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Sample records for photosynthetic acclimation response

  1. Photosynthetic acclimation responses of maize seedlings grown under artificial laboratory light gradients mimicking natural canopy conditions.

    PubMed

    Hirth, Matthias; Dietzel, Lars; Steiner, Sebastian; Ludwig, Robert; Weidenbach, Hannah; And, Jeannette Pfalz; Pfannschmidt, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    In this study we assessed the ability of the C4 plant maize to perform long-term photosynthetic acclimation in an artificial light quality system previously used for analyzing short-term and long-term acclimation responses (LTR) in C3 plants. We aimed to test if this light system could be used as a tool for analyzing redox-regulated acclimation processes in maize seedlings. Photosynthetic parameters obtained from maize samples harvested in the field were used as control. The results indicated that field grown maize performed a pronounced LTR with significant differences between the top and the bottom levels of the plant stand corresponding to the strong light gradients occurring in it. We compared these data to results obtained from maize seedlings grown under artificial light sources preferentially exciting either photosystem II or photosystem I. In C3 plants, this light system induces redox signals within the photosynthetic electron transport chain which trigger state transitions and differential phosphorylation of LHCII (light harvesting complexes of photosystem II). The LTR to these redox signals induces changes in the accumulation of plastid psaA transcripts, in chlorophyll (Chl) fluorescence values F \\rm s/F \\rm m, in Chl a/b ratios and in transient starch accumulation in C3 plants. Maize seedlings grown in this light system exhibited a pronounced ability to perform both short-term and long-term acclimation at the level of psaA transcripts, Chl fluorescence values F \\rm s/F \\rm m and Chl a/b ratios. Interestingly, maize seedlings did not exhibit redox-controlled variations of starch accumulation probably because of its specific differences in energy metabolism. In summary, the artificial laboratory light system was found to be well-suited to mimic field light conditions and provides a physiological tool for studying the molecular regulation of the LTR of maize in more detail.

  2. UVR8 mediated plant protective responses under low UV-B radiation leading to photosynthetic acclimation.

    PubMed

    Singh, Suruchi; Agrawal, S B; Agrawal, Madhoolika

    2014-08-01

    The UV-B photoreceptor UVR8 regulates the expression of several genes leading to acclimation responses in plants. Direct role of UVR8 in maintaining the photosynthesis is not defined but it is known to increase the expression of some chloroplastic proteins like SIG5 and ELIP. It provides indirect protection to photosynthesis by regulating the synthesis of secondary metabolites and photomorphogenesis. Signaling cascades controlled by UVR8 mediate many protective responses thus promotes plant acclimation against stress and secures its survival.

  3. Inter and intra-specific variation in photosynthetic acclimation response to long term exposure of elevated carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkinson, M. |

    1996-08-01

    The response of intra and interspecific variation in photosynthetic acclimation to growth at elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration (600{micro}mol mol-l) in six important grassland species was investigated. Plants were grown in a background sward of Lolium perenne and measurements were made after four years of growth at elevated C{sub a}. Elevated CO{sub 2} was maintained using a FACE (Free-Air Carbon Enrichment) system. Significant intra and interspecific variation in acclimation response was demonstrated. The response of adaxial and abaxial stomatal conductance to elevated CO{sub 2} was also investigated. The stomatal conductance of both the adaxial and abaxial leaf surfaces was found to be reduced by elevated C{sub a}. Significant asymmetric responses in stomatal conductance was demonstrated in D. glomerata and T. pratense. Analysis of stomatal indices and densities indicated that the observed reductions in stomatal conductance were probably the result of changes in stomatal aperture.

  4. Molecular and photosynthetic responses to prolonged darkness and subsequent acclimation to re-illumination in the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum.

    PubMed

    Nymark, Marianne; Valle, Kristin C; Hancke, Kasper; Winge, Per; Andresen, Kjersti; Johnsen, Geir; Bones, Atle M; Brembu, Tore

    2013-01-01

    Photosynthetic diatoms that live suspended throughout the water column will constantly be swept up and down by vertical mixing. When returned to the photic zone after experiencing longer periods in darkness, mechanisms exist that enable the diatoms both to survive sudden light exposure and immediately utilize the available energy in photosynthesis and growth. We have investigated both the response to prolonged darkness and the re-acclimation to moderate intensity white irradiance (E = 100 µmol m(-2) s(-1)) in the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum, using an integrated approach involving global transcriptional profiling, pigment analyses, imaging and photo-physiological measurements. The responses were studied during continuous white light, after 48 h of dark treatment and after 0.5 h, 6 h, and 24 h of re-exposure to the initial irradiance. The analyses resulted in several intriguing findings. Dark treatment of the cells led to 1) significantly decreased nuclear transcriptional activity, 2) distinct intracellular changes, 3) fixed ratios of the light-harvesting pigments despite a decrease in the total cell pigment pool, and 4) only a minor drop in photosynthetic efficiency (Φ(PSII_max)). Re-introduction of the cells to the initial light conditions revealed 5) distinct expression profiles for nuclear genes involved in photosynthesis and those involved in photoprotection, 6) rapid rise in photosynthetic parameters (α and rETR(max)) within 0.5 h of re-exposure to light despite a very modest de novo synthesis of photosynthetic compounds, and 7) increasingly efficient resonance energy transfer from fucoxanthin chlorophyll a/c-binding protein complexes to photosystem II reaction centers during the first 0.5 h, supporting the observations stated in 6). In summary, the results show that despite extensive transcriptional, metabolic and intracellular changes, the ability of cells to perform photosynthesis was kept intact during the length of the experiment. We conclude

  5. Biophysical consequences of photosynthetic temperature acclimation for climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Nicholas G.; Lombardozzi, Danica; Tawfik, Ahmed; Bonan, Gordon; Dukes, Jeffrey S.

    2017-03-01

    Photosynthetic temperature acclimation is a commonly observed process that is increasingly being incorporated into Earth System Models (ESMs). While short-term acclimation has been shown to increase carbon storage in the future, it is uncertain whether acclimation will directly influence simulated future climate through biophysical mechanisms. Here, we used coupled atmosphere-biosphere simulations using the Community Earth System Model (CESM) to assess how acclimation-induced changes in photosynthesis influence global climate under present-day and future (RCP 8.5) conditions. We ran four 30 year simulations that differed only in sea surface temperatures and atmospheric CO2 (present or future) and whether a mechanism for photosynthetic temperature acclimation was included (yes or no). Acclimation increased future photosynthesis and, consequently, the proportion of energy returned to the atmosphere as latent heat, resulting in reduced surface air temperatures in areas and seasons where acclimation caused the biggest increase in photosynthesis. However, this was partially offset by temperature increases elsewhere, resulting in a small, but significant, global cooling of 0.05°C in the future, similar to that expected from acclimation-induced increases in future land carbon storage found in previous studies. In the present-day simulations, the photosynthetic response was not as strong and cooling in highly vegetated regions was less than warming elsewhere, leading to a net global increase in temperatures of 0.04°C. Precipitation responses were variable and rates did not change globally in either time period. These results, combined with carbon-cycle effects, suggest that models without acclimation may be overestimating positive feedbacks between climate and the land surface in the future.

  6. Molecular and Photosynthetic Responses to Prolonged Darkness and Subsequent Acclimation to Re-Illumination in the Diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum

    PubMed Central

    Nymark, Marianne; Valle, Kristin C.; Hancke, Kasper; Winge, Per; Andresen, Kjersti; Johnsen, Geir; Bones, Atle M.; Brembu, Tore

    2013-01-01

    Photosynthetic diatoms that live suspended throughout the water column will constantly be swept up and down by vertical mixing. When returned to the photic zone after experiencing longer periods in darkness, mechanisms exist that enable the diatoms both to survive sudden light exposure and immediately utilize the available energy in photosynthesis and growth. We have investigated both the response to prolonged darkness and the re-acclimation to moderate intensity white irradiance (E = 100 µmol m−2 s−1) in the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum, using an integrated approach involving global transcriptional profiling, pigment analyses, imaging and photo-physiological measurements. The responses were studied during continuous white light, after 48 h of dark treatment and after 0.5 h, 6 h, and 24 h of re-exposure to the initial irradiance. The analyses resulted in several intriguing findings. Dark treatment of the cells led to 1) significantly decreased nuclear transcriptional activity, 2) distinct intracellular changes, 3) fixed ratios of the light-harvesting pigments despite a decrease in the total cell pigment pool, and 4) only a minor drop in photosynthetic efficiency (ΦPSII_max). Re-introduction of the cells to the initial light conditions revealed 5) distinct expression profiles for nuclear genes involved in photosynthesis and those involved in photoprotection, 6) rapid rise in photosynthetic parameters (α and rETRmax) within 0.5 h of re-exposure to light despite a very modest de novo synthesis of photosynthetic compounds, and 7) increasingly efficient resonance energy transfer from fucoxanthin chlorophyll a/c-binding protein complexes to photosystem II reaction centers during the first 0.5 h, supporting the observations stated in 6). In summary, the results show that despite extensive transcriptional, metabolic and intracellular changes, the ability of cells to perform photosynthesis was kept intact during the length of the experiment. We conclude that

  7. Acclimation of photosynthetic temperature optima of temperate and boreal tree species in response to experimental forest warming.

    PubMed

    Sendall, Kerrie M; Reich, Peter B; Zhao, Changming; Jihua, Hou; Wei, Xiaorong; Stefanski, Artur; Rice, Karen; Rich, Roy L; Montgomery, Rebecca A

    2015-03-01

    Rising temperatures caused by climate change could negatively alter plant ecosystems if temperatures exceed optimal temperatures for carbon gain. Such changes may threaten temperature-sensitive species, causing local extinctions and range migrations. This study examined the optimal temperature of net photosynthesis (Topt ) of two boreal and four temperate deciduous tree species grown in the field in northern Minnesota, United States under two contrasting temperature regimes. We hypothesized that Topt would be higher in temperate than co-occurring boreal species, with temperate species exhibiting greater plasticity in Topt , resulting in better acclimation to elevated temperatures. The chamberless experiment, located at two sites in both open and understory conditions, continuously warmed plants and soils during three growing seasons. Results show a modest, but significant shift in Topt of 1.1 ± 0.21 °C on average for plants subjected to a mean 2.9 ± 0.01 °C warming during midday hours in summer, and shifts with warming were unrelated to species native ranges. The 1.1 °C shift in Topt with 2.9 °C warming might be interpreted as suggesting limited capacity to shift temperature response functions to better match changes in temperature. However, Topt of warmed plants was as well-matched with prior midday temperatures as Topt of plants in the ambient treatment, and Topt in both treatments was at a level where realized photosynthesis was within 90-95% of maximum. These results suggest that seedlings of all species were close to optimizing photosynthetic temperature responses, and equally so in both temperature treatments. Our study suggests that temperate and boreal species have considerable capacity to match their photosynthetic temperature response functions to prevailing growing season temperatures that occur today and to those that will likely occur in the coming decades under climate change. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Acclimation to UV-B radiation and visible light in Lactuca sativa involves up-regulation of photosynthetic performance and orchestration of metabolome-wide responses.

    PubMed

    Wargent, J J; Nelson, B C W; McGhie, T K; Barnes, P W

    2015-05-01

    UV-B radiation is often viewed as a source of stress for higher plants. In particular, photosynthetic function has been described as a common target for UV-B impairment; yet as our understanding of UV-B photomorphogenesis increases, there are opportunities to expand the emerging paradigm of regulatory UV response. Lactuca sativa is an important dietary crop species and is often subjected to rapid sunlight exposure at field transfer. Acclimation to UV-B and visible light conditions in L. sativa was dissected using gas exchange and chlorophyll fluorescence measurements, in addition to non-destructive assessments of UV epidermal shielding (SUV ). After UV-B treatment, seedlings were subjected to wide-range metabolomic analysis using liquid chromatography hybrid quadrupole time-of-flight high-resolution mass spectrometry (LC-QTOF-HRMS). During the acclimation period, net photosynthetic rate increased in UV-treated plants, epidermal UV shielding increased in both subsets of plants transferred to the acclimatory conditions (UV+/UV- plants) and Fv /Fm declined slightly in UV+/UV- plants. Metabolomic analysis revealed that a key group of secondary compounds was up-regulated by higher light conditions, yet several of these compounds were elevated further by UV-B radiation. In conclusion, acclimation to UV-B radiation involves co-protection from the effects of visible light, and responses to UV-B radiation at a photosynthetic level may not be consistently viewed as damaging to plant development.

  9. Photosynthetic acclimation to warming in tropical forest tree seedlings

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Klaus

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Tropical forests have a mitigating effect on man-made climate change by acting as a carbon sink. For that effect to continue, tropical trees will have to acclimate to rising temperatures, but it is currently unknown whether they have this capacity. We grew seedlings of three tropical tree species over a range of temperature regimes (TGrowth = 25, 30, 35 °C) and measured the temperature response of photosynthetic CO2 uptake. All species showed signs of acclimation: the temperature-response curves shifted, such that the temperature at which photosynthesis peaked (TOpt) increased with increasing TGrowth. However, although TOpt shifted, it did not reach TGrowth at high temperature, and this difference between TOpt and TGrowth increased with increasing TGrowth, indicating that plants were operating at supra-optimal temperatures for photosynthesis when grown at high temperatures. The high-temperature CO2 compensation point did not increase with TGrowth. Hence, temperature-response curves narrowed with increasing TGrowth. TOpt correlated with the ratio of the RuBP regeneration capacity over the RuBP carboxylation capacity, suggesting that at high TGrowth photosynthetic electron transport rate associated with RuBP regeneration had greater control over net photosynthesis. The results show that although photosynthesis of tropical trees can acclimate to moderate warming, carbon gain decreases with more severe warming. PMID:28453647

  10. Systems-Wide Analysis of Acclimation Responses to Long-Term Heat Stress and Recovery in the Photosynthetic Model Organism Chlamydomonas reinhardtii[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Hemme, Dorothea; Veyel, Daniel; Mühlhaus, Timo; Sommer, Frederik; Jüppner, Jessica; Unger, Ann-Katrin; Sandmann, Michael; Fehrle, Ines; Schönfelder, Stephanie; Steup, Martin; Geimer, Stefan; Kopka, Joachim; Giavalisco, Patrick; Schroda, Michael

    2014-01-01

    We applied a top-down systems biology approach to understand how Chlamydomonas reinhardtii acclimates to long-term heat stress (HS) and recovers from it. For this, we shifted cells from 25 to 42°C for 24 h and back to 25°C for ≥8 h and monitored abundances of 1856 proteins/protein groups, 99 polar and 185 lipophilic metabolites, and cytological and photosynthesis parameters. Our data indicate that acclimation of Chlamydomonas to long-term HS consists of a temporally ordered, orchestrated implementation of response elements at various system levels. These comprise (1) cell cycle arrest; (2) catabolism of larger molecules to generate compounds with roles in stress protection; (3) accumulation of molecular chaperones to restore protein homeostasis together with compatible solutes; (4) redirection of photosynthetic energy and reducing power from the Calvin cycle to the de novo synthesis of saturated fatty acids to replace polyunsaturated ones in membrane lipids, which are deposited in lipid bodies; and (5) when sinks for photosynthetic energy and reducing power are depleted, resumption of Calvin cycle activity associated with increased photorespiration, accumulation of reactive oxygen species scavengers, and throttling of linear electron flow by antenna uncoupling. During recovery from HS, cells appear to focus on processes allowing rapid resumption of growth rather than restoring pre-HS conditions. PMID:25415976

  11. The photosynthetic acclimation response of Lolium perenne to four years growth in a free-air CO{sub 2} enrichment (FACE) facility

    SciTech Connect

    Creasey, R.

    1996-11-01

    In this study, the photosynthetic responses of field grown Lolium perenne to ambient (354 {mu}mol mol{sup -1}) and elevated (600 {mu}mol mol{sup -1}) C{sub a} were measured. The experiment utilized the FACE facility at Eschikon, Switzerland; here the L. Perenne swards had been grown at two nitrogen treatments, with six cuts per year, for 4 years. The study revealed a significant decrease in Rubisco activity (Vcmax) in the low nitrogen FACE plots; this is consistent with the theories of source-sink imbalance resulting in feedback inhibition and down-regulation. Such negative acclimation was not wholly supported by diurnal investigations which revealed an average stimulation of 53.38% and 52.78% in the low and high nitrogen, respectively. However, light response curves and AI investigations also suggested down-regulation, especially in the low nitrogen. SI is expected to decrease in response to elevated C{sub a}, if any change is seen. This was indeed observed in the high nitrogen plots but for the low nitrogen a significant increase was found. Conclusions drawn from this project center around the implications of negative acclimation to future crop productivity. For instance, inter-specific differences in response to elevated C{sub a} may result in ecosystem changes and new management techniques may be necessary. However, real predictions cannot be made from leaf level studies alone as these may not represent the overall changes at the whole plant level.

  12. Response of superoxide dismutase isoenzymes in tomato plants (Lycopersicon esculentum) during thermo-acclimation of the photosynthetic apparatus.

    PubMed

    Camejo, Daymi; Martí, María del C; Nicolás, Emilio; Alarcón, Juan J; Jiménez, Ana; Sevilla, Francisca

    2007-11-01

    Seedlings of Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. var. Amalia were grown in a growth chamber under a photoperiod of 16 h light at 25 degrees C and 8 h dark at 20 degrees C. Five different treatments were applied to 30-day-old plants: Control treatment (plants maintained in the normal growth conditions throughout the experimental time), heat acclimation (plants exposed to 35 degrees C for 4 h in dark for 3 days), dark treatment (plants exposed to 25 degrees C for 4 h in dark for 3 days), heat acclimation plus heat shock (plants that previously received the heat acclimation treatment were exposed to 45 degrees C air temperature for 3 h in the light) and dark treatment plus heat shock (plants that previously received the dark treatment were exposed to 45 degrees C air temperature for 3 h in the light). Only the heat acclimation treatment increased the thermotolerance of the photosynthesis apparatus when the heat shock (45 degrees C) was imposed. In these plants, the CO(2) assimilation rate was not affected by heat shock and there was a slight and non-significant reduction in maximum carboxylation velocity of Rubisco (V(cmax)) and maximum electron transport rate contributing to Rubisco regeneration (J(max)). However, the plants exposed to dark treatment plus heat shock showed a significant reduction in the CO(2) assimilation rate and also in the values of V(cmax) and J(max). Chlorophyll fluorescence measurements showed increased thermotolerance in heat-acclimated plants. The values of maximum chlorophyll fluorescence (F(m)) were not modified by heat shock in these plants, while in the dark-treated plants that received the heat shock, the F(m) values were reduced, which provoked a significant reduction in the efficiency of photosystem II. A slight rise in the total superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity was found in the plants that had been subjected to both heat acclimation and heat shock, and this SOD activity was significantly higher than that found in the plants subjected to

  13. Exploiting heterogeneous environments: does photosynthetic acclimation optimize carbon gain in fluctuating light?

    PubMed Central

    Retkute, Renata; Smith-Unna, Stephanie E.; Smith, Robert W.; Burgess, Alexandra J.; Jensen, Oliver E.; Johnson, Giles N.; Preston, Simon P.; Murchie, Erik H.

    2015-01-01

    Plants have evolved complex mechanisms to balance the efficient use of absorbed light energy in photosynthesis with the capacity to use that energy in assimilation, so avoiding potential damage from excess light. This is particularly important under natural light, which can vary according to weather, solar movement and canopy movement. Photosynthetic acclimation is the means by which plants alter their leaf composition and structure over time to enhance photosynthetic efficiency and productivity. However there is no empirical or theoretical basis for understanding how leaves track historic light levels to determine acclimation status, or whether they do this accurately. We hypothesized that in fluctuating light (varying in both intensity and frequency), the light-response characteristics of a leaf should adjust (dynamically acclimate) to maximize daily carbon gain. Using a framework of mathematical modelling based on light-response curves, we have analysed carbon-gain dynamics under various light patterns. The objective was to develop new tools to quantify the precision with which photosynthesis acclimates according to the environment in which plants exist and to test this tool on existing data. We found an inverse relationship between the optimal maximum photosynthetic capacity and the frequency of low to high light transitions. Using experimental data from the literature we were able to show that the observed patterns for acclimation were consistent with a strategy towards maximizing daily carbon gain. Refinement of the model will further determine the precision of acclimation. PMID:25788730

  14. Exploiting heterogeneous environments: does photosynthetic acclimation optimize carbon gain in fluctuating light?

    PubMed

    Retkute, Renata; Smith-Unna, Stephanie E; Smith, Robert W; Burgess, Alexandra J; Jensen, Oliver E; Johnson, Giles N; Preston, Simon P; Murchie, Erik H

    2015-05-01

    Plants have evolved complex mechanisms to balance the efficient use of absorbed light energy in photosynthesis with the capacity to use that energy in assimilation, so avoiding potential damage from excess light. This is particularly important under natural light, which can vary according to weather, solar movement and canopy movement. Photosynthetic acclimation is the means by which plants alter their leaf composition and structure over time to enhance photosynthetic efficiency and productivity. However there is no empirical or theoretical basis for understanding how leaves track historic light levels to determine acclimation status, or whether they do this accurately. We hypothesized that in fluctuating light (varying in both intensity and frequency), the light-response characteristics of a leaf should adjust (dynamically acclimate) to maximize daily carbon gain. Using a framework of mathematical modelling based on light-response curves, we have analysed carbon-gain dynamics under various light patterns. The objective was to develop new tools to quantify the precision with which photosynthesis acclimates according to the environment in which plants exist and to test this tool on existing data. We found an inverse relationship between the optimal maximum photosynthetic capacity and the frequency of low to high light transitions. Using experimental data from the literature we were able to show that the observed patterns for acclimation were consistent with a strategy towards maximizing daily carbon gain. Refinement of the model will further determine the precision of acclimation. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  15. Importance of Fluctuations in Light on Plant Photosynthetic Acclimation.

    PubMed

    Vialet-Chabrand, Silvere; Matthews, Jack S A; Simkin, Andrew J; Raines, Christine A; Lawson, Tracy

    2017-04-01

    The acclimation of plants to light has been studied extensively, yet little is known about the effect of dynamic fluctuations in light on plant phenotype and acclimatory responses. We mimicked natural fluctuations in light over a diurnal period to examine the effect on the photosynthetic processes and growth of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). High and low light intensities, delivered via a realistic dynamic fluctuating or square wave pattern, were used to grow and assess plants. Plants subjected to square wave light had thicker leaves and greater photosynthetic capacity compared with fluctuating light-grown plants. This, together with elevated levels of proteins associated with electron transport, indicates greater investment in leaf structural components and photosynthetic processes. In contrast, plants grown under fluctuating light had thinner leaves, lower leaf light absorption, but maintained similar photosynthetic rates per unit leaf area to square wave-grown plants. Despite high light use efficiency, plants grown under fluctuating light had a slow growth rate early in development, likely due to the fact that plants grown under fluctuating conditions were not able to fully utilize the light energy absorbed for carbon fixation. Diurnal leaf-level measurements revealed a negative feedback control of photosynthesis, resulting in a decrease in total diurnal carbon assimilated of at least 20%. These findings highlight that growing plants under square wave growth conditions ultimately fails to predict plant performance under realistic light regimes and stress the importance of considering fluctuations in incident light in future experiments that aim to infer plant productivity under natural conditions in the field.

  16. Low temperature acclimation of photosynthetic capacity and leaf morphology in the context of phloem loading type.

    PubMed

    Dumlao, Matthew R; Darehshouri, Anza; Cohu, Christopher M; Muller, Onno; Mathias, Jennifer; Adams, William W; Demmig-Adams, Barbara

    2012-09-01

    Carbon export from leaf mesophyll to sugar-transporting phloem occurs via either an apoplastic (across the cell membrane) or symplastic (through plasmodesmatal cell wall openings) pathway. Herbaceous apoplastic loaders generally exhibit an up-regulation of photosynthetic capacity in response to growth at lower temperature. However, acclimation of photosynthesis to temperature by symplastically loading species, whose geographic distribution is particularly strong in tropical and subtropical areas, has not been characterized. Photosynthetic and leaf anatomical acclimation to lower temperature was explored in two symplastic (Verbascum phoeniceum, Cucurbita pepo) and two apoplastic (Helianthus annuus, Spinacia oleracea) loaders, representing summer- and winter-active life histories for each loading type. Regardless of phloem loading type, the two summer-active species, C. pepo and H. annuus, exhibited neither foliar anatomical nor photosynthetic acclimation when grown under low temperature compared to moderate temperature. In contrast, and again irrespective of phloem loading type, the two winter-active mesophytes, V. phoeniceum and S. oleracea, exhibited both a greater number of palisade cell layers (and thus thicker leaves) and significantly higher maximal capacities of photosynthetic electron transport, as well as, in the case of V. phoeniceum, a greater foliar vein density in response to cool temperatures compared to growth at moderate temperature. It is therefore noteworthy that symplastic phloem loading per se does not prevent acclimation of intrinsic photosynthetic capacity to cooler growth temperatures. Given the vagaries of weather and climate, understanding the basis of plant acclimation to, and tolerance of, low temperature is critical to maintaining and increasing plant productivity for food, fuel, and fiber to meet the growing demands of a burgeoning human population.

  17. Growth, photosynthetic acclimation and yield quality in legumes under climate change simulations: an updated survey.

    PubMed

    Irigoyen, J J; Goicoechea, N; Antolín, M C; Pascual, I; Sánchez-Díaz, M; Aguirreolea, J; Morales, F

    2014-09-01

    Continued emissions of CO2, derived from human activities, increase atmospheric CO2 concentration. The CO2 rise stimulates plant growth and affects yield quality. Effects of elevated CO2 on legume quality depend on interactions with N2-fixing bacteria and mycorrhizal fungi. Growth at elevated CO2 increases photosynthesis under short-term exposures in C3 species. Under long-term exposures, however, plants generally acclimate to elevated CO2 decreasing their photosynthetic capacity. An updated survey of the literature indicates that a key factor, perhaps the most important, that characteristically influences this phenomenon, its occurrence and extent, is the plant source-sink balance. In legumes, the ability of exchanging C for N at nodule level with the N2-fixing symbionts creates an extra C sink that avoids the occurrence of photosynthetic acclimation. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi colonizing roots may also result in increased C sink, preventing photosynthetic acclimation. Defoliation (Anthyllis vulneraria, simulated grazing) or shoot cutting (alfalfa, usual management as forage) largely increases root/shoot ratio. During re-growth at elevated CO2, new shoots growth and nodule respiration function as strong C sinks that counteracts photosynthetic acclimation. In the presence of some limiting factor, the legumes response to elevated CO2 is weakened showing photosynthetic acclimation. This survey has identified limiting factors that include an insufficient N supply from bacterial strains, nutrient-poor soils, low P supply, excess temperature affecting photosynthesis and/or nodule activity, a genetically determined low nodulation capacity, an inability of species or varieties to increase growth (and therefore C sink) at elevated CO2 and a plant phenological state or season when plant growth is stopped.

  18. Photosynthetic Acclimation to Temperature in the Desert Shrub, Larrea divaricata

    PubMed Central

    Armond, Paul A.; Schreiber, Ulrich; Björkman, Olle

    1978-01-01

    The response of photosynthetic electron transport and light-harvesting efficiency to high temperatures was studied in the desert shrub Larrea divaricata Cav. Plants were grown at day/night temperatures of 20/15, 32/25, or 45/33 C in rough approximation of natural seasonal temperature variations. The process of acclimation to high temperatures involves an enhancement of the stability of the interactions between the light-harvesting pigments and the photosystem reaction centers. As temperature is increased, the heat-induced dissociation of these complexes results in a decrease in the quantum yield of electron transport at limiting light intensity, followed by a loss of electron transport activity at rate-saturating light intensity. The decreased quantum yield can be attributed to a block of excitation energy transfer from chlorophyll b to chlorophyll a, and changes in the distribution of the excitation energy between photosystems II and I. The block of excitation energy transfer is characterized by a loss of the effectiveness of 480 nm light (absorbed primarily by chlorophyll b) to drive protochemical processes, as well as fluorescence emission by chlorophyll b. PMID:16660304

  19. Dynamic reorganization of photosynthetic supercomplexes during environmental acclimation of photosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Minagawa, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Plants and algae have acquired the ability to acclimate to ever-changing environments in order to survive. During photosynthesis, light energy is converted by several membrane protein supercomplexes into electrochemical energy, which is eventually used to assimilate CO2. The efficiency of photosynthesis is modulated by many environmental factors such as quality and quantity of light, temperature, drought, and CO2 concentration, among others. Accumulating evidence indicates that photosynthetic supercomplexes undergo supramolecular reorganization within a short time frame during acclimation to an environmental change. This reorganization includes state transitions that balance the excitation of photosystem I and II by shuttling peripheral antenna proteins between the two, thermal energy dissipation that occurs at energy-quenching sites within the light-harvesting antenna generated for negative feedback when excess light is absorbed, and cyclic electron flow that is facilitated between photosystem I and the cytochrome bf complex when cells demand more ATP and/or need to activate energy dissipation. This review will highlight the recent findings regarding these environmental acclimation events in model organisms with particular attention to the unicellular green alga C. reinhardtii and with reference to the vascular plant A. thaliana, which offers a glimpse into the dynamic behavior of photosynthetic machineries in nature. PMID:24381578

  20. Photosynthetic and morphological acclimation of seedlings of tropical lianas to changes in the light environment.

    PubMed

    Avalos, Gerardo; Mulkey, Stephen S

    2014-12-01

    • Few studies have analyzed the physiological performance of different life stages and the expression of ontogenetic niche shifts in lianas. Here, we analyzed the photosynthetic and morphological acclimation of seedlings of Stigmaphyllon lindenianum, Combretum fruticosum, and Bonamia trichantha to distinctive light conditions in a tropical dry forest and compared their response with the acclimation response of adult canopy lianas of the same species. We expected acclimation to occur faster through changes in leaf photochemistry relative to adaptation in morphology, consistent with the life history strategies of these lianas.• Seedlings were assigned to the following light treatments: high light (HH), low light (LL), sun to shade (HL), and shade to sun (LH) in a common garden. After 40 d, HL and LH seedlings were exposed to opposite light treatments. Light response curves, the maximum photosynthetic rate in the field (Amax), and biomass allocation were monitored for another 40 d on leaves expanded before transfer.• Photosynthetic responses, Amax, and biomass of Stigmaphyllon and Combretum varied with light availability. Physiological characters were affected by current light environment. The previous light environment (carryover effects) only influenced Amax. Morphological characters showed significant carryover effects. Stigmaphyllon showed high morphological and physiological plasticity. Sun-exposed seedlings of this liana increased stem biomass and switched from self-supporting to climbing forms.• Acclimation in seedlings of these lianas is consistent with the response of adult lianas in the canopy in direction, but not in magnitude. There was no evidence for ontogenetic niche shifts in the acclimation response. © 2014 Botanical Society of America, Inc.

  1. Differential Mechanisms of Photosynthetic Acclimation to Light and Low Temperature in Arabidopsis and the Extremophile Eutrema salsugineum.

    PubMed

    Khanal, Nityananda; Bray, Geoffrey E; Grisnich, Anna; Moffatt, Barbara A; Gray, Gordon R

    2017-08-09

    capacity, while Yukon showed greater growth plasticity to irradiance. Both of these Eutrema accessions are able to photosynthetically acclimate but do so by different mechanisms. The Shandong accessions demonstrate a stable response, favouring energy partitioning to photochemistry while the Yukon accession shows a more rapid response with partitioning to other (non-photochemical) strategies.

  2. Differential Mechanisms of Photosynthetic Acclimation to Light and Low Temperature in Arabidopsis and the Extremophile Eutrema salsugineum

    PubMed Central

    Khanal, Nityananda; Bray, Geoffrey E.; Grisnich, Anna; Moffatt, Barbara A.; Gray, Gordon R.

    2017-01-01

    capacity, while Yukon showed greater growth plasticity to irradiance. Both of these Eutrema accessions are able to photosynthetically acclimate but do so by different mechanisms. The Shandong accessions demonstrate a stable response, favouring energy partitioning to photochemistry while the Yukon accession shows a more rapid response with partitioning to other (non-photochemical) strategies. PMID:28792470

  3. Photosynthetic Acclimation in Pea and Soybean to High Atmospheric CO2 Partial Pressure.

    PubMed

    Xu, D. Q.; Gifford, R. M.; Chow, W. S.

    1994-10-01

    Nonnodulated pea (Pisum sativum L. cv Frosty) and soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr. cv Wye) plants were grown under artificial lights from germination with ample nutrients, 600 [mu]mol photons m-2 s-1, and either 34 to 36 (control) or 64 to 68 Pa (enriched) CO2. For soybean, pod removal and whole-plant shading treatments were used to alter the source-sink balance and carbohydrate status of the plants. Growth of both species was substantially increased by CO2 enrichment despite some down-regulation of photosynthesis rate per unit leaf area ("acclimation"). Acclimation was observed in young pea leaves but not old and in old soybean leaves but not young. Acclimation was neither evident in quantum yield nor was it related to triose phosphate limitation of net photosynthesis. A correlation between levels of starch and sugars in the leaf and the amount of acclimation was apparent but was loose and only weakly related to the source-sink balance of the plant. A consistent feature of acclimation was reduced ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase (RuBPCase) content, although in vivo RuBPCase activity was not necessarily diminished by elevated growth CO2 owing to increased percentage of activation of the enzyme. A proposal is discussed that the complexity of photosynthetic acclimation responses to elevated CO2 is as an expression of re-optimization of deployment of within-plant resources at three levels of competition.

  4. Photosynthetic Acclimation in Pea and Soybean to High Atmospheric CO2 Partial Pressure.

    PubMed Central

    Xu, D. Q.; Gifford, R. M.; Chow, W. S.

    1994-01-01

    Nonnodulated pea (Pisum sativum L. cv Frosty) and soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr. cv Wye) plants were grown under artificial lights from germination with ample nutrients, 600 [mu]mol photons m-2 s-1, and either 34 to 36 (control) or 64 to 68 Pa (enriched) CO2. For soybean, pod removal and whole-plant shading treatments were used to alter the source-sink balance and carbohydrate status of the plants. Growth of both species was substantially increased by CO2 enrichment despite some down-regulation of photosynthesis rate per unit leaf area ("acclimation"). Acclimation was observed in young pea leaves but not old and in old soybean leaves but not young. Acclimation was neither evident in quantum yield nor was it related to triose phosphate limitation of net photosynthesis. A correlation between levels of starch and sugars in the leaf and the amount of acclimation was apparent but was loose and only weakly related to the source-sink balance of the plant. A consistent feature of acclimation was reduced ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase (RuBPCase) content, although in vivo RuBPCase activity was not necessarily diminished by elevated growth CO2 owing to increased percentage of activation of the enzyme. A proposal is discussed that the complexity of photosynthetic acclimation responses to elevated CO2 is as an expression of re-optimization of deployment of within-plant resources at three levels of competition. PMID:12232358

  5. Redundant roles of photoreceptors and cytokinins in regulating photosynthetic acclimation to canopy density

    PubMed Central

    Boonman, A.; Prinsen, E.; Voesenek, L. A. C. J.; Pons, T. L.

    2009-01-01

    The regulation of photosynthetic acclimation to canopy density was investigated in tobacco canopies and in tobacco and Arabidopsis plants with part of their foliage experimentally shaded. Both species acclimated to canopy light gradients and partial shading by allocating photosynthetic capacity to leaves in high light and adjusting chloroplast organization to the local light conditions. An investigation was carried out to determine whether signalling mediated by photoreceptors, sugars, cytokinin, and nitrate is involved in and necessary for proper photosynthetic acclimation. No evidence was found for a role for sugars, or for nitrate. The distribution of cytokinins in tobacco stands of contrasting density could be explained in part by irradiance-dependent delivery of cytokinins through the transpiration stream. Functional studies using a comprehensive selection of Arabidopsis mutants and transgenics showed that normal wild-type responses to partial shading were retained when signalling mediated by photoreceptors or cytokinins was disrupted. This indicates that these pathways probably operate in a redundant manner. However, the reduction of the chlorophyll a/b ratio in response to local shade was completely absent in the Arabidopsis Ws-2 accession mutated in PHYTOCHROME D and in the triple phyAphyCphyD mutant. Moreover, cytokinin receptor mutants also showed a reduced response, suggesting a previously unrecognized function of phyD and cytokinins. PMID:19240103

  6. Photosynthetic and stomatal acclimation to elevated CO{sub 2} depends on soil type in Quercus prinus

    SciTech Connect

    Bunce, J.A.

    1995-06-01

    Quercus prinus (L.) seedlings grown outdoors at ambient and elevated (ambient + 350 ppm) CO{sub 2} with a fertile soil had no photosynthetic acclimation to elevated CO{sub 2} and no stomatal response to growth or measurement CO{sub 2}. In contrast, seedlings grown with soil collected from a Q. prinus stand had photosynthetic and stomatal acclimation, and stomatal conductance was sensitive to measurement CO{sub 2}. In plants grown with the native soil, light-saturated stomatal conductance measured at the growth CO{sub 2} was reduced by 54% at elevated CO{sub 2}, compared to the short-term reduction of 36%. Photosynthetic acclimation in plants grown with the native soil reduced the stimulation of light-saturated photosynthesis at elevated CO{sub 2} from a factor of 1.9 to a factor of 1.3. In contrast to the dependence of photosynthetic and stomatal acclimation on soil type, the response of leaf respiration to elevated CO{sub 2} was the same for both soils. Respiration of leaves was reduced in the elevated CO{sub 2} treatment by 41 % on a leaf area basis. However, this effect was immediately reversible by altering the measurement CO{sub 2}, indicating that no acclimation of respiration occurred.

  7. Balancing photosynthetic electron flow is critical for cyanobacterial acclimation to nitrogen limitation.

    PubMed

    Salomon, Eitan; Bar-Eyal, Leeat; Sharon, Shir; Keren, Nir

    2013-03-01

    Nitrogen limitation forces photosynthetic organisms to reallocate available nitrogen to essential functions. At the same time, it increases the probability of photo-damage by limiting the rate of energy-demanding metabolic processes, downstream of the photosynthetic apparatus. Non-diazotrophic cyanobacteria cope with this situation by decreasing the size of their phycobilisome antenna and by modifying their photosynthetic apparatus. These changes can serve two purposes: to provide extra amino-acids and to decrease excitation pressure. We examined the effects of nitrogen limitation on the form and function of the photosynthetic apparatus. Our aim was to study which of the two demands serve as the driving force for the remodeling of the photosynthetic apparatus, under different growth conditions. We found that a drastic reduction in light intensity allowed cells to maintain a more functional photosynthetic apparatus: the phycobilisome antenna was bigger, the activity of both photosystems was higher and the levels of photosystem (PS) proteins were higher. Pre-acclimating cells to Mn limitation, under which the activity of both PSI and PSII is diminished, results in a very similar response. The rate of PSII photoinhibition, in nitrogen limited cells, was found to be directly related to the activity of the photosynthetic apparatus. These data indicate that, under our experimental conditions, photo-damage avoidance was the more prominent determinant during the acclimation process. The combinations of limiting factors tested here is by no means artificial. Similar scenarios can take place under environmental conditions and should be taken into account when estimating nutrient limitations in nature.

  8. Adaptation and acclimation of photosynthetic microorganisms to permanently cold environments.

    PubMed

    Morgan-Kiss, Rachael M; Priscu, John C; Pocock, Tessa; Gudynaite-Savitch, Loreta; Huner, Norman P A

    2006-03-01

    Persistently cold environments constitute one of our world's largest ecosystems, and microorganisms dominate the biomass and metabolic activity in these extreme environments. The stress of low temperatures on life is exacerbated in organisms that rely on photoautrophic production of organic carbon and energy sources. Phototrophic organisms must coordinate temperature-independent reactions of light absorption and photochemistry with temperature-dependent processes of electron transport and utilization of energy sources through growth and metabolism. Despite this conundrum, phototrophic microorganisms thrive in all cold ecosystems described and (together with chemoautrophs) provide the base of autotrophic production in low-temperature food webs. Psychrophilic (organisms with a requirement for low growth temperatures) and psychrotolerant (organisms tolerant of low growth temperatures) photoautotrophs rely on low-temperature acclimative and adaptive strategies that have been described for other low-temperature-adapted heterotrophic organisms, such as cold-active proteins and maintenance of membrane fluidity. In addition, photoautrophic organisms possess other strategies to balance the absorption of light and the transduction of light energy to stored chemical energy products (NADPH and ATP) with downstream consumption of photosynthetically derived energy products at low temperatures. Lastly, differential adaptive and acclimative mechanisms exist in phototrophic microorganisms residing in low-temperature environments that are exposed to constant low-light environments versus high-light- and high-UV-exposed phototrophic assemblages.

  9. Photosynthetic acclimation to enriched CO{sub 2} concentrations in Pinus Ponderosa

    SciTech Connect

    Torres, M.P.

    1995-11-01

    By the middle of the 21st century earth`s ambient CO{sub 2} level is expected to increase two-fold ({approximately}350 umol/L). Higher levels of CO{sub 2} are expected to cause major changes in the morphological, physiological, and biochemical traits of the world`s vegetation. Therefore, we constructed an experiment designed to measure the long-term acclimation processes of Pinus Ponderosa. As a prominent forest conifer, Pinus Ponderosa is useful when assessing a large scale global carbon budget. Eighteen genetically variable families were exposed to 3 different levels of CO{sub 2} (350 umol/L, 525 umol/L, 700 umol/L), for three years. Acclimation responses were quantified by assays of photosynthetic rate, chlorophyll fluorescence, and chlorophyll pigment concentrations.

  10. A cell-based model for the photoacclimation and CO(2)-acclimation of the photosynthetic apparatus.

    PubMed

    Papadakis, I A; Kotzabasis, K; Lika, K

    2005-06-30

    We have developed a mathematical model based on the underlying mechanisms concerning the responses of the photosynthetic apparatus of a microalga cell which grows under constant incident light intensity and ambient CO(2) concentration. Photosynthesis involves light and carbon-fixation reactions which are mutually dependent and affect each other, but existing models for photosynthesis don't account for both reactions at once. Our modeling approach allows us to derive distinct equations for the rates of oxygen production, NADPH production, carbon dioxide fixation, carbohydrate production, and rejected energy, which are generally different. The production rates of the photosynthesis products are hyperbolic functions of light and CO(2) concentration. The model predicts that in the absence of photoinhibition, CO(2)-inhibition, photorespiration, and chlororespiration, a cell acclimated to high light and/or CO(2) concentration has higher photosynthetic capacity and lower photosynthetic efficiency than does a cell acclimated to low conditions. This results in crossing between the two curves which represent the oxygen production rates and carbon fixation rates in low and high conditions. Finally, in the absence of photoinhibition and CO(2)-inhibition, the model predicts the carbohydrate production rate in terms of both light intensity and CO(2) concentration.

  11. Natural Genetic Variation for Acclimation of Photosynthetic Light Use Efficiency to Growth Irradiance in Arabidopsis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Harbinson, Jeremy

    2015-01-01

    Plants are known to be able to acclimate their photosynthesis to the level of irradiance. Here, we present the analysis of natural genetic variation for photosynthetic light use efficiency (ΦPSII) in response to five light environments among 12 genetically diverse Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) accessions. We measured the acclimation of ΦPSII to constant growth irradiances of four different levels (100, 200, 400, and 600 µmol m−2 s−1) by imaging chlorophyll fluorescence after 24 d of growth and compared these results with acclimation of ΦPSII to a step-wise change in irradiance where the growth irradiance was increased from 100 to 600 µmol m−2 s−1 after 24 d of growth. Genotypic variation for ΦPSII is shown by calculating heritability for the short-term ΦPSII response to different irradiance levels as well as for the relation of ΦPSII measured at light saturation (a measure of photosynthetic capacity) to growth irradiance level and for the kinetics of the response to a step-wise increase in irradiance from 100 to 600 µmol m−2 s−1. A genome-wide association study for ΦPSII measured 1 h after a step-wise increase in irradiance identified several new candidate genes controlling this trait. In conclusion, the different photosynthetic responses to a changing light environment displayed by different Arabidopsis accessions are due to genetic differences, and we have identified candidate genes for the photosynthetic response to an irradiance change. The genetic variation for photosynthetic acclimation to irradiance found in this study will allow future identification and analysis of the causal genes for the regulation of ΦPSII in plants. PMID:25670817

  12. Worldwide variation in within-canopy photosynthetic acclimation: differences in temporal and environmental controls among plant functional types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niinemets, Ülo; Keenan, Trevor

    2017-04-01

    Major light gradients, characteristically 10- to 50-fold, constitute the most prominent feature of plant canopies. These gradients drive within-canopy variation in foliage structural, chemical and physiological traits. As a key acclimation response to variation in light availability, foliage photosynthetic capacity per area (Aarea) increases with increasing light availability within the canopy, maximizing whole canopy photosynthesis. Recently, a worldwide database including 831 within-canopy gradients with standardized light estimates for 304 species belonging to major vascular plant functional types was constructed and within-canopy variation in photosynthetic acclimation was characterized (Niinemets Ü, Keenan TF, Hallik L (2015) Tansley review. A worldwide analysis of within-canopy variations in leaf structural, chemical and physiological traits across plant functional types. The New Phytologist 205: 973-993). However, the understanding of how within-canopy photosynthetic gradients vary during the growing season and in response to site and stand characteristics is still limited. Here we analyzed temporal, environmental and site (nutrient availability, stand density, ambient CO2 concentration, water availability) sources of variation in within-canopy photosynthetic acclimation in different plant functional types. Variation in key structural (leaf dry mass per unit area, MA), chemical (nitrogen content per dry mass, NM, and area, NA) and physiological (photosynthetic nitrogen use efficiency, EN) photosynthetic capacity per dry mass, Amass and area, Aarea) was examined. The analysis demonstrates major, typically 1.5-2-fold, time-, environment and site-dependent modifications in within-canopy variation in foliage photosynthetic capacity. However, the magnitude and direction of temporal and environmental variations in plasticity significantly varied among functional types. Species with longer leaf life span and low rates of canopy expansion or flush-type canopy

  13. Long-term water stress leads to acclimation of drought sensitivity of photosynthetic capacity in xeric but not riparian Eucalyptus species

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Shuang-Xi; Medlyn, Belinda E.; Prentice, Iain Colin

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims Experimental drought is well documented to induce a decline in photosynthetic capacity. However, if given time to acclimate to low water availability, the photosynthetic responses of plants to low soil moisture content may differ from those found in short-term experiments. This study aims to test whether plants acclimate to long-term water stress by modifying the functional relationships between photosynthetic traits and water stress, and whether species of contrasting habitat differ in their degree of acclimation. Methods Three Eucalyptus taxa from xeric and riparian habitats were compared with regard to their gas exchange responses under short- and long-term drought. Photosynthetic parameters were measured after 2 and 4 months of watering treatments, namely field capacity or partial drought. At 4 months, all plants were watered to field capacity, then watering was stopped. Further measurements were made during the subsequent ‘drying-down’, continuing until stomata were closed. Key Results Two months of partial drought consistently reduced assimilation rate, stomatal sensitivity parameters (g1), apparent maximum Rubisco activity (Vcmax′) and maximum electron transport rate (Jmax′). Eucalyptus occidentalis from the xeric habitat showed the smallest decline in Vcmax′ and Jmax′; however, after 4 months, Vcmax′ and Jmax′ had recovered. Species differed in their degree of Vcmax′ acclimation. Eucalyptus occidentalis showed significant acclimation of the pre-dawn leaf water potential at which the Vcmax′ and ‘true’ Vcmax (accounting for mesophyll conductance) declined most steeply during drying-down. Conclusions The findings indicate carbon loss under prolonged drought could be over-estimated without accounting for acclimation. In particular, (1) species from contrasting habitats differed in the magnitude of V′cmax reduction in short-term drought; (2) long-term drought allowed the possibility of acclimation, such that V

  14. Photosynthetic complex stoichiometry dynamics in higher plants: environmental acclimation and photosynthetic flux control

    PubMed Central

    Schöttler, Mark A.; Tóth, Szilvia Z.

    2014-01-01

    The composition of the photosynthetic apparatus of higher plants is dynamically adjusted to long-term changes in environmental conditions such as growth light intensity and light quality, and to changing metabolic demands for ATP and NADPH imposed by stresses and leaf aging. By changing photosynthetic complex stoichiometry, a long-term imbalance between the photosynthetic production of ATP and NADPH and their metabolic consumption is avoided, and cytotoxic side reactions are minimized. Otherwise, an excess capacity of the light reactions, relative to the demands of primary metabolism, could result in a disturbance of cellular redox homeostasis and an increased production of reactive oxygen species, leading to the destruction of the photosynthetic apparatus and the initiation of cell death programs. In this review, changes of the abundances of the different constituents of the photosynthetic apparatus in response to environmental conditions and during leaf ontogenesis are summarized. The contributions of the different photosynthetic complexes to photosynthetic flux control and the regulation of electron transport are discussed. PMID:24860580

  15. Effect of cold acclimation on the photosynthetic performance of two ecotypes of Colobanthus quitensis (Kunth) Bartl.

    PubMed

    Bravo, León A; Saavedra-Mella, Felipe A; Vera, Felipe; Guerra, Alexi; Cavieres, Lohengrin A; Ivanov, Alexander G; Huner, Norman P A; Corcuera, Luis J

    2007-01-01

    The effects of cold acclimation of two ecotypes (Antarctic and Andes) of Colobanthus quitensis (Kunth) Bartl. Caryophyllaceae on their photosynthetic characteristics and performance under high light (HL) were compared. Non-acclimated plants of the Antarctic ecotype exhibited a higher (34%) maximal rate of photosynthesis than the Andes ecotype. In cold-acclimated plants the light compensation point was increased. Dark respiration was significantly increased during the exposure to 4 degrees C in both ecotypes. Cold-acclimated Antarctic plants showed higher Phi(PSII) and qP compared with the Andes ecotype. In addition, the Antarctic ecotype exhibited higher heat dissipation (NPQ), especially in the cold-acclimated state, which was mainly associated with the fast relaxing component of non-photochemical quenching (NPQ(F)). By contrast, the Andes ecotype exhibited a lower NPQ(F) and a significant increase in the slowly relaxing component (NPQ(s)) at low temperature and HL, indicating higher sensitivity to low temperature-induced photoinhibition. Although the xanthophyll cycle was fully operational in both ecotypes, cold-acclimated Antarctic plants exposed to HL exhibited higher epoxidation state of the xanthophyll cycle pigments (EPS) compared with the cold-acclimated Andes ecotype. Thus, the photosynthetic apparatus of the Antarctic ecotype operates more efficiently than that of the Andes one, under a combination of low temperature and HL. The ecotype differences are discussed in relation to the different climatic conditions of the two Colobanthus.

  16. Short-term acclimation of the photosynthetic electron transfer chain to changing light: a mathematical model.

    PubMed

    Ebenhöh, Oliver; Fucile, Geoffrey; Finazzi, Giovanni; Rochaix, Jean-David; Goldschmidt-Clermont, Michel

    2014-04-19

    Photosynthetic eukaryotes house two photosystems with distinct light absorption spectra. Natural fluctuations in light quality and quantity can lead to unbalanced or excess excitation, compromising photosynthetic efficiency and causing photodamage. Consequently, these organisms have acquired several distinct adaptive mechanisms, collectively referred to as non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) of chlorophyll fluorescence, which modulates the organization and function of the photosynthetic apparatus. The ability to monitor NPQ processes fluorometrically has led to substantial progress in elucidating the underlying molecular mechanisms. However, the relative contribution of distinct NPQ mechanisms to variable light conditions in different photosynthetic eukaryotes remains unclear. Here, we present a mathematical model of the dynamic regulation of eukaryotic photosynthesis using ordinary differential equations. We demonstrate that, for Chlamydomonas, our model recapitulates the basic fluorescence features of short-term light acclimation known as state transitions and discuss how the model can be iteratively refined by comparison with physiological experiments to further our understanding of light acclimation in different species.

  17. Short-term acclimation of the photosynthetic electron transfer chain to changing light: a mathematical model

    PubMed Central

    Ebenhöh, Oliver; Fucile, Geoffrey; Finazzi, Giovanni; Rochaix, Jean-David; Goldschmidt-Clermont, Michel

    2014-01-01

    Photosynthetic eukaryotes house two photosystems with distinct light absorption spectra. Natural fluctuations in light quality and quantity can lead to unbalanced or excess excitation, compromising photosynthetic efficiency and causing photodamage. Consequently, these organisms have acquired several distinct adaptive mechanisms, collectively referred to as non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) of chlorophyll fluorescence, which modulates the organization and function of the photosynthetic apparatus. The ability to monitor NPQ processes fluorometrically has led to substantial progress in elucidating the underlying molecular mechanisms. However, the relative contribution of distinct NPQ mechanisms to variable light conditions in different photosynthetic eukaryotes remains unclear. Here, we present a mathematical model of the dynamic regulation of eukaryotic photosynthesis using ordinary differential equations. We demonstrate that, for Chlamydomonas, our model recapitulates the basic fluorescence features of short-term light acclimation known as state transitions and discuss how the model can be iteratively refined by comparison with physiological experiments to further our understanding of light acclimation in different species. PMID:24591710

  18. Improving models of photosynthetic thermal acclimation: which parameters are most important and how many should be modified?

    PubMed

    Stinziano, Joseph R; Way, Danielle A; Bauerle, William L

    2017-10-09

    Photosynthetic temperature acclimation could strongly affect coupled vegetation-atmosphere feedbacks in the global carbon cycle, especially as the climate warms. Thermal acclimation of photosynthesis can be modelled as changes in the parameters describing the direct effect of temperature on photosynthetic capacity (i.e. activation energy, Ea ; deactivation energy, Hd ; entropy parameter, ΔS) or the basal value of photosynthetic capacity (i.e. photosynthetic capacity measured at 25 °C). However, the impact of acclimating these parameters (individually or in combination) on vegetative carbon gain is relatively unexplored. Here we compare the ability of 66 photosynthetic temperature acclimation scenarios to improve the ability of a spatially explicit canopy carbon flux model, MAESTRA, to predict eddy covariance data from a loblolly pine forest. We show that: 1) incorporating seasonal temperature acclimation of basal photosynthetic capacity improves the model's ability to capture seasonal changes in carbon fluxes and outperforms acclimation of other single factors (i.e. Ea or ΔS alone); 2) multifactor scenarios of photosynthetic temperature acclimation provide minimal (if any) improvement in model performance over single factor acclimation scenarios; 3) acclimation of Ea should be restricted to the temperature ranges of the data from which the equations are derived; and 4) model performance is strongly affected by the Hd parameter. We suggest that a renewed effort be made into understanding whether basal photosynthetic capacity, Ea , Hd and ΔS co-acclimate across broad temperature ranges to determine whether and how multifactor thermal acclimation of photosynthesis occurs. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  19. Photosynthetic acclimation of Acer saccharum. Eleventh annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Gates, D.M.

    1985-01-01

    The overall goal of our research program has been to understand the effect of variations in the characteristics of whole-leaf CO/sub 2/ exchange on productivity of plants and plant communities. To this end we have measured CO/sub 2/ exchange as a function of major environmental factors, emphasizing irradiance, temperature, and CO/sub 2/ concentration. In addition we have determined the effect of O/sub 2/ on photosynthesis, because of the major impact O/sub 2/ has on net carbon gain during photosynthesis. We have tested various models for their ability to simulate the daily responses of CO/sub 2/ exchange measured in the field. These studies have convinced us that we have adequate modeling capacity for simulation of daily time courses under natural conditions. During the past three years we have made progress on several projects related to gas exchange, particularly CO/sub 2/ exhange, in leaves. The primary emphasis has been on the analysis and modeling of daily CO/sub 2/ exchange in Acer saccharum seedlings. More recently we have been emphasizing the investigation of the photosynthetic response of Populus grandidentata. Data has also been collected on a number of other species in order to test the generality of some of the responses noted in the intensive studies.

  20. Importance of Fluctuations in Light on Plant Photosynthetic Acclimation1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    The acclimation of plants to light has been studied extensively, yet little is known about the effect of dynamic fluctuations in light on plant phenotype and acclimatory responses. We mimicked natural fluctuations in light over a diurnal period to examine the effect on the photosynthetic processes and growth of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). High and low light intensities, delivered via a realistic dynamic fluctuating or square wave pattern, were used to grow and assess plants. Plants subjected to square wave light had thicker leaves and greater photosynthetic capacity compared with fluctuating light-grown plants. This, together with elevated levels of proteins associated with electron transport, indicates greater investment in leaf structural components and photosynthetic processes. In contrast, plants grown under fluctuating light had thinner leaves, lower leaf light absorption, but maintained similar photosynthetic rates per unit leaf area to square wave-grown plants. Despite high light use efficiency, plants grown under fluctuating light had a slow growth rate early in development, likely due to the fact that plants grown under fluctuating conditions were not able to fully utilize the light energy absorbed for carbon fixation. Diurnal leaf-level measurements revealed a negative feedback control of photosynthesis, resulting in a decrease in total diurnal carbon assimilated of at least 20%. These findings highlight that growing plants under square wave growth conditions ultimately fails to predict plant performance under realistic light regimes and stress the importance of considering fluctuations in incident light in future experiments that aim to infer plant productivity under natural conditions in the field. PMID:28184008

  1. Acclimation of photosynthetic parameters is not the icing on the cake. It is the cake.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prentice, Iain Colin; Wang, Han; Togashi, Henrique; Keenan, Trevor; Davis, Tyler; Wright, Ian

    2015-04-01

    Photosynthesis and transpiration are tightly coupled through stomatal behaviour and therefore it is impossible to understand and parsimoniously model one without also considering the other. The ratio of leaf-internal to ambient carbon dioxide concentration (ci:ca ratio) is a measure of the "exchange rate" between water and carbon. We have shown that it is possible to predict the observed dependencies of ci:ca on environmental factors (temperature, vapour pressure deficit and atmospheric pressure) based on the "least-cost hypothesis", which states that plants minimize the sum of the unit costs (respiration per unit assimilation) of maintaining the capacities for carbon fixation (Vcmax) and water transport. Moreover, with the help of the "co-ordination hypothesis" (the long-accepted idea that Rubisco capacity and electron transport tend to co-limit photosynthesis) it is possible to predict not only how ci:ca should vary, but also how Vcmax and electron transport capacity (Jmax) should vary, in space and time. We will present empirical support for this idea based on both ecophysiological measurements at the leaf scale, and analysis of carbon dioxide flux measurements at the ecosystem scale. We conclude that acclimation of photosynthetic parameters is pervasive. This is fundamental because it predicts a quite different set of environmental responses than those that are usually applied in models that incorrectly assume constancy of parameter values with time and within plant functional types (PFTs). In addition, acclimation actually simplifies modelling because it describes universal relationships that apply across all PFTs with the C3 photosynthetic pathway, and it removes the need to specify parameters such as Vcmax and Jmax as if they were properties of PFTs.

  2. Photosynthetic acclimation, vernalization, crop productivity and 'the grand design of photosynthesis'.

    PubMed

    Hüner, Norman P A; Dahal, Keshav; Bode, Rainer; Kurepin, Leonid V; Ivanov, Alexander G

    2016-09-20

    Daniel Arnon first proposed the notion of a 'grand design of photosynthesis' in 1982 to illustrate the central role of photosynthesis as the primary energy transformer for all life on Earth. However, we suggest that this concept can be extended to the broad impact of photosynthesis not only in global energy transformation but also in the regulation of plant growth, development, survival and crop productivity through chloroplast redox signalling. We compare and contrast the role of chloroplast redox imbalance, measured as excitation pressure, in governing acclimation to abiotic stress and phenotypic plasticity. Although all photoautrophs sense excessive excitation energy through changes in excitation pressure, the response to this chloroplast redox signal is species dependent. Due to a limited capacity to adjust metabolic sinks, cyanobacteria and green algae induce photoprotective mechanisms which dissipate excess excitation energy at a cost of decreased photosynthetic performance. In contrast, terrestrial, cold tolerant plants such as wheat enhance metabolic sink capacity which leads to enhanced photosynthetic performance and biomass accumulation with minimal dependence on photoprotection. We suggest that the family of nuclear C-repeat binding transcription factors (CBFs) associated with the frost resistance locus, FR2, contiguous with the vernalization locus,VRN1, and mapped to chromosome 5A of wheat, may be critical components that link leaf chloroplast redox regulation to enhanced photosynthetic performance, the accumulation of growth-active gibberellins and the dwarf phenotype during cold acclimation prior to the vegetative to reproductive transition controlled by vernalization in winter cereals. Further genetic, molecular and biochemical research to confirm these links and to elucidate the molecular mechanism by which chloroplast redox modulation of CBF expression leads to enhanced photosynthetic performance is required. Because of the superior abiotic stress

  3. Photosynthetic acclimation is important for post-submergence recovery of photosynthesis and growth in two riparian species

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Fang-Li; Nagel, Kerstin A.; Zeng, Bo; Schurr, Ulrich; Matsubara, Shizue

    2009-01-01

    Background and Aims Concomitant increases in O2 and irradiance upon de-submergence can cause photoinhibition and photo-oxidative damage to the photosynthetic apparatus of plants. As energy and carbohydrate supply from photosynthesis is needed for growth, it was hypothesized that post-submergence growth recovery may require efficient photosynthetic acclimation to increased O2 and irradiance to minimize photo-oxidative damage. The hypothesis was tested in two flood-tolerant species: a C3 herb, Alternanthera philoxeroides; and a C4 grass, Hemarthria altissima. The impact of low O2 and low light, typical conditions in turbid floodwater, on post-submergence recovery was assessed by different flooding treatments combined with shading. Methods Experiments were conducted during 30 d of flooding (waterlogging or submergence) with or without shading and subsequent recovery of 20 d under growth conditions. Changes in dry mass, number of branches/tillers, and length of the longest internodes and main stems were recorded to characterize growth responses. Photosynthetic parameters (photosystem II efficiency and non-photochemical quenching) were determined in mature leaves based on chlorophyll a fluorescence measurements. Key Results In both species growth and photosynthesis recovered after the end of the submergence treatment, with recovery of photosynthesis (starting shortly after de-submergence) preceding recovery of growth (pronounced on days 40–50). The effective quantum yield of photosystem II and non-photochemical quenching were diminished during submergence but rapidly increased upon de-submergence. Similar changes were found in all shaded plants, with or without flooding. Submerged plants did not suffer from photoinhibition throughout the recovery period although their growth recovery was retarded. Conclusions After sudden de-submergence the C3 plant A. philoxeroides and the C4 plant H. altissima were both able to maintain the functionality of the photosynthetic

  4. Cytokinin Import Rate as a Signal for Photosynthetic Acclimation to Canopy Light Gradients1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Boonman, Alex; Prinsen, Els; Gilmer, Frank; Schurr, Ulrich; Peeters, Anton J.M.; Voesenek, Laurentius A.C.J.; Pons, Thijs L.

    2007-01-01

    Plants growing in dense canopies are exposed to vertical light gradients and show photosynthetic acclimation at the whole-plant level, resulting in efficient photosynthetic carbon gain. We studied the role of cytokinins transported through the transpiration stream as one of probably multiple signals for photosynthetic acclimation to light gradients using both tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) and Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). We show that substantial variation in leaf transpiration parallels the light gradient in tobacco canopies and experimental reduction of the transpiration rate of a leaf, independent of light, is sufficient to reduce photosynthetic capacity in both species, as well as transcript levels of the small subunit of Rubisco (rbcS) gene in Arabidopsis. Mass spectrometric analysis of xylem sap collected from intact, transpiring tobacco plants revealed that shaded leaves import less cytokinin than leaves exposed to high light. In Arabidopsis, reduced transpiration rate of a leaf in the light is associated with lower cytokinin concentrations, including the bioactive trans-zeatin and trans-zeatin riboside, as well as reduced expression of the cytokinin-responsive genes ARR7 and ARR16. External application of cytokinin to shaded leaves rescued multiple shade effects, including rbcS transcript levels in both species, as did locally induced cytokinin overproduction in transgenic tobacco plants. From these data, we conclude that light gradients over the foliage of a plant result in reduced cytokinin activity in shaded leaves as a consequence of reduced import through the xylem and that cytokinin is involved in the regulation of whole-plant photosynthetic acclimation to light gradients in canopies. PMID:17277095

  5. Protective effect of UV-A radiation during acclimation of the photosynthetic apparatus to UV-B treatment.

    PubMed

    Štroch, Michal; Materová, Zuzana; Vrábl, Daniel; Karlický, Václav; Šigut, Ladislav; Nezval, Jakub; Špunda, Vladimír

    2015-11-01

    We examined the acclimation response of the photosynthetic apparatus of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) to a combination of UV-A and UV-B radiation (UVAB) and to UV-B radiation alone. Our aim was to evaluate whether UV-A radiation prevents UV-B-induced damage to the photosynthetic apparatus and whether UV-A pre-acclimation is required to mitigate the negative influence of UV-B radiation. Barley plants were grown from seeds under low photosynthetically active radiation (50 μmol m(-2) s(-1)) either in the absence or presence of UV-A radiation (UVA- and UVA+ plants, respectively). After 8 days of development, plants were exposed simultaneously to UV-A and UV-B radiation for the next 6 days. Additionally, UVA- plants were exposed to UV-B radiation alone. The UVA+ plants had a higher CO2 assimilation rate near the light-saturation region (A(N)) and a higher content of both total chlorophylls (Chls) and total carotenoids than the UVA- plants. Chls content, A(N), the potential quantum yield of photosystem II (PSII) photochemistry (F(V)/F(M)), the capacity of light-induced thermal energy dissipation and the efficiency of excitation energy transfer within PSII remained the same or even increased in both UVA+ and UVA- plants after UVAB treatment. On the contrary, exposure of UVA- plants to UV-B radiation itself led to a reduction in all these characteristics. We revealed that the presence of UV-A radiation during UVAB treatment not only mitigated but completely eliminated the negative effect of UV-B radiation on the functioning of the photosynthetic apparatus and that UV-A pre-acclimation was not crucial for development of this UV-A-induced resistance against UV-B irradiation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Acclimation of Norway spruce photosynthetic apparatus to the combined effect of high irradiance and temperature.

    PubMed

    Stroch, Michal; Vrábl, Daniel; Podolinská, Jana; Kalina, Jirí; Urban, Otmar; Spunda, Vladimír

    2010-05-15

    Diurnal courses of photosynthetic gas exchange parameters, chlorophyll a fluorescence characteristics and the de-epoxidation state of the xanthophyll cycle pigments (DEPS) were measured during the gradual acclimation of 4-year-old Norway spruce seedlings to different photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD) and air temperature (T(air)) regimes, simulating cloudy days with moderate T(air) (LI, maximum PPFD 300 micromol m(-2)s(-1), T(air) range 15-25 degrees C), sunny days with moderate T(air) (HI, maximum PPFD 1000 micromol m(-2)s(-1), T(air) range 15-25 degrees C) and hot sunny days (HI-HT, maximum PPFD 1000 micromol m(-2)s(-1), T(air) range 20-35 degrees C). The plants were acclimated inside a growth chamber and each acclimation regime lasted for 13d. Acclimation to HI conditions led to a strong depression of the net CO(2) assimilation rates (A(N)), particularly during noon and afternoon periods. Exposure to the HI-HT regime led to a further decrease of A(N) even during the morning period. Insufficient stomatal conductance was found to be the main reason for depressed A(N) under HI and HI-HT conditions. Only slight changes of the maximum photosystem II (PSII) photochemical efficiency (F(V)/F(M)), in the range of 0.78-0.82, supported the resistance of the Norway spruce photosynthetic apparatus against PSII photoinhibition during acclimation to both HI and HI-HT conditions. The HI plants showed increased content of xanthophyll cycle pigments (VAZ) and enhanced efficiency of thermal energy dissipation within PSII (D) that closely correlated with the increased DEPS. In contrast, acclimation to the HI-HT regime resulted in a slight reduction of VAZ content and significantly diminished D and DEPS values during the entire day in comparison with HI plants. These results indicate a minor role of the xanthophyll cycle-mediated thermal dissipation in PSII photoprotection under elevated temperatures. The different contributions of the thermal dissipation and non

  7. Ion antiport accelerates photosynthetic acclimation in fluctuating light environments

    PubMed Central

    Armbruster, Ute; Carrillo, L. Ruby; Venema, Kees; Pavlovic, Lazar; Schmidtmann, Elisabeth; Kornfeld, Ari; Jahns, Peter; Berry, Joseph A.; Kramer, David M.; Jonikas, Martin C.

    2014-01-01

    Many photosynthetic organisms globally, including crops, forests and algae, must grow in environments where the availability of light energy fluctuates dramatically. How photosynthesis maintains high efficiency despite such fluctuations in its energy source remains poorly understood. Here we show that Arabidopsis thaliana K+ efflux antiporter (KEA3) is critical for high photosynthetic efficiency under fluctuating light. On a shift from dark to low light, or high to low light, kea3 mutants show prolonged dissipation of absorbed light energy as heat. KEA3 localizes to the thylakoid membrane, and allows proton efflux from the thylakoid lumen by proton/potassium antiport. KEA3’s activity accelerates the downregulation of pH-dependent energy dissipation after transitions to low light, leading to faster recovery of high photosystem II quantum efficiency and increased CO2 assimilation. Our results reveal a mechanism that increases the efficiency of photosynthesis under fluctuating light. PMID:25451040

  8. Photosynthetic acclimation to dynamic changes in environmental conditions associated with deciduous overstory phenology in Daphniphyllum humile, an evergreen understory shrub.

    PubMed

    Katahata, Shinichiro; Naramoto, Masaaki; Kakubari, Yoshitaka; Mukai, Yuzuru

    2005-04-01

    Photoprotective responses during photosynthetic acclimation in Daphniphyllum humile Maxim, an evergreen understory shrub that grows in temperate deciduous forests, were examined in relation to changes in light availability and temperature caused by the seasonal dynamics of canopy leaf phenology. Gradual increases in irradiance in the understory from summer to autumn as overstory foliage senesced were accompanied by increased concentrations of xanthophyll cycle pigments (VAZ) in understory leaves. The chlorophyll (Chl) a/b ratio in understory leaves also increased from summer to autumn, reflecting the change in ratio of the light-harvesting antenna to the reaction center. However, low temperatures following overstory leaf fall reduced Rubisco activity. In contrast, the photosynthetic capactiy of leaves of D. humile growing at the forest border, which was higher in summer than that of leaves of understory plants, decreased in autumn. In autumn, Fv/Fm ratios decreased and concentrations of zeaxanthin (Z) and especially antheraxanthin (A) increased in leaves of both forest-border and understory plants. Although VAZ was twice as high in leaves of forest-border than of understory plants, NPQ was similar in both. We conclude that leaves of understory plants are able to acclimate to seasonal changes in light and temperature by varying their photosynthetic and photoprotective functions, thereby taking advantage of the favorable light conditions caused by overstory leaf fall.

  9. Long-term water stress leads to acclimation of drought sensitivity of photosynthetic capacity in xeric but not riparian Eucalyptus species.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shuang-Xi; Medlyn, Belinda E; Prentice, Iain Colin

    2016-01-01

    Experimental drought is well documented to induce a decline in photosynthetic capacity. However, if given time to acclimate to low water availability, the photosynthetic responses of plants to low soil moisture content may differ from those found in short-term experiments. This study aims to test whether plants acclimate to long-term water stress by modifying the functional relationships between photosynthetic traits and water stress, and whether species of contrasting habitat differ in their degree of acclimation. Three Eucalyptus taxa from xeric and riparian habitats were compared with regard to their gas exchange responses under short- and long-term drought. Photosynthetic parameters were measured after 2 and 4 months of watering treatments, namely field capacity or partial drought. At 4 months, all plants were watered to field capacity, then watering was stopped. Further measurements were made during the subsequent 'drying-down', continuing until stomata were closed. Two months of partial drought consistently reduced assimilation rate, stomatal sensitivity parameters (g1), apparent maximum Rubisco activity (V'(cmax)) and maximum electron transport rate (J'(max)). Eucalyptus occidentalis from the xeric habitat showed the smallest decline in V'(cmax) and J'(max); however, after 4 months, V'(cmax) and J'(max) had recovered. Species differed in their degree of V'(cmax) acclimation. Eucalyptus occidentalis showed significant acclimation of the pre-dawn leaf water potential at which the V'(cmax) and 'true' V(cmax) (accounting for mesophyll conductance) declined most steeply during drying-down. The findings indicate carbon loss under prolonged drought could be over-estimated without accounting for acclimation. In particular, (1) species from contrasting habitats differed in the magnitude of V'(cmax) reduction in short-term drought; (2) long-term drought allowed the possibility of acclimation, such that V'(cmax) reduction was mitigated; (3) xeric species showed a

  10. The photosynthetic acclimation of Lolium perenne in response to three years growth in a free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) system

    SciTech Connect

    Hymus, Graham J.

    1996-08-01

    Pure stands of Ryegrass were in their third year of growth in the field, exposed to either ambient (355 μmol mol-1), or elevated (600 μmol mol-1) atmospheric CO2 concentration. A Free-Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) system was used to maintain the elevated CO2 concentration whilst limiting experimental constraints on the field conditions. The theoretically predicted increase in the net rates of CO2 uptake per unit leaf area (A {mu}mol mol-1) as a consequence, primarily, of the suppression of photorespiration by CO2 a competitive inhibitor of RubP oxygenation by Rubisco, was observed for the Lolium perenne studied. Also observed was a general decline in leaf evapotranspiration (E) consistent with observations of increased water use efficiency of crops grown in elevated CO2. Enhancement of leaf A in the FACE grown L. perenne ranged from 26.5 1 % to 44.95% over the course of a diurnal set of measurements. Whilst reductions in leaf E reached a maximum of 16.61% over the same diurnal course of-measurements. The increase in A was reconciled with an absence of the commonly observed decline in Vcmax as a measure of the maximum in vivo carboxylation capacity of the primary carboxylasing enzyme Rubisco and Jmax a measure of the maximum rate of electron transport. The manipulation of the source sink balance of the crop, stage of canopy regrowth or height in the canopy had no effect on the observation of a lack of response. The findings of this study will be interpreted with respect to the long term implications of C3 crops being able to adapt physiologically to maximize the potential benefits conferred by growth in elevated CO2.

  11. Photosynthetic recovery and acclimation to excess light intensity in the rehydrated lichen soil crusts.

    PubMed

    Wu, Li; Lei, Yaping; Lan, Shubin; Hu, Chunxiang

    2017-01-01

    As an important successional stage and main type of biological soil crusts (BSCs) in Shapotou region of China (southeastern edge of Tengger Desert), lichen soil crusts (LSCs) often suffer from many stresses, such as desiccation and excess light intensity. In this study, the chlorophyll fluorescence and CO2 exchange in the rehydrated LSCs were detected under a series of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) gradients to study the photosynthetic acclimation of LSCs. The results showed that although desiccation leaded to the loss of photosynthetic activity in LSCs, the fluorescence parameters including Fo, Fv and Fv/Fm of LSCs could be well recovered after rehydration. After the recovery of photosynthetic activity, the effective photosynthetic efficiency ΦPSII detected by Imaging PAM had declined to nearly 0 within both the lichen thallus upper and lower layers when the PAR increased to 200 μE m-2 s-1, however the net photosynthesis detected by the CO2 gas analyzer in the LSCs still appeared when the PAR increased to 1000 μE m-2 s-1. Our results indicate that LSCs acclimating to high PAR, on the one hand is ascribed to the special structure in crust lichens, making the incident light into the lichen thallus be weakened; on the other hand the massive accumulation of photosynthetic pigments in LSCs also provides a protective barrier for the photosynthetic organisms against radiation damage. Furthermore, the excessive light energy absorbed by crust lichens is also possibly dissipated by the increasing non-photochemical quenching, therefore to some extent providing some protection for LSCs.

