Science.gov

Sample records for photosynthetic bacterium chlorobium

  1. The complete genome sequence of Chlorobium tepidum TLS, a photosynthetic, anaerobic, green-sulfur bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Eisen, Jonathan A.; Nelson, Karen E.; Paulsen, Ian T.; Heidelberg, John F.; Wu, Martin; Dodson, Robert J.; Deboy, Robert; Gwinn, Michelle L.; Nelson, William C.; Haft, Daniel H.; Hickey, Erin K.; Peterson, Jeremy D.; Durkin, A. Scott; Kolonay, James L.; Yang, Fan; Holt, Ingeborg; Umayam, Lowell A.; Mason, Tanya; Brenner, Michael; Shea, Terrance P.; Parksey, Debbie; Nierman, William C.; Feldblyum, Tamara V.; Hansen, Cheryl L.; Craven, M. Brook; Radune, Diana; Vamathevan, Jessica; Khouri, Hoda; White, Owen; Gruber, Tanja M.; Ketchum, Karen A.; Venter, J. Craig; Tettelin, Hervé; Bryant, Donald A.; Fraser, Claire M.

    2002-01-01

    The complete genome of the green-sulfur eubacterium Chlorobium tepidum TLS was determined to be a single circular chromosome of 2,154,946 bp. This represents the first genome sequence from the phylum Chlorobia, whose members perform anoxygenic photosynthesis by the reductive tricarboxylic acid cycle. Genome comparisons have identified genes in C. tepidum that are highly conserved among photosynthetic species. Many of these have no assigned function and may play novel roles in photosynthesis or photobiology. Phylogenomic analysis reveals likely duplications of genes involved in biosynthetic pathways for photosynthesis and the metabolism of sulfur and nitrogen as well as strong similarities between metabolic processes in C. tepidum and many Archaeal species. PMID:12093901

  2. Structure and organization of a 25 kbp region of the genome of the photosynthetic green sulfur bacterium Chlorobium vibrioforme containing Mg-chelatase encoding genes.

    PubMed

    Petersen, B L; Møller, M G; Stummann, B M; Henningsen, K W

    1998-01-01

    A region comprising approximately 25 kbp of the genome of the strictly anaerobic and obligate photosynthetic green sulfur bacterium Chlorobium vibrioforme has been mapped, subcloned and partly sequenced. Approximately 15 kbp have been sequenced in it's entirety and three genes with significant homology and feature similarity to the bchI, -D and -H genes and the chlI, -D and -H genes of Rhodobacter and Synechocystis strain PCC6803, respectively, which encode magnesium chelatase subunits, have been identified. Magnesium chelatase catalyzes the insertion of Mg2+ into protoporphyrin IX, and is the first enzyme unique to the (bacterio)chlorophyll specific branch of the porphyrin biosynthetic pathway. The organization of the three Mg-chelatase encoding genes is unique to Chlorobium and suggests that the magnesium chelatase of C. vibrioforme is encoded by a single operon. The analyzed 25 kbp region contains five additional open reading frames, two of which display significant homology and feature similarity to genes encoding lipoamide dehydrogenase and genes with function in purine synthesis, and another three display significant homology to open reading frames with unknown function in distantly related bacteria. Putative E. coli sigma 70-like promoter sequences, ribosome binding sequences and rho-independent transcriptional stop signals within the sequenced 15 kbp region are related to the identified genes and orfs. Southern analysis, restriction mapping and partial sequencing of the remaining ca. 10 kbp of the analyzed 25 kbp region have shown that this part includes the hemA, -C, -D and -B genes (MOBERG and AVISSAR 1994), which encode enzymes with function in the early part of the biosynthetic pathway of porphyrins.

  3. Presence of exclusively bacteriochlorophyll-c containing substrain in the culture of green sulfur photosynthetic bacterium Chlorobium vibrioforme strain NCIB 8327 producing bacteriochlorophyll-d.

    PubMed

    Saga, Yoshitaka; Oh-oka, Hirozo; Hayashi, Takashi; Tamiaki, Hitoshi

    2003-12-01

    The light-dependent composition change of light harvesting bacteriochlorophyll(BChl)s in the present culture of a green sulfur photosynthetic bacterium Chlorobium (Chl.) vibrioforme f. sp. thiosulfatophilum strain NCIB 8327 was investigated by visible absorption spectroscopy and HPLC analyses. When the culture was repeatedly grown in liquid media under a low light condition, both the Soret and Qy absorption bands of the in vivo spectrum were shifted to longer wavelengths. Analysis of the extracted pigments by HPLC revealed that the ratio of the amount of BChl-c to that of BChl-d molecules gradually increased during repeated cultivation. In contrast, when the culture grown under a low light intensity was transferred to a high light condition and continued to be grown, the absorption bands were shifted to shorter wavelengths and the ratio of BChls-c/d decreased finally to the almost original value. Colonies were prepared on solid agar media from the liquid culture containing both BChls-c and d, which was grown under a low light intensity. Each colony obtained was found to contain either BChl-c or d, but not both of them. Two types of cells isolated in this study were derived from the same clone, judged from their genetic analyses. The variation of pigment composition in our liquid culture observed here could be ascribed to the difference of growth rates between two substrains containing BChl-c and BChl-d, respectively, depending on light conditions.

  4. Chlorobium ferrooxidans sp. nov., a phototrophic green sulfur bacterium that oxidizes ferrous iron in coculture with a "Geospirillum" sp. strain.

    PubMed

    Heising, S; Richter, L; Ludwig, W; Schink, B

    1999-08-01

    A green phototrophic bacterium was enriched with ferrous iron as sole electron donor and was isolated in defined coculture with a spirilloid chemoheterotrophic bacterium. The coculture oxidized ferrous iron to ferric iron with stoichiometric formation of cell mass from carbon dioxide. Sulfide, thiosulfate, or elemental sulfur was not used as electron donor in the light. Hydrogen or acetate in the presence of ferrous iron increased the cell yield of the phototrophic partner, and hydrogen could also be used as sole electron source. Complexed ferric iron was slowly reduced to ferrous iron in the dark, with hydrogen as electron source. Similar to Chlorobium limicola, the phototrophic bacterium contained bacteriochlorophyll c and chlorobactene as photosynthetic pigments, and also resembled representatives of this species morphologically. On the basis of 16S rRNA sequence comparisons, this organism clusters with Chlorobium, Prosthecochloris, and Pelodictyon species within the green sulfur bacteria phylum. Since the phototrophic partner in the coculture KoFox is only moderately related to the other members of the cluster, it is proposed as a new species, Chlorobium ferrooxidans. The chemoheterotrophic partner bacterium, strain KoFum, was isolated in pure culture with fumarate as sole substrate. The strain was identified as a member of the epsilon-subclass of the Proteobacteria closely related to "Geospirillum arsenophilum" on the basis of physiological properties and 16S rRNA sequence comparison. The "Geospirillum" strain was present in the coculture only in low numbers. It fermented fumarate, aspartate, malate, or pyruvate to acetate, succinate, and carbon dioxide, and could reduce nitrate to dinitrogen gas. It was not involved in ferrous iron oxidation but possibly provided a thus far unidentified growth factor to the phototrophic partner.

  5. Genetic Manipulation of Carotenoid Biosynthesis in the Green Sulfur Bacterium Chlorobium tepidum†

    PubMed Central

    Frigaard, Niels-Ulrik; Maresca, Julia A.; Yunker, Colleen E.; Jones, A. Daniel; Bryant, Donald A.

    2004-01-01

    The green sulfur bacterium Chlorobium tepidum is a strict anaerobe and an obligate photoautotroph. On the basis of sequence similarity with known enzymes or sequence motifs, nine open reading frames encoding putative enzymes of carotenoid biosynthesis were identified in the genome sequence of C. tepidum, and all nine genes were inactivated. Analysis of the carotenoid composition in the resulting mutants allowed the genes encoding the following six enzymes to be identified: phytoene synthase (crtB/CT1386), phytoene desaturase (crtP/CT0807), ζ-carotene desaturase (crtQ/CT1414), γ-carotene desaturase (crtU/CT0323), carotenoid 1′,2′-hydratase (crtC/CT0301), and carotenoid cis-trans isomerase (crtH/CT0649). Three mutants (CT0180, CT1357, and CT1416 mutants) did not exhibit a discernible phenotype. The carotenoid biosynthetic pathway in C. tepidum is similar to that in cyanobacteria and plants by converting phytoene into lycopene using two plant-like desaturases (CrtP and CrtQ) and a plant-like cis-trans isomerase (CrtH) and thus differs from the pathway known in all other bacteria. In contrast to the situation in cyanobacteria and plants, the construction of a crtB mutant completely lacking carotenoids demonstrates that carotenoids are not essential for photosynthetic growth of green sulfur bacteria. However, the bacteriochlorophyll a contents of mutants lacking colored carotenoids (crtB, crtP, and crtQ mutants) were decreased from that of the wild type, and these mutants exhibited a significant growth rate defect under all light intensities tested. Therefore, colored carotenoids may have both structural and photoprotection roles in green sulfur bacteria. The ability to manipulate the carotenoid composition so dramatically in C. tepidum offers excellent possibilities for studying the roles of carotenoids in the light-harvesting chlorosome antenna and iron-sulfur-type (photosystem I-like) reaction center. The phylogeny of carotenogenic enzymes in green sulfur

  6. Identification of a chondroitin synthase from an unexpected source, the green sulfur bacterium Chlorobium phaeobacteroides.

    PubMed

    Green, Dixy E; DeAngelis, Paul L

    2017-01-19

    Glycosaminoglycans [GAGs] are known to be present in all animals as well as some pathogenic microbes. Chondroitin sulfate is the most abundant GAG in mammals where it has various structural and adhesion roles. The Gram-negative bacteria Pasteurella multocida Type F and Escherichia coli K4 produce extracellular capsules composed of unsulfated chondroitin or a fructosylated chondroitin, respectively. Such polysaccharides that are structurally related to host molecules do not generally provoke a strong antibody response thus are thought to be employed as molecular camouflage during infection. We observed a sequence from the photosynthetic green sulfur bacteria, Chlorobium phaeobacteroides DSM 266, which was very similar (~62% identical) to the open reading frames of the known bi-functional chondroitin synthases (PmCS and KfoC); some segments are strikingly conserved amongst the three proteins. Recombinant E. coli-derived Chlorobium enzyme preparations were found to possess bona fide chondroitin synthase activity in vitro This new catalyst, CpCS, however, has a more promiscuous acceptor usage than the prototypical PmCS, which may be of utility in novel chimeric GAG syntheses. The finding of such a similar chondroitin synthase enzyme in C. phaeobacteroides is unexpected for several reasons including: (a) a free-living non-pathogenic organism should not "need" an animal self molecule for protection, (b) the Proteobacteria and the green sulfur bacterial lineages diverged ~2.5-3 billion years ago, and (c) the ecological niches of these bacteria are not thought to overlap substantially to facilitate horizontal gene transfer. CpCS provides insight into the structure/function relationship of this class of enzymes.

  7. Parallel electron donation pathways to cytochrome c(z) in the type I homodimeric photosynthetic reaction center complex of Chlorobium tepidum.

    PubMed

    Tsukatani, Yusuke; Azai, Chihiro; Kondo, Toru; Itoh, Shigeru; Oh-Oka, Hirozo

    2008-09-01

    We studied the regulation mechanism of electron donations from menaquinol:cytochrome c oxidoreductase and cytochrome c-554 to the type I homodimeric photosynthetic reaction center complex of the green sulfur bacterium Chlorobium tepidum. We measured flash-induced absorption changes of multiple cytochromes in the membranes prepared from a mutant devoid of cytochrome c-554 or in the reconstituted membranes by exogenously adding cytochrome c-555 purified from Chlorobium limicola. The results indicated that the photo-oxidized cytochrome c(z) bound to the reaction center was rereduced rapidly by cytochrome c-555 as well as by the menaquinol:cytochrome c oxidoreductase and that cytochrome c-555 did not function as a shuttle-like electron carrier between the menaquinol:cytochrome c oxidoreductase and cytochrome c(z). It was also shown that the rereduction rate of cytochrome c(z) by cytochrome c-555 was as high as that by the menaquinol:cytochrome c oxidoreductase. The two electron-transfer pathways linked to sulfur metabolisms seem to function independently to donate electrons to the reaction center.

  8. Ultrafast energy transfer in light-harvesting chlorosomes from the green sulfur bacterium Chlorobium tepidum.

    PubMed

    Savikhin, S; van Noort, P I; Zhu, Y; Lin, S; Blankenship, R E; Struve, W S

    1995-05-15

    Two independent pump-probe techniques were used to study the antenna energy transfer kinetics of intact chlorosomes from the green sulfur bacterium Chlorobium tepidum with femtosecond resolution. The isotropic kinetics revealed by one-color experiments in the BChl c antenna were inhomogeneous with respect to wavelength. Multiexponential analyses of the photobleaching/stimulated emission (PB/SE) decay profiles typically yielded (apart from a approximately 10 fs component that may stem from the initial coherent oscillation) components with lifetimes 1-2 ps and several tens of ps. The largest amplitudes for the latter component occur at 810 nm, the longest wavelength studied. Analyses of most two-color pump-probe profiles with the probe wavelength red-shifted from the pump wavelength yielded no PB/SE rise components. PB/SE components with approximately 1 ps risetime were found in 790 --> 810 and 790 --> 820 nm profiles, in which the probe wavelength is situated well into the BChl a absorption region. A 760 --> 740 nm uphill two-color experiment yielded a PB/SE component with 4-6 ps risetime. Broadband absorption difference spectra of chlorosomes excited at 720 nm (in the blue edge of the 746 nm BChl c Qy band) exhibit approximately 15 nm red-shifting of the PB/SE peak wavelength during the first several hundred fs. Analogous spectra excited at 760 nm (at the red edge) show little dynamic spectral shifting. Our results suggest that inhomogeneous broadening and spectral equilibration play a larger role in the early BChl c antenna kinetics in chlorosomes from C. tepidum than in those from C. aurantiacus, a system studied previously. As in C. aurantiacus, the initial one-color anisotropies r(0) for most BChl c wavelengths are close to 0.4. The corresponding residual anisotropies r(infinity) are typically 0.19-0.25, which is much lower than found in C. aurantiacus (> or = 0.35); the transition moment organization is appreciably less collinear in the BChl c antenna of C

  9. Two exopolyphosphatases with distinct molecular architectures and substrate specificities from the thermophilic green-sulfur bacterium Chlorobium tepidum TLS.

    PubMed

    Albi, Tomás; Serrano, Aurelio

    2014-09-01

    The genome of the thermophilic green-sulfur bacterium Chlorobium tepidum TLS possesses two genes encoding putative exopolyphosphatases (PPX; EC 3.6.1.11), namely CT0099 (ppx1, 993 bp) and CT1713 (ppx2, 1557 bp). The predicted polypeptides of 330 and 518 aa residues are Ppx-GppA phosphatases of different domain architectures - the largest one has an extra C-terminal HD domain - which may represent ancient paralogues. Both ppx genes were cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3). While CtPPX1 was validated as a monomeric enzyme, CtPPX2 was found to be a homodimer. Both PPX homologues were functional, K(+)-stimulated phosphohydrolases, with an absolute requirement for divalent metal cations and a marked preference for Mg(2+). Nevertheless, they exhibited remarkably different catalytic specificities with regard to substrate classes and chain lengths. Even though both enzymes were able to hydrolyse the medium-size polyphosphate (polyP) P13-18 (polyP mix with mean chain length of 13-18 phosphate residues), CtPPX1 clearly reached its highest catalytic efficiency with tripolyphosphate and showed substantial nucleoside triphosphatase (NTPase) activity, while CtPPX2 preferred long-chain polyPs (>300 Pi residues) and did not show any detectable NTPase activity. These catalytic features, taken together with the distinct domain architectures and molecular phylogenies, indicate that the two PPX homologues of Chl. tepidum belong to different Ppx-GppA phosphatase subfamilies that should play specific biochemical roles in nucleotide and polyP metabolisms. In addition, these results provide an example of the remarkable functional plasticity of the Ppx-GppA phosphatases, a family of proteins with relatively simple structures that are widely distributed in the microbial world.

  10. Inorganic nitrogen assimilation by the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas capsulata.

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, B C; Gest, H

    1976-01-01

    The photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas capsulata lacks glutamate dehydrogenase and normally uses the glutamine synthetase/glutamate synthase sequence of reactions for assimilation of N2 and ammonia. The glutamine synthetase in cell-free extracts of the organism is completely sedimented by centrifugation at 140,000 X g for 2 h, is inhibited by L-alanine but not by adenosine 5'-monophosphate, and exhibits two apparent Km values for ammonia (ca. 13 muM and 1 mM). PMID:10281

  11. Triazine herbicide resistance in the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Alfred E.; Gilbert, Carl W.; Guy, Rachel; Arntzen, Charles J.

    1984-01-01

    The photoaffinity herbicide azidoatrazine (2-azido-4-ethylamino-6-isopropylamino-s-triazine) selectively labels the L subunit of the reaction center of the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides. Herbicide-resistant mutants retain the L subunit and have altered binding properties for methylthio- and chloro-substituted triazines as well as altered equilibrium constants for electron transfer between primary and secondary electron acceptors. We suggest that a subtle alteration in the L subunit is responsible for herbicide resistance and that the L subunit is the functional analog of the 32-kDa QB protein of chloroplast membranes. Images PMID:16593520

  12. Spectroscopic and functional properties of novel 2[4Fe-4S] cluster-containing ferredoxins from the green sulfur bacterium Chlorobium tepidum.

    PubMed

    Yoon, K S; Bobst, C; Hemann, C F; Hille, R; Tabita, F R

    2001-11-23

    Two distinct ferredoxins, Fd I and Fd II, were isolated and purified to homogeneity from photoautotrophically grown Chlorobium tepidum, a moderately thermophilic green sulfur bacterium that assimilates carbon dioxide by the reductive tricarboxylic acid cycle. Both ferredoxins serve a crucial role as electron donors for reductive carboxylation, catalyzed by a key enzyme of this pathway, pyruvate synthase/pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase. The reduction potentials of Fd I and Fd II were determined by cyclic voltammetry to be -514 and -584 mV, respectively, which are more electronegative than any previously studied Fds in which two [4Fe-4S] clusters display a single transition. Further spectroscopic studies indicated that the CD spectrum of oxidized Fd I closely resembled that of Fd II; however, both spectra appeared to be unique relative to ferredoxins studied previously. Double integration of the EPR signal of the two Fds yielded approximately approximately 2.0 spins per molecule, compatible with the idea that C. tepidum Fd I and Fd II accept 2 electrons upon reduction. These results suggest that the C. tepidum Fd I and Fd II polypeptides each contain two bound [4Fe-4S] clusters. C. tepidum Fd I and Fd II are novel 2[4Fe-4S] Fds, which were shown previously to function as biological electron donors or acceptors for C. tepidum pyruvate synthase/pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase (Yoon, K.-S., Hille, R., Hemann, C. F., and Tabita, F. R. (1999) J. Biol. Chem. 274, 29772-29778). Kinetic measurements indicated that Fd I had approximately 2.3-fold higher affinity than Fd II. The results of amino acid sequence alignments, molecular modeling, oxidation-reduction potentials, and spectral properties strongly indicate that the C. tepidum Fds are chimeras of both clostridial-type and chromatium-type Fds, suggesting that the two Fds are likely intermediates in the evolutional development of 2[4Fe-4S] clusters compared with the well described clostridial and chromatium types.

  13. Hydrogen Production by Co-cultures of Rhizopus oryzae and a Photosynthetic Bacterium, Rhodobacter sphaeroides RV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asada, Yasuo; Ishimi, Katsuhiro; Nagata, Yoko; Wakayama, Tatsuki; Miyake, Jun; Kohno, Hideki

    Hydrogen production with glucose by using co-immobilized cultures of a fungus, Rhizopus oryzae NBRC5384, and a photosynthetic bacterium, Rhodobacter sphaeroides RV, in agar gels was studied. The co-immobilized cultures converted glucose to hydrogen via lactate in a high molar yield of about 8moles of hydrogen per glucose at a maximum under illuminated conditions.

  14. Hydrogen Production by the Photosynthetic Bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum

    PubMed Central

    Zürrer, Hans; Bachofen, Reinhard

    1979-01-01

    Continuous photosynthetic production of hydrogen by Rhodospirillum rubrum in batch cultures was observed up to 80 days with the hydrogen donor, pure lactate or lactic acid-containing wastes, supplied periodically. Hydrogen was produced at an average rate of 6 ml/h per g (dry weight) of cells with whey as a hydrogen donor. In continuous cultures with glutamate as a growth-limiting nitrogen source and lactate as a hydrogen donor, hydrogen was evolved at a rate of 20 ml/h per g (dry weight). The composition of the gas evolved remained practically constant (70 to 75% H2, 25 to 30% CO2). Photosynthetic bacteria processing specific organic wastes could be an advantage in large-scale production of hydrogen together with food protein of high value, compared to other biological systems. Images PMID:16345375

  15. Reconstitution of an active magnesium chelatase enzyme complex from the bchI, -D, and -H gene products of the green sulfur bacterium Chlorobium vibrioforme expressed in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Petersen, B L; Jensen, P E; Gibson, L C; Stummann, B M; Hunter, C N; Henningsen, K W

    1998-02-01

    Magnesium-protoporphyrin chelatase, the first enzyme unique to the (bacterio)chlorophyll-specific branch of the porphyrin biosynthetic pathway, catalyzes the insertion of Mg2+ into protoporphyrin IX. Three genes, designated bchI, -D, and -H, from the strictly anaerobic and obligately phototrophic green sulfur bacterium Chlorobium vibrioforme show a significant level of homology to the magnesium chelatase-encoding genes bchI, -D, and -H and chlI, -D, and -H of Rhodobacter sphaeroides and Synechocystis strain PCC6803, respectively. These three genes were expressed in Escherichia coli; the subsequent purification of overproduced BchI and -H proteins on an Ni2+-agarose affinity column and denaturation of insoluble BchD protein in 6 M urea were required for reconstitution of Mg-chelatase activity in vitro. This work therefore establishes that the magnesium chelatase of C. vibrioforme is similar to the magnesium chelatases of the distantly related bacteria R. sphaeroides and Synechocystis strain PCC6803 with respect to number of subunits and ATP requirement. In addition, reconstitution of an active heterologous magnesium chelatase enzyme complex was obtained by combining the C. vibrioforme BchI and -D proteins and the Synechocystis strain PCC6803 ChlH protein. Furthermore, two versions, with respect to the N-terminal start of the bchI gene product, were expressed in E. coli, yielding ca. 38- and ca. 42-kDa versions of the BchI protein, both of which proved to be active. Western blot analysis of these proteins indicated that two forms of BchI, corresponding to the 38- and the 42-kDa expressed proteins, are also present in C. vibrioforme.

  16. Development of a gene cloning system for the hydrogen-producing marine photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas sp

    SciTech Connect

    Matsunaga, T.; Matsunaga, N.; Tsubaki, K.; Tanaka, T.

    1986-10-01

    Seventy-six strains of marine photosynthetic bacteria were analyzed by agarose gel electrophoresis for plasmid DNA content. Among these strains, 12 carried two to four different plasmids with sizes ranging from 3.1 to 11.0 megadaltons. The marine photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas sp. NKPB002106 had two plasmids, pRD06S and pRD06L. The smaller plasmid, pRD06S, had a molecular weight of 3.8 megadaltons and was cut at a single site by restriction endonucleases SalI, SmaI, PstI, XhoI, and BglII. Moreover, the marine photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas sp. NKPB002106 containing plasmid pRD06 had a satisfactory growth rate (doubling time, 7.5 h), a hydrogen-producing rate of 0.96 ..mu..mol/mg (dry weight) of cells per h, and nitrogen fixation capability. Plasmid pRD06S, however, had neither drug resistance nor heavy-metal resistance, and its copy number was less than 10. Therefore, a recombinant plasmid consisting of pRD06S and Escherichia coli cloning vector pUC13 was constructed and cloned in E. coli. The recombinant plasmid was transformed into Rhodopseudomonas sp. NKPB002106. As a result, Rhodopseudomonas sp. NKPB002106 developed ampicillin resistance. Thus, a shuttle vector for gene transfer was constructed for marine photosynthetic bacteria.

  17. Efficiency of light harvesting in a photosynthetic bacterium adapted to different levels of light.

    PubMed

    Timpmann, Kõu; Chenchiliyan, Manoop; Jalviste, Erko; Timney, John A; Hunter, C Neil; Freiberg, Arvi

    2014-10-01

    In this study, we use the photosynthetic purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides to find out how the acclimation of photosynthetic apparatus to growth conditions influences the rates of energy migration toward the reaction center traps and the efficiency of charge separation at the reaction centers. To answer these questions we measured the spectral and picosecond kinetic fluorescence responses as a function of excitation intensity in membranes prepared from cells grown under different illumination conditions. A kinetic model analysis yielded the microscopic rate constants that characterize the energy transfer and trapping inside the photosynthetic unit as well as the dependence of exciton trapping efficiency on the ratio of the peripheral LH2 and core LH1 antenna complexes, and on the wavelength of the excitation light. A high quantum efficiency of trapping over 80% was observed in most cases, which decreased toward shorter excitation wavelengths within the near infrared absorption band. At a fixed excitation wavelength the efficiency declines with the LH2/LH1 ratio. From the perspective of the ecological habitat of the bacteria the higher population of peripheral antenna facilitates growth under dim light even though the energy trapping is slower in low light adapted membranes. The similar values for the trapping efficiencies in all samples imply a robust photosynthetic apparatus that functions effectively at a variety of light intensities.

  18. Biological conversion of synthesis gas. [Chlorobium thiosulfatophilum, chlorobium phaeobacteroides, and Rhodospirillum rubrum

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-06

    The anaerobic bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum has been chosen for catalysis of the biological water gas shift reaction. Two bacteria, Chlorobium thiosulfatophilum and Chlorobium phaeobacteroides, are being evaluated as candidates for H{sub 2}S conversion to elemental sulfur. Since these latter two organisms both grow and convert H{sub 2}S in batch culture using standard basal medium, the choice of a suitable bacterium must be made in consideration of specific growth and uptake rates. Produced elemental sulfur stability against further oxidation to sulfate, and minimal use of H{sub 2} as a producing agent must also be considered. The effects of temperature on the performance of R. rubrum were evaluated. It was found that the cell concentration was highest at temperatures of 25 and 30{degree}C, and that the specific uptake rate was highest at temperatures of 30, 32 and 34{degree}C. No growth was observed at 37{degree}C. Also, temperature did not affect the yield of H{sub 2} from CO. Thus, R. rubrum may be used for biological rates gas shift at any temperature between 30 and 34{degree}C, although growth is maximized at lower temperatures. Preliminary studies with C. thiosulfatophilum showed rapid utilization of H{sub 2}S from the gas and liquid phases with subsequent production of elemental sulfur. Elemental sulfur production interfered with cell concentrations measurements, although a technique has been developed to rectify this problem.

  19. Decoherence dynamics of coherent electronic excited states in the photosynthetic purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Xian-Ting; Zhang, Wei-Min; Zhuo, Yi-Zhong

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we present a theoretical description to the quantum coherence and decoherence phenomena of energy transfer in photosynthesis observed in a recent experiment [Science 316, 1462 (2007)]. As a successive two-color laser pulses with selected frequencies cast on a sample of the photosynthetic purple bacterium Rb. sphaeroides two resonant excitations of electrons in chromophores can be generated. However, this effective two-level subsystem will interact with its protein environment and decoherence is inevitable. We describe this subsystem coupled with its environment as a dynamical spin-boson model. The non-Markovian decoherence dynamics is described using a quasiadiabatic propagator path integral (QUAPI) approach. With the photon-induced effective time-dependent level splitting energy and level flip coupling coefficient between the two excited states and the environment-induced non-Markovian decoherence dynamics, our theoretical result is in good agreement with the experimental data.

  20. Characterization of giant spheroplasts generated from the aerobic anoxygenic photosynthetic marine bacterium Roseobacter litoralis.

    PubMed

    Nojiri, Akane; Ogita, Shinjiro; Isogai, Yasuhiro; Nishida, Hiromi

    2015-01-01

    We generated and characterized giant spheroplasts from the aerobic anoxygenic photosynthetic marine bacterium Roseobacter litoralis. The giant spheroplasts contained vacuole-like structures within the cells, mainly consisting of a single membrane. The in vivo absorption spectrum of the giant spheroplasts did not have peaks typically observed for bacteriochlorophyll a. The culture media pH decreased during the growth of the giant spheroplasts. The change in the pH profile for cells grown under light was no different from that for cells grown in the dark. These results showed that the R. litoralis giant spheroplasts formed lost their photosynthetic apparatus in culture. Most of the giant spheroplasts returned to their original size, likely via filamentous cells. The culture media pH increased during the growth of the filamentous cells. Some filamentous cells had septum-like structures. In such filamentous cells, DNA was separated. Initially, the color of the separated cells was white. Two weeks later, the cells changed to red in the dark, and the in vivo absorption spectrum of the cells had peaks typically observed for bacteriochlorophyll a. Our findings strongly suggest that the giant spheroplasts of R. litoralis can control the genetic information, return to their original cell size, and regain their original functions.

  1. Native Mass Spectrometry Characterizes the Photosynthetic Reaction Center Complex from the Purple Bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hao; Harrington, Lucas B.; Lu, Yue; Prado, Mindy; Saer, Rafael; Rempel, Don; Blankenship, Robert E.; Gross, Michael L.

    2017-01-01

    Native mass spectrometry (MS) is an emerging approach to study protein complexes in their near-native states and to elucidate their stoichiometry and topology. Here, we report a native MS study of the membrane-embedded reaction center (RC) protein complex from the purple photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides. The membrane-embedded RC protein complex is stabilized by detergent micelles in aqueous solution, directly introduced into a mass spectrometer by nano-electrospray (nESI), and freed of detergents and dissociated in the gas phase by collisional activation. As the collision energy is increased, the chlorophyll pigments are gradually released from the RC complex, suggesting that native MS introduces a near-native structure that continues to bind pigments. Two bacteriochlorophyll a pigments remain tightly bound to the RC protein at the highest collision energy. The order of pigment release and their resistance to release by gas-phase activation indicates the strength of pigment interaction in the RC complex. This investigation sets the stage for future native MS studies of membrane-embedded photosynthetic pigment-protein and related complexes.

  2. Excitation dynamics of two spectral forms of the core complexes from photosynthetic bacterium Thermochromatium tepidum.

    PubMed

    Ma, Fei; Kimura, Yukihiro; Zhao, Xiao-Hui; Wu, Yi-Shi; Wang, Peng; Fu, Li-Min; Wang, Zheng-Yu; Zhang, Jian-Ping

    2008-10-01

    The intact core antenna-reaction center (LH1-RC) core complex of thermophilic photosynthetic bacterium Thermochromatium (Tch.) tepidum is peculiar in its long-wavelength LH1-Q(y) absorption (915 nm). We have attempted comparative studies on the excitation dynamics of bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) and carotenoid (Car) between the intact core complex and the EDTA-treated one with the Q(y) absorption at 889 nm. For both spectral forms, the overall Car-to-BChl excitation energy transfer efficiency is determined to be approximately 20%, which is considerably lower than the reported values, e.g., approximately 35%, for other photosynthetic purple bacteria containing the same kind of Car (spirilloxanthin). The RC trapping time constants are found to be 50 approximately 60 ps (170 approximately 200 ps) for RC in open (closed) state irrespective to the spectral forms and the wavelengths of Q(y) excitation. Despite the low-energy LH1-Q(y) absorption, the RC trapping time are comparable to those reported for other photosynthetic bacteria with normal LH1-Q(y) absorption at 880 nm. Selective excitation to Car results in distinct differences in the Q(y)-bleaching dynamics between the two different spectral forms. This, together with the Car band-shift signals in response to Q(y) excitation, reveals the presence of two major groups of BChls in the LH1 of Tch. tepidum with a spectral heterogeneity of approximately 240 cm(-1), as well as an alteration in BChl-Car geometry in the 889-nm preparation with respect to the native one.

  3. Final Report - "CO2 Sequestration in Cell Biomass of Chlorobium Thiosulfatophilum"

    SciTech Connect

    James L. Gaddy, PhD; Ching-Whan Ko, PhD

    2009-05-04

    World carbon dioxide emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels have increased at a rate of about 3 percent per year during the last 40 years to over 24 billion tons today. While a number of methods have been proposed and are under study for dealing with the carbon dioxide problem, all have advantages as well as disadvantages which limit their application. The anaerobic bacterium Chlorobium thiosulfatophilum uses hydrogen sulfide and carbon dioxide to produce elemental sulfur and cell biomass. The overall objective of this project is to develop a commercial process for the biological sequestration of carbon dioxide and simultaneous conversion of hydrogen sulfide to elemental sulfur. The Phase I study successfully demonstrated the technical feasibility of utilizing this bacterium for carbon dioxide sequestration and hydrogen sulfide conversion to elemental sulfur by utilizing the bacterium in continuous reactor studies. Phase II studies involved an advanced research and development to develop the engineering and scale-up parameters for commercialization of the technology. Tasks include culture isolation and optimization studies, further continuous reactor studies, light delivery systems, high pressure studies, process scale-up, a market analysis and economic projections. A number of anaerobic and aerobic microorgansims, both non-photosynthetic and photosynthetic, were examined to find those with the fastest rates for detailed study to continuous culture experiments. C. thiosulfatophilum was selected for study to anaerobically produce sulfur and Thiomicrospira crunogena waws selected for study to produce sulfate non-photosynthetically. Optimal conditions for growth, H2S and CO2 comparison, supplying light and separating sulfur were defined. The design and economic projections show that light supply for photosynthetic reactions is far too expensive, even when solar systems are considered. However, the aerobic non-photosynthetic reaction to produce sulfate with T

  4. Nitrogenase from the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas capsulata: purification and molecular properties.

    PubMed Central

    Hallenbeck, P C; Meyer, C M; Vignais, P M

    1982-01-01

    Nitrogenase proteins were isolated from cultures of the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas capsulata grown on a limiting amount of ammonia. Under these conditions, the nitrogenase N2ase A was active in vivo, and nitrogenase activity in vitro was not dependent upon manganese and the activating factor. The nitrogenase proteins were also isolated from nitrogen-limited cultures in which the in vivo nitrogenase activity had been stopped by an ammonia shock. This nitrogenase activity, N2ase R, showed an in vitro requirement for manganese and the activating factor for maximal activity. The Mo-Fe protein (dinitrogenase) was composed of two dissimilar subunits with molecular weights of 55,000 and 59,500; the Fe protein (dinitrogenase reductase), from either type of culture, was composed of a single subunit (molecular weight), 33,500). The metal and acid labile sulfur contents of both nitrogenase proteins were similar to those found for previously isolated nitrogenases. The Fe proteins from both N2ase A and N2ase R contained phosphate and ribose, 2 mol of each per mol of N2ase R Fe protein and about 1 mol of each per mol of N2ase A Fe protein. The greatest difference between the two types of Fe protein was that the N2ase R Fe protein contained about 1 mol per mol of an adenine-like molecule, whereas the N2ase A Fe protein content of this compound was insignificant. These results are compared with various models previously presented for the short-term regulation of nitrogenase activity in the photosynthetic bacteria. PMID:6799495

  5. Production of polyhydroxybutyrate by the marine photosynthetic bacterium Rhodovulum sulfidophilum P5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Jinling; Wei, Ying; Zhao, Yupeng; Pan, Guanghua; Wang, Guangce

    2012-07-01

    The effects of different NaCl concentrations, nitrogen sources, carbon sources, and carbon to nitrogen molar ratios on biomass accumulation and polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) production were studied in batch cultures of the marine photosynthetic bacterium Rhodovulum sulfidophilum P5 under aerobic-dark conditions. The results show that the accumulation of PHB in strain P5 is a growth-associated process. Strain P5 had maximum biomass and PHB accumulation at 2%-3% NaCl, suggesting that the bacterium can maintain growth and potentially produce PHB at natural seawater salinity. In the nitrogen source test, the maximum biomass accumulation (8.10±0.09 g/L) and PHB production (1.11±0.13 g/L and 14.62%±2.2 of the cell dry weight) were observed when peptone and ammonium chloride were used as the sole nitrogen source. NH{4/+}-N was better for PHB production than other nitrogen sources. In the carbon source test, the maximum biomass concentration (7.65±0.05 g/L) was obtained with malic acid as the sole carbon source, whereas the maximum yield of PHB (5.03±0.18 g/L and 66.93%±1.69% of the cell dry weight) was obtained with sodium pyruvate as the sole carbon source. In the carbon to nitrogen ratios test, sodium pyruvate and ammonium chloride were selected as the carbon and nitrogen sources, respectively. The best carbon to nitrogen molar ratio for biomass accumulation (8.77±0.58 g/L) and PHB production (6.07±0.25 g/L and 69.25%±2.05% of the cell dry weight) was 25. The results provide valuable data on the production of PHB by R. sulfidophilum P5 and further studies are on-going for best cell growth and PHB yield.

  6. Characterisation of the LH2 spectral variants produced by the photosynthetic purple sulphur bacterium Allochromatium vinosum.

    PubMed

    Carey, Anne-Marie; Hacking, Kirsty; Picken, Nichola; Honkanen, Suvi; Kelly, Sharon; Niedzwiedzki, Dariusz M; Blankenship, Robert E; Shimizu, Yuuki; Wang-Otomo, Zheng-Yu; Cogdell, Richard J

    2014-11-01

    This study systematically investigated the different types of LH2 produced by Allochromatium (Alc.) vinosum, a photosynthetic purple sulphur bacterium, in response to variations in growth conditions. Three different spectral forms of LH2 were isolated and purified, the B800-820, B800-840 and B800-850 LH2 types, all of which exhibit an unusual split 800 peak in their low temperature absorption spectra. However, it is likely that more forms are also present. Relatively more B800-820 and B800-840 are produced under low light conditions, while relatively more B800-850 is produced under high light conditions. Polypeptide compositions of the three different LH2 types were determined by a combination of HPLC and TOF/MS. The B800-820, B800-840 and B800-850 LH2 types all have a heterogeneous polypeptide composition, containing multiple types of both α and β polypeptides, and differ in their precise polypeptide composition. They all have a mixed carotenoid composition, containing carotenoids of the spirilloxanthin series. In all cases the most abundant carotenoid is rhodopin; however, there is a shift towards carotenoids with a higher conjugation number in LH2 complexes produced under low light conditions. CD spectroscopy, together with the polypeptide analysis, demonstrates that these Alc. vinosum LH2 complexes are more closely related to the LH2 complex from Phs. molischianum than they are to the LH2 complexes from Rps. acidophila.

  7. Secreted protease mediates interspecies interaction and promotes cell aggregation of the photosynthetic bacterium Chloroflexus aggregans.

    PubMed

    Morohoshi, Sho; Matsuura, Katsumi; Haruta, Shin

    2015-01-01

    Interspecies interactions were studied in hot spring microbial mats where diverse species of bacterial cells are densely packed. The anoxygenic photosynthetic bacterium, Chloroflexus aggregans, has been widely found in the microbial mats as a major component in terrestrial hot springs in Japan at the temperature from 50 to 70°C. C. aggregans shows cellular motility to form a microbial mat-like dense cell aggregate. The aggregating ability of C. aggregans was affected by another bacterial species, strain BL55a (related to Bacillus licheniformis) isolated from the microbial mats containing C. aggregans. Cell aggregation rate of C. aggregans was promoted by the addition of culture supernatants of strain BL55a. Similar effects were also detected from other bacterial isolates, specifically Geobacillus sp. and Aeribacillus sp. Protease activity was detected from the culture supernatants from all of these isolates. The promoting effect of strain BL55a was suppressed by a serine protease inhibitor, phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride. A purified serine protease, subtilisin obtained from B. licheniformis, showed a promoting effect on the cell aggregation. These results suggest that an extracellular protease, secreted from co-existing bacterial species promoted the aggregating motility of C. aggregans. This is the first report that exogenous protease affects bacterial cellular motility.

  8. The Protective Roles of the Antioxidant Enzymes Superoxide Dismutase and Catalase in the Green Photosynthetic Bacterium Chloroflexus Aurantiacus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blankenship, Robert E.; Rothschild, Lynn (Technical Monitor)

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the biochemical response of the green thermophilic photosynthetic bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus to oxidative stress. Lab experiments focused primarily on characterizing the antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase and the response of this organism to oxidative stress. Experiments in the field at the hotsprings in Yellowstone National Park focused on the changes in the level of these enzymes during the day in response to oxidants and to the different types of ultraviolet radiation.

  9. Sorption of metals by Chlorobium spp.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Gil, J; Borrego, C

    1997-12-01

    The capacity of two species of green phototrophic sulfur bacteria, Chlorobium limicola and C. phaeobacteroides, to sorb several metal ions (Mn2+, Fe2+, Ni2+, Cu2+, Zn2+, Cd2+ and Pb2+) has been tested in laboratory batch cultures at increasing concentrations up to 2,000 mumol/l. Except for nickel--which was not sorbed to bacterial cells--the rest of metals tested were bound in a fast and passive process, which was mathematically described by means of Freundlich isotherms models. The sorption capacity of the two species studied were found to be dependent on the metal involved, whereas no differences were observed in the sorption intensity, suggesting that in all cases the sorption process proceeds in a similar way. Further, the comparison of the sorption intensity values as well as the metal recovery index (Ri), for both species, revealed that C. phaeobacteroides was more efficient that C. limicola to attach metal ions. The ecological significance of this ability in the water column of some stratified lakes, where coinciding maxima of ferrous iron and green photosynthetic sulfur bacteria are frequently found, is discussed.

  10. Coherent Control Protocol for Separating Energy-Transfer Pathways in Photosynthetic Complexes by Chiral Multidimensional Signals†

    PubMed Central

    Abramavicius, Darius; Mukamel, Shaul

    2013-01-01

    Adaptive optimizations performed using a genetic algorithm are employed to construct optimal laser pulse configurations that separate spectroscopic features associated with the two main energy-transfer pathways in the third-order nonlinear optical response simulated for the Fenna–Matthews–Olson (FMO) photosynthetic complex from the green sulfur bacterium Chlorobium tepidum. Superpositions of chirality-induced tensor components in both collinear and noncollinear pulse configurations are analyzed. The optimal signals obtained by manipulating the ratios of various 2D spectral peaks reveal detailed information about the excitation dynamics. PMID:21495702

  11. High-level production of the industrial product lycopene by the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guo-Shu; Grammel, Hartmut; Abou-Aisha, Khaled; Sägesser, Rudolf; Ghosh, Robin

    2012-10-01

    The biosynthesis of the major carotenoid spirilloxanthin by the purple nonsulfur bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum is thought to occur via a linear pathway proceeding through phytoene and, later, lycopene as intermediates. This assumption is based solely on early chemical evidence (B. H. Davies, Biochem. J. 116:93-99, 1970). In most purple bacteria, the desaturation of phytoene, catalyzed by the enzyme phytoene desaturase (CrtI), leads to neurosporene, involving only three dehydrogenation steps and not four as in the case of lycopene. We show here that the chromosomal insertion of a kanamycin resistance cassette into the crtC-crtD region of the partial carotenoid gene cluster, whose gene products are responsible for the downstream processing of lycopene, leads to the accumulation of the latter as the major carotenoid. We provide spectroscopic and biochemical evidence that in vivo, lycopene is incorporated into the light-harvesting complex 1 as efficiently as the methoxylated carotenoids spirilloxanthin (in the wild type) and 3,4,3',4'-tetrahydrospirilloxanthin (in a crtD mutant), both under semiaerobic, chemoheterotrophic, and photosynthetic, anaerobic conditions. Quantitative growth experiments conducted in dark, semiaerobic conditions, using a growth medium for high cell density and high intracellular membrane levels, which are suitable for the conventional industrial production in the absence of light, yielded lycopene at up to 2 mg/g (dry weight) of cells or up to 15 mg/liter of culture. These values are comparable to those of many previously described Escherichia coli strains engineered for lycopene production. This study provides the first genetic proof that the R. rubrum CrtI produces lycopene exclusively as an end product.

  12. Functional Genomic Analysis of Three Nitrogenase Isozymes in the Photosynthetic Bacterium Rhodopseudomonas palustris‡

    PubMed Central

    Oda, Yasuhiro; Samanta, Sudip K.; Rey, Federico E.; Wu, Liyou; Liu, Xiudan; Yan, Tingfen; Zhou, Jizhong; Harwood, Caroline S.

    2005-01-01

    The photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas palustris is one of just a few prokaryotes described so far that has vnf and anf genes for alternative vanadium cofactor (V) and iron cofactor (Fe) nitrogenases in addition to nif genes for a molybdenum cofactor (Mo) nitrogenase. Transcriptome data indicated that the 32 genes in the nif gene cluster, but not the anf or vnf genes, were induced in wild-type and Mo nitrogenase-expressing strains grown under nitrogen-fixing conditions in Mo-containing medium. Strains that were unable to express a functional Mo nitrogenase due to mutations in Mo nitrogenase structural genes synthesized functional V and Fe nitrogenases and expressed vnf and anf genes in nitrogen-fixing growth media that contained Mo and V at concentrations far in excess of those that repress alternative nitrogenase gene expression in other bacteria. Thus, not only does R. palustris have multiple enzymatic options for nitrogen fixation, but in contrast to reports on other nitrogen-fixing bacteria, the expression of its alternative nitrogenases is not repressed by transition metals. Between 95 and 295 genes that are not directly associated with nitrogenase synthesis and assembly were induced under nitrogen-fixing conditions, depending on which nitrogenase was being used by R. palustris. Genes for nitrogen acquisition were expressed at particularly high levels during alternative nitrogenase-dependent growth. This suggests that alternative nitrogenase-expressing cells are relatively starved for nitrogen and raises the possibility that fixed nitrogen availability may be the primary signal that controls the synthesis of the V and Fe nitrogenases. PMID:16267302

  13. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray studies of ferredoxin-NAD(P){sup +} reductase from Chlorobium tepidum

    SciTech Connect

    Muraki, Norifumi; Seo, Daisuke; Shiba, Tomoo; Sakurai, Takeshi; Kurisu, Genji

    2008-03-01

    Ferredoxin-NAD(P){sup +} reductase from C. tepidum has been overexpressed in E. coli, purified and crystallized. Diffraction data were collected to 2.4 Å resolution. Ferredoxin-NAD(P){sup +} reductase (FNR) is a key enzyme that catalyzes the photoreduction of NAD(P){sup +} to generate NAD(P)H during the final step of the photosynthetic electron-transport chain. FNR from the green sulfur bacterium Chlorobium tepidum is a homodimeric enzyme with a molecular weight of 90 kDa; it shares a high level of amino-acid sequence identity to thioredoxin reductase rather than to conventional plant-type FNRs. In order to understand the structural basis of the ferredoxin-dependency of this unique photosynthetic FNR, C. tepidum FNR has been heterologously expressed, purified and crystallized in two forms. Form I crystals belong to space group C222{sub 1} and contain one dimer in the asymmetric unit, while form II crystals belong to space group P4{sub 1}22 or P4{sub 3}22. Diffraction data were collected from a form I crystal to 2.4 Å resolution on the synchrotron-radiation beamline NW12 at the Photon Factory.

  14. Isotope effects associated with the anaerobic oxidation of sulfite and thiosulfate by the photosynthetic bacterium, Chromatium vinosum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fry, B.; Gest, H.; Hayes, J. M.

    1985-01-01

    The purple photosynthetic bacterium Chromatium vinosum, strain D, catalyzes several oxidations of reduced sulfur compounds under anaerobic conditions in the light: e.g., sulfide --> sulfur --> sulfate, sulfite --> sulfate, and thiosulfate --> sulfur + sulfate. Here it is shown that no sulfur isotope effect is associated with the last of these processes; isotopic compositions of the sulfur and sulfate produced can differ, however, if the sulfane and sulfonate positions within the thiosulfate have different isotopic compositions. In the second process, an observed change from an inverse to a normal isotope effect during oxidation of sulfite may indicate the operation of 2 enzymatic pathways. In contrast to heterotrophic anaerobic reduction of oxidized sulfur compounds, anaerobic oxidations of inorganic sulfur compounds by photosynthetic bacteria are characterized by relatively small isotope effects.

  15. Effects of carotenoid inhibition on the photosynthetic RC-LH1 complex in purple sulphur bacterium Thiorhodospira sibirica.

    PubMed

    Moskalenko, A A; Makhneva, Z K; Fiedor, L; Scheer, H

    2005-11-01

    Core complexes (LH1-RC) were isolated using preparative gel electrophoresis from photosynthetic membranes of the purple bacterium, Thiorhodospira sibirica, grown in the absence or presence of the carotenoid biosynthesis inhibitor, diphenylamine. The biosynthesis of carotenoids is affected by diphenylamine both quantitavely and qualitatively: after inhibition, the level of carotenoids in core complexes reaches only 10% of the normal content, as analyzed by HPLC and absorption spectroscopy. The normally grown bacterium biosynthesizes spirilloxanthin, rhodopin, anhydrorhodovibrin and lycopene, whereas after inhibition only neurosporene, zeta-carotene and their derivatives are found in the complexes. There is no concomitant accumulation of appreciable amounts of colorless carotenoid precursors. Interestingly, the main absorption band of the core light harvesting complex isolated from carotenoid-inhibited cells, shows a red shift to 889 nm, instead of a blue shift observed in many carotenoid-deficient species of purple photosynthetic bacteria. The stability of isolated core complexes against n-octyl-beta-D: -glucopyranoside clearly depends on the presence of carotenoids. Subcomplexes resulting from the detergent treatment, were characterized by non-denaturating gel electrophoresis combined with in situ absorption spectroscopy. Core complexes with the native carotenoid complement dissociate into three subcomplexes: (a) LH1 complexes partially depleted of carotenoids, with an unusual spectrum in the NIR region (lambdamax = 791, 818, 847 and 875 nm), (b) reaction centers associated with fragments of LH1, (c) small amounts of a carotenoidless B820 subcomplex. The core complex from the carotenoid-deficient bacterium is much less stable and yields only the two sub-complexes (b) and (c). We conclude that carotenoids contribute critically to stability and interactions of the core complexes with detergents.

  16. Identification, isolation, and sequence of the reaction center protein genes of the photosynthetic purple bacterium Rhodopseudomonas capsulata

    SciTech Connect

    Hearst, J.E.

    1984-07-01

    Reaction centers in photosynthetic membranes are the centers to which electronic excitation due to light absorption is transferred. This excitation brings about a charge separation between a bacteriochlorophyll molecule and two quinone molecules which ultimately leads to the formation of a hydroquinone. The reduced hydroquinone is then utilized to produce a proton gradient across the membrane and ultimately to produce ATP. We have focused our interest on the structure of the reaction center in the photosynthetic purple bacterium, Rhodopseudomonas capsulata, with the intention of establishing a detailed understanding of these first chemical steps in the natural fixation of sunlight. The methods used to identify and isolate the genes for the three reaction center subunits, L, M, and H, in Rps. capsulata are outlined. These genes have then been sequenced, and the sequences analyzed in detail for their similarity with sequences of comparable proteins from more advanced photosynthetic bacteria such as Anabena, from algae such as Euglena and Chlamydomonas, and from higher plants such as amaranthus, soybean, tobacco and spinach. Homology was found which has been tentatively interpreted to be in the region of quinone binding in all of these reaction centers. There is growing optimism that there will be substantial structural similarity between the reaction centers of the purple bacteria and those of photosystem II in higher plants. This conclusion is important because the x-ray crystal structures of several of the purple bacteria reaction center complexes are presently being worked on and will ultimately be solved.

  17. Influence of organics and silica on Fe(II) oxidation rates and cell-mineral aggregate formation by the green-sulfur Fe(II)-oxidizing bacterium Chlorobium ferrooxidans KoFox - Implications for Fe(II) oxidation in ancient oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauger, Tina; Byrne, James M.; Konhauser, Kurt O.; Obst, Martin; Crowe, Sean; Kappler, Andreas

    2016-06-01

    Most studies on microbial phototrophic Fe(II) oxidation (photoferrotrophy) have focused on purple bacteria, but recent evidence points to the importance of green-sulfur bacteria (GSB). Their recovery from modern ferruginous environments suggests that these photoferrotrophs can offer insights into how their ancient counterparts grew in Archean oceans at the time of banded iron formation (BIF) deposition. It is unknown, however, how Fe(II) oxidation rates, cell-mineral aggregate formation, and Fe-mineralogy vary under environmental conditions reminiscent of the geological past. To address this, we studied the Fe(II)-oxidizer Chlorobium ferrooxidans KoFox, a GSB living in co-culture with the heterotrophic Geospirillum strain KoFum. We investigated the mineralogy of Fe(III) metabolic products at low/high light intensity, and in the presence of dissolved silica and/or fumarate. Silica and fumarate influenced the crystallinity and particle size of the produced Fe(III) minerals. The presence of silica also enhanced Fe(II) oxidation rates, especially at high light intensities, potentially by lowering Fe(II)-toxicity to the cells. Electron microscopic imaging showed no encrustation of either KoFox or KoFum cells with Fe(III)-minerals, though weak associations were observed suggesting co-sedimentation of Fe(III) with at least some biomass via these aggregates, which could support diagenetic Fe(III)-reduction. Given that GSB are presumably one of the most ancient photosynthetic organisms, and pre-date cyanobacteria, our findings, on the one hand, strengthen arguments for photoferrotrophic activity as a likely mechanism for BIF deposition on a predominantly anoxic early Earth, but, on the other hand, also suggest that preservation of remnants of Fe(II)-oxidizing GSB as microfossils in the rock record is unlikely.

  18. Breakdown of food waste by anaerobic fermentation and non-oxygen producing photosynthesis using a photosynthetic bacterium.

    PubMed

    Mekjinda, N; Ritchie, R J

    2015-01-01

    Large volumes of food waste are produced by restaurants, hotels, etc generating problems in its collection, processing and disposal. Disposal as garbage increases the organic matter in landfills and leachates. The photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas palustris (CGA 009) easily broke down food waste. R. palustris produces H2 under anaerobic conditions and digests a very wide range of organic compounds. R. palustris reduced BOD by ≈70% and COD by ≈33%, starch, ammonia, nitrate, was removed but had little effect on reducing sugar or the total phosphorus, lipid, protein, total solid in a 7-day incubation. R. palustris produced a maximum of 80ml H2/g COD/day. A two-stage anaerobic digestion using yeast as the first stage, followed by a R. palustris digestion was tested but production of H2 was low.

  19. Isolation of a thermotolerant photosynthetic bacterium, Rhodobacter sphaeroides Strain, NAT, and its capacity for oil and chemical oxygen demand removal at high temperatures.

    PubMed

    Yamaoka, Yosuke; Takeno, Kenji; Shinkawa, Hidenori; Noparatnaraporn, Napavarn; Sasaki, Ken

    2008-06-01

    A thermotolerant photosynthetic bacterium NAT identified as Rhodobacter sphaeroides was isolated. When alginate-immobilized cells of strain NAT were used in high-temperature treatment of artificial sewage wastewater containing oil, the chemical oxygen demand (COD) decreased by 80% and 76% of the oil was removed after 96 h of treatment at 55 degrees C. Lipase activity was observed in the culture.

  20. Isolation, characterization, and amino acid sequences of auracyanins, blue copper proteins from the green photosynthetic bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McManus, J. D.; Brune, D. C.; Han, J.; Sanders-Loehr, J.; Meyer, T. E.; Cusanovich, M. A.; Tollin, G.; Blankenship, R. E.

    1992-01-01

    Three small blue copper proteins designated auracyanin A, auracyanin B-1, and auracyanin B-2 have been isolated from the thermophilic green gliding photosynthetic bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus. All three auracyanins are peripheral membrane proteins. Auracyanin A was described previously (Trost, J. T., McManus, J. D., Freeman, J. C., Ramakrishna, B. L., and Blankenship, R. E. (1988) Biochemistry 27, 7858-7863) and is not glycosylated. The two B forms are glycoproteins and have almost identical properties to each other, but are distinct from the A form. The sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis apparent monomer molecular masses are 14 (A), 18 (B-2), and 22 (B-1) kDa. The amino acid sequences of the B forms are presented. All three proteins have similar absorbance, circular dichroism, and resonance Raman spectra, but the electron spin resonance signals are quite different. Laser flash photolysis kinetic analysis of the reactions of the three forms of auracyanin with lumiflavin and flavin mononucleotide semiquinones indicates that the site of electron transfer is negatively charged and has an accessibility similar to that found in other blue copper proteins. Copper analysis indicates that all three proteins contain 1 mol of copper per mol of protein. All three auracyanins exhibit a midpoint redox potential of +240 mV. Light-induced absorbance changes and electron spin resonance signals suggest that auracyanin A may play a role in photosynthetic electron transfer. Kinetic data indicate that all three proteins can donate electrons to cytochrome c-554, the electron donor to the photosynthetic reaction center.

  1. Light-enhanced bioaccumulation of molybdenum by nitrogen-deprived recombinant anoxygenic photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas palustris.

    PubMed

    Naito, Taki; Sachuronggui; Ueki, Masayoshi; Maeda, Isamu

    2016-01-01

    As molybdenum (Mo) is an indispensable metal for plant nitrogen metabolisms, accumulation of dissolved Mo into bacterial cells may connect to the development of bacterial fertilizers that promote plant growth. In order to enhance Mo bioaccumulation, nitrogen removal and light illumination were examined in anoxygenic photosynthetic bacteria (APB) because APB possess Mo nitrogenase whose synthesis is strictly regulated by ammonium ion concentration. In addition, an APB, Rhodopseudomonas palustris, transformed with a gene encoding Mo-responsive transcriptional regulator ModE was constructed. Mo content was most markedly enhanced by the removal of ammonium ion from medium and light illumination while their effects on other metal contents were limited. Increases in contents of trace metals including Mo by the genetic modification were observed. Thus, these results demonstrated an effective way to enrich Mo in the bacterial cells by the culture conditions and genetic modification.

  2. Photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas palustris GJ-22 induces systemic resistance against viruses.

    PubMed

    Su, Pin; Tan, Xinqiu; Li, Chenggang; Zhang, Deyong; Cheng, Ju'e; Zhang, Songbai; Zhou, Xuguo; Yan, Qingpin; Peng, Jing; Zhang, Zhuo; Liu, Yong; Lu, Xiangyang

    2017-03-14

    Photosynthetic bacteria (PSB) have been extensively used in agriculture to promote plant growth and to improve crop quality. Their potential application in plant disease management, however, is largely overlooked. In this study, the PSB strain Rhodopseudomonas palustris GJ-22 was investigated for its ability to induce resistance against a plant virus while promoting plant growth. In the field, a foliar spray of GJ-22 suspension protected tobacco plants against tobacco mosaic virus (TMV). Under axenic conditions, GJ-22 colonized the plant phyllosphere and induced resistance against TMV. Additionally, GJ-22 produced two phytohormones, indole-3-acetic acid and 5-aminolevulinic acid, which promote growth and germination in tobacco. Furthermore, GJ-22-inoculated plants elevated their immune response under subsequent TMV infection. This research may give rise to a novel biological agent with a dual function in disease management while promoting plant growth.

  3. Triplet excited state spectra and dynamics of carotenoids from the thermophilic purple photosynthetic bacterium Thermochromatium tepidum

    SciTech Connect

    Niedzwiedzki, Dariusz; Kobayashi, Masayuki; Blankenship, R. E.

    2011-01-13

    Light-harvesting complex 2 from the anoxygenic phototrophic purple bacterium Thermochromatium tepidum was purified and studied by steady-state absorption, fluorescence and flash photolysis spectroscopy. Steady-state absorption and fluorescence measurements show that carotenoids play a negligible role as supportive energy donors and transfer excitation to bacteriochlorophyll-a with low energy transfer efficiency of ~30%. HPLC analysis determined that the dominant carotenoids in the complex are rhodopin and spirilloxanthin. Carotenoid excited triplet state formation upon direct (carotenoid) or indirect (bacteriochlorophyll-a Q{sub x} band) excitation shows that carotenoid triplets are mostly localized on spirilloxanthin. In addition, no triplet excitation transfer between carotenoids was observed. Such specific carotenoid composition and spectroscopic results strongly suggest that this organism optimized carotenoid composition in the light-harvesting complex 2 in order to maximize photoprotective capabilities of carotenoids but subsequently drastically suppressed their supporting role in light-harvesting process.

  4. [Screening and identification of a photosynthetic bacterium reducing selenite to red elemental selenium].

    PubMed

    Wang, Dong-liang; Xiao, Min; Qian, Wei; Han, Bo

    2007-02-01

    Selenium is essential element for humans and animals but is very toxic at higher concentrations. In four inorganic states of selenate [SeO4 2- ( VI)], selenite [SeO3 2- (IV)], elemental selenium [Se (0)] and selenide [Se2- (- II )], selenite is well known to be more soluble and higher toxic than other three forms. Many microorganisms have the capacity to reduce selenite to red elemental selenium, which provide the potential to cope with the detoxification of pollution and to use the biological availability of red elemental selenium. Strain S3 that was more resistant to sodium selenite was selected from 20 photosynthetic bacteria preserved in laboratory. The red granule produced by S3 was identified as elemental selenium ( Se) by transmission electron microscopy and Electron-Dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis. The granule diameter of the red elemental selenium was 5nm - 200nm, similar as the Nano-Se that has bioavailability. Morphology, physiology and photosynthetic pigments analysis results showed that strain S3 was essentially consistent with Rhodobacter azotoformans . The 16S rDNA sequence analysis (GenBank accession number DQ402051) suggested that strain S3 was clustered together with R. azotoformans in phylogenetic tree, with the sequence identity of 99% . Based on all the results of taxonomy, strain S3 was identified as R. azotoformans S3. The effects of selenite on growth kinetics and the ability to resistant selenite of strain S3 were investigated. In contrast to Rhodospirillum rubrum which was reported not to reduce selenite until the end of exponential growth, strain S3 transformed selenite (1.25mmol/L) at the beginning of the growth, suggesting that strain S3 and Rs. rubrum may employ different strategies to reduce selenite. Strain S3 can grow in the presence of up to 125mmol/L sodium selenite, which is much higher than those which could be resisted to by other bacteria such as Escherichia coli ( < 20mmol/L) and Ralstonia metallidurans CH34 ( < 6mmol/L) . It

  5. Melatonin production in an aerobic photosynthetic bacterium: an evolutionarily early association with darkness.

    PubMed

    Tilden, A R; Becker, M A; Amma, L L; Arciniega, J; McGaw, A K

    1997-03-01

    Melatonin was measured in a species of aerobic photosynthetic bacteria, Erythrobacter longus, grown in either constant light or constant dark. A radioimmunoassay was used to quantify melatonin levels and thin-layer chromatography to confirm the identity of melatonin immunoactivity. Melatonin levels were significantly higher (nearly 2.3-fold) in the dark-grown than in the light-grown samples. Also, the homogenates of the dark-grown bacteria retained melatonin-producing enzymatic activity, whereas the light-grown homogenates did not; melatonin levels extracted from the dark-grown homogenates increased with increasing extraction time, reaching as high as 29.2 ng.mg-1 protein at 120 min. Removal of membrane fragments from homogenates did not influence melatonin levels in light-grown homogenate, but this procedure increased melatonin levels in dark-grown homogenate, indicating that at least some of the enzymes in the pathway of melatonin production are not membrane-bound. This study is the second to demonstrate the presence of melatonin at the prokaryotic level, supporting the evidence that melatonin appeared very early in evolution. Its function in prokaryotes has not been determined, but may relate to its antioxidative actions.

  6. Extracellular production of tellurium nanoparticles by the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus.

    PubMed

    Borghese, Roberto; Brucale, Marco; Fortunato, Gianuario; Lanzi, Massimiliano; Mezzi, Alessio; Valle, Francesco; Cavallini, Massimiliano; Zannoni, Davide

    2016-05-15

    The toxic oxyanion tellurite (TeO3(2-)) is acquired by cells of Rhodobacter capsulatus grown anaerobically in the light, via acetate permease ActP2 and then reduced to Te(0) in the cytoplasm as needle-like black precipitates. Interestingly, photosynthetic cultures of R. capsulatus can also generate Te(0) nanoprecipitates (TeNPs) outside the cells upon addition of the redox mediator lawsone (2-hydroxy-1,4-naphtoquinone). TeNPs generation kinetics were monitored to define the optimal conditions to produce TeNPs as a function of various carbon sources and lawsone concentration. We report that growing cultures over a 10 days period with daily additions of 1mM tellurite led to the accumulation in the growth medium of TeNPs with dimensions from 200 up to 600-700 nm in length as determined by atomic force microscopy (AFM). This result suggests that nucleation of TeNPs takes place over the entire cell growth period although the addition of new tellurium Te(0) to pre-formed TeNPs is the main strategy used by R. capsulatus to generate TeNPs outside the cells. Finally, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) analysis of TeNPs indicate they are coated with an organic material which keeps the particles in solution in aqueous solvents.

  7. Extraction of extracellular polymeric substances from the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas acidophila.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Guo-Ping; Yu, Han-Qing; Yu, Zhou

    2005-04-01

    Among the four methods for extracting extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) from Rhodopseudomonas acidophila (EDTA, NaOH, H(2)SO(4), heating/centrifugation), EDTA extraction was found to be the most effective. The contents of the major components of EPS from R. acidophila, i.e., carbohydrate, protein and nucleic acid, were 6.5, 58.4 and 5.4 mg g(-1) dry cells, respectively. The optimum extraction time was 1-3 h and the EDTA dosage was approximately 2.8 g g(-1) dry cells. Under these conditions, no cell lysis was observed. The EPS content and the percentage of the three main components were greatly dependent on the extraction method. The intensity of absorption peaks for photosynthetic pigments in the UV-visible spectrum of bacteria remained unchanged prior to and after EDTA extraction; and no pigment peaks appeared in the EPS spectrum. This suggests that few cells were destroyed and lysis did not occur. UV-visible spectrum analysis, an easy and rapid technique, could be used to monitor cell lysis during EPS extraction from R. acidophila.

  8. Isolation and Characterization of a Purple Non-Sulfur Photosynthetic Bacterium Rhodopseudomonas faecalis Strain A from Swine Sewage Wastewater.

    PubMed

    Wei, Hongyi; Okunishi, Suguru; Yoshikawa, Takeshi; Kamei, Yuto; Maeda, Hiroto

    2016-01-01

    A purple non-sulfur photosynthetic bacterium (PNSB), PSB Strain A was isolated from swine sewage wastewater. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that PSB Strain A was most closely related to Rhodopseudomonas faecalis. Growth of the isolate under anaerobic-light conditions with a variety of carbon sources was investigated. Both PSB Strain A and the standard strain showed good growth with acetic acid, propionic acid, and n-butyric acid at a concentration of 20 mM. At the high concentration of 200 mM, PSB Strain A showed better growth in pyruvate, acetate, propionate, succinate and malate. By applying PSB Strain A to treat swine sewage wastewater, the concentration of VFAs, which were acetic acid and propionic acid, decreased from 158.0 mM to 120.2±2.9 mM, and 14.9 mM to 9.3±0.9 mM, respectively, after 216-h incubation. After 330-h incubation, the concentrations of TOC and ammonia nitrogen dropped from 4508.0 mg/L to 3104.0±451.5 mg/L, and 629.7 mg/L to 424.1±7.4 mg/L, respectively. The isolated PSB Strain A showed almost the same efficiency compared with the standard strain on the removal of VFAs and TOC. The results suggest the possibility of using the isolated strain to treat swine sewage wastewater.

  9. Inhibitor-complexed Structures of the Cytochrome bc[subscript 1] from the Photosynthetic Bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    SciTech Connect

    Esser, Lothar; Elberry, Maria; Zhou, Fei; Yu, Chang-An; Yu, Linda; Xia, Di

    2008-06-30

    The cytochrome bc{sub 1} complex (bc{sub 1}) is a major contributor to the proton motive force across the membrane by coupling electron transfer to proton translocation. The crystal structures of wild type and mutant bc{sub 1} complexes from the photosynthetic purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides (Rsbc{sub 1}), stabilized with the quinol oxidation (Q{sub P}) site inhibitor stigmatellin alone or in combination with the quinone reduction (Q{sub N}) site inhibitor antimycin, were determined. The high quality electron density permitted assignments of a new metal-binding site to the cytochrome c1 subunit and a number of lipid and detergent molecules. Structural differences between Rsbc{sub 1} and its mitochondrial counterparts are mostly extra membranous and provide a basis for understanding the function of the predominantly longer sequences in the bacterial subunits. Functional implications for the bc{sub 1} complex are derived from analyses of 10 independent molecules in various crystal forms and from comparisons with mitochondrial complexes.

  10. In Vitro Enzymatic Activities of Bacteriochlorophyll a Synthase Derived from the Green Sulfur Photosynthetic Bacterium Chlorobaculum tepidum.

    PubMed

    Saga, Yoshitaka; Hirota, Keiya; Harada, Jiro; Tamiaki, Hitoshi

    2015-08-18

    The activity of an enzyme encoded by the CT1610 gene in the green sulfur photosynthetic bacterium Chlorobaculum tepidum, which was annotated as bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) a synthase, BchG (denoted as tepBchG), was examined in vitro using the lysates of Escherichia coli containing the heterologously expressed enzyme. BChl a possessing a geranylgeranyl group at the 17-propionate residue (BChl aGG) was produced from bacteriochlorophyllide (BChlide) a and geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate in the presence of tepBchG. Surprisingly, tepBchG catalyzed the formation of BChl a bearing a farnesyl group (BChl aF) as in the enzymatic production of BChl aGG, indicating loose recognition of isoprenoid pyrophosphates in tepBchG. In contrast to such loose recognition of isoprenoid substrates, BChlide c and chlorophyllide a gave no esterifying product upon being incubated with geranylgeranyl or farnesyl pyrophosphate in the presence of tepBchG. These results confirm that tepBchG undoubtedly acts as the BChl a synthase in Cba. tepidum. The enzymatic activity of tepBchG was higher than that of BchG of Rhodobacter sphaeroides at 45 °C, although the former activity was lower than the latter below 35 °C.

  11. Structural analysis of the homodimeric reaction center complex from the photosynthetic green sulfur bacterium Chlorobaculum tepidum.

    PubMed

    He, Guannan; Zhang, Hao; King, Jeremy D; Blankenship, Robert E

    2014-08-05

    The reaction center (RC) complex of the green sulfur bacterium Chlorobaculum tepidum is composed of the Fenna-Matthews-Olson antenna protein (FMO) and the reaction center core (RCC) complex. The RCC complex has four subunits: PscA, PscB, PscC, and PscD. We studied the FMO/RCC complex by chemically cross-linking the purified sample followed by biochemical and spectroscopic analysis. Blue-native gels showed that there were two types of FMO/RCC complexes, which are consistent with complexes with one copy of FMO per RCC and two copies of FMO per RCC. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis of the samples after cross-linking showed that all five subunits of the RC can be linked by three different cross-linkers: bissulfosuccinimidyl suberate, disuccinimidyl suberate, and 3,3-dithiobis-sulfosuccinimidyl propionate. The interaction sites of the cross-linked complex were also studied using liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry. The results indicated that FMO, PscB, PscD, and part of PscA are exposed on the cytoplasmic side of the membrane. PscD helps stabilize FMO to the reaction center and may facilitate transfer of the electron from the RC to ferredoxin. The soluble domain of the heme-containing cytochrome subunit PscC and part of the core subunit PscA are located on the periplasmic side of the membrane. There is a close relationship between the periplasmic portions of PscA and PscC, which is needed for the efficient transfer of the electron between PscC and P840.

  12. Draft Genome Sequence of the Pelagic Photoferrotroph Chlorobium phaeoferrooxidans

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Aria S.; Morgan-Lang, Connor; Thompson, Katherine J.; Simister, Rachel L.; Llirós, Marc; Hirst, Martin; Hallam, Steven J.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Chlorobium phaeoferrooxidans, a photoferrotrophic member of the genus Chlorobium in the phylum Chlorobi. This genome sequence provides insight into the metabolic capacity that underpins photoferrotrophy within low-light-adapted pelagic Chlorobi. PMID:28360175

  13. Characterization of chlorophyll pigments in the mutant lacking 8-vinyl reductase of green photosynthetic bacterium Chlorobaculum tepidum.

    PubMed

    Mizoguchi, Tadashi; Harada, Jiro; Tamiaki, Hitoshi

    2012-12-01

    The mutant lacking the enzyme BciA (renamed CT1063), which catalyzed reduction of the 8-vinyl group of a porphyrinoid-type 3,8-divinyl-(proto)chlorophyllide-a [DV-(P)Chlide-a] in the green sulfur bacterium Chlorobaculum (Cba.) tepidum, was reconstructed on the basis of the previous study reported by Chew and Bryant [J. Biol. Chem.2007, 282, 2967-2975]. Cba. tepidum biosynthesizes the following three different types of chlorophylls (Chls) through their common precursory DV-(P)Chlide-a as its photosynthetically active pigments: bacteriochlorophyll(BChl)-c and Chl-a with the partially reduced 17,18-trans-dihydroporphyrin and BChl-a with the further reduced 7,8-trans-17,18-trans-tetrahydroporphyrin. The structures of Chls thus produced were characterized in detail by various spectroscopic techniques. In the mutant, both BChl-c and Chl-a possessing the alkyl group at the 8-position were exclusively replaced by their 8-vinylated derivatives, whereas BChl-a possessed the original 8-ethyl group. The present observations were inconsistent with the previous report. However, it was apparently confirmed that the enzyme BciA was responsible for the reduction of DV-(P)Chlide-a to produce BChl-c and Chl-a. Noteworthily, exclusive accumulation of the reduced (8-ethylated) form of BChl-a, not its 8-vinylated derivative, in the mutant indicates the presence of another enzyme catalyzing the 8-vinyl reduction as yet unidentified or any other reduction mechanism using a known enzyme to yield BChl-a.

  14. Spectroscopic studies of two spectral variants of light-harvesting complex 2 (LH2) from the photosynthetic purple sulfur bacterium Allochromatium vinosum.

    PubMed

    Niedzwiedzki, Dariusz M; Bina, David; Picken, Nichola; Honkanen, Suvi; Blankenship, Robert E; Holten, Dewey; Cogdell, Richard J

    2012-09-01

    Two spectral forms of the peripheral light-harvesting complex (LH2) from the purple sulfur photosynthetic bacterium Allochromatium vinosum were purified and their photophysical properties characterized. The complexes contain bacteriochlorophyll a (BChl a) and multiple species of carotenoids. The composition of carotenoids depends on the light conditions applied during growth of the cultures. In addition, LH2 grown under high light has a noticeable split of the B800 absorption band. The influence of the change of carotenoid distribution as well as the spectral change of the excitonic absorption of the bacteriochlorophylls on the light-harvesting ability was studied using steady-state absorption, fluorescence and femtosecond time-resolved absorption at 77K. The results demonstrate that the change of the distribution of the carotenoids when cells were grown at low light adapts the absorptive properties of the complex to the light conditions and maintains maximum photon-capture performance. In addition, an explanation for the origin of the enigmatic split of the B800 absorption band is provided. This spectral splitting is also observed in LH2 complexes from other photosynthetic sulfur purple bacterial species. According to results obtained from transient absorption spectroscopy, the B800 band split originates from two spectral forms of the associated BChl a monomeric molecules bound within the same complex.

  15. Expressed genes for plant-type ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase in the photosynthetic bacterium Chromatium vinosum, which possesses two complete sets of the genes.

