically distinct eukaryote cells) has left remarkable traces of its evolutionary role in the more complex topology of the membranes surrounding all non-plant (meta-algal) chloroplasts. It took place twice, soon after green and red algae diverged over 550 Myr ago to form two independent major branches of the eukaryotic tree (chromalveolates and cabozoa), comprising both meta-algae and numerous secondarily non-photosynthetic lineages. In both cases, enslavement probably began by evolving a novel targeting of endomembrane vesicles to the perialgal vacuole to implant host porter proteins for extracting photosynthate. Chromalveolates arose by such enslavement of a unicellular red alga and evolution of chlorophyll c to form the kingdom Chromista and protozoan infrakingdom Alveolata, which diverged from the ancestral chromalveolate chimaera. Cabozoa arose when the common ancestor of euglenoids and cercozoan chlorarachnean algae enslaved a tetraphyte green alga with chlorophyll a and b. I suggest that in cabozoa the endomembrane vesicles originally budded from the Golgi, whereas in chromalveolates they budded from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) independently of Golgi-targeted vesicles, presenting a potentially novel target for drugs against alveolate Sporozoa such as malaria parasites and Toxoplasma. These hypothetical ER-derived vesicles mediated fusion of the perialgal vacuole and rough ER (RER) in the ancestral chromist, placing the former red alga within the RER lumen. Subsequently, this chimaera diverged to form cryptomonads, which retained the red algal nucleus as a nucleomorph (NM) with approximately 464 protein-coding genes

  14. Diurnal and Seasonal Variation in the Carbon Isotope Composition of Leaf- and Root- respired CO2 in C3 and C4 Species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, W.; Resco, V.; Chen, S.; Williams, D. G.

    2008-12-01

    The carbon isotope signature of leaf (δ13Cl) and root (δ13Cr) dark- respired CO2 records and integrates short-term metabolic changes. Plants with C3 and C4 photosynthetic metabolism are expected to differ in diurnal and seasonal patterns in δ13Cl and δ13Cr because of differences in photorespiration, isotopic fractionation at metabolic branch points and allocation patterns. A thorough understanding of the environmental and metabolic controls on δ13Cl and δ13Cr is necessary to interpret the δ13C of ecosystem respired CO2 and partition the CO2 efflux into autotrophic and heterotrophic respiration sources. We measured δ13Cl in two C3 tree species (Prosopis velutina and Celtis reticulata), a C3 herb (Viguiera dentata) and a C4 grass (Sporobolus wrightii), and δ13Cr in P. velutina and S. wrightii in a semiarid savanna in southeastern Arizona, USA. δ13Cl during the dry pre-monsoon period was relatively enriched in 13C during daytime periods and became depleted in 13C at night relative to daytime values for all species with the exception of S. wrightii, the C4 grass. δ13Cl in S. wrightii was strongly influenced by seasonal differences in water availability with a larger diurnal amplitude in δ13Cl (8.2 +/- 0.6‰) during the wet monsoon period compared to that in the dry pre-monsoon period (4.4 +/- 0.4‰). The δ13C values of starch and lipid fractions remained constant over diurnal periods within the pre-monsoon and monsoon seasons. For C3 species, δ13Cl and δ13C of the cumulative, flux-weighted photosynthate pool estimated from gas exchange were strongly positively correlated, suggesting that progressive 13C-enrichment of leaf-respired CO2 during the daytime period resulted from changes in the δ13C signature of respiratory substrates associated with short-term changes in photosynthetic 13C discrimination. Rapid decreases in δ13Cl following the daytime period was likely caused by decreases in the ratio of PDH:acetyl-CoA oxidation rather than by a shift in

  15. Changes in Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungal Abundance and Community Structure in Response to the Long-Term Manipulation of Inorganic Nutrients in a Lowland Tropical Forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheldrake, Merlin; Rosenstock, Nicholas; Tanner, Ed