  12. Photosynthetic recovery and acclimation to excess light intensity in the rehydrated lichen soil crusts

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Li; Lei, Yaping; Lan, Shubin; Hu, Chunxiang

    2017-01-01

    As an important successional stage and main type of biological soil crusts (BSCs) in Shapotou region of China (southeastern edge of Tengger Desert), lichen soil crusts (LSCs) often suffer from many stresses, such as desiccation and excess light intensity. In this study, the chlorophyll fluorescence and CO2 exchange in the rehydrated LSCs were detected under a series of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) gradients to study the photosynthetic acclimation of LSCs. The results showed that although desiccation leaded to the loss of photosynthetic activity in LSCs, the fluorescence parameters including Fo, Fv and Fv/Fm of LSCs could be well recovered after rehydration. After the recovery of photosynthetic activity, the effective photosynthetic efficiency ΦPSII detected by Imaging PAM had declined to nearly 0 within both the lichen thallus upper and lower layers when the PAR increased to 200 μE m-2 s-1, however the net photosynthesis detected by the CO2 gas analyzer in the LSCs still appeared when the PAR increased to 1000 μE m-2 s-1. Our results indicate that LSCs acclimating to high PAR, on the one hand is ascribed to the special structure in crust lichens, making the incident light into the lichen thallus be weakened; on the other hand the massive accumulation of photosynthetic pigments in LSCs also provides a protective barrier for the photosynthetic organisms against radiation damage. Furthermore, the excessive light energy absorbed by crust lichens is also possibly dissipated by the increasing non-photochemical quenching, therefore to some extent providing some protection for LSCs. PMID:28257469

  13. UV-B radiation and photosynthetic irradiance acclimate eggplant for outdoor exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Latimer, J. G.; Mitchell, C. A.; Mitchell, G. A.

    1987-01-01

    Treatment of greenhouse-grown eggplant (Solanum melongena L. var. esculentum Nees. 'Burpee's Black Beauty') seedlings with supplemental photosynthetically active radiation from cool-white fluorescent lamps increased growth of plants subsequently transferred outdoors relative to growth of plants that received no supplemental radiation or were shaded to 45% of solar irradiation in the greenhouse before transfer outdoors. Eggplant seedlings transferred outdoors were placed under plastic tarps either to provide relative protection from solar ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation (280-315 nm) using Mylar film or to allow exposure to UV-B using cellulose acetate. Protection of seedlings from UV-B radiation resulted in greater leaf expansion than for UV-B-exposed seedlings, but no change in leaf or shoot dry weight occurred after 9 days of treatment. Specific leaf weight increased in response to UV-B exposure outdoors. Exposure of eggplant to UV-B radiation from fluorescent sunlamps in the greenhouse also decreased leaf expansion and leaf and shoot dry weight gain after 5 days of treatment. However, there were no differences in leaf or shoot dry weight relative to control plants after 12 days of UV-B treatment, indicating that UV-B treated plants had acclimated to the treatment and actually had caught up with non-UV-B-irradiated plants in terms of growth.

  14. UV-B radiation and photosynthetic irradiance acclimate eggplant for outdoor exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Latimer, J. G.; Mitchell, C. A.; Mitchell, G. A.

    1987-01-01

    Treatment of greenhouse-grown eggplant (Solanum melongena L. var. esculentum Nees. 'Burpee's Black Beauty') seedlings with supplemental photosynthetically active radiation from cool-white fluorescent lamps increased growth of plants subsequently transferred outdoors relative to growth of plants that received no supplemental radiation or were shaded to 45% of solar irradiation in the greenhouse before transfer outdoors. Eggplant seedlings transferred outdoors were placed under plastic tarps either to provide relative protection from solar ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation (280-315 nm) using Mylar film or to allow exposure to UV-B using cellulose acetate. Protection of seedlings from UV-B radiation resulted in greater leaf expansion than for UV-B-exposed seedlings, but no change in leaf or shoot dry weight occurred after 9 days of treatment. Specific leaf weight increased in response to UV-B exposure outdoors. Exposure of eggplant to UV-B radiation from fluorescent sunlamps in the greenhouse also decreased leaf expansion and leaf and shoot dry weight gain after 5 days of treatment. However, there were no differences in leaf or shoot dry weight relative to control plants after 12 days of UV-B treatment, indicating that UV-B treated plants had acclimated to the treatment and actually had caught up with non-UV-B-irradiated plants in terms of growth.

  15. Temperature response of photosynthesis in C3, C4, and CAM plants: temperature acclimation and temperature adaptation.

    PubMed

    Yamori, Wataru; Hikosaka, Kouki; Way, Danielle A

    2014-02-01

    Most plants show considerable capacity to adjust their photosynthetic characteristics to their growth temperatures (temperature acclimation). The most typical case is a shift in the optimum temperature for photosynthesis, which can maximize the photosynthetic rate at the growth temperature. These plastic adjustments can allow plants to photosynthesize more efficiently at their new growth temperatures. In this review article, we summarize the basic differences in photosynthetic reactions in C3, C4, and CAM plants. We review the current understanding of the temperature responses of C3, C4, and CAM photosynthesis, and then discuss the underlying physiological and biochemical mechanisms for temperature acclimation of photosynthesis in each photosynthetic type. Finally, we use the published data to evaluate the extent of photosynthetic temperature acclimation in higher plants, and analyze which plant groups (i.e., photosynthetic types and functional types) have a greater inherent ability for photosynthetic acclimation to temperature than others, since there have been reported interspecific variations in this ability. We found that the inherent ability for temperature acclimation of photosynthesis was different: (1) among C3, C4, and CAM species; and (2) among functional types within C3 plants. C3 plants generally had a greater ability for temperature acclimation of photosynthesis across a broad temperature range, CAM plants acclimated day and night photosynthetic process differentially to temperature, and C4 plants was adapted to warm environments. Moreover, within C3 species, evergreen woody plants and perennial herbaceous plants showed greater temperature homeostasis of photosynthesis (i.e., the photosynthetic rate at high-growth temperature divided by that at low-growth temperature was close to 1.0) than deciduous woody plants and annual herbaceous plants, indicating that photosynthetic acclimation would be particularly important in perennial, long-lived species that

  16. Site fertility and the morphological and photosynthetic acclimation of Pinus sylvestris needles to light.

    PubMed

    Niinemets, U; Ellsworth, D S; Lukjanova, A; Tobias, M

    2001-11-01

    Morphological and photosynthetic acclimation of current-year needles to canopy gradients in light availability (seasonal mean integrated quantum flux density, Q(int)) was studied in the temperate conifer, Pinus sylvestris L., at two sites of contrasting nutrient availability. The nutrient-rich site supported a monospecific P. sylvestris stand on an old-field. The trees were approximately 30 years old and 19-21 m tall. Mean foliar N and P contents (+/- SD) were 1.53 +/- 0.11% and 0.196 +/- 0.017%, respectively. The nutrient-poor site was located on a raised bog supporting a sparse stand of 50- to 100-year-old trees, with a height of 1-2 m, and mean needle N and P contents of 0.86 +/- 0.12% and 0.074 +/- 0.010%, respectively. At both sites, needle thickness (T) and width (W) increased with increasing Qint, and leaf dry mass per unit leaf area (MA) was also greater at higher irradiance. The light effects on MA-the product of needle density (D) and volume to total area ratio (V/AT)-resulted primarily from large increases in V/AT with Qint rather than from modifications of D, which was relatively insensitive to light. Although needle morphology versus light relationships were qualitatively similar at both sites, needles were shorter, and the slopes of W, T, MA and V/AT versus light relationships were lower, at the nutrient-poor than at the nutrient-rich site, indicating that the plasticity of foliar morphological characteristics was affected by nutrient availability. As a result of lower plasticity, needles at the nutrient-poor site were narrower, thinner, and had lower MA at high irradiance than needles at the nutrient-rich site. The maximum carboxylase activity of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Vcmax) and the maximum photosynthetic electron transport rate (Jmax) scaled positively with foliar N and P contents. The correlations were generally stronger with P than with N, suggesting that needle photosynthetic capacity was more heavily limited by the

  17. High-temperature sensitivity and its acclimation for photosynthetic electron reactions of desert succulents

    SciTech Connect

    Chetti, M.B.; Nobel, P.S. )

    1987-08-01

    Photosynthetic electron reactions of succulent plants from hot deserts are able to tolerate extremely high temperatures and to acclimate to seasonal increase in temperature. In this study, we report the influence of relatively long, in vivo, high-temperature treatments on electron transport reactions for two desert succulents, Agave deserti and Opuntia ficus-indica, species which can tolerate 60{degree}C. Whole chain electron transport averaged 3{degree}C more sensitive to a 1-hour high-temperature treatment than did PSII (Photosystem II) which in turn averaged 3{degree}C more sensitive than did PSI. For plants maintained at day/night air temperatures of 30{degree}C/20{degree}C, treatment at 50{degree}C cause these reactions to be inhibited an average of 39% during the first hour, an additional 31% during the next 4 hours, and 100% by 12 hours. Upon shifting the plants from 30{degree}C/20{degree}C to 45{degree}C/35{degree}C, the high temperatures where activity was inhibited 50% increased 3{degree}C to 8{degree}C for the three electron transport reactions, the half-times for acclimation averaging 5 days for A. deserti and 4 days for O. ficus-indica. For the 45{degree}C/35{degree}C plants treated at 60{degree}C for 1 hour, PSI activity was reduced by 54% for A. deserti and 36% for O. ficus-indica. Acclimation leads to a toleration of very high temperatures without substantial disruption of electron transport for these desert succulents, facilitating their survival in hot deserts. Indeed, the electron transport reactions of these species tolerate longer periods at higher temperatures than any other vascular plants so far reported.

  18. High-temperature sensitivity and its acclimation for photosynthetic electron transport reactions of desert succulents.

    PubMed

    Chetti, M B; Nobel, P S

    1987-08-01

    Photosynthetic electron transport reactions of succulent plants from hot deserts are able to tolerate extremely high temperatures and to acclimate to seasonal increases in temperature. In this study, we report the influence of relatively long, in vivo, high-temperature treatments on electron transport reactions for two desert succulents, Agave deserti and Opuntia ficus-indica, species which can tolerate 60 degrees C. Whole chain electron transport averaged 3 degrees C more sensitive to a 1-hour high-temperature treatment than did PSII (Photosystem II) which in turn averaged 3 degrees C more sensitive than did PSI. For plants maintained at day/night air temperatures of 30 degrees C/20 degrees C, treatment at 50 degrees C caused these reactions to be inhibited an average of 39% during the first hour, an additional 31% during the next 4 hours, and 100% by 12 hours. Upon shifting the plants from 30 degrees C/20 degrees C to 45 degrees C/35 degrees C, the high temperatures where activity was inhibited 50% increased 3 degrees C to 8 degrees C for the three electron transport reactions, the half-times for acclimation averaging 5 days for A. deserti and 4 days for O. ficus-indica. For the 45 degrees C/35 degrees C plants treated at 60 degrees C for 1 hour, PSI activity was reduced by 54% for A. deserti and 36% for O. ficus-indica. Acclimation leads to a toleration of very high temperatures without substantial disruption of electron transport for these desert succulents, facilitating their survival in hot deserts. Indeed, the electron transport reactions of these species tolerate longer periods at higher temperatures than any other vascular plant so far reported.

  19. High-Temperature Sensitivity and Its Acclimation for Photosynthetic Electron Transport Reactions of Desert Succulents 1

    PubMed Central

    Chetti, Mahadev B.; Nobel, Park S.

    1987-01-01

    Photosynthetic electron transport reactions of succulent plants from hot deserts are able to tolerate extremely high temperatures and to acclimate to seasonal increases in temperature. In this study, we report the influence of relatively long, in vivo, high-temperature treatments on electron transport reactions for two desert succulents, Agave deserti and Opuntia ficus-indica, species which can tolerate 60°C. Whole chain electron transport averaged 3°C more sensitive to a 1-hour high-temperature treatment than did PSII (Photosystem II) which in turn averaged 3°C more sensitive than did PSI. For plants maintained at day/night air temperatures of 30°C/20°C, treatment at 50°C caused these reactions to be inhibited an average of 39% during the first hour, an additional 31% during the next 4 hours, and 100% by 12 hours. Upon shifting the plants from 30°C/20°C to 45°C/35°C, the high temperatures where activity was inhibited 50% increased 3°C to 8°C for the three electron transport reactions, the half-times for acclimation averaging 5 days for A. deserti and 4 days for O. ficus-indica. For the 45°C/35°C plants treated at 60°C for 1 hour, PSI activity was reduced by 54% for A. deserti and 36% for O. ficus-indica. Acclimation leads to a toleration of very high temperatures without substantial disruption of electron transport for these desert succulents, facilitating their survival in hot deserts. Indeed, the electron transport reactions of these species tolerate longer periods at higher temperatures than any other vascular plant so far reported. PMID:16665562

  20. Thermal Plasticity of Photosynthesis: the Role of Acclimation in Forest Responses to a Warming Climate

    SciTech Connect

    Gunderson, Carla A; O'Hara, Keiran H; Campion, Christina M; Walker, Ashley V; Edwards, Nelson T

    2010-01-01

    The increasing air temperatures central to climate change predictions have the potential to alter forest ecosystem function and structure by exceeding temperatures optimal for carbon gain. Such changes are projected to threaten survival of sensitive species, leading to local extinctions, range migrations, and altered forest composition. This study investigated photosynthetic sensitivity to temperature and the potential for acclimation in relation to the climatic provenance of five species of deciduous trees, Liquidambar styraciflua, Quercus rubra, Quercus falcata, Betula alleghaniensis, and Populus grandidentata. Open-top chambers supplied three levels of warming (+0, +2, and +4 C above ambient) over 3 years, tracking natural temperature variability. Optimal temperature for CO2 assimilation was strongly correlated with daytime temperature in all treatments, but assimilation rates at those optima were comparable. Adjustment of thermal optima was confirmed in all species, whether temperatures varied with season or treatment, and regardless of climate in the species' range or provenance of the plant material. Temperature optima from 17 to 34 were observed. Across species, acclimation potentials varied from 0.55 C to 1.07 C per degree change in daytime temperature. Responses to the temperature manipulation were not different from the seasonal acclimation observed in mature indigenous trees, suggesting that photosynthetic responses should not be modeled using static temperature functions, but should incorporate an adjustment to account for acclimation. The high degree of homeostasis observed indicates that direct impacts of climatic warming on forest productivity, species survival, and range limits may be less than predicted by existing models.

  1. Vertical, horizontal and azimuthal variations in leaf photosynthetic characteristics within a Fagus crenata crown in relation to light acclimation.

    PubMed

    Iio, Atsuhiro; Fukasawa, Hisakazu; Nose, Yachiho; Kato, Shuri; Kakubari, Yoshitaka

    2005-05-01

    An understanding of spatial variations in gas exchange parameters in relation to the light environment is crucial for modeling canopy photosynthesis. We measured vertical, horizontal and azimuthal (north and south) variations in photosynthetic capacity (i.e., the maximum rate of carboxylation: Vcmax), nitrogen content (N), leaf mass per area (LMA) and chlorophyll content (Chl) in relation to relative photosynthetic photon flux (rPPF) within a Fagus crenata Blume crown. The horizontal gradient of rPPF was similar in magnitude to the vertical gradient of rPPF from the upper to the lower crown. The rPPF in the north quadrant of the crown was slightly lower than in the south quadrant. Nitrogen content per area (Narea), LMA and Vcmax were strictly proportional to rPPF, irrespective of the vertical direction, horizontal direction and crown azimuth, whereas nitrogen content per dry mass, Chl per area and photosynthetic capacity per dry mass (Vm) were fairly constant. Statistical analyses separating vertical trends from horizontal and azimuthal trends indicated that, although horizontal and vertical light acclimation of leaf properties were similar, there were two significant azimuthal variations: (1) Vcmax was lower in north-facing leaves than in south-facing leaves for a given Narea, indicating low photosynthetic nitrogen-use efficiency (PNUE) of north-facing leaves; and (2) Vcmax was lower in north-facing leaves than in south-facing leaves for a given LMA, indicating low Vm of the north-facing leaves. With respect to the low PNUE of the north-facing leaves, there were no significant azimuthal variations in leaf CO2 conductance from the stomata to the carboxylation site. Biochemical analysis indicated that azimuthal variations in nitrogen allocation to ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) and in nitrogen allocation between carboxylation (Rubisco and other Calvin cycle enzymes) and light harvesting machinery (Chl pigment-protein complexes) were not

  2. Root Restriction as a Factor in Photosynthetic Acclimation of Cotton Seedlings Grown in Elevated Carbon Dioxide 1

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Richard B.; Strain, Boyd R.

    1991-01-01

    Interactive effects of root restriction and atmospheric CO2 enrichment on plant growth, photosynthetic capacity, and carbohydrate partitioning were studied in cotton seedlings (Gossypium hirsutum L.) grown for 28 days in three atmospheric CO2 partial pressures (270, 350, and 650 microbars) and two pot sizes (0.38 and 1.75 liters). Some plants were transplanted from small pots into large pots after 20 days. Reduction of root biomass resulting from growth in small pots was accompanied by decreased shoot biomass and leaf area. When root growth was less restricted, plants exposed to higher CO2 partial pressures produced more shoot and root biomass than plants exposed to lower levels of CO2. In small pots, whole plant biomass and leaf area of plants grown in 270 and 350 microbars of CO2 were not significantly different. Plants grown in small pots in 650 microbars of CO2 produced greater total biomass than plants grown in 350 microbars, but the dry weight gain was found to be primarily an accumulation of leaf starch. Reduced photosynthetic capacity of plants grown at elevated levels of CO2 was clearly associated with inadequate rooting volume. Reductions in net photosynthesis were not associated with decreased stomatal conductance. Reduced carboxylation efficiency in response to CO2 enrichment occurred only when root growth was restricted suggesting that ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase activity may be responsive to plant source-sink balance rather than to CO2 concentration as a single factor. When root-restricted plants were transplanted into large pots, carboxylation efficiency and ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate regeneration capacity increased indicating that acclimation of photosynthesis was reversible. Reductions in photosynthetic capacity as root growth was progressively restricted suggest sink-limited feedback inhibition as a possible mechanism for regulating net photosynthesis of plants grown in elevated CO2. PMID:16668232

  3. Biochemical acclimation, stomatal limitation and precipitation patterns underlie decreases in photosynthetic stimulation of soybean (Glycine max) at elevated [CO₂] and temperatures under fully open air field conditions.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, David M; Ruiz-Vera, Ursula M; Siebers, Matthew H; Gray, Sharon B; Bernacchi, Carl J; Ort, Donald R

    2014-09-01

    The net effect of elevated [CO2] and temperature on photosynthetic acclimation and plant productivity is poorly resolved. We assessed the effects of canopy warming and fully open air [CO2] enrichment on (1) the acclimation of two biochemical parameters that frequently limit photosynthesis (A), the maximum carboxylation capacity of Rubisco (Vc,max) and the maximum potential linear electron flux through photosystem II (Jmax), (2) the associated responses of leaf structural and chemical properties related to A, as well as (3) the stomatal limitation (l) imposed on A, for soybean over two growing seasons in a conventionally managed agricultural field in Illinois, USA. Acclimation to elevated [CO2] was consistent over two growing seasons with respect to Vc,max and Jmax. However, elevated temperature significantly decreased Jmax contributing to lower photosynthetic stimulation by elevated CO2. Large seasonal differences in precipitation altered soil moisture availability modulating the complex effects of elevated temperature and CO2 on biochemical and structural properties related to A. Elevated temperature also reduced the benefit of elevated [CO2] by eliminating decreases in stomatal limitation at elevated [CO2]. These results highlight the critical importance of considering multiple environmental factors (i.e. temperature, moisture, [CO2]) when trying to predict plant productivity in the context of climate change. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Increased photosynthetic acclimation in alfalfa associated with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) and cultivated in greenhouse under elevated CO2.

    PubMed

    Goicoechea, Nieves; Baslam, Marouane; Erice, Gorka; Irigoyen, Juan José

    2014-11-15

    Medicago sativa L. (alfalfa) can exhibit photosynthetic down-regulation when grown in greenhouse conditions under elevated atmospheric CO2. This forage legume can establish a double symbiosis with nitrogen fixing bacteria and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF), which may increase the carbon sink effect of roots. Our aim was to assess whether the association of alfalfa with AMF can avoid, diminish or delay the photosynthetic acclimation observed in previous studies performed with nodulated plants. The results, however, showed that mycorrhizal (M) alfalfa at the end of their vegetative period had lower carbon (C) discrimination than non-mycorrhizal (NM) controls, indicating photosynthetic acclimation under ECO2 in plants associated with AMF. Decreased C discrimination was due to the acclimation of conductance, since the amount of Rubisco and the expression of genes codifying both large and small subunits of Rubisco were similar or slightly higher in M than in NM plants. Moreover, M alfalfa accumulated a greater amount of soluble sugars in leaves than NM plants, thus favoring a down-regulation effect on photosynthetic rates. The enhanced contents of sugars in leaves coincided with a reduced percentage of arbuscules in roots, suggesting decreased sink of carbohydrates from shoots to roots in M plants. The shorter life cycle of alfalfa associated with AMF in comparison with the NM controls may also be related to the accelerated photosynthetic acclimation in M plants. Further research is needed to clarify to what extent this behavior could be extrapolated to alfalfa cultivated in the field and subjected to periodic cutting of shoots under climatic change scenarios. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  5. Sweating responses during heat acclimation and moderate conditioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shvartz, E.; Bhattacharya, A.; Sperinde, S. J.; Brock, P. J.; Sciaraffa, D.; Van Beaumont, W.

    1979-01-01

    Experiments were conducted on ten young male subjects to determine sweating onset, distribution, and patterns as well as the relationships of these responses to body temperature during heat acclimation and moderate conditioning performed in temperate (24 C) conditions. The subjects are randomly assigned to two groups of five subjects each. The experimental period consisted of eight successive days of either graded exercise to exhaustion on a bicycle ergometer in heat (acclimation group) or in a temperate environment (control group). Major conclusions are that (1) acclimation and conditioning result in relatively more sweat rate on the limbs than on the torso, but that these changes are less related to body temperature than torso sweat rate; and (2) sweating sensitivity increases during acclimation and conditioning, but its contribution to heat acclimation is minor.

  6. Sweating responses during heat acclimation and moderate conditioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shvartz, E.; Bhattacharya, A.; Sperinde, S. J.; Brock, P. J.; Sciaraffa, D.; Van Beaumont, W.

    1979-01-01

    Experiments were conducted on ten young male subjects to determine sweating onset, distribution, and patterns as well as the relationships of these responses to body temperature during heat acclimation and moderate conditioning performed in temperate (24 C) conditions. The subjects are randomly assigned to two groups of five subjects each. The experimental period consisted of eight successive days of either graded exercise to exhaustion on a bicycle ergometer in heat (acclimation group) or in a temperate environment (control group). Major conclusions are that (1) acclimation and conditioning result in relatively more sweat rate on the limbs than on the torso, but that these changes are less related to body temperature than torso sweat rate; and (2) sweating sensitivity increases during acclimation and conditioning, but its contribution to heat acclimation is minor.

  7. The hidden function of photosynthesis: a sensing system for environmental conditions that regulates plant acclimation responses.

    PubMed

    Pfannschmidt, Thomas; Yang, Chunhong

    2012-06-01

    Plants convert light energy from the sun into chemical energy by photosynthesis. Since they are sessile, they have to deal with a wide range of conditions in their immediate environment. Many abiotic and biotic parameters exhibit considerable fluctuations which can have detrimental effects especially on the efficiency of photosynthetic light harvesting. During evolution, plants, therefore, evolved a number of acclimation processes which help them to adapt photosynthesis to such environmental changes. This includes protective mechanisms such as excess energy dissipation and processes supporting energy redistribution, e.g. state transitions or photosystem stoichiometry adjustment. Intriguingly, all these responses are triggered by photosynthesis itself via the interplay of its light reaction and the Calvin-Benson cycle with the residing environmental condition. Thus, besides its primary function in harnessing and converting light energy, photosynthesis acts as a sensing system for environmental changes that controls molecular acclimation responses which adapt the photosynthetic function to the environmental change. Important signalling parameters directly or indirectly affected by the environment are the pH gradient across the thylakoid membrane and the redox states of components of the photosynthetic electron transport chain and/or electron end acceptors coupled to it. Recent advances demonstrate that these signals control post-translational modifications of the photosynthetic protein complexes and also affect plastid and nuclear gene expression machineries as well as metabolic pathways providing a regulatory framework for an integrated response of the plant to the environment at all cellular levels.

  8. Photosynthetic Acclimation of Symbiodinium in hospite Depends on Vertical Position in the Tissue of the Scleractinian Coral Montastrea curta

    PubMed Central

    Lichtenberg, Mads; Larkum, Anthony W. D.; Kühl, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Coral photophysiology has been studied intensively from the colony scale down to the scale of single fluorescent pigment granules as light is one of the key determinants for coral health. We studied the photophysiology of the oral and aboral symbiont band of scleractinian coral Montastrea curta to investigate if different acclimation to light exist in hospite on a polyp scale. By combined use of electrochemical and fiber-optic microsensors for O2, scalar irradiance and variable chlorophyll fluorescence, we could characterize the physical and chemical microenvironment experienced by the symbionts and, for the first time, estimate effective quantum yields of PSII photochemistry and rates of electron transport at the position of the zooxanthellae corrected for the in-tissue gradient of scalar irradiance. The oral- and aboral Symbiodinium layers received ∼71% and ∼33% of surface scalar irradiance, respectively, and the two symbiont layers experience considerable differences in light exposure. Rates of gross photosynthesis did not differ markedly between the oral- and aboral layer and curves of PSII electron transport rates corrected for scalar irradiance in hospite, showed that the light use efficiency under sub-saturating light conditions were similar between the two layers. However, the aboral Symbiodinium band did not experience photosynthetic saturation, even at the highest investigated irradiance where the oral layer was clearly saturated. We thus found a different light acclimation response for the oral and aboral symbiont bands in hospite, and discuss whether such response could be shaped by spectral shifts caused by tissue gradients of scalar irradiance. Based on our experimental finding, combined with previous knowledge, we present a conceptual model on the photophysiology of Symbiodinium residing inside living coral tissue under natural gradients of light and chemical parameters. PMID:26955372

  9. Biochemical acclimation, stomatal limitation and precipitation patterns underlie decreases in photosynthetic stimulation of Soybean (Glycine max) at elevated [CO2] and temperatures under fully open air field conditions

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The net effect of elevated [CO2] and temperature on photosynthetic acclimation and plant productivity is poorly resolved. We assessed the effects of canopy warming and fully open air [CO2] enrichment on 1) the acclimation of two biochemical parameters that frequently limit photosynthesis (A), the ma...

  10. The photosynthetic acclimation of Lolium perenne growing in a free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) system

    SciTech Connect

    Bryant, Jonathan B.

    1994-11-01

    Stands of Ryegrass (Lolium perenne L. cv. Bastion) were grown in the field at ambient or elevated (600μmol/mol) CO2 concentration, high (560Kg/ha) or low (140Kg/ha) nitrogen addition and with a frequent (every 4 weeks) or infrequent (every 8 weeks) cutting regime. Plants were in the second year of a 3 year experiment. Exposure to elevated CO2 was carried out with a Free-Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) system which provides the most "realistic" system of CO2 fumigation currently available. Elevated CO2 increased diurnal CO2 assimilation by between 34 and 88% whilst reducing rates of stomatal conductance by between 1 and 42%. However, analysis of the A vs. Ci response showed considerable acclimation of the photosynthetic apparatus in response to elevated CO2 - Vcmax as an in vivo measure of RubisCO activity, decreased by between 29 and 35% in high CO2, whilst Jmax, as a measure of the RubP regeneration capacity, showed no significant change. Two out of three additional perennial grassland species studied showed similar acclamatory behavior to Ryegrass. Diurnal assimilation rate, Jmax and, in most cases, Vcmax, increased significantly directly after cutting of Ryegrass stands, but nitrogen treatment had little effect on any of these parameters. Neither stomatal density, stomatal index nor stomatal pore length of Ryegrass were significantly altered by growth in elevated CO2. The results are discussed in terms of the limitation imposed on maximizing photosynthetic and growth responses of Ryegrass at elevated CO2, by the ability of perennial species to increase long-term sink capacity under these conditions.

  11. Nutrient scavenging and energy management: acclimation responses in nitrogen and sulfur deprived Chlamydomonas.

    PubMed

    Saroussi, Shai; Sanz-Luque, Emanuel; Kim, Rick G; Grossman, Arthur R

    2017-10-01

    Photosynthetic organisms have evolved to modulate their metabolism to accommodate the highly dynamic light and nutrient conditions in nature. In this review we discuss ways in which the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii acclimates to nitrogen and sulfur deprivation, conditions that would limit the anabolic use of excitation energy because of a markedly reduced capacity for cell growth and division. Major aspects of this acclimation process are stringently regulated and involve scavenging the limited nutrient from internal and external sources, and the redirection of fixed carbon toward energy storage (e.g. starch, oil). However, photosynthetic organisms have also evolved mechanisms to dissipate excess absorbed light energy, and to eliminate potentially dangerous energetic electrons through the reduction of O2 and H(+) to H2O; this reduction can occur both through photosynthetic electron transport (e.g. Mehler reaction, chlororespiration) and mitochondrial respiration. Furthermore, algal cells likely exploit other energy management pathways that are currently not linked to nutrient limitation responses or that remain to be identified. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Adaptive and acclimative responses of cyanobacteria to far-red light.

    PubMed

    Gan, Fei; Bryant, Donald A

    2015-10-01

    Cyanobacteria use three major photosynthetic complexes, photosystem (PS) I, PS II and phycobilisomes, to harvest and convert sunlight into chemical energy. Until recently, it was generally thought that cyanobacteria only used light between 400 nm and 700 nm to perform photosynthesis. However, the discovery of chlorophyll (Chl) d in Acaryochloris marina and Chl f in Halomicronema hongdechloris showed that some cyanobacteria could utilize far-red light. The synthesis of Chl f (and Chl d) is part of an extensive acclimation process, far-red light photoacclimation (FaRLiP), which occurs in many cyanobacteria. Organisms performing FaRLiP contain a conserved set of 17 genes encoding paralogous subunits of the three major photosynthetic complexes. Far-red light photoacclimation leads to substantial remodelling of the photosynthetic apparatus and other changes in cellular metabolism through extensive changes in transcription. Far-red light photoacclimation appears to be controlled by a red/far-red photoreceptor, RfpA, as well as two response regulators (RfpB and RfpC), one of which is a DNA-binding protein. The remodelled photosynthetic complexes, including novel phycobiliproteins, absorb light above 700 nm and enable cells to grow in far-red light. A much simpler acclimation response, low-light photoacclimation (LoLiP), occurs in some cyanobacteria that contain the apcD4-apcB3-isiX cluster, which allows cells to grow under low light conditions. © 2015 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Proteomic responses of blue mussel (Mytilus) congeners to temperature acclimation.

    PubMed

    Fields, Peter A; Zuzow, Marcus J; Tomanek, Lars

    2012-04-01

    The ability to acclimate to variable environmental conditions affects the biogeographic range of species, their success at colonizing new habitats, and their likelihood of surviving rapid anthropogenic climate change. Here we compared responses to temperature acclimation (4 weeks at 7, 13 and 19°C) in gill tissue of the warm-adapted intertidal blue mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis, an invasive species in the northeastern Pacific, and the cold-adapted M. trossulus, the native congener in the region, to better understand the physiological differences underlying the ongoing competition. Using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and tandem mass spectrometry, we showed that warm acclimation caused changes in cytoskeletal composition and proteins of energy metabolism in both species, consistent with increasing rates of filtration and respiration due to increased ciliary activity. During cold acclimation, changes in cytoskeletal proteins were accompanied by increasing abundances of oxidative stress proteins and molecular chaperones, possibly because of the increased production of aldehydes as indicated by the upregulation of aldehyde dehydrogenase. The cold-adapted M. trossulus showed increased abundances of molecular chaperones at 19°C, but M. galloprovincialis did not, suggesting that the two species differ in their long-term upper thermal limits. In contrast, the warm-adapted M. galloprovincialis showed a stronger response to cold acclimation than M. trossulus, including changes in abundance in more proteins and differing protein expression profiles between 7 and 13°C, a pattern absent in M. trossulus. In general, increasing levels of oxidative stress proteins inversely correlate with modifications in Krebs cycle and electron transport chain proteins, indicating a trade-off between oxidative stress resistance and energy production. Overall, our results help explain why M. galloprovincialis has replaced M. trossulus in southern California over the last century, but

  14. A chloroplast thylakoid lumen protein is required for proper photosynthetic acclimation of plants under fluctuating light environments.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Last, Robert L

    2017-09-19

    Despite our increasingly sophisticated understanding of mechanisms ensuring efficient photosynthesis under laboratory-controlled light conditions, less is known about the regulation of photosynthesis under fluctuating light. This is important because-in nature-photosynthetic organisms experience rapid and extreme changes in sunlight, potentially causing deleterious effects on photosynthetic efficiency and productivity. Here we report that the chloroplast thylakoid lumenal protein MAINTENANCE OF PHOTOSYSTEM II UNDER HIGH LIGHT 2 (MPH2; encoded by At4g02530) is required for growth acclimation of Arabidopsis thaliana plants under controlled photoinhibitory light and fluctuating light environments. Evidence is presented that mph2 mutant light stress susceptibility results from a defect in photosystem II (PSII) repair, and our results are consistent with the hypothesis that MPH2 is involved in disassembling monomeric complexes during regeneration of dimeric functional PSII supercomplexes. Moreover, mph2-and previously characterized PSII repair-defective mutants-exhibited reduced growth under fluctuating light conditions, while PSII photoprotection-impaired mutants did not. These findings suggest that repair is not only required for PSII maintenance under static high-irradiance light conditions but is also a regulatory mechanism facilitating photosynthetic adaptation under fluctuating light environments. This work has implications for improvement of agricultural plant productivity through engineering PSII repair.

  15. The temporal and species dynamics of photosynthetic acclimation in flag leaves of rice (Oryza sativa L.) and wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) under elevated carbon dioxide

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Although initial exposure to higher atmospheric carbon dioxide can result in enhanced photosynthetic rates, temporal declines in photosynthesis associated with prolonged exposure to higher CO2 levels can also result in a down-regulation or acclimation of photosynthesis. In this study, we tested for...

  16. Cold acclimation of Arabidopsis thaliana results in incomplete recovery of photosynthetic capacity, associated with an increased reduction of the chloroplast stroma.

    PubMed

    Savitch, L V; Barker-Astrom, J; Ivanov, A G; Hurry, V; Oquist, G; Huner, N P; Gardeström, P

    2001-12-01

    The effects of short-term cold stress and long-term cold acclimation on the light reactions of photosynthesis were examined in vivo to assess their contributions to photosynthetic acclimation to low temperature in Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh.. All photosynthetic measurements were made at the temperature of exposure: 23 degrees C for non-acclimated plants and 5 degrees C for cold-stressed and cold-acclimated plants. Three-day cold-stress treatments at 5 degrees C inhibited light-saturated rates of CO2 assimilation and O2 evolution by approximately 75%. The 3-day exposure to 5 degrees C also increased the proportion of reduced QA by 50%, decreased the yield of PSII electron transport by 65% and decreased PSI activity by 31%. In contrast, long-term cold acclimation resulted in a strong but incomplete recovery of light-saturated photosynthesis at 5 degrees C. The rates of light-saturated CO2 and O2 gas exchange and the in vivo yield of PSII activity under light-saturating conditions were only 35-40% lower, and the relative redox state of QA only 20% lower, at 5 degrees C after cold acclimation than in controls at 23 degrees C. PSI activity showed full recovery during long-term cold acclimation. Neither short-term cold stress nor long-term cold acclimation of Arabidopsis was associated with a limitation in ATP, and both treatments resulted in an increase in the ATP/NADPH ratio. This increase in ATP/NADPH was associated with an inhibition of PSI cyclic electron transport but there was no apparent change in the Mehler reaction activity in either cold-stressed or cold-acclimated leaves. Cold acclimation also resulted in an increase in the reduction state of the stroma, as indicated by an increased total activity and activation state of NADP-dependent malate dehydrogenase, and increased light-dependent activities of the major regulatory enzymes of the oxidative pentose-phosphate pathway. We suggest that the photosynthetic capacity during cold stress as well as cold

  17. Acclimation of photosynthetic characteristics of the moss Pleurozium schreberi to among-habitat and within-canopy light gradients.

    PubMed

    Tobias, M; Niinemets, U

    2010-09-01

    Light availability varies strongly among moss habitats and within the moss canopy, and vertical variation in light within the canopy further interacts with the age gradient. The interacting controls by habitat and canopy light gradient and senescence have not been studied extensively. We measured light profiles, chlorophyll (Chl), carotenoid (Car) and nitrogen (N) concentrations, and photosynthetic electron transport capacity (J(max)) along habitat and canopy light gradients in the widespread, temperate moss Pleurozium schreberi to separate sources of variation in moss chemical and physiological traits. We hypothesised that this species, like typical feather mosses with both apical and lateral growth, exhibits greater plasticity in the canopy than between habitats due to deeper within-canopy light gradients. For the among-habitat light gradient, Chl, Chl/N and Chl/Car ratio increased with decreasing light availability, indicating enhanced light harvesting in lower light and higher capacity for photoprotection in higher light. N and J(max) were independent of habitat light availability. Within the upper canopy, until 50-60% above-canopy light, changes in moss chemistry and photosynthetic characteristics were analogous to patterns observed for the between-habitat light gradient. In contrast, deeper canopy layers reflected senescence of moss shoots, with pigment and nitrogen concentrations and photosynthetic capacity decreasing with light availability. Thus, variation in chemical and physiological traits within the moss canopy is a balance between acclimation and senescence. This study demonstrates extensive light-dependent variation in moss photosynthetic traits, but also that between-habitat and within-canopy light gradient affects moss physiology and chemistry differently.

  18. BOREAS TE-10 Photosynthetic Response Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Papagno, Andrea (Editor); Middleton, Elizabeth; Sullivan, Joseph

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmospheric Study (BOREAS) TE-10 (Terrestrial Ecology) team collected several data sets in support of its efforts to characterize and interpret information on the gas exchange, reflectance, transmittance, chlorophyll content, carbon content, hydrogen content, nitrogen content, and photosynthetic response of boreal vegetation. This data set contains measurements of quantitative parameters and leaf photosynthetic response to increases in light conducted in the SSA during the growing seasons of 1994 and 1996 using an oxygen electrode system. Leaf photosynthetic responses were not collected in 1996. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884), or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  19. Leaf architectural, vascular and photosynthetic acclimation to temperature in two biennials.

    PubMed

    Muller, Onno; Stewart, Jared J; Cohu, Christopher M; Polutchko, Stephanie K; Demmig-Adams, Barbara; Adams, William W

    2014-12-01

    Acclimation of leaf features to growth temperature was investigated in two biennials (whose life cycle spans summer and winter seasons) using different mechanisms of sugar loading into exporting conduits, Verbascum phoeniceum (employs sugar-synthesizing enzymes driving symplastic loading through plasmodesmatal wall pores of phloem cells) and Malva neglecta (likely apoplastic loader transporting sugar via membrane transport proteins of phloem cells). In both species, acclimation to lower temperature involved greater maximal photosynthesis rates and vein density per leaf area in close correlation with modification of minor vein cellular features. While the symplastically loading biennial exhibited adjustments in the size of minor leaf vein cells (consistent with adjustment of the level of sugar-synthesizing enzymes), the putative apoplastic biennial exhibited adjustments in the number of cells (consistent with adjustment of cell membrane area for transporter placement). This upregulation of morphological and anatomical features at lower growth temperature likely contributes to the success of both the species during the winter. Furthermore, while acclimation to low temperature involved greater leaf mass per area in both species, this resulted from greater leaf thickness in V. phoeniceum vs a greater number of mesophyll cells per leaf area in M. neglecta. Both types of adjustments presumably accommodate more chloroplasts per leaf area contributing to photosynthesis. Both biennials exhibited high foliar vein densities (particularly the solar-tracking M. neglecta), which should aid both sugar export from and delivery of water to the leaves. © 2014 Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society.

  20. Temperature responses of photosynthesis and respiration in Populus balsamifera L.: acclimation versus adaptation.

    PubMed

    Silim, Salim N; Ryan, Natalie; Kubien, David S

    2010-04-01

    To examine the role of acclimation versus adaptation on the temperature responses of CO(2) assimilation, we measured dark respiration (R(n)) and the CO(2) response of net photosynthesis (A) in Populus balsamifera collected from warm and cool habitats and grown at warm and cool temperatures. R(n) and the rate of photosynthetic electron transport (J) are significantly higher in plants grown at 19 versus 27 degrees C; R(n) is not affected by the native thermal habitat. By contrast, both the maximum capacity of rubisco (V(cmax)) and A are relatively insensitive to growth temperature, but both parameters are slightly higher in plants from cool habitats. A is limited by rubisco capacity from 17-37 degrees C regardless of growth temperature, and there is little evidence for an electron-transport limitation. Stomatal conductance (g(s)) is higher in warm-grown plants, but declines with increasing measurement temperature from 17 to 37 degrees C, regardless of growth temperature. The mesophyll conductance (g(m)) is relatively temperature insensitive below 25 degrees C, but g(m) declines at 37 degrees C in cool-grown plants. Plants acclimated to cool temperatures have increased R(n)/A, but this response does not differ between warm- and cool-adapted populations. Primary carbon metabolism clearly acclimates to growth temperature in P. balsamifera, but the ecotypic differences in A suggest that global warming scenarios might affect populations at the northern and southern edges of the boreal forest in different ways.

  1. Photosynthetic responses to the environment. Volume 8

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, H.Y.; Smith, C.M.

    1993-11-01

    This volume contains the proceedings of Photosynthetic Responses to the Environment, a meeting held August 24--27, 1992. The volume contains 10 full papers and 15 mini papers. Separate entries were prepared for the database for each of these presentations.

  2. An inorganic carbon transport system responsible for acclimation specific to air levels of CO2 in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yingjun; Spalding, Martin H

    2006-06-27

    Many photosynthetic microorganisms acclimate to CO(2) limited environments by induction and operation of CO(2)-concentrating mechanisms (CCMs). Despite their central role in CCM function, inorganic carbon (Ci) transport systems never have been identified in eukaryotic photosynthetic organisms. In the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, a mutant, pmp1, was described in 1983 with deficiencies in Ci transport, and a Pmp1 protein-associated Ci uptake system has been proposed to be responsible for Ci uptake in low CO(2) (air level)-acclimated cells. However, even though pmp1 represents the only clear genetic link to Ci transport in microalgae and is one of only a very few mutants directly affecting the CCM itself, the identity of Pmp1 has remained unknown. Physiological analyses indicate that C. reinhardtii possesses multiple Ci transport systems responsible for acclimation to different levels of limiting CO(2) and that the Pmp1-associated transport system is required specifically for low (air level) CO(2) acclimation. In the current study, we identified and characterized a pmp1 allelic mutant, air dier 1 (ad1) that, like pmp1, cannot grow in low CO(2) (350 ppm) but can grow either in high CO(2) (5% CO(2)) or in very low CO(2) (<200 ppm). Molecular analyses revealed that the Ad1/Pmp1 protein is encoded by LciB, a gene previously identified as a CO(2)-responsive gene. LciB and three related genes in C. reinhardtii compose a unique gene family that encode four closely related, apparently soluble plastid proteins with no clearly identifiable conserved motifs.

  3. Does ear C sink strength contribute to overcoming photosynthetic acclimation of wheat plants exposed to elevated CO2?

    PubMed Central

    Aranjuelo, Iker; Cabrera-Bosquet, Llorenç; Morcuende, Rosa; Avice, Jean Christophe; Nogués, Salvador; Araus, José Luis; Martínez-Carrasco, Rafael; Pérez, Pilar

    2011-01-01

    Wheat plants (Triticum durum Desf., cv. Regallo) were grown in the field to study the effects of contrasting [CO2] conditions (700 versus 370 μmol mol−1) on growth, photosynthetic performance, and C management during the post-anthesis period. The aim was to test whether a restricted capacity of sink organs to utilize photosynthates drives a loss of photosynthetic capacity in elevated CO2. The ambient 13C/12C isotopic composition (δ13C) of air CO2 was changed from –10.2‰ in ambient [CO2] to –23.6‰ under elevated [CO2] between the 7th and the 14th days after anthesis in order to study C assimilation and partitioning between leaves and ears. Elevated [CO2] had no significant effect on biomass production and grain filling, and caused an accumulation of C compounds in leaves. This was accompanied by up-regulation of phosphoglycerate mutase and ATP synthase protein content, together with down-regulation of adenosine diphosphate glucose pyrophosphatase protein. Growth in elevated [CO2] negatively affected Rubisco and Rubisco activase protein content and induced photosynthetic down-regulation. CO2 enrichment caused a specific decrease in Rubisco content, together with decreases in the amino acid and total N content of leaves. The C labelling revealed that in flag leaves, part of the C fixed during grain filling was stored as starch and structural C compounds whereas the rest of the labelled C (mainly in the form of soluble sugars) was completely respired 48 h after the end of labelling. Although labelled C was not detected in the δ13C of ear total organic matter and respired CO2, soluble sugar δ13C revealed that a small amount of labelled C reached the ear. The 12CO2 labelling suggests that during the beginning of post-anthesis the ear did not contribute towards overcoming flag leaf carbohydrate accumulation, and this had a consequent effect on protein expression and photosynthetic acclimation. PMID:21511906

  4. Carotenogenic response in photosynthetic organisms: a colorful story.

    PubMed

    Solovchenko, Alexei; Neverov, Konstantin

    2017-09-01

    Carotenoids are a diverse group of terpenoid pigments ubiquitous in and essential for functioning of phototrophs. Most of the researchers in the field are focused on the primary carotenoids serving light harvesting, photoprotection, and supporting the structural integrity of the photosynthetic apparatus (PSA) within the thylakoid membranes. A distinct group of the pigments functionally and structurally uncoupled from the PSA and accumulating outside of the thylakoids is called secondary carotenoids. Induction of the biosynthesis and massive accumulation of the latter termed as secondary carotenogenesis and carotenogenic response (CR), respectively, is a major though insufficiently studied stress response discovered in many phototrophic organisms ranging from single-celled algae to terrestrial higher plants. The CR protects cell by means of optical shielding of cell structures vulnerable photodamage, consumption of potentially harmful dioxygen, augmenting sink capacity of photoassimilates, and exerting an antioxidant effect. The secondary carotenoids exhibit a remarkable photostability in situ. Therefore, the CR-based photoprotective mechanism, unlike, e.g., antioxidant enzyme-based protection in the chloroplast, does not require continuous investment of energy and metabolites making it highly suitable for long-term stress acclimation in phototrophs. Capability of the CR determines the strategy of acclimation of photosynthetic organisms to different stresses such as excessive irradiance, drought, extreme temperatures, and salinities. Build-up of the CR might be accompanied by gradual disengagement of 'classical' active (energy-dependent) photoprotective mechanisms such as non-photochemical quenching. In addition to that, the CR has great ecological significance. Illustrious examples of this are extremely stress-tolerant 'snow' algae and conifer species developing red coloration during winter. The CR has also considerable practical implications since the secondary

  5. BOREAS TE-9 NSA Photosynthetic Response Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G.; Curd, Shelaine (Editor); Dang, Qinglai; Margolis, Hank; Coyea, Marie

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmospheric Study (BOREAS) TE-9 (Terrestrial Ecology) team collected several data sets related to chemical and photosynthetic properties of leaves. This data set describes: (1) the response of leaf and shoot-level photosynthesis to ambient and intercellular CO2 concentration, temperature, and incident photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) for black spruce, jack pine, and aspen during the three intensive field campaigns (IFCs) in 1994 in the Northern Study Area (NSA); (2) the response of stomatal conductance to vapor pressure difference throughout the growing season of 1994; and (3) a range of shoot water potentials (controlled in the laboratory) for black spruce and jack pine. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884), or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  6. A deficiency in chloroplastic ferredoxin 2 facilitates effective photosynthetic capacity during long-term high light acclimation in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Wang, Peng; Liu, Bing; Feng, Dongru; Zhang, Jie; Su, Jianbin; Zhang, Yang; Wang, Jin-Fa; Wang, Hong-Bin

    2013-12-01

    Photosynthetic electron transport is the major energy source for cellular metabolism in plants, and also has the potential to generate excess reactive oxygen species that cause irreversible damage to photosynthetic apparatus under adverse conditions. Ferredoxins (Fds), as the electron-distributing hub in the chloroplast, contribute to redox regulation and antioxidant defense. However, the steady-state levels of photosynthetic Fd decrease in plants when they are exposed to environmental stress conditions. To understand the effect of Fd down-regulation on plant growth, we characterized Arabidopsis thaliana plants lacking Fd2 (Fd2-KO) under long-term high light (HL) conditions. Unexpectedly, Fd2-KO plants exhibited efficient photosynthetic capacity and stable thylakoid protein complexes. At the transcriptional level, photoprotection-related genes were up-regulated more in the mutant plants, suggesting that knockout Fd2 lines possess a relatively effective photo-acclimatory responses involving enhanced plastid redox signaling. In contrast to the physiological characterization of Fd2-KO under short-term HL, the plastoquinone pool returned to a relatively balanced redox state via elevated PGR5-dependent cyclic electron flow during extended HL. fd2 pgr5 double mutant plants displayed severely impaired photosynthetic capacity under HL treatment, further supporting a role for PGR5 in adaptation to HL in the Fd2-KO plants. These results suggest potential benefits of reducing Fd levels in plants grown under long-term HL conditions.

  7. The penalty of a long, hot summer. Photosynthetic acclimation to high CO2 and continuous light in "living fossil" conifers.

    PubMed

    Osborne, Colin P; Beerling, David J

    2003-10-01

    Deciduous forests covered the ice-free polar regions 280 to 40 million years ago under warm "greenhouse" climates and high atmospheric pCO2. Their deciduous habit is frequently interpreted as an adaptation for minimizing carbon losses during winter, but experiments with "living fossils" in a simulated warm polar environment refute this explanation. Measured carbon losses through leaf abscission of deciduous trees are significantly greater than losses through winter respiration in evergreens, yet annual rates of primary productivity are similar in all species. Here, we investigate mechanisms underlying this apparent paradox by measuring the seasonal patterns of leaf photosynthesis (A) under pCO2 enrichment in the same trees. During spring, A increased significantly in coastal redwood (Sequoia sempervirens), dawn redwood (Metasequoia glyptostroboides), and swamp cypress (Taxodium distichum) at an elevated pCO2 of 80 Pa compared with controls at 40 Pa. However, strong acclimation in Rubisco carboxylation capacity (Vc,max) completely offset the CO2 response of A in all species by the end of 6 weeks of continuous illumination in the simulated polar summer. Further measurements demonstrated the temporary nature of acclimation, with increases in Vc,max during autumn restoring the CO2 sensitivity of A. Contrary to expectations, the acclimation of Vc,max was not always accompanied by accumulation of leaf carbohydrates, but was associated with a decline in leaf nitrogen in summer, suggesting an alteration of the balance in plant sources and sinks for carbon and nitrogen. Preliminary calculations using A indicated that winter carbon losses through deciduous leaf abscission and respiration were recovered by 10 to 25 d of canopy carbon fixation during summer, thereby explaining the productivity paradox.

  8. Temperature response of Antarctic cryptoendolithic photosynthetic microorganisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ocampo-Friedmann, R.; Meyer, M. A.; Chen, M.; Friedmann, E. I.

    1988-01-01

    Growth responses to temperatures between 12.5 [degrees] C and 25 degrees C were determined for five photosynthetic microorganisms isolated from the Ross Desert cryptoendolithic community. Among eukaryotic algae, two strains of Trebouxia sp. have an upper temperature limit of 20 degrees C, and two strains of Hemichloris antarctica of 25 degrees C. The cyanobacterium Chroococcidiopsis sp., in contrast, grows at temperatures above 25 degrees C. These and earlier studies suggest that the eukaryotic algae of the Antarctic cryptoendolithic community have an upper temperature limit near 25 degrees C.

  9. Temperature response of Antarctic cryptoendolithic photosynthetic microorganisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ocampo-Friedmann, R.; Meyer, M. A.; Chen, M.; Friedmann, E. I.

    1988-01-01

    Growth responses to temperatures between 12.5 [degrees] C and 25 degrees C were determined for five photosynthetic microorganisms isolated from the Ross Desert cryptoendolithic community. Among eukaryotic algae, two strains of Trebouxia sp. have an upper temperature limit of 20 degrees C, and two strains of Hemichloris antarctica of 25 degrees C. The cyanobacterium Chroococcidiopsis sp., in contrast, grows at temperatures above 25 degrees C. These and earlier studies suggest that the eukaryotic algae of the Antarctic cryptoendolithic community have an upper temperature limit near 25 degrees C.

  10. Deconditioning-induced exercise responses as influenced by heat acclimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shvartz, E.; Bhattacharya, A.; Sperinde, S. J.; Brock, P. J.; Sciaraffa, D.; Haines, R. F.; Greenleaf, J. E.

    1979-01-01

    A study to determine the effect of heat acclimation and physical training in temperate conditions on changes in exercise tolerance following water-immersion deconditioning is presented. Five young men were tested on a bicycle ergometer before and after heat acclimation and after water immersion. The subjects and the experimental procedure, heat acclimation and exercise training, water immersion, and exercise tolerance are discussed. Heat acclimation resulted in the usual decreases in exercise heart rate and rectal temperature and an increase in sweat rate. Water immersion resulted in substantial diuresis despite water consumed. The results show that heat acclimation provides an effective method of preventing the adverse effects of water-immersion deconditioning on exercise tolerance.

  11. Deconditioning-induced exercise responses as influenced by heat acclimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shvartz, E.; Bhattacharya, A.; Sperinde, S. J.; Brock, P. J.; Sciaraffa, D.; Haines, R. F.; Greenleaf, J. E.

    1979-01-01

    A study to determine the effect of heat acclimation and physical training in temperate conditions on changes in exercise tolerance following water-immersion deconditioning is presented. Five young men were tested on a bicycle ergometer before and after heat acclimation and after water immersion. The subjects and the experimental procedure, heat acclimation and exercise training, water immersion, and exercise tolerance are discussed. Heat acclimation resulted in the usual decreases in exercise heart rate and rectal temperature and an increase in sweat rate. Water immersion resulted in substantial diuresis despite water consumed. The results show that heat acclimation provides an effective method of preventing the adverse effects of water-immersion deconditioning on exercise tolerance.

  12. Balancing photosynthetic light-harvesting and light-utilization capacities in potato leaf tissue during acclimation to different growth temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffen, K. L.; Wheeler, R. M.; Arora, R.; Palta, J. P.; Tibbitts, T. W.

    1995-01-01

    We investigated the effect of temperature during growth and development on the relationship between light-harvesting capacity, indicated by chlorophyll concentration, and light-utilization potential, indicated by light- and bicarbonate-saturated photosynthetic oxygen evolution, in Solanum tuberosum L. cv. Norland. Clonal plantlets were transplanted and grown at 20 degrees C for 2 weeks before transfer to 12, 16, 20, 24 and 28 degrees C for 6 weeks. After 4 weeks of the temperature treatments, leaf tissue fresh weights per area were one-third higher in plants grown at 12 degrees C vs those grown at 28 degrees C. Conversely, chlorophyll content per area in tissue grown at 12 degrees C was less than one-half of that of tissue grown at 28 degrees C at 4 weeks. Photosynthetic capacity measured at a common temperature of 20 degrees C and expressed on a chlorophyll basis was inversely proportional to growth temperature. Leaf tissue from plants grown at 12 degrees C for 4 weeks had photosynthetic rates that were 3-fold higher on a chlorophyll basis than comparable tissue from plants grown at 28 degrees C. These results suggest that the relationship between light-harvesting capacity and light-utilization potential varies 3-fold in response to the growth temperatures examined. The role of this response in avoidance of photoinhibition is discussed.

  13. Balancing photosynthetic light-harvesting and light-utilization capacities in potato leaf tissue during acclimation to different growth temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffen, K. L.; Wheeler, R. M.; Arora, R.; Palta, J. P.; Tibbitts, T. W.

    1995-01-01

    We investigated the effect of temperature during growth and development on the relationship between light-harvesting capacity, indicated by chlorophyll concentration, and light-utilization potential, indicated by light- and bicarbonate-saturated photosynthetic oxygen evolution, in Solanum tuberosum L. cv. Norland. Clonal plantlets were transplanted and grown at 20 degrees C for 2 weeks before transfer to 12, 16, 20, 24 and 28 degrees C for 6 weeks. After 4 weeks of the temperature treatments, leaf tissue fresh weights per area were one-third higher in plants grown at 12 degrees C vs those grown at 28 degrees C. Conversely, chlorophyll content per area in tissue grown at 12 degrees C was less than one-half of that of tissue grown at 28 degrees C at 4 weeks. Photosynthetic capacity measured at a common temperature of 20 degrees C and expressed on a chlorophyll basis was inversely proportional to growth temperature. Leaf tissue from plants grown at 12 degrees C for 4 weeks had photosynthetic rates that were 3-fold higher on a chlorophyll basis than comparable tissue from plants grown at 28 degrees C. These results suggest that the relationship between light-harvesting capacity and light-utilization potential varies 3-fold in response to the growth temperatures examined. The role of this response in avoidance of photoinhibition is discussed.

  14. Thermal responses of Symbiodinium photosynthetic carbon assimilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oakley, Clinton A.; Schmidt, Gregory W.; Hopkinson, Brian M.

    2014-06-01

    The symbiosis between hermatypic corals and their dinoflagellate endosymbionts, genus Symbiodinium, is based on carbon exchange. This symbiosis is disrupted by thermally induced coral bleaching, a stress response in which the coral host expels its algal symbionts as they become physiologically impaired. The disruption of the dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) supply or the thermal inactivation of Rubisco have been proposed as sites of initial thermal damage that leads to the bleaching response. Symbiodinium possesses a highly unusual Form II ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco), which exhibits a lower CO2:O2 specificity and may be more thermally unstable than the Form I Rubiscos of other algae and land plants. Components of the CO2 concentrating mechanism (CCM), which supplies inorganic carbon for photosynthesis, may also be temperature sensitive. Here, we examine the ability of four cultured Symbiodinium strains to acquire and fix DIC across a temperature gradient. Surprisingly, the half-saturation constant of photosynthesis with respect to DIC concentration ( K P), an index of CCM function, declined with increasing temperature in three of the four strains, indicating a greater potential for photosynthetic carbon acquisition at elevated temperatures. In the fourth strain, there was no effect of temperature on K P. Finding no evidence for thermal inhibition of the CCM, we conclude that CCM components are not likely to be the primary sites of thermal damage. Reduced photosynthetic quantum yields, a hallmark of thermal bleaching, were observed at low DIC concentrations, leaving open the possibility that reduced inorganic carbon availability is involved in bleaching.

  15. Acclimation responses of Arabidopsis thaliana to sustained phosphite treatments

    PubMed Central

    Berkowitz, Oliver

    2013-01-01

    Phosphite () induces a range of physiological and developmental responses in plants by disturbing the homeostasis of the macronutrient phosphate. Because of its close structural resemblance to phosphate, phosphite impairs the sensing, membrane transport, and subcellular compartmentation of phosphate. In addition, phosphite induces plant defence responses by an as yet unknown mode of action. In this study, the acclimation of Arabidopsis thaliana plants to a sustained phosphite supply in the growth medium was investigated and compared with plants growing under varying phosphate supplies. Unlike phosphate, phosphite did not suppress the formation of lateral roots in several Arabidopsis accessions. In addition, the expression of well-documented phosphate-starvation-induced genes, such as miRNA399d and At4, was not repressed by phosphite accumulation, whilst the induction of PHT1;1 and PAP1 was accentuated. Thus, a mimicking of phosphate by phosphite was not observed for these classical phosphate-starvation responses. Metabolomic analysis of phosphite-treated plants showed changes in several metabolite pools, most prominently those of aspartate, asparagine, glutamate, and serine. These alterations in amino acid pools provide novel insights for the understanding of phosphite-induced pathogen resistance. PMID:23404904

  16. Photosynthetic acclimation to light in woody and herbaceous species: a comparison of leaf structure, pigment content and chlorophyll fluorescence characteristics measured in the field.

    PubMed

    Hallik, L; Niinemets, U; Kull, O

    2012-01-01

    Acclimation of foliage photosynthetic properties occurs with varying time kinetics, but structural, chemical and physiological factors controlling the kinetics of acclimation are poorly understood, especially in field environments. We measured chlorophyll fluorescence characteristics, leaf total carotenoid (Car), chlorophyll (Chl) and nitrogen (N) content and leaf dry mass per area (LMA) along vertical light gradients in natural canopies of the herb species, Inula salicina and Centaurea jacea, and tree species, Populus tremula and Tilia cordata, in the middle of the growing season. Presence of stress was assessed on the basis of night measurements of chlorophyll fluorescence. Our aim was to compare the light acclimation of leaf traits, which respond to light availability at long (LMA and N), medium (Chl a/b ratio, Car/Chl ratio) and short time scales (fluorescence characteristics). We found that light acclimation of nitrogen content per unit leaf area (N(area)), chlorophyll content per unit dry mass (Chl(mass)) and Chl/N ratio were related to modifications in LMA. The maximum PSII quantum yield (F(v) /F(m)) increased with increasing growth irradiance in I. salicina and P. tremula but decreased in T. cordata. Leaf growth irradiance, N content and plant species explained the majority of variability in chlorophyll fluorescence characteristics, up to 90% for steady-state fluorescence yield, while the contribution of leaf total carotenoid content was generally not significant. Chlorophyll fluorescence characteristics did not differ strongly between growth forms, but differed among species within a given growth form. These data highlight that foliage acclimation to light is driven by interactions between traits with varying time kinetics.

  17. Cotton growth and photosynthetic acclimation to phosphorus nutrition and CO2 enrichment

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Two experiments were conducted in 2011 to study cotton response to varying phosphorus (P) supply under current and projected atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Cotton (cultivar deltapine 555) plants were grown in six growth chambers with three levels of P supply (0.2 (optimum), 0.05 and 0.01 mM) and tw...

  18. Salt acclimation processes in wheat.

    PubMed

    Janda, Tibor; Darko, Éva; Shehata, Sami; Kovács, Viktória; Pál, Magda; Szalai, Gabriella

    2016-04-01

    Young wheat plants (Triticum aestivum L. cv. Mv Béres) were exposed to 0 or 25 mM NaCl for 11 days (salt acclimation). Thereafter the plants were irrigated with 500 mM NaCl for 5 days (salt stress). Irrigating the plants with a low concentration of NaCl successfully led to a reduction in chlorotic symptoms and in the impairment of the photosynthetic processes when the plants were exposed to subsequent high-dose salt treatment. After exposure to a high concentration of NaCl there was no difference in leaf Na content between the salt-acclimated and non-acclimated plants, indicating that salt acclimation did not significantly modify Na transport to the shoots. While the polyamine level was lower in salt-treated plants than in the control, salt acclimation led to increased osmotic potential in the leaves. Similarly, the activities of certain antioxidant enzymes, namely glutathione reductase, catalase and ascorbate peroxidase, were significantly higher in salt-acclimated plants. The results also suggest that while SOS1, SOS2 or NHX2 do not play a decisive role in the salt acclimation processes in young wheat plants; another stress-related gene, WALI6, may contribute to the success of the salt acclimation processes. The present study suggested that the responses of wheat plants to acclimation with low level of salt and to treatment with high doses of salt may be fundamentally different. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Photosynthetic acclimation to drought stress in Agave salmiana Otto ex Salm-Dyck seedlings is largely dependent on thermal dissipation and enhanced electron flux to photosystem I.

    PubMed

    Campos, Huitziméngari; Trejo, Carlos; Peña-Valdivia, Cecilia B; García-Nava, Rodolfo; Conde-Martínez, F Víctor; Cruz-Ortega, Ma Del Rocío

    2014-10-01

    Agave salmiana Otto ex Salm-Dyck, a crassulacean acid metabolism plant that is adapted to water-limited environments, has great potential for bioenergy production. However, drought stress decreases the requirement for light energy, and if the amount of incident light exceeds energy consumption, the photosynthetic apparatus can be injured, thereby limiting plant growth. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of drought and re-watering on the photosynthetic efficiency of A. salmiana seedlings. The leaf relative water content and leaf water potential decreased to 39.6 % and -1.1 MPa, respectively, over 115 days of water withholding and recovered after re-watering. Drought caused a direct effect on photosystem II (PSII) photochemistry in light-acclimated leaves, as indicated by a decrease in the photosynthetic electron transport rate. Additionally, down-regulation of photochemical activity occurred mainly through the inactivation of PSII reaction centres and an increased thermal dissipation capacity of the leaves. Prompt fluorescence kinetics also showed a larger pool of terminal electron acceptors in photosystem I (PSI) as well as an increase in some JIP-test parameters compared to controls, reflecting an enhanced efficiency and specific fluxes for electron transport from the plastoquinone pool to the PSI terminal acceptors. All the above parameters showed similar levels after re-watering. These results suggest that the thermal dissipation of excess energy and the increased energy conservation from photons absorbed by PSII to the reduction of PSI end acceptors may be an important acclimation mechanism to protect the photosynthetic apparatus from over-excitation in Agave plants.

  20. Core Genome Responses Involved in Acclimation to High Temperature1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Larkindale, Jane; Vierling, Elizabeth

    2008-01-01

    Plants can acclimate rapidly to environmental conditions, including high temperatures. To identify molecular events important for acquired thermotolerance, we compared viability and transcript profiles of Arabidopsis thaliana treated to severe heat stress (45°C) without acclimation or following two different acclimation treatments. Notably, a gradual increase to 45°C (22°C to 45°C over 6 h) led to higher survival and to more and higher-fold transcript changes than a step-wise acclimation (90 min at 38°C plus 120 min at 22°C before 45°C). There were significant differences in the total spectrum of transcript changes in the two treatments, but core components of heat acclimation were apparent in the overlap between treatments, emphasizing the importance of performing transcriptome analysis in the context of physiological response. In addition to documenting increases in transcripts of specific genes involved in processes predicted to be required for thermotolerance (i.e. protection of proteins and of translation, limiting oxidative stress), we also found decreases in transcripts (i.e. for programmed cell death, basic metabolism, and biotic stress responses), which are likely equally important for acclimation. Similar protective effects may also be achieved differently, such as prevention of proline accumulation, which is toxic at elevated temperatures and which was reduced by both acclimation treatments but was associated with transcript changes predicted to either reduce proline synthesis or increase degradation in the two acclimation treatments. Finally, phenotypic analysis of T-DNA insertion mutants of genes identified in this analysis defined eight new genes involved in heat acclimation, including cytosolic ascorbate peroxidase and the transcription factors HsfA7a (heat shock transcription factor A7a) and NF-X1. PMID:18055584

  1. Improved responses to elevated CO2 in durum wheat at a low nitrate supply associated with the upregulation of photosynthetic genes and the activation of nitrate assimilation.

    PubMed

    Vicente, Rubén; Pérez, Pilar; Martínez-Carrasco, Rafael; Morcuende, Rosa

    2017-07-01

    Elevated CO2 often leads to photosynthetic acclimation, and N availability may alter this response. We investigated whether the coordination of shoot-root N assimilation by elevated CO2 may help to optimize the whole-plant N allocation and maximize photosynthesis in hydroponically-grown durum wheat at two NO3(-) supplies in interaction with plant development. Transcriptional and biochemical analyses were performed on flag leaves and roots. At anthesis, the improved photosynthetic acclimation response to elevated CO2 at low N was associated with increased Rubisco, chlorophyll and amino acid contents, and upregulation of genes related to their biosynthesis, light reactions and Calvin-Benson cycle, while a decrease was recorded at high N. Despite the decrease in carbohydrates with elevated CO2 at low N and the increase at high N, a stronger upward trend in leaf NR activity was found at low rather than high N. The induction of N recycling-related genes was accompanied by an amino acids decline at high N. At the grain-filling stage, the photosynthetic acclimation to elevated CO2 at high N was associated with the downregulation of both N assimilation, mainly in roots, and photosynthetic genes. At low N, enhanced root N assimilation partly compensated for slower shoot N assimilation and maximized photosynthetic capacity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Leaf anatomical and photosynthetic acclimation to cool temperature and high light in two winter versus two summer annuals.

    PubMed

    Cohu, Christopher M; Muller, Onno; Adams, William W; Demmig-Adams, Barbara

    2014-09-01

    Acclimation of foliar features to cool temperature and high light was characterized in winter (Spinacia oleracea L. cv. Giant Nobel; Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynhold Col-0 and ecotypes from Sweden and Italy) versus summer (Helianthus annuus L. cv. Soraya; Cucurbita pepo L. cv. Italian Zucchini Romanesco) annuals. Significant relationships existed among leaf dry mass per area, photosynthesis, leaf thickness and palisade mesophyll thickness. While the acclimatory response of the summer annuals to cool temperature and/or high light levels was limited, the winter annuals increased the number of palisade cell layers, ranging from two layers under moderate light and warm temperature to between four and five layers under cool temperature and high light. A significant relationship was also found between palisade tissue thickness and either cross-sectional area or number of phloem cells (each normalized by vein density) in minor veins among all four species and growth regimes. The two winter annuals, but not the summer annuals, thus exhibited acclimatory adjustments of minor vein phloem to cool temperature and/or high light, with more numerous and larger phloem cells and a higher maximal photosynthesis rate. The upregulation of photosynthesis in winter annuals in response to low growth temperature may thus depend on not only (1) a greater volume of photosynthesizing palisade tissue but also (2) leaf veins containing additional phloem cells and presumably capable of exporting a greater volume of sugars from the leaves to the rest of the plant. © 2014 Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society.

  3. Acclimation responses to high light by Guazuma ulmifolia Lam. (Malvaceae) leaves at different stages of development.

    PubMed

    Calzavara, A K; Rocha, J S; Lourenço, G; Sanada, K; Medri, C; Bianchini, E; Pimenta, J A; Stolf-Moreira, R; Oliveira, H C

    2017-09-01

    The re-composition of deforested environments requires the prior acclimation of seedlings to full sun in nurseries. Seedlings can overcome excess light either through the acclimation of pre-existing fully expanded leaves or through the development of new leaves that are acclimated to the new light environment. Here, we compared the acclimation capacity of mature (MatL, fully expanded at the time of transfer) and newly expanded (NewL, expanded after the light shift) leaves of Guazuma ulmifolia Lam. (Malvaceae) seedlings to high light. The seedlings were initially grown under shade and then transferred to full sunlight. MatL and NewL were used for chlorophyll fluorescence and gas exchange analyses, pigment extraction and morpho-anatomical measurements. After the transfer of seedlings to full sun, the MatL persisted and acclimated to some extent to the new light condition, since they underwent alterations in some morpho-physiological traits and maintained a functional electron transport chain and positive net photosynthesis rate. However, long-term exposure to high light led to chronic photoinhibition in MatL, which could be related to the limited plasticity of leaf morpho-anatomical attributes. However, the NewL showed a high capacity to use the absorbed energy in photochemistry and dissipate excess energy harmlessly, attributes that were favoured by the high structural plasticity exhibited by these leaves. Both the maintenance of mature, photosynthetically active leaves and the production of new leaves with a high capacity to cope with excess energy were important for acclimation of G. ulmifolia seedlings. © 2017 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  4. Hypohydration and Acclimation: Effects on Hormone Responses to Excercise/Heat Stress.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-03-15

    increased rectal temperature and heart rate and decreased sweat rate (19). Gaebelein and Senay (9) also demonstrated an increased physiological cost ( heart ... increased plasma volume associated with heat acclimation (21), assuming that the increased plasma volume would permit an elevated sweat rate and more...AD-A127 855 HYPOHYDRATION AND ACCLIMATION: EFFECTS ON HORMONE i/I RESPONSES TO EXCERCISE /..(U) ARMY RESEARCH INST OF ENVIRONMENTAL MEDICINE NATICK MR

  5. The acclimation of Phaeodactylum tricornutum to blue and red light does not influence the photosynthetic light reaction but strongly disturbs the carbon allocation pattern.

    PubMed

    Jungandreas, Anne; Schellenberger Costa, Benjamin; Jakob, Torsten; von Bergen, Martin; Baumann, Sven; Wilhelm, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Diatoms are major contributors to the aquatic primary productivity and show an efficient acclimation ability to changing light intensities. Here, we investigated the acclimation of Phaeodactylum tricornutum to different light quality with respect to growth rate, photosynthesis rate, macromolecular composition and the metabolic profile by shifting the light quality from red light (RL) to blue light (BL) and vice versa. Our results show that cultures pre-acclimated to BL and RL exhibited similar growth performance, photosynthesis rates and metabolite profiles. However, light shift experiments revealed rapid and severe changes in the metabolite profile within 15 min as the initial reaction of light acclimation. Thus, during the shift from RL to BL, increased concentrations of amino acids and TCA cycle intermediates were observed whereas during the BL to RL shift the levels of amino acids were decreased and intermediates of glycolysis accumulated. Accordingly, on the time scale of hours the RL to BL shift led to a redirection of carbon into the synthesis of proteins, whereas during the BL to RL shift an accumulation of carbohydrates occurred. Thus, a vast metabolic reorganization of the cells was observed as the initial reaction to changes in light quality. The results are discussed with respect to a putative direct regulation of cellular enzymes by light quality and by transcriptional regulation. Interestingly, the short-term changes in the metabolome were accompanied by changes in the degree of reduction of the plastoquinone pool. Surprisingly, the RL to BL shift led to a severe inhibition of growth within the first 48 h which was not observed during the BL to RL shift. Furthermore, during the phase of growth arrest the photosynthetic performance did not change. We propose arguments that the growth arrest could have been caused by the reorganization of intracellular carbon partitioning.

  6. The Acclimation of Phaeodactylum tricornutum to Blue and Red Light Does Not Influence the Photosynthetic Light Reaction but Strongly Disturbs the Carbon Allocation Pattern

    PubMed Central

    Jungandreas, Anne; Schellenberger Costa, Benjamin; Jakob, Torsten; von Bergen, Martin; Baumann, Sven; Wilhelm, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Diatoms are major contributors to the aquatic primary productivity and show an efficient acclimation ability to changing light intensities. Here, we investigated the acclimation of Phaeodactylum tricornutum to different light quality with respect to growth rate, photosynthesis rate, macromolecular composition and the metabolic profile by shifting the light quality from red light (RL) to blue light (BL) and vice versa. Our results show that cultures pre-acclimated to BL and RL exhibited similar growth performance, photosynthesis rates and metabolite profiles. However, light shift experiments revealed rapid and severe changes in the metabolite profile within 15 min as the initial reaction of light acclimation. Thus, during the shift from RL to BL, increased concentrations of amino acids and TCA cycle intermediates were observed whereas during the BL to RL shift the levels of amino acids were decreased and intermediates of glycolysis accumulated. Accordingly, on the time scale of hours the RL to BL shift led to a redirection of carbon into the synthesis of proteins, whereas during the BL to RL shift an accumulation of carbohydrates occurred. Thus, a vast metabolic reorganization of the cells was observed as the initial reaction to changes in light quality. The results are discussed with respect to a putative direct regulation of cellular enzymes by light quality and by transcriptional regulation. Interestingly, the short-term changes in the metabolome were accompanied by changes in the degree of reduction of the plastoquinone pool. Surprisingly, the RL to BL shift led to a severe inhibition of growth within the first 48 h which was not observed during the BL to RL shift. Furthermore, during the phase of growth arrest the photosynthetic performance did not change. We propose arguments that the growth arrest could have been caused by the reorganization of intracellular carbon partitioning. PMID:25111046

  7. Orthostatic responses to dietary sodium restriction during heat acclimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szlyk, Patricia C.; Sils, Ingrid V.; Caretti, David M.; Moore, Robert J.; Armstrong, Lawrence E.; Tartarini, Kim A.; Francesconi, Ralph P.; Askew, Eldon W.; Hubbard, Roger W.