    PubMed Central

    Viale, A M; Kobayashi, H; Akazawa, T

    1989-01-01

    Two sets of genes for the large and small subunits of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO) were detected in the photosynthetic purple sulfur bacterium Chromatium vinosum by hybridization analysis with RuBisCO gene probes, cloned by using the lambda Fix vector, and designated rbcL-rbcS and rbcA-rbcB. rbcL and rbcA encode the large subunits, and rbcS and rbcB encode the small subunits. rbcL-rbcS was the same as that reported previously (A. M. Viale, H. Kobayashi, T. Takabe, and T. Akazawa, FEBS Lett. 192:283-288, 1985). A DNA fragment bearing rbcA-rbcB was subcloned in plasmid vectors and sequenced. We found that rbcB was located 177 base pairs downstream of the rbcA coding region, and both genes were preceded by plausible procaryotic ribosome-binding sites. rbcA and rbcD encoded polypeptides of 472 and 118 amino acids, respectively. Edman degradation analysis of the subunits of RuBisCO isolated from C. vinosum showed that rbcA-rbcB encoded the enzyme present in this bacterium. The large- and small-subunit polypeptides were posttranslationally processed to remove 2 and 1 amino acid residues from their N-termini, respectively. Among hetero-oligomeric RuBisCOs, the C. vinosum large subunit exhibited higher homology to that from cyanobacteria, eucaryotic algae, and higher plants (71.6 to 74.2%) than to that from the chemolithotrophic bacterium Alcaligenes eutrophus (56.6%). A similar situation has been observed for the C. vinosum small subunit, although the homology among small subunits from different organisms was lower than that among the large subunits. Images PMID:2708310

  16. Characterization of ATP citrate lyase from Chlorobium limicola.

    PubMed Central

    Antranikian, G; Herzberg, C; Gottschalk, G

    1982-01-01

    ATP citrate lyase (EC 4.1.3.8) from Chlorobium limicola was partially purified. It was established that the consumption of substrates and the formation of products proceeded stoichiometrically and that citrate cleavage was of the si-type. ADP and oxaloacetate inhibited enzyme activity. Oxaloacetate also inhibited the growth of C. limicola. PMID:7142107

  17. Ultrafast time-resolved spectroscopy of the light-harvesting complex 2 (LH2) from the photosynthetic bacterium Thermochromatium tepidum

    SciTech Connect

    Niedzwiedzki, Dariusz M.; Fuciman, Marcel; Kobayashi, Masayuki; Frank, Harry A.; Blankenship, Robert E.

    2011-10-08

    The light-harvesting complex 2 from the thermophilic purple bacterium Thermochromatium tepidum was purified and studied by steady-state absorption and fluorescence, sub-nanosecond-time-resolved fluorescence and femtosecond time-resolved transient absorption spectroscopy. The measurements were performed at room temperature and at 10 K. The combination of both ultrafast and steady-state optical spectroscopy methods at ambient and cryogenic temperatures allowed the detailed study of carotenoid (Car)-to-bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) as well BChl-to-BChl excitation energy transfer in the complex. The studies show that the dominant Cars rhodopin (N = 11) and spirilloxanthin (N = 13) do not play a significant role as supportive energy donors for BChl a. This is related with their photophysical properties regulated by long π-electron conjugation. On the other hand, such properties favor some of the Cars, particularly spirilloxanthin (N = 13) to play the role of the direct quencher of the excited singlet state of BChl.

  18. Flux coupling and transcriptional regulation within the metabolic network of the photosynthetic bacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC6803.

    PubMed

    Montagud, Arnau; Zelezniak, Aleksej; Navarro, Emilio; de Córdoba, Pedro Fernández; Urchueguía, Javier F; Patil, Kiran Raosaheb

    2011-03-01

    Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 is a model cyanobacterium capable of producing biofuels with CO(2) as carbon source and with its metabolism fueled by light, for which it stands as a potential production platform of socio-economic importance. Compilation and characterization of Synechocystis genome-scale metabolic model is a pre-requisite toward achieving a proficient photosynthetic cell factory. To this end, we report iSyn811, an upgraded genome-scale metabolic model of Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 consisting of 956 reactions and accounting for 811 genes. To gain insights into the interplay between flux activities and metabolic physiology, flux coupling analysis was performed for iSyn811 under four different growth conditions, viz., autotrophy, mixotrophy, heterotrophy, and light-activated heterotrophy (LH). Initial steps of carbon acquisition and catabolism formed the versatile center of the flux coupling networks, surrounded by a stable core of pathways leading to biomass building blocks. This analysis identified potential bottlenecks for hydrogen and ethanol production. Integration of transcriptomic data with the Synechocystis flux coupling networks lead to identification of reporter flux coupling pairs and reporter flux coupling groups - regulatory hot spots during metabolic shifts triggered by the availability of light. Overall, flux coupling analysis provided insight into the structural organization of Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 metabolic network toward designing of a photosynthesis-based production platform.

  19. Coupling of cytochrome and quinone turnovers in the photocycle of reaction centers from the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    PubMed Central

    Osváth, S; Maróti, P

    1997-01-01

    A minimal kinetic model of the photocycle, including both quinone (Q-6) reduction at the secondary quinone-binding site and (mammalian) cytochrome c oxidation at the cytochrome docking site of isolated reaction centers from photosynthetic purple bacteria Rhodobacter sphaeroides, was elaborated and tested by cytochrome photooxidation under strong continuous illumination. The typical rate of photochemical excitation by a laser diode at 810 nm was 2.200 s-1, and the rates of stationary turnover of the reaction center (one-half of that of cytochrome photooxidation) were 600 +/- 70 s-1 at pH 6 and 400 +/- 50 s-1 at pH 8. The rate of turnover showed strong pH dependence, indicating the contribution of different rate-limiting processes. The kinetic limitation of the photocycle was attributed to the turnover of the cytochrome c binding site (pH < 6), light intensity and quinone/quinol exchange (6 < pH < 8), and proton-coupled second electron transfer in the quinone acceptor complex (pH > 8). The analysis of the double-reciprocal plot of the rate of turnover versus light intensity has proved useful in determining the light-independent (maximum) turnover rate of the reaction center (445 +/- 50 s-1 at pH 7.8). PMID:9251814

  20. Excitation energy transfer in the green photosynthetic bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus: A specific effect of 1-hexanol on the optical properties of baseplate and energy transfer processes.

    PubMed

    Mimuro, M; Nishimura, Y; Yamazaki, I; Kobayashi, M; Wang, Z Y; Nozawa, T; Shimada, K; Matsuura, K

    1996-05-01

    The effect of 1-hexanol on spectral properties and the processes of energy transfer of the green gliding photosynthetic bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus was investigated with reference to the baseplate region. On addition of 1-hexanol to a cell suspension in a concentration of one-fourth saturation, a specific change in the baseplate region was induced: that is, a bleach of the 793-nm component, and an increase in absorption of the 813-nm component. This result was also confirmed by fluorescence spectra of whole cells and isolated chlorosomes. The processes of energy transfer were affected in the overall transfer efficiency but not kinetically, indicating that 1-hexanol suppressed the flux of energy flow from the baseplate to the B806-866 complexes in the cytoplasmic membranes. The fluorescence excitation spectrum suggests a specific site of interaction between bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) c with a maximum at 771 nm in the rod elements and BChl a with a maximum at 793 nm in the baseplate, which is a funnel for a fast transfer of energy to the B806-866 complexes in the membranes. The absorption spectrum of chlorosomes was resolved to components consistently on the basis, including circular dichroism and magnetic circular dichroism spectra; besides two major BChl c forms, bands corresponding to tetramer, dimer, and monomer were also discernible, which are supposed to be intermediary components for a higher order structure. A tentative model for the antenna system of C. aurantiacus is proposed.

  1. Polarization angle dependence of stark absorption spectra of spirilloxanthin bound to the reconstituted LH1 complexes using LH1-subunits isolated from the purple photosynthetic bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum.

    PubMed

    Horibe, Tomoko; Nakagawa, Katsunori; Kusumoto, Toshiyuki; Fujii, Ritsuko; Cogdell, Richard J; Nango, Mamoru; Hashimoto, Hideki

    2012-01-01

    Reconstituted LH1 complexes were prepared using the LH1 subunit-type complexes, isolated from the purple photosynthetic bacterium Rhodospirillum (Rs.) rubrum, and purified all-trans spirilloxanthin. Stark absorption spectra of spirilloxanthin bound to both the native and reconstituted LH1 complexes were compared in different polarization angles (χ) against the external electric field. From the polarization angle dependence of the Stark absorption spectra, two angles were determined in reference to the direction of transition dipole moment (m) of spirilloxanthin: one is the change in polarizability upon photoexcitation (Δα), θ(Δα) and the other is the change in static dipole moment upon photoexcitation (Δμ), θ(Δμ). Despite the symmetric molecular structure of all-trans spirilloxanthin, its Stark absorption spectra show pronounced values of Δμ. This large Δμ values essentially caused by the effect of induced dipole moment through Δα both in the cases for native and reconstituted LH1 complexes. However, slightly different values of θ(Δα) and θ(Δμ) observed for the native LH1 complex suggest that spirilloxanthin is asymmetrically distorted when bound to the native LH1 complex and gives rise to intrinsic Δμ value.

  2. Specific Ca2+-binding motif in the LH1 complex from photosynthetic bacterium Thermochromatium tepidum as revealed by optical spectroscopy and structural modeling.

    PubMed

    Ma, Fei; Kimura, Yukihiro; Yu, Long-Jiang; Wang, Peng; Ai, Xi-Cheng; Wang, Zheng-Yu; Zhang, Jian-Ping

    2009-03-01

    Native and Ca(2+)-depleted light-harvesting-reaction center core complexes (LH1-RC) from the photosynthetic bacterium Thermochromatium (Tch.) tepidum exhibit maximal LH1-Q(y) absorption at 915 and 889 nm, respectively. To understand the structural origins of the spectral variation, we performed spectroscopic and structure modeling investigations. For the 889 nm form of LH1-RC, bacteriochlorophyll a (BChl a) in the native form was found by means of near-infrared Fourier-transform Raman spectroscopy, a higher degree of macrocycle distortion and a stronger hydrogen bond with the beta-Trp(-8) residue. SWISS-MODEL structure modeling suggests the presence of a specific coordination motif of Ca(2+) at the C-terminus of the alpha-subunit of LH1, while MODELLER reveals the tilt of alpha- and beta-polypeptides with reference to the structural template, as well as a change in the concentric orientation of BChl a molecules, both of which may be connected to the long-wavelength LH1-Q(y) absorption of the 915 nm form. The carotenoid spirilloxanthin shows a twisted all-trans configuration in both forms of LH1 as evidenced by the resonance Raman spectroscopic results. With regard to the thermal stability, the 915 nm form was shown by the use of temperature-dependent fluorescence spectroscopy to be approximately 20 K more stable than the 889 nm form, which may be ascribed to the specific Ca(2+)-binding motif of LH1.

  3. A heterogeneous tag-attachment to the homodimeric type 1 photosynthetic reaction center core protein in the green sulfur bacterium Chlorobaculum tepidum.

    PubMed

    Azai, Chihiro; Kim, Kwang; Kondo, Toru; Harada, Jiro; Itoh, Shigeru; Oh-oka, Hirozo

    2011-07-01

    The 6xHis-tag-pscA gene, which was genetically engineered to express N-terminally histidine (His)-tagged PscA, was inserted into a coding region of the recA gene in the green sulfur bacterium Chlorobaculum tepidum (C. tepidum). Although the inactivation of the recA gene strongly suppressed a homologous recombination in C. tepidum genomic DNA, the mutant grew well under normal photosynthetic conditions. The His-tagged reaction center (RC) complex could be obtained simply by Ni(2+)-affinity chromatography after detergent solubilization of chlorosome-containing membranes. The complex consisted of three subunits, PscA, PscB, and PscC, in addition to the Fenna-Matthews-Olson protein, but there was no PscD. Low-temperature EPR spectroscopic studies in combination with transient absorption measurements indicated that the complex contained all intrinsic electron transfer cofactors as detected in the wild-type strain. Furthermore, the LC/MS/MS analysis revealed that the core protein consisted of a mixture of a His-/His-tagged PscA homodimer and a non-/His-tagged PscA heterodimer. The development of the pscA gene duplication method presented here, thus, enables not only a quick and large-scale preparation of the RC complex from C. tepidum but also site-directed mutagenesis experiments on the artificially incorporated 6xHis-tag-pscA gene itself, since the expression of the authentic PscA/PscA homodimeric RC complex could complement any defect in mutated His-tagged PscA. This method would provide an invaluable tool for structural and functional analyses of the homodimeric type 1 RC complex.

  4. Coupling dark metabolism to electricity generation using photosynthetic cocultures.

    PubMed

    Badalamenti, Jonathan P; Torres, César I; Krajmalnik-Brown, Rosa

    2014-02-01

    We investigated the role of green sulfur bacteria inlight-responsive electricity generation in microbial electrochemical cells (MXCs). We operated MXCs containing either monocultures or defined cocultures of previously enriched phototrophic Chlorobium and anode-respiring Geobacter under anaerobic conditions in the absence of electron donor. Monoculture control MXCs containing Geobacter or Chlorobium neither responded to light nor produced current, respectively. Instead, light-responsive current generation occurred only in coculture MXCs. Current increased above background levels only in the dark and declined slowly over 96 h. This pattern suggested that Chlorobium exhausted intracellular glycogen reserves via dark fermentation to supply an electron donor, presumably acetate, to Geobacter. With medium containing sulfide as the sole photosynthetic electron donor, current generation had a similar and reproducible negative light response. To investigate whether this metabolic interaction also occurred without an electrode, we performed coculture experiments in batch serum bottles. In this setup, sulfide served as the sole electron donor, whose oxidation by Chlorobium was required to provide S(0) as the electron acceptor to Geobacter. Copies of Geobacter 16S rDNA increased approximately 14-fold in batch bottle cocultures containing sulfide compared to those lacking sulfide, and did not decline after termination of sulfide feeding. These results suggest that products of both photosynthesis and dark fermentation by Chlorobium were sufficient both to yield an electrochemical response by Geobacter biofilms, and to promote Geobacter growthin batch cocultures. Our work expands upon the fusion of MXCs with coculture techniques and reinforces the utility of microbial electrochemistry for sensitive, real-time monitoring of microbial interactions in which a metabolic intermediate can be converted to electrical current.

  5. A ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO)-like protein from Chlorobium tepidum that is involved with sulfur metabolism and the response to oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Hanson, T E; Tabita, F R

    2001-04-10

    A gene encoding a product with substantial similarity to ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO) was identified in the preliminary genome sequence of the green sulfur bacterium Chlorobium tepidum. A highly similar gene was subsequently isolated and sequenced from Chlorobium limicola f.sp. thiosulfatophilum strain Tassajara. Analysis of these amino acid sequences indicated that they lacked several conserved RubisCO active site residues. The Chlorobium RubisCO-like proteins are most closely related to deduced sequences in Bacillus subtilis and Archaeoglobus fulgidus, which also lack some typical RubisCO active site residues. When the C. tepidum gene encoding the RubisCO-like protein was disrupted, the resulting mutant strain displayed a pleiotropic phenotype with defects in photopigment content, photoautotrophic growth and carbon fixation rates, and sulfur metabolism. Most important, the mutant strain showed substantially enhanced accumulation of two oxidative stress proteins. These results indicated that the C. tepidum RubisCO-like protein might be involved in oxidative stress responses and/or sulfur metabolism. This protein might be an evolutional link to bona fide RubisCO and could serve as an important tool to analyze how the RubisCO active site developed.

  6. Excited-state absorption in bacteriochlorophyll a-protein from the green photosynthetic bacterium Prosthecochloris aestuarii: Reinterpretation of the absorption difference spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Amerongen, H. van; Struve, W.S. )

    1991-10-31

    Excited-state absorption arising from transitions between singly and doubly excited exciton components in strongly coupled photosynthetic antennae profoundly influences the absorption difference spectra observed in pump-probe spectroscopy. Model calculations of the absorption difference spectrum in the BChl a-protein complex from P. aestuarii are compared with the experimental spectrum.

  7. Trapping kinetics in mutants of the photosynthetic purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides: influence of the charge separation rate and consequences for the rate-limiting step in the light-harvesting process.

    PubMed

    Beekman, L M; van Mourik, F; Jones, M R; Visser, H M; Hunter, C N; van Grondelle, R

    1994-03-22

    The primary light-harvesting processes, energy transfer in the light-harvesting antenna, and trapping of the excited states by reaction centers were studied in several mutant strains of the photosynthetic purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides. The mutants had reaction centers in which the rates of electron transfer were modified by site-directed mutations at the M210 position. Low-intensity pump-probe laser spectroscopy was used to monitor the absorbance transients in the Qy region of the antenna pigments, and it was found that despite a wide variation in charge separation rates within the RC, produced by the alterations at Tyr M210, there was relatively little corresponding variation in the overall trapping rate. These effects of the mutations on the trapping kinetics demonstrate that the rate-limiting step of the overall light-harvesting process is the transfer of the excitations from the antenna to the reaction center.

  8. Proton efflux coupled to dark H/sub 2/ oxidation in whole cells of a marine sulfur photosynthetic bacterium (Chromatium sp. strain Miami PBS1071)

    SciTech Connect

    Kumazawa, S.; Izawa, S.; Mitsui, A.

    1983-04-01

    Whole cells of photoanaerobically grown Chromatium sp. strain Miami PBS1071, a marine sulfur purple bacterium, oxidized H/sub 2/ in the dark through the oxyhydrogen reaction at rates of up to 59 nmol of H/sub 2/ per mg (dry weight) per min. H/sub 2/ oxidation was routinely measured in H/sub 2/ pulse experiments with air-equilibrated cells. The reaction was accompanied by a reversible H/sup +/ efflux from the cells, suggesting an outward H/sup +/ translocation reaction coupled to H/sub 2/ oxidation. Anaerobic H/sub 2/ uptake with 2,5-dimethyl-p-benzoguinone as an oxidant also showed a weak H/sup +/-translocating activity. Carbonylcyanide 3-chlorophenylhydrazone (1 ..mu..M) stimulated H/sub 2/ oxidation and abolished the associated H/sup +/ changes when H/sub 2/ oxidation was observed in O/sub 2/ pulse experiments with H/sub 2/-Ar-equilibrated cells. However, the uncoupler inhibited both H/sub 2/ oxidation and H/sup +/ changes when measurements were made in H/sub 2/ pulse experiments with air-equilibrated cells. It is suggested that in this bacterium the susceptibility of hydrogenase to reversible O/sub 2/ inactivation in situ is enhanced by the presence of uncoupling agents.

  9. Relaxation dynamics of the LH2 complex from a photosynthetic purple bacterium Thiorhodospira sibirica studied by the near-IR femtosecond pump-probe method

    SciTech Connect

    Razjivin, A P; Pishchal'nikov, R Yu; Kozlovskii, V S; Kompanets, V O; Chekalin, Sergei V; Moskalenko, A A; Makhneva, Z K

    2005-01-31

    Photoinduced changes in the absorption spectrum of the LH2 (B800-830-850) complex from a Thiorhodospira sibirica (Trs. sibirica) bacterium are studied by the pump-probe method. The complex has the anomalous absorption spectrum exhibiting three bands in the near-IR region at 793, 826.5, and 846.5 nm. At room temperature, the excitation energy transfer from the B800, B830, and B859 bands was detected with the time constants {tau}{sub 1{approx}}0.5 ps, {tau}{sub 2{approx}}2.5 ps, and {tau}{sub 3} of the order of a few hundreds of picoseconds, respectively. A rapid energy transfer from the B830 band compared to energy transfer from the B850 band ({tau}{sub 2}||{tau}{sub 3}) suggests that all the three bands belong to the same complex (i.e., that the LH2 complex from Trs. sibirica is homogeneous). A slower energy transfer (by three - five times) from the B830 band of the LH2 complex from Trs. sibirica compared to energy transfer from the B800 band of the LH2 complexes (B800-850 and especially B800-820) from other purple bacteria suggests that the electronic structures of ensembles of bacteriochlorophyll molecules in these complexes are substantially different. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  10. Stark absorption spectroscopy on the carotenoids bound to B800-820 and B800-850 type LH2 complexes from a purple photosynthetic bacterium, Phaeospirillum molischianum strain DSM120.

    PubMed

    Horibe, Tomoko; Qian, Pu; Hunter, C Neil; Hashimoto, Hideki

    2015-04-15

    Stark absorption spectroscopy was applied to clarify the structural differences between carotenoids bound to the B800-820 and B800-850 LH2 complexes from a purple photosynthetic bacterium Phaeospirillum (Phs.) molischianum DSM120. The former complex is produced when the bacteria are grown under stressed conditions of low temperature and dim light. These two LH2 complexes bind carotenoids with similar composition, 10% lycopene and 80% rhodopin, each with the same number of conjugated CC double bonds (n=11). Quantitative classical and semi-quantum chemical analyses of Stark absorption spectra recorded in the carotenoid absorption region reveal that the absolute values of the difference dipole moments |Δμ| have substantial differences (2 [D/f]) for carotenoids bound to either B800-820 or B800-850 complexes. The origin of this striking difference in the |Δμ| values was analyzed using the X-ray crystal structure of the B800-850 LH2 complex from Phs. molischianum DSM119. Semi-empirical molecular orbital calculations predict structural deformations of the major carotenoid, rhodopin, bound within the B800-820 complex. We propose that simultaneous rotations around neighboring CC and CC bonds account for the differences in the 2 [D/f] of the |Δμ| value. The plausible position of the rotation is postulated to be located around C21-C24 bonds of rhodopin.

  11. Carotenoid-to-Bacteriochlorophyll Energy Transfer in the LH1-RC Core Complex of a Bacteriochlorophyll b Containing Purple Photosynthetic Bacterium Blastochloris viridis.

    PubMed

    Magdaong, Nikki Cecil M; Niedzwiedzki, Dariusz M; Goodson, Carrie; Blankenship, Robert E

    2016-06-16

    Carotenoid-to-bacteriochlorophyll energy transfer has been widely investigated in bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) a-containing light harvesting complexes. Blastochloris viridis utilizes BChl b, whose absorption spectrum is more red-shifted than that of BChl a. This has implications on the efficiency and pathways of carotenoid-to-BChl energy transfer in this organism. The carotenoids that comprise the light-harvesting reaction center core complex (LH1-RC) of B. viridis are 1,2-dihydroneurosporene and 1,2-dihydrolycopene, which are derivatives of carotenoids found in the light harvesting complexes of several BChl a-containing purple photosynthetic bacteria. Steady-state and ultrafast time-resolved optical spectroscopic measurements were performed on the LH1-RC complex of B. viridis at room and cryogenic temperatures. The overall efficiency of carotenoid-to-bacteriochlorophyll energy transfer obtained from steady-state absorption and fluorescence measurements were determined to be ∼27% and ∼36% for 1,2-dihydroneurosporene and 1,2-dihydrolycopene, respectively. These results were combined with global fitting and target analyses of the transient absorption data to elucidate the energetic pathways by which the carotenoids decay and transfer excitation energy to BChl b. 1,2-Dihydrolycopene transfers energy to BChl b via the S2 → Qx channel with kET2 = (500 fs)(-1) while 1,2-dihydroneurosporene transfers energy via S1→ Qy (kET1 = (84 ps)(-1)) and S2 → Qx (kET2 = (2.2 ps)(-1)) channels.

  12. Metabolic analysis of Chlorobium chlorochromatii CaD3 reveals clues of the symbiosis in ‘Chlorochromatium aggregatum'.

    PubMed Central

    Cerqueda-García, Daniel; Martínez-Castilla, León P; Falcón, Luisa I; Delaye, Luis

    2014-01-01

    A symbiotic association occurs in ‘Chlorochromatium aggregatum', a phototrophic consortium integrated by two species of phylogenetically distant bacteria composed by the green-sulfur Chlorobium chlorochromatii CaD3 epibiont that surrounds a central β-proteobacterium. The non-motile chlorobia can perform nitrogen and carbon fixation, using sulfide as electron donors for anoxygenic photosynthesis. The consortium can move due to the flagella present in the central β-protobacterium. Although Chl. chlorochromatii CaD3 is never found as free-living bacteria in nature, previous transcriptomic and proteomic studies have revealed that there are differential transcription patterns between the symbiotic and free-living status of Chl. chlorocromatii CaD3 when grown in laboratory conditions. The differences occur mainly in genes encoding the enzymatic reactions involved in nitrogen and amino acid metabolism. We performed a metabolic reconstruction of Chl. chlorochromatii CaD3 and an in silico analysis of its amino acid metabolism using an elementary flux modes approach (EFM). Our study suggests that in symbiosis, Chl. chlorochromatii CaD3 is under limited nitrogen conditions where the GS/GOGAT (glutamine synthetase/glutamate synthetase) pathway is actively assimilating ammonia obtained via N2 fixation. In contrast, when free-living, Chl. chlorochromatii CaD3 is in a condition of nitrogen excess and ammonia is assimilated by the alanine dehydrogenase (AlaDH) pathway. We postulate that ‘Chlorochromatium aggregatum' originated from a parasitic interaction where the N2 fixation capacity of the chlorobia would be enhanced by injection of 2-oxoglutarate from the β-proteobacterium via the periplasm. This consortium would have the advantage of motility, which is fundamental to a phototrophic bacterium, and the syntrophy of nitrogen and carbon sources. PMID:24285361

  13. Metabolic analysis of Chlorobium chlorochromatii CaD3 reveals clues of the symbiosis in 'Chlorochromatium aggregatum'.

    PubMed

    Cerqueda-García, Daniel; Martínez-Castilla, León P; Falcón, Luisa I; Delaye, Luis

    2014-05-01

    A symbiotic association occurs in 'Chlorochromatium aggregatum', a phototrophic consortium integrated by two species of phylogenetically distant bacteria composed by the green-sulfur Chlorobium chlorochromatii CaD3 epibiont that surrounds a central β-proteobacterium. The non-motile chlorobia can perform nitrogen and carbon fixation, using sulfide as electron donors for anoxygenic photosynthesis. The consortium can move due to the flagella present in the central β-protobacterium. Although Chl. chlorochromatii CaD3 is never found as free-living bacteria in nature, previous transcriptomic and proteomic studies have revealed that there are differential transcription patterns between the symbiotic and free-living status of Chl. chlorocromatii CaD3 when grown in laboratory conditions. The differences occur mainly in genes encoding the enzymatic reactions involved in nitrogen and amino acid metabolism. We performed a metabolic reconstruction of Chl. chlorochromatii CaD3 and an in silico analysis of its amino acid metabolism using an elementary flux modes approach (EFM). Our study suggests that in symbiosis, Chl. chlorochromatii CaD3 is under limited nitrogen conditions where the GS/GOGAT (glutamine synthetase/glutamate synthetase) pathway is actively assimilating ammonia obtained via N2 fixation. In contrast, when free-living, Chl. chlorochromatii CaD3 is in a condition of nitrogen excess and ammonia is assimilated by the alanine dehydrogenase (AlaDH) pathway. We postulate that 'Chlorochromatium aggregatum' originated from a parasitic interaction where the N2 fixation capacity of the chlorobia would be enhanced by injection of 2-oxoglutarate from the β-proteobacterium via the periplasm. This consortium would have the advantage of motility, which is fundamental to a phototrophic bacterium, and the syntrophy of nitrogen and carbon sources.

  14. Probing the effect of the binding site on the electrostatic behavior of a series of carotenoids reconstituted into the light-harvesting 1 complex from purple photosynthetic bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum detected by stark spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Katsunori; Suzuki, Satoru; Fujii, Ritsuko; Gardiner, Alastair T; Cogdell, Richard J; Nango, Mamoru; Hashimoto, Hideki

    2008-08-07

    Reconstitutions of the LH1 complexes from the purple photosynthetic bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum S1 were performed with a range of carotenoid molecules having different numbers of C=C conjugated double bonds. Since, as we showed previously, some of the added carotenoids tended to aggregate and then to remain with the reconstituted LH1 complexes (Nakagawa, K.; Suzuki, S.; Fujii, R.; Gardiner, A.T.; Cogdell, R.J.; Nango, M.; Hashimoto, H. Photosynth. Res. 2008, 95, 339-344), a further purification step using a sucrose density gradient centrifugation was introduced to improve purity of the final reconstituted sample. The measured absorption, fluorescence-excitation, and Stark spectra of the LH1 complex reconstituted with spirilloxanthin were identical with those obtained with the native, spirilloxanthin-containing, LH1 complex of Rs. rubrum S1. This shows that the electrostatic environments surrounding the carotenoid and bacteriochlorophyll a (BChl a) molecules in both of these LH1 complexes were essentially the same. In the LH1 complexes reconstituted with either rhodopin or spheroidene, however, the wavelength maximum at the BChl a Qy absorption band was slightly different to that of the native LH1 complexes. These differences in the transition energy of the BChl a Qy absorption band can be explained using the values of the nonlinear optical parameters of this absorption band, i.e., the polarizability change Tr(Deltaalpha) and the static dipole-moment change |Deltamu| upon photoexcitation, as determined using Stark spectroscopy. The local electric field around the BChl a in the native LH1 complex (ES) was determined to be approximately 3.0x10(6) V/cm. Furthermore, on the basis of the values of the nonlinear optical parameters of the carotenoids in the reconstituted LH1 complexes, it is possible to suggest that the conformations of carotenoids, anhydrorhodovibrin and spheroidene, in the LH1 complex were similar to that of rhodopin glucoside in crystal structure of

  15. Malate dehydrogenase from the mesophile Chlorobium vibrioforme and from the mild thermophile Chlorobium tepidum: molecular cloning, construction of a hybrid, and expression in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Naterstad, K; Lauvrak, V; Sirevåg, R

    1996-12-01

    The genes (mdh) encoding malate dehydrogenase (MDH) from the mesophile Chlorobium vibrioforme and the moderate thermophile C. tepidum were cloned and sequenced, and the complete amino acid sequences were deduced. When the region upstream of mdh was analyzed, a sequence with high homology to an operon encoding ribosomal proteins from Escherichia coli was found. Each mdh gene consists of a 930-bp open reading frame and encodes 310 amino acid residues, corresponding to a subunit weight of 33,200 Da for the dimeric enzyme. The amino acid sequence identity of the two MDHs is 86%. Homology searches using the primary structures of the two MDHs revealed significant sequence similarity to lactate dehydrogenases. A hybrid mdh was constructed from the 3' part of mdh from C. tepidum and the 5' part of mdh from C. vibrioforme. The thermostabilities of the hybrid enzyme and of MDH from C. vibrioforme and C. tepidum were compared.

  16. Photosynthetic reaction center of green sulfur bacteria studied by EPR

    SciTech Connect

    Nitschke, W.; Rutherford, A.W. ); Fieler, U. )

    1990-04-24

    Membrane preparations of two species of the green sulfur bacteria Chlorobium have been studied be EPR. Three signals were detected which were attributed to iron-sulfur centers acting as electron acceptors in the photosynthetic reaction center. (1) A signal from a center designated F{sub B}, was photoinduced at 4K. (2) A similar signal, F{sub A}, was photoinduced in addition to the F{sub B} signal upon a short period of illumination at 200 K. (3) Further illumination at 200 K resulted in the appearance of a broad feature at g=1.78. This is attributed to the g{sub x} component of an iron-sulfur center designated F{sub X}. The designations of these signals as F{sub B}, F{sub A}, and F{sub X} are based on their spectroscopic similarities to signals in photosystem I (PS I). The orientation dependence of these EPR signals in ordered Chlorobium membrane multilayers is remarkably similar to that of their PS I homologues. A magnetic interaction between the reduced forms of F{sub B} and F{sub A} occurs, which is also very similar to that seen in PS I. The triplet state of P{sub 840}, the primary electron donor, could be photoinduced at 4 K in samples which had been preincubated with sodium dithionite and methyl viologen and then preilluminated at 200 K. The preillumination reduces the iron-sulfur centers while the preincubation is thought to result in the inactivation of an earlier electron acceptor. Orientation studies of the triplet signal in ordered multilayers indicate that the bacteriochlorophylls which act as the primary electron donor in Chlorobium are arranged with a structural geometry almost identical with that of the special pair in purple bacteria. The Chlorobium reaction center appears to be similar in some respects to both PS I and to the purple bacterial reaction center. This is discussed with regard to the evolution of the different types of reaction centers from a common ancestor.

  17. Mimicking photosynthetic solar energy transduction.

    PubMed

    Gust, D; Moore, T A; Moore, A L

    2001-01-01

    Increased understanding of photosynthetic energy conversion and advances in chemical synthesis and instrumentation have made it possible to create artificial nanoscale devices and semibiological hybrids that carry out many of the functions of the natural process. Artificial light-harvesting antennas can be synthesized and linked to artificial reaction centers that convert excitation energy to chemical potential in the form of long-lived charge separation. Artificial reaction centers can form the basis for molecular-level optoelectronic devices. In addition, they may be incorporated into the lipid bilayer membranes of artificial vesicles, where they function as components of light-driven proton pumps that generate transmembrane proton motive force. The proton gradient may be used to synthesize adenosine triphosphate via an ATP synthase enzyme. The overall energy transduction process in the liposomal system mimics the solar energy conversion system of a photosynthetic bacterium. The results of this research illustrate the advantages of designing functional nanoscale devices based on biological paradigms.

  18. Isolation of Rhp-PSP, a member of YER057c/YjgF/UK114 protein family with antiviral properties, from the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas palustris strain JSC-3b.

    PubMed

    Su, Pin; Feng, Tuizi; Zhou, Xuguo; Zhang, Songbai; Zhang, Yu; Cheng, Ju'e; Luo, Yuanhua; Peng, Jing; Zhang, Zhuo; Lu, Xiangyang; Zhang, Deyong; Liu, Yong

    2015-11-04

    Rhodopseudomonas palustris strain JSC-3b isolated from a water canal adjacent to a vegetable field produces a protein that was purified by bioactivity-guided fractionation based on ammonium sulfate precipitation, ion-exchange absorption and size exclusion. The protein was further identified as an endoribonuclease L-PSP (Liver-Perchloric acid-soluble protein) by shotgun mass spectrometry analysis and gene identification, and it is member of YER057c/YjgF/UK114 protein family. Herein, this protein is designated Rhp-PSP. Rhp-PSP exhibited significant inhibitory activities against tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) in vivo and in vitro. To our knowledge, this represents the first report on the antiviral activity of a protein of the YER057c/YjgF/UK114 family and also the first antiviral protein isolated from R. palustris. Our research provides insight into the potential of photosynthetic bacterial resources in biological control of plant virus diseases and sustainable agriculture.

  19. Excitation Energy Transfer Dynamics and Excited-State Structure in Chlorosomes of Chlorobium phaeobacteroides

    PubMed Central

    Pšenčík, Jakub; Ma, Ying-Zhong; Arellano, Juan B.; Hála, Jan; Gillbro, Tomas

    2003-01-01

    The excited-state relaxation within bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) e and a in chlorosomes of Chlorobium phaeobacteroides has been studied by femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy at room temperature. Singlet-singlet annihilation was observed to strongly influence both the isotropic and anisotropic decays. Pump intensities in the order of 1011 photons × pulse−1 × cm−2 were required to obtain annihilation-free conditions. The most important consequence of applied very low excitation doses is an observation of a subpicosecond process within the BChl e manifold (∼200–500 fs), manifesting itself as a rise in the red part of the Qy absorption band of the BChl e aggregates. The subsequent decay of the kinetics measured in the BChl e region and the corresponding rise in the baseplate BChl a is not single-exponential, and at least two components are necessary to fit the data, corresponding to several BChl e→BChl a transfer steps. Under annihilation-free conditions, the anisotropic kinetics show a generally slow decay within the BChl e band (10–20 ps) whereas it decays more rapidly in the BChl a region (∼1 ps). Analysis of the experimental data gives a detailed picture of the overall time evolution of the energy relaxation and energy transfer processes within the chlorosome. The results are interpreted within an exciton model based on the proposed structure. PMID:12547796

  20. Exciton dynamics in the chlorosomal antennae of the green bacteria Chloroflexus aurantiacus and Chlorobium tepidum.

    PubMed Central

    Prokhorenko, V I; Steensgaard, D B; Holzwarth, A R

    2000-01-01

    The energy transfer processes in isolated chlorosomes from green bacteria Chlorobium tepidum and Chloroflexus aurantiacus have been studied at low temperatures (1.27 K) by two-pulse photon echo and one-color transient absorption techniques with approximately 100 fs resolution. The decay of the coherence in both types of chlorosomes is characterized by four different dephasing times stretching from approximately 100 fs up to 300 ps. The fastest component reflects dephasing that is due to interaction of bacteriochlorophylls with the phonon bath, whereas the other components correspond to dephasing due to different energy transfer processes such as distribution of excitation along the rod-like aggregates, energy exchange between different rods in the chlorosome, and energy transfer to the base plate. As a basis for the interpretation of the excitation dephasing and energy transfer pathways, a superlattice-like structural model is proposed based on recent experimental data and computer modeling of the Bchl c aggregates (1994. Photosynth. Res. 41:225-233.) This model predicts a fine structure of the Q(y) absorption band that is fully supported by the present photon echo data. PMID:11023914

  1. Chirality-Based Signatures of Local Protein Environments in Two-Dimensional Optical Spectroscopy of Two Species Photosynthetic Complexes of Green Sulfur Bacteria: Simulation Study

    PubMed Central

    Voronine, Dmitri V.; Abramavicius, Darius; Mukamel, Shaul

    2008-01-01

    Two-dimensional electronic chirality-induced signals of excitons in the photosynthetic Fenna-Matthews-Olson complex from two species of green sulfur bacteria (Chlorobium tepidum and Prosthecochloris aestuarii) are compared. The spectra are predicted to provide sensitive probes of local protein environment of the constituent bacteriochlorophyll a chromophores and reflect electronic structure variations (site energies and couplings) of the two complexes. Pulse polarization configurations are designed that can separate the coherent and incoherent exciton dynamics contributions to the two-dimensional spectra. PMID:18676650

  2. Isolation of Rhp-PSP, a member of YER057c/YjgF/UK114 protein family with antiviral properties, from the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas palustris strain JSC-3b

    PubMed Central

    Su, Pin; Feng, Tuizi; Zhou, Xuguo; Zhang, Songbai; Zhang, Yu; Cheng, Ju’e; Luo, Yuanhua; Peng, Jing; Zhang, Zhuo; Lu, Xiangyang; Zhang, Deyong; Liu, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Rhodopseudomonas palustris strain JSC-3b isolated from a water canal adjacent to a vegetable field produces a protein that was purified by bioactivity-guided fractionation based on ammonium sulfate precipitation, ion-exchange absorption and size exclusion. The protein was further identified as an endoribonuclease L-PSP (Liver-Perchloric acid-soluble protein) by shotgun mass spectrometry analysis and gene identification, and it is member of YER057c/YjgF/UK114 protein family. Herein, this protein is designated Rhp-PSP. Rhp-PSP exhibited significant inhibitory activities against tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) in vivo and in vitro. To our knowledge, this represents the first report on the antiviral activity of a protein of the YER057c/YjgF/UK114 family and also the first antiviral protein isolated from R. palustris. Our research provides insight into the potential of photosynthetic bacterial resources in biological control of plant virus diseases and sustainable agriculture. PMID:26530252

  3. Energy transfer and exciton coupling in isolated B800-850 complexes of the photosynthetic purple sulfur bacterium Choromatium tepidum. The effect of structural symmetry on bacteriochlorophyll excited states

    SciTech Connect

    Kennis, J.T.M.; Streltsov, A.M.; Aartsma, T.J.; Amesz, J.; Nozawa, Tsunenori

    1996-02-08

    Energy transfer and exciton coupling in isolated B800-850 complexes from the purple sulfur bacterium Chromatium tepidum were studied by means of spectrally resolved absorbance difference spectroscopy with a time resolution of 200 fs. Energy transfer from bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) 800 to BChl 850 was found to occur with a time constant of 0.8-0.9 ps. Remarkably, the amplitude of the absorbance changes of BChl 850 was 4 times larger than that of BChl 800. By relating this result to the crystal structure of B800-850 complexes of Rhodopseudomonas acidophila, it was concluded that the spectral properties of BChl 850 are mainly determined by strong exciton interactions between BChl 850 molecules in a circular symmetric arrangement, which lead to concentration of the oscillator strength in a few optically allowed transitions, corresponding to delocalized eigenstates. In BChl 850, a rapid red shift of the bleaching was observed. This relaxation process may be ascribed either to vibrational relaxation or exciton scattering. A similar red shift appears to occur in BChl 800. 26 refs., 5 figs.

  4. Effects of oxidants and reductants on the efficiency of excitation transfer in green photosynthetic bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, J.; Brune, D. C.; Blankenship, R. E.

    1990-01-01

    The efficiency of energy transfer in chlorosome antennas in the green sulfur bacteria Chlorobium vibrioforme and Chlorobium limicola was found to be highly sensitive to the redox potential of the suspension. Energy transfer efficiencies were measured by comparing the absorption spectrum of the bacteriochlorophyll c or d pigments in the chlorosome to the excitation spectrum for fluorescence arising from the chlorosome baseplate and membrane-bound antenna complexes. The efficiency of energy transfer approaches 100% at low redox potentials induced by addition of sodium dithionite or other strong reductants, and is lowered to 10-20% under aerobic conditions or after addition of a variety of membrane-permeable oxidizing agents. The redox effect on energy transfer is observed in whole cells, isolated membranes and purified chlorosomes, indicating that the modulation of energy transfer efficiency arises within the antenna complexes and is not directly mediated by the redox state of the reaction center. It is proposed that chlorosomes contain a component that acts as a highly quenching center in its oxidized state, but is an inefficient quencher when reduced by endogenous or exogenous reductants. This effect may be a control mechanism that prevents cellular damage resulting from reaction of oxygen with reduced low-potential electron acceptors found in the green sulfur bacteria. The redox modulation effect is not observed in the green gliding bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus, which contains chlorosomes but does not contain low-potential electron acceptors.

  5. Albidovulum inexpectatum gen. nov., sp. nov., a nonphotosynthetic and slightly thermophilic bacterium from a marine hot spring that is very closely related to members of the photosynthetic genus Rhodovulum.

    PubMed

    Albuquerque, Luciana; Santos, João; Travassos, Pedro; Nobre, M Fernanda; Rainey, Fred A; Wait, Robin; Empadinhas, Nuno; Silva, Manuel T; da Costa, Milton S

    2002-09-01

    Several bacterial isolates, with an optimum growth temperature of about 50 degrees C, were recovered from the marine hot spring at Ferraria on the island of São Miguel in the Azores. The geothermal water emerged from a porous lava flow and rapidly cooled in contact with seawater except at low tide. The bacterial species represented by strains FRR-10(T) and FRR-11 was nonpigmented, strictly aerobic, and organotrophic. Several genes, bchZ, pufB, pufA, pufL, or pufM, encoding the photosynthetic reaction center proteins and the core light-harvesting complexes were not detected in these strains. The organism oxidized thiosulfate to sulfate with enhancement of growth. The organism did not require additional NaCl in the culture medium for growth, but NaCl at 1.0% enhanced growth. Phylogenetic analyses using the 16S rRNA gene sequence of strain FRR-10(T) indicated that the new organism represented a new species of the alpha-3 subclass of the Proteobacteria and that it branches within the species of the genus Rhodovulum. The contradiction of classifying an organism which branches within the radiation of the genus Rhodovulum but does not possess the hallmark characteristics of this genus is discussed. However, the absence of several of these characteristics, namely, the lack of photosynthesis and pigmentation, which could be related to colonization of dark environments, and growth at high temperatures, leads to our proposal that strains FRR-10(T) and FRR-11 should be classified as a new species of a novel genus, Albidovulum inexpectatum, representing, at present, the most thermophilic organism within the alpha-3 subclass of the Proteobacteria.

  6. Initial characterization of the photosynthetic apparatus of "Candidatus Chlorothrix halophila," a filamentous, anoxygenic photoautotroph.

    PubMed

    van de Meene, Allison M L; Le Olson, Tien; Collins, Aaron M; Blankenship, Robert E

    2007-06-01

    "Candidatus Chlorothrix halophila" is a recently described halophilic, filamentous, anoxygenic photoautotroph (J. A. Klappenbach and B. K. Pierson, Arch. Microbiol. 181:17-25, 2004) that was enriched from the hypersaline microbial mats at Guerrero Negro, Mexico. Analysis of the photosynthetic apparatus by negative staining, spectroscopy, and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis indicated that the photosynthetic apparatus in this organism has similarities to the photosynthetic apparatus in both the Chloroflexi and Chlorobi phyla of green photosynthetic bacteria. The chlorosomes were found to be ellipsoidal and of various sizes, characteristics that are comparable to characteristics of chlorosomes in other species of green photosynthetic bacteria. The absorption spectrum of whole cells was dominated by the chlorosome bacteriochlorophyll c (BChl c) peak at 759 nm, with fluorescence emission at 760 nm. A second fluorescence emission band was observed at 870 nm and was tentatively attributed to a membrane-bound antenna complex. Fluorescence emission spectra obtained at 77 K revealed another complex that fluoresced at 820 nm, which probably resulted from the chlorosome baseplate complex. All of these results suggest that BChl c is present in the chlorosomes of "Ca. Chlorothrix halophila," that BChl a is present in the baseplate, and that there is a membrane-bound antenna complex. Analysis of the proteins in the chlorosomes revealed an approximately 6-kDa band, which was found to be related to the BChl c binding protein CsmA found in other green bacteria. Overall, the absorbance and fluorescence spectra of "Ca. Chlorothrix halophila" revealed an interesting mixture of photosynthetic characteristics that seemed to have properties similar to properties of both phyla of green bacteria when they were compared to the photosynthetic characteristics of Chlorobium tepidum and Chloroflexus aurantiacus.

  7. /sup 34/S//sup 32/S fractionation in sulfur cycles catalyzed by anaerobic bacteria. [Chlorobium vibrioforme; Desulfovibrio vulgaris

    SciTech Connect

    Fry, B.; Gest, H.; Hayes, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    Stable isotopic distributions in the sulfur cycle were studied with pure and mixed cultures of the anaerobic bacteria, Chlorobium vibrioforme and Desulfovibrio vulgaris. D. vulgaris and C. vibrioforme can catalyze three reactions constituting a complete anaerobic sulfur cycle: reduction of sulfate to sulfide (D. vulgaris), oxidation of sulfide to elemental sulfur (C. vibrioforme), and oxidation of sulfur to sulfate (C. vibrioforme). In all experiments, the first and last reactions favored concentration of the light /sup 32/S isotope in products (isotopic fractionation factor ..sigma.. = -7.2 and -1.7 per thousand, respectively), whereas oxidation of sulfide favored concentration of the heavy /sup 34/S isotope in products (..sigma.. = +1.7 per thousand). Experimental results and model calculations suggest that elemental sulfur enriched in /sup 34/S versus sulfide may be a biogeochemical marker for the presence of sulfide-oxidizing bacteria in modern and ancient environments.

  8. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel protein electrophoresis of freshwater photosynthetic sulfur bacteria.

    PubMed

    Osuna, M Begoña; Casamayor, Emilio O

    2011-01-01

    Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel protein electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) was carried out using different bacterial strains of the photosynthetic sulfur bacteria Chlorobium, Thiocapsa, Thiocystis, and Chromatium cultured in the laboratory, and the natural blooms in two karstic lakes (Lake Cisó and Lake Vilar, NE Spain) where planktonic photosynthetic bacteria (purple and green sulfur bacteria) massively developed accounting for most of the microbial biomass. Several extraction, solubilization, and electrophoresis methods were tested to develop an optimal protocol for the best resolution of the SDS-PAGE. Protein composition from different water depths and at different times of the year was visualized within a molecular mass range between 100 and 15 kDa yielding up to 20 different protein bands. Protein banding patterns were reproducible and changed in time and with depth in agreement with changes in photosynthetic bacteria composition. When a taxonomically stable community was followed in time, differences were observed in the intensity but not in the composition of the SDS-PAGE banding pattern. Three environmental variables directly related to the activity of sulfur bacteria (light, oxygen, and sulfide concentrations) had a significant effect on protein banding patterns and explained 33% of the variance. Changes in natural protein profiles of the bacterial blooms agreed with changes in species composition and in the in situ metabolic state of the populations.

  9. Chlorobium limicola forma thiosulfatophilum: Biocatalyst in the Production of Sulfur and Organic Carbon from a Gas Stream Containing H2S and CO2

    PubMed Central

    Cork, Douglas J.; Garunas, Ruta; Sajjad, Ashfaq

    1983-01-01

    Chlorobium limicola forma thiosulfatophilum (ATCC 17092) was grown in a 1-liter continuously stirred tank reactor (800-ml liquid volume) at pH 6.8, 30°C, saturated light intensity, and a gas flow rate of 23.6 ml/min from a gas cylinder blend consisting of 3.9 mol% H2S, 9.2 mol% CO2, 86.4 mol% N2, and 0.5 mol% H2. This is the first demonstration of photoautotrophic growth of a Chlorobium sp. on a continuous inorganic gas feed. A significant potential exists for applying this photoautotrophic process to desulfurization and CO2 fixation of gases containing acidic components (H2S and CO2). PMID:16346255

  10. Carbon monoxide metabolism by the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum

    SciTech Connect

    Ludden, P.W.; Roberts, G.P.

    1991-01-01

    Research continued on carbon monoxide metabolism by Rhodospirillum rubrum. In the past year, progress was made in: (1) the identification and isolation of the physiological electron carrier from monoxide dehydrogenase (CODH) to hydrogenase in R. rubrum; (2) the isolation, sequencing and mutagenesis of the genes encoding the components of the CO oxidation system in R. rubrum, (3) the purification and characterization of the CO-induced hydrogenase activity of R. rubrum; (4) the spectroscopic investigation of the cobalt-substituted form of the enzyme.

  11. Production of bioplastics and hydrogen gas by photosynthetic microorganisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuo, Asada; Masato, Miyake; Jun, Miyake

    1998-03-01

    Our efforts have been aimed at the technological basis of photosynthetic-microbial production of materials and an energy carrier. We report here accumulation of poly-(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB), a raw material of biodegradable plastics and for production of hydrogen gas, and a renewable energy carrier by photosynthetic microorganisms (tentatively defined as cyanobacteria plus photosynthetic bateria, in this report). A thermophilic cyanobacterium, Synechococcus sp. MA19 that accumulates PHB at more than 20% of cell dry wt under nitrogen-starved conditions was isolated and microbiologically identified. The mechanism of PHB accumulation was studied. A mesophilic Synechococcus PCC7942 was transformed with the genes encoding PHB-synthesizing enzymes from Alcaligenes eutrophus. The transformant accumulated PHB under nitrogen-starved conditions. The optimal conditions for PHB accumulation by a photosynthetic bacterium grown on acetate were studied. Hydrogen production by photosynthetic microorganisms was studied. Cyanobacteria can produce hydrogen gas by nitrogenase or hydrogenase. Hydrogen production mediated by native hydrogenase in cyanobacteria was revealed to be in the dark anaerobic degradation of intracellular glycogen. A new system for light-dependent hydrogen production was targeted. In vitro and in vivo coupling of cyanobacterial ferredoxin with a heterologous hydrogenase was shown to produce hydrogen under light conditions. A trial for genetic trasformation of Synechococcus PCC7942 with the hydrogenase gene from Clostridium pasteurianum is going on. The strong hydrogen producers among photosynthetic bacteria were isolated and characterized. Co-culture of Rhodobacter and Clostriumdium was applied to produce hydrogen from glucose. Conversely in the case of cyanobacteria, genetic regulation of photosynthetic proteins was intended to improve conversion efficiency in hydrogen production by the photosynthetic bacterium, Rhodobacter sphaeroides RV. A mutant acquired by

  12. Photosynthetic water splitting

    SciTech Connect

    Greenbaum, E.

    1981-01-01

    The photosynthetic unit of hydrogen evolution, the turnover time of photosynthetic hydrogen production, and hydrogenic photosynthesis are discussed in the section on previous work. Recent results are given on simultaneous photoproduction of hydrogen and oxygen, kinetic studies, microscopic marine algae-seaweeds, and oxygen profiles.

  13. Redox regulation of energy transfer efficiency in antennas of green photosynthetic bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blankenship, R. E.; Cheng, P.; Causgrove, T. P.; Brune, D. C.; Wang, J.

    1993-01-01

    The efficiency of energy transfer from the peripheral chlorosome antenna structure to the membrane-bound antenna in green sulfur bacteria depends strongly on the redox potential of the medium. The fluorescence spectra and lifetimes indicate that efficient quenching pathways are induced in the chlorosome at high redox potential. The midpoint redox potential for the induction of this effect in isolated chlorosomes from Chlorobium vibrioforme is -146 mV at pH 7 (vs the normal hydrogen electrode), and the observed midpoint potential (n = 1) decreases by 60 mV per pH unit over the pH range 7-10. Extraction of isolated chlorosomes with hexane has little effect on the redox-induced quenching, indicating that the component(s) responsible for this effect are bound and not readily extractable. We have purified and partially characterized the trimeric water-soluble bacteriochlorophyll a-containing protein from the thermophilic green sulfur bacterium Chlorobium tepidum. This protein is located between the chlorosome and the membrane. Fluorescence spectra of the purified protein indicate that it also contains groups that quench excitations at high redox potential. The results indicate that the energy transfer pathway in green sulfur bacteria is regulated by redox potential. This regulation appears to operate in at least two distinct places in the energy transfer pathway, the oligomeric pigments in the interior of the chlorosome and in the bacteriochlorophyll a protein. The regulatory effect may serve to protect the cell against superoxide-induced damage when oxygen is present. By quenching excitations before they reach the reaction center, reduction and subsequent autooxidation of the low potential electron acceptors found in these organisms is avoided.

  14. [Fractionation of sulfur isotopes by phototrophic sulfur bacterium Ectothiorhodospira shaposhnikovii].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, M V; Gogotova, G I; Matrosov, A G; Ziakun, A M

    1976-01-01

    Two processes of sulphur isotope fractionation have been found in experiments with the sulphur purple bacterium Ectothiorhodospira shaposhnikovii. As a result, a light isotope, 32S, is concentrated in residual hydrogen sulphide, and a heavy isotope, 34S, in elementary suphur which is deposited outside the cell. The sulphate produced is lighter than elementary sulphur. Fractionation of sulphur isotopes is observed in natural conditions and is confined to places of mass growth of photosynthetic sulphur bacteria.

  15. Nonphotochemical Hole-Burning Studies of Energy Transfer Dynamics in Antenna Complexes of Photosynthetic Bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuzaki, Satoshi

    2001-01-01

    This thesis contains the candidate's original work on excitonic structure and energy transfer dynamics of two bacterial antenna complexes as studied using spectral hole-burning spectroscopy. The general introduction is divided into two chapters (1 and 2). Chapter 1 provides background material on photosynthesis and bacterial antenna complexes with emphasis on the two bacterial antenna systems related to the thesis research. Chapter 2 reviews the underlying principles and mechanism of persistent nonphotochemical hole-burning (NPHB) spectroscopy. Relevant energy transfer theories are also discussed. Chapters 3 and 4 are papers by the candidate that have been published. Chapter 3 describes the application of NPHB spectroscopy to the Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) complex from the green sulfur bacterium Prosthecochloris aestuarii; emphasis is on determination of the low energy vibrational structure that is important for understanding the energy transfer process associated within three lowest energy Qy-states of the complex. The results are compared with those obtained earlier on the FMO complex from Chlorobium tepidum. In Chapter 4, the energy transfer dynamics of the B800 molecules of intact LH2 and B800-deficient LH2 complexes of the purple bacterium Rhodopseudomonas acidophila are compared. New insights on the additional decay channel of the B800 ring of bacteriochlorophyll a (BChl a) molecules are provided. General conclusions are given in Chapter 5.

  16. Photosynthetic system in Blastochloris viridis revisited.

    PubMed

    Konorty, Marina; Brumfeld, Vlad; Vermeglio, Andre; Kahana, Nava; Medalia, Ohad; Minsky, Abraham

    2009-06-09

    The bacterium Blastochloris viridis carries one of the simplest photosynthetic systems, which includes a single light-harvesting complex that surrounds the reaction center, membrane soluble quinones, and a soluble periplasmic protein cytochrome c(2) that shuttle between the reaction center and the bc(1) complex and act as electron carriers, as well as the ATP synthase. The close arrangement of the photosynthetic membranes in Bl. viridis, along with the extremely tight arrangement of the photosystems within these membranes, raises a fundamental question about the diffusion of the electron carriers. To address this issue, we analyzed the structure and response of the Bl. viridis photosynthetic system to various light conditions, by using a combination of electron microscopy, whole-cell cryotomography, and spectroscopic methods. We demonstrate that in response to high light intensities, the ratio of both cytochrome c(2) and bc(1) complexes to the reaction centers is increased. The shorter membrane stacks, along with the notion that the bc(1) complex is located at the highly curved edges of these stacks, result in a smaller average distance between the reaction centers and the bc(1) complexes, leading to shorter pathways of cytochrome c(2) between the two complexes. Under anaerobic conditions, the slow diffusion rate is further mitigated by keeping most of the quinone pool reduced, resulting in a concentration gradient of quinols that allows for a constant supply of theses electron carriers to the bc(1) complex.

  17. Theoretical Simulations and Ultrafast Pump-probe Spectroscopy Experiments in Pigment-protein Photosynthetic Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Buck, D. R.

    2000-09-12

    Theoretical simulations and ultrafast pump-probe laser spectroscopy experiments were used to study photosynthetic pigment-protein complexes and antennae found in green sulfur bacteria such as Prosthecochloris aestuarii, Chloroflexus aurantiacus, and Chlorobium tepidum. The work focused on understanding structure-function relationships in energy transfer processes in these complexes through experiments and trying to model that data as we tested our theoretical assumptions with calculations. Theoretical exciton calculations on tubular pigment aggregates yield electronic absorption spectra that are superimpositions of linear J-aggregate spectra. The electronic spectroscopy of BChl c/d/e antennae in light harvesting chlorosomes from Chloroflexus aurantiacus differs considerably from J-aggregate spectra. Strong symmetry breaking is needed if we hope to simulate the absorption spectra of the BChl c antenna. The theory for simulating absorption difference spectra in strongly coupled photosynthetic antenna is described, first for a relatively simple heterodimer, then for the general N-pigment system. The theory is applied to the Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) BChl a protein trimers from Prosthecochloris aestuarii and then compared with experimental low-temperature absorption difference spectra of FMO trimers from Chlorobium tepidum. Circular dichroism spectra of the FMO trimer are unusually sensitive to diagonal energy disorder. Substantial differences occur between CD spectra in exciton simulations performed with and without realistic inhomogeneous distribution functions for the input pigment diagonal energies. Anisotropic absorption difference spectroscopy measurements are less consistent with 21-pigment trimer simulations than 7-pigment monomer simulations which assume that the laser-prepared states are localized within a subunit of the trimer. Experimental anisotropies from real samples likely arise from statistical averaging over states with diagonal energies shifted by

  18. Phosphofructokinase Activities in Photosynthetic Organisms 1

    PubMed Central

    Carnal, Nancy Wieland; Black, Clanton C.

    1983-01-01

    A pyrophosphate-dependent phosphofructokinase (PPi-PFK) activity is detectable in extracts of a wide variety of primitive and advanced plants, the Charalean algae, and in the photosynthetic bacterium, Rhodospirillum rubrum. Angiosperms with extractable PPi-PFK activities 4- to 70-fold higher than the respective ATP-PFK activities tend to be succulent and to exhibit CAM. Even though PPi-PFK activity is not detected in crude extracts of some well known CAM plants, e.g. plants in the Crassulaceae, gel filtration of the extract and/or inclusion of the PPi-PFK activator, fructose 2,6-bisphosphate, in the assay reveals that a PPi-PFK activity is present in these species. Fructose 2,6-bisphosphate likewise activates PPi-PFK activities in extracts of C3 and C4 plants. C3 and C4 plant PPi-PFK activities are roughly equivalent to ATP-PFK activities in the same species. PPi-PFK activity is also detected in some bryophytes, lower vascular plants, ferns, and gymnosperms. The Charophytes, advanced algae presumed to be similar to species ancestral to vascular plants, exhibit at least 4-fold higher PPi-PFK than ATP-PFK activities. R. rubrum also exhibits a much higher PPi-PFK activity than ATP-PFK activity. These data indicate that PPi-PFK may serve as an alternate enzyme to ATP-PFK in glycolysis in a wide range of photosynthetic organisms. PMID:16662776

  19. Evolving a photosynthetic organelle.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Takuro; Archibald, John M

    2012-04-24

    The evolution of plastids from cyanobacteria is believed to represent a singularity in the history of life. The enigmatic amoeba Paulinella and its 'recently' acquired photosynthetic inclusions provide a fascinating system through which to gain fresh insight into how endosymbionts become organelles.The plastids, or chloroplasts, of algae and plants evolved from cyanobacteria by endosymbiosis. This landmark event conferred on eukaryotes the benefits of photosynthesis--the conversion of solar energy into chemical energy--and in so doing had a huge impact on the course of evolution and the climate of Earth 1. From the present state of plastids, however, it is difficult to trace the evolutionary steps involved in this momentous development, because all modern-day plastids have fully integrated into their hosts. Paulinella chromatophora is a unicellular eukaryote that bears photosynthetic entities called chromatophores that are derived from cyanobacteria and has thus received much attention as a possible example of an organism in the early stages of organellogenesis. Recent studies have unlocked the genomic secrets of its chromatophore 23 and provided concrete evidence that the Paulinella chromatophore is a bona fide photosynthetic organelle 4. The question is how Paulinella can help us to understand the process by which an endosymbiont is converted into an organelle.

  20. Unravelling coherent dynamics and energy dissipation in photosynthetic complexes by 2D spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Abramavicius, Darius; Voronine, Dmitri V; Mukamel, Shaul

    2008-05-01

    Spectroscopic studies of light harvesting and the subsequent energy conversion in photosynthesis can track quantum dynamics happening on the microscopic level. The Fenna-Matthews-Olson complex of the photosynthetic green sulfur bacteria Chlorobium tepidum is a prototype efficient light-harvesting antenna: it stores the captured photon energy in the form of excitons (collective excitations), which are subsequently converted to chemical energy with almost 100% efficiency. These excitons show an elaborate relaxation pattern involving coherent and incoherent pathways. We make use of the complex chirality and fundamental symmetries of multidimensional optical signals to design new sequences of ultrashort laser pulses that can distinguish between coherent quantum oscillations and incoherent energy dissipation during the exciton relaxation. The cooperative dynamical features, which reflect the coherent nature of excitations, are amplified. The extent of quantum oscillations and their timescales in photosynthesis can be readily extracted from the designed signals, showing that cooperativity is maintained during energy transport in the Fenna-Matthews-Olson complex. The proposed pulse sequences may also be applied to reveal information on the robustness of quantum states in the presence of fluctuating environments in other nanoscopic complexes and devices.

  1. Characteristics of Fluorescence and Delayed Light Emission from Green Photosynthetic Bacteria and Algae

    PubMed Central

    Clayton, Roderick K.

    1965-01-01

    Green photosynthetic bacteria exhibit variations in the intensity of their fluorescence during illumination. The initial intensity of fluorescence, measured at the onset of illumination, has a spectrum in which the major pigment Chlorobium chlorophyll predominates. The minor pigment bacteriochlorophyll predominates in the spectrum of the time-varying part of the fluorescence. The spectrum of delayed light emission is identical to that of the time-varying fluorescence. The variations in fluorescence also resemble the delayed light in their kinetics and in their dependence on exciting light intensity. Similar results are obtained for the kinetics of prompt and delayed light emission in the algae Chlorella and Anacystis. These findings raise the possibility that the variations in fluorescence actually represent a fast component of delayed light emission, of intensity comparable to the intensity of fluorescence. In Anacystis there is an outburst of light emission that develops after the exciting light has been turned off, reaching a maximum intensity after 1 to 3 seconds. This emitted light has the spectrum of chlorophyll fluorescence. It appears to be a novel example of bioluminescence with singlet excited chlorophyll as the emitter. PMID:14324979

  2. Unravelling Coherent Dynamics and Energy Dissipation in Photosynthetic Complexes by 2D Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Abramavicius, Darius; Voronine, Dmitri V.; Mukamel, Shaul

    2008-01-01

    Spectroscopic studies of light harvesting and the subsequent energy conversion in photosynthesis can track quantum dynamics happening on the microscopic level. The Fenna-Matthews-Olson complex of the photosynthetic green sulfur bacteria Chlorobium tepidum is a prototype efficient light-harvesting antenna: it stores the captured photon energy in the form of excitons (collective excitations), which are subsequently converted to chemical energy with almost 100% efficiency. These excitons show an elaborate relaxation pattern involving coherent and incoherent pathways. We make use of the complex chirality and fundamental symmetries of multidimensional optical signals to design new sequences of ultrashort laser pulses that can distinguish between coherent quantum oscillations and incoherent energy dissipation during the exciton relaxation. The cooperative dynamical features, which reflect the coherent nature of excitations, are amplified. The extent of quantum oscillations and their timescales in photosynthesis can be readily extracted from the designed signals, showing that cooperativity is maintained during energy transport in the Fenna-Matthews-Olson complex. The proposed pulse sequences may also be applied to reveal information on the robustness of quantum states in the presence of fluctuating environments in other nanoscopic complexes and devices. PMID:18192357

  3. Photosynthetic Photovoltaic Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-21

    PHOTOSYNTHETIC PHOTOVOLTAIC CELLS 5b. GRANT NUMBER F49620-02-1-0399 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER MARC A. BALDO 5e. TASK...building an ’antenna’ on top of a conventional solar cell. Biomimetic organic solar cells operate as follows: The antenna absorbs the light, and acts to...no longer must absorb all the light. Thus, its quantum efficiency can approach 100% potentially doubling the performance of organic solar cells. 15

  4. Genes, Genomes, and Assemblages of Modern Anoxygenic Photosynthetic Cyanobacteria as Proxies for Ancient Cyanobacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grim, S. L.; Dick, G.

    2015-12-01

    Oxygenic photosynthetic (OP) cyanobacteria were responsible for the production of O2 during the Proterozoic. However, the extent and degree of oxygenation of the atmosphere and oceans varied for over 2 Ga after OP cyanobacteria first appeared in the geologic record. Cyanobacteria capable of anoxygenic photosynthesis (AP) may have altered the trajectory of oxygenation, yet the scope of their role in the Proterozoic is not well known. Modern cyanobacterial populations from Middle Island Sinkhole (MIS), Michigan and a handful of cultured cyanobacterial strains, are capable of OP and AP. With their metabolic versatility, these microbes may approximate ancient cyanobacterial assemblages that mediated Earth's oxygenation. To better characterize the taxonomic and genetic signatures of these modern AP/OP cyanobacteria, we sequenced 16S rRNA genes and conducted 'omics analyses on cultured strains, lab mesocosms, and MIS cyanobacterial mat samples collected over multiple years from May to September. Diversity in the MIS cyanobacterial mat is low, with one member of Oscillatoriales dominating at all times. However, Planktothrix members are more abundant in the cyanobacterial community in late summer and fall. The shift in cyanobacterial community composition may be linked to seasonally changing light intensity. In lab mesocosms of MIS microbial mat, we observed a shift in dominant cyanobacterial groups as well as the emergence of Chlorobium, bacteria that specialize in AP. These shifts in microbial community composition and metabolism are likely in response to changing environmental parameters such as the availability of light and sulfide. Further research is needed to understand the impacts of the changing photosynthetic community on oxygen production and the entire microbial consortium. Our study connects genes and genomes of AP cyanobacteria to their environment, and improves understanding of cyanobacterial metabolic strategies that may have shaped Earth's redox evolution.

  5. Structure-function studies of the photosynthetic reaction center using herbicides that compete for the quinone binding site

    SciTech Connect

    Bylina, E.J.

    1995-12-31

    Certain classes of herbicides act as competitive inhibitors of the photosynthetic reaction center. Genetic engineering techniques can be used to generate photosynthetic reaction centers which contain altered quinone binding sites. A genetic system for rapidly screening herbicides developed in the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus has been used to examine the effect of different s-triazine herbicides on the growth of bacteria containing reaction centers with altered quinone binding sites. Structural insights into herbicide binding have been obtained by determining the level of resistance or sensitivity to structurally related herbicides in these modified reaction centers.

  6. The Photosynthetic Cycle

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Calvin, Melvin

    1955-03-21

    A cyclic sequence of transformations, including the carboxylation of RuDP (ribulose diphosphate) and its re-formation, has been deduced as the route for the creation of reduced carbon compounds in photosynthetic organisms. With the demonstration of RuDP as substrate for the carboxylation in a cell-free system, each of the reactions has now been carried out independently in vitro. Further purification of this last enzyme system has confirmed the deduction that the carboxylation of RuDP leads directly to the two molecules of PGA (phosphoglyceric acid) involving an internal dismutation and suggesting the name "carboxydismutase" for the enzyme. As a consequence of this knowledge of each of the steps in the photosynthetic CO{sub 2} reduction cycle, it is possible to define the reagent requirements to maintain it. The net requirement for the reduction of one molecule of CO{sub 2} is four equivalents of [H]and three molecules of ATP (adenine triphosphate). These must ultimately be supplied by the photochemical reaction. Some possible ways in which this may be accomplished are discussed.

  7. Photosynthetic Pigments in Diatoms

    PubMed Central

    Kuczynska, Paulina; Jemiola-Rzeminska, Malgorzata; Strzalka, Kazimierz

    2015-01-01

    Photosynthetic pigments are bioactive compounds of great importance for the food, cosmetic, and pharmaceutical industries. They are not only responsible for capturing solar energy to carry out photosynthesis, but also play a role in photoprotective processes and display antioxidant activity, all of which contribute to effective biomass and oxygen production. Diatoms are organisms of a distinct pigment composition, substantially different from that present in plants. Apart from light-harvesting pigments such as chlorophyll a, chlorophyll c, and fucoxanthin, there is a group of photoprotective carotenoids which includes β-carotene and the xanthophylls, diatoxanthin, diadinoxanthin, violaxanthin, antheraxanthin, and zeaxanthin, which are engaged in the xanthophyll cycle. Additionally, some intermediate products of biosynthetic pathways have been identified in diatoms as well as unusual pigments, e.g., marennine. Marine algae have become widely recognized as a source of unique bioactive compounds for potential industrial, pharmaceutical, and medical applications. In this review, we summarize current knowledge on diatom photosynthetic pigments complemented by some new insights regarding their physico-chemical properties, biological role, and biosynthetic pathways, as well as the regulation of pigment level in the cell, methods of purification, and significance in industries. PMID:26389924

  8. Photosynthetic Pigments in Diatoms.

    PubMed

    Kuczynska, Paulina; Jemiola-Rzeminska, Malgorzata; Strzalka, Kazimierz

    2015-09-16

    Photosynthetic pigments are bioactive compounds of great importance for the food, cosmetic, and pharmaceutical industries. They are not only responsible for capturing solar energy to carry out photosynthesis, but also play a role in photoprotective processes and display antioxidant activity, all of which contribute to effective biomass and oxygen production. Diatoms are organisms of a distinct pigment composition, substantially different from that present in plants. Apart from light-harvesting pigments such as chlorophyll a, chlorophyll c, and fucoxanthin, there is a group of photoprotective carotenoids which includes β-carotene and the xanthophylls, diatoxanthin, diadinoxanthin, violaxanthin, antheraxanthin, and zeaxanthin, which are engaged in the xanthophyll cycle. Additionally, some intermediate products of biosynthetic pathways have been identified in diatoms as well as unusual pigments, e.g., marennine. Marine algae have become widely recognized as a source of unique bioactive compounds for potential industrial, pharmaceutical, and medical applications. In this review, we summarize current knowledge on diatom photosynthetic pigments complemented by some new insights regarding their physico-chemical properties, biological role, and biosynthetic pathways, as well as the regulation of pigment level in the cell, methods of purification, and significance in industries.

  9. Nonphotochemical Hole-Burning Studies of Energy Transfer Dynamics in Antenna Complexes of Photosynthetic Bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuzaki, Satoshi

    2001-01-01

    This thesis contains the candidate's original work on excitonic structure and energy transfer dynamics of two bacterial antenna complexes as studied using spectral hole-burning spectroscopy. The general introduction is divided into two chapters (1 and 2). Chapter 1 provides background material on photosynthesis and bacterial antenna complexes with emphasis on the two bacterial antenna systems related to the thesis research. Chapter 2 reviews the underlying principles and mechanism of persistent nonphotochemical hole-burning (NPHB) spectroscopy. Relevant energy transfer theories are also discussed. Chapters 3 and 4 are papers by the candidate that have been published. Chapter 3 describes the application of NPHB spectroscopy to the Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) complex from the green sulfur bacterium Prosthecochloris aestuarii; emphasis is on determination of the low energy vibrational structure that is important for understanding the energy transfer process associated within three lowest energy Qy-states of the complex. The results are compared with those obtained earlier on the FMO complex from Chlorobium tepidum. In Chapter 4, the energy transfer dynamics of the B800 molecules of intact LH2 and B800-deficient LH2 complexes of the purple bacterium Rhodopseudomonas acidophila are compared. New insights on the additional decay channel of the B800 ring of bacteriochlorophylla (BChla) molecules are provided. General conclusions are given in Chapter 5. A version of the hole spectrum simulation program written by the candidate for the FMO complex study (Chapter 3) is included as an appendix. The references for each chapter are given at the end of each chapter.

  10. Complete Genome Sequence of the Filamentous Anoxygenic Phototrophic Bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Kuo-Hsiang; Barry, Kerrie; Chertkov, Olga; Dalin, Eileen; Han, Cliff; Hauser, Loren John; Honchak, Barbara M; Karbach, Lauren E; Land, Miriam L; Lapidus, Alla L.; Larimer, Frank W; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pitluck, Sam; Pierson, Beverly K

    2011-01-01

    Chloroflexus aurantiacus is a thermophilic filamentous anoxygenic phototrophic (FAP) bacterium, and can grow phototrophically under anaerobic conditions or chemotrophically under aerobic and dark conditions. According to 16S rRNA analysis, Chloroflexi species are the earliest branching bacteria capable of photosynthesis, and Cfl. aurantiacus has been long regarded as a key organism to resolve the obscurity of the origin and early evolution of photosynthesis. Cfl. aurantiacus contains a chimeric photosystem that comprises some characters of green sulfur bacteria and purple photosynthetic bacteria, and also has some unique electron transport proteins compared to other photosynthetic bacteria.

  11. Polaromonas vacuolata gen. nov., sp. nov., a psychrophilic, marine, gas vacuolate bacterium from Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Irgens, R L; Gosink, J J; Staley, J T

    1996-07-01

    Several strains of a novel heterotrophic gas vacuolate bacterium were isolated from antarctic marine waters. The results of phylogenetic analyses in which 16S ribosomal DAN sequencing was used, coupled with phenotypic tests, indicated that strain 34-P(T) (T = type strain) belongs to a new genus and species of the beta subgroup of the Proteobacteria, for which the name Polaromonas vacuolata is proposed. Although the other four strains studied probably belong to this new species, DNA-DNA hybridization tests were not conducted. The closest phylogenetic relatives of P. vacuolata are the photosynthetic nonsulfur purple bacterium Rhodoferax fermentans and the hydrogen autotroph Variovorax paradoxus.

  12. Inelastic neutron scattering study of light-induced dynamics of a photosynthetic membrane system

    SciTech Connect

    Furrer, A.; Stoeckli, A.

    2010-01-15

    Inelastic neutron scattering was employed to study photoeffects on the molecular dynamics of membranes of the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas viridis. The main photoactive parts of this biomolecular system are the chlorophyll molecules whose dynamics were found to be affected under illumination by visible light in a twofold manner. First, vibrational modes are excited at energies of 12(2) and 88(21) cm{sup -1}. Second, a partial 'freezing' of rotational modes is observed at energies of 1.2(3) and 2.9(5) cm{sup -1}. These results are attributed to a possible coupling between molecular motions and particular mechanisms in the photosynthetic process.

  13. Photosynthetic approaches to chemical biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Desai, Shuchi H; Atsumi, Shota

    2013-12-01

    National interest and environmental advocates encourage alternatives to petroleum-based products. Besides biofuels, many other valuable chemicals used in every-day life are petroleum derivatives or require petroleum for their production. A plausible alternative to production using petroleum for chemical production is to harvest the abundant carbon dioxide resources in the environment to produce valuable hydrocarbons. Currently, efforts are being made to utilize a natural biological system, photosynthetic microorganisms, to perform this task. Photosynthetic microorganisms are attractive to use for biochemical production because they utilize economical resources for survival: sunlight and carbon dioxide. This review examines the various compounds produced by photosynthetic microorganisms.