    2014-05-01

    The arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis is considered primarily mutualistic. In exchange for up to 30% of plants' total photosynthate, AM provide improved access to mineral nutrients. While there is evidence that AM fungi provide nitrogen, potassium and other nutrients to their host plants, most research has focused on their effect on plant phosphorus uptake. Pot experiments have shown, and field experiments have provided further support, that nutrient availability (primarily P, but also N) is inversely correlated with mycorrhizal colonization, indicating plant control over carbon losses to AM fungi. Yet pot experiments have also shown that some fungal species are more mutualistic than others and that AM colonization may cause decreased plant growth, suggesting that plant control is not absolute. AMF communities are diverse, and it is poorly understood how factors such as adaptation to local soil environment, fungal-plant compatibility, and plant nutrient status combine to shape AMF community structure. We conducted a study to examine the relative effects of N, P, and K addition on the AMF community in a plant species rich tropical forest, given the long-held belief that AMF are primarily involved in plant P uptake, particularly on weathered tropical soils. Our study site is the Barro Colorado Nature Monument in Panama. It is a 13 year-old factorial N, P, and K addition experiment (40 m x 40m plots; n=4) in an AMF dominated, old (>200 yr), secondary, tropical forest. Previous research has shown co-limitation by N, P, and K, but the strongest plant growth responses were obtained with K additions. We analyzed the AMF community using 454 pyrosequencing of the ribosomal small subunit (SSU) on both soils and the roots of the 6 dominant AMF tree species. Additionally, we used the AMF-specific neutral lipid fatty acid (NLFA) biomarker as a measure of AMF biomass. Both AMF biomass and community structure were altered by nutrient additions. AMF biomass in soil was reduced

  16. Soluble ferric iron as an effective protective agent against UV radiation: Implications for early life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez, Felipe; Aguilera, Angeles; Amils, Ricardo

    2007-11-01

    Some recent MER Rover Opportunity results on ancient sedimentary rocks from Mars describe sandstones originated from the chemical weathering of olivine basalts by acidic waters [Squyres, S.W., Knoll, A.H., 2005. Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 240, 1-10]. The absence of protective components in early Mars atmosphere forced any possible primordial life forms to deal with high doses of UV radiation. A similar situation occurred on the primitive Earth during the development of early life in the Archean [Berkner, L.V., Marshall, L.C., 1965. J. Atmos. Sci. 22 (3), 225-261; Kasting, J.F., 1993. Science 259, 920-926]. It is known that some cellular and/or external components can shield organisms from damaging UV radiation or quench its toxic effects [Olson, J.M., Pierson, B.K., 1986. Photosynth. Res. 9, 251-259; García-Pichel, F., 1998. Origins Life Evol. B 28, 321-347; Cockell, C., Rettberg, P., Horneck, G., Scherer, K., Stokes, M.D., 2003. Polar Biol. 26, 62-69]. The effectiveness of iron minerals for UV protection has also been reported [Phoenix, V.R., Konhauser, K.O., Adams, D.G., Bottrell, S.H., 2001. Geology 29 (9), 823-826], but nothing is known about the effect of iron in solution. Here we demonstrate the protective effect of soluble ferric iron against UV radiation on acidophilic photosynthetic microorganisms. These results offer an interesting alternative means of protection for life on the surface of early Mars and Earth, especially in light of the geochemical conditions in which the sedimentary minerals, jarosite and goethite, recently reported by the MER missions, were formed [Squyres, S.W., Arvidson, R.E., Bell III, J.F., Brückner, J., Cabrol, N.A., Calvin, W., Carr, M.H., Christensen, P.R., Clark, B.C., Crumpler, L., Des Marais, D.J., d'Uston, C., Economou, T., Farmer, J., Farrand, W., Folkner, W., Golombek, M., Gorevan, S., Grant, J.A., Greeley, R., Grotzinger, J., Haskin, L., Herkenhoff, K.E., Hviid, S., Johnson, J., Klingelhöfer, G., Knoll, A.H., Landis, G