    1994-01-01

    Several studies have shown that individuals consuming low-salt diets and working in the heat have an increased risk or incidence of heat injury, suggestive of inadequate cardiovascular adjustment. Furthermore, others have shown that prolonged work in hot climates can precipitate orthostatic hypotension and syncope. This study was designed to evaluate the effects of moderate-salt (MS) and low-salt (LS) diets on the circulatory responses and incidence of presyncopal symptoms to an orthostatic test (OT) during successive days of heat acclimation (HA). Seventeen unacclimatized male soldiers (mean +/- SE: age 20+/-1 yrs) participated in this two-phase study. The first phase consisted of a seven day dietary stabilization period during which all subjects consumed similar diets of about 4000 kcal/day containing 8g NaCl and lived in a dormitory setting (21 C, 30% RH). The second phase commenced on day eight and consisted of dietary NaCl restriction and 10 days HA (days 8-17). Volunteers were randomly assigned to either the MS diet (n=9) providing 8g NaCl/day or the LS diet (n=8) furnishing just 4g NaCl/day. The acquisition of HA was manifested in both groups by reductions in exercising rectal temperature and heart rate (HR); these characteristics were similar in the MS and LS diets. The OT was performed at 21 C on day seven of the stabilization phase and on days 9, 11, 13, 15, and 17 of the HA phase, before and after 8.5 hr of intermittent treadmill walking in a hot environment. Blood pressure (BP) and HR responses at 1,2, and 4 min and any presyncopal symptoms were recorded after assuming an upright position from recumbency. All subjects completed the OT before and after prolonged exercise in the heat without incidence of either hypotension or presyncopal symptoms irrespective of dietary-salt intake and day of HA. The results indicate that the prolonged work in the heat can be performed without orthostatic hypotension or syncope while consuming 4g NaCl/day with adequate

  8. Cold Acclimation Does Not Alter Physiological or Perceptual Responses During Subsequent Exercise in the Heat.

    PubMed

    Jones, Douglas M; Rostomily, Kaitlyn A; Pautz, Carina M; Ito, Danica W; Bailey, Stephen P; Roelands, Bart; Buono, Michael J; Meeusen, Romain

    2017-09-01

    Warfighters often train and conduct operations in cold environments. Specifically, military trainees and divers that are repeatedly exposed to cold water may experience inadvertent cold acclimatization, which results in body heat retention. These same warfighters can quickly switch between environments (cold to hot or hot to cold) given the nature of their work. This may present a risk of early onset of hyperthermia when cold-acclimatized warfighters are subsequently exposed to physiological insults that increase body temperature, such as exercise and heat stress. However, there is currently no evidence that suggests this is the case. The purpose of this work, therefore, is to determine what impact, if any, repeated immersion in cold water has on subsequent exercise in the heat. Twelve healthy subjects (values in mean ± SD: age, 25.6 ± 5.2 years; height, 174.0 ± 8.9 cm; weight, 75.6 ± 13.1 kg) voluntarily provided written informed consent in accordance with the San Diego State University Institutional Review Board. They first completed 120 minutes of moderate treadmill walking in 40°C and 40% relative humidity. During this trial, subjects' physiological and perceptual responses were recorded. Twenty-four hours later, subjects began a cold acclimation protocol, which consisted of seven, 90-minute immersions in cold water (10°C, water level to chest). Each immersion was also separated by 24 hours. Subjects then repeated a subsequent trial of exercise in the heat 24 hours after the final immersion of the cold acclimation protocol. Results from cold acclimation revealed no change in core temperature, a decrease in skin temperature, and attenuated shivering and lactate responses, which supports a successful insulative-hypothermic cold acclimation response. This type of cold acclimation response primarily results in heat retention with associated energy conservation. Findings for heat trials (pre-cold acclimation and post-cold acclimation) revealed no differences

  9. Acclimation to Cu in fathead minnows: does age influence the response?

    PubMed

    Sellin, Marlo K; Tate-Boldt, Erik; Kolok, Alan S

    2005-08-30

    This study had two primary objectives. The first was to determine if the length of exposure necessary for acclimation to Cu to develop in larval fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) is different than that for juveniles. The second objective was to determine whether the acclimatory response, as determined by organism survival, is consistent with acclimation as determined by whole-body Na+. Six experiments were conducted: four using larval (<20-d-old) and two using juvenile (<60-d-old) fathead minnows. Within each experiment, fish were allocated to one of four groups: unexposed, continuously exposed, episodically exposed or naïvely exposed. The continuous group was exposed to a sublethal Cu exposure (125 microg/L) for 8, 12, 16 or 20 d and then subjected to a survival test at a lethal dose (375 microg/L). Fish in the episodic group were exposed to the sublethal dose for either 4 or 8 d, given a depuration period of varying lengths (4-16 d) then subjected to a survival test. Naïve minnows were maintained in clean water then given the survival challenge. Results from survival tests show that the larvae acclimate after only a 4-d sublethal exposure to Cu. In contrast, juveniles require a 16-d exposure to acclimate. Once acclimation had developed, there was a strong relationship between larval survival and whole-body Na+. Acclimated larvae maintained whole-body Na+ relative to unexposed fish, while unacclimated larvae did not. Interestingly, this was not the case for juveniles, as acclimated and unacclimated groups did not differ with respect to whole-body Na+ concentrations. The results of this study show that age influences the time course and possibly the mechanisms of acclimation in fathead minnows exposed to Cu.

  10. Characterization of the nature of photosynthetic recovery of wheat seedlings from short-term dark heat exposures and analysis of the mode of acclimation to different light intensities.

    PubMed

    Kreslavski, Vladimir; Tatarinzev, Nikolai; Shabnova, Nadezhda; Semenova, Galina; Kosobryukhov, Anatoli

    2008-10-09

    The nature of photosynthetic recovery was investigated in 10-d-old wheat (Triticum aestivum L., cv. Moskovskaya-35) seedlings exposed to temperatures of 40 and 42 degrees C for 20 min and to temperature 42 degrees C for 40 min in the dark. The aftereffect of heat treatment was monitored by growing the heat-treated plants in low/moderate/high light at 20 degrees C for 72h. The net photosynthetic rates (P(N)) and the fluorescence ratios F(v)/F(m) were evaluated in intact primary leaves and the rates of cyclic and non-cyclic photophosphorylation were measured in the isolated thylakoids. At least two temporally separated steps were identified in the path of recovery from heat stress at 40 and 42 degrees C in the plants growing in high and moderate/high light, respectively. Both photochemical activity of the photosystem II (PSII) and the activity of CO(2) assimilation system were lowered during the first step in comparison with the corresponding activities immediately after heat treatment. During the second step, the photosynthetic activities completely or partly recovered. Recovery from heat stress at 40 degrees C was accompanied by an appreciably higher rate of cyclic photophosphorylation in comparison with control non-heated seedlings. In pre-heated seedlings, the tolerance of the PSII to photoinhibition was higher than in non-treated ones. The mode of acclimation to different light intensities after heat exposures is analyzed.

  11. Cold acclimation is accompanied by complex responses of glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored proteins in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Daisuke; Kawamura, Yukio; Uemura, Matsuo

    2016-01-01

    Cold acclimation results in changes of the plasma membrane (PM) composition. The PM is considered to contain specific lipid/protein-enriched microdomains which can be extracted as detergent-resistant plasma membrane (DRM). Previous studies in animal cells have demonstrated that glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins (GPI-APs) can be targeted to microdomains and/or the apoplast. However, the functional significance of GPI-APs during cold acclimation in plants is not yet fully understood. In this study, we aimed to investigate the responsiveness of GPI-APs to cold acclimation treatment in Arabidopsis. We isolated the PM, DRM, and apoplast fractions separately and, in addition, GPI-AP-enriched fractions were prepared from the PM preparation. Label-free quantitative shotgun proteomics identified a number of GPI-APs (163 proteins). Among them, some GPI-APs such as fasciclin-like arabinogalactan proteins and glycerophosphoryldiester phosphodiesterase-like proteins predominantly increased in PM- and GPI-AP-enriched fractions while the changes of GPI-APs in the DRM and apoplast fractions during cold acclimation were considerably different from those of other fractions. These proteins are thought to be associated with cell wall structure and properties. Therefore, this study demonstrated that each GPI-AP responded to cold acclimation in a different manner, suggesting that these changes during cold acclimation are involved in rearrangement of the extracellular matrix including the cell wall towards acquisition of freezing tolerance. PMID:27471282

  12. Heat Acclimation and Water-Immersion Deconditioning: Responses to Exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shvartz, E.; Bhattacharya, A.; Sperinde, S. J.; Brock, P. J.; Sciaraffa, D.; Haines, R. F.; Greenleaf, J. E.

    1977-01-01

    Simulated subgravity conditions, such as bed rest and water immersion, cause a decrease in a acceleration tolerance (3, 4), tilt tolerance (3, 9, 10), work capacity (5, 7), and plasma volume (1, 8-10). Moderate exercise training performed during bed rest (4) and prior to water immersion (5) provides some protection against the adverse effects of deconditioning, but the relationship between exercise and changes due to deconditioning remains unclear. Heat acclimation increases plasma and interstitial volumes, total body water, stroke volume (11), and tilt tolerance (6) and may, therefore, be a more efficient method of ameliorating deconditioning than physical training alone. The present study was undertaken to determine the effects of heat acclimation and moderate physical training, performed in cool conditions, on water-immersion deconditioning.

  13. Leaf Structural Acclimation Amplifies Simulated Climate Warming in Response to Elevated Carbon Dioxide.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovenock, M.; Swann, A. L. S.

    2016-12-01

    Many plants undergo structural acclimations, or changes in trait morphology, in response to elevated carbon dioxide in field and greenhouse manipulation experiments. These structural acclimations can alter plant functioning - changes in which, taken at the global scale, have been shown to dramatically impact climate. Vegetation modifies Earth's climate by controlling the fluxes of carbon, water, and energy. Of critical importance is a better understanding of how vegetation responses to climate change will feedback on climate. Yet, the climate impacts of plant structural acclimation remain to be tested and quantified. Here we show that one plant structural acclimation - a one third increase in leaf mass per area in response to elevated carbon dioxide in C3 plants globally - significantly impacts climate in earth system model experiments. Consideration of leaf structural acclimation decreases global net primary productivity (-6PgC/yr) compared to the control climate change simulation, representing a flux of carbon dioxide to the atmosphere of similar magnitude to current annual fossil fuel emissions (8PgC/yr). Additional terrestrial warming (+0.3°C globally), especially of the northern extratropics (+0.4°C), results from reduced evapotranspiration and enhanced absorption of solar radiation at the surface. Structural acclimation drives the productivity and evapotranspiration declines by decreasing the leaf area growth associated with carbon fertilization, as greater leaf mass per area increases the cost of building leaf area and productivity fails to fully compensate. Our results suggest that plant structural acclimations, such as leaf mass per area, should be considered in climate projections and provide additional motivation for ecological and physiological experiments that determine plant responses to environment.

  14. Physiological responses during short-term acclimation to increasing atmospheric CO2 concentration in Pinus nigra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maseyk, K. S.; Biron, P.; Richard, P.; Canale, L.; Bariac, T.

    2010-12-01

    atmospheric CO2, but were still ~40% higher at 800 ppm compared to 380 ppm. Stomatal conductance varied little in response to leaf-level changes in CO2 concentration but decreased overall by about 30% with increasing ambient CO2. Consequently the acclimated intrinsic water-use efficiency (A/gs) increased by 125% with CO2, or 20% more than predicted from the instantaneous measurements. Measurements of the chamber air CO2 isotopic composition (13C/12C) also indicated decreasing photosynthetic discrimination against 13CO2, consistent with the increase in water use efficiency, and is being checked with analysis of the leaf sugar isotopic composition. Transpiration trends were consistent between leaf-level and total canopy measurements, but did not show a clear trend with CO2 due to concurrent increases in leaf temperature and leaf-atmosphere vapour pressure deficit. These results possibly indicate interactions with stomatal conductance that result in constant total plant water use, but increasing transpiration ratio (A/E), with increasing CO2. Likewise, there was little increase in the evaporative enrichment of leaf water isotopic composition (18O/16O), despite the changes in stomatal conductance.

  15. Acclimation of photosynthesis to temperature in Arabidopsis thaliana and Brassica oleracea

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Plants differ in how much the response of photosynthesis to temperature changes with the temperature during leaf development, and also in the biochemical basis of such changes in photosynthetic response. The amount of photosynthetic acclimation to temperature and the components of the photosyntheti...

  16. Temperature response of photosynthetic light- and carbon-use characteristics in the red seaweed Gracilariopsis lemaneiformis (Gracilariales, Rhodophyta).

    PubMed

    Zou, Dinghui; Gao, Kunshan

    2014-04-01

    The red seaweed Gracilariopsis is an important crop extensively cultivated in China for high-quality raw agar. In the cultivation site at Nanao Island, Shantou, China, G. lemaneiformis experiences high variability in environmental conditions like seawater temperature. In this study, G. lemaneiformis was cultured at 12, 19, or 26°C for 3 weeks, to examine its photosynthetic acclimation to changing temperature. Growth rates were highest in G. lemaneiformis thalli grown at 19°C, and were reduced with either decreased or increased temperature. The irradiance-saturated rate of photosynthesis (Pmax ) decreased with decreasing temperature, but increased significantly with prolonged cultivation at lower temperatures, indicating the potential for photosynthesis acclimation to lower temperature. Moreover, Pmax increased with increasing temperature (~30 μmol O2  · g(-1) FW · h(-1) at 12°C to 70 μmol O2  · g(-1) FW · h(-1) at 26°C). The irradiance compensation point for photosynthesis (Ic ) decreased significantly with increasing temperature (28 μmol photons · m(-2)  · s(-1) at high temperature vs. 38 μmol photons · m(-2)  · s(-1) at low temperature). Both the photosynthetic light- and carbon-use efficiencies increased with increasing growth or temperatures (from 12°C to 26°C). The results suggested that the thermal acclimation of photosynthetic performance of G. lemaneiformis would have important ecophysiological implications in sea cultivation for improving photosynthesis at low temperature and maintaining high standing biomass during summer. Ongoing climate change (increasing atmospheric CO2 and global warming) may enhance biomass production in G. lemaneiformis mariculture through the improved photosynthetic performances in response to increasing temperature. © 2014 Phycological Society of America.

  17. Responses to Moderate and Low Sodium Diets During Exercise-Heat Acclimation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-11-01

    Inc. yis in exercise - 1983. L. and C.jouchard. in tely obese M. P i. ex n-6. Responses to Moderate and Low Sodium Diets rs.Changes During Exercise ...AD-A273 292 AD IEImIIli REPORT NOT94-6 RESPONSES TO MODERATE AND LOW SODIUM DIETS DURING EXERCISE -HEAT ACCLIMATION U S ARMY RESEARCH INSTITUTE OF...COVERED Nov 93 final 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS Responses to Moderate and Low Sodium Diets During Exercise -Heat Acclimation 6. AUTHOR(S

  18. No effects of acclimation to heat on immune and hormonal responses to passive heating in healthy volunteers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanikowska, Dominika; Sato, Maki; Sugenoya, Junichi; Iwase, Satoshi; Shimizu, Yuuki; Nishimura, Naoki; Inukai, Yoko

    2012-01-01

    Heat acclimation results in whole body-adaptations that increase heat tolerance, and might also result in changed immune responses. We hypothesized that, after heat acclimation, tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin 6 and the lymphocyte count would be altered. Heat acclimation was induced in 6 healthy men by 100 min of heat exposure for 9 days. Heat exposure consisted of (1) 10 min of immersion up to chest-level in water at 42°C and (2) 90 min of passive heating by a warm blanket to maintain tympanic temperature at 37.5°C. The climatic chamber was maintained at 40°C and a relative humidity of 50%. Blood samples were analyzed before and after heat acclimation for natural killer (NK) cell activity, counts of lymphocytes B and T, before and after heat acclimation for peripheral blood morphology, interleukin 6, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and cortisol. A Japanese version of the profile of mood states questionnaire was also administered before and after acclimation. The concentrations of white blood cells, lymphocytes B and T, cortisol, interleukin 6, tumor necrosis factor alpha and NK cell activity showed no significant differences between pre- and post-acclimation, but there was a significantly lower platelet count after acclimation and, with the profile of mood states questionnaire, there was a significant rise in anger after acclimation. It is concluded that heat acclimation by passive heating does not induce alterations in immune or endocrine responses.

  19. Proteomic analysis of cardiac response to thermal acclimation in the eurythermal goby fish Gillichthys mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Jayasundara, Nishad; Tomanek, Lars; Dowd, W Wesley; Somero, George N

    2015-05-01

    Cardiac function is thought to play a central role in determining thermal optima and tolerance limits in teleost fishes. Investigating proteomic responses to temperature in cardiac tissues may provide insights into mechanisms supporting the thermal plasticity of cardiac function. Here, we utilized a global proteomic analysis to investigate changes in cardiac protein abundance in response to temperature acclimation (transfer from 13°C to 9, 19 and 26°C) in a eurythermal goby, Gillichthys mirabilis. Proteomic data revealed 122 differentially expressed proteins across acclimation groups, 37 of which were identified using tandem mass-spectrometry. These 37 proteins are involved in energy metabolism, mitochondrial regulation, iron homeostasis, cytoprotection against hypoxia, and cytoskeletal organization. Compared with the 9 and 26°C groups, proteins involved in energy metabolism increased in 19°C-acclimated fish, indicating an overall increase in the capacity for ATP production. Creatine kinase abundance increased in 9°C-acclimated fish, suggesting an important role for the phosphocreatine energy shuttle in cold-acclimated hearts. Both 9 and 26°C fish also increased abundance of hexosaminidase, a protein directly involved in post-hypoxia stress cytoprotection of cardiac tissues. Cytoskeletal restructuring appears to occur in all acclimation groups; however, the most prominent effect was detected in 26°C-acclimated fish, which exhibited significantly increased actin levels. Overall, proteomic analysis of cardiac tissue suggests that the capacity to adjust ATP-generating processes is crucial to the thermal plasticity of cardiac function. Furthermore, G. mirabilis may optimize cellular functions at temperatures near 19°C, which lies within the species' preferred temperature range.

  20. Carbon balance, partitioning and photosynthetic acclimation in fruit-bearing grapevine (Vitis vinifera L. cv. Tempranillo) grown under simulated climate change (elevated CO2, elevated temperature and moderate drought) scenarios in temperature gradient greenhouses.

    PubMed

    Salazar-Parra, Carolina; Aranjuelo, Iker; Pascual, Inmaculada; Erice, Gorka; Sanz-Sáez, Álvaro; Aguirreolea, Jone; Sánchez-Díaz, Manuel; Irigoyen, Juan José; Araus, José Luis; Morales, Fermín

    2015-02-01

    Although plant performance under elevated CO2 has been extensively studied in the past little is known about photosynthetic performance changing simultaneously CO2, water availability and temperature conditions. Moreover, despite of its relevancy in crop responsiveness to elevated CO2 conditions, plant level C balance is a topic that, comparatively, has received little attention. In order to test responsiveness of grapevine photosynthetic apparatus to predicted climate change conditions, grapevine (Vitis vinifera L. cv. Tempranillo) fruit-bearing cuttings were exposed to different CO2 (elevated, 700ppm vs. ambient, ca. 400ppm), temperature (ambient vs. elevated, ambient +4°C) and irrigation levels (partial vs. full irrigation). Carbon balance was followed monitoring net photosynthesis (AN, C gain), respiration (RD) and photorespiration (RL) (C losses). Modification of environment (13)C isotopic composition (δ(13)C) under elevated CO2 (from -10.30 to -24.93‰) enabled the further characterization of C partitioning into roots, cuttings, shoots, petioles, leaves, rachides and berries. Irrespective of irrigation level and temperature, exposure to elevated CO2 induced photosynthetic acclimation of plants. C/N imbalance reflected the inability of plants grown at 700ppm CO2 to develop strong C sinks. Partitioning of labeled C to storage organs (main stem and roots) did not avoid accumulation of labeled photoassimilates in leaves, affecting negatively Rubisco carboxylation activity. The study also revealed that, after 20 days of treatment, no oxidative damage to chlorophylls or carotenoids was observed, suggesting a protective role of CO2 either at current or elevated temperatures against the adverse effect of water stress. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  1. Post Junctional Sudomotor and Cutaneous Vascular Responses in Noninjured Skin Following Heat Acclimation in Burn Survivors.

    PubMed

    Pearson, James; Ganio, Matthew S; Schlader, Zachary J; Lucas, Rebekah A I; Gagnon, Daniel; Rivas, Eric; Davis, Scott L; Kowalske, Karen J; Crandall, Craig G

    Thermal tolerance is improved in burn survivors following 7 days of exercise heat acclimation. It is unknown whether post junctional sudomotor and/or cutaneous vascular adaptations in noninjured skin contribute to this improvement. Thirty-three burn survivors were stratified into moderately (17-40% BSA grafted, n = 19) and highly (>40% BSA grafted, n = 14) skin-grafted groups. Nine nonburned subjects served as controls. All subjects underwent a 7-day heat acclimation protocol, which improved thermal tolerance in all groups. Before and after this heat acclimation protocol, post junctional cutaneous vascular responses were assessed by administering increasing doses of sodium nitroprusside (SNP) and methacholine (MCh) using intradermal microdialysis in noninjured skin. MCh infusion was also used to assess post junctional responses in sudomotor function in noninjured skin. Cutaneous vascular responses to SNP and MCh were not different between pre- and post heat acclimation in either group of burn survivors (both P > .05). The maximal sweating rate to MCh increased post acclimation in the control group (0.41 ± 0.20 to 0.54 ± 0.21 mg·min·cm; P = .016) but was unchanged in both groups of burn survivors (both P > .05). The number of sweat glands activated during the highest dose of MCh was elevated in the >40% BSA-grafted group (49 ± 16 to 56 ± 18 glands·cm; P = .005) but was unchanged in control subjects and the <40% BSA-grafted group (both P > .05). Given that post junctional administration of MCh and SNP did not alter sweating or skin blood flow from noninjured skin of burn survivors, improved thermal tolerance in these individuals following heat acclimation is more likely a result of either an increased sweating efficiency or an increased neural drive for sweating.

  2. Adaptive radiation of photosynthetic physiology in the Hawaiian lobeliads: dynamic photosynthetic responses.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Rebecca A; Givnish, Thomas J

    2008-03-01

    Hawaiian lobeliads have radiated into habitats from open alpine bogs to densely shaded rainforest interiors, and show corresponding adaptations in steady-state photosynthetic light responses and associated leaf traits. Shaded environments are not uniformly dark, however, but punctuated by sunflecks that carry most of the photosynthetically active light that strikes plants. We asked whether lobeliads have diversified in their dynamic photosynthetic light responses and how dynamic responses influence daily leaf carbon gain. We quantified gas exchange and dynamic light regimes under field conditions for ten species representing each major Hawaiian sublineage. Species in shadier habitats experienced shorter and less numerous sunflecks: average sunfleck length varied from 1.4 +/- 1.7 min for Cyanea floribunda in shaded forest understories to 31.2 +/- 2.1 min for Trematolobelia kauaiensis on open ridges. As expected, the rate of photosynthetic induction increased significantly toward shadier sites, with assimilation after 60 s rising from ca. 30% of fully induced rates in species from open environments to 60% in those from densely shaded habitats. Uninduced light use efficiency-actual photosynthesis versus that expected under steady-state conditions-increased from 10 to 70% across the same gradient. In silico transplants-modeling daily carbon gain using one species' photosynthetic light response in its own and other species' dynamic light regimes-demonstrated the potential adaptive nature of species differences: understory Cyanea pilosa in its light regimes outperformed gap-dwelling Clermontia parviflora, while Clermontia in its light regimes outperformed Cyanea. The apparent crossover in daily photosynthesis occurred at about the same photon flux density where dominance shifts from Cyanea to Clermontia in the field. Our results further support our hypothesis that the lobeliads have diversified physiologically across light environments in Hawaiian ecosystems and that

  3. The influence of photosynthetic acclimation to rising CO2 and warmer temperatures on leaf and canopy photosynthesis models

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    There is an increasing necessity to understand how climate change factors, particularly increasing atmospheric concentrations of CO2 ([CO2]) and rising temperature, will influence photosynthetic carbon assimilation (A). Based on theory, an increased [CO2] concomitant with a rise in temperature will ...

  4. Acclimation of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to Different Growth Irradiances*

    PubMed Central

    Bonente, Giulia; Pippa, Sara; Castellano, Stefania; Bassi, Roberto; Ballottari, Matteo

    2012-01-01

    We report on the changes the photosynthetic apparatus of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii undergoes upon acclimation to different light intensity. When grown in high light, cells had a faster growth rate and higher biomass production compared with low and control light conditions. However, cells acclimated to low light intensity are indeed able to produce more biomass per photon available as compared with high light-acclimated cells, which dissipate as heat a large part of light absorbed, thus reducing their photosynthetic efficiency. This dissipative state is strictly dependent on the accumulation of LhcSR3, a protein related to light-harvesting complexes, responsible for nonphotochemical quenching in microalgae. Other changes induced in the composition of the photosynthetic apparatus upon high light acclimation consist of an increase of carotenoid content on a chlorophyll basis, particularly zeaxanthin, and a major down-regulation of light absorption capacity by decreasing the chlorophyll content per cell. Surprisingly, the antenna size of both photosystem I and II is not modulated by acclimation; rather, the regulation affects the PSI/PSII ratio. Major effects of the acclimation to low light consist of increased activity of state 1 and 2 transitions and increased contributions of cyclic electron flow. PMID:22205699

  5. Photorespiration Is Crucial for Dynamic Response of Photosynthetic Metabolism and Stomatal Movement to Altered CO2 Availability.

    PubMed

    Eisenhut, Marion; Bräutigam, Andrea; Timm, Stefan; Florian, Alexandra; Tohge, Takayuki; Fernie, Alisdair R; Bauwe, Hermann; Weber, Andreas P M

    2017-01-09

    The photorespiratory pathway or photorespiration is an essential process in oxygenic photosynthetic organisms, which can reduce the efficiency of photosynthetic carbon assimilation and is hence frequently considered as a wasteful process. By comparing the response of the wild-type plants and mutants impaired in photorespiration to a shift in ambient CO2 concentrations, we demonstrate that photorespiration also plays a beneficial role during short-term acclimation to reduced CO2 availability. The wild-type plants responded with few differentially expressed genes, mostly involved in drought stress, which is likely a consequence of enhanced opening of stomata and concomitant water loss upon a shift toward low CO2. In contrast, mutants with impaired activity of photorespiratory enzymes were highly stressed and not able to adjust stomatal conductance to reduced external CO2 availability. The transcriptional response of mutant plants was congruent, indicating a general reprogramming to deal with the consequences of reduced CO2 availability, signaled by enhanced oxygenation of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate and amplified by the artificially impaired photorespiratory metabolism. Central in this reprogramming was the pronounced reallocation of resources from growth processes to stress responses. Taken together, our results indicate that unrestricted photorespiratory metabolism is a prerequisite for rapid physiological acclimation to a reduction in CO2 availability.

  6. Molecular, behavioral, and performance responses of juvenile largemouth bass acclimated to an elevated carbon dioxide environment.

    PubMed

    Dennis, Clark E; Adhikari, Shivani; Wright, Adam W; Suski, Cory D

    2016-04-01

    Aquatic hypercarbia, either naturally occurring or anthropogenically induced, can have extensive impacts on aquatic environments and resident organisms. While the impact of acute hypercarbia exposure on the behavior and physiology of fishes has been well studied, relatively little work has examined the physiological impact and acclimation capacity of fishes to chronic hypercarbia. To better understand the impacts of prolonged hypercarbia exposure, largemouth bass were held at ambient CO2 (13 mg L(-1)) and elevated CO2 (31 mg L(-1); ≈ 21,000 µatm) for 58 days. Following this acclimation period, fish were subjected to three separate, yet complementary, experiments: (1) acute hypercarbia challenge of 120 mg L(-1) CO2 for 1 h to quantify physiological and molecular responses; (2) hypercarbia avoidance challenge to compare CO2 agitation and avoidance responses; and (3) swim performance challenge to quantify burst swimming performance. Acclimation to 31 mg L(-1) CO2 resulted in a significant constitutive upregulation of c-fos expression in erythrocytes, combined with significant constitutive expression of hsp70 in both gill and erythrocytes, relative to controls. Largemouth bass acclimated to elevated CO2 also had a reduced glucose response (relative to controls) following an acute CO2 exposure, indicating a reduced stress response to CO2 stressors. In addition, largemouth bass acclimated to elevated CO2 conditions required 50 % higher CO2 concentrations to illicit agitation behaviors and displayed prolonged burst swimming abilities in high CO2 environments relative to controls. Together, results demonstrate that largemouth bass exposed to chronic hypercarbia may possess a physiological advantage during periods of elevated CO2 relative to naïve fish, which may permit increased performance in hypercarbia.

  7. Canopy warming caused photosynthetic acclimation and reduced seed yield in maize grown at ambient and elevated [CO2 ].

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Vera, Ursula M; Siebers, Matthew H; Drag, David W; Ort, Donald R; Bernacchi, Carl J

    2015-11-01

    Rising atmospheric CO2 concentration ([CO2 ]) and attendant increases in growing season temperature are expected to be the most important global change factors impacting production agriculture. Although maize is the most highly produced crop worldwide, few studies have evaluated the interactive effects of elevated [CO2 ] and temperature on its photosynthetic physiology, agronomic traits or biomass, and seed yield under open field conditions. This study investigates the effects of rising [CO2 ] and warmer temperature, independently and in combination, on maize grown in the field throughout a full growing season. Free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) technology was used to target atmospheric [CO2 ] to 200 μmol mol(-1) above ambient [CO2 ] and infrared heaters to target a plant canopy increase of 3.5 °C, with actual season mean heating of ~2.7 °C, mimicking conditions predicted by the second half of this century. Photosynthetic gas-exchange parameters, leaf nitrogen and carbon content, leaf water potential components, and developmental measurements were collected throughout the season, and biomass and yield were measured at the end of the growing season. As predicted for a C4 plant, elevated [CO2 ] did not stimulate photosynthesis, biomass, or yield. Canopy warming caused a large shift in aboveground allocation by stimulating season-long vegetative biomass and decreasing reproductive biomass accumulation at both CO2 concentrations, resulting in decreased harvest index. Warming caused a reduction in photosynthesis due to down-regulation of photosynthetic biochemical parameters and the decrease in the electron transport rate. The reduction in seed yield with warming was driven by reduced photosynthetic capacity and by a shift in aboveground carbon allocation away from reproduction. This field study portends that future warming will reduce yield in maize, and this will not be mitigated by higher atmospheric [CO2 ] unless appropriate adaptation traits can be introduced

  8. Seasonal changes in temperature and light drive acclimation of photosynthetic physiology and macromolecular content in Lobaria pulmonaria.

    PubMed

    MacKenzie, T D; MacDonald, T M; Dubois, L A; Campbell, D A

    2001-11-01

    Lobaria pulmonaria (L.) Hoffm. is an epiphytic lichen common to temperate deciduous forests where it copes with large changes in temperature and light levels through repeated annual cycles. Samples of L. pulmonaria were taken from a deciduous forest in southeastern Canada at 35-day intervals from February 1999 to February 2000 and also from a rare population in an evergreen forest in March and August 1999. At field-ambient temperatures and light levels, the realised photosystem II (PSII) electron transport was low both in the summer and winter, with transient peaks in the spring and autumn. In contrast, the seasonal pattern of potential electron transport measured at a fixed 20 degrees C peaked in winter, showing the importance of temperature in driving photosynthesis to low levels in the winter despite an acclimation of electron-transport potential to exploit the high ambient light. Realised gross CO2 uptake was correlated with PSII electron transport at mechanistically plausible rates at all sampling sites in the summer but not in the winter, indicating electron diversion away from CO2 fixation in the winter. Chlorophyll content was highest in the dark summer months. The amount of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase-oxygenase (RuBisCO) large subunit (LSU) was highest in spring. Changes in the level of this hyperabundant protein and in the activity of PSII maintained a relatively constant rate of maximum CO2 uptake per RuBisCO LSU from April through November, despite great changes in the seasonal light and temperature. L. pulmonaria acclimates between light and temperature stress in the winter months to light-limitation in the dark summer months. Transition intervals in the spring and autumn, with warm, bright and wet conditions, are likely the most amenable times for growth.

  9. Potential for Increased Photosynthetic Performance and Crop Productivity in Response to Climate Change: role of CBFs and Gibberellic Acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huner, Norman; Dahal, Keshav; Kurepin, Leonid; Savitch, Leonid; Singh, Jas; Ivanov, Alexander; Kane, Khalil; Sarhan, Fathey

    2014-04-01

    We propose that targeting the dwarf phenotype, enhanced photosynthetic performance typically associated with the cold acclimation of winter cultivars of rye (Secale cereale L.), wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and Brassica napus L. may provide a novel approach to improve crop yield and productivity under abiotic as well as biotic stress conditions. In support of this hypothesis, we provide the physiological, biochemical and molecular evidence that the dwarf phenotype induced by cold acclimation is coupled to significant enhancement in photosynthetic performance, resistance to photoinhibition and a decreased dependence on photoprotection through nonphotochemical quenching which result in enhanced biomass production and ultimately increased seed yield. These system-wide changes at the levels of phenotype, physiology and biochemistry appear to be governed by the family of C-repeat / dehydration-responsive family of transcription factors (CBF/DREB1). We relate this phenomenon to the semi-dwarf, gibberellic acid insensitive, cereal varieties developed during the “green revolution” of the early 1960s and 1970s. We suggest that genetic manipulation of the family of C-repeat / dehydration-responsive element binding transcription factors (CBF/DREB1) may provide a novel approach for the maintenance and perhaps even the enhancement of plant productivity under conditions of sub-optimal growth conditions predicted for our future climate.

  10. Potential for increased photosynthetic performance and crop productivity in response to climate change: role of CBFs and gibberellic acid.

    PubMed

    Hüner, Norman P A; Dahal, Keshav; Kurepin, Leonid V; Savitch, Leonid; Singh, Jas; Ivanov, Alexander G; Kane, Khalil; Sarhan, Fathey

    2014-01-01

    We propose that targeting the enhanced photosynthetic performance associated with the cold acclimation of winter cultivars of rye (Secale cereale L.), wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), and Brassica napus L. may provide a novel approach to improve crop productivity under abiotic as well as biotic stress conditions. In support of this hypothesis, we provide the physiological, biochemical, and molecular evidence that the dwarf phenotype induced by cold acclimation is coupled to significant enhancement in photosynthetic performance, resistance to photoinhibition, and a decreased dependence on photoprotection through non-photochemical quenching which result in enhanced biomass production and ultimately increased seed yield. These system-wide changes at the levels of phenotype, physiology, and biochemistry appear to be governed by the family of C-repeat/dehydration-responsive family of transcription factors (CBF/DREB1). We relate this phenomenon to the semi-dwarf, gibberellic acid insensitive (GAI), cereal varieties developed during the "green revolution" of the early 1960s and 1970s. We suggest that genetic manipulation of the family of C-repeat/dehydration-responsive element binding transcription factors (CBF/DREB1) may provide a novel approach for the maintenance and perhaps even the enhancement of plant productivity under conditions of sub-optimal growth conditions predicted for our future climate.

  11. Potential for increased photosynthetic performance and crop productivity in response to climate change: role of CBFs and gibberellic acid

    PubMed Central

    Hüner, Norman P. A.; Dahal, Keshav; Kurepin, Leonid V.; Savitch, Leonid; Singh, Jas; Ivanov, Alexander G.; Kane, Khalil; Sarhan, Fathey

    2014-01-01

    We propose that targeting the enhanced photosynthetic performance associated with the cold acclimation of winter cultivars of rye (Secale cereale L.), wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), and Brassica napus L. may provide a novel approach to improve crop productivity under abiotic as well as biotic stress conditions. In support of this hypothesis, we provide the physiological, biochemical, and molecular evidence that the dwarf phenotype induced by cold acclimation is coupled to significant enhancement in photosynthetic performance, resistance to photoinhibition, and a decreased dependence on photoprotection through non-photochemical quenching which result in enhanced biomass production and ultimately increased seed yield. These system-wide changes at the levels of phenotype, physiology, and biochemistry appear to be governed by the family of C-repeat/dehydration-responsive family of transcription factors (CBF/DREB1). We relate this phenomenon to the semi-dwarf, gibberellic acid insensitive (GAI), cereal varieties developed during the “green revolution” of the early 1960s and 1970s. We suggest that genetic manipulation of the family of C-repeat/dehydration-responsive element binding transcription factors (CBF/DREB1) may provide a novel approach for the maintenance and perhaps even the enhancement of plant productivity under conditions of sub-optimal growth conditions predicted for our future climate. PMID:24860799

  12. Thermal acclimation of interactions: differential responses to temperature change alter predator-prey relationship.

    PubMed

    Grigaltchik, Veronica S; Ward, Ashley J W; Seebacher, Frank

    2012-10-07

    Different species respond differently to environmental change so that species interactions cannot be predicted from single-species performance curves. We tested the hypothesis that interspecific difference in the capacity for thermal acclimation modulates predator-prey interactions. Acclimation of locomotor performance in a predator (Australian bass, Macquaria novemaculeata) was qualitatively different to that of its prey (eastern mosquitofish, Gambusia holbrooki). Warm (25°C) acclimated bass made more attacks than cold (15°C) acclimated fish regardless of acute test temperatures (10-30°C), and greater frequency of attacks was associated with increased prey capture success. However, the number of attacks declined at the highest test temperature (30°C). Interestingly, escape speeds of mosquitofish during predation trials were greater than burst speeds measured in a swimming arena, whereas attack speeds of bass were lower than burst speeds. As a result, escape speeds of mosquitofish were greater at warm temperatures (25°C and 30°C) than attack speeds of bass. The decline in the number of attacks and the increase in escape speed of prey means that predation pressure decreases at high temperatures. We show that differential thermal responses affect species interactions even at temperatures that are within thermal tolerance ranges. This thermal sensitivity of predator-prey interactions can be a mechanism by which global warming affects ecological communities.

  13. Cell wall compositional modifications of Miscanthus ecotypes in response to cold acclimation.

    PubMed

    Domon, Jean-Marc; Baldwin, Laëtitia; Acket, Sébastien; Caudeville, Elodie; Arnoult, Stéphanie; Zub, Hélène; Gillet, Françoise; Lejeune-Hénaut, Isabelle; Brancourt-Hulmel, Maryse; Pelloux, Jérôme; Rayon, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    Miscanthus, a potential energy crop grass, can be damaged by late frost when shoots emerge too early in the spring and during the first winter after planting. The effects of cold acclimation on cell wall composition were investigated in a frost-sensitive clone of Miscanthus x giganteus compared to frost-tolerant clone, Miscanthus sinensis August Feder, and an intermediate frost-tolerant clone, M. sinensis Goliath. Cellulose and lignin contents were higher in M. x giganteus than in the M. sinensis genotypes. In ambient temperature controls, each clone displayed different glucuronoarabinoxylan (GAX) contents and degree of arabinose substitution on the xylan backbone. During cold acclimation, an increase in (1→3),(1→4)-β-D-glucan content was observed in all genotypes. Uronic acid level increased in the frost sensitive genotype but decreased in the frost tolerant genotypes in response to cold. In all clones, major changes in cell wall composition were observed with modifications in phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) and cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD) activities in both non- and cold-acclimated experiments. A large increase in CAD activity under cold stress was displayed in each clone, but it was largest in the frost-tolerant clone, M. sinensis August Feder. The marked increase in PAL activity observed in the frost-tolerant clones under cold acclimation, suggests a reorientation of the products towards the phenylpropanoid pathway or aromatic synthesis. How changes in cell wall physical properties can impact frost tolerance is discussed.

  14. Acclimation of respiratory temperature responses in northern and southern populations of Pinus banksiana.

    PubMed

    Tjoelker, M G; Oleksyn, J; Lorenc-Plucinska, G; Reich, P B

    2009-01-01

    Temperature acclimation of respiration may contribute to climatic adaptation and thus differ among populations from contrasting climates. Short-term temperature responses of foliar dark respiration were measured in 33-yr-old trees of jack pine (Pinus banksiana) in eight populations of wide-ranging origin (44-55 degrees N) grown in a common garden at 46.7 degrees N. It was tested whether seasonal adjustments in respiration and population differences in this regard resulted from changes in base respiration rate at 5 degrees C (R(5)) or Q(10) (temperature sensitivity) and covaried with nitrogen and soluble sugars. In all populations, acclimation was manifest primarily through shifts in R(5) rather than altered Q(10). R(5) was higher in cooler periods in late autumn and winter and lower in spring and summer, inversely tracking variation in ambient air temperature. Overall, R(5) covaried with sugars and not with nitrogen. Although acclimation was comparable among all populations, the observed seasonal ranges in R(5) and Q(10) were greater in populations originating from warmer than from colder sites. Population differences in respiratory traits appeared associated with autumnal cold hardening. Common patterns of respiratory temperature acclimation among biogeographically diverse populations provide a basis for predicting respiratory carbon fluxes in a wide-ranging species.

  15. Growth and photosynthetic responses of wheat plants grown in space.

    PubMed Central

    Tripathy, B C; Brown, C S; Levine, H G; Krikorian, A D

    1996-01-01

    Growth and photosynthesis of wheat (Triticum aestivum L. cv Super Dwarf) plants grown onboard the space shuttle Discovery for 10 d were examined. Compared to ground control plants, the shoot fresh weight of space-grown seedlings decreased by 25%. Postflight measurements of the O2 evolution/photosynthetic photon flux density response curves of leaf samples revealed that the CO2-saturated photosynthetic rate at saturating light intensities in space-grown plants declined 25% relative to the rate in ground control plants. The relative quantum yield of CO2-saturated photosynthetic O2 evolution measured at limiting light intensities was not significantly affected. In space-grown plants, the light compensation point of the leaves increased by 33%, which likely was due to an increase (27%) in leaf dark-respiration rates. Related experiments with thylakoids isolated from space-grown plants showed that the light-saturated photosynthetic electron transport rate from H2O through photosystems II and I was reduced by 28%. These results demonstrate that photosynthetic functions are affected by the microgravity environment. PMID:8819868

  16. Growth and photosynthetic responses of wheat plants grown in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tripathy, B. C.; Brown, C. S.; Levine, H. G.; Krikorian, A. D.

    1996-01-01

    Growth and photosynthesis of wheat (Triticum aestivum L. cv Super Dwarf) plants grown onboard the space shuttle Discovery for 10 d were examined. Compared to ground control plants, the shoot fresh weight of space-grown seedlings decreased by 25%. Postflight measurements of the O2 evolution/photosynthetic photon flux density response curves of leaf samples revealed that the CO2-saturated photosynthetic rate at saturating light intensities in space-grown plants declined 25% relative to the rate in ground control plants. The relative quantum yield of CO2-saturated photosynthetic O2 evolution measured at limiting light intensities was not significantly affected. In space-grown plants, the light compensation point of the leaves increased by 33%, which likely was due to an increase (27%) in leaf dark-respiration rates. Related experiments with thylakoids isolated from space-grown plants showed that the light-saturated photosynthetic electron transport rate from H2O through photosystems II and I was reduced by 28%. These results demonstrate that photosynthetic functions are affected by the microgravity environment.

  17. Growth and photosynthetic responses of wheat plants grown in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tripathy, B. C.; Brown, C. S.; Levine, H. G.; Krikorian, A. D.

    1996-01-01

    Growth and photosynthesis of wheat (Triticum aestivum L. cv Super Dwarf) plants grown onboard the space shuttle Discovery for 10 d were examined. Compared to ground control plants, the shoot fresh weight of space-grown seedlings decreased by 25%. Postflight measurements of the O2 evolution/photosynthetic photon flux density response curves of leaf samples revealed that the CO2-saturated photosynthetic rate at saturating light intensities in space-grown plants declined 25% relative to the rate in ground control plants. The relative quantum yield of CO2-saturated photosynthetic O2 evolution measured at limiting light intensities was not significantly affected. In space-grown plants, the light compensation point of the leaves increased by 33%, which likely was due to an increase (27%) in leaf dark-respiration rates. Related experiments with thylakoids isolated from space-grown plants showed that the light-saturated photosynthetic electron transport rate from H2O through photosystems II and I was reduced by 28%. These results demonstrate that photosynthetic functions are affected by the microgravity environment.

  18. Growth and photosynthetic responses of wheat plants grown in space.

    PubMed

    Tripathy, B C; Brown, C S; Levine, H G; Krikorian, A D

    1996-03-01

    Growth and photosynthesis of wheat (Triticum aestivum L. cv Super Dwarf) plants grown onboard the space shuttle Discovery for 10 d were examined. Compared to ground control plants, the shoot fresh weight of space-grown seedlings decreased by 25%. Postflight measurements of the O2 evolution/photosynthetic photon flux density response curves of leaf samples revealed that the CO2-saturated photosynthetic rate at saturating light intensities in space-grown plants declined 25% relative to the rate in ground control plants. The relative quantum yield of CO2-saturated photosynthetic O2 evolution measured at limiting light intensities was not significantly affected. In space-grown plants, the light compensation point of the leaves increased by 33%, which likely was due to an increase (27%) in leaf dark-respiration rates. Related experiments with thylakoids isolated from space-grown plants showed that the light-saturated photosynthetic electron transport rate from H2O through photosystems II and I was reduced by 28%. These results demonstrate that photosynthetic functions are affected by the microgravity environment.

  19. A Novel Proteinase, SNOWY COTYLEDON4, Is Required for Photosynthetic Acclimation to Higher Light Intensities in Arabidopsis1[W

    PubMed Central

    Albrecht-Borth, Verónica; Kauss, Dominika; Fan, Dayong; Hu, Yuanyuan; Collinge, Derek; Marri, Shashikanth; Liebers, Monique; Apel, Klaus; Pfannschmidt, Thomas; Chow, Wah S.; Pogson, Barry J.

    2013-01-01

    Excess light can have a negative impact on photosynthesis; thus, plants have evolved many different ways to adapt to different light conditions to both optimize energy use and avoid damage caused by excess light. Analysis of the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mutant snowy cotyledon4 (sco4) revealed a mutation in a chloroplast-targeted protein that shares limited homology with CaaX-type endopeptidases. The SCO4 protein possesses an important function in photosynthesis and development, with point mutations rendering the seedlings and adult plants susceptible to photooxidative stress. The sco4 mutation impairs the acclimation of chloroplasts and their photosystems to excess light, evidenced in a reduction in photosystem I function, decreased linear electron transfer, yet increased nonphotochemical quenching. SCO4 is localized to the chloroplasts, which suggests the existence of an unreported type of protein modification within this organelle. Phylogenetic and yeast complementation analyses of SCO4-like proteins reveal that SCO4 is a member of an unknown group of higher plant-specific proteinases quite distinct from the well-described CaaX-type endopeptidases RAS Converting Enzyme1 (RCE1) and zinc metallopeptidase STE24 and lacks canonical CaaX activity. Therefore, we hypothesize that SCO4 is a novel endopeptidase required for critical protein modifications within chloroplasts, influencing the function of proteins involved in photosynthesis required for tolerance to excess light. PMID:23940253

  20. Photosynthetic acclimation and the estimation of temperate ice algal primary production in Saroma-ko Lagoon, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudoh, Sakae; Robineau, Brigitte; Suzuki, Yoshihiro; Fujiyoshi, Yoshihiro; Takahashi, Masayuki

    1997-02-01

    Temporal changes in the sea ice environment, ice algal biomass and photosynthetic characteristics were studied at Saroma-ko Lagoon in Japan, the area where the southernmost seasonal sea ice in the northern hemisphere occurs. In 1992, the sea ice started to develop in early January and covered the entire lagoon surface in late January, when water temperatures at the center of the lagoon decreased below -1.7°C. High concentrations of ice algae in the bottom layer of the sea ice, where light levels were 0.5-2.8% of the surface irradiance, were visually confirmed in mid-February. The biomass increased in late February to a maximum of 38.25 mg Chl am -2 then suddenly decreased during stormy weather in early March. Afterwards it remained rather constant, with high values of 20-30 mg Chl am -2 until mid-March. Photosynthesis vs. light analysis revealed that ice algae in this lagoon had a low dark respiration rate of 0.024 mg C mg Chl a-1h -1 on average while the increase of photosynthesis at light levels lower than 25 μmol m -2s -1 showed gentle linear increases with increments of light intensity. However, the maximum photosynthetic rate and the efficiency of the photosynthesis at low light levels were rather low compared with values from previous studies in the polar sea ice areas. Nevertheless, in situ estimates of net diel photosynthesis and production, which were calculated with a numerical model using the photosynthetic parameters and hourly averaged light at the ice algal habitat, suggested that large positive values were expected throughout this study. In temperate sea ice areas like Saroma-ko, where there are day/night light cycles, ice algae that have a small net loss of carbon at night due to dark respiration could achieve positive photosynthesis and growth even though they do not show the efficient photosynthesis under low light as shown by polar ice algae.

  1. The Penalty of a Long, Hot Summer. Photosynthetic Acclimation to High CO2 and Continuous Light in “Living Fossil” Conifers1

    PubMed Central

    Osborne, Colin P.; Beerling, David J.

    2003-01-01

    Deciduous forests covered the ice-free polar regions 280 to 40 million years ago under warm “greenhouse” climates and high atmospheric pCO2. Their deciduous habit is frequently interpreted as an adaptation for minimizing carbon losses during winter, but experiments with “living fossils” in a simulated warm polar environment refute this explanation. Measured carbon losses through leaf abscission of deciduous trees are significantly greater than losses through winter respiration in evergreens, yet annual rates of primary productivity are similar in all species. Here, we investigate mechanisms underlying this apparent paradox by measuring the seasonal patterns of leaf photosynthesis (A) under pCO2 enrichment in the same trees. During spring, A increased significantly in coastal redwood (Sequoia sempervirens), dawn redwood (Metasequoia glyptostroboides), and swamp cypress (Taxodium distichum) at an elevated pCO2 of 80 Pa compared with controls at 40 Pa. However, strong acclimation in Rubisco carboxylation capacity (Vc,max) completely offset the CO2 response of A in all species by the end of 6 weeks of continuous illumination in the simulated polar summer. Further measurements demonstrated the temporary nature of acclimation, with increases in Vc,max during autumn restoring the CO2 sensitivity of A. Contrary to expectations, the acclimation of Vc,max was not always accompanied by accumulation of leaf carbohydrates, but was associated with a decline in leaf nitrogen in summer, suggesting an alteration of the balance in plant sources and sinks for carbon and nitrogen. Preliminary calculations using A indicated that winter carbon losses through deciduous leaf abscission and respiration were recovered by 10 to 25 d of canopy carbon fixation during summer, thereby explaining the productivity paradox. PMID:12972654

  2. Heat-shock response of the upper intertidal barnacle Balanus glandula: thermal stress and acclimation.

    PubMed

    Berger, Michael S; Emlet, Richard B

    2007-06-01

    In the intertidal zone in the Pacific Northwest, body temperatures of sessile marine organisms can reach 35 degrees C for an extended time during low tide, resulting in potential physiological stress. We used immunochemical assays to examine the effects of thermal stress on endogenous Hsp70 levels in the intertidal barnacle Balanus glandula. After thermal stress, endogenous Hsp70 levels did not increase above control levels in B. glandula exposed to 20 and 28 degrees C. In a separate experiment, endogenous Hsp70 levels were higher than control levels when B. glandula was exposed to 34 degrees C for 8.5 h. Although an induced heat-shock response was observed, levels of conjugated ubiquitin failed to indicate irreversible protein damage at temperatures up to 34 degrees C. With metabolic labeling, we examined temperature acclimation and thermally induced heat-shock proteins in B. glandula. An induced heat-shock response of proteins in the 70-kDa region (Hsp70) occurred in B. glandula above 23 degrees C. This heat-shock response was similar in molting and non-molting barnacles. Acclimation of B. glandula to relatively higher temperatures resulted in higher levels of protein synthesis in the 70-kDa region and lack of an upward shift in the induction temperature for heat-shock proteins. Our results suggest that B. glandula may be well adapted to life in the high intertidal zone but may lack the plasticity to acclimate to higher temperatures.

  3. Photosynthetic response of Nodularia spumigena to UV and photosynthetically active radiation depends on nutrient (N and P) availability.

    PubMed

    Roleda, Michael Y; Mohlin, Malin; Pattanaik, Bagmi; Wulff, Angela

    2008-11-01

    Biomass of N. spumigena is distributed within the dynamic photic zone that changes in both light quantity and quality. This study was designed to determine whether nutrient status can mitigate the negative impacts of experimental radiation treatments on the photosynthetic performance of N. spumigena. Cyanobacterial suspensions were exposed to radiation consisting of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR=400-700 nm), PAR+UV-A (=PA, 320-700 nm), and PAR+UV-A+UV-B (=PAB, 280-700 nm) under different nutrient media either replete with external dissolved nitrate (N) and orthophosphate (P; designated as +N/+P), replete with P only (-N/+P), or replete with N only (+N/-P). Under low PAR (75 micromol photons m(-2) s(-1)), nutrient status had no significant effect on the photosynthetic performance of N. spumigena in terms of rETRmax, alpha, and E(k). Nodularia spumigena was able to acclimate to high PAR (300 micromol photons m(-2) s(-1)), with a corresponding increase in rETRmax and E(k). The photosynthetic performance of N. spumigena cultured with supplemental nitrogen was more susceptible to experimental PAR irradiance. Under UVR, P-enrichment in the absence of additional external N (-N/+P) induced lower photoinhibition of photosynthesis compared with +N/-P cultures. However, the induction of NPQ may have provided PSII protection under P-deplete and PAR+UVR conditions. Because N. spumigena are able to fix nitrogen, access to available P can render them less susceptible to photoinhibition, effectively promoting blooms. Under a P-deficient condition, N. spumigena were more susceptible to radiation but were capable of photosynthetic recovery immediately after removal of radiation stress. In the presence of an internal P pool in the Baltic Sea, which may be seasonally available to the diazotrophic cyanobacteria, summer blooms of the resilient N. spumigena will persist.

  4. Identification of Mutants of Arabidopsis Defective in Acclimation of Photosynthesis to the Light Environment1

    PubMed Central

    Walters, Robin G.; Shephard, Freya; Rogers, Jennifer J.M.; Rolfe, Stephen A.; Horton, Peter

    2003-01-01

    In common with many other higher plant species, Arabidopsis undergoes photosynthetic acclimation, altering the composition of the photosynthetic apparatus in response to fluctuations in its growth environment. The changes in photosynthetic function that result from acclimation can be detected in a noninvasive manner by monitoring chlorophyll (Chl) fluorescence. This technique has been used to develop a screen that enables the rapid identification of plants defective at ACCLIMATION OF PHOTOSYNTHESIS TO THE ENVIRONMENT (APE) loci. The application of this screen to a population of T-DNA-transformed Arabidopsis has successfully led to the identification of a number of mutant lines with altered Chl fluorescence characteristics. Analysis of photosynthesis and pigment composition in leaves from three such mutants showed that they had altered acclimation responses to the growth light environment, each having a distinct acclimation-defective phenotype, demonstrating that screening for mutants using Chl fluorescence is a viable strategy for the investigation of acclimation. Sequencing of the genomic DNA flanking the T-DNA elements showed that in the ape1 mutant, a gene was disrupted that encodes a protein of unknown function but that appears to be specific to photosynthetic organisms, whereas the ape2 mutant carries an insertion in the region of the TPT gene encoding the chloroplast inner envelope triose phosphate/phosphate translocator. PMID:12586872

  5. The quantitative proteomic response of Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 to phosphate acclimation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Inorganic phosphate (Pi) is a critical nutrient for all life and is periodically limiting in marine and freshwater provinces, yet little is understood how organisms acclimate to fluctuations in Pi within their environment. To investigate whole cell adaptation, we grew Synechocystis sp. PCC6803, a model freshwater cyanobacterium, in 3%, and 0.3% inorganic phosphate (Pi) media. The cells were allowed to acclimate over 60 days, and cells were harvested for quantitative high throughput mass spectrometry-based proteomics using the iTRAQ™ labelling technology. Results In total, 120 proteins were identified, and 52 proteins were considered differentially abundant compared to the control. Alkaline phosphatase (APase) activities correlated significantly (p < 0.05) with observed relative PhoA abundances. PstS1 and PstS2 were both observed, yet PstS1 was not differentially more abundant than the control. Phycobilisome protein abundances appeared to be coordinated, and are significantly less abundant in 0.3% Pi than 3% Pi cultures. Also, the central metabolic cell function appears to have shifted towards the production of (NADPH) reducing energy and nucleotide sugars. Conclusions This acclimation response bears strong similarity to the previously reported response to nitrogen deprivation within Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. However, it also demonstrates some characteristics of desiccation stress, such as the regulation of fatty acids and increased abundance of rehydrin in the 3% Pi culture. PMID:23442353

  6. Modeling acclimation of photosynthesis to temperature in evergreen conifer forests.

    PubMed

    Gea-Izquierdo, Guillermo; Mäkelä, Annikki; Margolis, Hank; Bergeron, Yves; Black, T Andrew; Dunn, Allison; Hadley, Julian; Kyaw Tha Paw U; Falk, Matthias; Wharton, Sonia; Monson, Russell; Hollinger, David Y; Laurila, Tuomas; Aurela, Mika; McCaughey, Harry; Bourque, Charles; Vesala, Timo; Berninger, Frank

    2010-10-01

    • In this study, we used a canopy photosynthesis model which describes changes in photosynthetic capacity with slow temperature-dependent acclimations. • A flux-partitioning algorithm was applied to fit the photosynthesis model to net ecosystem exchange data for 12 evergreen coniferous forests from northern temperate and boreal regions. • The model accounted for much of the variation in photosynthetic production, with modeling efficiencies (mean > 67%) similar to those of more complex models. The parameter describing the rate of acclimation was larger at the northern sites, leading to a slower acclimation of photosynthesis to temperature. The response of the rates of photosynthesis to air temperature in spring was delayed up to several days at the coldest sites. Overall photosynthesis acclimation processes were slower at colder, northern locations than at warmer, more southern, and more maritime sites. • Consequently, slow changes in photosynthetic capacity were essential to explaining variations of photosynthesis for colder boreal forests (i.e. where acclimation of photosynthesis to temperature was slower), whereas the importance of these processes was minor in warmer conifer evergreen forests.

  7. Warm acclimation and oxygen depletion induce species-specific responses in salmonids.

    PubMed

    Anttila, Katja; Lewis, Mario; Prokkola, Jenni M; Kanerva, Mirella; Seppänen, Eila; Kolari, Irma; Nikinmaa, Mikko

    2015-05-15

    Anthropogenic activities are greatly altering the habitats of animals, whereby fish are already encountering several stressors simultaneously. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the capacity of fish to respond to two different environmental stressors (high temperature and overnight hypoxia) separately and together. We found that acclimation to increased temperature (from 7.7±0.02°C to 14.9±0.05°C) and overnight hypoxia (daily changes from normoxia to 63-67% oxygen saturation), simulating climate change and eutrophication, had both antagonistic and synergistic effects on the capacity of fish to tolerate these stressors. The thermal tolerance of Arctic char (Salvelinus alpinus) and landlocked salmon (Salmo salar m. sebago) increased with warm acclimation by 1.3 and 2.2°C, respectively, but decreased when warm temperature was combined with overnight hypoxia (by 0.2 and 0.4°C, respectively). In contrast, the combination of the stressors more than doubled hypoxia tolerance in salmon and also increased hypoxia tolerance in char by 22%. Salmon had 1.2°C higher thermal tolerance than char, but char tolerated much lower oxygen levels than salmon at a given temperature. The changes in hypoxia tolerance were connected to the responses of the oxygen supply and delivery system. The relative ventricle mass was higher in cold- than in warm-acclimated salmon but the thickness of the compact layer of the ventricle increased with the combination of warm and hypoxia acclimation in both species. Char had also significantly larger hearts and thicker compact layers than salmon. The results illustrate that while fish can have protective responses when encountering a single environmental stressor, the combination of stressors can have unexpected species-specific effects that will influence their survival capacity.

  8. Thermoregulatory responses of middle-aged and young men during dry-heat acclimation.

    PubMed

    Pandolf, K B; Cadarette, B S; Sawka, M N; Young, A J; Francesconi, R P; Gonzalez, R R

    1988-07-01

    Thermoregulatory responses during heat acclimation were compared between nine young (mean age 21.2 yr) and nine middle-aged men (mean age 46.4 yr) who were matched (P greater than 0.05) for body weight, surface area, surface area-to-weight ratio, percent body fat, and maximal aerobic power. After evaluation in a comfortable environment (22 degrees C, 50% relative humidity), the men were heat acclimated by treadmill walking (1.56 m/s, 5% grade) for two 50-min exercise bouts separated by 10 min of rest for 10 consecutive days in a hot dry (49 degrees C ambient temperature, 20% relative humidity) environment. During the first day of heat exposure performance time was 27 min longer (P less than 0.05) for the middle-aged men, whereas final rectal and skin temperatures and heart rate were lower, and final total body sweat loss was higher (P less than 0.05) compared with the young men. These thermoregulatory advantages for the middle-aged men persisted for the first few days of exercise-heat acclimation (P less than 0.05). After acclimation no thermoregulatory or performance time differences were observed between groups (P greater than 0.05). Sweating sensitivity, esophageal temperature at sweating onset, and the sweating onset time did not differ (P greater than 0.05) between groups either pre- or postacclimatization. Plasma osmolality and sodium concentration were slightly lower for the young men both pre- and postacclimatization; however, both groups had a similar percent change in plasma volume from rest to exercise during these tests.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Elevated [CO2] modified the drought acclimation response in peanut

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Peanut agroecosystems play a key role in food production and are a major source of protein in many arid and semi-arid regions where extreme weather events are expected to increase in frequency. We are taking a systems-level approach to investigate the response of peanut to elevated [CO2], water defi...

  10. Mechanisms and fitness implications of photomorphogenesis during chromatic acclimation in cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Beronda L

    2016-07-01

    Photosynthetic organisms absorb photons and convert light energy to chemical energy through the process of photosynthesis. Photosynthetic efficiency is tuned in response to the availability of light, carbon dioxide and nutrients to promote maximal levels of carbon fixation, while simultaneously limiting the potential for light-associated damage or phototoxicity. Given the central dependence on light for energy production, photosynthetic organisms possess abilities to tune their growth, development and metabolism to external light cues in the process of photomorphogenesis. Photosynthetic organisms perceive light intensity and distinct wavelengths or colors of light to promote organismal acclimation. Cyanobacteria are oxygenic photosynthetic prokaryotes that exhibit abilities to alter specific aspects of growth, including photosynthetic pigment composition and morphology, in responses to changes in available wavelengths and intensity of light. This form of photomorphogenesis is known as chromatic acclimation and has been widely studied. Recent insights into the photosensory photoreceptors found in cyanobacteria and developments in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms initiated by light sensing to affect the changes characteristic of chromatic acclimation are discussed. I consider cyanobacterial responses to light, the broad diversity of photoreceptors encoded by these organisms, specific mechanisms of photomorphogenesis, and associated fitness implications in chromatically acclimating cyanobacteria.

  11. Photosynthetic microbial fuel cells with positive light response.

    PubMed

    Zou, Yongjin; Pisciotta, John; Billmyre, R Blake; Baskakov, Ilia V

    2009-12-01

    The current study introduces an aerobic single-chamber photosynthetic microbial fuel cell (PMFC). Evaluation of PMFC performance using naturally growing fresh-water photosynthetic biofilm revealed a weak positive light response, that is, an increase in cell voltage upon illumination. When the PMFC anodes were coated with electrically conductive polymers, the rate of voltage increased and the amplitude of the light response improved significantly. The rapid immediate positive response to light was consistent with a mechanism postulating that the photosynthetic electron-transfer chain is the source of the electrons harvested on the anode surface. This mechanism is fundamentally different from the one exploited in previously designed anaerobic microbial fuel cells (MFCs), sediment MFCs, or anaerobic PMFCs, where the electrons are derived from the respiratory electron-transfer chain. The power densities produced in PMFCs were substantially lower than those that are currently reported for conventional MFC (0.95 mW/m(2) for polyaniline-coated and 1.3 mW/m(2) for polypyrrole-coated anodes). However, the PMFC did not depend on an organic substrate as an energy source and was powered only by light energy. Its operation was CO(2)-neutral and did not require buffers or exogenous electron transfer shuttles.

  12. Response of chaparral shrubs to below-freezing temperatures: acclimation, ecotypes, seedlings vs. adults.

    PubMed

    Boorse, G C; Ewers, F W; Davis, S D

    1998-09-01

    Leaf death due to freezing was examined for four, co-occurring species of chaparral shrubs from the Santa Monica Mountains of southern California, Rhus laurina (= Malosma laurina), R. ovata, Ceanothus megacarpus, and C. spinosus. Measurements were made on seedlings vs. adults for all species, and for Rhus spp. in winter vs. summer, and at a warm vs. a cold site. We used four methods to determine the temperature for 50% change in activity or cell death (LT(50)) of leaves: (1) electrical conductivity (electrolyte leakage into a bathing solution), (2) photosynthetic fluorescent capacity (Fv/Fm), (3) percentage of palisade mesophyll cells stained by fluorescein diacetate vital stain, and (4) visual score of leaf color (Munsell color chart). In all four species seedlings were found to be more sensitive to freezing temperatures than were adults by 1°-3°C. For adults the LT(50) ranged from -5°C for Rhus laurina in the summer to -16°C for Rhus ovata in the winter. The LT(50) of R. ovata located at a colder inland site was 4C lower than R. ovata at the warmer coastal site just 4 km apart, suggesting ecotypic differences between R. ovata at the two sites. Both R. laurina and R. ovata underwent significant winter hardening. At the cold site, R. ovata acclimated by 6°C on average, while R. laurina acclimated by only 3°C. These results were consistent with species distributions and with field observations of differential shoot dieback between these two congeneric species after a natural freeze-thaw event in the Santa Monica Mountains.

  13. Ecohydrological responses of dense canopies to environmental variability: 2. Role of acclimation under elevated CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drewry, D. T.; Kumar, P.; Long, S.; Bernacchi, C.; Liang, X.-Z.; Sivapalan, M.

    2010-12-01

    The ability to accurately predict land-atmosphere exchange of mass, energy, and momentum over the coming century requires the consideration of plant biochemical, ecophysiological, and structural acclimation to modifications of the ambient environment. Amongst the most important environmental changes experienced by terrestrial vegetation over the last century has been the increase in ambient carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations, with a projected doubling in CO2 from preindustrial levels by the middle of this century. This change in atmospheric composition has been demonstrated to significantly alter a variety of leaf and plant properties across a range of species, with the potential to modify land-atmosphere interactions and their associated feedbacks. Free Air Carbon Enrichment (FACE) technology has provided significant insight into the functioning of vegetation in natural conditions under elevated CO2, but remains limited in its ability to quantify the exchange of CO2, water vapor, and energy at the canopy scale. This paper addresses the roles of ecophysiological, biochemical, and structural plant acclimation on canopy-scale exchange of CO2, water vapor, and energy through the application of a multilayer canopy-root-soil model (MLCan) capable of resolving changes induced by elevated CO2 through the canopy and soil systems. Previous validation of MLCan flux estimates were made for soybean and maize in the companion paper using a record of six growing seasons of eddy covariance data from the Bondville Ameriflux site. Observations of leaf-level photosynthesis, stomatal conductance, and surface temperature collected at the SoyFACE experimental facility in central Illinois provide a basis for examining the ability of MLCan to capture vegetation responses to an enriched CO2 environment. Simulations of control (370 [ppm]) and elevated (550 [ppm]) CO2 environments allow for an examination of the vertical variation and canopy-scale responses of vegetation states and fluxes

  14. Heat acclimation decreases the growth hormone response to acute constant-load exercise in the heat.

    PubMed

    Oöpik, Vahur; Timpmann, Saima; Kreegipuu, Kairi; Unt, Eve; Tamm, Maria

    2014-02-01

    The major objective of this study was to elucidate the effect of heat acclimation on blood growth hormone (GH) response to moderate intensity exhausting exercise in the heat. In addition, the potential relationship between inter-individual differences in GH response to exercise and variability in exercise-induced sweat loss was investigated. Twenty young men completed three exercise tests on a treadmill: H1 (walk at 60% VO₂peak until exhaustion at 42 °C), N (walk at 22 °C; duration equal to H1) and H2 (walk until exhaustion at 42 °C after a 10-day heat acclimation program). Core temperature (T(c)) was recorded continuously and venous blood samples were taken before, during and after each exercise test. Exercise-induced sweat production was calculated on the basis of body mass change taking into account water intake and the volume of blood samples drawn. Lower pre-exercise T(c), lower rate of rise in T(c) during exercise, and prolonged time to exhaustion in H2 compared with H1 revealed that the subjects successfully achieved an acclimated state. Overall, serum GH level was higher in H1 compared with both N and H2 (p<0.001) but did not differ between the two latter trials (p>0.05). T(c) correlated with serum GH concentration (r=0.615, p<0.01). Analysis of the individual data revealed a group (n=9) possessing a threshold-like pattern of the relationship between T(c) and blood GH response, whereas a plateau-like pattern was evident in the rest of the subjects (n=11). Both sweat production (r=0.596; p<0.001) and the rate of sweat production (r=0.457; p<0.001) correlated with the growth hormone area under the curve. Heat acclimation decreases the GH response to moderate intensity exhausting exercise in the heat. GH may have a modest stimulating effect on whole-body sweat production during exercise. © 2013.

  15. Responses of action potential and K+ currents to temperature acclimation in fish hearts: phylogeny or thermal preferences?

    PubMed

    Haverinen, Jaakko; Vornanen, Matti

    2009-01-01

    Electrical activity of the heart is assumed to be one of the key factors that set thermal tolerance limits for ectothermic vertebrates. Therefore, we hypothesized that in thermal acclimation--the duration of cardiac action potential and the repolarizing K+ currents that regulate action potential duration (APD)--the rapid component of the delayed rectifier K+ current (I(Kr)) and the inward rectifier K+ current (I(K1)) are more plastic in eurythermal than in stenothermal fish species. The hypothesis was tested in six freshwater teleosts representing four different fish orders (Cadiformes, Cypriniformes, Perciformes, Salmoniformes) acclimated at +4 degrees C (cold acclimation) or +18 degrees C (warm acclimation). In cold acclimation, a compensatory shortening of APD occurred in all species regardless of thermal tolerances, life styles, or phylogenies of the fish, suggesting that this response is a common characteristic of the teleost heart. The strength of the response did not, however, obey simple eurythermy-stenothermy gradation but differed among the phylogenetic groups. Salmoniformes fish showed the greatest acclimation capacity of cardiac electrical activity, whereas the weakest response appeared in the perch (Perciformes) heart. The underlying ionic mechanisms were also partly phylogeny dependent. Modification of the I(Kr) current was al- most ubiquitously involved in acclimation response of fish cardiac myocytes to temperature, while the ability to change the I(K1) current under chronic thermal stress was absent or showed inverse compensation in Salmoniformes species. Thus, in Salmoniformes fish, the thermal plasticity of APD is strongly based on I(Kr), while other fish groups rely on both I(Kr) and I(K1).

  16. Effects of heat acclimation on endurance capacity and prolactin response to exercise in the heat.

    PubMed

    Burk, Andres; Timpmann, Saima; Kreegipuu, Kairi; Tamm, Maria; Unt, Eve; Oöpik, Vahur

    2012-12-01

    We examined the effect of heat acclimation (HA) on endurance capacity and blood prolactin (PRL) response to moderate intensity exercise in the heat in young male subjects (n = 21). Three exercise tests (ET) were completed on a treadmill: H1 (walk at 60% VO(2)peak until exhaustion at 42°C), N (walk at 22°C; duration equal to H1) and H2 (walk until exhaustion at 42°C after a 10-day HA program). Heart rate (HR), skin (T (sk)) and core (T (c)) temperatures and body heat storage (HS) were measured. Blood samples were taken immediately before, during and immediately after each ET. HA resulted in lower HR, T (sk), T (c) and HS rate (P < 0.05) during ET, whereas endurance capacity increased from 88.6 ± 27.5 min in H1 to 162.0 ± 47.8 min in H2 (P < 0.001). Blood PRL concentration was lower (P < 0.05) during exercise in H2 compared to H1 but the peak PRL level observed at the time of exhaustion did not differ in the two trials. Blood PRL concentration at 60 min of exercise in H1 correlated with time to exhaustion in H1 (r = -0.497, P = 0.020) and H2 (r = -0.528, P = 0.014). In conclusion, HA slows down the increase in blood PRL concentration but does not reduce the peak PRL level occurring at the end of exhausting endurance exercise in the heat. Blood PRL response to exercise in the heat in non-heat-acclimated subjects is associated with their endurance capacity in the heat in a heat-acclimated state.

  17. Thermoregulatory responses during thermal acclimation in pigs divergently selected for residual feed intake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campos, Paulo Henrique Reis Furtado; Noblet, Jean; Jaguelin-Peyraud, Yolande; Gilbert, Hélène; Mormède, Pierre; de Oliveira Donzele, Rita Flavia Miranda; Donzele, Juarez Lopes; Renaudeau, David

    2014-09-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the performance and thermoregulatory responses during acclimation to high ambient temperature (Ta) of pigs from two lines selected for high (RFI+) or low (RFI-) residual feed intake with the hypothesis that RFI- pigs producing less heat would better tolerate high Ta. Pigs (50 kg initial body weight; 17 per line among which 10 of them were catheterized) were individually housed in a climatic-controlled room where Ta was maintained at 24.2 ± 0.4 °C during 7 days and thereafter at 30.4 ± 0.7 °C during 14 days. Irrespective of Ta, RFI- pigs had lower feed intake (ADFI) and similar average daily gain (ADG) than RFI+ pigs. Whatever the line, ADFI, ADG, and feed efficiency decreased with increased Ta. Overall, the Ta increase resulted in an increase in rectal temperature (RT), skin temperature (ST), and respiratory rate (RR) within the first 24-48 h and, subsequently, in a decrease followed by stabilization. The RT decrease during acclimation occurred 24 h earlier in RFI- pigs than in RFI+. Thyroid hormones and cortisol decreased at high Ta and it was similar in both lines. Based on performance and RT, ST, and RR responses, it seems that selection for low RFI tends to ameliorate pigs' tolerance to high Ta. Nevertheless, this selection does not induce significant differences between lines in endocrine and metabolite responses during thermal stress.

  18. Gene expression plasticity in response to salinity acclimation in threespine stickleback ecotypes from different salinity habitats.

    PubMed

    Gibbons, Taylor C; Metzger, David C H; Healy, Timothy M; Schulte, Patricia M

    2017-02-18

    Phenotypic plasticity is thought to facilitate the colonization of novel environments and shape the direction of evolution in colonizing populations. However, the relative prevalence of various predicted patterns of changes in phenotypic plasticity following colonization remains unclear. Here, we use a whole-transcriptome approach to characterize patterns of gene expression plasticity in the gills of a freshwater-adapted and a saltwater-adapted ecotype of threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) exposed to a range of salinities. The response of the gill transcriptome to environmental salinity had a large shared component common to both ecotypes (2159 genes) with significant enrichment of genes involved in transmembrane ion transport and the restructuring of the gill epithelium. This transcriptional response to freshwater acclimation is induced at salinities below two parts per thousand. There was also differentiation in gene expression patterns between ecotypes (2515 genes), particularly in processes important for changes in the gill structure and permeability. Only 508 genes that differed between ecotypes also responded to salinity and no specific processes were enriched among this gene set, and an even smaller number (87 genes) showed evidence of changes in the extent of the response to salinity acclimation between ecotypes. No pattern of relative expression dominated among these genes, suggesting that neither gains nor losses of plasticity dominated the changes in expression patterns between the ecotypes. These data demonstrate that multiple patterns of changes in gene expression plasticity can occur following colonization of novel habitats.

  19. Ecohydrological responses of dense canopies to environmental variability: 1. Interplay between vertical structure and photosynthetic pathway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drewry, D. T.; Kumar, P.; Long, S.; Bernacchi, C.; Liang, X.-Z.; Sivapalan, M.