  14. Studies on Hydrogen Production by Photosynthetic Bacteria after Anaerobic Fermentation of Starch by a Hyperthermophile, Pyrococcus furiosus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugitate, Toshihiro; Fukatsu, Makoto; Ishimi, Katsuhiro; Kohno, Hideki; Wakayama, Tatsuki; Nakamura, Yoshihiro; Miyake, Jun; Asada, Yasuo

    In order to establish the sequential hydrogen production from waste starch using a hyperthermophile, Pyrococcus furiosus, and a photosynthetic bacterium, basic studies were done. P. furiosus produced hydrogen and acetate by anaerobic fermentation at 90°C. A photosynthetic bacterium, Rhodobacter sphaeroides RV, was able to produce hydrogen from acetate under anaerobic and light conditions at 30°C. However, Rb. sphaeroides RV was not able to produce hydrogen from acetate in the presence of sodium chloride that was essential for the growth and hydrogen production of P. furiosus although it produced hydrogen from lactate at a reduced rate with 1% sodium chloride. A newly isolated strain, CST-8, from natural environment was, however, able to produce hydrogen from acetate, especially with 3 mM L-alanine and in the presence of 1% sodium chloride. The sequential hydrogen production with P. furiosus and salt-tolerant photosynthetic bacteria could be probable at least in the laboratory experiment scale.

  15. Polarized pump--probe spectroscopy of electronic excitation transport in photosynthetic antennas

    SciTech Connect

    Struve, W.S. )

    1990-08-01

    Polarized pump--probe spectroscopy was performed with 1.5--2 psec resolution on the bacteriochlorophyll a protein antenna complex from the green sulfur bacterium Prosthecochloris aestuarii and on native and enriched photosystem I particles from spinach. The resulting photobleaching profiles reflect the details of singlet electronic-excitation transport in these photosynthetic antennas, in which the pigments are complexed by proteins into clusters of five or more chromophores.

  16. Biochemistry and control of the reductive tricarboxylic acid pathway of CO2 fixation and physiological role of the Rubis CO-like protein

    SciTech Connect

    Tabita, F. Robert

    2008-12-04

    During the past years of this project we have made progress relative to the two major goals of the proposal: (1) to study the biochemistry and regulation of the reductive TCA cycle of CO2 fixation and (2) to probe the physiological role of a RubisCO-like protein (RLP). Both studies primarily employ the green sulfur bacterium Chlorobium tepidum as well as other photosynthetic bacteria including Rhodospirillum rubrum and Rhodopseudomonas palustris.

  17. Single Bacterium Detection Using Sers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonchukov, S. A.; Baikova, T. V.; Alushin, M. V.; Svistunova, T. S.; Minaeva, S. A.; Ionin, A. A.; Kudryashov, S. I.; Saraeva, I. N.; Zayarny, D. A.

    2016-02-01

    This work is devoted to the study of a single Staphylococcus aureus bacterium detection using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) and resonant Raman spectroscopy (RS). It was shown that SERS allows increasing sensitivity of predominantly low frequency lines connected with the vibrations of Amide, Proteins and DNA. At the same time the lines of carotenoids inherent to this kind of bacterium are well-detected due to the resonance Raman scattering mechanism. The reproducibility and stability of Raman spectra strongly depend on the characteristics of nanostructured substrate, and molecular structure and size of the tested biological object.

  18. Modelling the bacterial photosynthetic reaction center. V. Assignment of the electronic transition observed at 2200 cm-1 in the special-pair radical-cation as a second-highest occupied molecular orbital to highest occupied molecular orbital transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reimers, Jeffrey R.; Shapley, Warwick A.; Hush, Noel S.

    2003-08-01

    Primary charge separation in photoexcited photosynthetic reaction centers produces the radical cation P+ of a bacteriochlorophyll dimer known as the special-pair P. P+ has an intense electronic transition in the vicinity of 1800-5000 cm-1 which is usually assigned to the interchromophore hole-transfer excitation of the dimer radical cation; in principle, this spectrum can give much insight into key steps of the solar-to-electrical energy-conversion process. The extent to which this transition is localized on one-half of the dimer or delocalized over both is of utmost importance; an authoritative deduction of this quantity from purely spectroscopic arguments requires the detailed assignment of the observed high to medium resolution spectra. For reaction centers containing bacteriochlorophylls a or b, a shoulder is observed at 2200 cm-1 on the low-energy side of the main hole-transfer absorption band, a band whose maximum is near 2700 cm-1. Before quantitative analysis of the hole-transfer absorption in these well-studied systems can be attempted, the nature of the processes leading to this shoulder must be determined. We interpret it as arising from an intrachromophore SHOMO to HOMO transition whose intensity arises wholly through vibronic coupling with the hole-transfer band. A range of ab initio and density-functional calculations are performed to estimate the energy of this transition both for monomeric cations and for P+ of Blastochloris viridis, Rhodobacter sphaeroides, Chlorobium limicola, Chlorobium tepidum, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, Synochocystis S.6803, spinach photosystems I and II, Heliobacillus mobilis, and finally Heliobacterium modesticaldum, with the results found to qualitatively describe the available experimental data. Subsequent papers in this series provide quantitative analyses of the vibronic coupling and complete spectral simulations based on the model developed herein.

  19. The crystal structure of ferritin from Chlorobium tepidum reveals a new conformation of the 4-fold channel for this protein family.

    PubMed

    Arenas-Salinas, Mauricio; Townsend, Philip D; Brito, Christian; Marquez, Valeria; Marabolli, Vanessa; Gonzalez-Nilo, Fernando; Matias, Cata; Watt, Richard K; López-Castro, Juan D; Domínguez-Vera, José; Pohl, Ehmke; Yévenes, Alejandro

    2014-11-01

    Ferritins are ubiquitous iron-storage proteins found in all kingdoms of life. They share a common architecture made of 24 subunits of five α-helices. The recombinant Chlorobium tepidum ferritin (rCtFtn) is a structurally interesting protein since sequence alignments with other ferritins show that this protein has a significantly extended C-terminus, which possesses 12 histidine residues as well as several aspartate and glutamic acid residues that are potential metal ion binding residues. We show that the macromolecular assembly of rCtFtn exhibits a cage-like hollow shell consisting of 24 monomers that are related by 4-3-2 symmetry; similar to the assembly of other ferritins. In all ferritins of known structure the short fifth α-helix adopts an acute angle with respect to the four-helix bundle. However, the crystal structure of the rCtFtn presented here shows that this helix adopts a new conformation defining a new assembly of the 4-fold channel of rCtFtn. This conformation allows the arrangement of the C-terminal region into the inner cavity of the protein shell. Furthermore, two Fe(III) ions were found in each ferroxidase center of rCtFtn, with an average FeA-FeB distance of 3 Å; corresponding to a diferric μ-oxo/hydroxo species. This is the first ferritin crystal structure with an isolated di-iron center in an iron-storage ferritin. The crystal structure of rCtFtn and the biochemical results presented here, suggests that rCtFtn presents similar biochemical properties reported for other members of this protein family albeit with distinct structural plasticity.

  20. Characterization of the quinones in purple sulfur bacterium Thermochromatium tepidum.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Yuuka; Kawakami, Tomoaki; Yu, Long-Jiang; Yoshimura, Miku; Kobayashi, Masayuki; Wang-Otomo, Zheng-Yu

    2015-07-08

    Quinone distributions in the thermophilic purple sulfur bacterium Thermochromatium tepidum have been investigated at different levels of the photosynthetic apparatus. Here we show that, on average, the intracytoplasmic membrane contains 18 ubiquinones (UQ) and 4 menaquinones (MQ) per reaction center (RC). About one-third of the quinones are retained in the light-harvesting-reaction center core complex (LH1-RC) with a similar ratio of UQ to MQ. The numbers of quinones essentially remains unchanged during crystallization of the LH1-RC. There are 1-2 UQ and 1 MQ associated with the RC-only complex in the purified solution sample. Our results suggest that a large proportion of the quinones are confined to the core complex and at least five UQs remain invisible in the current LH1-RC crystal structure.

  1. Forster energy transfer in chlorosomes of green photosynthetic bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Causgrove, T. P.; Brune, D. C.; Blankenship, R. E.

    1992-01-01

    Energy transfer properties of whole cells and chlorosome antenna complexes isolated from the green sulfur bacteria Chlorobium limicola (containing bacteriochlorophyll c), Chlorobium vibrioforme (containing bacteriochlorophyll d) and Pelodictyon phaeoclathratiforme (containing bacteriochlorophyll e) were measured. The spectral overlap of the major chlorosome pigment (bacteriochlorophyll c, d or, e) with the bacteriochlorophyll a B795 chlorosome baseplate pigment is greatest for bacteriochlorophyll c and smallest for bacteriochlorophyll e. The absorbance and fluorescence spectra of isolated chlorosomes were measured, fitted to gaussian curves and the overlap factors with B795 calculated. Energy transfer times from the bacteriochlorophyll c, d or e to B795 were measured in whole cells and the results interpreted in terms of the Forster theory of energy transfer.

  2. Environmental control of photosynthetic enhancement.

    PubMed

    Punnett, T

    1971-01-22

    The transition from granular to homogeneous chloroplasts in vivo in Egeria densa caused by environmental conditions was paralleled by a decrease in photosynthetic enhancement from 30 percent to nearly zero. The drop in enhancement can be explained either by a change in the partitioning of light energy between the two photosystems or a change to a single photosystem.

  3. Spectral measurements of photosynthetic efficiency

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The photosynthetic efficiency of plants was examined for plants in two very different canopies, a USDA cornfield having an instrumented flux tower in Beltsville, MD, USA and a coniferous forest in British Columbia, Canada, included in the tower network of the Canadian Carbon Program. Basic field st...

  4. Role of an elliptical structure in photosynthetic energy transfer: Collaboration between quantum entanglement and thermal fluctuation

    PubMed Central

    Oka, Hisaki

    2016-01-01

    Recent experiments have revealed that the light-harvesting complex 1 (LH1) in purple photosynthetic bacteria has an elliptical structure. Generally, symmetry lowering in a structure leads to a decrease in quantum effects (quantum coherence and entanglement), which have recently been considered to play a role in photosynthetic energy transfer, and hence, elliptical structure seems to work against efficient photosynthetic energy transfer. Here we analyse the effect of an elliptical structure on energy transfer in a purple photosynthetic bacterium and reveal that the elliptical distortion rather enhances energy transfer from peripheral LH2 to LH1 at room temperature. Numerical results show that quantum entanglement between LH1 and LH2 is formed over a wider range of high energy levels than would have been the case with circular LH1. Light energy absorbed by LH2 is thermally pumped via thermal fluctuation and is effectively transferred to LH1 through the entangled states at room temperature rather than at low temperature. This result indicates the possibility that photosynthetic systems adopt an elliptical structure to effectively utilise both quantum entanglement and thermal fluctuation at physiological temperature. PMID:27173144

  5. Role of an elliptical structure in photosynthetic energy transfer: Collaboration between quantum entanglement and thermal fluctuation.

    PubMed

    Oka, Hisaki

    2016-05-13

    Recent experiments have revealed that the light-harvesting complex 1 (LH1) in purple photosynthetic bacteria has an elliptical structure. Generally, symmetry lowering in a structure leads to a decrease in quantum effects (quantum coherence and entanglement), which have recently been considered to play a role in photosynthetic energy transfer, and hence, elliptical structure seems to work against efficient photosynthetic energy transfer. Here we analyse the effect of an elliptical structure on energy transfer in a purple photosynthetic bacterium and reveal that the elliptical distortion rather enhances energy transfer from peripheral LH2 to LH1 at room temperature. Numerical results show that quantum entanglement between LH1 and LH2 is formed over a wider range of high energy levels than would have been the case with circular LH1. Light energy absorbed by LH2 is thermally pumped via thermal fluctuation and is effectively transferred to LH1 through the entangled states at room temperature rather than at low temperature. This result indicates the possibility that photosynthetic systems adopt an elliptical structure to effectively utilise both quantum entanglement and thermal fluctuation at physiological temperature.

  6. The genetic basis of anoxygenic photosynthetic arsenite oxidation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hernandez-Maldonado, Jamie; Sanchez-Sedillo, Benjamin; Stoneburner, Brendon; Boren, Alison; Miller, Laurence G.; McCann, Shelley; Rosen, Michael R.; Oremland, Ronald S.; Saltikov, Chad W.

    2017-01-01

    “Photoarsenotrophy”, the use of arsenite as an electron donor for anoxygenic photosynthesis, is thought to be an ancient form of phototrophy along with the photosynthetic oxidation of Fe(II), H2S, H2, and NO2-. Photoarsenotrophy was recently identified from Paoha Island's (Mono Lake, CA) arsenic-rich hot springs. The genomes of several photoarsenotrophs revealed a gene cluster, arxB2AB1CD, where arxA is predicted to encode for the sole arsenite oxidase. The role of arxA in photosynthetic arsenite oxidation was confirmed by disrupting the gene in a representative photoarsenotrophic bacterium, resulting in the loss of light-dependent arsenite oxidation. In situ evidence of active photoarsenotrophic microbes was supported by arxA mRNA detection for the first time, in red-pigmented microbial mats within the hot springs of Paoha Island. This work expands on the genetics for photosynthesis coupled to new electron donors and elaborates on known mechanisms for arsenic metabolism, thereby highlighting the complexities of arsenic biogeochemical cycling.

  7. Practical removal of radioactivity from sediment mud in a swimming pool in Fukushima, Japan by immobilized photosynthetic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Ken; Morikawa, Hiroyo; Kishibe, Takashi; Mikami, Ayaka; Harada, Toshihiko; Ohta, Masahiro

    2012-01-01

    About 90% of the radioactive Cs in the sediment mud of a school's swimming pool in Fukushima, Japan was removed by treatment for 3 d using the alginate immobilized photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobcater sphaeroides SSI. Even though batch treatment was carried out 3 times repeatedly, the activity of immobilized cells in removing Cs was maintained at levels of about 84% (second batch) and 78% (third batch). Cs was strongly attached to the sediment mud because, even with HNO(3) treatment at pH of 2.00-1.60 for 24 h, it was not eluted into the water. Furthermore, more than 75% of the Cs could be removed without solubilization with HNO(3). This suggests that the Cs attached to the sediment mud was transformed into immobilized cells via the Cs(+) ion by the negative charge of the immobilized cell surface and/or the potassium transport system of the photosynthetic bacterium.

  8. Phytochromes in photosynthetically competent plants

    SciTech Connect

    Pratt, L.H.

    1990-07-01

    Plants utilize light as a source of information in photomorphogenesis and of free energy in photosynthesis, two processes that are interrelated in that the former serves to increase the efficiency with which plants can perform the latter. Only one pigment involved in photomorphogenesis has been identified unequivocally, namely phytochrome. The thrust of this proposal is to investigate this pigment and its mode(s) of action in photosynthetically competent plants. Our long term objective is to characterize phytochrome and its functions in photosynthetically competent plants from molecular, biochemical and cellular perspectives. It is anticipated that others will continue to contribute indirectly to these efforts at the physiological level. The ultimate goal will be to develop this information from a comparative perspective in order to learn whether the different phytochromes have significantly different physicochemical properties, whether they fulfill independent functions and if so what these different functions are, and how each of the different phytochromes acts at primary molecular and cellular levels.

  9. Biological conversion of synthesis gas. Final report, August 31, 1990--September 3, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Basu, R.; Klasson, K.T.; Johnson, E.R.; Takriff, M.; Clausen, E.C.; Gaddy, J.L.

    1993-09-01

    Based upon the results of this culture screening study, Rhodospirillum rubrum is recommended for biocatalysis of the water gas shift reaction and Chlorobium thiosulfatophilum is recommended for H{sub 2}S conversion to elemental sulfur. Both bacteria require tungsten light for growth and can be co-cultured together if H{sub 2}S conversion is not complete (required concentration of at least 1 ppM), thereby presenting H{sub 2} uptake by Chlorobium thiosulfatophilum. COS degradation may be accomplished by utilizing various CO-utilizing bacteria or by indirectly converting COS to elemental sulfur after the COS first undergoes reaction to H{sub 2} in water. The second alternative is probably preferred due to the low expected concentration of COS relative to H{sub 2}S. Mass transfer and kinetic studies were carried out for the Rhodospirillum rubrum and Chlorobium thiosulfatophilum bacterial systems. Rhodospirillum rubrum is a photosynthetic anaerobic bacterium which catalyzes the biological water gas shift reaction: CO + H{sub 2}O {yields} CO{sub 2} + H{sub 2}. Chlorobium thiosulfatophilum is also a photosynthetic anaerobic bacteria, and converts H{sub 2}S and COS to elemental sulfur.

  10. The sulfolipid sulfoquinovosyldiacylglycerol is not required for photosynthetic electron transport in Rhodobacter sphaeroides but enhances growth under phosphate limitation

    SciTech Connect

    Benning, C.; Somerville, C.R. ); Beatty, J.T. ); Prince, R.C. )

    1993-02-15

    All photosynthetic organisms, with the exception of several species of photosynthetic bacteria, are thought to contain the sulfolipid 6-sulfo-[alpha]-D-quinovosyldiacylglycerol. The association of this lipid with photosynthetic membranes has led to the assumption that it plays some role in photosynthesis. Stable null mutants of the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides completely lacking sulfolipid were obtained by disruption of the sqdB gene. The ratios of the various components of the photosynthetic electron transport chain, as well as the electron transfer rates during cyclic electron transport, were not altered in the mutants, when grown under optimal conditions. Growth rates of wild type and mutants were identical under a variety of growth conditions, with the exception of phosphate limitation, which resulted in reduced growth of the mutants. Phosphate limitation of the wild type a used a significant reduction in the amount of all phospholipids and an increased amount of sulfolipid. By contrast, the sulfolipid-deficient mutant had reduced levels of phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine but maintained a normal level of phosphatidylglycerol. In addition, two unidentified lipids lacking phosphorus accumulated in the membranes of both wild-type and mutant strains under phosphate limitation. We conclude that sulfolipid plays no significant unique role in photoheterotrophic growth or photosynthetic electron transport in R. sphaeroides but may function as a surrogate for phospholipids, particularly phosphatidylglycerol, under phosphate-limiting conditions. 34 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Isolation, characterization, and primary structure of rubredoxin from the photosynthetic bacterium, Heliobacillus mobilis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, W. Y.; Brune, D. C.; LoBrutto, R.; Blankenship, R. E.

    1995-01-01

    Rubredoxin is a small nonheme iron protein that serves as an electron carrier in bacterial systems. Rubredoxin has now been isolated and characterized from the strictly anaerobic phototroph, Heliobacillus mobilis. THe molecular mass (5671.3 Da from the amino acid sequence) was confirmed and partial formylation of the N-terminal methionyl residue was established by matrix-assisted laser desorption mass spectroscopy. The complete 52-amino-acid sequence was determined by a combination of N-terminal sequencing by Edman degradation and C-terminal sequencing by a novel method using carboxypeptidase treatment in conjunction with amino acid analysis and laser desorption time of flight mass spectrometry. The molar absorption coefficient of Hc. mobilis rubredoxin at 490 nm is 6.9 mM-1 cm-1 and the midpoint redox potential at pH 8.0 is -46 mV. The EPR spectrum of the oxidized form shows resonances at g = 9.66 and 4.30 due to a high-spin ferric iron. The amino acid sequence is homologous to those of rubredoxins from other species, in particular, the gram-positive bacteria, and the phototrophic green sulfur bacteria, and the evolutionary implications of this are discussed.

  12. Time-resolved spectroscopy of energy and electron transfer processes in the photosynthetic bacterium Heliobacillus mobilis.

    PubMed

    Lin, S; Chiou, H C; Kleinherenbrink, F A; Blankenship, R E

    1994-02-01

    The kinetics of excitation energy transfer and electron transfer processes within the membrane of Heliobacillus mobilis were investigated using femtosecond transient absorption difference spectroscopy at room temperature. The kinetics in the 725- to 865-nm region, upon excitation at 590 and 670 nm, were fit using global analysis. The fits returned three kinetic components with lifetimes of 1-2 ps and 27-30 ps, and a component that does not decay within several nanoseconds. The 1- to 2-ps component is attributed to excitation equilibration to form a thermally relaxed excited state. The 27- to 30-ps phase corresponds to the decay of the relaxed excited state to form a charge-separated state. The intrinsic energy and electron transfer rates were estimated using the experimental results and theoretical models for excitation migration and trapping dynamics. Taking into account the number of antenna pigments and their spectral distribution, an upper limit of 1.2 ps for the intrinsic time constant for charge separation in the reaction center is calculated. This upper limit corresponds with the trapping-limited case for excitation migration and trapping. Reduction of the primary electron acceptor A0 was observed in the 640 to 700 nm region using excitation at 780 nm. An instantaneous absorbance increase followed by a decay of about 30 ps was observed over a broad wavelength region due to the excited state absorption and decay of BChl g molecules in the antenna. In addition, a narrow bleaching band centered at 670 nm grows in with an apparent time constant of about 1.0 ps, superimposed on the 30-ps absorbance increase due to excited state absorption. Measurements on a longer time scale showed that besides the 670 nm pigment a BChl g molecule absorbing near 785 nm may be involved in the primary charge separation, and that this pigment may be in equilibrium with the 670 nm pigment. The bleaching bands at 670 nm and 785nm recovered with a time constant of about 600 ps, due to forward electron transport to a secondary electron acceptor. Energy and electron transfer properties of H. mobilis membranes are compared with Photosystem 1, to which the heliobacteria bear an evolutionary relationship.

  13. Origin of mitochondria by intracellular enslavement of a photosynthetic purple bacterium.

    PubMed

    Cavalier-Smith, Thomas

    2006-08-07

    Mitochondria originated by permanent enslavement of purple non-sulphur bacteria. These endosymbionts became organelles through the origin of complex protein-import machinery and insertion into their inner membranes of protein carriers for extracting energy for the host. A chicken-and-egg problem exists: selective advantages for evolving import machinery were absent until inner membrane carriers were present, but this very machinery is now required for carrier insertion. I argue here that this problem was probably circumvented by conversion of the symbiont protein-export machinery into protein-import machinery, in three phases. I suggest that the first carrier entered the periplasmic space via pre-existing beta-barrel proteins in the bacterial outer membrane that later became Tom40, and inserted into the inner membrane probably helped by a pre-existing inner membrane protein, thereby immediately providing the protoeukaryote host with photosynthesate. This would have created a powerful selective advantage for evolving more efficient carrier import by inserting Tom70 receptors. Massive gene transfer to the nucleus inevitably occurred by mutation pressure. Finally, pressure from harmful, non-selected gene transfer to the nucleus probably caused evolution of the presequence mechanism, and photosynthesis was lost.

  14. Origin of mitochondria by intracellular enslavement of a photosynthetic purple bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Cavalier-Smith, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    Mitochondria originated by permanent enslavement of purple non-sulphur bacteria. These endosymbionts became organelles through the origin of complex protein-import machinery and insertion into their inner membranes of protein carriers for extracting energy for the host. A chicken-and-egg problem exists: selective advantages for evolving import machinery were absent until inner membrane carriers were present, but this very machinery is now required for carrier insertion. I argue here that this problem was probably circumvented by conversion of the symbiont protein-export machinery into protein-import machinery, in three phases. I suggest that the first carrier entered the periplasmic space via pre-existing β-barrel proteins in the bacterial outer membrane that later became Tom40, and inserted into the inner membrane probably helped by a pre-existing inner membrane protein, thereby immediately providing the protoeukaryote host with photosynthesate. This would have created a powerful selective advantage for evolving more efficient carrier import by inserting Tom70 receptors. Massive gene transfer to the nucleus inevitably occurred by mutation pressure. Finally, pressure from harmful, non-selected gene transfer to the nucleus probably caused evolution of the presequence mechanism, and photosynthesis was lost. PMID:16822756

  15. Cloning and characterization of monofunctional catalase from photosynthetic bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum S1.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong-Heon; Oh, Duck-Chul; Oh, You-Sung; Malinverni, Juliana C; Kukor, Jerome J; Kahng, Hyung-Yeel

    2007-09-01

    In this study, an approx. 2.5-kb gene fragment including the catalase gene from Rhodospirillum rubrum S1 was cloned and characterized. The determination of the complete nucleotide sequence revealed that the cloned DNA fragment was organized into three open reading frames, designated as ORF1, catalase, and ORF3 in that order. The catalase gene consisted of 1,455 nucleotides and 484 amino acids, including the initiation and stop codons, and was located 326 bp upstream in the opposite direction of ORF1. The catalase was overproduced in Escherichia coli UM255, a catalase-deficient mutant, and then purified for the biochemical characterization of the enzyme. The purified catalase had an estimated molecular mass of 189 kDa, consisting of four identical subunits of 61 kDa. The enzyme exhibited activity over a broad pH range from pH 5.0 to pH 11.0 and temperature range from 20 degrees C to 60 degrees C. The catalase activity was inhibited by 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole, cyanide, azide, and hydroxylamine. The enzyme's K(m) value and V(max) of the catalase for H2O2 were 21.8 mM and 39,960 U/mg, respectively. Spectrophotometric analysis revealed that the ratio of A406 to A280 for the catalase was 0.97, indicating the presence of a ferric component. The absorption spectrum of catalase-4 exhibited a Soret band at 406 nm, which is typical of a heme-containing catalase. Treatment of the enzyme with dithionite did not alter the spectral shape and revealed no peroxidase activity. The combined results of the gene sequence and biochemical characterization proved that the catalase cloned from strain S1in this study was a typical monofunctional catalase, which differed from the other types of catalases found in strain S1.

  16. Light-driven carbon dioxide reduction to methane by nitrogenase in a photosynthetic bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Fixen, Kathryn R.; Zheng, Yanning; Harris, Derek F.; Shaw, Sudipta; Yang, Zhi-Yong; Dean, Dennis R.; Seefeldt, Lance C.

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogenase is an ATP-requiring enzyme capable of carrying out multielectron reductions of inert molecules. A purified remodeled nitrogenase containing two amino acid substitutions near the site of its FeMo cofactor was recently described as having the capacity to reduce carbon dioxide (CO2) to methane (CH4). Here, we developed the anoxygenic phototroph, Rhodopseudomonas palustris, as a biocatalyst capable of light-driven CO2 reduction to CH4 in vivo using this remodeled nitrogenase. Conversion of CO2 to CH4 by R. palustris required constitutive expression of nitrogenase, which was achieved by using a variant of the transcription factor NifA that is able to activate expression of nitrogenase under all growth conditions. Also, light was required for generation of ATP by cyclic photophosphorylation. CH4 production by R. palustris could be controlled by manipulating the distribution of electrons and energy available to nitrogenase. This work shows the feasibility of using microbes to generate hydrocarbons from CO2 in one enzymatic step using light energy. PMID:27551090

  17. Complete genome sequence of the metabolically versatile photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas palustris

    SciTech Connect

    Larimer, Frank W; Chain, Patrick S. G.; Hauser, Loren John; Lamerdin, Jane; Malfatti, Stephanie; Do, Long; Land, Miriam L; Pelletier, Dale A; Beatty, Thomas; Lang, Andrew S.; Tabita, F Robert; Gibson, Janet L.; Hanson, Thomas E.; Bobst, Cedric; Torres y Torres, Janelle L.; Peres, Caroline; Harrison, Faith H.; Gibson, Jane; Harwood, Caroline S

    2004-01-01

    Rhodopseudomonas palustris is among the most metabolically versatile bacteria known. It uses light, inorganic compounds, or organic compounds, for energy. It acquires carbon from many types of green plant-derived compounds or by carbon dioxide fixation, and it fixes nitrogen. Here we describe the genome sequence of R. palustris, which consists of a 5,459,213-base-pair (bp) circular chromosome with 4,836 predicted genes and a plasmid of 8,427 bp. The sequence reveals genes that confer a remarkably large number of options within a given type of metabolism, including three nitrogenases, five benzene ring cleavage pathways and four light harvesting 2 systems. R. palustris encodes 63 signal transduction histidine kinases and 79 response regulator receiver domains. Almost 15% of the genome is devoted to transport. This genome sequence is a starting point to use R. palustris as a model to explore how organisms integrate metabolic modules in response to environmental perturbations.

  18. Synergistic Effect of Photosynthetic Bacteria and Isolated Bacteria in Their Antifungal Activities against Root Rot Fungi.

    PubMed

    Wei, Hongyi; Okunishi, Suguru; Yoshikawa, Takeshi; Kamei, Yuto; Dawwoda, Mahmoud A O; Santander-DE Leon, Sheila Mae S; Nuñal, Sharon Nonato; Maeda, Hiroto

    2016-01-01

    Antifungal bacteria (AB) in root rot fungus (RRF)-contaminated sweet potato farms were isolated, and seven strains were initially chosen as antagonistic candidates. An antagonistic test by using the mycelial disk placement method revealed that one AB strain by itself could inhibit the RRF growth. This AB strain was identified as Bacillus polyfermenticus based on phylogeny of 16S ribosomal RNA genes. Two AB strains (Bacillus aerophilus) displayed high levels of antifungal activity when paired with photosynthetic bacterial strain A (a purple nonsulfur photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas faecalis). The results suggest the possible use of the isolates as agents for the biological control of the RRF infection of agricultural products in fields of cultivation.

  19. Comparison of aerobic and photosynthetic Rhodobacter sphaeroides 2.4.1 proteomes

    SciTech Connect

    Callister, Stephen J.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Zeng, Xiaohua; Roh, Jung Hyeob; Dominguez, Migual; Tavano, Christine; Monroe, Matthew E.; Kaplan, Samuel; Donohue, Timothy; Smith, Richard D.; Lipton, Mary S.

    2006-07-05

    Proteomes from aerobic and photosynthetic grown Rhodobacter sphaeroides 2.4.1 cell cultures were characterized using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry in conjunction with an accurate mass and elution time (AMT) tag approach. Roughly 8000 high quality peptides were detected that represented 1,445 gene products and 34% of the predicted proteins. The identified proteins corresponded primarily to open reading frames (ORFs) contained within the two chromosomal elements of this bacterium, but a significant number were also observed from ORFs associated with 5 naturally occurring plasmids. Data mining of peptides revealed a number of proteins uniquely detected within the photosynthetic cell culture. Proteins observed in both aerobic respiratory and photosynthetic grown cultures were analyzed semi-quantitatively by comparing their estimated abundances to provide insights into bioenergetic models for aerobic respiration and photosynthesis. Additional emphasis was placed on gene products annotated as hypothetical to gain information as to their potential roles within these two growth conditions. Where possible, transcriptome data for R. sphaeroides obtained under the same culture conditions were compared with these results. This comparative study demonstrated the applicability of the AMT tag approach for high-throughput proteomic analyses of pathways associated with the photosynthetic lifestyle.

  20. The impact of different intensities of green light on the bacteriochlorophyll homologue composition of the Chlorobiaceae Prosthecochloris aestuarii and Chlorobium phaeobacteroides.

    PubMed

    Massé, Astrid; Airs, Ruth L; Keely, Brendan J; de Wit, Rutger

    2004-08-01

    Members of the Chlorobiaceae and Chloroflexaceae are unique among the phototrophic micro-organisms in having a remarkably rich chlorophyll pigment diversity. The physiological regulation of this diversity and its ecological implications are still enigmatic. The bacteriochlorophyll composition of the chlorobiaceae Prosthecochloris aestuarii strain CE 2404 and Chlorobium phaeobacteroides strain UdG 6030 was therefore studied by both HPLC with photodiode array (PDA) detection and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). These strains were grown in liquid cultures under green light (480-615 nm) at different light intensities (0.2-55.7 micromol photons m(-2) s(-1)), simulating the irradiance regime at different depths of the water column of deep lakes. The specific growth rates of Ptc. aestuarii under green light achieved a maximum of 0.06 h(-1) at light intensities exceeding 6 micromol photons m(-2) s(-1), lower than the maximum observed under white light (approx. 0.1 h(-1)). The maximal growth rates of Chl. phaeobacteroides under green light were slightly higher (0.07 h(-1)) than observed for Ptc. aestuarii and were achieved at 3.5 and 4.3 micromol photons m(-2) s(-1). LC-MS/MS analysis of pigment extracts revealed most (>90 %) BChl c homologues of Ptc. aestuarii to be esterified with farnesol. The homologues differed in mass by multiples of 14 Da, reflecting different alkyl subsituents at positions C-8 and C-12 on the tetrapyrrole macrocycle. The relative proportions of the individual homologues varied only slightly among different light intensities. The specific content of BChl c was maximal at 3-5 micromol photons m(-2) s(-1) [400+/-150 nmol BChl c (mg protein)(-1)]. In the case of Chl. phaeobacteroides, the specific content of BChl e was maximal at 4.3 micromol photons m(-2) s(-1) [115 nmol BChl e (mg protein)(-1)], and this species was characterized by high carotenoid (isorenieratene) contents. The major BChl e forms were esterified with a range of

  1. A "MICROTUBULE" IN A BACTERIUM

    PubMed Central

    van Iterson, Woutera; Hoeniger, Judith F. M.; van Zanten, Eva Nijman

    1967-01-01

    A study of the anchorage of the flagella in swarmers of Proteus mirabilis led to the incidental observation of microtubules. These microtubules were found in thin sections and in whole mount preparations of cells from which most of the content had been released by osmotic shock before staining negatively with potassium phosphotungstate (PTA). The microtubules are in negatively stained preparations about 200 A wide, i.e. somewhat thicker than the flagella (approximately 130 A). They are thus somewhat thinner than most microtubules recorded for other cells. They are referred to as microtubules because of their smooth cylindrical wall, or cortex, surrounding a hollow core which is readily filled with PTA when stained negatively. Since this is probably the first time that such a structure is described inside a bacterium, we do not know for certain whether it represents a normal cell constituent or an abnormality, for instance of the type of "polysheaths" (16). PMID:10976198

  2. Thiorhodospira sibirica gen. nov., sp. nov., a new alkaliphilic purple sulfur bacterium from a Siberian soda lake.

    PubMed

    Bryantseva, I; Gorlenko, V M; Kompantseva, E I; Imhoff, J F; Süling, J; Mityushina, L

    1999-04-01

    A new purple sulfur bacterium was isolated from microbial films on decaying plant mass in the near-shore area of the soda lake Malyi Kasytui (pH 9.5, 0.2% salinity) located in the steppe of the Chita region of south-east Siberia. Single cells were vibrioid- or spiral-shaped (3-4 microns wide and 7-20 microns long) and motile by means of a polar tuft of flagella. Internal photosynthetic membranes were of the lamellar type. Lamellae almost filled the whole cell, forming strands and coils. Photosynthetic pigments were bacteriochlorophyll a and carotenoids of the spirilloxanthin group. The new bacterium was strictly anaerobic. Under anoxic conditions, hydrogen sulfide and elemental sulfur were used as photosynthetic electron donors. During growth on sulfide, sulfur globules were formed as intermediate oxidation products. They were deposited outside the cytoplasm of the cells, in the peripheral periplasmic space and extracellularly. Thiosulfate was not used. Carbon dioxide, acetate, pyruvate, propionate, succinate, fumarate and malate were utilized as carbon sources. Optimum growth rates were obtained at pH 9.0 and optimum temperature was 30 degrees C. Good growth was observed in a mineral salts medium containing 5 g sodium bicarbonate l-1 without sodium chloride. The new bacterium tolerated up to 60 g sodium chloride l-1 and up to 80 g sodium carbonates l-1. Growth factors were not required. The DNA G + C composition was 56.0-57.4 mol%. Based on physiological, biochemical and genetic characteristics, the newly isolated bacterium is recognized as a new species of a new genus with the proposed name Thiorhodospira sibirica.

  3. Tocopherol functions in photosynthetic organisms.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Hiroshi; DellaPenna, Dean

    2007-06-01

    During the past decade, the genes required for tocopherol (vitamin E) synthesis in plants and cyanobacteria have been identified. A series of mutants in which specific pathway steps are disrupted have been generated, providing new insights into tocopherol functions in photosynthetic organisms. Tocopherols are essential for controlling non-enzymatic lipid peroxidation during seed dormancy and seedling germination. Their absence results in elevated levels of malondialdehyde and phytoprostanes, and in inappropriate activation of plant defense responses. Surprisingly, tocopherol deficiency in mature leaves has limited consequences under most abiotic stresses, including high intensity light stress. The cell wall development of phloem transfer cells under cold conditions is, however, severely impaired in mature leaves of tocopherol-deficient mutants, indicating that tocopherols are required for proper adaptation of phloem loading at low temperatures.

  4. [Effects of light quality on photosynthetic pigment contents and photosynthetic characteristics of peanut seedling leaves].

    PubMed

    Yan, Meng-Meng; Wang, Ming-Lun; Wang, Hong-Bo; Wang, Yue-Fu; Zhao, Chang-Xing

    2014-02-01

    This study explored the effects of different light quality on photosynthetic pigment contents and photosynthetic characteristics of peanut (Qinhua 6) seedling leaves. The results showed that, compared with natural light, blue light (445-470 nm) could significantly improve the specific leaf area (SLA), chlorophyll a/b value and carotenoid content of peanut seedlings. Meanwhile, the net photosynthetic rate, stomatal conductance, and transpiration rate were higher, the intercellular CO2 content was lower, and the photosynthetic efficiency was improved significantly under blue light. Red light (610-660 nm) could improve the chlorophyll content significantly, and reduce SLA, chlorophyll a/b value and carotenoid content, with a lower photosynthetic efficiency than natural light. Green light (515-520 nm) and yellow light (590-595 nm) were not conducive to photosynthetic pigment accumulation of leaves, and significantly inhibited leaf photosynthesis of peanut seedlings.

  5. The death mechanism of the harmful algal bloom species Alexandrium tamarense induced by algicidal bacterium Deinococcus sp. Y35

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yi; Zhu, Hong; Lei, Xueqian; Zhang, Huajun; Cai, Guanjing; Chen, Zhangran; Fu, Lijun; Xu, Hong; Zheng, Tianling

    2015-01-01

    Harmful algal blooms (HABs) cause a variety of deleterious effects on aquatic ecosystems, especially the toxic dinoflagellate Alexandrium tamarense, which poses a serious threat to marine economic and human health based on releasing paralytic shellfish poison into the environment. The algicidal bacterium Deinococcus sp. Y35 which can induce growth inhibition on A. tamarense was used to investigate the functional mechanism. The growth status, reactive oxygen species (ROS) content, photosynthetic system and the nuclear system of algal cells were determined under algicidal activity. A culture of strain Y35 not only induced overproduction of ROS in algal cells within only 0.5 h of treatment, also decrease the total protein content as well as the response of the antioxidant enzyme. Meanwhile, lipid peroxidation was induced and cell membrane integrity was lost. Photosynthetic pigments including chlorophyll a and carotenoid decreased along with the photosynthetic efficiency being significantly inhibited. At the same time, photosynthesis-related gene expression showed down-regulation. More than, the destruction of cell nuclear structure and inhibition of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) related gene expression were confirmed. The potential functional mechanism of the algicidal bacterium on A. tamarense was investigated and provided a novel viewpoint which could be used in HABs control. PMID:26441921

  6. The death mechanism of the harmful algal bloom species Alexandrium tamarense induced by algicidal bacterium Deinococcus sp. Y35.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi; Zhu, Hong; Lei, Xueqian; Zhang, Huajun; Cai, Guanjing; Chen, Zhangran; Fu, Lijun; Xu, Hong; Zheng, Tianling

    2015-01-01

    Harmful algal blooms (HABs) cause a variety of deleterious effects on aquatic ecosystems, especially the toxic dinoflagellate Alexandrium tamarense, which poses a serious threat to marine economic and human health based on releasing paralytic shellfish poison into the environment. The algicidal bacterium Deinococcus sp. Y35 which can induce growth inhibition on A. tamarense was used to investigate the functional mechanism. The growth status, reactive oxygen species (ROS) content, photosynthetic system and the nuclear system of algal cells were determined under algicidal activity. A culture of strain Y35 not only induced overproduction of ROS in algal cells within only 0.5 h of treatment, also decrease the total protein content as well as the response of the antioxidant enzyme. Meanwhile, lipid peroxidation was induced and cell membrane integrity was lost. Photosynthetic pigments including chlorophyll a and carotenoid decreased along with the photosynthetic efficiency being significantly inhibited. At the same time, photosynthesis-related gene expression showed down-regulation. More than, the destruction of cell nuclear structure and inhibition of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) related gene expression were confirmed. The potential functional mechanism of the algicidal bacterium on A. tamarense was investigated and provided a novel viewpoint which could be used in HABs control.

  7. Hybrid system of semiconductor and photosynthetic protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Younghye; Shin, Seon Ae; Lee, Jaehun; Yang, Ki Dong; Nam, Ki Tae

    2014-08-01

    Photosynthetic protein has the potential to be a new attractive material for solar energy absorption and conversion. The development of semiconductor/photosynthetic protein hybrids is an example of recent progress toward efficient, clean and nanostructured photoelectric systems. In the review, two biohybrid systems interacting through different communicating methods are addressed: (1) a photosynthetic protein immobilized semiconductor electrode operating via electron transfer and (2) a hybrid of semiconductor quantum dots and photosynthetic protein operating via energy transfer. The proper selection of materials and functional and structural modification of the components and optimal conjugation between them are the main issues discussed in the review. In conclusion, we propose the direction of future biohybrid systems for solar energy conversion systems, optical biosensors and photoelectric devices.

  8. Hybrid system of semiconductor and photosynthetic protein.

    PubMed

    Kim, Younghye; Shin, Seon Ae; Lee, Jaehun; Yang, Ki Dong; Nam, Ki Tae

    2014-08-29

    Photosynthetic protein has the potential to be a new attractive material for solar energy absorption and conversion. The development of semiconductor/photosynthetic protein hybrids is an example of recent progress toward efficient, clean and nanostructured photoelectric systems. In the review, two biohybrid systems interacting through different communicating methods are addressed: (1) a photosynthetic protein immobilized semiconductor electrode operating via electron transfer and (2) a hybrid of semiconductor quantum dots and photosynthetic protein operating via energy transfer. The proper selection of materials and functional and structural modification of the components and optimal conjugation between them are the main issues discussed in the review. In conclusion, we propose the direction of future biohybrid systems for solar energy conversion systems, optical biosensors and photoelectric devices.

  9. Design principles of photosynthetic light-harvesting.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Graham R; Schlau-Cohen, Gabriela S; Amarnath, Kapil; Zaks, Julia

    2012-01-01

    Photosynthetic organisms are capable of harvesting solar energy with near unity quantum efficiency. Even more impressively, this efficiency can be regulated in response to the demands of photosynthetic reactions and the fluctuating light-levels of natural environments. We discuss the distinctive design principles through which photosynthetic light-harvesting functions. These emergent properties of photosynthesis appear both within individual pigment-protein complexes and in how these complexes integrate to produce a functional, regulated apparatus that drives downstream photochemistry. One important property is how the strong interactions and resultant quantum coherence, produced by the dense packing of photosynthetic pigments, provide a tool to optimize for ultrafast, directed energy transfer. We also describe how excess energy is quenched to prevent photodamage under high-light conditions, which we investigate through theory and experiment. We conclude with comments on the potential of using these features to improve solar energy devices.

  10. Genome sequence of the photoarsenotrophic bacterium Ectothiorhodospira sp. strain BSL-9, isolated from a hypersaline alkaline arsenic-rich extreme environment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hernandez-Maldonado, Jaime; Stoneburner, Brendon; Boren, Alison; Miller, Laurence; Rosen, Michael R.; Oremland, Ronald S.; Saltikov, Chad W

    2016-01-01

    The full genome sequence of Ectothiorhodospira sp. strain BSL-9 is reported here. This purple sulfur bacterium encodes an arxA-type arsenite oxidase within the arxB2AB1CD gene island and is capable of carrying out “photoarsenotrophy” anoxygenic photosynthetic arsenite oxidation. Its genome is composed of 3.5 Mb and has approximately 63% G+C content.

  11. Genetically modified photosynthetic antenna complexes with blueshifted absorbance bands.

    PubMed

    Fowler, G J; Visschers, R W; Grief, G G; van Grondelle, R; Hunter, C N

    1992-02-27

    Light energy for photosynthesis is collected by the antenna system, creating an excited state which migrates energetically 'downhill'. To achieve efficient migration of energy the antenna is populated with a series of pigments absorbing at progressively redshifted wavelengths. This variety in absorbing species in vivo has been created in a biosynthetically economical fashion by modulating the absorbance behaviour of one kind of (bacterio)chlorophyll molecule. This modulation is poorly understood but has been ascribed to pigment-pigment and pigment-protein interactions. We have examined the relationship between aromatic residues in antenna polypeptides and pigment absorption, by studying the effects of site-directed mutagenesis on a bacterial antenna complex. A clear correlation was observed between the absorbance of bacteriochlorophyll a and the presence of two tyrosine residues, alpha Tyr44 and alpha Tyr45, in the alpha subunit of the peripheral light-harvesting complex of Rhodobacter sphaeroides, a purple photosynthetic bacterium that provides a well characterized system for site-specific mutagenesis. By constructing single (alpha Tyr44, alpha Tyr45----PheTyr) and then double (alpha Tyr44, alpha Tyr45----PheLeu) site-specific mutants, the absorbance of bacteriochlorophyll was blueshifted by 11 and 24 nm at 77 K, respectively. The results suggest that there is a close approach of tyrosine residues to bacteriochlorophyll, and that this proximity may promote redshifts in vivo.

  12. How to harvest solar energy with the photosynthetic reaction center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balaeff, Alexander; Reyes, Justin

    Photosynthetic reaction center (PRC) is a protein complex that performs a key step in photosynthesis: the electron-hole separation driven by photon absorbtion. The PRC has a great promise for applications in solar energy harvesting and photosensing. Such applications, however, are hampered by the difficulty in extracting the photogenerated electric charge from the PRC. To that end, it was proposed to attach the PRC to a molecular wire through which the charge could be collected. In order to find the attachment point for the wire that would maximize the rate of charge outflow from the PRC, we performed a computational study of the PRC from the R. virdis bacterium. An ensemble of PRC structures generated by a molecular dynamics simulation was used to calculate the rate of charge transport from the site of initial charge separation to several trial sites on the protein surface. The Pathways model was used to calculate the charge transfer rate in each step of the network of heme co-factors through which the charge transport was presumed to proceed. A simple kinetic model was then used to determine the overall rate of the multistep charge transport. The calculations revealed several candidate sites for the molecular wire attachment, recommended for experimental verification.

  13. Carbon monoxide metabolism by photosynthetic bacteria: Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Ludden, P.W.; Roberts, G.P.

    1988-01-01

    The photosynthetic bacterium, Rhodospirillum rubrum, is capable of converting carbon monoxide to CO/sub 2/ and cellular material. Because carbon monoxide is a major industrial pollutant in this country and a product of the biological oxidation of CO is the product of H/sub 2/, a major industrial feedstock, this process has practical importance. The oxidation of carbon monoxide to CO/sub 2/ by microorganisms is a major component of the carbon monoxide cycle on earth. We have isolated the enzyme responsible for this process from Rhodospirillum rubrum. Carbon monoxide dehydrogenase is an iron - sulfur, nickel- and zinc-containing enzyme. The enzyme is quite stable to heat and amendable to purification, however, it is very labile to oxygen, and all experiments must be conducted anaerobically. We are studying the activities of this enzyme, its regulation and its induction by its substrate carbon monoxide. The enzyme is absent in cells that have not been exposed to carbon monoxide, but cells produce the enzyme at a maximal rate upon exposure to carbon monoxide for as little as ten minutes. Oxygen, a potent and irreversible inhibitor of the enzyme, represses the synthesis of this enzyme. 1 tab.

  14. Photosynthetic reaction center complexes from heliobacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trost, J. T.; Vermaas, W. F. J.; Blankenship, R. E.

    1991-01-01

    Photosynthetic reaction centers are pigment-protein complexes that are responsible for the transduction of light energy into chemical energy. Considerable evidence indicates that photosynthetic organisms were present very early in the evolution of life on Earth. The goal of this project is to understand the early evolutionary development of photosynthesis by examining the properties of reaction centers isolated from certain contemporary organisms that appear to contain the simplest photosynthetic reaction centers. The major focus is on the family of newly discovered strictly anaerobic photosynthetic organisms that are grouped with the gram-positive phylum of bacteria. The properties of these reactions centers suggest that they may be the descendants of an ancestor that also gave rise to Photosystem 1 found in oxygen-evolving photosynthetic organisms. Photoactive reaction center-core antenna complexes were isolated from the photosynthetic bacteria, Heliobacillus mobilis and Heliobacterium gestii, by extraction of membranes with Deriphat 160C followed by differential centrifugation and sucrose density gradient centrifugation. Other aspects of this investigation are briefly discussed.

  15. Studies of photosynthetic Energy Conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clayton, R. K.; Jagendorf, A. T.

    1985-01-01

    The composition, structure and properties of reaction centers from Rhodopseudomonas viridis were examined. Four distinct polypeptides were found, one of which contains heme groups. Linear dichroism showed the 2 hemes have different orientations in the reaction center. In this bacterium containing BCh1 b, not a, circular dichroism indicated the absence of strong excitonic coupling between the 2 BCh1 b's in the antenna complex. Isolated chromatophores are unusual in not having any detectable ATPase. The intrinsic portion, F/sub O/, is also missing. Equipment improvements included installation of a computer, interfacing with data acquisition systems, and development of programs for rapid analysis of data on absorption, linear or circular dichroism, and fluorescence. The dichroism spectrometer was rebuilt to measure absorbance, linear or circular dichroism in modulated light; and the dual wavelengths spectrometer was updated to greater sensitivity and resolution. A system to combine fluorescence measurements with absorbancy of quinone redox changes was developed, and used to estimate the proportion of alpha and beta centers in a given PSII population.

  16. Regulation of Photosynthetic Electron Transport and Photoinhibition

    PubMed Central

    Roach, Thomas; Krieger-Liszkay, Anja Krieger

    2014-01-01

    Photosynthetic organisms and isolated photosystems are of interest for technical applications. In nature, photosynthetic electron transport has to work efficiently in contrasting environments such as shade and full sunlight at noon. Photosynthetic electron transport is regulated on many levels, starting with the energy transfer processes in antenna and ending with how reducing power is ultimately partitioned. This review starts by explaining how light energy can be dissipated or distributed by the various mechanisms of non-photochemical quenching, including thermal dissipation and state transitions, and how these processes influence photoinhibition of photosystem II (PSII). Furthermore, we will highlight the importance of the various alternative electron transport pathways, including the use of oxygen as the terminal electron acceptor and cyclic flow around photosystem I (PSI), the latter which seem particularly relevant to preventing photoinhibition of photosystem I. The control of excitation pressure in combination with the partitioning of reducing power influences the light-dependent formation of reactive oxygen species in PSII and in PSI, which may be a very important consideration to any artificial photosynthetic system or technical device using photosynthetic organisms. PMID:24678670

  17. Photosynthetic reaction center complexes from heliobacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trost, J. T.; Vermaas, W. F. J.; Blankenship, R. E.

    1991-01-01

    The goal of this project is to understand the early evolutionary development of photosynthesis by examining the properties of reaction centers isolated from certain contemporary organisms that appear to contain the simplest photosynthetic reaction centers. The major focus of this project is the family of newly discovered strictly anaerobic photosynthetic organisms known as Heliobacteria. These organisms are the only known photosynthetic organisms that are grouped with the gram-positive phylum of bacteria. The properties of these reaction centers suggest that they might be the decendants of an ancestor that also gave rise to Photosystem 1 found in oxygen-evolving photosynthetic organisms. Photoactive reaction center-core antenna complexes have been isolated from the photosynthetic bacteria Heliobacillus mobilis and Heliobacterium gestii. The absorption and fluorescence properties of membranes and reaction centers are almost identical, suggesting that a single pigment-protein complex serves as both antenna and reaction center. Experiments in progress include sequence determination of the 48,000 Mr reaction center protein, and evolutionary comparisons with other reaction center proteins.

  18. Relevance of the photosynthetic reaction center from purple bacteria to the structure of photosystem II

    SciTech Connect

    Michel, H.; Deisenhofer, J.

    1988-01-12

    Photosynthetic organisms are able to oxidize organic or inorganic compounds upon the absorption of light, and they use the extracted electron for the fixation of carbon dioxide. The most important oxidation product is oxygen due to the splitting of water. In eukaryotes these processes occur in photosystem II of chloroplasts. Among prokaryotes photosynthetic oxygen evolution is restricted to cyanobacteria and prochloron-type organisms. How water is split in the oxygen-evolving complex of photosystem II belongs to the most important question to be answered. The primary charge separation occurs in the reaction center of photosystem II. This reaction center is a complex consisting of peripheral and integral membrane proteins, several chlorophyll A molecules, two pheophytin A molecules, two and three plastoquinone molecules, and one non-heme iron atom. The location of the photosystem II reaction center is still a matter of debate. Nakatani et al. (l984) concluded from fluorescence measurements that a protein of apparent molecular weight 47,000 (CP47) is the apoprotein of the photosystem II reaction center. A different view emerged from work with the photosynthetic reaction centers from the purple bacteria. The amino acid sequence of the M subunit of the reaction center from Phodopseudomonas (Rps.) sphaeroides has sequence homologies with the D1 protein from spinach. A substantial amount of structural information can be obtained with the reaction center from Rhodopseudomonas viridis, which can be crystallized. Here the authors discuss the structure of the photosynthetic reaction center from the purple bacterium Rps. viridis and describe the role of those amino acids that are conserved between the bacterial and photosystem II reaction center.

  19. A soxA Gene, Encoding a Diheme Cytochrome c, and a sox Locus, Essential for Sulfur Oxidation in a New Sulfur Lithotrophic Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Mukhopadhyaya, Pratap N.; Deb, Chirajyoti; Lahiri, Chandrajit; Roy, Pradosh

    2000-01-01

    A mobilizable suicide vector, pSUP5011, was used to introduce Tn5-mob in a new facultative sulfur lithotrophic bacterium, KCT001, to generate mutants defective in sulfur oxidation (Sox−). The Sox− mutants were unable to oxidize thiosulfate while grown mixotrophically in the presence of thiosulfate and succinate. The mutants were also impaired in oxidizing other reduced sulfur compounds and elemental sulfur as evident from the study of substrate oxidation by the whole cells. Sulfite oxidase activity was significantly diminished in the cell extracts of all the mutants. A soxA gene was identified from the transposon-adjacent genomic DNA of a Sox− mutant strain. The sequence analysis revealed that the soxA open reading frame (ORF) is preceded by a potential ribosome binding site and promoter region with −10- and −35-like sequences. The deduced nucleotide sequence of the soxA gene was predicted to code for a protein of 286 amino acids. It had a signal peptide of 26 N-terminal amino acids. The amino acid sequence showed similarity with a putative gene product of Aquifex aeolicus, soluble cytochrome c551 of Chlorobium limicola, and the available partial SoxA sequence of Paracoccus denitrificans. The soxA-encoded product seems to be a diheme cytochrome c for KCT001 and A. aeolicus, but the amino acid sequence of C. limicola cytochrome c551 revealed a single heme-binding region. Another transposon insertion mutation was mapped within the soxA ORF. Four other independent transposon insertion mutations were mapped in the 4.4-kb soxA contiguous genomic DNA region. The results thus suggest that a sox locus of KCT001, essential for sulfur oxidation, was affected by all these six independent insertion mutations. PMID:10894738

  20. BOREAS TE-10 Photosynthetic Response Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Papagno, Andrea (Editor); Middleton, Elizabeth; Sullivan, Joseph

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmospheric Study (BOREAS) TE-10 (Terrestrial Ecology) team collected several data sets in support of its efforts to characterize and interpret information on the gas exchange, reflectance, transmittance, chlorophyll content, carbon content, hydrogen content, nitrogen content, and photosynthetic response of boreal vegetation. This data set contains measurements of quantitative parameters and leaf photosynthetic response to increases in light conducted in the SSA during the growing seasons of 1994 and 1996 using an oxygen electrode system. Leaf photosynthetic responses were not collected in 1996. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884), or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  1. Phylogenetic taxonomy of the family Chlorobiaceae on the basis of 16S rRNA and fmo (Fenna-Matthews-Olson protein) gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Imhoff, Johannes F

    2003-07-01

    A new taxonomy of the green sulfur bacteria is proposed, based on phylogenetic relationships determined using the sequences of the independent 16S rRNA and fmo (Fenna-Matthews-Olson protein) genes, and supported by the DNA G + C content and sequence signatures. Comparison of the traditional classification system for these bacteria with their phylogenetic relationship yielded a confusing picture, because properties used for classification (such as cell morphology, photosynthetic pigments and substrate utilization) do not concur with their phylogeny. Using the genetic information available, strains and species assigned to the genera Chlorobium, Pelodictyon and Prosthecochloris are considered, and the following changes are proposed. Pelodictyon luteolum is transferred to the genus Chlorobium as Chlorobium luteolum comb. nov. Pelodictyon clathratiforme and Pelodictyon phaeoclathratiforme are transferred to the genus Chlorobium and combined into one species, Chlorobium clathratiforme comb. nov. The name Pelodictyon will become a synonym of Chlorobium. Strains known as Chlorobium limicola subsp. thiosulfatophilum that have a low DNA G + C content (52-52.5 mol%) are treated as strains of Chlorobium limicola; those with a high DNA G + C content (58.1 mol%) are transferred to Chlorobaculum gen. nov., as Chlorobaculum thiosulfatiphilum sp. nov. Chlorobium tepidum is transferred to Chlorobaculum tepidum comb. nov., and defined as the type species of the genus Chlorobaculum. Strains assigned to Chlorobium phaeobacteroides, but phylogenetically distant from the type strain of this species, are assigned to Chlorobium limicola and to Chlorobaculum limnaeum sp. nov. Strains known as Chlorobium vibrioforme subsp. thiosulfatophilum are transferred to Chlorobaculum parvum sp. nov. Chlorobium chlorovibrioides is transferred to 'Chlorobaculum chlorovibrioides' comb. nov. The type strain of Chlorobium vibrioforme is phylogenetically related to Prosthecochloris, and is therefore

  2. Photosynthetic complex stoichiometry dynamics in higher plants: environmental acclimation and photosynthetic flux control

    PubMed Central

    Schöttler, Mark A.; Tóth, Szilvia Z.

    2014-01-01

    The composition of the photosynthetic apparatus of higher plants is dynamically adjusted to long-term changes in environmental conditions such as growth light intensity and light quality, and to changing metabolic demands for ATP and NADPH imposed by stresses and leaf aging. By changing photosynthetic complex stoichiometry, a long-term imbalance between the photosynthetic production of ATP and NADPH and their metabolic consumption is avoided, and cytotoxic side reactions are minimized. Otherwise, an excess capacity of the light reactions, relative to the demands of primary metabolism, could result in a disturbance of cellular redox homeostasis and an increased production of reactive oxygen species, leading to the destruction of the photosynthetic apparatus and the initiation of cell death programs. In this review, changes of the abundances of the different constituents of the photosynthetic apparatus in response to environmental conditions and during leaf ontogenesis are summarized. The contributions of the different photosynthetic complexes to photosynthetic flux control and the regulation of electron transport are discussed. PMID:24860580

  3. Enhanced practical photosynthetic CO2 mitigation

    DOEpatents

    Bayless, David J.; Vis-Chiasson, Morgan L.; Kremer, Gregory G.

    2003-12-23

    This process is unique in photosynthetic carbon sequestration. An on-site biological sequestration system directly decreases the concentration of carbon-containing compounds in the emissions of fossil generation units. In this process, photosynthetic microbes are attached to a growth surface arranged in a containment chamber that is lit by solar photons. A harvesting system ensures maximum organism growth and rate of CO.sub.2 uptake. Soluble carbon and nitrogen concentrations delivered to the cyanobacteria are enhanced, further increasing growth rate and carbon utilization.

  4. Molecular factors controlling photosynthetic light harvesting by carotenoids.

    PubMed

    Polívka, Tomás; Frank, Harry A

    2010-08-17

    Carotenoids are naturally occurring pigments that absorb light in the spectral region in which the sun irradiates maximally. These molecules transfer this energy to chlorophylls, initiating the primary photochemical events of photosynthesis. Carotenoids also regulate the flow of energy within the photosynthetic apparatus and protect it from photoinduced damage caused by excess light absorption. To carry out these functions in nature, carotenoids are bound in discrete pigment-protein complexes in the proximity of chlorophylls. A few three-dimensional structures of these carotenoid complexes have been determined by X-ray crystallography. Thus, the stage is set for attempting to correlate the structural information with the spectroscopic properties of carotenoids to understand the molecular mechanism(s) of their function in photosynthetic systems. In this Account, we summarize current spectroscopic data describing the excited state energies and ultrafast dynamics of purified carotenoids in solution and bound in light-harvesting complexes from purple bacteria, marine algae, and green plants. Many of these complexes can be modified using mutagenesis or pigment exchange which facilitates the elucidation of correlations between structure and function. We describe the structural and electronic factors controlling the function of carotenoids as energy donors. We also discuss unresolved issues related to the nature of spectroscopically dark excited states, which could play a role in light harvesting. To illustrate the interplay between structural determinations and spectroscopic investigations that exemplifies work in the field, we describe the spectroscopic properties of four light-harvesting complexes whose structures have been determined to atomic resolution. The first, the LH2 complex from the purple bacterium Rhodopseudomonas acidophila, contains the carotenoid rhodopin glucoside. The second is the LHCII trimeric complex from higher plants which uses the carotenoids

  5. Photoproduction of hydrogen by membranes of green photosynthetic bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, J D; Olson, J M

    1980-01-01

    Photoproduction of H/sub 2/ from ascorbate by unit-membrane vesicles from Chlorobium limicola f. thiosulfatophilum was achieved with a system containing gramicidin D, tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine, methyl viologen, dithioerythritol, Clostridium hydrogenase, and an oxygen-scavenging mixture of glucose, glucose oxidase, ethanol, and catalase. Maximum quantum yield was less than one percent. Half maximum rate of H/sub 2/ production occurred at a white-light intensity of approximately 0.15 cm/sup -2/. The reaction was inhibited completely by 0.3% sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate, 1% Triton X-100, or preheating the vesicles at 100/sup 0/C for 5 minutes. Low concentrations (0.01 and 0.05%) of Triton X-100 about doubled the reaction rate.

  6. Factors Determining Annual Changes in Bacterial Photosynthetic Pigments in Holomictic Lake Cisó, Spain

    PubMed Central

    Pedrós-Alió, Carlos; Montesinos, Emilio; Guerrero, Ricardo

    1983-01-01

    The pigments and biomass of anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria were measured during a year cycle in Lake Cisó (Girona, Spain). Two genera, Chromatium and Chlorobium, accounted for most of the bacterial population. The bacteria were present throughout the year despite complete mixing of the lake during fall and winter. This was possible because the sulfide production in the sediment was high enough to make the lake anaerobic to the very surface. Solar radiation, temperature, and biomass of Chromatium sp. were found to be important in determining pigment concentrations by correlation analysis. Sulfide concentration and biomass of Chlorobium spp. were found to be unimportant. A path analysis was performed to determine what percentage of the variability of pigments could be explained by the variables studied. Since a high percentage could be explained, it was possible to conclude that solar radiation, temperature, and biomass of Chromatium sp. were the main variables. PMID:16346436

  7. Photosynthetic responses to the environment. Volume 8

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, H.Y.; Smith, C.M.

    1993-11-01

    This volume contains the proceedings of Photosynthetic Responses to the Environment, a meeting held August 24--27, 1992. The volume contains 10 full papers and 15 mini papers. Separate entries were prepared for the database for each of these presentations.

  8. Coral bleaching independent of photosynthetic activity.

    PubMed

    Tolleter, Dimitri; Seneca, François O; DeNofrio, Jan C; Krediet, Cory J; Palumbi, Stephen R; Pringle, John R; Grossman, Arthur R

    2013-09-23

    The global decline of reef-building corals is due in part to the loss of algal symbionts, or "bleaching," during the increasingly frequent periods of high seawater temperatures. During bleaching, endosymbiotic dinoflagellate algae (Symbiodinium spp.) either are lost from the animal tissue or lose their photosynthetic pigments, resulting in host mortality if the Symbiodinium populations fail to recover. The >1,000 studies of the causes of heat-induced bleaching have focused overwhelmingly on the consequences of damage to algal photosynthetic processes, and the prevailing model for bleaching invokes a light-dependent generation of toxic reactive oxygen species (ROS) by heat-damaged chloroplasts as the primary trigger. However, the precise mechanisms of bleaching remain unknown, and there is evidence for involvement of multiple cellular processes. In this study, we asked the simple question of whether bleaching can be triggered by heat in the dark, in the absence of photosynthetically derived ROS. We used both the sea anemone model system Aiptasia and several species of reef-building corals to demonstrate that symbiont loss can occur rapidly during heat stress in complete darkness. Furthermore, we observed damage to the photosynthetic apparatus under these conditions in both Aiptasia endosymbionts and cultured Symbiodinium. These results do not directly contradict the view that light-stimulated ROS production is important in bleaching, but they do show that there must be another pathway leading to bleaching. Elucidation of this pathway should help to clarify bleaching mechanisms under the more usual conditions of heat stress in the light.

  9. Longitudinal photosynthetic gradient in crust lichens' thalli.

    PubMed

    Wu, Li; Zhang, Gaoke; Lan, Shubin; Zhang, Delu; Hu, Chunxiang

    2014-05-01

    In order to evaluate the self-shading protection for inner photobionts, the photosynthetic activities of three crust lichens were detected using Microscope-Imaging-PAM. The false color images showed that longitudinal photosynthetic gradient was found in both the green algal lichen Placidium sp. and the cyanolichen Peltula sp. In longitudinal direction, all the four chlorophyll fluorescence parameters Fv/Fm, Yield, qP, and rETR gradually decreased with depth in the thalli of both of these two lichens. In Placidium sp., qN values decreased with depth, whereas an opposite trend was found in Peltula sp. However, no such photosynthetic heterogeneity was found in the thalli of Collema sp. in longitudinal direction. Microscope observation showed that photobiont cells are compactly arranged in Placidium sp. and Peltula sp. while loosely distributed in Collema sp. It was considered that the longitudinal photosynthetic heterogeneity was ascribed to the result of gradual decrease of incidence caused by the compact arrangement of photobiont cells in the thalli. The results indicate a good protection from the self-shading for the inner photobionts against high radiation in crust lichens.

  10. Photon echo studies of photosynthetic light harvesting.

    PubMed

    Read, Elizabeth L; Lee, Hohjai; Fleming, Graham R

    2009-01-01

    The broad linewidths in absorption spectra of photosynthetic complexes obscure information related to their structure and function. Photon echo techniques represent a powerful class of time-resolved electronic spectroscopy that allow researchers to probe the interactions normally hidden under broad linewidths with sufficient time resolution to follow the fastest energy transfer events in light harvesting. Here, we outline the technical approach and applications of two types of photon echo experiments: the photon echo peak shift and two-dimensional (2D) Fourier transform photon echo spectroscopy. We review several extensions of these techniques to photosynthetic complexes. Photon echo peak shift spectroscopy can be used to determine the strength of coupling between a pigment and its surrounding environment including neighboring pigments and to quantify timescales of energy transfer. Two-dimensional spectroscopy yields a frequency-resolved map of absorption and emission processes, allowing coupling interactions and energy transfer pathways to be viewed directly. Furthermore, 2D spectroscopy reveals structural information such as the relative orientations of coupled transitions. Both classes of experiments can be used to probe the quantum mechanical nature of photosynthetic light-harvesting: peak shift experiments allow quantification of correlated energetic fluctuations between pigments, while 2D techniques measure quantum beating directly, both of which indicate the extent of quantum coherence over multiple pigment sites in the protein complex. The mechanistic and structural information obtained by these techniques reveals valuable insights into the design principles of photosynthetic light-harvesting complexes, and a multitude of variations on the methods outlined here.

  11. Mitochondrial Genome Structure of Photosynthetic Eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Yurina, N P; Odintsova, M S

    2016-02-01

    Current ideas of plant mitochondrial genome organization are presented. Data on the size and structural organization of mtDNA, gene content, and peculiarities are summarized. Special emphasis is given to characteristic features of the mitochondrial genomes of land plants and photosynthetic algae that distinguish them from the mitochondrial genomes of other eukaryotes. The data published before the end of 2014 are reviewed.

  12. Polarized fluorescence measurements on ordered photosynthetic antenna complexes

    PubMed Central

    van Amerongen, H.; van Haeringen, B.; van Gurp, M.; van Grondelle, R.

    1991-01-01

    We have used a new and relatively easy approach to study the pigment-organization in chlorosomes from the photosynthetic bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus and in B800-850 antenna complexes of the photosynthetic purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides. These particles were embedded in compressed and uncompressed gels and the polarized fluorescence was determined in a 90° setup. Assuming both a rotational symmetric distribution of the particles in the gel and of the transition dipole moments in the particles, the order parameters and , describing the orientation of the symmetry axis of the particles with respect to the direction of gel expansion can be determined. Moreover, the direction parameters, describing the orientation of the absorption and emission dipole moments with respect to the symmetry axis of the particles can be obtained. The value of is essential for quantitative interpretation of linear dichroism measurements and usually it is estimated from theoretical approaches, which may lead to incorrect results. For the rod-like chlorosomes the value of appears to be the same as predicted by the theoretical approach of Ganago, A. O., M. V. Fok, I. A. Abdourakhmanov, A. A. Solov'ev, and Yu. E. Erokhin (1980. Mol. Biol. [Mosc.]. 14:381-389). The agreement with linear dichroism results, analyzed with this theoretical approach shows that the transition dipole moments are indeed in good approximation distributed in a rotationally symmetric way around the long axis of the chlorosomes. Moreover, it appears those BChl c molecules, which fluoresce, are oriented in the same way with respect to the symmetry axis as the rest of these pigments, with the dipole moments close to parallel to the long axis. The B800-850 complexes appear to orient like discs, whereas the transition dipoles of the BChl a 800- and 850-nm bands are oriented almost perpendicular to the symmetry axis. These findings are in agreement with the minimal model for these complexes

  13. Characterization of photosynthetic reaction centers by surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chumanov, George D.; Cotton, Therese M.; Zhou, Chengli; Gaul, Dale; Picorel, Rafael; Seibert, Michael

    1993-06-01

    Surface-enhanced Resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) spectra were obtained for the reaction center complexes of the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides (RC) and from photosystem II (PSII) of spinach, adsorbed on Ag and Au surfaces. These preliminary results demonstrate the considerable potential of this technique for selectively exciting resonance Raman scattering from reaction center components within their distinct absorption bands. Because of the high sensitivity afforded by SERRS, spectra could be measured from a single monolayer of reaction centers adsorbed on a metal surface. The surface-sensitivity provides new information indicating the topology of the PSII reaction center 47 kD light-harvesting protein complex. The activity of the PSII reaction center complex adsorbed on metal surfaces was monitored by photochemical reduction of cyt b-559. Measurement of fluorescence emission was shown to be a new and sensitive method for monitoring the structural and functional integrity of the PSII reaction center complex on the metal surface.

  14. Comparative analysis of plastid genomes of non-photosynthetic Ericaceae and their photosynthetic relatives

    PubMed Central

    Logacheva, Maria D.; Schelkunov, Mikhail I.; Shtratnikova, Victoria Y.; Matveeva, Maria V.; Penin, Aleksey A.

    2016-01-01

    Although plastid genomes of flowering plants are typically highly conserved regarding their size, gene content and order, there are some exceptions. Ericaceae, a large and diverse family of flowering plants, warrants special attention within the context of plastid genome evolution because it includes both non-photosynthetic and photosynthetic species with rearranged plastomes and putative losses of “essential” genes. We characterized plastid genomes of three species of Ericaceae, non-photosynthetic Monotropa uniflora and Hypopitys monotropa and photosynthetic Pyrola rotundifolia, using high-throughput sequencing. As expected for non-photosynthetic plants, M. uniflora and H. monotropa have small plastid genomes (46 kb and 35 kb, respectively) lacking genes related to photosynthesis, whereas P. rotundifolia has a larger genome (169 kb) with a gene set similar to other photosynthetic plants. The examined genomes contain an unusually high number of repeats and translocations. Comparative analysis of the expanded set of Ericaceae plastomes suggests that the genes clpP and accD that are present in the plastid genomes of almost all plants have not been lost in this family (as was previously thought) but rather persist in these genomes in unusual forms. Also we found a new gene in P. rotundifolia that emerged as a result of duplication of rps4 gene. PMID:27452401

  15. Novel Waddlia Intracellular Bacterium in Artibeus intermedius Fruit Bats, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Pierlé, Sebastián Aguilar; Morales, Cirani Obregón; Martínez, Leonardo Perea; Ceballos, Nidia Aréchiga; Rivero, Juan José Pérez; Díaz, Osvaldo López; Brayton, Kelly A.

    2015-01-01

    An intracellular bacterium was isolated from fruit bats (Artibeus intermedius) in Cocoyoc, Mexico. The bacterium caused severe lesions in the lungs and spleens of bats and intracytoplasmic vacuoles in cell cultures. Sequence analyses showed it is related to Waddlia spp. (order Chlamydiales). We propose to call this bacterium Waddlia cocoyoc. PMID:26583968

  16. A monogalactosyldiacylglycerol synthase found in the green sulfur bacterium Chlorobaculum tepidum reveals important roles for galactolipids in photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Shinji; Harada, Jiro; Yokono, Makio; Yuzawa, Yuichi; Shimojima, Mie; Murofushi, Kazuhiro; Tanaka, Hironori; Masuda, Hanako; Murakawa, Masato; Haraguchi, Tsuyoshi; Kondo, Maki; Nishimura, Mikio; Yuasa, Hideya; Noguchi, Masato; Oh-Oka, Hirozo; Tanaka, Ayumi; Tamiaki, Hitoshi; Ohta, Hiroyuki

    2011-07-01

    Monogalactosyldiacylglycerol (MGDG), which is conserved in almost all photosynthetic organisms, is the most abundant natural polar lipid on Earth. In plants, MGDG is highly accumulated in the chloroplast membranes and is an important bulk constituent of thylakoid membranes. However, precise functions of MGDG in photosynthesis have not been well understood. Here, we report a novel MGDG synthase from the green sulfur bacterium Chlorobaculum tepidum. This enzyme, MgdA, catalyzes MGDG synthesis using UDP-Gal as a substrate. The gene encoding MgdA was essential for this bacterium; only heterozygous mgdA mutants could be isolated. An mgdA knockdown mutation affected in vivo assembly of bacteriochlorophyll c aggregates, suggesting the involvement of MGDG in the construction of the light-harvesting complex called chlorosome. These results indicate that MGDG biosynthesis has been independently established in each photosynthetic organism to perform photosynthesis under different environmental conditions. We complemented an Arabidopsis thaliana MGDG synthase mutant by heterologous expression of MgdA. The complemented plants showed almost normal levels of MGDG, although they also had abnormal morphological phenotypes, including reduced chlorophyll content, no apical dominance in shoot growth, atypical flower development, and infertility. These observations provide new insights regarding the importance of regulated MGDG synthesis in the physiology of higher plants.

  17. Analysis of the biosynthetic pathway for sulfoquinovosyldiacylglycerol in the purple bacterium R. sphaeroides

    SciTech Connect

    Benning, C.; Somerville, C.R. )

    1990-05-01

    The membrane lipid sulfoquinovosyldiacylglycerol (SQD) can be found in all photosynthetically active membranes studied. In a green leaf, about 50% of the organic sulfur is bound in SQD. Therefore, this sulfolipid constitutes a major component of the global sulfur cycle. However, since the discovery of SQD, very little progress has been made towards the elucidation of the biosynthetic pathway. For a genetical analysis of the pathway of SQD, we selected the photosynthetic purple-nonsulfur bacterium R. sphaeroides, as our model system. We have been able to isolate several classes of mutants, which show reduced levels of SQD. Some of the mutants accumulate {sup 35}S-labeled, water soluble compounds. We expect that these compounds are related to precursors or are precursors, which accumulate due to a specific block in the biosynthetic pathway of SQD. To study the possible precursor function of these compounds, we developed an in vitro SQD biosynthesis system using cell free extracts from R. sphaeroides. In addition, we have been able to isolate cosmids prepared from WT DNA, which complement three classes of SQD mutants in R. sphaeroides. The analysis and expression of the genes encoded by these cosmids should facilitate the characterization of the proteins involved in SQD biosynthesis.