    2010-12-01

    Vegetation acclimation to changing climate, in particular elevated atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO2), has been observed to include modifications to the biochemical and ecophysiological functioning of leaves and the structural components of the canopy. These responses have the potential to significantly modify plant carbon uptake and surface energy partitioning, and have been attributed with large-scale changes in surface hydrology over recent decades. While the aggregated effects of vegetation acclimation can be pronounced, they often result from subtle changes in canopy properties that require the resolution of physical, biochemical and ecophysiological processes through the canopy for accurate estimation. In this paper, the first of two, a multilayer canopy-soil-root system model developed to capture the emergent vegetation responses to environmental change is presented. The model incorporates both C3 and C4 photosynthetic pathways, and resolves the vertical radiation, thermal, and environmental regimes within the canopy. The tight coupling between leaf ecophysiological functioning and energy balance determines vegetation responses to climate states and perturbations, which are modulated by soil moisture states through the depth of the root system. The model is validated for three growing seasons each for soybean (C3) and maize (C4) using eddy-covariance fluxes of CO2, latent, and sensible heat collected at the Bondville (Illinois) Ameriflux tower site. The data set provides an opportunity to examine the role of important environmental drivers and model skill in capturing variability in canopy-atmosphere exchange. Vertical variation in radiative states and scalar fluxes over a mean diurnal cycle are examined to understand the role of canopy structure on the patterns of absorbed radiation and scalar flux magnitudes and the consequent differences in sunlit and shaded source/sink locations through the canopies. An analysis is made of the impact of

  20. A proteomic approach to decipher chilling response from cold acclimation in pea (Pisum sativum L.).

    PubMed

    Dumont, Estelle; Bahrman, Nasser; Goulas, Estelle; Valot, Benoît; Sellier, Hélène; Hilbert, Jean-Louis; Vuylsteker, Christophe; Lejeune-Hénaut, Isabelle; Delbreil, Bruno

    2011-01-01

    Two pea lines (Pisum sativum L.) with contrasted behaviours towards chilling and subsequent frost were studied by a proteomic approach to better understand cold acclimation. Following a chilling period, the Champagne line becomes tolerant to frost whereas Terese remains sensitive. Variance analysis allowed to select 260 statistically variable spots with 68 identified proteins (35 in leaves, 18 in stems, and 15 in roots). These proteins were shared out in proteins related to chilling response or cold acclimation. The better adaptation of Champagne to chilling might be related to a higher content in proteins involved in photosynthesis and in defence mechanisms. Moreover Champagne might prevent freezing damage particularly thanks to a higher constitutive expression of housekeeping proteins related to Terese. After three days of subsequent frost, proteomes of previously chilled plants also showed significant differences compared to unchilled plants. Out of 112 statistically variable spots (44 in leaves, 38 in stems, and 30 in roots), 32 proteins were identified. These proteins were related to frost response or frost resistance. It seems that Champagne could resist to frost with the reorientation of the energy metabolism. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. PROTEOMICS ANALYSIS OF OVEREXPRESSED PLASMA PROTEINS IN RESPONSE TO COLD ACCLIMATION IN Ostrinia furnacalis.

    PubMed

    Shang, Qingli; Pan, Yiou; Peng, Tianfei; Yang, Shuang; Lu, Xin; Wang, Zhenying; Xi, Jinghui

    2015-12-01

    Many insects in temperate regions overwinter in diapause. In these insects, one of the metabolic adaptations to cold stress is the synthesis of responsive proteins. Using proteomic analysis, an investigation aimed to a better understanding of the molecular adaptation mechanisms to cold stress was carried out in Ostrinia furnacalis larva. Proteins were extracted from the larval hemolymph collected from both control and overwintering larva. By polyethylene glycol precipitation, approximately 560 protein spots were separated and visualized on two-dimensional (2D) gels after silver staining. Eighteen protein spots were found to be upregulated in overwinter larval plasma in different patterns. As an initial work, 13 of these proteins were identified using MALDI TOF/TOF MS. The differentially overexpressed proteins include heat shock 70 kDa cognate protein, small heat shock protein (sHSP), putative aliphatic nitrilase, arginine kinase, phosphoglyceromutase, triosephosphateisomerase, and glutathione transferase. Alterations in the levels of these proteins were further confirmed by qPCR. This study is the first analysis of differentially expressed plasma proteins in O. furnacalis diapause larvae under extremely low temperature conditions and gives new insights into the acclimation mechanisms responsive to cold stress. Our results also support the idea that energy metabolism, alanine and proline metabolism, and antioxidative reaction act in the cold acclimation of O. furnacalis diapause larvae. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Photoacclimation and the effect of the symbiotic environment on the photosynthetic response of symbiotic dinoflagellates in the tropical marine hydroid Myrionema amboinense.

    PubMed

    Fitt; Cook

    2001-01-01

    Symbiotic dinoflagellates of the genus Symbiodinium and residing in the tropical hydroid Myrionema amboinense acclimate to low photon flux associated with low light 'shade' environments by increasing the amount of photosynthetic pigments per algal cell. The photosynthetic light intensity (PI) curves suggested that the low-light pigment response involved an increase in the number of photosynthetic units (PSU) in the chloroplast in addition to any increases in PSU size. Comparisons of light-dependent portion of the P-I curves of freshly isolated zooxanthellae (FIZ) with those from symbionts within the intact animal suggest that the host cell environment reduced average light levels reaching the symbiotic algae by more than half. This phenomenon may protect the algae from photobleaching of pigments and/or photoinhibition of photosynthesis at high light intensities present in shallow water habitats. In addition, maximum photosynthesis (P(max)) of symbionts removed from the host cell was higher than that recorded from dinoflagellates in the intact association, suggesting that the availability of carbon dioxide for photosynthesis may be limited in the intact hydroid. Shaded polyps contained fewer zooxanthellae and had less tissue biomass (measured as protein) than unshaded polyps. However symbionts from shaded polyps acclimated to the low light intensities by increasing chlorophyll levels and photosynthetic rates. The higher photosynthetic rates may have resulted from increased availability of carbon dioxide associated with lower symbiont density. Calculations of the contribution of zooxanthellae carbon to the host animal's respiratory demand (CZAR) showed that zooxanthellae from shaded polyps living in the field potentially provide about the same amount of carbon to their host as zooxanthellae from polyps living in the field in unshaded high light intensities.

  3. Effects of Hypoxia on the Physiology of Zebrafish (Danio rerio): Initial Responses, Acclimation and Recovery.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jianfeng; Guo, Ying; Gao, Yongfei; Zhu, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia often occurs in aquatic environments as dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration decrease to a level where it is detrimental to aquatic organisms. To investigate the effects of hypoxia on the physiology of zebrafishes (Danio rerio), the organisms were kept at normoxic conditions (DO: 8 ± 0.3 mg L(-1): control group) or were subjected to mild (DO: 3 ± 0.3 mg L(-1)) or severe hypoxia (DO: 1 ± 0.2 mg L(-1)) for 48 h and a subsequent restoration of oxygen concentrations (DO: 8 ± 0.3 mg L(-1)) for another 96 h at 25°C. We found that the enzyme activities show different initial responses, acclimation and recovery to severe hypoxia relative to normoxic conditions, but no significant difference was observed between normoxic conditions and mild hypoxia. The results suggest that zebrafishes can acclimate to the mild hypoxia (3 mg L(-1)) quickly but oxidative damage would occur when DO decreased below 1 mg L(-1). Our findings could be useful for water resource managers to set protection limits of DO for aquatic organisms.

  4. Whole plant acclimation responses by finger millet to low nitrogen stress

    PubMed Central

    Goron, Travis L.; Bhosekar, Vijay K.; Shearer, Charles R.; Watts, Sophia; Raizada, Manish N.

    2015-01-01

    The small grain cereal, finger millet (FM, Eleusine coracana L. Gaertn), is valued by subsistence farmers in India and East Africa as a low-input crop. It is reported by farmers to require no added nitrogen (N), or only residual N, to produce grain. Exact mechanisms underlying the acclimation responses of FM to low N are largely unknown, both above and below ground. In particular, the responses of FM roots and root hairs to N or any other nutrient have not previously been reported. Given its low N requirement, FM also provides a rare opportunity to study long-term responses to N starvation in a cereal species. The objective of this study was to survey the shoot and root morphometric responses of FM, including root hairs, to low N stress. Plants were grown in pails in a semi-hydroponic system on clay containing extremely low background N, supplemented with N or no N. To our surprise, plants grown without deliberately added N grew to maturity, looked relatively normal and produced healthy seed heads. Plants responded to the low N treatment by decreasing shoot, root, and seed head biomass. These declines under low N were associated with decreased shoot tiller number, crown root number, total crown root length and total lateral root length, but with no consistent changes in root hair traits. Changes in tiller and crown root number appeared to coordinate the above and below ground acclimation responses to N. We discuss the remarkable ability of FM to grow to maturity without deliberately added N. The results suggest that FM should be further explored to understand this trait. Our observations are consistent with indigenous knowledge from subsistence farmers in Africa and Asia, where it is reported that this crop can survive extreme environments. PMID:26347768

  5. Acclimation responses to temperature vary with vertical stratification: implications for vulnerability of soil-dwelling species to extreme temperature events.

    PubMed

    van Dooremalen, Coby; Berg, Matty P; Ellers, Jacintha

    2013-03-01

    The occurrence of summer heat waves is predicted to increase in amplitude and frequency in the near future, but the consequences of such extreme events are largely unknown, especially for belowground organisms. Soil organisms usually exhibit strong vertical stratification, resulting in more frequent exposure to extreme temperatures for surface-dwelling species than for soil-dwelling species. Therefore soil-dwelling species are expected to have poor acclimation responses to cope with temperature changes. We used five species of surface-dwelling and four species of soil-dwelling Collembola that habituate different depths in the soil. We tested for differences in tolerance to extreme temperatures after acclimation to warm and cold conditions. We also tested for differences in acclimation of the underlying physiology by looking at changes in membrane lipid composition. Chill coma recovery time, heat knockdown time and fatty acid profiles were determined after 1 week of acclimation to either 5 or 20 °C. Our results showed that surface-dwelling Collembola better maintained increased heat tolerance across acclimation temperatures, but no such response was found for cold tolerance. Concordantly, four of the five surface-dwelling Collembola showed up to fourfold changes in relative abundance of fatty acids after 1 week of acclimation, whereas none of the soil-dwelling species showed a significant adjustment in fatty acid composition. Strong physiological responses to temperature fluctuations may have become redundant in soil-dwelling species due to the relative thermal stability of their subterranean habitat. Based on the results of the four species studied, we expect that unless soil-dwelling species can temporarily retreat to avoid extreme temperatures, the predicted increase in heat waves under climatic change renders these soil-dwelling species more vulnerable to extinction than species with better physiological capabilities. Being able to act under a larger thermal

  6. Physiological responses in rufous-collared sparrows to thermal acclimation and seasonal acclimatization.

    PubMed

    Maldonado, Karin Evelyn; Cavieres, Grisel; Veloso, Claudio; Canals, Mauricio; Sabat, Pablo

    2009-04-01

    A large number of physiological acclimation studies assume that flexibility in a certain trait is both adaptive and functionally important for organisms in their natural environment; however, it is not clear how an organism's capacity for temperature acclimation translates to the seasonal acclimatization that these organisms must accomplish. To elucidate this relationship, we measured BMR and TEWL rates in both field-acclimatized and laboratory-acclimated adult rufous-collared sparrows (Zonotrichia capensis). Measurements in field-acclimatized birds were taken during the winter and summer seasons; in the laboratory-acclimated birds, we took our measurements following 4 weeks at either 15 or 30 degrees C. Although BMR and TEWL rates did not differ between winter and summer in the field-acclimatized birds, laboratory-acclimated birds exposed to 15 degrees C exhibited both a higher BMR and TEWL rate when compared to the birds acclimated to 30 degrees C and the field-acclimatized birds. Because organ masses seem to be similar between field and cold-acclimated birds whereas BMR is higher in cold-acclimated birds, the variability in BMR cannot be explained completely by adjustments in organ masses. Our findings suggest that, although rufous-collared sparrows can exhibit thermal acclimation of physiological traits, sparrows do not use this capacity to cope with minor to moderate fluctuations in environmental conditions. Our data support the hypothesis that physiological flexibility in energetic traits is a common feature of avian metabolism.

  7. Does long-term cultivation of saplings under elevated CO2 concentration influence their photosynthetic response to temperature?

    PubMed Central

    Šigut, Ladislav; Holišová, Petra; Klem, Karel; Šprtová, Mirka; Calfapietra, Carlo; Marek, Michal V.; Špunda, Vladimír; Urban, Otmar

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Plants growing under elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations often have reduced stomatal conductance and subsequently increased leaf temperature. This study therefore tested the hypothesis that under long-term elevated CO2 the temperature optima of photosynthetic processes will shift towards higher temperatures and the thermostability of the photosynthetic apparatus will increase. Methods The hypothesis was tested for saplings of broadleaved Fagus sylvatica and coniferous Picea abies exposed for 4–5 years to either ambient (AC; 385 µmol mol−1) or elevated (EC; 700 µmol mol−1) CO2 concentrations. Temperature response curves of photosynthetic processes were determined by gas-exchange and chlorophyll fluorescence techniques. Key Results Initial assumptions of reduced light-saturated stomatal conductance and increased leaf temperatures for EC plants were confirmed. Temperature response curves revealed stimulation of light-saturated rates of CO2 assimilation (Amax) and a decline in photorespiration (RL) as a result of EC within a wide temperature range. However, these effects were negligible or reduced at low and high temperatures. Higher temperature optima (Topt) of Amax, Rubisco carboxylation rates (VCmax) and RL were found for EC saplings compared with AC saplings. However, the shifts in Topt of Amax were instantaneous, and disappeared when measured at identical CO2 concentrations. Higher values of Topt at elevated CO2 were attributed particularly to reduced photorespiration and prevailing limitation of photosynthesis by ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP) regeneration. Temperature response curves of fluorescence parameters suggested a negligible effect of EC on enhancement of thermostability of photosystem II photochemistry. Conclusions Elevated CO2 instantaneously increases temperature optima of Amax due to reduced photorespiration and limitation of photosynthesis by RuBP regeneration. However, this increase disappears when plants

  8. Does long-term cultivation of saplings under elevated CO2 concentration influence their photosynthetic response to temperature?

    PubMed

    Šigut, Ladislav; Holišová, Petra; Klem, Karel; Šprtová, Mirka; Calfapietra, Carlo; Marek, Michal V; Špunda, Vladimír; Urban, Otmar

    2015-11-01

    Plants growing under elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations often have reduced stomatal conductance and subsequently increased leaf temperature. This study therefore tested the hypothesis that under long-term elevated CO2 the temperature optima of photosynthetic processes will shift towards higher temperatures and the thermostability of the photosynthetic apparatus will increase. The hypothesis was tested for saplings of broadleaved Fagus sylvatica and coniferous Picea abies exposed for 4-5 years to either ambient (AC; 385 µmol mol(-1)) or elevated (EC; 700 µmol mol(-1)) CO2 concentrations. Temperature response curves of photosynthetic processes were determined by gas-exchange and chlorophyll fluorescence techniques. Initial assumptions of reduced light-saturated stomatal conductance and increased leaf temperatures for EC plants were confirmed. Temperature response curves revealed stimulation of light-saturated rates of CO2 assimilation (Amax) and a decline in photorespiration (RL) as a result of EC within a wide temperature range. However, these effects were negligible or reduced at low and high temperatures. Higher temperature optima (Topt) of Amax, Rubisco carboxylation rates (VCmax) and RL were found for EC saplings compared with AC saplings. However, the shifts in Topt of Amax were instantaneous, and disappeared when measured at identical CO2 concentrations. Higher values of Topt at elevated CO2 were attributed particularly to reduced photorespiration and prevailing limitation of photosynthesis by ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP) regeneration. Temperature response curves of fluorescence parameters suggested a negligible effect of EC on enhancement of thermostability of photosystem II photochemistry. Elevated CO2 instantaneously increases temperature optima of Amax due to reduced photorespiration and limitation of photosynthesis by RuBP regeneration. However, this increase disappears when plants are exposed to identical CO2 concentrations. In

  9. Foliar temperature acclimation reduces simulated carbon sensitivity to climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Nicholas G.; Malyshev, Sergey L.; Shevliakova, Elena; Kattge, Jens; Dukes, Jeffrey S.

    2016-04-01

    Plant photosynthesis and respiration are the largest carbon fluxes between the terrestrial biosphere and the atmosphere, and their parameterizations represent large sources of uncertainty in projections of land carbon uptake in Earth system models (ESMs). The incorporation of temperature acclimation of photosynthesis and foliar respiration, commonly observed processes, into ESMs has been proposed as a way to reduce this uncertainty. Here we show that, across 15 flux tower sites spanning multiple biomes at various locations worldwide (10° S-67° N), acclimation parameterizations improve a model's ability to reproduce observed net ecosystem exchange of CO2. This improvement is most notable in tropical biomes, where photosynthetic acclimation increased model performance by 36%. The consequences of acclimation for simulated terrestrial carbon uptake depend on the process, region and time period evaluated. Globally, including acclimation has a net effect of increasing carbon assimilation and storage, an effect that diminishes with time, but persists well into the future. Our results suggest that land models omitting foliar temperature acclimation are likely to overestimate the temperature sensitivity of terrestrial carbon exchange, thus biasing projections of future carbon storage and estimates of policy indicators such as the transient climate response to cumulative carbon emissions.

  10. Acclimation of Foliar Respiration and Photosynthesis in Response to Experimental Warming in a Temperate Steppe in Northern China

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Yonggang; Xu, Ming; Shen, Ruichang; Yang, Qingpeng; Huang, Bingru; Wan, Shiqiang

    2013-01-01

    Background Thermal acclimation of foliar respiration and photosynthesis is critical for projection of changes in carbon exchange of terrestrial ecosystems under global warming. Methodology/Principal Findings A field manipulative experiment was conducted to elevate foliar temperature (Tleaf) by 2.07°C in a temperate steppe in northern China. Rd/Tleaf curves (responses of dark respiration to Tleaf), An/Tleaf curves (responses of light-saturated net CO2 assimilation rates to Tleaf), responses of biochemical limitations and diffusion limitations in gross CO2 assimilation rates (Ag) to Tleaf, and foliar nitrogen (N) concentration in Stipa krylovii Roshev. were measured in 2010 (a dry year) and 2011 (a wet year). Significant thermal acclimation of Rd to 6-year experimental warming was found. However, An had a limited ability to acclimate to a warmer climate regime. Thermal acclimation of Rd was associated with not only the direct effects of warming, but also the changes in foliar N concentration induced by warming. Conclusions/Significance Warming decreased the temperature sensitivity (Q10) of the response of Rd/Ag ratio to Tleaf. Our findings may have important implications for improving ecosystem models in simulating carbon cycles and advancing understanding on the interactions between climate change and ecosystem functions. PMID:23457574

  11. Acclimation of foliar respiration and photosynthesis in response to experimental warming in a temperate steppe in northern China.

    PubMed

    Chi, Yonggang; Xu, Ming; Shen, Ruichang; Yang, Qingpeng; Huang, Bingru; Wan, Shiqiang

    2013-01-01

    Thermal acclimation of foliar respiration and photosynthesis is critical for projection of changes in carbon exchange of terrestrial ecosystems under global warming. A field manipulative experiment was conducted to elevate foliar temperature (Tleaf) by 2.07°C in a temperate steppe in northern China. Rd/Tleaf curves (responses of dark respiration to Tleaf), An/Tleaf curves (responses of light-saturated net CO2 assimilation rates to Tleaf), responses of biochemical limitations and diffusion limitations in gross CO2 assimilation rates (Ag) to Tleaf, and foliar nitrogen (N) concentration in Stipa krylovii Roshev. were measured in 2010 (a dry year) and 2011 (a wet year). Significant thermal acclimation of Rd to 6-year experimental warming was found. However, An had a limited ability to acclimate to a warmer climate regime. Thermal acclimation of Rd was associated with not only the direct effects of warming, but also the changes in foliar N concentration induced by warming. Warming decreased the temperature sensitivity (Q10) of the response of Rd/Ag ratio to Tleaf. Our findings may have important implications for improving ecosystem models in simulating carbon cycles and advancing understanding on the interactions between climate change and ecosystem functions.

  12. CO2-induced photosynthetic and stoichiometric responses to phosphorus limitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Boer, Hugo; di Lallo, Giacomo; van Dijk, Jerry

    2017-04-01

    Carbon fertilisation from rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations increases the productivity of plants globally. Meanwhile, the global cycles of Nitrogen (N) and Phosphorus (P) are also altered due to anthropogenic emissions. In general, the additional supply of N is expected to exceed that of P, leading to an increase in P limitation in natural ecosystems. Although the direct carbon fertilisation effect and the interaction with available N is relatively well understood, it remains uncertain how carbon fertilisation is confounded by the availability of P. It is hypothesised that (i) the photosynthetic P-use efficiency increases at elevated CO2 owing to a direct increase in photosynthesis and (ii) the photosynthetic maximum carboxylation rate (Vcmax) and electron transport rate (Jmax) are down-regulated in response to a combination of elevated CO2 and P-limitation via a coordinated reduction of leaf N and P content per unit leaf area. In this study we examined the hypothesised effects of P limitation and CO2 fertilisation on the photosynthetic and stoichiometric responses of three plant species: Holcus lanatus (C3 grass), Panicum miliaceum (C4 grass) and Solanum dulcamara (C3 herb). Individuals of these species were grown at sub-ambient (150 ppm), modern (450 ppm) and elevated CO2 concentrations (800 ppm) and exposed to an N:P treatment consisting of either severe nitrogen limitation at an N:P ratio of 1:1, or severe P limitation at an N:P ratio of 45:1, with a similar supply rate of N. Our results show significant effects of growth CO2 and P supply on Vcmax and Jmax, as well as the whole-plant biomass at the point of harvest. Interaction effects between growth CO2 and P supply were observed for the light-saturated photosynthesis rate, stomatal conductance, leaf P content, and the N:P ratio of the leaf. No significant change in the leaf N content was observed across treatments. These results suggest that limited availability of P constrains the biochemical potential

  13. Acclimation of metabolism to light in A rabidopsis thaliana: the glucose 6‐phosphate/phosphate translocator GPT2 directs metabolic acclimation

    PubMed Central

    DYSON, BETH C.; ALLWOOD, J. WILLIAM; FEIL, REGINA; XU, YUN; MILLER, MATTHEW; BOWSHER, CAROLINE G.; GOODACRE, ROYSTON; LUNN, JOHN E.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Mature leaves of plants transferred from low to high light typically increase their photosynthetic capacity. In A rabidopsis thaliana, this dynamic acclimation requires expression of GPT2, a glucose 6‐phosphate/phosphate translocator. Here, we examine the impact of GPT2 on leaf metabolism and photosynthesis. Plants of wild type and of a GPT2 knockout (gpt2.2) grown under low light achieved the same photosynthetic rate despite having different metabolic and transcriptomic strategies. Immediately upon transfer to high light, gpt2.2 plants showed a higher rate of photosynthesis than wild‐type plants (35%); however, over subsequent days, wild‐type plants acclimated photosynthetic capacity, increasing the photosynthesis rate by 100% after 7 d. Wild‐type plants accumulated more starch than gpt2.2 plants throughout acclimation. We suggest that GPT2 activity results in the net import of glucose 6‐phosphate from cytosol to chloroplast, increasing starch synthesis. There was clear acclimation of metabolism, with short‐term changes typically being reversed as plants acclimated. Distinct responses to light were observed in wild‐type and gpt2.2 leaves. Significantly higher levels of sugar phosphates were observed in gpt2.2. We suggest that GPT2 alters the distribution of metabolites between compartments and that this plays an essential role in allowing the cell to interpret environmental signals. PMID:25474495

  14. Molecular signals that shape the integrative responses of the heat-acclimated phenotype.

    PubMed

    Horowitz, Michal; Kodesh, Einat

    2010-12-01

    The introduction of molecular biology to thermoregulation was delayed compared with its application in other research fields pertinent to human health and disease. Using principles from molecular biology, we revisited fundamental problems in integrative and environmental physiology and were able to explore new research horizons. Global genomic responses in tandem with an appropriate physiological experimental model are a good experimental design strategy that can unravel the molecular mechanisms underlying integrative thermoregulatory responses. In this way, dynamic adaptation models, with accentuated or diminished regulatory circuits, triggered by superimposition of novel stressors sharing similar protective pathways, have significant benefits. On the basis of this approach, we will discuss the molecular physiological linkage of heat acclimation alone or combined with exercise training and decipher stress-specific genes in the thermoregulatory circuits in the heart and skeletal muscles. Opposing/competing adaptive features are required for each of the above-mentioned physiological conditions. Aerobic training increases the capacity to store/use ATP. In contrast, the acclimated phenotype attempts to counteract excessive heat production. Nevertheless, both treatments augment muscle force generation. These changes are tissue-specific; in the exercise-trained rat heart, there is up-regulation of Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release mechanism genes, whereas in the skeletal muscle (soleus), the enrichment is found in genes involved in metabolism. The final issue discussed in this review is the possibility that heat shock proteins serve as consensus markers of heat stress. The role of the autonomic nervous system in their induction during heat stress and how they affect integrative body systems are described.

  15. Cardiac Molecular-Acclimation Mechanisms in Response to Swimming-Induced Exercise in Atlantic Salmon

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Vicente; Grisdale-Helland, Barbara; Helland, Ståle J.; Torgersen, Jacob; Kristensen, Torstein; Claireaux, Guy; Farrell, Anthony P.; Takle, Harald

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac muscle is a principal target organ for exercise-induced acclimation mechanisms in fish and mammals, given that sustained aerobic exercise training improves cardiac output. Yet, the molecular mechanisms underlying such cardiac acclimation have been scarcely investigated in teleosts. Consequently, we studied mechanisms related to cardiac growth, contractility, vascularization, energy metabolism and myokine production in Atlantic salmon pre-smolts resulting from 10 weeks exercise-training at three different swimming intensities: 0.32 (control), 0.65 (medium intensity) and 1.31 (high intensity) body lengths s−1. Cardiac responses were characterized using growth, immunofluorescence and qPCR analysis of a large number of target genes encoding proteins with significant and well-characterized function. The overall stimulatory effect of exercise on cardiac muscle was dependent on training intensity, with changes elicited by high intensity training being of greater magnitude than either medium intensity or control. Higher protein levels of PCNA were indicative of cardiac growth being driven by cardiomyocyte hyperplasia, while elevated cardiac mRNA levels of MEF2C, GATA4 and ACTA1 suggested cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. In addition, up-regulation of EC coupling-related genes suggested that exercised hearts may have improved contractile function, while higher mRNA levels of EPO and VEGF were suggestive of a more efficient oxygen supply network. Furthermore, higher mRNA levels of PPARα, PGC1α and CPT1 all suggested a higher capacity for lipid oxidation, which along with a significant enlargement of mitochondrial size in cardiac myocytes of the compact layer of fish exercised at high intensity, suggested an enhanced energetic support system. Training also elevated transcription of a set of myokines and other gene products related to the inflammatory process, such as TNFα, NFκB, COX2, IL1RA and TNF decoy receptor. This study provides the first characterization of the

  16. Cardiac molecular-acclimation mechanisms in response to swimming-induced exercise in Atlantic salmon.

    PubMed

    Castro, Vicente; Grisdale-Helland, Barbara; Helland, Ståle J; Torgersen, Jacob; Kristensen, Torstein; Claireaux, Guy; Farrell, Anthony P; Takle, Harald

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac muscle is a principal target organ for exercise-induced acclimation mechanisms in fish and mammals, given that sustained aerobic exercise training improves cardiac output. Yet, the molecular mechanisms underlying such cardiac acclimation have been scarcely investigated in teleosts. Consequently, we studied mechanisms related to cardiac growth, contractility, vascularization, energy metabolism and myokine production in Atlantic salmon pre-smolts resulting from 10 weeks exercise-training at three different swimming intensities: 0.32 (control), 0.65 (medium intensity) and 1.31 (high intensity) body lengths s(-1). Cardiac responses were characterized using growth, immunofluorescence and qPCR analysis of a large number of target genes encoding proteins with significant and well-characterized function. The overall stimulatory effect of exercise on cardiac muscle was dependent on training intensity, with changes elicited by high intensity training being of greater magnitude than either medium intensity or control. Higher protein levels of PCNA were indicative of cardiac growth being driven by cardiomyocyte hyperplasia, while elevated cardiac mRNA levels of MEF2C, GATA4 and ACTA1 suggested cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. In addition, up-regulation of EC coupling-related genes suggested that exercised hearts may have improved contractile function, while higher mRNA levels of EPO and VEGF were suggestive of a more efficient oxygen supply network. Furthermore, higher mRNA levels of PPARα, PGC1α and CPT1 all suggested a higher capacity for lipid oxidation, which along with a significant enlargement of mitochondrial size in cardiac myocytes of the compact layer of fish exercised at high intensity, suggested an enhanced energetic support system. Training also elevated transcription of a set of myokines and other gene products related to the inflammatory process, such as TNFα, NFκB, COX2, IL1RA and TNF decoy receptor. This study provides the first characterization of the

  17. Understanding the adaptive response in vertebrates: the phenomenon of ease and ease response during post-stress acclimation.

    PubMed

    Subhash Peter, M C

    2013-01-15

    Vertebrates have evolved mechanisms to perceive stressors that arise either from their body or from the environment. Consequently, a state of stress and stress response occur in fish which is characterized by a disturbed physiological homeostasis. The pattern of stress response becomes complex as a result of neuroendocrine involvement and shows varied magnitudes in fishes depending on the nature and the severity of stressors. The integrated and compensatory physiological modifications in fishes during their early phase of adaptive response favor them to accommodate the imposed stressor through the process of stress acclimation. In contrast, with the direction of neuroendocrine signals, a phase of recovery often called post-stress acclimation occurs if the animal gets away from the stressor exposure. During this late phase of adaptive response, physiological modifications operate in favor of the animal that reduces the magnitude of stress response and finally to a phase of normality as animals possess the urge to correct its disrupted homeostasis. The phenomenon of ease and its response thus reduces the allostatic load, resets the homeostatic state through physiologic processes and corrects the stress-induced homeostatic disturbance with the aid of neuroendocrine signals. Ample evidences are now available to support this novel concept of ease and ease response where mitigation of the intensity of stress response occurs physiologically. Treatment of fish with melatonin or serotonin precursor tryptophan can modify the magnitude of stress response as evident in the pattern of tested physiological indices. In addition to cortisol, thyroid hormone as a major stress modifier hormone is involved in the regulation of ease response in fish probably due to the mechanisms involving inter-hormonal interference. Understanding the mechanisms of adaptive responses in vertebrates thus warranties more studies on the physiology of ease and its response.

  18. Intraspecific variation in thermal acclimation of photosynthesis across a range of temperatures in a perennial crop

    PubMed Central

    Zaka, Serge; Frak, Ela; Julier, Bernadette; Gastal, François; Louarn, Gaëtan

    2016-01-01

    Interest in the thermal acclimation of photosynthesis has been stimulated by the increasing relevance of climate change. However, little is known about intra-specific variations in thermal acclimation and its potential for breeding. In this article, we examined the difference in thermal acclimation between alfalfa (Medicago sativa) cultivars originating from contrasting origins, and sought to analyze the mechanisms in play. A series of experiments was carried out at seven growth temperatures between 5 and 35 °C using four cultivars from temperate and Mediterranean origin. Leaf traits, the photosynthetic rate at 25 °C (A40025), the photosynthetic rate at optimal temperature (A400opt), the thermal optimum of photosynthesis (Topt), and the photosynthetic parameters from the Farqhuar model were determined. Irrespective of cultivar origin, a clear shift in the temperature responses of photosynthesis was observed as a function of growth temperature, affecting thermal optimum of photosynthesis, photosynthetic rate at optimal temperature and photosynthetic rate at 25 °C. For both cultivars, Topt values increased linearly in leaves grown between 5 and 35 °C. Relative homeostasis of A40025 and A400opt was found between 10 °C and 30 °C growth temperatures, but sharp declines were recorded at 5 and 35 °C. This homeostasis was achieved in part through modifications to leaf nitrogen content, which increased at extreme temperatures. Significant changes were also recorded regarding nitrogen partitioning in the photosynthetic apparatus and in the temperature dependence of photosynthetic parameters. The cultivars differed only in terms of the temperature response of photosynthetic parameters, with Mediterranean genotypes displaying a greater sensitivity of the maximum rate of Rubisco carboxylation to elevated temperatures. It was concluded that intra-specific variations in the temperature acclimation of photosynthesis exist among alfalfa cultivars, but that

  19. Role of CBFs as integrators of chloroplast redox, phytochrome and plant hormone signaling during cold acclimation.

    PubMed

    Kurepin, Leonid V; Dahal, Keshav P; Savitch, Leonid V; Singh, Jas; Bode, Rainer; Ivanov, Alexander G; Hurry, Vaughan; Hüner, Norman P A

    2013-06-18

    Cold acclimation of winter cereals and other winter hardy species is a prerequisite to increase subsequent freezing tolerance. Low temperatures upregulate the expression of C-repeat/dehydration-responsive element binding transcription factors (CBF/DREB1) which in turn induce the expression of COLD-REGULATED (COR) genes. We summarize evidence which indicates that the integration of these interactions is responsible for the dwarf phenotype and enhanced photosynthetic performance associated with cold-acclimated and CBF-overexpressing plants. Plants overexpressing CBFs but grown at warm temperatures mimic the cold-tolerant, dwarf, compact phenotype; increased photosynthetic performance; and biomass accumulation typically associated with cold-acclimated plants. In this review, we propose a model whereby the cold acclimation signal is perceived by plants through an integration of low temperature and changes in light intensity, as well as changes in light quality. Such integration leads to the activation of the CBF-regulon and subsequent upregulation of COR gene and GA 2-oxidase (GA2ox) expression which results in a dwarf phenotype coupled with increased freezing tolerance and enhanced photosynthetic performance. We conclude that, due to their photoautotrophic nature, plants do not rely on a single low temperature sensor, but integrate changes in light intensity, light quality, and membrane viscosity in order to establish the cold-acclimated state. CBFs appear to act as master regulators of these interconnecting sensing/signaling pathways.

  20. Role of CBFs as Integrators of Chloroplast Redox, Phytochrome and Plant Hormone Signaling during Cold Acclimation

    PubMed Central

    Kurepin, Leonid V.; Dahal, Keshav P.; Savitch, Leonid V.; Singh, Jas; Bode, Rainer; Ivanov, Alexander G.; Hurry, Vaughan; Hüner, Norman P. A.

    2013-01-01

    Cold acclimation of winter cereals and other winter hardy species is a prerequisite to increase subsequent freezing tolerance. Low temperatures upregulate the expression of C-repeat/dehydration-responsive element binding transcription factors (CBF/DREB1) which in turn induce the expression of COLD-REGULATED (COR) genes. We summarize evidence which indicates that the integration of these interactions is responsible for the dwarf phenotype and enhanced photosynthetic performance associated with cold-acclimated and CBF-overexpressing plants. Plants overexpressing CBFs but grown at warm temperatures mimic the cold-tolerant, dwarf, compact phenotype; increased photosynthetic performance; and biomass accumulation typically associated with cold-acclimated plants. In this review, we propose a model whereby the cold acclimation signal is perceived by plants through an integration of low temperature and changes in light intensity, as well as changes in light quality. Such integration leads to the activation of the CBF-regulon and subsequent upregulation of COR gene and GA 2-oxidase (GA2ox) expression which results in a dwarf phenotype coupled with increased freezing tolerance and enhanced photosynthetic performance. We conclude that, due to their photoautotrophic nature, plants do not rely on a single low temperature sensor, but integrate changes in light intensity, light quality, and membrane viscosity in order to establish the cold-acclimated state. CBFs appear to act as master regulators of these interconnecting sensing/signaling pathways. PMID:23778089

  1. Microtopographic hydrologic variability change resulting from vegetation acclimation response to elevated atmospheric CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, P. V.; Kumar, P.

    2015-12-01

    The elevated concentration of atmospheric CO2 increases the ratio of carbon fixation to water loss from plants or water use efficiency, which reduces transpiration. However, the magnitude of the effects of this vegetation acclimation on hydrologic dynamics, such as soil moisture content and surface runoff controlled by microtopographic variability on the land surface, remains unclear. Here we integrate a multi-layer canopy-root-soil model (MLCan) with a coupled surface-subsurface flow model (GCSFlow) to capture the acclimation responses of vegetation to climate change and predict how these changes affect hydrologic dynamics on landscapes at fine scales. The model is implemented on a hybrid CPU-GPU parallel computing environment to overcome challenges associated with the high density of computational grid and nonlinear solvers. The model is capable of simulating large-scale heterogeneities due to both microtopography and soils and lateral water fluxes at emerging lidar-scale resolutions (~1m). We demonstrate that hybrid computing is feasible for detailed, large-scale ecohydrologic modeling, which has been previously assumed to be an intractable computational problem. Simulations are performed for corn crop in the Goose Creek watershed in central Illinois, USA at present and projected higher concentrations of atmospheric CO2, 400 ppm and 550 ppm, respectively. The results show a net decrease of 11% for the average annual evapotranspiration of corn, which increases water content in the soil and at the land surface. These results highlight the critical role of a warming climate on atmospheric-soil-vegetation interactions and the need to understand other dynamics near the soil surface associated with water and vegetation.

  2. Photosynthetic responses of two eucalypts to industrial-age changes in atmospheric [CO2] and temperature.

    PubMed

    Ghannoum, Oula; Phillips, Nathan G; Sears, Marie A; Logan, Barry A; Lewis, James D; Conroy, Jann P; Tissue, David T

    2010-10-01

    The unabated rise in atmospheric [CO(2)] is associated with increased air temperature. Yet, few CO(2)-enrichment studies have considered pre-industrial [CO(2)] or warming. Consequently, we quantified the interactive effects of growth [CO(2)] and temperature on photosynthesis of faster-growing Eucalyptus saligna and slower-growing E. sideroxylon. Well-watered and -fertilized tree seedlings were grown in a glasshouse at three atmospheric [CO(2)] (290, 400, and 650 µL L(-1)), and ambient (26/18 °C, day/night) and high (ambient + 4 °C) air temperature. Despite differences in growth rate, both eucalypts responded similarly to [CO(2)] and temperature treatments with few interactive effects. Light-saturated photosynthesis (A(sat)) and light- and [CO(2)]-saturated photosynthesis (A(max) ) increased by ∼ 50% and ∼ 10%, respectively, with each step-increase in growth [CO(2)], underpinned by a corresponding 6-11% up-regulation of maximal electron transport rate (J(max)). Maximal carboxylation rate (V(cmax)) was not affected by growth [CO(2)]. Thermal photosynthetic acclimation occurred such that A(sat) and A(max) were similar in ambient- and high-temperature-grown plants. At high temperature, the thermal optimum of A(sat) increased by 2-7 °C across [CO(2)] treatments. These results are the first to suggest that photosynthesis of well-watered and -fertilized eucalypt seedlings will remain strongly responsive to increasing atmospheric [CO(2)] in a future, warmer climate. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  3. Patterns of spatio-temporal distribution of winter chronic photoinhibition in leaves of three evergreen Mediterranean species with contrasting acclimation responses.

    PubMed

    Silva-Cancino, María Carolina; Esteban, Raquel; Artetxe, Unai; Plazaola, José Ignacio García

    2012-03-01

    High irradiance and relatively low temperature, which characterize Mediterranean winters, cause chilling stress in plants. Downregulation of photosynthetic efficiency is a mechanism that allows plants to survive these conditions. This study aims to address whether this process shows a regular spatial pattern across leaf surface or not. Three species (Buxus sempervirens, Cistus albidus and Arctostaphylos uva-ursi) with contrasting responses to winter stress were studied. During 7 days, macro and micro Fv/Fm spatial patterns were monitored by the use of chlorophyll fluorescence imaging techniques. In the field, the strongest photoinhibition was found in B. sempervirens, while there was almost no chronic photoinhibition in C. albidus. In leaves of the first species, Fv/Fm decreased from base to tip while in C. albidus it was uniform over the leaf lamina. An intermediate behavior is shown by A. uva-ursi leaves. Spatial heterogeneity distribution of Fv/Fm was found inside the leaves, resulting in greater Fv/Fm values in the inner layers than in the outer ones. Neither xanthophyll-linked downregulation of Fv/Fm nor protein remobilization were the reasons for such spatial patterns since pigment composition and nitrogen content did not reveal tip-base differences. During recovery from winter, photoinhibition changes occurred in Fv/Fm, pigments and chloroplast ultrastructure. This work shows for the first time that irrespective of physiological mechanisms responsible for development of winter photoinhibition, there is an acclimation response with strong spatio-temporal variability at leaf level in some species. This observation should be taken into account when modeling or scaling up photosynthetic responses.

  4. Photobiological characteristics and photosynthetic UV responses in two Ulva species (Chlorophyta) from southern Spain.

    PubMed

    Figueroa, Felix L; Nygård, Charlotta; Ekelund, Nils; Gómez, Iván

    2003-12-05

    The effect of different wavebands of artificial UV (UVB and UVA) and photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) was assessed in two species of the genus Ulva, U. olivascens and U. rotundata, from southern Spain in order to test for possible differences in acclimation of photosynthesis. Both species share similar morphology but are subject to different light environments: U. rotundata is an estuarine alga, inhabiting subtidal locations, while U. olivascens is an intertidal, sun-adapted organism. Algae were exposed to three different UV conditions, PAR+UVA+UVB, PAR+UVA and PAR for 7 d. Short-term exposure (6 h) was also carried out, using two PAR levels, 150 and 700 micromolm(-2)s(-1). Pigment contents and photosynthesis vs. irradiance curves from oxygen evolution were used to contrast sun- and shade adaptation between these species. O2-based net photosynthesis (Pmax) and PAM-chlorophyll fluorescence (optimal quantum yield, Fv/Fm) were used as parameters to evaluate photoinhibition of photosynthesis in the experiments. The results underline different photobiological characteristics among species: the subtidal U. rotundata had higher contents of pigments (Chl a, Chl b and carotenoids) than the sun-adapted U. olivascens, which resulted in higher thallus absorptance and P-I parameters characterized by higher photosynthetic efficiency at limiting irradiances (alpha) and lower saturating points for photosynthesis (Ek). After 7 d exposure, photoinhibition of Fv/Fm was close to 40-45% in both species. Differences between UV treatments were seen in U. rotundata after 5 d and after 7 d in U. olivascens, in which PAR+UVA impaired strongly photosynthesis (80%). Such patterns were correlated with a progressive decrease in pigment contents, specially chlorophylls. In short-term (6 h) exposures, combinations of UVA+UVB and high PAR level resulted in high rates of photoinhibition of chlorophyll fluorescence (68-92%) in U. rotundata, whereas in U. olivascens photoinhibition ranged

  5. Infective Juveniles of the Entomopathogenic Nematode, Steinernema feltiae Produce Cryoprotectants in Response to Freezing and Cold Acclimation.

    PubMed

    Ali, Farman; Wharton, David A

    2015-01-01

    Steinernema feltiae is a moderately freeze-tolerant entomopathogenic nematode which survives intracellular freezing. We have detected by gas chromatography that infective juveniles of S. feltiae produce cryoprotectants in response to cold acclimation and to freezing. Since the survival of this nematode varies with temperature, we analyzed their cryoprotectant profiles under different acclimation and freezing regimes. The principal cryoprotectants detected were trehalose and glycerol with glucose being the minor component. The amount of cryoprotectants varied with the temperature and duration of exposure. Trehalose was accumulated in higher concentrations when nematodes were acclimated at 5°C for two weeks whereas glycerol level decreased from that of the non-acclimated controls. Nematodes were seeded with a small ice crystal and held at -1°C, a regime that does not produce freezing of the nematodes but their bodies lose water to the surrounding ice (cryoprotective dehydration). This increased the levels of both trehalose and glycerol, with glycerol reaching a higher concentration than trehalose. Nematodes frozen at -3°C, a regime that produces freezing of the nematodes and results in intracellular ice formation, had elevated glycerol levels while trehalose levels did not change. Steinernema feltiae thus has two strategies of cryoprotectant accumulation: one is an acclimation response to low temperature when the body fluids are in a cooled or supercooled state and the infective juveniles produce trehalose before freezing. During this process a portion of the glycerol is converted to trehalose. The second strategy is a rapid response to freezing which induces the production of glycerol but trehalose levels do not change. These low molecular weight compounds are surmised to act as cryoprotectants for this species and to play an important role in its freezing tolerance.

  6. Infective Juveniles of the Entomopathogenic Nematode, Steinernema feltiae Produce Cryoprotectants in Response to Freezing and Cold Acclimation

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Farman; Wharton, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Steinernema feltiae is a moderately freeze-tolerant entomopathogenic nematode which survives intracellular freezing. We have detected by gas chromatography that infective juveniles of S. feltiae produce cryoprotectants in response to cold acclimation and to freezing. Since the survival of this nematode varies with temperature, we analyzed their cryoprotectant profiles under different acclimation and freezing regimes. The principal cryoprotectants detected were trehalose and glycerol with glucose being the minor component. The amount of cryoprotectants varied with the temperature and duration of exposure. Trehalose was accumulated in higher concentrations when nematodes were acclimated at 5°C for two weeks whereas glycerol level decreased from that of the non-acclimated controls. Nematodes were seeded with a small ice crystal and held at -1°C, a regime that does not produce freezing of the nematodes but their bodies lose water to the surrounding ice (cryoprotective dehydration). This increased the levels of both trehalose and glycerol, with glycerol reaching a higher concentration than trehalose. Nematodes frozen at -3°C, a regime that produces freezing of the nematodes and results in intracellular ice formation, had elevated glycerol levels while trehalose levels did not change. Steinernema feltiae thus has two strategies of cryoprotectant accumulation: one is an acclimation response to low temperature when the body fluids are in a cooled or supercooled state and the infective juveniles produce trehalose before freezing. During this process a portion of the glycerol is converted to trehalose. The second strategy is a rapid response to freezing which induces the production of glycerol but trehalose levels do not change. These low molecular weight compounds are surmised to act as cryoprotectants for this species and to play an important role in its freezing tolerance. PMID:26509788

  7. Exercise- and methylcholine-induced sweating responses in older and younger men: effect of heat acclimation and aerobic fitness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Y.; Havenith, George; Kenney, W. Larry; Loomis, Joseph L.; Buskirk, Elsworth R.

    The purpose of this investigation was to examine the effects of aging and aerobic fitness on exercise- and methylcholine-induced sweating responses during heat acclimation. Five younger [Y group - age: 23+/-1 (SEM) years; maximal oxygen consumption (V.O2max): 47+/-3 ml.kg-1.min-1], four highly fit older (HO group - 63+/-3 years; 48+/-4 ml.kg-1.min-1) and five normally fit older men (NO group - 67+/-3 years; 30+/-1 ml.kg-1.min-1) who were matched for height, body mass and percentage fat, were heat acclimated by daily cycle exercise ( 35% V.O2max for 90 min) in a hot (43°C, 30% RH) environment for 8 days. The heat acclimation regimen increased performance time, lowered final rectal temperature (Tre) and percentage maximal heart rate (%HRmax), improved thermal comfort and decreased sweat sodium concentration similarly in all groups. Although total body sweating rates (M.sw) during acclimation were significantly greater in the Y and HO groups than in the NO group (P<0.01) (because of the lower absolute workload in the NO group), the M.sw did not change in all groups with the acclimation sessions. Neither were local sweating rates (m.sw) on chest, back, forearm and thigh changed in all groups by the acclimation. The HO group presented greater forearm m.sw (30-90 min) values and the Y group had greater back and thigh m.sw (early in exercise) values, compared to the other groups (P<0.001). In a methylcholine injection test on days immediately before and after the acclimation, the order of sweat output per gland (SGO) on chest, back and thigh was Y>HO>NO, and on the forearm Y=HO>NO. No group differences were observed for activated sweat gland density at any site. The SGO at the respective sites increased in the post-acclimation test regardless of group (P<0.01), but on the thigh the magnitude of the increase was lower in the NO (P<0.02) and HO (P=0.07) groups than in the Y group. These findings suggest that heat tolerance and the improvement with acclimation are little

  8. Acclimation of Swedish and Italian ecotypes of Arabidopsis thaliana to light intensity.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Jared J; Polutchko, Stephanie K; Adams, William W; Demmig-Adams, Barbara

    2017-08-31

    This study addressed whether ecotypes of Arabidopsis thaliana from Sweden and Italy exhibited differences in foliar acclimation to high versus low growth light intensity, and compared CO2 uptake under growth conditions with light- and CO2-saturated intrinsic photosynthetic capacity and leaf morphological and vascular features. Differential responses between ecotypes occurred mainly at the scale of leaf architecture, with thicker leaves with higher intrinsic photosynthetic capacities and chlorophyll contents per leaf area, but no difference in photosynthetic capacity on a chlorophyll basis, in high light-grown leaves of the Swedish versus the Italian ecotype. Greater intrinsic photosynthetic capacity per leaf area in the Swedish ecotype was accompanied by a greater capacity of vascular infrastructure for sugar and water transport, but this was not associated with greater CO2 uptake rates under growth conditions. The Swedish ecotype with its thick leaves is thus constructed for high intrinsic photosynthetic and vascular flux capacity even under growth chamber conditions that may not permit full utilization of this potential. Conversely, the Swedish ecotype was less tolerant of low growth light intensity than the Italian ecotype, with smaller rosette areas and lesser aboveground biomass accumulation in low light-grown plants. Foliar vein density and stomatal density were both enhanced by high growth light intensity with no significant difference between ecotypes, and the ratio of water to sugar conduits was also similar between the two ecotypes during light acclimation. These findings add to the understanding of the foliar vasculature's role in plant photosynthetic acclimation and adaptation.

  9. Effects of acclimation to human interaction on performance, temperament, physiological responses, and pregnancy rates of Brahman-crossbred cows.

    PubMed

    Cooke, R F; Arthington, J D; Araujo, D B; Lamb, G C

    2009-12-01

    decreased the probability of pregnancy linearly (P < 0.05) during yr 1 (only Braford cows for cortisol analysis) and affected the probability of pregnancy quadratically (P < 0.05) during yr 2. Results from this study indicate that acclimation did not affect cow temperament and physiological responses but did increase pregnancy rates of Braford cows during yr 1. Further, measurements and physiological responses associated with temperament influenced the probability of cows becoming pregnant during the breeding season.

  10. The effects on photosynthetic CO{sub 2} assimilation to long-term elevation of atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration: An assessment of the response of Trifolium Repens L. cv. Blanca grown at F.A.C.E.

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, C.E.

    1994-11-01

    Understanding how photosynthetic capacity acclimates to elevated CO{sub 2} concentrations is vital in predicting the response of important grassland species such as Trifolium repens. Previous studies of acclimatization have been carried out in artificial experimental conditions, such as acrylic greenhouses or controlled environment chambers. The advent of FACE technology has enabled a large area of crop to be fumigated in the field, providing more realistic growing conditions. Pure stands of Trifolium repens L. cv. Blanca grown at either 355 or 600{mu}mol mol{sup -1} CO{sub 2} were examined, and their photosynthetic response to elevated Ca determined via gas exchange studies. Rates of photosynthesis of young, fully expanded leaves were increased between 21 and 36% when grown and measured at elevated CO{sub 2}. This increase in A corresponded to a decrease in g{sub S} of between 18 and 52%. No acclimation effect was observed in the most frequently cut stands, whilst the response of stands clipped only 4 times per year was more variable. When down regulation of V{sub cmax} did occur, this was not nearly as marked as that which occurred in 3 other temperate species (Chrysanthemum leucanthemum, Ranunculus friesianus, Plantago lanceolata (L.) J. & C. Presl.), at similar growth regimes. No acclimation of stomatal frequency, SI or pore length was found to occur in the enriched clover stands.

  11. Comparative Transcriptomic Analysis of the Response to Cold Acclimation in Eucalyptus dunnii

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yiqing; Jiang, Yusong; Lan, Jianbin; Zou, Yong; Gao, Junping

    2014-01-01

    Eucalyptus dunnii is an important macrophanerophyte with high economic value. However, low temperature stress limits its productivity and distribution. To study the cold response mechanisms of E. dunnii, 5 cDNA libraries were constructed from mRNA extracted from leaves exposed to cold stress for varying lengths of time and were evaluated by RNA-Seq analysis. The assembly of the Illumina datasets was optimized using various assembly programs and parameters. The final optimized assembly generated 205,325 transcripts with an average length of 1,701 bp and N50 of 2,627 bp, representing 349.38 Mb of the E. dunnii transcriptome. Among these transcripts, 134,358 transcripts (65.4%) were annotated in the Nr database. According to the differential analysis results, most transcripts were up-regulated as the cold stress prolonging, suggesting that these transcripts may be involved in the response to cold stress. In addition, the cold-relevant GO categories, such as ‘response to stress’ and ‘translational initiation’, were the markedly enriched GO terms. The assembly of the E. dunnii gene index and the GO classification performed in this study will serve as useful genomic resources for the genetic improvement of E. dunnii and also provide insights into the molecular mechanisms of cold acclimation in E. dunnii. PMID:25412179

  12. Responses and acclimation of Chinese cork oak (Quercus variabilis Bl.) to metal stress: the inducible antimony tolerance in oak trees.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiulian; Zheng, Lingyu; Xia, Xinli; Yin, Weilun; Lei, Jingpin; Shi, Shengqing; Shi, Xiang; Li, Huiqing; Li, Qinghe; Wei, Yuan; Chang, Ermei; Jiang, Zeping; Liu, Jianfeng

    2015-08-01

    Antimony (Sb) pollution has become a pressing environmental problem in recent years. Trees have been proven to have great potential for the feasible phytomanagement; however, little is known about Sb retention and tolerance in trees. The Chinese cork oak (Quercus variabilis Bl.) is known to be capable of growth in soils containing high concentrations of Sb. This study explored in detail the retention and acclimation of Q. variabilis under moderate and high external Sb levels. Results revealed that Q. variabilis could tolerate and accumulate high Sb (1623.39 mg kg(-1) DW) in roots. Dynamics of Sb retention in leaves, stems, and roots of Q. variabilis were different. Leaf Sb remained at a certain level for several weeks, while in roots and stems, Sb concentrations continued to increase. Sb damaged tree's PSII reaction cores but elicited defense mechanism at the donor side of PSII. It affected the electron transport flow after QA (-) more strongly than the oxygen-evolving complex and light-harvesting pigment-protein complex II. Sb also decreased leaf chlorophyll concentrations and therefore inhibited plant growth. During acclimation to Sb toxicity, Sb concentrations in leaves, stems, and roots decreased, with photosynthetic activity and pigments recovering to normal levels by the end of the experiment. These findings suggest that Sb tolerance in Q. variabilis is inducible. Acclimation seems to be related to homeostasis of Sb in plants. Results of this study can provide useful information for trees breeding and selection of Sb phytomanagement strategies, exploiting the established ability of Q. variabilis to transport, delocalize in the leaves, and tolerate Sb pollutions.

  13. Construction of a Miniaturized Chromatic Acclimation Sensor from Cyanobacteria with Reversed Response to a Light Signal

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Mitsuharu; Ferri, Stefano; Rögner, Matthias; Sode, Koji

    2016-01-01

    Cyanobacteria harbor unique photoreceptors, designated as cyanobacteriochromes (CBCRs). In this study, we attempted to engineer the chromatic acclimation sensor CcaS, a CBCR derived from the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. The wild-type CcaS induces gene expression under green light illumination and represses it under red light illumination. We focused on the domain structure of CcaS, which consists of an N-terminal transmembrane helix; a GAF domain, which serves as the sensor domain; a linker region (L1); two PAS domains; a second linker region (L2); and a C-terminal histidine kinase (HK) domain. Truncated versions of the photoreceptor were constructed by removing the L1 linker region and the two PAS domains, and fusing the GAF and HK domains with a truncated linker region. Thus constructed “miniaturized CcaSs” were grouped into four distinct categories according to their responses toward green and red light illumination, with some showing improved gene regulation compared to the wild type. Remarkably, one of the miniaturized CcaSs induced gene expression under red light and repressed it under green light, a reversed response to the light signal compared to wild type CcaS. These characteristics of engineered photoreceptors were discussed by analyzing the CcaS structural model. PMID:27883080

  14. Construction of a Miniaturized Chromatic Acclimation Sensor from Cyanobacteria with Reversed Response to a Light Signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Mitsuharu; Ferri, Stefano; Rögner, Matthias; Sode, Koji

    2016-11-01

    Cyanobacteria harbor unique photoreceptors, designated as cyanobacteriochromes (CBCRs). In this study, we attempted to engineer the chromatic acclimation sensor CcaS, a CBCR derived from the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. The wild-type CcaS induces gene expression under green light illumination and represses it under red light illumination. We focused on the domain structure of CcaS, which consists of an N-terminal transmembrane helix; a GAF domain, which serves as the sensor domain; a linker region (L1); two PAS domains; a second linker region (L2); and a C-terminal histidine kinase (HK) domain. Truncated versions of the photoreceptor were constructed by removing the L1 linker region and the two PAS domains, and fusing the GAF and HK domains with a truncated linker region. Thus constructed “miniaturized CcaSs” were grouped into four distinct categories according to their responses toward green and red light illumination, with some showing improved gene regulation compared to the wild type. Remarkably, one of the miniaturized CcaSs induced gene expression under red light and repressed it under green light, a reversed response to the light signal compared to wild type CcaS. These characteristics of engineered photoreceptors were discussed by analyzing the CcaS structural model.

  15. Acyl-lipid desaturase 1 primes cold acclimation response in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mingjie; Thelen, Jay J

    2016-09-01

    Membrane fluidity change has long been suggested as the primary mechanism by which, plants adapt to cold stress, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are not completely established. In this study, we found that a knockout of acyl-lipid/CoA desaturase 1 gene (ADS1; EC 1.14.99) enhances freezing tolerance after cold acclimation (CA). Fatty acid composition analysis demonstrated that 18:1 content in ads1 mutant plants was 20% lower than in wild-type (WT) grown at 23°C. Lipidomics revealed that 34C-species of monogalactosyl diacylglycerol (MGDG) content in ads1 mutants were 3.3-14.9% lower than in WT. Lipid positional analysis identified 10% lower 18:1 fatty acid content at the sn-2 position of MGDG. The cytosolic calcium content in ads1 mutant plants was also approximately two-times higher than that of WT in response to cold shock. Each of these biochemical differences between WT and ads1 mutant disappeared after CA. Subcellular localization of C- and N-terminal enhanced-fluorescence-fusion proteins indicated that ADS1 localized exclusively to chloroplasts. These observations suggest that ADS1-mediated alteration of chloroplast membrane fluidity is required to prime a CA response, and is the upstream event of cytosolic calcium signaling.

  16. Exploring priming responses involved in peach fruit acclimation to cold stress.

    PubMed

    Tanou, Georgia; Minas, Ioannis S; Scossa, Federico; Belghazi, Maya; Xanthopoulou, Aliki; Ganopoulos, Ioannis; Madesis, Panagiotis; Fernie, Alisdair; Molassiotis, Athanassios

    2017-09-12

    Cold storage of fruit may induce the physiological disorder chilling injury (CI); however, the molecular basis of CI development remains largely unexplored. Simulated conditions of CI priming and suppression provided an interesting experimental system to study cold response in fruit. Peaches (cv. June Gold) at the commercial harvest (CH) or tree-ripe (TR) stages were immediately exposed to cold treatment (40 d, 0 °C) and an additional group of CH fruits were pre-conditioned 48 h at 20 °C prior to low-temperature exposure (pre-conditioning, PC). Following cold treatment, the ripening behaviour of the three groups of fruits was analysed (3 d, 20 °C). Parallel proteomic, metabolomic and targeted transcription comparisons were employed to characterize the response of fruit to CI expression. Physiological data indicated that PC suppressed CI symptoms and induced more ethylene biosynthesis than the other treatments. Differences in the protein and metabolic profiles were identified, both among treatments and before and after cold exposure. Transcriptional expression patterns of several genes were consistent with their protein abundance models. Interestingly, metabolomic and gene expression results revealed a possible role for valine and/or isoleucine in CI tolerance. Overall, this study provides new insights into molecular changes during fruit acclimation to cold environment.

  17. Multilocular adipocytes from muscovy ducklings differentiated in response to cold acclimation.

    PubMed Central

    Barré, H; Cohen-Adad, F; Duchamp, C; Rouanet, J L

    1986-01-01

    Morphological and functional aspects of adipose tissue from 6-week-old cold-acclimated muscovy ducklings reared at 4 degrees C ambient temperature (Ta) from the age of 1 week were examined for the occurrence of brown adipose tissue (b.a.t.) in order to explain non-shivering thermogenesis (n.s.t.) observed at this age. Metabolic rate and integrated muscle electrical activity (e.m.g.) were measured at different Ta (from -10 to +28 degrees C) in cold-acclimated and in control ducklings reared at thermoneutrality. The results confirm the existence of n.s.t. in 6-week-old cold-acclimated muscovy ducklings. In cold-acclimated ducklings, typical multilocular adipocytes were found in subcutaneous adipose deposits instead of the unilocular white adipocytes as in control ducklings. Mitochondria isolated from this differentiated tissue were less abundant than in b.a.t. of mammals. Their respiration rate was similar to the respiration rate of white adipose tissue mitochondria from control rats and much lower than the b.a.t. mitochondria rate from cold-acclimated rats. It is therefore unlikely that this differentiated adipose tissue contributes to the n.s.t. observed, an n.s.t. whose capacity reached 5.26 W/kg (+73.5% above resting metabolic rate) in cold-acclimated ducklings. The role of this differentiated adipose tissue in the metabolic adaptation to cold is discussed. Images Plate 4 Plate 1 Plate 2 Plate 3 PMID:3795059

  18. Role of various hormones in photosynthetic responses of green plants under environmental stresses.

    PubMed

    Poonam; Bhardwaj, Renu; Kaur, Ravdeep; Bali, Shagun; Kaur, Parminder; Sirhindi, Geetika; Thukral, Ashwani K; Ohri, Puja; Vig, Adarsh P

    2015-01-01

    Environmental stress includes adverse factors like water deficit, high salinity, enhanced temperature and heavy metals etc. These stresses alter the normal growth and metabolic processes of plants including photosynthesis. Major photosynthetic responses under various stresses include inhibition of photosystems (I and II), changes in thylakoid complexes, decreased photosynthetic activity and modifications in structure and functions of chloroplasts etc. Various defense mechanisms are triggered inside the plants in response to these stresses that are regulated by plant hormones or plant growth regulators. These phytohormones include abscisic acid, auxins, cytokinins, ethylene, brassinosteroids, jasmonates and salicylic acid etc. The present review focuses on stress protective effects of plants hormones on the photosynthetic responses.

  19. Effects of acclimation to handling on performance, reproductive, and physiological responses of Brahman-crossbred heifers.

    PubMed

    Cooke, R F; Arthington, J D; Austin, B R; Yelich, J V

    2009-10-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of acclimation to handling on growth, plasma concentrations of progesterone (P4) and cortisol, temperament, and reproductive performance of Brahman-crossbred heifers. Over 2 consecutive years, 37 Braford and 43 Brahman x Angus heifers were initially evaluated, within 30 d after weaning, for BW and puberty status via transrectal ultrasonography and plasma P4 concentrations (d 0 and 10), and for temperament by measurements of chute score, pen score, and exit velocity (d 10 only). On d 11, heifers were stratified by breed, puberty status, temperament score, BW, and age and randomly assigned to receive or not (control) the acclimation treatment. Acclimated heifers were exposed to a handling process 3 times weekly (Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays) for 4 wk (d 11 to 39 of the experiment). The acclimation treatment was applied individually to heifers by processing them through a handling facility, whereas control heifers remained undisturbed on pasture. Heifer puberty status, evaluated via plasma P4 concentrations and transrectal ultrasonography, and BW were assessed again on d 40 and 50, d 80 and 90, and d 120 and 130. Blood samples collected before (d 10) and at the end of the acclimation period (d 40) were also analyzed for plasma concentrations of cortisol. Heifer temperament was assessed again on d 40 of the study. No interactions containing the effects of treatment, breed, and year were detected. Acclimated heifers had reduced (P < 0.01) ADG compared with control heifers (0.50 vs. 0.58 kg/d, respectively). Attainment of puberty and pregnancy, however, was hastened (P = 0.02 and 0.04, respectively) in acclimated heifers compared with control. Acclimated heifers had reduced chute score (P < 0.01) and concentrations of cortisol (P < 0.01) and P4 (P = 0.03; prepubertal heifers only) compared with control heifers after the acclimation period (1.37 vs. 1.84 for chute score; 37.8 vs. 50.5 ng/mL of cortisol; 0.52 vs

  20. Seedlings of subtropical rainforest species from similar successional guild show different photosynthetic and morphological responses to varying light levels.

    PubMed

    Lestari, D Puji; Nichols, J Doland

    2017-02-01

    Restoration using rainforest species in Australia and elsewhere has been limited to a small number of widely known species, mainly pioneer or early successional species, Using the presumed successional status as a guideline for species selection in reforestation should be taken with a caveat since a species' capacity to adjust to light gradients is not easily predicted. This study examined the photosynthetic and growth responses of four Australian subtropical rainforest species in the context of using late successional species in restoration programs. Since the selected species [Sloanea australis ((Benth.) F. Muell.), Cinnamomum oliveri (F. M. Bailey),Caldcluvia paniculosa ((F. Muell.) Hoogland) and Geissois benthamiana (F. Muell.)] are considered late-successional species, this study also discussed the possibility of separating these species according to their acclimation level towards light gradients. Seedlings of four species were grown under four light treatments using neutral density shade cloth (5, 33, 64 and 80% irradiance) during summer November 2014 to February 2015. All species demonstrated a narrow range of photosynthetic acclimation to different light levels, experienced photoinhibition and photodamage in 80% irradiance and allocated more biomass to leaves in 5% irradiance, supporting their classification as late successional species. Cinnamomum oliveri was the only species able to utilize higher irradiance, with a higher light saturated rate of photosynthesis than the other species. Canonical analysis of principal coordinates revealed that the degree of plasticity of each species in response to contrasting irradiance levels varied. This analysis separated the species into three light tolerance classes: obligate shade-adapted species (S. australis and G. benthamiana), high light-adapted species (C. paniculosa) and the generalist (C. oliveri). Overall, this study suggests that the four species can be planted and will grow well under 33-64% irradiance

  1. Acclimation-dependent expression of heat shock protein 70 in Pacific abalone ( Haliotis discus hannai Ino) and its acute response to thermal exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiaqi; He, Qingguo; Sun, Hui; Liu, Xiao

    2012-01-01

    Heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) is one important member of heat shock protein (Hsp) family that is responsible for various stresses, especially thermal stress. Here we examined the response of Hsp70 gene to both chronic and acute thermal exposure in Pacific abalone ( Haliotis discus hannai Ino). For the chronic exposure, abalones were maintained at 8, 12, 20, and 30°C for four months and their mRNA levels were measured. The highest mRNA level of Hsp70 gene relative to actin gene was detected in the 30°C-acclimated group, followed by the 8°C-acclimated group and then the 12°C- and 20°C-acclimated groups. After the long-term acclimation, gills from each of the above acclimation groups were dissected and exposed to different temperatures between 8°C and 38°C for 30 min. Hsp70 expression in gills acclimated to different temperatures responded differentially to the same temperature exposure. The incubation temperature that induced maximum Hsp70 mRNA expression was higher in the higher temperature acclimation groups than lower temperature groups. Pacific abalones could alter the expression pattern of Hsp70 gene according to environmental thermal conditions, through which they deal with the stress of thermal variations.

  2. Salinity- and population-dependent genome regulatory response during osmotic acclimation in the killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) gill.

    PubMed

    Whitehead, Andrew; Roach, Jennifer L; Zhang, Shujun; Galvez, Fernando

    2012-04-15

    The killifish Fundulus heteroclitus is abundant in osmotically dynamic estuaries and it can quickly adjust to extremes in environmental salinity. We performed a comparative osmotic challenge experiment to track the transcriptomic and physiological responses to two salinities throughout a time course of acclimation, and to explore the genome regulatory mechanisms that enable extreme osmotic acclimation. One southern and one northern coastal population, known to differ in their tolerance to hypo-osmotic exposure, were used as our comparative model. Both populations could maintain osmotic homeostasis when transferred from 32 to 0.4 p.p.t., but diverged in their compensatory abilities when challenged down to 0.1 p.p.t., in parallel with divergent transformation of gill morphology. Genes involved in cell volume regulation, nucleosome maintenance, ion transport, energetics, mitochondrion function, transcriptional regulation and apoptosis showed population- and salinity-dependent patterns of expression during acclimation. Network analysis confirmed the role of cytokine and kinase signaling pathways in coordinating the genome regulatory response to osmotic challenge, and also posited the importance of signaling coordinated through the transcription factor HNF-4α. These genome responses support hypotheses of which regulatory mechanisms are particularly relevant for enabling extreme physiological flexibility.

  3. The photosynthetic response of the perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne) in its fifth year of free-air CO(sub 2) enrichment (FACE) at Eschikon, Switzerland

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, J.P.; Long, S.P.; Williams, J.

    1998-12-31

    Stands of Ryegrass (Lolium perenne L. cv.Bastion) were grown in the field at ambient or elevated (600 {micro}mol mol{sup {minus}1}) [CO{sub 2}], high (560 kg Ha{sup {minus}1} y{sup {minus}1}) or low (140 kg Ha{sup {minus}1} y{sup {minus}1}) nitrogen addition and were harvested five times a year during the growing season. The plants were sown during 1992, additional plots being sown during 1995. These were in their fifth year and second year of growth respectively. Exposure to elevated [CO{sub 2}] was carried out with a Free-Air CO{sub 2} Enrichment (FACE) system which provides the most realistic system of fumigation currently available. Elevated [CO{sub 2}] increased diurnal CO{sub 2} uptake by between 40 to 83% while reducing stomatal conductance by between 1 and 38% in all of the 1992 grown plants measured at high [CO{sub 2}]. Analysis of the A/c{sub i} response of 1992 grown plants showed no acclimation of the photosynthetic apparatus in response to elevated [CO{sub 2}] - both V{sub c,max} (a measure of the maximum in vivo rate of carboxylation) and J{sub max} (a measure of the maximum capacity for the regeneration of RuBP) showed no significant change during any of the periods of regrowth. In contrast the leaves of 1995 grown plants, appeared to be experiencing an acclimatory change in their photosynthetic apparatus in response to elevated [CO{sub 2}]. However, this negative response seemed to be removed directly after a harvest when the source:sink balance had increased. The apparent lack of an acclimatory response after almost 5 years of growth at elevated [CO{sub 2}], suggests that L. perenne may be close to achieving the appropriate photosynthetic adjustments which would allow it to attain a significantly higher photosynthetic potential.

  4. THE PHOTOSYNTHETIC RESPONSE OF THE PERENNIAL RYEGRASS (LOLIUM PERENNE) IN ITS FIFTH YEAR OF FREE-AIR CO{sub 2} ENRICHMENT (FACE) AT ESCHIKON, SWITZERLAND

    SciTech Connect

    ANDERSON,J.P.; LONG,STEPHEN,P.; WILLIAMS,J.

    1998-12-31

    Stands of Ryegrass (Lolium perenne L. cv.Bastion) were grown in the field at ambient or elevated (600 {micro}mol mol{sup {minus}1}) [CO{sub 2}], high (560 kg Ha{sup {minus}1} y{sup {minus}1}) or low (140 kg Ha{sup {minus}1} y{sup {minus}1}) nitrogen addition and were harvested five times a year during the growing season. The plants were sown during 1992, additional plots being sown during 1995. These were in their fifth year and second year of growth respectively. Exposure to elevated [CO{sub 2}] was carried out with a Free-Air CO{sub 2} Enrichment (FACE) system which provides the most realistic system of fumigation currently available. Elevated [CO{sub 2}] increased diurnal CO{sub 2} uptake by between 40 to 83% while reducing stomatal conductance by between 1 and 38% in all of the 1992 grown plants measured at high [CO{sub 2}]. Analysis of the A/c{sub i} response of 1992 grown plants showed no acclimation of the photosynthetic apparatus in response to elevated [CO{sub 2}]--both V{sub c,max} (a measure of the maximum in vivo rate of carboxylation) and J{sub max} (a measure of the maximum capacity for the regeneration of RuBP) showed no significant change during any of the periods of regrowth. In contrast the leaves of 1995 grown plants, appeared to be experiencing an acclimatory change in their photosynthetic apparatus in response to elevated [CO{sub 2}]. However, this negative response seemed to be removed directly after a harvest when the source:sink balance had increased. The apparent lack of an acclimatory response after almost 5 years of growth at elevated [CO{sub 2}], suggests that L. perenne may be close to achieving the appropriate photosynthetic adjustments which would allow it to attain a significantly higher photosynthetic potential.

  5. Response of mice to continuous 5-day passive hyperthermia resembles human heat acclimation.

    PubMed

    Sareh, Houtan; Tulapurkar, Mohan E; Shah, Nirav G; Singh, Ishwar S; Hasday, Jeffrey D

    2011-05-01

    Chronic repeated exposure to hyperthermia in humans results in heat acclimation (HA), an adaptive process that is attained in humans by repeated exposure to hyperthermia and is characterized by improved heat elimination and increased exercise capacity, and acquired thermal tolerance (ATT), a cellular response characterized by increased baseline heat shock protein (HSP) expression and blunting of the acute increase in HSP expression stimulated by re-exposure to thermal stress. Epidemiologic studies in military personnel operating in hot environments and elite athletes suggest that repeated exposure to hyperthermia may also exert long-term health effects. Animal models demonstrate that coincident exposure to mild hyperthermia or prior exposure to severe hyperthermia can profoundly affect the course of experimental infection and injury, but these models do not represent HA. In this study, we demonstrate that CD-1 mice continuously exposed to mild hyperthermia (ambient temperature ~37°C causing ~2°C increase in core temperature) for 5 days and then exposed to a thermal stress (42°C ambient temperature for 40 min) exhibited some of the salient features of human HA, including (1) slower warming during thermal stress and more rapid cooling during recovery and (2) increased activity during thermal stress, as well as some of the features of ATT, including (1) increased baseline expression of HSP72 and HSP90 in lung, heart, spleen, liver, and brain; and (2) blunted incremental increase in HSP72 expression following acute thermal stress. This study suggests that continuous 5-day exposure of CD-1 mice to mild hyperthermia induces a state that resembles the physiologic and cellular responses of human HA. This model may be useful for analyzing the molecular mechanisms of HA and its consequences on host responsiveness to subsequent stresses.

  6. Growth response and acclimation of CO2 exchange characteristics to elevated temperatures in tropical tree seedlings.

    PubMed

    Cheesman, Alexander W; Winter, Klaus

    2013-09-01

    Predictions of how tropical forests will respond to future climate change are constrained by the paucity of data on the performance of tropical species under elevated growth temperatures. In particular, little is known about the potential of tropical species to acclimate physiologically to future increases in temperature. Seedlings of 10 neo-tropical tree species from different functional groups were cultivated in controlled-environment chambers under four day/night temperature regimes between 30/22 °C and 39/31 °C. Under well-watered conditions, all species showed optimal growth at temperatures above those currently found in their native range. While non-pioneer species experienced catastrophic failure or a substantially reduced growth rate under the highest temperature regime employed (i.e. daily average of 35 °C), growth in three lowland pioneers showed only a marginal reduction. In a subsequent experiment, three species (Ficus insipida, Ormosia macrocalyx, and Ochroma pyramidale) were cultivated at two temperatures determined as sub- and superoptimal for growth, but which resulted in similar biomass accumulation despite a 6°C difference in growth temperature. Through reciprocal transfer and temperature adjustment, the role of thermal acclimation in photosynthesis and respiration was investigated. Acclimation potential varied among species, with two distinct patterns of respiration acclimation identified. The study highlights the role of both inherent temperature tolerance and thermal acclimation in determining the ability of tropical tree species to cope with enhanced temperatures.

  7. The Reliability of Adolescent Thermoregulatory Responses During a Heat Acclimation Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Brokenshire, Caroline S.; Armstrong, Neil; Williams, Craig A.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the between trial variation of thermoregulatory measures during a heat acclimation protocol. Eight 14-16 y old boys completed three bouts of 20-min cycling at 45 % peak VO2 in a hot environment (35.1 ± 1.2 °C and 46. 4 ± 1.0 % relative humidity) on two occasions separated by a minimum of 24 h. Reliability was assessed through analysis of within-subject variation, the change in the mean, and retest correlation for measurements of aural temperature (Tau), mean skin temperature (Tsk), heart rate (HR) and oxygen uptake (VO2). Between trial differences were low for Tau, Tskbout1, Tskbout2and3 and HR with coefficients of variation 0.6 %, 1.5 %, 0.5 % and 4.0 %, respectively. The results demonstrate good reliability that will allow future investigators to precisely determine the extent of heat acclimation protocols in relation to the measurement error. Key points To allow paediatric heat acclimation guidelines to be produced, the extent of heat acclimation needs to be established once biological and mechanical variation has been accounted for. The results of the present study indicate that between trial differences were low for aural temperature, mean skin temperature and heart rate with coefficient of variation values ranging from 0.6 - 4.0 %. Future investigators will be able to utilise the coefficient of variation values to establish the effectiveness of heat acclimation with precision alongside the selection of appropriate sample size. PMID:24149612

  8. Trait Acclimation Mitigates Mortality Risks of Tropical Canopy Trees under Global Warming.

    PubMed

    Sterck, Frank; Anten, Niels P R; Schieving, Feike; Zuidema, Pieter A

    2016-01-01

    There is a heated debate about the effect of global change on tropical forests. Many scientists predict large-scale tree mortality while others point to mitigating roles of CO2 fertilization and - the notoriously unknown - physiological trait acclimation of trees. In this opinion article we provided a first quantification of the potential of trait acclimation to mitigate the negative effects of warming on tropical canopy tree growth and survival. We applied a physiological tree growth model that incorporates trait acclimation through an optimization approach. Our model estimated the maximum effect of acclimation when trees optimize traits that are strongly plastic on a week to annual time scale (leaf photosynthetic capacity, total leaf area, stem sapwood area) to maximize carbon gain. We simulated tree carbon gain for temperatures (25-35°C) and ambient CO2 concentrations (390-800 ppm) predicted for the 21st century. Full trait acclimation increased simulated carbon gain by up to 10-20% and the maximum tolerated temperature by up to 2°C, thus reducing risks of tree death under predicted warming. Functional trait acclimation may thus increase the resilience of tropical trees to warming, but cannot prevent tree death during extremely hot and dry years at current CO2 levels. We call for incorporating trait acclimation in field and experimental studies of plant functional traits, and in models that predict responses of tropical forests to climate change.

  9. Trait Acclimation Mitigates Mortality Risks of Tropical Canopy Trees under Global Warming

    PubMed Central

    Sterck, Frank; Anten, Niels P. R.; Schieving, Feike; Zuidema, Pieter A.

    2016-01-01

    There is a heated debate about the effect of global change on tropical forests. Many scientists predict large-scale tree mortality while others point to mitigating roles of CO2 fertilization and – the notoriously unknown – physiological trait acclimation of trees. In this opinion article we provided a first quantification of the potential of trait acclimation to mitigate the negative effects of warming on tropical canopy tree growth and survival. We applied a physiological tree growth model that incorporates trait acclimation through an optimization approach. Our model estimated the maximum effect of acclimation when trees optimize traits that are strongly plastic on a week to annual time scale (leaf photosynthetic capacity, total leaf area, stem sapwood area) to maximize carbon gain. We simulated tree carbon gain for temperatures (25–35°C) and ambient CO2 concentrations (390–800 ppm) predicted for the 21st century. Full trait acclimation increased simulated carbon gain by up to 10–20% and the maximum tolerated temperature by up to 2°C, thus reducing risks of tree death under predicted warming. Functional trait acclimation may thus increase the resilience of tropical trees to warming, but cannot prevent tree death during extremely hot and dry years at current CO2 levels. We call for incorporating trait acclimation in field and experimental studies of plant functional traits, and in models that predict responses of tropical forests to climate change. PMID:27242814

  10. Heat acclimation responses of an ultra-endurance running group preparing for hot desert-based competition.

    PubMed

    Costa, Ricardo J S; Crockford, Michael J; Moore, Jonathan P; Walsh, Neil P

    2014-01-01

    Heat acclimation induces adaptations that improve exercise tolerance in hot conditions. Here we report novel findings into the effects of ultra-marathon specific exercise load in increasing hot ambient conditions on indices of heat acclimation. Six male ultra-endurance runners completed a standard pre-acclimation protocol at 20°C ambient temperature (T amb), followed by a heat acclimation protocol consisting of six 2 h running exercise-heat exposures (EH) at 60% VO2max on a motorised treadmill in an environmental chamber. Three EH were performed at 30°C T amb, followed by another three EH at 35°C T amb. EH were separated by 48 h within T amb and 72 h between T amb. Nude body mass (NBM), blood and urine samples were collected pre-exercise; while NBM and urine were collected post-exercise. Rectal temperature (T re), heart rate (HR), thermal comfort rating (TCR) and rating of perceived exertion were measured pre-exercise and monitored every 5 min during exercise. Water was provided ad libitum during exercise. Data were analysed using a repeated measures and one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), with post hoc Tukey's HSD. Significance was accepted as P< 0.05. Overall mean T re was significantly lower during 30°C EH3 and 35°C EH3 compared with their respective EH1 (-0.20 and-0.23°C, respectively; P<0.05). Similarly, overall mean HR was significantly lower during 30°C EH3 and 35°C EH3 compared with their respective EH1 (8 and 7 bpm respectively; P<0.05). A significant decrease in overall mean TCR was observed during 35°C EH3, compared with 35°C EH1 (P< 0.05). Significant increases in resting pre-exercise plasma volume (estimated from Hb and Hct) were observed by 30°C EH3 (7.9%; P< 0.05). Thereafter, plasma volume remained above baseline throughout the experimental protocol. Two EH of 2 h at 60% VO2max at 30°C T amb was sufficient to initiate heat acclimation in all ultra-endurance runners. Further, heat acclimation responses occurred with increasing EH to 35

  11. Uncoupling High Light Responses from Singlet Oxygen Retrograde Signaling and Spatial-Temporal Systemic Acquired Acclimation1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Matthew; Havaux, Michel; Albrecht-Borth, Verónica

    2016-01-01

    Distinct ROS signaling pathways initiated by singlet oxygen (1O2) or superoxide and hydrogen peroxide have been attributed to either cell death or acclimation, respectively. Recent studies have revealed that more complex antagonistic and synergistic relationships exist within and between these pathways. As specific chloroplastic ROS signals are difficult to study, rapid systemic signaling experiments using localized high light (HL) stress or ROS treatments were used in this study to uncouple signals required for direct HL and ROS perception and distal systemic acquired acclimation (SAA). A qPCR approach was chosen to determine local perception and distal signal reception. Analysis of a thylakoidal ascorbate peroxidase mutant (tapx), the 1O2-retrograde signaling double mutant (ex1/ex2), and an apoplastic signaling double mutant (rbohD/F) revealed that tAPX and EXECUTER 1 are required for both HL and systemic acclimation stress perception. Apoplastic membrane-localized RBOHs were required for systemic spread of the signal but not for local signal induction in directly stressed tissues. Endogenous ROS treatments revealed a very strong systemic response induced by a localized 1 h induction of 1O2 using the conditional flu mutant. A qPCR time course of 1O2 induced systemic marker genes in directly and indirectly connected leaves revealed a direct vascular connection component of both immediate and longer term SAA signaling responses. These results reveal the importance of an EXECUTER-dependent 1O2 retrograde signal for both local and long distance RBOH-dependent acclimation signaling that is distinct from other HL signaling pathways, and that direct vascular connections have a role in spatial-temporal SAA induction. PMID:27288360

  12. Photosynthetic acclimation of overstory Populus tremuloides and understory Acer saccharum to elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration: interactions with shade and soil nitrogen

    Treesearch

    Mark E. Kubiske; Donald R. Zak; Kurt S. Pregitzer; Yu Takeuchi

    2002-01-01

    We exposed Populus tremuloides Michx. and Acer saccharum Marsh. to a factorial combination of ambient and elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations ([CO2]) and high-nitrogen (N) and low-N soil treatments in open-top chambers for 3 years. Our objective was to compare photosynthetic...

  13. Oxidative stress and metabolic responses to copper in freshwater- and seawater-acclimated killifish, Fundulus heteroclitus.

    PubMed

    Ransberry, Victoria E; Morash, Andrea J; Blewett, Tamzin A; Wood, Chris M; McClelland, Grant B

    2015-04-01

    In freshwater (FW), many of the main mechanisms of copper (Cu) toxicity have been characterized; however, toxicity mechanisms in seawater (SW) are less well understood. We investigated the effects of salinity on Cu-induced oxidative stress and metabolic responses in adult killifish, Fundulus heteroclitus. We exposed FW and SW-acclimated killifish to either low Cu (LC, 50 μg/L) or high Cu (HC, 200 μg/L) for 96 h and compared them to controls (CTRL) under the same salinities without added Cu. Cu exerted minimal influence on tissue ion levels in either FW or SW. Salinity generally protected against Cu bioaccumulation in the gills and liver, but not in the carcass. Hematocrit (Hct) and hemoglobin (Hb) levels were increased by LC and HC in both FW and SW, and blood lactate was reduced in FW-killifish exposed to LC and HC. Rates of oxygen consumption were similar across treatments. Salinity reduced Cu load in gill, liver and intestine at LC but only in the gills at HC. In general, Cu increased gill, liver, and intestine catalase (CAT) activity, while superoxide dismutase (SOD) either decreased or remained unchanged depending on tissue-type. These changes did not directly correlate with levels of protein carbonyls, used as an index of oxidative stress. Cu-induced changes in carbohydrate metabolic enzymes were low across tissues and the effect of salinity was variable. Thus, while salinity clearly protects against Cu bioaccumulation in some tissues, it is unclear whether salinity protects against Cu-induced oxidative stress and metabolic responses.

  14. Acclimation temperature affects the metabolic response of amphibian skeletal muscle to insulin.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Ann M; Gleeson, Todd T

    2011-09-01

    Frog skeletal muscle mainly utilizes the substrates glucose and lactate for energy metabolism. The goal of this study was to determine the effect of insulin on the uptake and metabolic fate of lactate and glucose at rest in skeletal muscle of the American bullfrog, Lithobates catesbeiana, under varying temperature regimens. We hypothesize that lactate and glucose metabolic pathways will respond differently to the presence of insulin in cold versus warm acclimated frog tissues, suggesting an interaction between temperature and metabolism under varying environmental conditions. We employed radiolabeled tracer techniques to measure in vitro uptake, oxidation, and incorporation of glucose and lactate into glycogen by isolated muscles from bullfrogs acclimated to 5 °C (cold) or 25 °C (warm). Isolated bundles from Sartorius muscles were incubated at 5 °C, 15 °C, or 25 °C, and in the presence and absence of 0.05 IU/mL bovine insulin. Insulin treatment in the warm acclimated and incubated frogs resulted in an increase in glucose incorporation into glycogen, and an increase in intracellular [glucose] of 0.5 μmol/g (P<0.05). Under the same conditions lactate incorporation into glycogen was reduced (P<0.05) in insulin-treated muscle. When compared to the warm treatment group, cold acclimation and incubation resulted in increased rates of glucose oxidation and glycogen synthesis, and a reduction in free intracellular glucose levels (P<0.05). When muscles from either acclimation group were incubated at an intermediate temperature of 15 °C, insulin's effect on substrate metabolism was attenuated or even reversed. Therefore, a significant interaction between insulin and acclimation condition in controlling skeletal muscle metabolism appears to exist. Our findings further suggest that one of insulin's actions in frog muscle is to increase glucose incorporation into glycogen, and to reduce reliance on lactate as the primary metabolic fuel.

  15. The Metabolic Status Drives Acclimation of Iron Deficiency Responses in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii as Revealed by Proteomics Based Hierarchical Clustering and Reverse Genetics*

    PubMed Central

    Höhner, Ricarda; Barth, Johannes; Magneschi, Leonardo; Jaeger, Daniel; Niehues, Anna; Bald, Till; Grossman, Arthur; Fufezan, Christian; Hippler, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Iron is a crucial cofactor in numerous redox-active proteins operating in bioenergetic pathways including respiration and photosynthesis. Cellular iron management is essential to sustain sufficient energy production and minimize oxidative stress. To produce energy for cell growth, the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii possesses the metabolic flexibility to use light and/or carbon sources such as acetate. To investigate the interplay between the iron-deficiency response and growth requirements under distinct trophic conditions, we took a quantitative proteomics approach coupled to innovative hierarchical clustering using different “distance-linkage combinations” and random noise injection. Protein co-expression analyses of the combined data sets revealed insights into cellular responses governing acclimation to iron deprivation and regulation associated with photosynthesis dependent growth. Photoautotrophic growth requirements as well as the iron deficiency induced specific metabolic enzymes and stress related proteins, and yet differences in the set of induced enzymes, proteases, and redox-related polypeptides were evident, implying the establishment of distinct response networks under the different conditions. Moreover, our data clearly support the notion that the iron deficiency response includes a hierarchy for iron allocation within organelles in C. reinhardtii. Importantly, deletion of a bifunctional alcohol and acetaldehyde dehydrogenase (ADH1), which is induced under low iron based on the proteomic data, attenuates the remodeling of the photosynthetic machinery in response to iron deficiency, and at the same time stimulates expression of stress-related proteins such as NDA2, LHCSR3, and PGRL1. This finding provides evidence that the coordinated regulation of bioenergetics pathways and iron deficiency response is sensitive to the cellular and chloroplast metabolic and/or redox status, consistent with systems approach data. PMID:23820728

  16. Early and delayed long-term transcriptional changes and short-term transient responses during cold acclimation in olive leaves

    PubMed Central

    Leyva-Pérez, María de la O; Valverde-Corredor, Antonio; Valderrama, Raquel; Jiménez-Ruiz, Jaime; Muñoz-Merida, Antonio; Trelles, Oswaldo; Barroso, Juan Bautista; Mercado-Blanco, Jesús; Luque, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Low temperature severely affects plant growth and development. To overcome this constraint, several plant species from regions having a cool season have evolved an adaptive response, called cold acclimation. We have studied this response in olive tree (Olea europaea L.) cv. Picual. Biochemical stress markers and cold-stress symptoms were detected after the first 24 h as sagging leaves. After 5 days, the plants were found to have completely recovered. Control and cold-stressed plants were sequenced by Illumina HiSeq 1000 paired-end technique. We also assembled a new olive transcriptome comprising 157,799 unigenes and found 6,309 unigenes differentially expressed in response to cold. Three types of response that led to cold acclimation were found: short-term transient response, early long-term response, and late long-term response. These subsets of unigenes were related to different biological processes. Early responses involved many cold-stress-responsive genes coding for, among many other things, C-repeat binding factor transcription factors, fatty acid desaturases, wax synthesis, and oligosaccharide metabolism. After long-term exposure to cold, a large proportion of gene down-regulation was found, including photosynthesis and plant growth genes. Up-regulated genes after long-term cold exposure were related to organelle fusion, nucleus organization, and DNA integration, including retrotransposons. PMID:25324298

  17. Early and delayed long-term transcriptional changes and short-term transient responses during cold acclimation in olive leaves.

    PubMed

    Leyva-Pérez, María de la O; Valverde-Corredor, Antonio; Valderrama, Raquel; Jiménez-Ruiz, Jaime; Muñoz-Merida, Antonio; Trelles, Oswaldo; Barroso, Juan Bautista; Mercado-Blanco, Jesús; Luque, Francisco

    2015-02-01

    Low temperature severely affects plant growth and development. To overcome this constraint, several plant species from regions having a cool season have evolved an adaptive response, called cold acclimation. We have studied this response in olive tree (Olea europaea L.) cv. Picual. Biochemical stress markers and cold-stress symptoms were detected after the first 24 h as sagging leaves. After 5 days, the plants were found to have completely recovered. Control and cold-stressed plants were sequenced by Illumina HiSeq 1000 paired-end technique. We also assembled a new olive transcriptome comprising 157,799 unigenes and found 6,309 unigenes differentially expressed in response to cold. Three types of response that led to cold acclimation were found: short-term transient response, early long-term response, and late long-term response. These subsets of unigenes were related to different biological processes. Early responses involved many cold-stress-responsive genes coding for, among many other things, C-repeat binding factor transcription factors, fatty acid desaturases, wax synthesis, and oligosaccharide metabolism. After long-term exposure to cold, a large proportion of gene down-regulation was found, including photosynthesis and plant growth genes. Up-regulated genes after long-term cold exposure were related to organelle fusion, nucleus organization, and DNA integration, including retrotransposons. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Kazusa DNA Research Institute.

  18. Human Monocyte Heat Shock Protein 72 Responses to Acute Hypoxic Exercise after 3 Days of Exercise Heat Acclimation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ben J.; Mackenzie, Richard W. A.; Cox, Valerie; James, Rob S.; Thake, Charles D.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether short-term heat acclimation (STHA) could confer increased cellular tolerance to acute hypoxic exercise in humans as determined via monocyte HSP72 (mHSP72) expression. Sixteen males were separated into two matched groups. The STHA group completed 3 days of exercise heat acclimation; 60 minutes cycling at 50% V˙O2peak in 40°C 20% relative humidity (RH). The control group (CON) completed 3 days of exercise training in 20°C, 40% RH. Each group completed a hypoxic stress test (HST) one week before and 48 hours following the final day of CON or STHA. Percentage changes in HSP72 concentrations were similar between STHA and CON following HST1 (P = 0.97). STHA induced an increase in basal HSP72 (P = 0.03) with no change observed in CON (P = 0.218). Basal mHSP72 remained elevated before HST2 for the STHA group (P < 0.05) and was unchanged from HST1 in CON (P > 0.05). Percent change in mHSP72 was lower after HST2 in STHA compared to CON (P = 0.02). The mHSP72 response to hypoxic exercise was attenuated following 3 days of heat acclimation. This is indicative of improved tolerance and ability to cope with the hypoxic insult, potentially mediated in part by increased basal reserves of HSP72. PMID:25874231

  19. Human monocyte heat shock protein 72 responses to acute hypoxic exercise after 3 days of exercise heat acclimation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ben J; Mackenzie, Richard W A; Cox, Valerie; James, Rob S; Thake, Charles D

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether short-term heat acclimation (STHA) could confer increased cellular tolerance to acute hypoxic exercise in humans as determined via monocyte HSP72 (mHSP72) expression. Sixteen males were separated into two matched groups. The STHA group completed 3 days of exercise heat acclimation; 60 minutes cycling at 50% V̇O2peak in 40°C 20% relative humidity (RH). The control group (CON) completed 3 days of exercise training in 20°C, 40% RH. Each group completed a hypoxic stress test (HST) one week before and 48 hours following the final day of CON or STHA. Percentage changes in HSP72 concentrations were similar between STHA and CON following HST1 (P = 0.97). STHA induced an increase in basal HSP72 (P = 0.03) with no change observed in CON (P = 0.218). Basal mHSP72 remained elevated before HST2 for the STHA group (P < 0.05) and was unchanged from HST1 in CON (P > 0.05). Percent change in mHSP72 was lower after HST2 in STHA compared to CON (P = 0.02). The mHSP72 response to hypoxic exercise was attenuated following 3 days of heat acclimation. This is indicative of improved tolerance and ability to cope with the hypoxic insult, potentially mediated in part by increased basal reserves of HSP72.

  20. Local cold acclimation of the hand impairs thermal responses of the finger without improving hand neuromuscular function.

    PubMed

    Geurts, C L M; Sleivert, G G; Cheung, S S

    2005-01-01

    To investigate the effects of cold acclimation on the thermal response and neuromuscular function of the hand. Ten healthy subjects [three female, seven male, age (mean +/- SD): 27.9 +/- 7.9 years] immersed their right hand in 8 degrees C water for 30 min, 5 days a week for 3 weeks. On the first and the last day, neuromuscular function of the first dorsal interosseus (FDI) muscle was tested. There was no significant change in maximal voluntary contraction strength or evoked contractile characteristics of the FDI after cold acclimation. Minimum finger temperature decreased significantly from 10.6 +/- 1.2 to 9.3 +/- 0.8 degrees C after 3 weeks (P < 0.01), with most of the decrease occurring after a single exposure. Mean finger temperature dropped significantly from 14.2 +/- 1.9 to 11.7 +/- 1.4 degrees C following cold acclimation (P < 0.05), with 90% of this adaptation occurring after 5 days. Onset time of cold-induced vasodilatation increased from 446 +/- 171 to 736 +/- 384 s (P < 0.05) and the amplitude decreased from 5.3 +/- 3.2 to 2.5 +/- 2.1 degrees C (P < 0.05). This was significantly different from the control group, who immersed their right hand on the first and last days only. These data suggest that cold acclimation does not enhance hand temperature or function but may put the hands at a greater risk of cold injury when exposed to the cold.

  1. Acclimation conditions modify physiological response of the diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana to elevated CO2 concentrations in a nitrate-limited chemostat.

    PubMed

    Hennon, Gwenn M M; Quay, Paul; Morales, Rhonda L; Swanson, Lyndsey M; Virginia Armbrust, E

    2014-04-01

    Diatoms are responsible for a large proportion of global carbon fixation, with the possibility that they may fix more carbon under future levels of high CO2 . To determine how increased CO2 concentrations impact the physiology of the diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana Hasle et Heimdal, nitrate-limited chemostats were used to acclimate cells to a recent past (333 ± 6 μatm) and two projected future concentrations (476 ± 18 μatm, 816 ± 35 μatm) of CO2 . Samples were harvested under steady-state growth conditions after either an abrupt (15-16 generations) or a longer acclimation process (33-57 generations) to increased CO2 concentrations. The use of un-bubbled chemostat cultures allowed us to calculate the uptake ratio of dissolved inorganic carbon relative to dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIC:DIN), which was strongly correlated with fCO2 in the shorter acclimations but not in the longer acclimations. Both CO2 treatment and acclimation time significantly affected the DIC:DIN uptake ratio. Chlorophyll a per cell decreased under elevated CO2 and the rates of photosynthesis and respiration decreased significantly under higher levels of CO2 . These results suggest that T. pseudonana shifts carbon and energy fluxes in response to high CO2 and that acclimation time has a strong effect on the physiological response.

  2. Phenotypic flexibility of thermogenesis in the hwamei (Garrulax canorus): responses to cold acclimation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Li-Meng; Xia, Su-Su; Chen, Qian; Wang, Run-Mei; Zheng, Wei-Hong; Liu, Jin-Song

    2016-02-15

    Cold acclimation in birds involves a comprehensive array of physiological and morphological adjustment ranging from changes in aerobic enzyme activity to metabolic rate and organ mass. In the present study, we investigated phenotypic variation in thermogenic activity in the hwamei (Garrulax canorus) under normal (35°C) or cold (15°C) ambient temperature conditions. Acclimation to an ambient temperature of 15°C for 4 wk significantly increased the body mass, basal metabolic rate (BMR), and energy intake, including both gross energy intake and digestible energy intake, compared with birds kept at 35°C. Furthermore, birds acclimated to 15°C increased the dry mass of their liver and kidneys, but not their heart and pectoral muscles, and displayed higher state-4 respiration in the liver, kidneys, heart, and pectoral muscles, and higher cytochrome-c oxidase (COX) activity in liver, kidney, and pectoral muscle, compared with those kept at 35°C. There was a positive correlation between BMR and state-4 respiration in all of the above organs except the liver, and between BMR and COX activity in all of the above organs. Taken together, these data illustrate the morphological, physiological, and enzymatic changes associated with cold acclimation, and support the notion that the hwamei is a bird species from temperate climates that exhibits high phenotypic flexibility of thermogenic capacity. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  3. Food deprivation alters osmoregulatory and metabolic responses to salinity acclimation in gilthead sea bream Sparus auratus.

    PubMed

    Polakof, Sergio; Arjona, Francisco J; Sangiao-Alvarellos, Susana; Martín del Río, María P; Mancera, Juan M; Soengas, José L

    2006-06-01

    The influence of acclimation to different environmental salinities (low salinity water, LSW; seawater, SW; and hyper saline water, HSW) and feeding conditions (fed and food deprived) for 14 days was assessed on osmoregulation and energy metabolism of several tissues of gilthead sea bream Sparus auratus. Fish were randomly assigned to one of six treatments: fed fish in LSW, SW, and HSW, and food-deprived fish in LSW, SW, and HSW. After 14 days, plasma, liver, gills, kidney and brain were taken for the assessment of plasma osmolality, plasma cortisol, metabolites and the activity of several enzymes involved in energy metabolism. Food deprivation abolished or attenuated the increase in gill Na+,K+-ATPase activity observed in LSW- and HSW-acclimated fish, respectively. In addition, a linear relationship between renal Na+,K+-ATPase activity and environmental salinity was observed after food deprivation, but values decreased with respect to fed fish. Food-deprived fish acclimated to extreme salinities increased production of glucose through hepatic gluconeogenesis, and the glucose produced was apparently exported to other tissues and served to sustain plasma glucose levels. Salinity acclimation to extreme salinities enhanced activity of osmoregulatory organs, which is probably sustained by higher glucose use in fed fish but by increased use of other fuels, such as lactate and amino acids in food-deprived fish.

  4. Drought acclimation in wild and cultivated barley lines. [Hordeum spontaneum; Hordeum vulgare

    SciTech Connect

    Glinka, Z. ); Gunasekera, D.; Mane, S.; Berkowitz, G. )

    1991-05-01

    Wild barley (Hordeum spontaneum) seeds collected from arid and temperate regions in Israel were used, along with cultivated barley (H. vulgare) in a study to evaluate the range of acclimation responses to low leaf water potential ({Psi}w). Stress was imposed on plants by withholding water until {Psi}w was {minus}2 megapascals (MPa). Protoplast volume (PV) was measured at {minus}0.2 and {minus}2 MPa (imposed in vitro) in leaf tissue from well-watered and stressed plants. In well-watered plants, PV declined at {minus}2, as compared to {minus}0.2 MPa in all lines. With tissue from in situ stressed plants, PV reduction at {minus}2 MPa was not as great in some lines. The change in the extent of PV reduction occurring at {minus}2 MPa was used as an index of drought acclimation. The 13 wild barley lines were separated into high, medium, and low acclimation groups. Lines collected from arid regions scored in the high acclimation group. The cultivated barley lines scored in the medium and low groups. Relative water content decline at low leaf {Psi}w in situ was not a good indicator of acclimation; all lines responded similarly. Photosynthesis in situ was measured at high and low leaf {Psi}w in lines from the three groupings. Photosynthetic sensitivity to low {Psi}w was twice as great in low acclimation, as compared to high acclimation lines. It was concluded that PV response to low {Psi}w is a good indicator of drought acclimation in barley, and that wild lines offer a range of acclimation potential which could be used in breeding programs.

  5. Growth and photosynthetic responses to copper in wild grapevine.

    PubMed

    Cambrollé, J; García, J L; Ocete, R; Figueroa, M E; Cantos, M

    2013-09-01

    The present study evaluates the tolerance and accumulation potential of Vitis vinifera ssp. sylvestris under moderate and high external Cu levels. A greenhouse experiment was conducted in order to investigate the effects of a range of external Cu concentrations (0-23mmolL(-1)) on growth and photosynthetic performance by measuring gas exchange, chlorophyll fluorescence parameters and photosynthetic pigments. We also measured the total copper, nitrogen, phosphorus, sulphur, calcium, magnesium, iron, potassium and sodium concentrations in the plant tissues. All the experimental plants survived even with external Cu concentrations as high as 23mmolL(-1) (1500mg Cu L(-1)), although the excess of metal resulted in a biomass reduction of 35%. The effects of Cu on growth were linked to a reduction in net photosynthesis, which may be related to the effect of the high concentration of the metal on photosynthetic electron transport. V. vinifera ssp. sylvestris survived with leaf Cu concentrations as high as 80mgkg(-1) DW and growth parameters were unaffected by leaf tissue concentrations of 35mg Cu kg(-1) DW. The results of our study indicate that plants of V. vinifera ssp. sylvestris from the studied population are more tolerant to Cu than the commercial varieties of grapevine that have been studied in the literature, and could constitute a basis for the genetic improvement of Cu tolerance in grapevine. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Acclimation of isoprene emission and photosynthesis to growth temperature in hybrid aspen: resolving structural and physiological controls.

    PubMed

    Rasulov, Bahtijor; Bichele, Irina; Hüve, Katja; Vislap, Vivian; Niinemets, Ülo

    2015-04-01

    Acclimation of foliage to growth temperature involves both structural and physiological modifications, but the relative importance of these two mechanisms of acclimation is poorly known, especially for isoprene emission responses. We grew hybrid aspen (Populus tremula x P. tremuloides) under control (day/night temperature of 25/20 °C) and high temperature conditions (35/27 °C) to gain insight into the structural and physiological acclimation controls. Growth at high temperature resulted in larger and thinner leaves with smaller and more densely packed chloroplasts and with lower leaf dry mass per area (MA). High growth temperature also led to lower photosynthetic and respiration rates, isoprene emission rate and leaf pigment content and isoprene substrate dimethylallyl diphosphate pool size per unit area, but to greater stomatal conductance. However, all physiological characteristics were similar when expressed per unit dry mass, indicating that the area-based differences were primarily driven by MA. Acclimation to high temperature further increased heat stability of photosynthesis and increased activation energies for isoprene emission and isoprene synthase rate constant. This study demonstrates that temperature acclimation of photosynthetic and isoprene emission characteristics per unit leaf area were primarily driven by structural modifications, and we argue that future studies investigating acclimation to growth temperature must consider structural modifications.

  7. Membrane development in purple photosynthetic bacteria in response to alterations in light intensity and oxygen tension.

    PubMed

    Niederman, Robert A

    2013-10-01

    Studies on membrane development in purple bacteria during adaptation to alterations in light intensity and oxygen tension are reviewed. Anoxygenic phototrophic such as the purple α-proteobacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides have served as simple, dynamic, and experimentally accessible model organisms for studies of the photosynthetic apparatus. A major landmark in photosynthesis research, which dramatically illustrates this point, was provided by the determination of the X-ray structure of the reaction center (RC) in Blastochloris viridis (Deisenhofer and Michel, EMBO J 8:2149-2170, 1989), once it was realized that this represented the general structure for the photosystem II RC present in all oxygenic phototrophs. This seminal advance, together with a considerable body of subsequent research on the light-harvesting (LH) and electron transfer components of the photosynthetic apparatus has provided a firm basis for the current understanding of how phototrophs acclimate to alterations in light intensity and quality. Oxygenic phototrophs adapt to these changes by extensive thylakoid membrane remodeling, which results in a dramatic supramolecular reordering to assure that an appropriate flow of quinone redox species occurs within the membrane bilayer for efficient and rapid electron transfer. Despite the high level of photosynthetic unit organization in Rba. sphaeroides as observed by atomic force microscopy (AFM), fluorescence induction/relaxation measurements have demonstrated that the addition of the peripheral LH2 antenna complex in cells adapting to low-intensity illumination results in a slowing of the rate of electron transfer turnover by the RC of up to an order of magnitude. This is ascribed to constraints in quinone redox species diffusion between the RC and cytochrome bc1 complexes arising from the increased packing density as the intracytoplasmic membrane (ICM) bilayer becomes crowded with LH2 rings. In addition to downshifts in light intensity as a paradigm

  8. Ventilatory response to acute hypoxia in transgenic mice over-expressing erythropoietin: effect of acclimation to 3-week hypobaric hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Villafuerte, Francisco C; Cárdenas-Alayza, Rosa; Macarlupú, José Luis; Monge-C, Carlos; León-Velarde, Fabiola

    2007-09-30

    We used transgenic mice constitutively over-expressing erythropoietin ("tg6" mice) and wild-type (wt) mice to investigate whether the high hematocrit (hct), consequence of Epo over-expression affected: (1) the normoxic ventilation (V (E)) and the acute hypoxic ventilatory response (HVR) and decline (HVD), (2) the increase in ventilation observed after chronic exposure to hypobaric hypoxia (430mmHg for 21 days), (3) the respiratory "blunting", and (4) the erythrocythemic response induced by chronic hypoxia exposure. V (E) was found to be similar in tg6 and wt mice in normoxia (FIO2=0.21). Post-acclimation V (E) was significantly elevated in every time point in wt mice at FIO2=0.10 when compared to pre-acclimation values. In contrast, tg6 mice exhibited a non-significant increase in V (E) throughout acute hypoxia exposure. Changes in V (E) are associated with adjustments in tidal volume (V(T)). HVR and HVD were independent of EE in tg6 and wt mice before chornic hypoxia exposure. HVR was significantly greater in wt than in tg6 mice after chronic hypoxia. After acclimation, HVD decreased in tg6 mice. Chronic hypoxia exposure caused hct to increase significantly in wt mice, while only a marginal increase occurred in the tg6 group. Although pre-existent EE does not appear to have an effect on HVR, the observation of alterations on V(T) suggests that it may contribute to time-dependent changes in ventilation and in the acute HVR during exposure to chronic hypoxia. In addition, our results suggest that EE may lead to an early "blunting" of the ventilatory response.

  9. Thermal acclimation of leaf respiration of tropical trees and lianas: response to experimental canopy warming, and consequences for tropical forest carbon balance.

    PubMed

    Slot, Martijn; Rey-Sánchez, Camilo; Gerber, Stefan; Lichstein, Jeremy W; Winter, Klaus; Kitajima, Kaoru

    2014-09-01

    Climate warming is expected to increase respiration rates of tropical forest trees and lianas, which may negatively affect the carbon balance of tropical forests. Thermal acclimation could mitigate the expected respiration increase, but the thermal acclimation potential of tropical forests remains largely unknown. In a tropical forest in Panama, we experimentally increased nighttime temperatures of upper canopy leaves of three tree and two liana species by on average 3 °C for 1 week, and quantified temperature responses of leaf dark respiration. Respiration at 25 °C (R25 ) decreased with increasing leaf temperature, but acclimation did not result in perfect homeostasis of respiration across temperatures. In contrast, Q10 of treatment and control leaves exhibited similarly high values (range 2.5-3.0) without evidence of acclimation. The decrease in R25 was not caused by respiratory substrate depletion, as warming did not reduce leaf carbohydrate concentration. To evaluate the wider implications of our experimental results, we simulated the carbon cycle of tropical latitudes (24°S-24°N) from 2000 to 2100 using a dynamic global vegetation model (LM3VN) modified to account for acclimation. Acclimation reduced the degree to which respiration increases with climate warming in the model relative to a no-acclimation scenario, leading to 21% greater increase in net primary productivity and 18% greater increase in biomass carbon storage over the 21st century. We conclude that leaf respiration of tropical forest plants can acclimate to nighttime warming, thereby reducing the magnitude of the positive feedback between climate change and the carbon cycle.

  10. Common garden experiments to characterize cold acclimation responses in plants from different climatic regions.

    PubMed

    Malyshev, Andrey V; Henry, Hugh A L; Kreyling, Juergen

    2014-01-01

    Cold acclimation is a crucial factor to consider in the context of ongoing climate change. Maladaptation with regard to frost damage and use of the growing season may occur depending on cold acclimation cues. Importance of photoperiod and preceding temperatures as cues needs therefore to be evaluated within (ecotypes) and among species. Common garden designs, in particular the (1) establishment of multiple common gardens along latitudinal/altitudinal gradients, (2) with in situ additional climate manipulations and (3) with manipulations in climate chambers are proposed as tools for the detection of local adaptations and relative importance of temperature and photoperiod as cues for cold adaptation. Here, we discuss issues in species and ecotype selection, establishment of common gardens including manipulations of temperature and photoperiod, and quantification of cold adaptation.

  11. Photosynthetic responses of yellow poplar and white oak to long term atmospheric CO sub 2 enrichment in the field. [Liriondendron tulipifera L; Quercus alba L

    SciTech Connect

    Gunderson, C.A.; Norby, R.J. )

    1991-05-01

    A critical consideration in evaluating forest response to rising atmospheric CO{sub 2} is whether the enhancement of net photosynthesis (P{sub N}) by elevated CO{sub 2} can be sustained over the long term. There are reports of declining enhancement of P{sub N} with duration of exposure to elevated CO{sub 2}, associated with decreases in photosynthetic capacity and carboxylation efficiency. We investigated whether this photosynthetic acclimation occurs in two tree species under field conditions. Seedlings of yellow-poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera L.) and white oak (Quercus alba L.) were planted in the ground within six open-top field chambers in May 1989 and have been exposed continuously to CO{sub 2} enrichment during the last two growing seasons. The three CO{sub 2} treatment levels were: ambient, ambient +150, and ambient +300 {mu}L/L. Throughout the second season, gas exchange of upper, light-saturated leaves was surveyed periodically, and leaves of different ages and canopy positions were measured occasionally. Net photosynthesis remained higher at higher CO{sub 2} levels (28-32% higher in +150 and 49-67% higher in +300 seedlings) in both species throughout the season, regardless of increasing leaf age and duration of exposure to CO{sub 2} enrichment. Stomatal conductance remained unchanged or decreased slightly with increasing CO{sub 2}, but instantaneous water use efficiency (P{sub N}/transpiration) increased significantly with CO{sub 2}. Analysis of P{sub N} versus internal CO{sub 2} concentration indicated no significant treatment differences in carboxylation efficiency, CO{sub 2}-saturated P{sub N}, or CO{sub 2} compensation point. There was no evidence of a downward acclimation of photosynthesis to CO{sub 2} enrichment in this system.

  12. Dynamic responses of prolactin, growth hormone and their receptors to hyposmotic acclimation in the olive flounder Paralichthys olivaceus.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Mingzhe; Jia, Qianqian; Wang, Ting; Lu, Qi; Tang, Langlang; Wang, Youji; Lu, Weiqun

    2017-09-18

    Prolactin (PRL) and growth hormone (GH) play important roles in regulating salt and water balance through osmoregulatory organs in vertebrates. The aim of this study was to investigate the dynamic changes of GH/PRL hormone gene expressions in the pituitary gland and their receptors in gill and kidney, as well as the plasma osmolality when the olive flounder fish Paralichthys olivaceus were acclimated in freshwater (FW) conditions. After transfer from seawater (SW) to freshwater (FW), the osmolality of FW-adaption fish reached the lowest level at 1d which rose slightly afterwards. However, the hormone gene expression of PRL increased from 2d, reaching its peak at 5d, and then decreased at 14d. At this time, the value was still significantly higher than the control, showing a similar trend to the plasma hormone PRL. In contrast, the pituitary mRNA level of GH significantly decreased at 1d and then returned to normal levels. The mRNA levels of PRL receptor (PRLR) in both gill and kidney displayed a similar trend to the pituitary PRL. We also observed the synchronous expression trend of the renal PRLR with pituitary PRL (5d) and the asynchronous expression peaks between branchial (8d) and renal PRLR (5d). Significant responses of GH and its receptor (GHR) in both gill and kidney during the FW-acclimation were not observed. Nevertheless, the gene expression of GH receptor variant (GHR-V) in both gill and kidney declined at 2d, indicating unknown osmoregulatory functions of GHR-V. Collectively, our results provided more insights of the PRL, GH and their corresponding receptors in modulating osmoregulatory responses, representing an important aspect of FW-acclimation in flounder fish. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Light-exposed shoots of seven coexisting deciduous species show common photosynthetic responses to tree height.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Rie; Kohyama, Takashi S

    2016-10-01

    Functional traits of light-exposed leaves have been reported to show tree height-dependent change. However, it remains unknown how plastic response of leaf traits to tree height is linked with shoot-level carbon gain. To answer this question, we examined the photosynthetic properties of fully lit current-year shoots in crown tops with various heights for seven deciduous broad-leaved species dominated in a cool-temperate forest in northern Japan. We measured leaf mass, stomatal conductance, nitrogen content, light-saturated net photosynthetic rate (all per leaf lamina area), foliar stable carbon isotope ratio, and shoot mass allocation to leaf laminae. We employed hierarchical Bayesian models to simultaneously quantify inter-trait relationships for all species. We found that leaf and shoot traits were co-varied in association with height, and that there was no quantitative inter-specific difference in leaf- and shoot-level plastic responses to height. Nitrogen content increased and stomatal conductance decreased with height. Reflecting these antagonistic responses to height, photosynthetic rate was almost unchanged with height. Photosynthetic rate divided by stomatal conductance as a proxy of photosynthetic water use efficiency sufficiently explained the variation of foliar carbon isotope ratio. The increase in mass allocation to leaves in a shoot compensated for the height-dependent decline in photosynthetic rate per leaf lamina mass. Consequently, photosynthetic gain at the scale of current-year shoot mass was kept unchanged with tree height. We suggest that the convergent responses of shoot functional traits across species reflect common requirements for trees coexisting in a forest.

  14. Photosynthetic responses to altitude: an explanation based on optimality principles

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Han; Prentice, I. Colin; Davis, Tyler W.; ...

    2016-11-18

    Ecophysiologists have long been fascinated by the photosynthetic behaviour of alpine plants, which often have to withstand extreme environmental pressures (Gale, 1972; Friend&Woodward, 1990; Korner, 2003, 2007; Shi et al., 2006). About 8%of the world’s land surface is above 1500 maltitude (Korner, 2007). High altitudes can be climatically unusual, often with (for example) low temperatures, strong winds, and now high rates of warming (Korner, 2003; Pepin &Lundquist, 2008; Rangwala&Miller, 2012). Moreover, the low atmospheric pressure provides a set of environmental conditions unique on Earth (Table 1). There has been extensive speculation about altitudinal effects on photosynthesis and, in particular, howmore » to account for the puzzling – but consistently observed – tendencies towards higher carbon dioxide (CO2) drawdown (low ratio of leafinternal to ambient CO2 partial pressures (ci:ca; hereafter, v), resulting in low carbon isotope discrimination) and higher carboxylation capacity (Vcmax) with increasing altitude (Gale, 1972; Korner & Diemer, 1987; Friend et al., 1989; Terashima et al., 1995; Bresson et al., 2009; Zhu et al., 2010). At first glance, it might be expected that CO2 assimilation rates would be reduced at high altitudes due to the low partial pressure of CO2 (Friend & Woodward, 1990). But, actual measured photosynthetic rates are usually as high as, or even higher than, those at low altitudes (Machler & Nosberger, 1977; Korner & Diemer, 1987; Cordell et al., 1999; Shi et al., 2006).« less

  15. The effects of acclimation to the United States and other demographic factors on responses to salt levels in foods: An examination utilizing face reader technology.

    PubMed

    Kerrihard, Adrian L; Khair, Mohamad B; Blumberg, Renata; Feldman, Charles H; Wunderlich, Shahla M

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the role of extended time in the United States (as defined as a continuous period greater than two years; referred to hereafter as "US Acclimated"), as well as other demographic factors, on the level of net positive response of consumers to different salt levels in food samples. One hundred panelists were recruited, including 50 meeting our US acclimation criterion. Panelists assessed samples of potatoes with five different levels of salt concentrations, and the levels of their net positive responses were evaluated with FaceReader technology (Noldus). The data of our study showed a significant positive association between US Acclimated participants and the level of net positive response to samples with higher salt contents. This interaction remained statistically significant even when modeling the effects with consideration of race/ethnicity and gender. Another notable outcome was the unexpected significant interaction between gender and US acclimation in regards to evaluated positive response across all salt concentrations (US Acclimated females demonstrating substantially and significant higher levels of positive response than US Acclimated males). The association between living in the United States and showing more positive response to higher salt contents is consistent with many persistent characterizations of the eating habits in the United States, but it is not in fact well explained by the most recent data regarding the observed levels of average sodium consumption across worldwide geographical regions. The results of this study may be demonstrating evidence of underlying as-yet-unknown factors contributing to the responses of consumers to salt levels in foods. Further examination of these possible factors may well be warranted. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Photosynthetic responses to altitude: an explanation based on optimality principles

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Han; Prentice, I. Colin; Davis, Tyler W.; Keenan, Trevor F.; Wright, Ian J.; Peng, Changhui

    2016-11-18

    Ecophysiologists have long been fascinated by the photosynthetic behaviour of alpine plants, which often have to withstand extreme environmental pressures (Gale, 1972; Friend&Woodward, 1990; Korner, 2003, 2007; Shi et al., 2006). About 8%of the world’s land surface is above 1500 maltitude (Korner, 2007). High altitudes can be climatically unusual, often with (for example) low temperatures, strong winds, and now high rates of warming (Korner, 2003; Pepin &Lundquist, 2008; Rangwala&Miller, 2012). Moreover, the low atmospheric pressure provides a set of environmental conditions unique on Earth (Table 1). There has been extensive speculation about altitudinal effects on photosynthesis and, in particular, how to account for the puzzling – but consistently observed – tendencies towards higher carbon dioxide (CO2) drawdown (low ratio of leafinternal to ambient CO2 partial pressures (ci:ca; hereafter, v), resulting in low carbon isotope discrimination) and higher carboxylation capacity (Vcmax) with increasing altitude (Gale, 1972; Korner & Diemer, 1987; Friend et al., 1989; Terashima et al., 1995; Bresson et al., 2009; Zhu et al., 2010). At first glance, it might be expected that CO2 assimilation rates would be reduced at high altitudes due to the low partial pressure of CO2 (Friend & Woodward, 1990). But, actual measured photosynthetic rates are usually as high as, or even higher than, those at low altitudes (Machler & Nosberger, 1977; Korner & Diemer, 1987; Cordell et al., 1999; Shi et al., 2006).

  17. Two Cyanobacterial Photoreceptors Regulate Photosynthetic Light Harvesting by Sensing Teal, Green, Yellow, and Red Light

    PubMed Central

    Wiltbank, Lisa B.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The genomes of many photosynthetic and nonphotosynthetic bacteria encode numerous phytochrome superfamily photoreceptors whose functions and interactions are largely unknown. Cyanobacterial genomes encode particularly large numbers of phytochrome superfamily members called cyanobacteriochromes. These have diverse light color-sensing abilities, and their functions and interactions are just beginning to be understood. One of the best characterized of these functions is the regulation of photosynthetic light-harvesting antenna composition in the cyanobacterium Fremyella diplosiphon by the cyanobacteriochrome RcaE in response to red and green light, a process known as chromatic acclimation. We have identified a new cyanobacteriochrome named DpxA that maximally senses teal (absorption maximum, 494 nm) and yellow (absorption maximum, 568 nm) light and represses the accumulation of a key light-harvesting protein called phycoerythrin, which is also regulated by RcaE during chromatic acclimation. Like RcaE, DpxA is a two-component system kinase, although these two photoreceptors can influence phycoerythrin expression through different signaling pathways. The peak responsiveness of DpxA to teal and yellow light provides highly refined color discrimination in the green spectral region, which provides important wavelengths for photosynthetic light harvesting in cyanobacteria. These results redefine chromatic acclimation in cyanobacteria and demonstrate that cyanobacteriochromes can coordinately impart sophisticated light color sensing across the visible spectrum to regulate important photosynthetic acclimation processes. PMID:26861023

  18. Responses of photosynthetic capacity to soil moisture gradient in perennial rhizome grass and perennial bunchgrass

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Changing water condition represents a dramatic impact on global terrestrial ecosystem productivity, mainly by limiting plant functions, including growth and photosynthesis, particularly in arid and semiarid areas. However, responses of the potential photosynthetic capacity to soil water status in a wide range of soil moisture levels, and determination of their thresholds are poorly understood. This study examined the response patterns of plant photosynthetic capacity and their thresholds to a soil moisture gradient in a perennial rhizome grass, Leymus chinensis, and a perennial bunchgrass, Stipa grandis, both dominant in the Eurasian Steppe. Results Severe water deficit produced negative effects on light-saturated net CO2 assimilation rate (Asat), stomatal conductance (gs), mesophyll conductance (gm), maximum carboxylation velocity (Vc,max), and maximal efficiency of PSII photochemistry (Fv/Fm). Photosynthetic activity was enhanced under moderate soil moisture with reductions under both severe water deficit and excessive water conditions, which may represent the response patterns of plant growth and photosynthetic capacity to the soil water gradient. Our results also showed that S. grandis had lower productivity and photosynthetic potentials under moderate water status, although it demonstrated generally similar relationship patterns between photosynthetic potentials and water status relative to L. chinensis. Conclusions The experiments tested and confirmed the hypothesis that responsive threshold points appear when plants are exposed to a broad water status range, with different responses between the two key species. It is suggested that vegetation structure and function may be shifted when a turning point of soil moisture occurs, which translates to terms of future climatic change prediction in semiarid grasslands. PMID:21266062

  19. Leaf photosynthetic and water-relations responses for 'Valencia' orange trees exposed to oxidant air pollution

    SciTech Connect

    Olszyk, D.M.; Takemoto, B.K.; Poe, M.

    1991-01-01

    Leaf responses were measured to test a hypothesis that reduced photosynthetic capacity and/or altered water relations were associated with reductions in yield for 'Valencia' orange trees (Citrus sinensis (L.), Osbeck) exposed to ambient oxidant air pollution. Exposures were continuous for 4 years to three levels of oxidants (in charcoal-filtered, half-filtered, and non-filtered air). Oxidants had no effect on net leaf photosynthetic rates or on photosynthetic pigment concentrations. A single set of measurements indicated that oxidants increased leaf starch concentrations (24%) prior to flowering, suggesting a change in photosynthate allocation. Leaves exposed to oxidants had small, but consistent, changes in water relations over the summer growing season, compared to trees growing in filtered air. Other changes included decreased stomatal conductance (12%) and transpiration (9%) rates, and increased water pressure potentials (5%). While all responses were subtle, their cumulative impact over 4 years indicated that 'Valencia' orange trees were subject to increased ambient oxidant stress.

  20. Physiological and Hematological Responses of Matched Older and Younger Men during Dry-Heat Acclimation,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-06-01

    aerobic activity for the older men was associated with their better initial performance during exercise in the heat: however, heat acclimation negated this...34.".. "’- "-" ..’ "’ INTRODUCTION In general. exercise -h’t. ’clarance i- :ep.rted to be reduced in older . adults (8.34). Older adults have been shown to have higher heart...rates, mean skin and core temperatures and lower sweat rates than younger adults during exercise in the

  1. Algal photosynthetic responses to toxic metals and herbicides assessed by chlorophyll a fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Kumar, K Suresh; Dahms, Hans-Uwe; Lee, Jae-Seong; Kim, Hyung Chul; Lee, Won Chan; Shin, Kyung-Hoon

    2014-06-01

    Chlorophyll a fluorescence is established as a rapid, non-intrusive technique to monitor photosynthetic performance of plants and algae, as well as to analyze their protective responses. Apart from its utility in determining the physiological status of photosynthesizers in the natural environment, chlorophyll a fluorescence-based methods are applied in ecophysiological and toxicological studies to examine the effect of environmental changes and pollutants on plants and algae (microalgae and seaweeds). Pollutants or environmental changes cause alteration of the photosynthetic capacity which could be evaluated by fluorescence kinetics. Hence, evaluating key fluorescence parameters and assessing photosynthetic performances would provide an insight regarding the probable causes of changes in photosynthetic performances. This technique quintessentially provides non-invasive determination of changes in the photosynthetic apparatus prior to the appearance of visible damage. It is reliable, economically feasible, time-saving, highly sensitive, versatile, accurate, non-invasive and portable; thereby comprising an excellent alternative for detecting pollution. The present review demonstrates the applicability of chlorophyll a fluorescence in determining photochemical responses of algae exposed to environmental toxicants (such as toxic metals and herbicides). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Eleven days of moderate exercise and heat exposure induces acclimation without significant HSP70 and apoptosis responses of lymphocytes in college-aged males.

    PubMed

    Hom, Lindsay L; Lee, Elaine Choung-Hee; Apicella, Jenna M; Wallace, Sean D; Emmanuel, Holly; Klau, Jennifer F; Poh, Paula Y S; Marzano, Stefania; Armstrong, Lawrence E; Casa, Douglas J; Maresh, Carl M

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess whether a lymphocyte heat shock response and altered heat tolerance to ex vivo heat shock is evident during acclimation. We aimed to use flow cytometry to assess the CD3(+)CD4(+) T lymphocyte cell subset. We further aimed to induce acclimation using moderately stressful daily exercise-heat exposures to achieve acclimation. Eleven healthy males underwent 11 days of heat acclimation. Subjects walked for 90 min (50 ± 8% VO(2max)) on a treadmill (3.5 mph, 5% grade), in an environmental chamber (33°C, 30-50% relative humidity). Rectal temperature (°C), heart rate (in beats per minute), rating of perceived exertion , thermal ratings, hydration state, and sweat rate were measured during exercise and recovery. On days 1, 4, 7, 10, and 11, peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated from pre- and post-exercise blood samples. Intracellular and surface HSP70 (SPA-820PE, Stressgen, Assay Designs), and annexin V (ab14085, Abcam Inc.), as a marker of early apoptosis, were measured on CD3(+) and CD4(+) (sc-70624, sc-70670, Santa Cruz Biotechnology) gated lymphocytes. On day 10, subjects experienced 28 h of sleep loss. Heat acclimation was verified with decreased post-exercise rectal temperature, heart rate, and increased sweat rate on day 11, versus day 1. Heat acclimation was achieved in the absence of significant changes in intracellular HSP70 mean fluorescence intensity and percent of HSP70(+) lymphocytes during acclimation. Furthermore, there was no increased cellular heat tolerance during secondary ex vivo heat shock of the lymphocytes acquired from subjects during acclimation. There was no effect of a mild sleep loss on any variable. We conclude that our protocol successfully induced physiological acclimation without induction of cellular heat shock responses in lymphocytes and that added mild sleep loss is not sufficient to induce a heat shock response.

  3. Plasticity and acclimation to light reflected in temporal and spatial changes of small-scale macroalgal distribution in a stream.

    PubMed

    Ensminger, Ingo; Foerster, Julia; Hagen, Christoph; Braune, Wolfram

    2005-08-01

    The small-scale distribution pattern of macroalgae in the river Ilm, in Germany was monitored. These patterns were then related to abiotic factors and tested to discover whether the distribution of the common macroalgae, Cladophora glomerata (L.) Kütz. and Vaucheria sp., was linked to differences in their photosynthetic plasticity. Cladophora glomerata revealed higher maximum photosynthetic electron transport rates after acclimation to high light (HL) compared with low light (LL) acclimated samples. By contrast, Vaucheria sp. did not acclimate to different growth light conditions. The photosynthetic performance of both algae also varied according to diurnal conditions. High light caused a reversible decrease of the dark-adapted quantum yield (F(v)/F(m)) in C. glomerata and a concomitant reversible decrease of the light-adapted quantum yield (DeltaF/F'(m)). In Vaucheria sp., F(v)/F(m) remained mostly unchanged over the day, whereas DeltaF/F'(m) decreased during the morning at low light. Photosynthetic pigments confirmed acclimational differences between the species. HL C. glomerata showed increased chlorophyll a:chlorophyll b ratios, and higher amounts of xanthophyll-cycle pigments compared with LL samples, whereas Vaucheria sp. did not reveal differences between the light treatments. While preferences for substrate size, water velocity, and depth are similar for C. glomerata and Vaucheria sp., the physiological responses to light conditions are different. It is concluded that light conditions significantly affect the small-scale spatial distribution of macroalgae and that fitness is enhanced in species with a higher plasticity in photosynthetic acclimation in unstable environments.

  4. Thioredoxin f1 and NADPH-Dependent Thioredoxin Reductase C Have Overlapping Functions in Regulating Photosynthetic Metabolism and Plant Growth in Response to Varying Light Conditions.

    PubMed

    Thormählen, Ina; Meitzel, Tobias; Groysman, Julia; Öchsner, Alexandra Bianca; von Roepenack-Lahaye, Edda; Naranjo, Belén; Cejudo, Francisco J; Geigenberger, Peter

    2015-11-01

    Two different thiol redox systems exist in plant chloroplasts, the ferredoxin-thioredoxin (Trx) system, which depends on ferredoxin reduced by the photosynthetic electron transport chain and, thus, on light, and the NADPH-dependent Trx reductase C (NTRC) system, which relies on NADPH and thus may be linked to sugar metabolism in the dark. Previous studies suggested, therefore, that the two different systems may have different functions in plants. We now report that there is a previously unrecognized functional redundancy of Trx f1 and NTRC in regulating photosynthetic metabolism and growth. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mutants, combined, but not single, deficiencies of Trx f1 and NTRC led to severe growth inhibition and perturbed light acclimation, accompanied by strong impairments of Calvin-Benson cycle activity and starch accumulation. Light activation of key enzymes of these pathways, fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase and ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase, was almost completely abolished. The subsequent increase in NADPH-NADP(+) and ATP-ADP ratios led to increased nitrogen assimilation, NADP-malate dehydrogenase activation, and light vulnerability of photosystem I core proteins. In an additional approach, reporter studies show that Trx f1 and NTRC proteins are both colocalized in the same chloroplast substructure. Results provide genetic evidence that light- and NADPH-dependent thiol redox systems interact at the level of Trx f1 and NTRC to coordinately participate in the regulation of the Calvin-Benson cycle, starch metabolism, and growth in response to varying light conditions.

  5. Thioredoxin f1 and NADPH-Dependent Thioredoxin Reductase C Have Overlapping Functions in Regulating Photosynthetic Metabolism and Plant Growth in Response to Varying Light Conditions1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Thormählen, Ina; Meitzel, Tobias; Groysman, Julia; Öchsner, Alexandra Bianca; von Roepenack-Lahaye, Edda; Naranjo, Belén; Cejudo, Francisco J.; Geigenberger, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Two different thiol redox systems exist in plant chloroplasts, the ferredoxin-thioredoxin (Trx) system, which depends on ferredoxin reduced by the photosynthetic electron transport chain and, thus, on light, and the NADPH-dependent Trx reductase C (NTRC) system, which relies on NADPH and thus may be linked to sugar metabolism in the dark. Previous studies suggested, therefore, that the two different systems may have different functions in plants. We now report that there is a previously unrecognized functional redundancy of Trx f1 and NTRC in regulating photosynthetic metabolism and growth. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mutants, combined, but not single, deficiencies of Trx f1 and NTRC led to severe growth inhibition and perturbed light acclimation, accompanied by strong impairments of Calvin-Benson cycle activity and starch accumulation. Light activation of key enzymes of these pathways, fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase and ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase, was almost completely abolished. The subsequent increase in NADPH-NADP+ and ATP-ADP ratios led to increased nitrogen assimilation, NADP-malate dehydrogenase activation, and light vulnerability of photosystem I core proteins. In an additional approach, reporter studies show that Trx f1 and NTRC proteins are both colocalized in the same chloroplast substructure. Results provide genetic evidence that light- and NADPH-dependent thiol redox systems interact at the level of Trx f1 and NTRC to coordinately participate in the regulation of the Calvin-Benson cycle, starch metabolism, and growth in response to varying light conditions. PMID:26338951

  6. In High-Light-Acclimated Coffee Plants the Metabolic Machinery Is Adjusted to Avoid Oxidative Stress Rather than to Benefit from Extra Light Enhancement in Photosynthetic Yield

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Samuel C. V.; Araújo, Wagner L.; Tohge, Takayuki; Fernie, Alisdair R.; DaMatta, Fábio M.

    2014-01-01

    Coffee (Coffea arabica L.) has been traditionally considered as shade-demanding, although it performs well without shade and even out-yields shaded coffee. Here we investigated how coffee plants adjust their metabolic machinery to varying light supply and whether these adjustments are supported by a reprogramming of the primary and secondary metabolism. We demonstrate that coffee plants are able to adjust its metabolic machinery to high light conditions through marked increases in its antioxidant capacity associated with enhanced consumption of reducing equivalents. Photorespiration and alternative pathways are suggested to be key players in reductant-consumption under high light conditions. We also demonstrate that both primary and secondary metabolism undergo extensive reprogramming under high light supply, including depression of the levels of intermediates of the tricarboxylic acid cycle that were accompanied by an up-regulation of a range of amino acids, sugars and sugar alcohols, polyamines and flavonoids such as kaempferol and quercetin derivatives. When taken together, the entire dataset is consistent with these metabolic alterations being primarily associated with oxidative stress avoidance rather than representing adjustments in order to facilitate the plants from utilizing the additional light to improve their photosynthetic performance. PMID:24733284

  7. In high-light-acclimated coffee plants the metabolic machinery is adjusted to avoid oxidative stress rather than to benefit from extra light enhancement in photosynthetic yield.

    PubMed

    Martins, Samuel C V; Araújo, Wagner L; Tohge, Takayuki; Fernie, Alisdair R; DaMatta, Fábio M

    2014-01-01

    Coffee (Coffea arabica L.) has been traditionally considered as shade-demanding, although it performs well without shade and even out-yields shaded coffee. Here we investigated how coffee plants adjust their metabolic machinery to varying light supply and whether these adjustments are supported by a reprogramming of the primary and secondary metabolism. We demonstrate that coffee plants are able to adjust its metabolic machinery to high light conditions through marked increases in its antioxidant capacity associated with enhanced consumption of reducing equivalents. Photorespiration and alternative pathways are suggested to be key players in reductant-consumption under high light conditions. We also demonstrate that both primary and secondary metabolism undergo extensive reprogramming under high light supply, including depression of the levels of intermediates of the tricarboxylic acid cycle that were accompanied by an up-regulation of a range of amino acids, sugars and sugar alcohols, polyamines and flavonoids such as kaempferol and quercetin derivatives. When taken together, the entire dataset is consistent with these metabolic alterations being primarily associated with oxidative stress avoidance rather than representing adjustments in order to facilitate the plants from utilizing the additional light to improve their photosynthetic performance.

  8. Acclimation of ecosystem CO2 exchange in the Alaskan Arctic in response to decadal climate warming

    PubMed

    Oechel; Vourlitis; Hastings; Zulueta; Hinzman; Kane

    2000-08-31

    Long-term sequestration of carbon in Alaskan Arctic tundra ecosystems was reversed by warming and drying of the climate in the early 1980s, resulting in substantial losses of terrestrial carbon. But recent measurements suggest that continued warming and drying has resulted in diminished CO2 efflux, and in some cases, summer CO2 sink activity. Here we compile summer CO2 flux data for two Arctic ecosystems from 1960 to the end of 1998. The results show that a return to summer sink activity has come during the warmest and driest period observed over the past four decades, and indicates a previously undemonstrated capacity for ecosystems to metabolically adjust to long-term (decadal or longer) changes in climate. The mechanisms involved are likely to include changes in nutrient cycling, physiological acclimation, and population and community reorganization. Nevertheless, despite the observed acclimation, the Arctic ecosystems studied are still annual net sources of CO2 to the atmosphere of at least 40 g C m(-2) yr(-1), due to winter release of CO2, implying that further climate change may still exacerbate CO2 emissions from Arctic ecosystems.

  9. Elevated CO2 differentially affects photosynthetic induction response in two Populus species with different stomatal behavior.

    PubMed

    Tomimatsu, Hajime; Tang, Yanhong

    2012-08-01

    To understand dynamic photosynthetic characteristics in response to fluctuating light under a high CO(2) environment, we examined photosynthetic induction in two poplar genotypes from two species, Populus koreana 9 trichocarpa cv. Peace and Populus euramericana cv. I-55, respectively. Stomata of cv. Peace barely respond to changes in photosynthetic photon flux density (PFD), whereas those of cv. I-55 show a normal response to variations in PFD at ambient CO(2). The plants were grown under three CO2 regimes (380, 700, and 1,020 μmol CO(2) mol(-1) in air) for approximately 2 months. CO2 gas exchange was measured in situ in the three CO2 regimes under a sudden PFD increase from 20 to 800 μmol m(-2) s(-1). In both genotypes, plants grown under higher CO(2) conditions had a higher photosynthetic induction state, shorter induction time, and reduced induction limitation to photosynthetic carbon gain. Plants of cv. I-55 showed a much larger increase in induction state and decrease in induction time under high CO(2) regimes than did plants of cv. Peace. These showed that, throughout the whole induction process, genotype cv. I-55 had a much smaller reduction of leaf carbon gain under the two high CO(2) regimes than under the ambient CO(2) regime, while the high CO(2) effect was smaller in genotype cv. Peace. The results suggest that a high CO(2) environment can reduce both biochemical and stomatal limitations of leaf carbon gain during the photosynthetic induction process, and that a rapid stomatal response can further enhance the high CO(2) effect.

  10. Thermal acclimation of photosynthesis: on the importance of adjusting our definitions and accounting for thermal acclimation of respiration.

    PubMed

    Way, Danielle A; Yamori, Wataru

    2014-02-01

    While interest in photosynthetic thermal acclimation has been stimulated by climate warming, comparing results across studies requires consistent terminology. We identify five types of photosynthetic adjustments in warming experiments: photosynthesis as measured at the high growth temperature, the growth temperature, and the thermal optimum; the photosynthetic thermal optimum; and leaf-level photosynthetic capacity. Adjustments of any one of these variables need not mean a concurrent adjustment in others, which may resolve apparently contradictory results in papers using different indicators of photosynthetic acclimation. We argue that photosynthetic thermal acclimation (i.e., that benefits a plant in its new growth environment) should include adjustments of both the photosynthetic thermal optimum (T opt) and photosynthetic rates at the growth temperature (A growth), a combination termed constructive adjustment. However, many species show reduced photosynthesis when grown at elevated temperatures, despite adjustment of some photosynthetic variables, a phenomenon we term detractive adjustment. An analysis of 70 studies on 103 species shows that adjustment of T opt and A growth are more common than adjustment of other photosynthetic variables, but only half of the data demonstrate constructive adjustment. No systematic differences in these patterns were found between different plant functional groups. We also discuss the importance of thermal acclimation of respiration for net photosynthesis measurements, as respiratory temperature acclimation can generate apparent acclimation of photosynthetic processes, even if photosynthesis is unaltered. We show that while dark respiration is often used to estimate light respiration, the ratio of light to dark respiration shifts in a non-predictable manner with a change in leaf temperature.

  11. Photosynthetic response to fluctuating environments and photoprotective strategies under abiotic stress.

    PubMed

    Yamori, Wataru

    2016-05-01

    Plants in natural environments must cope with diverse, highly dynamic, and unpredictable conditions. They have mechanisms to enhance the capture of light energy when light intensity is low, but they can also slow down photosynthetic electron transport to prevent the production of reactive oxygen species and consequent damage to the photosynthetic machinery under excess light. Plants need a highly responsive regulatory system to balance the photosynthetic light reactions with downstream metabolism. Various mechanisms of regulation of photosynthetic electron transport under stress have been proposed, however the data have been obtained mainly under environmentally stable and controlled conditions. Thus, our understanding of dynamic modulation of photosynthesis under dramatically fluctuating natural environments remains limited. In this review, first I describe the magnitude of environmental fluctuations under natural conditions. Next, I examine the effects of fluctuations in light intensity, CO2 concentration, leaf temperature, and relative humidity on dynamic photosynthesis. Finally, I summarize photoprotective strategies that allow plants to maintain the photosynthesis under stressful fluctuating environments. The present work clearly showed that fluctuation in various environmental factors resulted in reductions in photosynthetic rate in a stepwise manner at every environmental fluctuation, leading to the conclusion that fluctuating environments would have a large impact on photosynthesis.

  12. Photosynthetic physiological response of Radix Isatidis (Isatis indigotica Fort.) seedlings to nicosulfuron.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xiangyang; Zhang, Liguang; Ning, Na; Wen, Yinyuan; Dong, Shuqi; Yin, Meiqiang; Guo, Meijun; Wang, Binqiang; Feng, Lei; Guo, Pingyi

    2014-01-01

    Radix Isatidis (Isatis indigotica Fort.) is one of the most important traditional Chinese medicine plants. However, there is no suitable herbicide used for weed control in Radix Isatidis field during postemergence stage. To explore the safety of sulfonylurea herbicide nicosulfuron on Radix Isatidis (Isatis indigotica Fort.) seedlings and the photosynthetic physiological response of the plant to the herbicide, biological mass, leaf area, photosynthetic pigment content, photosynthetic rate, chlorophyll fluorescence characteristics, and P700 parameters of Radix Isatidis seedlings were analyzed 10 d after nicosulfuron treatment at 5th leaf stage in this greenhouse research. The results showed that biological mass, total chlorophyll, chlorophyll a, and carotenoids content, photosynthetic rate, stomatal conductance, PS II maximum quantum yield, PS II effective quantum yield, PS II electron transport rate, photochemical quenching, maximal P700 change, photochemical quantum yield of PS I, and PS I electron transport rate decreased with increasing herbicide concentrations, whereas initial fluorescence, quantum yield of non-regulated energy dissipation in PS II and quantum yield of non-photochemical energy dissipation due to acceptor side limitation in PS I increased. It suggests that nicosulfuron ≥1 mg L-1 causes the damage of chloroplast, PS II and PS I structure. Electron transport limitations in PS I receptor side, and blocked dark reaction process may be the main cause of the significantly inhibited growth and decreased photosynthetic rate of Radix Isatidis seedlings.

  13. Photosynthetic light response of flooded cherrybark oak (Quercus pagoda) seedlings grown in two light regimes

    Treesearch

    Emile S. Gardiner; Ken W. Krauss

    2001-01-01

    Two-year-old cherrybark oak (Quercus pagoda Raf.) seedlings raised in full or partial (27 percent) sunlight were flooded for 30 days to study the effects of light availability and root inundation on photosynthetic light response. Compared with seedlings receiving full sunlight, seedlings receiving partial sunlight developed leaves...

  14. Diatom Proteomics Reveals Unique Acclimation Strategies to Mitigate Fe Limitation

    PubMed Central

    Nunn, Brook L.; Faux, Jessica F.; Hippmann, Anna A.; Maldonado, Maria T.; Harvey, H. Rodger; Goodlett, David R.; Boyd, Philip W.; Strzepek, Robert F.

    2013-01-01

    Phytoplankton growth rates are limited by the supply of iron (Fe) in approximately one third of the open ocean, with major implications for carbon dioxide sequestration and carbon (C) biogeochemistry. To date, understanding how alteration of Fe supply changes phytoplankton physiology has focused on traditional metrics such as growth rate, elemental composition, and biophysical measurements such as photosynthetic competence (Fv/Fm). Researchers have subsequently employed transcriptomics to probe relationships between changes in Fe supply and phytoplankton physiology. Recently, studies have investigated longer-term (i.e. following acclimation) responses of phytoplankton to various Fe conditions. In the present study, the coastal diatom, Thalassiosira pseudonana, was acclimated (10 generations) to either low or high Fe conditions, i.e. Fe-limiting and Fe-replete. Quantitative proteomics and a newly developed proteomic profiling technique that identifies low abundance proteins were employed to examine the full complement of expressed proteins and consequently the metabolic pathways utilized by the diatom under the two Fe conditions. A total of 1850 proteins were confidently identified, nearly tripling previous identifications made from differential expression in diatoms. Given sufficient time to acclimate to Fe limitation, T. pseudonana up-regulates proteins involved in pathways associated with intracellular protein recycling, thereby decreasing dependence on extracellular nitrogen (N), C and Fe. The relative increase in the abundance of photorespiration and pentose phosphate pathway proteins reveal novel metabolic shifts, which create substrates that could support other well-established physiological responses, such as heavily silicified frustules observed for Fe-limited diatoms. Here, we discovered that proteins and hence pathways observed to be down-regulated in short-term Fe starvation studies are constitutively expressed when T. pseudonana is acclimated (i

  15. The Role of Light in Cold Acclimation of Hedera helix L. var. Thorndale 1

    PubMed Central

    Steponkus, Peter L.; Lanphear, F. O.

    1968-01-01

    The role of light in cold acclimation of Hedera helix L. var. Thorndale appears to differ from that reported for winter annuals. Although light greatly enhances the degree of hardiness attained, cold acclimation is not obligatorily linked to a light requirement. Photoperiods, varying from 8 to 24 hours, received during the cold acclimation period were equally effective in promoting maximum hardiness. Relatively low light intensities and short photoperiods stimulated maximum hardiness, and proportional increases in hardiness in response to increased photoperiods were demonstrated only in stems of prestarved plants. Exclusion of CO2 and high concentrations of photosynthetic inhibitors decreased hardiness, but in no instance was hardiness reduced to the level of the dark control. The data are only compatible with a photosynthetic role of light if it is assumed that only a small portion of the total photosynthates are required to elicit maximum hardiness. Alternatively, the light stimulation which was elicited by low light intensities, short photoperiods, in the absence of CO2, and in the presence of photosynthetic inhibitors, may be a light signal similar to a phytochrome response. PMID:16656748

  16. Comparing biomarker responses during thermal acclimation: A lethal vs non-lethal approach in a tropical reef clownfish.

    PubMed

    Madeira, Carolina; Madeira, Diana; Diniz, Mário S; Cabral, Henrique N; Vinagre, Catarina

    2017-02-01

    Knowledge of thermal stress biology for most tropical fish species in reef ecosystems under climate change is still quite limited. Thus, the objective of this study was to measure the time-course changes of thermal stress biomarkers in the commercially exploited coral reef fish Amphiprion ocellaris, during a laboratory simulated event of increased temperature. Heat shock protein 70kDa (Hsp70) and total ubiquitin (Ub) were determined in the muscle (lethal method) and in the fin (non-lethal alternative method) under two temperature treatments (control - 26°C and elevated temperature - 30°C) throughout one month with weekly samplings. Results suggest that biomarker basal levels are tissue-specific and influence the degree of response under temperature exposure. Responses were highly inducible in the muscle but not in fin tissue, indicating that the latter is not reliable for monitoring purposes. Thermal stress was observed in the muscle after one week of exposure (both biomarkers increased significantly) and Ub levels then decreased, suggesting the animals were able to acclimate by maintaining high levels of Hsp70 and through an effective protein turnover. In addition, the results show that mortality rates did not differ between treatments. This indicates that A. ocellaris is capable of displaying a plastic response to elevated temperature by adjusting the protein quality control system to protect cell functions, without decreasing survival. Thus, this coral reef fish species presents a significant acclimation potential under ocean warming scenarios of +4°C. Monitoring of thermal stress through a non-lethal method, fin-clipping, although desirable proved to be inadequate for this species.

  17. Photosynthetic response of Cannabis sativa L. to variations in photosynthetic photon flux densities, temperature and CO2 conditions.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Suman; Lata, Hemant; Khan, Ikhlas A; Elsohly, Mahmoud A

    2008-10-01

    Effect of different photosynthetic photon flux densities (0, 500, 1000, 1500 and 2000 μmol m(-2)s(-1)), temperatures (20, 25, 30, 35 and 40 °C) and CO2 concentrations (250, 350, 450, 550, 650 and 750 μmol mol(-1)) on gas and water vapour exchange characteristics of Cannabis sativa L. were studied to determine the suitable and efficient environmental conditions for its indoor mass cultivation for pharmaceutical uses. The rate of photosynthesis (PN) and water use efficiency (WUE) of Cannabis sativa increased with photosynthetic photon flux densities (PPFD) at the lower temperatures (20-25 °C). At 30 °C, PN and WUE increased only up to 1500 μmol m(-2)s(-1) PPFD and decreased at higher light levels. The maximum rate of photosynthesis (PN max) was observed at 30 °C and under 1500 μmol m(-2)s(-1) PPFD. The rate of transpiration (E) responded positively to increased PPFD and temperature up to the highest levels tested (2000 μmol m(-2)s(-1) and 40 °C). Similar to E, leaf stomatal conductance (gs) also increased with PPFD irrespective of temperature. However, gs increased with temperature up to 30 °C only. Temperature above 30 °C had an adverse effect on gs in this species. Overall, high temperature and high PPFD showed an adverse effect on PN and WUE. A continuous decrease in intercellular CO2 concentration (Ci) and therefore, in the ratio of intercellular CO2 to ambient CO2 concentration (Ci/Ca) was observed with the increase in temperature and PPFD. However, the decrease was less pronounced at light intensities above 1500 μmol m(-2)s(-1). In view of these results, temperature and light optima for photosynthesis was concluded to be at 25-30 °C and ∼1500 μmol m(-2)s(-1) respectively. Furthermore, plants were also exposed to different concentrations of CO2 (250, 350, 450, 550, 650 and 750 μmol mol(-1)) under optimum PPFD and temperature conditions to assess their photosynthetic response. Rate of photosynthesis, WUE and Ci decreased by 50 %, 53 % and 10

  18. Intraspecific variation in thermal acclimation of photosynthesis across a range of temperatures in a perennial crop.

    PubMed

    Zaka, Serge; Frak, Ela; Julier, Bernadette; Gastal, François; Louarn, Gaëtan

    2016-01-01

    Interest in the thermal acclimation of photosynthesis has been stimulated by the increasing relevance of climate change. However, little is known about intra-specific variations in thermal acclimation and its potential for breeding. In this article, we examined the difference in thermal acclimation between alfalfa (Medicago sativa) cultivars originating from contrasting origins, and sought to analyze the mechanisms in play. A series of experiments was carried out at seven growth temperatures between 5 and 35 °C using four cultivars from temperate and Mediterranean origin. Leaf traits, the photosynthetic rate at 25 °C (A400 (25)), the photosynthetic rate at optimal temperature (A400 (opt)), the thermal optimum of photosynthesis (Topt), and the photosynthetic parameters from the Farqhuar model were determined. Irrespective of cultivar origin, a clear shift in the temperature responses of photosynthesis was observed as a function of growth temperature, affecting thermal optimum of photosynthesis, photosynthetic rate at optimal temperature and photosynthetic rate at 25 °C. For both cultivars, Topt values increased linearly in leaves grown between 5 and 35 °C. Relative homeostasis of A400 (25) and A400 (opt) was found between 10 °C and 30 °C growth temperatures, but sharp declines were recorded at 5 and 35 °C. This homeostasis was achieved in part through modifications to leaf nitrogen content, which increased at extreme temperatures. Significant changes were also recorded regarding nitrogen partitioning in the photosynthetic apparatus and in the temperature dependence of photosynthetic parameters. The cultivars differed only in terms of the temperature response of photosynthetic parameters, with Mediterranean genotypes displaying a greater sensitivity of the maximum rate of Rubisco carboxylation to elevated temperatures. It was concluded that intra-specific variations in the temperature acclimation of photosynthesis exist among alfalfa cultivars

  19. The acclimation of Tilia cordata stomatal opening in response to light, and stomatal anatomy to vegetational shade and its components.