  18. Prosthecochloris indica sp. nov., a novel green sulfur bacterium from a marine aquaculture pond, Kakinada, India.

    PubMed

    Anil Kumar, Pinnaka; Naga Radha Srinivas, Tanuku; Sasikala, Chintalapati; Venkata Ramana, Chintalapati; Süling, Jorg; Imhoff, Johannes

    2009-04-01

    A green sulfur bacterium, strain JAGS6T was isolated from a marine aquaculture pond located near Kakinada on the east coast of India. Cells of strain JAGS6T were Gram-negative, non-motile, coccoid, 1-1.2 microm in diameter, with prosthecae. Phylogenetic analysis on the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that strain JAGS6T clusters with members of the genus Prosthecochloris and the sequence similarity with the nearest relative, Prosthecochloris vibrioformis, is 96.7%. Cultures of strain JAGS6T are green in color and the cells contain bacteriochlorophyll c and most likely carotenoids of the chlorobactene series as photosynthetic pigments. Strain JAGS6T is mesophilic, halotolerant (up to 7% NaCl) and is obligately phototrophic, utilizing sulfide but not thiosulfate as a photosynthetic electron donor. Sulfur globules are deposited outside the cells during oxidation of sulfide. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis and its morphological and physiological characteristics, strain JAGS6T is distinct from described species of the genus Prosthecochloris and we propose to describe it as a new species, Prosthecochloris indica, sp. nov. The type strain is JAGS6T (=JCM 13299T=ATCC BAA1214T).

  19. Thiorhodococcus mannitoliphagus sp. nov., a purple sulfur bacterium from the White Sea.

    PubMed

    Rabold, Sandra; Gorlenko, Vladimir M; Imhoff, Johannes F

    2006-08-01

    A novel purple sulfur bacterium, strain WS(T), was isolated from a microbial mat from an estuary of the White Sea. Individual cells are coccoid shaped, motile by flagella and do not contain gas vesicles. The mean cell diameter is 1.85 mum (range 1.5-2.0 mum). Cell suspensions exhibit a purple-violet colour. They contain bacteriochlorophyll a and carotenoids of the rhodopinal series as photosynthetic pigments. The novel bacterium is an anoxygenic photoautotroph, using sulfide, thiosulfate, sulfite and elemental sulfur as electron donors for photosynthesis and is capable of photoassimilating several organic carbon sources in the presence of carbonate and a reduced sulfur source (sulfide and/or thiosulfate). Sulfur globules, formed during oxidation of sulfide, are stored transiently inside the cells. Optimal salinity and pH for growth are at 0.5-2.0 % NaCl and pH 7.0-7.5. The DNA base composition of strain WS(T) is 61.8 mol% G+C. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis showed that the new isolate belongs to the genus Thiorhodococcus, with Thiorhodococcus minor CE2203(T) as the nearest relative (sequence similarity of 97.3 %). Several distinct differences from described species necessitate the description of a novel species. Thiorhodococcus mannitoliphagus sp. nov. is the proposed name, with strain WS(T) (=ATCC BAA-1228(T)=VKM B-2393(T)) as the type strain.

  20. Developing Research Capabilities in Energy Biosciences: Design principles of photosynthetic biofuel production.

    SciTech Connect

    Donald D. Brown; David Savage

    2012-06-30

    The current fossil fuel-based energy infrastructure is not sustainable. Solar radiation is a plausible alternative, but realizing it as such will require significant technological advances in the ability to harvest light energy and convert it into suitable fuels. The biological system of photosynthesis can carry out these reactions, and in principle could be engineered using the tools of synthetic biology. One desirable implementation would be to rewire the reactions of a photosynthetic bacterium to direct the energy harvested from solar radiation into the synthesis of the biofuel H2. Proposed here is a series of experiments to lay the basic science groundwork for such an attempt. The goal is to elucidate the transcriptional network of photosynthesis using a novel driver-reporter screen, evolve more robust hydrogenases for improved catalysis, and to test the ability of the photosynthetic machinery to directly produce H2 in vivo. The results of these experiments will have broad implications for the understanding of photosynthesis, enzyme function, and the engineering of biological systems for sustainable energy production. The ultimate impact could be a fundamental transformation of the world's energy economy.

  1. Excited state dynamics in photosynthetic reaction center and light harvesting complex 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strümpfer, Johan; Schulten, Klaus

    2012-08-01

    Key to efficient harvesting of sunlight in photosynthesis is the first energy conversion process in which electronic excitation establishes a trans-membrane charge gradient. This conversion is accomplished by the photosynthetic reaction center (RC) that is, in case of the purple photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides studied here, surrounded by light harvesting complex 1 (LH1). The RC employs six pigment molecules to initiate the conversion: four bacteriochlorophylls and two bacteriopheophytins. The excited states of these pigments interact very strongly and are simultaneously influenced by the surrounding thermal protein environment. Likewise, LH1 employs 32 bacteriochlorophylls influenced in their excited state dynamics by strong interaction between the pigments and by interaction with the protein environment. Modeling the excited state dynamics in the RC as well as in LH1 requires theoretical methods, which account for both pigment-pigment interaction and pigment-environment interaction. In the present study we describe the excitation dynamics within a RC and excitation transfer between light harvesting complex 1 (LH1) and RC, employing the hierarchical equation of motion method. For this purpose a set of model parameters that reproduce RC as well as LH1 spectra and observed oscillatory excitation dynamics in the RC is suggested. We find that the environment has a significant effect on LH1-RC excitation transfer and that excitation transfers incoherently between LH1 and RC.

  2. Interactions between colloidal silver and photosynthetic pigments located in cyanobacteria fragments and in solution.

    PubMed

    Siejak, Przemysław; Frackowiak, Danuta

    2007-09-25

    Changes in the yield of the fluorescence emitted by pigments of photosynthetic organisms could be used for the establishment of the presence of some toxic substances. The presence of colloidal metals can be indicated by enhancement of pigments' emission as a result of plasmons generation. The spectra of the pigments of cyanobacterium Synechocystis located in the bacterium fragments and in solutions with and without colloidal silver additions have been measured. The quantum yield of the pigments' fluorescence in solution has been observed to increase at some wavelength of excitation, while the fluorescence of the pigments in the bacteria fragments has been only quenched as a consequence of interactions with colloidal silver particles. Close contact between pigment molecules located in bacteria fragments and silver particles is probably not possible. We plan in future to investigate the influence of other, more typical metal pollutants of water, using similar spectral methods and several other photosynthetic bacteria pigments, in solution, in cell fragments and in the whole bacteria organisms.

  3. Atomic-level structural and functional model of a bacterial photosynthetic membrane vesicle.

    PubMed

    Sener, Melih K; Olsen, John D; Hunter, C Neil; Schulten, Klaus

    2007-10-02

    The photosynthetic unit (PSU) of purple photosynthetic bacteria consists of a network of bacteriochlorophyll-protein complexes that absorb solar energy for eventual conversion to ATP. Because of its remarkable simplicity, the PSU can serve as a prototype for studies of cellular organelles. In the purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides the PSU forms spherical invaginations of the inner membrane, approximately 70 nm in diameter, composed mostly of light-harvesting complexes, LH1 and LH2, and reaction centers (RCs). Atomic force microscopy studies of the intracytoplasmic membrane have revealed the overall spatial organization of the PSU. In the present study these atomic force microscopy data were used to construct three-dimensional models of an entire membrane vesicle at the atomic level by using the known structure of the LH2 complex and a structural model of the dimeric RC-LH1 complex. Two models depict vesicles consisting of 9 or 18 dimeric RC-LH1 complexes and 144 or 101 LH2 complexes, representing a total of 3,879 or 4,464 bacteriochlorophylls, respectively. The in silico reconstructions permit a detailed description of light absorption and electronic excitation migration, including computation of a 50-ps excitation lifetime and a 95% quantum efficiency for one of the model membranes, and demonstration of excitation sharing within the closely packed RC-LH1 dimer arrays.

  4. Cloning and characterization of nif structural and regulatory genes in the purple sulfur bacterium, Halorhodospira halophila.

    PubMed

    Tsuihiji, Hisayoshi; Yamazaki, Yoichi; Kamikubo, Hironari; Imamoto, Yasushi; Kataoka, Mikio

    2006-03-01

    Halorhodospira halophila is a halophilic photosynthetic bacterium classified as a purple sulfur bacterium. We found that H. halophila generates hydrogen gas during photoautotrophic growth as a byproduct of a nitrogenase reaction. In order to consider the applied possibilities of this photobiological hydrogen generation, we cloned and characterized the structural and regulatory genes encoding the nitrogenase, nifH, nifD and nifA, from H. halophila. This is the first description of the nif genes for a purple sulfur bacterium. The amino-acid sequences of NifH and NifD indicated that these proteins are an Fe protein and a part of a MoFe protein, respectively. The important residues are conserved completely. The sequence upstream from the nifH region and sequence similarities of nifH and nifD with those of the other organisms suggest that the regulatory system might be a NifL-NifA system; however, H. halophila lacks nifL. The amino-acid sequence of H. halophila NifA is closer to that of the NifA of the NifL-NifA system than to that of NifA without NifL. H. halophila NifA does not conserve either the residue that interacts with NifL or the important residues involved in NifL-independent regulation. These results suggest the existence of yet another regulatory system, and that the development of functional systems and their molecular counterparts are not necessarily correlated throughout evolution. All of these Nif proteins of H. halophila possess an excess of acidic residues, which acts as a salt-resistant mechanism.

  5. Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO2 Mitigation

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory Kremer; David J. Bayless; Morgan Vis; Michael Prudich; Keith Cooksey; Jeff Muhs

    2004-10-13

    This report highlights significant achievements in the Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO{sub 2} Mitigation Project for the period ending 09/30/2004. The primary effort of this quarter was focused on mass transfer of carbon dioxide into the water film to study the potential effects on the photosynthetic organisms that depend on the carbon. Testing of the carbon dioxide scrubbing capability (mass transfer capability) of flowing water film appears to be relatively high and largely unaffected by transport of the gas through the bioreactor. The implications are that the transfer of carbon dioxide into the film is nearly at maximum and that it is sufficient to sustain photosynthesis at whatever rate the organisms can sustain. This finding is key to assuming that the process is an energy (photon) limited reaction and not a nutrient limited reaction.

  6. Photosynthetic Rates of Citronella and Lemongrass 1

    PubMed Central

    Herath, H. M. Walter; Ormrod, Douglas P.

    1979-01-01

    Ten selections of citronella (Cymbopogon nardus [L.] Rendle) were grown at 32/27, 27/21, or 15/10 C day/night temperatures, and plants from three populations of lemongrass (Cymbopogon citratus [D.C.] Stapf from Japan or Sri Lanka and Cymbopogon flexuosus [D.C.] Stapf from India) were grown at 8- or 15-hour photoperiods. Net photosynthetic rates of mature leaves were measured in a controlled environment at 25 C and 260 microeinsteins per meter2 per second. Rates declined with increasing leaf age, and from the tip to the base of the leaf blade. Rates for citronella leaves grown at 15/10 C were extremely low for all selections. Highest rates of net photosynthesis were recorded for four selections grown at 27/21 C and for two selections grown at 32/27 C. Lemongrass grown at 8-hour photoperiod had higher photosynthetic rates than that grown at 15-hour photoperiod. PMID:16660737

  7. BOREAS TE-9 NSA Photosynthetic Response Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G.; Curd, Shelaine (Editor); Dang, Qinglai; Margolis, Hank; Coyea, Marie

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmospheric Study (BOREAS) TE-9 (Terrestrial Ecology) team collected several data sets related to chemical and photosynthetic properties of leaves. This data set describes: (1) the response of leaf and shoot-level photosynthesis to ambient and intercellular CO2 concentration, temperature, and incident photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) for black spruce, jack pine, and aspen during the three intensive field campaigns (IFCs) in 1994 in the Northern Study Area (NSA); (2) the response of stomatal conductance to vapor pressure difference throughout the growing season of 1994; and (3) a range of shoot water potentials (controlled in the laboratory) for black spruce and jack pine. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884), or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  8. Hydrogen production by photosynthetic green algae.

    PubMed

    Ghirardi, Maria L

    2006-08-01

    Oxygenic photosynthetic organisms such as cyanobacteria, green algae and diatoms are capable of absorbing light and storing up to 10-13% of its energy into the H-H bond of hydrogen gas. This process, which takes advantage of the photosynthetic apparatus of these organisms to convert sunlight into chemical energy, could conceivably be harnessed for production of significant amounts of energy from a renewable resource, water. The harnessed energy could then be coupled to a fuel cell for electricity generation and recycling of water molecules. In this review, current biochemical understanding of this reaction in green algae, and some of the major challenges facing the development of future commercial algal photobiological systems for H2 production have been discussed.

  9. Photosynthetic rates of citronella and lemongrass.

    PubMed

    Herath, H M; Ormrod, D P

    1979-02-01

    Ten selections of citronella (Cymbopogon nardus [L.] Rendle) were grown at 32/27, 27/21, or 15/10 C day/night temperatures, and plants from three populations of lemongrass (Cymbopogon citratus [D.C.] Stapf from Japan or Sri Lanka and Cymbopogon flexuosus [D.C.] Stapf from India) were grown at 8- or 15-hour photoperiods. Net photosynthetic rates of mature leaves were measured in a controlled environment at 25 C and 260 microeinsteins per meter(2) per second. Rates declined with increasing leaf age, and from the tip to the base of the leaf blade. Rates for citronella leaves grown at 15/10 C were extremely low for all selections. Highest rates of net photosynthesis were recorded for four selections grown at 27/21 C and for two selections grown at 32/27 C. Lemongrass grown at 8-hour photoperiod had higher photosynthetic rates than that grown at 15-hour photoperiod.

  10. Paradigms: examples from the bacterium Xylella fastidiosa.

    PubMed

    Purcell, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    The history of advances in research on Xylella fastidiosa provides excellent examples of how paradigms both advance and limit our scientific understanding of plant pathogens and the plant diseases they cause. I describe this from a personal perspective, having been directly involved with many persons who made paradigm-changing discoveries, beginning with the discovery that a bacterium, not a virus, causes Pierce's disease of grape and other plant diseases in numerous plant species, including important crop and forest species.

  11. Pneumonia caused by a previously undescribed bacterium.

    PubMed Central

    Hopfer, R L; Mills, K; Fainstein, V; Fischer, H E; Luna, M P

    1982-01-01

    A new and as yet unidentified bacterium was isolated from the lung tissue of a cancer patient with bilateral pneumonia. Clinically, the pneumonia was consistent with legionellosis; the organism cultured from the lung grew only on the charcoal-yeast extract agar routinely used for Legionella isolation. Subsequent testing, however, showed the organism to be quite distinct from the known Legionella species in its biochemical, antigenic, and growth characteristics. Images PMID:7130363

  12. Characterization of a novel extremely alkalophilic bacterium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Souza, K. A.; Deal, P. H.

    1977-01-01

    A new alkalophilic bacterium, isolated from a natural spring of high pH is characterized. It is a Gram-positive, non-sporulating, motile rod requiring aerobic and alkaline conditions for growth. The characteristics of this organism resemble those of the coryneform group of bacteria; however, there are no accepted genera within this group with which this organism can be closely matched. Therefore, a new genus may be warranted.

  13. Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO2 Mitigation

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory Kremer; David J. Bayless; Morgan Vis; Michael Prudich; Keith Cooksey; Jeff Muhs

    2005-01-13

    This report highlights significant achievements in the Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO{sub 2} Mitigation Project during the ending 12/31/2004. Specific results and accomplishments for the program include review of pilot scale testing and design of a new bioreactor. Testing confirmed that algae can be grown in a sustainable fashion in the pilot bioreactor, even with intermittent availability of sunlight. The pilot-scale tests indicated that algal growth rate followed photon delivery during productivity testing.

  14. ENHANCED PRACTICAL PHOTOSYNTHETIC CO2 MITIGATION

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Gregory Kremer; Dr. David J. Bayless; Dr. Morgan Vis; Dr. Michael Prudich; Dr. Keith Cooksey; Dr. Jeff Muhs

    2003-04-15

    This quarterly report documents significant achievements in the Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO{sub 2} Mitigation project during the period from 1/2/2003 through 4/01/2003. As indicated in the list of accomplishments below we are progressing with long-term model scale bioreactor tests and are completing final preparations for pilot scale bioreactor testing. Specific results and accomplishments for the first quarter of 2003 are included.

  15. Nitric oxide in marine photosynthetic organisms.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Amit; Castellano, Immacolata; Patti, Francesco Paolo; Palumbo, Anna; Buia, Maria Cristina

    2015-05-01

    Nitric oxide is a versatile and powerful signaling molecule in plants. However, most of our understanding stems from studies on terrestrial plants and very little is known about marine autotrophs. This review summarizes current knowledge about the source of nitric oxide synthesis in marine photosynthetic organisms and its role in various physiological processes under normal and stress conditions. The interactions of nitric oxide with other stress signals and cross talk among secondary messengers are also highlighted.

  16. Photosynthetic carbon metabolism in Enteromorpha compressa (Chlorophyta)

    SciTech Connect

    Beer, S.; Shragge, B.

    1987-12-01

    The intertidal macroalga Enteromorpha compressa showed the ability to use HCO/sub 3//sup -/, as an exogenous inorganic carbon (Ci) source for photosynthesis. However, although the natural sea water concentration of this carbon form was saturating, additional CO/sub 2/ above ambient Ci levels doubled net photosynthetic rates. Therefore, the productivity of this alga, when submerged, is likely to be limited by Ci. When plants were exposed to air, photosynthetic rates saturated at air-levels of CO/sub 2/ during mild desiccation. Based on carbon fixing enzyme activities and Ci pulse-chase incorporation patterns, it was found that Enteromorpha is a C/sub 3/ plant. However, this alga did not show O/sub 2/ inhibited photosynthetic rates at natural sea water Ci conditions. It is suggested that such a C/sub 4/-like gas exchange response is due to the HCO/sub 3//sup -/ utilization system concentrating CO/sub 2/ intracellularly, thus alleviating apparent photorespiration.

  17. Genomic analysis of Melioribacter roseus, facultatively anaerobic organotrophic bacterium representing a novel deep lineage within Bacteriodetes/Chlorobi group.

    PubMed

    Kadnikov, Vitaly V; Mardanov, Andrey V; Podosokorskaya, Olga A; Gavrilov, Sergey N; Kublanov, Ilya V; Beletsky, Alexey V; Bonch-Osmolovskaya, Elizaveta A; Ravin, Nikolai V

    2013-01-01

    Melioribacter roseus is a moderately thermophilic facultatively anaerobic organotrophic bacterium representing a novel deep branch within Bacteriodetes/Chlorobi group. To better understand the metabolic capabilities and possible ecological functions of M. roseus and get insights into the evolutionary history of this bacterial lineage, we sequenced the genome of the type strain P3M-2(T). A total of 2838 open reading frames was predicted from its 3.30 Mb genome. The whole proteome analysis supported phylum-level classification of M. roseus since most of the predicted proteins had closest matches in Bacteriodetes, Proteobacteria, Chlorobi, Firmicutes and deeply-branching bacterium Caldithrix abyssi, rather than in one particular phylum. Consistent with the ability of the bacterium to grow on complex carbohydrates, the genome analysis revealed more than one hundred glycoside hydrolases, glycoside transferases, polysaccharide lyases and carbohydrate esterases. The reconstructed central metabolism revealed pathways enabling the fermentation of complex organic substrates, as well as their complete oxidation through aerobic and anaerobic respiration. Genes encoding the photosynthetic and nitrogen-fixation machinery of green sulfur bacteria, as well as key enzymes of autotrophic carbon fixation pathways, were not identified. The M. roseus genome supports its affiliation to a novel phylum Ignavibateriae, representing the first step on the evolutionary pathway from heterotrophic ancestors of Bacteriodetes/Chlorobi group towards anaerobic photoautotrophic Chlorobi.

  18. Tectonics and the photosynthetic habitable zone (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sleep, N. H.

    2009-12-01

    The traditional habitable zone lies between an inner stellar radius where the surface of the planet becomes too hot for liquid water carbon-based life and on outer radius, where the surface freezes. It is effectively the zone where photosynthesis is feasible. The concept extends to putative life on objects with liquid methane at the surface, like Titan. As a practical matter, photosynthesis leaves detectable biosignatures in the geological record; black shale on the Earth indicates that sulfide and probably FeO based photosynthesis existed by 3.8 Ga. The hard crustal rocks and the mantle sequester numerous photosynthetic biosignatures. Photosynthesis can produce detectable free oxygen with ozone in the atmosphere of extrasolar planets. In contrast, there is no outer limit for subsurface life in large silicate objects. Pre-photosynthetic niches are dependable but meager and not very detectable at great antiquity or great distance, with global productivity less than 1e-3 of the photosynthetic ones. Photosynthetic organisms have bountiful energy that modifies their surface environment and even tectonics. For example, metamorphic rocks formed at the expense of thick black shale are highly radioactive and hence self-fluxing. Active tectonics with volcanism and metamorphism prevents volatiles from being sequestered in the subsurface as on Mars. A heat-pipe object, like a larger Io, differs from the Earth in that the volatiles return to the deep interior distributed within massive volcanic deposits rather than concentrated in the shallow oceanic crust. One the Earth, the return of water to the surface by arc volcanoes controls its mantle abundance at the transition between behaving as a trace element and behaving as a major element that affects melting. The ocean accumulates the water that the mantle and crust do not take. The Earth has the “right” amount of water that erosion/deposition and tectonics both tend to maintain near sea level surfaces. The mantle contains

  19. Biological conversion of synthesis gas. Project status report, April 1, 1992--June 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Ackerson, M.D.; Clausen, E.C.; Gaddy, J.L.

    1992-06-30

    Overall mass transfer coefficients for CO have been determined in a continuous stirred-tank reactor at agitation rates of 300--700 rpm using a biological system with the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum. A non-steady state approach was employed in order to separate mass transfer and kinetic limited regions of the fermentation. As a result, a kinetic model could be developed for specific CO uptake by the culture including the apparent CO inhibition. The maximum specific CO uptake rate found matched the earlier results obtained in batch culture and by other investigators. CO inhibition was more predominant in CSTR culture than in batch culture, perhaps due to CO acclimation. The growth of the photosynthetic bacterium Chlorobium thiosulfatophilum on CO{sub 2} has been studied at light intensities ranging from 27-1723 lux in batch culture. Modeling results indicate that growth is dependent upon light intensity according to a Monod type relationship.

  20. Biological conversion of synthesis gas

    SciTech Connect

    Ackerson, M.D.; Clausen, E.C.; Gaddy, J.L.

    1992-06-30

    Overall mass transfer coefficients for CO have been determined in a continuous stirred-tank reactor at agitation rates of 300--700 rpm using a biological system with the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum. A non-steady state approach was employed in order to separate mass transfer and kinetic limited regions of the fermentation. As a result, a kinetic model could be developed for specific CO uptake by the culture including the apparent CO inhibition. The maximum specific CO uptake rate found matched the earlier results obtained in batch culture and by other investigators. CO inhibition was more predominant in CSTR culture than in batch culture, perhaps due to CO acclimation. The growth of the photosynthetic bacterium Chlorobium thiosulfatophilum on CO[sub 2] has been studied at light intensities ranging from 27-1723 lux in batch culture. Modeling results indicate that growth is dependent upon light intensity according to a Monod type relationship.

  1. High yield of B-branch electron transfer in a quadruple reaction center mutant of the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    PubMed

    de Boer, Arjo L; Neerken, Sieglinde; de Wijn, Rik; Permentier, Hjalmar P; Gast, Peter; Vijgenboom, Erik; Hoff, Arnold J

    2002-03-05

    A new reaction center (RC) quadruple mutant, called LDHW, of Rhodobacter sphaeroides is described. This mutant was constructed to obtain a high yield of B-branch electron transfer and to study P(+)Q(B)(-) formation via the B-branch. The A-branch of the mutant RC contains two monomer bacteriochlorophylls, B(A) and beta, as a result of the H mutation L(M214)H. The latter bacteriochlorophyll replaces bacteriopheophytin H(A) of wild-type RCs. As a result of the W mutation A(M260)W, the A-branch does not contain the ubiquinone Q(A); this facilitates the study of P(+)Q(B)(-) formation. Furthermore, the D mutation G(M203)D introduces an aspartic acid residue near B(A). Together these mutations impede electron transfer through the A-branch. The B-branch contains two bacteriopheophytins, Phi(B) and H(B), and a ubiquinone, Q(B.) Phi(B) replaces the monomer bacteriochlorophyll B(B) as a result of the L mutation H(M182)L. In the LDHW mutant we find 35-45% B-branch electron transfer, the highest yield reported so far. Transient absorption spectroscopy at 10 K, where the absorption bands due to the Q(X) transitions of Phi(B) and H(B) are well resolved, shows simultaneous bleachings of both absorption bands. Although photoreduction of the bacteriopheophytins occurs with a high yield, no significant (approximately 1%) P(+)Q(B)(-) formation was found.

  2. Bd oxidase homologue of photosynthetic purple sulfur bacterium Allochromatium vinosum is co-transcribed with a nitrogen fixation related gene.

    PubMed

    Dincturk, H Benan; Demir, Volkan; Aykanat, Tutku

    2011-02-01

    Purple sulfur bacteria, which are known to be the most ancient among anoxygenic phototrophs, play an important role in the global sulfur cycle. Allochromatium vinosum oxidizes reduced sulfur compounds such as hydrogen sulfide, elemental sulfur and thiosulfide. At low oxygen concentrations, A. vinosum can grow chemotrophically using oxygen as the terminal electron acceptor. Being also a nitrogen fixer, A. vinosum is faced with the paradox of co-existence of aerobic metabolism and nitrogen fixation. Due to growth difficulties, only a few studies have dealt with the aerobic metabolism of the organism and, until now, there has been no information about the genes involved in the respiratory metabolism of purple sulfur bacteria. In this article we show the first terminal oxidase gene for A. vinosum. The presence of a Bd type of quinol oxidase is necessary to protect nitrogenases against the inhibitory effects of oxygen. In this case, a nitrogen fixation related gene is part of the cyd operon and this gene is co-transcribed with cydAB genes. Bd oxidase of A. vinosum may be the earliest form of oxidase where the function of the enzyme is to scavenge the contaminant oxygen during nitrogen fixation. This may be an important clue about the early evolution of oxygenic photosynthesis, perhaps as a protective mechanism for nitrogen fixation.

  3. Regulation of nitrogenase in the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas capsulata as studied by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed Central

    Hallenbeck, P C; Meyer, C M; Vignais, P M

    1982-01-01

    By using two-dimensional electrophoresis, five putative soluble nif gene products were identified, and the regulation of nif gene expression in Rhodopseudomonas capsulata was investigated. Expression of nif was repressed by ammonia and atmospheric concentrations of oxygen. Deprivation of molybdenum caused an interesting pattern of partial repression of nif gene expression that was not relieved by tungsten. These results are discussed in relation to the better understood system of nif regulation in Klebsiella pneumoniae. Images PMID:6955301

  4. Carbon monoxide metabolism by the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum. Progress report, November 15, 1990--November 15, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Ludden, P.W.; Roberts, G.P.

    1991-12-31

    Research continued on carbon monoxide metabolism by Rhodospirillum rubrum. In the past year, progress was made in: (1) the identification and isolation of the physiological electron carrier from monoxide dehydrogenase (CODH) to hydrogenase in R. rubrum; (2) the isolation, sequencing and mutagenesis of the genes encoding the components of the CO oxidation system in R. rubrum, (3) the purification and characterization of the CO-induced hydrogenase activity of R. rubrum; (4) the spectroscopic investigation of the cobalt-substituted form of the enzyme.

  5. Temperature response of Antarctic cryptoendolithic photosynthetic microorganisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ocampo-Friedmann, R.; Meyer, M. A.; Chen, M.; Friedmann, E. I.

    1988-01-01

    Growth responses to temperatures between 12.5 [degrees] C and 25 degrees C were determined for five photosynthetic microorganisms isolated from the Ross Desert cryptoendolithic community. Among eukaryotic algae, two strains of Trebouxia sp. have an upper temperature limit of 20 degrees C, and two strains of Hemichloris antarctica of 25 degrees C. The cyanobacterium Chroococcidiopsis sp., in contrast, grows at temperatures above 25 degrees C. These and earlier studies suggest that the eukaryotic algae of the Antarctic cryptoendolithic community have an upper temperature limit near 25 degrees C.

  6. Culturing photosynthetic bacteria through surface plasmon resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Ooms, Matthew D.; Bajin, Lauren; Sinton, David

    2012-12-17

    In this work, cultivation of photosynthetic microbes in surface plasmon enhanced evanescent fields is demonstrated. Proliferation of Synechococcus elongatus was obtained on gold surfaces excited with surface plasmons. Excitation over three days resulted in 10 {mu}m thick biofilms with maximum cell volume density of 20% vol/vol (2% more total accumulation than control experiments with direct light). Collectively, these results indicate the ability to (1) excite surface-bound cells using plasmonic light fields, and (2) subsequently grow thick biofilms by coupling light from the surface. Plasmonic light delivery presents opportunities for high-density optofluidic photobioreactors for microalgal analysis and solar fuel production.

  7. Culturing photosynthetic bacteria through surface plasmon resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ooms, Matthew D.; Bajin, Lauren; Sinton, David

    2012-12-01

    In this work, cultivation of photosynthetic microbes in surface plasmon enhanced evanescent fields is demonstrated. Proliferation of Synechococcus elongatus was obtained on gold surfaces excited with surface plasmons. Excitation over three days resulted in 10 μm thick biofilms with maximum cell volume density of 20% vol/vol (2% more total accumulation than control experiments with direct light). Collectively, these results indicate the ability to (1) excite surface-bound cells using plasmonic light fields, and (2) subsequently grow thick biofilms by coupling light from the surface. Plasmonic light delivery presents opportunities for high-density optofluidic photobioreactors for microalgal analysis and solar fuel production.

  8. Simulation of photosynthetic production using neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kmet, Tibor; Kmetova, Maria

    2013-10-01

    This paper deals with neural network based optimal control synthesis for solving optimal control problems with control and state constraints and discrete time delay. The optimal control problem is transcribed into nonlinear programming problem which is implemented with adaptive critic neural network. This approach is applicable to a wide class of nonlinear systems. The proposed simulation methods is illustrated by the optimal control problem of photosynthetic production described by discrete time delay differential equations. Results show that adaptive critic based systematic approach holds promise for obtaining the optimal control with control and state constraints.

  9. Climate Control of Photosynthetic Parameters across Biomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, S.; Yi, C.

    2011-12-01

    Meteorological tower networks measure net ecosystem exchange (NEE) of CO2, which is a balance between ecosystem respiration (Reco) and gross primary production (GPP). For understanding the mechanistic response of CO2 exchange to climate factors at process-level, it's necessary to separate NEE into its two components. A light-response analysis model (Ruimy, et al., 1995) has proved to be an efficient tool for this purpose. Principal light-response parameters-apparent quantum yield (α), photosynthetic capacity (Fmax) and ecosystem respiration (Reco) are important for modeling of CO2 exchange from regional scale to global domains using remote sensing. A major challenge lies in understanding how those parameters vary across biomes under different climatic conditions. So far, few large-sample studies have been conducted on this purpose. In our study, we partition seasonal NEE into photosynthesis and ecosystem respiration of 247 unique fluxnet sites, which represents over 900 site-years. Our results indicate that: (1) apparent quantum yield (α) of deciduous broadleaf forests and mixed forests is sensitive to seasonal temperature; (2) photosynthetic capacity (Fmax) of deciduous forests and evergreen broadleaf forests is controlled by Bowen Ratio; and (3) Ecosystem respiration of evergreen needle forests and mixed forests is controlled by temperature, while evergreen broadleaf forests controlled by Bowen Ratio. Our results also demonstrate that some relationships between photosynthetic parameters and climate controls are latitude dependent. Ecosystem respiration of croplands and deciduous broadleaf forests in high latitudes shows better temperature correlations than that in low latitudes; apparent quantum yield (α) of evergreen needle forests only display temperature control in latitudes above 40N. On biome-scale average, the magnitudes of photosynthetic capacity are categorized into two groups: (1) with high value (from 31.96 to 37.13 umol m-2s-1) of croplands

  10. Microspectroscopy of the photosynthetic compartment of algae.

    PubMed

    Evangelista, Valtere; Frassanito, Anna Maria; Passarelli, Vincenzo; Barsanti, Laura; Gualtieri, Paolo

    2006-01-01

    We performed microspectroscopic evaluation of the pigment composition of the photosynthetic compartments of algae belonging to different taxonomic divisions and higher plants. The feasibility of microspectroscopy for discriminating among species and/or phylogenetic groups was tested on laboratory cultures. Gaussian bands decompositions and a fitting algorithm, together with fourth-derivative transformation of absorbance spectra, provided a reliable discrimination among chlorophylls a, b and c, phycobiliproteins and carotenoids. Comparative analysis of absorption spectra highlighted the evolutionary grouping of the algae into three main lineages in accordance with the most recent endosymbiotic theories.

  11. Detection of Salmonella bacterium in drinking water using microring resonator.

    PubMed

    Bahadoran, Mahdi; Noorden, Ahmad Fakhrurrazi Ahmad; Mohajer, Faeze Sadat; Abd Mubin, Mohamad Helmi; Chaudhary, Kashif; Jalil, Muhammad Arif; Ali, Jalil; Yupapin, Preecha

    2016-01-01

    A new microring resonator system is proposed for the detection of the Salmonella bacterium in drinking water, which is made up of SiO2-TiO2 waveguide embedded inside thin film layer of the flagellin. The change in refractive index due to the binding of the Salmonella bacterium with flagellin layer causes a shift in the output signal wavelength and the variation in through and drop port's intensities, which leads to the detection of Salmonella bacterium in drinking water. The sensitivity of proposed sensor for detecting of Salmonella bacterium in water solution is 149 nm/RIU and the limit of detection is 7 × 10(-4)RIU.

  12. Primary structures of high potential, four-iron-sulfur ferredoxins from the purple sulfur photosynthetic bacteria, Thiocapsa roseopersicina and Chromatium gracile

    SciTech Connect

    Tedro, S.M.; Meyer, T.E.; Bartsch, R.G.; Kamen, M.D.

    1981-01-25

    The amino acid sequences of high potential iron-sulfur proteins (HiPIP) from the purple sulfur photosynthetic bacteria Thiocapsa roseopersicina and Chromatium gracile were determined by alignment of tryptic peptides with the amino acid sequence of HiPIP from the closely related bacterium Chromatium vinosum, strain D. The two new sequences exhibit about 80% similarity to that of C. vinosum, but only an average of 33% similarity to the other known HiPIP species. Comparison of the three closely related sequences prompted a reinvestigation of the C. vinosum sequence, which resulted in three corrections, all involving changes of asparagine or aspartic acid to their respective acid or amide.

  13. Adaptive radiation of photosynthetic physiology in the Hawaiian lobeliads: dynamic photosynthetic responses.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Rebecca A; Givnish, Thomas J

    2008-03-01

    Hawaiian lobeliads have radiated into habitats from open alpine bogs to densely shaded rainforest interiors, and show corresponding adaptations in steady-state photosynthetic light responses and associated leaf traits. Shaded environments are not uniformly dark, however, but punctuated by sunflecks that carry most of the photosynthetically active light that strikes plants. We asked whether lobeliads have diversified in their dynamic photosynthetic light responses and how dynamic responses influence daily leaf carbon gain. We quantified gas exchange and dynamic light regimes under field conditions for ten species representing each major Hawaiian sublineage. Species in shadier habitats experienced shorter and less numerous sunflecks: average sunfleck length varied from 1.4 +/- 1.7 min for Cyanea floribunda in shaded forest understories to 31.2 +/- 2.1 min for Trematolobelia kauaiensis on open ridges. As expected, the rate of photosynthetic induction increased significantly toward shadier sites, with assimilation after 60 s rising from ca. 30% of fully induced rates in species from open environments to 60% in those from densely shaded habitats. Uninduced light use efficiency-actual photosynthesis versus that expected under steady-state conditions-increased from 10 to 70% across the same gradient. In silico transplants-modeling daily carbon gain using one species' photosynthetic light response in its own and other species' dynamic light regimes-demonstrated the potential adaptive nature of species differences: understory Cyanea pilosa in its light regimes outperformed gap-dwelling Clermontia parviflora, while Clermontia in its light regimes outperformed Cyanea. The apparent crossover in daily photosynthesis occurred at about the same photon flux density where dominance shifts from Cyanea to Clermontia in the field. Our results further support our hypothesis that the lobeliads have diversified physiologically across light environments in Hawaiian ecosystems and that

  14. Thermal responses of Symbiodinium photosynthetic carbon assimilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oakley, Clinton A.; Schmidt, Gregory W.; Hopkinson, Brian M.

    2014-06-01

    The symbiosis between hermatypic corals and their dinoflagellate endosymbionts, genus Symbiodinium, is based on carbon exchange. This symbiosis is disrupted by thermally induced coral bleaching, a stress response in which the coral host expels its algal symbionts as they become physiologically impaired. The disruption of the dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) supply or the thermal inactivation of Rubisco have been proposed as sites of initial thermal damage that leads to the bleaching response. Symbiodinium possesses a highly unusual Form II ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco), which exhibits a lower CO2:O2 specificity and may be more thermally unstable than the Form I Rubiscos of other algae and land plants. Components of the CO2 concentrating mechanism (CCM), which supplies inorganic carbon for photosynthesis, may also be temperature sensitive. Here, we examine the ability of four cultured Symbiodinium strains to acquire and fix DIC across a temperature gradient. Surprisingly, the half-saturation constant of photosynthesis with respect to DIC concentration ( K P), an index of CCM function, declined with increasing temperature in three of the four strains, indicating a greater potential for photosynthetic carbon acquisition at elevated temperatures. In the fourth strain, there was no effect of temperature on K P. Finding no evidence for thermal inhibition of the CCM, we conclude that CCM components are not likely to be the primary sites of thermal damage. Reduced photosynthetic quantum yields, a hallmark of thermal bleaching, were observed at low DIC concentrations, leaving open the possibility that reduced inorganic carbon availability is involved in bleaching.

  15. Non-photosynthetic pigments as potential biosignatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwieterman, E. W.; Cockell, C. S.; Meadows, V. S.

    2014-03-01

    Photosynthetic organisms on Earth produce potentially detectable surface reflectance biosignatures due in part to the spectral location and strength of pigment absorption. However, life on Earth uses pigments for a multitude of purposes other than photosynthesis, including coping with extreme environments. Macroscopic environments exist on Earth where the surface reflectance is significantly altered by a nonphotosynthetic pigment, such as the case of hypersaline lakes and ponds (Oren et al. 1992). Here we explore the nature and potential detectability of non-photosynthetic pigments in disk-averaged planetary observations using a combination of laboratory measurements and archival reflectance spectra, along with simulated broadband photometry and spectra. The in vivo visible reflectance spectra of a cross section of pigmented microorganisms are presented to illustrate the spectral diversity of biologically produced pigments. Synthetic broadband colors are generated to show a significant spread in color space. A 1D radiative transfer model (Meadows & Crisp 1996; Crisp 1997) is used to approximate the spectra of scenarios where pigmented organisms are widespread on planets with Earth-like atmospheres. Broadband colors are revisited to show that colors due to surface reflectivity are not robust to the addition of scattering and absorption effects from the atmosphere. We consider a èbest case' plausible scenario for the detection of nonphotosynthetic pigments by using the Virtual Planetary Laboratory's 3D spectral Earth model (Robinson et al. 2011) to explore the detectability of the surface biosignature produced by pigmented halophiles that are widespread on an Earth-analog planet.

  16. Photosynthetic water splitting: 1987 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Greenbaum, E.

    1988-01-01

    This document is an annual report of photosynthetic water splitting for the production of hydrogen and oxygen. Unicellular green algae are capable of evolving molecular hydrogen in the presence of carbon dioxide. Controlling factors that determine hydrogen evolution are either temperature or light intensity. Also, mutants of the green alga Chlamydomonas are capable of evolving hydrogen in the presence of carbon dioxide. The significance of these discoveries is that the presence of carbon dioxide (or bicarbonate) is a key factor in determining the activity of the Photosystem II water splitting complex. Second, a new advance in oxygen sensor technology has been made that, for the first time, allows the absolute measurement of photosynthetically evolved oxygen from a single colony of microalgae growing on a solidified agar medium. The key aspect of this electrochemical sensor is the utilization of ultra-pure potassium hydroxide as the electrolyte and a recognition of the role that electrolyte impurities play in contributing to base line noise. 9 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Respiratory processes in non-photosynthetic plastids

    PubMed Central

    Renato, Marta; Boronat, Albert; Azcón-Bieto, Joaquín

    2015-01-01

    Chlororespiration is a respiratory process located in chloroplast thylakoids which consists in an electron transport chain from NAD(P)H to oxygen. This respiratory chain involves the NAD(P)H dehydrogenase complex, the plastoquinone pool and the plastid terminal oxidase (PTOX), and it probably acts as a safety valve to prevent the over-reduction of the photosynthetic machinery in stress conditions. The existence of a similar respiratory activity in non-photosynthetic plastids has been less studied. Recently, it has been reported that tomato fruit chromoplasts present an oxygen consumption activity linked to ATP synthesis. Etioplasts and amyloplasts contain several electron carriers and some subunits of the ATP synthase, so they could harbor a similar respiratory process. This review provides an update on the study about respiratory processes in chromoplasts, identifying the major gaps that need to be addressed in future research. It also reviews the proteomic data of etioplasts and amyloplasts, which suggest the presence of a respiratory electron transport chain in these plastids. PMID:26236317

  18. Engineered photosynthetic bacteria, method of manufacture of biofuels

    DOEpatents

    Laible, Philip D.; Snyder, Seth W.

    2016-09-13

    The invention provides for a novel type of biofuel; a method for cleaving anchors from photosynthetic organisms; and a method for producing biofuels using photosynthetic organisms, the method comprising identifying photosynthesis co-factors and their anchors in the organisms; modifying the organisms to increase production of the anchors; accumulating biomass of the organisms in growth media; and harvesting the anchors.

  19. Determination of photosynthetic parameters in two seawater-tolerant vegetables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Nianwei; Zhou, Feng; Liu, Qian; Zhao, Wenqian

    2016-03-01

    It is difficult to determine the photosynthetic parameters of non-flat leaves/green stems using photosynthetic instruments, due to the unusual morphology of both organs, especially for Suaeda salsa and Salicornia bigelovii as two seawater-tolerant vegetables. To solve the problem, we developed a simple, practical, and effective method to measure and calculate the photosynthetic parameters (such as P N, g s, E) based on unit fresh mass, instead of leaf area. The light/CO2/temperature response curves of the plants can also be measured by this method. This new method is more effective, stable, and reliable than conventional methods for plants with non-flat leaves. In addition, the relative notes on measurements and calculation of photosynthetic parameters were discussed in this paper. This method solves technical difficulties in photosynthetic parameter determination of the two seawater-tolerant vegetables and similar plants.

  20. Morning reduction of photosynthetic capacity before midday depression

    PubMed Central

    Koyama, Kohei; Takemoto, Shuhei

    2014-01-01

    Midday depression of photosynthesis has important consequences for ecosystem carbon exchange. Recent studies of forest trees have demonstrated that latent reduction of photosynthetic capacity can begin in the early morning, preceding the midday depression. We investigated whether such early morning reduction also occurs in an herbaceous species, Oenothera biennis. Diurnal changes of the photosynthetic light response curve (measured using a light-emitting diode) and incident sunlight intensity were measured under field conditions. The following results were obtained: (1) the light-saturated photosynthetic rate decreased beginning at sunrise; (2) the incident sunlight intensity on the leaves increased from sunrise; and (3) combining (1) and (2), the net photosynthetic rate under natural sunlight intensity increased from sunrise, reached a maximum at mid-morning, and then showed midday depression. Our results demonstrate that the latent morning reduction of photosynthetic capacity begins at sunrise, preceding the apparent midday depression, in agreement with previous studies of forest trees. PMID:24633128

  1. Draft Genome Sequence of the Suttonella ornithocola Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Waldman Ben-Asher, Hiba; Yerushalmi, Rebecca; Wachtel, Chaim; Barbiro-Michaely, Efrat

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT   We report here the draft genome sequence of the Suttonella ornithocola bacterium. To date, this bacterium, found in birds, passed only phylogenetic and phenotypic analyses. To our knowledge, this is the first publication of the Suttonella ornithocola genome sequence. The genetic profile provides a basis for further analysis of its infection pathways. PMID:28209820

  2. [Influence of photosynthetic parameters on leaf longevity].

    PubMed

    Vasfilov, S P

    2015-01-01

    Higher plants show a wide range of leaf lifespan (LL) variability. LL is calculated as a sum of functional LL(f) (corresponding to the time of active photosynthesis and CO2 accumulation in the leaf) and nonfunctional LL(n) (the time of photosynthetic activity absence). For evergreen species of boreal zones, LL(n) corresponds to the period of winter rest. Photosynthetic potential of leaf (PPL), interpreted as the maximum possible amount of CO2 that can be fixed during its life, can be estimated on the basis of maximum photosynthesis rate (P(a)) dynamics during LL(f); the maximum (P(a max)) being achieved in mature leaf. Photosynthetic potential depends on LL(f) more strongly than on P(a max). The PPL/LL(f) ratio is indicative of the rate of PPL realization over leaf lifespan. As LL(f) shows strong positive correlation with LL, the latter parameter can also characterize the rate of PPL realization. Long LL(f) in evergreen species provides higher PPL, which is advantageous by comparison with deciduous ones. In evergreen species, the PPL itself is realized slower than in deciduous ones. The increase in LL(f) and LL is accompanied by the increase in leaf constructional cost (LCC(a)) as well as the decrease in photosynthesis rate. At that, photosynthesis rate per unit of dry weight (P(m)) decreases much faster than that per unit of leaf area (P(a)). Apparently, when considering dry leaf weight, the apoplast share seems to be much higher in long-living leaves of evergreen species than in short-living leaves of deciduous species. The leaf payback (LP) may be stabilized by unidirectional shifts in PPL and LCC(a). Species with short/long LL(f) and high/low PPL realization rate are typical for early/late succession stages and for habitats with the environmental conditions favorable/adverse for photosynthesis and growth. If the conditions for photosynthesis and growth are favorable, high PPL realization rate provides advantage in competition. The PPL realization rate is

  3. Agrobacterium tumefaciens is a diazotrophic bacterium

    SciTech Connect

    Kanvinde, L.; Sastry, G.R.K. )

    1990-07-01

    This is the first report that Agrobacterium tumefaciens can fix nitrogen in a free-living condition as shown by its abilities to grown on nitrogen-free medium, reduce acetylene to ethylene, and incorporate {sup 15}N supplied as {sup 15}N{sub 2}. As with most other well-characterized diazotrophic bacteria, the presence of NH{sub 4}{sup +} in the medium and aerobic conditions repress nitrogen fixation by A. tumefaciens. The system requires molybdenum. No evidence for nodulation was found with pea, peanut, or soybean plants. Further understanding of the nitrogen-fixing ability of this bacterium, which has always been considered a pathogen, should cast new light on the evolution of a pathogenic versus symbiotic relationship.

  4. Photosynthetic Machineries in Nano-Systems

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, László; Magyar, Melinda; Szabó, Tibor; Hajdu, Kata; Giotta, Livia; Dorogi, Márta; Milano, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Photosynthetic reaction centres are membrane-spanning proteins, found in several classes of autotroph organisms, where a photoinduced charge separation and stabilization takes place with a quantum efficiency close to unity. The protein remains stable and fully functional also when extracted and purified in detergents thereby biotechnological applications are possible, for example, assembling it in nano-structures or in optoelectronic systems. Several types of bionanocomposite materials have been assembled by using reaction centres and different carrier matrices for different purposes in the field of light energy conversion (e.g., photovoltaics) or biosensing (e.g., for specific detection of pesticides). In this review we will summarize the current status of knowledge, the kinds of applications available and the difficulties to be overcome in the different applications. We will also show possible research directions for the close future in this specific field. PMID:24678673

  5. [An efficient mutational method for photosynthetic bacteria].

    PubMed

    Lin, J Q; Xiao, M; Long, M T; Han, B; Quian, W; Du, J

    2006-01-01

    The pigment and auxotrophic mutants of Rhodobacter sphaeroides Y6 were obtained by treatment with ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) followed by lithium chloride (LiCI). Treatment with 0.081 M EPS and subsequent treatment with 0.071 M LiCI resulted in 12% higher frequency of pigment mutations than application of 0.081 M EMS alone; the frequency of auxotrophic mutations increased 2.5-fold when treatment with lithium chloride was applied. A blue shift 10 nm was recorded in the absorption spectrum of carotenoids form YM5-3 green mutant; considerable accumulation of neurosporine was revealed by HPLC and mass spectrometry. The method is efficient for isolating mutants of photosynthetic bacteria.

  6. Phytoplankton strategies for photosynthetic energy allocation.

    PubMed

    Halsey, Kimberly H; Jones, Bethan M

    2015-01-01

    Phytoplankton physiology is dynamic and highly responsive to the environment. Phytoplankton acclimate to changing environmental conditions by a complex reallocation of carbon and energy through metabolic pathways to optimize growth. Considering the tremendous diversity of phytoplankton, it is not surprising that different phytoplankton taxa use different strategies to partition carbon and energy resources. It has therefore been satisfying to discover that general principles of energetic stoichiometry appear to govern these complex processes and can be broadly applied to interpret phytoplankton distributions, productivity, and food web dynamics. The expectation of future changes in aquatic environments brought on by climate change warrants gathering knowledge about underlying patterns of photosynthetic energy allocation and their impacts on community structure and ecosystem productivity.

  7. Mapping the spectral variability in photosynthetic and non-photosynthetic vegetation, soils, and shade using AVIRIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Dar A.; Smith, Milton O.; Sabol, Donald E.; Adams, John B.; Ustin, Susan L.

    1992-01-01

    The primary objective of this research was to map as many spectrally distinct types of green vegetation (GV), non-photosynthetic vegetation (NPV), shade, and soil (endmembers) in an Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) scene as is warranted by the spectral variability of the data. Once determined, a secondary objective was to interpret these endmembers and their abundances spatially and spectrally in an ecological context.

  8. Synthetic Antenna Functioning As Light Harvester in the Whole Visible Region for Enhanced Hybrid Photosynthetic Reaction Centers.

    PubMed

    Hassan Omar, Omar; la Gatta, Simona; Tangorra, Rocco Roberto; Milano, Francesco; Ragni, Roberta; Operamolla, Alessandra; Argazzi, Roberto; Chiorboli, Claudio; Agostiano, Angela; Trotta, Massimo; Farinola, Gianluca M

    2016-07-20

    The photosynthetic reaction center (RC) from the Rhodobacter sphaeroides bacterium has been covalently bioconjugated with a NIR-emitting fluorophore (AE800) whose synthesis was specifically tailored to act as artificial antenna harvesting light in the entire visible region. AE800 has a broad absorption spectrum with peaks centered in the absorption gaps of the RC and its emission overlaps the most intense RC absorption bands, ensuring a consistent increase of the protein optical cross section. The covalent hybrid AE800-RC is stable and fully functional. The energy collected by the artificial antenna is transferred to the protein via FRET mechanism, and the hybrid system outperforms by a noteworthy 30% the overall photochemical activity of the native protein under the entire range of visible light. This improvement in the optical characteristic of the photoenzyme demonstrates the effectiveness of the bioconjugation approach as a suitable route to new biohybrid materials for energy conversion, photocatalysis, and biosensing.

  9. Photosynthetic characteristics of plants of a Californian cool coastal environment.

    PubMed

    Mooney, H A; Field, C; Williams, W E; Berry, J A; Björkman, O

    1983-03-01

    Herbaceous perennials native to coastal bluffs in northern California all had similar photosynthetic characteristics: moderate photosynthetic capacities, light saturation at relatively low irradiances, and low photosynthetic temperature optima. They all decreased stomatal conductance in response to decreased humidity. Though the coastal habitat generally has high humidities and cool air temperatures leaf microclimatic conditions lead frequently to large vapor-concentration gradients between leaf and air. Stomatal sensitivty to the vapor-concentration gradient may result in important plant-water conservation in this summer drought habitat.

  10. Thiocapsa imhoffii, sp. nov., an alkaliphilic purple sulfur bacterium of the family Chromatiaceae from Soap Lake, Washington (USA).

    PubMed

    Asao, Marie; Takaichi, Shinichi; Madigan, Michael T

    2007-12-01

    An alkaliphilic purple sulfur bacterium, strain SC5, was isolated from Soap Lake, a soda lake located in east central Washington state (USA). Cells of strain SC5 were gram-negative, non-motile, and non-gas vesiculate cocci, often observed in pairs or tetrads. In the presence of sulfide, elemental sulfur was deposited internally. Liquid cultures were pink to rose red in color. Cells contained bacteriochlorophyll a and spirilloxanthin as major photosynthetic pigments. Internal photosynthetic membranes were of the vesicular type. Optimal growth of strain SC5 occurred in the absence of NaCl (range 0-4%), pH 8.5 (range pH 7.5-9.5), and 32 degrees C. Photoheterotrophic growth occurred in the presence of sulfide or thiosulfate with only a limited number of organic carbon sources. Growth factors were not required, and cells could fix N2. Dark, microaerobic growth occurred in the presence of both an organic carbon source and thiosulfate. Sulfide and thiosulfate served as electron donors for photoautotrophy, which required elevated levels of CO2. Phylogenetic analysis placed strain SC5 basal to the clade of the genus Thiocapsa in the family Chromatiaceae with a 96.7% sequence similarity to its closest relative, Thiocapsa roseopersicina strain 1711T (DSM217T). The unique assemblage of physiological and phylogenetic properties of strain SC5 defines it as a new species of the genus Thiocapsa, and we describe strain SC5 herein as Tca. imhoffii, sp. nov.

  11. Photoinhibition of Phaeocystis globosa resulting from oxidative stress induced by a marine algicidal bacterium Bacillus sp. LP-10

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Chengwei; Guo, Xiaoyun; Li, Yi; Zhang, Huajun; Lei, Xueqian; Cai, Guanjing; Guo, Jiajia; Yu, Zhiming; Zheng, Tianling

    2015-01-01

    Harmful algal blooms caused by Phaeocystis globosa have resulted in staggering losses to coastal countries because of their world-wide distribution. Bacteria have been studied for years to control the blooms of harmful alga, however, the action mechanism of them against harmful algal cells is still not well defined. Here, a previously isolated algicidal bacterium Bacillus sp. LP-10 was used to elucidate the potential mechanism involved in the dysfunction of P. globosa algal cells at physiological and molecular levels. Our results showed Bacillus sp. LP-10 induced an obvious rise of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which was supposed to be major reason for algal cell death. Meanwhile, the results revealed a significant decrease of photosynthetic physiological indexes and apparent down-regulated of photosynthesis-related genes (psbA and rbcS) and protein (PSII reaction center protein D1), after treated by Bacillus sp. LP-10 filtrates, suggesting photoinhibition occurred in the algal cells. Furthermore, our results indicated that light played important roles in the algal cell death. Our work demonstrated that the major lethal reason of P. globosa cells treated by the algicidal bacterium was the photoinhibition resulted from oxidative stress induced by Bacillus sp. LP-10. PMID:26601700

  12. Heavy Metal Coprecipitation with Hydrozincite [Zn5(CO3)2(OH)6] from Mine Waters Caused by Photosynthetic Microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Podda, Francesca; Zuddas, Paola; Minacci, Andrea; Pepi, Milva; Baldi, Franco

    2000-01-01

    An iron-poor stream of nearly neutral pH polluted by mine tailings has been investigated for a natural phenomenon responsible for the polishing of heavy metals in mine wastewaters. A white mineralized mat, which was determined to be hydrozincite [Zn5(CO3)2(OH)6] by X-ray diffraction analysis, was observed in the stream sediments mainly in spring. The precipitate shows a total organic matter residue of 10% dry weight and contains high concentrations of Pb, Cd, Ni, Cu, and other metals. Scanning electron microscopy analysis suggests that hydrozincite is mainly of biological origin. Dormant photosynthetic microorganisms have been retrieved from 1-year-old dry hydrozincite. The autofluorescent microorganisms were imaged by a scanning confocal laser microscope. A photosynthetic filamentous bacterium, classified as Scytonema sp. strain ING-1, was found associated with microalga Chlorella sp. strain SA1. This microbial community is responsible for the natural polishing of heavy metals in the water stream by coprecipitation with hydrozincite. PMID:11055969

  13. Bacteriochlorophyll aggregates self-assembled on functionalized gold nanorod cores as mimics of photosynthetic chlorosomal antennae: a single molecule study.

    PubMed

    Furumaki, Shu; Vacha, Frantisek; Hirata, Shuzo; Vacha, Martin

    2014-03-25

    We prepare artificial aggregates that mimic the structure and function of natural chlorosomal light harvesting complexes of green photosynthetic bacteria. Gold nanorods functionalized with hydroxyl groups and immobilized on a substrate serve as cores for the growth of bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) aggregates from a buffer solution. The BChl pigments form large self-assembled aggregate particles with sizes more than twice that of natural chlorosomes. The size is controllable by the aggregation time. The aggregates are characterized on a single-particle level by atomic force microscopy, electron microscopy, and single-molecule spectroscopy. The absorption and fluorescence spectral properties which reflect the molecular level arrangement of the BChl aggregates closely resemble those of the natural chlorosomes of the photosynthetic bacterium Chlorobaculum tepidum. On the other hand, the results of linear dichroism and circular dichroism are different from those of the chlorosomes and indicate a different mesoscopic structure for the artificial aggregates. These results emphasize the structural role played by the baseplate pigment-protein complex in natural chlorosomes.

  14. Hydrogen Biogeochemistry in Anaerobic and Photosynthetic Ecosystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoehler, Tori M.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    culture studies. Our recent work has extended the study of hydrogen to cyanobacterial mat communities. The large amounts of reducing power generated during photosynthetic activity carry the potential to contribute a swamping term to the H2 economy of the anaerobic microbial populations within the mat - and thereby to alter the population structure and biogeochemical function of the mat as a whole. In hypersaline microbial mats, we observe a distinct diel cycle in H2 production and a substantial corresponding flux. On an early Earth dominated by microbial mats, this transmission of photosynthetic reducing power may have carried important implications for both biospheric and atmospheric evolution.

  15. Mapping of Photosynthetic Pigments in Spanish Reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peña-Martinez, R.; Domínguez-Gómez, J.-A.; de Hoyos, C.; Ruiz-Verdú, A.

    2004-05-01

    We present the preliminary results of the first stage of the project AO-594, which comprises the development and calibration of algorithms for photosynthetic pigment mapping in Spanish reservoirs. In the years 2001-2002, an extensive field campaign was made in 36 reservoirs and lakes in order to obtain a database of Rrs spectra (400-1000 nm), photosynthetic pigments concentration and phytoplankton composition. The sampled water bodies cover a wide range of environmental conditions, trophic levels and phytoplankton communities. As a first approach in algorithm development, we have explored the relationships between ratios of MERIS bands and pigment concentrations through simple linear regression analysis. The bands have been selected based on the spectral properties of each pigment and a peak analysis of the Rrs spectra. For chlorophyll a, we have found a very good linear relationship (R2 =0.919) using the ratio between bands 9 and 7. Similar results are found using band 8 instead of 7. In any case, the model derived for the whole range of concentrations (0-500 mg m3 ) fails for low values (<15 mg m-3 ). Possible solutions include the use of - non-linear models or the use of two different models depending on the ratio values. For cyanobacteria detection, the ratio between bands 9 and 6 (the later centred at 620 nm) shows a good correlation (R2 =0.723) with phycocyanin concentration measured fluorometrically, and better (R2 =0.945) with zeaxanthin measured using HPLC. The correlation of other indicator pigments with MERIS band ratios is less strong, but is still possible to develop algorithms accurate enough for bloom monitoring. We also discuss the problems found with the L2 MERIS reflectance imagery that we have tried to use for model calibration. We present the results of the study carried on six reservoirs in northeastern Spain. In a date coincident with a MERIS image (June 19th, 2003) we have collected pigment concentration and reflectance data measured from a

  16. Characterizations of intracellular arsenic in a bacterium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfe-Simon, F.; Yannone, S. M.; Tainer, J. A.

    2011-12-01

    Life requires a key set of chemical elements to sustain growth. Yet, a growing body of literature suggests that microbes can alter their nutritional requirements based on the availability of these chemical elements. Under limiting conditions for one element microbes have been shown to utilize a variety of other elements to serve similar functions often (but not always) in similar molecular structures. Well-characterized elemental exchanges include manganese for iron, tungsten for molybdenum and sulfur for phosphorus or oxygen. These exchanges can be found in a wide variety of biomolecules ranging from protein to lipids and DNA. Recent evidence suggested that arsenic, as arsenate or As(V), was taken up and incorporated into the cellular material of the bacterium GFAJ-1. The evidence was interpreted to support As(V) acting in an analogous role to phosphate. We will therefore discuss our ongoing efforts to characterize intracellular arsenate and how it may partition among the cellular fractions of the microbial isolate GFAJ-1 when exposed to As(V) in the presence of various levels of phosphate. Under high As(V) conditions, cells express a dramatically different proteome than when grown given only phosphate. Ongoing studies on the diversity and potential role of proteins and metabolites produced in the presence of As(V) will be reported. These investigations promise to inform the role and additional metabolic potential for As in biology. Arsenic assimilation into biomolecules contributes to the expanding set of chemical elements utilized by microbes in unusual environmental niches.

  17. Cultivar variation in cotton photosynthetic performance under different temperature regimes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) yields are impacted by overall photosynthetic production. Factors that influence crop photosynthesis are the plants genetic makeup and the environmental conditions. This study investigated cultivar variation in photosynthesis when plants were grown in the field under...

  18. Towards autotrophic tissue engineering: Photosynthetic gene therapy for regeneration.

    PubMed

    Chávez, Myra Noemi; Schenck, Thilo Ludwig; Hopfner, Ursula; Centeno-Cerdas, Carolina; Somlai-Schweiger, Ian; Schwarz, Christian; Machens, Hans-Günther; Heikenwalder, Mathias; Bono, María Rosa; Allende, Miguel L; Nickelsen, Jörg; Egaña, José Tomás

    2016-01-01

    The use of artificial tissues in regenerative medicine is limited due to hypoxia. As a strategy to overcome this drawback, we have shown that photosynthetic biomaterials can produce and provide oxygen independently of blood perfusion by generating chimeric animal-plant tissues during dermal regeneration. In this work, we demonstrate the safety and efficacy of photosynthetic biomaterials in vivo after engraftment in a fully immunocompetent mouse skin defect model. Further, we show that it is also possible to genetically engineer such photosynthetic scaffolds to deliver other key molecules in addition to oxygen. As a proof-of-concept, biomaterials were loaded with gene modified microalgae expressing the angiogenic recombinant protein VEGF. Survival of the algae, growth factor delivery and regenerative potential were evaluated in vitro and in vivo. This work proposes the use of photosynthetic gene therapy in regenerative medicine and provides scientific evidence for the use of engineered microalgae as an alternative to deliver recombinant molecules for gene therapy.

  19. Augmenting iron accumulation in cassava by the beneficial soil bacterium Bacillus subtilis (GBO3)

    PubMed Central

    Freitas, Mônica A.; Medeiros, Flavio H. V.; Carvalho, Samuel P.; Guilherme, Luiz R. G.; Teixeira, William D.; Zhang, Huiming; Paré, Paul W.

    2015-01-01

    Cassava (Manihot esculenta), a major staple food in the developing world, provides a basic carbohydrate diet for over half a billion people living in the tropics. Despite the iron abundance in most soils, cassava provides insufficient iron for humans as the edible roots contain 3–12 times less iron than other traditional food crops such as wheat, maize, and rice. With the recent identification that the beneficial soil bacterium Bacillus subtilis (strain GB03) activates iron acquisition machinery to increase metal ion assimilation in Arabidopsis, the question arises as to whether this plant-growth promoting rhizobacterium also augments iron assimilation to increase endogenous iron levels in cassava. Biochemical analyses reveal that shoot-propagated cassava with GB03-inoculation exhibit elevated iron accumulation after 140 days of plant growth as determined by X-ray microanalysis and total foliar iron analysis. Growth promotion and increased photosynthetic efficiency were also observed for greenhouse-grown plants with GB03-exposure. These results demonstrate the potential of microbes to increase iron accumulation in an important agricultural crop and is consistent with idea that microbial signaling can regulate plant photosynthesis. PMID:26300897

  20. Quantitative proteomics of Chlorobaculum tepidum: insights into the sulfur metabolism of a phototrophic green sulfur bacterium.

    PubMed

    Falkenby, Lasse G; Szymanska, Monika; Holkenbrink, Carina; Habicht, Kirsten S; Andersen, Jens S; Miller, Mette; Frigaard, Niels-Ulrik

    2011-10-01

    Chlorobaculum (Cba.) tepidum is a green sulfur bacterium that oxidizes sulfide, elemental sulfur, and thiosulfate for photosynthetic growth. To gain insight into the sulfur metabolism, the proteome of Cba. tepidum cells sampled under different growth conditions has been quantified using a rapid gel-free, filter-aided sample preparation (FASP) protocol with an in-solution isotopic labeling strategy. Among the 2245 proteins predicted from the Cba. tepidum genome, approximately 970 proteins were detected in unlabeled samples, whereas approximately 630-640 proteins were detected in labeled samples comparing two different growth conditions. Wild-type cells growing on thiosulfate had an increased abundance of periplasmic cytochrome c-555 and proteins of the periplasmic thiosulfate-oxidizing SOX enzyme system when compared with cells growing on sulfide. A dsrM mutant of Cba. tepidum, which lacks the dissimilatory sulfite reductase DsrM protein and therefore is unable to oxidize sulfur globules to sulfite, was also investigated. When compared with wild type, the dsrM cells exhibited an increased abundance of DSR enzymes involved in the initial steps of sulfur globule oxidation (DsrABCL) and a decreased abundance of enzymes putatively involved in sulfite oxidation (Sat-AprAB-QmoABC). The results show that Cba. tepidum regulates the cellular levels of enzymes involved in sulfur metabolism and other electron-transferring processes in response to the availability of reduced sulfur compounds.

  1. Renewable hydrogen production by photosynthetic water splitting

    SciTech Connect

    Greenbaum, E.; Lee, J.W.

    1998-06-01

    This mission-oriented research project is focused on the production of renewable hydrogen. The authors have demonstrated that certain unicellular green algae are capable of sustained simultaneous photoproduction of hydrogen and oxygen by light-activated photosynthetic water splitting. It is the goal of this project to develop a practical chemical engineering system for the development of an economic process that can be used to produce renewable hydrogen. There are several fundamental problems that need to be solved before the application of this scientific knowledge can be applied to the development a practical process: (I) maximizing net thermodynamic conversion efficiency of light energy into hydrogen energy, (2) development of oxygen-sensitive hydrogenase-containing mutants, and (3) development of bioreactors that can be used in a real-world chemical engineering process. The authors are addressing each of these problems here at ORNL and in collaboration with their research colleagues at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, the University of California, Berkeley, and the University of Hawaii. This year the authors have focused on item 1 above. In particular, they have focused on the question of how many light reactions are required to split water to molecular hydrogen and oxygen.

  2. Photocurrent of a single photosynthetic protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerster, Daniel; Reichert, Joachim; Bi, Hai; Barth, Johannes V.; Kaniber, Simone M.; Holleitner, Alexander W.; Visoly-Fisher, Iris; Sergani, Shlomi; Carmeli, Itai

    2012-10-01

    Photosynthesis is used by plants, algae and bacteria to convert solar energy into stable chemical energy. The initial stages of this process--where light is absorbed and energy and electrons are transferred--are mediated by reaction centres composed of chlorophyll and carotenoid complexes. It has been previously shown that single small molecules can be used as functional components in electric and optoelectronic circuits, but it has proved difficult to control and probe individual molecules for photovoltaic and photoelectrochemical applications. Here, we show that the photocurrent generated by a single photosynthetic protein--photosystem I--can be measured using a scanning near-field optical microscope set-up. One side of the protein is anchored to a gold surface that acts as an electrode, and the other is contacted by a gold-covered glass tip. The tip functions as both counter electrode and light source. A photocurrent of ~10 pA is recorded from the covalently bound single-protein junctions, which is in agreement with the internal electron transfer times of photosystem I.

  3. Multiantenna artificial photosynthetic reaction center complex.

    PubMed

    Terazono, Yuichi; Kodis, Gerdenis; Liddell, Paul A; Garg, Vikas; Moore, Thomas A; Moore, Ana L; Gust, Devens

    2009-05-21

    In order to ensure efficient utilization of the solar spectrum, photosynthetic organisms use a variety of antenna chromophores to absorb light and transfer excitation to a reaction center, where photoinduced charge separation occurs. Reported here is a synthetic molecular heptad that features two bis(phenylethynyl)anthracene and two borondipyrromethene antennas linked to a hexaphenylbenzene core that also bears two zinc porphyrins. A fullerene electron acceptor self-assembles to both porhyrins via dative bonds. Excitation energy is transferred very efficiently from all four antennas to the porphyrins. Singlet-singlet energy transfer occurs both directly and by a stepwise funnel-like pathway wherein excitation moves down a thermodynamic gradient. The porphyrin excited states donate an electron to the fullerene with a time constant of 3 ps to generate a charge-separated state with a lifetime of 230 ps. The overall quantum yield is close to unity. In the absence of the fullerene, the porphyrin excited singlet state donates an electron to a borondipyrromethene on a slower time scale. This molecule demonstrates that by incorporating antennas, it is possible for a molecular system to harvest efficiently light throughout the visible from ultraviolet wavelengths out to approximately 650 nm.

  4. Light gradients in spherical photosynthetic vesicles.

    PubMed

    Paillotin, G; Leibl, W; Gapiński, J; Breton, J; Dobek, A

    1998-07-01

    Light-gradient photovoltage measurements were performed on EDTA-treated thylakoids and on osmotically swollen thylakoids (blebs), both of spherical symmetry but of different sizes. In the case of EDTA vesicles, a negative polarity (due to the normal light gradient) was observed in the blue range of the absorption spectrum, and a positive polarity, corresponding to an inverse light gradient, was observed at lambda = 530 and lambda = 682 nm. The sign of the photovoltage polarity measured in large blebs (swollen thylakoids) is the same as that obtained for whole chloroplasts, although differences in the amplitudes are observed. An approach based on the use of polar coordinates was adapted for a theoretical description of these membrane systems of spherical symmetry. The light intensity distribution and the photovoltage in such systems were calculated. Fits to the photovoltage amplitudes, measured as a function of light wavelength, made it possible to derive the values of the dielectric constant of the protein, epsilons = 3, and the refractive index of the photosynthetic membrane for light propagating perpendicular and parallel to the membrane surface, nt = 1.42 and nn = 1.60, respectively. The latter two values determine the birefringence of the biological membrane, Deltan = nn - nt = 0.18.

  5. Plasmidless, photosynthetically incompetent mutants of Rhodospirillum rubrum.

    PubMed Central

    Kuhl, S A; Wimer, L T; Yoch, D C

    1984-01-01

    Ethyl methanesulfonate rendered a high percentage of Rhodospirillum rubrum cells plasmidless and photosynthetically incompetent (Kuhl et al., J. Bacteriol. 156:737-742, 1983). By probing restriction endonuclease-digested chromosomal DNA from these plasmidless strains with 32P-labeled R. rubrum plasmid DNA, we showed that no homology exists between the plasmid and the chromosomal DNA of the mutant. Loss of the plasmid in all the nonphotosynthetic isolates was accompanied by the synthesis of spirilloxanthin under aerobic growth conditions, resistance to cycloserine and HgCl2, and loss of ability to grow fermentatively on fructose. Changes in both the protein and lipid composition of the membranes and the impaired uptake of 203HgCl2 in the plasmidless strains (compared with the wild type) suggest either that membrane modification occurs as a result of plasmid loss, accounting for several of the acquired phenotype characteristics of the cured strains, or that both membrane modification and plasmid loss are part of the same pleiotropic mutation. Images PMID:6434514

  6. ENHANCED PRACTICAL PHOTOSYNTHETIC CO2 MITIGATION

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. David J. Bayless; Dr. Morgan Vis; Dr. Gregory Kremer; Dr. Michael Prudich; Dr. Keith Cooksey; Dr. Jeff Muhs

    2001-01-16

    This is the first quarterly report of the project Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO{sub 2} Mitigation. The official project start date, 10/02/2000, was delayed until 10/31/2000 due to an intellectual property dispute that was resolved. However, the delay forced a subsequent delay in subcontracting with Montana State University, which then delayed obtaining a sampling permit from Yellowstone National Park. However, even with these delays, the project moved forward with some success. Accomplishments for this quarter include: Culturing of thermophilic organisms from Yellowstone; Testing of mesophilic organisms in extreme CO{sub 2} conditions; Construction of a second test bed for additional testing; Purchase of a total carbon analyzer dedicated to the project; Construction of a lighting container for Oak Ridge National Laboratory optical fiber testing; Modified lighting of existing test box to provide more uniform distribution; Testing of growth surface adhesion and properties; Experimentation on water-jet harvesting techniques; and Literature review underway regarding uses of biomass after harvesting. Plans for next quarter's work and an update on the project's web page are included in the conclusions.

  7. Photosynthetic light harvesting: excitons and coherence

    PubMed Central

    Fassioli, Francesca; Dinshaw, Rayomond; Arpin, Paul C.; Scholes, Gregory D.

    2014-01-01

    Photosynthesis begins with light harvesting, where specialized pigment–protein complexes transform sunlight into electronic excitations delivered to reaction centres to initiate charge separation. There is evidence that quantum coherence between electronic excited states plays a role in energy transfer. In this review, we discuss how quantum coherence manifests in photosynthetic light harvesting and its implications. We begin by examining the concept of an exciton, an excited electronic state delocalized over several spatially separated molecules, which is the most widely available signature of quantum coherence in light harvesting. We then discuss recent results concerning the possibility that quantum coherence between electronically excited states of donors and acceptors may give rise to a quantum coherent evolution of excitations, modifying the traditional incoherent picture of energy transfer. Key to this (partially) coherent energy transfer appears to be the structure of the environment, in particular the participation of non-equilibrium vibrational modes. We discuss the open questions and controversies regarding quantum coherent energy transfer and how these can be addressed using new experimental techniques. PMID:24352671

  8. ENHANCED PRACTICAL PHOTOSYNTHETIC CO2 MITIGATION

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Gregory Kremer; Dr. David J. Bayless; Dr. Morgan Vis; Dr. Michael Prudich; Dr. Keith Cooksey; Dr. Jeff Muhs

    2001-07-25

    This quarterly report documents significant achievements in the Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO{sub 2} Mitigation project during the period from 4/03/2001 through 7/02/2001. Most of the achievements are milestones in our efforts to complete the tasks and subtasks that constitute the project objectives. Note that this version of the quarterly technical report is a revision to add the reports from subcontractors Montana State and Oak Ridge National Laboratories The significant accomplishments for this quarter include: Development of an experimental plan and initiation of experiments to create a calibration curve that correlates algal chlorophyll levels with carbon levels (to simplify future experimental procedures); Completion of debugging of the slug flow reactor system, and development of a plan for testing the pressure drop of the slug flow reactor; Design and development of a new bioreactor screen design which integrates the nutrient delivery drip system and the harvesting system; Development of an experimental setup for testing the new integrated drip system/harvesting system; Completion of model-scale bioreactor tests examining the effects of CO{sub 2} concentration levels and lighting levels on Nostoc 86-3 growth rates; Completion of the construction of a larger model-scale bioreactor to improve and expand testing capabilities and initiation of tests; Substantial progress on construction of a pilot-scale bioreactor; and Preliminary economic analysis of photobioreactor deployment. Plans for next quarter's work are included in the conclusions. A preliminary economic analysis is included as an appendix.