    PubMed

    Aasamaa, Krõõt; Aphalo, Pedro José

    2017-02-01

    Stomatal anatomical traits and rapid responses to several components of visible light were measured in Tilia cordata Mill. seedlings grown in an open, fully sunlit field (C-set), or under different kinds of shade. The main questions were: (i) stomatal responses to which visible light spectrum regions are modified by growth-environment shade and (ii) which separate component of vegetational shade is most effective in eliciting the acclimation effects of the full vegetational shade. We found that stomatal opening in response to red or green light did not differ between the plants grown in the different environments. Stomatal response to blue light was increased (in comparison with that of C-set) in the leaves grown in full vegetational shade (IABW-set), in attenuated UVAB irradiance (AB-set) or in decreased light intensity (neutral shade) plus attenuated UVAB irradiance (IAB-set). In all sets, the addition of green light-two or four times stronger-into induction light barely changed the rate of the blue-light-stimulated stomatal opening. In the AB-set, stomatal response to blue light equalled the strong IABW-set response. In attenuated UVB-grown leaves, stomatal response fell midway between IABW- and C-set results. Blue light response by neutral shade-grown leaves did not differ from that of the C-set, and the response by the IAB-set did not differ from that of the AB-set. Stomatal size was not modified by growth environments. Stomatal density and index were remarkably decreased only in the IABW- and IAB-sets. It was concluded that differences in white light responses between T. cordata leaves grown in different light environments are caused only by their different blue light response. Differences in stomatal sensitivity are not dependent on altered stomatal anatomy. Attenuated UVAB irradiance is the most efficient component of vegetational shade in stimulating acclimation of stomata, whereas decreased light intensity plays a minor role. © The Author 2016. Published

  20. Singlet oxygen-mediated and EXECUTER-dependent signalling and acclimation of Arabidopsis thaliana exposed to light stress.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shengrui; Apel, Klaus; Kim, Chanhong

    2014-04-19

    Plants respond to environmental changes by acclimation that activates defence mechanisms and enhances the plant's resistance against a subsequent more severe stress. Chloroplasts play an important role as a sensor of environmental stress factors that interfere with the photosynthetic electron transport and enhance the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). One of these ROS, singlet oxygen ((1)O2), activates a signalling pathway within chloroplasts that depends on the two plastid-localized proteins EXECUTER 1 and 2. Moderate light stress induces acclimation protecting photosynthetic membranes against a subsequent more severe high light stress and at the same time activates (1)O2-mediated and EXECUTER-dependent signalling. Pre-treatment of Arabidopsis seedlings with moderate light stress confers cross-protection against a virulent Pseudomonas syringae strain. While non-pre-acclimated seedlings are highly susceptible to the pathogen regardless of whether (1)O2- and EXECUTER-dependent signalling is active or not, pre-stressed acclimated seedlings without this signalling pathway lose part of their pathogen resistance. These results implicate (1)O2- and EXECUTER-dependent signalling in inducing acclimation but suggest also a contribution by other yet unknown signalling pathways during this response of plants to light stress.

  1. Photosynthetic responses of subtidal seagrasses to a daily light cycle in Torres Strait: A comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Stuart J.; Kerville, Simon P.; Coles, Robert G.; Short, Fred

    2008-09-01

    In this study, we examined the photosynthetic responses of five common seagrass species from a typical mixed meadow in Torres Strait at a depth of 5-7 m using pulse amplitude modulated (PAM) fluorometry. The photosynthetic response of each species was measured every 2 h throughout a single daily light cycle from dawn (6 am) to dusk (6 pm). PAM fluorometry was used to generate rapid light curves from which measures of electron transport rate (ETR max), photosynthetic efficiency ( α), saturating irradiance ( E k) and light-adapted quantum yield (Δ F/ F' m) were derived for each species. The amount of light absorbed by leaves (absorption factor) was also determined for each species. Similar diurnal patterns were recorded among species with 3-4 fold increases in maximal electron rate from dawn to midday and a maintenance of ETR max in the afternoon that would allow an optimal use of low light by all species. Differences in photosynthetic responses to changes in the daily light regime were also evident with Syringodium isoetifolium showing the highest photosynthetic rates and saturating irradiances suggesting a competitive advantage over other species under conditions of high light. In contrast Halophila ovalis, Halophila decipiens and Halophila spinulosa were characterised by comparatively low photosynthetic rates and minimum light requirements (i.e. low E k) typical of shade adaptation. The structural makeup of each species may explain the observed differences with large, structurally complex species such as Syringodium isoetifolium and Cymodocea serrulata showing high photosynthetic effciciencies ( α) and therefore high-light-adapted traits (e.g. high ETR max and E k) compared with the smaller Halophila species positioned lower in the canopy. For the smaller Halophila species these shade-adapted traits are features that optimise their survival during low-light conditions. Knowledge of these characteristics and responses improves our understanding of the underlying

  2. Photosynthetic and Biochemical Changes in Response to Short Interval High ``g'' Exposure in Wheat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixit, Jyotsana; Vidyasagar, Pandit; Jagtap, Sagar; Kamble, Shailendra

    We have investigated the effect of short interval post imbibition high “g” exposure on wheat seeds (Triticum aestivum var.Lok-1) by evaluating the photosynthetic performance, chlorophyll “a” fluorescence biochemical indices and antioxidant response. Imbibed wheat seeds were exposed to high “g” ranging from 500 g to 2500 g for 10 min, allowed to germinate and grown for 5 days under normal gravity i.e. 1 g. Chlorophyll “a” fluorescence transient was examined in wheat seedling raised from hyper gravity treated seeds. Fv/Fm, PI, Fv/Fo decreased in high “g” treated seeds compared to control. Photosynthetic performance indices such as Transpiration rate, Stomatal conductance, Net photosynthetic rate, Intracellular CO2 concentration, Intrinsic water use efficiency also declined in wheat seedlings raised from High “g” treated seeds suggesting that high g reduces efficiency of photosynthesis in wheat seedlings. Results of Biochemical analysis showed reduced alpha- amylase activity in wheat seeds subjected to high “g” ranging from 500 g to 2500 g in a magnitude dependent manner. Decline in enzyme activity was positively correlated with higher starch content and lower reducing sugars in high “g” exposed wheat seeds. This possibly explains the reduced percent germination and growth in response to high “g”. Antioxidant enzyme activity (CAT and POX) significantly increased as a result of hypergravity exposure In conclusion, short interval high “g” exposure results in reduced growth and photosynthetic activity in wheat seedlings.

  3. Ethylene Potentiates Sulfur-Mediated Reversal of Cadmium Inhibited Photosynthetic Responses in Mustard.

    PubMed

    Khan, Nafees A; Asgher, Mohd; Per, Tasir S; Masood, Asim; Fatma, Mehar; Khan, M I R

    2016-01-01

    The potential of exogenous ethylene and sulfur (S) in reversal of cadmium (Cd)-inhibited photosynthetic and growth responses in mustard (Brassica juncea L. cv. Pusa Jai Kisan) were studied. Plants grown with 50 μM Cd showed increased superoxide and H2O2 accumulation and lipid peroxidation together with increased activity of 1-aminocyclopropane carboxylic acid synthase (ACS) and ethylene production and inhibition of photosynthesis and growth. Application of 1 mM SO4(2-) or 200 μL L(-1) ethephon (ethylene source) influenced photosynthetic and growth performance equally in presence or absence of Cd. However, their combined application synergistically improved photosynthetic performance more in presence of Cd and reduced oxidative stress (lower superoxide and H2O2 accumulation) by decreasing ethylene and glucose sensitivity with the increase in cysteine and methionineand a non-proteinogenic thiol (reduced glutathione; GSH) contents. The central role of ethylene in potentiating S-mediated reversal of Cd-induced oxidative stress was evident with the use of ethylene action inhibitor, norbornadiene (NBD). The application of NBD resulted in decreased thiol production and photosynthetic responses. This suggests that ethylene promotes the effects of S in reversal of adverse effects of Cd, and thus, ethylene modulation may be considered as potential tool to substantiate the S effects in reversal of Cd inhibited photosynthesis and growth in mustard.

  4. Ethylene Potentiates Sulfur-Mediated Reversal of Cadmium Inhibited Photosynthetic Responses in Mustard

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Nafees A.; Asgher, Mohd; Per, Tasir S.; Masood, Asim; Fatma, Mehar; Khan, M. I. R.

    2016-01-01

    The potential of exogenous ethylene and sulfur (S) in reversal of cadmium (Cd)-inhibited photosynthetic and growth responses in mustard (Brassica juncea L. cv. Pusa Jai Kisan) were studied. Plants grown with 50 μM Cd showed increased superoxide and H2O2 accumulation and lipid peroxidation together with increased activity of 1-aminocyclopropane carboxylic acid synthase (ACS) and ethylene production and inhibition of photosynthesis and growth. Application of 1 mM SO42- or 200 μL L-1 ethephon (ethylene source) influenced photosynthetic and growth performance equally in presence or absence of Cd. However, their combined application synergistically improved photosynthetic performance more in presence of Cd and reduced oxidative stress (lower superoxide and H2O2 accumulation) by decreasing ethylene and glucose sensitivity with the increase in cysteine and methionineand a non-proteinogenic thiol (reduced glutathione; GSH) contents. The central role of ethylene in potentiating S-mediated reversal of Cd-induced oxidative stress was evident with the use of ethylene action inhibitor, norbornadiene (NBD). The application of NBD resulted in decreased thiol production and photosynthetic responses. This suggests that ethylene promotes the effects of S in reversal of adverse effects of Cd, and thus, ethylene modulation may be considered as potential tool to substantiate the S effects in reversal of Cd inhibited photosynthesis and growth in mustard. PMID:27853462

  5. [Molecular responses of photosynthetic apparatus of plants to long term irradiance changes].

    PubMed

    Adamiec, Małgorzata; Jackowski, Grzegorz

    2008-01-01

    In response to long term (at least 1-3 h) irradiance changes the responses are elicited at the level of structure and function of photosynthetic apparatus of plants which are thought to be aimed to keep the balance between the level of excitation energy funneled to the reaction centers of the photosystems by energetic antennae and the utilization of this energy in the form of photosynthetic electron transfer and dark reactions. At high vs medium irradiances the rate of excitation energy transfer via LHCII is reduced while the rate of electron flow and photosynthetic dark reactions is increased. The reaction at LHCII level stems from the reduction of its pool per PSII reaction center and the regulatory events comprise changes in the expression of LHCII apoproteins and/or chi b biosynthesis. The basis for higher electron flow capabilities lies in significant increases in the content of some electron carriers and the catalytic activity of ATP synthase. The upregulation of photosynthetic dark reaction in turn is due to the activation of signaling pathways leading to the increase in the pool and catalytic activities of rubisco and other Calvin cycle enzymes.

  6. Identification of large variation in the photosynthetic induction response among 37 soybean genotypes that is not correlated with steady-state photosynthetic capacity

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Irradiance continuously fluctuates during the day in the field, potentially resulting in photosynthetic induction of leaves as they transition from low to high light. The speed of the induction response affects the cumulative carbon gain of the plants and could impact growth and yield. The photosynt...

  7. A mechanistic model for the light response of photosynthetic electron transport rate based on light harvesting properties of photosynthetic pigment molecules.

    PubMed

    Ye, Zi-Piao; Robakowski, Piotr; Suggett, David J

    2013-03-01

    Models describing the light response of photosynthetic electron transport rate (ETR) are routinely used to determine how light absorption influences energy, reducing power and yields of primary productivity; however, no single model is currently able to provide insight into the fundamental processes that implicitly govern the variability of light absorption. Here we present development and application of a new mechanistic model of ETR for photosystem II based on the light harvesting (absorption and transfer to the core 'reaction centres') characteristics of photosynthetic pigment molecules. Within this model a series of equations are used to describe novel biophysical and biochemical characteristics of photosynthetic pigment molecules and in turn light harvesting; specifically, the eigen-absorption cross-section and the minimum average lifetime of photosynthetic pigment molecules in the excited state, which describe the ability of light absorption of photosynthetic pigment molecules and retention time of excitons in the excited state but are difficult to be measured directly. We applied this model to a series of previously collected fluorescence data and demonstrated that our model described well the light response curves of ETR, regardless of whether dynamic down-regulation of PSII occurs, for a range of photosynthetic organisms (Abies alba, Picea abies, Pinus mugo and Emiliania huxleyi). Inherent estimated parameters (e.g. maximum ETR and the saturation irradiance) by our model are in very close agreement with the measured data. Overall, our mechanistic model potentially provides novel insights into the regulation of ETR by light harvesting properties as well as dynamical down-regulation of PSII.

  8. Field and controlled environment measurements show strong seasonal acclimation in photosynthesis and respiration potential in boreal Scots pine.

    PubMed

    Kolari, Pasi; Chan, Tommy; Porcar-Castell, Albert; Bäck, Jaana; Nikinmaa, Eero; Juurola, Eija

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the seasonality of photosynthesis in boreal evergreen trees and its control by the environment requires separation of the instantaneous and slow responses, as well as the dynamics of light reactions, carbon reactions, and respiration. We determined the seasonality of photosynthetic light response and respiration parameters of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) in the field in southern Finland and in controlled laboratory conditions. CO2 exchange and chlorophyll fluorescence were measured in the field using a continuously operated automated chamber setup and fluorescence monitoring systems. We also carried out monthly measurements of photosynthetic light, CO2 and temperature responses in standard conditions with a portable IRGA and fluorometer instrument. The field and response measurements indicated strong seasonal variability in the state of the photosynthetic machinery with a deep downregulation during winter. Despite the downregulation, the photosynthetic machinery retained a significant capacity during winter, which was not visible in the field measurements. Light-saturated photosynthesis (P sat) and the initial slope of the photosynthetic light response (α) obtained in standard conditions were up to 20% of their respective summertime values. Respiration also showed seasonal acclimation with peak values of respiration in standard temperature in spring and decline in autumn. Spring recovery of all photosynthetic parameters could be predicted with temperature history. On the other hand, the operating quantum yield of photosystem II and the initial slope of photosynthetic light response stayed almost at the summertime level until late autumn while at the same time P sat decreased following the prevailing temperature. Comparison of photosynthetic parameters with the environmental drivers suggests that light and minimum temperature are also decisive factors in the seasonal acclimation of photosynthesis in boreal evergreen trees.

  9. Field and controlled environment measurements show strong seasonal acclimation in photosynthesis and respiration potential in boreal Scots pine

    PubMed Central

    Kolari, Pasi; Chan, Tommy; Porcar-Castell, Albert; Bäck, Jaana; Nikinmaa, Eero; Juurola, Eija

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the seasonality of photosynthesis in boreal evergreen trees and its control by the environment requires separation of the instantaneous and slow responses, as well as the dynamics of light reactions, carbon reactions, and respiration. We determined the seasonality of photosynthetic light response and respiration parameters of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) in the field in southern Finland and in controlled laboratory conditions. CO2 exchange and chlorophyll fluorescence were measured in the field using a continuously operated automated chamber setup and fluorescence monitoring systems. We also carried out monthly measurements of photosynthetic light, CO2 and temperature responses in standard conditions with a portable IRGA and fluorometer instrument. The field and response measurements indicated strong seasonal variability in the state of the photosynthetic machinery with a deep downregulation during winter. Despite the downregulation, the photosynthetic machinery retained a significant capacity during winter, which was not visible in the field measurements. Light-saturated photosynthesis (Psat) and the initial slope of the photosynthetic light response (α) obtained in standard conditions were up to 20% of their respective summertime values. Respiration also showed seasonal acclimation with peak values of respiration in standard temperature in spring and decline in autumn. Spring recovery of all photosynthetic parameters could be predicted with temperature history. On the other hand, the operating quantum yield of photosystem II and the initial slope of photosynthetic light response stayed almost at the summertime level until late autumn while at the same time Psat decreased following the prevailing temperature. Comparison of photosynthetic parameters with the environmental drivers suggests that light and minimum temperature are also decisive factors in the seasonal acclimation of photosynthesis in boreal evergreen trees. PMID:25566291

  10. Thermal acclimation of photosynthesis: a comparison of boreal and temperate tree species along a latitudinal transect.

    PubMed

    Dillaway, Dylan N; Kruger, Eric L

    2010-06-01

    Common gardens were established along a approximately 900 km latitudinal transect to examine factors limiting geographical distributions of boreal and temperate tree species in eastern North America. Boreal representatives were trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) and paper birch (Betula papyrifera Marsh.), while temperate species were eastern cottonwood (Populus deltoides Bartr ex. Marsh var. deltoides) and sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua L.). The species were compared with respect to adjustments of leaf photosynthetic metabolism along the transect, with emphasis on temperature sensitivities of the maximum rate of ribulose bisphosphate (RuBP) carboxylation (E(V)) and regeneration (E(J)). During leaf development, the average air temperature (T(growth)) differed between the coolest and warmest gardens by 12 degrees C. Evidence of photosynthetic thermal acclimation (metabolic shifts compensating for differences in T(growth)) was generally lacking in all species. Namely, neither E(V) nor E(J) was positively related to T(growth). Correspondingly, the optimum temperature (T(opt)) of ambient photosynthesis (A(sat)) did not vary significantly with T(growth). Modest variation in T(opt) was explained by the combination of E(V) plus the slope and curvature of the parabolic temperature response of mesophyll conductance (g(m)). All in all, species differed little in photosynthetic responses to climate. Furthermore, the adaptive importance of photosynthetic thermal acclimation was overshadowed by g(m)'s influence on A(sat)'s temperature response.

  11. Photosynthetic limitations in response to water stress and recovery in Mediterranean plants with different growth forms.

    PubMed

    Galmés, Jeroni; Medrano, Hipólito; Flexas, Jaume

    2007-01-01

    * Whether photosynthesis is limited during water stress and recovery because of diffusive or biochemical factors is still open to debate, and apparent contradictions appear when various studies on species with different growth forms are compared. * Ten Mediterranean species, representing different growth forms, were subjected to different levels of water stress, the most severe followed by rewatering. A quantitative limitation analysis was applied to estimate the effects of water stress on stomatal (S(L)), mesophyll conductance (MC(L)) and biochemical limitations (B(L)). * Results confirmed a general pattern of photosynthetic response to water stress among C(3) plants when stomatal conductance (g(s)) is used as a reference parameter. As g(s) values decreased from a maximum to approx. 0.05 mol H(2)O m(-2) s(-1), the total photosynthetic limitation rose from 0 to approx. 70%, and this was caused by a progressive increase of both S(L) and MC(L) limitations, while B(L) remained negligible. When lower values of g(s) were achieved (total photosynthetic limitation increased from 70 to 100%), the contribution of S(L) declined, while MC(L) still increased and B(L) contributed significantly (20-50%) to the total limitation. * Photosynthetic recovery of severely stressed plants after rewatering showed a dominant role of MC(L), irrespective of the degree of photosynthesis recovery.

  12. Photosynthetic responses of thalli and isolated protoplasts of Bryopsis hypnoides (Bryopsidales, Chlorophyta) during dehydration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lü, Fang; Wang, Guangce; Jin, Haochen

    2011-03-01

    Bryopsis hypnoides Lamouroux is a unique intertidal siphonous green alga whose extruded protoplasm can aggregate spontaneously in seawater to form numerous new cells that can develop into mature algal thalli. In this study, the photosynthetic responses during dehydration of both the thalli and protoplasts isolated from B. hypnoides were measured using a Dual-PAM (pulse amplitude modulation)-100 fluorometer. The results show that the photosynthetic rates of B. hypnoides thalli were maintained for an initial period, beyond which continued desiccation resulted in reduced rates of PSI and PSII. However, the photosynthetic performances of the isolated protoplasts dehydrated in air (CO2 concentration 600-700 mg/L) showed a slight increase of Y(II) at 20% water loss, but the rates decreased thereafter with declining water content. When protoplasts were dehydrated in CO2 deficient conditions (CO2 concentration 40-80 mg/L), the values of Y(II) declined steadily with increased dehydration without an initial rise. These results indicated that the thalli and isolated protoplasts of this alga can utilize CO2 in ambient air effectively, and the photosynthetic performances of the isolated protoplasts were significantly different from that of the thalli during dehydration. Thus the protoplasts may be an excellent system for the study of stress tolerance.

  13. High light acclimation of Chromera velia points to photoprotective NPQ.

    PubMed

    Belgio, Erica; Trsková, Eliška; Kotabová, Eva; Ewe, Daniela; Prášil, Ondřej; Kaňa, Radek

    2017-04-12

    It has previously been shown that the long-term treatment of Arabidopsis thaliana with the chloroplast inhibitor lincomycin leads to photosynthetic membranes enriched in antennas, strongly reduced in photosystem II reaction centers (PSII) and with enhanced nonphotochemical quenching (NPQ) (Belgio et al. Biophys J 102:2761-2771, 2012). Here, a similar physiological response was found in the microalga Chromera velia grown under high light (HL). In comparison to cells acclimated to low light, HL cells displayed a severe re-organization of the photosynthetic membrane characterized by (1) a reduction of PSII but similar antenna content; (2) partial uncoupling of antennas from PSII; (3) enhanced NPQ. The decrease in the number of PSII represents a rather unusual acclimation response compared to other phototrophs, where a smaller PSII antenna size is more commonly found under high light. Despite the diminished PSII content, no net damage could be detected on the basis of the Photosynthesis versus irradiance curve and electron transport rates pointing at the excess capacity of PSII. We therefore concluded that the photoinhibition is minimized under high light by a lower PSII content and that cells are protected by NPQ in the antennas.

  14. Photosynthetic responses to altitude: an explanation based on optimality principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Han; Prenticce, Iain Colin; Davis, Tyler; Keenan, Trevor; Wright, Ian; Peng, Changhui

    2017-04-01

    Increasing altitude is commonly accompanied by a declining ratio of leaf-internal to ambient CO2 partial pressures (ci:ca; hereafter, χ) and an increase in carboxylation capacity (Vcmax), while carbon assimilation (A) shows little to no change. Here we provide a consistent, quantitative explanation for these responses based on the 'least-cost hypothesis' for the regulation of χ and the 'co-ordination hypothesis' for the regulation of Vcmax. With leaf temperature held constant, our analysis predicts that the cost of maintaining water transport capacity increases with altitude (due to declining atmospheric pressure and increasing vapour pressure deficit, VPD) while the cost of maintaining carboxylation capacity decreases (due to the enhanced affinity of Rubisco for CO2 at low O2 partial pressures). Both effects favour investment in carboxylation capacity rather than water transport capacity. The response of A then reflects the competing effects of stronger CO2 limitation at low ci versus increased radiation penetration through a thinner atmosphere. These effects of atmospheric pressure are expected to be most strongly expressed in herbaceous plants that can maintain leaf temperatures in a narrow range. In leaves closely coupled to the atmosphere additional effects of declining temperature on photosynthesis are expected to modify but not obliterate those of pressure.

  15. A heat acclimation protocol for team sports.

    PubMed

    Sunderland, C; Morris, J G; Nevill, M E

    2008-05-01

    exercise induced acclimation, and resulted in an improvement in intermittent running exercise capacity in female games players. A lower rectal temperature and a concomitant rise in thermal comfort may be partly responsible for the improvement in exercise capacity.

  16. Long-term growth of soybean at elevated [CO2] does not cause acclimation of stomatal conductance under fully open-air conditions.

    PubMed

    Leakey, Andrew D B; Bernacchi, Carl J; Ort, Donald R; Long, Stephen P

    2006-09-01

    Accurately predicting plant function and global biogeochemical cycles later in this century will be complicated if stomatal conductance (g(s)) acclimates to growth at elevated [CO(2)], in the sense of a long-term alteration of the response of g(s) to [CO(2)], humidity (h) and/or photosynthetic rate (A). If so, photosynthetic and stomatal models will require parameterization at each growth [CO(2)] of interest. Photosynthetic acclimation to long-term growth at elevated [CO(2)] occurs frequently. Acclimation of g(s) has rarely been examined, even though stomatal density commonly changes with growth [CO(2)]. Soybean was grown under field conditions at ambient [CO(2)] (378 micromol mol(-1)) and elevated [CO(2)] (552 micromol mol(-1)) using free-air [CO(2)] enrichment (FACE). This study tested for stomatal acclimation by parameterizing and validating the widely used Ball et al. model (1987, Progress in Photosynthesis Research, vol IV, 221-224) with measurements of leaf gas exchange. The dependence of g(s) on A, h and [CO(2)] at the leaf surface was unaltered by long-term growth at elevated [CO(2)]. This suggests that the commonly observed decrease in g(s) under elevated [CO(2)] is due entirely to the direct instantaneous effect of [CO(2)] on g(s) and that there is no longer-term acclimation of g(s) independent of photosynthetic acclimation. The model accurately predicted g(s) for soybean growing under ambient and elevated [CO(2)] in the field. Model parameters under ambient and elevated [CO(2)] were indistinguishable, demonstrating that stomatal function under ambient and elevated [CO(2)] could be modelled without the need for parameterization at each growth [CO(2)].

  17. Identification of large variation in the photosynthetic induction response among 37 soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] genotypes that is not correlated with steady-state photosynthetic capacity.

    PubMed

    Soleh, M A; Tanaka, Y; Kim, S Y; Huber, S C; Sakoda, K; Shiraiwa, T

    2017-03-01

    Irradiance continuously fluctuates during the day in the field. The speed of the induction response of photosynthesis in high light affects the cumulative carbon gain of the plant and could impact growth and yield. The photosynthetic induction response and its relationship with the photosynthetic capacity under steady-state conditions (P max) were evaluated in 37 diverse soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] genotypes. The induction response of leaf photosynthesis showed large variation among the soybean genotypes. After 5 min illumination with strong light, genotype NAM23 had the highest leaf photosynthetic rate of 33.8 µmol CO2 m(-2) s(-1), while genotype NAM12 showed the lowest rate at 4.7 µmol CO2 m(-2) s(-1). Cumulative CO2 fixation (CCF) during the first 5 min of high light exposure ranged from 5.5 mmol CO2 m(-2) for NAM23 to 0.81 mmol CO2 m(-2) for NAM12. The difference in the induction response among genotypes was consistent throughout the growth season. However, there was no significant correlation between CCF and P max among genotypes suggesting that different mechanisms regulate P max and the induction response. The observed variation in the induction response was mainly attributed to ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) activation, but soybean lines differing in the induction response did not differ in the leaf content of Rubisco activase α- and β-proteins. Future studies will be focused on identifying molecular determinants of the photosynthetic induction response and determining whether this trait could be an important breeding target to achieve improved growth of soybeans in the field.

  18. Seismic stress responses of soybean to different photosynthetic photon flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, R. S.; Coe, L. L.; Montgomery, L.; Mitchell, C. A.

    1990-01-01

    Physical agitation applied as periodic seismic stress (shaking) reduced stem elongation, leaf expansion, and biomass accumulation by vegetative soybeans. Level of photon flux (PPF) influenced the type and extent of plant response to mechanical stress. Plant parts responded differently as PPF varied between 135 and 592 micromoles m-2 s-1. Stem length was significantly reduced by seismic stress at 135 micromoles m-2 s-1 but this effect was insignificant at higher PPFs. Reduced stem length resulted from an inhibition of internode elongation. Stem diameter was unaffected by stress at the PPFs tested. In contrast to effects on stem elongation, leaf area was insensitive to stress treatments at 135 micromoles m-2 s-1 but was progressively inhibited by stress as PPF increased. Statistically significant reductions in shoot f. wt and d. wt by seismic stress occurred only at 295 micromoles m-2 s-1. Root biomass accumulation was not affected by seismic stress at any PPF used in this study.

  19. Seismic stress responses of soybean to different photosynthetic photon flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, R. S.; Coe, L. L.; Montgomery, L.; Mitchell, C. A.

    1990-01-01

    Physical agitation applied as periodic seismic stress (shaking) reduced stem elongation, leaf expansion, and biomass accumulation by vegetative soybeans. Level of photon flux (PPF) influenced the type and extent of plant response to mechanical stress. Plant parts responded differently as PPF varied between 135 and 592 micromoles m-2 s-1. Stem length was significantly reduced by seismic stress at 135 micromoles m-2 s-1 but this effect was insignificant at higher PPFs. Reduced stem length resulted from an inhibition of internode elongation. Stem diameter was unaffected by stress at the PPFs tested. In contrast to effects on stem elongation, leaf area was insensitive to stress treatments at 135 micromoles m-2 s-1 but was progressively inhibited by stress as PPF increased. Statistically significant reductions in shoot f. wt and d. wt by seismic stress occurred only at 295 micromoles m-2 s-1. Root biomass accumulation was not affected by seismic stress at any PPF used in this study.

  20. Long-Term Acclimation to Different Thermal Regimes Affects Molecular Responses to Heat Stress in a Freshwater Clam Corbicula Fluminea

    PubMed Central

    Falfushynska, Halina I.; Phan, Tuan; Sokolova, Inna M.

    2016-01-01

    Global climate change (GCC) can negatively affect freshwater ecosystems. However, the degree to which freshwater populations can acclimate to long-term warming and the underlying molecular mechanisms are not yet fully understood. We used the cooling water discharge (CWD) area of a power plant as a model for long-term warming. Survival and molecular stress responses (expression of molecular chaperones, antioxidants, bioenergetic and protein synthesis biomarkers) to experimental warming (20–41 °C, +1.5 °C per day) were assessed in invasive clams Corbicula fluminea from two pristine populations and a CWD population. CWD clams had considerably higher (by ~8–12 °C) lethal temperature thresholds than clams from the pristine areas. High thermal tolerance of CWD clams was associated with overexpression of heat shock proteins HSP70, HSP90 and HSP60 and activation of protein synthesis at 38 °C. Heat shock response was prioritized over the oxidative stress response resulting in accumulation of oxidative lesions and ubiquitinated proteins during heat stress in CWD clams. Future studies should determine whether the increase in thermal tolerance in CWD clams are due to genetic adaptation and/or phenotypic plasticity. Overall, our findings indicate that C. fluminea has potential to survive and increase its invasive range during warming such as expected during GCC. PMID:27995990

  1. Long-Term Acclimation to Different Thermal Regimes Affects Molecular Responses to Heat Stress in a Freshwater Clam Corbicula Fluminea.

    PubMed

    Falfushynska, Halina I; Phan, Tuan; Sokolova, Inna M

    2016-12-20

    Global climate change (GCC) can negatively affect freshwater ecosystems. However, the degree to which freshwater populations can acclimate to long-term warming and the underlying molecular mechanisms are not yet fully understood. We used the cooling water discharge (CWD) area of a power plant as a model for long-term warming. Survival and molecular stress responses (expression of molecular chaperones, antioxidants, bioenergetic and protein synthesis biomarkers) to experimental warming (20-41 °C, +1.5 °C per day) were assessed in invasive clams Corbicula fluminea from two pristine populations and a CWD population. CWD clams had considerably higher (by ~8-12 °C) lethal temperature thresholds than clams from the pristine areas. High thermal tolerance of CWD clams was associated with overexpression of heat shock proteins HSP70, HSP90 and HSP60 and activation of protein synthesis at 38 °C. Heat shock response was prioritized over the oxidative stress response resulting in accumulation of oxidative lesions and ubiquitinated proteins during heat stress in CWD clams. Future studies should determine whether the increase in thermal tolerance in CWD clams are due to genetic adaptation and/or phenotypic plasticity. Overall, our findings indicate that C. fluminea has potential to survive and increase its invasive range during warming such as expected during GCC.

  2. Long-Term Acclimation to Different Thermal Regimes Affects Molecular Responses to Heat Stress in a Freshwater Clam Corbicula Fluminea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falfushynska, Halina I.; Phan, Tuan; Sokolova, Inna M.

    2016-12-01

    Global climate change (GCC) can negatively affect freshwater ecosystems. However, the degree to which freshwater populations can acclimate to long-term warming and the underlying molecular mechanisms are not yet fully understood. We used the cooling water discharge (CWD) area of a power plant as a model for long-term warming. Survival and molecular stress responses (expression of molecular chaperones, antioxidants, bioenergetic and protein synthesis biomarkers) to experimental warming (20–41 °C, +1.5 °C per day) were assessed in invasive clams Corbicula fluminea from two pristine populations and a CWD population. CWD clams had considerably higher (by ~8–12 °C) lethal temperature thresholds than clams from the pristine areas. High thermal tolerance of CWD clams was associated with overexpression of heat shock proteins HSP70, HSP90 and HSP60 and activation of protein synthesis at 38 °C. Heat shock response was prioritized over the oxidative stress response resulting in accumulation of oxidative lesions and ubiquitinated proteins during heat stress in CWD clams. Future studies should determine whether the increase in thermal tolerance in CWD clams are due to genetic adaptation and/or phenotypic plasticity. Overall, our findings indicate that C. fluminea has potential to survive and increase its invasive range during warming such as expected during GCC.

  3. Development of photosynthetic response curves and their integration into a decision-support tool for floriculture growers

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Irradiance, CO2, and temperature are critical inputs for photosynthesis and crop growth. They are also environmental parameters which growers can control in protected horticulture production systems. We evaluated the photosynthetic response of 13 herbaceous ornamentals (Begonia × hiemalis, Begonia...

  4. Photosynthetic activity, pigment composition and antioxidative response of two mustard (Brassica juncea) cultivars differing in photosynthetic capacity subjected to cadmium stress.

    PubMed

    Mobin, Mohammad; Khan, Nafees A

    2007-05-01

    Photosynthetic performance, contents of chlorophyll and associated pigments, cellular damage and activities of antioxidative enzymes were investigated in two mustard (Brassica juncea L.) cultivars differing in photosynthetic capacity subjected to cadmium (Cd) stress. Exposure to Cd severely restricted the net photosynthetic rate (P(N)) of RH-30 compared to Varuna. This corresponded to the reductions in the activities of carbonic anhydrase (CA) and ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (Rubisco) in both the cultivars. Decline in chlorophyll (Chl) (a+b) and Chl a content was observed but decrease in Chl b was more conspicuous in Varuna under Cd treatments, which was responsible for higher Chl a:b ratio. Additionally, the relative amount of anthocyanin remained higher in Varuna compared to RH-30 even in the presence of high Cd concentration, while percent pheophytin content increased in RH-30 at low Cd concentration. A higher concentration of Cd (100 mg Cd kg(-1) soil) resulted in elevated hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) content in both the cultivars. However, Varuna exhibited lower content of H(2)O(2) in comparison to RH-30. This was reflected in the increased cellular damage in RH-30, expressed by greater thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) content and electrolyte leakage. The enhanced activities of antioxidative enzymes, ascorbate peroxidase (APX), catalase (CAT) and glutathione reductase (GR) and also lower activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) in Varuna alleviated Cd stress and protected the photosynthetic activity.

  5. Ecohydrological Responses of Dense Canopies to Environmental Variability Part 2: Role of Acclimation Under Elevated CO2

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The ability to accurately predict land-atmosphere exchange of mass, energy, and momentum over the coming century requires the consideration of plant biochemical, ecophysiological and structural acclimation to modifications of the ambient environment. Amongst the most important environmental changes ...

  6. Supramolecular architecture of photosynthetic membrane in red algae in response to nitrogen starvation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Long-Sheng; Su, Hai-Nan; Li, Kang; Xie, Bin-Bin; Liu, Lu-Ning; Zhang, Xi-Ying; Chen, Xiu-Lan; Huang, Feng; Zhou, Bai-Cheng; Zhang, Yu-Zhong

    2016-11-01

    The availability of nitrogen is one of the most important determinants that can limit the growth of photosynthetic organisms including plants and algae; however, direct observations on the supramolecular architecture of photosynthetic membranes in response to nitrogen stress are still lacking. Red algae are an important evolutionary group of algae which contain phycobilisomes (PBSs) on their thylakoid membranes, as do cyanobacteria. PBSs function not only as light-harvesting antennae but also as nitrogen storage. In this report, alterations of the supramolecular architecture of thylakoid membranes from red alga Porphyridium cruentum during nitrogen starvation were characterized. The morphology of the intact thylakoid membrane was observed to be round vesicles. Thylakoid membranes were reduced in content and PBSs were degraded during nitrogen starvation. The size and density of PBSs were both found to be reduced. PBS size decreased by less than one-half after 20days of nitrogen starvation, but their hemispherical morphology was retained. The density of PBSs on thylakoid membranes was more seriously affected as time proceeded. Upon re-addition of nitrogen led to increasing of PBSs on thylakoid membranes. This work reports the first direct observation on alterations in the supramolecular architecture of thylakoid membranes from a photosynthetic organism in response to nitrogen stress. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Photosynthesis, photoinhibition and low temperature acclimation in cold tolerant plants.

    PubMed

    Huner, N P; Oquist, G; Hurry, V M; Krol, M; Falk, S; Griffith, M

    1993-07-01

    Cold acclimation requires adjustment to a combination of light and low temperature, conditions which are potentially photoinhibitory. The photosynthetic response of plants to low temperature is dependent upon time of exposure and the developmental history of the leaves. Exposure of fully expanded leaves of winter cereals to short-term, low temperature shiftsinhibits whereas low temperature growthstimulates electron transport capacity and carbon assimilation. However, the photosynthetic response to low temperature is clearly species and cultivar dependent. Winter annuals and algae which actively grow and develop at low temperature and moderate irradiance acquire a resistance to irradiance 5- to 6-fold higher than their growth irradiance. Resistance to short-term photoinhibition (hours) in winter cereals is a reflection of the increased capacity to keep QA oxidized under high light conditions and low temperature. This is due to an increased capacity for photosynthesis. These characteristics reflect photosynthetic acclimation to low growth temperature and can be used to predict the freezing tolerance of cereals. It is proposed that the enhanced photosynthetic capacity reflects an increased flux of fixed carbon through to sucrose in source tissue as a consequence of the combined effects of increased storage of carbohydrate as fructans in the vacuole of leaf mesophyll cells and an enhanced export to the crown due to its increased sink activity. Long-term exposure (months) of cereals to low temperature photoinhibition indicates that this reduction of photochemical efficiency of PS II represents a stable, long-term down regulation of PS II to match the energy requirements for CO2 fixation. Thus, photoinhibition in vivo should be viewed as the capacity of plants to adjust photosynthetically to the prevailing environmental conditions rather than a process which necessarily results in damage or injury to plants. Not all cold tolerant, herbaceous annuals use the same

  8. A natural experiment on plant acclimation: lifetime stomatal frequency response of an individual tree to annual atmospheric CO2 increase.

    PubMed

    Wagner, F; Below, R; Klerk, P D; Dilcher, D L; Joosten, H; Kürschner, W M; Visscher, H

    1996-10-15

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) has been increasing in atmospheric concentration since the Industrial Revolution. A decreasing number of stomata on leaves of land plants still provides the only morphological evidence that this man-made increase has already affected the biosphere. The current rate of CO2 responsiveness in individual long-lived species cannot be accurately determined from field studies or by controlled-environment experiments. However, the required long-term data sets can be obtained from continuous records of buried leaves from living trees in wetland ecosystems. Fine-resolution analysis of the lifetime leaf record of an individual birch (Betula pendula) indicates a gradual reduction of stomatal frequency as a phenotypic acclimation to CO2 increase. During the past four decades, CO2 increments of 1 part per million by volume resulted in a stomatal density decline of approximately 0.6%. It may be hypothesized that this plastic stomatal frequency response of deciduous tree species has evolved in conjunction with the overall Cenozoic reduction of atmospheric CO2 concentrations.

  9. Developmental plasticity and acclimation both contribute to adaptive responses to alternating seasons of plenty and of stress in Bicyclus butterflies.

    PubMed

    Brakefield, Paul M; Pijpe, Jeroen; Zwaan, Bas J

    2007-04-01

    Plasticity is a crucial component of the life cycle of invertebrates that live as active adults throughout wet and dry seasons in the tropics. Such plasticity is seen in the numerous species of Bicyclus butterflies in Africa which exhibit seasonal polyphenism with sequential generations of adults with one or other of two alternative phenotypes. These differ not only in wing pattern but in many other traits. This divergence across a broad complex of traits is associated with survival and reproduction either in a wet season that is favourable in terms of resources, or mainly in a dry season that is more stressful. This phenomenon has led us to examine the bases of the developmental plasticity in a model species, B.anynana, and also the evolution of key adult life history traits, including starvation resistance and longevity. We now understand something about the processes that generate variation in the phenotype,and also about the ecological context of responses to environmental stress. The responses clearly involve a mix of developmental plasticity as cued by different environments in pre-adult development,and the acclimation of life history traits in adults to their prevailing environment.

  10. Evidence for Compensatory Photosynthetic and Yield Response of Soybeans to Aphid Herbivory.

    PubMed

    Kucharik, Christopher J; Mork, Amelia C; Meehan, Timothy D; Serbin, Shawn P; Singh, Aditya; Townsend, Philip A; Stack Whitney, Kaitlin; Gratton, Claudio

    2016-04-13

    The soybean aphid,Aphis glycinesMatsumura, an exotic species in North America that has been detected in 21 U.S. states and Canada, is a major pest for soybean that can reduce maximum photosynthetic capacity and yields. Our existing knowledge is based on relatively few studies that do not span a wide variety of environmental conditions, and often focus on relatively high and damaging population pressure. We examined the effects of varied populations and duration of soybean aphids on soybean photosynthetic rates and yield in two experiments. In a 2011 field study, we found that plants with low cumulative aphid days (CAD, less than 2,300) had higher yields than plants not experiencing significant aphid pressure, suggesting a compensatory growth response to low aphid pressure. This response did not hold at higher CAD, and yields declined. In a 2013 controlled-environment greenhouse study, soybean plants were well-watered and fertilized with nitrogen (N), and aphid populations were manipulated to reach moderate to high levels (8,000-50,000 CAD). Plants tolerated these population levels when aphids were introduced during the vegetative or reproductive phenological stages of the plant, showing no significant reduction in yield. Leaf N concentration and CAD were positively and significantly correlated with increasing ambient photosynthetic rates. Our findings suggest that, given the right environmental conditions, modern soybean plants can withstand higher aphid pressure than previously assumed. Moreover, soybean plants also responded positively through a compensatory photosynthetic effect to moderate population pressure, contributing to stable or increased yield.

  11. Evidence for compensatory photosynthetic and yield response of soybeans to aphid herbivory

    DOE PAGES

    Kucharik, Christopher J.; Mork, Amelia C.; Meehan, Timothy D.; ...

    2016-04-13

    The soybean aphid, Aphis glycines Matsumura, an exotic species in North America that has been detected in 21 U.S. states and Canada, is a major pest for soybean that can reduce maximum photosynthetic capacity and yields. Our existing knowledge is based on relatively few studies that do not span a wide variety of environmental conditions, and often focus on relatively high and damaging population pressure. We examined the effects of varied populations and duration of soybean aphids on soybean photosynthetic rates and yield in two experiments. In a 2011 field study, we found that plants with low cumulative aphid daysmore » (CAD, less than 2,300) had higher yields than plants not experiencing significant aphid pressure, suggesting a compensatory growth response to low aphid pressure. This response did not hold at higher CAD, and yields declined. In a 2013 controlled-environment greenhouse study, soybean plants were well-watered and fertilized with nitrogen (N), and aphid populations were manipulated to reach moderate to high levels (8,000–50,000 CAD). Plants tolerated these population levels when aphids were introduced during the vegetative or reproductive phenological stages of the plant, showing no significant reduction in yield. Leaf N concentration and CAD were positively and significantly correlated with increasing ambient photosynthetic rates. Our findings suggest that, given the right environmental conditions, modern soybean plants can withstand higher aphid pressure than previously assumed. Moreover, soybean plants also responded positively through a compensatory photosynthetic effect to moderate population pressure, contributing to stable or increased yield.« less

  12. Evidence for compensatory photosynthetic and yield response of soybeans to aphid herbivory

    SciTech Connect

    Kucharik, Christopher J.; Mork, Amelia C.; Meehan, Timothy D.; Serbin, Shawn P.; Singh, Aditya; Townsend, Philip A.; Whitney, Kaitlin Stack; Gratton, Claudio

    2016-04-13

    The soybean aphid, Aphis glycines Matsumura, an exotic species in North America that has been detected in 21 U.S. states and Canada, is a major pest for soybean that can reduce maximum photosynthetic capacity and yields. Our existing knowledge is based on relatively few studies that do not span a wide variety of environmental conditions, and often focus on relatively high and damaging population pressure. We examined the effects of varied populations and duration of soybean aphids on soybean photosynthetic rates and yield in two experiments. In a 2011 field study, we found that plants with low cumulative aphid days (CAD, less than 2,300) had higher yields than plants not experiencing significant aphid pressure, suggesting a compensatory growth response to low aphid pressure. This response did not hold at higher CAD, and yields declined. In a 2013 controlled-environment greenhouse study, soybean plants were well-watered and fertilized with nitrogen (N), and aphid populations were manipulated to reach moderate to high levels (8,000–50,000 CAD). Plants tolerated these population levels when aphids were introduced during the vegetative or reproductive phenological stages of the plant, showing no significant reduction in yield. Leaf N concentration and CAD were positively and significantly correlated with increasing ambient photosynthetic rates. Our findings suggest that, given the right environmental conditions, modern soybean plants can withstand higher aphid pressure than previously assumed. Moreover, soybean plants also responded positively through a compensatory photosynthetic effect to moderate population pressure, contributing to stable or increased yield.

  13. Response of microbial community structure to pre-acclimation strategies in microbial fuel cells for domestic wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Park, Younghyun; Cho, Hyunwoo; Yu, Jaechul; Min, Booki; Kim, Hong Suck; Kim, Byung Goon; Lee, Taeho

    2017-02-27

    Microbial community structures and performance of air-cathode microbial fuel cells (MFCs) inoculated with activated sludge from domestic wastewater were investigated to evaluate the effects of three substrate pre-acclimation strategies: 1, serial pre-acclimation with acetate and glucose before supplying domestic wastewater; 2, one step pre-acclimation with acetate before supplying domestic wastewater; and 3, direct supply of domestic wastewater without any pre-acclimation. Strategy 1 showed much higher current generation (1.4mA) and Coulombic efficiency (33.5%) than strategies 2 (0.7mA and 9.4%) and 3 (0.9mA and 10.3%). Pyrosequencing showed that microbial communities were significantly affected by pre-acclimation strategy. Although Proteobacteria was the dominant phylum with all strategies, Actinobacteria was abundant when MFCs were pre-acclimated with glucose after acetate. Not only anode-respiring bacteria (ARB) in the genus Geobacter but also non-ARB belonging to the family Anaerolinaceae seemed to play important roles in air-cathode MFCs to produce electricity from domestic wastewater.

  14. Seasonal response of photosynthetic electron transport and energy dissipation in the eighth year of exposure to elevated atmospheric CO2 (FACE) in Pinus taeda (loblolly pine).

    PubMed

    Logan, Barry A; Combs, Andrew; Myers, Kalisa; Kent, Rose; Stanley, Lela; Tissue, David T

    2009-06-01

    To determine the effect of growth under elevated CO(2) partial pressures (pCO(2)) on photosynthetic electron transport and photoprotective energy dissipation, we examined light-saturated net photosynthetic CO(2) assimilation (A(sat)), the capacity for photosynthetic O(2) evolution, chlorophyll fluorescence emission and the pigment composition of upper-canopy loblolly pine needles in the eighth year of exposure to elevated pCO(2) (20 Pa above ambient) at the free-air CO(2) enrichment facility in the Duke Forest. During the summer growing season, A(sat) was 50% higher in current-year needles and 24% higher in year-old needles in elevated pCO(2) in comparison with needles of the same age cohort in ambient pCO(2). Thus, photosynthetic down-regulation at elevated pCO(2) was observed in the summer in year-old needles. In the winter, A(sat) was not significantly affected by growth pCO(2). Reductions in A(sat), the capacity for photosynthetic O(2) evolution and photosystem II (PSII) efficiency in the light-acclimated and fully-oxidized states were observed in the winter when compared to summer. Growth at elevated pCO(2) had no significant effect on the capacity for photosynthetic O(2) evolution, PSII efficiencies in the light-acclimated and fully-oxidized states, chlorophyll content or the size and conversion state of the xanthophyll cycle, regardless of season or needle age cohort. Therefore, we observed no evidence that photosynthetic electron transport or photoprotective energy dissipation responded to compensate for the effects of elevated pCO(2) on Calvin cycle activity.

  15. Species-specific photosynthetic responses of four coniferous seedlings to open-field experimental warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, S.; Yoon, S. J.; Yoon, T. K.; Han, S. H.; Lee, J.; Lee, D.; Kim, S.; Hwang, J.; Cho, M.; Son, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Temperature increase under climate change is expected to affect photosynthesis of tree species. Biochemical models generally suggest that the elevated temperature increases the photosynthetic carbon fixation, however, many opposing results were reported as well. We aimed to examine the photosynthetic responses of four coniferous seedlings to projected future temperature increase, by conducting an open-field warming experiment. Experimental warming set-up using infra-red heater was built in 2011 and the temperature in warming plots has been regulated to be consistently 3oC higher than that of control plots. The seeds of Abies holophylla (AH), A. koreana (AK), Pinus densiflora (PD), and P. koraiensis (PK) were planted in each 1 m × 1 m plot (n=3) in April, 2012. Monthly net photosynthetic rates (Pn; μmol CO2 m-2 s-1) of 1-year-old seedlings (n=9) from June to November, 2013 were measured using CIRAS-2 (PP-Systems, UK) and photosynthetic parameters (the apparent quantum yield; ф; µmol CO2 mol-1, the dark respiration rate; Rd; µmol CO2 mol-1, and the light compensation point; LCP; µmol mol-1 s-1) were also calculated from the light-response curve of photosynthesis in August, 2013. Chlorophyll contents were measured using DMSO extraction method. Monthly Pn was generally higher for PD and decreased for AK in warmed plots than in control plots (Fig. 1). Pn of AK and PK did not show any significant difference, however, Pn of PK in October and November increased by experimental warming. Pn of PD also showed the highest increase in November and this distinct increase of Pn in autumn might be caused by delayed cessation of photosynthesis by temperature elevation. ф and Rd in warmed plots were higher for PD and lower for AK, while LCP did not significantly differ by treatments for all species. Because ф is considered to be related to the efficiency of harvesting and using light, the change in ф might have caused the response of Pn to warming in this study. Decreases

  16. Effects of exercise-heat acclimation on fluid, electrolyte, and endocrine responses during tilt and +Gz acceleration in women and men

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Brock, P. J.; Sciaraffa, D.; Polese, A.; Elizondo, R.

    1985-01-01

    Two aspects of prolonged endurance training were investigated: (1) the effects of exercise-heat acclimation (on a cycle ergometer at 40 C, 42 rh) on orthostatic tolerance (70 deg head-up tilt) and on a +Gz (head-to-foot) acceleration tolerance of male and female subjects; and (2) comparison of their fluid-electrolyte shifts and hormonal (plasma epinephdrine, norepinephrine, renin, and vasopressin) responses during tilting and centrifugation. The adaptive responses during the 12 d, 2-h acclimation did not alter acceleration tolerance of either men or women, or the women's tilt tolerance, but did increase men's tilt tolerance from 30.4 min before to 58.3 min after acclimation. The patterns of fluid, electrolyte, and protein shifts at tolerance in acceleration and tilting tests were virtually the same in men and women. On the other hand, the hormonal plasma epinephrine, norepinephrine, renin, and vasopressin resonses displayed different shift patterns during acceleration and tilting. It is concluded that the responses to tilting cannot be used to predict responses to acceleration. Future experiments for relating the orthostatic and the acceleration tolerances, and the practical questions of the training regimens for future astronauts are discussed.

  17. Artificial Photosynthetic Reaction Center Exhibiting Acid-Responsive Regulation of Photoinduced Charge Separation

    SciTech Connect

    Pahk, Ian; Kodis, Gerdenis; Fleming, Graham R.; Moore, Thomas A.; Moore, Ana L.; Gust, Devens

    2016-09-16

    Charge separation (CS) is the primary light-driven reaction in photosynthesis whereas onphotochemical quenching (NPQ) is a photoprotective regulatory mechanism employed by many photosynthetic organisms to dynamically modulate energy flow within the photosynthetic apparatus in response to fluctuating light conditions. Activated by decreases in lumen pH produced during periods of high photon flux, NPQ induces rapid thermal dissipation of excess excitation energy. As a result, the rate of CS decreases, thereby limiting the accumulation of potentially deleterious reactive intermediates and byproducts. In this article, a molecular triad that functionally mimics the effects of NPQ associated with an artificial photosynthetic reaction center is described. Steady-state absorption and emission, time-resolved fluorescence, and transient absorption spectroscopies have been used to demonstrate a 1 order of magnitude reduction in the CS quantum yield via reversible protonation of an excited-state-quenching molecular switch moiety. As in the natural system, the populations of unquenched and quenched states and therefore the overall yields of CS were found to be dependent on acid concentration.

  18. The adaptive response of lichens to mercury exposure involves changes in the photosynthetic machinery.

    PubMed

    Nicolardi, Valentina; Cai, Giampiero; Parrotta, Luigi; Puglia, Michele; Bianchi, Laura; Bini, Luca; Gaggi, Carlo

    2012-01-01

    Lichens are an excellent model to study the bioaccumulation of heavy metals but limited information is available on the molecular mechanisms occurring during bioaccumulation. We investigated the changes of the lichen proteome during exposure to constant concentrations of mercury. We found that most of changes involves proteins of the photosynthetic pathway, such as the chloroplastic photosystem I reaction center subunit II, the oxygen-evolving protein and the chloroplastic ATP synthase β-subunit. This suggests that photosynthesis is a target of the toxic effects of mercury. These findings are also supported by changes in the content of photosynthetic pigments (chlorophyll a and b, and β-carotene). Alterations to the photosynthetic machinery also reflect on the structure of thylakoid membranes of algal cells. Response of lichens to mercury also involves stress-related proteins (such as Hsp70) but not cytoskeletal proteins. Results suggest that lichens adapt to mercury exposure by changing the metabolic production of energy. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Involvement of ethylene in gibberellic acid-induced sulfur assimilation, photosynthetic responses, and alleviation of cadmium stress in mustard.

    PubMed

    Masood, Asim; Khan, M Iqbal R; Fatma, Mehar; Asgher, Mohd; Per, Tasir S; Khan, Nafees A

    2016-07-01

    The role of gibberellic acid (GA) or sulfur (S) in stimulation of photosynthesis is known. However, information on the involvement of ethylene in GA-induced photosynthetic responses and cadmium (Cd) tolerance is lacking. This work shows that ethylene is involved in S-assimilation, photosynthetic responses and alleviation of Cd stress by GA in mustard (Brassica juncea L.). Plants grown with 200 mg Cd kg(-1) soil were less responsive to ethylene despite high ethylene evolution and showed photosynthetic inhibition. Plants receiving 10 μM GA spraying plus 100 mg S kg(-1) soil supplementation exhibited increased S-assimilation and photosynthetic responses under Cd stress. Application of GA plus S decreased oxidative stress of plants grown with Cd and limited stress ethylene formation to the range suitable for promoting sulfur use efficiency (SUE), glutathione (GSH) production and photosynthesis. The role of ethylene in GA-induced S-assimilation and reversal of photosynthetic inhibition by Cd was substantiated by inhibiting ethylene biosynthesis with the use of aminoethoxyvinylglycine (AVG). The suppression of S-assimilation and photosynthetic responses by inhibiting ethylene in GA plus S treated plants under Cd stress indicated the involvement of ethylene in GA-induced S-assimilation and Cd stress alleviation. The outcome of the study is important to unravel the interaction between GA and ethylene and their role in Cd tolerance in plants.

  20. Death-specific protein in a marine diatom regulates photosynthetic responses to iron and light availability.

    PubMed

    Thamatrakoln, Kimberlee; Bailleul, Benjamin; Brown, Christopher M; Gorbunov, Maxim Y; Kustka, Adam B; Frada, Miguel; Joliot, Pierre A; Falkowski, Paul G; Bidle, Kay D

    2013-12-10

    Diatoms, unicellular phytoplankton that account for ∼40% of marine primary productivity, often dominate coastal and open-ocean upwelling zones. Limitation of growth and productivity by iron at low light is attributed to an elevated cellular Fe requirement for the synthesis of Fe-rich photosynthetic proteins. In the dynamic coastal environment, Fe concentrations and daily surface irradiance levels can vary by two to three orders of magnitude on short spatial and temporal scales. Although genome-wide studies are beginning to provide insight into the molecular mechanisms used by diatoms to rapidly respond to such fluxes, their functional role in mediating the Fe stress response remains uncharacterized. Here, we show, using reverse genetics, that a death-specific protein (DSP; previously named for its apparent association with cell death) in the coastal diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana (TpDSP1) localizes to the plastid and enhances growth during acute Fe limitation at subsaturating light by increasing the photosynthetic efficiency of carbon fixation. Clone lines overexpressing TpDSP1 had a lower quantum requirement for growth, increased levels of photosynthetic and carbon fixation proteins, and increased cyclic electron flow around photosystem I. Cyclic electron flow is an ATP-producing pathway essential in higher plants and chlorophytes with a heretofore unappreciated role in diatoms. However, cells under replete conditions were characterized as having markedly reduced growth and photosynthetic rates at saturating light, thereby constraining the benefits afforded by overexpression. Widespread distribution of DSP-like sequences in environmental metagenomic and metatranscriptomic datasets highlights the presence and relevance of this protein in natural phytoplankton populations in diverse oceanic regimes.

  1. Growth and photosynthetic responses of the cordgrass Spartina maritima to CO2 enrichment and salinity.

    PubMed

    Mateos-Naranjo, E; Redondo-Gómez, S; Andrades-Moreno, L; Davy, A J

    2010-10-01

    Future climatic scenarios combine increasing concentrations of atmospheric CO(2) and rising sea levels. Spartina maritima is a C(4) halophyte that is an important pioneer and ecosystem engineer in salt marshes of the Atlantic coast of southern Europe. A glasshouse experiment investigated the combined effects on its growth and photosynthetic apparatus of approximately doubling CO(2) concentration (from 380 to 700 μmol mol(-1)) at a range of salinity (0, 171 and 510 mM NaCl). We measured relative growth rates, gas exchange, chlorophyll fluorescence parameters, photosynthetic pigment concentrations, and total ash, Na(+), K(2+), Ca(2+) and N concentrations. Elevated CO(2) stimulated growth of S. maritima by c. 65% at all external salinities; this growth enhancement was associated with greater net photosynthetic rate (A) and improved leaf water relations. A increased despite a drop in stomatal conductance in response to 700 μmol mol(-1) CO(2). CO(2) and salinity had a marked overall effect on the photochemical (PSII) apparatus and the synthesis of photosynthetic pigments. Φ(PSII) values at midday decreased significantly with external salinity in plants grown at 380 μmol mol(-1) CO(2); and F(v)/F(m) and Φ(PSII) values were higher at 700 μmol mol(-1) CO(2) in presence of NaCl. Plant nutrient concentrations declined under elevated CO(2), which can be ascribed to the dilution effect caused by an increase in biomass. The results suggest that the productivity S. maritima and the ecosystem services it provides will increase in likely future climatic scenarios.

  2. Influence of light history on the photosynthetic and motility responses of Gymnodinium chlorophorum exposed to UVR and different temperatures.

    PubMed

    Häder, Donat-P; Richter, Peter R; Villafañe, Virginia E; Helbling, E Walter

    2014-09-05

    In the wake of global climate change, phytoplankton productivity and species composition is expected to change due to altered external conditions such as temperature, nutrient accessibility, pH and exposure to solar visible (PAR) and ultraviolet radiation (UVR). The previous light history is also of importance for the performance of phytoplankton cells. In order to assess the combined impacts of UVR and temperature on the dinoflagellate Gymnodinium chlorophorum we analyzed the effective photochemical quantum yield (Y), relative electron transport rate vs. irradiance curves (rETR vs. I), percentage of motile cells and swimming velocity. Cells were grown at three different temperatures (15, 20 and 25 °C) and two PAR intensities: low light (LL, 100 μmol photons m(-2) s(-1)) and high light (HL, 250 μmol photons m(-2) s(-1)). Pre-acclimated cells were then exposed to either PAR only (P), PAR+UV-A (PA) or PAR+UV-A+UV-B (PAB) radiation at two different irradiances, followed by a recovery period in darkness. The Y decreased during exposure, being least inhibited in P and most in PAB treatments. Inhibition was higher and recovery slower in LL-grown cells than in HL-grown cells at 15° and 20 °C, but the opposite occurred at 25 °C, when exposed to high irradiances. Maximal values of rETR were determined at t0 as compared to the different (before and after exposure) radiation treatments. The effects of temperature and UVR on rETR were antagonistic in LL-grown cells (i.e., less UVR inhibition at higher temperature), while it was synergistic in HL cells. Swimming velocity and percentage of motile cells were not affected at all tested temperatures and exposure regimes, independent of the light history. Our results indicate that, depending on the previous light history, increased temperature and UVR as predicted under climate change conditions, can have different interactions thus conditioning the photosynthetic response of G. chlorophorum. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B

  3. A novel role for a TonB-family protein and photoregulation of iron acclimation in Fremyella diplosiphon.

    PubMed

    Pattanaik, Bagmi; Montgomery, Beronda L

    2010-07-01

    Photosynthetic organisms display adaptations to changes in light and nutrient availability. Iron, which is required for the function of photosynthetic photosystems and other important biochemical processes, is an essential mineral that consequently impacts not only overall photosynthetic efficiency, but also the physiology of organisms in general. Our recent study represents the first functional characterization of a cyanobacterial TonB protein. TonB proteins classically are membrane proteins that support the transport of iron and vitamin B12 into cells. TonB proteins thus generally serve a critical role in organismal iron acclimation. We recently identified FdTonB, a TonB-family protein, in the filamentous freshwater cyanobacterium Fremyella diplosiphon. FdTonB contains conserved TonB residues and domains, as well as novel protein domains. Our recent study, however, supports a novel function for this protein in the photoregulation of morphology, rather than iron acclimation, in F. diplosiphon. Our detailed investigations into the responses of SF33 wild-type and ΔtonB mutant strains did not support a role for FdTonB in organismal responses to iron limitation. However, close examination of our recent results did highlight a novel interaction between light and iron acclimation in F. diplosiphon.

  4. Alterations in mitochondrial electron transport system activity in response to warm acclimation, hypoxia-reoxygenation and copper in rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss.

    PubMed

    Sappal, Ravinder; MacDougald, Michelle; Fast, Mark; Stevens, Don; Kibenge, Fred; Siah, Ahmed; Kamunde, Collins

    2015-08-01

    Fish expend significant amounts of energy to handle the numerous potentially stressful biotic and abiotic factors that they commonly encounter in aquatic environments. This universal requirement for energy singularizes mitochondria, the primary cellular energy transformers, as fundamental drivers of responses to environmental change. Our study probed the interacting effects of thermal stress, hypoxia-reoxygenation (HRO) and copper (Cu) exposure in rainbow trout to test the prediction that they act jointly to impair mitochondrial function. Rainbow trout were acclimated to 11 (controls) or 20°C for 2 months. Liver mitochondria were then isolated and their responses in vitro to Cu (0-20μM) without and with HRO were assessed. Sequential inhibition and activation of mitochondrial electron transport system (ETS) enzyme complexes permitted the measurement of respiratory activities supported by complex I-IV (CI-IV) in one run. The results showed that warm acclimation reduced fish and liver weights but increased mitochondrial protein indicating impairment of energy metabolism, increased synthesis of defense proteins and/or reduced liver water content. Whereas acute rise (11→20°C) in temperature increased mitochondrial oxidation rates supported by CI-IV, warm acclimation reduced the maximal (state 3) and increased the basal (state 4) respiration leading to global uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS). HRO profoundly inhibited both maximal and basal respiration rates supported by CI-IV, reduced RCR for all except CII and lowered CI:CII respiration ratio, an indication of decreased OXPHOS efficiency. The effects of Cu were less pronounced but more variable and included inhibition of CII-IV maximal respiration rates and stimulation of both CI and CIII basal respiration rates. Surprisingly, only CII and CIII indices exhibited significant 3-way interactions whereas 2-way interactions of acclimation either with Cu or HRO were portrayed mostly by CIV, and those of

  5. Photosynthetic responses to vapour pressure deficit in temperate and tropical evergreen rainforest trees of Australia.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, S C

    2005-02-01

    Rainforests occur in high precipitation areas of eastern Australia, along a gradient in seasonality of precipitation, ranging from a summer dry season in the temperate south to a winter dry season in the tropical north. The response of net photosynthesis to increasing vapour pressure deficit (VPD) was measured in a range of Australian rainforest trees from different latitudes to investigate possible differences in their response to atmospheric drought. Plants were grown in glasshouses under ambient or low VPD to determine the effect of growth VPD on the photosynthetic response. Temperate species, which experience low summer precipitation, were found to maintain maximum net photosynthesis over the measurement range of VPD (0.5-1.9 kPa). In contrast, the tropical species from climates with high summer precipitation showed large reductions in net photosynthesis with increasing VPD. Temperate species showed higher intrinsic water-use efficiencies under low VPD than the tropical species, whereas their efficiencies were similar under high VPD. Growing plants under a low VPD had little effect on either the photosynthetic response to VPD or the intrinsic water-use efficiency of the species. These different responses of gas exchange to VPD shown by the tropical and temperate rainforest species may reflect different strategies to maximise productivity in their respective climates.

  6. Plant Photosynthetic Responses During Insect Effector-Triggered Plant Susceptibility and Immunity.

    PubMed

    Gramig, Greta G; Harris, Marion O

    2015-06-01

    Gall-inducing insects are known for altering source-sink relationships within plants. Changes in photosynthesis may contribute to this phenomenon. We investigated photosynthetic responses in wheat [Triticum aestivum L. (Poaceae: Triticeae)] seedlings attacked by the Hessian fly [Mayetiola destructor (Say) (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae], which uses a salivary effector-based strategy to induce a gall nutritive tissue in susceptible plants. Resistant plants have surveillance systems mediated by products of Resistance (R) genes. Detection of a specific salivary effector triggers downstream responses that result in a resistance that kills neonate larvae. A 2 × 2 factorial design was used to study maximum leaf photosynthetic assimilation and stomatal conductance rates. The plant treatments were-resistant or susceptible wheat lines expressing or not expressing the H13 resistance gene. The insect treatments were-no attack (control) or attack by larvae killed by H13 gene-mediated resistance. Photosynthesis was measured for the second and third leaves of the seedling, the latter being the only leaf directly attacked by larvae. We predicted effector-based attack would trigger increases in photosynthetic rates in susceptible but not resistant plants. For susceptible plants, attack was associated with increases (relative to controls) in photosynthesis for the third but not the second leaf. For resistant plants, attack was associated with increases in photosynthesis for both the second and third leaves. Mechanisms underlying the increases appeared to differ. Resistant plants exhibited responses suggesting altered source-sink relationships. Susceptible plants exhibited responses suggesting a mechanism other than altered source-sink relationships, possibly changes in water relations that contributed to increased stomatal conductance.

  7. Changes in ultrastructure and responses of antioxidant systems of algae (Dunaliella salina) during acclimation to enhanced ultraviolet-B radiation.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jiyuan; Yu, Juan

    2009-12-02

    Because of depletion of the stratospheric ozone layer, levels of solar ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation (280-315 nm), which penetrates the water column to an ecologically-significant depth, are increasing. In order to assess changes in ultrastructure and responses of antioxidant systems of algae during acclimation to enhanced ultraviolet-B radiation, Dunaliella salina was treated with higher dose of UV-B radiation (13.2 kJm(-2) d(-1) dose) in this study. As compared to the control panel (8.8 kJm(-2) d(-1)), the treatment D. salina had many changes in ultrastructures: (1) thylakoids became swelled, and some of them penetrated into the pyrenoid; (2) lipid globules accumulated; (3) the amounts of starch grains increased; (4) cristae of mitochondria disintegrated; (5) inclusions in vacuoles reduced; and (6) cisternae of Golgi dictyosomes became loose and swollen. Enhanced UV-B irradiation also induced different responses of the antioxidant systems in D. salina: (1) contents of TBARS (thiobarbituric acid reacting substance) and H(2)O(2) increased significantly (p<0.05); (2) levels of MAAs (mycosporine-like amino acids) increased at the beginning and subsequently decreased, and finally they leveled off at lower values; (3) there were not apparent variations for carotenoid contents, and contents of chlorophyll a presented a trend of initial increase and ultimate decrease; (4) both ascorbate and glutathione contents increased significantly (p<0.05); and (5) for the enzyme activities, POD activities increased remarkably (p<0.05), and SOD activities declined apparently (p<0.05), and CAT activity in D. salina had slight variations (p>0.05). In addition, growth curve displayed that enhanced UV-B radiation prominently inhibited increase of cell concentration when compared with control panel (p<0.05). Our results indicated that enhanced UV-B radiation caused ultrastructural changes of D. salina and induced different responses of antioxidant systems in D. salina.

  8. Leaf cold acclimation and freezing injury in C3 and C4 grasses of the Mongolian Plateau

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Mei-Zhen; Osborne, Colin P.

    2008-01-01

    The scarcity of C4 plants in cool climates is usually attributed to their lower photosynthetic efficiency than C3 species at low temperatures. However, a lower freezing resistance may also decrease the competitive advantage of C4 plants by reducing canopy duration, especially in continental steppe grasslands, where a short, hot growing season is bracketed by frost events. This paper reports an experimental test of the hypothesis that cold acclimation is negligible in C4 grasses, leading to greater frost damage than in C3 species. The experiments exposed six C3 and three C4 Mongolian steppe grasses to 20 d chilling or control pre-treatments, followed by a high-light freezing event. Leaf resistance to freezing injury was independent of photosynthetic type. Three C3 species showed constitutive freezing resistance characterized by <20% leaf mortality, associated with high photosynthetic carbon fixation and electron transport rates and low leaf osmotic potential. One freezing-sensitive C4 species showed the expected pattern of chilling-induced damage to photosynthesis and >95% leaf mortality after the freezing event. However, three C3 and two C4 species displayed a cold acclimation response, showing significant decreases in osmotic potential and photosynthesis after exposure to chilling, and a 30–72% reduction of leaf freezing injury. This result suggested that down-regulation of osmotic potential may be involved in the cold acclimation process, and demonstrated that there is no inherent barrier to the development of cold acclimation in C4 species from this ecosystem. Cold acclimation via osmoregulation represents a previously undescribed mechanism to explain the persistence of C4 plants in cool climates. PMID:18980952

  9. Thermal Acclimation of Respiration and Photosynthesis in the Marine Macroalga Gracilaria lemaneiformis (Gracilariales, Rhodophyta).

    PubMed

    Zou, Dinghui; Gao, Kunshan

    2013-02-01

    The responses of respiration and photosynthesis to temperature fluctuations in marine macroalgae have the potential to significantly affect coastal carbon fluxes and sequestration. In this study, the marine red macroalga Gracilaria lemaneiformis was cultured at three different temperatures (12, 19, and 26°C) and at high- and low-nitrogen (N) availability, to investigate the acclimation potential of respiration and photosynthesis to temperature change. Measurements of respiratory and photosynthetic rates were made at five temperatures (7°C-33°C). An instantaneous change in temperature resulted in a change in the rates of respiration and photosynthesis, and the temperature sensitivities (i.e., the Q10 value) for both the metabolic processes were lower in 26°C-grown algae than 12°C- or 19°C-grown algae. Both respiration and photosynthesis acclimated to long-term changes in temperature, irrespective of the N availability under which the algae were grown; respiration displayed strong acclimation, whereas photosynthesis only exhibited a partial acclimation response to changing growth temperatures. The ratio of respiration to gross photosynthesis was higher in 12°C-grown algae, but displayed little difference between the algae grown at 19°C and 26°C. We propose that it is unlikely that respiration in G. lemaneiformis would increase significantly with global warming, although photosynthesis would increase at moderately elevated temperatures.

  10. Implications of plant acclimation for future climate-carbon cycle feedbacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercado, Lina; Kattge, Jens; Cox, Peter; Sitch, Stephen; Knorr, Wolfgang; Lloyd, Jon; Huntingford, Chris

    2010-05-01

    The response of land ecosystems to climate change and associated feedbacks are a key uncertainty in future climate prediction (Friedlingstein et al. 2006). However global models generally do not account for the acclimation of plant physiological processes to increased temperatures. Here we conduct a first global sensitivity study whereby we modify the Joint UK land Environment Simulator (JULES) to account for temperature acclimation of two main photosynthetic parameters, Vcmax and Jmax (Kattge and Knorr 2007) and plant respiration (Atkin and Tjoelker 2003). The model is then applied over the 21st Century within the IMOGEN framework (Huntingford et al. 2004). Model simulations will provide new and improved projections of biogeochemical cycling, forest resilience, and thus more accurate projections of climate-carbon cycle feedbacks and the future evolution of the Earth System. Friedlingstein P, Cox PM, Betts R et al. (2006) Climate-carbon cycle feedback analysis, results from the C4MIP model intercomparison. Journal of Climate, 19, 3337-3353. Kattge J and Knorr W (2007): Temperature acclimation in a biochemical model of photosynthesis: a reanalysis of data from 36 species. Plant, Cell and Environment 30, 1176-1190 Atkin O.K and Tjoelker, M. G. (2003): Thermal acclimation and the dynamic response of plant respiration to temperature. Trends in Plant Science 8 (7), 343-351 Huntingford C, et al. (2004) Using a GCM analogue model to investigate the potential for Amazonian forest dieback. Theoretical and Applied Climatology, 78, 177-185.

  11. Growth and photosynthetic responses to salinity of the salt-marsh shrub Atriplex portulacoides.

    PubMed

    Redondo-Gómez, Susana; Mateos-Naranjo, Enrique; Davy, Anthony J; Fernández-Muñoz, Francisco; Castellanos, Eloy M; Luque, Teresa; Figueroa, M Enrique

    2007-09-01

    Atriplex (Halimione) portulacoides is a halophytic, C(3) shrub. It is virtually confined to coastal salt marshes, where it often dominates the vegetation. The aim of this study was to investigate its growth responses to salinity and the extent to which these could be explained by photosynthetic physiology. The responses of young plants to salinity in the range 0-700 mol m(-3) NaCl were investigated in a glasshouse experiment. The performance of plants was examined using classical growth analysis, measurements of gas exchange (infrared gas analysis), determination of chlorophyll fluorescence characteristics (modulated fluorimeter) and photosynthetic pigment concentrations; total ash, sodium, potassium and nitrogen concentrations, and relative water content were also determined. Plants accumulated Na(+) approximately in proportion to external salinity. Salt stimulated growth up to an external concentration of 200 mol m(-3) NaCl and some growth was maintained at higher salinities. The main determinant of growth response to salinity was unit leaf rate. This was itself reflected in rates of CO(2) assimilation, which were not affected by 200 mol m(-3) but were reduced at higher salinities. Reductions in net photosynthetic rate could be accounted for largely by lower stomatal conductance and intercellular CO(2) concentration. Apart from possible effects of osmotic shock at the beginning of the experiment, salinity did not have any adverse effect on photosystem II (PSII). Neither the quantum efficiency of PSII (Phi(PSII)) nor the chlorophyll fluorescence ratio (F(v)/F(m)) were reduced by salinity, and lower mid-day values recovered by dawn. Mid-day F(v)/F(m) was in fact depressed more at low external sodium concentration, by the end of the experiment. The growth responses of the hygro-halophyte A. portulacoides to salinity appear largely to depend on changes in its rate of photosynthetic gas exchange. Photosynthesis appears to be limited mainly through stomatal conductance

  12. RNA-seq reveals a diminished acclimation response to the combined effects of ocean acidification and elevated seawater temperature in Pagothenia borchgrevinki.

    PubMed

    Huth, Troy J; Place, Sean P

    2016-08-01

    The IPCC has reasserted the strong influence of anthropogenic CO2 contributions on global climate change and highlighted the polar-regions as highly vulnerable. With these predictions the cold adapted fauna endemic to the Southern Ocean, which is dominated by fishes of the sub-order Notothenioidei, will face considerable challenges in the near future. Recent physiological studies have demonstrated that the synergistic stressors of elevated temperature and ocean acidification have a considerable, although variable, impact on notothenioid fishes. The present study explored the transcriptomic response of Pagothenia borchgrevinki to increased temperatures and pCO2 after 7, 28 and 56days of acclimation. We compared this response to short term studies assessing heat stress alone and foretell the potential impacts of these stressors on P. borchgrevinki's ability to survive a changing Southern Ocean. P. borchgrevinki did demonstrate a coordinated stress response to the dual-stressor condition, and even indicated that some level of inducible heat shock response may be conserved in this notothenioid species. However, the stress response of P. borchgrevinki was considerably less robust than that observed previously in the closely related notothenioid, Trematomus bernacchii, and varied considerably when compared across different acclimation time-points. Furthermore, the molecular response of these fish under multiple stressors displayed distinct differences compared to their response to short term heat stress alone. When exposed to increased sea surface temperatures, combined with ocean acidification, P. borchgrevinki demonstrated a coordinated stress response that has already peaked by 7days of acclimation and quickly diminished over time. However, this response is less dramatic than other closely related notothenioids under identical conditions, supporting previous research suggesting that this notothenioid species is less sensitive to environmental variation. Copyright

  13. Minor loading vein acclimation for three Arabidopsis thaliana ecotypes in response to growth under different temperature and light regimes

    PubMed Central

    Cohu, Christopher M.; Muller, Onno; Demmig-Adams, Barbara; Adams, William W.

    2013-01-01

    In light of the important role of foliar phloem as the nexus between energy acquisition through photosynthesis and distribution of the products of photosynthesis to the rest of the plant, as well as communication between the whole plant and its leaves, we examined whether foliar minor loading veins in three Arabidopsis thaliana ecotypes undergo acclimation to the growth environment. As a winter annual exhibiting higher rates of photosynthesis in response to cooler vs. warmer temperatures, this species might be expected to adjust the structure of its phloem to accommodate greater fluxes of sugars in response to growth at low temperature. Minor (fourth- and third-order) veins had 14 or fewer sieve elements and phloem tissue comprised 50% or more of the cross-sectional area. The number of phloem cells per minor loading vein was greater in leaves grown under cool temperature and high light vs. warm temperature and moderate light. This effect was greatest in an ecotype from Sweden, in which growth under cool temperature and high light resulted in minor veins with an even greater emphasis on phloem (50% more phloem cells with more than 100% greater cross-sectional area of phloem) compared to growth under warm temperature and moderate light. Likewise, the number of sieve elements per minor vein increased linearly with growth temperature under moderate light, almost doubling over a 27°C temperature range (21°C leaf temperature range) in the Swedish ecotype. Increased emphasis on cells involved in sugar loading and transport may be critical for maintaining sugar export from leaves of an overwintering annual such as A. thaliana, and particularly for the ecotype from the northern-most population experiencing the lowest temperatures. PMID:23847643

  14. Photosynthetic responses of Emiliania huxleyi to UV radiation and elevated temperature: roles of calcified coccoliths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, K.; Gao, K.; Villafañe, V. E.; Helbling, E. W.

    2011-06-01

    Changes in calcification of coccolithophores may affect their photosynthetic responses to both, ultraviolet radiation (UVR, 280-400 nm) and temperature. We operated semi-continuous cultures of Emiliania huxleyi (strain CS-369) at reduced (0.1 mM, LCa) and ambient (10 mM, HCa) Ca2+ concentrations and, after 148 generations, we exposed cells to six radiation treatments (>280, >295, >305, >320, >350 and >395 nm by using Schott filters) and two temperatures (20 and 25 °C) to examine photosynthesis and calcification responses. Overall, our study demonstrated that: (1) decreased calcification resulted in a down regulation of photoprotective mechanisms (i.e., as estimated via non-photochemical quenching, NPQ), pigments contents and photosynthetic carbon fixation; (2) calcification (C) and photosynthesis (P) (as well as their ratio) have different responses related to UVR with cells grown under the high Ca2+ concentration being more resistant to UVR than those grown under the low Ca2+ level; (3) elevated temperature increased photosynthesis and calcification of E. huxleyi grown at high Ca2+ concentrations whereas decreased both processes in low Ca2+ grown cells. Therefore, a decrease in calcification rates in E. huxleyi is expected to decrease photosynthesis rates, resulting in a negative feedback that further reduces calcification.

  15. Decreased calcification affects photosynthetic responses of Emiliania huxleyi exposed to UV radiation and elevated temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, K.; Gao, K.; Villafañe, V. E.; Helbling, E. W.

    2011-02-01

    Changes in calcification of coccolithophores may affect their photosynthetic responses to both, ultraviolet radiation (UVR, 280-400 nm) and temperature. We operated semi-continuous cultures of Emiliania huxleyi (strain CS-369) at reduced (0.1 mM, LCa) and ambient (10 mM, HCa) Ca2+ concentrations and, after 148 generations, we exposed cells to six radiation treatments (>280, >295, >305, >320, >350 and >395 nm by using Schott filters) and two temperatures (20 and 25 °C) to examine photosynthesis and calcification responses. Overall, our study has demonstrated that: (1) decreased calcification resulted in a down regulation of photoprotective mechanisms (i.e., as estimated via non-photochemical quenching, NPQ), pigment contents and photosynthetic carbon fixation; (2) Calcification (C) and photosynthesis (P) (as well as their ratio) have different responses related to UVR with cells grown under the high Ca2+ concentration having a better performance as compared to those grown under the low Ca2+ level; (3) elevated temperature increased photosynthesis and calcification of E. huxleyi grown at high Ca2+ concentrations whereas the opposite was observed in low Ca2+ grown cells. Therefore, a decrease in calcification rates in E. huxleyi is expected to decrease photosynthesis rates and producing also a negative feedback, further reducing calcification.

  16. Molecular and Physiological Analysis of Drought Stress in Arabidopsis Reveals Early Responses Leading to Acclimation in Plant Growth1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Harb, Amal; Krishnan, Arjun; Ambavaram, Madana M.R.; Pereira, Andy

    2010-01-01

    Plant drought stress response and resistance are complex biological processes that need to be analyzed at a systems level using genomics and physiological approaches to dissect experimental models that address drought stresses encountered by crops in the field. Toward this goal, a controlled, sublethal, moderate drought (mDr) treatment system was developed in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) as a reproducible assay for the dissection of plant responses to drought. The drought assay was validated using Arabidopsis mutants in abscisic acid (ABA) biosynthesis and signaling displaying drought sensitivity and in jasmonate response mutants showing drought resistance, indicating the crucial role of ABA and jasmonate signaling in drought response and acclimation. A comparative transcriptome analysis of soil water deficit drought stress treatments revealed the similarity of early-stage mDr to progressive drought, identifying common and specific stress-responsive genes and their promoter cis-regulatory elements. The dissection of mDr stress responses using a time-course analysis of biochemical, physiological, and molecular processes revealed early accumulation of ABA and induction of associated signaling genes, coinciding with a decrease in stomatal conductance as an early avoidance response to drought stress. This is accompanied by a peak in the expression of expansin genes involved in cell wall expansion, as a preparatory step toward drought acclimation by the adjustment of the cell wall. The time-course analysis of mDr provides a model with three stages of plant responses: an early priming and preconditioning stage, followed by an intermediate stage preparatory for acclimation, and a late stage of new homeostasis with reduced growth. PMID:20807999

  17. Photosynthetic and physiological responses of native and exotic tidal woody seedlings to simulated tidal immersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Tonggui; Gu, Shenhua; Zhou, Hefeng; Wang, G. Geoff; Cheng, Xiangrong; Yu, Mukui

    2013-12-01

    Hibiscus hamabo, a native tidal woody species, and Myrica cerifera, an exotic tidal woody species, have been widely planted on coastal beaches in subtropical China. However, whether there are differences in physiological response and tolerance to immersion between the two tidal species is still unknown. Our objectives were to evaluate differences in the photosynthetic and physiological responses to tidal immersion for the two species in the context of sea level rise. With increasing immersion, net photosynthesis, stomatal conductance, intercellular CO2 concentration, and light saturation point declined progressively for both species, whereas dark respiration and light compensation point showed the reverse trend. Lower variation was observed in H. hamabo than in M. cerifera for each index in the same treatment. Photosynthetic ability and utilization of light, especially under high light intensity, decreased for both species. Leaf soluble sugar and protein contents, and glycolate oxidase activity first increased and then decreased with increasing of immersion degree, with the higher values observed in the W4 (4 h duration, 15 cm depth) and W6 (6 h duration, 25 cm depth) treatments for H. hamabo, and W2 (2 h duration, 5 cm depth) and W4 treatments for M. cerifera. These findings indicate that H. hamabo has a better ability to keep the reduction of photosynthesis at a minimum through soluble substance regulated osmotic potential and avoiding excess light damage to the photosynthetic system through increased photorespiration, heat dissipation, chlorophyll fluorescence. Our results suggest that H. hamabo is more tolerant to tidal immersion than M. cerifera, and therefore it is better adapted to the anticipated sea level rise in future.

  18. Signal transduction during light-quality acclimation in cyanobacteria: a model system for understanding phytochrome-response pathways in prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Stowe-Evans, Emily L; Kehoe, David M

    2004-06-01

    The colorful process of complementary chromatic adaptation (CCA), in which cyanobacteria dramatically alter their pigmentation in response to ambient light color changes, has intrigued scientists for more than a century. Over the past four decades, intensive research on the model organism Fremyella diplosiphon has revealed many details of the photobiology and molecular biology of this process, which includes restructuring of these organism's photosynthetic light-harvesting antennae, called phycobilisomes. This restructuring involves changes in transcription of genes encoding phycobilisome components. These genes have been cloned and their patterns of light-responsive expression characterized. In the past ten years, attention has focused on the signal transduction mechanism(s) through which cyanobacteria sense and respond to changes in ambient light color. Genetic approaches led to the isolation of signal transduction components that control light-color responses in F. diplosiphon. Several of these appear to be within a complex phosphorelay that is in part controlled by a photoreceptor called RcaE, the founding member of a large, novel class of prokaryotic photoreceptors with similarity to both plant phytochrome photoreceptors and sensor histidine kinases. The strong foundation of knowledge provided by years of research on CCA makes this a powerful model system for studying signal transduction systems controlled by prokaryotic phytochromes. In this regard, recent results demonstrate that multiple light sensing systems control this organism's responses to changes in light quality and that large numbers of genes are differentially regulated during this process.

  19. UV-B Perception and Acclimation in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Chappuis, Richard; Allorent, Guillaume

    2016-01-01

    Plants perceive UV-B, an intrinsic component of sunlight, via a signaling pathway that is mediated by the photoreceptor UV RESISTANCE LOCUS8 (UVR8) and induces UV-B acclimation. To test whether similar UV-B perception mechanisms exist in the evolutionarily distant green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, we identified Chlamydomonas orthologs of UVR8 and the key signaling factor CONSTITUTIVELY PHOTOMORPHOGENIC1 (COP1). Cr-UVR8 shares sequence and structural similarity to Arabidopsis thaliana UVR8, has conserved tryptophan residues for UV-B photoreception, monomerizes upon UV-B exposure, and interacts with Cr-COP1 in a UV-B-dependent manner. Moreover, Cr-UVR8 can interact with At-COP1 and complement the Arabidopsis uvr8 mutant, demonstrating that it is a functional UV-B photoreceptor. Chlamydomonas shows apparent UV-B acclimation in colony survival and photosynthetic efficiency assays. UV-B exposure, at low levels that induce acclimation, led to broad changes in the Chlamydomonas transcriptome, including in genes related to photosynthesis. Impaired UV-B-induced activation in the Cr-COP1 mutant hit1 indicates that UVR8-COP1 signaling induces transcriptome changes in response to UV-B. Also, hit1 mutants are impaired in UV-B acclimation. Chlamydomonas UV-B acclimation preserved the photosystem II core proteins D1 and D2 under UV-B stress, which mitigated UV-B-induced photoinhibition. These findings highlight the early evolution of UVR8 photoreceptor signaling in the green lineage to induce UV-B acclimation and protection. PMID:27020958

  20. Longleaf pine photosynthetic response to soil resource availability and elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Runion, G.B.; Mitchell, R.J.; Green, T.H.; Prior, S.A.; Rogers, H.H.; Gjerstad, D.H.

    1999-05-01

    Gas exchange responses during a drought cycle were studied in longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.) seedlings after prolonged exposure to varying levels of atmospheric CO{sub 2} soil N and water. Elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration increased photosynthesis, tended to decrease stomatal conductance, and increased water-use efficiency (WUE). Although soil resource availability influences gas exchange measurements, it generally did not affect the magnitude or direction of the response to CO{sub 2} concentration. However, significant interactions among treatment variables were observed for plant xylem pressure potential. In seedlings grown with high N, a positive growth response to elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2} increased whole-plant water use resulting in more severe plant water stress, despite increased leaf-level WUE; however, under low N conditions the lack of a growth response to elevated CO{sub 2} reduced whole-plant water use, decreased water stress severity, and increased WUE. Photosynthetic response to CO{sub 2} was greatest in the high N treatment at the beginning of the drought cycle, but diminished as water stress increased; however, plants grown with low N showed greater photosynthetic responses to CO{sub 2} later in the drought cycle. Therefore, plant gas exchange rates interact with growth response in determining the severity of water stress under drought and, thus, the ability of elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2} to ameliorate the effects of drought and allow plants to maintain increased rates of photosynthesis may be influenced by the availability of other resources, such as N and water.

  1. Shade affects responses to drought and flooding - acclimation to multiple stresses in bittersweet (Solanum dulcamara L.).

    PubMed

    Visser, E J W; Zhang, Q; De Gruyter, F; Martens, S; Huber, H

    2016-01-01

    Plants exposed to environmental stress often respond by a change in their phenotypic traits. These changes in trait expression may alleviate the negative effect of such stress factors. However, if multiple stresses are present, responses are likely to be less predictable and hence do not necessarily correlate to plant performance. This study tested if this expectation was true, by subjecting Solanum dulcamara plants to various simultaneous stress factors. Plants were grown in well-watered conditions, drought or flooding, and exposed to either full light or shade for 4 weeks. Shoot and root biomass, stem morphological parameters, such as height, number of nodes and length of stem internodes, and leaf traits like length, specific leaf area, chlorophyll content and stomatal conductance were determined. Both variation in light and in water availability typically caused slower growth, and resulted in distinct phenotypic changes in stem, leaf and root traits. However, effects of stresses on the expression of traits were not always additive. Instead, some combined stress responses (e.g. leaf size) appeared to be limited by physical or physiological constraints, whereas other responses were opposite to each other (e.g. root:shoot ratio), resulting in an intermediate phenotype in the combined stress treatment. These data suggest that in natural conditions, where combined stress factors are likely to be present, the optimal phenotype may not necessarily be expressed. Responses of plants to multiple stress factors may therefore not be associated with immediate advantages in terms of increased performance.

  2. The oxidative stress response in freshwater-acclimated killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) to acute copper and hypoxia exposure.

    PubMed

    Ransberry, Victoria E; Blewett, Tamzin A; McClelland, Grant B

    2016-01-01

    Aquatic organisms face multiple stressors in natural ecosystems. Here we examine the effects of moderate hypoxia and low-level copper (Cu) on freshwater (FW)-acclimated killifish. Both Cu and hypoxia can affect oxidative stress in fish, but it is unclear if in combination these two stressors would act synergistically. We exposed killifish for 96h to Cu in normoxia (total 23.4±0.9μg CuL(-1)), or either no Cu (2.33±0.01mg O2 L(-1)) or with Cu in hypoxia (23.6±0.8μg Cu L(-1); 2.51±0.04mg O2 L(-1)), and compared them to normoxic controls with no added Cu (0.7±0.1μg Cu L(-1); 9.10±0.00mg O2 L(-1)) at a hardness of 140mgL(-1) as CaCO3 equivalents. Gills showed significant Cu accumulation with both excess waterborne Cu in normoxia and in hypoxia. This was accompanied by increases in gill catalase (CAT) activity but with no significant changes in either protein carbonyls or lipid peroxidation (TBARS). Hypoxia alone decreased gill protein carbonyls. Liver showed no change in Cu load, but a significant decline in CAT activity occurred with Cu in normoxia. Liver showed an increase in TBARS with Cu in normoxia. Cu when combined with hypoxia caused a significant decline in cytochrome c oxidase (COX) and citrate synthase (CS) activity in gill and liver. Thus, low waterborne levels of Cu and moderate hypoxia both affected gill and liver phenotypes. However, killifish are tolerant of Cu and hypoxia, and there was no evidence of a synergistic response to exposure to the two stressors combined compared to each stressor alone.

  3. Detection of photosynthetic responses of cool-temperate forests following extreme climate events using Bayesian inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toda, M.; Knohl, A.; Herbst, M.; Keenan, T. F.; Yokozawa, M.

    2016-12-01

    The increase in extreme climate events associated with ongoing global warming may create severe damage to terrestrial ecosystems, changing plant structure and the eco-physiological functions that regulate ecosystem carbon exchange. However, most damage is usually due to moderate, rather than catastrophic, disturbances. The nature of plant functional responses to such disturbances, and the resulting effects on the terrestrial carbon cycle, remain poorly understood. To unravel the scientific question, tower-based eddy covariance data in the cool-temperate forests were used to constrain plant eco-physiological parameters in a persimoneous ecosystem model that may have affected carbon dynamics following extreme climate events using the statistic Bayesian inversion approach. In the present study, we raised two types of extreme events relevant for cool-temperate regions, i.e. a typhoon with mechanistic foliage destraction and a heat wave with severe drought. With appropriate evaluation of parameter and predictive uncertainties, the inversion analysis shows annual trajectory of activated photosynthetic responses following climate extremes compared the pre-disturbance state in each forest. We address that forests with moderate disturbance show substantial and rapid photosynthetic recovery, enhanced productivity, and, thus, ecosystem carbon exchange, although the effect of extreme climatic events varies depending on the stand successional phase and the type, intensity, timing and legacy of the disturbance.

  4. The acclimation of Chlorella to high-level nitrite for potential application in biological NOx removal from industrial flue gases.

    PubMed

    Li, Tianpei; Xu, Gang; Rong, Junfeng; Chen, Hui; He, Chenliu; Giordano, Mario; Wang, Qiang

    2016-05-20

    Nitrogen oxides (NOx) are the components of fossil flue gas that give rise to the greatest environmental concerns. This study evaluated the ability of the green algae Chlorella to acclimate to high level of NOx and the potential utilization of Chlorella strains in biological NOx removal (DeNOx) from industrial flue gases. Fifteen Chlorella strains were subject to high-level of nitrite (HN, 176.5 mmolL(-1) nitrite) to simulate exposure to high NOx. These strains were subsequently divided into four groups with respect to their ability to tolerate nitrite (excellent, good, fair, and poor). One strain from each group was selected to evaluate their photosynthetic response to HN condition, and the nitrite adaptability of the four Chlorella strains were further identified by using chlorophyll fluorescence. The outcome of our experiments shows that, although high concentrations of nitrite overall negatively affect growth and photosynthesis of Chlorella strains, the degree of nitrite tolerance is a strain-specific feature. Some Chlorella strains have an appreciably higher ability to acclimate to high-level of nitrite. Acclimation is achieved through a three-step process of restrict, acclimate, and thriving. Notably, Chlorella sp. C2 was found to have a high tolerance and to rapidly acclimate to high concentrations of nitrite; it is therefore a promising candidate for microalgae-based biological NOx removal.

  5. Time Course of Physiological and Psychological Responses in Humans during a 20-Day Severe-Cold–Acclimation Programme

    PubMed Central

    Brazaitis, Marius; Eimantas, Nerijus; Daniuseviciute, Laura; Baranauskiene, Neringa; Skrodeniene, Erika; Skurvydas, Albertas

    2014-01-01

    The time course of physiological and psychological markers during cold acclimation (CA) was explored. The experiment included 17 controlled (i.e., until the rectal temperature reached 35.5°C or 170 min had elapsed; for the CA-17 session, the subjects (n = 14) were immersed in water for the same amount of time as that used in the CA-1 session) head-out water immersions at a temperature of 14°C over 20 days. The data obtained in this study suggest that the subjects exhibited a thermoregulatory shift from peripheral-to-central to solely central input thermoregulation, as well as from shivering to non-shivering thermogenesis throughout the CA. In the first six CA sessions, a hypothermic type of acclimation was found; further CA (CA-7 to CA-16) led to a transitional shift to a hypothermic–insulative type of acclimation. Interestingly, when the subjects were immersed in water for the same time as that used in the CA-1 session (CA-17), the CA led to a hypothermic type of acclimation. The presence of a metabolic type of thermogenesis was evident only under thermoneutral conditions. Cold-water immersion decreased the concentration of cold-stress markers, reduced the activity of the innate immune system, suppressed specific immunity to a lesser degree and yielded less discomfort and cold sensation. We found a negative correlation between body mass index and Δ metabolic heat production before and after CA. PMID:24722189

  6. Efficient high light acclimation involves rapid processes at multiple mechanistic levels.

    PubMed

    Dietz, Karl-Josef

    2015-05-01

    Like no other chemical or physical parameter, the natural light environment of plants changes with high speed and jumps of enormous intensity. To cope with this variability, photosynthetic organisms have evolved sensing and response mechanisms that allow efficient acclimation. Most signals originate from the chloroplast itself. In addition to very fast photochemical regulation, intensive molecular communication is realized within the photosynthesizing cell, optimizing the acclimation process. Current research has opened up new perspectives on plausible but mostly unexpected complexity in signalling events, crosstalk, and process adjustments. Within seconds and minutes, redox states, levels of reactive oxygen species, metabolites, and hormones change and transmit information to the cytosol, modifying metabolic activity, gene expression, translation activity, and alternative splicing events. Signalling pathways on an intermediate time scale of several minutes to a few hours pave the way for long-term acclimation. Thereby, a new steady state of the transcriptome, proteome, and metabolism is realized within rather short time periods irrespective of the previous acclimation history to shade or sun conditions. This review provides a time line of events during six hours in the 'stressful' life of a plant.

  7. Phototaxis beyond turning: persistent accumulation and response acclimation of the microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Arrieta, Jorge; Barreira, Ana; Chioccioli, Maurizio; Polin, Marco; Tuval, Idan

    2017-06-14

    Phototaxis is an important reaction to light displayed by a wide range of motile microorganisms. Flagellated eukaryotic microalgae in particular, like the model organism Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, steer either towards or away from light by a rapid and precisely timed modulation of their flagellar activity. Cell steering, however, is only the beginning of a much longer process which ultimately allows cells to determine their light exposure history. This process is not well understood. Here we present a first quantitative study of the long timescale phototactic motility of Chlamydomonas at both single cell and population levels. Our results reveal that the phototactic strategy adopted by these microorganisms leads to an efficient exposure to light, and that the phototactic response is modulated over typical timescales of tens of seconds. The adaptation dynamics for phototaxis and chlorophyll fluorescence show a striking quantitative agreement, suggesting that photosynthesis controls quantitatively how cells navigate a light field.

  8. Low night temperature acclimation of Phalaenopsis.

    PubMed

    Pollet, Bruno; Vanhaecke, Lynn; Dambre, Pieter; Lootens, Peter; Steppe, Kathy

    2011-06-01

    The capability of Phalaenopsis to acclimate its photosynthetic capacity and metabolic activity to cool night temperature conditions is crucial for improving orchid production in terms of efficient greenhouse heating. The extent to which Phalaenopsis possesses acclimation potential and the mechanistic background of the metabolic processes involved, have, however, not been studied before. Plants were subjected to a direct and gradual shift from a day to night temperature regime of 28/28-28/16°C, the cold stress and cold acclimation treatment, respectively. In comparison with the cold stress treatment, the cold acclimation treatment led to a higher malate accumulation and a reduction in leaf net CO(2) uptake. Consistently, the contribution of respiratory CO(2) recycling to nocturnal malate synthesis was calculated to be 23.5 and 47.0% for the cold stress and cold acclimation treatment, respectively. Moreover, the lower levels of starch measured in the cold acclimated leaves confirmed the suggested enhanced respiratory CO(2) recycling, implying that Phalaenopsis CAM operation evolved towards CAM idling. It is, however, plausible that this adjustment was not an effect of the low night temperature per se but a consequence of cool-root induced drought stress. Apart from that, at the start of the photoperiod, membrane stability showed a depression which was directly counteracted by an increased generation of glucose, fructose and sucrose. From these observations, it can be concluded that the observed plasticity in CAM operation and metabolic flexibility may be recognized as important steps in the low night temperature acclimation of Phalaenopsis.

  9. Using Phenomic Analysis of Photosynthetic Function for Abiotic Stress Response Gene Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Rungrat, Tepsuda; Awlia, Mariam; Brown, Tim; Cheng, Riyan; Sirault, Xavier; Fajkus, Jiri; Trtilek, Martin; Furbank, Bob; Badger, Murray; Tester, Mark; Pogson, Barry J; Borevitz, Justin O; Wilson, Pip

    2016-01-01

    Monitoring the photosynthetic performance of plants is a major key to understanding how plants adapt to their growth conditions. Stress tolerance traits have a high genetic complexity as plants are constantly, and unavoidably, exposed to numerous stress factors, which limits their growth rates in the natural environment. Arabidopsis thaliana, with its broad genetic diversity and wide climatic range, has been shown to successfully adapt to stressful conditions to ensure the completion of its life cycle. As a result, A. thaliana has become a robust and renowned plant model system for studying natural variation and conducting gene discovery studies. Genome wide association studies (GWAS) in restructured populations combining natural and recombinant lines is a particularly effective way to identify the genetic basis of complex traits. As most abiotic stresses affect photosynthetic activity, chlorophyll fluorescence measurements are a potential phenotyping technique for monitoring plant performance under stress conditions. This review focuses on the use of chlorophyll fluorescence as a tool to study genetic variation underlying the stress tolerance responses to abiotic stress in A. thaliana. PMID:27695390

  10. Elevated carbon dioxide influences yield and photosynthetic responses of hydroponically-grown sweetpotato

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mortley, D.; Hill, J.; Loretan, P.; Bonsi, C.; Hill, W.; Hileman, D.; Terse, A.

    1996-01-01

    The response of 'TI-155' and 'Georgia Jet' sweetpotato cultivars to elevated CO2 concentrations of 400 (ambient), 750 and 1000 micromoles mol-1 were evaluated under controlled environment conditions using the nutrient film technique (NFT). Growth chamber conditions included photosynthetic photon flux (PPF) of 600 micromoles m-2 s-1, 14/10 light/dark period, and 70% +/- 5% RH. Plants were grown using a modified half-Hoagland nutrient solution with a pH range of 5.5-6.0 and an electrical conductivity of 0.12 S m-1. Gas exchange measurements were made using infrared gas analysis, an open-flow gas exchange system, and a controlled-climate cuvette. Photosynthetic (Pn) measurements were made at CO2 ranges of 50 to 1000 micromoles mol-1. Storage root yield/plant increased with CO2 up to 750 but declined at 1000 micromoles mol-1. Storage root dry matter (DM) and foliage dry weight increased with increasing CO2. Harvest index (HI) for both cultivars was highest at 750 micromoles mol-1. The PPF vs Pn curves were typical for C3 plants with saturation occurring at approximately 600 micromoles m-2 s-1. CO2 concentration did not significantly influence net Pn, transpiration, water-use-efficiency (WUE), and stomatal conductance. As measurement CO2 concentration increased, net Pn and WUE increased while transpiration and stomatal conductance decreased.

  11. Photosynthetic responses of Oryza sativa L. seedlings to cadmium stress: physiological, biochemical and ultrastructural analyses.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuwen; Jiang, Xiaohan; Li, Kang; Wu, Min; Zhang, Rufeng; Zhang, Lu; Chen, Guoxiang

    2014-04-01

    In the present study, photosynthetic responses induced by cadmium stress in chlorophyll biosynthesis, photochemical activities, the stability of thylakoid membranes chlorophyll-protein complexes and the chloroplast ultrastructure of the cereal crop Oryza sativa L. were characterized. Cadmium inhibited the biosynthesis of chlorophyll by interfering with activity of δ-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase in the rice seedlings. For the photochemical activities analyses, the extent of the decrease in photosystem II activity was much greater than that in the PS I activity. The variations in the chlorophyll a fluorescence parameters also indicated that cadmium toxicity drastically affected the photochemistry of PS II. Biochemical analyses by BN-PAGE and protein immunoblot showed that cadmium toxicity considerably affected the stability of PS II-core, cytb 6 /f, RuBisCO, PSI + LHCI and LHCII (Trimeric). We observed the rate of the thylakoid membranes protein degradation, was mainly at the level of RbcL, PsaA, Lhca1 and D1. In addition, the damages to chloroplast structure and thylakoid stacking analyzed by transmission electron microscopy were indicative of general disarray in the photosynthetic functions exerted by cadmium toxicity. These results are valuable for understanding the biological consequences of heavy metals contamination particularly in soils devoted to organic agriculture.

  12. Elevated carbon dioxide influences yield and photosynthetic responses of hydroponically-grown sweetpotato

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mortley, D.; Hill, J.; Loretan, P.; Bonsi, C.; Hill, W.; Hileman, D.; Terse, A.

    1996-01-01

    The response of 'TI-155' and 'Georgia Jet' sweetpotato cultivars to elevated CO2 concentrations of 400 (ambient), 750 and 1000 micromoles mol-1 were evaluated under controlled environment conditions using the nutrient film technique (NFT). Growth chamber conditions included photosynthetic photon flux (PPF) of 600 micromoles m-2 s-1, 14/10 light/dark period, and 70% +/- 5% RH. Plants were grown using a modified half-Hoagland nutrient solution with a pH range of 5.5-6.0 and an electrical conductivity of 0.12 S m-1. Gas exchange measurements were made using infrared gas analysis, an open-flow gas exchange system, and a controlled-climate cuvette. Photosynthetic (Pn) measurements were made at CO2 ranges of 50 to 1000 micromoles mol-1. Storage root yield/plant increased with CO2 up to 750 but declined at 1000 micromoles mol-1. Storage root dry matter (DM) and foliage dry weight increased with increasing CO2. Harvest index (HI) for both cultivars was highest at 750 micromoles mol-1. The PPF vs Pn curves were typical for C3 plants with saturation occurring at approximately 600 micromoles m-2 s-1. CO2 concentration did not significantly influence net Pn, transpiration, water-use-efficiency (WUE), and stomatal conductance. As measurement CO2 concentration increased, net Pn and WUE increased while transpiration and stomatal conductance decreased.

  13. Elevated carbon dioxide influences yield and photosynthetic responses of hydroponically-grown [correction of glown] sweetpotato.

    PubMed

    Mortley, D; Hill, J; Loretan, P; Bonsi, C; Hill, W; Hileman, D; Terse, A

    1996-12-01

    The response of 'TI-155' and 'Georgia Jet' sweetpotato cultivars to elevated CO2 concentrations of 400 (ambient), 750 and 1000 micromoles mol-1 were evaluated under controlled environment conditions using the nutrient film technique (NFT). Growth chamber conditions included photosynthetic photon flux (PPF) of 600 micromoles m-2 s-1, 14/10 light/dark period, and 70% +/- 5% RH. Plants were grown using a modified half-Hoagland nutrient solution with a pH range of 5.5-6.0 and an electrical conductivity of 0.12 S m-1. Gas exchange measurements were made using infrared gas analysis, an open-flow gas exchange system, and a controlled-climate cuvette. Photosynthetic (Pn) measurements were made at CO2 ranges of 50 to 1000 micromoles mol-1. Storage root yield/plant increased with CO2 up to 750 but declined at 1000 micromoles mol-1. Storage root dry matter (DM) and foliage dry weight increased with increasing CO2. Harvest index (HI) for both cultivars was highest at 750 micromoles mol-1. The PPF vs Pn curves were typical for C3 plants with saturation occurring at approximately 600 micromoles m-2 s-1. CO2 concentration did not significantly influence net Pn, transpiration, water-use-efficiency (WUE), and stomatal conductance. As measurement CO2 concentration increased, net Pn and WUE increased while transpiration and stomatal conductance decreased.

  14. The emission factor of volatile isoprenoids: stress, acclimation, and developmental responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niinemets, Ü.; Arneth, A.; Kuhn, U.; Monson, R. K.; Peñuelas, J.; Staudt, M.

    2010-03-01

    Volatile isoprenoid emission rate from plants is driven by plant emission capacity under specified environmental conditions (ES, the emission factor) and by responsiveness of the emissions to instantaneous variations in environment. In models of isoprenoid emission, ES has been often considered as intrinsic species-specific constant invariable in time and space. Here we analyze the variations in species-specific values of ES under field conditions focusing on biotic and abiotic stresses, past environmental conditions and developmental processes. The reviewed studies highlight strong stress-driven (effects of abiotic and biotic stresses), adaptive (previous temperature and light environment and growth CO2 concentration) and developmental (leaf age) variations in ES values. These biological factors can alter species-specific ES values by more than an order of magnitude. Recent models are including some of these biological sources of variation to some degree, while the majority of models based on early concepts still ignore these important sources of variation. This analysis emphasizes the need to include more biological realism in the isoprenoid emission models and also highlights the gaps in knowledge that require further experimental work for mechanistic consideration of ES variation in models.

  15. The emission factor of volatile isoprenoids: stress, acclimation, and developmental responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niinemets, Ü.; Arneth, A.; Kuhn, U.; Monson, R. K.; Peñuelas, J.; Staudt, M.

    2010-07-01

    The rate of constitutive isoprenoid emissions from plants is driven by plant emission capacity under specified environmental conditions (ES, the emission factor) and by responsiveness of the emissions to instantaneous variations in environment. In models of isoprenoid emission, ES has been often considered as intrinsic species-specific constant invariable in time and space. Here we analyze the variations in species-specific values of ES under field conditions focusing on abiotic stresses, past environmental conditions and developmental processes. The reviewed studies highlight strong stress-driven, adaptive (previous temperature and light environment and growth CO2 concentration) and developmental (leaf age) variations in ES values operating at medium to long time scales. These biological factors can alter species-specific ES values by more than an order of magnitude. While the majority of models based on early concepts still ignore these important sources of variation, recent models are including some of the medium- to long-term controls. However, conceptually different strategies are being used for incorporation of these longer-term controls with important practical implications for parameterization and application of these models. This analysis emphasizes the need to include more biological realism in the isoprenoid emission models and also highlights the gaps in knowledge that require further experimental work to reduce the model uncertainties associated with biological sources of variation.

  16. Photosynthetic Responses of Plant Communities to Sand Burial on the Machair Dune Systems of the Outer Hebrides, Scotland

    PubMed Central

    KENT, MARTIN; OWEN, NIA W.; DALE, M. PAMELA

    2005-01-01

    • Background and Aims The effects of both short-term (2 weeks) and long-term (6 weeks) burial on the photosynthetic efficiency of four typical plant sub-communities of the machair sand dunes of the Outer Hebrides are described. Previous studies have examined the photosynthetic responses on individual species rather than the response at the community level. • Methods Three replicate turves from four different sub-community types (foredune grassland, dune slack, three-year fallow and unploughed grassland) were subjected to short- and long-term burial treatments after acclimatisation in an unheated greenhouse for approximately 10 weeks. Three replicate control turves from each sub-community were left unburied. After treatment, photosynthetic rate was measured at 16–20 h and 40–44 h after re-exposure, using an infra-red gas analyser, with standardization by total leaf area for each turf. Effects of sub-community type, burial duration and time since re-exposure were analysed by 3-factor split-plot analysis of variance (ANOVA) with repeated measures for time since re-exposure in the subplots. • Key Results Buried turves were characterized by a low dark respiration rate, which may represent a maintenance response to burial. After removal of sand, each machair sub-community showed some capacity for an elastic photosynthetic response. There were no differences between the effects of short- and long-term burial on the photosynthetic efficiency of machair vegetation, although turves buried for 6 weeks generally attained photosynthetic rates approaching those of control rates sooner than turves buried for 2 weeks. Photosynthetic responses to burial varied between sub-communities, with the slack turves exhibiting the poorest capacity for recovery within the investigated 44-h period. • Conclusions In the machair environment, the ability to maintain photosynthetic equipment whilst buried, and the ability to bring about a relatively rapid reinstatement of

  17. Submergence-induced morphological, anatomical, and biochemical responses in a terrestrial species affect gas diffusion resistance and photosynthetic performance.

    PubMed

    Mommer, Liesje; Pons, Thijs L; Wolters-Arts, Mieke; Venema, Jan Henk; Visser, Eric J W

    2005-09-01

    Gas exchange between the plant and the environment is severely hampered when plants are submerged, leading to oxygen and energy deficits. A straightforward way to reduce these shortages of oxygen and carbohydrates would be continued photosynthesis under water, but this possibility has received only little attention. Here, we combine several techniques to investigate the consequences of anatomical and biochemical responses of the terrestrial species Rumex palustris to submergence for different aspects of photosynthesis under water. The orientation of the chloroplasts in submergence-acclimated leaves was toward the epidermis instead of the intercellular spaces, indicating that underwater CO(2) diffuses through the cuticle and epidermis. Interestingly, both the cuticle thickness and the epidermal cell wall thickness were significantly reduced upon submergence, suggesting a considerable decrease in diffusion resistance. This decrease in diffusion resistance greatly facilitated underwater photosynthesis, as indicated by higher underwater photosynthesis rates in submergence-acclimated leaves at all CO(2) concentrations investigated. The increased availability of internal CO(2) in these "aquatic" leaves reduced photorespiration, and furthermore reduced excitation pressure of the electron transport system and, thus, the risk of photodamage. Acclimation to submergence also altered photosynthesis biochemistry as reduced Rubisco contents were observed in aquatic leaves, indicating a lower carboxylation capacity. Electron transport capacity was also reduced in these leaves but not as strongly as the reduction in Rubisco, indicating a substantial increase of the ratio between electron transport and carboxylation capacity upon submergence. This novel finding suggests that this ratio may be less conservative than previously thought.

  18. Submergence-Induced Morphological, Anatomical, and Biochemical Responses in a Terrestrial Species Affect Gas Diffusion Resistance and Photosynthetic Performance

    PubMed Central

    Mommer, Liesje; Pons, Thijs L.; Wolters-Arts, Mieke; Venema, Jan Henk; Visser, Eric J.W.

    2005-01-01

    Gas exchange between the plant and the environment is severely hampered when plants are submerged, leading to oxygen and energy deficits. A straightforward way to reduce these shortages of oxygen and carbohydrates would be continued photosynthesis under water, but this possibility has received only little attention. Here, we combine several techniques to investigate the consequences of anatomical and biochemical responses of the terrestrial species Rumex palustris to submergence for different aspects of photosynthesis under water. The orientation of the chloroplasts in submergence-acclimated leaves was toward the epidermis instead of the intercellular spaces, indicating that underwater CO2 diffuses through the cuticle and epidermis. Interestingly, both the cuticle thickness and the epidermal cell wall thickness were significantly reduced upon submergence, suggesting a considerable decrease in diffusion resistance. This decrease in diffusion resistance greatly facilitated underwater photosynthesis, as indicated by higher underwater photosynthesis rates in submergence-acclimated leaves at all CO2 concentrations investigated. The increased availability of internal CO2 in these “aquatic” leaves reduced photorespiration, and furthermore reduced excitation pressure of the electron transport system and, thus, the risk of photodamage. Acclimation to submergence also altered photosynthesis biochemistry as reduced Rubisco contents were observed in aquatic leaves, indicating a lower carboxylation capacity. Electron transport capacity was also reduced in these leaves but not as strongly as the reduction in Rubisco, indicating a substantial increase of the ratio between electron transport and carboxylation capacity upon submergence. This novel finding suggests that this ratio may be less conservative than previously thought. PMID:16126859

  19. Pinctada margaritifera responses to temperature and pH: Acclimation capabilities and physiological limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Moullac, Gilles; Soyez, Claude; Latchere, Oihana; Vidal-Dupiol, Jeremie; Fremery, Juliette; Saulnier, Denis; Lo Yat, Alain; Belliard, Corinne; Mazouni-Gaertner, Nabila; Gueguen, Yannick

    2016-12-01

    The pearl culture is one of the most lucrative aquacultures worldwide. In many South Pacific areas, it depends on the exploitation of the pearl oyster Pinctada margaritifera and relies entirely on the environmental conditions encountered in the lagoon. In this context, assessing the impact of climatic stressors, such as global warming and ocean acidification, on the functionality of the resource in terms of renewal and exploitation is fundamental. In this study, we experimentally addressed the impact of temperature (22, 26, 30 and 34 °C) and partial pressure of carbon dioxide pCO2 (294, 763 and 2485 μatm) on the biomineralization and metabolic capabilities of pearl oysters. While the energy metabolism was strongly dependent on temperature, results showed its independence from pCO2 levels; no interaction between temperature and pCO2 was revealed. The energy metabolism, ingestion, oxygen consumption and, hence, the scope for growth (SFG) were maximised at 30 °C and dramatically fell at 34 °C. Biomineralization was examined through the expression measurement of nine mantle's genes coding for shell matrix proteins involved in the formation of calcitic prisms and/or nacreous shell structures; significant changes were recorded for four of the nine (Pmarg-Nacrein A1, Pmarg-MRNP34, Pmarg-Prismalin 14 and Pmarg-Aspein). These changes showed that the maximum and minimum expression of these genes was at 26 and 34 °C, respectively. Surprisingly, the modelled thermal optimum for biomineralization (ranging between 21.5 and 26.5 °C) and somatic growth and reproduction (28.7 °C) appeared to be significantly different. Finally, the responses to high temperatures were contextualised with the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) projections, which highlighted that pearl oyster stocks and cultures would be severely threatened in the next decade.

  20. Flower Development under Drought Stress: Morphological and Transcriptomic Analyses Reveal Acute Responses and Long-Term Acclimation in Arabidopsis[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Su, Zhao; Ma, Xuan; Guo, Huihong; Sukiran, Noor Liyana; Guo, Bin; Assmann, Sarah M.; Ma, Hong

    2013-01-01

    Drought dramatically affects plant growth and crop yield, but previous studies primarily examined responses to drought during vegetative development. Here, to study responses to drought during reproductive development, we grew Arabidopsis thaliana plants with limited water, under conditions that allowed the plants to initiate and complete reproduction. Drought treatment from just after the onset of flowering to seed maturation caused an early arrest of floral development and sterility. After acclimation, plants showed reduced fertility that persisted throughout reproductive development. Floral defects included abnormal anther development, lower pollen viability, reduced filament elongation, ovule abortion, and failure of flowers to open. Drought also caused differential expression of 4153 genes, including flowering time genes FLOWERING LOCUS T, SUPPRESSOR OF OVEREXPRESSION OF CO1, and LEAFY, genes regulating anther and pistil development, and stress-related transcription factors. Mutant phenotypes of hypersensitivity to drought and fewer differentially expressed genes suggest that DEHYDRATION RESPONSE ELEMENT B1A may have an important function in drought response in flowers. A more severe filament elongation defect under drought in myb21 plants demonstrated that appropriate stamen development requires MYB DOMAIN PROTEIN 21 under drought conditions. Our study reveals a regulatory cascade in reproductive responses and acclimation under drought. PMID:24179129

  1. Lettuce irrigated with contaminated water: Photosynthetic effects, antioxidative response and bioaccumulation of microcystin congeners.

    PubMed

    Bittencourt-Oliveira, Maria do Carmo; Cordeiro-Araújo, Micheline Kézia; Chia, Mathias Ahii; Arruda-Neto, João Dias de Toledo; de Oliveira, Ênio Tiago; dos Santos, Flávio

    2016-06-01

    The use of microcystins (MCs) contaminated water to irrigate crop plants represents a human health risk due to their bioaccumulation potential. In addition, MCs cause oxidative stress and negatively influence photosynthetic activities in plants. The present study was aimed at investigating the effect of MCs on photosynthetic parameters and antioxidative response of lettuce. Furthermore, the bioaccumulation factor (BAF) of total MCs, MC-LR and MC-RR in the vegetable after irrigation with contaminated water was determined. Lettuce crops were irrigated for 15 days with water containing cyanobacterial crude extracts (Microcystis aeruginosa) with MC-LR (0.0, 0.5, 2.0, 5.0 and 10.0 µg L(-1)), MC-RR (0.0, 0.15, 0.5, 1.5 and 3.0 µg L(-1)) and total MCs (0.0, 0.65, 2.5, 6.5 and 13.0 µg L(-1)). Increased net photosynthetic rate, stomatal conductance, leaf tissue transpiration and intercellular CO2 concentration were recorded in lettuce exposed to different MCs concentrations. Antioxidant response showed that glutathione S-transferase activity was down-regulated in the presence of MCs. On the other hand, superoxide dismutase, catalase and peroxidase activities were upregulated with increasing MCs concentrations. The bioaccumulation factor (BAF) of total MCs and MC-LR was highest at 6.50 and 5.00 µg L(-1), respectively, while for MC-RR, the highest BAF was recorded at 1.50 µg L(-1) concentration. The amount of total MCs, MC-LR and MC-RR bioacumulated in lettuce was highest at the highest exposure concentrations. However, at the lowest exposure concentration, there were no detectable levels of MC-LR, MC-RR and total MCs in lettuce. Thus, the bioaccumulation of MCs in lettuce varies according to the exposure concentration. In addition, the extent of physiological response of lettuce to the toxins relies on exposure concentrations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Effects of soil water and nitrogen on growth and photosynthetic response of Manchurian ash (Fraxinus mandshurica) seedlings in northeastern China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Miao; Shi, Shuai; Lin, Fei; Hao, Zhanqing; Jiang, Ping; Dai, Guanhua

    2012-01-01

    Soil water and nitrogen (N) are considered to be the main environmental factors limiting plant growth and photosynthetic capacity. However, less is known about the interactive effects of soil water and N on tree growth and photosynthetic response in the temperate ecosystem. We applied N and water, alone and in combination, and investigated the combined effect of different water and N regimes on growth and photosynthetic responses of Fraxinus mandshurica seedlings. The seedlings were exposed to three water regimes including natural precipitation (CK), higher precipitation (HW) (CK +30%) and lower precipitation (LW) (CK -30%), and both with and without N addition for two growing seasons. We demonstrated that water and N supply led to a significant increase in the growth and biomass production of the seedlings. LW treatment significantly decreased biomass production and leaf N content, but they showed marked increases in N addition. N addition could enhance the photosynthetic capability under HW and CK conditions. Leaf chlorophyll content and the initial activity of Rubisco were dramatically increased by N addition regardless of soil water condition. The positive relationships were found between photosynthetic capacity, leaf N content, and SLA in response to water and N supply in the seedling. Rubisco expression was up-regulated by N addition with decreasing soil water content. Immunofluorescent staining showed that the labeling for Rubisco was relatively low in leaves of the seedlings under LW condition. The accumulation of Rubisco was increased in leaf tissues of LW by N addition. Our study has presented better understanding of the interactions between soil water and N on the growth and photosynthetic response in F. mandschurica seedlings, which may provide novel insights on the potential responses of the forest ecosystem to climate change associated with increasing N deposition.

  3. Effects of Soil Water and Nitrogen on Growth and Photosynthetic Response of Manchurian Ash (Fraxinus mandshurica) Seedlings in Northeastern China

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Miao; Shi, Shuai; Lin, Fei; Hao, Zhanqing; Jiang, Ping; Dai, Guanhua

    2012-01-01

    Background Soil water and nitrogen (N) are considered to be the main environmental factors limiting plant growth and photosynthetic capacity. However, less is known about the interactive effects of soil water and N on tree growth and photosynthetic response in the temperate ecosystem. Methods/Principal Findings We applied N and water, alone and in combination, and investigated the combined effect of different water and N regimes on growth and photosynthetic responses of Fraxinus mandshurica seedlings. The seedlings were exposed to three water regimes including natural precipitation (CK), higher precipitation (HW) (CK +30%) and lower precipitation (LW) (CK −30%), and both with and without N addition for two growing seasons. We demonstrated that water and N supply led to a significant increase in the growth and biomass production of the seedlings. LW treatment significantly decreased biomass production and leaf N content, but they showed marked increases in N addition. N addition could enhance the photosynthetic capability under HW and CK conditions. Leaf chlorophyll content and the initial activity of Rubisco were dramatically increased by N addition regardless of soil water condition. The positive relationships were found between photosynthetic capacity, leaf N content, and SLA in response to water and N supply in the seedling. Rubisco expression was up-regulated by N addition with decreasing soil water content. Immunofluorescent staining showed that the labeling for Rubisco was relatively low in leaves of the seedlings under LW condition. The accumulation of Rubisco was increased in leaf tissues of LW by N addition. Conclusions/Significance Our study has presented better understanding of the interactions between soil water and N on the growth and photosynthetic response in F. mandschurica seedlings, which may provide novel insights on the potential responses of the forest ecosystem to climate change associated with increasing N deposition. PMID:22347401

  4. Modulation of the heat shock response is associated with acclimation to novel temperatures but not adaptation to climatic variation in the ants Aphaenogaster picea and A. rudis.

    PubMed

    Helms Cahan, Sara; Nguyen, Andrew D; Stanton-Geddes, John; Penick, Clint A; Hernáiz-Hernández, Yainna; DeMarco, Bernice B; Gotelli, Nicholas J

    2017-02-01

    Ecological diversification into thermally divergent habitats can push species toward their physiological limits, requiring them to accommodate temperature extremes through plastic or evolutionary changes that increase persistence under the local thermal regime. One way to withstand thermal stress is to increase production of heat shock proteins, either by maintaining higher baseline abundance within cells or by increasing the magnitude of induction in response to heat stress. We evaluated whether environmental variation was associated with expression of three heat shock protein genes in two closely-related species of woodland ant, Aphaenogaster picea and A. rudis. We compared adult workers from colonies collected from 25 sites across their geographic ranges. Colonies were maintained at two different laboratory temperatures, and tested for the independent effects of environment, phylogeny, and acclimation temperature on baseline and heat-induced gene expression. The annual maximum temperature at each collection site (Tmax) was not a significant predictor of either baseline expression or magnitude of induction of any of the heat shock protein genes tested. A phylogenetic effect was detected only for basal expression of Hsp40, which was lower in the most southern populations of A. rudis and higher in a mid-range population of possible hybrid ancestry. In contrast, a higher acclimation temperature significantly increased baseline expression of Hsc70-4, and increased induction of Hsp40 and Hsp83. Thus, physiological acclimation to temperature variation appears to involve modulation of the heat shock response, whereas other mechanisms are likely to be responsible for evolutionary shifts in thermal performance associated with large-scale climate gradients.

  5. The temperature response of CO2 assimilation, photochemical activities and Rubisco activation in Camelina sativa, a potential bioenergy crop with limited capacity for acclimation to heat stress.

    PubMed

    Carmo-Silva, A Elizabete; Salvucci, Michael E

    2012-11-01

    The temperature optimum of photosynthesis coincides with the average daytime temperature in a species' native environment. Moderate heat stress occurs when temperatures exceed the optimum, inhibiting photosynthesis and decreasing productivity. In the present study, the temperature response of photosynthesis and the potential for heat acclimation was evaluated for Camelina sativa, a bioenergy crop. The temperature optimum of net CO(2) assimilation rate (A) under atmospheric conditions was 30-32 °C and was only slightly higher under non-photorespiratory conditions. The activation state of Rubisco was closely correlated with A at supra-optimal temperatures, exhibiting a parallel decrease with increasing leaf temperature. At both control and elevated temperatures, the modeled response of A to intercellular CO(2) concentration was consistent with Rubisco limiting A at ambient CO(2). Rubisco activation and photochemical activities were affected by moderate heat stress at lower temperatures in camelina than in the warm-adapted species cotton and tobacco. Growth under conditions that imposed a daily interval of moderate heat stress caused a 63 % reduction in camelina seed yield. Levels of cpn60 protein were elevated under the higher growth temperature, but acclimation of photosynthesis was minimal. Inactivation of Rubisco in camelina at temperatures above 35 °C was consistent with the temperature response of Rubisco activase activity and indicated that Rubisco activase was a prime target of inhibition by moderate heat stress in camelina. That photosynthesis exhibited no acclimation to moderate heat stress will likely impact the development of camelina and other cool season Brassicaceae as sources of bioenergy in a warmer world.

  6. Contributions of photosynthetic and non-photosynthetic cell types to leaf respiration in Vicia faba L. and their responses to growth temperature.

    PubMed

    Long, Benedict M; Bahar, Nur H A; Atkin, Owen K

    2015-11-01

    In intact leaves, mitochondrial populations are highly heterogeneous among contrasting cell types; how such contrasting populations respond to sustained changes in the environment remains, however, unclear. Here, we examined respiratory rates, mitochondrial protein composition and response to growth temperature in photosynthetic (mesophyll) and non-photosynthetic (epidermal) cells from fully expanded leaves of warm-developed (WD) and cold-developed (CD) broad bean (Vicia faba L.). Rates of respiration were significantly higher in mesophyll cell protoplasts (MCPs) than epidermal cell protoplasts (ECPs), with both protoplast types exhibiting capacity for cytochrome and alternative oxidase activity. Compared with ECPs, MCPs contained greater relative quantities of porin, suggesting higher mitochondrial surface area in mesophyll cells. Nevertheless, the relative quantities of respiratory proteins (normalized to porin) were similar in MCPs and ECPs, suggesting that ECPs have lower numbers of mitochondria yet similar protein complement to MCP mitochondria (albeit with lower abundance serine hydroxymethyltransferase). Several mitochondrial proteins (both non-photorespiratory and photorespiratory) exhibited an increased abundance in response to cold in both protoplast types. Based on estimates of individual protoplast respiration rates, combined with leaf cell abundance data, epidermal cells make a small but significant (2%) contribution to overall leaf respiration which increases twofold in the cold. Taken together, our data highlight the heterogeneous nature of mitochondrial populations in leaves, both among contrasting cell types and in how those populations respond to growth temperature. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. [Species-dependence of the pattern of plant photosynthetic rate response to light intensity transition from saturating to limiting one].

    PubMed

    Chen, Yue; Xu, Da-Quan

    2007-12-01

    By observing the photosynthetic responses of leaves to changes in light intensity and CO(2) concentration it was found that among the more than 50 plant species examined 32 species and 25 species showed respectively the V pattern and L pattern of the photosynthetic response to light intensity transition from saturating to limiting one (Figs.1 and 2 and Table 1). The pattern of photosynthetic response to light intensity transition is species-dependent but not leaf developmental stage-dependent (Fig.3). The species-dependence was not related to classification in taxonomy because the photosynthetic response might display the two different patterns (V and L) in plants of the same family, for example, rice and wheat (Gramineae), soybean and peanut (Leguminosae). It seemed to be related to the pathway of photosynthetic carbon assimilation because all of the C(4) plants examined (maize, green bristlegrass and thorny amaranth) displayed the L pattern. It might be related to light environment where the plants originated. The V pattern of photosynthetic response to light intensity transition was often observed in some plants grown in shade habitats, for example, sweet viburnum and Japan fatsia, while the L pattern was frequently observed in those plants grown in sunny habitats, for example, ginkgo and cotton. Furthermore, the ratio of electron transport rate to carboxylation rate in vivo measured at limiting light was far higher in the V pattern plants (mostly higher than 10) than in the L pattern plants (mostly lower than 5), but the ratio measured at saturating light had no significant difference between the two kinds of plants (Table 2). These results can be explained in part by that the V pattern plant species have larger light-harvesting complex (LHCII) and at saturating light the reversible dissociation of some LHCIIs from PSII reaction center complex occurs. The pattern of photosynthetic response to light intensity transition and the ratio of electron transport rate

  8. Photosynthetic Response to Long- and Short-Term Changes in Carbon Dioxide in Sweetpotatoes Grown Hydroponically with Enhanced Mineral Nutrition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, Casey; Terse, Anita; Hileman, Douglas R.; Mortley, Desmond G.; Hill, Jill

    1998-01-01

    Sweetpotato [Ipomoea batatas L.(Lam.)] has been selected by NASA as a potential food for long-term space missions. In previous experiments, sweetpotato plants grown hydroponically under elevated levels of CO2 depleted the nitrogen in the nutrient solution between the hi-weekly solution replacements. In this experiment, the effect of enhanced nutrient replenishment on photosynthetic rates of sweetpotato was determined. CO2 response curves were determined for "TU-82-155" and "Georgia-Jet" sweetpotatoes grown hydroponically in growth chambers at three different CO2 concentrations (400, 750, and 1000 micro-mol/mol CO2). Gas exchange measurements were made using infrared gas analysis, an open-flow gas exchange system, and a controlled-climate cuvette. Photosynthetic measurements were made at CO2 concentrations from 50-1000 micro-mol/mol CO2. Net photosynthetic rates showed an increase with increasing measurement CO2 in all nutrient regimes, but the response of photosynthetic rates to the growth CO2 conditions varied among the experiments and between the two varieties. Enhanced mineral nutrition led to increased net photosynthetic rates in "Georgia Jet" plants, but not in "TU-82-155" plants. The results of this study will help to determine the CO2 requirements for growth of sweetpotato on proposed space missions.

  9. Dynamic response of UV-absorbing compounds, quantum yield and the xanthophyll cycle to diel changes in UV-B and photosynthetic radiations in an aquatic liverwort.

    PubMed

    Fabón, Gabriel; Monforte, Laura; Tomás-Las-Heras, Rafael; Núñez-Olivera, Encarnación; Martínez-Abaigar, Javier

    2012-01-01

    We studied the diel responses of the liverwort Jungermannia exsertifolia subsp. cordifolia to radiation changes under laboratory conditions. The samples were exposed to three radiation regimes: P (only PAR), PA (PAR+UV-A), and PAB (PAR+UV-A+UV-B). The day was divided in four periods: darkness, a first low-PAR period, the high-PAR plus UV period, and a second low-PAR period. After 15 days of culture, we measured photosynthetic pigments, chlorophyll fluorescence and UV-absorbing compounds in the four periods of the day on two consecutive days. With respect to UV-absorbing compounds, we analyzed their global amount (as the bulk UV absorbance of methanolic extracts) and the concentration of seven hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives, both in the soluble (mainly vacuolar) and insoluble (cell wall-bound) fractions of the plant extracts. PAB samples increased the bulk UV absorbance of the soluble and insoluble fractions, and the concentrations of p-coumaroylmalic acid in the soluble fraction and p-coumaric acid in the cell wall. Most of these variables showed significant diel changes and responded within a few hours to radiation changes (more strongly to UV-B), increasing at the end of the period of high-PAR plus UV. F(v)/F(m), Φ(PSII), NPQ and the components of the xanthophyll cycle showed significant and quick diel changes in response to high PAR, UV-A and UV-B radiation, indicating dynamic photoinhibition and protection of PSII from excess radiation through the xanthophyll cycle. Thus, the liverwort showed a dynamic protection and acclimation capacity to the irradiance level and spectral characteristics of the radiation received.

  10. Photosynthetic performance, lipid production and biomass composition in response to nitrogen limitation in marine microalgae.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yuelu; Yoshida, Tomomi; Quigg, Antonietta

    2012-05-01

    Increasing energy prices demand a renewable, carbon neutral, transport fuel that is environmentally and commercially sustainable. The interest in the production of microalgae as biofuels is increasing due to their high oil content, rapid biomass production and small foot print. In this research, marine microalgae Dunaliella tertiolecta (Chlorophyceae) and Thalassiosira pseudonana (Bacillariophyceae) were incubated in nitrogen (N)-replete medium, and then transferred to N-free medium for 15 and 11 days, respectively. Fluorescence induction and relaxation (FIRe) fluorometry and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) were used to monitor the photosynthetic performance, lipid production and metabolic responses to changing N availability. Growth rates of D. tertiolecta and T. pseudonana were 0.84 ± 0.16 d(-1) and 1.21 ± 0.09 d(-), respectively in N-replete medium. Upon transfer to N-free medium. The growth rates of T. pseudonana declined rapidly, while D. tertiolecta continued to grow for 5 days in N-free medium before growth declined slowly. The maximum quantum yield of photochemistry (F(v)/F(m)) remained high initially for D. tertiolecta but decreased immediately after transfer to N-free media for T. pseudonana. The functional absorption cross section for PSII (σ(PSII)) increased, the time constant for Q(A) reoxidation (τ(Qa)) and connectivity factor (p) decreased in parallel to the nutritional status of the microalgae. The relative protein and lipid content varied in response to N limitation, but carbohydrates did not change. Based on FTIR, D. tertiolecta and T. pseudonana produced 20-26% lipid when most stressed. The combination of photosynthetic efficiency and biomass composition monitoring provided evidence that metabolic strategies to changing nutrient status are species-specific. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Freshwater acclimation induces stress responses and expression of branchial Na+/K(+)-ATPase and proliferating cell nuclear antigen in Takifugu niphobles.

    PubMed

    Tang, Cheng-Hao; Lee, Tsung-Han

    2013-08-01

    Almost the whole life cycle of the grass puffer (Takifugu niphobles) occurs in seawater (SW), but it is also sometimes found in fresh water (FW) rivers. This study aims to evaluate the effects of FW exposure on the stress, osmoregulatory, and physiological responses of the grass puffer. The grass puffers were captured from a local wetland and acclimated to SW (35‰) or FW in the laboratory. In the stress responses, plasma glucose concentrations and the abundances of hepatic and branchial heat shock proteins were higher in the FW group than in the SW group. FW acclimation led to a significant increase in the protein abundance and the specific activity of branchial Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase (NKA). Immunochemical staining showed that the NKA immunoreactive (NKIR) cells of the FW and SW puffer were distributed mainly in gill filaments. Although the number of NKIR cells was similar in the two groups, the protein levels of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) of nuclear fractions were elevated in the gills of the FW puffer. The induction of gill PCNA might contribute to cell proliferation which would maintain the amount of NKIR cells or repair DNA when exposed to FW, an osmotically stressful environment. Hence, activation of stress responses would provide the osmoprotection associated with FW adaptation of the grass puffer. Changes of branchial NKA expression and activity for osmoregulatory adjustment were required for stable blood osmolality and muscle water content. Based on our findings, the grass puffer was suggested to be a euryhaline teleost with SW preference.

  12. Leaf photosynthetic and solar-tracking responses of mallow, Malva parviflora, to photon flux density.

    PubMed

    Greer, Dennis H; Thorpe, Michael R

    2009-10-01

    Malva parviflora L. (mallow) is a species that occupies high-light habitats as a weedy invader in orchards and vineyards. Species of the Malvaceae are known to solar track and anecdotal evidence suggests this species may also. How M. parviflora responds physiologically to light in comparison with other species within the Malvaceae remains unknown. Tracking and photosynthetic responses to photon flux density (PFD) were evaluated on plants grown in greenhouse conditions. Tracking ability was assessed in the growth conditions and by exposing leaves to specific light intensities and measuring changes in the angle of the leaf plane. Light responses were also determined by photosynthesis and chlorophyll fluorescence. Leaves followed a heliotropic response which was highly PFD-dependent, with tracking rates increasing in a curvilinear pattern. Maximum tracking rates were up to 20 degrees h(-1) and saturated for light above 1,300 micromol (photons) m(-2) s(-1). This high-light saturation, both for tracking (much higher than the other species), and for photosynthesis, confirmed mallow as a high-light demanding species. Further, because there was no photoinhibition, the leaves could capture the potential of an increased carbon gain in higher irradiance by resorting to solar tracking. Modelling suggested the tracking response could increase the annual carbon gain by as much as 25% compared with leaves that do not track the sun. The various leaf attributes associated with solar tracking, therefore, help to account for the success of this species as a weed in many locations worldwide.

  13. Cell-Wall Changes and Cell Tension in Response to Cold Acclimation and Exogenous Abscisic Acid in Leaves and Cell Cultures.

    PubMed Central

    Rajashekar, C. B.; Lafta, A.

    1996-01-01

    Freeze-induced cell tensions were determined by cell water relations in leaves of broadleaf evergreen species and cell cultures of grapes (Vitis spp.) and apple (Malus domestica). Cell tensions increased in response to cold acclimation in leaves of broadleaf evergreen species during extracellular freezing, indicating a higher resistance to cell volume changes during freezing in cold-hardened leaves than in unhardened leaves. Unhardened leaves, typically, did not develop tension greater than 3.67 MPa, whereas cold-hardened leaves attained tensions up to 12 MPa. With further freezing there was a rapid decline and a loss of tension in unhardened leaves of all the broadleaf evergreen species studied. Also, similar results were observed in cold-hardened leaves of all of the species except in those of inkberry (Ilex glabra) and Euonymus fortunei, in which negative pressures persisted below -40[deg]C. Abscisic acid treatment of inkberry and Euonymus kiautschovica resulted in increases in freeze-induced tensions in leaves, suggesting that both cold acclimation and abscisic acid have similar effects on freezing behavior[mdash] specifically on the ability of cell walls to undergo deformation. Decreases in peak tensions were generally associated with lethal freezing injury and may suggest cavitation of cellular water. However, in suspension-cultured cells of grapes and apple, no cell tension was observed during freezing. Cold acclimation of these cells resulted in an increase in the cell-wall strength and a decrease in the limiting cell-wall pore size from 35 to 22 A in grape cells and from 29 to 22 A in apple cells. PMID:12226314

  14. Photosynthetic electron transport and specific photoprotective responses in wheat leaves under drought stress.

    PubMed

    Zivcak, Marek; Brestic, Marian; Balatova, Zuzana; Drevenakova, Petra; Olsovska, Katarina; Kalaji, Hazem M; Yang, Xinghong; Allakhverdiev, Suleyman I

    2013-11-01

    The photosynthetic responses of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) leaves to different levels of drought stress were analyzed in potted plants cultivated in growth chamber under moderate light. Low-to-medium drought stress was induced by limiting irrigation, maintaining 20 % of soil water holding capacity for 14 days followed by 3 days without water supply to induce severe stress. Measurements of CO2 exchange and photosystem II (PSII) yield (by chlorophyll fluorescence) were followed by simultaneous measurements of yield of PSI (by P700 absorbance changes) and that of PSII. Drought stress gradually decreased PSII electron transport, but the capacity for nonphotochemical quenching increased more slowly until there was a large decrease in leaf relative water content (where the photosynthetic rate had decreased by half or more). We identified a substantial part of PSII electron transport, which was not used by carbon assimilation or by photorespiration, which clearly indicates activities of alternative electron sinks. Decreasing the fraction of light absorbed by PSII and increasing the fraction absorbed by PSI with increasing drought stress (rather than assuming equal absorption by the two photosystems) support a proposed function of PSI cyclic electron flow to generate a proton-motive force to activate nonphotochemical dissipation of energy, and it is consistent with the observed accumulation of oxidized P700 which causes a decrease in PSI electron acceptors. Our results support the roles of alternative electron sinks (either from PSII or PSI) and cyclic electron flow in photoprotection of PSII and PSI in drought stress conditions. In future studies on plant stress, analyses of the partitioning of absorbed energy between photosystems are needed for interpreting flux through linear electron flow, PSI cyclic electron flow, along with alternative electron sinks.

  15. Photosynthetic response of Persian Gulf acroporid corals to summer versus winter temperature deviations

    PubMed Central

    Saleh, Abolfazl; Mehdinia, Ali; Shirvani, Arash; Kayal, Mohsen

    2015-01-01

    With on-going climate change, coral susceptibility to thermal stress constitutes a central concern in reefconservation. In the Persian Gulf, coral reefs are confronted with a high seasonal variability in water temperature, and both hot and cold extremes have been associated with episodes of coral bleaching and mortality. Using physiological performance as a measure of coral health, we investigated the thermal susceptibility of the common acroporid, Acropora downingi, near Hengam Island where the temperature oscillates seasonally in the range 20.2–34.2 °C. In a series of two short-term experiments comparing coral response in summer versus winter conditions, we exposed corals during each season (1) to the corresponding seasonal average and extreme temperature levels in a static thermal environment, and (2) to a progressive temperature deviation from the annual mean toward the corresponding extreme seasonal value and beyond in a dynamic thermal environment. We monitored four indictors of coral physiological performance: net photosynthesis (Pn), dark respiration (R), autotrophic capability (Pn/R), and survival. Corals exposed to warming during summer showed a decrease in net photosynthesis and ultimately died, while corals exposed to cooling during winter were not affected in their photosynthetic performance and survival. Coral autotrophic capability Pn/R was lower at the warmer thermal level within eachseason, and during summer compared to winter. Corals exposed to the maximum temperature of summer displayed Pn/R < 1, inferring that photosynthetic performance could not support basal metabolic needs under this environment. Our results suggest that the autotrophic performance of the Persian Gulf A. downingi is sensitive to the extreme temperatures endured in summer, and therefore its populations may be impacted by future increases in water temperature. PMID:26157627

  16. Temperature-dependent responses of the photosynthetic and chlorophyll fluorescence attributes of apple (Malus domestica) leaves during a sustained high temperature event.

    PubMed

    Greer, Dennis H

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study was to follow changes in the temperature-dependent responses of photosynthesis and photosystem II performance in leaves of field-grown trees of Malus domestica (Borkh.) cv. 'Red Gala' before and after exposure to a long-term heat event occurring late in the growing season. Light-saturated photosynthesis was optimal at 25 °C before the heat event. The high temperatures caused a reduction in rates at low temperatures (15-20 °C) but increased rates at high temperatures (30-40 °C) and a shift in optimum to 30 °C. Rates at all temperatures increased after the heat event and the optimum shifted to 33 °C, indicative of some acclimation to the high temperatures occurring. Photosystem II attributes were all highly temperature-dependent. The operating quantum efficiency of PSII during the heat event declined, but mostly at high temperatures, partly because of decreased photochemical quenching but also from increased non-photochemical quenching. However, a further reduction in PSII operating efficiency occurred after the heat event subsided. Non-photochemical quenching had subsided, whereas photochemical quenching had increased in the post-heat event period and consistent with a greater fraction of open PSII reaction centres. What remained uncertain was why these effects on PSII performance appeared to have no effect on the process of light-saturated photosynthesis. However, the results provide an enhanced understanding of the impacts of sustained high temperatures on the photosynthetic process and its underlying reactions, notably photochemistry.

  17. A compendium of temperature responses of Rubisco kinetic traits: variability among and within photosynthetic groups and impacts on photosynthesis modeling

    PubMed Central

    Galmés, Jeroni; Hermida-Carrera, Carmen; Laanisto, Lauri; Niinemets, Ülo

    2016-01-01

    The present study provides a synthesis of the in vitro and in vivo temperature responses of Rubisco Michaelis–Menten constants for CO2 (Kc) and O2 (Ko), specificity factor (Sc,o) and maximum carboxylase turnover rate (kcatc) for 49 species from all the main photosynthetic kingdoms of life. Novel correction routines were developed for in vitro data to remove the effects of study-to-study differences in Rubisco assays. The compilation revealed differences in the energy of activation (∆Ha) of Rubisco kinetics between higher plants and other photosynthetic groups, although photosynthetic bacteria and algae were under-represented and very few species have been investigated so far. Within plants, the variation in Rubisco temperature responses was related to species’ climate and photosynthetic mechanism, with differences in ∆Ha for kcatc among C3 plants from cool and warm environments, and in ∆Ha for kcatc and Kc among C3 and C4 plants. A negative correlation was observed among ∆Ha for Sc/o and species’ growth temperature for all data pooled, supporting the convergent adjustment of the temperature sensitivity of Rubisco kinetics to species’ thermal history. Simulations of the influence of varying temperature dependences of Rubisco kinetics on Rubisco-limited photosynthesis suggested improved photosynthetic performance of C3 plants from cool habitats at lower temperatures, and C3 plants from warm habitats at higher temperatures, especially at higher CO2 concentration. Thus, variation in Rubisco kinetics for different groups of photosynthetic organisms might need consideration to improve prediction of photosynthesis in future climates. Comparisons between in vitro and in vivo data revealed common trends, but also highlighted a large variability among both types of Rubisco kinetics currently used to simulate photosynthesis, emphasizing the need for more experimental work to fill in the gaps in Rubisco datasets and improve scaling from enzyme kinetics to

  18. A compendium of temperature responses of Rubisco kinetic traits: variability among and within photosynthetic groups and impacts on photosynthesis modeling.

    PubMed

    Galmés, Jeroni; Hermida-Carrera, Carmen; Laanisto, Lauri; Niinemets, Ülo

    2016-09-01

    The present study provides a synthesis of the in vitro and in vivo temperature responses of Rubisco Michaelis-Menten constants for CO2 (Kc) and O2 (Ko), specificity factor (Sc,o) and maximum carboxylase turnover rate (kcatc) for 49 species from all the main photosynthetic kingdoms of life. Novel correction routines were developed for in vitro data to remove the effects of study-to-study differences in Rubisco assays. The compilation revealed differences in the energy of activation (∆Ha) of Rubisco kinetics between higher plants and other photosynthetic groups, although photosynthetic bacteria and algae were under-represented and very few species have been investigated so far. Within plants, the variation in Rubisco temperature responses was related to species' climate and photosynthetic mechanism, with differences in ∆Ha for kcatc among C3 plants from cool and warm environments, and in ∆Ha for kcatc and Kc among C3 and C4 plants. A negative correlation was observed among ∆Ha for Sc/o and species' growth temperature for all data pooled, supporting the convergent adjustment of the temperature sensitivity of Rubisco kinetics to species' thermal history. Simulations of the influence of varying temperature dependences of Rubisco kinetics on Rubisco-limited photosynthesis suggested improved photosynthetic performance of C3 plants from cool habitats at lower temperatures, and C3 plants from warm habitats at higher temperatures, especially at higher CO2 concentration. Thus, variation in Rubisco kinetics for different groups of photosynthetic organisms might need consideration to improve prediction of photosynthesis in future climates. Comparisons between in vitro and in vivo data revealed common trends, but also highlighted a large variability among both types of Rubisco kinetics currently used to simulate photosynthesis, emphasizing the need for more experimental work to fill in the gaps in Rubisco datasets and improve scaling from enzyme kinetics to realized

  19. Photosynthetic response to globally increasing CO2 of co-occurring temperate seagrass species.

    PubMed

    Borum, Jens; Pedersen, Ole; Kotula, Lukasz; Fraser, Matthew W; Statton, John; Colmer, Timothy D; Kendrick, Gary A

    2016-06-01

    Photosynthesis of most seagrass species seems to be limited by present concentrations of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC). Therefore, the ongoing increase in atmospheric CO2 could enhance seagrass photosynthesis and internal O2 supply, and potentially change species competition through differential responses to increasing CO2 availability among species. We used short-term photosynthetic responses of nine seagrass species from the south-west of Australia to test species-specific responses to enhanced CO2 and changes in HCO3 (-) . Net photosynthesis of all species except Zostera polychlamys were limited at pre-industrial compared to saturating CO2 levels at light saturation, suggesting that enhanced CO2 availability will enhance seagrass performance. Seven out of the nine species were efficient HCO3 (-) users through acidification of diffusive boundary layers, production of extracellular carbonic anhydrase, or uptake and internal conversion of HCO3 (-) . Species responded differently to near saturating CO2 implying that increasing atmospheric CO2 may change competition among seagrass species if co-occurring in mixed beds. Increasing CO2 availability also enhanced internal aeration in the one species assessed. We expect that future increases in atmospheric CO2 will have the strongest impact on seagrass recruits and sparsely vegetated beds, because densely vegetated seagrass beds are most often limited by light and not by inorganic carbon. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Predicting stomatal responses to the environment from the optimization of photosynthetic gain and hydraulic cost.