  9. Supplemental photosynthetic lighting for greenhouse tomato production

    SciTech Connect

    Godfriaux, B.L.; Wittman, W.K. ); Janes, H.W.; McAvoy, R.J.; Putman, J.; Logendra, S. . Dept. of Horticulture and Forestry); Mears, D.R.; Giacommelli, G.; Giniger, M. . Dept. of Biological and Agricultural Engineering)

    1989-12-01

    The influence of supplemental light on the growth and productivity of greenhouse tomatoes grown to a single cluster on movable benches is examined, and the economic feasibility of such a system is evaluated. Experiments were conducted to quantify the tomato plants' response to various levels of supplemental light in terms of growth rate and yield at various stages in their development (e.g., seedling, flowering plant, etc.). The 1984--85 experiments showed that supplemental photosynthetic lighting nearly doubled tomato yields, from 0.48 to 0.86 lbs/plant. Subsequent experiments in 1985--86 identified the best tomato varieties for this treatment and further increased yields to 1.3 lbs/plant. In addition, the use of supplemental lighting was found to hasten tomato crop maturity. An economic analysis was performed on the 1985--86 empirical data using the tax rates and provisions then in force. It indicated that a 10-acre greenhouse could provide an after-tax internal rate of return of 10% to 12% using only equity financing. This return could likely be increased to 15--18% with the use of combined debt/equity financing. Using supplemental lighting on 10,000 acres of greenhouse production would require an estimated 7.5 billion kWh of additional electricity per year and, at 4.7 cents/kWh, generate an estimated $350 million in additional utility revenues. 48 refs., 34 figs., 24 tabs.

  10. Fluctuating Two-State Light Harvesting in a Photosynthetic Membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Duohai; Hu, Dehong; Liu, Ruchuan; Zeng, Xiaohua; Kaplan, Samuel; Lu, H. Peter

    2007-06-28

    How light is converted into chemical energy in a natural photosynthetic system is of great interest in energy sciences. Using single-molecule and single-vesicle fluorescence spectroscopy and imaging, we have observed fluctuating inter-molecular protein energy transfers in the photosynthetic membranes of R. sphaeroides. Our results suggest that there are dynamic coupled and non-coupled states in the light-harvesting protein assembly.

  11. On the photosynthetic potential in the very Early Archean oceans.

    PubMed

    Avila, Daile; Cardenas, Rolando; Martin, Osmel

    2013-02-01

    In this work we apply a mathematical model of photosynthesis to quantify the potential for photosynthetic life in the very Early Archean oceans. We assume the presence of oceanic blockers of ultraviolet radiation, specifically ferrous ions. For this scenario, our results suggest a potential for photosynthetic life greater than or similar to that in later eras/eons, such as the Late Archean and the current Phanerozoic eon.

  12. Microaerophilic growth and induction of the photosynthetic reaction center in Rhodopseudomonas viridis

    SciTech Connect

    Lang, F.S.; Oesterhelt, D.

    1989-05-01

    Rhodopseudomonas viridis was grown in liquid culture at 30 degrees C anaerobically in light (generation time, 13 h) and under microaerophilic growth conditions in the dark (generation time, 24 h). The bacterium could be cloned at the same temperature anaerobically in light (1 week) and aerobically in the dark (3 to 4 weeks) if oxygen was limited to 0.1%. Oxygen could not be replaced by dimethyl sulfoxide, potassium nitrate, or sodium nitrite as a terminal electron acceptor. No growth was observed anaerobically in darkness or in the light when air was present. A variety of additional carbon sources were used to supplement the standard succinate medium, but enhanced stationary-phase cell density was observed only with glucose. Conditions for induction of the photosynthetic reaction center upon the change from microaerophilic to phototrophic growth conditions were investigated and optimized for a mutant functionally defective in phototrophic growth. R. viridis consumed about 20-fold its cell volume of oxygen per hour during respiration. The MICs of ampicillin, kanamycin, streptomycin, tetracycline, 1-methyl-3-nitro-1-nitrosoguanidine, and terbutryn were determined.

  13. Hydrogen photoproduction by use of photosynthetic organisms and biomimetic systems.

    PubMed

    Allakhverdiev, Suleyman I; Kreslavski, Vladimir D; Thavasi, Velmurugan; Zharmukhamedov, Sergei K; Klimov, Vyacheslav V; Nagata, Toshi; Nishihara, Hiroshi; Ramakrishna, Seeram

    2009-02-01

    Hydrogen can be important clean fuel for future. Among different technologies for hydrogen production, oxygenic natural and artificial photosyntheses using direct photochemistry in synthetic complexes have a great potential to produce hydrogen, since both use clean and cheap sources: water and solar energy. Artificial photosynthesis is one way to produce hydrogen from water using sunlight by employing biomimetic complexes. However, splitting of water into protons and oxygen is energetically demanding and chemically difficult. In oxygenic photosynthetic microorganisms such as algae and cyanobacteria, water is split into electrons and protons, which during primary photosynthetic process are redirected by photosynthetic electron transport chain, and ferredoxin, to the hydrogen-producing enzymes hydrogenase or nitrogenase. By these enzymes, e- and H+ recombine and form gaseous hydrogen. Biohydrogen activity of hydrogenase can be very high but it is extremely sensitive to photosynthetic O2. In contrast, nitrogenase is insensitive to O2, but has lower activity. At the moment, the efficiency of biohydrogen production is low. However, theoretical expectations suggest that the rates of photon conversion efficiency for H2 bioproduction can be high enough (>10%). Our review examines the main pathways of H2 photoproduction by using of photosynthetic organisms and biomimetic photosynthetic systems.

  14. Rice photosynthetic productivity and PSII photochemistry under nonflooded irrigation.

    PubMed

    He, Haibing; Yang, Ru; Jia, Biao; Chen, Lin; Fan, Hua; Cui, Jing; Yang, Dong; Li, Menglong; Ma, Fu-Yu

    2014-01-01

    Nonflooded irrigation is an important water-saving rice cultivation technology, but little is known on its photosynthetic mechanism. The aims of this work were to investigate photosynthetic characteristics of rice during grain filling stage under three nonflooded irrigation treatments: furrow irrigation with plastic mulching (FIM), furrow irrigation with nonmulching (FIN), and drip irrigation with plastic mulching (DI). Compared with the conventional flooding (CF) treatment, those grown in the nonflooded irrigation treatments showed lower net photosynthetic rate (PN), lower maximum quantum yield (Fv/Fm), and lower effective quantum yield of PSII photochemistry (ΦPSII). And the poor photosynthetic characteristics in the nonflooded irrigation treatments were mainly attributed to the low total nitrogen content (TNC). Under non-flooded irrigation, the PN, Fv/Fm, and ΦPSII significantly decreased with a reduction in the soil water potential, but these parameters were rapidly recovered in the DI and FIM treatments when supplementary irrigation was applied. Moreover, The DI treatment always had higher photosynthetic productivity than the FIM and FIN treatments. Grain yield, matter translocation, and dry matter post-anthesis (DMPA) were the highest in the CF treatment, followed by the DI, FIM, and FIN treatments in turn. In conclusion, increasing nitrogen content in leaf of rice plants could be a key factor to improve photosynthetic capacity in nonflooded irrigation.

  15. Rice Photosynthetic Productivity and PSII Photochemistry under Nonflooded Irrigation

    PubMed Central

    He, Haibing; Yang, Ru; Jia, Biao; Chen, Lin; Fan, Hua; Cui, Jing; Yang, Dong; Li, Menglong; Ma, Fu-Yu

    2014-01-01

    Nonflooded irrigation is an important water-saving rice cultivation technology, but little is known on its photosynthetic mechanism. The aims of this work were to investigate photosynthetic characteristics of rice during grain filling stage under three nonflooded irrigation treatments: furrow irrigation with plastic mulching (FIM), furrow irrigation with nonmulching (FIN), and drip irrigation with plastic mulching (DI). Compared with the conventional flooding (CF) treatment, those grown in the nonflooded irrigation treatments showed lower net photosynthetic rate (PN), lower maximum quantum yield (Fv/Fm), and lower effective quantum yield of PSII photochemistry (ΦPSII). And the poor photosynthetic characteristics in the nonflooded irrigation treatments were mainly attributed to the low total nitrogen content (TNC). Under non-flooded irrigation, the PN, Fv/Fm, and ΦPSII significantly decreased with a reduction in the soil water potential, but these parameters were rapidly recovered in the DI and FIM treatments when supplementary irrigation was applied. Moreover, The DI treatment always had higher photosynthetic productivity than the FIM and FIN treatments. Grain yield, matter translocation, and dry matter post-anthesis (DMPA) were the highest in the CF treatment, followed by the DI, FIM, and FIN treatments in turn. In conclusion, increasing nitrogen content in leaf of rice plants could be a key factor to improve photosynthetic capacity in nonflooded irrigation. PMID:24741364

  16. Electrochemical and optical studies of model photosynthetic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-15

    The objective of this research is to obtain a better understanding of the relationship between the structural organization of photosynthetic pigments and their spectroscopic and electrochemical properties. Defined model systems were studied first. These included the least ordered (solutions) through the most highly ordered (Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) monolayers and self-assembled monolayers) systems containing BChl, BPheo, and UQ. Molecules other than the photosynthetic pigments and quinones were also examined, including chromophores (i.e. surface active cyanine dyes and phtahlocyanines) an redox active compounds (methyl viologen (MV) and surfactant ferrocenes), in order to develop the techniques needed to study the photosynthetic components. Because the chlorophylls are photosensitive and labile, it was easier first to develop procedures using stable species. Three different techniques were used to characterize these model systems. These included electrochemical techniques for determining the standard oxidation and reduction potentials of the photosynthetic components as well as methods for determining the heterogeneous electron transfer rate constants for BChl and BPheo at metal electrodes (Pt and Au). Resonance Raman (RR) and surface enhanced resonance Raman (SERR) spectroscopy were used to determine the spectra of the photosynthetic pigments and model compounds. SERRS was also used to study several types of photosynthetic preparations.

  17. Hydraulic basis for the evolution of photosynthetic productivity.

    PubMed

    Scoffoni, Christine; Chatelet, David S; Pasquet-Kok, Jessica; Rawls, Michael; Donoghue, Michael J; Edwards, Erika J; Sack, Lawren

    2016-05-27

    Clarifying the evolution and mechanisms for photosynthetic productivity is a key to both improving crops and understanding plant evolution and habitat distributions. Current theory recognizes a role for the hydraulics of water transport as a potential determinant of photosynthetic productivity based on comparative data across disparate species. However, there has never been rigorous support for the maintenance of this relationship during an evolutionary radiation. We tested this theory for 30 species of Viburnum, diverse in leaf shape and photosynthetic anatomy, grown in a common garden. We found strong support for a fundamental requirement for leaf hydraulic capacity (Kleaf) in determining photosynthetic capacity (Amax), as these traits diversified across this lineage in tight coordination, with their proportionality modulated by the climate experienced in the species' range. Variation in Kleaf arose from differences in venation architecture that influenced xylem and especially outside-xylem flow pathways. These findings substantiate an evolutionary basis for the coordination of hydraulic and photosynthetic physiology across species, and their co-dependence on climate, establishing a fundamental role for water transport in the evolution of the photosynthetic rate.

  18. Taxonomic characterization of the cellulose-degrading bacterium NCIB 10462

    SciTech Connect

    Dees, C.; Ringleberg, D.; Scott, T.C.; Phelps, T.

    1994-06-01

    The gram negative cellulase-producing bacterium NCIB 10462 has been previously named Pseudomonas fluorescens subsp. or var. cellulosa. Since there is renewed interest in cellulose-degrading bacteria for use in bioconversion of cellulose to chemical feed stocks and fuels, we re-examined the characteristics of this microorganism to determine its proper taxonomic characterization and to further define it`s true metabolic potential. Metabolic and physical characterization of NCIB 10462 revealed that this was an alkalophilic, non-fermentative, gram negative, oxidase positive, motile, cellulose-degrading bacterium. The aerobic substrate utilization profile of this bacterium was found to have few characteristics consistent with a classification of P. fluorescens with a very low probability match with the genus Sphingomonas. Total lipid analysis did not reveal that any sphingolipid bases are produced by this bacterium. NCIB 10462 was found to grow best aerobically but also grows well in complex media under reducing conditions. NCIB 10462 grew slowly under full anaerobic conditions on complex media but growth on cellulosic media was found only under aerobic conditions. Total fatty acid analysis (MIDI) of NCIB 10462 failed to group this bacterium with a known pseudomonas species. However, fatty acid analysis of the bacteria when grown at temperatures below 37{degrees}C suggest that the organism is a pseudomonad. Since a predominant characteristic of this bacterium is it`s ability to degrade cellulose, we suggest it be called Pseudomonas cellulosa.

  19. Pangenome Evolution in the Marine Bacterium Alteromonas

    PubMed Central

    López-Pérez, Mario; Rodriguez-Valera, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    We have examined a collection of the free-living marine bacterium Alteromonas genomes with cores diverging in average nucleotide identities ranging from 99.98% to 73.35%, i.e., from microbes that can be considered members of a natural clone (like in a clinical epidemiological outbreak) to borderline genus level. The genomes were largely syntenic allowing a precise delimitation of the core and flexible regions in each. The core was 1.4 Mb (ca. 30% of the typical strain genome size). Recombination rates along the core were high among strains belonging to the same species (37.7–83.7% of all nucleotide polymorphisms) but they decreased sharply between species (18.9–5.1%). Regarding the flexible genome, its main expansion occurred within the boundaries of the species, i.e., strains of the same species already have a large and diverse flexible genome. Flexible regions occupy mostly fixed genomic locations. Four large genomic islands are involved in the synthesis of strain-specific glycosydic receptors that we have called glycotypes. These genomic regions are exchanged by homologous recombination within and between species and there is evidence for their import from distant taxonomic units (other genera within the family). In addition, several hotspots for integration of gene cassettes by illegitimate recombination are distributed throughout the genome. They code for features that give each clone specific properties to interact with their ecological niche and must flow fast throughout the whole genus as they are found, with nearly identical sequences, in different species. Models for the generation of this genomic diversity involving phage predation are discussed. PMID:27189983

  20. Differential Allocation to Photosynthetic and Non-Photosynthetic Nitrogen Fractions among Native and Invasive Species

    PubMed Central

    Funk, Jennifer L.; Glenwinkel, Lori A.; Sack, Lawren

    2013-01-01

    Invasive species are expected to cluster on the “high-return” end of the leaf economic spectrum, displaying leaf traits consistent with higher carbon assimilation relative to native species. Intra-leaf nitrogen (N) allocation should support these physiological differences; however, N biochemistry has not been examined in more than a few invasive species. We measured 34 leaf traits including seven leaf N pools for five native and five invasive species from Hawaii under low irradiance to mimic the forest understory environment. We found several trait differences between native and invasive species. In particular, invasive species showed preferential N allocation to metabolism (amino acids) rather than photosynthetic light reactions (membrane-bound protein) by comparison with native species. The soluble protein concentration did not vary between groups. Under these low irradiance conditions, native species had higher light-saturated photosynthetic rates, possibly as a consequence of a greater investment in membrane-bound protein. Invasive species may succeed by employing a wide range of N allocation mechanisms, including higher amino acid production for fast growth under high irradiance or storage of N in leaves as soluble protein or amino acids. PMID:23700483

  1. Differential allocation to photosynthetic and non-photosynthetic nitrogen fractions among native and invasive species.

    PubMed

    Funk, Jennifer L; Glenwinkel, Lori A; Sack, Lawren

    2013-01-01

    Invasive species are expected to cluster on the "high-return" end of the leaf economic spectrum, displaying leaf traits consistent with higher carbon assimilation relative to native species. Intra-leaf nitrogen (N) allocation should support these physiological differences; however, N biochemistry has not been examined in more than a few invasive species. We measured 34 leaf traits including seven leaf N pools for five native and five invasive species from Hawaii under low irradiance to mimic the forest understory environment. We found several trait differences between native and invasive species. In particular, invasive species showed preferential N allocation to metabolism (amino acids) rather than photosynthetic light reactions (membrane-bound protein) by comparison with native species. The soluble protein concentration did not vary between groups. Under these low irradiance conditions, native species had higher light-saturated photosynthetic rates, possibly as a consequence of a greater investment in membrane-bound protein. Invasive species may succeed by employing a wide range of N allocation mechanisms, including higher amino acid production for fast growth under high irradiance or storage of N in leaves as soluble protein or amino acids.

  2. ENHANCED PRACTICAL PHOTOSYNTHETIC CO2 MITIGATION

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Gregory Kremer; Dr. David J. Bayless; Dr. Morgan Vis; Dr. Michael Prudich; Dr. Keith Cooksey; Dr. Jeff Muhs

    2002-10-15

    This report documents significant achievements in the Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO{sub 2} Mitigation project during the period from 10/2/2001 through 10/01/2002. This report marks the end of year 2 of a three-year project as well as the milestone date for completion of Phase I activities. This report includes our current status and defines the steps being taken to ensure that we meet the project goals by the end of year 3. As indicated in the list of accomplishments below our current efforts are focused on evaluating candidate organisms and growth surfaces, preparing to conduct long-term tests in the bench-scale bioreactor test systems, and scaling-up the test facilities from bench scale to pilot scale. Specific results and accomplishments for the third quarter of 2002 include: Organisms and Growth Surfaces: (1) Test results continue to indicate that thermophilic cyanobacteria have significant advantages as agents for practical photosynthetic CO{sub 2} mitigation before mesophilic forms. (2) Additional thermal features with developed cyanobacterial mats, which might be calcium resistant, were found in YNP. (3) Back to back tests show that there is no detectable difference in the growth of isolate 1.2 s.c. (2) in standard and Ca-modified BG-11 medium. The doubling time for both cases was about 12 hours. (4) The cultivation of cyanobacteria in Ca-BG medium should proceed in the pH range between 7 and 7.4, but this suggestion requires additional experiments. (5) Cyanobacteria can be grown in media where sodium is present at trace levels. (6) Ca{sup 2+} enriched medium can be used as a sink for CO{sub 2} under alkaline conditions. (7) Cyanobacteria are able to generate cones of filaments on travertine surfaces. [Travertine is a mixture of CaCO{sub 3} and CaSO{sub 4}]. We hypothesize that SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} stimulates the generation of such cones, because they are not almost generated on CaCO3 surface. On the other hand, we know that plant gas contains elevated

  3. Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO2 Mitigation

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory Kremer; David J. Bayless; Morgan Vis; Michael Prudich; Keith Cooksey; Jeff Muhs

    2003-10-15

    This quarterly report documents significant achievements in the Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO{sub 2} Mitigation project during the period from 7/2/2003 through 10/01/2003. As indicated in the list of accomplishments below we are preparing for the final tests necessary to meet our project goals. Specific results and accomplishments for the third quarter of 2003 include: (1) Bioreactor support systems and test facilities: (A) The solar collector used in the light delivery system showed signs of degradation and hence had to be replaced by ORNL. A set of light readings were taken after the new solar collector was installed. The readings showed an acceptable light profile. (B) The CRF-2 test system has undergone major improvements to produce the high flow rates needed for harvesting (as determined by previous experiments). The main changes to the system are new stainless steel header/frame units with increased flow capacity and a modified pipe end sealing method to improve flow uniformity, and installation and plumbing for a new high flow harvesting pump. The improvements have been completed and the system is ready for testing. (C) The pilot scale bioreactor is ready for testing pending some information from the CRF-2 tests. (2) Organisms and Growth Surfaces: (A) The shape of the Chlorogloeopsis sp. cells (cyanobacteria) was found to be affected by environmental pH, which may be useful in culture quality control. Besides, the further investigation of this phenomenon suggested that the rate of cell adhesion to glass surface decreases upon medium alkalinization. Thus, harvesting effectiveness may be improved by increasing medium pH up to 9 before harvesting of cyanobacteria from a substratum.

  4. ENHANCED PRACTICAL PHOTOSYNTHETIC CO2 MITIGATION

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory Kremer; David J. Bayless; Morgan Vis; Michael Prudich; Keith Cooksey; Jeff Muhs

    2004-01-30

    This quarterly report documents significant achievements in the Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO{sub 2} Mitigation project during the period from 10/2/2003 through 1/1/2004. As indicated in the list of accomplishments below we have seen very encouraging results from the model scale tests in terms of organism growth rates and we have begun the final tests necessary to meet our project goals. Specific results and accomplishments for the fourth quarter of 2003 include: (1) Bioreactor support systems and test facilities--(A) The solar collector is working well and has survived the winter weather. (B) The improved high-flow CRF-2 test system has been used successfully to run several long-term growth tests with periodic harvesting events. The high flow harvesting system performed well. The mass measurement results after a 4-week test show 275% growth over the initial mass loading. This figure would have been higher had there been no leakage and handling losses. Carbon dating of biomass from this test is planned for carbon uptake estimation. The next test will include direct measurement of carbon uptake in addition to organism mass measurements. (C) Qualitative organism growth testing has begun in the pilot scale bioreactor. Some issues with uniformity of organism loading, fluid leakage and evaporation have surfaced and are currently being addressed, and quantitative testing will begin as soon as these problems are resolved. (2) Organisms and Growth Surfaces--(A) Montana State University (Subcontracted to do organism studies) submitted their final (3-year) project report. An abstract of the report in included in this quarterly report.

  5. ENHANCED PRACTICAL PHOTOSYNTHETIC CO2 MITIGATION

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. David J. Bayless; Dr. Morgan Vis; Dr. Gregory Kremer; Dr. Michael Prudich; Dr. Keith Cooksey; Dr. Jeff Muhs

    2001-04-16

    This quarterly report documents significant achievements in the Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO{sub 2} Mitigation project during the period from 1/03/2001 through 4/02/2001. Many of the activities and accomplishments are continuations of work initiated and reported in last quarter's status report. Major activities and accomplishments for this quarter include: Three sites in Yellowstone National Park have been identified that may contain suitable organisms for use in a bioreactor; Full-scale culturing of one thermophilic organism from Yellowstone has progressed to the point that there is a sufficient quantity to test this organism in the model-scale bioreactor; The effects of the additive monoethanolamine on the growth of one thermophilic organism from Yellowstone has been tested; Testing of growth surface adhesion and properties is continuing; Construction of a larger model-scale bioreactor to improve and expand testing capabilities is completed and the facility is undergoing proof tests; Model-scale bioreactor tests examining the effects of CO{sub 2} concentration levels and lighting levels on organism growth rates are continuing; Alternative fiber optic based deep-penetration light delivery systems for use in the pilot-scale bioreactor have been designed, constructed and tested; An existing slug flow reactor system has been modified for use in this project, and a proof-of-concept test plan has been developed for the slug flow reactor; Research and testing of water-jet harvesting techniques is continuing, and a harvesting system has been designed for use in the model-scale bioreactor; and The investigation of comparative digital image analysis as a means for determining the ''density'' of algae on a growth surface is continuing Plans for next quarter's work and an update on the project's web page are included in the conclusions.

  6. Anaerobic energy metabolism in unicellular photosynthetic eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Atteia, Ariane; van Lis, Robert; Tielens, Aloysius G M; Martin, William F

    2013-02-01

    Anaerobic metabolic pathways allow unicellular organisms to tolerate or colonize anoxic environments. Over the past ten years, genome sequencing projects have brought a new light on the extent of anaerobic metabolism in eukaryotes. A surprising development has been that free-living unicellular algae capable of photoautotrophic lifestyle are, in terms of their enzymatic repertoire, among the best equipped eukaryotes known when it comes to anaerobic energy metabolism. Some of these algae are marine organisms, common in the oceans, others are more typically soil inhabitants. All these species are important from the ecological (O(2)/CO(2) budget), biotechnological, and evolutionary perspectives. In the unicellular algae surveyed here, mixed-acid type fermentations are widespread while anaerobic respiration, which is more typical of eukaryotic heterotrophs, appears to be rare. The presence of a core anaerobic metabolism among the algae provides insights into its evolutionary origin, which traces to the eukaryote common ancestor. The predicted fermentative enzymes often exhibit an amino acid extension at the N-terminus, suggesting that these proteins might be compartmentalized in the cell, likely in the chloroplast or the mitochondrion. The green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Chlorella NC64 have the most extended set of fermentative enzymes reported so far. Among the eukaryotes with secondary plastids, the diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana has the most pronounced anaerobic capabilities as yet. From the standpoints of genomic, transcriptomic, and biochemical studies, anaerobic energy metabolism in C. reinhardtii remains the best characterized among photosynthetic protists. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: The evolutionary aspects of bioenergetic systems.

  7. Carotenoid photoprotection in artificial photosynthetic antennas.

    PubMed

    Kloz, Miroslav; Pillai, Smitha; Kodis, Gerdenis; Gust, Devens; Moore, Thomas A; Moore, Ana L; van Grondelle, Rienk; Kennis, John T M

    2011-05-11

    of structural and environmental effects on the interactions between carotenoids and tetrapyrroles and thereby better defining their role in controlling natural photosynthetic systems.

  8. Growth and photosynthetic responses of wheat plants grown in space.

    PubMed

    Tripathy, B C; Brown, C S; Levine, H G; Krikorian, A D

    1996-03-01

    Growth and photosynthesis of wheat (Triticum aestivum L. cv Super Dwarf) plants grown onboard the space shuttle Discovery for 10 d were examined. Compared to ground control plants, the shoot fresh weight of space-grown seedlings decreased by 25%. Postflight measurements of the O2 evolution/photosynthetic photon flux density response curves of leaf samples revealed that the CO2-saturated photosynthetic rate at saturating light intensities in space-grown plants declined 25% relative to the rate in ground control plants. The relative quantum yield of CO2-saturated photosynthetic O2 evolution measured at limiting light intensities was not significantly affected. In space-grown plants, the light compensation point of the leaves increased by 33%, which likely was due to an increase (27%) in leaf dark-respiration rates. Related experiments with thylakoids isolated from space-grown plants showed that the light-saturated photosynthetic electron transport rate from H2O through photosystems II and I was reduced by 28%. These results demonstrate that photosynthetic functions are affected by the microgravity environment.

  9. Growth and photosynthetic responses of wheat plants grown in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tripathy, B. C.; Brown, C. S.; Levine, H. G.; Krikorian, A. D.

    1996-01-01

    Growth and photosynthesis of wheat (Triticum aestivum L. cv Super Dwarf) plants grown onboard the space shuttle Discovery for 10 d were examined. Compared to ground control plants, the shoot fresh weight of space-grown seedlings decreased by 25%. Postflight measurements of the O2 evolution/photosynthetic photon flux density response curves of leaf samples revealed that the CO2-saturated photosynthetic rate at saturating light intensities in space-grown plants declined 25% relative to the rate in ground control plants. The relative quantum yield of CO2-saturated photosynthetic O2 evolution measured at limiting light intensities was not significantly affected. In space-grown plants, the light compensation point of the leaves increased by 33%, which likely was due to an increase (27%) in leaf dark-respiration rates. Related experiments with thylakoids isolated from space-grown plants showed that the light-saturated photosynthetic electron transport rate from H2O through photosystems II and I was reduced by 28%. These results demonstrate that photosynthetic functions are affected by the microgravity environment.

  10. Photosynthetic terpene hydrocarbon production for fuels and chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X; Ort, DR; Yuan, JS

    2015-01-28

    Photosynthetic hydrocarbon production bypasses the traditional biomass hydrolysis process and represents the most direct conversion of sunlight energy into the next-generation biofuels. As a major class of biologically derived hydrocarbons with diverse structures, terpenes are also valuable in producing a variety of fungible bioproducts in addition to the advanced drop-in' biofuels. However, it is highly challenging to achieve the efficient redirection of photosynthetic carbon and reductant into terpene biosynthesis. In this review, we discuss four major scientific and technical barriers for photosynthetic terpene production and recent advances to address these constraints. Collectively, photosynthetic terpene production needs to be optimized in a systematic fashion, in which the photosynthesis improvement, the optimization of terpene biosynthesis pathway, the improvement of key enzymes and the enhancement of sink effect through terpene storage or secretion are all important. New advances in synthetic biology also offer a suite of potential tools to design and engineer photosynthetic terpene platforms. The systemic integration of these solutions may lead to disruptive' technologies to enable biofuels and bioproducts with high efficiency, yield and infrastructure compatibility.

  11. Growth and photosynthetic responses of wheat plants grown in space.

    PubMed Central

    Tripathy, B C; Brown, C S; Levine, H G; Krikorian, A D

    1996-01-01

    Growth and photosynthesis of wheat (Triticum aestivum L. cv Super Dwarf) plants grown onboard the space shuttle Discovery for 10 d were examined. Compared to ground control plants, the shoot fresh weight of space-grown seedlings decreased by 25%. Postflight measurements of the O2 evolution/photosynthetic photon flux density response curves of leaf samples revealed that the CO2-saturated photosynthetic rate at saturating light intensities in space-grown plants declined 25% relative to the rate in ground control plants. The relative quantum yield of CO2-saturated photosynthetic O2 evolution measured at limiting light intensities was not significantly affected. In space-grown plants, the light compensation point of the leaves increased by 33%, which likely was due to an increase (27%) in leaf dark-respiration rates. Related experiments with thylakoids isolated from space-grown plants showed that the light-saturated photosynthetic electron transport rate from H2O through photosystems II and I was reduced by 28%. These results demonstrate that photosynthetic functions are affected by the microgravity environment. PMID:8819868

  12. Optimization of Light-Harvesting Pigment Improves Photosynthetic Efficiency.

    PubMed

    Jin, Honglei; Li, Mengshu; Duan, Sujuan; Fu, Mei; Dong, Xiaoxiao; Liu, Bing; Feng, Dongru; Wang, Jinfa; Wang, Hong-Bin

    2016-11-01

    Maximizing light capture by light-harvesting pigment optimization represents an attractive but challenging strategy to improve photosynthetic efficiency. Here, we report that loss of a previously uncharacterized gene, HIGH PHOTOSYNTHETIC EFFICIENCY1 (HPE1), optimizes light-harvesting pigments, leading to improved photosynthetic efficiency and biomass production. Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) hpe1 mutants show faster electron transport and increased contents of carbohydrates. HPE1 encodes a chloroplast protein containing an RNA recognition motif that directly associates with and regulates the splicing of target RNAs of plastid genes. HPE1 also interacts with other plastid RNA-splicing factors, including CAF1 and OTP51, which share common targets with HPE1. Deficiency of HPE1 alters the expression of nucleus-encoded chlorophyll-related genes, probably through plastid-to-nucleus signaling, causing decreased total content of chlorophyll (a+b) in a limited range but increased chlorophyll a/b ratio. Interestingly, this adjustment of light-harvesting pigment reduces antenna size, improves light capture, decreases energy loss, mitigates photodamage, and enhances photosynthetic quantum yield during photosynthesis. Our findings suggest a novel strategy to optimize light-harvesting pigments that improves photosynthetic efficiency and biomass production in higher plants.

  13. Photosynthetic characteristics and organization of chlorophyll in marine dinoflagellates

    PubMed Central

    Prézelin, Barbara B.; Alberte, Randall S.

    1978-01-01

    The photosystem I reaction center complex, the P-700-chlorophyll a-protein, has been isolated from the photosynthetic membranes of two marine dinoflagellates, Gonyaulax polyedra and Glenodinium sp., by detergent solubilization with Triton X-100. The complexes isolated from the two species were indistinguishable, exhibiting identical absorption properties (400-700 nm) at both room (300 K) and low (77 K) temperature. The room temperature, red wavelength maximum was at 675 nm. The absorption properties, kinetics of photobleaching, sodium dodecyl sulfate electrophoretic mobilities, and chlorophyll a/P-700 ratio (50 ± 10) of the P-700-chlorophyll a-protein complexes from the two species also were essentially the same and similar to those properties characterizing P-700-chlorophyll a-protein complexes of higher plants and green algae. Photosynthetic unit sizes were determined for cells grown at 1000 μW/cm2. Both dinoflagellates had unit sizes (total chlorophyll/P-700 ratios) of about 600, even though the distribution of chlorophyll a, chlorophyll c, and peridinin in the light-harvesting components differed in Gonyaulax and Glenodinium. The number of photosynthetic units per cell in the two species correlates directly with their photosynthetic activities. A model is presented for the distribution of chlorophyll in the photosynthetic apparatus of these dinoflagellates which accounts for the known role of the isolated pigment-protein complexes and for the known photoadaptive physiology in pigmentation and photosynthesis for these species. PMID:16592518

  14. Carotenoid Photoprotection in Artificial Photosynthetic Antennas

    SciTech Connect

    Kloz, Miroslav; Pillai, Smitha; Kodis, Gerdenis; Gust, Devens; Moore, Thomas A.; Moore, Ana L.; van Grondelle, Rienk; Kennis, John T. M.

    2011-04-14

    . These synthetic systems are providing a deeper understanding of structural and environmental effects on the interactions between carotenoids and tetrapyrroles and thereby better defining their role in controlling natural photosynthetic systems.

  15. Biological optimization systems for enhancing photosynthetic efficiency and methods of use

    DOEpatents

    Hunt, Ryan W.; Chinnasamy, Senthil; Das, Keshav C.; de Mattos, Erico Rolim

    2012-11-06

    Biological optimization systems for enhancing photosynthetic efficiency and methods of use. Specifically, methods for enhancing photosynthetic efficiency including applying pulsed light to a photosynthetic organism, using a chlorophyll fluorescence feedback control system to determine one or more photosynthetic efficiency parameters, and adjusting one or more of the photosynthetic efficiency parameters to drive the photosynthesis by the delivery of an amount of light to optimize light absorption of the photosynthetic organism while providing enough dark time between light pulses to prevent oversaturation of the chlorophyll reaction centers are disclosed.

  16. Photovoltaic concepts inspired by coherence effects in photosynthetic systems.

    PubMed

    Brédas, Jean-Luc; Sargent, Edward H; Scholes, Gregory D

    2016-12-20

    The past decade has seen rapid advances in our understanding of how coherent and vibronic phenomena in biological photosynthetic systems aid in the efficient transport of energy from light-harvesting antennas to photosynthetic reaction centres. Such coherence effects suggest strategies to increase transport lengths even in the presence of structural disorder. Here we explore how these principles could be exploited in making improved solar cells. We investigate in depth the case of organic materials, systems in which energy and charge transport stand to be improved by overcoming challenges that arise from the effects of static and dynamic disorder - structural and energetic - and from inherently strong electron-vibration couplings. We discuss how solar-cell device architectures can evolve to use coherence-exploiting materials, and we speculate as to the prospects for a coherent energy conversion system. We conclude with a survey of the impacts of coherence and bioinspiration on diverse solar-energy harvesting solutions, including artificial photosynthetic systems.

  17. Cyanobacteria as photosynthetic biocatalysts: a systems biology perspective.

    PubMed

    Gudmundsson, Steinn; Nogales, Juan

    2015-01-01

    The increasing need to replace oil-based products and to address global climate change concerns has triggered considerable interest in photosynthetic microorganisms. Cyanobacteria, in particular, have great potential as biocatalysts for fuels and fine-chemicals. During the last few years the biotechnological applications of cyanobacteria have experienced an unprecedented increase and the use of these photosynthetic organisms for chemical production is becoming a tangible reality. However, the field is still immature and many concerns about the economic feasibility of the biotechnological potential of cyanobacteria remain. In this review we describe recent successes in biofuel and fine-chemical production using cyanobacteria. We discuss the role of the photosynthetic metabolism and highlight the need for systems-level metabolic optimization in order to achieve the true potential of cyanobacterial biocatalysts.

  18. Photovoltaic concepts inspired by coherence effects in photosynthetic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brédas, Jean-Luc; Sargent, Edward H.; Scholes, Gregory D.

    2017-01-01

    The past decade has seen rapid advances in our understanding of how coherent and vibronic phenomena in biological photosynthetic systems aid in the efficient transport of energy from light-harvesting antennas to photosynthetic reaction centres. Such coherence effects suggest strategies to increase transport lengths even in the presence of structural disorder. Here we explore how these principles could be exploited in making improved solar cells. We investigate in depth the case of organic materials, systems in which energy and charge transport stand to be improved by overcoming challenges that arise from the effects of static and dynamic disorder -- structural and energetic -- and from inherently strong electron-vibration couplings. We discuss how solar-cell device architectures can evolve to use coherence-exploiting materials, and we speculate as to the prospects for a coherent energy conversion system. We conclude with a survey of the impacts of coherence and bioinspiration on diverse solar-energy harvesting solutions, including artificial photosynthetic systems.

  19. Evolution of photosynthetic prokaryotes: a maximum-likelihood mapping approach.

    PubMed Central

    Raymond, Jason; Zhaxybayeva, Olga; Gogarten, J Peter; Blankenship, Robert E

    2003-01-01

    Reconstructing the early evolution of photosynthesis has been guided in part by the geological record, but the complexity and great antiquity of these early events require molecular genetic techniques as the primary tools of inference. Recent genome sequencing efforts have made whole genome data available from representatives of each of the five phyla of bacteria with photosynthetic members, allowing extensive phylogenetic comparisons of these organisms. Here, we have undertaken whole genome comparisons using maximum likelihood to compare 527 unique sets of orthologous genes from all five photosynthetic phyla. Substantiating recent whole genome analyses of other prokaryotes, our results indicate that horizontal gene transfer (HGT) has played a significant part in the evolution of these organisms, resulting in genomes with mosaic evolutionary histories. A small plurality phylogenetic signal was observed, which may be a core of remnant genes not subject to HGT, or may result from a propensity for gene exchange between two or more of the photosynthetic organisms compared. PMID:12594930

  20. Photosynthetic light reactions: integral to chloroplast retrograde signalling.

    PubMed

    Gollan, Peter J; Tikkanen, Mikko; Aro, Eva-Mari

    2015-10-01

    Chloroplast retrograde signalling is ultimately dependent on the function of the photosynthetic light reactions and not only guides the acclimation of the photosynthetic apparatus to changing environmental and metabolic cues, but has a much wider influence on the growth and development of plants. New information generated during the past few years about regulation of photosynthetic light reactions and identification of the underlying regulatory proteins has paved the way towards better understanding of the signalling molecules produced in chloroplasts upon changes in the environment. Likewise, the availability of various mutants lacking regulatory functions has made it possible to address the role of excitation energy distribution and electron flow in the thylakoid membrane in inducing the retrograde signals from chloroplasts to the nucleus. Such signalling molecules also induce and interact with hormonal signalling cascades to provide comprehensive information from chloroplasts to the nucleus.

  1. Tracking photosynthetic efficiency with narrow-band spectroradiometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gamon, John A.; Field, Christopher B.

    1992-01-01

    Narrow-waveband spectroradiometry presents the possibility of detecting subtle signals closely related to the current physiological state of vegetation. One such signal related to the epoxidation state of the xanthophyll cycle pigments, violaxanthin, antheraxanthin, and zeaxanthin is discussed. Recent advances in plant ecophysiology demonstrated a close relationship between these pigments and the regulatory state of photosystem 2 in photosynthesis. Our recent field studies of sunflower (Helianthus annuus) and oak (Quercus agrifolia) demonstrated that a 'xanthophyll signal' can be isolated from the diurnal reflectance spectra of intact canopies. Furthermore, the xanthophyll signal can be used to derive a 'physiological reflectance index' (PRI) that closely correlates with the actual photosynthetic efficiency (defined as the photosynthetic rate divided by the incident PAR) in closed canopies. If these signals were detectable in Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometers (AVIRIS) images, they could lead to improved remote estimates of photosynthetic fluxes.

  2. Superradiance Transition and Nonphotochemical Quenching in Photosynthetic Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Berman, Gennady Petrovich; Nesterov, Alexander; Lopez, Gustavo; Sayre, Richard Thomas

    2015-04-23

    Photosynthetic organisms have evolved protective strategies to allow them to survive in cases of intense sunlight fluctuation with the development of nonphotochemical quenching (NPQ). This process allows light harvesting complexes to transfer the excess sunlight energy to non-damaging quenching channels. This report compares the NPQ process with the superradiance transition (ST). We demonstrated that the maximum of the NPQ efficiency is caused by the ST to the sink associated with the CTS. However, experimental verifications are required in order to determine whether or not the NPQ regime is associated with the ST transition for real photosynthetic complexes. Indeed, it can happen that, in the photosynthetic apparatus, the NPQ regime occurs in the “non-optimal” region of parameters, and it could be independent of the ST.

  3. Extreme Ionizing-Radiation-Resistant Bacterium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaishampayan, Parag A.; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri J.; Schwendner, Petra

    2012-01-01

    potential for transfer, and subsequent proliferation, on another solar body such as Mars and Europa. These organisms are more likely to escape planetary protection assays, which only take into account presence of spores. Hence, presences of extreme radiation-resistant Deinococcus in the cleanroom facility where spacecraft are assembled pose a serious risk for integrity of life-detection missions. The microorganism described herein was isolated from the surfaces of the cleanroom facility in which the Phoenix Lander was assembled. The isolated bacterial strain was subjected to a comprehensive polyphasic analysis to characterize its taxonomic position. This bacterium exhibits very low 16SrRNA similarity with any other environmental isolate reported to date. Both phenotypic and phylogenetic analyses clearly indicate that this isolate belongs to the genus Deinococcus and represents a novel species. The name Deinococcus phoenicis was proposed after the Phoenix spacecraft, which was undergoing assembly, testing, and launch operations in the spacecraft assembly facility at the time of isolation. D. phoenicis cells exhibited higher resistance to ionizing radiation (cobalt-60; 14 kGy) than the cells of the D. radiodurans (5 kGy). Thus, it is in the best interest of NASA to thoroughly characterize this organism, which will further assess in determining the potential for forward contamination. Upon the completion of genetic and physiological characteristics of D. phoenicis, it will be added to a planetary protection database to be able to further model and predict the probability of forward contamination.

  4. Extreme Ionizing-Radiation-Resistant Bacterium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaishampayan, Parag A.; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri J.; Schwendner, Petra

    2013-01-01

    potential for transfer, and subsequent proliferation, on another solar body such as Mars and Europa. These organisms are more likely to escape planetary protection assays, which only take into account presence of spores. Hence, presences of extreme radiation-resistant Deinococcus in the cleanroom facility where spacecraft are assembled pose a serious risk for integrity of life-detection missions. The microorganism described herein was isolated from the surfaces of the cleanroom facility in which the Phoenix Lander was assembled. The isolated bacterial strain was subjected to a comprehensive polyphasic analysis to characterize its taxonomic position. This bacterium exhibits very low 16SrRNA similarity with any other environmental isolate reported to date. Both phenotypic and phylogenetic analyses clearly indicate that this isolate belongs to the genus Deinococcus and represents a novel species. The name Deinococcus phoenicis was proposed after the Phoenix spacecraft, which was undergoing assembly, testing, and launch operations in the spacecraft assembly facility at the time of isolation. D. phoenicis cells exhibited higher resistance to ionizing radiation (cobalt-60; 14 kGy) than the cells of the D. radiodurans (5 kGy). Thus, it is in the best interest of NASA to thoroughly characterize this organism, which will further assess in determining the potential for forward contamination. Upon the completion of genetic and physiological characteristics of D. phoenicis, it will be added to a planetary protection database to be able to further model and predict the probability of forward contamination.

  5. Hydrogen Production by the Thermophilic Bacterium Thermotoga neapolitana

    PubMed Central

    Pradhan, Nirakar; Dipasquale, Laura; d’Ippolito, Giuliana; Panico, Antonio; Lens, Piet N. L.; Esposito, Giovanni; Fontana, Angelo

    2015-01-01

    As the only fuel that is not chemically bound to carbon, hydrogen has gained interest as an energy carrier to face the current environmental issues of greenhouse gas emissions and to substitute the depleting non-renewable reserves. In the last years, there has been a significant increase in the number of publications about the bacterium Thermotoga neapolitana that is responsible for production yields of H2 that are among the highest achievements reported in the literature. Here we present an extensive overview of the most recent studies on this hyperthermophilic bacterium together with a critical discussion of the potential of fermentative production by this bacterium. The review article is organized into sections focused on biochemical, microbiological and technical issues, including the effect of substrate, reactor type, gas sparging, temperature, pH, hydraulic retention time and organic loading parameters on rate and yield of gas production. PMID:26053393

  6. Hydrogen Production by the Thermophilic Bacterium Thermotoga neapolitana.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Nirakar; Dipasquale, Laura; d'Ippolito, Giuliana; Panico, Antonio; Lens, Piet N L; Esposito, Giovanni; Fontana, Angelo

    2015-06-04

    As the only fuel that is not chemically bound to carbon, hydrogen has gained interest as an energy carrier to face the current environmental issues of greenhouse gas emissions and to substitute the depleting non-renewable reserves. In the last years, there has been a significant increase in the number of publications about the bacterium Thermotoga neapolitana that is responsible for production yields of H2 that are among the highest achievements reported in the literature. Here we present an extensive overview of the most recent studies on this hyperthermophilic bacterium together with a critical discussion of the potential of fermentative production by this bacterium. The review article is organized into sections focused on biochemical, microbiological and technical issues, including the effect of substrate, reactor type, gas sparging, temperature, pH, hydraulic retention time and organic loading parameters on rate and yield of gas production.

  7. Global scale environmental control of plant photosynthetic capacity

    DOE PAGES

    Ali, Ashehad; Xu, Chonggang; Rogers, Alistair; ...

    2015-12-01

    Photosynthetic capacity, determined by light harvesting and carboxylation reactions, is a key plant trait that determines the rate of photosynthesis; however, in Earth System Models (ESMs) at a reference temperature, it is either a fixed value for a given plant functional type or derived from a linear function of leaf nitrogen content. In this study, we conducted a comprehensive analysis that considered correlations of environmental factors with photosynthetic capacity as determined by maximum carboxylation (Vc,m) rate scaled to 25°C (i.e., Vc,25; μmol CO2·m–2·s–1) and maximum electron transport rate (Jmax) scaled to 25°C (i.e., J25; μmol electron·m–2·s–1) at the global scale.more » Our results showed that the percentage of variation in observed Vc,25 and J25 explained jointly by the environmental factors (i.e., day length, radiation, temperature, and humidity) were 2–2.5 times and 6–9 times of that explained by area-based leaf nitrogen content, respectively. Environmental factors influenced photosynthetic capacity mainly through photosynthetic nitrogen use efficiency, rather than through leaf nitrogen content. The combination of leaf nitrogen content and environmental factors was able to explain ~56% and ~66% of the variation in Vc,25 and J25 at the global scale, respectively. As a result, our analyses suggest that model projections of plant photosynthetic capacity and hence land–atmosphere exchange under changing climatic conditions could be substantially improved if environmental factors are incorporated into algorithms used to parameterize photosynthetic capacity in ESMs.« less

  8. Global scale environmental control of plant photosynthetic capacity

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, Ashehad; Xu, Chonggang; Rogers, Alistair; McDowell, Nathan G.; Medlyn, Belinda E.; Fisher, Rosie A.; Wullschleger, Stan D.; Reich, Peter B.; Bauerle, William L.; Wilson, Cathy J.; Vrugt, Jasper A.; Santiago, Louis S.

    2015-12-01

    Photosynthetic capacity, determined by light harvesting and carboxylation reactions, is a key plant trait that determines the rate of photosynthesis; however, in Earth System Models (ESMs) at a reference temperature, it is either a fixed value for a given plant functional type or derived from a linear function of leaf nitrogen content. In this study, we conducted a comprehensive analysis that considered correlations of environmental factors with photosynthetic capacity as determined by maximum carboxylation (Vc,m) rate scaled to 25°C (i.e., Vc,25; μmol CO2·m–2·s–1) and maximum electron transport rate (Jmax) scaled to 25°C (i.e., J25; μmol electron·m–2·s–1) at the global scale. Our results showed that the percentage of variation in observed Vc,25 and J25 explained jointly by the environmental factors (i.e., day length, radiation, temperature, and humidity) were 2–2.5 times and 6–9 times of that explained by area-based leaf nitrogen content, respectively. Environmental factors influenced photosynthetic capacity mainly through photosynthetic nitrogen use efficiency, rather than through leaf nitrogen content. The combination of leaf nitrogen content and environmental factors was able to explain ~56% and ~66% of the variation in Vc,25 and J25 at the global scale, respectively. As a result, our analyses suggest that model projections of plant photosynthetic capacity and hence land–atmosphere exchange under changing climatic conditions could be substantially improved if environmental factors are incorporated into algorithms used to parameterize photosynthetic capacity in ESMs.

  9. Global-scale environmental control of plant photosynthetic capacity.

    PubMed

    Ali, Ashehad A; Xu, Chonggang; Rogers, Alistair; McDowell, Nathan G; Medlyn, Belinda E; Fisher, Rosie A; Wullschleger, Stan D; Reich, Peter B; Vrugt, Jasper A; Bauerle, William L; Santiago, Louis S; Wilson, Cathy J

    2015-12-01

    Photosynthetic capacity, determined by light harvesting and carboxylation reactions, is a key plant trait that determines the rate of photosynthesis; however, in Earth System Models (ESMs) at a reference temperature, it is either a fixed value for a given plant functional type or derived from a linear function of leaf nitrogen content. In this study, we conducted a comprehensive analysis that considered correlations of environmental factors with photosynthetic capacity as determined by maximum carboxylation (V(cm)) rate scaled to 25 degrees C (i.e., V(c),25; μmol CO2 x m(-2)x s(-1)) and maximum electron transport rate (J(max)) scaled to 25 degrees C (i.e., J25; μmol electron x m(-2) x s(-1)) at the global scale. Our results showed that the percentage of variation in observed V(c),25 and J25 explained jointly by the environmental factors (i.e., day length, radiation, temperature, and humidity) were 2-2.5 times and 6-9 times of that explained by area-based leaf nitrogen content, respectively. Environmental factors influenced photosynthetic capacity mainly through photosynthetic nitrogen use efficiency, rather than through leaf nitrogen content. The combination of leaf nitrogen content and environmental factors was able to explain -56% and -66% of the variation in V(c),25 and J25 at the global scale, respectively. Our analyses suggest that model projections of plant photosynthetic capacity and hence land-atmosphere exchange under changing climatic conditions could be substantially improved if environmental factors are incorporated into algorithms used to parameterize photosynthetic capacity in ESMs.

  10. Energy transfer in real and artificial photosynthetic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hindman, J.C.; Hunt, J.E.; Katz, J.J.

    1995-02-01

    Fluorescence emission from the photosynthetic organisms Tribonema aequale, Anacystis nidulau, and Chlorelia vulgais and from some chlorophyll model systems have been recorded as a function of excitation wavelength and temperature. Considerable similarity was observed in the effects of excitation wavelength and temperature on the fluorescence from intact photosynthetic organisms and the model systems. The parallelism in behavior suggest that self-assembly processes may occur in both the in vivo and in vitro systems that give rise to chlorophyll species at low temperature that may differ significantly from those present at ambient temperatures.

  11. ENHANCED PRACTICAL PHOTOSYNTHETIC CO2 MITIGATION

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Gregory Kremer; Dr. David J. Bayless; Dr. Morgan Vis; Dr. Michael Prudich; Dr. Keith Cooksey; Dr. Jeff Muhs

    2002-04-15

    This quarterly report documents significant achievements in the Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO{sub 2} Mitigation project during the period from 1/3/2001 through 4/02/2002. Most of the achievements are milestones in our efforts to complete the tasks and subtasks that constitute the project objectives, and we are currently on schedule to complete Phase I activities by 10/2002, the milestone date from the original project timeline. As indicated in the list of accomplishments below, we are continuing to evaluate candidate organisms and growth surfaces, and we are expanding the test facilities in preparation for scaled up system-level testing. Specific results and accomplishments for the first quarter of 2002 include: Organisms and Growth Surfaces: (1) Isolate 1.2 s.c. (2) has been selected for further investigations because of its favorable growth properties. (2) Research on optimal conditions for the growth of cyanobacterial isolates from YNP should be carried out using distilled water which has more stable chemical parameters, although tap water use may be permissible during full scale operations (at the cost of longer organism doubling times). (3) Tr. 9.4 WF is able to generate a biofilm on an Omnisil surface. Over the long term Omnisil does not inhibit the growth of TR 9.4 isolate, though it does elongate the lag phase of growth of this isolate. (4) Initial survivability tests for the TR 9.4 organism on Omnisil screens in the CRF2 modelscale bioreactor are underway. We have experienced problems keeping the organisms alive for more than three days, but we are currently investigating several possible causes for this unexpected result. (5) Accelerated materials testing have shown that Omnisil fabric has acceptable strength properties for use in a practical bioreactor system. Bioreactor support systems and test facilities: (1) Several CO{sub 2} scrubbing experiments have been completed in the translating slug flow test system, however the error introduced by the

  12. ENHANCED PRACTICAL PHOTOSYNTHETIC CO2 MITIGATION

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Gregory Kremer; Dr. David J. Bayless; Dr. Morgan Vis; Dr. Michael Prudich; Dr. Keith Cooksey; Dr. Jeff Muhs

    2001-10-15

    This report documents significant achievements in the Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO{sub 2} Mitigation project during the period from 10/03/2000 through 10/02/2001. Most of the achievements are milestones in our efforts to complete the tasks and subtasks that constitute the project objectives. This is the fourth quarterly report for this project, so it also serves as a year-1 project review. We have made significant progress on our Phase I objectives, and our current efforts are focused on fulfilling these research objectives ''on time'' relative to the project timeline. Overall, we believe that we are on schedule to complete Phase I activities by 10/2002, which is the milestone date from the original project timeline. Our results to date concerning the individual factors which have the most significant effect on CO{sub 2} uptake are inconclusive, but we have gathered useful information about the effects of lighting, temperature and CO{sub 2} concentration on one particular organism (Nostoc) and significant progress has been made in identifying other organisms that are more suitable for use in the bioreactor due to their better tolerance for the high temperatures likely to be encountered in the flue gas stream. Our current tests are focused on one such thermophilic organism (Cyanidium), and an enlarged bioreactor system (CRF-2) has been prepared for testing this organism. Tests on the enhanced mass transfer CO{sub 2} absorption technique are underway and useful information is currently being collected concerning pressure drop. The solar collectors for the deep-penetration hybrid solar lighting system have been designed and a single solar collector tracking unit is being prepared for installation in the pilot scale bioreactor system currently under construction. Much progress has been made in designing the fiber optic light delivery system, but final selection of the ''optimum'' delivery system design depends on many factors, most significantly the

  13. Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO2 Mitigation

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory Kremer; David J. Bayless; Morgan Vis; Michael Prudich; Keith Cooksey; Jeff Muhs

    2003-07-22

    This quarterly report documents significant achievements in the Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO{sub 2} Mitigation project during the period from 4/2/2003 through 7/01/2003. As indicated in the list of accomplishments below we have completed some long-term model scale bioreactor tests and are prepared to begin pilot scale bioreactor testing. Specific results and accomplishments for the second quarter of 2003 include: (1) Bioreactor support systems and test facilities: (a) Qualitative long-term survivability tests for S.C.1.2(2) on Omnisil have been successfully completed and results demonstrate a growth rate that appears to be acceptable. (b) Quantitative tests of long-term growth productivity for S.C.1.2(2) on Omnisil have been completed and initial results are promising. Initial results show that the mass of organisms doubled (from 54.9 grams to 109.8 grams) in about 5 weeks. Full results will be available as soon as all membranes and filters are completely dried. The growth rate should increase significantly with the initiation of weekly harvesting during the long term tests. (c) The phase 1 construction of the pilot scale bioreactor has been completed, including the solar collector and light distribution system. We are now in the phase of system improvement as we wait for CRF-2 results in order to be able to finalize the design and construction of the pilot scale system. (d) A mass transfer experimental setup was constructed in order to measure the mass transfer rate from the gas to the liquid film flowing over a membrane and to study the hydrodynamics of the liquid film flowing over a membrane in the bioreactor. Results were reported for mass transfer coefficient, film thickness, and fluid velocity over an Omnisil membrane with a ''drilled hole'' header pipe design. (2) Organisms and Growth Surfaces: (a) A selectivity approach was used to obtain a cyanobacterial culture with elevated resistance to acid pH. Microlonies of ''3.2.2 S.C.1 Positive'' migrated

  14. ENHANCED PRACTICAL PHOTOSYNTHETIC CO2 MITIGATION

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Gregory Kremer; Dr. David J. Bayless; Dr. Morgan Vis; Dr. Michael Prudich; Dr. Keith Cooksey; Dr. Jeff Muhs

    2002-07-15

    This quarterly report documents significant achievements in the Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO{sub 2} Mitigation project during the period from 4/2/2001 through 7/01/2002. Most of the achievements are milestones in our efforts to complete the tasks and subtasks that constitute the project objectives, and we are currently on schedule to complete Phase I activities by 10/2002, the milestone date from the original project timeline. As indicated in the list of accomplishments below, our efforts are focused on improving the design of the bioreactor test system, evaluating candidate organisms and growth surfaces, and scaling-up the test facilities from bench scale to pilot scale. Specific results and accomplishments for the second quarter of 2002 include: Organisms and Growth Surfaces: (1) Our collection of cyanobacteria, isolated in YNP was increased to 15 unialgal cultures. (2) Illumination rate about 50 {micro}E/m{sup 2}/sec is not saturated for the growth of 1.2 s.c. (2) isolate. The decrease of illumination rate led to the decrease of doubling time of this isolate. (3) The positive effect of Ca{sup 2+} on the growth of isolate 1.2 s.c. (2) without Omnisil was revealed, though Ca{sup 2+} addition was indifferent for the growth of this isolate at the presence of Omnisil. (4) Calcium addition had a positive effect on the generation of cyanobacterial biofilm on Omnisil surface. (5) The survivability problems with the Tr9.4 organism on Omnisil screens in the CRF2 model-scale bioreactor have been solved. The problems were related to the method used to populate the growth surfaces. When pre-populated screens were placed in the bioreactor the microalgae died within 72 hours, but when the microalgae were cultured while in place in the bioreactor using a continuous-population method they grew well inside of the CRF2 test system and survived for the full 7-day test duration. CRF2 tests will continue as soon as the new combined drip system/harvesting system header pipe

  15. ENHANCED PRACTICAL PHOTOSYNTHETIC CO2 MITIGATION

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Gregory Kremer; Dr. David J. Bayless; Dr. Morgan Vis; Dr. Michael Prudich; Dr. Keith Cooksey; Dr. Jeff Muhs

    2002-01-15

    This quarterly report documents significant achievements in the Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO{sub 2} Mitigation project during the period from 10/3/2001 through 1/02/2002. Most of the achievements are milestones in our efforts to complete the tasks and subtasks that constitute the project objectives. Our research team has made significant progress towards completion of our Phase I objectives, and our current efforts remain focused on fulfilling these research objectives in accordance with the project timeline. Overall, we believe that we are on schedule to complete Phase I activities by 10/2002, which is the milestone date from the original project timeline. Specific results and accomplishments for the fourth quarter of 2001 include: (1) New procedures and protocols have been developed to increase the chances of successful implementation in the bioreactor of organisms that perform well in the lab. The new procedures include pre-screening of organisms for adhesion characteristics and a focus on identifying the organisms with maximum growth rate potential. (2) Preliminary results show an increase in adhesion to glass and a decrease in overall growth rates when using growth media prepared with tap water rather than distilled water. (3) Several of the organisms collected from Yellowstone National Park using the new procedures are currently being cultured in preparation for bioreactor tests. (4) One important result from a test of growth surface temperature distribution as a function of gas stream and drip-fluid temperatures showed a high dependence of membrane temperature on fluid temperature, with gas stream temperature having minimal effect. This result indicates that bioreactor growth surface temperatures can be controlled using fluid delivery temperature. The possible implications for implementation of the bioreactor concept are encouraging, since it may be possible to use the bioreactor with very high gas stream temperatures by controlling the temperature

  16. Stigmatellin probes the electrostatic potential in the QB site of the photosynthetic reaction center.

    PubMed

    Gerencsér, László; Boros, Bogáta; Derrien, Valerie; Hanson, Deborah K; Wraight, Colin A; Sebban, Pierre; Maróti, Péter

    2015-01-20

    The electrostatic potential in the secondary quinone (QB) binding site of the reaction center (RC) of the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides determines the rate and free energy change (driving force) of electron transfer to QB. It is controlled by the ionization states of residues in a strongly interacting cluster around the QB site. Reduction of the QB induces change of the ionization states of residues and binding of protons from the bulk. Stigmatellin, an inhibitor of the mitochondrial and photosynthetic respiratory chain, has been proven to be a unique voltage probe of the QB binding pocket. It binds to the QB site with high affinity, and the pK value of its phenolic group monitors the local electrostatic potential with high sensitivity. Investigations with different types of detergent as a model system of isolated RC revealed that the pK of stigmatellin was controlled overwhelmingly by electrostatic and slightly by hydrophobic interactions. Measurements showed a high pK value (>11) of stigmatellin in the QB pocket of the dark-state wild-type RC, indicating substantial negative potential. When the local electrostatics of the QB site was modulated by a single mutation, L213Asp → Ala, or double mutations, L213Asp-L212Glu → Ala-Ala (AA), the pK of stigmatellin dropped to 7.5 and 7.4, respectively, which corresponds to a >210 mV increase in the electrostatic potential relative to the wild-type RC. This significant pK drop (ΔpK > 3.5) decreased dramatically to (ΔpK > 0.75) in the RC of the compensatory mutant (AA+M44Asn → AA+M44Asp). Our results indicate that the L213Asp is the most important actor in the control of the electrostatic potential in the QB site of the dark-state wild-type RC, in good accordance with conclusions of former studies using theoretical calculations or light-induced charge recombination assay.

  17. Protein structure, electron transfer and evolution of prokaryotic photosynthetic reaction centers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blankenship, R. E.

    1994-01-01

    Photosynthetic reaction centers from a variety of organisms have been isolated and characterized. The groups of prokaryotic photosynthetic organisms include the purple bacteria, the filamentous green bacteria, the green sulfur bacteria and the heliobacteria as anoxygenic representatives as well as the cyanobacteria and prochlorophytes as oxygenic representatives. This review focuses on structural and functional comparisons of the various groups of photosynthetic reaction centers and considers possible evolutionary scenarios to explain the diversity of existing photosynthetic organisms.

  18. Chloroflexus islandicus sp. nov., a thermophilic filamentous anoxygenic phototrophic bacterium from geyser Strokkur (Iceland).

    PubMed

    Gaisin, Vasil A; Kalashnikov, Alexander M; Grouzdev, Denis S; Sukhacheva, Marina V; Kuznetsov, Boris B; Gorlenko, Vladimir M

    2017-01-23

    A novel, thermophilic filamentous anoxygenic phototrophic bacterium, strain isl-2T, was isolated from the Strokkur Geyser, Iceland. Strain isl-2T formed unbranched multicellular filaments with gliding motility. The cells formed no spores and stained Gram-negative. The existence of pili was described in Chloroflexus spp. for the first time. Optimal growth occurred in a pH range of 7.5-7.7 and at a temperature of 55°C. Strain isl-2T grew photoheterotrophically under anaerobic conditions in the light and chemoheterotrophically under aerobic conditions in the dark. The major cellular fatty acids were C18:1ω9, C16:0, C18:0, and C18:0-OH. The major quinone was menaquinone-10. The photosynthetic pigments were bacteriochlorophylls c and a as well as β- and γ-carotenes. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequences placed strain isl-2T into the genus Chloroflexus of the phylum Chloroflexi with Chloroflexus aggregans DSM 9485T as the closest relative (97.0% identity). The whole-genome sequence of strain isl-2T was determined. Average nucleotide identity values obtained for strain isl-2T in comparison to available genomic sequences of other strains of Chloroflexus spp. were ≤81.4% and digital DNA-DNA hybridisation values ≤ 22.8%. Additional phylogenetic analysis of the PufLM and BchG amino acid sequences supported the separate position of the isl-2T phylotype from other Chloroflexus phylotypes. Based on physiological and phylogenetic data as well as on genomic data, it was suggested that strain isl-2T represents a novel species within the genus Chloroflexus, with the proposed name Chloroflexus islandicus sp. nov. The type strain of the species is isl-2T (=VKM B-2978T, =DSM 29225T, =JCM 30533T).

  19. Functional Implications of Photosystem II Crystal Formation in Photosynthetic Membranes.

    PubMed

    Tietz, Stefanie; Puthiyaveetil, Sujith; Enlow, Heather M; Yarbrough, Robert; Wood, Magnus; Semchonok, Dmitry A; Lowry, Troy; Li, Zhirong; Jahns, Peter; Boekema, Egbert J; Lenhert, Steven; Niyogi, Krishna K; Kirchhoff, Helmut

    2015-05-29

    The structural organization of proteins in biological membranes can affect their function. Photosynthetic thylakoid membranes in chloroplasts have the remarkable ability to change their supramolecular organization between disordered and semicrystalline states. Although the change to the semicrystalline state is known to be triggered by abiotic factors, the functional significance of this protein organization has not yet been understood. Taking advantage of an Arabidopsis thaliana fatty acid desaturase mutant (fad5) that constitutively forms semicrystalline arrays, we systematically test the functional implications of protein crystals in photosynthetic membranes. Here, we show that the change into an ordered state facilitates molecular diffusion of photosynthetic components in crowded thylakoid membranes. The increased mobility of small lipophilic molecules like plastoquinone and xanthophylls has implications for diffusion-dependent electron transport and photoprotective energy-dependent quenching. The mobility of the large photosystem II supercomplexes, however, is impaired, leading to retarded repair of damaged proteins. Our results demonstrate that supramolecular changes into more ordered states have differing impacts on photosynthesis that favor either diffusion-dependent electron transport and photoprotection or protein repair processes, thus fine-tuning the photosynthetic energy conversion.

  20. Systemic regulation of photosynthetic function in field-grown sorghum.

    PubMed

    Li, Tao; Liu, Yujun; Shi, Lei; Jiang, Chuangdao

    2015-09-01

    The photosynthetic characteristics of developing leaves of plants grown under artificial conditions are, to some extent, regulated systemically by mature leaves; however, whether systemic regulation of photosynthesis occurs in field-grown crops is unclear. To explore this question, we investigated the effects of planting density on growth characteristics, gas exchange, leaf nitrogen concentration and chlorophyll a fluorescence in field-grown sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L.). Our results showed that close planting resulted in a marked decline in light intensity in lower canopy. Sorghum plants grown at a high planting density had lower net photosynthetic rate (Pn), stomatal conductance (Gs), and transpiration rate (E) than plants grown at a low planting density. Moreover, in the absence of mineral deficiency, close planting induced a slight increase in leaf nitrogen concentration. The decreased photosynthesis in leaves of the lower canopy at high planting density was caused mainly by the low light. However, newly developed leaves exposed to high light in the upper canopy of plants grown at high planting density also exhibited a distinct decline in photosynthesis relative to plants grown at low planting density. Based on these results, the photosynthetic function of the newly developed leaves in the upper canopy was not determined fully by their own high light environment. Accordingly, we suggest that the photosynthetic function of newly developed leaves in the upper canopy of field-grown sorghum plants is regulated systemically by the lower canopy leaves. The differences in systemic regulation of photosynthesis were also discussed between field conditions and artificial conditions.

  1. Hydraulic constraints modify optimal photosynthetic profiles in giant sequoia trees.

    PubMed

    Ambrose, Anthony R; Baxter, Wendy L; Wong, Christopher S; Burgess, Stephen S O; Williams, Cameron B; Næsborg, Rikke R; Koch, George W; Dawson, Todd E

    2016-11-01

    Optimality theory states that whole-tree carbon gain is maximized when leaf N and photosynthetic capacity profiles are distributed along vertical light gradients such that the marginal gain of nitrogen investment is identical among leaves. However, observed photosynthetic N gradients in trees do not follow this prediction, and the causes for this apparent discrepancy remain uncertain. Our objective was to evaluate how hydraulic limitations potentially modify crown-level optimization in Sequoiadendron giganteum (giant sequoia) trees up to 90 m tall. Leaf water potential (Ψ l ) and branch sap flow closely followed diurnal patterns of solar radiation throughout each tree crown. Minimum leaf water potential correlated negatively with height above ground, while leaf mass per area (LMA), shoot mass per area (SMA), leaf nitrogen content (%N), and bulk leaf stable carbon isotope ratios (δ(13)C) correlated positively with height. We found no significant vertical trends in maximum leaf photosynthesis (A), stomatal conductance (g s), and intrinsic water-use efficiency (A/g s), nor in branch-averaged transpiration (E L), stomatal conductance (G S), and hydraulic conductance (K L). Adjustments in hydraulic architecture appear to partially compensate for increasing hydraulic limitations with height in giant sequoia, allowing them to sustain global maximum summer water use rates exceeding 2000 kg day(-1). However, we found that leaf N and photosynthetic capacity do not follow the vertical light gradient, supporting the hypothesis that increasing limitations on water transport capacity with height modify photosynthetic optimization in tall trees.

  2. FLASH SPECTROSCOPY AND FLASH FLUORIMETRY IN PHOTOSYNTHETIC STUDIES

    DTIC Science & Technology

    A comparative study of the flash induced forma tion of a pigment , X, absorbing at 515 millimicron in different classes of algae was made. This...that it occurs as a non- photosynthetic inter mediate, specifically as a consequence of damag ing photo-oxidation processes was examined. The latter

  3. An Improved Method for Extraction and Separation of Photosynthetic Pigments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katayama, Nobuyasu; Kanaizuka, Yasuhiro; Sudarmi, Rini; Yokohama, Yasutsugu

    2003-01-01

    The method for extracting and separating hydrophobic photosynthetic pigments proposed by Katayama "et al." ("Japanese Journal of Phycology," 42, 71-77, 1994) has been improved to introduce it to student laboratories at the senior high school level. Silica gel powder was used for removing water from fresh materials prior to…

  4. Photosynthetic terpene hydrocarbon production for fuels and chemicals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Photosynthetic terpene production[ED1] represents an energy and carbon-efficient route for hydrocarbon fuel production. Diverse terpene structures also provide the potential to produce next-generation 'drop-in' hydrocarbon fuel molecules. However, it is highly challenging to achieve efficient redire...

  5. Zones of photosynthetic potential on Mars and the early Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cockell, Charles S.; Raven, John A.

    2004-06-01

    Ultraviolet radiation is more damaging on the surface of Mars than on Earth because of the lack of an ozone shield. We investigated micro-habitats in which UV radiation could be reduced to levels similar to those found on the surface of present-day Earth, but where light in the photosynthetically active region (400-700 nm) would be above the minimum required for photosynthesis. We used a simple radiative transfer model to study four micro-habitats in which such a theoretical Martian Earth-like Photosynthetic Zone (MEPZ) might exist. A favorable radiation environment was found in martian soils containing iron, encrustations of halite, polar snows and crystalline rocks shocked by asteroid or comet impacts, all of which are known habitats for phototrophs on Earth. Although liquid water and nutrients are also required for life, micro-environments with favorable radiation environments for phototrophic life exist in a diversity of materials on Mars. This finding suggests that the lack of an ozone shield is not in itself a limit to the biogeographically widespread colonization of land by photosynthetic organisms, even if there are no other UV-absorbers in the atmosphere apart from carbon dioxide. When applied to the Archean Earth, these data suggest that even with the worst-case assumptions about the UV radiation environment, early land masses could have been colonized by primitive photosynthetic organisms. Such zones could similarly exist on anoxic extra-solar planets lacking ozone shields.

  6. Evolution of heliobacteria: implications for photosynthetic reaction center complexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vermaas, W. F.; Blankenship, R. E. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    The evolutionary position of the heliobacteria, a group of green photosynthetic bacteria with a photosynthetic apparatus functionally resembling Photosystem I of plants and cyanobacteria, has been investigated with respect to the evolutionary relationship to Gram-positive bacteria and cyanobacteria. On the basis of 16S rRNA sequence analysis, the heliobacteria appear to be most closely related to Gram-positive bacteria, but also an evolutionary link to cyanobacteria is evident. Interestingly, a 46-residue domain including the putative sixth membrane-spanning region of the heliobacterial reaction center protein show rather strong similarity (33% identity and 72% similarity) to a region including the sixth membrane-spanning region of the CP47 protein, a chlorophyll-binding core antenna polypeptide of Photosystem II. The N-terminal half of the heliobacterial reaction center polypeptide shows a moderate sequence similarity (22% identity over 232 residues) with the CP47 protein, which is significantly more than the similarity with the Photosystem I core polypeptides in this region. An evolutionary model for photosynthetic reaction center complexes is discussed, in which an ancestral homodimeric reaction center protein (possibly resembling the heliobacterial reaction center protein) with 11 membrane-spanning regions per polypeptide has diverged to give rise to the core of Photosystem I, Photosystem II, and of the photosynthetic apparatus in green, purple, and heliobacteria.

  7. Effect of Photosynthetic Photon Flux Density on Carboxylation Efficiency 1

    PubMed Central

    Weber, James A.; Tenhunen, John D.; Gates, David M.; Lange, Otto L.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD) on photosynthetic response (A) to CO2 partial pressures between 35 pascals and CO2 compensation point (Γ) was investigated, especially below PPFD saturation. Spinacia oleracea cv `Atlanta,' Glycine max cv `Clark,' and Arbutus unedo were studied in detail. The initial slope of the photosynthetic response to CO2 (∂A/∂C[Γ]) was constant above a PPFD of about 500 to 600 micromoles per square meter per second for all three species; but declined rapidly with PPFD below this critical level. For Γ there was also a critical PPFD (approximately 200 micromoles per square meter per second for S. oleracea and G. max; 100 for A. unedo) above which Γ was essentially constant, but below which Γ increased with decreasing PPFD. All three species showed a dependence of ∂A/∂C(Γ) on PPFD at low PPFD. Simulated photosynthetic responses obtained with a biochemically based model of whole-leaf photosynthesis were similar to measured responses. PMID:16665640

  8. Functional Implications of Photosystem II Crystal Formation in Photosynthetic Membranes*

    PubMed Central

    Tietz, Stefanie; Puthiyaveetil, Sujith; Enlow, Heather M.; Yarbrough, Robert; Wood, Magnus; Semchonok, Dmitry A.; Lowry, Troy; Li, Zhirong; Jahns, Peter; Boekema, Egbert J.; Lenhert, Steven; Niyogi, Krishna K.; Kirchhoff, Helmut

    2015-01-01

    The structural organization of proteins in biological membranes can affect their function. Photosynthetic thylakoid membranes in chloroplasts have the remarkable ability to change their supramolecular organization between disordered and semicrystalline states. Although the change to the semicrystalline state is known to be triggered by abiotic factors, the functional significance of this protein organization has not yet been understood. Taking advantage of an Arabidopsis thaliana fatty acid desaturase mutant (fad5) that constitutively forms semicrystalline arrays, we systematically test the functional implications of protein crystals in photosynthetic membranes. Here, we show that the change into an ordered state facilitates molecular diffusion of photosynthetic components in crowded thylakoid membranes. The increased mobility of small lipophilic molecules like plastoquinone and xanthophylls has implications for diffusion-dependent electron transport and photoprotective energy-dependent quenching. The mobility of the large photosystem II supercomplexes, however, is impaired, leading to retarded repair of damaged proteins. Our results demonstrate that supramolecular changes into more ordered states have differing impacts on photosynthesis that favor either diffusion-dependent electron transport and photoprotection or protein repair processes, thus fine-tuning the photosynthetic energy conversion. PMID:25897076

  9. Predicting Photosynthetic Fluxes from Spectral Reflectance of Leaves and Canopies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gamon, John A.

    1997-01-01

    The central hypothesis of this study has been that photosynthetic efficiency and capacity can be predicted from 'physiological reflectance indices' derived from spectral reflectance of leaves and canopies. I have approached this topic with a combination of laboratory and field experiments, and have also explored the potential of deriving a meaningful physiological index from imaging spectrometry (e.g. AVIRIS). A few highlights are presented below. The main emphasis has been on the 'Photochemical Reflectance Index' (PRI), derived from reflectance at 531 nm and 570 nm. Unlike most 'conventional' vegetation indices (e.g. NDVI), PRI changes rapidly both with illumination and physiological state, because it detects the interconversion of xanthophyll cycle pigments, which serve as photoregulatory pigments and control energy distribution for the photosynthetic system. This approach has differed dramatically from most remote sensing in that it has emphasized temporal variation in narrow-band spectral signatures, instead of spatial patterns of broadband indices. Our primary conclusion has been that PRI works well as an index of photosynthetic light-use efficiency at the leaf scale, much in the same way as the fluorescence index DeltaF/Fm. However, unlike DeltaF/Fm which must be measured at close scales, PRI can be sampled at a range of spatial scales, presenting the possibility of monitoring photosynthetic fluxes remotely.

  10. A Model for Prediction of Heat Stability of Photosynthetic Membranes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A previous study has revealed a positive correlation between heat-induced damage to photosynthetic membranes (thylakoid membranes) and chlorophyll loss. In this study, we exploited this correlation and developed a model for prediction of thermal damage to thylakoids. Prediction is based on estimat...