    PubMed

    Sperry, John S; Venturas, Martin D; Anderegg, William R L; Mencuccini, Maurizio; Mackay, D Scott; Wang, Yujie; Love, David M

    2016-10-20

    Stomatal regulation presumably evolved to optimize CO2 for H2 O exchange in response to changing conditions. If the optimization criterion can be readily measured or calculated, then stomatal responses can be efficiently modelled without recourse to empirical models or underlying mechanism. Previous efforts have been challenged by the lack of a transparent index for the cost of losing water. Yet it is accepted that stomata control water loss to avoid excessive loss of hydraulic conductance from cavitation and soil drying. Proximity to hydraulic failure and desiccation can represent the cost of water loss. If at any given instant, the stomatal aperture adjusts to maximize the instantaneous difference between photosynthetic gain and hydraulic cost, then a model can predict the trajectory of stomatal responses to changes in environment across time. Results of this optimization model are consistent with the widely used Ball-Berry-Leuning empirical model (r(2)  > 0.99) across a wide range of vapour pressure deficits and ambient CO2 concentrations for wet soil. The advantage of the optimization approach is the absence of empirical coefficients, applicability to dry as well as wet soil and prediction of plant hydraulic status along with gas exchange.

  1. Growth, photosynthetic and respiratory responses to sub-lethal copper concentrations in Scenedesmus incrassatulus (Chlorophyceae).

    PubMed

    Perales-Vela, Hugo Virgilio; González-Moreno, Sergio; Montes-Horcasitas, Carmen; Cañizares-Villanueva, Rosa Olivia

    2007-05-01

    In the present paper we investigated the effects of sub-lethal concentrations of Cu2+ in the growth and metabolism of Scenedesmus incrassatulus. We found that the effect of Cu2+ on growth, photosynthetic pigments (chlorophylls and carotenoids) and metabolism do not follow the same pattern. Photosynthesis was more sensitive than respiration. The analysis of chlorophyll a fluorescence transient shows that the effect of sub-lethal Cu2+ concentration in vivo, causes a reduction of the active PSII reaction centers and the primary charge separation, decreasing the quantum yield of PSII, the electron transport rate and the photosynthetic O2 evolution. The order of sensitivity found was: Growth>photosynthetic pigments content=photosynthetic O2 evolution>photosynthetic electron transport>respiration. The uncoupled relationship between growth and metabolism is discussed.

  2. Photosynthetic Light Response of Bottomland Oak Seedlings Raised Under Partial Sunlight

    Treesearch

    Emile S. Gardiner

    2002-01-01

    Seedlings of cherrybark oak (Quercus pagoda Rafinesque), Nuttall oak (Quercus nuttallii Palmer) and overcup oak (Quercus lyrata Walter) were grown under two light levels, partial (20 percent) or full sunlight, to study physiological acclimation of leaves to low light availability. Shifts in leaf morphology were...

  3. Long-term growth under elevated CO2 suppresses biotic stress genes in non-acclimated, but not cold-acclimated winter wheat.

    PubMed

    Kane, Khalil; Dahal, Keshav P; Badawi, Mohamed A; Houde, Mario; Hüner, Norman P A; Sarhan, Fathey

    2013-11-01

    This study compared the photosynthetic performance and the global gene expression of the winter hardy wheat Triticum aestivum cv Norstar grown under non-acclimated (NA) or cold-acclimated (CA) conditions at either ambient CO2 or elevated CO2. CA Norstar maintained comparable light-saturated and CO2-saturated rates of photosynthesis but lower quantum requirements for PSII and non-photochemical quenching relative to NA plants even at elevated CO2. Neither NA nor CA plants were sensitive to feedback inhibition of photosynthesis at elevated CO2. Global gene expression using microarray combined with bioinformatics analysis revealed that genes affected by elevated CO2 were three times higher in NA (1,022 genes) compared with CA (372 genes) Norstar. The most striking effect was the down-regulation of genes involved in the plant defense responses in NA Norstar. In contrast, cold acclimation reversed this down-regulation due to the cold induction of genes involved in plant pathogenesis resistance; and cellular and chloroplast protection. These results suggest that elevated CO2 has less impact on plant performance and productivity in cold-adapted winter hardy plants in the northern climates compared with warmer environments. Selection for cereal cultivars with constitutively higher expression of biotic stress defense genes may be necessary under elevated CO2 during the warm growth period and in warmer climates.

  4. Participation of intracellular and extracellular pH changes in photosynthetic response development induced by variation potential in pumpkin seedlings.

    PubMed

    Sherstneva, O N; Vodeneev, V A; Katicheva, L A; Surova, L M; Sukhov, V S

    2015-06-01

    Electrical signals presented in plants by action potential and by variation potential (VP) can induce a reversible inactivation of photosynthesis. Changes in the intracellular and extracellular pH during VP generation are a potential mechanism of photosynthetic response induction; however, this hypothesis requires additional experimental investigation. The purpose of the present work was to analyze the influence of pH changes on induction of the photosynthetic response in pumpkin. It was shown that a burning of the cotyledon induced VP propagation into true leaves of pumpkin seedlings inducing a decrease in the photosynthetic CO2 assimilation and an increase in non-photochemical quenching of fluorescence, whereas respiration was activated insignificantly. The photosynthetic response magnitude depended linearly on the VP amplitude. The intracellular and extracellular concentrations of protons were analyzed using pH-sensitive fluorescent probes, and the VP generation was shown to be accompanied by apoplast alkalization (0.4 pH unit) and cytoplasm acidification (0.3 pH unit). The influence of changes in the incubation medium pH on the non-photochemical quenching of fluorescence of isolated chloroplasts was also investigated. It was found that acidification of the medium stimulated the non-photochemical quenching, and the magnitude of this increase depended on the decrease in pH. Our results confirm the contribution of changes in intracellular and extracellular pH to induction of the photosynthetic response caused by VP. Possible mechanisms of the influence of pH changes on photosynthesis are discussed.

  5. Phytoplankton strategies for photosynthetic energy allocation.

    PubMed

    Halsey, Kimberly H; Jones, Bethan M

    2015-01-01

    Phytoplankton physiology is dynamic and highly responsive to the environment. Phytoplankton acclimate to changing environmental conditions by a complex reallocation of carbon and energy through metabolic pathways to optimize growth. Considering the tremendous diversity of phytoplankton, it is not surprising that different phytoplankton taxa use different strategies to partition carbon and energy resources. It has therefore been satisfying to discover that general principles of energetic stoichiometry appear to govern these complex processes and can be broadly applied to interpret phytoplankton distributions, productivity, and food web dynamics. The expectation of future changes in aquatic environments brought on by climate change warrants gathering knowledge about underlying patterns of photosynthetic energy allocation and their impacts on community structure and ecosystem productivity.

  6. Phytoplankton Strategies for Photosynthetic Energy Allocation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halsey, Kimberly H.; Jones, Bethan M.

    2015-01-01

    Phytoplankton physiology is dynamic and highly responsive to the environment. Phytoplankton acclimate to changing environmental conditions by a complex reallocation of carbon and energy through metabolic pathways to optimize growth. Considering the tremendous diversity of phytoplankton, it is not surprising that different phytoplankton taxa use different strategies to partition carbon and energy resources. It has therefore been satisfying to discover that general principles of energetic stoichiometry appear to govern these complex processes and can be broadly applied to interpret phytoplankton distributions, productivity, and food web dynamics. The expectation of future changes in aquatic environments brought on by climate change warrants gathering knowledge about underlying patterns of photosynthetic energy allocation and their impacts on community structure and ecosystem productivity.

  7. Thioredoxins Play a Crucial Role in Dynamic Acclimation of Photosynthesis in Fluctuating Light.

    PubMed

    Thormählen, Ina; Zupok, Arkadius; Rescher, Josephin; Leger, Jochen; Weissenberger, Stefan; Groysman, Julia; Orwat, Anne; Chatel-Innocenti, Gilles; Issakidis-Bourguet, Emmanuelle; Armbruster, Ute; Geigenberger, Peter

    2017-01-09

    Sunlight represents the energy source for photosynthesis and plant growth. When growing in the field, plant photosynthesis has to manage strong fluctuations in light intensities. Regulation based on the thioredoxin (Trx) system is believed to ensure light-responsive control of photosynthetic reactions in the chloroplast. However, direct evidence for a role of this system in regulating dynamic acclimation of photosynthesis in fluctuating conditions is largely lacking. In this report we show that the ferredoxin-dependent Trxs m1 and m2 as well as the NADPH-dependent NTRC are both indispensable for photosynthetic acclimation in fluctuating light intensities. Arabidopsis mutants with combined deficiency in Trxs m1 and m2 show wild-type growth and photosynthesis under constant light condition, while photosynthetic parameters are strongly modified in rapidly alternating high and low light. Two independent trxm1m2 mutants show lower photosynthetic efficiency in high light, but surprisingly significantly higher photosynthetic efficiency in low light. Our data suggest that a main target of Trx m1 and m2 is the NADP-malate dehydrogenase involved in export of excess reductive power from the chloroplast. The decreased photosynthetic efficiency in the high-light peaks may thus be explained by a reduced capacity of the trxm1m2 mutants in the rapid light activation of this enzyme. In the ntrc mutant, dynamic responses of non-photochemical quenching of excitation energy and plastoquinone reduction state both were strongly attenuated in fluctuating light intensities, leading to a massive decrease in PSII quantum efficiency and a specific decrease in plant growth under these conditions. This is likely due to the decreased ability of the ntrc mutant to control the stromal NADP(H) redox poise. Taken together, our results indicate that NTRC is indispensable in ensuring the full range of dynamic responses of photosynthesis to optimize photosynthesis and maintain growth in fluctuating

  8. Unsaturated Lipids Change in Olive Tree Drupe and Seed during Fruit Development and in Response to Cold-Stress and Acclimation

    PubMed Central

    D’Angeli, Simone; Altamura, Maria Maddalena

    2016-01-01

    The olive tree is a plant of economic value for the oil of its drupe. It is a cultigen complex composed of genotypes with differences in cold-hardiness. About 90% of the oil is stored in oil bodies (OBs) in the drupe during the oleogenic phase. Phenols and lipids contribute to oil quality, but the unsaturated fatty acid (FA) fraction is emerging as the most important for quality, because of the very high content in oleic acid, the presence of ω6-linoleic acid and ω3-linolenic acid, and the very low saturated FA content. Another 10% of oil is produced by the seed. Differences in unsaturated FA-enriched lipids exist among seed coat, endosperm, and embryo. Olive oil quality is also affected by the environmental conditions during fruit growth and genotype peculiarities. Production of linoleic and α-linolenic acids, fruit growth, fruit and leaf responses to low temperatures, including cuticle formation, and cold-acclimation are related processes. The levels of unsaturated FAs are changed by FA-desaturase (FAD) activities, involving the functioning of chloroplasts and endoplasmic reticulum. Cold induces lipid changes during drupe and seed development, affecting FADs, but its effect is related to the genotype capability to acclimate to the cold. PMID:27845749

  9. Unsaturated Lipids Change in Olive Tree Drupe and Seed during Fruit Development and in Response to Cold-Stress and Acclimation.

    PubMed

    D'Angeli, Simone; Altamura, Maria Maddalena

    2016-11-12

    The olive tree is a plant of economic value for the oil of its drupe. It is a cultigen complex composed of genotypes with differences in cold-hardiness. About 90% of the oil is stored in oil bodies (OBs) in the drupe during the oleogenic phase. Phenols and lipids contribute to oil quality, but the unsaturated fatty acid (FA) fraction is emerging as the most important for quality, because of the very high content in oleic acid, the presence of ω6-linoleic acid and ω3-linolenic acid, and the very low saturated FA content. Another 10% of oil is produced by the seed. Differences in unsaturated FA-enriched lipids exist among seed coat, endosperm, and embryo. Olive oil quality is also affected by the environmental conditions during fruit growth and genotype peculiarities. Production of linoleic and α-linolenic acids, fruit growth, fruit and leaf responses to low temperatures, including cuticle formation, and cold-acclimation are related processes. The levels of unsaturated FAs are changed by FA-desaturase (FAD) activities, involving the functioning of chloroplasts and endoplasmic reticulum. Cold induces lipid changes during drupe and seed development, affecting FADs, but its effect is related to the genotype capability to acclimate to the cold.

  10. Ozone exposure and flux-based response functions for photosynthetic traits in wheat, maize and poplar.

    PubMed

    Bagard, Matthieu; Jolivet, Yves; Hasenfratz-Sauder, Marie-Paule; Gérard, Joëlle; Dizengremel, Pierre; Le Thiec, Didier

    2015-11-01

    Ozone exposure- and dose-response relationships based on photosynthetic leaf traits (CO2 assimilation, chlorophyll content, Rubisco and PEPc activities) were established for wheat, maize and poplar plants grown in identical controlled conditions, providing a comparison between crop and tree species, as well as between C3 and C4 plants. Intra-specific variability was addressed by comparing two wheat cultivars with contrasting ozone tolerance. Depending on plant models and ozone levels, first-order, second-order and segmented linear regression models were used to derive ozone response functions. Overall, flux-based functions appeared superior to exposure-based functions in describing the data, but the improvement remained modest. The best fit was obtained using the POD0.5 for maize and POD3 for poplar. The POD6 appeared relevant for wheat, although intervarietal differences were found. Our results suggest that taking into account the dynamics of leaf antioxidant capacity could improve current methods for ozone risk assessment for plants. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Surveying Rubisco Diversity and Temperature Response to Improve Crop Photosynthetic Efficiency.

    PubMed

    Orr, Douglas J; Alcântara, André; Kapralov, Maxim V; Andralojc, P John; Carmo-Silva, Elizabete; Parry, Martin A J

    2016-10-01

    The threat to global food security of stagnating yields and population growth makes increasing crop productivity a critical goal over the coming decades. One key target for improving crop productivity and yields is increasing the efficiency of photosynthesis. Central to photosynthesis is Rubisco, which is a critical but often rate-limiting component. Here, we present full Rubisco catalytic properties measured at three temperatures for 75 plants species representing both crops and undomesticated plants from diverse climates. Some newly characterized Rubiscos were naturally "better" compared to crop enzymes and have the potential to improve crop photosynthetic efficiency. The temperature response of the various catalytic parameters was largely consistent across the diverse range of species, though absolute values showed significant variation in Rubisco catalysis, even between closely related species. An analysis of residue differences among the species characterized identified a number of candidate amino acid substitutions that will aid in advancing engineering of improved Rubisco in crop systems. This study provides new insights on the range of Rubisco catalysis and temperature response present in nature, and provides new information to include in models from leaf to canopy and ecosystem scale.

  12. Surveying Rubisco Diversity and Temperature Response to Improve Crop Photosynthetic Efficiency1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Andralojc, P. John

    2016-01-01

    The threat to global food security of stagnating yields and population growth makes increasing crop productivity a critical goal over the coming decades. One key target for improving crop productivity and yields is increasing the efficiency of photosynthesis. Central to photosynthesis is Rubisco, which is a critical but often rate-limiting component. Here, we present full Rubisco catalytic properties measured at three temperatures for 75 plants species representing both crops and undomesticated plants from diverse climates. Some newly characterized Rubiscos were naturally “better” compared to crop enzymes and have the potential to improve crop photosynthetic efficiency. The temperature response of the various catalytic parameters was largely consistent across the diverse range of species, though absolute values showed significant variation in Rubisco catalysis, even between closely related species. An analysis of residue differences among the species characterized identified a number of candidate amino acid substitutions that will aid in advancing engineering of improved Rubisco in crop systems. This study provides new insights on the range of Rubisco catalysis and temperature response present in nature, and provides new information to include in models from leaf to canopy and ecosystem scale. PMID:27342312

  13. Synergic effect of salinity and CO2 enrichment on growth and photosynthetic responses of the invasive cordgrass Spartina densiflora

    PubMed Central

    Mateos-Naranjo, Enrique; Redondo-Gómez, Susana; Álvarez, Rosario; Cambrollé, Jesús; Gandullo, Jacinto; Figueroa, M. Enrique

    2010-01-01

    Spartina densiflora is a C4 halophytic species that has proved to have a high invasive potential which derives from its clonal growth and its physiological plasticity to environmental factors, such as salinity. A greenhouse experiment was designed to investigate the synergic effect of 380 and 700 ppm CO2 at 0, 171, and 510 mM NaCl on the growth and the photosynthetic apparatus of S. densiflora by measuring chlorophyll fluorescence parameters, gas exchange and photosynthetic pigment concentrations. PEPC activity and total ash, sodium, potassium, calcium, magnesium, and zinc concentrations were determined, as well as the C/N ratio. Elevated CO2 stimulated growth of S. densiflora at 0 and 171 mM NaCl external salinity after 90 d of treatment. This growth enhancement was associated with a greater leaf area and improved leaf water relations rather than with variations in net photosynthetic rate (A). Despite the fact that stomatal conductance decreased in response to 700 ppm CO2 after 30 d of treatment, A was not affected. This response of A to elevated CO2 concentration might be explained by an enhanced PEPC carboxylation capacity. On the whole, plant nutrient concentrations declined under elevated CO2, which can be ascribed to the dilution effect caused by an increase in biomass and the higher water content found at 700 ppm CO2. Finally, CO2 and salinity had a marked overall effect on the photochemical (PSII) apparatus and the synthesis of photosynthetic pigments. PMID:20194923

  14. Synergic effect of salinity and CO2 enrichment on growth and photosynthetic responses of the invasive cordgrass Spartina densiflora.

    PubMed

    Mateos-Naranjo, Enrique; Redondo-Gómez, Susana; Alvarez, Rosario; Cambrollé, Jesús; Gandullo, Jacinto; Figueroa, M Enrique

    2010-06-01

    Spartina densiflora is a C(4) halophytic species that has proved to have a high invasive potential which derives from its clonal growth and its physiological plasticity to environmental factors, such as salinity. A greenhouse experiment was designed to investigate the synergic effect of 380 and 700 ppm CO(2) at 0, 171, and 510 mM NaCl on the growth and the photosynthetic apparatus of S. densiflora by measuring chlorophyll fluorescence parameters, gas exchange and photosynthetic pigment concentrations. PEPC activity and total ash, sodium, potassium, calcium, magnesium, and zinc concentrations were determined, as well as the C/N ratio. Elevated CO(2) stimulated growth of S. densiflora at 0 and 171 mM NaCl external salinity after 90 d of treatment. This growth enhancement was associated with a greater leaf area and improved leaf water relations rather than with variations in net photosynthetic rate (A). Despite the fact that stomatal conductance decreased in response to 700 ppm CO(2) after 30 d of treatment, A was not affected. This response of A to elevated CO(2) concentration might be explained by an enhanced PEPC carboxylation capacity. On the whole, plant nutrient concentrations declined under elevated CO(2), which can be ascribed to the dilution effect caused by an increase in biomass and the higher water content found at 700 ppm CO(2). Finally, CO(2) and salinity had a marked overall effect on the photochemical (PSII) apparatus and the synthesis of photosynthetic pigments.

  15. A better energy allocation of absorbed light in photosystem II and less photooxidative damage contribute to acclimation of Arabidopsis thaliana young leaves to water deficit.

    PubMed

    Sperdouli, Ilektra; Moustakas, Michael

    2014-05-01

    Water deficit stress promotes excitation pressure and photooxidative damage due to an imbalance between light capture and energy use. Young leaves (YL) of Arabidopsis thaliana plants acclimate better to the onset of water deficit (OnsWD) than do mature leaves (ML). To obtain a better understanding of this differential response, we evaluated whether YL and ML of A. thaliana exposed to the OnsWD, mild water deficit (MiWD) and moderate water deficit (MoWD), show differences in their photosynthetic performance, and whether photosynthetic acclimation correlates with leaf developmental stage. Water deficit (WD) resulted in greater photooxidative damage in ML compared to YL, but the latter could not be protected under the OnsWD or MiWD, but only under MoWD. YL of A. thaliana with signs of photosynthetic acclimation under MoWD retained higher maximum quantum yield (Fv/Fm) and decreased reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation. YL under MoWD, show a reduced excitation pressure and a better balance between light capture and photochemical energy use, which contributed to their photoprotection, but only under low light intensity (LL, 130μmolphotonsm(-2)s(-1)) and not under high light (HL, 1200μmolphotonsm(-2)s(-1)). In conclusion, leaf developmental stage was correlated with photo-oxidative damage and a differential allocation of absorbed light energy in photosystem II (PSII) of Arabidopsis leaves under WD. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  16. Efficient acclimation of the chloroplast antioxidant defence of Arabidopsis thaliana leaves in response to a 10- or 100-fold light increment and the possible involvement of retrograde signals

    PubMed Central

    Oelze, Marie-Luise; Vogel, Marc Oliver; Alsharafa, Khalid; Kahmann, Uwe; Viehhauser, Andrea; Maurino, Veronica G.; Dietz, Karl-Josef

    2012-01-01

    Chloroplasts are equipped with a nuclear-encoded antioxidant defence system the components of which are usually expressed at high transcript and activity levels. To significantly challenge the chloroplast antioxidant system, Arabidopsis thaliana plants, acclimated to extremely low light slightly above the light compensation point or to normal growth chamber light, were moved to high light corresponding to a 100- and 10-fold light jump, for 6 h and 24 h in order to observe the responses of the water–water cycle at the transcript, protein, enzyme activity, and metabolite levels. The plants coped efficiently with the high light regime and the photoinhibition was fully reversible. Reactive oxygen species (ROS), glutathione and ascorbate levels as well as redox states, respectively, revealed no particular oxidative stress in low-light-acclimated plants transferred to 100-fold excess light. Strong regulation of the water–water cycle enzymes at the transcript level was only partly reflected at the protein and activity levels. In general, low light plants had higher stromal (sAPX) and thylakoid ascorbate peroxidase (tAPX), dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR), and CuZn superoxide dismutase (CuZnSOD) protein contents than normal light-grown plants. Mutants defective in components relevant for retrograde signalling, namely stn7, ex1, tpt1, and a mutant expressing E .coli catalase in the chloroplast showed unaltered transcriptional responses of water–water cycle enzymes. These findings, together with the response of marker transcripts, indicate that abscisic acid is not involved and that the plastoquinone redox state and reactive oxygen species do not play a major role in regulating the transcriptional response at t=6 h, while other marker transcripts suggest a major role for reductive power, metabolites, and lipids as signals for the response of the water–water cycle. PMID:22131159

  17. Needle age and season influence photosynthetic temperature response and total annual carbon uptake in mature Picea mariana trees

    DOE PAGES

    Jensen, Anna M.; Warren, Jeffrey; Hanson, Paul J.; ...

    2015-01-01

    Using seasonal- and cohort-specific photosynthetic temperature response functions, we quantified the physiological significance of maintaining multiple foliar cohorts in mature (~40-45 year old) Picea mariana trees in an ombrotrophic Sphagnum-bog, northern Minnesota, USA. We measured photosynthetic capacity, foliar respiration (Rd), biochemistry and morphology to estimate annual carbon (C) uptake by cohort, season and canopy position. Temperature response of key photosynthetic parameters at 25 C (i.e., light-saturated rate of CO2 assimilation (Asat), light-saturated rate of Rubisco carboxylation (Vcmax), light-saturated electron transport rate (Jmax)) were clearly dependent on season and were generally less responsive in younger needles. Temperature optimums range between 18.7-23.7,more » 31.3-38.3 and 28.7-36.7 C for Asat, Vcmax and Jmax respectively. Current-year (Y0) foliage had lower photosynthetic capacities compared to one-year-old (Y1) and two-year-old (Y2) foliage. As Y0 needles matured, values of Asat, Vcmax, Jmax, foliar LMA and nitrogen increased. Values of Vcmax, Jmax and Rd were related to foliar nitrogen but only in the youngest (Y0) cohort. Foliar ontogeny affected photosynthetic capacity more than growth temperature. Morphological and physiological cohort differences were reflected by their annual contribution to modeled C uptake, with a ~36% lower estimated annual C uptake by Y0 needles (LAI 0.52 m2m-2) compared to Y1&2 cohorts (LAI 0.67 m2m-2). Collectively, these results illustrate the physiological and ecological significance of characterizing multiple foliar cohorts during bud break and throughout the growth season, and for cumulative C uptake model estimates.« less

  18. Needle age and season influence photosynthetic temperature response and total annual carbon uptake in mature Picea mariana trees

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, Anna M.; Warren, Jeffrey; Hanson, Paul J.; Childs, Joanne; Wullschleger, Stan D.

    2015-01-01

    Using seasonal- and cohort-specific photosynthetic temperature response functions, we quantified the physiological significance of maintaining multiple foliar cohorts in mature (~40-45 year old) Picea mariana trees in an ombrotrophic Sphagnum-bog, northern Minnesota, USA. We measured photosynthetic capacity, foliar respiration (Rd), biochemistry and morphology to estimate annual carbon (C) uptake by cohort, season and canopy position. Temperature response of key photosynthetic parameters at 25 C (i.e., light-saturated rate of CO2 assimilation (Asat), light-saturated rate of Rubisco carboxylation (Vcmax), light-saturated electron transport rate (Jmax)) were clearly dependent on season and were generally less responsive in younger needles. Temperature optimums range between 18.7-23.7, 31.3-38.3 and 28.7-36.7 C for Asat, Vcmax and Jmax respectively. Current-year (Y0) foliage had lower photosynthetic capacities compared to one-year-old (Y1) and two-year-old (Y2) foliage. As Y0 needles matured, values of Asat, Vcmax, Jmax, foliar LMA and nitrogen increased. Values of Vcmax, Jmax and Rd were related to foliar nitrogen but only in the youngest (Y0) cohort. Foliar ontogeny affected photosynthetic capacity more than growth temperature. Morphological and physiological cohort differences were reflected by their annual contribution to modeled C uptake, with a ~36% lower estimated annual C uptake by Y0 needles (LAI 0.52 m2m-2) compared to Y1&2 cohorts (LAI 0.67 m2m-2). Collectively, these results illustrate the physiological and ecological significance of characterizing multiple foliar cohorts during bud break and throughout the growth season, and for cumulative C uptake model estimates.

  19. Does physiological acclimation to climate warming stabilize the ratio of canopy respiration to photosynthesis?

    PubMed

    Drake, John E; Tjoelker, Mark G; Aspinwall, Michael J; Reich, Peter B; Barton, Craig V M; Medlyn, Belinda E; Duursma, Remko A

    2016-08-01

    Given the contrasting short-term temperature dependences of gross primary production (GPP) and autotrophic respiration, the fraction of GPP respired by trees is predicted to increase with warming, providing a positive feedback to climate change. However, physiological acclimation may dampen or eliminate this response. We measured the fluxes of aboveground respiration (Ra ), GPP and their ratio (Ra /GPP) in large, field-grown Eucalyptus tereticornis trees exposed to ambient or warmed air temperatures (+3°C). We report continuous measurements of whole-canopy CO2 exchange, direct temperature response curves of leaf and canopy respiration, leaf and branch wood respiration, and diurnal photosynthetic measurements. Warming reduced photosynthesis, whereas physiological acclimation prevented a coincident increase in Ra . Ambient and warmed trees had a common nonlinear relationship between the fraction of GPP that was respired above ground (Ra /GPP) and the mean daily temperature. Thus, warming significantly increased Ra /GPP by moving plants to higher positions on the shared Ra /GPP vs daily temperature relationship, but this effect was modest and only notable during hot conditions. Despite the physiological acclimation of autotrophic respiration to warming, increases in temperature and the frequency of heat waves may modestly increase tree Ra /GPP, contributing to a positive feedback between climate warming and atmospheric CO2 accumulation. © 2016 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2016 New Phytologist Trust.

  20. Generalist–specialist trade-off during thermal acclimation

    PubMed Central

    Seebacher, Frank; Ducret, Varlérie; Little, Alexander G.; Adriaenssens, Bart

    2015-01-01

    The shape of performance curves and their plasticity define how individuals and populations respond to environmental variability. In theory, maximum performance decreases with an increase in performance breadth. However, reversible acclimation may counteract this generalist–specialist trade-off, because performance optima track environmental conditions so that there is no benefit of generalist phenotypes. We tested this hypothesis by acclimating individual mosquitofish (Gambusia holbrooki) to cool and warm temperatures consecutively and measuring performance curves of swimming performance after each acclimation treatment. Individuals from the same population differed significantly in performance maxima, performance breadth and the capacity for acclimation. As predicted, acclimation resulted in a shift of the temperature at which maximal performance occurred. Within acclimation treatments, there was a significant generalist–specialist trade-off in responses to acute temperature change. Surprisingly, however, there was also a trade-off across acclimation treatments, and animals with greater capacity for cold acclimation had lower performance maxima under warm conditions. Hence, cold acclimation may be viewed as a generalist strategy that extends performance breadth at the colder seasons, but comes at the cost of reduced performance at the warmer time of year. Acclimation therefore does not counteract a generalist–specialist trade-off and, at least in mosquitofish, the trade-off seems to be a system property that persists despite phenotypic plasticity. PMID:26064581

  1. Steady and dynamic photosynthetic responses of seedlings from contrasting successional groups under low-light growth conditions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun-Wen; Zhang, Qiang; Li, Xiao-Shuang; Cao, Kun-Fang

    2011-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that leaf-level photosynthetic-related traits might confer late successionals a competitive advantage over early successionals in low-light growth conditions, steady photosynthetic assimilation- and dynamic photosynthetic induction-related traits were examined in low-light-grown seedlings with contrasting successional status. Compared with the early successionals, late successionals as a group significantly exhibited lower leaf gas exchange rates. While late successionals required a longer time to respond to simulated sunflecks, they had lower rates of induction losses after sunflecks. Such photosynthetic induction traits allowed late successionals to more effectively utilize subsequent sunflecks. It was observed that plants with lower gas exchange rates responded more slowly to simulated sunfelcks, but they had lower rates of induction losses after sunflecks. In addition, the rate of response to sunflecks was positively correlated with the rate of induction loss after sunflecks across the successional status of species. A principal components analysis (PCA) demonstrated that early and late successionals were separated along the first axis of the PCA, and that early successionals were grouped on the right and were associated with higher gas exchange rates, fast responses to sunflecks, and rapid rates of induction loss after sunflecks; late successionals held an opposite pattern. Overall, our results suggest that smaller respiratory carbon losses and lower metabolic costs give late successionals a competitive advantage in low-light growth conditions, that late successionals have an advantage over early successionals in utilizing sunflecks, and thus that the successional status of species are mainly associated with the leaf-level photosynthetic-related traits. Copyright © Physiologia Plantarum 2010.

  2. Overexpression of plastidial thioredoxins f and m differentially alters photosynthetic activity and response to oxidative stress in tobacco plants

    PubMed Central

    Rey, Pascal; Sanz-Barrio, Ruth; Innocenti, Gilles; Ksas, Brigitte; Courteille, Agathe; Rumeau, Dominique; Issakidis-Bourguet, Emmanuelle; Farran, Inmaculada

    2013-01-01

    Plants display a remarkable diversity of thioredoxins (Trxs), reductases controlling the thiol redox status of proteins. The physiological function of many of them remains elusive, particularly for plastidial Trxs f and m, which are presumed based on biochemical data to regulate photosynthetic reactions and carbon metabolism. Recent reports revealed that Trxs f and m participate in vivo in the control of starch metabolism and cyclic photosynthetic electron transfer around photosystem I, respectively. To further delineate their in planta function, we compared the photosynthetic characteristics, the level and/or activity of various Trx targets and the responses to oxidative stress in transplastomic tobacco plants overexpressing either Trx f or Trx m. We found that plants overexpressing Trx m specifically exhibit altered growth, reduced chlorophyll content, impaired photosynthetic linear electron transfer and decreased pools of glutathione and ascorbate. In both transplastomic lines, activities of two enzymes involved in carbon metabolism, NADP-malate dehydrogenase and NADP-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase are markedly and similarly altered. In contrast, plants overexpressing Trx m specifically display increased capacity for methionine sulfoxide reductases, enzymes repairing damaged proteins by regenerating methionine from oxidized methionine. Finally, we also observed that transplastomic plants exhibit distinct responses when exposed to oxidative stress conditions generated by methyl viologen or exposure to high light combined with low temperature, the plants overexpressing Trx m being notably more tolerant than Wt and those overexpressing Trx f. Altogether, these data indicate that Trxs f and m fulfill distinct physiological functions. They prompt us to propose that the m type is involved in key processes linking photosynthetic activity, redox homeostasis and antioxidant mechanisms in the chloroplast. PMID:24137166

  3. A comparative study of the photosynthetic capacity in two green tide macroalgae using chlorophyll fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Qu, Tongfei; Zhao, Xinyu; Tang, Xianghai; Xiao, Hui; Tang, Xuexi

    2016-01-01

    Green tides have occurred in the Yellow Sea, China, every year from 2007 to 2015. The free-floating Ulva prolifera (Müller) J. Agardh was the causative macroalgal species. The co-occurring, attached U. intestinalis was also observed. Photosynthetic capacities were determined using chlorophyll fluorescence in situ and after 7 days lab acclimation, and a significant differences were noted. Pigment composition showed no obvious differences, but concentrations varied significantly, especially chlorophyll b in U. prolifera two times increase was observed after acclimation. The optimal photochemical efficiency of PS II (Fv/Fm) was significantly higher in U. prolifera. Photosynthetic rate (α), maximum relative electron transport rate (rETRmax), and minimum saturating irradiance (Ek), obtained from rapid light response curves (RLCs), showed almost the same photosynthetic physiological status as Fv/Fm. Quenching coefficients and low temperature (77 K) chlorophyll fluorescence emission spectra of thylakoid membranes analysis showed U. prolifera has a better recovery activity and plasticity of PSII than U. intestinalis. Furthermore, energy dissipation via non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) and state transitions showed efficacious photoprotection solution especially in U. prolifera suffered from the severe stresses. Results in the present study suggested that U. prolifera's higher photosynthetic capacity would contribute to its free-floating proliferation, and efficacious photoprotection in addition to favorable oceanographic conditions and high nutrient levels support its growth and aggregation.

  4. Physiological and biochemical response of the photosynthetic apparatus of two marine diatoms to Fe stress

    SciTech Connect

    McKay, R.M.L.; LaRoche, J.; Geider, R.J.

    1997-06-01

    Flavodoxin is a small electron-transfer protein capable of replacing ferredoxin during periods of Fe deficiency. When evaluating the suitability of flavodoxin as a diagnostic indicator for Fe limitation of phytoplankton growth, we examined its expression in two marine diatoms we cultured using trace-metal-buffered medium. Thalassiosira weissflogii and Phaeodactylum tricornutum were cultured in ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid-buffered Sargasso Sea water containing from 10 to 1000 nm added Fe. Trace-metal-buffered cultures of each diatom maintained high growth rates across the entire range of Fe additions. Similarly, declines in chlorophyll/cell and in the ratio of photosystem II variable-to-maximum fluorescence were negligible (P. tricornutum) to moderate (T. weissflogii, 54% decline in chlorophyll/cell and 22% decrease in variable-to-maximum fluorescence). Moreover, only minor variations in photosynthetic parameters were observed across the range of additions. In contrast, flavodoxin was expressed to high levels in low-Fe cultures. Despite the inverse relationship between flavodoxin expression and Fe content of the medium, its expression was seemingly independent of any of the indicators of cell physiology that were assayed. It appears that flavodoxin is expressed as an early-stage response to Fe stress and that its accumulation need not be intimately connected to limitations imposed by Fe on the growth rate of these diatoms.

  5. Ocean acidification mediates photosynthetic response to UV radiation and temperature increase in the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Gao, K.; Villafañe, V. E.; Helbling, E. W.

    2012-10-01

    Increasing atmospheric CO2 concentration is responsible for progressive ocean acidification, ocean warming as well as decreased thickness of upper mixing layer (UML), thus exposing phytoplankton cells not only to lower pH and higher temperatures but also to higher levels of solar UV radiation. In order to evaluate the combined effects of ocean acidification, UV radiation and temperature, we used the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum as a model organism and examined its physiological performance after grown under two CO2 concentrations (390 and 1000 μatm) for more than 20 generations. Compared to the ambient CO2 level (390 μatm), growth at the elevated CO2 concentration increased non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) of cells and partially counteracted the harm to PS II (photosystem II) caused by UV-A and UV-B. Such an effect was less pronounced under increased temperature levels. The ratio of repair to UV-B induced damage decreased with increased NPQ, reflecting induction of NPQ when repair dropped behind the damage, and it was higher under the ocean acidification condition, showing that the increased pCO2 and lowered pH counteracted UV-B induced harm. As for photosynthetic carbon fixation rate which increased with increasing temperature from 15 to 25 °C, the elevated CO2 and temperature levels synergistically interacted to reduce the inhibition caused by UV-B and thus increase the carbon fixation.

  6. Ocean acidification mediates photosynthetic response to UV radiation and temperature increase in the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Gao, K.; Villafañe, V. E.; Helbling, E. W.

    2012-06-01

    Increasing atmospheric CO2 concentration is responsible for progressive ocean acidification, ocean warming as well as decreased thickness of upper mixing layer (UML), thus exposing phytoplankton cells not only to lower pH and higher temperatures but also to higher levels of solar UV radiation. In order to evaluate the combined effects of ocean acidification, UV radiation and temperature, we used the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum as a model organism and examined its physiological performance after grown under two CO2 concentrations (390 and 1000 µatm) for more than 20 generations. Compared to the ambient CO2 level (390 µatm), growth at the elevated CO2 concentration increased non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) of cells and partially counteracted the harm to PSII caused by UV-A and UV-B. Such an effect was less pronounced under increased temperature levels. As for photosynthetic carbon fixation, the rate increased with increasing temperature from 15 to 25 °C, regardless of their growth CO2 levels. In addition, UV-induced inhibition of photosynthesis was inversely correlated to temperature. The ratio of repair to UV-induced damage showed inverse relationship with increased NPQ, showing higher values under the ocean acidification condition against UV-B, reflecting that the increased pCO2 and lowered pH counteracted UV-B induced harm.

  7. Photosynthetic Responses to the Environment. Proceedings Symposium held August 24 - 27, 1992. Volume 8

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-08-27

    Department of Agriculture, and Department of Energy. Generous gifts in support of the symposium were v donated by the Hawaiian Sugar Planter’s Association...Foundation, Washington D. C. Arja Pennanen, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland Zvi Plaut, Hawaii Sugar Planters’ Association, Aiea, Hawaii Barbara...Australia DYNAMIC LIGHT ACCLIMATION OF PSII Coordinated interactions between light-harvesting, energy conversion . electron transport and carbon

  8. Light history modulates antioxidant and photosynthetic responses of biofilms to both natural (light) and chemical (herbicides) stressors.

    PubMed

    Bonnineau, Chloé; Sague, Irene Gallardo; Urrea, Gemma; Guasch, Helena

    2012-05-01

    In multiple stress situations, the co-occurrence of environmental and chemical factors can influence organisms' ability to cope with toxicity. In this context, the influence of light adaptation on the response of freshwater biofilms to sudden light changes or to herbicides exposure was investigated by determining various parameters: diatom community composition, photosynthetic parameters, chlorophyll a content, antioxidant enzyme activities. Biofilms were grown in microcosms under sub-optimal, saturating, and high light intensities and showed already described characteristics of shade/light adaptation (community structure, photosynthetic adaptation, etc.). Light history modulated antioxidant and photosynthetic responses of biofilms to the stress caused by short-term exposure to sudden light changes or to herbicides. First biofilms adapted to sub-optimal light intensity (shade-adapted) were found to be more sensitive to an increase in light intensity than high-light adapted ones to a reduction in light intensity. Second, while light history influenced biofilms' response to glyphosate, it had little influence on biofilms' response to copper and none on its response to oxyfluorfen. Indeed glyphosate exposure led to a stronger decrease in photosynthetic efficiency of shade-adapted biofilms (EC(50) = 11.7 mg L(-1)) than of high-light adapted communities (EC(50) = 35.6 mg L(-1)). Copper exposure led to an activation of ascorbate peroxidase (APX) in biofilms adapted to sub-optimal and saturating light intensity while the protein content decreased in all biofilms exposed to copper. Oxyfluorfen toxicity was independent of light history provoking an increase in APX activity. In conclusion this study showed that both previous exposure to contaminants and physical habitat characteristics might influence community tolerance to disturbances strongly.

  9. Plant acclimation impacts carbon allocation to isoprene emissions: evidence from past to future CO2 levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Boer, Hugo J.; van der Laan, Annick; Dekker, Stefan C.; Holzinger, Rupert

    2016-04-01

    Isoprene (C5H8) is produced in plant leaves as a side product of photosynthesis, whereby approximately 0.1-2.0% of the photosynthetic carbon uptake is released back into the atmosphere via isoprene emissions. Isoprene biosynthesis is thought to alleviate oxidative stress, specifically in warm, dry and high-light environments. Moreover, isoprene biosynthesis is influenced by atmospheric CO2 concentrations in the short term (responses in the leaf interior CO2 concentration (Ci), and in the long term (>weeks) via acclimation in photosynthetic biochemistry. In order to understand the effects of CO2-induced climate change on carbon allocation in plants it is therefore important to quantify how isoprene biosynthesis and emissions are effected by both short-term responses and long-term acclimation to rising atmospheric CO2 levels. A promising development for modelling CO2-induced changes in isoprene emissions is the Leaf-Energetic-Status model (referred to as LES-model hereafter, see Harrison et al., 2013 and Morfopoulos et al., 2014). This model simulates isoprene emissions based on the hypothesis that isoprene biosynthesis depends on the imbalance between the photosynthetic electron supply of reducing power and the electron demands of carbon fixation. In addition to environmental conditions, this imbalance is determined by the photosynthetic electron transport capacity (Jmax) and the maximum carboxylation capacity of Rubisco (V cmax). Here we compare predictions of the LES-model with observed isoprene emission responses of Quercus robur (pedunculate oak) specimen that acclimated to CO2 levels representative of the last glacial, the present and the end of this century (200, 400 and 800 ppm, respectively) for two growing seasons. Plants were grown in walk-in growth chambers with tight control of light, temperature, humidity and CO2 concentrations. Photosynthetic biochemical parameters V cmax and Jmax were determined with a Licor LI-6400XT photosynthesis system

  10. Seasonal patterns of photosynthetic light response in Douglas-fir seedlings subjected to elevated atmospheric CO(2) and temperature.

    PubMed

    Lewis, J. D.; Olszyk, D.; Tingey, D. T.

    1999-04-01

    Increases in atmospheric CO(2) concentration and temperature are predicted to increase the light response of photosynthesis by increasing light-saturated photosynthetic rates and apparent quantum yields. We examined the interactive effects of elevated atmospheric CO(2) concentration and temperature on the light response of photosynthesis in Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco) seedlings. Seedlings were grown in sunlit chambers controlled to track either ambient (~400 ppm) CO(2) or ambient + 200 ppm CO(2), at ambient temperature or ambient + 4 degrees C. Photosynthetic light response curves were measured over an 18-month period beginning 32 months after treatments were initiated. Light-response curves were measured at the growth CO(2) concentration, and were used to calculate the light-saturated rate of photosynthesis, light compensation point, quantum yield and respiration rate. Elevated CO(2) increased apparent quantum yields during two of five measurement periods, but did not significantly affect light-saturated net photosynthetic rates, light compensation points or respiration rates. Elevated temperature increased all parameters. There were no significant interactions between CO(2) concentration and temperature. We conclude that down-regulation of photosynthesis occurred in the elevated CO(2) treatments such that carbon uptake at a given irradiance was similar across CO(2) treatments. In contrast, increasing temperature may substantially increase carbon uptake rates in Douglas-fir, assuming other environmental factors do not limit photosynthesis; however, it is not clear whether the increased carbon uptake will increase growth rates or be offset by increased carbon efflux through respiration.

  11. Thermal Acclimation in Ectotherms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westmoreland, David

    1994-01-01

    A major contributor to our understanding of the adaptation of all organisms to the physical environment is physiological ecology. Described here is an inexpensive, reliable and simple experiment to aid in helping students to understand better the acclimation process. (ZWH)

  12. Thermal Acclimation in Ectotherms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westmoreland, David

    1994-01-01

    A major contributor to our understanding of the adaptation of all organisms to the physical environment is physiological ecology. Described here is an inexpensive, reliable and simple experiment to aid in helping students to understand better the acclimation process. (ZWH)

  13. Potential regulation of gene expression in photosynthetic cells by redox and energy state: approaches towards better understanding.

    PubMed

    Pfannschmidt, T; Bräutigam, K; Wagner, R; Dietzel, L; Schröter, Y; Steiner, S; Nykytenko, A

    2009-02-01

    Photosynthetic electron transport is performed by a chain of redox components that are electrochemically connected in series. Its efficiency depends on the balanced action of the photosystems and on the interaction with the dark reaction. Plants are sessile and cannot escape from environmental conditions such as fluctuating illumination, limitation of CO(2) fixation by low temperatures, salinity, or low nutrient or water availability, which disturb the homeostasis of the photosynthetic process. Photosynthetic organisms, therefore, have developed various molecular acclimation mechanisms that maintain or restore photosynthetic efficiency under adverse conditions and counteract abiotic stresses. Recent studies indicate that redox signals from photosynthetic electron transport and reactive oxygen species (ROS) or ROS-scavenging molecules play a central role in the regulation of acclimation and stress responses. The underlying signalling network of photosynthetic redox control is largely unknown, but it is already apparent that gene regulation by redox signals is of major importance for plants. Signalling cascades controlling the expression of chloroplast and nuclear genes have been identified and dissection of the different pathways is advancing. Because of the direction of information flow, photosynthetic redox signals can be defined as a distinct class of retrograde signals in addition to signals from organellar gene expression or pigment biosynthesis. They represent a vital signal of mature chloroplasts that report their present functional state to the nucleus. Here we describe possible problems in the elucidation of redox signalling networks and discuss some aspects of plant cell biology that are important for developing suitable experimental approaches. The photosynthetic function of chloroplasts represents an important sensor that integrates various abiotic changes in the environment into corresponding molecular signals, which, in turn, regulate cellular

  14. Responses of photosynthetic assemblage structure and physiology to variations in nitrogen substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rii, Y. M.; Bidigare, R.; Church, M. J.

    2016-02-01

    Picophytoplankton (<3 μm) are major contributors to productivity and biomass in the North Pacific Subtropical Gyre (NPSG). Due to the persistent dearth of fixed inorganic nitrogen in the well-lit region, nitrogen availability is central to structuring planktonic communities through competition for this limiting resource. We examined changes in phytoplankton assemblage structure and physiology in response to nitrogen enrichments in five experiments conducted between 2011-2013 (two summer, two spring, and one winter). Natural seawater planktonic communities from the surface water at Station ALOHA were enriched with nitrate (NO3-) or ammonium (NH4+) and incubated over 120 to 144 hours. During summer experiments, picophytoplankton exhibited a rapid increase in 14C-based primary production, with phytoplankton >3 µm becoming increasingly more productive later in the experiment (120 h). Chlorophyll a concentrations increased gradually over the experiment period. During spring experiments, phytoplankton displayed the opposite pattern; chlorophyll a concentrations increased rapidly (48 h, 3-fold) but rates of photosynthetic carbon fixation did not increase until after 96 h. For the winter experiment, both primary productivity and chlorophyll a increased gradually over the experimental period. HPLC pigment analyses and high-throughput sequencing of 18S rRNA genes revealed that pennate diatoms, haptophytes, and dictyochophytes thrived in both N enrichments, but chrysophytes flourished in the NH4+ additions. Overall, our results indicate that responses in biomass and productivity differed in both time scale and magnitude between experiments conducted during different seasons, shedding insight into the potential controls of phytoplankton nutrient acquisition and growth in the euphotic zone.

  15. Photosynthetic response of Eriophorum vaginatum to in situ shrub shading in tussock tundra of northern Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson-Smith, A.; Pattison, R.; Sullivan, P.; Welker, J. M.

    2009-12-01

    Eriophorum vaginatum (Cotton Grass) is an important component of moist acidic tussock tundra, a plant community that appears to be undergoing changes in species composition associated with climate warming. This species is one of the most abundant in the arctic tundra, and provides important forage for caribou in their calving grounds on the Arctic Coastal Plain and along their migratory route through the foothills of Alaska. Recently, remote sensing data, repeat photography and plot-level measurements have indicated that shrub abundance is increasing while Eriophorum abundance is either constant or decreasing. One possible explanation for the reduction of Eriophorum while Betula nana is increasing, is that lower light levels in the taller Betula canopy may be constraining Eriophorum photosynthesis and subsequently reducing plant growth. This study measured the effect of shading on the light response of Eriphorum leaf photosynthesis in four different sites near Toolik Lake Alaska during the summer of 2009. Measurements were taken in: 1) a shrub patch within the drift zone of the ITEX long term snow fence experiment, 2) an LTER shade house (50% shading) built in 1989, 3) water track site 1 and water track site 2 (i.e. control areas with no experimental manipulations) Average photosynthetic rates for Eriophorum at a light level of 800 PAR varied from 3.8 to 10.9 umol m-2 s-1 and were not significantly different in shaded and unshaded areas. This study indicates that shading by shrubs does not appear to be altering the light response of Eriophorum nor does long-term shading by itself eliminate Eriophorum from the community. An alternative explanation for the decline of Eriophorum while Betula increases in abundance under changing climates may be related to plant and soil mineral nutrition, plant water relations or biotic processes involving herbivores.

  16. Photosynthetic responses of field-grown Pinus radiata trees to artificial and aphid-induced defoliation.

    PubMed

    Eyles, Alieta; Smith, David; Pinkard, Elizabeth A; Smith, Ian; Corkrey, Ross; Elms, Stephen; Beadle, Chris; Mohammed, Caroline

    2011-06-01

    The phloem-feeding aphid Essigella californica represents a potential threat to the productivity of Pinus radiata plantations in south-eastern Australia. Five- and nine-year-old field trials were used to characterize the effects of artificial and natural aphid-induced (E. californica) defoliation, respectively, on shoot photosynthesis and growth. Photosynthetic capacity (A(max)) was significantly greater following a 25% (D25) (13.8 µmol m(-2) s(-1)) and a 50% (D50) (15.9 µmol m(-2) s(-1)) single-event upper-crown artificial defoliation, 3 weeks after defoliation than in undefoliated control trees (12.9 µmol m(-2) s(-1)). This response was consistently observed for up to 11 weeks after the defoliation event; by Week 16, there was no difference in A(max) between control and defoliated trees. In the D50 treatment, this increased A(max) was not sufficient to fully compensate for the foliage loss as evidenced by the reduced diameter increment (by 15%) in defoliated trees 36 weeks after defoliation. In contrast, diameter increment of trees in the D25 treatment was unaffected by defoliation. The A(max) of trees experiencing upper-crown defoliation by natural and repeated E. californica infestations varied, depending on host genotype. Despite clear differences in defoliation levels between resistant and susceptible genotypes (17 vs. 35% of tree crown defoliated, respectively), growth of susceptible genotypes was not significantly different from that of resistant genotypes. The observed increases in A(max) in the lower crown of the canopy following attack suggested that susceptible genotypes were able to partly compensate for the loss of foliage by compensatory photosynthesis. The capacity of P. radiata to regulate photosynthesis in response to natural aphid-induced defoliation provides evidence that the impact of E. californica attack on stem growth will be less than expected, at least for up to 35% defoliation.

  17. Can leaf net carbon gain acclimate to keep up with global warming?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vico, Giulia; Manzoni, Stefano; Way, Danielle; Hurry, Vaughan

    2016-04-01

    Plants are able to adjust their physiological activity to fluctuations and long-term changes in their growing environment. Nevertheless, projected increases in temperature will occur with unprecedented speed. Will global warming exceed the thermal acclimation capacity of leaves, thus reducing net CO2 assimilation? Such a reduction in net CO2 assimilation rate (Anet) in response to warming may deplete ecosystems' net primary productivity, with global impacts on the carbon cycling. Here we combine data on net photosynthetic thermal acclimation to changes in temperature with a probabilistic description of leaf temperature variability. We analytically obtain the probability distribution of the net CO2 assimilation rate as a function of species-specific leaf traits and growing conditions. Using this approach, we study the effects of mean leaf temperature and its variability on average Anet and the frequency of occurrence of sub-optimal thermal conditions. To maximize the net CO2 assimilation in warmer conditions, the thermal optimum for Anet (Topt) must track the growing temperature. Observations suggest that plants' thermal acclimation capacity is limited, so that growing temperatures cannot be tracked by the Topt. It is thus likely that net CO2 assimilation rates will decline in the future. Furthermore, for set leaf traits, large fluctuations in leaf temperature reduce average Anet and increase the frequency of occurrence of sub-optimal conditions for net CO2 assimilation.

  18. Long-term adaptive response to high-frequency light signals in the unicellular photosynthetic eukaryote Dunaliella salina.

    PubMed

    Combe, Charlotte; Hartmann, Philipp; Rabouille, Sophie; Talec, Amelie; Bernard, Olivier; Sciandra, Antoine

    2015-06-01

    Productivity of microalgal cultivation processes is tightly related to photosynthetic efficiency, and therefore to light availability at the cell scale. In an agitated, highly turbid suspension,the light signal received by a single phytoplankton cell moving in a dense culture is a succession of flashes. The growth characteristics of microalgae under such dynamic light conditions are thus fundamental information to understand nonlinear properties of the photosynthetic process and to improve cultivation process design and operation. Studies of the long term consequences of dynamic illumination regime on photosynthesis require a very specific experimental set-up where fast varying signals are applied on the long term. In order to investigate the growth response of the unicellular photosynthetic eukaryote Dunaliella salina (Chlorophyceae) to intermittent light exposure, different light regimes using LEDs with the same average total light dose were applied in continuous cultures. Flashing light with different durations of light flashes (△t of 30 s, 15 s, 2 s and 0.1 s) followed by dark periods of variable length (0.67 ≤ L:D ≤ 2) yielding flash frequencies in the range 0.017-5 Hz, were compared to continuous illumination. Specific growth rate, photosynthetic pigments, lipid productivity and elemental composition were measured on two duplicates for each irradiance condition. The different treatments of intermittent light led to specific growth rates ranging from 0.25 to 0.93 day(-1) . While photosynthetic efficiency was enhanced with increased flash frequency, no significant differences were observed in the particular carbon and chlorophyll content. Pigment analysis showed that within this range of flash frequency, cells progressively photoacclimated to the average light intensity.

  19. Seagrass canopy photosynthetic response is a function of canopy density and light environment: a model for Amphibolis griffithii.

    PubMed

    Hedley, John D; McMahon, Kathryn; Fearns, Peter

    2014-01-01

    A three-dimensional computer model of canopies of the seagrass Amphibolis griffithii was used to investigate the consequences of variations in canopy structure and benthic light environment on leaf-level photosynthetic saturation state. The model was constructed using empirical data of plant morphometrics from a previously conducted shading experiment and validated well to in-situ data on light attenuation in canopies of different densities. Using published values of the leaf-level saturating irradiance for photosynthesis, results show that the interaction of canopy density and canopy-scale photosynthetic response is complex and non-linear, due to the combination of self-shading and the non-linearity of photosynthesis versus irradiance (P-I) curves near saturating irradiance. Therefore studies of light limitation in seagrasses should consider variation in canopy structure and density. Based on empirical work, we propose a number of possible measures for canopy scale photosynthetic response that can be plotted to yield isoclines in the space of canopy density and light environment. These plots can be used to interpret the significance of canopy changes induced as a response to decreases in the benthic light environment: in some cases canopy thinning can lead to an equivalent leaf level light environment, in others physiological changes may also be required but these alone may be inadequate for canopy survival. By providing insight to these processes the methods developed here could be a valuable management tool for seagrass conservation during dredging or other coastal developments.

  20. Seagrass Canopy Photosynthetic Response Is a Function of Canopy Density and Light Environment: A Model for Amphibolis griffithii

    PubMed Central

    Hedley, John D.; McMahon, Kathryn; Fearns, Peter

    2014-01-01

    A three-dimensional computer model of canopies of the seagrass Amphibolis griffithii was used to investigate the consequences of variations in canopy structure and benthic light environment on leaf-level photosynthetic saturation state. The model was constructed using empirical data of plant morphometrics from a previously conducted shading experiment and validated well to in-situ data on light attenuation in canopies of different densities. Using published values of the leaf-level saturating irradiance for photosynthesis, results show that the interaction of canopy density and canopy-scale photosynthetic response is complex and non-linear, due to the combination of self-shading and the non-linearity of photosynthesis versus irradiance (P-I) curves near saturating irradiance. Therefore studies of light limitation in seagrasses should consider variation in canopy structure and density. Based on empirical work, we propose a number of possible measures for canopy scale photosynthetic response that can be plotted to yield isoclines in the space of canopy density and light environment. These plots can be used to interpret the significance of canopy changes induced as a response to decreases in the benthic light environment: in some cases canopy thinning can lead to an equivalent leaf level light environment, in others physiological changes may also be required but these alone may be inadequate for canopy survival. By providing insight to these processes the methods developed here could be a valuable management tool for seagrass conservation during dredging or other coastal developments. PMID:25347849

  1. Photosynthetic responses of lettuce to downy mildew infection and cytokinin treatment.

    PubMed

    Prokopová, Jitka; Spundová, Martina; Sedlárová, Michaela; Husicková, Alexandra; Novotný, Radko; Dolezal, Karel; Naus, Jan; Lebeda, Ales

    2010-08-01

    Changes in primary metabolism of lettuce, Lactuca sativa L. (cv. Cobham Green), induced by compatible interaction with the biotrophic oomycete pathogen Bremia lactucae Regel (race BL 16), under two intensities of illumination in the presence and absence of exogenous cytokinins were studied by chlorophyll fluorescence imaging. Thirteen days post-inoculation leaf discs infected by B. lactucae exhibited impairments of photosynthesis associated with biotrophic infections, including: reductions in photosynthetic pigment contents and the maximum quantum yield of photosystem II photochemistry (F(V)/F(M)), inhibition of electron transport (Phi(PSII)) and increased non-photochemical chlorophyll fluorescence quenching (NPQ). Detected changes in photosynthetic parameters correlated with the leaf area colonized by the pathogen's intercellular hyphae. Applications of two cytokinins, benzylaminopurine and meta-topolin, previously shown to suppress B. lactucae sporulation if applied 24 h prior to inoculation at a concentration of 200 microM, retarded the pathogen's asexual reproduction with no apparent negative effects on the host's photosynthetic apparatus. However, long-lasting treatment of healthy tissues with this high concentration of exogenous cytokinin led to effects parallel to pathogenesis: reductions in photosynthetic pigment contents accompanied by inhibition of photosystem II photochemistry and electron transport. These effects of both prolonged exposure to cytokinins and the pathogenesis were weaker in discs exposed to the lower photosynthetic photon flux density. The role of cytokinins in plant-biotrophic pathogen interactions and their potential as disease control agents are discussed. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Photosynthetic characteristics of a multicellular green alga Volvox carteri in response to external CO2 levels possibly regulated by CCM1/CIA5 ortholog.

    PubMed

    Yamano, Takashi; Fujita, Akimitsu; Fukuzawa, Hideya

    2011-09-01

    When CO(2) supply is limited, aquatic photosynthetic organisms induce a CO(2)-concentrating mechanism (CCM) and acclimate to the CO(2)-limiting environment. Although the CCM is well studied in unicellular green algae such as Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, physiological aspects of the CCM and its associated genes in multicellular algae are poorly understood. In this study, by measuring photosynthetic affinity for CO(2), we present physiological data in support of a CCM in a multicellular green alga, Volvox carteri. The low-CO(2)-grown Volvox cells showed much higher affinity for inorganic carbon compared with high-CO(2)-grown cells. Addition of ethoxyzolamide, a membrane-permeable carbonic anhydrase inhibitor, to the culture remarkably reduced the photosynthetic affinity of low-CO(2) grown Volvox cells, indicating that an intracellular carbonic anhydrase contributed to the Volvox CCM. We also isolated a gene encoding a protein orthologous to CCM1/CIA5, a master regulator of the CCM in Chlamydomonas, from Volvox carteri. Volvox CCM1 encoded a protein with 701 amino acid residues showing 51.1% sequence identity with Chlamydomonas CCM1. Comparison of Volvox and Chlamydomonas CCM1 revealed a highly conserved N-terminal region containing zinc-binding amino acid residues, putative nuclear localization and export signals, and a C-terminal region containing a putative LXXLL protein-protein interaction motif. Based on these results, we discuss the physiological and genetic aspects of the CCM in Chlamydomonas and Volvox.

  3. Two Cyanobacterial Photoreceptors Regulate Photosynthetic Light Harvesting by Sensing Teal, Green, Yellow, and Red Light.

    PubMed

    Wiltbank, Lisa B; Kehoe, David M

    2016-02-09

    The genomes of many photosynthetic and nonphotosynthetic bacteria encode numerous phytochrome superfamily photoreceptors whose functions and interactions are largely unknown. Cyanobacterial genomes encode particularly large numbers of phytochrome superfamily members called cyanobacteriochromes. These have diverse light color-sensing abilities, and their functions and interactions are just beginning to be understood. One of the best characterized of these functions is the regulation of photosynthetic light-harvesting antenna composition in the cyanobacterium Fremyella diplosiphon by the cyanobacteriochrome RcaE in response to red and green light, a process known as chromatic acclimation. We have identified a new cyanobacteriochrome named DpxA that maximally senses teal (absorption maximum, 494 nm) and yellow (absorption maximum, 568 nm) light and represses the accumulation of a key light-harvesting protein called phycoerythrin, which is also regulated by RcaE during chromatic acclimation. Like RcaE, DpxA is a two-component system kinase, although these two photoreceptors can influence phycoerythrin expression through different signaling pathways. The peak responsiveness of DpxA to teal and yellow light provides highly refined color discrimination in the green spectral region, which provides important wavelengths for photosynthetic light harvesting in cyanobacteria. These results redefine chromatic acclimation in cyanobacteria and demonstrate that cyanobacteriochromes can coordinately impart sophisticated light color sensing across the visible spectrum to regulate important photosynthetic acclimation processes. The large number of cyanobacteriochrome photoreceptors encoded by cyanobacterial genomes suggests that these organisms are capable of extremely complex light color sensing and responsiveness, yet little is known about their functions and interactions. Our work uncovers previously undescribed cooperation between two photoreceptors with very different light

  4. Seasonally different response of photosynthetic activity to daytime and night-time warming in the Northern Hemisphere

    DOE PAGES

    Tan, Jianguang; Piao, Shilong; Chen, Anping; ...

    2014-08-27

    Over the last century the Northern Hemisphere has experienced rapid climate warming, but this warming has not been evenly distributed seasonally, as well as diurnally. The implications of such seasonal and diurnal heterogeneous warming on regional and global vegetation photosynthetic activity, however, are still poorly understood. Here, we investigated for different seasons how photosynthetic activity of vegetation correlates with changes in seasonal daytime and night-time temperature across the Northern Hemisphere (>30°N), using Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) data from 1982 to 2011 obtained from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR). Our analysis revealed some striking seasonal differences in themore » response of NDVI to changes in day- versus night-time temperatures. For instance, while higher daytime temperature (Tmax) is generally associated with higher NDVI values across the boreal zone, the area exhibiting a statistically significant positive correlation between Tmax and NDVI is much larger in spring (41% of area in boreal zone – total area 12.6 × 106 km2) than in summer and autumn (14% and 9%, respectively). In contrast to the predominantly positive response of boreal ecosystems to changes in Tmax, increases in Tmax tended to negatively influence vegetation growth in temperate dry regions, particularly during summer. Changes in night-time temperature (Tmin) correlated negatively with autumnal NDVI in most of the Northern Hemisphere, but had a positive effect on spring and summer NDVI in most temperate regions (e.g., Central North America and Central Asia). Such divergent covariance between the photosynthetic activity of Northern Hemispheric vegetation and day- and night-time temperature changes among different seasons and climate zones suggests a changing dominance of ecophysiological processes across time and space. Lastly, understanding the seasonally different responses of vegetation photosynthetic activity to diurnal

  5. Weak vertical canopy gradients of photosynthetic capacities and stomatal responses in a fertile Norway spruce stand.

    PubMed

    Tarvainen, Lasse; Wallin, Göran; Uddling, Johan

    2013-12-01

    The sensitivity of carbon (C) assimilation to within-canopy nitrogen (N) allocation and of stomatal conductance (g s) to environmental variables were investigated along a vertical canopy gradient in a fertile Norway spruce [Picea abies (L.) Karst.] stand. Maximum rates of ribulose bisphosphate-saturated carboxylation (V (cmax)) and electron transport (J (max)) exhibited weak relationships with needle N content. Using these relationships together with a combined stomatal-photosynthesis model, it was found that the sensitivity of C assimilation of 12 1-year old shoots to within-canopy N allocation pattern was very weak. Modelled C assimilation based on optimal compared to observed N allocation pattern increased by only 1-2 %, and altering total needle N content by ± 30 % resulted in a 2-4 % change in modelled C assimilation. C assimilation was more sensitive to water use and changed by 8-12 % in response to ± 30 % altered stomatal conductance. No indications of significant limitations of photosynthesis by other nutrients or non-optimal within-canopy allocation of water were detected. The sensitivity of g s to photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD) was found to be stronger in the lower canopy, while no significant within-canopy variation was observed in light-saturated g( s) or stomatal sensitivity to vapour pressure deficit (VPD). The results of this study show that, at this N rich site, photosynthesis integrated for shoots at different canopy positions is only marginally affected by N allocation pattern and that increased stand-scale N availability would only be truly beneficial to canopy photosynthesis if it resulted in increased leaf area.

  6. Anatomical, biochemical, and photosynthetic responses to recent allopolyploidy in Glycine dolichocarpa (Fabaceae).

    PubMed

    Coate, Jeremy E; Luciano, Amelia K; Seralathan, Vasu; Minchew, Kevin J; Owens, Tom G; Doyle, Jeff J

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that polyploidy has pronounced effects on photosynthesis. Most of these studies have focused on synthetic or recently formed autopolyploids, and comparatively little is known about the integrated effects of natural allopolyploidy, which involves hybridity and genome doubling and often incorporates multiple genotypes through recurrent origins and lineage recombination. Glycine dolichocarpa (designated T2) is a natural allotetraploid with multiple origins. We quantified 21 anatomical, biochemical, and physiological phenotypes relating to photosynthesis in T2 and its diploid progenitors, G. tomentella (D3) and G. syndetika (D4). To assess how direction of cross affects these phenotypes, we included three T2 accessions having D3-like plastids (T2(D3)) and two accessions having D4-like plastids (T2(D4)). T2 accessions were transgressive (more extreme than any diploid accession) for 17 of 21 phenotypes, and species means differed significantly in T2 vs. both progenitors for four of 21 phenotypes (higher for guard cell length, electron transport capacity [J(max)] per palisade cell, and J(max) per mesophyll cell; lower for palisade cells per unit leaf area). Within T2, four of 21 parameters differed significantly between T2(D3) and T2(D4) (palisade cell volume; chloroplast number and volume per unit leaf area; and J(max) per unit leaf area). T2 is characterized by transgressive photosynthesis-related phenotypes (including an ca. 2-fold increase in J(max) per cell), as well as by significant intraspecies variation correlating with plastid type. These data indicate prominent roles for both nucleotypic effects and cytoplasmic factors in photosynthetic responses to allopolyploidy.

  7. Response of photosynthetic apparatus to moderate high temperature in contrasting wheat cultivars at different oxygen concentrations.

    PubMed

    Stasik, Oleg; Jones, Hamlyn G

    2007-01-01

    The photosynthetic responses to moderately high temperatures (38 degrees C, imposed at 21% or 2% O(2) in air and 1500 mumol m(-2) s(-1)) were compared in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) cultivars grown in northern regions of Ukraine and expected to be relatively sensitive to high temperatures ('North' cultivars) and in cultivars grown in southern regions and expected to be relatively heat-tolerant ('South' cultivars). Heating intact leaves in 21% O(2) for 1 h decreased CO(2) assimilation by c. 63% in 'North' cultivars and only c. 32% in 'South' cultivars, with a decrease in PSII activity being observed in only one of the 'North' cultivars. Carboxylation efficiency was decreased by about 2.7-fold in 'North' cultivars with no significant effect in 'South' cultivars. The maximum rates of carboxylation by Rubisco in vivo, V(cmax), estimated from Farquhar's model, increased more than 2-fold in 'South' cultivars and remained unchanged in 'North' cultivars while the maximum rate of RuBP regeneration, J(max), decreased by 53% and 21% in 'North' and 'South' cultivars, respectively. Where the heat treatment was imposed in 2% O(2) this increased (as compared with treatment at 21% O(2)) the inhibitory effect on CO(2) assimilation in tolerant cultivars, but decreased it in sensitive ones. The results suggested that differences in tolerance of moderately high temperatures in wheat relate to the stability of the Rubisco function and to RuBP regeneration activity rather than to the effects on PSII activity or stomatal control.

  8. Effects of salinity acclimation on Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase responses and FXYD11 expression in the gills and kidneys of the Japanese eel (Anguilla japonica).

    PubMed

    Tang, Cheng-Hao; Lai, Dong-Yang; Lee, Tsung-Han

    2012-11-01

    Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase (NKA) is a primary active pump provides the driving force for ion-transporting systems in the osmoregulatory tissues of teleosts. Therefore, modulation of NKA expression or activity and its regulatory subunit, FXYD protein, is essential for teleosts in salinity adaptation. To understand the mechanisms for modulation of NKA in catadromous fishes, NKA expression and activity, cloning and mRNA expression of FXYD11 (AjFXYD11) were examined in Japanese eel (Anguilla japonica) exposed to fresh water (FW) and seawater (SW; 35‰). Expression and activity of NKA as well as mRNA expression of AjFXYD11 in gills were elevated in SW eel compared to FW eel. Conversely, NKA responses in eel kidneys were higher in FW group than SW group, whereas no significant difference was found in renal AjFXYD11 expression between the two groups. Comparison of NKA activity and AjFXYD11 expression between two osmoregulatory tissues suggested that AjFXYD11 plays a specific, functional role in gills. However, since cortisol plays an important role for regulation of ion transport in teleost SW acclimation and gill AjFXYD11 expression was elevated in SW eel, the organ culture approach was used to study the effect of cortisol on gill AjFXYD11 mRNA expression. Our results revealed that cortisol treatment increased the levels of gill AjFXYD11 transcripts. This finding suggested that cortisol could be involved in the regulation of NKA by altering AjFXYD11 expression during the process of SW acclimation in A. japonica. Taken together, the differential expression of branchial and renal NKA and AjFXYD11 implicated their roles in the osmotic homeostasis of Japanese eel exposed to environments of different salinities.

  9. Differences in photosynthetic responses of NADP-ME type C4 species to high light.

    PubMed

    Romanowska, Elżbieta; Buczyńska, Alicja; Wasilewska, Wioleta; Krupnik, Tomasz; Drożak, Anna; Rogowski, Paweł; Parys, Eugeniusz; Zienkiewicz, Maksymilian

    2017-03-01

    Three species chosen as representatives of NADP-ME C4 subtype exhibit different sensitivity toward photoinhibition, and great photochemical differences were found to exist between the species. These characteristics might be due to the imbalance in the excitation energy between the photosystems present in M and BS cells, and also due to that between species caused by the penetration of light inside the leaves. Such regulation in the distribution of light intensity between M and BS cells shows that co-operation between both the metabolic systems determines effective photosynthesis and reduces the harmful effects of high light on the degradation of PSII through the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). We have investigated several physiological parameters of NADP-ME-type C4 species (e.g., Zea mays, Echinochloa crus-galli, and Digitaria sanguinalis) grown under moderate light intensity (200 µmol photons m(-2) s(-1)) and, subsequently, exposed to excess light intensity (HL, 1600 µmol photons m(-2) s(-1)). Our main interest was to understand why these species, grown under identical conditions, differ in their responses toward high light, and what is the physiological significance of these differences. Among the investigated species, Echinochloa crus-galli is best adapted to HL treatment. High resistance of the photosynthetic apparatus of E. crus-galli to HL was accompanied by an elevated level of phosphorylation of PSII proteins, and higher values of photochemical quenching, ATP/ADP ratio, activity of PSI and PSII complexes, as well as integrity of the thylakoid membranes. It was also shown that the non-radiative dissipation of energy in the studied plants was not dependent on carotenoid contents and, thus, other photoprotective mechanisms might have been engaged under HL stress conditions. The activity of the enzymes superoxide dismutase and ascorbate peroxidase as well as the content of malondialdehyde and H2O2 suggests that antioxidant defense is not

  10. Hydrogen Peroxide Alleviates Nickel-Inhibited Photosynthetic Responses through Increase in Use-Efficiency of Nitrogen and Sulfur, and Glutathione Production in Mustard.

    PubMed

    Khan, M I R; Khan, Nafees A; Masood, Asim; Per, Tasir S; Asgher, Mohd

    2016-01-01

    The response of two mustard (Brassica juncea L.) cultivars differing in photosynthetic capacity to different concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) or nickel (Ni) was evaluated. Further, the effect of H2O2 on photosynthetic responses of the mustard cultivars grown with or without Ni stress was studied. Application of 50 μM H2O2 increased photosynthesis and growth more prominently in high photosynthetic capacity cultivar (Varuna) than low photosynthetic capacity cultivar (RH30) grown without Ni stress. The H2O2 application also resulted in alleviation of photosynthetic inhibition induced by 200 mg Ni kg(-1) soil through increased photosynthetic nitrogen-use efficiency (NUE), sulfur-use efficiency (SUE), and glutathione (GSH) reduced production together with decreased lipid peroxidation and electrolyte leakage in both the cultivars. However, the effect of H2O2 was more pronounced in Varuna than RH30. The greater increase in photosynthetic-NUE and SUE and GSH production with H2O2 in Varuna resulted from higher increase in activity of nitrogen (N) and sulfur (S) assimilation enzymes, nitrate reductase and ATP-sulfurylase, respectively resulting in enhanced N and S assimilation. The increased N and S content contributed to the higher activity of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase under Ni stress. Application of H2O2 also regulated PS II activity and stomatal movement under Ni stress for maintaining higher photosynthetic potential in Varuna. Thus, H2O2 may be considered as a potential signaling molecule for augmenting photosynthetic potential of mustard plants under optimal and Ni stress conditions. It alleviates Ni stress through the regulation of stomatal and non-stomotal limitations, and photosynthetic-NUE and -SUE and GSH production.

  11. Hydrogen Peroxide Alleviates Nickel-Inhibited Photosynthetic Responses through Increase in Use-Efficiency of Nitrogen and Sulfur, and Glutathione Production in Mustard

    PubMed Central

    Khan, M. I. R.; Khan, Nafees A.; Masood, Asim; Per, Tasir S.; Asgher, Mohd

    2016-01-01

    The response of two mustard (Brassica juncea L.) cultivars differing in photosynthetic capacity to different concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) or nickel (Ni) was evaluated. Further, the effect of H2O2 on photosynthetic responses of the mustard cultivars grown with or without Ni stress was studied. Application of 50 μM H2O2 increased photosynthesis and growth more prominently in high photosynthetic capacity cultivar (Varuna) than low photosynthetic capacity cultivar (RH30) grown without Ni stress. The H2O2 application also resulted in alleviation of photosynthetic inhibition induced by 200 mg Ni kg-1 soil through increased photosynthetic nitrogen-use efficiency (NUE), sulfur-use efficiency (SUE), and glutathione (GSH) reduced production together with decreased lipid peroxidation and electrolyte leakage in both the cultivars. However, the effect of H2O2 was more pronounced in Varuna than RH30. The greater increase in photosynthetic-NUE and SUE and GSH production with H2O2 in Varuna resulted from higher increase in activity of nitrogen (N) and sulfur (S) assimilation enzymes, nitrate reductase and ATP-sulfurylase, respectively resulting in enhanced N and S assimilation. The increased N and S content contributed to the higher activity of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase under Ni stress. Application of H2O2 also regulated PS II activity and stomatal movement under Ni stress for maintaining higher photosynthetic potential in Varuna. Thus, H2O2 may be considered as a potential signaling molecule for augmenting photosynthetic potential of mustard plants under optimal and Ni stress conditions. It alleviates Ni stress through the regulation of stomatal and non-stomotal limitations, and photosynthetic-NUE and -SUE and GSH production. PMID:26870064

  12. Higher Thermal Acclimation Potential of Respiration but Not Photosynthesis in Two Alpine Picea Taxa in Contrast to Two Lowland Congeners

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiao Wei; Wang, Jing Ru; Ji, Ming Fei; Milne, Richard Ian; Wang, Ming Hao; Liu, Jian-Quan; Shi, Sheng; Yang, Shu-Li; Zhao, Chang-Ming

    2015-01-01

    The members of the genus Picea form a dominant component in many alpine and boreal forests which are the major sink for atmospheric CO2. However, little is