  11. Effect of Pb2+ ions on photosynthetic apparatus.

    PubMed

    Sersen, Frantisek; Kralova, Katarina; Pesko, Matus; Cigan, Marek

    2014-01-01

    Using model lead compounds Pb(NO3)2 and Pb(CH3CHOO)2, the mechanism and the site of action of Pb2+ ions in the photosynthetic apparatus of spinach chloroplasts were studied. Both compounds inhibited photosynthetic electron transport (PET) through photosystem 1 (PS1) and photosystem 2 (PS2), while Pb(NO3)2 was found to be more effective PET inhibitor. Using EPR spectroscopy the following sites of Pb2+ action in the photosynthetic apparatus were determined: the water-splitting complex and the Z•/D• intermediates on the donor side of PS2 and probably also the ferredoxin on the acceptor side of PS1, because cyclic electron flow in chloroplasts was impaired by treatment with Pb2+ ions. Study of chlorophyll fluorescence in suspension of spinach chloroplasts in the presence of Pb2+ ions confirmed their site of action in PS2. Using fluorescence spectroscopy also formation of complexes between Pb2+ and amino acid residues in photosynthetic proteins was confirmed and constants of complex formation among Pb2+ and aromatic amino acids were calculated for both studied lead compounds.

  12. Lipids in photosynthetic reaction centres: structural roles and functional holes.

    PubMed

    Jones, Michael R

    2007-01-01

    Photosynthetic proteins power the biosphere. Reaction centres, light harvesting antenna proteins and cytochrome b(6)f (or bc(1)) complexes are expressed at high levels, have been subjected to an intensive spectroscopic, biochemical and mutagenic analysis, and several have been characterised to an informatively high resolution by X-ray crystallography. In addition to revealing the structural basis for the transduction of light energy, X-ray crystallography has brought molecular insights into the relationships between these multicomponent membrane proteins and their lipid environment. Lipids resolved in the X-ray crystal structures of photosynthetic proteins bind light harvesting cofactors, fill intra-protein cavities through which quinones can diffuse, form an important part of the monomer-monomer interface in multimeric structures and may facilitate structural flexibility in complexes that undergo partial disassembly and repair. It has been proposed that individual lipids influence the biophysical properties of reaction centre cofactors, and so affect the rate of electron transfer through the complex. Lipids have also been shown to be important for successful crystallisation of photosynthetic proteins. Comparison of the three types of reaction centre that have been structurally characterised reveals interesting similarities in the position of bound lipids that may point towards a generic requirement to reinforce the structure of the core electron transfer domain. The crystallographic data are also providing new opportunities to find molecular explanations for observed effects of different types of lipid on the structure, mechanism and organisation of reaction centres and other photosynthetic proteins.

  13. Complete Genome of the Cellulolytic Ruminal Bacterium Ruminococcus albus 7

    SciTech Connect

    Suen, Garret; Stevenson, David M; Bruce, David; Chertkov, Olga; Copeland, A; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Detter, J. Chris; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Han, Cliff; Hauser, Loren John; Ivanova, N; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Land, Miriam L; Lapidus, Alla L.; Lucas, Susan; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pitluck, Sam; Tapia, Roxanne; Woyke, Tanja; Boyum, Julie; Mead, David; Weimer, Paul J

    2011-01-01

    Ruminococcus albus 7 is a highly cellulolytic ruminal bacterium that is a member of the phylum Firmicutes. Here, we describe the complete genome of this microbe. This genome will be useful for rumen microbiology and cellulosome biology and in biofuel production, as one of its major fermentation products is ethanol.

  14. Complete genome of the cellulolytic ruminal bacterium Ruminococcus albus 7

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ruminococcus albus 7 is a highly cellulolytic rumen bacterium that is a member of the phylum Firmicutes. Here, we describe the complete genome for this microbe. This genome will be useful for rumen microbiology, cellulosome biology, and in biofuel production, as one of its major fermentation product...

  15. Gut bacterium of Dendrobaena veneta (Annelida: Oligochaeta) possesses antimycobacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Fiołka, Marta J; Zagaja, Mirosław P; Piersiak, Tomasz D; Wróbel, Marek; Pawelec, Jarosław

    2010-09-01

    The new bacterial strain with antimycobacterial activity has been isolated from the midgut of Dendrobaena veneta (Annelida). Biochemical and molecular characterization of isolates from 18 individuals identified all as Raoultella ornithinolytica genus with 99% similarity. The bacterium is a possible symbiont of the earthworm D. veneta. The isolated microorganism has shown the activity against four strains of fast-growing mycobacteria: Mycobacterium butiricum, Mycobacterium jucho, Mycobacterium smegmatis and Mycobacterium phlei. The multiplication of the gut bacterium on plates with Sauton medium containing mycobacteria has caused a lytic effect. After the incubation of the cell free extract prepared from the gut bacterium with four strains of mycobacteria in liquid Sauton medium, the cells of all tested strains were deformed and divided to small oval forms and sometimes created long filaments. The effect was observed by the use of light, transmission and scanning microscopy. Viability of all examined species of mycobacteria was significantly decreased. The antimycobacterial effect was probably the result of the antibiotic action produced by the gut bacterium of the earthworm. The application of ultrafiltration procedure allowed to demonstrate that antimicrobial substance with strong antimycobacterial activity from bacterial culture supernatant, is a protein with the molecular mass above 100 kDa.

  16. Assembly of Photosynthetic Antenna Protein / Pigments Complexes from Algae and Plants for Development of Nanobiodevices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-10

    Assembly of Photosynthetic Antenna Protein / Pigments Complexes from Algae and Plants for Development of Nanobiodevices Key...Assembly of Photosynthetic Antenna Protein / Pigments Complexes from Algae and Plants for Development of Nanobiodevices 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER...unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT This is the report of a project to use photosynthetic antenna pigment complexes from algae and plants as

  17. Bioinspired Organic PV Cells Using Photosynthetic Pigment Complex for Energy Harvesting Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-10

    Photosynthetic Pigment Complex for Energy Harvesting Materials Key Researcher involved in the Proposed Project: Mamoru Nango... Photosynthetic Pigment Complex for Energy Harvesting Materials 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA48690814030 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT This is the report of a research project that used the photosynthetic pigment complex of purple bacteria or green plants

  18. Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO2 Mitigation

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory Kremer; David J. Bayless; Morgan Vis; Michael Prudich; Keith Cooksey; Jeff Muhs

    2006-01-15

    This final report highlights significant achievements in the Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO{sub 2} Mitigation Project during the period from 10/1/2001 through 01/02/2006. As indicated in the list of accomplishments below, our efforts during this project were focused on the selection of candidate organisms and growth surfaces and initiating long-term tests in the bench-scale and pilot-scale bioreactor test systems. Specific results and accomplishments for the program include: (1) CRF-2 test system: (a) Sampling test results have shown that the initial mass of algae loaded into the Carbon Recycling Facility Version 2 (CRF-2) system can be estimated with about 3% uncertainty using a statistical sampling procedure. (b) The pressure shim header pipe insert design was shown to have better flow for harvesting than the drilled-hole design. (c) The CRF-2 test system has undergone major improvements to produce the high flow rates needed for harvesting (as determined by previous experiments). The main changes to the system are new stainless steel header/frame units, with increased flow capacity and a modified pipe-end-sealing method to improve flow uniformity, and installation and plumbing for a new high flow harvesting pump. Qualitative system tests showed that the harvesting system performed wonderfully, cleaning the growth surfaces within a matter of seconds. (d) Qualitative tests have shown that organisms can be repopulated on a harvested section of a bioreactor screen, demonstrating that continuous bioreactor operation is feasible, with continuous cycles of harvesting and repopulating screens. (e) Final preparations are underway for quantitative, long-term tests in the CRF-2 with weekly harvesting. (2) Pilot-scale test system: (a) The construction of the pilot-scale bioreactor was completed, including the solar collector and light distribution system. Over the course of the project, the solar collector used in the light delivery system showed some degradation, but

  19. ENHANCED PRACTICAL PHOTOSYNTHETIC CO2 MITIGATION

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Gregory Kremer; Dr. David J. Bayless; Dr. Morgan Vis; Dr. Michael Prudich; Dr. Keith Cooksey; Dr. Jeff Muhs

    2003-01-15

    This quarterly report documents significant achievements in the Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO{sub 2} Mitigation project during the period from 10/2/2001 through 1/01/2003. As indicated in the list of accomplishments below our current efforts are focused on evaluating candidate organisms and growth surfaces, preparing to conduct long-term tests in the bench-scale bioreactor test systems, and scaling-up the test facilities from bench scale to pilot scale. Specific results and accomplishments for the first quarter of 2003 include: Organisms and Growth Surfaces: (1) Additional thermal features with developed cyanobacterial mats, which might be calcium resistant, were found in the West Thumb area of YNP. New samples were isolated and are being cultured in glass tubes. (2) We checked the motile ability of 8.2.1 Synechococcus s.c. (10) and 3.2.2 Synechococcus s.c. 6. It was found that unicellular isolates 8.2.1 Synechococcus s.c. (10) and 3.2.2 Synechococcus s.c. 1 are phototaxic. Isolate 3.2.2 Synechococcus s.c. 1 currently consists of two populations: one population appears to be positive phototaxic, and second population appears negative phototaxis to the same level of light. This means that the character of screen illumination should be uniform and reasonable for cyanobacterial cells. (3) The aeration of growth media with 5% CO{sub 2} in air stimulates cyanobacterial growth 10-20 times over that with air alone. It is possible the rate of the stimulation of cyanobacterial growth in CRF will be higher because cyanobacteria will be grown as a biofilm. We plan to increase the concentration to 15% CO{sub 2} in air. (4) We are continuing the organizing of our collection of the thermophilic cyanobacteria isolated from Yellowstone National Park. During this reporting period we transferred about 160 samples and discarded about 80 samples with weak growth in standard media as BG-11, D or DH. As result of this work we currently have 13 unialgal cultures of thermophilic

  20. Structural insight into photoactivation of an adenylate cyclase from a photosynthetic cyanobacterium

    PubMed Central

    Ohki, Mio; Sugiyama, Kanako; Kawai, Fumihiro; Tanaka, Hitomi; Nihei, Yuuki; Unzai, Satoru; Takebe, Masumi; Matsunaga, Shigeru; Adachi, Shin-ichi; Shibayama, Naoya; Zhou, Zhiwen; Koyama, Ryuta; Takahashi, Tetsuo; Tame, Jeremy R. H.; Iseki, Mineo; Park, Sam-Yong

    2016-01-01

    Cyclic-AMP is one of the most important second messengers, regulating many crucial cellular events in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes, and precise spatial and temporal control of cAMP levels by light shows great promise as a simple means of manipulating and studying numerous cell pathways and processes. The photoactivated adenylate cyclase (PAC) from the photosynthetic cyanobacterium Oscillatoria acuminata (OaPAC) is a small homodimer eminently suitable for this task, requiring only a simple flavin chromophore within a blue light using flavin (BLUF) domain. These domains, one of the most studied types of biological photoreceptor, respond to blue light and either regulate the activity of an attached enzyme domain or change its affinity for a repressor protein. BLUF domains were discovered through studies of photo-induced movements of Euglena gracilis, a unicellular flagellate, and gene expression in the purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides, but the precise details of light activation remain unknown. Here, we describe crystal structures and the light regulation mechanism of the previously undescribed OaPAC, showing a central coiled coil transmits changes from the light-sensing domains to the active sites with minimal structural rearrangement. Site-directed mutants show residues essential for signal transduction over 45 Å across the protein. The use of the protein in living human cells is demonstrated with cAMP-dependent luciferase, showing a rapid and stable response to light over many hours and activation cycles. The structures determined in this study will assist future efforts to create artificial light-regulated control modules as part of a general optogenetic toolkit. PMID:27247413

  1. Photosynthetic H2 metabolism in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (unicellular green algae).

    PubMed

    Melis, Anastasios

    2007-10-01

    Unicellular green algae have the ability to operate in two distinctly different environments (aerobic and anaerobic), and to photosynthetically generate molecular hydrogen (H2). A recently developed metabolic protocol in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii permitted separation of photosynthetic O2-evolution and carbon accumulation from anaerobic consumption of cellular metabolites and concomitant photosynthetic H2-evolution. The H2 evolution process was induced upon sulfate nutrient deprivation of the cells, which reversibly inhibits photosystem-II and O2-evolution in their chloroplast. In the absence of O2, and in order to generate ATP, green algae resorted to anaerobic photosynthetic metabolism, evolved H2 in the light and consumed endogenous substrate. This study summarizes recent advances on green algal hydrogen metabolism and discusses avenues of research for the further development of this method. Included is the mechanism of a substantial tenfold starch accumulation in the cells, observed promptly upon S-deprivation, and the regulated starch and protein catabolism during the subsequent H2-evolution. Also discussed is the function of a chloroplast envelope-localized sulfate permease, and the photosynthesis-respiration relationship in green algae as potential tools by which to stabilize and enhance H2 metabolism. In addition to potential practical applications of H2, approaches discussed in this work are beginning to address the biochemistry of anaerobic H2 photoproduction, its genes, proteins, regulation, and communication with other metabolic pathways in microalgae. Photosynthetic H2 production by green algae may hold the promise of generating a renewable fuel from nature's most plentiful resources, sunlight and water. The process potentially concerns global warming and the question of energy supply and demand.

  2. Calcium ions are required for the enhanced thermal stability of the light-harvesting-reaction center core complex from thermophilic purple sulfur bacterium Thermochromatium tepidum.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Yukihiro; Yu, Long-Jiang; Hirano, Yu; Suzuki, Hiroaki; Wang, Zheng-Yu

    2009-01-02

    Thermochromatium tepidum is a thermophilic purple sulfur photosynthetic bacterium collected from the Mammoth Hot Springs, Yellowstone National Park. A previous study showed that the light-harvesting-reaction center core complex (LH1-RC) purified from this bacterium is highly stable at room temperature (Suzuki, H., Hirano, Y., Kimura, Y., Takaichi, S., Kobayashi, M., Miki, K., and Wang, Z.-Y. (2007) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1767, 1057-1063). In this work, we demonstrate that thermal stability of the Tch. tepidum LH1-RC is much higher than that of its mesophilic counterparts, and the enhanced thermal stability requires Ca2+ as a cofactor. Removal of the Ca2+ from Tch. tepidum LH1-RC resulted in a complex with the same degree of thermal stability as that of the LH1-RCs purified from mesophilic bacteria. The enhanced thermal stability can be restored by addition of Ca2+ to the Ca2+-depleted LH1-RC, and this process is fully reversible. Interchange of the thermal stability between the two forms is accompanied by a shift of the LH1 Qy transition between 915 nm for the native and 880 nm for the Ca2+-depleted LH1-RC. Differential scanning calorimetry measurements reveal that degradation temperature of the native LH1-RC is 15 degrees C higher and the enthalpy change is about 28% larger than the Ca2+-depleted LH1-RC. Substitution of the Ca2+ with other metal cations caused a decrease in thermal stability of an extent depending on the properties of the cations. These results indicate that Ca2+ ions play a dual role in stabilizing the structure of the pigment-membrane protein complex and in altering its spectroscopic properties, and hence provide insight into the adaptive strategy of this photosynthetic organism to survive in extreme environments using natural resources.

  3. Photosynthetic response of Nodularia spumigena to UV and photosynthetically active radiation depends on nutrient (N and P) availability.

    PubMed

    Roleda, Michael Y; Mohlin, Malin; Pattanaik, Bagmi; Wulff, Angela

    2008-11-01

    Biomass of N. spumigena is distributed within the dynamic photic zone that changes in both light quantity and quality. This study was designed to determine whether nutrient status can mitigate the negative impacts of experimental radiation treatments on the photosynthetic performance of N. spumigena. Cyanobacterial suspensions were exposed to radiation consisting of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR=400-700 nm), PAR+UV-A (=PA, 320-700 nm), and PAR+UV-A+UV-B (=PAB, 280-700 nm) under different nutrient media either replete with external dissolved nitrate (N) and orthophosphate (P; designated as +N/+P), replete with P only (-N/+P), or replete with N only (+N/-P). Under low PAR (75 micromol photons m(-2) s(-1)), nutrient status had no significant effect on the photosynthetic performance of N. spumigena in terms of rETRmax, alpha, and E(k). Nodularia spumigena was able to acclimate to high PAR (300 micromol photons m(-2) s(-1)), with a corresponding increase in rETRmax and E(k). The photosynthetic performance of N. spumigena cultured with supplemental nitrogen was more susceptible to experimental PAR irradiance. Under UVR, P-enrichment in the absence of additional external N (-N/+P) induced lower photoinhibition of photosynthesis compared with +N/-P cultures. However, the induction of NPQ may have provided PSII protection under P-deplete and PAR+UVR conditions. Because N. spumigena are able to fix nitrogen, access to available P can render them less susceptible to photoinhibition, effectively promoting blooms. Under a P-deficient condition, N. spumigena were more susceptible to radiation but were capable of photosynthetic recovery immediately after removal of radiation stress. In the presence of an internal P pool in the Baltic Sea, which may be seasonally available to the diazotrophic cyanobacteria, summer blooms of the resilient N. spumigena will persist.

  4. Apparatus and method for measuring single cell and sub-cellular photosynthetic efficiency

    DOEpatents

    Davis, Ryan Wesley; Singh, Seema; Wu, Huawen

    2013-07-09

    Devices for measuring single cell changes in photosynthetic efficiency in algal aquaculture are disclosed that include a combination of modulated LED trans-illumination of different intensities with synchronized through objective laser illumination and confocal detection. Synchronization and intensity modulation of a dual illumination scheme were provided using a custom microcontroller for a laser beam block and constant current LED driver. Therefore, single whole cell photosynthetic efficiency, and subcellular (diffraction limited) photosynthetic efficiency measurement modes are permitted. Wide field rapid light scanning actinic illumination is provided for both by an intensity modulated 470 nm LED. For the whole cell photosynthetic efficiency measurement, the same LED provides saturating pulses for generating photosynthetic induction curves. For the subcellular photosynthetic efficiency measurement, a switched through objective 488 nm laser provides saturating pulses for generating photosynthetic induction curves. A second near IR LED is employed to generate dark adapted states in the system under study.

  5. Eukaryotic behaviour of a prokaryotic energy-transducing membrane: fully detached vesicular organelles arise by budding from the Rhodobacter sphaeroides intracytoplasmic photosynthetic membrane.

    PubMed

    Niederman, Robert A

    2010-05-01

    A major feature that distinguishes prokaryotic organisms from eukaryotes is their less complex internal structure, in which all membrane-associated functions are thought to be present within a continuous lipid-protein bilayer, rather than with distinct organelles. Contrary to this notion, as described by Tucker and co-workers in this issue of Molecular Microbiology, the application of cryo-electron tomography to the purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides has demonstrated a heretofore unrecognized ultrastructural complexity within the intracytoplasmic membrane (ICM) housing the photosynthetic apparatus. In addition to distinguishing invaginations of the cytoplasmic membrane (CM) and interconnected vesicular structures still attached to the CM, a eukaryote-like ICM budding process was revealed, which results in the formation of fully detached vesicular structures. These bacterial organelles are able to carry out both the light-harvesting and light-driven energy transduction activities necessary for the cells to assume a photosynthetic lifestyle. Their formation is shown to represent the final stage in a membrane invagination and growth process, originating with small CM indentations, which after cell disruption give rise to a membrane fraction that can be separated from mature ICM vesicles by rate-zone sedimentation.

  6. High Efficiency Light Harvesting by Carotenoids in the LH2 Complex from Photosynthetic Bacteria: Unique Adaptation to Growth under Low-Light Conditions

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Rhodopin, rhodopinal, and their glucoside derivatives are carotenoids that accumulate in different amounts in the photosynthetic bacterium, Rhodoblastus (Rbl.) acidophilus strain 7050, depending on the intensity of the light under which the organism is grown. The different growth conditions also have a profound effect on the spectra of the bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) pigments that assemble in the major LH2 light-harvesting pigment–protein complex. Under high-light conditions the well-characterized B800-850 LH2 complex is formed and accumulates rhodopin and rhodopin glucoside as the primary carotenoids. Under low-light conditions, a variant LH2, denoted B800-820, is formed, and rhodopinal and rhodopinal glucoside are the most abundant carotenoids. The present investigation compares and contrasts the spectral properties and dynamics of the excited states of rhodopin and rhodopinal in solution. In addition, the systematic differences in pigment composition and structure of the chromophores in the LH2 complexes provide an opportunity to explore the effect of these factors on the rate and efficiency of carotenoid-to-BChl energy transfer. It is found that the enzymatic conversion of rhodopin to rhodopinal by Rbl. acidophilus 7050 grown under low-light conditions results in nearly 100% carotenoid-to-BChl energy transfer efficiency in the LH2 complex. This comparative analysis provides insight into how photosynthetic systems are able to adapt and survive under challenging environmental conditions. PMID:25171303

  7. High efficiency light harvesting by carotenoids in the LH2 complex from photosynthetic bacteria: unique adaptation to growth under low-light conditions.

    PubMed

    Magdaong, Nikki M; LaFountain, Amy M; Greco, Jordan A; Gardiner, Alastair T; Carey, Anne-Marie; Cogdell, Richard J; Gibson, George N; Birge, Robert R; Frank, Harry A

    2014-09-25

    Rhodopin, rhodopinal, and their glucoside derivatives are carotenoids that accumulate in different amounts in the photosynthetic bacterium, Rhodoblastus (Rbl.) acidophilus strain 7050, depending on the intensity of the light under which the organism is grown. The different growth conditions also have a profound effect on the spectra of the bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) pigments that assemble in the major LH2 light-harvesting pigment-protein complex. Under high-light conditions the well-characterized B800-850 LH2 complex is formed and accumulates rhodopin and rhodopin glucoside as the primary carotenoids. Under low-light conditions, a variant LH2, denoted B800-820, is formed, and rhodopinal and rhodopinal glucoside are the most abundant carotenoids. The present investigation compares and contrasts the spectral properties and dynamics of the excited states of rhodopin and rhodopinal in solution. In addition, the systematic differences in pigment composition and structure of the chromophores in the LH2 complexes provide an opportunity to explore the effect of these factors on the rate and efficiency of carotenoid-to-BChl energy transfer. It is found that the enzymatic conversion of rhodopin to rhodopinal by Rbl. acidophilus 7050 grown under low-light conditions results in nearly 100% carotenoid-to-BChl energy transfer efficiency in the LH2 complex. This comparative analysis provides insight into how photosynthetic systems are able to adapt and survive under challenging environmental conditions.

  8. Detecting extraterrestrial life with the Colossus telescope using photosynthetic biosignatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berdyugina, S.; Kuhn, J.; Harrington, D.; Moretto, G.; Langlois, M.; Halliday, D.; Harlingten, C.

    2014-03-01

    We propose to search for life on Earth-like planets in habitable zones using photosynthesis biosignatures. Many life forms on Earth process the solar light and utilize it to support their own activity and to provide a valuable energy source for other life forms. We expect therefore that photosynthesis is very likely to arise on another planet and can produce conspicuous biosignatures. We have recently identified biological polarization effects, e.g., selective light absorption or scattering by photosynthetic molecules which can be used for remote detection of extraterrestrial life. Here we present synthetic spectra and polarization of Earth-like planets with photosynthetic life and evaluate the sensitivity of the Colossus telescope for their remote detection in the solar neighborhood.

  9. Detection of circular polarization in light scattered from photosynthetic microbes

    PubMed Central

    Sparks, William B.; Hough, James; Germer, Thomas A.; Chen, Feng; DasSarma, Shiladitya; DasSarma, Priya; Robb, Frank T.; Manset, Nadine; Kolokolova, Ludmilla; Reid, Neill; Macchetto, F. Duccio; Martin, William

    2009-01-01

    The identification of a universal biosignature that could be sensed remotely is critical to the prospects for success in the search for life elsewhere in the universe. A candidate universal biosignature is homochirality, which is likely to be a generic property of all biochemical life. Because of the optical activity of chiral molecules, it has been hypothesized that this unique characteristic may provide a suitable remote sensing probe using circular polarization spectroscopy. Here, we report the detection of circular polarization in light scattered by photosynthetic microbes. We show that the circular polarization appears to arise from circular dichroism of the strong electronic transitions of photosynthetic absorption bands. We conclude that circular polarization spectroscopy could provide a powerful remote sensing technique for generic life searches. PMID:19416893

  10. Changes of Photosynthetic Behaviors in Kappaphycus alvarezii Infected by Epiphyte.

    PubMed

    Pang, Tong; Liu, Jianguo; Liu, Qian; Lin, Wei

    2011-01-01

    Epiphytic filamentous algae (EFA) were noted as a serious problem to reduce the production and quality of K. alvarezii. The morphological studies revealed that the main epiphyte on K. alvarezii was Neosiphonia savatieri in China. Though the harmful effects of EFA on the production of K. alvarezii have been reported, the detailed mechanism of the N. savatieri in limiting the production of K. alvarezii has not been studied yet. The present paper studied the effects of N. savatieri infection on photosynthetic behaviors in K. alvarezii by detecting chlorophyll fluorescence transient in vivo. The results revealed that damage of oxygen-evolving complex (OEC), decrease of active reaction centers (RCs), and the plastoquinone (PQ) pool as well as significant reduction in the performance indexes (PI) of PSII were caused by the infection of N. savatieri. The influence of N. savatieri on photosynthetic activity of K. alvarezii should be one of the important reasons to reduce the production of K. alvarezii infected by N. savatieri.

  11. Influence of thermal light correlations on photosynthetic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Mendoza, Adriana; Manrique, Pedro; Caycedo-Soler, Felipe; Johnson, Neil F.; Rodríguez, Ferney J.; Quiroga, Luis

    2014-03-01

    The thermal light from the sun is characterized by both classical and quantum mechanical correlations. These correlations have left a fingerprint on the natural harvesting structures developed through five billion years of evolutionary pressure, specially in photosynthetic organisms. In this work, based upon previous extensive studies of spatio-temporal correlations of light fields, we hypothesize that structures involving photosensitive pigments like those present in purple bacteria vesicles emerge as an evolutionary response to the different properties of incident light. By using burstiness and memory as measures that quantify higher moments of the photon arrival statistics, we generate photon-time traces. They are used to simulate absorption on detectors spatially extended over regions comparable to these light fields coherence length. Finally, we provide some insights into the connection between these photo-statistical features with the photosynthetic membrane architecture and the lights' spatial correlation. Facultad de Ciencias Uniandes.

  12. Ion antiport accelerates photosynthetic acclimation in fluctuating light environments

    PubMed Central

    Armbruster, Ute; Carrillo, L. Ruby; Venema, Kees; Pavlovic, Lazar; Schmidtmann, Elisabeth; Kornfeld, Ari; Jahns, Peter; Berry, Joseph A.; Kramer, David M.; Jonikas, Martin C.

    2014-01-01

    Many photosynthetic organisms globally, including crops, forests and algae, must grow in environments where the availability of light energy fluctuates dramatically. How photosynthesis maintains high efficiency despite such fluctuations in its energy source remains poorly understood. Here we show that Arabidopsis thaliana K+ efflux antiporter (KEA3) is critical for high photosynthetic efficiency under fluctuating light. On a shift from dark to low light, or high to low light, kea3 mutants show prolonged dissipation of absorbed light energy as heat. KEA3 localizes to the thylakoid membrane, and allows proton efflux from the thylakoid lumen by proton/potassium antiport. KEA3’s activity accelerates the downregulation of pH-dependent energy dissipation after transitions to low light, leading to faster recovery of high photosystem II quantum efficiency and increased CO2 assimilation. Our results reveal a mechanism that increases the efficiency of photosynthesis under fluctuating light. PMID:25451040

  13. Quantum oscillatory exciton migration in photosynthetic reaction centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramavicius, Darius; Mukamel, Shaul

    2010-08-01

    The harvesting of solar energy and its conversion to chemical energy is essential for all forms of life. The primary photon absorption, transport, and charge separation events, which trigger a chain of chemical reactions, take place in membrane-bound photosynthetic complexes. Whether quantum effects, stemming from entanglement of chromophores, persist in the energy transport at room temperature, despite the rapid decoherence effects caused by environment fluctuations, is under current active debate. If confirmed, these may explain the high efficiency of light harvesting and open up numerous applications to quantum computing and information processing. We present simulations of the photosynthetic reaction center of photosystem II that clearly establish oscillatory energy transport at room temperature originating from interference of quantum pathways. These signatures of quantum transport may be observed by two dimensional coherent optical spectroscopy.

  14. Quantum oscillatory exciton migration in photosynthetic reaction centers.

    PubMed

    Abramavicius, Darius; Mukamel, Shaul

    2010-08-14

    The harvesting of solar energy and its conversion to chemical energy is essential for all forms of life. The primary photon absorption, transport, and charge separation events, which trigger a chain of chemical reactions, take place in membrane-bound photosynthetic complexes. Whether quantum effects, stemming from entanglement of chromophores, persist in the energy transport at room temperature, despite the rapid decoherence effects caused by environment fluctuations, is under current active debate. If confirmed, these may explain the high efficiency of light harvesting and open up numerous applications to quantum computing and information processing. We present simulations of the photosynthetic reaction center of photosystem II that clearly establish oscillatory energy transport at room temperature originating from interference of quantum pathways. These signatures of quantum transport may be observed by two dimensional coherent optical spectroscopy.

  15. Light energy to bioelectricity: photosynthetic microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Rosenbaum, Miriam; He, Zhen; Angenent, Largus T

    2010-06-01

    Here, we reviewed five different approaches that integrate photosynthesis with microbial fuel cells (MFCs)-photoMFCs. Until now, no conclusive report has been published that identifies direct electron transfer (DET) between a photosynthetic biocatalyst and the anode of a MFC. Therefore, most recent research has been performed to generate sufficient electric current from sunlight with either electrocatalysts or heterotrophic bacteria on the anode to convert photosynthetic products indirectly. The most promising photoMFCs to date are electrocatalytic bioelectrochemical systems (BESs) that convert hydrogen from photosynthesis and sediment-based BESs that can convert excreted organics from cyanobacteria or plants. In addition, illumination on the cathode may provide either oxygen for an electrocatalytic reduction reaction or a promising anoxygenic biocathode.

  16. BOREAS TE-9 NSA Photosynthetic Capacity and Foliage Nitrogen Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Curd, Shelaine (Editor); Dang, Qinglai; Margolis, Hank; Coyea, Marie

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmospheric Study (BOREAS) TE-9 (Terrestrial Ecology) team collected several data sets related to chemical and photosynthetic properties of leaves in boreal forest tree species. This data set describes the spatial and temporal relationship between foliage nitrogen concentration and photosynthetic capacity in the canopies of black spruce, jack pine, and aspen located within the Northern Study Area (NSA). The data were collected from June to September 1994 and are useful for modeling the vertical distribution of carbon fixation for different forest types in the boreal forest. The data are available in tabular ASCII files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884), or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  17. Photosynthetic carbon reduction by seagrasses exposed to ultraviolet A radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The seagrasses Halophila engelmannii, Halodule wrightii, and Syringodium filiforme were examined for their intrinsic sensitivity to ultraviolet-A-UV-A and ultraviolet-B-UV-B radiation. The effect of UV-A on photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) was also determined. Ultraviolet-A and ultraviolet-B were studied with emphasis on the greater respective environmental consequence in terms of seagrass distribution and abundance. Results indicate that an intrinsic sensitivity to UV-A alone is apparent only in Halophila, while net photosynthesis in Halodule and Syringodium seems unaffected by the level of UV-A provided. The sensitivity of Halophila to UV-A in the absense of (PAR) indicates that the photosynthetic reaction does not need to be in operation for damage to occur. Other significant results are reported.

  18. Engineering photosynthetic organisms for the production of biohydrogen.

    PubMed

    Dubini, Alexandra; Ghirardi, Maria L

    2015-03-01

    Oxygenic photosynthetic organisms such as green algae are capable of absorbing sunlight and converting the chemical energy into hydrogen gas. This process takes advantage of the photosynthetic apparatus of these organisms which links water oxidation to H2 production. Biological H2 has therefore the potential to be an alternative fuel of the future and shows great promise for generating large scale sustainable energy. Microalgae are able to produce H2 under light anoxic or dark anoxic condition by activating 3 different pathways that utilize the hydrogenases as catalysts. In this review, we highlight the principal barriers that prevent hydrogen production in green algae and how those limitations are being addressed, through metabolic and genetic engineering.  We also discuss the major challenges and bottlenecks facing the development of future commercial algal photobiological systems for H2 production. Finally we provide suggestions for future strategies and potential new techniques to be developed towards an integrated system with optimized hydrogen production.

  19. Remote sensing of vegetation canopy photosynthetic and stomatal conductance efficiencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myneni, R. B.; Ganapol, B. D.; Asrar, G.

    1992-01-01

    The problem of remote sensing the canopy photosynthetic and stomatal conductance efficiencies is investigated with the aid of one- and three-dimensional radiative transfer methods coupled to a semi-empirical mechanistic model of leaf photosynthesis and stomatal conductance. Desertlike vegetation is modeled as clumps of leaves randomly distributed on a bright dry soil with partial ground cover. Normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), canopy photosynthetic (Ep), and stomatal efficiencies (Es) are calculated for various geometrical, optical, and illumination conditions. The contribution of various radiative fluxes to estimates of Ep is evaluated and the magnitude of errors in bulk canopy formulation of problem parameters are quantified. The nature and sensitivity of the relationship between Ep and Es to NDVI is investigated, and an algorithm is proposed for use in operational remote sensing.

  20. Isolation of a bacterium capable of degrading peanut hull lignin

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, T.A.; Kerr, R.D.; Benner, R.

    1983-11-01

    Thirty-seven bacterial strains capable of degrading peanut hull lignin were isolated by using four types of lignin preparations and hot-water-extracted peanut hulls. One of the isolates, tentatively identified as Arthrobacter species, was capable of utilizing all four lignin preparations as well as extracted peanut hulls as a sole source of carbon. The bacterium was also capable of degrading specifically labeled (/sup 14/C) lignin-labeled lignocellulose and (/sup 14/C)cellulose-labeled lignocellulose from the cordgrass Spartina alterniflora and could also degrade (/sup 14/C) Kraft lignin from slash pine. After 10 days of incubation with (/sup 14/C) cellulose-labeled lignocellulose or (/sup 14/C) lignin-labeled lignocellulose from S. alterniflora, the bacterium mineralized 6.5% of the polysaccharide component and 2.9% of the lignin component. (Refs. 24).

  1. A Streamlined Strategy for Biohydrogen Production with an Alkaliphilic Bacterium

    SciTech Connect

    Elias, Dwayne A; Wall, Judy D.; Mormile, Dr. Melanie R.; Begemann, Matthew B

    2012-01-01

    Biofuels are anticipated to enable a shift from fossil fuels for renewable transportation and manufacturing fuels, with biohydrogen considered attractive since it could offer the largest reduction of global carbon budgets. Currently, biohydrogen production remains inefficient and heavily fossil fuel-dependent. However, bacteria using alkali-treated biomass could streamline biofuel production while reducing costs and fossil fuel needs. An alkaliphilic bacterium, Halanaerobium strain sapolanicus, is described that is capable of biohydrogen production at levels rivaling neutrophilic strains, but at pH 11 and hypersaline conditions. H. sapolanicus ferments a variety of 5- and 6- carbon sugars derived from hemicellulose and cellulose including cellobiose, and forms the end products hydrogen and acetate. Further, it can also produce biohydrogen from switchgrass and straw pretreated at temperatures far lower than any previously reported and in solutions compatible with growth. Hence, this bacterium can potentially increase the efficiency and efficacy of biohydrogen production from renewable biomass resources.

  2. Magnesium insertion by magnesium chelatase in the biosynthesis of zinc bacteriochlorophyll a in an aerobic acidophilic bacterium Acidiphilium rubrum.

    PubMed

    Masuda, T; Inoue, K; Masuda, M; Nagayama, M; Tamaki, A; Ohta, H; Shimada, H; Takamiya, K

    1999-11-19

    To elucidate the mechanism for formation of zinc-containing bacteriochlorophyll a in the photosynthetic bacterium Acidiphilium rubrum, we isolated homologs of magnesium chelatase subunits (bchI, -D, and -H). A. rubrum bchI and -H were encoded by single genes located on the clusters bchP-orf168-bchI-bchD-orf320-crtI and bchF-N-B-H-L as in Rhodobacter capsulatus, respectively. The deduced sequences of A. rubrum bchI, -D, and -H had overall identities of 59. 8, 40.5, and 50.7% to those from Rba. capsulatus, respectively. When these genes were introduced into bchI, bchD, and bchH mutants of Rba. capsulatus for functional complementation, all mutants were complemented with concomitant synthesis of bacteriochlorophyll a. Analyses of bacteriochlorophyll intermediates showed that A. rubrum cells accumulate magnesium protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester without detectable accumulation of zinc protoporphyrin IX or its monomethyl ester. These results indicate that a single set of magnesium chelatase homologs in A. rubrum catalyzes the insertion of only Mg(2+) into protoporphyrin IX to yield magnesium protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester. Consequently, it is most likely that zinc-containing bacteriochlorophyll a is formed by a substitution of Zn(2+) for Mg(2+) at a step in the bacteriochlorophyll biosynthesis after formation of magnesium protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester.

  3. Importance of Fluctuations in Light on Plant Photosynthetic Acclimation.

    PubMed

    Vialet-Chabrand, Silvere; Matthews, Jack S A; Simkin, Andrew J; Raines, Christine A; Lawson, Tracy

    2017-04-01

    The acclimation of plants to light has been studied extensively, yet little is known about the effect of dynamic fluctuations in light on plant phenotype and acclimatory responses. We mimicked natural fluctuations in light over a diurnal period to examine the effect on the photosynthetic processes and growth of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). High and low light intensities, delivered via a realistic dynamic fluctuating or square wave pattern, were used to grow and assess plants. Plants subjected to square wave light had thicker leaves and greater photosynthetic capacity compared with fluctuating light-grown plants. This, together with elevated levels of proteins associated with electron transport, indicates greater investment in leaf structural components and photosynthetic processes. In contrast, plants grown under fluctuating light had thinner leaves, lower leaf light absorption, but maintained similar photosynthetic rates per unit leaf area to square wave-grown plants. Despite high light use efficiency, plants grown under fluctuating light had a slow growth rate early in development, likely due to the fact that plants grown under fluctuating conditions were not able to fully utilize the light energy absorbed for carbon fixation. Diurnal leaf-level measurements revealed a negative feedback control of photosynthesis, resulting in a decrease in total diurnal carbon assimilated of at least 20%. These findings highlight that growing plants under square wave growth conditions ultimately fails to predict plant performance under realistic light regimes and stress the importance of considering fluctuations in incident light in future experiments that aim to infer plant productivity under natural conditions in the field.

  4. Excitation energy transfer in photosynthetic protein-pigment complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Shu-Hao

    Quantum biology is a relatively new research area which investigates the rules that quantum mechanics plays in biology. One of the most intriguing systems in this field is the coherent excitation energy transport (EET) in photosynthesis. In this document I will discuss the theories that are suitable for describing the photosynthetic EET process and the corresponding numerical results on several photosynthetic protein-pigment complexes (PPCs). In some photosynthetic EET processes, because of the electronic coupling between the chromophores within the system is about the same order of magnitude as system-bath coupling (electron-phonon coupling), a non-perturbative method called hierarchy equation of motion (HEOM) is applied to study the EET dynamics. The first part of this thesis includes brief introduction and derivation to the HEOM approach. The second part of this thesis the HEOM method will be applied to investigate the EET process within the B850 ring of the light harvesting complex 2 (LH2) from purple bacteria, Rhodopseudomonas acidophila. The dynamics of the exciton population and coherence will be analyzed under different initial excitation configurations and temperatures. Finally, how HEOM can be implemented to simulate the two-dimensional electronic spectra of photosynthetic PPCs will be discussed. Two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy is a crucial experimental technique to probe EET dynamics in multi-chromophoric systems. The system we are interested in is the 7-chromophore Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) complex from green sulfur bacteria, Prosthecochloris aestuarii. Recent crystallographic studies report the existence of an additional (eighth) chromophore in some of the FMO monomers. By applying HEOM we are able to calculate the two-dimensional electronic spectra of the 7-site and 8-site FMO complexes and investigate the functionality of the eighth chromophore.

  5. Water flow influences oxygen transport and photosynthetic efficiency in corals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finelli, Christopher M.; Helmuth, Brian S. T.; Pentcheff, N. Dean; Wethey, David S.

    2006-03-01

    Recent studies indicate that the incidence and persistence of damage from coral reef bleaching are often highest in areas of restricted water motion, and that resistance to and recovery from bleaching is increased by enhanced water motion. We examined the hypothesis that water motion increases the efflux of oxygen from coral tissue thereby reducing oxidative stress on the photosynthetic apparatus of endosymbiotic zooxanthellae. We experimentally exposed colonies of Montastrea annularis and Agaricia agaricites to manipulations of water flow, light intensity, and oxygen concentration in the field using a novel mini-flume. We measured photosynthetic efficiency using a pulse amplitude modulated fluorometer to test the short-term response of corals to our manipulations. Under normal oxygen concentrations, A. agaricites showed a significant 8% increase in photosynthetic efficiency from 0.238 (± 0.032) in still water to 0.256 (± 0.037) in 15 cm s-1 flow, while M. annularis exhibited no detectable change. Under high-ambient oxygen concentrations, the observed effect of flow on A. agaricites was reversed: photosynthetic efficiencies showed a significant 11% decrease from 0.236 (± 0.056) in still water to 0.211 (± 0.048) in 15 cm s-1 flow. These results support the hypothesis that water motion helps to remove oxygen from coral tissues during periods of maximal photosynthesis. Flow mitigation of oxidative stress may at least partially explain the increased incidence and severity of coral bleaching in low flow areas and observations of enhanced recovery in high-flow areas.

  6. Prochlorococcus, a Marine Photosynthetic Prokaryote of Global Significance

    PubMed Central

    Partensky, F.; Hess, W. R.; Vaulot, D.

    1999-01-01

    The minute photosynthetic prokaryote Prochlorococcus, which was discovered about 10 years ago, has proven exceptional from several standpoints. Its tiny size (0.5 to 0.7 μm in diameter) makes it the smallest known photosynthetic organism. Its ubiquity within the 40°S to 40°N latitudinal band of oceans and its occurrence at high density from the surface down to depths of 200 m make it presumably the most abundant photosynthetic organism on Earth. Prochlorococcus typically divides once a day in the subsurface layer of oligotrophic areas, where it dominates the photosynthetic biomass. It also possesses a remarkable pigment complement which includes divinyl derivatives of chlorophyll a (Chl a) and Chl b, the so-called Chl a2 and Chl b2, and, in some strains, small amounts of a new type of phycoerythrin. Phylogenetically, Prochlorococcus has also proven fascinating. Recent studies suggest that it evolved from an ancestral cyanobacterium by reducing its cell and genome sizes and by recruiting a protein originally synthesized under conditions of iron depletion to build a reduced antenna system as a replacement for large phycobilisomes. Environmental constraints clearly played a predominant role in Prochlorococcus evolution. Its tiny size is an advantage for its adaptation to nutrient-deprived environments. Furthermore, genetically distinct ecotypes, with different antenna systems and ecophysiological characteristics, are present at depth and in surface waters. This vertical species variation has allowed Prochlorococcus to adapt to the natural light gradient occurring in the upper layer of oceans. The present review critically assesses the basic knowledge acquired about Prochlorococcus both in the ocean and in the laboratory. PMID:10066832

  7. Stoichiometry and kinetics of mercury uptake by photosynthetic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Kis, Mariann; Sipka, Gábor; Maróti, Péter

    2017-03-04

    Mercury adsorption on the cell surface and intracellular uptake by bacteria represent the key first step in the production and accumulation of highly toxic mercury in living organisms. In this work, the biophysical characteristics of mercury bioaccumulation are studied in intact cells of photosynthetic bacteria by use of analytical (dithizone) assay and physiological photosynthetic markers (pigment content, fluorescence induction, and membrane potential) to determine the amount of mercury ions bound to the cell surface and taken up by the cell. It is shown that the Hg(II) uptake mechanism (1) has two kinetically distinguishable components, (2) includes co-opted influx through heavy metal transporters since the slow component is inhibited by Ca(2+) channel blockers, (3) shows complex pH dependence demonstrating the competition of ligand binding of Hg(II) ions with H(+) ions (low pH) and high tendency of complex formation of Hg(II) with hydroxyl ions (high pH), and (4) is not a passive but an energy-dependent process as evidenced by light activation and inhibition by protonophore. Photosynthetic bacteria can accumulate Hg(II) in amounts much (about 10(5)) greater than their own masses by well-defined strong and weak binding sites with equilibrium binding constants in the range of 1 (μM)(-1) and 1 (mM)(-1), respectively. The strong binding sites are attributed to sulfhydryl groups as the uptake is blocked by use of sulfhydryl modifying agents and their number is much (two orders of magnitude) smaller than the number of weak binding sites. Biofilms developed by some bacteria (e.g., Rvx. gelatinosus) increase the mercury binding capacity further by a factor of about five. Photosynthetic bacteria in the light act as a sponge of Hg(II) and can be potentially used for biomonitoring and bioremediation of mercury-contaminated aqueous cultures.

  8. Quantifying reflectance anisotropy of photosynthetically active radiation in grasslands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Middleton, Elizabeth M.

    1992-01-01

    Quantifying the vegetative surface's reflectance anisotropy was an important part of the First ISLSCP Field Experiment, as its major objectives focused on retrieval of surface parameters from satellite-derived reflectances. The explicit remote measurements for approximating the bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) of photosynthetically active radiation had not been previously undertaken. In this paper the proper expression of reflectance for BRDFs for retrieval of canopy parameters is assessed.

  9. Transition dipole moments of the Qy band in photosynthetic pigments.

    PubMed

    Oviedo, M Belén; Sánchez, Cristián G

    2011-11-10

    From studying the time evolution of the single electron density matrix within a density functional tight-binding formalism we calculate the Q(y) transition dipole moments vector direction and strength for a series of important photosynthetic pigments. We obtain good agreement with first-principles and experimental results and provide insights into the detailed nature of these excitations from the time evolving populations of molecular orbitals involved as well as correlations between pigment chemistry and dipole strength.

  10. Iron-mediated changes in phytoplankton photosynthetic competence during SOIREE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, P. W.; Abraham, E. R.

    Active fluorescence (fast repetition rate fluorometry, FRRF) was used to follow the photosynthetic response of the phytoplankton community during the 13-day Southern Ocean Iron RElease Experiment (SOIREE). This in situ iron enrichment was conducted in the polar waters of the Australasian-Pacific sector of the Southern Ocean in February 1999. Iron fertilisation of these high nitrate low chlorophyll (HNLC) waters resulted in an increase in the photosynthetic competence ( Fv/ Fm) of the resident cells from around 0.20 to greater than 0.60 (i.e. close to the theoretical maximum) by 10/11 days after the first enrichment. Although a significant iron-mediated response in Fv/ Fm was detected as early as 24 h after the initial fertilisation, the increase in Fv/ Fm to double ambient levels took 6 days. This response was five-fold slower than observed in iron enrichments (in situ and in vitro) in the HNLC waters of the subarctic and equatorial Pacific. Although little is known about the relationship between water temperature and Fv/ Fm, it is likely that low water temperatures — and possibly the deep mixed layer — were responsible for this slow response time. During SOIREE, the photosynthetic competence of the resident phytoplankton in iron-enriched waters increased at dissolved iron levels above 0.2 nM, suggesting that iron limitation was alleviated at this concentration. Increases in Fv/ Fm of cells within four algal size classes suggested that all taxa displayed a photosynthetic response to iron enrichment. Other physiological proxies of algal iron stress (such as flavodoxin levels in diatoms) exhibited different temporal trends to iron-enrichment than Fv/ Fm during the time-course of SOIREE. The relationship between Fv/ Fm, algal growth rate and such proxies in Southern Ocean waters is discussed.

  11. Thermostable purified endoglucanase from thermophilic bacterium acidothermus cellulolyticus

    DOEpatents

    Tucker, Melvin P.; Grohmann, Karel; Himmel, Michael E.; Mohagheghi, Ali

    1992-01-01

    A substantially purified high molecular weight cellulase enzyme having a molecular weight of between about 156,000 to about 203,400 daltons isolated from the bacterium Acidothermus cellulolyticus (ATCC 43068) and a method of producing it are disclosed. The enzyme is water soluble, possesses both C.sub.1 and C.sub.x types of enzymatic activity, has a high degree of stability toward heat and exhibits both a high optimum temperature activity and high inactivation characteristics.

  12. Isolation and Characterization of a Chlorinated-Pyridinol-Degrading Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Y.; Racke, K. D.; Bollag, J.

    1997-01-01

    The isolation of a pure culture of bacteria able to use 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol (TCP) as a sole source of carbon and energy under aerobic conditions was achieved for the first time. The bacterium was identified as a Pseudomonas sp. and designated ATCC 700113. [2,6-(sup14)C]TCP degradation yielded (sup14)CO(inf2), chloride, and unidentified polar metabolites. PMID:16535719

  13. Initiation of Chromosomal Replication in Predatory Bacterium Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus

    PubMed Central

    Makowski, Łukasz; Donczew, Rafał; Weigel, Christoph; Zawilak-Pawlik, Anna; Zakrzewska-Czerwińska, Jolanta

    2016-01-01

    Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus is a small Gram-negative predatory bacterium that attacks other Gram-negative bacteria, including many animal, human, and plant pathogens. This bacterium exhibits a peculiar biphasic life cycle during which two different types of cells are produced: non-replicating highly motile cells (the free-living phase) and replicating cells (the intracellular-growth phase). The process of chromosomal replication in B. bacteriovorus must therefore be temporally and spatially regulated to ensure that it is coordinated with cell differentiation and cell cycle progression. Recently, B. bacteriovorus has received considerable research interest due to its intriguing life cycle and great potential as a prospective antimicrobial agent. Although, we know that chromosomal replication in bacteria is mainly regulated at the initiation step, no data exists about this process in B. bacteriovorus. We report the first characterization of key elements of initiation of chromosomal replication – DnaA protein and oriC region from the predatory bacterium, B. bacteriovorus. In vitro studies using different approaches demonstrate that the B. bacteriovorus oriC (BdoriC) is specifically bound and unwound by the DnaA protein. Sequence comparison of the DnaA-binding sites enabled us to propose a consensus sequence for the B. bacteriovorus DnaA box [5′-NN(A/T)TCCACA-3′]. Surprisingly, in vitro analysis revealed that BdoriC is also bound and unwound by the host DnaA proteins (relatively distantly related from B. bacteriovorus). We compared the architecture of the DnaA–oriC complexes (orisomes) in homologous (oriC and DnaA from B. bacteriovorus) and heterologous (BdoriC and DnaA from prey, Escherichia coli or Pseudomonas aeruginosa) systems. This work provides important new entry points toward improving our understanding of the initiation of chromosomal replication in this predatory bacterium. PMID:27965633

  14. Automated systems to monitor space radiation effect on photosynthetic organisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, D.; di Costa, F.; Faraloni, C.; Fasolo, F.; Pace, E.; Perosino, M.; Torzillo, G.; Touloupakis, E.; Zanini, A.; Giardi, M. T.

    We developed automated biodevices to obtain, automatically, measures about the space radiation effect on living photosynthetic organisms, which can be used as biomass and oxygen-producing system on shuttles or ISS. Vitality measurements were performed by optical devices (fluorimeters) measuring fluorescence emission. Fluorescence methodology is a well known applied technique for studying photosynthetic activity, and in particular the oxygen-evolving process of photosynthetic organisms. Different strains of unicellular green algae are properly immobilized on agar growth medium and kept under survial light. The biodevices are characterised by the sensibility and selectivity of the biological component response, together with easy use, versatility, miniature size and low cost. We performed experiments in some facilities, in order to understand separately the effect of radiation of different LET, on the biochemical activity (gamma rays at Joint Research Centre -Varese, Italy; fast neutrons at CERF -- SPS beam at CERN -Geneva, Switzerland). The exposure to different radiation beams of the automatic devices, allowed us to test them under stress condition. In one year, these instrument are expected to be sent to space, inside a spacecraft, in order to study the effect of ionising cosmic radiation during an ESA flight.

  15. Variation potential influence on photosynthetic cyclic electron flow in pea

    PubMed Central

    Sukhov, Vladimir; Surova, Lyubov; Sherstneva, Oksana; Katicheva, Lyubov; Vodeneev, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    Cyclic electron flow is an important component of the total photosynthetic electron flow and participates in adaptation to the action of stressors. Local leaf stimulation induces electrical signals, including variation potential (VP), which inactivate photosynthesis; however, their influence on cyclic electron flow has not been investigated. The aim of this study was to investigate VP's influence on cyclic electron flow in pea (Pisum sativum L.). VP was induced in pea seedling leaves by local heating and measured in an adjacent, undamaged leaf by extracellular electrodes. CO2 assimilation was measured using a portable gas exchange measuring system. Photosystem I and II parameters were investigated using a measuring system for simultaneous assessment of P700 oxidation and chlorophyll fluorescence. Heating-induced VP reduced CO2 assimilation and electron flow through photosystem II. In response, cyclic electron flow rapidly decreased and subsequently slowly increased. Slow increases in cyclic flow were caused by decreased electron flow through photosystem II, which was mainly connected with VP-induced photosynthetic dark stage inactivation. However, direct influence by VP on photosystem I also participated in activation of cyclic electron flow. Thus, VP, induced by local leaf-heating, activated cyclic electron flow in undamaged leaves. This response was similar to photosynthetic changes observed under the direct action of stressors. Possible mechanisms of VP's influence on cyclic flow were discussed. PMID:25610447

  16. Photosynthetic Physiological Characteristics of Gazania rigens L. Under Drought Stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, T. T.; Zheng, S. W.; Zhou, X. H.; Wang, D. X.; Lu, X. P.

    2016-08-01

    To investigate the responses of photosynthetic physiological characteristics of Gazania rigens L. to drought stress, the changes of three cultivars (‘Xingbai’, ‘XH’ and ‘Hongwen’) photosynthetic values under drought stress were determined via LI-6400 portable photosynthesis analyzer (LI-COR, USA), and the relationships between photosynthesis and drought resistance of each cultivar were analyzed. The results showed that, three cultivars net photosynthetic rate (Pn), stomatal conductance (Gs), transpiration rate (Tr), and light use efficiency (LUE) value indicated the trend of decreasing gradually and there existed significant reduction in Pn and Gs values. There were extremely negative significant correlations between drought stress treatment days and Pn, Gs, Tr, water use efficiency (WUE) and LUE values. A small amount of leaves began to turn soft and yellow after drought stress treatment for 10 days, but they could recover to grow quickly after rehydration. The Pn values of ‘Hongwen’ decreased quickly and changed in a large range, so it had a poor resistance; the Pn values of ‘Xingbai’ decreased slowly and changed in a small range, so it had a strong resistance; while the changes of their hybrids -‘XH’ were between its parents. This research would provide a theoretical basis for gazania resistance cultivar breeding and application in landscape.

  17. Single-Molecule Fluorescence Spectroscopy of Photosynthetic Systems.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Toru; Chen, Wei Jia; Schlau-Cohen, Gabriela S

    2017-01-25

    Photosynthesis begins when a network of pigment-protein complexes captures solar energy and transports it to the reaction center, where charge separation occurs. When necessary (under low light conditions), photosynthetic organisms perform this energy transport and charge separation with near unity quantum efficiency. Remarkably, this high efficiency is maintained under physiological conditions, which include thermal fluctuations of the pigment-protein complexes and changing local environments. These conditions introduce multiple types of heterogeneity in the pigment-protein complexes, including structural heterogeneity, energetic heterogeneity, and functional heterogeneity. Understanding how photosynthetic light-harvesting functions in the face of these fluctuations requires understanding this heterogeneity, which, in turn, requires characterization of individual pigment-protein complexes. Single-molecule spectroscopy has the power to probe individual complexes. In this review, we present an overview of the common techniques for single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy applied to photosynthetic systems and describe selected experiments on these systems. We discuss how these experiments provide a new understanding of the impact of heterogeneity on light harvesting and thus how these systems are optimized to capture sunlight under physiological conditions.

  18. Continuous cultivation of photosynthetic microorganisms: Approaches, applications and future trends.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Bruno D; Mota, Andre; Teixeira, Jose A; Vicente, Antonio A

    2015-11-01

    The possibility of using photosynthetic microorganisms, such as cyanobacteria and microalgae, for converting light and carbon dioxide into valuable biochemical products has raised the need for new cost-efficient processes ensuring a constant product quality. Food, feed, biofuels, cosmetics and pharmaceutics are among the sectors that can profit from the application of photosynthetic microorganisms. Biomass growth in a photobioreactor is a complex process influenced by multiple parameters, such as photosynthetic light capture and attenuation, nutrient uptake, photobioreactor hydrodynamics and gas-liquid mass transfer. In order to optimize productivity while keeping a standard product quality, a permanent control of the main cultivation parameters is necessary, where the continuous cultivation has shown to be the best option. However it is of utmost importance to recognize the singularity of continuous cultivation of cyanobacteria and microalgae due to their dependence on light availability and intensity. In this sense, this review provides comprehensive information on recent breakthroughs and possible future trends regarding technological and process improvements in continuous cultivation systems of microalgae and cyanobacteria, that will directly affect cost-effectiveness and product quality standardization. An overview of the various applications, techniques and equipment (with special emphasis on photobioreactors) in continuous cultivation of microalgae and cyanobacteria are presented. Additionally, mathematical modeling, feasibility, economics as well as the applicability of continuous cultivation into large-scale operation, are discussed.

  19. Photosynthetic strategies in leaves and stems of Egeria densa.

    PubMed

    Rascio, N; Mariani, P; Tommasini, E; Bodner, M; Larcher, W

    1991-10-01

    Photosynthetic mechanisms have been compared in leaves and, separately, in stems of Egeria densa Planch. In order to correlate the structural and functional characteristics of the two organs (1) the ultrastructural features of leaves and stems have been studied and (2) their photosynthetic activity has been evaluated by measuring in vivo both oxygen evolution and the kinetics of chlorophyll fluorescence. The results confirm the aquatic behaviour of the leaf which is able to utilize inorganic C supplied both as CO2 and HCO 3 (-) . In this respect, the different wall organization found in the two cell layers of the leaf is particularly interesting, since it could be related to the known polar mechanism of inorganic-C uptake. The stem, by contrast, behaves rather as an aerial organ, needing very high CO2 concentrations in the aquatic environment in order to carry out photosynthesis. In the stem, the aerenchyma plays a role in supplying the green cells with gaseous respiratory CO2, thus facilitating the photosynthetic activity of the submerged stems.

  20. Counting viruses and bacteria in photosynthetic microbial mats.

    PubMed

    Carreira, Cátia; Staal, Marc; Middelboe, Mathias; Brussaard, Corina P D

    2015-03-01

    Viral abundances in benthic environments are the highest found in aquatic systems. Photosynthetic microbial mats represent benthic environments with high microbial activity and possibly high viral densities, yet viral abundances have not been examined in such systems. Existing extraction procedures typically used in benthic viral ecology were applied to the complex matrix of microbial mats but were found to inefficiently extract viruses. Here, we present a method for extraction and quantification of viruses from photosynthetic microbial mats using epifluorescence microscopy (EFM) and flow cytometry (FCM). A combination of EDTA addition, probe sonication, and enzyme treatment applied to a glutaraldehyde-fixed sample resulted in a substantially higher viral (5- to 33-fold) extraction efficiency and reduced background noise compared to previously published methods. Using this method, it was found that in general, intertidal photosynthetic microbial mats harbor very high viral abundances (2.8 × 10(10) ± 0.3 × 10(10) g(-1)) compared with benthic habitats (10(7) to 10(9) g(-1)). This procedure also showed 4.5- and 4-fold-increased efficacies of extraction of viruses and bacteria, respectively, from intertidal sediments, allowing a single method to be used for the microbial mat and underlying sediment.

  1. Improvement of Photosynthetic Efficiency Through Reduction of Chlorophyll Antenna Size

    SciTech Connect

    Blankinship, S.L.; Greenbaum, E.; Lee, J.W.; Mets, L.

    1999-05-03

    We have previously presented a graphical illustration of a strategy to improve photosynthetic conversion efficiencies by a reduction of the antenna size in photosynthetic reaction centers. During the current reporting period, we have made progress in demonstrating the conceptual correctness of this idea. Light-saturation studies for CO, in air were performed with an antenna-deficient mutant of Chlamydomonas (DS521) and the wild type (DES15). The light-saturated rate for CO(2), assimilation in mutant DS521 was about two times higher (187 Mu-mol.h(-1).mg chl(-1)) than that of the wild type, DES15 (95 Mu-mol.h(-1).mg chl(-1). Significantly, a partial linearization of the light-saturation curve was also observed. The light intensities that give half-saturation of the photosynthetic rate were 276 and 152 Mu-E.m(-2).s(-1) in DS521 and DES15, respectively. These results confirmed that DS521 has a smaller chlorophyll antenna size and demonstrated that the reduction of antenna size can indeed improve the overall efficiency of photon utilization. Corresponding experiments were also performed with CO(2), in helium. Under this anaerobic condition, no photoinhibition was observed, even at elevated light intensities. Photoinhibition occurs under aerobic conditions. The antenna-deficient mutant DS521 can also provide significant resistance to photoinhibition, in addition to the improvement in the overall efficiency in CO(2), fixation.

  2. Photosynthetic microbial fuel cells with positive light response.

    PubMed

    Zou, Yongjin; Pisciotta, John; Billmyre, R Blake; Baskakov, Ilia V

    2009-12-01

    The current study introduces an aerobic single-chamber photosynthetic microbial fuel cell (PMFC). Evaluation of PMFC performance using naturally growing fresh-water photosynthetic biofilm revealed a weak positive light response, that is, an increase in cell voltage upon illumination. When the PMFC anodes were coated with electrically conductive polymers, the rate of voltage increased and the amplitude of the light response improved significantly. The rapid immediate positive response to light was consistent with a mechanism postulating that the photosynthetic electron-transfer chain is the source of the electrons harvested on the anode surface. This mechanism is fundamentally different from the one exploited in previously designed anaerobic microbial fuel cells (MFCs), sediment MFCs, or anaerobic PMFCs, where the electrons are derived from the respiratory electron-transfer chain. The power densities produced in PMFCs were substantially lower than those that are currently reported for conventional MFC (0.95 mW/m(2) for polyaniline-coated and 1.3 mW/m(2) for polypyrrole-coated anodes). However, the PMFC did not depend on an organic substrate as an energy source and was powered only by light energy. Its operation was CO(2)-neutral and did not require buffers or exogenous electron transfer shuttles.

  3. A global scale mechanistic model of the photosynthetic capacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, A. A.; Xu, C.; Rogers, A.; Fisher, R. A.; Wullschleger, S. D.; McDowell, N. G.; Massoud, E. C.; Vrugt, J. A.; Muss, J. D.; Fisher, J. B.; Reich, P. B.; Wilson, C. J.

    2015-08-01

    Although plant photosynthetic capacity as determined by the maximum carboxylation rate (i.e., Vc, max25) and the maximum electron transport rate (i.e., Jmax25) at a reference temperature (generally 25 °C) is known to vary substantially in space and time in response to environmental conditions, it is typically parameterized in Earth system models (ESMs) with tabulated values associated to plant functional types. In this study, we developed a mechanistic model of leaf utilization of nitrogen for assimilation (LUNA V1.0) to predict the photosynthetic capacity at the global scale under different environmental conditions, based on the optimization of nitrogen allocated among light capture, electron transport, carboxylation, and respiration. The LUNA model was able to reasonably well capture the observed patterns of photosynthetic capacity in view that it explained approximately 55 % of the variation in observed Vc, max25 and 65 % of the variation in observed Jmax25 across the globe. Our model simulations under current and future climate conditions indicated that Vc, max25 could be most affected in high-latitude regions under a warming climate and that ESMs using a fixed Vc, max25 or Jmax25 by plant functional types were likely to substantially overestimate future global photosynthesis.

  4. A global scale mechanistic model of the photosynthetic capacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, C.; Ali, A. A.; Fisher, R.; Wullschleger, S. D.; Rogers, A.; McDowell, N. G.; Wilson, C. J.

    2015-12-01

    Although plant photosynthetic capacity as determined by the maximum carboxylation rate (i.e., Vc,max25) and the maximum electron transport rate (i.e., Jmax25) at a reference temperature (generally 25oC) is known to vary substantially in space and time in response to environmental conditions, it is typically parameterized in Earth system models (ESMs) with tabulated values associated to plant functional types. In this study, we developed a mechanistic model of leaf utilization of nitrogen for assimilation (LUNA V1.0) to predict the photosynthetic capacity at the global scale under different environmental conditions, based on the optimization of nitrogen allocated among light capture, electron transport, carboxylation, and respiration. The LUNA model was able to reasonably well capture the observed patterns of photosynthetic capacity in view that it explained approximately 55% of the variation in observed Vc,max25 and 65% of the variation in observed Jmax25 across the globe. Our model simulations under current and future climate conditions indicated that Vc,max25 could be most affected in high-latitude regions under a warming climate and that ESMs using a fixed Vc,max25 or Jmax25 by plant functional types were likely to substantially overestimate future global photosynthesis.

  5. Evidence that putrescine modulates the higher plant photosynthetic proton circuit.

    PubMed

    Ioannidis, Nikolaos E; Cruz, Jeffrey A; Kotzabasis, Kiriakos; Kramer, David M

    2012-01-01

    The light reactions of photosynthesis store energy in the form of an electrochemical gradient of protons, or proton motive force (pmf), comprised of electrical (Δψ) and osmotic (ΔpH) components. Both components can drive the synthesis of ATP at the chloroplast ATP synthase, but the ΔpH component also plays a key role in regulating photosynthesis, down-regulating the efficiency of light capture by photosynthetic antennae via the q(E) mechanism, and governing electron transfer at the cytochrome b(6)f complex. Differential partitioning of pmf into ΔpH and Δψ has been observed under environmental stresses and proposed as a mechanism for fine-tuning photosynthetic regulation, but the mechanism of this tuning is unknown. We show here that putrescine can alter the partitioning of pmf both in vivo (in Arabidopsis mutant lines and in Nicotiana wild type) and in vitro, suggesting that the endogenous titer of weak bases such as putrescine represents an unrecognized mechanism for regulating photosynthetic responses to the environment.

  6. Ionic liquids effects on the permeability of photosynthetic membranes probed by the electrochromic shift of endogenous carotenoids.

    PubMed

    Malferrari, Marco; Malferrari, Danilo; Francia, Francesco; Galletti, Paola; Tagliavini, Emilio; Venturoli, Giovanni

    2015-11-01

    Ionic liquids (ILs) are promising materials exploited as solvents and media in many innovative applications, some already used at the industrial scale. The chemical structure and physicochemical properties of ILs can differ significantly according to the specific applications for which they have been synthesized. As a consequence, their interaction with biological entities and toxicity can vary substantially. To select highly effective and minimally harmful ILs, these properties need to be investigated. Here we use the so called chromatophores--protein-phospholipid membrane vesicles obtained from the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides--to assess the effects of imidazolinium and pyrrolidinium ILs, with chloride or dicyanamide as counter anions, on the ionic permeability of a native biological membrane. The extent and modalities by which these ILs affect the ionic conductivity can be studied in chromatophores by analyzing the electrochromic response of endogenous carotenoids, acting as an intramembrane voltmeter at the molecular level. We show that chromatophores represent an in vitro experimental model suitable to probe permeability changes induced in cell membranes by ILs differing in chemical nature, degree of oxygenation of the cationic moiety and counter anion.

  7. Calculation of the radiative properties of photosynthetic microorganisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dauchet, Jérémi; Blanco, Stéphane; Cornet, Jean-François; Fournier, Richard

    2015-08-01

    A generic methodological chain for the predictive calculation of the light-scattering and absorption properties of photosynthetic microorganisms within the visible spectrum is presented here. This methodology has been developed in order to provide the radiative properties needed for the analysis of radiative transfer within photobioreactor processes, with a view to enable their optimization for large-scale sustainable production of chemicals for energy and chemistry. It gathers an electromagnetic model of light-particle interaction along with detailed and validated protocols for the determination of input parameters: morphological and structural characteristics of the studied microorganisms as well as their photosynthetic-pigment content. The microorganisms are described as homogeneous equivalent-particles whose shape and size distribution is characterized by image analysis. The imaginary part of their refractive index is obtained thanks to a new and quite extended database of the in vivo absorption spectra of photosynthetic pigments (that is made available to the reader). The real part of the refractive index is then calculated by using the singly subtractive Kramers-Krönig approximation, for which the anchor point is determined with the Bruggeman mixing rule, based on the volume fraction of the microorganism internal-structures and their refractive indices (extracted from a database). Afterwards, the radiative properties are estimated using the Schiff approximation for spheroidal or cylindrical particles, as a first step toward the description of the complexity and diversity of the shapes encountered within the microbial world. Finally, these predictive results are confronted to experimental normal-hemispherical transmittance spectra for validation. This entire procedure is implemented for Rhodospirillum rubrum, Arthrospira platensis and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, each representative of the main three kinds of photosynthetic microorganisms, i.e. respectively

  8. Bio-Inspired Assembly of Artificial Photosynthetic Antenna Complexes for Development of Nanobiodevices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-24

    distribution unlimited. 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT This is the report of a project to sue photosynthetic antenna pigment complexes of... pigment complexes of purple photosynthetic bacteria in order to control the direction and orientation of the complex on electrodes with pattern for...of modified photosynthetic protein / pigments complexes or their protein-mimic materials to perform tasks of light-harvesting and charge separation

  9. Probing the dynamics of photosynthetic membranes with fluorescence recovery after photobleaching.

    PubMed

    Mullineaux, Conrad W; Sarcina, Mary

    2002-06-01

    In the past few years, there has been remarkable progress in knowledge of the structures and organization of the protein complexes of photosynthetic membranes. However, static structures do not tell the whole story. Photosynthetic membranes, like other biological membranes, are dynamic systems. Recent technological advances are making it increasingly easy to probe the dynamics of photosynthetic membranes using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching. Here we explain the potential and the limitations of the technique.

  10. PS2013 Satellite Workshop on Photosynthetic Light-Harvesting Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Niederman, Robert A.; Blankenship, Robert E.; Frank, Harry A.

    2015-02-07

    These funds were used for partial support of the PS2013 Satellite Workshop on Photosynthetic Light-Harvesting Systems, that was held on 8-11 August, 2013, at Washington University, St. Louis, MO. This conference, held in conjunction with the 16th International Congress on Photosynthesis/St. Louis, continued a long tradition of light-harvesting satellite conferences that have been held prior to the previous six international photosynthesis congresses. In this Workshop, the basis was explored for the current interest in replacing fossil fuels with energy sources derived form direct solar radiation, coupled with light-driven electron transport in natural photosynthetic systems and how they offer a valuable blueprint for conversion of sunlight to useful energy forms. This was accomplished through sessions on the initial light-harvesting events in the biological conversion of solar energy to chemically stored energy forms, and how these natural photosynthetic processes serve as a guide to the development of robust bio-hybrid and artificial systems for solar energy conversion into both electricity or chemical fuels. Organized similar to a Gordon Research Conference, a lively, informal and collegial setting was established, highlighting the exchange of exciting new data and unpublished results from ongoing studies. A significant amount of time was set aside for open discussion and interactive poster sessions, with a special session devoted to oral presentations by talented students and postdoctoral fellows judged to have the best posters. This area of research has seen exceptionally rapid progress in recent years, with the availability of a number of antenna protein structures at atomic resolution, elucidation of the molecular surface architecture of native photosynthetic membranes by atomic force microscopy and the maturing of ultrafast spectroscopic and molecular biological techniques for the investigation and manipulation of photosynthetic systems. The conferees

  11. Effects of ultraviolet radiation (UVA+UVB) on young gametophytes of Gelidium floridanum: growth rate, photosynthetic pigments, carotenoids, photosynthetic performance, and ultrastructure.

    PubMed

    Simioni, Carmen; Schmidt, Eder C; Felix, Marthiellen R de L; Polo, Luz Karime; Rover, Ticiane; Kreusch, Marianne; Pereira, Debora T; Chow, Fungyi; Ramlov, Fernanda; Maraschin, Marcelo; Bouzon, Zenilda L

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of radiation (PAR+UVA+UVB) on the development and growth rates (GRs) of young gametophytes of Gelidium floridanum. In addition, photosynthetic pigments were quantified, carotenoids identified, and photosynthetic performance assessed. Over a period of 3 days, young gametophytes were cultivated under laboratory conditions and exposed to photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) at 80 μmol photons m(-2) s(-1) and PAR+UVA (0.70 W m(-2))+UVB (0.35 W m(-2)) for 3 h per day. The samples were processed for light and electron microscopy to analyze the ultrastructure features, as well as carry out metabolic studies of GRs, quantify the content of photosynthetic pigments, identify carotenoids and assess photosynthetic performance. PAR+UVA+UVB promoted increase in cell wall thickness, accumulation of floridean starch grains in the cytoplasm and disruption of chloroplast internal organization. Algae exposed to PAR+UVA+UVB also showed a reduction in GR of 97%. Photosynthetic pigments, in particular, phycoerythrin and allophycocyanin contents, decreased significantly from UV radiation exposure. This result agrees with the decrease in photosynthetic performance observed after exposure to ultraviolet radiation, as measured by a decrease in the electron transport rate (ETR), where values of ETRmax declined approximately 44.71%. It can be concluded that radiation is a factor that affects the young gametophytes of G. floridanum at this stage of development.

  12. Long-term population dynamics of phototrophic sulfur bacteria in the chemocline of Lake Cadagno, Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Tonolla, Mauro; Peduzzi, Raffaele; Hahn, Dittmar

    2005-07-01

    Population analyses in water samples obtained from the chemocline of crenogenic, meromictic Lake Cadagno, Switzerland, in October for the years 1994 to 2003 were studied using in situ hybridization with specific probes. During this 10-year period, large shifts in abundance between purple and green sulfur bacteria and among different populations were obtained. Purple sulfur bacteria were the numerically most prominent phototrophic sulfur bacteria in samples obtained from 1994 to 2001, when they represented between 70 and 95% of the phototrophic sulfur bacteria. All populations of purple sulfur bacteria showed large fluctuations in time with populations belonging to the genus Lamprocystis being numerically much more important than those of the genera Chromatium and Thiocystis. Green sulfur bacteria were initially represented by Chlorobium phaeobacteroides but were replaced by Chlorobium clathratiforme by the end of the study. C. clathratiforme was the only green sulfur bacterium detected during the last 2 years of the analysis, when a shift in dominance from purple sulfur bacteria to green sulfur bacteria was observed in the chemocline. At this time, numbers of purple sulfur bacteria had decreased and those of green sulfur bacteria increased by about 1 order of magnitude and C. clathratiforme represented about 95% of the phototrophic sulfur bacteria. This major change in community structure in the chemocline was accompanied by changes in profiles of turbidity and photosynthetically available radiation, as well as for sulfide concentrations and light intensity. Overall, these findings suggest that a disruption of the chemocline in 2000 may have altered environmental niches and populations in subsequent years.

  13. Enhancement of leaf photosynthetic capacity through increased stomatal density in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yu; Sugano, Shigeo S; Shimada, Tomoo; Hara-Nishimura, Ikuko

    2013-05-01

    Photosynthetic rate is determined by CO2 fixation and CO2 entry into the plant through pores in the leaf epidermis called stomata. However, the effect of increased stomatal density on photosynthetic rate remains unclear. This work investigated the effect of alteration of stomatal density on leaf photosynthetic capacity in Arabidopsis thaliana. Stomatal density was modulated by overexpressing or silencing STOMAGEN, a positive regulator of stomatal development. Leaf photosynthetic capacity and plant growth were examined in transgenic plants. Increased stomatal density in STOMAGEN-overexpressing plants enhanced the photosynthetic rate by 30% compared to wild-type plants. Transgenic plants showed increased stomatal conductance under ambient CO2 conditions and did not show alterations in the maximum rate of carboxylation, indicating that the enhancement of photosynthetic rate was caused by gas diffusion changes. A leaf photosynthesis-intercellular CO2 concentration response curve showed that photosynthetic rate was increased under high CO2 conditions in association with increased stomatal density. STOMAGEN overexpression did not alter whole plant biomass, whereas its silencing caused biomass reduction. Our results indicate that increased stomatal density enhanced leaf photosynthetic capacity by modulating gas diffusion. Stomatal density may be a target trait for plant engineering to improve photosynthetic capacity.

  14. Chitin utilization by the insect-transmitted bacterium Xylella fastidiosa.

    PubMed

    Killiny, Nabil; Prado, Simone S; Almeida, Rodrigo P P

    2010-09-01

    Xylella fastidiosa is an insect-borne bacterium that colonizes xylem vessels of a large number of host plants, including several crops of economic importance. Chitin is a polysaccharide present in the cuticle of leafhopper vectors of X. fastidiosa and may serve as a carbon source for this bacterium. Biological assays showed that X. fastidiosa reached larger populations in the presence of chitin. Additionally, chitin induced phenotypic changes in this bacterium, notably increasing adhesiveness. Quantitative PCR assays indicated transcriptional changes in the presence of chitin, and an enzymatic assay demonstrated chitinolytic activity by X. fastidiosa. An ortholog of the chitinase A gene (chiA) was identified in the X. fastidiosa genome. The in silico analysis revealed that the open reading frame of chiA encodes a protein of 351 amino acids with an estimated molecular mass of 40 kDa. chiA is in a locus that consists of genes implicated in polysaccharide degradation. Moreover, this locus was also found in the genomes of closely related bacteria in the genus Xanthomonas, which are plant but not insect associated. X. fastidiosa degraded chitin when grown on a solid chitin-yeast extract-agar medium and grew in liquid medium with chitin as the sole carbon source; ChiA was also determined to be secreted. The gene encoding ChiA was cloned into Escherichia coli, and endochitinase activity was detected in the transformant, showing that the gene is functional and involved in chitin degradation. The results suggest that X. fastidiosa may use its vectors' foregut surface as a carbon source. In addition, chitin may trigger X. fastidiosa's gene regulation and biofilm formation within vectors. Further work is necessary to characterize the role of chitin and its utilization in X. fastidiosa.

  15. [Rhodobaculum claviforme gen. nov., sp. nov., a New Alkaliphilic Nonsulfur Purple Bacterium].

    PubMed

    Bryantseva, I A; Gaisin, V A; Gorlenko, V M

    2015-01-01

    Two alkaliphilic strains of nonsulfur purple bacteria (NPB), B7-4 and B8-2, were isolated from southeast Siberia moderately saline alkaline steppe lakes with pH values above 9.0. The isolates were motile, polymorphous cells (from short rods to long spindly cells) 2.0-3.2 x 9.6-20.0 μm. Intracellular membranes of vesicular type were mostly located at the cell periphery. The microorganisms contained bacteriochlorophyll a and carotenoids of the spheroidene and spirilloxanthin series. The photosynthetic apparatus was represented by LH2 and LH1 light-harvesting complexes. In the presence of organic compounds, the strains grew aerobically in the dark or anaerobically in the light. Capacity for photo- and chemoautotrophic growth was not detected. The cbbl gene encoding RuBisCO was not revealed. Optimal growth of both strains occurred at 2% NaCl (range from 0.5 to 4%), pH 8.0-8.8 (range from 7.5 to 9.7), and 25-35 degrees C. The DNA G+C content was 67.6-69.8 mol %. Pairwise comparison of the nucleotides of the 16S rRNA genes revealed that strains B7-4 and B8-2 belonged to the same species (99.9% homology) and were most closely related to the aerobic alkaliphilic bacteriochlorophyll a-containing anoxygenic phototrophic bacterium (APB) Roseibacula alcaliphilum De (95.2%) and to NPB strains Rhodobaca barguzinensis VKM B-2406(T) (94.2%) and Rbc. bogoriensis LBB1(T) (93.9%). The isolates were closely related to the NPB Rhodobacter veldkampii DSM 11550(T) (94.8%) and to aerobic bacteriochlorophyll a-containing bacteria Roseinatronobacter monicus ROS 35(T) and Roseicitreum antarcticul ZS2-28(T) (93.5 and 93.9%, respectively). New strains were described as a new NPB genus and species of the family Rhodobacteriaceae, Rhodobaculum claviforme gen. nov., sp. nov., with B7-4(T) (VKM B-2708, LMG 28126) as the type strain.

  16. Alternating electron and proton transfer steps in photosynthetic water oxidation.

    PubMed

    Klauss, André; Haumann, Michael; Dau, Holger

    2012-10-02

    Water oxidation by cyanobacteria, algae, and plants is pivotal in oxygenic photosynthesis, the process that powers life on Earth, and is the paradigm for engineering solar fuel-production systems. Each complete reaction cycle of photosynthetic water oxidation requires the removal of four electrons and four protons from the catalytic site, a manganese-calcium complex and its protein environment in photosystem II. In time-resolved photothermal beam deflection experiments, we monitored apparent volume changes of the photosystem II protein associated with charge creation by light-induced electron transfer (contraction) and charge-compensating proton relocation (expansion). Two previously invisible proton removal steps were detected, thereby filling two gaps in the basic reaction-cycle model of photosynthetic water oxidation. In the S(2) → S(3) transition of the classical S-state cycle, an intermediate is formed by deprotonation clearly before electron transfer to the oxidant (Y Z OX). The rate-determining elementary step (τ, approximately 30 µs at 20 °C) in the long-distance proton relocation toward the protein-water interface is characterized by a high activation energy (E(a) = 0.46 ± 0.05 eV) and strong H/D kinetic isotope effect (approximately 6). The characteristics of a proton transfer step during the S(0) → S(1) transition are similar (τ, approximately 100 µs; E(a) = 0.34 ± 0.08 eV; kinetic isotope effect, approximately 3); however, the proton removal from the Mn complex proceeds after electron transfer to . By discovery of the transient formation of two further intermediate states in the reaction cycle of photosynthetic water oxidation, a temporal sequence of strictly alternating removal of electrons and protons from the catalytic site is established.

  17. Transpiration-induced changes in the photosynthetic capacity of leaves.

    PubMed

    Sharkey, T D

    1984-02-01

    High transpiration rates were found to affect the photosynthetic capacity of Xanthium strumarium L. leaves in a manner analagous to that of low soil water potential. The effect was also looked for and found in Gossypium hirsutum L., Agathis robusta (C. Moore ex Muell.) Bailey, Eucalyptus microcarpa Maiden, Larrea divaricata Cav., the wilty flacca tomato mutant (Lycopersicon esculentum (L.) Mill.) and Scrophularia desertorum (Munz) Shaw. Two methods were used to distinguish between effects on stomatal conductance, which can lower assimilation by reducing CO2 availability, and effects on the photosynthetic capacity of the mesophyll. First, the response of assimilation to intercellular CO2 pressure (C i) was compared under conditions of high and low transpiration. Second, in addition to estimating C i using the usual Ohm's law analogy, C i was measured directly using the closed-loop technique of T.D. Sharkey, K. Imai, G.D. Farquhar and I.R. Cowan (1982, Plant Physiol, 60, 657-659). Transpiration stress responses of Xanthium strumarium were compared with soil drought effects. Both stresses reduced photosynthesis at high C i but not at low C i; transpiration stress increased the quantum requirement of photosynthesis. Transpiration stress could be induced in small sections of leaves. Total transpiration from the plant did not influence the photosynthetic capacity of a leaf kept under constant conditions, indicating that water deficits develop over small areas within the leaf. The effect of high transpiration on photosynthesis was reversed approximately half-way by returning the plants to low-transpiration conditions. This reversal occurred as fast as measurements could be made (5 min), but little further recovery was observed in subsequent hours.

  18. Photosynthetic characteristics of sinking microalgae under the sea ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Shinya; Michel, Christine; Gosselin, Michel; Demers, Serge; Fukuchi, Mitsuo; Taguchi, Satoru

    2014-12-01

    The photosynthetic characteristics of sinking a microalgal community were studied to compare with the ice algal community in the sea ice and the phytoplankton community in the water column under the sea ice at the beginning of the light season in the first-year sea ice ecosystem on the Mackenzie Shelf, in the western Canadian Arctic. The phytoplankton community was collected using a water bottle, whereas the sinking algal community was collected using particle collectors, and the ice algal community was obtained by using an ice-core sampler from the bottom portion of ice core. Photosynthesis versus irradiance (P-E) incubation experiments were conducted on deck to obtain the initial slope (αB) and the maximum photosynthetic rate (PmB) of the three algal communities. The αB and the PmB of the light saturation curve, and chlorophyll a (Chl a) specific absorption coefficient (āph*) between the sinking microalgal community and the ice algal community were similar and were distinctly different from the phytoplankton community. The significant linear relationship between αB and PmB, which was obtained among the three groups, may suggest that a photo-acclimation strategy is common for all algal communities under the low light regime of the early season. Although the sinking algal community could be held for the entire duration of deployment at maximum, this community remained photosynthetically active once exposed to light. This response suggests that sinking algal communities can be the seed population, which results in a subsequent phytoplankton bloom under the sea ice or in a surface layer, as well as representing food for the higher trophic level consumers in the Arctic Ocean even before the receding of the sea ice.

  19. Photoperiodic controls on ecosystem-level photosynthetic capacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoy, P. C.; Trowbridge, A. M.; Bauerle, W.

    2012-12-01

    Most models of photosynthesis at the leaf or canopy level assume that temperature is the dominant control on the variability of photosynthetic parameters. Recent studies, however, have found that photoperiod is a better descriptor of the seasonal variability of photosynthetic function at the leaf and plant scale, and that spectral indices of leaf functionality are poor descriptors of this seasonality. We explored the variability of photosynthesic parameters at the ecosystem scale using over 100 site-years of air temperature and gross primary productivity (GPP) data from non-tropical forested sites in the Free/Fair Use LaThuille FLUXNET database (www.fluxdata.org), excluding sites that were classified as dry and/or with savanna vegetation, where we expected GPP to be driven by moisture availability. Both GPP and GPP normalized by daily photosynthetic photon flux density (GPPn) were considered, and photoperiod was calculated from eddy covariance tower coordinates. We performed a Granger causality analysis, a method based on the understanding that causes precede effects, on both the GPP and GPPn. Photoperiod Granger-caused GPP (GPPn) in 95% (87%) of all site-years. While temperature Granger-caused GPP in a mere 23% of site years, it Granger-caused GPPn 73% of the time. Both temperature values are significantly less than the percent of cases in which day length Granger-caused GPP (p<0.05, Student's t-test). An inverse analysis was performed for completeness, and it was found that GPP Granger-caused photoperiod (temperature) in 39% (78%) of all site years. Results demonstrate that incorporating simple photoperiod controls may be a logical step in improving ecosystem and global model output.

  20. Hexacoordination of bacteriochlorophyll in photosynthetic antenna LH1.

    PubMed

    Fiedor, Leszek

    2006-02-14

    The ability of chlorophylls to coordinate ligands is of fundamental structural importance for photosynthetic pigment-protein complexes, where in virtually all cases the pigment is thought to be in a pentacoordinated state. In this study, the correlation of the Q(X) transition energy with the coordination state of the central metal in bacteriochlorophyll is applied in investigating the pigment coordination state in bacterial photosynthetic antenna LH1. To facilitate a detailed spectral analysis in the Q(X) region, carotenoid-depleted forms of LH1 are prepared and model LH1 are constructed with non-native carotenoids having blue-shifted absorption. The deconvolution of the Q(X) envelope in LH1 reveals that the band is the sum of two transitions, which peak near 590 and 607 nm, showing that a significant fraction (up to 25%) of hexacoordinated bacteriochlorophyll is present in the complex. The hexacoordination can be seen also in LH1 antennae from other species of purple photosynthetic bacteria. It seems correlated with the LH1 aggregation state and probably is a consequence of the structural flexibility of the assembled complex. The sixth ligand probably originates from the apoprotein and seems not to affect the chromophore core size. These findings show that in light-harvesting complexes a hexacoordinated state of bacteriochlorophyll is not uncommon. Its presence may be relevant to a correct assembly of the antenna and have functional consequences, as it results in a splitting of the pigment S2 excited state (Q(X)), i.e., the carotenoid excitation acceptor state, what might affect intracomplex carotenoid-to-bacteriochlorophyll energy transfer.

  1. Draft Genome Sequences of Two Heat-Resistant Mutant Strains (A52 and B41) of the Photosynthetic Hydrogen-Producing Bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus

    PubMed Central

    Gokce, Abdulmecit; Cakar, Zeynep Petek; Yucel, Meral; Ozcan, Orhan; Sencan, Sevde; Sertdemir, Ibrahim; Erguner, Bekir; Yuceturk, Betul; Sarac, Aydan; Yuksel, Bayram

    2016-01-01

    The draft genome sequences of two heat-resistant mutant strains, A52 and B41, derived from Rhodobacter capsulatus DSM 1710, and with different hydrogen production levels, are reported here. These sequences may help understand the molecular basis of heat resistance and hydrogen production in R. capsulatus. PMID:27284151

  2. The light intensity under which cells are grown controls the type of peripheral light-harvesting complexes that are assembled in a purple photosynthetic bacterium

    SciTech Connect

    Brotosudarmo, Tatas H. P.; Collins, Aaron M.; Gall, Andrew; Roszak, Aleksander W.; Gardiner, Alastair T.; Blankenship, Robert E.; Cogdell, Richard J.

    2011-11-15

    The differing composition of LH2 (peripheral light-harvesting) complexes present in Rhodopseudomonas palustris 2.1.6 have been investigated when cells are grown under progressively decreasing light intensity. Analysis of the absorption spectra reveals there must be more than two types of LH2 complexes present. Purified HL (high-light) and LL (low-light) LH2 complexes have mixed apoprotein compositions. The HL complexes contain PucABa and PucABb apoproteins. The LL complexes contain PucABa, PucABd and PucBb-only apoproteins. This mixed apoprotein composition can explain their resonance Raman spectra.

  3. Protonated rhodosemiquinone at the Q(B) binding site of the M265IT mutant reaction center of photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    PubMed

    Maróti, Ágnes; Wraight, Colin A; Maróti, Péter

    2015-03-31

    The second electron transfer from primary ubiquinone Q(A) to secondary ubiquinone Q(B) in the reaction center (RC) from Rhodobacter sphaeroides involves a protonated Q(B)(-) intermediate state whose low pK(a) makes direct observation impossible. Here, we replaced the native ubiquinone with low-potential rhodoquinone at the Q(B) binding site of the M265IT mutant RC. Because the in situ midpoint redox potential of Q(A) of this mutant was lowered approximately the same extent (≈100 mV) as that of Q(B) upon exchange of ubiquinone with low-potential rhodoquinone, the inter-quinone (Q(A) → Q(B)) electron transfer became energetically favorable. After subsequent saturating flash excitations, a period of two damped oscillations of the protonated rhodosemiquinone was observed. The Q(B)H(•) was identified by (1) the characteristic band at 420 nm of the absorption spectrum after the second flash and (2) weaker damping of the oscillation at 420 nm (due to the neutral form) than at 460 nm (attributed to the anionic form). The appearance of the neutral semiquinone was restricted to the acidic pH range, indicating a functional pK(a) of <5.5, slightly higher than that of the native ubisemiquinone (pK(a) < 4.5) at pH 7. The analysis of the pH and temperature dependencies of the rates of the second electron transfer supports the concept of the pH-dependent pK(a) of the semiquinone at the Q(B) binding site. The local electrostatic potential is severely modified by the strongly interacting neighboring acidic cluster, and the pK(a) of the semiquinone is in the middle of the pH range of the complex titration. The kinetic and thermodynamic data are discussed according to the proton-activated electron transfer mechanism combined with the pH-dependent functional pK(a) of the semiquinone at the Q(B) site of the RC.

  4. Isolation of an algal morphogenesis inducer from a marine bacterium.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Yoshihide; Imagawa, Hiroshi; Nishizawa, Mugio; Shizuri, Yoshikazu

    2005-03-11

    Ulva and Enteromorpha are cosmopolitan and familiar marine algal genera. It is well known that these green macroalgae lose their natural morphology during short-term cultivation under aseptic conditions and during long-term cultivation in nutrient-added seawater and adopt an unusual form instead. These phenomena led to the belief that undefined morphogenetic factors that were indispensable to the foliaceous morphology of macroalgae exist throughout the oceans. We characterize a causative factor, named thallusin, isolated from an epiphytic marine bacterium. Thallusin induces normal germination and morphogenesis of green macroalgae.

  5. Factors Affecting Zebra Mussel Kill by the Bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel P. Molloy

    2004-02-24

    The specific purpose of this research project was to identify factors that affect zebra mussel kill by the bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens. Test results obtained during this three-year project identified the following key variables as affecting mussel kill: treatment concentration, treatment duration, mussel siphoning activity, dissolved oxygen concentration, water temperature, and naturally suspended particle load. Using this latter information, the project culminated in a series of pipe tests which achieved high mussel kill inside power plants under once-through conditions using service water in artificial pipes.

  6. Comprehensive comparative analysis of kinesins in photosynthetic eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Dale N; Simmons, Mark P; Reddy, Anireddy SN

    2006-01-01

    Background Kinesins, a superfamily of molecular motors, use microtubules as tracks and transport diverse cellular cargoes. All kinesins contain a highly conserved ~350 amino acid motor domain. Previous analysis of the completed genome sequence of one flowering plant (Arabidopsis) has resulted in identification of 61 kinesins. The recent completion of genome sequencing of several photosynthetic and non-photosynthetic eukaryotes that belong to divergent lineages offers a unique opportunity to conduct a comprehensive comparative analysis of kinesins in plant and non-plant systems and infer their evolutionary relationships. Results We used the kinesin motor domain to identify kinesins in the completed genome sequences of 19 species, including 13 newly sequenced genomes. Among the newly analyzed genomes, six represent photosynthetic eukaryotes. A total of 529 kinesins was used to perform comprehensive analysis of kinesins and to construct gene trees using the Bayesian and parsimony approaches. The previously recognized 14 families of kinesins are resolved as distinct lineages in our inferred gene tree. At least three of the 14 kinesin families are not represented in flowering plants. Chlamydomonas, a green alga that is part of the lineage that includes land plants, has at least nine of the 14 known kinesin families. Seven of ten families present in flowering plants are represented in Chlamydomonas, indicating that these families were retained in both the flowering-plant and green algae lineages. Conclusion The increase in the number of kinesins in flowering plants is due to vast expansion of the Kinesin-14 and Kinesin-7 families. The Kinesin-14 family, which typically contains a C-terminal motor, has many plant kinesins that have the motor domain at the N terminus, in the middle, or the C terminus. Several domains in kinesins are present exclusively either in plant or animal lineages. Addition of novel domains to kinesins in lineage-specific groups contributed to the

  7. Advances in Metabolic Engineering of Cyanobacteria for Photosynthetic Biochemical Production

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Martin C.; Lan, Ethan I.

    2015-01-01

    Engineering cyanobacteria into photosynthetic microbial cell factories for the production of biochemicals and biofuels is a promising approach toward sustainability. Cyanobacteria naturally grow on light and carbon dioxide, bypassing the need of fermentable plant biomass and arable land. By tapping into the central metabolism and rerouting carbon flux towards desirable compound production, cyanobacteria are engineered to directly convert CO2 into various chemicals. This review discusses the diversity of bioproducts synthesized by engineered cyanobacteria, the metabolic pathways used, and the current engineering strategies used for increasing their titers. PMID:26516923

  8. Carotenoid cation formation and the regulation of photosynthetic light harvesting.

    PubMed

    Holt, Nancy E; Zigmantas, Donatas; Valkunas, Leonas; Li, Xiao-Ping; Niyogi, Krishna K; Fleming, Graham R

    2005-01-21

    Photosynthetic light harvesting in excess light is regulated by a process known as feedback deexcitation. Femtosecond transient absorption measurements on thylakoid membranes show selective formation of a carotenoid radical cation upon excitation of chlorophyll under conditions of maximum, steady-state feedback deexcitation. Studies on transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana plants confirmed that this carotenoid radical cation formation is correlated with feedback deexcitation and requires the presence of zeaxanthin, the specific carotenoid synthesized during high light exposure. These results indicate that energy transfer from chlorophyll molecules to a chlorophyllzeaxanthin heterodimer, which then undergoes charge separation, is the mechanism for excess energy dissipation during feedback deexcitation.

  9. Specularly modified vegetation indices to estimate photosynthetic activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rondeaux, G.; Vanderbilt, V. C.

    1993-01-01

    The hypothesis tested was that some part of the ecosystem-dependent variability of vegetation indices was attributable to the effects of light specularly reflected by leaves. 'Minus specular' indices were defined excluding effects of specular light which contains no cellular pigment information. Results, both empirical and theoretical, show that the 'minus specular' indices, when compared to the traditional vegetation indices, potentially provide better estimates of the photosynthetic activity within a canopy - and therefore canopy primary production - specifically as a function of sun and view angles.

  10. Regulation of leaf photosynthetic rate correlating with leaf carbohydrate status and activation state of Rubisco under a variety of photosynthetic source/sink balances.

    PubMed

    Kasai, Minobu

    2008-09-01

    There is evidence suggesting that in plants changes in the photosynthetic source/sink balance are an important factor that regulates leaf photosynthetic rate through affects on the leaf carbohydrate status. However, to resolve the regulatory mechanism of leaf photosynthetic rate associated with photosynthetic source/sink balance, information, particularly on mutual relationships of experimental data that are linked with a variety of photosynthetic source/sink balances, seems to be still limited. Thus, a variety of manipulations altering the plant source/sink ratio were carried out with soybean plants, and the mutual relationships of various characteristics such as leaf photosynthetic rate, carbohydrate content and the source/sink ratio were analyzed in manipulated and non-manipulated control plants. The manipulations were removal of one-half or all pods, removal of one-third or two-third leaves, and shading of one-third or one-half leaves with soybean plants grown for 8 weeks under 10 h light (24 degrees C) and 14 h darkness (17 degrees C). It was shown that there were significant negative correlations between source/sink ratio (dry weight ratio of attached leaves to other all organs) and leaf photosynthetic rate; source/sink ratio and activation ratio (percentage of initial activity to total activity) of Rubisco in leaf extract; leaf carbohydrate (sucrose or starch) content and photosynthetic rate; carbohydrate (sucrose or starch) content and activation ratio of Rubisco; amount of protein-bound ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP) in leaf extract and leaf photosynthetic rate; and the amount of protein-bound RuBP and activation ratio of Rubisco. In addition, there were significant positive correlations between source/sink ratio and leaf carbohydrate (sucrose or starch) content; source/sink ratio and the amount of protein-bound RuBP; carbohydrate (sucrose or starch) content and amount of protein-bound RuBP and the activation ratio of Rubisco and leaf photosynthetic rate

  11. A reverse KREBS cycle in photosynthesis: consensus at last

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchanan, B. B.; Arnon, D. I.

    1990-01-01

    The Krebs cycle (citric acid or tricarboxylic acid cycle), the final common pathway in aerobic metabolism for the oxidation of carbohydrates, fatty acids and amino acids, is known to be irreversible. It liberates CO2 and generates NADH whose aerobic oxidation yields ATP but it does not operate in reverse as a biosynthetic pathway for CO2 assimilation. In 1966, our laboratory described a cyclic pathway for CO2 assimilation (Evans, Buchanan and Arnon 1966) that was unusual in two respects: (i) it provided the first instance of an obligate photoautotroph that assimilated CO2 by a pathway different from Calvin's reductive pentose phosphate cycle (Calvin 1962) and (ii) in its overall effect the new cycle was a reversal of the Krebs cycle. Named the 'reductive carboxylic acid cycle' (sometimes also called the reductive tricarboxylic acid cycle) the new cycle appeared to be the sole CO2 assimilation pathway in Chlorobium thiosulfatophilum (Evans et al. 1966) (now known as Chlorobium limicola forma thiosulfatophilum). Chlorobium is a photosynthetic green sulfur bacterium that grows anaerobically in an inorganic medium with sulfide and thiosulfate as electron donors and CO2 as an obligatory carbon source. In the ensuing years, the new cycle was viewed with skepticism. Not only was it in conflict with the prevailing doctrine that the 'one important property ... shared by all (our emphasis) autotrophic species is the assimilation of CO2 via the Calvin cycle' (McFadden 1973) but also some of its experimental underpinnings were challenged. It is only now that in the words of one of its early skeptics (Tabita 1988) 'a long and tortuous controversy' has ended with general acceptance of the reductive carboxylic acid cycle as a photosynthetic CO2 assimilation pathway distinct from the pentose cycle. (Henceforth, to minimize repetitiveness, the reductive pentose phosphate cycle will often be referred to as the pentose cycle and the reductive carboxylic acid cycle as the carboxylic

  12. Polysaccharide degradation systems of the saprophytic bacterium Cellvibrio japonicus

    DOE PAGES

    Gardner, Jeffrey G.

    2016-06-04

    Study of recalcitrant polysaccharide degradation by bacterial systems is critical for understanding biological processes such as global carbon cycling, nutritional contributions of the human gut microbiome, and the production of renewable fuels and chemicals. One bacterium that has a robust ability to degrade polysaccharides is the Gram-negative saprophyte Cellvibrio japonicus. A bacterium with a circuitous history, C. japonicus underwent several taxonomy changes from an initially described Pseudomonas sp. Most of the enzymes described in the pre-genomics era have also been renamed. Furthermore, this review aims to consolidate the biochemical, structural, and genetic data published on C. japonicus and its remarkablemore » ability to degrade cellulose, xylan, and pectin substrates. Initially, C. japonicus carbohydrate-active enzymes were studied biochemically and structurally for their novel polysaccharide binding and degradation characteristics, while more recent systems biology approaches have begun to unravel the complex regulation required for lignocellulose degradation in an environmental context. Also included is a discussion for the future of C. japonicus as a model system, with emphasis on current areas unexplored in terms of polysaccharide degradation and emerging directions for C. japonicus in both environmental and biotechnological applications.« less

  13. Polysaccharide degradation systems of the saprophytic bacterium Cellvibrio japonicus.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Jeffrey G

    2016-07-01

    Study of recalcitrant polysaccharide degradation by bacterial systems is critical for understanding biological processes such as global carbon cycling, nutritional contributions of the human gut microbiome, and the production of renewable fuels and chemicals. One bacterium that has a robust ability to degrade polysaccharides is the Gram-negative saprophyte Cellvibrio japonicus. A bacterium with a circuitous history, C. japonicus underwent several taxonomy changes from an initially described Pseudomonas sp. Most of the enzymes described in the pre-genomics era have also been renamed. This review aims to consolidate the biochemical, structural, and genetic data published on C. japonicus and its remarkable ability to degrade cellulose, xylan, and pectin substrates. Initially, C. japonicus carbohydrate-active enzymes were studied biochemically and structurally for their novel polysaccharide binding and degradation characteristics, while more recent systems biology approaches have begun to unravel the complex regulation required for lignocellulose degradation in an environmental context. Also included is a discussion for the future of C. japonicus as a model system, with emphasis on current areas unexplored in terms of polysaccharide degradation and emerging directions for C. japonicus in both environmental and biotechnological applications.

  14. Molybdate Reduction to Molybdenum Blue by an Antarctic Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, S. A.; Shukor, M. Y.; Shamaan, N. A.; Mac Cormack, W. P.; Syed, M. A.

    2013-01-01

    A molybdenum-reducing bacterium from Antarctica has been isolated. The bacterium converts sodium molybdate or Mo6+ to molybdenum blue (Mo-blue). Electron donors such as glucose, sucrose, fructose, and lactose supported molybdate reduction. Ammonium sulphate was the best nitrogen source for molybdate reduction. Optimal conditions for molybdate reduction were between 30 and 50 mM molybdate, between 15 and 20°C, and initial pH between 6.5 and 7.5. The Mo-blue produced had a unique absorption spectrum with a peak maximum at 865 nm and a shoulder at 710 nm. Respiratory inhibitors such as antimycin A, sodium azide, potassium cyanide, and rotenone failed to inhibit the reducing activity. The Mo-reducing enzyme was partially purified using ion exchange and gel filtration chromatography. The partially purified enzyme showed optimal pH and temperature for activity at 6.0 and 20°C, respectively. Metal ions such as cadmium, chromium, copper, silver, lead, and mercury caused more than 95% inhibition of the molybdenum-reducing activity at 0.1 mM. The isolate was tentatively identified as Pseudomonas sp. strain DRY1 based on partial 16s rDNA molecular phylogenetic assessment and the Biolog microbial identification system. The characteristics of this strain would make it very useful in bioremediation works in the polar and temperate countries. PMID:24381945

  15. Rare bacterium of new genus isolated with prolonged enrichment culture.

    PubMed

    Hashizume, Akiko; Fudou, Ryosuke; Jojima, Yasuko; Nakai, Ryohsuke; Hiraishi, Akira; Tabuchi, Akira; Sen, Kikuo; Shibai, Hiroshiro

    2004-01-01

    Dynamic change in microbial flora was monitored with an oxygen electrode. The 1st phase microorganisms, which first grew well in LB medium, were followed by the 2nd phase microorganisms, which supposedly assimilated microbial cells of the 1st phase and their metabolites. In a similar way, a change in microbial flora was observed from the 1st phase to the 4th phase in 84 hr. Based on this observation, prolonged enrichment culture was done for as long as two months to increase the ratio of existence of rare microorganisms. From these culture liquids, four slow-growing bacteria (provisionally named Shinshu-ah1, -ah2, -ah3, and -ah4), which formed scarcely visible small colonies, were isolated. Sequence analysis of their 16S rDNA showed that Shinshu-ah1 had 97% homology with Bradyrhizobium japonicum and uncultured alpha proteobacterium clone blaii 16, Shinshu-ah2 91% with Rasbo bacterium, Alpha proteobacterium 34619, Bradyrhizobium genosp. P, Afipia felis and an unidentified bacterium, Shinshu-ah3 99% with Methylobacterium mesophilicum, and Shinshu-ah4 95% with Agromyces ramosus DSM 43045. Phylogenetic study indicated that Shinshu-ah2 had a possibility to form a new family, Shinshu-ah1 a new genus, and Shinshu-ah4 a new species.

  16. Mechanisms Underlying Carotenoid Absorption in Oxygenic Photosynthetic Proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Mendes-Pinto, Maria M.; Galzerano, Denise; Telfer, Alison; Pascal, Andrew A.; Robert, Bruno; Ilioaia, Cristian

    2013-01-01

    The electronic properties of carotenoid molecules underlie their multiple functions throughout biology, and tuning of these properties by their in vivo locus is of vital importance in a number of cases. This is exemplified by photosynthetic carotenoids, which perform both light-harvesting and photoprotective roles essential to the photosynthetic process. However, despite a large number of scientific studies performed in this field, the mechanism(s) used to modulate the electronic properties of carotenoids remain elusive. We have chosen two specific cases, the two β-carotene molecules in photosystem II reaction centers and the two luteins in the major photosystem II light-harvesting complex, to investigate how such a tuning of their electronic structure may occur. Indeed, in each case, identical molecular species in the same protein are seen to exhibit different electronic properties (most notably, shifted absorption peaks). We assess which molecular parameters are responsible for this in vivo tuning process and attempt to assign it to specific molecular events imposed by their binding pockets. PMID:23720734

  17. Mechanisms underlying carotenoid absorption in oxygenic photosynthetic proteins.

    PubMed

    Mendes-Pinto, Maria M; Galzerano, Denise; Telfer, Alison; Pascal, Andrew A; Robert, Bruno; Ilioaia, Cristian

    2013-06-28

    The electronic properties of carotenoid molecules underlie their multiple functions throughout biology, and tuning of these properties by their in vivo locus is of vital importance in a number of cases. This is exemplified by photosynthetic carotenoids, which perform both light-harvesting and photoprotective roles essential to the photosynthetic process. However, despite a large number of scientific studies performed in this field, the mechanism(s) used to modulate the electronic properties of carotenoids remain elusive. We have chosen two specific cases, the two β-carotene molecules in photosystem II reaction centers and the two luteins in the major photosystem II light-harvesting complex, to investigate how such a tuning of their electronic structure may occur. Indeed, in each case, identical molecular species in the same protein are seen to exhibit different electronic properties (most notably, shifted absorption peaks). We assess which molecular parameters are responsible for this in vivo tuning process and attempt to assign it to specific molecular events imposed by their binding pockets.

  18. Regulation of Chloroplast Photosynthetic Activity by Exogenous Magnesium 1

    PubMed Central

    Huber, Steven C.

    1978-01-01

    Magnesium was most inhibitory to photosynthetic reactions by intact chloroplasts when the magnesium was added in the dark before illumination. Two millimolar MgCl2, added in the dark, inhibited CO2-dependent O2 evolution by Hordeum vulgare L. and Spinacia oleracea L. (C3 plants) chloroplasts 70 to 100% and inhibited (pyruvate + oxaloacetate)-dependent O2 evolution by Digitaria sanguinalis L. (C4 plant) mesophyll chloroplasts from 80 to 100%. When Mg2+ was added in the light, O2 evolution was reduced only slightly. O2 evolution in the presence of phosphoglycerate was less sensitive to Mg2+ inhibition than was CO2-dependent O2 evolution. Magnesium prevented the light activation of several photosynthetic enzymes. Two millimolar Mg2+ blocked the light activation of NADP-malate dehydrogenase in D. sanguinalis mesophyll chloroplasts, and the light activation of phosphoribulokinase, NADP-linked glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, and fructose 1,6-diphosphatase in barley chloroplasts. The results suggest that Mg2+ inhibits chloroplast photosynthesis by preventing the light activation of certain enzymes. PMID:16660509

  19. Changes of Photosynthetic Behaviors in Kappaphycus alvarezii Infected by Epiphyte

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Tong; Liu, Jianguo; Liu, Qian; Lin, Wei

    2011-01-01

    Epiphytic filamentous algae (EFA) were noted as a serious problem to reduce the production and quality of K. alvarezii. The morphological studies revealed that the main epiphyte on K. alvarezii was Neosiphonia savatieri in China. Though the harmful effects of EFA on the production of K. alvarezii have been reported, the detailed mechanism of the N. savatieri in limiting the production of K. alvarezii has not been studied yet. The present paper studied the effects of N. savatieri infection on photosynthetic behaviors in K. alvarezii by detecting chlorophyll fluorescence transient in vivo. The results revealed that damage of oxygen-evolving complex (OEC), decrease of active reaction centers (RCs), and the plastoquinone (PQ) pool as well as significant reduction in the performance indexes (PI) of PSII were caused by the infection of N. savatieri. The influence of N. savatieri on photosynthetic activity of K. alvarezii should be one of the important reasons to reduce the production of K. alvarezii infected by N. savatieri. PMID:21845201

  20. Role of interference in the photosynthetic heat engine.

    PubMed

    Xu, Y Y; Liu, J

    2014-11-01

    The observation of quantum coherence in pigment-protein complexes has attracted considerable interest. One such endeavor entails applying a quantum heat engine to model the photosynthetic reaction center, but the definition of work used is inconsistent with that defined in quantum thermodynamics. Using the definition of work proposed in Weimer et al. [Europhys. Lett. 83, 30008 (2008)EULEEJ0295-507510.1209/0295-5075/83/30008], we investigated two proposals for enhancing the performance of the photosynthetic reaction center. In proposal A, which is similar to that in Dorfman et al. [Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 110, 2746 (2013)PNASA60027-842410.1073/pnas.1212666110], we found that the power and current-voltage characteristic of the heat engine can be increased by Fano interference but the efficiency cannot. In proposal B, which is similar to that in Creatore et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 253601 (2013)PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.111.253601], we found that the mechanism of strengthening the performance of the heat engine is invalid; i.e., the dipole-dipole interaction between two electron donors could not increase the power, efficiency, or current-voltage characteristic.

  1. Photosynthetic activity of vascular bundles in Plantago media leaves.

    PubMed

    Miszalski, Zbigniew; Skoczowski, Andrzej; Silina, Ekaterina; Dymova, Olga; Golovko, Tamara; Kornas, Andrzej; Strzalka, Kazimierz

    2016-10-01

    Photosynthetic processes in the leaf lamina and midribs of Plantago media were investigated using plants grown in high light (HL) or low light (LL) conditions. The fluorescence parameters, which indicate photochemical/photosynthetic activity, were different in HL and LL grown plants, but no major differences between lamina and midribs were found. An OJIP test (chlorophyll a fluorescence transient induction) of LL grown plants, indicative of the chloroplast electron transport chain, also showed both tissues to be similar. In HL plants, a partial blockage of electron flow between QA (the primary plastoquinone electron acceptor of PSII) and QB (the secondary plastoquinone acceptor of PSII) was found, and this was less visible in midribs. The effective dissipation of quantum energy per reaction center (DI0/RC) was similar in both tissues of HL grown plants, while in the midribs of LL leaves, this process seemed to be less effective. Measurements of (13)C discrimination showed that the midrib tissues of LL and HL leaves effectively used β-carboxylation products to accumulate their biomass. Thus, the well protected activity of electron transport in midribs with their limited capacity to fix CO2 from the air may indicate the involvement of this tissue in β-carboxylation, transport or signaling. Carbon accumulated in roots showed a lower (13)C discrimination value (more negative) than the values observed in lamina. This could indicate that roots are supplied with assimilates mostly during the light phase of the day cycle with intensive C3 photosynthesis.

  2. Artificial photosynthetic reaction centers coupled to light-harvesting antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Pulak Kumar; Smirnov, Anatoly Yu.; Nori, Franco

    2011-12-01

    We analyze a theoretical model for energy and electron transfer in an artificial photosynthetic system. The photosystem consists of a molecular triad (i.e., with a donor, a photosensitive unit, and an acceptor) coupled to four accessory light-harvesting-antenna pigments. The resonant energy transfer from the antennas to the artificial reaction center (the molecular triad) is described here by the Förster mechanism. We consider two different kinds of arrangements of the accessory light-harvesting pigments around the reaction center. The first arrangement allows direct excitation transfer to the reaction center from all the surrounding pigments. The second configuration transmits energy via a cascade mechanism along a chain of light-harvesting chromophores, where only one chromophore is connected to the reaction center. We show that the artificial photosynthetic system using the cascade energy transfer absorbs photons in a broader wavelength range and converts their energy into electricity with a higher efficiency than the system based on direct couplings between all the antenna chromophores and the reaction center.

  3. Synergistic Two-Photon Absorption Enhancement in Photosynthetic Light Harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kuo-Mei; Chen, Yu-Wei; Gao, Ting-Fong

    2012-06-01

    The grand scale fixation of solar energies into chemical substances by photosynthetic reactions of light-harvesting organisms provides Earth's other life forms a thriving environment. Scientific explorations in the past decades have unraveled the fundamental photophysical and photochemical processes in photosynthesis. Higher plants, green algae, and light-harvesting bacteria utilize organized pigment-protein complexes to harvest solar power efficiently and the resultant electronic excitations are funneled into a reaction center, where the first charge separation process takes place. Here we show experimental evidences that green algae (Chlorella vulgaris) in vivo display a synergistic two-photon absorption enhancement in their photosynthetic light harvesting. Their absorption coefficients at various wavelengths display dramatic dependence on the photon flux. This newly found phenomenon is attributed to a coherence-electronic-energy-transfer-mediated (CEETRAM) photon absorption process of light-harvesting pigment-protein complexes of green algae. Under the ambient light level, algae and higher plants can utilize this quantum mechanical mechanism to create two entangled electronic excitations adjacently in their light-harvesting networks. Concerted multiple electron transfer reactions in the reaction centers and oxygen evolving complexes can be implemented efficiently by the coherent motion of two entangled excitons from antennae to the charge separation reaction sites. To fabricate nanostructured, synthetic light-harvesting apparatus, the paramount role of the CEETRAM photon absorption mechanism should be seriously considered in the strategic guidelines.

  4. Role of interference in the photosynthetic heat engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Y. Y.; Liu, J.

    2014-11-01

    The observation of quantum coherence in pigment-protein complexes has attracted considerable interest. One such endeavor entails applying a quantum heat engine to model the photosynthetic reaction center, but the definition of work used is inconsistent with that defined in quantum thermodynamics. Using the definition of work proposed in Weimer et al. [Europhys. Lett. 83, 30008 (2008), 10.1209/0295-5075/83/30008], we investigated two proposals for enhancing the performance of the photosynthetic reaction center. In proposal A, which is similar to that in Dorfman et al. [Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 110, 2746 (2013), 10.1073/pnas.1212666110], we found that the power and current-voltage characteristic of the heat engine can be increased by Fano interference but the efficiency cannot. In proposal B, which is similar to that in Creatore et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 253601 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.111.253601], we found that the mechanism of strengthening the performance of the heat engine is invalid; i.e., the dipole-dipole interaction between two electron donors could not increase the power, efficiency, or current-voltage characteristic.

  5. Function and distribution of bilin biosynthesis enzymes in photosynthetic organisms.

    PubMed

    Dammeyer, Thorben; Frankenberg-Dinkel, Nicole

    2008-10-01

    Bilins are open-chain tetrapyrrole molecules essential for light-harvesting and/or sensing in many photosynthetic organisms. While they serve as chromophores in phytochrome-mediated light-sensing in plants, they additionally function in light-harvesting in cyanobacteria, red algae and cryptomonads. Associated to phycobiliproteins a variety of bile pigments is responsible for the specific light-absorbance properties of the organisms enabling efficient photosynthesis under different light conditions. The initial step of bilin biosynthesis is the cleavage of heme by heme oxygenases (HO) to afford the first linear molecule biliverdin. This reaction is ubiquitously found also in non-photosynthetic organisms. Biliverdin is then further reduced by site specific reductases most of them belonging to the interesting family of ferredoxin-dependent bilin reductases (FDBRs)-a new family of radical oxidoreductases. In recent years much progress has been made in the field of heme oxygenases but even more in the widespread family of FDBRs, revealing novel biochemical FDBR activities, new crystal structures and new ecological aspects, including the discovery of bilin biosynthesis genes in wild marine phage populations. The aim of this review is to summarize and discuss the recent progress in this field and to highlight the new and remaining questions.

  6. Purple non-sulfur photosynthetic bacteria monitor environmental stresses.

    PubMed

    Kis, Mariann; Sipka, Gábor; Asztalos, Emese; Rázga, Zsolt; Maróti, Péter

    2015-10-01

    Heavy metal ion pollution and oxygen deficiency are major environmental risks for microorganisms in aqueous habitat. The potential of purple non-sulfur photosynthetic bacteria for biomonitoring and bioremediation was assessed by investigating the photosynthetic capacity in heavy metal contaminated environments. Cultures of bacterial strains Rhodobacter sphaeroides, Rhodospirillum rubrum and Rubrivivax gelatinosus were treated with heavy metal ions in micromolar (Hg(2+)), submillimolar (Cr(6+)) and millimolar (Pb(2+)) concentration ranges. Functional assays (flash-induced absorption changes and bacteriochlorophyll fluorescence induction) and electron micrographs were taken to specify the harmful effects of pollution and to correlate to morphological changes of the membrane. The bacterial strains and functional tests showed differentiated responses to environmental stresses, revealing that diverse mechanisms of tolerance and/or resistance are involved. The microorganisms were vulnerable to the prompt effect of Pb(2+), showed weak tolerance to Hg(2+) and proved to be tolerant to Cr(6+). The reaction center controlled electron transfer in Rvx. gelatinosus demonstrated the highest degree of resistance against heavy metal exposure.

  7. Photosynthetic circadian rhythmicity patterns of Symbiodium, the coral endosymbiotic algae

    PubMed Central

    Sorek, Michal; Yacobi, Yosef Z.; Roopin, Modi; Berman-Frank, Ilana; Levy, Oren

    2013-01-01

    Biological clocks are self-sustained endogenous timers that enable organisms (from cyanobacteria to humans) to anticipate daily environmental rhythms, and adjust their physiology and behaviour accordingly. Symbiotic corals play a central role in the creation of biologically rich ecosystems based on mutualistic symbioses between the invertebrate coral and dinoflagellate protists from the genus Symbiodinium. In this study, we experimentally establish that Symbiodinium photosynthesis, both as a free-living unicellular algae and as part of the symbiotic association with the coral Stylophora pistillata, is ‘wired’ to the circadian clock mechanism with a ‘free-run’ cycle close to 24 h. Associated photosynthetic pigments also showed rhythmicity under light/dark conditions and under constant light conditions, while the expression of the oxygen-evolving enhancer 1 gene (within photosystem II) coincided with photosynthetically evolved oxygen in Symbiodinium cultures. Thus, circadian regulation of the Symbiodinium photosynthesis is, however, complicated as being linked to the coral/host that have probably profound physiochemical influence on the intracellular environment. The temporal patterns of photosynthesis demonstrated here highlight the physiological complexity and interdependence of the algae circadian clock associated in this symbiosis and the plasticity of algae regulatory mechanisms downstream of the circadian clock. PMID:23554392

  8. Does Chloroplast Size Influence Photosynthetic Nitrogen Use Efficiency?

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yong; Ren, Binbin; Ding, Lei; Shen, Qirong; Peng, Shaobing; Guo, Shiwei

    2013-01-01

    High nitrogen (N) supply frequently results in a decreased photosynthetic N-use efficiency (PNUE), which indicates a less efficient use of accumulated Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco). Chloroplasts are the location of Rubisco and the endpoint of CO2 diffusion, and they play a vital important role in photosynthesis. However, the effects of chloroplast development on photosynthesis are poorly explored. In the present study, rice seedlings (Oryza sativa L., cv. ‘Shanyou 63’, and ‘Yangdao 6’) were grown hydroponically with three different N levels, morphological characteristics, photosynthetic variables and chloroplast size were measured. In Shanyou 63, a negative relationship between chloroplast size and PNUE was observed across three different N levels. Here, plants with larger chloroplasts had a decreased ratio of mesophyll conductance (gm) to Rubisco content (gm/Rubisco) and a lower Rubisco specific activity. In Yangdao 6, there was no change in chloroplast size and no decline in PNUE or gm/Rubisco ratio under high N supply. It is suggested that large chloroplasts under high N supply is correlated with the decreased Rubisco specific activity and PNUE. PMID:23620801

  9. Characterization of photosynthetic supramolecular assemblies using small angle neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Tiede, D.M.; Marone, P.; Wagner, A.M.; Thiyagarajan, P.

    1995-12-31

    We are using small angle neutron scattering (SANS) to resolve structural features of supramolecular assemblies of photosynthetic proteins in liquid and frozen solutions. SANS resolves the size, shape, and structural homogeneity of macromolecular assemblies in samples identical to those used for spectroscopic assays of photosynthetic function. Likely molecular structures of the supramolecular assemblies can be identified by comparing experimental scattering data with scattering profiles calculated for model supramolecular assemblies built from crystal structures of the individual proteins. SANS studies of the Rhodobacter sphaeroides reaction center, RC, presented here, show that the detergent solubilized RC exists in a variety of monomeric and aggregation states. The distribution between monomer and aggregate was found to depend strongly upon detergent, temperature and nature of additives, such as ethylene glycol used for low temperature spectroscopy and polyethylene glycol used for crystallization. Likely aggregate structures are being identified by fitting the experimental scattering profiles with those calculated for model aggregates built-up using the RC crystal structure. This work establishes the foundation for using SANS to identify intermediates in the RC crystallization pathways, and for determining likely structures of complexes formed between the RC and its physiological reaction partners, cytochrome c, and the LHI antenna complex.

  10. Evanescent cultivation of photosynthetic bacteria on thin waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierobon, S. C.; Ooms, M. D.; Sinton, D.

    2014-04-01

    Waveguides with thicknesses similar to biofilms (10-100 µm) provide an opportunity to improve the bioenergy density of biofilm photobioreactors, avoiding the fundamental light- and mass-transport productivity limitations of planktonic photobioreactors. This report investigates the biofilm growth of a mutant of Synechococcus elongatus (PCC 7942) in evanescent light fields that can be scaled over large planar areas. In this study, areas of 7.2 cm2 are illuminated via frustrated total internal reflections on planar waveguides. The resulting photosynthetic biofilm growth showed resilience to surface intensities exceeding photosynthetic limits and a more uniform cell density distribution (1.0 ± 0.3 × 109 mL-1) than predicted from surface light distribution profiles. These results indicate potential for larger area biofilms using the uniform lighting conditions identified. The combination of evanescent illumination with biofilms indicates a modular reactor cell density on the order of 108 mL-1, representing a two orders of magnitude improvement over current facility architectures, with significant potential for further improvement through denser biofilms.

  11. [Pigment composition and photosynthetic activity of pea chlorophyll mutants].

    PubMed

    Ladygin, V G

    2003-01-01

    Pea chlorophyll mutants chlorotica 2004 and 2014 have been studied. The mutants differ from the initial form (pea cultivar Torsdag) in stem and leaf color (light green in the mutant 2004 and yellow-green in the mutant 2014), relative chlorophyll content (approximately 80 and 50%, respectively), and the composition of carotenoids: the mutant 2004 contains a significantly smaller amount of carotene but accumulates more lutein and violaxanthine; in the mutant 2014, the contents of all carotenoids are decreased proportionally to the decrease in chlorophyll content. It is shown that the rates of CO2 assimilation and oxygen production in the mutant chlorotica 2004 and 2014 plants are reduced. The quantum efficiency of photosynthesis in the mutants is 29-30% lower than in the control plants; in their hybrids, however, it is 1.5-2 higher. It is proposed that both the greater role of dark respiration in gas exchange and the reduced photosynthetic activity in chlorotica mutants are responsible for the decreased phytomass increment in these plants. On the basis of these results, the conclusion is drawn that the mutations chlorotica 2004 and 2014 affect the genes controlling the formation and functioning of various components of the photosynthetic apparatus.

  12. Artificial photosynthetic reaction centers coupled to light-harvesting antennas.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Pulak Kumar; Smirnov, Anatoly Yu; Nori, Franco

    2011-12-01

    We analyze a theoretical model for energy and electron transfer in an artificial photosynthetic system. The photosystem consists of a molecular triad (i.e., with a donor, a photosensitive unit, and an acceptor) coupled to four accessory light-harvesting-antenna pigments. The resonant energy transfer from the antennas to the artificial reaction center (the molecular triad) is described here by the Förster mechanism. We consider two different kinds of arrangements of the accessory light-harvesting pigments around the reaction center. The first arrangement allows direct excitation transfer to the reaction center from all the surrounding pigments. The second configuration transmits energy via a cascade mechanism along a chain of light-harvesting chromophores, where only one chromophore is connected to the reaction center. We show that the artificial photosynthetic system using the cascade energy transfer absorbs photons in a broader wavelength range and converts their energy into electricity with a higher efficiency than the system based on direct couplings between all the antenna chromophores and the reaction center.

  13. Engineering photosynthetic organisms for the production of biohydrogen

    DOE PAGES

    Dubini, Alexandra; Ghirardi, Maria L.

    2014-03-27

    Oxygenic photosynthetic organisms such as green algae are capable of absorbing sunlight and converting the chemical energy into hydrogen gas. This process takes advantage of the photosynthetic apparatus of these organisms which links water oxidation to H2 production. Biological H2 has therefore the potential to be an alternative fuel of the future and shows great promise for generating large scale sustainable energy. Microalgae are able to produce H2 under light anoxic or dark anoxic condition by activating 3 different pathways that utilize the hydrogenases as catalysts. In this review, we highlight the principal barriers that prevent hydrogen production in greenmore » algae and how those limitations are being addressed, through metabolic and genetic engineering. We also discuss the major challenges and bottlenecks facing the development of future commercial algal photobiological systems for H2 production. Lastly we provide suggestions for future strategies and potential new techniques to be developed towards an integrated system with optimized hydrogen production.« less

  14. Engineering photosynthetic organisms for the production of biohydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Dubini, Alexandra; Ghirardi, Maria L.

    2014-03-27

    Oxygenic photosynthetic organisms such as green algae are capable of absorbing sunlight and converting the chemical energy into hydrogen gas. This process takes advantage of the photosynthetic apparatus of these organisms which links water oxidation to H2 production. Biological H2 has therefore the potential to be an alternative fuel of the future and shows great promise for generating large scale sustainable energy. Microalgae are able to produce H2 under light anoxic or dark anoxic condition by activating 3 different pathways that utilize the hydrogenases as catalysts. In this review, we highlight the principal barriers that prevent hydrogen production in green algae and how those limitations are being addressed, through metabolic and genetic engineering. We also discuss the major challenges and bottlenecks facing the development of future commercial algal photobiological systems for H2 production. Lastly we provide suggestions for future strategies and potential new techniques to be developed towards an integrated system with optimized hydrogen production.

  15. Insights from Placing Photosynthetic Light Harvesting into Context.

    PubMed

    Demmig-Adams, Barbara; Stewart, Jared J; Burch, Tyson A; Adams, William W

    2014-08-21

    Solar-energy conversion through natural photosynthesis forms the base of virtually all food chains on Earth and provides fiber, materials, and fuels, as well as inspiration for the design of biomimetic energy-conversion systems. We summarize well-known as well as recently discovered feedback loops between natural light-harvesting systems and whole-organism function in natural settings. We propose that the low effective quantum yield of natural light-harvesting systems in high light is caused by downstream limitations rather than unavoidable intrinsic vulnerabilities. We evaluate potential avenues, and their costs and benefits, for increasing the maximal rate and photon yield of photosynthesis in high light in plants and photosynthetic microbes. By summarizing mechanisms observable only in complex systems (whole plants, algae, or, in some cases, intact leaves), we aim to stimulate future research efforts on reciprocal feedback loops between light harvesting and downstream processes in whole organisms and to provide additional arguments for the significance of research on photosynthetic light harvesting.

  16. Towards quantification of vibronic coupling in photosynthetic antenna complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, V. P.; Westberg, M.; Wang, C.; Gellen, T.; Engel, G. S.; Dahlberg, P. D.; Gardiner, A. T.; Cogdell, R. J.

    2015-06-07

    Photosynthetic antenna complexes harvest sunlight and efficiently transport energy to the reaction center where charge separation powers biochemical energy storage. The discovery of existence of long lived quantum coherence during energy transfer has sparked the discussion on the role of quantum coherence on the energy transfer efficiency. Early works assigned observed coherences to electronic states, and theoretical studies showed that electronic coherences could affect energy transfer efficiency—by either enhancing or suppressing transfer. However, the nature of coherences has been fiercely debated as coherences only report the energy gap between the states that generate coherence signals. Recent works have suggested that either the coherences observed in photosynthetic antenna complexes arise from vibrational wave packets on the ground state or, alternatively, coherences arise from mixed electronic and vibrational states. Understanding origin of coherences is important for designing molecules for efficient light harvesting. Here, we give a direct experimental observation from a mutant of LH2, which does not have B800 chromophores, to distinguish between electronic, vibrational, and vibronic coherence. We also present a minimal theoretical model to characterize the coherences both in the two limiting cases of purely vibrational and purely electronic coherence as well as in the intermediate, vibronic regime.

  17. Photosynthetic diversity meets biodiversity: the C4 plant example.

    PubMed

    Sage, Rowan F; Stata, Matt

    2015-01-01

    Physiological diversification reflects adaptation for specific environmental challenges. As the major physiological process that provides plants with carbon and energy, photosynthesis is under strong evolutionary selection that gives rise to variability in nearly all parts of the photosynthetic apparatus. Here, we discuss how plants, notably those using C4 photosynthesis, diversified in response to environmental challenges imposed by declining atmospheric CO2 content in recent geological time. This reduction in atmospheric CO2 increases the rate of photorespiration and reduces photosynthetic efficiency. While plants have evolved numerous mechanisms to compensate for low CO2, the most effective are the carbon concentration mechanisms of C4, C2, and CAM photosynthesis; and the pumping of dissolved inorganic carbon, mainly by algae. C4 photosynthesis enables plants to dominate warm, dry and often salinized habitats, and to colonize areas that are too stressful for most plant groups. Because C4 lineages generally lack arborescence, they cannot form forests. Hence, where they predominate, C4 plants create a different landscape than would occur if C3 plants were to predominate. These landscapes (mostly grasslands and savannahs) present unique selection environments that promoted the diversification of animal guilds able to graze upon the C4 vegetation. Thus, the rise of C4 photosynthesis has made a significant contribution to the origin of numerous biomes in the modern biosphere.

  18. Towards quantification of vibronic coupling in photosynthetic antenna complexes

    PubMed Central

    Singh, V. P.; Westberg, M.; Wang, C.; Dahlberg, P. D.; Gellen, T.; Gardiner, A. T.; Cogdell, R. J.

    2015-01-01

    Photosynthetic antenna complexes harvest sunlight and efficiently transport energy to the reaction center where charge separation powers biochemical energy storage. The discovery of existence of long lived quantum coherence during energy transfer has sparked the discussion on the role of quantum coherence on the energy transfer efficiency. Early works assigned observed coherences to electronic states, and theoretical studies showed that electronic coherences could affect energy transfer efficiency—by either enhancing or suppressing transfer. However, the nature of coherences has been fiercely debated as coherences only report the energy gap between the states that generate coherence signals. Recent works have suggested that either the coherences observed in photosynthetic antenna complexes arise from vibrational wave packets on the ground state or, alternatively, coherences arise from mixed electronic and vibrational states. Understanding origin of coherences is important for designing molecules for efficient light harvesting. Here, we give a direct experimental observation from a mutant of LH2, which does not have B800 chromophores, to distinguish between electronic, vibrational, and vibronic coherence. We also present a minimal theoretical model to characterize the coherences both in the two limiting cases of purely vibrational and purely electronic coherence as well as in the intermediate, vibronic regime. PMID:26049466

  19. Stable sulfur isotope fractionation by the green bacterium Chlorobaculum parvum during photolithoautotrophic growth on sulfide.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Donovan P

    2008-01-01

    Growing cultures of the green obligate photolithotroph, Chlorobaculum parvum DSM 263T (formerly Chlorobium vibrioforme forma specialis thiosulfatophilum NCIB 8327), oxidized sulfide quantitatively to elemental sulfur, with no sulfate formation. In the early stages of growth and sulfide oxidation, the sulfur product became significantly enriched with 34S, with a maximum delta34S above +5 per thousand, while the residual sulfide was progressively depleted in 34S to delta34S values greater than -4 per thousand. As oxidation proceeded, the delta34S of the sulfur declined to approach that of the initial sulfide when most of the substrate sulfide had been converted to sulfur in this closed culture system. No significant formation of sulfate occurred, and the substrate sulfide and elemental sulfur product accounted for all the sulfur provided throughout oxidation. The mean isotope fractionation factors (epsilon) for sulfide and sulfur were equivalent at epsilon values of -2.4 per thousand and +2.4 per thousand respectively. The significance of the experimentally-observed fractionation to the 34S/32S ratios seen in natural sulfur-containing minerals is considered.

  20. Mimicry of the radical pair and triplet states in photosynthetic reaction centers with a synthetic model

    SciTech Connect

    Wasielewski, M.R.; Greenfield, S.R.; Svec, W.A.

    1997-08-01

    Results are presented on a photosynthetic model system that closely mimics the spin dynamics of triplet state formation found in photosynthetic reaction centers. This research will make it possible to design new models to probe the mechanism of the primary events of photosynthesis.

  1. Chlorophylls d and f and Their Role in Primary Photosynthetic Processes of Cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Allakhverdiev, S I; Kreslavski, V D; Zharmukhamedov, S K; Voloshin, R A; Korol'kova, D V; Tomo, T; Shen, J-R

    2016-03-01

    The finding of unique Chl d- and Chl f-containing cyanobacteria in the last decade was a discovery in the area of biology of oxygenic photosynthetic organisms. Chl b, Chl c, and Chl f are considered to be accessory pigments found in antennae systems of photosynthetic organisms. They absorb energy and transfer it to the photosynthetic reaction center (RC), but do not participate in electron transport by the photosynthetic electron transport chain. However, Chl d as well as Chl a can operate not only in the light-harvesting complex, but also in the photosynthetic RC. The long-wavelength (Qy) Chl d and Chl f absorption band is shifted to longer wavelength (to 750 nm) compared to Chl a, which suggests the possibility for oxygenic photosynthesis in this spectral range. Such expansion of the photosynthetically active light range is important for the survival of cyanobacteria when the intensity of light not exceeding 700 nm is attenuated due to absorption by Chl a and other pigments. At the same time, energy storage efficiency in photosystem 2 for cyanobacteria containing Chl d and Chl f is not lower than that of cyanobacteria containing Chl a. Despite great interest in these unique chlorophylls, many questions related to functioning of such pigments in primary photosynthetic processes are still not elucidated. This review describes the latest advances in the field of Chl d and Chl f research and their role in primary photosynthetic processes of cyanobacteria.

  2. Seasonal patterns of photosynthetic capacity: photoperiodic control and its carbon cycling implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauerle, W.; Oren, R.; Way, D.; Qian, S.; Stoy, P. C.; Thornton, P. E.; Bowden, J.; Hoffman, F. M.; Reynolds, R.

    2012-12-01

    While temperature is an important driver of seasonal changes in photosynthetic physiology, photoperiod also regulates leaf activity. Climate change will extend growing seasons if temperature cues predominate, but photoperiod-controlled species will show limited responsiveness to warming. We show that photoperiod explains more seasonal variation in photosynthetic activity across 23 tree species than temperature. Although leaves remain green, photosynthetic capacity peaks just after summer solstice and declines with decreasing photoperiod, before air temperatures peak. In support of these findings, saplings grown at constant temperature, but exposed to an extended photoperiod maintained high photosynthetic capacity, while photosynthetic activity declined in saplings experiencing a naturally shortening photoperiod; leaves remained equally green in both treatments. Incorporating a photoperiodic correction of photosynthetic physiology into a global-scale terrestrial carbon cycle model significantly improves predictions of seasonal atmospheric CO2 cycling, demonstrating the benefit of such a function in coupled climate system models. Accounting for photoperiod-induced seasonality in photosynthetic parameters reduces modeled global gross primary production ~4 PgC y-1, resulting in a ~2 PgC y-1 decrease of net primary production. Such a correction is also needed in models estimating current carbon uptake based on remotely-sensed greenness. Photoperiod-associated declines in photosynthetic capacity could limit autumn carbon gain in forests, even if warming delays leaf senescence. Assessments of late season carbon sequestration under a changing climate should focus on potential adverse impacts of warming via increased ecosystem respiration.

  3. Photoperiodic Regulation of the Seasonal Pattern of Photosynthetic Capacity and the Implications for Carbon Cycling

    SciTech Connect

    Bauerle, William L.; Oren, Ram; Way, Danielle A.; Qian, Song S.; Stoy, Paul C.; Thornton, Peter E; Bowden, Joseph D.; Hoffman, Forrest M; Reynolds, Robert F.

    2012-01-01

    Although temperature is an important driver of seasonal changes in photosynthetic physiology, photoperiod also regulates leaf activity. Climate change will extend growing seasons if temperature cues predominate, but photoperiod-controlled species will show limited responsiveness to warming. We show that photoperiod explains more seasonal variation in photosynthetic activity across 23 tree species than temperature. Although leaves remain green, photosynthetic capacity peaks just after summer solstice and declines with decreasing photoperiod, before air temperatures peak. In support of these findings, saplings grown at constant temperature but exposed to an extended photoperiod maintained high photosynthetic capacity, but photosynthetic activity declined in saplings experiencing a naturally shortening photoperiod; leaves remained equally green in both treatments. Incorporating a photoperiodic correction of photosynthetic physiology into a global-scale terrestrial carbon-cycle model significantly improves predictions of seasonal atmospheric CO{sub 2} cycling, demonstrating the benefit of such a function in coupled climate system models. Accounting for photoperiod-induced seasonality in photosynthetic parameters reduces modeled global gross primary production 2.5% ({approx}4 PgC y{sup -1}), resulting in a >3% ({approx}2 PgC y{sup -1}) decrease of net primary production. Such a correction is also needed in models estimating current carbon uptake based on remotely sensed greenness. Photoperiod-associated declines in photosynthetic capacity could limit autumn carbon gain in forests, even if warming delays leaf senescence.

  4. Maximum photosynthetic efficiency of biomass growth: a criticism of some measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y.K.; Pirt, S.J.

    1982-02-01

    The yield of biomass produced in a photosynthetic culture is an expression of the photosynthetic efficiency. Microbial cells consume energy for both growth and for maintenance. The bioenergetics of Chlorella cultures and the maximum growth yields obtained by various researchers are examined in this paper.

  5. [Leaf morphology and photosynthetic characteristics of wild Ussurian pear in China].

    PubMed

    Dong, Xing-guang; Cao, Yu-fen; Tian, Lu-ming; Wang, Kun; Zhang, Ying; Qi, Dan

    2015-05-01

    The wild Ussurian pear was the most important wild pear resource in northern China, belonging to the most hardiness species. Taking 48 accessions of wild Ussurian pear and 2 accessions of cultivated Ussurian pear as test materials, this paper studied the morphology of leaves, chlorophyll content, and photosynthetic characteristics. We compared the difference between the wild and cultivated Ussurian pear, analyzed the photosynthetic characteristics of wild Ussurian pear, clarified the interrelationships between the indices, and established significant linear equations of photosynthesis and water-related physiological indices. The results showed that the leaf morphological index, chlorophyll content and photosynthetic indices for cultivated Ussurian pear were significantly lower than their average values for wild Ussurian pear. The specific leaf area (SLA), leaf dry matter content ( LDMC) , and intercellular CO2 concentration had low coefficients of variation, and the other 8 indices had variation coefficient indices between 0.12-0.41. So, the level of diversity was high, indicating obvious difference in photosynthetic characteristic of wild pear resources in China. The photosynthetic indices were significantly correlated with chlorophyll composition (Chl a/b) and LDMC. The photosynthetic rate had significant exponential correlation with the intercellular CO2 concentration, transpiration rate, and stomatal conductance. The photosynthetic rate was mainly affected by stomatal limitation. The wild variety 'Jinzhoushanli' was selected as high photosynthetic genetic resource.

  6. Structure and morphology of magnetite anaerobically-produced by a marine magnetotactic bacterium and a dissimilatory iron-reducing bacterium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sparks, N.H.C.; Mann, S.; Bazylinski, D.A.; Lovley, D.R.; Jannasch, H.W.; Frankel, R.B.

    1990-01-01

    Intracellular crystals of magnetite synthesized by cells of the magnetotactic vibroid organism, MV-1, and extracellular crystals of magnetite produced by the non-magnetotactic dissimilatory iron-reducing bacterium strain GS-15, were examined using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, electron diffraction and 57Fe Mo??ssbauer spectroscopy. The magnetotactic bacterium contained a single chain of approximately 10 crystals aligned along the long axis of the cell. The crystals were essentially pure stoichiometric magnetite. When viewed along the crystal long axis the particles had a hexagonal cross-section whereas side-on they appeared as rectangules or truncated rectangles of average dimension, 53 ?? 35 nm. These findings are explained in terms of a three-dimensional morphology comprising a hexagonal prism of {110} faces which are capped and truncated by {111} end faces. Electron diffraction and lattice imaging studies indicated that the particles were structurally well-defined single crystals. In contrast, magnetite particles produced by the strain, GS-15 were irregular in shape and had smaller mean dimensions (14 nm). Single crystals were imaged but these were not of high structural perfection. These results highlight the influence of intracellular control on the crystallochemical specificity of bacterial magnetites. The characterization of these crystals is important in aiding the identification of biogenic magnetic materials in paleomagnetism and in studies of sediment magnetization. ?? 1990.

  7. Dependence of Photosynthetic Capacity, Photosynthetic Pigment Allocation, and Carbon Storage on Nitrogen Levels in Foliage of Aspen Stands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Middleton, Elizabeth M.; Sullivan, Joseph H.; Papagno, Andrea J.

    2000-01-01

    The role of foliar nitrogen (N) in the seasonal dynamics and vertical canopy distribution of photosynthetic pigments, photosynthetic capacity, and carbon (C) storage was investigated in boreal broadleaved species. The study was conducted at two different aged stands (60 y and 15 y) in 1994 and 1996 in Saskatchewan, Canada as part of the Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS). Foliage in upper and lower strata was examined for aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) and its associated hazelnut shrub (Corylus americana Walt.). We determined that C accumulation, expressed as dry mass per unit leaf area (mg C cm (exp -2)), was linearly dependent on N content (approximately 0.3- 3.5 mg N cm (exp -2))(r (exp 2) = 0.93, n=383, P less than 0.001) when eleven foliage groups were defined according to species, site, and developmental stage. C assembly was greatest in the upper aspen strata of both sites (seasonal average, 40.1 plus or minus 0.6 mg C cm (exp -2)), intermediate in the lower aspen strata (32.7 plus or minus 0.6), and considerably lower, and similar, in the hazelnut shrub layers (23.7 plus or minus 0.6) and in expanding aspen leaves (23.8 plus or minus 0.5); the lowest C assembly per unit N occurred in the two youngest, emerging leaf groups (17.1 plus or minus 0.6). Other relationships among physiological and biochemical variables were typically non-linear and were confounded by inclusion of the three groups of young (i.e., emerging or expanding) leaves, unless these were separately identified. Net C uptake, measured as photosynthetic capacity (A (sub max), micromole CO2 m (exp -2) s (exp -1)), was greater in aspen throughout the season, and optimal in mid-summer at a C:N ratio of approximately 18 (approximately 2.3 %N). When young leaves were excluded and logarithms of both variables were used, A (sub max) was approximately linearly dependent on N (mg N cm (exp-2) (r (exp 2) = 0.85, n= 193, P less than 0.001), attributed to incorporation of N into photosynthetic

  8. Draft Genome Sequence of Ensifer adhaerens M78, a Mineral-Weathering Bacterium Isolated from Soil

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuanli; Chen, Wei; He, Linyan; Wang, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Ensifer adhaerens M78, a bacterium isolated from soil, can weather potash feldspar and release Fe, Si, and Al from rock under nutrient-poor conditions. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of strain M78, which may facilitate a better understanding of the molecular mechanism involved in mineral weathering by the bacterium. PMID:27609930

  9. Draft Genome Sequence of Ensifer adhaerens M78, a Mineral-Weathering Bacterium Isolated from Soil.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuanli; Chen, Wei; He, Linyan; Wang, Qi; Sheng, Xia-Fang

    2016-09-08

    Ensifer adhaerens M78, a bacterium isolated from soil, can weather potash feldspar and release Fe, Si, and Al from rock under nutrient-poor conditions. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of strain M78, which may facilitate a better understanding of the molecular mechanism involved in mineral weathering by the bacterium.

  10. Genome Sequence of the Antarctic Psychrophile Bacterium Planococcus antarcticus DSM 14505

    PubMed Central

    Margolles, Abelardo; Gueimonde, Miguel

    2012-01-01

    Planococcus antarcticus DSM 14505 is a psychrophile bacterium that was isolated from cyanobacterial mat samples, originally collected from ponds in McMurdo, Antarctica. This orange-pigmented bacterium grows at 4°C and may possess interesting enzymatic activities at low temperatures. Here we report the first genomic sequence of P. antarcticus DSM 14505. PMID:22843594

  11. Near-complete genome sequence of the cellulolytic Bacterium Bacteroides (Pseudobacteroides) cellulosolvens ATCC 35603

    DOE PAGES

    Dassa, Bareket; Utturkar, Sagar M.; Hurt, Richard A.; ...

    2015-09-24

    We report the single-contig genome sequence of the anaerobic, mesophilic, cellulolytic bacterium, Bacteroides cellulosolvens. The bacterium produces a particularly elaborate cellulosome system, whereas the types of cohesin-dockerin interactions are opposite of other known cellulosome systems: cell-surface attachment is thus mediated via type-I interactions whereas enzymes are integrated via type-II interactions.

  12. Kinetic study of trichloroethylene and toluene degradation by a bioluminescent reporter bacterium

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, C.J.; Sanseverino, J.; Bienkowski, P.R.; Sayler, G.S.

    1995-12-31

    A constructed bioluminescent reporter bacterium, Pseudomonas putida B2, is very briefly described in this paper. The bacterium degrades toluene and trichloroethylene (TCE), and produces light in the presence of toluene. The light response is an indication of cellular viability and expression of the genes encoding toluene and TCE degrading enzymes.

  13. Draft Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strain RB, a Bacterium Capable of Synthesizing Cadmium Selenide Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ayano, Hiroyuki; Kuroda, Masashi; Soda, Satoshi; Ike, Michihiko

    2014-05-15

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain RB is a bacterium capable of synthesizing cadmium selenide (CdSe) nanoparticles and was isolated from a soil sample. Here, we present the draft genome sequence of P. aeruginosa strain RB. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a draft genome of a CdSe-synthesizing bacterium.

  14. Photosynthetic flexibility in maize exposed to salinity and shade

    PubMed Central

    Sharwood, Robert E.; Sonawane, Balasaheb V.; Ghannoum, Oula

    2014-01-01

    C4 photosynthesis involves a close collaboration of the C3 and C4 metabolic cycles across the mesophyll and bundle-sheath cells. This study investigated the coordination of C4 photosynthesis in maize plants subjected to two salinity (50 and 100mM NaCl) treatments and one shade (20% of full sunlight) treatment. Photosynthetic efficiency was probed by combining leaf gas-exchange measurements with carbon isotope discrimination and assaying the key carboxylases [ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC)] and decarboxylases [nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate malic enzyme (NADP-ME) and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEP-CK)] operating in maize leaves. Generally, salinity inhibited plant growth and photosynthesis to a lesser extent than shade. Salinity reduced photosynthesis primarily by reducing stomatal conductance and secondarily by equally reducing Rubisco and PEPC activities; the decarboxylases were inhibited more than the carboxylases. Salinity increased photosynthetic carbon isotope discrimination (Δp) and reduced leaf dry-matter carbon isotope composition (13δ) due to changes in p i/p a (intercellular to ambient CO2 partial pressure), while CO2 leakiness out of the bundle sheath (ϕ) was similar to that in control plants. Acclimation to shade was underpinned by a greater downregulation of PEPC relative to Rubisco activity, and a lesser inhibition of NADP-ME (primary decarboxylase) relative to PEP-CK (secondary decarboxylase). Shade reduced Δp and ɸ without significantly affecting leaf 13δ or p i/p a relative to control plants. Accordingly, shade perturbed the balance between the C3 and C4 cycles during photosynthesis in maize, and demonstrated the flexible partitioning of C4 acid decarboxylation activity between NADP-ME and PEP-CK in response to the environment. This study highlights the need to improve our understanding of the links between leaf 13δ and photosynthetic Δp, and the role

  15. Menaquinone as pool quinone in a purple bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Schoepp-Cothenet, Barbara; Lieutaud, Clément; Baymann, Frauke; Verméglio, André; Friedrich, Thorsten; Kramer, David M.; Nitschke, Wolfgang

    2009-01-01

    Purple bacteria have thus far been considered to operate light-driven cyclic electron transfer chains containing ubiquinone (UQ) as liposoluble electron and proton carrier. We show that in the purple γ-proteobacterium Halorhodospira halophila, menaquinone-8 (MK-8) is the dominant quinone component and that it operates in the QB-site of the photosynthetic reaction center (RC). The redox potentials of the photooxidized pigment in the RC and of the Rieske center of the bc1 complex are significantly lower (Em = +270 mV and +110 mV, respectively) than those determined in other purple bacteria but resemble those determined for species containing MK as pool quinone. These results demonstrate that the photosynthetic cycle in H. halophila is based on MK and not on UQ. This finding together with the unusual organization of genes coding for the bc1 complex in H. halophila suggests a specific scenario for the evolutionary transition of bioenergetic chains from the low-potential menaquinones to higher-potential UQ in the proteobacterial phylum, most probably induced by rising levels of dioxygen 2.5 billion years ago. This transition appears to necessarily proceed through bioenergetic ambivalence of the respective organisms, that is, to work both on MK- and on UQ-pools. The establishment of the corresponding low- and high-potential chains was accompanied by duplication and redox optimization of the bc1 complex or at least of its crucial subunit oxidizing quinols from the pool, the Rieske protein. Evolutionary driving forces rationalizing the empirically observed redox tuning of the chain to the quinone pool are discussed. PMID:19429705

  16. The effects of phenotypic plasticity on photosynthetic performance in winter rye, winter wheat and Brassica napus.

    PubMed

    Dahal, Keshav; Kane, Khalil; Gadapati, Winona; Webb, Elizabeth; Savitch, Leonid V; Singh, Jasbir; Sharma, Pooja; Sarhan, Fathey; Longstaffe, Fred J; Grodzinski, Bernard; Hüner, Norman P A

    2012-02-01

    The contributions of phenotypic plasticity to photosynthetic performance in winter (cv Musketeer, cv Norstar) and spring (cv SR4A, cv Katepwa) rye (Secale cereale) and wheat (Triticum aestivum) cultivars grown at either 20°C [non-acclimated (NA)] or 5°C [cold acclimated (CA)] were assessed. The 22-40% increase in light-saturated rates of CO₂ assimilation in CA vs NA winter cereals were accounted for by phenotypic plasticity as indicated by the dwarf phenotype and increased specific leaf weight. However, phenotypic plasticity could not account for (1) the differential temperature sensitivity of CO₂ assimilation and photosynthetic electron transport, (2) the increased efficiency and light-saturated rates of photosynthetic electron transport or (3) the decreased light sensitivity of excitation pressure and non-photochemical quenching between NA and NA winter cultivars. Cold acclimation decreased photosynthetic performance of spring relative to winter cultivars. However, the differences in photosynthetic performances between CA winter and spring cultivars were dependent upon the basis on which photosynthetic performance was expressed. Overexpression of BNCBF17 in Brassica napus generally decreased the low temperature sensitivity (Q₁₀) of CO₂ assimilation and photosynthetic electron transport even though the latter had not been exposed to low temperature. Photosynthetic performance in wild type compared to the BNCBF17-overexpressing transgenic B. napus indicated that CBFs/DREBs regulate not only freezing tolerance but also govern plant architecture, leaf anatomy and photosynthetic performance. The apparent positive and negative effects of cold acclimation on photosynthetic performance are discussed in terms of the apparent costs and benefits of phenotypic plasticity, winter survival and reproductive fitness.

  17. Seasonal photosynthetic activity in evergreen conifer leaves monitored with spectral reflectance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, C. Y.; Gamon, J. A.

    2013-12-01

    Boreal evergreen conifers must maintain photosynthetic systems in environments where temperatures vary greatly across seasons from high temperatures in the summer to freezing levels in the winter. This involves seasonal downregulation and photoprotection during periods of extreme temperatures. To better understand this downregulation, seasonal dynamics of photosynthesis of lodgepole (Pinus contorta D.) and ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa D.) were monitored in Edmonton, Canada over two years. Spectral reflectance at the leaf and stand scales was measured weekly and the Photochemical Reflectance Index (PRI), often used as a proxy for chlorophyll and carotenoid pigment levels and photosynthetic light-use efficiency (LUE), was used to track the seasonal dynamics of photosynthetic activity. Additional physiological measurements included leaf pigment content, chlorophyll fluorescence, and gas exchange. All the metrics indicate large seasonal changes in photosynthetic activity, with a sharp transition from winter downregulation to active photosynthesis in the spring and a more gradual fall transition into winter. The PRI was a good indicator of several other variables including seasonally changing photosynthetic activity, chlorophyll fluorescence, photosynthetic LUE, and pigment pool sizes. Over the two-year cycle, PRI was primarily driven by changes in constitutive (chlorophyll:carotenoid) pigment levels correlated with seasonal photosynthetic activity, with a much smaller variation caused by diurnal changes in xanthophyll cycle activity (conversion between violaxanthin & zeaxanthin). Leaf and canopy scale PRI measurements exhibited parallel responses during the winter-spring transition. Together, our findings indicate that evergreen conifers photosynthetic system possesses a remarkable degree of resilience in response to large temperature changes across seasons, and that optical remote sensing can be used to observe the seasonal effects on photosynthesis and

  18. Isolation of a bacterium that reductively dechlorinates tetrachloroethene to ethene

    SciTech Connect

    Maymo-Gatell, X.; Chien, Yueh-tyng; Zinder, S.H.

    1997-06-06

    Tetrachloroethene is a prominent groundwater pollutant that can be reductively dechlorinated by mixed anaerobic microbial populations to the nontoxic product ethene. Strain 195, a coccoid bacterium that dechlorinates tetrachlorethene to ethene, was isolated and characterized. Growth of strain 195 with H{sub 2} and tetrachloroethene as the electron donor and acceptor pair required extracts from mixed microbial cultures. Growth of strain 195 was resistant to ampicillin and vancomycin; its cell wall did not react with a peptidoglycan-specific lectin and its ultrastructure resembled S-layers of Archaea. Analysis of the 16S ribosomal DNA sequence of strain 195 indicated that it is a eubacterium without close affiliation to any known groups. 24 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  19. A bacterium that degrades and assimilates poly(ethylene terephthalate).

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Shosuke; Hiraga, Kazumi; Takehana, Toshihiko; Taniguchi, Ikuo; Yamaji, Hironao; Maeda, Yasuhito; Toyohara, Kiyotsuna; Miyamoto, Kenji; Kimura, Yoshiharu; Oda, Kohei

    2016-03-11

    Poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) is used extensively worldwide in plastic products, and its accumulation in the environment has become a global concern. Because the ability to enzymatically degrade PET has been thought to be limited to a few fungal species, biodegradation is not yet a viable remediation or recycling strategy. By screening natural microbial communities exposed to PET in the environment, we isolated a novel bacterium, Ideonella sakaiensis 201-F6, that is able to use PET as its major energy and carbon source. When grown on PET, this strain produces two enzymes capable of hydrolyzing PET and the reaction intermediate, mono(2-hydroxyethyl) terephthalic acid. Both enzymes are required to enzymatically convert PET efficiently into its two environmentally benign monomers, terephthalic acid and ethylene glycol.

  20. Genome analysis of the Anerobic Thermohalophilic bacterium Halothermothrix orenii

    SciTech Connect

    Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Ivanova, Natalia; Anderson, Iain; Lykidis, Athanasios; Hooper, Sean D.; Sun, Hui; Kunin, Victor; Lapidus, Alla; Hugenholtz, Philip; Patel, Bharat; Kyrpides, Nikos C.

    2008-11-03

    Halothermothirx orenii is a strictly anaerobic thermohalophilic bacterium isolated from sediment of a Tunisian salt lake. It belongs to the order Halanaerobiales in the phylum Firmicutes. The complete sequence revealed that the genome consists of one circular chromosome of 2578146 bps encoding 2451 predicted genes. This is the first genome sequence of an organism belonging to the Haloanaerobiales. Features of both Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria were identified with the presence of both a sporulating mechanism typical of Firmicutes and a characteristic Gram negative lipopolysaccharide being the most prominent. Protein sequence analyses and metabolic reconstruction reveal a unique combination of strategies for thermophilic and halophilic adaptation. H. orenii can serve as a model organism for the study of the evolution of the Gram negative phenotype as well as the adaptation under thermohalophilic conditions and the development of biotechnological applications under conditions that require high temperatures and high salt concentrations.

  1. Real-time RNA profiling within a single bacterium.

    PubMed

    Le, Thuc T; Harlepp, Sébastien; Guet, Calin C; Dittmar, Kimberly; Emonet, Thierry; Pan, Tao; Cluzel, Philippe

    2005-06-28

    Characterizing the dynamics of specific RNA levels requires real-time RNA profiling in a single cell. We show that the combination of a synthetic modular genetic system with fluorescence correlation spectroscopy allows us to directly measure in real time the activity of any specific promoter in prokaryotes. Using a simple inducible gene expression system, we found that induced RNA levels within a single bacterium of Escherichia coli exhibited a pulsating profile in response to a steady input of inducer. The genetic deletion of an efflux pump system, a key determinant of antibiotic resistance, altered the pulsating transcriptional dynamics and caused overexpression of induced RNA. In contrast with population measurements, real-time RNA profiling permits identifying relationships between genotypes and transcriptional dynamics that are accessible only at the level of the single cell.

  2. Endocytosis-like protein uptake in the bacterium Gemmata obscuriglobus

    PubMed Central

    Lonhienne, Thierry G. A.; Sagulenko, Evgeny; Webb, Richard I.; Lee, Kuo-Chang; Franke, Josef; Devos, Damien P.; Nouwens, Amanda; Carroll, Bernard J.; Fuerst, John A.

    2010-01-01

    Endocytosis is a process by which extracellular material such as macromolecules can be incorporated into cells via a membrane-trafficking system. Although universal among eukaryotes, endocytosis has not been identified in Bacteria or Archaea. However, intracellular membranes are known to compartmentalize cells of bacteria in the phylum Planctomycetes, suggesting the potential for endocytosis and membrane trafficking in members of this phylum. Here we show that cells of the planctomycete Gemmata obscuriglobus have the ability to uptake proteins present in the external milieu in an energy-dependent process analogous to eukaryotic endocytosis, and that internalized proteins are associated with vesicle membranes. Occurrence of such ability in a bacterium is consistent with autogenous evolution of endocytosis and the endomembrane system in an ancestral noneukaryote cell. PMID:20566852

  3. The domestication of the probiotic bacterium Lactobacillus acidophilus.

    PubMed

    Bull, Matthew J; Jolley, Keith A; Bray, James E; Aerts, Maarten; Vandamme, Peter; Maiden, Martin C J; Marchesi, Julian R; Mahenthiralingam, Eshwar

    2014-11-26

    Lactobacillus acidophilus is a Gram-positive lactic acid bacterium that has had widespread historical use in the dairy industry and more recently as a probiotic. Although L. acidophilus has been designated as safe for human consumption, increasing commercial regulation and clinical demands for probiotic validation has resulted in a need to understand its genetic diversity. By drawing on large, well-characterised collections of lactic acid bacteria, we examined L. acidophilus isolates spanning 92 years and including multiple strains in current commercial use. Analysis of the whole genome sequence data set (34 isolate genomes) demonstrated L. acidophilus was a low diversity, monophyletic species with commercial isolates essentially identical at the sequence level. Our results indicate that commercial use has domesticated L. acidophilus with genetically stable, invariant strains being consumed globally by the human population.

  4. Mechanism of anaerobic degradation of triethanolamine by a homoacetogenic bacterium.

    PubMed

    Speranza, Giovanna; Morelli, Carlo F; Cairoli, Paola; Müller, Britta; Schink, Bernhard

    2006-10-20

    Triethanolamine (TEA) is converted into acetate and ammonia by a strictly anaerobic, gram-positive Acetobacterium strain LuTria3. Fermentation experiments with resting cell suspensions and specifically deuterated substrates indicate that in the acetate molecule the carboxylate and the methyl groups correspond to the alcoholic function and to its adjacent methylene group, respectively, of the 2-hydroxyethyl unit of TEA. A 1,2 shift of a hydrogen (deuterium) atom from -CH2-O- to =N-CH2- without exchange with the medium was observed. This fact gives evidence that a radical mechanism occurs involving the enzyme and/or coenzyme molecule as a hydrogen carrier. Such a biodegradation appears analogous to the conversion of 2-phenoxyethanol into acetate mediated by another strain of the anaerobic homoacetogenic bacterium Acetobacterium.

  5. Mechanism of anaerobic degradation of triethanolamine by a homoacetogenic bacterium

    SciTech Connect

    Speranza, Giovanna . E-mail: giovanna.speranza@unimi.it; Morelli, Carlo F.; Cairoli, Paola; Mueller, Britta; Schink, Bernhard

    2006-10-20

    Triethanolamine (TEA) is converted into acetate and ammonia by a strictly anaerobic, gram-positive Acetobacterium strain LuTria3. Fermentation experiments with resting cell suspensions and specifically deuterated substrates indicate that in the acetate molecule the carboxylate and the methyl groups correspond to the alcoholic function and to its adjacent methylene group, respectively, of the 2-hydroxyethyl unit of TEA. A 1,2 shift of a hydrogen (deuterium) atom from -CH{sub 2} -O- to =N-CH{sub 2} - without exchange with the medium was observed. This fact gives evidence that a radical mechanism occurs involving the enzyme and/or coenzyme molecule as a hydrogen carrier. Such a biodegradation appears analogous to the conversion of 2-phenoxyethanol into acetate mediated by another strain of the anaerobic homoacetogenic bacterium Acetobacterium.

  6. Genome sequence of the radioresistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans R1.

    PubMed

    White, O; Eisen, J A; Heidelberg, J F; Hickey, E K; Peterson, J D; Dodson, R J; Haft, D H; Gwinn, M L; Nelson, W C; Richardson, D L; Moffat, K S; Qin, H; Jiang, L; Pamphile, W; Crosby, M; Shen, M; Vamathevan, J J; Lam, P; McDonald, L; Utterback, T; Zalewski, C; Makarova, K S; Aravind, L; Daly, M J; Minton, K W; Fleischmann, R D; Ketchum, K A; Nelson, K E; Salzberg, S; Smith, H O; Venter, J C; Fraser, C M

    1999-11-19

    The complete genome sequence of the radiation-resistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans R1 is composed of two chromosomes (2,648,638 and 412,348 base pairs), a megaplasmid (177,466 base pairs), and a small plasmid (45,704 base pairs), yielding a total genome of 3,284, 156 base pairs. Multiple components distributed on the chromosomes and megaplasmid that contribute to the ability of D. radiodurans to survive under conditions of starvation, oxidative stress, and high amounts of DNA damage were identified. Deinococcus radiodurans represents an organism in which all systems for DNA repair, DNA damage export, desiccation and starvation recovery, and genetic redundancy are present in one cell.

  7. BIOGEOCHEMICAL STUDIES OF PHOTOSYNTHETIC MICROBIAL MATS AND THEIR BIOTA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DesMarais, David; Discipulo, M.; Turk, K.; Londry, K. L.

    2005-01-01

    Photosynthetic microbial mats offer an opportunity to define holistic functionality at the millimeter scale. At the same time. their biogeochemistry contributes to environmental processes on a planetary scale. These mats are possibly direct descendents of the most ancient biological communities; communities in which oxygenic photosynthesis might have been invented. Mats provide one of the best natural systems to study how microbial populations associate to control dynamic biogeochemical gradients. These are self- sustaining, complete ecosystems in which light energy absorbed over a dial (24 hour) cycle drives the synthesis of spatially-organized, diverse biomass. Tightly-coupled microorganisms in the mat have specialized metabolisms that catalyze transformations of carbon, nitrogen, sulfur, and a host of other elements.

  8. New thioredoxin targets in the unicellular photosynthetic eukaryote Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Lemaire, Stéphane D.; Guillon, Blanche; Le Maréchal, Pierre; Keryer, Eliane; Miginiac-Maslow, Myroslawa; Decottignies, Paulette

    2004-01-01

    Proteomics were used to identify the proteins from the eukaryotic unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii that can be reduced by thioredoxin. These proteins were retained specifically on a thioredoxin affinity column made of a monocysteinic thioredoxin mutant able to form mixed disulfides with its targets. Of a total of 55 identified targets, 29 had been found previously in higher plants or Synechocystis, but 26 were new targets. Biochemical tests were performed on three of them, showing a thioredoxin-dependent activation of isocitrate lyase and isopropylmalate dehydrogenase and a thioredoxin-dependent deactivation of catalase that is redox insensitive in Arabidopsis. In addition, we identified a Ran protein, a previously uncharacterized nuclear target in a photosynthetic organism. The metabolic and evolutionary implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:15123830

  9. RNA function and phosphorus use by photosynthetic organisms

    PubMed Central

    Raven, John A.

    2013-01-01

    Phosphorus (P) in RNA accounts for half or more of the total non-storage P in oxygenic photolithotrophs grown in either P-replete or P-limiting growth conditions. Since many natural environments are P-limited for photosynthetic primary productivity, and peak phosphorus fertilizer production is inevitable, the paper analyses what economies in P allocation to RNA could, in principle, increase P-use efficiency of growth (rate of dry matter production per unit organism P). The possibilities of decreasing P allocation to RNA without decreasing growth rate include (1) more widespread down-regulation of RNA production in P-limited organisms, (2) optimal allocation of P to RNA, both spatially among cell compartments and organs, and temporally depending on the stage of growth, and (3) a constant rate of protein synthesis through the diel cycle. Acting on these suggestions would, however, be technically demanding. PMID:24421782

  10. Regulation of Photosynthetic Capacity in Chlamydomonas mundana 1

    PubMed Central

    Russell, George K.; Gibbs, Martin

    1966-01-01

    A regulatory system has been described in the obligately phototrophic green alga Chlamydomonas mundana. Cells grown in acetate media are unable to fix carbon dioxide in the light but carry out a photoassimilation of acetate to carbohydrate: cells cultured with carbon dioxide as the sole source of cellular carbon carry out typical green plant photosynthesis. The control appears to take place at the level of the reductive pentose phosphate cycle. The presence of sodium acetate in the medium strongly inhibits formation of ribulose-1.5-diphosphate carboxylase, ribulose-5-phosphate kinase, and one of the 2 fructose-1,6-diphosphate aldolase activities of the cell. Ribose-5-phosphate isomerase is present in higher activity in autotrophic cells. Changes in the levels of triose phosphate dehydrogenase were also noted. The total pigment content of the cell and the photosynthetic electron transport reactions are not altered under different conditions of growth. PMID:16656335

  11. Ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy: principles and application to photosynthetic systems.

    PubMed

    Berera, Rudi; van Grondelle, Rienk; Kennis, John T M

    2009-01-01

    The photophysical and photochemical reactions, after light absorption by a photosynthetic pigment-protein complex, are among the fastest events in biology, taking place on timescales ranging from tens of femtoseconds to a few nanoseconds. The advent of ultrafast laser systems that produce pulses with femtosecond duration opened up a new area of research and enabled investigation of these photophysical and photochemical reactions in real time. Here, we provide a basic description of the ultrafast transient absorption technique, the laser and wavelength-conversion equipment, the transient absorption setup, and the collection of transient absorption data. Recent applications of ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy on systems with increasing degree of complexity, from biomimetic light-harvesting systems to natural light-harvesting antennas, are presented. In particular, we will discuss, in this educational review, how a molecular understanding of the light-harvesting and photoprotective functions of carotenoids in photosynthesis is accomplished through the application of ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy.

  12. Metal ion modulated electron transfer in photosynthetic proteins.

    SciTech Connect

    Utschig, L. M.; Thurnauer, M. C.; Chemistry

    2004-07-01

    Photosynthetic purple bacterial reaction center (RC) proteins are ideal native systems for addressing basic questions regarding the nature of biological electron transfer because both the protein structure and the electron-transfer reactions are well-characterized. Metal ion binding to the RC can affect primary photochemistry and provides a probe for understanding the involvement of local protein environments in electron transfer. The RC has two distinct transition metal ion binding sites, the well-known non-heme Fe{sup 2+} site buried in the protein interior and a recently discovered Zn{sup 2+} site located on the surface of the protein. Fe{sup 2+} removal and Zn{sup 2+} binding systematically affect different electron-transfer steps in the RC. Factors involved in the metal ion alteration of RC electron transfer may provide a paradigm for other biological systems involved in electron transfer.

  13. Full transcription of the chloroplast genome in photosynthetic eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Chao; Wang, Shuo; Xia, En-Hua; Jiang, Jian-Jun; Zeng, Fan-Chun; Gao, Li-Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Prokaryotes possess a simple genome transcription system that is different from that of eukaryotes. In chloroplasts (plastids), it is believed that the prokaryotic gene transcription features govern genome transcription. However, the polycistronic operon transcription model cannot account for all the chloroplast genome (plastome) transcription products at whole-genome level, especially regarding various RNA isoforms. By systematically analyzing transcriptomes of plastids of algae and higher plants, and cyanobacteria, we find that the entire plastome is transcribed in photosynthetic green plants, and that this pattern originated from prokaryotic cyanobacteria — ancestor of the chloroplast genomes that diverged about 1 billion years ago. We propose a multiple arrangement transcription model that multiple transcription initiations and terminations combine haphazardly to accomplish the genome transcription followed by subsequent RNA processing events, which explains the full chloroplast genome transcription phenomenon and numerous functional and/or aberrant pre-RNAs. Our findings indicate a complex prokaryotic genome regulation when processing primary transcripts. PMID:27456469

  14. Native Mass Spectrometry of Photosynthetic Pigment-Protein Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hao; Cui, Weidong; Gross, Michael L.; Blankenship, Robert E.

    2013-01-01

    Native mass spectrometry, or as is sometimes called “native electrospray (ESI)” allows proteins in their native or near-native protein in solution to be introduced into gas phase and interrogated by MS. This approach is now a powerful tool to investigate protein complexes. This article reviews the background of native MS of protein complexes and describes its strengths, taking photosynthetic pigment-protein complexes as examples. Native MS can be utilized in combination with other MS-based approaches to obtain complementary information to that provided by tools such as X-ray crystallography and NMR spectroscopy to understand the structure-function relationships of protein complexes. When additional information beyond that provided by native MS is required, other MS-based strategies can be successfully applied to augment the results of native MS. PMID:23337874

  15. [Post-photosynthetic use of labeled assimilates in fiber flax].

    PubMed

    Chikov, V I; Avvakumova, N Iu; Bakirova, G G

    2003-01-01

    The distribution of 14C in various tissues of fiber flax was assayed 1, 17, and 21 days after 30-min assimilation of 14CO@2 by the whole rapidly growing plant. Polymeric photosynthetic products were largely hydrolyzed in the 14C-donor part of the shoot and the hydrolysates were transported upward. The content of 14C in pigments and lipids of the donor leaves (that absorbed 14CO2) was significantly higher than that in the 14C-acceptor ones. An additional nitrogen feeding decreased the labeled sucrose: hexose ratio and inhibited transport of the assimilates from both 14C-donor and acceptor leaves. 14C transported to the shoot tip was largely used for synthesis of poorly soluble proteins (extractable with alkali and Triton X-100) in the acceptor tissues. In the donor part of the shoot, particularly in the bast, cellulose was mainly synthesized from the "new" assimilates.

  16. New thioredoxin targets in the unicellular photosynthetic eukaryote Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Lemaire, Stéphane D; Guillon, Blanche; Le Maréchal, Pierre; Keryer, Eliane; Miginiac-Maslow, Myroslawa; Decottignies, Paulette

    2004-05-11

    Proteomics were used to identify the proteins from the eukaryotic unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii that can be reduced by thioredoxin. These proteins were retained specifically on a thioredoxin affinity column made of a monocysteinic thioredoxin mutant able to form mixed disulfides with its targets. Of a total of 55 identified targets, 29 had been found previously in higher plants or Synechocystis, but 26 were new targets. Biochemical tests were performed on three of them, showing a thioredoxin-dependent activation of isocitrate lyase and isopropylmalate dehydrogenase and a thioredoxin-dependent deactivation of catalase that is redox insensitive in Arabidopsis. In addition, we identified a Ran protein, a previously uncharacterized nuclear target in a photosynthetic organism. The metabolic and evolutionary implications of these findings are discussed.

  17. Vibration-assisted resonance in photosynthetic excitation-energy transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irish, E. K.; Gómez-Bombarelli, R.; Lovett, B. W.

    2014-07-01

    Understanding how the effectiveness of natural photosynthetic energy-harvesting systems arises from the interplay between quantum coherence and environmental noise represents a significant challenge for quantum theory. Recently it has begun to be appreciated that discrete molecular vibrational modes may play an important role in the dynamics of such systems. Here we present a microscopic mechanism by which intramolecular vibrations may be able to contribute to the efficiency and directionality of energy transfer. Excited vibrational states create resonant pathways through the system, supporting fast and efficient energy transport. Vibrational damping together with the natural downhill arrangement of molecular energy levels gives intrinsic directionality to the energy flow. Analytical and numerical results demonstrate a significant enhancement of the efficiency and directionality of energy transport that can be directly related to the existence of resonances between vibrational and excitonic levels.

  18. Relationship between photosynthetic pigments and chlorophyll fluorescence in soybean under varying phosphorus nutrition at ambient and elevated CO2

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Photosynthetic pigments such as chlorophyll (Chl) a, Chl b and carotenoids concentration, and chlorophyll fluorescence (CF) have widely been used as indicators of stress and photosynthetic performance in plants. Although photosynthetic pigments and CF are partly interdependent due to absorption and ...

  19. Complete fluorescent fingerprints of extremophilic and photosynthetic microbes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dartnell, Lewis R.; Storrie-Lombardi, Michael C.; Ward, John M.

    2010-10-01

    The work reported here represents a study into the total fluorescence exhibited by a broad selection of model, extremophilic and photosynthetic bacterial strains, over a great range of excitation and emission wavelengths from ultraviolet (UV) through visible to near infrared. The aim is to identify distinctive fluorescent features that may serve as detectable biosignatures of remnant microbial life on the Martian surface. A lab-bench fluorescence spectrometer was used to generate an excitation-emission matrix (EEM) for the unpigmented Escherichia coli, radiation-resistant Deinococcus radiodurans, Antarctic Dry Valley isolates Brevundimonas sp. MV.7 and Rhodococcus sp. MV.10, and the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. Detailed EEMs, representing the fluorescence signature of each organism, are presented, and the most significant features suitable for biosignature surveys are identified, including small-molecule cellular metabolites, light-harvesting photosynthetic pigments and extracellular UV-screening compounds. E. coli exhibits the most intense emission from tryptophan, presumably due to the absence of UV-screening pigments that would shield the organism from short-wavelength light-exciting intracellular fluorescence. The efficacy of commonly available laser diodes for exciting cellular fluorescence is treated, along with the most appropriate filter wavelengths for imaging systems. The best combination of available laser diodes and PanCam filters aboard the ExoMars probe is proposed. The possibility of detecting fluorescence excited by solar UV radiation in freshly exposed surface samples by imaging when both sunlit and shadowed, perhaps by the body of the rover itself, is discussed. We also study how these biological fluorophore molecules may be degraded, and thus the potential biosignatures erased, by the high flux of far-ultraviolet light on Mars.

  20. Mosaic origin of the heme biosynthesis pathway in photosynthetic eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Oborník, Miroslav; Green, Beverley R

    2005-12-01

    Heme biosynthesis represents one of the most essential metabolic pathways in living organisms, providing the precursors for cytochrome prosthetic groups, photosynthetic pigments, and vitamin B(12). Using genomic data, we have compared the heme pathway in the diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana and the red alga Cyanidioschyzon merolae to those of green algae and higher plants, as well as to those of heterotrophic eukaryotes (fungi, apicomplexans, and animals). Phylogenetic analyses showed the mosaic character of this pathway in photosynthetic eukaryotes. Although most of the algal and plant enzymes showed the expected plastid (cyanobacterial) origin, at least one of them (porphobilinogen deaminase) appears to have a mitochondrial (alpha-proteobacterial) origin. Another enzyme, glutamyl-tRNA synthase, obviously originated in the eukaryotic nucleus. Because all the plastid-targeted sequences consistently form a well-supported cluster, this suggests that genes were either transferred from the primary endosymbiont (cyanobacteria) to the primary host nucleus shortly after the primary endosymbiotic event or replaced with genes from other sources at an equally early time, i.e., before the formation of three primary plastid lineages. The one striking exception to this pattern is ferrochelatase, the enzyme catalyzing the first committed step to heme and bilin pigments. In this case, two red algal sequences do not cluster either with the other plastid sequences or with cyanobacterial sequences and appear to have a proteobacterial origin like that of the apicomplexan parasites Plasmodium and Toxoplasma. Although the heterokonts also acquired their plastid via secondary endosymbiosis from a red alga, the diatom has a typical plastid-cyanobacterial ferrochelatase. We have not found any remnants of the plastidlike heme pathway in the nonphotosynthetic heterokonts Phytophthora ramorum and Phytophthora sojae.

  1. A photosynthetic-plasmonic-voltaic cell: Excitation of photosynthetic bacteria and current collection through a plasmonic substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Samsonoff, Nathan; Ooms, Matthew D.; Sinton, David

    2014-01-27

    Excitation of photosynthetic biofilms using surface-confined evanescent light fields enables energy dense photobioreactors, while electrode-adhered biofilms can provide electricity directly. Here, we demonstrate concurrent light delivery and electron transport through a plasmonically excited metal film. Biofilms of cyanobacterium Synechococcus bacillaris on 50-nm gold films are excited via the Kretschmann configuration at λ = 670 nm. Cells show light/dark response to plasmonic excitation and grow denser biofilms, closer to the electrode surface, as compared to the direct irradiated case. Directly irradiated biofilms produced average electrical powers of 5.7 μW/m{sup 2} and plasmonically excited biofilms produced average electrical powers of 5.8 μW/m{sup 2}, with individual biofilms producing as much as 12 μW/m{sup 2}.

  2. A photosynthetic-plasmonic-voltaic cell: Excitation of photosynthetic bacteria and current collection through a plasmonic substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samsonoff, Nathan; Ooms, Matthew D.; Sinton, David

    2014-01-01

    Excitation of photosynthetic biofilms using surface-confined evanescent light fields enables energy dense photobioreactors, while electrode-adhered biofilms can provide electricity directly. Here, we demonstrate concurrent light delivery and electron transport through a plasmonically excited metal film. Biofilms of cyanobacterium Synechococcus bacillaris on 50-nm gold films are excited via the Kretschmann configuration at λ = 670 nm. Cells show light/dark response to plasmonic excitation and grow denser biofilms, closer to the electrode surface, as compared to the direct irradiated case. Directly irradiated biofilms produced average electrical powers of 5.7 μW/m2 and plasmonically excited biofilms produced average electrical powers of 5.8 μW/m2, with individual biofilms producing as much as 12 μW/m2.

  3. Identification of Associations between Bacterioplankton and Photosynthetic Picoeukaryotes in Coastal Waters

    PubMed Central

    Farnelid, Hanna M.; Turk-Kubo, Kendra A.; Zehr, Jonathan P.

    2016-01-01

    Photosynthetic picoeukaryotes are significant contributors to marine primary productivity. Associations between marine bacterioplankton and picoeukaryotes frequently occur and can have large biogeochemical impacts. We used flow cytometry to sort cells from seawater to identify non-eukaryotic phylotypes that are associated with photosynthetic picoeukaryotes. Samples were collected at the Santa Cruz wharf on Monterey Bay, CA, USA during summer and fall, 2014. The phylogeny of associated microbes was assessed through 16S rRNA gene amplicon clone and Illumina MiSeq libraries. The most frequently detected bacterioplankton phyla within the photosynthetic picoeukaryote sorts were Proteobacteria (Alphaproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria) and Bacteroidetes. Intriguingly, the presence of free-living bacterial genera in the photosynthetic picoeukaryote sorts could suggest that some of the photosynthetic picoeukaryotes were mixotrophs. However, the occurrence of bacterial sequences, which were not prevalent in the corresponding bulk seawater samples, indicates that there was also a selection for specific OTUs in association with photosynthetic picoeukaryotes suggesting specific functional associations. The results show that diverse bacterial phylotypes are found in association with photosynthetic picoeukaryotes. Taxonomic identification of these associations is a prerequisite for further characterizing and to elucidate their metabolic pathways and ecological functions. PMID:27148165

  4. Photosynthetic adaptation strategy of Ulva prolifera floating on the sea surface to environmental changes.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xinyu; Tang, Xuexi; Zhang, Huanxin; Qu, Tongfei; Wang, Ying

    2016-10-01

    For 8 consecutive years, a green tide has originated in the southern Yellow Sea and spread to the Qingdao offshore area. The causative species, Ulva prolifera, always forms a very thick thallus mat that is capable of drifting long distances over long periods. During this process, although the thalli face disturbance by complex environmental factors, they maintain high biomass and proliferation. We hypothesized that some form of photosynthetic adaptation strategy must exist to protect the thalli. Therefore, we studied the different photosynthetic response characteristics of the surface and lower layers of the floating thallus mats, and investigated the physiological and molecular-level adaptation mechanisms. The results showed that: (1) U. prolifera has strong photosynthetic capability that ensures it can gain sufficient energy to increase its biomass and adapt to long-distance migration. (2) Surface layer thalli adapt to the complex environment by dissipating excess energy via photosynthetic quantum control (energy quenching and energy redistribution between PSII/PSI) to avoid irreversible damage to the photosynthetic system. (3) Lower layer thalli increase their contents of Chlorophyll a (Chl a) and Chlorophyll b (Chl b) and decrease their Chl a/Chl b ratio to improve their ability to use light energy. (4) U. prolifera has strong photosynthetic plasticity and can adapt to frequent exchange between the surface and lower layer environments because of wave disturbance. Pigment component changes, energy quenching, and energy redistribution between PSII/PSI contribute to this photosynthetic plasticity.

  5. Needle longevity, photosynthetic rate and nitrogen concentration of eight spruce taxa planted in northern Japan.

    PubMed

    Kayama, Masazumi; Kitaoka, Satoshi; Wang, Wenjie; Choi, Dongsu; Koike, Takayoshi

    2007-11-01

    Growth characteristics of Picea glehnii Masters, P. jezoensis (Sieb. et Zucc) Carr., P. jezoensis var. hondoensis (Mayr) Rehder and P. shirasawae Hayashi from Japan, P. abies (L.) Karst. from Europe and P. glauca Voss, P. mariana Britt., Sterns and Pogg. and P. rubens Sarg. from North America were compared. The trees were grown in similar conditions at the Tomakomai Experimental Forest of Hokkaido University in northern Japan. Tree growth, needle biomass, longevity, photosynthetic rate, nitrogen concentration and specific leaf area (SLA) were measured, and photosynthetic nitrogen-use efficiency was calculated. Picea jezoensis, P. jezoensis var. hondoensis, P. abies and P. glauca had high growth rates, high photosynthetic rates in young needles, high needle nitrogen concentrations and short needle life spans. In contrast, P. glehnii, P. shirasawae, P. mariana and P. rubens had low growth and photosynthetic rates, low needle nitrogen concentrations, long needle life spans and maintained a high photosynthetic nitrogen-use efficiency in older needles. Examination of relationships between several growth parameters of the eight taxa revealed positive correlations between SLA and mass-based photosynthetic rate and between SLA and mass-based nitrogen concentration, whereas mass-based photosynthetic rate and mass-based nitrogen concentration were negatively correlated with needle longevity. The species differed greatly in growth characteristics despite being grown in similar conditions.

  6. Still Acting Green: Continued Expression of Photosynthetic Genes in the Heterotrophic Dinoflagellate Pfiesteria piscicida (Peridiniales, Alveolata)

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Gwang Hoon; Jeong, Hae Jin; Yoo, Yeong Du; Kim, Sunju; Han, Ji Hee; Han, Jong Won; Zuccarello, Giuseppe C.

    2013-01-01

    The loss of photosynthetic function should lead to the cessation of expression and finally loss of photosynthetic genes in the new heterotroph. Dinoflagellates are known to have lost their photosynthetic ability several times. Dinoflagellates have also acquired photosynthesis from other organisms, either on a long-term basis or as “kleptoplastids” multiple times. The fate of photosynthetic gene expression in heterotrophs can be informative into evolution of gene expression patterns after functional loss, and the dinoflagellates ability to acquire new photosynthetic function through additional endosymbiosis. To explore this we analyzed a large-scale EST database consisting of 151,091 unique sequences (29,170 contigs, 120,921 singletons) obtained from 454 pyrosequencing of the heterotrophic dinoflagellate Pfiesteria piscicida. About 597 contigs from P. piscicida showed significant homology (E-value photosynthetic function. Most of the genes involved in the Calvin-Benson cycle were found, genes of the light-dependent reaction were also identified. Also genes of associated pathways including the chorismate pathway and genes involved in starch metabolism were discovered. BLAST searches and phylogenetic analysis suggest that these plastid-associated genes originated from several different photosynthetic ancestors. The Calvin-Benson cycle genes are mostly associated with genes derived from the secondary plastids of peridinin-containing dinoflagellates, while the light-harvesting genes are derived from diatoms, or diatoms that are tertiary plastids in other dinoflagellates. The continued expression of many genes involved in photosynthetic pathways indicates that the loss of transcriptional regulation may occur well after plastid loss and could explain the organism's ability to “capture” new plastids (i.e. different secondary endosymbiosis or tertiary symbioses) to renew photosynthetic function. PMID:23874554

  7. Still acting green: continued expression of photosynthetic genes in the heterotrophic Dinoflagellate Pfiesteria piscicida (Peridiniales, Alveolata).

    PubMed

    Kim, Gwang Hoon; Jeong, Hae Jin; Yoo, Yeong Du; Kim, Sunju; Han, Ji Hee; Han, Jong Won; Zuccarello, Giuseppe C

    2013-01-01

    The loss of photosynthetic function should lead to the cessation of expression and finally loss of photosynthetic genes in the new heterotroph. Dinoflagellates are known to have lost their photosynthetic ability several times. Dinoflagellates have also acquired photosynthesis from other organisms, either on a long-term basis or as "kleptoplastids" multiple times. The fate of photosynthetic gene expression in heterotrophs can be informative into evolution of gene expression patterns after functional loss, and the dinoflagellates ability to acquire new photosynthetic function through additional endosymbiosis. To explore this we analyzed a large-scale EST database consisting of 151,091 unique sequences (29,170 contigs, 120,921 singletons) obtained from 454 pyrosequencing of the heterotrophic dinoflagellate Pfiesteria piscicida. About 597 contigs from P. piscicida showed significant homology (E-value photosynthetic function. Most of the genes involved in the Calvin-Benson cycle were found, genes of the light-dependent reaction were also identified. Also genes of associated pathways including the chorismate pathway and genes involved in starch metabolism were discovered. BLAST searches and phylogenetic analysis suggest that these plastid-associated genes originated from several different photosynthetic ancestors. The Calvin-Benson cycle genes are mostly associated with genes derived from the secondary plastids of peridinin-containing dinoflagellates, while the light-harvesting genes are derived from diatoms, or diatoms that are tertiary plastids in other dinoflagellates. The continued expression of many genes involved in photosynthetic pathways indicates that the loss of transcriptional regulation may occur well after plastid loss and could explain the organism's ability to "capture" new plastids (i.e. different secondary endosymbiosis or tertiary symbioses) to renew photosynthetic function.

  8. Role of various hormones in photosynthetic responses of green plants under environmental stresses.

    PubMed

    Poonam; Bhardwaj, Renu; Kaur, Ravdeep; Bali, Shagun; Kaur, Parminder; Sirhindi, Geetika; Thukral, Ashwani K; Ohri, Puja; Vig, Adarsh P

    2015-01-01

    Environmental stress includes adverse factors like water deficit, high salinity, enhanced temperature and heavy metals etc. These stresses alter the normal growth and metabolic processes of plants including photosynthesis. Major photosynthetic responses under various stresses include inhibition of photosystems (I and II), changes in thylakoid complexes, decreased photosynthetic activity and modifications in structure and functions of chloroplasts etc. Various defense mechanisms are triggered inside the plants in response to these stresses that are regulated by plant hormones or plant growth regulators. These phytohormones include abscisic acid, auxins, cytokinins, ethylene, brassinosteroids, jasmonates and salicylic acid etc. The present review focuses on stress protective effects of plants hormones on the photosynthetic responses.

  9. Application of photosynthetic N(2)-fixing cyanobacteria to the CELSS program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fry, Ian V.; Hrabeta, Jana; Dsouza, Joe; Packer, Lester

    1987-01-01

    The feasibility of using photosynthetic microalgae (cyanobacteria) as a subsystem component for the closed ecological life support system program, with particular emphasis on the manipulation of the biomass (protein/carbohydrate) was addressed. Using factors which retard growth rates, but not photosynthetic electron flux, the partitioning of photosynthetically derived reductant may be dictated towards CO2 fixation (carbohydrate formation) and away from N2 fixation (protein formation). Cold shock treatment of fairly dense cultures markedly increases the glycogen content from 1 to 35 percent (dry weight), and presents a useful technique to change the protein/carbohydrate ratio of these organisms to a more nutritionally acceptable form.

  10. Self-trapping of a single bacterium in its own chemoattractant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsori, Y.; de Gennes, P.-G.

    2004-05-01

    Bacteria (e.g., E. coli) are very sensitive to certain chemoattractants (e.g., asparate) which they themselves produce. This leads to chemical instabilities in a uniform population. We discuss here the different case of a single bacterium, following the general scheme of Brenner, Levitov and Budrene. We show that in one and two dimensions (in a capillary or in a thin film) the bacterium can become self-trapped in its cloud of attractant. This should occur if a certain coupling constant g is larger than unity. We then estimate the reduced diffusion Deff of the bacterium in the strong-coupling limit, and find Deff ~ g-1.

  11. Ecology and metabolism of the beneficial intestinal commensal bacterium Faecalibacterium prausnitzii.

    PubMed

    Miquel, Sylvie; Martín, Rebeca; Bridonneau, Chantal; Robert, Véronique; Sokol, Harry; Bermúdez-Humarán, Luis G; Thomas, Muriel; Langella, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Faecalibacterium prausnitzii is a major commensal bacterium, and its prevalence is often decreased in conditions of intestinal dysbiosis. The phylogenic identity of this bacterium was described only recently. It is still poorly characterized, and its specific growth requirements in the human gastrointestinal tract are not known. In this review, we consider F. prausnitzii metabolism, its ecophysiology in both humans and animals, and the effects of drugs and nutrition on its population. We list important questions about this beneficial and ubiquitous commensal bacterium that it would be valuable to answer.

  12. Conformationally Constrained Macrocyclic Diporphyrin-Fullerene Artificial Photosynthetic Reaction Center

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Vikas; Kodis, Gerdenis; Chachisvilis, Mirianas; Hambourger, Michael; Moore, Ana L.; Moore, Thomas A.; Gust, Devens

    2011-01-01

    Photosynthetic reaction centers convert excitation energy from absorbed sunlight into chemical potential energy in the form of a charge-separated state. The rates of the electron transfer reactions necessary to achieve long-lived, high-energy charge-separated states with high quantum yields are determined in part by precise control of the electronic coupling among the chromophores, donors and acceptors, and of the reaction energetics. Successful artificial photosynthetic reaction centers for solar energy conversion have similar requirements. Control of electronic coupling in particular necessitates chemical linkages between active component moieties that both mediate coupling and restrict conformational mobility so that only spatial arrangements that promote favorable coupling are populated. Toward this end, we report the synthesis, structure and photochemical properties of an artificial reaction center containing two porphyrin electron donor moieties and a fullerene electron acceptor in a macrocyclic arrangement involving a ring of 42 atoms. The two porphyrins are closely spaced, in an arrangement reminiscent of that of the special pair in bacterial reaction centers. The molecule is produced by an unusual cyclization reaction that yields mainly a product with C2 symmetry and trans-2 disubstitution at the fullerene. The macrocycle maintains a rigid, highly-constrained structure that was determined by UV-vis spectroscopy, NMR, mass spectrometry, and molecular modeling at the semi-empirical PM6 and DFT (B3LYP/6-31G**) levels. Transient absorption results for the macrocycle in 2-methyltetrahydrofuran reveal photoinduced electron transfer from the porphyrin first excited singlet state to the fullerene to form a P•+-C60•−-P charge separated state with a time constant of 1.1 ps. Photoinduced electron transfer to the fullerene excited singlet state to form the same charge-separated state has a time constant of 15 ps. The charge-separated state is formed with a

  13. Biohybrid photosynthetic antenna complexes for enhanced light-harvesting.

    PubMed

    Springer, Joseph W; Parkes-Loach, Pamela S; Reddy, Kanumuri Ramesh; Krayer, Michael; Jiao, Jieying; Lee, Gregory M; Niedzwiedzki, Dariusz M; Harris, Michelle A; Kirmaier, Christine; Bocian, David F; Lindsey, Jonathan S; Holten, Dewey; Loach, Paul A

    2012-03-14

    Biohybrid antenna systems have been constructed that contain synthetic chromophores attached to 31mer analogues of the bacterial photosynthetic core light-harvesting (LH1) β-polypeptide. The peptides are engineered with a Cys site for bioconjugation with maleimide-terminated chromophores, which include synthetic bacteriochlorins (BC1, BC2) with strong near-infrared absorption and commercial dyes Oregon green (OGR) and rhodamine red (RR) with strong absorption in the blue-green to yellow-orange regions. The peptides place the Cys 14 (or 6) residues before a native His site that binds bacteriochlorophyll a (BChl-a) and, like the native LH proteins, have high helical content as probed by single-reflection IR spectroscopy. The His residue associates with BChl-a as in the native LH1 β-polypeptide to form dimeric ββ-subunit complexes [31mer(-14Cys)X/BChl](2), where X is one of the synthetic chromophores. The native-like BChl-a dimer has Q(y) absorption at 820 nm and serves as the acceptor for energy from light absorbed by the appended synthetic chromophore. The energy-transfer characteristics of biohybrid complexes have been characterized by steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence and absorption measurements. The quantum yields of energy transfer from a synthetic chromophore located 14 residues from the BChl-coordinating His site are as follows: OGR (0.30) < RR (0.60) < BC2 (0.90). Oligomeric assemblies of the subunit complexes [31mer(-14Cys)X/BChl](n) are accompanied by a bathochromic shift of the Q(y) absorption of the BChl-a oligomer as far as the 850-nm position found in cyclic native photosynthetic LH2 complexes. Room-temperature stabilized oligomeric biohybrids have energy-transfer quantum yields comparable to those of the dimeric subunit complexes as follows: OGR (0.20) < RR (0.80) < BC1 (0.90). Thus, the new biohybrid antennas retain the energy-transfer and self-assembly characteristics of the native antenna complexes, offer enhanced coverage of the solar

  14. A mechanistic model for the light response of photosynthetic electron transport rate based on light harvesting properties of photosynthetic pigment molecules.

    PubMed

    Ye, Zi-Piao; Robakowski, Piotr; Suggett, David J

    2013-03-01

    Models describing the light response of photosynthetic electron transport rate (ETR) are routinely used to determine how light absorption influences energy, reducing power and yields of primary productivity; however, no single model is currently able to provide insight into the fundamental processes that implicitly govern the variability of light absorption. Here we present development and application of a new mechanistic model of ETR for photosystem II based on the light harvesting (absorption and transfer to the core 'reaction centres') characteristics of photosynthetic pigment molecules. Within this model a series of equations are used to describe novel biophysical and biochemical characteristics of photosynthetic pigment molecules and in turn light harvesting; specifically, the eigen-absorption cross-section and the minimum average lifetime of photosynthetic pigment molecules in the excited state, which describe the ability of light absorption of photosynthetic pigment molecules and retention time of excitons in the excited state but are difficult to be measured directly. We applied this model to a series of previously collected fluorescence data and demonstrated that our model described well the light response curves of ETR, regardless of whether dynamic down-regulation of PSII occurs, for a range of photosynthetic organisms (Abies alba, Picea abies, Pinus mugo and Emiliania huxleyi). Inherent estimated parameters (e.g. maximum ETR and the saturation irradiance) by our model are in very close agreement with the measured data. Overall, our mechanistic model potentially provides novel insights into the regulation of ETR by light harvesting properties as well as dynamical down-regulation of PSII.

  15. High cell density cultivation of the chemolithoautotrophic bacterium Nitrosomonas europaea.

    PubMed

    Papp, Benedek; Török, Tibor; Sándor, Erzsébet; Fekete, Erzsébet; Flipphi, Michel; Karaffa, Levente

    2016-05-01

    Nitrosomonas europaea is a chemolithoautotrophic nitrifier, a gram-negative bacterium that can obtain all energy required for growth from the oxidation of ammonia to nitrite, and this may be beneficial for various biotechnological and environmental applications. However, compared to other bacteria, growth of ammonia oxidizing bacteria is very slow. A prerequisite to produce high cell density N. europaea cultures is to minimize the concentrations of inhibitory metabolic by-products. During growth on ammonia nitrite accumulates, as a consequence, N. europaea cannot grow to high cell concentrations under conventional batch conditions. Here, we show that single-vessel dialysis membrane bioreactors can be used to obtain substantially increased N. europaea biomasses and substantially reduced nitrite levels in media initially containing high amounts of the substrate. Dialysis membrane bioreactor fermentations were run in batch as well as in continuous mode. Growth was monitored with cell concentration determinations, by assessing dry cell mass and by monitoring ammonium consumption as well as nitrite formation. In addition, metabolic activity was probed with in vivo acridine orange staining. Under continuous substrate feed, the maximal cell concentration (2.79 × 10(12)/L) and maximal dry cell mass (0.895 g/L) achieved more than doubled the highest values reported for N. europaea cultivations to date.

  16. Presence of an unusual methanogenic bacterium in coal gasification waste.

    PubMed

    Tomei, F A; Rouse, D; Maki, J S; Mitchell, R

    1988-12-01

    Methanogenic bacteria growing on a pilot-scale, anaerobic filter processing coal gasification waste were enriched in a mineral salts medium containing hydrogen and acetate as potential energy sources. Transfer of the enrichments to methanol medium resulted in the initial growth of a strain of Methanosarcina barkeri, but eventually small cocci became dominant. The cocci growing on methanol produced methane and exhibited the typical fluorescence of methanogenic bacteria. They grew in the presence of the cell wall synthesis-inhibiting antibiotics d-cycloserine, fosfomycin, penicillin G, and vancomycin as well as in the presence of kanamycin, an inhibitor of protein synthesis in eubacteria. The optimal growth temperature was 37 degrees C, and the doubling time was 7.5 h. The strain lysed after reaching stationary phase. The bacterium grew poorly with hydrogen as the energy source and failed to grow on acetate. Morphologically, the coccus shared similarities with Methanosarcina sp. Cells were 1 mum wide, exhibited the typical thick cell wall and cross-wall formation, and formed tetrads. Packets and cysts were not formed.

  17. Hydrodynamics and collective behavior of the tethered bacterium Thiovulum majus

    PubMed Central

    Petroff, Alexander; Libchaber, Albert

    2014-01-01

    The ecology and dynamics of many microbial systems, particularly in mats and soils, are shaped by how bacteria respond to evolving nutrient gradients and microenvironments. Here we show how the response of the sulfur-oxidizing bacterium Thiovulum majus to changing oxygen gradients causes cells to organize into large-scale fronts. To study this phenomenon, we develop a technique to isolate and enrich these bacteria from the environment. Using this enrichment culture, we observe the formation and dynamics of T. majus fronts in oxygen gradients. We show that these dynamics can be understood as occurring in two steps. First, chemotactic cells moving up the oxygen gradient form a front that propagates with constant velocity. We then show, through observation and mathematical analysis, that this front becomes unstable to changes in cell density. Random perturbations in cell density create oxygen gradients. The response of cells magnifies these gradients and leads to the formation of millimeter-scale fluid flows that actively pull oxygenated water through the front. We argue that this flow results from a nonlinear instability excited by stochastic fluctuations in the density of cells. Finally, we show that the dynamics by which these modes interact can be understood from the chemotactic response of cells. These results provide a mathematically tractable example of how collective phenomena in ecological systems can arise from the individual response of cells to a shared resource. PMID:24459183

  18. Bioconversion of methane to lactate by an obligate methanotrophic bacterium

    SciTech Connect

    Henard, Calvin A.; Smith, Holly; Dowe, Nancy; Kalyuzhnaya, Marina G.; Pienkos, Philip T.; Guarnieri, Michael T.

    2016-02-23

    Methane is the second most abundant greenhouse gas (GHG), with nearly 60% of emissions derived from anthropogenic sources. Microbial conversion of methane to fuels and value-added chemicals offers a means to reduce GHG emissions, while also valorizing this otherwise squandered high-volume, high-energy gas. However, to date, advances in methane biocatalysis have been constrained by the low-productivity and limited genetic tractability of natural methane-consuming microbes. Here, leveraging recent identification of a novel, tractable methanotrophic bacterium, Methylomicrobium buryatense, we demonstrate microbial biocatalysis of methane to lactate, an industrial platform chemical. Heterologous overexpression of a Lactobacillus helveticus L-lactate dehydrogenase in M. buryatense resulted in an initial titer of 0.06 g lactate/L from methane. Cultivation in a 5 L continuously stirred tank bioreactor enabled production of 0.8 g lactate/L, representing a 13-fold improvement compared to the initial titer. The yields (0.05 g lactate/g methane) and productivity (0.008 g lactate/L/h) indicate the need and opportunity for future strain improvement. Additionally, real-time analysis of methane utilization implicated gas-to-liquid transfer and/or microbial methane consumption as process limitations. This work opens the door to develop an array of methanotrophic bacterial strain-engineering strategies currently employed for biocatalytic sugar upgrading to “green” chemicals and fuels.

  19. Bioconversion of methane to lactate by an obligate methanotrophic bacterium

    DOE PAGES

    Henard, Calvin A.; Smith, Holly; Dowe, Nancy; ...

    2016-02-23

    Methane is the second most abundant greenhouse gas (GHG), with nearly 60% of emissions derived from anthropogenic sources. Microbial conversion of methane to fuels and value-added chemicals offers a means to reduce GHG emissions, while also valorizing this otherwise squandered high-volume, high-energy gas. However, to date, advances in methane biocatalysis have been constrained by the low-productivity and limited genetic tractability of natural methane-consuming microbes. Here, leveraging recent identification of a novel, tractable methanotrophic bacterium, Methylomicrobium buryatense, we demonstrate microbial biocatalysis of methane to lactate, an industrial platform chemical. Heterologous overexpression of a Lactobacillus helveticus L-lactate dehydrogenase in M. buryatense resultedmore » in an initial titer of 0.06 g lactate/L from methane. Cultivation in a 5 L continuously stirred tank bioreactor enabled production of 0.8 g lactate/L, representing a 13-fold improvement compared to the initial titer. The yields (0.05 g lactate/g methane) and productivity (0.008 g lactate/L/h) indicate the need and opportunity for future strain improvement. Additionally, real-time analysis of methane utilization implicated gas-to-liquid transfer and/or microbial methane consumption as process limitations. This work opens the door to develop an array of methanotrophic bacterial strain-engineering strategies currently employed for biocatalytic sugar upgrading to “green” chemicals and fuels.« less

  20. Yersinia ruckeri sp. nov., the redmouth (RM) bacterium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ewing, W.H.; Ross, A.J.; Brenner, Don J.; Fanning, G. R.

    1978-01-01

    Cultures of the redmouth (RM) bacterium, one of the etiological agents of redmouth disease in rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri) and certain other fishes, were characterized by means of their biochemical reactions, by deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) hybridization, and by determination of guanine-plus-cytosine (G+C) ratios in DNA. The DNA relatedness studies confirmed the fact that the RM bacteria are members of the family Enterobacteriaceae and that they comprise a single species that is not closely related to any other species of Enterobacteriaceae. They are about 30% related to species of both Serratia and Yersinia. A comparison of the biochemical reactions of RM bacteria and serratiae indicated that there are many differences between these organisms and that biochemically the RM bacteria are most closely related to yersiniae. The G+C ratios of RM bacteria were approximated to be between 47.5 and 48.5% These values are similar to those of yersiniae but markedly different from those of serratiae. On the basis of their biochemical reactions and their G+C ratios, the RM bacteria are considered to be a new species of Yersinia, for which the name Yersinia ruckeri is proposed. Strain 2396-61 (= ATCC 29473) is designated the type strain of the species.

  1. Novel Rickettsiella bacterium in the leafhopper Orosius albicinctus (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae).

    PubMed

    Iasur-Kruh, Lilach; Weintraub, Phyllis G; Mozes-Daube, Netta; Robinson, Wyatt E; Perlman, Steve J; Zchori-Fein, Einat

    2013-07-01

    Bacteria in the genus Rickettsiella (Coxiellaceae), which are mainly known as arthropod pathogens, are emerging as excellent models to study transitions between mutualism and pathogenicity. The current report characterizes a novel Rickettsiella found in the leafhopper Orosius albicinctus (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae), a major vector of phytoplasma diseases in Europe and Asia. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and pyrosequencing were used to survey the main symbionts of O. albicinctus, revealing the obligate symbionts Sulcia and Nasuia, and the facultative symbionts Arsenophonus and Wolbachia, in addition to Rickettsiella. The leafhopper Rickettsiella is allied with bacteria found in ticks. Screening O. albicinctus from the field showed that Rickettsiella is highly prevalent, with over 60% of individuals infected. A stable Rickettsiella infection was maintained in a leafhopper laboratory colony for at least 10 generations, and fluorescence microscopy localized bacteria to accessory glands of the female reproductive tract, suggesting that the bacterium is vertically transmitted. Future studies will be needed to examine how Rickettsiella affects host fitess and its ability to vector phytopathogens.

  2. Hydrodynamics and collective behavior of the tethered bacterium Thiovulum majus.

    PubMed

    Petroff, Alexander; Libchaber, Albert

    2014-02-04

    The ecology and dynamics of many microbial systems, particularly in mats and soils, are shaped by how bacteria respond to evolving nutrient gradients and microenvironments. Here we show how the response of the sulfur-oxidizing bacterium Thiovulum majus to changing oxygen gradients causes cells to organize into large-scale fronts. To study this phenomenon, we develop a technique to isolate and enrich these bacteria from the environment. Using this enrichment culture, we observe the formation and dynamics of T. majus fronts in oxygen gradients. We show that these dynamics can be understood as occurring in two steps. First, chemotactic cells moving up the oxygen gradient form a front that propagates with constant velocity. We then show, through observation and mathematical analysis, that this front becomes unstable to changes in cell density. Random perturbations in cell density create oxygen gradients. The response of cells magnifies these gradients and leads to the formation of millimeter-scale fluid flows that actively pull oxygenated water through the front. We argue that this flow results from a nonlinear instability excited by stochastic fluctuations in the density of cells. Finally, we show that the dynamics by which these modes interact can be understood from the chemotactic response of cells. These results provide a mathematically tractable example of how collective phenomena in ecological systems can arise from the individual response of cells to a shared resource.

  3. The lipopolysaccharide of a chloridazon-degrading bacterium.

    PubMed

    Weisshaar, R; Lingens, F

    1983-12-01

    Lipopolysaccharide of a chloridazon-degrading bacterium was obtained by a two-stage extraction procedure with phenol/EDTA in a yield of 0.3% of dried bacteria. The carbohydrate moiety consisted of heptose, 3-deoxyoctulosonic acid and D-glucose in a molar ratio of 1:2:2 X 3. Lipid A was composed of 1 mol 2,3-diamino-2,3-dideoxy-D-glucose, 2 mol amide-bound and 2.6 mol ester-bound fatty acids/mol. Amide-bound fatty acids were 3-hydroxydodecanoic acid and 3-hydroxyhexadecanoic acid; dodecanoic acid and R-(-)-3-hydroxydodec-5-cis-enoic acid were found to be present in ester linkage. Under conditions of acidic hydrolysis, the latter was converted into the cis and trans isomers of 5-hexyltetrahydrofuran-2-acetic acid. Dodecanoic acid was demonstrated to be linked with the hydroxy groups of the amide-bound fatty acids. The taxonomic significance of these results, especially the demonstration of 2,3-diamino-2, 3-dideoxy-D-glucose, is discussed.

  4. Bioconversion of methane to lactate by an obligate methanotrophic bacterium.

    PubMed

    Henard, Calvin A; Smith, Holly; Dowe, Nancy; Kalyuzhnaya, Marina G; Pienkos, Philip T; Guarnieri, Michael T

    2016-02-23

    Methane is the second most abundant greenhouse gas (GHG), with nearly 60% of emissions derived from anthropogenic sources. Microbial conversion of methane to fuels and value-added chemicals offers a means to reduce GHG emissions, while also valorizing this otherwise squandered high-volume, high-energy gas. However, to date, advances in methane biocatalysis have been constrained by the low-productivity and limited genetic tractability of natural methane-consuming microbes. Here, leveraging recent identification of a novel, tractable methanotrophic bacterium, Methylomicrobium buryatense, we demonstrate microbial biocatalysis of methane to lactate, an industrial platform chemical. Heterologous overexpression of a Lactobacillus helveticus L-lactate dehydrogenase in M. buryatense resulted in an initial titer of 0.06 g lactate/L from methane. Cultivation in a 5 L continuously stirred tank bioreactor enabled production of 0.8 g lactate/L, representing a 13-fold improvement compared to the initial titer. The yields (0.05 g lactate/g methane) and productivity (0.008 g lactate/L/h) indicate the need and opportunity for future strain improvement. Additionally, real-time analysis of methane utilization implicated gas-to-liquid transfer and/or microbial methane consumption as process limitations. This work opens the door to develop an array of methanotrophic bacterial strain-engineering strategies currently employed for biocatalytic sugar upgrading to "green" chemicals and fuels.

  5. Novel Trypanosomatid-Bacterium Association: Evolution of Endosymbiosis in Action

    PubMed Central

    Kostygov, Alexei Y.; Dobáková, Eva; Grybchuk-Ieremenko, Anastasiia; Váhala, Dalibor; Maslov, Dmitri A.; Votýpka, Jan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT We describe a novel symbiotic association between a kinetoplastid protist, Novymonas esmeraldas gen. nov., sp. nov., and an intracytoplasmic bacterium, “Candidatus Pandoraea novymonadis” sp. nov., discovered as a result of a broad-scale survey of insect trypanosomatid biodiversity in Ecuador. We characterize this association by describing the morphology of both organisms, as well as their interactions, and by establishing their phylogenetic affinities. Importantly, neither partner is closely related to other known organisms previously implicated in eukaryote-bacterial symbiosis. This symbiotic association seems to be relatively recent, as the host does not exert a stringent control over the number of bacteria harbored in its cytoplasm. We argue that this unique relationship may represent a suitable model for studying the initial stages of establishment of endosymbiosis between a single-cellular eukaryote and a prokaryote. Based on phylogenetic analyses, Novymonas could be considered a proxy for the insect-only ancestor of the dixenous genus Leishmania and shed light on the origin of the two-host life cycle within the subfamily Leishmaniinae. PMID:26980834

  6. Bioconversion of methane to lactate by an obligate methanotrophic bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Henard, Calvin A.; Smith, Holly; Dowe, Nancy; Kalyuzhnaya, Marina G.; Pienkos, Philip T.; Guarnieri, Michael T.

    2016-01-01

    Methane is the second most abundant greenhouse gas (GHG), with nearly 60% of emissions derived from anthropogenic sources. Microbial conversion of methane to fuels and value-added chemicals offers a means to reduce GHG emissions, while also valorizing this otherwise squandered high-volume, high-energy gas. However, to date, advances in methane biocatalysis have been constrained by the low-productivity and limited genetic tractability of natural methane-consuming microbes. Here, leveraging recent identification of a novel, tractable methanotrophic bacterium, Methylomicrobium buryatense, we demonstrate microbial biocatalysis of methane to lactate, an industrial platform chemical. Heterologous overexpression of a Lactobacillus helveticus L-lactate dehydrogenase in M. buryatense resulted in an initial titer of 0.06 g lactate/L from methane. Cultivation in a 5 L continuously stirred tank bioreactor enabled production of 0.8 g lactate/L, representing a 13-fold improvement compared to the initial titer. The yields (0.05 g lactate/g methane) and productivity (0.008 g lactate/L/h) indicate the need and opportunity for future strain improvement. Additionally, real-time analysis of methane utilization implicated gas-to-liquid transfer and/or microbial methane consumption as process limitations. This work opens the door to develop an array of methanotrophic bacterial strain-engineering strategies currently employed for biocatalytic sugar upgrading to “green” chemicals and fuels. PMID:26902345

  7. Kinetics of a chlorate-accumulating, perchlorate-reducing bacterium.

    PubMed

    Dudley, Margaret; Salamone, Anna; Nerenberg, Robert

    2008-05-01

    Kinetics parameters for perchlorate and chlorate reduction were determined for Dechlorosoma sp. HCAP-C, also known as Dechlorosoma sp. PCC, a novel perchlorate-reducing bacterium (PCRB) that accumulates significant amounts of chlorate during perchlorate reduction. This is the first report of such behavior, and we hypothesized the perchlorate reduction kinetics would be markedly different from other PCRB. In batch tests with initial perchlorate concentrations ranging from 200 to around 1400 mg/L, maximum chlorate accumulation ranged from 41 to 279 mg/L, and were consistently around 20% of the initial perchlorate concentration. For perchlorate, parameters were determined using a competitive inhibition model. The maximum specific substrate degradation rate qmaxP was 11.5mgClO4-/mgdry weight (DW)-d, and the half-maximum rate constant KP was 193 mgClO4-/L. For chlorate, the qmaxC was 8.3 mgClO3-/mgDW-d and the KC was 58.3 mgClO3-/L. The high KP values relative to conventional PCRB, values suggests that HCAP-C does not play a significant role at low perchlorate concentrations. However, the relatively high qmaxP, and the potential for syntrophic relationships with chlorate-reducing bacteria that relieve the effects of chlorate inhibition, suggest that HCAP-C could play a significant role at high perchlorate concentrations.

  8. Heavy Metal Induced Antibiotic Resistance in Bacterium LSJC7.

    PubMed

    Chen, Songcan; Li, Xiaomin; Sun, Guoxin; Zhang, Yingjiao; Su, Jianqiang; Ye, Jun

    2015-09-29

    Co-contamination of antibiotics and heavy metals prevails in the environment, and may play an important role in disseminating bacterial antibiotic resistance, but the selective effects of heavy metals on bacterial antibiotic resistance is largely unclear. To investigate this, the effects of heavy metals on antibiotic resistance were studied in a genome-sequenced bacterium, LSJC7. The results showed that the presence of arsenate, copper, and zinc were implicated in fortifying the resistance of LSJC7 towards tetracycline. The concentrations of heavy metals required to induce antibiotic resistance, i.e., the minimum heavy metal concentrations (MHCs), were far below (up to 64-fold) the minimum inhibition concentrations (MIC) of LSJC7. This finding indicates that the relatively low heavy metal levels in polluted environments and in treated humans and animals might be sufficient to induce bacterial antibiotic resistance. In addition, heavy metal induced antibiotic resistance was also observed for a combination of arsenate and chloramphenicol in LSJC7, and copper/zinc and tetracycline in antibiotic susceptible strain Escherichia coli DH5α. Overall, this study implies that heavy metal induced antibiotic resistance might be ubiquitous among various microbial species and suggests that it might play a role in the emergence and spread of antibiotic resistance in metal and antibiotic co-contaminated environments.

  9. Mechanisms of gold biomineralization in the bacterium Cupriavidus metallidurans

    PubMed Central

    Reith, Frank; Etschmann, Barbara; Grosse, Cornelia; Moors, Hugo; Benotmane, Mohammed A.; Monsieurs, Pieter; Grass, Gregor; Doonan, Christian; Vogt, Stefan; Lai, Barry; Martinez-Criado, Gema; George, Graham N.; Nies, Dietrich H.; Mergeay, Max; Pring, Allan; Southam, Gordon; Brugger, Joël

    2009-01-01

    While the role of microorganisms as main drivers of metal mobility and mineral formation under Earth surface conditions is now widely accepted, the formation of secondary gold (Au) is commonly attributed to abiotic processes. Here we report that the biomineralization of Au nanoparticles in the metallophillic bacterium Cupriavidus metallidurans CH34 is the result of Au-regulated gene expression leading to the energy-dependent reductive precipitation of toxic Au(III)-complexes. C. metallidurans, which forms biofilms on Au grains, rapidly accumulates Au(III)-complexes from solution. Bulk and microbeam synchrotron X-ray analyses revealed that cellular Au accumulation is coupled to the formation of Au(I)-S complexes. This process promotes Au toxicity and C. metallidurans reacts by inducing oxidative stress and metal resistances gene clusters (including a Au-specific operon) to promote cellular defense. As a result, Au detoxification is mediated by a combination of efflux, reduction, and possibly methylation of Au-complexes, leading to the formation of Au(I)-C-compounds and nanoparticulate Au0. Similar particles were observed in bacterial biofilms on Au grains, suggesting that bacteria actively contribute to the formation of Au grains in surface environments. The recognition of specific genetic responses to Au opens the way for the development of bioexploration and bioprocessing tools. PMID:19815503

  10. Heavy Metal Induced Antibiotic Resistance in Bacterium LSJC7

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Songcan; Li, Xiaomin; Sun, Guoxin; Zhang, Yingjiao; Su, Jianqiang; Ye, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Co-contamination of antibiotics and heavy metals prevails in the environment, and may play an important role in disseminating bacterial antibiotic resistance, but the selective effects of heavy metals on bacterial antibiotic resistance is largely unclear. To investigate this, the effects of heavy metals on antibiotic resistance were studied in a genome-sequenced bacterium, LSJC7. The results showed that the presence of arsenate, copper, and zinc were implicated in fortifying the resistance of LSJC7 towards tetracycline. The concentrations of heavy metals required to induce antibiotic resistance, i.e., the minimum heavy metal concentrations (MHCs), were far below (up to 64-fold) the minimum inhibition concentrations (MIC) of LSJC7. This finding indicates that the relatively low heavy metal levels in polluted environments and in treated humans and animals might be sufficient to induce bacterial antibiotic resistance. In addition, heavy metal induced antibiotic resistance was also observed for a combination of arsenate and chloramphenicol in LSJC7, and copper/zinc and tetracycline in antibiotic susceptible strain Escherichia coli DH5α. Overall, this study implies that heavy metal induced antibiotic resistance might be ubiquitous among various microbial species and suggests that it might play a role in the emergence and spread of antibiotic resistance in metal and antibiotic co-contaminated environments. PMID:26426011

  11. Thiosulphate oxidation in the phototrophic sulphur bacterium Allochromatium vinosum.

    PubMed

    Hensen, Daniela; Sperling, Detlef; Trüper, Hans G; Brune, Daniel C; Dahl, Christiane

    2006-11-01

    Two different pathways for thiosulphate oxidation are present in the purple sulphur bacterium Allochromatium vinosum: oxidation to tetrathionate and complete oxidation to sulphate with obligatory formation of sulphur globules as intermediates. The tetrathionate:sulphate ratio is strongly pH-dependent with tetrathionate formation being preferred under acidic conditions. Thiosulphate dehydrogenase, a constitutively expressed monomeric 30 kDa c-type cytochrome with a pH optimum at pH 4.2 catalyses tetrathionate formation. A periplasmic thiosulphate-oxidizing multienzyme complex (Sox) has been described to be responsible for formation of sulphate from thiosulphate in chemotrophic and phototrophic sulphur oxidizers that do not form sulphur deposits. In the sulphur-storing A. vinosum we identified five sox genes in two independent loci (soxBXA and soxYZ). For SoxA a thiosulphate-dependent induction of expression, above a low constitutive level, was observed. Three sox-encoded proteins were purified: the heterodimeric c-type cytochrome SoxXA, the monomeric SoxB and the heterodimeric SoxYZ. Gene inactivation and complementation experiments proved these proteins to be indispensable for thiosulphate oxidation to sulphate. The intermediary formation of sulphur globules in A. vinosum appears to be related to the lack of soxCD genes, the products of which are proposed to oxidize SoxY-bound sulphane sulphur. In their absence the latter is instead transferred to growing sulphur globules.

  12. Methods and constructs for expression of foreign proteins in photosynthetic organisms

    DOEpatents

    Laible, Philip D.; Hanson, Deborah K.

    2002-01-01

    A method for expressing and purifying foreign proteins in photosynthetic organisms comprising the simultaneous expression of both the heterologous protein and a means for compartmentalizing or sequestering of the protein.

  13. Short-term acclimation of the photosynthetic electron transfer chain to changing light: a mathematical model

    PubMed Central

    Ebenhöh, Oliver; Fucile, Geoffrey; Finazzi, Giovanni; Rochaix, Jean-David; Goldschmidt-Clermont, Michel

    2014-01-01

    Photosynthetic eukaryotes house two photosystems with distinct light absorption spectra. Natural fluctuations in light quality and quantity can lead to unbalanced or excess excitation, compromising photosynthetic efficiency and causing photodamage. Consequently, these organisms have acquired several distinct adaptive mechanisms, collectively referred to as non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) of chlorophyll fluorescence, which modulates the organization and function of the photosynthetic apparatus. The ability to monitor NPQ processes fluorometrically has led to substantial progress in elucidating the underlying molecular mechanisms. However, the relative contribution of distinct NPQ mechanisms to variable light conditions in different photosynthetic eukaryotes remains unclear. Here, we present a mathematical model of the dynamic regulation of eukaryotic photosynthesis using ordinary differential equations. We demonstrate that, for Chlamydomonas, our model recapitulates the basic fluorescence features of short-term light acclimation known as state transitions and discuss how the model can be iteratively refined by comparison with physiological experiments to further our understanding of light acclimation in different species. PMID:24591710

  14. Photosynthetic CO{sub 2} fixation and energy production - microalgae as a main subject

    SciTech Connect

    Asada, Yasuo

    1993-12-31

    Research activities for application of microalgal photosynthesis to CO{sub 2} fixation in Japan are overviewed. Presenter`s studies on energy (hydrogen gas) production by cyanobacteria (blue-green algae) and photosynthetic bacteria are also introduced.

  15. Resonance Raman spectra of the anion and cation radicals of bacterial photosynthetic pigments

    SciTech Connect

    Diers, J.R.; Bocian, D.F. )

    1994-12-08

    Resonance Raman (RR) spectra are reported for the radical ions of the bacterial photosynthetic pigments bacteriochlorophyll a (BCh) and its metal-free analog bacteriopheophytin a (BPh). The radical anions, BCh[sup [minus

  16. Leaf ontogeny strongly influences photosynthetic tolerance to drought and high temperature in Gossypium hirsutum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Temperature and drought are major abiotic limitations to crop productivity worldwide. While abiotic stress physiology research has focused primarily on fully expanded leaves, no studies have investigated photosynthetic tolerance to concurrent drought and high temperature during leaf ontogeny. To add...

  17. Mimicry of the radical pair and triplet states in photosynthetic reaction centers with a synthetic model

    SciTech Connect

    Hasharoni, K.; Levanon, H.; Greenfield, S.R.; Gosztola, D.J.; Svec, W.A.; Wasiclewski, M.R. |

    1995-08-02

    Supramolecular systems synthesized to model the photosynthetic reaction center (RC) are designed to mimic several key properties of the RC protein. Thus far, most RC models fulfill only a subset of these criteria, with very few reports employing time-resolved electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (TREPR). We now report TREPR results on a photosynthetic model system (1) in a nematic liquid crystal (LC) that does not contain the natural pigments, yet closely mimics the spin dynamics of triplet state formation found only in photosynthetic RCs. The design of supermolecule 1 follows criteria established for promoting high quantum yield charge separation in glassy media. The observation of this triplet state in 1 by TREPR demonstrates that most of the electronic states found in the primary photochemistry of photosynthetic RCs can be mimicked successfully in synthetic models interacting with LCs. 12 refs., 3 figs.

  18. Leaf hydraulic evolution led a surge in leaf photosynthetic capacity during early angiosperm diversification.

    PubMed

    Brodribb, Tim J; Feild, Taylor S

    2010-02-01

    Angiosperm evolution transformed global ecology, and much of this impact derives from the unrivalled vegetative productivity of dominant angiosperm clades. However, the origins of high photosynthetic capacity in angiosperms remain unknown. In this study, we describe the steep trajectory of leaf vein density (D(v)) evolution in angiosperms, and predict that this leaf plumbing innovation enabled a major shift in the capacity of leaves to assimilate CO(2). Reconstructing leaf vein evolution from an examination of 504 angiosperm species we found a rapid three- to fourfold increase in D(v) occurred during the early evolution of angiosperms. We demonstrate how this major shift in leaf vein architecture potentially allowed the maximum photosynthetic capacity in angiosperms to rise above competing groups 140-100 Ma. Our data suggest that early terrestrial angiosperms produced leaves with low photosynthetic rates, but that subsequent angiosperm success is linked to a surge in photosynthetic capacity during their early diversification.

  19. Carbon, Hydrogen, and Oxygen Isotope Ratios of Cellulose from Plants Having Intermediary Photosynthetic Modes 1

    PubMed Central

    Sternberg, Leonel O'Reilly; Deniro, Michael J.; Ting, Irwin P.

    1984-01-01

    Carbon and hydrogen isotope ratios of cellulose nitrate and oxygen isotope ratios of cellulose from species of greenhouse plants having different photosynthetic modes were determined. When hydrogen isotope ratios are plotted against carbon isotope ratios, four clusters of points are discernible, each representing different photosynthetic modes: C3 plants, C4 plants, CAM plants, and C3 plants that can shift to CAM or show the phenomenon referred to as CAM-cycling. The combination of oxygen and carbon isotope ratios does not distinguish among the different photosynthetic modes. Analysis of the carbon and hydrogen isotope ratios of cellulose nitrate should prove useful for screening different photosynthetic modes in field specimens that grew near one another. This method will be particularly useful for detection of plants which show CAM-cycling. PMID:16663360

  20. Using a Microscale Approach to Rapidly Separate and Characterize Three Photosynthetic Pigment Species from Fern

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ayudhya, Theppawut Israsena Na; Posey, Frederick T.; Tyus, Jessica C.; Dingra, Nin N.

    2015-01-01

    A rapid separation of three photosynthetic pigments (chlorophyll "a" and "b" and xanthophyll) from fern ("Polystichum acrostichoides") is described using microscale solvent extraction and traditional thin layer chromatography that minimizes use of harmful chemicals and lengthy procedures. The experiment introduces…